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The road from La Pine to New York hasn’t been easy, but 18-year-old Anna Stone will be there to dance in the Macy’s parade, fulfilling a childhood aspiration

DANCING DREAM

Sheriff’s new team handles its 1st calls Group fills a much-needed niche, Deschutes County’s Blanton says By Erin Golden The Bulletin

When the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office got a call last month about a woman who had barricaded herself in her La Pine home, armed with a gun and planning to hurt herself, deputies who were dispatched to the scene knew they might need some backup. After they learned about what was going on in the house, supervisors with the Sheriff’s Office agreed. And for the first time, they put a call out to members of a new tactical team made up of patrol and corrections deputies who are trained and equipped for some of the agency’s most challenging incidents. A few days later, the team was called out again, this time to help track down and arrest an armed man who had allegedly assaulted a woman. Since then, the Special Operations Team hasn’t been activated for any other calls. But Sheriff Larry Blanton said it’s clear there’s a real need for the group, which is available to respond to a variety of situations in the county — and, when needed, to supplement the region’s larger SWAT team, the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team, or CERT. Blanton said his deputies frequently respond to calls about violent domestic disputes, armed suspects and people who refuse to leave their home. He said the formation of the 18-member Special Operations Team is an attempt to be ready for anything. “It’s one of those teams you hope don’t deploy very often,” Blanton said. “But at the same time, (these types of situations) are something we deal with almost on a weekly basis.” See Team / A5

With green power’s premium, projects are a tougher sell By Matthew L. Wald and Tom Zeller Jr. New York Times News Service

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Anna Stone, 18, practicing at the La Pine Academy of Dance Arts, will be dancing in this year’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade. In September, she was shipped a box of costumes and a DVD of choreographed routines the dancers are expected to learn before they arrive in New York.

By Leon Pantenburg

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To contribute to Stone’s fund, donations may be dropped off at the La Pine Academy of Dance Arts, 51602 Coach Road.

LA PINE — hile many watch the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade on television, Anna Stone, 18, of La Pine, will be performing in the procession as a member of a 350-strong contingent of dancers. Anna, and other dancers from all over the nation, will participate in the parade and dance at selected locations as part of the festivities. Performing in the parade has been a long-

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time goal, Anna said. “When I was little, we watched the Macy’s parade on TV, and I dreamed of being one of the dancers,” Anna said. “But that didn’t seem possible, so I didn’t tell anybody.” Then, the dream seemed even further away when Anna was 12 years old. Her little brother, Matthew, has Down syndrome. Anna helped

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care for him, and Matthew, 10 at the time, was diagnosed with leukemia. For a long time, Matthew became the center of the family’s attention. There were weekly trips to Doernbecher Children’s Hospital in Portland, and as much as possible, the family accompanied Matthew to chemotherapy treatments. “It was so hard for Anna to see her little brother so sick,” said Pat Stone, Anna’s mom. “She would get physically ill, because Anna was so worried and didn’t want him to hurt so much.” See Dancer / A4

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Mumbai plotter deployed despite warning By Ginger Thompson, Eric Schmitt and Souad Mekhennet

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Michael Polsky’s wind farm company was doing so well in 2008 that banks were happy to lend millions for his effort to light up America with clean electricity. But two years later, Polsky has a product he is hardpressed to sell. His company, Invenergy, had a contract to sell power to a utility in Virginia, but state New York Times News Service ile photo regulators rejected the deal, citing the recession and the lower prices of natural gas Inside and other fossil fuels. • Wind farms have “The ratepayers of Virginia Oregon wary, must be protected from costs Page B3 for renewable energy that are unreasonably high,” the regulators said. Wind power would have increased the monthly bill of a typical residential customer by 0.2 percent. See Renewable / A5

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. authorities sent David Headley, a small-time drug dealer and sometime informant, to work for them in Pakistan months after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, de-

spite a warning that he sympathized with radical Islamic groups, according to court records and interviews. Not long after Headley arrived there, he began training with terrorists, eventually playing a key role in the 2008 attacks that left 164 people dead in Mumbai. See Terror / A4


A2 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Kinect reaches a sweaty new dimension By David Pogue New York Times News Service

With the money Microsoft has spent on failed efforts to design hardware, you could finance a trip to Mars. Its failures make up quite a flop parade: WebTV. Spot Watch. Ultimate TV. Ultra Mobile PC. Tablet PC. Smart Display. Portable Media Center. Zune. Kin phone. If this were ancient Greece, you’d wonder what Microsoft had done to annoy the gods. There is, of course, an exception the size of Mount Olympus: the Xbox. With 45 million game consoles sold, Xbox 360 is Microsoft’s monster hardware hit. And last week, what will surely be its second monster hit went on sale: the Kinect. The Kinect (“kinetic” plus “connect,” get it?) is an add-on for the existing Xbox 360. If you already have an Xbox, you can buy the Kinect for $150, or you can buy it with a 4-gigabyte Xbox for $300 — if you can find it in stock. The Kinect is a glossy, footwide, black plastic horizontal bar. You plug its single cable into your Xbox. (If you have the bulkier, pre-2010 Xbox, you also have to plug the Kinect’s power cord into the wall.) You park the Kinect itself on, or beside, your TV. During startup, a motor moves the bar on its stand, making it scan the room up and down like some would-be Wall-E. It has four microphones and three little lenses: a video camera, an infrared projector and a distance sensor. Together, these lenses determine where you are in the room. And not just you. The system tracks 48 parts of your body in three-dimensional space. It doesn’t just know where your hand is, like the Wii. No, the Kinect tracks the motion of your head, hands, torso, waist, knees, feet and so on. The point is to let you control games with your body, without having to find, hold, learn or recharge a controller. Your digital stunt double appears on the TV screen. What you do, it does. The Wii, by tracking the position of its remote control, was amazing for its time (2006). It’s a natural for games in which you swing one hand — bowling, tennis, golf. But the Kinect blows open a whole universe of new, whole-body simulations — volleyball, obstacle courses, dancing, flying. It doesn’t merely recognize that someone is there; it recognizes your face and body. In some games, you can jump in to take a buddy’s place; the game instantly notices the change and signs you in under your own name. If you leave the room, it pauses the game automatically. There’s a crazy, magical, omigosh rush the first time you try the Kinect. It’s an experience you’ve never had before. The Kinect comes with “Kinect

Stuart Isett / New York Times News Service

Tim Nichols, a psychologist with Microsoft’s video games research center, watches players test Microsoft’s Kinect for the Xbox 360 at the company’s campus in Redmond, Wash. The Kinect, a $150 add-on for the Xbox 360, will let players control games with body movements and spoken commands. Adventures,” a suite of five starter games. In “20,000 Leaks,” you’re at an undersea observatory where particularly aggressive fish keep poking holes in the glass; your job is to plug the leaks by touching them with any part of your body. There’s also “Rallyball” (glorified dodgeball), “Reflex Ridge” (an exhausting whole-body obstacle course), “Space Pop” (pop bubbles in zero gravity) and “River Rush” (control a whitewater raft by lunging and jumping). Two players can play these games together, which is fantastic. The graphics aren’t quite as simplistic as the Wii’s amputatedWeebles aesthetic, but they’re still cartoony. Don’t expect to look especially sexy while you’re playing, either. Kinect is about what you feel, not how you look. Some games make that point by snapping photos of you at especially humiliating moments. You get a quick slide show of them when the round is over. For now, there are 17 games available, most for $48. Microsoft says many more are on the way. They’re generally simple, familyfriendly, Wii-type games, not the elaborate adventure games and war simulations that Xbox fans

more video games.” Then again, the Kinect may not be the antidote for sedentary lifestyles. It’s connected to an Xbox, with its infinite access to movies, TV shows and a million games where all you do is sit there on the couch. Stuart Goldenberg / New York Times News Service

may be used to. Still, some are pure genius. “Dance Central,” for example, is like “Guitar Hero” for your whole body. You learn and perform dance moves by following the on-screen model, as pop songs play and the crowd cheers. “Your Shape: Fitness Evolved” is an interactive fitness program, complete with cardio classes and personal training. You can’t play Kinect sitting down, and that’s a plus. I left my two youngsters alone with “Kinect Adventures” one afternoon. When I returned, they were drenched with sweat, panting hard and practically levitating. “Dad! Dad! Can we get one for Christmas? Please?” Next thing you know, we’ll be hearing doctors say, “I think your kids really need to play

The bad You should know, first of all, that the Kinect requires a lot of open space. You stand at least 6 feet away from the TV — preferably farther, especially if two are playing. Dorm rooms may be iffy. There’s way too much administrative hassle, too. Games take a long time to start up, a minute or more of company logos and repetitive Wii-style warnings. Remember, you don’t have any physical controls, so you make menu choices by “tapping” big buttons with your hand. To avoid accidental taps, you have to hold your hand still in the air for several seconds, which gets old fast. Sometimes, you can navigate by voice instead, saying, for example, “Xbox: Sign in,” or “Xbox: Sponsored trailer.” Unfortunately, that’s slow and inefficient in its own way.

I couldn’t understand why this error message appeared whenever I completed a game: “This operation will result in a loss of player progress. Do you wish to proceed?” Come on, Microsoft. You can track 48 parts of my body, but you can’t figure out how to save my game? Navigating the Xbox/Kinect software is baffling. Where would you guess you would go to switch games: to the Dashboard, the Guide or the Hub? And good luck trying to sort out all the different Microsoft accounts you’ll need: for starters a Windows Live ID, an Xbox Live Profile and a Kinect ID. Finally, note that the body tracking isn’t as quick or precise as the Wii’s remote-tracking. When you jump, there’s a slight delay before your on-screen character jumps. My fitness instructor in “Your Shape” kept tsk-ing that I wasn’t in sync with her, even though I swear I was.

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T S Climate scientists to campaign vs. skeptics on warming

Promoting his book, Bush to appear on NBC By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

By Neela Banerjee McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Faced with increasing political attacks, hundreds of climate scientists are joining a broad campaign to push back against congressional conservatives who have threatened prominent researchers with investigations and have vowed to kill regulations to rein in manmade greenhouse gas emissions. The efforts reveal a shift among climate scientists, many of whom have traditionally stayed out of politics and avoided the news media. Many now say they are willing to go toe-to-toe with their critics, some of whom gained new power after the Republicans won control of the House in last Tuesday’s election. Today, the American Geophysical Union, the country’s largest association of climate scientists, plans to announce that 700 climate scientists have agreed to speak out as experts on questions about global warming and the role of man-made air pollution. Some are prepared to go before what they consider potentially hostile audiences on conservative talk-radio and television shows. John Abraham of St. Thomas University in Minnesota, who last May wrote a widely disseminated response to climate-change skeptics, is organizing a “Climate Rapid Response Team,” which so far has more than three dozen leading scientists to defend the consensus on global warming in the scientific community. Some are also preparing a handbook on the human causes of climate change, which they plan to start sending to U.S. high schools as soon as this fall.

Thousands of uncounted Afghan ballots discovered The Washington Post KABUL, Afghanistan — The Afghan Independent Election Commission has discovered tens of thousands of previously uncounted ballots cast in the September parliamentary elections, a commission official said Sunday. Abdullah Ahmadzai said the commission plans to announce this week that the additional votes will be added to preliminary results released publicly last month. But he said it is unlikely there will be significant changes among the winners of the 249 seats of the Wolesi Jirga, the lower house of parliament. “We checked our warehouses and found those,” Ahmadzai said of the missing votes, which were spread through 511 polling centers in 20 provinces. “There will not be any significant changes in the results. However, there may be changes in one or two provinces.” Ahmadzai said more changes could come after the commission completes an audit of an additional 76 voting centers at which major irregularities have been alleged. He did not indicate whether the audit found rampant abuse by polling officials or candidates. The disclosures came on a day in which more than 200 Afghans marched through the streets of Kabul, carrying signs and chanting slogans denouncing the election results.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks Sunday during a town hall meeting with students at St. Xavier’s College in Mumbai, India.

Students greet Obama with tough questions By Sheryl Gay Stolberg New York Times News Service

MUMBAI, India — When Michelle Obama, the first lady, introduced her husband to a group of college students here on Sunday, she urged them to ask him “tough questions.” They did. “What is your take or opinion about jihad?” came the first question for President Barack Obama at a town hall-style meeting at St. Xavier’s College. Next up were queries about spirituality, Gandhi, the U.S. midterm elections and his government’s negotiations with the Taliban. Finally, there was the question Obama confessed he had been waiting for: Why hasn’t the United States labeled Pakistan “a terrorist state”? “Pakistan is an enormous

country; it is a strategically important country,” Obama began, meandering around to a defense of his administration. He said its policy was to “work with the Pakistani government in order to eradicate this extremism that we consider a cancer within the country that can potentially engulf the country.” The diplomatic response about the neighbor that India views with suspicion was indicative of the fine line Obama has walked on the topic of terrorism while in India. On Saturday, his first day here, he faced criticism in the local press when he paid homage to victims and survivors of the 2008 terrorist siege in Mumbai without mentioning that the gunmen were Pakistani or suggesting that some groups in Pakistan pose a terrorist threat.

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The rugged region is home to hundreds of Pakistani and foreign militants, many belonging to or allied with al-Qaida and the Taliban.

Scant hope seen in Myanmar election YANGON, Myanmar — Myanmar’s secretive military-ruled government gave no sign early today of when results from the country’s first election in two decades would be released, though it’s almost certain power will remain in the hands of the junta and its political proxies. What’s unclear is whether the vote marks a small step toward democratic rule. While most observers have rejected the poll as a sham engineered to solidify military control, even some critics say having a parliament for the first time in 22 years could provide an opening for eventual change. There was little doubt that the junta-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party would emerge with an enormous share of the parliamentary seats from Sunday’s poll, despite widespread popular opposition to 48 years of military rule. It fielded 1,112 candidates for the 1,159 seats in the twohouse national parliament and 14 regional parliaments, while the largest anti-government party, the National Democratic Force, contested just 164 spots.

While the students at St. Xavier’s, a 141-year-old Jesuit institution in this pretty seaside city, were exceedingly polite to Obama, they seemed unafraid to get straight to the point, even if Obama did not always get straight to his. He carefully avoided saying that he was opposed to jihad — which has several meanings, including both holy war and a personal quest for self-improvement — and instead said: “I think all of us recognize that this great religion in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified. And so, I think, one of the challenges that we face is, how do we isolate those who have these distorted notions of religious war.”

Greek leader claims victory for austerity

Itsuo Inouye / The Associated Press

A Myanmar activist holds a picture of Myanmar’s prodemocracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi during a protest Sunday in front of the Myanmar Embassy in Tokyo, Japan. latest attacks against al-Qaida and Taliban militants seeking sanctuary in the region. The missiles struck an hour apart in the North Waziristan — the area that has seen the overwhelming majority of drone strikes over the last two months.

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ATHENS — Since he was elected a year ago, Prime Minister George Papandreou has struggled to satisfy two difficult and seemingly mutually exclusive constituencies: international financial markets and Greeks. On Sunday, he claimed a victory on both counts, based on projections of a strong showing by his Socialist party in regional elections widely seen as a referendum on the government’s austerity measures. With only 10 percent of the votes counted — and despite record-high abstentions, estimated at 40 percent — Papandreou gave a triumphant televised address. — From wire reports

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U.S.: Strikes kill 14 militants in Pakistan PESHAWAR, Pakistan — A pair of American drone strikes killed 14 suspected militants in northwestern Pakistan on Sunday, local intelligence officials said, in the

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George W. Bush will end a self-imposed silence about his presidency in an NBC primetime special today, the eve of the release of his memoir, “Decision Points.” That the interviewer will be Matt Lauer, the co-host of the “Today” show, reveals calculations by Bush and his advisers, as well as a campaign by NBC. By choosing the top morning anchor instead, both sides are essentially endorsing the soft power of Matt Lauer. “He’s an extraordinarily fair interviewer,” said Jim Bell, the executive producer of “Today” and of the prime-time special. That was a selling point for Bush and his advisers, who decided that “the first interview should be in a news context, with a network news anchor,” said David Drake, a senior vice president of Crown, the “Decision Points” publisher. For NBC, the interview — which was taped over the course of two days in Texas late last month — is a major coup. “They talked about every subject un-

der the sun,” said Steve Capus, the president of NBC News, who observed that Bush “has things he wants to get off his chest.” But critics of Bush — and there are many, with polls showing that most Americans still hold an unfavorable view of him — who would like to see a televised confrontation over issues like the Iraq war may come away disappointed. The tone of the prime-time special is conversational, not prosecutorial, and for that reason, “Lauer/Bush” is not likely to join “Frost/Nixon” in the public imagination. To get first dibs for the Bush interview, each major television network pieced together its best proposal — a “package,” Drake said — and at least one other offered a prime-time special like NBC’s. He declined to share specifics, but said “it was a close decision.” The NBC interview is the start of a book tour like almost no other. Bush will sit down with Oprah Winfrey and Rush Limbaugh, as well as with all three prime-time hosts on the Fox News Channel this week.

Indonesia buries dead from volcano By Sarah DiLorenzo The Associated Press

MOUNT MERAPI, Indonesia — One by one the bodies of dozens killed by Indonesia’s most volatile volcano — some too charred to ever be identified — were placed into a mass grave Sunday, as people terrified that another eruption was coming fled the city at the foot of Mount Merapi. As relatives wept and men recited traditional Islamic prayers, villagers and policemen unloaded the corpses — some in plain wooden coffins, others still in the morgue’s yellow body bags — from ambulances. They were placed into a massive trench, dug into a large green field in the shadow of the volcano, which has claimed 138 lives in the past two weeks. The notoriously unpre-

dictable mountain unleashed its most powerful eruption in a century on Friday, sending hot clouds of gas, rocks and debris avalanching down its slopes at highway speeds, smothering entire villages and leaving a trail of charred corpses in its path. Concerns over the ash it spewed prompted international airlines to cancel flights to the capital of Jakarta just days before President Barack Obama’s planned trip to Indonesia — his second stop in a 10-day Asian tour. With more than 90 killed, Friday was the deadliest day at Merapi since 1930.

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A4 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Dancer Continued from A1 For the first three months, Matthew had chemo every week, and then the treatments were reduced. In all, he ended up getting 2,100 chemotherapy treatments. Through all this, “Christ and dance were my base,” Anna said. “I was on the dance competition team, and you can’t miss practice or you’ll get cut from the team,” Anna said. “But the team and Angie (Angie Stinson is the owner of La Pine Academy of Dance Arts) were OK with me being gone. I’d come back from Portland, and everybody would sit down to hear how it went. We’d all cry together, then get up and dance together.” The Macy’s parade performers are sponsored by Spirit of America Productions. Each year,

the company trains hundreds of dancers, male and female, between the ages of 14 and 18, to participate in the parade. Participation is by invitation only, and participants come from selected dance studios all over the country. Everyone has to pay his or her own way, and that amounts to $2,500 per dancer. Pat Stone is going along as a chaperone, and she is also financing her own trip. Anna’s journey from La Pine to New York has been arduous. First, there is the hard work and self-discipline needed to become an exceptional dancer. She started taking ballet lessons at age 5 at La Pine Academy of Dance Arts. Except for the second grade, Anna was homeschooled, and dance was her extracurricular activity. Over the years, she studied several forms

C OV ER S T OR I ES of dance, including tumbling, jazz and hip-hop. Anna is currently a dance instructor at the La Pine Academy of Dance Arts, teaching jazz and hip-hop. And the family situation has somewhat normalized now, says Pat Stone. Matthew, now 15, is in remission, she said, and is a freshman at La Pine High School. Anna’s dream of dancing in the Macy’s parade started to seem doable. Stinson and her family, formerly of Roseburg, moved to La Pine in 2008 and bought the dance studio. Years earlier, Stinson was the instructor of a dance team that performed in the Macy’s parade. Stinson knew the right people, and got an invitation to take a dance team to the 2010 parade. “Originally, I also offered the trip to the other dancers on the competition team,” Stinson said,

“but they couldn’t afford the trip.” For many dancers, the experience is the “trip of a lifetime,” Stinson said. Along with dancing in the parade, participants get tickets to a Broadway show, and have the opportunity to see the Radio City Music Hall Christmas Spectacular with the Rockettes, go on an Empire State Building tour, and participate in a class with a noted New York choreographer. The hitch was, all this costs money, and all the fees had to be paid by Sept. 15. Like many other Central Oregon families, things are tight right now with the Stone family. Anna’s father, Jim Stone, is retired from the U.S. Forest Service and spends his time volunteering at their church and helping take care of Matthew. The family’s finances were devastated by the

Missed warnings In recent weeks, U.S. government officials have begun to acknowledge that Headley’s path from American informant to transnational terrorist illustrated the breakdowns and miscommunications that have bedeviled them since the Sept. 11 attacks. Warnings about his radicalism were apparently not shared with the drug agency that made use of his ties in Pakistan. The director of national intelligence began an investigation into his government connections after reports last month that two of Headley’s former wives had gone to the U.S. authorities between 2005 and 2008, before the Mumbai attacks, to say they feared he was plotting with terrorists. Combined with the earlier warning from the former girlfriend, three of the women in Headley’s life reported his ties to terrorists, only to have those warnings dismissed. An examination of Headley’s story shows that his government ties ran far deeper and longer than previously known. One federal law enforcement authority knowledgeable about the case said he believed that Headley was a Drug Enforcement Agency informant until at least 2003, meaning that he was talking to U.S. agencies even as he was learning to deal with explosives and small arms in terrorist training camps. The review raises new questions about why the Americans missed warning signs that a valued informant was becoming an important figure in radical Islamic groups, and whether some officials chose to look the other way rather than believe the complaints about him. The October 2001 warning from the girlfriend was first reported Friday by ProPublica, the independent investigative news operation, and published in The Washington Post. Fuller details of how the government handled the matter were provided to The Times by officials who did not want to be quoted discussing an ongoing inquiry. They disclosed that the FBI actually talked to Headley about the girlfriend, and he told them she was unreliable. They said that while he seemed to have a philosophical affinity for some groups, there was no evidence that he was plotting against the United States. Also in-

the routines. After the parade, Anna’s future plans are still undecided. A dance scholarship to a college doesn’t seem to be in the picture, she said, because home-schooled students typically don’t have the high school dance experience to qualify. Anna would someday like to own her own dance studio, and she is actively pursuing a photography career. But right now, all her attention is focused on learning the routines and dancing in the parade. “I’m pursuing a dream, and most people never get a chance to do that,” she said. “I will be doing something I’ve always wanted to do.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at survivalsenselp@gmail.com.

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Terror Continued from A1 The October 2001 warning was dismissed, the authorities said, as the ire of a jilted girlfriend and for lack of proof. Less than a month later, those concerns did not come up when a federal court in New York granted Headley an early release from probation so that he could be sent to work for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Pakistan. It is unclear what Headley was supposed to do in Pakistan for the Americans. “All I knew was the DEA wanted him in Pakistan as fast as possible because they said they were close to making some big cases,” said Luis Caso, Headley’s former probation officer, describing the hastily arranged release. This weekend, while President Barack Obama was visiting India, he briefed Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on the status of his administration’s investigation of Headley, including the failure to act on repeated warnings that he might be a terrorist. A senior U.S. official said the inquiry has concluded that while the government received warnings, it did not have strong enough evidence at the time to act on them. “Had the United States government sufficiently established he was engaged in plotting a terrorist attack in India, the information would have most assuredly been transferred promptly to the Indian government,” the official said in a statement to The New York Times. The statement did not make clear whether any U.S. agencies would be held accountable.

current economy and the longterm, out-of-pocket costs associated with treating Matthew’s cancer. Pat got a job working part time at Bi-Mart in La Pine, but the latest challenge is financing the trip. “We put it (the fees) on a credit card, and I’ve been fundraising,” Anna said. So far, she’s raised about $1,200 of the $2,500 needed. The family has recycled bottles and cans, sold items on Craigslist and held a garage sale. “We hoped to raise enough that there might be some spending money,” Anna said, shrugging. “But we’re not there yet.” A box with costumes was shipped to Anna in the middle of September, along with a DVD of choreographed routines the dancers are expected to learn before they arrive in New York. Stinson is helping Anna learn

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David Headley has pleaded guilty in connection with the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks that set fire to the Taj Mahal Palace hotel, which has been restored. fluencing the handling of the case, they said, was that he had been a longtime informant. The Indian government has been outspoken in its concerns that the United States overlooked repeated warnings about Headley’s terrorist activities both because of his links to U.S. law enforcement as well as to officials in Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence Directorate — a key ally of the United States in the fight against terrorism. Bruce Riedel, a terrorism expert at the Brookings Institution and a former CIA officer, said the Indians are right to ask, “Why weren’t alarms screaming?” Headley, 50, born in the United States to a Pakistani diplomat and Philadelphia socialite, has pleaded guilty in connection with the Mumbai plot and a thwarted attack against a Danish newspaper that published cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. As he has many times before, he is cooperating with the authorities, this time hoping to avoid the death penalty. Officials of the DEA, which has a long history with Headley, declined to discuss their relationship with him. The CIA and the FBI said that Headley had never worked with them. Privately, the agencies point fingers at each other. The transcript of a Nov. 16, 2001, probation hearing in federal court in New York shows the government took great pains not to identify which agency was handling Headley, or whether he worked for more than one. Caso, his former probation officer, recalled that Headley had been turned over to the DEA. Another person familiar with the case confirms this account. It was a world Headley knew well. After arrests in 1987 and 1998, he cooperated with the drug agency in exchange for lighter sentences. He specialized in the ties between Pakistani drug organizations and American dealers along the East Coast.

Trusted informant A September 1998 letter that prosecutors submitted to court after an arrest then showed that the government considered Headley — who had admitted to distributing 15 kilograms of heroin over his years as a dealer — so “reliable and forthcoming” that they sent him to Pakistan to “develop intelligence on Pakistani heroin traffickers.” The letter indicates that Headley, who faced seven to nine years in jail for his offense, was such a trusted partner to the drug agency in the 1990s that he helped translate hours of tape-recorded telephone intercepts and coached drug agency investigators on how to question Pakistani suspects. The courts looked favorably on his cooperation, according to records, sentencing Headley to 15 months in prison and five years probation. While he was on probation, in October 2001, a woman told the

FBI that she believed her former boyfriend, Headley, was sympathetic to terrorists, according to law enforcement officials. The government was flooded with thousands of such tips at that time, in the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. William Headley, an uncle, recalled that agents called his sister to ask if her son had terrorist leanings. “She didn’t seem upset at all by the call,” William Headley said. “And I didn’t think much of it either because at that time, I thought the government was checking out anyone who had ties to Pakistan.” It is unclear how widely disseminated the warning was. But in that probation hearing one month later, the government enlisted Headley’s help again, suspending his sentence in exchange for what court records only described as “continuing cooperation.” According to the transcript, it was a rushed affair. The probation officer apologized for not being properly dressed, and the lawyers explained that they had not been able to make their case in writing. Headley was a potential gold mine, according to an official knowledgeable about the agreement to release him from probation. One person involved in the case said U.S. agencies had “zero in terms of reliable intelligence. And it was clear from the conversations about him that the government was considering assignments that went beyond drugs.” The authorities have not disclosed what happened after he signed on as an informant, presumably to begin working his Pakistani contacts again. Less than two months after he arrived in Pakistan, he attended a course sponsored by Lashkar-e-Taiba, the Pakistani terrorist group, on “the merits of waging jihad.” Between 2002 and 2005, Headley attended at least four additional Lashkar sessions, including training on surveillance and smallarms combat. Then in 2007, he began scouting targets for the group to attack in Mumbai, staying at least twice at the Taj Mahal hotel and hiring fishermen for private tours of the port that helped him identify where the sea-traveling attackers could land. It is unclear when and why his connections to the U.S. government ended. After the Mumbai attacks, Headley apparently turned his attention to Europe, according to recently released transcripts of his questioning by the Indian authorities. He contacted Ilyas Kashmiri, widely considered one of al-Qaida’s most dangerous operatives, and began plotting the attack against the Danish newspaper, according to his own account. Kashmiri put Headley in touch with al-Qaida operatives in Europe who would help. He traveled to Britain in August 2009, then to Stockholm. British intelligence authorities alerted the United States to Headley’s August meeting in Britain, saying that they believed he was

involved in a plot against the Denmark newspaper. He was arrested in connection with the Denmark plot last October. They had no idea that he was also involved in the Mumbai attacks until he told them. Since then, he has been in federal custody in Chicago.

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Renewable Continued from A1 Even as many politicians, environmentalists and consumers want renewable energy and reduced dependence on fossil fuels, a growing number of projects are being canceled or delayed because governments are unwilling to add even small amounts to consumers’ electricity bills. Deals to buy renewable power have been scuttled or slowed in states like Florida, Idaho and Kentucky as well as Virginia. By the end of the third quarter, year-to-date installations of new wind power dropped 72 percent from 2009 levels, according to the American Wind Energy Association, a trade group. Polsky views the focus on short-term costs as short-sighted. “They have to look for the ratepayers’ long-term interest,” he said, “not just the bills this year.” Electricity generated from wind or sun still generally costs more — and sometimes a lot more — than the power squeezed from coal or natural gas. Prices for fossil fuels have dropped in part because the recession has reduced demand. In the case of natural gas, newer drilling techniques have opened the possibility of vast new supplies for years to come.

Back and forth The gap in price can pit regulators, who see their job as protecting consumers from unreasonable rates, against renewable energy developers and utility companies, many of which are willing to pay higher prices now to ensure a broader energy portfolio in the future. In April, for example, the state public utilities commission in Rhode Island rejected a powerpurchase deal for an offshore wind project that would have cost 24.4 cents a kilowatt-hour. The utility now pays about 9.5 cents a kilowatt hour for electricity from fossil fuels. The state Legislature responded by passing a bill allowing the regulators to consider factors other than price. The commission then approved an agreement to buy electricity from a smaller wind farm, although that decision is being challenged in the courts. Similarly, in Kentucky this

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Wind turbines spin in northeast Oregon. A reluctance to add even small amounts to consumers’ electricity bills is delaying the creation of additional renewable energy projects in certain areas.

“One of the problems in the United States is that we haven’t been willing to confront the tough questions.” — Paul Gipe, Alliance for Renewable Energy year, the public service commission voted down a contract for a local utility, Kentucky Power, to buy electricity from NextEra Energy Resources in Illinois. According to the commission, Kentucky Power argued that the contract would position the utility “to better meet growing environmental requirements and impending government portfolio mandates for renewable energy” and that it would benefit customers. But Kentucky’s attorney general, Jack Conway, joined by business and industrial electricity users, opposed the deal, contending that it would have increased a typical residential customer’s rates by about 0.7 percent and was “a discretionary expense” that the utility’s customers could ill afford. Commissioner James Gardner, the lone dissenting commissioner, protested that “there is a necessity for this power,” and said that “there are great pressures nationally and in Kentucky to increase renewables.” Companies that make solar cells and wind machines argue that a national energy policy is needed to guarantee them a market that will allow their industry

to develop. Clean power will be an important industry globally for years, they say, and if the United States does not subsidize renewable energy now, it risks falling far behind other countries. They point to China, which is rapidly increasing the amount of electricity it generates from renewable sources. In its most recent quarterly assessment of the renewable energy sector, the accounting and consulting firm Ernst & Young identified China as the most attractive market for investment in renewable energy.

National standard? In part, the analysis suggested, this reflected the failure of American lawmakers to pass a national renewable energy standard and the looming expiration of a Treasury program that allowed renewable developers to receive cash grants in lieu of tax credits. In Europe, many national governments have guaranteed prices for energy from sun or wind. As a result, renewable advocates say, many countries are on track to meet the European Union’s goal of 20 percent of energy from renewable sources by 2020. The United States has so far

relied on a combination of state renewable energy mandates and federal tax credits to encourage greater reliance on energy from renewable sources. Legislation that would have set a price on carbon-dioxide emissions and included a standard for increasing the share of clean energy in the nation’s electricity portfolio failed in Congress this year. “Our investors tell us they’re nervous about all the uncertainty,” said John Cusack, the president of Gifford Park Associates, a sustainability management and investment consulting firm in Eastchester, N.Y. “They don’t know what’s going to happen.” To be sure, a lot of renewable power development is still going forward. The American Wind Energy Association estimates that wind farms capable of producing 6,300 megawatts of wind power are under construction, and that a busy second half of 2010 would leave installations about 50 percent behind last year. Solar power is becoming less expensive, and its use is expanding rapidly. But it still accounts for less than 1 percent of the nation’s electricity needs, providing enough to serve about 350,000 homes. Renewable energy supporters argue that higher fossil fuel prices will eventually make renewable energy more competitive — and at times over the last two decades, when the price for natural gas has spiked, wind power in particular has been a relative bargain. Advocates also argue that while the costs might be higher now, as the technology matures and supply chains and manufacturing bases take root, clean sources of power will become more attractive. Fold in the higher costs of extracting and burning fossil fuels on human health, the climate and the environment, many advocates argue, and renewable technologies like wind power are already cheaper. “One of the problems in the United States is that we haven’t been willing to confront the tough questions,” said Paul Gipe, who sits on the steering committee of the Alliance for Renewable Energy, a group advocating energy policy reform. “We have to ask ourselves, ‘Do we really want renewables?’” he said. “And if the answer to that is yes, then we’re going to have to pay for them.”

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 A5

Team Continued from A1 The team was formed in late 2008. Team members began training regularly, learning how to handle incidents from a hostage situation to a riot at the jail to transporting a high-risk inmate to the courthouse. The team was ready to go by mid-2010 and assisted with inmate transports and courtroom security on a handful of occasions, said Lt. Paul Garrison, the team’s commander. But until the two incidents last month, both in La Pine, the team hadn’t been called to handle any incidents in the community. If a situation in the county looks like it might require some additional resources, officials make a call about which tactical team should be called in. CERT, which has about 40 members from several local agencies, responds to calls in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. Garrison said his team is trained to deal with the same type of situations that CERT responds to, but in some cases — such as those that require more people, or a particularly complex incident with an active shooter — CERT is probably better equipped to handle the call. “At this point, the captains in their respective divisions make that ultimate decision,” he said. “If a patrol situation that may not rise to the level of a CERT activation but requires some speciality training and tactics, it meets the criteria for us to respond.” CERT has six members from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, and Blanton said he has no plans to pull them off the team now that the Special Operations Team is up and running. He said having two teams is important because one could run out of resources in

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a large-scale incident and need reinforcements. If one team was involved in a shooting, for example, members would have to be pulled off duty. Blanton said he would like to expand the county’s team in the future but added that keeping spending in check is a priority. In the 2009-10 fiscal year, the Sheriff’s Office spent just over $64,100 on the team. The bulk of the expenses, more than $51,500, was spent on vehicles, uniforms and supplies. The remaining funds covered training expenses and overtime pay for team members. In the first four months of the current fiscal year, which began in July, the office has spent $2,353 on the team, all of it on overtime pay. Sheriff’s Office Business Manager Jim Ross said officials have set aside more than $38,000 for the team in the current fiscal year’s budget. Most of it — $30,000 — is for overtime. Another $6,300 is budgeted for firearms and $2,500 for ammunition. Garrison said he’s pleased with the team’s participation on its first two calls. In the first situation, deputies attempted to talk to the woman on the phone, but when they lost contact, the Special Operations Team went into the house and found her. She was in need of medical attention and was taken to the hospital. On the second call, deputies were able to track down the assault suspect and take him to jail, with the team’s help. “We’d obviously like to continue to be involved in callouts like we have been to this point, as well as any other high-profile situations that may come up, and high-risk prisoner transports and court security,” Garrison said. “How we’re going to get to that point is by building on the foundation we’ve already laid and relying on the commitment of the team members.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Inside

OREGON Student campaign helps out gay youths, see Page B2. Wind farms draw health concerns from residents, see Page B3. Coastal communities wary of mining project, see Page B6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2010

Program putting time to work for students

SISTERS CITY COUNCIL

Winners hope for smooth 2 years By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Traditional political fundraising was no guarantee of success in the recent Sisters City Council election, and the results of that election have some hoping the new council will be able to erase divisions formed in the last two years. The election was, in one way, defined by two groups of candidates who took drastically different approaches to fundraising. On one side, Councilor Sharlene Weed, Wendy Holzman and Jacki Shepardson rejected traditional political fundraising, instead asking supporters to donate money to the Sisters Kiwanis Food Bank. Weed and Holzman each won seats. Donations topped $4,000. On the other, Jerry Bogart and Virginia Lindsey, who both lost, raised about $9,000 through the Citizens for Sisters PAC, spending the money on campaign signs and advertisements. That strategy worked last year when the same PAC raised about $12,000 for Bogart, Councilor Pat Thompson and Mayor Lon Kellstrom. All three won seats. But not this time. David Asson split with Bogart and Lindsey early in this election. He raised more than $3,000 on his own and won. Kellstrom, who was not running for re-election this year, had recruited Asson to run. He had believed the relative political unknown’s campaign was doomed when he pulled out of the PAC. “Turns out David was right, and I was wrong,” Kellstrom said, and added that the organized political fundraising likely hurt his favored candidates. “It could’ve been. I can’t point to much else.” The current council is dealing with a controversy over its decision to hire an economic development director — a part-time position for which it has budgeted $30,000. See Sisters / B5

B

At Summit High School, 36 minutes a week set aside to reinforce learning Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Luigi Miccolis, 66, shows his 16-month-old grandson Matthew Miccolis, both of Bend, a pot on display in the booth of Sisters artists Mitch and Michelle Deaderick at the sixth annual Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Elementary School in Bend on Sunday. The event is sponsored by the Clay Guild of the Cascades.

Keepsakes of clay Potters put their art on display at annual Bend showcase

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

D Mike Gwinup, 56, of Bend, molds a clay pot on a pottery wheel, while demonstrating proper technique for visitors at the Clay Guild of the Cascades’ 2010 Wildfire Pottery Showcase.

CENTRAL OREGON WEATHER

Beginning of week may require raincoats

avid Novotny, 9, worked to turn his blob of clay into a cow at the sixth annual Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Elementary School in Bend on Sunday afternoon. David’s friend, Asher Bachtold, 10, told him he should call his artwork a “duck cow” because it looked more like a duck. Eventually, David said his sculpture might turn into something else. “Steak,” he said. Artist Jon King, of Corvallis, was at the children’s area with the two boys. Letting the young artists watch how quickly they could transform pieces, with a little imagination, is one of the goals of the kids’ area, he said. On Sunday, he said, he saw a lot of “rampant imagination and a willingness to smash things.” The kids’ center also allowed parents to walk through the different artists’ booths. There were 26 artists at the pottery showcase this year, 18 of whom are from Central Oregon. Linda Heisserman said the Clay Guild of the Cascades, which sponsors the event, was created to support local artists. “Each year the artists here get better and better,” she said. See Clay / B5

October 2010 weather for Bend DAY High temp.

90

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 76 85 81 69 59 58 63 63 69 70 71 58 67 78 77 56 57 57 61 68 76 70 59 51 60 46 42 49 48 51 53 H

High temperatures averaged 62.8°F

80

Average temperature for October....49.1°

60 50

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

It looks like Central Oregonians will have a wet start to the week, but the weather is expected to dry up toward the weekend. “If I had to label it, I would say it’s a wet beginning of the week, tapering off into a chilly, mostly dry end of the week,” said Rob Brooks, forecaster with the National Weather Service in Pendleton. Today, partly cloudy skies are expected with a 20 percent chance of rain and snow showers. The highs will be between 39 and 45 degrees, with the nighttime temperatures dropping into the mid- to low 20s. “Tuesday starts out nice, with partly cloudy skies in the afternoon,” Brooks said. The chance of rain in the afternoon is about 90 percent. The snow level is expected to drop to 3,500 feet overnight, and the day’s highs should be in the upper- to mid-40s, with the mercury dropping to somewhere between 27 and 33 degrees overnight.

A slight chance of showers will continue Wednesday with highs in the low to mid-40s. A crisp Wednesday night, possibly the coldest of the week, will see temperatures dropping into the low to mid-20s. For Veteran’s Day, meteorologists expect a slight chance of rain and chilly weather. The highs could reach the upper 40s, but the nighttime lows will drop into the mid- to upper 20s. Partly cloudy skies are expected again on Friday, but without any mention of showers. The temperatures could reach the low 50s. And the lows will remain in the mid- to upper 20s. Brooks said the weather pattern for this week is normal, although perhaps a little bit chillier, than in years past. The weekend is expected to see daytime temperatures in the upper to low 50s, dropping at night to the mid- to upper 30s. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-4198074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

The Bulletin

The school year may be just a couple months old, but a new schedule at Bend-area high schools is under way, with administrators hoping a short period for intervention and enrichment each day will help students get help before falling behind. On Friday at Summit High School, students were using a 36-minute block of time to finish homework, check their grades and get help from tutors, teachers and mentors. Summit Principal Lynn Baker said administrators owe the time to the kids. He pointed to the school’s mission to ensure high levels of learning for each student. “It would be disingenuous to say we were going for this without “We’re telling providing time and support to those stu- kids, ‘We’re dents who are strug- not going to gling,” he said. That’s why Summit’s give up on you, administration decided even if you’ve to start Storm Time, the 36-minute period given up on every school day, ex- yourself.’” cept Wednesdays, that focuses on getting — Lynn Baker, students the help they Summit High need in classes in which School principal they’re struggling. For now, all students are enrolled in Storm Time. That may change next semester, and the variety of the classes might change as well. Baker mentioned, for example, that all advanced placement French students might have Storm Time together, so they can prepare for the test, or students may be able to take an SAT test prep course during Storm Time. Baker said what keeps most students from succeeding is obvious. “They simply don’t hand in their homework,” he said. “Students who are in advanced placement classes often need extra time to do homework. Students who are highly involved in clubs and activities and sports need time. ... They don’t need an intervention, they just need time.” Many students can use Storm Time as a study hall that allows them an organized period each day to get their work done. And if a student does find he or she needs extra help in a particular class, then he or she can get a laminated, bright green “Storm Time pass” to go to a teacher’s classroom. “There’s a lot of fluidity,” Baker said. See Time / B5

Daily highs and lows

70

Drier, colder conditions forecast to follow up wet start

By Sheila G. Miller

40

Death prompts state safety audit of Bend Parkway

30 20 10 Low temp.

DAY

L Low temperatures averaged 35.4°F

Bulletin staff report 32° F freezing point of water

41 47 55 46 27 26 26 40 42 55 32 29 31 36 33 29 32 27 29 32 33 34 40 38 34 31 29 28 40 38 38 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Precipitation total...1.33” (Average precipitation for the month.....0.72") T .03

Highest temperature

T

85° Oct. 2

1.14 .09

Lowest temperature

.05 .02

26° Oct. 6, 7

Highest recorded maximum for the month ....90° (1979)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month .......0°(2002)

Average maximum 62.8°

Average minimum 35.4°

Monthly average maximum through the years*....................63°

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................32.1°

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Traffic specialists will be doing a three-day safety audit on the Bend Parkway after a man was recently killed in one of its crosswalks. The safety audit starts today to assess bike and pedestrian safety. Highway traffic specialists from the Oregon Department of Transportation will analyze safety issues and help develop solutions. There are two parkway crosswalks in Bend. One is at Reed Lane; the other is at Badger Road. In October, a 55-year-old man was killed when he was struck by a car in the Reed Lane crosswalk. The man’s 14-year-old daughter was also struck and received nonlife-threatening injuries. Both crosswalks are marked by yellow pedestrian crossing signs. The speed limit on the parkway is 45 mph. In other transportation news, there will be short traffic delays for northbound and southbound traffic on U.S. Highway 97 near the Lava Lands Visitor Center. ODOT contractors will be doing blasting at around 10:45 a.m.


B2 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

Project preaches better life Students help spread ‘It Gets Better’ message to tormented gay youths By Karen McCowan The (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE — Things turned bad at a young age for University of Oregon Law School student Jon Patterson. “The first time someone called me a fag, I was 8 years old,” Patterson says in a video that he and six classmates posted on YouTube this week. In it, fellow UO law student Zachary Smallwood recounts being taunted in the eighth grade simply for bringing his violin to school each day. “One day, one of my best friends sat next to me and said, ‘You know, I just want you to know that only gay guys play the violin.’” Classmate Sarah Spring tells of being warned as a teen that “because I am gay, I couldn’t even get a job at McDonald’s.” Such negative stories, however, only set up the real point of their video: describing their satisfying adult lives as part of a mushrooming It Gets Better project. “Guess what?” Spring goes on in her testimonial. “Here I am today, in law school, and gay.” The project was started last month by Seattle gay rights activist Dan Savage, who writes a syndicated sex advice column for readers of all sexual orientations.

Sept. 22 suicide of Rutgers student His and other “It Gets Better” stories gained international attention in the aftermath of the Sept. 22 suicide of Rutgers University student Tyler Clementi. The freshman jumped to his

2 climbers rescued in Smith Rock State Park

“As an openly gay adult, it can get great,” he says. “It can get awesome.” Smallwood, who organized the law students’ “It Gets Better message,” agrees. death from New York’s George “We made this video for you Washington Bridge after two because we want you to know other students secretly filmed that we have a community,” he his sexual encounter with an- tells troubled teens who may other man and then posted it on watch it. “We’re loved, we have the Internet. great friends, we have great But Savage actually launched family, we have wonderful his project more than a week partners.” earlier, in reAdults who sponse to a string work with local of youth suicides “When a gay gay and lesbian that included a youths say they 15-year-old Indi- student kills welcome “It Gets ana boy who hung himself, what Better” for its himself Sept. 9 in message of hope his family’s barn. he’s saying is that to teens who can Billy Lucas never he can’t picture feel like targeted called himself outcasts, and bea future with gay, according to cause it can raise news accounts, enough joy in it to other students’ but was torment- compensate for awareness of the ed simply because pain that bullyclassmates per- the pain in his life ing causes. ceived him that now.” “In my classes, way. these issues come In interviews, — Dan Savage, up all the time,” Savage has said syndicated columnist said Willamette he started It Gets High School soBetter because he cial studies teachwished he could have talked er Anna Niklas, who also serves to the dead youth “for five as faculty adviser to the west minutes.” Eugene school’s Gay-Straight He’s said that he understands Alliance. their feelings of despair because The local chapter is part of a of his own experiences as a gay national group dedicated to creteenager. But what he knows ating safe school environments now, he says, is that “life gets so for all students. much better.” “When a gay student kills himself, what he’s saying is that Helping each other he can’t picture a future with “They meet once a week at enough joy in it to compensate Willamette,” Niklas said of the for the pain in his life now,” student club. “They check in Savage has said. with each other and make sure Savage’s message and those each other is OK.” of thousands of “It Gets Better” Laura Philips leads a weekly videos posted in the last month drop-in support group for gay, is that such youths don’t have to lesbian, bisexual, transgender be filled with despair. and “questioning” students at-

tending a variety of area middle and high schools. “All of the attention to this and to the recent suicides around the country is, on one hand, very upsetting,” Philips said. “On the other hand, the fact that this goes on is not news to local teens. “They’re glad to see greater attention being paid by the general public to an issue that particularly affects them and their friends.” The support group, sponsored by Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays, meets Friday afternoons at Amazon Community Center. The group has met for more than a dozen years, so some of its own alumni are a testament to Savage’s message, Philips said. “It’s very gratifying to hear from young people now in their 20s how happy and successful they are,” she said.

N  R CIVIL SUITS Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration. Filed Oct. 19

Law school students form organization

10CV1138AB: Kelly B. Ryan and Anita Christensen v. SLM Financial Corp., complaint, economic damages $80,000, noneconomic damages $30,000 10CV1139AB: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Dorothy A. Adams, complaint, $18,667.84 10CV1140MA: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Stephanie N. Bain, complaint, $15,407.10 10CV1141MA: CitiBank South Dakota NA v. Craig S. Dwyer, complaint, $21,833.19 10CV1142AB: FIA Card Services v. Mark A. Anderson, complaint, $33,159.23 10CV1143AB: Ohana Harmony House LLC v. Norma J. Cleveland and Nancy Cleveland, complaint, $10,159 10CV1144ST: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. Kenneth D. Van Cleve, complaint, $12,636.26 10CV1145MA: Stone Creek Financial Inc. v. Rick E. Loeks aka Rick Edward Loeks, complaint, $13,458.50

The video-producing UO students are all members of OUTLaws, a law school student organization that promotes “awareness, education, support and understanding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer legal issues and civil rights.” They decided to collaborate on their own video to lend their diverse voices to the cause. “I think it was around college time when I realized, ‘Hey, you know what? I’m fabulous. And if you don’t like it, so what,’?” Patterson says in the video. “You’ll find that there are so many things out there to pursue beyond middle school and high school,” added Smallwood, a graduate of Thurston High School in Springfield. “So, hang in there. Your life’s so important. And it’s gonna get better.”

10CV1137ST: Livingston Financial LLC v. Dan Smith, complaint, $11,955.05 10CV1146ST: Credit Associates Inc. v. Brad Fraley and Leading Edge Aviation Inc., complaint, $18,587 10CV1147ST: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. Todd E. Hansen, complaint, $24,208.69 10CV1148AB: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. Heather L. Sporalsky, complaint, $16,464.59 10CV1149ST: Ranch at the Canyons Association Inc. v. Sun Eagle Properties LLC, complaint, $12,908.75 10CV1150MA: EGP Investments LLC v. Scott Young, complaint, $61,257.16 10CV1151ST: Receivables Performance Management LLC v. Eric A. and Jeanette M. Grindy, complaint, $17,218.09

Filed Oct. 20

Filed Oct. 21

10CV1152AB: Sterling Savings Bank v. Delita C. Cordes, complaint, $328,902.24 10CV1153SF: Wells Fargo Bank NA v. Barbara A. and Bob T. Earl, complaint, $107,444.93 Filed Oct. 22

10CV1154ST: Emily Ohern v. Roy Hill, complaint, $407,500 10CV1155AB: Anastasia K. Robinson v. Danise D. H. Lee, complaint, $145,000 10CV1156MA: Angela Lyons and Madilynn Lyons v. James Renwick, complaint, economic damages $38,885.65, noneconomic damages $140,000 Filed Oct. 25

10CV1159SF: Capital One Bank NA v. Melissa Johnson, complaint, $15,871.42 10CV1160ST: American Express Bank FSB v. Erika Stephens and Redmond Painting Inc., complaint, $11,708.67 10CV1161ST: Ray Klein Inc. dba Professional Credit Service v. Christina A. Service, complaint, $10,922.34 Filed Oct. 26

10CV1165AB: Deborah Jay v. Darlene Needham, complaint, $48,699.54 10CV1166MA: Mary Strong v. High Desert Realty Inc. dba Prudential High Desert Realty and Ruben Garmyn, complaint, $25,000 Filed Oct. 27

10CV1167ST: Security Credit Services LLC v. Jeff Wagnon aka Jeffery A. Wagnon aka Jeff A. Wagnon, complaint, $10,662.18 10CV1171SF: Jerry N. and Dorothy M. Hotson v. David G. and Susan Smythe, complaint, $125,929.70 Filed Oct. 28

10CV1172MA: Stephanie A. Utzman v. Kassie K. Johngard, complaint, $278,796.30 10CV1174ST: Discover Bank v. Cindy J. Crabtree, complaint, $10,734.40 10CV1176SF: DMK Golf Design Inc. v. RCM Homes Inc. and Randall C. Myers, complaint, $47,908.99 Filed Oct. 29

10CV1180AB: Cheryle True v. David M. Molinaro, complaint, $397,744.58

Hitler launches failed coup, ‘Beer-Hall Putsch,’ in 1923 The Associated Press Today is Monday, Nov. 8, the 312th day of 2010. There are 53 days left in the year.

The Associated Press

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Nov. 8, 1960, Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kennedy defeated Vice President Richard M. Nixon for the presidency.

Two men have been rescued from the Red Wall climbing area of Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne. KTVZ-TV reported 24year-old Ian Wallace Carlsen, of Puyllup, Wash., called 911 at about 6:45 p.m. Saturday to report he and 22-year-old Russell Scott Howard, of Gresham, were stranded. Both had been rappelling and had underestimated the amount of rope they needed to descend the wall. Carlsen was stranded about 250 feet from the bottom, and Howard was stranded about 200 feet from the bottom. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue members climbed to the top of the Red Wall and lowered two mountain rescue members over the edge. The stranded men were attached to the mountain rescue members and lowered the rest of the way to the bottom of the Red Wall. Neither was injured. The sheriff’s office said 18 members of the mountain rescue team responded to the incident, which took about seven hours to resolve.

ON THIS DATE In 1860, the Stephen Foster song “Old Black Joe” was copyrighted. In 1889, Montana became the 41st state. In 1909, the original Boston Opera House first opened with a performance of “La Gioconda” by Amilcare Ponchielli. In 1923, Adolf Hitler launched his first attempt at seizing power in Germany with a failed coup in Munich that came to be known as the “Beer-Hall Putsch.” In 1932, New York Gov. Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated incumbent Herbert Hoover for the presidency. In 1935, the movies “Mutiny on the Bounty,” starring Clark Gable and Charles Laughton, and “A Night at the Opera,” starring the Marx Brothers, premiered in New York. In 1942, Operation Torch, resulting in an Allied victory, began during World War II as U.S. and British forces landed in French North Africa. In 1980, scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., announced that the U.S. space probe Voyager 1 had discovered a 15th moon orbiting

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y the planet Saturn. In 1988, Vice President George H.W. Bush won the presidential election, defeating Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis. In 1994, midterm elections resulted in Republicans winning a majority in the Senate while at the same time gaining control of the House for the first time in 40 years. TEN YEARS AGO A statewide recount began in Florida, which emerged as critical in deciding the winner of the 2000 presidential election. Earlier that day, Vice President Al Gore had telephoned Texas Gov. George W. Bush to concede, but called back about an hour later to retract his concession. Waco special counsel John Danforth released his final report absolving the government of wrongdoing in the 1993 siege at the Branch Davidian compound in Texas. FIVE YEARS AGO French President Jacques Chirac declared a 12-day state of emergency to halt France’s worst civil unrest in nearly four

decades. Gunmen assassinated a second lawyer in the Saddam Hussein trial in Baghdad. At Campbell County Comprehensive High School in Tennessee, Assistant Principal Kent Bruce was shot and killed and two other administrators seriously wounded. (Student Kenneth Bartley later pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and attempted murder, and was sentenced to 45 years in prison, with a chance for parole in 25.) Bartolo Colon won the American League Cy Young Award. ONE YEAR AGO The embattled president of Afghanistan, Hamid Karzai, pledged there would be no place for corrupt officials in his new administration, as demanded by the U.S. and its international partners. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Norman Lloyd is 96. Singer Patti Page is 83. CBS newsman Morley Safer is 79. Singeractress Bonnie Bramlett is 66. Singer Bonnie Raitt is 61. TV personality Mary Hart is 60. Former Playboy Enterprises Chairman and Chief Executive Christie He-

fner is 58. Actress Alfre Woodard is 58. Singer-songwriter Rickie Lee Jones is 56. Author Kazuo Ishiguro is 56. Rock musician Porl Thompson (The Cure) is 53. Singer-actor Leif Garrett is 49. Chef and TV personality Gordon Ramsay is 44. Actress Courtney Thorne-Smith is 43. Actress Parker Posey is 42. Rock musician Jimmy Chaney is 41. Actress Roxana Zal is 41. Singer Diana King is 40. Actor Gonzalo Menendez is 39. Actress Gretchen Mol is 37. Actor Matthew Rhys is 36. Actress Tara Reid is 35. Country singer Bucky Covington is 33. Actress Dania Ramirez is 31. Actress Azura Skye is 29. Actor Chris Rankin is 27. TV personality Jack Osbourne is 25. Actress Jessica Lowndes (TV: “90210”) is 22.

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “There’s nothing that makes you so aware of the improvisation of human existence as a song unfinished. Or an old address book.” — Carson McCullers, American author (1917-1967)

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 B3

O O  B Wind turbines tower over a tractor tilling farmland near Wasco in 2002. As Oregon has become a national leader in wind energy, an increasing number of projects has some residents concerned about the adverse health effects of turbine farms. The Associated Press ile photo

Bad vibes from wind farms Oregon has become a national leader in wind energy production, but not all residents are welcoming new projects with open arms By Richard Cockle The Oregonian

LA GRANDE — If there’s anything that worries Linda Bond, it’s the prospect of living in the shadow of hundreds of wind turbines with their noise and blinking lights. “I am really concerned about their proximity to the schools,” said Bond, a 59-year-old retired Oregon City teacher who now lives in Union, where a huge wind energy project is proposed. She attended one of several Oregon Public Health “listening sessions” this week in Eastern Oregon. “There will be some people adversely affected,” she said. Bond isn’t alone in her nervousness. For scores of residents, the luster of renewable green energy has all but disappeared behind an unwelcome march of gigantic, rolled-steel wind towers. Oregon is a national leader in wind energy production, ranking fourth behind Texas, Iowa and California — up from sixth place last year, according to the American Wind Energy Association in Washington, D.C.

Half a million homes The state boasts more than 1,200 wind turbines on more than a dozen wind farms across Central and Eastern Oregon, and it produces 2,095 megawatts of wind capacity, enough to power 500,000 homes. At listening sessions in La Grande and Pendleton, the conversation often turned on fears that wind energy projects degrade human health, property values, scenic views and wildlife habitat. Bond’s adopted town of Union, with its frontier-era red-brick storefronts and gracious Queen

Anne and Victorian homes, could face a thicket of 182 wind turbines if the 300-megawatt Antelope Ridge Wind Power Project gets a go-ahead. Some of those wind towers, with their blades extended, will reach 520 feet into the sky, nearly equal to the height of Oregon’s tallest building, the Wells Fargo tower in Portland. Houston-based Horizon Wind Energy has proposed the $600 million project in a semicircle on 47,000 acres above and around Union, with towers as close as 11⁄2 miles to schools, homes and businesses.

Unhealthy roar Many of the more than 60 people attending the La Grande meeting admitted they’re unsure what to expect, but they fear that the blinking lights on the towers and the low-frequency roar and whoosh-whoosh-whoosh of giant turbine blades would become an unhealthy and permanent fixture in their lives. “You can’t imagine the stress it’s caused,” said Dennis Wilkinson, of Cove, organizer of Friends of the Grande Ronde Valley, a political action group that opposes the Antelope Ridge project. He attended the Pendleton listening session, which drew about 30 people. Due largely to his group’s efforts, Union County voters formally opposed construction of Antelope Ridge by a slim 52 to 48 percent vote in Tuesday’s general election. The nonbinding advisory vote capped months of controversy. The Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council is evaluating Antelope Ridge. Nationally, the third quarter of 2010 was the slowest since 2007 for the U.S. wind energy industry — down 72 percent since last

year and a third the rate of China’s wind energy installation, according to the American Wind Energy Association. Enthusiasm for wind energy projects by rural Eastern Oregonians who must live with the turbines has waned since the 1998 completion of the Vansycle Ridge Wind Farm Oregon’s first wind project, in Umatilla County.

Project blocked in ’07 In 2007, organized resistance helped block the proposed 40turbine Massachusetts-based First Wind project between The Dalles and Mosier. The following year, a group called the Blue Mountain Alliance set out to ban turbines on the western face of the Blue Mountains in Umatilla County. Near Boardman, opposition to the 2-year-old Willow Creek Wind Energy Project has proved bitter. Nearby homeowners, at the meeting in Pendleton, said the towers’ noise and proximity to their homes disrupts their lives. One, builder Dan Williams, complained of panic attacks, lost sleep and fractures to family relationships caused by stress. “I don’t want to see what’s happened to our community ever happen to anybody else,” he told members of the state health panel and siting council Chairman W. Bryan Wolfe, of Hermiston, who attended the session. The study of the effects of wind turbines on human health is an emerging and much-debated science whose leader arguably is Dr. Nina Pierpont, of Malone, N.Y. Pierpont coined the phrase “wind-turbine syndrome.” She says low-frequency noise and vibrations from wind turbines can affect the inner ear, triggering a variety of symptoms ranging

from headaches and difficulty sleeping to learning and mood disorders, irritability and panic attacks. Her research suggests wind turbines should never be built nearer than two miles from homes. Jae Douglas, Oregon Public Health’s moderator, said the most frequent wind farm concern she’s heard is about stress. Her office is charged with writing an assessment of any health impacts from turbines for consideration by the siting council, Oregon Department of Energy and county commissions — agencies that make the decisions on wind energy projects. A draft will come in March and the final assessment in June, Douglas said.

Man charged with DUII in head-on crash PORTLAND — Police say an 18-year-old Canby man was driving under the influence when he crashed his 1994 Jeep Cherokee head-on with another vehicle, sending the driver of that car to the hospital. The Marion County Sheriff’s Office said Ian L. Beyers has been charged with driving while under the influence and reckless driving. The 23-year-old Newburg woman in the car Beyers hit was airlifted to a Portland hospital. Her condition wasn’t immediately known. Beyers and a passenger were uninjured.

Tree farmer blames damage on deer MEDFORD — It’s that time of year, when the weather turns crisp, the holidays approach and an Oregon Christmas tree farmer’s thoughts turn to — deer? Larry Ryerson with the UCut Christmas Tree Farm in Medford estimates that deer have damaged about 1,000 of the farm’s 10,000 trees. Ryerson told KDRV this is

the time of year that “the deer get into them with their antlers and just rip on them, and it’s kind of upsetting.”

Hackers chat for 26 hours on town’s dime COOS BAY — The city of Coos Bay has learned that hackers accessed the City Hall phone system and racked up more than 26 hours of phone calls to an overseas location last month. The city just found out about the breach two weeks ago. Police say an investigation showed the city’s previous security systems were inadequate but they have since been reinforced. — From wire reports

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B4 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Bend puts price on transparency

W

e’d have a hard time putting a price on government openness, but the city of Bend has no such scruples. As of last Wednesday, the going rate was

$136,328.25.

A group of local hotels will pay this sum to settle a dispute over back taxes. The disagreement involves a now-defunct provision in city code intended to support hotels that include breakfast with the price of a room. The hotels were allowed to exempt a portion of their customers’ bills from Bend’s room tax, the argument being that the tax is supposed to apply to lodging, not food. Earlier this year, a city audit determined that the hotels had misused the tax break and, as a result, owed $340,000 in back taxes. It seems the hotels in many cases had applied the tax to the full room bills, then sent the city a portion of the proceeds. Basically, the hotels charged the full tax, then paid the city as if they’d charged a reduced tax. The hotel operators argued that they’d used the tax break as intended, the city disagreed, and a bitter and drawn-out struggle ensued. As we’ve argued before, we don’t think the hoteliers owe Bend anything. If the operators treated anyone badly, it was their customers, not the city, which had agreed to forego the money anyway. Instead of making customers whole, the city’s concept of justice simply profits the city. Nevertheless, the City Council approved a settlement on Wednesday. The hotels will pay a portion of the money the city believes they owe: just over $136,000. And the city will pocket the money ... and shut up about it. The settlement reads, in part: “If public comment on this agreement is required by the media, Operator or the City in its official capacity will simply state the terms of the agreement in general language and that the parties have in good faith worked together to resolve their dispute. Both parties recognize that the settlement agreement itself and other related City records may be subject to public disclosure in the event of a public records request.” Where did the silence requirement originate? City Manager Eric King says the hoteliers wanted it. To this claim, attorney Neil Bryant, who represents the hotel operators, responded, “Really?” The gag provision, he says, “was a mutual understanding and a request that if we reached a settlement that the agreement and what went into it would speak for itself, and that would be our public comment as well as our press release.” In any case, five of the city’s seven councilors agreed to vote for the settlement, in effect consigning themselves voluntarily to silence. But what about the dissenters, Jim Clinton and Jodie Barram? Do they have to shut up, too? According to City Attorney Mary Winters, “the city councilors repre-

When government entities shut out the public, as the city has attempted to do here, they encourage taxpayers to assume they’re hiding something. Clinton says that silence provision isn’t intended to sweep anything nefarious under the rug. sent the city as a whole, and the settlement agreement we entered into is binding on the city.” Though she says she has only so much control over councilors, “when we have a settlement agreement, my expectation is that they respect the process.” In other words, the settlement agreement isn’t exactly a gag order for Clinton and Barram. It’s more of a very strong gag request. To his credit, Clinton maintains that the gag requirement “doesn’t apply to me at all,” as he didn’t agree to the settlement. Moreover, he says, “citizens have a right to know why something was done.” He’s right. When government entities shut out the public, as the city has attempted to do here, they encourage taxpayers to assume they’re hiding something. Clinton says that silence provision isn’t intended to sweep anything nefarious under the rug. Instead, it recognizes that this is “a potentially contentious case,” and that “neither side wants to read in the paper the nasty comments one side is making about the other. Each group has a different version of the facts, and they definitely have a different interpretation of the facts.” That’s not a particularly persuasive argument for silence, either. The two sides have argued publicly in the past, and at worst they’ll simply carry on an argument with which we’re all familiar. What’s so horrible about that? We’re not sure which is worse: a gag requirement that hides something damaging, or one that hides nothing at all. Still, Clinton’s willingness to talk about the forbidden subject should alleviate some of the public’s understandable concerns. It’s a little ironic that a dissenting councilor has helped to save his colleagues from the worst consequences of their secretiveness: absolute distrust. In the end, it seems to us that the settlement agreement will benefit one group in particular. It provides an easy “out” for city councilors who might be asked by their constituents to justify other aspects of the settlement. How convenient.

My Nickel’s Worth Mosque response In response to John Poe’s Oct. 30 In My View, “Americans should defend Muslim project near ground zero”: If a building is damaged as the result of a terrorist attack (jet engine hit), then it can reasonably be argued to be ground zero. As to what the project is supposed to be, we only have the word of the person proposing. Most people do not consider the actions of one person “raised” as a Catholic the same as the actions of a dozen practicing Muslims with obvious support of a network of practicing Muslims. As to the First Amendment, which he accurately quotes, Congress has no say in this controversy. This is in New York’s court. Lastly, no one wishes to persecute or use the government to prevent the placing of this project, which the builder originally named Cordoba (after the mosque dedicated to victory over Christian Spain), but we do question and have the right to voice our concerns over the appropriateness. Jeffrey Bender Redmond

Shelter vandals The Tumalo Langlauf Club’s volunteers, supplemented by Bend Nordic, spent a great deal of time the past few weeks working at the Meissner shelter site. The team built a firewood shelter, worked to split wood to fill the shelter, and dressed up the base with a nice fence and sign post. Then, thoughtless miscreants trashed the shelter last weekend and burned up a significant amount of the winter firewood. Meiss-

ner is a local favorite with cross-country skiers, and we share with our fellow lovers of the outdoors sadness over the actions of these scofflaws. Lloyd Vordenberg Bend

Road safety A few short weeks ago, there was a tragic accident at the intersection of Reed Lane and the Bend Parkway. A human life was cut short, and now more people’s lives are affected, and nothing realistic is being considered to alleviate a hideous error in the design of that crossing. I wrote to ODOT and suggested an interim solution that could conceivably be put into effect in a short period of time and for a cost that could be tolerated. All I received was a reply (which I requested) containing a political paragraph of excuses suggesting how many state, county and city organizations will have to be contacted to approve an acceptable solution. They have cut down a few bushes. Hooray. Now we are faced with another potential hazard. ODOT has mandated that studded tires will still be restricted to a Nov. 1 installation date. How many of us were out on the streets on a recent Monday evening? Many of the streets in Bend were a slippery slope. Why, based upon this situation, and the occurrence of the same weather pattern last year, can’t ODOT relax its antiquated rules and allow a few days grace for the good and safety of the public, particularly those who may be forced to venture onto dangerous roads in order to service all of our citizens?

However, ODOT is now dictating the rules and regulations relating to the installations of studded tires, complete with the photograph in the Oct. 27 Bulletin. Where does this state department draw the line? Ronald Ira Ruby Bend

Dangerous crossing On Oct. 27, I witnessed firsthand the problem with the crosswalks on the Bend Parkway, and it scared the heck out of me. Near Walmart, two teenagers wanted to cross, and the lead cars in both lanes stopped for them. Several cars back, where I was, we were hard on the brakes trying to slow from 45 mph plus. I immediately looked in my rear-view mirror to see if I was going to be rear-ended. It appeared the Nissan behind me would not send me to the hospital, but the semi in the other lane had to swerve into the bike lane and most likely would have gone off the road completely had he not gotten his rig stopped. It was very nerve-racking, and the teens just laughed when I honked in frustration. One person has already been killed in a crosswalk on the Bend Parkway. What is it going to take to make a change to this flawed design? How many accidents and near-misses like mine is it going to take to change it? Motorists, in the meantime, think about the chaos you’re causing behind you before you stop for someone waiting to cross! They can wait 10 or 30 seconds for a break in the traffic! Brad Cockman Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Why Democrats fared so badly in Midwestern states I DAVID f Balzac were alive today, he would plant himself in that region of America that starts in central New York and Pennsylvania and then stretches out through Ohio and Indiana before spreading out to include Wisconsin and Arkansas. He’d plant himself in the working-class families in this area. He’d do it because this is the beating center of American life — the place where the trajectory of American politics is being determined. If America can figure out how to build a decent future for the working-class people in this region, then the U.S. will remain a predominant power. If it can’t, it won’t. It would take a Balzac to understand the perplexities and contradictions one finds in these neighborhoods. On the one hand, people are living with the daily grind of getting by on $40,000 a year, but they’re also living with Xboxes and smart phones. People in these places have traditional bourgeois values, but they live amid a decaying social fabric, with high divorce rates and skyrocketing single-parenthood numbers. Many people in these neighborhoods distrust government but still look to it

for help. They disdain Wall Street but admire capitalism. They are intensely patriotic but accustomed to globalization. If you talk to people on the coasts about the ’60s, they often think of Woodstock. If you ask people in this region about the ’60s, they might remember the last time there were plenty of good jobs instead. The Midwest has lost a manufacturing empire but hasn’t yet found another role. Working-class people in this region overwhelmingly backed George W. Bush in 2000 and 2004 but then lost faith in the Republican Party’s ability to solve their problems. By 2008, they were willing to take a flier on Barack Obama. He carried Ohio, Indiana and Iowa. Over the past two years, these voters have watched government radically increase spending in an attempt to put people back to work. According to the Office of Management and Budget, federal spending increased from about 21 percent of GDP in 2008 to nearly 26 percent of GDP this year. There was an $800 billion stimulus package, along with auto bailouts aimed directly at the Midwest. Economists are debating the effects

BROOKS

of all this, but voters have reached a verdict. According to exit polls on Tuesday, two-thirds of the Americans who voted said that the stimulus package was either harmful to the American economy or made no difference whatsoever. Between June and August of 2009, the working class became disillusioned with Democratic policies. Workingclass voters used to move toward the Democrats in recessions; this time, they moved to the right, shifting attitudes on everything from global warming to gun control. In Tuesday’s exit polls, 56 percent of voters said government does too much, while only 38 percent said it should do more. On Tuesday, the Democrats got destroyed in this region. They lost five House seats in Pennsylvania and another five in Ohio. They lost governorships in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wis-

consin and Iowa. Republicans gained control of both state legislative houses in Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Indiana and Minnesota. As Ronald Brownstein of the National Journal noted, “The stampede toward the GOP among blue collar whites was powerful almost everywhere.” Republicans captured at least 35 seats in the U.S. House in districts where the percentage of whites with college degrees lags behind the national average. The old industry towns in the Midwest were the epicenter of the disaster. Some Democrats believe their policies have nothing to do with the debacle. It was the unemployment rate, they say. But it was Democratic economic policies that first repelled these voters. There’s been a sharp rise in the number of voters who think the Democrats are “too liberal.” Signature policy initiatives like health care remain gigantically unpopular. Republicans didn’t score gains everywhere unemployment was high (see California, for example). But they did score gains nearly everywhere where disapproval of President Obama and his policies was high. When the successful Democratic Sen-

ate candidate in West Virginia takes a rifle and literally blows a hole in one of your major legislative accomplishments in a campaign commercial, that is a sign that the voters are unhappy with your policies, not just the economy. Democrats have, at least temporarily, blown the opportunity they were given to connect with the industrial Midwest. Voters in this region face structural problems, not cyclical ones. Intensely suspicious of government, they are nonetheless casting about for somebody, anybody, who can revive their towns and neighborhoods. Disillusioned with big spending and big debt, they at least want to see their government reflect their values of discipline, order and responsibility. Not only in America, but also in Germany, Sweden, France, Britain and across Europe, working-class voters these days are putting centerright governments in power. American politics are volatile because nobody has an answer for these people. They will remain volatile until somebody finds one.

David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 B5

Sisters

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Jon King, 53, of Corvallis, second from left, encourages a group of kids as they create pieces of clay art of their own, at the kids’ clay area, part of the Wildfire Pottery Showcase at Highland Elementary School in Bend.

Clay Continued from B1 Marcia Hudson, of Redmond, displayed her handmade birdhouses at her booth, along with her teapots and bowls. Being able to show her work locally has been valuable, she said. “I get to know the people that take home a piece of work,” she said. “They call me later when they need a gift, and you have a continuing relationship with them.” Patrice Merwin and her friend Shirley Manca, both of Prineville, drive to the show every year. “There is so much talent and creativity in here,” Merwin said. The two ladies were stopped at Corrine Vegter’s booth. Much of Vegter’s art was inspired after she drove cross-country in a camper van, working to sell her pieces. She had several vintage travel trailers made out of clay that lit up inside. Manca spotted a magnet with a pink, silver and white 1953-style travel trailer on it. “I had one like this we used for deer hunting every year,” she said. The women spotted a mug that

Time Continued from B1 The class is graded, and attendance is required. “We’re telling kids, ‘We’re not going to give up on you, even if you’ve given up on yourself,’” Baker said. “We’re going to hammer away at successful strategies.” In Christie McCormick’s classroom, Storm Time is no joke. A group of tutors and mentors was on hand to help the freshmen in McCormick’s class.

Older students help out underclassmen Taylor Withers, a 16-year-old junior, serves as a National Honor Society peer tutor during two Storm Time periods each week. “Some kids need help, and if I can help them pass their classes, that’s good,” Taylor said. Taylor usually works with Kent Callister, a 14-year-old freshman. “We check his grades to see if he’s missing any assignments,” she said. “Sometimes we just focus on one class.” Kent said he appreciated the help. “It just makes things easier,” he said. Taylor said she doesn’t often have a lot of homework she needs to finish during the school day, so she’s glad to help out. “It’s nice to be productive,” she said. Students from LINK Crew also help freshmen; the juniors and seniors who work the freshman orientation come through freshman Storm Time sessions every other Friday to check on their students and offer advice and help. “We ask them how they’re doing in their classes, if they’re going to dances,” Mel Hopkins, 16, said. “We encourage them to get involved.” Rachael Maguire, 16, said

Visitors and artists mingle through a variety of booths filled with pottery at the 2010 Wildfire Pottery Showcase in the Highland Elementary School gymnasium in Bend.

Continued from B1 Weed, Holzman and Asson have all criticized the decision because of what they worry was a flawed process. Economic Development for Central Oregon searched for a director, recommending Mac Hay for the position. But EDCO declined to reveal details of the search. In a 4-1 vote, the council approved Hay’s contract, and only Weed dissented. The city’s attorney has said the process was legal. But it would seem that the three newly elected councilors don’t plan on stirring up the issue. All three expect Hay to remain in the position. Weed, for instance, said she hopes the issues are resolved, and anyone with questions about the process — like who the other finalists were — will be satisfied by year’s end. “I still think there are some questions that need answering before it dies down,” Weed said. “But I’m willing to move on as long as nothing illegal happened.” Hay recently described his goals to the council, and Holzman attended the meeting. She was encouraged by Hay’s approach and believes it will involve talking frequently to the community. That’s something Holzman pushed for in general during her campaign. “I think that’s really going to be a big thing,” Holzman said. “We have to look at different perspectives.” In Sisters, councilors elect the mayor, and one of the first things the council will do is make that decision. It appears likely, according to Asson, that the decision will come down to choosing between Weed and Kellstrom. “I do suspect there will be a little bit of difficulty appointing the new mayor,” Asson said. Despite that possibility, Asson and others are hoping for a

smooth two-year session. Holzman, for her part, wants the council to take a new shape, one less divided than the current City Council. With a newly formed council, she believes that can happen. “I hope there can be a lot of open and good discussions, and that people can come into things without being really set,” Holzman said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

“I get to know the people that take home a piece of work. They call me later when they need a gift, and you have a continuing relationship with them.” — Marcia Hudson, Redmond artist had a Volkswagen van similar to the one their friend in Santa Cruz had for about 30 years. He called it Rosebud. “This is so cool,” Merwin said. Rosalind O’Donoghue, of Redmond, was at the show to get an early jump on her Christmas shopping.

she thinks the LINK students help the freshmen feel more comfortable. “We know Summit really well,” she said. “And they get to know us, so they have an upperclassman who is a friend.” Teacher Dave Turnbull’s Storm Time is of similar rigor. Turnbull’s students must look over their grades with him every Friday. He keeps track of grade improvements and slips. “I hold them accountable,” he said. Baker said research has shown students forced to track their progress in school improve their grades. Turnbull agreed, pointing to sports psychology. “Humans have a need to improve,” he said. “But when they’re not held accountable, it’s easy to fall into that trap of coasting.” With Turnbull looking over their shoulders, students are less likely to slip. He’s not afraid to track a kid down, either. Recently, he found a student from his Storm Time hiding in the bathroom, standing on the toilet. “Over time, they realize it’s not worth it to try to hide from it,” Turnbull said. When the school offered tutorials before school, about 10 percent of students participated. Turnbull said he only had students come in before a big test. “By that point it was too late,” Turnbull said. Now they’re all getting more of the help they need.

Cougar Seminar at Mountain View The new program isn’t just in place at Summit High. Mountain View High School started a Cougar Seminar in which students earn a half-credit for work in the class. Principal Katie Legace said students are divided according to grade level, and those who need additional help with math, reading or writing are divided into

“I look for creative gifts,” she said. But she was at the show for herself, too. “I’m enjoying the heck out of this,” she said. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

classes devoted to those. Other seminars focus on college readiness standards like writing; there are seminars on expository writing, scientific inquiry, and speech and debate. Juniors and seniors can choose the seminars they want to participate in, as long as they don’t need help in math, writing or reading. They’re also able to take seminars in advanced placement classes or on higher-level math classes. “It depends on what the student needs help with,” Legace said.

A Magazine Highlighting The Variety Of Organizations That Connect Your Community.

Publishing Sunday, December 12, 2010 in The Bulletin

30 minutes of extra learning at Bend High The time is used slightly differently at Bend High, where Principal H.D. Weddel said a 30-minute period is designated in each class at least once each week for special help or extended learning. “We kept kids in the same class, so they had the same teacher, and we feel the advantage of that is with intervention and enrichment the specific teacher can work with them,” he said. “If they didn’t get a concept, they have some time to work with that. If they got it and they need to be more challenged, that’s a time they can work on that. And that teacher knows exactly what that kid needs.” Each day, one block meets for a longer period of time, and students will have that designated 30 minutes in each class at least once each week. Weddel said he’s not ready to say just yet whether it’s making a big difference for students. “I think everyone agrees to the concept of it,” he said. “But I still think we need time.” He expects to start collecting data and begin evaluating the program after the first semester is finished. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Central Oregon communities continue to grow due to a nationally-recognized appreciation for the region’s quality of life. From providing the most basic needs of food, shelter and security, to creating and maintaining positive social, educational, recreational and professional environments, Central Oregon’s nonprofit community is a foundation for our area’s success and sustainability. Hundreds of organizations and thousands of volunteers make up this nonprofit network. Through the publication of Connections, The Bulletin will both define and profile the organizations that make up this network. Connections will provide readers with a thorough look at nonprofit organizations in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook Counties.

Advertising space reservation deadline is Wednesday, November 24, 2010 CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE TODAY.

ATTENTION CENTRAL OREGON NONPROFIT GROUPS The Bulletin is in the process of verifying and compiling a comprehensive list of nonprofit entities in Central Oregon. Please fill out this form to verify information in order to be considered for publication in Connections. Mail back to: The Bulletin, Attn: Nicole Werner, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. E-mail information to nwerner@bendbulletin.com or call 541-382-1811 ext. 871

Name of Nonprofit Group ____________________________________________________ Contact Person ____________________________________________________________ Phone __________________ E-mail ___________________________________________ Nonprofit Mission Statement/Purpose___________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

________________________________________________________________________


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, NOVEMBER 8

TUESDAY

Today: Partly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

45

19

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

46/30

46/29

53/29

32/27

Mitchell

Madras

48/1

46/24

Camp Sherman 40/16 Redmond Prineville 45/19 Cascadia 47/25 44/30 Sisters 43/18 Bend Post  45/19

Oakridge Elk Lake 42/28

42/-4

42/-5

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

41/-6

40/-4

Fort Rock

Vancouver 50/43

Seattle

Chemult

Bend

40/27

Boise

45/19

49/29





Idaho Falls Elko

57/37

43/24

42/21

Reno



40/22

44/28



Helena

44/18

Silver Lake

41/-7

Missoula

Redding Christmas Valley

Chance of rain and snow showers today. Slight chance of snow tonight.

Crater Lake 31/20

48/25

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:51 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:46 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:53 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:45 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:51 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:43 p.m.

Salt Lake City

59/46

49/33



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases First

Full

Last

New

Nov. 13 Nov. 21 Nov. 28 Dec. 5

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 56/44/0.82 . . . . . 50/41/sh. . . . . . 51/44/sh Baker City . . . . . . 58/37/0.29 . . . . . .44/26/rs. . . . . . 43/31/rs Brookings . . . . . . 52/47/2.85 . . . . . 50/43/sh. . . . . . 49/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 49/39/0.36 . . . . . 42/27/pc. . . . . . 43/30/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 56/48/0.87 . . . . . 47/37/sh. . . . . . 49/41/sh Klamath Falls . . . 52/38/0.48 . . . . . . 45/26/c. . . . . . 41/31/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . .NA/43/NA . . . . . . 40/24/c. . . . . . 39/30/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 48/36/0.00 . . . . . . 43/-5/rs. . . . . . 43/22/rs Medford . . . . . . . 53/47/0.65 . . . . . . 47/35/c. . . . . . 47/39/sh Newport . . . . . . . 57/45/0.85 . . . . . 50/43/sh. . . . . . 52/46/sh North Bend . . . . . 57/46/0.21 . . . . . 53/40/sh. . . . . . 51/38/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 50/39/0.25 . . . . . . 52/31/c. . . . . . 49/33/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 55/46/0.37 . . . . . 56/31/pc. . . . . . 48/33/rs Portland . . . . . . . 58/49/0.69 . . . . . 47/43/sh. . . . . . . 47/44/r Prineville . . . . . . . 56/40/0.02 . . . . . 47/25/pc. . . . . . 46/27/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 58/41/0.01 . . . . . 44/20/pc. . . . . . 44/26/rs Roseburg. . . . . . . 54/48/0.78 . . . . . 49/38/sh. . . . . . 49/40/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 58/48/1.05 . . . . . 49/37/sh. . . . . . 50/42/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 52/40/0.00 . . . . . 43/18/sh. . . . . . 45/22/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 59/51/0.12 . . . . . . 52/32/c. . . . . . 47/28/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52/41 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.03” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .71 in 1949 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 in 1971 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.27” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.49” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.76” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.90 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.29 in 1980 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .8:13 a.m. . . . . . .5:16 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:29 a.m. . . . . . .3:40 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:49 a.m. . . . . . .5:48 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:40 p.m. . . . . . .2:18 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:48 a.m. . . . . . .3:31 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:44 p.m. . . . . . .2:37 a.m.

1

LOW

49 26

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

48 26

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

49/39

44/-3

36/-11

Calgary 41/23

Eugene Chance of rain and snow 47/37 showers today. Slight Pass chance of snow tonight. Grants 46/35 Eastern

43/17

43/-5

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 63° Joseph • 34° Joseph

FRIDAY Partly cloudy.

46 23

BEND ALMANAC

47/43

Burns

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

LOW

44 33

NORTHWEST

43/-4

La Pine

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, chance rain.

Rain and higher elevation snow will fall from western Washington into western Oregon today.

Paulina

43/-3

Sunriver

33/-13

Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Showers possible tonight. Central

47/25

48/26

41/26



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Cloudy, rain likely.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, cold.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . no report . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . no report . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . no report . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . no report . . . no report

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . no report Mammoth Mtn., Calif.. . no report Park City, Utah . . . . . . . no report Squaw Valley, Calif. . . . . no report Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . no report Taos, New Mexico . . . . . no report Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . no report

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 50/43

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 41/23

S

Saskatoon 43/28

Seattle 49/39

Gila Bend, Ariz.

• 15° Atlanta, Mich.

• 2.85” Brookings, Ore.

Cheyenne 63/34 Denver 74/36 Albuquerque 68/41

Los Angeles 67/51 Phoenix 80/55

Oklahoma City 76/50

Houston 75/61

Chihuahua 78/41

Juneau 39/27

S

S

S S

Quebec 41/34

To ronto 52/34

Green Bay 56/38

Des Moines 68/45 Omaha 73/46

Buffalo

Chicago 63/45

Boston 48/42

Halifax 57/50 Portland 47/44

50/34

New York 47/42 Philadelphia 53/40 Washington, D. C. 58/42

Columbus 63/38 Louisville 70/43

St. Louis 75/48

Charlotte 66/38 Nashville 70/39

Little Rock 74/47

Dallas 75/58

La Paz 91/63

S

Detroit 58/40

Kansas City 75/52

Tijuana 62/51

Anchorage 29/20

S

Thunder Bay 48/34

Rapid City 72/39

Salt Lake City San Francisco 49/33 59/46 Las Vegas 69/45

Honolulu 86/70

Winnipeg 55/36

St. Paul 62/43

Boise 49/29

• 88°

S

Bismarck 68/38

Billings 53/34

Portland 47/43

S

Birmingham 70/38

Atlanta 67/45

New Orleans 72/49

Orlando 72/50 Miami 77/63

Mazatlan 84/65

Monterrey 78/55

FRONTS

Coastal residents wary of planned mining operation The Associated Press BANDON — About 200 Oregon coast residents have organized to oppose a planned mining operation near Coos Bay. But the Australian-owned company undertaking the project says the mine will be environmentally safe and bring jobs to a region with a 13 percent unemployment rate. The Eugene Register-Guard reported that Oregon Resources Corp. is moving forward with construction of a $14 million plant, and negotiations with the county continue about expanding the site. The company wants to extract hard minerals such as chromite, zircon and garnet. “Chromite mining has every potential to be toxic,” said Cameron La Follette, land use director for the nonprofit Oregon

Coast Alliance. Residents near the proposed mining pit say the company would excavate about 170 acres, and they worry groundwater and fish would be at risk. The state, though, has approved the project. Officials have largely dismissed neighbors’ fears about pollution, noise and traffic, as is evidenced by the 17 permits the company has in hand, all that’s needed to begin mining as early as next year. Bill Mason, hydrogeologist with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, says the chances of any significant amount of hexavalent chromium getting into the groundwater are minimal. “There are a couple schools of thought,” he said. “One is you’re moving all the chromite, that’s the purpose, and the stuff you’re

putting back has less chromite in it. Isn’t that better? Maybe. You still have chromite in the ground, and if you change the system too much, you possibly increase (the concentration of) it.” Opponents have filed a federal lawsuit against the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and National Marine Service, charging that the agencies shouldn’t have granted Oregon Resources’ permits, and that they violated environmental laws in doing so. The company plans to mine 700,000 tons of ore per year, with as many as 67,000 truck trips, or one 24-ton truck every six to eight minutes. And then there’s the question of what the miners leave behind, opponents say, despite the company’s promise that trees will be replanted and streams returned to their original channels.

DEAL

DAY

of the Buy Any

Drink And Get The Second Drink FREE

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .75/49/0.00 . 76/53/pc . . . 81/50/s Akron . . . . . . . . .47/27/0.00 . . .56/35/s . . . 57/38/s Albany. . . . . . . . .46/31/0.00 . . .41/36/r . . 48/33/sh Albuquerque. . . .70/42/0.00 . . .68/41/s . . 58/32/pc Anchorage . . . . .32/29/0.00 . .29/20/sn . . . 29/26/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .58/30/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 73/48/s Atlantic City . . . .52/33/0.02 . 54/44/pc . . . 56/44/c Austin . . . . . . . . .75/32/0.00 . 76/54/pc . . 81/60/pc Baltimore . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . 57/42/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . .53/34/sh . . .43/26/rs Birmingham . . . .61/30/0.00 . . .70/38/s . . . 74/42/s Bismarck . . . . . . .67/34/0.00 . 68/38/pc . . 51/32/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .64/51/0.35 . .49/29/sh . . 47/32/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . . .48/42/r . . 52/43/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .51/37/0.00 . . .43/39/r . . 53/42/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .46/28/0.00 . . .50/34/s . . . 49/39/s Burlington, VT. . .40/32/0.00 . . .43/37/r . . 45/33/sh Caribou, ME . . . .37/31/0.01 . . .41/37/r . . 46/30/pc Charleston, SC . .57/37/0.00 . . .67/45/s . . . 73/49/s Charlotte. . . . . . .54/26/0.00 . . .66/38/s . . . 72/39/s Chattanooga. . . .58/30/0.00 . . .66/37/s . . . 72/40/s Cheyenne . . . . . .67/41/0.00 . 63/34/pc . . . 43/27/c Chicago. . . . . . . .59/35/0.00 . . .63/45/s . . . 66/48/s Cincinnati . . . . . .56/22/0.00 . . .66/37/s . . . 67/40/s Cleveland . . . . . .50/31/0.00 . . .55/38/s . . . 56/41/s Colorado Springs 72/41/0.00 . 73/37/pc . . .49/23/rs Columbia, MO . .72/37/0.00 . . .73/47/s . . . 73/53/s Columbia, SC . . .58/31/0.00 . . .68/39/s . . . 74/42/s Columbus, GA. . .62/33/0.00 . . .70/43/s . . . 77/45/s Columbus, OH. . .51/26/0.00 . . .63/38/s . . . 63/41/s Concord, NH . . . .43/28/0.00 . . .40/36/r . . 49/30/sh Corpus Christi. . .76/53/0.00 . 79/62/pc . . 83/65/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .71/40/0.00 . . .75/58/s . . 79/61/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .52/26/0.00 . . .65/38/s . . . 65/42/s Denver. . . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . 74/36/pc . . .45/29/rs Des Moines. . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . . 68/47/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .53/27/0.00 . . .58/40/s . . . 58/42/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .53/30/0.00 . . .52/38/s . . 52/42/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .79/45/0.00 . . .78/48/s . . . 71/41/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .16/13/0.03 . . . 15/-3/c . . . 10/4/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .62/30/0.00 . 60/41/pc . . 58/43/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .58/27/0.00 . 51/25/pc . . 46/24/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .57/31/0.00 . . .62/40/s . . 62/41/pc Green Bay. . . . . .53/35/0.00 . . .56/38/s . . . 58/42/s Greensboro. . . . .52/30/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . . 70/38/s Harrisburg. . . . . .48/30/0.00 . 54/39/pc . . 55/40/pc Hartford, CT . . . .50/37/0.00 . . .42/37/r . . 52/40/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .68/35/0.00 . . 40/27/rs . . . 38/21/c Honolulu . . . . . . .85/74/0.00 . . .86/70/s . . . 85/71/s Houston . . . . . . .71/40/0.00 . 75/61/pc . . 80/65/pc Huntsville . . . . . .60/30/0.00 . . .69/35/s . . . 72/39/s Indianapolis . . . .59/30/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 69/43/s Jackson, MS . . . .64/33/0.00 . . .73/44/s . . . 77/49/s Madison, WI . . . .58/37/0.00 . . .62/38/s . . . 64/42/s Jacksonville. . . . .62/37/0.00 . . .69/42/s . . . 75/47/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .43/35/0.00 . . 39/27/rs . . .38/28/rs Kansas City. . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .75/52/s . . 74/55/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .55/31/0.00 . . .61/39/s . . 61/39/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 69/45/pc . . . 62/43/s Lexington . . . . . .54/25/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 65/42/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/42/0.00 . . .76/44/s . . 72/50/pc Little Rock. . . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .74/47/s . . . 74/54/s Los Angeles. . . . .67/58/0.00 . 67/51/pc . . . 67/52/s Louisville . . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . . .70/43/s . . . 74/48/s Memphis. . . . . . .65/36/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . . 74/53/s Miami . . . . . . . . .75/53/0.00 . 77/63/pc . . . 80/63/s Milwaukee . . . . .58/35/0.00 . . .61/43/s . . . 60/46/s Minneapolis . . . .61/36/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . . 64/49/s Nashville . . . . . . .59/28/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . . 73/44/s New Orleans. . . .63/45/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . . 77/55/s New York . . . . . .51/36/0.00 . .47/42/sh . . 53/45/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .53/36/0.00 . .48/39/sh . . 56/43/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .52/44/0.00 . . .61/44/s . . 60/46/pc Oklahoma City . .73/41/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . . 74/47/s Omaha . . . . . . . .74/42/0.00 . . .73/46/s . . 72/46/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .69/49/0.00 . . .72/50/s . . . 76/51/s Palm Springs. . . .80/53/0.00 . 68/49/pc . . . 71/54/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .64/32/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . . 68/48/s Philadelphia . . . .51/34/0.00 . 53/40/pc . . . 56/44/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . . 75/50/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .45/26/0.00 . . .53/35/s . . . 57/38/s Portland, ME. . . .41/32/0.03 . . .47/44/r . . 51/37/sh Providence . . . . .46/39/0.00 . . .44/40/r . . 53/42/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .53/30/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 69/38/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .75/42/0.00 . 72/39/pc . . 46/31/sh Savannah . . . . . .60/32/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . . 74/47/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .55/47/0.01 . .48/25/sh . . 49/32/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .55/48/0.52 . .49/39/sh . . . .48/38/r Richmond . . . . . .54/33/0.00 . . .63/40/s . . 64/42/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .67/33/0.00 . . .69/44/s . . 66/38/pc Rochester, NY . . .43/26/0.00 . 49/37/pc . . 50/39/pc Spokane . . . . . . .49/45/0.39 . 43/31/pc . . . .42/31/r Sacramento. . . . .58/55/0.45 . 60/39/pc . . 60/47/pc Springfield, MO. .69/38/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . . 71/51/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .73/38/0.00 . . .75/48/s . . . 76/53/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . . .73/53/s . . . 77/57/s Salt Lake City . . .64/46/0.00 . .49/33/sh . . . 40/33/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .80/51/s . . . 71/45/s San Antonio . . . .74/38/0.00 . 75/55/pc . . 80/61/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . 76/56/pc San Diego . . . . . .70/58/0.00 . 64/55/pc . . . 66/56/s Washington, DC .53/36/0.00 . 58/42/pc . . 59/44/pc San Francisco . . .59/56/1.18 . 59/46/pc . . 60/51/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .75/44/0.00 . . .77/51/s . . 74/54/pc San Jose . . . . . . .60/57/0.15 . 64/43/pc . . 64/51/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .60/46/0.06 . 50/30/pc . . .45/28/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . .68/35/0.00 . 64/34/pc . . 51/26/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . 78/54/pc . . . 76/51/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .46/37/0.03 . . .43/37/c . . 44/38/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . . .73/61/c . . 72/60/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .67/55/s . . . 66/54/s Baghdad . . . . . . .81/43/0.00 . . .82/53/s . . . 81/50/s Bangkok . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 88/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . . .55/32/s . . 56/31/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .80/62/s . . . 82/63/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . . 42/37/rs . . 43/38/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .64/54/0.19 . .65/50/sh . . 66/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . .58/47/sh . . 61/46/sh Buenos Aires. . . .93/57/0.00 . . .60/49/r . . 73/45/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/61/0.00 . . .87/68/s . . . 88/66/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .80/61/s . . . 81/62/s Calgary . . . . . . . .63/25/0.00 . . .41/23/c . . . 39/19/s Cancun . . . . . . . 75/NA/0.20 . 80/61/pc . . 81/62/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.06 . . .47/42/r . . 48/39/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . . .46/41/r . . 45/38/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .55/41/0.30 . .46/38/sh . . . .49/42/r Harare . . . . . . . . .82/64/0.03 . . .84/66/s . . 87/65/sh Hong Kong . . . . .79/68/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . . 80/56/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . .69/55/c . . 70/56/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .73/56/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . 84/59/s Johannesburg . . .81/57/0.00 . . .79/63/s . . . .77/58/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 69/59/pc . . 70/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .62/56/sh . . 63/54/pc London . . . . . . . .48/41/0.00 . . .47/42/r . . 49/44/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . . .56/42/r . . 55/40/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .87/80/t . . . .88/76/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .100/75/0.00 . .102/80/s . . 103/77/s Mexico City. . . . .68/30/0.00 . . .70/41/s . . . 76/40/s Montreal. . . . . . .41/32/0.00 . . .43/36/c . . . 46/32/s Moscow . . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . . .40/34/c . . 50/39/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/61/0.03 . . .79/61/t . . . .78/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . 81/72/pc . . 82/73/pc New Delhi. . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .85/64/s . . . 86/65/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . 60/48/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .39/18/0.00 . 33/23/pc . . 34/22/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .39/25/0.00 . 43/28/pc . . . 48/29/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .48/39/0.84 . . .46/39/r . . 51/42/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .82/70/0.00 . . .79/70/s . . 84/72/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .64/55/r . . . .65/56/r Santiago . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . .65/46/r . . . 78/49/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .78/65/s . . 81/64/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .43/47/0.00 . . .50/44/r . . . .52/42/r Seoul . . . . . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . .49/36/sh . . . 48/35/s Shanghai. . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .63/50/s . . . 61/49/s Singapore . . . . . .88/75/1.01 . . .89/76/t . . . .90/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .37/19/0.00 . 37/27/pc . . .38/32/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 77/66/pc . . . 70/64/c Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/72/0.00 . .74/65/sh . . 71/64/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .82/62/s . . . 84/63/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . .67/55/sh . . 64/50/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .50/34/0.00 . . .52/34/s . . . 49/36/s Vancouver. . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .50/43/sh . . . .46/43/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . .47/43/sh . . 54/44/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .45/39/0.07 . . .45/39/r . . 54/47/sh

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G

C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

Trouble in paradise Disney Channel star Demi Lovato’s problems shatter illusions of teen TV stars, Page C3

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2010

In search of

Avoiding cell phone bill shock By Tim Doran The Bulletin

TECH FOCUS

SEEDS Northeast Bend facility, one of the major seed extractories in the West, seen as a ‘critical link’ to restoring landscapes By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

A

So many consumers have encountered unexpected charges on their cellular telephone bills that federal officials want companies to send alerts to customers before the fees start piling up. Last month, the Federal Communications Commission proposed creating new rules to avoid what the agency calls bill shock, which is how consumers react when they open a bill and find unexpected charges that do not stem from a change in service. In a statement on the agency’s website, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said one consumer received a $35,000 cell phone bill after visiting family in Haiti after the earthquake, although her provider said it would extend a courtesy plan to those affected. And a business executive was charged $2,000 extra while overseas despite buying an international plan. “The facts and data show that this happens all too often,” Genachowski said in the news release. As part of the effort, the FCC announced a settlement Oct. 28 with Verizon Wireless, which will refund at least $52.8 million to about 15 million customers who found unexplained data charges on their bills. Beginning in November 2007, some Verizon customers who did not subscribe to a data plan were charged $1.99 a minute for pay-as-you-go data fees, according to the FCC. See Cell / C6

cascade of pine cones poured into a big gray funnel at the Bend

Seed Extractory last month in a warehouse tucked behind the new Pine Nursery Park.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

ABOVE: Ponderosa pine seeds after they were shaken out of pine cones at the Bend Seed Extractory, but before being cleaned up and distributed for reforestation projects. TOP PHOTO: Ponderosa pine cones bounce along a device used to extract seeds at the facility in northeast Bend. This year, the Forest Service facility removed seeds from about 1,000 bushels of pine cones; some years that number reaches as high as 20,000 bushels. RIGHT: Jim Barner looks into a box, filled with packets of seeds, inside a cooler at the Bend Seed Extractory. The facility stores about 20,000 pounds of seeds from some 2,000 different species of plants.

The cones — from ponderosa pines in the Umatilla National Forest — fell through the funnel and onto a large, shaking conveyor belt, then bounced down the line. And as the pine cones bopped up and down on the conveyor, winged seed capsules shook free from the cones and fell through the slots, collected in a barrel below. National forests and Bureau of Land Management districts from across the Pacific Northwest send pine cones to the seed extractory every year, where workers remove, clean and sort seeds destined for reforestation projects. The facility also receives daily shipments of grasses, shrubs, berries and more from across the West, as part of an effort to collect and preserve the seeds of thousands of wild plants growing on federal lands. “It’s kind of a sleepy, quiet little place in some respects out there, but this is one of the major seed extractories, private or government, in the Western U.S.,” said John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor. “It’s a critical link to native restoration of our Western landscapes.” Native seeds collected at the facility grow into plants that help restore thousands of acres across the West, he said, in some cases improving the health of ecosystems that have been overrun with noxious or invasive plants. “The ability to put native plants back on the landscape, where they were missing before, really just enhances the ability of wildlife to use those plants,” Allen said. See Seeds / C6

SCIENCE

“The ability to put native plants back on the landscape, where they were missing before, really just enhances the ability of wildlife to use those plants.” — John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor

Laurie Skrivan / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Justin Leszcz refills two wading pools for his ducks last month at his backyard farm in Affton, Mo.

Urban farmer feeds chefs’ need for great produce By Evan S. Benn St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Two years ago, Justin Leszcz was making good money as a car salesman but yearned for a greener existence. He traded in his former life for his current one as an urban farmer, raising heritage-breed animals and selling heirloom produce that he and his wife grow in the backyard of their Affton, Mo., home. Their business, YellowTree Farm, comprises less than half an acre around their ranch-style house, plus a patch of land they recently began using in Waterloo. “I’m still a salesman, I guess. I’m just selling things that get me way more excited than cars,” Leszcz, 33, said with a laugh, adding, “I don’t even have a car anymore.” The former Bommarito Automotive Group employee doesn’t even have a truck to make deliveries. Instead, he borrows his wife’s car or gets rides from friends. When he’s not tending his crops and animals or researching the next seeds or hatchlings he’ll buy, Leszcz is often at the back doors of some of St. Louis’ best restaurants. Sometimes he shows up with the produce chefs have ordered; other times, he brings them something new with which to experiment. See Urban / C6

GREEN


T EL EV ISION

C2 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Should woman cover ‘As the World Turns’ stars: life after soap tattoo while at work?

Rome instead of Staten Island.’ You know, too bad.”

By Greg Evans

New York Times News Service

Dear Abby: I have a tattoo on my forearm. It’s my deceased son’s name, with angel’s wings and a halo. Because of where it’s placed on my arm, I wear long sleeves or three-quarter sleeves to work. If I feel it might “peek out,” I wear an Ace bandage over it. I am a bank branch manager, and I’m sometimes asked, “What happened to your arm?” when the bandage can be seen. I feel telling the person I have a tattoo defeats the whole purpose of keeping it covered, and I don’t want to lie. What is the proper response? — Tattooed Female Professional in Indiana Dear Professional: Does having a visible tattoo violate the dress code at your bank? So many people have body art that it’s no longer considered shocking. If no rule prevents it, I see no reason to hide it — and if you’re questioned about its significance, tell the truth. If there is a rule that discourages it and you are asked about the Ace bandage, just smile and say, “Thank you for your concern, but it’s nothing serious.” Dear Abby: For the past few years, my “Aunt Maude” has given birthday, holiday and graduation gifts she has picked up at yard sales. These “gifts” are neither usable nor are they age-appropriate. My sister “Hallie” is being married soon. We would like Aunt Maude to attend without feeling she needs to buy a used gift. Money is not an issue for her, but she thinks she is buying a personalized gift when, in fact, it’s something that will be discarded. Our family would rather she attend with no gift than a yard sale item. What’s the best way to handle this? — Blushing Bridesmaid Dear Blushing Bridesmaid: The subject of wedding gifts can be a sensitive one. To imply that someone’s gift is unacceptable would be extremely rude. However, a way to approach this might be for

DEAR ABBY Maude’s sibling to suggest to her that Hallie has already received more “things” than she can use, and that the most meaningful gift Maude could give her niece would be her presence at the celebration. Dear Abby: My boyfriend says all his friends think I am “stuck up.” He told me (loudly) that I come across as rude because I’m not outgoing enough. More than once, people have asked him what my deal is. I am quiet and reserved when I’m around new people, but once I’m comfortable, I do open up. I know I can sometimes come across as being unfriendly, but the way he presented it to me left me crushed. Shyness can be misperceived, and I try to be nice to everyone. I’m loyal to a fault and the first to offer help to friends, family and especially my boyfriend. While he had a valid point in what he said, I am now questioning the effect his approach has had on our relationship. Am I justified in feeling so hurt, or should I just suck it up? — Picked Apart in Utah Dear Picked Apart: Sometimes it’s not what someone says, but the way it is said that is hurtful. Because your boyfriend’s tone was loud and angry, it’s understandable that you felt attacked. If it happened in public rather than in private, he was tactless. But if you’re going to have a relationship with him, his friends will have to be a part of it. And rather than scolding you, he should have explained to them that you need time to get to know them. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

If people at the Knitting Factory recognized Jake Silbermann’s cornflower-blue eyes last month, they were too cool to let on. The handsome Silbermann, looking considerably more pulled together in a sport coat and sweater combo than most of the 20-somethings attending the Royal Flush film festival at this Brooklyn club, took questions from the small audience following a screening of his short film “Stuffer.” At 27 and just three years after quitting his telesales job to join the cast of the soap opera “As the World Turns,” Silbermann is known to millions (maybe not you, but millions nonetheless) as Noah Mayer. Paired with the equally photogenic Van Hansis, who played Luke Snyder, he was half of daytime television’s first same-sex super couple. Now Silbermann is out of a job, or at least the steady soap opera work that only a few of his former cast mates can currently lay claim to. On Sept. 17, after 54 years of backstabbing, bitchery and tune-in-tomorrows, “As the World Turns” followed its sister soap “Guiding Light” into an ever-expanding universe of defunct daytime melodrama. In 1990, an average daily soap viewership of 6.5 million could choose among 12 network serials. Today, according to a recent report in Advertising Age, average viewership hovers well below 1.5 million, with six soaps left on the air. When production at the “As the World Turns” studio in Brooklyn halted in June, New York was left with only one soap — “One Life to Live,” on ABC — and hundreds of actors plotting their next real-life story lines. “It’s the loss of a creative environment as much as a

Pay cut

Piotr Redlinski / New York Times News Service

Jake Silbermann, left, who played Noah Mayer in “As the World Turns,” sits with his mother, Ellen, at the screening of his short film “Stuffer” in New York, on Oct. 17. Silbermann’s film, directed by Nathan Crooker, won the jury prize for best short film at the Royal Flush film festival last month. loss of paychecks,” said Trent Dawson, whose hapless, occasionally cross-dressing Henry Coleman gave “As the World Turns” some comic relief and the actor a schedule that allowed him to moonlight at the Baltimore Centerstage theater. Dawson, 39, is currently appearing in Vaclav Havel’s “Memorandum” at the Beckett Theater, Off Broadway. In addition to dozens of regular cast members, “As the World Turns” at times hired as many as 50 extras and day players per week, said Christopher Goutman, the last executive producer of the show. New York, he said, “will have a lot more actors waiting tables.”

In interviews with actors who brought life to the soap’s fictional Oakdale, few said they were caught off guard by the show’s demise. Silbermann said he sensed a certain end-time mood almost immediately after joining the show in 2007. Veteran cast members, he recalled, “would say, ‘Oh, man, if only you were here years ago, when location shoots meant going to

“You go from making basically $400 an hour to $400 a week,” said Michael Park, 42, the “As the World Turns” star who won a 2010 Daytime Emmy Award for his portrayal of the good-guy cop Jack Snyder, “and you pray that there’s something else down the line.” Park is now appearing Off Broadway in “Middletown” at the Vineyard Theater, in his third stage production since the soap ended. So far three of Park’s former colleagues (Maura West, Daniel Cosgrove and Terri Colombino) have found full-time soap work, and of those only Colombino has managed to stay in New York. (She begins on “One Life to Live” on Nov. 29.) She said she took a pay cut in her move from the fictional burgs of Oakdale to Llanview. “As the World Turns” star Eileen Fulton, 77, dismissed talk of retirement with a succinct “You die.” “Just show me the script,” Fulton said. “I’ll travel.” She’d even consider another soap role, though nothing permanent. “I want to do movies, too. Character parts. I’ve got all kinds of wigs.”

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 11/8/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

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6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Rudy Maxa This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Dancing With the Stars The remaining couples perform. ’ ‘PG’ Å Matt Lauer Reports (N) Å The Event I Know Who You Are ‘14’ How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Dancing With the Stars The remaining couples perform. ’ ‘PG’ Å House Office Politics (N) ‘14’ Å Lie to Me The Canary’s Song ’ ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow Mobile, AL ‘G’ American Experience ’ ‘PG’ Matt Lauer Reports (N) Å The Event I Know Who You Are ‘14’ 90210 Mother Dearest (N) ‘14’ Å Gossip Girl (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Moment-Luxury Paint Paper Sewing-Nancy 1 Stroke Paint Antiques Roadshow Mobile, AL ‘G’ American Experience ’ ‘PG’

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(10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline Chase The Posse (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News Jay Leno Hawaii Five-0 Mana’o (N) ‘14’ Å News Letterman (10:01) Castle (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News (N) (11:35) Nightline News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ The Tenth Inning The sport of baseball rebuilds itself. ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Chase The Posse (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News Jay Leno Married... With Married... With King of Queens King of Queens Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Rachel’s-Food The Tenth Inning The sport of baseball rebuilds itself. ‘PG’ Å (DVS)

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å Intervention Joey ‘14’ Å Hoarders ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Al; Julie (N) ‘PG’ Å Intervention Andrew ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami In Plane Sight ‘14’ Å (3:30) “Airplane II: ›› “Life” (1999, Comedy-Drama) Eddie Murphy, Martin Lawrence, Obba Babatunde. Two wrongly convicted › “Wild Wild West” (1999, Action) Will Smith, Kevin Kline, Kenneth Branagh. Secret agents fight to stop a ›› “Tremors” (1990, Horror) Kevin Bacon. Monster sandworms 102 40 39 The Sequel” felons make the most of life in jail. Å presidential assassination. Å devour denizens of a Nevada desert town. Animal Cops Houston Exodus ‘PG’ Pit Boss The Great Escape ’ ‘14’ Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å I Shouldn’t Be Alive ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Bulls and Parolees ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 Animal Cops Houston Trinity ’ ‘PG’ The Rachel Zoe Project ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ 137 44 (6:45) CMT Music The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ ››› “Rocky II” (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burgess Meredith. ’ CMT Music ’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ››› “Rocky II” (1979) Sylvester Stallone. ’ Biography on CNBC Henry Ford American Greed ID thieves. Mad Money How I Made My Millions Biography on CNBC Henry Ford Paid Program Best Cooking 51 36 40 52 How I Made My Millions Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (5:15) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:45) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:15) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:45) ›› “Harold & Kumar Escape From Guantanamo Bay” (2008, Comedy) Kal Penn. Å Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Bend on the Run Outside Presents Talk of the Town Local issues. Ride Guide ‘14’ PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Sonny-Chance Hannah Forever Shake it Up! ‘Y’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie ›› “Ella Enchanted” (2004) Anne Hathaway. Å (9:45) Fish Hooks Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Sonny-Chance Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Gang Wars: Oakland I ’ ‘14’ Å Wreck Chasers Wreck Chasers American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Wreck Chasers Wreck Chasers 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NFL Football Pittsburgh Steelers at Cincinnati Bengals (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL PrimeTime (N) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Monday Night 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker E:60 (N) NBA Tonight NFL Presents Bull Riding 22 24 21 24 Boxing Rico Ramos vs. Heriberto Ruiz From Jacksonville, N.C. (Live) Bowling Å Bowling Å PBA Bowling 1996 Rochester Open AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball From Dec. 19, 2009. (N) 23 25 123 25 College Football From Sept. 3, 2005. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids America’s Funniest Home Videos ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell. Premiere. Å America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Haunted Leg ’ ‘PG’ Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Good Eats Good Eats 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Pac-10 Hoops Wintervention Women’s College Volleyball UCLA at California Replay Seahawks Bensinger Profiles The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Replay Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Man on Fire” (2004, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington. A bodyguard takes revenge on a girl’s kidnappers. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie. 131 Curb/Block Holmes on Homes Hit the Deck ‘G’ Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Restoration Restoration Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Paint ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “Baby for Sale” (2004, Drama) Dana Delany, Hart Bochner. ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life Humiliating parents. Å True Life Reconnect with a mother. True Life Father will be released. ’ World of Jenks The Buried Life World of Jenks The Buried Life 192 22 38 57 The Seven ’ SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob ›› “Star Wars: Episode II -- Attack of the Clones” (2002, Science Fiction) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman. ’ 132 31 34 46 ›› “Star Wars: Episode II -- Attack of the Clones” (2002, Science Fiction) Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman. ’ Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics (N) Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics ’ Scare Tactics ’ Gundam Å Gundam Å 133 35 133 45 Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files Behind Scenes Mark Chironna Franklin Jesse Duplantis The Test First to Know Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Van Impe Pres Praise-A-Thon Biannual fundraising event. 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond Moguls and Movie Stars: A History of ›› “Traffic in Souls” (1913) Matt Moore. Silent. White slavers The Indian MasMoguls and Movie Stars: A History of (9:15) ›››› “The Birth of a Nation” (1915, Drama) Lillian Gish, Mae Marsh, Henry B. Walthall. Silent. D.W. Griffith’s Civil War 101 44 101 29 Hollywood The Birth of Hollywood force unwary women into prostitution. sacre Hollywood The Birth of Hollywood masterpiece. Wedding Day Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å Little People Little People Little People Little People Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Kate Plus 8 ‘PG’ TBA Little People Little People 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Bait ‘PG’ Å (DVS) Bones The Girl in the Fridge ’ ‘14’ Bones Quarantined. ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Woman in the Car ‘14’ The Closer Jump the Gun ‘14’ Å Men of a Certain Age ‘MA’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Refuge ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Would Happen Scooby-Doo Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time MAD (N) ‘PG’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son ››› “My Cousin Vinny” (1992, Comedy) Joe Pesci, Marisa Tomei, Ralph Macchio. Roseanne ’ ‘G’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Switch ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Honor Code ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Frame-Up ’ ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ ‘PG’ Å “Welcome Home Roscoe Jenkins” 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Don’t Forget VH1 Special ’ ‘PG’ My Big Friggin’ Wedding ’ ‘14’ Bret Michaels Mario Lopez My Big Friggin’ Wedding ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Behind the Music Pink ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:45) ››› “Hook” 1991 ‘PG’ Å (6:10) ›› “Jumanji” 1995, Fantasy Robin Williams. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Scorpion King” 2002 The Rock. ‘PG-13’ Å (9:35) › “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” 1992 ‘PG-13’ Å (11:05) › “House on Haunted Hill” ›› “Without a Trace” 1983, Drama Judd Hirsch, Kate Nelligan. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å ›› “Without a Trace” 1983 ‘PG’ ›› “Eyewitness” 1981, Suspense William Hurt. ‘R’ Å Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out The Daily Habit Insane Cinema: Shaun White Insane Cinema The Daily Habit ASP Women’s The Daily Habit Insane Cinema: Shaun White Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf Being John Daly Being John Daly Golf Videos Golf Videos Golf Central Learning Center Being John Daly Being John Daly Golf Videos Golf Videos Canadian Tour Learning Center Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ ››› “Edward Scissorhands” (1990) Johnny Depp, Winona Ryder. Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (3:45) ››› “Home › “12 Rounds” 2009, Action John Cena, Aidan Gillen, Ashley Scott. An escaped con- 24/7 Pacquiao/Mar- Real Time With Bill Maher Comic Dana In Treatment (N) ’ In Treatment (N) ’ ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in love HBO 425 501 425 10 Alone” vict kidnaps a cop’s fiancee. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å garito ‘MA’ Gould. ’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› Kinky Boots (5:25) › “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues” 1993 ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Kids in-Hall Undeclared ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘PG’ ›› “Vice Squad” 1982 Season Hubley. ‘R’ (10:45) › “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues” 1993 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ››› “Death Becomes Her” 1992 (6:15) ›› “Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian” 2009 Ben Stiller. Exhibits ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action Vin Diesel. Fugitive Dom Torretto and Brian ›› “The Time Traveler’s Wife” 2009 Rachel McAdams. A time-traveler keeps moving MAX 400 508 7 Meryl Streep. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å come to life at one of the world’s largest museums. ’ ‘PG’ O’Conner resume a feud in Los Angeles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å in and out of the life of his true love. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Hunt for the Somali Pirates ‘PG’ Inside the State Department (N) ‘PG’ American Doomsday (N) ‘PG’ Hunt for the Somali Pirates ‘PG’ Inside the State Department ‘PG’ American Doomsday ‘PG’ Sunken Treasures of the Nile ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) “Staten Is(5:45) ›› “Everybody’s Fine” 2009, Comedy-Drama Robert De Niro. iTV. A widower (7:25) “Killshot” 2009, Drama Diane Lane. iTV. A couple flee a Dexter Circle Us ’ ‘MA’ Å Weeds Fran Tarken- The Big C (N) ’ Weeds Fran Tarken- The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å SHO 500 500 land” 2009 ‘R’ wants to reconnect with his grown children. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å relentless assassin and his young partner. ’ ‘R’ ton (N) ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å ton ’ ‘MA’ Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Hot Rod TV ‘G’ Hot Rod TV ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:55) ›› “Planet 51” 2009, Comedy ‘PG’ (6:35) ››› “Black Hawk Down” 2001, War Josh Hartnett, Ewan McGregor. ‘R’ ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ (10:45) ›› “K-PAX” 2001 Kevin Spacey. ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) ›› “The Naked Face” 1985 Roger ›› “Bottle Shock” 2008, Drama Alan Rickman, Chris Pine, Bill Pullman. Vintners vie “A Quiet Little Marriage” 2008, Drama Mary Elizabeth Ellis, Cy ›› “A Walk on the Moon” 1999, Drama Diane Lane, Viggo Mortensen. Premiere. Dis- ›› “Extract” 2009 TMC 525 525 Moore. Premiere. ‘R’ Å to win a French-American wine contest. ’ ‘PG-13’ satisfied housewife sows wild oats in 1969. ’ ‘R’ Carter, Jimmi Simpson. ‘NR’ ’ ‘R’ Å (4:30) NHL Hockey Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings (Live) Hockey Central Whacked Out World Extreme Cagefighting Joseph Benavidez vs. Dominick Cruz World Extreme Cagefighting Jamie Varner vs. Kamal Shalorus VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ‘PG’ Å OMG! Sextuplets! ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY

THURSDAY

THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; November’s theme is “Dinnertime!: Stories About Thanksgiving”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-9775677. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY FALL CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a fall concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring piano soloist Robert Thies; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www .cosymphony.com.

BEND VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade includes marching bands, floats, military vehicles, a flyover and more; free for spectators; 11 a.m.; downtown Bend; 541-480-4516. VETERANS DAY PARADE: Parade honoring veterans; free; Downtown Redmond, Sixth Street between Dogwood and Forest avenues; downtown Redmond. VFW OPEN HOUSE: Meet military service members and veterans in honor of Veterans Day; free; noon-6 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. A SIMON & GARFUNKEL RETROSPECTIVE: AJ Swearingen and Jonathan Beedle perform both classic and obscure songs from the band; $23-$37; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org.

TUESDAY “EAT, DRINK & BE DEADLY”: Buckboard Productions presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www .bendticket.com. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Ashland-based indie-folk trio Kites and Crows performs; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; 541-306-0048. BODY VOX-2: The Portland-based dance ensemble performs; $20 or $25; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. KELLI SCARR: The New York-based indie-folk musician performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silver moonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; a discussion with the director follows; free; 3-5 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3837412. “OUT IN THE SILENCE”: A screening of the film about the difficulties gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people experience in small-town America; a discussion with the director follows; free; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, BORIS GODUNOV”: Starring Rene Pape, Aleksandrs Antonenko and Ekaterina Semenchuk in an encore presentation of Mussorgsky’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. “BUTTE BAGGIN’ II”: A screening of the ski film featuring descents on local mountains; free; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 919-389-1088. 18 SWITCHBACKS: The Colorado-based Americana band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com. BUILT TO SPILL: The Boise, Idahobased indie band performs, with Fauxbois; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. ROGER CLYNE AND THE PEACEMAKERS: The Phoenix-based Americana-rock act performs; ages 21 and older; $15; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Jurassic Park” by Michael Crichton; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121055 or www .deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. POETRY REVIVAL: Poets Buddy Wakefield, Anis Mojgani and Derrick Brown join together for an evening of visceral spoken word performances; presented by the Deschutes Public Library and the Cascades Theatrical Company; free admission; 6 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-312-1032. CENTRAL OREGON HOMEGROWN MUSIC REVIEW: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta, Shireen Amini, Tim Coffey, Dennis McGregor, Brent Alan and Erin Cole-Baker; proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon; $12; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “A FISH CALLED WANDA”: A screening of the 1988 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www .jcld.org. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an electric rock ’n’ roll set, with Tuck and Roll; $15 plus fees in advance, $18 at the door; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com. BEAD AND GEMSTONE SHOW: Thousands of beads and gemstones will be on display and available for purchase; free; 10-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541-389-9600.

SATURDAY INDOOR SATURDAY SWAP: Sale of toys, tools, clothes, jewelry and more; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Indoor Swap Meet, 401 N.E. Second St., Bend; 541-317-4847. MARINE CORPS BIRTHDAY RUN/ WALK: Run 5K or walk one mile in honor of the Marine Corps; race begins outside city hall; registration required; proceeds benefit Disabled American Veterans’ Portland shuttle

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

van; $22 with a shirt, $16 without; $21 with shirt or $14 without before Nov. 1; 9 a.m.; City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-383-8061, chandler@bendcable.com or www .vetsdayrun.homestead.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in a presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. VETERANS CHILI COOK-OFF CHALLENGE: Featuring chili, drinks, music and more; proceeds benefit local veterans organizations; free admission; noon-5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. NATIONAL GAMING DAY: Play a variety of board and video games; free; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7079 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUDUBON FUNDRAISER: Featuring a membership drive, silent auction, book sale, presentations, live music and more; proceeds benefit the East Cascades Audubon Society birding projects; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-317-3086 or www.ecaudubon.org. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC BENEFIT GALA: Includes live music, dinner, a silent auction and a raffle; proceeds benefit High Desert Chamber Music programs; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-306-3988, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.HighDesertChamberMusic .com. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Cinder Kittens play the Maidens of Mayhem; a portion of proceeds benefits junior roller derby; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-330-1183 or www.lavacityrollerdolls.com. “FROM CHEYENNE TO PENDLETON”: A screening of the documentary about the rise and fall of the rodeo cowgirl, with filmmaker Steve Wursta; $5, free museum members; 7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241 or kgarton@ highdesertmuseum.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs with warm-up band The Fondue Party; $5 donation; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 27: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Bill Beach and Brasil Beat; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541977-5637, joe@justjoesmusic.com or www.justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an acoustic rock ’n’ roll set; $13 plus fees in advance, $16 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com. HEAD FOR THE HILLS: The Fort Collins, Colo.-based bluegrass band performs; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www

.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY CRUSADER CHOIR: The Idaho-based choir performs a concert of sacred music; free; 10:15 a.m.; Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St.; 541-382-5496. EMPTY BOWLS: Ninth annual event features gourmet soup and a selection of artisan bowls, with live music; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $18 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-548-2380, ext. 144 or www .neighborimpact.org. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Guy Few performs on the trumpet, piano and other instruments, with Stephanie Mara; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org.

TUESDAY Nov. 16 “NATIVE AMERICAN RESEARCH — THE WARM SPRINGS TRIBE”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Jane Kirkpatrick; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb.org/deschutes/ bend-gs.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CONVICTION (R) 4, 6:45 FOR COLORED GIRLS (R) 4:05, 6:50 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG-13) 4:15, 6:55 NEVER LET ME GO (R) 4:20, 7:05 NOWHERE BOY (R) 4:40, 7:05 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 4:10, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

BON JOVI — THE CIRCLE TOUR (no MPAA rating) 7:30

DUE DATE (R) 12:25, 2, 2:40, 4:25, 5:15, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:05 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 12:50, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:05 JACKASS 3-D (R) 1:50, 4:50, 7:45, 10:10 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) Noon, 3:40, 6:20, 9:10 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 12:30, 3:50, 6:40, 9:35 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 12:15, 1:45, 2:30, 4, 5:05, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 9:50 MEGAMIND (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:50, 10:10 RED (PG-13) 1, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 SAW 3-D (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8, 10:20

SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 12:40, 3:45, 6:35, 9:30 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:05, 6:55, 9:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) EDITOR’S NOTE: Due to Monday Night Football, no movies will be shown today.

Lovato’s problems shatter illusion of teen TV stars

WEDNESDAY Nov. 17

By Mary McNamara

THANKSGIVING POTLUCK: Bring a vegan dish to share, along with its recipe; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017 or http://vegnetbend.org. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DEAD WINTER CARPENTERS: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

LOS ANGELES — So will they be doing a special rehab episode on “Sonny With a Chance”? The news that Demi Lovato, the 18-year-old star of the Disney Channel sitcom and the “Camp Rock” TV movies, recently checked in to a treatment facility to deal with “physical and emotional issues” was surprising only in its failure to surprise. In the wake of a trail of young stars who flashed brightly only to bottom out — Lindsay Lohan is now officially more famous for wrecking her career than for her actual career — Lovato’s troubles are remarkable only in that they appear to involve eating disorders and cutting rather than the more ubiquitous drugs and alcohol. The only people who don’t seem to understand the perilous nature of being an 18-year-old pop culture star are the people who keep making TV shows about them. Even as Lovato, Lohan and Britney Spears prove to a new generation the deleterious effects of early fame, an alarming number of kid shows these days are celebrations of early fame. On “Sonny With a Chance,” Lovato plays the Super-Talented But Grounded Girl from Wisconsin who has landed a spot on a teen comedy show where she quickly learns some Hard Lessons — (other) actors can be shallow and spiteful, some fans can be pesky, the media can be mean, and other kids (or more important, boys) might like you just because you’re famous. But it is all worth it in the end because nothing beats being a star. That, of course, was the theme of Disney’s “Hannah Montana,” the multimedia juggernaut that followed on the heels of the enormous popularity of “High School Musical” and our nation’s increasing belief that fame and fortune is but an “American Idol” audition away. “Hannah,” in turn, launched “Jonas,” which follows the exploits of the boy band the Jonas Brothers, and “Sonny With a Chance.” Lovato and the Jonas Brothers also starred in the two “Camp Rock” movies, which were about summer camp for future rock stars. Meanwhile, over at Nickelodeon, “The Naked Brothers Band” gave way to the teen starturn shows “Big Time Rush” and “Victorious,” and fame, via the Internet and fashion industry, also fuels “iCarly” and “True Jackson, VP.”

THURSDAY Nov. 18 STEELHEAD FILM NIGHT: A screening of fishing films and photos from around the world; proceeds benefit the Deschutes River Conservancy; $10; 6 and 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “What Does It All Mean?” with Kathleen Dean Moore; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7257. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: The La Pine High School drama department presents the holiday classic about a man who sees what the world would be like without him when an angel visits on Christmas Eve; $5, $4 with a donation of canned food; 7 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-322-5360.

FRIDAY Nov. 19 A CASCADES CLASSICAL EVENING: Concert pianist Dr. William Chapman Nyaho performs pieces by Chopin, Bach-Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and Gershwin; proceeds benefit the Cascades Classical Music Foundation; $75; 6 p.m.; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-383-0868.

M T For Monday, Nov. 8

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DUE DATE (R) 5, 7:15, 9:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 SAW VII (R) 5, 7, 9 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3:45, 6:45, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DUE DATE (R) 7 HEREAFTER (PG-13) 6:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 6:30 WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” (PG) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SECRETARIAT (PG) 4, 7

Los Angeles Times

Disturbing message Individually, many of these shows are quite good, but taken together the message is loud and disturbing: Life is not whole unless it is fabulous, and by fabulous we mean part of the entertainment industry. Kids with grown-up attributes are nothing new and have long been the basis of young adult fiction and television — and certainly teen idols, troubled or not. But now the medium has become the message. We have teen idols who play teen idols. Disney’s Gary Marsh has said that all Disney wants to do is encourage

Chris Pizzello / The Associated Press

Disney Channel star Demi Lovato recently checked in to a treatment facility. kids to “follow their dreams,” but how narrow have those dreams become. What happened to kid inventors or kid detectives? What happened to Doogie Howser? “If there is anything I’ve learned about kids today — and I’m not saying this is good or bad — it’s that they all want to be stars,” Dan Schneider, creator of “iCarly” and “Victorious,” told the Los Angeles Times last year.

Dream life And why wouldn’t they? These TV characters are dream stars, the kind who skipped the local gigs and the cattle calls, who were never pushed by desperate parents or wily agents. These are kids who just like to sing/play/ tell jokes/design dresses and happen to be, without any training at all, unbelievably good at it! (For adult fans, there’s a parental “Antiques Roadshow” thing — sure, that might look like an ordinary, rumpled and irritating 10-year-old lying on your couch, but under the right circumstances she could be a rock star!) Valiantly, these fictional stars cope with the difficulty of balancing their fabulousness with “normal,” getting into scrapes with their friends and occasionally an authority figure. But little mention is made of the actual work that the performing life requires — the auditions, the travel, the meetings, the publicity tours or even the rehearsals. None of the young women are obsessed with their weight or their appearance, and diva behavior invariably receives its just rewards (as opposed to a bigger trailer and a personal chef). Drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and sexual behavior beyond kissing simply do not exist. Most significant, no mention whatsoever is made of money. Of the fact that Sonny and Hannah and all those boy bands make lots of it, for themselves and a bunch of adults. That they are, in fact, businesses, with employees and paychecks, with executives, lawyers and accountants all watching the bottom line and fine-tuning the show, the performance, the image to boost it. So the real pressure of young stardom — that you are earning hundreds of thousands, perhaps millions, of dollars at a time when most of your peers are still baby-sitting — is resolutely ignored.


C4 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H B Y JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Nov. 8, 2010: Follow your sixth sense, and financial benefits will head in your direction. Don’t underestimate what you have to offer and your natural talents. A special event or new home affects your domestic life. You could be sinking a lot of money into your security. If you are single, you will want someone to call your own. If you are attached, the two of you will fade into your home and personal life, loving being a reclusive couple. SAGITTARIUS can be an expensive friend. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Grasp the bigger picture. You might not be in agreement with others’ ideas or attitudes. Use this chasm to energize research and to explore different options. You might not choose to share what is on your mind; you could be distracted. Tonight: Follow the music. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Relate to people individually. Your personal touch helps draw people out. If you are tired, take a break. Choose a type of activity that is the opposite of what you are doing. Tonight: Listen to what a partner shares. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Others come toward you quite suddenly. You might not want to share your thoughts. Let others display their true colors. In order to succeed, you must step back. Tonight: Sort through your

options. Just don’t be alone. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH An easy, steady pace brings results. You could be feeling out of sorts. Recognize that not everyone has to agree with you. Still, this source of heaviness could color your day and your plans. Tonight: Take wing ASAP. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Allow ideas to bubble up. A discussion could be overly heavy or serious. Don’t let a distance in a relationship go too far. Both you and the other party might have problems restoring the closeness you both value. A discussion with a partner, as well as a youthful individual, creates fun and ideas. Tonight: Play the night away (even if it is Monday). VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Take a personal day if possible. You might need some time to work on a project or just catch up on a roommate’s news. Others come forward when you are relaxed. Avoid any wild diets or health kicks — as appealing as they may be. Tonight: You don’t have to go far. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Your ability to communicate comes through once you loosen up. You might not need to ask intrusive questions if you observe. A light and easy chat will reveal more. A special loved one touches base with you. Tonight: Hang with a favorite friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Be careful if you are diving into the world of financial wheelers and dealers. Unless you are unusually skilled in this

arena, this experience could prove to be negative. Your creativity could be funneled into a hobby or project. Tonight: Play as if there is no tomorrow. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Don’t expect any hassles, and most likely you will bypass any boulders in your path. Once more, you confirm the importance of a positive mind-set. A brainstorming session could explode into a special project or a new relationship. Tonight: Follow the fun and music. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Step back and let those who seem to be full of themselves take the lead. Everyone, including the people in question, needs to find out how much he or she is blowing hot air. At this moment, no one knows. No one questions your competency. Tonight: Take some much-needed personal time. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Your ability to express yourself in groups, or perhaps in a special meeting, could define your day and a project’s success. For some, the project might be as simple as expanding your immediate circle. It doesn’t have to be work-related. Tonight: Being alone won’t work. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH No matter where you are or what your plans, you could feel overwhelmed by everything that hits you from out of left field. Realize what is happening in your mind. Is there a disparity between your scenario and what might be really occurring? Tonight: Could be late. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

COV ER S T OR I ES

Seeds

Urban

Continued from C1 The seed extractory has been operating in Bend for about 60 years, starting along with the former Bend Pine Nursery, said Jim Barner, the seed facility’s manager. It originally focused on getting the seeds out of pine cones. But in the early 1990s, the seed experts also started handling grasses, forbs, shrubs and more. Now, the extractory isolates seeds from between 300 and 500 plants a year, he estimated. “We really just process seed from wild seed collected, or wild cones collected, to a purer state,” he said.

Continued from C1 “Justin’s the guy who’s always coming by with a different odd herb or flower, saying, ‘Here, try this. Have you ever seen this before? Here are some things you can do with it,’” said Gerard Craft, chefowner of Niche in the Benton Park neighborhood of St. Louis. “As chefs, we love to get to play with new stuff and expand our knowledge of food.” At Jim Fiala’s The Crossing in Clayton, Mo., chef Ian Vest sautées and roasts YellowTree’s white-flesh cucuzza, an Italian squash, and he uses the farm’s tingle-inducing Szechuan buttons to perk up customers’ taste buds. “What’s cool about Justin being so passionate is that it’s like everything he brings us is a gift, not just something that came out of the ground,” Fiala said.

‘Christmas all year’ The process starts when boxes and bags of plant material are delivered to the Forest Service facility, in northeast Bend. “We have Christmas all year long when we open up the boxes,” said Nita Rauch, assistant manager of the seed extractory. The bags are filled with material that people have collected — not just seeds, but bits of branches, flowers, berries, fruits, cones or stalks. And sometimes it’s hard to identify the target, since the seeds can be hidden and difficult to find. “If it’s a species we’ve never seen before, the first thing we do is identify a seed,” Barner said. Grass seeds can be nearly invisible, and sometimes the workers need to use a microscope to find them. Then, the trick is to remove the seeds, intact, from the rest of the plant material. The plant sample is typically put in a cylindrical device filled with brushes that circle around, loosening up the material and breaking apart whatever is encapsulating the seeds. For pine seeds, workers remove the winged seed covering by tossing the seeds into a modified mortar mixer or a modified cement mixer, which rolls them around until the wings break off. The loose mixture of plant material is then put through a screening device — typically with three or four screens, with holes of varying shapes and sizes. The extractory is stocked with shelves of screens, with holes that range from the size of pinheads to dimes — some oblong, some triangular, some circular. With different combinations of screens, the workers can isolate different types of seeds. “It’s really kind of an art,” Barner said of choosing the screens to capture as many seeds as possible. “There’s so many variables.” But with the right combination, and the right amount of air blowing the material across the screens, the crew ends up with a bucket containing just seeds. Then it’s time to test them.

Seed testing First, the seeds are weighed. One day last month, Ann Craycroft counted out 100 tiny seeds,

Cell Continued from C1 Verizon, which has 93.2 million wireless customers, offers cell phone service in Central Oregon. In 2008, the company bought Unicel, which had roughly 90,000 cellular customers in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. In a statement issued Oct. 28, Verizon accepted responsibility for the errors, apologized to customers and agreed to provide information to customers about data usage and tracking, and increase training on the issue with its work force. Current and former customers entitled to a refund, most in the $2 to $6 range, will be notified by mail, the company said in its statement. Consumers complain about other companies, too. At the Oregon Attorney General’s Office last year, telecommunications companies generated the most complaints from consumers for the fourth year in a row. Complaints about international money transfer schemes, and business and investment opportunities ranked second and third, respectively, according to a March 9 statement from Attorney General John Kroger. Within the telecommunications category, satellite television providers topped the complaint list, with cell service companies coming in second. “Over the years, it’s been one of the top, if not the top, complaint category,” said Tony Green, spokesman for the attorney general. This year, the office also created a new website that allows the public to search the complaint

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Sarah Garvin, an intern with the Seeds of Success program, uses a microscope to analyze seeds at the extractory complex in Bend. Maps on the wall, books and an Internet database help identify new and old species. and weighed them to calculate how many seeds make up a pound. For that species, it would take more than 4 million seeds to make a pound, she said. For big seeds like sugar pine, it only takes about 2,000 seeds to make a pound. The seeds also are tested for moisture content — the drier the better, which is one reason Bend is a good place for the seed extractory. “It’s just ideal here, with low humidity,” Barner said, noting that the moisture content of the seeds has to be less than 10 percent so the seeds will remain viable. Technicians then X-ray the seeds to ensure they contain embryos and could potentially germinate — a collection has to be at least 90 percent viable to meet the standards. Then, the seed samples are sealed in plastic bags, labeled and either sent to other storage facilities across the West or stored in one of the freezers or refrigerated containers on-site.

Seeds of Success Some samples are part of the BLM’s Seeds of Success program, which started in 2001 and is designed to collect the materials needed to restore and rehabilitate ecosystems. “The purpose of it was to collect, conserve and develop native plant materials for restoration use across the United States,” said Peggy Olwell, plant conservation lead with the BLM. It started after a bad fire season, when the BLM had to buy more than 6.5 million pounds of seed for restoration projects — and 60 percent of it had to be from non-native species, because the quantity and diversity of native plants wasn’t available, she said. So now, nurseries are working to grow plant lines for restoration purposes — and with species from the West, the nurseries start with seeds cleaned and processed at the Bend Seed Extractory. The program is designed to collect seeds from different areas of a plant’s range, as well, she said. That way, if an area heats up, dries out or changes in

On the Web For more information about the Federal Communications Commission’s proposed rules to prevent bill shock and find links to comment, visit http://reboot .fcc.gov/billshock. To search for consumer complaints through the Oregon Attorney General’s Office, visit https://justice.oregon. gov/complaints/.

database by company name and location. Of the 426 complaints listed under the business description cellular and other wireless, Verizon had the largest number of complaints — 159 — of the five major cellular providers operating in Oregon. T-Mobile had 97, Sprint Nextel 87, AT&T 63 and U.S. Cellular 20. However, those numbers should be viewed with some caution. Verizon, which has more than 93 million customers nationwide, would be expected to have more complaints than U.S. Cellular, which has 6.1 million. A complaint alone does not indicate any wrongdoing by a company. A spot check of the details shows a number of complaints could not be substantiated. The federal government also gets complaints about cellular providers, and a survey conducted for the FCC in the spring found one in six cellular customers had experienced bill shock. More than half of them received increases of $50 or more but got no warning from their providers beforehand. Under the FCC’s proposed changes, companies would have to send voice or text alerts to cus-

other ways, there will be plants available that have adapted to a variety of conditions. “With the climates changing, we’re not sure exactly what it is we’re going to need out there on the landscape,” Olwell said. The Seeds of Success program also stores seeds for research purposes. The Bend facility’s budget is about $250,000 a year, Barner said, but it’s a self-sustaining operation because different national forests and programs pay it to extract, clean and store the seeds.

Native to region And when the various national forests or BLM districts need seeds for restoring areas burned by wildfire, eroded by landslides or for habitat projects, they can call the seed extractory and get seeds that come from lineages native to the area. In one of the refrigerated storage buildings, large burlap bags labeled for national forests — including the Deschutes, Ochoco and Wallowa-Whitman — sat filled with seeds ready to be spread as part of restoration projects. Locally, spruce seeds from the Bend facility were used as part of a joint project between the Forest Service and the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council to restore a section of Tumalo Creek several years ago, said Ryan Houston, the group’s executive director. “The idea was basically to replant that area with the same genetic stock that are there naturally,” Houston said. It maintains the genetic history, he said, and perhaps spruce from Central Oregon are a little better adapted to the local environment than spruce from northern Idaho. “Those plants are going to have a higher probability of surviving, because they’re of a lineage that’s been growing in that area, they’re used to whatever weather patterns that area may have.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

tomers before they begin incurring overage charges. Providers also would have to send alerts before international charges or related roaming fees begin piling up, and they would need to clearly disclose tools to help consumers set limits and avoid unexpectedly large bills. As of Wednesday, the FCC had received about 20 comments on the proposed rules, including support from Consumers Union, the publisher of Consumer Reports. One person pointed out that cellular providers have no problem sending text messages about the services they offer, so they should be able to send an alert warning about extra charges. Another mentioned the difficulty keeping track of usage for those on a family plan. Cellular industry representatives say providers have been improving ways to inform customers about usage and additional charges, but new rules and the associated costs to implement them thwart the industry’s efforts, according to a blog posting by Christopher Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA — The Wireless Association. While the Oregon attorney general is not involved in the federal proposal, he generally favors giving consumers more information to help them make decisions, said Green, the spokesman. “Certainly, we are in support of laws that protect consumers from bill shock,” he said. “Anytime you ... provide consumers with more information, that’s certainly something we support, in concept.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Menu staples Fiala, who is also chef-owner of Acero, Terrace View and Liluma, bought almost all of YellowTree’s cream sausage tomatoes — a sweet, white variety. Over the summer, YellowTree’s green, yellow, red and purple tomatoes were menu staples — and dining-room decoration, laid out on a sheet pan visible to customers — at Farmhaus restaurant in south St. Louis. The Good Pie in midtown St. Louis uses YellowTree’s produce on some of its salads and wood-fired pizzas. “One day we stopped in the Good Pie to eat, and they were making a salad with all of our food,” said Danielle Leszcz, 29. “That was a great feeling.” For the winter, the Leszczes are planning to grow microgreens — young plant leaves with concentrated flavors — in their backyard greenhouse. They also raise and slaughter rabbits, the next batch of which is going to Monarch restaurant in Maplewood. And this month they are getting ready to buy squab — tender, domestic pigeons not often seen on St. Louis restaurant menus — to breed. “Gerard says he’ll take as many squabbing pigeons as I can grow,” Justin Leszcz said.

The Leszczes say their philosophy is simple: Grow food that they want to eat. “We’re not going to plant vegetables that we hate. Because the stuff we don’t sell, we eat. And everything else, we give to them,” Leszcz said, pointing to a pen of chickens, Pekin ducks and hens that lay blue-green eggs. “The whole reason we got into this was to feed ourselves,” Danielle Leszcz said. They grow garlic, onions, celery, carrots and lettuce, and they have chicken and rabbits at the ready. An excess of fruit and sunchokes at the end of last year’s growing and foraging season provided enough homemade wine for the couple to drink for 10 months. Their trips for groceries are few and far between. “We can bypass the produce section completely and just pick up maybe some flour, sugar, milk and meat,” she said. YellowTree’s neighbors have embraced the project; one has let the Leszczes take over his yard, and none has ever complained, even when the farm housed a noisy goat and a rooftop beehive. YellowTree has a clean record with the St. Louis County Department of Health, which oversees animal-related ordinances, spokesman John Shelton said. Federal law allows small farms like YellowTree to raise and slaughter their own poultry, provided they process fewer than 1,000 birds a year. (Danielle Leszcz, a full-time paralegal, keeps up on agricultural regulations.) The Leszczes are well below that limit, and they say they intend to stay that way, not wanting to expand too fast. After

mentions in local media and food magazines, YellowTree has begun to attract visitors who want tours, gardening advice or a pound of tomatoes. The couple is happy to oblige, but Justin Leszcz, a former restaurant cook, said he’d rather work directly with chefs. “They’re the ones who push me to grow things no one else here is growing,” he said. “And by putting all this unique stuff on their menus, they’re able to expose more people to it than if I were selling it from a stand in front of my house.”

Occasional setbacks The dirt-packed path that Leszcz started down two years ago hasn’t been all smooth. A family of raccoons killed YellowTree’s first flock of squab this summer, most of the rooftop bees didn’t survive the winter, and crops sometimes don’t turn out as expected. Those setbacks can be costly, especially for a family that ditched half its income to start a backyard farm. But the Leszczes said they have everything they need, and the former car salesman said he couldn’t put a price on pursuing his dream. “Money, money, money — that’s what life used to be about,” he said, surveying the season’s last green tomatoes and red peppers. “I’d say things have definitely changed for the better.”

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Bankruptcy with Dignity Experience You Can Trust Milly Whatley, P.C. Attorney-at-Law

541-312-5392 2445 NE Division, Suite 202, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.millywhatley.com Milly Whatley is an attorney who is characterized by federal law as a “debt relief agency.” This is because she helps Central Oregonians file for relief under the Bankruptcy Code. She has proudly done so since 2001.


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Auto Racing Inside NASCAR’s Denny Hamlin takes Cup lead after getting eighth win of the season, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2010

PREP SPORTS

PREP SPORTS C O M M E N TA RY

CYCLING CENTRAL

Playoff schedules set for local schools High school soccer, volleyball and football state playoff matchups were all finalized this weekend, with plenty of action scheduled to take place in Central Oregon. For a complete listing of who plays who this week, go to On Deck on Page D2. — Bulletin staff report

BEAU EASTES

New state volleyball seeding a work in progress

INSIDE NFL Falcons ........27 Buccaneers ..21

Ravens .........26 Dolphins ...... 10

Bears ...........22 Bills.............. 19

Chargers ......29 Texans .........23

Browns.........34 Patriots ........ 14

Giants .......... 41 Seahawks ......7

Jets ..............23 Lions............20

Raiders ........23 Chiefs ..........20

Vikings.........27 Cardinals ..... 24

Eagles ..........26 Colts ............ 24

Saints ..........34 Panthers ........3

Packers ........45 Cowboys........7

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f this is the best the Oregon School Activities Association can do for volleyball, the state’s governing body for high school athletics needs to go back to the drawing board, pronto. In the first round of the Class 4A state tournament this Friday, reigning 4A state champion Sisters High’s reward for going 21-2 overall for the regular season and undefeated in Sky-Em League play is a state quarterfinal date with Crook County, winner of the last FOUR 5A state titles. (Crook County is playing in 4A this year because of declining enrollment.) No, the Cowgirls didn’t fall apart this season. In fact, quite the opposite. Competing this fall in the Intermountain Hybrid, a league made up of both 6A and 5A schools, Crook County tied for second place with Mountain View and was the only team in the league to defeat Summit, 5A’s top power-ranked squad. The Cowgirls did not drop a match to a 4A team all season, and in addition to knocking off Summit, they defeated 5A’s No. 2 (Sherwood) and No. 3 (Mountain View) power-ranked teams. “It’s been a learning experience,” Sisters coach Diane Bremer says diplomatically. “It’s funny to see win-loss records on (the OSAA website, where the state power rankings are posted). You can have a winning percentage 300 points higher than other teams, but your opponents’ winning percentage counts for 50 percent of your power ranking while your own winning percentage is just 25 percent. “It’s hard to get your head around.” The 4A state championship bracket is not the only one that seems to be amiss. In Class 6A, Central Catholic, which has yet to be defeated by an opponent from Oregon this year — the Rams have dropped only two games all season to in-state teams — is listed as the No. 3 team in 6A. Jesuit, a squad Central Catholic has defeated three times this season, is ranked No. 1. “The only time Central Catholic has lost this season was in Reno (Nev.),” Crook County coach Rosie Honl says. “And that was to the No. 1 and No. 3 teams in the nation.” The rankings would be laughable if they didn’t determine playoff seeding. Instead they’re a nightmare. “I suppose the power rankings have potential,” Bremer says. “But it doesn’t feel like that this year.” Multiple problems have plagued the OSAA’s attempts to rank volleyball teams this season. The most obvious is a challenge that other team sports are dealing with in their first year of power rankings: how to weight victories against opponents from different classifications? Crook County is a prime example of the system failing when teams opt to play tougher competition. A win against an 8-4 6A team is rewarded the same as a win against an 8-4 1A team. The power rankings do not differentiate between classifications. “We’ve been hanging with 6A schools and have beaten every 5A there is,” says Honl, whose team this year posted a regular-season record of 12-8, with six of those losses coming against 6A teams. “You would think teams would get points or weighted wins for playing a classification above you.” See Seeding / D4

Browns rout Pats Cleveland uses some creativity on offense en route to a big 34-14 win over New England, see Page D3

Cleveland quarterback Colt McCoy (12) leads the Browns to a 34-14 win over New England.

NBA Lakers crush Blazers Pau Gasol has tripledouble in a 121-96 L.A. blowout over Portland, see Page D4

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

First-year cyclocross competitor Kate Dunning laughs with fellow competitors before starting their race at the Clatsop County Fairgrounds Cross Crusade event Saturday Oct. 30, in Astoria.

A ticket to race Bend women wins bike in raffle and becomes addicted to ’cross HEATHER CLARK

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lucky number turned Kate Dunning into a cyclocross racer. For nearly two decades, mountain biking and road biking have been part of Dunning’s lifestyle. But she

rode purely for fun and for fitness with friends and family. Dunning, 43, is active with the Bend Bella Cyclists women’s recreational bike club, even serving as a ride leader for the group. Her enthusiasm for cycling extends to bike racing only insomuch as she heartily embraces the competition as a fan. The former Midwesterner, who moved to Bend 14 years ago, has attended World Cup downhill mountain bike races and national crosscountry races, and she has volun-

teered in some way with local races — road, cyclocross, and mountain bike events — nearly every year she has lived in Central Oregon. But competing herself was never appealing. Until a lucky raffle ticket forced her to reconsider. Last December, Dunning signed up to volunteer at a party for women cyclocross racers held during the cyclocross national championships here in Bend. See Ticket / D5

COLLEGE FOOTBALL: BCS Los Angeles Lakers’ Pau Gasol (16) puts in a reverse lay-up against Portland on Sunday.

TCU closes in on Oregon, Auburn By Ralph D. Russo The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 NBA .......................................... D4 Auto racing ................................D5 Cycling Central..........................D5

NEW YORK — TCU’s best chance to catch Oregon and Auburn in the BCS standings came and went, and the Horned Frogs are still chasing the top two. TCU closed the gap on the first-place Ducks and second-place Tigers, and widened its advantage on fourth-place Boise State on Sunday, a day after a resounding 47-7 victory at previously unbeaten Utah. “The bottom line is that they put themselves on a different plateau,” TCU coach Gary Patterson said of his team after the win over Utah. “They have to finish the season and we can only

control what we can control. But I thought they made a statement. Everybody else in the country, when they go into someone else’s house in a big game, they usually end up getting beat.” The Horned Frogs’ BCS average is .9259 after coming in third in both the Harris and coaches’ polls and second in the computer ratings. Oregon (.9638) is first in both polls and third in the computers. Auburn (.9611) is second in the polls and first in the computers. LSU moved up to fifth overall after beating Alabama 24-21. Looking ahead, TCU (10-0) appears to have virtually no chance of moving up unless at least one of the top two teams loses. See TCU / D4

BCS Standings List Nov. 7, 2010

1. Oregon 2. Auburn 3. TCU 4. Boise St. 5. LSU 6. Stanford 7. Wisconsin 8. Nebraska 9. Ohio St. 10. Okla. St. 11. Mich. St. 12. Alabama

Rk 1 2 3 4 6 8 5 9 7 13 10 11

Harris USA Today Pts Pct Rk Pts Pct 2820 .9895 1 1463 .9919 2684 .9418 2 1389 .9417 2620 .9193 3 1340 .9085 2585 .9070 4 1330 .9017 2221 .7793 6 1153 .7817 2134 .7488 9 1058 .7173 2229 .7821 5 1184 .8027 1984 .6961 8 1067 .7234 2145 .7526 7 1123 .7614 1508 .5291 11 832 .5641 1682 .5902 10 876 .5939 1627 .5709 12 791 .5363

Rk 3 1 2 5 4 t6 10 t6 16 t6 9 11

Computer BCS Pct Avg Pv .910 .9638 1 1.000 .9611 2 .950 .9259 3 .790 .8662 4 .890 .8170 10 .770 .7454 13 .620 .7349 9 .770 .7298 7 .470 .6613 11 .770 .6211 17 .670 .6180 14 .540 .5490 17


D2 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Tuesday Boys soccer: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Mountain View at Ashland, TBA. Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Newport at Madras, TBA. Class 3A/2A/1A state playoffs, first round: Culver at Catlin Gabel in Portland, TBA. Girls soccer: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Ashland at Summit, TBA; Wilsonville at Bend, TBA; Sandy at Mountain View, TBA. Class 4A state playoffs, La Salle at Sisters, TBA.

2 p.m. — English Premier League, Liverpool at Chelsea (taped), FSNW.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network.

BOXING 5 p.m. — Rice Ramos vs. Herberto Ruiz, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5:30 p.m. — NFL, Pittsburgh Steelers at Cincinnati Bengals, ESPN.

TUESDAY SOCCER 2:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, AC Milan vs. Real Madrid (taped), FSNW.

Friday Football: Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Franklin at Mountain View, TBA; Bend at Corvallis, TBA. Class 2A state playoffs, first round: Culver at Oakridge, TBA. Volleyball: Class 5A state tournament in Hillsboro: Summit vs. Churchill, 8 a.m.; Mountain View vs. West Albany, 10 a.m.; Class 4A state tournament in Eugene: Sisters vs. Crook County, 1:15 p.m. Saturday Volleyball: Class 5A and 4A state volleyball finals, TBA.

FOOTBALL College

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — College, Toledo at Northern Illinois, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Detroit Pistons at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

RADIO TUESDAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Detroit Pistons at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Running • Gebremariam, Kiplagat win titles at NYC Marathon: Gebre Gebremariam, of Ethiopia, has won the men’s title at the New York City Marathon in his debut at the distance. Kenya’s Edna Kiplagat won the women’s race Sunday for her first major marathon championship. Shalane Flanagan, of the United States, was second in the women’s race in her marathon debut. The 2008 Olympic bronze medalist in the 10,000 meters became the first American woman to finish in the top two since 1990.

Tennis • Pennetta routs Vandeweghe to give Italy Fed Cup: Flavia Pennetta routed 18-year-old CoCo Vandeweghe 6-1, 6-2 on Sunday in San Diego to give Italy its second straight Fed Cup final victory over the United States. Pennetta’s victory in the fourth singles match gave the Italians a 3-1 decision in the best-of-five finale. Her victory came after Melanie Oudin stunned French Open champion Francesca Schiavone 6-3, 6-1 to keep the United States alive. • Federer beats Djokovic to win Swiss Indoors title: Roger Federer reclaimed his hometown title from Novak Djokovic, beating the defending champion 6-4, 3-6, 6-1 in the Swiss Indoors final on Sunday in Basel, Switzerland. The top-seeded Federer broke the Serb’s serve early in the first, and twice in the deciding set to cruise to victory in under two hours. Federer’s 65th career singles title moved him past Pete Sampras into sole possession of fourth on the list in the modern era. Jimmy Connors leads with 109. • Ferrer wins all-Spanish final at Valencia Open: David Ferrer beat Marcel Granollers 7-5, 6-3 to win the Valencia Open on Sunday, virtually assuring himself of a spot in the season-ending ATP Tour finals. Ferrer had key breaks in each set and defended his own service game well to earn the title at the City of Arts and Sciences. Granollers netted Ferrer’s serve to finish the all-Spanish final on the hard indoor surface. • Ivanovic returns to top 20 by winning Bali title: Ana Ivanovic ended her season by returning to the top 20 by defeating Alisa Kleybanova, of Russia, 6-2, 7-6 (5) in the Tournament of Champions final in Bali, Indonesia. The 23year-old Serb captured her second title in three weeks to move back into the top 20 for the first time in more than a year, having dropped to a low of 65 in July.

Horse racing • Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Blame retiring: Breeders’ Cup Classic winner Blame has crossed his last finish line and is headed for the breeding shed. Trainer Al Stall Jr. says the 4-year-old Blame will stand as a stallion at Claiborne Farm, which co-owns the horse with Adele Dilschneider, starting in 2011. Blame ended 6-year-old Zenyatta’s 19-race winning streak on Saturday, edging her out by a head despite a late rush from the previously undefeated horse. • Borel fined, Castellano suspended following fight: Jockey Calvin Borel has been fined and fellow rider Javier Castellano has been fined and suspended for six days following a fight in the winner’s circle on Friday at Churchill Downs. The Kentucky Board of Stewards fined Borel $5,000 and Castellano $2,500 for their fight following the conclusion of the Breeders’ Cup Marathon. — From wire reports

POLLS ——— THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (49) 9-0 1,484 1 2. Auburn (2) 10-0 1,396 3 3. TCU (2) 10-0 1,391 4 4. Boise St. (7) 8-0 1,366 2 5. LSU 8-1 1,196 12 6. Wisconsin 8-1 1,182 7 7. Stanford 8-1 1,143 10 8. Ohio St. 8-1 1,087 8 9. Nebraska 8-1 1,055 9 10. Michigan St. 9-1 868 16 11. Alabama 7-2 861 5 12. Oklahoma St. 8-1 821 19 13. Iowa 7-2 807 15 14. Arkansas 7-2 775 17 15. Utah 8-1 657 6 16. Virginia Tech 7-2 540 20 17. Mississippi St. 7-2 501 21 18. Arizona 7-2 481 13 19. Oklahoma 7-2 436 11 20. Missouri 7-2 420 14 21. Nevada 8-1 304 25 22. South Carolina 6-3 170 18 23. Texas A&M 6-3 130 — 24. Florida 6-3 94 — 25. UCF 7-2 74 — Others receiving votes: Southern Cal 51, San Diego St. 42, Miami 39, Penn St. 29, Baylor 23, North Carolina 20, Kansas St. 18, Pittsburgh 14, N. Illinois 9, Florida St. 6, Temple 4, Navy 3, Syracuse 2, Delaware 1. USA TODAY TOP 25 POLL The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 6, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Oregon (50) 9-0 1,463 1 2. Auburn (4) 10-0 1,389 2 3. TCU (2) 10-0 1,340 4 4. Boise State (3) 8-0 1,330 3 5. Wisconsin 8-1 1,184 7 6. LSU 8-1 1,153 11 7. Ohio State 8-1 1,123 8 8. Nebraska 8-1 1,067 10 9. Stanford 8-1 1,058 12 10. Michigan State 9-1 876 15 11. Oklahoma State 8-1 832 18 12. Alabama 7-2 791 5 13. Iowa 7-2 779 16 14. Arkansas 7-2 696 19 15. Utah 8-1 659 6 16. Oklahoma 7-2 569 9 17. Virginia Tech 7-2 563 20 18. Mississippi State 7-2 477 21 19. Arizona 7-2 403 13 20. Missouri 7-2 395 14 21. Nevada 8-1 328 23 22. South Carolina 6-3 151 17 23. Central Florida 7-2 99 NR 24. Florida 6-3 85 NR 25. Texas A&M 6-3 79 NR Others receiving votes: Miami (Fla.) 67; San Diego State 44; Kansas State 36; Baylor 30; Penn State 28; Michigan 15; Fresno State 11; Temple 11; Florida State 8; North Carolina 8; Northern Illinois 8; Navy 5; North Carolina State 5; Pittsburgh 5; Hawaii 3; Southern Mississippi 2. HARRIS TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in the Harris Interactive College Football Poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Nov. 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Oregon (93) 9-0 2,820 1 2. Auburn (7) 10-0 2,684 2 3. TCU (5) 10-0 2,620 4 4. Boise State (9) 8-0 2,585 3 5. Wisconsin 8-1 2,229 7 6. LSU 8-1 2,221 12 7. Ohio State 8-1 2,145 8 8. Stanford 8-1 2,134 10 9. Nebraska 8-1 1,984 11 10. Michigan State 9-1 1,682 16 11. Alabama 7-2 1,627 5 12. Iowa 7-2 1,564 14 13. Oklahoma State 8-1 1,508 18 14. Arkansas 7-2 1,422 17 15. Utah 8-1 1,265 6 16. Oklahoma 7-2 1,067 9 17. Virginia Tech 7-2 1,033 20 18. Mississippi State 7-2 904 21 19. Arizona 7-2 817 13 20. Missouri 7-2 757 15 21. Nevada 8-1 661 23 22. South Carolina 6-3 284 19 23. Florida 6-3 228 NR 24. Texas A&M 6-3 127 NR 25. Central Florida 7-2 109 NR Other teams receiving votes: Miami (FL) 96; San Diego State 64; North Carolina 63; Baylor 60; Penn State 46; Kansas State 43; Temple 34; Florida State 29; Michigan 29; Pittsburgh 25; North Carolina State 19; Navy 13; Syracuse 10; Northern Illinois 9; Air Force 7; Fresno State 7; Hawaii 6; Tulsa 5; West Virginia 4; Clemson 2; Northwestern 2.

Betting Line Favorite Steelers

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today 4 4.5 BENGALS

TENNIS WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ———

HOCKEY NHL

COMMONWEALTH BANK TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS Sunday Nusa Dua, Indonesia Singles Championship Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, def. Alisa Kleybanova, Russia, 6-2, 7-6 (5).

Fed Cup WORLD GROUP Final Italy 2, United States 0 At San Diego Sports Arena Surface: Hard-Indoor Singles Francesca Schiavone, Italy, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-4, 6-2. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 7-6 (4), 6-2.

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— DAVIDOFF SWISS INDOORS Sunday Basel, Switzerland Singles Championship Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 6-4, 3-6, 6-1. VALENCIA OPEN 500 Sunday Valencia, Spain Singles Championship David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 7-5, 6-3.

GOLF PGA Tour HSBC CHAMPIONS Sunday At Sheshan International Golf Club Shanghai Purse: $7 million Yardage: 7,266; Par: 72 Final Francesco Molinari, $1,200,000 65-70-67-67—269 Lee Westwood, $675,000 66-70-67-67—270 Richie Ramsay, $372,500 69-68-71-71—279 Luke Donald, $372,500 68-70-68-73—279 Rory McIlroy, $250,000 71-71-71-67—280 Tiger Woods, $145,714 68-72-73-68—281 Richard Green, $145,714 72-68-73-68—281 Retief Goosen, $145,714 70-74-69-68—281 Peter Hanson, $145,714 73-69-70-69—281 Fredrik Andersson Hed, $145,714 69-71-71-70—281 Paul Casey, $145,714 73-71-67-70—281 Ernie Els, $145,714 72-65-71-73—281 Ian Poulter, $90,000 70-70-73-69—282 Henrik Stenson, $90,000 67-74-72-69—282 Jaco Van Zyl, $90,000 71-66-72-73—282 Pablo Martin, $77,200 68-73-71-71—283 Charl Schwartzel, $77,200 74-70-67-72—283 Seung-yul Noh, $77,200 67-72-71-73—283 Padraig Harrington, $77,200 70-70-70-73—283 Ross Fisher, $77,200 69-70-69-75—283 Bill Haas, $68,000 72-71-72-69—284 Nick Watney, $68,000 72-68-74-70—284 Hunter Mahan, $68,000 70-73-71-70—284 Robert Allenby, $68,000 72-68-72-72—284 Brendan Jones, $60,200 76-72-69-68—285 Rickie Fowler, $60,200 71-74-72-68—285 Anthony Kim, $60,200 73-72-70-70—285 Adam Scott, $60,200 69-73-73-70—285 Tim Clark, $60,200 72-70-70-73—285 Ben Crane, $55,500 71-71-74-70—286 Martin Kaymer, $55,500 72-69-74-71—286 Yuta Ikeda, $55,500 67-75-76-68—286 K.J. Choi, $55,500 72-71-71-72—286 Robert Karlsson, $51,000 71-73-73-70—287 Richard Johnson, $51,000 70-70-77-70—287 Graeme McDowell, $51,000 74-71-73-69—287 Darren Fichardt, $51,000 73-72-70-72—287 Katsumasa Miyamoto, $51,000 69-75-77-66—287 Carl Pettersson, $47,500 71-73-71-73—288 Gregory Bourdy, $47,500 73-74-73-68—288 Phil Mickelson, $44,000 69-71-76-73—289 Kyung-tae Kim, $44,000 72-69-75-73—289 Miguel Jimenez, $44,000 72-70-75-72—289 Edoardo Molinari, $44,000 72-71-76-70—289 Ryo Ishikawa, $44,000 72-71-71-75—289 Ryan Palmer, $40,750 69-72-74-75—290 Hiroyuki Fujita, $40,750 75-75-70-70—290 Arjun Atwal, $39,500 73-71-73-74—291 David Horsey, $39,500 71-74-74-72—291 Heath Slocum, $39,500 71-72-78-70—291 Y.E. Yang, $38,250 69-74-73-76—292 Camilo Villegas, $38,250 75-70-78-69—292 Rhys Davies, $36,500 76-70-72-75—293 Jason Bohn, $36,500 72-75-72-74—293 Andrew Dodt, $36,500 73-68-80-72—293 Alvaro Quiros, $36,500 74-78-70-71—293 Matteo Manassero, $36,500 71-70-81-71—293 Michael Sim, $34,750 72-79-74-69—294 Shunsuke Sonoda, $34,750 72-77-78-67—294

Molinari holds steady to win HSBC The Associated Press SHANGHAI — The experience of losing to one No. 1 player in the world helped Francesco Molinari beat another. When last seen on a world stage, Molinari was helpless against Tiger Woods in Ryder Cup singles, when the former world No. 1 steamrolled the Italian for an easy victory at Celtic Manor. One month later at the HSBC Champions, Molinari turned in a world-class performance against the new No. 1. In an exquisite duel with Lee Westwood that came down to the last putt, Molinari played bogey-free Sunday at Sheshan International for a 5-under 67, giving him a one-shot victory and

San Francisco Purse: $2.5 million Yardage: 7,135; Par 71 Final Round (Charles Schwab points in parentheses) John Cook (880), $440,000 64-69-67-67—267 Michael Allen (508), $254,000 69-69-61-70—269 David Frost (389), $194,500 68-68-65-71—272 Bernhard Langer (389), $194,500 67-69-67-69—272 Fred Funk (228), $113,750 65-70-70-68—273 Tom Pernice, Jr. (228), $113,750 65-71-68-69—273 Russ Cochran (228), $113,750 67-68-68-70—273 Tom Lehman (228), $113,750 66-68-69-70—273 Tom Kite (164), $82,000 67-67-72-68—274 Fred Couples (146), $73,000 69-69-70-67—275 Corey Pavin (146), $73,000 68-68-71-68—275 David Peoples, $59,333 70-71-68-67—276 Nick Price, $59,333 70-70-67-69—276 Mark O’Meara, $59,333 70-65-69-72—276 Jeff Sluman, $52,000 67-70-71-71—279 Jay Haas, $49,000 71-71-69-69—280 Olin Browne, $44,500 67-70-73-71—281 Chien Soon Lu, $44,500 71-71-70-69—281 Mike Reid, $40,500 74-71-71-66—282 Dan Forsman, $37,000 72-71-70-70—283 Tommy Armour III, $37,000 71-70-72-70—283 Joe Ozaki, $33,000 71-72-71-70—284 Tom Watson, $33,000 72-72-73-67—284 Larry Mize, $29,500 70-74-69-72—285 Loren Roberts, $29,500 70-72-71-72—285 Peter Senior, $27,000 67-72-73-74—286 Brad Bryant, $26,000 73-70-72-72—287 Mark Wiebe, $25,000 71-69-73-75—288 Joey Sindelar, $24,250 73-72-72-73—290 Mark Calcavecchia, $24,250 70-78-74-68—290

IN THE BLEACHERS

GOLF ROUNDUP a World Golf Championship title. “It’s been four fantastic days, and especially the last two playing headto-head with Lee was really tough,” Molinari said. “I think the experience of playing with Tiger in the Ryder Cup definitely helped me in the last couple of days, because when you are playing against No. 1 in the world, it is not easy to always stick to the game plan and do your game.” In other Sunday events: Cook repeats as Schwab Cup champ SAN FRANCISCO — John Cook successfully defended his title in the Champions Tour’s season-ending

Charles Schwab Cup Championship at Harding Park, while Bernhard Langer took his first season points title. Cook shot 4-under 67, holing a 15foot par putt on the 18th hole to beat Michael Allen by two strokes. Shin claims Mizuno Classic victory SHIMA, Japan — Top-ranked Jiyai Shin won the Mizuno Classic for her second LPGA Tour victory of the season and eighth overall, closing with a 5-under 67 for a two-stroke victory over Yani Tseng. Shin finished at 18 under after opening with rounds of 65 and 66 on the Kintetsu Kashikojima course. The South Korean star, also the 2008 tournament winner, earned $180,000 to increase her season total to $1,779,768.

Michio Matsumura, $33,500 Tetsuji Hiratsuka, $33,500 Thaworn Wiratchant, $33,500 Marcus Fraser, $31,750 Alistair Presnell, $31,750 Anders Hansen, $31,750 Liang Wen-Chong, $31,750 Danny Willett, $30,250 Pariya Junhasavasdikul, $30,250 Stuart Appleby, $29,000 Simon Khan, $29,000 Bill Lunde, $29,000 Wu Kang-chun, $27,750 Louis Oosthuizen, $27,750 Kiradech Aphibarnrat, $27,000 Chao Li, $26,500 Mardan Mamat, $26,000 Hao Yuan, $25,500

71-74-75-75—295 71-71-80-73—295 75-76-73-71—295 72-76-73-76—297 74-75-74-74—297 71-74-79-73—297 79-73-76-69—297 77-69-75-77—298 74-80-72-72—298 72-73-74-80—299 76-73-76-74—299 78-72-79-70—299 75-77-75-74—301 69-80-80-72—301 78-75-73-77—303 79-79-75-71—304 75-76-75-80—306 79-75-79-75—308

LPGA Tour MIZUNO CLASSIC Sunday At Kintetsu Kashikojima Golf Club Shima, Japan Purse: $1.2 million Yardage: 6,506; Par: 72 Final Jiyai Shin, $180,000 65-66-67—198 Yani Tseng, $109,523 69-65-66—200 Stacy Lewis, $79,451 69-64-68—201 Miki Saiki, $61,461 67-67-70—204 Brittany Lincicome, $41,275 73-67-65—205 Na Yeon Choi, $41,275 67-70-68—205 Mika Miyazato, $41,275 68-69-68—205 Inbee Park, $25,784 72-69-65—206 Yukari Baba, $25,784 65-72-69—206 Jimin Kang, $25,784 68-69-69—206 Young Kim, $25,784 68-69-69—206 Chie Arimura, $20,327 67-70-70—207 Morgan Pressel, $20,327 66—69—72—207 Karrie Webb, $15,830 71-72-65—208 Maria Hjorth, $15,830 71-69-68—208 M.J. Hur, $15,830 70-69-69—208 Katherine Hull, $15,830 68-71-69—208 Sun-Ju Ahn, $15,830 68-70-70—208 Momoko Ueda, $15,830 70-67-71—208 Meena Lee, $15,830 67-69-72—208 Kaori Aoyama, $12,143 73-69-67—209 Ritsuko Ryu, $12,143 70-71-68—209 Song-Hee Kim, $12,143 71-69-69—209 Karine Icher, $12,143 67-72-70—209 Amy Hung, $12,143 71-68-70—209 Stacy Prammanasudh, $12,143 69-69-71—209 Mi-Jeong Jeon, $9,999 73-69-68—210 Candie Kung, $9,999 69-72-69—210 Junko Omote, $9,999 74-67-69—210 Asako Fujimoto, $9,999 71-68-71—210 Teresa Lu, $8,515 71-71-69—211 Maiko Wakabayashi, $8,515 70-70-71—211 Angela Stanford, $8,515 73-71-67—211 Na On Min, $8,515 71-68-72—211 Sakura Yokomine, $7,076 69-72-71—212 Hiromi Mogi, $7,076 74-69-69—212 Kyeong Bae, $7,076 72-69-71—212 Eun-Hee Ji, $7,076 73-72-67—212 Ji-Hee Lee, $7,076 73-74-65—212 Akiko Fukushima, $5,542 69-72-72—213 Vicky Hurst, $5,542 71-70-72—213 Hee-Won Han, $5,542 70-71-72—213 Anna Nordqvist, $5,542 74-70-69—213 Eun-A Lim, $5,542 72-68-73—213 Hyun-Ju Shin, $5,542 71-73-69—213 Na Ri Kim, $5,542 74-71-68—213 Yui Kawahara, $4,557 70-72-72—214 Catriona Matthew, $4,557 73-70-71—214 Sun Young Yoo, $4,557 72-71-71—214 Meaghan Francella, $3,898 74-68-73—215 Kristy McPherson, $3,898 72-70-73—215 Seon Hwa Lee, $3,898 70-73-72—215 Christina Kim, $3,898 70-70-75—215 Hiromi Takesue, $3,898 72-73-70—215 Amanda Blumenherst, $3,898 72-75-68—215 Bo Bae Song, $3,298 71-71-74—216 Akane Iijima, $3,298 71-72-73—216 Mayu Hattori, $3,298 73-73-70—216 Mie Nakata, $3,298 75-72-69—216 Wendy Ward, $2,878 74-70-73—217 Hee Young Park, $2,878 73-71-73—217 Yun-Jye Wei, $2,878 72-72-73—217 Ah-Reum Hwang, $2,878 74-73-70—217 Saiki Fujita, $2,878 73-75-69—217 Sophie Gustafson, $2,608 72-72-74—218 Azahara Munoz, $2,608 72-73-73—218 Alena Sharp, $2,608 74-72-72—218 Ayako Uehara, $2,608 73-73-72—218 Ji-Woo Lee, $2,391 76-70-73—219 Na-Ri Lee, $2,391 70-76-73—219 Gwladys Nocera, $2,391 76-74-69—219 Ai Miyazato, $2,391 72-79-68—219 Haeji Kang, $2,293 74-69-77—220 Shinobu Moromizato, $2,293 72-75-73—220 Rui Kitada, $2,251 73-74-75—222 Nobuko Kizawa, $2,223 74-74-75—223 Yoshimi Kohda, $2,194 77-75-72—224 Rikako Morita, $2,166 75-75-76—226

Champions Tour CHARLES SCHWAB CUP CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Harding Park Golf Course

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times Pacific ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 15 9 4 2 20 45 34 N.Y. Rangers 14 7 6 1 15 38 38 Pittsburgh 15 7 7 1 15 43 39 N.Y. Islanders 14 4 8 2 10 35 50 New Jersey 15 4 10 1 9 25 48 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 14 8 5 1 17 34 33 Boston 11 7 3 1 15 33 20 Ottawa 14 7 6 1 15 36 40 Toronto 13 5 5 3 13 31 34 Buffalo 15 4 9 2 10 37 48 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 14 10 4 0 20 47 34 Tampa Bay 13 7 4 2 16 39 39 Atlanta 14 6 5 3 15 44 51 Carolina 14 7 7 0 14 41 44 Florida 12 5 7 0 10 36 32 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA St. Louis 12 9 1 2 20 32 18 Detroit 12 8 3 1 17 39 32 Chicago 17 8 8 1 17 50 51 Columbus 13 8 5 0 16 32 32 Nashville 13 5 5 3 13 31 38 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 13 8 3 2 18 40 32 Minnesota 13 7 4 2 16 32 30 Colorado 13 7 5 1 15 45 42 Calgary 13 6 7 0 12 35 38 Edmonton 12 4 6 2 10 34 41 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Los Angeles 13 10 3 0 20 39 26 Dallas 13 8 5 0 16 43 37 Anaheim 15 7 7 1 15 40 50 San Jose 12 6 5 1 13 34 30 Phoenix 13 4 5 4 12 33 42 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Sunday’s Games Washington 3, Philadelphia 2, OT St. Louis 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Edmonton 2, Chicago 1 Anaheim 5, Nashville 4 Today’s Game Phoenix at Detroit, 4:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times Pacific ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose 1, New York 1, San Jose advanced on aggregate 3-2 Saturday, Oct. 30: New York 1, San Jose 0 Thursday, Nov. 4: San Jose 3, New York 1 Colorado 1, Columbus 1, Colorado advanced penalty kicks 5-4 Thursday, Oct. 28: Colorado 1, Columbus 0 Saturday, Nov. 6: Columbus 2, Colorado 1 Eastern Conference Championship Saturday, Nov. 13: San Jose at Colorado, 6:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake 1 Saturday, Oct. 30: FC Dallas 2, Real Salt Lake 1 Saturday, Nov. 6: FC Dallas 1, Real Salt Lake 1 Los Angeles 2, Seattle 0 Sunday, Oct. 31: Los Angeles 1, Seattle 0 Sunday, Nov. 7: Los Angeles 2, Seattle 1 Western Conference Championship Sunday, Nov. 14: FC Dallas at Los Angeles, 6 p.m. MLS CUP Sunday, Nov. 21: Conference Champions at Toronto, 5:30 p.m

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup AAA TEXAS 500 Sunday At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (30) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334 laps, 119.3 rating, 190 points, $453,575. 2. (19) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 334, 105, 175, $370,876. 3. (9) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 334, 121.7, 170, $234,350. 4. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 334, 115.2, 165, $226,065. 5. (2) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 142.5, 165, $189,600. 6. (26) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 103.4, 155, $191,826. 7. (7) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 334, 97.1, 146, $147,875. 8. (5) David Ragan, Ford, 334, 86.2, 142, $136,275. 9. (17) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 103.3, 143, $172,028. 10. (12) Paul Menard, Ford, 334, 89.2, 134, $124,575. 11. (11) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 334, 91, 130, $148,198. 12. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 334, 84.2, 127, $139,948.

13. (24) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 334, 73.3, 124, $142,473. 14. (10) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 334, 74.6, 121, $140,601. 15. (18) David Reutimann, Toyota, 334, 110, 118, $131,831. 16. (25) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 334, 75.9, 115, $135,054. 17. (28) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 334, 65.9, 112, $96,625. 18. (27) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 334, 50.1, 109, $107,775. 19. (3) Carl Edwards, Ford, 334, 86.2, 106, $135,123. 20. (14) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 78.1, 103, $134,479. 21. (13) Aric Almirola, Ford, 334, 56.2, 100, $137,365. 22. (8) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 334, 64.1, 97, $106,100. 23. (1) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 333, 69.9, 94, $121,450. 24. (6) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 333, 56.6, 91, $139,773. 25. (22) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 333, 56.1, 88, $105,300. 26. (35) Casey Mears, Toyota, 333, 42.7, 90, $97,500. 27. (23) Scott Speed, Toyota, 333, 55.7, 82, $113,273. 28. (4) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 333, 60.8, 79, $131,806. 29. (33) David Gilliland, Ford, 333, 40.4, 81, $114,960. 30. (31) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 333, 46.6, 73, $94,500. 31. (37) Patrick Carpentier, Ford, 333, 37.5, 75, $104,300. 32. (29) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 332, 89.3, 67, $140,631. 33. (36) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 332, 46.7, 64, $119,135. 34. (40) Andy Lally, Chevrolet, 331, 33, 66, $93,125. 35. (39) Robby Gordon, Toyota, engine, 240, 42.3, 63, $106,548. 36. (16) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, accident, 192, 61.4, 55, $126,740. 37. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 190, 68.2, 52, $138,901. 38. (21) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, accident, 188, 57.4, 49, $91,350. 39. (38) Mike Bliss, Toyota, rear gear, 45, 30.4, 51, $91,150. 40. (43) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, vibration, 35, 29.8, 43, $90,950. 41. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, overheating, 25, 30.1, 40, $90,720. 42. (42) Dave Blaney, Ford, overheating, 23, 29, 37, $102,593. 43. (34) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, engine, 12, 25.9, 34, $90,816. ——— Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 140.456 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 34 minutes, 1 second. Margin of Victory: 0.488 seconds. Caution Flags: 9 for 40 laps. Lead Changes: 33 among 13 drivers. Lap Leaders: G.Biffle 1-13; R.Gordon 14; G.Biffle 15-43; D.Gilliland 44; M.Bliss 45; M.Martin 46-48; G.Biffle 49-60; P.Carpentier 61; G.Biffle 62-96; M.Martin 97-103; G.Biffle 104-108; J.Johnson 109; D.Hamlin 110-111; M.Martin 112-133; C.Mears 134; J.Logano 135-137; G.Biffle 138-152; A.Lally 153; J.Logano 154-156; G.Biffle 157; J.Logano 158; G.Biffle 159176; J.Logano 177-194; A.Lally 195-197; J.Logano 198-200; G.Biffle 201-244; K.Harvick 245; M.Kenseth 246-247; G.Biffle 248-286; J.Logano 287-288; G.Biffle 289-301; M.Martin 302-305; D.Hamlin 306-334. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): G.Biffle, 11 times for 224 laps; M.Martin, 4 times for 36 laps; D.Hamlin, 2 times for 31 laps; J.Logano, 6 times for 30 laps; A.Lally, 2 times for 4 laps; M.Kenseth, 1 time for 2 laps; K.Harvick, 1 time for 1 lap; J.Johnson, 1 time for 1 lap; C.Mears, 1 time for 1 lap; D.Gilliland, 1 time for 1 lap; P.Carpentier, 1 time for 1 lap; R.Gordon, 1 time for 1 lap; M.Bliss, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. D.Hamlin, 6,325; 2. J.Johnson, 6,292; 3. K.Harvick, 6,266; 4. C.Edwards, 6,008; 5. M.Kenseth, 6,000; 6. J.Gordon, 5,994; 7. Ky.Busch, 5,986; 8. T.Stewart, 5,962; 9. G.Biffle, 5,953; 10. C.Bowyer, 5,928; 11. Ku.Busch, 5,890; 12. J.Burton, 5,852.

Formula One BRAZILIAN GRAND PRIX Sunday At Autodromo Jose Carlos Pace (Interlagos) circuit Sao Paulo, Brazil Lap length: 2.68 miles 1. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 71 laps, 1:33:11.803, 122.375 mph. 2. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 71, 1:33:16.046. 3. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 71, 1:33:18.610. 4. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 71, 1:33:26.437. 5. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 71, 1:33:27.396. 6. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 71, 1:33:47.123. 7. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 71, 1:33:55.259. 8. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 70, +1 lap. 9. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 70, +1 lap. 10. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 70, +1 lap. 11. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 70, +1 lap. 12. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 70, +1 lap. 13. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 70, +1 lap. 14. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 70, +1 lap. 15. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 70, +1 lap. 16. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 70, +1 lap. 17. Nick Heidfeld, Germany, BMW Sauber, 70, +1 lap. 18. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus Racing, 69, +2 laps. 19. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus Racing, 69, +2 laps. 20. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 69, +2 laps. 21. Bruno Senna, Brazil, HRT, 69, +2 laps. 22. Christian Klien, Austria, HRT, 65, +6 laps. Not Classfied 23. Lucas di Grassi, Brazil, Virgin, 62, 1:33:44.729. 24. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 49, Retired. Drivers Standings (After 18 of 19 races) 1. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 246 points. 2. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 238. 3. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 231. 4. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 222. 5. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 199. 6. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 143. 7. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 130. 8. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 126. 9. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 72. 10. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 47. 11. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 47. 12. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 32. 13. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 22. 14. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 21. 15. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 19. 16. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 8. 17. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 6. 18. Nick Heidfeld, Germany, BMW Sauber, 6. 19. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 3.

DEALS Transactions HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD—Assigned C Cody Almond and LW Matt Kassian to Houston (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Assigned F Blair Jones and D Mathieu Roy to Norfolk (AHL). THOROUGHBRED RACING KENTUCKY BOARD OF STEWARDS—Suspended jockey Javier Castellano six racing days (Nov. 11-14 and Nov. 17-18) for causing interference at the five-sixteenths pole and necessitating a disqualification in the fifth race at Churchill Downs on Nov. 5, 2010. Fined jockey Calvin Borel $5,000 and jockey Javier Castellano $2,500 for their conduct after the race.

NHL ROUNDUP

Capitals beat Flyers in overtime The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Mike Green scored a power-play goal 29 seconds into overtime to give the Washington Capitals a 32 win against the Philadelphia Flyers on Sunday. It was Green’s fourth goal of the season. Eric Fehr and Alexander Semin also scored for the Capitals, who moved ahead of Philadelphia into the Eastern Conference lead. Nicklas Backstrom had two assists. Also on Sunday: Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 NEW YORK — Ty Conklin made 27 saves for his 15th NHL shutout, Alexander

Steen scored twice and surging St. Louis stifled yet another opponent in beating New York for their seventh straight win. Oilers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 CHICAGO — Kurtis Foster and Sam Gagner scored 14 seconds apart in the third period, and Edmonton rallied to beat Chicago. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ducks defenseman Paul Mara scored his first goal since February 2009 with 1.7 seconds left, and Anaheim beat slumping Nashville after blowing the lead four times.


NFL

Browns roll to victory

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

AMERICAN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s Games

Strong offense leads Cleveland to a 34-14 win over New England

Raiders 23, Chiefs 20 Kansas City Oakland

The Associated Press CLEVELAND — When the scoreboard clock finally showed zeros, Bill Belichick walked slowly across the torn-up field to meet Cleveland’s coach, his protege and estranged friend, amid a swarm of players and photographers. Belichick found Eric Mangini, looked him in the eye and offered his hand. It was time to concede defeat, one as thorough as any in recent memory. “I congratulated him,” Belichick said. It’s all he could do. On this day, the Browns were better — a lot better. Rookie quarterback Colt McCoy scrambled for a touchdown and didn’t make any mistakes, Peyton Hillis ran for a careerhigh 184 yards and two TDs and the vastly improved Browns, using a little trickery and a ton of offensive imagination, pounded the Patriots 34-14 on Sunday. Two weeks after stunning New Orleans, the Browns (3-5) pulled off another shocker. Well rested after their bye week, they ended New England’s fivegame winning streak and did it decisively, outplaying one of the NFL’s top teams for 60 minutes. This was no fluke. The Patriots (6-2) were battered, baffled and beaten badly. “We know we can beat anybody,” Browns wide receiver Joshua Cribbs said. “If you beat these supposedly best two teams in the league, it gives us confidence there isn’t one team in this league that we don’t think we can beat.” It was particularly satisfying for Mangini, whose relationship with Belichick was damaged years ago when he left New England’s staff to coach the Jets and by the infamous “Spygate” episode. The two men ignored each other during pregame warmups, but had to meet afterward. Mangini was asked what his mentor said. “ ‘Good game.’ We were making plans for the summer,” he joked. Mangini had good reason to smile. He and his staff, many of whom worked in New England under Belichick, outschemed the Patriots in every facet. The Browns had an overwhelming advantage on offense, defense and special teams. Cleveland sprang a pop-up kickoff to set up its first touchdown and the Browns scored their second TD on a gadget play they knew would work. But it wasn’t all smoke and mirrors. The Browns bullied the Patriots, using Hillis to run the ball down their throats and flustering quarterback Tom Brady with a variety of fronts and coverages. “This sends a message that what happened last game against New Orleans was not a fluke,” said Pro Bowl tackle Joe Thomas, who opened holes as the Browns rushed for a seasonhigh 230 yards. “We’re a good team. We’re starting to find our identity.” Hillis, healthy at last after being slowed by a thigh injury, scored on a 2-yard run in the first, and then put the Patriots away with a 35-yard burst late to make it 34-14. He carried 29 times, picking up all 60 yards on Cleveland’s game-sealing drive. Brady and the Patriots have had better days. New England’s star went 19 of 36 for 224 yards and two TDs to rookie tight end Aaron Hernandez. However, Brady lost for the first time in five career starts against the Browns, who jumped to an early 10-0 lead and led by 17 entering the fourth. Brady was hindered by several drops and a crucial fumble by tight end Rob Gronkowski just before halftime, when the Patriots, who came in averaging a league-leading 29 points per game, blew a chance to cut into Cleveland’s 10-point lead. “We were out of sync all day,” Brady said. “It was not a good day at all. As an offense, we didn’t do much to advance the ball, and that includes the quarterback. If we play like we played today we are not going to beat anybody.” The Patriots had other issues. Kicker Stephen Gostkowski suffered a thigh injury, forcing Belichick to use receiver Wes

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 D3

Tony Dejak / The Associated Press

Cleveland Browns quarterback Colt McCoy (12) runs for a 16yard touchdown against the New England Patriots in the third quarter of an NFL football game on Sunday in Cleveland. The rookie quarterback led the Browns to a 34-14 win over New England.

0 10 3 7 0 — 20 0 0 14 6 3 — 23 Second Quarter KC—Tucker 11 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 14:31. KC—FG Succop 43, 11:08. Third Quarter Oak—Ford 94 kickoff return (Janikowski kick), 14:48. KC—FG Succop 25, 9:41. Oak—Barnes 2 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 6:13. Fourth Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 23, 9:46. KC—Bowe 20 pass from Cassel (Succop kick), 6:13. Oak—FG Janikowski 41, :03. Overtime Oak—FG Janikowski 33, 12:07. A—61,075. ——— KC Oak First downs 21 17 Total Net Yards 304 321 Rushes-yards 34-104 26-112 Passing 200 209 Punt Returns 3-17 6-30 Kickoff Returns 6-107 5-172 Interceptions Ret. 1-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 20-35-1 19-34-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-16 4-20 Punts 9-42.7 6-46.2 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 4-2 Penalties-Yards 12-100 15-140 Time of Possession 33:10 41:50 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Kansas City: Charles 10-53, Jones 19-32, Cassel 3-14, Arenas 1-5, Castille 1-0. Oakland: D.McFadden 17-89, Bush 5-17, Reece 1-4, Cartwright 1-2, J.Campbell 2-0. PASSING—Kansas City: Cassel 20-351-216. Oakland: J.Campbell 19-33-1-229, D.McFadden 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—Kansas City: Moeaki 6-63, Bowe 5-63, Charles 5-47, Copper 2-26, Tucker 1-11, Chambers 1-6. Oakland: Ford 6-148, D.McFadden 4-25, Higgins 3-26, Myers 3-20, Reece 2-8, Barnes 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Oakland: Janikowski 47 (WL).

N.Y. Jets New England Miami Buffalo

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NFL ROUNDUP Welker to kick an extra point in the fourth. If it had been closer, Welker may have had to try a late field goal. The Browns, though, never let the Patriots in it. For Mangini, the lopsided win over a quality opponent was further proof his system may be taking hold in his second season with Cleveland. There were still more than two minutes left when he was showered with Gatorade. Soaked to the skin, he smiled as his players celebrated behind him. “It feels great,” he said. “It’s special and it’s special because of our guys, because of our team, not because of their team, because of our team.” McCoy, making his third straight start, had his best game. He completed 14 of 19 passes for 174 yards, and his TD run in the third gave the Browns a 24-7 lead. With no receivers open, McCoy tucked the ball and sprinted for the left corner. “I felt real slow,” said McCoy, who covered the final few yards with a headfirst dive. In other games on Sunday: Vikings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 MINNEAPOLIS — Brett Favre rallied the Vikings from 14 points down to tie it with 27 seconds to play, then drove them into position for Ryan Longwell’s 35-yard game-winning field goal. Favre threw for a career-high 446 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions for the Vikings (3-5), who fought back cheers of “Fire Childress!” early in the game to pull out the win. Raiders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Chiefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 OAKLAND, Calif. — Jason Campbell threw a 47-yard pass to rookie Jacoby Ford in overtime to set up a 33-yard field goal by Sebastian Janikowski that gave the Raiders their biggest win in eight years. Campbell and Ford hooked up on a 29-yard pass in the closing seconds of regulation to set up Janikowski’s tying 41-yard field goal. The Raiders (5-4) then won it in overtime for their most significant victory since winning the 2002 AFC championship. Jets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Lions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 DETROIT — Mark Sanchez threw a 52-yard pass to Santonio Holmes to set up Nick Folk’s game-winning 30-yard field goal 2:18 into overtime. Sanchez scored on a quarterback sneak with 2:46 left in regulation and led a nine-play drive that set up Folk’s 36-yard kick to send the game into OT. Eagles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Colts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 PHILADELPHIA — Michael Vick threw for 218 yards and one touchdown, ran for 74 yards and a score, and the Eagles beat Peyton Manning and the Colts. The Eagles (5-3) are 12-0 after a bye since Andy Reid became coach in 1999. They hadn’t beaten Manning in three previous tries. Saints . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Panthers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Drew Brees threw for 253 yards and two touchdowns, Jabari Greer returned an interception for a touchdown and New Orleans became the latest team to shut

down Carolina’s NFL-worst offense. The Saints (6-3) overcame the loss of tight end Jeremy Shockey to a rib injury after his touchdown catch to keep pace in the competitive NFC South. Rookie tight end Jimmy Graham caught his first NFL TD in Shockey’s absence and the Saints held Carolina to 195 yards. Giants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41 Seahawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 SEATTLE — Eli Manning threw for three first-half touchdowns and Ahmad Bradshaw added a pair of rushing touchdowns for the Giants. Manning and the Giants (6-2) jumped to a 35-0 halftime lead, overwhelming the banged up Seahawks and staking claim as maybe the best team in the NFC halfway through the season. Bears. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 TORONTO — Jay Cutler threw two touchdown passes, including one to Earl Bennett late in the fourth quarter to give Chicago a win and keep the Bills winless. Chester Taylor also scored on a 1-yard plunge for the Bears (5-3), who came out of their off week to end a two-game skid. Tim Jennings’ interception came early in the fourth quarter, and with Chicago trailing 19-14. Falcons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Buccaneers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 ATLANTA — Michael Turner scored two early touchdowns and Atlanta held off Tampa Bay with a gutty goal-line stand to take over sole possession of first place in the NFC South. Turner rushed 24 times for 107 yards, including scoring plays of two and 10 yards that gave the Falcons (6-2) an early 14-0 lead. Atlanta was hanging on at the end against the Buccaneers (53), whose coach, Raheem Morris, had proclaimed his team the best in the NFC. Chargers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Texans. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 HOUSTON — Philip Rivers threw four touchdown passes against the NFL’s worst pass defense, and San Diego earned its first road win of the season. Rivers completed 17 of 23 passes for 295 yards. He used eight different receivers in the absence of tight end Antonio Gates, who was out with a right foot injury. Ravens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Dolphins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 BALTIMORE — Billy Cundiff made four field goals, and Baltimore cranked up the defense after halftime to hand Miami its first road loss. Baltimore (6-2) won its seventh straight at home behind Cundiff and a defense that blanked Miami (4-4) in the second half. Cundiff connected from 26, 39, 20, 24 yards, and the Ravens held the Dolphins to 24 yards rushing over the final 30 minutes. Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 GREEN BAY, Wis. — Aaron Rodgers threw for 289 yards and three touchdowns, Brandon Jackson scored twice and Green Bay beat disintegrating Dallas. James Jones caught eight passes for 123 yards and a touchdown for the Packers (63), who have won three straight. Green Bay’s Clay Matthews added a final dose of embarrassment in the fourth quarter, picking off a pass from Jon Kitna and running it back 62 yards for a touchdown.

Giants 41, Seahawks 7 N.Y. Giants Seattle

21 14 6 0 — 41 0 0 0 7 — 7 First Quarter NYG—Bradshaw 2 run (Tynes kick), 5:49. NYG—Nicks 46 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 2:18. NYG—Bradshaw 4 run (Tynes kick), 2:03. Second Quarter NYG—Smith 6 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 9:15. NYG—Boss 5 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), :53. Third Quarter NYG—FG Tynes 25, 10:05. NYG—FG Tynes 20, :00. Fourth Quarter Sea—Obomanu 36 pass from Whitehurst (Mare kick), 13:34. A—67,287. ——— NYG Sea First downs 30 8 Total Net Yards 487 162 Rushes-yards 47-197 14-49 Passing 290 113 Punt Returns 3-29 1-6 Kickoff Returns 1-17 8-137 Interceptions Ret. 2-30 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-32-0 12-23-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 0-0 Punts 1-50.0 5-41.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 5-40 9-70 Time of Possession 42:34 17:26 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Giants: Jacobs 11-78, Ware 13-66, Bradshaw 19-57, Manning 1-(minus 1), Rosenfels 3-(minus 3). Seattle: Lynch 1148, Whitehurst 2-2, Forsett 1-(minus 1). PASSING—N.Y. Giants: Manning 21-320-290. Seattle: Whitehurst 12-23-2-113. RECEIVING—N.Y. Giants: Nicks 6-128, Manningham 4-56, Smith 4-46, Bradshaw 4-35, Boss 2-15, Pascoe 1-10. Seattle: Butler 3-5, Stokley 2-26, Williams 2-25, Carlson 2-9, Obomanu 1-36, Baker 1-7, Forsett 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Vikings 27, Cardinals 24 Arizona Minnesota

0 14 7 3 0 — 24 0 10 0 14 3 — 27 Second Quarter Min—Peterson 12 pass from Favre (Longwell kick), 12:17. Ari—Stephens-Howling 96 kickoff return (Feely kick), 12:04. Min—FG Longwell 21, 6:22. Ari—Roberts 30 pass from Anderson (Feely kick), :29. Third Quarter Ari—Adams 30 fumble return (Feely kick), 14:48. Fourth Quarter Ari—FG Feely 22, 12:40. Min—Peterson 4 run (Longwell kick), 3:34. Min—Shiancoe 25 pass from Favre (Longwell kick), :27. Overtime Min—FG Longwell 35, 9:42. A—64,120. ——— Ari Min First downs 13 28 Total Net Yards 225 507 Rushes-yards 21-53 20-80 Passing 172 427 Punt Returns 1-7 7-86 Kickoff Returns 6-198 5-88 Interceptions Ret. 2-73 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 16-27-0 36-47-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 6-24 3-19 Punts 8-47.0 4-47.8 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-39 11-65 Time of Possession 27:13 38:05 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Arizona: Hightower 13-39, Anderson 3-16, Stephens-Howling 4-0, Wells 1-

PA 130 188 175 233

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE East N.Y. Giants Philadelphia Washington Dallas

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Atlanta New Orleans Tampa Bay Carolina

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Green Bay Chicago Minnesota Detroit

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St. Louis Seattle Arizona San Francisco

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Bears 22, Bills 19

Packers 45, Cowboys 7

Chicago Buffalo

Dallas Green Bay

Chicago 22, Buffalo 19 N.Y. Jets 23, Detroit 20, OT Baltimore 26, Miami 10 San Diego 29, Houston 23 Atlanta 27, Tampa Bay 21 New Orleans 34, Carolina 3 Cleveland 34, New England 14 Minnesota 27, Arizona 24, OT N.Y. Giants 41, Seattle 7 Oakland 23, Kansas City 20, OT Philadelphia 26, Indianapolis 24 Green Bay 45, Dallas 7 Open: Denver, Washington, St. Louis, Jacksonville, San Francisco, Tennessee Today’s Game Pittsburgh at Cincinnati, 5:30 p.m. Thursday’s Game Baltimore at Atlanta, 5:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 14 Minnesota at Chicago, 10 a.m. Tennessee at Miami, 10 a.m. Detroit at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Houston at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Indianapolis, 10 a.m. Carolina at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at N.Y. Giants, 1:15 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. New England at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Open: Oakland, San Diego, Green Bay, New Orleans Monday, Nov. 15 Philadelphia at Washington, 5:30 p.m. ——— All Times Pacific

Jets 23, Lions 20 N.Y. Jets Detroit

0 10 0 10 3 — 23 7 0 6 7 0 — 20 First Quarter Det—Pettigrew 10 pass from Stafford (Hanson kick), 9:16. Second Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 31, 4:46. NYJ—Edwards 74 pass from Sanchez (Folk kick), 1:00. Third Quarter Det—Stafford 1 run (kick failed), 8:58. Fourth Quarter Det—Burleson 2 pass from Stafford (Hanson kick), 11:51. NYJ—Sanchez 1 run (Folk kick), 2:46. NYJ—FG Folk 36, :00. Overtime NYJ—FG Folk 30, 12:42. A—57,799. ——— NYJ Det First downs 23 21 Total Net Yards 424 306 Rushes-yards 30-110 28-78 Passing 314 228 Punt Returns 6-62 2-27 Kickoff Returns 5-119 4-115 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-2 Comp-Att-Int 22-39-1 20-37-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 2-12 Punts 7-42.1 9-47.1 Fumbles-Lost 5-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 11-99 11-102 Time of Possession 29:32 32:46 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets: Tomlinson 15-55, Greene 10-46, B.Smith 2-8, Sanchez 3-1. Detroit: Best 16-48, Stafford 4-11, K.Smith 5-10, Stanton 1-6, Felton 2-3. PASSING—N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 22-39-1323. Detroit: Stafford 20-36-0-240, Stanton 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets: Tomlinson 634, Holmes 5-114, Keller 4-59, Edwards 3-78, Cotchery 2-29, Greene 2-9. Detroit: Burleson 7-113, Best 5-40, Pettigrew 3-18, Scheffler 2-22, K.Smith 1-27, C.Johnson 1-13, B.Johnson 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Saints 34, Panthers 3 New Orleans Carolina

7 10 10 7 — 34 3 0 0 0 — 3 First Quarter Car—FG Kasay 20, 10:19. NO—Shockey 7 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 2:28. Second Quarter NO—Graham 19 pass from Brees (Hartley kick), 2:49. NO—FG Hartley 31, :00. Third Quarter NO—FG Hartley 36, 8:38. NO—Greer 24 interception return (Hartley kick), :41. Fourth Quarter NO—Betts 1 run (Hartley kick), 8:12. A—73,191. ——— NO Car First downs 27 15 Total Net Yards 408 195 Rushes-yards 32-165 24-127 Passing 243 68 Punt Returns 3-15 2-18 Kickoff Returns 1-21 5-115 Interceptions Ret. 1-24 1-66 Comp-Att-Int 27-43-1 17-36-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 4-39 Punts 5-46.4 7-47.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-64 10-65 Time of Possession 34:41 25:19 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New Orleans: Jones 6-68, Ivory 12-50, Betts 13-31, Daniel 1-16. Carolina: Sutton 7-41, Stewart 5-30, Goodson 9-29, Clausen 1-11, Fiammetta 1-11, Senn 1-5. PASSING—New Orleans: Brees 27-43-1253. Carolina: Clausen 8-18-1-47, Pike 6-120-47, Moore 3-6-0-13.

Ravens 26, Dolphins 10

RECEIVING—New Orleans: Colston 865, Moore 6-77, D.Thomas 4-45, Graham 3-49, Meachem 2-15, Jones 2-(minus 6), Shockey 1-7, Betts 1-1. Carolina: Goodson 3-18, King 3-17, Sutton 3-15, Gettis 2-22, LaFell 2-14, Rosario 210, Smith 1-9, Fiammetta 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Carolina: Kasay 40 (WR).

PA Home 141 4-1-0 181 3-1-0 225 2-1-0 178 2-2-0 ——— Sunday’s Games

(minus 2). Minnesota: Peterson 15-81, Gerhart 2-6, Favre 2-1, Berrian 1-(minus 8). PASSING—Arizona: Anderson 15-260-179, Breaston 1-1-0-17. Minnesota: Favre 36-47-2-446. RECEIVING—Arizona: Fitzgerald 7107, Breaston 3-28, Roberts 2-29, Dray 1-17, Stephens-Howling 1-9, Spach 1-4, Doucet 1-2. Minnesota: Harvin 9-126, Berrian 9-89, Camarillo 4-66, Shiancoe 4-66, Peterson 4-63, Lewis 4-30, Dugan 1-3, Gerhart 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

New England 0 7 0 7 — 14 Cleveland 10 7 7 10 — 34 First Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 38, 11:49. Cle—Hillis 2 run (Dawson kick), 11:11. Second Quarter NE—Hernandez 2 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 8:43. Cle—Stuckey 11 run (Dawson kick), 3:23. Third Quarter Cle—McCoy 16 run (Dawson kick), 5:53. Fourth Quarter Cle—FG Dawson 37, 10:45. NE—Hernandez 1 pass from Brady (Welker kick), 6:37. Cle—Hillis 35 run (Dawson kick), 2:38. A—66,292. ——— NE Cle First downs 19 22 Total Net Yards 283 404 Rushes-yards 20-68 44-230 Passing 215 174 Punt Returns 0-0 2-18 Kickoff Returns 6-56 3-61 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 19-38-1 14-19-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-9 0-0 Punts 5-41.4 3-35.7 Fumbles-Lost 2-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 3-20 4-28 Time of Possession 21:52 38:08 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—New England: Woodhead 9-54, Green-Ellis 9-14, Brady 1-1, Hoyer 1-(minus 1). Cleveland: Hillis 29-184, McCoy 3-20, Stuckey 1-11, Bell 6-7, Vickers 3-6, Cribbs 2-2. PASSING—New England: Brady 1936-0-224, Hoyer 0-2-1-0. Cleveland: McCoy 14-19-0-174. RECEIVING—New England: Hernandez 548, Gronkowski 4-47, Welker 4-36, Woodhead 2-38, Branch 2-21, Morris 1-22, Tate 1-12. Cleveland: Massaquoi 4-58, Hillis 3-36, Cribbs 2-13, Stuckey 2-6, Watson 1-24, Robiskie 1-20, Moore 1-17. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

7 3 0 0 — 10 7 6 7 6 — 26 First Quarter Bal—McGahee 32 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 12:08. Mia—R.Brown 12 run (Carpenter kick), 5:23. Second Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 26, 14:13. Bal—FG Cundiff 39, 2:55. Mia—FG Carpenter 19, :15. Third Quarter Bal—Mason 12 pass from Flacco (Cundiff kick), 9:23. Fourth Quarter Bal—FG Cundiff 20, 6:45. Bal—FG Cundiff 24, 2:07. A—71,305. ——— Mia Bal First downs 17 23 Total Net Yards 289 402 Rushes-yards 17-73 39-146 Passing 216 256 Punt Returns 0-0 2-12 Kickoff Returns 3-57 3-69 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-50 Comp-Att-Int 22-34-3 21-28-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 4-23 Punts 3-48.0 0-0.0 Fumbles-Lost 4-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 4-23 5-40 Time of Possession 21:38 38:22 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: R.Brown 9-59, Henne 6-13, Williams 2-1. Baltimore: Rice 22-83, McGahee 6-24, L.McClain 5-17, D.Reed 1-15, Flacco 4-7, Koch 1-0. PASSING—Miami: Henne 22-34-3-231. Baltimore: Flacco 20-27-0-266, Koch 1-1-0-13. RECEIVING—Miami: Bess 5-50, R.Brown 5-40, Marshall 5-30, Hartline 4-85, Fasano 3-26. Baltimore: Rice 7-97, Mason 4-42, McGahee 3-42, Houshmandzadeh 2-34, Boldin 2-28, Heap 2-23, Williams 1-13. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami: Carpenter 46 (WL). Baltimore: Cundiff 37 (WL).

West

Eagles 26, Colts 24 Indianapolis 0 17 0 7 — 24 Philadelphia 13 3 3 7 — 26 First Quarter Phi—D.Jackson 9 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 13:14. Phi—FG Akers 22, 11:23. Phi—FG Akers 21, 2:11. Second Quarter Ind—Tamme 3 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 11:58. Phi—FG Akers 31, 6:25. Ind—James 6 run (Vinatieri kick), 1:58. Ind—FG Vinatieri 37, :03. Third Quarter Phi—FG Akers 44, 7:28. Fourth Quarter Phi—Vick 1 run (Akers kick), 13:47. Ind—James 1 run (Vinatieri kick), 1:50. A—69,144. ——— Ind Phi First downs 26 19 Total Net Yards 338 402 Rushes-yards 19-62 31-195 Passing 276 207 Punt Returns 0-0 2-5 Kickoff Returns 4-58 4-75 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-31 Comp-Att-Int 31-52-2 17-29-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-18 3-11 Punts 5-37.8 4-37.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 7-59 14-125 Time of Possession 28:10 31:50 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Indianapolis: D.Brown 15-50, James 4-12. Philadelphia: McCoy 16-95, Vick 10-74, D.Jackson 3-20, Harrison 2-6. PASSING—Indianapolis: Manning 3152-2-294. Philadelphia: Vick 17-29-0-218. RECEIVING—Indianapolis: Tamme 11108, Wayne 11-83, D.Brown 3-47, White 3-42, Garcon 2-15, Collie 1-(minus 1). Philadelphia: D.Jackson 7-109, Maclin 4-48, McCoy 3-8, Avant 2-41, Schmitt 1-12. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Browns 34, Patriots 14

East

Miami Baltimore

Chargers 29, Texans 23

0 7 0 0 — 7 0 28 7 10 — 45 Second Quarter GB—Jackson 9 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 14:15. GB—Jackson 2 run (Crosby kick), 8:26. GB—Jennings 8 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 2:13. GB—Collins fumble recovery in end zone (Crosby kick), 2:04. Dal—Bryant 2 pass from Kitna (Buehler kick), :16. Third Quarter GB—J.Jones 10 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 8:38. Fourth Quarter GB—FG Crosby 26, 13:08. GB—Matthews 62 interception return (Crosby kick), 11:07. A—70,913. ——— Dal GB First downs 12 26 Total Net Yards 205 415 Rushes-yards 14-39 35-138 Passing 166 277 Punt Returns 2-4 5-22 Kickoff Returns 7-172 2-52 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-62 Comp-Att-Int 19-30-2 27-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-17 1-12 Punts 6-52.8 2-49.5 Fumbles-Lost 4-2 2-0 Penalties-Yards 5-40 2-20 Time of Possession 22:04 37:56 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Dallas: Jones 5-16, Barber 614, Choice 3-9. Green Bay: Kuhn 13-50, Jackson 13-42, Rodgers 5-41, Nance 4-5. PASSING—Dallas: Kitna 19-30-2-183. Green Bay: Rodgers 27-34-0-289, Flynn 0-1-0-0. RECEIVING—Dallas: Bryant 9-86, Witten 3-44, Bennett 3-20, Austin 2-16, Hurd 1-11, R.Williams 1-6. Green Bay: J.Jones 8-123, Jennings 7-80, Nelson 4-42, Jackson 4-26, Kuhn 2-12, Crabtree 1-4, Swain 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Green Bay: Crosby 54 (BK).

San Diego Houston

Falcons 27, Buccaneers 21

0 7 7 8 — 22 0 7 6 6 — 19 Second Quarter Chi—Olsen 4 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 12:06. Buf—Parrish 14 pass from Fitzpatrick (Lindell kick), :13. Third Quarter Chi—Taylor 1 run (Gould kick), 6:18. Buf—Jackson 4 run (kick blocked), 2:59. Fourth Quarter Buf—McIntyre 1 run (run failed), 10:24. Chi—Bennett 2 pass from Cutler (Forte pass from Cutler), 6:41. A—50,746. ——— Chi Buf First downs 19 22 Total Net Yards 283 340 Rushes-yards 31-105 18-46 Passing 178 294 Punt Returns 1-3 1-6 Kickoff Returns 4-84 0-0 Interceptions Ret. 2-44 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-30-0 31-51-2 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-10 1-5 Punts 4-41.5 3-29.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-45 4-33 Time of Possession 31:13 28:47 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Chicago: Forte 14-49, Cutler 5-39, Taylor 10-13, Bennett 1-5, Hester 1-(minus 1). Buffalo: Spiller 7-20, Jackson 8-16, Fitzpatrick 2-9, McIntyre 1-1. PASSING—Chicago: Cutler 17-30-0-188. Buffalo: Fitzpatrick 31-51-2-299. RECEIVING—Chicago: Bennett 4-52, Knox 3-49, Olsen 3-29, Forte 3-12, Hester 2-23, Taylor 1-14, Manumaleuna 1-9. Buffalo: St.Johnson 11-145, Parrish 7-60, Jackson 5-20, Evans 3-31, D.Nelson 2-19, Martin 1-11, Jones 1-8, Spiller 1-5. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Chicago: Gould 42 (WR).

14 0 7 8 — 29 10 10 3 0 — 23 First Quarter Hou—Foster 8 run (Rackers kick), 13:06. SD—Ajirotutu 55 pass from Rivers (Brown kick), 9:28. Hou—FG Rackers 27, 4:47. SD—McMichael 11 pass from Rivers (Brown kick), 1:08. Second Quarter Hou—Foster 2 run (Rackers kick), 10:23. Hou—FG Rackers 21, :22. Third Quarter Hou—FG Rackers 25, 8:55. SD—McMichael 12 pass from Rivers (Brown kick), 5:48. Fourth Quarter SD—Ajirotutu 28 pass from Rivers (Tolbert run), 5:17. A—70,886. ——— SD Hou First downs 19 25 Total Net Yards 367 391 Rushes-yards 26-77 34-140 Passing 290 251 Punt Returns 1-0 1-5 Kickoff Returns 5-115 5-122 Interceptions Ret. 1-15 1-0 Comp-Att-Int 17-23-1 21-32-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 2-15 Punts 3-28.7 2-35.0 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 1-0 Penalties-Yards 6-62 4-31 Time of Possession 26:11 33:49 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Diego: Mathews 9-42, Tolbert 8-32, Hester 4-7, Sproles 1-3, Rivers 4(minus 7). Houston: Foster 27-127, Ward 5-12, Schaub 2-1. PASSING—San Diego: Rivers 17-23-1295. Houston: Schaub 21-32-1-266. RECEIVING—San Diego: Ajirotutu 4-111, Crayton 3-70, Hester 3-28, McMichael 2-23, Mathews 2-18, Kr.Wilson 1-37, Sproles 1-6, Tolbert 1-2. Houston: Dreessen 5-66, Foster 4-70, Casey 4-48, Johnson 4-41, Jones 4-41. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.

Tampa Bay Atlanta

0 14 7 0 — 21 7 10 10 0 — 27 First Quarter Atl—Turner 2 run (Bryant kick), 8:06. Second Quarter Atl—Turner 10 run (Bryant kick), 13:39. TB—Benn 14 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 12:10. Atl—FG Bryant 31, 5:27. TB—M.Williams 58 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 2:06. Third Quarter Atl—Palmer 5 pass from Ryan (Bryant kick), 10:31. Atl—FG Bryant 41, :46. TB—Spurlock 89 kickoff return (Barth kick), :30. A—67,266. ——— TB Atl First downs 14 26 Total Net Yards 278 365 Rushes-yards 27-96 33-130 Passing 182 235 Punt Returns 0-0 0-0 Kickoff Returns 5-221 3-70 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-4 Comp-Att-Int 11-22-2 24-36-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-7 0-0 Punts 3-39.0 3-32.0 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 5-30 4-53 Time of Possession 25:54 34:06 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Tampa Bay: Blount 13-46, Freeman 4-26, C.Williams 8-13, Parker 1-7, Benn 1-4. Atlanta: Turner 24-107, Snelling 515, Ryan 3-5, White 1-3. PASSING—Tampa Bay: Freeman 11-222-189. Atlanta: Ryan 24-36-0-235. RECEIVING—Tampa Bay: M.Williams 4-89, Winslow 3-31, Spurlock 2-46, Benn 1-14, C.Williams 1-9. Atlanta: Gonzalez 8-72, Snelling 5-24, White 449, Finneran 3-24, Jenkins 2-55, Palmer 2-11. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None.


D4 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NBA ROUNDUP

AUTO RACING ROUNDUP

Victory in Texas helps Hamlin take Cup lead from Johnson

Los Angeles Lakers Kobe Bryant, right, drives against Portland Trail Blazers’ Andre Miller in the first half of Sunday’s game in Los Angeles. The Lakers cruised to a 121-96 victory over the Blazers.

The Associated Press

Francis Specker / The Associated Press

Blazers fall to perfect Lakers The Associated Press

coach Phil Jackson couldn’t find many nits to pick, directing effusive praise at Gasol and Lamar Odom, who had 21 points and 12 rebounds. “Lamar Odom, right now, he’s an All-Star,” Portland coach Nate McMillan echoed. Kobe Bryant scored 12 points and Ron Artest played stringent defense on Portland star Brandon Roy for the Lakers, who led by 24 points in the first half and 29 down the stretch while outrebounding the Blazers 49-25. “We’re a pretty good team,” Bryant said. “We’re just playing extremely well together. We’re a deep team, we’re an unselfish team, and this is what you get.” Shannon Brown hit three three-pointers while scoring 15 points for the Lakers, who also started 7-0 two years ago and in 2001-02, when they began their roll to their first threepeat under coach Phil Jackson. Los Angeles’ only better starts were in 1987-88 (8-0) and 1997-98 (11-0). Two nights after struggling to hold off Toronto while getting outrebounded by 18 boards, the Lakers expected their biggest test of the young season from the Blazers, who were off to a 5-2 start. Portland has been consistently better during recent head-to-head matchups with Los Angeles, which hasn’t won its season series with the Blazers since 2004-05.

LOS ANGELES — Although Pau Gasol was caught a bit by surprise when Steve Blake lobbed a pass off the backboard to him during a 2-on-nobody fast break, the 7-foot Spaniard still snagged it and slammed it home with gusto. Not much is getting past Gasol or the Los Angeles Lakers — and the two-time defending champions’ opponents haven’t stood much of a chance during a sublime start to the season. Gasol had 20 points, 14 rebounds and 10 assists while completing his fourth career tripledouble by the third quarter, and the Lakers easily improved to 7-0 for the fifth time in franchise history with a 121-96 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers on Sunday night. Gasol clinched his first tripledouble since Feb. 17, 2009, with an assist on Artest’s basket with 3:10 left in the third quarter. He sheepishly acknowledged knowing how many assists he needed to hit the mark, but effusively praised his teammates for making his feat possible in another formidable win for the streaking champs. “We’ve been through so many battles, and we’re still growing as a team,” Gasol said. “Everybody is growing up together.” The Lakers might keep growing, but it’s tough to believe they could play much better. Even

But this one was no contest: The Lakers improved to 5-0 at home with a comfortable lead throughout the final 3½ quarters. In other games on Sunday: Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 HOUSTON — Luis Scola scored 24 points and Kevin Martin added 21 to help Houston win its first game of the season. Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 OKLAHOMA CITY — Ray Allen scored 19 points and Boston’s bench helped prevent a big lead from slipping away in the fourth quarter as the Celtics opened a four-game road trip with a win over the Thunder. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 ATLANTA — Jason Richardson scored 21 points, Steve Nash added 19 and Phoenix held off Atlanta’s second-half comeback to beat the Hawks, who suffered their first loss of the season. 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 NEW YORK — Elton Brand scored 20 points, Lou Williams and Jrue Holiday each had 19, and the 76ers beat the Knicks. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Richard Hamilton scored 27 points and Rodney Stuckey added 21 points and nine assists to help the Pistons beat the Warriors.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Sunday’s games

Lakers 121, Blazers 96 PORTLAND (96) Batum 7-13 0-0 17, Aldridge 3-9 2-2 8, Camby 0-3 1-2 1, Miller 7-14 6-6 20, Roy 1-6 6-6 8, Cunningham 2-5 5-6 9, Matthews 1-5 2-2 4, Johnson 5-7 1-2 12, Fernandez 4-7 3-3 13, Marks 2-2 0-0 4, Babbitt 0-4 0-2 0. Totals 3275 26-31 96. L.A. LAKERS (121) Artest 5-8 0-0 11, Odom 10-15 0-0 21, Gasol 9-13 2-2 20, Fisher 3-7 5-6 12, Bryant 3-11 6-7 12, Blake 2-4 0-0 5, Caracter 3-6 0-0 6, Brown 6-12 0-0 15, Barnes 6-7 0-0 13, Ratliff 0-1 0-0 0, Walton 0-2 0-0 0, Vujacic 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 50-91 13-15 121. Portland 14 22 28 32 — 96 L.A. Lakers 27 31 31 32 — 121 3-Point Goals—Portland 6-20 (Batum 3-6, Fernandez 2-5, Johnson 1-1, Roy 0-1, Matthews 0-2, Babbitt 0-2, Miller 0-3), L.A. Lakers 8-17 (Brown 3-6, Barnes 1-1, Fisher 1-1, Odom 1-1, Artest 1-1, Blake 1-3, Vujacic 0-1, Walton 0-1, Bryant 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Portland 35 (Camby 7), L.A. Lakers 56 (Gasol 14). Assists—Portland 21 (Miller 5), L.A. Lakers 33 (Gasol 10). Total Fouls—Portland 15, L.A. Lakers 26. Technicals—Portland Coach McMillan, Miller, Portland defensive three second, L.A. Lakers defensive three second. A—18,997 (18,997).

Rockets 120, T’Wolves 94 MINNESOTA (94) Beasley 5-12 5-6 15, Love 6-14 4-6 16, Milicic 3-4 1-2 7, Ridnour 1-4 0-0 2, Johnson 2-9 0-0 4, Brewer 3-11 4-8 10, Pekovic 3-9 6-7 12, Ellington 3-10 0-0 7, Tolliver 1-2 2-2 4, Telfair 38 0-0 7, Koufos 1-4 1-2 3, Ager 3-4 0-0 7. Totals 34-91 23-33 94. HOUSTON (120) Battier 3-9 4-4 12, Scola 6-13 12-17 24, Yao 35 7-7 13, Smith 3-11 1-2 7, Martin 9-13 1-2 21, Hill 4-8 6-6 14, Lee 2-9 2-2 7, Miller 0-0 0-0 0, Hayes 3-4 1-2 7, Budinger 2-7 5-5 9, Jeffries 0-3 0-0 0, Taylor 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 38-86 39-47 120. Minnesota 14 23 30 27 — 94 Houston 26 34 37 23 — 120 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 3-13 (Ager 1-1, Telfair 1-2, Ellington 1-3, Johnson 0-1, Beasley 0-1, Tolliver 0-1, Ridnour 0-1, Brewer 0-1, Love 0-2), Houston 5-16 (Martin 2-4, Battier 2-6, Lee 1-2, Smith 0-1, Budinger 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 64 (Love 16), Houston 59 (Scola 8). Assists—Minnesota 11 (Brewer 3), Houston 23 (Smith 6). Total Fouls—Minnesota 34, Houston 22. Flagrant Fouls—Tolliver. A—15,058 (18,043).

Celtics 92, Thunder 83 BOSTON (92) Pierce 6-14 5-6 17, Garnett 3-10 2-2 8, J.O’Neal 1-5 3-4 5, Rondo 5-8 0-2 10, Allen 8-16 0-0 19, Davis 4-7 0-0 8, Daniels 3-5 1-1 7, Erden 2-4 5-5 9, Robinson 4-7 0-0 9, Wafer 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-76 16-20 92. OKLAHOMA CITY (83) Durant 11-22 10-11 34, Krstic 6-12 1-1 13, Ibaka 4-11 0-0 8, Westbrook 6-16 4-5 16, Sefolosha 0-3 0-0 0, Harden 2-2 0-0 6, Aldrich 0-1 0-0 0, Maynor 3-6 0-0 6, Cook 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 32-75 15-17 83. Boston 28 30 15 19 — 92 Oklahoma City 21 16 27 19 — 83

Atlantic Division Boston New York New Jersey Philadelphia Toronto

W 6 3 2 2 1

L 1 3 4 5 5

Atlanta Orlando Miami Washington Charlotte

W 6 4 5 1 1

L 1 1 2 4 5

Cleveland Chicago Indiana Detroit Milwaukee

W 3 2 2 2 2

L 3 3 3 5 5

Pct .857 .500 .333 .286 .167

GB — 2½ 3½ 4 4½

L10 6-1 3-3 2-4 2-5 1-5

Str W-5 L-1 L-4 W-1 L-4

Home 4-0 1-2 2-2 1-3 1-1

Away 2-1 2-1 0-2 1-2 0-4

Conf 5-1 3-2 1-4 2-5 1-1

Away 4-0 1-1 2-2 0-3 1-3

Conf 4-0 3-1 4-1 1-4 1-4

Away 2-1 0-2 1-2 0-3 1-3

Conf 3-2 1-2 2-2 1-4 2-1

Southeast Division Pct .857 .800 .714 .200 .167

GB — 1 1 4 4½

L10 6-1 4-1 5-2 1-4 1-5

Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-2 L-2

Home 2-1 3-0 3-0 1-1 0-2

Central Division Pct .500 .400 .400 .286 .286

GB — ½ ½ 1½ 1½

L10 3-3 2-3 2-3 2-5 2-5

Str W-2 L-2 L-2 W-2 L-1

Home 1-2 2-1 1-1 2-2 1-2

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division New Orleans San Antonio Dallas Memphis Houston

W 6 4 3 3 1

L 0 1 2 4 5

Denver Portland Oklahoma City Utah Minnesota

W 4 5 3 3 1

L 2 3 3 3 6

L.A. Lakers Golden State Phoenix Sacramento L.A. Clippers

W 7 4 3 3 1

L 0 2 3 3 6

Pct 1.000 .800 .600 .429 .167

GB — 1½ 2½ 3½ 5

L10 6-0 4-1 3-2 3-4 1-5

Str W-6 W-3 L-1 W-1 W-1

Home 3-0 2-1 1-2 1-1 1-2

Away 3-0 2-0 2-0 2-3 0-3

Conf 3-0 3-1 2-2 3-3 1-5

Away 2-1 3-2 2-1 1-2 0-4

Conf 4-2 2-2 1-2 2-3 0-3

Away 2-0 0-2 2-1 2-1 0-3

Conf 6-0 4-1 2-3 1-2 1-6

Northwest Division Pct .667 .625 .500 .500 .143

GB — — 1 1 3½

L10 4-2 5-3 3-3 3-3 1-6

Str W-2 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-5

Home 2-1 2-1 1-2 2-1 1-2

Paciic Division Pct 1.000 .667 .500 .500 .143

GB — 2½ 3½ 3½ 6

L10 Str 7-0 W-7 4-2 L-1 3-3 W-2 3-3 L-2 1-6 L-2 ——— Sunday’s Games

Philadelphia 106, New York 96 Detroit 102, Golden State 97 Boston 92, Oklahoma City 83

Home 5-0 4-0 1-2 1-2 1-3

Phoenix 118, Atlanta 114 Houston 120, Minnesota 94 L.A. Lakers 121, Portland 96 Today’s Games

San Antonio at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Golden State at Toronto, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Memphis, 5 p.m.

Atlanta at Orlando, 4 p.m. Denver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Boston at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Denver at Indiana, 4 p.m. Utah at Miami, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Minnesota at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Cleveland at New Jersey, 4 p.m. New York at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Detroit at Portland, 7 p.m. All Times Pacific

3-Point Goals—Boston 4-10 (Allen 3-7, Robinson 1-1, Pierce 0-2), Oklahoma City 4-10 (Harden 2-2, Durant 2-3, Maynor 0-1, Westbrook 0-2, Cook 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Boston 44 (J.O’Neal 9), Oklahoma City 45 (Ibaka 11). Assists—Boston 22 (Rondo 10), Oklahoma City 17 (Westbrook 10). Total Fouls—Boston 16,

Oklahoma City 21. Technicals—Boston defensive three second, Durant. A—18,203 (18,203).

Pistons 102, Warriors 97 GOLDEN STATE (97)

TCU Continued from D1 The squads that finish the season first and second in the standings play in the BCS championship game on Jan. 10 in Glendale, Ariz. TCU’s remaining schedule includes games against San Diego State (7-2) on Saturday and at New Mexico (1-8) on Nov. 27, not the type of opponents likely to impress pollsters or computers. Both the Ducks and Tigers have tougher tests left. Oregon (9-0) plays at California (5-4) on Saturday. After a week off, the Ducks host No. 18 Arizona (7-2) and play at Oregon State (4-4) on Dec. 4. Auburn (10-0) is home for Georgia (5-5) on Saturday, then has a week off. The Iron Bowl against No. 11 Alabama (7-2) is the day after Thanksgiving. A

Seeding

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

FORT WORTH, Texas — Denny Hamlin won at Texas for the second time this season to take over the lead in the closest three-way Chase for the Sprint Cup yet with two races left. Hamlin moved in front with 29 laps to go, then got a push from Matt Kenseth on the final restart with three laps to go Sunday. Kenseth pushed ahead momentarily before Hamlin got right back in front and went on to his series-best eighth victory of the season. For Jimmie Johnson, it was more Texas trouble and a bump in his drive for an unprecedented fifth consecutive title while his Hendrick teammate Jeff Gordon got into a fight on the track. Johnson carried a 14-point lead into Texas, but leaves in second place — 33 behind Hamlin. Kevin Harvick is third, 59 points behind Hamlin. Johnson lost the points lead with a ninth-place finish in a race where he lost ground on two troublesome pit stops. Despite an unusual crew change late in the race, it was too late to get Johnson back ahead of Hamlin and Harvick. “It was just a long day,” Johnson said. “I had speed in the car. We worked our way forward and had issues on pit road. ... We gave away so much track

D.Wright 6-14 4-4 19, Lee 5-11 1-2 11, Biedrins 3-6 0-0 6, Curry 3-12 4-4 10, Ellis 1123 2-2 24, Radmanovic 3-6 0-0 7, Williams 4-8 3-3 12, Carney 1-2 3-4 6, B.Wright 0-0 2-2 2, Bell 0-2 0-2 0. Totals 36-84 19-23 97. DETROIT (102) Prince 5-14 2-2 14, Daye 4-5 0-0 9, Wallace 0-2 0-0 0, Stuckey 7-15 6-6 21, Hamilton 10-17 5-5 27, Villanueva 5-13 4-6 16, Bynum 0-1 0-0 0, Monroe 3-8 1-7 7, McGrady 0-1 1-2 1, Gordon 3-6 0-0 7. Totals 37-82 19-28 102. Golden State 18 27 31 21 — 97 Detroit 23 26 24 29 — 102 3-Point Goals—Golden State 6-23 (D.Wright 3-5, Carney 1-2, Williams 1-3, Radmanovic 13, Bell 0-2, Curry 0-3, Ellis 0-5), Detroit 9-17 (Prince 2-2, Hamilton 2-4, Villanueva 2-6, Daye 1-1, Gordon 1-2, Stuckey 1-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Golden State 51 (Biedrins 13), Detroit 55 (Villanueva 10). Assists—Golden State 19 (Curry 6), Detroit 27 (Stuckey 9). Total Fouls—Golden State 22, Detroit 17. Technicals—Golden State Coach Smart, Hamilton. A—12,813 (22,076).

Suns 118, Hawks 114 PHOENIX (118) Hill 5-10 4-4 14, Turkoglu 4-7 0-0 11, Lopez 3-4 1-1 7, Nash 7-11 4-4 19, Richardson 9-15 0-0 21, Frye 3-7 0-0 8, Warrick 3-5 0-2 6, Dudley 5-8 4-5 15, Dragic 2-5 1-2 6, Childress 4-9 3-4 11. Totals 45-81 17-22 118. ATLANTA (114) Smith 6-10 7-8 19, Horford 13-16 4-5 30, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Bibby 4-8 1-2 12, Johnson 15-27 24 34, Ja.Crawford 3-11 3-3 11, Teague 2-2 0-0 4, Pachulia 0-1 0-0 0, Powell 2-5 0-0 4, Jo.Crawford 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 45-83 17-22 114. Phoenix 30 31 29 28 — 118 Atlanta 28 22 38 26 — 114 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 11-23 (Turkoglu 3-6, Richardson 3-7, Frye 2-5, Dragic 1-1, Nash 1-1, Dudley 1-2, Childress 0-1), Atlanta 7-23 (Bibby 3-6, Johnson 2-6, Ja.Crawford 2-8, Smith 0-1, Jo.Crawford 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 40 (Childress, Hill, Dudley 6), Atlanta 44 (Horford 10). Assists—Phoenix 28 (Nash 15), Atlanta 29 (Johnson 6). Total Fouls— Phoenix 20, Atlanta 22. Technicals—Phoenix defensive three second. A—13,395 (18,729).

76ers 106, Knicks 96 PHILADELPHIA (106) Brand 7-11 6-10 20, Nocioni 4-6 2-2 11, Hawes 3-7 0-2 6, Holiday 6-14 3-4 19, Turner 6-11 2-3 14, Young 1-4 0-0 2, L.Williams 3-12 12-14 19, Kapono 0-1 0-0 0, Meeks 2-6 0-0 5, Speights 2-3 0-0 4, Battie 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 3778 25-35 106. NEW YORK (96) Gallinari 4-11 5-6 15, Stoudemire 8-18 5-8 21, Mozgov 4-6 1-2 9, Felton 2-11 3-3 7, Fields 4-5 0-0 8, Douglas 5-13 7-7 17, Chandler 4-14 2-4 11, Walker 0-1 0-0 0, Turiaf 2-4 1-3 5, Randolph 1-2 1-2 3. Totals 34-85 25-35 96. Philadelphia 33 21 26 26 — 106 New York 25 31 25 15 — 96 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 7-18 (Holiday 4-5, Nocioni 1-2, L.Williams 1-4, Meeks 1-4, Hawes 0-1, Young 0-2), New York 3-19 (Gallinari 2-6, Chandler 1-5, Walker 0-1, Felton 0-3, Douglas 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 57 (Turner 10), New York 55 (Stoudemire 15). Assists—Philadelphia 20 (Holiday 8), New York 20 (Felton 10). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 23, New York 25. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second, New York defensive three second. A—18,735 (19,763).

Continued from D1 The other big misfire with the volleyball rankings is how they account for tournament play. Currently, the only matches the OSAA includes for its power rankings are bracket-play matches. “It’d help if they counted pool play,” Honl says. “(Before power rankings) we used to get credit for a win (for the official record) in pool play if we won both games.” Most regular-season high school volleyball tournaments in the state are set up as follows: Teams begin a tournament in a four- or five-team pool, in which all teams in the same pool play two games (2520, 25-15 for example) against the others. Based on poolplay records, teams are then sent to different brackets. The first-place teams from pool play go to the “gold” bracket, the second-place teams go to the “silver” bracket, and so on. This system guarantees teams multiple matches during the day even if they do not win in pool play. But this presents a major problem for power rankings. Teams are essentially rewarded for not winning in the pool-play round and advancing to a weak bracket, in which wins are easier to come by. “All four tournaments we went to, we advanced to the gold bracket and went 6-0 (in games) during pool play,” Honl recalls. “We’d win a match in bracket play, but then run into Central Catholic or Jesuit.” Bremer makes the point, though, that not all tournaments are set up the same, making pool-play results something of an unknown. “We’ve been in some tournaments with such random formats,” Bremer says. “Some

position from the beginning. It’s tough to get back where we needed to.” The crew for Gordon took over in the No. 48 pit with Johnson after Gordon was hit and crashed during a caution period. An angry Gordon hit Jeff Burton with a hard two-handed

push after Burton sent Gordon’s car crashing. After getting out of his No. 24 car, Gordon walked from the top to the bottom of the track to confront Burton. Gordon shoved Burton, then took some swings before they were separated by two NASCAR safety officials. Hamlin won at Texas in April less than three weeks after surgery to repair a torn ACL in his left knee. His first race after the surgery was a 30th-place finish at Phoenix, where the next race is. Also on Sunday: Vettel wins Brazilian GP SAO PAULO — Sebastian Vettel took the lead at the first corner and cruised to victory at the Brazilian Grand Prix, prolonging the Formula One title race until next weekend’s season finale in Abu Dhabi. Red Bull teammate Mark Webber was second, championship leader Fernando Alonso of Ferrari third and Lewis Hamilton of McLaren fourth. Alonso was the only driver who could have won the championship in Brazil, but his third-place finish was not enough. He has an eight-point lead over Webber and a 15-point advantage over Vettel going into in Abu Dhabi next weekend. Hamilton remains mathematically in contention, 24 points back.

victory in either game will earn Auburn a spot in the Southeastern Conference championship game Dec. 4 against No. 24 Florida (6-3) or No. 22 South Carolina (6-3). As for Boise State, the Broncos (8-0) have four games left that could help them try to track down TCU, but probably won’t do them any good in the national championship race unless Oregon or Auburn drops a game. Boise State plays at Idaho (45) on Friday, then hosts Fresno State (6-2) the following Friday. The Broncos’ stiffest challenge comes the next Friday at No. 21 Nevada (8-1). They finish at home against Utah State (2-7) on Dec. 4. LSU (8-1) moves into Alabama’s spot as the top one-loss team in the standings. The Tigers will need Auburn to lose twice just to reach the SEC championship game out of the West. The Tigers have Louisi-

ana-Monroe (4-5), Mississippi (4-5) and Arkansas (7-2) left on their schedule. Stanford, Wisconsin, Nebraska, Ohio State and Oklahoma State complete the top 10. If the top two hold their ground, TCU and Boise State would be vying for the one automatic bid that goes to the highest-ranking team from the conferences without an automatic berth to the five big-money games — provided that team finishes in the top 12 of the standings. With Oregon and Auburn in the championship game, that so-called BCS buster invite would be to the Rose Bowl. Last season, TCU earned an automatic BCS bid, Boise State was given an at-large bid and the two played in the Fiesta Bowl in Arizona. There’s no certainty an at-large bid would go to the Horned Frogs or Broncos this season, even if they both remain unbeaten.

Larry Papke / The Associated Press

Denny Hamlin shoots blanks from revolvers after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Texas Motor Speedway on Sunday in Fort Worth, Texas.

start the score at four and you play to 21. Some you go to 21 and some you go to 25. Maybe from the OSAA’s standpoint, there’s more (conformity) when you play full matches.” While the OSAA has pledged to review the power-ranking system after its initial year in use, Bremer and Honl, who have won six state titles between them over the last four seasons, seem resigned to work through the current system, at least for this year.

“It is what it is,” Bremer says. “If you’re going to be the best team in the state, you’ll have play the best one way or another.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

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C YC L I NG C EN T R A L Survey results Results from The Bulletin’s online cycling survey. Percent per response from 200 respondents. kind of riding do you Q What enjoy? BMX 2% Cyclocross 19% Commuting 37% Mountain Bike 64% Road 57% 27% Other category best Q Which describes you as a cyclist? Avid recreational/fitness 32% Competitive/racing 22% Occasional rider Lifestyle/commuter 17% Other 12%

41%

consider yourself a Q Dofan you of competitive cycling? Yes No

56% 44%

kinds of cycling topics Q What would you like to read more about in The Bulletin and bendbulletin.com? News about local pros 51% Profiles on local nonpro riders 44% Product reviews 36% Stories on places in Central Oregon to ride 80% Stories about upcoming CO cycling events (races, classes/clinics, tours) 68% Stories related to bicycle transportation and safety 55% Source: The Bulletin

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Ticket Continued from D1 She was asked to help administer a prize raffle held during the gathering. The list of raffle items was impressive — iPods, high-end bicycle clothing, gift certificates for Pilates sessions, and what most who attended would consider the most coveted prize: a custom-built cyclocross bike frame. “I turned to this woman I knew and I said, ‘I can’t win the bike because I’m not a racer, but I’m hoping to win the bike shorts,’ � Dunning recalls. In a room full of ’cross racers, it was Dunning — a woman who had never ridden a ’cross bike in her life and who certainly had no prior intention of taking up racing — who held the winning ticket that night. She instantly became the owner of a new cyclocross bike, which was donated by custom bike-frame builder Jason Quade of Abbey Bike Works in Bend. Dunning attended the party with out-of-town friends who were in Bend to compete in cyclocross nationals. They gave her an ultimatum: “My friend said, ‘You won that bike frame

Central Oregon cyclists enjoy wide range of riding options By Heather Clark For The Bulletin

CYCLING SURVEY

They are alike in their interest in cycling, but bicycle riders in Central Oregon are quite diverse when it comes to what, and how often, they ride. The Bulletin recently conducted an online survey asking cyclists to share their riding habits and to comment on the kinds of local cycling coverage they find most meaningful. Some 200 Bulletin readers responded to the survey, the primary aim of which was to learn more about the inclinations of our cycling readers and to solicit feedback on the types of local cycling coverage that interest them. Forty percent of survey participants indicate that they ride only occasionally, while a third of respondents consider themselves avid recreational riders. Another quarter participate in competition and racing, and slightly fewer than one-fifth are commuters. We asked respondents to indicate the type of bike riding they most enjoy, and it is no surprise that Central Oregon cyclists are not wedded to a single style of riding. While mountain biking was the overall ride of choice at 65 percent, road biking was not far behind with 58 percent, followed by bicycle commuting, cyclocross and BMX. When asked to indicate what other

types of riding appeal to them, participants offered tandem, unicycle, recumbent, triathlon, cruiser and indoor riding. More than 50 percent of respondents are fans of competitive cycling and said they follow racing — local events such as the Cascade Cycling Classic, highprofile international races like the Tour de France, or both. The feedback that we at The Bulletin found most valuable was survey respondents’ preferences of cycling topics they would like to read about in our new weekly “Cycling Central� package. Again, participants were able to select more than one option, and many did. A whopping 80 percent of respondents indicated they want to read about places to ride in Central Oregon, and nearly 70 percent are interested in upcoming local cycling events, such as clinics and classes, races and rides. More than half of the survey participants want local coverage regarding bicycle safety and transportation, while 50 percent are interested in stories on Central Oregon’s numerous professional cyclists. Survey respondents were invited to share additional comments. While the range of suggestions for The Bulletin’s cycling cover-

and you are going to race it. When we come back here next year for nationals, you’re going to be on that bike.’ � Quade built Dunning’s bike frame, made of domestically milled steel and just a tick over four pounds, exactly to her body measurements and riding style, and she received it just in time for the start of the 2010 cyclocross season. The bike, Dunning says, “fits me like a glove.� Dunning, a trade manager for American Licorice Company, attended a series of women’s cyclocross clinics in late summer and joined the Bend-based Pine Mountain Sports team. She committed to participating in one local cyclocross race and one race in this year’s Cross Crusade series in northwest Oregon to “see how it goes.� “There are serious racing teams and then there are teams that run a variety of people,� she observes. “(Pine Mountain Sports) was having a team that was about trying as hard as you could, but it didn’t matter how you did. “It’s great,� she adds, “because it adds to your camaraderie.� Two races, however, have turned into 10. And counting. “There was no doubt in my

mind,� says Dunning, recalling her first race. “I’m coming back.� Dunning’s mountain bike skills are an asset in races where bike-handling skills are rewarded. But it is ’cross racing’s unpredictability that appeals to her most. “The part I find addicting and really exciting,� she explains, “is that so many things can go right and so many things can go wrong during a race. People will get stuck in an area and you’ll pass them, or someone drops a chain and clogs up an area, and you get passed through that. It’s not over till it’s over.� And Dunning is among hundreds of newcomers to cyclocross who turn out to race each week in Oregon. More than 200 riders compete in the beginner men’s and women’s fields at Cross Crusade, whose participation numbers are the highest of any cyclocross racing series in the nation. Dunning finds the laid-back atmosphere that surrounds much of ’cross racing — particularly in the beginner fields — a major attraction as well. “The crowds in a cyclocross race are more friendly and crazy,� she says, “and there are so

age was as varied as the kinds of biking options we enjoy here on the High Desert, we did manage to pick out a common thread. Interest in stories related to safe bike riding — rules of the road, riding etiquette, and safe bicycling routes — was a theme shared by numerous responders. Some respondents were concerned that a cycling-themed sports section each Monday in The Bulletin might serve to exclude coverage of other endurance sports in which many Central Oregonians take part. But we intend to continue our coverage of running, triathlon, swimming and cross-country skiing — just to name a few such popular local endurance activities — on Tuesdays in the “Community Sports� pages, while stories focusing on sports such as alpine and backcountry skiing, snowboarding, rock and mountain climbing, kayaking and more can still be found each Friday in our “Adventure Sports� package. The demographic breakdown of our survey respondents, while not necessarily representing a scientific sampling of Central Oregon cyclists, is worth noting: More than two-thirds of survey participants were men, nearly half were age 55 or older, and more than three-quarters reside in Bend.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 D5

SAFETY TIP: VISIBILITY The return to standard time that kicked in Sunday means the sun sets an hour earlier and cyclists riding home from work or returning from the trails may find themselves in darkness. Making oneself visible on a bike after dark is not only the law, it is a key safety measure, says Kim Curley, community outreach coordinator for Commute Options in Bend. And compliance is both simple — a white light in the front, a red light in the rear — and affordable: Basic lights for visibility range from $10 to $20 and can be purchased at local bike shops and outdoor stores. Brighter lights are more expensive, but they are a better option for riders who want to illuminate their path. Basic-model lights do not illuminate a bike route, Curley explains. “It’s just so people see you.� What the law says: According to the Oregon Bicyclist Manual, lights are required by law when riding after dark. The rider or bicycle must display a white light visible at least 500 feet to the front, and a red light or reflector visible at least 600 feet to the rear. The more powerful the light, the more that riders are visible to others; brighter lights also better illuminate road hazards. A rear light is more visible than a reflector. Front white reflectors are not visible to motorists approaching from a side street and do not meet legal lighting requirements. When to light up: Nothing prevents riders from turning on their lights at all times of the day for added safety, says Curley.

At a legal minimum, bike lights should be illuminated after dark. But from a safety standpoint, turn on bike lights an hour before dark, or anytime conditions are gray or foggy. “To be practical,� Curley offers, “I would put the light on at 4 p.m. for your commute home.� Pick your route: Whether riding back and forth to the trail on a mountain bike or commuting on the road back and forth to work, scouting a well-lit route in advance is an important safety measure, says Curley. “When it’s dark, there are roads that are more friendly (to cyclists) with more lighting, less traffic and better bike lanes. You have that freedom on a bike — to go a block over or go a different way based on the amount of light you have.� What to wear: Cyclists wearing brightly colored or reflective clothing are much easier for drivers to see out on the road, says Curley. “When you’re in a car, your field of vision is limited by steel and glass,� she says. “When you’re on a bike, you’re small, your physical presence isn’t as large as another vehicle. Being brightly colored is certainly an advantage.� Curley recommends avoiding blue, black, gray or brown clothing and opting for bright orange, green or yellow. Another inexpensive option to bolster visibility is the use of reflective strips or bands, which can be placed on a rider’s backpack, clothing or bike. These can be found at bike shops and outdoor gear retailers for less than $10 each. —Heather Clark

Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@gmail.com.

many people who are doing it for fun. There are 80 beginner women ‌ it’s insane. But everybody is so friendly and every walk of life is trying it.â€? Still, when the gun goes off at the start line, Dunning gives it her best effort. She recorded a pair of top-five finishes recently and has never placed out of the top 15. And the rider who says she never saw herself racing bikes now has every intention of lining up for the cyclocross national championships when they return to Bend next month. “I certainly didn’t picture that,â€? she says. “I know I’m at the bottom end of the crowd, but someone’s got to be at the back, right?â€? But that’s no guarantee, either. Like Dunning says, cyclocross racing is unpredictable — just like the chance encounter that brought her to the start line to begin with. After all, it was simple luck of the draw that transformed a longtime recreation rider from spectator to competitor. Lucky her. Heather Clark can be reached at cyclingcentral@bendbulletinn. com.

C    B 

E C 

Please e-mail cycling event information to cyclingcenral@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLASSES/CLINICS

Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.cotamtb.com.

INDOOR CYCLING AND STRENGTH WORKOUT CLASS: Taught by certified cycling coach Joanne Stevens at InMotion Training Studio, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; Tuesdays; six-week session runs weekly Nov. 2-Dec. 14. Cost $60. Drop-in fee $12; class includes on-bike interval training and off-bike strength training. Contact: www.jocoaching.com. “THE REHABILITATION OF ADAM CRAIG:� Learn from the pros about what it takes to get back in the saddle after a major injury, 7-9:30 p.m., Wed., Dec. 8, Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; includes meet-and-greet with Olympic mountain biker Adam Craig, and questionand-answer session; free.

RACES

MISC.

CROSSAFLIXION CUP CYCLOCROSS SERIES: For youths through masters, and beginners through experienced riders, Nov. 27 at Seventh Mountain Resort in Bend; races start at 9 a.m.; registration on race day or at http://signmeup.com; $10-$25 except for kiddie cross race 12 and under, which is free; contact Gina Miller at 541-318-7388 or gina@FreshAirSports.com. 2010 USA CYCLING CYCLOCROSS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: For youths through masters, with nonchampionship “B� races offered, Dec. 8-12 in Bend’s Old Mill District; deadline to avoid late registration fee is Nov. 16; online registration at www.usacycling.org; $45-$65; annual USA Cycling license required for championship races; more information at www.crossnats.com.

CENTRAL OREGON TRAIL ALLIANCE MONTHLY MEETING: Public welcome to participate in discussions on upcoming COTA events, 7 p.m., Nov. 18, Central Oregon Environmental Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668

Criterium racing • Local race promoter lands OBRA crit champs: Bend will be home to the 2011 and 2012 Oregon Bicycle Racing Association (OBRA) Criterium Championships, the statewide bike racing association has announced. OBRA last week confirmed it has awarded the championship to local race promoter Matt Plummer, who coordinates the Central Oregon Racing Criterium Series, a weeknight racing series held each summer at Bend’s Summit High School. The annual state criterium championship, which was previously held in Albany, is a one-day affair and includes 22 championship races for men, women and juniors in a range of age and ability divisions. In 2009, approximately 230 riders from Oregon and southwest Washington attended the event.

Plummer said he expects to hold the criterium championship in August, though a venue for the races has yet to be finalized. A three-judge panel from OBRA also selected sites for two other championships: The 2011 and 2012 road championships are slated for Salem, and the team time trial championships will be held in Corvallis.

Mountain biking • Date set for 2011 national event in Bend: USA Cycling recently announced the official date for the 2011 Marathon Mountain Bike National Championships, which were awarded to Bend earlier this year. The annual event — which crowns 24 national champions in marathon mountain biking — is scheduled to be held on Saturday, Sept. 17. A date for the 2012 championships, also in Bend,

has not yet been set. According to a USA Cycling news release, the 2011 and 2012 Marathon Mountain Bike National Championships will start and end in Bend’s Old Mill District. Competitors will gradually climb for approximately 25 miles toward Mount Bachelor before looping around and descending back to town. The mountain bike marathon event takes place on the heels of another cycling national championship in Bend: the 2011 Masters Road National Championships, scheduled to be held here Aug. 30 through Sept. 4.

Road racing • Annual Cascade Cycling Classic on NRC: The 2011 Cascade Cycling Classic has been scheduled for July 19-24. USA Cycling last week confirmed the dates for the 32nd annual event,

Central Oregon’s long-running stage race, which will once again mark a stop on the National Racing Calendar (NRC). Currently in its 15th season, the NRC is the nation’s premier domestic road cycling series sanctioned and owned by USA Cycling. With an overall ranking system that determines the country’s best individual male and female cyclists, as well as the best teams in the U.S., the NRC features the nation’s top prolevel events and boasts a total prize purse of nearly $1 million. The 29-race calendar is made up of criteriums, one-day races and stage races held at venues across the country. The Cascade Cycling Classic continues to be the only bike race in the Pacific Northwest to earn the NRC designation, which attracts the nation’s most talented teams and riders. — Bulletin staff reports

CYCLING SCOREBOARD CYCLOCROSS CROSS CRUSADE SERIES, NO. 5 Oct. 30 At Clatsop County Fairgrounds, Astoria Central Oregon finishers only Beginner Women — 3, Kate Dunning. Clydesdale — 1, David Taylor. 12, Matthew Lasala. Men A — 8, Damian Schmitt. 18, Patrick Jackson. 25, Matt Fox. 27, Scotty Carlile. 46, Garrett McAllister. Men A, 35-and-older — 6, Tim Jones. 8, Mike Brown. 12, Shane Fletcher. 13, Mike Schindler. 24, Erik Bergstrom. 27, Doug Smith. 28, Wade Miller. 31, Chris Winans. 32, Chad Sage. 34, Sean Rogers. Men B — 28, Anthony Broadman. 31, Cole Sprague. 56, Ben Hoover. Men B, 35-and-older — 3, Seth Graham. 6, Matt Engel. 53, Rob Angelo. 59, Derek Faller.

Men C, 35-and-older — 6, Todd Sprague. 27, Rob Kerr. Men 60-and-older — 1, Don Leet. 3, Amory Cheney. Singlespeed — 1, John Rollert. 19, Mark Campbell. 37, Jon Hansen. 42, Daniel Baumann. Women A — 3, Serena Bishop Gordon. 6, Heather Clark. 9, Laura Winberry. 10, Renee Scott. 14, Becky Bjork. 19, Karen Oppenheimer. Women A, 35-and-older — 16, Sami Fournier. 19, Gina Miller. Women B — 23, Amber Clark. Women B, 35-and-older — 2, Susanna Julbur. 4, Angelina Salerno. 5, Angela Mart. 9, Cary Steinman. 10, Mary Ramos. Junior boys — 1, Colin Dunlap. ——— CROSS CRUSADE SERIES, NO. 6 Oct. 31 At Clatsop County Fairgrounds, Astoria Central Oregon finishers only

Beginner Women — 2, Kate Dunning. Clydesdale — 1, David Taylor. 21, Matthew Lasala. Men A — 4, Damian Schmitt. 12, Patrick Jackson. 28, Matt Fox. Men A, 35-and-older — 3, Tim Jones. 8, Mike Schindler. 19, Sean Rogers. Men B — 21, Cole Sprague. 14, Garrett McAllister. 51, Alex Reightley. Men B, 35-and-older — 16, Matt Engel. 14, Seth Graham. 36, Rob Angelo. 38, Derek Faller. Men C, 35-and-older — 29, Kenny Wolford. 55, Susanna Julbur. Men 50-and-older — 10, Doug Smith. 24, Mike Reightley. Men 60-and-older — 2, Don Leet. Singlespeed — 1, John Rollert. 9, Scotty Carlile. 22, Jon Hansen. 43, Marcus Fortier. 59, Mark Campbell. Women A — 3, Serena Bishop. 8, Laura Winberry. 12, Renee

Scott. 13, Karen Oppenheimer. Women A, 35-and-older — 6, Becky Bjork. 13, Gina Miller. Women B, 35-and-older — 2, Angelina Salerno. 6, Angela Mart. 9, Cary Steinman. Junior boys — 1, Colin Dunlap. ——— APPLE CORE CROSS AT EZ ORCHARDS Nov. 6 At Salem Central Oregon finishers only Men B, 35-and-older — 6, Robert Uetrecht. 13, George Wescott. Men C — 15, Robert Gilbert. 16, Sean Lewis. Men C, 35-and-older — 1, Drew Holmes. Singlespeed — 1, Patrick Jackson. Women A, 35-and-older — 2, Stephanie Uetrecht. Junior boys — 5, Thomas Wimberly.

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D6 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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$1000 Gift Certificate For Product And/Or Services from Quality Builders Digital Living Product And/Or Services

$1000 Lighting Gift Certificate from Quality Builders Lighting & Design

Register and Bid Now! $100 Bead Certificate $100 Dining Gift Certificate $100 Framing Gift Certificate $100 Gift Certificate $100 Gift Certificate $100 Gift Certificate $100 Gift Certificate at Allyson’s Kitchen $100 Gift Certificate for Hoodoo’s Crescent Lake Resort $100 Gift Certificate for the Hunting Enthusiast $100 Gift Certificate to Anytime Fitness $100 Gift Certificate toward Hand-Blown Glass Art by Nancy Becker. $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Watercolor Painting or Print by Mary Marquiss $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Art by Janice Druian $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Painting by Marty Stewart $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Painting or Print by Susan Luckey Higdon $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Watercolor Painting or Print by Annie Ferder $100 Pro Golf Gift Card $100 Toward PANDORA Purchase $1000 Carpet and Pad Certificate $1000 Gift Certificate for Electrical Product And/Or Services $1000 Gift Certificate for Light Fixtures or Lamps $1000 Gift Certificate For Product And/Or Services $1000 Gift Certificate Toward Lennox System $1000 Toward Diamond Engagement Ring $1425 Treatment Certificate $150 Cooking Class for Two People at Allyson’s Kitchen $200 Fishing & Tackle Package $200 Framing Gift Certificate $200 Gift Certificate $200 Gift Certificate for Service/Labor on any Repair of your RV $200 Gift Certificate for the Hunting Enthusiast $200 Gift Certificate Quality Footwear & Outdoor Clothing $200 Gift Certificate Toward Family Photography and/or Products $250 Furniture Gift Certificate

$250 Gift Certificate $250 Gift Certificate at Allyson’s Kitchen $250 Gift Certificate for Any Service Provided by Health Source Chiropractic and Progressive Rehab $250 Gift Certificate for Electrical Product and/or Service $250 Gift Certificate for Light Fixtures or Lamps $250 Gift Certificate in Product And/Or Service $300 Furniture Gift Certificate $300 Gift Certificate for Fine Furniture $400 Gift Certificate $400 Gift Certificate. Quality Footwear & Outdoor Clothing $500 Dental Services Gift Certificate $500 Gift Certificate $500 Gift Certificate at Allyson’s Kitchen $500 Gift Certificate for Electrical Product and/or Services $500 Gift Certificate for Light Fixtures or Lamps $500 Gift Certificate in Product and/or Services $500 Gift Certificate toward Furniture of your Choice $500 Gift Certificate. Quality Footwear & Outdoor Clothing $500 Gift Package - 10 Rounds of Golf and $100 Pro Shop Gift Certificate $500 Home Furnishings Gift Certificate $500 Home Furnishings Gift Certificate $500 Printing and Design Service Certificate $500 Smartlipo Gift Certificate $500 Toward Hearts on Fire Diamond Jewelry of Your Choice 1 Week Rental 331 Mini Excavator 1 Week Rental MT52 Loader with Bucket 1 Week Rental S150 Loader with Bucket 10 Round Punch Card for 9 Holes of Golf 12 Month Membership plus All Access Tanning 12 Month Membership to Anytime Fitness 1-Hr Therapeutic Massage with choice of Ionic Footbath or Far Infra Red Sauna 1-Hr Therapeutic Massage, 30-min. Ionic Footbath and 45-min. Far Infra Red Sauna 1-Year 10x10 Storage Unit Rental 2-Year Annual Pass for Winterizing and DeWinterizing your RV

3 Diesel Oil Changes - Annual Pass 3 Night Stay at The Lodge at Suttle Lake 3 Night Stay at The Lodge at Suttle Lake 3 Oil Changes for Car or Light Truck 30 Minute - Erchonia Ionic Detoxifying Foot Bath 30-Min. Erchonia Ionic Detoxifying Foot Bath and 45-Min. FIR Detoxifying Sauna 35 Minute LIft and Tone Facial 45-Minute Far Infra Red Detoxifying Sauna 48” Culti-Packer. Great for Small Acreage. 6-Month Membership plus All Access Tanning 6-Month Membership to Anytime Fitness 7’ Landscape Rake 7’ Rear Grader Blade 8 Hour Tractor Rental 8 weeks Jiu Jitsu Training 8 Weeks of Acro Fit, 1 Hour Class 1 Day Per Week 8 Weeks of Cheerleading, 1 Hour Class 1 Day Per Week 8 Weeks of Gymnastics 8 Weeks of Tae Kwon Do 8 Weeks Snowboard, 1 Hour Class 1 Day Per Week Adaire Iron Bed Adams Keri Sport Ladies Full Set (pink) Air Conditioning Service - Recharge System Annie Ferder “Six Pack of Primroses” ATV Tune-Up Bagboy Compact Lx Push Cart (silver) Barbara Hudin “Mourning Doves” Barrel Table with Drawers Bentwood Furniture Audio/TV Entertainment Center Black Diamond Hiking Poles Black Zoot Suit Tuxedo Rental Bradington Young Leather Sofa Bridgestone J33R Driver - 10.5 Degree Reg Flex (Pro Launch Blue Shaft) Bridgestone J33R Driver - 10.5 Degree Reg Flex (Aldila NV Shaft) Bridgestone J33R Driver - 9.5 Degree Stiff Flex Bruce Jackson’s “Power of Zen” Bruce Jackson’s “Firefall” Camp Sherman Getaway for 6 Guests Colonic Hydrotherapy “Weight Loss Cure” 15 Sessions

Colonic Hydrotherapy Initial Consult and Treatment Complete Front Brake Service for Most Cars and Light Trucks, Parts and Labor Complete Wedding Tuxedo Rental Package Crown Corner Hutch Denise Hirschberg LAc. Acupuncture Initial Consult, Evaluation and Treatment Dirt Bike Full Suspension Service Dog Kennel, 10’x10’, 6’ tall Dutchtech Model 1200 Vacuum Cleaner European Facial European Facial & Pedicure Five Far Infra Red Detoxifying Sauna Treatments plus Five Ionic Footbaths Ford Ranger Low-Profile Wraparound Bug Shield. Fits 1993-1997 Rangers Ford Super Duty Chrome Bug Shield Installed. Fits 1999-2004 models Ford Super Duty Low-profile Smoked Bug Shield. Installed. Fits 1999-2004 Models Full System and Safety Check for your RV General Implement New 72” Landscape Rake General Implement New Boom Pole General Implement New Harrows, 4 x 8 Set Gift Certificate Ginger Twin/Full Bunk Beds Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material Home Theatre Hook-Up - 3 Hours Labor, Parts Included (Excluding TV Bracket) Hoodoo 2010-2011 AnyCard Hoodoo Ski Area 2010-2011 Season Pass Initial Chiropractic Consult and Evaluation with Sather Ekblad DC Initial Chiropractic or Naturopathic Consult with Payson Flattery, ND, DC Initial Naturopathic Consult with Kerie Raymond InTune Homes 1.5 Hour Home Walk Thru/Audio Consultation Italian Balsamic Vinegar Assortment Janice Druian - “Meditations on a River #3” K2 LOTTA LUV SKIS with Marker ERS 11.0 TC Bindings KitchenAid 90th Anniversary 5 Quart Stand Mixer

Laser Hair Removal LASIK: Custom Vue Wavefront Procedure Lazar Contemporary Swivel Chair Magic Motion Clock Man and Child Premium Tuxedo Rental Package Marty Stewart “Coastal Clouds” Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set Microdermabrasion with European Facial Mountain Hardwear Light Wedge 3 Tent Mountain Hardwear Sentinel Messenger Bag Mountain Hardwear Sub Zero SL Hooded Jacket MVP Skate Party Nantucket Wood Table Lamp New BowTech Compound Bow Nine Body By Laser Lipolaser Treatments Non-Surgical Face It - Face Lift NORDICA ENFORCER SKIS One 60-Minute Acupuncture/Asian Medicine Consultation and two 30Minute Qi Gong Classes One 60-Minute Physcial Therapy Evaluation and Two 30-Minute Pilates Lessons One Gift Certificate for Ski Jacket One Hour Lesson with PGA TOUR Academy One Night Stay Midweek in Ranch House One Ton of Grass or Alfalfa Hay One Year Couples Non-Tennis Membership One Year Couples Tennis Membership One Year Family Non-Tennis Membership One Year Family Tennis Membership One Year Fitness Membership One Year Individual Non-Tennis Membership One Year Individual Tennis Membership One-Month Supply of Kombucha Mama, Includes 1st Growler and 3 Refills One-Year Jazzercise Membership Oreck Halo UV-C Vacuum Cleaner Oreck Little Hero Canister Vacuum and Car Vac Combo Pack Package of Two Premium Tuxedo Rentals Photo-Rejuvenation Facial Ping G10 Irons set with Graphite Shafts, 3-PW, Reg. Flex Premium Storage Building 10’x10’ with Peaked Roof Premium Tuxedo Rental

Premium Western Tuxedo Rental Preschool Gymnastics Gift Certificate Print by Mary Marquiss Private Skate Party - Up to 25 Skaters Private Skate Party - Up to 50 Skaters Punch Card for 12 Large Buckets of Range Balls Radiator Coolant Flush Remote Car Starter w/ 6-Channel Alarm Remote Car Starter with 3-Channel Alarm Remote Car Starter with Keyless Entry Scott Kay Designer Bracelet Scott Kay Designer Necklace Season Golf Pass - 18 Holes Per Day for 1 Full Season Set of 4 Goodyear Wrangler Radial Tires Shun Classic 3-Piece Knife Starter Set Smile Makeover: Seen on Extreme Makeover Snowmobile Pre-Season Tune-Up Sofa - Craftsman, Casual Contemporary, Versatile Fabric Colors Sport Bike Tune-Up Steelheader Sponsorship Susan Luckey Higdon “Good Gravel” Three Far Infra Red Detoxifying Sauna Treatments plus Three Ionic Footbaths Three-Channel Car Alarm Tracy Leagjeld “Spring at Todd Lake” Transmission Service:Most Cars & Trucks Two Day Tractor Rental with Implement Trailer Two Night Stay in Junior Suite Two Night Stay Midweek in Cabins #1 or #2 Two Nights Junior Suite Mark Spencer Hotel Two Nights Lodging in Grand Pacific Suite Two Nights Lodging in Inglenook Room Two Nights of Oceanfront Lodging in Yachats Twosome of Golf on Nicklaus Course Watercraft Winterize Service Wedding Accessory Package Wedding Rental - 50 Chair Covers with Sashes Wheel Kit Trailer for Squeeze Chute White Zoot Suit Tuxedo Rental Women’s Arc’Teryx Gamma MX Jacket Women’s Icebreaker Jetter Jacket Zoom Teeth Whitening

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 E1

CLASSIFIEDS

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B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted:Jewelry buffer/polisher, silver smithing tools, equip & supplies. 541-350-7004 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-7959.

203

Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Beagle Mix, 8 weeks old, res- German Wirehaired Pointer Pups, champ bloodlines, cued, male, $75, great colors, $400. 541-576-3701, 541-536-4440 541-548-3408 Beautiful Purebred Yellow Lab. Call for info. $400 OBO. 541-508-6387 Bernese/Newfoundland pups, 3 wks old, 5 females, 2 males, $600-$675, $250 deposit. Wormed, dewclaws. Ready Golden Doodles pups ready for mid-Dec. 541-279-7914 their new home! $500. Beautiful! 541-279-9593. Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready now. Females $850, males $800. 541-852-2991. CAVALIER KING CHARLES PUREBRED pups, 3 boys @ $800 each; 1 girl, $900. References avail. 541-664-6050 shellyball1@mac.com

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chihuahuas, Applehead, 2 males, 5 weeks old, $250 each. 541-593-0223.

BeeCrafty Holiday Show November 12: Noon - 7 PM November 13: 10 AM - 5 PM Middle Sister Conference Hall, Deschutes County Fairgrounds, Redmond. 80+ local artisans & crafters will be selling their handcrafted items. Admission: $1.00 donation to be given to The Kid's Center & CASA of Central Oregon Information: 541-536-5655

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

2 Baby Bearded Dragons, $50 each. 2 Baby Chameleons, $50 each. 541-350-8949 Australian Shepherd male, red merle, 12 weeks old, perfect markings, has had two sets of vaccines and dewormings. 774-487-7933 Bend

1 7 7 7

Cockapoo pups AKC parents. Low shed, great family dogs. $300. 541-504-9958 Cockatiel, young male (we think) seeks new home. Good whistler. Experienced bird owners to reply. $30. 541-317-8987

Dachshunds puppies, 2 males, $200. Call 541-788-1289 olesonmd@hotmail English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 7 mo. old, all shots, $1500. 541-325-3376. English Bulldog Male, Intact, AKC Great with kids and animals. $500 541-588-6490.

Japanese Chin / Westie-Cairn mix, 8 wks, 5 Fem., $150 ea. Shots/wormed. 541-848-3525

KITTENS & cats avail. thru rescue group. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Visit at sanctuary Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt, 65480 78th, Bend. Map/photos/more at www.craftcats.org. 541 389 8420 or 598 5488 for info. We still have many to place, so adoption fees are temporarily reduced this weekend. KITTENS in Foster Home, $40 ea. incl. spay, neuter, shots and wormed. 541-548-5516. KITTENS, social, playful, handraised in rescue group foster homes, ready to adopt! Altered, ID chip, vaccinated. Small adoption fee/donation to offset some vet costs. Avail. only Sat/Sun 11-5, Tom Tom Motel, see mgr, 3600 N 3rd, Bend, near Sonic drive-in. Info: 541-815-7278 Lab/German Short-Hair pups. 2 Black, 2 yellow. $50. 8 weeks. Shots, wormed, and ready. Call 541-281-8297

English Setter Purebred pups ready for homes. $500 female (5), $400/ male (1), dam & sire on site. Great bird hunting/family dogs. 541-280-2597

LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

German Shepherd Puppies, 7 weeks, black, parents on site, $350. 541-536-5538

Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, $250 to $450. 541-954-1727

Maltese AKC, 1 female, 1 male; Malti-poos 2 females. Vet checked, 1st shots & dewormed. No AM calls or shipping; cash only. 541-350-5106

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O r e g o n

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267

Furniture & Appliances

Ski Equipment

Sporting Goods - Misc.

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Bid Now!

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

25¢ candy vending machines, not placed, exc cond, extra parts, $150 ea 541-536-4359

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Leave message, 541-923-6987

Maltese female puppy AKC, shots, dewclaws, 3 mos old, a little powder puff! $400. 541-536-2181; 541-728-8067 Miniature Schnauzer, purebred Male, 8 weeks, first shots, $250. 541-536-6262 Mini Australian Shepherds, Blue Merle Males, superior looks/disposition,from NSDR reg. parents, avail. 11/6, 541-504-4624,541-548-0852

Mini-Schnauzer, male, “Merlin”, young, very cute, $175 rehomeing fee, 541-389-2412.

You Can Bid On: Adaire Iron Bed, $900 Value at Edman Fine Furniture (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Papillons (3), 6 mo. female, Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne Style, wing back, burgundy black/white, $300, 4.5 yr. feplaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323. male, red/white, $250, 5 yr. old male, can be papered,$350, French Provincial Dresser, $65. alvinoshields@yahoo.com Nice Rocker, $45. Please call 541-420-2220. Pit Bull puppies, very cute, 1st shots, ready for good homes, FRIDGE: Amana 22 cu.ft. Mdl 3 @ $75 ea. 541-280-3992 ABB2223DEW with icemaker, bottom freezer, beautiful Pitbull Puppy, chocolate Male, condition, $400 OBO. family raised, guaranteed, 541-419-0882 or 923-5657 $150 OBO. 541-325-1391 POODLES AKC Toy, tiny toy. Also Pom-a-Poos. Home raised! 541-475-3889

Purebred, very small, rare, chocolate brown female Pomeranian puppies ready Dec. 1. Great for Christmas gift. AKC registered. (mother weighs pound and a half) Call to reserve your little angel. 541-728-8323 or 541-382-7786 Shawna. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Siberian Husky, AKC 13 weeks, both parents on site. $450 OBO. Josh, 541-633-9160

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Loveseat & Sofa, tan microfiber. Paid $800 3 mos ago; sell for $400. 541-728-0601 ROLLTOP DESK: Old but not antique, very good shape. I paid $500, will sell $300. 541-420-3344, 541-508-8522

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

210

Antiques & Collectibles

You Can Bid On: $500 Home Furnishings Gift Certificate at La Z Boy Furniture Gallerie (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Health and Beauty Items Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Mountain Hardwear Sub Zero SL Hooded Jacket, $275 Value at Mountain Supply

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

You Can Bid On: Smile Makeover: Seen on Extreme Makeover, $7,600 Value at Steve Schwam, DDS (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

245

Golf Equipment Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

249

Art, Jewelry and Furs Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Ping G10 Irons set with Graphite Shafts, 3-PW, Reg. Flex, $900 Value at P r o G o lf (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, $295! 541-280-5006 Shower Enclosure 2 doors, 5’wx6’h, includes all hardware. $25. 541-923-0041. W a n t e d - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263 You Can Bid On: Snowmobile Pre-Season Tune-Up, $100 Value at J D P o w e r s p o rt s (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Tools Drill Press, Delta 12”; Craftsman 10” Table Saw, Ryobi 9” band Saw; Ryobi 16” Jig Saw; 541-388-6729.

264

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

357 Stainless Steel Revolver, $300; 38 S&W police revolver, $200, 541-480-1337.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

COLT 1911A1 Series 80 45 ACP 2 8-round mags, orig. finish w/wear, exc. mech. cond., $450. 541-447-6061 lve msg.

215

Coins & Stamps

FEG M1937M 380 ACP, exc. finish cond., w/orig. holster. $375. 541-447-6061 lve msg.

Glock 22, 40 S&W with holster & mags; Ruger SR9, w/same, US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & $525 ea. 541-279-3504 Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, Find It in rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & The Bulletin Classifieds! dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex 541-385-5809 & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. BedGUN SHOW rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 Nov. 13th & 14th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds 240 Buy! Sell! Trade! Crafts and Hobbies SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables 18” Rock Saw, $975. Rock $8 Admission sander & polisher, $300. All OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS great cond! 541-350-7004 541-347-2120

WANTED TO BUY

242

Bid Now! Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Ariens 2006 . Big job capable 11.5 hp 28". Electric start. $800. 541-330-8285

You Can Bid On: $100 Gift Certificate toward purchase of Original Painting by Marty Stewart at Tumalo Art Company (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Thomas Kinkade litho-canvas, 1998 “Stairway to Paradise,” 24.5x34”, framed, VOP I, #101 of 3950, smokeless home. $500. 541-598-7219

253

TV, Stereo and Video 52” Samsung 2006 big screen, works great, exc cond. Must sell, $500. 541-480-2652.

255

Computers

You Can Bid On: 12 Month Membership to Anytime Fitness, $468 Value at Anytime Fitness

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790. Snow Plow, Meyers 6 ft. blade, angles both right, left & straight, all hydraulic controls $1450. 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800, leave msg.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

HUNTER RETIRING! Rifles & shotguns for sale. Call 541-382-7995, evenings.

267

Travel/Tickets

Fuel and Wood

Ruger .22 Single 6, 3 Screw revolver, as new with box, $400 Cash, 541-504-9210.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Sporting Goods - Misc. ATLAS 833 Snowshoes, used twice, like new. Paid $139; sell for $65. 541-549-6036

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $110/cord rounds, delivered in Bend, Sunriver & LaPine, 1½ cord min., fast service 541-410-6792 or 382-6099.

247 You Can Bid On: Two Nights Lodging in Inglenook Room, $390 Value at Overleaf Lodge (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

S U P E R T O P S OIL w w w .hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found jacket/coat, 11/2, name brand, NE 3rd/Franklin area. email: hikealot@q.com FOUND Ring, solid silver from Israel, at Les Schwab Amphitheater. 541-788-7244 Found Water Pump, 11/1, on American Ln, call to identify, ask for Craig, 541-948-3588. Found Young Blue Heeler near Costco. Email info to: mocachocolate68@yahoo.com

IF FOUND, please call (541) 419-6575. It very important to my family. A reward will be given if found & returned. LOST 3 month old orange & white striped tabby cat, SE Tempest area. 541-382-9768 Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893.

258

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 You Can Bid On: Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set, $2,098 Value at Lance and Sandy's Maytag

SNOWBLOWER 5 HP 22” MTD $200. 541-389-7472.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ 266 software, to disclose the Heating and Stoves name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Certified Woodstove, used, but in good shape, $250. Phone defined as those who sell one 541-389-9138 computer.

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: 1 Week Rental S150 Loader with Bucket, $810 Value at Bobcat of Central Oregon

541-389-6655

Snow Removal Equipment

Browning, made in Belgium, Grade II Auto.5, 12 ga, 3” Mag., 90-95% cond. $1,000 OBO. 541-447-7272

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Bid Now!

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

You Can Bid On: 8 Weeks Snowboard, 1 Hour Class, 1 Day Per Week, $110 Value at Acrovision Sports Center

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

248

Bid Now!

Exercise Equipment www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Hoodoo Ski Area 2010-2011 Season Pass, $585 Value at Hoodoo Ski Area

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

246

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Bid Now!

244

Snowboards

3 Plots at Redmond Memorial Cemetery, $600 each or best offer. Call 360-254-3186

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Bed Frames,2 Antique, twin, ca. 1900,carved headboard/footboard, $200, 541-815-5000

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Antique German Heco beautiful floral Anniversary Clock, $110. 541-390-6016

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

You Can Bid On: K2 LOTTA LUV SKIS w/ Marker ERS 11.0 TC Bindings, $1,185 Value at Powder House

Sofa w/recliners on ends; great for room w/limited space. Dark Blue; in great cond. $225, 541-322-6261

Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & cute, 8 weeks old, $240 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, cash. 541-678-7599 541-280-7959. Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st 212 shots, $550, 541-536-3108

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Jack is a family friendly, 5 year old Am/Staff who is looking for a place where he can lounge inside and be spoiled. He is very gentle and friendly. Neutered. FREE!! Please call John at 541-390-9004

C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372

English Springer Spaniels, AKC Reg., black/white ready to go! $750. 541-408-6322 www.kennykennels.com

S . W .

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com


E2 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

Employment

300 400 308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

2006 Challenger 16x18 inline Baler, low bale count, excellent cond, $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713.

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: General Implement New 72" Landscape Rake, $700 Value at Superior Tractor

Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin in Jan. Registration now open, www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 SECURITY DPSST UNARMED SECURITY CERTIFICATION CLASS TO BE HELD ON 11-13-2010 IN BEND. AFTER COMPLETING CLASS YOU WILL BE READY TO GO TO WORK IN THE SECURITY FIELD. 541-550-9260 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION Kioti CK-20 2005, 4x4, hyrdostatic trans, only 85 hours, full service at 50 hrs., $8000 or make offer, 541-788-7140.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Small bale orchard/alfalfa mix, $160/ton. Volume discounts, delivery avail. 541-480-8648. CLEAN GRASS HAY, small bales, $4/bale, $100/ton. Other quality hay available. Madras area, 541-490-5440 or 541-475-3697.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Powder Creek Manger Horse Feeders (2), w/hooks to hang in barn, stall or pen, ea. $40, 541-923-0442

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Shetland Pony weanling colt, Black, $200. 541-383-4552 PLEASE leave message

358

Farmers Column 12x24 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1743 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

375

Meat & Animal Processing Meat Goats, (3), $100 each, please call 541-923-8370 for more info.

476

476

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

DELIVERY/ SPA TECHNICIAN immediate opening for hard worker with CLEAN driving record and valid license. Must be able to do heavy lifting. Spa experience a plus. Fax resume to 541-388-4055. NO PHONE CALLS.

Individual Placement and Support (IPS) Supported Employment (SE) Trainer performs fidelity reviews and provides training to statewide programs serving people with serious mental illness. Extensive travel within Oregon. BA in a behavioral science required; Master’s degree preferred. Experience with program evaluation and SE preferred. Hiring range $18.84 $23.00/hour DOQ. Excellent benefits. Visit www.optionsonline.org and click on Jobs or call 541-476-2373. EOE. Fax application to 541-479-3514.

Dental Receptionist/Office Manager, Attractive benefit package. Must be detailed in computer work & have exc. people skills, Refs. required. Fax resume to 541-475-6159.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825 Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for two 24-hour shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate, and pass criminal background check. Ref. required. 541-447-5773. Caregivers Visiting Angels seeks compassionate, reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. Experience req’d. Must pass background check & drug test. Apply at our office located within Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend. No phone calls, please. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Human Resources Manager

This position is responsible for the development and implementation of Ranch-wide HR strategies, plans and programs, which facilitate growth and maximize customer service levels. Serves as a resource for the senior management team in the areas of, hiring, training, succession planning, performance evaluation, compensation, benefits, productivity analysis, employee morale, employment litigation, legal/regulatory compliance, and safety/risk management. Benefits include med/dent/life, paid vacation and holidays, discounts on food and merchandise, 401k. 5-10 years experience in HR management. Position will close Nov 30. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com.

Maintenance Technician Position: 96-unit Apartment Beautiful Community, has an immediate opening for a highly motivated and professional individual with strong background in apartment/building maintenance. The ideal candidate will have maintenance experience with a strong desire for a career in residential property management. Position requires employee to provide their own tools and On-Call Responsibilities. Hourly plus a free apt., required to live on-site. Exc. benefit package including: paid holidays, vacation, full medical, dental and 401k package avail. after 6 months of employment. Preemployment drug & physical screening required. Send resume to: 1-541-548-1384 Equal Opportunity Employer

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Medical billing Primary care clinic needs biller familiar with Medicare and commercial insurances. Please send resume to cketron1948@gmail.com

Plant Manager ED STAUB & SONS PETROLEUM is looking for a Bulk Plant Manager to over see its' fuel and propane operation in Redmond, Oregon.

The successful candidate will possess management and supervisory experience, as well as being a motivated, self-starter. Responsibilities include, maintaining operations, add to, as well as maintain current customer base, review and be accountable for financial statements, expenses, overhead, credit /collections, reconcile and update inventory, keeping the plant profitable, and managing a staff of up to 10. Must possess a CDL with hazmat endorsements.

READERS:

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Fax Resume to 530-667-2971, or email to ginger.rayl@edstaub.com.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

541-383-0386

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Sales

WANNA PHAT JOB? HHHHHHHHH DO YOU HAVE GAME? HHHHHHH All Ages Welcome. No Experience Necessary. We Train! No Car, No Problem. Mon. - Fri. 4pm -9pm, Sat. 9am - 2pm. Earn $300 - $500/wk. Call Oregon Newspaper Sales Group. 541-306-6346 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Social Services Second Nature Cascades is a dynamic and growing wilderness therapy program seeking an experienced doctoral (preferred) or master’s level therapist to join our clinical team based in Bend, Oregon. Qualifications: Candidate must be eligible for licensure in Oregon and experienced working with adolescents in a therapeutic wilderness setting and with IECA consultants. Contact: J Huffine, Ph. D. j@2ncascades.com

Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600 507

627

Real Estate Contracts

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

BEND 6 Bedroom Luxury vacation rental, centrally located, available Thanksgiving/ Christmas. 541-944-3063 or see www.bluskylodge.com

630 Trucking JOHN DAVIS TRUCKING in Battle Mountain, NV, is currently hiring for: CDL Class A Drivers. MUST BE WILLING TO RELOCATE. For application, please call 866-635-2805 or email jdtlisa@battlemountain.net or website www.jdt3d.net

The Bulletin Classifieds

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

Employment Opportunities

Advertise your open positions.

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor! Database SpecialistJELD-WEN, inc has two openings for Database Specialists. Ideal candidates will be detail orientated with strong organizational and follow through skills; the ability to handle multiple tasks; the willingness to learn and the ability to work individually or within a group. Must be comfortable performing data entry, programming and problem solving. Associates degree or equivalent along with programming experience is required. Positions are located in either Klamath Falls or Bend, Oregon. View the full job description at www.jeld-wen.com. Send resume to jobs@jeld-wen.com. EOE.

CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

528

631

Loans and Mortgages

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities

Avail. now,unfurnished 1 bdrm. condo at Mt. Bachelor Village, W/S/G/elec, amenities, lower level, no smoking/pets $650+dep, 541-389-1741 A Westside Condo @ Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G pd. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows $675, 2 bdrm, 1½ bath ½ off 1st Mo. Rent 541-330-0719

Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's Dishes & Collectibles" Pattern matching china & dish business...very fun! Extensive large inventory all incl. w/storage racks & packing material. Work from home part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email me at patorre@msn.com for more information if you are interested.I am moving to AZ to retire again. $20,000 OBO!

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1/2 OFF 1ST MO! 2 bdrm., 1 bath in 4-plex near hospital. Laundry, storage, yard, deck, W/S/G paid. $600+dep. No dogs. 541-318-1973. #1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

For Rent By Owner: 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, w/garage, hardwood downstairs, new carpets, $795/mo., please call 541-480-8080.

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Newly painted 2 Bdrm 1 bath in triplex, gas stove, private yard, plenty of parking space, no smoking; cat OK. $520/ mo + deposit. 541-419-4520


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

636

642

652

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NW Bend

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D included! $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Autumn Specials Are Here!

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Great NW Location! Exquisite, Studio cottage, short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $575 Avail. 12/1, 503-729-3424 . Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Clean, energy efficient nonReach thousands of readers! smoking units, w/patios, 2 Call 541-385-5809 on-site laundry rooms, storThe Bulletin Classifieds age units available. Close to GREAT WEST SIDE location, schools, pools, skateboard $895. 2 bdrm/2 bath home, park, ball field, shopping censeparate 2-car garage, house ter and tennis courts. Pet totally restored. W/D. Call friendly with new large dog 831-901-9020. run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. Older 1 Bdrm cottage, garage,

541-385-5809 Comfy furnished studio., all util. included, indoor pool, no pets, ref. and credit check, $495, 1st, last and $300 dep. 541-382-3672 leave msg. Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hookups, storage, deck, W/S paid, $600 +dep. no pets,541-480-4824 1 Mo. Free Option.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

Like New Duplex. Nice neighborhood. 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced yard, central heat, fully landscaped, $675+dep. 541-545-1825.

large yard, no pets, washer & dryer incl, refs & credit check, $525, 1st/last/dep. 541-382-3672 leave msg.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

61166 Larkspur Loop - Cute 3 Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood Bdrm 2 bath, fenced yd, dbl floors, granite counters, back garage, 1100 sq ft, 1 yr lease, deck, garage, W/D hookup, $850/mo + $800 dep; $200 quiet st., 2025 NW Elm, off 1st month. 541-389-9303 $625. 541-815-0688.

656

TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $600 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

648

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent SW Bend 3 Bdrm 2 bath, 1.15 ac. 800 sq ft shop/4-car garage, utilities furnished except elec. $995/mo + $750 sec dep. 541-228-5131; 541 517-4345 $925: 2 bdrm, 1 bath log home, 19427 Kemple Dr., west side location, $250 cleaning dep., call 503-860-2824.

61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. views. No pets or smoking Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), country home with wood W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500 stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068 658 Look at: Bendhomes.com Houses for Rent for Complete Listings of The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Redmond Area Real Estate for Sale Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family Happy holidays! Enjoy living at Classified Rep. to get the room, w/woodstove, new 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious new rates and get your ad carpet/paint, single garage 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 w/opener. $850/mo. baths, W/D hookups, fenced 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. 650 Rent starts at $545 mo. 834 NE Modoc Ct. Houses for Rent 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 Newer, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, MFG NE Bend home w/2 car garage. appl. 642 & heat pump. 1260 sq.ft. Yard w/sprinkler system, Apt./Multiplex Redmond 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1092 sq.ft., wood stove, newer carpet, corner lot. One pet possible vinyl, fenced yard, on approval and dep. Quiet 1104 NW 7th St., #22, 1 single garage, $825/mo. neighborhood. $850 mo.+ Bdrm., 1 bath, $425, no 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 dep. Call (503) 803-4718 credit checks, 1st & last only, avail. 10/1, please call A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 Cozy 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2-car ga541-788-3480. bath duplex in Canyon Rim rage, close to hospital, shopVillage, Redmond, all appliping, Mtn View HS. Available 1st Month Free w/ ances, includes gardener. now, no smkg or pets. $850/ 6 mo. lease! $795 mo. 541-408-0877. mo, 1yr lease. 541-923-7453 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. 660 Close to schools, parks & 652 Houses for Rent shopping. On-site laundry, Houses for Rent no-smoking units, dog run. La Pine NW Bend Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, super clean, Beautifully furnished (or unfur541-923-1907 move-in ready, mfd home, nished) 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW www.redmondrents.com new wall to wall carpet, incl. Crossing, $2695, incl. cable, range, fridge, W/D, dbl. ga4-plex SW Redmond 2 bdrm internet, garbage, lawn care; rage, no pets/smoking, $695 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D min 6 mo lease. 541-944-3063 mo, 1st & last, $750 security, hkups, garage, fenced yard. $250 cleaning dep., $25/ap2 bedroom. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. CLEAN, small plicant screening fee for Large yard, wood heat. $675 Pet negotiable 541-480-7806 credit check, rental history & + last + dep., Local ref., criminal background check. A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In no pets. 1015 NW Ogden. Please call 503-637-5054 or quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, 503-351-1516 SW Canyon/Antler. Hard- FABULOUS 3500 sq. ft. 5 bdrm, woods, W/D. References. 3 bath home in great neigh664 $550+utils. 541-420-7613 borhood, fenced yard. $1850 Houses for Rent +$500 security deposit. Avail. 11/10. 541-749-0724. Furnished

personals

Professional Golfer looking to drive your car to Palm Springs before Thanksgiving, Brandon, 541-693-4119.

Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. 541-389-5408

RIVERFRONT: walls of windows with amazing 180 degree river view with dock, canoe. piano, bikes, covered BBQ, $1450. 541-593-1414

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 E3 671

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Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

Homes for Sale

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Travel Trailers

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295, 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: Hardwood or Laminate Flooring Material, $1000 Value at Carpetco Flooring (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

700

You Can Bid On: Oreck Little Hero Canister Vacuum and Car Vac Combo Pack, $189.99 Value at Oreck

NEW HOME at 20114 Carson Creek, Bend. 3 bdrms, 2.5 bath, 1488 sq. ft., corner lot. Will consider trades. Call 541-480-7752. Price $159,900

705

748

Real Estate Services

Northeast Bend Homes

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $112,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

745

Homes for Sale

ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

749

Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, exc. cond., $1700. 541-647-4641 or 541-923-6283.

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010, Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $159,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in 755 this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which Sunriver/La Pine Homes makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or STICK-BUILT 1 bedroom house on an acre for sale discrimination based on race, in La Pine. color, religion, sex, handicap, Only $72,5000. familial status, marital status 541-536-9221. or national origin, or an intention to make any such 771 preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status Lots includes children under the Bank Owned Bargain, age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant Entry level home in SW Bend, women, and people securing 3 bdrm., 2 bath, $104,900, custody of children under 18. 20088 Mt. Hope Ln. Call Kurt, 541-815-2182. This newspaper will not River Park Real Estate knowingly accept any adverServices. tising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our Exceptional Investment readers are hereby informed 1+ acre in Bend: $65,000 that all dwellings advertised Property Zoned RM. in this newspaper are avail**Bids Due Nov 10th!** able on an equal opportunity Call Steve: 503.986.3638 basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free 773 at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for Acreages the hearing impaired is 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, 1-800-927-9275. quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, Bid Now! water near by, $250,000 www.BulletinBidnBuy.com OWC 541-617-0613 Buy New...Buy Local

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

FARM FOR SALE! Vale, OR. 151 acres irrigated land w/150 acres dry hillside pasture. 4 Bdrm home, outbuildings & corrals. Irrigation well & 1884 water rights from creek. Near Bullycreek Reservoir w/fishing, boating & camping. Area known for pheasant, quail & chukkar hunting; deer & elk hunting nearby. Shown by appt only! $1,250,000. 1-208-466-8510.

775 You Can Bid On: Premium Storage Building 10'x10' with Peaked Roof, $5,375 Value at HiLine Homes (Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Watercraft

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 14x50 2 bdrm, 2 bath sgl. wide in park. Super Good Cents package, drywall, vaulted ceiling, good condition, $15,000. 541-306-7951.

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006 , low hrs hard

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

875

Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail 90, 1979, good condition, but needs engine work, $499. 541-410-4792

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Reduced to $595! Call Bill 541-480-7930.

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

880

Motorhomes Allegro

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 Dolphin 35’ 1998, large tip-out, 45K mi., part trade for trailer or camper, $19,500, 541-536-2792.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

19’ Duckworth Jet 2002, 285 HP inboard Jet Pump, 8 HP kicker,all accessories, 1 owner, low hrs, $24,500,541-410-8617 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

870

Boats & Accessories

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com You Can Bid On: $150 Cooking Class for Two People at Allyson's Kitchen

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

times $3500 OBO Call 541-306-8321 like new

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

Real Estate For Sale

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

Motorcycles And Accessories

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Central Oregon Boat Recycling 541-480-0415

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

860

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

693

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Snowmobiles You Can Bid On: $1000 Gift Certificate Toward Lennox System at Mountain View Heating

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

800

WE BUY OLD BOATS!

850

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Boats & RV’s

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Ford Falcon Camper Van, 1989 Class B, fully equipped, like new, only 35K miles. $10,000. 541-588-6084 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Travel 1987,

Queen

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Montana 37’ 2005, very good condition, just serviced, $23,000 OBO. 970-812-6821

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

“WANTED” RV Consignments

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

Debris Removal

Handyman

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

JUNK BE GONE

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Domestic Services Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353

Excavating

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof tops •De-icing

Holiday Lighting

Handyman

I DO THAT!

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Snow Removal

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Gutter Cleaning From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Clear those rain gutters now, before winter sets in. Call Mindin’ The Gutter at 541-848-2457 for free estimate now!

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

SPRINKLER BLOW-OUT

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Bend Landscaping

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Flower bed clean up

• Snow Removal •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup

Pet Services

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

Serious On-site Horse Care Full service sitting w/options for more in-depth care. Call EquiCare, 541-706-1820 (leave message if no answer)

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, Winnebago Itasca Horizon 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Repair & Remodeling:

Travel Trailers

The Bulletin Classiieds

Moving and Hauling

Tile, Ceramic

Harris Custom Crating: We provide custom crating, palletizing, strap & wrap and arrange shipping if required. 541-390-0704,541-390-0799

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

885

Canopies and Campers

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Remodeling, Carpentry Kitchens & Baths Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

& Repair • Fall Clean up

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

541-322-7253


E4 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 932

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Airplane Hangars now available for lease at Redmond Municipal Airport. $270/mo. Please contact airport administration, 541-504-3499 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 Cyl. eng. w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500, please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

931 Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 541-706-1568

Bid Now! www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

(Bidding exp. Nov. 14, at 8pm)

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, asking 12,500. Please call 541-419-2181

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $17,500. 541-788-8626

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of Danny Melvin Duckworth, Deceased. Case No. 10-PB-0126-AB NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Chrysler New Yorker 1990, 3.3 V6, new tags, tires, battery, etc. excellent condition, $1600. 541-549-6523

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Studded snow tires 245-75-R16 Wildcat Touring AT, 4 for $500. Call 541-312-2972 Tires (4) Michelin Primacy Studless Snows, 215/55HR16, hardly used, $250, 541-480-5205. TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 Dodge Ram 2001, short seasons, $300, 541-447-1668 bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call Tires, (4) Snow/traction, 541-410-4354. LT245/75R-16/10, 6K mi., $300/set, 541-408-0531. FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 TIRES - Studded snows, (4) crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, P215/60Rx16, $95. Phone dually, matching canopy, 541-420-2220 towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old con932 struction owner needs Antique and money, will trade, $18,500. Classic Autos (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary EdiJeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Vans Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223. Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Chrysler Town & Country SX, 155K: 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871. FORD F-250 390 4x4, 1973 Runs good, $1600 OBO 541-536-9221

Mercedes-Benz SL 550 2007 Only 38,750 miles. Excellent, pristine condition. No body damage, chips, etc. Loaded with extras. Comes with 4 studded snow tires with less than 2000 miles wear. $46,000. 541-388-7944

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018. Honda CRV EX 2002, 4WD, only 63K, auto, many orig. extras+deer alarm, Demco front base plate for towing, exc. cond., $12,250, 541-549-7587. Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 spd, sunroof, gold color, good running cond, reduced, now $1500. 541-923-0134.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Subaru Outback Special Edition Wagon 2007, auto, exc. cond,$18,750, 541-312-8829

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Administrator: Theresa Lynn Hansen 15520 2nd Avenue South, Apt. B7 Seattle, WA 98148 Tel: 206-244-7370 Attorney for Administrator: Patrick J. Widmer, OSB # 934966 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101 Bend, Oregon 97702 Ph.: (541) 318-3330 Fax: (541) 323-1030 e-mail: pat@bendlawgroup.com LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT Estate of G. PHILLIP WICK, Deceased.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published November 8, 2010. Lesley Wick Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Lesley Wick 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP James E. Petersen, OSB #640887 jep@karnopp.com Erin K. MacDonald, OSB #024978 ckm@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 819 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 11/23/2010. The sale will be held at 10:00am by: REDMOND RECREATION & MECH. 342 SE EVERGREEN AVE., REDMOND, OR 2007 LARSON ESCAPE BOAT VIN = LAR85193D707

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 194K highway miles. $7500, 541-410-7586

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

LEGAL NOTICE Subcontractor Bid Solicitation Project: Central Oregon Community College Health Careers Building BID DATE and Time: November 16th @ 2:00pm Construction of a new 47,000 sq. ft. building to include classrooms, lab spaces, and auxiliary spaces. Prevailing wage/BOLI requirements apply. For information on how to obtain Bonding, Insurance, or lines of credit, contact Allied Insurance at (510) 578-2000 or Skanska USA Building, Inc. Skanska is an equal opportunity employer and actively requests bids from Minority, Women, Disadvantaged, and Emerging Small Business Enterprises. Skanska Contact: Todd Predmore, phone #503-641-2500, e-mail: todd.predmore@skanska.com

Theresa Hansen, Administrator

Amount due on lien $687.50

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267 Audi A4 2.8L Quattro. Best, most beautiful 1999,car on the road,runs great,looks perfect. $6000 firm. 541-222-0066

Dated and first published on November 8, 2010.

Case No. 10PB0129BH

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Administrator. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Administrator at Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP. 339 SW Century Drive, Suite 101, Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the Administrator, or the lawyers for the Administrator, Widmer Mensing Law Group, LLP.

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

GRAND AM 2002 with V-6. great shape! $3600, 541-536-9221

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Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, $16,999 OBO, Call 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Mercedes-Benz 450GL 2007, exc. cond., all options incl. navigation & TV/DVD players, 80K all road miles, $32,000, 541-350-5373.

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

Automobiles

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

package, Good condition, $1495, 541-815-9939.

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You Can Bid On: 3 Oil Changes for Car or Light Truck, $120 Value at Bryan's Automotive

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The Bulletin Classifieds

Pickups C-10

4 Studded tires, Wintercat SST 245-65-R17, used 2 seasons, $180. 541-504-1209

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

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OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

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Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

Sport Utility Vehicles

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998. 916

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Reputed owner(s): TONY A. JONES OREGON FIRST COM. LOAN SERV. LEGAL NOTICE Sale of Abandoned Manufactured Home: One (1) 1976 "HOMETTE" Manufactured Dwelling, Plate No. X127911, Manufacturer ID No. 03910426J, has been abandoned by the Estate of Lawrence Pauls. The home is located at 2633 S.W. Obsidian Avenue, Space No. 3, Redmond, Oregon 97756. Sale shall be by private bidding, with sealed bids. Bids to be delivered to: Mr. Richard Martin, P.O. Box 1915, Redmond, Oregon 97756, no later than November 22, 2010 at 10:00 a.m. Minimum bid shall be $2,736.59 and does not include any unpaid taxes, to be paid by purchaser. Please contact Mr. Richard Martin for more information and/or questions at (541) 350-5142.

541-322-7253

LEGAL NOTICE Swalley Irrigation District is seeking responses from engineering firms on its RFQ for general Engineering Consultant Services. Responses due before 2:00 p.m. on Nov. 15, 2010. Contact Central Oregon Builders Exchange for copy of RFQ or the District at 541-388-0658. LEGAL NOTICE The Board of Directors of Arnold Irrigation District will hold their monthly board meeting on Wednesday, November 10, 2010 at 3:00 pm at 19604 Buck Canyon Rd. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601600927 T.S. No.: OR-221966-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DANIEL R. ELMS AND CARLA D. ELMS AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR RBANC LENDING INC., A OREGON CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/13/2006, recorded 6/19/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-42194 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 140406

LOT TWENTY-NINE, BLOCK TWENTY-SIX, TALL PINES FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15823 SUNRISE BOULEVARD LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $209,883.80; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,178.93 Monthly Late Charge $46.91 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $209,883.80 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.75% per annum from 5/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OR-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-101307 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEFFREY IRWIN AND SANDRA E. IRWIN, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR PLAZA HOME MORTGAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/28/2005, recorded 5/3/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-27333, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust, Series 2006-ASAP1. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK THREE (3), FIRST ADDITION TO PINE CREST RANCHETTES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 53332 ALICE DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 15, 2010 Delinquent Payments from June 01, 2010 1 payments at $954.39 each $954.39 4 payments at $1,185.46 each $4,741.84 (06-01-10 through 10-15-10) Late Charges: $176.40 Beneficiary Advances: $107.89 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,980.52 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $150,538.50, PLUS interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from 05/01/10 to 7/1/2010, 5.625% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 17, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/15/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3777800 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-BVS-109512 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHRIS L. MOORE, A MARRIED MAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TiTLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of METWEST COMMERCIAL LENDER, as beneficiary, dated 9/27/2007, recorded 10/3/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-53460, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8 AND THE NORTH 10 FEET OF LOT 9 IN BLOCK 4 OF WIESTORIA, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1531 NE 3RD STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 28, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 3,857.24 each $ 15,428.96 (07-01-10 through 10-28-10) Late Charges: $ 505.38 TOTAL: $ 15,934.34 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, iMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 7/1/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $622,409.73, PLUS interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 3, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. in construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://wwwJpsasap.com DATED: 10/28/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: {877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3799995 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010, 11/29/2010


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Monday, November 8, 2010 E5

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Legal Notices

EGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/28/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3728714 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010, 11/29/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No.: 9517070125 T.S. No.: 7102273 Reference is made to that certain deed made by Stacy D. Crawford and Karen H. Crawford, Husband and Wife as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, dated 7/5/2007, recorded 7/11/2007, in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-38330 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: Lot Twenty-Four of Hayden View Phase One, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 1453 SW 31st St., Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's failure to: Make the monthly payments of $1,471.96 each, commencing with the payment due on 7/1/2010 and continuing each month until this trust deed is reinstated or goes to trustee's sale; plus a late charge of $58.62 on each installment not paid within fifteen days following the payment due date; trustee's fees and other costs and expenses associated with this foreclosure and any further breach of any term or condition contained in subject note and deed of trust. By the reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The principal sum of $179,143.97 together with the interest thereon at the rate 6.500% per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 2/18/2011 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Entrance Entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auc-

tion to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured (and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee). Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes; has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed; the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 10/12/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee C/O Max Default Services Corporation 43180 Business Park Drive, Ste 202 Temecula, CA 92590 (619)465-8200 DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# 3773542 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0475800637 T.S. No.: OR-255679-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRETT MILLS, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTRY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 11/6/2007, recorded 11/15/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/in-

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LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Pursuant to an Amended Notice of Default and Election to Sell recorded September 27, 2010 as Instrument No. 2010-037901, the following described real property to satisfy the obligation referred to below, on Tuesday, the 22nd day of February, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 o'clock A.M. Pacific Time, of said day at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, William F. Nichols, as Successor Trustee, will sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash (the Trustee is authorized to make a credit bid for the Beneficiary) in lawful money of the United States of America, all payable at the time of the sale, the following real property located in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and particularly described as follows: LOT 10 IN BLOCK 7 OF HEIERMAN-MCCORMICK ADDITION, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Physical address: 1749 SW 15th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty regarding title, possession or encumbrances to satisfy the obligation secured by and pursuant to the power of sale conferred in the Deed of Trust that was made and entered into on the 19th day of May, 2008 by and among Linda S. Kandle, an unmarried woman, as Grantor, First American Title as Trustee, with William F. Nichols as Successor Trustee, and Hopkins U.S. Fund L.L.C., an Idaho limited liability company as trustee for the benefit on a parity for all Series "US" Debenture Holders, as Beneficiary; said Deed of Trust having been recorded on May 23, 2008 as Instrument No. 2008-22696, records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The default for which this sale is to be made is failure of the Grantor to pay when due, monthly installments as set forth on the Note secured by said Deed of Trust. Defaults include the failure to pay: monthly installments in the amount of $1,638.23 each, which include principal, interest and escrow impounds, are due for April 23, 2010 and for the 23rd day of each and every month thereafter until paid, as well as all costs, fees, late charges, service charges, attorney's fees, and any other costs or expenses associated with the Notice of Default. Interest due as of April 23, 2010 through September 10, 2010, is in the amount of $10,557.42 and continues to accrue at the rate of 16% per annum (base interest of 11% per annum increased to default rate of 5% = 16% per annum which accrues at a rate of $75.41 per day). All delinquent amounts are now due and payable along with all costs, fees, late charges (per month beginning with the payment that was due April 23, 2010), service charges, attorney's fees, and any other costs or expenses associated with this foreclosure as provided by the Deed of Trust, Promissory Note, or by Oregon law. The principal balance owing as of this date on the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust is $172,029.40 plus accrued interest from April 23, 2010 through September 10, 2010 in the amount of $10,557.42 plus accruing interest from and after April 23, 2010 at the rate of 16% per annum (base interest of 11% per annum increased to default rate of 5% = 16% per annum which accrues at a rate of $75.41 per day), together with all costs, fees, late charges ($65.33 per month beginning with the payment that was due April 23, 2010), service charges, attorney's fees, and any other costs or expenses associated with this foreclosure together with delinquent property taxes, as provided by the Deed of Trust, Promissory Note, or by Oregon law. Notice is further given that pursuant to ORS 86.753, the Grantor has the right to have the proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment of the entire amount then due, together with costs, trustee's and attorney's fees, and by curing any other default complained of in this notice of default, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO TENANTS AND OTHER OCCUPANTS OF THE PROPERTY: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 23, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and telephone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide telephone contact number 800-SAFENET (800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Dated this 29th day of September, 2010. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE William F. Nichols, Oregon State Bar No. 803279 White, Peterson, Gigray, Rossman, Nye & Nichols P.A. 5700 E. Franklin Road, Suite 200 Nampa, Idaho 83687-7901

strument/microfile/reception No. 2007-59836 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 169825 LOT FOUR, BLOCK ONE OF CRYSTAL ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON Commonly known as: 1440 NW 87TH COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $407,406.75; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,347.04 Monthly Late Charge $130.07 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $407,406.75 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI

TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/27/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the

word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/7/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3725972 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010, 11/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0640112831 T.S. No.: OR-255584-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TRACY L. HAMAKER AND ROBERT M. HAMAKER, WIFE AND HUSBAND as Grantor to PACIFIC NORTHWEST COMPANY OF OREGON, INC., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/30/2008, recorded 8/4/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-32517 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200205 THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS POLICY

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-394376-NH

IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS LOT SEVENTEEN (17), PHASE TWO (2), WESTBROOK MEADOWS, P.U.D. PHASES 1 AND 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61277 SW BROOKSIDE LOOP BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $314,008.87; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 5/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,768.07 Monthly Late Charge $70.84 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $314,008.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.25% per annum from 4/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of

trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/24/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this

notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/3/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3724027 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010, 11/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429640147 T.S. No.: OR-226119-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PAUL T. NAVARRO JR. and LISA R. NAVARRO AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 7/5/2006, recorded 7/11/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/recep-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-383687-NH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Janice G. Anderson, an unmarried woman as Grantor to Amerititle, as trustee in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Lehman Brothers Bank, FSB, a Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated 11/17/2006, recorded 11/22/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-77458, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 101028 Lot Four (4) in Block Four (4) of First Addition Selken Subdivision, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1810 NE 13th Street Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installment of principal and interest which became due on 7/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising form or associated with beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,530.93 Monthly Late Charge $76.55 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $209,288.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.8750 per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/22/2011 at the hour of 1:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bend St., Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 2/22/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL December 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER December 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 1/23/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 10/19/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-545-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LUCINA ALTAMIRANO as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS. CO. OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AEGIS WHOLESALE CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/9/2006, recorded 11/16/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-76018,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251286 LOT 1 OF BEAR CREEK ESTATES P.U.D., BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL 4 OF BEAR CREEK VILLAGE CONDOMINIUM STAGE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 75 NE TELIMA LN. BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 6/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,268.70 Monthly Late Charge $ 113.44 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $457,721.08 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.7500 per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/22/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 2/22/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 1/23/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.com Dated: 10/19/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 EI Camino Real, Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Nina Hernandez Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# 3783840 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010

ASAP# 3783637 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010


E6 Monday, November 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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tion No. 2006-47469 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 173804 LOT EIGHTEEN (18), BLOCK FIVE (5), TAMARACK PARK EAST, PHASE III, RECORDED JULY 1, 1988, IN CABINET C, PAGE 262, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1842 NORTHEAST VERONICA LANE BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $270,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,609.85 Monthly Late Charge $68.90 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $270,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure

costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/12/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance re-

quired under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/30/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3715725 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010, 11/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0042360198 T.S. No.: WC-248489-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL A. MARSDEN AND BEVERLY K. MARSDEN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 4/18/2006, recorded 4/26/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in

book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-28582 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111921 LOT 8 IN BLOCK 4 OF ARROWHEAD ACRES 3RD ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, TOGETHER WITH THAT PORTION OF LOT 7, BLOCK 4 OF ARROWHEAD ACRES 3RD ADDITION, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 7; THENCE NORTH 89º16'58" WEST, 75.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH, 120 FEET; THENCE NORTH 18º44'41" EAST, 233.37 FEET; THENCE SOUTH, 341.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 21771 OBSIDIAN AVENUE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $219,183.92; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/15/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,079.80

Monthly Late Charge $44.99 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $219,183.92 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.86% per annum from 9/15/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/10/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon

Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 8/27/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3714321 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-101019

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMS-93190

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-101025

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TERRENCE F. TUPKER JR., as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 11/8/2007, recorded 11/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-59702, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWENTY-SIX (26) IN BLOCK THIRTY (30) OF DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16932 JACINTO ROAD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 4 payments at $2,416.69 each $9,666.76 (07-01-10 through 10-12-10) Late Charges: $519.42 Beneficiary Advances: $44.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $10,230.18 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $250,272.86, PLUS interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from 06/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 7.125% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KENT SCHAUFELBERGER, A MARRIED MAN AND JOANN M. SCHAUFELBERGER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to PACIFIC NORTHWEST COMPANY OF OREGON, INC., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR QUICKEN LOANS INC., as beneficiary, dated 2/20/2007, recorded 2/21/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-10683, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 6 OF TANGLEWOOD, PHASE III, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1012 SOUTHEAST TEAKWOOD DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 4 payments at $2,102.06 each $8,408 .24 (07-01-10 through 10-12-10) Late Charges: $315.30 Beneficiary Advances: $136.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $8,859.54 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $373,700.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3773100 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010

ASAP# 3773096 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010, 11/15/2010

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8818 T.S. No.: 1297193-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26183-5 Loan No.: 0254696362 Title No.: 4488780 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Jerry Beaver and Melissa A. Beaver, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/01/2008, recorded on 04/04/2008 as Instrument No. 2008-15046, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 2 in Block 1 of Janela Court, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 120409 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61388 Franke Lane, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,070.27 beginning 04/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $178,495.95 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.250% per annum from 03/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 12/20/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 8-4-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP#202528, 10/25/10, 11/01/10, 11/08/10, 11/15/10)

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1242 T.S. No.: 1286571-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, NICHOLAS J. CHANDLER AND SAMUELA CHANDLER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DECISION ONE MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC. ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 8/8/2006, recorded 8/10/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-54704, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee under Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated as of November 1, 2006 MASTR Asset-Backed Securities, Trust 2006-HE4 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE4. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT THIRTY-FIVE (35), BLOCK EIGHT (8), C. L. & D. RANCH TRACT, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 15990 6TH STREET LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 1 payments at $1,309.25 each $1,309.25 10 payments at $1,320.32 each $13,203.20 (12-01-09 through 10-08-10) Late Charges: $531.09 Beneficiary Advances: $1,848.56 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $16,892.10 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $143,831.99, PLUS interest thereon at 9.55% per annum from 11/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 9.55% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 10, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/8/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3769656 10/18/2010, 10/25/2010, 11/01/2010, 11/08/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6732 T.S. No.: 1300601-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Steve J. Putnam and T. Lori Putnam, Husband And Wife., as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated November 21, 2007, recorded November 29, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-61742 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot eight (8), Ridge at Eagle Crest II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1640 Cinnamon Teal Dr. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,731.69 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $280,990.64 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from February 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 16, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 25, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Caleb Cordell, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Mortgageit, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 26, 2006, recorded May 01, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/ microfilm/reception No. 2006-29965 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11 (11), Larch Meadows, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1335 NW 16th Court Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,207.08 Monthly Late Charge $94.52. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $295,745.73 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 17, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Michael R. Totten, A Single Person and Shelby M. Wolfersperger, A Single Person, as Grantor to First American, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated December 13, 2005, recorded December 15, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-86041 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 11 in block 3 of Roberts Addition to the City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 716 N.W. 10th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $857.13 Monthly Late Charge $34.34. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $148,347.85 together with interest thereon at 3.000% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is January 01, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-344939 10/18, 10/25, 11/01, 11/08

R-353173 11/08, 11/15, 11/22, 11/29

R-346775 10/25, 11/01, 11/08, 11/15


Bulletin Daily Paper 11/08/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday November 8, 2010

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