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Room for more retail?

Elk season preview

Why stores (a revived Gottschalks, maybe) like Bend • BUSINESS, B1

SPORTS, D1

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THURSDAY

Increasing cloud cover, remaining mild High 78, Low 34 Page C6

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City Council candidates differ on Bend UGB

COCC

Student council employs lawyer

MAKING WAVES FOR THE HOME SHOW

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

There were shades of disagreement about how Bend should grow among some Bend City Council candidates during a Wednesday forum at the Bend Park & Recreation District headquarters. Chuck Arnold, who is running for Position 7 against Scott Ramsay, said he believes the city should focus its efforts on increasing density within Bend’s existing limits, while Position 7 incumbent Mark Capell said there should be a more moderated approach. These views were expressed in the context of Bend’s proposed urban growth boundary expansion, which is something the city spent more than $4 million on and has been fighting the state over for the past several years. “The thing that we really need to look at are the opportunities for infill development within the existing UGB,” Arnold said. “If we sprawl out and make the mistakes of other communities, I really think we’ll see it down the road.” Position 7 challenger Ronald “Rondo” Boozell agreed with Arnold on expanding the city’s UGB, and said that any future growth that occurs in Bend should be on the back’s of developers. Those developers, he said, should “pay the lion’s share” of the costs. Neither Scott Ramsay, who is running against Arnold, nor Mark Moseley, who is vying for Capell’s seat, were present at Wednesday’s forum. Bend is in the midst of trying to expand its urban growth boundary to comply with Oregon law that states a city must have a 20-year supply of land for housing and economic development. See Forum / A4

Counsel asked to clarify group’s autonomy, power By Sheila G. Miller

ELECTION

The Bulletin

Central Oregon Community College’s student government has hired an attorney and a public relations consultant with an eye toward clarifying its role at the college and its ability to administer student fees. The Associated Students of Central Oregon Community College (ASCOCC) will use student fees to pay for the lawyer’s services. “We want some definition,” said Brenda Pierce, who is currently in charge of student government’s marketing and communications. “We want to know where we stand.” In a memo sent Tuesday to student council adviser Taran Underdal, ASCOCC’s executive and general council announced it would appropriate student funds to hire Miller Nash LLP attorney Greg Lynch as an advocate. See COCC / A4

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

S

culptor Curt Grant, 54, finishes an 8-foot-tall stainless steel wave he was building at his Bend home earlier this week. Grant, who recently moved to Bend from Maui, works as a commission artist, creating art from glass, metal and stone.

CHILE: Last miner pulled to safety after 2 months underground, Page A2

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 287, 42 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Since he was first elected to the Arizona state Senate eight years ago, Manny Alvarez has burned through four cars at the rate of 40,000 miles a year. Alvarez, a Democrat from the southeastern tip of the state, represents the 25th district, an area that snakes along the Mexican border from the New Mexico line to Yuma County, more than 300 miles to the west. “To be honest with you, it stinks,” he says. “It’s very, very hard, but I still manage to do it.” If recent census figures are any indication, Alvarez and other rural lawmakers have extra reason to be concerned in the coming decade. Not only are their numbers declining, but in many cases their districts also are likely to become so geographically huge that representing constituents could become a trial of endurance. See Rural / A5

E3

Business

C4

By David Harrison A surfer for 15 years, he created this untitled piece to represent the Pipeline surf spot on the north shore of Oahu. “This originated out of the idea of having a wave in my shop with a surfboard on it, that I could sit on and eat my lunch, and not miss the ocean as much during the off season,” he said. The sculpture will be on display at his Crossfire Arts booth at the Central Oregon Builders Association Home & Garden show, Friday through Sunday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center.

TOP NEWS INSIDE

As redistricting looms, politicians in rural areas try to stay in touch

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

Banks ignored looming foreclosure crisis By Eric Dash and Nelson D. Schwartz New York Times News Service

At JPMorgan Chase & Co., they were derided as “Burger King kids” — walk-in hires who were so inexperienced they barely knew what a mortgage was. At Citigroup and GMAC, dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s on home foreclosures was outsourced to frazzled workers who sometimes tossed the paperwork into the garbage. And at Litton Loan Servicing, an arm of Goldman Sachs, employees processed foreclosure documents so quickly that they barely had time to see what they were signing. “I don’t know the ins and outs of the loan,” a Litton employee said in a deposition last year. “I’m not a loan officer.”

As the furor grows over lend- Inside ers’ efforts to side• Oregon joins other step legal rules in states in foreclosure their zeal to reclaim inquiry, Page B1 homes from delinquent borrowers, • Insurance proving these and other crucial amid banks insist that mortgage crisis, they have been Page B3 overwhelmed by the housing collapse. But interviews with bank employees, executives and federal regulators suggest that this mess was years in the making and came as little surprise to industry insiders and government officials.

The issue gained new urgency Wednesday, when all 50 state attorneys general announced that they would investigate foreclosure practices. That news came on the same day that JPMorgan Chase acknowledged that it had not had not used the nation’s largest electronic mortgage tracking system, known as MERS, since 2008. That system has been faulted for losing documents and other sloppy practices. The root of today’s problems goes back to the boom years, when home prices were soaring and banks pursued profit while paying less attention to the business of mortgage servicing, or collecting and processing monthly payments from homeowners. See Mortgages / A5

“In hindsight, we were all slow to jump on the issue. When you think about what it costs to add 10,000 people, that is a substantial investment in time and money along with the computers, training and system changes involved.” — Michael Heid, co-president, Wells Fargo Home Mortgage


A2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

F / Chilean miner rescue

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Chile rejoices as all miners are rescued

In this photo released by the Chilean Presidential Press Office, the last miner to be rescued, Luis Urzua, center, gestures after his rescue Wednesday night. Chile’s president, Sebastian Pinera, right, greeted each miner upon surfacing.

Los Angeles Times COPIAPO, Chile — Chile freed the last of 33 miners from imprisonment nearly half a mile underground late Wednesday, the miracle of a second chance at life made real by the methodical shuttle of a battered red, white and blue rescue capsule willed on by a joyful nation and global audience of hun-

Alex Ibanez Chilean Presidential Press Ofice

dreds of millions. When 54-year-old foreman Luis Urzua emerged at 9:55 p.m. from the 28inch-diameter hole that curved deep into the San Jose mine, it had been 69 days since the miners were trapped, 52 days since they were able to declare to the world that they were still alive — but less than 22 hours since the first miner

had resurfaced. “You brought your shift out like a good captain,” Chilean President Sebastian Pinera told Urzua, beaming as he gripped the arms of the burly miner who had organized his men for survival during the first crucial hours after they were trapped. “All of Chile shared your anguish and hope.”

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

12 22 32 34 46 2 Power Play: 4. The estimated jackpot is $34 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

10 12 19 34 36 45 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $4.2 million for the next drawing.

Defying predictions, miners emerge looking fit

The machinery that pulled the miners to safety Drill hole Casing

21 in. 24 in. 26 in.

60 ft.

The winch sits on a concrete base.

Capsule

By Donald G. Mcneil Jr. New York Times News Service

Defying grim predictions about how they would fare after two months trapped underground, many of the Chilean miners came bounding out of their rescue capsule Wednesday as pictures of energy and health, able not only to walk but, in one case, to leap around, hug everyone in sight and lead cheers. The miners’ apparent robustness was testimony to the rescue diet threaded down to them through the tiny borehole that reached them Aug. 22 but also to the way they organized themselves to keep their environment clean, find water and get exercise. Another factor was the excellent medical care they received from Chilean doctors ministering to them through tubes leading 2,300 feet into the earth. Late Wednesday, with all of the miners above ground, Chile’s health minister, Jaime Manalich, said that one miner had acute pneumonia but was improving with antibiotics, and that two others needed dental surgery. At the moment, he added, the rest seemed to be in “more than satisfactory” condition. Indeed, the 27th miner to be rescued, Franklin Lobos, is a former Chilean soccer star who juggled a soccer ball on his foot moments after emerging from the capsule. The men kept themselves fit and received excellent medical care. And they were not confined to the “rescue chamber,” the size of a Manhattan studio apartment. “They had the run of the mine,” said Jeffery Kravitz, acting director for technical support at the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration. With half a mile of tunnels open, he said, “they had places to exercise and to use for waste.” “They even had a sort of waterfall they could take a shower under,” Kravitz said. “They requested shampoo and shaved for their families.” Also, fresh air was pumped in, so asphyxiation was never a danger. While coal mines can fill with methane gas, the San Jose operation was a copper and gold mine. The air was nearly 90 degrees and humid, but it contained about 20 percent oxygen, like outside air. The men dug three wells and had potable water. Doctors from NASA and Chilean navy officers with experience in submarines were consulted on the strains of prolonged confinement. Alberto Iturra, a psychologist, talked to the miners, sometimes several times a day, to sort through their frustrations and depression. Overall, Chilean health authorities “did a phenomenal job,” Polk said. Contrary to a rumor, the miners were not in the disorienting dark all the time. Small fluorescent lights were sent down early in their ordeal and a circadian rhythm was kept up, with a red light at nighttime.

Capsule

26.5 ft.

Source: Chilean Ministry of Mining

New York Times News Service

As miners emerge, so do their stories By Alexei Barrionuevo and Simon Romero New York Times News Service

COPIAPO, Chile — In the days before he was rescued, Mario Gomez had reached a breaking point. Although he was the oldest and possibly the most experienced of the 33 miners trapped nearly a half-mile underground, he began to “feel strong explosions” in the shafts surrounding him, his sister said, and started panicking that another cave-in like the one that had hemmed them in two months earlier was imminent. “He said, ‘They needed to get us out right away,’” his sister, Eva Gomez, 61, recounted him as saying after his rescue. “They were taking too long,” he told her. When he finally surfaced Wednesday, he dropped to the ground in prayer. His wife, who had been saying for weeks that she wanted Gomez to retire, reached down and lifted him up from his knees before he was hospitalized with pneumonia. As the miners were rescued in a pageant that moved their worldwide audience — watching on television, computers, even cell phones — to tears and laughter, glimpses of their personalities, their struggles to maintain their spirits during their subterranean ordeal and the life that awaited them back on the surface began to emerge as well.

A miner’s diary Victor Segovia, 48, who had served as one of the group’s chroniclers by keeping a diary of their travails underground, stepped out of the rescue hole as a potential author: The government said he was writing a book. Carlos Mamani, 24, the sole Bolivian in the group, received a personal visit from his country’s president, Evo Morales, who offered him a new career in Bolivia and seemed eager to take him back right away (Late Wednesday, Chile’s health minister said that for the time being Mamani had turned Morales down). Esteban Rojas, 44, said he would give his wife of 25 years the church wedding she always deserved, while Yonny Barrios, 50, faced a slightly more complicated future. The woman he embraced upon exiting the rescue capsule turned out to be his mistress, not his wife. “He has another companion,” Marta Salinas, his wife of 28 years, told reporters, adding that she might wait for him at home. “I’m happy for him, and if he remakes his life, good for him.” And Mario Sepulveda, 39, in-

Timeline THE ACCIDENT Aug. 5 A mine collapses, trapping 33 men 2,300 feet underground near the city of Copiapó.

Aug. 6 Rescue workers try to reach a shelter where they believe the miners may be trapped, but a new collapse blocks their path. Aug. 8 Rescue workers begin drilling holes, five inches in diameter, to locate the miners. MINERS ARE FOUND Aug. 22 A drill reaches a depth of 2,260 feet and rescue workers hear tapping. Hours later, the first video images of the miners show they are in much better condition than expected.

Aug. 23 Food, water and medicine are lowered to the miners, who were running low on supplies. Sept. 17 A rescue drill reaches the miners. The small hole is widened over the next month to prepare for their evacuation. PLAN B REACHES MINERS OCT. 9 Engineers complete the rescue shaft known as Alternative B.

Oct. 12-13 Miners are extracted, reunited with their loved ones and given medical treatment.

stantly became a media sensation, leading cheers among the rescue workers, handing out rocks to government officials and giving an ebullient interview to Chilean television.

‘Don’t treat us as stars’ “Please don’t treat us as stars,” Sepulveda said Wednesday, wearing a green jumpsuit and dark sunglasses, in comments that many here absorbed with a warm smile. “I want to be treated as Mario Sepulveda, and I want to continue working. That’s all I want.” After night fell on the mine Wednesday, the last of miners was pulled to safety at 9:55 p.m., stepping into the embrace of their families and an electrified nation. With President Sebastian Pinera presiding over each rescue as a kind of master of ceremonies, the months of waiting boiled over

every time the rescue capsule popped out of the ground. When Víctor Zamora, 34, emerged and held his pregnant wife, Jessica, in an extended embrace after 69 days of dark separation, the moment — despite the penetrating glare of the sun and the world’s attention — was theirs alone. Several miners, like Gomez, 63, who had lost parts of three fingers in a mining accident, were veterans. But others were not even supposed to be in the mine Aug. 5, the day of the cave-in.

Trapped with cousins Rojas happened to be working that day only because he took the place of a co-worker who had to go to a funeral. He had planned on resigning Sept. 18 but ended up trapped in the mine far longer than that with three cousins: Pablo Rojas, Darío Segovia and Ariel Ticona. Raul Bustos, 40, a mechanic, had managed to escape one disaster — the February earthquake — only to find himself in another. He had worked at a shipyard but left his hometown, Talcahuano in southern Chile, after the coast was devastated. An uncle told him there was a job here in the desert, so Bustos decided to move. He had been working at the mine for just two months before being caught in the cave-in. Bustos had already finished his shift on the day of the accident but had stayed in the mine to finish repairing a vehicle. “This was his destiny,” said Carlos Narvaez, a relative. Jimmy Sanchez, 19, the youngest miner and an avid soccer fan, was expecting to work in the mine only until September. He took the job after his girlfriend had their child, so he could earn more money to support them, said his mother, Norma Lagues. Seeing her son emerging from the Phoenix 2 capsule early Wednesday was like watching him “being born again,” Lagues said. She said he was “totally changed, a very different person, much more mature” than before the mine collapse. “I am not going to let him work in a mine ever again, and he told me he doesn’t want to, either,” Lagues said. “They knew the mine was dangerous and reported it. He would go to work afraid.” The future for Gomez, who has worked more than 30 years in mines, remained more uncertain. His wife, Lilian Ramírez, wants him to stop mining, but his older brother Reinaldo said he expected him to continue mining, a profession he grew to love.

Welded steel pipes encased the first 184 feet of the shaft to reinforce the hole's walls.

250 ft.

500

An alternative shaft drilled to a depth of 1,630 feet served as a backup to the rescue shaft. 750

A rescue worker descended to the miners to determine the order of extraction. Each ascent the rescue capsule made took about 15 minutes.

1,000

1,250

1,500

1,750

2,000

The miners excavated near the end of the drill hole to ease the capsule’s entry into the chamber.

Gomez, his sister, said she was stunned by how much weight he had lost, saying he looked “extremely thin.” The siblings spoke of the day when the mine collapsed, how Gomez and the others had all tried to climb stairs in the mine to get as high as they could, and of the “desperate” days the miners lived without eating before they were discovered. “They weren’t sure that someone would look for them,” Gomez tearfully recalled to her, causing her to break down.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 A3

T S Obama uses Skype, Facebook, Twitter to reach young By Anne E. Kornblut The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama has been making an effort to appeal to younger voters in the final weeks before the midterm elections. He sat down with Rolling Stone magazine for an interview, followed the rapper B.o.B onstage at DAR Constitution Hall and launched a four-campus series of rallies, all in the hopes of motivating 18- to 29-year-olds to vote. On Tuesday night, Obama took his youth tour a step further, fielding the firstever presidential questions via internet services Skype, Twitter and Facebook. An official with the Democratic National Committee said the questions were selected in advance, in order to be integrated into the technology of the event, but were chosen to be representative of all of those submitted. Beyond his campus outreach, Obama has been making a substantive appeal to younger voters, emphasizing his reforms of the student loan system and a provision in the health care overhaul that allows children to stay on their parents’ health insurance longer. The president was scheduled to meet Wednesday with local college students and their families to discuss the “American Opportunity Tax Credit,” a provision of the stimulus package that expanded tax credits for college students. Obama has proposed making the provision permanent. Before he left GWU on Tuesday, Obama found time to revisit his most provocative campaign argument of late: the funding of this year’s campaigns. Obama said it is impossible to know what special interests are funding massive advertisement sweeps across the country. He theorized that they could be coming from oil companies or banks. Or, he added: “We don’t know if they’re being funded by foreign corporations, because they’re not disclosed.”

$35M collected in Medicare scam Armenian-American gangsters stole IDs, filed fake claims, prosecutors say By Michael Wilson and William K. Rashbaum New York Times News Service

A pregnant woman who gets an ultrasound exam — from an ear, nose and throat doctor. A forensic pathologist whose patients walked into his office, rather than being rolled in with

toe tags. A dermatologist who conducted heart tests. A psychiatrist who performed MRIs. But none of the far-fetched procedures ever took place, according to federal prosecutors. The names of the patients and doctors were real, but none of them knew that their identities

had been stolen. By inventing 118 bogus health clinics in 25 states, prosecutors said, a band of Armenian-American gangsters billed Medicare for more than $100 million and managed to collect $35 million over at least four years. Preet Bharara, the U.S. attorney in Manhattan, called it the “single largest Medicare fraud ever perpetrated by a single criminal enterprise.” Eighteen people were charged in the Medicare indictment un-

In this courtroom sketch, Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, left, and Col. James Pohl, center, a military judge acting as the investigating officer in the case, are shown during Hasan’s Article 32 hearing at the U.S. Magistrate court Wednesday in Fort Hood, Texas. Hasan, 40, is charged with premeditated murder and attempted premeditated murder for a Nov. 5, 2009, attack in which 13 people were killed and 32 wounded.

ELECTION

largely in Los Angeles, resembled a giant identity-theft ring that stole doctors’ dates of birth and Social Security and medical license numbers and paired them up with legitimate Medicare recipients, whose names and information were also stolen. The defendants would create a fake clinic and bill the agency for examinations and procedures that never happened and for equipment that did not exist, officials said.

CHINA

Retired party leaders call for unconditional press freedom By Michael Wines

Pat Lopez The Associated Press

Witnesses recount Fort Hood massacre By Clifford Krauss New York Times News Service

FORT HOOD, Texas — The first of dozens of witnesses to the 2009 massacre on this sprawling Army base gave chilling testimony Wednesday in a pretrial hearing for Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan, who is charged in the attack. The first witness described a scene of horror in which unarmed soldiers were mowed down, or jumped out of windows, or clawed over one another in a desperate reach for safety. “He looked at me, I looked at him,” said the witness, Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford Jr., as he described how he and Hasan made eye contact when the major trained a laser-guided handgun on soldiers in a processing center on base. “The laser comes across my line of sight. And I closed my eyes. And I get hit in the head, I spin around and I hit the floor.” Lunsford was shot five times. He has had reconstructive surgery on his face and has lost most of the sight in his left eye. His testimony was the be-

“I looked at him and wondered why he said, ‘Allahu akbar.’ He pulled out a weapon and started discharging.” — Sgt. Alonzo Lunsford Jr., Fort Hood shooting victim ginning of what promises to be several weeks, at least, of testimony in what is known as an Article 32 hearing, roughly equivalent to a civilian grand jury proceeding. Col. James Pohl, the investigating officer, will decide after the hearing whether Hasan should face a courtmartial. If he is tried and found guilty, Hasan, a 40-year-old Army psychiatrist, could face the death penalty. A U.S.-born son of Palestinian immigrants, Hasan has been charged with 13 counts of premeditated mur-

HUNGARY

Judge releases company chief arrested in toxic sludge flood By Dan Bilefsky New York Times News Service

BUDAPEST — The managing director of the company linked to Hungary’s red sludge disaster was released from custody without charge, his lawyer said Wednesday, citing a lack of sufficient evidence. Janos Banati, the lawyer, said by telephone that a judge of Veszprem City Court in west Hungary had decided to free the director, Zoltan Bakonyi, after finding that prosecutors had not made a convincing case. The court had met to review possible charges that negligence by Bakonyi — including what his critics contended was a failure to prepare emergency warning and rescue plans — had contributed to the calamity. “The court ordered the immediate release of Zoltan Bakonyi from custody. The decision of the court is based on the fact that in this early stage of the process not even the suspicion of a crime can be verified,” Banati said. Meanwhile, a ninth victim died Wednesday of injuries suffered during last week’s toxic mud spill from the plant in Ajka, western Hungary, officials said. A week ago, nearly 200 million gallons of caustic red mud — a byproduct of the conversion of bauxite to alumina, for aluminum — poured out of a reservoir

sealed Wednesday, part of a larger ring of 44 people prosecutors said had engaged in a variety of swindles, including bilking auto insurance companies by falsifying, staging or exaggerating the severity of fender-benders. Charges included racketeering, health care fraud, identity theft, money laundering and bank fraud. Forty-one of the defendants had been arrested as of Wednesday afternoon. At its heart, the gang, based

Bela Szandelszky / The Associated Press

Escorted by a police officer, right, Zoltan Bakonyi, managing director of MAL — the aluminum company whose broken reservoir flooded towns in western Hungary with toxic red sludge — lifts his arms above his covered face after being released from police custody in Veszprem, Hungary, on Wednesday. after part of a containing wall collapsed. The cascade killed nine people and injured hundreds. Hundreds more have been forced from their homes, and tens of millions of dollars in private property has been destroyed. Some critics of the government had seen the arrest of Bakonyi as a politically motivated act carried out under pressure from the prime minister, Viktor Orban.

Bakonyi is the son of Arpad Bakonyi, a businessman who played a central role in the privatization of the country’s aluminum industry and is the largest shareholder of the company now under scrutiny, the formerly state-owned MAL. The elder Bakonyi is also a close business associate of a former prime minister, Ferenc Gyurcsany, who is Orban’s political archrival.

der and 32 counts of attempted premeditated murder. Paralyzed below the middle of his chest after being shot in the attack, he sat in a wheelchair for the first two days of the hearing. Perhaps the most dramatic moment of the daylong hearing came during the testimony of Michelle Harper, a civilian Army employee. She described how she and others cowered under a desk as Hasan moved through the soldier-readiness center. For six minutes, a tape recording of her 911 call enraptured the courtroom. “My God, everybody is shot,” Harper told the 911 operator. “Oh my God, oh my God.” Lunsford, who worked at the readiness center, said he met Hasan several weeks before the attack and recognized him as the gunman. “I looked at him and wondered why he said, ‘Allahu akbar,’ ” Lunsford recalled, referring to the Arabic phrase for “God is great.” “He pulled out a weapon and started discharging.”

New York Times News Service

BEIJING — A group of retired Communist Party officials and intellectuals issued an unusually blunt demand Tuesday for total press freedom in China, stating that the current climate of censorship and government control of the press violated China’s Constitution and debased the government’s claim to represent its citizens. The document’s 23 signers, including academics and former executives of China’s state-controlled media, have no public influence on the nation’s ruling coalition of Communist leaders. Some of them have issued other public demands for reform in past years, to no effect. Their letter’s unvarnished language was notable for including an undisguised attack on the legality of censorship by the party’s Central Propaganda Department, which controls much of what is published, broadcast or posted on the Internet here. “This is an invisible black hand,” the signers wrote of the propaganda department, according to an English translation published by the China Media Project at the University of Hong Kong. “For their own reasons, they violate our Constitution, often ordering by telephone that the works of such and such a person cannot be published, or that such and such an event cannot be reported in the media.” Some experts said that the demands, which were quickly squelched by censors after being posted on the Internet, were unlikely to have a serious impact on government policies. “To the extent that people will learn about this letter, it resonates, because it shows there are different sensibilities within the party,” Nicholas Bequelin, a Hong Kong-based researcher for the advocacy group Human Rights Watch, said in an interview. “But it does not, on the political level, alter the balance.”

Justices dubious of inmate’s DNA query By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — In the course of an hourlong argument at the Supreme Court on Wednesday about a death row inmate’s quest to test DNA evidence, the justices asked neither of the questions that people without legal training might have thought crucial: Why won’t Texas prosecutors consent to the testing? And could the results show that the inmate, Henry Skinner, is innocent of the triple murder that sent him to death row? The justices focused instead on whether Skinner had located a path through a thicket of legal doctrines meant to limit post-conviction challenges. Last year, in District Attorney’s Office v. Osborne, No. 08-6, the court ruled by a 54 vote that inmates have no freestanding right under the Constitution’s due process clause to test evidence that could prove their innocence in states without laws on DNA testing. The court and Congress have, moreover, severely limited habeas corpus challenges to convictions and sentences. Skinner chose a third route, suing under a federal civil rights law known as Section 1983 and saying a Texas law that allows DNA testing in only some circumstances violated his rights. That position required Skinner’s lawyer, Robert Owen, to maintain that his client’s

goal, at least for now, was not to challenge his conviction or death sentence, as such challenges would have to be brought through a habeas petition, but simply to test the evidence. Justice Samuel Alito Jr. was skeptical. “In the real world,” he said, “a prisoner who wants access to DNA evidence is interested in overturning his conviction.”

Stay of execution Justice Anthony Kennedy wondered whether the Supreme Court erred in staying Skinner’s execution in March, less than a hour before he was to be put to death, in light of his position that he was not currently challenging his death sentence. “You are telling us that your attack doesn’t go to the sentence,” Kennedy told Owen. “I don’t see why we don’t just lift the stay, under your view of the case.” Skinner maintains that he was sleeping on a sofa in a vodka-andcodeine haze when his girlfriend and her two sons were killed on

New Year’s Eve in 1993. Prosecutors have blocked his requests to test blood, fingernail scrapings and hair found at the scene. Prosecutors said in their briefs that Skinner was playing games with the system, dragging out his case and seeking to impose unacceptable burdens on government resources and the victims’ dignity. They added that testing would be pointless because “no item of evidence exists that would conclusively prove that Skinner did not commit the murder.”

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Many tests unneeded for Obama appeal expected on ‘don’t ask’ advanced cancer patients By Glenn Kessler

The Washington Post

By Nicole Ostrow Bloomberg News

Patients with advanced incurable cancer are still routinely screened for additional types of malignancies, causing anxiety and no benefit for most, researchers said. The study showed that 8.9 percent of women who had advanced cancer received at least one mammography screening and 5.8 percent had a Pap test compared with 22 percent and 12.5 percent for the group without cancer. Among the men, 15 percent who had advanced malignancy received a prostate cancer screening test versus

Forum

27.2 percent of those who didn’t have cancer. The researchers said they conducted the study to improve care for patients and to reduce wasteful spending in Medicare, the health program for the elderly and disabled. Eliminating routine cancer screenings for people who already have advanced tumors may avoid unnecessary biopsies and psychological distress, the authors said. Researchers in the study looked at 87,736 Medicare recipients who had been diagnosed with advanced cancers of the lungs, colon, pancreas, esophagus or breast from 1998 to 2005.

Watch the forum

Continued from A1 Last year, city officials submitted a plan to the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development to increase the size of Bend’s UGB by about 8,500 acres. The department denied the plan and ask the city to do more work to increase density, develop vacant lots in the current UGB and resolve issues related to transportation and public works planning and affordable housing. Since then, the city has appealed that ruling to the Land Conservation and Development Commission, which made a decision on the appeal and is now in the process of issuing a final order to Bend on its UGB. That final ruling will likely result in a much smaller UGB proposal. While Capell admitted at the forum that the city probably overextended itself in trying to incorporate too much land into the UGB, he said there needs to be a mixture of development that takes place in the future that accounts for multiple needs. “Some people are going to want to live in a more densely developed area,” Capell said. “There are some people who don’t want to live that close to things. They want to live out in the country, and I think there

The forum will be rebroadcast on COTV on the following days: Monday, Oct. 18 at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 at 1:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 28 at 1:30 p.m. needs to be room for that.” Councilor Jodie Barram, who was also at the forum and is running uncontested, agreed with Capell’s idea of having choices and called it the difference between smart growth and compact growth. Candidates also answered questions about funding public transit and improving bike and pedestrian paths. The candidates agreed that public transit would have to be subsidized. For instance, Barram said two options would be property taxes or payroll taxes. The candidates also agreed that funds should be dedicated to bike and pedestrian paths, but did not clearly outline specific plans. Wednesday’s forum was sponsored by 1,000 Friends of Oregon, The Environmental Center, COTV and KPOV. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

WASHINGTON — The effort to repeal the law barring gay men and lesbians from serving openly in the U.S. military is nearing a chaotic endgame involving fastmoving courts, a slow-moving military, a lame-duck Congress and an administration increasingly caught in the middle. When the dust settles by the end of the year, the military’s “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy could well be history — or it could remain on the books, with a new right-leaning Congress disinclined to do anything about it. The Obama administration, which is seeking a repeal of the law, nevertheless is expected to appeal a ruling by a California

COCC Continued from A1 The memo states Lynch will, among other things, work to clarify the council’s autonomy and its authority to allocate student fees, and ensure the college doesn’t dissolve the council. It also states the council will hire a consultant for public relations training. India Simmons, who was hired by the COCC Yes political action committee to work on the college’s successful 2009 bond campaign, will take on that role. Students pay a $1.50 ASCOCC student fee for every credit they take each term. The maximum a student can pay is $18 per term. According to ASCOCC’s website, the student government expects to collect about $260,000 in student fees in 2010-11. Lynch will charge $295 per hour, Pierce said. The charge for Simmons’ public relations consulting was not available Wednesday. “I cannot guess how much we expect to pay Mr. Lynch,” Pierce wrote in an e-mail. “It depends on how quickly the college decides to address and resolve these issues.” ASCOCC serves as the student vote on 14 college committees; it also hands out student-fee funding to student clubs and programs and sponsors activities and events. College Relations Director Ron Paradis said the college agrees the issues raised by ASCOCC

federal judge who declared the policy unconstitutional. The administration also is expected to seek a stay of the judge’s injunction Tuesday ordering the military to immediately stop enforcing the ban worldwide. The Justice Department is generally required to uphold existing law and is expected to appeal rulings even when the president might agree with them. But Walter Dellinger, who was solicitor general in the Clinton administration, said an appeal could make clear that the president believed the law was unconstitutional, an approach President Bill Clinton took in 1996 concerning a law that would have required the discharge of HIVpositive service members from

the military. “I think this is the answer,” Dellinger said, noting that it would be politically untenable to allow a single district judge to set law for the country in a case that the Supreme Court has not heard. “Let the courts decide, but tell them what you think.” Originally, the Obama administration wanted Congress to do away with “don’t ask, don’t tell.” President Barack Obama called for a repeal of the law in his State of the Union address, and won the public support from Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. But Congress and the military have been moving on their own timetables.

“We need to clarify the appropriate role of (student government), and we need to work toward a clearly defined relationship between the college, the board and student government.” — Ron Paradis, relations director, Central Oregon Community College must be resolved. “Based on our initial review, it is apparent to us that we need to bring student government status at COCC in line with state requirements and best practices from other community colleges,” Paradis said in a prepared statement. “We need to clarify the appropriate role of ASCOCC, and we need to work toward a clearly defined relationship between the college, the board and student government.” Paradis said the student fee went into effect in 1993. Student government has existed at the college at least since the 1950s. But apparently the idea of regulating the student government has not come up for 60 years until ASCOCC members approached college administrators with questions.

‘Looks like a much bigger issue than it is’ “The students came to us and wanted to know what the process was that the board followed to ratify the student fee,” Paradis said. “In looking through the

minutes, we realized that the board didn’t technically ratify the fee until they approved the budget, which included the fee. So it was only done in a secondary way.” Lynch said he met with ASCOCC representatives on Friday afternoon and will meet with COCC lawyer Ron Bryant today. He expects ASCOCC representatives and college administrators to meet Friday. “It looks like a much bigger issue than it is,” Lynch said. “It’s just to better define the relationship so these issues don’t arise in the future.” In the meantime, COCC’s student newspaper, The Broadside, last week requested financial documents to determine how ASCOCC money is spent. Those documents have not yet been made public. Pierce believes it’s important for ASCOCC to have a lawyer “because we don’t have an advocate,” she said. The student government does have an adviser, Underdal, but Pierce said because Underdal is a college employee she can’t represent ASCOCC.

The president agreed to give the Pentagon time to study how to end the ban. Gates said Wednesday that Pentagon needs until December to resolve questions such as whether heterosexual troops would be required to share housing with gays, and whether the military would be required to provide benefits for same-sex partners of service members. “This is a very complex business. It has enormous consequences for our troops,” Gates told reporters as he flew to Brussels for a NATO meeting. “As I have said from the very beginning, there should be legislation and that legislation should be informed by the review we have underway.”

“Are we able to make a decision on hiring? On setting mileage rates?” she asked. “We would like to have full access to funds, we want to control our bank account, our credit cards.” Pierce said sometimes, like last year during the college’s successful bond campaign, ASCOCC was considered a separate entity from the college, but other times it is not. Paradis said he didn’t know what wording was used with student government when students worked in support of the bond measure last fall. As it stands now, the student government has a bank account with about $10,000, as well as a credit card with an approximate credit limit of $1,500, Pierce said. Student government members can ask for reimbursement and request checks to pay for other expenses. ASCOCC members worry that with an unclear relationship with the college, it could hypothetically vote to approve funding for a club event or other program, then have the college deny that funding and not reimburse students. Paradis said he doesn’t know when the issue will be resolved. “We’re having the conversation soon,” board Chairman Charley Miller said. “I don’t think we can set a timeline on doing it right.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Mortgages Continued from A1 Banks spent billions of dollars in the good times to build vast mortgage machines that made new loans, bundled them into securities and sold those investments worldwide. Lowly servicing became an afterthought. Even after the housing bubble began to burst, many of these operations languished with inadequate staffing and outmoded technology, despite warnings from regulators. When borrowers began to default in droves, banks found themselves in a never-ending game of catch-up, unable to devote enough manpower to modify or ease the terms of loans to millions of customers on the verge of losing their homes. Now banks are ill-equipped to deal with the foreclosure process. “We waited and waited and waited for wide-scale loan modifications,” said Sheila Bair, the chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Bair was one of the first government officials to call on the industry to take action. “They never owned up to all the problems leading to the mortgage crisis,” she said. “They have always downplayed it.” In recent weeks, revelations that mortgage servicers failed to accurately document the seizure and sale of tens of thousands of homes has caused a public uproar and prompted lenders like Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and Ally Bank, which is owned by GMAC, to halt foreclosures in many states. But for all the outrage over individual examples like having one

A long process, likely to get longer As the housing crisis has accelerated, the length of time borrowers spend waiting for the foreclosure process to end has grown. The wait may become even longer as the methods of some lenders face scrutiny. AVERAGE DAYS DELINQUENT

NUMBER OF LOANS

Through August 1 year, 6 mos.

First liens only, through August 3 million

90 OR MORE DAYS OVERDUE

478 days

LOANS IN FORECLOSURE 1 year

2 312 days

LOANS IN FORECLOSURE 6 mos.

1

90 OR MORE DAYS OVERDUE

0

0 2009

2010

Source: Lender Processing Services

employee approve 10,000 foreclosures a month — the so-called robo-signers — the bigger question remains: Why were banks so ill-prepared, despite warnings that plunging home values would push many owners to the brink? Some industry executives add that they’re committed to helping homeowners but concede they were slow to ramp up. “In hindsight, we were all slow to jump on the issue,” said Michael Heid, co-president of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage. “When you think about what it costs to add 10,000 people, that is a substantial investment in time and money along with the computers, training and system changes involved.” Other officials say that as foreclosures were beginning to spike as early as 2007, no one could

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2010

New York Times News Service

have imagined how rapidly they would reach their current level. About 11.5 percent of borrowers are in default today, up from 5.7 percent two years earlier. “The systems were not ever that great to begin with, but you didn’t have that much strain on them,” said Jim Miller, who previously oversaw the mortgage servicing units for troubled borrowers at Citigroup, Chase and Capitol One. “I don’t think anybody anticipated this thing getting as bad as it did.” Almost overnight, what had been a factory-like business that relied on workers with high school educations to process monthly payments needed to come up with a custom-made operation that could solve the problems of individual homeowners. Gregory Hebner, the president of the MOS

Group, a California loan modification company that works closely with service companies, likened it to transforming McDonald’s into a gourmet eatery. “You are already in chase mode, and you never catch up,” he said. And even when banks did begin hiring to deal with the avalanche of defaults, they often turned to workers with minimal qualifications or work experience, employees a former JPMorgan executive characterized as the “Burger King kids.” In many cases, the banks outsourced their foreclosure operations to law firms like that of David Stern, of Florida, which served clients like Citigroup, GMAC and others. Stern hired outsourcing firms in Guam and the Philippines to help. The end result was chaos, said Tammie Lou Kapusta, a former employee of Stern’s who was deposed by the Florida attorney general’s office last month. “The girls would come out on the floor not knowing what they were doing,” she said. “Mortgages would get placed in different files. They would get thrown out. There was just no real organization when it came to the original documents.” Citigroup and GMAC say they are no longer giving any new work to Stern’s firm. In some cases, even steps that were supposed to ease the situation, like the federal program aimed at helping homeowners modify their mortgages to reduce what they owed, had actually contributed to the mess. Loan servicing companies complain that bureaucratic requirements are constantly changed by Washington, forcing them to overhaul an already byzantine process that involves nearly 250 steps.

States plan joint inquiry of foreclosure filings By Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

As the nation’s attorneys general announced a joint investigation into flawed paperwork filed to support home foreclosures, federal housing regulators urged lenders Wednesday to vet and fix their foreclosure procedures. The regulatory body, the Federal Housing Finance Agency, made it clear that the foreclosure process should “proceed without delay” if no problems were

found, even though some Democratic lawmakers have called for a nationwide moratorium. “The country’s housing finance system remains fragile, and I intend to maintain our focus on addressing this issue in a manner that is fair to delinquent households, but also fair to servicers, mortgage investors, neighborhoods and most of all, is in the best interest of taxpayers,” Edward DeMarco, the agency’s acting director, said.

On Wednesday, the nation’s attorneys general vowed to do their own inquiry into whether mortgage servicers filed flawed paperwork to justify foreclosures. Attorneys general from all 50 states will participate, with state bank and mortgage regulators. The inquiry will focus on signed affidavits that mortgage loan servicers have filed with the court without confirming their accuracy, a practice known as robo-signing. Some were signed

without a notary public present, in violation of state law. Others were signed by employees who spend their day signing one affidavit after another. At a news conference Wednesday, Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller, who is leading the joint investigation, said the inquiry was not a “silver bullet” to keep delinquent homeowners in their homes. Rather, he said, “this is a chance to right the law and get the process right.”

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 A5

Rural Continued from A1 Census data released recently show that the recession has not stopped a century-long movement of people out of rural areas and into cities and suburbs, a trend that will have significant impact in next year’s redistricting debates. As the U.S. population has grown, all legislators, urban, suburban and rural, are going to represent more people. That will affect everything from the cost of campaigns to legislators’ workloads and travel time. But it is the rural legislators, elected from communities that are stagnant or shrinking, who are really going to get socked. Between 2006 and 2009, metropolitan areas added about 8 million people, which accounts for all the increase in the country’s population during that time, according to the census figures. The number of people who live in principal cities increased by about 5.3 million, while the number of suburban residents increased by about 2.7 million. The population outside metropolitan areas stayed level. In 2009, slightly more than half the country’s population lived in suburbs and another third lived in cities.

Rough estimates Those figures are rough estimates, since they are calculated from surveys sent to a sample of the population. A more complete picture of the nation’s population patterns won’t be available until next spring, when full results from the decennial census are released. Still, the picture from the census is unlikely to look very different from the estimates. The makeup of state legislatures will have to change to reflect the country’s increasingly urban and suburban population. “The rural districts get geographically bigger as more and more population has to be absorbed in the urban and suburban districts,” says Gary Moncrief, a political scientist at Boise State University in Idaho. Right now, California lawmakers have the most constituents per district. On average, a California state senator represents more than 900,000 people and an Assembly member represents 500,000, according to 2008

data from the National Conference of State Legislatures. A member of the 400-person New Hampshire House of Representatives, by contrast, represents barely more than 3,000. But even within individual states, population shifts in this decade have required some lawmakers to represent far more constituents than their counterparts.

Growing boundaries In Arizona, Alvarez, who is battling for re-election this year, is concerned that his district will get even larger. The last time Arizona redrew its legislative boundaries, in 2001, the state’s Independent Redistricting Commission did not take geography into account, says Steven Lynn, the independent chairman of the bipartisan group that drew the lines a decade ago. Members focused instead on population and other criteria such as compliance with the federal Voting Rights Act. A new commission will be appointed next year, made up of two Democrats, two Republicans and one independent chairman. The districts to emerge out of the 2010 census could conceivably follow a hub-and-spoke pattern, drawing population from the Phoenix and Tucson areas to keep down the size of rural districts. But most experts think the mapmakers will follow the pattern of 2000, creating ever more vast rural districts without urban or suburban constituents. That would mean that Alvarez or his successor would need a steady supply of new vehicles. With more people living in metropolitan areas, the legislatures may be spending more time on issues of concern to suburban residents. That’s likely to be the case in Idaho, where suburban Boise has exploded in population in recent years. Idaho lawmakers will focus much of their attention on transportation funding, a burning question for Boise-area residents. But having more legislators from metropolitan areas doesn’t necessarily mean the interests of people living in those areas will be better represented, warns Robert Lang, a sociologist at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas. “Metropolitan areas are political weaklings,” he says. “They just don’t usually have coalitions that stand up for their interests.”


N AT ION / WOR L D

A6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

First lady hits road stumping for Dems

KOSOVO

Clinton: U.S. will look out for Serbs

By Nia-Malika Henderson The Washington Post

By Helene Cooper New York Times News Service

GRACANICA, Kosovo — Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sought to soothe Kosovo’s Serbian population Wednesday, assuring religious and political leaders that the United States would look out for the Serbs’ rights even though it had thrown the full force of U.S. backing behind the Kosovo Albanians who declared independence from Serbia two years ago. “I know the decentralization process has not been easy,” Hillary Clinton Clinton told a group of Kosovo’s Serbian mayors gathered near a famed monastery. She said she believed that the only way Kosovo and Serbia would prosper “is if Kosovo Serbs see a future for themselves” in Kosovo. On the last day of her three-day tour of the Balkans, Clinton spent time with ethnic Serbs who did not flee from what was then a Serbian province during the war a decade ago. She got an earful at the Gracanica Monastery, founded by the Serbian king Stefan Milutin in 1321, where Vicar Bishop Teodosije Sibalic told her that his flock of parishioners was severely depleted. In Kosovo’s capital, Pristina, Clinton urged the government to protect the rights of the Serbian minority. Prime Minister Hashim Thaci said that Kosovo was open to talks with Serbia and lavished praise on everything Clinton, calling Clinton part of a family that had done much to ensure Kosovo’s emergence from Serbia. When she arrived in Pristina, crowds lined the streets all the way from the airport into the city. Chants of “Hillary! Hillary! Hillary!” filled the air. Clinton stopped her motorcade to pop out, shake hands and pose for photographs in front of a 12foot statue of her husband.

Mahmoud Tawil / The Associated Press

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad waves to the crowds from the sunroof of his SUV upon his arrival in Beirut, Lebanon, on Wednesday. Thousands of cheering Lebanese welcomed Ahmadinejad to Lebanon, throwing rose petals and sweets at his motorcade at the start of a visit that underscores deep divisions within this tiny Arab nation.

Lebanese cheer Iranian leader’s visit By Robert F. Worth New York Times News Service

BEIRUT, Lebanon — President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad of Iran arrived here Wednesday morning and was given an ecstatic welcome by supporters of Hezbollah, the militant Shiite movement his country backs. Thousands of cheering supporters thronged the road that leads from Beirut’s airport to the city, waving Iranian flags, throwing flowers and chanting greetings in Farsi as Ahmadinejad’s convoy slowly passed. It is the Iranian president’s first state visit here since he was first elected in 2005, and it comes at a time of rising tension between Hezbollah — a full member of Lebanon’s fragile coalition government — and its politi-

cal rivals. The Shiite group has been waging a campaign against the international tribunal investigating the 2005 assassination of former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri, which is expected to indict several of the Shiite group’s members. Hezbollah’s leaders have warned of disastrous consequences if that happens. They see the tribunal as an Israeli plot aimed at discrediting them and have pressured other factions to disavow it. Even without indictments, some fear that tensions could lead to violence or the collapse of Lebanon’s tenuous unity government, in which Hezbollah and its allies wield veto power. U.S. officials voiced their disapproval last week of Ahmadinejad’s

visit, which seems timed to embolden Hezbollah and underscore Tehran’s broader influence in Lebanon. After his arrival, Ahmadinejad appeared at a news conference alongside the Lebanese president, Michel Suleiman, to underscore Iran’s influence here, announcing several bilateral agreements on energy, water and other issues. Iran, which has long provided arms and training to Hezbollah, has also offered repeatedly to help equip the Lebanese Army if the United States cuts off its military aid here. Today, the Iranian president plans to visit southern Lebanon — near the Israeli border — in a trip aimed at highlighting Iranian support for Hezbollah’s armed struggle with Israel.

MILWAUKEE — In her first campaign swing for the November elections, first lady Michelle Obama made the political personal, harkening back to her days growing up in Chicago, recalling the electricity of the 2008 presidential campaign and telling an audience of Democratic donors that her understanding of the issues of the day comes down to her role as a mother. “You see, more than anything else, I come at this stuff, more, as a mom,” she said Wednesday in Wisconsin. “As I travel around this country and look into the eyes of every single child I meet, I see clearly what’s at stake.” Her remarks marked her first full foray into the midterm campaign and came in a state where Sen. Russ Feingold, DWis., is battling Republican Ron Johnson to keep his seat. While Feingold is ahead in fundraising, his popularity has lagged in most polls. The first lady has 10 additional campaign events on her schedule, and aides said more stops could be added. Today, she heads to Denver for a fundraising luncheon for Sen. Michael Bennet, D-Colo., and she has events planned for Sens. Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Barbara Boxer, D-Calif.

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First TB vaccine booster unveiled By Sandi Doughton The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Seattle scientists have developed a tuberculosis vaccine that may boost the effectiveness of the only existing vaccine, extending immunity against the disease. So far, the new vaccine has been tested only in laboratory animals. But if results are similar in people, it could prove a powerful tool to reduce the toll of a disease that kills nearly 2 million people a year — most of them in poor countries. “The thing that got me excited is that this is the first example I know of where a boost strategy really made a substantial difference in outcome,” said David Sherman, a tuberculosis expert at Seattle BioMed who was not involved in the project. The new vaccine was developed at the Infectious Disease Research Institute, a nonprofit bioscience laboratory. Researchers hope to begin human trials early next year, said Steven Reed, IDRI founder and research director. If the vaccine’s effectiveness is borne out, he estimates it would be five to 10 years before it reaches the market. The IDRI vaccine was able to confer lifelong immunity to guinea pigs that had received a BCG shot, Reed said. “The real hope we have now is that we know immunity to tuberculosis can be enhanced over that provided by BCG, and it can be enhanced with an approach that is highly scalable, inexpensive and safe.” Even if it proves equally effective in humans, the new vaccine is unlikely to replace BCG as a stand-alone shot, Sherman said. “Something would have to be dramatically better before the public health infrastructure all over the world changes what it does.” But as a booster shot, the new vaccine might be able to protect people well into adulthood. The research was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

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Personal Finance Sloppy foreclosures underscore importance of title insurance, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,441.23 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +23.31 +.96%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Oregon joins states in foreclosure probe Oregon Attorney General John Kroger has joined with counterparts in 49 states in an investigation into foreclosure practices. Major mortgage lenders halted foreclosures in 23 states where the process is overseen by the courts, and Bank of America, the nation’s largest bank, on Friday stopped the sale of foreclosed properties nationwide while it examines the process. At issue is whether foreclosure documents were signed properly. Such documents are not used in Oregon, a nonjudicial state, according to a news release from the Attorney General’s Office. But state banking and justice officials want to know if lenders have followed Oregon laws related to foreclosure, such as allowing homeowners to request a loan modification and meeting with lenders and whether the lenders filed required affidavits in support of foreclosures.

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11,096.08 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +75.68 +.69%

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Ten-year CLOSE 2.43 treasury CHANGE +.41%

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$1369.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$23.80

“I think long-term, Bend is the hub of Central Oregon. All the roads lead to it. As California keeps growing and people want to get out of California, Bend is a better alternative.” — Rick Cordes, Bend Factory Stores managing partner

By David Holley The Bulletin

Joe Levy wasn’t happy with Gottschalks’ location in the Pioneer Crossing shopping mall in south Bend. He would rather have placed the midsize department store chain, which closed last year after filing for bankruptcy, in Bend River Promenade near the Bend Parkway. Levy said Wednesday he hopes to some-

day open a Gottschalk by Joe Levy in Bend, the new version of his failed chain, though it won’t be among the first stores to open in 2011. But Levy said Bend needed a midsize department store retailer in 2008, and should have room for a Gottschalk by Joe Levy in the future. “It’s a tremendous market. The climate is great there. You’ve got the winter sports. You have a lot of tourism. It’s a great area.

Someday we hope to be back there,” Levy said, declining to further discuss the Bend retail market. That Bend is full of both big department stores and smaller boutiques, and that more continue to move in or expand, lend credence to Levy’s belief that Bend has a strong retail market. Kohl’s opened a 64,000-square-foot department store earlier this year. See Retail / B5

HEALTH CARE REFORM

With more child-only policies in mind, U.S. eases rules Insurers may charge more to cover children with serious ailments in states that allow it By Robert Pear New York Times News Service

Submitted photo

Randy Olson, of Bend, competes Tuesday at the Walt Gorman Memorial Windshield Repair Olympics in Las Vegas.

CLEARLY, A CUT ABOVE THE REST Bend man wins ‘World’s Best’ title at Windshield Repair Olympics The Bulletin

There were 27 single-family building permits taken out in the cities of Bend and Redmond, the rest of Deschutes County and Crook and Jefferson counties in September, 38.6 percent less than in September 2009, according to Don Patton, publisher of The Central Oregon Housing Market Letter and owner of Cascade Central Business Consultants. Since Jan. 1, 310 permits have been issued, 1.3 percent September total less than in for Deschutes, the same nine Crook and months Jefferson last year. counties 44

Bend 21

27

19

he world has a new champion — and he hails from Bend. Randy Olson, co-owner of Chip Medic windshield repair, took first place Tuesday in the Walt Gorman Memorial Windshield Repair Olympics, held at the Mandalay Bay Convention Center in Las Vegas. Olson, 56, beat out about a half-dozen other competitors, including last year’s second- and third-place finishers, that made it to the finals to win the gold medal.

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“I was a little intimidated, to be honest,” he said Wednesday from Las Vegas. “I knew I would have to put (on) my A game.” For Olson, a retired Bend Fire Department captain who owns Dent Medic and Chip Medic with fellow firefighter/paramedic Steve Kaneda, the victory brings prizes and publicity. “It’s all been pretty exciting for a firsttime contestant,” he said. “I’ve gotten a couple of medals, a trophy, $1,000 in prize money and the opportunity to use … the title ‘World’s Best Windshield Re-

pair Technician’ for a year.” Olson beat out the other contestants in a two-part competition. Participants first had to complete a written portion testing their knowledge of standards for the repair of laminated auto glass. Then they competed in the practical portion, which was scored in six areas: customer greeting, technician comportment, vehicle preparation, products to be used, repair technique and post repair and cleanup procedures. See Windshield / B2

Ethanol levels in gas edge higher Retailers can now sell 15% blend, but big changes are needed first By Matthew L. Wald New York Times News Service

2009 2010

$23.914 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.785

Expansions, potential moves underscore hub status, business watchers say

By Tim Doran

Central Oregon building permits down from September 2009

s

Bend retail market shows vitality

Proxense picked to present technology Proxense, a Bend company that makes pocket-sized wireless transmitters to share personal information such as medical records, is among 10 companies chosen to pitch their technological inventions for funding at the Oregon Entrepreneurs Network Venture Northwest 2010 conference in Portland on Nov. 4. The technology developed by Proxense puts personal data on a microchip readable by merchants, health care providers and other users. For example, a patient’s medical records can be transmitted instantly from the microchip via a wireless transmitter when the patient walks into a doctor’s office or hospital, avoiding the need to fill out reams of paperwork, according to Proxense founder John Giobbi. “This could be your virtual wallet, your keys and your identification,” Giobbi told The Bulletin earlier this year. — From staff reports

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration made a gesture of support for the ethanol industry Wednesday, with a declaration by the Environmental Protection Agency that gasoline retailers can sell fuel blends containing up to 15 percent ethanol for use in latemodel cars. But it was unclear when drivers might find the new fuel mix. Numerous other changes would have to occur before gas stations will begin selling the blend, known as E15, including

many approvals by states and significant changes to the infrastructure at most gas stations.

Safe for engines? The ruling, which was requested by ethanol producers, was widely expected but the subject of heated debate over whether E15 is safe for cars and other gasoline-powered devices. Fuel sold today typically contains as much as 10 percent ethanol, but auto makers and other critics say that a higher blend of ethanol could corrode engines.

The agency said Wednesday that its testing found that the blend would not damage the engines in cars with a model year of 2007 or later — about 1 in 7 cars on the road — and would not cause unacceptable increases in air pollution. The agency is still testing cars for the 2001 to 2006 model years and expects to issue a ruling on those as soon as next month. Ethanol producers called the ruling a “good first step,” which ended the 30-year-old cap of 10 percent on ethanol for ordinary cars. “We know we have challenges on which we have to move forward,” said Tom Buis, chief executive of Growth Energy, the industry group that petitioned the EPA for the change. See Ethanol / B5

New York Times ile photo

A patron pumps gas in New York in May 2009. The EPA has OK’d the sale of fuel containing a 15 percent ethanol blend.

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration, aiming to encourage health insurance companies to offer child-only policies, said Wednesday that they could charge higher premiums for coverage of children with serious medical problems, if state law allowed it. Earlier this year, major insurers, faced Inside with an unprof• Check for itable business, changes in stopped issuyour health ing new childcoverage, only policies. Page B3 They said that the Obama administration’s interpretation of the new health care law would allow families to buy such coverage at the last minute, when children became ill and were headed to the hospital. In September, the administration said that insurers could establish open-enrollment periods — for example, one month a year — during which they would accept all children.

Outside enrollment Now, on Wednesday, the administration, answering a question raised by many insurers, said they could charge higher premiums to sick children outside the open-enrollment period, if state laws allowed such underwriting, as many do. Insurers “can adjust their rates based on health status until 2014, to the extent state law allows,” said Jay Angoff, director of the Office of Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight at the Department of Health and Human Services. The difficulty in preserving access to child-only insurance policies is the latest example of unintended consequences of the new law, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. The problem may be solved in 2014. If Democrats can beat back Republican efforts to dismantle the law, most Americans will be required to carry health insurance, starting in 2014, and insurers will be required to accept all applicants, regardless of pre-existing conditions. The new policy statement, issued Wednesday by Kathleen Sebelius, the secretary of health and human services, came with a fresh blast of criticism of the insurance industry. See Insurance / B5


C OV ER S T ORY

B2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN The 2011 Ford Fusion is shown. Ford has seen an 18 percent gain in sales this year. New York Times News Service

U.S. carmakers are getting another look

Heating bills predicted to rise 2.5% this winter By Ruth Mantell McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — U.S. households will spend 2.5 percent more on heating fuels this winter than last year, with fuel prices rising “moderately” even as slightly milder weather is expected, the Energy Information Administration said Wednesday. Average household spending for space-heating fuels from Oct. 1 to March 31 is expected to total $986, up $24 from last year. Households heating primarily with natural gas are expected

to spend an average of $27 more this winter, up 4 percent. The gain in spending represents a 6 percent increase in prices, with a decline of 2 percent in consumption. Natural gas is the primary heating fuel for about half of U.S. households, the agency said. Meanwhile, households who heat their homes with electricity can expect to spend an average of $18 less, or 2 percent. The spending decline reflects a 4 percent dip in consumption, partially offset by 2 percent

growth in prices. Electricity is the second most common heating source and is especially common in the South. Those consumers primarily using heating oil will spend $220 more, a 12 percent increase, the agency projects.

$136 more for propane Those heating with propane are expected to spend an average of $136 more, or 8 percent. Henry Margusity, senior meteorologist for AccuWeather.

Windshield

Big Three shrug off bailout and years of decline with high-tech, fuel-sipping cars tered 93 problems per 100 cars in the survey, Toyota had 117. It wasn’t long ago that Ameri- The improvements at Ford have can consumers were wondering managed to change consumers’ whether Detroit’s troubled auto perception of U.S. vehicles in companies would survive, much general. less prosper again. “Ford has become almost the Decades of decline and fi- ‘halo brand’ for GM and Chrysnancial pressures had finally ler,” Spinella said. “Because of caught up with the beleaguered Ford’s success, people are less Big Three. Without government resistant in general to considerbailouts last year, chances were ing all of Detroit’s products.” that General Motors and ChrysRecent surveys of consumler would go out of business and ers by CNW Research show a drag their suppliers, and pos- marked change in attitudes tosibly Ford Motor, down with ward Detroit by younger buyers them. in particular. Three years ago, Now, with Ford leading the more than 40 percent of newway, Detroit is vehicle shoppers recapturing the under the age interest of many “Ten years ago, of 30 said they consumers who never conthe younger, more would ditched domestic sider a Detroitbrands in favor cutting-edge made product. of Asian and Eu- buyer was mostly Now that figure ropean models. is 32 percent “Ten years interested in cars and dropping ago, the younger, from Japan and steadily. more cuttingWhen Ryan edge buyer was Germany. That Kelso, a 28-yearmostly inter- is changing and old information ested in cars systems analyst, from Japan and changing fast. began looking Germany,” said Detroit all of a for a car to reArt Spinella, place his Toyota sudden seems president of the Corolla, he was consulting firm fresher than the intrigued by the CNW Research competition.” improvements at in Bandon, Ore. Ford. “That is changKelso had not — Art Spinella, ing and chang- president of consulting owned a domesing fast. Detroit firm CNW Research tic vehicle for all of a sudden several years. seems fresher His last one was than the competition.” a Ford Ranger pickup, and it This revitalization has little to was not a pleasant experience. do with the government bailouts. “It had some problems and People are considering U.S. cars kind of soured me a bit on Ford,” because of their improved qual- said Kelso, who lives in the ity and fuel economy, and high- small town of Napavine in westtech features that are equal to ern Washington. “I was kind of or better than those offered by thinking I would buy another overseas manufacturers. Japanese car.” “Detroit is building its comeKelso looked at the Nissan back the old fashioned way Altima, Honda Accord and — with competitive products,” Subaru Legacy but kept coming Spinella said. back to the positive reviews he Sales of Detroit’s vehicles had read about the new Ford Fuhave climbed 11 percent this sion midsize sedan. year through August, compared “I was prepared and ready to with an 8 percent increase for buy the Altima, but the Fusion the overall market. Both GM just got really good marks from and Ford are profitable for the all the reviews,” he said. “So I first time in years, in part be- decided to test drive the Fusion cause of improved sales and and I could tell immediately that higher sticker prices that cus- this was a really nice car.” tomers are increasingly willing Kelso, who calls himself a to pay. techie, was impressed by the voice-activated phone in Ford’s Sync multimedia system. “I Ford out front thought, this is pretty cool,” he Ford, which managed to stay said. afloat without help from taxHe has a 2010 model Fusion payers, is leading the pack with on order. “It just had everything an 18 percent gain in sales, fed I needed,” Kelso said. by a sweeping makeover of its Farley of Ford beamed at the vehicle lineup. description “pretty cool,” but “Our consideration rates said that nuts-and-bolts quality have grown remarkably for our and a positive driving experiindustry,” said James Farley, ence were the bigger reasons Ford’s global marketing chief. shoppers were considering Ford “The reason is we can now products. show customers the cold, hard facts that our vehicles are world ‘Cool factor’ class.” The proof emerged this sum“The cool factor in design and mer in the influential “initial high technology is critical,” he quality study” of new cars con- said. “But it’s the fundamental, ducted by the research firm J.D. underlying trust that people Power & Associates. have in our vehicles that is the For the first time since the foundation for shopping our study was inaugurated 24 years brand.” ago, the domestic auto brands Farley worked for Toyota for posted better scores on qual- 17 years before joining Ford in ity than imports. Consumers 2007. As a longtime competireported 108 problems per 100 tor, he knew well the baggage vehicles in domestic brands, that Detroit carried for years as versus 109 for imported models. a purveyor of subpar cars that “This year may mark a key could not match the quality of turning point for U.S. brands as Japanese models. they continue to fight the battle He said that the financial criagainst lingering negative per- sis that landed General Motors ceptions of their quality,” said and Chrysler in bankruptcy David Sargent, vice president actually helped raise awareness for global vehicle research at of the steady improvement that J.D. Power. Detroit — and Ford in particuFord trailed only the luxury lar — had made. brands Porsche, Acura, Mer“For the first time in many cedes-Benz and Lexus in initial years, Americans debated the quality. value of our industry,” he said. And Ford has blown past “When the crisis happened, they Toyota, once considered the started to notice that we were paragon of reliability for new- doing things differently and our car buyers. While Ford regis- cars had gotten a lot better.”

com, said overall temperatures are projected to be milder from about Dec. 1 to March 31. “It’s going to add up more on the mild side, which is good news for consumers,” Margusity said. “There won’t be a big, deep freeze over the country for an extended period of time. We are probably not going to see weeks of brutally cold weather.” On a regional basis, temperature projections vary widely, EIA noted. The Northeast is projected to be 5 percent colder than last year, but the South is expected to

Continued from B1 To keep the contest fair, Olson said, judges damaged the windshields just before the competition began. The idea was to make the damage and customer interaction similar to what technicians encounter on the job when they roll up to someone’s home or business to fix a windshield. It was “what you would get on any typical Central Oregon road when the gravel starts flying and you get a windshield chip,” he said. As might be expected from the new spokesman for his industry, Olson quickly provided the benefits of windshield repair, including the reduced environmental impact — keeping a cracked windshield out of a landfill and saving energy and materials needed to make a new one.

By Bill Vlasic

New York Times News Service

Champ’s secrets He also became a focal point for some of those attending the trade show who wanted to know the world champ’s secret. Olson pointed to products made by GlasWeld, a Bend company that makes a variety of glass-repair products. While competing and winning was great, in the end, Olson said, he’s simply grateful for the acknowledgement “that I’m at the top of my field and customers can have confidence in me.” Submitted photo

Randy Olson, of Bend, holds the trophy he received after taking first place in the Walt Gorman Memorial Windshield Repair Olympics on Tuesday in Las Vegas.

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Oil fears still crimp tourism in gulf By Steve Huettel, St. Petersburg Times

Oil is gone from Florida beaches. But many travelers don’t believe it, even months after BP capped off its broken well in the gulf. Surveys show large numbers of potential visitors say Sunshine State beaches remain fouled by the spill, including some hundreds of miles from where oil touched shore. As a result, many say they’re unlikely to take their next vacation in Florida. “This was the most watched story of the summer,” said Will Seccombe, chief marketing of-

ficer for Visit Florida, the state’s quasi-public tourism agency. “It’s really scary. It’s a serious misperception.”

Taking trip elsewhere Last month, researchers working for Pinellas County interviewed 90 potential visitors via live video. Nearly one-third said the St. Petersburg-Clearwater area had been “very affected” or “somewhat affected” by the spill. Just over half of them planned to choose another vacation destination, said Walter Klages of Re-

search Data Services in Tampa. In a survey by Conde Nast Traveler magazine in mid July, most readers correctly identified Panhandle destinations Pensacola, Destin/Fort Walton Beach and Panama City as having oil on their beaches. But some also picked out west coast cities from St. Petersburg to Naples (16 percent) and even Jacksonville and Amelia Island (6 percent). Orlando-based YPartnership has been asking travelers on behalf of Visit Florida how perceptions about the spill changed their vacation plans. Among the

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

Microsoft’s Bing gets social lift from Facebook By Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

Facebook and Microsoft announced a partnership Wednesday that will give the results on Microsoft’s Bing search engine a social twist — and could help both companies compete against a common adversary, Google. The new feature allows people who use Facebook to see Bing search results that incorporate information from their friends, like restaurant recommendations. When a user searches for something like a movie, place or product on Bing, information about how many of their friends “liked” that item on Facebook and related links they have shared will appear alongside the results. The Facebook data will help determine how prominently these will appear, said Yusuf Mehdi, a senior vice president for online business at Microsoft. “It isn’t just about the common connections between data and the offline world, it’s about the connections between people,” Mehdi said. Mark Zuckerberg, a founder and chief executive of Facebook,

said the move was a deepening of the company’s current partnership with Microsoft. In 2007, Microsoft paid $240 million for a 1.6 percent stake in Facebook. Since then, the two companies have worked together to introduce advertisements on Facebook and incorporate Bing Maps into Facebook’s location application, called Places. Facebook and Microsoft appear to be forming a united front against Google, a rival to both in several ways. Despite heavy investment by Microsoft, Bing still greatly lags Google in terms of market share. Google has made several attempts to strengthen its social networking offerings and compete with Facebook. At stake, analysts say, is the ability to know more about users, and to charge more for ads that are more effectively aimed at those users. “Making search more social is ultimately going to drive more targeted advertising, which you can charge a premium for,” said Mukul Krishna, a digital media analyst at Frost & Sullivan. “Search hinges on that business model.”

destination readers were less likely to visit were the Panhandle (20 percent), St. Petersburg (15 percent) and the Florida Keys (12 percent). “There’s a clear correlation between the continuing misperception in the marketplace and the loss of Florida’s market share of leisure travelers,” Seccombe said.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 B3

P F   With reforms in play, take a closer look at health plan options By Eileen Ambrose The Baltimore Sun

BALTIMORE — Many workers during open enrollment stick with whatever medical plan they had the year before, but health care reform may change that. About two-thirds of consumers recently polled by insurance giant UnitedHealthcare said they would look more closely at their choices during enrollment season thanks to the debate over the new law. This extra level of scrutiny can pay off. If you don’t look into the details, you might be tempted to go with the plan with the lowest premium. But that might not be the cheapest in the long run if it requires you to pay more for prescription drugs or other benefits you regularly use. Open enrollment season usually occurs in the fall. Employers haven’t made major changes this season, largely because of uncertainty about how the health care law will shake out, benefits experts say. Still, you may expand coverage after seeing the impact of reforms that kicked in early. Employers also are continuing wellness efforts to encourage you to stay healthy. And you likely can count on health care costs going up, and more of the burden being shifted to you. A study by benefits consultant Aon Hewitt last month found that average overall health care costs are expected to rise nearly 9 percent to $9,821 for each employee next year. Workers on average will pay $4,386 in premiums and out-of-pocket costs next year, up $486 from this year. Here are some things to look for as you select a plan:

Health care reforms Several reforms that took effect last month won’t be felt until the new plan year, which for many starts in January. Under the new law, for example, preventive care, such as mammograms, immunizations or prostate screenings, will be 100 percent covered. Your share of the cost won’t be higher if you go outside your plan’s network of doctors and hospitals in emergencies. And young adults will be able to stay on a parent’s plan up to their 26th birthday. An adult child doesn’t have to be financially dependent on the parent or even live in the same state. These children also can be married and on the parent’s plan, although their spouses won’t be covered. As always, there are exceptions. Employers have the option of maintaining a “grandfather status” for one or more of the plans they offer, said Melissa Jimeno, a principal in the Baltimore office of benefits consultant Mercer. This allows them to postpone certain reforms until the entire health care law takes effect in 2014.

John Kovalick, who purchased a foreclosed house from Deutsche Bank, with his wife at their home in Deland, Fla. As they learn of sloppy foreclosure proceedings around the country, the Kovalicks hope nothing goes awry in their purchase.

If you don’t look into the details, you might be tempted to go with the plan with the lowest premium. But that might not be the cheapest in the long run. The hitch: Grandfathered plans can’t significantly raise employees’ deductibles and out-of-pocket limits or substantially lower the employer’s contribution. A Mercer survey of nearly 1,100 small-to-large employers in July found that a little more than half expected their plans to be grandfathered. But that number may drop after employers calculate insurance costs and how much they are willing to absorb on their own, Jimeno says. Your employer must tell you if the plan is grandfathered. Among the consequences: The new preventive care and emergency services provisions won’t apply, and young adults don’t have to be permitted on a parent’s plan if they can get insurance at their own job or a spouse’s.

Flexible spending For years, you could set aside pretax dollars in this account and use the money to buy overthe-counter drugs, such as cough syrup or pain relievers. Health care reform changes this, even in grandfathered plans. Starting next year, you must get a doctor’s prescription for over-the-counter drugs if you want to get reimbursed, said Timothy Morgan, a director with CBIZ Benefits & Insurance in Columbia, Md. This provision also applies to health savings accounts and health reimbursement accounts where tax-sheltered money is set aside to pay health care expenses, Morgan says. Here, too, there are exceptions. For example, you won’t need a prescription to buy insulin, denture adhesives, first aid supplies and contact lens solution, Morgan said. Be aware, too, that if your flexible spending account comes with a debit card, you won’t be able to use it to buy over-the-counter drugs, Jimeno said. In these cases, you will have to submit a separate claim because of the prescription requirement.

Insurance limits Health care reform eliminated the cap on lifetime benefits starting with new plan years as of late last month. It also gradually phases out annual caps over a few years. The annual limit for the new plan year can’t be less than $750,000. This applies to grandfathered plans, too.

Gregg Matthews New York Times News Service

Mortgage crisis highlights need for protection when buying a foreclosed home

Mandatory insurance for American Dream

By Ron Lieber New York Times News Service

When homebuyers and people refinancing their mortgages first see the itemized estimate for all the closing costs and fees, the largest number is often for title insurance. This moment is often profoundly irritating, mysterious and rushed — just like so much of the homebuying process. Lenders require buyers to have title insurance, but buyers are often not sure who picked the insurance company. And buyers are so exhausted by the gantlet they’ve already run that they’re not interested in spending any time learning more about the policies and shopping around for a better one. Besides, does anyone actually know people who have had to collect on title insurance? It ultimately feels like a tax — an extortionate one at that — and not a protective measure. But all of the sudden, the importance of title insurance is becoming crystal clear. In recent weeks, lenders like GMAC Mortgage, JPMorgan Chase and Bank of America have halted many or all of their foreclosure proceedings in the wake of allegations of sloppiness, shortcuts or worse. And a potential nightmare situation has emerged that has spooked not only homeowners but lawyers, title insurance companies and their investors.

The ‘What if?’ What would happen if scores of people who had lost their homes to foreclosure somehow persuaded a judge to overturn the proceedings? Could they somehow win back the rights to their homes, free and clear of any mortgage? But they may not be able to simply move back into their home at that point. Banks, after all, have turned around and sold some of those foreclosed homes to nice young families reaching out for a bit of the American dream. Would they simply be put out on the street? And then what? The answer to that last question may depend on whether those new homeowners have title insurance, because people who buy

a home without a mortgage can choose to go without a policy. Title insurance covers you in case people turn up months or years after you buy your home saying that they, in fact, are the rightful owners of the house or the land, or at least had a stake in the transaction. (The insurance may cover you in other instances as well, relating to easements and other matters, but we’ll leave those aside for now.)

An imperfect process The insurance companies or their agents begin any transaction by running a title search, sifting through government filings related to the property. They do this before you buy a home or refinance your mortgage to help sort out any problems ahead of time and to reduce the risk of your filing a claim later. But sometimes they miss things, and issues can arise later. For instance, the person doing the title search may not notice that a home equity loan is still outstanding or that a contracting firm filed a lien against the owner years ago. That could create problems for you later, when you try to sell the home. Then there are the psychodramas that can ensue. The previous owner’s previously unknown love child or long-lost heirs could show up saying that they never agreed to the sale of the property. Or perhaps there was fraud against a seller who was elderly or had a mental disability, or forgery of an estranged spouse’s signature. While the title insurers are not supposed to kick back money directly to companies or brokers that send business their way, various government investigations have turned up all sorts of cozy dealings that make you shake your head in disgust. But since you have to buy the insurance if you need a mortgage, there is not much you can do except hold your nose. That’s what John Kovalick did in January when he bought a foreclosed house in Deltona, Fla., for $102,000 from Deutsche Bank. But in recent weeks, he’s seen the headlines about other banks halt-

Slashed CD rates typical in bank failures By Paul Gores Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

MILWAUKEE — True, no one has ever lost a penny on bank deposits insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. But Tom and Carol Spidell learned the hard way about a little-known hazard of having money in a failing bank. Shortly after West Allis, Wis.based Maritime Savings Bank was closed by regulators Sept. 17 and taken over by North Shore Bank, they received five letters — one for each certificate of deposit they had with Maritime — informing them that the interest rates on their CDs had been slashed. For the Spidells, that meant the interest on a CD that doesn’t mature until next spring will be paying about a half-percent

instead of the 3.05 percent they signed up for a couple of years ago. Other Maritime CDs with interest rates ranging from 1.5 percent to 1.95 percent also were pared to 0.45 percent or 0.55 percent, all of them with roughly a year to go before they mature. The Spidells were stunned. “Basically, I consider it an insult,” Tom Spidell said. But actually, what happened to the Spidells is typical when the deposits and assets of a failed bank are sold by the FDIC to a strong institution. Although banks and regulators often remind consumers that FDIC-insured deposits are safe, that doesn’t mean the promised future earnings on a yet-tomature CD at a failed bank are guaranteed.

The federal government, in a decision stemming from the savings-and-loan crisis in the late 1980s, today allows banks that acquire failed competitors to cut what often are above-market interest rates. “Every time a bank fails now, the acquiring institution has the option to lower the interest rates,” said FDIC spokesman David Barr. Reducing the rates on CDs — which are financial instruments that promise a specific amount of interest to savers who let the bank keep their money for a certain amount of time — makes the acquisition more affordable for a bank that steps in to resurrect a dying peer. It also makes it more likely that the FDIC will be able to find a strong institution willing

to take over an insolvent bank. But it can leave customers such as the Spidells feeling they didn’t have the whole story when they invested in bank CDs. In the economic downturn of the past two years, bank failures have become almost a weekly event in the U.S. In 2009, regulators closed 140 banks, after closing only 25 in 2008. So far this year, 128 have been closed. The takeover of a failed bank is different from a normal bank merger, said Greg McBride, a financial analyst with the personal finance firm Bankrate.com . “In a merger, the CD contract remains in force,” McBride said. “In the event a bank fails, the acquiring bank is not obligated to honor the CD contracts of the failed bank.”

ing foreclosures and wondered whether something might have gone wrong with the foreclosure on his new house. A spokesman for Deutsche Bank declined to comment. Kovalick is not the only one pondering what could go wrong. While the banks were pressing the pause button on many foreclosures, some title insurers were growing concerned as well. On Oct. 1, Old Republic National Title Insurance Co. released a notice forbidding any agents or employees to issue new policies on homes that had been recently foreclosed by GMAC Mortgage or Chase. Clearly, the title insurer was also worried about a situation in which untold numbers of former homeowners have had their foreclosures overturned. At that point, those individuals might claim the right to take back their old homes, but they would also be responsible for, say, a $400,000 loan on a home that is worth half that. So what would happen next? The banks might start the foreclosure process over again. At that point, lawyers for the people who had been foreclosed upon might take the next logical step and try to show that the banks never had the documents to prove they owned the mortgage in the first place. Banks might settle at that point, writing checks to everyone who had gone through a disputed foreclosure in exchange for each of them giving up the title. But if banks did not settle, or if the evicted homeowners refused to settle and fought on and won, they might end up owning their homes once again and not owing the bank either. Or banks might agree to slice big chunks off re-

maining balances in exchange for release from any liability for the errors they made. At that point — and again, this is what Old Republic and investors in other title insurers fear — those homeowners might actually want to move back into the homes. But some foreclosed homes were sold by the banks to others who now live there. And those new residents would have big, fat title insurance claims if their predecessors ever turned up at their doorsteps, proclaimed them trespassers and told them to leave.

Be safe or stay away Chances are, it will not come to that. After all, title insurers could settle with the previous residents, allowing them to walk away with a big check to restart their lives elsewhere. Still, for anyone considering buying a bargain home out of foreclosure anytime soon, consider asking your title insurer if any special riders are available that can cover appreciation on your home in the event of a total loss. That said, if you can possibly help it, stay away from foreclosed homes until the scene shakes out a little bit. Some people will undoubtedly make a fortune investing in these properties in the next few months. But if your down payment represents most of what you have, it’s hard to justify betting it all on a situation like this one.

541-388-4418


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B4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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8.13 +.03 22.31 +1.09 0.48 22.39 +.41 1.28 59.69 12.68 -.03 12.52 +.22 1.20 54.82 +.32 42.58 +.15 1.02 9.05 -.03 1.76 38.73 -.01 0.20 14.62 +.12 20.58 +.23 1.12 27.20 +.45 6.31 -.06 25.12 +.79 5.76 +.01 .37 -.01 0.27 32.15 +1.58 1.68 28.47 +.08 24.89 -.04 15.84 -.95 9.91 +.20 1.88 +.03 0.18 13.72 +.05 6.91 -.08 0.05 17.71 +.18 1.48 -.03 1.76 53.18 +.11 0.70 44.56 -.47 0.42 7.00 -.01 2.93 -.08 22.54 +.66 0.90 45.25 -.03 6.16 +.29 6.21 +.05 36.95 +1.32 28.40 -1.75 20.89 -.10 3.23 1.54 +.09 0.15 11.30 +.05 0.04 23.71 +.22 5.39 +.20 0.52 49.72 +.89 17.61 +.60 27.71 +.05 0.36 33.37 -2.15 0.25 4.86 +.24 0.24 59.98 +.12 3.64 +.21 3.93 +.10 14.14 +.47 7.22 -.08 0.06 4.08 +.13 6.61 +.29 1.13 18.25 +.24 25.56 +.51 0.04 17.28 +.18 6.38 +.11 12.49 +.07 26.91 -.09 1.30 +.02 0.04 31.67 +.66 86.26 +1.92 5.22 -.03 4.51 +.09 3.02 +.05 34.31 +.63 0.18 74.17 +2.00 1.90 +.14 0.11 86.81 +1.34 1.96 82.91 +.33 6.77 +.13 6.03 +.38 0.40 8.85 +.22 1.00 69.81 -.11 7.38 +.04 0.18 31.78 +3.09 45.93 +.07 .59 +.02 4.29 -.03 47.54 +.22 0.56 48.82 +.80 0.34 37.71 +.11 3.68 +.07 0.12 13.37 +.17 3.95 170.18 +1.73 31.26 +.47 1.26 35.18 +.29 1.40 72.68 +1.39 6.56 +.02 67.20 -1.20 1.35 +.01 20.50 +.62 15.55 -.13 0.60 24.55 +.35 0.72 49.02 +.62 0.75 40.50 +1.10 0.20 68.51 +.97 68.25 +2.08 4.39 +.12 0.48 8.38 -.01 2.06 27.22 +.13 1.58 35.90 +.10 1.29 +.04 76.18 -.76 25.97 +.47 4.50 +.10 4.42 +.11 18.60 +.09 0.80 32.94 +.42 2.97 -.06 47.14 +1.84 2.35 +.11 0.40 7.06 +.08 0.66 5.76 +.06 15.85 +.06 0.24 29.66 -.43 0.48 20.75 +.22 1.52 24.62 +.08 0.15 7.97 +.10 26.44 +.09 2.25 +.07 4.23 139.71 +4.15 3.04 +.06 155.17 -1.31 .80 +.03 29.57 +.11 27.04 -.72 1.54 28.90 -.01 43.46 +.12 1.31 56.40 +.82 9.17 +.09 1.35 31.82 +.33 5.60 27.78 -.19 6.32 +.15 0.44 17.01 -.35 1.68 35.83 -.03 0.08 10.84 0.72 39.26 +.72 0.56 20.10 +.01 6.38 7.40 +.13 42.71 +.93 1.61 22.77 +.33 1.93 24.73 -.02 20.26 +.34 8.67 +.09 2.75 +.02 6.71 +.14 38.09 +.04 50.76 +.14 0.84 23.47 -.25 0.72 50.13 +.17 0.32 32.37 +.31 0.24 49.78 +1.01 55.49 -.45 6.87 +.19 0.06 49.87 +.59 21.14 -.31 0.36 58.44 +.14 5.95 +.13 0.88 31.42 -1.14 25.05 +.01 0.18 48.12 +1.32 0.49 63.70 +1.41 3.25 53.20 +.61 21.73 -.31 2.60 18.00 -.02 1.49 +.15 45.50 +1.11 1.05 +.04 0.92 7.06 -.01 0.60 39.46 -.04 9.37 +.20 0.60 103.29 +1.72 0.40 22.89 -.10 49.50 -.48 1.12 10.51 +.04 300.14 +1.60 1.21 +.02 0.68 32.07 +.69 0.28 11.97 +.01 9.99 +.25 0.62 20.61 +.19 .37 -.01 0.75 35.10 +.78 84.46 +1.44 0.40 26.93 +.33 0.60 33.22 +.51 3.13 42.96 +.65 43.45 1.79 -.04 1.40 16.04 +.06 3.91 -.02 19.13 +.49 0.12 25.17 +.92 0.12 18.27 +.25 3.52 +.17 10.07 +.25 27.55 -.29 1.03 +.03 4.38 +.10 20.65 -.35 16.90 +.02 14.70 +.14 5.22 -.44 10.23 +.30 0.60 53.55 +.32 .22 +.04 20.50 -.29 0.60 30.70 +.02 10.88 -.06 0.04 13.46 +.11 0.68 14.09 +.12 0.64 41.17 +.48 0.18 20.07 +1.58 0.52 13.14 +.05 2.41 52.89 +.29 33.19 +.57 26.96 -.29 1.09 13.50 -.57 31.54 +.83 19.83 +.53 8.64 +.10 1.34 29.23 +.11 32.18 +.58 4.09 +.09 7.03 +.07 .48 -.12

Nm AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoLatin BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAm pfV BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BankAtl A BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioTime n BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDvAch BlkIntlG&I BlkLtdD BlkMuIntD Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CPFL En CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapGold n CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln

D 23.07 +.21 33.46 +.78 1.40 69.14 +.65 1.36 42.46 +.46 232.55 -.40 26.49 +.26 22.00 -.02 3.57 110.80 +1.16 3.21 -.19 0.80 38.42 +.24 4.33 +.23 11.62 +.24 1.00 21.58 +.08 27.76 -.04 0.88 35.49 +.95 1.98 +.04 0.84 34.30 +.18 0.60 23.38 -.29 1.83 33.79 +.02 32.92 +.76 0.42 6.87 +.18 1.74 82.00 +1.77 1.74 69.88 +2.31 43.89 +.23 43.67 +1.08 41.41 +.15 3.34 +.01 1.50 43.16 +.49 0.10 15.22 +.17 3.98 +.09 22.95 +.45 99.95 +.33 0.60 45.26 +.53 0.68 42.19 +.12 0.40 61.97 +1.16 1.74 35.53 +.60 1.34 67.32 +1.25 0.57 13.82 +.24 0.51 22.26 +.47 0.68 15.26 +.58 0.80 13.16 +.35 0.33 15.35 +.24 0.88 14.24 +.22 0.04 13.29 -.23 7.00 -.13 2.43 -.13 1.75 25.15 -.01 1.80 45.96 +.49 1.04 3.66 +.06 2.80 60.02 +.76 0.36 26.63 +.05 .91 -.04 0.04 1.85 2.99 +.12 44.31 +.14 23.69 +.34 80.20 +1.66 0.22 18.58 -.25 79.34 -1.26 14.20 -.30 0.72 83.58 +.05 1.00 16.04 -.20 0.32 17.75 +.25 0.48 49.25 +.81 10.60 +.50 1.16 49.39 -.03 2.16 38.25 +.38 .30 -.02 14.82 -.12 4.37 +.05 1.00 6.74 -.06 0.72 49.10 +1.10 1.48 76.02 +.47 43.49 +.24 6.44 -.01 0.92 33.90 +.19 16.85 +.37 0.28 27.45 +.29 83.66 +.36 0.30 34.58 +.73 0.60 41.03 +.30 32.93 -.97 38.96 +.57 5.29 +.20 4.31 +.15 2.77 -.03 57.19 +.26 21.97 +.05 0.68 18.68 +.12 1.69 5.86 +.17 1.28 12.56 +.08 39.83 +.40 4.00 179.24 +.63 0.65 9.84 -.05 1.36 10.90 +.05 1.05 17.21 -.10 0.86 15.07 -.06 0.40 13.63 +.30 0.60 13.69 -.45 24.62 +.69 1.68 71.47 +1.25 6.82 +.12 .53 +.05 1.46 +.06 54.07 +.96 0.04 7.14 +.21 2.00 86.83 +.98 6.21 +.08 0.22 11.39 +.03 8.31 -.23 0.60 12.25 +.02 22.40 +.38 17.14 +.77 0.44 19.05 +.12 21.18 +.55 1.80 +.08 0.56 19.83 -.06 0.40 23.89 +.08 1.28 27.34 +.11 0.32 37.35 +.62 0.60 21.03 -.86 2.22 5.83 +.18 17.23 +.67 0.52 29.87 +.48 0.56 17.12 +.25 0.34 10.13 +.17 7.08 +.15 0.31 20.69 +.22 0.28 12.54 +.24 15.08 +.20 0.05 16.60 +.43 0.16 15.95 +.34 0.80 30.16 -.54 0.10 74.57 +.22 0.42 50.88 +1.72 0.92 61.65 +.81 0.25 23.97 0.16 21.92 +.18 19.92 +.71 6.01 +.03 0.80 14.39 +.40 0.40 22.21 -.02 0.20 17.86 -.04 0.40 118.39 +2.02 1.00 71.50 +.87 0.04 36.19 +.06 41.65 +.26 5.30 +.07 1.00 30.65 +.27 4.60 263.77 -.40 0.84 18.53 -.30 5.55 +.06 5.28 207.25 -1.21 0.26 24.16 +.90 5.05 73.80 -.23 1.04 59.66 +2.40 0.26 24.25 +.80 0.34 8.15 +.18 9.63 +.68 0.35 31.64 +.69 18.80 -.11 0.50 26.78 0.72 34.13 +.47 0.12 31.17 +.51 9.66 +.11 7.97 +.23 5.53 +.01 1.02 12.96 -.02 0.63 9.01 +.06 15.27 +.37 13.47 +.11 0.04 7.23 +.11 5.17 +.09 12.58 -.11 3.46 -.13 1.80 49.55 +.68 0.28 30.59 +.66 17.75 +.60 43.58 +.22 1.10 36.60 +.78 3.48 76.24 +.16 1.08 67.08 +1.99 0.30 37.70 +.23 1.08 65.91 +2.28 16.85 +.67 .48 -.02 4.68 +.16 0.20 40.43 -.14 0.90 8.86 +.07 0.04 5.92 +.08 1.66 11.03 +.04 .80 0.78 33.18 +.34 .51 +.01 15.69 +.30 24.96 +.25 20.18 -.31 0.68 31.64 +.03 29.46 +.03 0.40 40.19 +.01 0.72 37.17 +1.27 25.68 -.09 28.17 +.17 0.54 42.24 +.16 0.14 33.55 -2.03 5.00 +.18 38.77 +1.74 1.76 80.29 +.95 0.04 12.96 -.07 28.78 +.11 .73 -.02 0.20 34.32 +.13 5.74 -.15 8.91 +.33 58.23 +.35 .39 +.01 4.44 +.02 0.43 8.15 0.86 17.60 +.27 0.80 30.05 +.57 0.78 15.99 -.09 1.56 15.22 +.69 24.01 +.42 0.01 17.67 +.41 14.17 -.24 2.90 39.89 +.10 5.43 +.17 63.58 +.90

Nm Cerner CerusCp Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChiCbl rsh ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaEd ChinaGreen ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaInf h ChIntLtg n CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRitar ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSoAir ChinaSun ChinaTDv lf ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChiCache n ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfN Citigp pfE Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n ClghGlbOp Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogentC Cogent CognizTech Cogo Grp Cohen&Str CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CtrySCkg n CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Cresud Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold CrwnMedia Cryptologic Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CushTRet Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DJSP Ent DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DayStar rs DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DelMnte Delcath dELIAs Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DeutBk pf DB Cap pf DeutBCT2 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE

D 86.64 +1.11 3.93 +.06 30.97 +1.27 32.64 +.08 4.35 +.23 39.74 +.53 21.55 +1.19 27.41 -.29 5.36 2.90 -.06 0.30 23.24 -.63 2.88 83.67 -.17 25.97 +.69 0.16 10.93 -.39 54.57 -1.98 0.69 4.05 -.03 12.61 +.20 17.74 +.33 2.15 +.10 11.44 +.11 .73 +.04 6.97 +.24 1.36 -.02 5.22 +.35 10.28 -.08 .29 -.02 6.17 +.32 .63 +.01 2.76 -.14 17.78 +1.32 1.54 66.61 +1.90 26.40 +1.93 13.27 +1.00 11.01 +.21 1.85 53.28 +.58 17.89 +.59 7.67 +.17 2.79 95.17 +4.15 1.60 +.02 3.79 +.61 6.20 +.18 1.56 +.14 34.91 +3.38 4.75 +.08 2.77 -.06 0.23 14.67 +.04 7.98 +.19 0.35 21.50 +.26 26.98 +2.35 1.48 +.04 180.98 +.07 14.49 +.37 0.24 7.01 +.05 1.48 57.13 +.26 1.27 23.02 +.39 0.68 69.66 +.34 3.28 +.16 15.14 -.08 0.32 73.84 -1.21 2.64 +.07 1.60 29.88 +.20 0.72 17.27 +.10 0.48 27.63 +.30 16.43 -.10 23.18 +.56 1.97 26.13 +.06 1.59 23.43 +.17 4.25 +.01 .96 +.03 58.71 +1.27 0.40 54.56 +.64 0.42 40.15 +1.13 3.59 +.11 1.57 +.03 14.30 +.38 69.71 +.74 7.21 +.46 6.31 -.26 0.56 68.75 +.44 2.20 68.70 +.27 18.93 +.28 1.08 13.10 +.02 0.60 44.23 -.06 9.60 -.06 23.04 +.19 1.76 59.94 +.34 20.61 +.86 10.30 +.49 10.49 +.01 65.40 +.57 7.33 +.42 0.40 24.69 +.16 0.96 16.61 +.13 0.72 8.28 +.11 44.65 +.40 5.79 +.14 2.12 75.73 +.79 16.99 +.03 0.60 17.42 +.34 1.38 +.01 0.38 18.14 +.12 0.38 17.16 +.09 0.20 38.47 -.42 0.94 37.77 -.18 0.48 14.71 -.05 2.00 26.50 +.14 23.39 +.95 0.96 24.24 +.71 32.39 -.13 26.83 +.16 0.69 77.69 +2.10 18.20 +.78 23.60 +.25 0.60 47.58 +.57 8.85 +.02 23.85 +.29 1.00 30.00 +.04 8.16 +.33 0.40 32.20 +1.52 0.92 22.58 +.55 69.76 +1.50 49.25 +1.82 1.77 -.04 2.20 60.13 +.52 0.40 40.13 +.66 2.38 48.20 -.02 19.08 +.07 0.96 32.73 +.29 47.64 -.34 4.22 +.13 11.42 +.18 .54 -.04 0.06 50.58 +1.22 1.08 50.60 +.39 0.42 20.47 +.92 1.09 48.57 -.43 2.30 29.60 +.53 34.27 -.04 1.09 25.14 +.65 18.35 +.25 6.02 +.12 0.56 39.62 +.40 0.20 18.70 +.25 0.44 30.59 +.09 1.65 37.74 +.23 25.59 +.24 12.90 +.50 0.82 63.36 +.02 7.75 +.04 29.75 +3.41 0.16 7.17 +.09 47.95 -.03 1.50 16.02 +.07 23.11 +.22 0.80 40.80 -.17 0.92 39.79 +1.03 7.39 +.04 1.70 126.43 +4.36 1.85 45.00 +.47 0.32 2.95 +.03 54.62 +2.09 0.32 18.82 +.76 14.34 -.36 .24 +.02 8.30 +.20 13.74 +.44 42.45 +.62 29.22 +.33 3.72 +1.17 1.27 +.11 .39 +.01 48.52 +1.38 24.60 +.46 1.80 54.02 +.48 1.05 92.82 +.56 1.47 +.04 139.04 +.39 0.90 9.04 26.90 +.47 1.70 +.02 37.78 +.47 4.01 +.09 13.48 +.28 2.40 13.53 +.14 .87 +.06 0.05 60.24 +.64 4.79 +.11 0.28 4.96 +.05 22.24 +1.09 2.26 -.20 0.78 9.92 -.08 1.21 27.30 +.29 0.15 10.78 +.06 31.30 +.33 2.24 47.09 +.11 13.46 +.23 0.08 42.03 +.67 12.71 +.66 1.28 44.13 +.12 9.98 +.23 70.82 -.01 3.00 +.77 0.20 50.57 -.39 10.40 +.07 53.40 +.53 11.21 +.26 1.20 75.28 +.62 0.36 14.22 +.62 8.67 -.11 1.90 -.03 14.13 +.21 0.44 27.37 +.36 11.58 +.17 .85 +.02 1.00 20.70 +.69 10.48 +.29 18.11 +.61 38.46 -1.31 1.88 +.06 3.21 +.01 0.20 31.89 +.10 4.81 -.02 0.93 57.71 +1.81 1.59 23.97 +.08 1.90 27.16 +.11 1.64 25.11 +.18 11.73 -.18 40.20 +1.22 8.57 -.32 0.08 12.55 +.15 0.64 67.60 +.76

Nm

D

DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat Duoyuan n DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

2.38 0.18 0.50 0.03 1.08 2.12 0.16 6.26 5.68 0.20 0.01

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

2.00 0.35

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 14.29 +.29 72.18 +1.19 41.62 +.82 70.94 +1.57 10.75 +.36 13.99 +.23 29.15 +.07 32.22 -.16 60.62 +.67 36.68 +.91 32.95 +1.17 26.79 +.33 42.45 +.26 36.68 +.90 39.53 +1.97 31.03 -.83 22.50 -1.10 20.52 -.65 36.56 -1.29 32.75 +.15 23.27 -1.36 12.11 -.11 23.39 +.20 35.76 +.23 54.28 +1.65 53.54 +2.20 11.22 -.25 57.94 +1.22 38.39 +1.23 17.68 +.59 43.95 +.46 38.64 +.47 .21 +.01 19.27 -.20 34.91 +.43 10.40 +.25 60.25 +1.33 9.69 +.40 29.24 +.43 48.65 +.30 50.59 +.13 44.55 +.23 14.55 +.07 69.73 +1.31 18.12 +.15 1.62 18.06 +.12 54.69 +.64 29.82 +.01 35.34 +.56 7.91 +.89 33.60 +.63 25.11 -.27 38.65 +.63 4.52 -.04 67.01 +1.61 1.88 -.02 4.73 +.16 46.88 +.59 24.76 -.06 17.56 -.02 12.11 +.07 75.29 +.04 13.69 -.34 2.81 -.13 2.75 -.01 2.42 +.03 10.89 +.36 1.91 +.02 4.96 +.09

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EGShConsu eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall n EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore hlf EMS EmersonEl Emulex EnCana g s EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris EntArk40 n Entergy EntPrPt EntGaming EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EsteeLdr EtfSilver Euronet EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h Exar ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird 51job h FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstPotom FstSolar FTDJInet FT Fincl FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac

0.25 18.53 -.01 15.06 +.29 24.87 +.43 22.44 +.34 13.17 +.52 20.30 +.10 25.73 +.69 2.51 45.07 +.76 0.62 98.75 0.88 38.08 +.93 59.12 +1.12 5.30 0.40 23.63 +.46 0.64 8.74 +.07 0.04 16.95 +.07 1.76 78.67 +.80 4.21 -.05 2.32 84.09 +1.30 0.64 29.85 +.45 1.39 16.57 +.02 1.80 14.30 +.05 1.29 16.34 +.15 1.23 14.24 +.03 1.62 11.95 1.53 11.29 -.04 1.56 12.77 -.04 23.93 +.80 0.62 52.30 +.44 1.34 47.27 +.48 1.26 35.52 +.09 13.27 +.16 0.20 7.45 67.05 +.24 2.26 +.07 0.04 13.31 +.32 1.60 33.02 +.25 6.06 +.09 0.05 18.71 +.29 16.76 +.15 0.38 28.33 -.93 1.10 +.04 54.88 +.70 1.34 53.91 +.91 10.36 +.06 0.80 30.71 +.32 1.40 +.05 4.75 +.20 35.51 +.52 4.26 +.17 0.52 46.24 +.50 74.15 +.53 5.02 +.14 3.81 -.09 3.58 49.59 +.30 25.37 -.64 4.68 +.05 2.16 27.05 +.42 0.68 24.00 +.13 26.39 +.47 1.40 47.42 +1.19 4.87 -.03 1.44 24.80 -.10 3.32 77.30 +.49 2.30 41.55 +.20 .34 +.01 2.60 46.55 +1.19 2.92 +.11 9.05 -.11 11.46 +.11 9.93 +.27 0.16 31.98 +.57 74.28 +.27 0.88 17.90 +.35 1.35 49.95 +.47 0.28 11.06 +.25 0.55 66.53 -.47 23.93 +.66 18.94 +.70 1.92 83.97 +1.25 1.26 1.09 +.17 8.39 +.19 6.42 -.12 5.88 +.16 0.16 15.65 +.23 4.39 +.06 2.10 43.19 +.16 6.17 +.07 5.44 -.03 0.28 28.29 +.38 0.40 48.64 +.82 48.05 +.28 2.34 -.01 25.14 +.58 0.33 16.38 +.34 3.21 +.10 1.76 65.04 +.34 24.48 +.44 21.33 +.55 96.74 +1.13 25.56 +.40 0.50 71.00 +1.38 72.84 +1.08 0.48 9.17 +.21 3.02 +.10 35.09 -.08 0.92 86.19 +2.03 9.45 -.35 0.62 46.06 -.05 0.84 52.75 +.71 0.48 89.75 +1.77 0.20 13.08 -.35 2.68 82.29 +.23 0.24 5.59 +.19 0.96 23.80 +.40 5.49 +.18 13.54 -.17 17.54 -.04 0.72 14.82 +.10 0.20 27.89 +.33 1.26 11.50 +.03 0.04 12.70 -.06 46.06 +7.80 14.40 +.32 20.81 +.66 0.16 15.31 -.25 0.24 14.91 +.36 .28 +.01 0.04 5.71 +.10 0.40 17.20 +.27 0.72 11.29 -.11 6.07 +.31 0.04 12.72 +.33 0.56 11.73 0.80 15.46 +.06 136.93 -.08 30.38 +.36 0.11 13.79 +.13 2.20 38.89 +.54 0.64 18.88 +.30 54.33 +.24 5.77 +.27 2.64 +.17 6.22 +.14 1.80 -.05 0.80 24.58 +.18 1.16 114.37 +2.00 0.50 52.59 +1.17 24.80 +.89 0.32 54.69 +1.22 0.60 15.65 +.17 5.37 +.14 13.64 -.14 5.40 -.09 13.91 +.33 33.26 +.63 32.28 +.30 17.67 +.09 9.03 +.38

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr ForwrdA Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GEC 4-47 vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenBiotc h GenesWyo Genomic Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoGloblR GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldenMin GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GtAPc39 GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC Gug BRIC GugSolar GulfRes n GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HNI Corp HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc Haemon HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HartfFn wt HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HaupgDig HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvcs HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelicosBio HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HimaxTch Hoku Corp HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl

D 25.02 +.03 4.00 +.05 0.76 55.91 -1.14 0.28 24.94 +.08 53.06 -1.51 25.52 +.65 1.77 22.53 +.42 0.88 116.98 +1.48 1.20 99.08 +3.95 .03 -.00 22.00 +.23 7.57 +.02 0.75 8.62 -.01 13.86 +.24 1.90 28.62 +.01 40.86 +1.15 1.18 +.01 0.12 9.62 +.17 7.86 -.02 9.78 +.10 1.12 31.17 +.78 0.20 4.93 +.11 4.49 4.36 +.17 24.45 +.47 8.97 +.19 0.84 14.30 +.03 0.48 5.21 +.04 1.68 17.85 +.11 0.14 18.19 +1.39 1.28 26.72 +.21 19.25 -.55 7.35 +.31 0.16 14.06 +.29 0.40 18.99 +.28 1.50 31.40 +.61 31.27 +.18 .36 -.01 3.88 +.14 32.20 +.67 16.66 -.13 5.11 +.17 26.17 +.66 1.68 64.06 +.69 0.48 17.28 +.09 1.50 26.13 -.25 15.90 +.10 0.04 4.43 +.03 1.12 37.48 +.62 4.10 +.13 .45 -.00 45.61 +1.29 14.01 +.11 0.18 18.25 +.28 0.44 21.06 +.38 23.86 +.71 1.64 45.69 +.46 .59 +.01 12.96 +.09 72.60 -.12 24.91 +.24 .94 -.01 20.08 +1.36 0.21 13.41 +.06 6.04 -.33 0.18 6.62 +.20 1.97 29.10 +.04 36.68 +.57 0.52 15.01 +.46 1.98 41.86 +.40 1.88 +.04 0.40 6.71 +.02 4.07 +.08 5.89 +.11 0.08 38.76 -.14 20.08 +.65 1.69 +.03 0.15 15.54 +.22 1.55 +.07 0.40 18.32 +.98 0.16 16.16 +.44 0.09 24.40 +1.03 0.18 45.24 +1.27 22.62 -.58 5.24 +.19 1.40 154.73 -.48 1.16 77.69 +1.27 14.86 +.31 11.88 +.12 543.30 +1.91 29.79 +.51 0.80 33.46 +.53 16.88 +.39 2.16 125.31 +1.61 2.82 +.27 7.79 +.30 22.95 +.19 3.47 +.10 3.30 -.68 2.34 17.17 -3.01 2.87 +.16 0.07 6.22 +.32 0.83 19.01 +.04 29.54 +.73 11.91 +.62 18.29 +1.73 33.27 +.28 1.33 +.08 10.30 +.16 0.52 22.28 +.52 0.64 42.25 +.03 0.03 31.48 +.67 0.51 46.79 +.89 8.96 +.21 8.34 -.03 15.93 +.69 1.02 65.02 +.02 0.58 26.75 +.19 1.86 36.72 +.37 0.81 188.47 +4.02 0.86 29.90 +.48 1.70 52.86 +.26 27.79 +.04 30.89 -.23 54.96 -.14 23.97 +.18 0.36 35.63 +.79 8.27 +.19 27.30 +.12 1.27 +.04 1.95 +.11 48.52 +.66 23.41 +.21 0.40 32.35 +.60 35.42 +.58 7.08 +.03 0.07 11.42 +.01 1.00 44.26 +.49 0.82 24.71 +.37 0.20 24.51 +.12 15.99 +.20 11.75 -.16 1.00 46.12 +.36 4.60 29.41 +.07 2.55 +.14 1.24 22.53 +.16 6.39 +.04 3.69 +.08 2.76 49.33 +.21 0.92 24.81 +.33 7.55 +.01 1.20 23.73 +.17 27.22 +.54 18.96 26.60 -.03 0.08 15.49 +.71 4.03 +.09 6.93 +.25 1.80 49.09 +.89 .41 -.03 12.08 -.08 0.24 43.86 +1.42 59.25 -.44 1.00 64.85 -.42 2.56 +.01 0.20 6.02 +.09 1.28 50.76 +.85 10.53 +.14 0.40 63.37 +.70 0.32 42.21 +.86 18.98 +.11 23.71 -1.42 25.87 -.17 1.70 34.08 +.42 0.41 36.23 +.14 0.25 2.38 2.97 +.03 0.60 32.43 +2.08 16.02 +.10 0.95 31.00 -.41 53.15 +2.99 33.26 +.44 36.35 +.21 1.21 46.41 +.86

Nm Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HubGroup HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.84 44.79 +.50 20.44 -.43 10.90 +.55 57.40 +.38 1.80 23.08 +.35 0.04 15.95 +.14 0.28 6.12 +.04 0.02 13.15 +.39 3.85 +.01 28.96 +.53 0.60 11.98 -.03 1.35 20.76 +.36 27.37 -1.37 53.80 +1.60 0.48 35.94 +.32 0.04 5.88 -.06 0.40 12.29 +.02 41.50 +.11 6.42 +.10 3.30 +.06

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IDT Corp iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iShGold s iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iShEMBd iShIndones iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShSemi iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShEur350 iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC Idacorp IDEX Ikanos ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndiaFd IndoTel Infinera InfoSpace Informat InfoSvcs wt InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm InsitTc Insmed h InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel IntactInt IntcntlEx InterDig Intermec InterMune IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Inuvo Invsco HiY Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian JPMCh pfJ JPMCh pfK Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew

25.88 -.21 0.06 18.20 +.47 0.53 52.56 +1.17 17.44 +.59 0.26 18.33 -.04 0.54 7.68 +.06 1.20 11.51 +.13 10.97 +.29 0.32 5.65 -.03 5.19 +.29 21.50 -.60 13.43 +.23 0.81 24.68 +.17 2.58 80.92 +1.82 0.42 29.40 +.39 0.60 25.25 +.38 0.30 23.21 +.45 0.48 19.16 +.22 0.16 10.15 +.03 0.39 54.99 +.67 0.25 14.14 +.14 0.75 56.27 +.79 0.38 13.78 +.23 1.37 46.20 +.35 1.36 70.39 +1.26 0.21 13.48 +.09 0.44 17.09 +.22 1.20 64.72 +1.04 0.68 75.00 +2.29 1.22 77.32 +.68 23.49 +.65 1.08 53.28 +.36 1.69 48.24 +.40 2.65 111.87 +.67 0.87 63.18 +1.01 0.68 45.74 +1.06 1.01 85.39 +2.04 2.34 118.28 +.87 3.75 108.64 -.01 0.59 46.86 +.85 5.35 112.98 -.06 0.64 45.06 +.55 5.64 113.60 +.48 0.08 29.89 +.40 1.13 61.37 +.66 0.82 35.47 +.42 1.22 52.75 +.90 1.24 56.03 +.27 3.82 103.05 -.16 3.77 99.79 1.10 84.41 +.01 1.38 57.32 +.64 0.83 41.96 +.40 0.52 51.14 +.40 1.42 93.26 +.73 0.99 82.17 +.77 7.98 90.04 +.30 0.44 48.32 -.09 88.38 +.32 1.85 64.73 +.62 1.28 60.97 +.39 0.57 90.23 +.86 0.72 53.05 +.44 1.11 65.22 +.48 1.06 64.93 +1.03 3.26 105.11 -.02 0.47 78.10 +1.13 0.79 70.58 +1.06 0.08 110.24 +.02 2.91 39.80 +.11 1.19 69.75 +.54 0.67 22.03 +.11 1.88 55.25 +.54 0.59 53.82 +.18 0.58 61.87 +.92 0.91 69.00 +1.05 0.82 46.90 +1.31 1.02 39.76 +.68 3.16 -.02 1.00 47.89 +.65 65.92 -.95 20.92 +.03 1.20 36.15 -.03 0.60 36.70 +.59 1.28 -.01 1.36 48.76 +.49 49.49 -.27 10.60 +.79 17.25 -.02 17.08 +.39 7.07 -.22 3.62 +.10 21.86 +.27 16.82 -.35 0.09 39.37 +.96 1.25 41.19 -.02 12.07 +.04 8.21 -.25 37.65 +.42 .01 +.00 0.54 71.20 +2.26 0.28 39.07 +.47 17.66 +.16 0.57 8.70 +.22 1.22 26.11 +.61 .69 -.00 6.27 +.03 6.09 9.21 +.03 2.72 52.45 -.13 0.63 19.24 -.53 22.95 +.05 112.94 -.30 29.99 +.20 12.37 +.22 14.85 -.23 0.38 17.84 +.70 2.60 140.37 +.52 6.05 +.08 1.08 50.07 +.45 0.24 15.04 +.20 0.50 23.16 +.44 21.59 -.12 6.64 +.15 12.38 +.34 68.82 +1.45 10.73 +.08 0.48 11.85 -.33 18.04 +1.54 31.11 +1.19 47.57 +.66 275.70-10.93 .37 +.01 0.54 5.96 +.01 0.44 22.87 +.43 3.57 21.49 +.04 0.29 4.66 +.02 14.24 +.10 0.69 8.62 +.06 8.68 +.08 0.25 21.25 +.29 26.63 +.93 8.43 -.05 4.57 +.13 0.59 26.05 +.45 62.55 +.53 2.36 -.01 25.32 +.79 13.78 +.53 35.44 -.33 26.27 +.84 9.55 +.23 22.93 +.75 12.49 -.02 0.20 39.84 -.56 13.02 -.48 1.80 35.14 +.24 1.75 25.45 +.15 1.47 25.23 +.06 0.28 15.02 +.33 0.38 26.33 +.31 22.07 -.26 1.08 -.01

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D 40.52 +.65 7.35 +.17 19.65 +.72 2.49 +.18 17.32 +.28 0.04 11.63 +.24 0.33 32.93 +.54 10.95 +.26 0.30 22.72 +.16 6.60 +.13 30.41 +.66 0.14 10.90 +.08 42.09 -.74 2.14 -.01 2.16 63.58 +.29 0.52 32.29 +.75 0.20 20.58 +.07 0.20 88.51 +2.43 1.33 +.10 46.33 -.02 0.70 72.82 +.25 31.64 -.27 0.25 11.11 +.19 0.20 25.38 +.26 12.65 -.04 0.08 11.36 +.07 0.48 9.02 +.03 1.00 34.96 +.27 21.67 +.25 2.89 +.15 5.79 +.56 41.50 +1.85 0.76 35.78 +.16 1.92 26.43 +.07 1.62 50.81 +.78 0.48 32.80 +.60 5.47 +.40 10.32 -.02 0.04 8.29 -.21 2.00 25.63 +.13 9.63 +.14 1.40 33.67 +.30 2.64 66.82 +.13 0.64 16.96 +.06 4.36 70.75 +.25 13.88 +.20 38.06 +.09 14.16 +.02 0.10 19.66 +.72 13.04 +.14 0.24 19.48 +.40 1.20 19.97 +.31 0.08 17.07 +.32 9.55 +.61 4.00 +.20 53.01 -.45 7.94 +.52 3.67 +.11 14.02 +.14 1.16 31.49 +.34 31.26 +.76 5.18 +.22 0.42 22.01 +.32 5.82 -.04 8.72 +.15 11.82 +.03 1.60 71.22 +1.19 0.46 31.12 +1.28 12.35 +1.21 .98 -.04 17.54 +.66 4.88 +.33 21.60 +.31 2.12 +.07 4.69 +.01 6.18 -.08 8.85 +.27 1.06 +.10 80.40 +.87 1.20 +.07 41.25 +.26 34.07 +.19 0.20 38.92 +1.01 38.94 -.06 0.44 25.25 +.77 4.91 -.02 8.97 +.14 0.50 35.89 +.05 12.14 +.14 5.94 -.09 84.88 +1.08 0.16 31.68 +.29 1.08 24.08 +.24 0.40 28.05 -.14 0.16 15.85 -.05 0.60 43.59 +.76 25.33 +.56 .89 +.02 1.66 +.08 0.40 7.66 +.08 45.13 +.53 10.49 +.16 1.73 +.08 11.25 -.05 0.29 4.54 +.01 32.32 +.28 32.02 +.20 14.24 -.10 56.33 +1.44 66.10 +.32 1.90 33.11 +.22 47.46 42.57 +1.03 35.70 +.60 1.67 +.04 1.96 37.40 +.04 6.18 -.04 0.60 29.35 -.36 0.80 27.25 +.75 0.04 25.43 +.28 0.34 51.11 +2.36 0.92 30.80 -.76 2.52 33.26 +.36 5.12 +.38 16.84 +.57 9.52 +.11 8.73 +.01 6.76 -.04 1.45 4.59 1.94 26.71 +.01 4.51 +.53 3.00 71.12 +.57 2.62 +.14 0.25 39.87 +.39 18.65 +.02 37.30 +1.19 39.70 +.99 2.99 -.06 4.50 82.05 +.60 7.87 +.24 0.44 21.89 -.15 1.44 113.01 +1.34 0.50 49.51 +1.75 45.59 -.35

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc MVC Cap Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MAKO Srg MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVIndSC MktVJrGld

2.80 76.78 -.77 0.04 17.16 +.73 11.19 +.49 0.24 6.34 +.17 1.00 26.98 +.23 0.63 20.66 +.19 6.94 +.33 13.59 +.12 7.74 +.10 0.90 7.69 -.01 0.58 6.92 -.02 10.03 +.16 12.10 -1.51 0.60 14.10 +.10 9.56 +.04 19.69 +.83 2.88 +.02 35.64 +.48 0.48 12.99 +.02 2.00 44.52 +.42 1.80 32.77 +.21 17.31 -.21 0.20 24.34 -.62 47.85 +.09 2.93 53.47 +.37 4.04 +.11 1.20 88.50 +2.25 4.90 +.02 9.79 -.16 0.24 2.35 -.05 0.08 11.57 -.45 6.67 -.01 0.74 55.27 +.43 0.52 12.40 +.08 1.00 35.69 +.41 25.24 +.28 0.11 58.59 +1.42 0.08 34.39 +.22 23.26 +.38 36.35 +1.16

Nm MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medivation Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck Meredith Mesab MetaFincl Metalico MetLife MetLfe pfA MetLfe pfB MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileMini MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS Cap7 MS Cap8 Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc Mueller MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTT DOCO NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatusMed NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Ness Tech NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTch NetSuite NBRESec NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g

D 0.42 0.45 0.18 2.56 0.16 0.84 0.04

49.95 +.85 61.95 +1.76 89.17 +1.60 38.40 +.26 36.00 +.24 24.09 +.14 7.29 -.32 4.81 1.60 78.38 +.28 17.31 +.34 0.30 11.71 -.11 2.00 29.10 +.34 0.24 36.23 +.69 11.51 +.11 0.60 230.89 +8.76 0.75 24.29 +.36 2.69 +.10 0.84 18.79 -.18 3.96 +.09 1.04 42.50 +.46 15.75 +.66 2.44 75.75 +.17 0.94 35.34 +.61 0.72 62.43 +1.17 18.73 -.13 47.21 +.07 0.90 58.24 -.06 0.12 8.55 -.11 0.92 25.19 +.35 25.26 +.95 21.28 +.52 53.17 +.40 0.80 10.72 +.27 14.25 +.33 0.24 30.79 +.54 12.25 +.17 0.90 33.55 +.14 5.79 +.12 20.21 +.42 0.36 25.54 +.17 10.80 +.05 64.91 +.14 1.52 37.16 +.52 0.92 34.87 +.27 1.70 42.59 +.38 0.52 22.25-10.98 4.58 +.20 0.74 39.76 +.57 1.02 22.99 -.01 1.63 24.61 11.03 +.27 3.88 +.03 0.14 10.38 -.23 1.37 30.47 -.68 7.18 +.11 7.65 -.10 43.78 +.89 20.16 -.13 0.64 25.34 +.51 2.90 2.11 -.04 2.46 60.50 +.69 .65 +.02 0.09 19.93 +.02 7.24 100.76 +2.28 0.20 31.10 +.97 7.96 +.09 9.48 -.01 10.72 -.08 4.87 -.08 2.96 -.12 16.04 +.22 23.13 +.77 13.52 +.04 6.73 -.07 55.85 +.43 0.61 21.73 +.10 0.61 17.86 +.02 1.12 48.85 +.16 27.76 +.27 14.29 +.31 2.54 +.07 16.61 -.25 1.12 54.69 +2.44 13.20 +.35 0.36 17.81 +.28 0.42 27.88 +.20 0.20 25.94 +.01 1.65 25.15 +.17 1.61 25.01 +.10 0.20 68.06 -.09 8.12 -.01 20.00 +2.58 2.34 +.14 0.40 27.29 +.32 0.07 3.24 -.01 1.10 65.45 +.49 18.93 +.20 19.94 +1.28 14.29 +.09 27.96 +.57 0.60 16.06 +.07 .71 +.00 43.03 +.66 2.30 +.12 6.81 +.24 21.22 +.24 0.57 16.49 -.20 0.44 13.01 -.05 1.20 29.17 +.09 19.40 +.53 0.14 26.56 +.31 14.26 +.05 20.12 +.11 2.64 +.04 13.80 +.38 1.38 54.86 +.21 7.17 45.96 +.48 0.40 48.15 +1.33 0.04 6.61 +.18 1.52 26.73 +.27 0.40 12.99 -.11 1.84 40.55 +.16 14.74 -.07 12.06 +.22 0.24 6.06 +.10 1.68 18.28 +.24 49.53 -.27 15.45 -.20 4.60 +.18 13.72 -.14 27.04 -.24 49.62 +.85 38.09 +.25 26.95 +.01 154.61 -.78 3.41 +.01 1.89 +.02 21.74 +.19 0.24 3.78 +.03 .55 -.03 7.44 +.03 24.42 +.44 14.25 +1.07 5.69 +.34 .04 +.00 .11 +.01 7.36 +.30 91.08 +1.46 1.00 16.58 +.01 8.57 +.10 0.28 12.68 +.02 4.01 +.02 0.20 18.14 +.33 59.84 +1.42 0.60 63.18 +1.18 8.75 +.28 0.15 14.17 +.25 0.15 15.88 +.12 0.20 22.32 +1.15 2.00 55.47 +.23 0.92 17.70 -.01 1.86 48.10 +.58 6.40 +.01 1.08 82.02 +.13 15.48 -.09 22.69 +.10 0.20 35.45 +.79 0.72 77.94 +1.09 0.56 11.25 +.35 5.30 -.02 1.55 27.10 +.09 0.80 38.43 -.58 1.44 62.21 +2.48 4.64 +.22 1.36 29.23 +.45 1.03 30.45 +.13 9.05 -.04 18.73 +.03 1.12 49.48 +.22 2.94 +.06 1.88 62.19 +.43 0.40 4.13 +.21 0.40 11.35 +.04 6.09 +.28 9.59 +.37

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D 1.99 59.45 +.24 9.83 +.07 2.46 +.22 6.05 +.02 27.01 +.23 1.60 39.06 -.14 0.50 31.78 -.01 34.21 +1.19 15.14 +.04 1.44 40.15 +.27 0.70 19.31 +.39 0.78 11.79 +.21 0.75 8.91 -.02 0.66 8.62 11.34 +.33 21.65 +.82 1.45 42.70 +.22 52.84 -.52 22.42 +.41 1.52 84.29 +1.06 55.70 +1.53 .95 +.01 0.85 15.08 +.12 17.05 +.65 9.20 +.09 5.10 +.08 16.03 +.34 2.66 119.41 +2.52 49.63 +1.01 .49 +.01 26.01 +.56 0.28 9.94 +.19 0.69 13.87 +.19 0.80 21.14 +.16 1.44 22.95 +.30 0.13 22.85 +.11 0.80 40.96 +.17 24.73 +.02 7.61 +.10 7.03 -.03 3.40 -.10 1.84 48.80 +.59 26.81 +.38 47.60 +.75 65.10 -.59 1.72 2.51 +.06 0.20 28.60 +.65 15.36 +.24 6.49 +.26 12.14 +.30 4.91 +.15 0.16 13.65 +.36 9.35 +.22 14.24 +.54 0.30 10.20 +.12 .22 +.02 1.99 -.07 30.83 +.29 1.75 34.54 +1.08 0.71 28.22 +.10 27.75 +.04 27.23 +1.07 .27 +.00 1.00 5.58 +.15 0.42 46.62 -.03 1.82 46.46 -.10 21.01 +.22 7.32 +.03 3.99 -.13 0.40 52.92 -.03 0.50 11.65 +.12 1.43 113.10 -1.37 2.20 76.24 +.74 1.40 27.72 +.18 2.44 57.73 +.04 21.82 +.05 0.04 18.56 +.45 0.48 50.58 +.72 5.71 -.07 .83 -.01 1.10 +.10 6.00 +.05 0.60 23.80 +.65 33.11 +.06 4.23 +.04 7.34 -.07 0.64 44.22 +.62 0.05 30.91 +1.39 90.84 +.17 33.57 +.74 0.20 3.96 20.00 +.25 1.80 21.20 +.20 4.44 +.02 1.08 71.79 +1.26 13.58 +.07 0.40 28.41 +.12 0.20 18.21 +.43 1.24 27.63 +.35 0.28 51.77 +.93 0.12 27.11 0.84 11.51 +.17 31.60 -.10 0.23 15.90 -.47 1.56 24.13 +.31 1.88 26.08 +.11 1.80 22.52 +.60 1.04 11.05 +.21 0.80 33.46 -.35 0.60 12.92 +.50 13.76 +.43 0.76 34.92 +.72 0.62 13.27 -.06 0.12 10.97 +.21 1.08 19.14 +.03 1.92 66.40 +.32 1.62 29.99 +3.18 0.28 23.52 +.38 0.25 66.56 -.11 3.97 129.46 +2.47 17.69 -.23 1.18 31.56 +.36 1.18 34.74 +.16 6.12 +.15 0.50 36.11 -.17 0.72 17.73 +.25 1.67 +.23 3.81 66.48 +.47 0.60 24.35 -.03 9.55 4.95 +1.89 2.56 57.36 +.18 4.80 62.60 +.40 0.95 33.65 +1.52 0.15 62.97 -.07 2.27 +.15 3.85 -.01 6.05 +.25 1.12 29.40 +.16 1.26 18.81 -.06 8.05 -.11 5.60 +.02 0.78 10.58 +.14 1.46 12.98 -.03 0.90 11.28 +.05 11.83 -.16 9.79 +.26 2.10 41.25 +.22 6.60 +.02 0.08 73.87 +2.01 1.46 22.30 +.23 3.80 64.38 +.22 28.32 +.06 0.20 35.58 +.11 2.17 0.32 43.40 +.31 .45 +.03 1.68 37.24 +1.04 1.60 67.44 +.88 0.40 94.40 +.68 28.33 +.45 1.99 -.11 13.14 +.37 33.84 +.87 0.52 20.51 +.07 2.82 +.06 1.04 20.57 +.10 0.80 30.10 +.25 0.40 148.47 +1.26 2.04 36.18 +.98 0.20 32.84 +.75 10.96 +.09 25.26 +.12 28.69 -.17 22.36 -.06 27.56 +.07 10.34 +.23 0.11 17.52 +.36 0.02 21.62 +.17 1.30 18.46 0.44 21.03 +.33 0.11 18.06 +.30 1.56 18.56 +.05 1.02 14.53 +.01 1.64 28.45 +.15 0.12 26.48 +.64 0.33 50.52 +.41 1.83 -.02 1.80 91.90 +1.04 0.12 131.86 +1.90 7.21 +.09 7.48 +.05 .48 -.02 10.36 +.14 1.08 53.03 +.90 341.04 +4.86 31.82 +.20 0.50 27.02 +.01 0.04 11.97 +.23 46.75 -.36 37.69 -.31 47.27 -.33 27.65 -.43 0.40 49.73 +.69 23.08 -.34 70.19 +1.07 13.77 -.25 0.43 41.97 +.62 32.39 +.07 15.26 -.79 28.17 -1.38 34.42 -1.24 19.57 -.39 50.81 -1.10 25.16 -.80 0.41 48.62 +.91 18.54 -.14 0.09 58.21 +.48 40.41 -.91 0.23 34.83 +.79 0.10 40.35 +1.20 36.16 -.52 15.93 -.51 0.01 34.70 +.95 41.00 +.05 24.47 -.55 0.48 168.00 +3.57 10.84 +.24

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66.91 +2.05 30.56 -1.03 18.16 -1.10 12.39 -.32 100.30 +5.34 18.89 -.11 1.93 62.63 +.61 2.48 44.32 +.13 36.51 +1.41 0.16 21.32 +.20 0.60 12.72 +.12 1.21 9.86 +.05 0.62 33.06 +.45 9.04 +.19 0.56 23.04 +.40 0.72 7.76 +.20 0.44 12.83 +.26 0.70 54.40 +.42 0.61 19.82 +.20 33.63 +.03 1.37 33.39 +.22 3.20 101.29 +1.66 8.91 -.12 8.18 -.10 0.71 6.93 +.05

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D 34.03 +.06 1.44 73.25 +.53 1.40 20.08 +.14 0.34 70.41 +1.41 5.20 +.11 9.04 +.28 0.58 17.72 +.25 2.41 110.88 +3.55 2.25 -.12 12.47 +3.91 11.03 -.05 0.64 61.23 +.77 39.23 +.57 32.96 -.25 0.42 33.77 -.08 8.29 +.16 4.85 +.12 37.37 +.17 0.41 5.41 +.13 23.64 +1.04 27.48 +.73 0.08 8.90 +.27 2.40 97.14 +.70 53.14 +.56 8.42 +.56 4.23 +.01 1.40 +.05 48.02 +1.58 25.11 -.39 3.85 +.01 21.25 +.04 3.75 +.01 7.29 +.77 12.31 -.54 7.05 +.07 0.75 43.99 -.51 3.81 +.01 10.61 -.06 16.14 +.52 1.60 62.83 +.79 21.62 +.92 0.62 50.71 +1.21 59.24 -.18 11.65 -.29 17.70 +.30 17.73 +.28 3.79 +.07 3.22 +.19 9.30 +.31 12.23 +.06 1.12 34.80 +.37 3.45 +.02 0.28 31.95 +.06 0.20 38.69 +1.06 69.73 +5.61 27.94 -.18 1.82 37.51 +.02 1.43 40.30 +1.49 0.60 24.96 +.26 0.02 12.97 -.02 34.67 +1.07 17.05 +1.26 1.00 23.63 +.24 4.49 +.02 .99 +.04 21.75 +.23 12.07 +.20 4.63 +.04 12.02 +.20 1.05 34.82 +.55 0.58 31.08 +.22 0.77 28.53 +.24 0.43 34.50 +.05 1.00 59.14 +.71 0.16 14.86 +.01 0.60 32.62 +.53 0.31 23.68 +.19 1.27 31.85 +.12 3.89 -.02 1.36 63.77 +.80 0.36 20.78 +.08 1.97 -.01 0.52 27.26 +.12 0.20 55.63 +.83 1.32 20.29 0.04 40.16 +.50 1.02 22.04 +.41 0.30 14.76 -.02 0.16 8.55 +.02 .92 -.03 72.19 +1.37 0.60 34.37 +.26 0.06 5.67 +.07 0.08 16.56 +.54 43.78 -.30 45.98 +1.37 17.94 +.53 16.65 -.24 11.68 +.66 4.84 +.15 3.00 157.05 +.38 0.60 49.29 +.24 25.84 +.24 .37 -.01 8.69 +.02 1.44 26.77 +.29 0.40 35.15 +.40 .31 +.00 0.60 39.83 +.83 5.97 +.16 14.24 -.06 13.76 -.02 3.71 +.05 10.32 +.31 9.72 +.07 0.04 26.71 -.66 2.20 +.03 26.86 +.10 0.35 12.13 +.08 4.67 +.25 0.04 8.89 +.20 9.36 -.03 8.34 +.04 32.91 +.27 14.54 +.46 15.60 +.21 0.20 10.50 25.55 +.49 19.52 +.36 1.13 55.03 +.16 23.61 +.82 28.86 +.51 25.38 +.27 0.04 2.71 +.10 1.00 28.90 +.32 32.49 +.63 1.40 24.57 -.10 0.92 24.94 +1.06 0.20 15.56 +.22 16.33 +.02 0.82 17.53 +.02 4.10 -.18 0.88 10.50 +.26 0.71 33.45 -.11 0.60 44.44 -.38 42.73 +.57 10.11 +.39 17.80 -.06 0.47 10.43 +.16 10.90 +.25 10.70 +.37 23.80 +.17 0.25 18.29 +.22 1.55 48.00 +.07 7.39 +.12 2.15 30.01 -.38 1.00 54.42 -.32 6.89 +.42 4.16 +.10 0.32 27.85 +.72 1.66 48.32 +.44 41.94 +.53 0.10 4.51 +.01 0.40 45.72 +1.49 1.27 27.15 +.98 1.12 12.15 +.05 13.50 +.21 5.53 +.04 1.65 15.13 +.20 0.85 7.83 +.11 0.68 14.66 +.19 4.78 80.61 +1.38 1.35 15.03 +.05 0.45 33.92 +.36 0.08 7.72 +.31 0.44 20.04 +1.42 1.00 17.36 +.35 0.54 10.73 +.06 32.32 +.06 0.68 41.81 +.39 4.56 31.19 -.07 38.46 +.47 11.36 +.08 24.06 -.26 0.50 35.68 +.13 10.37 +.35 .43 +.01 20.54 +.30 14.37 +.53 18.79 +.21 10.35 +.15 0.72 54.06 +.51 18.15 +.44 0.30 34.94 +.79 0.52 28.12 -.56 15.32 -.07 0.08 21.64 +.17 22.61 +.33 14.98 -.05 49.36 +.90 11.56 +.17 1.16 38.61 +.05 0.40 33.75 +.93 33.57 -1.69 2.10 89.14 +.99 18.16 +.31 1.00 45.59 +.07 1.00 49.90 +.07 21.65 +.22 1.25 +.07 1.60 56.21 +.15 0.85 31.49 +.42 0.52 40.69 +.78 0.02 15.04 +.16 18.42 +.20 20.79 +.53 10.31 +.03 18.54 +.03 3.65 +.09 2.75 -.11 0.64 54.89 +.22 14.40 +.03 2.44 74.59 +.33 3.23 53.95 +.90 0.28 15.64 +.14 0.30 50.29 -.08 70.30 +.25 0.28 39.77 -.20 6.70 +.10 3.36 +.02

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Insurance

round, or decline to enroll all children outside the open-enrollment period. Federal officials specifically rejected an option proposed by many insurers, which wanted to be able to accept healthy children and reject sick children outside the open-enrollment period. This option is “inconsistent with the language and intent” of the law, Sebelius said. Insurers said they needed to bring additional healthy children into their broader insurance pools, or else premiums would go up. Parents may seek child-only policies if they cannot afford family coverage or if they work for employers that do not offer coverage of dependents.

Continued from B1 “Unfortunately,” Sebelius said, “some insurers have decided to stop writing new business in the child-only insurance market, reneging on a previous commitment made in a March letter to ‘make preexisting condition exclusions a thing of the past.’ ” The White House has been tussling with insurers for months, trying to get them to provide coverage for children with cancer, autism, heart defects and other conditions. In a letter Wednesday to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners, Sebelius said the decision of some insurers to stop issuing childonly policies was “extremely disappointing.” But Sebelius acknowledged, “Nothing in the Affordable Care Act, or any other existing federal law, allows us to require insurance companies to offer a particular type of policy at this time.”

States encouraged to set open enrollments The administration encouraged states to set uniform open-enrollment periods for all insurers in the children’s market. In its policy statement, the administration said, “States may set one or more open-enrollment periods for coverage for children under age 19, but cannot allow insurers to selectively deny enrollment for children with a pre-existing condition while accepting enrollment from other children outside of the open-enrollment period.” Angoff, the Health and Human Services official, said the federal government could, by regulation, establish a uniform nationwide open-enrollment

Insurers’ lobbyists deny promise Insurance industry lobbyists say Sebelius mischaracterized their commitment. They denied that they had promised to continue offering child-only policies. In a series of questions and answers intended to clarify its reading of the law, the administration said Wednesday that insurers had two options. They can enroll all children year-

Ethanol Continued from B1 Oil producers, gasoline retailers and the makers of gasolinepowered equipment denounced the decision, many of them in the hours before it was released. A spokeswoman for the auto manufacturers — which generally support renewable fuels but want additional testing before more ethanol is used in cars not designed for it — described the announcement as “ethanol creep.” Gina McCarthy, the EPA assistant administrator for air and radiation, said that the decision advanced an important national goal of reducing oil consumption. The federal government would like to see Americans use 36 billion gallons of alternative fuels by 2022, including 21 billion from advanced biofuels beyond the

Retail

period for child-only policies. “That could get more carriers back into the market,” he said. But Angoff said states could act faster than the federal government. “Some states, including California, Colorado, Ohio, Oregon and Washington, have already established open-enrollment periods,” he said.

On March 29, six days after President Barack Obama signed the health care bill, Sebelius sent a sternly worded letter to insurers, saying, “Children with pre-existing conditions may not be denied access to their parents’ health insurance plan.” Karen Ignagni, president of America’s Health Insurance Plans, a trade group, sent an immediate response, accepting the administration’s demand. Robert Zirkelbach, a spokesman for the trade group, said Wednesday, “Health plans have upheld the commitment” by Ignagni. “Children with preexisting conditions are able to obtain coverage on their parents’ policies,” he said. Neither the Sebelius letter nor Ignagni’s response referred to the marketplace for child-only coverage, Zirkelbach said. Insurers agree that if they provide insurance for a child, they cannot refuse to help pay for the treatment of pre-existing conditions. But Zirkelbach said the law “does not mandate that health plans offer coverage to all children” before 2014.

Election-year politics? It was not clear why the agency made an announcement on one group of cars when a decision on another group is coming in a month or two, but analysts suggested that election-year politics played a role. Kevin Book, an analyst at ClearView Energy Partners, a research firm, said that in the midterm congressional elections in three weeks, “there are nine atrisk Democrats from the top 10 ethanol producer states. If you’re fighting for every seat in a midterm election, you can’t afford to wait until the rule is finished.” Paul Bledsoe, a senior adviser to the Bipartisan Policy Center and a veteran expert on the

competing with larger metropolitan areas for the national chain retailers.

Continued from B1 To the south, Wal-Mart Stores Inc. has plans to add a grocery, bakery and deli to its store on Southeast Pinebrook Boulevard in Bend, and is still considering opening a second store in northeast Bend near Cooley Road, said spokeswoman Jennifer Spall. Spall said Wal-Mart doesn’t talk about its market research, adding that customers in Bend have been asking for grocery service. She said the growth is a response to customers’ demand. “It’s just a fabulous community,” Spall said. Kathy Deggendorfer, daughter of the owner of the Columbia Sportswear chain, once operated three Columbia outlets in Bend. After she and her husband sold the outlets back to the company in 1998, the three stores were consolidated to one now located at the Bend Factory Stores. Deggendorfer still pays attention to the retail market in Bend, adding that she thinks it’s tough right now, given the economy. It still makes sense that Bend, a town of less than 90,000, has a growing retail market, however, because it’s the biggest regional hub west of Boise and east of the Cascades, she said. “It’s like St. Charles. The service area is much larger,” Deggendorfer said. Steve Toomey, a founder and partner of Compass Commercial Real Estate Services, said Bend’s retail is not only a regional hub but also a tourist attraction for people visiting the area. Yet one issue Bend is facing is

Sebelius’ stern letter

corn-based ethanol that is prevalent now. Currently, the industry says it can produce about 6 billion gallons of corn ethanol a year.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 B5

politics of energy policy, said, “Expanding fuel supply is never more popular than a few weeks before an election.” But McCarthy said the agency was obligated to respond to a petition by an ethanol producer group, Growth Energy. It had originally intended to reply this summer. The first group of cars affected is small. R.L. Polk, the auto industry consultant, said that as of January, there were 231 million vehicles of the model year 1981 or later, of which 35 million, or 15 percent, were covered by Wednesday’s decision. Another 85 million vehicles, or 37 percent, are in the group for which a ruling could come next month. But the newer vehicles are driven more miles and burn a disproportionate share of the fuel. The fuel itself gets a mixed reception from environmental advocates. Ethanol production

consumes prodigious quantities of natural gas, diesel fuel and other inputs that lead to carbon dioxide emissions. And it contributes to the demand for corn, helping to drive up the cost of that commodity, raising food prices and diverting farmland that could be used for growing crops for human consumption. It also pits farmers against car owners. Ethanol can eat away at the seals in engines and fuel systems that are not designed for its use. The EPA said that cars sold in the 2007 model year and later were more able to withstand ethanol because they were built to tighter pollution standards and that older cars might be able to accept higher blends as well.

Fear of liability But the automakers and fuel suppliers fear liability if the high-

Retail space limited Larger metros are attracting national retailers because the recession is allowing them to pay uncommonly low rent prices in big cities. Discount and outlet retailers are still looking at cities like Bend, however, Toomey said. Still, with a retail vacancy rate of 10.8 percent during the second quarter of 2010, Bend doesn’t have much retail space available, he said. “That’s extremely healthy,” Toomey said. The Bend Factory Stores are reporting year-over-year sales growth of 9.8 percent from September 2009 to September 2010, and fielding inquiries from retailers interested in renting some of the outlets’ vacant space, said managing partner Rick Cordes. Cordes said he invested in the Bend retail market because people continue to move to the area for its amenities, meaning retail has the potential for a large rebound whenever the economy recovers. “I think long-term, Bend is the hub of Central Oregon. All the roads lead to it. As California keeps growing and people want to get out of California, Bend is a better alternative,” said Cordes, who is based in California but vacations in Bend. “We like Bend because it’s a year-round playground.” There have been recent investments in the retail market, too, like the Illinois company that bought the new Kohl’s building

er-ethanol fuel damages engines. Handheld garden equipment and boat engines could fail in ways that create safety problems, people in those industries say. Ethanol also evaporates more easily than gasoline, which can put an ingredient of smog into the air. A more practical barrier to widespread adoption of E15 is with the gas stations that would sell it. Even if a gas station has enough pumps to offer a new grade of fuel, most do not have enough underground tanks, according to experts. Stations that sell regular, midgrade and premium fuel typically do it with one tank of regular and one of premium; the pump blends the two for midgrade. For them, going to E15 would mean giving up sales of premium, said Prentiss E. Searles, the marketing issues manager at the American Petroleum In-

on Aug. 19 for $17 million from Beverly Hills, Calif.-based RP Realty Partners. RP Realty still owns the rest of the Bend River Promenade mall, where Kohl’s is located. Inland Real Estate Acquisitions, the purchasing arm of Oak Brook, Ill.-based Inland Real Estate Group of Companies, bought the building partly because Kohl’s signed a contract in 2009 to lease the building for 20 years, Mark Cosenza, vice president of Inland Real Estate Acquisitions, said in August. Because of Bend’s population growth, the distance from other Kohl’s stores and the company’s recent success, Cosenza said the purchase was more attractive. “We believed in the demographics,” he said in a phone interview after the sale. “We like their product, and there hasn’t been this product in Bend.”

Stores surviving Patti Orsatti, owner of Lulu’s Boutique in downtown Bend, said she opened a store because Bend has so many attractions that make people want to live or vacation in the area. She said it might be a risk for Gottschalks to reopen because the retail market here does seem crowded. Yet small stores like hers and larger ones like Kohl’s appear to be surviving, she said. Plus, she expects a strong economic turnaround. “I feel that it’s definitely going to come back with a bang,” Orsatti said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at

stitute, the trade group for the oil industry. “If you’ve got a limited number of vehicles that can use E15, it doesn’t make a lot of sense,” Searles said. John Eichberger, a spokesman for the National Association of Convenience Stores, which represents 115,000 of the about 160,000 U.S. locations that sell gasoline, said that some gas stations might sell E15 by giving up selling diesel fuel. Eichberger said many other state and federal regulations would have to change before E15 could be legally sold. But the basic problem, he said, was that “we don’t have a retail infrastructure that can handle the product, we don’t have consumers ready to buy it, and we don’t have the auto industry ready to approve the use in their cars.” Even gas pumps aren’t certified for E15, Eichberger said.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .40f .72 .82 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .42f ... ... .63 ... .64f

9 14 89 29 56 ... ... 30 22 53 17 11 33 10 ... ... 20 ... 15 ... 7

47.54 +.22 +37.6 21.58 +.08 ... 13.29 -.23 -11.8 16.20 +.23 +31.8 71.47 +1.25 +32.0 .53 -.01 -22.1 36.17 +1.47 +31.6 60.08 -.48 +53.9 63.36 +.02 +7.1 6.36 -.14 +165.0 25.56 +.40 -21.9 42.21 +.86 -18.1 12.34 +.02 -7.3 19.24 -.53 -5.7 8.29 -.21 +49.4 22.01 +.32 +7.2 4.91 -.02 +81.9 7.87 +.24 +12.8 20.66 +.19 -12.5 10.80 +.05 +22.3 25.34 +.51 -16.9

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1370.00 $1369.50 $23.914

Pvs Day $1350.00 $1345.70 $23.129

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .80f .52f ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

21 16 18 28 80 ... 37 21 ... 24 18 9 25 21 ... 16 85 10 ... ...

82.02 +.13 +24.1 38.43 -.58 +2.3 50.30 +.79 +11.7 16.03 +.34 +26.3 50.58 +.72 +39.5 2.14 -.09 -23.8 37.24 +1.04 -1.4 131.86 +1.90 +19.5 21.32 +.63 +.1 50.45 +.45 +5.8 73.25 +.53 +18.8 39.37 +.33 -1.6 27.26 +.12 +18.2 9.32 +.12 +55.3 11.31 +.23 -15.7 22.86 -.02 +1.6 15.28 -.06 -21.0 25.81 -.17 -4.4 2.49 ... +18.6 16.01 +.17 +1.1

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm MGM Rsts SPDR Fncl

9033210 1666523 1637414 1302292 1021572

Last Chg 4.25 117.92 13.29 12.10 14.86

+.01 +.91 -.23 -1.51 +.01

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

WstnRefin 6.51 +.84 +14.8 CtrySCkg n 29.75 +3.41 +12.9 Goldcp wt 5.32 +.58 +12.2 MLSel10 3-12 7.73 +.80 +11.5 CSGlobWm 6.64 +.67 +11.3

Losers ($2 or more) Name GrtAtlPac GtAPc39 MGM Rsts StJoe ProUShCmdy

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

3.30 -.68 -17.1 17.17 -3.01 -14.9 12.10 -1.51 -11.1 22.16 -2.38 -9.7 12.12 -.88 -6.8

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Taseko GrtBasG g LibertyAcq KodiakO g GoldStr g

Last Chg

55193 6.89 +.42 51360 2.87 +.16 50197 10.49 +.16 49749 4.00 +.20 46688 5.24 +.19

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Cohen&Co Geokinetics ChinaPhH OrchidsPP VirnetX

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Intel SiriusXM Microsoft Cisco PwShs QQQ

1676817 1511343 726993 650845 638591

19.24 1.40 25.34 23.18 50.52

5.47 +.82 +17.7 6.98 +.82 +13.3 3.17 +.30 +10.5 14.10 +1.10 +8.4 17.50 +1.31 +8.1

Name

Last

FstFrnkln CrwnMedia SigaTech h KellySB 51job h

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

SunLink NTS Rlty ChIntLtg n HeraldNB Solitario

2.14 3.48 2.76 2.59 2.24

-.26 -10.7 -.26 -7.0 -.14 -4.8 -.13 -4.8 -.10 -4.3

MetaFincl Wowjnt un DJSP un Tongxin un DJSP Ent

316 169 40 525 41 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-.53 +.05 +.51 +.56 +.41

14.14 3.72 12.47 14.32 46.06

Chg %Chg +6.32 +1.17 +3.91 +3.81 +7.80

+80.8 +45.9 +45.7 +36.3 +20.4

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Diary 2,291 742 112 3,145 415 3

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

22.25 -10.98 5.15 -.85 3.95 -.54 4.30 -.55 2.26 -.20

-33.0 -14.2 -12.0 -11.3 -8.1

Diary 1,946 708 125 2,779 232 20

11,258.01 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 4,812.87 3,546.48 Dow Jones Transportation 408.57 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,743.74 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,110.20 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,535.28 2,024.27 Nasdaq Composite 1,219.80 1,010.91 S&P 500 12,847.91 10,573.39 Wilshire 5000 745.95 553.30 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,096.08 4,731.44 405.69 7,561.50 2,110.56 2,441.23 1,178.10 12,422.38 706.47

+75.68 +120.04 +2.71 +71.88 +23.41 +23.31 +8.33 +98.91 +10.43

YTD %Chg %Chg +.69 +2.60 +.67 +.96 +1.12 +.96 +.71 +.80 +1.50

52-wk %Chg

+6.41 +15.41 +1.93 +5.24 +15.65 +7.58 +5.65 +7.57 +12.96

+10.79 +16.97 +7.38 +5.28 +14.15 +12.38 +7.88 +9.82 +13.23

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

341.72 2,670.38 3,828.34 5,747.35 6,434.52 23,457.69 34,798.65 21,145.26 3,231.82 9,403.51 1,876.15 3,202.16 4,691.10 5,732.85

+1.98 s +1.89 s +2.12 s +1.51 s +2.06 s +1.45 s +1.05 s +1.90 s +.03 s +.16 s +.43 s +1.68 s +.10 s +1.18 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9919 1.5893 .9963 .002092 .1499 1.3965 .1288 .012230 .080828 .0332 .000884 .1508 1.0420 .0323

.9862 1.5778 .9892 .002098 .1497 1.3914 .1288 .012212 .080451 .0333 .000885 .1502 1.0441 .0322

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.64 +0.11 +7.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.92 +0.04 +7.7 GrowthI 23.75 +0.22 +7.8 Ultra 20.78 +0.16 +6.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.41 +0.18 +5.4 AMutlA p 24.29 +0.17 +6.9 BalA p 17.28 +0.08 +8.4 BondA p 12.54 +0.01 +9.5 CapWA p 21.45 +0.09 +9.8 CapIBA p 49.96 +0.29 +7.3 CapWGA p 35.35 +0.37 +6.0 EupacA p 41.26 +0.51 +7.6 FdInvA p 34.60 +0.25 +6.9 GovtA p 14.77 +7.8 GwthA p 28.75 +0.25 +5.2 HI TrA p 11.30 +0.04 +12.8 IncoA p 16.39 +0.09 +9.2 IntBdA p 13.71 +6.4 ICAA p 26.85 +0.23 +5.1 NEcoA p 24.28 +0.27 +8.0 N PerA p 27.51 +0.26 +7.3 NwWrldA 54.84 +0.71 +16.2 SmCpA p 37.11 +0.38 +17.7 TxExA p 12.49 -0.01 +6.9 WshA p 25.91 +0.15 +7.1 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.82 +0.51 +5.6 IntlEqA 29.06 +0.51 +5.4 IntEqII I r 12.35 +0.22 +4.8 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.67 +0.31 +4.9 MidCap 30.02 +0.32 +17.4 MidCapVal 19.32 +0.11 +7.5 Baron Funds: Growth 45.63 +0.48 +10.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.24 +0.01 +10.9 DivMu 14.75 +4.9 TxMgdIntl 15.85 +0.20 +3.7 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.77 +0.11 +6.9 GlAlA r 19.06 +0.13 +6.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.78 +0.12 +6.2 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.81 +0.11 +7.1 GlbAlloc r 19.15 +0.13 +7.1 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 48.51 +0.44 +9.1 Columbia Class A: DivEqInc 9.36 +0.07 +7.3 DivrBd 5.11 +9.3 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.86 +0.32 +13.0 AcornIntZ 39.27 +0.44 +16.8 ValRestr 45.78 +0.56 +8.1 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.84 +0.12 +8.9 USCorEq2 10.06 +0.09 +11.1 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.39 +0.29 +4.6 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.78 +0.30 +4.8 NYVen C 31.16 +0.28 +3.9 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.80 +0.01 +9.3 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.56 +0.33 +19.7 EmMktV 36.68 +0.57 +17.8 IntSmVa 16.27 +0.20 +9.0 LargeCo 9.30 +0.07 +7.3 USLgVa 18.62 +0.15 +10.6 US SmVa 22.69 +0.37 +15.8 IntlSmCo 16.16 +0.18 +15.1 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 17.96 +0.18 +7.4 Glb5FxInc 11.69 +0.01 +7.8 2YGlFxd 10.24 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.74 +0.41 +6.1 Income 13.45 +0.01 +7.6 IntlStk 35.32 +0.45 +10.9 Stock 100.25 +0.82 +5.3 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.12 +0.11 +3.1

NatlMunInc 10.03 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.35 LgCapVal 17.17 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.85 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.96 FPACres 26.31 Fairholme 33.58 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.32 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.73 StrInA 13.00 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.94 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.43 FF2015 11.20 FF2020 13.51 FF2020K 12.90 FF2025 11.21 FF2030 13.35 FF2035 11.04 FF2040 7.70 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.30 AMgr50 14.97 Balanc 17.64 BlueChGr 41.21 Canada 54.93 CapAp 23.80 CpInc r 9.33 Contra 63.71 ContraK 63.75 DisEq 21.68 DivIntl 29.54 DivrsIntK r 29.56 DivGth 25.97 EmrMk 25.83 Eq Inc 41.45 EQII 17.09 Fidel 29.53 FltRateHi r 9.72

+9.8 +0.01 +4.4 +0.11 +3.4 +0.14 +5.0 +3.0 +0.19 +7.6 +0.03 +11.6 +0.06 +14.2 +0.15 +8.8 +0.02 +10.8 +0.16 +9.1 +0.07 +0.07 +0.09 +0.08 +0.09 +0.11 +0.09 +0.06

+8.0 +8.2 +8.4 +8.5 +8.6 +8.5 +8.2 +8.2

+0.10 +7.5 +0.09 +9.6 +0.09 +8.9 +0.37 +8.6 +0.64 +13.3 +0.17 +11.1 +0.05 +13.3 +0.50 +9.5 +0.51 +9.6 +0.15 +3.2 +0.37 +5.5 +0.37 +5.6 +0.31 +10.3 +0.43 +14.2 +0.24 +7.2 +0.09 +5.8 +0.22 +4.7 +0.02 +5.8

GNMA 11.76 GovtInc 10.82 GroCo 75.88 GroInc 16.85 GrowthCoK 75.93 HighInc r 8.98 Indepn 22.02 IntBd 10.83 IntmMu 10.43 IntlDisc 32.38 InvGrBd 12.02 InvGB 7.53 LgCapVal 11.81 LatAm 58.15 LevCoStk 24.96 LowP r 35.83 LowPriK r 35.82 Magelln 66.62 MidCap 26.15 MuniInc 12.94 NwMkt r 16.61 OTC 49.52 100Index 8.34 Ovrsea 31.67 Puritn 17.25 SCmdtyStrt 11.45 StIntMu 10.78 STBF 8.52 SmllCpS r 17.66 StratInc 11.60 StrReRt r 9.35 TotalBd 11.16 USBI 11.70 Value 64.18 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 55.31 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 41.74 IntlInxInv 35.21 TotMktInv 34.20 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.74 TotMktAd r 34.20 First Eagle:

+0.01 +8.2 +7.5 +0.62 +10.0 +0.16 +5.4 +0.61 +10.1 +0.02 +11.9 +0.21 +10.5 +9.6 -0.01 +5.5 +0.46 +6.7 +0.01 +9.2 +9.8 +0.08 +5.0 +0.99 +13.8 +0.26 +9.1 +0.34 +12.4 +0.34 +12.5 +0.61 +3.7 +0.26 +11.9 -0.01 +7.2 +0.10 +15.3 +0.49 +8.3 +0.05 +5.2 +0.50 +2.4 +0.09 +8.6 +0.05 +5.0 +3.1 +4.1 +0.22 +10.8 +0.02 +11.1 +0.04 +10.4 +0.01 +9.8 +8.4 +0.61 +12.7 +1.19 +30.3 +0.30 +7.3 +0.45 +5.4 +0.27 +8.7 +0.30 +7.3 +0.27 +8.7

GlblA 44.36 +0.37 +11.0 OverseasA 21.99 +0.18 +13.0 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 12.11 -0.01 +6.7 FoundAl p 10.30 +0.10 +6.6 HYTFA p 10.38 +9.5 IncomA p 2.14 +0.01 +9.6 USGovA p 6.87 +0.01 +6.9 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.8 IncmeAd 2.13 +0.01 +9.8 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.16 +0.01 +9.0 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.03 +0.17 +6.1 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.89 +0.12 +5.2 GlBd A p 13.86 +0.08 +12.6 GrwthA p 17.49 +0.26 +4.0 WorldA p 14.50 +0.20 +3.8 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.88 +0.07 +12.2 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.03 +0.29 +3.2 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.55 +0.19 +2.1 GMO Trust IV: IntlIntrVl 21.68 +0.21 +5.7 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.23 +0.18 +16.1 IntlCorEq 28.61 +0.29 +7.1 Quality 19.55 +0.19 +2.2 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.29 +0.02 +11.6 HYMuni 8.84 +12.5 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.19 +0.02 +10.4 CapApInst 33.87 +0.31 +2.7 IntlInv t 58.89 +0.88 +8.3 Intl r 59.58 +0.89 +8.6 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.05 +0.16 +4.5 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.03 +0.16 +4.6 Hartford HLS IA :

CapApp 39.15 +0.29 +7.1 Div&Gr 18.63 +0.12 +6.3 Advisers 18.66 +0.09 +6.9 TotRetBd 11.50 +0.01 +9.2 HussmnStrGr 13.10 -0.04 +2.5 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.26 +0.16 +1.6 CmstkA 14.67 +0.11 +7.4 EqIncA 8.15 +0.03 +6.1 GrIncA p 17.84 +0.11 +4.3 HYMuA 9.66 -0.01 +10.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.91 +0.17 +5.2 AssetStA p 23.58 +0.17 +5.8 AssetStrI r 23.78 +0.17 +6.0 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.74 +8.6 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.73 +8.7 HighYld 8.18 +0.02 +12.4 IntmTFBd 11.14 +4.7 ShtDurBd 11.06 +3.3 USLCCrPls 19.31 +0.18 +6.2 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.87 +0.69 +17.3 PrkMCVal T 21.23 +0.19 +7.2 Twenty T 62.74 +0.61 +1.9 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.70 +0.09 +9.4 LSGrwth 12.50 +0.11 +9.2 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.11 +0.33 +11.6 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.85 +0.32 +21.8 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.20 +0.33 +21.5 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.10 -0.01 +5.6 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.74 +0.19 +11.0 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.49 +0.04 +13.5 StrInc C 15.06 +0.03 +12.6 LSBondR 14.43 +0.03 +13.2 StrIncA 14.99 +0.04 +13.3

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.72 +0.02 +13.0 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.64 +0.05 +4.8 BdDebA p 7.77 +0.02 +10.9 ShDurIncA p 4.68 +0.01 +6.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.76 +0.07 +6.7 ValueA 21.59 +0.14 +5.0 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.69 +0.15 +5.2 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.91 +0.01 +10.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.65 +0.10 +7.2 Matthews Asian: AsianG&I 18.19 +0.15 +16.7 PacTiger 23.55 +0.26 +22.5 MergerFd 15.96 +0.01 +2.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.77 +0.02 +12.8 TotRtBdI 10.77 +0.02 +13.0 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.93 +0.29 +8.3 GlbDiscZ 29.33 +0.30 +8.5 QuestZ 18.20 +0.16 +5.6 SharesZ 20.22 +0.17 +6.4 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 41.39 +0.54 +9.6 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.92 +0.56 +9.4 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.33 +0.03 +12.2 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.60 +0.20 +4.2 Intl I r 18.81 +0.24 +11.7 Oakmark r 39.61 +0.18 +6.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.97 +0.05 +12.7 GlbSMdCap 14.79 +0.18 +15.8 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 40.61 +0.40 +1.7 DvMktA p 34.83 +0.43 +21.1 GlobA p 58.30 +0.65 +10.0 GblStrIncA 4.40 +0.02 +17.3

IntBdA p 7.00 +0.03 +12.9 MnStFdA 30.54 +0.21 +8.6 RisingDivA 14.57 +0.11 +5.8 S&MdCpVl 29.32 +0.23 +10.3 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.22 +0.09 +5.0 S&MdCpVl 25.20 +0.20 +9.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.18 +0.10 +5.1 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.35 +10.4 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.52 +0.43 +21.4 IntlBdY 7.00 +0.04 +13.2 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.73 +0.03 +11.0 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.31 +0.03 +13.4 AllAsset 12.73 +0.05 +14.6 ComodRR 8.79 +0.09 +15.0 HiYld 9.37 +0.02 +13.2 InvGrCp 12.00 +0.02 +14.6 LowDu 10.73 +0.01 +5.8 RealRtnI 11.87 +0.08 +12.0 ShortT 9.94 +2.0 TotRt 11.73 +0.03 +11.2 TR II 11.28 +0.01 +9.9 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.73 +0.01 +5.5 RealRtA p 11.87 +0.08 +11.6 TotRtA 11.73 +0.03 +10.8 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.73 +0.03 +10.2 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.73 +0.03 +11.0 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.73 +0.03 +11.1 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 44.21 +0.37 +14.3 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.85 +0.39 +6.7 Price Funds: BlChip 35.14 +0.29 +7.2 CapApp 19.51 +0.12 +7.4 EmMktS 34.85 +0.65 +15.8

EqInc 22.13 EqIndex 31.76 Growth 29.70 HlthSci 28.42 HiYield 6.81 IntlBond 10.57 IntlStk 14.04 MidCap 54.54 MCapVal 22.44 N Asia 19.60 New Era 46.46 N Horiz 30.09 N Inc 9.80 R2010 15.20 R2015 11.65 R2020 15.96 R2025 11.60 R2030 16.53 R2040 16.55 ShtBd 4.90 SmCpStk 31.77 SmCapVal 33.25 SpecIn 12.52 Value 21.99 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.64 VoyA p 22.18 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.57 PremierI r 18.40 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.58 S&P Sel 18.61 Scout Funds: Intl 31.43 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.21 AmShS p 39.14 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.30 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.65 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.10 IntValue I 27.69

+0.10 +7.1 +0.23 +7.1 +0.27 +8.0 +0.12 +8.6 +0.02 +12.6 +0.02 +9.2 +0.20 +11.4 +0.35 +14.8 +0.19 +8.3 +0.25 +21.4 +0.83 +6.5 +0.28 +17.6 +0.01 +8.9 +0.09 +9.0 +0.08 +9.2 +0.12 +9.3 +0.09 +9.3 +0.13 +9.3 +0.14 +9.2 +3.6 +0.41 +17.9 +0.54 +12.8 +0.03 +9.7 +0.11 +7.4 +0.09 +6.2 +0.27 +12.4 +0.13 +11.9 +0.19 +12.8 +0.26 +7.9 +0.14 +7.3 +0.35 +8.8 +0.36 +5.3 +0.36 +5.0 +0.35 +5.5 +0.22 +9.3 +0.34 +9.9 +0.35 +10.2

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15.57 +0.17 +8.0

+8.4

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10.02 +0.10

EmMkInst

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NS

ExtIn

37.44 +0.41 +14.6

FTAllWldI r

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InstIdx

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InsPl

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InsTStPlus

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MidCpIst

18.72 +0.14 +14.2

SCInst

31.68 +0.41 +15.2

TBIst

10.92

TSInst

29.39 +0.23 +8.5

+8.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

89.65 +0.64 +7.3

STBdIdx

10.74

+5.0

TotBdSgl

10.92

+8.5

TotStkSgl

28.36 +0.22 +8.5

Wells Fargo Adv C: AstAllC t

11.61 +0.08 +5.2

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.82

+1.1

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.02 +0.02 +13.0


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps to opening a business in a workshop offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Business Development Center. Cost includes handouts. Registration required; $15; 10 a.m.-noon; Crook County School District, 471 N.E. Ochoco Plaza Drive, Prineville; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu. TRAINING FOR HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION SECRETARIES: Sponsored by the Central Oregon Regional Council of the Community Association Institute, the topics of record keeping and minutes will be presented by Ashley Yorra, attorney with Vial Fotheringham. RSVP requested; $20 for members, $25 for nonmembers, $5 additional for late registration; 11:30 a.m.; Awbrey Glen Restaurant, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 503-531-9668 or knguyen@caioregon.org. HOW HEALTH CARE REFORM MAY IMPACT YOUR BUSINESS: Hosted by Opportunity Knocks and Economic Development for Central Oregon (EDCO). Presenters will include Todd Gerdes, owner of Gerdes Dodge LLC; Patrick O’Keefe, owner of Cascade Insurance Center; and Richard MacDonell, owner of MyMD personal medicine clinic; $20 for a single event ticket or free with purchase of Bend Venture Conference ticket; 1-2:30 p.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend; 541-318-4650 or info@oppknocks.org. HOLIDAY PROMOTIONALS SHOWCASE: Learn to harness the power of promotional products to benefit your business. Co-hosted by industry professionals representing some of the biggest names in apparel and promotional products such as BIC, Callaway Golf, Cutter & Buck, Jones Soda, Nike and more. Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments will be served. Call 541-382-3534 to register or for more information; 4-7 p.m.; Bend Park & Recreation District Office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; 541389-7275. 2010 SUSTAINABLILITY AWARDS: The Environmental Center will honor individuals, businesses and organizations who push the envelope

of sustainability in Central Oregon. Registration requested to info@ envirocenter.org or 541-385-6908; $15; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. BEND CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Maximize your networking at the last YPN meeting of the year; $5 for members ($10 at the door) and $12 for nonmembers ($15 at the door); 57 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-0700. GREEN PATHWAYS, HEATING AND COOLING WITH COMMON CENTS: Randall Marchington and Scott Zettle of Bend Heating will discuss energy efficiency and incentives available in the HVAC industry. Refreshments provided; free; 5-6 p.m.; Neil Kelly, 190 N.E. Irving Ave., Bend; 541-3827580 or http://www.greensaversusa. com. EFFICIENT HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www. buildinggreencouncil.org. SUCCESSFUL SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Sponsored by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department. Learn about keyword marketing, site content best practices, internal links and submitting a website. Registration required. Class continues Oct. 14 and 21; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; American Legion Post No. 44, 708 S.W. Eighth St.; 541-5482551. CANDIDATES LUNCH FORUM: Sponsored by Redmond Chamber of Commerce and CVB, meet mayoral candidates Tory Allman, Margie Dawson, Ed Onimus, Jay Patrick and George Endicott. Reservations required; $13; 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-5191 or Karen@visitredmondoregon.com.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION: Learn to create animations in Flash that can be incorporated into Web pages. Class continues Oct. 23; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO SELL YOUR HOME IN AN OVERLEVERAGED MARKET: Presented by Christine Browning and her team from GoBend Realty. Attorneys Kyle Schmid and Christian Malone, CPA Dan Parr and credit specialist Victoria Malendoski also will be presenting. Topics to be covered include why to avoid foreclosure and bankruptcy, tax implications, how to save your credit and the ins and outs of short selling a home. Call for additional information; 6 p.m.; Deschutes County Title Co., 397 Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541585-1047 ext. 13. MS OFFICE FOR MAC: Offered by Central Oregon Community College’s Community Learning Department, this three-evening class will teach participants to operate Microsoft Office on the Macintosh operating system. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality

matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website without having to use a professional designer. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu. WEB DESIGN WRITING THAT SELLS: Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc. edu.

WEDNESDAY Oct. 20 PREP PROFILE SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Administrators will learn to apply PREP’s survey for understanding the personality matching, behavioral motivators and change readiness for their clients; $995, or $795 for two or more people from the same organization; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www. prep-profiles.com. CRITICAL TAX PLANNING IDEAS AND STRATEGIES FOR BUSINESS: Live broadcast for tax practitioners. Program is eligible for CPE/CFP/EA credit. Register online at www. allstarttax.com Lunch provided; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Anna Robbins’ office at Edward Jones, 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 2, Bend; 541-330-4329. SAVING AND INVESTING: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn strategies to reduce spending and increase income, resources to aid saving, savings tools and challenges, and the differences between saving and investing. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org.

Apple shares top $300 for first time By Barbara Ortutay The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Apple’s shares topped $300 for the first time in the company’s history Wednesday as stellar iPad sales and a planned expansion into China give investors all the assurance they need for the iPhone maker’s already healthy prospects. Shares of Apple Inc. climbed $1.60 to close at $300.14 after peaking at a record $301.96 earlier. This gives Apple a market capitalization of about $273 billion. Apple had long surpassed the scale of tech heavyweights such as Microsoft Corp., Google Inc. and IBM, which also hit an all-time high on Wednesday. In fact, Apple’s market cap is now trails only Exxon Mobil Corp. as a U.S. publicly traded company. Exxon’s market cap hovers around $330 billion. Big-name corporations such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and General Electric Co. don’t even come close. Apple, which reports fiscal fourth-quarter earnings on Monday, has been on a tear

The Associated Press ile photo

Apple Inc. Chairman and CEO Steve Jobs is silhouetted as he leaves the stage after an event in April. Apple’s stock topped $300 Wednesday. lately, with sales of the iPad tablet surpassing expectations. Investors also have high hopes for Apple’s push into China, where the iPhone maker is looking to open 25 retail stores next year. Mounting speculation about a Verizon iPhone as soon as 2011 is also adding to Apple’s appeal.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Kevin E. Rea, 1010 N.E. Wiest Way, $150,000 Greg Welch Construction, 2418 N.W. Lolo Drive, $190,166 Krause Family Trust, 19484 Bounty Lake Court, $438,931 MMP Properties LLC, 61530 S. U.S. Highway 97, $160,450 Leader Builders LLC, 2154 N.W. Toussaint Drive, $197,078

Robert R. Turner, 61339 King Josiah Place, $129,220 City of Redmond

Redmond School District 2J, 4555 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., $47,400,000 City of Sisters

Hayden Homes LLC, 1626 W. Lambert Ave. No. 89, $165,438 Deschutes County

Jerry Earl Nye Revocable Trust, 65095 Collins Road, Bend, $122,302.08 James L. McLaughlin, 7781 Angel Falls Way, Redmond, $254,000.97

A magazine for your mind, body, and self.

How would you describe the Central Oregon lifestyle? Are we professionals, artists, athletes, homemakers ... some of each? How do we view ourselves, our family life, health or professional and personal relationships? What inspires us? There’s simply no right answer. Central Oregonians are as diverse as they are inspiring. This environment allows us to create and experience a lifestyle that is as unique as our individual personalities. U Magazine was created to celebrate this lifestyle. From health, style, and professional success to personal goals and relationships, U Magazine will provide readers with stories and information that educate, empower, and inspire.

Sales deadline: Monday, October 18 Publishes Saturday, November 6

CALL 541.382.1811 TO RESERVE YOUR SPACE IN U MAGAZINE TODAY


L

Inside

OREGON Veteran receives 1961 high school diploma, see Page C3.

C

Goats hired as live lawnmowers in Portland, see Page C6.

WASHINGTON Woman opens surrogacy center, see Page C2. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

CROOK COUNTY

REDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT

State mum on hiring of sheriff’s daughter

Superintendent gets 3-year contract

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Crook County officials were hoping the Oregon Government Ethics Commission would weigh in on whether the temporary hiring of the sheriff’s daughter for a position in his office was ethical. Instead, they received a letter back from the commission that gives no clear direction. “What it tells me are the statutory rules that apply to conflict of interest and nepotism, period,” said Crook County Counsel Dave Gordon. “It doesn’t tell me anything else. Specifically, it doesn’t tell me how those rules apply to the situation I described.” So the issue will be taken up by the Crook County Court. Crook County Sheriff Rodd Clark said his daughter, Rebekah Burkhardt, decided to volunteer with the Sheriff’s Office to gain job skills while she was unemployed. After two people left the office, Burkhardt was hired as a full-time temporary employee at $15 an hour. Clark notified the Crook County Court and Gordon of his daughter’s hire. Clark said he followed the statutes and laws, declared a conflict of interest, and has let his second-in-command be in charge of his daughter’s employment. See Sheriff / C5

Board also unanimously approves sale of Evergreen Elementary building to city By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond School Board made two significant moves during its Wednesday meeting, extending Superintendent Shay Mikalson’s contract by three years and agreeing to sell Evergreen Elementary to the city of Redmond for $260,000. Both moves, approved in 4-0 votes, bring to a close uncertain periods for the district. After Superintendent Vickie Fleming resigned in January,

the district struggled to find a permanent replacement. And for the past two years, the district has watched the price of Evergreen plummet from more than $4 million to $260,000 as no interested bidders came forward until recently. The district has been trying to sell Evergreen since 2008, when voters approved a $110 million bond to pay for a new high school, an elementary school and upgrades at several buildings. As part of its bond campaign, the board promised

to keep Evergreen standing. The promise has likely cost the district some money because the nearly 90-year-old building requires millions of dollars in renovation work to make it suitable for a different use. And the deal with the city is not final, yet. A nine-month due diligence period must run its course. The city had decisions of its own to make. It pulled back on an $8 million plan to build a new City Hall because of the recession. Instead, the city plans to renovate Evergreen for about $5 million. Mayor George Endicott praised the deal, saying the city’s decision was based on its

belief that Evergreen’s place in the community is an historically important one. “I think (the deal) has reached a very positive conclusion,” Endicott said. “We’re going to get to preserve a real icon for the city of Redmond as a result.” During the nine-month due diligence, the city will conduct several inspections of the building — from structural to environmental — and work to expand its Downtown Urban Renewal District. Including Evergreen in the district would allow urban renewal money to pay for parts of the project, such as sewers or sidewalks. The total sale price includes $10,000 in earnest money and

$250,000 for the building. The district will shutter the building for the next nine months and be responsible for Evergreen’s maintenance and security. Doug Snyder, the district’s chief operations officer, said the deal worked for everyone involved. “We’re very pleased to bring this proposal forward,” Snyder told the board members. “It’s in the best interest of the school district and the city.” The board also brought to an end the search for a superintendent. When Fleming left, the district launched a search for a replacement but rejected all 15 applicants. See Redmond / C5

FARMERS MARKETS CLOSE UP SHOP IN BEND

A D WAT C H The Bulletin will fact-check campaign ads leading up to the November election.

Dudley’s allegations lack context The candidate: Chris Dudley, Republican nominee for governor The ad: In “Downward,” stringed instruments provide dramatic background music against a backdrop of a swirling clouds, as graphic representations of Democratic nominee John Kitzhaber’s face seemingly plucked from newspaper photos rain downward. A narrator makes a series of statements portraying Kitzhaber as having been a failure as governor between 1995 and 2003. As he speaks, ostensibly supporting quotes and paraphrases appear above the newspapers that carried them.

ELECTION

See Ad watch / C5

Screen shot from “Downward.”

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

R

ick Steffen, right, hands a customer his change while operating his produce stand at the final Bend farmers market of the season in Drake Park on Wednesday. Steffen said the warm, sunny weather was a nice way to end this year’s farmers market season. The warm weather is expected to continue today, with temperatures reaching into the high 70s.

Police talk to Trono, prepare to hand case to DA Detectives to review crime lab results from July shooting of Bend developer By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Clarification In a story headlined “Big role for small donations in commission race,” which appeared Friday, Sept. 10, on page C1, the amount of the loan Corinne Martinez made to Deschutes County Commission candidate Tony DeBone was omitted. The amount of the loan was $10,000.

After a long-awaited interview with shooting victim Stephen Trono, Bend police detectives are preparing to turn their case over to the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office for review. Lt. Ben Gregory said Wednesday that police were still waiting for some records and results from the crime lab. But the rest of the investigation, which began after Trono was shot several times on July 28, is more or less complete, Gregory said.

“I would say the lead detective has a very good indication of what happened,” he said. “But with that said, we still want to review the crime lab results. We think that’s prudent.” Gregory declined to elaborate on what police believed happened at Trono’s northwest Bend home in the early morning hours of July 28. At about 12:30 a.m., 18-yearold Mathew Trono called 911 to report that his mother, 39-yearold Angelicque Trono, had accidentally shot his father six times

with a .22-caliber revolver. Angelicque Trono told officers that she’d been startled awake by a noise and had sent her husband to investigate — and then mistook him for an intruder when he came back in the house. Stephen Trono Detectives searched the scene and recovered a handgun but have not confirmed it was the weapon used in the shooting. In the weeks after the interview, they talked to people who know the Trono family, but they said they needed to speak to Stephen Tro-

no before moving forward with the investigation. The interview was delayed for more than two months as Trono was hospitalized and underwent several surgeries. He was released from Oregon Health & Science University on Tuesday. Gregory said police interviewed Trono once, on Sept. 30, when he was still in the hospital in Portland. He said the information gathered in that conversation fit what detectives had found over the last couple of months, but did not specify what that was. “First of all, I will say that the Tronos have been cooperative,” he said. “Generally, Mr. Trono said some things that confirmed things that our investi-

gation has revealed.” Gregory said he was not sure if the District Attorney’s Office would be willing to consider the case before that evidence is ready. He declined to comment on what specific information or lab results he was waiting for. He would not say if detectives think a crime was committed. The District Attorney’s Office, he said, will ultimately decide what happens with the case. “Whether or not they decide to charge or not charge, I can’t speculate on that,” he said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.


C2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Surrogate to 7 babies opens surrogacy center By Cheryll A. Borgaard The Daily News

LONGVIEW, Wash. — Tina Franklin has given birth to 10 babies, but only three of them are her own. The other seven, she’s willingly handed over to other parents. Franklin, 37, has been a surrogate mother four times, carrying a set of twins, a set of triplets and two single pregnancies for other people. She’s also matched up five couples with other surrogates. She’s now using her experience to give birth to a new business. Last month, she opened Oregon Surrogacy Center in downtown Rainier. She already has had a number of inquiries, both from potential surrogates and from parents, she said last week. She and her husband started discussing surrogacy in 2002. “My husband and I are done having children. One day I woke up and thought, ‘Am I really not going to be pregnant again?’ � she said. “I love being pregnant, and I had good, healthy pregnancies,� said Franklin, whose children are 18, 14 and 8. “To be able to help someone else have a child and to be pregnant yourself, you feel like the most important person in the world. You’re giving them some hope.� Franklin and the surrogates she connects to potential parents are known as gestational surrogates, meaning the egg or eggs fertilized for the pregnancy did not come from their bodies. “A gestational surrogate has no biological ties to the child or children they’re carrying,� she said. Franklin usually has 10 to 12 women on her list of prospective surrogates, who are free to be listed with other agencies besides hers, she said. Franklin’s application for surrogates is “extremely thick and thorough,� she said. They must be 21 to 40 years old, had a previous healthy pregnancy and delivery, be drug-free and STD-free, have a stable living environment, and their husband or partner must be supportive. Surrogates also are psychologically screened, driving records and criminal backgrounds are checked, and they cannot be receiving welfare, food stamps or other government assistance. Although she lives in Washington, Franklin set up her business in Oregon, where it is legal to compensate a surrogate for carrying the baby or babies. Washington law prohibits surrogacy contracts for payment except for actual medical expenses and attorney fees. Religious groups, bioethicists and others have raised a host of questions about surrogacy, particularly over whether it is ethical for surrogates to be paid and whether surrogate mothers can indeed avoid maternal attachment to the child they bear.

Roger Werth / The Daily News

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Deschutes County hires new 911 director

took over as interim director in September.

The former director of Santiam Canyon 911 in Stayton has been hired to serve as director of Deschutes County 911. Rob Poirier will begin work on Monday and will be paid about $79,000, said County Administrator Dave Kanner. Poirier was selected from a field of about 40 applicants. Poirier worked in Stayton for three years and previously was the support manager for the Lebanon Police Department, where he supervised communication and dispatch operations, among other duties, Kanner said. Deschutes County 911 has had several leadership changes over the last several months. Former Bend Police Chief Andy Jordan took over as interim director on Jan. 1, when former director Becky McDonald was put on paid administrative leave during a personnel investigation. McDonald was fired in April and later reassigned to another position with the county. Rick Silbaugh, the agency’s public safety systems manager,

Deschutes won’t waive land use fees

Tina Franklin shows photos of babies she’s birthed as a surrogate mother at her new business, Oregon Surrogacy Center in Rainier. Franklin has never encountered any hostility and says she’s providing a service to those who are desperate for children. “I feel that every person that wants to parent a child should have that right, that opportunity, whatever means they need to do,� Franklin said. “We’re fortunate to have the technology if the only way to become a parent is surrogacy. First-time surrogates can expect to get $18,000 to $20,000. A third-time surrogate can get $30,000 and up, earning more because they have proven to have successful pregnancies, Franklin said. In the case of multiples, the surrogate receives additional payments of $2,000 for each baby delivered. In addition, the intended parents pay for the surrogate’s medical insurance and expenses, legal fees and psychological counseling, if needed. According to Franklin’s website, costs can range from $60,000 to $110,000, “the worst-case scenario.� “The money is a benefit, definitely, but most of (the surrogates) are very willing and helpful people,� she said. “I’ve never had a surrogate come and say to me ‘I’m in it for the money.’ � Franklin charges a $4,500 fee to act as a liaison between the surrogate mother, intended parents and fertility clinic and to help arrange the other services. Being a gestational surrogate is not just sitting back and providing a womb, Franklin said. “You have to prepare your body, there are lots of medications. They shut your ovaries off and coordinate your (menstrual) cycle with the intended donor,� she said. “There are daily

shots, pills, ultrasounds. It’s not just one appointment; it can be six, seven appointments leading up to the transfer (of embryos). After the transfer, you still have to stay on medication and have more ultrasounds and blood work.� Julie Shaw of Portland is one of Franklin’s surrogates. The 27-year-old student has an 8year-old boy and a 3-year-old girl. She’s carrying twins for a Eugene couple, making this her first surrogacy. She chose to be a surrogate because “my pregnancies were all healthy, and my children are all healthy, and there are people out there who aren’t as fortunate,� she said. Franklin’s first surrogate pregnancy was in 2003. She carried twins — a boy and a girl — for a couple in New York. The woman had had 11 miscarriages before they met Franklin. “She could get pregnant, she just couldn’t carry them to term,� Franklin said. The triplets were for a gay couple in Australia. Sperm from both men were used to fertilize donated eggs, and embryos from both fertilizations were transferred to Franklin’s uterus. Franklin’s last surrogacy was in February and will be her last — “It’s a personal choice,� she said. She said she’ll continue to keep in touch with the seven babies she gave birth to for other parents. “I consider them part of my family, but you put yourself in that mind-set that the baby is not yours, it’s going to another family,� she said. “I love them, but I look at them with a niece or nephew kind of love.�

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:16 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 19800 block of Hollygrape Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:22 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 200 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Burglary — A compound bow was reported stolen at 11:59 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 2000 block of Northeast Mays Avenue. DUII — Andrew James Hilliard, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:38 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Minnesota Avenue. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A license plate was reported stolen at 4:48 p.m. Oct. 12, in the 2000 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:45 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northwest Canal Boulevard and Northwest Kingwood Avenue. Theft — Keys were reported stolen at noon Oct. 12, in the 400 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:13 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 3300 block of Southwest Indian Place. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:51 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 3200 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

Chuck Yeager breaks sound barrier in 1947 By The Associated Press Today is Thursday, Oct. 14, the 287th day of 2010. There are 78 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 14, 1960, the idea of a Peace Corps was suggested by Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy to an audience of students at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ON THIS DATE In 1066, Normans under William the Conqueror defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings. In 1890, Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, was born in Denison, Texas. In 1912, Theodore Roosevelt, campaigning for the presidency, was shot in the chest in Milwaukee. Despite the wound, he went ahead with a scheduled speech. In 1930, Ethel Merman made her Broadway debut in the musical comedy “Girl Crazy� with songs by George and Ira Gershwin. In 1939, a German U-boat torpedoed and sank the HMS Royal Oak, a British battleship anchored at Scapa Flow in Scotland’s Orkney Islands; 833 of the more than 1,200 men aboard were killed. In 1944, German Field Marshal

The Deschutes County Commission voted unanimously Wednesday morning to deny a request from a Redmond woman to waive a $10,000 land use fee. Kelly Brown is one of many property owners in the county who have rented out their farmland for commercial events, such as weddings. Brown and other property owners who rent their farmland for events went through a land use process last year to determine whether there is way to legally hold the events under existing land use laws. But Brown withdrew the group’s application to change county code two days before a scheduled hearing in front of the County Commission. In August, a circuit court judge found Brown guilty and sentenced her to a $500 fine for violating county land use laws by renting out her property for a wedding. At the August sentencing,

Brown’s attorney also entered guilty pleas on Brown’s behalf for three more cases in which the county alleged Brown held weddings on her property in violation of county code. Circuit Court Judge Barbara Haslinger decided not to impose fees for those cases. Now, Brown wants to restart the process to allow commercial events on farmland in Deschutes County, and she had asked the County Commission to waive the land use fee. During the Wednesday morning meeting, commissioners also said they want to have county planners work on the issue of whether to create a legal way for people to hold commercial events on farmland, although planners are currently busy working on the county’s update of its land use blueprint, known as the comprehensive plan. Ten people testified at the meeting, some against the fee waiver and some in support of it. Several agreed the issue needs to be resolved — either at the state or at the county level — so that property owners know whether they can rent out their land for events.

T O D AY IN HISTORY Erwin Rommel committed suicide rather than face execution for allegedly conspiring against Adolf Hitler. In 1947, Air Force test pilot Charles E. (“Chuck�) Yeager broke the sound barrier as he flew the experimental Bell XS-1 (later X-1) rocket plane over Muroc Dry Lake in California. In 1968, the first successful live telecast from a manned U.S. spacecraft was transmitted from Apollo 7. In 1987, a 58-hour drama began in Midland, Texas, as 18month-old Jessica McClure slid 22 feet down an abandoned well at a private day care center; she was rescued on Oct. 16. In 1990, composer-conductor Leonard Bernstein died in New York at age 72. TEN YEARS AGO Two hijackers seized a London-bound Saudi Arabian Airlines jetliner carrying more than 100 people, taking it first to Syria and then to Baghdad, where they surrendered peacefully. A mudslide caused by heavy rains swept through the Swiss Alpine village of Gondo, destroying buildings and killing 13 people.

FIVE YEARS AGO The Treasury Department reported that the federal deficit hit $319 billion for the budget year just ended, down from the previous year, but still the third highest. Blond, blue-eyed British actor Daniel Craig was named the star of the next James Bond film, “Casino Royale.� ONE YEAR AGO The Unification Church held the largest mass wedding in a decade, with some 40,000 people participating in cities around the world. NASCAR founder Bill France Sr. headlined the five inductees into the first Hall of Fame class. Actress Collin Wilcox-Paxton, who played Mayella Ewell in the movie classic “To Kill a Mockingbird,� died in Highlands, N.C., at age 74. Pro wrestler Lou Albano, 76, died in Westchester County, N.Y.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former Surgeon General C. Everett Koop is 94. Actor Roger Moore is 83. Fashion designer Ralph Lauren is 71. Singer-musician Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues) is 64. Golf Hall of Famer Beth Daniel is 54. Singermusician Thomas Dolby is 52. Actress Lori Petty is 47. New York Yankees manager Joe Girardi is 46. Actor Steve Coogan is 45. Country singer Natalie Maines (The Dixie Chicks) is 36. Actress-singer Shaznay Lewis (All Saints) is 35. Singer Usher is 32. TV personality Stacy Keibler is 31. Actor Ben Whishaw is 30. Actor Jordan Brower is 29.

Theft — Items were reported stolen from vehicles at 9:23 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 1000 block of Southwest 28th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:23 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 2800 block of Southwest Indian Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:46 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 900 block of Southwest 28th Street. Theft — A phone was reported stolen at 7:52 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 1300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:24 a.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:16 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northeast Elm Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:20 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. DUII — Jon M. Paxton, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:45 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:05 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Bluewood Place in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:54 p.m. Oct. 12, in the 16500 block of Reed Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:28 p.m. Oct. 12, in the area of Cold Springs Road

and U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:19 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 200 block of West Hood Avenue in Sisters. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:11 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 7700 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Theft — A generator was reported stolen at 8:25 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 55100 block of Prong Horn Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:12 a.m. Oct. 12, in the 62500 block of Dixon Loop in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 19 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-4477178 — or check the website at www.humanesocietyochocos. com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic medium-haired cat — Adult female, Siamese calico; found near Ninth Street. Jack Russell Terrier — Adult male, tan and white; found near Northwest Way.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 C3

O After 50-year delay, veteran Dudley against receives high school diploma natural gas pipeline By Jeff Barnard By Paris Achen

Associated Press Writer

Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — Republican gubernatorial candidate Chris Dudley says he does not think a proposed liquefied natural gas pipeline from Coos Bay through southwestern Oregon “pencils out,” and he is more interested in seeing low-cost gas from the Rockies brought to Oregon. The former Portland Trail Blazers center and financial consultant appeared Wednesday evening in a solo candidates’ forum on KOBI-TV in Medford. The station had hoped to get Dudley and Democrat John Kitzhaber to face off in their second debate, but the two campaigns could not agree on a date. Kitzhaber will appear next week. Asked if he supported the proposal to build an LNG port in Coos Bay and a pipeline to carry it through southwestern Oregon, Dudley said he was more interested in the 680-mile Ruby pipeline, which Houstonbased El Paso Corp. is building from Wyoming to the Klamath County town of Malin. Dudley said natural gas prices in the Rockies are lower than in Canada, another major supplier, and “our state needs that access.”

“My classmates have always involved me in all the class reunions, but I’ve got to admit I always felt a little like an outsider knowing I didn’t have a diploma. This means a lot.” — Dowl Boles, who got his 1961 high school diploma Tuesday Principal Arthur Strauss, now deceased, Steele said. “This shows not all hoarding is a bad thing,” Steele quipped, referring to TLC’s reality show, “Hoarding: Buried Alive.” The school board invited Dunn, who just left the school board last year, to present the diploma to Boles. When board President Kerry Bradshaw called Boles to receive his diploma, Boles quickly pulled off his white “Oregon” cap and donned a black graduation cap. “It’s an honor and a privilege to honor you with this diploma,” Dunn said as he handed the diploma to Boles. “Congratulations.” Steele said Boles is the first

veteran from Crater to take advantage of the law, which was created through House Bill 2691 in 2005. It’s unclear how many veterans have taken advantage of the law, as the Oregon Department of Education does not track the number, spokeswoman Susanne Smith said. Terry Hulse, a classmate of Boles’, snapped photos of Boles as he received his diploma. Hulse surprised Boles on Tuesday by inviting their classmates to the ceremony. Boles joined the Navy at the coaxing of his close friend Jay Heath, who had signed up. “We were part of the Kid-

die Cruise,” Heath said. “If you signed up when you were 17, you got out when you were 21.” Boles was brokenhearted after his girlfriend broke up with him. He wanted to get away, and the military seemed like a good option. The two friends worked as repairmen in the boiler room on the aircraft carrier USS Midway, now a museum in San Diego. Their ship cruised to Hawaii, Guam, Japan and Hong Kong. While Boles and Heath saw very little of the action, three of the pilots on the ship were killed during the Laos conflict, Boles said. After the military, Boles returned to Medford and worked at a plywood mill before taking up work as a groundskeeper. He later worked as a school bus driver for the Medford School District, where his wife, Carolyn, worked as an education assistant. The couple retired in 2001 and moved to Springfield. Carolyn died four years ago from cancer.

Probation program in school Eugene’s party patrols not a safety risk, officials say keep UO revelry in check By Betsy Hammond The Oregonian

By Edward Russo The Register-Guard

EUGENE — A half-dozen Eugene police officers strode up to the run-down rental house on Ferry Street, west of the University of Oregon, where booming music announced that a party was in full swing. With officers stationed at the front and back doors, Sgt. Larry Crompton stood on the front porch and delivered the unwelcome message to the young revelers inside. “People, leave now,” he said, “or we are going to start writing tickets.” Soon more than a dozen young men and women, some with the unsteady gait of the inebriated, filed out of the house and walked away. Another Friday night, another evening of police busting student parties in the neighborhoods around the UO. Drinking and parties have long been part of the college scene, but the drunken revelry in the area, particularly west and south of the campus, has become so widespread on Friday and Saturday nights that it now requires a concerted effort by police to keep things under control. Last Friday, about a dozen officers assigned to the department’s party patrol broke up several parties and issued 50 citations, including 29 for underage drinking. Oregon Liquor Control Commission investigators who participated in the patrol issued another handful of citations. Saturday night, police issued 24 citations, most for alcohol-related offenses. “I would like to say it’s gotten better, but it hasn’t,” Lt. Sam

Kamkar said. “It’s gotten worse.” Without the so-called party patrols, the gatherings can get out of hand. On Sept. 24 — just before the school year began — police used tear gas to disperse about 400 young people who had massed on the streets near Ferry Street and East 13th Avenue. Some partygoers smashed car windows and ripped out street signs. During the past 13 years, police have had to quell six other large, alcoholfueled disturbances in the west university neighborhood. Kamkar blamed the increased density of student housing in the west and south university neighborhoods for the growing party scene. The UO has pushed hard in recent years to increase student enrollment without providing more on-campus housing, and the city’s land use laws designate neighborhoods near the UO for highdensity residential development. The result: off-campus neighborhoods jampacked with UO students, drawing students and nonstudents looking for weekend boozing. Sgt. Michael Gilbert, a 24-year department veteran, said young people are more likely to question authority than in the past, and cell phones and texting allow gatherings to form quickly. “We are seeing more drinking on the streets,” he said. “With texting it’s just easy to put a crowd together.” Oregon Liquor Control Commission investigator Mark Jaehnig, who regularly participates in party patrols, said partygoers walk from place to place to drink. “What we have seen more and more each year is that they are rolling parties,” he said.

Obama to appear in support of Kitzhaber PORTLAND — The Democratic Party of Oregon is taking reservations on its website for President Barack Obama’s appearance next Wednesday in Portland to support John Kitzhaber’s campaign for governor. The event begins at 4 p.m. at the Oregon Convention Center. The Register-Guard reports the audience will have to go through airport-like security. No signs or banners will be permitted. Former Gov. Kitzhaber is in a close race with Republican Chris Dudley. Obama’s campaign sweep will take him to Seattle the following day to appear with Sen. Patty Murray.

State takes custody of faith healers’ baby PORTLAND — The Oregon Department of Human Services won custody Tuesday of a 10-month-old Oregon City child facing blindness in one eye. The girl’s parents, Timothy and Rebecca Wyland, believe in faith healing and are facing trial in January on charges of failing to provide adequate care.

The Oregonian reports the state has had temporary custody of the girl, Alayna Wyland, since July. She was initially placed in foster care but allowed back in the Wyland home last month under a court order requiring close medical supervision.

Sheriff: Horman search costs $209K in overtime PORTLAND — The Multnomah County Sheriff is scheduled to request $209,656 from the board of county commissioners to pay for the first three months of overtime stemming from the Kyron Horman investigation. The Oregonian reports that Dan Staton will address the commissioners on Thursday. The money he seeks covers a lead investigator, two detectives and the salary of a one-year investigative technician assigned to the criminal investigation. Staton in July said he’d try to absorb the costs of the investigation within his department, but would return to the board if his budget couldn’t handle it. Kyron has been missing since June 4. — From wire reports

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PORTLAND — In this era of heightened schoolhouse security, in which even longtime parent volunteers must undergo background checks, one Portland school stands out because its campus houses a youth probation program that draws teenage gang members with juvenile records. King School, which serves students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade in Northeast Portland, leases office space at one end of the building to a Multnomah County community justice program that supervises youths who stole cars, possessed weapons, committed minor assaults, robbed someone or broke other laws. Most have been part of a gang. The decision to require teenage lawbreakers to report for probation in an office annex that adjoins the King School courtyard and playground dates back three decades and has never led to a serious incident. County justice officials say offenders are on their best behavior when they check in with court counselors, and they say having adults with juvenile corrections training on site increases safety at King School. “I can understand why people would question it, but to me, it’s safer,” said Lonnie Nettles, head of family services for the Community Justice Department. “Our whole goal is to intervene in the cycle of intergenerational crime.” Sign-in sheets show that only a handful of young probationers report to King most afternoons, though about 140 of the county’s

400 youths on probation are served from the office. Probation officers most often check on teens at their school or home. The worst offenders — youths who commit Measure 11 crimes and sex offenses — are supervised from an office downtown. School district officials acknowledge they didn’t give much thought to safety before they granted the program a new five-year lease in fall 2007 because youth corrections programs had operated at the school for so long. The county pays about $65,000 a year. Portland Community College operates a job-skills program for low-income parents on cash assistance in part of the space rented by the county, and the county allows neighborhood groups to use conference rooms for free. The Northeast Coalition of Neighborhoods rents another section of the building. King’s new principal, Kim Patterson, has raised concerns about student safety and the image that gets projected to neighborhood residents. How, she wonders, can the school appear safe and orderly when adults and young offenders who are not affiliated with the school routinely cross the campus and playground and sometimes enter the courtyard used by King students? She’s particularly sensitive because, in the increasingly middle-class neighborhood around the school, only 41 percent of families send their children to King King’s enrollment is primarily African-American and Latino, with 99 percent of students qualifying for subsidized school meals.

O  B

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Julia Moore / Mail Tribune

Navy veteran Dowl Boles, 69, laughs during a Central Point School Board meeting Tuesday. The board presented Boles with his 1961 high school diploma.

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MEDFORD — The U.S. Navy recruiter in 1958 promised Crater High School sophomore Dowl Boles if he interrupted his high school education to join the military, he would receive his high school diploma when his threeyear enlistment ended. “When I got out, the school district said they didn’t do that,” recounted Boles, now 69. “I was very disappointed. The recruiter was either misinformed or a prophet.” After a nearly 50-year delay, the recruiter’s promise finally was fulfilled Tuesday when the Central Point School Board presented Boles with his 1961 high school diploma, in front of about 10 members of the class of 1961. “My classmates have always involved me in all the class reunions, but I’ve got to admit I always felt a little like an outsider knowing I didn’t have a diploma,” said Boles, wearing a black graduation cap and holding his diploma. “This means a lot.” Boles’ graduation day Tuesday came as a result of a little-known 2005 state law that requires high schools to grant diplomas to veterans who left high school to serve in the U.S. military during times of war. A December 2009 newspaper article Boles read in The Register Guard newspaper in Eugene talked about U.S. Navy veteran Ronald Eugene Burroughs, of Springfield, who obtained his diploma from Thurston High School after 50 years. “I wouldn’t have known about the law if it had not been for reading about Mr. Burroughs,” Boles said. Boles contacted the Central Point School District to request his diploma, and Samantha Steele, Central Point schools education director, took up the task of organizing Boles’ longawaited graduation. By happenstance, Crater athletic secretary Margaret Rackley dug through some old Crater files and found a blank, original 1961 diploma signed by former School Board President Dick Dunn, former Superintendent C.A. Meyer and former Crater

Dudley said he doesn’t think importing liquefied natural gas, which generally costs more, “pencils out the way it did in the past.” He added there are property rights issues to be considered in the route the pipeline would take. The Oregonian newspaper has reported that backers of the Coos Bay project continue to seek state permits, but that observers say approval of the Ruby Pipeline makes it less viable. The Coos Bay pipeline would also go to Malin, where it could be sent south to California. Asked if he supported removing dams to help salmon, as has been done on the Rogue River and is proposed for the Klamath River, Dudley said he generally did not. Usually quick and confident with his answers to questions he has been asked many times on issues like jobs, taxes and schools, Dudley was taken aback when asked to describe his what his friends and colleagues consider his idiosyncrasies. “Hmmm. I’m glad my wife’s not here,” he said. “Oh, I don’t know. I’d have to think about what are the pet peeves. I like quiet in the morning, that sort of thing. I’ll think of a better one.”


C4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

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Dallas Brown for county commission

M

ake no mistake about it: If Dallas Brown is elected to the Deschutes County Commission, the quiet times are likely to end. That may well be a good thing.

Brown is young — only 25 — but he has spent close to a year getting ready and then running for the commission seat being vacated by Dennis Luke. He has attended countless county meetings and met with all but one of the county government department heads. He won his primary race handily, and he hasn’t slowed down since. He is, in many respects, a walking catalogue of information about county government in general and Deschutes County in particular. With neither family demands nor a business to run, he says he will give the commission job the 10-hour days he is currently giving the race for that job. He maps out an ambitious agenda for the county in the months ahead, starting with a study of agricultural lands to see what can be done to make it easier for farmers to do business here. He wants to beef up the county’s road system, which he describes as being five years behind the times, and open up new industrial land east of Redmond. Doing so, he says, would help improve the area’s economy. Brown has slightly less ambitious goals, as well. He wants to improve the county’s website so it’s more user-friendly, hire more grant writers and do an efficiency study of county government in an effort to save the county money. One inefficiency that needs addressing, he says, is that the lights in the County Services Building are left on all night. He also believes that while the county is likely to need more jail space down the road, it can extend the life of the existing facility by doing such things as releasing more inmates with electronic ankle monitors. The county now charges those inmates $25 per day for the privilege, and he believes it should pick up the tab. He makes a good case for that approach: No county jail, even the most efficiently run one, can operate for $25 per prisoner per day. Deschutes County, like most governments in Oregon, is hardly rolling in money these days, and several of Brown’s proposals aim directly at improving the situation. Beyond the relatively small savings that such measures as turning off the lights are likely to generate, he recognizes

Get your letters in It happens every election year. The Bulletin’s readers take a healthy interest in politics and many of you want to share your opinions with your neighbors. It’s a good thing, but it does present a small problem. In order to accommodate as many writers as possible, we must put a deadline on submissions to My Nickel’s Worth and In My View. This fall, the magic date is Monday, Oct. 18, by 5 p.m. Letters and In My View pieces e-mailed, snail mailed or hand

“He maps out an ambitious agenda for the county in the months ahead, starting with a study of agricultural lands to see what can be done to make it easier for farmers to do business here. He wants to beef up the county’s road system, which he describes as being five years behind the times, and open up new industrial land east of Redmond. Doing so, he says, will help improve the area’s economy.” that labor costs must also be addressed. County workers contribute only minimally to their health insurance costs, for one thing, and, like most public employees in this state, their 6 percent PERS contribution is picked up by their employer, in this case Deschutes County. He notes that negotiations with three unions representing county workers will begin soon, and he believes union concessions are necessary. We do not agree with Brown on everything, however. We don’t believe the county is best served by three full-time commissioners rather than by several part-time ones and a strong county manager, for example. Brown is opposed in this race by Republican Tony DeBone of La Pine. DeBone, too, has things to offer county government, among them representation of an area that has, arguably, been under-represented in the past. DeBone is a small-business man, as well, and may have a better feel for the impact government can have on small business. In the end, however, The Bulletin believes Brown is the better choice for county commission. He is bright, articulate and as well-prepared as any candidate of the nearly 100 we have spoken to in the past couple of months. If he is still a bit green around the edges, that is hardly a disqualifier. He will serve Deschutes County well.

delivered after that time will not be accepted for publication. And do remember these important points: Letters must be 250 words or less, while In My View pieces must be between 600 and 800 words long. All must contain the writer’s first and last name, a telephone number where we can reach you, and a mailing address. We’re receiving letters regarding the election by the fistful this week, so please don’t wait until Monday to add yours to the stack. We want to print as many as we possibly can, and the sooner they arrive, the better our, and your, chances.

My Nickel’s Worth Wheeler is better choice All predictions are that the current economic problems will last a long time. More than ever, we need a state treasurer who can maximize management of our tax receipts and retirement funds. Ted Wheeler has done an excellent job in the past few months, and we know from his time as head of Multnomah County that he has the ability to do the best job going forward as well. As CEO of Multnomah County, he started with a $45 million deficit and not only balanced the budget three years in a row but paid off another $24 million of debt. And he did it in such a way that he now has endorsements from both business and unions. During this time, GOP nominee Chris Telfer and her friends in the Senate did nothing with any effect about the continuing fiscal crises. Now Telfer is saying she would have but wasn’t told until recently that Oregon had any financial problems, nor that PERS was a looming problem. Is she really that clueless, or does she think the voters are? We need a treasurer who understands what’s going on and has the education and experience to get the most out of our state monies. The only candidate that does is Wheeler. Please vote Wheeler for treasurer and keep the best we’ve ever had for that office. Joseph Maley Sunriver

Vote for Wyden Sen. Ron Wyden has been a friend of South Deschutes County for quite some time. Thanks to his work, we now have a La Pine Senior Center that brightens the lives of our older friends and is enjoyed by the entire La Pine community.

In response to Bureau of Land Management foot-dragging, Wyden introduced a bill directing the transfer of BLM lands to the county, enabling expansion of the La Pine sewer plant. The expansion is essential for growth and economic development in our area. The same bill also provides a new permanent location for our rodeo grounds, and will help us develop a downtown core. He moved the Federal Health Care Agency like a lever when they threw up roadblocks to La Pine’s medical clinic. So as you can see, Wyden has been a friend to south Deschutes County. We should send Wyden back to Washington. Please vote Wyden. Stu Martinez Former mayor of La Pine

mine many state land issues. These include how our forests are harvested, how our land is used, and the control of our navigable waterways. We’ve witnessed the stranglehold that Democrats have had on these resources. It’s time to use a more reasoned approach. By controlling both the Oregon governship and Treasurer’s Office, we can put these resources to environmentally sound, financially beneficial uses. Ask yourself this simple question: If you had $100,000 to invest, would you give it to a career politician or a professional financial adviser? I’m going to give my vote to Telfer — it’s the logical choice. Jess Messner Powell Butte

Elect CPA Telfer

If you missed attending the Deschutes County Commission debate between Dallas Brown and Tony DeBone, watch a replay on COTV. There was a stark contrast between the two men. What Brown lacks in age he more than made up for in preparation. He has diligently researched all areas of the county and understands the responsibilities of the position on the commission. He showed his maturity and knowledge throughout the debate, and showed himself as the clear choice for voters in Deschutes County. Don’t just take my word for it, watch it yourself. Dallas was better prepared, offered specific policies and spoke with a confidence that his opponent lacked. Brown has the time, energy and skills to be an outstanding commissioner. He is ready to begin the job on Day One. I am voting for Brown for Deschutes County Commissioner. I believe if you inform yourself on the race, you will do the same. Evelyn Haertel Bend

Imagine having a professional financial person as Oregon’s state treasurer instead of a career politician supervising the state’s purse strings! Over $120 billion flows through the Treasurer’s Office — that’s our money. Come next January, we’ll have either a career politician “managing” our money or a certified public accountant known for asking the tough questions and protecting our financial interests. We’ve seen what happens when the Oregon Legislature and Governor’s Office run wild without proper supervision. We need Telfer as our next state treasurer. She has a proven track record of effectively challenging the state bureaucrats to disclose how much money they are hiding from public scrutiny in their reserve and slush fund accounts. Another important reason to elect both Telfer and GOP gubernatorial candidate Chris Dudley relates to state land policy. Along with the secretary of state, the governor and treasurer serve on a three-person committee to deter-

Brown has what it takes

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Now more than ever, America needs loyalty, productivity By Warren Ebentheuer

M

y view should go across America, not just for The Bulletin, because this message is for everyone who states that they are a loyal American. At 83, I have seen an unbelievable change over the years. There are at least three categories of citizens in this country: 1. Citizens who are willing to make an effort to help with the betterment of their country, and willing to make a sacrifice. 2. So-called citizens who only care about what they want for themselves, and don’t care about anyone else. People who can close up a manufacturing business and send it to China so they can

make a larger profit for themselves at the cost of American workers. 3. Legislators who get voted into office by voters who know nothing about the candidates’ philosophy of what this country needs to be able to survive. We need to stop government from growing bigger and bigger, stop unions from being greedy at the expense of everybody else in this country. When loyal Americans help their country, they are helping their children. Make people work for government giveaways. Stop giving to people free, free, free. Stop taking from the working person and handing it to a person who is able, but would rather sit at home

IN MY VIEW and have you provide their daily needs. Stop spending big money on prisoners by feeding, clothing and giving them a bed all for free. Make them either work to live, or go without, because prisoners are coming out a lot fatter than when they went in. Thank you, good citizens, for all you give so that violent criminals can eat well and sit doing nothing productive in a prison. You see, I don’t have a lot of years to go, but I can see the formula we are in cannot survive unless there are some big changes made. We need more loyalty to

the necessities of this country, or every problem is going to be more difficult to fix. I volunteered twice to serve my country’s need. Not for money, because money was not on my mind. It was a privilege to be a part of what my country needed. Please stop voting for a party that is wanting a job that they don’t understand, if the truth was written in front of them. If you are not certain of who or what to vote for, then don’t vote. Follow wise people. All people are not wise, so please be careful who you listen to. I want to use a quote from Thomas Jefferson in 1802. “I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent

the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.” All Americans who feel loyalty to their country must step up to the plate and be conservative on who you vote for in the elections. Vote for wisdom in leadership, not just a bunch of words that sound good, but are not reality. The future for America depends on the majority of citizens to come to the aid of their country. One thing more: Bring all our soldiers home. Stop fighting unending wars that will only serve to suck more money out of our already struggling economy. Warren Ebentheuer lives in Terrebonne.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 C5

O Betty Ann Koth

D

N   Beverly Bolton, of Madras June 10, 1933 - Oct. 12, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Colonial Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Funeral Services to be held on Monday, October 18, 2010 at 11:00 AM at United Methodist Church in Madras.

Brock L. Brooks, of Madras Oct. 5, 1963 - Oct. 1, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Colonial Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Memorial Services to be held on Saturday, October 16, 2010 at 10:00 AM at the Madras High School Gymnasium.

Hazel Isabella Wanker, of Oakridge, OR formerly of Madras Nov. 30, 1920 - Oct. 9, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Services will be announced at a later date by her family.

Mark A. Roberts, of Lincoln City, OR April 14, 1963 - Oct. 9, 2010 Arrangements: Pacific View Memorial Chapel, 1-541-994-4662 Services: Services are to be held at the Elks Lodge in Lincoln City, OR on October 23, 2010 at 2:00 p.m.

Petrona Hernandez de Lopez, of Bend June 29, 1938 - Oct. 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmoirtuaries.com Services: Funeral Services will be held at Saint Francis of Assisi in Bend, Oregon on Saturday, October 16, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. Interment at Pilot Butte Cemetery immediately to follow.

Yardley Antonio Rico, of Culver July 4, 1991 - Oct. 9, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Colonial Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Funeral Services will be held on Friday, October 15, 2010 at 4:00 PM at the Culver High School Gymnasium.

October 1, 1941 - October 7, 2010 Betty Ann Koth, age 69, of Bend, went home to be with her Lord on October 7, 2010, at St. Charles Hospital. On October 1, 1941, Betty was born in Neligh, Nebraska, to Russell and Gladys (Fuller) Hilliard. She attended Kenwood and Bend High School. On March 12, Betty Ann Koth 1965, she married Richard Koth in a double wedding at Chapel of the Chimes, Las Vegas. Betty worked in the dry cleaning business for over 30 years. In 1979, Betty and Richard bought 1 Hour Martinizing Cleaners (now Mirror Pond) and ran it for over 11 years. After they sold the cleaners, she worked for Wettles store in sales, and her most recent position was at the Greener Cleaners. She was a member of Crossroads Church. Betty was also involved in a bowling league and ladies Bunco. Betty enjoyed working, reading, tending to her flowers which they sold commercially. She loved children, and spending time with her nieces and nephews. Betty will be dearly missed by all who knew her. She is preceded in death by her daughters, Rebecca Melba Koth and Candy Kay Koth; and her parents. Betty is survived by her husband, Richard Koth; son, Richard Koth Jr. of San Luis Obispo, CA; brothers, Kenneth (Faye) Hilliard of Dallas, TX, Dennis (Josephine) Hilliard of Tucson, AZ, Donald (Clydette) Hilliard of Portland, OR; sister, Norma (Fred) Brockmann of Albany, OR; stepchildren, Robert Willard of Palm Springs, CA, Kari Baker of John Day, OR; numerous nieces, nephews, her two dogs, relatives and friends. A viewing will be held from 12-4 pm, Friday, October 15, 2010, at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend. A graveside service will be held at 10 am, Saturday, October 16, 2010, at Pilot Butte Cemetery, Bend followed by a memorial service at 11 am, at Crossroads Church, 63945 Old Bend Redmond Hwy, Bend. Following the memorial service a reception will be held by the church family. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts can be made to Crossroads Church. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home was honored to serve the family. (541) 382-2471. Please visit and sign the online guestbook at www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

Kathleen Marie Weaks Sept. 25, 1980 - Oct. 6, 2010

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Kathleen Marie Weaks, beloved daughter of Stephanie Weaks of Cincinnati, OH and Donald Weaks of Naples FL, dear sister of Stacey and Bridget Weaks, cherished aunt of David and Chad Weaks of Tucson, AZ, passed away October 6, 2010, at age 30. Katie, a graduate of Summit Country Day, Cincinnati OH, and the Culinary Institute of America, Poughkeepsie, NY, was a talented chef at 900 Wall in Bend, OR. Katie will forever be remembered as a bubbly, bright, creative individual. She will be deeply missed. Visitation will be held from 5:00 - 7:00 on Friday October, 15, at Elden A. Good Funeral Home, 2620 Erie Ave, Cincinnati, OH. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday October, 16 at 11:00 a.m. at St. Mary Church in Hyde Park. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Culinary Institute of America or Central Oregon Community College c/o 900 Wall. Condolences may be sent through www.goodfuneralhome.com.

Kathryn M. McTague-Walser

W. ‘John’ Siegworth

Aug. 6, 1924 - Oct. 10, 2010

Oct. 14. 1923 - Sept. 28, 2010

Kathryn passed this earth on the 10th of October, 2010, in her own home with all of her family beside her. She was born in New York City on the 6th of August, 1924, to Dr. & Mrs. Harry P. McTague (Kathryn McCoy) of New York, New York. Kathryn McTague-Walser Her father was a well known psychiatrist with a specialty in stress related mental disabilities. Her parents preceded her in death as did her husband, William E. Walser and grandson, Jacob John Taylor. She was a homemaker, wife, mother, the ideal hostess, superb cook and the life of any party. Kathryn was a member of the church all of her life. She belonged to St. Rita's Parish during her years living in Maywood Park. When she was in Bend where she had a second home, she attended St. Francis. She also attended The Grotto regularly when she was in Portland. In later years she joined Holy Family Catholic Church. She had lots of friends all during her life and prided herself in keeping in touch with them. She was a Lector for many years, Eucharist Minister, a Hospice volunteer, and an avid bridge player. She read the Bridge and "Irish Sweepstakes" columns everyday of her life until she was unable to read. She will be long remembered as someone who always had a solution for a problem and knowledge on every topic. When finding out she was suffering from speech aphasia she put "her house" in order and placed the balance of her life in the "hands of Our Lord." She was a friend you could rely on always. She is survived by her daughters, Kathy Test-Bailey, Carolyn Taylor-Flack; and son, William Walser; son-in-laws, Lou Bailey and Rob Flack; grandchildren, Adam Test, Josh & Charlotte Taylor, Jessica Taylor; greatgrandson, Mason Edward; and many friends. Her family especially appreciates the care given by her team of caregivers led by Carolyn Taylor-Flack, assisted by Home Instead, Angela Olson, members of St. Therese Pastoral Care, Rob Hakala and Kristen Freiermuth. If it were not for these individuals Kathryn would not have been able to stay in her own home throughout her illness. God Bless you all! A funeral mass and rosary will be celebrated on Friday, October 15, 2010, at Holy Family Catholic Church, SE 39th Avenue at Flavel. Rosary 9:30 am, Mass 10 am, and reception following. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Louise Barracks Foundation at Holy Family Catholic Church, 3732 SE Knapp St., Portland, OR 97202 for catholic education or The National Sanctuary of Our Sorrowful Mother (The Grotto), P.O. Box 20008, Portland, OR 97294. Arrangements by Zeller Chapel of the Roses.

W. “John" Siegworth of Bend passed away from natural causes on September 28, 2010, at Partners In Care Hospice House. Born in Burlington, Iowa, on Oct. 14, 1923, to Fred and Bertha (Breuer) Siegworth; He had three brothers, Wayne, Loren and Harold. John Siegworth He served for 11 years in the Army Air Corps/Air Force in WWII and the Korean War. John relocated to Los Angeles in 1946, married Erma Lyon and had one daughter, Linda. He later married Dorotha Tharp in 1954, and they raised her five children. After Dorotha's passing in 1987, he married Bend resident, Marie Clark. After 35 years as a Mail Carrier in Los Angeles, he retired to Bend in 1978, was active in Bend Elks Lodge 1371, a founding member of its RV Club, and delivered Christmas baskets for many years. He was the 1984-85 Elk of the Year. John is survived by his daughter, Linda Harris; brother, Harold Siegworth; step- daughters, Elsie Olson, Donna Martin, Jeanne Hawes, Linda Weyand; numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by brothers, Wayne and Loren; and wives, Dorotha and Marie. Donations to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend 97701. The family is served by Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903.

Sheriff Continued from C1 Crook County Commissioner Lynn Lundquist said the County Court doesn’t have any authority over the hiring and firing of employees by the Sheriff’s Office. But, he said, the court does control the Sheriff’s Office’s budget. “An option is, you could say we’re not going to fund that position,” Lundquist said. Lundquist said he was not sure where the County Court’s discussion would end up but that he personally didn’t believe Burkhardt should be working in the office. “I don’t think this is appropriate,” he said. Burkhardt has applied to stay in the job permanently. In the letter to the Ethics Commission, Gordon wrote, “There is little doubt that the daughter can adequately do the work. If the daughter successfully completes probation then she would become a part of the bargaining unit. The sheriff actively participates in union negotiations (the current contract expires in June 2011; negotiations will start in January). The union contract directly governs employee benefits.” Burkhardt has been filling the role of a civil deputy who gave two weeks’ notice and took another job. Operations Commander Russ Wright, who hired Burkhardt, said in an earlier inter-

David Musto, drug expert, dies By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Dr. David Musto, an expert on drug-control policy who wrote an important history of drug use in the United States and government efforts to control it and served as a government adviser on drug policy during the Carter administration, died Friday in Shanghai. He was 74 and lived in New Haven. Musto was in China to attend a ceremony marking the dona-

tion of his books and papers to Shanghai University and the creation there of the Center for International Drug Control Policy Studies. The apparent cause of death was a heart attack, his son Christopher said. Musto, who was a professor of child psychiatry in the Child Study Center at the Yale School of Medicine and a professor of the history of medicine, broke new ground in 1973 with “The American Disease: Origins of Narcotic Control.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Ad watch Continued from C1 The claims: The ad’s narrator makes a variety of claims, many of them familiar ones: 1) Under Kitzhaber, “Oregon’s unemployment soared and our incomes fell further behind”; 2) The Oregonian newspaper reported that “Kitzhaber’s failures contributed generously to the state’s downward spiral”; and 3) Kitzhaber “admitted the state was ungovernable, that he lacked an overall vision and didn’t address the bigger issues.” Our verdict: This ad contains some facts, but lacks crucial context while relying on misleading paraphrasing and sourcing. Addressing the claims in order: 1) As proof that unemployment soared, the ad cites a Sept. 25 article in The Oregonian to support that unemployment rose 65 percent. Actually, The Oregonian story cited examines an earlier Dudley ad, calling it “half true.” The article concluded that Oregon’s unemployment rate did grow from 4.7 percent to 7.8 percent during Kitzhaber’s tenure, but notes that Kitzhaber took office during an economic boom, when unemployment was at historic lows, and left as a national slump caused unemployment to grow across the nation.

Redmond Continued from C1 As it turns out, the district found Fleming’s replacement in Mikalson, who last year was the principal of Obsidian Middle School. Mikalson has been working with a one-year contract. Board members extended Mikalson’s contract by three years, a decision that came after about 270 people responded

The ad also flashes a 2003 Oregonian headline “Oregon Dream Shatters” as a source. The article does talk about the income gap having widened in Oregon, but does not blame Kitzhaber. Rather, it discusses how Kitzhaber and conservative Republicans in the Legislature fought to a stalemate marked by partisanship and conflict. 2) The claim that The Oregonian reported as fact that Kitzhaber had contributed “generously” to the state’s “downward spiral” is not true, though the paper, in a 2003 profile, did report that the then-outgoing governor’s critics accused him of having done so. 3) As for Kitzhaber having said the state was “ungovernable,” no recording has been located of the Eugene Rotary Club speech at which that statement was allegedly made. Kitzhaber says he was taken out of context and that his point was that Oregon was on its way to becoming ungovernable because of partisanship. The other two statements — that he admitted not having an overall vision and not taking on the bigger issues — are paraphrases taken from an interview with the Portland newsweekly Willamette Week this year, in which Kitzhaber said he intended to learn from past mistakes. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-576-9008 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

to an anonymous survey concerning the superintendent’s performance. The results were overwhelmingly positive, according to school board Chairman Jim Erickson. Details of the contract — including salary — are expected to be finalized within the next two months. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

view he didn’t feel pressure to hire Burkhardt. He added that she had proven to be a valuable employee. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Almond David Regnier December 15, 1920 – October 8, 2010 Born in Kennewick, Washington to Edward Joseph and Lottie Regnier. Almond graduated from Bellingham High School, Bellingham, Washington, June 5, 1940. At nineteen years old, Almond enrolled in a machinist apprentice program for 2 years at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. On may 18, 1944 Almond was drafted into the U.S. Army. While in the army, he was trained at Budda Diesel School to become a locomotive diesel mechanic. Almond then served in France and Germany as part of the 756th Railway Shop Battalion. He received the European African Middle Eastern Service Medal, The American Theatre Service Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the Victory Medal. At the age of 25, Almond returned home after WWII to Fort Lewis, Washington after answering the call of duty for his country and was Honorably Discharged on June 3, 1946. Almond returned to the Puget Sound Naval Yard and worked as a machinist for the next several years until 1955 at the age of 34 he moved to Benita, California and worked as a machinist for the Yuba Mfg. Company. Almond even tried his hand at gold mining at Angels Camp, California and hit it big, but eventually the gold ran out. Now, at the age of 38, Almond moved back to Central Oregon and worked for the US Forest Service for a while. He then became involved in the lumber business in Bend with a partner where Hollywood Video and Outback Steak House are now located. In 1964, at the age of 44, Almond started the the A.D. Regnier Building Supply, and was known throughout Central Oregon as one of the main suppliers for sheet stock particle board for all the cabinet shops in Central, Eastern Oregon and the Portland areas. Almond lived on the 1600 block of Galveston where he ran his business and cared for aging parents. After his father’s death in 1964, he lived in the same house with his mother until she passed away in May of 1977. In 1977, at the age of 56, he sold his business to his nephews . He met Fannie Haberstich who was hosting the dance for the Tri-County Singles Group, three months later they were married. Almond had never learned to dance before that night. For the next 32 years, Almond and his wife lived in Metolius, and then Madras and enjoyed being involved in community events and family functions. Fannie passed away June 18, 2009 and several months later, Almond moved into the Cascade Assisted Living in Madras. He was one of the staff’s favorite residents, always joking and kidding around until the end. Almond passed away on the morning of October 8, 2010. Almond was a loving person and cared very deeply for his family and friends. He will be truly missed. A memorial service will be held October 16, 2010 at 2:00 pm at the Father’s House, located at 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend Oregon. For additional information call David T. Reginer 541-280-9126.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 14 Today: Gradual increasing cloud cover, remaining mild.

HIGH Ben Burkel

78

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

68/45

67/41

73/41

57/36



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks



73/41

74/31

Partly to mostly cloudy today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

80/40

Mitchell 76/36

Madras 70/39

Camp Sherman 70/31 Redmond Prineville 78/34 Cascadia 76/35 77/35 Sisters 73/33 Bend Post 78/34

Oakridge Elk Lake 75/33

66/22

75/30

74/32

76/30

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

71/29

73/31

Fort Rock

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 83° Brookings • 25° Baker City

Vancouver 55/45



Calgary 69/39

Seattle Missoula 70/37



Eugene

Mostly sunny skies today. Clear to partly cloudy skies tonight. Eastern

67/45

Bend

Grants Pass 75/43

Helena 70/39

Boise

78/34

73/41

Idaho Falls



Elko

90/53

69/34

75/37

75/33

Reno

72/33

80/45

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 80/56 Clear to partly cloudy skies tonight.

Crater Lake 63/37

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:19 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:23 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:20 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:21 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:29 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . .none

HIGH

Salt Lake City 75/51

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

First

Full

Last

New

Oct. 14

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Nov. 5

Astoria . . . . . . . . 70/46/0.00 . . . . . 62/48/sh. . . . . . . 58/46/c Baker City . . . . . . 65/25/0.00 . . . . . . 70/39/s. . . . . . 63/32/pc Brookings . . . . . . 83/53/0.00 . . . . . 64/53/pc. . . . . . 63/47/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 69/25/0.00 . . . . . . 74/44/s. . . . . . . 67/38/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 71/37/0.00 . . . . . 67/45/pc. . . . . . 63/41/pc Klamath Falls . . . 74/30/0.00 . . . . . . 75/36/s. . . . . . . 68/34/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 75/27/0.00 . . . . . . 75/42/s. . . . . . 67/34/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 77/23/0.00 . . . . . . 76/30/s. . . . . . 59/26/pc Medford . . . . . . . 83/40/0.00 . . . . . 78/48/pc. . . . . . 71/44/pc Newport . . . . . . . 73/48/0.00 . . . . . . 63/52/c. . . . . . 59/47/pc North Bend . . . . . . 73/43/NA . . . . . 65/49/pc. . . . . . 61/44/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 68/30/0.00 . . . . . . 72/41/s. . . . . . 70/40/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 65/36/0.00 . . . . . . 69/44/s. . . . . . . 64/36/s Portland . . . . . . . 70/42/0.01 . . . . . . 67/48/c. . . . . . 63/45/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 79/37/0.00 . . . . . . 76/35/s. . . . . . . 64/31/s Redmond. . . . . . . 77/25/0.00 . . . . . . 76/32/s. . . . . . . 62/28/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 78/43/0.01 . . . . . . 71/49/s. . . . . . 65/43/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 72/41/0.00 . . . . . 67/46/pc. . . . . . 63/42/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 75/27/0.00 . . . . . 73/33/pc. . . . . . 65/29/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 72/36/0.00 . . . . . . 69/42/s. . . . . . . 63/39/s

WATER REPORT

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville .........................Mod. Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

3MEDIUM

LOW 0

2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 in 1964 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.06” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 in 1969 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.18” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.01” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 8.05” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.15 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.39 in 1972 *Melted liquid equivalent

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

58 24

TEMPERATURE

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:14 a.m. . . . . . .6:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:28 a.m. . . . . . .6:26 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:55 a.m. . . . . . .7:30 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:23 p.m. . . . . . .5:06 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:12 a.m. . . . . . .6:02 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:23 p.m. . . . . . .5:19 a.m.

Moon phases

Mostly sunny and chilly. HIGH

57 22

PLANET WATCH

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

MONDAY Mostly sunny and cool.

HIGH

60 24

OREGON CITIES City

58/46

Portland

Redding

Silver Lake

70/28

LOW

61 28

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley

Chemult

HIGH

34

SUNDAY Mostly sunny and cool.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

77/32

69/24

LOW

67/48

Burns

La Pine

Mostly sunny and significantly cooler.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, seasonable temperatures.

NORTHWEST

70/31

Brothers 

75/31

SATURDAY

Rain will be possible northwest, with dry conditions expected elsewhere over the region.

Paulina

74/32

Sunriver

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,903 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37,845 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,143 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 23,594 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93,301 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 440 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43.4 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,036 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.09 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 55/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 69/39

Seattle 58/46

Boise 73/41

• 104°

S

Saskatoon 64/38 Winnipeg 60/39

Billings 80/44

(in the 48 contiguous states): Portland 67/48

S

Bismarck 70/39 St. Paul 68/42

Cheyenne 73/42

• 19°

San Francisco 80/56

Big Piney, Wyo.

• 1.46” Ft Lauderdale, Fla.

Las Vegas 90/67

Los Angeles 73/61 Honolulu 86/72

Tijuana 79/59

Anchorage 38/29

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 57/44

Thunder Bay 54/36

Rapid City 78/44

Indio, Calif.

S

To ronto 56/45

Buffalo

56/46 Green Bay 63/41 Philadelphia Chicago Detroit 64/48 65/51 62/48

Halifax 57/38 Portland 61/49 Boston 60/51 New York 64/47

Des Moines 74/44

Columbus Washington, D. C. 63/43 61/48 Louisville 68/41 Kansas City St. Louis Charlotte 72/46 69/47 72/41 Albuquerque Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 74/48 77/51 70/45 76/47 Phoenix Atlanta 97/71 71/44 Birmingham Dallas 73/46 79/50 New Orleans 79/58 Houston Orlando Chihuahua 82/50 86/62 76/50 Miami 84/72 Monterrey La Paz National Hurricane Center's 83/58 forecast position of 91/68 Mazatlan Hurricane Paula 90/80 Salt Lake City 75/51

Juneau 46/40

Omaha 78/42

Denver 79/47

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .76/50/0.00 . . .78/48/s . . . 84/54/s Akron . . . . . . . . .70/40/0.00 . 59/40/pc . . 57/40/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .63/34/0.00 . . .59/47/r . . . .50/43/r Albuquerque. . . .71/54/0.00 . . .74/48/s . . . 76/49/s Anchorage . . . . .40/26/0.00 . . .38/29/s . . 41/36/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .80/61/0.01 . . .71/44/s . . . 74/44/s Atlantic City . . . .63/45/0.01 . . .65/51/r . . 61/49/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .84/53/0.00 . . .82/45/s . . . 86/53/s Baltimore . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . .60/45/sh . . 65/45/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .67/36/0.00 . . .80/44/s . . . 75/42/s Birmingham . . . .80/54/0.05 . . .73/46/s . . . 76/45/s Bismarck . . . . . . .66/32/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . . 73/41/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .74/43/0.00 . . .73/41/s . . 69/40/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .60/45/0.00 . . .60/51/c . . 57/47/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .60/44/0.00 . . .61/51/r . . 56/47/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .58/35/0.00 . .56/46/sh . . 54/45/sh Burlington, VT. . .60/38/0.00 . . .59/47/r . . . .51/42/r Caribou, ME . . . .52/37/0.00 . 53/39/pc . . . .48/43/r Charleston, SC . .83/67/0.00 . .81/52/sh . . . 76/56/s Charlotte. . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 72/41/pc . . . 73/44/s Chattanooga. . . .80/59/0.00 . . .72/43/s . . . 74/44/s Cheyenne . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . . .73/42/s . . . 75/42/s Chicago. . . . . . . .66/55/0.10 . 65/51/pc . . . 60/45/s Cincinnati . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . 67/42/pc . . 66/38/pc Cleveland . . . . . .68/38/0.00 . 60/45/pc . . 58/45/pc Colorado Springs 61/37/0.00 . . .73/41/s . . . 77/43/s Columbia, MO . .69/56/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 68/43/s Columbia, SC . . .84/57/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . . 76/45/s Columbus, GA. . .80/63/0.03 . . .79/47/s . . . 76/48/s Columbus, OH. . .73/43/0.00 . 63/43/pc . . . 60/37/c Concord, NH . . . .63/28/0.00 . . .63/47/c . . . .55/39/r Corpus Christi. . . 88/-1/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 82/63/s Dallas Ft Worth. .81/62/0.00 . . .79/50/s . . . 85/55/s Dayton . . . . . . . .75/46/0.12 . 64/44/pc . . 62/37/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 79/50/s Des Moines. . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .74/44/s . . . 69/43/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .66/45/0.03 . 62/48/pc . . 61/47/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .62/40/0.00 . 60/37/pc . . . 56/46/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 79/52/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .29/26/0.00 . . .26/6/pc . . . 25/9/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .64/35/0.00 . . .67/36/s . . . 64/42/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .71/38/0.00 . . .71/34/s . . 72/35/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .63/50/0.31 . 62/43/pc . . 59/42/pc Green Bay. . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 63/41/pc . . . 59/41/s Greensboro. . . . .71/63/0.00 . .66/43/sh . . 69/44/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .62/40/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 60/44/sh Hartford, CT . . . .64/36/0.00 . . .60/48/c . . 53/43/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .66/30/0.00 . . .70/39/s . . . 66/40/s Honolulu . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . .86/72/s . . . 86/72/s Houston . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . .82/50/s . . . 84/53/s Huntsville . . . . . .78/53/0.18 . . .70/40/s . . . 76/42/s Indianapolis . . . .78/55/0.42 . 63/44/pc . . . 66/43/s Jackson, MS . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .75/43/s . . . 81/49/s Madison, WI . . . .65/51/0.00 . 66/41/pc . . . 60/38/s Jacksonville. . . . .84/60/0.00 . . .86/54/s . . . 78/53/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/44/0.05 . . .46/40/r . . . .45/37/r Kansas City. . . . .67/49/0.00 . . .72/46/s . . . 71/46/s Lansing . . . . . . . .59/50/0.69 . 62/44/pc . . 60/40/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . . .90/67/s . . . 90/68/s Lexington . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .64/41/s . . 65/40/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .70/38/0.00 . . .79/37/s . . . 76/45/s Little Rock. . . . . .83/59/0.20 . . .76/47/s . . . 80/49/s Los Angeles. . . . .67/62/0.00 . . .73/61/s . . . 72/59/s Louisville . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 68/41/pc . . . 66/43/s Memphis. . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .71/51/s . . . 80/49/s Miami . . . . . . . . .87/76/0.07 . .84/72/sh . . 85/71/pc Milwaukee . . . . .63/57/0.00 . 65/44/pc . . . 60/47/s Minneapolis . . . .65/47/0.00 . 68/42/pc . . . 64/44/s Nashville . . . . . . .77/59/0.03 . . .70/45/s . . . 74/45/s New Orleans. . . .82/62/0.02 . . .79/58/s . . . 77/58/s New York . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . . .64/47/r . . 58/47/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .62/47/r . . . .57/46/r Norfolk, VA . . . . .71/63/0.00 . . .70/51/t . . 67/50/pc Oklahoma City . .72/57/0.00 . . .77/51/s . . . 84/53/s Omaha . . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . .78/42/s . . . 72/43/s Orlando. . . . . . . .85/65/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . . 82/58/s Palm Springs. . .102/81/0.00 . 99/72/pc . . . 99/66/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .68/58/0.00 . 67/45/pc . . . 63/40/s Philadelphia . . . .66/47/0.00 . . .64/48/r . . 62/45/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .98/71/0.00 . . .97/71/s . . 93/69/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .56/42/sh . . 57/41/sh Portland, ME. . . .60/35/0.00 . 61/49/pc . . . .54/42/r Providence . . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .63/52/c . . 57/46/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .78/62/0.00 . .68/44/sh . . . 69/45/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .78/44/s . . . 78/44/s Savannah . . . . . 86/67/trace . . .82/52/s . . . 77/54/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .76/42/0.00 . . .80/45/s . . . 78/45/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .58/46/sh . . 55/43/pc Richmond . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . .68/48/sh . . 67/44/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .62/38/0.00 . . .71/38/s . . . 71/45/s Rochester, NY . . .60/34/0.00 . .56/46/sh . . . .54/43/r Spokane . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . 54/36/pc Sacramento. . . . .91/53/0.00 . . .88/57/s . . . 84/53/s Springfield, MO. .68/52/0.00 . . .66/45/s . . . 69/45/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .72/61/0.01 . . .69/47/s . . . 68/45/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/69/0.00 . . .85/65/s . . . 83/61/s Salt Lake City . . .66/39/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . . 76/53/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/61/0.00 . 92/63/pc . . 90/62/pc San Antonio . . . .83/57/0.00 . . .83/48/s . . . 86/55/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .73/56/0.00 . . .77/48/s . . . 81/52/s San Diego . . . . . .74/66/0.00 . 74/64/pc . . . 72/63/s Washington, DC .70/54/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 69/45/pc San Francisco . . .88/66/0.00 . . .80/56/s . . . 70/54/s Wichita . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .76/47/s . . . 78/49/s San Jose . . . . . . .92/61/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 83/56/s Yakima . . . . . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .69/38/s . . . 63/36/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .71/40/s . . 72/43/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .103/74/0.00 . 97/71/pc . . 95/68/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .55/45/0.00 . 54/44/pc . . 51/43/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .76/64/0.02 . . .76/65/t . . 73/64/sh Auckland. . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .63/53/sh . . 64/49/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .95/68/s . . . 94/67/s Bangkok . . . . . . .88/77/0.27 . . .86/76/t . . . .86/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .73/45/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . . 66/43/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . .86/75/s . . 88/77/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . 52/41/pc . . 50/42/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/48/0.01 . . .66/50/t . . . .65/51/t Budapest. . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . 55/38/pc . . . 56/36/s Buenos Aires. . . .73/59/0.00 . .66/54/sh . . 70/54/sh Cabo San Lucas .91/66/0.00 . . .91/73/s . . . 90/71/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .94/73/s . . . 96/73/s Calgary . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .69/39/s . . 51/30/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .81/73/1.25 . . .84/67/t . . 84/66/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/48/0.00 . 60/44/pc . . 58/43/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .48/43/0.00 . 56/40/pc . . . 50/41/c Geneva . . . . . . . .55/52/0.00 . . .61/43/s . . 58/43/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . 93/63/pc Hong Kong . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .88/79/t . . . .87/78/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/59/0.39 . .67/58/sh . . 66/56/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . .83/59/s . . . 93/69/s Johannesburg . . .72/54/0.00 . . .73/58/t . . . .71/54/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . .66/59/sh . . 66/58/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .73/57/s . . 71/57/pc London . . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . 56/45/pc . . 55/45/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 68/45/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .90/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .113/84/0.00 . .106/80/s . . 103/79/s Mexico City. . . . .73/48/0.00 . 72/47/pc . . . 75/48/s Montreal. . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . . .47/41/r Moscow . . . . . . .36/32/0.07 . . 39/32/rs . . .39/31/rs Nairobi . . . . . . . .86/36/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . 83/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .86/77/1.09 . . .85/77/t . . . .84/75/t New Delhi. . . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . . 93/70/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . 77/62/pc . . 73/60/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .43/34/0.00 . . .50/38/c . . 42/35/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . .56/44/sh . . . .46/40/r Paris. . . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .60/45/s . . 58/45/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .77/66/0.00 . 79/67/pc . . . .83/70/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.61 . .72/56/sh . . 68/55/sh Santiago . . . . . . .63/48/0.01 . .66/51/sh . . 68/50/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .76/61/sh . . . .82/63/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .55/55/0.11 . . .61/46/s . . 64/50/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . . 60/43/s Shanghai. . . . . . .68/64/0.04 . .71/63/sh . . . 73/61/s Singapore . . . . . .88/75/0.12 . . .91/78/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .46/36/0.00 . .45/34/sh . . .41/30/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .76/62/s . . . .62/50/r Taipei. . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .90/76/t . . 86/75/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .89/70/s . . . 91/73/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . 78/65/pc . . 73/62/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 47/42/sh Vancouver. . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .55/45/sh . . . 55/42/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . . 56/36/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . .48/38/sh . . 42/35/sh

Goats hired to clear Portland lot By Molly Hottle The Oregonian

PORTLAND — Kathy Quigley has never had neighbors quite like the attention-getters that recently moved in at Southeast Belmont Street and 10th Avenue: Goats. About 50 were brought in to clear weeds from a two-acre urban lot, drawing hundreds of passers-by to stop for a peek, offer a hand-picked weed or pet the animals through a chain-link fence. “I think one of the things that struck me was how starved people are for nature,” said Quigley,

who lives a few blocks away. “And this is kind of like bringing nature to us.” Vancouver real estate agency Killian Pacific had Goat Rental NW of Damascus deliver the animals. The idea came from Brett Milligan, whose Portland landscape firm GreenWorks was hired by Killian to tend the lot. “They’ve been out here two weeks,” Milligan said. “I thought things would kind of die down in terms of public interest, but it hasn’t at all.” Milligan liked the idea of avoiding gas-powered mowers.

But because Killian would agree only if it didn’t have to pay extra, Milligan offered to count the goats and refill their water buckets for free. “I’m getting paid in personal satisfaction,” Milligan said with a laugh. “I was very interested in alternative practices, things you could make happen in the city. “ Georgina Stiner, president of Goat Rental NW, said using goats instead of lawn mowers is hardly new, but she’s finding a growing interest in urban areas. “We’ve had jobs off Powell Boulevard, a lot where there’s a

lot of construction where they can’t really bring a weed whacker in,” said Stiner, who started her business nearly one year ago and owns 170 goats that came mostly from shelters. Lisa Walker, property manager for FC Services, LLC., which manages land for Killian Pacific, said that besides being green, the goats have a side benefit: “The digestive system of the goat actually causes the seeds to be sterile,” she said. “Next year, we won’t have as many weeds.” The lot was once home to a warehouse and the Monte Carlo

Brent Wojahn / The Oregonian

Goats nibble on weeds in a vacant lot in southeast Portland on Tuesday. The goats were brought in as an alternative to mowing. and Lido restaurants. The buildings, vacant by then, burned down in 2002. Killian plans to develop the site after the economy improves, Walker said.

Meanwhile, the goats will stick around until Friday, guarded at night by security guards and frequent visits by Portland police officers, Stiner said.


S

College Football Inside With the BCS standings about to come out, who might play for the national title? see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

NFL

MLB PLAYOFFS: NLCS

Phillies pitcher Roy Halladay

Great pitching will be the talk of Phils-Giants series

The San Diego Chargers placed linebacker Shawne Merriman on injured reserve on Wednesday.

Chargers place Merriman on IR, likely done in S.D. SAN DIEGO — The San Diego Chargers have turned out the lights on the player known as “Lights Out.” Outside linebacker Shawne Merriman, once one of the most-feared players in the NFL, was placed on the injured reserve list because of a calf injury and a “minor-injury designation” on Wednesday. Merriman must be released once he’s healthy, the team said. Technically, the Chargers could re-sign the controversial player. That almost certainly won’t happen, though, because general manager A.J. Smith hasn’t been a fan of Merriman’s celebrity-leaning lifestyle. Known as “Lights Out” because of his once-ferocious hits, Merriman had 39½ sacks in his first three seasons. He’s had only four in the three seasons since then due to a variety of injuries. He was suspended for four games in 2006 after testing positive for steroids. Even missing the four games, he had 17 sacks that year. Merriman blamed the positive test on a tainted supplement, which he never identified. He also brought unwanted attention off the field. He was arrested just before the 2009 season after reality television star Tila Tequila accused him of battery and false imprisonment at his suburban San Diego home. No charges were filed, and Merriman and Tequila settled dueling lawsuits. Merriman, who’s been on the trading block for some time, declined to comment when contacted via e-mail. — The Associated Press

Report: League could lose $1 billion during lockout CHICAGO — The NFL reportedly could lose $1 billion if there is a lockout after the March 3 expiration of the collective bargaining agreement — even if the entire 2011 season is played. The Wall Street Journal reported the figure Wednesday, citing unidentified senior NFL officials familiar with information presented to the 32 team owners at the league’s meeting in Chicago. The paper said the NFL could lose $400 million in March alone, when many season tickets are renewed, and another $500 million if preseason games are canceled next summer because of labor unrest. The NFL officials also told the Journal that each team could expect to lose about $8 million for every canceled home game. The owners opted out of the collective bargaining agreement with the players in 2008. — The Associated Press

MLB PLAYOFFS: ALCS

New York first baseman Mark Teixeira

Teixeira helped build two teams: Yankees, Rangers

By Rob Maaddi

By Barbara Barker

The Associated Press

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

PHILADELPHIA — When the Philadelphia Phillies and San Francisco Giants meet in the National League championship series, runs could be awfully scarce. These teams have perhaps the two best starting rotations in the majors. For the Phillies, it’s Roy Halladay, Roy OsInside walt and Cole Hamels. For the Giants, it’s • NLCS Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain and Jonathan breakdown, Sanchez. Page D4 The Phillies feature three aces who have 11 All-Star games, one Cy Young Award, one NLCS MVP award, one World Series MVP award, one perfect game and one no-hitter on their impressive resumes. See NLCS / D4

Mark Teixeira has a keen interest in getting rid of two entities he helped build in Texas several years ago. The first is an 8,634-foot home on a golf course outside of Fort Worth. Though Teixeira now lives in Connecticut year-round, the real estate market Inside is so bad he hasn’t been able to • ALCS unload the home he built when he breakdown, was playing for the Rangers. Page D4 The second entity is the Texas Rangers, his former team and the one the Yankees are going to need to eliminate in order to get back to the World Series. See ALCS / D4

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

HUNTING & FISHING

No. 2 UO stays quiet during its bye week By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile

Rifle season for elk hunting starts this weekend, and many deer hunters have reported seeing a lot of elk this fall.

Big fall on tap for elk hunting? Rifle season starts Saturday in some Central Oregon units, and it could be a very successful year for hunters By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Based on what deer hunters have reported, rifle elk season could be a memorable one for hunters in Central Oregon’s Ochoco District this fall. “They (deer hunters) were commonly seeing elk,” Brian Ferry, wildlife biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in Prineville, said this week. “They saw a number of nice bulls. Every person I talked to commented on the elk they were seeing and the nice bulls they saw … a lot of positive comments.” Rocky Mountain bull elk controlled centerfire firearm seasons run Oct. 2731 and Nov. 6-14 in the Ochoco, Maury, Grizzly and Paulina-East Fort Rock

units in Central Oregon. This Saturday marks the start of the Cascade bull elk general centerfire firearm season, which runs through Oct. 22. The Ochoco Unit is a highly coveted tag, according to Ferry. High demand means about six years worth of waiting for hunters who apply for the tag. Only about 250 hunters per period hunted the unit in 2009, according to Ferry. In the 1990s, as many as 900 tags were issued per hunt period in the Ochoco Unit. The reason for the decline in the number of tags issued, Ferry explained, is an ODFW objective to manage for bigger, older, five- or six-point bulls. See Elk / D5

Central Oregon bull elk hunting seasons G EN ERAL CASCADE BULL ELK

The second-ranked Oregon Ducks are keeping quiet for their bye week. Practices in Eugene were declared closed to the public and the media, and the players weren’t talking to reporters. Coach Chip Kelly shut the Ducks down because he thought that’s what the team “needed.” Kelly himself was speaking only because he had to. On the weekly Pac-10 coaches conference call he gave a few terse answers about what was going on with his team, both mentally and physically. He insisted the directive for silence wasn’t made because of Oregon’s ranking and the attention that comes with it. “We don’t shield our team. I think our kids can read whatever they want to read. I don’t talk about that,” Kelly said. “But they also know that it means absolutely nothing. You can just look at Alabama; they were the No. 1 team in the country and they lost. Now they’re the No. 8 team in the country. I don’t shield my team. “I know our kids can read the paper, I know our kids can read the Internet. But we don’t need to discuss it. Because it means nothing.” See UO / D5

Upper Deschutes Unit: Oct. 16-22 Metolius Unit: Oct. 16-22 (This Friday is the deadline to purchase Cascade bull elk tags)

CONTROLLED ROCKY MOUNTAIN BULL ELK Grizzly Unit: Oct. 27-31; Nov. 6-14 Ochoco Unit: Oct. 27-31; Nov. 6-14 Maury Unit: Oct. 27-31; Nov. 6-14 Paulina-East Fort Rock: Oct. 27-31; Nov. 6-14 • For a map of the units, see Page D5

Dean Hare / The Associated Press

Oregon head coach Chip Kelly, right, talks with Avery Patterson during Saturday’s win against Washington State.

GOLF

Mastering languages becomes part of LPGA game

INDEX

By Karen Crouse New York Times News Service

Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Football .....................................D3 Auto racing ................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Golf ............................................D5 Hunting & fishing ..................... D6

D

Jed Jacobsohn / The New York Times

George Martin, left, tutors LPGA golfer Na On Min of South Korea in English before a tournament in Danville, Calif., on Tuesday.

PRATTVILLE, Ala. — While people around her ate lunch, Na Yeon Choi sat digesting English vocabulary. In the clubhouse at last week’s Navistar LPGA Classic, Choi was bent over a workbook with her pen poised, pondering how to use the word stereotype in a sentence. More than one public perception was challenged at the sight of Choi, the world’s sixth-ranked women’s golfer, inside on an afternoon tailor-made for golf practicing her English through a cross-cultural LPGA program.

Choi, 22, was a tour rookie in 2008 when the LPGA proposed penalties and suspensions for players unable to communicate in English, a tin-eared turn at assimilation that was swiftly abandoned after a public outcry. A tour at the fore of globalization was made to look parochial, a wobble that soon contributed to the resignation of LPGA Commissioner Carolyn Bivens. The controversy trained a spotlight on the South Koreans — for their dominance on tour and their reluctance to speak English in public. See LPGA / D5


D2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Portugal Masters, first round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, first round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Frys. com Open, first round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, CVS/Pharmacy LPGA Challenge, first round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 12:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, practice, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, qualifying, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, Tampa Bay Lightning at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network.

FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, South Florida at West Virginia, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — College, Kansas at Kansas State, FSNW. 6 p.m. — High school, Abilene (Texas) at Midland Lee (Texas), ESPN2.

SOCCER 11:30 p.m. — Girls high school, Mountain View at Bend, COTV (same-day tape).

FRIDAY GOLF 7 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Portugal Masters, second round, Golf Channel. 10:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Miccosukee Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Frys. com Open, second round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, CVS/Pharmacy LPGA Challenge, second round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, qualifying, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Bank of America 500, practice, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Cincinnati at Louisville, ESPN. 7 p.m. — High school, Grant at Redmond, COTV.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, American League Championship Series, New York Yankees at Texas Rangers, TBS.

SOCCER 8 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Chivas USA at Seattle Sounders, ESPN.

RADIO FRIDAY 7 p.m. — High school, Mountain View at Summit, KICE-AM 940. 7 p.m. — High school, Estacada at Madras, KWSOFM 91.9. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Today Boys soccer: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6:30 p.m.; Crook County at Roosevelt, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; La Salle at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Roosevelt, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Bend at Summit, 6:30 p.m.; Roosevelt at Crook County, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 6 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 6:45 p.m.; La Pine at Cottage Grove, 6:45 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 6 p.m.

Gano, WAS Ja. Hanson, DET Gould, CHI Jo. Brown, STL Crosby, GBY Akers, PHL Feely, ARI Tynes, NYG Buehler, DAL

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Football: Grant at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Lincoln at Bend, 7 p.m.; Mountain View at Summit, 7 p.m.; Marshall at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 7 p.m.; Elmira at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Culver at Scio, 7 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 2:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Lincoln, 4 p.m.; Triad at Gilchrist, 5:30 p.m.; Prospect at Trinity Lutheran, 5 p.m. Saturday Cross country: Redmond at State of Jefferson Invitational in Ashland, 11:30 a.m.; Bend, Summit, Crook County at Concordia/PUMA Classic in Portland, noon; Madras at Bristow Rock n River Invitational in Pleasant Hill, 9:30 a.m. Volleyball: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at Clearwater Classic in Bend, TBA; Gilchrist at Hosanna, 1 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Triad, 2 p.m. Boys soccer: Riverside at Culver, 1 p.m.

AT A GLANCE MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL 2010 Postseason All Times PDT Subject to change ——— DIVISION SERIES American League Tampa Bay vs. Texas Wednesday, Oct. 6 Texas 5, Tampa Bay 1 Thursday, Oct. 7 Texas 6, Tampa Bay 0 Saturday, Oct. 9 Tampa Bay 6, Texas 3 Sunday, Oct. 10 Tampa Bay 5, Texas 2 Tuesday, Oct. 12 Texas 5, Tampa Bay 1, Texas wins series 3-2 Minnesota vs. New York Wednesday, Oct. 6 New York 6, Minnesota 4 Thursday, Oct. 7 New York 5, Minnesota 2 Saturday, Oct. 9 New York 6, Minnesota 1, New York wins series 3-0 National League Philadelphia vs. Cincinnati Wednesday, Oct. 6 Philadelphia 4, Cincinnati 0 Friday, Oct. 8 Philadelphia 7, Cincinnati 4 Sunday, Oct. 10 Philadelphia 2, Cincinnati 0, Philadelphia wins series 3-0 San Francisco vs. Atlanta Thursday, Oct. 7 San Francisco 1, Atlanta 0 Friday, Oct. 8 Atlanta 5, San Francisco 4, 11 innings Sunday, Oct. 10 San Francisco 3, Atlanta 2 Monday, Oct. 11 San Francisco 3, Atlanta 2, San Francisco wins series 3-1 LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES American League Friday, Oct. 15 New York (Sabathia 21-7) at Texas (Wilson 15-8), 5:07 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 16 New York (Pettitte 11-3 or Hughes 18-8) at Texas (Lewis 12-13), 1:07 p.m. Monday, Oct. 18 Texas (Lee 12-9) at New York (Hughes 18-8 or Pettitte 11-3), 5:07 p.m Tuesday, Oct. 19 Texas (Hunter 13-4) at New York (Burnett 10-15), 5:07 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Texas at New York, 1:07 p.m., if necessary Friday, Oct. 22 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 New York at Texas, 5:07 p.m., if necessary National League Saturday, Oct. 16 San Francisco (Lincecum 16-10) at Philadelphia (Halladay 21-10), 4:57 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 17 San Francisco (Sanchez 13-9) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 13-13), 5:19 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 19 Philadelphia (Hamels 12-11) at San Francisco (Cain 13-11), 1:19 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 21 Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:57 p.m., if necessary Saturday, Oct. 23 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 12:57 p.m. or 4:57 p.m., if necessary Sunday, Oct. 24 San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:57 p.m., if necessary

TENNIS WTA Tour GENERALI LADIES LINZ Wednesday Linz, Austria Singles First Round Petra Kvitova (5), Czech Republic, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 6-2, 1-0, retired. Ana Ivanovic (7), Serbia, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-2, 6-0. Daniela Hantuchova (2), Slovakia, def. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-2. Second Round Sara Errani (9), Italy, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-2. Andrea Petkovic (6), Germany, def. Anne Keothavong, Britain, 6-0, 6-3. Roberta Vinci, Italy, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-4, 6-2. HP OPEN Wednesday Osaka, Japan Singles Second Round

Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 5-7, 7-5, 6-4. Sam Stosur (1), Australia, def. Junri Namigata, Japan, 6-0, 6-3. Marion Bartoli (2), France, def. Stefanie Voegele, Switzerland, 6-2, 6-2. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, def. Maria Kirilenko (4), Russia, 6-4, retired.

ATP Tour SHANGHAI MASTERS Wednesday Shanghai Singles First Round Sam Querrey, United States, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (6). Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, def. Marsel Ilhan, Turkey, 6-1, 2-6, 7-6 (4). Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 6-2, 6-2. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-1, 6-4. Gael Monfils (15), France, def. Benjamin Becker, Germany, 6-1, 7-5. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Wu Di, China, 6-1, 6-4. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Marin Cilic (14), Croatia, 6-2, 6-2. Second Round Jeremy Chardy, France, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov, Ukraine, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2. Jurgen Melzer (13), Austria, def. Daniel GimenoTraver, Spain, 6-3, 7-6 (2). Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia,d ef. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-3, 6-3. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 6-3, 7-6 (5). David Ferrer (11), Spain, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Florian Mayer, Germany, def. Mikhail Youzhny (8), Russia, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-1. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Bai Yan, China, 6-2, 6-2. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def. Sam Querrey, United States, 7-6 (7), 6-1. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Andy Roddick (10), United States, 3-6, 3-2, retired. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Gael Monfils (15), France, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Stanislas Wawrinka, Switzerland, 6-4, 6-4. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. John Isner, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4. Mischa Zverev, Germany, def. Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (3).

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 4 1 0 .800 135 New England 3 1 0 .750 131 Miami 2 2 0 .500 66 Buffalo 0 5 0 .000 87 South W L T Pct PF Houston 3 2 0 .600 118 Jacksonville 3 2 0 .600 107 Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 132 Indianapolis 3 2 0 .600 136 North W L T Pct PF Baltimore 4 1 0 .800 92 Pittsburgh 3 1 0 .750 86 Cincinnati 2 3 0 .400 100 Cleveland 1 4 0 .200 78 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 1 0 .750 77 Oakland 2 3 0 .400 111 Denver 2 3 0 .400 104 San Diego 2 3 0 .400 140 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Washington 3 2 0 .600 89 N.Y. Giants 3 2 0 .600 106 Philadelphia 3 2 0 .600 122 Dallas 1 3 0 .250 81 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 4 1 0 .800 113 Tampa Bay 3 1 0 .750 74 New Orleans 3 2 0 .600 99 Carolina 0 5 0 .000 52 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 4 1 0 .800 92 Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 119 Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 63 Detroit 1 4 0 .200 126

PA 81 96 92 161 PA 136 137 95 101 PA 72 50 102 97 PA 57 134 116 106 PA 92 98 103 87 PA 70 80 102 110 PA 74 89 67 112

West W L T Pct Arizona 3 2 0 .600 Seattle 2 2 0 .500 St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 San Francisco 0 5 0 .000 ——— Sunday’s Games Seattle at Chicago, 10 a.m. Miami at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Houston, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. San Diego at St. Louis, 10 a.m. Detroit at N.Y. Giants, 10 a.m. Baltimore at New England, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. New Orleans at Tampa Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Oakland at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Dallas at Minnesota, 1:15 p.m. Indianapolis at Washington, 5:20 p.m. Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Arizona, Carolina Monday’s Game Tennessee at Jacksonville, 5:30 p.m.

PF PA 88 138 75 77 83 96 76 130

NFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Through Week 5 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int Vick, PHL 96 59 799 6 0 Cutler, CHI 102 68 912 6 3 Brees, NOR 199 142 1410 9 5 Romo, DAL 174 119 1346 7 5 Rodgers, GBY 168 111 1233 9 6 M. Ryan, ATL 177 109 1165 7 3 Freeman, TAM 116 69 824 5 3 Kolb, PHL 76 48 478 2 1 E. Manning, NYG 174 112 1302 8 8 McNabb, WAS 170 96 1315 4 3 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD A. Peterson, MIN 88 480 5.45 80t 3 Bradshaw, NYG 91 449 4.93 39 3 M. Turner, ATL 93 421 4.53 55 1 S. Jackson, STL 98 398 4.06 42t 1 L. McCoy, PHL 68 365 5.37 46t 5 Gore, SNF 91 322 3.54 20 1 DeA. Williams, CAR 68 317 4.66 39t 1 Forte, CHI 72 300 4.17 68t 2 Bra. Jackson, GBY 55 252 4.58 71 1 Snelling, ATL 53 244 4.60 30 2 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD R. White, ATL 37 463 12.5 45t 3 H. Nicks, NYG 33 409 12.4 31t 6 Amendola, STL 33 303 9.2 36 0 Gore, SNF 33 284 8.6 41 2 Austin, DAL 31 474 15.3 69t 2 Sa. Moss, WAS 29 408 14.1 56 1 St. Smith, NYG 28 300 10.7 45 1 L. McCoy, PHL 28 218 7.8 31 0 Fitzgerald, ARI 26 301 11.6 29 2 Pettigrew, DET 26 275 10.6 35 1 Punters No Yds LG Avg Donn. Jones, STL 27 1286 63 47.6 Rocca, PHL 28 1315 63 47.0 Morstead, NOR 19 892 58 46.9 A. Lee, SNF 25 1145 60 45.8 Dodge, NYG 19 850 64 44.7 Masthay, GBY 19 844 58 44.4 Be. Graham, ARI 27 1180 62 43.7 N. Harris, DET 24 1048 66 43.7 J. Baker, CAR 30 1309 57 43.6 Kluwe, MIN 21 911 59 43.4 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD G. Tate, SEA 8 144 18.0 63 0 D. Hester, CHI 14 179 12.8 62t 1 Tra. Williams, GBY 11 128 11.6 52 0 D. Bryant, DAL 8 90 11.3 62t 1 Amendola, STL 12 105 8.8 24 0 Logan, DET 9 76 8.4 17 0 Camarillo, MIN 8 65 8.1 22 0 De. Jackson, PHL 9 72 8.0 22 0 Spurlock, TAM 8 62 7.8 23 0 Munnerlyn, CAR 10 74 7.4 28 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD L. Washington, SEA 10 404 40.4 101t 2 D. Manning, CHI 11 328 29.8 62 0 Ginn Jr., SNF 8 235 29.4 61 0 Logan, DET 18 522 29.0 105t 1 Dev. Thomas, WAS 12 336 28.0 42 0 Stephens-Howling, ARI 22 579 26.3 102t 1 Roby, NOR 15 394 26.3 39 0 Goodson, CAR 19 464 24.4 46 0 Weems, ATL 11 268 24.4 35 0 Hobbs, PHL 14 332 23.7 46 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts H. Nicks, NYG 6 0 6 0 36 Best, DET 5 4 1 0 30 Forte, CHI 5 2 3 0 30 L. McCoy, PHL 5 5 0 0 30 Ca. Johnson, DET 4 0 4 0 26 Maclin, PHL 4 0 4 0 24 Bradshaw, NYG 3 3 0 0 18 Driver, GBY 3 0 3 0 18 Gore, SNF 3 1 2 0 18 Harvin, MIN 3 0 3 0 18 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts M. Bryant, ATL 11-11 12-14 49 47

8-8 13-13 8-8 8-8 14-14 14-14 10-10 13-13 9-9

11-14 9-11 10-11 9-12 7-10 6-7 6-7 5-8 6-9

49 52 53 46 56 49 53 50 51

41 40 38 35 35 32 28 28 27

AFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Week 5 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds TD Int Brady, NWE 122 85 911 9 2 P. Rivers, SND 183 115 1759 11 4 P. Manning, IND 216 146 1609 11 2 Fitzpatrick, BUF 85 52 595 7 2 Orton, DEN 213 141 1733 8 3 V. Young, TEN 96 59 684 6 2 Sanchez, NYJ 147 81 902 8 0 Garrard, JAC 116 77 789 9 6 S. Wallace, CLE 100 63 693 4 2 Schaub, HOU 164 102 1233 7 5 Rushers Att Yds Avg LG TD A. Foster, HOU 96 562 5.85 74t 4 Chr. Johnson, TEN 113 485 4.29 76t 6 Tomlinson, NYJ 76 435 5.72 31 3 Mendenhall, PIT 89 411 4.62 50t 4 Benson, CIN 103 406 3.94 22 2 Jones-Drew, JAC 102 406 3.98 23 1 D. McFadden, OAK 85 392 4.61 33 1 Rice, BAL 87 363 4.17 30 2 Hillis, CLE 76 350 4.61 48 4 Charles, KAN 50 325 6.50 56t 1 Receivers No Yds Avg LG TD Wayne, IND 39 531 13.6 42 2 Collie, IND 37 446 12.1 73t 5 T. Owens, CIN 31 476 15.4 78t 2 Gaffney, DEN 31 327 10.5 28 1 Dal. Clark, IND 31 295 9.5 50t 3 B. Lloyd, DEN 30 589 19.6 61 3 Gates, SND 29 478 16.5 34 7 E. Royal, DEN 29 330 11.4 41 2 Boldin, BAL 28 363 13.0 38 3 Z. Miller, OAK 28 340 12.1 27 3 Punters No Yds LG Avg Lechler, OAK 21 1033 68 49.2 Sepulveda, PIT 19 911 62 47.9 Scifres, SND 16 732 67 45.8 Hodges, CLE 29 1318 57 45.4 Podlesh, JAC 16 719 63 44.9 Weatherford, NYJ 27 1212 61 44.9 Huber, CIN 26 1165 72 44.8 McAfee, IND 20 885 66 44.3 Moorman, BUF 26 1152 61 44.3 B. Colquitt, DEN 23 1009 63 43.9 Punt Returners No Yds Avg LG TD McCluster, KAN 6 142 23.7 94t 1 Leonhard, NYJ 9 118 13.1 32 0 Jac. Jones, HOU 9 97 10.8 39 0 Mariani, TEN 7 73 10.4 38 0 E. Royal, DEN 9 92 10.2 28 0 Arenas, KAN 9 89 9.9 36 0 Mi. Thomas, JAC 11 107 9.7 41 0 Parrish, BUF 9 83 9.2 26 0 Powers, IND 7 55 7.9 13 0 Higgins, OAK 10 78 7.8 53 0 Kickoff Returners No Yds Avg LG TD Br. Tate, NWE 18 601 33.4 103t 2 Bra. Smith, NYJ 13 419 32.2 86 0 Ant. Brown, PIT 7 219 31.3 89t 1 Mariani, TEN 19 537 28.3 98t 1 Spiller, BUF 24 630 26.3 95t 1 T. Underwood, JAC 17 421 24.8 53 0 Parmele, BAL 12 276 23.0 39 0 J. Ford, OAK 14 320 22.9 64 0 Sproles, SND 15 333 22.2 33 0 McCluster, KAN 9 197 21.9 32 0 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Rec Ret Pts Gates, SND 7 0 7 0 42 Chr. Johnson, TEN 6 6 0 0 36 Collie, IND 5 0 5 0 30 A. Foster, HOU 5 4 1 0 30 Hillis, CLE 5 4 1 0 30 Keller, NYJ 5 0 5 0 30 Marc. Lewis, JAC 5 0 5 0 30 Ste. Johnson, BUF 4 0 4 0 24 Mendenhall, PIT 4 4 0 0 24 Tolbert, SND 4 4 0 0 24 Kicking PAT FG LG Pts Folk, NYJ 13-13 12-14 53 49 Nugent, CIN 8-8 12-13 54 44 Janikowski, OAK 10-10 11-16 54 43 Scobee, JAC 11-11 10-10 59 41 Rackers, HOU 13-13 9-11 49 40 Vinatieri, IND 16-16 8-8 47 40 Bironas, TEN 14-14 8-9 55 38 Prater, DEN 11-11 9-9 54 38 Kaeding, SND 16-16 6-7 48 34 J. Reed, PIT 8-8 8-12 52 32

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) Wednesday’s Game SOUTH UCF 35, Marshall 14 ——— Today’s Games EAST South Florida at West Virginia, 4:30 p.m. MIDWEST Kansas St. at Kansas, 4:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Oct. 9, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Ohio St. (34) 6-0 1,453 2 2. Oregon (15) 6-0 1,427 3 3. Boise St. (8) 5-0 1,395 4 4. TCU (1) 6-0 1,304 5 5. Nebraska 5-0 1,236 7 6. Oklahoma (2) 5-0 1,225 6 7. Auburn 6-0 1,104 8 8. Alabama 5-1 1,021 1 9. LSU 6-0 999 12 10. South Carolina 4-1 978 19 11. Utah 5-0 926 10 12. Arkansas 4-1 813 11 13. Michigan St. 6-0 806 17 14. Stanford 5-1 732 16 15. Iowa 4-1 648 15 16. Florida St. 5-1 547 23 17. Arizona 4-1 472 9 18. Wisconsin 5-1 410 20 19. Nevada 6-0 376 21 20. Oklahoma St. 5-0 348 22 21. Missouri 5-0 298 24 22. Florida 4-2 209 14 23. Air Force 5-1 187 25 24. Oregon St. 3-2 186 — 25. West Virginia 4-1 141 — Others receiving votes: Michigan 137, Miami 63, N.C. State 31, Virginia Tech 17, Northwestern 5, Texas 5, Kansas St. 1.

PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT ——— Conf. W L Oregon 3 0 Oregon State 2 0 Stanford 2 1 Arizona 1 1 California 1 1 Washington 1 1 USC 1 2 UCLA 1 2 Arizona State 1 2 Washington State 0 3 Saturday’s Games California at USC, 12:30 p.m. Arizona at Washington State, 4:30 p.m. Oregon State at Washington, 7:15 p.m.

Atlanta Florida

Ov’ll W 6 3 5 4 3 2 4 3 3 1

L 0 2 1 1 2 3 2 3 3 5

Betting Line Favorite Chargers TEXANS PATRIOTS Saints EAGLES GIANTS BEARS PACKERS STEELERS Jets 49ERS VIKINGS Colts Titans

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Sunday 8.5 8.5 RAMS 5 4.5 Chiefs 3 3 Ravens 4.5 4.5 BUCCANEERS 1 3 Falcons 9.5 10 Lions 7 6.5 Seahawks NL NL Dolphins 11.5 13.5 Browns 3 3 BRONCOS 6.5 6.5 Raiders 1.5 1.5 Cowboys 3 3 REDSKINS Monday 3 3 REDSKINS

COLLEGE Today Kansas St 3.5 3 KANSAS WEST VIRGINIA 11.5 10.5 S. Florida Friday Cincinnati 3 3 LOUISVILLE Saturday Miami-Fla. 19 19.5 DUKE SYRACUSE 2.5 (P) 1 Pittsburgh e-RUTGERS 6.5 7 Army C. MICHIGAN 11 13 Miami-Ohio CLEMSON 14.5 15 Maryland MICHIGAN ST 7.5 7 Illinois PURDUE 5 5.5 Minnesota NC State 7.5 7 E. CAROLINA GEORGIA 16.5 15 Vanderbilt S. Carolina 6 5 KENTUCKY FLORIDA 8 7.5 Mississippi St ALABAMA 20.5 21.5 Mississippi OKLAHOMA 23 23.5 Iowa St TEMPLE 16.5 20 Bowling Green BALL ST 13 14 E. Michigan OHIO U 16.5 17 Akron Baylor 1 1 COLORADO COLORADO ST 3 3 Unlv NOTRE DAME 22 24 W. Michigan N. ILLINOIS 14.5 14.5 Buffalo N. Carolina 6.5 6.5 VIRGINIA NAVY 2 1.5 Smu USC 2.5 2.5 California NEBRASKA 8.5 9.5 Texas FLORIDA ST 21.5 22 Boston College Iowa 4 3.5 MICHIGAN WASHINGTON 2.5 (O) 1 Oregon St VIRGINIA TECH 22.5 22.5 Wake Forest Idaho 2 (L) 1.5 LA TECH TCU 29.5 29 Byu UAB 2 2.5 Utep Arizona 24 23.5 WASHINGTON ST Utah 19.5 20 WYOMING TOLEDO 2 2.5 Kent St TEXAS TECH 3.5 3.5 Oklahoma St TEXAS A&M 3 3.5 Missouri Southern Miss 15 14.5 MEMPHIS Houston 9.5 9.5 RICE TULSA 18.5 18.5 Tulane Ohio St 6 4 WISCONSIN AUBURN 3 4 Arkansas Boise St 39.5 39.5 SAN JOSE ST Air Force 3.5 1 SAN DIEGO ST FRESNO ST 30 31 New Mexico St Nevada 7.5 7 HAWAII INDIANA 14 11.5 Arkansas St GEORGIA TECH 19 19 Mid Tenn St W. KENTUCKY PK 2 UL-Monroe TROY 17.5 19 UL-Lafayette Florida Int’l 4 5.5 NORTH TEXAS e-East Rutherford, N.J. L-Louisiana Tech opened as favorite. O-Oregon State opened as favorite

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Houston 91, New Jersey 81 Dallas 101, Detroit 96 Indiana 98, Minnesota 86 Toronto 119, Philadelphia 116,2OT Boston 104, New York 101 New Orleans 90, Miami 76 L.A. Lakers 98, Sacramento 95 Today’s Games Charlotte at Orlando, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 4 p.m. San Antonio vs. Cleveland at Pittsburgh, Pa., 4:30 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 6 p.m. Denver at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games New Orleans at Indiana, 4 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4 p.m. Detroit vs. Minnesota at Syracuse, N.Y., 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Chicago, 5 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 3 2 0 1 5 N.Y. Islanders 3 1 1 1 3 New Jersey 4 1 2 1 3 N.Y. Rangers 2 1 1 0 2 Pittsburgh 4 1 3 0 2 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 Montreal 3 1 1 1 3 Buffalo 4 1 2 1 3 Boston 2 1 1 0 2 Ottawa 3 0 2 1 1 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts Washington 4 3 1 0 6 Carolina 2 2 0 0 4 Tampa Bay 2 2 0 0 4

GF 8 11 7 10 10

GA 6 11 14 9 11

GF GA 12 6 8 9 8 12 5 5 4 10 GF GA 14 9 6 4 9 6

3 1 2 0 2 8 10 2 0 2 0 0 3 5 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 3 2 0 1 5 11 7 Nashville 2 2 0 0 4 7 3 St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 7 2 Chicago 4 1 2 1 3 11 13 Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 5 5 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Edmonton 2 2 0 0 4 7 2 Colorado 3 2 1 0 4 11 11 Vancouver 3 1 1 1 3 6 7 Calgary 2 1 1 0 2 3 5 Minnesota 2 0 1 1 1 4 6 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 2 2 0 0 4 9 7 Los Angeles 3 2 1 0 4 6 5 San Jose 2 1 0 1 3 5 5 Phoenix 2 1 1 0 2 5 5 Anaheim 4 1 3 0 2 6 16 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games New Jersey 1, Buffalo 0, OT Washington 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Tampa Bay 4, Montreal 3, OT Toronto 4, Pittsburgh 3 Nashville 3, Chicago 2 Anaheim 4, Vancouver 3 Today’s Games Tampa Bay at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Carolina at Ottawa, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Nashville, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Minnesota, 5:30 p.m. Detroit at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Florida at Calgary, 6:30 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF x-New York 14 8 6 48 35 x-Columbus 13 8 7 46 35 Kansas City 10 12 6 36 32 Chicago 8 12 8 32 33 Toronto FC 8 13 7 31 28 New England 8 15 5 29 31 Philadelphia 7 14 7 28 32 D.C. 6 19 3 21 19 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF x-Los Angeles 17 6 5 56 41 x-Real Salt Lake 14 4 10 52 41 x-FC Dallas 12 2 14 50 41 x-Seattle 13 9 6 45 36 x-San Jose 12 8 7 43 30 Colorado 11 8 9 42 39 Chivas USA 8 15 4 28 29 Houston 7 15 6 27 37 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Friday’s Game Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Columbus at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Chicago, 1 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Kansas City at New England, 5 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Houston at San Jose, 7 p.m. Colorado at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

GA 27 31 33 37 37 48 45 44 GA 22 18 24 32 28 29 36 48

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL National League ATLANTA BRAVES—Named Fredi Gonzalez manager. Fired first-base coach Glenn Hubbard and bench coach Chino Cadahia. Named Carlos Tosca bench coach. Reassigned hitting coach Terry Pendleton to first-base coach. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Claimed RHP Bryan Augenstein off waivers from Arizona. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Assigned C-OF Bryce Harper to Scottsdale (Arizona Fall). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CLEVELAND CAVALIERS—Waived G Cedric Jackson and F Tasmin Mitchell. NEW ORLEANS HORNETS—Signed C D.J. Mbenga. FOOTBALL National Football League CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed G Adrian Martinez to the practice squad. Released WR Eron Riley from the practice squad. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Traded RB Jerome Harrison to Philadelphia for RB Mike Bell. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed CB Frank Walker. Placed CB Cedric Griffin on injured reserve. Signed CB Marcus Sherels to the practice squad. Released TE John Nalbone from the practice squad. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed RB-LB Brit Miller from the practice squad. Signed WR Brandon McRae and LB Mortty Ivy to the practice squad. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Placed LB Shawne Merriman on injured reserve. Agreed to terms with T Marcus McNeill on a five-year contract extension through 2015. Signed LB Antwan Barnes. Signed WR Kole Heckendorf to the practice squad. Signed K Mike Windt. Released K Ethan Albright. TENNESSEE TITANS—Re-signed LB Jamie Winborn. Placed LB Colin Allred on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Chicago D Niklas Hjalmarsson two games for delivering a hit from behind that caused injury to Buffalo RW Jason Pominville during Monday’s game. LOS ANGELES KINGS—Loaned D Johan Fransson to SKA St. Petersburg (KHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Assigned F Tim Kennedy to Hartford (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Announced a marketing/player affiliation agreement with Arizona (CHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Assigned G Thomas Greiss to Worcester (AHL). COLLEGE WEST VIRGINIA—Announced QB Jeremy Johnson has left the football team.

FISH REPORT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 721 150 339 109 The Dalles 908 210 1326 405 John Day 99 60 902 339 McNary 1,174 183 1,656 544 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 802,903 91,378 411,625 154,436 The Dalles 537,711 74,300 321,812 118,345 John Day 458,853 68,318 263,461 95,431 McNary 410,957 43,626 243,323 81,849

Brodeur, Kovalchuk lift Devils to first win, a shutout over Buffalo The Associated Press BUFFALO, N.Y. — In need of a win, the New Jersey Devils knew exactly who to turn to. Martin Brodeur made 24 saves for his 111th NHL shutout, and Ilya Kovalchuk scored 53 seconds into overtime to lift the short-handed Devils to their first win of the season, 1-0 over the Buffalo Sabres on Wednesday night. Brodeur, who came in with just an .859 save percentage, extended his NHL record for shutouts with his third career blanking of the Sabres. It was also his 23rd career 1-0 win, and it helped give Devils rookie coach John MacLean his first career NHL victory. After playing with only 15 skaters Monday in a loss to Pittsburgh due to sal-

NHL ROUNDUP ary cap limitations and injuries to defenseman Anton Volchenkov (broken nose) and forward Brian Rolston (groin), the Devils (1-2-1) increased their roster to 16 versus Buffalo — still two shy of a full allotment of players. Once Pierre-Luc Letourneau-Leblond cleared waivers and was assigned to Albany of the AHL, New Jersey freed up enough cap space to sign gritty forward Adam Mair and put him in the lineup against the Sabres, Mair’s former team. “We’ve had a lot of changes, we’ve had injuries, and we’ve played with 15 players, and now 16 players,” Brodeur said. “It’s been chaotic a little bit. So for us to

finally get one under our belt, now we can start playing our season.” The Devils’ slow and sluggish start to the season wasn’t lost on MacLean, who was so angry and frustrated at the team’s morning skate that he sent his players off after just 20 minutes. MacLean downplayed his eruption, saying the players took it upon themselves to come out with a clear focus on getting back to playing the type of game that has made the Devils so successful over the years. New Jersey used stingy defense in the first and third periods to secure the victory, allowing only one shot in the opening

20 minutes, and eight in the third period. Also on Wednesday: Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 WASHINGTON — Nicklas Backstrom deflected in Alex Ovechkin’s drive from the point on a power play with 3:39 left, lifting Washington over the New York Islanders. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PITTSBURGH — Clarke MacArthur scored twice and Toronto withstood Sidney Crosby’s first goal of the season to keep the Penguins winless in their new arena. Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 MONTREAL — Ryan Malone scored

4:09 into overtime to give Tampa Bay a win over Montreal. Malone flipped a loose puck past Carey Price for the Lightning, who came back twice for the victory. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ryan Getzlaf set up Corey Perry’s tying goal and Bobby Ryan’s go-ahead score 1:18 apart in the third period, and Anaheim finally earned its first victory of the season. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 CHICAGO — Joel Ward’s power-play goal with 26.7 seconds remaining in the third period snapped a tie and lifted Nashville over Chicago.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 D3

NFL

C O L L E G E F O OT BA L L C O M M E N TA RY

Seahawks at difficult juncture in schedule

Cycling • WADA: Investigation may be as big as BALCO: The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency says he wouldn’t be surprised if some BALCO-like revelations come out of the ongoing investigation into cycling that has Lance Armstrong as its apparent focus. WADA general director David Howman said Wednesday that he suspects “some information will come out of the current inquiries that will be equally as significant as BALCO.” In addition to implicating athletes such as Barry Bonds and Marion Jones, BALCO opened a window into the methods that athletes used to dope. Howman wouldn’t get into specifics of what he thought might come out of the case being investigated by U.S. prosecutors in Los Angeles, but said WADA has agreed to cooperate in passing along any information it has.

By Danny O’Neil The Seattle Times

RENTON, Wash. — The Seattle Seahawks returned to the practice field this week, resuming their season under mostly sunny skies with pressure looming on the horizon. That pressure is the result of this year’s schedule, which calls for Seattle to play four of its next six games on the road, beginning Sunday in Chicago. This is the fulcrum of Seattle’s season, the stretch that will determine whether the Seahawks will play meaningful games come December or just look for meaningful growth. “It’s going to be very difficult,” coach Pete Carroll said. “These games are enormously challenging, and it’s not going to be easy in Chicago.” It won’t be easy in New Orleans against the defending Super Bowl champs on Nov. 21, either, or in Arizona on Nov. 14. Even Seattle’s game in Oakland on Halloween is a trouble spot, given the way the Raiders played Sunday against San Diego. For a team with Seattle’s baggage of road losses, this amounts to a two-month gauntlet as Seattle plays only two home games in the 61 days following their Week 3 victory over San Diego. Seattle is 2-2 because of a potent combination of defense and decibels. The Seahawks have forced seven turnovers in two home victories. Staying in the playoff chase will require more than just success at home, though. Seattle must find a way to keep from getting run over on the road. The Seahawks haven’t lost their last four road games dating to last season so much as they’ve been flattened, outscored 133-34. That will have to change if Seattle has any hope of keeping its head above water this season. That’s just the reality of the Seahawks’ schedule. Seattle is 0-2 on the road, but took drastically different paths to those results. In Denver in Week 2, the Seahawks shot themselves in the foot with regularity, committing two turnovers inside the opponent’s 20-yard line. The loss in St. Louis in Week 4 was utterly devoid of significant plays. Seattle’s offense never crossed midfield in the second half, and its defense created only one turnover. The interception in the end zone saved Seattle from an opponent’s scoring chance, but did nothing to shift field position. “We played a good, solid football game without any explosive plays in any part of our offense or defense,” Carroll said. “It just didn’t happen. We created no bonuses at all.” Seattle has to find a way to generate that energy itself. If Seattle can survive this stretch of four road games in the next six weeks, and be at .500 come Thanksgiving, the Seahawks will be in great position for a closing kick with four of their final six games at home.

Basketball

Jay LaPrete / The Associated Press

Ohio State’s Terrelle Pryor throws a pass against during the first quarter of a victory over Indiana in Columbus, Ohio, on Saturday. Ohio State is in position to play for the national title if it stays undefeated.

This may be the year BCS finally gets it right By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

I

t’s midway through the season and all seems surprisingly well in college football. The defending national champion has gone down, there’s a consensus No. 1 in the polls, and Boise State is getting at least a modicum of respect not possible in recent years. Nothing about the first BCS standings that come out Sunday night is likely to change that. This might be one of the rare years where the most reviled ranking system in sports actually gets it right. Keep winning, and Ohio State can book a ticket for Arizona in January. Same goes for Oregon, everyone’s darling team of the moment. Lose one, though, and there’s probably no denying Boise State any longer. That’s really about it. With Alabama’s loss to South Carolina, the paths are increasingly clear to the Jan. 10 national title game. No controversy. No complaints. But probably not nearly as much fun. BCS supporters have said all along that the controversies raised by the imperfect rating system merely add to the lure of college football. Their argument is that anything that gets people talking about who is No. 1 is better for the sport than an actual playoff system to decide the true national champion. They said it with a straight face when The AP’s No. 1, Southern Cal, was denied a spot in the national championship game after the 2003 season. They said it again three years later when undefeated Boise State was left out along with a very good Michigan team while Florida coach Urban Meyer talked his team into the title game. They might be right. Sure, Boise State could complain that it shouldn’t be passed in the polls by Oregon when it has done nothing but win games impressively this year. And supporters of No. 4 TCU will certainly scream if Nebraska moves past their school with a win over Texas on Saturday. But if Boise State coach Chris Petersen adamantly refuses to get drawn into the debate, who are we to begin arguing the case of the BCS wannabes? “I’ll start out by saying I did not vote us No. 1, and I appreciate your guys’ interest in all that stuff, but that’s the last time I’m talking about that until December,” Petersen said Monday. An analysis this week by ESPN college football researcher Brad Edwards actually put Boise State at No. 1

on top of the BCS standings, while Ohio State was fifth, mostly because the Buckeyes have played an incredibly soft schedule so far. That likely will change even before the BCS rankings are out if Ohio State can get past No. 18 Wisconsin in a showdown crucial to its hopes of playing in the national title game once again. Boise State, meanwhile, is traveling to California to play a pathetic San Jose State team whose only claim to fame is that it plays a far tougher schedule than the Broncos. Had Boise already played Alabama, Wisconsin, Utah and even Nevada this year — as San Jose State has — then we’d have a much clearer idea of just how good the Broncs really are. The knock on Boise State isn’t all its fault. The school is contractually obligated to take the field against the patsies who populate the Western Athletic Conference. But while the Broncos don’t play anyone of significance except No. 19 Nevada, the teams ahead of them in the rankings do. And, as their schedules get progressively tougher, Ohio State and Oregon will cement their spots at the top of the BCS standings as long as they keep winning. There are, however, still ways to mess this up. This is the BCS, after all, and something is bound to happen that doesn’t make sense. Nebraska and Oklahoma aren’t out of this yet. They have reputations and they’ll keep getting more votes as they keep winning, which is key in a system that relies two-thirds on polls and one-third on computer rankings. Auburn and LSU are still undefeated, too, and any unbeaten SEC team will have a powerful grip on voters. But Boise State and TCU have done enough in the last few years to gain reputations of their own. So much so that, if either Ohio State or Oregon stumble, there’s a good chance one of the national championship contestants could be decided the day after Thanksgiving in Reno, of all places, when Boise State meets Nevada. Right now, though, the pollsters seem to have it just about right. Halfway through the season, there’s not a lot to argue about. Leave an undefeated Boise State out of a national title game, though, and the BCS may find itself mired in its biggest controversy ever. Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org.

AUTO RACING: NASCAR SPRINT CUP

Stewart within striking distance, but needs help By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

KANNAPOLIS, N.C. — With his win at California, Tony Stewart is back in contention for a third NASCAR championship. He’s sliced a decent chunk off his deficit over the last two races, and jumped five spots in the standings to fifth following Sunday’s victory. Now a manageable 107 points behind leader Jimmie Johnson, he figures he’s got time to make a push with six races remaining in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. But he also believes he’s going to need some help from Johnson and Denny Hamlin, the two most dominant drivers this season. “When you look at the fact we’ve gained almost 60 points in the last two weeks, it shows that we’re definitely not out of it,” Stewart said. “Realistically, do I feel like we’re in a comfortable spot? No. Jimmie and Denny are going to have to have a bad race for us to be in striking distance. But we’ve still got time.” It makes Saturday night’s race at Charlotte Motor Speedway a critical halfway point of the Chase. It’s not Stewart’s best track: In 23 career starts, he has one victory and 11 top-10s — and none since

S  B

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

Tony Stewart celebrates after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series auto race at Auto Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif., Sunday. 2007. He won the non-points AllStar race at Charlotte last year, but has three finishes of 13th or lower in the races since and was 15th in May. “I think we’ve made up a lot of ground since we ran here in the spring. We’ll be better, I just don’t know how good we’ll be,” Stewart

said. He’ll be racing the same Chevrolet he drove to victory at Atlanta in August, a car that gave him proof that the intermediate track program has picked up at StewartHaas Racing. But Charlotte is Johnson’s track, and everybody knows he’s the mas-

ter there. A six-time Charlotte winner, Johnson completed the only perfect weekend of his career there last October. He won the pole, led every practice session and rolled to the victory. Stewart was the last driver to win the Chase before Johnson began his four-year run in 2006, and it was the lessons Johnson learned from losing to Stewart the year before that Johnson has applied to this streak of domination. So consumed with what Stewart was doing, Johnson lost sight of his own program. Since then, he’s practiced a singular focus and doesn’t worry about trying to get into other drivers’ heads. Stewart, in turn, won’t waste time trying to play mind games with Johnson. “You don’t have to get in his head, we just have to go out and do our thing,” he said. “We’re still in a situation where certain things have to happen on their own, but there are things out of our control still. By focusing on things we do have control over, we’ve got ourselves from 10th to fifth in points. And we’ve got ourselves somewhat back in striking distance.”

• Arenas fined for faking injury: For someone looking to get back into the good graces of his team, its fans and the NBA, Gilbert Arenas has a funny way of showing it. The Washington Wizards guard’s latest escapade took place Tuesday, when coach Flip Saunders announced before a preseason game against the Atlanta Hawks that Arenas would miss the contest with a sore left knee. But Arenas revealed after the Wizards’ 107-92 victory that he pretended to have a bum knee to give teammate Nick Young a chance to start. He told reporters Wednesday that he was trying to do Young a favor. “I lied to coach and told him my knee was sore so he’d start Nick,” Arenas said. Arenas was fined an undisclosed amount by the Wizards for his deception. It was another blow to the image of a player who is still trying to recover from his 50-game suspension and felony conviction for bringing guns into the locker room last season.

Golf • Transgender woman sues LPGA over birth rule: A transgender woman is suing the LPGA over a requirement which states that all competitors must be “female at birth.” Fifty-seven-year-old Lana Lawless underwent gender reassignment surgery in 2005. She filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in San Francisco on Tuesday claiming that the policy violates California civil rights laws. Lawless won the women’s world championship in long-drive golf in 2008, but was barred from competing this year because Long Drivers of America — which oversees the event — had changed its policy to mirror that of the LPGA. She wants to prevent the LPGA from holding events in California until the policy is changed.

Football • Packers TE Finley, LB Barnett could be done: Green Bay Packers tight end Jermichael Finley and linebacker Nick Barnett may be lost for the season after having surgery this week. Packers coach Mike McCarthy says both players will need more time than originally expected to recover, and placing them on injured reserve is “definitely” an option. The team may wait until next week to make a decision on ending either player’s season. Finley hurt his knee in Sunday’s overtime loss at Washington, and Barnett hurt his wrist in a victory over Detroit one week earlier. • Favre’s elbow hurting: Brett Favre’s latest problem is his elbow. With the NFL investigating whether he sent lewd photos of himself to a Jets game hostess while he played for New York in 2008, Favre said Wednesday that his cherished, league-record streak of 289 straight starts could be in danger if the pain in his right elbow gets any worse.The 41-year-old quarterback did not practice with Minnesota on Wednesday, preferring to rest the tendinitis that flared up noticeably on Monday night in the Vikings 29-20 loss to the Jets. “I don’t want to play just to play,” Favre said. “It’s kind of a funny injury. It could flare up and get worse.” • Eagles, Browns swap running backs: Jerome Harrison finally broke free on another long run. Disappointed with his role in Cleveland’s offense this season, Harrison was traded to the Philadelphia Eagles on Wednesday for Mike Bell in an exchange of running backs

Tennis • Federer wins with between-the-legs shot: Roger Federer marked a winning return to play Wednesday with a between-the-legs shot in his 6-3, 6-4 victory over American John Isner at the Shanghai Masters. Federer played his first match since the U.S. Open, where he lost to Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. He showed few signs of rustiness as he moved into the third round, joining top-ranked Rafael Nadal, Andy Murray and Djokovic. Andy Roddick retired from his match against Guillermo Garcia-Lopez because of a thigh injury while leading 6-3, 2-3.

Auto racing • Pearson headlines second NASCAR Hall of Fame class: David Pearson has been selected to the NASCAR Hall of Fame. The Silver Fox was controversially left out of last year’s inaugural class despite 105 career wins. There was an outcry among race fans at his exclusion in favor of longtime NASCAR chairman Bill France Jr. Pearson received an immediate standing ovation from those gathered in the Great Hall of the Hall of Fame on Wednesday. Also selected was Bobby Allison, whose 84 wins are tied for third on the all-time victory list. Lee Petty, the patriarch of Petty Enterprises was the third name announced. He was followed by Ned Jarrett and Bud Moore. Not selected was Darrell Waltrip, the three-time champion who had actively campaigned.

Baseball • Braves tap Gonzalez as new manager: Talk about a seamless transition. Less than 48 hours after Bobby Cox wrapped up his managing career, the Atlanta Braves introduced his protege, former Florida manager Fredi Gonzalez, to take over the job Wednesday. The decision was widely expected since Gonzalez was fired in June by the Marlins. Cox had announced more than a year ago this would be his final season, and his two-decade-long tenure ended with a loss to San Francisco in the NL division series Monday night. Cox held a farewell news conference at Turner Field, reminiscing about a career that left him as the fourth winningest manager in baseball history and a likely Hall of Famer. As soon as he was done, the Braves introduced Gonzalez as their new manager, with Cox as his side. — From wire reports


D4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E AGU E B A SEBA L L

NLCS: Giants-Phillies

ALCS: Yankees-Rangers

A look at the best-of-seven National League Championship Series between the San Francisco Giants and Philadelphia Phillies:

A look at the best-of-seven American League Championship Series between the New York Yankees and Texas Rangers:

SCHEDULE

SCHEDULE

(All times Pacific) Game 1, Saturday, at Philadelphia (4:57 p.m.) Game 2, Sunday, at Philadelphia (5:19 p.m.) Game 3, Tuesday, Oct. 19, at San Francisco (1:19 p.m.) Game 4, Wednesday, Oct. 20, at San Francisco (4:57 p.m.) x-Game 5, Thursday, Oct. 21, at San Francisco (4:57 p.m.) x-Game 6, Oct. 23, at Philadelphia (12:57 p.m.) x-Game 7, Oct. 24, at Philadelphia (4:57 p.m.). • All games on FOX. x-if necessary.

(All times Pacific) Game 1, Friday, at Arlington, Texas (5:07 p.m.) Game 2, Saturday, at Arlington, Texas (1:07 p.m.) Game 3, Monday, Oct. 18, at New York (5:07 p.m.) Game 4, Tuesday, Oct. 19, at New York (5:07 p.m.) x-Game 5, Wednesday, Oct. 20, at New York (1:07 p.m.) x-Game 6, Friday, Oct. 22, at Arlington, Texas (5:07 p.m.) x-Game 7, Saturday, Oct. 23, at Arlington, Texas (5:07 p.m.). • All games on TBS. x-if necessary.

PROJECTED LINEUPS

PROJECTED LINEUPS

Giants: CF Andres Torres (.268, 16, 63, 26 SBs), 2B Freddy Sanchez (.292, 7, 47), 1B Aubrey Huff (.290, 26, 86), C Buster Posey (.305, 18, 67 after being called up from minors May 29), LF Pat Burrell (.266, 18, 51, signed to minor league deal May 29 after release by Tampa Bay and called up from Triple-A on June 4), SS Juan Uribe (.248, 24, 85), RF Cody Ross (.269, 14, 65 with Florida and Giants) or Jose Guillen (.266, 3, 15 after acquired from Royals on Aug. 13), 3B Pablo Sandoval (.268, 13, 63). Phillies: CF Shane Victorino (.259, 18, 69, 34 SBs), 3B Placido Polanco (.298, 6, 52), 2B Chase Utley (.275, 16, 65), 1B Ryan Howard (.276, 31, 108), RF Jayson Werth (.296, 27, 85), SS Jimmy Rollins (.243, 8, 41 in 88 games), LF Raul Ibanez (.275, 16, 83), C Carlos Ruiz (.302, 8, 53).

Yankees: SS Derek Jeter (.270, 10 HRs, 67 RBIs, 18 SBs, 111 runs), RF Nick Swisher (.288, 29, 89), 1B Mark Teixeira (.256, 33, 108, AL-high 113 runs), 3B Alex Rodriguez (.270, 30, 125), 2B Robinson Cano (.319, 29, 109, 41 2Bs, 200 hits), C Jorge Posada (.248, 18, 57), DH Marcus Thames (.288, 12, 33 in 212 at-bats) or Lance Berkman (.248, 14, 58 with Astros and Yankees), CF Curtis Granderson (.247, 24, 67), LF Brett Gardner (.277, 5, 47, 47 SBs, 97 runs, .383 on-base percentage). Rangers: SS Elvis Andrus (.265, 0, 35, 88 runs, 32/47 SBs), 3B Michael Young (.284, 21, 91, 99 runs, careerhigh 115 strikeouts), CF Josh Hamilton (major league-leading .359, 32, 100), DH Vladimir Guerrero (.300, 29, 115), RF Nelson Cruz (.318, 22, 78 in 108 games), 2B Ian Kinsler (.286, 9, 45), LF David Murphy (.291, 12, 65), C Bengie Molina (.240, 2, 19 in 57 games since acquired from San Francisco), 1B Jorge Cantu (.235, 1, 2 in 30 games since acquired from Florida) or Mitch Moreland (.255, 9, 25 in 47 games since called up from Triple-A on July 29).

PROJECTED ROTATIONS Giants: RH Tim Lincecum (16-10, 3.43, 231 Ks), LH Jonathan Sanchez (13-9, 3.07, 205 Ks, career-high 193 1-3 innings), RH Matt Cain (13-11, 3.14, 177 Ks), LH Madison Bumgarner (7-6, 3.00, 86 Ks in 18 starts as rookie). Phillies: RH Roy Halladay (21-10, 2.44, 9 CGs), RH Roy Oswalt (7-1, 1.74 in 13 games with Phillies after trade from Houston; 13-13, 2.76 overall), LH Cole Hamels (12-11, 3.06), RH Joe Blanton (9-6, 4.82).

MATCHUPS Both original NL franchises, but share little history between them. Have never met in the postseason. (The biggest sports link connecting the cities might be in the NBA — Wilt Chamberlain and the old Philadelphia Warriors moved West in 1962 and became the San Francisco Warriors. Oh, and the Eagles beat the 49ers last weekend). ... Giants and Phillies went 3-3 against each other this year. Starting in 2000, they’re 36-36 in head-to-head games. ... Fun facts about the aces: The only player to hit at least three career home runs off Lincecum is Howard, the Phillies’ slugger. And, Halladay is 0-2 lifetime vs. the Giants with a 7.23 ERA, his highest for any opponent he’s started against at least three times. ... Giants handed Halladay his first NL loss, beating Phillies in late April. San Francisco won two of three in that set at AT&T Park. ... Oswalt beat Giants in start of three-game series at Citizens Bank Park in mid-August. Phillies won two of three at home, nudging them ahead of Giants for the wild-card lead. ... Lincecum and Hamels got nodecisions in the Phillies’ 7-6 win in 11 innings early in the season. Lincecum struck out 11, Hamels fanned 10. ... Burrell drew a standing ovation when he returned to Philly for the first time since helping the Phillies win the 2008 World Series. The cheers turned to boos when he homered in his first at-bat Aug. 17. Burrell homered the next game against the Phillies, too. ... Blanton beat SF in his one game against them. He did not pitch in the NLDS. ... Sanchez went 2-0 vs. the Phillies this season. ... Phillies manager Charlie Manuel picked Giants manager Bruce Bochy to be on his NL staff at the All-Star game in July. ... Games 4 and 5 are scheduled for twilight starts in San Francisco, never a good thing for hitters.

Ed Andrieski / / The Associated Press

San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Tim Lincecum, a twotime Cy Young Award winner, threw a shutout in his postseason debut against the Atlanta Braves.

NLCS Continued from D1 The Giants’ Big Three have combined for four All-Star games and two Cy Young Awards. Game 1 is Saturday night at Citizens Bank Park. Get set for The Freak vs. Doc. Lincecum, the two-time reigning NL Cy Young winner, is expected to start for the Giants. Halladay, the leading candidate to win his second Cy this year, should get the ball for the Phillies, even though manager Charlie Manuel wouldn’t commit to announcing his starter. “They’re different sizes, different pitchers, really,” Manuel said. “They call (Lincecum) a freak. I don’t know if he’s a freak or not, but his style is different. I hear people talk about his mechanics, but he does everything the pitcher is supposed to do. He’s special. He’s got a tremendous changeup, fastball, breaking ball. And when he’s real good his command is good. “Halladay, on the other hand, is bigger, stronger. He’s got more pitches, and I would say Halladay definitely has more command of the strike zone than Lincecum has. But on any given day he can be powerful, too,” Manuel said. Halladay finished 21-10 with a 2.44 ERA in his first season in Philadelphia. He led the majors in wins, complete games (nine), shutouts (four) and innings (250 2 ⁄3). Halladay threw a perfect game in May, and nearly matched that in his playoff debut. He tossed the second nohitter in postseason history in Game 1 of the division series against Cincinnati. “Big Roy is big Roy,” Manuel said. Lincecum had an up-anddown year after emerging as the most dominant pitcher in the league in his first two full

seasons. The hard-throwing righty rebounded in September after a career-worst five-start losing streak in August, and finished 16-10 with a 3.43 ERA. In his playoff debut, Lincecum tossed a two-hitter in San Francisco’s 1-0 win over Atlanta in Game 1 of their series. He struck out 14 in a masterful performance. “He’s the kind of guy that, he just goes out and he throws,” Phillies slugger Ryan Howard said. “I mean, he’s a great pitcher. It doesn’t seem that too much can really get to him. It’s just a matter of being patient, trying to get a good pitch to hit and taking what we can get.” The Giants will use Sanchez in Game 2, but it’s uncertain whether Oswalt or Hamels goes for Philadelphia. Oswalt had a so-so outing in Game 2 against the Reds while Hamels finished that series off with a five-hit shutout. The Phillies might flip-flop the two because Oswalt has been more successful in San Francisco and it would give them a righty-lefty-righty split. Oswalt is 3-6 in 10 career starts at AT&T Park, but his ERA is 4.18 there. Hamels is 2-1 with a 6.12 ERA in four starts at the 11-year-old ballpark. He’s allowed at least four runs in each of his starts. The Phillies finished sixth with a 3.67 ERA this season. They were sensational against the Reds, allowing the NL’s best-hitting team to score just three earned runs in the franchise’s first postseason sweep. The Giants led the majors with a 3.36 ERA. They overmatched the injury-decimated Braves in the first round, posting a 1.66 ERA in four games, each decided by one run. “We’ve got pitching, and pitching wins,” Giants left fielder Pat Burrell said. Burrell, a member of the 2008 World Series champion Phillies, could’ve been referring to his former team, too.

WATCH FOR • Ace High: The Game 1 matchup between Halladay and Lincecum is about as good as it gets. Howard has done well against Lincecum (6 for 19 with 3 HRs and 2 doubles), but Utley hasn’t (2 for 20, 8 strikeouts). Maybe Huff can give his Giants teammates a scouting report on Halladay — Huff has batted against the Phillies ace 73 times (.258, 0 HRs), mostly during their days in the AL. • Shear the Beard: Closer Brian Wilson has struggled against the Phillies, with a 6.43 ERA in eight games. He blew a save chance in April by giving up a three-run double to Werth with two outs in the ninth. Figure the Phils will hardly take a “Fear the Beard” approach against the Giants closer. • Healthy or Hurting?: Rollins has been in and out of the lineup this year with an assortment of injuries. No telling how effective the former NL MVP will be. Guillen delivered several big hits for the Giants, but was left off their first-round roster because of neck trouble. — The Associated Press

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Cole Hamels has been dominant in the second half of the 2010 season, rebounding from an off 2009 after winning the World Series MVP in 2008.

PROJECTED ROTATIONS Yankees: LH CC Sabathia (21-7, 3.18 ERA, 237 2-3 innings), RH Phil Hughes (18-8, 4.19), LH Andy Pettitte (11-3, 3.28), RH A.J. Burnett (10-15, 5.26). Rangers: LH C.J. Wilson (15-8, 3.35, 3 CGs in 33 starts), RH Colby Lewis (12-13, 3.72 in career-high 201 innings), LH Cliff Lee (12-9, 3.18 ERA, 7 CGs in 28 starts, 185 Ks, 18 walks, 212 1-3 innings; 4-6, 3.98 in 15 starts since acquired from Seattle on July 9), RH Tommy Hunter (13-4, 3.73).

MATCHUPS Yankees manager Joe Girardi was a catcher on New York teams that eliminated Texas in first round of playoffs en route to World Series titles in 1996, 1998 and 1999. Rangers dropped final nine games in those matchups, their only playoff appearances before beating Tampa Bay 3-2 in best-of-five division series this year. This is first time Rangers have home-field advantage in a postseason series. ... Texas is in ALCS for first time. Yankees, seeking 41st pennant and 28th World Series crown, are 11-2 in ALCS. Only losses came in 1980 to Kansas City and 2004 to Boston. ... Yankees went 1-4 in Texas this season, including three-game sweep by Rangers from Sept. 10-12. New York earned three-game sweep at home from April 16-18, before Texas acquired Lee. ... New York counters Lee with Sabathia, who was MVP of ALCS last year against Angels. Pettitte is 19-9 with 3.87 ERA in postseason. He holds records for wins and starts (41).

WATCH FOR • Mr. Lee: After struggling in August, Lee finally had an injection in his sore back and took nearly two weeks off before returning to allow two hits in eight-plus innings of 4-1 win over Yankees on Sept. 12. He’s been unbeatable in October — against everyone. New York’s patient and gritty hitters like to work pitchers, run deep counts, extend at-bats and draw walks. Lee, however, rarely misses. He has 54 strikeouts and six walks in 56 1⁄3 postseason innings. He struck out 21 and did not walk a batter in two starts covering 16 innings against Tampa Bay. Even though Pettitte is as poised and proven as anyone in postseason, there’s no way Yankees want to wind up facing Lee in Game 7. • Bullpen Breakdown: New York appears to have an edge in late innings, with power arms in the ’pen and Rivera looming. He saved two games against Minnesota, increasing his postseason record to 41 and overall total to 600. Texas has a rookie closer who looked shaky against Rays, as did other Rangers relievers. • Jeter Meter. The 36-year-old shortstop had an uncharacteristic season, sinking to career lows for batting average and on-base percentage (.340), and hitting just one homer after Aug. 1. He worked with hitting coach Kevin Long in Texas when he was given Sept. 11 off and batted .342 with .436 OBP after that. Now, the Yankees captain is trying to live up to billing as one of the most clutch performers in postseason history (.312, 20, 56). He was 4 for 14 (.286) with an RBI in first round but did not walk or score. — The Associated Press

Bill Kostroun / The Associated Press

New York Yankees first baseman Mark Teixeira was the face of the franchise in Texas before being traded to New York in 2007. Some of the prospects in the trade now start for the Rangers.

ALCS Continued from D1 If it weren’t for Teixeira — or more specifically if it weren’t for the players the Rangers got for Teixeira when they traded him in 2007 — the Rangers wouldn’t have been able to build themselves into the team they are today, a team getting ready to host the Yankees on Friday in Game 1 of the ALCS. Three key building blocks — shortstop Elvis Andrus, closer Neftali Feliz and lefthanded pitcher Matt Harrison — were acquired when the Rangers traded Teixeira to the Atlanta Braves at the July 31 deadline. The trade signaled a change of philosophy: The Rangers had stopped caring about short-term winning and were going to completely rebuild. “They’ve done a great job of rebuilding, and I was a big part of that rebuilding process on the way out,” the Yankees’ first baseman said Wednesday with a smile after taking batting practice at Yankee Stadium. “They traded me and got a lot of big pieces.” Texas has been built into the sort of winning team that Teixeira and third baseman Alex Rodriguez dreamed of being a part of when they were together on the Rangers seven years ago. “The Dallas area deserves a winner, and I went there years ago with the intention of being in the position that they are in there today,” said Rodriguez, who played in Texas from 20002003 before being traded to the Yankees. Though Rodriguez said that he feels nothing special returning to play the Rangers, Teixeira said that this is the matchup he had been hoping for. After the Yankees swept Minnesota in the ALDS, Teixeira texted Texas third baseman Michael Young to tell him that he was rooting for the Rangers to win their series against Tampa

“They’ve done a great job of rebuilding, and I was a big part of that rebuilding process on the way out. They traded me and got a lot of big pieces.” — Current Yankee Mark Teixeira, on a trade that took him from Texas to New York Bay. “Michael and I came up together and had a lot of great experiences together,” he said. “I am so happy for him, because he wants to win so bad. It’s a friendly rivalry. I want to beat Michael as much as anybody, but at the same time we’ll have fun playing against each other.” Teixeira is having fun playing baseball, period, in these playoffs. After slumping through the Yankees’ championship run last season, he excelled in the Minnesota series. Teixeira was the star of Game 1 with a tiebreaking two-run homer. He reached base twice in Game 2, and drove in the second run of the Yankees’ series-clinching 6-1 win in Game 3. Teixeira finished 4-for-13 with the homer and a team-high-tying three RBIs. Last year he had just eight RBIs in 15 games covering all three postseason rounds. “I think we feel good about the way we are playing,” he said. “I feel it’s going to be a great series. We have two very talented teams. If we pitch the way we’re capable of and they pitch the way they’re capable of, well, there might not be a lot of runs, but it’s going to be a great series.” So Teixeira got the matchup he wanted. He will finally be a part of playoff baseball in Texas, albeit in a Yankees uniform. Now, if only he could sell that house.

Tony Gutierrez / The Associated Press

Texas Rangers’ center fielder Josh Hamilton is the new face of the franchise. With a stellar 2010 campaign, despite a late injury, he is the favorite to be named the AL MVP this season.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 D5

LPGA

GOLF NOTEBOOK

The race to keep a PGA Tour card is on during the Fall Series not been relevant over the last decade with Tiger Woods and Vijay Singh winning it. Both are lifetime members. Kuchar, however, was on the Nationwide Tour just four years ago. Furyk already gets a five-year exemption for winning the FedEx Cup.

By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. — It’s going to take a lot more money to stay on the PGA Tour this year. Blame some of that on Tiger Woods. Woods has gone over $10 million in earnings three of the last five years. The exceptions were 2008, when he played only six PGA Tour events before seasonending knee surgery and still made $5.75 million; and 2006, when he earned $9.94 million. With chaos in his personal life and changes in his swing, Woods is at No. 65 on the money list with just under $1.3 million. It stands to reason that Woods failing to rake in so much cash means it has been disbursed down the ladder. Another big factor is the tour has one extra tournament this year — the Viking Classic was washed out in 2009 because of rain. A year ago, Jimmy Walker finished at No. 125 on the money list with $662,683. With three tournaments left in the season, Aron Price is at No. 125 and already has surpassed that amount. Price has $693,502. Tour officials expect it will take as much as $775,000 to finish in the top 125 and keep full status for next year. Among those who might still have some work left are David Duval (No. 109), Canadian Open runner-up Dean Wilson (No. 122) and Kevin Sutherland (No. 116), who has not finished out of the top 125 since his lone victory in the 2002 Match Play Championship. The two biggest spikes in money required to finish No. 125 came in 2007, the first year of a new six-year television contract, and in 2008, the year Woods played a limited schedule. It also affects the top part of the money list. Matt Kuchar is at No. 1 with about $4.9 million, and Sea Island was his last official event of the year. Whether he wins the money title depends on Jim Furyk, who is just over $100,000

Elk Continued from D1 “Hunters have told us they’d like to see Ochoco (Unit) managed more for quality and a trophy-hunt opportunity,” Ferry said. “The best way we’ve come up with doing that is getting a specific number of bulls that survive the hunting season (20 bulls per 100 cows) by regulating the number of hunters.” Ferry noted a current figure of 25 bulls per 100 cows in the Ochoco unit, the second-highest ratio of bulls to cows in the last 10 years for the unit. He also reported 28 bulls per 100 cows in the Maury Unit, and 25 bulls per 100 cows in the Grizzly Unit. “Hunters should have a pretty good selection of bulls,” Ferry said. Ferry said the overall health of the elk herds in the region is good and the populations are either stable or growing. Elk are scattered all over the Ochoco Mountains and can travel long distances in short periods of time, according to Ferry. Elk tend to move away from disturbances and look for secluded areas. Ferry said many elk herds are moving onto private land, where human activity is less frequent. Hunters must receive

UO Continued from D1 To Kelly’s credit, he did go on to discuss the team in general terms and to address individual performances. Following a 43-23 victory over Washington State, Oregon moved up a spot in the AP Top 25, falling in behind No. 1 Ohio State and just ahead of No. 3 Boise State. The Ducks are off this weekend before hosting UCLA next Thursday night at Autzen Stadium. The silence out of Oregon was frustrating, mostly because of the physical condition of running back Kenjon Barner, and, to a lesser degree, quarterback Darron Thomas. The scene was unnerving

Expecting the worst

Rogelio V. Solis / The Associated Press

Dean Wilson is No. 122 on the PGA Tour money list, and despite a runner-up finish this season, he is on the bubble to return to the PGA Tour next season. behind and has not decided whether to play Las Vegas next week. Either way, it will be the lowest amount to win the PGA Tour money title since Duval earned just under $2.6 million in 1998, the year before the tour signed its first big TV contract.

four major champions. There have been years when Tiger Woods (2005, 2006) and Padraig Harrington (2008) won multiple majors, and years when major champions (Woods, Phil Mickelson) stopped going. This is the first time in 20 years that the Grand Slam has two alternates in a season when four players won majors. The other alternate is Ernie Els, who is filling in for Mickelson. The PGA Grand Slam is Oct. 19-20 at Port Royal in Bermuda.

Grand slammed British Open champion Louis Oosthuizen had to pull out of the PGA Grand Slam of Golf after damaging ligaments on the outside of his left ankle while at home in South Africa. Oosthuizen already had to withdraw last week from the Dunhill Links Championship, preventing his return to St. Andrews. The PGA Grand Slam is only for major champions, so Oosthuizen will be replaced in the four-man field by David Toms, who hasn’t been to this event since he won the PGA Championship in 2001. Only past major winners can be alternates, and Toms accepted the spot after Retief Goosen (schedule conflict) and Zach Johnson (new baby) declined. Alternates at the Grand Slam are nothing new. Last year was the first time since 2004 that the field had the

Kuchar’s rise Matt Kuchar is virtually a lock to win the Vardon Trophy for the lowest adjusted scoring average. He tied for 25th last week at the McGladrey Classic with a 7-under 273, lowering his average to 69.57. That’s 0.04 ahead of Steve Stricker, who is done for the year, and Kuchar is 0.21 ahead of Jim Furyk, which likely is too much ground to make up. It would be the highest average to win the Vardon Trophy since Steve Elkington (69.92) in 1995. The real perk for Kuchar would be if he holds his lead on the money list. Players to win the money title on the PGA Tour are given a five-year exemption, which has

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permission from landowners to hunt on private land. “Elk are very mobile,” Ferry said. “If they get spooked, they pick up and move.” Generally, hunters who do not receive a Rocky Mountain elk tag will hunt the Cascade Moun-

tains, according to Steve George, a Bend-based wildlife biologist for the ODFW. “This year might be somewhat different,” George said this week. “(Hunters) might be staying closer to home. We’ve seen more interest this year in the

when Barner was injured in Pullman. His parents rushed to his side as he lay prone on the field tended by trainers, and pal LaMichael James paced nervously with a towel on his head. An ambulance pulled onto the field to remove Barner, who was taken to a local hospital. Then he reportedly was transferred to a hospital in Oregon because of a concussion. But the information flow stopped there. When asked if Barner was back with the team, Kelly said: “I’m not talking about that. Practice is closed.” It is Oregon’s practice not to discuss specific injuries because of privacy concerns. Kelly has often said that injured players are day-to-day until game time, when they’re either

out or playing. Barner, who is a return specialist and backs up James, has rushed for 215 yards and four touchdowns this season, and he’s caught six passes for 107 yards and another score. He’s also scored on a punt return. Then there’s the matter of Thomas, who left the game against the Cougars with his arm dangling at his side. He had fallen awkwardly on his right shoulder during a 1-yard run that was brought back by a penalty. He was replaced by backup Nate Costa. Thomas has passed for 1,231 yards with 14 touchdowns and five interceptions this season. He has also run for 221 yards and a pair of scores. His injury did not appear as serious as Barner’s. More

Johnson Wagner already is resigned to going back to Q-school just two years after winning the Houston Open. His hope is that expecting the worst can lead to a change for the better. Wagner was forced into a five-week break when he failed to qualify for the FedEx Cup playoffs. After taking two weeks away from golf, he spent time with his coach and got after it so he would have no excuses. He tied for eighth in the Viking Classic, then tied for 25th at Sea Island. That at least has moved him to No. 147, with the belief he at least is headed in the right direction. “I’m looking at these five weeks as basically Q-school,” Wagner said. “It’s looking like I might have to go back, and I don’t want to. I’ve been playing to protect something all year, and now I have nothing to protect.” What was he trying to protect? “My job,” he said. He was hurt by finishing at No. 153 a year ago. While he was exempt from his 2008 Houston Open win, Wagner was not eligible for limited-field events like the Colonial, Memorial and AT&T National. “I just wasn’t getting the starts when I was playing well,” he said. The bigger problem was being consumed with results — making the cut, climbing the leaderboard, trying to get into the top 125 to qualify for the playoffs, trying to cash a decent check. “The point is to win and have chances to win,” Wagner said. He has three more weeks to sort that out.

Cascades, and that’s a reflection of the economy.” In Central Oregon, Cascade bull elk units include the Metolius and the Upper Deschutes. The elk populations in those units have been slowly on the rise in the last few years, according to George. But elk remain difficult to find in the densely forested Cascades. George said that elk in the Upper Deschutes unit live in areas near the Cascade lakes, Mount Bachelor and Fall River. For hunters in the Metolius Unit, he recommended Green Ridge and the west slopes of the Cascades. Conditions could be favorable for elk hunters in the Cascades this weekend, according to George. “With the little moisture we’ve gotten, conditions won’t be too bad,” he said. “The temperatures we’re having will help. Overall, conditions won’t be too bad for opening weekend.” Cold, snowy weather bunches the elk together and gets them to start moving west toward warmer climate, according to George. Most, he added, end up on the western slope of the Cascades in the winter.

Continued from D1 Languages are like greens: Each has nuances, and boldness sometimes results in embarrassment. The South Korean players became shyer after a profile of Kyeong Bae in a Canadian newspaper this summer in which she referred to the cartoon character SpongeBob SquarePants as “Spongie Bob.” Choi shuddered in sympathy. Like many of the non-Americans on the tour, if she cannot speak perfect English, she prefers not speak at all. Choi relies on her caddie to help her read the way a putt breaks. For help with the subtleties of English, she turned to Martin George, whose Language Training Center, based in Indianapolis, entered into a partnership with the LPGA this year. George, the company president, and another instructor, Erica Tomasik, travel with the tour, tutoring players one on one in clubhouses or hotel lobbies or through video conferences. Commissioner Michael Whan likened the program, which was in place when he started in January, to one he in which he participated as an employee of Procter & Gamble two decades ago when it was extending its reach to the Far East. “This may feel like an LPGA thing, but it’s really a business thing,” Whan said, adding: “I don’t really consider it a language program. I consider it a cross-cultural program.” He said players learn that signing autographs is not the same everywhere. Chitchat matters more to fans in Toledo; they want only the signature in Thailand, Whan said, adding, “It’s good for business for the players to recognize things like that.” At his first tournament, in March in Carlsbad, Calif., George said, he was unsure what kind of reception he would receive. “I was told, ‘You may have no students,’” he recalled with a chuckle. George ended up working with three golfers. Through word of mouth, the number of players using the service has grown to more than two dozen, including one American, Vicky Hurst, who is studying Korean, her mother’s native language. One of George’s students, InKyung Kim, recently finished Andre Agassi’s autobiography, “Open,” which she read at George’s suggestion. “It was really well-written,” said Kim, who met with George last week after the pro-am. As Kim was speaking, one of her amateur partners asked if she would autograph his hat. They exchanged small talk for a minute as George looked on. The ability of the golfers to connect with their playing partners in the lucrative pro-ams is considered vital for the tour’s bottom line, and yet George e-mailed later to say, “Most of the players don’t know how important that type of engagement is to their careers.” Unlike the tour’s traveling day care center, the mobile language lab does not have a sponsor to absorb the costs. The players pay $40 an hour. “When players are investing their own resources, they tend to take it more serious,” said Sean Pyun, the LPGA manager for international development and

member services, adding, “It’s really amazing how quickly the program has evolved in a short time.” Other languages may be added next year. The Americans Morgan Pressel and Paula Creamer have expressed a desire to hone their Spanish. Beatriz Recari, a rookie from Spain, is interested in Mandarin but is immersed in Japanese. As Recari conversed in Japanese for an hour last week with Tomasik, the subject turned to the NFL. Recari’s favorite team, she said, is the Miami Dolphins, though she acknowledged they had not played well in a loss to the New England Patriots a few days earlier. As they talked, Tomasik introduced tenses and words and used them in sentences that Recari repeated. Recari, who is bubbly in any language, learned English at the age of 5 and also speaks French and Norwegian in addition to Spanish. “My first year on tour, in Europe, I studied economics,” she said. “But then I chose golf over schooling, and I was missing a lot that student part of me. This nurtures me as a person, and it helps me develop my left brain like when I was studying economics.” Recari also learned that the proper way to respond in Japanese when presented with a gift is to apologize for the giver’s considerable effort. Ai Miyazato, who is from Japan, has been ranked No. 1 for eight consecutive weeks in a year with much jockeying to fill the void at the top created by the abrupt retirement of Lorena Ochoa. In one-on-one conversations, Miyazato, 25, speaks English without a trace of self-consciousness, repeatedly addressing the other person by name to build rapport. She began working with George not so much to build her vocabulary but her confidence. When asked at weekly tour interview sessions how it feels to be No. 1, Miyazato said that she wished to convey so much more — satisfaction, anxiety, excitement — but that under the spotlight, words, tenses and sentence structure often eluded her. At the Navistar LPGA Classic, as elsewhere, she started a pretournament interview speaking English and ended it with her manager, Takumi Zaoya, translating her answers from Japanese to English. “I feel like my English is still not enough,” a chagrined Miyazato said. “I want the people to get to know me a little, but I get nervous.” News conferences, in which the players sit onstage and speak into a microphone, are daunting. “I like this table for talking better than the media center,” Choi said in the clubhouse, with a grand sweep of her hand. Choi has expressed a desire to continue her lessons by video conference during the off-season. The impression she leaves is that she will not stop until her English is flawless. “Ambition” was another of her vocabulary words. Using it in a sentence, Choi wrote, “My ambition is to be the best person I can be.”

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should be evident on Saturday when Oregon reopens practice. The Ducks are 6-0 for the first time since 2002, but that season they dropped six of their final seven, including a 38-17 loss to Wake Forest in the now-defunct Seattle Bowl. Kelly was wary of complacency. “We can improve on blocking, we can improve our tackling, our kickoff-return team needs a lot of work. We’ve got to clean up ball security in terms of fumbles lost. We’ve got a few holding penalties, because fundamentally our hands are getting outside the framework,” he said. “So we need to get them back inside the framework. “We don’t look at this as a bye week, we look at this as an improvement week.”

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D6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

Science fiction meets history Fishing for sturgeon in the Columbia Gorge offers a look back in time

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

GARY LEWIS

CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Angler reports indicate a high growth rate and excellent catch rates. The reservoir has been stocked twice with catchable rainbow trout and will be stocked again in October.

O

ut over the crested wheat, golden in the morning sun, an army of turbines tread toward the horizon. Three-hundred feet tall, white against the sky, their arms swing in unison. Mrs. Twohey, one of my English teachers from long ago, told us that science fiction had proven that “whatever man could imagine, man could achieve” and that our present had been foretold in old time radio and in comic books 40 years before. “Read science fiction today,” she said, “and most of it will come true in your lifetimes.” I thought of Mrs. Twohey when we topped out on a ridge in Sherman County and saw the blades. Out there, on the winds that sweep down the Columbia, the turbines extract the energy we use to light our cities. Two-hundred turbines or more, they tower over the landscape, Vestas V82s and Siemens SWTs on 280-foot towers, at a cost of a billion dollars and a maximum generating capacity of 450 megawatts. Down on the river, we launched at Rufus, below the John Day Dam, which, with 16 turbines, can generate a maximum capacity of 2,485 megawatts. At 183 feet tall, the dam towers above the river. When construction began in the 1950s, it was science fiction embodied in concrete gravity and re-bar. We couldn’t hear the whir of the blades or the hum of electricity in the conductors above the roar of the river. Lou McMinds, owner of EZ Marine, powered his white and stainless Alumaweld cross-current. Sage, Lou’s chocolate lab, paced back and forth from bow to stern. Bred to flush and retrieve, the lab has learned to point a fishing rod. Below the dam, the topography of the river bottom changes as currents carve and smooth and carve again. Lou watched the screen on the Lowrance. Up and down, the sonar plumbed the depth and the chart plotter marked our course — 16 feet deep, 18, 20 — there! Forty-eight feet, 50. Here, in a deep trough, we’d find the sturgeon where they wait for the river to bring them food on the current. We dropped anchor and tied off the buoy with a couple of turns on the cleat. Marc Marcantonio, and my wife, Mer-

BIG LAVA LAKE: The resort is reporting excellent fishing with the cooler temperatures. The fish that are landed have been in great condition, ranging in size from 11 to 16 inches. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Anglers are still catching large fish from two to seven pounds. CRESCENT LAKE: The water temperature is around 60 and the fish are spread throughout the lake. The water level is dropping a bit and some anglers are picking up 8- to 10-pound browns. Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Marc Marcantonio, of Steilacoom, Wash., reaches down to remove the hook from a big Columbia River sturgeon. rilee, had yet to catch their first sturgeon. Beneath the depths of the river, we imagined a canyon, stacked with fish. And the scent of salmon in the river. With a strip of fish carcass, McMinds baited a 9/0 barbless hook and half-hitched it with the flo-orange mason’s twine he uses for leader. Lowered over the side, our baits bounced back in the choppy water. Two big Lamiglas rods were planted in the rod holders like twin blue rockets in launchers. Up on the horizon, the blades turned with the wind that blew in from the west and stacked waves against the dam. I tried to conceive a future more bizarre than 200 turbines on the horizon and the best I could do was imagine a sturgeon: its white belly tucked against the bottom, barbels that flicked in the gravel and nostrils that Hoovered the scent of salmon. Power quivered up the braided line and flickered in the tip of the rod. Sage leapt onto the fighting platform above the engine, his gaze going from rod tip to reel, where the tension had changed from the drag of the current to a live pulse. The rod beat with the weight of a fish. Lou handed it to Merrilee. With her feet wedged against the rails, she put the handle beneath her leg and the crook of her left elbow behind the rod. Downstream, the sturgeon streaked and

Marcantonio cut us loose from anchor, while I cranked in the other line. For half a mile downstream and 20 minutes, the battle raged — 21st century female pitted against prehistoric beast, a dinosaur descended from dinosaurs that have lived in the great river since before men speared and netted fish along its banks. Then we saw it, gray and white in green water. Alongside, the beast measured 8½ feet long. I reached down and slid the hook from its lip. We kept it for a moment at the surface then watched it kick away. Back on the buoy, we let the baits out again. When the rod plunged and the hook was set, Marcantonio put his weight against it and brought the 7½-foot sturgeon to hand in eight minutes. The next fish was mine, of the same size class, close to 8 feet. Nine minutes to hand. The biggest of these prehistoric fish are usually the females, huge spawners with the potential to repopulate the river. We fight them as hard and fast as we can to bring them alongside and let them go. No matter what the science fiction writer has conceived, the dinosaur survives. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Environmental Center in Bend; the first hour of the meeting is for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the Chapter is up to, the second hour is for the board meeting to make the decisions based on what members are interested in accomplishing; 541-3064509; communications@deschutestu. org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org.

Trout fishing is good on Fall River

THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and

skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-Stand open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to dusk; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on; rifle and pistol available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; sight-in days Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com.

FLY-TYING CORNER

HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing is excellent with flows around 175 cfs. CULTUS LAKE: There have been reports of nice rainbow trout and lake trout being harvested from Cultus over the last several weeks. FALL RIVER: Trout fishing has been good, with several different hatches of insects throughout the day.

FISHING REPORT HOSMER LAKE: Fishing for Atlantic salmon has been good early and late in the day. Fishing on Hosmer is restricted to fly fishing with barbless hooks. KINGSLEY RESERVOIR: Kingsley has been stocked with lots of trout and should offer good fishing for trout. Anglers have the opportunity to catch all size classes of trout, including large trophy trout and steelhead. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Anglers are continuing to catch kokanee in the Metolius arm. LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Fish will be moving to shore as temperatures cool; however, right now fish are still in deeper waters. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Lots of insect hatches should offer lots of opportunities for good dry fly fishing. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: A strong hatch has been occurring around 10 a.m. Anglers should be aware that beginning in 2010 new fishing regulations went into effect that permanently restrict fishing to artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: The water is very low and the only places to launch a boat are off the sandy beaches. Fourwheel drive is a must to pull your boat back out. Rainbow trout and brown trout will be following spawning kokanee to feed on eggs.

Goose hunting starts Saturday Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

HUNTING REPORT

CENTRAL ZONE

UPLAND GAME BIRD: Opportunities are primarily available for valley and mountain quail, and chukar. A cold wet spring resulted in poor early hatches for these species, but the late hatches appear strong. Hunters should check the synopsis for mountain quail as only selected counties (including Crook) are open for hunting.

OPEN: Cascade bull elk (Oct. 16-22), chukar, pheasant, quail, forest grouse, duck, goose (opens Oct. 16), antlerless elk, cougar, bear PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT GENERAL: Fall weather conditions have been variable, with wide temperature extremes, and frost occurring at higher elevations. The Ochoco National Forest and Prineville BLM should be contacted regarding the latest information on motorized access and camping (BLM 541-416-6700, Ochoco Nat. For. 541-416-6500). ANTLERLESS ELK: Hunts are ongoing in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units, with the seven-day long special youth antlerless Ochoco hunt slated to start this Saturday. Portions of these hunts include private agricultural and range lands where permission from the landowner is needed. Typically elk move onto private lands in greater numbers during the fall to take advantage of the irrigated pastures and hay fields. COUGAR: Are present at all elevations in the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units. Like coyotes, cougar will be attracted to deer and antelope, but also elk. The Maury and Ochoco units are recom-

mended because of their greater amounts of public lands and better accessibility. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days after harvest.

FOREST GROUSE: Opportunities are limited to higher elevation forest lands on the Ochoco National Forest. Hunters should check the more heavily forested portions of the Lookout Mountain and Paulina ranger districts for these elusive birds. DUCK: Seasons are ongoing, with goose hunters poised to start this Saturday. Opportunities are limited for waterfowl hunters due to the minimal habitat present on public lands. Much of the better hunting opportunities are associated with private agricultural lands where hunters must have landowner permission. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

OFFICIAL EVENT GUIDE For the second year running Bend will play host to one of the most popular events in cycling, the 2010 USA Cycling Cyclo-Cross National Championships! Capture your share of the over $1,000,000 economic boost that this event brings to Bend by advertising in the official event guide! Distribution of this years event guide will nearly double last year’s totals, expanding its reach to include all local demographics and interest levels! In addition, early distribution to racers will enable your business to be front and center while they plan their trips to Bend!

• Great low advertising rates to fit any budget! • ALL ADS include full color! • Boost your business and support a high-profile local event!

Publishes on Wednesday, December 8th • Advertising deadline: Wednesday, October 20th

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Before the water cools down at the end of October, you can still get steelhead to take a fly on the surface. You’ve got to chug it. Make the fly push water, like a frog trying to get somewhere in a hurry. The technique is a variation on the standard wet-fly swing. Cast across at a downstream angle, throw an upstream mend, hold the rod close to the body then lift and lower the tip to make the fly push water. If a steelhead chases, you’ll see a splash or a bulge behind the fly. If he grabs, let him turn with the fly in his mouth before you lift the rod. If he misses, take a few deep breaths and make another cast. This time, let the fly swing through its arc without chugging it. Tie this pattern with beige thread on a No. 4 TMC 5263

BROUGHT TO YOU BY:

Ryan Brennecke / For The Bulletin

Morrish’s Waking Wounded, courtesy of Ken Morrish and Idylwilde Flies. hook. For the abdomen, use a 1 ⁄8-inch white foam cylinder. Tie the throat with pearl Krystal Flash. Glue a light brown rabbit strip to the foam. For the

collar, use light colored natural elk hair and spin elk hair to create the thorax. At the head, tie down a trimmed piece of 6mm tan foam.

Call a Bulletin representative today at 541-382-1811 to learn more.


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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

Clues to ‘Castle’ Will author, detective on ABC series finally get together? Page E2

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

SPOTLIGHT Winds group seeks funds for NY concert

A giant cabbage at Rasmussen Farms in the Hood River Valley. Firewood is stacked near the chestnut shed at Nella Chestnut Farm. Photos by Julie Johnson The Bulletin

An apple, wet with rain, grows in an orchard on the Hood River Fruit Loop.

FRUIT Take home the bounty of the Hood River Valley

By Julie Johnson The Bulletin

y kids were very disappointed when they learned the Fruit Loop we were exploring last weekend was a lovely tour of Hood River County’s agricultural bounty, and unrelated to Froot Loops, the sugar cereal they’re not allowed to eat at home. I think I may have convinced them, though, that apples can be better than artificially colored, fruit-flavored cereal. The Fruit Loop is a collection of 32 farms along and near the Hood River Valley’s state highways 35 and 281. The roads traverse a rough loop, with the town of Hood River anchoring the north end. These farms are located in one of Oregon’s richest swaths of farmland and the nation’s largest pear-growing region, according to the member farms. There are also farms that specialize in apples, cherries, chestnuts, blueberries and even alpacas. But this time of year, it’s the apples and pears that are the main draw. Most varieties are harvested in October, and growers in the Hood River Valley offer heirloom and rare apples unavailable at your average grocery store, as well as a wealth of Anjou and Bosc pears fresh from the tree. Aside from the fruit, the Fruit Loop features some of the most beautiful rural landscapes in Oregon. Drive it in October (it’ll be your last chance this year, as activities cease at the end of the month) and you’re bound to see eye-popping fall color, orchard-draped hillsides and, if you are lucky, incredible views of Mount Hood. See Outing / E6

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loop

2010 Hood River Fruit Loop WASHINGTON

Attend free training on state health plans

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Columbia River 84

Country Club Rd.

Hood River

To Portland

84 35 To The Dalles

OREGON Portland Dr.

Ho

o

ive dR

r

281

Odell

Dee Fruit Loop 35 281

ABOVE: Nella Chestnut Farm’s orchard in Hood River.

Hood River

Mount Hood Bend Base Line Dr.

O R E G O N

Parkdale LEFT: An alpaca nibbles food from a visitor’s hand at Cascade Alpacas in the Hood River Valley.

The Summit High School Winds Ensemble has been selected to perform at the Heritage Music Festival in New York City, which is held at Carnegie Hall. Heritage Music Festivals are held throughout the country each spring and include performance and competition opportunities. The Summit students were selected from hundreds of bands in the U.S. to participate in one of the Elite Performance Series festivals. The public’s help is sought in obtaining the funds to send 55 students and the band director, Dan Judd, to the April festival. The cost per student is projected to be $1,500. The nonprofit group Friends of Music, which works to provide Summit students with opportunities in music, is working to raise funds to assure all 55 students can attend. Tax-deductible donations can be made by sending a check to: Friends of Music, P.O. Box 2043, 86 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Contact: 541-815-5333 or www.friendsofmusic-shs.org.

35 To Mount Hood Greg Cross / The Bulletin

BELOW: The views of the Hood River Valley are glorious and expansive in clear weather, but even socked in by clouds and rain, the landscape exudes a bucolic charm.

The Oregon Health Action Campaign will hold a free training session for people who want to learn about state-sponsored health plans. Participants will learn about enrollment options for the Oregon Health Plan, Healthy Kids and other health access programs serving low- and moderate-income Oregonians. The training session will be held from 1 to 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St. Advance registration is required. Contact: Dianne Rushcamp at 503-754-2934 or dianne@ohac .org.

Tower celebrates 1,000th event The Tower Theatre Foundation has marked three big milestones in the past year: Since reopening in 2004, the Tower has hosted its 1,000th event, welcomed its 250,000th theatergoer and signed up a record 425 members. The 1,000th event was a December exhibition by Acrovision Sports Center. The 250,000th ticket holder was Helen Loeffler, of Bend, who attended a July performance by the Cascade Horizon Band. It was during the Sept. 25 final performance of Cat Call Productions’ “Little Shop of Horrors” that the 425th person signed on to be a member of the nonprofit foundation. Contact: 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

Document shredding, troop benefit Saturday Steve Scott Realtors and SecureShred are sponsoring a free document-shredding event to benefit local military troops serving overseas on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Steve Scott Realtors parking lot, 685 S.E. Third St. in Bend. In exchange for free shredding of personal documents, participants are asked to bring a quality-of-life item for troops such as a thank-you card, AA batteries, deodorant or protein bars. Items will be shipped to military troops with ties to Central Oregon by Caring for Troops, a local nonprofit organization. See a full list of items that are helpful for the troops at www.caringfor troops.com. Contact: Eileen Dees, 541-410-2487 or Debbie Martorano, 541-480-2089 — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C ouple flirts with marriage for a second time around Dear Abby: Do you have any data on the success of remarrying your ex-spouse? After being married to my husband for 25 years, we divorced due to his infidelity. We have been divorced for eight years and have had no contact. A family member’s funeral brought us face-to-face again, and we have been in touch ever since. Neither of us has remarried or been in a relationship. We realize that we still have feelings for each other and have discussed remarrying in the future. I love him, but I’m wary of being hurt again. What do you think? Does remarrying your ex ever work? — Having Second (Time) Thoughts Dear Second Thoughts: It can work, provided you’re both willing to deal with the issues that broke you up in the first place. By that, I mean that you must be ready to examine whether there was something missing in the marriage that caused your husband to cheat, or whether he has a character flaw and would repeat his infidelity. I strongly recommend you do this with the assistance of a licensed marriage counselor. If you both go through the process, remarrying your ex could work. If you don’t, you would be courting another dose of heartache. Dear Abby: I have been dating “Nick” for more than a year. We have both been married before — Nick’s a widower, and I am divorced. He says he cares for me, but doesn’t feel passionate about me, nor does “love” describe how he feels about me. We are intimate, are great friends and spend almost every day together. He treats me great, dates no one else and I can be myself around him. But am I cheating myself by accepting the status quo? Our intimate times aren’t satisfying because

DEAR ABBY of the lack of emotional ties, but I’m torn because I enjoy his company. I am confused. Any words of wisdom, Abby? — Not Quite Fulfilled Dear Not Quite Fulfilled: You and Nick are friends with benefits. Because you have no future with him beyond what you have now, and because intimacy with him is not satisfying because of his inability (or refusal) to emotionally commit — I’d have to say he’s reaping more of the benefits. The status quo is a substitute for what you really want, and yes, you are cheating yourself. Dear Abby: I have been going through photo albums recently. Oh, the joy of seeing all those familiar faces again! However, when I turned the pictures over to verify people’s last names and the dates they were taken, I was disappointed to find them blank. The vacations depicted in the photos were wonderful, and I’m sure I thought we’d never forget the year. But the years go by. ... So this is a reminder to take the time to label the back of photos with pertinent information. Believe me, it will be appreciated in later years. — Shutterbug In Canon City, Colo. Dear Shutterbug: The situation you describe is one that countless people have experienced — and something folks often don’t think about until it is too late. Thank you for the timely suggestion. It’s one that I hope readers will make the time to follow. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Will cop, ‘Castle’ cross moat dividing them? By Ellen Gray

Stana Katic stars opposite Nathan Fillion as a New York police detective on “Castle.”

Philadelphia Daily News

LOS ANGELES — Anyone who thinks that the dancing ends on ABC when Tom Bergeron and Brooke Burke sign off Monday nights should probably take a closer look at the tricky two-step that Nathan Fillion and Stana Katic engage in weekly on “Castle.” As choreographed here on Stages 11 and 12 of Raleigh Studios, the romance-meetsmurder-mystery has Fillion’s novelist Richard Castle and Katic’s homicide detective Kate Beckett circling each other, drawing together and drifting apart, their rhythms dictated by the actors’ instincts and by people offscreen who know just how volatile onscreen chemistry can be. Because, yeah, they’ve seen “Moonlighting.” “When you’re dealing with romantic drama, where you have that tension, you want to make sure you maintain that tension, because that’s part of the fun, but in any real relationship, there are always missed opportunities, there are always moments when you almost come together,” “Castle” creator Andrew Marlowe told me during one of several interviews conducted — some in the homicide squad’s interrogation room — in late July during breaks in filming. “In doing this dance, we also understand our obligation to the audience, to keep it interesting for them, but not to frustrate them and not to have them feel like they’ve been jerked around,” he said. So, if you’ve been waiting two seasons now for Castle and Beckett to really get together, read into that what you will, straight from the mouth of the man who may or may not be responsible for last fall’s New York bestseller “Heat Wave,” and its sequel, “Naked Heat,” published

ABC via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

last week by Disney/ABC-owned Hyperion Books. “The book was written by the ruggedly handsome mystery writer, Richard Castle. I do have to say I worked very closely with him to make sure we were protecting all the elements of the show,” is all Marlowe will say about authorship. The truth is, tension, sexual or otherwise, wasn’t much in evidence on the day I visited “Castle,” where the cast was still basking in the glow of a weekend visit to San Diego ComicCon — an event where former “Firefly” star Fillion, in particular, is regarded as something of a rock star — and most people just seemed happy to be back at work on the show’s third season. Fillion, whose work on producer Joss Whedon’s “Firefly,” “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” and the online musical “Dr. Horrible” makes him a prominent figure in the “Whedonverse,” doesn’t mind at all that his sci-fi fans seem to have followed him to a different genre. “I call Joss Whedon fans ... ‘gold-ticket audiences,’ because it doesn’t seem to matter what I do, they’re always there,” said the actor. “They’re always excited, they’re always supportive. They’re always loyal.” The first lead to be cast — executive producer Laurie Zaks said that the actor “read the script very early in our casting

When: 10 p.m. Mondays Where: ABC

process and called us and said, ‘I love this part,’ ” and after meeting him, “we knew it was right” — Fillion said that he recognized something of himself in the Castle character. “He’s living in his imagination every day,” Fillion said. “He’s creating from his mind, he’s writing, he’s researching, he’s very much about the book and the printed page. And now, all of the sudden, he’s on the forefront of murder investigations, so now every day is a field trip to this guy. And he loves life, he’s having a great time.” Katic was one of more than a hundred actresses who auditioned for her part. She sees Beckett as a throwback to the “dames” in ’40s films. “They were as sexy, as powerful, as ballsy as the boys,” she said. “And what’s fun about it is that, hopefully, within all that kind of strength of character and know-how, we are finding more

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

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541-389-9252 541-706-6900

‘Castle’

opportunities for her to have the kind of sense of humor that that kind of a girl would have, and also just this sensuality and charisma that that kind of a girl has. It’s different. It’s not ditzy, it’s got a certain amount of, like — what is that phrase, the cat that swallowed the canary? Yeah, a little bit of that.” In casting Katic, “I was looking for somebody who had strength, somebody who had intelligence, somebody who could go toe-totoe, but in a different way,” Marlowe said. “When you’re creating this sort of dynamic, you want each character to occupy their own territory, their own ZIP code, if you will. And one interesting thing about the Castle character is that he represents all the different kinds of men. You know, he’s the man-child, he’s also a really good father, you can see him in relationships, you can see him as the long-suffering son. “With Beckett, I wanted her to be a little more of an enigma for him to be compelled to kind of pull back those layers. But I was very cognizant that I wanted her to be, in a way, post-feminist, where her issue wasn’t about proving herself in a male-dominated workplace. She’s there, she’s smart, she’s really good at what she does,” Marlowe said, noting that when he wrote the screenplay for “Air Force One,” “I made a choice to make the vice president a woman and not really talk about it ... because I felt it was where we were in the culture — or it was where we were about to be.”

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 Road Hazard; Cold ‘14’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Winter Games (N) ‘14’ The First 48 (N) ‘14’ Å The First 48 Last Fare ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Dissolved ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Cliffhanger” (1993, Action) Sylvester Stallone, John Lithgow, Michael Rooker. A ››› “The Mummy” (1999, Adventure) Brendan Fraser, Rachel Weisz, John Hannah. A mummy seeks (3:30) ›› “Broken Arrow” (1996) John (10:45) ››› “The Terminator” (1984, Science Fiction) Arnold 102 40 39 Travolta, Christian Slater. Å mountaintop rescue becomes a hunt for stolen money. revenge for a 3,000-year-old curse. Å Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton. Å Maneaters Gators/Crocs ‘PG’ Å Wild Kingdom Manta Queen ’ ‘PG’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ Å The Blue Planet Open Ocean ’ ‘G’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life Coasts ‘G’ Blue Planet: Seas of Life ‘G’ Å 68 50 12 38 Maneaters ’ ‘PG’ Å The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ The Real Housewives of D.C. ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly What Happens Housewives 137 44 Trick My Truck Home Videos Home Videos The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Petty Blue Four generations of the Petty family compete in NASCAR. ’ Trick My Truck Ultimate Tailgating The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 Trick My Truck Put it on the Map Biography on CNBC American Greed Mad Money American Originals: Budweiser Biography on CNBC Celeb Secret Zumba Dance 51 36 40 52 BP: In Deep Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Ugly Americans Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Ugly Americans South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Sasquatch Gng Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon Bend on the Run Outside Presents Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 U.S. Senate Debate NV (Live) Tonight From Washington U.S. House of Representatives Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb “Wizards of Waverly Place The Movie” (2009) ‘G’ (9:45) Fish Hooks Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Hannah Montana Hannah Montana 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark How Do They How It’s Made ’ Storm Chasers What Goes Around Storm Chasers Greatest Storms (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Storm Chasers What Goes Around 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:30) College Football South Florida at West Virginia (Live) High School Football Abilene (Texas) at Midland Lee (Texas) (Live) SportsNation MMA Live (N) 2010 World Series of Poker 2010 World Series of Poker 22 24 21 24 NASCAR Racing 2007 Hot August Nights Auction 30 for 30 (N) UWF Wrestling College Football 2004 Southern Mississippi at Memphis 23 25 123 25 NBA Finals game 7, from June 17, 2010. (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids ›› “Liar Liar” (1997) Jim Carrey. A fast-talking lawyer cannot tell a lie. ›› “Liar Liar” (1997) Jim Carrey. A fast-talking lawyer cannot tell a lie. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped Good Eats Good Eats (N) Iron Chef America Symon vs. Fraser Food Feuds (N) Food Feuds Chopped Prickly Situation ‘G’ 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Bellator Fighting Championships (N) Huskies Cougars Access Tennis 20 45 28* 26 (4:30) College Football Kansas State at Kansas (Live) (4:00) ›› “Zoolander” (2001) ›› “Baby Mama” (2008, Comedy) Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Greg Kinnear. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Always Sunny The League (N) Always Sunny The League 131 Holmes/Homes Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins My First Place My First Sale ‘G’ Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Buck UFO Files ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Stan Lee’s Superhumans ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens Closer Encounters Alien encounters throughout history. ‘PG’ UFO Files Real UFO’s ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 UFO Files ‘PG’ Å Project Runway There’s a Pattern Here ‘PG’ Å Project Runway A Look in the Line ‘PG’ Å Project Runway We’re in a New York State of Mind ‘PG’ On the Road On the Road On the Road 138 39 20 31 (4:30) Project Runway ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control That ’70s Show That ’70s Show The Challenge: Cutthroat ’ ‘14’ The Challenge: Cutthroat ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore Girls Like That ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (11:05) Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob BrainSurge ‘G’ Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez George Lopez The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Gangland Highway to Hell ‘14’ Å Gangland Divide and Conquer ‘14’ TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å TNA ReACTION (N) ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 Star Trek: Voyager ’ ‘PG’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å Destination Truth Siberian Snowman Destination Truth (N) ’ Å Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Destination Truth ’ Å 133 35 133 45 Destination Truth ’ Å Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ American Dad ’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 King of Queens ››› “Murder, He Says” (1945, Comedy) Fred MacMurray, Helen Walker, Marjorie ››› “Murder, She Said” (1961) Margaret Rutherford. Sleuth ››› “The Band Wagon” (1953) Fred Astaire. A Hollywood has››› “Incendiary Blonde” (1945, Musical) Betty Hutton, Arturo de Córdova, Charlie 101 44 101 29 Ruggles. Life of Texas Guinan, Roaring ’20s hostess. Main. An insurance salesman encounters homicidal mountain folk. Miss Marple poses as maid to find corpse. been tries his luck in a Broadway musical. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ LA Ink Will Kat ruin a surprise. ‘PG’ American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Lottery Changed My Life (N) ’ ‘PG’ Cellblock 6: Female Lock Up ‘PG’ Lottery Changed My Life ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Great Satan ’ ‘14’ Bones The End in the Beginning ‘14’ Law & Order Doped ’ ‘14’ ››› “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” (2002) Nia Vardalos. Å CSI: NY ... Comes Around ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Scooby-Doo “Scooby-Doo and the Witch’s Ghost” (1999, Adventure) Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Boneknapper Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Extreme Pig Outs ‘PG’ Å Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Deep Fried Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Fast Food ‘PG’ Å All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Saturday Night Live in the 2000s: Time and Again ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. ’ 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

Last-Harvey ›› “Con Air” 1997 Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their flight. ‘R’ In the House ›› “Step Brothers” 2008 Will Ferrell. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:40) › “Bad Company” 2002, Action Anthony Hopkins. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› Mo’ Money (7:15) ›› “Without a Trace” 1983, Drama Judd Hirsch, Kate Nelligan. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Paradise Road” 1997, Drama Glenn Close, Pauline Collins. ‘R’ Å ›› Off Limits ›› “Smilla’s Sense of Snow” 1997, Suspense Julia Ormond. ‘R’ Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Cubed (N) Å The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Insane Cinema The Daily Habit LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Frys.com Open, First Round From San Martin, Calif. Golf Central LPGA Tour Golf CVS/pharmacy LPGA Challenge, First Round Little House on the Prairie Fred ‘G’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Mad Hungry Mad Hungry Whatever With Alexis & Jennifer The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) › “Anaconda” 1997 Jennifer Lopez, (6:15) ››› “Taken” 2008, Action Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. A former spy uses his “Monica & David” 2009, Documentary (9:15) Conviction: Bored to Death ’ Bored to Death ’ Bored to Death ’ Cathouse: Sex, Real Sex Xtra: PorHBO 425 501 425 10 Ice Cube. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å old skills to save his kidnapped daughter. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Premiere. ’ ‘NR’ Å HBO First Look ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Guys nucopia ››› “The Claim” 2000, Drama Peter Mullan, Wes Bentley. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. ››› “Chopper” 2000, Drama Eric Bana. ‘R’ ›› “Saw” 2004, Horror Cary Elwes, Danny Glover. ‘R’ Nosebleed ‘14’ ››› “Home Movie” 2008 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ››› “Minority Re(4:30) ›› “Heaven’s Prisoners” 1996 Alec Baldwin. An ex-cop (6:45) ››› “Darkman” 1990, Action Liam Neeson, Frances McDormand. A scientist (8:20) ›› “Darkman II: The Return of Durant” 1995 Arnold Vo- ›› “Darkman III: Die Darkman Die” 1996, Horror Jeff Fahey, MAX 400 508 7 runs afoul of an old friend’s drug operation. seeks revenge on the thugs who disfigured him. ’ ‘R’ Å sloo. Sadistic crime lord awakens from coma. Arnold Vosloo, Darlanne Fluegel. ’ ‘R’ Å port” 2002 ’ World’s Toughest Fixes ‘PG’ Into the Lost Crystal Caves World’s Toughest Fixes ‘PG’ Into the Lost Crystal Caves Outlaw Bikers Billy Queen. ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Big Time Rush Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air (10:05) The Troop Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Monster Bucks American Hunter Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Steve’s Outdoor Jackie Bushman Beyond, Lodge Legends of Fall Bone Collector Pheasants For. Drop Zone OUTD 37 307 43 (6:45) ›› “Soul Men” 2008, Comedy Samuel L. Jackson, Bernie Mac, Sharon Leal. (8:25) “Give ’Em Hell Malone” 2009, Crime Drama Thomas Dexter Practically Perfect Dexter hires a Zalman: Body “The Amateurs” 2005, Comedy Jeff Bridges. iTV. Small-town Beach Heat: Miami SHO 500 500 Jane, Ving Rhames. iTV Premiere. ‘R’ nanny. ’ ‘MA’ Å citizens make an amateur porn film. ’ ‘R’ iTV. Estranged singers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ Language (N) ‘MA’ Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘14’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘14’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ‘14’ ›› “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” 2009 ‘R’ Å (7:05) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008, Comedy Josh Zuckerman. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009 ’ ‘G’ Å (10:45) › “Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo” 1999 ‘R’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:20) ››› “Hijacking Hollywood” 1997 ››› “Buffalo 66” 1998, Drama Vincent Gallo, Christina Ricci. An ex-con concocts a ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. James Bond “The Butcher” 2007, Suspense Eric Roberts, Robert Davi, Geoffrey Lewis. A betrayed TMC 525 525 Henry Thomas. ’ ‘NR’ Å crazy plan to impress his parents. ’ ‘R’ Å seeks revenge for the death of Vesper Lynd. ’ ‘PG-13’ gangster seeks revenge. ’ ‘NR’ NHL Hockey Tampa Bay Lightning at Philadelphia Flyers Hockey Central WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å The Daily Line (Live) World Extreme Cagefighting Urijah Faber vs. Mike Brown The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Katie & Carley ‘PG’ Å Bridezillas Carley & Erica ‘14’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Homecoming ‘PG’ The Locator ‘G’ The Locator ‘PG’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Cry, the Beloved Country” by Alan Paton; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1061 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. CONCERT OF INDIA: Featuring a performance by M. Manjunath of the Mysore Violin Brothers and Arjun Kumar; $15 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-350-9642 or www.bendticket.com. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. THE TRUE BLUE BAND: The highenergy blues band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. “TELEVISION”: A screening of the telemark ski movie; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit local nonprofits; $10; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

FRIDAY LITERARY HARVEST: The seventh annual event features keynote speaker Elizabeth Lyon; the winners of the Literary Harvest Contest will present their work; $10, $5 for Central Oregon Writers Guild members; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-408-6306 or www.centraloregonwritersguild.com. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: Dennis L. Jenkins presents “Oregon’s Earliest Inhabitants: Archaeological Investigations at the Paisley Caves”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center,

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; with a champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “THE LAST STATION”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. BROADWAY CALLS: Pop-punk show, with Capture the Flag, Mascot and Icarus the Owl; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.myspace.com/ capturetheflagpop. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreet theater.com. CENTRAL OREGON’S LAST COMIC STANDING: Qualifying round; comedians present comic acts and attempt to advance to the next round of competition; $5; 8-10 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-585-3557. BIG JUGS: The country-bluegrass band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178. MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES: The Boise, Idahobased indie rock band performs, with Bryan Free; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY ESTATE SALE: Proceeds benefit Bend Nile Club; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; dnelson995@aol.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-385-0750. “BUTTERFLIES” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features 100 species of live butterflies; exhibit runs through Feb. 6; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the High Desert Droids robotics team; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-389-7904. NONDENOMINATIONAL WOMEN’S CONFERENCE: With gospel singers, speakers and testimonials; free; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Agape Harvest Fellowship, 52460 Skidgel Road, La Pine; 541-536-5858. OREGON PET EXPO: Featuring seminars, a vaccine clinic and a variety of pet booths; $5, $4 ages 55 and older and free ages 16 and younger; 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-815-2639. “A CAREGIVER’S JOURNEY”: Author Karen Twitchell talks about

the concerns of caregivers; proceeds benefit the Alyce Hatch Center; $15; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-282-1980 or bendnative@aol.com. BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. NORTHWEST CROSSING HALLOWEEN PARTY: Activities and crafts for children, pumpkin painting, cupcake decorating and more; costumes encouraged; $5; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www.northwest crossing.com. SHREDDING EVENT: Safely destroy personal documents; for residential shredding only; donations of quality of life items requested, to be sent to overseas troops; 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Steve Scott Realtors, 685 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-410-2487. CORN-BAG TOSS CHALLENGE: Toss corn bags through a board in teams of two; with a barbecue lunch; registration required to play; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $50 per team, free for spectators; 11 a.m.; Baldy’s BBQ, 235 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541617-1010 or www.bendsnip.org. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by the Candlelight Chamber Players; free; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. BOWLOPOLIS FAMILY FUN NIGHT: Bowling and children’s activities; proceeds benefit Girls on the Run of Deschutes County; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; Lava Lanes Bowling Center, 1555 N.E. Forbes Road, Bend; info@ deschutescountygotr.org or www.deschutescountygotr.org. “SUDS N SUDS”: A presentation of Take Two Productions’ musical about two sisters overcoming debt and frustrations; with a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Bend Future Farmers of America; $20; 6:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-318-5778. HAUNT AT JUNIPER HOLLOW AND DARK INTENTIONS HAUNTED HOUSES: Fourth annual event features two haunted houses; recommended for ages 12 and older; proceeds benefit the Oregon Athletic & Educational Foundation; Wednesdays and Thursdays: $10, $17 both haunts; Fridays and Saturdays: $12, $22 both haunts; 7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-2390 or www.scaremegood.com. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or

www.2ndstreettheater.com. LUCKYIAM: Performance by the Living Legend, with Mestizo and Cadalack Ron; free; 9:30 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

SUNDAY BEND MARKET: Vendors sell produce, antiques and handcrafted items; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Indoor Markets, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-408-0078. KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS OKTOBERFEST: The sixth annual event features live music, food and more; $15, $5 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger; 1-6 p.m.; St. Edward the Martyr Church, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters; 541-549-2078 or www.stedwardsisters.org. “DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man whose experiments have brought forth his villainous other half; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

MONDAY “PEACEABLE KINGDOM”: Film screens in honor of Vegetarian Awareness Month; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

TUESDAY SENIOR DAY: Ages 62 and older can visit for free; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “GERMAN RESEARCH VIA SOCIAL NETWORKING”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Allen Braemer; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www.orgen web.org/deschutes/bend-gs. JO DEE MESSINA: The awardwinning country musician performs, with Lisa C. Pollock; $45 or $55; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. LUCY SCHWARTZ: The Los Angeles-based singer songwriter performs, with Anastacia Beth Scott; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: James C. Foster reads from his book “BONG HiTS 4 JESUS: A Perfect Constitutional Storm in Alaska’s Capital”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “REPORTING THE TRUTHS OF THE WORLD”: Nicholas Kristof talks about international issues; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

GET LOW (PG-13) 1, 4, 7 IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY (PG13) 12:45, 3:40, 6:40 MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG) 12:35, 3:50, 6:50 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 12:15, 3:10, 6:10 THE TILLMAN STORY (R) 12:35, 3:30, 6:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 12:25, 3:20, 6:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

CASE 39 (R) 12:20, 3:55, 7:05, 9:40 DEVIL (PG-13) 1:45, 4:50, 6:55, 9:25 EASY A (PG-13) 1:35, 5:10, 7:55, 10:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) 1:10, 4:25, 7:50 JACKASS 3-D (R) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:03 a.m. LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 1:40, 5:15 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3-

D(PG) Noon, 4, 6:25, 9:15 LET ME IN (R) 12:05, 3:40, 6:40, 9:20 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 1:20, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05 MY SOUL TO TAKE 3-D (R) 1:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:10 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 12:30, 3:35, 6:20, 9:10 RED (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) 7:45, 10:15 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:50, 4:10, 7, 9:50 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 12:15, 1, 3:50, 4:45, 6:50, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15 THE TOWN (R) 12:35, 4:20, 7:10, 10 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 YOU AGAIN (PG) 1:05, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) SALT (PG-13) 6:30

N   N  Christina Aguilera, husband separate

Michael Jackson video set to be released

LOS ANGELES — Christina Aguilera and her husband of nearly five years have separated. The “Beautiful” singer says in a statement released Tuesday that she and husband Jordan Bratman’s commitment to their 2-year-old son Christina remains “as Aguilera strong as ever.” The Grammy Award-winner’s statement did not indicate when the couple split or whether either would file for divorce. Court records in Los Angeles do not show any filing by either Aguilera or Bratman. The couple married in November 2005. Their split was first reported by US Weekly.

NEW YORK — Michael Jackson’s complete library of videos is being restored and re-released, as well as a never-released clip for his song “One More Chance.” The “Michael Jackson’s Vision” boxed set is due out Nov. 22 and includes 4½ hours’ worth of material, including the full version of “Black or White,” which was cut short after its initial release due to violent imagery and Jackson’s gyrations. Other videos include Martin Scorsese-directed “Bad” and his most famous video, “Thriller.”

Richter to join O’Brien on TBS talk show NEW YORK — When Conan O’Brien debuts his new, late-night talk show on TBS, he’ll have an old friend and colleague by his side. Andy Richter will serve as sidekick on “Conan.” Richter said Andy Richter he’s “thrilled” to be working with O’Brien and he’s most exited about “getting out of the house again.” O’Brien added, “This decision was made without my authority. ... I will get to the bottom of this.” Richter and O’Brien first joined forces in 1993 on NBC’s “Late Night with Conan O’Brien.” Richter was also tapped to appear with O’Brien on “The Tonight Show.” “Conan” will premiere Nov. 8 on TBS.

Michael Douglas’ health ‘precarious’

M T For Thursday, Oct. 14

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

EDITOR’S NOTE: Powderwhore Productions will screen “TeleVision” at 9 p.m. today.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 4:45 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 4, 6:30, 9 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3:45, 6:45, 9:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 6:45, 9:30 YOU AGAIN (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 6:45 SECRETARIAT (PG) 6:45 THE TOWN (R) 6:30 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 6:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ALPHA AND OMEGA (PG) 4 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) 7

BERLIN — Director Oliver Stone says he is worried about the health of actor Michael Douglas, who is battling throat cancer in an advanced stage. Stone said Tuesday in Berlin that Douglas is in a “precarious” state of health. Michael He said Douglas Douglas, who reprised his role as stock trader Gordon Gekko in Stone’s latest film “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” was meant to accompany him on a promotion tour in Europe. But Stone said Douglas is still “suffering” and remained in the U.S. for further cancer treatments. The 65-year-old Douglas said in August he is battling throat cancer, but he attended the film’s premiere in New York three weeks ago. Stone’s newest film is a sequel to the 1987 “Wall Street,” for which Douglas won an Academy Award.

Mirren crowned new queen of action NEW YORK — Helen Mirren is so good playing a veteran spy in “RED” that her co-stars are starting to wondering whether she’s really acting. The ensemble cast, which includes Bruce Willis, John Malkovich and Morgan Freeman as retired CIA operatives, has reached a consensus that Mirren is the most likely to be a real-life undercover agent. “She’s just there listening to what you’re saying, taking notes, and all of a sudden you feel a little stabbing pain back here, and you’re on the floor,” Willis joked. Mirren’s feminine wiles could be an asset. “I don’t think any man would be looking for an alternative motive because they’d probably be overwhelmed by her charms,” says co-star Mary-Louise Parker. As former sniper Victoria, the 65-year-old Mirren wields a semi-automatic as gracefully as she arranges flowers. Mirren, the Oscar-winning actress whose screen credits include “The Last Station” and “The Queen,” admits she was nervous about becoming an action star but says working with Willis eased the transition. Mirren says she looked to domestic diva Martha Stewart with her “gracious intelligence combined with a steely determination” to create the lethal, yet elegant character. Despite her best intentions and a reputation for a rockhard body, Mirren spent little time training physically for the role. Willis says “RED,” which opens Friday, packs in the action, comedy and romance but acknowledges, “At the end of the day, I’m just waiting for that shot of Helen on that .50-caliber machine gun, tearing it up.”

Midler joins ‘Priscilla Queen of the Desert’ NEW YORK — Bette Midler has signed up to help produce the stage version of “Priscilla Queen of the Desert.” The musical is adapted from the zany 1994 movie about a trio of drag queens traveling across the Australian outback in a bus. Producer James Nederlander says of Midler: “We are thrilled that she wants to join us on the bus for this magnificent adventure.” Midler made her Broadway debut in “Fiddler on the Roof” and has returned several times in concerts and revues. “Priscilla Queen of the Desert the Musical” is currently in Toronto. Previews in New York begin Feb. 28. — From wire reports


E4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Oct. 14, 2010: This year, you change gears often as you experiment with different styles in your personal life. If you are attached, the more extroverted you are, the more threatened a partner could become. Learn how to create greater security between the two of you. If you are single, you are extremely magnetic and attract people. Settling in might not happen that easily. You might become extremely assertive about making money this year. Use your energy well. Pick and choose where you place it. CAPRICORN understands you well. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Take a stand and be direct with your dealings. You might be going to extremes in a key relationship or partnership. You find conflicting opinions difficult to deal with. Honor your feelings, and don’t give away too much of yourself. Tonight: Out late. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Keep reaching out for others, knowing full well what needs to occur. You see yourself developing a different attitude with those you deal with on a daily level. Others respect your innate sense of what works. A meeting proves to be provocative and opens up many options. Tonight: Make anything possible. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Dealing with a difficult partner could be exhausting but absolutely necessary. Recognize

your limits while getting as much accomplished as possible. You need to work through unusual stress. Tonight: Chat with a friend. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer to others, knowing your limits. Understanding evolves when dealing with others. You might not like a family member’s attitude. You have to deal with a difficult person, whether you like it or not. Be open to possibilities. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH The Lion roars as he tries to complete his work. There are times when you feel as if you have had enough and it is time for some R and R. You will want to get through a project quickly and efficiently. Tonight: Working your tail off! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Creativity feeds the soul, especially right now. Understand what is happening behind the scenes with a child or loved one. This person might not be telling you the whole story. You might feel that you got a distorted tale when the facts come out. Tonight: Put on your dancing shoes. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could be inordinately hung up on a personal matter. You wonder about the hows and whys of the situation. Actually, you might have more of a problem isolating certain details than you realize. Pressure builds as a result, encouraging you to view life through new eyes. Tonight: Decide what you don’t enjoy doing. Say “no” to just that! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You could be picking up a

lot of strange information. Others make strong statements, and you might wonder which way to go with an opportunity. If you think someone is being deceptive, he or she probably is. Tonight: Easy works. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Your focus is on handling a money manner. Be sure of one thing: Others have very different ideas, especially involving your funds and finances. Rest assured, you will find the right path. Tonight: Pay bills first. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You are still a force to behold and are extremely lively. You will see situations a lot differently from many, and are not afraid of hard work or responsibility. Imagine the possibilities more openly, and rest assured you will head in the right direction. Tonight: On top of your game. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Much is still going on behind the scenes. You could be questioning the pros and cons at the moment. You are often lightheaded, though you could be restricting yourself from certain possibilities. Tonight: Reach out for the impossible ... don’t just think about it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH You could see many different sides to a personal situation. In a meeting, you gain even more insight about what does and doesn’t motivate those around you. Lady Luck plays a strong role. Tonight: Where the gang is.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-389-2867. AMERICAN LEGION POST 44: 7 p.m.; American Legion Post 44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. social, 7-9 p.m. meeting; The Environmental Center, Bend; www.deschutesdems.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SECOND CHILDHOOD DOLL CLUB: 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; call for location; 541-923-8557 or 541-548-4269. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010.

THINK AGAIN PARENTS (TAPS) SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION TEAM OF REDMOND: 4-5:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, Historical Room; 541-548-4481. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www.bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HOMELESS LEADERSHIP COALITION: 8:30 a.m.; Bend Public Library; www.cohomeless.org or 541-504-1389, ext. 306. NATIONAL ACTIVE AND RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL OREGON CHAPTER: 10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-2228. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds

Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY BACHELOR BEAUTS MAINSTREAM SQUARE DANCE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 3 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30-11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-382-4366 or www .latinocommunityassociation.org. OPEN DANCE: 7-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363. SONS OF NORWAY: Social; 6 p.m. children’s club, 6:30 dinner; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CENTRAL OREGON SENIOR SINGLES: 4-6 p.m.; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, Bend; 541-410-6828.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292.

BAND OF BROTHERS: For all veterans; 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-382-0118. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-389-0663. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION: $8.50 for lunch; 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, Redmond; 541-382-7044 or sueathome@coinet.com. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. MT. BACHELOR KENNEL CLUB: 7:30 p.m.; Bend; www.mbkc.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507. VFW DEXTER FINCHER POST 1412: 6:30 p.m.; Veterans Hall, Prineville; 541-447-7438.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend;

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CLASSIC CAR CRUISE IN: 5-7:30 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, Bend; rimcoffeehouse@ bendbroadband.com. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517.

BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 4 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. BOOK-A-LUNCH: Noon-1 p.m.; La Pine Public Library; 541-312-1090. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541317-5843 or www.coflyfishers.org. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LATINA WOMEN’S GROUP: 10:30 a.m.noon; Sam Johnson Park, Redmond; 541-504-4204 or 541-504-1397. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: 5:30-7:30 p.m.; lesliek@ bendbroadband.com to RSVP. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541-383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575. VEGETARIAN CONNECTION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, Bend; 541-948-2596. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

Find Your Dream Home

If you go What: Hood River Fruit Loop Getting there: From Bend, drive north on U.S. Highway 97, then west on U.S. Highway 26 toward Government Camp. Turn right at state

Highway 35 and descend into Hood River Valley. Pick up a Fruit Loop map at any of the participating farms. Cost: Free to browse Contact: 541-386-7697 or www.hoodriverfruitloop.com

Every Saturday In Real Estate

541-322-CARE

Enter to Win one of these Great Prizes!

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

Chestnut pods litter the ground under the trees at Nella Chestnut Farm. When the pods split, the chestnuts fall out.

Outing Continued from E1 We weren’t so lucky in the weather department, as our trip coincided with a daylong rainstorm that left the mountains obscured by clouds and the hillsides covered in mist. But even wet and gray weather couldn’t dampen the beauty of the Hood River Valley. Because we’d traveled from Portland that morning, we started our trip along the Fruit Loop at the north end, passing through the quaint town of Hood River before dropping down state Highway 35. Stop at any farm along the route (they are well-marked with signs), and pick up a map of the Fruit Loop. The map will describe each farm on the loop and may help you determine which you’d like to visit. We started at Rasmussen Farms, which boasted at least a dozen varieties of apples, plus more fruit, a pumpkin patch, corn maze and more. Most of the farms will let you sample fruit you may not be familiar with, which is how I fell in love with the Tokyo rose apple. We also purchased a bunch of winter banana apples, an heirloom variety that’s especially good for applesauce. My sons had their eyes on some caramel apples, and we indulged them. Seemed like a great idea until my 8-year-old, Harry, realized he couldn’t bite his caramel apple with his loose and missing front teeth. Our next stop was a chestnut farm, where I discovered that chestnut pods look like nothing

Nella Chestnut Farm’s acreage includes this lovely pond. more than Tribbles, those furry critters of “Star Trek” fame. But once the pods split open and release the chestnuts inside, they can be gathered up from the orchard. My husband procured two pounds of these nuts for his Thanksgiving stuffing. Next, we went to an alpaca farm, where the boys fed the Peruvian animals out of their hands, the alpacas’ soft lips nibbling at the food pellets. Alpacas — not to be confused with llamas — are beautiful in a long-necked, alien kind of way. We saw baby alpacas nursing and browsed through the farm’s yarn and knitting store, which carried many products made from alpaca wool imported from Peru, plus a small selection of items made from their own alpaca wool. I became the proud owner of a hat made of alpaca wool. It’s warm (three times as insulating

as sheep’s wool, claimed the shop worker) and very, very soft. There are few places in Oregon where you can get as varied and interesting an insight into agriculture as the Hood River Valley, which is what makes the Fruit Loop such a fascinating excursion. And one thing I noticed at each place we went was this: These farmers love to share what they know. So ask questions. Learn about what the farmers do and why they share, opening their farms to visitors each year. Try an apple you’ve never heard of. I passed out slices of Tokyo rose apples for breakfast the other day, and even the kids admitted they were better than Froot Loops. Julie Johnson can be reached at 541-383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

RV SHOW

ENTERPRISES REALTY, INC.

2 FOR 1 COUPON

Coupon redeemable for two tickets at the regular adult admission price of $5. This coupon is good only for the day of purchase. Expires 10/17/10. Cannot be applied at the senior or child rate or combined with any other offer.


F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

H

Fitness A new study shows that biking or walking to work can limit the risk of obesity, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2010

MEDICINE

PILOT PROGRAM

VERTIGO For some, a simple series of movements could be the cure

Bend clinic tests ‘medical home’ model By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

The Epley maneuver

By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

The most common cause of vertigo is debris that enters one of three semicircular canals that make up the vestibular labyrinth, an inner ear organ that helps the brain keep track of head movement. Dr. John Epley, a Portland physician, developed a sequence of positions that uses gravity to move the debris out the end of the canal.

or several months last year, Sonja Decker had to lie down to sleep with the utmost caution. If she rolled over on to her side — her preferred sleeping position — she would experience the spinning sensation known as vertigo. Despite visits to multiple doctors, nobody could provide her with any relief. “It was really affecting my quality of life and my ability to sleep,” the 72-year-old Bend woman said. When she went for physical therapy for her knee at Rebound Physical Therapy on Bend’s east side, her therapist had to ease her down onto her back gently, so as not to trigger the vertigo. Then during one session, the therapist suggested she see Stuart Johnson, another therapist at the clinic who specializes in inner ear disorders. He conducted a simple test that confirmed Decker had the most common cause of vertigo, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, or BPPV. Johnson told her there was a good chance he could cure her with a set of basic head maneuvers, and if she wanted, he could perform the treatment there on the spot. “Yeeeessss!” Decker recalls responding, almost in tears. Johnson took her head in his hands, turned it 45 degrees, and laid her down with her head hanging off the edge of the exam table. After 30 seconds in that position, he turned her head 90 degrees in the opposite direction. Then 30 seconds later, he asked Decker to roll onto her side and he turned her head a further 90 degrees. “It was miserable because it caused my vertigo to trigger,” Decker said. “He just kept saying, ‘Keep your eyes open and stay with me,’ and that cured it. One time.” That night she carefully lay back in bed and turned onto her side. To her surprise, her world did not begin to spin. “Honey,” she told her husband, “I’m cured.” See Vertigo / F4

F

1 The Epley maneuver starts with the patient in a seated position on a table.

Cochlea

Otoconia debris

Vestibular labyrinth

2 The practitioner turns the patient’s head 45 degrees to the affected side and brings the patient down on his or her back with the head hanging off the edge of the table.

3

Inside • How many calories are in Chili’s Big Mouth Bites? Find out on Page F6

Chain restaurants offer plenty of caloric pitfalls By Rachel Saslow

After holding that position, the practitioner turns the patient’s head 90 degrees in the opposite direction.

The Washington Post

Sometimes, American restaurants unveil menu items that are so gluttonous they seem to be trying to stun the senses. This was N U T R the case earlier this year with KFC’s much-discussed Double Down sandwich: two pieces of bacon, two slices of cheese and “Colonel’s Sauce,” with two thick filets of fried chicken functioning as the bun. But compared with some chain restaurants’ offerings, the 540calorie Double Down is almost

Inner ear

Cochlea

4

High Lakes Health Care will begin enrolling patients this month in a program that could change the way they get medical care. For a select group of 200 patients already MO going to High Lakes, the Bend clinic will, with consent, give them a nurse case manager who will make sure the patients get needed immunizations, are taking their medications and are working toward agreed-on lifestyle changes. Then, the clinic will track the outcomes of these patients. They expect the program will reduce emergency room visits, hospitalizations and help the patients feel better. “We’re pretty excited about it,” said Dr. Steve Mann, a family practice physician at High Lakes. “We think this is probably the best thing that’s hap-

pened to medical care in a long time.” The High Value Patient Centered Care project, as it is named, brings together five of the largest health insurers in the state with 14 medical clinics across Oregon. High N E Y Lakes is the only Central Oregon clinic participating. It’s one of several initiatives of the Oregon Health Leadership Council, a group charged by state business leaders with reducing health care costs. Known as the medical home model because it aims to give people a home base for medical care, this is gaining popularity across the nation as a way to reduce costs and improve care for patients. It can be especially helpful for patients with chronic conditions that can take intensive medical management and result in multiple hospitalizations. See Clinic / F5

health food. Many meals offered at these eateries are much worse, nutritionally speaking. Read on for a list of dishes that in just one sitting provide close to or more than the I T I O N 2,000 calories recommended by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for an entire day’s sustenance. They also mostly stomp all over the recommended daily intakes for sodium (no more than 2,400 milligrams), fat (65 grams) and saturated fat (20 grams) for someone on a 2,000calorie diet. See Calories / F6

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After holding that position, the practitioner will ask the patient to roll onto his or her side and rotates the head another 90 degrees.

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As the patient sits up, the otoconia debris falls out of the canal into another portion of the ear, where it eventually disintegrates.

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The patient may feel dizzy for a while after sitting up, but about 80 percent of patients will be cured of their vertigo after the treatment.

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F2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H  D FLU SHOTS Many insurance plans will cover seasonal flu shots. The following prices apply only to recipients without insurance accepted by the provider. Friday — Noon-6 p.m.; $30; Erickson’s Thriftway, Bend. Saturday — 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; $25; Shop Smart, La Pine. Saturday — Noon-5 p.m.; $30; Erickson’s Thriftway, Madras. Tuesday — 9 a.m.-noon; $30; Sisters Community Church. The following locations have flu shots available on an ongoing basis. Call for times or appointments. Rite Aid, Prineville — $24.99; 541-447-2466. Walgreens, Redmond — $29.99; 541-548-1731. Walmart, Bend — $24; 541-389-8184. Walmart Supercenter, Redmond — $24; 541-923-1718.

SUPPORT GROUPS KNITTING CONNECTIONS: Cancer survivors and caregivers come together to knit; bring yarn or current projects; free; 5:30-7 p.m. Mondays, Oct. 18-Nov. 22; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 2690 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-706-3754 to register. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541-3828274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-382-7504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA):

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Teague Hatfield discusses shoe types during a Learn to Run class. See the Classes section for details. 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-330-0301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE:

Get Back to Your Life

541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960.

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES DEALING WITH ANGER: Parenting class; registration required; $50 or $68; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday and Oct. 25; Ponderosa Elementary School, 3790 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-617-8835 or www. bendparksandrec.org. HEALTH ACCESS TRAINING: Learn about state-sponsored health plans and how to qualify and enroll in them; registration required; free; 1-4 p.m. Oct. 20; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 503754-2934 or dianne@ohac.org. INTRODUCTION TO IYENGAR YOGA: Free; 6-7:15 a.m. Friday and 7-8:15 p.m. Wednesday; Iyengar Yoga of Bend, 660 N.E. Third St., Suite 5; 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. LEARN TO RUN: Learn the fundamentals of running or fitness walking, including selecting gear and setting goals; $55; 9 a.m. Saturdays, Oct. 23-Nov. 27; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-3568 or www.footzonebend.com. LIFE LINE SCREENING: Be screened for bone density and potential cardiovascular conditions; appointments required; $139 or more; 9 a.m. Oct. 27; Ranch Chapel, 5060 S.W. Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 877-237-1287 or www.lifelinescreening.com. MYELOMA UPDATE: Hear an overview of myeloma, learn about drug therapies, disease and treatment side effects and more; registration required; free; 6 p.m. Oct. 21; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-345-0212 or susan.alger@lls.org. SEVEN STEPS TO PAIN-FREE LIVING: Learn to manage pain or live without it; free; 5:30 p.m. Tuesday; Center for Integrated Medicine, 916 S.W. 17th St., Suite 202, Redmond; 541-504-0250 to RSVP. VOLUNTEER TRAINING: Cancer survivors train to become support sisters or brothers; free; 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Oct. 22; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-3754 or mpjohnson@ stcharleshealthcare.org to register. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: www. bendbootcamp.com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

• BABY BOOT CAMP: 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: 541-598-4483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541-383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: elizabethgoodheart2@ gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS

Community Education Series Teleconference: Hospice Foundation of America

CANCER & END OF LIFE CARE Location: Partners In Care 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. Bend

RSVP Seating is limited RSVP Partners In Care 541-382-5882

Bend Spine & Pain Specialists S A C R O I L L I A C PA I N

R A D I C U L O PAT H Y

H E R N I AT E D D I S C

D E G E N E R AT I V E DISC DISEASE

S C I AT I C A N E C K PA I N N E U R O PAT H Y D A I LY H E A D A C H E

Theodore Ford, MD Board Certified Anesthesiologist Board Certified Pain Specialist Non-surgical Pain Management

ARTHRITIS M U S C L E S PA S M B A C K PA I N FA I L E D B A C K S U R G E RY

REFLEX S Y M PAT H E T I C DY S T R O P H Y

TRIGGER POINT

SPINE ARTHRITIS

(541) 647 - 1646 2041 NE Williamson Court, Suite B • Bend www.BendSpineandPain.com

CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-306-1672 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or www.redmondhealingyoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-383-8077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Stroller-fitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-678-2707.

Date Friday, October 22

Cost - Free Time 8:30 am Registration (for CEU) 9:00 am - 12 pm Teleconference presentation 12:00 -12:30 pm Panel discussion with local professionals Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions Serving Central Oregon 24 Hours Everyday

Experts in Chronic and Terminal Care A local, nonprofit, mission driven organization for over 30 years

www.partnersbend.org 541.382.5882 | 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 F3

F INMOTION

Next week A clinic in Bend focuses on fixing backs with exercise machines that isolate and strengthen back and core muscles.

Can a nation switch gears? ‘Active travel’ is the focus of new study correlating walking, biking and obesity By Lindy Washburn The (Hackensack N.J.) Record

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Kathy and Dan Harshburger make their way down a trail at Virginia Meissner Sno-park in January.

Lifelong cross-country skiers have better endurance, aerobic capacity than others Chalk up another victory for the Central Oregon lifestyle. A study in Sweden found that male seniors who have been active cross-country skiers all their lives had twice the aerobic capacity of seniors who do not exercise. The researchers also found the lifelong skiers had results comparable to men who are 40 to 50 years younger but do not engage in any endurance exercise. “The findings show that humans have a great potential to maintain a high level of physical work capacity and thereby better quality of life even at advanced ages,” said Per Tesch, a professor of sports science

at Mid Sweden University and one of the researchers involved in the study. Tesch said some of the results for oxygen uptake among the senior skiers had never been recorded in men that age. Cross-country skiing is an ideal winter exercise for older adults because its low impact nature is easy on the knees, yet it provides a full-body workout. A 175-pound man can burn as many as 800 calories an hour cross-country skiing, and it’s an excellent crosstraining sport for runners and bikers. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Astrid Riecken / The Washington Post

David Opie, 49, a physicist by day, spars at Club One Fitness in Millersville, Md. “We’re all trying to fend off the march of time,” he said.

High-contact sports draw an older crowd By Lenny Bernstein The Washington Post

A person reaches a certain age and realizes there is more to life than managing that next business project and pounding out the miles on a treadmill when the workday ends. For some, it is the thud of a right cross to the face or a swift kick to the ribs. Some middle-aged professionals, bored with the typical range of fitness options, are turning to contact sports such as boxing and karate that long have been the province of younger, less brittle competitors. The sports provide a bit more excitement than traditional workouts, require attention to strategy and tactics, and force devotees to develop new skills, such as coping with the reality of someone charging across a mat to knock you on your butt. “It’s kind of fun. It’s different. It’s something new,” says Janet Magina, 53, a manager at Boeing who started learning to box in January at Club One Fitness in Millersville, Md. “You work out some aggression.” “What are we doing here? We’re all trying to fend off the march of time,” says David Opie, 49, a physicist and vice president at Noxilizer Medical Devices by day. “That’s what I’d like to achieve physically.” Opie is no pencil-necked, pocket-protectored scientist. He stands more than 6 feet tall and weighs 230 pounds. Magina says she’s “been hitting things all my life,” as a former kick-boxer and karate student. I watched them spar with a dozen other people recently at Club One in a session that their instructor kept at less than half speed. I thought I might put on

some gloves and give it a try, but a few minutes of observation is all you need to realize that if you don’t know what you’re doing, you’ll spend the evening with 16-ounce boxing gloves glancing off your head or buried in your midsection. Besides, before boxers are allowed to spar, they must go through intensive conditioning that they uniformly say is the toughest regimen they’ve ever experienced. The workouts include core work, running, ropejumping and hitting light and heavy bags. They emphasize balance and coordination along with cardiovascular development, strength-building and flexibility. “We don’t lift weights, but it is a total, complete workout,” Opie says. Club One, located in an office park, has all the accouterments of a typical gym: elliptical machines, weights, a mirrored studio. But in the middle of the large room is an Olympic-size boxing ring, and there are plans to add a mixed martial arts cage. The place bears no resemblance to the worn, dingy boxing gyms of Hollywood movies, even though some Gold and Silver Gloves fighters, and a few pros, have trained there, says Christen Jeter, the club’s general manager. I couldn’t find any good numbers on whether more working professionals are turning to contact sports. But one part of the movement, known as “whitecollar boxing,” is enjoyed by thousands in gyms across the globe and has its own association. The competitions started in Brooklyn’s famed Gleason’s Gym in the late 1980s and have spread to England and Asia.

HACKENSACK, N.J. — A Rutgers transportation expert says the United States could solve part of its obesity problem by making it easier for people to bike or walk where they need to go. John Pucher analyzed data from 15 countries, 50 states and 47 of the nation’s largest cities for a relationship between “active travel” — the kind that doesn’t rely upon motorized vehicles — and health. Not surprisingly, he found that communities where people cycle and walk more in daily life have less obesity and diabetes than those where people rely on cars to get around. That was true at all three geographic levels, he said in a study called “Walking and Cycling to Health: A Comparative Analysis of City, State and International Data.” The study focused on travel to work and to do errands, not recreational bike-riding or walking. In some European countries, such non-recreational trips are three to five times more common than they are in the United States, the study found. In the Netherlands, Switzerland and Spain, for example, people bike, walk or use mass transit for nearly half of all their trips. “Women and men, old and young, men in suits, they’re all biking,” said Pucher. “They even deliver the mail by bike.” They also have the lowest rates of obesity — just 8 percent in each of those three countries. In the United States, on the other hand, Americans cycle, walk or use mass transit for 11 percent of trips, and in many states far less than that. (Mass-transit use is considered “active travel” because 95 percent of such trips involve walking or biking to or from the station.) And obesity rates in the U.S. average 26 percent, more than three times higher than in the European countries studied. Among the 50 states, Pucher said, “The very highest levels of obesity are found in exactly those states that have the lowest level of biking, walking and public-transit use.” Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Tennessee lead the nation in obesity, at 31 to 33 percent, and lag in walking and cycling, at 1.4 to 2.3 percent of all trips. And the single biggest trend in American travel behavior

over the past decade, he notes, is the sharp decline in the number of children walking and biking to school, which has occurred at a time when obesity rates among children have skyrocketed. Proving cause and effect is impossible, “but you have this interesting relationship,” said Pucher, a professor at the Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. Pucher lives his research: He doesn’t own a car. A resident of Highland Park, he commutes across the Albany Street bridge to the Rutgers campus in New Brunswick by bike five months of the year and on foot the rest of the time. “Yes, even in Central Jersey it is possible to be carfree,” he said. “But it’s not easy!”

Elizabeth Lara / The Record

Two cyclists make their way along the George Washington Bridge in Fort Lee, N.J., beside morning traffic heading into New York City. An extensive geographical study found, unsurprisingly, that communities that cycle or walk more in daily life have less obesity and diabetes.

“Even in cities that are very car-oriented Danger from motorists and have absolutely Public health experts increas- no history of biking, ingly are teaming up with transportation planners to examine you can — through the health implications of transit changes of public choices. Two of the four authors of the “Walking and Cycling” policy — produce a big study are transportation plan- increase in cycling.” ners, one is an obesity researcher and the other is a public-health specialist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is to be published in the American Journal of Public Health. The key to promoting cycling and walking as a daily part of the routine is to make it safe, convenient and attractive, the study concluded. The rate of pedestrian and cyclist death and injury in the United States is many times higher than it is in European countries, with 33.5 cyclists and 13.7 pedestrians injured per 100 million kilometers traveled in the United

— John Pucher States, compared with 1.6 and 1.3 in the Netherlands. In New Jersey, 157 pedestrians were killed in 2009, an increase of 15 percent over the previous year. Bergen County had 12 pedestrian deaths and Passaic County had five. Women are especially concerned about safety, Pucher said, and their reluctance to bike to work reflects that. More than 85 percent of the bike commutes in New Jersey are by male bikers. Reducing car speeds and using

street design to calm traffic, as well as additional restrictions on car use and parking, would encourage more active travel, the study said. Portland is the American city with the highest portion of trips made by bike, Pucher found. The city quadrupled the miles of public bikeways between 1990 and 2008, and saw a fivefold increase in bike trips, to 6.2 percent of the total. Using a bike to get around is trendy there, a sign of belonging to a certain culture. Portland’s transformation makes him optimistic, Pucher says: “Even in cities that are very car-oriented and have absolutely no history of biking, you can — through changes of public policy — produce a big increase in cycling. That is very hopeful for New Jersey.”

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F4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M FA C T VS. FICTION THE CLAIM:

Adult brains don’t change. THE REALITY: We used to believe this was true, said Dr. Richard Koller, a neurologist at NorthStar Neurology in Bend. Now, more advanced brain-imaging techniques have revealed that, though adult brains do not develop at the lightening quick pace of young children, they are not static. There is, Koller said, “evidence that adults are forming new neurons.” The fortunate implication is that you can teach your old brain new tricks. Grown-up brains can learn entirely new skills, neurologists say, such as a new foreign language or a new sport, even though it could take a bit more work than if begun as a child. On a more clinical level, Koller said, neurologists hope that in the future they will use the plasticity of adult brains to help people heal from neurological injuries such as a stroke. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Swallowing batteries is a bad idea; so is delaying treatment By Ami na K han Los Angeles Times

Note to pediatricians: Swallowed batteries damage children’s insides alarmingly fast and need to be treated as quickly as possible, say the authors of a study in the September issue of the Archives of Otolaryngology — Head & Neck Surgery. Though batteries should not be part of your child’s food pyramid, they’re increasingly becoming an issue in our high-tech environment. Disc batteries, easily gobbled by a curious toddler, can cause those children to choke. Even worse, the alkaline in the power cells can destroy tissue, and small-voltage electrical shocks can cause internal burns. The researchers, led by Stanley Kimball of Mount Carmel Health System in Columbus, Ohio, looked at the cases of 10 children (average age: 3.2 years) who swallowed batteries and had to have them removed through esophagoscopy. Even though two of the children whose injuries the authors reviewed were treated within three hours of having swallowed the alkaline-leaking capsules, they still sustained serious damage to the tissue of the esophagus. “Our study confirms that esophageal injury can progress very quickly in children following ingestion of a disc battery,” the authors wrote. But the researchers found a surprising trend among doctors: They described another study showing that more than a third of physicians surveyed weren’t concerned about a swallowed battery. That wasn’t the worst of it, apparently … “Twenty-two percent would not remove (batteries) even if they were lodged in the esophagus,” they wrote. In their paper, the authors present a protocol in a tree-format to help guide doctors in deciding how to deal with a swallowed battery. Perhaps most important: As soon as the battery is identified using chest radiography, the authors concluded, “emergency esophagoscopy is mandated.”

Next week A local surgeon deals with his own melanoma.

Vertigo Continued from F1 Studies suggest about two to three out of every 100 people will experience BPPV at some point in their lifetimes, including 10 percent of people older than 65. Most cases resolve on their own in a couple of weeks, but many patients can experience the spinning sensation off and on for months. Most patients and many doctors still aren’t aware that a series of simple head maneuvers can completely resolve the condition and allow people to resume a normal life.

Rocks in wrong place BPPV is also known as top-shelf vertigo because it’s triggered by head movement, such as tilting the head backward when looking at the top shelf of a cupboard. Patients often experience it when they lean back in a dentist’s chair or at a beauty salon wash basin. Until about 30 years ago, doctors had no treatment, much less a cure, for the condition. Then Dr. John Epley, a Klamath Falls native practicing in Portland, developed the set of head motions that now has become the standard treatment for BPPV. Initially his colleagues were not impressed, ridiculing the doctor, even trying to have his medical license pulled. This laying on of hands looked more like a parlor trick than good medicine. When Epley first tried to publish a journal article describing the success he was having with the technique, the journal editors rejected his submission on the basis that it wasn’t based on any valid medical theory. His theory, however, proved to be exactly right. Doctors now know that BPPV is caused when debris enters canals in the inner ear that control the body’s balance, and that the Epley maneuver removes the debris in 80 percent of patients. It all starts with a sensory organ known as an otolith, which resembles a hairbrush with rocks stuck on the ends of the bristles. The rocks, called otoconia, are made of calcium carbonate and allow the brain to determine body position. If you sit up in bed, for example, the brush is moved from horizontal to a vertical position. Gravity tugs on the rocks, bending the bristles, which then send a corresponding signal to the brain. But over time, those rocks slough off and can trickle into one of three semi-circular canals in the inner ear. These canals are oriented at 90-degree angles to each other, like the corner of a box. When you move your head, the fluid in these three canals moves, triggering sensory organs that help the body determine its position in space and maintain balance. When the rocks get inside these canals, they can interfere with that sensory process, fooling the brain into thinking the head is still moving. The effect is a sensation that you or your room is spinning. Over time, the rocks usually dissolve and the symptoms fade away. But the condition can be debilitating, with even the slightest movement sending the person’s head spinning. Epley reasoned that if the rocks simply fell into the canals, maybe he could use gravity to get them to tumble right back out. The Epley maneuver he developed resembles the child’s toy where you try to move a marble through a maze by tilting the box. By shifting the head through the right sequence of movements, you can move those rocks all the way through the canal to another part of the ear where they can dissolve without causing any problems.

Eye-opener So how do practitioners like Johnson know which canal the rock is in and which way to turn the head? This is where it really gets inter-

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Stuart Johnson, a therapist with Rebound Physical Therapy in Bend, tests Sonja Decker for vertigo using infrared video goggles at Rebound’s east-side location in August. The eye test shows whether debris has entered canals in the inner ear used to track head rotation.

Alcohol consumption and vertigo Have you ever experienced the sensation called room spins after a night of drinking? According to physical therapist Stuart Johnson from Rebound Physical Therapy in Bend, it’s caused, like most vertigo, by a foreign substance — in this case alcohol — inside the ear canals. At the ends of each canal are hair receptor cells encased inside a fragile membrane called the cupula. When you move your head, the fluid in the canal pushes the cupula, triggering the hair receptor cells to signal the brain that the head is moving. If you drink enough, alcohol infuses into the canal, changing the density of the fluid outside the cupula, and the cupula begins to billow and move, stimulating the hair cells. “It makes you think you’re spinning,” Johnson said. Eventually, the alcohol infuses into the cupula as well, equalizing the density inside and outside of the membrane, and the spinning stops. But as your body starts to clear the alcohol, it clears out faster outside the cupula than inside, once again leading to a difference in density on either side of the membrane. “There’s going to be another, milder spin that goes the other way,” Johnson said. “But most of us are asleep by then.” — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

esting. The inner ear has three functions. Most people could probably guess hearing and balance. But the inner ear also has an important function known as vestibulo-ocular reflex, or in common language, gaze stabilization. “The vestibular system detects head movement and has a reflex that goes directly from the inner ear to the eye muscles that steer the eye muscles in the opposite direction, the same amount, the same speed, so when your head moves, your eyes can track,” Johnson explained. Without this reflex we wouldn’t be able to read a sign while walking or catch a baseball on the run. But in BPPV, when the rocks enter the canals, they also impact the eye muscles, creating abnormal eye movements that reveal which canal holds the rocks. Johnson uses an infrared camera to observe this involuntary eye twitch, known as nystagmus, in complete darkness. If the patient can focus on a target, she can keep the effect from happening. Johnson has his patients wear goggles that put their eyes into complete darkness but allow him to see the movement through the infrared camera. He has the patient lie back from a seated position quickly, which is usually enough to trigger vertigo and the nystagmus. “The brain thinks the head is turning, so the eyes drift the other direction and then it realizes, no, the head isn’t turning so it snaps back,” Johnson said. “The

snapping back is the movement we’re trying to see.” The direction the eye is moving tells him which canal is being affected by the rocks, and which way to turn the head to get them out.

Local treatment Johnson is certified in vestibular rehabilitation through the American Physical Therapy Association and Emory University. While there are doctors in the

region who perform the technique as well, Johnson said vertigo and BPPV are often poorly managed. Many patients are referred for treatment to Portland. It’s a tough trip for most, since vertigo patients often suffer from motion sickness, too. “I’m trying to spread the word among doctors that, one, these patients can be treated, and two, they can be treated locally,” Johnson said. Not all vertigo is BPPV, so Johnson said it’s important for doctors to rule out other causes, including inner ear infections, nerve damage or migraines. “If they don’t have spinning, I know it’s probably not BPPV,” Johnson said. “BPPV only starts with head movement; it doesn’t start spontaneously. And most of the time, it goes away in less than a minute. If somebody has all those three things, then I know there’s a good chance they have BPPV, and there’s a good chance I can help them.” Tammi Coleman, another therapist at Rebound, has experienced vertigo intermittently for the past 18 months. Last year, she got up too quickly after demonstrating an exercise for a patient and thought she was going to hit the floor. “I really noticed it lying in bed,” she said. “The way I describe it is like an ocean wave coming in. You just feel it kind of coming on, and you know it’s going to stop and it does stop in about 15 seconds.” Now when the vertigo returns, she knows she can get immediate help at work. “It’s a very easy treatment for a very annoying problem,” she said. About a third of people treated for vertigo will have another case within a year of treatment, and more than half will have a recurrence within five years. In August, more than a year after her first treatment, Decker felt the spinning start again. “I rolled over, and it just triggered, just a little bit. I just tried to lie there really still, and I slowly got on my back,” she said. “It just struck terror in my heart.” She came to see Johnson as soon as he had an opening, but he was unable to trigger the

vertigo or the telltale eye movements again. “It’s possible that you started to have some debris trickle down into that canal, and when you moved your head back, it came back out again,” he told her. Decker was terrified that she might face recurring bouts of vertigo again, but her experience with her first treatment gave her hope that she could once again dispatch it quickly and painlessly. That first night, she kept repeating what she had heard on her first visit with Johnson. “I just kept saying to myself, ‘It’s benign, and it’s treatable,’” she said. Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Over 1 Million Americans will become caregivers this year. “A Caregiver’s Journey” will comfort you, give practical advice and help you through this journey. October 16th at 10:00 a.m. St. Charles Hospital in Bend Tickets are $15.00 each available at: Alyce Hatch Center 1406 NW Juniper Street (541) 389-5437 Tickets will also be available at the door Sponsored by: Alyce Hatch Board of Directors

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 F5

M V ITAL STATS St. St. Charles Charles Bend more more expensive expensive than state than state average For many procedures, people who have commercial insurance pay more than the state average for care in Central Oregon. According to numbers released last week by the state, St. Charles Bend has been a costly hospital since 2005, and it has gotten further away from the state average for at least some procedures in recent years.

Prices for five common procedures State average

St. Charles Bend

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Dr. Michael Bell has opened a new neurology practice, Bend Neurological Associates LLC, an independent office located at The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research, at 2200 N.E. Neff Road, Suite 302. In November, Bell will be Dr. Michael Dr. David joined by Dr. David Schloesser. Bell Schloesser Both physicians will practice general neurology. Bell has worked in Bend for three years, Schloesser for 10 years. Dr. Maureen Porter has joined the staff of Bend Dental Group. Porter is a graduate of Marquette University, and she completed advanced training at the University of Colorado Hospital. She has practiced in Sisters since 2009. Dr. Yoli Di Giulio has opened a new dentistry practice, Cornerstone Family Dentistry LLC, in Bend. Di Giulio has 16 years of general and cosmetic dental experience.

Clinic

New health law bolsters end-of-life care options

Continued from F1 So far, projects to evaluate medical homes have been small but have shown some major successes. Boeing put 750 of its least healthy employees into medical home programs in 2009 and shaved 20 percent off its health care costs.

Vaginal delivery $7,617 $6,424

$8K 6K 4K

$4,036 $3,805

2K 0

2005

2009

treatment simultaneously. Although the vast majority of About this time last year, vot- patients seeking hospice beners and politicians were con- efits are older than 65, starting sumed by the rumor, fanned by in 2013, the new law also alhealth care overhaul opponents, lows children who are enrolled that the legislation would include in Medicaid or the Children’s “death panels” of government Health Insurance Program to bureaucrats who could “pull the receive both hospice and curaplug on Grandma” if tive care. she needed costly care. Experts agree that The outcry led legishospice benefits can lators to scrap a proviprovide crucial supsion of the House bill port for both patients that would have paid for and families during a H E A LT H voluntary consultations very difficult time, and CARE between physicians some research indiand Medicare beneficates they may extend REFORM ciaries about end-of-life the patient’s life. Yet care: living wills, hosfewer than 40 percent pice benefits and the like. of patients are in hospice care Since the furor died down, when they die, according to the end-of-life care has been mostly National Hospice and Palliative out of the spotlight. But misper- Care Organization. ceptions remain. A July poll by Hospice professionals say pathe Kaiser Family Foundation tients and family members are found that 36 percent of seniors better served if they use hospice still believe that the overhaul benefits for about two months. creates “death panels.” Another Experts agree that the require17 percent said they didn’t know ment that they forgo curative one way or the other. treatment stops some Medicare Many people may not realize patients from choosing hospice. that, in some ways, the new law Even when aggressive therapy will expand options for patients may provide little therapeutic at the end of life. benefit while severely diminishOne of these involves hospice ing the patient’s quality of life, care, in which a team of special- it’s not easy to say “no more.” ly trained providers treats dying Once the 15 demonstration sites patients’ pain and other symp- are up and running, expected toms but don’t try to cure the un- sometime in 2012, participants derlying disease. Under current won’t have to make that choice. Medicare rules, beneficiaries This report is produced whose doctors determine that they have less than six months through a collaboration between to live can choose hospice care The Washington Post and — but only if they forgo any fur- Kaiser Health News. KHN, an editorially independent news ther life-prolonging treatment. The new law establishes a service, is a program of the three-year “concurrent care” Kaiser Family Foundation, a demonstration program at 15 nonpartisan health care policy sites nationwide, in which Medi- organization that is not affiliated care would cover both kinds of with Kaiser Permanente.

By Michelle Andrews

Balloon angioplasty $57,524

$60K 40K

$29,500 $29,786 $22,986

20K 0 2005

2009

Knee replacement $41,575

$60K 40K 20K 0

$25,064 $28,682 $19,866

2005

2009

Appendix removal $20K 15K

$10,575 10K $9,037

$15,906 $13,867

5K 0

2005

2009

Surgical repair of herniated disc $20K

$16,181 $13,199

15K 10K $9,108 $7,779 5K 0

2005

2009

Source: Office for Oregon Health Policy and Research Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Dr. Steve Mann, a family physician at High Lakes Health Care, is involved in a project to bring a new model of health care to the area. “We’re pretty excited about it,” said Mann. “We think this is probably the best thing that’s happened to medical care in a long time.”

Special to The Washington Post

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

Sickest and most expensive patients Medical home programs have so far been primarily targeted to the sickest patients who use the most services. According to federal research, 5 percent of the population accounts for nearly half of the health care costs in this country. Often, these are people with multiple conditions that require intensive treatment and a good-size stable of medical professionals. In Oregon, these patients cost about $20,000 per year, according to the leadership council. Regence, Oregon’s largest insurer, said an average plan cost about $4,000 per year in 2009. “These are the people that are expensive to the system and have a poor quality of life,” said Mann. Though many of these high-cost patients see doctors often, each visit concentrates on a different disease. A patient may see a physician for diabetes one day, heart problems the next day and depression a third day. There hasn’t been anyone yet looking at the patient as a whole. In addition, patients are typically on their own for getting and taking needed medications, following physician orders outside of the

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hospital and making lifestyle changes. Not surprisingly, many have trouble managing their conditions on their own.

New system A patient enrolled in the High Lakes medical home project will see changes. To begin, Mann said, the patient will be with the nurse case manager, likely for about an hour, going over all the medical issues the patient has and goals for managing those conditions. Then, after the initial visit, the case manager will make sure patients are getting necessary care and understand what they need to do to manage their conditions. Case managers will remind patients about appointments or medications, and follow up after hospital or sometimes specialist visits. “They will be a nuisance for the things that patients need to get done,” said Mann. “Patients will not have to remember on their own.” Case managers have been used before in patient care, said Dr. Bart McMullan, the chair of the project and former CEO of Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon. However, they have been employed by the insurers rather than the medical clinics. Being employed in the clinic allows the nurses to work closely with physicians to coordinate patient care. Mann said he is working in the very same room as the clinic’s nurse manager and the other members of the medical home team, another physician and a physician assistant. The hope, Mann said, is that by “micromanaging” these highcost patients, providers can make the patients feel better, use less health care and cost less to the system. Insurers are helping fund the program by giving each clinic a per-member, per-month payment to help pay for the cost of

Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

(541) 678-0020

the case manager. Then, at the end of two years, said McMullan, if there are savings, the health plans will share that money with the participating clinics. McMullan said that based on other similar programs across the country, he expects the project will save between 5 and 20 percent of health costs. Mann said even just one success could save a considerable amount. Keeping people on track with medications and immunizations, he said, could prevent a week in the intensive care unit. “That costs $80,000. So one case pays for the entire program.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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F6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N Continued from F1 “These chains don’t promote moderation,” Michael Jacobson, the executive director of the Center for Science in the Public Interest, said in May, when his watchdog organization gave its 2010 Xtreme Eating awards to nine “caloric heavyweight” meals. “They practice caloric extremism, and they’re helping make modern-day Americans become the most obese people ever to walk the Earth.” Jacobson also expressed surprise that restaurants haven’t started to alter their menus in advance of a new law that will require chains with 20 or more outlets to disclose calorie counts to diners. (The Food and Drug Administration hasn’t specified when the regulations will take effect.) “Restaurants are not in the business of making people healthy,” said Washington dietitian Rebecca Scritchfield. “They’re trying to make money, and salt and fat are cheap ways to make food taste better.” We asked Scritchfield to give us her take on these caloric heavyweights. All of the nutritional information below comes from the restaurants’ websites, except for the Cheesecake Factory’s, which is courtesy of CSPI’s Xtreme Eating awards. (The chain does not publish its nutritional information online.)

Quiznos large tuna melt sub sandwich The numbers: 1,520 calories, 101 grams of fat, 21 grams of saturated fat, 2,020 milligrams sodium. Equivalent of eating: More than a stick of butter’s worth of fat. Expert evaluation: Grabbing a tuna sandwich for lunch sure sounds like a healthful decision, but not with this jumbo-size sub. “If someone hears ‘tuna’ and they think they should be eating more fish, they might think that’s a good choice, but the portion is way too big,” Scritchfield said. On top of that, “it’s made with foods that have high calories, such as mayonnaise and cheese.”

Chipotle chicken burrito, filled with rice, pinto beans, corn salsa, cheese, sour cream and guacamole, accompanied by a side of chips The numbers: 1,750 calories, 79.5 grams of fat, 23 grams of saturated fat, 2,750 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The calories in more than nine chicken soft tacos at Taco Bell. Expert evaluation: “There are lots of ways you can make that healthier,” Scritchfield said. “My top recommendation is not to get cheese and sour cream but instead get guacamole because that has the heart-healthy fat and gives you the creaminess you’re going for.” You could also forgo the chips and save 570 calories.

How some chain restaurants’ favorite offerings stack up healthwise

doing?’ but we’d leave dissatisfied,” Scritchfield said. “They’re breaking it down so their numbers look good.”

The Greene Turtle boneless wings, which includes 16 wings in “We Mean Hot” sauce, served with blue cheese dressing and celery sticks

Photos by Allison Ghaman / The Washington Post

Clockwise from upper left: Chili’s Big Mouth Bites (1,930 calories); Cheesecake Factory’s pasta carbonara (2,500); a chicken burrito from Chipotle (1,750); P.F. Chang’s double pan-fried noodles with meat (1,820); a large tuna melt from Quiznos (1,520).

Applebee’s

Domino’s

New England fish and chips

bread bowl pasta

The numbers: 1,910 calories, 137 grams fat, 24 grams saturated fat, 3,150 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The fat in almost a pound of cheddar cheese. Expert evaluation: “If you really wanted this, I’d say split it and add some veggies,” Scritchfield said. “And do not touch the salt shaker; it already has more than a day’s worth of sodium in it.”

The numbers: One bread bowl, which Domino’s nutritional information counts as two servings, contains 1,340 to 1,470 calories, 48 to 56 grams of fat, 21 to 27 grams of saturated fat, 65 to 115 grams of fiber, 1,830 to 2,860 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The fiber in about 16 to 29 servings of oatmeal. Expert evaluation: “If you get enough fiber, and 25 to 35 grams a day is the right amount, it helps keep digestion at a normal pace. But if you eat too much fiber, it actually gives you constipation,” Scritchfield said.

Chili’s Big Mouth Bites four mini burgers topped with jalapeño ranch dressing The numbers: 1,930 calories, 31 grams of saturated fat, 4,400 milligrams sodium. Equivalent of eating: The calories of around 25 eggs. Expert evaluation: “These are interesting because they’re sold as ‘mini’ burgers, but it’s still a high-calorie, high-fat and highsalt meal because of what’s on them,” Scritchfield said.

Outback Steakhouse full rack of baby back ribs served with Aussie fries The numbers: 1,936 calories, 133 grams of fat, 56 grams of saturated fat, 2,741 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The fat grams in 20 tablespoons of salad dressing. Expert evaluation: “There is no color on that plate: no broccoli, no garden salad. Vegetables should be half of your dinner plate, and they’re absent,” Scritchfield said. Outback diners can substitute steamed green beans or seasonal veggies for the fries and slash about 200 calories and 15 grams of fat.

These next mega-meals could be shared, but Scritchfield said it wouldn’t be surprising if they sometimes are consumed by just one person: “People envision what they’re served as their portion.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

P.F. Chang’s China Bistro double pan-fried noodles with a combination of meats The numbers: Although this is one entree, the company counts it as four servings since it totals 36 ounces; contains 1,820 calories, 84 grams of fat, 8 grams saturated fat, 7,692 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The sodium in 70 tablespoons of blue cheese dressing. Expert evaluation: “If four people shared this (as their entire meal), not only would the waiter be like, ‘What are you

The numbers: 1,963 calories, 153 grams of fat, 30 grams of saturated fat, 10,877 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The sodium in 52 large orders of french fries. Expert evaluation: “I thought there was a typo, that there’s no way that has 10,000 milligrams of sodium, but sure enough, they do,” Scritchfield said. “Salt is a flavor enhancer, but this amount is unnecessarily over the top.” An order of 16 regular wings with “Kinda Hot” sauce contains 1,787 calories and drops the sodium intake to 6,819 grams.

Uno Chicago Grill Chicago classic deep-dish individual pizza, which is topped with sausage, tomato sauce and cheese The numbers: 2,310 calories, 165 grams of fat, 54 grams saturated fat, 4,920 milligrams of sodium. Equivalent of eating: The fat in 45 strips of bacon. Expert evaluation: Although Uno counts this smaller pizza as having three servings in its online nutritional information, Scritchfield said that when someone orders an “individual” pizza, they are likely to see it as a meal for one.

VITAMINS TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Zinc Zinc is an essential mineral found naturally in many plant and animal foods and added to others. The body needs zinc to produce some 100 different enzymes, playing a role in immune function, wound healing, DNA synthesis and cell division. Zinc is needed for normal growth and development and is required for proper sense of taste and smell. Because the body cannot store zinc, a daily intake of zinc is required to ensure adequate levels. Oysters contain more zinc per serving than any other food, but most Americans get their zinc from red meat and poultry. Breakfast cereals are often fortified with zinc as well. Phytates, which are present in whole-grain breads, cereals, legumes and other foods, inhibit absorption of zinc. Most Americans get plenty of zinc in their diets, but nutritional surveys suggest that 35 to 45 percent of those older than 60 had intake levels below the average requirement. Vegetarians sometimes also struggle to get enough zinc because the body has a harder time absorbing zinc from plant foods. Nutritional guidelines recommend vegetarians consume 50 percent more zinc than is recommended for omnivores. Zinc demands increase during pregnancy and breast-feeding, as the mineral is crucial for normal development. Zinc has proved effective in healing wounds and treating severe diarrhea among malnourished children in developing countries. Zinc has been studied extensively for its ability to prevent and treat colds, but the results have been mixed. The Food and Drug Administration has warned about using zinc-containing nasal sprays or gels because of numerous reports of loss of smell. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Recommended daily allowance, in micrograms Men (19+): 11 mg Women (19+) 8 mg Pregnant women: 11-13 mg Breast-feeding women: 12-14 mg Children (0-6 months): 2 mg* Children (7-12 months): 3 mg Children (1-3 years): 3 mg Children (4-8 years): 5 mg Children (9-13 years): 8 mg Children (14-18): 9-11 mg

Good sources Oysters (1 medium): 12.8 mg Beef (cooked, 3 oz.): 8.9 mg Crab (Alaska King, cooked, 3 oz.): 6.5 mg Chicken leg (roasted, 1 leg): 2.7 mg Back beans (canned, ½ cup): 1.7 mg Almonds (dry roasted, 1 oz.): 1 mg Source: National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements

*No RDA has been set for children younger than 6 months, estimated adequate intake provided instead.

The Cheesecake Factory pasta carbonara The numbers: 2,500 calories, 85 grams of saturated fat. Equivalent of eating: The saturated fat in about five cups of half-and-half cream. Expert evaluation: “Four adult men would have to share this entree in order to each stay within a day’s worth of saturated fat,” Scritchfield said.

Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., PC

www.corapc.com www.cascademedicalimaging.com

Calories

WELCOMES NEW PHYSICIAN Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., P.C. Is proud to present our newest physician Dr. William Wheir 1460 NE Medical Center Drive Bend, Oregon 97701 541-382-6633 Appointments: 541-382-9383

William H. Wheir, MD Radiologist

Dr. Wheir comes to Central Oregon Radiology Assoc., PC From the New Mexico School Of Medicine with Fellowship training in Neuroradiology.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 G1

C

The Bulletin

LASSIFIEDS

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

contact us:

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371 FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

Subscribe or manage your subscription

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

TV, Stereo and Video

Fuel and Wood

Toshiba 32” TV, purchased in 2006, not a flat screen, great picture. $50. 541-383-1517.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Petmate Kennel, intermediate size, 32" L x 22" W x 22" H, $65; Vari-Kennel, large, 36"L x 24" W x 26" H, $80. Both like new! 541-383-4408

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Want to Buy or Rent Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top Pomeranian female puppy dollar paid, Estate incl. Honcream 8 weeks old. Going to est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 be very small, $350. 541-480-3160 WANTED: RV water heater, round aluminum-type, Pomeranians, Beautiful pups, gas/electric. 541-475-9371. exceptionally well cared for, Wanted washers and dryers, $250-$350, 541-367-7766 working or not, cash paid, Poodle Pom 8 week old female, 541- 280-7959. non-shedding, adorable face. $350. 541-480-3160 205

Items for Free FREE! Older model RCA console TV and VHS player, Call 541-598-6804 FREE World Book full set, 1973 Edition. Excellent condition. Call 541-593-1598 Plant Bulbs: Great Hyacinth, Paper Whites, & small white flowers, FREE, 541-548-3853

Bloodhound AKC Pups, SAR lines, parents on-site, ready Nov., $500, 541-390-8835.

CHIHUAHUA BABIES! 6 weeks, 1st shots. Ready for their new families! Set appointment, 541-419-6445.

POODLES Standard; two 6-year-old sisters, indoor dogs, must be together, divorce forces sale, they need to go to a good home. $150 for both. 541-848-3525

Shih-tzu/poodle mix, ready to go! 4 males, 2 females. Great with kids! 541-233-8202 Siberian Husky AKC puppies, vet checked, 9 weeks old. Josh @ 541-633-9160 STILL KITTEN SEASON! We have over 3 dozen, friendly, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Just $25/1, $40/2. Adult cats $15 or 2/$25, or free as mentor cat with kitten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt. 598-5488, 389-8420, photos/map at www.craftcats.org.

Doberman Pinscher, reg. tail, dewclaws, shots, black & tan, $475. 503-550-1705

YORKIE, MALE 1.5 years old gold and white, 8lbs real sweet dog, divorce forces sale. $250 541-848-3525

DOXIE PUPPIES: 2 MINI BOYS, $250; 1 GIRL LEFT, $275 PRINEVILLE- 360-607-0604

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English Bulldog puppies, AKC, exc. champion pedigree, 8 weeks old, ready to go! $2000/ea. 541-306-0372 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY LAST ONE! FEMALE AKC REGISTERED, CHAMPION LINES. UP TO DATE ON ALL SHOTS & MICROCHIPPED $1750 541 416-0375

English Mastiff pups! 4 females left, brindle and fawn. $700. 7-wks. Beautiful pups! 541 598 5814 European Red Min Pin, 14 mo Male, very beautiful, free to good home. 541-325-3005

Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Pups,

ready 10/15, male & female, black & tan or all blacks, exc. temperament, both parents on site+grandma, sire Chateau De Chiefs, AKSC #02BGG872-IM, Dam Sonja Vom Holtzberg, AKC #DN17285408, $800, 541-815-2888. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Maltese, AKC Pups, 1 male, 2 females, 10 weeks old, shots & dew claws, $500/ea. 541-536-2181,541-728-8067

Moving must sell. Papered Pomeranians assorted ages and colors. Approved homes only. Small adoption fees. 541-480-3160

Chinese dishes, from Hong Kong, 99-piece set, everyday pattern, $50 OBO, 541-595-6261

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Online scrapbook store going out of business. Hundreds of items at cost! One day only! Scrapbook paper, embellishments, stamp ink, chipboard, adhesive, Stickles glitter glue, Distress Ink and more. Saturday 10/16 from 9 am -5 PM. No early birds, please. CASH ONLY. No holds. 61056 Honkers Lane, Bend OR 97702

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Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bar Stools (3), swivel, light oak, 29,5 inches high to the seat, $60, call 541-923-0442.

and matching chair with ottoman, big pillows, modern, great condition, $500.00 for all 541-389-3868 anytime Desk, 1940’s wood office, 3+1 drawers & wood chair, $75, 541-317-5156. Entertainment Center, pine, Bork Holder, Amish crafted, $175, call 541-617-1858 Furniture

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

MobilAire III by Invacare Mdl. IRC301 oxygen concentrator, like new $375 541-390-7726

COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Oregon's Largest 3 Day Gun & Knife Show October 15-16-17 Portland Expo Center I-5 exit 306B Featuring the New Elite Truck Traveling Showcase Fri. 12-6 Sat. 9-5 and Sun 10-4 Adm. $9 includes Showcase Tour

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Tools Craftsman portable saw. 10" blade. Table 26"+ x 19-1/2". Extensions left, right, rear. Rip capacity 24" right and left. 3 HP universal motor. On stand with wheels. Like new. $195 cash only. Call 385-0542. Powermatic Tilt Table Mortiser, w/stand, never used, $800; Jet 8” joiner, long bed, like new, $950; Jet 1200 CFM dust collector, w/floor sweep, $200, 541-306-4582.

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Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

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Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

End Special $130 a cord split & delivered, $100 a cord for rounds 541-610-6713.

LOG Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Hot Tub, exc. cond., all chemicals incl., $2500 OBO, Please call 541-408-6191.

PROPANE Heatilator fireplace, with all exhaust pipes, $450 or best offer. 541-323-1872

with loader, 34HP, 4x4, industrial tires.

Was $21,950

Cash Price Only! Midstate Power Products

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb bales, $140-$160/ton Qty Discount! Patterson Ranch in Sisters - Call 541-549-3831 Custom Tillage & Seeding: Plant a new pasture or hay field, clear land, no till drill, plow your land under now before winter! 541-419-2713 Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., $40 per bale. Also feeder hay, $30 bale. Call Redmond, 541-548-2514

Premium Orchard Grass, second cutting, no rain, no weeds. Mid-size 800-lb bales, $60 each. Call 541-419-2713

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Premium Pasture mix, 3x3, 800lb. bales, 2nd cutting, $40 ea., please call 541-419-2713. Credit Cards Accepted.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Rained-on Orchard Grass

BarkTurfSoil.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Critical Facility Engineer Prineville. McKinstry seeks union technicians to maintain and troubleshoot mechanical and electrical systems in a data center environment. Previous hands on mech and/or elect. exp. is preferred. Apply online at www.mckinstry.com

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449. Masonry Hod Carrier Needed Valid ODL req. Wage DOE. Apply 8 am-2 pm, MonFri, 63026 NE Lower Meadow Dr., Suite #200, Bend

P Home Delivery Advisor P The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer great benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Job

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or online@bendbulletin.com

541-617-7825 Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Lost and Found

Livestock & Equipment

Found Ice Chest: 10/9, Arnold Market Lp/Horse Butte,words painted on it, 541-389-2420.

Female Pig, FFA backup. $1.85/lb. hanging weight plus cut and wrap. Leave message 617-1757

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

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Meat & Animal Processing

LOST 10/5/10 approx. 6 PM Grass Fattened All Natural AnSpiral notebook last seen on gus Steer Beef, $2.40/lb bumper prior to leaving hanging weight incl. cut & Home Depot. Please call wrap. No additional process541-977-7771 ing fees. 541-508-8541. Lost Cat “Tucker” neut male, 383 short hair gray, 10/10 Westward Ho Motel.541-647-7009 Produce and Food

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Food service SUBWAY Sandwich Artist wanted! Must be 16 or older. Part-time, full time, days, nights. Apply in person at Riverwoods Country Store, 19745 Baker Rd., Bend.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

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Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893.

Caregiver Prineville senior care home looking for Care Manager for 2 or 3 overnight shifts per week. Must be mature and compassionate. References and experience only. 541-447-5773.

Home Delivery Advisor

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Hart 2-horse aluminum slant load, bumper pull w/rear tack & front dressing rooms. $5000 firm. 541-617-9034

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Lost Rifle, west of La Pine Sun. Oct. 3 Cascade Lakes Hwy & S. Century Dr. 541-929-5812

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Employment Opportunities

DRIVER NEEDED for early AM newspaper coin racks route. 4 days per week, 1-2 hours per day. Please call 541-389-7941.

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

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Horses and Equipment

476

Employment Opportunities

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Saddle: English Triumph Triple Crown, pad, stirrups & girth, $200. 541-330-9070

Found: Master Lock with Keys, on Cloverdale Rd. at Hwy. 20, 10/6, call 541-771-4072.

476

Employment Opportunities

Put up dry, barn-stored. Exc. feeder hay. $105. 541-383-0494

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Found Wallet: Near Jewell Elementary, 10/9, belongs to lady,call to ID, 541-771-0263

RECLINER, large, leather, great shape, $200. 541-647-2685 541-633-5629

Brand New L3400 HSD

GREEN GRASS HAY, small bales, $100/ton, $4/bale, Madras area, 541-490-5440.

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

CAUTION

1st, 2nd, & 3rd cuttings of Alfalfa, Orchard Grass, & Blue grass, all small bales, 2-tie, Madras, 541-325-6317 or 541-325-6316.

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Persian Cross Kittens (6), 7 weeks, wormed, 1st shots, $50-$100, 541-420-1580.

Shotgun, Browning 12 ga., like brand new, Gold Finger, Invector+ Field Model 28, $500 firm, 541-419-5911.

1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

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FOUND silver pocket watch in NW Bend, 10/9/10. Call to describe, 541-382-7706.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! Taurus 40 Cal, semi-auto, subcompact, holster, & case, 385-5809. $350, 541-647-8931 Range, Kitchenaid, elec., w/ convection oven, black, ce251 ramic top, self-cleaning $500 Hot Tubs and Spas Firm, 541-617-1858

REM Model 271 rifle, 4XWeaver scope, appraised @ $500, asking $425. 541-382-4508

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Schools and Training

Hay, Grain and Feed

Garage Door, 6’ x 6’ roll up, $25, please call 541-923-0442.

Parrots -Dbl. Red Factor Congo African Greys,3 babies, nearly weaned, & 3 yearlings, babies are Abundenced weaned & are allowed to glide to floor before wing clipping, snuggly babies, DNA sexing will be completed prior to sale. $500-$700, For more info call Aleta 541-548-4750.

Papillons, Beutiful puppies, exceptionally well cared for, $300-$400, 541-367-7766

1(800)659-3440 www.collectorswest.com

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Redmond

Lodgepole, Year

Employment

300 400

541-548-6744

Found: Prescription glasses in zippered bag, on Knott Rd. Call to identify 541-388-3807

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Dry Seasoned Firewood Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Heating and Stoves

Farm Market

NOW $16,700

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Belguim Browning auto rifle, 3006, Bushnell scope, case, ammo, excellent condition. $585. 541-604-0269.

Bushmaster AR-15 16" barrel, A2 sights, collapsible stock, two 30rd mags w/ammo. $800; Compact 1911 .45acp . $400 541-771-9072

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Flag Pole, 20’, Steel, (5) 4’ sections, $25, please call 541-923-1369.

Medical Equipment

Older Savage 7mm mag, Model 110, left hand. Walnut stock. 3x9 Simmons 8pt scope. Mint Chairs (2), beautiful, Queen Anne cond. Cancer forces sale. Style, wing back, burgundy $300 firm. 541-604-5220 cell plaid, $200 ea., 541-330-4323.

Couch navy blue

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

.22 Iver Johnson Pistol Double action, $175. 541-728-1036

Browning Gold hunter mossy oak 3½" 12 ga. new $850; Browning Belgium light 12 ga. auto 5 $425; Winchester '66 centennial 30-30, $600. Ken 541-410-2829 others for sale.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Browning 12 gauge auto shotgun, Belguim made, excellent condition, case, ammo, $575. 541-604-0269

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A Central Oregon Mix Cord. Split, Delivered, Bend, $125 for 1 or $240 for 2. Cash, Check, Visa/MC Accepted. 541-312-4027

Golf Balls, exc. cond., $20/100, PRO-V, $50/100, 541-383-2155.

12 ga Stevens single shot $125. 22 bolt Stevens 84C, $125. 22 Model 77 Winchester, $150. 303 British Endfield, $225. All nice! 541-815-0149

• Receipts should include,

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

260

Ad must include price of item

246

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Misc. Items

Golf Equipment

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677

Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $795! Coins & Stamps MS-390, $395! 026 20” $279! Husqavarna 395XP, $795! WANTED TO BUY 281XP, $695! 372XP, $695! US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, Currency collect, accum. Pre $295! 541-280-5006 1964 silver coins, bars, COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Range finders! Chainsaw! coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & $199. ALL LIKE NEW! dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex 541-280-5006 & vintage watches. No collection too large or small. BedCheck out the rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com 240 Updated daily Crafts and Hobbies

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Golden Retriever Pups, 2 left, 12 weeks, Males, purebred, to approved homes only. $300 Call 541-788-2005

Shepherd

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Antiques & Collectibles

Benelli 12 Gauge Shotgun Semi Auto/Camo 2¾”-3” $800. 541-480-9181

Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready 10/8. Females $900, males $850. 541-852-2991.

Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

TV 52” Samsung, big screen, works great, exc. cond. Asking $400. 541-480-2652.

215

Pets and Supplies

Australian Shepherd mini /Border Collie mix 4-wk-old pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. $250. 541-923-1174.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The POODLES AKC Toy, tiny Bulletin Internet website. toy. Also Pom-a-Poos, Chipoos. Joyful! 541-475-3889

208

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Include your name, phone number and address

KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR U Pick: Gala Apples, Jonagold apples, Golden Delicous Apples, Brooks Prunes, Bartlett Pears, Asian pears. Ready Picked: Peaches while they last.

Bring Containers NEW FALL HOURS Closed Tue. & Wed. Open Thur.-Mon. 10-4 Only 541-934-2870

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

General Merchandise

King

To place your ad visit call 541-385-5809 Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. or visit www.bendbulletin.com

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of October 11, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending route! Be your own boss! 25 machines plus candy all for $9995. 1-877-915-8222.

Employment EXPERIENCED REEFER drivers needed! Our incredible freight network offers plenty of miles! Opportunities for Independent Contractors and Company Drivers. Call Prime Inc. today! 1-800-277-0212, www.primeinc.com. DRIVERS - COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New Team Pay! Up to .48 cents/mile. CDL training available. Regional locations! (877) 369-7104, www.centraldrivingjobs.net.

Manufactured Homes SAVE THOUSANDS! Repossessed dealer manufactured home inventory. Instant equity. Buy At Factory Cost. All Homes new with Factory Warranty. Call: 541-928-1471. jandmhomes.com.

Real Estate 20-ACRES ONLY $99/mo. $0 down, $12,900, great deal! Near growing El Paso Texas. Owner financing. No credit checks. Money back guarantee. Free map/ pictures. 800-343-9444.


G2 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

Rentals

600

Edited by Will Shortz

642

650

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NE Bend

1 Bdrm, living room, kitchen, nice deck, private yard area, on dry canyon, newly remodeled, $550/mo., owner pays W/S/G, 541-480-9883.

1 Bedroom Studio Apt. 605

Roommate Wanted

Pet on approval, no smoking, all utils & TV Wi fi included, $500/month. 541-508-6118

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

541-322-7253

616

Want To Rent Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365 Room w/private bath, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, garage,hot tub, tons storage, wi-fi+ cable. $500 mo util. incl, No dogs/ drugs 541-410-4384 Lori

631 476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Mechanic Needed

ATTENTION: Our client is looking to hire a full-time equipment MeRecruiters and chanic. Applicant must be Businesses available to work evening The Bulletin's classified and weekends. Duties will inads include clude maintaining bowling publication on our machines, arcade games, and Internet site. Our site is general maintenance of the currently receiving over building. All applicants will 1,500,000 page views need to have at least two every month. Place your years of mechanical experiemployment ad with ence, light electrical experiThe Bulletin and reach a ence is helpful but not necesworld of potential applisary. Candidates need to be cants through the dependable, hard working, Internet....at no extra cost! self-motivated, able to work independently, and meet deadlines along with the ability to pass a pre-employment drug test, criminal background check. All applicants must be able to pass pre-employment drug test Remember.... Add your web address to and criminal background your ad and readers on check. Please fax your reThe Bulletin's web site will sume to 541-388-1984 or be able to click through aue-mail it to centraloregontomatically to your site. jobs@bbsihq.com. The Bulletin Office Busy dermatology office is looking for a part time front desk professional. Medical reception and EMR exp. preferred. Must be friendly, energetic, great work ethic and a team player. Salary based on experience. Please email resume to Jodi@centraloregondermatology.com or fax 541-323-2174.

is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Independent Contractors - Sales

START EARNING MONEY FOR THE HOLIDAYS !! Crews now forming for sales reps to sell local newspaper in Central Oregon. No experience neccesary. We Train. Earn daily Cash bonus' along with a weekly paycheck. Great for students and active adults.

Earn up to $10-$30 per hr. CALLOREGON NEWSPAPER SALES GROUP 541-861-8166

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632 507

Apt./Multiplex General

Real Estate Contracts The Bulletin is now offering a LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

284

286

288

AWBREY BUTTE, Quality outdoor clothing/gear, household, small refrig, camper jacks, misc. Sat. 8-2 1396 NW City View Drive. Barn/Shop/Garage Sale Power tools, misc auto, guns, saddles & tack - English & Western. Christmas items, Hummels, hunting & camping. Fri-Sat., 9-3, rain or shine! 67500 Harrington Loop, behind rodeo grounds.

Family Moving Sale, Fri-Sun, 9-2. Furniture, toys, tools, something for everyone! 2590 NW Skyline Ranch Rd. Garage Sale: 3234 NW Fairway Heights. Sun. Only 10-2, lots of girls age 3-10 toys, books, games, some furniture & misc household & garage. Free stuffed animal w/purchase.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809

MOVING-Good

stuff cheap, cheap stuff cheaper: SHOP Tools, Lawn/Garden, Living room, Bedroom, Kitchen, Snowboard, Bikes. Sat/Sun 10/9-10, 8 a.m. 541-420-3422 19449 Apache Rd, DRW Bend

286

Sales Northeast Bend Estate Sale! Sat., 8-5, Bend Masonic Center, 1036 NE 8th St., Hwy. 20 & NE 8th St.

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Garage Sale: Fri.-Sat. 8-3, 3334 NE Stonebrook Lp, clothes, hunting & camping gear, golf, furniture, TV’s, linens housewares, all in exc. cond!

HANDBAG

SALE:

Dooney & Bourke, Coach, Tignanello, Guess Saturday, Oct. 16, 8:30 2937 Red Oak Drive Huge Garage Sale; Christmas Decorations, Clothing, Furniture & More. Everything goes! Fri & Sat 9 am - 4 pm 705 NE Providence Drive (off of Neff Rd) (541) 678-3004 MAKE OFFER Garage Sale Tools, man’s bike, basketball hoop, golf equipment and much more. Sat. only, 9-2. 62750 Stenkamp Rd, follow signs from Neff Rd. & Powell Butte Hwy

Moving Sale - Downsizing for retirement. Antique round oak table & chairs, signed “Verly” Bowl, art glass vase, Carnival Glass Dish, 3’ Alabaster Statue, 2 old tins, old .22 rifle, bookcase, dresser, desk, storage cabinet +lots of other items. Friday 9:30-5, cash only. 644 NE Caldwell Ct Moving Sale! Fri-Sat 8-3, 1442 NE Tucson #D, 1 block East of 27th off Neff. Cash only. Everything must go!

ROBOTICS

TEAM

Huge Sale: Oct 16; 9am - 3pm. Saturday, Mountain View High School cafeteria, 2755 NE 27th St. Quality donations accepted, call Kim 541-389-7904. See in Community Calendar. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Barn Sale Sat. 9am-5pm. 61640 Ward Rd. Anvil, trailer hitch w/spring bars, tools, pole bed frame, spurs, misc items.

Central location, pleasant studio, $400/mo. Parking/laundry on-site, cable + W/S/G paid. No pets/smoking. 541-598-5829 until 6pm.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719

4 Bdrm, 2 bath, w/d, fenced yard, 2 car garage, RV parking, fireplace, close to schools and hospital. $845/mo., 541-948-4531

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 The Bulletin on-site laundry rooms, storTo Subscribe call age units available. Close to 541-385-5800 or go to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping cenwww.bendbulletin.com ter and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to run, some large breeds okay Old Mill. No smoking/pets. with mgr. approval.

292

ESTATE SALE in Mitchell!

$975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call Rachel 541-604-0620.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard. Section 8 OK. 3 To 4 bdrm., 2 bath house, W/S/G paid; small pet OK. very nice, but small, large $750/mo. Call 541-480-2233 yard, storage building, heat pump, $890/mo. call SW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath 541-310-0058,541-788-1750 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new Advertise your car! flooring & paint, appls incl Add A Picture! W&D, no pets/smoking, WS&G owner paid, credit Reach thousands of readers! Call 541-385-5809 check req’d, discount 1st mo rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. The Bulletin Classifieds For appt/info: 541-504-6141 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 646

660

Apt./Multiplex Furnished

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Houses for Rent La Pine

Furnished 1 bdrm apt. on quiet 5 acre estate, pet on approval. Garden area and hot house avail. $550 mo. util. included. 541-549-3838.

2 Bdrm, 2 bath mfd. home, bonus room,on 1 acre,large dbl. garage w/shop area, $625, $625 dep., pets OK w/dep. Section 8 OK, 541-728-1008.

55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239

648

Houses for Rent General

La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

* FALL SPECIAL * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Powell Butte, taking applications for a lovely, quiet country home with wood stove, elec. heat. Will be avail in Dec. 541-447-6068

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809

Sales Other Areas

654

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Established E-Bay Store. "Patti's Dishes & Collectibles" Pattern matching china & dish business...very fun! Extensive large inventory all incl. w/storage racks & packing material. Work from home part-time or grow to full time if more income is desired. Must be self-motivated. Call Patti 541-318-9010 or email me at patorre@msn.com for more information if you are interested.I am moving to AZ to retire again. $20,000 OBO!

Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408 Newport Hills, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1 level, 3-car garage, A/C, no pets/smoking, $1300 mo.+ dep., incl. yard care, avail. now, 541-382-1470

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. W/D Hookup, $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site, $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard w/patio,1454 sq. ft., forced air heat, gas fireplace, near Lava Ridge, $1200+dep., 541-389-1135. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath house 1200 sq.ft., single level, 21354 Starling Dr., $925/mo., no pets or smoking, Ed, 503-789-0104.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale Commercial building for sale: $130,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale property at 907 Highland Ave, Redmond, through a sealed bid process. OPEN HOUSE: Oct. 15, 10-2:00 pm. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com

745

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $117,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

687

750

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Redmond Homes

4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

4 units, ranging from 2,250 to 8,750 sq ft, @ 25¢/sq ft. 3-phase power, fire sprinkler sys. Prime loc., 1510 American Ln, Bend. 530-305-0104

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Lots of antiques, Hoosier, old cupboards, crocks, churns, old kitchenOffice / Warehouse Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun. enamelware, ware, oil lamps, primitives, Westside Apt. For Rent, 1 space • 1792 sq ft 8:00-3, 61270 Victory stoves, lots of yard art, iron bdrm. Washer & Dryer, Quiet 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, near En827 Business Way, Bend sworth school, dbl garage, neighborhood, 15 min walk Lp., lots of great stuff! beds, antique jar collection, 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep 1715 Sonya Ct., no smoking, to town, $435/mo., 100 pieces vintage Pyrex, Paula, 541-678-1404 pets neg., $850/ mo., (541) HUGE Moving Sale, every room 541-388-0182,541-617-8457 and much more! 383-2586, (541) 749-8127. in house & garage, Sat. 8-5. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, 207 SW Sasser, go to WEST SIDE CONDO 21885 Rastovich Rd., off MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Mitchell & watch for signs Alfalfa Area Farm House on 2 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse Ward Rd. 541-617-1888 rate! If you have a home to Friday & Saturday 9-4 acres, 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, clean, on quiet street near Century rent, call a Bulletin Classified Crowd control numbers fenced, pets negotiable. Drive, includes w/d, A/C, ONCE IN 42 YRS S A L E Rep. to get the new rates and Friday 8:00 a.m. $750/mo., $500 dep. Refs and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. One day SATURDAY, OCT. 16 get your ad started ASAP! req’d. 541-383-9074 eves $775 541-280-7268. 61345 Ward Rd. 9am-4pm Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-385-5809 Absolutely NO early sales 541-350-6822 Newer Pahlisch 3 bdrm, 2 bath, for pix & info go to 693 1406 sq.ft., vaulted ceilings, Sale - Furniture, ‘60-’80 Chevy www.atticestatesandappraisals.com gas fireplace, fenced yard, Ofice/Retail Space pickup parts, ‘78 Cutlass, evdbl. garage w/opener, $1095 erything else! Fri-Sat, 8-2, DON'T FORGET to take your for Rent 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. signs down after your gacorner Pettigrew/Bear Creek. rage sale and be careful not An Office with bath, various to place signs on utility NOTICE: 290 sizes and locations from poles! All real estate advertised $250 per month, including Sales Redmond Area www.bendbulletin.com here in is subject to the Fedutilities. 541-317-8717 eral Fair Housing Act, which BIG SALE! Thur-Sun, 7:30-5:00. Downtown Redmond makes it illegal to advertise 1952 NW Oak Ave. Native 640 any preference, limitation or Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. American, tools, collector $650/mo + utils; $650 secudiscrimination based on race, knives, lapidary, tons of ob- Garage Sale, E of Sisters off Apt./Multiplex SW Bend rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth color, religion, sex, handicap, Hwy 20. Furn, dbl stroller & sidian, garden statuary, St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848 familial status or national 1 Bdrm quiet, private home, more. 66510 Ponderosa movies, clothes. Cash please. origin, or intention to make carport, new stainless appl., Loop. 7am-2pm 318-8389 Need help ixing stuff any such preferences, limitajet tub, elec., internet, & Garage Sale Fri-Sat., 8am-5pm. around the house? Indoor Swap Meet tions or discrimination. We cable incl., W/D, $785, 1st. & Household items, pictures, Call A Service Professional Sat., 9-4, 401 NE 2nd St., will not knowingly accept any last, 541-408-5460. electronics, DVDs & games, Every and ind the help you need. Bend (old St. Vincent dePaul advertising for real estate misc. 1961 NW Elm Ave. www.bendbulletin.com bldg, next to Bimart) 10x10 1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., which is in violation of this spaces, $25, 541-317-4847 fenced yard, W/S/G incl., Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-5, law. All persons are hereby Mill Quarter Area, exc. street $430/mo., no pets, 2447 SW Mariposa Lp., Elec. Multiple Family Sale-Piano, informed that all dwellings exposure, corner office locaWheel Chair, 1998 ATV 4X4 advertised are available on 541-382-3678 tion, great as office or health furniture, clothes & other good shape, misc. shop tools, an equal opportunity basis. services, 1600 sq.ft., good items. Saturday, Oct 16th, Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. household & yard decor,more The Bulletin Classified parking, call 541-815-2182. 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. 70325 townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D Club Rd, Sisters Oregon. Terrebonne SaleFri-Sat-Sun 9-3 hookups, patio, fenced yard. Look at: Bendhomes.com Find It in Check out the DU decoys/paintings, guns, NO PETS. W/S/G pd. classiieds online coins, tools, furn, 10100 Rent starts at $545 mo. for Complete Listings of The Bulletin Classifieds! www.bendbulletin.com Crooked River Dr. #10 179 SW Hayes Ave. Area Real Estate for Sale 541-385-5809 Updated daily (Smith Rock State Park exit) 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

541-385-5809

705

Real Estate Services

652

Houses for Rent SE Bend

244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

700

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Autumn Specials Are Here!

$675, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath 1/2-off 1st Mo. Rent

Quiet 2 bdrm, new windows, W/G/S/Cable paid, laundry on-site, cat OK, $575/mo, $500 dep., 541-383-2430 or 541-389-9867.

282

2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

The Bulletin Classiieds

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

L o o kin g for y o ur n e x t e m plo y e e ? P l a c e a B u ll e t i n h e l p w a nte d a d to d a y a n d re a c h o v er 6 0,0 0 0 re a d ers e a c h w e e k. Y o u r c l a s s ifi e d a d w ill als o a p p e a r o n b e n d b u ll e t i n . c o m w h i c h c u r r e n tl y r e c e i v e s o v e r 1 . 5 m illi o n p a g e v i e w s e v ery m o n t h a t n o e x t r a c o s t. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Real Estate For Sale

2137 sq ft 1-level, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, hardwood & granite, lrg ¼ acre lot, not SS. $223,990 Debbie Lahey • 541-977-4825 RE/MAX Town & Country

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes Weekend Retreat or Family Home - $155,000 Like new home, 1 acre, La Pine. Terms considered. 503-986-3638 www.odotproperty.com

762

Homes with Acreage Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666 Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

771

Lots 1.15 Acres RM zoned bare parcel for sale: $65,000 The Oregon Department of Transportation is offering for sale, property located near Maricopa Drive in Bend, through a sealed bid process. Contact Steve Eck, Property Agent, at 503-986-3638 or visit www.odotproperty.com.

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes MOVE IN TODAY! 2b/1b $11,999; 2b/2b, $13,000; 3b/2b $16,000. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, $14,000 cash.John,541-350-1782


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 865

870

880

881

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

2006 Polaris Ranger

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Boats & RV’s

800

700 XP Snow Plow, winch, stereo, custom rear seats, front and rear running lights, 2nd battery, windshield. $8000 541.280.6246

860

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 G3

Motorcycles And Accessories

Polaris 2004 Sportsman ATV - 2007 Can-Am Outlander Max 400 with winch. Barely used - odometer reading 65 miles. $5,595, or $5,995 with Eagle trailer. 541-923-2953

4x4. 85 hours, 650 miles. One owner. Always garaged. $4000. firm. 541-419-6215.

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $17,500. 541-548-3985.

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595!

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Travel 1987,

Queen

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Allegro

31’

1989,

basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Wilderness 2007 26'. Front queen bed, rear bath. Couch & dinette table in slide-out. One owner. $18,000. OBO. 541-419-6215

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, rear camera/monitor, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

sale, like new, $6900 OBO, must see! 541-923-4237.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Spingdale 29’ 2007,slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns. HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Chrysler Cordoba 1982, 29K 1-owner mi, mint cond, loaded. Come take a look! $3195 OBO. 541-330-8969

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

Subaru Outback 2003 Limited Wagon ~ Too many features to list, always garaged, 48,650 miles. 541-390-1017 for details. $12,450 OBO

leather - moon - 5 speed,

$12,995 541-598-3750 DLR 0225

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Toyota SR-5 1995, V-6, 5-spd., A/C, w/shell, $3800, call 541-389-1957.

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256 VW Beetle 1967, lots of new parts, needs motor work. $2000 OBO. 541-548-7126

933 Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

Moonroof, leather

$12,995 VIN#132979

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $10,800. 541-420-2715

940

Vans Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12 CD, wheels, sunroof, white, leather, 4 captains chairs, 7 passenger, recent tranny, struts, tires, brakes, fuel pump, etc. $3,750 Call (541) 508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Chevrolet Suburban 2005 Exc. cond., loaded. Nav, rear screen DVD, towing, power seats, etc. 140,000 hwy miles. Set of studded tires included. $15,000 OBO. 503-888-2101 or davidfriend@majestys.com.

CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo

NEWER 6L 3/4 ton 4WD SUV or king cab short-bed pickup, in exc. cond., 541-389-1913.

van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2700 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-9677.

931

Automotive Parts, Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, Service and Accessories

pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111. CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

Tires, 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $350, 541-447-1668 Tires, Studless Snows, Schwab Big Horn, 31x10.5x15, on Ford 5x5.5 Rims, used 1 season, $400, 541-536-3252.

CHEVY BLAZER 4x4 LS 1998 good condition, 110k miles, $5,295. For more information 541-382-9411 after 4 p.m. Ford Bronco 1980, extra engine & trans., runs but needs love. $800. 541-546-7001

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Yukon SLT 2003 4x4

935

Pickups

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

975

Automobiles

Dodge Ram 2001, short

885

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Subaru Outback 2004 Limited Wagon

Sport Utility Vehicles

929 KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

The Bulletin Classiieds

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $22,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

916

Automotive Wanted

Motorcycle Trailer Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Utility Trailers

Wanderer 27’ with slide, 1998, queen custom mattress, plus sofa sleeps 2, recliner, very good condition, $5300. Call 541-382-2893 Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

VIN#-#604795

Tires, (4), 225/60R16 Studded, great tread & studs, $200, 541-390-6016. Mallard 21 CKS 2008 bought new 2009, used just 3x, loaded, 1 slide, must see, like new. $14,950. 541-480-7930

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105 Keystone Springdale 26 ft. 2005 travel trailer with tip-out and awning. Great condition. Priced at what is owed at $11,800. Call (541) 948-1733 or (503) 881-5396.

933

Pickups

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Travel Trailers

Forest River Sierra 26.5’ 1998, Moving

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $25,000. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Aircraft, Parts and Service

925

Call Bill 541-480-7930.

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

908

882

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

900

Fifth Wheels

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Sunseeker 31' Class C 2001 33,000 miles, A/C, 1 slide, 2 TVs, ex. cond, non-smoker, $29,900. 541 382 4086

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930.

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/5HP new motor, new sail & trailer, large price drop, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 541-420-9188

17’ Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975.

875

Watercraft

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Autos & Transportation

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852.

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non mi., glass t-top, runs & looks smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. great, $12,500,541-280-5677

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

FORD EXPEDITION 1999 4x4, 118,000 miles, new paint and trans, exc. cond., garaged. $6000 OBO. (541) 549-4834, (541) 588-0068

Ford Explorer 2008 Eddie Bauer 28,000 miles-loaded $26,995 VIN#B29136

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $4950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto, $

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at 140 (This special package is not available on our website) Accounting/Bookeeping

Domestic Services

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Shelly’s Cleaning & Artistic Painting: 9 Yrs. Exp., friendly service, Organizing, cleaning, murals. No job too big or small,just call. 541-526-5894.

Barns

Rebecca’s Cleaning Honest•Reliable•Hardworking Big, small, and everything in between. Maintenance and windows too! 541-610-9353

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

From foundation to roof, we do it all! 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Handymen at affordable prices: sheds to changing a light bulb, hanging a picture, to shovelling a walk, give a call, we do it all! 541-788-1354

Handyman

I DO THAT! Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Irrigation Equipment

Sprinkler Blowouts Discounts available. Call Kent for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097• LCB #8451

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Snow Removal

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Reliable 24 Hour Service •Driveways •Walkways •Roof Tops •De-Icing

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Fall Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Pruning •Debris Hauling

Gutter Cleaning Lawn & Landscape Winterizing •Fertilizer •Aeration •Compost

The Bulletin

Sprinkler Blowouts: Time to Blow out your irrigation system. Call Cutting Edge Lawn Works for your irrigation needs: 541-815-4097. LCB# 8451 Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012 If you need assistance cleaning up your property, I have a tractor w/scoop, bush hog and harrow. $40/hr, min 2 hrs. Call Victor 541-383-5085 Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com IRRIGATION SPRINKLER BLOWOUT AND WINTERIZATION, $40. Cedar Creek Landscaping LCB#8499. 541-948-3157

Bend Landscaping Sprinkler Blowouts, Lawn Aerating, Fall Cleanup

Holiday Lighting

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Masonry

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4400. Call 541-429-2966

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1800, 541-815-9939. GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! GRAND Cherokee Limited, The Bulletin Classiieds 2006, 47,900 mi., Hemi V-8, 5.7L, loaded, perfect cond., silver, plenty of power! New Remodeling, Carpentry struts, shocks, Michelins, Original owner/records. Repair & Remodeling: Never “off road’’ $21,900. Kitchens & Baths (541) 593-3214, Sunriver. Structural Repair, We move walls. Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows/doors • Garages/Additions/Remodels www.remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

Tile, Ceramic

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2006

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Leather-36,000 miles,

$17995 VIN#234708.

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.


G4 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Automobiles

CHRYSLER Sebring JX 1998 convertible, V6, AT, ABS, AC, Cruise, PW/PS, dual air bags, 91k milies. Garaged, very good cond. KBB $3720, $3200 OBO. 541-317-0567.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C, CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edition, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Find It in

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Ford Conversion Van 1994, 7 pass. van, 117K, rear bed, perfect CarFax. Like new in/ out. $4500. 541-382-7449

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

SUBARUS!!! Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828. Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626 Mercury Grand Marquis Mercedes 300SD 1981, 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K never pay for gas again, will mi, $3495. 541-382-8399 run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm sysMitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch auto., pearl white, very low start, power everything, 197K mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer Nissan Versa 2008, great refused, $2900 OBO, call cond., low mi., maint. up-to541-848-9072. date, $9500, 541-548-4044.

Subaru Forester 2001, white, very clean, new tires, reg. maint. Call for more details. $6500. 541-549-9960

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Camry LE 2009

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

4 door sedan 18,000 miles

$16,995 VIN#165212

541-598-3750

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/ Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 190K hwy. mi. $1000 below kbb. $6500. 541-410-7586.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5000. 541-593-4016 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4131 T.S. No.: 1294405-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1630 T.S. No.: 1291570-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6213 T.S. No.: 1294296-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ronald R. Vetter, An Unmarried Man and Mary A. Collister, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated May 23, 2005, recorded May 24, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-32043 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot seven, block one, Clear Sky Estates, Deschutes County Oregon Commonly known as: 732 & 734 Southeast 5th St. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $930.13 Monthly Late Charge $37.32. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $137,780.49 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from April 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patrick Whelan, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 02, 2007, recorded March 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-13975 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6, Gallatin, Phases I and II, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61529 Tall Tree Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,786.55 Monthly Late Charge $75.53. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,600.00 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 11, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard W. Anglin, Sr. and Gail E. Anglin As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers"), As Nominee For Summit Mortgage Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated September 05, 2008, recorded September 12, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-37534 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, block 6, Timber Haven First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15680 Paulina Avenue La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,214.14 Monthly Late Charge $50.18. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $192,696.20 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from April 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-344088 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

R-341691 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

R-338746 09/23/10, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1660 T.S. No.: 1289433-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3938 T.S. No.: 1294342-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4290 T.S. No.: 1296428-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John T. Ristick, and Judith E. Ristick, as Grantor to David Federal Attorney, as Trustee, in favor of Union Federal Bank of Indianapolis, as Beneficiary, dated January 23, 2003, recorded January 24, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-05792 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 in block 55 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 9, Part 2. Deschutes County, Oregon. Model: BD565F-4 serial #GW3OREED49204 Manufacturer: Golden West Homes HUD tags ORE199530, ORE199531 Commonly known as: 17053 Sacramento Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,107.59 Monthly Late Charge $36.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $108,722.48 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 10, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 10, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sean A Kluckow and Brianna M. Kluckow Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated January 02, 2008, recorded January 08, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-00985 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 1, block 3, Brightenwood Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 60685 Newcastle Dr. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,219.39 Monthly Late Charge $96.61. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $350,000.00 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Charles E. Clausen Jr., as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated September 21, 2005, recorded September 30, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-66707 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 42 of Braeburn Phase III, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19322 Brookside Wy Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,907.45 Monthly Late Charge $75.84. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $316,566.90 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 05, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 03, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 06, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-341653 09/30/10, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

R-339022 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

R-341112 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, October 14, 2010 G5

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Dated and first published on September 30, 2010.

(3) The Deed of Trust is dated October 6, 2006, and was recorded in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon on October 10, 2006 as fee number 2006-67760.

LEGAL NOTICE All ARC deposits made with Brooks Resources for the Awbrey Butte Owners Association (ABOA) ARC prior to December 1, 2008 are now subject to forfeiture if construction has not been completed to the ARC and design guideline standards or final inspection has not been completed. All ARC deposits made December 1, 2008 and after are subject to a 24 month expiration. If construction and final inspection was not completed within this time, your deposit is subject to forfeiture. If you made a deposit prior to December 1, 2008 and did not receive a refund, please contact Aperion Property Management at 541-389-3172. LEGAL NOTICE CIRCUIT COURT, STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of DWIGHT WILLIAM STEWART, Deceased. Case No. 10PB0105BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o the law office of Carl W. Hopp, Jr., 168 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, OR 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional personal representative, Carl W. Hopp, Jr., Attorney at Law, LLC.

Patricia L. Heatherman, OSB #932990 Conservator/Temp Guardian: Lucinda Downs 61289 SW Brookside Loop Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 815-3319 Temp Guardian: David Downs 61289 SW Brookside Loop Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 815-3319 Attorney for Guardian/ Conservator: Patricia L. Heatherman, OSB #932990 Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 389-4646 Fax: (541) 389-4644 E-mail: patricia@heathermanlaw.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) LEGAL NOTICE Mr. Nick Yesterday: Lakeshort R.V. Park is trying to locate this person in regard to his motorhome at Lakeshore R.V. Park. If anyone knows of this person or his phone number, please contact Lakeshore R.V. Park, 541-447-6059.

(4) The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sum: monthly payments beginning with payment due on January 10, 2010. (5) The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $130,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 12% per annum from January 10, 2010 until paid; together with all title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. (6) The Beneficiary has elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligation. A Notice of Default and Election to Sell was recorded in the Deschutes County official records on July 16, 2010 as fee number 2010-27747. (7) The undersigned will sell the property on November 30, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 a.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110 at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, Deschutes County, Oregon. (8) The Grantor or any other person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not be due had no default occurred) together with all costs, and Trustees and attorney's fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: JULIE B. GRAHAM. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Three (3), ALPENVIEW ESTATES PHASE I, recorded March 16, 1995, in Cabinet D, Page 107, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: February 20, 2007 Recording No. 2007-10247 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,186.06 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of April 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is se-

cured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $222,371.76; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from March 15, 2010; plus late charges of $138.27; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount

provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30781). DATED: August 3, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Earl H. Cordes, Jr., Tenants In Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 20, 2008, recorded June 23, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-26909 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land situate in and being the South 70.00 feet of Lot One (1), Block Five (5), of BROWN'S 2ND Addition, recorded January 9, 1961, in Cabinet A, Page 307, as measured along the east and West lines of said foot, located in Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range thirteen (13), East of the Willamette meridian, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows commencing at a 1/2" pin at the Southwest corner of Lot 1, Block S of Brown's Second Addition, the initial Point as well as the true POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 00°33'00" West along the West line of said Lot - 70.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe, thence north 89°46'00" East along the North line of the South 70.00 feet of said Lot as measured along the East and West line of said Lot 150.00 feet to a 1/2" pipe on the East line of said Lot; thence South 00°33'00" Last along said Lest line - 70.00 feet to the Southeast corner of said Lot thence South 89°46'00" West along the South line of said Lot - 250.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 3145 SW 25th St. Redmond OR 97756-9535. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,203.10 Monthly Late Charge $49.64. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $158,032.80 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 25, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Susan K. Takemoto, a single person, as grantor, to Amerititle, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as solely as nominee for First Franklin a Division of National City Bank, as beneficiary, dated 08/09/06, recorded 08/22/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-57508 and subsequently assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, as trustee for the holders of the First Franklin Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-FF15 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-FF15 by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWELVE (12), SUMMIT PARK, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. More accurately described as: Lot twelve (12) SUMMIT PARK, recorded July 7, 2004, in Cabinet G, page 343, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 21381 Kristine Court Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,524.78 beginning 11/01/09; plus late charges of $68.56 each month beginning 11/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $463.29; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $223,513.67 with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75 percent per annum beginning 10/01/09; plus late charges of $68.56 each month beginning 11/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $463.29; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 01/07/2011 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from person named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/7/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/8/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503) 620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800) 452-8260) and ask for the lawyer referral service. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance, a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: 09/03/2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. By Chris Ashcraft, Assistant Vice President Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No. 7236.22478/Takemoto, Susan Kay. This communication is from a debt collector and is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

R-344951 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04

ASAP# 3724628 10/14/2010, 10/21/2010, 10/28/2010, 11/04/2010

Dated and first published on September 30, 2010. Kimberly Ann Walton Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Conservatorship and Guardianship of Nathanial G. Potter, A Minor. Case No. 07-PC-0071-AB NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested persons, including the biological father of the minor and pursuant to ORS 125.065(2), that Temporary Guardians have been appointed in the above captioned matter. All persons who object to the Temporary Guardians being appointed as the Permanent Guardians are required to present the objection to Deschutes County Court at 1100 NW Bond, Bend, OR 97701 within in 15 days of the publication. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Temporary Guardians, or the lawyer for the Temporary Guardian, Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C.

LEGAL NOTICE THE CONTENTS OF THE FOLLOWING LOCKERS FROM DAVIS STORAGE, 1191 N. HWY. 26, Madras will be sold at public auction on Saturday, Oct. 23, 2010, 10 a.m. Bring truck. Units to be broom cleaned by 5 p.m. Unit #33 Puerta; #36 Hayden, #1 and #4 Gillian. These units are with unknown names #2, #3, #11, #12, #16, #18, #31, #37. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The undersigned hereby gives notice of a Trustee's sale of real property located in Deschutes County, Oregon. The sale is to be conducted for the purpose of foreclosing all of the Grantor's interest in the real property covered by the following described Deed of Trust:

DATED at Bend, Oregon, this 22 day of July, 2010. Craig K. Edwards, Trustee Edwards Law Offices PC 225 NW Franklin Avenue, Ste. 2 Bend, OR 97701 541/318-0061

(1) Grantor: Keith A. Campisi and Mary E. Campisi; Trustee: Deschutes County Title; Beneficiary: Dennis M. Harny; Successor Trustee: Craig K. Edwards, Edwards Law Offices, 225 NW Franklin Ave., Ste. 2, Bend, OR 97701 (2) The property covered by the Deed of Trust is as follows: Lot Eight in Block III, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as 60025 Crater Road, Bend, Oregon 97702

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4780 T.S. No.: 1298224-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: KATHLEEN A. SWAN. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Eight (8), THE WILLOWS PHASE I, recorded May 13, 1993 in Cabinet C, Page 773, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 16, 2005. Recording No. 2005-79120 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of

$971.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of March 2010 through July 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $135,816.26; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from February 1, 2010; plus late charges of $563.30; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: December 16, 2010. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal

as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30297). DATED: August 5, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx4448 T.S. No.: 1290365-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by David J. Luoma, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated August 31, 2005, recorded September 06, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-59627 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block sixteen (16), Tillicum Village Third Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61356 Eena Ct. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,108.65 Monthly Late Charge $42.86. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $141,319.92 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341687 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8247 T.S. No.: 1298346-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Neil D. Laursen and Julie E. Laursen, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 07, 2005, recorded September 08, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-60463 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 266, Northwest Crossing, Phase 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2363 NW Labiche Lane Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 15, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,166.46 Monthly Late Charge $82.04. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $371,048.51 together with interest thereon at 5.090% per annum from May 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 19, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-345541 10/14/10, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04


G6 Thursday, October 14, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fideljtyasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee'' and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 30, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3759199 10/07/2010, 10/14/2010, 10/21/2010, 10/28/2010

PUBLIC NOTICE Prineville-Crook County All Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030930879 T.SNo.: 10-10263-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ANTONIO MENDEZ as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE ESCROW AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on January 25, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-05527 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 241009 LOT NINETEEN (19), FORREST COMMONS, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 19, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1327 NW 18TH STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $803.91 Monthly Late Charge $40.20 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 154,349.99 together with interest thereon at the rate

of 6.25000 % per annum from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's

if appropriate, of existing plans, studies, reports, and technical information.

Notice is hereby given that Crook County and the City of Prineville are currently in the process of updating the Prineville-Crook County All Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan. An open public involvement process is essential to the development of an effective plan. In order to develop a more comprehensive approach to reducing the effects of natural disasters, the planning process will include: (1) An opportunity for the public to comment on the plan during the drafting stage and prior to plan approval;

The Crook County Office of Emergency Management invites you to become involved in this update process. To become involved in the initial planning process or to submit information to be considered as part of the planning and update process, please contact the Crook County Office of Emergency Management prior to November 1, 2010. James Savage Office of Emergency Management Crook County Sheriff's Office 308 N.E. 2nd St. Prineville, Oregon 97754 James.savage@co.crook.or.us Office: (541) 447-6398

(2) An opportunity for neighboring communities, local and regional agencies involved in hazard mitigation activities, and agencies that have the authority to regulate development, as well as businesses, academia and other private and non-profit interests to be involved in the planning process; and

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-374111-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, PEDRO VARGAS, SR. as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR PACIFIC COMMUNITY MORTGAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2006, recorded 12/7/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-80194, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 241945 LOT 25 OF FAIRHAVEN PHASE VI, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 533 NW 24TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 4/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,348.00 Monthly Late Charge $67.40 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,491.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.3750 per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 1/14/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 1/14/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 12/15/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 9/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3729671 09/23/2010, 09/30/2010, 10/07/2010, 10/14/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3450 T.S. No.: 1295964-09.

(3) Review and incorporation,

541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6489 T.S. No.: 1286022-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Patricia J. Snow, An Unmarried Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 08, 2006, recorded December 14, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-81607 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 27 of Shevlin Meadows, Phases 1 and 2, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2348 NW Summerhill Drive Bend OR 97701-5293. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 15, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,021.79 Monthly Late Charge $39.44. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $195,900.39 together with interest thereon at 3.238% per annum from February 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-339859 09/23, 09/30, 10/07, 10/14

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2266 T.S. No.: 1293174-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert T. Ludwick, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., A Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated March 07, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15546 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 21, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums Recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit. Commonly known as: 1525 Northwest Juniper Street #1 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $764.67 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $76,280.45 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-341720 09/30, 10/07, 10/14, 10/21

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Ron Varcoe, An Unmarried Person, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For American Mortgage Network, Inc., Dba American Mortgage Network of Oregon A Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated July 17, 2007, recorded July 20, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-40150 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Parcel 2 of partition plat no. 2005-8, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20548 Fred Meyer Rd. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $978.71 Monthly Late Charge $32.80. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $172,579.40 together with interest thereon at 3.875% per annum from May 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on January 20, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is December 21, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-343436 10/14, 10/21, 10/28, 11/04

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6986 T.S. No.: 1290541-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jennifer Shea, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Wealthbridge Mortgage Corp., An Oregon Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 17, 2007, recorded April 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-23954 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land lying in the West Halt of the Southeast Quarter (W1/2 SE1/4) of Section Eight (8), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: beginning at the South Quarter corner of said Section 8; thence North 89°52' 48" East along the South Line of said Section 8, 1025.40 feet; thence North 25°08' West along the Northeasterly Right of Way of the Bend-Tumalo State Highway No. 20, 1982.94 feet (sometimes shown as 1,974.85 feet) to the True Point of Beginning, same being the Northwesterly corner of the Nancy Hoefling tract described in a deed recorded November 2, 1389, in nook 195, Page 2320, Deschutes County Records; thence continuing North 25°08' West along said Right of Way, 255,00 feet to the Southwesterly corner of the Games N. Saul, et ux tract, described in a deed recorded March 17, 1989, in book 280, Page 1509, Deschutes County Records; thence North 03'10' East, 558.76 feet along the Saul Southerly boundary to the Southeasterly corner thereof; thence South 04'09 West, 99.25 feet; thence South 42'06' East, 105.23 feet to the Northeasterly corner of the aforementioned Hoefling Tract; thence South 76'37'20" West along Hoefling's Northerly boundary, 524.14 feet to the true point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed in instrument recorded May 3, 2977, in Book 249, Page 657, Deed Records, Commonly known as: 63743 Scenic Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,918.17 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $273,278.94 together with interest thereon at 6.125% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 14, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 06, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 14, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-346213 10/07, 10/14, 10/21, 10/28

Bulletin Daily Paper 10/14/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday October 14, 2010

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