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Military’s attempts to prevent suicides fruitless

DISTRICT 54

Jason Conger

The Washington Post

“Every one of these is tragic. It’s personally and professionally frustrating as a leader.” — Maj. Gen. William Grimsley, Fort Hood, Texas

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 275, 80 pages, 6 sections

MON-SAT

By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Michelle Day-London, 36, middle, holds her 14-month-old daughter, Zeriah London, on Friday during a break from moving into her new northeast Bend apartment with her husband, Bennie London, 51, in green. The couple, who are going to be living in The Bend Sanctuary, a new affordable housing complex for people recovering from drug and alcohol addiction, got help with the moving from friend Kevin Holliday, 28, far left, and Day-London’s sister, Jennifer Wilson, right.

Clean path to a new home Bend Sanctuary offers long term housing for recovering addicts By Erin Golden The Bulletin

F

or the first time in a long time, Dolly Haney feels like she’s found a place to plant her feet. After a three-year struggle with methamphetamine got her thrown out of her house and landed her in jail, the 39-year-old Bend woman decided to turn things around this spring. She started going to treatment and moved into a transitional housing facility. With several months clean, Haney felt like she was on the right track, but was struggling to find long-term housing on a limited budget. This summer, however, Haney got some good news. She’d been selected for one of four spots in a new longterm, affordable housing complex for people in recovery — a type of facility

“If I suspect one of our neighbors is using, I will be the first one to call the proper authorities, because I’m going to hold other people accountable too.” — Michelle Day-London, resident, Bend Sanctuary

that’s rare in Central Oregon. Haney will pay rent at a reduced rates, submit to regular drug tests and won’t be allowed to stay if she doesn’t stay drug-free.

She hopes The Bend Sanctuary, a project funded with a state grant and affordable housing money from the city of Bend, will be the right place for her and her 17-year-old son to make a fresh start. “I know that stress levels are a lot of what guide people, what would guide me to want to use,” she said. “I know that making sure that it’s a safe, non-toxic environment for both of us is a huge relief.” The project was launched by Pfiefer and Associates, a drug and alcohol treatment provider based in Bend. Executive Director Sally Pfiefer said Bend and other communities in the area have a few transitional housing options for people in drug and alcohol treatment and recovery. See Sanctuary / A6

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With less than two weeks until ballots land in Oregonians’ mailboxes, the three candidates for Bend’s seat in the state House are getting detailed about their stance on issues affecting Oregonians. Incumbent freshman State Rep. Judy Stiegler, a Democrat, is asking voters to send her back to Salem. Bend lawyer and Republican Jason Conger, along with Mike Kozak, an unaffiliated owner of a real estate investment company, are her challengers. All three have given in-depth interviews to The Bulletin on a wide range of topics. This week, Stiegler discussed her voting record and clarified her position on raising taxes, teacher compensation and her support of labor unions.

ELECTION

Measures 66 & 67 Stiegler’s opponents have criticized her support of two Legislature-referred ballot measures that raised income taxes on Oregon’s higher-wage earners and corporations. Measure 66 raised the personal income tax on joint filers with taxable income of at least $250,000 and single filers with taxable income of at least $125,000. See District 54 / A6

Supreme Court weighs whether Medical historian uncovers funeral protests experiments on Guatemalans cross the line Subjects were infected with syphilis by American doctors to test antibiotics

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Judy Stiegler

Candidates detail plans for office

By Ann Gerhart Fort Hood’s leaders have tried nearly everything to stop the suicides. There are support groups and hot lines, counseling sessions and Reiki healing therapies, and strict assessment guidelines for commanders. But the soldiers keep killing themselves. This past weekend, four more were dead at the Texas post, all of them decorated veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, three of them officers, two of them fathers of young children. All four appear to have shot themselves, according to preliminary reports gathered for the Army’s Suicide Prevention Task Force. Their deaths, which did not appear to be related, came within a few days of a visit from the Army’s vice chief of staff, who reiterated his urgent plea for hurting soldiers to seek help. “Every one of these is tragic,” said Maj. Gen. William Grimsley, who commands Fort Hood, the nation’s largest Army post. “It’s personally and professionally frustrating as a leader.” “It came out of nowhere,” said Spec. Dana Blomquist, 23, whose former squad leader, Sgt. Timothy Ryan Rinella, 29, was found dead Saturday in nearby Copperas Cove. “He always had a smile on his face. He cared for so much for his soldiers and people that weren’t even his soldiers. There are so many people who are feeling guilty, but he never really showed any of the normal signs of people needing help.” See Suicides / A6

Mike Kozak

By Robert Barnes The Washington Post

By Donald G. McNeil Jr. New York Times News Service

From 1946 to 1948, American public health doctors deliberately infected nearly 700 Guatemalans — prison inmates, mental patients and soldiers — with venereal diseases in what was meant as an effort to test the effectiveness of penicillin. American tax dollars, through the National Institutes of Health, even paid for syphilis-infected prostitutes to sleep with prisoners, since Guatemalan prisons allowed such visits. When the prostitutes did not succeed in infecting the men, some prisoners had the bacteria poured onto scrapes made on their penises, faces or arms, and in some cases it was injected by spinal puncture. If the subjects contracted the disease, they were given antibiotics. “However, whether everyone was then cured is not clear,” said Susan Reverby, the professor at Wellesley College who brought the experiments to light in a research paper that prompted American health officials to investigate. The revelations were made public Friday, when Secretary of State Hill-

Bryce Vickmark / New York Times News Service

Susan Reverby, a Wellesley College professor who’s work uncovered a U.S. study in Guatemala, is seen at her home in Cambridge, Mass. Top American officials described the study, in which government medical researchers deliberately infected prison inmates, soldiers and mental patients with syphilis, as “clearly unethical.” ary Clinton and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius apologized to the government of Guatemala and the survivors and descendants of those infected. They called the experiments “clearly unethical.” “Although these events occurred more than 64 years ago, we are

outraged that such reprehensible research could have occurred under the guise of public health,” the secretaries said in a statement. “We deeply regret that it happened, and we apologize to all the individuals who were affected by such abhorrent research practices.” See Syphilis / A7

TOPEKA, Kan. — A filmmaker several years ago tracked Shirley Phelps-Roper and her family members as they went about praising God for killing U.S. soldiers and picketing their funerals — their way of putting the nation on notice about the Almighty’s wrath. He called the documentary “The Most “The question our Hated Family in Amer- case presents is: ica,” and Phelps-Roper had only one real Can (free speech) regret. survive a few “If he had just called it, ‘The Most modest words Hated Family in the from a little WORLD,’” she said. In the last hours of church — less the last days, she ex- than 70 souls, in plained, Jesus said his the middle of the chosen will be “hated nation — about by all men.” Phelps-Roper, along your sins?” with her father, the Rev. Fred Phelps, and — Margie Phelps, other family members lawyer, Westboro who make up West- Baptist Church boro Baptist Church, may yet get their wish. The family’s inflammatory picketing — “Thank God for dead soldiers” is a favorite sign — has prompted more than 40 state legislatures and Congress to pass laws. Next week, the Supreme Court takes up the battle over how the Phelpses spread their message: that the nation’s tolerance of homosexuality has drawn God’s condemnation. See Westboro / A7


A2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Mexico planning to unify command of police By Randal C. Archibold New York Times News Service

SANTIAGO, Mexico — The Mexican government is preparing a plan to radically alter the nation’s police forces, hoping not only to instill a trust the public has never had in them but also to choke off a critical source of manpower for organized crime. The proposal, which presidential aides say is expected in the coming weeks, would all but do away with the nation’s 2,200 local police departments and place their duties under a “unified command.” It comes at a critical moment for President Felipe Calderón, who faces mounting pressure from the United States and within Mexico to demonstrate progress in defeating the drug cartels. He has already hurled the military into the fight, using soldiers to buttress the federal police and battle the drug traffickers, but violence continues to soar and corruption among the nation’s police forces remains a constant, fundamental scourge. Local police departments, filled with underpaid, undertrained officers, are heavily infiltrated by criminal organizations or under the thumb of mayors, often simply escorting local officials rather than patrolling the community, according to a report by Mexico’s Senate last month. Calderón’s new plan would eliminate what are now wide variations in police training, equipment, operations and recruitment in favor of a single national standard, helping the government field a more professional, cohesive force to work alongside its soldiers and agents fighting the drug war. The approach has its pitfalls, though. State authorities, which would now control the local police forces in coordination with the federal police, are hardly immune to corruption themselves, and municipal officials are suspicious of surrendering autonomy. It is also unclear how dishonest officers would be weeded out of the new chain of command. But the government is running out of options, and the public’s worries have only intensified with a recent rash of assassinations. Until now, Calderón’s main approach has been to draw on the military and the federal police, but the strategy has come under criticism for its human rights record. The State Department withheld funds from Mexico under an anti-drug initiative for the first time this year partly because of abuses.

New York Times News Service

As listed by The Associated Press

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Infraction status meant to save money on prosecution, Schwarzenegger says By Jesse McKinley New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — A month before California voters decide the fate of a ballot initiative that would legalize marijuana, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill that essentially puts those caught possessing small amounts of the drug on the same level as those caught speeding

on the freeway. The governor — who has come out against the ballot measure, Proposition 19 — cast the new law’s effect as largely administrative, changing the crime of possession from a misdemeanor to an infraction, the lowest level of offense under state law. And like everything else in a state struggling with a $19 billion

Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. is playing a larger and more directly partisan role in this year’s elections than it is known to have played in any previous U.S. campaign. The news late Thursday that the company — whose holdings include the Fox News Channel, The Wall Street Journal and The New York Post — had given $1 million to a business coalition that is advertising heavily against Democrats came roughly two months after election filings showed that its News America division had given $1 million to the Republican Governors Association. The latest disclosure of a large donation by News Corp. — to the U.S. Chamber of Com-

deficit, money mattered, too. “The only difference is that because it is a misdemeanor, a criminal defendant is entitled to a jury trial,” Schwarzenegger said in a statement that accompanied his signature. “In this time of drastic budget cuts, prosecutors, defense attorneys, law enforcement and the courts cannot afford to expend limited resources prosecuting a crime that carries the same punishment as a traffic ticket.” Under the law, SB 1449, possession of up to an ounce of marijuana is punishable by a $100

CONGO

fine. But offenders would not be arrested or risk having a criminal record. In his signing statement, Schwarzenegger was firm in his opposition to Proposition 19, which would legalize, tax and regulate the use of marijuana for those over 21, calling the measure “deeply flawed.” But as is the case with so many other things in California, many voters might not see things his way. A Field Poll released on Sunday found that 49 percent of voters approved of Proposition 19, with 42 percent against.

Ecuador’s police return to work; chief resigns McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Jehad Nga / New York Times News Service

Jean-Claude Singbatile is seen in Niangara, Congo. Singbatile, a high school student, says he spent 14 days in captivity and witnessed the executions of dozens of people.

Neighbors reject reproach by U.N. By Jeffrey Gettleman and Josh Kron New York Times News Service

NAIROBI, Kenya — The United Nations on Friday officially released a much-disputed report on massacres in the Democratic Republic of Congo that has drawn the ire of several countries, especially Rwanda, whose forces were accused of possibly committing genocide. The report paints a harrowing picture of the conflict in Congo from 1993 to 2003, with foreign armies from a half-dozen African countries slaughtering countless civilians across a vast stretch of territory, often in the quest for minerals. Earlier versions of the report had so outraged Rwanda that it threatened to withdraw thousands of its peacekeepers from Sudan, where it plays a linchpin role in the troubled Darfur region. But after a special visit by Secretary-General Ban Kimoon and extensive negotiations, Rwanda rescinded its threat, and the final report is not fundamentally different from previous versions. The hefty 566-page document was issued by the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, based in Geneva, which said that it interviewed more than 1,280 witnesses and analyzed more than 1,500 docu-

“The apparent systematic and widespread attacks described in this report reveal a number of inculpatory elements that, if proven before a competent court, could be characterized as crimes of genocide.” — United Nations report ments over two years. Rwanda’s Foreign Ministry still rejected the report as “an insult to history,” and said it could “undermine the peace and stability” of the Great Lakes region in Africa. Uganda, too, had issued a veiled threat on Thursday, saying the allegations “undermine Uganda’s resolve” to its peacekeeping operations. The several thousand Ugandan peacekeepers in Somalia are about the only thing keeping Somalia’s weak transitional government from being overrun by Islamist insurgents. Later statements from Uganda, though, gave the impression that Uganda was not planning on withdrawing its peace-

News Corp. gives $1M to anti-Dem camp By Jim Rutenberg

Oregon Lottery Results

California reduces pot penalty

merce, which is largely working to elect Republicans this year — drew condemnation from Democrats and liberal groups. They cited it as more evidence that Murdoch was pursuing a political agenda. Had it not been disclosed in

news reports — first by Politico. com on Thursday night — the donation would not have had to have been made public by News Corp. As a 501(c)(6) trade association, the chamber is not required to disclose its donors publicly.

keepers. A Ugandan military spokesman sent a text message on Friday simply saying, “No pullout.” The final report is slightly watered down compared with the draft copies, with a few more qualifications in the language. The final report reads: “The apparent systematic and widespread attacks described in this report reveal a number of inculpatory elements that, if proven before a competent court, could be characterized as crimes of genocide.” The final version of the report also includes more reasons such attacks may not be considered genocide, citing Rwanda’s willingness to take back hundreds of thousands, if not more, Hutu refugees. Analysts say that may be one reason why this Congo report will get a more extensive airing than previous reports that alleged the Rwandans massacred civilians. One such report from 1994 emerged only recently, after some high-level U.N. officials denied it even existed. Already, the calls for prosecution have begun. On Friday, Human Rights Watch, Amnesty International and others urged the Congolese government and other U.N. member states to begin judicial action to punish those responsible for the killings in Congo.

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QUITO, Ecuador — The situation was back to normal in Ecuador and police officers were back on the streets across the country Friday, new Ecuadorean police commander Floresmilo Ruiz said. The previous commander of Ecuador’s police force, Freddy Martinez, resigned earlier Friday, a day after a police mutiny appeared to put the country’s democracy at risk. The Ecuadorean government insists that the mutiny was part of a broader coup attempt, which eventually failed, while the international community referred to it as a disruption of democratic order in Ecuador. Ruiz inspected troops at the Quito Regiment, where the mutiny started Thursday and where Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa was pushed around, insulted and otherwise attacked in footage that went around the world. The new commander called on police to reflect on the previous day’s events and said Correa should have been shown respect. Early Thursday, Martinez had tried to explain to his men that a new law they were protesting would in fact work to their benefit, but he failed to convince police officers and they kept up their mutiny. District Attorney Marco Freire also visited the regiment’s facilities, to try to determine the sequence of events and establish who was responsible for them so they can be prosecuted. For hours, Correa was detained against his will at the Police Hospital in Quito, surrounded by 30,000 police officers and some rank-and-file soldiers who had joined the mutiny that also saw a takeover of the main police barracks and the runway at Quito’s international airport. Late Thursday, the military managed to free Correa, who was unharmed despite a shootout that claimed at least two lives.

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Medicare scrutinizing claims in fraud crackdown Anti-U.S. cleric’s By Jay Weaver McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — The behemoth Medicare bureaucracy will have to act more like a credit card company in flagging suspicious bills under a new federal law that could save taxpayers billions of dollars a year in wasteful government health care spending. The anti-fraud provision, tucked into the Small Business Lending Act that became law Monday, would force Medicare to end its 45-year-old policy of paying claims quickly without verifying them. That antiquated billing system, designed to keep the wheels of public health care spending going full speed, has led to an estimated $60 billionplus a year in Medicare fraud. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which pays out $500 billion yearly for elderly and disabled Americans, would have to adopt new billing software with “predictive modeling” by next year. Such ana-

“When we see this amount of fraudulent activity, it’s no longer going to be assumed that we start with the premise that everybody is on the up and up.” — Kathleen Sebelius, Health and Human Services secretary lytical technology enables the credit card industry to detect questionable bills for, say, a flatscreen TV purchased outside a cardholder’s immediate area so that companies can notify the customer and stop payment if fraud is a factor. A senior Medicare official said Wednesday that the agency has already started a pilot billing program with predictive capabilities for suspicious claims, providers and facilities. “The truth is, we already have the authority to use predictive analysis, and we’re already doing some of this,” said Peter Budetti, Medicare’s Baltimorebased deputy administrator for

program integrity. “We have every intention and interest in going forward.” Under the legislation, signed into law by President Barack Obama, Medicare has to start competitive bidding for “predictive modeling” software contractors by January and implement the billing technology in the 10 worst fraud states by July. Medicare’s billing contractors would use the new technology for processing claims for both hospitalization and outpatient services, the bulk of the program’s costs. After the first year of operation, the Department of Health

and Human Services’ inspector general’s office would report to Congress on the actual savings. If the savings are significant, some of the money would be used to expand the program to 10 more states. Top Health and Human Services and Justice Department authorities have acknowledged that the so-called “pay and chase” system has largely been a failure. “I would say that that world is coming to an end,” HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius told The Miami Herald during a health care fraud summit. “When we see this amount of fraudulent activity, it’s no longer going to be assumed that we start with the premise that everybody is on the up and up,” Sebelius said. “We actually have to get more stringent. That’s a very different way of doing business than assuming everything is OK and then looking back and finding out that it really isn’t.”

EAST COAST STORM PROMPTS FLASH FLOOD WARNINGS

backing puts Iraq’s al-Maliki closer to victory By Sahar Issa and Laith Hammoudi McClatchy -Tribune News Service

BAGHDAD — Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Friday took a major step toward a second term by securing the support of a Shiite Muslim political bloc that includes the anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. The reversal by al-Sadr’s bloc — which until recently had strongly opposed returning alMaliki to power — leaves alMaliki just shy of a parliamentary majority and figures to end nearly seven months of political deadlock that the U.S. military has blamed for a recent uptick in insurgent attacks. Al-Maliki, whose mostly Shiite State of Law party finished a close second in the March elections with 89 parliamentary seats, would control an additional 70 seats with the support of the other Shiite parties, of which al-Sadr’s is the largest. That would leave

al-Maliki four seats shy of the 163-seat majority needed to form a government.

Kurdish pressure That support is likely to come from the Kurdish political bloc, which won 43 seats and now is poised to play the role of kingmaker. Experts say Kurdish leaders will put pressure on alMaliki to speed up the resolution of the disputed oil-rich city of Kirkuk, which Kurds claim is rightfully theirs. Mohsin Sadoon, a member of the Kurdish coalition, called the decision “a great and important step” and said that talks with the al-Maliki alliance would proceed quickly. “It was the issue that delayed the formation of the government for a long time,” Sadoon said. “We will start the negotiations of forming the government with the alliance by presenting our demands and political projects very soon.”

FCC withdraws advice on cell phone radiation By Cecilia Kang The Washington Post

Matt Rourke / The Associated Press

People and their dogs stand before floodwaters from the Schuylkill River that submerged a section of Kelly Drive in Philadelphia on Friday. Torrential downpours from a faded tropical storm inundated the Northeast, forcing evacuations, toppling trees, cutting power to thousands and washing out roads during a snarled morning commute. Some East Coast cities received more rain in hours than they normally get in months. The massive rainstorm drove up the Eastern Seaboard from the Carolinas to Maine on Thursday. North Carolina was hit hardest Thursday. Jacksonville took on 12 inches in six hours — nearly a quarter of its typical annual rainfall. Four people, including two

children, were killed when their sport utility vehicle skidded off a rain-slicked highway about 145 miles east of Raleigh and plunged into a water-filled ditch, North Carolina troopers said. A fifth victim likely drowned when his pickup veered off the road and into a river that was raging because of the rain. On Friday, the storm claimed the life of a Pennsylvania woman who apparently drove into a rain-swollen creek before daybreak. Forecasters warned of the danger of flash floods as rain drove across the densely populated East Coast cities with buffeting winds on a drive to New England. — The Associated Press

Finland heightens drive to end tobacco use By Kati Pohjanpalo and Nicole Itano Bloomberg News

HELSINKI — Marlboro Man lit up his last cigarette on Finnish TV screens in 1978. Soon, his smokes will be out of plain sight in stores, and selling tobacco to Marlboro Jr. may land the retailer in jail. Finland will push tobacco sales under the counter in shops as a new law comes into effect in stages, starting yesterday. The Nordic nation, one of the first to ban tobacco advertisements, is the first to target an end to smoking through legal means. “It’s a warning to the people who want to invest, or work in, or be a part of the tobacco industry,” said Ismo Tuominen, an official who helped draft the new law at the Helsinki-based Health Ministry. “This is a warning that we are trying to get rid of this business in Finland once and for all. Our issue is that no one has the right to kill people.” Smoking bans in public places go back as far as 1977, and the habit has been outlawed in bars and restaurants since 2007, excluding tiny booths. The tactic is working. One in five Finns smoke daily, down from one in four in the early 1990s, Statistics Finland says. In 1998, 25 percent of men between the ages of 15 and 24 smoked, falling to 18 percent in 2008. For young women, the number dropped to 14 percent from 23 percent. Under the new measures, selling tobacco to people under 18 is punishable by a fine or up to six months in jail. Imports will

“This is a warning that we are trying to get rid of this business in Finland once and for all. Our issue is that no one has the right to kill people.” — Ismo Tuominen, Finland Health Ministry become more heavily restricted, and all sales of snus — moist tobacco placed in the mouth under the top lip — are forbidden. The display of tobacco products and brands, including Marlboro, will be banned starting in 2012, which will force shops to sell smokes from under the counter or from closed cupboards with opaque doors. Marlboro is sold in 160 countries, including Finland, by Philip Morris International; Altria Group owns the brand in the U.S. “I think this is a very easy and cheap way to protect children,” Tuominen said. Cigarette vending machines aren’t widely used in Finland. They are mostly found in bars with age limits on entry. The machines are already regulated and will be fully banned in 2015. “Maybe the biggest impact will be to stop the youngest kids from smoking, as they don’t see the cigarettes in the stores,” said Juhani Lehtonen, 18, a Helsinki high school student. “It won’t impact adults’ smoking at all.” Not all agree the measures will stop kids smoking. “It’s wasted effort,” said Sandra Suominen, 14, “It’s going to be a new fad with the kids — smoking will become cool.” The new law also expands the

ban to outdoor events, including football games and concerts, where smoking won’t be permitted by the audience. Hotels may designate one in 10 rooms for smokers, and smoking will be prohibited in common areas of apartment buildings. About 5 billion cigarettes are sold in Finland annually, almost a pack a week per citizen, according to the Finnish Grocery Trade Association, whose members sell about 95 percent of groceries in the country. Finns buy

their smokes from supermarkets, kiosks and gas stations. Corner shops, like the Tabacs popular in France, are nowhere to be seen. Tobacco sales bring in about $1.57 billion to retailers each year, and passengers import about $206 million of tobacco products, the association said. “Changing all the displays will require a lot of work and imply a lot of cost for us,” Ilkka Nieminen, director in charge of retail operations at the grocery association, said in an interview. “There will be a lot of unnecessary hassle at the cashier unless we find practical solutions for self-service to continue.” Changing the tobacco display units will cost retailers as much as $41 million, the grocery association estimates.

WASHINGTON — The Federal Communications Commission has changed its guidance to cell phone users worried about the health effects of wireless devices, dropping a long-standing recommendation that concerned consumers purchase phones with lower levels of radiation emissions. The move comes amid a growing debate over cell phone safety and coincides with efforts in some jurisdictions to require wireless providers to more clearly state the radiation emissions of the phones they sell. The revisions were made last week, without any formal announcement, to a consumer fact sheet posted on the FCC’s website. Consumer advocates criticized the agency for what they called a lack of transparency. “A secretive change like the one that was just made raises questions of collusions with industry and does not help make the change credible,” wrote wireless industry consultant Michael Marcus in a blog on Public Knowledge, a public interest site. An FCC representative declined to comment. In its revised guidance, the FCC said that data on a phone’s radiation emissions

is not a useful gauge of the risk posed by any device. The updated language omitted a previous suggestion that users buy phones with lower specific absorption rates, a measure of the rate of radio-frequency energy absorbed by the human body. The FCC now says that any phone approved by the FCC has passed its absorption tests and is safe. Scientists are mixed on the effects of cell phone radio frequencies on human tissue. Some say that heavy users could have higher exposure and be at greater risk for brain cancer. Others say that children, with thinner skulls, are at a greater risk for tissue changes that can lead to cancer. But leading health groups, including the World Health Organization, say there is not enough evidence to reach that conclusion. “The FCC requires that cell phone manufacturers conduct their SAR testing to include the most severe, worst-case (and highest power) operating conditions for all the frequency bands used in the USA for that cell phone,” the agency wrote on its consumer and governmental affairs section of its website on Sept. 20.

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A4 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R  I B

Catholic Church seeks limit on payouts By Martin Oversohl

Guest Speaker Luke Hendrix, Executive Pastor at Imago Dei in Portland, will give the message at the 9:30 a.m. service and lead the 11:15 Redux service Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share part three of the message “Power” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “The Symbol of Grace” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • The theme will be “Come to the Table with Joy” for the 11 a.m. service Sunday following the 10:45 a.m. song service at Community of Christ, 23080 Cooley Rd., Bend. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Making the Rule of God Personal,” based on Mathew 6:33, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • October topic is “Children and Health Care” 1:30-2:30 p.m. Fridays at Christian Science Reading Room Resource Workshops, 115 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Worship in our Service,” based on 1 Corinthians 12:4-12, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “Spread Hope!” as part of the series “The Hope Experience” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part two of the message “Unshakable: Building a Kingdom Culture” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “Live It Out” as part two of a series at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Pastor Syd Brestel will share the message “The First Shall Be Last and the Last Shall Be First” as the conclusion of the “Hard Truths” series at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “Love Is Letting Go of Fear” at the 9 a.m. contemporary, 10:45 a.m. traditional and 5:01 p.m. evening services this World Communion Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “Love In Any Language,” based on Luke 17:510 and 2 Timothy 1:1-14, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary and 11 a.m. traditional services Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will

continue the series “Guerilla Love” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Regal Old Mill 16 Cinemas, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., Bend. • A new series “Morph” based on the seven churches of Revelation begins at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Guest Pastor The Rev. Mark Beiderwieden will share the message “O Ye of Little Faith” based on Luke 17:1-10, at 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • The Rev. Susan Maginn will speak on the topic “The Slow Revolution” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Teri Hawkins will speak on the topic “Soul Work” at 10 a.m. Sunday at The Unity Community of Central Oregon, held at Eastern Star Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend. • Pastor Ken Johnson will share the message “How to Have Hope in Times Like These” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Myron Wells will share the message “Really? Why Didn’t We Listen?,” based on Nehemiah 8:1-18, at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Dr. John Nastari will share the message “The Heart of the Matter,” based on 2 Samuel 5:1-5, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary and 11 a.m. traditional services Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Randy VanMehren will share the message “It Is the Lord Who Works In Us to Both To Will and To Do His Good Pleasure” at the 10:30 a.m. service Sunday at Emmaus Lutheran Church, 2175 S.W. Salmon Ave., Redmond. • A special “Blessing of the Animals” service at 10 a.m. will be held in addition to the 8:30 a.m. contemporary and the 11 a.m. traditional services Sunday at Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 Black Butte Blvd., Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “The Origin of Space, Time & Matter,” based on Genesis 1, as part of the series “Back to the Beginnings” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “Because Christians are Born of God’s Boundless Forgiveness Through the Gospel of Christ Crucified for the Sins of Men, So Christians’ Forgiveness Towards Others Knows No Bounds,” based on Luke 17:4, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BERLIN — The Catholic Church called Thursday for Germany to agree to a ceiling on compensation payouts by sports clubs, boarding schools and religious organizations to sex abuse victims. The Catholic bishops did not disclose how high they thought the ceiling should be. They made the proposal at a governmentheaded meeting with other institutions and victim groups. Abuse by pedophile German priests from the 1950s to 1990s came into the open this year,

after similar scandals in Ireland and Belgium. Victims have alleged that the church covered up the abuse. In Germany, the scandal quickly widened with similar disclosures by other churches, non-religious groups and sporting organizations of crimes against children, ranging from violence and exhibitionism to serial rape. Berlin summoned the victims, who are now adult, and groups that employed the pedophiles to negotiate a broad settlement. The church, with 26 million members among Germany’s 80

million population, said compensation should be proportionate to each victim’s present-day need for psychological counseling. It should not be equal across all the cases, nor should it cover past counseling, said the proposal. The meeting, headed by three cabinet ministers, is discussing cases that are so old that the victims can no longer sue in the courts. Victim representatives have said a sliding scale between 5,000 and 80,000 euros ($7,000 and $106,000) would be appropriate. Germany’s legal system does not provide for punitive dam-

ages such as the millions of dollars paid a decade ago by U.S. Catholic dioceses for sex abuse, or the big sums paid last year by Catholic bodies in Ireland. Bishop Stephan Ackermann, the Catholic envoy on the issue, said before it met, “I can understand that many victims are getting impatient and that nobody wants this put off forever.” But it would torpedo the talks if amounts were named outside the meeting, he said. Small groups with modest finances, such as sports clubs, would simply walk out if they could not afford to pay, he said.

700 BABIES BAPTIZED IN GEORGIAN CEREMONY

Shakh Aivazov / The Associated Press

A baby cries during a baptism in a Georgian Orthodox church in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Tuesday. Some 700 babies were baptized during a special ceremony in the Georgian capital.

VOICES OF FAITH

How does sacrifice play into helping others? McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q: A:

Is it wrong not to help someone because it means you’ll have to sacrifice? If you help another and sacrifice something in the process, you will feel good about it if it makes a positive difference at that time and into the future. On the other hand, if your sacrifice doesn’t make a difference, you will not feel good about it. For instance, say I have a friend, and on the last week of every month he comes to me asking for help. He needs $20 because he is out of groceries and has no money until payday. This happens time and time again, with the $20 never getting repaid. Am I really helping him, and is my sacrifice making a difference, or am I enabling him to be irresponsible with his finances and encouraging him to live beyond his means?

In this case my sacrifice of $20 is not helping create a better condition; it is just maintaining a bad one. On the other hand, if I told him I would never give him money again, but I would teach him the basics of budgeting and pay for him to go to a money management course, my sacrifice would make a positive difference. The right or wrong of a sacrifice is whether it will permanently improve a condition in a person’s life or assist in maintaining a bad condition in a person’s life. The Rev. Duke Tufty Unity Temple on the Plaza in Kansas City

A:

The Rev. Pat Rush, pastor, Visitation Catholic Church, Kansas City: We generally consider the Ten Commandments as the benchmark for right and

wrong, and there is no commandment that requires us to help others at a sacrificial cost to ourselves. Jesus, however, goes beyond the commandments, telling us to love our neighbor as ourselves and teaching that there is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. The first letter of John tells us that we are reborn as God’s children and are called to become like him. We become like God by practicing divine virtues such as compassion, mercy, justice and—above all—love, virtues that lead us to sacrifice for others. Driving Interstate 70 from Colorado recently, I saw a sign that warned against picking up hitchhikers because of the proximity of a prison. Certainly we must sometimes weigh the risks of helping others against

our safety and other concerns. But to live as God’s children is to make sacrifices for others, such as giving time or money or donating blood or even a kidney to another in need. Although we revere the soldier who throws himself on a grenade to protect his colleagues, few of us will literally lay down our lives for another. But all who follow Christ are called to be Good Samaritans over and over again as we grow to resemble the God whose children we are. The Rev. Pat Rush Visitation Catholic Church, Kansas City Send your questions for one of our panels of religion columnists to Helen Gray at The Star, 1729 Grand Blvd., Kansas City, Mo. 64108. Send e-mail to hgraykcstar.com.

Rift at humanist center reveals a deeper division among skeptics By Mark Oppenheimer New York Times News Service

AMHERST, N.Y. — You can tell something about a man by what he names his dog. At Paul Kurtz’s house, I was greeted in his driveway by a pug puppy named John Dewey. Kurtz, an 84-year-old who names his dogs for freethinkers throughout history, is the exiled founder of the Center for Inquiry, which is devoted to promoting humanism and criticizing religion. He founded the center’s two affiliates: the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, which investigates claims of the paranormal, like UFO sightings and mental telepathy, and the Council for Secular Humanism, which promotes ethics and values

without God. And he started two magazines and a publishing house. There are more famous opponents of supernaturalism, but none is an institution-builder like Kurtz, a retired philosophy professor. The Center for Inquiry, which assumed its name in 1991, until recently shared a budget of more than $6 million with its affiliates, and it supports campus groups, a West Coast office and branches in many American cities and in countries like England, Peru and Poland. Which makes Kurtz’s fall Lear-like. We are meeting in his home, not at the center, minutes away in this Buffalo suburb. In 2008, look-

ing to spend less time running the center, he supported his board’s decision to hire Ronald Lindsay, a corporate lawyer from Washington, as chief executive. In June 2009, at odds with Lindsay, Kurtz was voted out as the center’s chairman. In May, he resigned from the board altogether. According to Kurtz, there were two areas of conflict. First, he says, Lindsay changed the work culture. Whereas Kurtz had managed “in the spirit of a think tank,” Lindsay brought his legal background to bear. “I am used to the academic life, where we don’t impose rules on employees,” Kurtz said, sitting in his living room. But Lindsay, he said, “set up a command system,

said these are the rules and laws, and anyone who deviates from that will be investigated.” Employees were interrogated for minor infractions, Kurtz said, and several were let go. By phone and by e-mail, Lindsay said the “investigations” were due-process inquiries into complaints, and that he had not fired anyone for questioning his authority. But Kurtz’s second complaint goes beyond internecine power struggles. He said that Lindsay was turning the center away from Kurtz’s humanist philosophy and toward negative, angry atheism. “If religion is being weakened, what replaces it in secular society?” he asked. “Most of my col-

leagues are concerned with critiquing the concept of God. That is important, but equally important is, where do you turn?” In books like “What Is Secular Humanism?” Kurtz has argued for a universal but nonreligious ethics, one he now calls “planetary humanism.” Its first principle is that “every person on the planet should be considered equal in dignity and value.” In his books, he explains how this principle can be derived from nature and from what we know of the human species. “Angry atheism does not work,” Kurtz said. “It has to be friendly, cooperative relations with people of other points of view.” To that end, he and several former em-

ployees of the center are starting a new organization, the Institute for Science and Human Values. Lindsay and the employees who remain dispute Kurtz’s portrayal of them as angry atheists. He countered that magazines run by Kurtz had long published cartoons critical of religion. The center’s donations have fallen since Kurtz’s departure, which prompted warring blog posts between his defenders and Lindsay’s. Matters have not improved: On Wednesday, when Kurtz stopped by the center, where he still keeps an office, he found the locks had been changed. Lindsay told me that Kurtz did not need the new key because he “has no connection with us.”


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

REMEMBER TO SEND IN YOUR FALL SCHEDULE

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN Pastor Mike will share his message titled, ”Unshakable, Building a Kingdom Culture” Part II WEDNESDAYS 7:00 PM: Fuel Youth Group A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups. Please contact the church for details and times. Child care provided during Sunday morning service. Pastor Michael Johnson The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com RADIANT LIFE FELLOWSHIP Loving God & Truth + People & Life 60670 Brookswood Blvd. • (541) 389-4749 www.rlfbend.org Pastor George Bender SUNDAY “GLOW” Sunday School @ 9:30 am “IGNITE” Worship @ 10:30 am “SPARKLERS” Kids’ Care & Kids’ Church WEDNESDAY “VISION” Bible Study @ 7 pm “ILLUMINATE” Youth Worship @ 7 pm REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10;15 AM Worship Service This Sunday at First Baptist, Pastor Syd concludes is Hard Truths sermon series with a study on Jesus’ counter cultural statement, “The first shall be last and the last shall be first.” For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

Christian Schools CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Catholic

Christian Science

HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm

HOLY REDEEMER, La Pine 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00AM Sunday Mass — 10:00AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00PM HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30PM Sunday Mass — 8:00AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00–12:15PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Joe Reinig Fr. Daniel Maxwell Deacon Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 8:00 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM A sung Latin Mass on Sunday, October 17th at 1:30 PM in the historic St. Francis Church downtown, with the Cappella Singers joining us. On Sunday October 31st, a sung Latin Mass will celebrate the Feast of All Saints. *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818

Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Christian REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Sunday, October 3rd Sermon Title: “Really? Why Didn’t We Listen?” Nehemiah 8: 1-18 Speaker: Myron Wells POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eckankar ECKANKAR RELIGION OF THE LIGHT AND SOUND OF GOD FREE discussion of all faiths: “Have you had a spiritual experience?” Have you had a sense you’ve lived before? An out-of-body or near-death experience? Dreams of a departed one? An inner light or inner sound? Discover what your experiences really mean. Connect with other like-minded people. Learn new and advanced ways for exploring your inner worlds. Saturday, October 16, 2:00PM in the new COCC Campus Center, downstairs conference room. 2699 College Way, Bend, OR. For more contact info: 541-728-6476 (message) www.eckankar.org

Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you! Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH How to Have Hope in Times Like These Pastor Ken Johnson In times like these, there is certain hope in Christ alone. WEST CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00 and10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th Grade Meets: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 5th Grade Meets: Wednesday at 6:45pm Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:45pm Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Tuesdays at 6:45pm and Sunday at 10:45am SOUTH CAMPUS Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97702 Sunday at 10:30am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 10:30am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome! Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack Religious Education, Hebrew program & Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study & Adult Education Teen Youth Group Upcoming Events: Fri. Oct. 1 - 5:30 pm - Celebrate Simchat Torah followed by potluck Shabbat Dinner Fri. Oct. 15 - 6 pm Children’s Shabbat Service Feb. Oct. 22 - 7 pm - Friday Eve Service Rebecca David will help lead and Monroe Weinberg will be honored

NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 ��� 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Traditional Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim Pastor www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational

We offer a wide range of monthly activities including services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education.

ST. ALBANS- REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org

THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond

ALFALFA COMMUNITY CHURCH Alfalfa Community Hall 541-330-0593, Alfalfa, Oregon Sunday School 9:30, Worship 10:30 We sing hymns, pray for individual needs, and examine the Bible verse by verse. You can be certain of an eternity with Jesus (Eph. 2:8,9) and you can discover His plan and purpose for your life (Eph. 2:10). We welcome your fellowship with us.

Rabbi Glenn Ettman

Evangelical

www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: info@saints.org

TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice.

Sukkot- Saturday, September 25, call for information

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Nursery provided on Sundays

Sat. Oct. 30 - 10 am - Bat Mitzvah Rebecca David

Episcopal

Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education 10:00am Holy Eucharist Dr. John F. Burgess “How much Faith?” Tuesday- 3pm Bible Study Wednesday- 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown

Fall schedule Contemporary Worship at 8:00 AM Traditional Worship at 11:00 AM Sunday School & Bible Study at 9:30 AM

Shabbat & Simchat Torah service- Friday, October 1 @ 6:00 pm For the complete schedule of services go to: www.bethtikvahbend.org We are currently enrolling students in grades K—6 for Sunday School and Hebrew School Classes begin Sunday, September 12th For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000 All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 Women’s Bible Study, Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study, Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service 11:00 AM Formal Service Sermon by Pastor David C . Nagler Junior Church is at 9:15 AM for kids preschool to 5th grade Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241 Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski “Love is Letting Go of Fear” Sunday Worship 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as you are Youth Groups Senior Highs Mondays Middle School Wednesdays Details: gbolt@bendfp.org Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always! www.bendfp.org 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, October 3, 11:00am Rev. Susan Maginn: “The Slow Revolution” We are living in a transformational age. A new world will be created by our ability to live a sustainable life. We are slowing to hear the Earth’s lamentation and fall in love with her again and again Childcare and religious education are provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569United Church of God

United Church of Christ ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. Everyone united by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with us at 10 a.m. Sunday, October 3rd at the Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 SW 29th St. in Redmond. The next meeting will be Sunday, October 17th. Guest pastor Kimberly Brown will lead worship. For details, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call the church at: 541-388-2230 or, email: prisbill@earthlink.net

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson 8:30am Contemporary Service 11:00am Traditional Service World Communion Sunday Sermon title “**Love In Any Language*” Scripture: Luke 17:5-10 & 2 Timothy 1:1-14 *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

Nursery Care provided for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Sermon “Is There Going To Be A Test?” Scripture: Judges 6:11-12 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 2:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

$126 The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday

CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Temples


COV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

District 54 Continued from A1 Measure 67 raised the states minimum corporate tax from $10 to $150 and provides for businesses to be taxed on gross receipts regardless of whether they are profitable. Critics of the measures say they’ve created an unfriendly business environment in Oregon and taken money out of the pockets of people who would otherwise spend it, stimulating the economy. But Stiegler has defended her vote, saying legislators facing a budget shortfall had to raise revenue and, lacking a sales tax, had few options. This week, Stiegler said she believes the impact of the measures on Oregon businesses “at this point, is neutral.” “We are competitive from a business competition point of view,” she continued. “I think we have the structure to be competitive.” Conger and small business owner Kozak disagree. Conger has credited the ballot measures with “killing jobs” and driving companies out of Oregon. Kozak has said his minimum corporate tax went up 1,500 percent when voters passed Measure 67 in January. Kozak also said that, while he believes it is too early to tell the exact impact of the measures, he has spoken to local business owners who have laid off employees and are talking about moving out of state in response to the measures’ passage. Chuck Sheketoff, of the Oregon Center for Public Policy, said he’s heard many stories like the one Kozak tells. But Sheketoff says those stories are contradicted by the number of businesses that are moving to Oregon. He points to the wind-power company Vestas, which recently announced plans to move its North American headquarters to Portland. And Stiegler noted the biotechnology company Genentech recently expanded in Hillsboro. She also said the Oregon Employment Department’s weekly employment summary shows businesses are opening in Central Oregon. In the past month, the summaries have listed three restaurants slated to open in Bend, a chiropractic clinic that has opened in Sisters, and OnPoint Community Credit Union’s plans to open Redmond and Bend branches. But Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, said Central Oregon has been impacted by the passage of Measures 66 & 67. Lee said his organization does not endorse political candidates and limited his comments only to the impact of the ballot measures. “We have seen an impact but herein lies the problem, most

Suicides Continued from A1 The rate of suicide among the nation’s soldiers now eclipses that in the civilian world. The rate at Fort Hood, where 14 suicides already are confirmed this year and six other deaths are under investigation, is nearly four times that of the civilian population. Grimsley said he saw no indication that the increase in suicides is related to November’s mass shooting, when an Army psychiatrist allegedly opened fire inside the post and killed 13 people. A thick Army report on the crisis two months ago points to several causes, including troops being so busy fighting two wars in 10 years that they don’t take time to focus on their mental health and a rise in crime and substance abuse. The Army has concerns that the force is becoming “increasingly dependent on both legal and illegal drugs,” according to the report. Soldiers “tell us again and again we are failing,” the chief of psychiatry at Walter Reed Army Medical Center said at a military medicine symposium last week. They fear losing their security clearance and losing promotions if they seek help, said Col. John Bradley, and they don’t have confidence that the military can provide the necessary care. “They don’t trust us. They believe we speak with forked tongues,” added retired Col. Charles Hoge, a former psychiatrist at Walter Reed, who was also at the symposium. At the same time, in what the Army has begun to call “an era of persistent conflict,” soldiers are increasingly culturally, socially and physically isolated from the rest of the country, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said in a

companies impacted by this really don’t want to be in the media,” he said. Lee counted a local manufacturing company that has laid off two employees, an aviation company that has put a potential move to Bend on hold and a technology company that pulled away from plans to move to Bend and instead moved to Vancouver, Wash., among those impacted by the ballot measures. “We were in the final stages of making that happen, and they immediately, right after the measures happened, they moved to Vancouver and took jobs that paid $100,000 to $200,000.” Lee said. When asked if she would vote for further tax increases if she is re-elected, Stiegler said she was against the idea. “Are we going to raise either personal or corporate taxes in the next session? No, I’m not going to be in favor of that at all,” she said.

Employee compensation Stiegler also said this week that she favors a complete review of state employees’ compensation packages to see where cuts could be made. Specifically, she said reducing the 6 percent the state pays into PERS on behalf of its workers and making state employees pay for part of their health insurance costs are potential options. Conger and Kozak both support phasing out the 6 percent pickup. Conger also would like to implement a statewide hiring freeze, roll back pay raises for state employees and downsize the state’s workforce by about 5,000 people. Kozak proposes cutting state personnel by mandating state agency heads to downsize their departments. In addition to state employee compensation, Stiegler — a noted advocate for education — said she is open to the idea of performance-based pay for teachers. “What I don’t want merit pay to come down to is how well a kid does on a test,” she said. “I think it can be one of the factors, some kind of student assessment, and that could be a variety of things.” Conger said he supports some type of performance-based pay for teachers ���but the devil is in the details.” Before making any kind of decision, Conger said he would look to educators to advise him on how to set teacher pay. Kozak called the idea of performance-based pay a “very interesting concept,” but said he has not taken an in-depth look at the issue. Becca Uherbelau, of the Oregon Education Association, said the organization is opposed to tying teacher pay to standardized tests. But the association supports the efforts of nearly a dozen school districts statewide

blunt speech Wednesday at Duke University. Such a small fraction of the nation’s 350 million people serves in the all-volunteer force that the divide between military and civilian life is widening. “Whatever their fond sentiments for men and women in uniform, for most Americans, the war remains an abstraction — a distant and unpleasant series of news items that do not affect them personally,” Gates said.

Army town All of these factors are on full display in the Texas town just outside sprawling Fort Hood. Killeen is an Army company town, and its crime rate rises when the brigades come home, with more arrests for domestic violence, assault, and drunk and disorderly conduct. The skills that keep soldiers alive in war make them dysfunctional in civil society. So the suicides are no longer shocking. But the quartet in one weekend rocked Fort Hood. The first, found Friday in Temple, was Pvt. Antonio Heath, 24, an ammunition stock-control specialist from Warren, N.Y., stationed in Iraq for most of last year. On Saturday, Master Sgt. Baldemar Gonzales, 39, was found dead in his house on post. He had fought in the Persian Gulf War in 1991 and was deployed to Iraq again from the spring of 2008 to 2009. Married and a recipient of the Bronze Star Medal, he was the senior noncommis-

participating in the Chalkboard Project which aims to improve student achievement and teacher proficiency. Bend-La Pine Schools is one of the districts participating in the Chalkboard Project. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said part of the project is determining the best way to set teacher pay. He said educators must look at a host of data, including student progress over time and “professional development” or teacher training. “What we often say is, if you look at one data point, you only have a snapshot so that doesn’t give you any real information, so to try to draw a lot of conclusions from that snapshot is tough to do,” Wilkinson said.

State contracts In a meeting with The Bulletin’s editorial board this week, Stiegler discussed her vote on House Bill 2867, which limits Oregon’s ability to award state contracts. The bill prohibits the state from awarding service contracts worth more than $250,000 to the low bidder if the only savings in the bid is on labor costs. So if three companies bid on a state contract for services, like running concession stands, the lowest bidder could not win the contract its bid was the lowest only because it paid its employees less. Stiegler said she voted for the legislation because she wanted to insure the state was providing high quality services through its contractors. “If you have a situation where you’re not necessarily guaranteeing superior service, and all you’re doing is guaranteeing less pay then I don’t necessarily think you are achieving the desired effect,” Stiegler said. “You don’t want to undercut services.” With the caveat that he had not read the bill, Kozak said he was generally “not in favor of that kind of thing.” “You have some real issues there because, usually the cost differences are in the cost of labor because the hard product itself, the bricks and mortar, are usually a set cost,” Kozak said. “So that’s competition. Some guys work for less and that’s how you lower your price. ... (The bill) sounds like a typical union stance.” Conger agreed and said he had two problems with the legislation. “That bill probably does two things: it drives up the cost, or potentially drives up the cost of state contracts with the private sector, which I am adamantly opposed to,” he said. “And the only benefit that I can see there clearly flows to unions in support of the prevailing wage. ... It’s a union subsidy any way you slice it.” Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or cpowers@bendbulletin.com

sioned officer for a brigade combat team detachment until the summer of 2009. Since September, he had been assigned to the Warrior Transition Team, a medical program that places wounded and ill soldiers into a unit to help ease them back to duty or into civilian life. Rinella, a father of four, was found next. Then, on Sunday, there were gunshots at one of the developments for families on Fort Hood. Authorities discovered Sgt. Michael Timothy Franklin, 31, and his wife, Jesse Ann, both dead from gunshots. Army investigators said they think Franklin killed his wife, then turned the gun on himself. He had wanted to be an elementary school teacher, a college friend told his hometown newspaper in Middletown, R.I. , but joined the Army in 1997 after he struggled to find work. He told friends that his two tours in Iraq were “crazy,” and said his life was like the movie “Stop-Loss,” in which soldiers keep getting shipped back just as their time is about to run out. Rinella missed the birth of his first son when he was in Iraq, and he missed the birth of his second in 2004 because his flight home was 20 minutes late. He was stoical at the time. “I made the choice to join the military,” he told the Associated Press, “and I knew I was going to miss some things.” Alice Crites contributed to this report.

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Former French president charged with corruption By Ansgar Haase McClatchy-Tribune News Service

PARIS — Former French president Jacques Chirac will go on trial early next year on corruption charges, according to French courts. The 77-year-old will be the first French president to ever face trial.

Sanctuary Continued from A1 Those facilities come with limits, both in terms of how long residents can stay and which family members can live with them. As a result, she said people making big changes in their lives sometimes run into trouble when it’s time to take the next step. “The problem is most of these people have no credit history, and if they do, it’s bad, and their rental history is worse,” Pfiefer said. “They might not even have the money for the first month’s rent.” In 2008, Pfiefer and Associates applied for and received a grant from the state’s Alcohol and Drug Free Housing Fund. With the money from the grant, the group purchased a property in Redmond and opened it as the area’s first long-term affordable housing facility for people in recovery. It came with some strict rules: Tenants and their guests cannot use drugs or alcohol, must attend regular counseling and submit to drug testing. So far, Pfiefer said it’s been a success. Of the five tenants who have lived in the facility, three have moved on to other homes that were a better fit with their employment or family life and another continues to live in the same apartment. Only one was asked to leave because of unpaid rent. When the grant came up again — it’s offered every two years — Pfiefer decided to try to create something similar in Bend. After submitting an ap-

Chirac stands accused of using his position as mayor of Paris, a job he held from 1977 to 1995, to secure jobs for supporters in his political party. At least 21 people reportedly were added to city hall payrolls in the early 1990s, when in reality they worked for the Rally for the Republic political party.

plication, Pfiefer and Associates was awarded $200,000 from the state and later picked up another $60,000 from the city of Bend’s affordable housing fund. The group purchased a four-unit townhouse on Bend’s northeast side and quickly had a waiting list of potential residents. On Friday, the four tenants — three single mothers, all with teenagers, and a couple with a baby — were given the keys to their new homes. They’ll be required to stick to the same rules as the residents at the Redmond house. Michelle Day-London, 36, said that’s a big part of the reason she’s excited to move in. She’s been in and out of recovery for about 14 years, and estimates that she’s been homeless at least a dozen times, sometimes for up to five months at a stretch. Day-London said she’s been clean for more than a year and this will mark the first time she’s been able to live together with her husband and 14month-old daughter. “If I suspect one of our neighbors is using, I will be the first one to call the proper authorities, because I’m going to hold other people accountable too,” she said. Last year at this time, Tina Myers, 40, was homeless and living in La Pine. She’d been trying for years to beat her addictions to drugs and alcohol, hold a steady job and be a stable parent for her three children. Each time she’d get clean, she’d fall back into her old habits.

The trial’s start has been set for March 7. It is expected to last around a month. Chirac and the Union for a Popular Movement party — the successor to the RPR — have paid a $3 million settlement to the city of Paris in exchange for the city removing itself as a plaintiff in the case.

Last year, however, she decided to make a more serious effort. She moved in with her parents and her teenage son in Bend and stopped drinking and using drugs. Since April, she’s been working as a electronics technical support consultant. When she landed a spot at the The Bend Sanctuary for her and her son, Myers was “ecstatic.” “It’s the security of knowing we don’t have to sleep on other people’s couches, don’t have to go ask people for food because we were homeless, that we’ll have something to eat,” she said. “It’s going to give both security so we can grow in our lives in other aspects and not have to worry about where we’re going to lay our heads at night.” Rick Treleaven, the executive director of BestCare Treatment Services, said the project is a welcome addition to the community because stable housing can be crucial for people trying to stay sober. “At some point, they, like the rest of us, want to get something stable. ... From a clinical perspective, it enhances the ability to stay sober over the long term,” he said. “Having a home, getting a job, a stable family situation, all the things the rest of us want are important.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 A7

Syphilis

Michael S. Williamson / Washington Post

Retired Army Maj. Gen. Bill Branson stands in salute to protest the Westboro Baptist Church picketers during a funeral service in De Soto, Mo., for Staff Sgt. James Ide, who was killed in Afghanistan. “It is an insult to every American who has died for the freedom of speech,” said the father of another dead soldier whose service was disrupted by Westboro church members. Supporters of the Ide family cheered as Westboro church members left the area.

Westboro Continued from A1 It creates an only-in-America quandary: whether the freedom of speech is so powerfully woven into the nation’s fabric that it protects one family’s right to vile and hurtful protest at the very moment of another family’s most profound grief. Albert Snyder, whose son Matthew’s 2006 funeral in a little town in northern Maryland is at the center of the case, says that right cannot possibly exist. “It is an insult to every American who has died for the freedom of speech,” Snyder said in a recent interview. “No one in the history of the nation has ever protested like this. Don’t tell me that my son died for that.” Snyder’s was one of about 200 families who say the funerals of their loved ones were disrupted by Westboro’s protests. A Baltimore jury ruled that Westboro had to pay Snyder $10 million for invasion of privacy and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The judge cut the amount in half, and then a unanimous three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit in Richmond overturned the judgment.

‘Distasteful’ The judges called the Phelps protest “distasteful and repugnant” but protected by the Constitution as “imaginative and hyperbolic rhetoric.” Margie Phelps, another daughter and a lawyer who will argue the church’s side before the Supreme Court, called the case “the ultimate litmus test” for America’s belief in free speech. “It has survived pornography. It survived burning flags. It survived every kind of filth on the Internet. It survived what people thought was seditious talk,” she said recently, on a break between a protest at a Catholic church and before worship service at Westboro. “The question our case presents is: Can it survive a few modest words from a little church — less than 70 souls, in the middle of the nation — about your sins?”

“I had one chance to bury my son in peace and they took it away from me.” — Albert Snyder, father of deceased solder But Snyder’s attorney, Sean Summers, said the appeals court was wrong to consider only the First Amendment rights of the church members.

Conflict of freedoms “The Phelpses’ freedom of speech should have ended where it conflicted with Mr. Snyder’s freedom to participate in his son’s funeral, which was intended to be a solemn religious gathering,” Summers told the court in his brief. Snyder put it another way. “I had one chance to bury my son in peace,” he said, “and they took it away from me.” On March 10, 2006, seven members of the Phelps family picketed 20-year-old Marine Lance Cpl. Matthew Snyder’s funeral at St. John’s Catholic Church in the town of Westminster. Snyder was not gay; the Phelpses say their message is not about the individual soldier, but the nation. More than a thousand people turned out, both to support the Snyders and protest Westboro. The funeral procession was rerouted so as not to pass the Phelpses. The parochial school across the street papered over its windows to shield students from signs such as “Semper Fags” and an illustration of two stick figures engaging in anal sex. The media were out in force. A SWAT team was called. “They turned my son’s funeral into a circus,” Snyder said. Fred Phelps asked: “If we’re saying God is mad at the country and he’s killing kids on account of it, then what’s more appropriate as a forum to preach than at the funeral of one of these dead

soldiers that God has just killed?” Phelps, who once practiced law but now is disbarred, is one of 16 in the extended family who have law degrees. The family obeyed law enforcement directives and all laws. “We don’t believe in that civil disobedience stuff,” Margie Phelps said. “It’s not scriptural, so we don’t do it.” A few weeks later, Phelps-Roper wrote on the Westboro church’s website that Snyder’s membership in the Catholic Church and his divorce from Matthew’s mother had made his son a prime target for God’s punishment. Snyder said the stress from the events made him physically sick, worsened his diabetes and deepened his depression. He is supported by the attorneys general of 48 states and the District of Columbia. He has also drawn backing from the majority and minority leaders of the Senate, along with a bipartisan mix of 40 senators.

Hijacking funerals Their brief, written by longtime Supreme Court practitioner Walter Dellinger, argues that the Phelpses have a right to free speech but not to “hijack a private funeral as a vehicle for expression of their own hate.” Such willful attempts to insult and invade privacy are not constitutionally protected, they say. But the Phelpses are supported by a broad coalition of media organizations and First Amendment scholars. They say ruling against the church would undermine the core protections of the First Amendment and open speakers to liability when the listener dis-

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agrees with the message. The same groups are quick to disassociate themselves from the “vile” and “repulsive” words of Westboro. “This case tests the mettle of even the most ardent free speech advocates because the underlying speech is so repugnant,” the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press said in its brief. Roy Englert, a frequent Supreme Court practitioner not involved in the case, said there are really only two possibilities for the court. “Either the court is going to make some new First Amendment law that says funerals are different, which certainly would be a popular position,” Englert said. “Or the court is going to say, ‘Let’s take the most obnoxious speech in America today, and let’s reaffirm that even obnoxious speech is protected.’ “ At the Westboro complex, the emphasis is on what members believe God is saying. “Our Father has arranged all this bully-pulpit activity because he trusts us, beloved,” Fred Phelps began a recent sermon. Now 80, he preaches sitting down. A “Fag Media Shame” banner hangs nearby, perhaps hung for a visiting reporter. Phelps-Roper said only a “sucker” would have sympathy for Snyder and the loss of his son. Fred Phelps said the court’s decision will be unanimous. “The speech is protected,” he said. “They’re not going to give up the whole body of American law over one teared-up moron.” On their website, the Phelpses offer running totals on the number of Americans killed in Iraq and Afghanistan and the millions of gallons of oil God dumped into the Gulf of Mexico. Another category is “nanoseconds of sleep that WBC members lose over your opinions and feeeeellllliiiiiings.” The answer is zero. Treating all Foot Conditions

Continued from A1 In a twist to the revelation, the public health doctor who led the experiment, John Cutler, would later have an important role in the Tuskegee study in which black American men with syphilis were deliberately left untreated for decades. Late in his own life, Cutler continued to defend the Tuskegee work. His unpublished Guatemala work was unearthed recently in the archives of the University of Pittsburgh by Reverby, a medical historian who has written two books about Tuskegee. President Alvaro Colom of Guatemala, who first learned of the experiments Thursday in a phone call from Clinton, called them “hair-raising” and “crimes against humanity.” His government said it would cooperate with the American investigation and do its own. The experiments are “a dark chapter in the history of medicine,” said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health. Modern rules for federally financed research “absolutely prohibit” infecting people without their informed consent, Collins said. Reverby presented her findings about the Guatemalan experiments at a conference in January, but nobody took notice, she said in a telephone interview Friday. In June, she sent a draft of an article she was preparing for the January 2011 issue of the Journal of Policy History to Dr. David Sencer, a former director of the Centers for Disease Control. He prodded the government to investigate. In the 1940s, Reverby said, the U.S. Public Health Service “was deeply interested in whether penicillin could be used to prevent, not just cure, early syphilis infection, whether better blood tests for the disease could be established, what dosages of penicillin actually cured infection, and to understand the process of re-infection after cures.” It had difficulties growing syphilis in the laboratory, and its tests on rabbits and chimpanzees told it little about how penicillin worked in humans. In 1944, it injected prison “volunteers” at the Terre Haute Federal Penitentiary in Indiana with lab-grown gonorrhea, but found it hard to infect people that way. In 1946, Cutler was asked to lead the Guatemala mission, which ended two years later, partly because of medical “gossip” about the work, Reverby said, and partly because he was using so much penicillin, which was costly and in short supply. Cutler would later join the study in Tuskegee, Ala., which had begun relatively innocuously in 1932 as an observation of how syphilis progressed in black male sharecroppers. In 1972, it was revealed that, even when early antibiotics were invented, doctors hid that fact from the

men in order to keep studying them. Cutler, who died in 2003, defended the Tuskegee experiment in a 1993 documentary. Deception was also used in Guatemala, Reverby said. Dr. Thomas Parran, the former surgeon general who oversaw the start of Tuskegee, acknowledged that the Guatemala work could not be done domestically, and details were hidden from Guatemalan officials. Reverby said she found some of Cutler’s papers at the University of Pittsburgh, where he taught until 1985, while she was researching Parran. “I’m sifting through them, and I find ‘Guatemala ... inoculation ...’ and I think ‘What the heck is this?’ And then it was ‘Oh my god, oh my god, oh my god.’ My partner was with me, and I told him, ‘You aren’t going to believe this.’” Fernando de la Cerda, minister counselor at the Guatemalan Embassy in Washington, said that Clinton apologized to Colom in her Thursday phone call. “We thank the United States for its transparency in telling us the facts,” he said. Asked about the possibility of reparations for survivors or descendants, de la Cerda said that was still unclear. The public response on the websites of Guatemalan news outlets was furious. One commenter, Cesar Duran, on the site of Prensa Libre wrote: “APOLOGIES ... please ... this is what has come to light, but what is still hidden? They should pay an indemnity to the state of Guatemala, not just apologize.” Dr. Mark Siegler, director of the Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago’s medical school, said he was stunned. “This is shocking,” Siegler said. “This is much worse than Tuskegee — at least those men were infected by natural means.” He added: “It’s ironic — no, it’s worse than that, it’s appalling — that, at the same time as the United States was prosecuting Nazi doctors for crimes against humanity, the U.S. government was supporting research that placed human subjects at enormous risk.” The Nuremberg trials of Nazi doctors who experimented on concentration camp inmates and prisoners led to a code of ethics, though it had no force of law. In the 1964 Helsinki Declaration, the medical associations of many countries adopted a code. The Tuskegee scandal and the hearings into it conducted by Sen. Edward Kennedy became the basis for the 1981 American laws governing research on human subjects, Siegler said. It was preceded by other domestic scandals. From 1963 to 1966, researchers at the Willowbrook State School on New York’s Staten Island infected retarded children with hepatitis to test gamma globulin against it. And in 1963, elderly patients at the Brooklyn Jewish Chronic Disease Hospital were injected with live cancer cells to see if they caused tumors.

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N AT ION / WOR L D

A8 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Musharraf announces new political party

SQUATTERS PROTEST IN AMSTERDAM

Exiled leader also plans return to Pakistan from London By John F. Burns New York Times News Service

Evert Elzinga / The Associated Press

Masked squatters unfurl a banner reading “your laws, not ours” in the center of Amsterdam, Netherlands, on Friday. A law banning “squatting” in unused buildings has come into force in the Netherlands. Hundreds of people are taking to the streets to protest the law, which makes their way of life — a way that is traditionally acceptable in Amsterdam — punishable by up to one year in prison.

LONDON — Pakistan’s former military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, used a meeting Friday in one of London’s most historic political clubs to announce the creation of a new political party, the All Pakistan Muslim League, and to renew his pledge to return to Pakistan from a self-imposed exile here before national elections scheduled for 2013. Musharraf, a 67-year-old former general who came to power in a military coup in 1999, chose to make his announcement at

New York Times News Service

By Gene Johnson The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Those who have seen the photos say they are grisly: soldiers beside newly killed bodies, decaying corpses and severed fingers. The dozens of photos, described in interviews and in emails and military documents obtained by The Associated Press, were seized by Army investigators and are a crucial part of the case against five soldiers accused of killing three Afghan civilians earlier this year. Troops allegedly shared the photos by e-mail and thumb drive like electronic trading cards. Now 60 to 70 of them are being kept tightly shielded from the public and even defense attorneys because of fears they could wind up in the news media and provoke anti-American violence. Maj. Kathleen Turner, a spokeswoman for Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Seattle, where the accused soldiers are stationed, acknowledged that the images were “highly sensitive, and that’s why that protective order was put in place.” She declined to comment further. At least some of the photos

“Everyone would share the photographs. They were of every guy we ever killed in Afghanistan.” — Cpl. Jeremy Morlock, defendant pertain to those killings. Others may have been of insurgents killed in battle, and some may have been taken as part of a military effort to document those killed, according to lawyers involved in the case. Among the most gruesome allegations is that some of the soldiers kept fingers from the bodies of Afghans they killed as war trophies. The troops also are accused of passing around photos of the dead and of the fingers. Four members of the unit — two of whom are also charged in the killings — have been accused of wrongfully possessing images of human casualties, and another is charged with trying to impede an investigation by having someone erase incriminating evidence from a computer hard drive.

“Everyone would share the photographs,” one of the defendants, Cpl. Jeremy Morlock, told investigators. “They were of every guy we ever killed in Afghanistan.” After the first slaying, one service member sent urgent e-mails to his father warning that more bloodshed was on the way. The father told the AP he pleaded for help from the military, but authorities took no action. A spokesman said Friday that the Army was investigating. Morlock’s attorney, Michael Waddington, said the photos were not just shared among the defendants or even their platoon. At a preliminary hearing in Morlock’s case Monday, Army officials confirmed that the number of restricted photos is 60 to 70. The investigating officer said he would view the photos in private. Defense attorneys will also be allowed to see them if they visit the criminal investigations office on base, but they cannot have copies — an arrangement that did not satisfy Grimes. The defendants have been detained and cannot travel to see the photos to assist in their own defense, he noted, and most of the defense lawyers are based out of state.

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BEIJING — Who doesn’t love a weeklong obligatory vacation? In China, where an estimated 200 million people on Friday began elbowing their way onto trains, buses and highways for the National Day holiday, the answer is not so simple. Beyond the frustration of overloaded transportation and jam-packed tourist attractions, there is the problem of figuring out what has become a decidedly confusing rubric of work and vacation days. According to a governmentmandated holiday schedule that took effect in 2008, workers were given three consecutive days off last week for the Mid-Autumn Festival, but they were then required to make up two of those days by working the Saturday and Sunday on either end of the holiday. This give-and-take arrange-

ment is then repeated for the National Day holiday, with employees enjoying seven straight days off — Friday through Oct. 7 — except only three of those are official free days. (The four “gifted days” will be made up over the weekends before and after.) If you have trouble following the math, you are in good company. The problem was made worse this year because the Mid-Autumn Festival, which hews to the lunar calendar, fell on Sept. 22, within a week of the longer National Day sojourn. A cheat sheet that has been making the rounds on the Internet sums up the pattern as such, beginning Sept. 18: One day off, three days on, three days off, six days on, seven days off, two days on, one day off. Confusion aside, many Chinese resent having to pay back

some of their vacation days. Even if the government increased the number of official holidays to 11 from 10 days, it infuriated the nation by killing off one of three so-called Golden Weeks (the third one is the Spring Festival, when Chinese celebrate the Lunar New Year in January or February). Many officials are still seeking an end to the National Day Golden Week, but they acknowledge that for now, mandatory holidays may be the only way to give workers time off, given that most companies ignore a law that guarantees workers 15 days of paid vacation a year — to be taken at a time of their own choosing.

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In a lengthy BBC radio interview, his main theme was that Pakistan’s army was the only institution that could save the country from its current political woes, including widespread corruption in the government of President Asif Ali Zardari and the violence associated with the Taliban, al-Qaida and other Islamic extremist groups. His reasoning appeared to support the idea of another military takeover, or at least a return to a form of “guided democracy” in which the military would have the decisive voice.

China’s mandatory vacation, with complications By Andrew Jacobs

Photos show U.S. soldiers posing with Afghan corpses

the National Liberal Club. It was a rare public appearance for Musharraf, who has said he has been warned by Britain’s intelligence agencies that he risks assassination by Islamic terrorist groups. And for all the parliamentary trappings, his remarks suggested his political thinking had altered little since he ended a standoff with Pakistan’s prime minister at the time, Nawaz Sharif, with one of the recurrent coups that have kept the military in control of Pakistan for long periods since its founding in 1947.

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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

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• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Talk show move comes with risks, Page B2

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

SPOTLIGHT

Spreading the wealth

Veterans Day Parade seeking participants The Bend Veterans Day Parade Committee is seeking participants for the Veterans Day Parade, scheduled for Nov. 11 in downtown Bend. Civic organizations, clubs, businesses, veterans groups and others are encouraged to enter the parade. Participants are required to register and attend scheduled planning meetings Oct. 13 and Oct. 28 in Bend. Meetings are held at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1643, located at 1503 N.E. Fourth St., in Bend. The parade starts at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11. Contact: 541-480-4516.

BendFilm releases app BendFilm, the independent film festival taking place Oct. 710, has released a free iPhone application so attendees can access festival information on the go. The BendFilm app is automatically updated and includes a full list of films with run times and synopses, a schedule of show times, listing of venues and information about ticketing. The free app is available now for iPhone or iPod Touch in the Apple App Store. Tickets for the annual festival are on sale now at www.bend film.org, where you can get more festival information and download the BendFilm app. Contact: 541-388-3788 or www.bendfilm.org.

1,000 Lights event seeks official charities The Smith Rock Race Group is seeking nonprofit and community organizations to be official charities for the Fourth Annual Bend’s First 1,000 Lights Community Walk & Family Festival. The event will be held Dec. 31 and will benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen as well as other charities. Applications from other organizations will be accepted through Oct. 15. Contact: Rosemary Douglass, rosemary@smithrockrace.com, 541-388-1860, www.bendsfirst 1000lightswalk.com.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Ted Campbell receives change after purchasing toys at Pegasus Books in downtown Bend on Sept. 23. He asked proprietor Duncan McGeary to give the buffalo nickels he used to kids. Campbell became a collector himself after a cashier gave him a Standing Liberty Quarter.

Bend coin club president spends a day distributing his treasures downtown

Watch opera in HD The fifth season of “The Met: Live in HD,” an award-winning series of live, high-definition simulcasts of performances from the Metropolitan Opera, opens Oct. 9 at 10 a.m. with a performance of Richard Wagner’s 1869 opera “Das Rheingold.” Locals can see the show at Regal Old Mill Stadium 16. The season, which includes Gaetano Donizetti’s “Don Pasquale” and “Don Carlos,” by Giuseppe Verdi, runs through May. For each opera, Regal will broadcast live on a Saturday, and an encore screening will be shown two and a half weeks later on a Wednesday evening. Tickets for the live broadcasts are $24, $22 for seniors 60 and older and $18 for youth 11 and younger; all tickets for encores are $18. A complete schedule for “The Met: Live in HD” can be found at www.metoperafamily .org/metopera/broadcast.

By David Jasper The Bulletin

T

Bend Coin Club of Central Oregon President Ted Campbell displays Indian Head nickels, which he spent last week in downtown Bend to help promote coin collecting.

Crook County to host women’s health fair The Ladies Night Out free health fair will be held Tuesday from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at the Crook County High School commons, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd. in Prineville. The event will feature expert speakers on health topics including pregnancy, childbirth, menopause and breast cancer. It will also have more than 40 health and lifestyle exhibitors and places for women to pamper themselves with massages, hair trims or acupuncture treatments. Attendees can win door prizes of purses, cosmetics or pedicure gift cards. The event is sponsored by the Crook County CHIP, Pioneer Memorial Hospital, the Rimrock Health Alliance and a grant from the Oregon Office of Rural Health. Contact: 541-233-0706. — From staff reports

Join the club The Bend Coin Club of Central Oregon meets from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. on the third Thursday of every month at Stone Lodge Retirement Living, 1460 N.E. 27th St., Bend. The next meeting will be held Oct. 21 and will feature guest speaker Jim Wilson, discussing wooden nickels. Contact: 541-693-3438, www.bend coinclub.org or bendcoinclub@ hotmail.com.

ed Campbell, founder and president of the Bend Coin Club of Central Oregon, was on a mission last week: He had a handful of buffalo nickels, and he was determined to spend them downtown. “We’re going to do that as a promotion — go around to different businesses and spend some old money. And try to get cashiers to give them to kids, or somebody young, not just put them in their pocket and walk away,” Campbell says. Campbell became a coin collector himself in such a manner, beginning in 1967, when he was 10. “I went to a little grocery store, and the guy gave me what’s called a Standing Liberty Quarter,” says Campbell. The quarter featured Lady Liberty and was minted from 1916 to 1930. “I went, ‘What is this?’ But I got excited, and I started collecting pennies.” The coins he plans to spend on this sunny, late September weekday are officially called the Five-Cent Indian Head, for the image on their face, according to buffalonickel.com. They were minted from 1913 to 1938. Today, depending on factors such as condition, how many were minted that particular year and at which mint, a buffalo nickel can be worth well into the hundreds. See Coins / B6

Making a brewery feel like home By Kimberly Bradley New York Times News Service

BERLIN — It was just a coincidence that Julia Ware, a German jewelry designer, and her husband, Hayden, an Internet entrepreneur from Connecticut, happened to buy an apartment here on the same day that Essicka Kimberly, an architect from Mexico, did. But it turned out to be a fortunate one. The Wares, both 35, had become friends with Kimberly, 43, in Ire-

land, where they were all living at the time. They knew she was thinking of moving to Berlin, as they were — for the high standard of living and the creative freedom the city seemed to offer — but they couldn’t have predicted that her arrival would dovetail so conveniently with theirs. It was December 2006, and the Wares had bought a vast loftlike space that they thought of as “a blank canvas” — the old ice-machine room

in what had once been a brewery in the Prenzlauer Berg district in northeast Berlin. The raw space needed to be designed from top to bottom, and instead of using the developer’s plans, they were able to turn it over to someone they trusted. “We told Essicka, ‘It’s all yours,’ ” Julia Ware said. “We didn’t even want that much input. That’s when you mess things up.” See Brewery / B6

Andreas Meichsner / New York Times News Service

The master bedroom anchors the front of the building on the second level of Hayden and Julia Ware’s apartment in Berlin.


T EL EVISION

B2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Remaining friends is prolonging pain Dear Abby: My boyfriend, “Jake,” dumped me two years ago. Since then, we have tried to remain friends. He texts or calls to check up on me, tells me he misses me, calls me pet names and recites lines from my favorite movies. Although I appreciate Jake’s efforts to stay friends, I’m confused because he was the one who broke off our relationship. He has said in the past that letting me go is something he will always regret, but he hasn’t made an attempt to get back together. Abby, I feel that Jake is stringing me along. I enjoy our friendship, but in my heart I’ll always want more. I can’t shake the feeling that he still loves me. At what point should I just give up and let go? — Left Hanging in Houston Dear Left Hanging: How about right now? But before you do, tell Jake that this “friendship” has prolonged the pain of your breakup, that what you feel for him isn’t platonic — and you will always want more. If he does still love you, it will be his opening to declare himself. However, if he doesn’t, then for your sake, cut the cord, because you won’t be free to find someone else until you do. Dear Abby: I was married in Las Vegas six months ago in a quickie wedding so my husband could put me on his health insurance. I used my late grandmother’s ring for the ceremony, assuming that “Harry” would buy one for me shortly. He hasn’t, and he makes it very clear he doesn’t intend to. Harry claims we don’t have any money. However, we are buying a house, and he constantly spends money on his hobbies. I am starting to regret the whole package — not having a real wedding, no ring, no proposal. I am so resentful I am considering ending our marriage over it. I need to know if there’s a way to fix this. — Ringless

DEAR ABBY in Richmond, Texas Dear Ringless: When most mature couples marry, they have gotten to know each other well enough to know if their values and priorities are similar. Apparently, you and Harry tied the knot so quickly there wasn’t time for that to happen. A way to “fix this” would be through marriage counseling — provided you and Harry are willing to spend the money that way. Please suggest it. Dear Abby: After my wife’s funeral, many of our friends returned to the mortuary to collect the flowers they had sent. Some of them were very rude, insisting that because they had sent them, the flowers belonged to them. This has upset our daughter, who was in charge of sending thank-you notes. Now she doesn’t know who sent what because we were too distracted to look at the cards on the flowers. Is this something new, or are those people just rude? — Widower in Livingston, Mont. Dear Widower: When flowers have been sent — whether for a birthday or for an occasion like a funeral — they are no longer the property of the sender. They belong to whomever they were sent to. What your “many friends” did was insensitive and rude. As to what your daughter should say in her thank-you notes, I suggest a short message to those who signed the memorial book at the funeral service: “Our family thanks you for attending Mother’s funeral, and for your compassion during this sad time. Your thoughtfulness is deeply appreciated.” Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los

Anderson Cooper’s daytime dreams are not without risks By Joe Flint

Anderson Cooper, the longtime CNN newsman, has signed on for a new daytime talk show that will launch in the fall of 2011.

Los Angeles Times

Anderson Cooper, the CNN newsman who has often tried to walk the fine line between serious journalist and television personality, is going to take a day job to complement his evening gig. Telepictures, the syndication unit of Warner Bros., has signed Cooper for a new talk show it plans to launch in the fall of 2011, just when Oprah Winfrey leaves the airwaves for her new cable network OWN. Clearly Cooper has decided — for now, anyway — against making the move to broadcast news. CBS may be in need of an anchor for its evening newscast when Katie Couric’s contract is up, but if Cooper is busy doing daytime TV, he won’t be a candidate. He also likely would have been a contender for any spots that open up on the morning shows. It’s hard to fault Cooper for not wanting to wait for a chance to anchor a broadcast network newscast. Ratings are on the serious decline there and all the networks are struggling to compete against cable. In fact, if Cooper’s daytime television show is successful, he may have just taken away one of Couric’s career options. There has been talk that she would try her hand at afternoon chat should she decide to walk away from CBS. Cooper can also make a ton of money in daytime television and, since Telepictures is part of Time Warner, the same company that owns CNN, it keeps him in the family. But there are a lot of risks as well. While Cooper’s early days saw him hosting an ill-fated reality show for ABC called

The Associated Press file photo

“The Mole,” since then he has worked hard to reshape his image and earned a reputation as a crusading journalist for his coverage of Hurricane Katrina. Cooper, who will continue at CNN, hasn’t been afraid to try his hand at the lighter fare. He often sits in for Regis Philbin on the hit morning show “Live with Regis & Kelly” and moves seamlessly between both worlds. However, guest hosting on a friendly celebrity chat show and taking on a daytime talk show are two different things. Cooper, who like any newsman on cable these days has done his fair share of tabloid material, will have to be careful not to make that a full-time job in his afternoon gig or else he could find himself permanently on

the soft side of the newsroom. In the release announcing the new show, Cooper said he hopes to “relay important information ... and create something worthwhile and special in daytime.” Has Cooper watched much daytime television lately? It’s either softball celebrity chit-chat or depraved families and friends screaming at each other. It is hardly the home of serious journalism or deep exploration of topical issues. Yes, Winfrey can occasionally take on serious topics, but over her career she also got as down and dirty as anyone

in daytime. If Cooper wants to go the celebrity route, he’ll be competing against Ellen DeGeneres, another Telepictures talent who also is looking to snag Winfrey’s audience and stature. If he heads more toward the world of Dr. Phil, he could hurt his stature as one of the faces of CNN. Then there is the question of whether Cooper will appeal to the daytime audience. The latest numbers from Nielsen show his females numbers on the decline. In the third quarter of this year, Cooper’s audience of women aged 25 to 54 — the bread and butter of daytime TV — was off almost 60 percent from 2009. Certainly the lines continue to blur between journalist and junket hopper. Even the legendary Edward R. Murrow did his fair share of puff pieces. But Cooper, a Yale graduate who seems to have always aspired to be more Murrow and Sevareid than Regis or Kelly, should be extra careful to protect the reputation he’s tried to build and not let it slip away in pursuit of ratings or dollars.

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College Football Stanford at Oregon (Live) Willa’s Wild Life Jane-Dragon News Nightly News Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune College Football Florida at Alabama (Live) Å College Football Stanford at Oregon (Live) NUMB3RS Sniper Zero ‘PG’ Å Bones The Man in the Mud ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Plain Sight ’ ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine PDXposed ‘G’ Paid Program The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Crown-Contn Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge Encounters ’ Å Steves Europe News News Nightly News Straight Talk Inside Edition Grants Getaways That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ›› “Once Upon a Time in Mexico” (2003) Antonio Banderas. Å Wolf: Travels Simply Painting Endless Feast ‘G’ Garden Home Painting Wild Painting Wild This Old House Crown-Contn Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge Encounters ’ Å Steves Europe

8:00

8:30

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Paid Program Comedy.TV ’ ‘14’ Å The Event To Keep Us Safe ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ News Ultimate Healing The Unit Stress ’ ‘PG’ Å College Football Entourage ‘MA’ Curb Enthusiasm Cops (N) ‘PG’ Cops ‘PG’ Å America’s Most Wanted Da Vinci’s Inquest ’ ‘14’ Å NUMB3RS Sniper Zero ‘PG’ Å Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge Encounters ’ Å Ladies of Letters The Event To Keep Us Safe ’ ‘PG’ Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ House Needle in a Haystack ’ ‘14’ House Insensitive ’ ‘14’ Å Endless Feast ‘G’ Joy/Painting Joy of Painting Garden Smart ‘G’ Art Wolfe’s Travels to the Edge Encounters ’ Å Ladies of Letters

10:00

10:30

Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Old Christine Old Christine The Closer Flashpoint ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 Two/Half Men NUMB3RS Calculated Risk ’ ‘PG’ New Tricks The death of a journalist. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit House of Payne House of Payne New Jewish Endless Feast ‘G’ New Tricks The death of a journalist.

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 Comedy.TV ‘14’ News Sat. Night Live News (11:35) Cold Case College Football Ugly Betty ‘PG’ Lone Star One in Every Family ‘PG’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ News Sat. Night Live Stargate Universe Air ‘PG’ Å Wolf: Travels Simply Painting Song of the Mountains ’ ‘G’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

CSI: Miami Out of Time ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami Hostile Takeover ’ ‘14’ 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å (4:30) ››› “Troy” (2004, Adventure) Brad Pitt, Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom. Achilles leads Greek forces in the Trojan War. Å 102 40 39 68 137 190 51 52 135 11 58 87 156 21 22 23 24 67 54 177 20 131 176 155 138 56 192 82 132 133 205 16

50 12 38 44 32 42 53 36 40 52 38 35 48 53 135 47 20 43 21 23 24 25 63 29 61 62 45

98 11 14 39 16 37 22 23 21 24 123 25 124 19 41 36 50 46 44 28* 26

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101 44 101 29 178 17 84 179 65 15 191

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CSI: Miami Bolt Action ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami In Plane Sight ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami Bad Seed ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Cliffhanger” (1993, Action) Sylvester Stallone, John Lithgow. Premiere. A moun- ›› “Volcano” (1997, Action) Tommy Lee Jones, Anne Heche, Gaby Hoffmann. Earthtaintop rescue becomes a hunt for stolen money. quakes and lava ravage Los Angeles. Å Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ Your Worst Animal Nightmares ‘14’ Dogs 101 Puppies ’ ‘PG’ Å Dogs 101 (N) ’ ‘PG’ Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Pit Boss Back Behind Bars (N) ‘14’ Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Undercovers Instructions ‘14’ Å Chase Pilot ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “Legally Blonde” (2001, Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Luke Wilson. ›› “Legally Blonde” (2001, Comedy) Reese Witherspoon, Luke Wilson. Law & Order: Los Angeles ’ ‘14’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ “The Dukes of Hazzard: Reunion!” (1997, Comedy) John Schneider. ‘PG’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ American Greed The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part American Greed The Suze Orman Show Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Your Memory Paid Program CNN Presents ‘PG’ Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ The Empowered Patient Right on the Edge (N) Larry King Live ‘PG’ The Empowered Patient Right on the Edge “Still Waiting...” (2009, Comedy) Justin Long, Danneel Harris. Å ››› “Napoleon Dynamite” (2004, Comedy) Jon Heder, Jon Gries. Å South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park Å South Park ‘MA’ Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked Get Outdoors Visions of NW Inside Golf ‘G’ Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Outside Film Festival City Edition American Perspectives American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Wizards of Waverly Place ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Hannah Forever Hannah Forever Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Ten Commandments of the Mafia Ten Commandments of the Mafia County Jail: Oakland ’ ‘14’ Å Behind Bars Ohio ’ ‘14’ Å Behind Bars Kansas ’ ‘14’ Å Prison Breaks Prison Breaks Behind Bars Ohio ’ ‘14’ Å College Football Penn State at Iowa (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å College Football Final (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å College Football Stanford at Oregon or Washington at USC (Live) College Football Scoreboard Å SportsCenter (N) Baseball Tonight (Live) Å College Football Final (N) Å Golf Ryder Cup, Day Two From Newport, Wales. 2008 Poker - Europe 2008 Poker - Europe ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express ›› “Johnson Family Vacation” (2004) Cedric the Entertainer. Å ›› “Good Burger” (1997, Comedy) Kel Mitchell, Kenan Thompson. Å ›› “Major Payne” (1995, Comedy) Damon Wayans, Karyn Parsons. Å ››› “Coming to America” (1988) Huckabee Glenn Beck Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Hannity Special Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å The American Terrorist The Next Iron Chef Interpretation The Next Iron Chef Adaptability The Next Iron Chef Pressure The Next Iron Chef The Next Iron Chef Integrity The Next Iron Chef The final battle. Iron Chef America (3:30) College Football Arizona State at Oregon State Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. College Football Georgia at Colorado (3:30) ›› “Man on Fire” (2004) Denzel Washington. ›› “The Transporter 2” (2005, Action) Jason Statham, Amber Valletta. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer Archer Dear Genevieve Color Splash: Mi Antonio Treatment ‘G’ Å Hunters Int’l House Hunters Divine Design ‘G’ Sarah’s House Dear Genevieve Curb/Block Color Splash: Mi House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Banned From the Bible II ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Mold & Fungus ‘PG’ Manson ‘PG’ Å Jonestown Paradise Lost ‘PG’ Å ›› “August Rush” (2007, Drama) Freddie Highmore, Keri Russell. Å ››› “Akeelah and the Bee” (2006, Drama) Laurence Fishburne. Å Project Runway ‘PG’ Å › “Georgia Rule” (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan. Å Lockup: Raw Pushing the Limits Lockup: Raw Predatory Behavior Lockup: Raw Killer Next Door Lockup: Raw The Revolving Door Lockup: Raw Intimacy in prison. The Squeeze Cook County Jail. (N) The Squeeze Play or Get Played True Life Digital habits. ’ True Life ’ True Life This Is Me Now ’ World of Jenks The Buried Life Teen Mom ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iTwins ‘G’ iCarly (N) ’ ‘G’ True Jackson, VP Big Time Rush Victorious ’ ‘G’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ ››› “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ’ ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone. ’ ›› “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. ’ ››› “First Blood” (1982) ’ “Hallowed Ground” (2007, Horror) Jaimie Alexander, Brian McNamara. “Children of the Corn” (2009) Kandyse McClure, David Anders. ‘MA’ Å › “The Graves” (2010, Horror) Clare Grant, Jillian Murray. Premiere. “Flu Bird Horror” (2008) Clare Carey. In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades Thru History Travel the Road To Be Announced Conquerors Virtual Memory Michael English Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens American Dad ’ American Dad ’ American Dad ’ ››› “Gladiator” (2000) Russell Crowe. A fugitive general becomes a gladiator in ancient Rome. Å (10:55) “3000 Miles to Graceland” ››› “They Live by Night” (1949) Cathy O’Donnell. Two young ›››› “Bonnie and Clyde” (1967) Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway. Bonnie Parker and ››› “Badlands” (1973, Crime Drama) Martin Sheen, Sissy Spacek, Warren Oates. A ››› “Gun Crazy” (1950) Peggy Cummins. Gun nut and sideClyde Barrow become 1930s outlaw lovers. Å teen girl joins a garbageman on a South Dakota killing spree. show sharpshooter team up for love and crime. lovers flee the long arm of the law. Å Dateline: Real Life Mysteries ’ ‘14’ Dateline: Real Life Mysteries ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence (N) ’ ‘14’ 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å (4:00) ››› “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. Å ››› “Catch Me if You Can” (2002, Comedy-Drama) Leonardo DiCaprio, Tom Hanks. Å (10:43) ››› “Runaway Jury” (2003) John Cusack. “Scooby-Doo Mummy” “Scooby-Doo! The Mystery Begins” (2009, Comedy) Robbie Amell. ‘PG’ ››› “Beetlejuice” (1988) Michael Keaton, Alec Baldwin. Premiere. King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ World’s Creepiest Destinations ‘PG’ Haunted Lighthouses of America The Bermuda Triangle: Waves Most Terrifying Places in America 2 Most Terrifying Places in America Ghost Stories (N) Ghost Stories America’s Scariest Halloween Attr. Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (3:30) “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” Å NCIS Ex-File ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Identity Crisis ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A distraught naval officer. ‘14’ NCIS Chimera ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Requiem ’ ‘14’ Å “I Now Pronounce You” (4:30) ››› “Rocky II” (1979, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. ’ ››› “Rocky III” (1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T. Premiere. ’ ›› “Rocky IV” (1985) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire. Premiere. ’ I Love Money ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) ››› “Starship Troopers” (6:15) ››› “Rookie of the Year” 1993 Thomas Ian Nicholas. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Contact” 1997 Jodie Foster. A scientist seeks alien life in deep space. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:35) ››› “Field of Dreams” 1989 Kevin Costner. ››› “Max Dugan Returns” 1983, Comedy Marsha Mason. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Project X” 1987, Drama Matthew Broderick, Helen Hunt. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Max Dugan Returns” 1983, Comedy Marsha Mason. ‘PG’ Å ›› “Project X” 1987 ‘PG’ Å Skate Arabia ‘PG’ Å Insane Cinema: Neverland ‘PG’ Red Bull X-Fighters 2010 Egypt Skate Arabia ‘PG’ Å Insane Cinema: On the Pipe 3 ‘14’ Insane Cinema: On the Pipe 4 ‘PG’ On Surfari ‘PG’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf Viking Classic, Third Round From Madison, Miss. Live From the Ryder Cup Live From the Ryder Cup PGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å (4:15) ›› “Love Happens” 2009 Aaron (6:15) › “Land of the Lost” 2009, Comedy Will Ferrell, Anna Friel. A time-space vortex ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock. Premiere. A well-to-do white (10:15) Boardwalk Empire Agent Nelson (11:15) ››› “The Blind Side” 2009 SanHBO 425 501 425 10 Eckhart. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å sucks three people into another reality. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Van Alden visits Nucky. ’ ‘MA’ dra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å (6:45) ››› “Tigerland” 2000, Drama Colin Farrell, Matthew Davis. ‘R’ ››› “Mad Max” 1979 Mel Gibson. ‘R’ (10:05) ›› “Kill Me Again” 1989 Val Kilmer. ‘R’ (11:45) Tigerland ›› “Kill Me Again” 1989, Suspense Val Kilmer. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:10) › “12 Rounds” 2009, Action John ›› “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” 2009, Romance-Comedy Mat- (7:45) ››› “Sneakers” 1992, Suspense Robert Redford, Dan Aykroyd, Ben Kingsley. Premiere. High-tech › “The Fourth Kind” 2009, Suspense Milla Jovovich, Will Patton, (11:40) Life on Top MAX 400 508 7 Cena. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å thew McConaughey. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å computer hackers are tricked into espionage. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Elias Koteas. Premiere. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å Ultimate Factories Corvette ‘G’ Border Wars Last Defense ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Corvette ‘G’ Border Wars Last Defense ‘PG’ Border Wars Dirty Money ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Camaro ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard Back, Barnyard Planet Sheen ‘Y7’ T.U.F.F. Puppy SpongeBob SpongeBob Tigre: Rivera Tigre: Rivera Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Glenn Martin Jimmy Neutron The Secret Show Random! Cart. NTOON 89 115 189 Tracks, Africa The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Trophy Quest Wild and Raw Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Best of West OUTD 37 307 43 ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. iTV. Col. Claus Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- The Big C Taking Weeds A Shoe for a ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. iTV. A teen is caught (11:05) Dexter My Bad Dexter must make SHO 500 500 Shoe ‘MA’ a choice. ’ ‘MA’ Å von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å Lumps ’ ‘MA’ up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ American Le Mans Series Racing The Petit Le Mans Test Drive Pinks -- All Out ‘14’ NASCAR Perfor. NASCAR Smarts Race in 60 Stealth Rider ‘14’ Stealth Rider MotoGP Racing Japan (Live) SPEED 35 303 125 (3:40) ››› “Julie & Julia” 2009 (5:50) ›› “The Scorpion King” 2002 The Rock. Å (7:25) ››› “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs” ’ ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009 ‘G’ Å (10:45) ››› “Julie & Julia” 2009 Meryl Streep. Å STARZ 300 408 300 ›› “Captain Corelli’s Mandolin” 2001, Drama Nicolas Cage, Penélope Cruz. An Italian (7:15) ›› “Everybody’s Fine” 2009 Robert De Niro. Premiere. A widower wants to › “Trauma” 1993, Suspense Christopher Rydell, Asia Argento. Premiere. A medium’s › “The Collector” 2009, Horror Josh StewTMC 525 525 officer strikes a chord with a Greek villager. ’ ‘R’ reconnect with his grown children. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å daughter and her companion hunt a murderer. ’ ‘R’ art. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ IndyCar Racing Miami Indy 300 Bull Riding PBR Uncasville Invitational PBR Total Bull Gun It w/Spies Sports Jobs Bull Riding PBR Uncasville Invitational PBR Total Bull Gun It w/Spies Sports Jobs VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. GREEN AND SOLAR HOME TOUR: Tour sustainable homes in Central Oregon; with a kickoff and presentation by keynote speaker Matt Briggs at Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, in Bend; free; 9 a.m. speaker, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. homes open; 541-647-8802, highdesert@cascadiagbc.org or www.greenandsolarhometour.com. FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts a sale of fiction, nonfiction, travel, children’s books and more; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-536-1622. BUDDY WALK: Walk to promote awareness of Down syndrome; event includes live entertainment, face painting, a clown, a bounce house and more; $5 per person, $20 per family in advance; $10 per person, $25 family at the event; 10 a.m. registration, 11 a.m. walk; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-548-8559 or www.codsn. org. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 11 a.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-4752222. HARVEST FESTIVAL: Press apples, grind corn, build a log cabin, meet homesteaders and more; $2, $10 per family, free ages 2 and younger; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. FIRE DEPARTMENT OPEN HOUSE: Meet firefighters, tour the station, try on firefighting gear, build a toy fire engine, fire safety information and more; free; noon-4 p.m.; North Fire Station, 63377 N.E. Jamison St., Bend; 541-322-6309. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet reads from his book “The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 25: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Warren Rand and Quartet Northwest; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-977-5637, joe@justjoesmusic. com or www. justjoesmusic.com/ jazzatjoes/events.htm. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater. com. “LOVE LETTERS”: Gregory Harrison and Linda Purl star in a performance of A.R. Gurney’s play about friendship and ill-fated romance across decades; proceeds benefit the Sisters Schools Foundation; $25-$75; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE REDWOOD PLAN: The Seattlebased dance-punk band performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-3886868.

SUNDAY FALL BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Bend Public Library hosts

a bag sale of fiction, nonfiction, travel, children’s books and more; free admission, $4 per bag of books; 1-4 p.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-536-1622. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 5 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. MISS OREGON USA PAGEANT: Featuring more than 20 contestants from around the state; $30; 6 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-306-9957 or www. missoregonusa.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jack Nisbet reads from his book “The Collector: David Douglas and the Natural History of the Northwest”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866.

MONDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Scales and Tales”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Jurassic Park” by Michael Crichton; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. WORLD SERIES HOLD ’EM FOR HABITAT: Poker tournament, followed by a closed winners’ tournament Oct. 5; proceeds benefit Habitat for Humanity; $5; 6:30 p.m., 5 p.m. sign-ups; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541419-6021.

TUESDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and create art; themed “Scales and Tales”; $15, $10 museum members; 9 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. RED DOG GOLF TOURNAMENT: A day of golf, with dinner, a murder-mystery show and more; a portion of proceeds benefits the Humane Society of Redmond; $100; noon; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-8152639. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Sprawling From Grace,” a documentary about car addiction and sustainable energy solutions; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. COWBOY JUNKIES: The country and blues band performs; $31-$43 in advance, $34-$46 day of show; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org. “FINDING FREMONT IN OREGON, 1843”: A screening of the documentary about John C. Fremont’s 1843 trek through Oregon; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Des Chutes Historical Museum; $10; 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. THE DEVIL MAKES THREE: The Santa Cruz, Calif.-based acoustic band performs, with Larry and His Flask and The Dela Project; $17 plus fees in advance, $20 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

randompresents.com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GREG BROWN: The folk singer and songwriter performs, with Bo Ramsey; $30 plus fees in advance, $35 day of show; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

THURSDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Maus: A Survivor’s Tale” by Art Spiegelman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1085 or www. deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 6-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. BENEFIT CONCERT: With a performance by Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Every Dollar Feeds Kids; free; 6:30 p.m. appetizers, 7 p.m. performance; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541549-1058. CLOTHES DOWN CHILD ABUSE: A fall fashion show, with appetizers and a silent auction; proceeds benefit KIDS Center; $10; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 151 N. Main St., Prineville; 541-408-3616. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater. com.

FRIDAY A DAY OF CULTURE: Learn about cultures that have influenced the museum and visit various stations; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.midnight; 541-388-3378, info@ bendfilm.org or www.bendfilm.org. SOCIAL GATHERING: Central Oregon veterans talk about their experiences, preceding the symposium on World War II; free; 4-6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-389-1813 or www. deschuteshistory.org. “DARWIN’S LEGACY — 200 YEARS OF INSIGHTS AND CHALLENGES”: Featuring “Evolution of Human and Primate Behavior” with Frances White; $10, $3 students, $8 members of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center &

Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541593-4442. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Garth Stein reads from and discusses his book “The Art of Racing in the Rain”; free; 7-9:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-447-7978, mashcraft@crooklib.org or www. crooklib.org. OREGON ARCHAEOLOGY CELEBRATION PRESENTATION: Staff from the Museum at Warm Springs present “The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow”; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock State Park Visitor Center, 10260 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-923-7551. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-5498846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress.com. “CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld.org. “EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL”: 2nd Street Theater presents the musical comedy about five college students who accidentally unleash an evil force; contains adult language; $20, $25 splatter zone, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com.

SATURDAY Oct. 9 “WORLD WAR II IN CENTRAL OREGON”: Symposium features several speakers and highlights the local impact of World War II; $20; 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3891813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the school; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School, 63175 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 541322-5323. COLD HANDS, WARM HEART BOUTIQUE: A sale of crafts, with a bakery, lunch and a silent auction; proceeds benefit local charitable programs; free admission; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3821672. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DAS RHEINGOLD”: Starring Bryn Terfel in a presentation of the masterpiece directed by Robert Lepage; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. BENDFILM: The seventh annual independent film festival features films showing at McMenamins Old St. Francis School, the Tower Theatre, Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, Sisters Movie House and the Oxford Hotel; $150 full festival pass, $95 full film pass, individual tickets $10; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; 541-388-3378, info@bendfilm.org or www. bendfilm.org. SISTERS HARVEST FAIRE: The 35th annual event features vendors selling pottery, metal art, photography, jewelry and more; with live music, kids activity area and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541549-0251 or www.sisterscountry. com. FROM TIMBER TO TURNED WOOD: Featuring a 1900s-style logging competition, axe throwing, chopping, log rolling, chain saw carving and more; free; shows at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; Hood Avenue, across from Les Schwab Tires, Sisters; 541549-0251.

M T For Saturday, Oct. 2

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

ANIMAL KINGDOM (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 6:15, 9 GET LOW (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 JACK GOES BOATING (R) Noon, 2:20, 4:25, 6:55, 9:25 MAO’S LAST DANCER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:30, 6:20, 9:15 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 6:10, 9:10

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DEVIL (PG-13) 1:35, 4:10, 6:20, 9:05 EASY A (PG-13) 2:10, 5:10, 7:40, 9:55 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 12:25, 3:30 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:10, 3:20, 10:05 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3-D (PG) 12:50, 4:05, 6:25, 9 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG) 2:05, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40 LET ME IN (R) 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13) 7:25 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 12:20, 3:40, 6:15, 9:10 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3-D (R) 7:45, 10:20 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE (R) 6:35, 9:15 SECRETARIAT (PG) 7 THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG13) 12:35, 1:55, 3:50, 4:45, 6:50, 7:30, 9:35, 10:15 THE TOWN (R) 12:45, 4:20, 7:10, 10 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 12:15, 12:55,

3:25, 4, 6:30, 7, 9:30, 10:05 YOU AGAIN (PG) 1:40, 4:30, 9:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

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10 actors who may launch careers on new fall TV shows By Rick Bentley McClatchy Newspapers

Every fall when the networks launch their new shows, I start looking for the standouts. It’s not just about which new show will survive, but which new faces I think I’ll be seeing around Hollywood long after their show ends. They’re not always on the best programs. Sometimes, like with this year’s just-canceled “Lone Star” from Fox, they’re only on TV for a couple of weeks before the networks cut their show from the lineup. Even in canceled shows, there are those who shine. This is the 13th season I’ve selected 10 standout stars. Some of my picks have been on target, such as Keri Russell, who was on my first list. She has a new series this year, Fox’s “Running Wilde.” Some picks don’t pan out, such as my 2002 selection of Derek Cecil. He hasn’t had a strong role since starring in the series “Push, Nevada.” So, before another new show bites the dust, here are my picks for this year’s “10 to watch.” 1. James Wolk, Robert/Bob Allen on “Lone Star,” Fox: Not only did Wolk immediately get the starring role in this “Dallas” for the 21st century, the Texas native landed a major role in the feature film “You Again.” He’ll need that luck to hold up because his show got the ax so early. 2. Katy Mixon, Victoria on “Mike & Molly,” CBS: The Florida native is a ball of comic energy as the bubbly Victoria. She’s had roles on “My Name Is Earl” and “Eastbound and Down,” but this part is the one that will get her the most attention. Mixon describes her character as “a firecracker with a heart of gold.” 3. Mehcad Brooks, Rolly Marks on “My Generation,” ABC: He’s got double the chance to be noticed because the Texas native has this new series and is part of Calvin Klein’s underwear ad campaign. He’s best known from his work on “Desperate Housewives.” 4. Lucas Neff, Jimmy Chance on “Raising Hope,” Fox: Neff never planned on being an actor, but here he is the star of his own series. His University of Illinois application was misprocessed and he was assigned to the performing arts department by mistake. It looks like others also saw his acting potential. 5. Sacha Dhawan, Manmeet on “Outsourced,” NBC: The British actor’s credits in-

Some of my picks have been on target, such as Keri Russell, who was on my first list. She has a new series this year, Fox’s “Running Wilde.” Some picks don’t pan out, such as my 2002 selection of Derek Cecil. clude the BBC TV shows “The Deep,” “Five Days II,” “Paradox” and “Out Of Sight.” “I find myself going into auditions over here and being very British all of a sudden,” says Dhawan. “It’s been really nice to audition over here in America because I think the casting directors really like the whole Britishness.” 6. Aly Michalka, Marti Perkins on “Hellcats,” CW: She’s already found fame in the music world as part of the platinum-selling recording team of Aly & AJ. Now the 21-yearold is ready to leap into the acting world through this role, which requires strong acting and athleticism. 7. Tanya Fischer, Zoe Waters on “The Defenders,” CBS: The Wisconsin native manages to steal scenes despite being on a legal drama filled with larger-than-life lawyers and clients. Fischer says her character “likes to dress up and be a girl.” 8. Ellen Woglom, Mereta Sprows on “Outlaw,” NBC: The Nashville native has had small roles on a few other series including “Californication” and “The O.C.” This legal drama puts her in a brighter spotlight. 9. Heather Hemmens, Alice Verdura on “Hellcats,” CW: She’s had small roles on “CSI: Miami” and “Without a Trace,” but this newcomer finally gets to make a mark with this wicked role. Bad-girl roles are always starmakers. 10. Ben Rappaport, Todd Dempsy on “Outsourced,” NBC: This is Rappaport’s first professional job and it’s demanding. He has to be the voice of reason in a call center full of lunacy. He’s very comfortable with the TV comedy format.

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B4 S aturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, Oct. 2, 2010: This year, you flip from being overly responsible and perhaps dominant to playful and gregarious. Underneath there is a seriousness that you might not be totally in contact with. You are processing on a deep level. If you are single, through a friend, you will meet someone who could light up your life. Friendship marks your relationship if you are attached. Don’t lock each other into roles. Always be a friend as well as a loved one. You can count on LEO. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Finally, you are enthusiastic and energized. How would you like to use this burst of energy? Clear out a money issue, or at least balance your checkbook. Clear out other errands. A friend has an exciting suggestion or two. Tonight: Let your imagination be a factor in deciding. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Return calls in the morning. A friend could be unpredictable. A discussion doesn’t help stabilize the situation. Perhaps acceptance is the best way. Schedule time with family, perhaps at home. Tonight: Invite favorite people over. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Take a hint from Aries before you cruise into the afternoon. Accomplish what you

must ASAP. Schedule a late lunch and perhaps a fun happening with a friend you rarely see. Tonight: Catch up on news. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your high magnetism combines with your energy as you wake up. Be spontaneous, and you enjoy yourself no matter where you are or what you do. Stay connected to your limits, and curb a desire to go overboard. Tonight: Indulge a friend or loved one. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might be slow to get started, as many issues come forward, but by the afternoon, you beam. Make plans with friends or a love one who you nearly always have a great time with. Be spontaneous about your actions. Tonight: Beam in what you want. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Use the morning for what you deem important. By midafternoon, the instinct to cocoon takes over, dominating your plans. Don’t allow others to dominate or ignore your needs. Tonight: Vanish if you can. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Get an early start on a project or a matter you feel you must complete. This afternoon, allow the weekend spirit to filter in and become more a part of your plans. Invite friends along to a flea market, movie or whatever knocks your socks off. Tonight: You are ringmaster. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Make long-distance calls in the morning. You are on top of your game and in touch with

your feelings. Nevertheless, you might not have the freedom you need to act on them. Much is on your plate! Tonight: Spend time with an older friend or relative. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Spend time with your spouse or a close loved one this morning. Reconnect as you used to. Allowing for more frivolous time helps you bond closer. Cut away from your responsibilities just for a day. Take off if you want. Be spontaneous. Tonight: Allow the good times to rock and roll. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Allow others to determine plans, then act on them. You actually might enjoy kicking back. You do a lot; take a needed break. All you need to do is respond. A discussion late today could surprise you with its intensity. Tonight: Make someone feel special. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH If a project or a responsibility nags at you, go off and complete it. You will want to free yourself up in order to relax with friends. What you might think could be an easy, friendly happening could become rather wild. Just hang in there. Go for something fun. Tonight: Follow another’s lead. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH How you feel in the morning is nothing like how you feel later in the day. Use the a.m. to the max, indulging a loved one and/or child. Allow spontaneity to play a greater role in your life. Tonight: A nice, easy pace. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Coins Continued from B1 But, notes Campbell, they can still be spent at face value. The nickels he plans to spend are worth about $1 each. Campbell’s profession was police work; he spent 20 years serving as a law officer in Washington state. Before he began collecting again 19 years ago, he sold off some of his coin collection. “Then in August of 1991, I was involved in a shooting,” he explains. “Four officers got shot, and two citizens got killed. One of the bad guys got shot and crippled. I realized I needed something besides police work to make it a little happier place, so I got back into coins.” Once he began collecting again, “I finally settled on the Morgan silver dollar,” he says. Named for their creator, George T. Morgan, “these ran from 1878 to 1904.” Campbell, 53, was sidelined from police work by major injuries incurred when his patrol car was struck by another auto. He’s now retired. After he moved to Bend a couple of years ago, he launched the Bend Coin Club of Central Oregon, posting fliers for the first meeting in November 2008. Five people, including himself, showed up to the first meeting. Today, the club has about 30 dues-paying members who meet monthly at Stone Lodge Retirement Living. He’d like to see membership climb to 50 in the next year. “It’s a very relaxed social group that likes to share a lot of stories,” he says. “If you’ve got the coin-collecting bug, it’s just the place to be.” Meetings are free, and, “You can come to up to three meetings for free, just to see if you like it, and (if you join) we charge a whopping $10 a year,” he says.

Talking numismatics Before Campbell sets out on Wall Street to spend the coins, he joins Coin Club board member Eric Holcomb, a former aerospace engineer, at Di Lusso Bakery Café in downtown Bend. Holcomb, 50, began collecting coins as a kid at around age 10, just like Campbell. Along with coin collecting, Holcomb col-

“Do ya?” says Campbell. “Some of them are worth a lot of money.” “Actually, this one doesn’t look very good, does it?” the employee says. “It’s not the best, but you know what it is,” agrees Campbell. On the way out, Campbell says that he gave the young cashier a nickel to keep.

Questionable coinage

Some of the coins owned by Bend Coin Club President Ted Campbell, including a 2010 Lincoln Cent, depicting a Union shield, bottom right.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bend Coin Club of Central Oregon president Ted Campbell gets rolls of dimes from his bank to check them for silver dimes, produced until 1964. This particular roll had none. lects medals commemorating the Apollo II space mission. Numismatics, the study and collecting of coins, also includes tokens and medals, notes Holcomb. Campbell, too, branched off from coin collecting as he grew up. By the 1970s, was into collecting gold and silver. “When my daughter was born in ’79, I paid her delivery doctor in gold nuggets,” he says. “Gold had just gone crazy.” Campbell and Holcomb offer a brief, broad overview of coin collecting. “Three things make a coin valuable,” Campbell explains. “One is rarity. How many of them did they make? The next thing is condition: What kind of condition is it in? Has it been out of circulation, is it beat up? But the third thing is popularity. Right now, the Morgan Dollar series is very, very popular. And right now, putting together a whole set, especially in uncirculated condition, which I’m trying to do, is extremely difficult. Because I don’t have a quarter of a million dollars to buy a 93-S in uncirculated condition.” That’s an 1893 coin minted in San Francisco, in layman’s terms. In 2008, a collector paid $1 million for such a coin, according to CoinLink.com, an online coin

collecting news outlet.

A serious hobby Since coin collecting has a price, this is as good a time as any to ask Campbell if he’s married. “No, been single for about a year and a half. Just got a girlfriend I’m interested in, and one of the first discussions we had is, ‘I have a hobby.’ ” Campbell fishes around a grocery store bag and brings out more coins, including a Peace Dollar, made in the 1920s to commemorate the end of World War 1. “They started in 1921 and ended in ’38,” he says. “Uh, well, ’34, wasn’t it?” adds Holcomb. He looks through one of the coin collecting books Campbell has brought along and discovers that “Neither one of us was right. It was ’35.” This is important, Campbell says: “If you have old coins, never ever ever clean them. Never. Not at all. People want the original tone and the original surface and dirt that is on the coin. You could have a $1,000 coin, and you clean it, and it becomes a $100 coin.” “Generally, that’s pretty good advice,” agrees Holcomb. “There are exceptions, but you’d better consult with somebody who re-

ally knows what they’re doing before you attempt it.” Also important: Don’t touch the face of a collectible penny; handle it by the edges or ruin the finish. Oops.

Assets and liabilities You don’t have to spend a mint to get into collecting, say Holcomb and Campbell. “Some people are just doing what they find out of pocket change,” Campbell says. “Remind me to talk about 2009.” Campbell’s referring to a set of pennies released every three months in 2009. Normally, the obverse side, or front face, of a penny depicts Lincoln’s profile; the reverse traditionally shows the Lincoln memorial. “In 2009, it was the 200th anniversary of Lincoln’s birth, and it was the 100th anniversary of the penny,” Campbell says. “Every three months, they came out with a new design to honor him.” There are four pennies in all, showing Lincoln’s profile as always with the log cabin he grew up in, followed by the “informative years,” showing him reading a book, followed by his Illinois legislative career, and finally a presidential one. “They left the Capitol build-

ing unfinished to signify that his presidency ended not the way everyone wanted it to,” says Campbell. (Psst, collectors: The log cabin penny had the lowest mintage, according to Campbell.) “You can spend zero, or you can spend a lot: whatever your assets or liabilities are,” he says. About 20 minutes into the interview, he asks, “You guys aren’t bored yet, are you?” “Not sure how much time you have allocated,” Holcomb says. “No,” replies a reporter. “We’re professionally obligated not to be bored.” “I had the same issue as a cop,” replies Campbell.

On a mission As we head out into the parking lot to set off for downtown, Campbell and Holcomb discuss the history of the buffalo nickel and its place in history. “There’s a lot of criticism right now from the coin world about how ‘blah’ our coinage is,” Campbell says. “There’s a lot of people who wish they’d continued making the buffalo nickel,” adds Holcomb, who bids farewell, opting out of the downtown mission. At Powell’s Sweet Shoppe, Campbell tells the cashier about the coins, adding that they’re still valid U.S. coinage. “I’ve got a couple of these at home,” a nearby worker interjects.

Campbell says that occasionally cashiers will balk at the rare coins he sometimes spends. Once at McDonald’s, a cashier turned down a Susan B. Anthony dollar. “She called a manager over, and he about slapped her upside the head,” he says, joking. He has no such problem at the next stop, Pegasus Books on nearby Minnesota Avenue, where he introduces himself to Duncan McGeary, the store’s owner. “You could buy sports cards,” suggests McGeary. “You know, I did that in the ’80s and early ’90s,” replies Campbell. “I still got a bunch left.” “Yeah, me too,” says McGeary, a sly reference to a rise and fall of sports cards’ popularity. “I’m not calling them collectibles anymore, I’m calling them ‘keepables.’ ” Campbell eventually decides on buying some small action figures. “I have a grandson that loves those guys,” he says. During the transaction, McGeary says, “So you want me to give those away to young people?” “If you would.” “All right, I’ll make sure they get them instead of the grownups,” McGeary promises. “They’re worth more than a nickel, for sure,” Campbell says. “Well, I’ll go cash them in,” McGeary says, laughing. When Campbell gets a handful of change back, he examines the coins in his palm closely. “See, I always check the dates,” he says. “Just habit.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

www.OasisSpaofBend.com A view of the living space inside Hayden and Julia Ware’s apartment in a renovated brewery in the Prenzlauer Berg district of Berlin. The Wares use curtains to divide the second level into different rooms. With the help of designer Essicka Kimberly, the Wares turned the 3,230square-foot apartment into a livable home.

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Brewery Continued from B1 For Kimberly, who had trained at the Architectural Association in London and whose experience was primarily in designing municipal projects, it was a chance to try a residential job — but on an industrial scale. “I was inspired by the challenge of preserving the place’s un-domestic scale,” she said, while “transforming it into a livable home.” The Wares paid about 655,000 euros (about $890,000) for the 3,230-square-foot space; the renovation cost about 400,000 euros ($540,000) and included a meticulous restoration of the original brickwork and the installation of a 16-foot-long open kitchen along one side of the ground floor. “I knew I needed a big kitchen — I went to culinary school,” Julia Ware said. “What’s a bit baffling is that now, even though it’s five meters long, every single cupboard is full.” In the center of the space, off the kitchen, is a shallow tiled basin that Kimberly said was inspired by “the pools in the central plazas you find where I come from — this space seemed to be

The exterior of a renovated brewery where Hayden and Julia Ware bought an apartment space.

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asking for a basin.” A vertical garden of ferns, ivies and other plants, created by Green Fortune, a Swedish company, grows around the support column of the central staircase, up to the second level. The master bedroom anchors the front of the building on the second level; elsewhere on the upper level are mezzaninelike areas overlooking the space below and nooks for reading. But no “little boxy rooms,” Kimberly said, because she wanted to preserve the “empty, light-filled space.” As Julia Ware noted, “She knew we’re messy, so this place is easy to clean — there are no places to put knickknacks.” Huge birch doors running along tracks in the wall conceal dressing

and storage areas on one side of the upper level; on the other side, curtains on ceiling tracks can be drawn to define a guest room, office or sitting room, or pulled back to create a single open space. “The idea of living in a space that’s old on the outside, but could be formed anew on the inside, really appealed to us,” Julia Ware said. And in the past two years, since they moved in, she added, they have become so accustomed to the industrial dimensions that normal homes now feel oddly confining. Hayden Ware put it more simply. “I really like living here,” he said. “It’s the world’s largest one-bedroom.”

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L

Inside

OREGON Paramedic testifies in trial of accused bank bombers, see Page C2. BUSINESS United, Continental create world’s largest airline, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Prolific TV writer Stephen Cannell dies at 69, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

A D WAT C H The Bulletin will fact-check campaigns ads leading up to the November election.

Wyden spins rival’s stance on bonuses By Keith Chu The Bulletin

The candidate: U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Democratic incumbent The ad: “Oregonians” is Sen. Ron Wyden’s fourth TV spot and his first to go on the attack against opponent Jim Huffman. In it, five Oregonians express distaste for several of Huffman’s policy positions. The ad builds to the tag line — “Jim Huffman: bailouts, bonuses and bad ideas.”

C

Deer Ridge jobs on the ropes 9 positions may be eliminated as part of $2.5M in proposed cuts by Department of Corrections By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Nine people could lose their jobs at the state prison in Madras as part of a $2.5 million Oregon Department of Corrections budget cut that will close a state prison in Salem. The nine jobs on the chopping block at Deer Ridge Correctional Institution are mainly positions created in anticipation of the medium-security portion of the prison being opened. The prison in

Madras has both minimum- and medium-security facilities, but the 1,223-bed medium-security sector was built and never opened. The latest cuts, officials said, make it even more likely that the other half of Deer Ridge won’t be opening anytime soon. “The positions identified (to be cut) are mostly tradesman positions,” said Jon Yeakey, who is the supervising executive assistant and public information officer for Deer Ridge.

“An electrician, a carpenter, a licensed plumber — because you have so many of those kinds of needs (at a larger institution), you better have a person on staff rather than pay contractors,” Yeakey said. “But because we’re not at full capacity … (minimum-security facilities) don’t typically have those positions.”

63 jobs at risk statewide Overall, the cuts mean about 63 people statewide will lose their jobs, according to The Associated Press. The cuts, which the governor has yet to formally approve, will also close the Oregon State Penitentiary minimum-security prison in Salem, according to Yeakey. The approximately 175

inmates there will go to other state prisons. “Right now the department is trying to be as judicious with taxpayers’ dollars as possible and taking a fine tooth comb to every position out there,” Yeakey said. The Deer Ridge minimum-security facility is at capacity, with more than 600 inmates, Yeakey said. The Madras prison employes about 150 people. When the medium security will be open is unclear. “A lot of people had hopes, we felt maybe we could open in the next biennium,” Yeakey said. “There’s no telling what the future holds.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-4198074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

AN ANCIENT ART International mounted archery competition comes to the High Desert

A screen shot from U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden’s TV ad, “Oregonians.” The claims: Wyden highlights several of Huffman’s more controversial positions: that he supported the Wall Street bailout; that “when we were furious about billions in bonuses, Mr. Huffman wrote an article telling us to ‘get over it’ ”; and that Huffman wants to privatize Social Security. Our verdict: Wyden accurately portrays Huffman’s policy positions, but the advertisement oversimplifies Huffman’s article about bonuses. It is true that Huffman has supported the bank bailout. In March, the Eugene RegisterGuard paraphrased Huffman as saying he supported the bill that bailed out Wall Street banks. Huffman’s spokesman, Rainier Butler, didn’t object to the line when asked about it this week. It’s also true that Huffman has supported privatizing Social Security. Huffman told The Bulletin in April: “I think some elements of a privatized approach in which people have some control over how their money is being used makes sense. I would continue to support that option.” Huffman added that he probably wouldn’t support “total privatization.” The bonuses claim is a little stickier. The ad is correct that Huffman wrote a wrote an opinion column in The Oregonian in April 2009 headlined “Outraged at those bonuses? Get over it,” that argued against going after large CEO bonuses after the fact. But it’s a stretch to imply that Huffman supported the bonuses themselves. In the column, Huffman wrote that Congress should have written the bank bailout bill to prevent federal money from going to bonuses, not that the bonuses were justified. “Indeed, if outrage is the emotion de jour, how about a little for a Congress that has doled out hundreds of billions with few strings attached?” Huffman wrote. “Where’s the outrage over the government’s agreeing to AIG’s use of bailout funds to pay bonuses?” Huffman’s camp also argues that because The Oregonian wrote the story’s headline, it’s false to say that Huffman told people to “get over it.” “The headline clearly missed the point of the article in general,” Butler said. “Jim’s point was about honoring a contract.” Wyden campaign manager Jake Weigler countered that the headline is a fair paraphrase of the story and that the ad’s claim is true. “In the article, it is clear that Huffman is telling taxpayers that it is unfair for Congress to go after the TARP-funded Wall Street bonuses,” Weigler said.

ELECTION

Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

A

nita Woo, of Malaysia, releases an arrow from her Turk-

for honors in several fast-paced events combining speed and ac-

ish-style bow while practicing her shooting Friday af- curacy. Competitors ride in period costumes of their countries, ternoon at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center

shooting targets along a 160-meter track while galloping without

in Redmond in preparation for the USA International Invitational reins. Horseback Archery Challenge, to be held today and Sunday.

Admission to the event in the Juniper Arena is $10 a day for

Competitors are coming from South Korea, Japan, the United adults, $5 for kids 8-16, and free for kids 7 and younger. The Kingdom, Mongolia, Brazil, Poland, Malaysia and all corners of event’s opening ceremony is at 9:30 a.m. today. Competition bethe U.S. The top horseback archers in the world will compete gins at 10:30 a.m. Sunday hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

WOLF MANAGEMENT

State Fish and Wildlife tweaks its plan, goals for returning predator By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission approved changes to the state’s wolf management plan at its meeting in Bend on Friday, drawing on experiences from the last several years as wolves made their way into Oregon, establishing packs but also preying on livestock in some areas. The plan sets guidelines and goals about the return of wolves to Oregon, seven decades after they were killed off in the state. It outlines wolf population goals to get them off of the state’s endangered species list, and lays

out how the state should deal with problem animals that attack livestock. It’s updated every five years. Friday’s additions included changes to definitions of when permits can be issued to kill or harass problem wolves and a statement that the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife should take the lead in confirming wolf-kills. Those and the other changes to the 2005 wolf management plan were designed to keep the intent of the original plan, said Craig Ely, northeast region manager with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. See Wolves / C7

Race for Crook County sheriff hits new intensity Incumbent stands on his record; rival says he would make office more efficient By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

They used to work side by side. They worshipped in the same church. For eight years, they were the top two law enforcement officials in the Crook County Sheriff’s Office. Now, they are both running to be the next county sheriff. And even though they both vowed to run a friendly campaign, the race is getting heated. “I don’t know what happened there,” said current Crook County Sheriff Rodd Clark. “Typical-

ELECTION ly, in my experience — and this is my seventh time running for sheriff — if someone is running for sheriff, and they don’t have the attributes to sway someone to run for them, they have to attack the incumbent.” Challenger Jim Hensley said it was never his intention to run on anything but his own merits. “This community knows how hard I’ve worked and what I’ve done to help them over the years,” he said. But regardless of the intentions, for the two men who have worked together for 20 years, this race is intensifying. And as

Rodd Clark

Jim Hensley

much as they have in common, they couldn’t disagree more on who should be elected the next county sheriff. About two years ago, Clark demoted Hensley. He said his he and his staff lost the confidence the former undersheriff could do his job. Because of their 20-year working relationship, Clark said he didn’t fire Hensley. See Sheriff / C7


C2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:45 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 20900 block of Lupine Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:31 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 2000 block of Northeast Hollow Tree Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:54 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 300 block of Northeast 10th Street. DUII — Karen Jean HumphreysVanantwerp, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:22 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 100 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:30 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 100 block of Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive. Theft — Items were reported stolen

from a vehicle at 6:15 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 62600 block of Hawkview Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 7:04 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 100 block of Southwest Cleveland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:44 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 700 block of Northeast First Street. Redmond Police Department

DUII — James Dakota Frasier, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:48 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 2200 block of Southwest Canal Boulevard. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:40 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 200 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — An MP3 player was reported stolen at 2:51 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 2400 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:25 p.m. Sept. 30, in the 300 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:17 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of Seventh Street

and Black Butte Boulevard. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:09 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 700 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — Vandalism to a vehicle was reported at 9:12 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 100 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and vandalized at 6:47 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 700 block of Northwest Seventh Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:26 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 2000 block of Northwest Quince Place. Theft — An Xbox was reported stolen at 12:57 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 900 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:19 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 69300 block of Green Ridge Loop in Cloverdale. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:30 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 200 block of Southwest Blue Heron Drive in Redmond.

L B   Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:51 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 9100 block of Boxwood Lane in Terrebonne. DUII — Rishi Madan Sehgal, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:40 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 70400 block of McKenzie Canyon Road in Redmond. Theft — A computer was reported stolen at 12:13 a.m. Sept. 30, in the 8800 block of Morning Glory Drive in Terrebonne. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:43 p.m. Sept. 30, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Smith Rock Way in Terrebonne.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 2:57 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 1523 N.W. Jacksonville Ave. 5:01 p.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 2600 N.W. College Way. 7:03 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 20235 Sawyer Reach Court. 21 — Medical aid calls.

EMT details bombing’s aftermath Paramedic takes stand in trial of two accused of causing explosion that killed two officers

Stephanie McClung, a paramedic who treated Woodburn Police Chief Scott Russell after a bombing at a bank in 2008, testifies at the trial of Bruce and Joshua Turnidge on Friday at the Marion County courthouse in Salem.

By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

SALEM — A paramedic who treated the Woodburn police chief after he was blown across the lobby of a bank by a bomb testified Friday she was running out of ways to keep him alive when an ambulance driver briefly lost his way en route to a hospital. “He was dying faster than I could stabilize him, and now we didn’t know where we were,� paramedic Stephanie McClung said. “I told him to just go uphill ’til you see a sign.� The ambulance driver found the hospital, and Woodburn Police Chief Scott Russell survived but lost his right leg. The compelling testimony came in Marion County Circuit Court during the trial of Bruce Turnidge and his son Joshua Turnidge. They could face the death penalty if convicted of aggravated murder in the Dec. 12, 2008, bombing of the West Coast Bank branch in Woodburn. Prosecutors have said the Turnidges decided to plant the bomb because they feared newly elected President Barack Obama

Kobbi R. Blair The Associated Press

would curb their gun rights. The blast killed Senior Trooper William Hakim, a bomb technician with the State Police, and Woodburn Police Capt. Thomas Tennant as they were trying to pry the lid from a suspicious green metal box. McClung said she got her first look at Russell after he was loaded into an ambulance outside the bank. His neck was so deeply cut under his jaw that the skin would have fallen open but for a collar, she said. One leg was cut open, exposing bone and arteries. The other

was hanging by just skin after lower leg bones were snapped.

Tracheotomy McClung testified she had to paralyze Russell with a difficult procedure so she could insert a tube into his trachea leading to his lungs. Normally the procedure is done in a hospital, but she had to do it in an ambulance bouncing along Interstate 5 in a snowstorm, with blood preventing her from seeing where to put the tube. “For whatever reason, luck I

guess, a little air bubble came out of his trachea,� she said. “Knowing air comes out of the lungs and not the esophagus, I aimed for the bubble. I felt it go through. We thought we were in.� Detective Rick Puente testified that when the ambulance arrived at the hospital in Portland, about 15 security guards were lined up to greet them, their hands over their hearts. “It was very humbling,� Puente said, his voice shaking with emotion. “It’s hard to explain, but it did bring some peace to me. Reassurance to me.�

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Yard sale believed linked to burglary The Redmond Police Department is requesting the public’s assistance in tracking down stolen items thought to have been sold at a yard sale near the end of July. The stolen items were taken from a business located on East Antler Avenue in Redmond, and include a Dell laptop computer, a Dell computer monitor, a computer hard drive, a digital camera and other small computer-related items. Police believe some of the items may have been sold at a yard sale later held at 626 N.W. Birch Ave. Individuals who may have purchased any of the items at the yard sale are encouraged

to contact Redmond Police through the nonemergency dispatch number, 541-693-6911.

Grant awarded to Prineville Police A grant of more than $250,000 was awarded to the Prineville Police Department, according to a news release. The department, which was notified Thursday that it had won the award, will use the money from the 2010 COPS Hiring Program grant to reestablish a school resource officer position. The two previous resource officer positions were eliminated during the last few years because of a lack of money. The federal grant will fully fund the resource officer position for three years.

Department of Defense says radar won’t be issue in 8 wind power projects The Associated Press PORTLAND — The Defense Department has decided that the risk of eight planned Oregon and Washington wind energy projects interfering with a military radar station in north-central Oregon is manageable.

1,128 turbines The projects would have a combined 1,128 turbines. The Oregonian said Friday’s decision gives the national security green light to six projects with 869 turbines in Oregon, including Iberdrola Renewables’ 225-turbine Montague project in north-

central Oregon. Radar settings at the Fossil surveillance station were tweaked in September to reduce interference. Defense Deputy Undersecretary for Installations and Environment Dorothy Robyn says the station will also be the military’s key test site for technological upgrades designed to address similar interference problems. The Defense Department had placed holds on two of the eight projects — all close to approval by the Federal Aviation Administration. Robyn says it pulled the holds on the two projects and approved the other six.

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20 die in capsizing on Lake George in ’05 TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Oct. 2, 1985, actor Rock Hudson died at his home in Beverly Hills, Calif. at age 59 after battling AIDS.

Judge David H. Souter to the Supreme Court. TEN YEARS AGO In his first public address since a disputed election, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic branded his opponents puppets of the West. (A wave of unrest aimed at driving Milosevic from power swept Yugoslavia, and the government responded by arresting dozens of strike leaders.) FIVE YEARS AGO A tour boat capsized on New York’s Lake George, killing 20 elderly passengers. Playwright August Wilson died in Seattle at age 60. Actor-comedian Nipsey Russell died in New York at age 87. ONE YEAR AGO The International Olympic Committee, meeting in Copenhagen, chose Rio de Janeiro to be the site of the 2016 Summer Olympics; Chicago was eliminated in the first round, despite a last-minute in-person appeal by President Barack Obama. A man accused of stalking ESPN reporter Erin Andrews and secretly videotaping her inside her hotel room was arrested at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport. (Michael David Barrett later pleaded guilty to interstate stalking and was sentenced to 21⠄2 years in federal prison.) Marek Edelman, 90, the last surviving leader of the ill-fated 1943 Warsaw ghetto revolt against the Nazis (not to be confused with the above-mentioned 1944 uprising), died in Warsaw. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Country singer-musician Leon

Rausch (Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys) is 83. Retired MLB AllStar Maury Wills is 78. Movie critic Rex Reed is 72. Singersongwriter Don McLean is 65. Cajun/country singer Jo-el Sonnier is 64. Actor Avery Brooks is 62. Fashion designer Donna Karan is 62. Photographer Annie Leibovitz is 61. Rock musician Mike Rutherford (Genesis, Mike & the Mechanics) is 60. Singer-actor Sting is 59. Actress Lorraine Bracco is 56. Country musician Greg Jennings (Restless Heart) is 56. Rock singer Phil Oakey (The Human League) is 55. Rhythmand-blues singer Freddie Jackson is 52. Singer-producer Robbie Nevil is 52. Retro-soul singer

James Hunter is 48. Rock musician Bud Gaugh (Sublime, Eyes Adrift) is 43. Folk-country singer Gillian Welch is 43. Country singer Kelly Willis is 42. Rhythmand-blues singer Dion Allen (Az Yet) is 40. Actress-talk show host Kelly Ripa is 40. Singer Tiffany is 39. Rock singer Lene Nystrom is 37. Actor Efren Ramirez is 37. Rhythm-and-blues singer LaTocha Scott (Xscape) is 37. Gospel singer Mandisa (TV: “American Idol�) is 34. Rock musician Mike Rodden (Hinder) is 28. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “There’s one way to find out if a man is honest — ask him. If he says ‘yes,’ you know he is crooked.� — Groucho Marx, (born this date in 1890, died in 1977)

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ON THIS DATE In 1780, British spy John Andre was hanged in Tappan, N.Y. during the Revolutionary War. In 1835, the first battle of the Texas Revolution took place as American settlers fought Mexican soldiers near the Guadalupe River; the Mexicans ended up withdrawing. In 1869, political and spiritual leader Mohandas K. Gandhi was born in Porbandar, India. In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson suffered a serious stroke at the White House that left him paralyzed on his left side. In 1944, Nazi troops crushed the two-month-old Warsaw Uprising, during which a quarter of a million people were killed. In 1950, the comic strip “Peanuts,� created by Charles M. Schulz, was syndicated to seven newspapers. In 1958, the former French colony of Guinea in West Africa proclaimed its independence. In 1967, Thurgood Marshall was sworn as an associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court as the court opened its new term. In 1970, one of two chartered twin-engine planes flying the Wichita State University football team to Utah crashed into a mountain near Silver Plume, Colo., killing 31 of the 40 people on board. In 1990, the Senate voted 909 to confirm the nomination of

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

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Today is Saturday, Oct. 2, the 275th day of 2010. There are 90 days left in the year.

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The Associated Press

These Dentists are offering 1/2 price teeth whitening (normally $400) during the month of October: Dr. Marci Aplin-Scott Dr. Carlo Arredondo Dr. David Cauble Dr. Jade Cherrington Dr. Edward Clark Dr. Karen Coe Dr. Yoli Di Giulio Dr. David Dunscombe Dr. Blake Drew Dr. Matt Engel Dr. Greg Everson Dr. Matt Falkenstein Dr. David Fuller Dr. Greg Ginsburg Dr. Janell Ginsburg Dr. Ben Grieb Dr. James Hammett Dr. Brad Hester Dr. Andrew Himsworth Dr. Max Higbee

Dr. T.J. Higbee Dr. Bradley Johnson Dr. Jeff Johnson Dr. Scott Joslin Dr. Mark Keener Dr. Matthew McCleery Dr. Michael Olin Dr. Maureen Porter Dr. Zack Porter Dr. Tom Rheuben Dr. Mehdi Salari Dr. Stephen Schwam Dr. Anne Scott Dr. Ken Shirtcliff Dr. Marika Stone Dr. Andy Timm Dr. Jeff Timm Dr. Ryan Timm Dr. Steve Timm Dr. Peter Yonan

Call today to set up your October appointment! These dentists and their offices are donating the entire proceeds to the Kemple Smile Campaign to benefit the Kemple Memorial Children’s Dental Clinic.


B

C3

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,370.75 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +2.13 +.09%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

s

10,829.68 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +41.63 +.39%

s

1,146.24 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +5.04 +.44%

s

By David Streitfeld New York Times News Service

Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union, the only credit union based in Bend, announced Friday it may merge with Northwest Community Credit Union, which is based in Springfield and has more than four times the assets. Mid Oregon, which has its headquarters on Northeast Cushing Drive in Bend, has 19,349 members and assets of $138 million, according to the National Credit Union Association. It has an additional office in Bend, along with branches in Madras, Prineville and Redmond. Northwest Community has assets of $644 million and 68,364 members, according to the association, and has 17 branches including one each in Bend and Redmond. The potential merger must be reviewed and receive approval from regulators and Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union members, who would vote to join Northwest Community Credit Union, according to a Mid Oregon news release.

Ten-year CLOSE 2.52 treasury CHANGE +.40%

s

$1316.10 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$8.30

Bank of America to freeze pending foreclosure cases Documents in 23 states to be reviewed for errors

Bend credit union in merger talks

BONDS

Bank of America, the country’s largest mortgage lender by assets, said on Friday that it was reviewing documents in all of its pending foreclosure cases to determine if errors were made. It is the third major lender in the last two weeks that has said it was freezing foreclosures in the 23 states where the process is controlled by courts. But Bank of America Corp. went further

than the first two lenders, GMAC Mortgage and JPMorgan Chase & Co., which have said they will amend paperwork only in cases they think were improperly done. So far, that has amounted to only a handful of cases. Bank of America, in an e-mailed statement, said it would “amend all affidavits in foreclosure cases that have not yet gone to judgment.” That could mean tens of thousands of foreclosure cases could be affected. Spokesmen for the bank said that they

were uncertain how many cases the lender currently had in court. They provided no timeline for their freeze or explanation for it. The moratorium is likely to further fuel the uproar over the foreclosure tactics of the big lenders, which continued to have political ramifications on Friday. Before Bank of America’s announcement, Richard Blumenthal, the Connecticut attorney general, asked judges in his state to put a moratorium on all foreclosures for 60 days. Connecticut is one of the 23 states where foreclosure is a judicial matter. See Foreclosure / C5

Giant merger complete

State takes income tax payments online

$950 billion

$811.8

900 850 800 ASONDJFMAMJJA Note: All figures are seasonally adjusted Source: Department of Commerce

AP

New York Times News Service

It was a stock market mystery that had everyone guessing for months: Just what caused last May’s harrowing “flash crash”? On Friday, after months of investigation and speculation, federal authorities finally provided the answer: It all began with the click of a computer mouse in Kansas. In a long-awaited report on one of wildest days in Wall Street’s history, regulators said that the automated sale of a large block of futures by a mutual fund — not named in the report, but identified by officials as Waddell & Reed Financial of Overland Park, Kan. — touched off a chain reaction of events on May 6. The Dow Jones industrial average plunged more than 600 points in a matter of minutes that day and then recovered in a blink. See Crash / C5

Michael Stravato / The Associated Press

A newly painted United Airlines plane, with Continental’s globe logo on the tail, bottom, leaves from Bush Intercontinental Airport in Houston on Friday.

World’s largest airline to completely unify its 2 brands by early 2012 By Joshua Freed and David Koenig The Associated Press

United and Continental on Friday closed the deal that will create the world’s biggest airline, although it will be months before it looks that way to travelers. By early 2012, travelers will see a combined airline called United Airlines, with Continental’s blue and gold colors and globe logo on the tail. Between now and then, the new company, United Continental Holdings Inc., will run the two as separate operations, with each airline’s customers checking in at Continental or United websites and

“If you take two carriers out, and a third pretty soon, prices are likely to go up.” Rick Seaney, CEO, FareCompare.com airport counters. Their frequent flier programs will stay separate for now too. The company said travelers should begin to see a more unified brand in the spring. Will they see higher fares too?

Rick Seaney, CEO of FareCompare.com, said the economy will hold down prices in the short run. Eventually, he expects reduced competition to lead to higher fares — the result of Delta’s takeover of Northwest, Continental’s disappearance, and Southwest’s pending purchase of AirTran. “If you take two carriers out, and a third pretty soon, prices are likely to go up,” he said. Airline pricing is notoriously fickle. Fares can rise on one route while falling on another due to competition, the economy and fuel prices. See Merger / C5

WHAT’S GOING UP? What: Juniper Ridge Hydroelectric Project Where: The Pilot Butte Canal, on the east side of U.S. Highway 97, north of Bend Owner: Central Oregon Irrigation District General contractor: Slayden Construction Group, Stayton Primary consultant: Black Rock Consulting Inc., Tumalo Design: Sunrise Engineering, Fillmore, Utah Contact: 541-548-6047 Details: With construction essentially complete, workers at the Juniper Ridge Hydroelectric Project north of Bend have started testing the system and generating electricity, said Steve Johnson, district manager of the Central Oregon Irrigation District, which owns the dam. Travelers on U.S. Highway 97 can see the powerhouse, located about a mile south of Deschutes Market Road

on the east side of the highway, but the $24 million project also includes 2.5 miles of piped irrigation canal, Johnson said. Canal piping began in October 2009, at the end of the irrigation season, and was completed when the new season began in April. The district will only generate electricity during irrigation season or other times when the water, initially diverted from the Deschutes River, normally flows in the Pilot Butte Canal. To generate electricity, the water turns a turbine in the powerhouse, Johnson said. It’s expected to produce about 3.5 megawatts per hour, or roughly enough to power about 1,300 homes. “Every kilowatt-hour produced, that’s all going to PacifiCorp,” he said, referring to Pacific Power’s parent company. “It’s all being sold to them.” Money generated by selling the electricity will first be used to pay for the project, Johnson said,

LOS ANGELES — “The Hobbit” is almost out of movie jail. After months of negotiation and delay, Warner Brothers and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer are on the verge of an agreement that would allow director Peter Jackson to begin shooting a two-part version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “Hobbit” early next year. Barring further hitches — and there have been many, as the studios wrestled with their dual ownership of the project over the past year — a financial deal should be in place over the next few days, according to several people who have been involved in the bargaining. They spoke on the condition of anonymity, citing company policies, confidentiality requirements and the delicate nature of the dealings. The long-anticipated “Hobbit” films amount to an extension of the lucrative “Lord of the Rings” franchise, which generated about $3 billion in revenue at the worldwide box office and enormous home video revenue for New Line Cinema, now a Warner unit. See Hobbit / C5

Juniper Ridge Hydroelectric Project Location of the recently completed powerhouse, Tumalo Rd. the turbine. which houses

Tumalo 20

97

Cooley Rd.

Deschutes Mkt Rd.

Monthly construction spending for the past 13 months:

By Graham Bowley

New York Times News Service

Correction

Construction spending

Lone sale of $4.1B in contracts caused the ‘flash crash’

By Michael Cieply

Solar program slots fill in 5 minutes

In a story headlined “More foreclosure aid for Oregon,” which appeared Friday, Oct. 1, on Page B1, the numeric telephone number listed under “How to get help” was incorrect. The number is 1-800-723-3638. The Bulletin regrets the error.

$22.037 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.239

Deal near for ‘Hobbit’ films in 3-D

State personal income tax payments can now be made online through an Oregon Department of Revenue website. The website also allows taxpayers to view their current balances or call up payment activity for the previous 10 years. In the future, it will allow taxpayers to change their addresses and set up payment plans, according to a news release from the Revenue Department. It can be reached from the department’s main page, www.oregon.gov/DOR/.

Pacific Power filled its available slots for round two of the state’s solar incentive program in five minutes, the utility announced Friday. The program, created by the Legislature, encourages the use of solar power by having Pacific Power and Portland General Electric pay Oregon utility customers for each kilowatt-hour of electricity they produce from new solar electric systems. The rate paid to customers in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties in round two will be 49.5 cents per kilowatt-hour, according to the state Public Utility Commission. Another chance to sign up for the program is expected in April. — From staff reports

s

BEND Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Water in the Pilot Butte Canal east of U.S. Highway 97 flows from a hydroelectric plant south of Deschutes Market Road. Central Oregon Irrigation District owns the Juniper Ridge Hydroelectric Project, which is undergoing testing, and will sell the electricity to Pacific Power. and any remaining will help pay district operations and maintenance expenses, keeping a lid on

assessments the district’s members must pay. Along with generating renewable

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

energy, the Juniper Ridge Hydroelectric Project will conserve water. Piping the canal reduces the amount of water lost when it seeps into the porous ground, Johnson said. The district estimates piping saves about 20 cubic feet per second per day during the season. — Tim Doran, The Bulletin


BUSI N ESS

C4 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 21.39 ACE Ltd 58.19 AES Corp 11.54 AFLAC 52.06 AGCO u37.77 AK Steel 13.97 AMB Pr 26.60 AMR 6.20 AOL n 25.03 AT&T Inc u28.81 AU Optron 10.57 AbtLab 52.58 AberFitc 37.75 Accenture u44.38 Actuant 23.11 AdvAuto 58.70 AMD 7.05 AdvSemi 4.14 AecomTch 24.30 Aegon 6.04 Aeropostl s 23.18 Aetna 31.20 AffilMgrs 79.74 Agilent 33.73 Agnico g 71.27 Agrium g u75.01 AirProd 83.02 Aircastle 8.37 Airgas u68.30 AirTran u7.34 Albemarle u47.26 AlbertoC n u37.87 AlcatelLuc 3.41 Alcoa 12.23 Alcon u168.11 AlexREE 71.05 AllgEngy 24.72 AllegTch 46.95 Allergan u66.25 AlliData 65.71 AlliancOne 4.10 AlliBInco 8.37 AldIrish d1.41 Allstate 31.57 AlphaNRs 42.50 AlpTotDiv 5.50 AlpAlerMLP u15.53 Altria u23.78 AmBev u124.95 AmbacF h .56 Amdocs 28.87 Ameren 28.79 Amerigrp u41.30 AMovilL u54.21 AmAxle 8.75 AmCampus 30.65 AEagleOut 15.05 AEP 36.22 AEqInvLf 10.37 AmExp 41.78 AGreet 19.06 AIntGr pfA 8.55 AmIntlGrp 38.86 AmTower u51.62 AmWtrWks 23.53 Ameriprise 47.76 AmeriBrgn 30.85 Ametek u48.01 Amphenol u49.06 Anadarko 57.06 AnalogDev 31.39 AnglogldA 47.06 ABInBev u58.66 AnnTaylr 21.18 Annaly 17.46 Anworth 7.24 Aon Corp 39.28 Apache 98.28 AptInv 21.53 AquaAm u20.54 ArcelorMit 33.49 ArchCoal 27.01 ArchDan 31.92 ArrowEl 26.78 ArvMerit 15.69 Ashland 48.99 AsdEstat 14.19 Assurant u40.61 AssuredG 17.42 AstoriaF 13.63 AstraZen 50.99 AtwoodOcn 30.78 AutoNatn 23.59 Autoliv u65.47 AutoZone u228.83 AvalonBay 105.13 AveryD 37.24 AvisBudg 11.72 Avnet 26.84 Avon 32.12 AXIS Cap u32.98 BB&T Cp 24.37 BCE g u32.44 BHP BillLt 77.69 BHPBil plc 65.30 BJs Whls 41.83 BP PLC 41.95 BPZ Res 3.89 BRFBrasil s u15.76 BakrHu 43.53 Baldor 40.38 BallCp u59.39 BallyTech 34.71 BcBilVArg 13.48 BcoBrades u20.78 BcoSantand 12.58 BcSBrasil n 14.06 BcpSouth 14.16 BkofAm 13.30 BkAm pfL 985.35 BkAm wtB 2.51 BkIrelnd d3.67 BkNYMel 26.34 BkNova g u53.36 Barclay 19.10 BarVixShT d17.04 Bard 81.76 BarrickG 47.01 Baxter 47.65 BeazerHm 4.19 BeckCoult 47.97 BectDck 74.30 Belo 6.20 Bemis u31.96 Berkley 26.96 BerkH B s 82.71 BerryPet 31.56 BestBuy 40.76 BigLots 33.44 BBarrett 36.89 BioMedR 18.25 Blackstone 12.44 BlockHR 12.59 Boeing 66.83 Boise Inc 6.40 Boise wt .40 Borders 1.22 BorgWarn u52.18

+.27 +.28 -.06 +.47 +.19 +.19 +.35 -.29 -1.24 -2.42 +.16 +.46 +.41 +1.02 -.07 -.18 +.28 +1.06 +.21 +.23 +.11 +.71 +.34 +.64 -1.57 -1.04 +1.89 +2.48 +.15 +.72 +.02 -.91 -.06 +.21 +.03 +.18 +.04 -.23 +.05 -.11 -.07 -.22 -.41 +.26 +1.73 +.79 +.36 +1.64 +.24 +2.05 +.02 -2.17 +.20 -.69 -.11 +.06 +.35 +.35 -.01 +2.79 +.45 +2.71 +.22 +6.39 +.03 +.05 +.12 +.03 +1.32 -.10 +1.05 +1.39 +.20 +.68 +.50 +1.12 -.28 -.11 +.45 +.36 -.05 +.19 -.01 ... -.01 -.13 +.02 -.03 +1.35 +1.28 +.06 +.02 +.08 +.25 -.24 -.22 +1.31 +5.11 +.01 +.01 +.21 +.64 +.39 +.83 -1.17 +1.15 +.88 +1.30 -.27 -.41 +.21 +.05 +.09 +.23 -.01 -.28 +.13 +.04 -.25 -1.35 +.47 -1.18 -.04 +.74 -.24 +2.39 +.36 -.07 +.26 +.04 +.43 +.52 +.19 -.50 +.24 +1.46 +.08 +.34 +.01 +.04 +.01 +.52 +.82 +1.82 -.09 +.09 +.94 +.94 -.14 -.26 +.11 +.03 +.17 -.17 +.52 +.15 +.15 -.43 +.14 -.11 +.51 +.21 +.30 +.77 ... -.35 +.05 +.78 +.15 -.17 +.22 +1.09 +.21 -.48 -.09 +.24 +.31 -.17 ... +.01 +.29 -1.70 +.33 +1.37 +.34 -.11 +.14 +2.02 -.08 +3.10 +1.20 -.87 +.12 +.78 +.07 +.58 -.17 ... +.01 -.07 +.04 +.44 +.29 -.14 -.06 -.50 +1.37 +1.74 +1.38 +1.56 +.33 -.03 +.78 +3.49 +.06 -.28 +.23 +1.02 +.93 +2.47 -.02 +.19 +.54 -.82 -.24 +2.15 ... -.45 +.40 +1.50 -.08 -.30 +.29 +1.25 -.02 +.32 +.20 -.30 +1.35 +8.38 +.13 +.12 +.27 +.39 +.21 +.21 +.54 +1.24 +.25 -.71 -.25 +.41 +.33 +1.92 +.72 +.64 -.06 -.37 +.06 +.01 -.82 +.84 +.20 +.02 ... +.30 +.21 +.49 -.11 -.28 +.03 -.61 -.17 +.56 +.08 +1.31 +.19 -.85 +.89 +1.43 +.33 -.19 -.25 +.94 -.36 -.48 +.29 +2.23 -.09 -.44 -.02 -.16 +.03 -.05 -.44 +2.50

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BostProp 83.64 +.52 -1.64 BostonSci 6.07 -.06 +.32 Bowne u11.36 +.03 +.38 BoydGm 7.28 +.03 +.46 Brandyw 12.09 -.01 +.06 BridgptEd 15.45 -.01 +.36 Brinker 19.06 +.20 +.65 BrMySq 27.28 +.17 -.02 BroadrdgF 23.08 +.21 +.13 Brookdale 16.70 +.39 +1.06 BrkfldAs g u28.65 +.28 +1.08 BrkfldPrp 15.91 +.34 +.24 BrwnBrn 20.17 -.02 +.01 Brunswick 15.33 +.11 +.87 Buenavent u46.53 +1.35 +4.68 BungeLt 57.45 -1.71 -3.29 BurgerKing u23.90 +.02 +.09 C&D Tch h .34 +.04 +.09 CB REllis 18.13 -.15 -.68 CBIZ Inc 6.00 +.07 +.20 CBL Asc 13.15 +.09 -.09 CBS B 16.38 +.52 +.21 CF Inds 94.65 -.85 -5.71 CIGNA 36.03 +.25 +.02 CIT Grp n 40.57 -.25 +.31 CMS Eng u18.22 +.20 +.16 CNO Fincl 5.40 -.14 -.18 CSX 55.16 -.16 -.98 CVS Care 31.78 +.31 +.77 CablvsnNY 26.34 +.15 +.54 CabotO&G 30.56 +.45 +1.87 CalDive 5.50 +.03 +.19 Calgon 14.87 +.37 +1.06 CallonP h 4.78 -.17 +.99 Calpine 12.75 +.30 +.23 CamdnP 48.18 +.21 -.17 Cameco g 28.02 +.29 +.62 Cameron 43.63 +.67 +1.56 CampSp 36.09 +.34 -.15 CdnNRy g 64.14 +.12 -.36 CdnNRs gs 36.15 +1.55 +3.06 CP Rwy g 61.13 +.20 -1.29 CapOne 39.30 -.25 -.05 CapitlSrce 5.29 -.05 -.25 CapsteadM 10.88 +.01 -.16 CardnlHlth 32.85 -.19 -.40 CareFusion 24.76 -.08 -.19 CarMax u27.79 -.07 +.44 Carnival 38.39 +.21 +.60 Carters 26.44 +.11 +1.14 Caterpillar u78.22 -.46 -1.51 Celanese 32.25 +.15 -.44 Celestic g 8.47 +.04 +.27 Cemex 8.62 +.12 -.08 Cemig pf 16.66 +.27 +1.04 CenovusE n 29.68 +.91 +1.71 CenterPnt u15.90 +.18 +.25 CnElBrasil 13.03 +.18 +.21 CntryLink u39.77 +.31 +.52 ChRvLab 33.48 +.33 +1.12 ChesEng 22.80 +.15 +1.32 Chevron 81.95 +.90 +1.83 ChicB&I 24.29 -.16 +.65 Chicos 10.51 -.01 +.01 Chimera 3.96 +.01 -.03 ChinaLife 59.78 +.30 -1.59 ChiMYWd nud13.25 ... ... ChinaMble 51.54 +.41 -.49 ChinaNepst 4.45 +.23 +1.33 ChNBorun nu11.07 -.53 +2.28 ChinaSecur 5.59 +.03 +.17 ChinaUni 14.72 +.16 -.45 Chipotle u174.50 +2.50 +1.31 Chubb 56.37 -.62 -.79 Cimarex 68.98 +2.80 +.77 CinciBell 2.61 -.06 -.09 Citigp pfJ 26.52 +.11 +.19 Citigrp 4.09 +.18 +.19 CliffsNRs 66.58 +2.66 +4.00 Clorox 67.00 +.24 +.75 Coach 43.12 +.16 +.68 CocaCE u31.80 +.80 +1.60 CocaCl 59.12 +.60 +.50 Coeur 20.09 +.17 +.48 CohStQIR 7.80 -.06 -.02 ColgPal 76.57 -.29 -1.95 CollctvBrd 16.16 +.02 +.12 Comerica 37.16 +.01 +.83 CmclMtls 14.80 +.31 +.22 CmwReit rs 25.86 +.26 +.06 ComScop 23.49 -.25 +.02 CmtyHlt 30.59 -.38 +.18 CBD-Pao 71.05 +2.03 +3.82 Compellent 19.41 +1.23 +.02 CompPrdS 21.38 +.93 +1.05 CompSci 45.73 -.27 +.35 ComstkRs 22.70 +.21 +.46 Con-Way 30.88 -.11 +.96 ConAgra 22.13 +.19 +.35 ConchoRes u67.49 +1.32 +3.04 ConocPhil 57.86 +.43 +1.50 ConsolEngy 38.31 +1.35 +1.91 ConEd 48.33 +.11 -.46 ConstellA 17.77 +.08 -.34 ConstellEn 32.42 +.18 +.14 ContlRes 47.44 +1.08 +2.68 Cnvrgys 10.71 +.26 +.24 Cooper Ind 49.23 +.30 +1.34 CooperTire 19.79 +.16 -.21 CornPdts 37.77 +.27 -.19 Corning 18.23 -.05 +.48 CorpOffP 37.60 +.29 +.91 CorrectnCp 24.87 +.19 +1.86 Cosan Ltd 11.68 +.09 -.33 Cott Cp 7.91 +.06 -.44 CtrySCkg nud29.05 +.46 ... CousPrp 7.14 ... -.05 Covance 46.62 -.17 +4.10 CovantaH 15.81 +.06 +.41 CoventryH 21.29 -.24 -.36 Covidien 40.36 +.17 +1.06 CredSuiss 43.24 +.68 -1.20 CrwnCstle u44.11 -.04 +.71 CrownHold 28.99 +.33 +.71 Cummins u91.31 +.73 +.45 CurEuro 137.25 +1.44 +2.84 CypSharp 13.47 +.12 +.22 Cytec u57.45 +1.07 +.95

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DiaOffs 66.66 DiamRk 9.54 DicksSptg 28.35 DigitalRlt 60.94 Dillards 23.99 DrxTcBll s 33.58 DrxEMBll s 36.13 DrSCBear rsd25.62 DREBear rs 23.34 DirEMBr rs d25.71 DirFnBear 13.08 DrxFBull s 21.82 DrxREBll s 48.00 DirxSCBull 47.85 DirxLCBear d12.26 DirxLCBull 53.35 DirxEnBull 34.27 Discover 16.58 Disney 33.34 DolbyLab 57.48 DollarGn n 29.15 DollarTh 49.86 DomRescs 44.03 Dominos 13.15 DEmmett 17.69 Dover 52.52 DowChm 27.88 DrPepSnap 35.11 DresserR 37.26 DuPont u44.85 DuPFabros 25.00 DukeEngy 17.83 DukeRlty 11.75 DuoyGWat 13.19 Duoyuan n 2.83 Dynegy rs 4.70 E-House 18.92

-1.11 +3.84 +.05 -.27 +.31 ... -.76 +.34 +.35 +.12 -.09 -.69 +1.51 +3.13 -.33 -1.09 -.39 +.50 -1.23 -2.45 -.30 +.18 +.48 -.35 +.64 -1.07 +.79 +1.83 -.16 -.01 +.60 -.01 +1.23 +2.44 -.10 -.19 +.24 -.24 +.67 -4.26 -.10 +.92 -.28 -1.17 +.37 -.20 -.07 -.20 +.18 ... +.31 +.71 +.42 -.04 -.41 +.16 +.37 -.25 +.23 -.73 -.15 +.14 +.12 -.16 +.16 -.18 +.16 +1.63 -.01 +.20 -.17 +.17 +.05 -.94

Name FstHorizon FstInRT FirstEngy FlagstB rs Flowserve Fluor FEMSA FootLockr FordM ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Fortress FortuneBr FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline

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11.51 +.10 +.61 5.11 +.04 -.02 38.89 +.35 +.79 1.90 +.08 +.08 110.57 +1.15 +3.72 50.35 +.82 +1.44 51.07 +.34 -.19 14.81 +.28 +.03 12.26 +.02 -.30 12.91 +.08 -.04 31.04 +.11 -.31 30.05 +.35 +.96 3.59 ... -.06 49.58 +.35 -.81 21.93 +.40 +.12 107.91 +1.01 +1.16 89.13 +3.74 +2.52 8.18 +.01 +.11 13.38 -.02 +.38 28.10 -.33 -.79

G-H-I GLG Ptrs GMX Rs Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Gartner GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP

u4.49 4.83 16.34 20.00 6.88 12.59 18.51 u30.04 30.56 15.96 5.40 26.57 62.46 16.36 15.58

-.01 ... -.03 +.67 +.85 +.86 +.29 +.08 -.13 -.38 +.36 +.25 -.13 -.32 +.60 +1.38 +.06 +.08 +.02 +.22 +.48 +.68 -.55 +.25 -.35 -1.22 +.11 -.30 -.02 +.04

Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

Chg Wkly

Name

Last

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Penney 27.44 +.26 +1.89 PenRE 11.85 -.01 -.63 Pentair 33.57 -.06 +.37 PepBoy 10.47 -.11 +.79 PepcoHold u18.76 +.16 +.25 PepsiCo 67.00 +.56 +.87 PerkElm 23.02 -.12 -.15 Petrohawk 16.47 +.33 +1.34 PetrbrsA 32.96 +.14 +2.17 Petrobras 36.46 +.19 +1.54 PtroqstE 6.06 -.03 +.06 Pfizer 17.18 +.01 -.22 PhilipMor u55.55 -.47 -.55 PhilipsEl 31.52 +.20 +.16 PhlVH 59.99 -.17 +1.20 Pier 1 8.26 +.07 +.26 PinnclEnt 11.15 ... +.31 PinWst u41.65 +.38 +.42 PioNtrl 66.06 +1.03 +1.34 PitnyBw 21.40 +.02 +.34 PlainsEx 26.42 -.25 +.66 PlumCrk 35.51 +.21 +.42 Polo RL 90.31 +.45 +1.15 PolyOne u12.16 +.07 +.38 PortGE 20.38 +.10 +.25 PostPrp 28.31 +.39 -.26 Potash 142.64 -1.40 -3.36 PwshDB 24.16 +.05 +.34 PS Agri u26.65 -.83 -1.25 PS USDBull 22.65 -.19 -.32 PwShPfd 14.48 +.02 +.03 Praxair u89.65 -.61 -.44 PrecCastpt 128.78 +1.43 -2.60 PrecDrill 6.98 +.13 +.79 PrideIntl 30.10 +.67 +.16 PrinFncl 25.92 ... +.02 ProShtS&P 48.66 -.24 +.06

of all Central Oregon adults cite The Bulletin as their primary source for local sales and shopping information. ( M o r e t h a n a l l o t h e r s o u r c e s c o m bi n e d. )

D r i v e r e s u l t s f o r y o u r a dv e r t i s i n g do l l a r s c a l l 541- 382- 1811 A M E R I C A N O P I N I O N R E SE A R C H 2006

4.80 +.01 ... 26.48 +.35 +.56 11.08 -.04 +.16 46.48 +.55 +.64 12.52 +.20 +.41 40.40 -.21 -.83 42.99 +.21 -.62 u68.87 -.16 +1.24 49.43 +.22 +2.30 10.30 +.09 +.50 68.57 -1.21 -3.77 13.34 +.23 +.39 12.01 +.37 +.31 16.41 +.52 +.80 d55.12 +.19 -.59 u37.25 +.59 +1.25 d9.34 -.15 -.35 11.41 +.19 +.27 65.25 +.51 +1.19

+.03 -1.30 +.84 +1.48 +3.20 +4.06 +.35 +2.63 +.57 +1.83 -.10 +.10 +.04 +.11 -.06 -.14 +.06 +.02 +.58 +.37 +.24 +.26 +.06 -.80 +.05 +.15 -.15 +.20 -.04 +.20 +.35 ... ... -.34 +1.01 +.21 -.21 -.35 +.03 +1.85 +1.02 -2.74 +.24 +.45 -.06 -.14 +.49 +2.06 +.11 -.50 +.64 +.12 +.38 +1.27 +.15 +.24 +.25 -1.44 +.06 +1.88 +.05 +.24 +.27 +.75 +.45 +.05 +.40 +.58 +.13 -.53 +.75 +.79 -.58 -.14 +1.11 +1.85 +.01 -.01 +.16 +.94 -.10 +.15 +.14 +.90 +.14 +1.41 +.24 +.84 +.30 +.04 -.02 +.10 +.09 +.52 +.24 +.36 -.67 -.60 -.14 -.55 -.00 -.04 +.08 +.18

GenMarit 4.76 GenMills s 36.95 GenuPrt 44.55 Genworth 12.28 Gerdau 13.67 GlaxoSKln 39.79 GlimchRt 6.24 GlobPay 42.07 GolLinhas 16.31 GoldFLtd 15.27 Goldcrp g 43.72 GoldmanS 147.70 Goodrich 74.21 GoodrPet 14.91 Goodyear 10.85 GrafTech 15.99 GtPlainEn 18.97 GreenbCos 16.03 GpTelevisa 18.96 Guess 40.29 GushanEE d.64 HCC Ins 26.11 HCP Inc 35.85 HSBC 51.82 HSBC Cap2 27.00 Hallibrtn 33.33 Hanesbrds 26.02 HarleyD 28.57 HarmonyG 11.32 HarrisCorp 44.70 HartfdFn 23.42 HartfFn wt u14.85 HarvNRes u10.44 Hasbro u44.61 HatterasF 28.67 HltCrREIT 47.38 HltMgmt 7.47 HealthNet 26.76 HlthSouth 19.09 HlthSprg u25.84 HeclaM 6.38 Heinz 47.51 HelixEn 11.46 HelmPayne 40.26 Herbalife u60.84 Hersha 5.20 Hershey 47.79 Hertz 10.01 Hess 60.92 HewittAsc u50.06 HewlettP 40.77 Hexcel 17.98

ArenaPhm d1.53 -.04 -.08 AresCap 15.71 +.06 +.42 AriadP 3.89 +.07 +.34 Ariba Inc u19.08 +.18 +.09 ArkBest 23.75 -.48 -.07 ArmHld 19.25 +.49 -.54 Arris 9.74 -.03 -.07 ArtTech 4.11 ... +.07 ArubaNet u21.08 -.26 -1.05 AscentSol 3.57 +.41 +.57 AsiaEnt wt .55 -.01 +.05 AsiaInfoL 19.82 +.09 +.14 AspenTech 10.62 +.25 +.57 AsscdBanc 13.21 +.02 +.15 athenahlth 32.76 -.26 +1.57 Atheros 25.61 -.74 -2.34 AtlasAir 50.11 -.19 -4.90 AtlasEngy 29.70 +1.06 +2.89 Atmel u7.88 -.08 +.12 Autodesk 31.88 -.09 -.09 AutoData 41.82 -.21 -.82 Auxilium 25.35 +.57 -.86 AvagoTch 22.63 +.12 +1.05 AvanirPhm 3.26 +.07 +.04 AviatNetw 4.09 ... +.06 Axcelis 1.94 +.01 +.23 BE Aero 30.55 +.24 -.03 BGC Ptrs 6.02 +.05 +.30 BJsRest u28.47 +.31 +.36 BMC Sft u40.98 +.50 +.32 BSD Med 3.15 -.06 -.07 BallardPw 1.69 +.02 -.02 BannerCp 2.14 -.02 -.03 BeacnRfg 14.50 -.07 -.14 BebeStrs 7.16 -.05 +.55 BedBath 43.40 -.01 -.32 Biocryst 5.01 +.07 +.26 Biodel 5.08 -.22 -.25 BioFuelEn 1.86 -.13 +.18 BiogenIdc 56.53 +.41 +.11 BioMarin 22.40 +.05 ... BioSante 1.70 +.02 +.28 BioScrip 5.11 -.05 -.10 BlkRKelso 11.58 +.08 -.03 Blkboard 36.08 +.04 +.16 BlueCoat 23.90 -.16 -.88 BobEvans 28.41 +.34 -.41 BonTon 10.31 +.14 +1.59 BostPrv 6.51 -.03 -.09 BreitBurn u18.47 +.20 +1.01 BrigExp 19.24 +.49 +1.49 Brightpnt 7.00 +.01 -.07 Broadcom 34.72 -.67 +.85 Broadwind d1.99 +.12 +.43 BrcdeCm 5.87 +.01 -.39 BrklneB 9.89 -.10 -.03 BrooksAuto 6.70 -.01 +.06 BrukerCp 14.27 +.24 +.12 Bucyrus 69.89 +.54 -1.08 BuffaloWW 48.63 +.74 +.73 BldrFstSrc 2.25 -.03 -.04 CA Inc 21.25 +.13 +.10 CBOE n d20.60 +.40 -.01 CEVA Inc u14.12 -.18 +.49 CH Robins u69.64 -.28 +1.04 CME Grp 260.01 -.44 -9.62 CNinsure 23.37 +.13 +1.49 CSG Sys 18.32 +.09 -2.33 CTC Media u21.98 +.04 +.66 CVB Fncl 7.51 ... +.02 CadencePh 8.41 +.06 +.05

Cadence 7.60 Cal-Maine 28.44 CalifPizza 17.35 CdnSolar 15.84 CapellaEd 79.65 CpstnTrb h .79 CardioNet 4.77 Cardtronic u15.31 CareerEd 21.67 Carmike 8.37 Carrizo 24.26 Caseys 41.37 CatalystH 36.00 CathayGen 11.84 CaviumNet 28.75 CeleraGrp 6.74 Celgene 58.10 CelldexTh 4.13 CentEuro 21.80 CEurMed 24.78 CenGrdA lf 10.45 CentAl 13.52 Cephln 62.97 Cepheid 18.53 CeragonN 10.03 Cerner 85.03 CerusCp u3.85 ChrmSh 3.56 ChartInds 20.72 ChkPoint u36.91 Cheesecake 26.69 ChildPlace u51.46 ChinAgri s 11.97 ChinaArc h .64 ChinaBAK 1.80 ChinaBiot 11.00 ChinaCEd 7.36 ChinaDir 1.25 ChinaLdg n 23.50 ChinaMda 10.03 ChinaNGas 6.13 ChinaRE n 11.10 ChinaSky 7.82 ChinaSun 4.40 ChiValve n 8.01 ChiCache nud27.15 CienaCorp 15.45 CinnFin 28.85 Cintas 27.48 Cirrus 17.41 Cisco 21.91 CitrixSys u67.94 CleanEngy 14.18 Clearwire u7.91 Cogent 10.83 Cognex u26.20 CognizTech u65.80 Coinstar 43.77 ColdwtrCrk 5.34 ColBnkg 19.29 Comcast 17.82 Comc spcl 16.76 CmcBMO 37.66 CommVlt 26.61 Compuwre 8.59 Comtech 27.50 Comverge 8.00 Concepts 13.38 ConcurTch 50.30 Conexant 1.67 ConstantC 21.34

-.03 -.13 -.54 -1.86 +.29 -.07 -.46 +2.86 +2.03 +1.74 +.02 +.11 +.26 +.47 -.11 +.44 +.20 +1.29 -.35 +.88 +.32 +1.04 -.38 -1.50 +.80 +2.62 -.05 -.31 -.01 -.80 ... -.15 +.49 -.36 +.13 -.03 -.52 -2.20 -.17 +.20 +.09 +.29 +.35 +.87 +.53 -.90 -.18 -.33 +.14 +.12 +1.04 +5.07 +.01 +.08 +.04 -.02 +.36 +.67 -.02 +2.39 +.22 +.39 +2.69 +2.43 +.41 +1.09 -.02 -.12 -.03 +.03 ... +1.70 +.28 +.37 +.04 +.11 +.03 +.77 -.17 +1.55 +.21 +.93 +.35 +.03 +.25 +1.25 -.11 +.04 +.25 +.37 ... ... -.12 -.15 +.03 +.07 -.07 -.24 -.43 +.47 +.01 -.18 -.30 -2.61 -.03 -1.06 -.18 +.34 +.19 +.09 -.62 +3.40 +1.33 +1.58 +.78 +1.46 +.07 +.30 -.36 +.56 -.26 -.76 -.25 -.72 +.07 -.46 +.58 -1.19 +.07 -.19 +.15 +1.02 +.14 +1.14 -.37 -.33 +.86 -1.56 +.03 ... -.09 -.02

CopanoEn 27.59 +.23 +.50 Copart 32.80 -.17 -1.10 CorinthC 7.19 +.17 +.89 Costco u65.05 +.56 +1.00 CowenGp 3.38 +.09 +.15 CrackerB 51.01 +.25 +.47 Cray Inc 6.90 +.30 +.82 Cree Inc 53.49 -.80 +.97 Crocs 13.21 +.21 +.86 CrosstexE 7.93 +.03 -.03 Crucell u33.60 +.34 +.27 Ctrip.com s u47.45 -.30 +.53 CubistPh 23.48 +.09 -.07 Cyberonics u27.70 +1.02 +2.46 Cyclacel 1.72 ... +.01 Cymer 36.92 -.16 +1.49 CyprsBio h 3.85 ... +.03 CypSemi 12.96 +.38 +.02 Cytori 4.85 -.04 -.23

D-E-F

Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price.

Last

MitsuUFJ 4.73 +.10 -.09 MizuhoFn d2.87 ... -.16 MobileTel s 21.62 +.39 +.54 Mohawk 54.00 +.70 +2.08 MolsCoorB 47.78 +.56 +.89 Molycorp n u29.58 +1.29 +1.77 Monsanto 48.26 +.33 -7.12 MonstrWw 13.03 +.07 +.34 Montpelr 17.22 -.10 +.06 Moodys 25.23 +.25 -.54 MorgStan 25.02 +.34 -.13 Mosaic 59.62 +.86 -2.47 Motorola 8.56 +.03 -.12 MuellerWat 3.05 +.03 +.09 MurphO 62.14 +.22 +1.22 NBTY u54.98 ... +.04 NCR Corp 13.76 +.13 -.05 NRG Egy 21.09 +.27 +.34 NV Energy 13.13 -.02 -.03 NYSE Eur 28.93 +.36 -.11 Nabors 17.83 -.23 -1.16 NalcoHld 25.14 -.07 -.34 NBkGreece 2.25 -.02 -.20 NatGrid 43.20 +.46 +.04 NOilVarco 45.18 +.71 +.97 NatRetPrp 25.19 +.08 -.19 NatSemi 12.80 +.03 +.09 NatwHP 38.60 -.07 -.76 Navistar 43.41 -.23 -.52 Netezza 26.95 ... -.51 NewOriEd 98.54 +.96 -.60 NY CmtyB 16.34 +.09 -.01 NY Times 7.85 +.11 +.06 NewAlliBc 12.69 +.07 +.21 NewellRub u17.99 +.18 +.12 NewfldExp 58.64 +1.20 +3.46 NewmtM 63.68 +.87 +.28

L O C A L A D V E R T I SI N G F A C T # 2

EMC Cp 20.34 ENI 44.02 EOG Res 96.17 EQT Corp 36.41 EastChm u74.57 EKodak 4.10 Eaton u82.53 EatnVan 28.98 EVTxMGlo 11.00 Ecolab u51.32 EdisonInt 34.63 EdwLfSci s 67.11 ElPasoCp 12.43 Elan 5.60 EldorGld g 18.45 ElsterGp n ud14.15 EBrasAero 28.39 EmersonEl 53.67 Emulex 10.23 EnCana g s 30.26 Energizer 68.25 EngyTsfr 48.52 EnergySol 4.97 Enerpls g u26.24 ENSCO 44.84 Entergy 77.17 EntPrPt u40.05 EqtyOne 17.03 EqtyRsd 47.82 EsteeLdr 63.29 ExcelM 5.67 ExcoRes 15.14 Exelon 43.03 ExterranH 23.11 ExtraSpce 16.17 ExxonMbl 62.54 FMC Corp 67.83 FMC Tech 69.40 FNBCp PA 8.57 FTI Cnslt 34.85 FairchldS 9.30 FamilyDlr u44.30 FedExCp 85.64 FedRlty 81.90 FedInvst 23.06 FelCor 4.58 Ferro u12.98 FibriaCelu 17.53 FidlNFin 15.04 FidNatInfo 26.99 FstBcpPR d.28 FstCwlth 5.53

DCT Indl DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden DaVita DeVry DeanFds Deere DelMnte DeltaAir DenburyR DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE

Name

How to Read the Market in Review

-.15 +.36 +.41 -.29 -.04 -.33 +.06 -.21 +.06 +.27 +.27 -.68 +.09 -.09 -.82 +.65 +.59 +.79 ... +.21 +.20 -.09 +3.12 +.42 +.48 +1.62 +.34 +.94 +.10 +.03 +.36 +.40 +.07 +.03 +.44 +2.77 +.04 +.26 -.34 +.95 -.02 -.20 +.02 +.07 -.13 -.81 +1.23 -.79 +.02 +.08 +.26 +.60 +.16 +1.55 +.13 +.17 +.03 -.10 +.41 -.67 +.47 +.73 +.45 +.60 +.02 +2.51 +.10 +.23 +.20 -.05 +.04 +.01 -.19 +.21 -.43 -.49 -.11 +.37 ... +.20 +.06 +.13 +.14 -.27 +.32 +1.32 -.20 +.36 +.49 +1.07 +.02 ... +.20 -.33 -.58 -1.15 +1.80 +3.11 -.37 -.56 -1.30 -.21 +.19 -.34

HighwdPrp 32.10 -.37 -.17 Hill-Rom u36.42 +.53 +.89 HomeDp 31.82 +.14 +.18 HonwllIntl 44.15 +.21 -.31 Hornbeck 19.29 -.20 +.71 Hospira 56.39 -.62 +1.16 HospPT 22.33 ... +.30 HostHotls 14.65 +.17 +.10 HovnanE 3.89 -.04 +.04 Humana 50.13 -.11 -.12 Huntsmn 11.67 +.11 +.13 Hypercom u6.45 -.05 +2.32 IAMGld g 17.67 -.04 +.14 ICICI Bk u50.88 +1.03 +1.64 ING 10.53 +.24 -.03 ION Geoph 5.23 +.09 +.73 iShGold s u12.91 +.11 +.24 iShGSCI 30.42 +.41 +.96 iSAstla 23.99 +.25 +.04 iShBraz 78.12 +1.17 +4.22 iSCan 28.33 +.30 +.53 iShGer 22.21 +.21 +.18 iSh HK u18.32 +.18 +.36 iShJapn 9.90 +.02 +.04 iSh Kor u54.44 +.95 +1.67 iSMalas 13.85 +.11 +.13 iShMex 53.90 +.91 +.74 iShSing u13.42 +.20 +.24 iSPacxJpn 44.73 +.43 +.25 iSTaiwn u13.63 +.08 +.23 iSh UK 16.63 +.27 +.02 iShSilver u21.65 +.34 +.64 iShS&P100 51.76 +.26 -.19 iShDJDv 47.07 +.23 +.28 iShBTips u109.22 +.30 +.65 iShChina25 43.10 +.28 +.25 iSSP500 115.00 +.51 -.14 iShBAgB 108.26 -.12 +.39 iShEMkts 45.43 +.66 +1.31 iShiBxB ud112.11 -.54 +.45 iShIndones u29.61 +.53 +.70 iSSPGth 59.56 +.19 -.11 iShSPLatA u51.05 +.51 +2.32 iSSPVal 54.57 +.32 -.04 iShB20 T 104.61 -.50 +1.51 iShB7-10T 98.83 +.06 +.79 iShB1-3T u84.32 +.02 +.05 iS Eafe 55.47 +.55 +.09 iSRusMCV 40.61 +.24 +.35 iSRusMCG 49.90 +.08 +.24 iShRsMd 90.67 +.30 +.59 iSSPMid 80.27 +.19 +.87

iShiBxHYB 89.22 +.12 +1.06 iShC&SRl 62.24 +.33 -.53 iShBFxBd 108.92 +.09 +.41 iSR1KV 59.35 +.36 +.03 iSR1KG 51.55 +.18 -.01 iSRus1K 63.41 +.26 +.02 iSR2KV 62.26 +.27 +.78 iSR2KG 75.12 +.38 +1.03 iShR2K 67.86 +.36 +.87 iShUSPfd 39.58 +.03 -.10 iShDJTel u21.92 +.13 +.21 iShREst 53.14 +.26 -.40 iShFnSc 52.46 +.40 -.24 iShSPSm 59.46 +.37 +.61 iShBasM 65.56 +.97 +.63 iShEur350 38.25 +.40 +.10 iStar 3.06 ... -.27 ITT Corp 47.02 +.19 -.10 ITT Ed 69.91 -.36 +3.87 ITW 47.26 +.24 +.52 IngerRd 35.91 +.20 +.62 IngrmM 17.08 +.22 +.68 IntcntlEx 106.55 +1.83 +2.02 IBM u135.64 +1.50 +1.53 Intl Coal 5.54 +.22 +.15 IntlGame d14.31 -.14 +.49 IntPap 22.36 +.61 +.53 IntlRectif 21.30 +.21 +.35 InterOil g 66.72 -1.72 -1.37 Interpublic u10.15 +.12 +.08 IntraLks n u17.21 +.30 +2.01 IntPotash 26.45 +.38 -.58 Invesco 21.37 +.14 -.53 InvMtgCap 21.30 -.22 -.60 IronMtn 22.32 -.02 +.47 ItauUnibH u24.58 +.41 +1.85 IvanhM g u24.17 +.76 +.50

J-K-L JCrew 33.21 JPMorgCh 38.81 JPMAlerian u34.07 Jabil 14.30 JacobsEng 39.01 Jaguar g 6.75 JanusCap 11.10 Jarden 31.55 Jefferies 22.89 JinkoSol n u31.89 JohnJn 61.75 JohnsnCtl 30.54 JonesApp 19.50

-.41 +.28 +.75 -.94 +.33 +.87 -.11 +.73 +.31 +1.60 +.25 +.10 +.15 +.22 +.42 +1.21 +.20 -.52 +.28 +2.31 -.21 -.39 +.04 +.66 -.14 -.01

JnprNtwk 30.30 -.05 +.52 KB Home 11.34 +.01 -.77 KBR Inc u25.08 +.44 +.84 KKR n 10.84 +.24 +.20 KKR Fn 8.89 +.11 +.12 KT Corp 20.77 +.31 +1.30 KC Southn 37.26 -.15 -1.88 Keithley u21.60 +.09 +9.60 Kellogg 50.91 +.40 -.09 Kennamtl 31.19 +.26 +.01 KeyEngy 9.74 +.23 +.79 Keycorp 8.11 +.15 +.21 KimbClk 65.03 -.02 -1.02 Kimco 15.79 +.21 -.70 KindME 69.00 +.50 +.17 KingPhrm 9.83 -.13 +.04 Kinross g 18.90 +.11 -.10 KnghtCap 12.69 +.30 +.07 KnightTr 19.08 -.25 -.20 Kohls 52.64 -.04 +.33 Kraft u31.21 +.35 -.45 Kroger 21.72 +.06 -.37 L-1 Ident u11.80 +.07 +.11 L-3 Com 71.72 -.55 +.11 LDK Solar u10.15 -.13 +1.30 LG Display 17.37 -.07 +.58 LSI Corp 4.55 ... +.08 LaZBoy 8.72 +.28 +.33 LabCp 78.03 -.40 +1.20 LVSands u35.19 +.34 +1.46 LaSalleH 23.10 -.29 -.49 Lazard 35.16 +.08 -.32 LeggMason 30.60 +.29 -.02 LeggPlat 23.02 +.26 +.22 LenderPS 31.48 -1.75 -.97 LennarA 15.67 +.29 +.44 LeucNatl 23.79 +.17 +.12 LexRltyTr 7.25 +.09 +.22 Lexmark u45.07 +.45 +1.80 LbtyASE 4.43 +.02 +.08 LibtProp 32.01 +.11 +.11 LillyEli 36.54 +.01 +.44 Limited 26.82 +.04 -.36 LincNat 23.97 +.05 -.13 LiveNatn 9.91 +.03 +.12 LizClaib 6.25 +.17 +.31 LloydBkg 4.63 +.02 -.18 LockhdM 69.61 -1.67 -3.52 Loews 38.02 +.12 +.40 Lorillard 80.03 -.28 -1.37 LaPac 7.63 +.06 -.24 Lowes 22.35 +.06 -.13

M-N-O M&T Bk 81.91 +.10 -8.71 MBIA 10.18 +.13 -.81 MDU Res 20.52 +.57 +.62 MEMC 11.96 +.04 +.17 MF Global 7.21 +.01 -.19 MFA Fncl 7.73 +.10 +.10 MGIC 9.25 +.02 +.21 MGM Rsts 11.25 -.03 +.58 MPG OffTr 2.47 -.03 -.13 MSCI Inc 34.33 +1.12 +.16 Macerich 43.87 +.92 +.60 MackCali 32.29 +.03 -.38 Macys 23.15 +.07 +.40 MagnaI g 82.49 +.23 +3.24 Manitowoc 11.88 -.23 +1.61 ManpwI 51.82 -.38 +2.38 Manulife g 12.57 -.06 -.21 MarathonO 33.81 +.71 +1.60 MarinerEn 24.42 +.19 +.23 MktVGold u56.60 +.67 +.93 MktVRus 33.25 +.72 +1.21 MktVJrGld 34.19 +.79 +.43 MktV Agri 46.08 +.23 -1.54 MarIntA 36.28 +.45 +.06 MarshM 23.92 -.20 -.42 MarshIls 7.15 +.11 +.06 Masco 11.18 +.17 +.18 MasseyEn 31.71 +.69 +.50 Mastec 10.30 -.02 +.41 MasterCrd 224.78 +.78 +3.21 McClatchy 3.86 -.07 -.01 McCorm u41.66 -.38 -.06 McDrmInt s u14.92 +.14 +.64 McDnlds 74.92 +.41 -.18 McGrwH 32.99 -.07 -.19 McKesson 60.70 -1.08 -1.21 McMoRn 17.35 +.14 +1.00 McAfee 47.24 -.02 -.08 MeadJohn 56.25 -.66 -.87 MeadWvco 24.58 +.20 -.12 Mechel 25.21 +.31 +.84 MedcoHlth 52.29 +.23 +.80 MedProp 10.23 +.09 -.04 Medicis 29.52 -.13 -.48 Medtrnic 33.63 +.05 -.21 Merck 36.60 -.21 -.74 MetLife 38.94 +.49 -.21 MetroPCS u10.93 +.47 +.82 MindrayM 29.19 -.38 +.67 Mirant 9.99 +.03 +.09

NewpkRes 8.51 +.11 -.54 Nexen g 20.27 +.17 +.89 NextEraEn 54.41 +.02 -.09 NiSource 17.58 +.18 +.24 NikeB 80.25 +.11 +.68 NobleCorp 33.50 -.29 -.73 NobleEn 75.76 +.67 +.31 NokiaCp 10.31 +.28 +.25 Nomura d4.94 +.17 -.07 Nordstrm 37.11 -.09 +.60 NorflkSo 59.02 -.49 -.86 NoestUt u29.83 +.26 +.23 NorthropG 60.33 -.30 ... Novartis u57.13 -.54 -.41 NuSkin 28.95 +.15 +1.81 Nucor 38.87 +.67 +1.23 OGE Engy 40.58 +.71 +.14 OasisPet n u19.98 +.61 +2.26 OcciPet 80.77 +2.47 +4.47 Oceaneer 53.54 -.32 -.08 OfficeDpt 4.60 ... ... OfficeMax 13.92 +.83 +.53 OilSvHT 113.82 +.67 +3.00 OldNBcp 10.37 -.13 -.23 OldRepub 13.67 -.18 +.04 Olin 20.30 +.14 +.60 OmegaHlt 22.50 +.05 +.23 Omncre 23.46 -.42 +1.02 Omnicom 39.66 +.18 -.13 ONEOK 45.64 +.60 +.81 OrientEH 11.09 -.06 +.42 OshkoshCp 28.07 +.57 +1.12 OvShip 33.88 -.44 -.18 OwensCorn 25.92 +.29 +.50 OwensIll 28.85 +.79 +1.36

P-Q-R PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMI Grp PNC PNM Res PPG PPL Corp PackAmer Pactiv PallCorp ParkerHan PatriotCoal PeabdyE Pengrth g PennWst g

45.72 +.30 +.36 21.38 +.32 +.20 3.73 +.06 +.17 52.84 +.93 -.24 11.50 +.11 +.12 u73.09 +.29 +.17 27.44 +.21 +.03 23.33 +.16 +.29 u32.95 -.03 +.02 u41.97 +.33 +.21 70.41 +.35 +.53 11.95 +.54 +.82 50.89 +1.88 +1.70 11.16 +.10 +.38 20.33 +.26 +1.29

PrUShS&P 29.33 ProUltDow 47.32 PrUlShDow d24.30 ProUltQQQ 66.15 PrUShQQQ d14.70 ProUltSP 39.69 ProUShL20 31.54 PrUSCh25 rsd31.86 ProUSRE rs 21.21 ProUSOG rs 55.13 ProUSBM rsd28.10 ProUltRE rs 45.00 ProUShtFn 19.57 ProUFin rs 55.30 ProUltO&G 32.25 ProUBasM 36.46 ProUSR2K 17.34 ProUltR2K 32.14 ProUSSP500d26.74 ProUltSP500154.70 ProUltCrude 10.57 ProUShCrude12.78 ProUShEuro 19.39 ProctGam 60.16 ProgrssEn u44.86 ProgsvCp 20.86 ProLogis 11.95 ProvET g 7.19 Prudentl 53.07 PSEG 33.08 PubStrg 97.98 PulteGrp 8.73 QEP Res n 30.35 QuantaSvc 19.01 QntmDSS 2.09 QstDiag 50.13 Questar s u17.66 QksilvRes 12.75 Quiksilvr 3.98 QwestCm u6.34 RAIT Fin 1.69 RPM 20.04 RRI Engy 3.55 Rackspace u25.77 RadianGrp 7.81 RadioShk 21.54 RangeRs 37.83 RaserT h d.23 RJamesFn 25.96 Raytheon 44.61 RealD n 17.79 RltyInco 33.97

-.26 +.08 +.35 -.24 -.20 +.10 -.14 -1.72 +.03 +.37 +.32 -.13 +.29 -.96 -.48 -.49 -.23 +.29 -1.29 -2.84 -.86 -.53 +.51 -.62 -.30 +.14 +.94 -.57 +.75 +1.57 +1.03 +.61 -.15 -.49 +.36 +.84 -.36 +.13 +1.94 -.75 +.48 +1.28 -.60 -1.84 -.43 -.83 +.19 -1.48 +.44 +.30 -.01 -.48 +.17 +.38 +.13 +.30 -1.11 -2.94 ... +.21 +.94 -2.99 -.03 +.31 +.21 +1.01 -.07 +.15 -.03 +.29 -.34 +1.09 +.13 +.42 +.15 +.29 +.07 -.02 +.07 +.09 +.04 +.21 +.12 +.20 ... ... -.21 +1.31 -.01 +.26 +.21 +.19 -.30 +1.77 -.00 -.06 +.63 +1.11 -.72 -.88 -.70 +1.44 +.25 +.31

Name RedHat RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RepubSvc ResMed s ResrceCap RetailHT ReynldAm RioTinto s RiteAid RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH Roper Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RubyTues RdxSPEW Ryland

Last

Chg Wkly

41.27 +.27 +.01 13.22 +.10 -.30 39.60 +.13 +.29 74.00 +.82 -.73 7.18 -.09 +.23 19.12 -.01 -.10 47.98 -.31 +.27 42.19 +.66 +.37 u59.46 -.50 +.22 u12.35 -.15 +.48 30.56 +.07 +.23 32.83 +.02 ... 6.30 -.05 -.04 98.60 -.11 -.11 u58.85 -.54 -.53 59.83 +1.10 +1.14 .94 -.00 -.01 26.07 +.07 +.84 61.87 +.14 +.16 58.51 +.26 +.83 u32.37 +.90 -.09 u66.01 +.83 +.67 31.02 +.66 +1.23 52.69 +.56 +.59 31.96 +.43 -.07 60.17 +1.38 +1.65 61.78 +1.48 +1.48 12.34 +.47 +.65 42.50 +.12 +.14 17.71 -.21 +.20

S-T-U SAIC 16.03 SAP AG 50.28 SCANA 40.55 SK Tlcm 17.74 SLGreen 63.75 SLM Cp 11.47 SM Energy 38.13 SpdrDJIA 108.32 SpdrGold u128.91 SP Mid 145.97 S&P500ETF 114.61 Spdr Div 50.36 SpdrHome 15.80 SpdrKbwBk 23.17 SpdrKbwIns 39.41 SpdrLehHY 39.85 SpdrKbw RB 22.85 SpdrRetl 41.97 SpdrOGEx 42.72 SpdrMetM 54.50 SPX Cp 64.14 STMicro 7.60 Safeway 21.21 StJoe 25.30 StJude 39.48 Saks 8.54 Salesforce 112.00 SallyBty n u11.31 SandRdge 5.89 Sanofi 33.12 SaraLee 13.43 Satyam lf d3.96 Schlmbrg 62.43 Schwab 14.13 ScrippsNet u47.14 SeadrillLtd u29.26 SealAir 22.73 Sealy 2.43 SemiHTr 27.71 SempraEn 54.16 SenHous 23.60 ServiceCp 8.69 ShawGrp 34.37 Sherwin 74.04 SiderNac s 17.76 Siemens u105.95 SilvWhtn g u26.67 SilvrcpM g 8.31 SimonProp 93.59 Skechers 22.56 SmithfF 16.87 SocQ&M u48.08 SolarWinds 17.30 Solera u43.73 Solutia 16.37 SonyCp 30.54 Sothebys 36.60 SouthnCo u37.14 SthnCopper 35.88 SoUnCo 24.46 SwstAirl u12.94 SwstnEngy 33.46 SpectraEn 22.80 SpiritAero 19.98 SprintNex 4.72 SprottGld n 11.64 SP Matls 33.21 SP HlthC 30.49 SP CnSt u27.93 SP Consum 33.45 SP Engy 56.81 SPDR Fncl 14.50 SP Inds 31.31 SP Tech 23.03 SP Util 31.55 StdPac 3.98 StanBlkDk 62.02 StarwdHtl 52.76 StateStr 38.21 Statoil ASA 21.42 Steelcse 8.34 Sterlite 15.38 StillwtrM 16.98 StoneEngy 14.92 StratHotels 4.24 Stryker 50.01 SunLfFn g 25.94 Suncor gs 33.30 Sunoco 36.59 SunstnHtl 9.33 Suntech 9.25 SunTrst 26.10 SupEnrgy 26.65 Supvalu 11.34 SwRCmATR u8.48 Syniverse u22.18 Synovus 2.48 Synovus pf 23.74 Sysco 28.58 TAM SA 23.49 TCF Fncl 16.27 TECO 17.50 TJX 44.54 TRWAuto u40.92 TaiwSemi 10.25 Talbots 12.93 TalismE g 17.49 Target 53.47 TataMotors u25.59 Taubmn 44.41 TeckRes g 42.47 TeekayTnk 12.00 TelNorL 14.29 TelcmNZ 7.60 TelefEsp 75.13 TelMexL 15.18 TempleInld 19.22

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Chg Wkly

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Chg Wkly

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J-K-L JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JackHenry JackInBox

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B USI N ESS

TH E B U LLE TI N • Saturday, October 2, 2010 C5

Crash

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Sandy Henning has accepted the position of district ranger for the east half of the Ochoco National Forest. Henning recently moved to Prineville from Atlanta, where she worked as the regional silviculturist for the southern region of the U.S. Forest Service. She was the primary contact for hardwood silviculture, regional silviculture certification programs, and coordination of regional trust fund programs. Henning holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing and a master’s degree in forestry from Michigan State University. Debbie Pantenburg has been named general sales manager of Horizon Broadcasting Group in Bend. She will be responsible for all sales and marketing functions of the company’s six radio stations and its community Web portal, MyCentralOregon.com. Pantenburg was most recently a partner/ owner of BNBranding. She spent nine years as director of advertising sales and operations at Western Communications Inc., which is the parent company of The Bulletin, eight years in Boise in the same role for The Idaho Statesman, and 17 years with Gannett Inc., where she was responsible for the overall sales and production operations at several regional newspapers, including the classified division of USA TODAY. She is a graduate of the University of Southern Mississippi. Heather Roberts has been

Merger Continued from C3 Then there are the different types of tickets. Bob Harrell, an aviation and travel consultant in New York, said business fares — high-priced, last-minute tickets — will rise now as the overall economy improves. Airlines will have less success raising leisure fares, he said, because consumers worried about jobs and home values will wait for sales. Mergers don’t automatically lead to higher fares. Airlines are collecting less in fares per mile on domestic flights than they were before Delta Air Lines Inc. bought Northwest in 2008, thanks to the recession and competition from low-fare carriers. They have offset weak fares by raising billions from add-on fees for checking baggage and changing flights. The U.S. had at least five major international airlines before Delta bought Northwest. Now it has three dominant international airlines — United Continental, Delta and AMR Corp.’s American — and a big domestic hauler, Southwest Airlines Co. United and Continental together carried 8.7 percent more traffic than Delta through August of this year. The combined

Hobbit Continued from C3 The films are to be made in 3-D. For MGM, a deal that finally lets the “Hobbit” films proceed would lock in badly needed revenue as the company proceeds with a restructuring that is still far from resolved. For Warner, it means new tent-pole fantasy films just as the company is winding down its “Harry Potter” series. Jackson, who is a producer and writer of the two “Hobbit” films, also agreed to become their director. Jackson’s agreement to direct the movies has been in place but hasn’t formally closed because it depends on the studios’ willingness to begin production soon, according to people briefed on his status. The first “Hobbit” film is expected to be released in mid-December 2012, the second a year

Debbie Pantenburg

Heather Roberts

named promotion director at Horizon Broadcasting Group. A native of Portland, Roberts joined the group from KOHD, the ABC television affiliate in Bend, where she worked as news assignment editor, traffic coordinator and most recently as sales, promotion and public affairs coordinator. Roberts began her career at KATU-TV Portland, then joined KFXO, the FOX affiliate in Bend, in 2006 as a news anchor/reporter. She attended Emerson College in Boston. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage has named Steve Mora, of Bend, as a private mortgage banker to provide mortgage loans for home purchases and to refinance loans. He specializes in jumbo, conforming and FHA loans. Mora previously worked in a similar position for Select Lending Services, a Wells Fargo affiliate. Mora earned a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Washington, and started his mortgage career as a broker at

airline would have about 5,800 daily departures, versus Delta’s 5,715. United Continental hopes its larger route map will attract more corporate travelers. “We believe we’ll be able to increase the mix of business travelers because we can go to corporations and offer them a very compelling proposition of flying on a single carrier,” United Continental CEO Jeffery A. Smisek said on a conference call Friday. Business travelers in a hurry favor nonstops over changing planes or taking two separate airlines. Smisek spoke from United’s headquarters in Chicago, where the new company is based. The airline will be closing Continental’s headquarters and operations center in Houston, but Smisek declined to discuss job cuts. The company expects up to $1.2 billion in combined new revenue and cost savings by 2013, much of it in new sales as a larger network attracts new passengers. J.P. Morgan analyst Jamie Baker wrote in a note that he is “doubtful” of the company’s projections. He wrote that Delta management claimed $1.5 billion in similar gains from the Northwest deal, but its margins have only been on par with the rest of the industry.

later. Jackson has said he can direct the films only if those release dates can be met. It remained unclear how Warner and MGM planned to apportion the financing of the project. They have owned it in a 50-50 arrangement, but by longstanding agreement, New Line has been in charge of production decisions, subject to some approvals by MGM. Under several possible financing options that were considered, Warner was expected to put up all or most of the cash either by lending money to MGM or buying out its interest, perhaps leaving it with a royalty or other payments. MGM’s rights have included foreign distribution of the film, and as recently as this week questions remained about how that would ultimately be handled. Media officials for MGM, Warner, New Line and Jackson all declined to comment.

Steve Mora

Julane Dover

First Financial Mortgage in Santa Monica, Calif. Aimee Baillargeon has been appointed executive director of the Sagebursh Classic, a golf and culinary event in Bend. Baillargeon comes from Jackson Hole, Wyo., where she owned the Jackson Hole Event Co. and orchestrated almost 400 events. After selling her former company and moving to Bend in 2007, Baillargeon started the Bend Event Co. and has planned numerous community philanthropic events and nonprofit fundraisers. Julane Dover, of Bend, recently became a Mary Kay independent sales director. Dover attended a business and leadership-development seminar at the Mary Kay Inc. headquarters in Dallas, where she learned about business management, marketing strategies, sales techniques and personal development. Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty, of Redmond, recognized Debbie Hershey as the top listing

Foreclosure Continued from C3 Others include Illinois, Florida, New Jersey and New York. Blumenthal, who is running for senator in Connecticut, said the freeze “should stop a foreclosure steamroller based on defective documents and enable effective remedies.” California’s attorney general, Jerry Brown, said Friday that Chase should stop any foreclosures in the state. Brown, who is a candidate for governor, earlier made the same demand of GMAC. In California, lenders generally pursue foreclosures outside of the court system, so they are presumably still proceeding with evictions. Chase declined to say whether it would comply with Brown’s demand. Chase said this week that it had frozen 56,000 foreclosure cases. GMAC, which is largely owned by the Treasury after receiving $17 billion in federal bailout money to prevent its collapse, has repeatedly declined to say how many cases it is halting. The nation’s two other major lenders, Citi and Wells Fargo, have issued statements maintaining they have no problems with their cases. The problem for all the lenders that have announced moratoriums stems directly from their attempt to deal with an unprecedented number of foreclosures. According to LPS Applied

Debbie Hershey

Cec De Clerck

agent and Cec De Clerck as the top selling agent for September. Scott Linden, host and creator of the TV series “Wingshooting USA,” has been named keynote speaker at the North American Gamebird Association national convention scheduled Jan. 17-19, 2011, in Charleston, S.C. The association includes hunting preserve and lodge operators, and game bird producers. Recently voted “favorite upland TV host” in a national survey, Linden’s topic is “Follow the hunter with the longest nose … to more customers.” The second season of “Wingshooting USA” launched last week on Versus network, AMGTV and TUFF TV, and in January it also will be carried by the Pursuit Channel. Voted favorite upland bird hunting series, the program also captured a Telly Award of excellence in 2009. Linden also hosts and produces daily and weekly radio shows with a combined distribution of more than 560 stations.

Analytics, a company that processes mortgage settlements and defaults, 2.37 million households are seriously delinquent and awaiting formal foreclosure. Another 2 million are already in foreclosure. Sometimes these loans were owned by the lender, but often the banks were merely the loan servicer acting on behalf of the owner. Many of the loans are owned by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the mortgage holding companies now controlled by the Treasury. In other cases the loans have been sold to private investment pools. Confronted with so many cases, the lenders tried to process them on a wholesale basis, with the goal of avoiding the expense of a full trial and instead getting summary judgments. The tool for doing this was the so-called robo-signers, in which midlevel bank executives would sign thousands of affidavits a month attesting that they had personal knowledge that the facts of the case were as presented. The affidavits were prepared by lawyers who were paid a flat fee, which also placed a premium on volume. When defense lawyers started deposing these robo-signers, they acknowledged that they could not possibly have knowledge of all the cases. The banks say this is a technicality and they will refile the proper affidavits. The defense lawyers say the practice calls the entire process into question.

Continued from C3 The finger-pointing and speculation that followed — Were high-speed traders behind it? A rogue computer program? Financial terrorists? — captivated Wall Street. But in the report released Friday, the authorities said they found no evidence of market manipulation. Instead, the temporary crash resulted from a confluence of forces after a single fund company tried to hedge its stock market investment position legitimately, albeit in an aggressive and abrupt manner. The mutual fund started a program about 2:32 p.m. on May 6 to sell $4.1 billion of futures contracts, using a computer sell algorithm that over the next 20 minutes dumped 75,000 contracts onto the market, even automatically accelerating its selling as prices plunged.

Lingering questions The regulators hope the report lifts the uncertainty that has hung over the nation’s exchanges — and investors’ minds — since the crash. Certainly, officials at the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission seemed confident they had established the causes of the crash and answered any final doubts, and the findings were welcomed by some in the markets. But it also left lingering questions among many who felt it did not explain why the crash took place on that particular day in May, or provide any assurance that this could not occur again. The regulators had already identified in a previous report the single large sale of futures contracts as having played an important role in the May 6 plunge. But in the new findings published Friday, the regulators emphasized the central role this large sale played on a

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day when markets were already under pressure because of the debt crisis in Greece. “This report identifies what happened and reaffirms the importance of a number of the actions we have taken since that day,” Mary Schapiro, the SEC chairman, and Gary Gensler, chairman of the CFTC, said in a statement. “We now must consider what other investor-focused measures are needed to ensure that our markets are fair, efficient and resilient, now and for years to come,” they said.

Rapid sale The report set out the sequence of events that began with the sale by Waddell & Reed of 75,000 E-Mini Standard & Poor’s 500 futures contracts, using computer sell algorithms. Usually, a sale of this size would take place over as many as five hours, but the large sale was executed in 20 minutes, the regulators said. The algorithm was programmed to execute the trade “without regard to price or time,” the report said, which meant that it continued to sell even as prices dropped sharply. The algorithm is one used widely across markets. It was provided to the firm by Barclays Capital, but it was up to Waddell & Reed to set the parameters dictating the way it sold the futures contracts. There was no explanation from officials why the firm chose to sell so many contracts all at once, except to speculate that it was already late in the trading day when it made the sale. Neither would officials explicitly say whether the firm was under investigation, but they pointed out that it had made similar trades in the past. In response to Friday’s report, Waddell & Reed put out a statement it had already issued in May. It said it had sold the contracts because it was worried about the European crisis spreading to the United States. The report’s findings will be put to a joint SEC-CFTC advisory committee, which will determine if any new policies are needed.

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InovioPhm Intellichk IntTower g Inuvo InvVKAdv2 IsoRay Iteris KeeganR g Kemet KimberR g KodiakO g LadThalFn Lannett Libbey LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LongweiPI LucasEngy MAG Slv g MGT Cap MadCatz g MagHRes Metalico Metalline MetroHlth MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt MtnPDia g NIVS IntT NeoStem

1.27 1.20 6.37 .29 12.77 1.16 1.47 7.62 3.38 .96 3.60 1.07 4.61 13.71 10.26 1.61 2.29 1.97 7.75 .29 .47 4.05 3.98 .68 3.77 .62 1.33 9.79 2.14 u4.67 2.10 2.09

+.02 +.11 +.13 +.09 +.07 +.13 -.01 ... -.07 +.09 -.09 +.03 ... +.09 +.02 -.63 +.04 +.06 +.03 +.09 +.21 +.30 +.05 -.04 +.03 +.26 +.54 +1.01 -.03 -.05 -.02 -.01 ... +.31 +.31 +.36 +.07 +.08 -.01 -.01 +.03 +.02 -.09 -.22 +.15 +.44 +.02 -.01 -.03 +.03 +.03 +.01 +.02 +.07 -.02 -.84 -.06 -.13 +.17 +.24 -.04 -.03 +.06 +.27

NeuB HYld u14.12 +.12 +.33 NBRESec 3.70 +.04 ... Neuralstem 2.44 -.08 +.10 Nevsun g 4.93 +.03 +.17 NDragon d.05 +.00 -.00 NewEnSys 5.99 +.01 +.82 NwGold g 6.74 +.03 +.43 NA Pall g 4.46 +.32 +.50 NDynMn g 8.63 +.12 -.03 NthnO&G 17.97 +1.03 +1.41 NthgtM g 3.05 +.02 -.34 NovaGld g u8.89 +.15 +.20 NCADv3 13.44 +.01 +.04 NvDCmdty ud25.10 ... ... NuvDiv3 14.80 +.01 +.11 NvInsDv 15.14 +.03 +.14 NMuHiOp 13.12 +.02 +.01 NuvREst u10.05 -.06 ... NvTxAdFlt 2.57 -.02 +.02 Oilsands g .52 -.00 -.00 OpkoHlth 2.29 +.05 +.01 OrienPap n 4.31 -.03 -.16 OrionEngy 3.16 -.01 +.11 OrsusXel .18 -.01 +.00 OverhillF 4.70 +.11 -.04 Palatin rs d1.77 +.15 -.03 ParaG&S 1.68 +.15 +.14 ParkNatl 64.31 +.27 +1.30 PhrmAth 1.53 +.01 +.03 PionDvrsHi u20.95 +.01 -.07 PionDrill 6.27 -.11 +.04 PlatGpMet 2.20 -.14 +.03

Biggest mutual funds PolyMet g ProceraNt ProlorBio Protalix PudaCoal Quaterra g RadientPh RaeSyst RareEle g ReavesUtl RegeneRx RELM Rentech RexahnPh Richmnt g Rubicon g SamsO&G ScolrPh SeabGld g Senesco SinoHub Solitario SondeR grs SparkNet SprottRL g SulphCo Talbots wt TanzRy g Taseko Tengsco ThaiCap TianyinPh

2.03 .53 6.16 8.93 7.81 1.60 .69 1.57 u8.75 21.57 .30 d2.14 .98 1.17 5.25 4.08 1.33 .56 28.92 .29 1.99 2.31 3.00 3.20 1.80 .37 2.74 7.28 5.55 .44 15.24 3.00

+.01 +.10 ... +.02 +.15 -.26 +.24 +.45 +.16 +1.05 -.01 -.02 +.01 -.12 ... +.01 +.11 +.91 +.29 -.14 -.01 -.03 +.05 +.35 -.01 +.04 +.01 -.01 +.17 +.15 -.04 -.09 -.02 -.09 -.01 -.09 +.24 -.53 -.01 -.03 +.01 +.24 -.01 +.09 -.03 +.03 -.02 -.04 +.04 +.03 +.01 -.00 -.06 +.19 +.07 +.21 +.35 +.38 +.01 +.01 +.17 +.64 -.03 +.30

TimberlnR 1.29 TrnsatlPt n 3.10 TravelCtrs 3.36 TriValley .73 TrioTch u5.20 Tucows g .67 TwoHrbInv 8.93 TwoHrb wt d.17 UQM Tech 2.65 US Geoth .83 US Gold 4.98 Uluru .11 Univ Insur 4.49 Ur-Energy u1.07 Uranerz 1.65 UraniumEn 3.33 VangTotW 45.16 VantageDrl 1.54 Versar 2.82 VirnetX u15.05 VistaGold 2.68 Vringo n 3.10 WalterInv 17.60 WFAdvInco u10.28 WFAdMSec u16.15 WstnAsInt 9.78 WidePoint 1.15 WT DrfChn 25.48 WT Drf Bz u28.99 WizzardSft .23 YM Bio g 1.84 ZBB Engy .46

+.12 +.26 +.14 +.08 -.10 +.13 +.06 -.07 +.48 +1.70 +.00 -.01 -.09 -.05 +.02 -.02 +.09 ... +.02 +.03 +.01 -.01 +.00 -.00 ... +.05 +.08 +.14 +.04 +.26 +.05 +.31 +.37 +.32 -.06 +.09 -.20 +.30 +.37 +1.85 +.11 +.33 -.20 +.13 +.11 +.10 +.02 +.22 +.10 +.18 +.08 -.01 +.03 -.01 +.08 +.12 +.08 +.47 -.01 +.04 +.14 +.18 +.00 -.00

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: GwthFdA p American Funds A: CapInBldA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapWGrA p American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx nx Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Stock x Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk American Funds A: EupacA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n American Funds A: WshMutA p Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p American Funds A: NewPerA p American Funds A: BalA p PIMCO Funds A: TotRtA Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n

IB XC LG BL LG GL BL SP SP LC LV IL IL IB LV BL GL BL IB XC

144,752 61,740 57,889 54,531 50,996 49,365 47,650 45,058 44,398 42,853 36,729 35,626 35,326 35,095 34,596 32,274 28,903 28,598 28,457 28,315

+1.3 +5.7 +5.9 +4.2 +6.7 +6.5 +4.0 +5.3 +5.3 +5.9 +5.8 +7.3 +7.5 +1.3 +4.8 NA +6.8 +3.7 +1.2 +5.7

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

+10.7/B +14.6/B +11.1/D +10.7/C +17.9/A +9.8/D +14.6/A +13.6/A +13.5/A +11.2/C +10.3/C +11.4/B +10.5/C +10.4/B +15.2/A NA +12.6/B +13.0/A +10.2/C +14.7/B

+49.6/A +6.3/C +8.4/B +21.4/A +20.6/A +26.2/A +18.9/B +3.8/A +3.3/A +6.8/B -6.7/D +24.5/B +33.8/A +47.8/A +4.2/B NA +29.2/A +16.2/C +46.3/A +6.8/C

1,000,000 3,000 250 250 2,500 250 250 5,000,000 3,000 250 2,500 2,500 250 1,000,000 250 1,000 250 250 1,000 100,000

Percent Load

NAV

NL 11.61 NL 28.54 5.75 27.97 5.75 49.04 NL 62.31 5.75 34.33 5.75 16.07 NL 104.84 NL 105.52 5.75 26.14 NL 97.58 NL 33.71 5.75 39.96 NL 11.61 5.75 25.40 4.25 2.11 5.75 26.68 5.75 16.96 3.75 11.61 NL 28.54

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Timing is wrong for Measure 73

W

hat do drunken driving and serious sex crimes have in common? Nothing — aside, that is, from their coexistence in ballot Measure 73, which would

create mandatory minimum sentences for both under certain circumstances. Voters should give this one a big thumbs-down. While you could argue that sex offenders and drunken drivers should serve more time in jail, the offenses ought to be considered independently. Moreover, the proper place of this debate is the Legislature, where participants are forced to weigh the benefits of harsher sentences against the cost of imposing them. Given the condition of — and outlook for — Oregon’s budget, this is one debate that can wait. The measure’s drunken driving language would make a third DUII conviction within 10 years a felony carrying a mandatory minimum sentence of 90 days in jail. Under current law, a third DUII conviction is a misdemeanor carrying no mandatory minimum sentence. The sexual offense language, meanwhile, applies to particularly serious crimes, including first-degree rape and using a child in a sexually explicit display. Such offenses already carry mandatory minimum sentences ranging from almost six

years to 25. Measure 73 would establish a 25-year mandatory minimum sentence for second-time offenders, though it could affect some first-time offenders, too. These would be people convicted of multiple crimes in a single case. We have no sympathy for the people this measure is intended to punish, and you could make a case that longer sentences are a good idea. But it’s a case that ought to be made to legislators, who’ll have to consider the cost, which could be as much as $14 million in the second year and as much as $29 million by the fifth year. That’s not a huge amount of money, but it’s money Oregon simply doesn’t have. Just this week, in fact, the state announced plans to close a minimumsecurity prison in Salem and lay off dozens of people. Finally, sentences for drunken drivers and sex offenders should be considered independently. The fact that Measure 73 arbitrarily lumps them together is, all by itself, a good reason to oppose it.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s note: The following editorials, which do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today, appeared on Oct. 30, 1983.

Golden Throat Wars, even small ones, seem to incite national leaders to new heights of hyperbole, and the U.S. invasion of Grenada last week is no exception. This week’s Sheela Silverman Golden Throat Award goes to two people, U.S. President Ronald Reagan and Cuban President Fidel Castro. Reagan wins for his description of the leaders of the Grenadian coup as “a brutal group of leftist thugs (who) seized power, killing the prime minister, three cabinet members, two labor leaders ...” and, we presume, a partridge in a pear tree. Castro may have been less poetic, but his statement on the end of Cuba’s role in the war certainly was no less masterful: “At the end (six Cubans), embracing our flag, continued fighting ... did not surrender and sacrificed themselves for the fatherland.” Take that, you imperialist Yankee running dogs.

Can’t blame him Sometimes the decisions in life are simply the choice of the lesser of two evils. Such is the case of Manuel Quintana, a convicted murderer in Richmond, Va. Quintana’s apparently dying of heart disease, and the state

is trying to convince him to undergo triple bypass surgery to save his life. Quintana says no, and you really can’t blame him. What would be the point? Once he’d recovered from the painful operation, the state plans to electrocute him anyway. This way, he’ll likely die relatively comfortably in a hospital.

Sign of the times Ah, Central Oregon! We who live here are blessed with wide open spaces, crystal clear water and pristine air ... well, we do have the spaces and the water. The air, however, is sometimes less than pristine. For proof, drive to the top of Pilot Butte early some morning. Bend is shrouded in smoke, the byproduct of hundreds of woodstoves. In Los Angeles, they’d call it air pollution, even if it does smell good.

My Nickel’s Worth GOP hypocrites The hypocrisy of Republicans like Greg Walden is boundless. On Sept. 19, after castigating Democrats for two years about the federal deficit, Walden urged extension of the Bush tax cuts to the rich. Extending these tax cuts would, of course, contribute to the deficit. Walden claimed ending these tax cuts would hurt “small business.” Yet the day before his speech, The Bulletin reported that 97 percent of business owners don’t earn enough to be affected if the Bush tax cuts go away! Moreover, four out of five businesses are sole proprietorships, so ending the Bush tax giveaway would have little effect on job creation. Finally, research shows that tax rate increases can stimulate the wealthy to start new businesses or expand existing ones if combined with targeted business tax incentives like those recently proposed by President Obama. Walden and his cronies should not expect to fool the people yet again. After years of “borrow and spend” during the Bush years to pay for wasteful government spending like the Iraq war, their claims of fiscal responsibility are selfserving and hypocritical. Please don’t let these foxes back in the hen house again. John Cushing Bend

Vote for Stiegler When we elected Judy Stiegler as our House representative in 2008, we expected her to keep her promises. Because Judy grew up poor and credits her public school education with the career she has today, we expected

Stiegler to be a champion for K-12 and higher education. She kept that promise by steadfastly supporting stable funding for our public schools, and by fighting to keep OSU-Cascades Campus open. She knows that education is the route to a brighter future and a vibrant economy. As a breast cancer survivor, we expected Judy to know how critically important quality health care is to our community. As our representative, she voted to include 80,000 children in the Oregon Health Plan, bringing nearly $1 billion of our federal tax dollars back to Oregon and creating 3,600 jobs. She promised to support critical services for veterans, seniors and our most vulnerable citizens. She has done that through her strong support for Oregon Project Independence and several programs that give veterans the assistance they deserve. Judy has also worked hard to keep our communities safe by supporting funding for public safety. Stiegler doesn’t make empty promises. When she makes a commitment, she works hard to keep it. When she says she’s working to bring jobs to Bend, she means it. We need to keep her working for us in Salem. Linnea Saverude Bend

Re-elect Wyden Just what we need in Oregon: a tea party takeover of a U.S. Senate seat by the people whose idea of policy is shouting at the players from somewhere out of bounds. What we do need are senators like Ron Wyden, who sets the standard nationwide as one who runs on his prin-

ciples, but once elected will work with his natural enemies to find centrist solutions to our most difficult problems. That’s what he did on health care. The easy way would have been to stick with his party and throw single-payer red meat to the party activists. Instead, he trolled the waters for the best ideas about creating a private, market-based, competitive system of health insurance and coverage that businesses and Republicans loved because it took health care out of the responsibility of employers, and put it in the hands of individuals. And covered everyone. And he fought like a cat for his bipartisan plan until the fat lady sang. Now he’s doing it again on tax policy, proposing a vast simplification of the tax code by closing the loopholes, which allows you to reduce tax rates yet raise the same amount of revenue. We should be jumping up and down to pass the Wyden-Gregg tax plan. Do we want a sideline screamer or a principled dealmaker? Jared Christensen Bend

Dump Wyden After reading several letters to the editor in The Bulletin over the past few weeks, it sounds like the popular consensus is to dump Sen. Ron Wyden. Sounds like he does some rather shady dealing just to assure his re-election to the Senate. It sounds like maybe we should give Jim Huffman a chance. Too many years as a senator make them think that they own that position. Look at the late Sens. Ted Kennedy and Robert Byrd, as prime examples. Randy Avery

It’s pretty now The old McKay site, newest addition to Bend’s Drake Park, finally has its lawn. And a beautiful addition it is. With the house gone and a temporary fence removed, it’s impossible to tell where the old park ended and the new piece begins. But we wonder about the lawyers who’ve taken over the old Baer house across the street for offices. It must be difficult to keep your mind on your work with a view like that right out the window.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Planned Parenthood’s harmful push for ‘comprehensive’ sex ed By Marie Annette Bulletin guest columnist

A

recent Planned Parenthood letter accused a Bulletin editorial piece about school-based health centers of being “full of harmful insinuations about Planned Parenthood,” then encouraged referrals for adolescents to Planned Parenthood “to keep them safe.” Since no examples of any such “harmful insinuations” were given, I’d like to clear up any fog about their school of thought on keeping adolescents “safe.” First of all, Planned Parenthood’s promotion of promiscuity, pornography and medical misinformation should be obvious on its website for teens. And its online guide “Healthy, Happy and Hot,” clarifies that “sexual health” means having plenty of sex to stay healthy, implies that unmarried people who routinely practice unprotected sex with multiple partners are morally equivalent to married people who are monogamous, and conjures up a “right” for HIV carriers to conceal the disease from partners. In addition, the recent Planned Par-

enthood document on “sexual rights” demands unrestricted sexual rights for children, and another more recent document, “Stand & Deliver,” demands “comprehensive” sex education for children as young as 10 and accuses the Catholic Church of depriving children of their sexual “experiences and needs” by focusing on abstinence before marriage. Just so you know, there were 270,000 victims of sexual abuse in public schools between 1991 and 1998. How many credible cases of clerical sexual abuse in 2009? Six (John Jay College report). History has already shown the consequences of “comprehensive” sex education. Johnny can’t read but he sure knows how to use that bubblegumflavored condom he was given during a class on “responsibility.” Suzie still can’t do math but she has no trouble figuring out how to get an abortion without her parents knowing about it. When we see news reports of school shootings, or of children and parents killing each other, we hear people crying out “violence is not the answer,” but when children in today’s classrooms

IN MY VIEW are being taught that killing their own offspring is an acceptable way to solve their problems, how can we tell other people not to kill each other? Through ingenious marketing, Planned Parenthood has lured potential clients with that very appealing word which the vulnerable may find difficult to resist: “choice.” However, the Elliot Institute’s updated study on forced abortion in America shows that 64 percent of women having abortions in the U.S. reported feeling pressured by others. A 1952 Planned Parenthood pamphlet says of abortion: “It kills the life of a baby after it has begun. It is dangerous to your life and health. It may make you sterile so that when you want a child you cannot have it.” Fast-forward to 2010, and you’ll find that Planned Parenthood’s “baby-killing” business has grown to 35.4 percent of its total clinic income (American Life League calculations based on Planned Parenthood reports). It’s not

difficult to see that their bottom line is most likely the primary object of concern over “harmful” insinuations. ALL found that the number of abortions performed by Planned Parenthood (which performs more than any other providers) increases each year despite increased taxpayer funding of contraception. Economist and author Dr. Jacqueline Kasun said that “states which spend large amounts on birth control have higher costs of public assistance, and states that require parental consent for a minor to have an abortion have lower rates of adolescent pregnancy.” According to Dennis Howard, president of Movement for a Better America, the economic impact from abortions has risen to $38.5 trillion in lost United States gross domestic product since 1970. The Bulletin once reported that 40 percent of babies born in the U.S. (in 2007) had unwed mothers. The Bulletin also once reported that 75 percent of young Americans would not qualify for military service, and it seems many of the reasons for rejections could be traced to single-parent or fatherless

homes. With at least 35 radical-Muslim compounds in the U.S. that are training people how to kill us (according to Richard Thomas, president of the Thomas More Law Center), and 75 percent of U.S. mosques preaching anti-Western extremism (according to Frank Gaffney, former Pentagon official who founded the Center for Security Policy), we should be using our tax dollars to strengthen the American family, not weaken it by funding an organization that profits from destroying it. That means not voting for a “Johnny” who can’t read the bill, or a “Suzie” who can’t do the math. It means voting for those who not only can, but who also will act with the common sense and determination to work toward putting an immediate halt to all taxpayer funding to Planned Parenthood. Our children would be safer, our economy stronger, and our country more secure, and that would be the hope and change we could believe in. Marie Annette lives in Prineville.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 C7

O    D N Aidan Jane Rauscher, of Eugene, OR Aug. 18, 2001 – Sept. 20, 2010 Arrangements: Musgrove Family Mortuary, Eugene, OR. Services: Were held on Saturday, September 25, 2010, in Eugene, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Oak Hill School, 86397 Eldon Schafer Dr., Eugene, OR 97405-8648.

Stephen Cannell, 69, prolific TV writer By Bill Carter New York Times News Service

Stephen J. Cannell, one of television’s most prolific writers and series creators, whose work encompassed the “The Rockford Files” and “Wiseguy” to “The ATeam” and “The Greatest American Hero,” died Thursday at his home in Pasadena, Calif. He was 69. The cause was complications from melanoma, his family said. For 30 years, beginning in the early 1970s and extending through the 1990s, television viewers could hardly go a week without running into a show written by Cannell. His writing

credits include more than 1,000 episodes of various series, primarily crime dramas, and he is listed as the creator of almost 20 series — some long-running hits like “The Rockford Files,” and “The Commish,” others quick flame-outs like “Booker.” At one point in 1989, Cannell’s company was producing five series on three networks. One of them, “21 Jump Street,” introduced a future Oscar nominee to public acclaim: Johnny Depp. But that was not unusual. Cannell’s shows often opened doors for emerging actors. Jeff Goldblum gained his first wide notice in a short-lived but well-remem-

bered Cannell series, “Tenspeed and Brown Shoe.” And “Wiseguy” gave another future Oscar winner, Kevin Spacey, a chance to stand out in a memorable extended turn as a villain.

Saw writing as a craft Cannell, who regarded his writing less as an art than a craft to which he was both committed and devoted, never writing less than two hours a day, shifted late in his career to crime novels and again proved he had a popular touch. Several of his 16 books, many featuring the detective Shane Scully, were best sellers.

“Most of my things strike to the same theme,” Cannell said in an interview this year in Success magazine, “which is not to take yourself so seriously that you can’t grow.” Born Feb. 5, 1941, in Los Angeles, to an affluent family (his father owned an interior design business), Cannell suffered from extreme dyslexia, which went undiagnosed and all but ruined his school years. Despite inheriting his family’s intense work ethic, he failed three grades and was unable to retain a football scholarship to the University of Oregon because of his academic record.

Eryn Flannery Rauscher, of Eugene, OR Feb. 11, 2003 – Sept. 20, 2010 Arrangements: Musgrove Family Mortuary, Eugene, OR. Services: Were held on Saturday, September 25, 2010, in Eugene, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Oak Hill School, 86397 Eldon Schafer Dr., Eugene, OR 97405-8648.

Daniel Douglas Mills, of Prineville May 21, 1936 - Sept. 28, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: No services will be held at this time.

Lois Lindstedt, of Bend Sept. 18, 1915 - Sept. 29, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471, www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: In Glendale, California at a later date.

Nancy A. Robison, of Prineville Sept. 3, 1943 - Sept. 29, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: Services will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

American Kidney Foundation at 6110 Executive Blvd., Rockville, MD 20852.

Tony Kephart, of Crescent May 21, 1969 - Sept. 28, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Memorial: Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 11:30 AM at the First Baptist Church of Cottage Grove, Oregon.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Georgy Arbatov, Soviet foreign policy guru, dies at 87 By David Nowak

an advisory body to Soviet authorities that he founded and that had huge sway over policy toward the American continent at a time of heightened tensions between the Cold War adversaries.

The Associated Press

MOSCOW — Georgy Arbatov, a foreign policy adviser to Soviet presidents who served as the country’s top America-watcher during the Cold War, died Friday. He was 87. Russian state TV, which reported Arbatov’s death, did not give the cause of death, or say where he was when he passed away.

Speech writer

Soviet reformist Arbatov, who advised leaders from Leonid Brezhnev to Mikhail Gorbachev and was especially close to Yuri Andropov, was credited in the West and later in Russia for understanding the Soviet system was fundamentally untenable. “He belonged to a group of reformers who believed that the Soviet system could be and had to be reformed,” said Yevgeny Primakov, who served as prime minister under Boris Yeltsin, in comments to state news channel Rossiya-24.

Wolves Continued from C1 But some changes were made based on what wildlife officials have learned over the past of couple years, as gray wolves have migrated to Oregon.

Permit process eased For example, in the original plan, before a rancher could get a permit to harass wolves, the wild animals had to be causing problems with livestock over a 48-hour period. But those conditions were never met, said Russ Morgan, wolf coordinator with the Department of Fish and Wildlife. So the revisions changed it to state that any wolf-livestock conflict could lead to a harassment permit. “We believe that by relaxing that, and saying that if you have a conflict, why not harass the wolves and get them out of there?”

Sheriff Continued from C1 Instead, Hensley became a parole and probations officer. Clark questioned Hensley’s ability to manage the Sheriff Office’s budget and said he doesn’t believe Hensley could lead the office. “I don’t believe he has the skills to be a successful sheriff, personally, based on his performance the last couple of years as undersheriff,” Clark said. Hensley said Clark isn’t an accessible and transparent sheriff. He accused him of sneaking out the back door when people he doesn’t want to speak to are in the office. He said current employees have told him morale in the office is low, and the reason is Clark. And he accused Clark of using the county’s vehicle to run personal errands. “The bottom line is … I believe I can do a better job than what Rodd Clark (is doing),” Hensley said. Hensley said he has examined the budget and would immediately make changes to save taxpayers money. He pointed to using patrol vehicles longer, not taking employees out to lunch and cutting

The Associated Press file photo

Georgy Arbatov, director of the Russian Institute, which studies American policy, left, looks on as Sen. Edward M. Kennedy talks at the Soviet Union’s U.S.A. Institute in April 1974. Arbatov, a foreign policy adviser to Soviet presidents and his country’s top America-watcher during the Cold War, died Friday.

“His name is associated with the entire epoch of the Soviet Union. … He was among the closest and best trusted consul-

tants of Brezhnev and Andropov,” Primakov said. From 1967 to 1995 Arbatov ran the U.S.A. and Canada Institute,

Morgan said. Other changes include defining the area where multiple livestock kills have to occur before a permit to kill a wolf is issued — the agency changed language to define that area as the range that a problem wolf is known to use. And while the 2005 plan said that wolves that needed to be relocated should be moved to a wilderness area, the new rules change that to state that the wolves should be moved to any suitable habitat. But the commission did not go far enough for some people who attended Friday’s meeting. Tik Moore, a Baker County rancher, said he was a “crash test dummy” for the wolf plan, after wolves killed several of his calves in 2009. “We got to test the wolf management plan — it’s got some good things, it’s got some bad things, we all know that,” Moore said. And although most ranchers will accept wolves living in

Oregon’s wilderness areas, he said, they have to be able to kill wolves in the act of attacking their livestock. “As a rancher, I’ve got to have the tools in my toolbox to protect what’s mine,” Moore said. After the meeting, he said he was very disappointed that the commission didn’t alter the wolf plan to give livestock producers that ability. Others from the conservation and ranching communities testified as well.

Ruling from Ethics Commission due The Oregon Government Ethics Commission will decide whether the temporary hire of the Crook County sheriff’s daughter for a position in his office was appropriate. Crook County Sheriff Rodd Clark said his daughter, Rebekah Burkhardt, 33, was unemployed and decided to volunteer with the Sheriff’s Office to gain job skills. After two people left the office, back on any expense that wasn’t necessary to run the office. “I’ve seen expenditures I would never have made,” he said. “How many times have the Sheriff’s Office decals changed? I can tell you, every time he decides he wants to change those, he’ll take and remark and re-outfit every car. … All I’m saying is, it’s well known that Rodd … will spend money in areas that aren’t necessary.” But Clark, who first took office in 1987, said he’s been his own budget officer throughout the years. He said he’s shepherded the department through difficult economic times without making

‘In the area’ too vague Dan Kruse, with Cascadia Wildlands, a nonprofit conservation organization, said that the definition of “in the area” when it comes to chronic livestock kills was too vague and ambiguous. Tim Lillebo with Oregon Wild and others also expressed support for the change in the plan that puts the state Fish and Wildlife in charge of confirming wolf-

Burkhardt was brought on as a full-time, temporary employee and is being paid $15 an hour. Clark said he declared a conflict of interest and had nothing to do with her hire. He pointed out that it takes a long time to fill a position in the Sheriff’s Office with the necessary interviewing, background checks and tests. The permanent job has been posted, and he said his management team has started working through applications to fill the position. sacrifices to public safety. His financial savvy, he said, is one of his strongest traits. If elected, in the next term as sheriff, he would like to put together a longterm plan for a new jail. “We’re currently operating from the old city jail in Prineville … and renting beds from Jefferson County jail,” he said. “It’s a short-term solution and adequate for tough economic times. But in the long term, Jefferson County beds will fill up and Crook County will have to build its own facility.” After so many years in the office, Clark said he’s not sure if he would retire after the next four

Arbatov, who studied international law but started out as a journalist after fighting in World War II, penned speeches for leaders including Brezhnev. Arbatov was awarded the highest Soviet scientific distinction in 1974, named Academician of the Academy of Sciences of the U.S.S.R. Konstantin Kosachyov, head of the foreign affairs committee of the lower house of parliament, said Arbatov’s legacy remains. “He was a scholar, a politician, a diplomat, and everything that made our politics in recent decades politics of civic-mindedness, politics of effectiveness, and politics of creativity.” Arbatov remained honorary director of the think tank he created.

kills, instead of the federal Wildlife Services agency. Commissioner Carter Kerns, representing Eastern Oregon, was the only commissioner who voted against approving the wolf plan revisions; he stated earlier in the meeting that the commission should delay a vote for a few months so the new governor and his staff could weigh in on the issue. Oregon’s sage grouse plan was also debated at the meeting, as Department of Fish and Wildlife staff presented a new proposal to protect the bird, which federal wildlife managers have said warrants protection under the Endangered Species Act, although it doesn’t have the resources to do so at this time. A significant threat to sage grouse in Oregon is the loss of sagebrush habitat and development that breaks up large chunks of habitat, said Christian Hagen, sage grouse coordinator with the state agency.

years if he’s elected. But he said it’s time to start training people in his office to manage the budget and start sharing more of the responsibilities. “There are some good people in the office, yet because I’ve done these things well, they haven’t had to do them,” he said. “There is a responsibility, from my perspective, to train these people.” If Hensley is elected, he said, he has ideas on how to help work together with other department heads to help create new programs for the county. One idea he would like to see realized is a work crew that would help people on parole pay off their debts to the courts and make restitution to victims. The first thing he would do, if elected, would be to freeze any spending not specifically designated for personnel and everyday expenses. “I’m saying personally, I have all the skills to run that office,” Hensley said. “I believe I have better people skills than Rodd does or Russ Wright (the current commander), and I believe I can make that Sheriff Office run very efficiently.” The Oregon Government Ethics Commission is looking at whether the temporary hire of

Joe Mantell, 94, actor who got Oscar nod for ‘Marty’ Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — Actor Joe Mantell, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in the 1955 film “Marty” and delivered one of film’s most famous lines in “Chinatown,” has died. He was 94. Mantell died of pneumonia Wednesday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center in Tarzana, said his daughter Cathy. Mantell received an Academy Award nomination for best supporting actor in 1956 for his performance as Angie, the best friend of Ernest Borgnine in “Marty.” His oft-repeated question to his sad-sack friend — “Well, what do you feel like doin’ tonight?” — was one of the film’s most memorable lines. He also played Angie in the 1953 television production of “Marty.” In 1974’s “Chinatown,” in which he played the partner of Jack Nicholson’s detective character, Jack Gittes, Mantell spoke the film’s famous last line: “Forget it, Jake. It’s Chinatown.” Mantell was born Dec. 21, 1915, in New York and made his film debut in “Undercover Man” in 1949. He was a familiar character actor on television, with roles in such series as “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Barney Miller,” “Mannix,” “The Twilight Zone” and “The Untouchables,” and the early 1960s sitcom “Pete and Gladys.”

He presented a plan to the commissioners that involves recommending that no development, including renewable energy projects, occur in the best sage grouse habitat across Eastern Oregon from development. Representatives of a ranching group, the Audubon Society and others emphasized the need to keep up the sage grouse numbers and keep the bird from being listed under the Endangered Species Act. About 20 people testified about the sage grouse plan, offering suggestions for how it should be improved. The commission asked Hagen and his colleagues to gather more information from people who volunteered their help and develop a revised grouse management plan. The commission will decide whether to adopt the new plan at its December meeting. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

the Clark’s daughter for a position in his office was appropriate. Clark said he declared a conflict of interest and had nothing to do with her hire. He said it takes time to fill a position in the Sheriff’s Office with the necessary interviewing, background checks and tests. The permanent job has been posted. Clark said he followed the appropriate channels and made the Crook County Court and the county counsel aware of the hire. Hensley said he believes the hire violates state and county codes. While he was undersheriff, Hensley’s son worked at the Sheriff’s Office, but he maintained that was different, because there was someone above him who could make the final call on his son’s employment. In 2007, a former Crook County sheriff’s deputy claimed during a staff meeting that Clark threatened to fire any employee who ran against him in an upcoming election. Later that year, Clark was found not guilty on charges of official misconduct and undue influence. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.


WE

C8 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, OCTOBER 2

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

80/48

76/50

83/49

66/48

70s

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

86/51

79/41

Mitchell

Madras

83/44

71/32

81/46

80/41

La Pine

80/40

79/39

81/42

Hampton Fort Rock

67/51

60s Seattle 70s

Chemult 79/38

Missoula

78/41

Helena

74/50

Bend 83/44

84/50

89/51

80s

83/45

Partly cloudy and warm today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

Crater Lake 70s 70/44

Idaho Falls Elko

96/60

90s

82/47

Boise

Redding 82/43

80s

79/49

Eugene

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

City

64/52

Grants Pass 60s

84/45

70s

88/45

Reno

88/53

San Francisco

90s

65/55

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:04 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:44 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:05 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:42 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:42 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:47 p.m.

Salt Lake City 86/58

80s

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

New

First

Full

Last

Oct. 7

Oct. 14

Oct. 22

Oct. 30

Astoria . . . . . . . . 62/55/0.00 . . . . . . 65/53/s. . . . . . 63/52/sh Baker City . . . . . . 90/35/0.00 . . . . . 87/47/pc. . . . . . 75/40/sh Brookings . . . . . . 63/58/0.00 . . . . . . 66/51/s. . . . . . 63/52/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 91/37/0.00 . . . . . 88/50/pc. . . . . . 77/41/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 69/56/0.00 . . . . . 74/50/pc. . . . . . 65/46/sh Klamath Falls . . . 88/42/0.00 . . . . . 83/44/pc. . . . . . 73/36/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 90/36/0.00 . . . . . 87/46/pc. . . . . . 76/38/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 86/35/0.00 . . . . . . 81/40/s. . . . . . 73/34/pc Medford . . . . . . . 92/52/0.00 . . . . . 86/52/pc. . . . . . 74/49/pc Newport . . . . . . .61/54/trace . . . . . . 61/52/s. . . . . . 60/51/sh North Bend . . . . . 61/55/0.00 . . . . . 65/53/pc. . . . . . 64/52/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 87/45/0.00 . . . . . . 87/51/s. . . . . . 80/49/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 83/52/0.00 . . . . . . 80/50/s. . . . . . 76/49/pc Portland . . . . . . . 67/57/0.00 . . . . . . 75/56/s. . . . . . . 67/54/c Prineville . . . . . . . 84/44/0.00 . . . . . . 79/45/s. . . . . . 75/42/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 88/40/0.00 . . . . . 83/42/pc. . . . . . 73/39/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 67/57/0.00 . . . . . 77/50/pc. . . . . . 72/51/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 69/55/0.00 . . . . . . 75/50/s. . . . . . 67/51/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 87/39/0.00 . . . . . . 81/43/s. . . . . . 76/38/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 85/51/0.00 . . . . . . 81/49/s. . . . . . 72/50/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86/44 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 in 1991 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 in 1950 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.01” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.95” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.88” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.05 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.59 in 2005 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

71 35

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and seasonable temperatures. HIGH

65 32

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:09 a.m. . . . . . .6:29 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:18 a.m. . . . . . .7:18 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .9:58 a.m. . . . . . .7:55 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:13 p.m. . . . . . .6:00 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:51 a.m. . . . . . .6:46 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:12 p.m. . . . . . .6:09 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 78/45

82/42

74/34

60s

Vancouver

75/56

Burns

80s

81/40

BEND ALMANAC

WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy and cool.

61 32

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 93° Rome • 35° Baker City

TUESDAY

Mostly cloudy, showers, significantly cooler, LOW breezy.

HIGH

75 37

Portland

Partly cloudy and warm today. Partly cloudy skies tonight. Eastern

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cooler, LOW breezy.

NORTHWEST

75/41

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

MONDAY

Dry weather will continue over the region with a mix of sun and clouds expected.

Paulina

79/42

Crescent

Crescent Lake

LOW

44

Morning clouds, then clearing today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

85/50

Camp Sherman 78/41 Redmond Prineville 83/44 Cascadia 79/45 82/45 Sisters 81/43 60s Bend Post 80/43

Tonight: Partly cloudy and cool.

80s

Willowdale

84/49

Oakridge Elk Lake

Today: Mainly sunny and unseasonably warm.

83

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,483 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,534 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 58,143 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 24,514 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96,346 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 874 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49.2 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,311 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.5 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 67/51

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 78/45

S

Saskatoon 70/40

Seattle 64/52

S Winnipeg 59/37

S

S

Thunder Bay 49/32

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 53/37

Halifax 63/44 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 65/40 82/49 55/40 75/56 contiguous states): Green Bay Boston 53/34 Boise St. P aul 66/47 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 89/51 55/36 54/44 New York 63/43 • 106° 54/40 68/51 Des Moines Mesa, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 60/37 Chicago 66/43 San Francisco 60/42 68/50 56/46 • 25° Omaha 65/55 Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 61/37 Stanley, Idaho City 69/52 Louisville Las Denver 86/58 69/45 Kansas City Vegas • 3.72” 74/49 66/40 St. Louis 97/73 Nashville Charlotte Andover, N.J. 65/40 77/46 76/48 Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 73/60 79/50 81/48 Phoenix Albuquerque Atlanta 105/78 Honolulu 80/60 Birmingham 78/53 85/74 Tijuana 79/51 77/62 Dallas 83/58 New Orleans Orlando Houston 82/61 86/67 Chihuahua 85/59 85/52 Miami 87/73 Monterrey La Paz 89/63 97/72 Mazatlan Anchorage 92/81 46/36 Juneau 50/39 Bismarck 61/37

FRONTS

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .83/61/0.00 . 81/55/pc . . 79/52/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .55/44/sh . . 51/38/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .63/57/3.04 . . .63/39/s . . . 57/40/s Albuquerque. . . .86/63/0.00 . 80/60/pc . . 79/58/pc Anchorage . . . . .51/44/0.01 . . .46/36/r . . . .46/36/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . . .78/53/s . . . 72/49/s Atlantic City . . . .76/61/1.02 . . .70/55/s . . 67/50/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . 84/48/pc Baltimore . . . . . .73/61/0.02 . . .68/51/s . . 64/48/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 85/48/s Birmingham . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .79/51/s . . . 70/43/s Bismarck . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . . .61/37/s . . . 71/47/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . .89/51/s . . 82/46/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .84/60/0.30 . . .66/47/s . . . 60/46/s Bridgeport, CT. . .76/61/0.85 . . .68/49/s . . . 63/46/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .62/51/0.00 . .54/44/sh . . . 50/40/c Burlington, VT. . .60/57/1.49 . 56/40/pc . . . 52/39/s Caribou, ME . . . .74/57/0.92 . . .58/38/s . . . 53/32/s Charleston, SC . .78/65/0.00 . 78/57/pc . . . 77/58/s Charlotte. . . . . . .78/56/0.03 . . .76/48/s . . 70/47/pc Chattanooga. . . .79/57/0.00 . . .78/47/s . . 69/45/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .71/43/0.00 . . .66/43/s . . . 76/46/s Chicago. . . . . . . .73/48/0.00 . . .56/46/c . . 56/41/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . .64/42/sh . . 60/41/sh Cleveland . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . .56/48/sh . . 56/48/sh Colorado Springs 85/43/0.00 . 68/41/pc . . 78/46/pc Columbia, MO . .74/47/0.00 . 64/38/pc . . . 61/39/s Columbia, SC . . .81/68/0.00 . . .78/50/s . . . 75/49/s Columbus, GA. . .85/62/0.00 . . .80/54/s . . . 77/51/s Columbus, OH. . .68/52/0.00 . .60/42/sh . . 59/41/sh Concord, NH . . . .76/57/1.35 . . .66/34/s . . . 60/35/s Corpus Christi. . .90/64/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . . 83/63/s Dallas Ft Worth. .83/61/0.00 . . .83/58/s . . . 77/50/s Dayton . . . . . . . .69/45/0.00 . .59/40/sh . . . 57/40/c Denver. . . . . . . . .81/53/0.00 . 74/49/pc . . 81/52/pc Des Moines. . . . .79/49/0.00 . . .60/37/s . . . 60/39/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .54/40/sh . . 54/40/sh Duluth . . . . . . . . .58/39/0.13 . 49/32/pc . . . 58/38/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . .89/60/s . . 86/60/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .59/35/0.00 . . .54/28/c . . . 50/28/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .62/44/0.00 . . .57/34/s . . . 62/47/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .80/45/0.00 . 77/42/pc . . 72/40/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .69/44/0.00 . .54/37/sh . . 54/33/pc Green Bay. . . . . .67/41/0.11 . . .53/34/c . . 54/34/pc Greensboro. . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . 66/48/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .70/59/0.15 . 66/47/pc . . 60/44/pc Hartford, CT . . . .78/60/1.47 . . .68/43/s . . . 63/42/s Helena. . . . . . . . .76/48/0.00 . . .82/47/s . . 84/50/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .85/74/s . . 87/74/pc Houston . . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . .85/59/s . . . 82/51/s Huntsville . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .77/45/s . . 68/40/pc Indianapolis . . . .73/46/0.00 . .60/41/sh . . . 60/40/c Jackson, MS . . . .84/62/0.00 . . .81/49/s . . . 76/45/s Madison, WI . . . .72/41/0.00 . 54/33/pc . . 56/33/pc Jacksonville. . . . .85/64/0.00 . . .82/59/t . . . 82/55/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .57/39/0.01 . . .50/39/r . . . .49/39/r Kansas City. . . . .76/50/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . . 62/39/s Lansing . . . . . . . .67/40/0.00 . .53/33/sh . . 54/33/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .94/75/0.00 . 97/73/pc . . . .90/71/t Lexington . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . .66/41/sh . . 59/40/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .81/42/0.00 . . .61/37/s . . . 63/41/s Little Rock. . . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .81/48/s . . . 69/42/s Los Angeles. . . . .76/66/0.00 . 73/60/pc . . 69/58/pc Louisville . . . . . . .76/54/0.00 . .69/45/sh . . . 61/44/c Memphis. . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . . .80/48/s . . . 69/43/s Miami . . . . . . . . .87/73/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . 87/73/pc Milwaukee . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .54/43/c . . 52/38/pc Minneapolis . . . .70/49/0.00 . 55/36/pc . . . 57/39/s Nashville . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 77/46/pc . . 66/41/pc New Orleans. . . .86/71/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 79/59/s New York . . . . . .74/60/2.46 . . .68/51/s . . . 65/48/s Newark, NJ . . . . .75/62/2.36 . . .69/49/s . . 66/48/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .72/64/0.09 . . .72/53/s . . 71/53/sh Oklahoma City . .79/54/0.00 . . .79/50/s . . . 73/47/s Omaha . . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . . .61/37/s . . . 63/41/s Orlando. . . . . . . .86/65/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . . 85/67/s Palm Springs. . .102/78/0.08 100/74/pc . . 96/68/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .73/44/0.00 . 60/36/pc . . . 59/37/s Philadelphia . . . .76/61/3.00 . . .68/50/s . . 66/51/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .106/81/0.00 . .105/78/s . 102/76/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . .58/43/sh . . 53/39/sh Portland, ME. . . .71/59/0.41 . . .65/40/s . . . 58/36/s Providence . . . . .79/61/0.32 . . .69/46/s . . . 62/44/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .78/61/0.01 . . .73/50/s . . 69/50/pc

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .74/45/0.00 . . .63/43/s . . . 79/49/s Savannah . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . . 79/55/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .93/56/0.00 . 88/53/pc . . 79/44/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .64/51/0.00 . . .64/52/s . . . 60/53/c Richmond . . . . . .75/60/0.01 . . .73/49/s . . 68/49/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .76/40/0.00 . . .58/36/s . . . 62/44/s Rochester, NY . . .61/55/0.00 . .55/42/sh . . 50/39/pc Spokane . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .78/51/s . . 68/48/pc Sacramento. . . . .86/57/0.00 . 91/55/pc . . 80/56/pc Springfield, MO. .73/44/0.00 . 70/39/pc . . . 59/37/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . 65/40/pc . . . 62/40/s Tampa . . . . . . . . 90/72/trace . 88/70/pc . . . 88/67/s Salt Lake City . . .89/54/0.00 . . .86/58/s . . . .84/58/t Tucson. . . . . . . .102/71/0.00 . . .98/71/s . . 96/70/pc San Antonio . . . .88/62/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . 83/52/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .77/45/s . . . 69/41/s San Diego . . . . . .78/69/0.01 . 74/66/pc . . 72/64/pc Washington, DC .75/61/0.03 . . .69/52/s . . 65/50/pc San Francisco . . .62/57/0.00 . 65/55/pc . . 63/54/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . . .71/46/s . . . 69/46/s San Jose . . . . . . .73/60/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . 75/56/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .85/46/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . 73/46/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .89/49/0.00 . 72/48/pc . . 72/49/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 100/75/pc . . 98/73/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .63/45/0.00 . .62/51/sh . . 67/53/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . .74/63/sh . . 75/61/pc Auckland. . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .63/46/s . . . 62/46/s Baghdad . . . . . .102/78/0.00 101/79/pc . . 99/80/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . . .88/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . 71/51/pc . . 67/45/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .91/80/s . . . 89/79/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . 57/44/pc . . . 64/53/c Bogota . . . . . . . .70/45/0.04 . . .65/51/t . . . .63/51/t Budapest. . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . . .58/43/c . . 62/44/pc Buenos Aires. . . .57/43/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 69/49/s Cabo San Lucas .91/75/0.00 . . .94/75/s . . . 91/72/s Cairo . . . . . . . . .102/79/0.00 . .101/75/s . . . 99/73/s Calgary . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . 62/43/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . 86/70/pc . . . 86/69/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.03 . .58/49/sh . . 60/51/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . .58/49/c . . 60/50/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .65/54/sh . . 70/51/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . 89/60/pc Hong Kong . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .88/79/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .69/55/c . . 66/51/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .96/70/0.00 . . .97/70/s . . . 96/69/s Johannesburg . . .81/61/0.00 . 87/57/pc . . 85/57/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . .64/57/sh . . 63/56/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .76/62/s . . . .70/59/r London . . . . . . . .61/54/0.30 . 63/52/pc . . 64/56/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .83/51/s . . . 82/49/s Manila. . . . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .89/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .109/82/0.00 . .107/84/s . . 106/84/s Mexico City. . . . .75/41/0.00 . . .74/47/s . . . 73/47/s Montreal. . . . . . .61/59/2.73 . . .54/41/c . . 53/36/pc Moscow . . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . . 43/28/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . .77/59/sh . . . .78/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .88/79/t New Delhi. . . . . .93/77/0.01 . . .91/70/s . . . 92/71/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.01 . .82/68/sh . . . .80/69/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . .51/41/sh . . . .56/51/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .61/54/0.77 . . .53/40/c . . 53/35/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .65/56/sh . . 69/54/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .84/73/0.00 . . .86/75/t . . 76/67/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . 75/54/pc Santiago . . . . . . .68/36/0.00 . . .69/43/s . . . 67/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . .71/62/t . . 69/59/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . . .66/52/s . . 66/55/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .70/59/sh . . 69/52/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .80/71/t . . . 80/67/s Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.98 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/34/0.00 . 55/41/pc . . . 57/41/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .67/57/sh . . 67/56/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . 93/78/pc . . . .90/77/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .97/73/0.00 . . .92/76/s . . . 92/75/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .80/68/sh . . . .81/70/t Toronto . . . . . . . .59/52/0.00 . .55/40/sh . . . 53/39/s Vancouver. . . . . .70/52/0.00 . 67/51/pc . . . 64/52/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .61/46/c . . 66/48/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .46/43/0.00 . 53/37/pc . . . 56/38/s


S

Auto Racing Inside Dario Franchitti will try to defend his IndyCar title today, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2010

L O C A L LY Dirty 2nd Half race slated for Sunday near Bend Hundreds of runners are expected to be kicking up dust in the Dirty 2nd Half, a half-marathon trail run set for Sunday near Bend. The 13.1-mile course starts and finishes at Seventh Mountain Resort, southwest of Bend off Century Drive. Start time Sunday is 9 a.m. Online registration for the race is closed, and no day-ofrace registration is planned. But runners can sign up today from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St. Entry fee today is $30. Last October, in the inaugural Dirty 2nd Half, more than 300 runners finished the race. Bend’s Max King and Kami Semick were the men’s and women’s winners, respectively. For more information, call FootZone of Bend at 541-3173568. —Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Lessons learned are key for Oregon State, Arizona State By Anne M. Peterson Arizona State coach Dennis Erickson

The Associated Press

Today’s game between Oregon State and Arizona State could come down to which team has the better students: Both the Beavers and the Sun Devils dropped games to Top 10 opponents last week, leaving each with a list of lessons to be learned. Oregon State lost 37-24 at No. 3 Boise State in the last game of a brutal nonconference schedule for the Beavers. See Beavs / D6

Next up • Arizona State at Oregon State • When: Today. 3:30 p.m. • TV: FSNW • Radio: KICE-AM 940; KRCOAM 690 • More information on the game, Page D6

Oregon will try to stop Stanford’s early-season success By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Stanford coach Jim Harbaugh

EUGENE — Leave it to a Stanford coach to quote Ralph Waldo Emerson when asked about his team’s dominance. Coach Jim Harbaugh isn’t quite ready to get caught up in recent successes as the No. 9 Cardinal (4-0, 1-0 Pac-10) get ready for a visit to Autzen Stadium today to face fourth-ranked Oregon (4-0, 1-0). See Ducks / D6

Angels ...........5 Rangers .........4

Padres ...........6 Giants ............4

Royals ............7 Rays ...............0

Phillies......... 11 Braves............5

Blue Jays .......6 Twins .............3

Brewers..........4 Reds...............3

Indians ...........7 White Sox ......3

D’backs ..........7 Dodgers .........5

Orioles ..... 10-2 Tigers .........6-1

Mets...............2 Nationals .......1

A’s ..................9 Mariners ........0

Pirates ...........5 Marlins ..........1

Yankees ........... Red Sox ....ppd.

Cubs ..............2 Astros ............0

Bulletin staff report

Cardinals .......3 Rockies ..........0

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend’s J.C. Grim (18) breaks a tackle by Redmond’s Andrew Larkin (84) to earn a first down during the first quarter on Friday night at Punk Hunnell Stadium. The Lava Bears had 31 first downs in the game.

San Diego Padre Adrian Gonzalez hits a three-run homer against San Francisco on Friday night.

Padres knock off Giants to stay in NL West race San Diego roughs up San Francisco starter Matt Cain to keep its postseason hopes alive see Page D4

CORRECTION An item headlined “On The Air,” which appeared on Page D2, on Friday, Oct. 1, included the incorrect time for the Alabama-Florida college football game that will air today on CBS. The game is at 5 p.m. Pacific time. The Bulletin regrets the error.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Sports in Brief ...........................D3 Golf ............................................D3 Auto racing ................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5

• No. 9 Stanford at No. 4 Oregon • W h en: Today, 5 p.m. • TV: ABC • Radio: KBND-AM 1110 • More information on the game, Page D6

Cougs thump Eagle Indians to remain unbeaten

MLB NL

Next up

PREP FOOTBALL

INSIDE

AL

D

Lava Bears hold off Panthers, 34-32 By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

The spark is back between Bend and Redmond. Competing in the Intermountain Conference together again for the first time since

2005 — Redmond played in the Class 6A Salem-based Central Valley Conference the last four years — the Lava Bears and the Panthers combined for more than 800 yards of total offense Friday night as Bend High edged visiting Redmond 34-32 at Punk Hun-

nell Stadium. Bend quarterback J.C. Grim passed for 178 yards and three touchdowns, while Gavin Gerdes led the Lava Bear ground attack with 187 yards and a touchdown on 36 carries. See Bears / D5

Central Oregon football scores Friday night’s games involving local football teams; for summaries, scores and a prep roundup, see Page D5: Bend ............................................... 34 Redmond ........................................ 32

Hood River Valley ........................... 36 Summit ............................................14

La Salle ........................................... 56 Madras ............................................. 6

Cottage Grove................................. 52 La Pine.............................................12

Mountain View ............................... 27 The Dalles-Wahtonka ....................... 6

Cascade Christian .......................... 21 Crook County ..................................13

Junction City ...................................17 Sisters .............................................. 6

Camas Valley .................................. 62 Gilchrist .......................................... 20

THE DALLES — Stout defense and a balanced offensive attack combined Friday night to keep Mountain View undefeated, as the Cougars rolled to a 27-6 Class 5A nonconference football victory over The Dalles-Wahtonka. On a windy evening at The Dalles-Wahtonka High School in the Columbia River Gorge, Mountain View’s Austin Sears rushed for 196 yards on 20 carries — including 178 yards in the first half. Sears capped the Cougars’ first possession of the game with a 12-yard touchdown run, Skyler Laughlin kicked the extra point, and Mountain View led the rest of the way. Going to the air primarily when the wind was at his back, Cougar quarterback Jacob Hollister was an efficient 10 of 17 passing for 133 yards and three touchdowns. Two of those touchdown strikes went to his brother, Cody Hollister, including a 13-yard connection that put Mountain View on top 13-0 five minutes into the second quarter. The Dalles-Wahtonka scored its only touchdown on an 11-yard pass from Ben Kuechmann to Seth Hartley with 1:06 remaining in the second period, pulling the Eagle Indians within 13-6 at halftime. Mountain View was quick to regain the momentum early in the second half. An interception by Christian Baker led to the first of two third-quarter touchdowns for the Cougars, a John Carroll seven-yard reception from Jacob Hollister. The Hollister brothers hooked up again for the final touchdown of the game on a 30yard pass play. Cody Hollister finished with six receptions for 75 yards and two touchdowns. Carroll made three catches for 63 yards and a score. Sears was one of seven ballcarriers in the game for Mountain View (5-0), which plays an Intermountain Conference game next Friday night at home against Class 6A Redmond.

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Will M’s King Felix get crowned? Breaking down the awards races By Mike Fitzpatrick The Associated Press

NEW YORK — What a perfect way to end the year of the pitcher. This hot debate over who deserves the American League Cy Young Award seems a fitting finish to a scintillating season that’s featured five no-hitters and several

other dazzling performances on the mound. Felix Hernandez ranks at the top of the league in just about every major pitching category except one: wins. The last-place Seattle Mariners have backed him so badly that his 2.27 ERA and 232 strikeouts, both best in the majors entering Friday, earned him only a 13-12 record. See Awards / D6

Reed Saxon / The Associated Press

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Felix Hernandez will finish the season 13-12, but he may win the American League Cy Young Award.


D2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF Midnight— Ryder Cup, day two, ESPN. 5 a.m. — Ryder Cup, day two, NBC. 11 a.m. — Champions Tour, Ensure Classic, second round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — Ryder Cup, day two (continuing coverage), NBC. 1 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Soboba Golf Classic, third round, Golf Channel. 5 p.m. — PGA Tour, Viking Classic, third round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 6:55 a.m. — English Premier League, Sunderland vs. Manchester United, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Northwestern at Minnesota, ESPN. 9 a.m. — College, Miami at Clemson, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — College, Louisiana-Monroe at Auburn, ESPNU. 9 a.m. — College, Kansas at Baylor, FSNW. Noon — College, Navy at Air Force, VS. network. 12:30 p.m. — College, Tennessee at LSU, CBS. 12:30 p.m. — College, Texas at Oklahoma, ABC. 12:30 p.m. — College, Wisconsin at Michigan State, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, Michigan at Indiana, ESPNU. 12:30 p.m. — College, Washington State at UCLA, FSNW. 3:30 p.m. — College, Arizona State at Oregon State, FSNW. 4 p.m. — College, Georgia Tech at Wake Forest, ESPNU. 5 p.m. — College, Stanford at Oregon, ABC. 5 p.m. — College, Penn State at Iowa, ESPN. 5 p.m. — College, Washington at USC, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — College, Florida at Alabama, CBS. 7:30 p.m. — College, South Carolina State at Florida A&M, ESPNU (same-day tape). 10:30 p.m. — College, Georgia at Colorado, FSNW.

AUTO RACING 12:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Kansas Lottery 300, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — IndyCar, Miami Indy 300, VS. network.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, teams TBA, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay at Kansas City Royals, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

RODEO 6 p.m. — PBR, Mohegan Sun Invitational, VS. network (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 4 a.m. — Ryder Cup, singles matches, NBC. 11 a.m. — Champions Tour, Ensure Classic, final round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Soboba Golf Classic, final round, Golf Channel. 5 p.m. — PGA Tour, Viking Classic, final round, Golf Channel.

EQUESTRIAN 10 a.m. — World Equestrian Games, NBC. 1 p.m. — World Equestrian Games, NBC.

AUTO RACING 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Price Chopper 400, ESPN.

FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at St. Louis Rams, Fox. 1 p.m. — NFL, Indianapolis Colts at Jacksonville Jaguars, CBS. 1 p.m. — NFL, Washington Redskins at Philadelphia Eagles, Fox. 5 p.m. — NFL, Chicago Bears at New York Giants, NBC.

SOCCER 10:30 a.m. — MLS, Toronto FC at Seattle Sounders, FSNW. 1 p.m. — MLS, Los Angeles Galaxy at Chivas USA, ESPN2.

RODEO Noon — PBR, Mohegan Sun Invitational, CBS (taped).

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, Oakland Athletics at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Miami at Clemson, KICE-AM 940. 3:30 p.m. — College, Arizona State at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. 5 p.m. — College, Stanford at Oregon, KBND-AM 1110.

SUNDAY FOOTBALL 10 a.m. — NFL, Seattle Seahawks at St. Louis Rams, KBNW-FM 96.5.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

ON DECK

Utah St. 31, BYU 16

IN THE BLEACHERS

Today Cross country: Mountain View at Sunfair Invitational in Yakima, Wash., 8:45 a.m.; Summit, Sisters at Harrier Classic in Albany, 9:30 a.m.; Sisters at Woahlink Lake XC Invitational in Florence, TBA; Madras, La Pine, Culver at Madras Invitational, 10 a.m. Volleyball: Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at South Albany tournament, 8 a.m.; Madras, La Pine at Philomath tournament, TBA; Culver at Mountain View JV tournament, TBA; Gilchrist at North Lake, 4:30 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Butte Falls, 2:30 p.m. Boys soccer: Central Christian at Culver, 1 p.m

GOLF PGA Tour VIKING CLASSIC Friday At Annandale Golf Club Course Madison, Miss. Purse: $3.6 million Yardage: 7,199; Par: 72 (a-amateur) Second Round Brendon de Jonge 66-66—132 Bill Haas 66-66—132 Michael Allen 69-66—135 Nathan Green 67-68—135 Bill Lunde 66-70—136 Joe Durant 70-67—137 Charles Warren 70-68—138 Brian Davis 71-67—138 Chris Stroud 73-65—138 Martin Flores 71-67—138 John Senden 70-68—138 Arjun Atwal 66-72—138 Tom Gillis 68-71—139 Jason Bohn 69-70—139 Roland Thatcher 74-65—139 J.P. Hayes 71-68—139 Lee Janzen 72-67—139 Steve Elkington 70-69—139 Rocco Mediate 72-67—139 Michael Connell 70-69—139 Chris Wilson 71-68—139 Cliff Kresge 70-70—140 Cameron Tringale 72-68—140 Jeff Quinney 67-73—140 Graham DeLaet 71-69—140 Jerry Kelly 70-70—140 Ken Duke 66-74—140 D.J. Trahan 69-72—141 Mathias Gronberg 71-70—141 Briny Baird 73-68—141 Craig Barlow 68-73—141 George McNeill 71-70—141 Jonathan Byrd 69-72—141 David Toms 71-70—141 Matt Bettencourt 69-72—141 Johnson Wagner 71-70—141 Garrett Willis 68-73—141 Charlie Wi 67-74—141 Henrik Bjornstad 72-69—141 Dean Wilson 67-75—142 Charles Howell III 70-72—142 Mathew Goggin 68-74—142 Chris DiMarco 70-72—142 Sean O’Hair 68-74—142 Scott McCarron 71-71—142 Brian Stuard 77-65—142 Brent Delahoussaye 71-71—142 Jeff Gove 72-70—142 Heath Slocum 70-72—142 Brett Wetterich 70-72—142 Carlos Franco 72-70—142 Scott Piercy 71-71—142 Kevin Stadler 73-70—143 Brian Gay 72-71—143 Troy Matteson 73-70—143 Boo Weekley 73-70—143 Eric Axley 73-70—143 Skip Kendall 71-72—143 Jeev Milkha Singh 70-73—143 Kevin Johnson 70-73—143 Brett Quigley 66-77—143 Tim Herron 73-70—143 Kirk Triplett 72-71—143 Mark Brooks 73-70—143 Paul Stankowski 71-72—143 Steve Wheatcroft 72-71—143 David Lutterus 73-70—143 Vance Veazey 69-74—143 Chad Campbell 76-68—144 Shaun Micheel 73-71—144 Jim Gallagher, Jr. 72-72—144 Carl Pettersson 75-69—144 Tom Pernice, Jr. 69-75—144 Andrew McLardy 69-75—144 Chris Tidland 73-71—144 Mark Wilson 73-71—144 Cameron Beckman 71-73—144 Will MacKenzie 71-73—144 Cameron Percy 70-74—144 Failed to qualify Chris Riley 71-74—145 Spencer Levin 74-71—145 Webb Simpson 70-75—145 John Mallinger 73-72—145 Nicholas Thompson 71-74—145 David Duval 68-77—145 Brenden Pappas 71-74—145 Woody Austin 70-75—145 Joe Ogilvie 68-77—145 Rocky Cleland 71-74—145 Omar Uresti 73-73—146 Glen Day 75-71—146 Bob Estes 74-72—146 Ryuji Imada 74-72—146 Trevor Immelman 76-70—146 Willie Wood 76-70—146 Rod Pampling 72-74—146 Daniel Mitchell 71-75—146 Len Mattiace 72-74—146 Michael Letzig 73-73—146 Michael Bradley 74-72—146 Daniel Chopra 74-72—146 John Merrick 75-72—147 Aron Price 71-76—147 Roger Tambellini 72-75—147 James Nitties 73-75—148 Jay Williamson 77-71—148 Jeff Maggert 76-72—148 Steve Lowery 73-75—148 Aaron Baddeley 74-74—148 a-Jonathan Randolph 76-72—148 Troy Merritt 70-79—149 Kris Blanks 75-74—149 Ted Purdy 74-75—149 Jarrod Lyle 75-74—149 Craig Bowden 78-71—149 John Daly 72-77—149 Robert Garrigus 75-75—150 Richard S. Johnson 74-76—150 Billy Mayfair 73-77—150 Brad Faxon 79-71—150 Rich Barcelo 72-78—150 Justin Bolli 76-74—150 Todd Hamilton 73-78—151 Kevin Sutherland 71-80—151 Henrik Stenson 77-75—152 Tim Petrovic 76-76—152 James Driscoll 75-77—152 Greg Kraft 79-74—153 Jordan Payne 76-78—154 Phil Schmitt 82-73—155 Parker McLachlin 76-83—159

Champions Tour ENSURE CLASSIC Friday At Rock Barn Golf and Spa, Jones Course Conover, N.C. Purse: $1,750,000 Yardage: 7,090; Par 72 (36-36) First Round Peter Senior 32-33—65 Tom Kite 32-34—66 Fred Couples 34-32—66 Bernhard Langer 32-34—66 Fulton Allem 33-34—67 Dan Forsman 34-33—67 Nick Price 35-32—67 Hal Sutton 34-33—67 Gary Hallberg 31-36—67 Don Pooley 35-33—68 Jay Haas 34-34—68 Tommy Armour III 35-33—68 Bob Tway 35-33—68 Chien Soon Lu 34-35—69 Bob Gilder 36-33—69 Chip Beck 34-35—69 Morris Hatalsky 35-34—69 Mark James 35-34—69 Denis Watson 35-34—69 Larry Mize 35-34—69 Fred Funk 35-34—69 Olin Browne 34-35—69 Jay Don Blake 33-37—70 David Eger 37-33—70 Larry Nelson 32-38—70 Mark Wiebe 33-37—70 Andy Bean 35-35—70 Hale Irwin 35-35—70 Tom Byrum 35-35—70

Tim Simpson Trevor Dodds Jay Sigel Keith Clearwater Jim Roy Kirk Hanefeld Dave Rummells Mark Carnevale John Harris David Frost D.A. Weibring Mike Reid Mike Goodes Bruce Vaughan Tom Jenkins Dana Quigley Bobby Clampett David Peoples Tom McKnight Blaine McCallister Wayne Levi Bobby Wadkins Phil Blackmar Tom Purtzer Ted Schulz J.L. Lewis Sandy Lyle Brad Bryant John Ross Keith Fergus Eduardo Romero James Mason Scott Simpson Joey Sindelar Joe Ozaki Robin Freeman Jim Rutledge Walter Hall Mike Donald Bruce Fleisher Bruce Lietzke R.W. Eaks Lee Chill Ronnie Black Jim Dent Russ Cochran Fred Holton Tom Wargo Gene Jones

36-34—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 33-38—71 34-37—71 35-36—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 36-35—71 36-35—71 34-37—71 34-37—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 33-38—71 34-38—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 38-34—72 35-37—72 36-36—72 36-36—72 39-34—73 37-36—73 35-38—73 36-37—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 37-37—74 37-37—74 36-38—74 36-38—74 37-38—75 38-37—75 39-36—75 36-39—75 38-37—75 36-39—75 38-37—75 38-38—76 37-39—76 38-38—76 39-37—76 42-37—79 39-40—79

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Preseason Schedule All Times PDT ——— Sunday’s Games New York at Armani Jeans Milano (Italy), 9:30 a.m. Maccabi Haifa (Israel) at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Monday’s Games L.A. Lakers vs. Minnesota at London, noon Tuesday’s Games Charlotte at Cleveland, 4 p.m. New Jersey vs. Philadelphia at Roanoke, Va., 4 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Washington at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Orlando vs. Houston at Hidalgo, Texas, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Portland, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

AUTO RACING NASCAR SPRINT CUP ——— PRICE CHOPPER 400 LINEUP After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Kansas Speedway Kansas City, Kan. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 174.644. 2. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 174.469. 3. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 174.43. 4. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 174.312. 5. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.255. 6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 174.149. 7. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 173.952. 8. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 173.902. 9. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 173.874. 10. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 173.768. 11. (21) Bill Elliott, Ford, 173.751. 12. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 173.7. 13. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 173.622. 14. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 173.416. 15. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 173.377. 16. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 173.349. 17. (09) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 173.321. 18. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 173.227. 19. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 173.177. 20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 173.077. 21. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 173.038. 22. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 173.033. 23. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 173.021. 24. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 172.961. 25. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 172.933. 26. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 172.883. 27. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 172.789. 28. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 172.706. 29. (46) Michael McDowell, Chevrolet, 172.612. 30. (43) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 172.557. 31. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 172.529. 32. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 172.408. 33. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 172.046. 34. (83) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, 172.024. 35. (64) Landon Cassill, Toyota, 171.985. 36. (26) Patrick Carpentier, Ford, 171.734. 37. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 171.723. 38. (37) David Gilliland, Ford, 171.51. 39. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 171.396. 40. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 170.719. 41. (7) Kevin Conway, Toyota, Owner Points. 42. (71) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 43. (38) Dave Blaney, Ford, 171.265. Failed to Qualify 44. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 171.255. 45. (55) Mike Bliss, Toyota, 170.557. 46. (66) Jason Leffler, Toyota, 169.465.

IndyCar INDY 300 LINEUP After Friday qualifying; race today At Homestead-Miami Speedway Homestead, Fla. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (10) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 213.187. 2. (9) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 212.908. 3. (12) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 212.58. 4. (6) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 212.158. 5. (4) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda, 211.933. 6. (22) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 211.63. 7. (20) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Honda, 211.444. 8. (11) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 211.392. 9. (5) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 211.355.

10. (3) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 211.24. 11. (7) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 211.013. 12. (8) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Honda, 210.928. 13. (32) Mario Moraes, Dallara-Honda, 210.741. 14. (34) Bertrand Baguette, Dallara-Honda, 210.738. 15. (24) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Honda, 210.715. 16. (26) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 210.698. 17. (67) Sarah Fisher, Dallara-Honda, 210.671. 18. (02) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 210.629. 19. (77) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 210.52. 20. (37) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 210.03. 21. (14) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 210.017. 22. (19) Alex Lloyd, Dallara-Honda, 209.443. 23. (2) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 209.311. 24. (36) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Honda, 209.308. 25. (78) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 208.986. 26. (06) Hideki Mutoh, Dallara-Honda, 208.579. 27. (18) Milka Duno, Dallara-Honda, 207.961.

TENNIS WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— PAN PACIFIC OPEN Friday Tokyo Singles Semifinals Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, 6-2, 6-7 (3), 6-4. Elena Dementieva (7), Russia, def. Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, 6-4, 7-5.

ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— THAILAND OPEN Friday Bangkok, Thailand Singles Quarterfinals Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Jurgen Melzer (3), Austria, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Benjamin Becker, Germany, def. Daniel Brands, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-3. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Ernests Gulbis (4), Latvia, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3. MALAYSIAN OPEN Friday Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Singles Quarterfinals Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Milos Raonic, Canada, 6-1, 3-6, 6-3. Mikhail Youzhny (4), Russia, def. Marcos Baghdatis (6), Cyprus, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-1. David Ferrer (5), Spain, def. Tomas Berdych (3), Czech Republic, 4-6, 7-5, 6-4. Andrey Golubev (8), Kazakhstan, def. Robin Soderling (1), Sweden, 6-3, 6-2.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 68 Miami 2 1 0 .667 52 New England 2 1 0 .667 90 Buffalo 0 3 0 .000 47 South W L T Pct PF Houston 2 1 0 .667 77 Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 89 Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 78 Jacksonville 1 2 0 .333 40 North W L T Pct PF Pittsburgh 3 0 0 1.000 72 Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 59 Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 44 Cleveland 0 3 0 .000 45 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 68 San Diego 1 2 0 .333 72 Denver 1 2 0 .333 61 Oakland 1 2 0 .333 52 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 2 1 0 .667 83 Washington 1 2 0 .333 56 Dallas 1 2 0 .333 54 N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 55 South W L T Pct PF Atlanta 2 1 0 .667 77 New Orleans 2 1 0 .667 63 Tampa Bay 2 1 0 .667 50 Carolina 0 3 0 .000 32 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 66 Green Bay 2 1 0 .667 78 Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 43 Detroit 0 3 0 .000 56 West W L T Pct PF Seattle 2 1 0 .667 72 Arizona 2 1 0 .667 48 St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 57 San Francisco 0 3 0 .000 38 Sunday’s Games Denver at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Detroit at Green Bay, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Seattle at St. Louis, 10 a.m. San Francisco at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Carolina at New Orleans, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Houston at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 1:05 p.m. Arizona at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Washington at Philadelphia, 1:15 p.m. Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 5:20 p.m. Open: Kansas City, Dallas, Minnesota, Tampa Bay Monday, Oct. 4 New England at Miami, 5:30 p.m.

College Schedule All Times PDT (Subject to change) ——— Friday’s Game FAR WEST

PA 47 51 82 87 PA 78 61 42 83 PA 33 55 41 57 PA 38 61 65 76 PA 62 67 53 85 PA 46 58 59 71 PA 51 47 38 78 PA 57 77 49 87

Today’s Games EAST Temple (3-1) at Army (3-1), 9 a.m. Vanderbilt (1-2) at Connecticut (2-2), 9 a.m. Harvard (1-1) at Lafayette (0-3), 9 a.m. Albany, N.Y. (1-2) at Yale (2-0), 9 a.m. Princeton (1-1) at Columbia (1-1), 9:30 a.m. Georgetown, D.C. (3-1) at Colgate (1-2), 10 a.m. Monmouth, N.J. (0-3) at Duquesne (3-1), 10 a.m. Fordham (2-2) at Holy Cross (1-3), 10 a.m. Brown (2-0) at Rhode Island (1-2), 10 a.m. Cent. Connecticut St. (2-2) at Sacred Heart (1-3), 10 a.m. Robert Morris (3-1) at St. Francis, Pa. (1-2), 10 a.m. Bryant (3-1) at Wagner (1-2), 10 a.m. Tulane (1-2) at Rutgers (2-1), 11 a.m. Cornell (0-2) at Bucknell (0-3), 12:30 p.m. Dartmouth (2-0) at Penn (1-1), 12:30 p.m. Fla. International (0-3) at Pittsburgh (1-2), 12:30 p.m. New Hampshire (2-2) at Maine (1-3), 3 p.m. Massachusetts (3-1) at Towson (1-3), 4 p.m. Notre Dame (1-3) at Boston College (2-1), 5 p.m. SOUTH Miami (2-1) at Clemson (2-1), 9 a.m. Florida St. (3-1) at Virginia (2-1), 9 a.m. Louisiana-Monroe (1-1) at Auburn (4-0), 9 a.m. San Diego (1-3) at Jacksonville (3-1), 9 a.m. Alcorn St. (1-0) at Mississippi St. (2-2), 9 a.m. Delaware (4-0) at James Madison (3-0), 9:05 a.m. Kentucky (3-1) at Mississippi (2-2), 9:20 a.m. Morehead St. (2-2) at Georgia St. (2-2), 10 a.m. Lincoln, Pa. (1-2) at Howard (0-3), 10 a.m. Coastal Carolina (1-3) at Richmond (1-2), 10 a.m. W. Carolina (1-3) at The Citadel (2-2), 10 a.m. Samford (2-2) at Elon (1-3), 10:30 a.m. Presbyterian (0-4) at VMI (1-2), 10:30 a.m. Furman (2-1) at Wofford (2-1), 10:30 a.m. Prairie View (1-3) at MVSU (0-4), noon McNeese St. (1-2) at Northwestern St. (1-3), noon Tennessee (2-2) at LSU (4-0), 12:30 p.m. East Carolina (2-1) at North Carolina (1-2), 12:30 p.m. Virginia Tech (2-2) at N.C. State (4-0), 12:30 p.m. Villanova (3-1) at William & Mary (3-1), 12:30 p.m. Grambling St. (2-1) at Alabama A&M (2-2), 1 p.m. Bethune-Cookman (3-0) at Morgan St. (1-2), 1 p.m. S. Carolina St. (2-1) at Florida A&M (2-2), 3 p.m. Duke (1-3) at Maryland (3-1), 3 p.m. Gardner-Webb (1-2) at Old Dominion (2-2), 3 p.m. Kentucky St. (0-0) at E. Kentucky (0-3), 4 p.m. Murray St. (1-3) at Jacksonville St. (4-0), 4 p.m. Savannah St. (0-4) at Liberty (2-2), 4 p.m. Tulsa (2-2) at Memphis (1-3), 4 p.m. Ark.-Pine Bluff (1-2) at Southern U. (1-2), 4 p.m. Georgia Tech (2-2) at Wake Forest (2-2), 4 p.m. Florida Atlantic (1-2) at South Florida (2-1), 4:05 p.m. Florida (4-0) at Alabama (4-0), 5 p.m. Texas Southern (1-3) at Alabama St. (3-0), 5 p.m. Marshall (1-3) at Southern Miss. (3-1), 5 p.m. MIDWEST Campbell (1-3) at Butler (2-2), 9 a.m. Ohio (1-3) at E. Michigan (0-4), 9 a.m. Ohio St. (4-0) at Illinois (2-1), 9 a.m. Northwestern (4-0) at Minnesota (1-3), 9 a.m. Valparaiso (0-4) at Dayton (3-1), 10 a.m. Kent St. (1-2) at Miami (Ohio) (2-2), 10 a.m. Marist (1-2) at Drake (2-2), 11 a.m. S. Illinois (1-3) at Illinois St. (3-1), 11 a.m. Youngstown St. (3-1) at Missouri St. (1-2), 11 a.m. W. Illinois (3-1) at N. Dakota St. (3-1), 11 a.m. Idaho (2-2) at W. Michigan (1-2), 11 a.m. SE Missouri (3-1) at E. Illinois (0-4), 11:30 a.m. North Dakota (2-2) at South Dakota (2-2), noon Buffalo (1-3) at Bowling Green (1-3), 12:30 p.m. Ball St. (1-3) at Cent. Michigan (2-2), 12:30 p.m. Michigan (4-0) at Indiana (3-0), 12:30 p.m. Wisconsin (4-0) at Michigan St. (4-0), 12:30 p.m. N. Carolina A&T (0-4) vs. Tennessee St. (2-2), 1 p.m. Quincy (0-4) at Indiana St. (1-2), 2:05 p.m. S. Dakota St. (0-3) at N. Iowa (1-2), 2:05 p.m. N. Illinois (2-2) at Akron (0-4), 3 p.m. Texas Tech (2-1) at Iowa St. (2-2), 4 p.m. Wyoming (1-3) at Toledo (3-1), 4 p.m. Penn St. (3-1) at Iowa (3-1), 5:05 p.m. SOUTHWEST Kansas (2-2) at Baylor (3-1), 9 a.m. Texas (3-1) vs. Oklahoma (4-0) at Dallas, 12:30 p.m. Louisville (1-2) at Arkansas St. (1-3), 4 p.m. Sam Houston St. (1-2) at Lamar (2-2), 4 p.m. SMU (2-2) at Rice (1-3), 4 p.m. Louisiana-Lafayette (1-2) at North Texas (1-3), 4:30 p.m. FAR WEST TCU (4-0) at Colorado St. (1-3), 11 a.m. Navy (2-1) at Air Force (3-1), 11:30 a.m. N. Arizona (2-1) at S. Utah (1-3), noon Washington St. (1-3) at UCLA (2-2), 12:30 p.m. E. Washington (2-2) at Weber St. (2-2), 12:30 p.m. Montana (2-2) at N. Colorado (2-2), 12:35 p.m. Montana St. (3-1) at Sacramento St. (2-2), 1:05 p.m. UTEP (3-1) at New Mexico (0-4), 3 p.m. Arizona St. (2-2) at Oregon St. (1-2), 3:30 p.m. Georgia (1-3) at Colorado (2-1), 4 p.m. Boise St. (3-0) at New Mexico St. (0-3), 5 p.m. Stanford (4-0) at Oregon (4-0), 5 p.m. UC Davis (1-3) at San Jose St. (1-3), 5 p.m. Washington (1-2) at Southern Cal (4-0), 5 p.m. Idaho St. (1-3) at Portland St. (1-2), 5:05 p.m. Cal Poly (3-1) at Fresno St. (2-1), 7 p.m. Nevada (4-0) at UNLV (1-3), 7 p.m. Louisiana Tech (1-3) at Hawaii (2-2), 8:30 p.m. THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 25, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (57) 4-0 1,496 1 2. Ohio St. (2) 4-0 1,431 2 3. Boise St. (1) 3-0 1,356 3 4. Oregon 4-0 1,276 5 5. TCU 4-0 1,269 4 6. Nebraska 4-0 1,158 6 7. Florida 4-0 1,132 9 8. Oklahoma 4-0 1,095 8 9. Stanford 4-0 895 16 10. Auburn 4-0 863 17 11. Wisconsin 4-0 854 11 12. LSU 4-0 805 15 13. Utah 4-0 792 13 14. Arizona 4-0 724 14 15. Arkansas 3-1 716 10 16. Miami 2-1 598 19 17. Iowa 3-1 505 18 18. Southern Cal 4-0 467 20 19. Michigan 4-0 398 21 20. South Carolina 3-1 397 12 21. Texas 3-1 364 7 22. Penn St. 3-1 197 23 23. N.C. State 4-0 166 — 24. Michigan St. 4-0 149 25 25. Nevada 4-0 123 — PAC-10 CONFERENCE Standings All Times PDT Conf. W L Arizona 1 0 Oregon 1 0 Stanford 1 0 USC 1 0 Oregon State 0 0 Washington 0 0 Arizona State 0 1 California 0 1 UCLA 0 1 Washington State 0 1 Today’s Games Washington State at UCLA, 12:30 p.m. Arizona State at Oregon State, 3:30 p.m. Washington at USC, 5 p.m. Stanford at Oregon, 5 p.m.

W 4 4 4 4 1 1 2 2 2 1

Ov’ll

L 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 3

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Favorite Opening Current Underdog Sunday TITANS 6.5 7 Broncos STEELERS 1 1 Ravens Bengals 3 3 BROWNS PACKERS 14.5 14.5 Lions SAINTS 14 13.5 Panthers FALCONS 7 7 49ers Seahawks 1.5 1 RAMS Jets 4.5 5.5 BILLS Colts 7 7 JAGUARS Texans 3.5 3 RAIDERS CHARGERS 9 8 Cards EAGLES 6.5 5.5 Redskins GIANTS 4 3.5 Bears Monday Patriots 1 1 DOLPHINS

d-Oklahoma CONNECTICUT Ohio U C MICHIGAN Wisconsin Michigan Northwestern Virginia Tech N CAROLINA MARYLAND

COLLEGE Today 4 3.5 7 7.5 8 10 15.5 19 1.5 2 13.5 10 4.5 5.5 3.5 3.5 10.5 14 7.5 9

Texas Vanderbilt E MICHIGAN Ball St MICHIGAN ST INDIANA MINNESOTA NC STATE E Carolina Duke

RUTGERS 14.5 17.5 Tulane Temple 4 6 ARMY Georgia Tech 10 10 WAKE FOREST Texas Tech 8 7 IOWA ST MISSISSIPPI 2.5 3 Kentucky Tulsa 10 9.5 MEMPHIS BAYLOR 9 9.5 Kansas Kent St 1(M) 3 MIAMI-OHIO Idaho 2 3.5 W MICHIGAN Tcu 33.5 33.5 COLORADO ST AIR FORCE 9 10 Navy BOWLING GREEN 6.5 3 Buffalo Notre Dame 2.5 2.5 BOSTON COLL LSU 14.5 16.5 Tennessee UCLA 25.5 24 Washington St Ohio St 18.5 17 ILLINOIS Georgia 4 4.5 COLORADO No Illinois 13.5 13.5 AKRON Utep 14.5 15 NEW MEXICO OREGON ST 5.5 3.5 Arizona St TOLEDO 3 3 Wyoming Smu 12 12.5 RICE Florida St 7.5 6.5 VIRGINIA ALABAMA 9 8 Florida SOUTHERN MISS 10.5 9.5 Marshall IOWA 7 7 Penn St USC 10.5 10 Washington Miami-Florida 3 3 CLEMSON Boise St 40 43 NEW MEXICO ST Nevada 19.5 20.5 UNLV OREGON 7 7 Stanford HAWAII 10 8.5 Louisiana Tech PITTSBURGH 18.5 17.5 Florida Int’l Louisville 5 4.5 ARKANSAS ST NORTH TEXAS 3.5 4.5 UL-Lafayette AUBURN 34 35 UL-Monroe S FLORIDA 21 21 Fla Atlantic d- Dallas, TX. (M) — Miami-Ohio opened as a favorite

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Preseason All Times PDT ——— Friday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 5, Ottawa 4, SO Carolina 2, Atlanta 1, OT Philadelphia 3, Buffalo 1 Washington 5, Columbus 3 New Jersey 4, N.Y. Islanders 3 Detroit 7, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 2, Florida 1, OT Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 2 Calgary 5, Edmonton 1 Vancouver 4, Anaheim 2 Today’s Games Atlanta at Columbus, 3 p.m. Detroit at Toronto, 4 p.m. Montreal vs. N.Y. Islanders (ss) at Quebec, Quebec, 4 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Ottawa, 4 p.m. New Jersey at N.Y. Islanders (ss), 4 p.m. Florida at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Colorado vs. Los Angeles at Las Vegas, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Games Nashville at Washington, 9:30 a.m. Pittsburgh at Detroit, 2 p.m. Philadelphia at Buffalo, 3 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 3 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at Anaheim, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 13 7 6 45 35 New York 13 8 5 44 34 Kansas City 9 10 6 33 29 Toronto FC 8 11 7 31 26 Chicago 7 10 8 29 31 Philadelphia 7 13 6 27 31 New England 7 14 5 26 28 D.C. 5 18 3 18 18 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF x-Los Angeles 15 6 5 50 38 x-Real Salt Lake 13 4 9 48 39 FC Dallas 11 2 13 46 36 Colorado 11 7 8 41 37 Seattle 11 9 6 39 31 San Jose 11 8 6 39 28 Houston 7 14 5 26 35 Chivas USA 7 14 4 25 25 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. x- clinched playoff berth ——— Today’s Games Toronto FC at Seattle FC, 12:30 p.m. Houston at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. San Jose at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Kansas City at New York, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New England, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. D.C. United at Colorado, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Game Los Angeles at Chivas USA, 5 p.m. Thursday, October 7 Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, October 8 Columbus at Chicago, 6 p.m. Saturday, October 9 Real Salt Lake at New York, 1:30 p.m. Colorado at FC Dallas, 3 p.m. San Jose at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 29 27 30 31 32 43 45 42 GA 21 17 22 26 29 28 45 34

DEALS Transactions BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ORLANDO MAGIC—Exercised their contract option on F Ryan Anderson through the 2011-12 season. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Minnesota DE Ray Edwards $10,000 for hitting Detroit QB Shaun Hill in the head ($5,000) and for unnecessary roughness ($5,000) for shoving a Lions player; Buffalo WR Steve Johnson $10,000 for an inappropriate gesture after a touchdown against New England, and Kansas City DT Shaun Smith $10,000 for striking San Francisco OL Anthony Davis in the groin area. Fined Seattle S Earl Thomas, $7,500 for taunting after an interception against San Diego. Fined Minnesota OT Ryan Cook $5,000 for an illegal clip against Detroit and Detroit S Louis Delmas $5,000 for unsportsmanlike conduct. Fined Baltimore OT Michael Oher and S Tom Zbikowski $5,000 apiece for their actions in a game against Cleveland. Fined Green Bay LB Clay Matthews $5,000 for grabbing Chicago QB Jay Cutler by the facemask. Fined New York Giants OT David Diehl, OT Kareem McKenzie and Tennessee CB Cortland Finnegan, $5,000 each for unnecessary roughness; New York OT Adam Koets $5,000 for a major facemask and Tennessee DE Jason Babin $5,000 for a late hit with the crown of his helmet. Fined New York Giants RB Ahmad Bradshaw $2,500 for a chop block in the end zone. BUFFALO BILLS—Released-injured LB Kawika Mitchell. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed DL Boo Robinson to practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed LB Leroy Hill on injured reserve. Signed DT Craig Terrill. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—F Darcy Tucker announced his retirement. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Kyle Beach, F Igor Makarov, F Brandon Pirri, F Ben Smith and D Brian Connelly to Rockford (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled G Thomas McCollum, F Willie Coetzee, F Francis Pare and F Tomas Tatar from Grand Rapids (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS—Assigned F Max Pacioretty to Hamilton (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Released F Kyle Wellwood.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 3,002 812 924 219 The Dalles 3,800 1,083 2,081 540 John Day 6,745 870 2,998 952 McNary 4,161 929 1,789 531 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 781,508 86,860 405,525 152,858 The Dalles 517,173 68,856 301,871 111,776 John Day 436,938 63,130 242,368 154,645 McNary 380,263 39,621 218,911 74,340


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 D3

RY D E R C U P C O M M E N TA RY

S  B

It’s Power vs. Franchitti for IndyCar title

Football • Flag-filled Titans-Giants game results in six fines: Ahmad Bradshaw’s chop block in the end zone cost the Giants a safety in their 29-10 loss to the Titans last Sunday. Now that penalty has cost Bradshaw a $2,500 fine. Bradshaw’s fine was one of six imposed by the NFL on Friday from the TitansGiants game. The NFL also levied fines of $5,000 each against New York linemen David Diehl, Kareem McKenzie and Adam Koets. Diehl and McKenzie were penalized for unnecessary roughness, and Koets was fined for a major facemask. Two Titans players were also fined $5,000 each: cornerback Cortland Finnegan, who threw Giants wide receiver Steve Smith to the ground by his helmet, and Jason Babin, who was fined for a late hit with the crown of his helmet. • NCAA denies appeals by UNC players: The NCAA has denied an appeal to shorten suspensions for North Carolina cornerback Kendric Burney and safety Deunta Williams. Burney was suspended six games and Williams four for receiving improper benefits connected to several trips, including to California to visit a former North Carolina player. Burney also had trips to Atlanta and Las Vegas linked to former college player Chris Hawkins, whom the NCAA has said qualifies as an agent.

Basketball • Fines for technical fouls to double this season: Technical fouls will become twice as expensive this season. The NBA informed teams that fines for technicals will double from last season’s amounts in a memo, the contents of which were confirmed to The Associated Press on Friday. Players and coaches will now be docked $2,000 for each of their first five technical fouls. The costs rise to $3,000 for the next five, followed by $4,000 for Nos. 11-15. Starting at 16, players are suspended one game for every two technicals, along with $5,000 for each. The number of technicals could rise this season with the NBA seeking to halt complaining about calls. • U.S. women cruise into worlds semis: Angel McCoughtry scored 17 points to help the United States rout South Korea 106-44 Friday and advance to the semifinals of the women’s basketball world championship in the Czech Republic Maya Moore added 15 points, Candice Dupree 12, and Swin Cash 11 for the U.S. (7-0), which had six players in double figures en route to one of the most lopsided victories in worlds history. The Americans, who made it to the medal round for the seventh straight time, will have to beat Spain in the semifinals today to get another chance at gold.

Horse racing • Undefeated Zenyatta to make final California start: Zenyatta seeks to remain undefeated in her 19th start when she takes on five rivals in the $250,000 Lady’s Secret Stakes, the final California start of her career. With a win in Saturday’s 1 1⁄16-mile race at her home track of Hollywood Park, Zenyatta would own the career earnings record by a female horse. Ouija Board, who retired in 2006, holds the record with $6,334,296. Zenyatta has earned $6,254,580 with her 18-0 record. The race will be Zenyatta’s final start in California. She’s scheduled to make her 20th and final start when she defends her title in the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic next month at Churchill Downs.

Tennis • Wozniacki reaches finals at Pan Pacific Open: Caroline Wozniacki withstood a late comeback to defeat Victoria Azarenka of Belarus 6-2, 6-7 (3), 6-4 Friday and reach the final of the Pan Pacific Open in Tokyo. Wozniacki will meet Elena Dementieva in the title match after the Russian beat French Open champion Francesca Schiavone of Italy 6-4, 7-5 in the other semifinal. The top-seeded Dane could overtake Serena Williams at No. 1 in the world rankings if she lifts the trophy in Tokyo and reaches the quarterfinals or better in Beijing next week. • Nadal into Thailand Open semis: Rafael Nadal rode a big serve to sweep past Mikhail Kukushkin of Kazakhstan 6-2, 6-3 Friday and reach the Thailand Open semifinals. The top-ranked Spaniard next plays compatriot Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, who beat fourth-seeded Ernests Gulbis of Latvia 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-3. Earlier, Jarkko Nieminen of Finland reached his second semifinal of the year with a 6-3, 7-6 (4) victory over third-seeded Jurgen Melzer of Austria. Nieminen next faces 2007 finalist Benjamin Becker of Germany, who defeated countryman Daniel Brands 6-4, 6-2 in less than an hour. • Soderling, Berdych ousted in Malaysia: Topseeded Robin Soderling of Sweden was eliminated in the Malaysian Open quarterfinals Friday, losing 6-3, 6-2 to Andrey Golubev of Kazakhstan’s in just 71 minutes. Golubev broke the hard-serving Soderling four times while saving all four break points he faced. The fifth-ranked Swede struggled with his consistency, mixing five aces with six double-faults. Golubev will face David Ferrer of Spain, who outlasted third-seeded Thomas Berdych of the Czech Republic 4-6, 7-5, 6-4. Fourth-seeded Mikahil Youzhny of Russia also rallied from a set down to beat No. 6 Marco Baghdatis of Cyprus 6-7 (5), 7-5, 6-1. He will play fellow Russian Igor Andreev, who defeated Milos Raonic 6-1, 3-6, 6-3.

Baseball • Reds’ celebratory cigars draw complaints: The Cincinnati Health Department will conduct an inspection of the Great American Ball Park and the Reds’ clubhouse after at least five people called a state hotline, complaining that when Reds players lighted up celebratory cigars after they clinched the NL Central it violated Ohio’s smoking ban. Department spokesman Rocky Merz said Friday that state law requires such an inspection after five complaints about the indoor smoking were phoned in. Don’t expect much to come of the inspection. Merz says further action is “highly unlikely.” Merz says an inspection must be done within 30 days and the Reds will be notified of the alleged violation. He says the department realizes “everyone was celebrating” the victory and wishes the Reds well. Team spokesman Rob Butcher declined comment Friday. • GM, manager out for Mets?: The New York Mets are braced for a shakeup. Manager Jerry Manuel and general manager Omar Minaya both said Friday they have not been notified they are losing their jobs. Sports Illustrated, citing unidentified sources, reported on its website earlier in the day that the team will announce after the season that the pair won’t return in their roles. — From wire reports

AUTO RACING

By Will Graves The Associated Press

Peter Morrison / The Associated Press

Matt Kuchar of the U.S. plays the fourth hole during the opening day of the Ryder Cup in Newport, Wales, on Friday. Play began in the rain but was delayed for seven hours before it was resumed. The heavy rainfall prevented Friday’s matches from being completed.

J acket s leak, but U.S. doesn’t when it matters By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

NEWPORT, Wales — The Sir Terry river was flowing wildly down the hill toward the 18th green, as thousands of fans trudged toward home through the muck of a golf course that was never supposed to flood. Taking advantage of a badly needed break, U.S. Ryder Cup players huddled in their team room, presumably trying to figure out why an event that earns so many millions couldn’t afford to give them rain jackets that didn’t leak. At least the jackets offered a convenient excuse. Better to blame the equipment for what was starting to shape up as a European rout than face the reality that, just a few holes into the Ryder Cup, the Americans were already a team in desperate disarray. The day before their captain had forgotten Stewart Cink was even there. On this miserable day, it seemed like most of the team had forgotten how to play. Their shots were as ugly as their leaky rain jackets, which looked as if they might have been leftovers from the U.S. track team in the 1960 Olympics. Tiger Woods seemed so embarrassed to be seen in his that he took it off before embarrassing himself anyway by taking four shots to reach the first green. If the fairways that billionaire owner Sir Terry Matthews said could never flood hadn’t flooded, the Americans would have been finished before afternoon tea. But even billionaires can mess up a sure thing, and for that the Americans should buy the Celtic Manor founder a pint. Matthews boasted earlier that the course could take a month’s worth of rain and drain in 10 minutes. It got a week’s worth, and it took seven hours and 18 minutes. The delay did more than just give the fairways a chance to dry out. It gave the Americans perhaps the only chance they had to regroup. New jackets. New swings. New hope. And new appreciation, perhaps, for a team that suddenly doesn’t seem like such an underdog. “We all made good comebacks, I thought,” Steve Stricker said. “We all kind of rallied a little bit, and they are going to be tight and close.” None of it translated into any points, but those will come soon enough. Sometime this morning is the best guess, when the four opening better ball matches should finish in a Ryder Cup that organizers will try to compress into two long and wet days. The relentless rain forced officials to combine formats and send off every player in the remaining three rounds, hoping against hope that the new front coming in Sunday won’t dump so much more rain on the course that the Sir Terry river starts churning again. Not everyone — the weatherman in particular — is convinced the new plan will work. If it doesn’t, the Ryder Cup will go to a Monday for the first time. Either way, the most carefully laid plans of both team captains can be tossed away. They

Ryder Cup at a glance N E W P O R T , Wales — A brief look at the still-tobe-completed opening round of the Ryder Cup at the 7,378-yard, par-71 Twenty Ten course at Celtic Manor: Leading: U.S. ahead 2-1, with the fourth of four better-ball matches tied, although none had progressed beyond the 12th hole when darkness forced suspension of play. Wet-and-wild: A heavy downpour forced the first suspension of play at 9:44 a.m. local time, leading to a 7-hour, 18-minute delay and prompting officials to try to catch up by scheduling six matches in both of today’s sessions instead of the usual four. Can’t cool him off: American Stewart Cink made five birdies in 11 holes, the most by any player on the day. Second-most were the three straight by teammate Phil Mickelson. Television: Today (PDT): 11:30 p.m. (Friday) to 5 a.m., ESPN; 5 a.m. to 3 p.m., NBC Sports.

can’t rest anyone now, can’t sit a bad player and can’t make some of the pairings they might like to make. Captains Colin Montgomerie and Corey Pavin agreed to the changes; then again, they didn’t have much choice. They work for the people running the Ryder Cup, the same people who refused to give any of the many thousands of fans who left early refunds on their $160 tickets. “I’m pleased that the solution was thought of by very smart people, other than myself, because I’m not a smart person,” Pavin said. On that, Pavin might have gotten some agreement before his players rallied to take leads in two of four matches and tie a third. Though Pavin always comes off as dull to the colorful Montgomerie, he was under fire even before play began for forgetting to introduce Cink at the opening ceremony and for pairings some thought were questionable. He looked a lot better as darkness halted play, largely because the conditions had changed and the Americans found the lack of wind and soft greens to their liking. Cink made five birdies in 11 holes, Woods and Phil Mickelson began showing some signs of life, and the surprise pairing of rookies Bubba Watson and Jeff Overton also played solid. If play hadn’t resumed Friday, the Americans would have faced a long night wondering what else could go wrong. They might have gone to bed haunted by the sight of fans carrying around life-sized cardboard replicas of Monty holding the Ryder Cup. Now, the swagger is back. It’s anyone’s cup. Assuming the Sir Terry doesn’t overflow again, the game is back on. Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at tdahlberg@ap.org.

GOLF ROUNDUP

De Jonge, Haas lead Viking Classic The Associated Press MADISON, Miss. — Brendon de Jonge used a fast early start to shoot his second straight 66 on Friday, then sat back and waited to see whether anyone could catch him. Bill Haas answered the challenge with another 66, joining de Jonge at 12 under after two rounds. Neither leader had a bogey during their second round at Annandale Golf Club. De Jonge, who made his 30th start this year at the Viking Classic, never held a second-round lead before, although he has finished in the top 10 six times this year. He said his second round was not perfect, but close enough. “You never want to say it’s an easy round,” he said. “I felt like it could have been a couple better, but I’ll take 66 any time.” De Jonge, 36th on the PGA money list, is still looking for first victory. “I’ve been there late on Sunday several times this year,” he said. “Obviously, I haven’t been able to close the deal, but I’ve definitely had some very good opportunities this year.” Haas, who shot back-to-back bogey-free rounds, credited his putting for keeping him from bogeying.

“Yeah, I played solid,” Haas said. “I think I made about a 5 footer on hole No. 4. That’s about the longest putt I’ve had to save par. “There’s easy holes out there, and there’s hard holes. You’ve got to make sure you par those hard holes.” Haas said he was surprised at how well he was playing, having taken the last two weeks off. Michael Allen, winless since joining the tour in 1984, finished three strokes back after a 6-under 66. Nathan Green offset a bogey with five birdies for a 68 on the day, putting him at 9 under as well through two rounds. Also on Friday: Senior takes first-round lead on Champions Tour CONOVER, N.C. — Peter Senior eagled the final hole for a 7-under 65 and a one-stroke lead over Bernhard Langer, Fred Couples and Tom Kite at the Ensure Classic. The 51-year-old Australian eagled the 18th hole in windy conditions at the Rock Barn Golf and Spa to take his first lead on the Champions Tour. Langer is seeking his sixth victory of the season, and also holds a 672-point lead over Couples in the Schwab Cup standings. There are four events left after this weekend.

HOMESTEAD, Fla. — The racer in Will Power would love nothing more than to clinch the IndyCar championship by outdueling Dario Franchitti in the final lap of tonight’s Indy 300, one last mad dash in a season full of them. The pragmatist in the 29-year-old Australian would prefer something a little more boring. “Sitting here, all you want is it just to be an easy race,” Power said with a sheepish shrug. “That’s human nature. There’s no way I want it to be a tough battle, but obviously it would just feel so much better if it was and you won.” Good thing. Because that’s precisely what he’s going to get. Franchitti moved within 11 points of Power on Friday after taking the pole for the 200-lap race by posting a qualifying speed of 213.187 mph. The margin is the closest any driver has been to Power since June and makes the math on what it will take for Franchitti to win the title pretty easy. If the 37-year-old Scot leads the most laps and takes the checkered flag, he’ll win a third championship no matter what Power does starting from the third spot. “It’s going to be, what do they say, a barnburner,” Franchitti said. This is the fifth straight season the points race has come down to the final event. Last year Franchitti successfully gambled on pit strategy to leapfrog Target Chip Ganassi Racing teammate Scott Dixon and Ryan Briscoe for the title. The ability to come through when it matters has made Franchitti the favorite in the garage. Danica Patrick called it a month ago. Tony Kanaan, a good friend of Franchitti’s, has hopped on board. “Will’s a pro but Dario’s an old pro,” Kanaan said. “The guy has been in that position three more times at least than Power. (Power) is going to have it hard.” Which is fine by Power. He knows in some ways he’s not even supposed to be here. His career nearly ended during a horrific crash in Sonoma last summer. He spent time in the hospital, his back a jumbled mess. At his bedside Roger Penske made a promise to find enough sponsorship to give Power a full-time ride provided he made a full recovery. The Captain delivered. And so has his latest star. Dominating the road courses like no driver in recent memory, Power has been atop the standings virtually all season, winning five times en route to becoming IndyCar’s king of the road. He’s also proven to be an increasingly tough out on the ovals, protecting his points lead by finishing third in Japan two weeks ago. It’s been a remarkable season for Power. All of it won’t matter a lick if Franchitti wins the title. “I’ll be very disappointed, but it happens,” he said. “Somebody has to finish second.”

Terry Renna / The Associated Press

Dario Franchitt makes a pit stop during practice for the Indy 300 auto race at HomesteadMiami Speedway in Homestead, Fla., Friday. Franchitti took the pole for tonight’s race.

NASCAR: SPRINT CUP

Kahne wins pole at Kansas Speedway The Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Kan. — Kasey Kahne and Paul Menard swept the front row in qualifying for Sunday’s race at Kansas Speedway, one of their last for Richard Petty Motorsports. Kahne drove his Ford to a quick lap of 174.644 mph on Friday, earning his third pole of the season. Menard ran 174.469 mph on the 1.5-mile tri-oval. Both are leaving RPM after the season. “To me it shows that myself and Paul and our teams are still really interested in running strong and not backing Kasey Kahne down just because we have other things we’re going to do in the future,” Kahne said. “At the same time, it shows that RPM is giving us great race cars. We still have great packages. We just need to put it together.” Kahne will drive next year for Red Bull Racing as he prepares to move to Hendrick Motorsports in 2012. Menard will join Richard Childress Racing in 2011. Jeff Gordon, who won the first two Cup races at Kansas Speedway in 2001 and 2002, qualified third at 174.430 in his Chevrolet. He was the highest qualifier among drivers in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Points leader Denny Hamlin qualified 12th — but that was still nine spots better than fourtime Cup winner Jimmie Johnson, who will start 21st. Johnson, whose win last week at Dover moved him up four spots to second in the Chase standings, trails Hamlin by 35 points going into Sunday’s race.


D4 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M AJ O R L E A GUE B A SE BA L L NL ROUNDUP Padres 6, Giants 4 SAN FRANCISCO — Adrian Gonzalez hit a three-run homer, Ryan Ludwick and Matt Stairs also connected and San Diego Padres put San Francisco’s potential clinching party on hold for at least a day with a dramatic victory. The NL West-leading Giants need one more victory to capture their first division crown and playoff berth since 2003. San Diego pulled within one game of wild card-leading Atlanta. Clayton Richard (14-9) won for only the second time in seven starts and held down a Giants team that has hit 17 homers in its last eight games. San Diego AB R H Venable cf-rf 4 0 0 Eckstein 2b 4 2 2 M.Tejada ss 4 0 1 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 2 Ludwick rf 4 1 1 Gwynn cf 0 0 0 Stairs lf 2 1 1 a-Denorfia ph-lf 2 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0 0 Torrealba c 4 0 0 Headley 3b 4 0 2 Richard p 2 1 1 R.Webb p 0 0 0 Thatcher p 0 0 0 Gregerson p 0 0 0 Adams p 0 0 0 Cunningham lf 1 0 1 Totals 35 6 11

BI 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 2 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .247 .269 .269 .297 .255 .204 .232 .262 .000 .276 .263 .148 .000 ------.288

San Francisco A.Torres cf F.Sanchez 2b A.Huff 1b Posey c Burrell lf J.Guillen rf C.Ray p b-Rowand ph Mota p c-Fontenot ph-3b Uribe 3b-ss Renteria ss d-Sandoval ph Affeldt p M.Cain p Runzler p C.Ross rf Totals

BI 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .270 .293 .290 .309 .262 .274 --.230 .000 .284 .245 .276 .267 .000 .106 .000 .268

AB 4 4 4 5 4 2 0 1 0 1 3 3 1 0 1 0 3 36

R H 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 4 11

San Diego 013 110 000 — 6 11 0 San Francisco 000 013 000 — 4 11 0 a-flied out for Stairs in the 5th. b-homered for C.Ray in the 6th. c-singled for Mota in the 8th. d-flied out for Renteria in the 8th. LOB—San Diego 7, San Francisco 9. 2B— Ad.Gonzalez (33), Burrell (15), C.Ross 2 (28). HR—Ludwick (17), off M.Cain; Ad.Gonzalez (31), off M.Cain; Stairs (6), off M.Cain; Rowand (11), off Richard. RBIs— Ad.Gonzalez 3 (101), Ludwick (69), Stairs (16), A.Torres (63), F.Sanchez (46), Rowand 2 (34). SB—A.Torres (26). CS—Cunningham (3). S—Richard. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 3 (Torrealba, Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez); San Francisco 4 (Burrell, Posey, F.Sanchez, A.Torres). Runners moved up—Venable, Denorfia. GIDP—Renteria. DP—San Diego 2 (M.Tejada, Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez), (Venable, Ad.Gonzalez). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard W, 14-9 5 1-3 7 3 3 2 1 97 3.75 R.Webb H, 9 1-3 1 1 1 1 1 16 2.91 Thatcher 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1.29 Gregerson H 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.16 Adams H, 37 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 15 1.78 H.Bell S, 46-49 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 17 1.83 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain L, 13-11 4 9 6 6 1 4 88 3.14 Runzler 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 9 3.03 C.Ray 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 4.57 Mota 2 0 0 0 0 2 19 4.42 Affeldt 1 1 0 0 1 1 20 4.14 M.Cain pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Thatcher pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Thatcher 2-1, Gregerson 2-0, H.Bell 2-0, Runzler 2-1, C.Ray 2-0. HBP—by Affeldt (Eckstein). WP—Runzler. T—3:14. A—42,409 (41,915).

Phillies 11, Braves 5 ATLANTA — Jimmy Rollins’ grand slam capped a five-run sixth inning and Philadelphia beat Atlanta to keep Bobby Cox and the Braves from moving closer to a wild-card berth. Philadelphia Rollins ss W.Valdez ss-2b B.Francisco rf Utley 2b Bocock ss Howard 1b Contreras p Zagurski p Herndon p Werth cf 1-Mayberry pr-cf Ibanez lf Dobbs 3b C.Ruiz c K.Kendrick p a-Do.Brown ph Bastardo p J.Romero p Durbin p d-Gload ph-1b Totals

AB 4 0 5 4 0 5 0 0 0 3 2 4 5 5 2 0 0 0 0 2 41

R 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 11

H 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 13

BI 4 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 11

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 11

Avg. .242 .255 .269 .276 .000 .279 ----.000 .296 .273 .276 .200 .302 .098 .217 ----.000 .276

Atlanta AB R H O.Infante 2b 4 0 0 Heyward rf 4 1 0 McCann c 3 0 1 Boscan c 0 1 0 D.Lee 1b 5 0 3 Me.Cabrera lf-cf 4 0 0 McLouth cf 2 0 1 b-M.Diaz ph-lf 3 0 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 0 e-Hinske ph 1 0 0 Di.Hernandez ss 0 0 0 Conrad 3b 4 1 2 Beachy p 1 1 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 c-Glaus ph 1 0 1 Farnsworth p 0 0 0 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 Minor p 0 0 0 f-Freeman ph 1 1 1 Totals 36 5 10

BI 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .320 .275 .272 --.259 .255 .192 .241 .242 .258 .111 .248 .200 --.000 .240 --.000 .000 .174

Philadelphia 000 205 040 — 11 13 0 Atlanta 100 010 003 — 5 10 1 a-walked for K.Kendrick in the 6th. b-singled for McLouth in the 6th. c-singled for M.Dunn in the 6th. dstruck out for Durbin in the 8th. e-grounded out for Ale. Gonzalez in the 8th. f-singled for Minor in the 9th. 1-ran for Werth in the 6th. E—Conrad (6). LOB—Philadelphia 7, Atlanta 10. 2B—Werth (46), Dobbs (7), C.Ruiz (28), D.Lee 2 (34). HR—Rollins (8), off M.Dunn. RBIs—Rollins 4 (41), B.Francisco (26), Utley (64), Howard 2 (108), Ibanez (81), C.Ruiz (53), Do.Brown (13), D.Lee 5 (79). S—O.Infante. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (B.Francisco, K.Kendrick, Mayberry, Gload); Atlanta 4 (Me.Cabrera 2, O.Infante, M.Diaz). Runners moved up—Rollins. Philadelphia IP Kndrk W, 11-10 5 Bastardo 1 J.Romero 2-3 Durbin 1-3 Contreras 1 Zagurski 2-3 Herndon 1-3

H 5 2 0 0 0 3 0

R 2 0 0 0 0 3 0

ER 2 0 0 0 0 3 0

BB 3 0 0 0 0 1 1

SO 2 3 0 0 0 1 0

NP ERA 95 4.73 21 4.58 8 3.50 7 3.88 6 3.40 33 10.80 10 4.30

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beachy L, 0-2 5 2-3 7 4 2 1 5 101 3.00 Moylan 0 0 2 0 1 0 8 2.97 M.Dunn 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 6 1.47 Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 5.49 C.Martinez 2-3 3 4 4 1 1 21 4.85 Minor 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 2 29 5.98 Moylan pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Herndon 1-0, Moylan 2-1, M.Dunn 3-3, Minor 3-3. IBB—off Beachy (Ibanez). T—3:35. A—51,139 (49,743).

Brewers 4, Reds 3 (11 innings) CINCINNATI — Casey McGehee hit a grounder off Reds second baseman Brandon Phillips in the 11th inning, driving in Corey Hart and sending the Brewers to a victory that ensured Cincinnati will begin the postseason on the road. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b L.Cain cf A.Escobar ss L.Cruz ss b-Counsell ph-ss Lucroy c M.Rogers p a-Dickerson ph Jeffress p c-Inglett ph Coffey p Loe p e-C.Gomez ph McClendon p Axford p Totals

AB 4 5 3 4 5 5 1 1 3 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 38

R 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 4 3 11

Avg. .269 .283 .305 .264 .283 .288 .236 .235 .252 .253 .500 .208 --.255 .000 .000 .246 .500 ---

Cincinnati Stubbs cf B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b J.Francisco 3b 1-Bloomquist pr Bruce rf Gomes lf R.Hernandez c Janish ss Tr.Wood p Ondrusek p Masset p Rhodes p d-L.Nix ph Chapman p F.Cordero p f-Heisey ph LeCure p Bray p Jor.Smith p Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 3 0 4 5 3 3 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 36

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 0 0 4 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 3 17

Avg. .253 .272 .323 .286 .283 .385 .276 .265 .297 .259 .189 .000 ----.294 --.000 .254 .091 --.000

Milwaukee 000 001 200 01 — 4 5 0 Cincinnati 100 011 000 00 — 3 7 1 a-struck out for M.Rogers in the 6th. b-singled for L.Cruz in the 7th. c-flied out for Jeffress in the 7th. dstruck out for Rhodes in the 8th. e-flied out for Loe in the 10th. f-popped out for F.Cordero in the 10th. 1-ran for J.Francisco in the 11th. E—B.Phillips (4). LOB—Milwaukee 6, Cincinnati 6. 2B—McGehee (38), J.Francisco (3). 3B—Stubbs (6). HR—Weeks (29), off Tr.Wood. RBIs—Weeks (83), McGehee (101), Counsell (21), Lucroy (25), B.Phillips (59), Votto (112), Janish (25). SB—Stubbs (29), Gomes (5). S—Janish. SF—Lucroy, B.Phillips, Votto. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (McGehee, Counsell); Cincinnati 3 (Tr.Wood, J.Francisco, Gomes). Runners moved up—Braun, Fielder, B.Phillips. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Coffey, Fielder). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA M.Rogers 5 2 2 2 1 6 74 1.80 Jeffress 1 2 1 1 0 2 29 2.70 Coffey 1 0 0 0 1 1 9 4.40 Loe 2 2 0 0 0 4 23 2.78 MClndn W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.15 Axford S, 24-27 1 1 0 0 1 2 17 2.48 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tr.Wood 6 1-3 3 3 3 1 6 103 3.51 Ondrusek BS, 2 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 3.79 Masset 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 17 3.45 Rhodes 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.32 Chapman 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 2.19 F.Cordero 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.95 LeCure L, 2-5 0 1 1 1 1 0 8 4.50 Bray 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.13 Jor.Smith 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.32 LeCure pitched to 2 batters in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Ondrusek 2-2, Rhodes 1-0, Bray 2-0, Jor.Smith 2-1. IBB—off Axford (Bruce). HBP—by Tr.Wood (Weeks). T—3:36. A—28,844 (42,319).

Mets 2, Nationals 1 (10 innings) NEW YORK — With the New York Mets braced for a management shakeup, Josh Thole homered in the 10th inning to begin the final series of the season with a victory over Washington. Washington AB R Espinosa 2b 3 0 Morgan cf 4 0 Desmond ss 3 0 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 Morse rf 4 1 I.Rodriguez c 4 0 Maxwell lf 4 0 Clippard p 0 0 Alb.Gonzalez 3b 4 0 Zimmermann p 2 0 Slaten p 0 0 Jo.Peralta p 0 0 a-Mench ph 1 0 S.Burnett p 0 0 Bernadina lf 0 0 Totals 33 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 14

Avg. .226 .254 .272 .260 .289 .268 .150 .500 .249 .200 --.000 .120 --.249

New York Jos.Reyes ss J.Feliciano rf Pagan cf I.Davis 1b Duda lf Hessman 3b Thole c R.Tejada 2b Misch p b-D.Wright ph Takahashi p Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 1

Avg. .283 .240 .290 .265 .189 .132 .277 .206 .125 .284 .063

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 33

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 6

Washington 000 000 100 0 — 1 3 2 New York 000 100 000 1 — 2 4 0 One out when winning run scored. a-popped out for Jo.Peralta in the 8th. b-flied out for Misch in the 8th. E—Maxwell 2 (2). LOB—Washington 4, New York 4. 2B—Maxwell (6). HR—Morse (14), off Misch; I.Davis (19), off Zimmermann; Thole (3), off Clippard. RBIs— Morse (40), I.Davis (71), Thole (17). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 2 (Alb. Gonzalez, Desmond); New York 2 (I.Davis, R.Tejada). Runners moved up—Morgan. Washington IP H R ER BB SO Zimmermann 6 3 1 1 0 3 Slaten 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Jo.Peralta 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 S.Burnett 2 0 0 0 0 1 Clipprd L, 11-7 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 New York IP H R ER BB SO Misch 8 3 1 1 1 10 Tkhshi W, 10-6 2 0 0 0 1 4 Inherited runners-scored—Jo.Peralta 1-0. T—2:35. A—29,424 (41,800).

NP 82 5 12 17 10 NP 109 33

ERA 4.94 3.23 2.11 2.19 2.80 ERA 3.89 3.64

Cardinals 3, Rockies 0 ST. LOUIS — Jake Westbrook matched his career high with nine strikeouts and got his first RBI of the season for St. Louis. Colorado

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W z-New York 94 z-Tampa Bay 94 Boston 87 Toronto 84 Baltimore 65 Central Division W x-Minnesota 93 Chicago 86 Detroit 80 Cleveland 69 Kansas City 67 West Division W x-Texas 89 Los Angeles 79 Oakland 79 Seattle 61 z-clinched playoff berth x-clinched division

L 65 66 72 76 95 L 67 74 80 91 93 L 71 81 81 99

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct .591 .588 .547 .525 .406 Pct .581 .538 .500 .431 .419 Pct .556 .494 .494 .381

GB — ½ 7 10½ 29½ GB — 7 13 24 26 GB — 10 10 28

Friday’s Games Baltimore 10, Detroit 6, 1st game N.Y. Yankees at Boston, ppd., rain Baltimore 2, Detroit 1, 2nd game L.A. Angels 5, Texas 4, 11 innings Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 7, Tampa Bay 0 Toronto 6, Minnesota 3 Oakland 9, Seattle 0

WCGB — — 6½ 10 29 WCGB — 8 14 25 27 WCGB — 15 15 33

L10 4-6 5-5 4-6 8-2 5-5 L10 3-7 7-3 4-6 7-3 5-5 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 4-6

4 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 2 1 0 32

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

St. Louis Greene 2b Miles 2b Mather cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Craig rf 1-Jay pr-rf P.Feliz 3b Pagnozzi c B.Ryan ss Westbrook p T.Miller p Franklin p Totals

AB 3 0 4 4 3 4 0 4 2 1 3 0 0 28

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 10 SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

.255 .283 .336 .317 .256 .286 .281 .269 .204 .171 .248 --Avg. .221 .291 .207 .313 .313 .245 .300 .218 .344 .221 .120 --.000

Colorado 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 St. Louis 110 001 00x — 3 6 1 a-singled for De La Rosa in the 8th. 1-ran for Craig in the 8th. E—Greene (8). LOB—Colorado 6, St. Louis 6. 2B—Fowler (20), Craig (7). RBIs—Craig (18), Pagnozzi (8), Westbrook (1). SB—C.Gonzalez (26), B.Ryan (11). CS—Holliday (5). S—Pagnozzi. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 5 (Tulowitzki, Helton, C.Gonzalez 3); St. Louis 1 (P.Feliz). Runners moved up—J.Herrera, Tulowitzki, P.Feliz. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeLaRosa L, 8-7 7 5 3 3 4 1 108 4.22 R.Betancourt 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 3.67 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrk W, 4-4 7 2-3 4 0 0 1 9 104 3.48 T.Miller H, 11 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.04 Franklin S, 27 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.46 Inherited runners-scored—T.Miller 3-0. IBB—off De La Rosa (Holliday). WP—De La Rosa. T—2:41. A—36,293 (43,975).

Pirates 5, Marlins 1 MIAMI — Chris Snyder and surging rookie Pedro Alvarez homered to lead Pittsburgh past Florida.

Florida Bonifacio cf O.Martinez ss Morrison lf Uggla 2b G.Sanchez 1b Tracy 3b Stanton rf B.Davis c Mendez p Badenhop p b-Cousins ph Cishek p d-Luna ph Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 0 0 1 0 1 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 4

Avg. .286 .304 .300 .259 .209 .160 .254 .208 .071 .500 .000 1.000 .273 ---

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 1 2 10

Avg. .272 .286 .288 .285 .274 .252 .259 .215 .286 .000 .306 --.138

Pittsburgh 010 022 000 — 5 12 1 Florida 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 a-struck out for D.McCutchen in the 5th. b-struck out for Badenhop in the 7th. c-struck out for Meek in the 9th. d-struck out for Cishek in the 9th. E—Alvarez (17). LOB—Pittsburgh 7, Florida 8. 2B—A.McCutchen (35), O.Martinez (4). 3B—Morrison (7). HR—Alvarez (16), off Mendez; C.Snyder (15), off Mendez. RBIs—Alvarez (64), Moss (2), Cedeno (37), C.Snyder 2 (48), Uggla (102). S—Mendez 2. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 5 (Moss, C.Snyder, Bowker 2, N.Walker); Florida 4 (O.Martinez 2, Bonifacio, Tracy). Runners moved up—Tabata. GIDP—C.Snyder. DP—Florida 1 (O.Martinez, Uggla, G.Sanchez). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO D.McCutchen 4 5 1 1 1 2 Park W, 2-2 3 0 0 0 0 6 Meek 1 1 0 0 1 0 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 0 2 Florida IP H R ER BB SO Mendez L, 1-3 5 1-3 7 5 5 1 1 Badenhop 1 2-3 4 0 0 0 1 Cishek 2 1 0 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Badenhop 2-1. T—2:26. A—23,124 (38,560).

NP 53 48 24 9 NP 85 21 34

ERA 6.12 3.49 2.14 3.67 ERA 5.11 4.05 0.00

Cubs 2, Astros 0 HOUSTON — Casey Coleman pitched seven strong innings and drove in a run for Chicago. Chicago Fuld cf Barney ss DeWitt 2b A.Soriano lf M.Hoffpauir 1b B.Snyder rf Scales 3b W.Castillo c Coleman p a-Nady ph Cashner p Marmol p Totals

Home 52-29 49-32 44-34 46-35 36-43 Home 52-27 43-36 52-29 38-43 38-41 Home 50-29 43-38 47-34 35-44

Away 42-36 45-34 43-38 38-41 29-52 Away 41-40 43-38 28-51 31-48 29-52 Away 39-42 36-43 32-47 26-55

East Division x-Philadelphia Atlanta Florida New York Washington Central Division x-Cincinnati St. Louis Milwaukee Houston Chicago Pittsburgh West Division San Francisco San Diego Colorado Los Angeles Arizona

Today’s Games Toronto (Marcum 13-8) at Minnesota (Duensing 10-3), 10:10 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 11-3) at Boston (Wakefield 4-10), 1:10 p.m., 1st game Cleveland (C.Carrasco 2-1) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 12-13), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Galarraga 4-8) at Baltimore (Matusz 9-12), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Sonnanstine 3-1) at Kansas City (Davies 8-11), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 17-9) at Texas (C.Wilson 14-8), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 10-15) at Boston (Matsuzaka 9-6), 6:05 p.m., 2nd game Oakland (Bre.Anderson 6-6) at Seattle (Pauley 4-8), 7:10 p.m.

Fowler cf J.Herrera 2b C.Gonzalez rf Tulowitzki ss Helton 1b Mora 3b Spilborghs lf Olivo c Iannetta c De La Rosa p a-S.Smith ph R.Betancourt p Totals

Pittsburgh AB R H A.McCutchen cf 5 0 2 Tabata lf 5 0 1 N.Walker 2b 5 0 2 Alvarez 3b 4 2 2 Bowker 1b 3 1 1 Moss rf 4 0 1 Cedeno ss 4 1 2 C.Snyder c 4 1 1 D.McCutchen p 1 0 0 a-Ciriaco ph 1 0 0 Park p 1 0 0 Meek p 0 0 0 c-Presley ph 1 0 0 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 12

Str L-1 L-3 L-3 W-3 W-3 Str L-2 L-1 L-5 W-7 W-2 Str L-1 W-1 W-2 L-3

AB 4 5 4 3 4 4 1 4 2 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 8

SO 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .148 .230 .263 .254 .170 .227 .273 .300 .100 .253 .000 ---

Houston AB Bourgeois cf 3 c-Bogusevic ph-cf 1 Keppinger 2b 4 Pence rf 4

R 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0

Avg. .221 .227 .289 .285

Ca.Lee 1b 4 Blum ss 4 Michaels lf 4 C.Johnson 3b 3 Ja.Castro c 2 Norris p 2 Abad p 0 Melancon p 0 W.Lopez p 0 b-A.Hernandez ph 1 Lyon p 0 Totals 32

W 96 90 78 78 68 W 89 84 77 75 74 57 W 91 89 83 78 65

L 64 70 82 82 92 L 71 76 83 85 86 103 L 69 71 77 82 95

Pct .600 .563 .488 .488 .425 Pct .556 .525 .481 .469 .463 .356 Pct .569 .556 .519 .488 .406

GB — 6 18 18 28 GB — 5 12 14 15 32 GB — 2 8 13 26

Friday’s Games Milwaukee 4, Cincinnati 3, 11 innings Pittsburgh 5, Florida 1 N.Y. Mets 2, Washington 1, 10 innings Philadelphia 11, Atlanta 5 Chicago Cubs 2, Houston 0 St. Louis 3, Colorado 0 Arizona 7, L.A. Dodgers 5 San Diego 6, San Francisco 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

.245 .267 .255 .309 .202 .159 .000 ----.200 ---

Chicago 010 100 000 — 2 6 1 Houston 000 000 000 — 0 7 1 a-singled for Coleman in the 8th. b-singled for W.Lopez in the 8th. c-struck out for Bourgeois in the 8th. E—Scales (2), Lyon (2). LOB—Chicago 12, Houston 6. 2B—W.Castillo (4), Coleman (1), Michaels 2 (14). RBIs—W.Castillo (5), Coleman (2). S—Coleman. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 6 (B.Snyder 2, Barney 2, M.Hoffpauir, Fuld); Houston 4 (Ca.Lee, Norris 2, Ja.Castro). GIDP—M.Hoffpauir, Michaels, Norris. DP—Chicago 2 (Coleman, Barney, M.Hoffpauir), (Scales, DeWitt, M.Hoffpauir); Houston 1 (Keppinger, Blum, Ca.Lee). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colemn W, 4-2 7 6 0 0 1 2 99 4.11 Cashner H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 4.80 Marml S, 38-43 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.55 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 9-10 6 3 2 2 7 6 117 4.92 Abad 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 13 2.95 Melancon 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.12 W.Lopez 1 2 0 0 0 0 14 3.02 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.16 Inherited runners-scored—Melancon 1-0. WP— Coleman. T—2:47. A—33,869 (40,976).

Diamondbacks 7, Dodgers 5 LOS ANGELES — Adam LaRoche homered and drove in three runs to reach 100 RBIs for the first time, leading Arizona to the victory. Arizona S.Drew ss C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b Ad.LaRoche 1b Mar.Reynolds 3b Allen lf c-Gillespie ph-lf G.Parra rf Schmidt c Kroenke p a-Church ph Vasquez p Rosa p Demel p Heilman p e-T.Abreu ph J.Gutierrez p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 2 1 4 4 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 34

R H 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 10

Los Angeles Theriot 2b Blake 3b Ethier rf Kemp cf Loney 1b Mitchell lf Troncoso p b-Barajas ph Sherrill p Kuo p d-Oeltjen ph Belisario p A.Ellis c Hu ss Ely p Re.Johnson lf Totals

AB 3 3 4 3 4 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 4 0 2 29

R 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 0 1 1 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .278 .259 .284 .260 .198 .289 .235 .258 .250 .000 .201 .000 ----.000 .237 ---

H BI BB 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 5 6

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 5

Avg. .268 .250 .284 .249 .269 .143 .000 .236 --.000 .227 --.278 .158 .074 .260

Arizona 203 020 000 — 7 10 0 Los Angeles 000 103 100 — 5 4 0 a-flied out for Kroenke in the 6th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Troncoso in the 6th. c-doubled for Allen in the 8th. d-flied out for Kuo in the 8th. e-singled for Heilman in the 9th. LOB—Arizona 5, Los Angeles 6. 2B—S.Drew (33), C.Young (33), Ad.LaRoche (37), Gillespie (8). HR—Ad.LaRoche (25), off Ely; Kemp (26), off Kroenke. RBIs—C.Young (91), K.Johnson (71), Ad.LaRoche 3 (100), Mar.Reynolds (85), Allen (6), Ethier (81), Kemp 2 (85), Loney (88), Barajas (47). SB—S.Drew (9), C.Young (28). CS—Mar.Reynolds (4). SF—Allen, Barajas. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 2 (G.Parra, K.Johnson); Los Angeles 2 (Hu, Kemp). Runners moved up—Ethier, A.Ellis. GIDP— Ad.LaRoche, Hu. DP—Arizona 1 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche); Los Angeles 1 (Theriot, Hu, Loney). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kroenke W, 1-0 5 2 1 1 2 1 71 6.75 Vasquez 0 1 3 3 2 0 13 5.20 Rosa H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 4.50 Demel H, 4 1 0 1 1 1 1 21 5.35 Heilman H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.63 Gutierrez S, 15 1 0 0 0 1 2 17 5.08 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ely L, 4-10 4 2-3 7 7 7 3 3 79 5.49 Troncoso 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 18 4.39 Sherrill 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 6.69 Kuo 1 1 0 0 0 3 20 1.22 Belisario 1 1 0 0 1 0 14 5.04 Vasquez pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Rosa 3-2. HBP—by Vasquez (Kemp), by Demel (Re.Johnson). WP—Demel. T—2:54. A—36,713 (56,000).

AL ROUNDUP

).

Royals 7, Rays 0 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Bruce Chen threw a twohitter for his first major league shutout Friday night, leading Kansas City to a victory over Tampa Bay that dropped the Rays to second place in the AL East. The Rays have lost five of six, managing just nine runs during that span.

WCGB — — 12 12 22 WCGB — 6 13 15 16 33 WCGB — 1 7 12 25

L10 7-3 4-6 3-7 4-6 6-4 L10 5-5 7-3 8-2 2-8 6-4 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 1-9 5-5 6-4

Str W-2 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-3 W-4 L-2 W-2 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-6 L-1 W-1

Home 52-29 55-24 39-40 46-33 41-40 Home 47-32 50-29 40-41 41-38 35-46 40-41 Home 48-31 45-36 52-29 43-36 40-41

Away 44-35 35-46 39-42 32-49 27-52 Away 42-39 34-47 37-42 34-47 39-40 17-62 Away 43-38 44-35 31-48 35-46 25-54

Saturday’s Games Colorado (Jimenez 19-8) at St. Louis (Lohse 4-8), 10:10 a.m. Milwaukee (Capuano 4-4) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 4-3), 10:10 a.m. Washington (Maya 0-3) at N.Y. Mets (Valdes 3-3), 10:10 a.m. Philadelphia (Worley 1-1) at Atlanta (Hanson 10-11), 1:10 p.m. San Diego (Stauffer 5-5) at San Francisco (Zito 9-13), 1:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 10-6) at Houston (Happ 6-3), 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 2-11) at Florida (Sanabia 5-3), 4:10 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 3-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 11-11), 7:10 p.m.

Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Bartlett ss Crawford lf W.Aybar dh C.Pena 1b Zobrist 2b Baldelli rf Jennings rf Shoppach c S.Rodriguez 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 3 2 3 0 3 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 2

Kansas City G.Blanco rf Aviles 2b B.Butler 1b Ka’aihue dh Fields 3b Gordon lf Y.Betancourt ss B.Pena c Dyson cf Totals

AB 5 4 5 1 4 4 3 4 4 34

R H 2 3 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 2 2 2 7 13

BI 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 7

Avg. .239 .254 .306 .230 .195 .241 .174 .190 .199 .254

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3

Avg. .270 .306 .319 .220 .333 .215 .259 .267 .240

Tampa Bay 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Kansas City 103 012 00x — 7 13 0 E—Bartlett (11). LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Kansas City 8. 2B—B.Upton (38), B.Butler (44), Y.Betancourt (29). 3B—G.Blanco (3), Dyson (2). RBIs—G.Blanco 3 (11), B.Butler (78), Gordon (18). S—Ka’aihue. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 1 (Crawford); Kansas City 2 (B.Pena, Y.Betancourt). Runners moved up—B.Butler. GIDP—B.Butler, Y.Betancourt. DP—Tampa Bay 2 (J.Shields, Zobrist, C.Pena), (S.Rodriguez, C.Pena). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB Shlds L, 13-15 5 12 7 6 2 Ekstrom 1 1 0 0 1 Cormier 1 0 0 0 1 Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 Kansas City IP H R ER BB Chen W, 12-7 9 2 0 0 2 J.Shields pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Ekstrom Ekstrom (Ka’aihue). WP—J.Shields. T—2:22. A—23,374 (37,840).

SO 1 0 2 0 SO 7

NP 99 14 15 6 NP 104

ERA 5.18 3.31 3.94 3.38 ERA 4.17

1-0. IBB—off

Baltimore C.Patterson dh Markakis rf Wigginton 3b Scott 1b Pie lf Ad.Jones cf Andino 2b Tatum c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 1 4 4 2 4 4 30

R 1 2 0 2 2 2 1 0 0 10

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 3 4 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 9 10 4

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Avg. .270 .293 .251 .285 .274 .283 .240 .281 .233

Detroit 010 000 041 — 6 9 0 Baltimore 000 630 01x — 10 9 0 a-struck out for St. Pierre in the 9th. LOB—Detroit 7, Baltimore 2. 2B—Damon (36), St. Pierre (1), Ad.Jones 2 (25), Tatum (4). 3B—Rhymes (3), Pie (5). HR—Kelly (8), off Tillman. RBIs—Damon (50), Raburn (62), Kelly 2 (26), Jh.Peralta (81), Boesch (67), Pie 3 (31), Ad.Jones 4 (69), Tatum 3 (9). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 3 (Raburn 2, S.Sizemore); Baltimore 1 (C.Patterson). Runners moved up—Wigginton, C.Izturis. GIDP— Pie, Andino, C.Izturis. DP—Detroit 3 (Jh.Peralta, Rhymes, Kelly), (Jh.Peralta, Kelly), (Rhymes, Jh.Peralta, Kelly). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bndrmn L, 8-10 4 1-3 6 9 9 4 1 67 5.53 Bonine 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.63 Figaro 2 2 1 1 0 1 27 6.75 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tillman W, 2-5 7 3 1 1 2 7 102 5.87 Hendrickson 1-3 3 4 4 2 0 21 5.26 Albers 1 2-3 3 1 1 0 3 40 4.52 Inherited runners-scored—Bonine 1-1, Albers 3-2. HBP—by Bonderman (Scott, Andino). T—2:32. A—0 (48,290).

Orioles 2, Tigers 1 (second game) Detroit Rhymes 2b Damon dh Boesch rf Raburn lf Kelly 1b Inge 3b C.Wells cf Santiago ss Laird c Avila c Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 2 32

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 1

Baltimore AB R H Lugo 2b 4 0 1 C.Izturis ss 0 0 0 Markakis rf 4 1 2 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 2 J.Fox dh 3 0 1 Wieters c 3 0 0 Reimold lf 4 0 0 Pie lf 0 0 0 Andino ss-2b 4 1 4 J.Bell 3b 3 0 1 Bran.Snyder 1b 3 0 2 Totals 32 2 13

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 7

Avg. .301 .271 .258 .278 .251 .247 .337 .265 .207 .231

SO 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .249 .233 .295 .285 .221 .250 .207 .274 .296 .213 .300

Detroit 000 000 001 — 1 4 0 Baltimore 001 000 10x — 2 13 3 E—Lugo (2), Andino (1), Bran.Snyder (1). LOB—Detroit 6, Baltimore 8. HR—Kelly (9), off Uehara; Markakis (11), off Porcello. RBIs—Kelly (27), Lugo (20), Markakis (58). CS—Santiago (2). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 1 (Boesch); Baltimore 5 (Wieters, Lugo, Reimold, Ad.Jones 2). Runners moved up—Reimold, J.Bell. GIDP—Lugo, Ad.Jones, Reimold, J.Bell. DP—Detroit 4 (Rhymes, Santiago, Kelly), (Inge, Rhymes, Kelly), (Rhymes, Santiago, Kelly), (Rhymes, Santiago, Kelly). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Prcllo L, 10-12 6 1-3 12 2 2 0 4 96 4.92 Perry 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.65 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gthrie W, 11-14 8 2 0 0 1 5 107 3.83 Uehara S, 12 1 2 1 1 0 2 11 2.93 Inherited runners-scored—Perry 3-0. HBP—by Porcello (Wieters), by Perry (J.Fox), by Guthrie (Santiago). T—2:14. A—20,870 (48,290).

Indians 7, White Sox 3

MINNEAPOLIS — Edwin Encarnacion’s three-run homer highlighted Toronto’s four-run eighth inning against Minnesota.

CHICAGO — Shin-Soo Choo hit a two-run homer, Fausto Carmona pitched six strong innings and Cleveland extended its seasonbest winning streak to seven games with a victory over Chicago.

Toronto AB R H Snider lf 5 0 0 Wise lf 0 0 0 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 J.Bautista rf 5 0 2 V.Wells cf 3 1 1 Overbay 1b 5 1 3 A.Hill 2b 5 0 0 Lind dh 4 1 1 J.Buck c 4 2 3 Encarnacion 3b 4 1 3 Totals 39 6 13

Blue Jays 6, Twins 3

Minnesota AB R Span cf 4 1 Hardy ss 4 0 Mauer c 4 0 Delm.Young lf 4 1 Thome dh 2 0 a-Plouffe ph-dh 2 1 Cuddyer 1b 4 0 Kubel rf 4 0 1-Repko pr 0 0 Valencia 3b 4 0 Punto 2b 3 0 Totals 35 3

BB 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 6

Avg. .255 .250 .276 .263 .273 .247 .204 .237 .279 .242

Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf Hafner dh J.Nix 3b-2b Crowe lf LaPorta 1b Valbuena 2b A.Marte 3b Marson c Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 4 5 5 4 0 4 38

R H 2 1 2 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 12

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 0

SO 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .267 .269 .327 .300 .278 .132 .272 .249 .232 .318 .240

Chicago Pierre lf Vizquel ss Teahen rf Viciedo 1b Kotsay dh Flowers c Morel 3b De Aza cf Lillibridge 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 2 4 4 4 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 5

Toronto 000 010 140 — 6 13 0 Minnesota 010 001 001 — 3 9 1 1-ran for Kubel in the 9th. E—Punto (8). LOB—Toronto 9, Minnesota 5. 2B—J.Bautista (35), V.Wells (43), Overbay (37), Lind (32), Cuddyer (37). HR—Encarnacion (19), off Crain; Delm.Young (21), off R.Romero; Plouffe (2), off Frasor. RBIs—J.Buck (66), Encarnacion 4 (48), Mauer (75), Delm.Young (111), Plouffe (5). SB—J.Bautista (9). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 6 (A.Hill 3, J.Bautista 2, Lind); Minnesota 1 (Valencia). Runners moved up—Lind. GIDP—Y.Escobar, Delm. Young. DP—Toronto 1 (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Overbay); Minnesota 1 (Hardy, Punto, Cuddyer). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romro W, 14-9 8 6 2 2 0 5 110 3.73 Frasor 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 22 3.68 Gregg S, 37-42 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.24 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pavano 7 9 2 1 1 3 100 3.75 Crain L, 1-1 1 3 4 4 1 1 37 3.04 Perkins 1 1 0 0 1 2 20 6.10 Inherited runners-scored—Gregg 2-0. IBB—off Perkins (V.Wells). WP—R.Romero. T—2:46. A—39,937 (39,504).

Orioles 10, Tigers 6 (first game) BALTIMORE — Jeremy Guthrie allowed two hits over eight shutout innings, Nick Markakis homered and Baltimore beat Detroit for a doubleheader sweep. In the opener, Chris Tillman (2-5) pitched seven innings of three-hit ball and Adam Jones drove in four runs to lead the Orioles. Detroit A.Jackson cf Rhymes 2b Damon dh Raburn lf Kelly 1b Jh.Peralta ss Boesch rf Inge 3b S.Sizemore 3b Avila c St. Pierre c a-Santiago ph Totals

AB 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 2 2 2 1 1 36

R 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 1 3 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 6 4 10

Avg. .296 .302 .273 .279 .251 .250 .260 .247 .230 .233 .286 .267

BI 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 6

Avg. .241 .274 .300 .278 .225 .252 .223 .192 .234 .195

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 4 7 3 3 10

Avg. .273 .279 .260 .299 .239 .000 .224 .261 .228

Cleveland 303 000 100 — 7 12 0 Chicago 110 000 001 — 3 7 1 E—Lillibridge (4). LOB—Cleveland 9, Chicago 6. 2B—Brantley (8), A.Cabrera (16), Teahen (13), Kotsay (17). HR—Choo (22), off T.Pena; Morel (3), off Carmona. RBIs—A.Cabrera (28), Choo 2 (90), J.Nix (34), Crowe 2 (35), Viciedo (12), Morel (7), De Aza (1). SB—Crowe (19). SF—J.Nix. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 5 (Valbuena 3, Hafner, LaPorta); Chicago 4 (Flowers 2, Lillibridge 2). Runners moved up—Choo, Morel. GIDP—Vizquel. DP—Cleveland 1 (A.Marte, J.Nix, LaPorta). Cleveland IP H R ER BB Crmna W, 13-14 6 5 2 2 1 J.Lewis 1 0 0 0 0 R.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 Pestano 1 1 1 1 2 Chicago IP H R ER BB T.Pena L, 5-3 6 9 6 6 2 Harrell 1 3 1 1 0 Putz 1 0 0 0 0 G.Infante 1 0 0 0 2 IBB—off T.Pena (Hafner). WP—T.Pena. T—2:52. A—23,128 (40,615).

SO 7 1 0 2 SO 2 1 2 1

NP 93 15 12 27 NP 104 30 7 24

ERA 3.77 2.97 3.25 2.25 ERA 5.10 4.88 2.83 0.00

Angels 5, Rangers 4 (11 innings) ARLINGTON, Texas — Juan Rivera homered twice, including a tiebreaking drive in the 11th, and Los Angeles beat Texas despite the return of Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton. Los Angeles Bourjos cf M.Izturis 2b B.Abreu lf J.Mathis c Tor.Hunter rf H.Matsui dh 2-Trumbo pr-dh Callaspo 3b J.Rivera 1b Conger c a-Napoli ph 1-Willits pr-lf E.Aybar ss b-H.Kendrick ph Romine ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 1 5 4 1 5 5 2 0 2 2 1 2 41

R H 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 11

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b J.Hamilton cf Francoeur lf Guerrero dh

AB 5 6 3 2 4

R 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .202 .250 .256 .197 .283 .271 .000 .266 .254 .200 .240 .263 .251 .280 .143

H BI BB 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 3 0 0 0

Avg. .265 .282 .359 .340 .300

N.Cruz rf Kinsler 2b Moreland 1b B.Molina c 3-German pr Teagarden c Borbon lf-cf Totals

5 4 3 4 0 0 5 41

0 1 3 0 0 0 0 4

1 0 2 3 0 0 0 8

0 0 2 1 0 0 0 3

0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

1 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

.316 .288 .254 .237 .250 .157 .278

Los Angeles000 100 021 01 — 5 11 0 Texas 000 010 102 00 — 4 8 0 a-walked for Conger in the 8th. b-singled for E.Aybar in the 8th. 1-ran for Napoli in the 8th. 2-ran for H.Matsui in the 9th. 3-ran for B.Molina in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 7, Texas 10. 2B—B.Abreu (41), Willits (7), Andrus (15). HR—Tor.Hunter (23), off Tom. Hunter; J.Rivera (14), off M.Lowe; J.Rivera (15), off Harrison; Moreland 2 (9), off Jer.Weaver 2. RBIs—Bourjos (14), M.Izturis (27), Tor.Hunter (89), J.Rivera 2 (52), Moreland 2 (25), B.Molina (18). SB—Moreland (3), German (4). CS—M.Izturis (3). SF—Bourjos. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (Tor. Hunter 2, Romine, Trumbo); Texas 5 (Guerrero, N.Cruz, M.Young 2, Kinsler). Runners moved up—Tor.Hunter, J.Hamilton. GIDP—Callaspo. DP—Texas 1 (M.Young, Andrus, Moreland). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jer.Weaver 7 6 2 2 1 4 87 3.01 Jepsen H, 26 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.03 Rodney BS, 7 1 1 2 2 2 0 29 4.24 Thmpsn W, 2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 1.45 Cassevah 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 3.20 Kohn S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.11 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tom.Hunter 5 3 1 1 0 1 60 3.73 Nippert 2 0 0 0 1 1 27 4.20 Kirkman BS, 1 2-3 2 2 2 2 0 23 1.65 Ogando 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 1.33 M.Lowe 1 3 1 1 0 1 21 3.65 Harrison L, 3-2 2 3 1 1 0 0 27 4.71 Cassevah pitched to 2 batters in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Kohn 2-0, Ogando 2-0. HBP—by Rodney (Kinsler), by Cassevah (Teagarden). WP—R.Thompson. Balk—Jer.Weaver. T—3:26. A—43,149 (49,170).

Athletics 9, Mariners 0 SEATTLE — Daric Barton homered in his first two at-bats, including a grand slam, and Trevor Cahill pitched seven sharp innings for his 18th victory to lead Oakland over Seattle. Oakland R.Davis cf Barton 1b Larish 1b M.Ellis 2b Cust dh K.Suzuki c Kouzmanoff 3b Carter lf Hermida rf Pennington ss Totals

AB 3 4 1 5 4 5 4 2 4 4 36

R H 2 2 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 2 9 10

Seattle I.Suzuki rf 1-Halman pr-rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez dh Smoak 1b Langerhans lf J.Bard c M.Saunders cf Mangini 3b Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 3 0 4 3 3 3 4 4 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 6 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

BB 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 5

SO 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 6

Avg. .283 .275 .185 .289 .273 .242 .248 .156 .215 .253

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 0 4

SO 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .315 .048 .261 .246 .214 .196 .213 .206 .200 .229

Oakland 160 101 000 — 9 10 0 Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 6 0 1-ran for I.Suzuki in the 8th. LOB—Oakland 5, Seattle 7. 2B—Barton (33). HR— Barton 2 (10), off French 2. RBIs—R.Davis (52), Barton 6 (57), M.Ellis (46), Pennington (46). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (Cust, M.Ellis, Larish); Seattle 3 (Figgins, M.Saunders 2). GIDP—K.Suzuki, J.Bard, Jo.Wilson. DP—Oakland 2 (Kouzmanoff, M.Ellis, Barton), (M.Ellis, Pennington, Larish); Seattle 1 (Mangini, Figgins, Smoak). Oakland IP H R Cahill W, 18-8 7 5 0 H.Rodriguez 1 1 0 Ro.Wolf 1 0 0 Seattle IP H R French L, 5-7 4 8 8 Seddon 3 1 1 Olson 1 1 0 B.Sweeney 1 0 0 WP—Olson. T—2:22. A—19,656 (47,878).

ER 0 0 0 ER 8 1 0 0

BB 2 0 2 BB 2 2 1 0

SO 6 1 1 SO 3 1 1 1

NP 95 15 24 NP 77 42 20 10

ERA 2.97 4.50 4.26 ERA 4.83 5.64 4.46 3.16

LEADERS NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—CGonzalez, Colorado, .336; Votto, Cincinnati, .323; OInfante, Atlanta, .320; Tulowitzki, Colorado, .317; Holliday, St. Louis, .313; Pujols, St. Louis, .313; Prado, Atlanta, .307; Zimmerman, Washington, .307. RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 115; CGonzalez, Colorado, 111; Weeks, Milwaukee, 111; Votto, Cincinnati, 105; Werth, Philadelphia, 105; Braun, Milwaukee, 100; AHuff, San Francisco, 100; Prado, Atlanta, 100. RBI—Pujols, St. Louis, 118; CGonzalez, Colorado, 117; Votto, Cincinnati, 112; Howard, Philadelphia, 108; Braun, Milwaukee, 103; ADunn, Washington, 103; Holliday, St. Louis, 103. HITS—CGonzalez, Colorado, 197; Braun, Milwaukee, 187; Holliday, St. Louis, 184; Prado, Atlanta, 184; Pujols, St. Louis, 183; Votto, Cincinnati, 176; AdGonzalez, San Diego, 174; Weeks, Milwaukee, 174. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 46; Holliday, St. Louis, 45; Braun, Milwaukee, 44; ATorres, San Francisco, 43; Loney, Los Angeles, 41; Prado, Atlanta, 40; Byrd, Chicago, 39; Pujols, St. Louis, 39; ASoriano, Chicago, 39. HOME RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 42; ADunn, Washington, 38; Votto, Cincinnati, 37; CGonzalez, Colorado, 34; Fielder, Milwaukee, 32; MarReynolds, Arizona, 32; Uggla, Florida, 32. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 52; Pagan, New York, 37; Morgan, Washington, 34; Victorino, Philadelphia, 34; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 33. PITCHING—Halladay, Philadelphia, 21-10; Wainwright, St. Louis, 20-11; Jimenez, Colorado, 19-8; Arroyo, Cincinnati, 17-10; CCarpenter, St. Louis, 16-9; THudson, Atlanta, 16-9; Lincecum, San Francisco, 16-10; DLowe, Atlanta, 16-12. STRIKEOUTS—Lincecum, San Francisco, 231; Halladay, Philadelphia, 219; Wainwright, St. Louis, 213; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 212; Hamels, Philadelphia, 209; Jimenez, Colorado, 204; Dempster, Chicago, 201. SAVES—BrWilson, San Francisco, 47; HBell, San Diego, 46; Marmol, Chicago, 38; FCordero, Cincinnati, 38; Wagner, Atlanta, 36; LNunez, Florida, 30; Lidge, Philadelphia, 27; Franklin, St. Louis, 27. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—JHamilton, Texas, .359; MiCabrera, Detroit, .328; Mauer, Minnesota, .327; ABeltre, Boston, .321; Butler, Kansas City, .319; ISuzuki, Seattle, .315; Cano, New York, .314. RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 111; Teixeira, New York, 111; Jeter, New York, 110; JBautista, Toronto, 109; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 107; AJackson, Detroit, 103; Cano, New York, 101. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 126; JBautista, Toronto, 124; ARodriguez, New York, 123; Guerrero, Texas, 114; Konerko, Chicago, 111; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 111; Teixeira, New York, 107. HITS—ISuzuki, Seattle, 211; Cano, New York, 193; ABeltre, Boston, 189; Butler, Kansas City, 187; JHamilton, Texas, 183; Markakis, Baltimore, 183; MYoung, Texas, 183. DOUBLES—ABeltre, Boston, 49; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 46; MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; Markakis, Baltimore, 45; DelmYoung, Minnesota, 45; Butler, Kansas City, 44; VWells, Toronto, 43. HOME RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 54; Konerko, Chicago, 39; MiCabrera, Detroit, 38; Teixeira, New York, 33; DOrtiz, Boston, 32; JHamilton, Texas, 31; VWells, Toronto, 31. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 66; RDavis, Oakland, 48; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 46; Figgins, Seattle, 42; Gardner, New York, 42; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 42. PITCHING—Sabathia, New York, 21-7; Price, Tampa Bay, 19-6; Lester, Boston, 19-9; Cahill, Oakland, 18-8; Verlander, Detroit, 18-9; CBuchholz, Boston, 17-7; PHughes, New York, 17-8; ESantana, Los Angeles, 17-9; Pavano, Minnesota, 17-11. STRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 233; FHernandez, Seattle, 232; Lester, Boston, 225; Verlander, Detroit, 219; Liriano, Minnesota, 201; Sabathia, New York, 197; CLewis, Texas, 192. SAVES—RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 44; Soria, Kansas City, 43; NFeliz, Texas, 39; Papelbon, Boston, 37; Gregg, Toronto, 37; MaRivera, New York, 32; Aardsma, Seattle, 31.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 D5

“That credit goes to the offensive line, giving us four or five yards each play. You can do a lot of things with a strong running back, an athletic quarterback and a line that gives you a good push.”

PREP ROUNDUP

Crook County football falls on road in close contest

— Bend High coach Craig Walker, on the Lava Bears rushing for 262 yards against Redmond

Bulletin staff report

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend’s Tyler Stacey (8) makes a reception for a touchdown in front of Redmond’s Robby Durighello during the first quarter against Redmond on Friday night at Punk Hunnell Stadium.

Bears Continued from D1 Bend won the game by dominating the clock, controlling the ball for 29 minutes and 25 seconds of the 48-minute game. “Hand it to Bend, they ground the ball well,” Panther coach Dan Elliott said about the Lava Bear offense, which recorded 31 first downs. “We played hard, but we were worn out a bit.” Bend ran 80 offensive plays to Redmond’s 46, and three times the Bears produced scoring drives of 14 plays or longer. The Lava Bears (1-0 IMC, 3-2 overall) kept the chains moving with a punishing rushing game, running the ball 57 times for 262 yards. “That credit goes to the offensive line, giving us four or five yards each play,” Lava Bear coach Craig Walker said. “You can do a lot of things with a strong running back, an athletic quarterback and a line that gives you a good push.” The Panthers (1-1 IMC, 3-2), whose two losses this season have come by a combined four points, battled to the final whistle, scoring with 24 seconds left in the game to narrow Bend’s lead to 34-32. Redmond’s ensuing onside kick was covered by the Bears, and Grim took a knee to end the game. Panther quarterback Mitch Dahlen completed 13 of 16 pass attempts for 218 yards and three touchdowns with no interceptions. Redmond running back Jordan Harding added 152 yards rushing and a touchdown. While the Panthers were never out of the game — a re-

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Andrew Larkin (84) pulls in a pass for a touchdown in front of Bend’s J.C. Grim during Redmond’s opening drive of the third quarter Friday night. covered onside kick would have given Redmond a chance at the win — Bend effectively won the league contest with a 15-play, 60-yard drive that culminated with Grim connecting with fullback Kenny Dailey on fourthand-three touchdown pass from Redmond’s four-yard line. Ahead 28-25 with 1 minute and 19 seconds left in the game, the Lava Bears elected to go for it on

fourth down. Grim rolled to his left and hit Dailey for what was his first and only reception on the night, giving Bend a 34-25 lead after the Bears’ two-point conversion attempt failed. The touchdown call proved pivotal after Dahlen led the Panthers on a frantic five-play, 80-yard scoring drive of their own, which ended when Dahlen hit Sawyer Gerdes in the back

of the end zone for a three-yard touchdown pass. “It’s definitely fun,” Grim said about the Bears’ go-for-broke offense, which converted three of four fourth-down attempts in the game. “It’s go hard or go home.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

PREP SCOREBOARD FOOTBALL Statewide scores Friday’s Games Adrian 76, Union 30 Aloha 47, Westview 26 Arlington 64, Triangle Lake 18 Ashland 35, Marshfield 9 Astoria 35, Scappoose 34 Baker 26, Burns 22 Banks 48, Tillamook 6 Blanchet Catholic 22, Harrisburg 8 Centennial 39, Barlow 27 Central 56, Philomath 13 Central Catholic 35, David Douglas 21 Churchill 33, Springfield 21 Colton 46, Willamina 14 Corvallis 35, Woodburn 22 Country Christian 68, Alsea 22 Cove 42, Joseph 24 Crane 60, Dayville/Monument 6 Crescent Valley 27, West Albany 13 Crow 43, Waldport 0 Dayton 33, Horizon Christian 0 Dufur 46, Ione 16 Elkton 44, Powers 42 Elmira 26, Sweet Home 14 Enterprise 27, Riverside 13 Franklin 35, Cleveland 0 Gladstone 25, Estacada 12 Glendale 42, Days Creek 0 Glide 34, Central Linn 24 Gresham 36, Reynolds 35 Heppner 50, Elgin 12 Hillsboro 39, Glencoe 21 Hood River 36, Summit 14 Jefferson 28, Salem Academy 7 Jefferson 41, Benson 6 Jesuit 10, Sunset 7 Kennedy 59, Valley Catholic 25 Klamath 21, Henley 7 Knappa 52, Gaston 16 Lake Oswego 31, Canby 21

Lakeridge 20, Clackamas 14 Lebanon 48, South Albany 7 Lowell 50, Siletz Valley 10 Madison 13, Wilson 6 Marist 55, Eagle Point 6 Marshall 32, Corbett 14 McKay 50, Sprague 29 McLoughlin 35, Umatilla 0 Molalla 27, North Marion 7 Moses Lake, Wash. 33, Hermiston 14 Newport 42, Cascade 20 North Douglas 41, Yoncalla 14 North Lake 38, Butte Falls 26 North Salem 34, McNary 26 Pendleton 69, Ontario 62 Perrydale 50, Oregon School for Deaf 8 Pleasant Hill 41, Toledo 13 Portland Christian 44, Vernonia 0 Powder Valley 28, Pine Eagle 24 Prairie City 60, Mitchell-Spray 6 Putnam 21, Milwaukie 14 Rogue River 42, Coquille 40 Roosevelt 33, Myrtle Point 0 Roseburg 31, South Medford 28, OT Santiam 30, Lost River 22 Santiam Christian 58, Creswell 7 Scio 28, Rainier 18 Sheldon 49, North Medford 14 Sheridan 64, Gervais 8 Sherman 58, Condon/Wheeler 14 Silverton 46, Dallas 7 Siuslaw 35, Douglas 27 Skyview, Wash. 49, Lincoln 26 Southridge 17, Beaverton 13 St. Mary’s 48, Chemawa 0 St. Paul 70, Echo 24 Stanfield 58, Irrigon 13 Stayton 40, Taft 0 Sutherlin 47, South Umpqua 7 Thurston 20, Grants Pass 19 Tigard 49, Forest Grove 21 Tualatin 49, McMinnville 14 Wallowa 46, Imbler 42 Warrenton 26, Nestucca 14

West Linn 35, Oregon City 0 West Salem 50, South Salem 28 Weston-McEwen 22, Pilot Rock 0 Willamette 34, North Eugene 27 Yamhill-Carlton 40, Seaside 26 Friday’s local summaries ——— INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE ——— BEND 34, REDMOND 32 Redmond 7 3 7 15 — 32 Bend 7 7 7 13 — 34 R— Jordan Harding 4 run (Travis Simpson kick) B— Tyler Stacey 20 pass from J.C. Grim (Hayden Crook kick) R— Simpson 29 FG B— Gavin Gerdes 5 run (Crook kick) R— Keanu Tavita 36 pass from Mitch Dahlen (Simpson kick) B— Kyle Lammers 20 run (Crook kick) B— Tanner Torkelson 58 pass from Grim (Crook kick) R— Andrew Larkin 50 pass from Dahlen (Harding run) B— Kenny Dailey 4 pass from Grim (run fail) R— Sawyer Gerdes 3 pass from Dahlen NONCONFERENCE ——— CASCADE CHRISTIAN 21, CROOK COUNTY 13 Cascade Christian 0 7 14 0 — 21 Crook County 13 0 0 0 — 13 Crook—Jordan Reeher 70 run (Travis Bartels kick failed) Crook—Jordan Reeher 1 run (Bartels kick) Cascade—Jordan Brown 7 run (Tyler Beard kick) Cascade—Brandon Williams 83 kick return (Tyler Beard kick) Cascade—Daniel Scottow 3 run (Beard kick) Camas Valley 62, Gilchrist 20 La Salle 56, Madras 6

Class 5A NONCONFERENCE ——— MOUNTAIN VIEW 27, THE DALLES-WAHTONKA 6 Mountain View 7 6 14 0 — 27

The Dalles-Wahtonka 0 6 0 0 — 6 MV— Austin Sears 12 run (Skyler Laugnlin kick) MV— Cody Hollister 13 pass from Jacob Hollister (kick failed) TDW— Seth Hartley 11 pass from Ben Kueshmann (run failed) MV— John Carroll 7 pass from J. Hollister (Laughlin kick) MV— C Hollister 30 pass from J. Hollister (Laughlin kick) ——— HOOD RIVER VALLEY 36, SUMMIT 14 Hood River Valley 14 13 9 0 — 36 Summit 0 0 7 7 — 14 H—Jesse Miles 28 pass from Dalton Frazier (Francisco Castro kick) H—Gabi Nuno 10 pass from Cody Walker (Castro kick) H—Miles 7 pass from Walker (Castro kick) H—Frazier 14 pass from Walker S—Cole Thomas 7 pass from Sam Stelk (Thomas kick) H—Frazier 43 pass from Walker (Castro kick) H—Frazier safety S—Stelk 4 run (Thomas kock)

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— JUNCTION CITY 17, SISTERS 6 Junction City 0 3 7 7 — 17 Sisters 0 0 0 6 — 6 JC — Brandon Gurdis FG JC — Gurdis 7 pass from Brit Bay (Gurdis kick) JC — Cory Jons 23 pass from Bay (Gurdis kick) S — Jalen Miller 46 run (kick failed) ——— COTTAGE GROVE 52, LA PINE 12 Cottage Grove 21 12 12 7 — 52 La Pine 0 0 6 6 — 12 CG— Dylan Millsaps 23 pass from Dustin Hurd (Alex Toureen kick) CG— Hurd 3 run (Toureen kick) CG— Zach Borrelli 4 run (Toureen kick) CG— Toureen 50 pass from Hurd (kick blocked) CG— Toureen 55 run (kick failed) LP— Deion Mock 17 run (kick failed) CG— Toureen 44 pass from Hurd (kick failed) CG— Casey Helsel 50 pass from Hurd (Brad Bonds kick) LP— Spencer Wilson 43 pass from Austin Manley (kick failed)

CENTRAL POINT — After beating two Central Oregon rivals, La Pine and Madras, by a combined score of 81-0 over the last two weeks, the Crook County Cowboys were thrown off their high horse Friday night by Class 3A Cascade Christian in a 21-13 road loss to the Challengers. “We just booted the ball around and didn’t take care of business in the second half,” said Crook County coach Woody Bennett. The game started in fine fashion for the visitors, when Cowboy running back Jordan Reeher scampered 70 yards on the first play from scrimmage to give Crook County a quick lead. Reeher, who gained 114 yards on just 16 carries, would score again on a one-yard run later in the first quarter, but that would be last time the Cowboys would put points on the scoreboard. Cascade Christian ran the double-wing formation effectively, and Brandon Williams took the opening kickoff of the second half 83 yards for a touchdown to give the Challengers a comeback victory. Crook County quarterback Travis Bartels completed five passes for 82 yards in the loss, four of those going to senior Tyler Tooley. The Cowboys (3-2) host Washougal of Washington next Friday night. In other prep events Friday: FOOTBALL Hood River Valley. . . . . . . . . . . 36 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Summit showed flashes of promise in a nonconference home loss to Hood River Valley that extended the Storm’s losing skid, dating back to the 2008 season, to 18 games. Summit’s defensive unit has struggled against the pass this year, and the Eagles amassed 350 yards through the air, including four touchdown passes in the first half to give Hood River Valley a 27-0 halftime lead. Justin Carroll rushed for 55 yards for Summit, and quarterback Sam Stelk completed 17 passes for 176 yards, including a touchdown to Cole Thomas. Summit (0-5 overall) plays at Bend next Friday night. Junction City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 SISTERS — Plagued by penalties in its Sky-Em League season opener — Sisters committed eight to Junction City’s one — the Outlaws failed to keep pace with the visiting Tigers. Junction City took a 3-0 lead in the second quarter and increased its advantage to 10 points in the third quarter after logging the game’s first touchdown. Sisters, despite accumulating more rushing yards (195) and passing yards (109), scored its only touchdown in the fourth quarter. Quarterback Jalen Miller, playing from the wildcat formation, broke free and rushed 46 yards for the Sisters score. Miller tallied 72 yards on 20 carries. The Outlaws (0-1 Sky-Em, 1-4 overall) are on the road at Elmira on Thursday. Cottage Grove. . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 LA PINE — The host Hawks could not contain Cottage Grove quarterback Dustin Hurd, who passed for four touchdowns and ran for another in the SkyEm League opener for La Pine. Deion Mock led the La Pine offense with 151 rushing yards on 16 carries, including a 17-yard touchdown run in the third quarter. Hawks quarterback Austin Manley completed five of 15 passes for 141 yards, highlighted by a 43-yard touchdown pass to Spencer Wilson in the fourth period. La Pine (0-1 Sky-Em, 0-5 overall) returns to league play Thursday night at Sweet Home. La Salle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 MADRAS — La Salle put on football clinic for host Madras in what served as both teams’ Tri-Valley League opener. The White Buffaloes (0-1 Tri-Valley League, 1-3 overall) continue league play Thursday at Gladstone.

Camas Valley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 CAMAS VALLEY — Tyler Shuey’s kickoff return put Gilchrist on the scoreboard early and Josh Anderson added two more touchdowns in the first half, but then the Grizzlies lost their momentum. Camas Valley continued to add points in the second half while Gilchrist faltered on defense. The Grizzlies (0-3 Special District 2, 0-3 overall) play host to Powers next Friday in what will be their first home game of the season. VOLLEYBALL Grant . . . . . . . . . . 12-22-25-28-15 Redmond . . . . . . . 25-25-18-26-8 PORTLAND — After dominating the first game and winning the second, the Panthers proceeded to lose in heartbreaking fashion at Grant. Redmond dropped the final three games, despite having three match points in a 28-26 fourth game, and fell to the Generals in a Class 6A Special District 1 match. “It wasn’t about fatigue or being on the road,” said Redmond coach Lisa Pom-Arleau. “We just didn’t execute.” Aubrey Nitschelm recorded 20 kills for the Panthers and Chloe Payne added 15. Redmond (1-1 SD1) hosts Summit next Thursday. Clackamas . . . . . .25-21-25-21-15 Crook County . . 22-25-18-25-12 CLACKAMAS — Crook County took a three-match win streak to Class 6A Clackamas and played a back-and-forth match against the Cavaliers before losing on the road in five games. After dropping the first and third games and winning the second and the fourth, the four-time defending state champs fell in the final game. Makayla Lindburg led the Cowgirls with 24 kills and six blocks and Annie Fraser added six kills in the nonconference contest. Crook County will compete in the South Albany State Preview event today before meeting Summit in Bend on Tuesday. Hosanna Christian . . . .25-25-25 Gilchrist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10-11 GILCHRIST — Hosanna Christian swept Gilchrist at home. Sara Carlson provided the Grizzlies (2-4 Mountain Valley League) with nine assists and Jenny Scevers contributed two kills in the home loss. Gilchrist is at North Lake today. GIRLS SOCCER Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 PORTLAND — Grant held a 3-0 advantage at the half and added three more goals in the second half of the Class 6A Special District 1 home win. Redmond (0-2 SD1, 1-5 overall) travels to Bend to face Summit on Tuesday. BOYS SOCCER Grant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 PORTLAND — Redmond’s unbeaten run came to an end against Grant at Rose City Park. The Panthers gave up a goal in the opening minutes of the match but quickly countered when Johny Estrada finished a cross from Alex Mendez. Grant scored twice more before the half, but Mendez pulled one back with a 20-yard free kick and made it a one-goal game shortly after the break. The host Generals struck two more times to claim the Class 6A Special District 1 victory. “It let the boys know we’re not invincible,” Redmond coach Jason Clark said about the team’s first defeat of the season. The Panthers (0-1-1 SD1, 3-1-2 overall) host Summit on Tuesday. Central Christian. . . . . . . . . . . .10 Irrigon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 REDMOND — The White Tigers improved to 4-3 in Class 3A/2A/1A Special District 5 behind the play of In-Taek Hong and Isaac Reynolds. Hong scored four goals and Reynolds posted three in Central Christian’s fourth win in five games. Weston Shepherd, Corwin Eells and Jeremiah Byrne also recorded goals for the Tigers (4-3 overall). Central Christian continues league play with a road game at Culver today.


D6 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Awards Continued from D1 Is that enough to beat out New York Yankees ace CC Sabathia (21 wins) and Tampa Bay lefty David Price (19 wins), who benefit from pitching for high-scoring teams? “It’s interesting. I don’t know what’s right,” Boston Red Sox manager Terry Francona said. “It’s part of what makes baseball great. We have all kinds of debate about all kinds of things.” If nothing else, the race brings to bat another referendum on the importance of wins and losses for starting pitchers in today’s game. Last season, Kansas City ace Zack Greinke won the AL Cy Young Award with only 16 wins and San Francisco’s Tim Lincecum took the NL honor with 15 — the fewest for a Cy Young starter in a non-shortened season. Reflecting the shift in focus away from wins and losses, several voters pointed to modern statistics that swayed their opinions such as FIP (fielding independent pitching), WHIP (walks plus hits per inning) and WAR (wins above replacement). Hernandez’s sparkling numbers — and mediocre won-lost record — take the discussion even further this year, especially since Sabathia and Price provide such stiff competition. “I think players still put a value on the guy that wins a ton of games and his ERA is competitive,” Red Sox infielder Mike Lowell said. “I really don’t know who I would vote for. “It’s hard. I mean, there’s a lot of factors,” he added. “It’s going to be cool to see how it pans out.” Let’s take a close look at the numbers. Price is 19-6 with the second-best ERA (2.73) of the three leading contenders. He has 187 strikeouts in 207 2⁄3 innings. Hernandez, who won’t make another start, has 232 strikeouts in 249 2⁄3 innings. Sabathia, the 2007 Cy Young winner for Cleveland, leads the league in wins with a 21-7 record. He has a 3.18 ERA and has struck out 197 in 237 2⁄3 innings. Price and Sabathia also warrant extra credit for pitching under pennant-race pressure in the formidable AL East and leading their teams to the playoffs. But it’s Hernandez who gets the nod. Sabathia’s innings total pushes him ahead of Price — and while the Yankees have indeed racked up runs for their big left-hander, he’s shouldered a large burden by being extremely consistent for a shaky rotation that’s struggled since the All-Star break. Still, it’s impossible to ignore the fact that Sabathia has padded his numbers against weak competition. He’s 10-1 vs. Seattle, Baltimore and Kansas City, the AL’s three worst teams. Plus, he never has to face the Yankees, by far the most prolific offense in baseball. Hernandez has dominated the Bronx Bombers, going 3-0 with a 0.35 ERA and two complete games in three starts. He also has wins against Minnesota, Texas, Cincinnati and Boston. Last year, Hernandez was on the other end of this argument. The right-hander went 19-5, tying for the league lead in wins, with a 2.49 ERA for a Mariners club that finished eight games

Beavs Continued from D1 They opened with a 30-21 loss to then-No. 6 TCU at Cowboys Stadium, then got past Louisville 35-28 before the loss to the Broncos to emerge 1-2 for the start of Pac-10 play. “I think the competition itself prepared us for the kind of competition we’re going to see for the rest of the year in our league ... but there’s areas obviously that we didn’t perform very well in, so it exposed those things and we definitely have got to get better,” Oregon State coach Mike Riley said. “There are numerous things I’m sure that you’ve realized that we’ve got to do better: run the football, thirddown conversions, third-down defense — those are three — red-zone offense, those are four. There’s a lot of stuff that we’ve got to do better.” The two most glaring issues were the first two that Riley mentioned: the running game and thirddown conversions. Oregon State’s rush really centers around junior Jacquizz Rodgers, who has seen fewer yards this season after averaging nearly 111 a game last season. This year he’s averaging about 84. Rodgers, a fearless back who has been known in the past to use his small stature to hide and fool opposing defenses, ran for just 45 yards and a score at Boise State. It does not bode well for Quizz that last week the Sun Devils held No. 4 Oregon’s prolific rushers to just 145 yards. “We need to be more physical, with me running the ball and everyone else around us blocking. I think once we become more balanced, it will help it out, too,” Quizz said. “I need to take it upon myself and just work on running harder.” Then there’s the matter of those third-down conversions. Oregon State has only had nine of 34 attempts this season, or a paltry 26 percent. Arizona State beat two lower-tier opponents (Portland State and Northern Arizona) in the preseason, but lost at No. 11 Wisconsin before a valiant 42-31 loss to Oregon in their conference opener at Sun Devil Stadium. What ultimately doomed the Sun Devils against the Ducks was seven turnovers. “We can’t turn it over seven times in the football game and expect to win. People can ask you anything about that football game but that’s it right there,” coach Dennis Erickson said. “We were down in the red zone nine times. We turned it over three times down there. We fumbled and had two picks down there. That’s almost half the times down there.” Arizona State did manage 597 total offensive yards against the Ducks. Quarterback Steven Threet passed for 387 yards and three touchdowns — but he threw four interceptions. “It definitely made for a miserable Saturday,” Threet said. “On Sunday, you have to come in and watch film and learn from it. There are lessons to be learned and you have to wake up early Monday morning and start working on the next game. You can’t let the previous game effect preparation for the next game.” Threet is averaging nearly 313 yards in total offense each game, good for 10th-best in the nation. The Beavers have traditionally rebounded in

above .500. In the end, he was runner-up to Greinke, who had a 2.16 ERA for a 65-97 team. This time, King Felix wears the crown. Simply put, he’s been the best pitcher in the American League. He just happens to be on its worst team.

AL MVP Texas slugger Josh Hamilton appeared to be the front-runner before breaking two ribs Sept. 4 when he crashed into the outfield wall while making a catch in Minnesota. He missed the rest of the month and was slated to return to the lineup Friday night, hoping to shake off any rust in time for the postseason. While he was away, the Rangers wrapped up the AL West title. And despite sitting out nearly four weeks, Hamilton was still leading the league in OPS, slugging percentage and batting average (.361). That’s good enough to hold off Toronto bopper Jose Bautista (54 homers, 124 RBIs), Detroit first baseman Miguel Cabrera and Yankees second baseman Robinson Cano for the MVP award.

NL Cy Young Durable and steady in his initial season with Philadelphia, right-hander Roy Halladay is headed to the playoffs for the first time in his 13-year career. He’s also poised to become the fifth pitcher to win the Cy Young Award in both leagues, joining Gaylord Perry, Pedro Martinez, Randy Johnson and Roger Clemens. By going 21-10 with a 2.44 ERA, 219 strikeouts and only 30 walks, Halladay has separated himself from the pack in this race. He leads the majors in innings (250 2⁄3), complete games (nine) and shutouts (four). Adam Wainwright of the St. Louis Cardinals is second, ahead of fast-starting Colorado ace Ubaldo Jimenez. Lincecum’s two-year reign comes to an end. Halladay won the AL prize with Toronto in 2003.

NL MVP Three-time winner Albert Pujols and Cincinnati first baseman Joey Votto have put up the biggest numbers at the plate. Colorado outfielder Carlos Gonzalez has enjoyed a breakout season, but his stats are subpar away from hitter-friendly Coors Field and the Rockies faded in the final two weeks. Milwaukee manager Ken Macha, however, has a different idea. “No doubt in my mind, Roy Halladay. He should get both,” Macha said. “What he’s done is amazing.” Still, the pick here is Votto, the key cog in the Reds’ offensive machine. He was hitting .323 with 37 homers and 111 RBIs for the resurgent NL Central champs, ranking him in the top three of all three Triple Crown categories. He also was leading the league in on-base percentage and OPS. Last season, Votto missed 21 games because of depression and anxiety related to the death of his father. Now, he’s a huge reason why the Reds are in the playoffs for the first time in 15 years.

Beavers-Sun Devils game preview

Ducks Continued from D1 “As long as all that is said is said against me, I feel a certain assurance of success,” Harbaugh said, quoting the 19th century philosopher. “But as soon as honeyed words of praise are spoken for me, I feel as one that lies unprotected before his enemies.” Uh-huh, sure. But who could blame Harbaugh for basking a little? Stanford hasn’t started a season 4-0 since 1986. The team hasn’t been ranked in the top 10 since 2001. Now that they’ve returned to the top tier of the rankings — after more down seasons than anyone cares to remember — their first opponent is the formidable Ducks. Harbaugh called the clash between the two teams “monumental.” There really couldn’t be any more hype than there already is: There’s the rankings, Autzen Stadium, a national TV audience, a visit from ESPN’s GameDay. The list goes on. “As a kid you always watched College GameDay and you’re always watching the games in prime time. To finally be in that slot is a dream come true,” said Stanford linebacker Shayne Skov. “For the guys who had to go through the tough seasons, the five-year guys, it’s a step in the right direction to how we want to send them off. It’s a great opportunity for the program.” The Cardinal have not played in a game where both teams were ranked inside the top 10 since 1970, when No. 10 Stanford defeated No. 4 Arkansas 34-28. That was the last time they won a game while ranked in the top 10 — they’ve lost six straight since then. Today’s game will be the first time Oregon and Stanford have faced each other as ranked teams. And the Cardinal are looking for their first 5-0 start since 1951, when they won the Pacific Coast Conference and a Rose Bowl berth. Oregon, the defending Pac-10 champion, has won 12 straight games at Autzen overall, and nine straight Pac-10 matchups. The team has hosted 70 straight sellout crowds. This season, the Ducks’ unique spread option offense is giving opponents fits, but after New Mexico, Tennessee, Portland State and Arizona State, the Cardinal

are going to be considerably more challenging — and partly because of their similar reliance on their ground game. Oregon has the third-ranked offense in the nation, averaging 560 yards a game. They also have the third-best rushing offense, with an average of 321.7 yards a game. Sophomore running back LaMichael James is averaging 158.3 yards a game, second only to Michigan’s Denard Robinson (172 yards). Darron Thomas has proven himself adept at running the offense in his first season as Oregon’s starting quarterback. “It’s not finesse. They run a spread attack but it is a very physical approach to the spread. They’re not trying to finesse you, they’re trying to get physical with you and impose their will on you,” Harbaugh said. Over on the other side, Stanford is ranked No. 24 for total offense with 457.5 yards per game, and they rank No. 19 in rushing offense with an average of 223.2 yards over four games. The Cardinal built a reputation for their smashmouth rushing attack last year with Toby Gerhart chewing up yards behind the blocking of fullback Owen Marecic. This season, Gerhart has moved on and Marecic is still clearing the path for Stanford’s running backs — and even scoring on his own. A two-way player, he ran for a 1-yard touchdown and then returned an interception 20 yards for a score on the next play from scrimmage in last week’s 37-14 win at Notre Dame. “This year they don’t have a big bruiser in the backfield like Gerhart, but other than that it’s the same Stanford team. They like to show their physicality and we’re going to have to match that physicality and intensity,” Oregon cornerback Cliff Harris said. Gerhart ran for a school-record 223 yards and quarterback Andrew Luck threw for 251 yards and two scores last year when Stanford defeated the visiting Ducks 51-42. At the time, Oregon was ranked No. 7. The Cardinal also proved the spoilers in 2001, when Stanford won 49-42 in Eugene for the then-No. 5 Ducks’ lone loss of the season. With everything pointing to another high-scoring affair, ultimately it may come down to defense. “At the end of the day, we just gotta make more plays than we give up and we gotta limit the big plays,” Harris said.

Ducks-Cardinal game preview No. 4 Oregon (4-0, 1-0 Pac-10) vs. No. 9 Stanford (4-0, 1-0), today, 5 p.m. (ABC) Line: Oregon by 7. Series Record: Stanford leads 44-28-1. Last Meeting: Stanford 51-42, 2009.

WHAT’S AT STAKE Stanford is looking for its first 5-0 start since 1951, when the Cardinal won the Pacific Coast Conference and a Rose Bowl berth.

KEY MATCHUP Stanford’s power rush against Oregon’s defense. The Duck D struggled against Arizona State last week, allowing 597 yards — including 210 on the ground. It was the first real challenge the defense had faced after nonconference victories over New Mexico, Tennessee and Portland State. Last year, Stanford rushed for 254 yards against Oregon. The Cardinal often use two tight ends.

PLAYERS TO WATCH Stanford: FB Owen Marecic is from Oregon and played for Jesuit High School. A twoway player for the Cardinal, Marecic scored on a run and interception return 13 seconds apart in Stanford’s 37-14 victory over Notre Dame last weekend. Oregon: QB Darron Thomas has steadily improved over the course of his first season as a starter. He’s thrown for 822 yards and 10 touchdowns. Last weekend against Arizona State, when Oregon’s rushing game sputtered, Thomas threw for 260 yards and two scores.

FACTS & FIGURES Stanford’s victory last season snapped a seven-game losing streak in the series. ... Oregon has won 10 straight Pac-10 games at Autzen Stadium. They have not lost a conference game at home since the 2007 Civil War. ... Oregon has not allowed an opponent to score in the fourth quarter. ... Oregon LB Casey Matthews has two interceptions and three fumble recoveries in four games. — The Associated Press

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Arizona State (2-2, 0-1 Pac-10) at Oregon State (1-2), today, 3:30 p.m. (FSN Northwest). Line: Oregon State by 3½. Series Record: Arizona State leads 24-11-1. Last Meeting: 2009, Oregon State won 28-17.

WHAT’S AT STAKE Oregon State finally opens its Pac-10 Conference schedule after a brutal preseason with losses to ranked TCU and Boise State on the road. The Beavers defeated Louisville in between. Can the Beavers get back on track as they has in recent seasons after early losses to contend for the Pac-10 title? And the issue for Arizona State is whether the Sun Devils can build on a hard-fought 42-31 loss to No. 4 Oregon.

KEY MATCHUP Oregon State RB Jacquizz Rodgers against Arizona State’s defense: The Sun Devils forced Oregon QB Darron Thomas to pass last weekend, holding the Ducks’ rush to just 145 yards. That doesn’t bode well for Rodgers, who rushed for just 46 yards and a score against Boise State last weekend.

PLAYERS TO WATCH Arizona State: RB Deantre Lewis. Coach Dennis Erickson hasn’t said officially whether the freshman will start, but it’s a safe bet he will. Lewis ran for 127 yards and a touchdown in the 42-31 loss to Oregon last weekend. Oregon State: QB Ryan Katz. The first year starter is going to have to help the Beavers overcome their problem with third-down plays. The Beavers have only converted nine of 34 third downs (just 26 percent) over their first three games.

FACTS & FIGURES James Rodgers was knocked cold against Boise State and has had to follow NCAA protocol for concussions this week by sitting out of practices. He says he had a headache the day after the hit, but feels fine and should be ready to go on today. ... The Beavers will honor the 2000 Oregon State team that went 11-1 and defeated Notre Dame in the Fiesta Bowl. Arizona State coach Dennis Erickson coached that team. ... Oregon State’s 28-17 victory over the Sun Devils last season snapped a 16-game losing streak in Tempe. — The Associated Press

time for Pac-10 play, but they may have to open without flanker James Rodgers, who was questionable for today’s game. Quizz’s older brother was knocked cold against Boise State and has had to follow NCAA protocol for concussions this week by sitting out of practices. The elder Rodgers, who was averaging more than 184 all-purpose yards a game, was questionable for today. The Beavers beat the Sun Devils 28-17 last season, snapping a 16-game losing streak in Tempe.

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Golden Retriever AKC English Cream puppies, beautiful. Ready 10/8. Females $900, males $850. 541-852-2991. Golden Retriever Pups, AKC reg., dew claws, shots, ready 10/3. 541-408-0839.

Great Dane AKC beautiful healthy, pups, loving & protective, rare blue, $700. 541-878-8060. See at: www.roguelk-kennels.com Griffin Wirehaired Pointers 3 males, 11 weeks, all shots, $800, 541-934-2423.

It's still kitten season! CRAFT has over 2 dozen, all colors, friendly, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Just $25 or 2 for $40. Adult cats just $15 or 2 for $25, or free as a mentor cat with kitten adoption. Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, other days by appt. 598-5488 or visit website, www.craftcats.org.

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Furniture & Appliances

Bicycles and Accessories

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

Horses and Equipment

Chinese dishes, 99-piece set, traditional pattern, $75 OBO. 541-595-6261

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Call to identify 541-382-8893. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Employment Opportunities

Yorkie, male 1.5 years old gold and white, 8lbs real sweet dog, divorce forces sale. $250 541-848-3525

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GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a ga- Two 20” kids sports-type bikes rage sale and don't forget to in good cond w/ handbrakes advertise in classified! $25 each. 541-420-4279. 385-5809. Large beveled glass dining set. w/ 4 wood & upholstered chairs, $400. 541-617-5787.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles. NEWER faux old leather look hide-a-bed sofa, love seat, chair and ottoman. $500. 541-617-5787 Power Chair, Jazzy Classic 14, 1 yr. old, used 3 mo., new $5600. Make offer. 509-429-6537. Range, Kitchenaid, elec., w/ convection oven, black, ceramic top, self-cleaning $500 Firm, 541-617-1858 Twin Bed, Colonial maple, includes box spring, mattress, frame and headboard. Like new! $175. 541-536-5067 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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Antiques & Collectibles 2 Lamps, milk glass shade, cranberry swirl/marble base, exc cond $200. 541-546-2891 Collector’s Edition of Italian white wine, “Always Elvis,” 2 bottles, $100. 541-546-2891 Cute display case from Hollywood, 5 shelves, glass front. $160, Snowshoes, $50. Overstuffed loveseat (sage green) $250. 541-389-5408 Guitars, autographed, Rolling Stones, Led Zepplin, McCartney, Eagles, more, all appraised over $2500, asking $400 ea., come w/certificate of authenticity & appraisal, call for pics, 541-330-9702.

Justice League of America Vol.I Superman DC 10 cent comic, with model 4T Fortress, $8150. 541-932-2710. Pie Safe? (old & cute) $400. Rattan Writing Desk $95. Call 541-389-5408

Wing Pottery Vases (2), Furniture & Appliances Red #196, 10½” high, mint cond, #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

$50 pair. 541-546-2891 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Area rug, 100% wool, 4.6’ x 7.6’, blue, brown, tan & rust, stripped. $25. 541-504-0707 Bdrm. Set, 8-piece, pine, king size, $495, call 541-617-1858 Bookshelves, 7’ long, 7’ high, 12” deep, maple, beautiful cond., $700, 541-419-0882. DRY SINK, solid hardrock maple, exc. cond., copper tray, $225. 541-318-9974. Entertainment Center, pine, Bork Holder, Amish crafted, $175, call 541-617-1858 Furniture

Benelli 12 Gauge Shotgun Semi Auto/Camo 2¾”-3” $800. 541-480-9181

BIG BUCK CONTEST $250 prize. Sponsored by Cowgirl Cash. 924 Brooks St., downtown Bend. No pre-entry. Contest for Oct. 2-13. Mule deer rifle hunt. Prizes for biggest, first in, youngest hunter and largest Cowgirl buck. Rebecca 541-678-5162 www.getcowgirlcash.com Browning BLR 30.06 Like new, $575. 541-382-0321 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Unique shoe rack from NY factory, $195. 2 mannequins (male & female) $195. Piano stool w/ball & claw feet, $60. 541-389-5408 Very large collection antiques & collectibles. $600 - must see to appreciate! 541-546-2891

Ruger Red Label O/U, 20 ga., like new, $875. Weatherby Orion 12 ga. O/U, very good. $950. Both firm! 541-593-4398 Taurus 40 Cal, semi-auto, subcompact, holster, & case, $385, 541-647-8931 Taurus PT 145, 45 ACP/Dbl. stack, compact, 2 clips, as new, $380, 541-728-1036.

Big 5hp DeWalt 18” radial arm saw with extra blades, $475 OBO. 541-447-1039

TABLE SAW - LIKE NEW. 3 HP 10" inch blade 5000 rpm with stand and sawdust collection bag. $200 OBO. Call 541-385-0542. Cash only. You pick up.

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Snow Removal Equipment

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TENNIS TUTOR PRO-LITE ball machine with oscillator. $200. Call 541-330-8774.

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Hot Tubs and Spas Washer/Dryer set, Frigidaire, stack combo, 2005, like new, $595, 541-408-7908

253 Speakers,pair Dolquist DQ-10’s, sub woofer incl., good cond, $400, call 541-419-0882.

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Computers

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Franklin tandem bike,great cond, rode cross country, ready to go, $600, 804-512-8212

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Tools

Sporting Goods - Misc.

WANTED TO BUY

Bicycles and Accessories

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

NORMA 7mm REM. MAG Brass, brand new, $1.50 each OBO. 541-728-1036.

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre Musical Instruments 1964 silver coins, bars, A BRAVIOFF PIANO, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold needs TLC, $150. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & 541-420-7418. dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No col- Moving-must sell Wurlitzer pilection too large or small. Bedano, reduced $400 obo. rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 Great starter piano. Phone to see. 541-330-2490.

Crafters Wanted Open Jury Oct. 5th, 5 p.m., Oct. 23rd, 9:30 a.m, Highland Baptist Church, Redmond, Tina , 541-447-1640 www.snowflakeboutique.org

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802

Scaffolding, 2 6’ section, & 1 3’ section, all accessories, Safe Way Light Weight, $700, 541-419-0882.

Coins & Stamps

Crafts and Hobbies

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

RIGID combination mitre-cut off saw, 12”, $195 sell or trade. 541-383-3839.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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COMPOUND BOWS! $95 & up. Range finders! Chainsaw! $199. ALL LIKE NEW! 541-280-5006

Mossberg 835 12 gauge. 24" barrel. Camo. Set of chokes. Hard case. $350 OBO. 541-420-1984

TV, Stereo and Video

241 Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

541-598-4643.

Appliances, new & recondi- Walt Disney Snow White FREE: older female Heeler, and tioned, guaranteed. Overframed picture, 1940s, all Chihuahua 2-year female. original. $150. 541-546-2891 stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Friendly! 541-280-1537. Maytag, 541-385-5418 German Shepherd Pups, males & females, 7 wks, ready now, $300, 541-550-0480

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Doberman Pups, blacks & blues, family raised, tails, dewclaws, shots, wormed, $400 ea. 530-739-3280

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Pets and Supplies

KITTENS, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Low adopt. fee, discount for 2. Nice adult cats also avail. Adopt a kitten & get an adult mentor cat free! Sat/Sun, 1-5, other days by appt. 389-8420, 598-5488, info/ 202 photos at www.craftcats.org. Want to Buy or Rent Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants, end of Season Sale! EveryPaying cash for used carpet. in thing 50% Half off! decent condition. Call 541-408-3317 541-388-0871, leave msg. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Moblacks, champion filled lines, torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! shots, wormed, parents on 541-280-7959. site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, Labradoodles, Australian 541- 280-7959. Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com 205 Labradoodles, beautiful black Items for Free puppies, first shots and wormed, Mom & Dad AKC. Horse Manure, large loads, $500-$700. 1-541-582-2492 perfect for gardening, will MINI AUSSIES AKC, mini, toys, load, FREE. 541-390-6570. red merles, black tri's some 208 with blue eyes, family raised, very social, great personaliPets and Supplies ties. 598-5314/598-6264 2 Blue Quakers, with cages, 2 Mini Dachshunds 6 wks.3 black years old, $350 for both. & tan male; 1 piebald female. Please call 541-389-8971 1st shots and wormed, adorable and family raised! $300 Australian Shepherd mini /Bor541-610-7341 der Collie mix 4-wk-old pups, ranch-raised, tails docked. Old English Sheepdog, adorable female puppy, great AKC $250. 541-923-1174. lines, 541-382-2531 Baby Boa Constrictors and Carpet pythons for sale! $50-$75 POMERANIANS - 5 beautiful, lovable pups ready for adopea. Eating, healthy, and born tion. Semona, 541-948-9392 in my facility! Rodents available too! Contact Stephanie POODLES AKC Toy, tiny @ 541-610-5818 or toy. Also Pom-a-Poos, Chirabid_angel@hotmail.com poos. Joyful! 541-475-3889 Bloodhound AKC Pups, SAR Queensland Heelers lines, parents on-site, ready Standards & mini,$150 & up. Nov., $500, 541-390-8835. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com Cats for barn/shop/companionship. FREE, fixed,shots. Will Two standard poodles, sisdeliver! info@craftcats.org ters 6 years old, indoor dogs, must be together, diChihuahua Puppies, 2 females, vorce forces sale, they need 8 weeks, $250, call to go to a good home. $150 541-390-8875. for both. 541-848-3525 Chi-pom Pups, adorable, lovable males and females, party color or brown frosted. WALKER HOUND pups, 6 wks, good hunting parents, ready 5 weeks old ready for you. to go. $100 541-815-6705. $225 cash. 541-480-2824 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, 541-598-5488 craftcats.org

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

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Building Materials ALL NEW MATERIALS 10’, 12’ to 16’ glue lam beams; 30 sheets roof sheeting; trim boards, all primered; roof vents; 2 doors; all reasonably priced. 541-647-0115

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . WINDOWS Milgard white vinyl, two 5’x18”; one 3’x3’; one 4’x5’ double pane. $400 OBO. 541-388-1484.

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Heating and Stoves Heater, Digital thermostat, Holmes, oil, $40, 541-388-1533.

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Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

A-1 Quality Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered,$185/cord, Rounds $165. Seasoned, burns twice as long as lodgepole. 541-416-3677

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $110/cord rounds, delivered in Bend, Sunriver & LaPine, 2 cord minimum, fast service 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

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Auction Sales No Minimums - No Reserves

PUBLIC

AUCTION

Dry Seasoned Firewood 10AM - WEDNESDAY - OCT. 6 Preview 8-10, Wed, Oct. 6 Rounds, $140/cord. Free delivery. 541-480-0436. MILLCRAFT LOG & TIMBER PRODUCTS Lodgepole Firewood 1399 N Hwy 197, Maupin, OR Rounds, $130/cord, or $75 half cord, $20 stacked, free Morbark Portable Sawmill; Linden F30/60 Tower Crane; delivery in Bend/Sisters, call Lathe; Keyseater; Grinders; Kelly, 541-385-9470. Pipe Machine; Drill Presses; Lodgepole Pine, Ready to Universal Mill; (3)Welders; burn, nice big cords, free Compressor; Shop Equipdelivery, Bend Area, ment & Tools; Water & Boom $160/cord split, $140/cord Trucks; (2)Skid Steer Loadrounds, Steve, 541-390-8955 ers; (2)Forklifts; More! LOG Truck loads of dry Lodge10% Buyers Premium pole firewood, $1200 for Terms: Cash, Cashiers Check, Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 MC/Visa Cards or 541-536-3561 for more Persons Under 12 Not Admitted information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

ILLUSTRATED BROCHURE James G. Murphy Inc 425-486-1246 www.murphyauction.com WA Auctioneer Lic #1960

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $14,500. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

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Lost and Found Found Binoculars, Purcell/Empire in RD, morning of 9/28, call to ID, 541-330-7369. Found: Camera, Dillon Falls area, 9/25, call to ID, 541-385-6781. Found German Shorthair Pointer, male, OWWI, 9/26, call to ID, 860-638-9746 Found: Near Watson Dr., black kitten, male, white spot on chest, tail funny. Call 541-771-9536

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed 1st, 2nd, & 3rd cuttings of Alfalfa, Orchard Grass, & Blue grass, all small bales, 2-tie, Madras, 541-325-6317 or 541-325-6316.

Found Subaru Key Fob, Roadkill firewood area, 9/27, call 541-593-5279.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb bales, $140-$160/ton Qty Discount! Patterson Ranch in Sisters - Call 541-549-3831

FOUND Toyota key with remote keyless entry. Call to identify. 541-410-9936.

2nd cutting orchard grass 100 lb. bales. 541-480-8185

HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Crosby Sovereign English saddle, perfect for beginner or child, $199. 541-678-3546 END OF SUMMER SALE! Over 30 Saddles @15% Off. (No reasonable offer refused) Also 10% off store wide. Home decor, horse tack, belts, frames, jewelry, spurs, chaps and LOTS MORE! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 2, 9 am to 5 pm ~ THE OLE TACK ROOM ~ 7th & Cook, Tumalo

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

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Produce and Food KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR U Pick: Gala Apples, Jonagold apples, Brooks Prunes, Bartlett Pears, Asian pears. Ready Picked: Peaches while they last.

Bring Containers NEW FALL HOURS Starting Fri. Oct. 1st.: Closed Tue. & Wed. Open Thur.-Mon. 10-4 Only 541-934-2870

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities

Bluegrass straw, 800-lb bales, $25ea. Premium oat hay, mid size 800-lb bales, $40 ea. Advertise in 30 Daily newspaPrem. orchard grass, mid size pers! $525/25-words, 800lb $50 ea. 541-419-2713 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Custom Tillage & Seeding: Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Plant a new pasture or hay Washington & Utah. (916) field, clear land, no till drill, 288-6019 email: plow your land under now elizabeth@cnpa.com for the before winter! 541-419-2713 Pacific Northwest Daily ConExcellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 nection. (PNDC) bales, approx. 750 lb., If no answer, please leave msg., I Caregiver: Nursing AssisLost Chi-Pom male, 9/26, SW will return your call. Redtant for elder care. Must have Indian Ave, Redmond; golden mond, 541-548-2514 reliable transportation and be color. Reward. 541-408-4937 avail. on weekends. 30 hrs/ Rained-on Lost Keys, set of 8-10 on plain week, $15/hr. Smoke free Orchard Grass ring, 9/24, Redmond Fred workplace, 541-385-9673 Put up dry, barn-stored. Exc. Meyer parking lot, $25 refeeder hay. $105. ward, 541-382-8244. CAREGIVERS NEEDED 541-383-0494 In home care agency presLost: Large Green Cooler, filled ently has openings for carwith fishing gear & jackets, Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedegivers, FT/PT, La Pine area. ding Straw & Garden Straw; Century Dr. or Hwy 97, beMust have ODL/Insurance & Kentucky Bluegrass; Comtween Sunriver & Bend, pass criminal background post; 541-546-6171. 541-390-4763. check. Call Kim for more info, 541-923-4041 from LOST wallet 9/24. St. Charles 341 9am-6pm, Monday-Friday. Med Ctr; belongs to Sr. lady 541-410-6906 541-678-2233 Horses and Equipment NECKLACE LOST IN OLD MILL 1870 Surrey, 4-seater with top, The Bulletin Classifieds is your Shopping Center Wed. 9/22. harness, all original, Rose Employment Marketplace Extreme sentimental value, Parade Trophy Winner. Exc Call 541-385-5809 today! Reward! 541-350-1584. cond. $3500. 541-576-2002

CASE MANAGER Needed full time for a treatment program located in Bend, Oregon. Excellent organizational skills and proven ability to work with at risk clients required. Recovery experience a plus. Good benefits with competitive salary available. Bachelors or Master degree required in social work, psychology, counseling or related fields. Apply by faxing resume to: Human Resources at: 541-383-3176. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Delivery Driver CDL required, willing to work in yard and sales. Do light mechanical, operate boom truck and Bobcat. Pick up application from 8am-2pm at 63026 NE Lower Meadow, Suite 200, Bend.

Driver Experienced transfer driver wanted. Home most nights. Contact Keven @ 541-891-1156 for details. Driver/Technician Ed Staub and Sons Petroleum, Inc is looking for a route driver/service technician for safe delivery of fuel or heating related products and other products as directed. Deliveries are made in a regional area to small commercial establishments and residential households. No overnight travel is required.

The successful applicant will have a Class A or B CDL License and able to get Hazmat, Tanker and Air Brake Endorsement. Must be able to pass an MVR check and Background verification. Fuel or propane delivery and service technician experience is preferred. We offer competitive pay and health benefits. paid holidays and vacation along with an excellent incentive bonus pay plan, 401(K) plan and a substantial profit sharing plan. To apply, e-mail resume to employment@edstaub.com or request an application at 3305 South Hwy 97, P.O. Box 1244, Redmond, OR 97756 Front desk The Riverhouse is seeking a Front Desk Agent. Qualified applicants will be able to work a varied schedule, be energetic, upbeat, and excel in customer service. Must have basic computer skills and cash handling skills. Previous front desk experience is preferred but not required. Medical Insurance & FREE GOLF available. Bring resumes and complete application in person at The Riverhouse, 3075 N Hwy 97, Bend, OR. Or you may apply and submit your resume/ cover letter on line at: www.riverhouse.com. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING IS REQUIRED.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.


E2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

HEALTHCARE Part-time Physician Full-time Family Nurse Practitioner Two Medical Assistants Deschutes County will be opening an on-site employee health clinic in Bend. The clinic will provide primary care and acute care to those covered under the Deschutes County health plan. Opening date is set for January 31, 2011. This clinic will be operated by Healthstat, a leading national provider of on-site health care. Healthstat is currently recruiting for a part-time physician, full-time Family Nurse Practitioner, and two Medical Assistants. Send resume by 9/30 to: Michael Brown 704-936-5547 (office) www.healthstatinc.com Michael.brown@ healthstatinc.com Heating & Cooling Residential Service Tech, EPA & NATE certified, background check, drug testing, paid training, ric@homeheatingbend HOUSE CLEANER - wanted for home cleaning service. Drivers license, no smoking, bondable, no weekends, no holidays. 541-815-0015. Inside Sales Rep - This is a commissioned position. We are seeking an experienced sales person to make calls. We need someone who is persistent, has great customer service skills and able to close the sale. Please send your resume to lmchargue@flowlogistics.com and sell us on why you are the one. Lot Attendant

Immediate opening for Lot Attendant at Toyota-Scion of Bend. Full time, year round position. Must be motivated and ready to work. Must pass drug test, good driving record, and be insurable. Apply in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Casey Cooper) 2225 NE Hwy. 20, Bend.

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Estate Sales HUGE ESTATE SALE one day only Sat., 9-4 Everything must go. 4 miles east of Redmond off Hwy 126, white fence on right, West Powell Butte Estates, follow signs.

Huge

Physical Therapist Partners In Care has an opening for a part-time (24 – 31 hours per week) Physical Therapist. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a resume via email to HR@partnersbend.org or by regular mail to: Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR.

All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment drug test and criminal background check.

Partners In Care is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Fri-Sat, 8-4. Sporting, jewelry, tools, bunk beds, furniture, household, auto, 76 Nova. 63875 W Quail Haven Dr.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, energetic and motivated person to join our team as a part time sale associate. If you are dependable and have a good work attitude, please leave your resume at Saxon’s in the Old Mill District, Bend. Sales - Outside On Commission Central Oregon manufacturer seeks sales representative. Manufacturing capabilities include precision machining and welding for both aerospace and industrial applications. All welding procedures and operators are certified to American Welding Society standards. Visit our website at www.snowlinemfg.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Resort The Riverhouse is seeking a detail-oriented person with strong customer service skills to work Night Audit. Previous computer skills required. Benefits include insurance and FREE GOLF! Please apply at 3075 N Hwy 97 or online at www.riverhouse.com. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING IS REQUIRED.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

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Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

500 800 507 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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Baja Vision 250 2007, new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

865

870

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $21,000 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Garage Sale Sat 8-12, 2073 NW Shevlin Crest. Furniture, tools, clothes, kids’, sporting items, electronics, household. Good Stuff At River’s Edge, Antiques,tools, sporting goods, kids, kitchen, decor, tons of books, much more, 3126 NW Quiet River Ln., Fri. 8-4, Sat. 8-2, 1/2 Price Sat. Noon.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com SALE! Household, furn incl twin bed, lots more! 1961 NW Hill Point Dr, off Shevlin Rd. Sat. 8am-2pm. No earlybirds!

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha Grizzly 350 4X4 2007, new, only 9.5 miles, independent suspension, differential locks on command, $3500, 541-548-5992, ask for Mark

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

The Bulletin Classifieds

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286

Advertise your open positions.

860

Real Estate Contracts Motorcycles And Accessories

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Boats & RV’s

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004

HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING 1993, exc. cond, great ride, Reduced to $4500!! Call Bill. 541-923-7522

• Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4295

500 mi., black on black, detachable windshield, back rest, and luggage rack, $15,900, call Mario, 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Garage Sale Sat & Sun. 10/2 & A Lot Of Stuff Sale: 1520 Huge Moving Sale: BMX NE Providence, Fri. & Sat 10/3. 9 am - 3 pm. 61344 Gear, collectible cards, anElkhorn St. in Elkhorn Es904, I need my garage: coltiques, store fixtures, baby tates. Cash only. lectibles, movies, vintage things & much more, watches, military, furniture, Fri.-Sat. 7am-2pm. Hallowe'en. 3325 NE Stonebrook Lp. LARGE ESTATE SALE Sat. 9-5. 60979 Snowbrush Huge Multi-Family Yard Dr. Thomasville mahogany Sale: Fri. & Sat, 7-5, 623 dining set with hutch, 10 Antiques & Collectibles! Tole & NE Lafayette, Something chairs; sofas, chairs, tables; decorative painting books, for everyone. cherrywood desk/file cabiunfinished wood pieces. Frinet; multiple original oil day & Saturday, 9-3, 2691 HUGE SALE 9-4, FRIDAY thru paintings from Italy, sculpNE Brandon Ct. off 27th St. SUNDAY, a variety of everytures & statues, china. thing but the kitchen sink, 3178 NE MANCHESTER AVE MOVING SALE at Widgi Creek: Fri. & Sat. 8-2, Misc. fishing, KIDS CLOTHES & TOYS, Home H H FREE H H water toys, RV parts, Yakima, furnishings, open 8-3 Friday furniture, tools. Follow signs and Saturday. 3064 NE Wells Garage Sale Kit out Century Dr,541-388-5161 Acres Road. Place an ad in The Bulletin Multi-Family Sale: Fri.-Sat., Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat., 9 for your garage sale and 8-3, A large variety, plumbam., E. On Butler Market, receive a Garage Sale Kit ing, kids toys, office items, right on Wells Acres, right on FREE! 60192 & 60184 Crater Rd. Dagget, left on Cobble Creek to 1986 Cobble Creek, lots KIT INCLUDES: Sunriver House full of vacation of tools, furniture & clothes. • 4 Garage Sale Signs rental furniture. Sat & Sun. • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use 10-4. #4 Pathfinder Circle 1. Multi Family Garage Sale: Toward Your Next Ad Call 541-350-3110 Fri. 8-4, Sat. 9-3, 2952 NE • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Pacific Crest Dr., furniture, Success!” Westside Fab Sunday Multi truck box, tools, much more! • And Inventory Sheet Family Sale, 1536 NW Davenport Ave., 2 large dog kenMulti-family yard sale: Fri.-Sat. PICK UP YOUR nels, cottage rocking chair, 8 a.m, furniture, lawn items, GARAGE SALE kids and womens shoes, and kids toys, washer, 3029 NE KIT AT: other items, cross country Quiet Canyon Dr., no earlies! 1777 SW Chandler Ave. skis, books, 2 blue clothes Bend, OR 97702 Sat. Only, 8-2, 63162 Peale St storage closets, pictures, 2 in Yardly Estates, clothes, 27’ TVs, rugs, household toys, garden tools, furniture, items, womens top label books, etc. clothing, jewerly and beads.

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, great winter project. $500 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

870

541-504-9284

HARLEY DAVIDSON FAT BOY - LO 2010,

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Boats & Accessories

Honda Shadow 750, 2008, 1400 mi, exc cond, + extras: shield, bags, rollbars, helmet, cover. $4999. 541-385-5685

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

12’ Fiberglass Navy boat/trailer, new tires, working lights. $400 or trade. 541-388-1533 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $18,500. 541-548-3985.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Reduced to $595!

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Call Bill 541-480-7930.

865

ATVs

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

286

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sale-Quitting 30 yr. business/hobby - Power tools, tractor equip., steel benches, cabinets, welding equip., heavy duty vises, HUGE MOVING SALE! Sat. 9-1 household treasures, skis, floor mats, compressor, airskate ramp, BBall hoop, ping less paint gun, golf clubs, pong table, furniture. 19571 motorcycle gear & clothing, E Campbell Rd (off Century good stuff for ladies too. Dr, 1/2 mile past Mt. Wash7317 NW Poplar Drive, off ington roundabout) hwy 126, Cline Fall exit, follow signs. Fri.-Sun. 8-4. No Just What You Look For... Early Sales. 360-903-4835. Quality items at great prices. Some tools, gardening, furniture & household 282 goods. 553 NW Flagline. Sales Northwest Bend Sat. 8-1, no early birds.

Fair Trade Sale: Featuring 10,000 Villages, Fri. Oct. 8th, 11-7, at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin A v e , Hosted by the River Mennonite Church. Handmade gifts incl. jewelry, personal accessories, home decor, art, ceramics, textiles, baskets & musical instruments, incl. holiday gifts.

Sales - ABLE TO TRAVEL. Hiring 8 People. No Experience Necessary. Transportation & Lodging Furnished. Paid Training. Work & Travel Entire USA. Start Today! www.protekchemical.com 877-936-7468. (PNDC)

Finance & Business

The Most Excellent Sale! Antiques, vintage furn, jewelry, etc. 63560 Ranch Village Dr, off Cooley Rd., Sat, 7-?? Yard Sale: Sat. 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m., 63410 Overtree Rd. , consolidated 3 households, lots of great stuff!

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Sales Southeast Bend 7-Day Liquidation Sale: Corner of SE Dell Ln & SE Yew Ave, Sat.-Sun, 10-6, Mon.-Fri. 1-5, homes, businesses, storage,clearance,10,000+ pieces, jewelry, $1- $20 ea., furniture, home decor, clothes, goodies galore! 2 full size pickups, trade for economy car/SUV. Freebies too! Directions or questions: 541-420-7328. Garage Sale: Sat. 9-3, 61330 Steens Mtn. Lp., Ponderosa Estates off 27th, misc. items, lots of great stuff.

Garage Sale: Sat. 9-4, 21675 Obsidian Ave, just off Ward Rd., Lots of great stuff! No early birds! Huge $1 Sale: 100’s of Items Elite Repeat Consignment Sat. 10-2 950 SE 3rd, 541-382-7202,Portion of proceeds benefit CASA of C.O.

Sat. & Sun., 9-5, in Sun Tree Village, 1001 SE 15th St, Space 86, Tools, antiques, stained glass lamps, fake fireplace, w/book cases, wool designer rug & more! Sold Motor Home: Furniture, pots, dishes, etc, tow bar, tow shield, RV accessories, LP’s, guns, Western Art, & much much more!. Fri. & Sat 8-4, 213 SE Soft Tail Dr.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

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290

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

2937 SW Salmon Ave., Redmond. Fri. 10/1 8am-4pm, Sat. 10/2 8am-3pm.Variety of items.

HUGE MOVING SALE! Indoor/outdoor furn., appl., collectibles, etc. Sat. 9-4, Sun. 10-3, 3158 SW 32nd St.,

Estate Sale 3165 SW Cascade Vista Drive, Sat. Oct. 2, Sun. Oct. 3, 7 to 4. Decades of collecting and quality items.

Really Huge Moving sale - Oct 1 & 2 9:00 am -? 2467 SW 33rd St. Redmond 541-419-6522

292

Sales Other Areas

USED TACK English & Western. Pony & Horse. Sat Oct. 2. 9:00 - 3:00 21685 Obsidian Ave, Bend. Off Ward Rd.

CRR - Hunters Widow Special Yard Sale, Sat. 8-4, Sun. 8-? 16568 SW Steelhead Rd. Clothes, household & more.

YARD AND GARAGE SALE, Friday noon to 5, sat. 8-4. 2205 SE Harley ln. A little bit of everything!

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Yard Sale, Sat. only, 9am-3pm, 723 SE 6th St. Household, Lego’s, clothes, Playstation, backpacks, skis, and more. Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun. 9-4, 787 NW Spruce Ave, Tools, household, misc., no early birds. Garage/Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat., 8 am - 2 pm., tools, drills, & misc., 710 NW 21st Ct, 541-923-5126.

Household, kids/baby stuff, office furniture,vehicles & more! Fri. 10-4, Sat. 12-5, 2606 SW 58th St. off Helmholtz.

Three Rivers area, 54970 Mallard Dr. Moving Sale. tools, power equipment, furniture and toys. Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 E3

870

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882

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Allegro

31’

1989,

basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Near N.A.D.A.'s Low Retail Price! 2008 Winnebago Access 31J, Class C, original owner, non-smoker, always garaged, only 7,017 miles, auto leveling jacks, rear camera/monitor, (2) slides, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range top/oven, (3) flat screen TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, well maintained, and very clean! A must see at $77,995! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

sale, like new, $6900 OBO, must see! 541-923-4237.

Holiday Rambler Neptune 37' 2008, 8500 miles, 325 Cummins, 2000 watt inverter, 3 cameras, jacks, fully loaded and in like new condition. End of season liquidation, was $157,900 Now Only $119,935 Vin. 45473 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

935

940

Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

900

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Ranger 4x4, 1998, 5speed, canopy, hook-up for motorhome w/tow bar, new clutch. $5500. 541-389-8961

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED, 2006 hemi V-8, 5.7 liter, loaded, perfect cond., silver, plenty of power! New struts, shocks, Michelins, orig. owner/records. Never “off road’’ $22,500 firm. 541-593-3214, Sunriver.

Dodge Ram 2500 1996, extended cargo

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

October Deals

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevy CK2500 2004 4X4, Duramax, Low 52K Miles! VIN #263331

Only $28,575

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

T-Hangar for rent at Bend airport. Call 541-382-8998. TWO HANGARS at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. Spots for 5 airplanes. Fully leased, income producing. $536 annual lease. $195,000 both Will consider all offers. For details, 541-815-6085.

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns. HUNTER SPECIAL 22’ fifth wheel, sleeps 6, very nice condition, awning, self contained, A/C, updated LPG tank, hitch included. $2500 OBO. 541-382-2213. Komfort 23’ 1984: 4-burner stove, oven, micro, extra lrg refrig/freezer. Qn bed, hideabed, booth dinette to bed, sleeps 4-6. Full bath shower/ tub, 20” HD TV, gas/ elec hot water htr, gas furnace, storm windows, 15’ awn, bike rack, louvered tailgate,$2450 cash. 541-382-1078; 541-815-0191

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $14,999. Call 541-536-3916.

S O L D! Montana 35’ 2005 335RLB S. 2 slides, 60

gal. water, 3 heated holding tanks, Arctic insulation, 15K BTU air cond, 4 6-volt batteries, elect. jack, 8 cu.ft. fridge, 10 gal. hot water heater, 16" tire/ .wheel pkg, full walk around queen, day/night/ blackout shades, Fantastic fan, hide-a-bed, man-size shower, spacious bathroom, lots of storage inside and out. Stored inside when not in use, never used for full time living. No pets, no smoke, meticulously maintained. No weathering, looks new. 17K Reese hitch with sway control neg. Must see. SOLD!!!!

Price Reduced! Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, w/d, rarely used, exc. cond. Now $15,500. 541-548-5302

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Springdale 309RLLGL 35’ travel trailer, 2007, excellent cond, $14,000 firm. Call 541-977-3383, btwn 7-9 pm.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

931

Automotive Parts, 885 Service and Accessories Canopies and Campers 18’ 1972 CAMP TRAILER Everything works great! $1100 OBO. 541-462-3067.

9.5’

1998,

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Battery, R89W dry-charge, clone, 541-480-0403.

Delco, $125,

Needed: Studless snow tires, for Nissan Maxima, size P125/55R17. Call Bill, 541-480-8466. Radiator & Shroud- 3 Row, for ‘69 Camero, recently reconditioned, $200,541-480-0403 Tires, (4), 225/60R16 Studded, great tread & studs, $200, 541-390-6016. Tow Bar, Falcon, $300, please call 541-330-5975 for more info. Wanted: Studded tires & wheels for ‘08 Suzuki Vitara, P225/65R17, 541-382-2194

extended overhead cab, stereo, WINTER IS COMING! 4 only self-contained,outdoor shower, P195/75R14 studded snow TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non tires, used very little last year smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. $150 set. 541-383-1811.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $9395. 541-598-5111. CHEVY SILVERADO 1997 extended cab 3/4 ton turbo-diesel. 79,000 miles. Line-X bed liner, break controller, CB radio. $6250. Call 541-548-2258 or 503-970-3328

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Dodge Ram 2001, short

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Balanced Bend Bookkeeping Seeing new clients, provide services for regular bookkeeping, training & catch up projects. 541-350-3652

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

VW Beetle 1967, lots of new parts, needs motor work. $2000 OBO. 541-548-7126

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Barns

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

Professional Cleaner, Affordable Prices: 8 yrs exp., also exp. artistic painting & odd jobs, no job too big or small, just call 541-526-5894

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

NOTICE: Oregon state law FIND IT! requires anyone who BUY IT! contracts for construction SELL IT! work to be licensed with the The Bulletin Classifieds Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Excavating is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Avalanche Z71 2005 4x4 60k mi., red, heated, leather seats - you name the extras, it has ‘em all! Premium wheels, boards, moonroof, On-Star, etc. New tires. Orig. senior owner. First $16,950. Contact Bob, 541-508-8522 or Casey 541-647-9404. CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. Chevy Suburban 2500 1999, auto, 90,134 miles. VIN #525700. $8,995

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com Chevy Trailblazer 2005, auto, 72,381 miles. VIN #227146. $13,995

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, auto, 62,548 miles. VIN #553803. $18,995

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com Jeep LIberty Limited 2002, auto, 119,517 miles. VIN #189889. $7995

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

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Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $19,000. 541-576-2442

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

***

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4500. 509-429-6537

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F250 1995 4WD, X-cab, 5 spd, 134K, tow ready, new tires. $4300. 541-410-2449. FORD F350 2002 Supercab, 7.3 Diesel, Lariat, Loaded, Leather, Black, Lifted, tow package, Short Bed 133K, 541-593-1258 $17,900 OBO

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., diesel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954.

Toyota 4Runner 2003

541-749-4025 • DLR FORD EXPEDITION 1999 4x4, 118,000 miles, new paint and trans, exc. cond., garaged. $6000 OBO. (541) 549-4834, (541) 588-0068

366

The Bulletin

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto, A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, luggage rack, step up bars, pwr windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $4900. Call 541-429-2966 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Toyota RAV4 2008 AWD..33,000 miles

Reach thousands of readers!

$17,995

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

VIN#..# 151507

GMC Yukon SLT 4x4 2003 Cleanest in Central Oregon! 1-owner, garaged, retiree, loaded, leather, service records, non-smoker. 165K mostly highway miles. Bluebook is $13,090; best offer. 541-317-8633

DLR 0225

Yukon SLT 2003 4x4 Moonroof, leather

$12,995 VIN#132979

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Ask us about

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Fire Fuels Reduction Handymen at affordable prices

New appl. to changing a light bulb, mowing a lawn to shovelling a walk, no job too big or small, call 541-526-5894.

Heating & Cooling Central Oregon Stove 541-815-2406 CCB# 87690 Stove Installation & Repair Gas Piping.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

• Sprinkler Blow-out, installation and repair • Fall Clean up

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler system blow-outs, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 541-536-1294. LCB 5012 Fall Maintenance! Thatch, Aerate, Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct?

Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering Remodeling, Carpentry

Fertilizer included with monthly program

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

(This special package is not available on our website)

I DO THAT!

Weed free bark & flower beds

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

541-598-3750

Pet Services

and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Chevy Corvette Base 1993, auto, 104,289 miles. VIN# 107781. $9,995.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Serious On-site Horse Care with full-service sitting, exercise, training, healthcare, & other options. Call EquiCare, 928-301-3889

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS • DOORS •WEATHERIZATION

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Only $16,988

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Summer Clean Up

***

AWD, Limited! Vin #022388

Handyman

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

385-5809

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Lets get to your Fall projects, Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5400; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $3400. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

smolichmotors.com

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4,

Buick LeSabre 2004,

The Bulletin Classified ***

HYUNDAI

Ford F250 1983, tow

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

CHECK YOUR AD

Pickups CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Jeep LIberty Sport 2002, auto, 104,410 miles. VIN #118256. $8,995

October Deals

541-382-2911• Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

Ford F150 King Ranch 4x4. 2005 Super Crew, every option + many extras. 82k mi, Exc.! $19,900 541-420-2385.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3850! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

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Dodge Ram 4X4 2009,

Quad Cab, 6.7 liter Diesel 6-speed manual, 8ft bed w/bed liner, exhaust brakes, drop down gooseneck hitch, camper tie downs, back axle air bag. 29,000 miles, asking $36,000. Call 541-815-1208 or e-mail larson1@uci.net

van, only 75K mi., ladder rack, built in slide out drawers, $2900 OBO, call Dave, 541-419-4677.

Automobiles

Handyman

Domestic Services M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

BMW X3 3.0i 2006, auto, 48,930 miles. VIN #D33243. $24,995

$29,995 VIN#J590169

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Accounting/Bookeeping

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

Chevy Silverado 2003, auto, 133,028 miles. VIN #153443. $13,995

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, bucket and forks, 540 hrs., upholstery, rechromed, nice! $18,500. 541-410-5454 $34,000. 541-548-1422. Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. OLDS 98 1969 Austin Western Super 500 2 door hardtop, $1600. Grader - All wheel drive, low 541-389-5355 hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 White 10-12-yard dump truck, 1967, with snow plow. Diesel engine, 15-spd trans, exc Porsche 914, 1974 cond, $3750. 541-447-1039 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 925 541-550-8256

Motorcycle Trailer, Kendon Stand up, 2007, used seldom & only locally, some custom work, $1700 OBO 541-306-3010.

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $10,800. 541-420-2715

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door, short wide box, auto trans, Big Horn Edition. 32,000 miles. Loaded!

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Toyota Tacoma 2008 SR5 4x4, ACC Cab, loaded, low mi., perfect cond. in/out, $22,800, 541-318-6253

Honda Pilot EX-L 2005, auto, 62,717 miles. VIN# 573406. $19,995.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Dodge Ram 2500 Diesel 2007 Quad Cab SLT, 4

Utility Trailers

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

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Bigfoot

Monaco Cayman XL 38' 2008 - 14,800 miles, 325 cummins jacks, levelers, diesel gen., like new condition. End of Season liquidation was $129,900 Now Only $109,788 vin.# 45969 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

933

Pickups

881

Forest River Sierra 26.5’ 1998, Moving

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

933

Pickups

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Travel Trailers

rage kept, rear walk round 2006 Wilderness 220RBS, Extreme package, fully loaded. queen island bed, TV’s,levelExcellent cond. $11,500 obo. ing hyd. jacks, backup cam541-647-0969 era, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Country Coach Intrigue 2002 40" Tag Axle. 400hp Cummins/Allison. 41k. Hydronic Heat, Satellite, 8kw Diesel Gen, air leveling, 2 slides, tile upgrade, light cherry cabinetry. 541-678-5712

932

Antique and Classic Autos

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $75,000. 541-848-9225.

Autos & Transportation

• Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

SUBARUS!!!

Smolich Auto Mall

Chrysler Pacifica Touring 2005, auto, 60,612 mi. VIN #648321 $14,995

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

Smolich Auto Mall October Deals

HONDA CIVIC 2 Dr EX 2007 4-cyl, 5-spd auto, AC, Power steering, windows, door locks, mirrors, tilt wheel, cruise control, front/side airbags, One-touch power moon roof, premium AM/FM/CD audio system w/MP3 port, 60/40 Fold down rear seats w/LATCH system for child seats, Remote entry w/trunk opener. 13,800 miles. Exc. cond., $15,750. 541-410-8363

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

LOOKING TO BUY * 2001-2006 Dodge 2500

Loaded, w/leather & more! Best Bang for the Buck! Only 38K Miles! Vin #335514

Only $11,773

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Mercury Grand Prix, 1984, Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. Call 541-382-8399

Scion X8 2008, auto, 26,142 miles. VIN# 059019. $15,995.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

smolichmotors.com 366

Ford Focus LX 2002, 4-dr., 5 spd., A/C, CD player, 57K orig. mi , incl snow tires, great cond. great mpg, $3895 OBO, 541-788-4622.

Ford Mustang 2010, Torch Red, 5-spd, V6, custom wheels/ tires, $25,000. 541-408-7972

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Mazda Miata MX5 2006, Galaxy Gray, with black interior, 5 spd o/d trans., 4 cyl., 6100 mi., $16,000. 541-385-5762

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134.

Infiniti G35 X 2005

AWD, loaded, moonroof, leather & only 16,200 miles.

$21,995 VIN#M304987

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 94 K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

541-322-7253

tion, 4.6L, manual 5-spd trans., 46,000 mi. on odometer. All factory options, w/K&N drop in filter, jet chip, Magnaflow Exhaust, never raced, extensive service records, exc. cond., $12,500, 541-312-2785.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $900. Runs great! 541-388-4167.

Subaru Impreza 2009, auto, 42,631 miles. VIN #506540. $13,995

Subaru Outback 3.0 2005, auto, 95,812 miles. VIN# 315294. $16,995.

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Wagon Base Model

$ Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

22,999

Model BDA-01 MSRP $24,220 VIN: B1314502

Manual

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details.

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Special Edition

$

21,999

Honda Accord 2007, auto, 48,435 miles. VIN# 047908. $13,750

1 AT

Model AFB-21 MSRP $22,890 VIN: AH797957

Automatic

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Sedan Premium

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

$

Honda Accord 2007, auto, 48,433 miles. VIN# 074166. $13,995.

1 AT

21,199

Model AAC-02 MSRP $22,384 VIN: A1244901

Manual

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details.

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302 Honda Civic 2007, auto, 33,029 miles. VIN #527728. $13,500

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.hondaofbend.com Honda Civic 2008, auto, 33,142 miles. VIN# 580622. $13,995.

$

16,499

1 AT

Model AJA-01 MSRP $18,190. VIN: AG512214 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Manual

CALL 888-701-7019

CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

Only 36K Miles! Vin #337383

Only $12,377

Only $17,888

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Just 35K Miles! VIN #400435

Volvo V70 1998 4WD, wagon, silver, 160K mi, JUST serviced @ Steve’s Volvo. Roof rack, snow tires, leather, very fresh, $5750. 541-593-4016

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF CROOK JUVENILE DEPARTMENT IN THE MATTER OF:

DOB: 08-14-07 DOB: 06-02-09

(0708BERGL; 0906BERGZ) Case No. 10-JV-0105 SUMMONS

runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

1 AT

VW Beetle 2006

1000

Children

The Guaranteed Trade-In Program assures a hasslefree great value when you trade-in your Subaru.

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

Toyota Avalon 2009

Legal Notices

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

No hassle. No questions asked. Hurry to Subaru of Bend to have your vehicle evaluated and take advantage of this exclusive program with great financing and lease offers through October 31, 2010

Honda Accord 2007, auto, 32,546 miles. VIN# 039149. $16,750.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, all options, NAV/ Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 190K hwy. mi. $1000 below kbb. $6500. 541-410-7586.

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BERGSTRALH, Landon BERGSTRALH, Zoey

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

October Deals

DLR 0225

Legal Notices

SUBARU Impreza Sport 2005, 50K miles, automatic, snow tires with wheels included. 1-1/4” rear hitch, 1 owner, $11,895. 541-400-0218.

Got a lot out of your Subaru? Get a lot for it.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Ford Mustang GT 2004, 40th Aniversary Edi-

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm sysJust bought a new boat? tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch Sell your old one in the start, power everything, 197K classifieds! Ask about our miles, will run for 500K miles Super Seller rates! easily, no reasonable offer 541-385-5809 refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072. Pontiac Grand AM 2003, 114k miles, 5 speed, 4 door, gold, CD, A/C, cruise, remote entry. $3500. 616-460-3617

541-598-3750

541-385-5809

541-382-2911 • Dlr #3025 www.bendchevrolet.com

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Smolich Auto Mall

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $18,995. 541-788-8626

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

October Deals

541-382-2911• DLR #3025 www.hondaofbend.com

The Bulletin Classifieds NISSAN

VIN#..#165212

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

and 3500 trucks w/5.9 cummins and 2003-2006 GM Duramax Diesels. Contact Ron at 541-720-4768 or email: oaideeo@gmail.com

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Ford Focus 2007

541-389-1178 • DLR

MERCEDES WAGON 1994 E320. 130k mi., new tires, seats 7, great car! $5500. 541-280-2828.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Camry Le 2009 18,000 miles $15,995

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through October 3, 2010. Subject to vehicle insurance; vehicle availability.

TO: Ryan Bergstralh IN THE NAME OF THE STATE OF OREGON, you are directed to appear before the above entitled Court at 300 NE 3rd Street, Prineville, Oregon on October 14, 2010 at

3:30 p.m. in connection with the above entitled matter. A hearing will be held upon a Petition filed on July 26, 2010, concerning children Landon and Zoey Bergstralh. This summons is published pursuant to the order of the Honorable Gary Thompson, Circuit Judge of the Juvenile Court, dated the 17th day of September, 2010. The order directs this summons be published once a week for circulation in Bend, Oregon.

an attorney immediately. Date of first publication: September 25, 2010 Date of second publication: October 2, 2010 Date of third publication: October 9, 2010 Dated this 20th day of September, 2010. Daina Vitolins District Attorney

You have a right to be represented by counsel at every stage of the proceedings. If you are financially unable to retain an attorney, the court will appoint one to represent you. Telephone (541) 447-6451 if you wish assistance in obtaining a court appointed attorney. If you have questions about these matters, you should contact

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Dolores Elaine Walter, who took title as Delores Elaine Walter. Trustee: AmeriTitle. Beneficiary: American General Financial Services (DE), Inc.Date: October 12, 2005. Recording Date: October 14, 2005. Recording Reference: 2005-70175. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Trustee is now Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, "TRUSTEE", Anderson & Monson, P.C., 10700 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy., Suite 460, Beaverton, OR 97005. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): The South One Hundred Thirty (130) feet of the West Twenty (20) feet of Tract One (1) and the South One Hundred Thirty (130) feet of the East Ninety (90) feet of Tract Eight (8) of DESCHUTES PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the Westerly Five (5) feet of the South One Hundred Thirty (130) feet of the East Ninety (90) feet of Tract Eight (8) of DESCHUTES PARK, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments beginning July 5, 2009 through the installment due March 5, 2010; for a total due on March 31, 2010 of $8,812.30. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $135,407.22, which includes the sum of $1,456.36 added on September 29, 2009 for lender purchased insurance, together with interest of $5,205.89 through January 18, 2010, plus interest on the principal sum of $135,407.22 at the rate of 6.55 percent per annum from January 19, 2010 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: NOVEMBER 2, 2010. Time: 1:00 P.M. Place: DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FRONT WEST ENTRANCE, 1164 NW BOND, CITY OF BEND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for NOVEMBER 2, 2010, Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than October 3, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and to http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE: The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. Bankruptcy Information: The personal liability of the grantor to pay the debt owed to Beneficiary may be discharged in the grantor's chapter 7 bankruptcy, however, the Trust Deed lien against the real property described above remains in existence and is in full force and effect. Beneficiary will not seek to enforce any debt obligation as a personal liability of the grantor once a discharge order is entered in her chapter 7 bankruptcy case. Beneficiary is merely foreclosing its lien which will not be affected by any bankruptcy discharge. DATED: June 21, 2010./s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Trustee, 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy. #460, Beaverton, Oregon 97005, (503) 646-9230. STATE OF OREGON ss. County of Washington - I, Miles D. Monson, certify that I am the Trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Miles D. Monson, Trustee

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031500028 T.S. No.: 10-10324-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, THOMAS J. DUNCAN JENNIFER L. DUNCAN as Grantor to AMERTITLE. as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on November 28, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-78018 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 248291 LOT TWO HUNDRED FOURTEEN (214), OF RIVERRIM P.U.D., PHASE 8, RECORDED MAY 31, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 694. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60875 GOLDENWOOD LOOP, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,905.19 Monthly Late Charge $79.68 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 494,804.14 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on January 19, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: September 27, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3753843 10/02/2010, 10/09/2010, 10/16/2010, 10/23/2010


For homes online

THE BULLETIN

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S AT U R D AY, O C T O B E R 2 , 2 0 1 0

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www.bendhomes.com

ADVERTISING SECTION F

Awbrey Glen Beauty: $464,900

New Homes from $99,990

One of Bend’s best neighborhoods with some on the finest golf! Quality-built home by Gary Laursen features 2,513 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths on a corner lot with wrap-around porch. New granite counters, fresh paint updates and hardwood floors on the main level with a spacious back deck and patio. Close to tennis, parks, clubhouse, pool, trails & more! Open House: Sat. 12-4 pm. From Mt. Washington, west on Putnam, left on Champion Circle and right on McCready. For more call Phyllis Mageau, Broker, at (541) 948-0447.

TAFT DIRE LLC (541) 728-0033 / www.taftdire.com

Septic Upgrade Loan Program Established for Low Income South County Households Deschutes County has finalized a contract with NeighborImpact to expand a financial assistance program for property owners in southern Deschutes County who are required to upgrade their wastewater treatment systems with nitrogen reducing systems. Deschutes County will provide $60,000 during fiscal year 20102011 to fund the septic system loan program. The new loan program is made possible through the county’s Groundwater Partnership Fund. NeighborImpact is a private nonprofit organization established to assist economically disadvantaged people in Central Oregon. For many years, NeighborImpact has offered low-interest cost deferred loans to property owners who have failing septic systems; however, some property owners are unable to qualify for financing through the conventional loan process. “We are aware that due to the recession and significant declining property values, some homeowners are unable to qualify for conventional NeighborImpact loans,” said Deschutes County Community Development Director Tom Anderson. “The new contract provides financial assistance to homeowners with the most need but are ineligible mostly due to circumstances outside of their control.” The new contract will create a separate lending pool for south Deschutes County residents who have been disqualified from the existing loan program due to mortgage delinquency, inadequate equity and other factors. NeighborImpact will continue to act as the contractor for administering both loan programs. For more information or to apply for this program, contact Karen Orme at 541-316-2037 or visit the NeighborImpact website at www.neighborimpact.org.

WANT MORE?

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Discover Antler Ridge - conveniently located on the southwest side of Redmond. With new homes starting at only $99,990 and nine floor plans to choose from, you are certain to find one to call your own! Directions: Highway 126 west, north on SW 35th Street to SW Cascade. Call 541-548-5011 or find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information.

ANTLER RIDGE- REDMOND WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES.COM 541-548-5011

Paid Advertisement

ARCHITECTURAL STYLE: Northwest Country Estate

Pinehurst Road, Bend This home was built in 2008 by Judson Construction. Built on 10 acres, the home embodies the classic Northwestern style inspired by the blend of forest, farmland and desert surrounding Central Oregon. Many outdoor features, including several water features, a koi pond with waterfall, and an outdoor kitchen, provide expanded living space. Inside, the home features four bedrooms, of which two are master suites, and four bathrooms. Large fireplaces add warmth during the winter months. The gourmet kitchen features Italian Cambrian black granite countertops and stainless steel appliances. The home also features a media room. This home is currently for sale, listed at $1,750,000.

For more real estate news, visit us online at:

Listed by:

www.bendhomes.com

Photos by John Melton, Courtesy of Prudential High Desert Realty

Prudential High Desert Realty | 541-312-9449 | www.bendoregonrealestate.com

Tell us about your home We’re looking for inspired homes in the region. Tell us about your home, and it could be featured in High Desert HomeStyles. Contact Nicole Werner at nwerner@bendbulletin.com.

Find homes for sale in Central Oregon by visiting

www.bendhomes.com


F2 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

1 0 5 2 N E R a m b li n g # 1 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, all appl., W/S paid! Gas fireplace, garage, fenced yard. $795/mo. 541-382-7727

ONLY $250 + RENT A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In MOVES YOU IN quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, Spacious 2 bdrm/1 bath SW Canyon/Antler. Hardapartments. Off-street parkwoods, W/D. References. ing. Nice shade trees. On-site $550+utils. 541-420-7613 laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 includes WST. Autumn Specials Computerized Property Management Are Here! 541-382-0053

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

636 45 Greeley #4 Downtown! 1 Bdrm, electric heat, W/S paid!! $525. 541-382-7727 1/2 Off First Full Month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $775+dep. With lease. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191

1660 NE Lotus “A”

2 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath with washer, dryer, single car garage. Pets considered, $675/ month. Water, sewer & garbage incl. Available now. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

1660 NE Lotus “B”

2 Bdrm, 2.5 Bath with washer, dryer, single car garage. Pets considered, $625/ month. Water, sewer & garbage incl. Available now. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

1700 NE Wells Acres #40 Cozy 2 bdrm/ 1 bath w/ patio. All kitchen appls., w/s/g pd, no pets. $495+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 1785 NE Lotus #1 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, w/bonus room! All Appliances, gas fireplace, garage, W/S pd! $825. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

GREAT LOCATION!

2 bdrm, 1 bath townhouse in quiet 6-plex between downtown and Old Mill, includes W/D, $575. 129 Adams Place (off Delaware) 541-647-4135 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale WEST SIDE CONDO 2 bdrm, 1½ bath townhouse on quiet street near Century Drive, includes w/d, A/C, and garage, 1725 SW Knoll. $775 541-280-7268.

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany * 2 bdrm $575 * 3 bdrm $595 W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with deposit. Call 382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

600 604

Storage Rentals 15 x 44 Heated Storage. $250/ mo. /6 mo. paid in advance. $265 mo.-to-mo. 24/7 access in a secure location. Contact Misty, 541-383-4499

616

Want To Rent Family seeks condo lease. Dec-May, Bend area. Prefer 2-3 bdrm, 2 bath. May want option to buy. 503-663-6460 or eric@ytm-law.com Mature woman seeks studio or room in Redmond/Bend area in exchange for housework or farmwork, etc. 503-679-7496

20940 Royal Oak Circl. Unit B 1 bdrm/ 1 bath attached apt. Furnished or unfurnished avail. kitchen, private ent. all utlts pd. no pets. $595+dep. CR. Properties Management 541-318-1414 403 NE DeKalb #3 2 bdrm, 1 bath, all appl., w/s/g pd. Garage. $595/mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District

Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing

Nice home in DRW, private bath/entrance, W/D, storage, pets interviewed, $350 + elec., no smoking. 541-388-6787

Room w/private bath, 3 bdrm, 2 bath house, garage,hot tub, tons storage, wi-fi+ cable. $500 mo util. incl, No dogs/ drugs 541-410-4384 Lori

Call 541-743-1890 Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

55+ Community Rentals, Pilot Butte Village, in hospital dist., near Whole Foods & Costco. 541-388-1239

***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

TERREBONNE $895 3/2.5 Views! dbl garage, w/d hookups, deck, fenced, granite counters. 1423 Barberry $995 4/2.5 Views! fireplace, w/d hookups, RV area, dbl garage. 1425 Majestic Rock Dr. CROOKED RIVER RANCH $750 2/2 Views, 1.5 acres, pellet w/d, loft, large deck, 12599 SW Spur Pl.

541-923-8222

www.MarrManagement.com The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 2200 Sq.ft., upgraded stainless appl., 3 bdrm., bonus room, 2.5 bath, dbl. garage, mtn. views, no smoking, 1 small pet? $1299+dep. 541-390-2915

3 bdrm, 2.5 bath newer home with fireplace, 2-car garage, small yard - no pets. 2883 NE Sedalia Loop. $900 mo. + dep., 541-389-2192 3 Bdrm., 2 bath house 1200 sq.ft., single level, 21354 Starling Dr., $925/mo., no pets or smoking, Ed, 503-789-0104. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, near Ensworth school, dbl garage, 1715 Sonya Ct., no smoking, pets neg., $850 per mo., call 541-382-2586.

NOTICE:

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Fully renovated 2 bdrm, all appl. including washer/dryer, W/S/G paid! Garage. $595 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Clean, spacious 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath, w/d hkup, w/s/g paid, 2 parking spaces, convenient loc, good schools. $600/mo. 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355 2 BDRM $525

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

1 Bdrm quiet, private home, carport, new stainless appl., jet tub, elec., internet, & cable incl., W/D, $785, 1st. & last, 541-408-5460.

1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 1St Mo. 1/2 off, like new, 2/1.5, W/D, walk-in closet, mtn. views, W/S/yard paid, no smoking, 61361 Sally Ln, NOW $700+$700 security, 1 yr. lease, 541-382-3813

* FALL SPECIAL *

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Apt./Multiplex General

The Bulletin

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

541-322-7253

1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval, reduced to $525/mo. 541-389-9901.

632

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

$900. Beautiful 3 bdrm 2.5 bath duplex w/garage . Gas fireplace, deck off master, walk-in closets. Close to Old Mill; nice view of canal & access to Deschutes River trail, ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

387 SW Garfield #200

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex,

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Like new 3Bdrm 2.5 bath duplex. Garage, fenced yard, gas fireplace, lots of tile, no pets, no smoking, W/S paid, $850 mo + deposit. 541-382-2260

JUST REDUCED SATURDAY 1-3:30

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $545 mo. 179 SW Hayes Ave. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

STARWOOD DELIGHT SUN 1-4

Pool, gated community, spotless. 1716 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. Single level, open floor plan, huge vaults. Private backyard, 2375 NE Buckwheat Court low maintenance. Directions: Hwy. 20 East to 27th, left on 27th past Neff to Rosemary. Left at Rosemary to Mt. View Park.

PRICED TO SELL! Listed by: MARILYN ROHALY

• Cute Basement Unit in Central Location. 2 bdrm, 1 bath with fireplace. Cozy kitchen. $350 per mo. incl. WS. •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm, 1 bath Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495/mo. Includes WSG. •Spacious Apt. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, near Old Mill Dist. $525/mo. Includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 Left! • Private Duplex in SE - 2 bdrm, 1 bath, w/Laundry Room & single garage. 900 Sq.ft. Pet? Prefer Cat. Only $550 W/S Included. • Private SE Duplex 2 bdrm/1 bath, w/single garage. Rear deck. W/D included. $675 incl. W/S • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm, 1 bath + Murphy bed. $595 includes WST/Wireless • Nice Duplex Near Hospital - 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, with utility area and garage. Private courtyard in front. 900 Sq.ft. Small Pets? $625. WS Included. Mountain View at this NE home. 3 bdrm/2 bath. Quiet cul-de-sac. Single garage. Fenced yard. 1114 sq. ft. $750 per mo. •Great Midtown Location - Cheerful, spacious, 1239 sq.ft.. 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath. Home on HUGE lot. Gas fireplace. W/D included. Single garage. $775 WS Included. •1400 sq.ft. house in DRW - 3 bdrm, 2 bath on small acreage. Space & Privacy. New paint/carpet. $795 per mo.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

426 NE Quimby

434 NE Clay 2 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, w/loft, all appliances, utility room, garage, W/S/G pd. $650. 541-382-7727

OPEN HOUSE

has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $35/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. Bend 541-382-6365

SW REDMOND: 3bdrm, 3 bath 1554/sf apt. Built 2004, new flooring & paint, appls incl W&D, no pets/smoking, WS&G owner paid, credit check req’d, discount 1st mo rent on 1-yr lease. HUD ok. For appt/info: 541-504-6141

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

BEND RENTALS • Starting at $450. Furnished also avail. For virtual tours & pics apm@riousa.com 541-385-0844

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

2944 NE Saber Dr.

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

www.ThePlazainBend.com

Mt. Bachelor Motel

SW Duplex in Redmond, 3 Bdrm 2.5 bath, garage, fenced yard, close to Vern Patrick School. Small pet OK. $775/mo. Call 541-480-2233

3 bdrm w/ family room or 4th bdrm, 2½ bath, all appliances, fenced yard, dbl. garage. $1050. 541-382-7727

1 bdrm 1 bath, full size washer & dryer, large storage space, 640 sq ft, $595, pets considered. Off street parking spot. Water, sewer & garbage incl. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

Rooms for Rent

Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Four plex, 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, all kitchen appl., W/D hook-ups, garage, fenced yard. w/s/g pd. $650 mo + dep. Pet negotiable. 541-480-7806

Lease option, Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks, lots of windows, wood stove & gas heat, furnished, near Lodge $235,000. 541-617-5787

640

630 2 Rooms For Rent in nice 3 bdrm., 2 bath, home w/huge fenced backyard, pets OK, all utils paid, 541-280-0016

244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 Rimrock, 541-548-2198 www.redmondrents.com

2 Bdrm. guest house, on 40 acres in Powell Butte, $650+dep., incl. all utils, pets & animals neg., call 541-848-3401.

1630 SE Tempest #11

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Next to Pilot Butte Park 1989 Zachary Ct. #2 1962 NE Sams Loop #3 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with opener. $675 mo., incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

638

61711 Bridge Creek Dr.

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

648

Houses for Rent General

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, w/s/g pd., $650 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

648

Houses for Rent General

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 1667 sq ft, West side, 2 bdrm 2.5 Bath, office with built -in desk cabinets, or could be 3rd bdrm. A/C, hot tub, single car garage. $1,200 month, Avail now. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558

642

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

631

Rentals

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

$158,500

541-322-9954

Fabulous close-in, very private location for this great family home featuring a large kitchen, rec room & artist’s studio. 3,848 sq. ft, 3 Bd/2.5 Ba. Beautiful, flat 5 acres, 4 irrigated & fenced, some Cascade views. 1,150 sq. ft. shop/barn w/2 horse stalls. You will love this one.

$339,900

Broker Bend, Oregon

SAT 1-4

Come see this unique, remodeled/expanded Starwood home: 3 bd/2ba, 2,073 sq. ft., 1/4 acre lot, open floor plan, slab granite kitchen, very private backyard 20842 Dione Way w/pastoral views, and a Directions: Off Tumalo Rd., fabulous MBR suite with 2-way fireplace, his/hers midway between Hwy 97 and Old walk-in closets, sitting area, Bend Redmond Road. and spa-like bath not seen in this price range.

Hosted by: RANDALL KEMP

Broker

HUNNELL HILLS RANCHETTE

541-410-8377

SATURDAY 1-4 PM

63825 W. Quail Haven Dr. Directions: Rt. on Rogers Rd. off Old Bend Redmond Hwy, Rt. on W. Quail Haven & follow Hasson signs.

$499,000 Hosted by: RANDALL KEMP Broker

541-410-8377

CASCADE VILLAGE This 3 BR, 2 BA, 1809 sq. ft. home has it all! Living room & huge family room, new kitchen, large laundry room, low maintenance yard. 20780 Livengood Way Expect to be impressed! Directions: N. Hwy. 97, Right on Almost everything is Cooley, Left on High Standard, Left NEW! Cascade Village on Cascade Village. - a wonderful 55+ park. Price reduced to www.johnlscott.com/ marilyn $45,400

Listed by: MARILYN ROHALY Broker

541-322-9954

Bend, Oregon


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 F3

650

656

659

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Take over lease, nice 3/2 home, 2846 NE Purcell, $850/mo., No pets. 5 mo. remain, renewable. Moving out of state. (541) 728-6675.

19040 Pumice Butte Rd.

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 1447 NW Kingston #2 1 bdrm, gas heat, washer/dryer included! extra storage! $595. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

4 Brdm.+office, 3.5 bath, huge family room, 2 master suites, 3400 sq.ft, on west side, for lease, small dog OK, no smoking, $1950,, call Dick, 541-350-1495.

Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 bath, NW Crossing, $2995, incl. cable, internet, garbage & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 Great location! 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath with 2+ garage. W/D, no smoking/pets. $1200/mo + sec dep. Avail. 10/15. 720-936-1903; 541-312-5379 Great NW location! Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $925/mo. 541-389-5408

541-385-5809 60960 Granite Drive 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, fenced yard on a large lot. $695. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

541-385-5809 61284 Kristen St. 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, 1613 sq. ft., gas heat and fireplace, dbl garage, dogs neg. $1095+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

61390 Merriewood Ct. 3bdrm 2.5 bath w/gas fireplace & 2-car garage. Vaulted ceiling, granite counters, gas oven, micro, laundry upstairs, loft office area, 2 sinks in master, deck off mstr. $1200. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

A clean 3 bdrm, 1.25 bath, 1269 sq.ft., near Old Mill, large fenced yard, gas stove in living room, $825. (541) 480-3393 or (541) 610-7803. DRW Private 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, pets OK, $995 mo, $1495 security dep (over 2 payments possible) 541-420-0194

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

20990 Via Bonita

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

3 bdrm, 2¾ bath, w/ office, all appl., gas heat/fireplace & woodstove, fenced yard. $1700. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

61776 Darla 4 bed 2.5 bath, 2268 sq ft 2 story, all bdrms & laundry upstairs. Hardwood, comm’l grade kitchen, new appls, gas fireplace, large pantry, AC, dbl garage, $1,450. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

61871 Avonlea 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, woodstove, fenced yard & dbl garage. $950 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

2 Bdrm, 2 bath Prineville duplex, garage w/opener, w/d hookup, near schools, 793 Bailey Rd. $550/mo, 1st, last. 541-923-2184;541-419-6612

GRO W

An older 3 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq.ft., woodstove on quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. Newer carpet & paint, $595. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ Alley Access, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

NorthWest Crossing

www.johnlscott.com/garyfiebick

way of living

ING

northwest crossing sales headquarters

THE GARNER GROUP REALTORS & DEVELOPMENT

With an ad in The Bulletin's

Open Homes

"Call A Service Professional"

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

explore the

60664 Golf Villlage Loop 3 bdrms., 2.5 baths, 2122 sq. ft., 14 yrs. old, Completely Updated. 2-car garage. Widgi Creek Golf Course. $543,210. Sunday 1-4, Open House 541-740-8642, jerry_west66@yahoo.com

Get your business

The Bulletin Classifieds

Reduced: 2335 NW 15th, Redmond, close to the Canyon. 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, $175,000. Open Sat, 1-4. Reduced: 3408 SW Kalama, Redmond - 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in 2004, $127,500. Open Sun., 1-4. Leanne Johnson, Coldwell Banker Mayfield, 541-604-0898.

this weekend

Directory 738

Multiplexes for Sale

sat & sun 12-3

FSBO: 4-Plex Townhomes, NE Bend, all rented w/long term renters, hardwood floors, great neighborhood near hospital, $399,000, 541-480-8080

This home would make a great second home or ski retreat with its great room plan and tall ceilings. Large upstairs master suite, hardwood floors, tile countertops.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

744

Open Houses

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse, 25¢/sq ft, first/ last, $300 cleaning dep. Avail 10/1. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

20444 Steamboat Ct. Spacious 4 bdrm, 3 bath, 2946 sq.ft., large site, landscaped, common rec facilities, plenty of living space inside & out with this home. Must See! $372,500. Gary Fiebick, Principal Broker • 541-390-1602

748 NW Mt. Washington Dr. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 1,500 Sq Ft $289,900 Directions: West on Skyliners Rd., right on NW Mt. Washington Dr. Home on right past NW Clearwater Dr.

www.johnlscott.com/garyfiebick

sat & sun 12-3 Multiple master suites on main level and upstairs, a den/office, great outdoor living spaces, and hardwood and tile finishes.

693

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

60665 TETON CT.

La Pine 2/1.5, Crescent Creek subdivision, near club house, fitness center in park, no smoking, pets neg. $675/mo. $775/dep. 541-815-5494.

661

3 bdrm, 1½ bath, all appl., woodstove, dbl. garage, half acre lot w/ RV parking! $825. 541-382-7727

2850 Sq.ft., totally renovated farm house on 18.3 acres, 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 3 car garage, horses & pets OK, close in Knott Rd. location, great views of Bachelor & 3 Sisters, $1300 mo., $1300 dep, Credit check req. 541-610-5882

Houses for Rent La Pine

Houses for Rent Prineville

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

660

20454 SE Steamboat Ct. Move in Ready! .5 Acre, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 1614 sq.ft., 3 car garage. New carpet, wood and tile floors, vaulted ceilings. Spacious deck, beautiful landscaping, $269,000. Gary Fiebick, Principal Broker • 541-390-1602

$650 3/2 w/d hookups, family room, fenced, deck, sheds 3125 SW Pumice Ave $725 3/2, dbl. garage w/opener, w/d hookups, bonus room, shed, fenced. 2236 SW 34th St. $925 3/2.5 dbl garage, w/d, gas fireplace, central air, deck, golf community. 4135 SW Ben Hogan $995 3/2.5 views, single garage w/ bonus room, fireplace, w/d, fenced, deck, RV space. 127 SW Canyon $1050 3/2 dbl garage, gas fireplace, shed, covered deck. 2648 NW Canyon Drive $1350 Special! 200 off 1st mo. rent. 3/2, gated, views, .5 acre lot, dbl. garage, large deck! 2345 Linnet Ln

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

541-389-7910

105 NW Greeley Avenue • Bend, OR 97701

www. hunterproperties.info

OPEN HOUSE SAT. 1-4 PM

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Location, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, single garage, fenced yard, pets okay, $625/mo. + dep. 541-788-9027.

Directions: West on Shevlin Park Rd., left on NW Crossing Dr. (at roundabout), left on NW High Lakes Lp.

More Online at:

www.MarrManagement.com

Great

3 Bed, 3 Bath, 2,028 Sq Ft $399,000

LAWNAE HUNTER, Principal Broker/Owner

541-923-8222

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

2335 NW High Lakes Loop

www.thegarnergroup.com 61982 SE Janalee Place

$139,000

$469,500

Not a short sale! Immaculate move-in ready! 3 bdrm/1 bath, warm & comfortable. MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

Exceptional custom home! .72 acre lot; 2568 sq. ft., 3 bdrm/2 bath, RV, shop. MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Notable Features: Single level Craftsman bungalow Brazilian cherry floors Tile countertops Custom beech cabinetry Covered front and rear porches Construction to begin soon

OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 1-4 PM

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

752 Breitenbush 1/2 off 1st Months Rent!!!! 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas heat, dbl garage, fenced yard. $850 mo. 541..382.7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Cute 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, carport, 182 SE Roosevelt, close to Old Mill. No smoking/pets. $975/mo. + $1000 dep. Call Rachel 541-604-0620.

Built By: The Grout Co. LIKE NEW! 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, 1120 sq ft, double garage, gas fireplace, central air, fenced, underground sprinklers, no pets/smoking. $850/mo. + $850/dep. Available now. Call 541-480-2468

$264,900

2307 NE Buckwheat Court

Main floor living; light and bright! Master on main level. TONA RESTINE, BROKER 541-610-5148

$185,000

2445 NW Dorion Way 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 1,526 sq ft $339,900

Gated Community! Beautifully maintained 1872 sq. ft., 3 bdrm/2 bath. SUZANNE STEPHENSON, BROKER 541-848-0506

preview online

$189,500 Great floor plan! 2010 sq. ft. with 4 bdrm/2.5 bath plus loft area, move-in ready! MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

$449,500 Custom NW home! 3271 sq. ft. 5 bdrm/3.5 bath, 2 sided fireplace in master suite. MIKE EVERIDGE, BROKER 541-390-0098

Attractive finishes and woodwork including acacia flooring, tile countertops, furniture grade custom cabinets. Complete by the end of the year.

2155 NW Clearwater Dr. 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 1,687 Sq Ft $365,000

Buy a lot. Build it your way.

$549,900 Just reduced! Over 5 acres, 2774 sq. ft., RV storage. MIKE WILSON, BROKER 541-977-5345

Full bank approval at $78,000 With 3% in Buyers closing cost! Excellent value in Ochoco Heights. TONA RESTINE, BROKER 541-610-5148

Lots & Land LAWNAE HUNTER, PRINCIPAL BROKER, 541-550-8635 $399,000 - 22 Improved lots: Ready to build.

$168,000 - 7 contiguous lots, utilities in. Priced to sell!

$899,000 - 13.4 acres, Residential, utilities in.

$850,000 - 29 fully approved lots. Ready to build.

$239,500 - Retail & mixed use; Sisters.

$1,560,000 - 39 fully approved Westside lots; Ready to build!

$24,000 - Lot 1. Excellent opportunity, utilities in.

$126,000 - 7 lots fully approved. Nice established neighborhood!.

What is a Short Sale? A short sale is a sale from seller (owner) to buyer that the Lenders agree to take a pay-off less than the existing loan amount. Owners benefit by avoiding a foreclosure on their credit, lenders get the house sold & the buyer generally receives a home that has been occupied & may be in better shape than a foreclosure home. There are many advantages to a Short Sale for all parties. Hunter Properties Brokers have a very high closing rate in this type of a sale. Call for Details! 541-389-7910

Lots starting at $58,000

NorthWest Crossing’s Information & Sales

headquarters

Open Mon - Fri 9-5 Sat & Sun 10-4 2762 NW Crossing Dr, Ste. 100

Sh

evl

in P

ark

Rd

Dr

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

705

Real Estate Services

744

Open Houses

ngton Dr

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

700

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

744

Open Houses

Mt. Washi

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

2 bdrm, 'A' Frame in DRW, washer/dryer included, large lot! $695. 541-382-7727

Real Estate For Sale

ng ssi NW Cro rs Rd line Sky NW

www.thegarnergroup.com : 541 383 4360


F4Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

www.bendhomes.com

SEARCH. Find acres of properties with slideshows offering up to 10 photographs per home to showcase unique features, home interiors and exteriors, quickly and easily.

FIND. Find homes in The Bulletin’s classified listings as well as standard MLS listings. Advanced search options allow you to locate homes based on architectural style, neighborhood amenities, views and more.

BUY. Use financial tools, such as the mortgage calculator, to estimate an approximate mortgage amount and provide insight into how much you can afford.

making Central Oregon real estate, real easy.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, October 2, 2010 F5

745

749

753

773

773

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Homes for Sale

Southeast Bend Homes

Sisters Homes

Acreages

Acreages

20420 Klahani Dr. Updated Tillicum Village home, .36 acre, 4 bdrm, 3 bath, office, 2187 sq.ft., great room living, large rear deck, excellent garage/storage, landscaped, RV area, & more. $248,900. Gary Fiebick, Principal Broker • 541-390-1602.

OWNER FINANCING, 20 YRS 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, vaulted ceilings. Renovated, new carpet, vinyl, paint & roofing. Tollgate.$229,000,541-419-2502

20-Acre Foreclosures, $99/mo. $0-Down, $12,900, GREAT DEAL! Near El Paso, Texas. Owner Financing, No Credit Checks Money-back Guarantee. Free Map/Pictures. 800-343-9444. (PNDC)

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Short Sale…Our company may be able to help. We have a record of getting results for homeowners in over their heads. First you need answers. Find out why homeowners thank us for the assistance we have given them. Hunter Properties LLC 541-389-7910 Serving all of Central Oregon www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

748

Northeast Bend Homes A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $118,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

750

Redmond Homes 2137 sq ft 1-level, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, hardwood & granite, lrg ¼ acre lot, not SS. $223,990 Debbie Lahey • 541-977-4825 RE/MAX Town & Country Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com 3155 SW Reindeer Ave. Very efficient home! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1120 sq.ft., Granite counters in kitchen, nice appl., fenced yard, rear patio w/ hot tub, storage building, $89,600 Gary Fiebick, Principal Broker • 541-390-1602

www.johnlscott.com/garyfiebick

Reduced: 2335 NW 15th, Redmond, close to the Canyon. 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, $175,000. Open Sat, 1-4. Reduced: 3408 SW Kalama, Redmond - 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, built in 2004, $127,500. Open Sun., 1-4. Leanne Johnson, Coldwell Banker Mayfield, 541-604-0898.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Weekend Retreat or Family Home - $155,000 Like new home, 1 acre, La Pine. Terms considered. 503-986-3638 www.odotproperty.com

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

762

Homes with Acreage Private, secluded and close to town. 6.5 Acres - 3 irrigated, pond & pasture. 2700 sq.ft., 4 bdrm, 2.75 bath, 3 miles west of Redmond. $389,000. 541-548-2138 or 541-390-0666 Ready to Downsize? 1.47 acres near Sunriver w/2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home Detached 2 car garage & shop. Privacy w/park-like grounds, Offered at $224,900. Call Bob Mosher 541593-2203

763

Recreational Homes and Property LAKE BILLY CHINOOK/3 RIVERS REC AREA Buildable 2 - 5+ acre parcels from $99,000 up to $300,000 with lake view. Private marina to the Lake in this gated community. Camp now - build later. Private gun range, ATV/dirt bike riding, airstrip, & deer, elk, wild turkeys and more -and of course all the water sports you could ever want. Call Elaine - 541-480-3860 Coldwell Banker/Dick Dodson Realty

Call 541-385-5809

live.life.

garner. www.thegarnergroup.com

COME AND TOUR

Eagles Landing! OPEN FRI-SUN 12-3 PM

764

Farms and Ranches

AUCTION WINDMILL NURSERY +/- 6.80 acres in Sherwood including existing structures, greenhouses & single-family home. Zoned: Exclusive Farm Use. Min. Bid: $399K. Bid deadline: 10/7/10. More info: www.LFC.com/915M2 or call 800-966-0660

773

OPEN FRI - SUN 12-3

Acreages

Two new homes move-in ready!

10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

Directions: From Hwy 20 east, north on NE 27th St., right on NE Conners Ave., left on NE Alex Lane to NE Dogwood Dr. 2946 & 2947 NE Dogwood Dr.

• Open, expansive floor plans • Exquisite finishes • Close to Medical • Close to large park • Starting at $205,500

F E AT U R E D N E I G H B O R H O O D S

OPEN FRI - SUN

12-3 pm

Old World Style Charm. One & two level plans from low $200,000s Directions: From Highway 20 East, north on NE 27th St., right on NE Rosemary Dr. 2716 NE Rosemary Dr.

LOTS & HOMES

• 6,970-10,890 sf lots • Lots from $82,000 • CCRs & Arch Review • Homes being built

19141 Park Commons Dr. 5 Bed, 3 Bath, 3,028 sq ft, bonus, den

Directions: From Third St., head west on Greenwood. Greenwood becomes Newport and eventually Shevlin Park Road. Shevlin Pines will be on your right a mile past the Mt. Washington roundabout.

OPEN THIS WEEKEND OPEN SAT & SUN 12-3

60968 Onyx St. 3 Bed, 3 Bath, 3,380 sq ft $349,900 •

Exceptional tile and stone finishes

• Thoroughly remodeled and enlarged

Two master suites & Bonus room Huge family room, formal LR • Two fireplaces in natural stone • Oversized 3-car garage • 0.41-acre fenced & landscaped lot •

Directions: From Highway 97 south, right on Ponderosa St. (opposite China Hat Rd.), left on Poplar St., right on Onyx St.

Visit our Sales Office at

NorthWest Crossing.

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www.johnlscott.com/garyfiebick

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

MOVE IN TODAY! 2b/1b $11,999; 2b/2b, $13,900; 3b/2b $19,739. Financing avail. w/ good credit. 2002 14x56, $14,900 cash.John,541-350-1782

Mt. Washi ngton Dr

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

ng ssi NW Cro Rd ners kyli S NW

C A L L U S T O D AY !

541 383 4360 Open Mon-Fri 9-5 | 10-4 Weekends

Get 3 lines, 4 days for $17.50.

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809

www.thegarnergroup.com


F6 Saturday, October 2, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE NW Bend | $335,000 West Ridge | $307,500 SAOP T. EN 14 BUILDER’S SPECIAL New Earth Advantage townhome. Great room with gas fireplace. Secluded patio. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, double garage. Move in today! MLS#201008902

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

REALTOR

SW Bend | $210,000

LI NE ST W IN G

Beautiful home in River Canyon Estates. 4 bed, 2.5 baths, Location, location, location & single level Perfect condition 2 bed, 2 bath w/ Ponderosa Pines & living in private northwest neighborhood. peek a boo mtn. views. No maintenance, large private lot. Brazillian Cherry floors, granite counters & more! Community offers pool, fitness room, tennis & beautiful clubhouse. Large easy care for lot, HOA $152.00 per New interior & exterior paint, carpet, electrical, plumbing. MLS#201008580 MLS#201008856 month includes landscape care. DIRECIONS: West on Century Drive, MLS#201006724 DIRECTIONS: Brookswood south to DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington to Clubhouse. right on Campbell, right on West Ridge. west on Sweetbrier, south on Snowbrush 61575 West Ridge Ave. 3135 Clubhouse St. 61004 Snowbrush

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

4.6 Acres | $65,000

Selling a home with green qualities or NEED SPACE? ROOM TO ROAM? East certifications? Marketing is the key. of Bend, minutes from Costco. Park an Learn about the Green Advantage. RV or build, manufactured/stick. GREEN, S.T.A.R. EARTH ADVANTAGE, MLS#2904688 ENERGY TRUST ALLY

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

MELANIE MAITRE, Broker 541-480-4186

JOY HELFRICH, Broker, e-Pro, GRI, GREEN 541-480-6808

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

NE Bend | $134,000

Centennial Glen | $139,900

SE Bend | $149,000

NE Bend | $149,900

LI NE ST W IN G

Rivers Edge Village | $99,000 Three Rivers South | $110,000

Get Green

LI NE ST W IN G

NW Bend | $279,900

Independently Owned and Operated

Bend, OR 97702 S A OP T. EN 12 -3

486 SW Bluff Dr.

SU OP N. EN 14

541-382-4123

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

Sportsman cabin for weekend getaways. This 1 bedroom cabin sits on 1.63 acres. Brand new never used sand-filter septic. Mountain views, RV storage, Outbuildings. MLS#201007396

Classic ranch style home conveniently located close to schools and shopping. Home has previously been used as a daycare and includes a large family room with an adjacent 4th bedroom. MLS#201008722

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1461 sq. ft. home New 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home completed in SE Bend. Open great room floor plan, June of 2010. Granite kitchen counters, gas fireplace, functional kitchen, spacious cultured stone fireplace, bright and open eating area. Landscaped & fenced backyard floor plan. This is one of only a few with sprinkler system. Call for more info. homes left in South Deer Field Park. MLS#201004072 MLS#201008469

Great room floor plan, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, new exterior paint, large fenced backyard with new deck and beautifully landscaped. Call Becky Brunoe 541-350-4772. MLS#201008333

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

Redmond | $149,900

NW Bend | $194,900

SE Bend | $217,500

Awbrey Butte | $229,900

NE Bend | $249,000

NE Bend | $249,900

PR NEW IC E

RE PR DU IC CE E D

Enjoy the sunrise from this large east facing view lot. Some city, Smith Rock and southern views. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $99,000! MLS#201008710

This darling home has been upgraded including slab granite counters in the kitchen and guest bath and a paver back patio. Vaulted ceilings in the main living area give this home an open feeling. MLS#201006819

Great home in desirable Starwood. Features split bedroom single level plan, large outdoor patios and mountain views! Community has 160 acres of trails, parks, RV Storage and common area. See it today! MLS#201005748

Great easy to assume FHA loan with balance of approx. $204,000. No bank fees on this well-built home. 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths, 1926 sq. ft., and den/office. Very private fenced backyard. Yummy kitchen. MLS#201008095

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

JUDY MEYERS, Broker, GRI 541-480-1922

Mountain High | $259,000 Eagle Crest on the Creek | $299,000 King’s Forest | $300,000

Desirable Awbrey Butte lot in NW Wonderful Large 4 bedroom home on .30 Impressive 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2416 sq. Bend. Beautifully treed .66 of an acre acre lot in a Cul-de-sac. Separation of ft. home with great room floor plan, large with views of Mt. Jefferson. Enjoy the space in floor plan. Vaulted living area. lot, 3 car garage & RV parking. Beautiful peaceful setting in this low traffic area. Large Deck for entertaining. Close to kitchen, office, gas fireplace, hobby room Perfect for your dream home. A must see, many amenities in NE Bend. & master suite with vaulted ceiling. Great price! MLS#201004270 MLS#201008468 MLS#201008091

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-480-5159 541-322-2404

Eagle Crest | $314,900

Sunriver | $319,000

Mountain High | $340,000

Eagle Crest Luxury Townhome overlooking creek & waterfalls. Single story, vaulted ceilings, 2 bedroom, 1419 sq. ft. Upgrades galore. Close to pool, tennis, trails & fitness center. Broker owned. MLS#201004579

Nice 4 bedroom, 2.75 bath, 3200 + sq. ft. great room plan. Master bedroom on main level. Upstairs 20 x 30 bonus room, loft, bedroom, bath, and office. 4-car tandem garage, RV parking, flat backyard, 1/2 acre. MLS#201008568

This chalet offers many upgrades, has rarely been used and has never been in the rental pool. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1447 sq. ft. Located on the 9th fairway, enjoy all the amenities of Eagle Crest Resort. MLS#2714563

Charming Sunriver cabin well maintained & upgraded, very popular rental. Gas fireplace in great room. Large covered front porch with hot tub & view of lawn and pool. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. New appliances. MLS#201006982

Immaculate single level home with formal and casual living spaces. Private setting, beautifully landscaped and golf course views. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2422 sq. ft. MLS#201003969

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

Westside | $349,900

NW Bend | $359,500

5 Acre Homesite | $374,900 Skyliner Summit | $349,000 Rivers Edge | $379,000

SW Bend | $389,000

Open & light, gorgeous kitchen with slab granite, spacious master suite, with a bonus room. Easy access to trails and downtown. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths 2644 sq. ft. MLS#201008030

1 owner immaculate home is a real showpiece! Kitchen updated in 2009, spacious livable floor plan. Bonus room upstairs, main floor master, storage galore, over sized 2-car garage & beautifully landscaped. MLS#201008720

One of the nicest small acreage subdivisions. Great views from this level parcel with 1 acre irrigation. Well & power to the home site, existing log structure and stall/storage building. Owner terms. MLS#201005418

Well maintained Westside 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3000 sq. ft., close to parks & recreation trails. Spacious kitchen, tile counters, alder cabinets & pantry. Bonus room, nice private deck, plenty of storage. MLS#201007194

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR 541-420-1111

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

NE Bend | $395,000

Barn, Shop, Home | $399,000 Mountain High | $399,900 Northwest Crossing | $417,000 Full Cascade Mountain Views | $425,000 NW Bend | $465,000

LI NE ST W IN G

RE PR DU ICE CE D

Easy Living on the Fairway! Private, peaceful setting in gated community with Golf Course views on a beautifully treed lot. Single level, 2 bedroom + den, 2 bath. MLS#201001975

G N DI

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G N DI

Lovely home on .5 of an acre lot. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2662 sq. ft., upgrades, remodeled kitchen. Main level master, office, family room. Beautifully landscaped, expansive decks, privacy. MLS#201008758

4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2995 sq. ft. Renaissance Home. Master + 1 bedroom & bath on main level. Gourmet kitchen with slab granite counters, stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors & 2 dining areas. 3-car garage. MLS#201008846

SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4361 541-383-4350

2.5 acres in quiet Boonesborough neighborhood 5 minutes north of Bend! 3 bedroom, 3 bath, open floor plan, large kitchen and master. RV storage/shop, horses ok per CC&Rs. Some mountain views, a must see! MLS#201004751

7.94 acres, 7.5 irrigated. Fenced and cross-fenced, barn and additional set-up for stalls. Includes irrigation equipment and shop. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1542 sq. ft. home. MLS#2812404

Spacious 3052 sq. ft. home on .42 of an acre wooded lot. Traditional sunken living room with fireplace & a great room/family room. Private setting at back of cul-de-sac. Large master suite. Brand new roof. MLS#201004189

Very functional 2300 sq. ft. floor plan. Master on main, all tile bathrooms. Hardwood floors in living room, dining room & kitchen. Large, inviting front porch as well as covered back deck. MLS#201007128

Quiet 9.81 acres in Tumalo. 1 acre irrigated. 1700 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath like new home. 1440 sq. ft. pole barn/shop. Breathtaking views. Easy to see, ready for immediate move-in. MLS#2809508

Northwest Style home on nearly a 1/2 acre lot. Great location to Deschutes River Trail, Old Mill, and recreation. 3 or 4 bedrooms, vaults, RiverRock and hardwoods. Beautiful landscaping. MLS#201007085

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

Sunriver | $555,500

Investment | $598,000 Gorgeous Views | $599,000

Luxury Townhome | $470,000 NW Bend Lot | $519,000 Eagle Crest | $539,850

Full on views of the lake at Painted Ridge. Ideal floor plan with great room and master suite on main level, upstairs loft area, 2 bedroom suites and office. Huge decks with privacy and views. MLS#2709663

LESTER FRIEDMAN, P.C., Broker 541-330-8491

Premier River Front Lot close to This spacious home will delight you with Downtown and the Old Mill District. all of its wonderful features. Situated on Yes, You Can Have It All!! Stunning river .39 of an acre backing to over 3 acres views on this 10,000 +/- square foot, flat of common area. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, building lot. Don’t miss this opportunity!! sunroom, bonus room, 3-car garage, MLS#2812452 and views. MLS#201008461

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

N E P

Multiple upgrades, extra-tall ceilings upstairs & down, combed cedar siding, oversize 2-car garage. 2 Master suites + a lock-out. Expansive views from upstairs living area. Previous rental info available. MLS#201005860

RARE OPPORTUNITY: Tumalo 10 acres with 4 legal dwellings. Gorgeous parcel with 6.7 acres of irrigation. Well cared for homes range from 750 -1450 sq. ft. Currently leased. Endless potential. OWC. MLS#201007897

See every Mtn. in Cascade Range from this home & expansive decks. Large private lot. Custom home-open living, coffered ceilings, formal dining, & large kitchen with eating area. 3-car garage. MLS#201004464 1119 Stoneridge

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

CATHY DEL NERO, Broker 541-410-5280

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

SE Bend | $625,000

Awbrey Butte | $689,000 Barn & Bunk Room | $825,000 Awbrey Glen | $950,000 A Piece of Heaven | $999,000 Commercial Parcel | $1,499,000

Single level home on 4.71 acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2124 sq. ft. 5-stall barn, close to BLM land. Recently remodeled. MLS# 201008335

Beautiful home on .66 of an acre. Gently sloping pine treed lot with panoramic Cascade mountain views. Very private cul-de-sac location. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 3220 sq. ft. Fabulous private patio & backyard. MLS#2906426

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

3167 sq. ft. with Northwest flare, reclaimed wood floors and granite. Mainly single level, wood burning fireplace, covered patios, barn & bunk quarters. 2.72 acres, close to town. MLS#201006082

Quality is evident throughout this exceptional 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 5996 sq. ft. home on .67 of an acre overlooking the 10th fairway. MLS#201008264

19+ acres, 14 irrigated, barn, shop, arena, corrals, pastures, ponds & a high quality home. Cascade views & direct access TO PUBLIC LAND. Also available on 1 tax lot for $749,900. Video at kellehers.com MLS#201007302

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers 541-815-0436 541-383-4349 541-383-4364

Camp Polk Rd. Bank owned Downtown Sisters commercial Project. 9.29 acres with Mixed Use Master Plan in Place. One of the last large opportunities left in Sisters. Call Dave 541-390-8465 or John 541-948-0062 MLS#201008753

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465


Bulletin Daily Paper 10/02/10