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• September 13, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Wooded homesites to get $3M boost for fire defense By Kate Ramsayer

Voter registration As local campaigns ramp up for the November election, voters in Central Oregon are following several statewide trends. Voters are increasingly registering with the Independent Party, although it remains small. The Democratic Party has also lost many voters. Below is a look at August voter registration by party, followed by the percentage of change since January. Party

Crook County

Democratic

3,404

-4.9% 30,783

-1.2% 3,205

-4% 863,491

-1.6%

Republican

5,194

0% 34,372

1.1% 3,806

0.1% 659,533

0%

Constitution

7

16.7% 101

4.1% 19

5.6% 3,004

1.8%

Independent

397

11.8% 3,501

16.1% 345

14.2% 58,161

14.1%

Libertarian

51

-5.6% 610

3.3% 51

0% 13,101

0.8%

Pacific Green

17

0% 302

Progressive

1

Working Families 13

The Bulletin

Nonaffiliated

2,078

A $3 million federal grant to help protect homes from wildfires in Deschutes, Crook and Klamath counties will go toward getting rid of highly flammable vegetation on between 3,000 and 5,000 acres of private land. And it will hopefully help prevent events like the Fourmile Canyon Fire outside of Boulder, Colo., which has already burned more than 170 structures, said Joe Stutler, Deschutes County forester. Central Oregon, like the area around Boulder, has areas where homes are in or near forested areas and lack “defensible space,” or spaces that are clear of brush and allow firefighters to tackle burns. “I can think of a dozen of those communities, neighborhoods that we’ve got in Deschutes County, Crook County and Klamath,” Stutler said. “The 170 homes in Boulder could be 170 homes in Deschutes County, easily.” With the new grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Pre-Disaster Mitigation Program, counties will be able to hire contractors to cut down small trees that can lead to bigger fires, get rid of low-hanging tree limbs, mow down brush and more near homes and in vacant lots in atrisk neighborhoods, he said. In some neighborhoods, programs will show residents how to do the work in their own yards, and then contractors will come by to pick up the cut trees and branches. See Wildfire / A4

Other

216

TOTAL

11,378

Deschutes County Jefferson County Oregon

-0.3% 20

0% 8,403

0.6%

100% 15

6.5% 0

0% 1,858

1,054%

8.3% 66

47% 18

20% 3,051

31.2%

-4.2% 18,110

-0.1% 1,854

-8% 1,302

-2% 121

-2.1% 89,162

5.5% 9,439

-1.7% 416,094

0.7%

-3.2% 24,712

-2.4%

-1.3% 2,051,408 -0.1%

Source: Oregon Secretary of State, Elections Division

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Independent Party gains across region Numbers show major-party discontent, founder says By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Oregon’s Independent Party is gaining members in Central Oregon, where a higher percentage of voters have registered with the party than the statewide average, according to voter data from January through August. The region’s slightly larger portion of Independent Party members might be due to people moving to the area, according to one of the party’s founders, Portland attorney Dan Meek. “You’ve got more movement of people

from other areas to Bend and Prineville and other areas,” Meek said. Members of the Independent Party, Oregon’s largest minor political party, accounted for 2.8 percent of the 2,051,408 registered voters statewide in August. By comparison, the party accounted for 3.5 percent of the 11,378 registered voters in Crook County, 3.7 percent of the 9,439 registered voters in Jefferson County and 3.9 percent of the 89,162 registered voters in Deschutes County, according to an analysis of state voter data. See Registration / A4

Yoga outside, 300 strong

‘Made in Italy’ ... via Chinese labor, goods Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

By Rachel Donadio New York Times News Service

PRATO, Italy — Over the years, Italy learned the difficult lesson that it could no longer compete with China on price. And so, its business class dreamed, Italy would sell quality, not quantity. For centuries, this walled medieval city just outside of Florence has produced some of the world’s finest fabrics, becoming a powerhouse for “Made in Italy” chic. And then, China came here. Chinese laborers, first a few immigrants, then tens of thousands, began settling in Prato in the late 1980s. They transformed the textile hub into a low-end garment manufacturing capital — enriching many, stoking resentment and prompting recent crackdowns that in turn have brought cries of bigotry and hypocrisy. See Italy / A6

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Scott McBride and his wife, Kristen, right, participate in Yogis Unite! Bend, an outdoor yoga class in Bend with more than 300 participants, held Sunday along the Deschutes River behind the Mill A building near the intersection of Colorado Avenue and Industrial Way. “Our goal is to unite our community through yoga and to raise money for the Bethlehem Inn and CAN Cancer,” said event organizer PJ Miller.

Cartel’s corrupt U.S. officer shows reach By Ceci Connolly

Martha Garnica, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection worker, was arrested in November 2009 for helping a drug cartel breach the border.

The Washington Post

EL PASO, Texas — She lived a double life. At the border crossing, she was Agent Garnica, a veteran law enforcement officer. In the shadows, she was “La Estrella,” the star, a brassy looker who helped drug cartels make a mockery of the U.S. border. Martha Garnica devised secret codes, passed stacks of cash through car windows and sketched out a map for smugglers to safely haul drugs and undocumented workers across the border. For that she was richly rewarded; she lived in a spacious house with a built-in pool, owned two Hummers and vacationed in Europe. See Border / A5

Courtesy U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

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Vol. 107, No. 256, 28 pages, 5 sections

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In retirement debate, what of hard labor? By John Leland New York Times News Service

At the Cooper Tire plant in Findlay, Ohio, Jack Hartley, who is 58, works a 12-hour shift assembling tires: pulling rubber over a drum, cutting the material, lifting the half-finished tire, which weighs 10 to 20 pounds, and throwing it onto a rack. Hartley performs these steps nearly 30 times an hour. “The pain started about the time I was 50,” he said. “Dessert with lunch is ibuprofen.” See Retirement / A4

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A2 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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So you want to buy a smart phone? After enduring the taunting of your friends, your contract is finally up on your creaky 3-year-old not-so-smart phone. The device doesn’t do e-mail or the Web, and it can’t find your position on a map. There is only one problem. Now that you have decided to step into 2007, the choices baffle you. The mobile phone industry has changed enormously since you last shopped. There are several new companies making devices, the phones have an alphabet soup of hardware options, and they run software that can do all kinds of amazing things. For some shoppers, though, the powers of modern smart phones may be overkill. Perhaps you would like to occasionally send e-mail or get access to the Web from your phone, but you don’t really care about playing games or editing movies. For you, there is an entrylevel smart phone, a phone that will let you do some of the fantastic things your pals keep bragging about, but that won’t cost too much or require a college course in using it.

Photos by New York Times News Service

Motorola Backflip runs on Google’s Android, and though it’s a bit bulky in your pocket, Web surfing and e-mail is quite handy.

Cheaper than $100 For the last few weeks, I have been testing several phones from the four major carriers — AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and TMobile. Although there is no official definition for what makes a phone “smart,” the industry does have a few generally recognized criteria. A smart phone is usually capable of getting access to your e-mail. It can display Web pages in a way that doesn’t distort them too much, and it can connect to the Internet using a cellular data connection (known as 3G) or your home wireless system (Wi-Fi). I defined “entry level” as any smart phone that costs less than $100 when you sign up for a new contract. These parameters did, of course, exclude the kings of the smart phone market — Apple’s iPhone 4, Droid 2 from Motorola and the HTC EVO 4G. But you will be surprised by what you can get for not much money upfront. A few of the best phones that I looked at cost less than $50, and some were completely free with a new contract.

Data plans But that is just the price of the phone. When you step into the world of smart phones, the real sticker shock comes on your monthly bill. Most carriers require you to sign up for a data plan when you buy a phone that provides access to the Internet. These can add $15 to $30 a month over what you are used to paying for your dumb phone. Of the four carriers, AT&T’s smart phone plan is the most affordable. For $54.99 a month, AT&T will give you 450 minutes of voice calls and 200 megabytes of data usage a month. (Some observers have grumbled at AT&T’s limit on data usage, but for entry-level users, 200 megabytes should be more than enough.) By comparison, Verizon’s cheapest plan, which includes 450 minutes of voice calls and unlimited data, costs $69.98 a month. Sprint’s unlimited data, 450-minute plan is $69.99. T-Mobile’s lowest-priced data plan — 500 minutes of voice, unlimited data — is $79.99 with a two-year contract. Now let’s talk about the phones themselves. The first major decision you have to make concerns the keyboard. Do you want a touch-screen keypad, as on the iPhone, or do you want a physical keyboard with push-button keys? There are trade-offs on both sides. An onscreen keyboard lets you have a bigger screen on a thinner, sleeker device, while a hard keyboard gives you tactile

The Palm Pre is a budget-minded option to consider when purchasing a smart phone.

Another low-price phone to consider is Palm’s Pre, which was released last year to great acclaim as a potential “iPhone killer.” The Pre did nothing of the sort, but it remains a lovely phone to use. feedback as you type. Although there are strong feelings on the question, your best bet is to try both keypad styles at the store. The one you prefer will usually be a matter of taste. It most likely will depend on your own sense of coordination and the size of your fingers.

Last year’s iPhone If you want a touch keyboard, the best device you can buy for less than $100 is the iPhone 3GS. That is last year’s iPhone model, which Apple sells for $99 with a two-year contract, and which offers nearly every feature available in the new iPhone 4. It is also one of the simplest phones on the market to learn to use. And if you do decide to venture into the wide world of add-on apps, there is no better phone.

If $99 is too steep, I suggest the LG Ally, from Verizon, or the AT&T Motorola Backflip, each of which sells for $49.99 with a contract. These phones run on Google’s Android operating system, but you don’t need to know what that means in order to use them. Though neither is a looker — they are a bit bulky in your pocket — and they are noticeably slower than more expensive phones, I found each quite handy for Web surfing and e-mail. They both have well-designed keyboards. Another low-price phone to consider is Palm’s Pre, which was released last year to great acclaim as a potential “iPhone killer.” The Pre did nothing of the sort, but it remains a lovely phone to use — and now you can get an updated version, the Pre Plus. It is just $29.99 from Verizon. It is unclear how long Palm will continue to make the Pre Plus (the company is undergoing a merger with Hewlett-Packard) so if you admired the Palm last year, now is a good time to snap it up. (The Pre’s underpowered little brother, the Palm Pixi Plus, sells for even less. Both Verizon and AT&T offer it free with a contract.)

Other choices There are also some options on the nation’s two smaller carriers, Sprint and T-Mobile. TMobile has introduced the Motorola Charm, a square Android phone that will sell for $74.99 with a contract. I found the phone’s unusual shape made for more difficult typing but, other than that, it was a solid phone. So, too, was the Samsung Intercept, a $99.99 Android phone offered by Sprint. If you have heard about Apple’s troubles with its new iPhone, you might have one question about inexpensive smart phones. Forget the bells and whistles, how well do they work as phones? Unfortunately, that is not a question I can shed much light on. Your call quality will depend greatly on your geography and the specific location of cell towers in the places you frequent most. In other words, it is hard to know how well your phone will make calls before you actually try it. But remember that all major carriers offer a 30-day grace period on your contract. If you notice your phone acting up in that period, take it back. At the least, a smart phone should be smart enough to let you make calls.

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

As high-res hits smaller screens, benefits are lost By Nathan Olivarez-Giles

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LOS ANGELES — Resolutions of 1080p, the maximum image resolution for highdefinition television, used to be found only on big-screen models with price tags in the thousands. But 1080p resolution has become so common that it’s being offered on models in the low 20-inch range, with prices down to $300. “It has been a big trend over the last year,” said Paul Gagnon, an analyst with Display Search. “You used to not see any sub-32-inch sets offered with 1080p resolution. Now, about a third of them are.” That sounds great for TV watchers on a budget or with limited space for a set. But there’s a catch: On a smaller screen, the benefits of this resolution are minuscule. “To see 1,080 vertical lines of resolution, you need at least a TV of about 46 inches to fully see it,” said Gary Merson, editor of HDGuru.com. “At 26 inches, forget it; you won’t tell the difference.” Increased availability of smaller sets with 1080p displays can’t be attributed solely to hype. In part, it happened because of who was making the televisions. TV manufacturers such as ViewSonic Corp., based in

Walnut, Calif., and Hannspree, based in Taiwan, used to be known primarily for their computer monitors. And 1080p does make sense, visually, for monitors. “It’s really easy to tell the difference between 720p and 1080p when you’re on a computer, because text and graphics have lots of hard edges,” said Raymond Soneira, president of DisplayMate Technologies Corp. “If you’re hooking it up to a computer, no ifs, ands or buts, get your 1080p.” Making the leap into TVs was not difficult for these manufacturers. “If you’re already making computer monitors, adding a TV tuner isn’t very expensive.” Westinghouse Digital Electronics, based in Santa Fe Springs, Calif., is going after young consumers who are used to thinking of a TV as a multipurpose device. “Many people nowadays, especially at the smaller screen sizes like 26 inches, are using displays as both a TV, but also a computer monitor and a display for video game consoles,” said Rey Roque, Westinghouse’s vice president of marketing. “And the technology now is affordable enough that we can offer features like 1080p across our line,” he said. “That just wasn’t affordable a few years ago.”

Prepaid phones gain ground as users seek to lower bills By Bridget Carey McClatchy-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — Sales have never been better for MetroPCS. The prepaid cell phone retailer broke records in the first and second quarter of 2010 with new subscribers to its no-contract, monthly flat-rate mobile service. Once aimed at customers with poor credit or those who rarely used a cell phone, prepaid phones increasingly are drawing customers angered by mobile bills of $100 per month, said Steve Roberts, regional vice president of sales and distribution of MetroPCS’s Miami office. Some parents are even buying prepaid phones to teach their teens to limit costs. What’s keeping those customers with MetroPCS and similar services are phones common in the marketplace but new to prepaid customers: feature-rich smart phones. To keep up with smart phone demand, MetroPCS added a second BlackBerry phone to offerings this summer. A phone that runs on Google’s Android operating system is “on our road map,” Roberts said. The company will be adding 4G wireless speeds to Florida by the end of the year. Competitor Boost Mobile

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just launched its first touchscreen smart phone and first Android smart phone — the No. 1 selling smart phone operating system in the U.S. All major cell phone carriers also offer prepaid plans and phones. Service giant Sprint has seen 60 percent of its new customers this year choose a nocontract option, such as Boost or Virgin Mobile — both of which it sells. “The economy was a catalyst for people to look at no-contract options, and people adopted it and are happy,” said Neil Lindsay, chief marketing officer for Sprint Prepaid. Even among major service providers, prepaid options have become more popular. T-Mobile has seen its prepaid customers double since 2006, and spokesman Graham Crow said more customers are using prepaid as a way to test-drive a bill.

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

T S Congress signals caution in run-up to the election By Jim Abrams WASHINGTON — Congress returns this week with embattled Democrats torn between trying to show they have the economic answers and fearing the further wrath of voters over new government programs. It appears the fears will win out. The inbox is overflowing as lawmakers end their summer recess and undertake four weeks of writing and trying to pass bills before leaving town ahead of the Nov. 2 election: Bush-era tax cuts are set to expire at year’s end; annual spending bills await action; and President Barack Obama has just come out with a new plan to stimulate the economy through tax credits, breaks for business investment and public works projects. But progress on any of those before the election is doubtful. Majority Democrats are returning to Washington after a month of listening to voters angry over government spending. Republicans are dead-set against White House initiatives. “It will be difficult to get a very broad agenda through,” said House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md. Some issues probably will fall back into a lame-duck session after the election. Even then, Republicans won’t be raring to cooperate, particularly if they regain control of the House or Senate. Democrats insist they’ll act before the end of the year to extend the middle-class tax cuts pushed through by President George W. Bush. And if Congress does nothing? Then a family in the $50,000-$75,000 income range would face an extra $1,126 in taxes next year. Obama and most Democrats want the extensions to apply only to individuals with annual incomes of less than $200,000, or joint filers earning less than $250,000. Continuing those tax cuts would add $3.1 trillion to the national debt over the next decade. The debt would rise by an additional $700 billion if tax cuts for the richest people are also extended. Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., says

Boehner says he’d compromise on tax cut bill WASHINGTON — The House Republican leader, John Boehner, on Sunday opened the door to a compromise on the contentious issue of the Bush-era tax cuts, saying he would vote to maintain lower rates for families earning less than $250,000, even if President Barack Obama and Democrats insisted on ending the cuts for wealthier Americans. With Congress returning to Washington this week, Boehner’s decision likely reframes both the final intense weeks on Capitol Hill before the elections and the fall campaign, in which embattled Democrats have planned to paint Republicans as obstructionists favoring the rich over the middle class. Obama in recent days has lambasted congressional Republicans — at times singling out Boehner by name — for threatening to block an extension of the tax cuts for more than 97 percent of Americans to preserve lower rates for “millionaires.” And Democratic party leaders had been planning to use the tax fight to help rally their base. “If the only option I have is to vote for some of those tax reductions, I’ll vote for them,” Boehner said in an interview on “Face the Nation” on CBS, during which the host, Bob Schieffer, pointedly asked if Republicans would hold the tax breaks for most Americans “hostage” to keep the lower rates for the wealthy. — New York Times News Service

he expects the Senate to get into “serious debate” on the Bush tax cuts, but he would not speculate on the chances for an agreement.

Here are the winners in major categories:

The Associated Press

Taylor Swift absolved Kanye West of last year’s onstage sin with one somber song, and West, also in song, beat himself up once again over his misbehavior. The Swift-West drama took center stage at Sunday’s MTV Video Music Awards in Los Angeles, with both superstars either addressing or dancing around the incident that won’t die. Both dramatic performances delivered on pre-show hype of a Kanye-Taylor sequel and overshadowed the evening’s other moments, including Lady Gaga’s eight-win sweep. Among her awards was video of the year for “Bad Romance.” The stage for both songs was set last year, when West interrupted Swift’s acceptance speech, saying her trophy should have gone to Beyonce. The incident left Swift with hurt feelings, but West was the one who was seriously damaged, as intense backlash made him Mr. Unpopularity. While West didn’t address the trophy-gate incident directly onstage, he rapped and sang a song that mocked the boorish behavior that has upstaged his music: “I always find something wrong; you’ve been putting up with my (expletive) for too long,” he said, before launching into an unprintable chorus, which included the line: “Let’s have a toast to scumbags.”

Video “Bad Romance” Male Video Eminem “Not Afraid” Female Video Lady Gaga “Bad Romance” New Artist Justin Bieber

See a complete list of winners in all categories at www.mtv.com. Source: www.mtv.com

The Bulletin

David Carson / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

David Vahling, of Newton, Ill., cheers after singing the national anthem Sunday at the start of the “Gateway to November” rally hosted by the St. Louis Tea Party and Tea Party Patriots at the Gateway Arch in St. Louis. Originally billed as a chance to reflect on the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a series of tea party rallies around the country on Sunday ended up focusing almost entirely on the upcoming election. “We are your everyday, average, churchgoing families, we represent the majority of people in this nation, and we’re ready to take back our government,” said Pam Pinkston, of

FCC likely to relax unlicensed airwaves New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — When the Federal Communications Commission first approved the use of unlicensed bands of the airwaves decades ago, it began a revolution in consumer electronics — first in television remote controls and garage door openers, then in baby monitors and cordless phones, and most recently in wireless computer networks. This month, the FCC is likely to approve what could be an even bigger expansion of the unlicensed airwaves, opening the door to supercharged Wi-Fi networks that will do away with the need to find a wireless hot spot and will provide the scaffolding for new applications that are not yet imagined. “We know what the first kind of deployments will be,” said Julius Genachowski, chairman of the FCC, in an interview, citing wireless broadband networks that can cover entire university or corporate campuses, for example — what is referred to in the industry as “Wi-Fi on steroids.” The stronger, faster networks will extend broadband signals to bypassed rural areas and allow for smart electric grids, remote health monitoring and, for consumers, wireless Internet without those annoying dead zones. “But this will also be a platform for innovators and entrepreneurs,” Genachowski said. “There is every chance of this leading to the development of one or more billion-dollar industries.” Just as broadband-ready smart phones could hardly be imagined in 1938, when the FCC first approved the use of unlicensed radio waves, or even in 1985, when it issued the rules that led to Wi-Fi, the eventual consumer products that will use the new airwaves are all but unknown.

Fair Oaks, Calif., one of about 4,000 people to attend Sacramento’s “United to the Finish” gathering. Several thousand people marched along Pennsylvania Avenue from the Washington Monument to the Capitol, many carrying signs reading “Congress You’re Fired” and “Let Failures Fail” and “Impeach Obama.” In St. Louis, crowds packed the area between the Gateway Arch and the Mississippi River while a band dressed in powdered wigs and 18th century clothing belted out KISS’s “I Want to Rock and Roll All Night.” — The Associated Press

W  B

Regulators back new bank rules BASEL, Switzerland — The world’s top bank regulators agreed Sunday on far-reaching new rules intended to strengthen the global banking industry and shield it against future financial disasters. The new requirements more than tripled the amount of capital banks must hold in reserve, an effort to move banks toward more conservative positions and force them to maintain a larger cushion against potential losses. They come two years after the collapse of Lehman Brothers set off a worldwide banking crisis that required billions in government bailouts. Banks have warned that the new regulations could reduce profits, strain weaker institutions and raise the cost of borrowing for businesses and consumers. But regulators provided a lengthy transition period to give the banks time to adjust. The centerpiece of the agreement is a measure that requires banks to raise the amount of common equity they hold — considered the least risky form of capital — to 7 percent of assets from 2 percent.

Iran says hiker can go free on $500K bail BEIRUT, Lebanon — An Iranian prosecutor said Sunday that an American woman held with two friends on espionage charges for more than a year would be freed on $500,000 bail and be allowed to leave the country, Iranian news agencies reported. The announcement was the latest turnabout in a case that

has further strained the poor relations between Tehran and Washington. Contradictory signals from Iran about the fate of the three Americans have also exposed factional infighting in Iran’s government. Iranian officials first announced Thursday that they would release the woman, Sarah Shourd, 32, and said that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had personally intervened to free her. But the following day Iran’s judiciary, run by one of the president’s conservative rivals, canceled the release, saying it violated judicial rules.

Hurricane Igor gains strength over Atlantic Hurricane Igor strengthened to a Category 4 storm, the second most dangerous on the Saffir Simpson scale, on Sunday as it moved west over the Atlantic Ocean, the U.S. National Hurricane Center reported. Igor’s maximum winds grew to near 135 miles per hour, and some additional strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours. The hurricane was about 1,120 miles east of the Leeward Islands on Sunday afternoon, the center said. It is moving west near 14 miles per hour, with a turn toward the northwest expected on Tuesday. Igor’s hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 40 miles from its center, but there currently are no hazards affecting land, the center said. — From wire reports

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A4 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Wildfire

Stephen McGee / New York Times News Service

Jack Hartley, 58, at his home with his dog, Bouncer, in Fostoria, Ohio. Hartley, who works a 12-hour shift assembling tires, said he does not think he can last until age 66, when he will be eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits.

Retirement Continued from A1 He said he does not think he can last until age 66, when he will be eligible for full Social Security retirement benefits. At 62 or 65, he said, “that’s it.” After years of debate about how to keep Social Security solvent, the White House has created an 18-member panel to consider changes, including raising the retirement age. Rep. John Boehner, R-Ohio and the House minority leader, has called for raising the age as high as 70 in the next 20 years, and many Democrats have endorsed similar steps, against opposition from some liberal groups. The panel will report by Dec. 1, after the midterm elections. Hartley says he feels like the forgotten man. Discussion has focused mostly on the older workers who hold relatively undemanding jobs at desks and computers that can be done at age 69 or beyond. But hard labor is not a thing of the past for older workers, who are on the whole less educated than younger ones. A new analysis by the Center for Economic and Policy Research found that one in three workers over age 58 does a physically demanding job like Hartley’s — including hammering nails, bending under sinks, lifting baggage — that can be radically different at age 69 than at age 62. Still others work under difficult conditions, like exposure to heat or cold, exposure to contaminants or weather, cramped workplaces or standing for long stretches. In all, the researchers found that 45 percent of older workers, or 8.5 million, held such difficult jobs. For janitors, nurses’ aides, plumbers, cashiers, waiters, cooks, carpenters, maintenance work-

“From 50 to 60 was a drastic change. The aches and pains, the feeling that your back could go at any second. My hips are worn out. In a seven-day week, I take Advil five nights for the pain.” — Jim McGuire, 62, ramp serviceman for United Airlines ers and others, raising the retirement age may mean squeezing more out of a declining body. Hartley had planned to retire at 58, but he and his wife had high medical expenses, and the company froze one year of its pension plan, reducing benefits. He is, he said, “stuck here.” Workers like Hartley present a conundrum for a Social Security overhaul, said Eugene Steuerle, a fellow at the Urban Institute, who favors raising the retirement age. People are living longer, and providing “old age” benefits to them when they are relatively young and healthy, he said, makes less available to them when they are older and frailer. “We’re close to the point when one-third of adults will be on Social Security and will be retired for a third or more of their adult lives,” Steuerle said. “It’s true that some people in late middle age have issues of physically demanding jobs, but saying we’re going to give everyone more years of retirement is not an efficient way of dealing with that issue.” Any changes in Social Security’s retirement age will not affect workers currently in their late 50s and their 60s, who are eligible for full benefits at age 66. But their experiences now are a harbinger of things to come, said Teresa Ghilarducci, a professor of economics at the New School for Social Research in New York, who opposes raising the Social Security retirement age because she says it will have a disproportionate impact on lower-income

workers and minorities, who tend to have lower life expectancies and so fewer years of collecting benefits. At the same time, bluecollar workers often spend more years paying into Social Security because they start full-time work younger, she said. “People who need to retire early — and they need to — are folks that start working in their late teens, whereas people who are promoting raising the retirement age are people who were in graduate school or professional school and got into jobs that would logically take them into their late 60s and 70s,” she said. A study by the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics found that for workers ages 55 to 60, the share who said their jobs required “lots of physical effort” all or almost all of the time declined between 1992 and 2002, to 18 percent from 20 percent, but the percentages who said they had to lift heavy loads, stoop, kneel or crouch increased. In 2002, 29 percent of workers ages 55 to 60 said they experienced chronic pain in their jobs, and 46 percent said they had arthritis. And though more Americans are retiring early, it is not always voluntary. A 2006 study by McKinsey & Co. found that 40 percent of early retirees said they were forced into it, about half for health reasons. “If you try to punish people for retiring earlier” by raising the retirement age, “you’re punishing people who aren’t choosing it,” Ghilarducci said.

This is not news to Jim McGuire, 62, a ramp serviceman for United Airlines, who started lifting bags into airplanes 43 years ago. He has had rotator cuff surgery and separated a shoulder on the job. “From 50 to 60 was a drastic change,” he said. “The aches and pains, the feeling that your back could go at any second. My hips are worn out. In a seven-day week, I take Advil five nights for the pain.” McGuire said that he did not have a planned retirement date, but that he hoped to make it to 66. Since United’s pension plan was taken over by the government, cutting his benefits in half, he says Social Security has become a much bigger part of his future plans. For Bobbie Smith, 69, a certified nursing assistant at a nursing home in Miami, getting older has just meant using her body more judiciously. Providing direct care to the elderly, Smith belongs to one of the fastest-growing work forces in the country and one of the grayest. “I learned to arrange work so it won’t be so hard on me,” she said. “I try to encourage patients to the point that they help themselves.” She said she planned to continue working, even as she got older than some of her patients. “What am I going to do if I sit at home, keep cleaning the house?” she said. “I need the money. I bought me a car, and I want to pay for it. But I would still work.”

Continued from A1 And the funds will also help chip up the vegetation collected, Stutler said, and send it to biomass plants elsewhere in the state to create electricity. The idea is to change the fire behavior in these areas, he said, so that any wildfire that comes through will drop to the ground and be easy for firefighters to extinguish. “We call it taking the heat out of the woods,” Stutler said. He pointed to several areas where the fuels-reduction work had helped over the past several years, like during the 2007 G.W. Fire, which crept close to Black Butte Ranch, or even a fire that started south of Sunriver this summer from an abandoned campfire. It went “right into a treated area, and laid down,” Stutler said. Previously, Central Oregon counties had received $5 million from FEMA over three years, he said. And the current funds will continue to help do work in the areas that Community Wildfire Protection Plans have labeled the highest risk, like Tollgate or Deschutes River Woods. This summer some of the money went to haul away debris from Woodside Ranch, where 170 of the 250 homeowners participated, said Ray Miao, president of the homeowners association. Residents cleaned up the pine needles and pinecones, trimmed shrubs, even cut down some small trees that had grown dense. “Wildfire is the biggest hazard in our area,” he said. “So you want to try to protect the house, protect your property and your neighbor’s property.” There are spots around Bend that could be included under

the most recent grant because of their high risk, said Katie Lighthall, program manager for Project Wildfire, which helped set the priorities for southeast Bend, southwest Bend and areas west of town. “Those priorities are set out in the Community Wildfire Protection Plans,” she said, noting that the FEMA funds won’t be used for individual scattered homes. “We’re doing it where we can maximize our bang for the buck.” Work funded by the grant will probably start in May, Stutler said. And although the weather might be cooler these days, the fire season isn’t completely over for 2010, he said. “I think we could be lulled into complacency,” he said, noting that in 2004 several inches of snow fell in the middle of September, and then a wildfire sparked at the end of October. “Until we have 2 to 3 inches of water over an extended period of time on the fuels, we’re not out of fire season,” said Stutler. While the Rooster Rock Fire sent clouds of smoke over Bend this summer, overall it has been a fairly mild season, said Chris Hoff, with the Central Oregon Fire Management Service. On average, about 450 fires a year start in Central Oregon; this year it’s around 280, he said. “May and June were very wet and cool,” Hoff said, noting that the vegetation didn’t really dry out until August. And there weren’t as many chances for fires to spark, either. “The amount of lightning was less than we normally had, so that helped us,” Hoff said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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Registration Continued from A1 Democrats accounted for approximately 35 percent of registered voters in Deschutes County, 30 percent in Crook County, 34 percent in Jefferson County and 42 percent statewide. Meanwhile, 39 percent of registered voters were Republican in Deschutes County, 46 percent in Crook County, 40 percent in Jefferson County and 32 percent statewide. Voters are registering with the Independent Party because they are dissatisfied with Democratic and Republican politicians, Meek said. “Circumstances are so unfavorable for most people now, that they think the two major parties have been ineffective in looking out for their interests,” Meek said. Yet he also acknowledged that some people might be confused when they register with the Independent Party, and believe they are not selecting a political party. In Oregon, voters who do not select a political party are described as “nonaffiliated.” Connie Coates, 64, of Bend, is one voter who did not realize she was selecting a political party when she registered as Independent. Coates switched from the Democratic Party to the Independent Party in August, “because I’m tired of Republicans and Democrats. I voted for Bush, and then I turned around

and voted for Obama. Bummer, and bummer.” But Coates did not realize she had changed her registration to another political party. “I just thought it meant you’re independent, to vote on anybody you want to vote on,” Coates said. “Man, I need to check this out.” Meek said voters currently have an opportunity when registering to indicate they are not members of political parties. But the Independent Party would support a clearer registration format, such as asking voters, “Do you want to be a member of a party?” Meek said. Lee Blake, of Bend, changed from the Republican Party to the Independent Party in August, after approximately 40 years as a registered Republican. Blake said his decision was based on his disenchantment “with a number of issues that I see the Republicans representing, and their lack of participation in trying to get some kind of cooperation with the current incumbents.” Blake called the Independent Party “a different basis to vote for who is the best person to serve our country, or our county, or whatever it is we’re voting on.” Because the Independent Party was only certified and added to voter registration materials in 2007, people who have not updated their voter registration since then have never seen a voter registration form with the Independent Party listed, said

Meek, who founded the party with fellow Portland attorney Linda Williams. As a result, people re-registering after changing addresses are one demographic that has an opportunity to pick the Independent Party, and could be contributing to its growth. “Those areas where people move more often is where we’re going to have a higher registration, just because of demographics,” Meek said. The only candidate for local office who received the Independent Party’s nomination is Dallas Brown, the Democrat running for Deschutes County commissioner, according to staff at clerk’s offices in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. “The reason I was aggressively seeking the Independent Party nomination is because I don’t consider myself a Democrat, first and foremost,” Brown said. “I consider myself a competent, common-sense candidate.” Tony DeBone, the Republican running for the same Deschutes County commission seat, said his platform will also attract votes from Independent Party members, even without the nomination. “In the commissioner’s race, I just ask people to research the two candidates, and I think I’d appeal to Democrats, Independents and Republicans,” DeBone said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 A5

Border Continued from A1 For years, until an intricate sting operation brought her down in late 2009, Garnica embodied the seldom-discussed role of the United States in the trafficking trade. Cartels based in Mexico, where there is a long history of corruption, increasingly rely on well-placed operatives such as Garnica to reach their huge customer base in the United States. It is an argument often made by Mexican officials — that all the attention paid to corruption in their country has obscured a similar, growing problem on the U.S. side of the border. The cartels have grown so sophisticated, law enforcement officials say, that they are employing Cold War-era spy tactics to recruit and corrupt U.S. officials. “In order to stay in business, the drug trafficking organizations have to look at different methods for moving product,” said Thomas Frost, an assistant inspector general in the Department of Homeland Security. “The surest method is by corrupting a border official. The amount of money available to corrupt employees is staggering.” In late August, Garnica’s double life ended. U.S. District Judge David Briones sentenced her to 20 years in prison after Martha Garshe pleaded nica was, in guilty to six the words of counts of drug prosecutors, a smuggling, hu“valued asset” man traffickof the Mexiing and bribcan crime ery. She was, syndicate La in the words of Linea. prosecutors, a “valued asset” of the crime syndicate La Linea based in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, directing the movements of at least five men, four of whom are in prison or dead. “Everybody makes mistakes,” she said in court, wearing handcuffs and an orange prison jumpsuit. “I take responsibility for my mistakes.” Garnica’s saga — pieced together from hundreds of pages of court testimony, tape-recorded conversations and interviews with border officials, investigators, undercover agents and members of the judiciary — underscores the enormous challenge facing the United States as it tries to curtail the $25 billion-a-year business of illegal drug trafficking.

Rising corruption Corruption is on the rise in the ranks of U.S. law enforcement working the border, and nowhere is the problem more acute than in the frontline jobs with Garnica’s former employer, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, according to federal investigators. Garnica’s stiff sentence represented a rare victory in the struggle to root out tainted government employees. Homeland Security statistics suggest the rush to fill thousands of border enforcement jobs has translated into lower hiring standards. Barely 15 percent of Customs and Border Protection applicants undergo polygraph tests and of those, 60 percent were rejected by the agency because they failed the polygraph or were not qualified for the job, said Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., who oversees a Senate subcommittee on homeland security. The number of CBP corruption investigations opened by the inspector general climbed from 245 in 2006 to more than 770 this year. Corruption cases at its sister agency, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, rose from 66 to more than 220 over the same period. The vast majority of corruption cases involve illegal trafficking of drugs, guns, weapons and cash across the Southwest border. “We have in our country today a big presence of the Mexican cartels,” Pryor said. “With about 50 percent of the nation’s methamphetamine and marijuana coming through Mexico and about 90 percent of the cocaine, there is a huge financial incentive for cartels to try to corrupt our people.” CBP Commissioner Alan Bersin said the rise in investigations might simply correspond to the rapid growth in personnel. Corruption of “customs officials all over the world has been a perennial problem of border inspection and border enforcement,” he said in an interview. “What we haven’t seen is a vast conspiracy in the work force.” Still, Frost said, it takes only a handful of dirty government

Courtesy FBI

Martha Garnica lived in a spacious house with a built-in pool, owned two Hummers and vacationed in Europe — a lifestyle funded by the Mexican drug cartel she helped gain access across the border. workers on the inside to make millions for the cartels. “It would be naive to think a $1 billion smuggling industry would allow itself to be dependent on one or two corrupt employees, or if you eliminate that corrupt employee that they won’t try to corrupt someone else,” he said.

Early suspicions There was always something about Martha Garnica that just didn’t feel right. As early as 1997, colleagues had suspicions about the assertive young mother of two who had worked seven years as an El Paso cop before joining the U.S. Customs Service. (Her division became part of CBP in 2003.) Garnica had a pattern of filing questionable workplace injury claims and socialized in bars popular among drug dealers. “There was an air about her that made her suspect,” said Ed Abud, an internal affairs officer at CBP El Paso who was involved in the investigation. Garnica’s adult daughter and attorney refused interview requests. In court, her attorney pleaded for leniency and counseling, saying Garnica had been the victim of abuse by a family member and a boyfriend. Abud said he now believes Garnica transferred to the federal agency with an eye toward criminal smuggling activities. “She came on board probably with the main purpose of trying to exploit the border for herself,” he said recently. “She figured, ‘What’s in it for me?’” In November 1997, authorities seized nearly 100 pounds of marijuana on the Bridge of the Americas into El Paso. An informant fingered Garnica as part of the conspiracy, according to two investigators. The FBI opened a case, but it went nowhere. In March 2005, she came under scrutiny again. That week, a van packed with 531 pounds of marijuana tried to enter the United States through the lane Garnica was staffing. She was not originally scheduled to work the lane that day, but “the duty roster had been tampered with,” said James Smith, head of the inspector general’s investigative unit in El Paso. As the van neared Garnica in the inspection booth, drug-sniffing dogs detected the marijuana, and agents arrested the driver. Others on the scene reported that Garnica looked shaken and left for the day, Smith said. But despite the mounting suspicions, authorities lacked the evidence to suspend or charge Garnica. “We kept hitting dead ends,” Smith said.

A break in the case Four years passed before they got their big break. In the spring of 2009, a CBP employee contacted Smith’s office. Garnica, he said, was overly friendly; he suspected she was trying to lure him into the smuggling business. The man was the perfect target, right out of the Cold War-era espionage handbook. He was recently divorced, with a child heading to college and a modest government salary. He was struggling to pay his bills. “It’s no different from spy agencies,” Smith said. “They look for weaknesses. Sex is a biggie. Alcohol, drug abuse, financial woes.” The man, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because officials say his life is in danger, agreed to work undercover. His code name would be Angel. It began subtly with chatty text messages, then drinks in a bar. They would talk about the weather and gripe about work, intermingling Spanish and English as so many people

Angel said in an interview after Garnica was sentenced. “I was always afraid her associates would get on to me.” As the undercover operation continued, the inspector general’s office pored over Garnica’s phone records and finances. She had two homes, two Hummers, a Cadillac and a truck. Her extended family took cruises, traveled to Europe and decorated one house with ostentatious statues and a fountain — signs she was living above her government salary. In several instances, Garnica’s number turned up in the cell phones of convicted drug traffickers and money launderers. Vehicles used in other smuggling cases appeared at her homes, according to surveillance information. On the night before Halloween, Garnica summoned Angel to the Agave bar. They had been talking for days about a big shipment — two large vehicles. The payoff would be several thousand dollars. Angel raced to meet Garnica; he had less than an hour before his shift began. He had trouble finding the bar, he said later, and when he spotted it, a pair of beefy men were guarding the door. “That made me uncomfortable,” he said. “I felt like everybody in the bar looked me up and down when I walked in,” he said later. As he scanned the room, Garnica pulled him aside to a table. She handed him a Nextel walkietalkie-style phone and a cocktail napkin with 12 ordinary phrases written in Spanish. Each corresponded to a lane at the port. “You have to memorize this,” she said. Angel hurried out of the bar to change his clothes and report for work. Around 1 a.m., Angel pushed the button on the phone and said simply: “Esta haciendo mucho frio” — it’s very cold out. The code words meant he was

working Lane 10. But Garnica, who investigators spotted watching the station in one of her Hummers, messaged back: “Hay mucha de la fea.” The slangy phrase translates roughly: “There’s a lot of ugliness” — criminal code warning of the presence of Mexican military or law enforcement. They aborted the delivery.

Arrests made A week later, Angel and Garnica repeated the routine, Angel again remarking on the cold weather to direct smugglers to Lane 10. He’d been given $3,500 in advance and told to look for a red pickup truck. When the truck reached Angel in the booth, he recognized Garnica’s nephew in the passenger seat and one of Ramirez-Rosalez’s brothers behind the wheel. “I acted like it was a normal inspection,” he recalled. “I stalled for a few minutes to make it look like I was checking the vehicle.” Then he waved the pair through. Just up the road, El Paso police stopped the truck, loaded with more than 160 pounds of marijuana, and arrested the pair. Two days later, a federal grand jury meeting in secret indicted Garnica and her co-conspirators. Garnica, unaware of the indictments or Angel’s role in the sting, prepared to bring across another load. The next shipment was set for the night of Nov. 17. At the last minute, investigators told Angel to call it off. “We’d already indicted Garnica, and we didn’t want to take any more risks,” Smith said. The next day, La Estrella was behind bars.

along the border do. by clogged traffic. Within a few months, they For investigators, each meetwere meeting for dinner. Garni- ing and message provided inca always picked up the tab, and sight into the methods and mindAngel always wore a wire, their set of the cartels. taped conversations and text “We were able to see the enmessages sent directly to Smith tire recruitment process play out and his team in the inspector through Angel,” Smith said. “It general’s office. starts with small probes. If you’re “Garnica was becoming his willing to do that, it escalates.” best friend,” Smith said. “Good New recruits get tested, and recruiters don’t just jump into with each test they pass, it beit. They chip through the wall. comes more difficult for them to That’s what she was doing.” refuse, he said. On Aug. 1, 2009, Garnica invitFor the next few weeks, Aned Angel to Jaguar’s, a strip club gel met often with Garnica and in east El Paso, to meet a man Ramirez-Rosalez, discussing she described as a drug traffick- money, vehicles and a plan to er. She and her smuggle a friend boyfriend, Carlos into the counRamirez-Rosalez, “It’s no different try. The person arrived in a Hum- from spy agencies. would ride in a mer, according to white VolkswaThey look for court records. gen Beetle with a JOURNEY OF DISCOVERY company logo on weaknesses. Has moved to 52 SE Bridgeford the doors. Why pay retail? A huge selection of very reasonable The pitch Sex is a biggie. In the pre541-385-5950 European furniture & accessories The group met Alcohol, drug dawn darkness 10-4 Daily • 541-382-7333 New Bend Location: in a VIP lounge, of Sunday, Oct. journeyofdiscovery.net abuse, financial 2nd & Greenwood where Hugo Al11, the vehicle apberto Flores Col- woes.” proached the Yswww.extrafurniture.com menero told Angel leta border crosshe could supply — James Smith, head of ing station and him with money the inspector general’s steered into Anand a weapon, investigative unit in gel’s inspection specifically a El Paso, on how drug lane. Inside were Glock semi-auto- cartels recruit two of Ramirezmatic pistol. They Rosalez’ brothers, exchanged phone both undocumentnumbers. ed Mexicans who Garnica offered to pay for a would eventually be arrested stripper for Angel; he demurred, as part of Garnica’s smuggling saying he had a new girlfriend. ring. At the time, Angel made “There’s plenty of fish in the a show of checking the driver’s sea,” Garnica replied, according identification, then waved the to the tape recording. Volkswagen through. InvestigaAngel left Jaguar’s around 11 tors followed the car straight to p.m. At 2 a.m., Flores Colmen- Garnica’s house. ero left him a voice message. In “We couldn’t believe it,” said a stroke of luck for investigators, one of the agents. instead of hanging up, Flores At 7 a.m., Garnica sent Angel a Colmenero switched to a call on text message: “Prueba de fuego. another line — all of it recorded Superada.” Trial by fire. Passed. by the inspector general’s team. The following afternoon, An“I’ve met with el cuatro,” or gel, Garnica and Ramirez-Ro“the fourth,” he said, referring salez met in a McDonald’s parkto Angel. He called Garnica “la ing lot. From the passenger-side original.” window of one of her Hummers, It was a disturbing revelation. Garnica handed Angel a pile of “We take that to mean that $20 bills wrapped in a piece of there are two or three other peo- paper. ple that Garnica has brought into “It’s 500,” she said. the organization,” said Juanita Fielden, the assistant U.S. attor‘Living a lie’ ney prosecuting the case. A few days later, over dinner Angel was suffering the strains at the restaurant La Mar, Flores of his own double life: undercover Colmenero gave Angel $500 in agent to a tight circle of investigacash. They brainstormed about tors, dirty employee to many of how best to smuggle “motita” his co-workers. — marijuana — into the States. Investigators worried about Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store At the time, Angel was working his safety and the psychological 2660 NE Hwy 20, Bend • (541) 330-0420 the “cargo” lanes designated for effects of “living a lie,” as Smith By Costco, across from Safeway, in the Forum Center. large vehicles. They discussed put it. 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A6 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Days after ‘don’t ask’ ruling, another challenge goes to court By James Dao New York Times News Service

Nadia Shira Cohen / New York Times News Service

Clothing sits in the parking lot of a “pronto moda” or “fast fashion” company, in Prato, Italy. Such companies rely on the tens of thousands of Chinese laborers who began settling in Prato in the late 1980s and transformed the textile hub into a low-end garment manufacturing capital.

Italy Continued from A1 The city is now home to the largest concentration of Chinese in Europe — some legal, many more not. Here in the heart of Tuscany, Chinese laborers work round the clock in some 3,200 businesses making low-end clothes, shoes and accessories, often with materials imported from China, for sale at midprice and low-end retailers worldwide. It is a “Made in Italy” problem: Enabled by Italy’s weak institutions and high tolerance for rule-bending, the Chinese have blurred the line between “Made in China” and “Made in Italy,” undermining Italy’s cachet and ability to market its goods exclusively as high end. Part of the resentment is cultural: The city’s classic Italian feel is giving way to that of a Chinatown, with signs in Italian and Chinese, and groceries that sell food imported from China.

Italy’s future? But what seems to gall some Italians most is that the Chinese are beating them at their own game — tax evasion and brilliant ways of navigating Italy’s notoriously complex bureaucracy — and have created a thriving, if largely underground new sector while many Prato businesses have gone under. The result is a toxic combination of residual fears about immigration and the economy. “This could be the future of Italy,” said Edoardo Nesi, the culture commissioner of Prato province. “Italy should pay attention to the risks.” The situation has steadily grown beyond the control of state tax and immigration authorities. According to the Bank of Italy, Chinese individuals in Prato channel an estimated $1.5 million a day to China, mainly earnings from the garment and textile trade. Profits of that magnitude are not showing up in tax records, and some local officials say the Chinese prefer to repatriate their profits rather than invest locally. The authorities also say that Chinese and probably Italian organized crime is on the rise, involving not only illegal fabric imports, but also human trafficking, prostitution, gambling and money laundering. The rest of Italy is watching closely. “Lots of businesses from Emilia Romagna, Puglia and the Veneto say, ‘We don’t want to wind up like Prato,’” said Silvia Pieraccini, the author of “The Chinese Siege,” a book about the rise of the “pronto moda” or “fast fashion” economy. Tensions have been running high since Italian authorities stepped up raids this spring on workshops that use illegal labor, and grew even more when Italian prosecutors arrested 24 people and investigated 100 businesses in the Prato area in late June. The charges included money laundering, prostitution, counterfeiting and classifying foreign-made products as “Made in Italy.” Yet many Chinese in Prato are offended at the idea that they have ruined the city. “If the Chinese hadn’t gone to Prato, would there be pronto moda?” asked Matteo Wong, 30, who was born in China and raised in Prato and runs a consulting office for Chinese immigrants. “Did the Chinese take jobs away from Italians? If anything, they brought lots of jobs to Italians.” In recent months, Prato has become a diplomatic point of contention. Italian officials say the Chinese government has not done enough so far to address the issue of illegal immigrants, and they are seeking a bilateral ac-

cord with China to identify and deport them. Italian officials say Prato is expected to be on the agenda when Prime Minister Wen Jiabao of China visits Rome in October.

‘This climate is risky’ According to the Prato chamber of commerce, the number of Italian-owned textile businesses registered in Prato has dropped in half since 2001 to just below 3,000, 200 fewer than those now owned by Chinese, almost all in the garment sector. Once a major fabric producer and exporter, Prato now accounts for 27 percent of Italy’s fabric imports from China. Resentment runs high. “You take someone from Prato with two unemployed kids, and when a Chinese person drives by in a Porsche Cayenne or a Mercedes bought with money earned from illegally exploiting immigrant workers, this climate is risky,” said Domenico Savi, Prato’s chief of police until June. According to the Prato mayor’s office, there are 11,500 legal Chinese immigrants, out of Prato’s total population of 187,000. But the office estimates the city has another 25,000 illegal immigrants, the majority of them Chinese. With its bureaucracy, protectionist policies and organized crime, Italy is arguably Western Europe’s least business-friendly country. Yet in Prato, the Chinese have managed to create an entirely new economy from scratch in a matter of years. A common technique used, often with the aid of knowledgeable Italian tax consultants and lawyers, is to open a business, close it before the tax police can catch up, then reopen the same workspace with a new tax code number. Prato’s streets have slowly become more and more Chinese, as the Chinese bought out Italianowned shops and apartments, often paying in cash. Public schools are increasingly filled with Chinese pupils. The work — long hours at sewing machines — takes place in backroom workshops with makeshift sleeping quarters. The heart of the “fast fashion” sector is an industrial area on the outskirts of town, Macrolotto, filled with Chinese fashion wholesalers. Here, vans from across Europe line the parking lots as retailers buy “Made in Italy” clothing to resell back home at a huge markup. By buying in relatively small quantities and taking advantage of the fluid borders of the Eu-

ropean Union, most manage to avoid paying import tariffs. Much of the tightening comes from Prato’s new administration. In 2009, the traditionally left-wing city elected its first right-wing mayor in the postwar era, whose winning campaign tapped into powerful local fears of a “Chinese invasion,” and who seeks a broader European Union response to Chinese immigration. “How can China leave a mark like this in the EU?” the mayor, Roberto Cenni, asked. “Noise, bad habits, prostitution. People can’t live anymore. They’re sick of it.” Cenni is a former president and a current shareholder of Go-Fin, a Prato holding company that is behind several midrange Italian fashion companies. At least one of these, Sasch, moved much of its production to China within the last 10 years. Powerless to reverse the broader economic currents, the mayor has instead focused on small initiatives, including new rules that prohibit drying fish on balconies and require all Prato shopkeepers to speak Italian. These have won him praise from some local people, but also criticism for bigotry. He has also stepped up raids on Chinese businesses. Critics say they are little more than media spectacles, but local Chinese have seen them as an unwarranted attack. Many illegal Chinese immigrants arrive by bus from Russia or the Balkans, and either destroy their passports or give them away to the organized crime groups that help bring them. Many others overstay their tourist visas. “Italy has a 20th-century immigration law; it tends to think of immigrants as a phenomenon linked to work, in which people move from poor countries to rich ones,” said Andrea Frattani, a former social welfare commissioner in Prato’s previous center-left government. Instead, he argued, what Italy is witnessing in Prato is “a precise strategy” on the part of the Chinese government to create an economic foothold in Europe. Asked recently if that was the case, China’s ambassador to Italy, Ding Wei, said only that Prato had been a central issue in his portfolio since he arrived in spring, and that he had sent advisers to investigate. The problems will not be resolved easily. “There’s no plan,” said Xu Qiu Lin, a local entrepreneur and the only Chinese member of Confindustria in Prato, echoing a widespread sentiment. “There’s no plan; that’s the problem.”

For 17 years, Maj. Margaret Witt rose steadily through the Air Force and Air Force Reserves, winning plaudits from colleagues, strong performance reviews from superiors and service medals from the department. A flight nurse, she treated wounded troops during Desert Storm and was featured in Air Force promotional materials for years. Witt is also a lesbian. To hide her sexual orientation, she skipped military functions where dates were invited. She dodged questions about her personal life. And she avoided inviting colleagues home, lest some possession — a book, a photograph — might tip them off. “You can’t be honest,” Witt, 46, said in a recent interview. “I didn’t want to answer questions, even to say what my weekend plans were.” Her efforts to maintain a low profile ended in 2004, when the jilted husband of a woman Witt had started to date sent a note to the Air Force disclosing her orientation. After an investigation and hearing, the Air Force discharged her in 2007 under the policy known as “don’t ask, don’t tell.” But her case is far from over. Witt sued, and, in what will be one of the most closely watched challenges to the law to date, she is scheduled to appear in federal court in Tacoma, Wash., today to argue that the Air Force violated her rights and must reinstate her. The court appearance comes at a time of growing debate about the policy. On Thursday, a federal judge in California ruled that the don’t ask, don’t tell policy was unconstitutional. Witt’s case has already set an important precedent. After a federal judge dismissed her lawsuit, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit reinstated it, ruling in 2008 that the government had to meet a higher standard of scrutiny before intruding on her private life. The panel sent her case back to the District Court for trial. If Witt prevails in District Court, she will become the first woman allowed to serve openly as a lesbian since don’t ask, don’t tell was enacted in 1993. The law, however, would continue to apply

to other service members. “It’s not as if she would go around telling people,” said James Lobsenz, a lawyer who, along with the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, is representing Witt. “But if someone asked, ‘Are you a lesbian,’ she could respond, ‘Yes,’ and not be thrown out.”

New challenges Under don’t ask, don’t tell, the simple acknowledgment of one’s homosexuality can lead to discharge. In its ruling, the 9th Circuit said that to discharge Witt, the government must prove that removing her, or any other individual

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Margaret Witt is challenging her discharge from the Air Force under “don’t ask, don’t tell.” If Witt prevails in the district court, she will become the first woman allowed to serve openly as a lesbian since the policy was enacted in 1993.

service member, is the only way to significantly advance an important policy. The ruling applies only in the 9th Circuit, which is based in San Francisco and covers much of the West. The government has asserted that Congress firmly established that homosexual behavior undermines morale and military readiness when it enacted don’t ask, don’t tell. But the Obama administration did not appeal the ruling, saying it would wait until Witt’s trial concluded in the lower court. If Witt wins and is allowed to serve openly as a lesbian, the Justice Department argues in court papers, it will undermine morale in the services by creating two standards of fairness: one for her and another for everyone else. Some legal experts and supporters of don’t ask, don’t tell say the 9th Circuit’s ruling could also open the door to challenges to other policies that attempt to set uniform standards across the military. Professor William Woodruff, a retired Army lawyer who teaches at Campbell University School of Law in Raleigh N.C., said that if the Witt ruling stood, individuals could challenge other kinds of discharges, like those for excess weight or poor eyesight. “Traditionally, the Supreme Court has said federal justices should not be playing in military policy,” he said. “Those are areas where the judiciary does not have the experience or knowledge to substitute their judgment for that of the military commander.”

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Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

LILY RAFF

Area farm growing a new trend I

f I told you this column is about a Central Oregonian’s first-ever farming season, you’d probably expect a sob story with dreams of a High Desert bounty crushed between a cold, late spring and an early autumn frost. Spoiler alert: It’s not. Make no mistake, this is a success story, despite this summer’s, well, challenging weather. The farmer is Sarahlee Lawrence, a 27year-old who grew up on her parents’ ranch near Terrebonne, left to study environmental science in college and graduate school, then worked as a river Sarahlee rafting guide for sevLawrence eral years. She was teaching a course at the Wild Rockies Field Institute, in Colorado, when she came across some alarming curriculum materials about food. She learned, for example, that our food travels an average of 1,500 miles from the field to our plates. “I just didn’t realize that all these environmental issues existed with food,” she says. “I didn’t realize that food is the biggest (part of our) carbon footprint and our biggest use of petroleum.” Then she thought: “I could do something about that.” Two years ago, she went home and planted cover crops to restore nutrients to the land where her parents had grown conventional hay. She shoveled 200 tons of manure onto the property to transform a three-acre patch of thin, volcanic soil into rich humus capable of producing vegetables. Onlookers raised their eyebrows skeptically. Did she forget how cold it gets at night? There are other places where growing seasons are long and mild. But Lawrence’s reasoning was simple. “Why do we need to grow food here? Because we live here,” she says. “Besides, it’s not like we’re tackling something impossible,” she adds. “It just takes more time and money than in some other places.” She plowed ahead, naming her farm Rainshadow Organics, and turning to other farmers in Central Oregon for mentorship. “They’re skilled and super dedicated,” she says of local organic food growers, “and maybe a little crazy.” Then she joined them. In early spring, she started seeds in the greenhouse. She found an experienced helper, Michael Adcock, through a program called Willing Workers on Organic Farms. In May, they began transplanting the sprouts into a one-acre plot they call the “baby garden,” where well water and a warm microclimate allow them to pamper delicate plants. Meanwhile, word of her farm spread, especially in Sisters, which didn’t have as many Community Supported Agriculture options as Bend and Redmond. “People have been so, so enthusiastic,” she says. “I thought people would be supportive, but this ... blew me away.” By late June, nearly 40 families had joined the CSA. They paid a flat fee at the start of the season in exchange for a weekly box of whatever produce she could provide. Lawrence is optimistic she’ll find 60 members next year. She also struck deals with St. Charles Redmond and several restaurants in Bend. Farmers markets, on the other hand, turned out to be an inefficient way to sell her goods. All summer, to Lawrence’s delight, food kept popping out of the ground. “Everybody says, ‘You can’t grow anything in Central Oregon.’ Well, it turns out you can grow a lot,” she says. From exotic-sounding green zebra tomatoes (in the greenhouse) and dragontongue beans to common spinach and onions, the farm did, in fact, produce a bounty, albeit for two short months. Lawrence is getting close to winning the equivalent of the local farmers’ lottery. She’s in talks with St. Charles Bend to provide more produce to the hospital system next year, which could mean expanding by as many as 50 acres. In other words, Lawrence isn’t giving up her farming dream anytime soon. “I love my job,” she says. “I hope I can do this until I’m, like, 100.” Lily Raff can be reached at 541-6177836 or at lraff@bendbulletin.com.

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OREGON National Guard mobilizes for Iraq, see Page B3. OBITUARIES ‘Body Snatchers’ actor Kevin McCarthy dies, see Page B5.

Annual Legislature put to a vote Measure 71 will put lawmakers in Salem yearly, limit sessions By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

The fact that Oregon’s Legislature officially meets every two years makes the state a bit of a unique bird.

ELECTION The Beaver State is one of only five that does not have annual legislative sessions, but if Ballot Measure 71 passes this November, Oregon will head into the mainstream. The proposal calls for the Legislature to meet annually and limits

the length of sessions to 160 days in odd-numbered years and 35 days in even-numbered years. Legislators could extend those sessions in five-day increments with a two-thirds supporting vote for each extension. Advocates say the change will save money by paring down the number of days legislators work and reducing the need for expensive special sessions. See Measure 71 / B2

If ‘yes’ — if ‘no’ Result of “yes” vote: Requires Legislative Assembly to meet each year. Limits regular sessions to 160 days in odd-numbered years and 35 days in even-numbered years. Allows five-day extensions by two-thirds vote. Result of “no” vote: Retains current law, requiring regular sessions of Legislative Assembly only in oddnumbered years, with no limit on length of sessions. Estimated financial impact: less than $100,000 Source: Oregon Secretary of State

21ST ANNUAL GREAT ROTARY DUCK RACE

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A crowd gathers to watch as thousands of plastic ducks are dumped from the Galveston Avenue bridge into the Deschutes River to start the 21st annual Great Rotary Duck Race on Sunday.

A mad dash of ducks Bend charity event sends 15,000 toy quackers down river By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

I

t wasn’t the first duck race for Dallas White and Caitlin Ewart. The two 10-year-olds knew what to do. They watched as a crane lifted a large green bin with more than 15,000 plastic ducks inside. As it hovered over the Deschutes River on Sunday afternoon,

the duo chanted, “dump it, dump it.” And as if on • Race cue, pink, blue, winners, yellow and green Page B2 ducks landed in the river. The 21st annual Great Rotary Duck Race is put on each year by the area’s four Rotary clubs. The ducks cost $5, and proceeds go to several local charities, including the Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools, Grandma’s House, Shots for Tots, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Central Oregon. See Ducks / B2

Inside

Dave Cooper snaps a photo, while his son Russell Cooper and his girlfriend Hydie Plotts watch for their duck numbered 3386 during the duck race in Drake Park.

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CENTRAL OREGON WEATHER

Temperatures forecast to stay warm before a cool weekend By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Central Oregonians should make some outdoor plans as the coming week is expected to bring warm temperatures before the mercury drops into the weekend. “We’re going to be in the mid-70s to low 80s range at least into Friday, and then things cool off over the weekend as temperatures get into the 60s,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Mary Johnson.

Chance of showers all week There will be a chance of precipitation throughout the week, but mainly coming as isolated showers in the evening. “You really can’t complain (about this week),” Johnson said. Today is expected to see temperatures ranging from 77 to 82 degrees and evening lows between 35 and 45 degrees. There could be some afternoon and evening showers.

The temperatures on Tuesday and Wednesday should stay in the upper 70s to low 80s until it drops into the mid-30s to low 40s at night. The middle of the week looks slightly warmer, according to Johnson.

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B2 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Ducks Continued from B1 Over the years, the fundraiser has held true to its original mission to help local charities that focus on children and families. “We can’t give money if people don’t buy ducks, so we’re thankful for our generous community,� said Jeremy Boethin, chair of the event, with the Rotary Club of Bend. As soon as the ducks were dumped and started heading downstream, so did Dallas and Caitlin. The plastic toys moved swiftly. Within about 15 minutes, the ducks were nearing the end of the race. A blue duck was in the lead, followed by a purple and pink. On the bank of the river, Andrew Ball, 11, and his brother, Alex, 14, watched as the first duck crossed the finish line. For Andrew Ball, having to wait was difficult. “I wanted to get scissors and

Winners of the 21st annual Great Rotary Duck Race 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) 11)

Kevin Taylor Kim Lorentzen Walt Cruz Shane Furlow Chris Crownover Kathy Andreas Fred or Alicia Hallett Leslie Bainbridge Martha Crisks Doyce Bedortha Paul Schroeder

cut the tension,� he said about his long wait. Although he only had one duck in the fight, he was confident his was among the top finalists. Maggie Hanson and her husband, Rick, moved to Bend two years ago and have felt good about participating in the event each year.

L B   Bulletin staff report

Work continues on U.S. highways 97, 20 Road crews with the Oregon Department of Transportation will continue work this week on U.S. highways 97 and 20. On Highway 97, crews will continue work on the stretch from Lava Butte to the South Century interchange. Traffic will be restricted to one lane in each direction between the Lava Lands Visitor Center and the Cottonwood Road interchange. No delays are expected. The interchange at U.S. 97

and Cottonwood Road will be closed starting today. Crews will work to rebuild the ramp and Cottonwood Road at the interchange. The road is scheduled to be closed for about a month. The northbound offramp at Cottonwood Road will remain closed. Drivers should take South Century Drive through Sunriver back to Cottonwood Road as a detour. On Highway 20, crews will stripe new pavement. During nighttime hours, crews will work to pave bike lanes on each side of the highway.

N  R CIVIL SUITS Deschutes County

Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration Filed Aug. 24

10CV0721MA: HSBC Bank USA NA, trustee for ACE Securities Corp. Home Equity Loan Trust v. James M. Wright and all persons in possession, complaint, $10,000 Filed Aug. 30

10CV0736AB: Capital One Bank USA NA v. Deborah M. Ohlrich dba Oregon Screen Printing, complaint, $22,929.24 10CV0737ST: Cynthia J. Todd v. Russell & Russell LLC, complaint, $400,000 10CV0738MA: Columbia State Bank v. Terry L. Anderson, Candice E. Anderson, Anderson Wealth Management LLC, Shevlin Center Owners Committee and city of Redmond, complaint, $2,193,414.19 10CV0739MA: Discover Bank v. Chris Pangle, complaint, $13,151.05

10CV0740ST: MultiBank 2009-1 RES-ADC Venture LLC v. Trepanier Construction Inc., Gary N. Thrasher, Aspen Builders & Contractors, complaint, $3,458,422.56 10CV0742ST: Kathryn Grace, representative of the estate of Kirian E. Kossler v. 2nd Street Theatre LLC and Julianne Ramaker, complaint, noneconomic damages $1,200,000, economic damages $766,995.47 10CV0749ST: Borden’s Corner LLC v. Total Health Solutions Inc. dba Indigo’s Smoothies CafÊ, Bill and Lori M. McCadden, complaint, $95,267.64 Filed Aug. 31

10CV0735ST: Portfolio Recovery Associates LLC v. Deborah M. Ohlrich, complaint, $36,617.44 Filed Sept. 1

10CV0750MA: Eric Peterson v. Charles Schwab & Co. Inc. and Aaron Boehm, complaint, $312,508.10 10CV1004ST: Columbia State Bank v. G.W. Potts & Sons Construction LLC, George W. and Beverly G. Potts, complaint, $47,223.56

“It’s really a unique event and a community event,� Maggie Hanson said. “The organizations it benefits are wonderful.� The first prize is a $20,000 retail voucher toward a new car at Bob Thomas Car Company. The other prizes include a pair of $1,000 diamond earrings, a gift certificate at Les Schwab Tire Centers and a dinner at Crossings at The Riverhouse. Before the winners were announced, both Dallas and Caitlin were feeling hopeful the first prize would be theirs. They didn’t mind that it would be at least another five years before they could take a new car for a spin. “I could still ride in it,� Dallas said. Caitlin said she would buy a large pickup with the voucher. Dallas would pick out a black Corvette. “I would scream and jump up and down,� Dallas said. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Measure 71 Continued from B1 But some say lengthy sessions may scare away political hopefuls who must work for a living, while short sessions mean less public input on legislation. Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, was a driving force behind the measure. Now serving his fourth term in the Legislature, Courtney said annual sessions are necessary for legislators to get their work done. “I have been there, and I will tell you we are going into special sessions more, and the general sessions are getting longer because we can’t handle the workload,� Courtney said. Biennial sessions also give greater opportunity for lobbyists, agency heads and even the media to have a greater influence on the political process, he said. “I can’t deal with public policy when I am not going to be in the building for 18 months,� Courtney said.

Too many, too few State Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, who is running for state treasurer, said the concept of meeting annually is a good one, but Measure 71 is a bad way to implement it. “In my heart, I believe in annual sessions, but I believe 160 days is too many, and 35 is way too short,� Telfer said. Telfer said a 25-day special session held in February illustrates her point. “There were way too many bills that never had public testimony,� she said. “Things moved way too fast, and the public did not have a chance to weigh in.� Telfer also said a 160-day session may not be doable for parttime legislators earning a state salary of $1,800 a month. “If, in fact, the Legislature is supposed to be the people’s legislature, you exclude a lot of good

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Volunteers use fishing nets to gather the ducks at the finish line after the 21st annual Great Rotary Duck Race on Sunday.

people who can’t give up that much time because they have to make a living.�

‘A political tool’ State Rep. Judy Stiegler, DBend, supports Measure 71. She said annual sessions will allow lawmakers to respond more quickly to emergencies and reduce their chances of using special sessions for political gain. “The example that comes to mind right now is calling a special session so we can make specific (budget) cuts instead of the governor’s across-the-board cuts,� she said. “I believe that is a legitimate reason to go in, but it can be used as a political tool during the campaign season. If we don’t go in there without some kind of an agreement ... there will be 90 people politically posturing.� Stiegler is running to keep her seat against Republican attorney Jason Conger and unaffiliated real estate broker Michael Kozak.

Ferrioli said he was formerly in favor of annual sessions but thinks cutting legislative sessions short — which now run as long as lawmakers decide is necessary — is a mistake. “Citizens from all over Oregon are going to be told that, ‘You are going to have to present your case in Salem in a shorter period of time with less opportunity to prepare and with far less opportunity to get a groundswell of Oregonians weighing in on an issue,’� he said.

Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

Timely response Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Kitzhaber, who recently announced he will implement a 10-year budget planning cycle if elected, supports the measure. “He talks about this in the context of the need to respond in a Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Bigger government? Kozak said he opposes the measure. “I don’t want to see annual legislative sessions because then government gets bigger, and we lose the concept of citizen legislator,� he said. “And if you look at the states who have professional politicians, they are the ones who have the worst problems.� Conger could not be reached for comment Friday. Stiegler said the cost of special sessions is another reason annual sessions make sense. “It costs, just to have us sitting there, about $13,500 a day, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but if you are sitting there for 10 or 20 days, that’s real money, and it’s money we don’t have,� Stiegler said. Senate Republican Leader Ted Ferrioli described himself as “sort of torn� over Measure 71 and echoed Telfer’s point about public involvement.

timely manner to the opportunities and challenges presented by today’s fast-paced economy,� said campaign spokeswoman Jillian Schoene. “And it is more important now than ever, particularly as it relates to the difficulty in forecasting state revenues two years out.� Representatives for Kitzhaber’s Republican opponent, Chris Dudley, were not able to respond to a request for comment by Friday’s deadline.

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N.Y. prison rebellion claims 43 lives in 1971 The Associated Press Today is Monday, Sept. 13, the 256th day of 2010. There are 109 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Sept. 13, 1970, the first New York City Marathon was held; Gary Muhrcke finished the 26.2-mile run, which took place entirely inside Central Park, in 2:31:38. ON THIS DATE In 1759, during the final French and Indian War, the British defeated the French on the Plains of Abraham overlooking Quebec City. In 1788, the Congress of the Confederation authorized the first national election, and declared New York City the temporary national capital. In 1803, Commodore John Barry, considered by many the father of the American Navy, died in Philadelphia. In 1860, General of the Armies of the United States John J. Pershing was born in Laclede, Mo. In 1948, Republican Margaret Chase Smith of Maine was elected to the U.S. Senate, becoming the first woman to serve in both houses of Congress. In 1959, Elvis Presley first met his future wife, 14-year-old Priscilla Beaulieu, while stationed in West Germany with the U.S. Army. (They married in 1967, but divorced in 1973.) In 1971, a four-day inmates’ re-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y bellion at the Attica Correctional Facility in western New York ended as police and guards stormed the prison; the ordeal and final assault claimed 43 lives. In 1989, Fay Vincent was elected commissioner of Major League Baseball, succeeding the late A. Bartlett Giamatti. In 1990, the combination police-courtroom drama “Law & Order� premiered on NBC. In 1993, at the White House, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and PLO chairman Yasser Arafat shook hands after signing an accord granting limited Palestinian autonomy. TEN YEARS AGO With the government all but abandoning its case against him, former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee pleaded guilty in Albuquerque, N.M., to a single count of mishandling nuclear secrets; he was then set free with an apology from U.S. District Judge James Parker, who said the government’s actions had “embarrassed our entire nation.� FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush took responsibility for federal government mistakes in dealing with Hurricane Katrina and suggested the calamity raised broader questions about the government’s ability to handle both natural disasters and terror

attacks. President Bush sought China’s help to stop nuclear weapons programs in North Korea and Iran, and won a pledge from President Hu Jintao to step up pressure on Pyongyang. ONE YEAR AGO The body of missing Yale University graduate student Annie Le was found behind a research lab wall on what would have been her wedding day. (A lab technician, Raymond Clark III, was later charged with murder.) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Barbara Bain is 79. Former White House spokesman Larry Speakes is 71. Actor Richard Kiel is 71. Actress Jacqueline Bisset is 66. Singer Peter Cetera is 66. Actress Jean Smart is 59. Singer Randy Jones (The Village People) is 58. Olympic gold medal runner Michael Johnson is 43. Rock musician Steve Perkins is 43. Actor Roger Howarth is 42. Actress Louise Lombard is 40. Tennis player Goran Ivanisevic is 39. Country singer Aaron Benward (Blue County) is 37. Country musician Joe Don Rooney (Rascal Flatts) is 35. Actor Scott Vickaryous is 35. Singer Fiona Apple is 33. Contemporary Christian musician Hector Cervantes (Casting Crowns) is 30. MLB pitcher Daisuke Matsuzaka is 30. Actor Ben Savage is 30. Actor Mitch

Holleman (“Reba�) is 15. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Revolt and terror pay a price. Order and law have a cost.� — Carl Sandburg, American poet and author (1878-1967)

*Before considering sinus surgery, you should consult an allergist to see about maximal medical therapy.

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WIN CASH! September 18 & 19

PRESENTED BY THE BULLETIN & ST. CHARLES IMMEDIATE CARE To register in the pumpkin pie contest, please email: kayla@c3events.com with your name and phone number.

Harvest Competitions Best Central Oregon Pumpkin Pie 20 spaces available • Must pre-register Contest held September 18 at noon

$100 Grand Prize

Pumpkin Painting Contest takes place from noon to 5 pm Saturday and from noon to 3 pm Sunday (While pumpkins last). Must be 17 years or younger to participate. We provide the pumpkins and the paint. All paintings must be done on-site and be an original design.

Gift Certificates to Powell’s Sweet Shoppe will be awarded to the top 5 best-painted pumpkins! For accommodations, please contact C3 Events at 541-389-0995 or email inquiry@c3events.com


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 B3

O Family revives hop harvest

A SILHOUETTED ASCENSION

State National Guard mobilizes for Iraq amid suicide concerns The Associated Press PORTLAND — More than 500 Oregon Army National Guard soldiers are mobilizing this week for Iraq amid continued concerns over soldier suicides. The Oregonian reported that the death of Sgt. 1st Class Matthew Gross in February was instrumental in each departing soldier meeting face to face with a chaplain.

By Greg Stiles (Medford) Mail Tribune

ASHLAND — Even amid the euphoria of their second straight harvest, the owners of Alpha Beta Hops realize they still are in the experimental phase of their hop-growing careers. Steve and Rebecca Pierce, along with their son Spencer, are discovering the ins and outs of organic farming even as they resurrect a crop that until last year hadn’t been commercially grown in Southern Oregon since the late 1980s. In April 2009, the Pierces planted 1,800 rhizomes of Cascade hops, which produce small cones whose lupulin resin gives beer its bitterness and aroma. They harvested just a fraction of the farm’s potential last fall. “We feel like pioneers,” admitted Steve Pierce, and the scene Saturday had a certain pioneer feel to it as his family was joined by about two dozen friends who gathered to help harvest hops at the startup operation on Butler Creek Road. Harvesting hops is fairly simple, but labor intensive. Friends come in handy, and about 25 to 30 showed up, helping cut down the entwined vines, shake the cones loose and sort the flowers, which are dried on a metal screen, bagged in mylar and stored at 40 degrees. “If we can get the nutrients figured out, we can get close to 2,000 pounds here,” Pierce said. “Last year, we had a couple hundred pounds, and I’m hoping for 300 or 400 pounds this year.” Aphids attacked the first crop, so the Pierces countered with an army of 7,500 ladybugs, which quelled the aphids. Spider mites took their turn this year, sucking chlorophyll from the lower parts of the plants. “You just can’t throw pesticides on them,” Pierce said. Nonetheless, when chilly weather damaged other types of crops in the spring, the hardy hop variety didn’t miss a beat, he said. Spurred by a wholesale price spike in 2007, the Pierces acquired juniper poles, wires and a tractor, and went to work converting a cow pasture not far from Grizzly Peak into a hop farm. A large warehouse fire in America and a crop failure in Germany pushed wholesale prices to between $50 and $60 a pound for hops. “When you consider Northwest craft brewers use about a pound of hops per (31-gallon) barrel, it gets expensive,” Steve Pierce said. It looked like a good time to jump in. Last year, the family sold 75 pounds of hops each to Standing Stone Brewing Co. and Caldera Brewing Co.

Gross was found dead in his locked car off a farm road outside Hermiston. The Umatilla County medical examiner ruled the death a suicide, but Gross’ family called for a second investigation and the case has been reopened. Suicide has become an issue of troop readiness and force strength. Three Oregon Guard soldiers have died in combat since 2007, and 14 have died by suicide.

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Young Hubbard brothers build mini-pumpkin empire The Associated Press HUBBARD — Dylan Wells, 21, and his brother Darren, 19, may grow and sell miniature pumpkins, but there is nothing small about the way they do business. The brothers raise small ornamental pumpkins, gourds, winter squash and Indian corn that are sold across the U.S. and in Japan and Mexico. They are also looking to tap into the Central American market. What started out as having too many pumpkins, after trying to grow just a few, has turned into a flourishing business for the Wells brothers. “It started by overplanting the garden with large pumpkins, so we filled up the pickup and parked it at the end of the driveway,” Dylan Wells said. “We put a can out there and used a payon-your-honor type system, and we still do that to this day.” After some research, their

father, Dan, found that there was a market for miniature ornamental pumpkins, and their business, Autumn Harvest, was born. When they first started 15 years ago, their father coached them in the basic principles of running a business. That education is helping them put themselves through college so they can return and continue their business. Their operation covers 210 acres near Hubbard. During their busiest time, they have 30 to 35 employees working to get their four pumpkin varieties, five squash varieties, mixed gourds and Indian corn harvested and processed. Autumn Harvest has operated as a wholesale operation, going through distributors in the Northwest, Mexico and Japan, but now it is tapping into the retail market, mainly with its new online store and Google.

O  B Lane County officials to dine on train cars EUGENE— About 25 politicians in Oregon’s Lane County have been invited to dine aboard the Union Pacific Railroad’s historic train cars. The Register-Guard reported the railroad is hosting the invitation-only event at its rail yards in Eugene to let company Chairman Jim Young meet local elected and appointed officials. The newspaper says it also gives the officials a chance to discuss issues such as train noise, road crossings, underground pollution and improving service. The dinner is worth about $30 per person, well under Oregon’s law preventing elected officials from receiving gifts worth more than $50 if given to influence legislation. The newspaper says that while many of the officials consider it a social event, some intend to reimburse the railroad

for the dinner’s cost. The Eugene stop is one of several the UP execs are making in the Northwest.

BPA to spend $125M on wildlife habitat PORTLAND — The Bonneville Power Administration plans to spend more than $125 million to protect fish and wildlife habitat in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The Oregonian reported that the federal power agency and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife released a draft of the deal late Friday after years of negotiations. The agreement to protect at least 16,880 acres compensates for habitat lost when the government built 13 Willamette River basin dams and reservoirs. The money will help the state, tribes and nonprofit organizations buy land or conservation easements.

Pilot injured when plane clips hangar AURORA — The Marion County Sheriff’s Office says a Vancouver, Wash., man was hurt when the light plane he was piloting struck a hangar at the Aurora airport. The sheriff’s office identified the victim of the Saturday evening accident as 53-year-old Kevin Carr, who was alone in the aircraft. He was taken by helicopter to Oregon Health & Science University hospital in Portland, but his condition was not immediately known. Sheriff’s deputies said preliminary information indicates the Savage-Cozy experimental aircraft struck the roof of a hangar before coming to rest on an airport ramp. The cause of the accident is being investigated. — From wire reports

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B4 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

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Temper tantrum over coal exports

L

awmakers have done their best in recent years to rid Oregon of the scourge of cheap electricity. They’ve required utilities to sell renewable power. They’ve diverted millions of dollars

in public school funding to solar and wind projects by means of the

Business Energy Tax Credit. They’ve even allowed people to generate renewable power on their own and sell it back to utilities (and other Oregonians) at highly inflated rates. But the political battles behind these policies are largely in the past. What windmills will environmental groups and like-minded politicians tilt at next? A story in Thursday’s editions of The Oregonian provides a hint, and it’s almost too outlandish to believe. We checked the date twice to make sure it wasn’t April 1. With the closure of Portland General Electric’s Boardman facility, Oregon will soon be free of coal-fired power plants. But in the rest of the world, and to some extent within the United States, coal use is booming. Barring significant policy changes, world coal use in 2030 will be roughly 40 percent higher in 2030 than in 2007, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Coal consumption in China could jump more than 80 percent during the same period. The United States happens to have enormous coal reserves, including cheaply mined deposits in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. As environmental policies have limited the use of coal in the United States, energy companies have looked with greater interest at markets abroad. Two such companies are Ambre Energy, based in Australia, and Peabody Energy, the biggest coal producer in the United States. Both may build coalexport terminals on the West Coast, according to The Oregonian, and likely sites include Washington state and, perhaps, Oregon. Environmental groups aren’t happy. Brett VandenHeuvel, executive director of Columbia Riverkeeper, accused coal companies of “seeking to get around the decisions of citizens opposing coal” by exporting the stuff. He told The Oregonian that regulatory agencies should weigh the environmental effects of coal shipped elsewhere, including global warming. Prepare for outrage, lawsuits and, from posturing officeholders, denun-

ciations of Big Coal and fossil-fuel economies. It’ll be just like the recent battle over natural gas import terminals, only the fury will be directed at fuel that’s on its way out rather than fuel on its way in. In Oregon, fossil fuels get it coming and going. (And as Facebook has discovered, to its chagrin, even some users of electricity are criticized for the fuel mix employed by their power companies.) The environmental consequences of coal use are well known, of course, and policymakers everywhere should work to minimize them. But throwing a temper tantrum over export terminals would be unproductive from an environmental standpoint and potentially harmful from an economic standpoint. The U.S. might have the world’s largest coal reserves, but it doesn’t have the world’s only coal reserves. The Northwest, meanwhile, doesn’t have a monopoly on potential terminal sites. For these reasons, China, India and other developing countries will continue to use lots of coal with or without Northwest terminals, Stanford University coal researcher Richard Morse told The Oregonian. Limiting coal exports, on the other hand, would end up hurting plenty of Americans. Far from harming Oregonians and Washingtonians, in fact, building a few coal-export terminals would be good for them. And we’re not referring only to construction workers and terminal employees. Watching cheap domestic fuel flow steadily to China, India and elsewhere would be a useful reminder that we live in a global economy. Oregonians are free to create a highcost, high-hassle island of windmills and solar arrays, and they have. But it pays to remember we have to compete with countries that are happy to eat our lunch in pursuit of greater prosperity. They’re also happy to do it on the strength of inexpensive fuel we’re turning away.

A health care reality B oth of Oregon’s major-party gubernatorial candidates argue that state workers must share at least some of the cost of their health insurance. So does outgoing Gov. Ted Kulongoski. What explains such common ground? The facts.

Across the nation, workers paid about 14 percent more for family health care coverage in 2010 than they did in 2009. That 14 percent increase represents $482, bringing the average worker’s share of his family’s health coverage to roughly $4,000. State workers in Oregon don’t

share the cost for their health coverage. And, as noted by Gov. Kulongoski’s Reset Cabinet, their plans don’t even require deductibles. If we were in state workers’ shoes, we probably wouldn’t like the prospect of surrendering a chunk of such a rich benefit. Nevertheless, it’s increasingly out of step with the rest of the working world. And, more importantly, it’s increasingly unaffordable. For those reasons, the 2011 Legislature had better consider meaningful reform as much of a no-brainer as the outgoing governor and both of his possible successors.

My Nickel’s Worth Immigration cheats Are we a safe haven for illegal aliens? Some of us local taxpayers are concerned that many contractors, subcontractors, merchants, landlords and others in Deschutes County are openly employing and housing many illegal aliens (often paying them low wages under the table), using the feeble excuse that they cannot get local citizens to do the work. That is pure hogwash. These folks know they are breaking the law, stating we must employ illegal aliens in order to be competitive. Every Oregon taxpayer should know that, according to Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR), it costs Oregonians more than $705 million every year to provide the services required by illegal aliens. Those who do business with illegal aliens are triple cheaters. 1. They cheat the government (you and me) of taxes that must be made up by honest citizens. 2. They cheat the community who has to pay the health, education, welfare, and law enforcement costs of illegal aliens and their families. 3. They cheat their competition, who has to pay fair wages and honest taxes, and thus is at a severe economic disadvantage. Employers and merchants can simply call toll free to 888-464-4218 (Social Security) to verify an employee’s legal status, or use the E-Verify system online. It takes less than 10 minutes of anyone’s time to do this. Help stop these cheaters and illegal alien activity by anonymously calling toll-free to Immigration at 866-347-2423. Let’s all stand up for honesty and in-

tegrity, and put a stop to these “triple cheaters!” Mert Troyer Bend

Bend ‘joke’ It’s a joke, right? The city puts in ramps that don’t meet the ADA requirements and now will cost the city more money to be fixed. Kind of reminds me of the joke from a few years ago. Let’s see … it was something about buses. How did that joke go? All I can remember is that the joke was on us! Thank you, city of Bend, for putting jokes on the front page for us to read! Frankly, I’d rather be entertained by fiscal responsibility. Gail Orr Bend

Tax public workers I have a nifty solution to part of Oregon’s budget problem. Why not put a 5 percent surtax on the total income of all those public union members who are getting a 4.5 percent raise, and then they can all join the regular folks who have taken a pay cut to pay for the infamous Measures 66 and 67? Craig Bennett Bend

Vote for Stiegler Because I live in Redmond and can’t vote for Judy Stiegler, I want to encourage those in Bend to do so. Judy has worked hard and achieved much during her time in the Legislature. Having put herself through college and law school, she knows the value of educa-

tion and helped others in the Legislature understand why Central Oregon needed the OSU-Cascades campus. Her efforts kept the college from being cut in 2009. Judy spent many years working on behalf of abused and neglected children through the Court Appointed Special Advocates program. Having volunteered as a CASA myself, I’ve seen the many needs of children and families. I’m glad to know that Judy will fight for the betterment of children, families and the elderly. Her support of expanding the Oregon Health Plan to include more children is an example. Judy loves the Bend community, has made her life here, and has a strong, compassionate heart. Teachers, police officers, firefighters and nurses all endorse her, and I am proud to support her myself. I urge Bend residents to vote for Judy Stiegler. Mary Clark Redmond

Kennel was first I agree with the planning commission’s recent decision to allow the Crook County kennel to remain in operation as it is. The kennel operator is obviously conscientious and is being harassed. I have little sympathy for anyone who purchases property in the “country” and later claims they had no knowledge of the area they purchased in. If there are dog kennels, there are dogs. If there are horses, there are flies. If there’s an airport, there are planes. The “duh” factor here is astonishing, and I hope the kennel remains for another 30 years! Anne Hutchison Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Many Republicans exhibit narcissistic personality disorder By Roger Aikin Bulletin guest columnist

T

he Bulletin was very one-sided during a recent week, with several letters from opponents of President Obama. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis say they “hate what President Obama is doing to this country.” We Democrats watched in horror for eight years while Bush and the Republicans drove this country off a cliff. They waged two endless wars, turned the best economy we had ever seen into one of the worst, and made the tax code even more unfair. They ignored the health care crisis and the banking mischief that led to the recession. Above all, they squandered the huge budget surplus (that President Clinton had achieved at great political cost) and doubled the total national debt. Now they are pushing a deficit narrative, which is both hypocritical and cynical because, in my opinion, they caused the deficit on purpose so that they could go after the federal programs they never liked in the first place: “Gee, we have a huge budget

deficit. How did that happen? We’ll just have to cut Social Security. Sorry.”) As for the “socialism” narrative the GOP is pushing, I am guessing that many people the Lewises know in Sunriver, like many of the rest of us, get at least one check from the government. So I propose the following definition: “Socialism is any government program that helps somebody else.” Again, with respect to the Lewises (whose letter is civil, and who claim not to actually hate the president, which is refreshing), “liberal haters” cannot hold a candle to haters on the far right. Limbaugh and his friends make a living venomously bashing gays, minorities, Muslims and their political enemies. (I had included here an example of Limbaugh’s fear mongering, but The Bulletin could not even print it because it was so offensive.) Threats of violence have even come from Republicans running for Congress. As for Fox and its agenda, Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp just donated $1 million to the Republican Governors re-

IN MY VIEW election fund — and didn’t report that fact on its own network until it was revealed elsewhere. Can you imaging how Fox would have howled if ABC had contributed to the Democrats? Again, with respect to the Lewises, I can’t watch Fox because its presenters have such bad manners. They even shout down each other. All news networks make things worse because the “stories” they now report are not “What are the facts?” but “What do people think are the facts?” So, if some 20 percent of Americans believe that the president is a Muslim, or not a citizen, that is a “story,” even though, historically, it is likely that at least 20 percent of Americans always hate whoever is president and will believe anything bad about him. (Both the right and left accuse each other of being poorly informed, but you might be interested to know that a significant percentage of the people who still believe

President Obama is not a United States citizen actually do know he was born in Hawaii.) Before the Internet you had to dig to find really wacky political viewpoints. You might even have to go to a library. Now politics on the Internet is like pornography — a website for every perversion. You would think people would be better informed, but they are not; they are just more stubbornly misinformed. Regarding Newt Gingrich’s comments about the “mosque:” America does not take instruction from Saudi Arabia. This Republican Muslim bashing ends up on recruiting posters for alQaida. I wish we could send all religious extremists to some other planet where they could have their holy war and leave the rest of us alone. Much has been written lately about “narcissistic personality disorder.” NPD is characterized by a grandiose sense of entitlement, vicious lack of empathy, haughty and contemptuous body language (nudge nudge, wink wink), sarcasm substituted for humor, and re-

actions of contempt, hatred or paranoia in the face of “others.” The new Republicans have become the “narcissistic presence” in American politics. When in power, they waste resources, both human and financial, and destroy the institutions they are supposed to sustain. When voted out of power, they deny responsibility for their actions, intimidate, assassinate character and generally act like enraged 6-year-olds. Their anger becomes their argument. They don’t come to town meetings — or Congress — to help their neighbors solve problems, but to disrupt and obstruct. Everything the Republicans touched turned to ashes, and now they want you to send them back to power in Congress? Their claim to your vote amounts to this: “We really messed up the country, and the Democrats haven’t fixed it fast enough.” The irony is that President Obama is what used to be called a “moderate Republican,” a breed that has been hunted to extinction. Roger Aikin lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 B5

O NFL tight end Ron Kramer ‘a legend’

One of France’s bestknown film directors, Claude Chabrol, shown here in 1990, has died. He was 80 and had been making films for more than half a century.

The Associated Press ANN ARBOR, Mich. — Former Green Bay Packers and Detroit Lions tight end Ron Kramer, a nine-time letterman in three sports at the University of Michigan, died at his home Saturday, the university said. He was 75. Kramer caught two touchdown passes from Bart Starr in Green Bay’s 1961 NFL Championship victory over the New York Giants, then posted his most productive season in 1962 with 37 receptions for 555 yards and seven TDs. He was a firstteam All-Pro both seasons. Kramer spent seven seasons with the Packers after being drafted in the first round with the fourth overall pick in 1957. He did not play in 1958, when he joined the Air Force while recovering from a leg injury suffered at the end of his rookie season. He finished his career with three seasons in Detroit, retiring after the 1967 season. His No. 87 is one of just five numbers retired by Michigan in football. He played offensive and defensive end, running back, quarterback, kicker and receiver. “He called me after every loss, and that meant a lot because it’s a lonely feeling to lose when you’re the coach at Michigan,” former Wolverines coach Lloyd Carr said Saturday night. “I’ll never forget that he used to bring our team apples because he remembered somebody doing that for him when he played at Michigan.” Carr said Kramer was a legend, adding: “We’re all going to miss him.” Kramer earned three letters each in football, basketball and track at Michigan and led the Wolverines in scoring for two seasons in football. As a basketball player he scored 1,119 points and was the team’s Most Valuable Player as a junior. He set the school’s all-time scoring record as team captain his senior year with 1,124 points, a standard that stood until 1961. Despite his 230-pound frame, he competed in the high jump in track. “Ron was one of the great Michigan athletes of the 20th century,” Michigan athletic director Dave Brandon said in a statement released by the university. The statement didn’t indicate a cause of death. Kramer was elected to the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame in 1971. In 1981, he was named a recipient of the NCAA’s Silver Anniversary Award in recognition of significant professional and civic contributions spanning 25 years after completion of his collegiate eligibility.

The Associated Press file photo

Claude Chabrol was known as ‘maestro’ of French filmmaking By Jenny Barchfield

Prime Minister Francois Fillon called him a “great director, producer PARIS — French director Claude and screenwriter (who) was one of the Chabrol, one of the founders of the grand figures of the ‘Nouvelle vague,’ New Wave movement whose films which revolutionized the style and probed the latent malice beneath the techniques of cinema by looking at placid surface of bourgeois life, died real experience, true life, that which is Sunday. He was 80. indiscreet and subtle.” Christophe Girard, who is respon“With the death of Claude Chabrol, sible for cultural matters at Paris City French cinema has lost one of its maeHall, announced the death on his blog. stros,” Fillon said in a statement. Other City Hall officials confirmed Thierry Fremaux, who runs the that Chabrol passed away, but de- Cannes Film Festival, told i-Tele news clined to provide any channel that Chabrol details, including the “had a much more clas“Claude Chabrol cause of death. sic style” than some of A prolific director, is part of our the other, more experiChabrol made more mental New Wave filmthan 70 films and TV national patrimony makers. “But in this productions during ... for his films classicism, there was his more than halfsuch an audacity, such century-long career. and also for his freedom and erudiHis first movie, 1958’s personality.” tion that I think — and “Le Beau Serge” won history will tell — that him considerable criti- — Thierry Fremaux, his thrillers ... will recal acclaim and was leader of Cannes Film main something towidely considered a Festival tally unique in French sort of manifesto for cinema.” the New Wave, or Speaking on France“Nouvelle vague” movement — which Info radio, Fremaux called Chabrol’s reinvented the codes of filmmaking death “a real shock because he was 80 and revolutionized cinema starting years old, but he continued to work, in the late 1950s. The vastly influen- and the energy, feeling and joie de tial movement also included directors vivre that he’d always shown made like Francois Truffaut and Jean-Luc you think he’d always be around.” Godard. “Claude Chabrol is part of our national patrimony ... for his films and also for his personality,” he said. Hitchcock comparison Serge Toubiana, who heads the ParChabrol’s movies focused on the is Cinematheque, told the same radio French bourgeoisie, lifting the facade station that Chabrol “was a delicious, of respectability to reveal the hypoc- malicious man with an incredible inrisy, violence and loathing simmer- telligence. ... He loved to laugh, loved ing just below the surface. Often sus- jokes and made jokes, sort of masked penseful, his work drew comparisons himself through joking.” with that of Alfred Hitchcock. Chabrol worked at a fast clip, churnPresident Nicolas Sarkozy, speak- ing out about a film every year. He ing during his trip Sunday to the wrote some original scripts, but also western Dordogne region, compared adapted classics of French literature, Chabrol to two giants of French let- including “Madame Bovary” (1991) ters, Rabelais and Balzac. and stories by Guy de Maupassant, The Associated Press

for the cinema and for television. Chabrol’s top films included “Les Biches,” or “Bad Girls,” from 1968 and 1970’s “The Butcher,” as well as the 2000 mystery “Merci pour le chocolat,” with actress Isabelle Huppert, one of his favorite actresses — who starred early on in her career in Chabrol’s “Violette Noiziere,” (1978) and “Story of a Woman” (1988). Chabrol’s last feature film, “Bellamy” — featuring another giant of French cinema, Gerard Depardieu — came out last year. Chabrol was born in Paris on June 24, 1930. The son of a pharmacist, he said he “completely” belonged to the sort of bourgeois social milieu that would become the fodder for his films — “otherwise I wouldn’t have dared” depict it, Chabrol said in a 1987 interview. The bourgeois “are always amusing, and they can also be very mean, so it’s just marvelous,” he told “Mardi cinema” television program.

Studied law, literature As a young man, he studied literature and law before writing movie reviews in the respected French film magazine “Cahiers du cinema.” He had not yet turned 30 when “Le Beau Serge,” the story of a man’s return to his native village after a long absence, was released to critical acclaim. A bon vivant and longtime smoker, Chabrol was rarely seen without his trademark pipe or Cuban cigar — even on set. He was also a joker and liked to ham it up for the cameras, often making grimaces and funny faces while on the red carpet. Chabrol also acted, making Hitchcock-style cameos in many of his own films, as well as those by other directors. He last appeared in this year’s “Gainsbourg,” playing a music producer in filmmaker Joann Sfar’s biopic about singer Serge Gainsbourg.

McCarthy starred in cult classic film ‘Body Snatchers’ By Dennis McLellan McClatchy-Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — Kevin McCarthy, the veteran stage and screen actor best known for his starring role as the panicked doctor who tried to warn the world about the alien “pod people” who were taking over in the 1956 science-fiction suspense classic “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” died Saturday. He was 96. McCarthy died of natural causes at Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, Mass., said his daughter Lillah. During a career that spanned more than 70 years, beginning on stage in New York in the late 1930s, McCarthy played Biff Loman opposite Paul Muni’s Willy in Kevin the 1949 London production of McCarthy “Death of a Salesman.” in 2005 Reprising his role in the 1951 film version opposite Fredric March, he earned a supporting-actor Oscar nomination and won a Golden Globe as most promising male newcomer. McCarthy had appeared in several other films and had a string of TV anthology-series credits behind him when he was cast as Dr. Miles Bennell in “Invasion of the Body Snatchers,” director Don Siegel’s thriller about an unsuspecting California town whose residents were being replaced by emotionless alien clones grown in oversized seed pods.

Film becomes cult classic In the film’s most memorable scene, McCarthy’s frantic Bennell runs into traffic, screaming to motorists, “Stop and listen to me! ... They’re not human! ... Can’t you see? Everyone! They’re here already. You’re next!” The low-budget film became an enduring cult classic that was selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 1994. McCarthy, who made a cameo appearance in the 1978 remake, got a lot of mileage out of the original film in his later years, appearing often as a guest at film festivals and autograph shows. McCarthy dismissed assertions that “Invasion of the Body Snatchers” was an allegory about the communist infiltration of America or an indictment of McCarthyism. “There was no assignment of political points of view when we were making the film,” he told the Bangor Daily News in 1997. “People began to think of McCarthyism later. I thought it was really about the onset of a kind of life where the corporate people are trying to tell you how to live, what to do, how to behave. And you become puppets to these merchants that are somehow turning individuals into victims. It seemed to me to be about conforming, the need to control life so it would be more tolerable.” McCarthy’s long career included numerous guest appearances on TV series including “The Twilight Zone,” “Burke’s Law,” “Flamingo Road” and “Murder, She Wrote.” He appeared in about 50 films, including “An Annapolis Story,” “40 Pounds of Trouble,” “The Prize,” “The Best Man,” “Kansas City Bomber,” “Buffalo Bill and the Indians,” “Piranha” and “The Howling.”

Scholar and author Peter Gubser American R&B pioneer ‘King’ Coleman dies at 78 led humanitarian relief agency By Matt Schudel The Associated Press MIAMI — Carlton “King” Coleman, a pioneer in American rhythm and blues, died Saturday morning from heart failure at a Miami hospice, his son said. He was 78. Coleman was known for providing the lead vocals on the 1959 hit “(Do The) Mashed Potatoes,” recorded with James Brown’s band. According to a 2003 Miami New Times article, Brown had initially planned to do the vocals himself, but a dispute with his record label made that impossible. To avoid any lawsuits from Brown’s label, a Miami producer had Coleman sing on the mostly instrumental track, while the group officially credited with the song was “Nat Kendrick and the Swans,” named for Brown’s drummer. Besides working with Brown, Coleman also released numerous singles of his own during his singing career, including “Mashed Potato Man” and “The Boo Boo Song.”

Coleman also performed with many other rhythm and blues legends, such as B.B. King and Jackie Wilson. He performed at venues all over the country, including the legendary Apollo Theater in New York. Coleman’s son Tony went on to become B.B. King’s drummer. “I can say that I’m proud to be his son,” Tony Coleman said of his father. “I’m proud to be working with his colleagues. He was one of the originals. He was one of the roots, and I’m one of his fruits.” Besides performing on stage, the elder Coleman also worked for many years as a radio disc jockey. He started at Tampa’s WTMP and eventually moved on to Miami’s WFEC. He finally ended up at Miami’s WMBM, where he was one of the city’s most popular DJs in the late 1950s. In recent years, Coleman returned to the airwaves with a nightly radio show on WMBM, which is now a gospel station.

New York Times News Service

Peter Gubser, a scholar and author who spent 30 years as president of a group promoting development and humanitarian assistance in the Middle East, died Sept. 2 of prostate cancer at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda, Md. He was 69. From 1977 to 2007, Dr. Gubser was president of American Near East Refugee Aid, a Washington nonprofit agency that offers economic, educational and nutritional aid to Palestinian and Arab refugees in the West Bank, Gaza Strip, Jordan and other parts of the Middle East.

Milk for children Among other efforts, Gubser led a 2003 initiative to establish a program providing milk to thousands of preschool children in the Gaza Strip. His relief agency also funded the construction of educational centers at West Bank colleges to offer training in business management.

In 1983, Gubser helped found the National Council on U.S.Arab Relations, which seeks to foster greater understanding of the Arab world.

Books on Middle East He wrote several books and articles on social and economic conditions in the Middle East. In April, he published a major biography of Saladin, a 12thcentury Islamic leader who fought against Christian crusaders from Europe. Peter Anton Gubser was born May 9, 1941, in Tulsa, Okla., and became interested in the Middle East while taking a year off from college to travel. After graduating from Yale University in 1964, he studied at American University of Beirut, receiving a master’s degree in Middle Eastern studies and Arabic language in 1966. He received a doctorate in social anthropology from England’s University of Oxford in 1969.

Early in his career, Gubser was an adjunct professor at the University of Manchester in England and worked for the Ford Foundation in Lebanon and Jordan. After moving to Washington in the 1970s, he worked for the American Institute for Research before going to American Near East Refugee Aid. He was an adjunct professor at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service from 1995 to 2003.

Member of boards He was a board member of the Foundation for Middle East Peace, Builders for Peace and other groups supporting humanitarian efforts in the Middle East. Survivors include his wife of 41 years, Annie Yenikomshian Gubser, of Somerset; two daughters, Sasha Gubser, of Denver, and Christi Gubser, of Boulder, Calif.; his mother, Mary Gubser, of Tulsa; two brothers; and two granddaughters.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, SEPTEMBER 13

HIGH Ben Burkel

82

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Today: Partly cloudy, slight chance afternoon thunderstorms.

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

78/49

75/46

84/47

64/40



84/48

85/49

78/49



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

85/44

83/47

Camp Sherman 77/39 Redmond Prineville 82/42 Cascadia 84/43 81/53 Sisters 80/41 Bend Post 82/42

Oakridge Elk Lake 79/51

70/30

Partly to mostly cloudy today. Partly cloudy tonight. Central

Mitchell

Madras

79/38

80/40

80/38

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

78/37

77/39

Fort Rock

Chemult 78/36

Crater Lake



Yesterday’s regional extremes • 87° Medford • 25° La Pine

Vancouver 63/52

Calgary 50/39

79/49

Missoula 77/43

Helena Bend

74/43

Boise

82/42



86/51

85/49

Idaho Falls



Elko

91/54

81/41

82/43

84/43

Reno



Partly to mostly sunny today. Skies will be partly cloudy tonight.

65/40

84/50

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:19 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:17 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:23 p.m. Moonset today . . . 10:16 p.m.

Salt Lake City

62/52

86/62

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

PLANET WATCH

Full

Last

New

Sept. 14 Sept. 23 Sept. 30 Oct. 7

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . .68/50/trace . . . . . . 67/53/c. . . . . . 67/53/pc Baker City . . . . .not available . . . . . 82/45/pc. . . . . . 78/43/pc Brookings . . . . . . 69/49/0.00 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . 64/53/pc Burns. . . . . . . . .not available . . . . . 82/42/pc. . . . . . 79/43/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 81/43/0.00 . . . . . 79/49/pc. . . . . . 79/49/pc Klamath Falls . . . 81/35/0.00 . . . . . . 80/41/s. . . . . . . 79/42/s Lakeview. . . . . . .NA/34/0.00 . . . . . 79/42/pc. . . . . . 79/43/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 81/25/0.00 . . . . . 80/38/pc. . . . . . . 76/35/s Medford . . . . . . . 87/49/0.00 . . . . . . 86/54/s. . . . . . . 87/55/s Newport . . . . . . . 64/46/0.00 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . 64/51/pc North Bend . . . . . 66/48/0.00 . . . . . 65/50/pc. . . . . . 64/52/pc Ontario . . . . . . .not available . . . . . 86/53/pc. . . . . . 85/51/pc Pendleton . . . . .not available . . . . . 83/49/pc. . . . . . . 84/51/s Portland . . . . . . . 77/50/0.00 . . . . . 75/55/pc. . . . . . 76/56/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 77/38/0.00 . . . . . 84/43/pc. . . . . . . 79/41/s Redmond. . . . . .not available . . . . . 82/39/pc. . . . . . . 81/41/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 83/48/0.00 . . . . . 83/52/pc. . . . . . 83/54/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 81/46/0.00 . . . . . 79/51/pc. . . . . . 79/51/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 79/32/0.00 . . . . . 80/41/pc. . . . . . . 82/32/s The Dalles . . . . .not available . . . . . 81/53/pc. . . . . . . 83/53/s

TEMPERATURE

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

5 HIGH

MEDIUM 2

4

V.HIGH

6

8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78/45 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 in 1981 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 in 1949 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.24” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .73 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.59” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.62” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.02 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.19 in 1994 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

77 40

FIRE INDEX

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

HIGH

79 42

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:22 a.m. . . . . . .6:37 p.m. Venus . . . . . . .10:40 a.m. . . . . . .8:24 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:04 a.m. . . . . . .8:39 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .7:33 p.m. . . . . . .7:28 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:54 a.m. . . . . . .7:56 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:28 p.m. . . . . . .7:27 a.m.

Moon phases First

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

79 40

OREGON CITIES City

70/54

Eugene  Grants Pass



Seattle



Redding

78/39

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

LOW

80 39

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

81/40

73/32

HIGH

42

75/55

Burns

La Pine

LOW

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny.

NORTHWEST

80/39

Brothers

79/39

Mostly sunny.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, slight chance thunderstorms.

Portland

Partly cloudy skies can be expected today and tonight. Eastern

WEDNESDAY

A few showers will fall over the northern Cascades and northern Washington today.

Paulina

80/40

Sunriver

TUESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32,903 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,170 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 59,580 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 26,513 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104,163 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,140 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,720 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 63/52

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 50/39

S

Saskatoon 50/32

Seattle 70/54

S

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 59/54

Winnipeg 63/45

Halifax 61/55 Portland Bismarck Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 64/53 72/43 79/49 75/52 75/55 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 71/51 Buffalo 72/43 66/57 Boise 73/53 Rapid City Detroit New York 86/51 • 106° 80/50 77/54 74/61 Des Moines Yuma, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia 81/60 Chicago 84/47 76/61 Columbus 78/57 • 23° Omaha San Francisco 83/55 Washington, D. C. 84/61 Salt Lake 62/52 Kremmling, Colo. 81/62 City Las Denver Louisville Kansas City Vegas 86/62 • 4.26” 89/55 86/60 84/63 98/73 St. Louis Charlotte Beaufort, N.C. 86/61 Los Angeles 86/56 Albuquerque 67/59 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 82/60 90/69 87/56 90/64 Phoenix Atlanta 103/79 Honolulu 87/65 Birmingham 88/73 Dallas Tijuana 89/62 94/74 72/59 New Orleans 92/72 Orlando Houston 94/75 Chihuahua 93/76 87/62 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 92/73 97/78 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/81 63/46 Juneau 65/38 Thunder Bay 63/39

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .89/73/0.00 . . .92/73/t . . 93/71/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .74/59/0.00 . 77/50/pc . . 70/49/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . .73/51/sh . . . 67/47/c Albuquerque. . . .87/60/0.00 . . .82/60/t . . 87/61/pc Anchorage . . . . .65/43/0.00 . . .63/46/s . . . 64/46/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . .87/65/s . . . 89/67/s Atlantic City . . . .66/56/0.28 . . .74/63/s . . 77/59/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .95/74/0.00 . 92/73/pc . . 93/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . .68/62/0.83 . . .80/59/s . . 80/57/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . 79/49/pc . . . .76/49/t Birmingham . . . .90/69/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . 92/65/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .73/43/0.00 . 72/43/pc . . 66/46/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .87/51/0.00 . . .86/51/s . . 81/50/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .65/56/0.00 . .66/57/sh . . 73/54/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .67/63/0.00 . .73/54/sh . . 74/55/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .67/57/0.10 . .73/53/sh . . 64/48/pc Burlington, VT. . .68/51/0.00 . .67/51/sh . . 63/47/sh Caribou, ME . . . .61/44/0.00 . .61/51/sh . . 62/48/sh Charleston, SC . .90/73/0.06 . . .86/67/s . . . 88/68/s Charlotte. . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . 88/58/pc Chattanooga. . . .89/68/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . 89/60/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .80/45/0.00 . 84/47/pc . . 82/48/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . 73/55/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . 85/56/pc . . 81/53/pc Cleveland . . . . . .74/59/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . 70/51/pc Colorado Springs 83/46/0.00 . 82/48/pc . . 81/52/pc Columbia, MO . .82/54/0.00 . . .84/61/s . . 83/61/pc Columbia, SC . . .95/73/0.00 . . .88/61/s . . . 90/63/s Columbus, GA. . .98/77/0.00 . . .92/67/s . . . 93/67/s Columbus, OH. . .78/60/0.00 . 83/55/pc . . . 76/53/s Concord, NH . . . .62/47/0.02 . .68/49/sh . . . 70/44/c Corpus Christi. . .91/75/0.58 . . .92/75/t . . 92/76/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .94/78/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 93/75/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . . 77/50/s Denver. . . . . . . . .84/46/0.00 . 89/55/pc . . 85/54/pc Des Moines. . . . .87/56/0.00 . . .81/60/s . . . .76/57/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .76/57/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . 69/49/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . 64/41/pc . . 57/39/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .94/61/0.00 . . .92/67/t . . 93/68/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/35/0.00 . 65/40/pc . . . 66/41/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . 67/43/pc . . 63/45/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .76/38/0.00 . . .78/45/s . . . 75/46/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .76/54/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . 68/49/pc Green Bay. . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .72/43/s . . . 64/43/s Greensboro. . . . .86/63/0.01 . . .84/63/s . . 87/58/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .66/59/0.86 . 79/56/pc . . 77/54/pc Hartford, CT . . . .68/54/0.00 . .71/54/sh . . 74/50/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .76/42/0.00 . 74/43/pc . . 68/44/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . .88/73/c . . . 87/73/c Houston . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 93/75/pc Huntsville . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . 91/62/pc Indianapolis . . . .85/54/0.00 . 82/57/pc . . 81/55/pc Jackson, MS . . . .93/71/0.00 . . .90/62/s . . 93/64/pc Madison, WI . . . .80/50/0.00 . . .74/47/s . . 71/46/pc Jacksonville. . . . .95/75/0.33 . . .90/72/s . . . 88/68/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .68/38/0.00 . 65/38/pc . . 65/37/pc Kansas City. . . . .86/54/0.00 . 84/63/pc . . . .81/63/t Lansing . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .71/47/s . . 67/46/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .99/69/0.00 . . .98/73/s . . . 97/71/s Lexington . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .83/55/s . . 83/56/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .92/53/0.00 . . .85/64/t . . . .80/61/t Little Rock. . . . . .86/67/0.00 . . .90/64/s . . 92/66/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/57/0.00 . . .67/59/s . . . 66/58/s Louisville . . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . . .86/60/s . . 85/56/pc Memphis. . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .88/65/s . . 91/66/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .89/77/1.57 . 91/79/pc . . . .91/80/t Milwaukee . . . . .81/56/0.00 . . .75/52/s . . 68/51/pc Minneapolis . . . .79/54/0.00 . . .71/51/s . . 66/50/pc Nashville . . . . . . .83/64/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . 89/61/pc New Orleans. . . .94/79/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . 91/75/pc New York . . . . . .67/60/0.14 . 74/61/pc . . 77/57/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .67/61/0.20 . 77/59/pc . . 77/57/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .70/63/0.24 . . .80/63/s . . 84/62/pc Oklahoma City . .84/69/1.70 . 90/69/pc . . 86/68/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .88/56/0.00 . . .84/61/t . . . .78/60/t Orlando. . . . . . . .95/76/0.54 . 94/75/pc . . 91/72/pc Palm Springs. . .106/75/0.00 . .100/75/s . . . 95/71/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .83/52/0.00 . . .82/55/s . . 78/54/pc Philadelphia . . . .68/62/0.21 . . .76/61/s . . 78/58/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .99/75/0.00 103/79/pc . . 103/80/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .74/59/0.02 . 77/52/pc . . 71/48/pc Portland, ME. . . .61/51/0.00 . .64/53/sh . . 69/49/sh Providence . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . 76/51/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .88/66/0.03 . . .84/62/s . . . 88/59/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .82/47/0.00 . 80/50/pc . . . 76/52/c Savannah . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . . 89/66/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . . .84/50/s . . . 82/48/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .70/56/0.00 . . .70/54/c . . 73/53/pc Richmond . . . . . .79/62/0.22 . . .83/58/s . . 86/56/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .83/45/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . 70/55/pc Rochester, NY . . .68/57/0.14 . .74/52/sh . . 63/48/pc Spokane . . . . . . .60/52/0.55 . 76/50/pc . . 78/50/pc Sacramento. . . . .91/54/0.00 . . .85/49/s . . . 86/50/s Springfield, MO. .82/54/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . 81/61/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . . .86/61/s . . . .85/61/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .90/78/0.16 . . .93/77/t . . . .92/74/t Salt Lake City . . .87/50/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . 85/57/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/66/0.00 . . .98/70/t . . 99/71/pc San Antonio . . . .92/75/0.00 . . .93/76/t . . 93/76/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . 90/67/pc . . 90/69/pc San Diego . . . . . .70/63/0.00 . . .73/63/s . . . 72/62/s Washington, DC .73/64/0.67 . . .81/62/s . . 82/59/pc San Francisco . . .69/56/0.00 . . .62/52/s . . . 64/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . 85/68/pc San Jose . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . 78/56/s Yakima . . . . . . not available . 81/48/pc . . . 82/50/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .86/50/0.00 . 80/51/pc . . 84/54/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .106/76/0.00 . .103/77/s . . 103/74/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .66/52/0.15 . 64/56/pc . . . .63/54/r Athens. . . . . . . . .78/67/0.00 . . .82/70/s . . . 84/69/s Auckland. . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . .60/54/s . . 61/53/pc Baghdad . . . . . .108/77/0.00 . .109/82/s . . 107/78/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/77/0.01 . . .90/78/t . . . .89/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . . .89/66/s . . . 88/65/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .94/76/s . . . 92/75/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .65/53/c . . . 67/54/c Bogota . . . . . . . .68/50/0.04 . . .64/51/c . . 63/52/sh Budapest. . . . . . .72/54/0.02 . . .72/55/s . . . 73/54/s Buenos Aires. . . .61/43/0.00 . . .62/49/c . . 67/47/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/75/0.00 . 91/78/pc . . . 92/77/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .91/72/s . . . 89/71/s Calgary . . . . . . . .61/36/0.06 . . .50/39/r . . 52/41/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .88/75/t . . . .89/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .65/55/sh . . 59/50/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .63/56/r . . 57/53/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . .62/50/sh . . . 72/51/s Harare . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .79/54/s . . . 81/51/s Hong Kong . . . . .88/79/1.98 . . .86/79/t . . . .88/69/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .72/66/1.24 . .75/66/sh . . . .76/67/t Jerusalem . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . . .81/62/s . . . 82/61/s Johannesburg . . .75/48/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 82/53/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . 64/57/pc . . . 65/58/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 92/67/pc . . 90/66/pc London . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .67/53/c . . . .63/51/r Madrid . . . . . . . .91/59/0.00 . . .88/59/s . . . 87/60/s Manila. . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .88/80/t . . . .87/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .108/88/0.00 . .109/87/s . . 108/88/s Mexico City. . . . .73/57/0.47 . . .74/55/t . . . .75/56/t Montreal. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .66/55/sh . . 61/50/sh Moscow . . . . . . .63/52/0.02 . . .65/49/s . . . 66/48/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 77/57/pc . . . 76/55/s Nassau . . . . . . . .91/77/0.02 . . .91/81/t . . . .90/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .86/78/0.01 . . .88/76/t . . . .87/77/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . 89/72/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.55 . . .61/53/s . . . .59/47/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .66/52/t . . 61/45/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.04 . 71/52/pc . . 72/53/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .86/66/0.00 . . .82/68/s . . 84/69/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .85/63/s . . . .82/61/t Santiago . . . . . . .52/45/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . 72/40/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . . .85/64/s . . . 86/61/c Sapporo. . . . . . . .81/62/0.00 . . .75/63/t . . . 77/61/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .81/69/s . . . .79/67/t Shanghai. . . . . . .79/77/0.11 . . .82/76/t . . . .83/75/t Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .63/50/sh . . . .60/51/r Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . .69/58/sh . . . .62/57/r Taipei. . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .90/80/s . . . .91/79/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .85/74/s . . . 83/72/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .89/74/t . . . .83/73/t Toronto . . . . . . . .72/57/0.24 . . .75/52/t . . 66/46/pc Vancouver. . . . . .57/54/0.49 . 63/52/pc . . . 68/53/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .68/55/s . . . 70/54/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . . .72/54/s . . . 69/55/s

84-year-old fetes birthday with leap from 13,000 feet Woman fulfills a dream to skydive as her family watches The Associated Press MOLALLA — When Lynn Benson, of Longview, heard that former President George H.W. Bush spent his 85th birthday skydiving last year, her first emotion was envy. “That was something I have always wanted to do,” the 84-yearold said. “I’ve always had a desire to look down on the Earth.” So, as a belated birthday present from her husband, Dick, she took the 13,000-foot leap with her daughter-in-law, Linda Benson, on Saturday. “I thought, I better hurry and do it because I’m not going to live forever,” Lynn said. Linda, 50, who’s always shared Lynn’s urge to skydive, was excited to share the experience with her mother-in-law.

‘Not nervous’ “I’m not nervous, I’m pumped,” Linda said, while she waited for the plane. “I couldn’t think of a better person to do this with.” The two women started their jump with about three hours of prep work on the ground at Sky Dive Oregon, training with skydiving professionals and learning what to expect during their descent, the proper way to land and various safety procedures. Both would be tandem jumping, each attached to an experienced diver’s chest. On their descent, they would reach speeds of approximately 120 mph. Oregon City resident, Tony St. Pierre, 33, trained with Lynn and Linda, and said he was surprised to see the “little old lady.” “She’s more excited than I am,” he said. St. Pierre, who also jumped tandem, decided to skydive to conquer his fear of heights. “If I can be skydiving at (Lynn

Benson’s) age, I think it would be pretty cool,” he said. More than a dozen Benson relatives — including spouses, children and grandchildren — gathered in the viewing area to watch the women jump. Linda’s grandson, Tyler Smith, said he was excited to watch his great-grandmother and grandmother jump, but also was a little nervous. “I thought it was suicide,” the 16-year-old said. “They are the two oldest skydivers I’ve ever heard of.” But, after watching others parachute safely, Tyler decided it didn’t look that bad.

Husband stays behind Lynn’s husband, Dick, said he was never scared by his wife’s decision because he knew it was something she’d always wanted to do. But that didn’t mean he was tempted to join her. Lynn’s son, David Benson, 60, said he didn’t fear for his mother’s safety. “Anyone who knows her is not surprised,” he said. David recalled how his mother’s love of adventure was reflected in her love of travel. She encouraged her four sons to get out, experience the world and see new things, David said. Although her children had the opportunity to travel while they were young, Lynn, who was raised in Seattle by a single mother during the Great Depression, didn’t share that experience. She’s since made up for lost time. With her husband, she’s traveled to several European countries, Japan, China and Mexico. During those trips, Lynn climbed the Great Wall of China and parasailed over the Pacific Ocean in Mexico. David said wherever his mother went, she always tried to learn something new or make a friend. He feels her choice to skydive will create an exciting final period of her life, rather than a “lingering end.”

PRESENTED BY THE BULLETIN AND ST. CHARLES IMMEDIATE CARE

September 18 & 19 in downtown Bend • Saturday 11am - 5pm • Sunday 11am - 4pm

Family Harvest Area Presented by Bobbie Strome of John L. Scott Real Estate Join us for two exciting, fun-filled days of games, activities, and entertainment in downtown Bend on Minnesota Avenue! Hay Maze

Hayrides

Find your way through the hay maze with proceeds benefiting local 4-H clubs.

Enjoy a hayride through the festival and downtown Bend.

Airlink Critical Care Transport Pony Rides

by DD Ranch, Terrebonne

Ponies from Diane’s Riding Place are sure to make festival memories.

Birkenstock of Bend Animal Extravaganza Animal fun and education courtesy of the Humane Society of Central Oregon.

Petting Zoo

Bobbie Strome of John L. Scott Real Estate

Apple Bobbing Good old-fashioned fun for young and old alike!

Sylvan Learning Center Pumpkin Pie Baking Contest McMenamins Pumpkin Painting Miller Lumber Playhouse & Neighborhood Win a custom made house - kid-sized! Donations benefit Kids Center

The Family Harvest Area is presented by: Bobbie Strome of

Robotics Demonstration by High Desert Droids Mt. View High School

Inflatable Jumping Fun Area Pottery Lounge Pottery Tent/ Coloring Contest

For accommodations, please contact C3 Events at 541-389-0995, or email inquiry@c3events.com


C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

Inside

GREEN, ETC.

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

Improving music quality,

Calculating your carbon footprint

b i tbyb i t

Oregon DEQ offers online tool to show people their energy stats

How music compression works

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Music is stored on CDs in uncompressed digital files. An MP3 encoder, which is built into iTunes, examines these files and identifies information that can be removed, often because we can’t even hear it.

The extra information for each track is discarded, resulting in a digital file that can be 10 times smaller than the source file. MP3s also contain other info, such as titles and even album art.

Information marked for removal

Original CD

Comparing bit rates

Final compressed file

A compressed file’s bit rate, measured in kilobits per second, is the amount of information recorded for each second of audio. The more bits per second, the less information is discarded when the file is compressed. Seconds

MP3s can be encoded at a variety of bit rates. The most commonly used bit rate is 128 kbps, which some say is near-CD quality. Others think music encoded at this rate lacks clarity and definition, and recommend bit rates of 160 kbps or 192 kbps to achieve CD-quality sound.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Bit rates above 256 kbps are generally indiscernable from the original. The trade-off is, of course, a larger file size. If disc space is not an issue, encoding files at higher bit rates will make for a higher-quality music library.

The average Oregon household sends more than 42 metric tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year — including 8 tons from burning fuel in their vehicles, 1.5 tons from using natural gas and more than 2 tons from eating meat, according to the Department of Environmental Quality. And with the help of an online

GREEN carbon calculator offered by the DEQ, residents can see how they compare with state and national averages — and what they can do to lower their carbon footprint. The calculator can determine how much carbon dioxide a household emits after a person enters information like the household’s size and income, the types of vehicles and how much people drive them, what they buy and how much they spend on services like entertainment, as well as stats on the house and its energy use. See Calculator / C6

What’s your carbon footprint? The Oregon Carbon Calculator helps figure your personal carbon footprint in three categories: transportation, housing and shopping. The calculator is at www.deq.state.or.us/programs/sustainability/carboncalculator.htm.

320 kbps

256 kbps 160 kbps 128 kbps

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Source: www.iis.fraunhofer.de

Increasing the bit rate can improve the sound of your music collection By Tim Doran The Bulletin

I

f you’ve been building a digital music collection for more than five years, it’s likely filled with an assortment of songs of differing sound quality. Maybe some come through the speakers with a more full sound, richer bass tones or clear high notes at the top of the scale. Many factors affect music quality, from how it’s recorded to what equipment it will be played on, and many steps in between, audio experts say. But even casual listeners who can’t distinguish between mono and stereo can potentially improve music quality coming

from their digital music player by changing one setting: the bit rate. By increasing the bit rate in the preferences of Apple’s iTunes, Nullsoft’s Winamp or other music players, you can improve the sound quality for any future CDs imported to your digital collection. And older CDs can be re-imported at the new setting as well. Increasing the bit rate has one drawback, however. It increases the size of the music file, taking up more room on a hard drive, iPod and other portable music players, and potentially reducing the total number of songs that can be stored. See Music / C3

OTECH

It’s not too late to improve the sound quality of your digital music collection. Bit-rate settings in iTunes can improve what you hear over your stereo but will eat up more memory on your computer. Under “Preferences” in iTunes, there are three quality settings for music being imported from a CD. Screen shots Screen shot

Dropping jaws and stopping conversations in a test-drive

The boss is robotic, and is rolling up behind you

By Nick Bilton By John Markoff New York Times News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Dr. Alan Shatzel’s pager beeped at 9 on a Saturday morning. A man had suffered a stroke and someone had to decide, quickly, whether to give him an anti-clotting drug that could mean the difference between life and death. Shatzel, a neurologist, hustled not to the emergency room where the patient lay — 260 miles away — but to a darkened room at a hospital here. He took a seat in front of the latest tools of his trade: computer monitors, a keyboard and a joystick that control his assistant on the scene — a robot on wheels. He guided the roughly 5-foot-tall machine, which has a large monitor as its “head,” into the patient’s room in Bakersfield, Calif. Shat-

zel’s face appeared on screen, and his voice issued from a speaker. For years, the military and law enforcement agencies have used specialized robots to disarm bombs and carry out other dangerous missions. Now, with rapidly falling costs, the next frontiers are the office, the hospital and the home. Mobile robots are now being used in hundreds of hospitals nationwide as the eyes, ears and voices of doctors who cannot be there in person. They are being rolled out in workplaces, allowing employees in disparate locales to communicate more easily and letting managers supervise employees from afar. And they are being tested as caregivers in assistedliving centers. See Robots / C6

New York Times News Service

SCIENCE

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

At Mozilla corporate headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., Mike Beltzner, pictured in the monitor of a mobile robot, remotely maneuvers through the company’s building from his home 2,200 miles away in Toronto, on Aug. 16.

For the past three weeks, I have been baby-sitting a robot. It is not your traditional looking robot — if there is such a thing yet — but looks like an extra-large lollipop on wheels. Using this contraption is a little like owning a puppy. Sometimes it wanders off on its own, and sometimes it stubbornly stops doing what you ask it to do. People ask, “Can it do any neat tricks?” The robot I adopted, the Texai, is made by Willow Garage, a technology company based in Menlo Park, Calif., and is designed for

telepresence. In humanspeak, that means it allows me to take control of the robot remotely and wander around an office, interacting with co-workers and gauging their reactions through the built-in camera and microphone as if I were in the same room. And react they did. While I sat comfortably on my couch at home manipulating the controls in a Web browser, the robot at the office encountered an editor in the hallway who had stepped out for ice cream. She stopped midstride, plastic spoon attached to her mouth like someone had stuck it there with Super Glue, and she just stared. See Test-drive / C6


T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Restaurant gadabout As the ‘World’ stops turning, Season 4 ditches friend at table we honor its supercouples premiere of DEAR ABBY

Dear Abby: My friend “Brooke” knows everyone in town. It creates a huge distraction when we dine in a restaurant because she is constantly looking around to see who else she knows. When she spots someone, she leaves me sitting at the table to go and say hello to the person. If this happened once, it would be acceptable. But it occurs continually throughout the meal and interrupts our conversation. The fact that Brooke is constantly scouting the room for others to greet makes meaningful conversation impossible because her mind is never fully present. I have reached the point of no longer wanting to dine with her although she is a good friend. How would you recommend resolving this? — Alone at the Table, Las Cruces, N.M. Dear Alone at the Table: Have a frank talk with Brooke, and explain how her rudeness has made you feel. If her behavior continues, then socialize with her in places where there are no distractions — like her home or yours. She may be insecure and feel a compulsion to ingratiate herself with others, but constantly leaving you alone at the table shows lack of consideration for your feelings. Also, I find it curious that all those people she knows do not come by your table to greet her — and possibly be introduced, don’t you? Dear Abby: I work with a nice woman in a service-oriented job. She wears a full set of dentures — top and bottom. When she’s nervous, she has a habit of “clicking” and adjusting them. It gets worse when she’s had an energy drink. Personally, I can ignore it. But I have heard comments from customers and co-workers who wonder if she’s “on something”

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— like speed. Should I tell her what people are saying or suggest she use a product to help keep the dentures in place? I would hate for her reputation to be ruined because of this nervous habit. — Caring Co-worker in Iowa Dear Caring Co-worker: Take the woman aside, and tell her privately that the clicking is distracting to customers and coworkers. She may not be aware that she is doing anything. Suggest that she discuss this with her dentist because her dentures may need adjusting — or, as you mentioned, her dentist can recommend a product to stabilize them. She may be more receptive if she hears it from a dental health professional. Dear Abby: I purchased some things at an estate sale. Later, while looking in a piece of luggage, I found a gold watch (with an appraisal of $7,000 that was in the same box) and a string of pearls. What is the proper thing to do in a situation like this? The estate people are long gone, but there was a name on the appraisal. I tried doing a search on the Internet, but can’t locate the person. Will I have bad karma if I keep these items? This person must have family somewhere. — Finders Keepers? Dear Finders Keepers?: If you have exhausted all avenues at your disposal to find the heirs, keep the items with a clear conscience. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

The final curtain falls Sept. 17 for long-running soap opera “As the World Turns,” which debuted as a 30-minute serial April 2, 1956. In its 54 years, “ATWT” dominated the ratings for two decades, prompted a prime-time spinoff (“Our Private World”), introduced daytime television’s first gay male character (Hank Elliot) in 1988 and won four daytime Emmy Awards for best show. It also created some of the soap world’s greatest supercouples. Here are five that “ATWT” fans will never forget.

By Verne Gay Newsday

Holden and Lily

Kathy Willens / The Associated Press

Holden Snyder and Lily Walsh captured soap fans’ hearts with their poor-boy, rich-girl love story. They met when Holden was a stable boy working for Lily’s mother. Their on-again, offagain relationship weathered the possibility of their being related, amnesia, two of Holden’s secret love children, kidnappings and more. Even when apart, their feelings for one another were evident. Together, they had three children: Faith, Ethan and Natalie.

Jeff and Penny As the soap’s first supercouple, Jeff Baker and Penny Hughes were credited with launching the show to No. 1. Their storied romance reached its pinnacle in 1958 when they married on Christmas Eve, and viewers across the country reportedly tuned in, dressed in their Sunday best. Jeff also recorded a love song for her, aptly named “Penny.” Their

Kathryn Hays, left, watches colleague Don Hastings cross his fingers during taping of an episode of the long-running soap opera “As the World Turns,” on June 15. The final episode of the soap opera, which has been running since 1956, will air Sept. 17. romance ended when Jeff died in a car accident.

Steve and Betsy The star-crossed love of Steve Andropoulos and Betsy Stewart began with a deathbed promise to Steve’s brother that drove Betsy to marry another man. But her love for Steve repeatedly brought her back into his arms, and upon discovering her daughter Dani was his, Betsy married Steve on May 30, 1984. Their wedding was watched by 20 million viewers, making it the second-highest rated episode in U.S. soap history.

Luke and Noah Luke Snyder and Noah Mayer were named one of television’s top power couples by TV Guide and great supercouples by Entertainment Weekly. They are the

first gay supercouple on daytime TV. At first Noah struggled to accept his sexuality but eventually admitted his feelings for Luke. The characters made history by sharing the first gay male kiss on U.S. daytime television. A YouTube video of the kiss was the most watched the following day.

Tom and Margo Tom Hughes and Margo Montgomery fell in love while investigating Mr. Big. They married in 1983 and went on to become a soap anomaly: They were one of the only supercouples to marry and stay that way for more than 25 years. Their marriage survived affairs, resulting in each having a child by his or her lover; Margo facing murder charges twice and being raped; a legal separation; and plenty of drama involving their son Casey.

Reason to watch: Blair and Serena hit the City of Light in the fourth-season opener at 9 tonight on The CW. Catching up: Season 3 ended in a cloud of doom and gloom and (I suppose) boom, too. Poor Chuck Bass (Ed Westwick) thought he was spurned by Blair (Leighton Meester) at a rendezvous at the Empire State Building. After sleeping with Jenny Humphrey (Taylor Momsen), he learned it was all a big misunderstanding with B. But Blair discovered his infidelity just as he was about to propose, and dumped him (again). Last we see of Chuck, he is in a Prague alleyway — shot by thugs, left for dead. Meanwhile, B and Serena (Blake Lively) are off to Paris for the summer. What this episode is about: Lights! Fountains! The Louvre! Oui! That’s Paris, all right. B has commandeered the Right Bank, Serena the Left and, befitting the spirit of their favored geographic locales, Serena has become the libertine — dating any guy she comes across — while B stands posed before a Manet, day after day, waiting for a prince charming to suddenly appear. She silently pines for Chuck, but Serena seems to have forgotten entirely about Nate (Chace Crawford) — back in NYC, also eagerly following the demands of his libido. Major cliffhangers will be resolved, sort of, including Chuck’s grim fate.

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:02) The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Wolf: Travels Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Inside Edition Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Rudy Maxa This Old House Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Bachelor Pad The winning team is revealed. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å America’s Got Talent The top 10 acts; Enrique Iglesias. ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Big Bang Theory Bachelor Pad The winning team is revealed. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å House Help Me ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å Lie to Me Black and White (N) ‘14’ News Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ American Masters The life and career of singer/songwriter Joan Baez. ‘PG’ America’s Got Talent The top 10 acts; Enrique Iglesias. ’ ‘PG’ Å 90210 Senior Year, Baby (N) ’ ‘14’ Gossip Girl Belles de Jour (N) ‘14’ Hometime ‘G’ Paint Paper Sew With Nancy 1 Stroke Paint American Masters The life and career of singer/songwriter Joan Baez. ‘PG’

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(10:01) Dating in the Dark (N) ‘PG’ KATU News at 11 Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å News (10:01) CSI: Miami Time Bomb ‘14’ How I Met (10:01) Dating in the Dark (N) ‘PG’ Inside Edition News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Christiane Northrup: Menopause and Beyond Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å News Married... With Married... With Roseanne ‘PG’ Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Daisy Cooks! Christiane Northrup: Menopause and Beyond

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘PG’ South Park ‘MA’ Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Thai Cooking

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

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The First 48 A Serial Killer Calls ‘14’ The First 48 Hard Fall ‘14’ Å Hoarders Julie and Shannon ‘PG’ Hoarders Robin; Ken (N) ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Carolyn; Jo (N) ‘PG’ Å Intervention Andrew ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Down to the Wire ’ ‘14’ (3:30) ›› “Broken Arrow” (1996) John ››› “First Blood” (1982, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. A Vietnam vet is ››› “Death Wish” (1974, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Hope Lange. A man turns ››› “Death Wish” (1974, Crime Drama) Charles Bronson, Hope Lange. A man turns 102 40 39 Travolta, Christian Slater. hounded by a brutal small-town sheriff. Å vigilante after a brutal attack on his family. Å vigilante after a brutal attack on his family. Å Pit Boss Shorty helps Jordan. ‘14’ Piranhas ’ ‘G’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Pit Boss Show Me the Money ‘14’ Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Housewives/OC Thintervention With Jackie Warner Thintervention With Jackie Warner 137 44 Cribs ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ ›› “Footloose” (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lithgow. ’ Cribs ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Footloose” (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon. ’ Biography on CNBC Sam Walton American Greed Mad Money Planet of the Apps: Hand-held Biography on CNBC Sam Walton Paid Program Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 Planet of the Apps: Hand-held Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Rick’s List Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å “Blue Collar Comedy Tour: One for the Road” (2006, Comedy) ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Trading Desk Outside Presents Outside Film Festival PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Hannah Montana Good-Charlie Hannah Forever Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb ›› “The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl” Å Suite/Deck Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Surviving the Cut ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å Surviving the Cut ’ ‘PG’ Å Surviving the Cut ’ ‘PG’ Å American Chopper ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ (7:15) NFL Football San Diego Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) NFL Football Baltimore Ravens at New York Jets (Live) Football Live 2010 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NASCAR Now Å College Football Georgia at South Carolina 22 24 21 24 Riding Shotgun Boxing Boxing PBA Bowling PBA Bowling SportsCentury Å AWA Wrestling Å NBA Eastern Conference Final game 1, from May 16, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 SportsCentury Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Friday Night Lights Git ’Er Done ‘14’ ›› “Johnson Family Vacation” (2004) Cedric the Entertainer. Premiere. ›› “Johnson Family Vacation” (2004) Cedric the Entertainer. Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Cinnamon’s Wake ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Challenge Ice Age Cakes Unwrapped Unwrapped (N) Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Good Eats Game. Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. Seahawks MLB Baseball: Red Sox at Mariners 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 8 › “Jumper” (2008, Science Fiction) Hayden Christensen, Jamie Bell. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “There’s Something About Mary” (1998, Romance-Comedy) Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon, Ben Stiller. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men 131 Curb/Block Holmes on Homes ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Designed to Sell House Hunters House Hunters My First Sale ‘G’ My First Place 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers Frank Flips ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine Old Christine “The 19th Wife” (2010) Chyler Leigh, Matt Czuchry. Premiere. ‘14’ Å Will & Grace ‘14’ Will & Grace ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 Reba ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann When I Was 17 Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å 2010 VMA Pre-Show ’ 2010 MTV Video Music Awards ’ World of Jenks World of Jenks World of Jenks World of Jenks 192 22 38 57 World of Jenks SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi. ’ Scrappers ’ GTTV Presents 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene (5:38) CSI: Crime Scene Investigation Bad Words ‘14’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘14’ Å Ghost Whisperer See No Evil ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Do Over ’ ‘PG’ Monster (N) Monster (N) 133 35 133 45 Ghost Whisperer Endless Love ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Mark Chironna Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Van Impe Pres Changing-World Judgement World follows one man. 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ (7:45) ››› “The Subject Was Roses” (1968) Patricia Neal, Jack Albertson. A World (9:45) ››› “A Face in the Crowd” (1957, Drama) Andy Griffith, Patricia Neal, Anthony Franciosa. A homePrivate Screenings (5:45) ››› “The Fountainhead” (1949, Drama) Gary Cooper, Patricia Neal. An 101 44 101 29 Patricia Neal architect’s buildings are altered to save money. Å (DVS) War II veteran comes home to his bickering parents. Å spun philosopher becomes an overnight sensation. Å Say Yes, Dress Fabulous Cakes Philadelphia ’ ‘G’ Little People Little People Little People Little People Kate Plus 8 ‘PG’ Quints by Surprise: 16 Months Later Quints-Surprise Little People Little People 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress The Closer Jump the Gun ‘14’ Å The Closer War Zone ‘14’ Å The Closer ‘14’ Å The Closer Executive Order (N) ‘14’ Rizzoli & Isles (N) ‘14’ Å The Closer Executive Order ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 The Closer Off the Hook ‘14’ Å ›› “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey. Premiere. Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time MAD (N) Total Drama Scooby-Doo King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 World’s Best Places to Pig Out ‘G’ Man-Carnivore Man-Carnivore Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Barbecue Wars ‘G’ Å Andy Griffith All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond ›› “How Stella Got Her Groove Back” (1998) Angela Bassett. Premiere. 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Å NCIS Agent Afloat ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Capitol Offense ’ ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW ’ Å (11:05) Covert Affairs ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ Money Hungry ’ ‘PG’ Scream Queens ’ ‘14’ Å Money Hungry ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ››› “Cadillac Records” ‘R’ (6:05) ››› “Rudy” 1993, Drama Sean Astin, Ned Beatty. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Passengers” 2008 Anne Hathaway. ‘PG-13’ Å (9:35) › “Sphere” 1998 Dustin Hoffman. Experts investigate a spaceship on the ocean floor. ›› “Down Periscope” 1996 Kelsey Grammer. ‘PG-13’ After Film School ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984, Comedy Tom Hanks, Tawny Kitaen. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990 Andrew “Dice” Clay. ‘R’ After Film School Modern Problems 2010 Pro-Tec Pool Party The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Firsthand ‘PG’ Built to Shred Insane Cinema: Neverland (N) Å The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Firsthand ‘PG’ Built to Shred Amer. Misfits Thrillbillies ‘14’ Jr. PGA Highlights Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf The Golf Fix Canadian Tour Learning Center The Martha Stewart Show ‘G’ Å Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Wedding Daze” (2004) John Larroquette, Karen Valentine. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (6:45) › “Bride Wars” 2009 Kate Hudson. Weddings scheduled Making Boardwalk ››› “Sex and the City” 2008, Romance-Comedy Sarah Jessica Parker, Kim Cattrall, Chris Noth. Time Boxing Yuriorkis Gamboa vs. Orlando ›› “I Spy” 2002 Eddie Murphy. A spy recruits a boxer to help HBO 425 501 425 10 him retrieve a stolen plane. ‘PG-13’ Å the same day turn best friends into enemies. Empire ‘14’ brings many changes for Carrie and her gal pals. ’ ‘R’ Å Salido, Featherweights Å (4:45) ›› “Sweet Revenge” 1998 (6:15) › “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues” 1993, Fantasy Uma Thurman. ‘R’ Freaks-Geeks Whitest Kids ››› “Dressed to Kill” 1980 Michael Caine. ‘R’ (10:45) The Grid Dinner-Band Hell Girl ‘14’ IFC 105 105 ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009, Action Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law. The detective and (4:30) ›› “Dead Presidents” 1995 Larenz Tate. A jobless Viet- ›› “Super Troopers” 2001 Jay Chandrasekhar. Budget cuts (8:15) ››› “A Serious Man” 2009, Comedy-Drama Michael Stuhlbarg. A troubled MAX 400 508 7 nam vet and his buddies organize a heist. ‘R’ threaten the jobs of five state troopers. ‘R’ professor seeks advice from three rabbis. ’ ‘R’ Å his astute partner face a strange enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Inside the Vietnam War ‘14’ Inside the Vietnam War ‘14’ Explorer ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Guard, Core Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘G’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Dirt Trax TV ATV World Truck Academy Destination Muzzy’s Bow. Western Extreme Elk Chronicles Best of the West Truck Academy ATV World Dirt Trax TV Baja Unlimited Ult. Adventure Destination OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) ››› “Brothers at War” 2009, Docu- ››› “The Score” 2001, Crime Drama Robert De Niro, Edward Norton. iTV. A master (8:15) ›› “Everybody’s Fine” 2009, Comedy-Drama Robert De Niro. iTV. A widower Weeds Bliss (N) ’ The Big C (N) ’ Weeds Bliss ’ The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å SHO 500 500 mentary iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å thief agrees to work with a volatile partner. ’ ‘R’ wants to reconnect with his grown children. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Intersections Intersections Barrett-Jackson Special Edition (N) Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Intersections Intersections Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ›› “Spy Game” 2001, Suspense Robert Redford, Brad Pitt. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:25) ›› “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” 2008 ‘PG’ Å ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” 2009, Documentary ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “40 Days and 40 Nights” 2002 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:50) “The Alphabet Killer” 2008 Eliza Dushku, Cary Elwes. A › “The Life Before Her Eyes” 2007 Uma Thurman. A woman’s › “I Hate Valentine’s Day” 2009 Nia Vardalos. A florist and a ›› “My One and Only” 2009 Renée Zellweger, Logan Lerman. A woman takes her ›› “The Answer TMC 525 525 former cop investigates a murder. ’ ‘R’ Å childhood memories ruin her life as an adult. restaurateur try dating without commitment. two sons and searches for a rich husband. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Man” 2009 Whacked Out ›› “Victory” (1981, Adventure) Sylvester Stallone, Michael Caine, Max von Sydow. The Daily Line (Live) World Extreme Cagefighting Urijah Faber vs. Mike Brown The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY THE SPEAKEASY: An open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; September’s theme is “School Days: Stories About Gettin’ Educated”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

TUESDAY “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Productions presents a dinner theater murder mystery; reservations recommended; $18 in advance, $20 at the door; 6 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardproductions .com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. STRUT THE MUTT DOGGIE FASHION SHOW: Dress your dog in black and white attire or a costume to compete; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; free; 5-7 p.m.; Allyson’s Kitchen, 375 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-7499974 or www.hsco.org. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The grand finale of the summer concert series features a performance by Larry and His Flask, with Adventure Galley; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com. FINN RIGGINS: The Idaho-based indie band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626. JENNA LINDBO: The Asheville, N.C.-based singer-songwriter performs a CD-release show, with Willie Carmichael; tickets should be purchased in advance; $10; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Broadway Studios, 711 N.W. Broadway St., Bend; 541-350-9572 or wcc@ bendcable.com.

FRIDAY RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Terri Daniel reads from her book “Embracing Death: A New Look at Grief, Gratitude and God”; free; 4-7 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-549-4004. WILLIE NELSON: The prolific country-folk musician performs, with Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses; $46 or $79 in advance, $48 or $83 day of show, plus fees; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-745-3000 or www.bendconcerts.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Debra Gwartney talks about her book “Live Through This”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

“CRAZY HEART”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a maneating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SATURDAY COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Breakfast accompanied by live music from Lindy Gravelle and a military keynote speaker; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Council on Aging RSVP program; $5; 8:30-10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-8817. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. TEDDY BEAR POKER RUN: Ride to area hospitals and deliver teddy bears for children; followed by a raffle and poker run that ends at Coyote Ranch in Redmond; proceeds benefit Central Oregon ABATE; $5 per hand with teddy bear, $10 per hand without; 8:30 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. ride; Northside Bar & Grill, 62860 Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541923-3809 or 541-815-3600. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Glen Gives; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Awbrey Glen parking lot, 2500 N.W. Awbrey Glen Drive, Bend; 541-318-8805. PROJECT CONNECT: Event features medical and dental services, social services for low-income individuals, food, music and more; free; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-9663 or www.projectconnectco.org. RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626. TREE PLANTING: Plant trees in Camp Polk Meadow, with an introduction to the land presented by the Deschutes Land Trust; meet at the lodge; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 541-389-8359 or www.wanderlusttours.com. RUN FOR CONGO WOMEN: Walk from the falls to the Old Mill District; proceeds benefit Women for Women International; donations accepted; 9:30 a.m.; Benham Falls, Forest Road 9702, Bend; 541-330-1621, patricia@bendbroadband.com or http://runforcongowomen.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Event includes arts, crafts, food, a silent auction and more; auction proceeds benefit the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-8905. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-3890995, inquiry@c3events.com or www.c3events.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Three Quarters Short, Raven Alan St. John, Maresa and Co., and others, food, raffles, a silent auction, kidney donor information and more; proceeds benefit John Whitehurst, who has kidney failure; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-788-6010 or WesternRecreation@live.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 11 a.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. HARVEST CELEBRATION: With historic activities and games, live music, vendors and more; noon-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL: With games, a clown, hayrides, hot dogs and more; free; 1-3 p.m.; Sisters Church of the Nazarene, 67130 Harrington Loop; 541-389-8960. LATIN AMERICAN GUITAR CONCERT: Rich Hurdle performs a selection of music from Latin America to celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month; free; 3 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. DIAMONDS & DUST: Annual event includes dinner, live music, live and silent auctions, and more; proceeds benefit Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center; $60; 5 p.m.; Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center, 60575 Billadeau Road, Bend; 541318-7400 or www.healingreins.org. HARVEST FESTIVAL DINNER: Featuring barbecue and potatoes, live music and historical presentations by Talking Tombstones actors; event will take place across from the park; $25; 5:30-9 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541504-2010. LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS BOUT: The Lava City Roller Dolls Smokin’ Ashes play the Salt City Shakers; a portion of proceeds benefits Saving Grace; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports, 20775 High Desert Lane, Bend; 541-3301183 or www .lavacityroller dolls.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Debra Gwartney talks about her book “Live Through This”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. NORSEMAN CHOIR: The Eugenebased Scandinavian choir performs; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-390-2821. PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-633-6804. “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a maneating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SUNDAY MCMENAMINS OKTOBERFEST: Featuring food, beer and live music by the Moon Mountain Ramblers, Boxcar String Band and High Five Polka; free; all day, music starts at 1 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. VOLLEYBALL FOR BABIES: Volleyball competition; proceeds benefit March of Dimes and Bend Beach Volleyball; $100 or $60 per team, free for spectators; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; sand volleyball courts, across from Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend; 541-4193004 or marbell1@yahoo.com. RV AND BOAT SHOW AND SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2010 models; free; 10 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-948-3626.

SISTERS FALL STREET FESTIVAL: Event includes arts, crafts, food, a silent auction and more; auction proceeds benefit the Sisters High School art department; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-8905. BEND FALL FESTIVAL: Harvest celebration features vendors, hayrides, pumpkin contests, live music and more; free; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@ c3events.com or www.c3events.com. HARVEST CELEBRATION: With historic activities and games, live music, vendors and more; noon-4 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-504-2010. POLO IN THE COUNTRY: Professional polo game; bring a blanket or chairs; proceeds benefit five local charities; $10, free ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m., gates open at noon; Camp Fraley Ranch, 60580 Gosney Road, Bend; 541-312-8113. SCALE HOUSE DEDICATION: The scale house will be dedicated on Shevlin-Hixon Drive, between the Art Station and the National Guard Armory in Bend; free; 3 p.m.; 541-280-1363. “LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS”: Cat Call Productions presents the story of a floral assistant who finds a maneating plant, the popularity of which brings promises of fame and fortune; $25; 4 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. PHIL KEAGGY: The Christian artist and virtuoso guitarist performs; $20, $25 VIP; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-633-6804. D.R.I. (DIRTY ROTTEN IMBECILES): The punk band performs, with Hands on Throat and We are 86’d; $13 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

TUESDAY Sept. 21 ATMOSPHERE: The Minneapolis-based hiphop act performs, with Blueprint, Grieves & Budo and DJ Rare Groove; $25 plus fees in advance, $28 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 22 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN’ & PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes kayak, canoe and boat gear demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by electro-acoustic band The Pitchfork Revolution; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian dish with a list of its ingredients and watch the video “Mind Power”; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Payback” by Margaret Atwood; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541312-1074 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TRUTH & SALVAGE COMPANY: The roots musicians perform; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www .mcmenamins.com.

M T For Monday, Sept. 13

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:40, 7:10 FLIPPED (PG) Noon, 2:20, 5, 7:30 GET LOW (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:25 THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 7:20 INCEPTION (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:35, 7 RESTREPO (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE AMERICAN (R) 1, 4:30, 7, 9:30 AVATAR 3-D SPECIAL EDITION (PG-13) 7:45

DESPICABLE ME 3-D (PG) 12:30, 4:20 DINNER FOR SCHMUCKS (PG-13) 12:50, 3:45, 6:25, 9:20 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 12:15, 3:30, 6:30, 9:35 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 1:55, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 GOING THE DISTANCE (R) 1:50, 4:35, 7:05, 9:40 INCEPTION (PG-13) 12:25, 3:40, 6:50, 10 THE LAST EXORCISM (PG-13) 2:15, 5:10, 7:40, 9:50 MACHETE (R) 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45 NANNY MCPHEE RETURNS (PG) 12:40, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15 THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13) 1:40, 4:15, 6:55, 9:25 RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3-D (R) 12:05, 2:20, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55 SALT (PG-13) 1:10, 3:55, 6:15, 9 THE SWITCH (PG-13) 2, 4:55, 7:35, 10 TAKERS (PG-13) 1:05, 4, 6:35, 9:05 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE

(PG-13) 12:45, 3:35, 6:20, 9:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

5, 7:15, 9:30 VAMPIRES SUCK (PG-13) 5:15, 7:15, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) GROWN UPS (PG-13) 8:45 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 6

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

THE AMERICAN (R) 6:45 EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 6:30 THE GIRL WHO PLAYED WITH FIRE (R) 6:30 WINTER’S BONE (R) 7

REDMOND CINEMAS

PINE THEATER

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

214 N. Main St., Prineville,

THE AMERICAN (R) 4, 6:30, 9 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 3:45, 7, 9:15 GOING THE DISTANCE (R)

541-416-1014

EAT PRAY LOVE (PG-13) 4 THE EXPENDABLES (R) 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

Music Continued from C1 But Steve Hartwell, lead audio engineer and owner of Featherlight Recording Studio in Bend, thinks it’s worth it. The explosion of digital technology has led to lower-quality music as consumers become obsessed with the number of songs they can collect, rather than how the music sounds, Hartwell said. “It’s the first time in musical history we’re actually going downhill in musical quality,” he said. Hartwell is not alone. For several years, audiophiles and digital music aficionados have carried on Web debates about the relative sound quality, or lack of it, found in the alphabet soup of audio file types, known by their extensions: “aac,” “wma,” “rax” and the most commonly used, MP3.

Creation of MP3s While MP3 became synonymous with digital music players — which were frequently called MP3 players — it actually stands for MPEG-layer 3, a file extension, according to the website for the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits, which developed the MP3 audio encoding software built into iTunes, Windows Media Player and others. Think of MP3 as equivalent to “txt,” for a text file, or “jpg,” for a picture file. In the ancient days of digital communication — the 1980s and early ’90s — experts searched for a way to send music over telephone lines. Professors and students at the Fraunhofer Institute in Germany, later joined by others, developed a way to compress the audio files, making them smaller, so they could travel faster and take up less space, yet still produce CDquality sound. For example, three minutes of compressed music could fit on a single 3.5-inch floppy disk, for those who remember floppy disks. Decompressed, it took up a dozen disks, according to the Fraunhofer website. MP3 encoding also saved space on the relatively small hard drives — sometimes 100 megabytes or less — found in personal computers in the early 1990s. During compression, however, some of the information — or music — gets lost. The sound at either end of the spectrum, during the quietest and loudest sections, gets stripped out, Hartwell said. The bit rate represents how much of the sound from the original source gets captured when creating the tracks, according to Apple. But it also affects the size of the music file. An MP3 file imported at 192 kilobytes per second will be larger than a file ripped at 128 kbps. Some of the music players and programs that came with computers a decade ago, by default, imported music from a CD at 96 kbps, or even less. Most personal computers available today come with hard drives measured in gigabytes, so file size may be less of an issue than it was 20 years ago. With iTunes — the free digital music player provided by the nation’s leading music retailer, according to a May report by market research firm The NPD Group — it’s easy to set the bit rate for music imported from CDs. In the Edit menu of iTunes 9 and 10, select “Preferences” and click

on “Import Settings” on the “General” tab. For importing MP3s, it offers three bit-rate settings: 128, 160 and 192 kbps. iTunes also provides different options for other file types and custom bit-rate settings. All things being equal, the higher the bit rate, the better the sound quality.

Why stop there? You can also check the bit rate of the music currently in your iTunes library. To learn about an individual song, highlight it in the music list, go to the “File” menu and click on “Get Info.” The window that pops up will have a summary of information, including the bit rate. To find all songs in the library below a certain bit rate, create a Smart Playlist, which essentially searches iTunes’ music library for the criteria the user selects and returns all matching songs. For example, to find all songs with a bit rate below 128 kbps, go to the “File” menu and select New Smart Playlist. Check the box next to “Match the Following Rule” box, select “Bit Rate” from the first drop-down menu; choose “is less than” from the second and enter 128 in the adjoining box. To make the bit rate show in the playlist window, select “View Options” on the “View” menu, and check the box next to “Bit Rate.” If you haven’t given away all the CDs you imported to your hard drive in years past, you can simply re-import them at the higher rate. If the computer’s hard drive is nearly full, however, adding a slew of larger music files may not be advisable. In a quick test, a file imported at 192 kbps doubled in size over one ripped at 96 kbps. The same file imported using Apple’s compression method, called Lossless, grew more than tenfold in the test. Apple says the Lossless method preserves CD-quality sound while still shrinking the file size over an uncompressed file. Other music players offer similar ways to check the bit rate. Currently, iTunes only sells songs with a 256 kbps bit rate, and Apple will even allow you to upgrade your lower-quality purchased music — for 30 cents per song. But at least they can be upgraded. If you’ve been building a digital music collection for five years or more, you probably have some files purchased from now-defunct online music sites that cannot be played at all. Boosting bit rates will not magically fix the sound quality of a digital music library. The system playing the music — the speakers, the way it was recorded, the type of file — all can have a huge effect on quality, Hartwell said. But on a decent system, which can even be found in many new home computers, he believes listeners should be able to hear the difference between one MP3 file imported at 96 kbps and another at 256 kbps. Improving the sound quality means hearing more of the music’s emotional message. “Music is about emotion,” Hartwell said. “It doesn’t matter what kind. It’s a form of communication. If we start to lose the emotional content ... we’re doing a disservice to everybody.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.


C4 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Sept. 13, 2010: This year, you will break precedent and open up to new possibilities. Certain situations need your focus and directness. At the same time, you remain anchored, allowing for an even smoother moment. You will discover that good will heads in your direction. At the same time, your responsibilities increase, perhaps adding additional pressure. If you are single, you suddenly have quite the pick of suitors. You can afford to take your time deciding who is right for you. If you are attached, despite some issues, the two of you are able to flow more in unison. This newfound closeness makes both of you happy again. SAGITTARIUS can trigger you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Respond to an inquiry only once you determine that this person is ready to hear the response. A key person in your life could be overly serious and touchy. You will have an opportunity to clear the air. Tonight: Think in terms of the big picture. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Deal directly with someone who can affect much of what goes on in your life. Your fatigue level is subject to change. You might want to rethink a personal matter. Be careful not to push someone into a corner. Tonight: A talk establishes a stronger mutual base. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Defer to others,

understanding what is going on behind the scenes. Your creativity will soar once you clear out a difficult problem. A boss or an authority figure is challenging. Tonight: Let the good times begin. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Stick to the basics until you get through a certain amount of errands and must-dos. A communication could trigger a long-overdue conversation. The unexpected adds insight and dimension to a situation. Tonight: Opt for something easy, but squeeze in some exercise. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Forthcoming news might be more exciting than you thought. There is a lot of excitement in clearing out a matter that could involve friends and/or money. You will gain through your innate abilities. Tonight: Let the weekend spirit continue. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HH You are coming from a secure spot where you discover the difference between friends and family. The decisions you have made might not have been as grounded as you think. You’ll have an opportunity to change directions. Tonight: Mosey on home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep the conversation active, and you’ll discover a whole new perspective. Your innate energy and liveliness communicate the essence of what is going on. Keep sharing, and you might be surprised by the nugget that drops on you. Tonight: Hanging out with favorite people. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Keep talking and sharing.

You are able to make all the difference. Honor who you are, and move a project forward. Others discover that you had a firmer grasp on a situation than they did. Tonight: Don’t you want to treat yourself or a friend? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Clearly, you have a lot going for you. Investigate a situation with a newfound openness and direction. Investigate what someone presents. This information might add confusion to a work-related matter. Tonight: The world is your oyster. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HH Know when to lie back and not push. Your instincts are righton. Investigate a personal matter more thoroughly before making a decision. Be clear about your choices and direction. You need to listen more. Tonight: Take some much-needed timeouts. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Open doors rather than slam them shut. Your ability to understand what is happening can change your direction. A friendship grows because of a discussion. The comfort level remains special and unique. Tonight: Managing to have fun only in the middle of the night. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH A boss has a lot of energy. Your ability to move in a new direction and clear out a problem marks your decisions. If you feel you cannot support another person’s decisions, you might need to make a move. Tonight: The only answer is yes. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Making your presence robotic A new generation of robots is making it possible to be, in effect, in two places at once. From anywhere with a computer and a Wi-Fi connection, the operator can use the robot to hear, talk, see and be seen, and move around a workplace far away. Early adopters include doctors, technology workers and supervisors. The robots range in size, features and price. Here is a sampling. Vgo (made by Vgo Communications)

Tilr (RoboDynamics)

Texai (Willow Garage)

RP-7i (InTouch Health)

QB (Anybots)

HEIGHT

4'0"

3'8" or 4'2"

5'2"

5'5"

2’6” to 6’0”

TOP SPEED

3.75 mph.

2.4 mph

1.5 mph

2 mph

3.5 m.p.h.

DISPLAY SIZE

7"

8" (touchscreen)

15"

15"

3.5”

FIELD OF VIEW

60 degrees

55 degrees

140 degrees

360 degrees

130 degrees

CONNECTION

400 kbps

500 kbps

500 kbps

600 kbps

500 kbps

PRICE

$4,995

$10,000

Not available

Not available

$15,000

UNIQUE FEATURES

Text-to-speech; camera auto-tilts based on drive speed; remote monitoring headlights and auto-docking to the charger.

Web-based controls; can use own video like Skype, Google Vid Chat, MSN, etc.

Technology agnostic (can pilot on Windows, Mac or Linux), secure connection between pilot and Texai (SSL and VPN tunnel).

FDA-cleared, connects directly to Class II medical devices, including electronic stethoscopes, otoscopes and ultrasound.

Untippable, twowheel drive design; stabilized video; Web-based controls. New York Times News Service

Sources: The companies

Robots Continued from C1 “Computers are beginning to grow wheels and roll around in the environment,” said Jeanne Dietsch, a veteran roboticist and co-founder of MobileRobots Inc., a robot maker in Amherst, N.H. Skeptics say these machines do not represent a great improvement over video teleconferencing. But advocates say the experience is substantially better, shifting control of space and time to the remote user. “Most of the existing videoconferencing technology is designed for meetings,” said Pamela Hinds, co-director at the Center for Work, Technology and Organization at Stanford University. “That is not where most work gets done.” For now, most of the mobile robots, sometimes called telepresence robots, are little more than ventriloquists’ dummies with long, invisible strings. But some models have artificial intelligence that lets them do some things on their own, and they will inevitably grow smarter and more agile. They will not only represent the human users, they will augment them. The robot is what allowed Shatzel to “be” in the patient’s room far away. From an earlier telephone conversation with the emergency room doctor, the patient’s condition had not been clear. But in speaking directly with the patient, examining his face and control of his hands, and glancing with the camera at the cardiac monitor in the room, Shatzel could assess the stroke, he said, with the same acuity as if he were there. He instructed the staff to administer the drug. “We had a good outcome,” he said later. Dr. John Whapham, a Loyola University neurologist who has helped create several regional networks providing telemedicine with robots made by InTouch Health, says that when he began using the robot during his resi-

Calculator Continued from C1 “The calculator is a tool to help Oregonians who are interested in it understand how they ... contribute to the emissions of greenhouse gases,” said David Allaway, policy analyst with DEQ. “We hope that people check out their carbon footprints, and most importantly, that they go to the ‘Take Action’ page, and they find a couple practices they can take that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and might save them money.” Most climate scientists believe the human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide and other gases, like methane, are leading to changes in the climate — from warming temperatures to more extreme weather. And there are a number of calculators or other tools available that allow people to figure out their greenhouse gas equation. Some of the DEQ calculator’s information about carbon offsets — where people pay money to support projects like tree plantings that will make up for their carbon emissions — are out of date, said Peter Weisberg, project analyst with the Portlandbased Climate Trust nonprofit. And the calculator can only give people a rough idea of what their emissions are, he said. “But they’re great for getting a general conception of where your emissions are,” Weisberg said.

dency, he would carry his laptop in a backpack so he could perform consultations anytime. “I’ll pull out the laptop, and when I’m on Michigan Avenue here in Chicago, put it on a garbage can or on the seat of a bus stop,” he said. “You’re live, and you can walk around, examine, image, zoom in and out. I do it all the time.”

Expanding the workplace “I’m very thin in this new outfit,” Mike Beltzner says, breaking the ice in a room of Silicon Valley computer programmers. In the flesh, he is 2,200 miles away, at home in Toronto with his cat. But at this meeting, his face appears on a 15-inch LCD display atop a narrow aluminum machine resembling an upright vacuum cleaner. Indeed, as this robot rolls around the room, it looks as if it could just as easily be sweeping. Beltzner rolls the robot to a large conference table in the Mountain View headquarters of Mozilla Corp., maker of Firefox, a popular Web browser. By swiveling his camera eye back and forth, he can see the entire room and chats comfortably with the assembled team. An hour earlier, Beltzner, director of Firefox, was logged into a different robot on the other side of the building to attend the weekly all-hands meeting. With a pink lei on one shoulder and a jaunty cap on the other, the robot was surrounded by more than 100 young software engineers, each sitting with a wirelessly connected laptop. When the meeting ends, “Robo-Beltzner” — as one colleague calls him — mingles in the large room, chatting. Then Beltzner executes a nifty pirouette and moves the robot, made by Willow Garage of Menlo Park, Calif., to a charging station. Like many other Silicon Valley companies, Mozilla has employees around the world, and in the month since it began testing the system, as many as 10 employees

It’s good that the DEQ’s option includes the impacts of shopping on carbon footprints, he added. An area that opens many people’s eyes is emissions related to goods and services, Allaway said. Things like visits to the doctor or consulting a financial adviser factor in as well. “That surprises people,” Allaway said, but “when you go to the office, it’s lit, heated, (and) there are devices, tools.” The calculator, which DEQ pays $2,000 a year for, was developed from one used in California by a team at the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. In putting it together, people started by looking at the typical household, and then using an economic model that calculates how much carbon dioxide is produced to create one type of product, said Chris Jones with the Berkeley lab. For example, the high emissions from eating beef come not only from cattle-ranching practices, but the methods used to grow the grains the cattle eat and the transportation at every step of the process. “For each sector of the economy, all emissions of all contributing sectors are included,” he said. “It’s everything.” While other carbon calculators might stick to transportation and housing costs, the model used by Oregon takes a look at goods and services — which, accord-

have logged in to run errands, chat and attend meetings. Beltzner has now used the Willow Garage robot for more than a month, usually four to six times a week to attend meetings and chat with his co-workers in Mountain View. He finds it to be a distinctly different experience from a video teleconference or a computer chat system. “With the robot, I find that I’m getting the same kind of interpersonal connection during the meetings and the same kind of nonverbal contact” that he would get if he were in the room, he said. “It’s a lot easier to have harder conversations when I ‘roll the robot,’” he added, referring to reviewing an employee’s performance or discussing technical issues.

Boss, or big brother? Tom Serani’s boss had grown frustrated that while Serani was on the road, his 20 salespeople working the phones back at company headquarters did not have the same zip as when he was in the office. “The new guys were not doing quite as well,” said the boss, Neal Creighton, a co-founder of RatePoint, a company based in Needham, Mass., that tracks Internet users’ opinions of products and companies. When RatePoint was approached by Vgo Communications to test a mobile robot, Creighton jumped at the chance. From his hotel room, Serani can roll a robot up to an office cubicle back at headquarters, listen in on a telephone sales pitch and offer advice. Still, the possibility that remotely operated robots might be used by some managers as surveillance devices, or as peeping Toms, has made some in the fledgling industry nervous. “I don’t want this technology to be seen as a means of oppression,” said Trevor Blackwell, founder and chief executive of Anybots, the maker of QB, a $15,000 mobile robot that balances on two wheels.

ing to the calculator, contribute to more than half of an average Oregonian’s carbon budget. “What we consider a household or individual carbon footprint to be is the carbon footprint of everything that that individual or household consumes,” Jones said. “It’s not just the carbon dioxide that comes out of your tailpipe ... it’s also the manufacture of the vehicle, the carbon associated with producing the fuel, it’s the servicing of the vehicle, it’s everything.” People can take steps to stem their carbon emissions. The calculator gives estimates of how much carbon — and in some cases how much money — people can save by doing things like changing their diet, increasing their fuel efficiency or reducing air travel. “That really is an important message — that households have opportunities to both reduce their carbon footprint and save money,” Jones said. “So we want to make sure they see what those opportunities are.” The idea, he said, is to show people that they can make a difference with small changes, get them talking with friends and colleagues about ways to cut down on carbon emissions, and take action on both an individual and community scale. “We really want to create social change,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Test-drive Continued from C1 From the perspective of my computer, it looked as if she were frozen in space and time by the sight of a digital version of me. In defense of my colleagues, the Texai is a little startling to encounter coming around a corner in the office. A 15inch, flat-panel screen with a webcam sits atop a 5-foot metal pole. A large motor with wheels sits at its base and looks like extra-large clown feet. I wheeled past, said hello over the robot’s speakers and watched through the camera as her head moved slowly with my passing, the spoon still suspended in midair. Moving around is like driving an exceptionally large, and unusually slow, remote-

controlled car. The robot is controlled through a Skype Voice over Internet Protocol. Its only requirements are a good Wi-Fi connection and a place to recharge its batteries. From my computer, I could see through two cameras, one pointing directly in front of the robot and one — called the nav-cam — pointing toward the ground and designed to help me avoid obstacles like trash cans or small children. Moments later, I came across two other people in another hallway who were clearly engaged in a private conversation. They were unaware that a digital robot with supersonic hearing had sneaked up on them. (The robot’s motor whirs but is not very loud.) My attempts at robot-human camaraderie did not work with these two. From the robot’s perspective, at least, they looked frustrated and annoyed. I de-

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cided to move along. I was worried that if they became too perturbed, they could easily press the robot’s visible power button, leaving me powerless, literally and figuratively. These kinds of encounters happened whenever I took the Texai out and about. Some people looked perplexed; it was as if the robot had a special power to pause reality, leaving people temporarily paralyzed, mouth usually agape. But gradually, people started to interact. During one robot outing, a copy editor spoke up and asked if the robot was there to replace her. I assured her that it would be some time before that happened.


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Golf Inside Dustin Johnson takes BMW Championship, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 2010

MIXED MARTIAL ARTS Gunderson slated for his third UFC fight on Wednesday Former Redmond resident John Gunderson is set to appear in another Ultimate Fighting Championship fight this Wednesday, as part of UFC Fight Night 22 in Austin, Texas. Gunderson (23-7 MMA, 1-1 John UFC) is Gunderson scheduled to fight Yves Edwards (38-16-1 MMA, 6-4 UFC) at lightweight in the preliminary card of Fight Night, which will include 10 mixed martial arts bouts. The main event is between middleweight contenders Nate Marquardt and Rousimar Palhares. UFC Fight Night 22 airs on Spike TV and serves as the lead-in for the debut episode of “The Ultimate Fighter 12.” Gunderson, formerly of the International Fight League, won a unanimous-decision over Mark Holst in The Ultimate Fighter 11 Finale. Gunderson lost his UFC debut in a decision to Rafaello Oliveira at UFC 108. Gunderson was scheduled to take on Paul Taylor at UFC 112, but Taylor was removed from the Abu Dhabi card hours before it began, reportedly because of a migraine headache. —Bulletin staff report

PREP BOYS SOCCER

FOOTBALL

Seattle gives Carroll victory in NFL return

Mountain View’s Kylor Snook, left, attempts to dribble the ball past Redmond’s Nate Christman (15) during the first half of Tuesay’s IMC game against Redmond. Snook, along with teammate Hunter Martinez, spent some time playing soccer in Europe last year.

By Tim Booth The Associated Press

SEATTLE — Pete Carroll flapped his arms, imploring his new home fans to get into the game. At one point, Seattle’s new coach was yanked off the field by an official after wandering too far out on the field following an enthusiastic celebration. Eleven years after he last coached an NFL game, Carroll thoroughly enjoyed his return to pro football. “He was probably the most enthusiastic person in the place. I got to say his energy was maybe even a little above mine and I haven’t played in that long so I was pretty excited,” Seattle linebacker Lofa Tatupu said. “Pete wants to get out there and hit.” Matt Hasselbeck threw for two touchdowns and ran for another as the Seahawks gave their new coach a 31-6 victory over the San Francisco 49ers on Sunday. Back on an NFL sideline for the first time since 1999, Carroll was marching up and down, almost constantly in motion. The only times he stood still was when he was giving congratulations to his players as they came off the field. And there was plenty to give. Even more than last January when Carroll left Southern California to take over a Seattle franchise with 23 losses in two seasons, Sunday was his beginning. “There are a ton of beginnings, but now that’s over. It’s a nice game, but it doesn’t mean that much. It’s already done,” Carroll said. “To have the opportunity emotionally to enjoy it like that in the locker room with these guys that have worked so hard that have listened to my stuff all this time, for them to feel the benefits and rewards it was very pleasing.” While Seattle could revel in an unlikely romp to start the Carroll era in the Pacific Northwest, the 49ers were already wondering how to regroup as their lofty preseason expectations to dominate the mediocre NFC West took a major hit. See Carroll / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

INSIDE NFL

New experience After a year studying and playing in Europe, two Mountain View soccer players hope to help the Cougars return to the state finals BEAU EASTES Houston Texans quarterback Matt Schaub looks for a receiver during the first quarter of Sunday’s game against the Indianapolis Colts. The Texans won 34-24.

Texans start season with win over Colts Arian Foster rushes for 231 years and three TDs for Houston, see Page D3 Dolphins ...... 15 Bills.............. 10

Jaguars ........ 24 Broncos ....... 17

Bears ........... 19 Lions............ 14

Texans .........34 Colts ............ 24

Titans...........38 Raiders ........ 13

Cardinals ..... 17 Rams............ 13

Patriots ........38 Bengals........ 24

Packers ........27 Eagles ..........20

Giants ..........31 Panthers ...... 18

Seahawks ....31 49ers .............6

Steelers ....... 15 Falcons ..........9

Redskins ...... 13 Cowboys........7

H

unter Martinez and Kylor Snook are bringing an international flair to the Mountain View boys soccer team this year. The two seniors studied and played soccer abroad last fall. Martinez spent his entire junior year in Aarhus, Denmark, and Snook lived for six months in Pamplona, Spain. “Everything is different,” Mar-

tinez says about the contrast in styles between soccer in the U.S. and Denmark. “It’s the same concept, trying to get the ball in the net, but the strategies are completely different.” Snook’s experience was similar. “Everything there was much more technical,” Snook says. “There was a lot more one-touches, a lot of quick passes. (Spanish players) weren’t necessarily the fastest people, but they played really fast.” While both Martinez and Snook went abroad for the educational opportunities — Martinez was interested in Scandinavia, and Snook wanted to learn Spanish — both say their soccer experiences

helped them fully immerse themselves in their host countries. “They say a great way to make friends is to play sports,” Martinez says about advice he received upon arriving in Aarhus, a metro area of 800,000 that is Denmark’s second-largest city. “Everyone that plays (soccer) is a big dog. There’s no American football contradicting it. Soccer is the biggest thing in the city.” For Snook, living in soccermad Spain was an eye-opening experience. “It was like a religion,” Snook says about soccer passions on the Iberian Peninsula. “Everyone loves it, even if they don’t play.” See Experience / D5

Inside • For complete results from Sunday’s NFL action, See Page D3

READY FOR ACTION

HIGH GEAR

Women gain a foothold in Formula One everywhere but behind the wheel By Brad Spurgeon New York Times News Service

Buccaneers .. 17 Browns......... 14

One drives a large truck and puts tires on rims. Another organizes an army of gasoline technicians who develop fuel. One runs a department of aerodynamics designers, while another is in charge of a racing team’s 240 employees. They are a few of the women who are breaking the mold in the macho world of Formula One, where, as is the tradition elsewhere in auto racing, they usually

hold jobs in marketing, media relations and hospitality. Although more women are working the technical jobs to make the cars go fast, the one place where they are still absent is behind the wheel. Formula One racing continued Sunday with the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, but it has been 18 years since the last female driver took part in a race, and half a decade since a woman even tested a car. See Women / D6

HIGH GEAR

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NFL ............................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 College football .........................D5 High Gear ................................. D6

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Seattle Seahawks coach Pete Carroll reacts as he moves to greet Seahawks CEO Tod Leiweke after the Seahawks beat the San Francisco 49ers 31-6 in an NFL football game on Sunday in Seattle.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Chris Yates, left, of Estacada, works on preparing his 10-second class boat for Sunday’s race as Ashley Heckman and Jack Heckman watch during the High Desert Showdown. Racing was staged Saturday and Sunday at Haystack Reservoir near Culver.


D2 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

TENNIS

Tuesday Boys soccer: Summit at Sherwood, 4 p.m.; Madras at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Irrigon at Culver, 4 p.m.; Riverside at Central Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Sherwood at Summit, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Stayton at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Volleyball: Redmond at Mountain View, 6:30 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 6:30 p.m.; Madras at Sisters, 6:30 p.m.; Henley at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Regis at Culver, 6 p.m.

1 p.m. — U.S. Open, men’s final, CBS.

FOOTBALL 4 p.m. — NFL, Baltimore Ravens at New York Jets, ESPN. 7:15 p.m. — NFL, San Diego Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, ESPN.

BASEBALL

National Tennis Center New York Purse: $22.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Sunday’s men’s U.S. Open final was delayed due to rain. It will be played today at 1 p.m. PDT.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Doubles Women Championship Liezel Huber, United States, and Nadia Petrova (2), Russia, lead Vania King, United States, and Yaroslava Shvedova (6), Kazakhstan, 6-2, 4-6, 5-4 (15-0), susp., rain.

Wednesday Cross country: Madras, Culver at Silver Falls State Park, 4:15 p.m.

7 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

TUESDAY SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, Manchester United vs. Rangers, FSNW.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays, MLB network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — WNBA Finals, Game 2, Atlanta Dream at Seattle Storm, ESPN.

VOLLEYBALL 6:30 p.m. — High school, Redmond at Mountain View, COTV. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Tennis • Rain postpones U.S. Open final to today: A Monday men’s final is becoming a U.S. Open tradition. The championship match between Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic was postponed a day because of persistent rain Sunday, the third consecutive year that the season’s last major tournament won’t finish on schedule. The No. 1seeded Nadal, bidding to complete a career Grand Slam, and No. 3 Djokovic were supposed to begin playing at 1:30 p.m. (PDT) Sunday, but showers began more than 1½ hours earlier and hadn’t stopped by 3:15 p.m., when tournament officials decided to call it a night. The final was rescheduled for 1 p.m. today on CBS, when the forecast calls for a 20 percent chance of thunderstorms.

Basketball • Bird leads Storm past Dream in WNBA finals opener: Sue Bird made a tiebreaking jumper from the foul line with 2.6 seconds left and the Seattle Storm beat the Atlanta Dream 79-77 in Game 1 of the WNBA finals on Sunday. Angel McCoughtry had a last-second try for the Dream, but her long three-pointer from the left side bounced off the far side of the rim at the buzzer. The best-of-five series resumes Tuesday night in Seattle.

Football • NFL looking into Jets QB Sanchez’s offseason camp: The NFL is investigating a complaint by an unidentified team that the New York Jets violated the league’s offseason training rules during a camp organized by quarterback Mark Sanchez because coaches were present for some workouts. The team says in a statement Sunday that the NFL is “reviewing the matter and has our full cooperation.” ESPN.com first reported that the unidentified team claims Sanchez’s “Jets West Camp” in Southern California in July violated rules when coach Rex Ryan and offensive coordinator Brian Schottenheimer watched some sessions. • NFL looks into Jets’ treatment of female reporter: The NFL is looking into how a female television reporter was treated at New York Jets practice Saturday. Ines Sainz, a reporter for Mexico’s TV Azteca doing a story on quarterback Mark Sanchez, had footballs thrown in her direction by a Jets’ coach during practice, and players later called out to her in the team’s locker room. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said Sunday that the league and the Jets began looking into the situation when they were made aware of it Saturday night. • Sooners’ Clay released from hospital: Oklahoma running back Brennan Clay has been released from the hospital after being injured in the Sooners’ win against Florida State. Coach Bob Stoops says “everything has checked out well” for Clay, who was back at home on campus Sunday. However, he says it’s still unclear how long the freshman will be sidelined. — From wire reports

FOOTBALL NFL

Thursday Boys soccer: Redmond at Summit, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Madras, 4:30 p.m. Girls soccer: Summit at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Madras at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at North Marion, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Crook County at Redmond, 6:30 p.m.; La Pine at Madras, 6:30 p.m.; Sisters vs. Yamhill-Carlton at Central, TBA; Sisters at Central, TBA; East Linn at Culver, 6 p.m.

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

Injury Report NEW YORK — The National Football League injury report, as provided by the league (OUT - Definitely will not play; DNP - Did not practice; LIMITED - Limited participation in practice; FULL - Full participation in practice):

Friday Football: Redmond at Hood River Valley, 7 p.m.; Bend at Sprague, 7 p.m.; Mazama at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; Klamath Union at Summit, 7 p.m.; Crook County at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Sisters at Madras, 7 p.m.; Vernonia at Culver, 7 p.m. Boys soccer: Corvallis at Bend, 4 p.m.; Crescent Valley at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Summit at Churchill, 5:30 p.m.; Culver at Central Christian, 4 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Corvallis, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Crescent Valley, 4 p.m. Volleyball: Gilchrist at Prospect, 4 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran at Paisley, 4:30 p.m.

TODAY SAN DIEGO CHARGERS at KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — CHARGERS: LIMITED: LB Shawne Merriman (Achilles), QB Billy Volek (knee). CHIEFS: DNP: LB Cameron Sheffield (neck). LIMITED: T Ryan O’Callaghan (groin). BALTIMORE RAVENS at NEW YORK JETS — RAVENS: OUT: NT Terrence Cody (knee), T Jared Gaither (back), WR Donte’ Stallworth (foot). LIMITED: DE Paul Kruger (shoulder). FULL: T Oniel Cousins (head), CB Lardarius Webb (knee). JETS: OUT: LB Calvin Pace (foot). LIMITED: S Brodney Pool (ankle).

Saturday Cross country: Redmond at South Salem Invitational, 12:15 p.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County, Madras, La Pine at Three-Course Challenge in Seaside, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Molalla Invitational, 11:30 a.m. Boys soccer: Crescent Valley at Bend, 11 a.m.; Corvallis at Mountain View, 11 a.m.; Sisters at Henley, noon; Culver at Riverside, 1 p.m. Girls soccer: Bend at Crescent Valley, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at Corvallis, 11 a.m.; Summit at Central Catholic, noon; Henley at Sisters, noon Volleyball: Summit at South Eugene tournament, 8 a.m.; La Pine at Lakeview tournament, 9 a.m.; Culver at Redmond JV tournament, TBA

College John Senden (33), $15,825 Y.E. Yang (33), $15,825 Brendon de Jonge (33), $15,825 Scott Verplank (18), $15,375 Ricky Barnes (18), $15,375 Jason Bohn (10), $15,150 D.J. Trahan (5), $15,000

74-75-74-74—297 73-78-69-77—297 74-71-72-80—297 76-75-73-74—298 73-74-76-75—298 73-74-73-79—299 75-76-75-75—301

LPGA Tour NORTHWEST ARKANSAS CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Pinnacle Country Club Rogers, Ark. Purse:, $2 million Yardage: 6,284; Par 71 Final Round Yani Tseng, $300,000 67-68-65—200 Michelle Wie, $181,326 68-64-69—201 Mika Miyazato, $131,539 69-70-64—203 Inbee Park, $101,754 70-70-65—205 In-Kyung Kim, $63,537 74-67-65—206 Jiyai Shin, $63,537 71-69-66—206 Kristy McPherson, $63,537 70-68-68—206 Seon Hwa Lee, $63,537 72-65-69—206 Ai Miyazato, $36,583 71-69-67—207 Anna Nordqvist, $36,583 70-70-67—207 Song-Hee Kim, $36,583 69-70-68—207 Stacy Lewis, $36,583 69-69-69—207 Juli Inkster, $36,583 69-66-72—207 Na Yeon Choi, $36,583 67-68-72—207 Janice Moodie, $28,789 68-69-71—208 Karine Icher, $25,315 70-69-70—209 Christina Kim, $25,315 70-69-70—209 Brittany Lincicome, $25,315 70-68-71—209 Morgan Pressel, $25,315 66-72-71—209 Amy Hung, $22,038 71-72-67—210 Maria Hernandez, $22,038 71-68-71—210 Jee Young Lee, $22,038 68-71-71—210 Shi Hyun Ahn, $18,631 70-74-67—211 Kyeong Bae, $18,631 72-70-69—211 Chella Choi, $18,631 70-71-70—211 Azahara Munoz, $18,631 69-71-71—211 Suzann Pettersen, $18,631 68-72-71—211 Karin Sjodin, $18,631 71-68-72—211 Stacy Prammanasudh, $15,586 72-72-68—212 Sarah Kemp, $15,586 73-67-72—212 Gloria Park, $15,586 67-73-72—212 Heather Bowie Young, $12,255 72-72-69—213 Jean Reynolds, $12,255 70-74-69—213 Cristie Kerr, $12,255 72-71-70—213 Meena Lee, $12,255 71-71-71—213 Julieta Granada, $12,255 75-66-72—213 Ji Young Oh, $12,255 68-73-72—213 Jane Park, $12,255 73-67-73—213 Moira Dunn, $12,255 71-69-73—213 Ilmi Chung, $12,255 69-70-74—213 Anna Rawson, $8,985 73-71-70—214 Becky Morgan, $8,985 73-70-71—214 Eun-Hee Ji, $8,985 70-71-73—214 Leta Lindley, $8,985 69-71-74—214 Samantha Richdale, $8,985 71-68-75—214 Paige Mackenzie, $8,985 72-65-77—214 Eunjung Yi, $6,711 75-69-71—215 Louise Stahle, $6,711 72-72-71—215 Shanshan Feng, $6,711 72-72-71—215 Pat Hurst, $6,711 70-74-71—215 Diana D’Alessio, $6,711 69-75-71—215 Mindy Kim, $6,711 75-68-72—215 Hee Young Park, $6,711 71-72-72—215 Sun Young Yoo, $6,711 69-74-72—215 Laura Diaz, $6,711 70-72-73—215 Jimin Kang, $6,711 69-73-73—215 Taylor Leon, $4,989 74-70-72—216 Alexis Thompson, $4,989 72-72-72—216 Jill McGill, $4,989 72-72-72—216 Candie Kung, $4,989 70-74-72—216 Jennifer Rosales, $4,989 72-71-73—216 Wendy Ward, $4,989 71-72-73—216 Silvia Cavalleri, $4,989 69-74-73—216 Lindsey Wright, $4,989 69-71-76—216 Marianne Skarpnord 71-73-73—217 Vicky Hurst, $4,269 76-67-74—217 Sandra Gal, $4,269 71-71-75—217 Amy Yang, $4,269 70-71-76—217 Beth Bader, $4,269 71-68-78—217 Ilhee Lee, $3,922 71-72-75—218

GOLF PGA Tour BMW CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Cog Hill Golf and Country Club, Dubsdread Course Lemont, Ill. Purse: $7.5 million Yardage: 7,616; Par: 71 Final Dustin Johnson (2500), $1,350,000 68-70-68-69—275 Paul Casey (1500), $810,000 69-69-69-69—276 K.J. Choi (700), $360,000 71-69-69-69—278 Kevin Na (700), $360,000 70-69-69-70—278 Matt Kuchar (700), $360,000 64-72-70-72—278 Ryan Moore (700), $360,000 65-74-66-73—278 Retief Goosen (450), $251,250 67-71-71-70—279 Phil Mickelson (400), $217,500 72-71-70-67—280 Steve Stricker (400), $217,500 70-73-67-70—280 Charlie Wi (400), $217,500 67-69-70-74—280 Camilo Villegas (338), $180,000 70-70-71-70—281 Marc Leishman (338), $180,000 72-65-72-72—281 Ernie Els (293), $150,000 70-71-67-74—282 Ian Poulter (293), $150,000 66-72-69-75—282 Nick Watney (268), $116,250 70-74-70-69—283 Tiger Woods (268), $116,250 73-72-68-70—283 Adam Scott (268), $116,250 71-69-72-71—283 Jim Furyk (268), $116,250 73-71-69-70—283 David Toms (268), $116,250 70-72-70-71—283 Zach Johnson (268), $116,250 70-73-66-74—283 Stewart Cink (245), $84,000 70-73-71-70—284 Tim Clark (245), $84,000 70-70-70-74—284 Justin Rose (245), $84,000 68-71-71-74—284 Tom Gillis (223), $60,750 70-72-76-67—285 Geoff Ogilvy (223), $60,750 73-72-72-68—285 Vijay Singh (223), $60,750 70-77-68-70—285 Robert Allenby (223), $60,750 72-70-72-71—285 Michael Sim (223), $60,750 72-70-72-71—285 Greg Chalmers (223), $60,750 72-69-68-76—285 Justin Leonard (190), $44,571 72-71-75-68—286 Bryce Molder (190), $44,571 74-72-72-68—286 Charley Hoffman (190), $44,571 70-77-70-69—286 Vaughn Taylor (190), $44,571 70-71-74-71—286 Carl Pettersson (190), $44,571 72-72-71-71—286 Brian Gay (190), $44,571 68-73-72-73—286 Bill Haas (190), $44,571 70-73-69-74—286 Brandt Snedeker (158), $33,000 76-72-72-67—287 Rory McIlroy (158), $33,000 76-74-68-69—287 Matt Jones (158), $33,000 71-70-73-73—287 Hunter Mahan (158), $33,000 71-68-75-73—287 Sean O’Hair (158), $33,000 75-68-71-73—287 Luke Donald (158), $33,000 68-70-72-77—287 Kevin Streelman (138), $27,000 71-75-72-70—288 Ryan Palmer (138), $27,000 73-72-71-72—288 Ben Crane (125), $23,250 76-77-67-69—289 Jason Dufner (125), $23,250 74-72-73-70—289 Rickie Fowler (125), $23,250 71-73-72-73—289 Fredrik Jacobson (113), $20,025 74-75-72-70—291 Anthony Kim (113), $20,025 70-75-72-74—291 Rory Sabbatini (98), $18,263 69-71-80-72—292 Heath Slocum (98), $18,263 71-74-75-72—292 Martin Laird (98), $18,263 73-73-69-77—292 Bubba Watson (98), $18,263 72-74-69-77—292 Brian Davis (80), $17,250 73-72-77-71—293 Jason Day (80), $17,250 72-76-71-74—293 Bo Van Pelt (80), $17,250 72-71-73-77—293 Stephen Ames (65), $16,800 74-77-72-71—294 Jeff Overton (65), $16,800 72-76-72-74—294 Tim Petrovic (65), $16,800 73-70-73-78—294 Andres Romero (50), $16,350 80-70-73-73—296 J.B. Holmes (50), $16,350 77-72-69-78—296 Stuart Appleby (50), $16,350 76-73-69-78—296 Angel Cabrera (33), $15,825 75-76-75-71—297

Lisa Meldrum, $3,922 Angela Stanford, $3,922 Katie Futcher, $3,797 Na On Min, $3,797 Cindy Lacrosse, $3,704 Meaghan Francella, $3,704 Allison Hanna, $3,586 Karen Stupples, $3,586 Danielle Downey, $3,586 Leah Wigger, $3,495 Sarah Jane Smith, $3,450

71-71-76—218 70-72-76—218 71-73-75—219 75-68-76—219 76-68-76—220 70-72-78—220 70-74-77—221 72-71-78—221 68-73-80—221 73-70-79—222 71-72-80—223

Champions Tour SONGDO CHAMPIONSHIP Sundday At Jack Nicklaus Golf Club Korea Sondo City, South Korea Yardage: 7,087; Par: 72 Final Charles Schwab Cup points in parentheses (x-won on first hole of playoff) x-Russ Cochran, $456,000 (456) 73-65-66—204 Fred Funk, $270,000 (270) 69-67-68—204 Tom Pernice, Jr., $222,400 (222) 74-64-67—205 Joe Ozaki, $167,500 (167) 72-69-67—208 D.A. Weibring, $167,500 (167) 71-68-69—208 Mark Calcavecchia, $124,000 (124) 74-66-69—209 Tim Simpson, $100,000 (100) 73-68-69—210 John Cook, $100,000 (100) 70-68-72—210 Michael Allen, $100,000 (100) 69-70-71—210 Scott Simpson, $72,400 (72) 73-72-66—211 David Frost, $72,400 (72) 73-69-69—211 J.L. Lewis, $72,400 (72) 74-68-69—211 Sandy Lyle, $72,400 (72) 70-70-71—211 Jay Haas, $54,750 76-69-67—212 Jay Don Blake, $54,750 69-76-67—212 Mike Reid, $54,750 75-68-69—212 Craig Stadler, $54,750 74-67-71—212 Brad Bryant, $41,100 73-70-70—213 Keith Fergus, $41,100 73-69-71—213 Tom Watson, $41,100 75-68-70—213 Peter Senior, $41,100 73-69-71—213 James Mason, $41,100 74-68-71—213 Chip Beck, $32,000 76-68-70—214 Ronnie Black, $32,000 73-69-72—214 Tommy Armour III, $32,000 74-68-72—214 Mike Goodes, $27,533.34 76-69-70—215 Bob Tway, $27,533.33 80-67-68—215 Denis Watson, $27,533.33 72-68-75—215 Mark Wiebe, $24,900 74-70-72—216 Jeff Sluman, $23,700 74-73-70—217 Bob Gilder, $20,700 76-69-73—218 Olin Browne, $20,700 72-73-73—218 Morris Hatalsky, $20,700 76-70-72—218 Don Pooley, $20,700 73-71-74—218 Andy Bean, $20,700 73-73-72—218 Mark O’Meara, $17,550 74-73-72—219 John Jacobs, $17,550 79-71-69—219 Tom Jenkins, $16,500 78-70-72—220 David Eger, $15,300 74-73-74—221 Des Smyth, $15,300 77-70-74—221 Jerry Pate, $15,300 79-69-73—221 Bernhard Langer, $13,800 73-69-80—222 Bruce Fleisher, $13,800 75-74-73—222 Gene Jones, $12,000 73-75-75—223 Bruce Vaughan, $12,000 78-70-75—223 Bruce Lietzke, $12,000 76-75-72—223 Wayne Levi, $12,000 77-72-74—223 Phil Blackmar, $9,600 78-73-73—224 Nam-Sin Park, $9,600 72-79-73—224 Sang-Ho Choi, $9,600 76-77-71—224 Graham Marsh, $9,600 77-76-71—224 Mike McCullough, $8,100 76-73-79—228 Gwang-Soo Choi, $7,500 77-77-75—229 Bobby Wadkins, $7,200 78-74-78—230 Fulton Allem, $6,900 81-81-72—234 Choon Bok Moon, $6,600 74-81-80—235

TENNIS U.S. Open Sunday At The USTA Billie Jean King

THE AP TOP 25 The Top 25 teams in The Associated Press college football poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 11, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pv 1. Alabama (52) 2-0 1,466 1 2. Ohio St. (5) 2-0 1,410 2 3. Boise St. (1) 1-0 1,306 3 4. TCU 2-0 1,235 4 5. Oregon 2-0 1,172 7 6. Texas (1) 2-0 1,150 5 7. Oklahoma 2-0 1,123 10 8. Nebraska 2-0 1,083 6 9. Iowa 2-0 1,037 9 10. Florida 2-0 1,036 8 11. Wisconsin 2-0 855 11 12. Arkansas 2-0 755 14 13. South Carolina 2-0 642 24 14. Utah 2-0 627 20 15. LSU 2-0 595 19 16. Auburn 2-0 538 21 17. Miami 1-1 530 12 18. Southern Cal 2-0 481 16 19. Stanford 2-0 446 25 20. Michigan 2-0 437 — 21. West Virginia 2-0 197 23 22. Penn St. 1-1 171 18 23. Houston 2-0 169 — 24. Arizona 2-0 138 — 25. Oregon St. 0-1 75 — Others receiving votes: Pittsburgh 62, Fresno St. 48, Air Force 46, California 45, Georgia 42, Florida St. 41, Missouri 37, Georgia Tech 35, Clemson 25, North Carolina 23, Texas A&M 18, Texas Tech 17, Michigan St. 15, James Madison 11, Kansas St. 10, Oklahoma St. 10, Maryland 6, East Carolina 4, Nevada 2, Baylor 1, Boston College 1, N.C. State 1, Northwestern 1. USA TODAY TOP 25 POLL The USA Today Top 25 football coaches poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Sept. 11, total points based on 25 points for first place through one point for 25th, and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Alabama (55) 2-0 1470 1 2. Ohio State (4) 2-0 1410 2 3. Boise State 1-0 1278 3 4. Texas 2-0 1262 4 5. TCU 2-0 1168 5 6. Oregon 2-0 1122 8 7. Florida 2-0 1108 6 8. Nebraska 2-0 1095 7 9. Oklahoma 2-0 1062 10 10. Iowa 2-0 1050 9 11. Wisconsin 2-0 889 11 12. LSU 2-0 740 16 13. Arkansas 2-0 738 15 14. Utah 2-0 625 t20 15. Auburn 2-0 618 t20 16. South Carolina 2-0 527 25 17. Miami (Fla.) 1-1 417 12 18. Arizona 2-0 410 23 19. Stanford 2-0 338 NR 20. Penn State 1-1 296 14 21. West Virginia 2-0 264 22 22. Michigan 2-0 254 NR 23. Houston 2-0 220 NR 24. California 2-0 131 NR 25. Missouri 2-0 82 NR Others receiving votes: Clemson 68; Florida State 63; Oklahoma State 55; Air Force 51; Pittsburgh 50; Georgia 39; Michigan State 35; Oregon State 33; Texas Tech 28; Georgia Tech 26; North Carolina 23; Brigham Young 17; Washington 14; Nevada 12; Arizona State 11; Boston College 11; Cincinnati 11; Northwestern 10; Fresno State 9; Maryland 7; Texas A&M 7; Connecticut 5; Notre Dame 5; Virginia Tech 4; Kansas State 3; Mississippi State 2; East Carolina 1; Temple 1.

Betting Line Favorite JETS Chargers

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today 2.5 2 Ravens 5.5 4.5 CHIEFS

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 13 6 5 44 33 New York 12 8 4 40 30 Toronto FC 7 10 7 28 22 Kansas City 7 9 6 27 22 Chicago 6 8 8 26 28 Philadelphia 6 11 6 24 27 New England 7 13 3 24 24 D.C. 5 16 3 18 16 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 14 5 5 47 36 Real Salt Lake 12 4 8 44 37 FC Dallas 10 2 11 41 29 Colorado 9 7 7 34 29 San Jose 9 7 6 33 24 Seattle 9 9 6 33 26 Chivas USA 7 12 4 25 25 Houston 6 12 5 23 28 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Game Philadelphia at San Jose, 7 p.m. Thursday’s Game New York at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Real Salt Lake, 1 p.m. Seattle FC at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Houston, 5:30 p.m. New England at Colorado, 6 p.m. D.C. United at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, September 19 Kansas City at Chivas USA, 5 p.m.

GA 23 25 27 24 30 38 38 37 GA 18 16 17 24 23 29 29 38

BASKETBALL WNBA playoffs WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— FINALS Seattle 1, Atlanta 0 Sunday, Sept. 12: Seattle 79, Atlanta 77 Tuesday, Sept. 14: Atlanta at Seattle, 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 16: Seattle at Atlanta, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, Sept. 19: Seattle at Atlanta, noon x-Tuesday, Sept. 21: Atlanta at Seattle, 6 p.m. x-if necessary

Men FIBA WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS At Istanbul All Times PDT ——— Finals At Istanbul Sunday, Sept. 12 Fifth/Sixth Place — Argentina 86, Spain 81 Bronze Medal — Lithuania 99, Serbia 88 Gold Medal — United States 81, Turkey 64 Sunday’s Results ——— USA 81, TURKEY 64 TURKEY Akyol 0-0 0-0 0, Guler 0-2 0-0 0, Ermis 0-0 0-0 0, Onan 2-7 3-4 7, Ilyasova 2-9 3-4 7, Erden 4-5 1-5 9, Tunceri 1-4 4-4 7, Savas 0-2 3-4 3, Gonlum 2-6 0-0 4, Arslan 2-6 0-2 6, Asik 2-6 1-2 5, Turkoglu 5-8 2-2 16. Totals 20-55 17-27 64. USA Billups 0-5 4-4 4, Durant 10-17 1-2 28, Rose 4-11 0-1 8, Westbrook 3-8 5-5 13, Gay 3-5 0-0 6, Iguodala 2-4 0-2 4, Granger 0-1 0-0 0, Curry 1-2 0-0 3, Gordon 0-5 0-0 0, Love 0-1 0-0 0, Odom 7-9 0-0 15, Chandler 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-68 10-14 81. Turkey 17 15 16 16 — 64 United States 22 20 19 20 — 81 3-Point Goals—Turkey 7-18 (Turkoglu 4-4, Arslan 2-5, Tuncerei 1-3, Guler 0-1, Onan 0-2, Ilyasova 03); United States 11-33 (Durant 7-13, Westbrook 2-3, Curry 1-1, Odom 1-1, Gay 0-1, Iguodala 0-1, Granger 0-1, Rose 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Turkey 34 (Ilyasova 11), United States 42 (Odom 11). Assists—Turkey 9 (Tunceri 5), United States 16 (Rose 6). Total Fouls—Turkey 18, United States 22. A—15,000.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League NEW YORK YANKEES—Called up 1B Juan Miranda and INF-OF Kevin Russo from Scanton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League PHILADLEPHIA PHILLIES—Selected the contract of INF Brian Bocock from Lehigh Valley (IL). Designated RHP Cesar Carrillo for assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Reinstated INF-OF Jerry Hairston, Jr. from the 15-day DL.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 11,507 1,278 4,062 1,014 The Dalles 6,977 1,207 5,379 1,521 John Day 4,029 1,168 3,255 911 McNary 4,229 620 5,014 1,381 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 613,785 57,469 367,999 143,648 The Dalles 400,820 42,328 237,785 94,389 John Day 338,704 39,288 170,764 67,056 McNary 277,868 24,876 142,245 52,522

GOLF ROUNDUP

Johnson closes out Cog Hill with victory The Associated Press

Nam Y. Huh / The Associated Press

Dustin Johnson waves to the crowd after winning the BMW Championship golf tournament in Lemont, Ill., Sunday. Johnson finished 9-under par and moved to No. 2 in the FedEx Cup standings.

LEMONT, Ill. — Maybe now everyone will believe Dustin Johnson when he says he is over a summer of Sunday disappointments. First came an 82 on the final day of the U.S. Open. Then came a crushing blow at the PGA Championship, when he was denied a spot in the playoff for not realizing he was in a bunker and touching the sand with his club on the final hole. Resilient as he is powerful, Johnson kept coming back for more. The payoff came Sunday in the BMW Championship, when the 26year-old American was flawless on the back nine at Cog Hill and made up a three-shot deficit against Paul Casey to win for the second time this year. Playing in the final group for the fourth time since June, Johnson closed with a 2-under 69 for a oneshot victory. “To finally get it done, especially after all the things I’ve gone through this summer ... it can’t feel any better,” Johnson said. “I played really good golf today. I didn’t make as many birdies as I would have liked, but I made just enough.” He made three birdies, none more important than the last one.

Tied for the lead, Johnson knew the 17th hole might be his last good chance. He pulled driver and smashed his tee shot over the trees with a slight fade, the ball landing in the fairway and leaving him a sand wedge that he hit within 2 feet for a tap-in birdie. “I knew I needed to hit a good tee ball because it was going to be my best chance of making a birdie,” he said. “I was just trying to cut a drive, hold it against the wind and get it around the corner a little bit. And I hit it perfect.” Equally impressive was the 18th, where Johnson ripped another drive to set up a conservative par. The Pebble Beach winner in February, Johnson has quickly emerged as one of the game’s rising stars. He now goes to the Tour Championship at No. 2 in the FedEx Cup standings, with a clear shot at the $10 million bonus. One player he won’t have to beat at East Lake is Tiger Woods. The world’s No. 1 player sputtered at the start and shot 70 to tie for 15th, not nearly enough to move into the top 30 in the standings and advance to the FedEx Cup finale. It’s the first time as a pro that

Woods hasn’t been eligible for a tournament. “That’s just the way it is,” Woods said. “I didn’t play well early in the year, and I didn’t play well in the middle of the year.” Woods played with Phil Mickelson for the first time all year, and Lefty buried him. Mickelson closed with a 67 and tied for eighth, his first top 10 since the U.S. Open. It was the 26th time the world’s best two players have been in the same group, and the record now stands at 11-11-4. “He certainly brings out the best in me, and I enjoy being paired with him,” Mickelson said. Woods next plays in the Ryder Cup, and he won’t be alone in having two weeks off. Two other Ryder Cup picks, Stewart Cink and Rickie Fowler, also failed to qualify for the Tour Championship. Also on Sunday: Tseng rallies to win in Arkansas ROGERS, Ark. — Taiwan’s Yani Tseng won the Northwest Arkansas Championship for her third victory of the year, shooting a 6-under 65 to rally past Michelle Wie. Tseng, also the Kraft Nabisco and Women’s British Open winner this year, birdied four of five holes early on

the back nine, then held on for a onestroke victory over Wie with a birdie on No. 18. Tseng finished at 13 under. Wie, three strokes ahead entering the final round, closed with a 69. Cochran earns first Champions victory INCHEON, South Korea — Russ Cochran won the Songdo Championship for his first Champions Tour victory, beating Fred Funk with a birdie on the first playoff hole. Cochran, the 51-year-old left-hander who won the 1991 Western Open for his lone PGA Tour title, closed with a 6-under 66 to match Funk (68) at 12 under at Jack Nicklaus Golf Club Korea. Tom Pernice Jr. (67) was third at 11 under. Kaymer takes KLM Open title HILVERSUM, Netherlands — PGA Championship winner Martin Kaymer won the KLM Open, closing with a 4-under 66 for a four-stroke victory over Christian Nilsson and Fabrizio Zanotti. The German star, also the winner this year in Abu Dhabi, had a 14-under 266 total. Nilsson and Zanotti shot 69s. British Open winner Louis Oosthuizen (65) was 9 under along with Jose Manuel Lara (65), David Horsey (68) and Gonzalo Fernandes Castano (69).


NFL

Texans stun Colts with 34-24 victory in opener Houston’s Arian Foster rushes for 231 yards and three touchdowns The Associated Press HOUSTON — It took a record day by an undrafted running back for the Houston Texans to end years of frustration against Peyton Manning and the Indianapolis Colts. Arian Foster, who spent most of last season on the practice squad, ran for a team record 231 yards and scored three touchdowns to carry the Texans to a 34-24 victory over the defending AFC champion Colts on Sunday. “Coming into the league, you don’t know what to expect, especially if you are not heralded and there’s not a lot of publicity,” Foster said. “You see guys like Andre Johnson and Matt Schaub and the way they carry themselves, and you try to mimic it and make your own personality. I feel privileged to be here.” Foster had the NFL’s secondbest opening weekend rushing performance since 1933, topped only by Buffalo’s O.J. Simpson’s 250 in 1973 against New England. He also surpassed Domanick Davis’ team record of 158 yards, set in 2004 at Jacksonville. The Texans (1-0) ran for a franchise record 257 yards and backed up their bold talk in the offseason that they were ready to challenge Indianapolis. The Colts came into the game with 15 wins in 16 games in the series, including rallying from 17 points down in the previous two meetings in Houston. “We had to have patience,” Foster said. “It didn’t feel like I was going to be able to get going early, but you keep pounding and pounding, and they start getting a little tired and we start getting a little tired. It’s a test of wills.” Foster, acquired by the Texans last summer, had 33 carries in gaining the most yards by a Colts’ opponent. “We failed to rise to the occasion, which we don’t normally do,” Colts linebacker Clint Session said. “We normally get out of these kinds of games, but we couldn’t do it.” Manning completed 40 of 57 passes for 433 yards and three touchdowns, the fourth-highest opening weekend passing yards total since 1933, and three touchdowns. He threw a 10-yard TD pass to Dallas Clark with 4:52 left to cut Houston’s lead to 27-17. But Foster ran for 41 yards on the Texans’ next series and capped his day with an 8-yard TD run. The Texans ranked 30th in rushing last season, and building a ground attack was a focal point at training camp. Foster beat out Steve Slaton for the No. 1 running back spot, despite spending the first 10 games of last season on the practice squad. “We heard all offseason that our running game wasn’t efficient,” Foster said. “You can either let it get to you, or let it get in you, and I feel like we let it get in us, and we used it.” Houston led 13-10 at halftime and turned the offense over to Foster to start the third quarter. He rushed 10 times for 49 yards on the drive, finishing the eightminute march with a 1-yard touchdown run. “At halftime, we talked about the key to the game being the most physical team and our offensive line,” Houston coach Gary Kubiak said. “That’s what you want as a coach. You want those guys walking the sideline saying, ‘Run the ball, coach.’ ” Also on Sunday: Packers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Eagles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 PHILADELPHIA — Aaron Rodgers threw a pair of touchdown passes, Mason Crosby kicked a team-record 56-yard field goal and Green Bay won despite a vintage performance by Philadelphia’s Michael Vick. In their first game since trading Donovan McNabb to Washington, the Eagles started with Kevin Kolb and finished with Vick. Kolb left with a concussion at halftime, so Vick played meaningful snaps for an extended period for the first time in nearly four years. Vick finished with 175 yards passing and ran for 103, but could not overcome a 20-3 deficit.

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

Houston Texans running back Arian Foster (23) bows to the crowd as he celebrates his 25-yard touchdown run with teammate Owen Daniels (81) during the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game against the Indianapolis Colts in Houston.

NFL ROUNDUP Bears . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Lions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 CHICAGO — Jay Cutler threw for 372 yards, including a 28yard TD pass to Matt Forte with 1:32 left and Chicago held on against Detroit. The Lions, who lost quarterback Matthew Stafford with a right shoulder injury late in the first half, nearly pulled out the win but Shaun Hill’s 25yard pass to Calvin Johnson in the end zone with 25 seconds left was ruled incomplete after a review. Stafford took a blindside sack by Julius Peppers and spent the second half on the sideline with his arm in a sling. His status for next week is uncertain. The Bears outgained the Lions 463168, but had four turnovers. Cardinals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Rams. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 ST. LOUIS — Larry Fitzgerald caught a 21-yard touchdown pass for the go-ahead score late in the fourth quarter, helping Arizona spoil the debut of No. 1 pick Sam Bradford. Derek Anderson hung in the pocket despite taking a pounding from the St. Louis pass rush, going 22 for 41 for 297 yards in his first start as the replacement for the retired Kurt Warner. Bradford was 32 of 55 for 253 yards, one touchdown and three interceptions. Buccaneers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Browns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 TAMPA, Fla. — Josh Freeman returned from a three-week layoff because of a broken thumb on his throwing hand and tossed a pair of touchdowns to help the Bucs overcome an 11-point deficit. Jake Delhomme guided Cleveland to a 14-3 lead before things unraveled for the Browns, who have not begun a season with a win since 2004 and fell to 1-11 in openers since the club returned as an expansion franchise in 1999. Patriots. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Bengals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady threw two of his three touchdown passes to Wes Welker to lead New England. The season-opening victory came just three days after Brady was unhurt in a two-car crash then agreed to a contract making him the NFL’s highest paid player. Chad Ochocinco and Terrell Owens combined for 19 receptions for 212 yards and a touchdown for the Bengals, but their impact fell short of the hype that accompanied their partnership. Giants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Panthers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The New York Giants opened their new $1.6 billion home by beating the Panthers with a big second half. Trailing 16-14 at halftime, the Giants surged behind second-year receiver Hakeem Nicks, who caught his third touchdown pass from Eli Manning. Ahmad Bradshaw set up his own 4-yard TD run in the fourth quarter with a 39-yard romp that provided the cushion New York needed to get some revenge on Carolina. Jaguars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Broncos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — David Garrard threw three touchdown passes, two to tight end Marcedes Lewis, and Jacksonville won a game the team called

one of the most important in franchise history. Garrard completed 16 of 21 passes for 170 yards. A big chunk of those went to Mike Thomas, who caught six passes for 89 yards. Maurice Jones-Drew ran for 98 yards. The Jaguars, coming off a 7-9 season in which they blacked out nine of 10 home games, needed to get off to a good start to keep fans in the seats and eliminate more talk about relocation. Steelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Falcons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 PITTSBURGH — Rashard Mendenhall ran 50 yards for a touchdown 2:35 into overtime and the Steelers overcame a shaky start by replacement quarterback Dennis Dixon and a missed field goal attempt late in regulation. With the Steelers leaning heavily on their running game and defense without suspended star quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, Mendenhall carried 22 times for 120 yards and the game’s only touchdown. Pittsburgh appeared ready to win it with 39 seconds left in the fourth quarter, but Jeff Reed, who has nine career game-winning kicks, was wide right on a 40-yard attempt. Dolphins. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Bills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ORCHARD PARK, N.Y. — Linebacker Karlos Dansby and Miami’s new-look defense provided the Dolphins with the quick start they were looking for. Dansby, Miami’s top offseason free-agent addition, had a sack and eight tackles in helping the Dolphins limit the Bills to 166 yards on offense. Ronnie Brown scored on a 1-yard plunge and Dan Carpenter hit field goals from 32 and 43 yards in allowing Miami to open the season with a win for the first time in five years. Chad Henne completed 21 of 34 passes for 182 yards for Miami. Titans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Raiders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Chris Johnson ran for 142 yards and two touchdowns, Vince Young threw for two TDs and Javon Ringer had a TD, and the Titans avoided any comparisons to last year’s 0-6 start with a seasonopening rout. Oakland led 3-0 early after a Young fumble. Tennessee answered with 24 straight points to take control. The Titans also sacked new Raiders quarterback Jason Campbell four times and forced two turnovers they turned into 10 points. Redskins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 Cowboys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 LANDOVER, Md. — DeAngelo Hall returned a fumble 32 yards for a touchdown to end the first half, and Washington survived an end-of-game penalty to hold off Dallas. Hall helped forced a fumble by Tashard Choice, scooped up the ball and somersaulted into the end zone for Washington’s only touchdown, making both Donovan McNabb and coach Mike Shanahan successful in their Redskins debuts. The Cowboys had a chance to win on the final play when Tony Romo scrambled to find Roy Williams open for a touchdown, but Alex Barron was called for holding — Dallas’ 12th penalty of the game. McNabb completed 15 of 32 passes for 171 yards for the Redskins. Romo was 31 for 41 for 282 yards for the Cowboys.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 D3

NFL SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Su n d a y’s Ga me s ——— CARDINALS 17, RAMS 13 Arizona 0 10 0 7 — 17 St. Louis 0 10 3 0 — 13 Second Quarter Ari—FG Feely 22, 13:54. StL—FG Jo.Brown 46, 5:28. Ari—Hightower 1 run (Feely kick), 2:54. StL—Robinson 1 pass from Bradford (Jo.Brown kick), :00. Third Quarter StL—FG Jo.Brown 25, 8:28. Fourth Quarter Ari—Fitzgerald 21 pass from Anderson (Feely kick), 6:13. A—52,440. ——— Ari StL First downs 21 20 Total Net Yards 378 325 Rushes-yards 21-112 24-85 Passing 266 240 Punt Returns 5-31 3-28 Kickoff Returns 3-82 3-73 Interceptions Ret. 3-69 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 22-41-0 32-55-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-31 2-13 Punts 6-43.7 6-54.2 Fumbles-Lost 7-4 2-1 Penalties-Yards 10-72 5-40 Time of Possession 27:09 32:51 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Arizona: Hightower 13-54, Stephens-Howling 7-49, Anderson 1-9. St. Louis: Jackson 22-81, Darby 1-2, Karney 1-2. PASSING—Arizona: Anderson 22-41-0297. St. Louis: Bradford 32-55-3-253. RECEIVING—Arizona: Breaston 7-132, Hightower 4-40, Fitzgerald 3-43, StephensHowling 3-16, Doucet 2-37, Komar 2-29, Spach 1-0. St. Louis: Clayton 10-119, Amendola 6-67, Fells 4-15, Jackson 4-6, Bajema 3-18, Robinson 3-18, Hoomanawanui 1-8, Karney 1-2. MISSED FIELD GOALS—St. Louis: Jo.Brown 34 (BK). ——— PACKERS 27, EAGLES 20 Green Bay 0 13 14 0 — 27 Philadelphia 3 0 7 10 — 20 First Quarter Phi—FG Akers 45, 4:23. Second Quarter GB—FG Crosby 49, 13:52. GB—Driver 6 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 1:48. GB—FG Crosby 56, :00. Third Quarter GB—Kuhn 3 run (Crosby kick), 8:36. Phi—McCoy 12 run (Akers kick), 4:24. GB—Jennings 32 pass from Rodgers (Crosby kick), 1:56. Fourth Quarter Phi—Maclin 17 pass from Vick (Akers kick), 10:23. Phi—FG Akers 24, 5:43. A—69,144. ——— GB Phi First downs 22 16 Total Net Yards 299 321 Rushes-yards 33-132 21-150 Passing 167 171 Punt Returns 1-10 2-14 Kickoff Returns 5-156 4-93 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 2-28 Comp-Att-Int 19-31-2 21-34-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-21 5-28 Punts 4-41.5 5-49.6 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 3-1 Penalties-Yards 2-15 10-80 Time of Possession 31:55 28:05 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Green Bay: Jackson 18-63, Grant 8-45, Kuhn 2-15, Rodgers 5-9. Philadelphia: Vick 11-103, McCoy 7-35, Maclin 1-11, Kolb 1-1, Weaver 1-0. PASSING—Green Bay: Rodgers 19-312-188. Philadelphia: Vick 16-24-0-175, Kolb 5-10-0-24. RECEIVING—Green Bay: Jennings 5-82, Driver 5-30, Finley 4-47, Jackson 2-12, J.Jones 2-10, Nelson 1-7. Philadelphia: McCoy 5-47, Avant 4-41, Maclin 4-38, D.Jackson 4-30, Celek 2-32, Buckley 1-10, McGlynn 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— SEAHAWKS 31, 49ERS 6 San Francisco 3 3 0 0 — 6 Seattle 0 14 14 3 — 31 First Quarter SF—FG Nedney 23, 10:16. Second Quarter SF—FG Nedney 23, 6:23. Sea—Hasselbeck 1 run (Mare kick), 2:26. Sea—Butler 13 pass from Hasselbeck (Mare kick), 1:27. Third Quarter Sea—Trufant 32 interception return (Mare kick), 13:59. Sea—Branch 3 pass from Hasselbeck (Mare kick), 10:30. Fourth Quarter Sea—FG Mare 35, 2:24. A—67,044. ——— SF Sea First downs 14 14 Total Net Yards 263 242 Rushes-yards 19-49 23-77 Passing 214 165 Punt Returns 2-27 3-17 Kickoff Returns 4-67 2-58 Interceptions Ret. 1-7 2-52 Comp-Att-Int 26-45-2 18-23-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-11 1-5 Punts 6-41.5 5-41.4 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 8-60 5-35 Time of Possession 32:45 27:15 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—San Francisco: Gore 17-38, Walker 1-10, Norris 1-1. Seattle: Forsett 7-43, Jones 8-18, Washington 6-12, Hasselbeck 2-4. PASSING—San Francisco: A.Smith 2645-2-225. Seattle: Hasselbeck 18-23-1-170. RECEIVING—San Francisco: V.Davis 8-73, Gore 6-45, Morgan 3-32, Walker 3-27, Crabtree 2-12, Ginn Jr. 1-19, Zeigler 1-10, Byham 1-5, Norris 1-2. Seattle: Williams 4-64, Carlson 3-36, Forsett 3-17, Branch 3-11, Robinson 2-12, Butler 1-13, Morrah 1-11, Obomanu 1-6. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— Steelers 15, Falcons 9 Atlanta 0 3 3 3 0 — 9 Pittsburgh 3 0 3 3 6 — 15 First Quarter Pit—FG Reed 52, 7:51. Second Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 49, :00. Third Quarter Atl—FG Bryant 39, 10:40. Pit—FG Reed 36, 6:53. Fourth Quarter Pit—FG Reed 34, 8:54. Atl—FG Bryant 23, 3:24. Overtime Pit—Mendenhall 50 run, 12:25. A—63,609. ——— Atl Pit First downs 18 14 Total Net Yards 295 354 Rushes-yards 25-58 31-143 Passing 237 211 Punt Returns 2-20 2-7 Kickoff Returns 4-82 1-23 Interceptions Ret. 1-1 1-1 Comp-Att-Int 27-44-1 18-26-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-15 3-25 Punts 7-40.1 5-50.8 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 3-24 4-25 Time of Possession 30:29 32:06 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Atlanta: Turner 19-42, Norwood 2-8, Ryan 2-4, Snelling 2-4. Pittsburgh: Mendenhall 22-120, Redman 6-19, Dixon 2-4, Moore 1-0. PASSING—Atlanta: Ryan 27-44-1-252. Pittsburgh: Dixon 18-26-1-236. RECEIVING—Atlanta: White 13-111, Weems 4-36, Douglas 3-39, Gonzalez 2-35, Peelle 2-11, Norwood 1-9, Turner 1-7, Snelling 1-4. Pittsburgh: Ward 6-108, Miller 4-40, Wallace 2-62, Mendenhall 2-15, Randle El 2-8, Moore 2-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Atlanta: Bryant 46 (WR). Pittsburgh: Reed 55 (WR), 40 (WR). ——— GIANTS 31, PANTHERS 18 Carolina 3 13 0 2 — 18 N.Y. Giants 7 7 10 7 — 31 First Quarter Car—FG Kasay 21, 3:42. NYG—Nicks 26 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), :02.

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East Miami New England N.Y. Jets Buffalo

W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 0 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

PF 15 38 0 10

Houston Jacksonville Tennessee Indianapolis

W 1 1 1 0

L 0 0 0 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 1.000 .000

PF 34 24 38 24

Pittsburgh Baltimore Cincinnati Cleveland

W 1 0 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 .000 .000 .000

PF 15 0 24 14

Kansas City San Diego Denver Oakland

W 0 0 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct .000 .000 .000 .000

PF 0 0 17 13

PA 10 24 0 15

Home 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Away 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

AFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

NFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Away 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

AFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0

NFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Away 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Div 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Away 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

NFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

South PA 24 17 13 34

Home 1-0-0 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0

North PA 9 0 38 17

Home 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

West PA 0 0 24 38

Home 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

NATIONAL CONFERENCE East Washington N.Y. Giants Dallas Philadelphia

W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

PF 13 31 7 20

New Orleans Tampa Bay Atlanta Carolina

W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

PF 14 17 9 18

Chicago Green Bay Detroit Minnesota

W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

PF 19 27 14 9

Arizona Seattle San Francisco St. Louis

W 1 1 0 0

L 0 0 1 1

T 0 0 0 0

Pct 1.000 1.000 .000 .000

PF 17 31 6 13

PA 7 18 13 27

Home 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

Away 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Away 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

NFC 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Div 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Away 0-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

Away 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-1-0 0-0-0

NFC 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

AFC 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

Div 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-1-0 0-1-0

South PA 9 14 15 31

Home 1-0-0 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

North PA 14 20 19 14

Home 1-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0-0-0

West PA Home 13 0-0-0 6 1-0-0 31 0-0-0 17 0-1-0 ——— Thursday’s Game

New Orleans 14, Minnesota 9 Sunday’s Games Chicago 19, Detroit 14 Miami 15, Buffalo 10 Jacksonville 24, Denver 17 N.Y. Giants 31, Carolina 18 Tampa Bay 17, Cleveland 14 Seattle 31, San Francisco 6 Washington 13, Dallas 7

Tennessee 38, Oakland 13 Pittsburgh 15, Atlanta 9, OT Houston 34, Indianapolis 24 New England 38, Cincinnati 24 Arizona 17, St. Louis 13 Green Bay 27, Philadelphia 20 Monday’s Games

Baltimore at N.Y. Jets, 4 p.m.

San Diego at Kansas City, 7:15 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 19

Chicago at Dallas, 10 a.m. Buffalo at Green Bay, 10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Tennessee, 10 a.m. Kansas City at Cleveland, 10 a.m. Miami at Minnesota,10 a.m. St. Louis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Jacksonville at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Indianapolis, 5:20 p.m.

Arizona at Atlanta, 10 a.m. Philadelphia at Detroit, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cincinnati, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 10 a.m. Seattle at Denver, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Washington, 1:15 p.m. New England at N.Y. Jets, 1:15 p.m. Monday, Sept. 20

New Orleans at San Francisco, 5:30 p.m. ——— All Times PDT Second Quarter Car—FG Kasay 52, 11:42. Car—FG Kasay 43, 1:46. NYG—Nicks 19 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), :45. Car—Smith 19 pass from Moore (Kasay kick), :03. Third Quarter NYG—FG Tynes 32, 9:03. NYG—Nicks 5 pass from Manning (Tynes kick), 1:42. Fourth Quarter NYG—Bradshaw 4 run (Tynes kick), 11:36. Car—Hardy safety, 3:57. A—77,245. ——— Car NYG First downs 14 21 Total Net Yards 237 376 Rushes-yards 24-89 36-118 Passing 148 258 Punt Returns 2-38 4-27 Kickoff Returns 7-172 5-67 Interceptions Ret. 3-33 3-0 Comp-Att-Int 14-35-3 20-30-3 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-34 1-5 Punts 4-43.3 3-28.7 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 1-1 Penalties-Yards 7-63 9-95 Time of Possession 25:21 34:39 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Carolina: D.Williams 16-62, Moore 2-15, Stewart 5-12, Baker 1-0. N.Y. Giants: Bradshaw 20-76, Jacobs 12-44, Manning 4-(minus 2). PASSING—Carolina: Moore 14-33-3182, Clausen 0-2-0-0. N.Y. Giants: Manning 20-30-3-263. RECEIVING—Carolina: Smith 5-75, Goodson 3-31, Jarrett 2-40, LaFell 2-22, Rosario 2-14. N.Y. Giants: Smith 5-43, Manningham 4-85, Nicks 4-75, Jacobs 2-21, Bradshaw 2-17, Beckum 2-11, Boss 1-11. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— BUCCANEERS 17, BROWNS 14 Cleveland 7 7 0 0 — 14 Tampa Bay 3 7 0 7 — 17 First Quarter Cle—Massaquoi 41 pass from Delhomme (Dawson kick), 2:48. TB—FG Barth 49, :50. Second Quarter Cle—Hillis 10 run (Dawson kick), 5:35. TB—M.Williams 3 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), :18. Fourth Quarter TB—Spurlock 33 pass from Freeman (Barth kick), 6:45. A—47,211. ——— Cle TB First downs 15 13 Total Net Yards 340 288 Rushes-yards 23-104 30-119 Passing 236 169 Punt Returns 3-29 4-24 Kickoff Returns 4-57 2-50 Interceptions Ret. 1-26 2-64 Comp-Att-Int 21-38-2 17-28-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 0-0 3-13 Punts 6-44.3 7-41.1 Fumbles-Lost 3-1 1-1 Penalties-Yards 5-47 6-55 Time of Possession 27:39 32:21 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cleveland: Harrison 9-52, Hillis 9-41, Cribbs 3-11, Delhomme 1-1, Watson 1-(minus 1). Tampa Bay: C.Williams 22-75, Freeman 2-34, Graham 6-10. PASSING—Cleveland: Delhomme 20-372-227, Cribbs 1-1-0-9. Tampa Bay: Freeman 17-28-1-182. RECEIVING—Cleveland: Stuckey 4-30, Hillis 4-24, Moore 3-87, Watson 3-16, Massaquoi 2-46, Cribbs 2-11, Wallace 1-9, Harrison 17, Robiskie 1-6. Tampa Bay: M.Williams 5-30, Winslow 4-32, Spurlock 2-49, Stroughter 2-32, C.Williams 2-23, Graham 1-8, Stevens 1-8. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Cleveland: Dawson 62. ——— JAGUARS 24, BRONCOS 17 Denver 0 7 7 3 — 17 Jacksonville 0 7 10 7 — 24 Second Quarter Jac—Lewis 21 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), :50. Den—Gaffney 8 pass from Orton (Prater kick), :16. Third Quarter Jac—Lewis 10 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 10:43. Den—Moreno 1 run (Prater kick), 4:07. Jac—FG Scobee 45, :45. Fourth Quarter Den—FG Prater 54, 11:20. Jac—Osgood 24 pass from Garrard (Scobee kick), 7:59. A—63,636.

Den Jac 21 18 363 299 25-89 34-134 274 165 1-4 3-26 3-62 4-137 0-0 1-8 21-33-1 16-21-0 3-21 1-5 4-43.0 4-41.3 1-1 0-0 7-70 5-47 30:30 29:30 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Denver: Moreno 15-60, Buckhalter 6-15, Orton 2-12, Tebow 2-2. Jacksonville: Jones-Drew 23-98, Jennings 4-26, Garrard 7-10. PASSING—Denver: Orton 21-33-1-295. Jacksonville: Garrard 16-21-0-170. RECEIVING—Denver: Royal 8-98, Lloyd 5-117, Gaffney 3-34, Graham 2-36, Larsen 1-4, Moreno 1-4, Gronkowski 1-2. Jacksonville: Thomas 6-89, Jones-Drew 3-15, Lewis 2-31, Miller 2-8, Osgood 1-24, Jennings 1-4, G.Jones 1-(minus 1). MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— PATRIOTS 38, BENGALS 24 Cincinnati 0 3 14 7 — 24 New England 10 14 7 7 — 38 First Quarter NE—Welker 9 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 9:47. NE—FG Gostkowski 32, 2:29. Second Quarter NE—Welker 4 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 8:58. NE—Guyton 59 interception return (Gostkowski kick), 5:38. Cin—FG Nugent 54, 1:14. Third Quarter NE—Tate 97 kickoff return (Gostkowski kick), 14:48. Cin—Gresham 1 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent kick), 7:54. Cin—Ochocinco 28 pass from C.Palmer (Nugent kick), :22. Fourth Quarter NE—Gronkowski 1 pass from Brady (Gostkowski kick), 7:41. Cin—Benson 1 run (Nugent kick), 3:57. A—68,756. ——— Cin NE First downs 26 20 Total Net Yards 428 376 Rushes-yards 25-87 23-118 Passing 341 258 Punt Returns 0-0 1-4 Kickoff Returns 4-70 4-184 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-59 Comp-Att-Int 34-50-1 25-35-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-4 0-0 Punts 3-46.3 1-43.0 Fumbles-Lost 2-1 0-0 Penalties-Yards 2-5 6-30 Time of Possession 31:50 28:10 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Cincinnati: Benson 15-43, Scott 6-35, C.Palmer 4-9. New England: Taylor 14-71, Faulk 3-23, Green-Ellis 5-22, Morris 1-2. PASSING—Cincinnati: C.Palmer 34-501-345. New England: Brady 25-35-0-258. RECEIVING—Cincinnati: Ochocinco 12159, Owens 7-53, Gresham 6-25, Shipley 5-82, Scott 3-15, Benson 1-11. New England: Welker 8-64, Moss 5-59, Faulk 4-47, Tate 4-36, Taylor 2-6, Hernandez 1-45, Gronkowski 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—New England: Gostkowski 47 (WL), 56 (WR). ——— TEXANS 34, COLTS 24 Indianapolis 0 10 0 14 — 24 Houston 6 7 7 14 — 34 First Quarter Hou—FG Rackers 30, 9:32. Hou—FG Rackers 49, 4:43. Second Quarter Hou—Walter 22 pass from Schaub (Rackers kick), 13:01. Ind—Wayne 14 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 5:19. Ind—FG Vinatieri 20, :15. Third Quarter Hou—Foster 1 run (Rackers kick), 7:03. Fourth Quarter Hou—Foster 25 run (Rackers kick), 8:41. Ind—Clark 10 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 4:52. Hou—Foster 8 run (Rackers kick), 1:56. Ind—Collie 73 pass from Manning (Vinatieri kick), 1:15. A—70,974. Ind Hou First downs 25 23 Total Net Yards 463 355 Rushes-yards 10-44 42-257 Passing 419 98 First downs Total Net Yards Rushes-yards Passing Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

Punt Returns Kickoff Returns Interceptions Ret. Comp-Att-Int Sacked-Yards Lost Punts Fumbles-Lost Penalties-Yards Time of Possession

1-13 1-39 7-155 3-79 1-19 0-0 40-57-0 9-17-1 2-14 2-9 5-35.6 2-45.5 1-1 0-0 5-73 7-50 29:07 30:53 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Indianapolis: Addai 10-44. Houston: Foster 33-231, Slaton 6-29, Schaub 3-(minus 3). PASSING—Indianapolis: Manning 4057-0-433. Houston: Schaub 9-17-1-107. RECEIVING—Indianapolis: Clark 11-80, Collie 10-131, Wayne 7-99, Addai 6-29, Garcon 4-75, Gonzalez 1-12, Brown 1-7. Houston: Johnson 3-33, Jones 2-29, Walter 2-29, Daniels 1-9, Foster 1-7. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— BEARS 19, LIONS 14 Detroit 7 7 0 0 — 14 Chicago 3 10 0 6 — 19 First Quarter Chi—FG Gould 20, 9:03. Det—Best 7 run (Hanson kick), 2:15. Second Quarter Det—Best 4 run (Hanson kick), 1:33. Chi—Forte 89 pass from Cutler (Gould kick), 1:03. Chi—FG Gould 31, :00. Fourth Quarter Chi—Forte 28 pass from Cutler (pass failed), 1:32. A—62,080. Det Chi First downs 13 23 Total Net Yards 168 463 Rushes-yards 21-20 31-101 Passing 148 362 Punt Returns 2-3 5-17 Kickoff Returns 3-68 3-70 Interceptions Ret. 1-23 1-7 Comp-Att-Int 20-34-1 23-35-1 Sacked-Yards Lost 2-23 4-10 Punts 8-42.1 5-30.2 Fumbles-Lost 3-2 4-3 Penalties-Yards 7-40 9-100 Time of Possession 25:18 34:42 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Detroit: Best 14-20, Felton 2-7, Morris 2-(minus 3), Sh.Hill 3-(minus 4). Chicago: Forte 17-50, Taylor 9-29, Cutler 5-22. PASSING—Detroit: Sh.Hill 9-19-1-88, Stafford 11-15-0-83. Chicago: Cutler 23-351-372. RECEIVING—Detroit: Scheffler 6-43, Best 5-16, C.Johnson 4-45, Morris 2-18, B.Johnson 1-24, Burleson 1-19, Pettigrew 1-6. Chicago: Forte 7-151, Aromashodu 5-71, Olsen 4-37, Knox 3-52, Taylor 3-44, Hester 1-17. MISSED FIELD GOALS—None. ——— DOLPHINS 15, BILLS 10 Miami 3 7 0 5 — 15 Buffalo 0 3 0 7 — 10 First Quarter Mia—FG D.Carpenter 32, 8:54. Second Quarter Mia—Brown 1 run (D.Carpenter kick), 11:12. Buf—FG Lindell 51, 7:08. Fourth Quarter Mia—FG D.Carpenter 43, 9:32. Buf—Parrish 31 pass from T.Edwards (Lindell kick), 5:13. Mia—Team safety, 1:32. A—69,295. Mia Buf First downs 19 9 Total Net Yards 296 166 Rushes-yards 36-132 17-50 Passing 164 116 Punt Returns 2-9 3-30 Kickoff Returns 2-27 1-11 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 21-34-0 18-34-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 3-18 3-23 Punts 7-41.1 7-42.6 Fumbles-Lost 0-0 1-0 Penalties-Yards 3-15 5-35 Time of Possession 36:53 23:07 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Miami: Brown 13-65, Williams 18-62, Polite 2-6, Bess 1-0, Henne 2-(minus 1). Buffalo: Jackson 4-19, Lynch 3-13, T.Edwards 2-12, Spiller 7-6, Sanborn 1-0. PASSING—Miami: Henne 21-34-0-182. Buffalo: T.Edwards 18-34-0-139. RECEIVING—Miami: Marshall 8-53, Bess 6-51, Fasano 3-46, Brown 2-20, Polite 2-12. Buffalo: Evans 4-34, Spiller 4-8, St.Johnson 340, Nelson 3-22, Parrish 2-35, Jackson 2-0. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Miami: D.Carpenter 46 (WR). Buffalo: Lindell 63 (SH). ——— TITANS 38, RAIDERS 13 Oakland 3 3 0 7 — 13 Tennessee 10 14 7 7 — 38 First Quarter Oak—FG Janikowski 34, 6:17. Ten—Washington 56 pass from Young (Bironas kick), 4:39. Ten—FG Bironas 43, 1:39. Second Quarter Ten—Ringer 15 run (Bironas kick), 3:45. Ten—C.Johnson 76 run (Bironas kick), 1:43. Oak—FG Janikowski 30, :16. Third Quarter Ten—C.Johnson 4 run (Bironas kick), 1:47. Fourth Quarter Ten—Scaife 1 pass from Young (Bironas kick), 14:55. Oak—D.McFadden 7 pass from J.Campbell (Janikowski kick), 9:58. A—69,143. Oak Ten First downs 21 17 Total Net Yards 286 345 Rushes-yards 25-135 39-205 Passing 151 140 Punt Returns 3-22 3-21 Kickoff Returns 5-105 3-70 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 1-32 Comp-Att-Int 23-38-1 13-17-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 4-30 2-14 Punts 4-54.8 4-50.0 Fumbles-Lost 4-1 2-1 Penalties-Yards 10-77 8-81 Time of Possession 28:56 31:04 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Oakland: D.McFadden 1895, J.Campbell 6-34, Bennett 1-6. Tennessee: C.Johnson 27-142, Ringer 5-33, Young 7-30. PASSING—Oakland: J.Campbell 22-371-180, Higgins 1-1-0-1. Tennessee: Young 13-17-0-154. RECEIVING—Oakland: D.McFadden 6-55, Z.Miller 4-43, Murphy 4-28, Figurs 2-17, Bennett 2-9, Heyward-Bey 1-11, Cartwright 1-10, Myers 1-5, Higgins 1-2, J.Campbell 1-1. Tennessee: C.Johnson 4-8, Washington 3-88, Scaife 3-37, Stevens 2-18, Hall 1-3. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Oakland: Janikowski 53 (WR). ——— REDSKINS 13, COWBOYS 7 Dallas 0 0 7 0 — 7 Washington 3 7 0 3 — 13 First Quarter Was—FG Gano 29, 4:25. Second Quarter Was—Hall 32 fumble return (Gano kick), :00. Third Quarter Dal—Austin 4 pass from Romo (Buehler kick), 1:41. Fourth Quarter Was—FG Gano 49, 1:50. A—90,670. Dal Was First downs 24 17 Total Net Yards 380 250 Rushes-yards 22-103 23-89 Passing 277 161 Punt Returns 1-11 0-0 Kickoff Returns 3-50 2-76 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 0-0 Comp-Att-Int 31-48-0 15-32-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-5 1-10 Punts 6-40.7 6-41.2 Fumbles-Lost 1-1 2-0 Penalties-Yards 12-91 5-42 Time of Possession 34:03 25:57 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—Dallas: Barber 8-39, Jones 8-38, Choice 5-18, Gronkowski 1-8. Washington: Portis 18-63, McNabb 1-17, Johnson 3-9, Bidwell 1-0. PASSING—Dallas: Romo 31-47-0-282, Barber 0-1-0-0. Washington: McNabb 15-320-171. RECEIVING—Dallas: Austin 10-146, Bryant 8-56, Witten 3-27, R.Williams 3-21, Jones 2-26, Barber 2-1, Choice 2-(minus 2), Bennett 1-7. Washington: Cooley 6-80, Moss 6-77, Armstrong 1-11, Sellers 1-2, Portis 1-1. MISSED FIELD GOALS—Dallas: Buehler 34 (WR).


D4 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Snider lf Totals

AL ROUNDUP Rangers 4, Yankees 1 ARLINGTON, Texas — Cliff Lee allowed two hits while pitching into the ninth inning in his return from a back injury and Julio Borbon beat out a drag bunt for a goahead single, carrying Texas Rangers a victory over New York and a sweep of the series between division leaders. Lee (11-8) didn’t give up a hit for 5 1⁄3 innings, facing the minimum in that stretch. Both hits and the lone run came in the sixth inning. New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Thames dh a-Berkman ph Cano 2b Posada c Kearns lf E.Nunez 3b Golson rf Totals

AB 2 3 4 3 1 3 3 3 3 3 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

H BI BB 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 3

SO 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 8

Avg. .261 .245 .261 .306 .290 .316 .258 .265 .304 .273

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Dav.Murphy lf Guerrero dh N.Cruz rf Kinsler 2b Moreland 1b C.Davis 1b Treanor c Borbon cf Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 2 3 1 4 3 32

R 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4

H BI BB 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 7 4 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

Avg. .273 .286 .283 .305 .314 .294 .255 .186 .220 .273

New York 000 001 000 — 1 2 0 Texas 000 001 30x — 4 7 0 LOB—New York 3, Texas 7. 2B—Jeter (27), Guerrero (25). RBIs—Jeter (61), Andrus (35), M.Young (79), Dav. Murphy (52), Borbon (36). SB—Andrus (30), Kinsler (13), Borbon (12). Runners left in scoring position—New York 2 (Teixeira, Berkman); Texas 4 (Moreland, Kinsler, Guerrero, Treanor). Runners moved up—Golson, M.Young, N.Cruz, Moreland, Treanor. GIDP—Granderson. DP—Texas 1 (Cl.Lee, Andrus, Moreland). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moseley L, 4-3 6 2-3 5 4 4 2 1 98 4.89 Albaladejo 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 26 1.59 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee W, 11-8 8 2 1 1 3 5 109 3.28 N.Feliz S, 36-39 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 3.05 Cl.Lee pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Albaladejo 1-1, N.Feliz 1-0. T—2:40. A—42,007 (49,170).

Red Sox 5, Athletics 3 OAKLAND, Calif. — Pinch-hitter Ryan Kalish hit a go-ahead two-run single in the sixth, J.D. Drew had a two-run double one batter earlier Boston rallied for a victory. Josh Beckett (5-4) settled down after a rocky start as Boston avoided its first sweep by the A’s since May 23-25, 2008. Boston AB Scutaro 2b 4 D.McDonald cf-lf 4 V.Martinez c 5 A.Beltre 3b 4 D.Ortiz dh 4 Lowell 1b 2 1-Reddick pr-rf 0 J.Drew rf 3 2-L.Anderson pr-1b0 Hall lf 2 a-Kalish ph-cf 2 Y.Navarro ss 2 b-Lowrie ph-ss 2 Totals 34

R 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 5

SO 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .274 .274 .292 .326 .260 .223 .257 .257 .222 .237 .252 .091 .250

Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b K.Suzuki c Cust dh M.Ellis 2b Hermida rf R.Davis lf Tolleson 3b Pennington ss Totals

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 5 3 5 11

Avg. .273 .280 .245 .278 .274 .197 .269 .289 .249

AB 3 4 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 32

Boston 000 004 010 — 5 9 0 Oakland 001 020 000 — 3 5 1 a-singled for Hall in the 6th. b-lined out for Y.Navarro in the 6th. 1-ran for Lowell in the 8th. 2-ran for J.Drew in the 8th. E—Blevins (2). LOB—Boston 7, Oakland 8. 2B—A.Beltre (41), J.Drew (23), Cust (17), M.Ellis (19). 3B—Pennington (8). RBIs—J.Drew 2 (62), Kalish 2 (18), Cust (43), M.Ellis 2 (38). SB—Crisp 2 (30), M.Ellis (5). Runners left in scoring position—Boston 5 (A.Beltre 2, Lowrie 3); Oakland 7 (Tolleson 2, Hermida 3, Barton 2). Runners moved up—V.Martinez. GIDP—Lowell. DP—Oakland 1 (Braden, Pennington, Barton). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beckett W, 5-4 6 5 3 3 5 7 110 5.83 Atchison H, 7 2 0 0 0 0 1 29 3.62 Pplbn S, 36-43 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 3.30 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Braden L, 9-12 5 2-3 6 4 4 4 2 97 3.56 Rodriguez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.74 Wuertz 1 1 1 0 0 2 17 4.54 Blevins 1 1 0 0 1 1 15 3.80 Ziegler 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.04 Wuertz pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—H.Rodriguez 2-2, Blevins 1-1. HBP—by Beckett (K.Suzuki). T—2:59. A—19,806 (35,067).

Blue Jays 5, Rays 4 TORONTO — Adam Lind hit a two-run homer off Rafael Soriano in the ninth inning, giving the Blue Jays a victory. With Toronto trailing 43, Aaron Hill led off the ninth with a single off Soriano (2-2), who had converted his previous 19 save chances since July 20. After falling behind 0-2, in the count, Lind lined his 22nd home run of the season to right field. Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Bartlett ss S.Rodriguez 2b a-Crawford ph-lf Longoria 3b Baldelli dh Zobrist rf-2b D.Navarro c b-Shoppach ph-c Hawpe 1b C.Pena 1b Jennings lf-rf Totals

AB 4 5 3 1 3 4 3 3 1 3 0 4 34

R 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 8 3 3

SO 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 7

Avg. .238 .250 .256 .305 .296 .167 .252 .200 .185 .200 .202 .273

Toronto Wise rf Y.Escobar ss J.Bautista 3b V.Wells cf Overbay 1b A.Hill 2b Lind dh J.Buck c

AB 3 4 4 2 4 4 2 2

R 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 2 0 1 0

SO 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 2

Avg. .260 .289 .264 .271 .249 .214 .229 .273

3 0 28 5

0 5

0 4

0 5

0 .241 8

Tampa Bay 000 102 001 — 4 8 1 Toronto 000 300 002 — 5 5 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-popped out for S.Rodriguez in the 7th. b-grounded out for D.Navarro in the 9th. E—Niemann (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Toronto 5. 2B— Longoria (44), Zobrist 2 (23), J.Bautista (32). HR—Lind (22), off R.Soriano. RBIs—B.Upton (54), Zobrist 2 (69), A.Hill (60), Lind 2 (68), J.Buck (59). SB—B.Upton (40), Jennings (1). CS—V.Wells (4). SF—B.Upton, J.Buck. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6 (Hawpe 2, D.Navarro, Bartlett 2, Crawford); Toronto 2 (Lind, Wise). DP—Tampa Bay 1 (D.Navarro, D.Navarro, Bartlett). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann 5 2 3 3 4 5 73 4.32 Choate 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 18 4.61 Balfour 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.51 Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 1.55 Soriano L, 2-2 0 2 2 2 0 0 5 1.95 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum 6 6 3 3 2 6 107 3.58 Carlson 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 3.86 Frasor 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.07 S.Downs 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 17 2.63 Gregg W, 2-5 1 1 1 1 1 0 20 3.29 Carlson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. R.Soriano pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Balfour 1-0, Frasor 1-0, S.Downs 1-0. WP—Niemann, Marcum, Frasor. PB—J.Buck. T—3:02. A—14,658 (49,539).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Tampa Bay Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Division Minnesota Chicago Detroit Kansas City Cleveland West Division Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 87 86 79 73 55 W 85 79 72 58 58 W 80 71 70 55

L 56 56 64 70 88 L 58 64 72 84 85 L 63 71 73 88

Pct .608 .606 .552 .510 .385 Pct .594 .552 .500 .408 .406 Pct .559 .500 .490 .385

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — ½ 8 14 32 GB — 6 13½ 26½ 27 GB — 8½ 10 25

Sunday’s Games Detroit 6, Baltimore 2 Minnesota 6, Cleveland 2 Toronto 5, Tampa Bay 4 Chicago White Sox 12, Kansas City 6 Texas 4, N.Y. Yankees 1 L.A. Angels 3, Seattle 0 Boston 5, Oakland 3

WCGB — — 7½ 13½ 31½ WCGB — 7½ 15 28 28½ WCGB — 15 16½ 31½

L10 4-6 5-5 4-6 4-6 6-4 L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 2-8 5-5 L10 5-5 6-4 6-4 3-7

Str L-3 L-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-2 W-1 W-1 L-1 L-2 Str W-5 L-1 W-4 L-4

Home 49-25 43-26 42-30 39-33 30-41 Home 48-23 40-28 47-28 31-37 30-41 Home 46-26 44-30 38-34 33-38

Away 38-31 43-30 37-34 34-37 25-47 Away 37-35 39-36 25-44 27-47 28-44 Away 34-37 27-41 32-39 22-50

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta Florida New York Washington Central Division Cincinnati St. Louis Houston Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh West Division San Diego San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles Arizona

Today’s Games Oakland (Cramer 0-0) at Kansas City (Hochevar 5-4), 12:10 p.m. Toronto (Rzepczynski 1-4) at Baltimore (Matusz 8-12), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 19-6) at Tampa Bay (Price 17-6), 4:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 16-8) at Seattle (Fister 511), 7:10 p.m.

W 83 82 73 70 60 W 81 74 68 66 62 48 W 80 81 79 71 57

L 61 62 69 73 83 L 62 67 75 76 81 94 L 62 63 64 73 86

Pct .576 .569 .514 .490 .420 Pct .566 .525 .476 .465 .434 .338 Pct .563 .563 .552 .493 .399

GB — 1 9 12½ 22½ GB — 6 13 14½ 19 32½ GB — — 1½ 10 23½

Sunday’s Games Philadelphia 3, N.Y. Mets 0 Pittsburgh 3, Cincinnati 1 Florida 6, Washington 5 Houston 7, L.A. Dodgers 4 Milwaukee 2, Chicago Cubs 0 Colorado 4, Arizona 2 San Francisco 6, San Diego 1 St. Louis 7, Atlanta 3

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Kubel rf Repko rf Cuddyer 1b Thome dh Delm.Young lf Valencia 3b A.Casilla ss Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 0 4 4 3 4 3 33

R 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 5 1

SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 7

Avg. .264 .278 .324 .256 .206 .273 .277 .297 .329 .267

Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf Hafner dh J.Nix 3b J.Brown lf LaPorta 1b Valbuena 2b a-Duncan ph Gimenez c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 4 36

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 9 2 0 10

Avg. .236 .271 .287 .274 .238 .246 .223 .179 .228 .204

Minnesota 500 001 000 — 6 7 1 Cleveland 020 000 000 — 2 9 1 a-grounded out for Valbuena in the 9th. E—A.Casilla (4), Valbuena (9). LOB—Minnesota 2, Cleveland 7. 2B—Kubel (21), Hafner (26), Valbuena (8). RBIs—Mauer (71), Cuddyer (72), Thome (54), Delm. Young (98), Valencia (27), Valbuena 2 (21). SB—Span (22). SF—Delm.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (A.Casilla, Valencia); Cleveland 4 (Gimenez, Hafner 2, J.Brown). Runners moved up—LaPorta. GIDP—Delm.Young. DP—Cleveland 1 (J.Nix, Valbuena, LaPorta). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slowey W, 12-6 5 6 2 0 0 5 88 4.24 Perkins 2 2 0 0 0 3 30 6.92 Mijares 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 2.77 Rauch 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.44 Fuentes 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 3.40 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Talbot L, 9-12 0 2 3 3 1 0 14 4.58 Masterson 7 5 3 1 0 6 98 4.73 J.Lewis 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 3.81 J.Smith 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.59 Talbot pitched to 3 batters in the 1st. Inherited runners-scored—Rauch 1-0, Masterson 22. WP—Masterson. T—2:33. A—22,988 (45,569).

Angels 3, Mariners 0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Dan Haren held Seattle to three singles over seven innings, Mike Napoli homered and the Angels scored another run on a catcher’s interference call with the bases loaded to complete a sweep of Seattle. The Angels, who are in third place in the AL West after winning three straight division titles, won the season series 14-5. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Branyan dh 1-M.Saunders pr F.Gutierrez cf Kotchman 1b Jo.Lopez 3b Langerhans lf J.Bard c Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 0 4 3 2 3 4 4 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 5

SO 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 9

Avg. .312 .249 .240 .212 .247 .225 .235 .174 .213 .247

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b Tor.Hunter rf Napoli 1b J.Rivera lf Willits lf H.Matsui dh Bo.Wilson c Br.Wood 3b Bourjos cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 0 3 3 3 3 31

R 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 3 1

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 5

Avg. .257 .272 .289 .247 .245 .277 .268 .205 .160 .204

Seattle 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Los Angeles 100 001 01x — 3 8 1 1-ran for Branyan in the 8th. E—J.Bard (2), Napoli (12). LOB—Seattle 9, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Napoli (24), Bourjos (5). HR—Napoli (24), off Rowland-Smith. RBIs—Napoli (65), J.Rivera (45), H.Matsui (76). SB—I.Suzuki (37). CS—Figgins (12). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 4 (J.Bard 2, Kotchman, Jo.Wilson); Los Angeles 3 (Bo.Wilson 2, H.Kendrick). Runners moved up—Langerhans. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Vargas L, 9-10 7 7 2 1 1 4 111 Rowland-Smith 1 1 1 1 0 1 13 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Haren W, 3-4 7 3 0 0 3 6 106 Walden H, 3 1 1 0 0 1 2 19 Rodny S, 10-15 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 WP—Haren. Catchers’ interference—J.Bard. T—2:27. A—42,357 (45,285).

ERA 3.62 6.88 ERA 3.04 2.25 4.20

White Sox 12, Royals 6 CHICAGO — Paul Konerko had a pair of tworun homers and an RBI single and pinch-hitter Andruw Jones hit a grand slam in a six-run sixth inning, leading the White Sox over the Royals. Kansas City led 6-0 after a half inning, but Konerko lined a run-scoring single to left to give Chicago its first

lead of the game in the sixth. Kansas City AB G.Blanco cf 4 Dyson cf 1 Maier rf 3 e-Bloomquist ph-rf 1 B.Butler dh 4 Ka’aihue 1b 4 Betemit 3b 5 Gordon lf 3 B.Pena c 3 b-May ph-c 2 Getz 2b 2 1-Aviles pr-2b 2 Y.Betancourt ss 4 Totals 38

R H 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 6 14

BI 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 7

SO 1 1 0 0 0 3 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 10

Avg. .257 .000 .263 .265 .312 .204 .303 .243 .264 .111 .237 .289 .258

Chicago AB Pierre lf 4 Vizquel 3b 3 c-Morel ph-3b 1 Rios cf 4 d-De Aza ph-rf 1 Konerko 1b 4 f-Viciedo ph-1b 1 Man.Ramirez dh 3 g-Lillibridge ph-dh 1 Pierzynski c 3 h-Flowers ph-c 1 Teahen rf 3 a-An.Jones ph-rf-cf 1 Al.Ramirez ss 4 Beckham 2b 3 Totals 37

R 1 1 0 2 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 12

BI 1 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 11

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .273 .288 .143 .291 .000 .322 .262 .294 .274 .268 .000 .260 .228 .280 .254

H 1 1 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 14

Kansas City 600 000 000 — 6 14 0 Chicago 202 206 00x — 12 14 0 a-homered for Teahen in the 6th. b-grounded out for B.Pena in the 7th. c-lined out for Vizquel in the 7th. d-flied out for Rios in the 7th. e-grounded out for Maier in the 8th. f-struck out for Konerko in the 8th. h-struck out for Pierzynski in the 8th. 1-ran for Getz in the 5th. LOB—Kansas City 12, Chicago 6. 2B—G.Blanco (6), B.Butler (39). HR—B.Butler (12), off Harrell; B.Pena (1), off Harrell; Konerko 2 (36), off O’Sullivan 2; An.Jones (19), off Bl.Wood. RBIs—B.Butler 3 (67), B.Pena 3 (17), Pierre (39), Konerko 5 (104), Pierzynski (52), An.Jones 4 (46). SB—Getz (15), Pierre (55). CS—Gordon (5). SF—Pierre. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 8 (Ka’aihue 2, Y.Betancourt 3, Betemit 2, G.Blanco); Chicago 4 (Pierzynski, Konerko 2, Beckham). GIDP—B.Butler, Betemit. DP—Chicago 2 (Vizquel, Beckham, Konerko), (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA O’Sullivan 3 8 6 5 1 3 75 6.28 Humber L, 1-1 2 1-3 5 4 4 1 0 49 4.50 D.Hughes 0 0 1 1 1 0 5 4.41 Bl.Wood 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 11 5.27 J.Chavez 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 7.23 G.Holland 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 6.91 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrell 3 1-3 9 6 6 3 1 86 4.50 Linebrink 1 1-3 2 0 0 2 1 31 4.32 S.Santos W, 2-0 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 3 21 2.14 Putz 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 2.57 Thornton 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 2.50 Sale 1 1 0 0 1 2 20 0.57 O’Sullivan pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. D.Hughes pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Humber 3-2, D.Hughes 31, Bl.Wood 3-3, Linebrink 2-0, S.Santos 2-0. HBP—by Humber (Man.Ramirez). WP—O’Sullivan, Linebrink. PB—B.Pena. T—3:26. A—23,756 (40,615).

Tigers 6, Orioles 2

roughed up San Diego ace Mat Latos and cut the struggling Padres’ lead to less than one percentage point atop the NL West. The Giants won three of four games after having lost nine of their first 11 against the Padres this year. San Francisco Rowand cf F.Sanchez 2b Fontenot 2b A.Huff 1b Posey c J.Guillen rf Romo p c-Renteria ph Affeldt p Br.Wilson p Burrell lf 1-C.Ross pr-lf Sandoval 3b Uribe ss Lincecum p Schierholtz rf Totals

AB 5 4 1 5 4 3 0 1 0 0 4 0 3 4 2 1 37

San Diego AB Durango cf 4 f-Hairston ph 0 g-Stairs ph 1 Eckstein 2b 4 M.Tejada ss 3 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 Torrealba c 4 Headley 3b 4 Ludwick rf 3 Venable lf 3 d-Hairston Jr. ph 1 Latos p 1 Mujica p 0 a-Baxter ph 1 A.Russell p 0 b-Salazar ph 1 Frieri p 0 C.Ramos p 0 e-Cunningham ph 1 Totals 35

R H 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 6 11 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 3

SO 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 10

Avg. .231 .286 .284 .294 .324 .284 .000 .273 .000 .000 .272 .261 .267 .251 .111 .256

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 1 1 11

Avg. .286 .217 .217 .269 .248 .305 .286 .266 .258 .227 .249 .125 --.000 --.227 .000 --.304

San Francisco 201 200 010 — 6 11 0 San Diego 000 010 000 — 1 9 1 a-fouled out for Mujica in the 5th. b-flied out for A.Russell in the 7th. c-struck out for Romo in the 9th. dpopped out for Venable in the 9th. e-singled for C.Ramos in the 9th. f-was announced for Durango in the 9th. gstruck out for Hairston in the 9th. 1-ran for Burrell in the 8th. E—Durango (1). LOB—San Francisco 8, San Diego 9. 2B—Burrell (14), Uribe (22). 3B—Venable (6). HR— Posey (13), off Latos. RBIs—Posey 2 (59), J.Guillen (7), Lincecum 2 (5), Eckstein (25). SF—J.Guillen. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 3 (Rowand, Renteria 2); San Diego 5 (Eckstein 2, Ludwick, Stairs 2). Runners moved up—Rowand, Sandoval, Durango. GIDP—Ad.Gonzalez. DP—San Francisco 1 (Uribe, A.Huff). S. Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincm W, 14-9 7 7 1 1 1 9 109 3.60 Romo 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.44 Affeldt 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 11 4.27 Br.Wilson 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 1.79 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos L, 14-6 4 7 5 5 2 4 86 2.43 Mujica 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 3.09 A.Russell 2 0 0 0 0 2 27 2.77 Frieri 1 2 1 0 0 0 18 2.22 C.Ramos 1 2 0 0 1 2 35 14.85 Inherited runners-scored—Br.Wilson 2-0. HBP—by Lincecum (M.Tejada). T—2:54. A—33,876 (42,691).

DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera hit a bases-loaded double in a five-run eighth inning that backed Justin Verlander’s 16th win, and Detroit got back to .500.

Cardinals 7, Braves 3

Baltimore AB R B.Roberts 2b 3 0 Wigginton 3b 4 0 Markakis rf 4 0 Scott dh 3 0 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 Pie lf 4 1 J.Fox c 3 1 Andino ss 3 0 Bran.Snyder 1b 3 0 Totals 31 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 5 1 2 12

Avg. .282 .249 .288 .280 .281 .277 .225 .143 .000

ATLANTA — Albert Pujols hit two home runs to power St. Louis past Atlanta, dropping the Braves out of first place in the NL East. The Braves fell one game behind first-place Philadelphia in the division.

Detroit AB Rhymes 2b 3 Raburn rf-lf 4 Kelly lf 3 a-A.Jackson ph-cf 0 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 Jh.Peralta ss 4 Boesch dh 1 Inge 3b 4 C.Wells cf-rf 2 Avila c 3 Totals 28

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 5 6 7

Avg. .303 .271 .245 .305 .335 .254 .262 .254 .308 .212

St. Louis Schumaker 2b Jay rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf Y.Molina c P.Feliz 3b Hawksworth p b-Winn ph Salas p Lohse p F.Lopez 3b B.Ryan ss Totals

R 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 6

SO 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 5

Baltimore 000 020 000 — 2 5 0 Detroit 010 000 05x — 6 5 0 a-walked for Kelly in the 8th. LOB—Baltimore 4, Detroit 5. 2B—Raburn (22), Mi.Cabrera (44). 3B—J.Fox (1). HR—Inge (11), off Simon. RBIs—J.Fox (22), Mi.Cabrera 3 (116), Inge 2 (63), C.Wells (11). SB—B.Roberts (9), Pie (5), Boesch 2 (6). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (Ad. Jones 2, Bran.Snyder); Detroit 1 (Avila). Runners moved up—Inge. GIDP—Ad.Jones, Avila. DP—Baltimore 1 (B.Roberts, Andino, Bran.Snyder); Detroit 1 (Inge, Rhymes, Mi.Cabrera). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tillman 6 2-3 1 1 1 6 4 107 6.32 Gonzalez L, 0-3 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 10 5.50 Hernandez 2-3 1 2 2 1 1 23 4.67 Simon 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 9 4.98 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Verlndr W, 16-8 8 5 2 2 1 11 122 3.48 Coke 1 0 0 0 1 1 12 2.88 M.Gonzalez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—M.Gonzalez 2-0, Da.Hernandez 2-2, Simon 1-1. WP—Verlander. Balk— Verlander. T—2:44. A—24,170 (41,255).

NL ROUNDUP Giants 6, Padres 1 SAN DIEGO — Tim Lincecum won his third straight start following a career-high five-game losing streak and had a two-run single as San Francisco

AB 5 5 5 3 5 2 3 0 1 0 2 2 5 38

R H 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 7 13

BI 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 7

BB 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 2 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .273 .313 .309 .307 .272 .253 .219 .000 .258 --.214 .234 .226

Atlanta AB R H O.Infante 2b 5 0 2 Heyward rf 3 1 2 Prado 3b 5 0 1 McCann c 4 0 1 D.Ross c 0 0 0 D.Lee 1b 3 0 0 Freeman 1b 1 0 0 McLouth cf 4 2 2 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 3 Me.Cabrera lf 4 0 0 T.Hudson p 2 0 0 Moylan p 0 0 0 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 Proctor p 0 0 0 a-Hinske ph 1 0 0 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 C.Martinez p 0 0 0 c-Glaus ph 1 0 0 Totals 37 3 11

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .342 .289 .315 .276 .281 .253 .077 .189 .274 .255 .203 --.000 --.251 ----.000 .240

St. Louis 101 041 000 — 7 13 0 Atlanta 001 001 010 — 3 11 1 a-flied out for Proctor in the 6th. b-lined into a double play for Hawksworth in the 9th. c-struck out for C.Martinez in the 9th. E—O.Infante (15). LOB—St. Louis 11, Atlanta 9. 2B—Rasmus (25), Heyward 2 (29), McLouth (10), Ale. Gonzalez (13). 3B—B.Ryan (3). HR—Pujols 2 (39), off T.Hudson 2; McLouth (5), off Hawksworth. RBIs—Pujols 2 (104), Rasmus (60), Y.Molina (54), Lohse (3), B.Ryan 2 (31), Prado (65), McLouth (21), Ale.Gonzalez (31). SB—B.Ryan (9). CS—Schumaker (3). S—Lohse. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 6 (Y.Molina, Schumaker 2, P.Feliz 2, Jay); Atlanta 5 (McCann 2, D.Lee, T.Hudson, Prado).

L10 7-3 4-6 6-4 5-5 3-7 L10 3-7 5-5 6-4 4-6 6-4 4-6 L10 4-6 7-3 10-0 3-7 3-7

Str W-1 L-1 W-3 L-1 L-5 Str L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-1 W-1 Str L-1 W-1 W-10 L-1 L-3

Home 45-27 51-21 35-33 40-27 35-36 Home 43-28 43-24 37-35 36-38 33-42 33-39 Home 42-32 42-27 50-22 41-31 35-40

Away 38-34 31-41 38-36 30-46 25-47 Away 38-34 31-43 31-40 30-38 29-39 15-55 Away 38-30 39-36 29-42 30-42 22-46

Today’s Games Arizona (Enright 6-3) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 14-10), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 6-6) at Florida (A.Miller 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 3-5) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 1-0), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Maya 0-1) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 12-12), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 11-7) at Houston (Myers 11-7), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Silva 10-6) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 13-7), 5:15 p.m. San Diego (Luebke 1-1) at Colorado (Francis 4-4), 5:40 p.m.

Twins 6, Indians 2 CLEVELAND — Kevin Slowey earned his first win in nearly a month and the Twins won their 4,000th game since the franchise moved to Minnesota. Slowey (12-6) gave up two runs over five innings in his second start since being sidelined with a strained right triceps.

WCGB — — 8 11½ 21½ WCGB — 6½ 13½ 15 19½ 33 WCGB — 1 2½ 11 24½

Runners moved up—Schumaker, P.Feliz, B.Ryan. GIDP—P.Feliz, Prado. DP—St. Louis 1 (Lohse, B.Ryan, Pujols); Atlanta 3 (McCann, McCann, Ale.Gonzalez), (Prado, D.Lee), (Freeman). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse W, 3-7 5 1-3 9 2 2 1 1 92 6.85 Hawksworth 2 2-3 1 1 1 0 2 27 4.90 Salas 1 1 0 0 1 1 25 1.90 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson L, 15-8 5 9 6 6 2 5 103 2.62 Moylan 1-3 1 1 1 1 1 16 3.20 M.Dunn 0 1 0 0 1 0 7 0.00 Proctor 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 6.75 O’Flaherty 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.38 Kimbrel 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.73 C.Martinez 1 1 0 0 1 0 19 3.80 M.Dunn pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Hawksworth 1-0, M.Dunn 2-1, Proctor 3-0. IBB—off M.Dunn (Y.Molina). HBP—by T.Hudson (Y.Molina). WP—T.Hudson. T—3:15. A—27,156 (49,743).

Rockies 4, Diamondbacks 2 DENVER — Pinch-hitter Jason Giambi hit a two-run homer off Sam Demel (1-1) with two outs in the ninth, giving Colorado its 10th straight win. Jonathan Herrera started the rally when he reached on an error by second baseman Kelly Johnson. Colorado’s winning streak is the longest in the NL this season and one game short of the major league best shared by the Chicago White Sox and Texas. Arizona S.Drew ss C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b Ad.LaRoche 1b Montero c Mar.Reynolds 3b Boyer p Heilman p Demel p Allen lf G.Parra rf I.Kennedy p T.Abreu 3b Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 3 4 0 0 0 3 3 3 1 33

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

Colorado AB R E.Young 2b 3 0 Barmes 2b 1 0 Fowler cf 4 0 b-Giambi ph 1 1 C.Gonzalez lf 3 0 Tulowitzki ss 4 0 Helton 1b 1 1 Mora 3b 4 0 Street p 0 0 S.Smith rf 4 0 Iannetta c 0 0 Olivo c 3 1 J.Chacin p 1 0 E.Rogers p 1 0 Beimel p 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 a-Spilborghs ph 1 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 J.Herrera 3b 1 1 Totals 32 4

H BI BB SO 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 2 5 12

Avg. .273 .262 .273 .264 .281 .206 .000 .000 --.263 .250 .208 .243

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 6

Avg. .277 .233 .249 .259 .337 .323 .249 .274 .000 .255 .210 .278 .088 .188 .000 .250 .282 --.281

SO 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Arizona 002 000 000 — 2 8 1 Colorado 000 000 202 — 4 6 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-doubled for Belisle in the 7th. b-homered for Fowler in the 9th. E—K.Johnson (7), J.Chacin (1). LOB—Arizona 11, Colorado 8. 2B—Montero (18), C.Gonzalez (31), Spilborghs (20). HR—Giambi (6), off Demel. RBIs— Ad.LaRoche (91), Montero (40), Giambi 2 (32), Spilborghs 2 (33). CS—E.Young (5). S—G.Parra. SF—Ad.LaRoche. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 6 (Mar. Reynolds 2, K.Johnson 3, S.Drew); Colorado 6 (Mora 2, Tulowitzki, Fowler, S.Smith 2). Runners moved up—Mora. GIDP—C.Young. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, E.Young, Helton). Arizona IP H R ER BB I.Kennedy 6 2 0 0 3 Boyer BS, 3-3 2-3 2 2 2 2 Heilman 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 Demel L, 1-1 2-3 1 2 0 0 Colorado IP H R ER BB J.Chacin 4 5 2 0 4 E.Rogers 2 3 0 0 0 Beimel 2-3 0 0 0 0 Belisle 1-3 0 0 0 0 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 1 Street W, 3-4 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Heilman Heilman (Helton). WP—Heilman. T—3:06. A—41,504 (50,449).

SO NP ERA 6 82 3.87 1 22 4.33 1 27 4.27 1 15 5.46 SO NP ERA 4 84 3.53 4 31 5.04 0 8 3.21 1 6 2.70 1 16 3.83 2 11 3.57 2-0. IBB—off

Marlins 6, Nationals 5 WASHINGTON — Mike Stanton homered twice off Jordan Zimmermann (0-1) and drove in three runs as Florida completed a threegame sweep. Florida Bonifacio 3b Morrison lf H.Ramirez ss Uggla 2b Tracy 1b Stanton rf Maybin cf Ohman p Veras p d-Helms ph Hensley p Mi.Rivera c Volstad p Badenhop p b-Luna ph Sanches p Cousins cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 4 1 0 1 0 2 37

R H 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 11

Washington Desmond ss A.Kennedy 2b Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b Bernadina lf

AB 5 4 4 2 4

R 1 0 1 1 1

BI 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 7

Avg. .320 .303 .301 .280 .250 .251 .238 ----.235 .000 .000 .089 .000 .100 --.400

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 0

SO 1 0 1 0 2

Avg. .281 .248 .301 .265 .261

Morse rf Jo.Peralta p S.Burnett p c-Espinosa ph Storen p Morgan cf I.Rodriguez c Zimmermann p Batista p a-Mench ph Balester p W.Harris rf Totals

1 0 0 1 0 3 4 1 0 1 0 2 32

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 5

2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 7

.300 .000 --.300 .500 .257 .269 .000 .125 .176 --.188

Florida 032 100 000 — 6 11 1 Washington 021 110 000 — 5 8 2 a-grounded out for Batista in the 4th. b-struck out for Badenhop in the 6th. c-grounded out for S.Burnett in the 8th. d-popped out for Veras in the 9th. E—Mi.Rivera (1), Desmond (32), Zimmermann (1). LOB—Florida 12, Washington 5. 2B—Uggla (27). HR— Stanton 2 (20), off Zimmermann 2. RBIs—Bonifacio (9), Uggla (90), Stanton 3 (49), Zimmerman (83), Bernadina (43), I.Rodriguez 3 (47). SB—Bonifacio (9), H.Ramirez (32), Desmond (15), Bernadina (15). CS—Stanton (1). S—Volstad, Morgan. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 6 (Tracy 2, H.Ramirez 2, Cousins 2); Washington 4 (Zimmermann, Mench, Morgan 2). Runners moved up—Uggla, Stanton, Mi.Rivera, I.Rodriguez. GIDP—A.Dunn, Zimmermann. DP—Florida 2 (Uggla, H.Ramirez, Tracy), (Bonifacio, Tracy). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad 4 2-3 8 5 4 3 1 89 5.05 Bdenhop W, 3-5 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.86 Sanches H, 11 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 4 23 2.58 Ohman H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.38 Veras H, 16 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.88 Hensley S, 3-6 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.42 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zimrman L, 0-1 3 5 5 4 3 1 80 5.29 Batista 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 4.06 Balester 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 23 2.77 Jo.Peralta 2 0 0 0 1 1 32 2.13 S.Burnett 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 18 2.58 Storen 1 1 0 0 1 1 28 3.17 Inherited runners-scored—Badenhop 2-0, Jo.Peralta 1-0. HBP—by Storen (Tracy). T—3:41. A—16,788 (41,546).

Astros 7, Dodgers 4 HOUSTON — Hunter Pence had his team-leading 24th homer among his three hits, and Carlos Lee hit his 21st homer as the Astros earned a split of the four-game series. Gustavo Chacin (2-2) escaped a bases-loaded jam with two outs in the fifth to keep the score tied 4-all. He and five other relievers combined for 4 1⁄3 innings of two-hit ball. Brandon Lyon pitched a hitless ninth for his 15th save. Los Angeles AB Oeltjen cf 2 d-Kemp ph 1 Dotel p 0 Theriot 2b 3 Ethier rf 3 Gibbons lf 4 Loney 1b 3 Mitchell 3b 3 Hu ss 4 Ausmus c 4 Monasterios p 0 Jef.Weaver p 1 Belisario p 0 a-Lindsey ph 1 Troncoso p 0 c-Re.Johnson ph-cf2 Totals 31

R 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 4 3

Houston AB R H Bourn cf 4 1 1 Ang.Sanchez 2b 5 0 2 Pence rf 4 1 3 Ca.Lee lf 5 2 2 Lyon p 0 0 0 M.Downs 3b 5 1 0 Wallace 1b 3 1 2 Manzella ss 4 0 1 Ja.Castro c 4 1 2 Figueroa p 2 0 0 G.Chacin p 0 0 0 b-Blum ph 1 0 1 Byrdak p 0 0 0 Fulchino p 0 0 0 Abad p 1 0 0 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 Bourgeois lf 0 0 0 Totals 38 7 14

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .167 .251 .000 .277 .288 .349 .278 .000 .000 .203 .083 .200 --.167 .000 .287

SO 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .263 .284 .288 .243 --.239 .224 .221 .219 .167 1.000 .251 .000 .000 .000 --.233

Los Angeles 000 400 000 — 4 7 1 Houston 400 020 01x — 7 14 0 a-singled for Belisario in the 5th. b-doubled for G.Chacin in the 5th. c-singled for Troncoso in the 7th. d-flied out for Oeltjen in the 7th. E—Hu (1). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Houston 10. 2B—Loney (40), Wallace (5), Ja.Castro (7), Blum (10). 3B—Loney (2). HR—Gibbons (5), off Figueroa; Pence (24), off Monasterios; Ca.Lee (21), off Dotel. RBIs—Gibbons 3 (15), Mitchell (1), Pence 2 (84), Ca.Lee (83), Wallace 2 (10), Ja.Castro (7), Blum (18). SB—Bourn 2 (49). S—Oeltjen. SF—Mitchell. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Gibbons 2, Ausmus); Houston 6 (Figueroa, M.Downs, Ca.Lee, Bourn, Manzella 2). Runners moved up—M.Downs. GIDP—Mitchell, Ca.Lee. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Mitchell, Theriot, Loney); Houston 1 (M.Downs, Ang.Sanchez, Wallace). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Monasterios 1 1-3 5 4 3 2 2 61 4.29 Jef.Weaver 2 3 0 0 0 1 31 4.75 Belisario 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 5.33 Troncoso L, 1-3 2 5 2 2 1 0 37 4.84 Dotel 2 1 1 1 0 3 23 4.06 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Figueroa 4 2-3 5 4 4 2 4 68 3.34 Chacin W, 2-2 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 4.66 Byrdak 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.19 Fulchino H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 5.65 Abad H, 3 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 21 2.84 Lindstrom H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 3.72 Lyon S, 15-16 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 3.21 Byrdak pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Fulchino pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Jef.Weaver 2-0, Belisario 2-0, G.Chacin 2-0, Fulchino 1-0, Abad 1-0. IBB—off Troncoso (Wallace), off G.Chacin (Ethier). WP—G.Chacin. T—3:09. A—30,240 (40,976).

Phillies 3, Mets 0 NEW YORK — Roy Oswalt (12-13) pitched a four-hitter for his second complete game this season. Raul Ibanez hit a solo homer off Jon Niese (9-8), and Chase Utley and Ryan Howard had RBI singles for the Phillies (83-61), who nosed ahead of Atlanta (82-61) in the NL East by winning for the fifth time in six games. Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf C.Ruiz c W.Valdez ss Oswalt p Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 3

SO 0 0 0 2 3 2 0 1 0 8

Avg. .262 .303 .276 .281 .289 .266 .294 .244 .135

New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan rf Beltran cf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Carter lf Thole c Lu.Hernandez 2b

AB 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 1

Avg. .286 .289 .236 .289 .263 .259 .297 .250

a-J.Feliciano ph 1 Dessens p 0 Niese p 1 P.Feliciano p 0 Acosta p 0 b-Duda ph 1 R.Tejada 2b 0 Totals 29

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

.269 --.180 ----.034 .188

Philadelphia 101 000 100 — 3 9 0 New York 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-grounded out for Lu.Hernandez in the 8th. bgrounded out for Acosta in the 8th. LOB—Philadelphia 8, New York 3. 2B—Polanco (26), W.Valdez (11). HR—Ibanez (14), off Niese. RBIs— Utley (56), Howard (99), Ibanez (70). CS—Pagan (8). S—Oswalt. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (Ibanez, Polanco 3). Runners moved up—Utley. GIDP—Polanco, Howard, Pagan. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Oswalt, W.Valdez, Howard); New York 2 (D.Wright, Jos.Reyes, I.Davis), (Jos.Reyes, Lu.Hernandez, I.Davis). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO Oswlt W, 12-13 9 4 0 0 1 6 New York IP H R ER BB SO Niese L, 9-8 7 8 3 3 2 6 P.Feliciano 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Acosta 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Dessens 1 1 0 0 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Acosta 1-0. Dessens (Victorino), off Niese (Victorino). P.Feliciano (Utley). T—2:15. A—31,563 (41,800).

NP ERA 113 2.94 NP ERA 101 3.85 5 2.92 8 3.19 11 2.09 IBB—off HBP—by

Pirates 3, Reds 1 CINCINNATI — Andrew McCutchen hit a three-run double in the ninth off Francisco Cordero (6-5), who blew his second straight save chance. Chan Ho Park (1-1) allowed a walk in the eighth inning to get the win. Joel Hanrahan loaded the bases with two outs in the ninth before striking out Chris Heisey for his fifth save in nine tries. Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Presley rf N.Walker 2b Alvarez 3b Bowker 1b Doumit c 1-Ciriaco pr C.Snyder c Milledge lf Hanrahan p Cedeno ss c-G.Jones ph A.Diaz ss Burres p a-Delw.Young ph Park p d-Tabata ph-lf Totals

AB 5 4 2 4 3 4 0 0 4 0 3 1 0 2 1 0 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 1 3 0 1 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 4

SO 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .275 .333 .309 .237 .184 .255 1.000 .212 .278 --.243 .246 .233 .158 .240 --.309

Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Janish ss Votto 1b Gomes lf R.Hernandez c 2-Valaika pr Cairo 3b Stubbs cf Heisey rf Cueto p Ondrusek p Rhodes p b-J.Francisco ph F.Cordero p Totals

AB 4 4 0 4 4 2 0 4 3 4 2 0 0 0 0 31

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 1 3

SO 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .279 .263 .274 .320 .260 .310 .333 .288 .246 .247 .122 .000 --.314 .000

Pittsburgh 000 000 003 — 3 7 0 Cincinnati 000 100 000 — 1 5 0 a-fouled out for Burres in the 8th. b-walked for Rhodes in the 8th. c-singled for Cedeno in the 9th. d-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Park in the 9th. 1-ran for Doumit in the 9th. 2-ran for R.Hernandez in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 7. 2B—A.McCutchen (29), O.Cabrera (26), Votto (30). RBIs—A.McCutchen 3 (47), Votto (102). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 3 (Cedeno, Alvarez, Presley); Cincinnati 2 (Heisey 2). DP—Pittsburgh 1 (A.McCutchen, A.McCutchen, Alvarez). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Burres 7 4 1 1 1 6 Park W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 0 Hanrahan 1 1 0 0 1 2 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Cueto 7 3 0 0 2 7 Ondrusek H, 5 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Rhodes H, 24 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Cordero L, 6-5 1 3 3 3 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Rhodes 1-0. Hanrahan (R.Hernandez). T—3:00. A—26,617 (42,319).

NP ERA 107 5.22 16 3.78 26 3.59 NP ERA 124 3.31 11 4.32 10 2.09 30 4.04 HBP—by

Brewers 2, Cubs 0 MILWAUKEE — Yovani Gallardo (12-7) pitched fourhit ball for seven innings to win for the first time in seven starts since Aug. 8, and he doubled and scored on Ryan Braun’s fifth-inning double. Chicago DeWitt 2b S.Castro ss Fukudome rf Nady 1b Colvin cf Soto c A.Soriano lf Barney 3b c-Ar.Ramirez ph Coleman p a-Byrd ph Mateo p J.Russell p Diamond p d-M.Hoffpauir ph Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 4

SO 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .264 .312 .273 .253 .251 .278 .258 .279 .243 .071 .300 .000 .000 .000 .167

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b L.Cain cf A.Escobar ss Lucroy c Gallardo p b-Gamel ph Loe p Axford p Totals

AB 4 3 4 2 4 4 3 3 2 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 3

SO 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .263 .278 .303 .273 .284 .258 .246 .265 .268 .000 .000 ---

Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Milwaukee 000 010 01x — 2 6 0 a-grounded out for Coleman in the 7th. b-flied out for Gallardo in the 7th. c-grounded out for Barney in the 9th. d-struck out for Diamond in the 9th. E—S.Castro (25). LOB—Chicago 9, Milwaukee 7. 2B—Fukudome (18), Braun (36), Gallardo (4). HR—McGehee (21), off Diamond. RBIs—Braun (85), McGehee (93). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 5 (Nady 2, Coleman, Barney, M.Hoffpauir); Milwaukee 4 (Fielder, McGehee 3). GIDP—Fielder. DP—Chicago 1 (Nady, S.Castro, Coleman). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Coleman L, 1-2 6 5 1 1 3 3 Mateo 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 J.Russell 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Diamond 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO Glardo W, 12-7 7 4 0 0 3 6 Loe H, 18 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 Axford S, 21-23 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 Inherited runners-scored—Axford 1-0. Coleman (Fielder, Fielder). WP—Axford. T—2:32. A—37,317 (41,900).

NP ERA 91 5.11 15 7.63 4 5.32 4 7.50 NP ERA 108 3.64 17 2.77 19 2.28 IBB—off


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 D5

Experience

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Boise State takes day off, but gets stung by James Madison By Ralph D. Russo The Associated Press

Every game counts. That’s what the people who push the Bowl Championship Series like to tell college football fans — and they’re right. But is it really a good thing that James Madison’s upset of Virginia Tech in September could determine which teams play for the national championship in January? The big story While No. 3 Boise State had a week off to bask in the glow of its dramatic victory against Virginia Tech last Monday night in Landover, Md., the Broncos’ national title hopes were taking a beating in Blacksburg. James Madison, a very good FCS team that won a national title in 2004, pulled off the biggest upset of a Saturday filled with marquee games, knocking off the Hokies 21-16 at Lane Stadium. “It was like a dream come true when the clock hit zero,” cornerback Leavander Jones said. “It was like, ‘Oh my God, we did it!’ ” And back in Idaho, the Boise State Broncos and their fans must have had a similar reaction, just replace the joy with dismay. While James Madison provided further evidence of increased parity in college football, how the gap between the haves and the have nots is not as wide as it once was, the Dukes were undermining the team that has done more than any other to prove that point in recent seasons. Yes, the irony is James Madison hurt Boise State’s chances to play in the national championship game by taking the luster off what the Broncos figured would be their crowning achievement this season — a victory against a Virginia Tech team expected to be highly ranked. More than anything else, the Broncos’ strength of schedule has held them back as they’ve piled up victories and Western Athletic Conference championships over the last decade. Even with a victory against a top-notch Virginia Tech team, by the time this season is over, Boise State’s schedule won’t be nearly as tough as those played by teams such as Alabama and Ohio State. Fresno State, Nevada and Hawaii just don’t stack up to Florida, Auburn and LSU. Or Wisconsin, Penn State and Iowa. For Boise State to have any chance to reach the BCS championship game for the first time, the Broncos must have a better record than the champions from the Big Ten, Southeastern Conference, Big 12 and Pac-10. That was true even before Virginia Tech lost. If Boise State is the only undefeated team at the end of the regular season, or one of two without a loss, it has a shot. But even in that scenario, regularseason perfection might not be enough for Boise State — again. That’s where James Madison could impact the Broncos’ chances. There are still many who believe that if a team such as Alabama, Ohio State, Texas or Oregon finishes with one loss, it would deserve a spot in the title game over an unbeaten Boise State. Crimson Tide coach Nick Sa-

Don Petersen / The Associated Press

James Madison players, from left, Josh Wells, Chad Byers, and Jordon Stanton celebrate after defeating 13th-ranked Virginia Tech 21-16 in an NCAA football game at Lane Stadium in Blacksburg, Va., Saturday.

‘Bama, Ohio State top AP poll; Ducks No. 5 NEW YORK — The combination of impressive victories by Alabama and Ohio State and a stunning loss by Virginia Tech led to Boise State losing all but one of its first-place votes in the AP Top 25. The Broncos were still No. 3, behind the top-ranked Tide and No. 2 Buckeyes in the poll released Sunday, but the gap has widened. Alabama received 52 first-place votes and 1,466 points. Ohio State had five first-place votes and 1,410 points and Boise State received one and 1,306. TCU remained fourth and Oregon jumped two spots to No. 5 after winning 48-13 at Tennessee. Michigan moved into the rankings for the first time this season at No. 20 after its dramatic 28-24 victory at Notre Dame. After Boise State beat Virginia Tech last week in Landover, Md., the Broncos received eight first-place votes from the media panel and were only 13 points behind No. 2 Ohio State. Some of the luster came off the Broncos’ big nonconference victory when Virginia Tech was upset Saturday by James Madison, which plays in Division I’s second tier. Add to that the Buckeyes’ 36-24 victory against Miami in Columbus, Ohio, and the Crimson Tide’s 24-3 win against Penn State in Tuscaloosa, Ala., and the top of the poll looks more like it did at the start of the season. In the USA Today coaches’ poll, the top five was Alabama, Ohio State, Boise State, Texas and TCU. Texas dropped a spot to No. 6 in The Associated Press poll and received one first-place vote. Oklahoma moved up three spots to No. 7 after beating Florida State, 47-17. Nebraska, Iowa and Florida rounded out the first 10. No. 11 Wisconsin was followed by Arkansas, South Carolina, Utah and LSU. Another Southeastern Conference team, Auburn, was No. 16, giving the SEC six ranked teams, more than any other league. No. 17 Miami slipped five spots and No. 18. Southern California dropped two after beating Virginia 17-14. Stanford moved up six spots to No. 19 after shutting out UCLA 35-0 at the Rose Bowl. Michigan was followed by West Virginia, Penn State, which slipped four spots, and three teams that were unranked last week — No. 23 Houston, No. 24 Arizona and No. 25 Oregon State. — The Associated Press

ban said as much Saturday on ESPN, when he made the point that teams with more difficult paths to the title game should be rewarded. Since the Bowl Championship Series is set up to be the ultimate exercise in the art of splitting hairs, giving only two of the 120 teams a chance to play for the national championship, the slightest blemish on the Broncos could lock them out of the title game. You can already hear the complaints coming from SEC, Big Ten and Big 12 country: ‘How can a team play for the national title if its best victory

came against an opponent that lost to a I-AA team?’ Whether it’s even a fair point is debatable. Kansas lost to North Dakota State of the FCS to open the season, then beat Georgia Tech on Saturday. Strange things happen. After losing to Appalachian State in 2007, Michigan went on to beat Florida in a bowl game. Virginia Tech might not lose another game. But with the BCS, there can be no flukes. Every action must have a reaction, no matter how impossible it is to measure. So we’re left with the possibility that James Madison could

knock Boise State out of the national championship game — and that’s just silly. Michigan men Saturday was a great day for Michigan quarterbacks past and present. After Denard Robinson put on one of the greatest shows in the illustrious history of Michigan football, with 502 total yards in a 28-24 victory against Notre Dame, a couple of former Wolverines also put up huge numbers. Ryan Mallett, who transferred out of Michigan after coach Rich Rodriguez was hired to replace Lloyd Carr, passed for 400 yards and two touchdowns to lead No. 12 Arkansas to a 31-7 victory against Louisiana-Monroe. Steven Threet, who started for Michigan in Rodriguez’s first season but didn’t really fit the spread offense and transferred out, threw for 391 yards and three touchdowns in Arizona State’s 41-20 win against Northern Arizona. In case you missed it San Diego State is 2-0 for the first time in 16 years. The Aztecs, under secondyear coach Brady Hoke, beat New Mexico State 41-21 on Saturday night behind Ronnie Hillman’s 150 yards rushing and four touchdowns. The win snapped a 14-game losing streak in nonconference road games for the Aztecs, who beat Nicholls State, an FCS team in their opener. The competition hasn’t exactly been BCS-worthy and it’s gets much tougher this week when the Aztecs visit Missouri. But San Diego State hasn’t had a winning season since 1998, so even the slightest glimmer of hope is a big deal. Looking ahead Not every Saturday can be a monster. The slate next week has no marquee matchup, but plenty of intriguing games nonetheless, including three top-10 teams hitting the road: No. 10 Florida is at Tennessee; No. 9 Iowa travels to No. 24 Arizona; and No. 6 Texas visits Texas Tech.

BASKETBALL: WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS

U.S. back on top after beating Turkey By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

Thanassis Stavrakis / The Associated Press

USA’s Chauncey Billups, left, and Kevin Durant applaud during the medal ceremony after the final of the World Basketball Championship between Turkey and the USA, Sunday in Istanbul. USA won the final 81-64.

ISTANBUL — Kevin Durant beamed as he listened to his national anthem, which hadn’t been played at the end of the world championship in 16 years. And that was no “B-Team” standing beside him on the center of the medals platform. It was the best team in the world. The United States won its first world championship since 1994 on Sunday, beating Turkey 81-64 behind another sensational performance from the tournament MVP. Durant scored 28 points, setting a record along the way for most in the tournament by a U.S. player. He left the court with 42 seconds remaining and shared a long hug with coach Mike Krzyzewski, who finally won the world title after his previous two attempts ended with bronze medals. “Our only option was to come out here and

get a gold, and it feels really good to bring this back home to the States,” Durant said. Lamar Odom added 15 points and 11 rebounds for the Americans, who won gold in the worlds for the fourth time, doing so with a team that was no sure thing after coming to Turkey without the superstars from its Olympic gold medal team. Also on Sunday: Lithuania. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99 Serbia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 ISTANBUL — Linas Kleiza scored 33 points to help Lithuania win its first world basketball championship medal with a victory over Serbia in the third-place game. Kleiza, who plays for the Toronto Raptors, scored 12 points during a 22-12 run — including 15 consecutive points — that put Lithuania ahead 48-38 heading to halftime. Novica Velickovic scored 18 points for Serbia.

Continued from D1 After starting the year with a lower-level club, Martinez was asked to try out for a team in one of the higher-level leagues. Following a two-week trial period with the club, Martinez earned a spot with a team in the more advanced league, a squad that, according to Martinez, included several members who also played for Denmark’s under-18 national team. “They’re pretty big guys, who maybe lack some speed, but are good (at) passing,” Martinez says. “The biggest (challenge) for me was the passing and the language barrier.” He compares Danish football with the speedy style of play made popular by Brazil. “It’s slower, with precision passing, working your way to the goal with a finish off a cross,” he explains. “It’s very technical.” Like Martinez, Snook did not plan to give up soccer while he studied overseas. “I knew Spain loved soccer,” says Snook, who was in Pamplona from August 2009 to February of this year. “I figured I’d pick up (a team) when I went over there.” After a couple weeks of school in Pamplona, Snook made friends who invited him to try out for their local club team. With America’s reputation as something less than a world soccer power, Snook says he surprised his coaches and teammates. “They had no idea,” Snook says with a laugh. “(The Spanish) portray American soccer players as not very good since it’s not our main sport. When I came out … it definitely surprised them in a good way.” Back home for their senior year, Martinez and Snook both

Carroll Continued from D1 Coach Mike Singletary was instantly questioned about the future of Alex Smith as quarterback. Smith threw for 244 yards, but tossed two costly interceptions and failed to lead San Francisco to touchdowns in the first quarter when Seattle’s offense couldn’t stay on the field. “I want very much to tell Pete Carroll, ‘thank you very much for kicking our tails,’ ” Singletary said. “It was good medicine and we’re going to take it. We’ll go from there.” Seattle went 1½ quarters with just seven offensive plays for 11 yards, including an interception on the first play from scrimmage. Then Hasselbeck got started. He completed 10 of his next 11 throws as Seattle abandoned an ineffective run game and used Hasselbeck’s arm. He finished 18 of 23 for 170 yards and touchdowns of 13 yards to Deon Butler and 3 yards to Deion Branch. He also bootlegged and sprinted for a 1-yard TD run in the second quarter that gave Seattle a 7-6 lead. The ball from his touchdown run ended up in the hands of Carroll after the game, a souvenir to acknowledge his first victory with Seattle. “Those don’t come around very often,” Hasselbeck said of the sixth rushing TD in his career and first since 2005. “Hopefully

hope to help Mountain View return to the state final — an experience the two missed when they were abroad last season. “It was the miracle season,” Martinez says about the Cougars’ run through the Class 5A state playoffs last year. “When we knocked off Bend in the semifinals, I was in shock. I listened to the championship game online and my buddy Cam (Riemhofer) scores two goals in 30 seconds.” Two of 10 seniors on Mountain View’s 2010 roster, Martinez and Snook bring a level of maturity to the Cougars after their experiences away from home. “It was a great experience for them,” says Mountain View coach Chris Rogers. “They saw that you can be a stud player in America, but over there you’re a sub.” “You have to fight and claw to get that starting spot or even time on the field over there,” Rogers adds. “It’s a big learning experience.” Despite missing a shot at a state title, neither Martinez nor Snook has any regrets about spending their junior year in a foreign land. “I was so ready for an experience to try something new,” Martinez says. “It went by so fast.” Snook echoes Martinez’s sentiments. “Everything (in Spain) was so much more relaxed,” Snook says. “No one is ever in a huge rush. It’s good. You feel less stressed, like you don’t have to use every minute of the day. “As far as soccer goes, it was hard to adjust,” Snook says about the different style of play in Spain. “But not as hard as adjusting to the people here again.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

that’s the first of many for him.” Jordan Babineaux and Marcus Trufant each intercepted Smith and Seattle’s defense held San Francisco to six points on three possessions inside the Seattle 10. Trufant returned his interception 32 yards for a touchdown early in the second half to give the Seahawks a 21-6 lead. Smith started nine of 10 passing, then missed 12 of his next 21 throws. The questions of how in sync San Francisco’s offense would be considering both Pro Bowl tight end Vernon Davis and receiver Michael Crabtree missed the entire unbeaten preseason, were raised again. Crabtree looked at Smith after the pair failed to connect on two throws in the third quarter, the second returned by Trufant. Smith finished 26 of 45 for 225 yards. Davis had eight catches for 73 yards a day after signing a five-year extension with San Francisco. “(Mike) pointed that out. He said, ‘you can’t expect to be out then come back the first week and get the chemistry together. It takes time. It is timing, you have to trust one another,’ ” Davis said. “I’m not going to dwell on it. I’m going to keep encouraging the guys to keep their heads up.”

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D6 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

G

E A R

FORMULA ONE

RACING SCOREBOARD

Alonso wins Italian GP, Button second By Paul Logothetis The Associated Press

mographics of female applicants. Martin Whitmarsh, director of McLaren Mercedes, said, “If you go back 30-odd years to when I went to university and studied engineering, the one thing I have to say is that in the engineering faculty there were no girls. “Within McLaren Racing at the moment, I think we probably have no more than 2 percent of our engineers are female. I haven’t done the analysis of what percentage of applicants are women, but it probably isn’t greatly skewed. I think that we probably have only 2 percent of the applicants are women.” “Engineering is slightly machismo,” he added. “Motor engineering is more machismo, racing cars even more machismo.” Women sometimes constitute 40 percent of spectators, depending on the race. But Kate Walker, who reports for a website specializing in women in motor sports, Girlracer.co.uk, said that she had felt uncomfortable as a spectator at one race she attended alone because there were so few women. Some question whether women are physically capable of handling a Formula One car, which submits drivers to huge G-forces in cornering and braking. Heikki Kovalainen, a driver at the Lotus team, said that a woman would not be strong enough. “It’s all the training you have to do to remain in peak condition,” he said. Whitmarsh agreed. “I don’t know how many women want 22-inch necks,” he said. “Imagine the weight of your head, plus a helmet, multiplied by five. Just braking you are forced five times your body weight in a harness.” But Legge, who was the last woman to test drive a Formula One car, laughed off such notions. “It is much easier to drive than a ChampCar,” she said, referring to the former open-wheel series in the United States in which she drove in 2006 and 2007 before it folded. “The forces thing and the strength thing is absolutely 110 percent, categorical rubbish.” She said the ChampCar did not have the cornering G-forces on the neck but that the braking and accelerating was the same. She added that power steering and other drivers’ aids made it physically easier to drive a Formula One car. Bernie Ecclestone, the promoter of the series, has frequently expressed a desire to have a female driver, particularly for the marketing value. “It would be interesting to have the equal opportunity, the equal car, no politics, nobody’s controlling situation, and then we would see how quick we really are,” Legge said. “The problem is that no team wants to be the first to hire one, and to risk looking stupid if the girl can’t finish the race. We just need to be given the opportunity.”

to have Fernando behind you,” defending world champion Button said. “I spent the whole time looking in my mirrors trying to judge how far Fernando was behind.” Webber started poorly for the second straight race but Hamilton fared even worse. He exited before the halfway point of his first lap after bumping with Massa as the pair jostled for third with the McLaren driver’s

front right wheel damaged. “I only have myself to blame,” Hamilton said. “I tried my best and some things just don’t go your way.” Webber easily passed Vettel on the 21st lap to sit seventh even though his German teammate was lapping faster. But Vettel, who had started sixth, eventually got past and worked his way up the field to recover from the Belgian GP, where

Hamlin takes top seed in Chase By Jenna Fryer

NASCAR

The Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — Denny Hamlin faced adversity before he even had a chance to live up to his billing as the popular pick to unseat Jimmie Johnson as Sprint Cup champion. He tore a knee ligament in a pickup basketball game in January, just a few weeks before the start of the season, to raise questions about his physical Denny Hamlin ability to compete at NASCAR’s highest level. When he stumbled out of the gate with a series of confidence-testing poor finishes, he was hit with the snickering from naysayers who never believed he had a title run in him from the beginning. So when he announced in March he’d undergo immediate surgery to repair his anterior cruciate ligament, his championship chances were officially dismissed. Only Hamlin refused to fade. He instead rattled off five wins in 10 races — four of which came after his surgery — and revived his title chances. And even after he cooled off over the summer, he turned it up as he closed in on the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. Locked into a tie with Johnson for the top seed in the Chase, Hamlin claimed sole possession Saturday night with a dominating win at his home track, Richmond International Raceway. It came a week after he had the car to beat in Atlanta until an engine failure dropped him to a last-place finish, and the Richmond win pushed him into the points lead for the first time in his career. “We’re tough right now,” Hamlin said after his seriesbest sixth win. “We’ve got the most wins and hopefully that will carry us for the rest of the season. At this point, I’d say we could win at all of (the final 10 tracks). Never through the course of my career had I felt that anywhere I show up, I could win. “Other than the exception of a road course, and I feel I could run top five there, I’ve never felt like I could win anywhere I went, until this year. Especially at this point now, the confidence level is pretty high.” It better be if he plans on being the last man standing at

the end of the 10-race title chase. The last four years have belonged to Johnson, who has mastered the Chase system and been untouchable under this format. Many a driver has challenged him since 2006, but nobody has yet to put together the 10 perfect races needed to dethrone Double J. That includes Hamlin, who won at Richmond last September to steamroll his way into the Chase with a heightened confidence that had him certain he could deliver a knockout punch to Johnson. Only reliability has always been an issue for his Joe Gibbs Racing team, and a pair of engine failures put him on the ropes. Add in a subpar finish at Dover, a track that has vexed him most of his career, and driver error at California, and Hamlin fell off the championship pace and settled for a disappointing fifth in the final standings. But with two wins in the final five races, Hamlin proved that when everything is clicking, he could hold his own. A huge part of this championship run will depend on him and his maturity, which has been questioned over his four-plus seasons in the Cup Series. Hamlin will have to manage the highs and the lows, not get caught up in the hip Charlotte nightclub he co-owns, and successfully manage the pressure that comes from staring down Johnson.

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Continued from D1 Giovanna Amati tried and failed to qualify for several races for the Brabham team in 1992, and Katherine Legge tested at the Minardi team in 2005. Women race in some of the sport’s top series, including Danica Patrick in IndyCar and NASCAR; Liz Halliday in endurance racing; and Legge in the DTM saloon car series in Europe. Opinions are divided as to why Formula One is different. Women work in most other areas of the series, however. At the top is Monisha Kaltenborn, the chief executive of the Sauber team since January. At the German Grand Prix in July, she was introduced as the first woman to have taken part in the decadesold ritual of the official Friday news conference. Kaltenborn said the series could benefit from a feminine presence. “There are many things that I think as a woman you see with more distance,” she said, “because you simply probably don’t have that emotional feeling to motor sport and fast cars, and you have a different view. And that is sometimes needed to open new directions here, because we all know some things have to change. It can be an advantage.” Kaltenborn has worked in Formula One for a decade. She trained as a lawyer and worked at the Fritz Kaiser Group when it held shares in the Sauber team. After the company sold its shares, she joined Sauber as head of the legal department, negotiating contracts with drivers, sponsors, suppliers and the Formula One commercial rightsholder and governing body. She said that for a year, one of the team directors thought she was an interpreter for Peter Sauber, the team owner. Lisa Lilley once found herself at the Ferrari hospitality unit serving coffee to journalists standing behind her in a line. She served two or three before she informed the next man that she was not a hostess but the Shell Oil technology manager for Ferrari assigned to Formula One. Lilley, who has a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, attends most of the races wearing the Ferrari team uniform. Because the only Ferrari clothes designed for women are those of the hostesses, she wears the men’s outfit. “It really doesn’t matter in the end if you are a man or a woman,” said Tina Vajanszki, a tire technician at Bridgestone, “as long as you do your job well.” Marianne Hinson, the director of the Lotus team’s aerodynamics department, has worked for Formula One teams since 1999. But she is perhaps an exception. The number of women in technical jobs seems in line with the de-

“I never imagined that it was so good,” said Alonso, who won here for McLaren in 2007. “A very emotional week.” Button made a great start to move ahead of Alonso, who struggled to hold off teammate Massa only days after the pair were cleared over a team orders controversy in a 1-2 finish at the German GP on July 25. “It was all looking very good but it was a tough race mentally

smolichmotors.com • smolichmotors.com

Women

Alberto Pellaschiar / The Associated Press

Ferrari driver Fernando Alonso leads McLaren Mercedes driver Jenson Button during the last laps the Italian Formula One Grand Prix at the Monza racetrack in Monza, Italy, Sunday. Alonso recovered from a poor start to win the race for home team Ferrari on Sunday.

ITALIAN GRAND PRIX Sunday At Autodromo Nazionale di Monza circuit Monza, Italy Lap length: 3.60 miles 1. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 53 laps, 1:16:24.572, 149.657 mph. 2. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 53, 1:16:27.510. 3. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 53, 1:16:28.795. 4. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 53, 1:16:52.768. 5. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 53, 1:16:54.514. 6. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 53, 1:16:55.848. 7. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 53, 1:16:57.384. 8. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 53, 1:16:58.600. 9. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 53, 1:17:09.520. 10. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 53, 1:17:28.785. 11. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 53, 1:17:29.628. 12. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 53, 1:17:30.678. 13. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 53, 1:17:43.491. 14. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 52, +1 lap. 15. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 52, +1 lap. 16. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 52, +1 lap. 17. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 51, +2 laps. 18. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus Racing, 51, +2 laps. 19. Sakon Yamamoto, Japan, HRT, 51, +2 laps. 20. Lucas di Grassi, Brazil, Virgin, 50, +3 laps, Retired. Not Classfied 21. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus Racing, 46, Retired. 22. Bruno Senna, Brazil, HRT, 11, Retired. 23. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 0, Accident. 24. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 0, Gearbox. ——— Drivers Standings (After 14 of 19 races) 1. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 187 points. 2. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 182. 3. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 166. 4. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 165. 5. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 163. 6. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 124. 7. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 112. 8. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 108. 9. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 46. 10. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 45. 11. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 31. 12. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 21. 13. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 19. 14. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 16. 15. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 13. 16. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 7. 17. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 6. 18. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 3. Constructors Standings 1. Red Bull, 350 points. 2. McLaren, 347. 3. Ferrari, 290. 4. Mercedes, 158. 5. Renault, 127. 6. Force India, 58. 7. Williams, 47. 8. BMW Sauber, 27. 9. Toro Rosso, 10.

smolichmotors.com • smolichmotors.com

MONZA, Italy — Fernando Alonso recovered from a poor start to win the Italian Grand Prix for home team Ferrari on Sunday and revive his Formula One title chances. The Spaniard lost the lead to McLaren’s Jenson Button at the first corner but regained it after the pit stops to hold on for a 2.9second victory. Felipe Massa of Ferrari was third and Red Bull’s Sebastian Vettel finished fourth. Red Bull driver Mark Webber, who finished sixth, leads the overall standings with 187 points. Lewis Hamilton crashed out on the first lap and is second with 182. Third-place Alonso has 166, Button 165 and Vettel 163. Alonso said his 24th career victory came second only in importance to his Spanish GP win in 2006 as it gave him hope of a third world title with five races left. “We made the right choices in the right moments,” Alonso said after his third victory of the season. “With the result we gain some confidence and motivation for the whole team not to give up. (But) we need to remain calm. We need to find some consistency, that would be the key.” Alonso was making his debut at Monza for the Italian team and it was Ferrari’s first victory at its home track since Michael Schumacher won in 2006. Alonso was already celebrating his win in front of fans ahead of the finish line after tying Juan Manuel Fangio of Argentina for eighth all-time. A huge heartshaped Ferrari banner was unfurled in front of the podium before the champagne came out.

he finished out of the points after crashing into Button. Alonso was able to get back in front after the top two pitted, emerging with less than a second advantage at the start of the 38th lap. He held the lead to the end. Button said he struggled on the new tires after his stop. “Everything was going smoothly but then we pitted one lap early and maybe that was a mistake,” Button said. “That’s for me where I lost time.” Vettel confirmed his spot at the close as he pitted to make the mandatory tire change on his last lap. He returned in front of Nico Rosberg, who finished fifth for Mercedes. Webber was left frustrated by a running duel with Nico Hulkenberg of Williams, who cut across chicanes several times as he battled with the Australian driver. Hulkenberg ultimately finished seventh. “We underperformed as a team today,” Webber said. “We could have capitalized and got more points, but we sniffed around just getting a few. It’s a bit disappointing but at least we got some (points).” Spanish team HRT said a radio engineer was being treated for injuries after he was hit by driver Sakon Yamamoto’s car during a pit stop. The team’s unidentified engineeer “remained conscious” and “the situation is under control.” An ambulance entered the pit lane during the 53-lap race to attend to the engineer before taking him to the medical center. F1 now departs Europe to begin a three-race swing through Asia, starting with the Singapore GP night race on Sept. 26.

FORMULA ONE

DEAL of the

DAY

1255 NW Galveston

541-318-0989

BUY ANY BREAKFAST OR LUNCH MENU ITEM & GET A FREE LARGE SMOOTHIE (up to $5.25 value) Coupon good 9/13/10. Original newsprint only. One coupon per visit. Coupon has no cash value.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 E1

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200

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Black Lab AKC,male, 10 mo, all shots, some training, FREE to good home,541-421-3621 eves Border Collie pups, black, white, tri,smooth coat,wormed/shots, ready, $275 541-948-7997

Giant Red Malamute/Wolf hybrid puppies, 5 females. Pups will be ready to go September 24th. $250 each. Please view at: www.oregonmalamutes.com Call 541-760-8443. Griffin Wirehaired Pointers 3 males, 11 weeks, all shots, $800, 541-934-2423.

202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Boxer Pup, AKC. 1st shots, 11 541-280-7959. weeks, socialized, ready for loving home, 541-280-6677 Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006

AKC German Shepherd pups, Beautiful, $675 509-406-3717

English Bulldog AKC, female 8 mo., house trained, serious inquiries only, great price -$1595 firm. 541-604-6653. ENGLISH BULLDOGS, 3 yr old AKC registered male & female, great with kids. $2200 for pair. 541-390-4051.

212

246

266

270

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Heating and Stoves

Lost and Found

AKC Reg. Cavalier King Charles Puppies! 8 weeks, 1st shots /worming done, health guarantee. 3 Ruby, 2 Black/Tan! Trained to doggie door and potty pad. Happy, healthy, ready for their forever loving home. $1200 541-693-4494 American Brittany Male Pup, 9.5 weeks, AKC Litter reg.,champion lines, wormed, dew claws removed, 2 sets shots, vet checked, $600, 541-447-5448.

Aussie Cross, 8 wks, already spayed, 1st shots, cute as can be! $125. 541-546-2401 Australian Shepherd, beautiful black tri female, 5 yrs., $200, 541-548-3660.

Poodles (Toy), Yorkiepoos, and Cockapoos, variety of colors. Shots, wormed, vet-checked house-raised. $325-$375. 541-567-3150;503-779-3844 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

RAGDOLL 15-month male, neutered/all shots. $125 includes scratch post/toys, etc 541-923-4109. Wanted: Active senior man is looking for a free or cheap Golden Retriever or Golden mix dog. I need a walking partner to replace my golden that passed away. I have great grandkids so must be good with children. Call 541-536-3986 Working cats for barn/shop, companionship, FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420

210 #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Log Furniture Sale, 20% off all Beds, Tables and Lamps, 541-419-2383.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643.

Lost Cat, 9/3, orange & white 16-yr male, near Dogleg Lane Sunriver. Call 541-593-0247

Frenchie-Faux Bulldog Puppies, $1000 OBO or trade. Also, Japanese Chin Puppies, $300, 541-447-0210.

MINI AUSSIES AKC, mini, toys, red merles, black tri's some with blue eyes, family raised, very social, great personalities. 598-5314/598-6264 Parson Russell Terriers, purebred, tri-colored, tails & dew claws done, 1st shots, 9 wks, socialized males & females $350. 541-410-2068. Pomeranian, needs good home, 9 mo. female, black, very sweet & shy, $175, 541-526-1646.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

Computers

Coins & Stamps

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & selling multiple systems/ Currency collect, accum. Pre software, to disclose the 1964 silver coins, bars, name of the business or the rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold term "dealer" in their ads. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Private party advertisers are dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex defined as those who sell one & vintage watches. No colcomputer. lection too large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 257

WANTED TO BUY

241

Musical Instruments

Bicycles and Accessories

CONN Alto Saxophone, good working condition, $450 OBO. 541-389-1046.

260

Misc. Items Cycling Apparel Sale New mens & womens Save 50-75%! Sept. 17th 8 am-4 pm Sept. 18th 8 am-12 pm, Mother's Juice Cafe, 1255 NW Galveston CASH ONLY! 760-518-4085

26’ mtn bike, Shimano equipped, front shock, rear rack, like new! $150. 541-480-5950

246 Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-7959

Winchester Model 70, .300 Win Mag., $525; Browning, BAR, .270 Win, Safari grade, w/Boss, Leopold, VARI-X2, $995, 541-728-1036.

255 215

Furniture & Appliances Schwinn High Timber Alum.

Sofa & loveseat, 100% leather, no rips/tears/stains, reduced to $180. 541-480-1373

Free Lhasa-poo, 10 mo, adorable, female, shots, to good family, 541-317-8328.

German Shorthair Pups, AKC, Champ. bird dogs, parents on site, family pet or hunting partner. $400. 541-330-0277,541-306-9957

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The POODLES-AKC Toy, parti, Bulletin Internet website. phantom & other colors; also 1 Pom-A-Poo.541-475-3889

tioned, guaranteed. Over-

English Mastiff AKC Pups, Fawn, w/black face, 3 large females, family raised, parents on-site, born 7/11, 541-206-2421,541-820-4546

O r e g o n

Antiques & Collectibles

Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants, stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s end of Season Sale! EveryMaytag, 541-385-5418 thing 50% Half off! 541-408-3317 BRAND NEW... Kenmore Series 400 Washer/Dryer set. $550. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & Call 541-480-3110 blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st Cherry Dining Table set with 6 shots, wormed, parents on chairs & 3 matching bar site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. chairs, $675. Sofa & loveseat www.kinnamanranch.com maroon ultrasuede, $375. Cherry sofa, cocktail, 1 end Lab Pups, Yellow, full bred, table, $250. 541-678-5294 males, $250, females $300, 541-447-1323. Dining Table, Oak, 6 chairs, 1 leaf, exc. cond., must sell, Labradoodles, Australian $1200 OBO, 541-408-2749. Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Fridge,Jen-Aire, stainless,sideby-side, water/ice dispenser, $300; Water Heater, elec., Bradford White, 80 Gal., $200, 541-480-6900

Lhasa-Poo pups darling black & white little teddy bears, 1st shots, wormed, health exam. $300.541-923-7501,279-9901

B e n d

208

KITTENS! Playful, altered, shots, ID chip, more! Nice Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! adult cats also avail. Adopt a A-1 Washers & Dryers kitten & take home an adult $125 each. Full Warranty. mentor cat free. Sat/Sun 1-5 Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s PM, call re: other days. dead or alive. 541-280-7355. 389-8420, 598-5488. Info/ Appliances, new & recondiphotos at www.craftcats.org.

Wanted: Malamute or mix, female pup up to 6 mos, no Chihuahua- absolutely adorable show. I have fenced yard; teacups, wormed, 1st shots, will wait for litter; no wolf $250, 541-977-4686. please! Mary, 541-390-1953 Chihuahua, male, 10 weeks, Wanted washers and dryers, sweet, cute, trained, bought working or not, cash paid, him for $250, 3 weeks ago, 541- 280-7959. asking $200; Pomeranians, 1 male, 1 female, purebreds, 208 5-6 yrs. old, no papers, sold together, from different litPets and Supplies ters, unaltered, SOLD 503-709-8858 The Bulletin recommends Cockatiels, a variety of colors, extra caution when pearls, white faced, $30 and purchasing products or up. 541-548-0501 services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, Companion cats free to seniors! or credit information may Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. be subjected to fraud. For 389-8420 www.craftcats.org more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney Dachshundpurebred 4-mo male LhasaPoo, Adorable 8 wk male. Brown w/ beautiful black General’s Office Consumer puppy, brown, wormed, 1st markings. 1st. shots, exam, Protection hotline at shots, $100. 541-536-1761 pup kit. $395. 541-410-7701 1-877-877-9392. DOBERMAN PINSCHERS AKC born 8/8/10. 541-848-0196

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies P o o dle s AKC love people 541-408-7370 www.ludwiglanepoodles.com

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 10 ga.shotgun, SxS, 32" FxF. $300. 541-389-8215 12 Ga. slug barrel for Remington 870, 20” w/deer sights, NIB, $120; 12 ga. Remington 870 Wingmaster, 30” barrel, vent rib, full choke, 2-3/4”, good cond., SOLD. Call 541-504-7773.

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. Soapstone Fireview Heater for 1500 sq ft room. Gas, has ceramic table to sit on & double wall chimney. Works well; attractive. 541-382-7995

267

Fuel and Wood

Brand new Browning Citori White Lightning w/cstm case $1300 firm. 907-687-7618 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Gun Safe, Yukon Gold, 18 guns, never used, $375, please call 541-312-2448 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. Sept. 22nd, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

264

Snow Removal Equipment

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Remington 700 VLS .22-250 with Leupold scope and Bi-pod, Price can't be beat! $625. Also have a Browning .410 Over Under Citori Call for Price. (541) 390-4572 Savage Bolt Action, left handed, 30-06, w/scope, $400 OBO, 541-617-1790.

Semi-Autos Rifles, 2 AR’s, 3 AK’s,Colt SP-1, $1000; Olympic Arms, new, $700, Krinkov $1200; Chinese under folder, $800, Romanian, new,$600, all prices FIRM, 541-410-4069 S&W .38 SPL+P, model 442 airweight, new in case, $500 541-388-2268.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

LOST:

REWARD,

Pom-Chihuahua mix, 2 yrs. old., “Sadie”, sable color, ~10 lbs. last seen at intersection of Century Dr. & Reed Market, 9/8, her family misses her very much and really wants her back. Call 785-342-5650. Lost Wallet: With pictures, Tribal Coin, Sunriver or Bend, 8/16, 605-490-1765.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $145 per cord rounds; $160 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

& Equipment 1 gallon perennials and Idaho Fescue @ $3 each. 541-389-5355

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

HUGE FUNDRAISER SALE! Sat. 8-4 2004 Cradle Mtn. Way. raising $ to go to Florida. w/son selected to US Soccer National team. Kids clothes, tools, coins, sports cards household, more call 815-3475 to make donation.

288

Sales Southeast Bend THE KIDS WENT TO COLLEGE AND WE CLEANED THE HOUSE OUT!! American girl doll furniture, bitty baby clothes and furniture, Barbie stuff galore (1990's), erector sets, lego, k'nex, hotwheels, remote controls, Queen log bed, children furniture, Pottery Barn items, dishwasher, wine cooler, snowboards, wakeboard, designer and vintage clothing, housewares, bikes. Too much to list! Friday 9 to 4, Saturday 8 to 4 60580 Gosney Rd. off Rickard road or Hwy. 20

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Logs sold by the foot and also FOUND: New Water Ski, Mon., Log home kit, 28x28 shell 9/6, north end of Bend. Call incl. walls (3 sided logs) to identify: 503-480-5558 ridge pole, rafters, gable end LOST KEYS Mar., 2010, thought logs, drawing (engineered) we would find them when we all logs peeled & sanded moved, but we didn’t! Truck $16,000 . 541-480-1025. fob, child’s picture, name on key chain. 440-653-3779 266 Lost: On 9/4- Black/tan female "mini-dachsund" in the Plainview/Sun Mt. area, answers to "Lucy." 541-330-0170

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663.

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

1st cutting Alfalfa/cow, $75/ton; 2nd cutting Orchard grass, $140/ton; 2nd cutting Alfalfa, $130/ton. Madras, 541-948-0292 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $140/ton 541-549-3831

Sales Northeast Bend Bluegrass straw, 800-lb bales,

BarkTurfSoil.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

300

325

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 541-504-8892; 480-0449

Farm Market

Hay, Grain and Feed

286 All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $150 for 1 or $290 for 2, Bend delivery. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

Lost and Found

Heatilator by Dover, propane, for inside use, incl all piping, $500 obo. 541-323-1872

R E W A R D

T o a v o i d fr a u d , T h e Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

270

Heating and Stoves

-

Men's 3-stone wedding ring, Only 2 years old... still has sentimental value Save a man's life... call the wife... 541-410-0366

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

www.bendbulletin.com LOG Truck loads of dry Lodge30-30 Winchester Carbine, or pole firewood, $1200 for pre-64, dies & ammo, 1` Call Classifieds at Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 owner, original bill of sale, 541-385-5809 or 541-536-3561 for more $495. Rule gas-powered information. winch, pulls 3500 lbs, all accys, never used, $475. 12-ga. Train Set, HO, complete town, SEASONED JUNIPER 4 engines, 20 cars, $2500 inBelgian Browning Auto 5, FN, $150/cord rounds, vested, $500, 541-389-9268 vent rib, exc shape, $475. $170/cord split. 541-389-0049 after 3pm. Delivered in Central Oregon. Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. .45 ACP, Glock M21 with three audio & studio equip. McIn13+1 high-capacity mags, tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, 269 holster & ammo. $600/OBO, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, possible trade. 541-647-8931 NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 Gardening Supplies ATTENTION COWBOY S H O O T E R S ! 1ST ONE FOR SALE, Wild Bunch, 1911 Government, SASS, by PARA USA, new in box, $1000, 541-728-1036.

L O S T

9 7 7 0 2

290

Sales Redmond Area Flamingo Sisterhood 1951 SW 38th St. 923-8578 10am-4:00 Fri. & Sat, different items each day

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

$25ea. Premium oat hay, mid size 800-lb bales, $40 ea. Prem. orchard grass, mid size 800lb $50 ea. 541-419-2713

Excellent Grass Hay, 3x3x8 bales, approx. 750 lb., If no answer, please leave msg., I will return your call. Redmond, 541-548-2514 PREMIUM GRASS HAY $125/ton , Forage Fescue, on stem, leafy, my horses like it more than orchard grass,26 bales /ton, in Culver, 541-475-4604 Top Quality Barn Stored Orchard Grass Hay, 75 lb., 2 sting bales, $155/ton. Kennor Farm, call 541-383-0494.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

333

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies EGGS, laying hens, miniature goats, Mast Farms, 541-388-8725 (p.m.’s best)

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, grass & grain fed, $1.75/lb hanging weight plus cut and wrap. Butcher October 2nd., please call 541-504-1899. GRASS FED BEEF, quick sale special. $1.80/lb. hanging weight + cut and wrap. Order now with deposit. Call 388-4687 or 610-6408.


E2 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Exp. Child Caregiver, retired school teacher, tutoring, housekeeping, exc. refs., flexible rates & schedule, 562-310-1402, Bend.

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CFO/CONTROLLER – CENTRAL OREGON / BEND/ REDMOND AREA OVERVIEW: The Company is a growing, private equity backed/owned niche wood forest products manufacturer located in the central Oregon area. Candidate would be responsible for the accounting and financial reporting functions, and providing value-added process improvement to other senior management and the board, including assistance with certain operational matters. QUALIFICATIONS: Controller/CFO experience in a small/middle market business in manufacturing environment - 5-10+yrs total exp., financial software conversion/implementation experience for small business, process improvement exp. P L U S E S : Wood forest products, CPA, experience with Microsoft Dynamics or other relevant manufacturing software, HR administration experience, public accounting experience, multilingual skills - English/Spanish Candidates should submit resumes and cover letters to

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Insurance Home Surveyor Perform fieldwork & computer reporting for a national industry leader. No exp. Paid training. Performance based pay, $12/hr. Part time. Apply at www.muellerreports.com. Medical Assistant Experience Required. We are looking for an energetic, dependable and outgoing person to join our team. We offer a superior salary, excellent benefit package and a 4 day work week. Typing and computer skills beneficial. Dermatology experience a plus. Outstanding patient care, team player and attention to detail a must. Position involves a variety of job duties in a fast-paced work environment. Fax your resume with cover letter to 541-323-2174 or email Jodi@centraloregondermatology.com Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Medical Partners In Care has an opening for a part-time (24 hours per week / 12-hour shifts) CNA to work in their Inpatient Unit (Hospice House). Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit a resume via email to HR@partnersbend.org or by regular mail to: Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 Attn: HR.

CentralOregonCFOsearch@gmail.com

Applicants must have an active OR State CNA license and must be able to work days, nights and weekends. All applicants must be able to pass a pre-employment drug test and criminal background check.

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

CUSTOMER SERVICE SPECIALIST (Part-time) Ferrellgas, a nationwide leader in the propane industry, is looking for a part-time Customer Service Specialist in the Bend area. The most critical part of our success is our employees. If you want to work for a company where your experience and dedication make a difference, join the Ferrellgas team. We are looking for a highly organized individual with excellent customer service and communication skills. Computer proficiency required as well as 1+ years administrative experience. Ferrellgas offers competitive pay, a comprehensive benefits package, 401(k), Employee Stock, paid holidays, vacation, and bonus potential. For more information, visit our local office at 900 NE First St, Bend OR 97701. No phone calls please

476

Employment Opportunities

Hairstylist / Nail Tech Also needs to be licensed for waxing. Recent relevant exp necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449.

Partners In Care is an Equal Employment Opportunity Employer

Hot Springs Resort & RV Park needs a year-round Campground Host Team with general maintenance skills, housekeeping, and reception. (541) 822-3512

Night Auditor Must have experience. Weekends a must. Apply in person at Days Inn, 849 NE 3rd St., Bend.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

541-617-7825 Ag Service Technician: Morrow County Grain Growers is currently seeking a ag service technician for its Wasco CaseIH dealership. Successful candidate must be able to provide own tools & be a committed team player. Exp. in Agriculture preferred. Ag knowledge in Hydraulics, Electronic Diagnostics, A/C, etc. is a plus for candidate! Basic computer & customer service skills are a must. Parts counter specialist: We are seeking an individual interested in building good customer relationships as a Parts Counter Person at our Lexington dealership. Successful candidate will have a knowledge of Automotive, Ag, ATV & Snowmobile parts. Computer & customer service skills are a must. Competitive wage + exc. benefit pkg. for both positions. For additional information: call 800-452-7396. To submit a job application and/or resume, send to: John Ripple, General Manager, Morrow County Grain Growers, Inc., PO Box 367, Lexington, OR 97839, or email to: johnr@mcgg.net Application can be found on our web site: wwww.mcgg.net under careers

Patrol Officer CITY OF PRINEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT Accepting applications to establish a hiring list for a full-time Patrol Officer. Application available at Prineville Police Dept., 400 NE 3rd St., Prineville, OR 97754 www.cityofprineville.com Closing Date: Oct. 15, 2010, 5:00 pm.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

SUTERRA-MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN: 5+ years experience manufacturing setting. Fix mechanical, electrical and other operational problems on equipment; requires welding, milling, etc. Apply/review description visit: www.suterra.com; fax: (310) 966-8298

Taxi cab drivers! Position is for an independent contractor to drive for Checker Cab of Central Oregon. We need someone who is over 25, has a minimum 5 year clean driving history, no criminal background and a neat appearance. Does this sound like you? Do you want to work for Central Oregon’s fastest growing taxi company? If so call 541-382-3411 to get started. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Web Developer Well-rounded web programmer needed for busy media operation. Expert level Perl or PHP, SQL skills desired. Knowledge of principles of interface design and usability essential; basic competence with Creative Suite, including Flash, needed; familiarity with widely used open-source apps, especially Joomla or Drupal, a plus. The ideal candidate is not only a technical ace but a creative thinker and problem-solver who thrives in a collaborative environment. Must be able to communicate well with non-technical customers, employees and managers. Media experience will be an advantage. This is a full-time, on-site staff position at our headquarters offering competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and lots of potential for professional growth. Send cover letter explaining why this position is a fit for your skills, resume and links to work samples or portfolio to even.jan@gmail.com. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

541-383-0386

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

Operate Your Own Business

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras/ Culver & La Pine Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

H

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

638

Finance & Business

Rentals

507

604

Real Estate Contracts

Storage Rentals

500 600 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend MUST FIND TRAINS ROMANTIC 2 Bdrm 1 bath duplex, very quiet, clean, W/D on site, new heat sys, w/s/g pd. Cat nego. $550. 541-815-9290

Townhouse-style 2 bdrm., 1½ bath apt., w/d hookup, no pets/smoking, $625, w/s/g pd, Clean! 120 SE Cleveland. 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

Secure 10x20 Storage, in Upstairs Studio Apt. for SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr rent, 10 minutes E. of access, $95/month, Call Costco, A/C, no W/D, elec., Rob, 541-410-4255. water & garbage incl. in rent, 616

Want To Rent

$425/mo., 541-385-5400.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Lease Condo? 3 bdrm 2 bath, Dec-May, Bend area. Family wants option to buy w/lease. 1 Bdrm., Studio Apt., $500/mo. 503-663-6460 or eric@ytm-law.com

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Wish to lease equestrian facility for 20+/- horses w/ various accommodations, incl. living quarters & indoor arena. 541-350-8438

630

Rooms for Rent 2 Rooms For Rent in nice 3 bdrm., 2 bath, home w/huge fenced backyard, pets OK, all utils paid, 541-280-0016 Awbrey Butte. Incredible views. 5 min. walk to COCC. Deck, hot tub, A/C, woodstove. 375/mo. Gary 541 306-3977. Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631 BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

541-322-7253

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

fenced yard, W/S/G incl., $430/mo., no pets,

541-382-3678 1St Mo. 1/2 off, like new, 2/1.5, W/D, walk-in closet, mtn. views, W/S/yard paid, no smoking, 61361 Sally Ln, $725+$725 security, 1 yr. lease, 541-382-3813 Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $555. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free w/ 6 mo. lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Fall Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 managed by

GSL Properties

632

Ask Us About Our

Apt./Multiplex General

Summertime Special!

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 bdrm $550. Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex with park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928. 1/2 off 1st mo! A Big 2 bdrm., in 4-plex near hospital. Laundry, storage, yard, deck, w/s/g paid. $600 + dep. No dogs. 541-318-1973.

Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small pet on approval, reduced to $525/mo. 541-389-9901.

* FALL SPECIAL * 2 bdrm, 1 bath $495 & $505 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com TRI-PLEX, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, 1130 sq.ft., W/D, new paint & carpet, W/S paid, $650 mo. + $650 security dep., 541-604-0338.

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A neat & clean 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1077 sq ft, gas heat, dbl garage w/opener, fenced yard, rear deck, RV parking, $995. 541-480-3393 541-610-7803

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Newer 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2-car SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 1 bdrm, 1 bath, laundry rm, lrg attached garage, fenced yard. Water/sewer pd. $625. Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

garage, A/C, 2883 NE Sedalia Loop. $1100 mo. + dep., no pets. 541-389-2192,

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 2 bdrm, 1 bath, stove, refrig, W/D, new energy efficient furnace & heat pump. ½ way btwn Bend/Redmond. $950. 541-318-5431;541-548-1247


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

652

661

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent Prineville

Beautifully furnished 6 bdrm, 3 2 Bdrm 2 bath duplex, garage bath, NW Crossing, $2995, w/opener, w/d hkup, close incl. cable, internet, garbage to schools, avail now. 593 & lawn care, min 6 mo lease. Bailey Rd. $550/mo, 1st/last. Call Robert at 541-944-3063 541-419-6612; 541-923-2184 Westside/Century Drive - Fur- Prineville 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV Parking, pets nished 2 bdrm 2 bath + ganeg., $825 + dep., landrage, clean, light & bright, scaped front & back, well decorated. Avail. 10/15 541-420-2485 to 5/15. Call 1-866-322-0218

654

664

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent Furnished

A 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1340 sq ft, RIVERFRONT: walls of winnew carpet & paint, wooddows with amazing 180 destove, family rm, dbl garage, gree river view with dock, RV parking, .5 acre. $895. canoe. piano, bikes, covered 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. BBQ, $1450. 541-593-6410.

656

671

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

2 Bdrm.+den, 2 bath, wood stove, dbl. garage, large lot, storage shed, $975/mo., 1st+dep., 19303 Galen Rd., DRW, 541-389-3774.

2 bedroom 1 bath manufactured home, with heat pump, $565/mo + security deposit. No pets. W/S/G paid. Call 541-382-8244.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, attached garage, 900 sq.ft., fenced yard, pets OK,$725, 1st, last, security dep., 1406 SW 17th St., avail 10/1, 541-420-7397 Eagle Crest Chalet, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, loft, designer furnished, W/D, resort benefits! $985/mo. + utilities. Avail. Sept. 503-318-5099

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Newly remodeled 2 bdrm 1 bath home. W/S/G pd. $750 mo with $750 dep; 1st & last. No pets. Call 541-312-9292

announcements You’re invited to a worship service, A Time to Share in God’s Love for Soul. Sunday Sept. 25th, 3 p.m., Wille Hall in new COCC campus center, 541-728-6476. www.eckankar.org

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

738

THE BULLETIN • Monday, September 13, 2010 E3 745

860

870

880

880

Homes for Sale

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Short Sale…Our company may be able to help. We have a record of getting results for homeowners in over their head. First you need answers. Find out why homeowners thank us for the assistance we have given them. Hunter Properties LLC 541-389-7910 Serving all of Central Oregon

Boats & RV’s

Wanted: Will pay up to $10,000 for Class C Motorhome w/ diesel engine, 541-593-8421

800 860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Call Bill 541-480-7930.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Suzuki DR350 1993, 14,000 mi., exc. cond., ready to go, $1895, 541-504-7745.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

748

Northeast Bend Homes

2005 YZ 250F

A Nice 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1128 sq.ft., all new carpet, pad & inside paint,fenced yard, heat pump., dbl. garage, quiet cul-de-sac, only $119,900, Randy Schoning, Broker, John L Scott, 541-480-3393

Well taken care of Too many extras to list Sacrifice at $1650! 541-536-4730

749

Baja Vision 250 2007,

Southeast Bend Homes

new, rode once, exc. cond., $2000. 541-848-1203 or 541-923-6283.

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

764

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004 • Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles!

$4295 541-504-9284

Honda XR50R 2003, excellent condition, new tires, skid plate, BB bars,

Reduced to $595!

Suzuki VL800 2004, just over 3000 miles, like new, $3995. 541-317-0783.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

ATVs

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

CanAm Max XT 650, 2008, 2 seat, winch, alloys, brush guards, low hrs. $6495. 541-549-5382;541-350-3675

Farms and Ranches 35 Acre irrigated, cattle and hay farm, close to Prineville, with a pond and excellent private well. 76 yr. old Widower will sacrifice for $395,000. 541-447-1039

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Adult Care

Building/Contracting

Drywall

NOTICE: Oregon state law Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs requires anyone who No Job Too Small. Free Exact contracts for construction Quotes. 541-408-6169 work to be licensed with the CCB# 177336 Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor Automotive Service is bonded and insured. Excavating Verify the contractor’s CCB Auto Body & Paint, 30 yrs. exp., license through the honest & professional, all CCB Consumer Website work guaranteed, low rates, www.hirealicensedcontractor.com Call Rick, 541-771-1875 or or call 503-378-4621. The John at 541-815-0397. Bulletin recommends Hourly Excavation & Dump checking with the CCB prior Truck Service. Site Prep Land to contracting with anyone. Clearing, Demolition, UtiliBarns Some other trades also ties, Asphalt Patching, Gradrequire additional licenses ing, Land & Agricultural DeM. Lewis Construction, LLC and certifications. velopment. Work Weekends. "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585 Garages, shops, hay sheds, Child Care, Reg. arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, Tiny Town CC ~ Annette & concrete. Free estimates Handyman M-F, 6am-6pm 12 wks-5 yrs. CCB#188576•541-604-6411 FT $25/PT $15 Pre-pay Bend N. 541-598-5031 I DO THAT! tinytowncc@gmail.com Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Debris Removal CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Gentle home cleaning, all sur face types. 20+ yrs exp. Lo cal refs. Call 541-626-3700

Bath and Kitchens Cabinet Works - Quality that Lasts! Refacing, refinishing. custom cabinets, media centers. 20+ yrs exp. CCB #168656 541-788-7349

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS • DOORS •WEATHERIZATION and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

Handyman

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Summer Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Heating & Cooling Central Oregon Stove

Landscape Maintenance

541-815-2406 CCB# 87690 Stove Installation & Repair Gas Piping.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Home Improvement

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response Since 1978

If you want a low price, that is N O T us, if you want the highest quality, that IS us! www.brgutters.com 541-389-8008 • 800-570-8008 CCB#103411

31’ 1989, basement model, 86K, walk around queen, dinette, couch, generator, 2 roof A/C’s, 454 Chevrolet, clean & nice too, $7200. Please call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

BEAVER 37' 1997 Patriot Best in class. 63,450 miles. Immaculate cond. All options. $72,000. 541-923-2593

2-Wet Jet PWC, new batteries & covers. “SHORE“ trailer includes spare & lights. $2400. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $38,500. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $75,000. 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

PRICE REDUCED! Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 27K mi., 1 owner, garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, 2 TV’s, rear camera exc. cond. $69,000. 541-536-7580

Aladdin 16’ Camp Trailer, very clean, electric water pump & catalytic heater, $500/best offer. 541-323-1872

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $695, 541-923-3490.

880

Southwind 36’ 2008, fully loaded with Work horse chassis and Allison transmission, 3 slides and great galley, miles are only 10,600. Vin #432277. This unit is like new with a market value of $104,260 but we have a Sale Priced $93,300. Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2 slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Motorhomes 1988 Class 22’ Mallard, very clean, 70k+ miles, Ford 460, expensive wheels, exc. rubber, microwave - TV, custom large 2-door 3-way reefer 4KW Onan generator, 3-stage catalytic heater, plus factory furnace. air, awning, tow pkg, $7,500. LaPine (541) 408-1828.

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K miles, oak cabinets, interior excellent condition $7,500, 541-548-7572.

“WANTED” RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Allegro

24’ SeaRay 1977 - looks almost new! Cutty cabin, cook, Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut sleep, porta-potty, Ford 351 cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, motor, Merc outdrive, 3 tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, props, Bimini top, exc. shape w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 w/ trailer, surge brakes, new tires, all licensed. $7,500. See 452 Franklin Ave. Bend. 541-382-3705 after 12 p.m. or 541-408-1828.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

771 Multiplexes for Sale An older 2 bdrm manufactured, 672 sq ft, woodstove on Lots quiet 1 acre lot in DRW. FSBO: 4-Plex Townhomes, NE Bend, all rented w/long Last lot in Orion Estates, Lot Newer carpet & paint, $595. term renters, hardwood floors, 541-480-3393 541-610-7803 12, Range Place, 20,000+ sq great neighborhood near hosHarley Davidson Police Bike ft, $125,000, Courtesy to La Pine nice 2 bdrm, 2 bath, Yamaha 350 Big Bear pital, $399,000, 541-480-8080 2001, low mi., custom bike brokers; exchanges considoutbldg, appliances, about an 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks very nice.Stage 1, new tires ered. Call 541-593-2308 acre. Avail Sept. 7, 50877 front & rear, strong machine, & brakes, too much to list! Fawn Loop off Masten Rd. 745 excellent condition $2200 WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in A Must See Bike $10,500 $650 mo. 541-745-4432 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 SE Bend. Super Cascade Mtn. OBO. 541-383-1782 Homes for Sale Views, area of nice homes & 687 BLM is nearby too! Owner paid PUBLISHER'S Commercial for $375,000, now $149,900. Harley Davidson NOTICE Randy Schoning, Broker, All real estate advertising in Screamin’ Eagle Rent/Lease John L. Scott, 541-480-3393. this newspaper is subject to Electric-Glide 2005, the Fair Housing Act which Light Industrial, various sizes, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy 773 makes it illegal to advertise North and South Bend locateal, 18,000 miles, exc. Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very "any preference, limitation or tions, office w/bath from Acreages cond. $21,000 OBO, please low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, discrimination based on race, $400/mo. 541-317-8717 call 541-480-8080. also boots, helmet, tires, color, religion, sex, handicap, 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, avail., 541-410-0429 familial status, marital status quiet, secluded, at end of LOW RENT and prime location! or national origin, or an inroad, power at property line, 870 - 3,000 sq. ft. warehouse tention to make any such water near by, $250,000 w/two offices & bath. Farmpreference, limitation or disOWC 541-617-0613 Boats & Accessories Harley Davidson Ultra ers Coop complex in Redcrimination." Familial status Classic 2008, 15K mi. mond - Call 541-548-8787 includes children under the 14 ACRES, tall pines bormany upgrades, custom age of 18 living with parents The Bulletin offers a LOWER, dering Fremont National exhaust, foot boards, grips, or legal custodians, pregnant MORE AFFORDABLE Rental Forest, fronts on paved hwy. pegs, luggage access. women, and people securing rate! If you have a home to 14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT road, power at property. $17,500 OBO 541-693-3975. custody of children under 18. rent, call a Bulletin Classified runs but needs some TLC. Zoned R5 residential, 12 This newspaper will not Rep. to get the new rates and miles north of Bly, OR. $550 OBO! knowingly accept any adverget your ad started ASAP! $42,500. Terms owner 818-795-5844, Madras tising for real estate which is 541-385-5809 541-783-2829. in violation of the law. Our 15’ Bayliner Capri 1989, 50 readers are hereby informed The Bulletin Harley FXDWG HP outboard, $1600, that all dwellings advertised To Subscribe call 541-923-1575. 1997, wide glide, Corbin in this newspaper are avail541-385-5800 or go to seat, saddle bags, low mi., able on an equal opportunity $7500, Call Rod, www.bendbulletin.com basis. To complain of dis17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 541-932-4369. crimination call HUD toll-free 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy WOODLAND BUSINESS at 1-800-877-0246. The toll load trailer with brakes, full PARK. Newer deluxe 1400 free telephone number for canvas and side/back curPeople Look for Information sq.ft. office/warehouse space the hearing impaired is tains, 42 gallon gas tank, About Products and Services facing Woodland Blvd. with a 1-800-927-9275. walk through windshield, Every Day through sign available on the reader low hours, $18,500. board. ADA compliant rest The Bulletin Classifieds 541-548-3985. *** room, a 14’ roll-up door plus CHRISTMAS VALLEY a man-door. Reznor space CHECK YOUR AD L A N D, 640 Acres, $175,000, heating. For information call Please check your ad on the road accessible, solar energy Bill Olson, Broker first day it runs to make sure area, By Owner 541-480-5458 or Jim it is correct. Sometimes in503-740-8658 Prosser, Broker at structions over the phone are 17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, 541-408-0260. misunderstood and an error Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° w/5HP new motor, new sail views in farm fields, sepcan occur in your ad. If this HONDA GL1500 GOLDWING & trailer, large price drop, 693 tic approved, power, OWC, happens to your ad, please 1993, exc. cond, great ride, $5000 or trade for vehicle, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., contact us the first day your $5,250. Come see! Office/Retail Space 541-420-9188 $149,900, 541-350-4684. ad appears and we will be Call Bill. 541-923-7522 for Rent happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Week775 An Office with bath, various days 12:00 noon for next Manufactured/ sizes and locations from day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun$250 per month, including Mobile Homes day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. 17’ Seaswirl 1972, utilities. 541-317-8717 If we can assist you, please Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, Will Finance - Dbl wide 2 bdrm call us: Approximately 1800 sq.ft., great for the family! 75 HP 2 bath, fireplace, fenced Honda Magna V45 perfect for office or 385-5809 motor, fish finder, extra yard, located in Terrebonne. 1984, exc. cond., runs church south end of Bend The Bulletin Classified motor, mooring cover, $6,900; or $1,000 down, great, $2500, call Greg, *** $750, ample parking $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329. $200 month. 541-383-5130. 541-408-2318. 541-548-2452.

PERSONAL AIDE SERVICES LLC Experienced male caregiver will help with any personal aide needs, chores and er rands, 541-961-5830.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Allegro 28' 2007, 23,000 miles, 2 slides, ford V-10, jacks, camera, side camera's, no smoke, no pets. Very nice condition. Vin # 11411 Market Value $74,900 SALE PRICE $67,777 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

865

HARLEY DAVIDSON FAT BOY - LO 2010, 500 mi., black on black, detachable windshield, back rest, and luggage rack, $15,900, call Mario, 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707.

18’ Wooden Sail Boat, trailer, great little classic boat. $750 OBO. 541-647-7135

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct? Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free! Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Pet Services Serious On-site Horse Care with full-service sitting, exercise, training, healthcare, & other options. Call EquiCare, 928-301-3889

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling Townsend Antique Transport: We move antiques in-town & out of town, everything padded & strapped, Call 541-382-7333.

Remodeling, Carpentry Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Decks •Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale


E4 Monday, September 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 882

Fifth Wheels

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

933

940

975

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1000! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Dodge ½ Ton 4WD Pickup, 1997. Canopy; new motor, torque converter & radiator, $4000 or best offer. Call 541-536-3490.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

FORD 1977 pickup, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

FORD F-150 1983, auto trans, in-line 6, canopy, step bumper, AM/FM radio. Clean. Runs good. 109k miles. 541-389-3177

Ford F-250 1970, Explorer Model, 2WD,remanufactured 360 V-8, auto trans., pwr. steering, pwr. brakes, clean & nice, recent “Explorer Green” paint job, runs & drives great, $1700 OBO, 541-633-6746.

Ford F250 1983, tow

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $6300. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Chevy

Wagon

Ford F250 1983, tow pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

FORD F350 2004 Super Duty, 60K mi., deisel, loaded! Leer canopy. Exc. cond. $23,500 Firm. 541-420-8954.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480. Toyota SR5 1985, 5spd 4WD, runs grt, 311K, Michelin M/S tires, $1000. 541-318-2981

ToyotaTundra 2000 SR5 4x4 loaded, all maint completed, perfect cond, looks new in/ out. $11,500. 541-420-2715

935

Audi A4 2008 Silver, 31,000 miles, below Bluebook, $24,500, 541-389-8181

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MUST SELL 1970 Monte Carlo, all orig, many extras. Sacrifice $6000.541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355 Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $18,500. 541-410-5454

Canopies and Campers Wabco 666 Grader - New tires,

9.5’

1998,

slide-in, exc. cond., very clean, queen cab over bed, furnace, fridge, water heater, self-contained, $7400, 541-548-3225.

541-385-5809

Fleetwood Caribou Model 11K, 1997, 3-way refrig, stove with oven, microwave, wired for cable, TV & AC, kept covered, original owner, asking $8900. 541-420-0551

clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $26,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

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extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $20,500, 541-576-2442

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

A/C, cruise, overdrive, DVD player, Goodyear Radials, chrome wheels, ski racks, step up bars, pwr. windows & locks, runs excellent, mint cond. in/out, $5295, call 541-429-2966

so nice, custom, 113,000 highway mi., white, cloth interior, one look worth 1000 words, $5400. Please call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

4 - 265/75R16 (E) traction tires on 16x8 (8-lug) chrome mod wheels, $300. 541-480-0403. Stock tires and wheels from a Nissan Titan. Near new condition. M&S, P265/70, R18 $150. 541-389-4342

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $4,000! 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Cadillac ETC 1994, loaded, heated pwr. leather seats, windows, keyless entry, A/C, exc. tires, 2nd owner 136K, all records $3100. 541-389-3030,541-815-9369

Chevy Cobalt LS 2006, 17K, remote start,low profile sport rims, extra studless snows w/rims, $8500, 541-410-5263.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

Ford Crown Victoria 1993, set up for pilot work, set up for pole, newer eng., well maint., runs good, pwr. inverter, computer stand, 2 spare tires, set studded tires, $2000 OBO, 541-233-3038.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302 Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,900. 541-408-2111

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K miles, $9650. 541-598-5111.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Pickups Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Lance 835 2007, extended cab-over, self-contained, A/C, $11,500, 541-678-3706.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Jaguar XJ6 1989, Dark Blue, 112k, runs great, sedan, auto, Power Everything, Sun roof, $1100, 541-961-3343.

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto,

Lance 880 10’9” truck camper, 1995, extended cabover, many comfort & convenience features. $7850. 541-382-9107

leather, sunroof, 6-cd new tires, low mi., $12,900, 541-420-8107.

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Vans

Tires, (4) Studded, used 1 season, Magnagrip. P205/55R16 - 895, $200, 541-270-0464

Leer Canopy, red, fits 1999-2006 Ford Superduty, pickups, $600, 541-588-0192

Wanted: Studded tires & wheels for ‘08 Suzuki Vitara, P225/65R17, 541-382-2194

Mercedes E320 2001, 4-Matic, loaded, good cond., great snow car, $9500, please call 541-408-6033.

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF ABANDONMENT The Pines Mobile Home Park gives notice that personal property (the "Property") described below is abandoned. The Property will be sold by private bidding. Sealed bids will not be accepted. The Property is described as a 1970 Pacific Trailer manufactured home, Plate

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Chrysler Town & Country SX 1998, 155K, 12CD, wheels, sunroof, white, looks new, also 1995 Buick LeSabre Limited, 108K, leather, so nice & easy, $7500/both, will separate, Call 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

Mercury Grand Prix, 1984, Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. Call 541-382-8399

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $19,800 OBO. 541-388-2774.

Pontiac Fiero GT 1987, V-6, 5 speed, sunroof, gold color, good running cond. $3000. 541-923-0134. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd,

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., $8500/consider trade. 541-593-4437.

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TIRES: 4 studded 205 x 65/R15, with wheels, 45% tread, $55. 541-788-5841

Lance Squire 4000 Camper, 9’6” 1996, queen bed, well maint., $4900, 541-948-7997

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $999. Call 541-388-4167.

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Ford Explorer XLS 1999, low mi., black, auto,

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle , 2 drop gates, 1 on side, 7’x12’, 4’ sides, all steel, $1400, call 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Sport Utility Vehicles Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422.

Bigfoot

To inspect the property, contact Harvey Berlant, 61000 Brosterhous, Bend OR 97701, Phone #541-382-8558.

FAST!

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

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#X127098, Manufacturer Serial #1896. The Property is located at 61000 Brosterhous, Space 542, Bend OR 97702. The tenant that occupied the home was Deni Coleman and Nakia Coleman.

A public hearing regarding a proposed annexation, Griffin Annexation, to the LaPine Rural Fire Protection District, will be held on September 29, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Hearing Room, First Floor, 1300 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. To view the legal description of the boundaries of the pro-

posed annexation, contact the Deschutes County Counsel's Office at 388-6623. The purpose of the proposed annexation is to provide fire protection services for the area proposed to be annexed. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. At meetings of the Board of County Commissioners the county will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Dennis R. Luke, Chair

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

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Buick LeSabre 2004,

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Total Package! Dodge Diesel 4x4, 1992, 5-spd, canopy, lumber rack, WITH Komfort 5th Wheel, 1983, AC, sleeps 6, ½ bath, lots of storage, new tires, $6500. 541-330-1962, leave msg.

LEGAL NOTICE ADOPTION: Loving, warm, educated family will give your baby the best in life. Expenses paid. Please call Roslyn, 1-800-336-5316.

Sell an Item

pkg., canopy incl, $850 OBO, 541-536-6223.

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

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Automobiles

FORD F150 1990 4X4 5 SPD. 6 Cyl., NEW CLUTCH. $ 1800. 541-447-7807

(Private Party ads only)

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps.$8500, 541-350-3866

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

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RANS S-6ES 2006 KIT Less FWF. All options for speed, comfort, looks, tricycle gear, factory complete tailcone. About 96% new in original packaging. Invoiced at $20,200. Asking $18,250. Located in RDM. Serious only please. 541-815-7433

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Kia Spectra LS, 2002 93K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $3000/best offer. Phone 541-536-6104

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

runs, but needs work, $3000, 541-420-8107.

Reduced! AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great mpg, exc. $19,995 541-475-3670

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929. Subaru Forester 2007, Great shape, great swow car, 111K easy hwy mi. Reduced, $11,400 OBO. 541-508-0214

Subaru Outback 2003 5-spd manual, tow/winter pkg, 123K hwy mi, great cond, all maint rec’ds. $8500. 541-280-2710

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, all avail. options, NAV/Bluetooth, 1 owner, service records, 185K hwy. mi. $6900 541-410-7586.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25867-5 Loan No.: 0206430696 Title No.: 4455601 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Ian Sexton, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 09/12/2007, recorded on 09/19/2007 as Document No. 2007-50817, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot fifty-seven (57), Yardley Estates, Phase II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 235488 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20624 Boulderfield Avenue, Bend, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,014.73 beginning 02/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $299,300.00 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.750% per annum from 01/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 11/01/2010, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 6-18-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Inc., Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 94628 (916) 962-3453 (RSVP# 201203, 09/06/10, 09/13/10, 09/20/10, 09/27/10 )

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6928 T.S. No.: 1291886-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Troy E. Wright and Hayley M. Wright, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated May 11, 2007, recorded May 16, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-27953 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot Seven (7 in Block Eight (8) of DESCHUTES, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. TOGETHER WITH that portion of Lot Eight 8) in Block Eight (8) of DESCHUTES, described as follows: Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot 8 in Block 8 of DESCHUTES, said corner located on the South right of way of Delaware Avenue; thence leaving said right of way South 00°01'49" West, along the West line of said lot, a distance of 24.82 feet to the true point of beginning; thence leaving said line East 6.40 feet; thence South 42.75 feet; thence West 6.42 feet to said West line; thence North 00°01'49" East, along said line, 42.75 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 645 NW Delaware Ave. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,499.20 Monthly Late Charge $215.69. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $664,137.84 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on December 14, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: August 06, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is November 14, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-334934 09/06, 09/13, 09/20, 09/27


Bulletin Daily Paper 09/13/10