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Rabid bat prompts public health warning Lithia Motors By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

After a bat tested positive for rabies in Madras, health officials are reminding people to vaccinate their pets and stay away from the winged creatures. “Our standard message is: Bats are wonderful,” said Paul Cieslak, manager of the communicable disease section of the Oregon

Public Health Division. “They kill insects. They are an important part of the ecosystem. Don’t touch them.” The rabid bat could have come into contact with several house cats. It did not come into contact with any humans. The house cats are being quarantined and re-immunized against rabies. “Bats are really the only reser-

voir of rabies in Oregon,” Cieslak said. “Reservoirs is where the virus naturally lives. ... If you come into any contact with a bat you should go to the doctor.” A bat that flies during the day, flops on the ground or seems disoriented is likely infected. People should not touch any bat, dead or alive. See Bats / A6

may set up shop in Bend

“If you come into any contact with a bat you should go to the doctor.” — Paul Cieslak, Oregon Public Health Division

Documents show Medford-based firm has plans for Bob Thomas site

A reason to smile

By David Holley The Bulletin

It appears one of the largest auto dealership chains in the nation, Medford-based Lithia Motors Inc., has plans to open in the Bend location that currently houses Bob Thomas Car Co., state and city documents show. Lithia has completed the necessary steps to be able to sell new Honda, Chevrolet and Cadillac automobiles at 345 N.E. Third St. In June, the Oregon Department of Motor Vehicles granted Lithia two dealer licenses to operate two businesses at the Bob Thomas location: Bend Honda and Chevrolet Cadillac of Bend. Lithia currently has 83 stores in 12 states and is publicly traded. Bob Thomas declined to comment on whether he is selling

Local program lets patients pay for braces through volunteer work By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Chloe Richer needed braces. But orthodontia doesn’t come cheap. Then the 14-year-old and her family found out about Smile! Central Oregon, an orthodontic clinic that allows patients to pay up to half the cost of treatment through volunteer work. Now Chloe has braces and a busy volunteering schedule at High “(The program) Desert Museum, where gives them she participates in the teen summer program, responsibility, job working eight hours skills, networking. a week. She helps out in the exhibits, greets There are so guests and works with many things that children; she’ll continue volunteering a few are good about hours a month through- this.” out the school year until — Dr. Lisa Panchura, her braces come off. Dr. Julie Panchura founder, Smile! Central started Smile! Central Oregon Oregon in September 2008 after debating what to do as she neared retirement. “I was thinking about what I wanted to do, the contribution I wanted to make in the world,” she said. Would she fill her free time volunteering at the soup kitchen or helping out at a clinic here and there? Then Panchura realized that, with her skill set as an orthodontist, she could strengthen the community in another way. Now, for every day that she works on patients’ smiles, dozens of patients are out in the community volunteering and making Central Oregon a better place. “There is this whole access-to-care issue, specifically in dentistry and orthodontics,” she said. “Everyone wants straight teeth, but it’s really a luxury. It’s not a medically necessary procedure.” See Smile! / A6

his dealership to Lithia. If he is selling, it could be the end to the company Thomas’ grandfather, Walter Coombs, started 94 years ago in 1916. The Bob Thomas Car Co. also sells used cars and averages about 70 employees, according to a letter from August 2009 written by the company’s general manager, Bruce Klouda. Thomas sells only Honda vehicles currently, having sold all of his Chevrolet and Cadillac — brands owned by General Motors — inventory in 2009. Thomas’ company was one of hundreds of dealers informed in 2009 that General Motors planned to sever his franchise agreement as part of GM’s financial restructuring. See Lithia / A7

Court ruling raises bar for corruption, fraud prosecutions By Spencer S. Hsu The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A Supreme Court ruling last month that gutted an anti-corruption tool favored by federal prosecutors is jeopardizing high-profile investigations into politicians and business executives, including several related to convicted ex-lobbyist Jack Abramoff, according to legal experts and new court filings. Since the June 24 decision, U.S. District Judge Ellen Huvelle in Washington has delayed sentencing for one close Abramoff associate, Michael Scanlon, and ordered the government to explain why the court should not dismiss several charges against another, Kevin Ring. Legal experts anticipate a flood of similar litigation by defense lawyers based on the Supreme Court ruling. The court ruled unanimously that a 1988

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

SMILE! Central Oregon orthodontics patient Chloe Richer, 14, speaks with High Desert Museum visitors Friday afternoon. Richer volunteers at the museum to help pay for her braces.

federal statute that makes it a crime to “deprive another of the intangible right of honest services” is unconstitutionally vague. The justices limited the law’s application to bribes and kickbacks, which several former prosecutors say will make corruption convictions against members of Congress more difficult. “I am worried about whether there is sufficient evidence to sustain an indictment with the new definition of bribery/materiality,” Huvelle told lawyers at a July 6 hearing in advance of Ring’s trial, scheduled for next month. She asked both sides to file briefs assessing the recent decision. In their June decision, the justices directed lower courts to reconsider the honest-services fraud convictions of former Enron executive Jeffrey Skilling, another business leader and a former state lawmaker. See Corruption / A6

If medium is message, what do human bones say? Artist’s odd choice raises practical, legal, ethical questions regarding sale, use of skeletal remains By Monica Hesse The Washington Post

“That’s the first question that everyone asks,” says Benjamin Kelley. “Where I get the bones.” Kelley, 26, is talking about his conceptual art, which is made with bones. Human bones. Femurs, mostly. The bones are pulverized, the powder is mixed with resin, and the mixture is poured into molds of Cadillac hood or-

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U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

naments, where it dries into a golden color. The resulting art, he says, represents the dehumanization of modern society and the way car culture impacts people’s lives in Michigan, where Kelley is from. Conner Contemporary Art gallery in Washington is currently showing two of his pieces. “The overall focus of my work is industry, and the automotive industry in particular,” says Kel-

ley. “Growing up in Mich —” But where do you get the bones?! Kelley sighs: He gets them online, of course, where everybody gets everything. The niche bone industry, in all its Gothic magnificence, does a small but steady trade. In the market for a coccyx, perhaps, or a tibia/fibula matching set? You might stop by — or visit the Web sites of — Skulls Unlimited International (based out of Oklahoma City), Maxilla & Mandible or Evolution (New York City), or

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the Bone Room (Berkeley, Calif.), whose site offers everything from assembled skeletons to pathological skulls displaying the effects of disease. One helpful prompt: “Need just a vertebra?” A complete arm at the Bone Room will set you back around $650; individual carpals can be purchased for $10 a pop. Just now on eBay: a pearly cranium, sold with its own carrying case, current bid $779. The item description notes that the skull is “used.” And how. See Bones / A7

INDEX Abby

B2

Comics

B4-5

Editorial

C6

Movies

B3

Stocks

B5

Obituaries

C7

TV listings

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Weather

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C3-5

Community B1-6

Horoscope

Classified F1-14

Crossword B5, F2

Local

Business

C1-8

Sports

D1-6

C4-5

Artist Benjamin Kelley holds one of his creations, a mixture of pulverized human bone and resin shaped in the form of a Cadillac hood ornament. Tracy A. Woodward The Washington Post

TOP NEWS INSIDE FRAUD: Department of Justice arrests 94 in connection with health care fraud, Page A2


A2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Interpol arrests more than 5,000 in soccer gambling crackdown The Associated Press PARIS — More than 5,000 people have been taken into custody in a crackdown on illegal World Cup gambling in Asia, where police raided hundreds of betting dens, the international police agency Interpol said Friday. Interpol coordinated the operation in Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and China, including Hong Kong and Macau. Police also seized $10 million in the operation, which targeted gambling linked to organized crime. “As well as having clear connections to organized crime gangs, illegal soccer gambling

is also linked with corruption, money laundering and prostitution,” said the Lyon-based organization’s No. 2 official, JeanMichel Louboutin. The operation “will have a significant long-term impact on these serious offenses as well,” he said.

800 raids across Asia Police raided nearly 800 illegal gambling dens that dealt with bets of more than $155 million, Interpol said in a statement. The operation ran from June 11 to July 11. Police also confiscated cars,

bank cards, computers and cell phones, and the materials “will now be reviewed and analyzed to determine the potential involvement of other individuals or gangs across the region and beyond,” Interpol said. Calls to China’s Ministry of Public Security rang unanswered late Friday. According to a July 8 statement posted on the ministry’s website, police uncovered more than 900 cases of online World Cup gambling, and detained or arrested more than 4,400 people. The total of seized and frozen funds added up to nearly $118 million, the statement said.

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By Jerry Markon The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Justice Department stepped up its crackdown on Medicare and Medicaid cheats on Friday, announcing charges against 94 people in what authorities called the largest health care fraud sting in U.S. history. Federal agents fanned out across five states to arrest defendants accused of bilking the Medicare system out of more than $251 million through false claims for services that were medically unnecessary or never provided. Among those charged, officials said, are doctors and health care company owners and executives. Thirty-six of the defendants had been arrested as of Friday afternoon.

In one alleged $70 million scheme operated out of a New York City clinic, more than 1,000 cash kickbacks were paid to Medicare beneficiaries out of a designated “kickback room,” Lanny Breuer, assistant attorney general for Justice’s criminal division, said at a news conference. An undercover investigation showed that beneficiaries lined up to receive illegal

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A man helps a victim who was wounded in a bomb blast in the city of Zahedan, Iran, on Thursday. Twin bombings killed at least 20 people outside a mosque in southeastern Iran on Thursday — including members of the Revolutionary Guard — in attacks that came less than a month after Iran hanged the leader of a militant insurgent group in the region.

Death toll rises from twin suicide bombings at Iranian mosque By William Yong and Robert F. Worth New York Times News Service

TEHRAN — A Sunni militant group whose leader was recently executed by Iranian authorities claimed responsibility Friday for one of the deadliest terrorist attacks Iran has seen in years: a double suicide bombing outside a mosque that killed 26 people and wounded 300. The bombing underscored the continuing threat of religious and ethnic violence in Iran, which is unrelated to the political upheavals of the past year. The victims included members of the powerful Revolutionary Guard Corps, officials

said, which the militant group, Jundallah, has singled out repeatedly in the past. The group claims to be fighting on behalf of Sunni Muslim members of the Baluch ethnic group in Iran and Pakistan and has been a thorn in the side of Iran’s security services for years, repeatedly bombing Zahedan and other southeastern cities. It claimed responsibility for an attack in October that killed 40 people, including 15 members of the Revolutionary Guards. Iran said it struck a major blow against the group earlier this year after it captured a Jundallah leader, Abdolmalek Rigi, and executed him in June.

The group’s Internet statement identified the bombers Friday as Abdulbaset and Muhammad Rigi, relatives of Abdolmalek Rigi, the former leader. Iranian officials have repeatedly accused the United States, Britain and Israel of supporting Jundallah, whose name means Soldiers of God in Arabic. Those accusations surfaced again Friday when Yadollah Javani, a high-ranking Revolutionary Guard Corps official, was quoted as saying the attack “points to the involvement of terrorist groups under the auspices of the United States, Israel and some Western countries” seeking to foment sectarian strife.

Iran, putting down reformers, now aims at conservatives By William Yong and Robert F. Worth New York Times News Service

TEHRAN — Having suppressed the opposition uprising that followed last summer’s disputed presidential election, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and his supporters are now renewing their efforts to marginalize another rival group — Iran’s traditional conservatives. Conservative rivals of Ahmadinejad are fighting back, accusing him of sidelining clerics and the parliament, pursuing an “extremist” ideology and scheming to consolidate control over all branches of Iran’s political system. “Now that they think they have ejected the reformists, maybe they think it is time to

remove their principalist opponents,” said Morteza Nabavi, the editor of a mainstream conservative newspaper, in an interview published Friday in Panjereh. Iranian conservatives, including Ahmadinejad’s group, prefer the term “principalism” to “fundamentalism.”

Growing political rift The strikes that broke out in the Tehran bazaar last week, while provoked by a proposed income tax increase, reflect the growing rift between the conservative factions, with the merchants, or bazaaris, on the side of the traditionalists. Ahmadinejad has often fed the traditional conservatives’

fears; he has referred to the divide among conservatives, warning that “the regime has only one party” in a speech published Monday on his official website that provoked outrage among his conservative rivals. In a sense, the power struggle among conservatives is a return to the status quo before last year’s presidential election, which unleashed the worst internal dissent Iran has experienced in decades. The street protests were widely seen in the West as a fundamental challenge to Iran’s theocracy. But after a year in which outpourings of public anger failed to effect tangible change, the dust has settled to once again reveal a more basic split within Iran’s political elite.

payments near a sign showing a woman with her finger to her lips warning in Russian, “Don’t Gossip,” Breuer said. The arrests came as Attorney General Eric Holder and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius held the first in a series of regional “summits” on health care fraud prevention in Miami. The high-level attention marked the latest step in crackdown on fraud that the Obama administration has said is a key part of its agenda on health care reform.

Determined officials “Countless Americans rely on Medicare for their well-being,” said FBI Director Robert Mueller, who added that the FBI and other federal agencies are determined “to stop those who would illegally manipulate the system.” The cost of Medicare, which covers the elderly and disabled, and Medicaid, its sister program for the poor, are growing as the American population ages, giving new urgency to initiatives to detect and prevent phony claims. Health care fraud is believed to rob the nation’s coffers of billions of dollars each year.

Medical marijuana patients face shortages in New Mexico By Sue Major Holmes The Associated Press

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Len Goodman can’t grow enough marijuana to keep up with demand. He is one of just 11 growers approved by New Mexico to produce pot for all of the state’s 2,000 registered medical marijuana patients, and his customers routinely wipe out his supply. Once a strain of marijuana is harvested, dried and cured, he sends an announcement that patients can place orders, and the pot is usually gone in 24 hours. New Mexico has been so cautious in licensing and regulating growers under its 3year-old medical marijuana law that the small number of providers can’t grow enough, creating a shortage that has forced some patients to the street to buy illegal drugs. The dilemma in New Mexico could have ramifications elsewhere because the state’s program has been held up as a national model, with other states looking to replicate its strong regulatory structure to avoid the chaos that has prevailed in places like California. Prospective pot growers

are subjected to a painstaking screening process before being granted a license. Once that happens, they are limited to 95 plants and seedlings and an inventory “that reflects current qualified patient needs.” The providers’ identities and locations are kept secret, avoiding the kind of storefront dispensaries that have flourished in Colorado and California. State Health Secretary Dr. Alfredo Vigil says he must balance patients’ needs against preventing so much legal pot from being grown that it ends up in the illegal market. He said the program is being expanded methodically to ensure sufficient oversight and to get to know producers and how they operate. He also opposes having hundreds of producers and many thousands of patients, which he said “absolutely takes it out of the arena of use for in-state patients and into the arena of de facto legalization.”

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Russia on course to expand security powers

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 A3

Analyst spying for Cuba gets life in prison FURNITURE OUTLET By Spencer S. Hsu The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — A retired State Department intelligence analyst was sentenced to life in prison and his wife got more than six years Friday for spying for Cuba for nearly 30 years in a screenplay-ready tale of romance and espionage. Walter Kendall Myers, 73, and Gwendolyn Steingraber Myers, 72, agreed to forfeit $1.7 million in cash and property, including all of Walter Myers’ federal salary over the years. He did not have to give up the 38-foot sailboat he once said they might use

in retirement to sail to the communist country. “If someone despises the American government to the extent that appears to be the case, you can pack your bags and leave,” U.S. District Judge Reggie Walton said, “and it doesn’t seem to me you continue to bear the benefits this country manages to provide and seek to undermine it.”

One slight comfort It was a grim ending to the Myerses’ idealistic embrace of the Cuban revolution, with one

slight comfort. Handing down punishment for Walter Myers’ guilty plea to conspiracy to commit espionage and two counts of wire fraud, Walton endorsed the couple’s request to be incarcerated near each other with easier access to their siblings, children and grandchildren.

Wife’s sentence deal The judge’s sentence for Gwen Myers fell halfway between the 72 months to 90 months she had agreed to in her deal with prosecutors, for gathering and transmitting national defense

information. Her lawyers cited her age, failing health and secondary role in the scheme. The couple, wearing blue jumpsuits over long-sleeved white shirts, held hands while the sentence was read. “We did not act out of anger toward the United States or from any thought of anti-Americanism,” Myers said in at 10-minute statement in seeking leniency for his wife. “We did not intend to hurt any individual American. Our only objective was to help the Cuban people defend their revolution. We only hoped to forestall conflict.”

QUALITY FOR LESS!

By Ellen Barry

By Henry Fountain New York Times News Service

A day after BP closed off the flow of oil from its runaway well in the Gulf of Mexico, officials said the signs from a crucial test of the well’s condition were encouraging. Pressures in the well rose significantly in the 24 hours after the valves were closed on a cap at the top of the well, an indication that the well was in good shape. But officials voiced caution, saying that they had expected that the pressure might rise even higher, and that the possibility of damage from the April 20 blowout could not yet be ruled out. Another possibility, they said, is that the reservoir has been depleted by three months of gushing oil. “This is generally good news,” Thad Allen, the retired Coast Guard admiral who is overseeing the spill response, said Friday afternoon, about 24 hours into what was expected to be at least a 48-hour test. “But we want to be careful not to do any harm or create a situation that could not be reversed.” He said that so far the test results were ambiguous, and that the possibility remained that the well had been breached and that oil and gas were escaping into the surrounding rock and perhaps even into the gulf. But there were no visible signs of a leak. The test, which ended — at least temporarily — what had been a three-month gusher, is intended to determine whether the well can withstand pressure from the sealing cap. The procedure will continue in six-hour increments, Allen said, and new data will be reviewed by scientists and engineers from the government, BP and other companies. He said there would be “enhanced monitoring” of the seabed, including acoustic tests that could detect small amounts of methane bubbling into the water, which

Patrick Semansky / The Associated Press

Vessels assisting in the capping of the Deepwater Horizon oil wellhead are seen on the Gulf of Mexico near the coast of Louisiana on Friday. would be evidence of damage to the well. At the White House earlier Friday, President Barack Obama cautioned against concluding that the corner had been turned in the oil disaster, which began with the explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon drill rig. He said it was still possible for there to be complications that “could be even more catastrophic” than the original leak. Appearing in the Rose Garden before taking off for a short Maine vacation, Obama said all decisions about the fate of the well would be based on science, “not based on P.R., not based on politics.” Kent Wells, a senior vice president of BP, said the company was watching the seafloor with cameras on robotic submersibles and using sonar and other equipment to look for leaks. So far, he said, “there is no evidence that the well doesn’t have integrity.” When the test began, Allen said, pressures increased in a way that would be expected if the well was undamaged. But the level reached was lower than scientists had predicted if the well was intact. And pressures are now rising very slowly.

Modified mosquito may block malaria By Rachel Bernstein Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Malaria kills nearly 1 million people a year, but it has a weakness — to infect humans, it needs mosquitoes. In a potential step toward eradicating the disease, researchers reported this week that they have developed a genetically engineered breed of mosquito that cannot be infected by the malaria-causing parasite. Genetically modified mosqui-

toes are far from ready for use in the field, but the researchers achieved an unprecedented 100 percent blockage of the Plasmodium parasite, highlighting the promise of this approach. The team, led by entomologist Michael Riehle at the University of Arizona, created the mosquitoes by changing a single gene, one involved in the production of insulin. To test the effect of that change, researchers injected 90 of the mosquitoes with the malaria parasite. Ten days

later, at a point when normal mosquitoes would have bellies full of parasites, they didn’t find a single one. This is the first instance of a genetic modification that completely blocked development of a malaria parasite that can infect humans. The research was reported online Thursday in the journal PLoS Pathogens. “We were just hoping to see any reduction,” Riehle said. “We were pretty shocked that it was that great.”

Feinberg urges victims not to file lawsuits New York Times News Service NEW ORLEANS — Kenneth Feinberg, hopping in and out of a Learjet, a helicopter and several SUVs, took his gift for oratory to four towns in southern Louisiana on Thursday to make his pitch to locals: He has a big chunk of a $20 billion fund from BP to compensate those harmed by the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, and they should get their share. Even with that kind of bankroll to pay claims, he was playing the role of salesman and politician. Despite his 64 years, Feinberg shows no sign of slowing down as he cajoles people to steer clear of the courts. His campaign stops are high-energy affairs. He jabs the air, punches up words to drive home a point and gets laughs with self-deprecating references to his Boston accent. Flying on a private jet paid for by BP, Feinberg arrived in New Orleans early, although it was already his second stop of the day, after a 7 a.m. visit with Gov. Bob Riley of Alabama. At the Jefferson Parish Council chambers in Harahan, he told a crowd of civic leaders and business people that he was there because his years of experience in administering compensation funds taught him a lesson. He described the two-part claims process. (BP has paid out more than $200 million from 36 claims offices to more than 32,000 claimants so far.) Then, 90 days after the well is declared permanently plugged, comes the tougher phase of the three-year program: negotiating with each claimant for the lump sum to cover economic losses from the spill. Those who accept the payment will have to sign a waiver stating that they will not sue BP. “If you think the lump sum payment is inadequate, don’t sign,” he said, adding that the litigation route in court will mean uncertainty, years of delay and a big cut for the lawyers. “I am determined to come up with a system that will be more generous, more beneficial, than if you go and file a lawsuit.”

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“I would like to turn your attention to the fact that it is our domestic legislation, and not an international act,” he said. “Each country has the right to perfect its own legislation, including that which affects special services. And we will do this.” He added that “what’s going on now — I would like you to know this — was done by my own direct instructions.” It was not clear whether he meant the drafting of the bill or its subsequent revision. The bill has been criticized by opposition legislators in parliament, but both the upper and lower houses are dominated by Kremlin loyalists. The measure passed in the lower house Friday by a vote of 354 to 96; passage by the upper house is considered almost certain. The version is somewhat weakened from an earlier draft, which prescribed punishment for individuals who ignored such warnings from the FSB, the country’s current intelligence service, the successor to the KGB. Amendments proposed during the bill’s first and second readings in parliament also removed a provision that would have allowed the FSB to publish its warnings in the media and to summon citizens to FSB offices to be warned.

Pressure levels look good; BP officials cautious

OVER

Not an international issue, president says

Early well tests encouraging

SOFAS AS LOW AS

MOSCOW — The lower house of the Russian parliament passed a draft law Friday allowing the country’s intelligence service to officially warn citizens that their activities could lead to a future violation of the law, reviving a Soviet-era KGB practice that was often used against dissidents. President Dmitry Medvedev is expected to sign it into law shortly. The legislation was proposed during the tense weeks after two suicide bombers attacked the Moscow subway. Its stated goal is to stanch the growth of radicalism among Russian young people. In a letter made public Thursday, 20 leading human rights representatives condemned it as a blow to “the cornerstone principles of law: the presumption of innocence and legal certainty.” Asked about the bill Thursday by a reporter in Yekaterinburg, where he was meeting with the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, Medvedev intimated that foreign observers had little business questioning it.

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Obama, family vacation in coastal Maine By Sheryl Gay Stolberg New York Times News Service

BAR HARBOR, Maine — It has been 100 years, the local newspaper reports, since a sitting president chose this picturesque seaside village as his vacation spot. President Barack Obama arrived here Friday for a summer weekend getaway with his wife, Michelle, and their daughters, Malia, 12, and Sasha, 9 — a precursor to a longer family vacation they are planning next month

on Martha’s Vineyard. But what sounds like a much-needed family escape from the literal and political heat of Washington to some sounds like hypocrisy to others, given recent statements by both the president and first lady urging Americans to spend their vacation time and money along the shores of the oil-stricken Gulf of Mexico. Bill Clinton and his family traveled to Jackson Hole, Wyo., in the summer of 1996 after polling

showed that Americans viewed Martha’s Vineyard as too elitist. George W. Bush caught so much flak for spending a month at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, in the summer of 2001, said his former press secretary, Ari Fleischer, that his staff printed T-shirts listing all the work-related side trips he had taken. Fleischer may disagree with Obama’s policies, but he said he was protective of the president’s right to “recharge his batteries” wherever it suited him.

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A4 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R Seminary hopes to unite faiths in training Pioneering female bishop resigns amid abuse criticism By Manya A. Brachear Chicago Tribune

By Jeff Black McClatchy-Tribune News Service

HAMBURG, Germany — The Lutheran bishop of Hamburg, Maria Jepsen, has resigned amid criticism that she mishandled a sex-abuse case in her diocese. The accusations against Jepsen, who was the first Lutheran female bishop in the world when she was appointed in 1992, relate to alleged sexual abuse of between five “My credibility will and 20 minors by a now be in doubt. I pastor in the town of Ahrensburg, in Jep- do not see myself sen’s diocese, during in the position the 1980s. Jepsen, 65, is accused to continue to of not reacting appro- spread God’s priately to the alleged abuse. The bishop said word as I had she was not resign- promised.” ing in an admission of guilt, but rather to pre- — Bishop Maria vent further damage to Jepsen, Hamburg, the church. Germany “My credibility will now be in doubt. I do not see myself in the position to continue to spread God’s word as I had promised,” she said at a brief press conference in Hamburg. The latest case comes as both major Christian denominations in Germany are being shaken by scandals dealing with abuse or other misconduct. The Catholic Church is battling dozens of separate allegations of sexual molestation by priests dating back to the 1950s, as well as a power struggle between the Vatican and the former bishop of Augsburg, also over allegations of mistreatment of children. Margot Kaessman, the former head of the Protestant federation of churches in Germany and the bishop of Hanover, resigned in February following a drunken-driving incident. In the Ahrensburg case, a witness claims to have informed Jepsen of the alleged abuse as early as 1999, an assertion that Jepsen has disputed. A victims’ association also accuses a church-instigated disciplinary committee, set up to investigate the pastor in question, who has since retired, of foot-dragging.

CHICAGO — A Chicago seminary plans to pioneer the collective training of clergy of multiple faiths. Meadville Lombard Theological School, a Unitarian Universalist seminary in Hyde Park, Ill., hopes to join Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, Catholic and Protestant institutions to train clergy together, including offering some shared courses where there is common ground. Andover Newton Theological School, a United Church of Christ seminary in the Boston area, is its only partner so far. Leaders say the interreligious approach heralds the future of theological education and could save financially strapped seminaries nationwide.

“We need to learn to appreciate the traditions out of which we come and to live in an atmosphere of acceptance that goes way beyond tolerance.”

— Rev. Peter Morales, president, Unitarian Universalist Association

“We live in an era when religious tribalism affects us every day,” said the Rev. Peter Morales, president of the Unitarian Universalist Association. “We need to learn to appreciate the traditions out of which we come and to live in an atmosphere of acceptance that goes way beyond tolerance. A seminary like this can help lead the way.” Claremont School of Theology, a historically Methodist seminary in California, announced last month that

it would add clerical training for Muslims and Jews to its curriculum this fall. Meadville Lombard and Andover Newton estimate it will take about a year to roll out its multifaith vision. Although there are other seminaries that accept students of multiple faiths — Catholic Theological Union in Hyde Park offers a master’s in theology with a concentration on interfaith dialogue — the new model is part of an effort to train students who will go on to serve as clergy of their own

religious communities in the context of a diverse religious landscape. It also demonstrates a growing awareness of the role religious differences play in global diplomacy. “The world is really shrinking and fracturing around religion,” said the Rev. Lee Barker, president of Meadville Lombard, who will become a senior executive of the new “theological university.” The multifaith model presents uncharted territory for denominations, which historically have counted on seminaries to ground students in their particular religious traditions. For American Muslims who have no institutions in the U.S. to train imams, the model opens a potential pathway for second-generation Muslims who don’t want to travel overseas for training but want to lead congregations.

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Voodoo pilgrims bathe in a waterfall believed to have purifying powers during an annual celebration in Saut d’Eau, Haiti, on Friday. The annual pilgrimage to Saut d’Eau venerates the site where believers say the Virgin Mary, whom many here revere as the goddess of love, Ezili Danto, once appeared.

R   B Lead Pastor Ken Wytsma will share the message at 9:30 a.m. and lead the Redux Q & A service at 11:15 Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “God Is In The Manufacturing Business” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Ryan Emerick will share a sermon titled “By Faith” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Getting More Than You Asked For,” based on Ephesians 3:14-21, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Maximize Our Limitations,” based on Matthew 14:13-21, at 10 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit” as part of the series “Q & A: Your Questions. God’s Answers” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Share stories from the heart with like-minded people who love God at the 1:30 p.m. Sunday worship service sponsored by Eckankar, The Light and Sound of God, held at Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share the message “Two Sides of Hope,” based on John 6:1-15, as part of the series “The Jesus Story: Twenty Days That Changed the World” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth

services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “The Unserving Servant” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Missionaries Tim and Hannah Alexander will share their experiences with Mercy Ships at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “Living Beyond Fear” at the 9 a.m. contemporary, 10:45 a.m. traditional services Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “Hospitality,” based on Genesis 18:1-10 and Luke 10:38-42, at the 9 a.m. contemporary and 10:30 a.m. traditional services Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Joel LiaBraaten will share the messages “First Things First” and “Special Time” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will conclude the series “I Want a Movie Life,” based on Romans 12:1-2 at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Regal Old Mill

16 Cinemas, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., Bend. • Glenn Austin will share the message “Joshua” as part four in the series “EPIC — Life Stories of the Bible” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Father James McKee will share the message “Jesus Christ, the Bread of Life” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Orthodox Mission of Bend, 1900 N.E. Division St., Suite 109, Bend. • Daryl Ochs will share the message “The Consciousness Adventure” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor David Carnahan will share the message “The Mystery of God’s Grace,” based on Colossians 1:21-29, at 10 a.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Charles Campbell will lead a discussion on the topic “Principled Economics” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor Scott McBride will share the message “What If God is Still Talking … Am I Listen-

ing?” as part of the series “Summer Sweeps” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Cash Lowe will share the message “Dare To Do Something That Doesn’t Make Sense,” based on Nehemiah 1 at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • The youth will be sharing experiences from their mission trip to Mexico at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary and 11 a.m. traditional services Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Deathbed Blessings and Prophecy,” based on Genesis 47:27-50:3, as part of the series “Joseph — The

Hand of Providence” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “Like St. Mary, Christians Sit at the Feet of Jesus and Learn of Eternal Life Through His Word and Sacraments,” based on Luke 10:39, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne. • Bend organist Mark Oglesby will present a repertoire ranging from baroque to post-modern on the new Rodgers Trillium organ at 7 p.m. Saturday at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care plus Teen Ministry 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road A Stephen Ministry Congregation

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

Christian Schools “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St . • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship Our theme for 2010 is “Expectancy” Pastor Mike Johnson will share his message titled, The Jesus Story: Twenty Days that Changed the World “Two Sides of Hope” John 6:1-15. 10:30 am Children’s Church “Faithtown” WEDNESDAYS 7:00 PM: Fuel Youth Group Adult small groups weekly Child care provided during Sunday morning service. Pastor Michael Johnson www.bendfcc.com

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver OR 97707 “Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am. • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs -6th gr.) • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am. • Home Bible Studies are also available. Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org

REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone This Sunday at First Baptist, Tim and Hannah Alexander, missionaries with Mercy Ships in Africa, will be presenting. For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, La Pine 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00AM Sunday Mass — 10:00AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00PM HOLY TRINITY, Sunriver 18143 Cottonwood Rd Thursday Mass — 9:30AM Saturday Vigil Mass — 5:30PM Sunday Mass — 8:00AM Confessions: Thursdays 9:00–9:15AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00–12:15PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Joe Reinig Fr. Daniel Maxwell Deacon Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM

BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.stfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Episcopal

Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School & Trek (Middle School)) Monday 6:30 PM 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH Summer Sweeps – Part 2 Flash Forward Pastor Scott McBride What if God is still talking ... am I listening? MAIN CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00 and 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00 and 10:45am Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th and 5th Grades Meet: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 10:45am SOUTH CAMPUS Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97701 Sunday at 11:00am

Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 11:00am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Rabbi Jay Shupack Rebbetzin Judy Shupack Shabbat and High Holiday Services Religious Education Program Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study • Adult Education Call 541-385-6421 for information. We welcome everyone to our services. TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. We offer a wide range of monthly activities including services, children’s education, Torah study, adult education and social functions.

or call 541-388-8826

CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo

Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth July 18, 2010 Message: “Dare To Do Somethng That Doesn’t Make Sense” The Book of Nehemiah Chapter 1 Speaker: Cash Lowe POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm 4th Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach

www.bendfp.org 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation

July 18, 2010 at 11:00 am “Principled Economics” - discussion led by Charles Campbell. This month’s discussion topic. “Principled Economics,” is an outgrowth of conversations in the Social Action Committee (SAC). Social justice and economics seem to be entangled so it seems prudent to have a discussion to explore how economics affects social well-being. Two articles will be reviewed for the discussion; anyone interested in receiving the articles in advance of Sunday’s discussion please email uufco@yahoo.com.

1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim Pastor www.zionrdm.com

Childcare and is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 www.uufco.org (541) 385-3908

Mennonite

Unity Community

THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome

UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569United Church of God

Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. United by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with us at 10 a.m. The next meetings are: Sunday, July 18th in Bend and Sunday, August 1st, in Redmond at the Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 SW 29th St. For information on location, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call the church at: 541-388-2230 or, email: prishardin@earthlink.net

THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey

Christian

SUMMER SCHEDULE Sunday Worship Service at 10:00 am

High Seas Expedition! Vacation Bible School July 26-29 Click Web site to sign up

United Church of Christ

For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org

NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond

Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always!

Nazarene

Evangelical

ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

www.trinitylutheranbend.org church e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.saints.org school e-mail: infor@saints.org

Wednesday 5:30 pm The Fold (9th-12th grades) Movie Night 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship

BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30am Sunday

Latin sung Mass at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, July 18, at the downtown church. *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass.

Vacation Bible School at Trinity August 23–27 from 9:00 AM–12:00 PM “You’ll be zip, zap, zoomin’ for Jesus on Planet Zoom”

Sunday Worship 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years, We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 • www.jccobend.com

Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 7:30 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM

Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM

Summer Schedule of Services June 20 – September 5 9:00 AM Sunday School / Bible Study 10:00 AM Worship Nursery provided on Sundays

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor “Living Beyond Fear”

Jewish Synagogues

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M.

Bible Church

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com

Terrebonne Foursquare Church Located in the quiet community of Terrebonne. Overlooking the impressive Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Be inspired. Enjoy encouragement. Find friends. Encounter God. Get away, every Sunday.

We welcome Rabbi Glenn Ettman to our community. Join us August 20th when Rabbi Ettman will conduct services, or if you are interested in finding out more about Rabbi Ettman please call. All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street

\Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study, Wednesday 7:15 a.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 SUMMER SERVICE TIMES Temporary Meeting Location St. Helens Hall at Trinity Episcopal Church 231 NW Idaho Sunday Service 9:30 AM Choir meets at 8:30 AM Please tell your friends. Sermon by Pastor David C . Nagler “A Deeper Hunger” Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational ALFALFA COMMUNITY CHURCH Alfalfa Community Hall 541-330-0593, Alfalfa, Oregon Sunday School 9:30, Worship 10:30 We sing hymns, pray for individual needs, and examine the Bible verse by verse. You can be certain of an eternity with Jesus (Eph. 2:8,9) and you can discover His plan and purpose for your life (Eph. 2:10). We welcome your fellowship with us. CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Pastor Thom Larson 9:00am Contemporary Service 10:30am Traditional Service Sermon title “**Hospitality*” Scripture: Genesis 18:1-10 & Luke 10:38-42 Jubilee Service for Children *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING

CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 · 541-389-8241 Sunday Morning Worship 8:45 AM, 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care Provided

4 Saturdays and TMC:

Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

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$100 5 Saturdays and TMC:

Presbyterian

The Bulletin: Every Saturday on

COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367

the church page. $20 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday

Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 10:00 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 1:00 pm - Middle School Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program 7:00 pm - Senior High Youth Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $20 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch

383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Temples


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Smile! Continued from A1 But a carefree smile matters. “A smile is priceless,” Panchura said. “It’s the first impression someone makes.” She couldn’t just give away orthodontia. Instead, she wanted to make a sustainable business plan. So Panchura, who has practiced in Central Oregon since 1989, asks her Smile! Central Oregon patients to volunteer in the community in exchange for reductions in the cost of their braces and other orthodontic work. For every hour that a family volunteers, it receives $10 off its bill. The orthodontist estimates that for every day the clinic is open, its patients volunteer between 600 and 1,000 hours in community nonprofits all over Central Oregon. Families can pay up to half their bills with volunteer work. They can also bank volunteer hours for future appointments. Unlike most orthodontic clinics, which require families to sign contracts and pay a certain amount each month, Smile! Central Oregon’s patients pay as they go at each appointment; payments are cash only. Patients know ahead of time how much their appointments will cost and what their options are; for example, if an appointment is going to cost $100, a family could arrive with $100 in cash or $50 plus a pledge of five hours of volunteer work.

No screening process There is no screening process or requirements for who can participate; anyone willing to do the volunteer work is eligible. Some families volunteer together, while other parents and children volunteer at various locations around the community. When Panchura started the clinic in 2008, she spread word through nonprofits and dentist offices. Now, Panchura has about

Corruption Continued from A1 Elsewhere, attorneys for former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich, D, moved unsuccessfully to delay his trial in Chicago, where he faces charges of honest-services fraud, racketeering, attempted extortion, bribery and conspiracy. Attorneys for former U.S. Rep. William Jefferson, D-La., may raise the matter in the appeal of his 2009 conviction and 13-year prison sentence for crimes including soliciting bribes, money laundering and racketeering. “We don’t know how many cases may be affected, but this is one of most-used tools in public corruption investigations,” said Melanie Sloan, executive director of Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. Public interest groups say Congress should tighten federal corruption laws, citing court decisions since 2007 that narrowed

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Smile! Central Oregon patients Yaneth Espinoza, left, and her son, Gerardo Pulido, 15, meet with Dr. Julie Panchura on Friday morning at The Brace Place in Bend. 100 patients through Smile! Central Oregon. And Panchura is willing to go bigger; she said she’ll continue accepting patients until it becomes impossible to serve any more. And she’s not done yet. Panchura plans to start a website that will encourage more businesses to follow Smile! Central Oregon’s example. Since she started the clinic, several dentists have piggybacked off Panchura’s idea to offer discounted dental care like cleanings and fillings using the same model. “Unless you have endless resources, you can’t thrive or survive” without some payment, she said. The clinic is only open two or three days each month. Appointments are at The Brace Place in northeast Bend. At 10 a.m. on Friday, there were six patients in the chairs at The Brace Place. Yaneth Espinoza sat with her son, Gerardo Pulido, 15, throughout his appointment. Both Espinoza and Gerardo are receiving orthodontic care through Smile! Central Oregon, but Friday was Gerardo’s day in the chair.

“I’m so happy,” Espinoza said. “We can’t afford it otherwise, so this was a way to do it with service hours.” Gerardo has been volunteering at Catholic youth summer camps this summer, and the whole family volunteers at Bethlehem Inn and the soup kitchen at Trinity Episcopal Church in Bend. The family has long volunteered through St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church, so the orthodontia is just a bonus to their hard work. “I knew he would need it, and when the time came, I said, ‘I’ll have to find out how to do this because I can’t afford it,’” she said.

the types of “official actions” that public servants are barred from performing for people who give them money or gifts. Those rulings also require that prosecutors show more specifically that illegal actions were done in return for money. “All these things are combining to really give members of Congress ... much less to fear from watchdogs than 10 years ago,” Sloan said. Legal experts say the effect of the Skilling decision will vary case by case. Prosecutors increasingly turned to honest-services fraud charges in recent years to target patterns of self-dealing and conflicts of interest by government and corporate officials, even without a direct quid pro quo. Critics said that the law was so vague that it could apply to a government employee skipping work to see a ballgame and that it gave prosecutors too much discretion over whom to charge. Jefferson and Blagojevich may

find it hard to benefit from the situation, because their cases include allegations of bribery, and in Blagojevich’s case, prosecutors obtained a new indictment with other charges, anticipating the Supreme Court’s decision. But federal prosecutors have said that the high court decision should have no effect on the case against Ring because bribery is a central component. The former lobbyist and congressional aide allegedly helped Abramoff arrange campaign contributions to then-Rep. John Doolittle, lied about his knowledge of a lucrative job arranged by lobbyists for Doolittle’s wife, Julie, and treated Doolittle’s staff to rock concerts, football games and fancy meals. Attorneys for Ring, who have said he is not guilty, argue that the case was grounded in the honestservices law, and they have asked Huvelle to dismiss several counts from his first trial, which ended in a hung jury. The Doolittles say that they are

‘I like to help others’ Gerardo enjoys the work. “I love to volunteer because I like to help others,” he said. He’s also looking forward to getting his braces off, although it could take up to three years. “You’ll be handsome,” Espinoza said. In the next chair, Chloe sat waiting for her first tightening. She got her braces in April. “For the first few days, it hurts because your teeth are moving, but then it goes away,” she said. “You get used to having them in

your mouth.” Panchura believes most patients want to pay their good fortune forward. And for the teenagers who get their braces through the program, the volunteer work is a learning opportunity. “It gives them responsibility, job skills, networking. There are so many things that are good about this,” she said. Across the room, 9-year-old Cassie Felty was having brackets put on her bottom teeth. Her mom, Heather Felty, does most of the volunteering, going regularly to a Redmond retirement center to sing for the residents. Another daughter volunteers at Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch. Felty knew Cassie would need braces, but with two other children already receiving orthodontic care, she couldn’t afford the third. Then she heard about Smile! Central Oregon. “I would have had to postpone Cassie’s,” Felty said. “But she had a crossbite, and it was wearing her bottom teeth out.” Some patients have never volunteered before; others, like the Callisters, have been doing volunteer work for years. “Now they can use it as currency,” Panchura said. Kent Callister’s entire family volunteers to defray the cost of his braces. They work at MountainStar Family Relief Nursery in the day care with 2-year-olds. On Friday morning before his appointment, Kent got in extra volunteer hours by cleaning the local skate park. “I mopped the whole park, I cleaned up the trash,” he said. “It was really just cleaning up all the dust.” Kent still has at least three months until he gets his braces off. “I definitely need it with my teeth now,” he said. “But once I’m done, I’ll be in perfect condition.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

innocent of wrongdoing and that authorities have told them the investigation of them is over. Justice Department spokeswoman Laura Sweeney declined to estimate how many cases are affected by the court’s ruling.

Bats

Rabies symptoms

Continued from A1 Rabies is an infectious viral disease that affects the nervous systems of humans and animals. If untreated, it is almost always fatal. People who have been exposed can be treated with a series of vaccinations. Sarah Decker, with the Jefferson County Public Health Department, said bats can slip through small spaces, such as a tear in a screen door. The most common way for people to come into contact with rabies is with a rabid animal. Health officials emphasized vaccinating cats because they often find sick bats and are less likely to be up-to-date on rabies vaccinations. “The most important thing is to make sure people get their pets vaccinated, and they will be protecting themselves by doing that,” Decker said. The last case of fatal rabies in Oregon in a human was about 30 years ago. This is the first bat that has tested positive for rabies in Jefferson County since 2003. So far this year, three foxes, one goat and four bats have tested positive for rabies in other Oregon counties, according to the Jefferson County Health Department. In 2007, a rabid bat flew through a screenless window in Bend and bit a woman while she was sleeping. At the time, Deschutes County Health Department officials said some-

If bit, people should immediately call their local health departments and then get vaccine and immunoglobulin shots within 10 days of the bite. The Deschutes County Health Department can be reached at 541-322-7418, Jefferson County residents can call 541-475-4456, and Crook County residents can call 541-447-5165. • Disorientation • Confusion • Salivation • Headaches • Inability to sleep • Difficulty swallowing • Muscle spasms of the throat • Pain, burning and numbness at the site of infection For more information on bats, go to www.dfw.state. or.us/wildlife/living_with/ docs/bats.pdf Source: Deschutes County Health Department and Bat Conservation International.

one is bit by a rabid bat at least twice a year. In the past 10 years, about 9.5 percent of bats tested in Oregon have rabies. “There is kind of a summertime preponderance of exposures to bats,” Cieslak said. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Minor earthquake shakes D.C. The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Earthquakes are so rare in the Washington area that even a geology student wasn’t quite sure what was going on when a minor one hit early Friday. Was it a truck passing by? A low-flying plane? Gerasimos Michalitsianos, who will be a senior at the University of Maryland, College Park, was sitting on his couch looking at e-mails when the 3.6-magnitude temblor occurred. The quake happened at

5:04 a.m. and was centered in the Rockville, Md., area, said Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist with U.S. Geological Survey’s National Earthquake Information Center. More than 18,000 people logged on to the U.S. Geological Survey’s website to report feeling it.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

In poster, North Korea boasts of a ship sinking By Choe Sang-Hun New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — A propaganda poster recently smuggled out of North Korea depicts the North Korean military smashing an enemy warship in half, a scene evocative of the sinking of a South Korean warship earlier this year. Although the poster did not identify the ship in the poster as the Cheonan, the South Korean corvette sunk in March, it raised suspicions that North Korea may have begun bragging about the sinking for domestic propaganda purposes, said Radio Free Asia, which released a photograph of the poster this week. With the caption, “If they attack, we will smash them in a single blow,” the poster shows

the red fist of a North Korean sailor splitting an enemy ship. The Cheonan was split in two and sunk in waters near the disputed western sea border between the two Koreas. Forty-six sailors were killed.

Secret medals A South Korean-led team of international investigators concluded in May that the ship was destroyed by a North Korean torpedo attack, though North Korea has denied involvement. But North Korea secretly awarded medals to the crew of a North Korean submarine and boasted of its victory during propaganda lectures for its military and party elites, according to recent reports by South Korean

websites that collect news from sources inside the North. The government in Seoul could not confirm those reports, and the North’s official news media have repeatedly accused the South and the United States of fabricating the Cheonan sinking to raise tensions. Radio Free Asia, which is supported by the United States, said it obtained the photograph of the poster from a Chinese businessman who recently returned from North Korea. It remained unclear whether the poster was made before or after the Cheonan sinking, or whether it depicted an earlier North-South naval clash and was distributed now to put up a fierce face amid rising tensions with the West.

Tracy A. Woodward / The Washington Post

“That’s the first question that everyone asks,” says artist Benjamin Kelley. “Where I get the bones.” Kelley’s work utilizes a mixture of resin and pulverized human bones in his work.

Bones Continued from A1 But bone dealers worry that theirs might be a dying business, threatened by foreign export laws. India and China used to be the main providers, but those supplies have all but disappeared. Dust to dust. Ashes to ashes. Ostensibly, the bones are there for medical and dental schools — professionals who have a vested interest in knowing how the hip bone’s connected to the back bone. However, “we sell more bones to artists than we do to science,” says Ronald Cauble, who has been running the Bone Room since 1987. “One of our biggest sales was to Damien Hirst,” he of the formaldehyde cows and diamond-encrusted platinum skull. Hirst bought that particular skull elsewhere, but Cauble says he sold the artist a whole pile of other bones. “They haven’t become any art yet, to our knowledge,” Cauble says. “He’s renovating his castle, he’s sawing things in half, he’s doing sharks in formaldehyde. He’s busy.”

Skulls Unlimited People have been known to purchase bones for unusual reasons. Skulls Unlimited is one of the only facilities in the country to offer full cadaver preparation, meaning that it will transform fleshy bodies into glistening skeletons, with the assistance of dermestid beetles. This is usually for medical institutions, but owner Jay Villemarette says that he recently cleaned a man’s skull to be returned to the man’s widow. Villemarette says requests like that are rare, but adds that simple bone purchases are such that “we can barely keep up with the demand.” However, he notes, the bone industry is at a critical point, due to a mass shortage. The United States, with its efficient burial practices, has never been a good skeleton provider: In order to prevent illegal use, Americans who donate their bodies to science usually go through accredited universities. Buyers once got their bones from India, which did a brisk trade in expertly prepared skeletons. Then, in the 1980s, the Indian government made it illegal to export human remains. Whatever bone scavenging still happens is illicit. China picked up some of the supply slack, dealers say, but it never did the volume that India had. And the bone trade was

“You could be doing the weirdest thing ever, but if you say, ‘I’m an artist,’ then people will leave you alone.” — Erik Thor Sandberg, artist

halted altogether in 2008 when the Chinese government cracked down. Now, most of what’s available in the United States are the stockpiles — a dwindling stash that could run out within a few years. The medical community has turned to artificial models, which can replicate human skeletons to near perfection, but that type of substitution simply won’t do for artists or collectors. “It’s really been a terrible problem,” says Cauble. “You run into all sorts of cultural issues,” with various religious beliefs prohibiting interfering with cadavers. He pauses. “And, of course, there’s the yuck factor.”

$1,600 human skull “Our skulls are running very low,” says Villemarette. The few that he has in stock are expensive, running in the neighborhood of $1,400 to $1,600. Most of those are designated “Research Quality,” meaning they can only be sold to doctors or academic institutions. On the other hand, “we have lots of fibula. ... And ribs? We have a lifetime supply of ribs.” Villemarette pauses. Maybe, he says, “lifetime” is not a good word here. But is it legal? This is all well and good, but we live in America, land of laws. Surely someone has something to say about the legality of all this. Who would regulate the buying and selling of bones? The National Institutes of Health? “(We’re) not aware of any federal laws on this particular point,” writes NIH spokesman Donald Ralbovsky, who then suggests calling the Department of Justice. “We can’t offer a blanket opinion on whether something would be legal,” writes DOJ’s Laura Sweeney. Perhaps the Federal Trade Commission? “We wouldn’t be involved in the regulation,” says Mitch Katz of the FTC. “We would be more involved in a deceptive advertising aspect.” Meaning? “If someone was representing

it as a human femur, but it wasn’t a femur,” then the FTC might get involved. Of course. There is a multitude of regulations that dictate what one can and cannot do with a human body. Bones of American Indians, for example, are protected by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. It’s illegal to make a profit on bones for transplantation purposes, just as it’s illegal with kidneys or livers. But in general, federal law does not specifically address the sale of human bones. Many states allow bones to be purchased only for educational purposes. To comply with New York’s law, Evolution can only sell to medical professionals. Ebay’s policy also says bones must be purchased for research — but identities are easy to fudge online, where no one can tell the difference between a medical student and a skinny Goth kid who needs the skull to represent the blackness of his soul. In the District of Columbia, possessing bones is fine, but displaying them is not, writes Kate Stanton, a spokesperson for the D.C. Attorney General’s Office. “Exhibition requires a permit, and use in an art exhibition would not be a permissible exhibition ... the typical permissible request is a medical convention,” she writes, not a Cadillac hood ornament. When Kelley, a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, is informed that his artwork might be illegal, he debates the technicalities: “I’m not using the entire bone,” he says. “I’ve broken it down into dust and altered it into a different form. Does that make a difference?”

Some see disrespect Not according to Stanton. “Does the artist specifically call attention to the fact that the pigments include human remains?” she asks. By identifying the bones as human remains, Kelley has shown a lack of respect for the dead. If Kelley is investigated for his bone work, he won’t be the first artist. Washington area artist Erik Thor Sandberg has bought several human bones to use as models for his paintings. His purchases once caught the attention of the FBI. The feds halted the questioning when Sandberg gave his profession. “You could be doing the weirdest thing ever,” Sandberg says, “but if you say, ‘I’m an artist,’ then people will leave you alone.”

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 A7

Former general counsel to succeed Byrd By Bernie Becker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — West Virginia’s governor, Joe Manchin III, announced Friday that he had chosen Carte Goodwin, his former general counsel, to temporarily fill the Senate seat long held by Robert Byrd. Goodwin, 36, will serve until a special election is held, which will likely be later this year. Manchin has expressed interest in being a candidate in that race. At an event announcing his appointment in Charleston, Goodwin said it would be

Lithia Continued from A1 Without Thomas’ GM location, and because GM also cut ties with Dave Hamilton Chevrolet-Jeep in Redmond, the closest GM dealership would be in Madras, according to a previous article in The Bulletin. Now that the DMV has given Lithia the go-ahead to operate Chevrolet Cadillac of Bend as an auto dealership, it implies that Lithia will actually operate a GM dealership in Bend, despite GM not letting Bob Thomas continue his. A Lithia spokesperson did not return requests for comment. Along with Oregon’s congressional delegation, Thomas spent much of 2010 working to secure an arbitration with GM. Thomas told The Bulletin last month that he did not have an arbitration hearing, but he did reach a settlement with GM, the details of which he is barred from discussing. Earlier this month, the city of Bend approved two business licenses related to Lithia. One was for Bend Honda, and the other for Lithia Body & Paint. Lithia, which has sold cars since 1946, is a family-owned company that went public in 1996. Its New York Stock Exchange price ended Friday at $6.44, down from a 52-week high of more than $16. David Whiston, a Chicagobased analyst who covers Lithia for Morningstar, said the company has differentiated itself from other large auto dealership chains by focusing on smaller, rural markets. Because Bend is in Lithia’s home state, because of the Honda, Chevrolet and Cadillac brands, and because of Bend’s size, “it’s probably the kind of deal they’re looking for,” Whiston said. The benefit of opening in

impossible to fill the shoes of Byrd, a Democrat who died last month after serving more than a half-century in the Senate. “But what I can do, and what I will do, is try my best to emulate his work ethic and his commitment to the law, the Constitution and this great state,” said Goodwin, who will become the youngest member of the Senate. Goodwin will also be the 59th member of the Senate’s Democratic caucus, joining it just days after Democrats struggled to cobble together the votes needed to pass an overhaul of

small markets, he said, is that Lithia doesn’t have to compete with the nation’s largest dealers, like AutoNation, which typically focus on large cities. “They don’t have to fight other deep-pocket competitors,” he said. Lithia did get in trouble financially during the recession, Whiston said, but it was able to dig itself out more easily than some other businesses because Lithia owns most of its dealerships’ buildings, instead of leasing them. That allowed the company to sell stores off to gain capital, he said. Lithia was forced to cut off some of its planned growth. Though the company has a strong presence in the Western states, it had planned to expand east, Whiston said. “In the short term, we will see them focus in Western United States,” he said. It may not necessarily be Lithia’s name recognition that could seemingly lead to the company opening a GM dealership in Bend, Whiston said. No matter how large they are, auto dealers don’t necessarily have a lot of clout when negotiating with suppliers, he said. However, suppliers have cut ties with one dealership in a spe-

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financial regulations. Sen. Harry Reid of Nevada, the majority leader, said Thursday that the new senator would be sworn in Tuesday. The member of a prominent West Virginia family, Goodwin now works as a lawyer in Charleston, after serving as Manchin’s general counsel from 2005 to 2009. His wife, Rochelle, is the state director for John D. Rockefeller IV, a Democrat who holds West Virginia’s other Senate seat. Goodwin said on Friday that he would not be a candidate in the special election for the seat.

cific market, then made an agreement to start anew with another dealership in that same market, Whiston said, giving Chrysler as an example. That happened to Matt Thomas. His Chrysler and Dodge franchises at Thomas Sales & Service were given to Jim Smolich Motors for free, according to a previous article in The Bulletin. Matt Thomas, who is not related to Bob Thomas, said it wouldn’t bother him if Lithia opened in Bend. Thomas Sales & Service still sells Subarus and used cars. “I welcome all competitors,” Matt Thomas said. “Competition is good for me.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville


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A8 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Pact lets Zimbabwe export limited number of diamonds

GLASS CANOPY FALLS ONTO N.J. GARAGE

By Alan Cowell New York Times News Service

PARIS — A global body created to curb trade in diamonds that finance conflict has agreed to allow Zimbabwe to export limited numbers of stones from fields where the military has been accused of violent human rights abuses and smuggling, representatives of the diamond industry and advocacy groups said Friday. The agreement emerged Thursday at meetings in St. Petersburg, Russia, involving the World Diamond Council, an industry body, and a U.N.-backed group called the Kimberley Process, set up by countries, diamond industry representatives and advocacy groups to counter sales of so-called blood diamonds.

Widespread reports of human rights abuses and violence in the Marange diamond fields of eastern Zimbabwe have provided a critical test of whether the Kimberly Process can realize its aspirations of preventing illicit profits from fueling conflicts and abuse.

Estimated $1.7 billion The deal provides for Zimbabwe to export two batches of rough diamonds before Sept. 6 under the supervision of monitors from the Kimberley Process. The amount Zimbabwe is likely to earn from the sales was not immediately made known. According to news reports, the Mines Ministry in Harare has estimated the value of its stock-

N.Y. governor signs bill limiting street-stop data By Al Baker and Ray Rivera New York Times News Service

Mel Evans / The Associated Press

Police and rescue workers check for survivors Friday after a glass canopy that had been attached to a high-rise condominium building fell onto a parking garage two stories below, partly collapsing the structure and trapping at least one person. Crews cleared debris and shored up the three-story structure in preparation for the rescue of the victim, who was trapped in a car in the first level.

Most blame Bush for debt, joblessness, war Bloomberg News WASHINGTON — Democrats, facing a U.S. electorate angry about the economy and other issues, still have one political asset: George W. Bush. The former Republican president is blamed more than President Barack Obama for the budget deficit, unemployment and illegal immigration, according to a Bloomberg National Poll conducted July 9-12. Most surprising is that 60 percent say Bush is primarily respon-

sible for the current situation in Afghanistan. Just 10 percent point to Obama, who has ordered 51,000 additional troops to that country since taking office, doubling the number deployed by Bush. Asked to compare Bush’s response to Hurricane Katrina with Obama’s handling of the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, 51 percent say Bush’s performance was worse, while 35 percent name Obama. Republicans are more likely to pan Obama’s performance on the oil spill, with 69 percent saying he

did worse than Bush. More blame Bush than Obama for the federal deficit, 32 percent to 24 percent. Among Republicans, 39 percent say Obama is to blame, while about a quarter of independents hold that view. On unemployment, Bush is listed as most responsible by 32 percent, compared with 22 percent for Obama. Those with incomes below $25,000 are more likely to blame Bush for the unemployment rate, which was 9.5 percent in June.

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NEW YORK — Gov. David A. Paterson on Friday signed legislation prohibiting the New York Police Department from electronically storing the names and addresses of people stopped on the streets but found to have done nothing wrong. Paterson’s support of the bill, which will fundamentally alter how the New York City police can use information gleaned from street stops, comes despite heated opposition from Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg and Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly. In a letter to the governor, Kelly argued for a veto and warned that signing the bill would probably lead to more New Yorkers becoming “victims of crime — unnecessarily.” Bloomberg’s press secretary, Stu Loeser, said, “We’re disappointed that police officers will be denied an important tool

they have been using to solve crimes and prevent others.” Critics have said the database improperly included information on thousands of innocent New Yorkers who were stopped on the streets and questioned and sometimes frisked, but who were not fined or arrested. As the number of documented street stops has exploded under Kelly, the number of names put into the database has grown. Last year, the police made a record 581,000 stops, bringing the tally since 2004 to nearly 3 million. Yet more than 85 percent of the stops never led to an arrest or a summons. Although the law addresses the electronic records generated by street stops, not the stop-and-frisk campaign itself, critics of the practice say racial disparity in the stops results in an unconstitutional inventory of young blacks and Hispanics who have not been arrested.

pile to be as high as $1.7 billion, but there was no indication that the entire stockpile would be exported under the agreement. The area is so rich in deposits that it could help catapult the nation into the ranks of the world’s top diamond producers, according to the head of a group of experts for the Kimberley Process. The agreement was intended in part to head off Zimbabwean threats to export millions of carats of newly mined diamonds on its own, without the international group’s seal of approval. Diamond traders had said they were worried that large-scale sales of uncertified Zimbabwean diamonds could destabilize the global trade. In June, an earlier meeting of the Kimberley Process ended in stalemate over the issue.

Fire at Iraqi hotel kills at least 28 Los Angeles Times BAGHDAD — A fire swept through a northern Iraq hotel filled with foreigners, killing at least 28 people as some desperate guests jumped from windows in attempts to escape the flames, officials and witnesses said Friday. At least half of the dead were foreigners, some of whom worked in Iraqi Kurdistan’s oil industry and mobile phone sector. The blaze at the five-story Soma Hotel in the city of Sulaimaniyah was likely caused by faulty electrical wiring, authorities said. A lack of fire escapes contributed to the death toll, as most of the victims died of smoke inhalation, local officials said.

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010

SPOTLIGHT

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“[Mia] weaseled her way into my heart, and I cannot imagine my life without her right now. I’ve just learned so much from her.” — Laurie Sacher

Participants sought for children’s bike race The Cascade Cycling Classic is seeking participants for its Kid’s Race on July 25 at Summit High School in Bend. The race is open to children ages 2 to 16. Helmets are required. All bicycles must pass a safety inspection. Registration runs 12:30 to 1:15 p.m. in the Summit High School parking lot. Races begin at 1:30 p.m. Registration and waiver forms are available for download at www.cascade-classic.org. Organizers encourage participants to bring their signed forms to speed up the registration process. Contact: 541-388-0002.

Local arts organizations awarded grant money The Oregon Arts Commission has announced four grants to local arts organizations, infusing nearly $30,000 into the Central Oregon arts community. Arts Central will receive $19,000 to expand its Artists in Schools program and continue to support The Art Station, the VanGo mobile art studio and Arts Central Theatre. The Nature of Words will receive $7,000 to support operations of the annual literary festival. The Sunriver Music Festival will receive $3,500 to support the classical music festival held each summer in Sunriver and Bend.

Enter Sisters Folk Fest songwriting contest The Sisters Folk Festival is now accepting entries for the Dave Carter Memorial Songwriting Contest. The contest is for singersongwriters, who will perform their songs on stage. Finalists will perform their songs at the festival, and they will have the opportunity to play at other venues in Sisters. Entrants may submit three or fewer songs, which will be judged on overall quality and consistency. Submissions are due by July 31. It costs $20 to enter. All songs must be submitted online at www.sonicbids.com. Contact: 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

See ‘Lamppost,’ support a charitable cause Bend pub theater group TWB Productions will put on a benefit performance of its ongoing production, Louis LaRusso’s “Lamppost Reunion,” at 8 p.m. July 26 at McMenamins Old St. Francis School. All proceeds from the night’s performance will go to an account with the National Transplant Assistance Fund that has been created for Bonnie Morrissey, who has polycystic kidney disease and needs a kidney transplant. Donations can also be made directly to the fund at www.ntafund.org/find-a-patient/. Morrissey and her husband, Monterey, lived in Redmond for four years and now split their time between Redmond and Northern California. While living in Central Oregon, the couple volunteered for a number of arts organizations. The play is adult-themed; those younger than 18 must be accompanied by a parent. Tickets are $21.50, including fees, in advance, and $25 at the door. Contact: www.bendticket.com or 541-330-8563.

Madras hospital gets mammogram cushion Mountain View Hospital in Madras recently purchased a breast cushion for its mammography machine to make the exam more comfortable. The hospital said in a press release that the cushion makes the digital mammograms warmer and softer. It also may foster better imaging because the cushion holds the breast in position. Patients are not charged for the use of the cushion and the hospital is not changing the price of its mammograms with the cushion’s purchase. Contact: Mountain View Hospital, 541-475-3882. —From staff reports

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Laurie Sacher, 29, plays with her dog, Mia, a rescue dog who became blind due to diabetes. The dog served as inspiration for the book “Blind Hope,” by Sacher’s employer at Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch, Kim Meeder.

Where there’s hope, there’s healing Experience with rescue dog inspires authors to write book

Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch co-owner and author Kim Meeder interacts with a ranch visitor Tuesday in Tumalo.

By David Jasper The Bulletin

or her third book, Kim Meeder, 48, collaborated with Laurie Sacher, 29, one of Meeder’s employees at Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch in Tumalo. The book’s inspiration, however, was Mia — Sacher’s dog. Sacher rescued the estimated 12year-old Australian shepherd three years ago along with a younger dog, Dakota, about 4. Much like the children and horses Meeder and husband Troy sought to help when they founded the ranch in 1995, these two dogs have known misfortune. Dakota was recently hit by a car. Use of her hind legs is limited, but she’s healing. Sacher told her dogs’ story Tuesday, sitting on the lawn at the nineacre ranch, playing with and petting her attentive dogs under a shady tree, the Three Sisters standing stark and snowy against a clear sky. Whether or not dogs can appreciate such a view is a moot point, but Mia won’t be seeing it. She has diabetes-caused cataracts. A veterinarian removed her left eye after it hemorrhaged, and her right eye is mostly closed and clouded over. It, too, will have to go when the pain becomes too great, Sacher said. After she rescued Mia and Dakota from a neglectful home, Sacher admits she immediately had qualms about Mia, who was not all she’d been looking for in a pet. In fact, that ambivalence toward Mia became the catalyst for Sacher’s spiritual growth, which Meeder chronicles in the new book, “Blind Hope,” published by Multnomah Books. The two

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Sacher works with Kyle Huttinga, 10, Tuesday at the ranch.

If you go What: Kim Meeder and Laurie Sacher, co-authors of “Blind Hope” Details: • Meeder will appear July 23 at Paulina Springs Books in Redmond, 422 S.W. Sixth St. (541-526-1491) • Sacher will bring Mia along July 24 at Paulina Springs Books in Sisters, 252 W. Hood Ave. (541-549-0866) • Sacher and Meeder will appear at 1 p.m. July 31 at Barnes & Noble, 2690 N.E. Highway 20, Bend (541-318-7242) Cost: Free Contact: www.crystalpeaksyouthranch.org will give presentations at area bookstores later this week (see “If you go”). Why did she find Mia off-putting? “She was kind of nasty, and she has really bad breath, which if you get close enough, you’ll smell. She just wasn’t

what I’d pictured for a dog,” Sacher said. “I obviously did take her. I felt like it was the right thing to do,” even if it wasn’t “for the purest motives.” “Part of it, honestly, was just my pride, like, ‘I work for a horse rescue,

and I’m going to give up on this dog? That would just be pathetic, and people are going to think poorly of me.’ ” To signify a fresh start with the dog, Sacher picked the name Mia. See Hope / B6


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Woman wants work separate from home Dear Abby: This summer, my boyfriend and I will be working together. I will be his boss. I want to maintain a professional environment while still keeping peace in the relationship. My boyfriend can be sensitive sometimes, so do you have any tips to help me separate my work life from my love life? — Stage Manager In The South Dear Stage Manager: Yup. Before you start working with your boyfriend, establish ground rules in advance. He needs to understand that he won’t be treated any differently than the rest of the cast and crew members because of your personal relationship, and to protect your job there must be no suggestion of favoritism. For you to allow that to happen, or for him to expect special treatment, would be unprofessional and could negatively affect the production. Dear Abby: I was my best friend “Chanel’s” maid of honor. I received her beautiful engraved invitation in the mail, but never sent back my RSVP, assuming that because I was maid of honor, had purchased my plane ticket, reserved a hotel room (which the bride and I were sharing the night before the wedding) and had already bought my dress, it was “understood” that I was coming. The bride and I had already discussed my special meal for the reception because I am a vegetarian. During the reception, Chanel’s mother informed me that “in the future I needed to RSVP when invited to a function.” Abby, as a member of the wedding party I honestly didn’t think I needed to. Are the members of the wedding party expected to RSVP? As an aside, Chanel’s mother was never fond of my mother and has told Chanel she thinks I’m “flaky.” Was I in the wrong, or did her mother use this as a way to express her dislike of

DEAR ABBY me? I have never considered her someone who was a stickler regarding etiquette. — Perplexed In Plano, Texas Dear Perplexed: Technically, when one receives an RSVP card with an invitation, the recipient should immediately return it with an acceptance or regrets. However, in your case, common sense should have allowed the bride’s mother to conclude that you would be there — for all of the reasons you mentioned — unless Chanel and her mother weren’t communicating. It appears your assessment of the woman is on target. For her to have been so insensitive to have taken it upon herself to “correct” you at the reception was in extremely poor taste. Dear Abby: What should I call my late daughter’s husband? My daughter had been married to “John” for 10 years at the time of her death. They had two young children. John has since remarried and his wife has adopted the children. We have a close relationship, but I am unsure how to introduce both of them. (They are also aunt and uncle to my other grandchildren.) — Judith In San Jose Dear Judith: The family history does not have to be explained at the time you introduce them. I see no reason why you should feel compelled to explain that your daughter died and John remarried, etc. Why not just say, “This is John and Mary, and our grandkids, Laurie and Jimmy”? Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘The Club’: The boys of summer, a polished look behind the scenes Show often feels fake, but still has nuggets to offer

“The Club” ML B Network, Sunday nights at 9. David Check, executive producer; Gary Waksman, lead producer; Robert Haddad, coordinating producer; Michael Clarke Duncan, narrator. Produced by MLB Productions.

By Mike Hale New York Times News Service

If timing is everything in baseball, then the MLB Network, the cable channel controlled by Major League Baseball, is in the groove with the new reality show “The Club.” The series focuses on the men who run the Chicago White Sox, a veteran team that was written off after stumbling through the first two months of this season. But as “The Club” premieres Sunday night, the Sox are on a roll, having won nine straight through Thursday, and 26 of 31 overall, as they fought back into first place in the American League Central. From a viewer’s standpoint, it seems as if the 2010 White

Sox were the perfect choice for the show, with their rollercoaster season and reports of bad blood between the general manager, Ken Williams, who assembles the team, and the manager, Ozzie Guillen, who must coax it to perform. Of course, there’s always the possibility that the Williams-Guillen spat was just clever marketing for “The Club.” Sunday night’s episode ends in mid-May, before talk of the tensions became a big story in the Chicago newspapers and

on baseball blogs. But judging from the premiere, we won’t be getting an in-depth report. The show is basically one big product placement for Major League Baseball, after all, and its producers haven’t met a cliche about teamwork or brotherly love that they couldn’t work into their script. Williams on Jerry Reinsdorf, the team’s owner (and therefore Williams’ boss): “I consider him a second father.” Guillen: “I love Jerry Reinsdorf more than I love my dad.” Reinsdorf on Jim Thome, a onetime star he traded to the Dodgers for a minor leaguer: “One of the two or three greatest human beings I’ve ever known.” Michael Clarke Duncan, the narrator, on Guillen: “One of the most magnetic figures on the entire South Side.” “The Club” does include some short scenes of the White Sox brain trust discussing the merits of players, but they ap-

pear staged, and little of interest is said. Only a few scenes in the opening hour deviate from the show’s tightly controlled, airbrushed presentation. In one, Reinsdorf and commissioner Bud Selig, two senior members of the old boys’ club that still runs Major League Baseball, discuss the Chicago lineup over a diner meal featuring some sort of huge, pale dumpling or biscuit. In the episode’s truest moment, a roomful of reporters sit with glazed faces, their mix of deadline nerves and utter boredom palpable, as Guillen drones through some postgame boilerplate. (“When we lose, I’ll take all the blame. That’s my philosophy.”) They perk up, though, when a mention of the Minnesota Twins’ new ballpark leads to a discussion of its superior locker-room arrangements and a nugget of baseball wisdom. “There’s nothing uglier than the manager taking a shower with the players,” Guillen says. “You look very bad.”

The Sooners, the better By Andy Edelstein Newsday

Country music legend Merle Haggard is the subject of Wednesday’s PBS “American Masters” profile. Throughout his long career, Haggard may be best known for his 1969 song “Okie From Muskogee,” which became an anthem for the Nixon-era Silent Majority. Most people may have assumed that Haggard was from Oklahoma, but they would be

wrong; he hails from California (although his parents had migrated to Oildale, near Bakersfield, from Oklahoma during the Great Depression). However ... these five TV stars were all born in the Sooner State. Carrie Underwood — The “American Idol” Season 4 winner was from the small town of Checotah (and she actually was born in Muskogee). Dr. Phil McGraw — The selfhelp guru was born in Vinita.

Ron Howard — Opie Cunningham was born in the Mayberry-like town of Duncan (his family moved to Burbank, Calif., when he was 4). Tony Randall — Felix Unger hailed from Tulsa, the oil capital of Oklahoma (where he was born Arthur Leonard Rosenberg). James Garner — Bret Maverick/Jim Rockford was born James Scott Bumgarner in Norman, home of the University of Oklahoma.

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(N) Å Ride Guide ‘14’ Untracked Get Outdoors Visions of NW Inside Golf ‘G’ Outside Presents Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Outside Film Festival City Edition American Perspectives American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Hannah Montana ’ ‘G’ Å Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Hannah Forever Good-Charlie Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Hannah Montana ’ ‘G’ Å Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Jonas L.A. ‘G’ Wild Pacific A Fiery Birth ‘PG’ Å Wild Pacific Strange Evolution ‘PG’ Wild Pacific Eat or Be Eaten ’ ‘PG’ Powering the Future ’ ‘G’ Å Powering the Future ’ ‘G’ Å MythBusters Dumpster Diving ‘PG’ Powering the Future ’ ‘G’ Å (4:00) Golf British Open, Best of the Third Round Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250 (Live) Drag Racing NHRA Fram Autolite Nationals, Qualifying From Sonoma, Calif. 2009 World Series of Poker Baseball Tonight (N) Å Boxing: 1993 Bruno vs. Lewis Classic Boxing From Dec. 14, 1996. Boxing: 1991 Foreman vs. Holyfield 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS (4:30) › “Hope Floats” (1998) Sandra Bullock, Harry Connick Jr. Å ›› “Practical Magic” (1998, Comedy-Drama) Sandra Bullock, Nicole Kidman. Å ›› “Two Weeks Notice” (2002) Sandra Bullock, Hugh Grant. Å ›› Blue Crush Huckabee Glenn Beck Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Red Eye Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Glenn Beck Iron Chef America Koren Grieveson. Challenge Bobby Flay Bobby Flay Unwrapped ‘G’ Unwrapped ‘G’ Unwrapped Unwrapped Unwrapped Unwrapped Iron Chef America Koren Grieveson. Mariners Batting Practice MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (Live) Mariners Post. 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Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘PG’ Å Untold Stories of the E.R. ‘PG’ Å Dateline on ID ’ ‘14’ Å Dateline: Real Life Mysteries ’ ‘14’ Dateline on ID ’ ‘14’ Å Dateline on ID ’ ‘14’ Å Dateline: Real Life Mysteries ’ ‘14’ ››› “A Few Good Men” (1992) Tom Cruise. A Navy lawyer defends two Marines in a comrade’s death. Å ››› “American Gangster” (2007, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington, Russell Crowe, Chiwetel Ejiofor. Å ›› “Four Brothers” (2005) Å Adventure Time Adventure Time Total Drama Total Drama Total Drama Scooby-Doo ›› “Looney Tunes: Back in Action” (2003) Brendan Fraser. Premiere. King of the Hill King of the Hill The Boondocks The Boondocks Extreme Roadside Adventures ‘G’ Extreme Towns ‘G’ Å Extreme Resorts ‘G’ Å Extreme Pools ‘G’ Å Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Extreme Resorts ‘G’ Å Got the Look Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Hot in Cleveland Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond NCIS Bikini Wax ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Hide and Seek ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Lost & Found ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS See No Evil ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS The murder of a Marine. ‘PG’ NCIS Pop Life ’ ‘PG’ Å Covert Affairs Pilot ‘PG’ Å Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ’ ‘14’ The T.O. Show ››› “The Temptations” (1998, Drama) Leon, Terron Brooks, DB Woodside. Fame brings rewards and pressures to the quintet. ’ ‘PG’ Å The T.O. Show Ochocinco: Ult PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ›››› “Jaws” 1975 Roy Scheider. ‘PG’ Å (6:20) › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ‘PG-13’ ›› “From Dusk Till Dawn” 1996, Action Harvey Keitel. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) › “The Glimmer Man” 1996 Steven Seagal. ‘R’ Fast Times ››› “Romancing the Stone” 1984 Michael Douglas. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Romancing the Stone” 1984 Michael Douglas. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Romancing the Stone” 1984 Michael Douglas. ‘PG’ Å After Film School When Michael Insane Cinema: Rewritten ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Shaun White Weekly Update Bubba’s World Insane Cinema: Rewritten ‘PG’ Insane Cinema: Shaun White Moto: In Out American Misfits Bubba’s World Weekly Update St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews St. Andrews PGA Tour Golf Legends Reno-Tahoe Open, Third Round From Reno, Nev. “Safe Harbor” (2009, Drama) Treat Williams, Nancy Travis. ‘PG’ Å “Dad’s Home” (2010, Drama) David James Elliott, Sharon Case. ‘PG’ Å “Jack’s Family Adventure” (2009) Jonathan Silverman. (10:42) “Jack’s Family Adventure” (2009, Drama) Å (4:15) ›› “Nights in Rodanthe” 2008 (6:15) ›› “17 Again” 2009, Comedy Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. A 37-year-old man mi- ›› “The Invention of Lying” 2009 Ricky Gervais. A writer learns (9:45) Boxing Luis Carlos Abregu vs. Timothy Bradley, Welterweights (11:45) True Blood HBO 425 501 425 10 Richard Gere. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å raculously transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å to lie for personal gain. ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å ››› “Barton Fink” 1991, Drama John Turturro, John Goodman. ‘R’ Å ››› “Get Shorty” 1995 John Travolta. ‘R’ Å (8:45) ›› “The Center of the World” 2001 ‘NR’ Å (10:15) ››› “Barton Fink” 1991, Drama John Turturro. ‘R’ Å IFC 105 105 (4:45) ›› “Four Christmases” 2008 Vince (6:15) › “Miss March” 2009 Zach Cregger. A young man sees (7:45) ›› “Eagle Eye” 2008, Action Shia LaBeouf, Michelle Monaghan, Rosario Dawson. Two strangers Co-Ed Confidential ›› “Jennifer’s Body” 2009, Horror Megan Fox, Amanda SeyMAX 400 508 7 Vaughn. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å his high-school sweetheart in Playboy. ’ ‘R’ become pawns of a mysterious woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å fried. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å 4 PLAY ‘MA’ Expedition Great White (N) ‘PG’ Expedition Great White (N) ‘PG’ Expedition Great White (N) ‘PG’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Expedition Great White ‘PG’ Break It Down Cargo Truck NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard The Penguins The Mighty B! ’ Fanboy-Chum SpongeBob SpongeBob Tigre: Rivera Tigre: Rivera Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Glenn Martin Jimmy Neutron The Secret Show Tak and Power NTOON 89 115 189 Profess. The Season Raglin Outdoors Ultimate Hunting High Places Trophy Quest Realtree Rdtrps Jimmy Big Time Ted Nugent Craig Morgan Western Extreme High Places Buck Commander Jimmy Big Time OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) ›› “A Walk on the Moon” 1999, ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, Olga Kurylenko. iTV. James Bond ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer, Ben Kings- ››› “Big Fan” 2009 Patton Oswalt. iTV. A football fan’s meeting ››› “The Reader” SHO 500 500 Drama Diane Lane. iTV. ‘R’ seeks revenge for the death of Vesper Lynd. ’ ‘PG-13’ ley. iTV. A couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ with his idol takes a dark turn. ’ ‘R’ Å 2008 ‘R’ Auto Racing Legends MIllion: Charlotte From Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, N.C. (Live) AMA Pro Racing Mid-Ohio AMA Pro Racing MId-Ohio GT3 Challenge Racing New Jersey Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:05) ››› “District 9” 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ Å (11:40) ›› 2012 STARZ 300 408 300 (3:55) ›› “The (5:40) ›› “Lovin’ Molly” 1974, Drama Anthony Perkins, Beau Bridges. Two rural Tex- (7:20) ››› “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” 2008, Comedy-Drama “The Calling” 2000, Horror Laura Harris. Premiere. A woman’s ›› “Danika” 2006 Marisa Tomei. A hallucinatory woman beTMC 525 525 Escapist” 2008 ans share the love of a free-spirited woman. ‘R’ Javier Bardem, Patricia Clarkson. ’ ‘PG-13’ comes preoccupied with her children. ’ ‘R’ son possesses strange powers. Cycling Tour de France: Stage 13 From Rodez to Revel. World Challenge Cycling Tour de France: Stage 13 From Rodez to Revel. VS. 27 58 30 (4:00) “When Harry Met Sally...” ‘R’ “The Bodyguard” 2004 Petchtai Wongkamlao. A man protects a boy when gangsters murder the lad’s father. Sunset Daze ‘G’ Sunset Daze ‘G’ ››› “Urban Cowboy” 1980, Drama John Travolta. ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY TOUR DES CHUTES: Bicycling routes of seven, 25, 48, 70 and 90 miles; live music, food and vendors after the ride; registration required; proceeds benefit the Lance Armstrong Foundation and the St. Charles Cancer Survivorship Program; $45 before July 12, $55 late registration; 7 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Lakes Elementary School, 2500 N.W. High Lakes Loop, Bend; 541-3856502 or www.tourdeschutes. org. DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races, including a kids Splash ‘N Dash to benefit The Center Foundation; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@freshairsports.com or www.freshairsports.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541280-4097. HIGH DESERT GARDEN TOUR: View six Bend-area gardens in a selfguided tour; $10, free ages 16 and younger; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; throughout Bend; 541-548-6088, ext. 7951. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. NEWBERRY’S ANNUAL GARDEN SHOW: Flowers that can be grown in Central Oregon will be on display; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Newberry home, 1968 N.E. Hollowtree Lane, Bend; 541-382-7786. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: Featuring approximately 60 activity booths, jump houses, dance and karate demonstrations, food and more; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; free admission, 50 cents per activity ticket, $20 all-day pass; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-385-7988 or www. saving-grace.org. GLORY DAZE CAR SHOW: Open to all makes and models; with a beer garden, hot air balloon rides and live music; $25 to register, free for spectators; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or www.sisterscountry.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; Bethlehem Inn will collect nonperishable food and clothing; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-3890995. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring selfguided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; refer to website for tour map or start at Greg Welch Construction in Bend; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Builders Association; free10 a.m.-6 p.m.; 541389-1058 or www.bendbulletin.com. WAKEBOARD AND WATER-SKI CONTEST: With wakeboarding, an awards ceremony and barbecue for contestants; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Sundance WaterSports Club; $25 or $30, free for spectators; 7 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. start; Lake Billy Chinook, Crooked River Bridge and Jordan Road, Culver; 541-480-0410. STUNT RIDING DEMONSTRATIONS: Chris “Tech” McNeil performs stunt riding at the BMW MOA International Rally; free; noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 314-608-0406. LIBERTY QUARTET: The Boise, Idaho-based gospel ensemble performs; free; 1 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822. MT. BACHELOR STAR PARTY: Look at the day and night skies through telescopes, with presentations and a barbecue; $9, $6 ages 12 and younger; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-5934394 or www.mbsp. org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Mary Lou Dobbs talks about her book “Repotting Yourself”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5261491. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook talks about and presents a slide show on his book “Bend Overall”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC FEAST: Culinary event includes a sampling of gourmet cuisine, Deschutes Brewery beer and live music; proceeds benefit nonprofit organizations serving children and families in Central Oregon; $195; 5-10 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top

Drive, Bend; 503-332-5000 or www. sagebrush.org. BARENAKED LADIES: The Grammynominated rock band performs, with Angel Taylor; $34 in advance, $38 day of show, or $53 in advance and $58 day of show reserved; plus fees; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. HALESTORM: The Pennsylvaniabased alt-rock band performs, with Adelita’s Way, Since October and New Medicine; $15; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.jmaxproductions. net. SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based bluespunk band performs; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www.angelinesbakery. com. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-389-2884 or www.actorsrealm.com. APHRODESIA: The San Franciscobased Afro-beat band performs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@ freshairsports.com or www. freshairsports.com. WAKEBOARD AND WATER-SKI CONTEST: Water-skiing competition; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Sundance WaterSports Club; $25 or $30, free for spectators; 7 a.m. registration, 8 a.m. start; Lake Billy Chinook, Crooked River Bridge and Jordan Road, Culver; 541-4800410. TOUR OF HOMES: Featuring selfguided tours of homes throughout Central Oregon; refer to website for tour map or start at Greg Welch Construction in Bend; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Builders Association; free10 a.m.-6 p.m.; 541389-1058 or www.bendbulletin.com. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Blues/rock act Paul Thorn performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383, info@bendconcerts.com or www.bendconcerts.com. RHAPSODY ON THE RIVER: A catered dinner, with a performance by the Sunriver Music Festival’s Young Artist Scholarship recipients; preceded by a silent auction; reservations required; $55; 4:30-8:30 p.m.; Mary McCallum Park, River Road, Sunriver; 541-5939310, tickets@ sunrivermusic. org or www. sunrivermusic. org. MIDDLE EASTERN DANCE SHOWCASE: Featuring performances that highlight various styles of belly dancing; free; 5:30 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-610-8622 or www.highdesertbellydance.org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. bendticket.com. SUNSET SERENADES: Golf clinic followed by live music by Lino & Friends; free; 6 p.m. golf, 7 p.m. music; Brand 33, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-549-3663 or541549-4653. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; pay as you can; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. actorsrealm.com. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com.

MONDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. bendticket.com. BLVD PARK: The Sacramento, Calif.-based roots band performs; free; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

TUESDAY MUSIC IN ACTION!: Rich Glauber presents an upbeat mix of songs, movement and storytelling; free; 10:30 a.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-617-7099. MUSIC IN ACTION!: Rich Glauber presents an upbeat mix of songs, movement and storytelling; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541617-7099. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-6339637. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The two-mile prologue stage begins and ends in the Old Mill District; free for spectators; 6 p.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541388-0002 or www.mbsef.org/ CascadeCyclingClassic. COSA OPEN MIC: The Central Oregon Songwriters Association holds an open mic; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or dvdskelton@aol.com. MUSIC IN ACTION!: Rich Glauber presents an upbeat mix of songs, movement and storytelling; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7099. OTTMAR LIEBERT AND LUNA NEGRA: The rock, jazz and flamenco guitarist performs with his band; $30; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. PRAYERS FOR ATHEISTS: The Providence, R.I.-based punk and hip-hop band performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

WEDNESDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: 700 horses with amateur and professional riders make their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-3891409 or www.jbarj. org/ohdc/. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 74-mile McKenzie Pass Road Race stage begins at Maxwell Sno-park for women and Big Springs Sno-park for men; both end at Three Creeks Sno-park; free for spectators10 a.m.; 541388-0002 or www.mbsef.org/ CascadeCyclingClassic. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The 77th annual event features exhibits, live music, livestock auctions, a veteran’s breakfast, tractor pulls and more; $6, $3 ages 6-12, free ages 5 and younger, free until 3 p.m; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. MUSIC IN ACTION!: Rich Glauber presents an upbeat mix of songs, movement and storytelling; free; 10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-617-7099. MUSIC IN ACTION!: Rich Glauber presents an upbeat mix of songs, movement and storytelling; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7099. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV hosts “Our Food Revolution: The Increasing Appetite for Local Options”; reservations required; free; 5-6 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-5814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www. talkofthetownco.com. MUSIC IN THE CANYON: The John Shipe Trio plays as part of the summer concert series; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-504-6878 or www.musicinthecanyon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring

a performance by Amy Clawson; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, TURANDOT”: Starring Maria Guleghina, Marcello Giordani, Samuel Ramey and Marina Poplavskaya in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CRAIG CAROTHERS: The Nashvillebased singer-songwriter performs, with Randy Sharp; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. DERRICK BROWN: The acclaimed slam poet performs; $7, $5 students with ID; 7 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541728-0756. FULL DRAW FILM TOUR: A showcase of outdoor independent filmmakers and their bow-hunting short films; $10, $7 children; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre. org. DERRICK BROWN: The acclaimed slam poet performs; ages 21 and older only; $7, $5 students with ID; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331.

THURSDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: 700 horses with amateur and professional riders make their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc/. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 16-mile Skyliners Time Trial stage begins and ends at Summit High School; free for spectators; 10 a.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef. org/CascadeCyclingClassic. JEFFERSON COUNTY FAIR & RODEO: The 77th annual event features exhibits, live music, livestock auctions, children’s games, dog demonstrations, tractor pulls and more; $6, free ages 12 and younger; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-325-5050. HORSE CRAZY COWGIRL BAND: The musicians perform a children’s concert, using a swing guitar, harmonica, banjo and more; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Paula Cole, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-3890995 or www.munchandmusic.com. TOWN HALL MEETINGS ON HOMELESSNESS: Talk about homelessness and what we can do to solve the problem; concurrent meetings take place at Bend’s Community Center, the Little Deschutes Lodge in La Pine, Madras Senior Center, the Clover Building in Prineville, the Redmond Grange and the Sisters Fire Hall; see website for addresses; 6-8 p.m.; abernethy9@ aol.com or www.cohomeless.org/ townhall.html. “THE WITNESS”: A screening of the film about Eddie Lama, whose life is changed when he finds a kitten; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT: Cello fusion group performs, with Loch Lomond; $15 plus fees; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

FRIDAY HIGH DESERT CLASSIC I: 700 horses with amateur and professional riders make their way through a number of courses and jumps, with vendors and more; proceeds benefit J Bar J Youth Services; free admission; 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; J Bar J Boys Ranch, 62895 Hamby Road, Bend; 541-389-1409 or www.jbarj.org/ohdc/. PARKING LOT SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church activities and community outreach; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; www.redmondchurch.com. SHOOTOUT AT HORSE RIDGE: A cowboy shooting tournament for gunfighters; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-385-6021 or www.hrp-sass.com. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: The 84-mile and 71-mile Cascade Lakes Road Race stage begins at Summit High School for men and at Wanoga Sno-park for women; both end at Mt. Bachelor Ski Area; free for spectators10 a.m.; 541388-0002 or www.mbsef.org/ CascadeCyclingClassic.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

M T For Saturday, July 17

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CYRUS (R) 12:15, 2:30, 4:50, 7, 9:15 I AM LOVE (R) 12:05, 2:50, 6:30, 9:40 INCEPTION (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3, 6:15, 9:30 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35 MICMACS (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:40, 9:20 SOLITARY MAN (R) 12:25, 2:40, 4:40, 6:50, 9:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 6:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 4 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 9:25 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 1:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DESPICABLE ME (PG) Noon, 2:15, 4:55, 7:40, 10 DESPICABLE ME 3-D (PG) 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 6:50, 9:20 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8:05, 10:35 INCEPTION (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 12:10, 2:35, 3:45, 4:15, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15, 10:45 THE KARATE KID (PG) 12:15, 4, 7:10, 10:20 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 5, 7:55, 10:30 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:30, 4:05, 6:35, 9:25 PREDATORS (R) 12:05, 2:40, 5:25, 8:10, 10:40 THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) 11:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:55, 2:25, 4:35, 5:15, 7:15, 7:50, 9:50, 10:25 STANDING OVATION (PG) 11 a.m., 1:35, 4:40, 7:35, 10:10 TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 12:20, 2:05, 3:55, 5:05, 6:45, 8, 9:35, 10:50

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

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DESPICABLE ME (PG) 10:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 6:45, 8:45 INCEPTION (PG-13) 10:30 a.m., 1:45, 5, 8:15 THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE (PG) 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15

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B4 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, July 17, 2010: This year, you grow in a new direction. At times though, you will pull back and go for the tried-andtrue. Your domestic and personal lives increase in importance. Some of you will be buying your first homes. Others will move. Many will remodel. Money carefully spent on your home will pay off. If you are single, you will dream of a home life with a significant other. Don’t hook up just because of this reason. Make sure the bond is of the caliber you want. If you are attached, the two of you nestle in more than ever. LIBRA can be an anchor. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Conversations and decisions made in the morning are people-oriented and will have good results. People are feeling tense in general, so adding to the comfort of others can only help. Tonight: Meet friends close to home. TAURUS (April 20-May 21) HHH Your ability to understand and get past a problem only can add to your life. Be willing to talk with a roommate or family member. He or she could be overly nervous or touchy. Successful communication occurs when you are nonjudgmental. Tonight: Don’t add any pressure; just relax. GEMINI (May 22-June 20) HHHHH Wit, flirtation and creativity add to your ability to relate. Certainly, right now a child, sweetie

or potential new friend wants to share more of him- or herself. Are you ready to reveal more? Tonight: Put on your dancing shoes. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Family and home remain basics. You might want to design your plans around your domestic life. You could overworry, or you could be more open. Your ability to relate emerges within your immediate circle. Tonight: Entertain at home. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Reach out for others, especially those in your daily life. You might be surprised by everything that you hear, and equally surprised by your openness. A discussion with a neighbor or sibling reveals much that you were not aware of. Tonight: Hanging out is fun. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Be aware of expenses that impact your lifestyle. Understand how much you have to offer, and don’t feel that you must do any more. Have a conversation to help clear your mind. You have a tendency to overwork things. Tonight: Treat a loved one or a friend. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Stop. Feel the energy pumping through your body and mind. The world could be your oyster if you proceed with that thought. Empowered, decide where you want to be and what you want. Create more of what you want. Tonight: Where you are, the party is. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Maintain a low profile and indulge a whim, if you desire. What

would you really like to do? What would make you happy? Make plans in this frame of mind. Relating might be one of the more difficult areas. Tonight: In the limelight. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Join friends and go off and forget demands and responsibilities, at least for a day. Getting away from the here and now can and will make all the difference. Take a day trip. Meet an out-of-town friend at a halfway point. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH A parent or older friend probably needs more attention. You discover that you need to juggle your schedule, and that you want to. Ultimately, you will feel good about yourself and gain a new perspective. Tonight: Call it an early night if you want to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH If you imagine yourself in another person’s position, you might be able to grasp the logic behind his or her decisions and actions. No one is asking you to agree. You only perhaps need to understand this personality better. Tonight: Break a pattern. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH One-on-one relating is probably most rewarding right now. Keep this factor in your mind when making plans, and avoid inviting too many people over or to join you at a baseball game. Tonight: For the romantic at heart, you could create a special moment.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

B6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Hope

Bill O’Leary / The Washington Post

Former transporation secretary Norman Mineta, left, and safety campaign creators Joel Machak and William Dear are among those who attended a ceremony at the Museum of American history which marked the donation of objects reflecting the evolution of automobile safety.

Crash dummies’ parts, costumes join museum exhibit about auto safety By Stephanie Lee The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Show biz has required Vince and Larry to break much more than a leg. As crash dummies — or safety crash devices — the accidentprone duo have sacrificed piles of arms, suffered battered chests and endured countless cases of whiplash, all in the name of protecting drivers and passengers. Now, some of their body parts and costumes belong to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, which this week accepted a donation of several objects that reflect the evolution of automobile safety from the 1920s to the present. Vehicle safety didn’t become a prominent public concern until the 1960s, when lap and shoulder belts became mandatory in new cars. Many drivers used to fear the idea of being trapped in a car during an accident, or they thought that safety devices reflected poorly on their skills, according to Roger White, associate curator in the museum’s Division of Work and Industry. “The objects in the collection reflect the technological developments of these things and the change of attitude on the part of everyone — motorists, even manufacturers,” he said. The donated items, which are joining the museum’s permanent exhibition about American transportation, include a prototype for the three-point seat belts that became a requirement in the 1970s, an energy-absorb-

ing steering column from a 1967 Chevrolet, a crash pad invented in the 1930s to cover steel dashboards and some of AAA’s first driver-education manuals. There are also a pair of crash test dummies designed to show how people react in accidents. Actors Tony Reitano and Whitney Rydbeck — who portrayed the hapless Vince and Larry in public awareness commercials during the 1980s and ’90s — were also on hand Wednesday for the ceremony accepting the donations. Getting dressed to shoot the spots was a laborious, 45-minute process, the actors said. The most annoying aspect of the costumes was the masks, which didn’t allow them to hear, see or talk properly. “We couldn’t get out of it if we had to,” said Reitano, 58. Rydbeck, 65, added, “God forbid you had to go to the bathroom.” The gig was unusual, to say the least. Reitano recalled seeing people dressed as crash dummies at Halloween parties, and Rydbeck recalled that the role was a good fit because he used to work as a mime. Plus, he said, “my head fit the helmet.” But the actors said they took the message behind the roles seriously. Rydbeck joked that he used to worry about the day newspapers would carry the headline, “Actor Who Played Crash Dummy Died for Not Buckling Up.” “I always buckle up, I’ll tell you that,” he said.

Continued from B1 “It’s a cute name, but also it means ‘mine’ in Spanish, like it belongs to somebody now,” Sacher said. Almost from the start, she could tell that something was wrong with Mia’s health. After visiting a couple of veterinarians, she learned Mia had diabetes. “Again, right away, I was like, ‘What am I doing?’ ” With insulin treatment, vet visits and exercise, Mia largely bounced back, except for her eyesight. “She weaseled her way into my heart, and I cannot imagine my life without her right now.” Sacher said. “I’ve just learned so much from her.” Sacher began to tell her storyteller employer, Meeder, author of “Hope Rising” and “A Bridge Called Hope,” about the bond that was forming between her and Mia. Meeder began taking notes. Her intent was to write some of these stories down for a ranch newsletter: The result is the new book “Blind Hope.” In the book, Meeder quotes Sacher: “When I rescued my dog, she was a discarded, homely mutt. I will never forget my first thought when I saw her: She’s a wretched creature … just like me.’” The transition of changing the dog’s name was difficult. On the third day after changing it to Mia, Sacher briefly took her dog off the leash at a barbecue. “She did fine for a while, coming back to me and responding to me. At one point she got kind of far away, and I tried to call her back. I remember she stopped and looked at me and locked eyes with me, and I could see her debating. (She) just decided to run the other way.” With help from kind bystanders, she got Mia back in the car. While Sacher caught her breath, “a thought settled over me: That that’s exactly how I’ve been with God most of my life, and just knowing about him, and always looking and debating and thinking and choosing to run away, again and again and again.” Sacher makes the analogy that man is to God as dog is to owner. “It made me actually really sad, to feel that from the master’s perspective. This is my dog that I have saved and I’m spending all this money on, and I’m doing all these things and I love her and she’d rather run away than be with me.” Rather than feel guilt-ridden about this perceived relationship to God, Sacher says she realized, “It was a bit of a heartbreak; I’m

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kim Meeder, 48, co-owner of Crystal Peaks Youth Ranch, was inspired to write “Blind Hope” by an employee and that employee’s rescued dog. It’s Meeder’s third book. “Oftentimes, the animals in our life seem to know us better than we know ourself,” Meeder said. hurting his heart.” It launched a process of learning to follow his voice, she said. The analogy became stronger as Mia’s eyesight failed. “She relies on me to be her eyes, but it only works if she listens and obeys. It doesn’t work if she doesn’t,” Sacher said with a laugh. When Mia fails to do so, “she gets bloody noses” bumping into things. And when Sacher doesn’t obey God, “It’s bloody like a bruised heart and bruised feelings. My scars and my wounds are more internal when I run and do things my own way.” Sacher says she grew up in a guilt-ridden branch of Christianity, but doesn’t specify which. She’s also learned from Mia, who looks about as happy as a dog can, rolling around in the grass as Sacher pets her tummy, the happiness to be had just by being. “This right here, what you’re seeing, just the sweetness of being in God’s presence.” She’d been wrestling with some of these religious issues when she opened up to Meeder ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

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at the ranch, “because it’s obviously a Christian organization. “Kim is such an expert at taking all of my ramblings” and putting them into words, said Sacher. “I was doing things externally and still not quite believing them in my heart yet, and not feeling right about that. I want my heart to lead my actions; I don’t want to just keep doing this external stuff. Kim knew my struggle.” Meeder explained that Sacher came to the ranch in 2006 as one of its long-term seasonal volunteers, who do two- to six-month stints at Crystal Peak. During that season, “We just fell in love with her. She did such an incredible job that we offered her a fulltime position here.” Sacher is one of 15 paid staffers at the ranch, which, at the moment, is home to 27 rescued horses. Sacher and Meeder have become friends who ski, ride horses and run together, “elbow to elbow.” Mia often accompanies them on runs. Meeder meets with staff “for what we loosely call mentoring sessions,” she said. “And I

gotta tell you, as any conscientious mentor would, that I think the mentor’s always the one that comes away with the most, and the most blessed. … I think I’m the one who’s mentored more by her.” Once Sacher began speaking to Meeder about her insights on her relationship with the dog, the two agreed that there was a book to be written. The two began to meet, Meeder taking notes as Sacher told her stories. “It really is a book about choosing hope. Love and hope and freedom in our heart isn’t a feeling; it’s a choice. And so much about what this book is about is choosing that for yourself,” Meeder said. “I think so much of what this book is about is a really beautiful journey of discovery, and how interesting how often the animals in our life seem to know us better than we know ourself, and can often be a reflection of areas in our life that we need to change.” She also believes that animals do something intuitively that people don’t always do: forgive. “Animals forgive, and move forward. And they oftentimes, by nature, show us how to proceed there.” One thing they don’t do, however, is brush. “You have bad breath,” Sacher told Mia, who was licking her face. “But I love you! Sweet dog; bad breath.” Sacher said that giving up on Mia would have been like abandoning hope. “It would have been very typical of me at that point in my life, because it would have been giving up as soon as something got difficult.” Said Meeder, “Rest assured, there will come a time in each one of our lives where someday is today, and someone is you, and it’s time to step up. And Laurie chose to take that step for an animal in need, and open her home and her life and her heart to a dog that would not have lived much longer, and so their story began.” In March 2009, a vet had told Sacher to start saying goodbye to Mia. With proper care, food, insulin and exercise, Mia’s prognosis has improved. Now, the dog may live a couple of more years. “I took her in again this March, and he was like, ‘Well, I think you need to think about getting her teeth cleaned.’ Which I still need to do.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

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Appropriate office dress often means conservative By Joy Sewing Houston Chronicle

In most office settings, plunging necklines, ultra-short skirts, stiletto heels and nose piercings are not appropriate attire. But many job candidates and even employees still don’t get it, said Lizandra Vega, an image consultant and author of “The Image of Success: Make a Great Impression and Land the Job You Want” (AMA, $16.95). “If you don’t have good sense in terms of how to dress on the job, then the perception is you won’t have good sense in terms of other decisions related to the job,” Vega said. “How you dress on the job is just as important as your performance because you represent the company’s brand when you’re at work, whether you deal with peers or clients.” Debate over appropriate office dress was revived last month with the firing of Debrahlee Lorenzana from Citibank for dressing in a way that was deemed “too sexy.” She made headlines with claims her former bosses at Citibank banned her from wearing sexy outfits or heels considered “too distracting” for male co-workers. Though there are no federal dress-code laws, companies can mandate dress codes as long as they are not found to be discriminatory. Lorenzana, who often wore turtlenecks, pencil skirts and high heels, has filed a sexual-discrimination complaint against the company. A veteran job recruiter, Vega said she’s seen job candidates not get hired for many dresscode infractions from too-long fingernails to exposed tattoos. She even recalled one job candidate who wore a shirt unbut-

toned to reveal cleavage that looked like “panting puppies.” “I don’t think it was intentional,” Vega said. “Many times, it’s not that women are looking to be sexy. They don’t realize their intimate apparel is not holding everything in. “When you buy a new career wardrobe, that’s the time to get a bra fitting and buy new undergarments. It’s about a complete, polished look.” Diane Gottsman, a national etiquette expert and owner of The Protocol School in San Antonio, said conservative styles often are the best option. “Whether you’re in Oklahoma or New York, you have to dress accordingly for work,” Gottsman said. “You have to use good judgment. If what you wear in the workplace makes people uncomfortable, it’s usually inappropriate.” Gottsman travels the country speaking to companies and universities about dress and etiquette issues. She agrees that the more provocative the outfit, the more negative attention it generates. “You want to get noticed for your achievements, not how high your heels are or how tight your skirt is,” Gottsman said. “You want to send a message of power — intellectual power. When you’re dressing too provocatively, you lose your voice and your power.” But fashion designer and Dallas native Bradley Bayou thinks there’s a place for “sexy” dressing in the office. Tailored blazers with slightly padded shoulders that nip at the waist create an hourglass shape, which he said can be sexy without being revealing.

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L

Inside

BUSINESS A 56-hour marathon open house, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Country songwriter Hank Cochran, see Page C7. OREGON Would-be debate turns into campaign stop for Kitzhaber, see Page C8.

C

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010

HEAD-ON CRASH CLOSES HIGHWAY 20

Prineville creating utility aid program Insert in water bill would allow residents to donate to fund to help those in need By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Photo courtesy Roger Hammers

Rescuers climb over a pickup truck with attached camper that tipped on its side during a two-vehicle crash on U.S. Highway 20 Friday afternoon. The westbound truck, driven by Brian Wright, 44, of Bend, was struck head-on shortly after 4 p.m. when a vehicle driven by Ashley White, 24, of Rockaway Beach, crossed the center line about 8 miles southeast of Sisters. White had to be extricated from her vehicle with the Jaws of Life, and a dog riding in her Suzuki SUV was killed. White, Wright, Wright’s wife, Michelle, and the couple’s three children, whom police said are 12 years old and younger, were taken by ambulance to St. Charles Bend. As of 8:30 p.m., they were being treated and evaluated in the emergency department, according to a nursing supervisor. Both lanes of the highway were closed, and traffic was detoured around the crash site until shortly after 7 p.m.

Denise Fenhagen, a volunteer with the St. Vincent de Paul Society of Crook County, remembered the young man whose foot was recently amputated. His medical bills were overwhelming. He couldn’t afford his utility bills. And his water was in danger of being shut off. Fenhagen, also a member of Human Dignity Advocates of Crook County, a nonprofit, has no shortage of anecdotes. About 20 people a month come through the doors of St. Vincent de Paul in Crook County with shut-off notices or, for some, the water has already been cut off. “There are a lot of families who are living on unemployment, Social Security or disability, and if

Many mouths to feed

their car breaks down or if they have some sort of medical situation and the funds get really low ...,” she said. “And water, it is a necessity.” The city of Prineville is working on a utility-assistance program to help those who are having their water shut off. From April through July, approximately 60 people a month were having their water shut off. The city manages 3,470 accounts. In June, the city made the billing statements clearer and the shut-offs dropped to about 46 households. Prineville officials are in the initial stages of setting up the program. Bend and Redmond have similar utility-assistance programs. Soon, city residents in Prine-

ville should have an insert in their water bills allowing them to make a donation to the water fund. Right now, when someone comes to Fenhagen she directs them to a number of faith-based organizations. “The feeling is right now that the people who are basically subsidizing the water department through donations are members of churches,” she said. “And not everyone goes to church, so if people in the city of Prineville would get their water bill and it would say, ‘If you want to help your neighbor in need please add a donation amount,’ it would be spread out amongst all the water users, not just the people who go to church.” Steve Langer, also with the Human Dignity Advocates of Crook County, was behind bringing a proposal to City Council to start an assistance program. See Utilities / C7

Bend may decide on single contractor for water system overhaul Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend city councilors could decide Wednesday whether to forgo Oregon’s competitive bidding requirements on a planned $71 million overhaul of the municipal water system. If councilors approve the exemption, it would allow the city to avoid awarding contracts to the lowest-priced bidder — as is normally required under state law — and instead let them hire a single firm to manage the project based on other criteria, such as references, expertise and experience in building surface water systems. Under the construction manager/general contractor process, the firm hired by the city would be in-

If you go What: Bend City Council meeting When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: Bend City Hall, 710 N.W. Wall St., Bend volved in nearly every facet of the city’s surface water improvement project, from design and engineering to hiring subcontractors and scheduling work. The firm could also perform some of the construction itself. “I don’t see many downfalls to it,” Bend Public Works Director Paul Rheault said of using the CM/GC method. See Contracts / C7

State tweaks its energy tax credits By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

The state is changing the way it calculates how much of a tax credit residents can get from installing solar photovoltaic panels, heat pumps, energy-efficient appliances and more, which will result in less money back to customers in many cases. Previously, customers could get a tax credit based on the total cost of the energy-saving equipment under the Residential Energy Tax

Credits. Under the new temporary rules, the tax credits will be based on the net cost — after Energy Trust of Oregon cash incentives, other utility incentives and federal tax credits are factored in. The change will save the state money by decreasing the amount of credits it issues, said Diana Enright, spokeswoman for the Department of Energy, although the agency hasn’t yet figured out how much would be saved. See Tax credits / C7

Marines will help beautify downtown Bend by weeding By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

The Bulletin / Rob Kerr

An American robin feeds three newborns in a nest on the front porch of a home on Bend’s west side Friday.

The U.S. Marines are going help weed Bend. “We’re here to serve our country, and while we’re in the city of Bend we can serve here,” said Staff Sgt. Kurt C. Clark, station commander of the Bend Recruitment Center. Clark said there are currently 15 recruits who have enlisted in Bend and are waiting to head to boot camp. He and his fellow recruiters meet with the recruits once a week to keep them in the physical condition necessary to be ready

for boot camp. Once a month, Clark said the group gathers for larger events, usually fun things like paint ball, and he would like to add volunteering to that mix. “I thought, ‘Hey, once a quarter we could throw in some volunteering hours,’” Clark said. He said when he asked his recruits on Thursday night why they were planning to train as Marines, they answered, “To serve our country.” He said all of them were really on board with his plan for them to forgo some fun times in the name of service. See Marines / C7


C2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

‘Barefoot Bandit’ agrees to return to Washington

Feds to consult biologists about river project risks

The Associated Press MIAMI — Without saying a word, the teenager accused in a two-year string of sometimes shoeless burglaries and other crimes that helped him gain international notoriety as the “Barefoot Bandit� agreed Friday to return to Washington state to face federal charges. Hector Dopico, an assistant federal public defender temporarily representing 19-year-old Colton Harris-Moore, told a federal judge that Harris-Moore waived his right to a hearing on whether he should be transferred to Seattle. U.S. Magistrate Judge Robert Dube said Harris-Moore would be handed over to the U.S. Marshals Service, which will handle his travel. The teen is suspected in about 70 crimes in nine states and British Columbia.

By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

GRANTS PASS — Conservation groups said Friday they have reached a settlement requiring a federal agency to consult with biologists about possible harm to salmon from granting insurance for development along rivers in Oregon. Andrew Hawley, an attorney for the Northwest Environmental Defense Center in Portland, said development would not be so extensive in flood plains containing important salmon habitat without the federal flood insurance. The settlement was reached in a lawsuit filed against the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Conservation groups won a

similar agreement in Washington state, where NOAA Fisheries Service biologists found that FEMA’s support for flood insurance was jeopardizing salmon survival. Under the Oregon settlement, FEMA agreed that while consultations with biologists are going on, it will only back projects where developers have shown they avoided or mitigated damage to salmon habitat. Hawley said the settlement will likely lead to changes in ordinances regulating new building along rivers and estuaries. “A lot is left undeveloped, luckily for the species,� he said. “Potentially this has some impact on what development will be allowed to occur.�

Scientists have cited development along rivers as a key factor in the continuing decline of salmon numbers in the Northwest, along with logging, grazing, irrigation withdrawals, dams and poorly operated hatcheries. FEMA spokesman Brad Carroll said in an e-mail statement that the settlement continues the agency’s policy of acting with care to ensure that its actions comply with federal environmental laws. Hawley noted that conservation groups warned the agency last year that its insurance program was not following the rules of the Endangered Species Act then filed the lawsuit after the agency did not respond.

Variety publishes ‘Sticks Nix Hick Pix’ in 1935 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, July 17, the 198th day of 2010. There are 167 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 17, 1918, Russia’s Czar Nicholas II and his family were executed by the Bolsheviks. ON THIS DATE In 1821, Spain ceded Florida to the United States. In 1936, the Spanish Civil War began as right-wing army generals launched a coup attempt against the Second Spanish Republic. In 1935, the entertainment trade publication Variety ran its legendary headline, “Sticks Nix Hick Pix� (which might be translated as, “Rural audiences reject rural-themed movies�). In 1944, during World War II, 320 men, two-thirds of them African-Americans, were killed when a pair of ammunition ships exploded at the Port Chicago Naval Magazine in California. In 1955, Disneyland had its opening day in Anaheim, Calif. In 1959, influential jazz vo-

T O D AY IN HISTORY calist Billie Holiday, known to her fans as “Lady Day,� died in a New York City hospital at age 44. In 1968, a coup in Iraq returned the Baath Party to power, five years after it was ousted. In 1975, an Apollo spaceship docked with a Soyuz spacecraft in orbit in the first superpower link-up of its kind. In 1981, 114 people were killed when a pair of walkways above the lobby of the Kansas City Hyatt Regency Hotel collapsed, one atop the other, during a tea dance. In 1996, TWA Flight 800, a Paris-bound Boeing 747, exploded and crashed off Long Island, N.Y., shortly after leaving John F. Kennedy International Airport, killing all 230 people aboard. TEN YEARS AGO Bashar Assad, son of Hafez Assad, began a seven-year term as Syria’s 16th head of state. A jet smashed into two homes in Patna, India, killing a total of 60 peo-

ple on board and on the ground (three passengers survived). FIVE YEARS AGO The Iraqi Special Tribunal filed its first criminal case against Saddam Hussein for a 1982 massacre of Shiites. Tiger Woods closed with a 2-under 70 to win the British Open for his tenth career major. Sir Edward Heath, former British prime minister, died in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England, at age 89. Actress Geraldine Fitzgerald died in New York City at age 91. ONE YEAR AGO Former CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite died in New York at 92. Bombs ripped through two luxury hotels in Jakarta, Indonesia, killing seven and wounding at least 50 more. The space shuttle Endeavour arrived at the international space station to deliver the third and final component of a billion-dollar Japanese lab. Gordon Waller, of the pop duo Peter and Gordon, died in Norwich, Conn. at 64. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Comedian Phyllis Diller is 93. Jazz singer Jimmy Scott is 85.

Actor Donald Sutherland is 75. Actress-singer Diahann Carroll is 75. Rock musician Spencer Davis is 68. Rock musician Terry “Geezer� Butler is 61. Actress Lucie Arnaz is 59. Actor David Hasselhoff is 58. Rock musician Fran Smith Jr. (The Hooters) is 58. Singer Phoebe Snow is 58. Television producer Mark Burnett (“Survivor,� “The Apprentice�) is 50. Actress Nancy Giles is 50. Singer Regina Belle is 47. Country singer Craig Morgan is 46. Rock musician Lou Barlow is 44. Contemporary Christian singer Susan Ashton is 43. Actor Andre Royo is 42. Actress Bitty Schram is 42. Actor Jason Clarke is 41. Singer JC (PM Dawn) is 39. Rapper Sole’ is 37. Country singer Luke Bryan is 34. Actor Eric Winter is 34. Hockey player Marc Savard is 33. Rhythm-and-blues singer Jeremih (jehr-uh-MY’) is 23. Actress Summer Bishil (BIHSH’-ihl) is 22. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Dreams have as much influence as actions.� — Stephane Mallarme, French essayist and poet (1842-1898)

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Swimmer injured after striking boulder A swimmer was seriously injured Thursday afternoon near Meadow Camp day use area after striking a submerged boulder, according to a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. While spending the afternoon at the Meadow Camp day use area on the Deschutes River with her family, Kari Lynn Williams, 20, of Bend, struck an underwater boulder after jumping 20 feet from rocks along the river’s edge. Authorities were alerted at 4:45 p.m. to the incident and responded to the scene. Williams was transported to St. Charles Bend with non-life threatening injuries.

Bend’s Kilns College adds degree program Kilns College, a theology school in Bend, will now offer an associates degree in biblical studies, according to a news

release. The new associate program is a two-year degree program that will allow students to complete the equivalent of their sophomore year in college. Previously, the college was only able to offer one year programs. For more information about Kilns College and programs offered, visit http://www. k ilnscollege.org /School / Admissions/Apply/.

State Police office in Bend reopening The Bend office of the Oregon State Police will reopen in a new building on Monday. Located at 20355 Poe Sholes Drive, the new building contains the Bend Area Command office, East Region Headquarters and the Forensic Services Division Crime Lab. Office-related business including sex offender registration has been suspended since July 7 due to the move.

Missing boy’s stepmother agrees to move out of house The Associated Press PORTLAND — The father and stepmother of a missing Portland boy have settled their dispute over when she will move out of their house. Portland news organizations said Terri Horman has agreed to move out of the house she shared with Kaine Horman by 3 p.m. on Saturday. Kaine Horman, who’s living elsewhere, had asked a judge to order his estranged wife to leave the house this weekend.

She had sought more time. Kaine Horman has filed for divorce and gotten a protective restraining order against her. He says he believes she was involved in the disappearance of 7-year-old Kyron Horman. He’s been missing since June 4.

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N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and computer stolen at 12:42 p.m. July 15, in the 3100 block of Northeast Stonebrook Drive. Theft — A bicycle and camera were reported stolen at 3:45 p.m. July 15, in the 300 block of Northwest Columbia Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:50 p.m. July 15, in the area of Southwest Century and Southwest Mt. Washington drives. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:02 p.m. July 15, in the 19600 block of Aspen Ridge Drive. DUII — Melinda Breanne Vachon, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:45 a.m. July 16, in the area of Northeast Sixth Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 7:46 a.m. July 16, in the 500 block of Southeast Centennial Street. Redmond Police Department

DUII — Willard Bryan Wilhelm, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:26 p.m. July 15, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Quartz Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:10 p.m. July 15, in the area of Southwest 19th Street and Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:11 p.m. July 15, in the 1100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Robbery — Attempted armed robbery was reported at 1:16 p.m. July 15, in the 1700 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:12 a.m. July 15, in the 1300 block of Northeast Hemlock Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:15 a.m. July 15, in the 3300 block of Southwest Newberry Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:14 a.m. July 15, in the 3300 block of Southwest Kalama Avenue.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Phyllis Pearl York, 48, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:15 p.m. July 15, in the area of China Hat and Knott roads. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:25 p.m. July 15, in the 100 block of North Cowboy Street in Sisters. Criminal mischief — Slashed tires were reported at 4:06 p.m. July 15, in the 60200 block of Navajo Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:54 p.m. July 15, in the 19700 block of Baker Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:18 p.m. July 15, in the area of Swalley Road near milepost one in Bend. DUII — Artpong Kanjankaset, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:07 a.m. July 15, in the 1100 block of Northeast Third Street in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 11:52 a.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 63183 Desert Sage St. 2:14 p.m. — Special outside fire, 63301 Cimarron Drive. 5:30 p.m. — Natural gas leak, 20127 Archie Briggs Road. 5:50 p.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 65475 Tweed Road. 5:58 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 501 N.E. Bellevue Drive. 25 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the Website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s Website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Chihuahua — Young female, brown and white, pink and black collar with white polka dots; found near Southeast Evergreen Avenue.

Saturday, July 24th at 7:00 p.m. Sunday, July 25th at 3:00 p.m. at Mountain View High School Auditorium General Admission Tickets $10 each Tickets available on-line at: www.centraloregonschoolofballet.com and at the door For more information call 541-389-9309

Behind the gates you will find this tranquil home with soaring vaults, mature ponderosa pines overlooking the 13th Fairway of Widgi Creek and two ponds. 2442 sq ft with 3 bedrooms (2 master suites) and two stories of windows bring the view inside. $461,000 OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM Flat .44 acre building site at the western edge of the Broken Top neighborhood. Beautiful Cascade Mountain vistas, ponderosa pines and filtered golf course views in all directions. Quiet culdesac location across from fairway. Owner will consider trade. $189,900

Tom Eilertson, Broker John L Scott Real Estate 510 NE Third Street, Bend, OR 97701

Tomeilertson@yahoo.com 541-350-8097 “Let me show you the way home‌â€?


C3

B

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010

MARKET REPORT

t

2,179.05 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -70.03 -3.11%

STOC K S R E P O R T

t

CLOSE 10,097.90 DOW JONES CHANGE -261.41 -2.52%

t

1,064.88 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -31.60 -2.88%

t

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.94 treasury CHANGE -1.01%

For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

56 HOURS

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

in the life of a real estate agent

AIG to pay $725M in settlement SAN FRANCISCO — American International Group said Friday that it agreed to pay $725 million to settle a securities class-action lawsuit filed in the wake of a 2004 scandal. AIG must pay $175 million within 10 days after a judge issues preliminary approval of the settlement, the company said in a regulatory filing Friday. AIG’s obligation to pay the $550 million balance depends partly on whether it can raise the money by selling new common stock before final approval, the insurer added. The suit, led by three Ohio public pension funds, stems from late 2004, when AIG was embroiled in an accounting scandal over alleged artificial inflation of claims reserves.

Consumer prices Changes from the preceding month in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers: Seasonally adjusted 1.0 percent

-0.1% 0.5

0.0

-0.5 2009

2010

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

AP

$17.773 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.573

FINANCIAL CRISIS AFTERMATH

Who will lead new consumer guardian? WASHINGTON — The Obama administration, savoring congressional approval of a far-reaching financial regulation bill, now faces a crucial choice over who will lead the powerful new consumer guardian created by the legislation. With an estimated budget of $500 million and broad discretion to write and enforce rules for mortgages, credit cards, student loans and debt collection, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau will affect ordinary Americans more than any other element in the measure. Its first director will have to set priorities and shape its institutional culture and assertiveness. A three-person short list includes Elizabeth Warren, the Harvard University law professor whose proposal to create the agency was embraced by Obama and who is the favorite of liberal advocacy groups. See Consumer / C5

Is Goldman case the beginning or end of bank punishment? By Julie Creswell New York Times News Service

First, Goldman Sachs. Now — what? Up and down Wall Street, the government’s $550 million legal settlement with Goldman — to some, a slap in the face, to others, a slap on the wrist — has banking executives running the odds. Will other financial companies be called to account for the sins of the subprime era? Or was the mighty Goldman prize enough to satisfy Washington, if not the many ordinary citizens who blame Wall Street for the Great Recession? Officials at the Securities and Exchange Commission, as well as federal and state prosecutors, insist their jobs are far from over. See Punishment / C5

Gannett’s quarterly earnings disappoint

Cost cutting and an improved financial business helped General Electric Co. post its first increase in quarterly profit since 2007 on Friday, but sales remained sluggish for the industrial and financial giant. The better earnings ended a long string of declines at the Fairfield, Conn.-based company, which makes everything from refrigerators to jet engines. GE’s outlook was largely upbeat, helped by improving orders and lower losses and its GE Capital lending unit. It sees profits continuing to grow next year. — From wire reports

t

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The prices that U.S. consumers pay for goods and services fell slightly in June, mainly because of lower gasoline costs, the government reported Friday. The consumer-price index dropped a seasonally adjusted 0.1 percent, the third straight monthly decline, according to Labor Department data. The closely followed core prices, seen as a better gauge of inflationary trends, rose 0.2 percent for the biggest gain since October 2009. Yet core inflation, which excludes particularly volatile food and energy prices, is still very low.

GE breaks string of profit declines

$1188.00 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$20.10

By Sewell Chan

Consumer prices fall in June for 3rd month

Gannett Co., the largest U.S. newspaper publisher, moved closer to ending a 3½-year slump in print advertising during the second quarter. But it still isn’t feeling confident enough to predict when the biggest part of its business will begin to grow again. The progress contained in earnings results released Friday evidently wasn’t enough to satisfy investors, especially given management’s hazy outlook. Gannett shares plunged more than 10 percent.

t

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jim Mazziotti stands in front of the home from which he is hosting a 56-hour marathon open house that is being broadcast on the Web this weekend.

Bend man is hosting a marathon open house — and he’s broadcasting it live on the Web By Adrianne Jeffries

Paul Sakuma / The Associated Press

Apple CEO Steve Jobs responds to complaints about the iPhone 4 at Apple headquarters in Cupertino, Calif., on Friday.

The Bulletin

Jim Mazziotti, 56, is not particularly tech-savvy. He uses all the wrong jargon, for example, referring to blogs as “blog sites” and podcasts as “a sound on the Internet.” But the Bend real estate agent is a true believer in the Internet’s ability to revolutionize the real estate industry, and this weekend he’s proving his faith. Mazziotti is hosting a marathon open house at a bank-owned property in Bend and broadcasting the event on the Internet for 56 hours straight. The house will be open to any interested buyers that wander in during the 56 hours, as well as any curious real estate professionals who want to stop by. While real-life visitors wander around the house and enter a drawing to win concert tickets, Mazziotti and other agents from his company, EXIT Realty, entertain Internet viewers with informational presentations on topics such as “10 Myths of First-Time Homebuyers” and “Eight Quick Fixes to Increase the Value of Your Home.” Viewers can even chat with each other and ask the presenters questions. Mazziotti will stay in the house for the entire 56 hours. At night, the web cam will stream video of

Apple’s solution for iPhone 4 flaw: free bumper cases Screenshot from www.ustream.tv/channel/56-hour-open-house-from-bend-oregon

Jim Mazziotti broadcasts his open house on www.ustream.tv. The site features a chat window next to the video screen where viewers can interact with Mazziotti. him snoring on an air mattress. About a dozen neighbors walked in during the first hour, some looking for concert tickets, others curious about the home because it’s a foreclosure. “I think it’s a really neat, futuristic technique,” said Cathy McMahan, who stopped in after checking out the yard sale next door. She recently sold her Bend home without taking a loss, a blessing she attributes in part to the statue of St.

Joseph she buried upside down in the front yard. She’s not convinced the virtual open house will be as effective, but said it’s probably better than an auction. But the point isn’t to sell the house, Mazziotti said, although that’s one of his goals. He wants to use the event to market himself and his company, and to show sellers that he’s not afraid to use new media to get the job done. See Marathon / C5

By John Boudreau San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

CUPERTINO, Calif. — Apple CEO Steve Jobs took the stage at his company’s Cupertino headquarters Friday to respond to complaints about the new iPhone 4. Jobs said the company will give a free bumper case to buyers of every iPhone 4 through Sept. 30. Apple will tap cases made by third-party providers because Jobs said the company can’t make enough. Users will be able to order them online starting next week. “Pick a case — zoom, we’ll send it off to you,” Job said. Earlier, Jobs said, “You know, we’re not perfect. Phones aren’t perfect. We want to make all our users happy.” Calling the situation “Antennagate,” Jobs said the company has been “working our butts off” the past 22 days to figure out what the underlying problem is. See iPhone / C5


B USI N ESS

C4 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 18.14 ACE Ltd u53.70 AES Corp 9.98 AFLAC 46.26 AGCO 29.53 AK Steel 13.43 AMB Pr 23.00 AMR 6.87 AOL n 20.75 AT&T Inc 24.69 AU Optron 9.14 Aarons s 16.98 AbtLab 47.07 AberFitc 33.25 AcadiaRlt 16.42 Accenture 39.00 Actuant 18.11 Acuity 38.62 AdvAuto u51.34 AMD 7.37 AdvSemi 4.07 Aegon 5.57 Aeropostl s 28.68 Aetna 27.16 AffilMgrs 62.67 Agilent 27.03 Agnico g 56.00 Agrium g 58.64 AirProd 69.32 Airgas 64.74 AirTran 4.76 Albemarle 40.31 AlcatelLuc 2.67 Alcoa 10.41 Alcon 151.30 Alere 26.68 AllgEngy 22.30 AllegTch 44.73 Allergan u64.00 AlliData 55.88 AlliBInco 8.22 AlliantEgy 33.57 AlliantTch 64.46 AldIrish 2.28 Allstate 27.83 AlphaNRs 33.99 AlpTotDiv 5.32 Altria 21.26 AlumChina 19.11 AmBev 106.56 AmbacF h .68 Amdocs 28.29 Ameren 24.60 Amerigrp 32.56 AMovilL 48.00 AmAxle 7.73 AmCampus 26.71 AEagleOut 11.84 AEP 34.76 AmExp 41.38 AmIntlGrp 35.64 AmOriBio 2.33 AmTower 44.19 AmWtrWks 20.84 Americdt 20.01 Ameriprise 37.55 AmeriBrgn 32.14 Amphenol 41.15 Anadarko 47.46 AnalogDev 29.21 AnglogldA 40.41 ABInBev u52.85 AnnTaylr 16.02 Annaly 17.50 Anworth 7.25 Aon Corp d36.24 Apache 82.75 AptInv 20.11 AquaAm u18.49 ArcelorMit 29.05 ArchCoal 19.65 ArchDan 26.74 ArenaRes 35.98 ArrowEl 22.76 ArvMerit 13.86 AshfordHT 7.87 Ashland 46.48 Assurant 36.58 AssuredG 14.96 AstoriaF 13.56 AstraZen 48.79 AtwoodOcn 26.07 AutoNatn 19.99 Autoliv 50.60 AutoZone u202.25 AvalonBay 96.43 AveryD 33.56 AvisBudg 9.89 Avnet 24.75 Avon 28.69 AXIS Cap 31.20 BB&T Cp 26.38 BCE g 29.78 BHP BillLt 65.53 BHPBil plc 55.03 BJs Whls u43.89 BP PLC 37.10 BPZ Res d3.25 BRE 37.14 BRFBrasil s 13.88 BakrHu 46.00 Baldor 36.08 BallCp 53.95 BallyTech 31.60 BcBilVArg 12.02 BcoBrades 16.43 BcoSantand 12.31 BcSBrasil n 11.62 BkofAm 13.98 BkAm pfH 24.98 BkAm wtB 2.96 BkIrelnd 3.59 BkMont g 58.09 BkNYMel 25.73 BkNova g 48.87 BankAtl A 1.62 Barclay 17.30 BarVixShT 27.37 Bard 77.58 BarnesNob 12.27 BarrickG 41.75 Baxter 42.45 BeazerHm 3.70 BectDck 67.75 Bemis 28.14 Berkley 26.19 BerkH B s 77.10 BerryPet 26.09 BestBuy 34.33 BigLots 33.39 BBarrett 32.07 BioMedR 16.11 Biovail u20.49 BlkIntlG&I 9.99 Blackstone 10.19 BlockHR 13.98 Boeing 61.90 Boise Inc 5.78

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Name

Last

Chg Wkly

Borders 1.35 BorgWarn 40.43 BostProp 74.71 BostonSci 6.11 BoydGm 7.74 Brandyw 10.18 BridgptEd 15.70 Brinker 15.53 BrMySq 25.17 BroadrdgF 20.13 Brookdale 13.64 BrkfldAs g 23.72 BrkfldPrp 14.23 BrwnBrn 18.95 Brunswick 12.50 Buckle 27.68 Buenavent 38.32 BungeLt 51.98 BurgerKing 17.22 CB REllis 13.70 CBL Asc 12.07 CBS B 13.53 CF Inds 76.96 CIGNA 30.34 CIT Grp n 36.80 CMS Eng 15.62 CNO Fincl 4.84 CSX 50.12 CVS Care 30.04 CablvsnNY 25.48 CabotO&G 31.87 CalDive 6.01 Calgon 12.48 CallGolf 5.99 CallonP h 5.52 Calpine 12.81 CamdnP 42.54 Cameco g 23.99 Cameron 34.75 CampSp 35.82 CdnNRy g 59.22 CdnNRs gs 34.51 CP Rwy g 56.16 CapOne 41.46 CapitlSrce 5.28 CapsteadM 11.57 CardnlHlt s 35.15 CareFusn n 21.55 CarMax 18.67 Carnival 31.41 Carters 25.25 Caterpillar 63.94 Celanese 25.03 Cemex 9.23 Cemig pf 14.39 CenovusE n 27.70 CenterPnt 13.93 CnElBrasil 12.28 CntryLink 34.58 ChRvLab 34.12 ChesEng 20.87 Chevron 71.50 ChicB&I 18.34 Chicos 9.49 Chimera 3.68 ChinaLife 63.67 ChinaMble 49.21 ChinaSecur 4.88 ChinaUni 12.55 Chipotle 136.82 Chiquita 12.27 Chubb 51.55 ChungTel 20.55 Cimarex 71.21 CinciBell 2.95 Cinemark 13.42 Citigp pfJ 25.73 Citigrp 3.90 CliffsNRs 46.55 Clorox 64.41 Coach 34.76 CobaltIEn n 8.01 CocaCE 27.69 CocaCl 52.37 Coeur 14.39 ColgPal 82.83 CollctvBrd 15.49 ColonPT 15.01 Comerica 36.17 CmclMtls 12.81 ComScop 24.75 CmtyHlt 32.56 CompPrdS u15.49 CompSci 45.30 ComstkRs d26.40 Con-Way 31.43 ConAgra 23.66 ConchoRes 53.07 ConocPhil 51.85 ConsolEngy 35.09 ConEd 45.06 ConstellA 16.34 ConstellEn 32.59 CtlAir B 22.86 ContlRes 43.25 Cnvrgys 10.20 Cooper Ind 44.35 CooperTire 20.78 CornPdts 30.98 Corning 16.96 CorpOffP 36.52 CorrectnCp 18.60 Cosan Ltd 10.08 CousPrp 6.24 Covance 52.90 CovantaH 15.12 CoventryH 18.72 Covidien 40.03 CredSuiss 40.65 CrwnCstle 36.47 CrownHold 25.90 Cummins 69.50 CurEuro 128.82 CushTRet 8.39

-.14 -.09 -2.15 +.50 -2.60 -.52 -.48 -.35 -.48 -.84 -.26 -.35 -.08 -.28 -.55 +.27 -.33 -.43 -.42 -.21 -.62 -1.14 -.68 +.50 -.42 +.07 -.52 -.52 -1.48 -.98 -.80 -.55 -1.03 -.86 -2.02 -1.96 -.85 -.25 -.45 -.20 -.40 -.18 -.86 -.51 -1.00 +2.72 -1.27 -.95 -.19 -.19 -.38 -.05 -.32 -.44 -1.90 -1.64 -.74 +.24 -.65 +.14 -1.45 -1.62 +.03 -.14 -.67 -1.16 -.28 -.22 -.36 -1.12 -.38 -.67 -1.74 -.85 -.83 +1.15 -.38 -.45 -.23 -.48 -2.12 +.58 -1.07 -1.05 -2.13 +.01 -1.80 -2.22 -.06 -.01 -.07 +.24 -.73 +.54 -.87 -1.06 -.94 -.68 -1.39 -.71 -.95 -1.73 -2.13 -.34 -1.20 -1.27 -.62 -.39 -.25 -.73 -1.07 -.66 -.37 -.12 -.27 -.96 -.25 +.13 -.83 -.70 -.57 -.61 -1.54 -.34 -.87 -1.44 -.38 -.79 -.11 -.10 -.70 -4.03 -1.15 -1.73 -.23 -.19 -.42 -.64 -5.64 -3.59 -.54 -.26 -1.24 -.58 -.10 -.28 -4.04 -3.47 -.10 -.08 -.59 -.62 ... +.13 -.26 -.14 -1.91 -4.52 -.81 +.29 -1.99 -1.74 -.11 +.78 -.29 +.01 -.48 -.03 -.65 -1.27 -.26 +.68 -.86 -.77 -.52 +.13 -2.62 -2.98 -.55 -.87 -1.28 -.02 -1.04 -.16 -1.20 +.14 -1.41 -.37 -1.10 -.63 -1.37 +.02 -.44 -.25 -1.91 -1.57 -1.01 -.45 -1.46 -2.00 -.68 -.21 -.13 +.27 -.93 -.92 -.74 -.06 -1.39 -.32 -.51 +.06 -2.07 -1.46 -.97 +.75 -.53 -.03 -.66 -.55 -1.19 -1.24 -.62 -.25 -.30 -.38 -.14 -.06 -1.12 +.67 -.52 -.72 -.71 -.05 -.46 -.73 -2.19 -1.68 -1.48 -1.55 -.27 +.55 -3.20 -2.03 -.09 +2.82 +.10 -.06

D-E-F DCT Indl DPL DR Horton DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden DaVita DeVry DeanFds Deere DelMnte DeltaAir DenburyR DeutschBk DBGoldDL DevelDiv DevonE DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt

4.35 24.84 10.10 47.13 10.29 37.41 39.76 60.00 52.85 11.47 59.73 13.77 11.72 14.41 61.23 30.79 10.03 61.16 62.55 8.74 13.02 24.72 60.82

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ArQule 3.95 ArchCap 75.34 ArcSight 23.36 ArenaPhm 4.66 AresCap 13.49 ArgonSt 34.40 AriadP 2.94 Ariba Inc 16.57 ArkBest 20.88 ArmHld u13.79 ArrayBio 2.93 Arris 11.29 ArtTech 3.64 ArubaNet u15.60 AsiaInfo 24.50 AspenTech 10.93 AsscdBanc 13.25 athenahlth 22.87 Atheros 29.27 AtlasAir 53.76 AtlasEngy 28.80 Atmel 5.04 Autodesk 25.35 AutoData 40.63 Auxilium 22.22 AvagoT n 21.99 AvanirPhm 3.12 AviatNetw 3.76 Axcelis 1.68 BE Aero 26.72 BGC Ptrs 5.08 BldrsEmg 39.72 BMC Sft 36.48 BannerCp 2.00 BeacnRfg 17.76 BebeStrs 6.79 BedBath 36.04 Biocryst 5.54 Biodel 3.47 BiogenIdc 51.86 BioMarin 19.18 BioMimetic d8.33 BioSante 1.63 BioScrip 6.35 BlkRKelso 10.07 Blkboard 37.87 BlueCoat 21.12 BlueNile 46.02 BostPrv 6.63 BrigExp 15.24 Brightpnt 7.20 Broadcom u35.99 Broadwind 2.90 BrcdeCm 5.03 BrklneB 9.16 BrooksAuto 8.11 BrukerCp h 11.30 Bucyrus 51.78 BuffaloWW 39.96 CA Inc 19.00 CBOE n d26.45 CDC Cp A 2.09 CH Robins 57.45 CKX Inc 4.99 CME Grp 266.23 CNinsure 23.62 CTC Media 16.73 CVB Fncl 9.92 CabotMic 33.32 Cadence 6.12 CalifPizza 14.93

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Name

Last

Chg Wkly

Dillards 20.69 DrxTcBll s 28.87 DrxEMBll s 23.14 DrSCBear rs 39.27 DREBear rs 36.31 DrxEBear rs 59.36 DirEMBr rs 44.26 DirFnBear 15.81 DrxFBull s 20.14 DrxREBll s 35.61 DirxSCBull 36.25 DirxLCBear 16.30 DirxLCBull 42.90 DirxEnBull 26.19 Discover 14.50 Disney 33.03 DolbyLab 65.19 DoleFood n 9.94 DollarGn n 29.09 DollarTh 46.22 DomRescs 40.43 Dominos 12.16 Domtar grs 47.77 DEmmett 14.07 Dover 42.58 DowChm 25.17 DrPepSnap u38.25 DresserR 31.93 DuPont 35.98 DuPFabros 23.92 DukeEngy 16.87 DukeRlty 10.60 Dynegy rs d3.47 EMC Cp u20.15 EMCOR 24.12 ENI 39.29 EOG Res 102.28

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Name Flowserve Fluor FEMSA FootLockr FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Fortress FortuneBr FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline

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88.76 42.79 45.30 12.84 11.34 3.83 11.83 27.96 27.35 3.90 40.48 19.00 90.14 60.08 7.39 12.39 30.10

-2.88 -1.60 -1.00 -.65 -.52 -.35 -.36 -.66 -1.69 -.03 -1.42 -.55 -3.61 -3.09 +.05 -.39 -.73

-3.93 -2.62 -.11 -.30 +.49 +.35 +.44 -.43 -1.76 +.33 -.22 +.05 -2.10 -5.60 +.00 -.49 +.13

G-H-I GLG Ptrs GMX Rs Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GaylrdEnt GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s Genpact GenuPrt Genworth

4.36 6.69 13.70 18.95 5.35 13.50 18.13 25.33 16.24 25.46 58.90 14.55 13.23 5.85 35.54 15.27 43.23 13.46

-.01 -.08 -.51 -.45 -.60 +.01 -.57 -.08 -.38 -.07 -1.61 -1.34 -.66 -.40 -1.59 +.90 +.11 +.46 -1.30 -1.64 -2.57 -1.94 -.70 -.40 -.54 -.52 -.04 +.19 -.53 -.61 -.36 -.25 +1.08 +2.11 -.90 -1.13

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Mohawk MolsCoorB Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan Mosaic Motorola MuellerWat MurphO NBTY NCR Corp NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatGrid NOilVarco NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios Navistar Netezza NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc NewellRub NewfldExp

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4.53 d3.11 20.35 43.80 43.97 56.20 11.95 14.94 21.94 24.74 44.76 7.50 3.60 50.18 u53.45 12.68 22.25 12.39 26.91 16.95 22.78 2.72 10.51 37.56 35.26 22.27 14.07 35.99 d8.85 4.99 49.87 13.64 16.61 8.80 11.17 14.95 49.56

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Name PeabdyE Pengrth g PennVa PennWst g Penney Penske Pentair PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PerkElm Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PtroqstE Pfizer PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PinnclEnt PinWst PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsEx Plantron PlaybyB PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL PolyOne Potash PwshDB PS Agri PS USDBull

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41.81 9.29 19.39 19.27 21.73 12.23 31.92 8.84 16.18 62.45 19.06 16.62 30.15 34.51 6.60 14.56 49.67 31.94 45.15 1.87 6.42 6.67 9.59 37.84 58.85 22.93 20.91 29.24 u5.37 36.06 57.58 73.90 8.40 96.59 21.97 25.27 24.01

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• Business Banking • Personal Banking • Commercial Lending • • Residential Mortgage Lending • Cash Management • • Online Banking and Bill Pay • Remote Deposit • Free ATM access* •

Local Bank. Local Relationships. Visit us today. Meet our local Board of Directors: Gwil T. Evans, Gary Everton, Gary D. Fish, Cynthia L. Kane, Ph.D., John P. Lietz, Dr. Bruce A. McLellan, Romy E. Mortensen, Larry R. Snyder

High Desert Bank 1000 SW Disk Drive Bend, Oregon 97702

541.848.4444 www.highdesertbank.com

EQT Corp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EVTxMGlo Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g EBrasAero EmersonEl Emulex EnCana g s EngyTsfr EnergySol Enerpls g ENSCO Entergy EntPrPt Equifax EqtyRsd EsteeLdr EvergrnEn ExcelM ExcoRes Exelon ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FTI Cnslt FairchldS FamilyDlr FedExCp FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstHorizon FstInRT FirstEngy FlagstB rs

35.99 54.21 4.40 67.20 28.71 10.34 47.57 32.55 54.75 11.97 29.97 4.85 15.89 21.46 45.22 9.44 31.84 u49.51 d4.70 21.82 40.26 75.96 u37.53 29.18 42.69 63.47 .10 4.95 14.60 41.48 24.71 13.87 57.96 58.03 59.30 7.97 33.62 9.84 38.12 74.61 20.84 4.95 7.20 13.73 13.27 27.52 12.82 .48 11.79 4.01 37.11 3.07

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Gerdau g 10.94 Gerdau 13.06 GlaxoSKln 36.42 GlimchRt 5.86 GolLinhas 13.21 GoldFLtd 12.95 Goldcrp g 40.14 GoldmanS 146.17 Goodrich 66.70 GoodrPet 12.04 Goodyear 10.94 vjGrace 22.05 GrafTech 14.66 Graingr 104.98 GrtAtlPac 3.95 GtPlainEn 17.20 GpTelevisa 18.36 Guess 32.56 HCP Inc 33.46 HSBC 47.62 HSBC Cap2 u25.42 Hallibrtn 27.51 Hanesbrds 24.44 HarleyD 23.55 Harman 29.12 HarmonyG 10.31 HarrisCorp 43.34 HartfdFn 21.77 Hasbro 39.50 Headwatrs 2.95 HltCrREIT 42.98 HltMgmt 7.22 HealthNet 24.72 HlthSouth 17.73 Heckmann 4.57 Heckmn wt .43 HeclaM 4.70 Heinz 44.80 HelixEn 9.60 HelmPayne 38.36 Hersha 4.73 Hershey 50.81 Hertz 10.03 Hess 51.49 HewittAsc u47.30 HewlettP 46.20 Hexcel 15.96 hhgregg 20.88 HighwdPrp 28.28 HollyCp 25.19 HomeDp 27.11 HonwllIntl 40.19

CdnSolar 12.62 CapFedF 32.46 CpstnTrb .92 CardiacSci 1.13 Cardiom g 7.94 CardioNet 4.56 CareerEd 24.94 Carrizo 17.50 Caseys 35.77 CatalystH 35.18 CathayGen 11.05 CaviumNet 28.10 CeleraGrp 6.26 Celgene 52.04 CelldexTh 4.51 CentEuro 24.78 CenGrdA lf 9.33 CentAl 9.03 Cephln 59.45 Cepheid 14.50 Cerner 74.62 Changyou d27.50 ChrmSh 3.93 ChkPoint 32.56 Cheesecake 24.21 ChildPlace 44.16 ChinAgri s 10.64 ChinaBAK 1.47 ChinaBiot 12.16 ChinaInfo 5.26 ChinaMda 9.69 ChinaRE n 8.72 ChinaSun 3.70 ChinaTcF 2.86 ChinaTInfo 7.19 ChinaCEd 6.11 CienaCorp 12.80 CinnFin 26.62 Cintas 25.20 Cirrus 17.16 Cisco 22.75 CitrixSys 45.36 CleanEngy 15.83 Clearwire 6.51 CoBizFncl 6.02 CogentC 7.80 Cogent 9.09 CognizTech 52.63 Coinstar 47.00 ColdwtrCrk 3.49 ColBnkg 17.64 CombinRx 1.42 Comcast 18.54 Comc spcl 17.52 CmcBMO 37.27 CommVlt 18.14 CompDivHd 14.07 Compuwre 8.39 Comtech 30.79 Concepts 12.59 ConcurTch 43.40 Conexant 2.13 Conmed 17.03 ConsolCm 16.81 ConstantC 20.52 CopanoEn 27.87 Copart 35.45 CorinthC 9.53 Costco 54.98 CrackerB 47.03 Cray Inc 5.84

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Cree Inc 65.12 -3.15 -1.00 Crocs 10.50 +.25 -.32 CrosstexE 6.26 -.16 -.08 Ctrip.com s 36.48 -.33 -.25 CubistPh 21.37 -.23 -.07 Curis 1.47 -.03 -.04 CybrSrce u25.96 -.01 ... Cyclacel 1.54 -.09 -.05 Cymer 31.51 -.46 +.62 CyprsBio 2.50 +.21 +.36 CypSemi 10.60 -.51 -.23 Cytori 3.81 -.27 +.07

-.04 -.04 -.42 -1.14 -.79 +1.58 -.40 -.13 -.70 -.06 -.49 -.17 -1.19 -1.43 +.95 +8.11 -2.80 -2.32 -.72 -1.50 -.72 +.05 -1.17 -.56 -.71 -1.05 -1.91 +1.99 -.30 -.79 -.54 -.50 -.59 -.52 -1.62 -1.34 -.72 -.05 -1.66 +.05 -.05 -.04 -.59 -1.13 -1.41 -.57 -1.46 -.24 -2.05 -3.00 -.40 -.27 -1.40 +.44 -1.01 -1.76 -1.59 -2.09 -.18 +.15 -.75 -.20 -.27 -.33 -.81 -.08 -.44 -.24 -.20 -.08 -.02 -.02 -.21 -.37 -.41 -.11 -.60 -.81 -1.68 -2.09 -.17 +.07 -.80 +.09 -.57 -.21 -1.83 -1.74 -.53+11.90 -1.22 +.95 -.91 -.87 -.82 -.31 -.33 -.27 -.74 -1.35 -1.23 -1.15 -1.60 -1.08

Hornbeck 15.68 Hospira u57.32 HospPT 19.67 HostHotls 13.45 HovnanE 4.03 Humana 45.66 Huntsmn 9.13 IAMGld g 15.91 ICICI Bk 37.62 IDT Corp u15.33 ING 8.36 ION Geoph 3.98 iShCmxG s 11.68 iSAstla 20.04 iShBraz 64.15 iSCan 25.68 iShEMU 31.28 iSFrnce 21.25 iShGer 20.12 iSh HK 15.15 iShJapn 9.35 iSh Kor 46.37 iSMalas 11.71 iShMex 48.99 iShSing 11.81 iSPacxJpn 37.54 iSSpain 36.97 iSTaiwn 11.83 iSh UK 14.59 iShSilver 17.49 iShS&P100 48.57 iShChina25 38.74 iShDJTr 74.45 iSSP500 107.05 iShBAgB 107.43 iShEMkts 38.65 iShiBxB u109.00 iSSPGth 54.90 iShSPLatA 42.90 iSSPVal 51.26 iShB20 T 100.80 iShB7-10T u95.86 iShB1-3T 84.13 iS Eafe 49.58 iSRusMCV 37.20 iSSPMid 72.64 iShiBxHYB 86.72 iShC&SRl 55.93 iSR1KV 55.58 iSR1KG 47.28 iSRus1K 58.74 iSR2KV 56.90

-.96 -.78 -1.37 -.85 -.65 -.16 -.73 -.76 -.25 +.14 -1.19 -.54 -.33 +.12 -.79 -1.11 -1.10 -.23 -.36 -.69 -.56 -.43 -.28 -.40 -.15 -.16 -.67 -.46 -2.00 -3.19 -.79 -.53 -.98 ... -.74 -.06 -.50 +.25 -.21 -.23 -.24 -.25 -1.82 -1.08 -.20 -.24 -1.56 -.97 -.17 -.04 -1.06 -.78 -1.21 -.43 -.22 -.17 -.42 +.13 -.46 -.24 -1.38 -.38 -1.12 -1.94 -2.32 -.71 -3.05 -1.26 +.33 +.69 -1.19 -1.33 +.19 +1.05 -1.49 -.55 -1.18 -2.01 -1.58 -.69 +.49 +1.58 +.55 +1.20 +.08 +.14 -1.64 -.48 -1.26 -.85 -2.35 -1.20 -.53 +.12 -1.98 -.85 -1.69 -.88 -1.33 -.45 -1.74 -.76 -2.12 -1.75

EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FEI Co FLIR Sys FSI Intl Fastenal FiberTw rs FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FFnclOH FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FstMerit Fiserv Flextrn FocusMda FormFac Fortinet n Fossil Inc FosterWhl FredsInc FresKabi rt FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf

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iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShREst iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed ITW IngerRd IngrmM IntcntlEx IBM Intl Coal IntlGame IntPap InterOil g Interpublic IntPotash Invesco InvTech IronMtn ItauUnibH IvanhM g

“Local Service - Local Knowledge”

66.67 61.07 38.05 19.16 47.95 50.70 54.42 55.39 4.07 45.58 86.53 42.70 34.37 15.80 101.54 128.03 4.04 14.97 22.78 52.58 7.32 22.48 18.14 d14.45 23.48 20.21 16.34

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J-K-L JCrew 33.05 JPMorgCh 39.00 JPMAlerian u32.48 Jabil 14.79 JacksnHew 1.15 JacobsEng 36.19 Jaguar g 7.77 JanusCap 9.45 Jarden 28.09 Jefferies 22.42 JohnJn 59.44 JohnsnCtl 28.51 JonesApp 14.49 JnprNtwk 25.90 KB Home 10.52 KBR Inc 20.44 KKR n ud9.69 KKR Fn 7.65 KT Corp 17.85 KV PhmA 1.28 KC Southn 34.72 Kellogg 51.05 Kennamtl 25.52

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KeyEngy 8.58 Keycorp 7.75 KilroyR 29.63 KimbClk 62.06 Kimco 13.37 KindME 68.50 KineticC 35.61 KingPhrm 8.37 Kinross g d15.71 KnghtCap 14.05 KnightTr 20.90 Kohls 46.42 KoreaElc 12.70 Kraft 28.81 Kroger 20.37 L-1 Ident 8.20 L-3 Com 71.63 LDK Solar 5.92 LG Display 15.37 LSI Corp 4.76 LaZBoy 7.20 LabCp 75.03 LVSands 23.50 LaSalleH 20.93 LeggMason 28.12 LeggPlat 20.00 LenderPS 34.09 LennarA 14.05 LeucNatl 19.83 LexRltyTr 5.77 Lexmark 32.74 LibtProp 28.09 LillyEli 34.64 Limited 23.50 LincNat 22.62 LionsGt g 6.09 LiveNatn 8.99 LizClaib 4.33 LloydBkg 3.60 LockhdM 73.93 Loews 35.56 LongtopFn 31.77 Lorillard 73.53 LaPac 6.99 Lowes 20.04 Lubrizol 84.70

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M-N-O M&T Bk MBIA MDC MDU Res

85.73 -3.05 -4.50 6.51 -.35 -.09 27.30 -1.09 -.96 18.98 -.72 -.30

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RPC u15.19 RPM 17.57 RRI Engy 3.87 Rackspace 16.64 RadianGrp 7.46 RadioShk 21.09 RangeRs 40.12 RaserT h .49 RJamesFn 24.78 Rayonier 45.50 Raytheon 47.73 RealD n ud19.51 RltyInco 30.73 RedHat u31.58 RedwdTr 14.40 RegalEnt 13.44 RgcyCtrs 33.60 RegionsFn 6.55 Regis Cp 13.64 RelStlAl 35.86 ReneSola 7.21 RepubSvc 29.98 ResMed 66.46 ResrceCap 5.47 RetailHT 87.18 ReynldAm 55.17 RioTinto s 45.76 RitchieBr d18.29 RiteAid .95 RobtHalf 24.04 RockwlAut 50.49 RockColl 54.16 RogCm gs 34.38 Rowan 24.02 RoyalBk g 51.23 RylCarb 23.39 RoyDShllB 52.54 RoyDShllA 54.71 Ryder 39.83 RdxSPEW 39.02 Ryland 16.12

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Chg Wkly

38.17 31.64 14.97 62.26 14.05 21.69 31.24 38.08 4.49 21.91 31.36 9.93 17.48 11.35 9.54 24.77 17.34 49.06 8.76 36.80 80.95 39.96 39.18 54.10 29.53 27.31 19.01 16.43 48.99 68.10 48.99 14.15 70.75 52.08 49.62 22.26 18.07 42.69 25.37 35.95 17.18 7.47 14.14 19.19 8.95 4.81 12.32 44.09 33.33 29.66 28.86 68.81 20.51 2.97 59.68 10.25 23.04 7.61 34.16 41.36 66.03 30.34 36.81 21.73

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Nasdaq National Market Name

Last

Chg Wkly

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 C5

Consumer

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Speakers With Spirit Toastmasters Club recently elected officers for the year 2010-11: president, Katherine Alexander; vice Katherine president of Alexander education and training and vice president of public relations, David Paul; vice president of membership, Kelly Pedrick; secretary/ treasurer, Susan Williamson; and sergeant-at-arms Glenn Ashford. Speakers With Spirit Toastmasters is a corporate club at Vertex Business Services. Pat Lynch, immediate Past High Desert Division governor for Toastmasters District 7, has announced the election of Mark Schang of Edward Jones, Bend, as High Desert Division governor for the year 2010-2011. Appointments of the High Desert Division area governors also include Michael Haas of Custom Software Solutions as Area 10 governor for the Madras, Prineville & Redmond clubs; Steve Curley, a principal brand strategist at Kinetic Branding, as Area 11 governor for the four clubs in Bend; and Anne Weaver as Area 12 governor for Klamath Falls, Lakeview and Alturas, Calif., clubs. The International Association of Fire Chiefs has appointed County Forester Joe Stutler to serve for a three-year term on the Wildland Fire Policy Committee. Stutler’s appointment to the

Punishment Continued from C3 They continue to delve into a variety of Wall Street practices, from how toxic mortgage investments like those in the Goldman case were created and sold, to how such investments got topflight credit ratings.

Marathon Continued from C3 “Most Realtors will list a property, put a sign in the yard, put it on the MLS (real estate database), and might put a few ads in the paper... and that’s what they do,” he said. “That is old school. That doesn’t work anymore.” Real estate agents are working harder than ever before, Mazziotti said. The average residential home in Bend spent 142 days on the market in the first half of 2010, compared with 128 days in 2006, according to the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. His foreclosure on Oakview Drive is one of several houses for sale in the northeast Bend neighborhood. And while they aren’t hosting online open houses, other real estate agents seem to have updated their bags of tricks. A sign on a house one street over directs the buyer to send a text message to a five-digit

David Paul

Kelly Pedrick

Susan Willimason

Brian Potwin

Glenn Ashford

Mark Schang

Michael Haas

Steve Curley

Ann Weaver

Joe Stutler

Roxana Ermisch

Shane Cochran

committee will bring exposure to Project Wildfire and wildland fire prevention programs. Bob Naidis was honored by Central Oregon Mediation Inc. by becoming the first recipient of the Mediation Hall of Fame. Naidis’ name will be entered on a plaque at the COM office commemorating his service as a volunteer mediator and coach/mentor for the organization since 1998. Mt. Bachelor has announced the advancement of two longtime employees, Amy Ohran and Curtis Norsen. Ohran left her former position as director of Snow Sports School to become director of Staff Resources and Development, overseeing all aspects of the employment of the resort’s more than 700 employ-

ees. Norsen expands his current role as leader of the Ski Patrol with the addition of risk management, safety awareness and education responsibilities for the entire company as Ski Patrol & Risk Manager. Roxana Ermisch of Cascades East Area Health Education Centers at St. Charles and Bridges to Communication LLC has been appointed by Gov. Ted Kulongoski to the 25-member Oregon Council on Health Care Interpreters for a three-year term. The Council is advisory to the Oregon Department of Human Services to develop standards with respect to education, training, and testing. Brian Potwin, safe routes to school instructor for Commute

Options, has become a certified instructor through the League of American Bicyclists. The League Cycling Instructor certification program teaches that bicycles are vehicles, with all the same rights and responsibilities as any other vehicle on the roadway. The league is the only nationally recognized instructor certification program of its kind in the United States. Shane Cochran, staff geologist with the Wallace Group, has obtained his Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act inspector accreditation. This accreditation allows Cochran to perform inspections and sampling involving asbestos in schools, public and commercial buildings.

And yet the Goldman settlement — both its size and its legal implications — brought a palpable sense of relief on Wall Street. After two months of strident claims and equally strident denials, the matter was finally settled, and for a price Goldman could easily afford. The penalty amounted to about 15 days of profits. On Friday, as other banking shares tum-

bled along with the broad market, Goldman’s share price rose again. Many legal experts viewed the deal as a benchmark for any future Wall Street settlements, when or if they emerge. “If” is the operative word: Even trickier than collateralized debt obligations, the instruments at the center of the Goldman case, are legal cases involving such investments.

Building civil cases around CDOs, let alone criminal ones, will be a formidable challenge, legal experts said. Still, it is too early for Wall Street to send out the all-clear signal. In addition to continuing SEC investigations, Andrew Cuomo, the attorney general of New York, has several active investigations into Wall Street.

number, which texts back with pricing and listing information. Then an agent calls you. Other signs in the neighborhood advertise an 800 number where callers can hear a recorded description of the house, and then press 1 to be connected to the agent. Mark Rieger, of Duke Warner Realty, is one of the agents who records such “audio tours” for his listings. He doesn’t do many traditional open houses anymore, he said. “Technology is something you have to keep up on or else you kind of get left in the dust,” he said. “People that drive by and want to hear the story about the house first and then make decision about whether to go inside. ... It’s no longer the order-taking that it was two or three years ago when all you had to have was a real estate license and a sign up in the yard and you could pull off a sale.” Real estate agents should be using whatever media consumers are using, said Michelle

Wardlaw, a spokesperson for the National Association of Realtors. That means adapting to new technology, she said, especially the Internet – more than 90 percent of buyers go to the Internet first when looking for a home. But only about 3 percent of Realtors are using social media like blogs and podcasts the way Mazziotti is, she said. Mazziotti actually hosted his 56-hour open house for the first time last year, inspired by a real estate agent who did the same thing in Canada. He drew 200 walk-ins and more than 2,000 online viewers, he said, and expects to have 500 walk-ins and 5,000 viewers this year. A marathon broadcast is tough to pull off, but Mazziotti — whom a member of his staff described

as “a big, softy Italian” — has the energy of a late-night infomercial salesman. He also records a weekly Internet broadcast about real estate, which appears to attract audiences in the single digits — not that it sways him. He uses Twitter and Facebook daily to network, and encourages his staff to do the same. “When we hear people whining and crying about sales are terrible and there is no business, it’s not true,” he said. “We know there’s business out there, and we know the only way you can sell things and find buyers and sellers is to market. So we’re marketing.”

Continued from C3 The other candidates are Michael Barr, an assistant Treasury secretary who helped shepherd the legislation through Congress, and Eugene Kimmelman, a former consumer advocate who is deputy assistant attorney general in the antitrust division of the Justice Department. Given the agency’s public visibility and broad mandate, its establishment could be as momentous, and as closely watched, as those of the Federal Trade Commission in 1915 and the Securities and Exchange Commission in 1934. On Friday, David Axelrod, a senior adviser to the president, called Warren “a great, great champion for consumers” and said she was “obviously a candidate” for the job. But Warren, 61, a scholar of bankruptcy law, has limited management experience, and as chairwoman of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the Wall

iPhone Continued from C5 He also pointed out the that other smart phones, like the BlackBerry Bold, have similar “death grip” problems like that on the iPhone 4, with some owners reporting dropped calls when they touch the antenna at the lower left corner of the device. He began the presentation with a defense of the iPhone 4 while admitting “we are not perfect.” Showing a video of other smart phones being held as signal strength drops, he said: “Most smart phones behave exactly the same way. This is life in the smart phone world — phones are not perfect. And it’s a challenge for the whole industry. Every phone has weak spots.” Jobs detailed the $100 million of research the company put behind antenna research. “We knew if you grip it a certain way, the bars would go

Street bailout, has occasionally clashed with the Treasury secretary, Timothy Geithner. Whoever is chosen for the five-year term will have to deftly navigate bureaucratic politics. Critically, the legislation sets up a new council of regulators, led by Geithner, that will have the power in some instances to nullify the new bureau’s rules if they are deemed to jeopardize the stability of the financial system. The nominee must pass Senate confirmation. Kimmelman, 55, is a former Washington lobbyist at Consumers Union, and Barr, 44, a University of Michigan law professor, has battled frequently with banks over the last year and a half, so all three of the likely nominees are likely to face serious opposition from the banking industry. All three declined to comment. “It will be a major fight in the Senate, no question about it,” said Michael Calhoun, president of the Center for Responsible Lending, an organization in Durham, N.C., that was pivotal in pushing for the bureau.

down — just like every smart phone. We didn’t think it would be a problem.” He said very few users have complained about the iPhone 4 antenna. About “one-half of one percent — 0.55 percent” have called the company’s Apple Care service for help regarding this issue. “Historically for us, this is not a large number. This does not jibe with what you read about this.” He also said there have been less than a third of the returns for the iPhone 4 than for the previous model, the iPhone 3GS. The event followed a Monday review by Consumer Reports that, while declaring the iPhone 4 the best smart phone on the market, recommended that readers not buy it because of the reception problem.

DESCHUTES COUNTY

FAIR & RODEO

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

ONLY 11 DAYS 1 JULY 29-AUGUST UNTIL THE FAIR! Redmond, Oregon

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Adrianne Jeffries can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at ajeffries@bendbulletin.com.

Join us for this year’s fantastic Tour of Homes™ at Brasada Ranch where we’ll have two beautiful homes built by Black Rock Construction. While you’re here, be sure to make time for our BBQ and Ice Cream Social. The BBQ runs from 12-4 on Fridays and 11-4 on Saturdays and Sundays, and it’s just $6. Enjoy free ice cream at the Ice Cream Social from 11-6 each day at the Athletic Club. This is also the perfect time to check-out the amazing real estate values currently available at Brasada Ranch. For more information call Brasada Ranch Real Estate at (541) 504-3200. The Central Oregon Tour of Homes™ runs July 16-18 and 23-25, 12-6 on both Fridays, and 10-6 both Saturdays and Sundays. We look forward to seeing you there! 16986 SW Brasada Ranch Road, Powell Butte, Oregon

LAND MOWING FIRE SUPPRESSION

Meet Fire Code Standards and Weed Control for vacant lots, fields, and pastures

G.A. Mowing 541-923-5776 or 541-410-3833 (cell)

Address

151 SW Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend

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Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.37 +.04 +.12 AbdAustEq 9.76 -.23 -.16 AbdnEMTel 16.46 -.28 -.25 AbdnIndo u11.63 -.05 +.09 AdeonaPh .97 -.01 -.05 AdvPhot .49 -.01 -.02 Advntrx rs 1.82 -.07 +.18 AlexcoR g 3.01 -.08 -.10 AlldDefen 3.21 -.04 -.30 AlldNevG 17.25 -1.24 -1.98 AlmadnM g .88 ... -.03 AlphaPro 1.82 -.03 +.08 AmApparel 1.49 -.07 -.12 AmDGEn n 2.81 -.08 -.04 AmDefense .25 ... +.03 AmLorain n 2.93 +.07 -.15 AmO&G 6.17 -.05 -.24 Anooraq g .97 -.04 -.02 AntaresP 1.58 -.03 -.16 AoxingP rs 2.98 -.14 -.61 ArcadiaRs .56 +.01 +.14 ArmourRsd d6.25 +.10 -.13 Augusta g d1.42 -.05 +.06 Aurizon g 4.79 -.23 -.22 BMB Munai .58 -.01 ... Ballanty 7.32 -.58 -.74 Banro g 1.94 -.04 -.11 BarcUBS36 38.40 -.45 +.17 BarcGSOil 22.24 -.27 -.13 BrcIndiaTR 63.97 -1.12 -1.27

BioTime n BlkMuIT2 BlkMunvst BootsCoots BovieMed Brigus grs BritATob CAMAC n CanoPet CapGold n CaracoP Cardero g CardiumTh CastleBr CelSci CFCda g CentGold g CentSe CheniereEn CheniereE ChiArmM ChiGengM ChIntLtg n ChMarFd n ChinaPhH n ClaudeR g ClayFront CloughGEq ClghGlbOp CompTch Contango Continucre

4.59 -.31 -.87 14.20 -.02 -.08 9.85 ... -.19 2.96 -.01 -.02 2.19 -.05 -.08 1.19 -.03 -.04 69.00 -1.66 +2.07 3.50 -.31 -.08 .55 -.03 +.06 3.62 -.10 -.21 4.57 -.40 -.80 1.12 -.04 ... .35 +.01 +.01 .39 -.01 +.01 .53 -.01 +.04 14.53 -.33 -.40 47.11 -.81 -1.04 18.37 -.43 -.36 2.63 -.05 -.16 18.30 +.21 +1.02 3.39 -.14 +.35 1.22 -.06 -.16 2.89 +.07 -.01 4.56 -.14 -.18 3.04 -.04 +.29 1.06 ... ... 19.31 -.31 -.04 12.83 -.17 +.02 11.83 +.02 +.13 2.24 -.03 -.38 42.28 -.96 -1.15 3.41 -.12 -.17

CornstProg CornerstStr CrSuisInco CrSuiHiY Crossh glf Crystallx g CubicEngy Cytomed DejourE g DelaMN2 DeltaAprl DenisnM g DryfMu EV CAMu EV LtdDur EVMuniBd ElixirGam eMagin EmersnR h EndvrInt EndvSilv g EngyInco EntreeGold EvolPetrol ExeterR gs Express-1 FT WindEn FiveStar FrkStPrp FrTmpLtd FredHolly Fronteer g

6.80 10.64 3.57 2.96 .13 .39 .89 .67 .29 12.98 13.47 1.13 9.21 13.00 15.68 13.17 .24 3.00 2.10 1.03 3.28 24.60 2.15 4.91 5.74 1.37 10.56 2.86 11.47 12.42 .88 6.11

-.07 -.12 +.06 ... -.02 ... +.05 +.03 -.02 ... -.76 -.08 +.06 -.04 -.11 ... ... +.01 -.02 -.06 -.19 -.06 -.13 -.14 -.31 -.10 -.39 -.19 -.43 -.07 -.02 -.28

-.08 -.32 +.03 -.04 -.01 -.04 +.08 +.12 -.01 -.06 -.62 -.03 +.02 -.02 -.45 -.19 -.01 -.23 +.45 -.07 -.29 +.35 +.31 -.39 -.51 +.03 -.17 -.26 -.29 +.09 +.12 -.43

GSE Sy d3.76 -.02 +.08 GabGldNR 15.48 -.17 -.08 GascoEngy .34 -.01 -.01 Gastar grs 3.78 -.19 +.03 GenMoly 3.00 -.12 -.25 GenesisEn 20.44 -.12 +.43 Geokinetics 4.35 -.08 -.01 GerovaFn 5.00 -.02 -.59 GlblScape 2.94 +.12 +.30 GoldRsv g .84 -.02 +.03 GoldStr g 4.02 -.16 -.20 GormanR 25.50 -1.03 -1.14 GrahamCp 13.85 -.61 -.97 GranTrra g 5.27 -.09 +.05 GrtBasG g 1.75 -.05 -.05 HQ SustM d4.63 +.10 +.12 HSBC CTI d7.60 +.02 -.12 HawkCorp u27.90 -.42 -.01 Hemisphrx .46 -.01 +.01 HooperH .59 -.05 -.12 Hyperdyn 1.03 -.02 -.01 IEC Elec 5.01 -.23 +.23 IGI Labs 1.24 +.06 +.22 iMergent 3.30 -.26 -.21 ImpOil gs 37.71 -1.17 +.19 IndiaGC .94 -.02 -.10 Innovaro d1.86 +.10 -.23 InovioPhm .95 -.03 -.05 Intellichk 1.41 -.19 +.02 IntTower g 6.00 -.18 -.16 InvVKAdv2 12.24 +.04 -.03 InvVKSelS u12.51 +.01 +.26

IsoRay Iteris KeeganR g Kemet KimberR g KodiakO g LadThalFn Lannett Libbey LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LucasEngy MAG Slv g MadCatz g MagHRes Metalico Metalline MetroHlth MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt NIVS IntT NTN Buzz NeoStem NB IncOp NBIntMu NBRESec Neuralstem Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g

1.35 1.55 4.94 u2.94 .63 3.03 1.13 4.31 10.30 9.93 1.09 2.24 6.16 .46 4.28 3.58 .65 3.57 .43 .83 8.41 1.75 2.27 .48 1.68 7.20 14.26 3.26 2.25 3.67 d.06 4.87

... ... -.12 +.05 -.03 -.14 -.07 -.23 -.71 -.02 -.06 +.07 -.14 ... -.34 ... -.03 -.11 -.04 -.03 -.18 -.14 -.03 -.03 -.04 +.01 -.05 -.04 -.15 -.20 +.00 -.11

-.08 +.19 -.10 +.53 -.01 -.24 -.10 -.29 -1.02 -.03 +.04 -.28 -.24 +.02 -.27 -.39 -.01 -.22 -.02 -.01 -.47 -.05 -.03 -.02 ... +.09 -.03 -.21 -.30 +.07 -.01 -.34

NA Pall g 3.10 -.16 -.30 NAsiaInv wt d.01 ... -.03 NDynMn g 6.37 -.18 -.75 NthnO&G 14.16 -.56 +.60 NthgtM g 2.95 -.02 -.01 NovaBayP 2.00 -.04 -.02 NovaGld g 6.48 -.06 -.01 NCADv3 13.37 +.01 +.04 NuvDiv2 u14.83 -.01 +.15 NuvDiv3 u14.56 +.03 +.10 NvGADiv2 13.72 -.03 -.14 NICADv u14.81 +.05 +.19 NvInsDv 14.64 +.01 -.05 NuvInsTF 14.92 -.07 -.02 NMuHiOp 12.90 -.04 -.11 NuvREst 8.70 -.07 +.12 NvTxAdFlt 2.55 +.05 +.04 Oilsands g .59 +.02 -.09 Oilsnd wtA d.10 ... -.03 OpkoHlth 2.32 -.09 -.08 OrchidsPP 13.15 -.06 -.22 OrienPap n 5.89 -.42 -1.06 OrionEngy 3.05 -.18 +.07 OrsusXel d.22 -.02 -.01 OverhillF 5.52 -.07 -.15 PacGE pfA 25.78 ... +.28 PacRim .18 +.01 +.00 Palatin .17 -.02 -.01 ParaG&S 1.27 -.01 -.04 ParkNatl 62.94 -2.56 -3.56 PhrmAth 1.64 ... ... PionDrill 6.05 -.11 -.02

Biggest mutual funds PlatGpMet PolyMet g ProceraNt ProlorBio Protalix PudaCoal n Quaterra g QuestCap g RadientPh RaeSyst ReavesUtl RegeneRx Rentech RexahnPh Richmnt g Rubicon g SamsO&G ScolrPh SeabGld g SearchMed SearchM wt Senesco SinoHub n SondeR grs SparkNet SulphCo Talbots wt TanzRy g Taseko Tengsco TianyinPh TimberlnR

1.72 -.04 -.09 1.34 -.03 -.14 .46 -.02 +.02 7.00 +.08 +.12 6.08 -.27 -.24 7.35 -.39 -.44 1.18 -.00 -.04 u1.48 -.02 +.04 .94 -.01 -.05 d.65 -.05 -.07 19.57 -.09 +.30 .26 +.00 -.01 .93 -.02 -.09 1.36 -.05 -.01 4.36 -.17 +.01 3.37 -.07 -.02 .99 +.05 +.14 .48 +.01 +.02 27.20 -1.25 -2.04 d2.47 -.08 -.36 .35 -.15 -.10 .31 -.00 -.01 2.52 -.15 -.33 2.66 -.08 -.18 3.20 -.05 -.14 .21 -.00 -.02 1.99 -.31 -.40 4.92 -.08 +.05 3.92 -.23 -.13 .44 ... -.01 2.71 -.09 -.05 .85 -.05 -.02

TrnsatlPt n TravelCtrs TriValley Tucows g TwoHrbInv UMH Prop UQM Tech US Geoth US Gold Uluru Univ Insur Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn VangTotW VantageDrl VantDrl wt Versar VirnetX VistaGold Vringo un WalterInv WFAdvInco WFAdMSec WstnAsInt Westmrld WT DrfChn WT Drf Bz WizzardSft Xenonics YM Bio g ZBB Engy

2.99 -.04 -.03 2.19 -.08 -.09 .91 -.05 ... .61 +.03 +.01 8.31 -.09 -.08 10.13 -.50 -.68 3.60 -.07 -.04 .78 +.01 -.01 4.55 -.24 -.35 .12 -.01 -.01 4.07 -.07 -.23 .74 -.03 -.02 1.00 -.03 -.03 2.21 -.13 -.21 40.51 -1.22 -.66 d1.13 -.12 -.15 .02 +.01 ... 2.68 -.08 -.31 5.73 -.16 -.13 d1.48 -.05 -.11 d2.59 -.35 -.52 16.76 -.29 +.26 9.52 -.01 +.06 14.76 +.08 -.07 9.52 -.08 -.29 7.95 -.16 -.05 24.99 ... -.02 26.95 -.24 -.42 .20 ... +.01 .35 +.02 -.07 1.36 -.05 +.12 .60 -.02 +.03

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: GwthFdA p American Funds A: CapInBldA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapWGrA p American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p American Funds A: WshMutA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p American Funds A: NewPerA p American Funds A: BalA p American Funds A: FundInvA p PIMCO Funds A: TotRtA

IB XC LG BL LG GL BL SP SP LC LV IL LV IB IL BL GL BL LC IB

133,927 58,508 58,394 52,394 51,938 47,349 46,079 44,145 43,384 42,830 36,999 34,013 33,997 33,304 33,115 29,810 28,582 28,053 27,888 27,822

+1.8 -4.9 -4.0 +0.2 -4.6 -0.5 -0.8 -4.5 -4.5 -2.7 -4.9 -0.1 -3.2 +1.7 -1.5 +0.6 -1.8 -1.7 -3.5 +1.7

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

+13.2/C +16.7/B +11.7/D +11.7/D +16.1/A +12.2/C +18.1/A +15.4/A +15.5/A +12.5/C +16.6/B +13.0/B +15.1/B +12.9/C +16.0/B +21.9/A +15.6/B +14.1/C +15.4/A +12.7/C

+45.3/A -1.5/C +4.2/A +14.8/B +15.6/A +21.4/A +11.2/C -4.0/A -3.5/A +1.0/B -10.4/D +31.7/A -4.6/B +43.6/A +19.5/B +18.3/A +24.8/A +7.9/C +12.6/A +42.1/A

1,000,000 3,000 250 250 2,500 250 250 3,000 5,000,000 250 2,500 250 250 1,000,000 2,500 1,000 250 250 250 1,000

NL NL 5.75 5.75 NL 5.75 5.75 NL NL 5.75 NL 5.75 5.75 NL NL 4.25 5.75 5.75 5.75 3.75

NAV 11.33 26.38 25.95 45.79 56.62 31.07 15.08 98.13 97.49 24.46 91.25 35.82 23.54 11.33 29.98 2.04 24.34 15.99 31.17 11.33

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Drug-sniffing dogs good for schools

R

edmond School District officials will make more use of drug-sniffing dogs at middle and high schools next year, conducting periodic searches through those schools. In

doing so they’ll join school officials in Bend and Sisters, which also

use the dogs from time to time. School officials in the districts recently contacted by The Bulletin say the dogs serve a useful purpose. By persuading kids to leave drugs at home, they help officials keep schools safe. And unless schools are safe, kids can’t learn very well. Still, some people object to the plan. The Oregon chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, for instance, says it treats all kids as bad guys without any evidence. The organization is certainly entitled to its hypersensitivity, but the Oregon Supreme Court has said such searches are legal. As for being intrusive, the district apparently will bend over backward to make sure that everyone, from kids to parents to the community at large, is aware of the program. School district officials will discuss the change with students, most likely at school assemblies. They will send out notices to families, and they will include information on the pro-

Such efforts to placate students and parents are more than sufficient. There’s absolutely no excuse for bringing illegal drugs to school, and any kid who gets caught doing so deserves what he gets. gram in district newsletters. Moreover, they say, they might increase notification as the date of a planned search draws near. What they won’t do is announce specific search dates in advance. Such efforts to placate students and parents are more than sufficient. There’s absolutely no excuse for bringing illegal drugs to school, and any kid who gets caught doing so deserves what he gets.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s note: The following editorials, which appeared on July 3, 1983, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

O’Neill-onomics? A year ago unemployment was higher than it is now. Interest rates were higher. Business failures were increasing at a rapid rate. The stock market was down. People called it Reaganomics. Now even Democratic presidential hopefuls have abandoned that word. They have yet to come up with a new word derogatory to the president to describe lower interest rates, falling unemployment and a rising stock market. They’d better hurry; they have only 17 months to capitalize on whatever descriptive term they create.

Spoiled brat This year’s thoroughly rotten weather, from freakishly heavy snows in the mountains to floods in the Midwest, is being blamed on El Nino, an ocean current that runs around the south Pacific rim. El Nino isn’t behaving like the Christ child for whom it was named; it’s acting like a spoiled brat. It seems that El Nino goes off course periodically, and this year it’s been farther off course than usual. That’s bad news for Central Oregon’s legions of backyard farmers. It’s tough enough to grow such things as corn and tomatoes in this country. It’s just about impossible when daytime highs struggle to reach the 70 degree mark.

Silver lining This is a test. Choose the one statement that best describes the Oregon Legislature. 1. Lawmakers, true to their promise to be done

with the state’s business by the end of June, are back home in the bosoms of their families. 2. Heeding voters’ obvious dissatisfaction over property taxes, lawmakers have approved a comprehensive tax reform plan and are ready to refer it to the people. 3. Lawmakers have spent six months and millions of dollars squabbling among themselves over the tax reform issue; they haven’t come up with anything they all can agree on, and it seems unlikely they will. The answer, of course, is No. 3, and while it’s frustrating to watch, it does have a bright side. One fellow sees it like this: legislators have been so busy fighting about taxes, they haven’t had time to create their usual biennial spate of bad laws.

Golden Throat This week’s Sheela Silverman Golden Throat Award goes to a man who apparently has made understatement an art. Navy Lt. Rich Truitt, defending the Navy’s decision to spend $46,000 on a two-dog doghouse, had this to say: “Granted, the building is a little more elaborate than something you’d put in your backyard.” True, true. The places some of us call home don’t cost $46,000 — backyard and dog house included.

In the round file We received an anonymous letter the other day that we wish the writer had had the nerve to sign. The letter was in response to the Bend-La Pine school district’s decision to move teacher Dave Sanville from a high school to a junior high. Unlike every other letter we’ve received on the subject, this one agreed with the move. It was well written, too. None of that is worth anything, though, without a signature.

My Nickel’s Worth Don’t lease Park & Rec HQ The Bend Park & Recreation District is planning to lease out its former district headquarters on the river in downtown Bend instead of converting it into a nice riverfront park. The city and the district have long planned to have this old building razed and the blacktop removed when the district was finally able to move to a new headquarters. This would create a very nice two-acre riverfront park, at minimal cost. The area is approximately the same size as Pioneer Park and Columbia Park. Removing the old building and blacktop and seeding it, thereby creating a true park, would cost about half what they plan to spend just to improve Columbia Park. Removal of this building and attendant blacktop would greatly enhance the riverfront and provide one more very attractive public area downtown. Leasing it will certainly prevent maximizing public use for another decade. I cannot believe the public would approve of this action if they knew of it. The district plans to approve a lease on July 20. Is not the development of beautiful riverfront areas a top priority of the district? Where else can the public be provided with a beautiful two-acre riverfront site at so little cost? Please urge the board, before July 20, to reconsider leasing this structure and thereby negating the value of this property to the public. Allan Bruckner Bend

Execution as protection In his June 29 “In My View” column, Don Hartsough made a cogent and compelling argument against the death

penalty, the core of his thesis being, “If we really mean to teach our kids that all life is valuable and should be protected, the death penalty makes no sense.” Hmm. While I have no way of knowing, I’d still wager that even Mr. Hartsough swats a mosquito or housefly on occasion. The point being that all life is not valuable, nor should all life be protected. We kill — and teach our children to kill — viruses, bacteria, lice, bedbugs, fleas, ticks, etc. Why? Because they kill us or are the carriers of things that kill us. Of course, they don’t intend to kill us; they are just following the law of nature, i.e., attempting to project their genetic code into the next generation and beyond. By way of contrast, the psychopathic killer kills with calculated intent and without compunction. He thinks no more of killing another human being than swatting a fly. It’s not that he doesn’t know right from wrong. He just doesn’t care. He is, of course, conscious of having done wrong and thus avoids with elaborate effort being apprehended. The question, then, is, does the psychopathic killer deserve more consideration than, say, the H1N1 virus? Wilburn Dodge Crooked River Ranch

Control borders Travelling around the globe I routinely cross customs stations in many different countries. As an American citizen I have also helped others wanting to visit or move to America. These experiences teach that it is a matter of accepted law that you are acting illegally if you remain in a country past the stated legal time limit, much less enter a country without permission.

Janet Whitney’s recent In My View column directly challenges this universal agreement. I have absolutely no prejudice against others entering our great land. I encourage it! But to embrace the idea that we should ignore legal tools to enforce border security seems to me completely out of the area of reason. Illegal entry stresses the support systems of the country entered and provides opportunity for abuse of those crossing. Literally all nations are in agreement on this. A simple cross-check using the Secure Communities Act seems a very reasonable way to at least confirm whether those suspected of a crime are here legally. I would go much further, not because I dislike or am critical of other countries, but because identity checks are a minor price to pay to begin to address a huge problem in America. Our country’s borders are controlled, and thus we have the right and responsibility to enforce access to them. This is a shared global understanding that protects both the host country and those wishing entry. Ray Lundy Bend

Goose kill was brutal I was sad to read of the foul behavior of the geese killers. It seems like a bad example to kill things just because you do not know how to contain or control them. Shows our children that compassion and brains are secondary to being a brute. If some schoolyard bullies had done this, they would have been brought up on cruelty charges. The end results were the same for the poor creatures. Mary Reilly Vancouver, Wash.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Backers of free-range, local meat should praise geese reduction By Haley Hunt Bulletin guest columnist

I

n recent years the philosophies of free-range, locally grown and lowmileage food have been popularized throughout the United States. As American consumers, we like to know where our main protein source — meat — has been raised, what it has eaten, and ultimately how it arrived as the focal point on our dinner plates. In the minds of many people, meats and other foods possessing one or more of these attributes are of a higher quality than conventionally produced food. In recent weeks, I have been shocked by the amount of press the Drake Park goose population reduction has received locally and nationally. One hundred and nine geese were processed in a way just as — or perhaps more — “humane” than much of the nation’s meat supply, yet

some Central Oregonians continue to treat this as a genocide or holocaust of sorts — a comparison that shames the magnitude of the events that actually transpired during World War II. There are two issues on the table here: One, it is not as though there will be no geese left for the public to enjoy in the park. In fact, little difference may be observed. The geese documented in the press did not behave as normal geese do. Many of these permanent park residents had abandoned the healthy and natural migratory habits that geese are hardwired to perform annually. Although people love to feed these animals, they — and their excrement — have continuously degraded the landscaping and improvements at Drake Park, not just seasonally but year-round. Also, overpopulation is not healthy for the geese themselves. As with any animal, this

IN MY VIEW problem serves as a breeding ground for diseases and mutations. I will admit, I have been one of the guilty indulging the geese’s reason for overstaying their welcome. Many Central Oregon residents have found pleasure in feeding these creatures and enjoying their presence in the park. But by the same token, we have all played a part in creating the issue that ultimately led to the Bend Park & Recreation District’s decision to safely euthanize the geese. Historically, 25 methods, including fertilization prevention, have been tried to no avail; some form of action was imminent and necessary. It would not be of benefit to anyone to have a large (and continually growing) permanent population of geese with no natural predators present.

Secondly, how does the ultimate fate of a small fraction of the geese at Drake Park differ from the ideals so many of you preach regarding locally grown, low-mileage, green food? These geese have essentially been treated as freerange poultry, a “green” feeding method popularized in California. These geese have spent a large portion of their lives as permanent fixtures in Drake Park, eating a staple diet of bread and biotic life in Mirror Pond and the surrounding waterways. In essence, the harvesting of these geese is the very definition of a locally grown, low-mileage meat. Additionally, the goose meat resulting from this reduction was donated to feed hungry people in our community via local food banks. If you are one of the individuals who believe that local and lowmileage food is the way to eat, it seems hypocritical to turn around and cry foul

when your beliefs are accommodated. After other methods failed, the park district implemented the reduction not to cause outrage in the community but to solve a recurrent problem in a way that benefits our community. If you are one of the many who believe in or promote the ideals of any of these food principles, you can certainly stand behind the district’s position — improving the park for human use, helping the hungry while doing it, and ensuring the health and wellness of future generations of geese. My purpose in writing this article is not to preach the wonders of free-range, locally grown or low-mileage food but to encourage people to practice what they preach. If you are one of the many who believe in eating local, recognize it when you see it. Haley Hunt lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 C7

O D Cochran, 74, country music songwriter N   Frances Haskins, of La Pine June 26, 1943 - July 15, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are scheduled at this time.

Gregory ‘Todd’ Coursey, of Prineville Oct. 13, 1957 - July 9, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home-Prineville 541-419-9733. Services: A graveside service will be conducted at 1:00 P.M. Friday, July 23, 2010 at Eagle Point National Cemetery, Eagle Point, Oregon.

James Leonard Smalley, of Culver Nov. 16, 1929 - July 15, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: No services are planned at this times.

By Randy Lewis

Hank Cochran, a consummate songwriter who composed a string of country hits including “Make the World Go Away” for Eddy Arnold, died Thursday.

Los Angeles Times

Hank Cochran, the esteemed country music songwriter revered for the poetic economy and power of such enduring hits as Patsy Cline’s “I Fall to Pieces” and Eddy Arnold’s “Make the World Go Away,” died Thursday at his home in Hendersonville, Tenn., after a battle with pancreatic cancer. He was 74. Cochran was joined Wednesday night by musicians Jamey Johnson and Billy Ray Cyrus and fellow songwriter Buddy Cannon, who sang songs with him at his bedside. In a career spanning more than half a century, Cochran wrote or cowrote hundreds of songs recorded by Merle Haggard, Waylon Jennings, George Jones, Loretta Lynn, Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, Ray Price, George Strait and numerous others. “He was a great friend, and a great mentor, and he was responsible for some of the music that inspired me to do what I do,” Haggard, himself one of country’s most prolific songwriters, said through a spokeswoman Thursday. Cochran’s name also can be found on the credits for Cline’s “She’s Got You,” Strait’s “The Chair” and “Ocean Front Property” and Ronnie Milsap’s “Don’t You Ever Get Tired of Hurting Me,” the latter being the one he usually cited as his favorite of his own songs. “People study songs and go over them and all that,” Cochran once

The Associated Press file photo

said, “and they tell me that’s one of the most well-written songs, but that has nothing to do with why it’s my favorite. It’s my favorite because it can still cut me up just like the day I wrote it.” Garland Perry Cochran was born Aug. 2, 1935, in Isola, Miss. After his parents divorced when he was 9, his father placed him at St. Peter’s Orphans’ Home in Memphis, Tenn. At age 12, he hitchhiked with an uncle to Hobbs, N.M., and spent two years laboring in the oil fields there. Having learned to play guitar from his uncle and having sung in church, he dreamed of making a living in music. After a brief return to Mississippi, he headed west and, still a teenager, settled in Los Angeles. In 1954, he met soon-to-be-rock star Eddie Cochran and although

they were not related, they billed themselves as the Cochran Brothers, appearing on an L.A. station’s show and toured as an opening act with country great Lefty Frizzell. When Elvis Presley’s career started to break nationally, the Cochrans traded country for rock ‘n’ roll, but couldn’t score a hit as a duo and broke up. Eddie Cochran soon charted his signature hit, “Summertime Blues,” while Hank Cochran moved to Nashville to pursue a solo career. Cochran continued to write and perform in recent years, but he never became a star performer in his own right. His lasting mark is his songs, for which he was inducted in 1974 into the Nashville Songwriters Association’s International Hall of Fame. “They were real simple,” Price said, “and to me, real simplicity is real beauty.”

Tax credits Continued from C1 She noted that there are a number of other incentives and credits available to help bring down the cost of buying equipment like solar panels and efficient heat pumps. “There’s so many other additional incentives now with the federal stimulus, we want to avoid the possibility of the applicant receiving more in incentives and credits than the cost of the equipment itself,” Enright said. The temporary rule expires in late December, at which point the agency will hold a hearing and determine whether to make the rule permanent. If customers signed a contract for equipment on or before July 14, Enright said, they can use the previous tax credit calculation. For solar panel systems, the change in calculation could have the biggest impact for smaller systems, said Kacia Brockman, solar program manager with the Energy Trust of Oregon. The rules state that people can get a tax credit for 50 percent of a solar electric system, up to $6,000, she said. So for a 2-kilowatt system that costs $14,000, people previously could get a state tax credit for $6,000. But under the new calculations, first customers would have to take away the Pacific Power Energy Trust incentive of $3,000, then deduct the 30 percent federal tax credit, which would bring the net cost to $7,700. And the 50 percent state cost would then be half of that figure, or $3,850 — more than $2,000 less than the old tax credit. Brockman said that while the rule change will have some impact on how many people buy equipment like solar panels, it’s hard to tell how much. Prices have dropped, she said, which could make up for some of the loss in tax credits. “Given that, customers are seeing the lowest prices we’ve ever seen for solar,” Brockman said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Contributions may be made to:

Mountain View Home Health & Hospice, 470 NE "A" Street, Madras, OR 97741.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Contracts Continued from C1 “You bring (the contractor) on early enough, and I think there’s potential for good cost savings and certainly efficiency.” The city is in the process of updating its water supply system. It wants to replace the aging pipes that bring water from Bridge Creek into Bend and add a new treatment system that would help kill Cryptosporidium and other potentially dangerous microorganisms. Bend has used the CM/GC process in the past, including for the construction of the Bend Police station and downtown parking garage. Other agencies, namely Deschutes County and Redmond School District, have also used the exemption for some of their own construction ventures. In order for Bend to receive an exemption from the competitive bidding process on the surface water improvement project, state law requires the city to demonstrate that having a CM/GC contract won’t encourage favoritism or substantially diminish competition. The city must also prove the exemption will likely result in a “substantial cost savings” to the municipality. City officials contend the surface water improvement project is a good candidate for using a CM/GC because of its complexity and the fact that it has several major components involved in the

Marines Continued from C1 Clark placed a call to Cheryl Howard, the volunteer coordinator for the Bend Beautification Program on Wednesday night to get initial information about how. Howard was thrilled. “This is giving back to the community in a very humble way, a local way,” Howard said. A date has not yet been set for

the Marines’ first day of weedpulling; Clark and Howard said they were still working out the details. But the regular commitment could be a big help to the volunteer portion of the beautification program. The program logged 6,500 volunteer hours in 2009, according to Kevin Ramsey who runs the Public Works side of things, and has become increasingly important as city funds have been cut. Fewer volunteers have come out so far this year

though, Ramsey said. Just because the Marines will be volunteering regularly doesn’t mean Howard’s not on the lookout for new volunteers. She said she sees a wide variety of people who come out to help keep Bend beautiful by weeding the medians, the roundabouts, the rightsof-way and other city lands. “You expect to see people who need community service and you do get that,” Howard said. “But you really get to see a lot of

people who are really committed to the community in the least glamorous way.” For Clark and his recruits, volunteering glamorously or otherwise is just a part of what it means to be a Marine. “It’s all about leadership,” Clark said. “It’s about showing them what’s right, showing them that we’re servants, showing this aspect that we should be giving back and doing everything we can as leaders. America has high

expectations of Marines and we’re meeting and exceeding those expectations.” Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@ bendbulletin.com. Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

CREATIVE LIGHTING 541-382-0968 635 SE BUSINESS WAY • BEND, OR 97702

Utilities Continued from C1 “We have a lot of people struggling in this county,” he said. Langer would like to see the city administer the program instead of diverting it to an outside charity. In part, he is worried that donations made to the assistance program would go into the charitable organization’s general fund. But Lisa Morgan, with the city of Prineville, said that would not happen. Any donations collected to help people pay their water bill would go toward that single cause. Since the city of Bend has started its utility assistance program in February, officials have received about $6,000. The city wanted to work with a nonprofit to help dis-

$71 million price tag, such as a 10mile-long pipeline, hydroelectric powerhouse and water treatment plant. The project also needs to be fast-tracked in order to comply with federal mandates requiring the city to update its water system by October 2012. With so many independent factors and different projects going on at the same time, Heidi Lansdowne, Bend’s Project Manager of the Public Works Department’s Water/Waste Water Division, said its easier for the city to have one contractor coordinate everything rather than go out to bid on each component and try to fit the deadlines together to make sure all the work is being performed on time and without conflicts between subcontractors. “As a CM/GC they’re basically taking responsibility for pulling the show together when it comes to construction,” Lansdowne said. “They’re not only in charge of the contracting, they’re managing the contracting as a very experienced firm.” With a CM/GC contract, Lansdowne said the contractor also becomes involved in the project earlier than with the traditional competitive bidding process where a construction crew would not be hired until after the design was completed. She said under the CM/GC scenario, the contractor is involved during the design phase and can perform value engineering work or make other suggestions that could save Bend money

tribute the funds but were unable to find a nonprofit that could help them. About 180 to 200 water customers in Bend have their water shut off each month. The city of Redmond is also in the process of finding a nonprofit to screen applicants and distribute the funds. So far, neither city has started distributing funds to water customers. “Maybe all three cities can use the same clearinghouse to process the applications,” said Steve Ebby, with the city of Bend. Morgan said the city of Prineville is still in the initial stages of developing the program. “There is definitely a need for it,” she said.

10

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@ bendbulletin.com.

in the long term. “It basically gets a complete fresh set of eyes at the beginning of the project,” Lansdowne said. “You can come up with some really great ideas sometimes, but sometimes people that aren’t construction-oriented forget about, ‘Well, how are you going to build it? We can build it, but it would be so much cheaper if we did it this way.’” In a financial impact analysis of whether the city should take the CM/GC route, Bend Budget Manager Sharon Wojda wrote that while using a single contractor could be more complicated for the city to administer than simply accepting the lowest bidder, if “properly managed and controlled” it could result in savings. Wojda also noted that if the CM/GC was not properly managed, cost overruns could occur. “The city has to properly manage the contractor,” Wojda said in an interview Friday. “If we go the CM/GC route, it doesn’t remove the city from the process. We’re not writing them a blank check. We’re obviously still heavily involved in the process and still have oversight.” The City Council will hold a public hearing Wednesday on the CM/GC exemption. Councilors could either make a decision after the public hearing or wait until the next council meeting in August. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@ bendbulletin.com.

Presented by

TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25 Presented by

Fridays: Noon - 6 pm, Saturdays & Sundays 10 am - 6 pm


C8 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JULY 17

HIGH Ben Burkel

89

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

60s Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

86/53

80/51

84/49

63/43

70s

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Willowdale

82/49

85/39

Mitchell

90s

87/44

Madras

Camp Sherman 90/47 84/39 Redmond Prineville 89/42 Cascadia 86/43 88/43 Sisters 87/41 Bend Post 89/42

Oakridge Elk Lake 86/41

77/30

86/39

86/38

87/40

87/38

85/37

84/39

Chemult 85/36

Vancouver 70/55

80/55

Seattle

60s

73/54

Eugene

Missoula 88/50

81/48

Helena Bend

87/54

Boise

89/42

Grants Pass

94/60

96/54

Idaho Falls

90s

107/71

Elko

92/54

97/56

88/41

Reno

87/41

99/66

Mostly sunny skies today. San Francisco 68/54 Mostly clear skies tonight.

80s

80/39

Salt Lake City 97/70

100s

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Minimal cloud cover and cooler. HIGH

LOW

Moon phases First

Full

Last

New

July 18

July 25

Aug. 2

Aug. 9

Astoria . . . . . . . . 63/56/0.00 . . . . . . 64/53/s. . . . . . . 64/53/c Baker City . . . . . . 90/44/0.00 . . . . . . 89/51/s. . . . . . . 84/48/s Brookings . . . . . . 67/52/0.00 . . . . . 64/50/pc. . . . . . 64/51/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 95/51/0.00 . . . . . . 92/50/s. . . . . . . 86/45/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 83/48/0.00 . . . . . . 81/48/s. . . . . . 79/48/pc Klamath Falls . . . 94/53/0.00 . . . . . . 88/47/s. . . . . . . 85/47/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 93/46/0.00 . . . . . . 92/51/s. . . . . . . 86/50/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 93/41/0.00 . . . . . . 87/38/s. . . . . . . 80/38/s Medford . . . . . . . 98/64/0.00 . . . . . . 97/56/s. . . . . . . 89/55/s Newport . . . . . . . 61/52/0.00 . . . . . . 61/51/s. . . . . . . 61/50/c North Bend . . . . . 63/48/0.00 . . . . . . 63/51/s. . . . . . 63/51/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 99/55/0.00 . . . . . . 97/62/s. . . . . . . 94/58/s Pendleton . . . . . . 92/56/0.00 . . . . . . 90/55/s. . . . . . . 87/54/s Portland . . . . . . . 76/53/0.00 . . . . . . 77/55/s. . . . . . . 76/54/s Prineville . . . . . . . 88/49/0.00 . . . . . . 86/43/s. . . . . . . 83/46/s Redmond. . . . . . . 93/46/0.00 . . . . . . 86/43/s. . . . . . . 84/41/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 88/60/0.00 . . . . . 88/54/pc. . . . . . 80/53/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 80/52/0.00 . . . . . . 79/53/s. . . . . . 77/51/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 92/51/0.00 . . . . . . 87/41/s. . . . . . . 80/44/s The Dalles . . . . . . 88/63/0.00 . . . . . . 82/54/s. . . . . . . 79/53/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90/54 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 in 1938 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 in 1987 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.32” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.48” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.03 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.14 in 1941 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters..................................Ext. Bend, east of Hwy. 97........Ext. La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras..........High Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

79 42

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Minimal cloud cover and cool. HIGH

80 43

PLANET WATCH

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

WEDNESDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:22 a.m. . . . . . .9:49 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:25 a.m. . . . . .10:42 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:40 a.m. . . . . .11:10 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:29 p.m. . . . . .11:37 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . .11:11 a.m. . . . . .11:32 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:19 p.m. . . . . .11:24 a.m.

OREGON CITIES City

80s

70s

Redding

Crater Lake

Calgary

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:38 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:44 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:39 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:44 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 1:07 p.m. Moonset today . . . 11:45 p.m.

LOW

82 42

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

88/40

80/32

LOW

84 39

NORTHWEST

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

HIGH

42

77/55

Burns

La Pine

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 101° Rome • 39° Florence

TUESDAY Sunny and pleasant.

Coastal clouds will give way to mostly sunny skies today. Inland areas will be sunny.

82/39

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

MONDAY Sunny, mild, afternoon and evening breezes.

Tonight: Clear and cool.

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

Today: Plenty of sunshine, warm, afternoon and evening breezes.

Paulina

85/40

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Coastal clouds early, then mostly sunny today. Coastal clouds tonight. Central

91/48

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33,190 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104,731 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 74,703 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 38,506 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139,907 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,900 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,180 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 70/55

S

S

Calgary 80/55

S

Saskatoon 74/56

Seattle 73/54

S Winnipeg 78/56

S

S

Thunder Bay 79/58

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 80/62

Halifax 84/62 Portland Green Bay Billings (in the 48 To ronto 88/65 P ortland 90/59 88/71 contiguous states): 84/65 77/55 Boston Rapid City Boise 93/76 Detroit 96/60 St. Paul 94/60 89/73 • 125° New York Buffalo 93/69 96/75 83/68 Des Moines Death Valley, Calif. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 93/73 Chicago 96/57 89/69 93/74 • 32° 92/75 Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. 95/73 Stanley, Idaho 68/54 City 93/76 Las Denver Louisville 97/70 • 1.63” Kansas City Vegas 99/64 91/76 94/79 St. Louis 112/89 Tupelo, Miss. Charlotte 96/80 88/69 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 95/71 79/68 101/75 91/75 95/77 Phoenix Atlanta 112/91 Honolulu 88/72 Birmingham 87/75 Dallas Tijuana 90/73 101/80 77/62 New Orleans 89/78 Orlando Houston 94/74 Chihuahua 97/80 95/69 Miami 91/81 Monterrey La Paz 96/76 95/70 Mazatlan Anchorage 90/80 62/53 Juneau 64/48 Bismarck 89/55

FRONTS

Democratic candidate for governor John Kitzhaber, left, speaks with Bill White, of Keizer, during a visit to the Democratic party headquarters Friday in Salem. The event had been scheduled as a debate but turned into a campaign stop for Kitzhaber when his opponent, Chris Dudley, declined to attend. Rick Bowmer The Associated Press

Kitzhaber says he’s less partisan this time around By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

SALEM — Democrat candidate for governor John Kitzhaber on Friday pitched himself as a unifying force in Oregon politics who can bring together competing interests like public employees and the business lobby. Kitzhaber told members of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association annual convention in Salem that he was a partisan “superlegislator” in his two terms as governor. But he said he has learned since he left office nearly eight years ago to put aside party differences. “I think I’m far less partisan now than I was then,” Kitzhaber said, noting his support for an open primary this year, something he said he would not have supported during his first run for office. What was supposed to be a debate became a campaign stop for Kitzhaber when his opponent, Republican Chris Dudley, declined the association’s invitation because of a family vacation. The ONPA debate is traditionally considered the opening of campaign season in the Oregon governor’s race.

Kitzhaber got in at least one swipe at his opponent during his question-and-answer session with the association’s panel when asked what he would do differently as a candidate as compared to his previous run. “Anyone asking to be governor has some obligations to candidly present proposals,” Kitzhaber said. The candidate “should welcome those proposals to be examined and challenged in public forums like this.” With the state facing a recession and deep unemployment, Kitzhaber said public employees have been unfairly criticized for taking in an outsize share of pay and benefits while the state struggles with a projected $2.5 billion budget deficit in the next biennium. “Public employees are not unwilling to make sacrifices — they already have,” Kitzhaber said, noting that employee unions already agreed to cutbacks and furloughs. “They’re going to have to make more. But we have to stop this narrative of blaming public employees for the global recession.” The January election that increased taxes on corporations

and the wealthy pit business interests against public employees, Kitzhaber said, and the “tragic” result was “both sides put out messages that are patently divisive and untrue.” Kitzhaber also proposed changing several core elements of Oregon politics, including the state’s reliance on personal income tax for revenue and Oregon’s biennial system of budgeting. He didn’t provide specifics, however. While Kitzhaber was able to keep his hands clean concerning his opponent, the Democratic Party of Oregon was quick to fire off missives to news organizations saying Dudley either can’t address the issues or that he will “attempt to run an issue-free campaign.” Republicans were quick to fire back on Friday afternoon, blaming Kitzhaber’s economic policies for a spike in unemployment. “With Oregonians struggling to make ends meet, our state simply cannot afford another eight years of high unemployment, failing schools and outof-control spending,” Dudley spokeswoman Brittany Bramell said.

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .96/75/0.00 . . .99/74/s . . . 98/77/s Akron . . . . . . . . .87/74/0.00 . 88/68/pc . . 88/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . . .89/67/NA . 88/66/pc . . 87/69/pc Albuquerque. . . .96/73/0.00 . . .95/71/s . . . 98/71/s Anchorage . . . . .60/53/0.00 . 62/53/pc . . . .60/51/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . .88/72/t . . . .90/72/t Atlantic City . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .88/74/s . . 91/76/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . . .97/74/s . . 99/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . .98/72/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . 94/74/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .98/60/0.00 . 90/59/pc . . 92/57/pc Birmingham . . . 95/75/trace . . .90/73/t . . . .90/74/t Bismarck . . . . . . .91/55/0.00 . . .89/55/s . . 83/59/pc Boise . . . . . . . . .101/67/0.00 . . .94/60/s . . . 92/54/s Boston. . . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 90/75/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .87/73/0.00 . 94/76/pc . . 87/76/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .82/75/0.01 . . .83/68/t . . . .86/67/t Burlington, VT. . .80/73/0.20 . . .86/66/t . . 83/70/pc Caribou, ME . . . .78/66/0.11 . 86/61/pc . . 78/58/pc Charleston, SC . .92/76/0.00 . 91/75/pc . . 91/75/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .93/74/0.08 . . .88/69/t . . . .89/70/t Chattanooga. . . .97/74/0.00 . . .88/72/t . . . .86/73/t Cheyenne . . . . . .89/54/0.00 . . .96/57/s . . 89/59/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . .92/75/s . . . .91/69/t Cincinnati . . . . . .90/74/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . 90/70/pc Cleveland . . . . . .87/75/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . 89/69/pc Colorado Springs 95/59/0.00 . . .95/59/t . . . .94/59/t Columbia, MO . .90/71/0.00 . . .95/73/s . . . 95/75/s Columbia, SC . . .94/74/0.00 . . .92/73/t . . . .91/74/t Columbus, GA. . 94/75/trace . . .92/73/t . . . .93/73/t Columbus, OH. . .88/73/0.15 . 89/69/pc . . 90/70/pc Concord, NH . . . .94/66/0.00 . 92/63/pc . . 88/65/pc Corpus Christi. . .93/75/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . 93/78/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .98/79/0.00 . .101/80/s . . 102/80/s Dayton . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . 90/70/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .95/63/0.00 . . .99/64/t . . . .94/65/t Des Moines. . . . .90/66/0.00 . . .93/73/s . . . 88/68/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . . .89/73/t . . . .90/72/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .82/62/0.03 . . .78/62/t . . 78/56/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .93/73/0.02 . . .98/74/s . . . 99/74/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . . .65/55/r . . . .67/54/r Fargo. . . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .89/63/t . . 81/61/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .87/58/t . . . .86/59/t

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .88/66/0.00 . 88/68/pc . . . .89/67/t Green Bay. . . . . .88/66/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . 85/63/pc Greensboro. . . . 93/75/trace . . .90/72/t . . . .90/72/t Harrisburg. . . . . .93/72/0.04 . 93/71/pc . . . 93/72/s Hartford, CT . . . .93/72/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 94/72/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .95/53/0.00 . . .87/54/s . . 86/53/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .88/74/0.01 . . .87/75/s . . . 87/73/s Houston . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . . .97/80/t . . . .92/80/t Huntsville . . . . . .95/75/0.11 . . .88/73/t . . . .90/72/t Indianapolis . . . .89/72/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . . .91/71/t Jackson, MS . . . .99/75/0.37 . . .91/75/t . . . .92/74/t Madison, WI . . . .87/69/0.00 . . .90/70/s . . 86/64/pc Jacksonville. . . . .92/70/0.05 . 93/74/pc . . 92/74/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .58/48/0.01 . .64/48/sh . . 68/49/pc Kansas City. . . . .92/73/0.45 . . .94/79/s . . . .93/76/t Lansing . . . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . . .88/66/t . . . .89/67/t Las Vegas . . . . .112/91/0.00 . .112/89/s . . 112/88/s Lexington . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .86/72/t . . 90/71/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . .96/73/s . . 88/71/pc Little Rock. . . . . .96/78/0.00 . 95/77/pc . . 96/76/pc Los Angeles. . . . 79/66/trace . . .79/68/s . . . 77/66/s Louisville . . . . . . .95/77/0.01 . . .91/76/t . . 94/77/pc Memphis. . . . . . .94/78/0.05 . . .93/78/t . . 94/79/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.01 . . .91/81/s . . . .90/80/t Milwaukee . . . . .90/69/0.00 . . .87/72/s . . 91/70/pc Minneapolis . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .93/69/t . . . 84/64/s Nashville . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .91/75/t . . 92/76/pc New Orleans. . . .88/73/0.25 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/79/t New York . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . 95/75/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .99/75/0.00 . 96/74/pc . . 95/75/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .97/76/0.00 . . .96/75/t . . . .90/75/t Oklahoma City . .95/77/0.00 . .101/75/s . . 100/76/s Omaha . . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .95/73/s . . 89/70/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .95/75/0.11 . 94/74/pc . . 94/76/pc Palm Springs. . .117/87/0.00 . .113/84/s . 113/83/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .87/64/0.00 . . .93/73/s . . 90/71/pc Philadelphia . . . .97/75/0.00 . . .93/74/s . . 94/75/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .113/94/0.00 112/91/pc . 111/91/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .87/71/0.00 . 86/65/pc . . . .87/66/t Portland, ME. . . .75/67/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . 86/64/pc Providence . . . . .89/68/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 92/75/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .97/77/0.00 . . .93/73/t . . . .92/73/t

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .94/56/0.00 . . .96/60/s . . 86/61/pc Savannah . . . . . .92/75/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . 93/73/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .99/69/0.34 . . .99/66/s . . . 96/61/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .67/52/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 71/53/s Richmond . . . . . .98/75/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . . .93/72/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .89/65/0.00 . 92/68/pc . . 83/63/pc Rochester, NY . . .85/73/0.04 . . .86/67/t . . 86/66/pc Spokane . . . . . . .87/58/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 82/55/s Sacramento. . . .102/65/0.00 . .102/66/s . . 100/59/s Springfield, MO. .93/71/0.23 . 93/73/pc . . . 94/72/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . . .96/78/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .94/74/0.01 . 91/77/pc . . 92/78/pc Salt Lake City . .103/63/0.00 . 97/70/pc . . . 98/72/s Tucson. . . . . . . .102/85/0.00 102/81/pc . 103/81/pc San Antonio . . . .95/77/0.00 . . .97/78/s . . 98/79/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .97/75/0.01 . . .99/78/s . . . 99/80/s San Diego . . . . . .81/67/0.01 . . .78/67/s . . . 76/65/s Washington, DC .98/77/0.00 . 93/76/pc . . 94/75/pc San Francisco . . .63/56/0.00 . . .68/54/s . . . 67/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .95/73/0.30 . . .97/75/s . . . 98/77/s San Jose . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .90/59/s . . . 86/57/s Yakima . . . . . . . .92/57/0.00 . . .86/55/s . . . 87/54/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .95/61/0.00 . 92/59/pc . . 94/58/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .113/85/0.00 110/87/pc . 110/85/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .72/59/0.00 . .69/56/sh . . 71/52/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .89/80/0.00 . . .92/74/s . . 90/75/pc Auckland. . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .60/46/t . . 60/44/pc Baghdad . . . . . .116/89/0.00 . .117/88/s . . 114/86/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.07 . . .89/78/t . . . .90/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .91/75/t . . . 94/75/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .87/77/s . . . 87/77/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . .86/67/t . . 74/56/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .68/50/0.94 . .63/51/sh . . 61/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . 91/65/pc . . . .84/63/t Buenos Aires. . . .46/27/0.00 . . .46/34/s . . 50/38/sh Cabo San Lucas .88/79/0.00 . . .91/79/c . . 92/79/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . .100/73/s . . . 99/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . . .80/55/s . . 73/53/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .89/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.97 . .63/49/sh . . 66/54/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . 65/53/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . . 80/55/s Harare . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . 71/53/pc . . . 72/51/s Hong Kong . . . . .91/81/1.12 . . .88/79/t . . . .87/79/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .88/71/s . . . 90/72/s Jerusalem . . . . . .88/67/0.00 . . .89/71/s . . . 91/71/s Johannesburg . . .50/27/0.00 . . .56/40/s . . . 62/41/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .63/59/0.00 . . .64/59/s . . . 64/58/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .82/65/s . . . 88/67/s London . . . . . . . .72/57/0.05 . .65/55/sh . . 74/59/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .93/59/0.00 . . .95/64/s . . . 96/65/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .88/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .102/88/0.00 103/84/pc . . 105/86/s Mexico City. . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .78/58/t . . . .79/58/t Montreal. . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . .82/64/t . . 82/63/pc Moscow . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . 91/67/pc . . 90/65/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 70/53/pc . . 68/55/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .91/84/0.00 . . .93/81/s . . . .92/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .96/86/0.02 . . .97/84/t . . . .97/83/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.14 . 86/74/pc . . 87/73/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .69/57/sh . . 65/48/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .86/70/0.01 . . .82/63/t . . 80/58/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . 76/53/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .75/70/0.00 . .74/66/sh . . 71/65/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . . .90/71/s . . 88/70/pc Santiago . . . . . . .54/27/0.00 . 58/35/pc . . . 54/31/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .57/55/0.00 . .65/55/sh . . 68/59/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . 82/68/pc . . 78/70/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .84/72/t . . . .81/72/r Shanghai. . . . . . .82/77/0.43 . . .86/79/t . . . 88/80/c Singapore . . . . . .88/77/0.57 . . .87/78/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .82/62/t . . 78/58/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . . .62/46/s . . . 63/47/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .94/82/t . . . .95/82/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .87/76/s . . . 86/76/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .87/75/t . . . 90/76/s Toronto . . . . . . . .84/72/0.04 . . .84/65/t . . 87/68/pc Vancouver. . . . . .70/59/0.00 . 70/55/pc . . . 71/55/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .90/68/0.46 . . .90/67/t . . 77/58/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . 91/64/pc . . . .83/62/t


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Baseball Inside Yankees honor Steinbrenner with win in ninth inning, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010

L O C A L LY Deschutes Dash festival hits Bend this weekend The 2010 Deschutes Dash Weekend Sports Festival gets under way today and continues on Sunday in and around the Old Mill District and on Century Drive in Bend. According to event officials, nearly 1,000 participants have entered the Deschutes Dash, whose 10 endurance events range from a 5kilometer running race to an Olympicdistance triathlon. All races will finish on the footbridge in the Old Mill District near the Les Schwab Amphitheater. Road closures will occur on parts of Century Drive, Chandler Avenue, Colorado Avenue and Columbia Street. Motorists can expect delays and road closures from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, and from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Sunday. Spectators are welcome and admission is free. For more information, visit www.freshairsports.com. — Bulletin staff report

Bareback riders keep tradition alive in C.O. Three prep cowboys who will compete at nationals are the latest in a long line of local rodeo standouts By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Austin Foss, Wyatt Bloom and David Peebles are not household names — yet. The three local cowboys — Foss lives in Terrebonne, Bloom in Bend and Peebles in Redmond — finished first, second, and fourth, respectively,

in the 2010 Oregon High School Rodeo Association bareback standings, each earning a spot at this year’s National High School Finals Rodeo. The rodeo gets under way Sunday in Gillette, Wyo. Foss, who placed 16th at the NHSFR last year, will be making his second NHSFR appearance, while

National High School Finals Rodeo When: Sunday, July 18, through Saturday, July 24 Where: Gillette, Wyo. Web: www.nhsra.com Bloom and Peebles will be competing at nationals for the first time. “We’re all pretty good buddies,”

Peebles says about the young roughstock riders. “If we find some useful stuff, we let the other know.” Peebles and his pals are the latest in a long line of standout bareback riders from Central Oregon. Powell Butte’s Clint Corey was a staple on the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association tour during the 1980s and ’90s, qualifying for the National Finals Rodeo 17 consecutive times from 1985 to 2001. See Rodeo / D5

Bend boxer finishes fourth at nationals

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL

Inaugural soccer tourney in Bend draws 90 teams The inaugural Bend Premier Cup, hosted by the Bend-based Oregon Rush Soccer Club, is taking place this weekend at three Bend venues. More than 90 teams, with players ranging in age from 9 to 19, are taking part in the tournament, which got under way on Friday and runs through Sunday at Pine Nursery Park, Big Sky Park & Sports Complex, and Summit High School. Teams participating in the tournament are from throughout the Northwest, including clubs from Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada and Alaska. The Bend Premier Cup concludes Sunday. The last game is slated for 2 p.m. at Pine Nursery Park. Spectators are welcome and admission is free. Expect a $5 parking fee at Summit High School. For Bend Premier cup game schedule information or results, visit www. bendpremiercup.com. — Bulletin staff report

Bulletin staff report

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend Elks shortstop Adam Norton fields a ground ball before getting an out at first base during the third inning of a West Coast League game Friday against the Corvallis Knights at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium.

Bend loses one at home

TOUR DE FRANCE AT A G L A NC E MENDE, France — A brief look at Friday’s 12th stage of the Tour de France: Stage: The sinewy route featured five mid-grade climbs on a 130.8-mile trek from Bourg-de-Peage to Mende, finishing with a short but punishing category 2 ascent up Cote de la CroixNeuve. Winner: Joaquin Rodriguez of Spain won in 4 hours, 58 minutes, 26 seconds. Defending champion Alberto Contador of Spain was second in the same time, and Alexandre Vinokourov of Kazakhstan was 4 seconds behind them in third. Yellow Jersey: Andy Schleck of Luxembourg kept the yellow jersey, but his lead over Contador was trimmed to 31 seconds. Spanish rider Samuel Sanchez is 2:45 back in third. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner finished the stage in a group of riders 31 seconds behind the winner. He’s 24th in overall time, 11:56 behind Schleck. Next stage: The 13th stage today takes riders 121.7 miles from Rodez to Revel, over five low-level climbs. On Sunday, the race enters the Pyrenees and four punishing mountain stages. — The Associated Press

Elks fall to division rival Corvallis, 11-2 Bulletin staff report

The Elks’ Garrett Queen connects with a pitch for a hit Friday night against Corvallis.

After the Bend Elks routed Corvallis a night earlier, the Knights decided to return the favor. Bend lost to Corvallis 11-2 on Friday night in a West Coast League baseball game at Bend’s Vince Genna Stadium. A night earlier, the Elks defeated the Knights 12-2. Crook County High School product Garrett Queen led the Elks’ offense with a double and a solo home run. Bend High prod-

uct Tommy Richards also had a pair of hits and a run scored for the Elks. The two local players accounted for four of Bend’s seven hits. Corvallis jumped out to the early lead, scoring five runs through the first five innings before the Elks (23-10) scored twice in the sixth. But the Elks’ bullpen surrendered six runs in the final two innings to put the game out of reach. The two teams conclude their three-game series with a game that starts at 6;35 p.m. at Genna Stadium. The Elks lead the Knights by 4 1⁄2 games in the WCL’s West Division

GOLF: BRITISH OPEN

Fierce wind makes for brutal day Play is suspended during second round due to weather; South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen leads By Doug Ferguson

“She was naked yesterday,” Tom Watson ST. ANDREWS, Scotsaid, “but she put on her • Scores, land — Around the loop boxing gloves today and Page D2 at the far end of St. Anjust hit us with all she drews, shots at the mercy • More had.” of a vicious wind were The next battle is coverage, flying in every direction catching Oosthuizen Page D5 as Rory McIlroy, Tiger (WUHST’-hy-zen). Woods and so many othThe 27-year-old South ers struggled to survive in the African, who had made only one British Open. cut in his previous eight majors, Just as daunting was one thing was at 12-under 132 and had a that didn’t move — the name five-shot lead, the largest after 36 of Louis Oosthuizen atop the holes in this major since Bobby leaderboard. Clampett at Royal Troon in 1982. It stayed there over the final Equally surprising was the guy 11 hours on a Friday when the right behind him — Mark Calmood of the Old Course turned cavecchia, who turned 50 a month foul. Oosthuizen finished his 5- ago and shot 67 in the morning under 67 just as the flags starting when players only had to cope whipping and the grandstands with a light wind and short spells creaked from gusts that topped 40 of rain. A pair of Englishmen, Lee mph, forcing a round to be halted Westwood (71) and Paul Casey for the first time in 12 years at the (69), were at 6-under 138. British Open. See British / D5 The Associated Press

Joaquin Rodriguez Oliver, of Spain, left, crosses the finish line to win the 12th stage of the Tour de France on Friday ahead of Alberto Contador, of Spain, who took second place.

INDEX Scoreboard .................................................D2 Cycling .......................................................D3 Golf .....................................................D3, D5 Auto racing .................................................D3 Baseball ............................................. D3, D4 Football ......................................................D6 Boxing ........................................................D6

Inside

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Bend’s Jenah Duea finished fourth in the USA Boxing National Championships this week at the U.S. Olympic Training Center. Duea, 27, advanced to the semifinals of the 152-pound female division, which qualified her for the U.S. National Team. In the third-place bout on Friday, Duea Jenah Duea lost a decision to Tiffanie Ward, of Hacienda Heights, Calif. “That was her fourth fight in five days,” said Duea’s coach, Richard Miller of the Deschutes County Rocks Boxing Club, who accompanied Duea to the nationals. “She’s doubly improved from the beginning of the season.” In the semifinals on Thursday, Duea lost a 22-3 decision to Andrecia Wasson, of Centerline, Mich. In earlier bouts, Duea scored a 35-13 decision Monday over Griselda Madrigal, of East Wenatchee, Wash., then on Wednesday scored a 23-20 decision over Maria Baumer, of Cincinnati. USA Boxing women’s bouts consist of four two-minute rounds. Fights are scored on a point system administered by judges, and boxers earn points for punches landed. Duea, originally from Iowa, moved to Central Oregon last year from New York.

CYCLING C O M M E N TA RY

Armstrong could have quit, but he’s still on his bike By John Leicester The Associated Press

PARIS — n the long road into Paris, nearly every day still left on this Tour de France is going to be a reminder of the champion that Lance Armstrong once was but no longer is. Take, for example, stage 14 looming this Sunday. That’s when the Tour will clamber high into the Pyrenees mountains to Ax-3 Domaines. That ski station was the setting for a vintage Armstrong performance in 2005, when he was still a genuine, no-holds-barred competitor, not the haggard has-been — as a rider, at least — he has become. See Armstrong / D5

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Alastair Grant / The Associated Press

South Africa’s Louis Oosthuizen putts on the 13th green during the second round of the British on the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland, Friday. Oosthuizen is the current leader.


D2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

Baseball

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 4 a.m. — British Open, third round, ESPN. 11 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Chiquita Classic, third round, Golf. Noon — American Century Championship, second round, NBC. Noon — British Open, third round, ABC (same-day tape). 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open, third round, Golf.

CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 13, VS. network.

SOCCER 1 p.m. — Tottenham Hotspur at San Jose Earthquakes, ESPN.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 6 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, FSNW.

AUTO RACING 1:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250, qualifying, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250, ESPN2. 8 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Fram-Autolite NHRA Nationals Qualifying, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 3 a.m. — British Open, final round, ESPN. 11 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Chiquita Classic, final round, Golf. Noon — American Century Championship, final round, NBC. Noon — British Open, third round, ABC (same-day tape). 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Reno-Tahoe Open, final round, Golf.

CYCLING 4:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 14, VS. network.

AUTO RACING 9:30 a.m. — IndyCar, Honda Indy Toronto, ABC. 3 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Fram-Autolite NHRA Nationals, final eliminations, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees, TBS. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, FSNW. 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs, ESPN.

SOCCER Noon — Celtic at Seattle Sounders, ESPN.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL 9 p.m. — AVP Nivea Tour, men’s finals, ESPN2 (same-day tape).

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 6:35 p.m. — WCL, Corvallis Knights at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Chicago Cubs, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Watersports contest on Lake Billy Chinook this weekend Bulletin staff report Sundance Watersports Club will hold a family wakeboard and water-ski contest today and Sunday at Lake Billy Chinook, in Jefferson County west of Madras. All ages and skill levels are welcome. Wakeboard events will take place today and will include the following divisions: 12 and under, women’s open, novice, intermediate, advanced, expert/outlaw, and wake skate. Water-skiing events will be held Sunday and include novice, intermediate, expert and open divisions. Registration will be available on the day of the event from 7 to 9 a.m. Events start at 10 a.m. The entry fee is $25, and T-shirts are $5. Spectators are welcome and admission is free. For more information, contact Aspect Wakeboards at 541-3894667 or Russ at 541-480-0410.

CYCLING TOUR DE FRANCE Friday At Mende, France 12th Stage A 130.8-mile hilly ride from Bourg-de-Peage to Mende (two Category 2 and three Category 3 climbs) 1. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 4 hours, 58 minutes, 26 seconds. 2. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, same time. 3. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 4 seconds behind. 4. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, :10. 5. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, same time. 6. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, same time. 7. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, same time. 8. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, same time. 9. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, :15. 10. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, same time. 11. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, :17. 12. Ruben Plaza, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, :31. 13. Damiano Cunego, Italy, Lampre-Farnesse, same time. 14. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, same time. 15. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, same time. 16. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Doimo, same time. 17. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 18. Carlos Sastre, Spain, Cervelo Test Team, same time. 19. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, same time. 20. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. Also 55. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, 3:35. 57. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 64. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 67. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, same time. 79. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 5:25. 100. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, same time. 129. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, 6:35. 157. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 10:51. 161. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 12:39. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, withdrew. Overall Standings (After 12 stages) 1. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, 58 hours, 42 minutes, 01 seconds. 2. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, 31 seconds behind. 3. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 2:45. 4. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, 2:58. 5. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, 3:31. 6. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, 4:06. 7. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, 4:27. 8. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 4:58. 9. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 5:02. 10. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, 5:16. 11. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Doimo, 5:30. 12. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 6:25. 13. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 14. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, 6:44. 15. Carlos Sastre, Spain, Cervelo Test Team, 7:34. 16. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, 7:39. 17. Michael Rogers, Australia, Team HTC-Columbia, 7:47. 18. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, 8:08. 19. Thomas Lovkvist, Sweden, Sky Pro Cycling, 8:24. 20. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, 9:05. Also 24. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, 11:56. 32. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, 21:16. 36. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, 25:08. 56. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, 52:57. 68. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 58:29. 81. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, 1:06:02. 121. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, 1:32:19. 128. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, 1:36:11. 158. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 1:56:02. 168. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 2:07:51. NEXT: A 121.8-mile plain ride from Rodez to Revel.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— MERCEDES CUP Friday Stuttgart, Germany Singles Quarterfinals Albert Montanes (5), Spain, def. Jurgen Melzer (2), Austria, 6-4, 6-1. Juan Carlos Ferrero, (4) Spain, def. Simon Greul, Germany, 6-3, 7-5. Gael Monfils (3), France, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 5-7, 6-3, 6-4. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, 6-1, 6-3. SWEDISH OPEN Friday Bastad, Sweden Singles Quarterfinals David Ferrer (3), Spain, def. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, 6-3, 6-3. Tommy Robredo (5), Spain, def. Fernando Verdasco (2), Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Robin Soderling (1), Sweden, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (5). Nicolas Almagro (4), Spain, def. Franco Skugor, Croatia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-0.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— PRAGUE OPEN Friday Prague, Czech Republic Singles Quarterfinals Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, 2-6, 6-2, 7-5. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (8), Czech Republic, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-2, 4-6, 7-5. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues (5), Spain, 6-4, 7-5. Agnes Szavay (7), Hungary, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-1, 6-4. PALERMO OPEN Friday Palermo, Italy Singles Quarterfinals Romina Oprandi, Italy, def. Aravane Rezai (2), France, 7-5, 6-0. Julia Goerges, Germany, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-2, 6-4. Kaia Kanepi (5), Estonia, def. Sara Errani (3), Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Flavia Pennetta, Italy, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives, Spain, 6-4, 6-2.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Columbus 8 3 4 28 New York 8 5 2 26 Toronto FC 6 4 4 22 Chicago 4 5 5 17 Kansas City 4 8 3 15 New England 4 9 2 14 D.C. 3 10 3 12 Philadelphia 3 8 2 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Los Angeles 11 2 3 36 Real Salt Lake 9 3 3 30

GF 20 18 17 18 12 15 11 16

GA 13 17 15 19 19 26 26 25

GF GA 25 7 28 11

IN THE BLEACHERS

FC Dallas 5 2 7 22 Colorado 6 4 4 22 San Jose 6 4 4 22 Houston 5 7 4 19 Seattle 5 8 4 19 Chivas USA 4 9 2 14 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m. New York at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Kansas City at Colorado, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Game Los Angeles at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.

17 16 18 21 18 17

13 13 16 22 24 21

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 14 7 .667 Washington 12 6 .667 Indiana 12 7 .632 Connecticut 11 8 .579 New York 9 9 .500 Chicago 10 11 .476 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 17 2 .895 Minnesota 7 11 .389 Phoenix 7 12 .368 San Antonio 6 12 .333 Los Angeles 5 14 .263 Tulsa 4 15 .211 ——— Friday’s Games Indiana 89, Atlanta 70 Tulsa 75, San Antonio 70 Chicago 80, Los Angeles 68 Today’s Games Seattle at Minnesota, 12:30 p.m. Atlanta at Connecticut, 4 p.m. Tulsa at Phoenix, 7 p.m.

GB — ½ 1 2 3½ 4 GB — 9½ 10 10½ 12 13

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Friday’s results) ——— West Division W L Bend Elks 23 10 Corvallis Knights 17 13 Kitsap BlueJackets 17 14 Bellingham Bells 19 17 Cowlitz Black Bears 8 19 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 17 12 Moses Lake Pirates 14 14 Kelowna Falcons 15 19 Walla Walla Sweets 9 21 Friday’s Games Kitsap 5, Cowlitz 4 Corvallis 11, Bend 2 Wenatchee 4, Kelowna 3 Moses Lake 6, Walla Walla 4 Today’s Games Kitsap at Cowlitz Corvallis at Bend Wenatchee at Kelowna Walla Walla at Moses Lake

Pct. .697 .567 .548 .528 .296 Pct. .586 .500 .441 .300

Friday’s Summary ——— CORVALLIS 11, CORVALLIS 2 Corvallis 020 210 033 — 11 13 1 Bend 000 002 000 — 2 7 1 Kraus, Pecoraro (7), Blake (9) and Kizer; Loredo, Scott (6), Deaton (8), Jones (8) and Higgs. W — Kraus. L— Loredo. 2B — Corvallis: Duffy, Jones. Bend: Queen. HR — Corvallis: Andriese (2), Dilliard (3), Kizer. Bend: Tompkins, Queen.

GOLF PGA Europe BRITISH OPEN Friday Second Round At St. Andrews (Old Course) St. Andrews, Scotland Purse: $7.3 million Yardage: 7,305; Par: 72 (a-amateur) Louis Oosthuizen 65-67—132 Mark Calcavecchia 70-67—137 Paul Casey 69-69—138 Lee Westwood 67-71—138 Tom Lehman 71-68—139 Ricky Barnes 68-71—139 Peter Hanson 66-73—139 Miguel Angel Jimenez 72-67—139 Graeme McDowell 71-68—139 Retief Goosen 69-70—139 Sean O’Hair 67-72—139 Ignacio Garrido 69-71—140 Toru Taniguchi 70-70—140 Robert Karlsson 69-71—140 Martin Kaymer 69-71—140 Nick Watney 67-73—140 Tiger Woods 67-73—140 Ignacio Garrido 69-71—140 Toru Taniguchi 70-70—140 Robert Karlsson 69-71—140 Martin Kaymer 69-71—140 Nick Watney 67-73—140 Tiger Woods 67-73—140 Shane Lowry 68-73—141 Vijay Singh 68-73—141 Y.E. Yang 67-74—141 Dustin Johnson 69-72—141 Ryo Ishikawa 68-73—141 Jeff Overton 73-69—142 Bradley Dredge 66-76—142 Alvaro Quiros 72-70—142 Adam Scott 72-70—142 Sergio Garcia 71-71—142 Marcel Siem 67-75—142 John Daly 66-76—142 Trevor Immelman 68-74—142 Simon Khan 74-69—143 Andrew Coltart 66-77—143 Lucas Glover 67-76—143 Rory McIlroy 63-80—143 Camilo Villegas 68-75—143 Peter Senior 73-71—144 Kevin Na 70-74—144 Marc Leishman 73-71—144 Phil Mickelson 73-71—144

Thomas Aiken 71-73—144 John Senden 68-76—144 Simon Dyson 69-75—144 Robert Allenby 69-75—144 Ian Poulter 71-73—144 Stewart Cink 70-74—144 Colm Moriarty 72-73—145 Scott Verplank 72-73—145 Luke Donald 73-72—145 Steve Stricker 71-74—145 Colin Montgomerie 74-71—145 Edoardo Molinari 69-76—145 Heath Slocum 71-74—145 Steve Marino 69-76—145 Hunter Mahan 69-76—145 Ross Fisher 68-77—145 Hirofumi Miyase 71-75—146 Rickie Fowler 79-67—146 Zach Johnson 72-74—146 Richard S. Johnson 73-73—146 Danny Chia 69-77—146 Robert Rock 68-78—146 Soren Kjeldsen 72-74—146 Charl Schwartzel 71-75—146 a-Eric Chun 71-76—147 Bubba Watson 74-73—147 Oliver Wilson 68-79—147 Thomas Bjorn 70-77—147 Justin Rose 70-77—147 Rhys Davies 73-75—148 Ben Crane 72-76—148 Gareth Maybin 72-76—148 Ryuichi Oda 76-72—148 Seung-yul Noh 72-76—148 Ross McGowan 68-80—148 G.Fernandez-Castano 72-76—148 Ernie Els 69-79—148 Tom Watson 73-75—148 Ben Curtis 76-73—149 Angel Cabrera 73-76—149 Jason Bohn 75-74—149 D.A. Points 72-77—149 Todd Hamilton 72-77—149 Koumei Oda 74-76—150 Jim Furyk 77-73—150 Geoff Ogilvy 72-78—150 Hiroyuki Fujita 75-75—150 Justin Leonard 76-74—150 K.J. Choi 76-74—150 Paul Goydos 74-76—150 Bill Haas 73-77—150 Yuta Ikeda 72-78—150 Padraig Harrington 73-77—150 Anders Hansen 77-74—151 Sandy Lyle 75-76—151 Francesco Molinari 74-77—151 Tim Petrovic 71-80—151 Jean Hugo 76-75—151 Paul Lawrie 69-82—151 Loren Roberts 73-78—151 Soren Hansen 72-79—151 Tim Clark 71-80—151 Kurt Barnes 75-77—152 Darren Fichardt 74-78—152 Paul Streeter 76-76—152 Josh Cunliffe 75-77—152 Shunsuke Sonoda 74-78—152 Katsumasa Miyamoto 77-76—153 a-Victor Dubuisson 80-73—153 Mathew Goggin 74-79—153 Alexander Noren 73-80—153 Nick Faldo 72-81—153 Jerry Kelly 79-75—154 Thomas Levet 73-81—154 Ryan Moore 70-84—154 Jose Manual Lara 80-75—155 Brian Gay 72-83—155 a-Tyrell Hatton 78-77—155 Jae-Bum Park 76-79—155 George McNeill 78-77—155 Jason Dufner 73-82—155 David Duval 77-78—155 Gary Clark 79-77—156 Glen Day 78-79—157 Martin Laird 74-83—157 a-Laurie Canter 81-79—160 Simon Edwards 79-86—165 Failed to finish second round Jason Day 71 Steven Tiley 66 Fredrik Andersson Hed 67 Alejandro Canizares 67 Henrik Stenson 68 a-Jin Jeong 68 Mark O’Meara 69 Bo Van Pelt 69 Chris Wood 70 Darren Clarke 70 J.B. Holmes 70 Zane Scotland 70 Tano Goya 70 Kyung-tae Kim 70 Kenny Perry 71 Stephen Gallacher 71 Matt Kuchar 72 a-Byeong-Hun An 72 Michael Sim 72 Tom Pernice Jr. 72 Mark F. Haastrup 72 Mike Weir 73 Davis Love III 73 Gregory Havret 73 a-Jamie Abbott 73 Tom Whitehouse 73 Thongchai Jaidee 75 Phillip Archer 75 Cameron Percy 76 Ewan Porter 81 Leaderboard SCORE THRU 1. Louis Oosthuizen -12 F 2. Mark Calcavecchia -7 F 3. Paul Casey -6 F 3. Lee Westwood -6 F 3. Steven Tiley -6 10 6. Tom Lehman -5 F 6. Ricky Barnes -5 F 6. Peter Hanson -5 F 6. Miguel Angel Jimenez -5 F 6. Graeme McDowell -5 F 6. Retief Goosen -5 F 6. Sean O’Hair -5 F

PGA Tour RENO-TAHOE OPEN Friday At Montreux Golf and Country Club, Reno, Nev. Purse: $3 million Yardage: 7,472; Par: 72 (a-amateur) Second Round Robert Garrigus 69-65—134 Matt Bettencourt 66-68—134 John Mallinger 69-67—136 Bob Heintz 69-68—137 Bill Lunde 69-68—137 John Merrick 69-68—137 Kevin Stadler 70-67—137 Chad Campbell 69-69—138 Chris DiMarco 67-71—138

Todd Fischer Scott McCarron Craig Bowden Cliff Kresge Will MacKenzie Jonathan Kaye Rich Barcelo Jeff Quinney Kevin Streelman Jeev Milkha Singh Mathias Gronberg Woody Austin Dicky Pride Aron Price Steve Wheatcroft Rod Pampling J.J. Henry Craig Barlow Paul Stankowski Jarrod Lyle Steve Elkington Mark Hensby Stuart Appleby Len Mattiace Kris Blanks Greg Kraft Matt Every Seung-su Han Alex Cejka John Rollins Steve Allan Roger Tambellini Kirk Triplett Robert Gamez Mark Brooks Martin Flores Robin Freeman Ben Fox Tom Gillis Guy Boros Skip Kendall Mark Wilson David Lutterus Jim Carter Omar Uresti Charles Warren Steve Flesch Kent Jones Garth Mulroy Matt Hill Henrik Bjornstad Vaughn Taylor Vance Veazey Brent Delahoussaye Josh Teater Willie Wood James Nitties Graham DeLaet Nicholas Thompson Ted Purdy Johnson Wagner Mike Small

69-70—139 70-69—139 68-72—140 70-70—140 68-72—140 71-69—140 71-69—140 72-69—141 69-72—141 72-69—141 69-72—141 69-72—141 72-69—141 70-71—141 74-67—141 72-69—141 69-72—141 69-72—141 71-70—141 69-72—141 69-73—142 69-73—142 73-69—142 78-65—143 71-72—143 72-71—143 75-68—143 72-71—143 71-72—143 71-72—143 69-74—143 71-72—143 76-68—144 76-68—144 74-70—144 74-70—144 73-71—144 73-71—144 73-72—145 72-73—145 75-70—145 74-71—145 70-75—145 69-76—145 70-75—145 70-75—145 74-71—145 73-72—145 71-74—145 70-75—145 72-73—145 74-72—146 75-71—146 77-69—146 74-72—146 76-70—146 72-74—146 70-76—146 72-75—147 73-74—147 75-72—147 73-74—147

Failed to qualify Tom Scherrer Nathan Green Michael Clark II Marco Dawson Cameron Beckman Notah Begay III Tim Wilkinson Shiv Kapur a-Daniel Miernicki Dean Wilson Blaine McCallister Jim Gallagher, Jr. Scott Piercy Brenden Pappas Tom Byrum Bob Burns Grant Waite John Chin Joe Ogilvie Cameron Tringale Erik Compton Daniel Chopra Kevin Johnson Ernie Gonzalez Brian Stuard Jeff Gove Robert Damron Chris Tidland Steve Lowery Alex Prugh Mitch Lowe Kenny Kim Jim McGovern Spike McRoy Matt Weibring Carlos Franco Spencer Levin Ryan Palmer Chris Wilson Billy Mayfair John Morse Eric Axley Steve Pate Mike Heinen Justin Bolli Nolan Henke Chris Smith David Ogrin Carlos Concha Ron Streck Keith Clearwater Andrew McLardy Parker McLachlin

75-73—148 73-75—148 73-75—148 73-75—148 74-74—148 80-69—149 73-76—149 73-76—149 79-70—149 74-75—149 76-73—149 69-80—149 76-73—149 75-75—150 75-75—150 77-73—150 76-74—150 75-75—150 73-77—150 74-76—150 80-70—150 78-73—151 78-73—151 76-75—151 76-75—151 73-78—151 73-78—151 75-76—151 77-75—152 77-75—152 77-75—152 76-77—153 76-77—153 74-79—153 80-73—153 75-79—154 78-77—155 79-76—155 80-75—155 77-78—155 80-75—155 73-82—155 73-82—155 79-77—156 78-78—156 77-80—157 82-75—157 76-82—158 80-78—158 83-78—161 76—WD 80—WD 81—WD

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Selected the contract of RHP Fernando Cabrera from Pawtucket (IL). Optioned RHP Robert Manuel to Pawtucket. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Released C Mike Redmond. DETROIT TIGERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Jack Duffey. NEW YORK YANKEES—Recalled 1B Juan Miranda from Scranton-Wilkes-Barre (IL). Optioned OF Kevin Russo to Scranton Wilkes-Barre. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Placed LHP Doug Davis on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Lorenzo Cain from Nashville (PCL). NEW YORK METS—Recalled INF Justin Turner from Buffalo (IL). Optioned INF/OF Nick Evans to Binghamton (EL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed RHP Mat Latos on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 9. Recalled RHP Ernesto Frieri and OF Luis Durango from Portland (PCL). Placed RHP Mike Adams on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 12. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BOSTON CELTICS—Agreed to terms with G Nate Robinson. MIAMI HEAT—Signed C Joel Anthony and C Dexter Pittman. ORLANDO MAGIC—Matched Chicago’s three-year offer sheet to G J.J. Redick. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Suspended Green Bay DL Johnny Jolly indefinitely and Seattle LB Leroy Hill one-game for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. ATLANTA FALCONS—Signed WR Kerry Meier. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed DB Larry Asante to a multiyear contract. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Signed S Reshad Jones. NEW YORK GIANTS—Waived injured WR Domenik Hixon. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Re-signed F Chad Kolarik to a one-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Re-signed D Sergei Kolosov to a one-year contract. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Named Larry Carriere assistant general manager and director of player personnel. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed C Jamie Lundmark to a one-year contract. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Signed F T.J. Hensick to a oneyear contract extension. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Named Julien BriseBois assistant general manager and general manager of Norfolk (AHL). Re-signed C Paul Szczechura and C Nate Thompson to one-year contracts.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 605 153 5,196 2,544 The Dalles 378 84 3,325 1,774 John Day 400 84 2,128 1,100 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 334,615 26,857 103,410 50,837 The Dalles 263,392 22,738 54,383 28,773 John Day 243,577 22,489 37,050 18,594 McNary 211,359 15,711 19,231 8,162

• Bend Little League team into championship round: Bend South defeated Sprague of Salem 12-7 in the losers’ bracket at the Oregon State Little League 9-10 state tournament at Lents Park in Portland. Bend South, the District 5 champion, had lost to to Murrayhill of Beaverton 9-8 on Thursday night in a championship semifinal game in the nine-team, double-elimination tournament. Bend South plays Murrayhill at 11 a.m. today, and will have to defeat Murrayhill twice to claim the state championship.

Basketball • Robinson back to Boston: The Boston Celtics have agreed in principle with guard Nate Robinson on a new contract, a team official told The Associated Press on Friday. The deal reunites the 5-foot-9 guard with Glen “Big Baby” Davis on a Boston bench that provided an important contribution during last year’s run to the NBA finals. The Boston Herald reported that Robinson will get $4 million a year for two seasons. • Magic match Bulls’ offer sheet to retain Redick: The only place J.J. Redick is heading is to the bank. In a move that highlights his remarkable NBA turnaround, the same Orlando Magic team that once benched Redick, shelled out $19 million Friday to retain the shooting guard. They matched a three-year offer sheet that the Chicago Bulls made for Redick last week that could cost Orlando much more. The decision drives the Magic deeper into the luxury tax and gives them one of the NBA’s highest payrolls at about $93 million next season. The move keeps Orlando’s roster mostly intact as the Magic hope continuity will overcome Miami’s All-Star trio and Boston’s Big Three in the Eastern Conference.

Football • Seahawks S Ellison to appear in court: Seattle Seahawks safety Kevin Ellison has a court date of Oct. 5 after pleading not guilty to drug possession in Southern California. A court clerk confirmed Friday that Ellison entered the plea Wednesday in Los Angeles County Superior Court in Torrance. He remains free on $10,000 bail. The 23-year-old former AllPac-10 safety and USC defensive captain was released by the Chargers after he was pulled over for speeding by police in Redondo Beach May 24. He was arrested after officers allegedly found he had about 100 Vicodin pills but no prescription for the painkiller. The Seahawks and former USC coach Pete Carroll then claimed Ellison off waivers. • NFL suspends Packer: The NFL suspended Green Bay Packers defensive end Johnny Jolly without pay for the upcoming season and perhaps beyond for violating the league’s substance abuse policy. Jolly’s suspension begins immediately and will continue through at least the 2010 season. He will be eligible to apply for reinstatement after the Super Bowl. Jolly is facing drug charges in Houston after his July 2008 arrest outside a club for possession of at least 200 grams of codeine. If convicted, Jolly faces up to 20 years in prison.

Track and field • U.S. relay runners win Olympic medals appeal: American sprinters who were stripped of their 2000 Olympics relay medals because teammate Marion Jones was doping won an appeal Friday to have them restored. The Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled in favor of the women, who had appealed the International Olympic Committee’s decision to disqualify them from the Sydney Games. The court said the IOC and International Association of Athletics Federations rules in 2000 did not allow entire teams to be disqualified because of doping by one athlete.

Tennis • Defending champ reaches Palermo semis: Defending champion Flavia Pennetta of Italy defeated Nuria Llagostera Vives of Spain 6-4, 6-2 to reach the Palermo Open semifinals in Italy. The top-seeded Pennetta will now meet eighth-seeded Julia Goerges of Germany, who beat Jill Craybas of the U.S. 6-2, 6-4. Wild card Romina Oprandi of Italy will take on fifthseeded Kaia Kanepi of Estonia in the other semifinal. • Melzer falls in Stuttgart quarters: Fifthseeded Albert Montanes of Spain upset second-seeded Juergen Melzer 6-4, 6-1 to reach the semifinals of the Mercedes Cup in Stuttgart, Germany. In today’s semifinals, Montanes will face fourth-seeded Juan Carlos Ferrero. In the other semifinal, third-seeded Gael Monfils of France plays Daniel Gimeno-Traver. • Soderling into semis: Top-Seeded Robin Soderling reached the semifinals of the Swedish Open in Bastad with a 4-6, 7-5, 7-6 (5) victory Friday over Andreas Seppi. Soderling will face David Ferrer in the next round, after he swept Pablo Cuevas 6-3, 6-3 on center court. Tommy Robredo will play Nicolas Almagro in the other semifinal. Schnyder advances: Patty Schnyder of Switzerland rallied past Anna Tatishvili of Georgia 2-6, 6-2, 7-5 Friday to advance to the semifinals of the Prague Open. In today’s semifinals, Schnyder will face eighth-seeded Barbora Zahlavova Strycova of the Czech Republic. Lucie Hradecka and seventh-seeded Agnes Szavay are in the other semi.

Auto racing • Former Indy champ to make NASCAR bid: Former Indianapolis 500 champion and Formula One star Jacques Villeneuve is heading back to the Brickyard in Indianapolis. Villeneuve will attempt to qualify the No. 32 Toyota for Braun Racing in NASCAR’s annual Cup visit to the historic 2.5-mile oval on July 25. Villeneuve drove for Braun Racing in the Nationwide Series race at Road America last month, qualifying second and leading three laps before an electrical problem late in the race relegated him to 25th. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 D3

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

BASEBALL

Contador puts dent in Schleck’s All-night tribute at Yankee Stadium: lead during Tour’s 12th stage

silence, then cheering

By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

MENDE, France — Alberto Contador sent a message Friday to Tour de France leader Andy Schleck: Here I come. The two-time Tour champion dropped the Luxembourg rider on the steep final climb of the 12th stage, the Spaniard’s first bold attack of the race gaining him crucial seconds in the title chase. Joaquin Rodriguez, a Spaniard with the Katusha team, got stagewin glory by edging Contador in a two-man sprint at the finish of the 131-mile course from Bourg-dePeage to Mende. Contador was content to cut 10 precious seconds from his deficit to Schleck and was 31 seconds behind after the stage. Samuel Sanchez of Spain was a distant third, 2 minutes, 45 seconds. The race has shaped up as a duel between Contador and Schleck, who are seemingly unparalleled in the climbs — and the Pyrenees await as the arena where their rivalry will play out beginning Sunday. Schleck knows that Contador is stronger in the time trial, and wants to have the biggest lead possible before the final race against the clock on the eve of the July 25 finish on the Champs-Elysees in Paris. Friday’s stage finish was destined for drama. In the final miles, the pack scaled the La Croix Neuve pass, which ascends nearly 2 miles at an average gradient of more than 10 percent. Contador and Rodriguez burst out of the pack near the midpoint of that steep final climb, dusting Schleck and overtaking several breakaway riders. Rodriguez then outsprinted Contador in the last few hundred yards to get his first stage win in his first Tour.

New York wins game on night when late Steinbrenner and announcer are honored By Ben Shpigel New York Times News Service

Christophe Ena / The Associated Press

The peloton stays in line during the 12th stage of the Tour de France on a ride from Bourg-de-Peage to Mende, France, Friday. Both were given a time of 4 hours, 58 minutes, 26 seconds, while Contador’s Astana teammate Alexandre Vinokourov was third, 4 seconds back. Schleck, the Saxo Bank team leader, was fifth, while Sanchez crossed in sixth. Seven-time champion Lance Armstrong, who has ruled himself out of contention in his final Tour, lost time to the leader for a third straight day — crossing in 57th place, 3:35 back of Rodriguez. He’s 32nd overall, 21:16 behind Schleck. Armstrong didn’t speak to reporters after the stage. Vinokourov and three other breakaway riders were the first at the foot of the climb. Initially, he and Belarus rider Vasil Kiryienka slugged it out before the Kazakh

star rode out alone, seeking a stage win in his first Tour since being kicked out of the 2007 race for blood doping and serving a two-year suspension. Then with just over a mile to go, Contador caught Schleck offguard by racing out wide and mustering a burst of speed. As the Spaniard rose up out of his saddle, his bike rocking side to side, Schleck couldn’t or wouldn’t match the acceleration, staying seated and pedaling in a steady rhythm. “I saw that a rider came out and Andy didn’t respond,” Contador said. “He’s a rather ambitious rider, and that could be a symptom of weakness.” Contador and Rodriguez

quickly overtook Vinokourov and battled it out to the end. “I knew this was going to be a really tough climb,” Schleck said of La Croix Neuve. “I don’t like this climb, it doesn’t fit me. It’s short and steep and you have to be explosive — not right for the kind of rider that I am. “I’m happy I lost only 10 seconds in the end. I was not so surprised I couldn’t stay with him in this climb.” Tour organizers said U.S. sprint specialist Tyler Farrar of the Garmin-Transitions team dropped out of the race. He had been riding with a broken left wrist from one of numerous crashes on rain-slicked roads in Stage 2.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Garrigus, Bettencourt share Reno-Tahoe lead The Associated Press RENO, Nev. — Robert Garrigus shot a 7-under 65 to share the second-round lead with Matt Bettencourt at the Reno-Tahoe Open. Tour veterans Chad Campbell, who posted his second 69 in a row, and Chris DiMarco, who slipped to 71 after an opening 67, were among those within four strokes of the lead at Montreux Golf & Country Club. John Mallinger shot a 67 for third-place alone Friday at 8-under 136, a stroke ahead of Bob Heintz, Bill Lunde, John Merrick and Kevin Stadler. Stadler shot 70 on Friday and the other three 69 to get to 7-under 137. Shiv Kapur missed the cut but made the fourth double eagle on tour this year, holing out his second shot with a 3-wood from 297 yards on the 616-yard, par-5 ninth. Bettencourt led the first round with a 66 and had a three-stroke

lead with three holes to go in Friday’s second round. But he bogeyed the last two to finish with a 68 while Garrigus added his seventh birdie of the day on No. 17. “It was just one of those days that nothing was going wrong,” Garrigus said. “I didn’t make any bad swings. Not one bad swing today.” The unusually hot weather in the mid-90s on the mountain course 30 miles from Lake Tahoe gave way to strong winds gusting up to 40 mph by early afternoon as the skies darkened and towering pines swung back and forth — making for generally higher scores the rest of the day. “It was really the old cliche — you’ve got to weather the storm,” said Garrigus, who said he was the his second hole when “it started blowing 35 miles an hour.” “I kind of thought, ‘Oh, it’s kind of like the British Open. The guys in the morning got no wind, and

we’re out here in the elements,’” he said. Bettencourt won the money title on the Nationwide Tour in 2008. Garrigus is trying to bounce back from his loss to Lee Westwood in a playoff at the St. Jude Classic in Memphis last month after he blew a three-stroke lead on the final hole of regulation before he bogeyed the first playoff hole. Also on Friday Public Links down to final two GREENSBORO, N.C. — Lion Kim birdied his final two holes to beat Kevin Phelan in the semifinals of the U.S. Amateur Public Links, and will face David McDaniel for the championship at Bryan Park Golf and Conference Center. The 21-year-old senior-tobe from the University of Michigan beat Phelan, who plays for North Florida, 1 up after making two long putts on the final two holes. McDaniel also won 1 up over Pepperdine’s Josh Anderson.

Andy Beams / Reno Gazette-Journal

Matt Bettencourt sinks a putt on the 15th hole during the second round of the Reno-Tahoe Open on Friday. He is tied for the tournament lead.

AU TO R AC I N G C O M M E N TA RY

As Yankee Stadium fell silent early Friday evening, Frank Sinatra’s voice wafted over the loudspeakers. Sinatra was singing “My Way,” a tune that George Steinbrenner no doubt knew well and with which he surely identified. No one did it quite the way Steinbrenner did in his 37 years as the principal owner of the Yankees, and Sinatra’s song provided a fitting introduction for a 20-minute pregame ceremony that honored both Steinbrenner, who died Tuesday, and the team’s longtime public-address announcer Bob Sheppard, who died two days before Steinbrenner. By the end of the night, the somber mood had dissipated, giving way to the rhythms of a stirring game between the best teams in the American League. Because he lived in Tampa, Fla., Steinbrenner took special joy in beating the Rays, and the Yankees honored him with a 5-4 comeback victory. The Yankees, who trailed 31 heading into the sixth and 4-3 entering the eighth, won when Nick Swisher, whose homer an inning earlier tied the score, ripped a two-out single in the bottom of the ninth off Lance Cormier. Swisher’s hit scored Curtis Granderson, who led off with a single and moved to second on a sacrifice. The Yankees widened their lead in the AL East over the second-place Rays to three games. “The two teams we couldn’t lose to, whether it was spring training or in the season, was Tampa and the Mets,” Derek Jeter, the Yankee captain, said before the game. “He’d bring everybody to a spring training game. We’d have four or five starting pitchers. So yeah, he never wanted to be embarrassed. In his mind, it was almost like embarrassment to lose in his hometown.” Playing in the Bronx for the first time since the deaths of Steinbrenner and Sheppard, the Yankees hosted a ceremony containing some of the extravagant touches that came to define Steinbrenner’s ownership. But there were some subtle ones, too. With all the flags ringing the stadium at half staff, most of the ceremony understandably centered on Steinbrenner. The funeral for Sheppard was held on Thursday on Long Island; a private graveside funeral service for Steinbrenner is to take place in Florida this weekend. More elaborate, but still unscheduled, public memorials will be held in the Bronx and Tampa. “We’ll be reminded every day with what’s on our jerseys, that the Boss is now just watching from above,” manager Joe Girardi said before the game. “I’m sure he’ll get upset when

we don’t win. I’m sure that won’t change.” Wearing uniform patches commemorating Steinbrenner and Sheppard, the Yankees watched the ceremony from in front of their dugout, with their caps off. Most of the Rays did the same. After the video tribute to Steinbrenner, Girardi could be seen biting his lip to hold back tears. Jeter was the only Yankees player to address the crowd during the ceremony, calling Steinbrenner and Sheppard “shining stars in the Yankees universe.” There was a moment of silence, followed by the playing of “Taps.” Army Sgt. Mary Kay Messenger sang the national anthem while the West Point Color Guard presented the colors in far center field, leaving most of the playing field empty as a tribute. Some in the crowd of 47,524 came bearing signs. One read, “38 YEARS, 11 PENNANTS, 7 RINGS, 1 BOSS.” Another said, “WIN IT FOR GEORGE.” One fan honored Steinbrenner by getting a tattoo reading, “The Boss 1930-2010” on his right biceps. An impromptu chant of “Let’s Go Yankees” started in the lower bowl of the stadium, and Mariano Rivera placed two red roses across the plate — one for Steinbrenner, one for Sheppard. The normally boisterous fans in the right-field bleachers refrained from doing their regular first-inning roll call of the Yankee players in the field, instead remaining quiet. Another unexpected silence lasted all game, with the Yankees turning off the public address system during the game as a way of paying homage to Sheppard. Of all the current players, Jeter probably knew Steinbrenner best, meeting with him for dinner in Tampa during the offseason. He also had a poignant relationship of sorts with Sheppard, having asked to use Sheppard’s voice to announce his at-bats. Before the ceremony, Jeter told reporters he was not sure how he would react. “I think it’ll be special,” Jeter said. “I think fans here are well aware of what George Steinbrenner meant to the organization. I’d expect the fans to be pretty emotional.” Fans flocked to Yankee Stadium on Tuesday morning after learning of Steinbrenner’s death, and some of their tributes — candles, newspapers, handwritten notes — lay outside Gate 4. In the lobby, a statue of Steinbrenner was flanked by wreaths with white and blue flowers. While the Yankees and the Rays took batting practice, the scoreboard in center field displayed photographs of Steinbrenner and quotations about him from current and former members of the organization.

Speed thrills at the track, but it also can kill By Cam Inman McClatchy-Tribune News Service

I

went to my first NHRA drag race 15 years ago to write about an upstart California driver named Blaine Johnson. Pungent fumes, deafening roars and earthquake-like vibrations ricocheted off Sonoma, Calif.,’s blazing-hot track, making a first impression that no sport can match. Same goes for the second impression: Johnson died a year later in a 300-mph crash. His Top Fuel dragster’s engine blew near the finish line at the NHRA’s Indianapolis event. He was 34. Drag racing’s risk of fatal accidents makes for an unavoidable topic heading into the FRAM Autolite NHRA Nationals this weekend at Infineon Raceway. This season’s third fatality at an NHRA event occurred Sunday, when Mark Niver, 60, died from a crash at the Northwest Nationals in Kent, Wash. The other deadly incidents claimed driver Neal Parker, 57, in a June 11 crash in New Jersey, and spectator Susan Zimmer, 53, from a stray tire that flew off Antron Brown’s wrecked

dragster Feb. 21 outside Phoenix. And yet the show goes on, race after race, with life and death on the line each time those startingtree lights turn green. Cory McClenathan won Sunday’s Top Fuel category in Washington. He also won the fatalitymarred event in Arizona. Go back further and there’s this eerie coincidence: McClenathan raced in the neighboring lane on Johnson’s fatal ride in 1996. “(Team member) Lee Beard could see I was really struggling the year Blaine died,” McClenathan said Wednesday. “Lee told me, ‘This is a defining moment, dig deep, get in that race car and try to win it for him.’” McClenathan used that same motivation Sunday after Niver’s accident. “You really have to stop and focus on your job, grab the ear plugs, put the iPhone on and get in a good place,” McClenathan said. “That’s the one thing you learn as a veteran driver. These things can be lethal. “I’ve been in some of the worst accidents. I’ll see a replay and can’t believe I walked away from

it.” Such is the case with his 2006 qualifying crash in Connecticut, when his dragster snapped in half midway down the track. Two NHRA drivers were not as lucky in ensuing years, as Eric Medlen died in 2007 and Scott Kalitta in 2008. NHRA responded with increased safety measures, such as shortening the track from a quarter-mile (1,320 feet) to 1,000 feet after Kalitta’s crash. Niver lost his life Sunday when his Top Alcohol dragster slammed into a catch net in the shutdown area. Among those in attendance was McClenathan’s daughter, Courtney, a 19-year-old college freshman. “It really struck her hard,” McClenathan said. “She woke up late at night this week and we sat down for an hour to talk. She was upset. “She understands I’m not ready to get out of the car yet.” McClenathan says only about 25 to 30 drivers actually race on the circuit for a living, others doing it as a hobby or by region. He has been at this for 25 years, and

he envisions racing a few more years. After that, he might work on the sport’s business side or mentor young drivers. Or perhaps he will finally pursue his ambitions to become a veterinarian back home in Indiana. “I really love driving a race car. I’m an adrenaline junkie at heart,” he said. “It’s one thing to jump out of a plane, which I did a few years ago. I love the free fall and the feeling of peace and harmony. Driving a dragster is the same. Once you start it, it’s under my control. It’s mine.” Back in 1995, Johnson sounded just as enraptured with life in the proverbial fast lane. He had won four consecutive Top Alcohol championships before jumping up to the Top Fuel class in 1994. “There was not really any goal when we started,” Johnson, a Santa Maria native, told me in 1995. “It was just like, ‘We’re going to go racing, and whatever happens, happens.’ We got better and then started to go faster.” Alas, speed kills. But it also thrills. Such is the NHRA’s impossible balancing act.

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PROPERTIES


D4 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MA JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 57 32 .640 — Tampa Bay 54 35 .607 3 Boston 51 39 .567 6½ Toronto 45 45 .500 12½ Baltimore 29 60 .326 28 Central Division W L Pct GB Chicago 50 39 .562 — Detroit 48 39 .552 1 Minnesota 47 43 .522 3½ Kansas City 39 50 .438 11 Cleveland 35 54 .393 15 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 52 38 .578 — Los Angeles 49 44 .527 4½ Oakland 44 46 .489 8 Seattle 35 55 .389 17 ——— Friday’s Games Cleveland 8, Detroit 2 N.Y. Yankees 5, Tampa Bay 4 Toronto 4, Baltimore 2 Texas 8, Boston 4 Minnesota 7, Chicago White Sox 4 Oakland 5, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 3, Seattle 2 Today’s Games Detroit (Verlander 11-5) at Cleveland (Carmona 8-7), 10:05 a.m., 1st game Tampa Bay (Niemann 7-2) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 7-7), 1:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 4-7) at Cleveland (Talbot 8-8), 4:05 p.m., 2nd game Toronto (Morrow 5-6) at Baltimore (Guthrie 3-10), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 8-7) at Minnesota (Pavano 10-6), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Cahill 9-3) at Kansas City (Chen 5-3), 4:10 p.m. Texas (Cl.Lee 8-4) at Boston (Lackey 9-5), 4:10 p.m. Seattle (Rowland-Smith 1-9) at L.A. Angels (J.Saunders 6-9), 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, 10:05 a.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Texas at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Toronto at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Minnesota, 11:10 a.m. Oakland at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m. Seattle at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 53 37 .589 — New York 48 42 .533 5 Philadelphia 47 42 .528 5½ Florida 42 47 .472 10½ Washington 40 50 .444 13 Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 50 41 .549 — St. Louis 49 41 .544 ½ Chicago 41 50 .451 9 Milwaukee 41 50 .451 9 Houston 37 53 .411 12½ Pittsburgh 30 59 .337 19 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 52 37 .584 — Colorado 49 40 .551 3 Los Angeles 49 41 .544 3½ San Francisco 49 41 .544 3½ Arizona 34 56 .378 18½ ——— Friday’s Games Chicago Cubs 4, Philadelphia 3 Houston 5, Pittsburgh 2 Cincinnati 3, Colorado 2 Washington 4, Florida 0 Milwaukee 9, Atlanta 3 St. Louis 8, L.A. Dodgers 4 San Diego 12, Arizona 1 San Francisco 1, N.Y. Mets 0 Today’s Games Philadelphia (Hamels 7-7) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 47), 10:05 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 7-7) at St. Louis (Wainwright 135), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Norris 2-6) at Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 1-7), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (De La Rosa 3-1) at Cincinnati (Volquez 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 7-6) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 9-4), 4:10 p.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 6-5) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 9-3), 4:10 p.m. Arizona (R.Lopez 5-7) at San Diego (Richard 6-4), 5:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Takahashi 7-3) at San Francisco (Cain 6-8), 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Colorado at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Washington at Florida, 10:10 a.m. Houston at Pittsburgh, 10:35 a.m. Milwaukee at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 11:15 a.m. Arizona at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago Cubs, 5:05 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Rangers 8, Red Sox 4 BOSTON — Bengie Molina hit for the cycle with a grand slam and triple in his last two at-bats and Texas came up with another big inning against Boston pitching. Molina’s slam came in a five-run fifth inning and gave Texas a 7-3 lead. The AL West-leading Rangers lost their last four games before the All-Star break but returned to take the first two of a four-game series against the Red Sox, who have lost seven of nine as injuries severely weakened their lineup.

Yankees 5, Rays 4 NEW YORK — Nick Swisher’s game-winning single with two outs in the ninth inning gave New York a win over Tampa Bay and capped an emotional night that saw the Yankees pay tribute to late owner George Steinbrenner and former public address announcer Bob Sheppard.Swisher hit a tying home run in the eighth, then lined a single that sent Curtis Granderson sliding home for the victory in a matchup of the teams with the best records in baseball. Tampa Bay B.Upton cf Crawford lf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Zobrist 2b Shoppach c W.Aybar dh Kapler rf Bartlett ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 4 4 1 4 4 33

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 4

H BI BB SO 2 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 3 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 9 3 4 10

Avg. .234 .322 .299 .201 .284 .203 .248 .212 .236

New York Jeter ss Swisher rf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Granderson cf Miranda dh a-R.Pena ph Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 5 2 4 4 3 4 3 0 2 32

R 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 5

H BI BB 0 0 0 3 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 5 5

Avg. .270 .303 .253 .269 .335 .266 .240 .204 .195 .307

SO 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 8

Tampa Bay 011 010 100 — 4 9 0 New York 001 002 011 — 5 7 2 Two outs when winning run scored. E—A.Rodriguez (6), Swisher (3). LOB—Tampa Bay 8, New York 7. 2B—Longoria (28). HR—Cano (17), off J.Shields; Posada (10), off J.Shields; Swisher (16), off Benoit. RBIs—Longoria (62), Zobrist (42), W.Aybar (24), Swisher 3 (52), Cano (59), Posada (30). S—W.Aybar, R.Pena. SF—W.Aybar. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 5 (C.Pena, Zobrist, Bartlett, Shoppach 2); New York 1 (Cano). Runners moved up—Crawford, Zobrist, Jeter. GIDP—Longoria. DP—New York 1 (A.Rodriguez, Cano, Teixeira). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Shields 6 4 3 3 3 5 96 4.86 Balfour H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.09 Benoit BS, 1-2 1 1 1 1 1 1 25 0.94 Choate L, 2-3 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 17 6.26 Wheeler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.14 Cormier 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 4.37 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 8 4 3 4 6 113 3.13 D.Robertson 1 0 0 0 0 3 12 5.28 M.Rivera W, 3-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.02 Cormier pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Wheeler 2-0, Cormier 21. IBB—off Sabathia (Longoria). T—3:28. A—47,524 (50,287).

Angels 3, Mariners 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Los Angeles’ Jered Weaver outpitched Felix Hernandez for the third time this season in a matchup of the AL’s strikeout leaders. Weaver (9-5) allowed two runs and six hits over seven innings and had five strikeouts, increasing his major league-leading total to 142. The right-hander is trying to become the first Angels pitcher to lead the majors in strikeouts since 1977, when all-time strikeout king Nolan Ryan had 341. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman dh Smoak 1b M.Saunders lf Ro.Johnson c Ja.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 7 2 0

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh Napoli 1b J.Rivera lf Frandsen 3b J.Mathis c Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 31

R H 1 1 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3 10

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 6

Avg. .322 .232 .259 .237 .214 .208 .228 .204 .252

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .288 .280 .260 .292 .252 .247 .245 .288 .250

SO 2 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .274 .303 .305 .325 .347 .311 .264 .290 .277 .228 .206

Seattle 000 000 200 — 2 7 1 Los Angeles 012 000 00x — 3 10 0 E—Ro.Johnson (3). LOB—Seattle 3, Los Angeles 5. 2B—H.Kendrick 2 (25), H.Matsui (14), Napoli (14). HR—Smoak (9), off Jer.Weaver. RBIs—Smoak 2 (36), B.Abreu (51), Frandsen (10). SB—F.Gutierrez (11), E.Aybar (15). CS—Figgins (5), M.Saunders (2). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 1 (Figgins); Los Angeles 4 (Tor.Hunter, J.Mathis, J.Rivera, H.Kendrick). GIDP—Tor.Hunter, H.Matsui. DP—Seattle 2 (Jo.Lopez, Figgins, Smoak), (Figgins, Ja.Wilson, Smoak).

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 8 3 2 10

Avg. .278 .204 .260 .295 .279 .332 .294 .240 .111 .000

Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hernandez L, 7-6 8 10 3 3 0 3 100 2.90 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jer.Weaver W, 9-5 7 6 2 2 0 5 100 3.16 Rodney H, 15 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.47 Fuentes S, 17-21 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 4.10 HBP—by F.Hernandez (E.Aybar). WP—Jer.Weaver. T—2:22. A—41,449 (45,285).

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh Hamilton cf N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf B.Molina c 1-J.Arias pr Treanor c C.Davis 1b Totals

AB 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 0 0 4 37

R H 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 12

Boston Scutaro ss E.Patterson cf D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b J.Drew rf A.Beltre 3b Nava lf Hall 2b Cash c a-Shealy ph Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 3 4 3 4 3 1 34

R 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 0 0 0 8

BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

Texas 200 050 010 — 8 12 0 Boston 020 101 000 — 4 8 2 a-grounded out for Cash in the 9th. 1-ran for B.Molina in the 8th. E—Doubront 2 (3). LOB—Texas 8, Boston 6. 2B— N.Cruz (14), B.Molina (1), Youkilis 2 (21). 3B—B.Molina (1). HR—B.Molina (2), off F.Cabrera; A.Beltre (14), off C.Lewis. RBIs—M.Young (55), Kinsler (31), N.Cruz (45), Dav.Murphy (25), B.Molina 4 (6), J.Drew 2 (45), A.Beltre (56). SF—M.Young, J.Drew. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 5 (M.Young, Andrus, Dav.Murphy 2, Kinsler); Boston 4 (Scutaro 2, Nava 2). Runners moved up—M.Young, Hamilton, C.Davis. GIDP—Kinsler. DP—Boston 1 (A.Beltre, Hall, Youkilis). Texas IP C.Lewis W, 9-5 5 Harrison 1

O’Day H, 12 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.45 F.Francisco 1 2 0 0 0 1 24 4.17 N.Feliz 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.72 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Doubront L, 1-2 4 2-3 7 4 2 2 5 92 4.11 F.Cabrera 1 1-3 2 3 3 2 0 29 20.25 Okajima 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 5.79 R.Ramirez 1 1 1 1 1 1 24 4.78 Richardson 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 2.70 Inherited runners-scored—F.Cabrera 2-2. WP— C.Lewis, Doubront 2, Okajima, R.Ramirez. T—3:21 (Rain delay: 1:00). A—37,669 (37,402).

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 4 3 3 1 7 104 3.42 1 1 1 1 1 24 4.56

Indians 8, Tigers 2 CLEVELAND — Andy Marte and Austin Kearns hit two-run homers for Cleveland. Marte broke at 2-2 tie in the fourth inning against Max Scherzer (6-7). Kearns’ eighth homer of the season capped a four-run sixth against the Tigers’ bullpen that put Cleveland ahead 8-2. Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b

AB 4 4 4 3

R 1 0 1 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1

SO 0 1 2 1

Avg. .303 .274 .315 .346

Boesch lf C.Guillen 2b Inge 3b Avila c Santiago ss Totals

4 3 4 3 3 32

0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 1 0 0 7

1 0 0 0 0 2

0 1 0 0 0 2

1 0 1 1 0 7

.336 .284 .264 .218 .264

Cleveland Brantley cf J.Nix 2b C.Santana c Hafner dh a-Duncan ph-dh Kearns rf LaPorta 1b Crowe lf A.Marte 3b Donald ss Totals

AB 5 5 2 3 1 5 3 3 3 4 34

R H 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 8 10

BI 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 2 1 8

BB 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 6

SO 0 3 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 9

Avg. .123 .204 .278 .250 .270 .269 .250 .255 .191 .273

Detroit 100 100 000 — 2 7 1 Cleveland 020 204 00x — 8 10 0 E—Inge (6). LOB—Detroit 5, Cleveland 9. 2B—Ordonez (16), Crowe (11), Donald (13). 3B—A.Jackson (5), Crowe (3). HR—A.Marte (3), off Scherzer; Kearns (8), off B.Thomas. RBIs—Mi.Cabrera (78), Boesch (50), C.Santana (17), Hafner (30), Kearns 2 (40), Crowe (21), A.Marte 2 (11), Donald (13). SB—A.Jackson (15), C.Santana (2). CS—C.Guillen (2), Inge (3). SF—C.Santana. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Boesch, Mi.Cabrera); Cleveland 4 (Kearns, LaPorta, C.Santana, A.Marte). Runners moved up—Mi.Cabrera, Boesch, Brantley. DP—Cleveland 1 (C.Santana, C.Santana, Donald). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer L, 6-7 5 5 4 4 5 7 109 4.74 Weinhardt 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 13 6.23 B.Thomas 2-3 2 2 2 0 0 9 4.50 E.Gonzalez 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 2.08 Schlereth 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.45 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrk W, 6-5 5 2-3 5 2 2 1 5 105 4.67 J.Smith 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 5.17 Sipp H, 9 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 19 5.29 Herrmann 1 2 0 0 0 1 19 2.65 R.Perez 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.94 J.Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—B.Thomas 2-2, J.Smith 1-0, Sipp 2-0. WP—Scherzer. T—3:03. A—22,295 (45,569).

Blue Jays 4, Orioles 2 BALTIMORE — Ricky Romero allowed five hits in seven innings and Aaron Hill homered as Toronto ended Baltimore’s fourgame winning streak. Fred Lewis had two hits and scored twice for the Blue Jays, who improved to 70 against the Orioles this season, including 4-0 in Baltimore. Toronto was 1-8 at Camden Yards last year. Toronto AB R H F.Lewis lf 4 2 2 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 1 J.Bautista rf 5 0 0 V.Wells cf 3 0 1 Lind dh 4 0 1 A.Hill 2b 4 2 3 Overbay 1b 3 0 1 J.Buck c 4 0 1 Encarnacion 3b 4 0 0 Totals 35 4 10 Baltimore C.Patterson dh M.Tejada 3b Markakis rf Wigginton 1b 1-S.Moore pr-1b Ad.Jones cf Pie lf Tatum c Lugo 2b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 0 4 4 4 4 3 34

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BI 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 4

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 4

Avg. .279 .250 .233 .266 .215 .196 .251 .272 .216

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 7 1 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 1 8

Avg. .283 .276 .305 .255 .254 .273 .350 .231 .266 .236

Toronto 111 001 000 — 4 10 2 Baltimore 000 020 000 — 2 7 1 1-ran for Wigginton in the 8th. E—Encarnacion (9), F.Lewis (3), M.Tejada (15). LOB—Toronto 8, Baltimore 6. 2B—F.Lewis (25), A.Hill (13), Overbay (19), Wigginton (14), Pie (3). HR—A.Hill (13), off Bergesen. RBIs—V.Wells (50), Lind (41), A.Hill (34), Overbay (32), Lugo (14). SF—V.Wells. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (A.Hill, F.Lewis 2); Baltimore 5 (C.Patterson 2, C.Izturis, Ad.Jones 2). Runners moved up—Encarnacion. GIDP—V.Wells, Encarnacion, Markakis. DP—Toronto 1 (Overbay, Y.Escobar, Overbay); Baltimore 2 (M.Tejada, Lugo, Wigginton), (Albers, Lugo, Wigginton). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romero W, 7-6 7 5 2 0 1 5 95 3.50 S.Downs H, 17 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.61 Camp H, 9 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 10 2.51 Gregg S, 21-24 1 0 0 0 0 1 6 3.57 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergesen L, 3-7 6 9 4 4 2 3 92 6.37 Albers 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 4.63 Ohman 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.67 Uehara 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 3.60 Da.Hernandez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 4.43 Inherited runners-scored—Camp 1-0, Uehara 1-0, Da.Hernandez 1-0. PB—Tatum. T—2:44. A—18,120 (48,290).

Twins 7, White Sox 4 MINNEAPOLIS — Francisco Liriano gave Minnesota a big lift on the mound and Chicago’s faulty fielding led to the end of the White Sox’s nine-game winning streak. Liriano (7-7) left with two outs in the eighth inning. The Twins had lost Liriano’s last five starts. Chicago Pierre lf Al.Ramirez ss Rios cf Konerko 1b An.Jones rf Pierzynski c Viciedo 3b Lillibridge dh Beckham 2b Totals

AB 3 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 35

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 4

H BI BB SO 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 8 4 5 10

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Kubel rf Cuddyer 1b Thome dh 1-Repko pr-dh Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 5 2 1 3 4 3 37

R H 0 1 1 2 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 3 1 0 7 12

BI 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 6

BB 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .263 .277 .304 .297 .205 .244 .295 .423 .225 Avg. .274 .284 .300 .262 .266 .257 .300 .303 .246 .244

Chicago 000 010 012 — 4 8 4 Minnesota 000 400 03x — 7 12 1 1-ran for Thome in the 7th. E—Floyd (2), T.Pena (2), Beckham (10), Viciedo (2), Hardy (2). LOB—Chicago 9, Minnesota 11. 2B— Konerko (17), Beckham (14), Hardy (8). RBIs—Pierre (16), Al.Ramirez (34), Konerko (64), Beckham (25), Span (39), O.Hudson (25), Mauer 2 (40), Cuddyer (41), Hardy (16). S—Punto. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 5 (An. Jones 2, Rios, Konerko 2); Minnesota 5 (Punto 2, Mauer, Hardy, Repko). Runners moved up—Rios. GIDP—Al.Ramirez. DP—Minnesota 1 (Hardy, O.Hudson, Cuddyer). Chicago Floyd L, 5-8 Threets T.Pena Linebrink Minnesota Liriano W, 7-7 Guerrier H, 14 Rauch

IP 5 1 2-3 2-3 2-3 IP 7 2-3 1-3 1-3

H 7 2 2 1 H 6 0 2

R 4 0 3 0 R 2 0 2

ER 1 0 1 0 ER 2 0 2

BB 3 0 1 0 BB 2 0 3

SO 5 0 0 0 SO 8 0 1

NP 102 24 19 8 NP 106 4 23

ERA 4.10 0.00 4.76 4.80 ERA 3.76 2.88 2.88

Crain S, 1-2 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.65 Inherited runners-scored—T.Pena 1-0, Linebrink 2-1, Guerrier 1-0, Crain 3-0. IBB—off Floyd (Thome). WP—Liriano. T—3:09. A—40,427 (39,504).

Athletics 5, Royals 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Gio Gonzalez outdueled Zack Greinke and Oakland took advantage of the umpires’ reversal of a call in the first inning. Kevin Kouzmanoff had a two-run single for the Athletics while Gonzalez (8-6) allowed seven hits and one walk in seven innings. Relievers Craig Breslow and Michael Wuertz each pitched a shutout inning. Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b K.Suzuki c Cust dh Kouzmanoff 3b M.Ellis 2b Gross rf R.Davis lf Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 3 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 31

R 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 7 4 5

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

Avg. .271 .269 .253 .288 .269 .283 .258 .268 .262

Kansas City Podsednik lf Kendall c DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Aviles 2b Bloomquist cf Y.Betancourt ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 34

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 7 0 1

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .300 .270 .322 .321 .276 .277 .299 .230 .259

Oakland 113 000 000 — 5 7 1 Kansas City 100 000 000 — 1 7 2 E—M.Ellis (1), Greinke (1), Y.Betancourt (11). LOB— Oakland 6, Kansas City 7. 2B—Crisp (4), Kouzmanoff (17), Podsednik (7). RBIs—Cust (19), Kouzmanoff 2 (42), M.Ellis (23). SB—K.Suzuki (2), R.Davis (28). CS—K.Suzuki (1). S—Barton. SF—Cust. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (Barton 2, Gross); Kansas City 4 (Y.Betancourt 3, Kendall). Runners moved up—Crisp. GIDP—R.Davis, DeJesus. DP—Oakland 1 (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton); Kansas City 1 (Y.Betancourt, Aviles, B.Butler). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO G.Gonzalez W, 8-6 7 7 1 1 1 3.63 Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 2 Wuertz 1 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO Greinke L, 5-9 6 4 5 2 4 3 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 0 0 Tejeda 1 2 0 0 0 0 Soria 1 0 0 0 1 0 WP—G.Gonzalez, Farnsworth. Balk—Soria. T—2:33. A—37,312 (37,840).

NP ERA 3 99 11 6 NP 93 15 17 11

3.24 5.30 ERA 3.67 2.35 3.27 2.25

NL ROUNDUP Padres 12, Diamondbacks 1 SAN DIEGO — Adrian Gonzalez hit a two-run homer to key a five-run outburst and Jon Garland threw six strong innings to lead San Diego. Gonzalez put the NL West leaders ahead 2-1 in the fourth when he connected off Dan Haren (7-8) for his 19th homer. San Diego added three more runs in the inning. Arizona C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf Montero c M.Reynolds 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b S.Drew ss G.Parra lf Haren p Boyer p Vasquez p c-Ojeda ph Norberto p Heilman p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 30

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 2

SO 0 0 1 2 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .263 .278 .259 .333 .212 .251 .272 .266 .377 .000 .000 .146 --.000

San Diego AB Hairston Jr. ss-2b 4 Eckstein 2b 5 Salazar 1b 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 Frieri p 0 Headley 3b 4 Hundley c 4 Hairston lf 4 Cunningham rf 3 Gwynn cf 2 Garland p 2 a-Durango ph 1 Thatcher p 0 b-Stairs ph 1 Mujica p 0 d-E.Cabrera ph-ss 1 Totals 35

R 1 1 0 3 0 4 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 12

H 1 2 0 2 0 3 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 14

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .248 .281 .226 .303 --.275 .257 .241 .339 .219 .194 .429 --.196 --.204

BI 2 0 0 2 0 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 12

BB 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Arizona 100 000 000 — 1 4 0 San Diego 000 510 24x — 12 14 0 a-singled for Garland in the 6th. b-grounded into a double play for Thatcher in the 7th. c-singled for Vasquez in the 8th. d-singled for Mujica in the 8th. LOB—Arizona 4, San Diego 10. 2B—J.Upton (14), Eckstein (20), Headley (17), Hairston (9). HR— Ad.Gonzalez (19), off Haren; Headley (7), off Haren. RBIs—J.Upton (43), Hairston Jr. 2 (34), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (58), Headley (32), Hundley (27), Hairston 3 (31), Cunningham (13), Gwynn (17), E.Cabrera (17). SB—Eckstein (6), Durango (1). SF—Cunningham. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 2 (M.Reynolds, Montero); San Diego 7 (Headley, Eckstein 2, Stairs 2, Hairston Jr. 2). Runners moved up—J.Upton, Montero, Hundley. GIDP—K.Johnson, Gwynn, Stairs. DP—Arizona 2 (K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche), (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche); San Diego 1 (Hairston Jr., Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren L, 7-8 5 8 6 6 1 8 97 4.60 Boyer 1 1-3 5 2 2 2 0 31 5.22 Vasquez 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 4.65 Norberto 1-3 0 3 3 3 0 24 9.00 Heilman 2-3 1 1 1 2 0 33 3.98 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garland W, 9-6 6 3 1 1 2 5 112 3.45 Thatcher 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.93 Mujica 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.93 Frieri 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Vasquez 2-0, Heilman 3-3. IBB—off Haren (Gwynn). HBP—by Heilman (Hairston). T—3:13. A—33,177 (42,691).

Giants 1, Mets 0 SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito struck out 10 in eight dominant innings of two-hit ball and San Francisco shut out New York for the second consecutive game. All-Star closer Brian Wilson completed the threehitter for San Francisco, which has won four straight and nine of 11. Aubrey Huff had three hits and scored the only run on a fielder’s choice grounder.

New York R.Tejada ss c-Carter ph Bay lf D.Wright 3b Beltran cf Francoeur rf I.Davis 1b Barajas c Cora 2b a-Turner ph-2b Niese p b-Pagan ph Parnell p Totals

AB 3 1 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 0 1 1 0 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 12

Avg. .224 .264 .263 .309 .250 .250 .252 .235 .220 --.179 .310 .000

San Francisco AB Torres rf-lf 4 Renteria ss 4 A.Huff 1b 3 Br.Wilson p 0 Posey c 4 Burrell lf 2 1-Schierholtz pr-rf 0 Uribe 2b 3 Sandoval 3b 3 Rowand cf 2 Zito p 2 Ishikawa 1b 0 Totals 27

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 3

Avg. .277 .298 .302 .000 .352 .290 .247 .246 .264 .240 .167 .333

SO 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

New York 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 San Francisco 000 100 00x — 1 7 0 a-walked for Cora in the 8th. b-flied out for Niese in the 8th. c-struck out for R.Tejada in the 9th. 1-ran for Burrell in the 6th. LOB—New York 4, San Francisco 6. 2B—Beltran (1), Renteria (7), Posey (6). RBIs—Burrell (12). CS— R.Tejada (2). S—Zito. Runners left in scoring position—New York 1 (Francoeur); San Francisco 4 (Posey, Sandoval, Uribe, Torres). GIDP—Posey 2, Uribe. DP—New York 4 (Cora, R.Tejada, I.Davis), (R.Tejada, Cora, I.Davis), (Francoeur, I.Davis), (R.Tejada, Turner, I.Davis). New York IP H R Niese L, 6-4 7 6 1 Parnell 1 1 0 San Fran. IP H R Zito W, 8-4 8 2 0 Wilson S, 24 1 1 0 T—2:13. A—41,869 (41,915).

ER 1 0 ER 0 0

BB 3 0 BB 2 0

SO 4 0 SO 10 2

NP 103 7 NP 112 17

ERA 3.44 1.42 ERA 3.51 1.86

Cardinals 8, Dodgers 4 ST. LOUIS — Yadier Molina homered and drove in four runs, matching his RBI total from the previous 25 games, helping St. Louis overcome a rough start by rookie Jaime Garcia. Chad Billingsley (7-5) was the second straight Dodgers starter to get cuffed around by the Cardinals, allowing seven runs and 10 hits in four innings. It was the second-shortest outing of the season for the right-hander, who has a 1.09 ERA in four day games but a 5.76 ERA in 13 night starts. Los Angeles Furcal ss Kemp cf Ethier rf Man.Ramirez lf Paul lf Blake 3b Loney 1b R.Martin c Link p e-Belliard ph J.Carroll 2b Billingsley p Sherrill p b-DeWitt ph Monasterios p d-G.Anderson ph A.Ellis c Totals

AB 4 4 5 0 4 5 5 4 0 1 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 39

R H 0 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 13

BI 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .331 .261 .324 .317 .258 .255 .310 .241 --.218 .297 .152 --.269 .143 .184 .214

St. Louis F.Lopez 3b Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Winn rf Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b J.Garcia p McClellan p a-Craig ph Boggs p T.Miller p c-Miles ph Motte p D.Reyes p Franklin p Greene ss Totals

AB 5 4 5 2 4 4 4 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4 35

R H 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 8 14

BI 1 0 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .271 .284 .311 .304 .262 .231 .255 .194 .500 .091 .000 --.333 .000 .000 .000 .286

Los Angeles 002 000 020 — 4 13 0 St. Louis 311 120 00x — 8 14 0 a-singled for McClellan in the 5th. b-grounded out for Sherrill in the 6th. c-lined out for T.Miller in the 7th. d-singled for Monasterios in the 8th. e-struck out for Link in the 9th. LOB—Los Angeles 12, St. Louis 7. 2B—Kemp (18), Paul (6), Loney (26). 3B—J.Carroll (1), Winn (1). HR—Y.Molina (4), off Sherrill. RBIs—Furcal (36), Kemp (52), Blake (37), Loney (64), F.Lopez (24), Winn 2 (4), Y.Molina 4 (38). SB—Furcal (15). CS—Y.Molina (4). S—J.Garcia. SF—Kemp. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 9 (Blake 2, Billingsley, R.Martin 2, Ethier 3, Belliard); St. Louis 2 (J.Garcia, Winn). Runners moved up—Pujols. GIDP—Rasmus. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Furcal, Loney). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Billngsly L, 7-5 4 10 7 7 2 0 67 4.61 Sherrill 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 7.17 Monasterios 2 1 0 0 1 0 23 3.75 Link 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 3.18 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia 3 1-3 8 2 2 1 4 82 2.27 McCllln W, 1-2 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 17 2.05 Boggs 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.41 T.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.86 Motte 2-3 2 2 2 2 1 34 2.72 D.Reyes H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.51 Franklin 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 3.53 Boggs pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Billingsley pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Sherrill 1-1, McClellan 2-0, T.Miller 1-0, D.Reyes 2-0. WP—D.Reyes. T—3:11. A—44,074 (43,975).

Brewers 9, Braves 3 ATLANTA — Ryan Braun’s two-run homer helped Milwaukee to an early lead and Randy Wolf earned his first win over Atlanta in seven years. Wolf (7-8) allowed seven hits and three runs in six innings for his first win over the Braves since Sept. 9, 2003, also at Turner Field. Wolf improved to 5-12 in his career against Atlanta. Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Kottaras c Gomez cf A.Escobar ss Braddock p Loe p c-L.Cain ph Hoffman p Ra.Wolf p Coffey p Counsell ss

AB 6 4 5 4 5 5 4 4 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

R 0 2 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 1 1 1 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

Avg. .270 .293 .291 .262 .278 .207 .239 .244 --.000 .000 --.262 .000 .242

Totals

41 9 16 8

Atlanta AB R Prado 2b 5 1 Heyward rf 4 1 C.Jones 3b 3 0 Kawakami p 0 0 J.Chavez p 0 0 d-Hinske ph 1 0 Glaus 1b 3 0 McCann c 4 0 D.Ross c 0 0 M.Diaz lf 4 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 1 Me.Cabrera cf 3 0 Hanson p 1 0 a-Infante ph 1 0 Medlen p 0 0 M.Dunn p 0 0 b-Conrad ph-3b 2 0 Totals 34 3

2

9

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 2 4

SO 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .323 .247 .250 .087 .000 .274 .258 .270 .279 .218 .333 .263 .152 .330 .182 --.257

Milwaukee 022 002 030 — 9 16 1 Atlanta 000 101 100 — 3 8 2 a-grounded out for Hanson in the 5th. b-singled for M.Dunn in the 7th. c-lined out for Loe in the 9th. dgrounded out for J.Chavez in the 9th. E—Gomez (4), Glaus (7), Me.Cabrera (3). LOB—Milwaukee 10, Atlanta 9. 2B—Fielder (15), McGehee (21), Gomez (8), Glaus (14). 3B—Prado (3). HR—Braun (14), off Hanson. RBIs—Weeks (54), Braun 2 (56), Fielder 2 (41), McGehee (54), A.Escobar (25), Ra.Wolf (4), Glaus (59), McCann (38). SB—A.Escobar (8). S—Ra.Wolf. SF—Ra.Wolf. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Weeks 2, Braun, A.Escobar); Atlanta 5 (McCann, M.Diaz, Glaus 2, Conrad). GIDP—McCann. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Weeks, A.Escobar, Fielder). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ra.Wolf W, 7-8 6 7 3 3 3 4 81 4.56 Coffey H, 8 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 4.33 Braddock H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.72 Loe H, 8 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 1.50 Hoffman 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 8.04 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson L, 8-6 5 6 4 3 1 5 84 4.19 Medlen 1 3 2 1 0 2 25 3.22 M.Dunn 1 1 0 0 1 2 18 0.00 Kawakami 1 5 3 3 0 0 22 4.75 J.Chavez 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 5.45 Ra.Wolf pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Coffey 2-0, Braddock 2-0, Loe 3-0. HBP—by Loe (Ale.Gonzalez), by Hanson (Fielder). PB—Kottaras. T—3:08. A—37,014 (49,743).

Nationals 4, Marlins 0 MIAMI — Stephen Strasburg struggled through a 34-pitch first inning but escaped early jams to lead Washington past Florida. Strasburg (4-2) allowed two baserunners in each of the first three innings, walking three and throwing the first wild pitch of his career. He finished with seven strikeouts in six innings and lowered his ERA to 2.03. Two relievers completed a four-hitter. Making his eighth major league start and facing Florida for the first time, Strasburg was locked in a scoreless duel with Ricky Nolasco (9-7) until Josh Willingham hit a three-run double in the sixth. Washington AB Morgan cf 4 C.Guzman 2b 4 Storen p 0 Capps p 0 Zimmerman 3b 4 A.Dunn 1b 3 A.Kennedy 1b 0 Willingham lf 4 I.Rodriguez c 3 Bernadina rf 4 Desmond ss 4 Strasburg p 2 a-Alb.Gonzalez ph-2b .299 Totals 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

8

1

9

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Uggla 2b Cantu 3b C.Ross cf Stanton rf R.Paulino c Nolasco p Sanches p Tankersley p Marinez p b-Lamb ph Badenhop p Totals

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 5

SO 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

AB 4 3 2 3 4 4 3 4 1 0 0 0 1 0 29

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 4

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 2 2 0

Avg. .252 .294 .500 .000 .294 .291 .242 .281 .292 .276 .255 .071 0

Avg. .265 .299 .302 .285 .257 .281 .225 .282 .121 ------.189 .000

Stubbs cf Hanigan c Arroyo p Rhodes p F.Cordero p Totals

3 3 3 0 0 31

0 0 0 0 0 3

1 0 0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 3

0 2 .236 0 1 .321 0 3 .200 0 0 --0 0 --2 10

Colorado 000 000 110 — 2 5 0 Cincinnati 002 010 00x — 3 8 0 a-was announced for Hammel in the 8th. b-walked for Hawpe in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Giambi (7), B.Phillips (25), O.Cabrera (21), Votto (16), Stubbs (8). HR—Olivo (12), off Arroyo. RBIs—Giambi (20), Olivo (43), O.Cabrera 2 (33), Gomes (61). SB—B.Phillips (11), Rolen (1). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 3 (S.Smith, C.Gonzalez 2); Cincinnati 3 (Gomes, Arroyo, Bruce). Runners moved up—O.Cabrera, Rolen, Hanigan. GIDP—C.Gonzalez. DP—Colorado 1 (C.Gonzalez, C.Gonzalez, Stewart); Cincinnati 1 (O.Cabrera, Votto). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hammel L, 7-4 7 8 3 3 1 10 100 4.07 Corpas 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 6 4.56 Beimel 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.22 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo W, 10-4 7 5 2 2 1 4 93 3.96 Rhodes H, 16 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 1.50 Cordero S, 25 1 0 0 0 1 1 20 4.10 Arroyo pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Beimel 1-0, Rhodes 2-0. T—2:39. A—37,188 (42,319).

Astros 5, Pirates 2 PITTSBURGH — Jeff Keppinger homered and had three RBIs and Brett Myers allowed two runs while working into the eighth inning and Houston remained unbeaten in seven games against Pittsburgh this season. Myers (7-6) extended his club record for consecutive starts of at least six innings to begin a season to 19, allowing two runs and five hits in 7 2⁄3 innings, striking out four and walking one. Houston AB R Bourgeois lf 4 2 Bourn cf 4 0 Keppinger 2b 4 1 Berkman 1b 4 0 Pence rf 3 2 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 Ang.Sanchez ss 3 0 Quintero c 4 0 Myers p 2 0 Lyon p 0 0 c-P.Feliz ph 1 0 Lindstrom p 0 0 Totals 33 5

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 5 2 11

Avg. .304 .252 .287 .251 .267 .280 .200 .239 .111 --.219 ---

Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Tabata lf N.Walker 2b G.Jones 1b Alvarez 3b Doumit c Milledge rf Cedeno ss Duke p Carrasco p a-An.LaRoche ph Gallagher p Ja.Lopez p Meek p b-Church ph Donnelly p Totals

H BI BB 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1

Avg. .290 .250 .269 .269 .216 .257 .277 .226 .087 .000 .229 .000 .000 --.185 ---

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

Houston 110 002 100 — 5 8 0 Pittsburgh 000 100 010 — 2 6 0 a-walked for Carrasco in the 6th. b-grounded out for Meek in the 8th. c-struck out for Lyon in the 9th. LOB—Houston 5, Pittsburgh 4. 2B—Keppinger (24), Quintero (8), A.McCutchen (17), Milledge (17). HR—Keppinger (4), off Carrasco. RBIs—Keppinger 3 (34), Ang.Sanchez (1), Quintero (11), A.McCutchen (30), N.Walker (13). SB—Bourgeois 2 (5). S—Ang.Sanchez, Myers. SF—N.Walker. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 4 (Myers, Bourn, Quintero, Berkman); Pittsburgh 1 (N.Walker). Runners moved up—Bourn, Keppinger, Tabata, Church. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers W, 7-6 7 2-3 5 2 2 1 4 93 3.35 Lyon H, 17 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 3.63 Lindstrm S, 22 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 2.72 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duke L, 3-9 5 5 2 2 0 5 78 5.38 Carrasco 1 2 2 2 1 1 26 4.05 Gallagher 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 17 5.47 Ja.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.76 Meek 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 1.09 Donnelly 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 5.14 Inherited runners-scored—Lyon 1-0, Ja.Lopez 1-0. WP—Duke, Carrasco. Balk—Gallagher. T—2:37. A—23,273 (38,362).

Cubs 4, Phillies 3

Washington 000 004 000 — 4 8 0 Florida 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-doubled for Strasburg in the 7th. b-popped out for Marinez in the 7th. LOB—Washington 4, Florida 8. 2B—Willingham (14), Alb.Gonzalez (5). RBIs—Willingham 3 (49), I.Rodriguez (28). SB—Morgan (21). CS—Desmond (3), H.Ramirez (6). S—Nolasco. SF—I.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 2 (Willingham, C.Guzman); Florida 4 (Cantu, Coghlan 2, C.Ross). Runners moved up—Morgan, Cantu. DP—Florida 1 (R.Paulino, R.Paulino, H.Ramirez). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Strasbrg W, 4-2 6 4 0 0 3 7 99 2.03 Storen 2 0 0 0 1 1 23 2.28 Capps 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 3.10 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco L, 9-7 5 1-3 7 4 4 1 8 93 4.66 Sanches 1 1 0 0 0 1 22 3.00 Tankersley 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.38 Marinez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Badenhop 2 0 0 0 0 0 15 5.26 Inherited runners-scored—Sanches 1-1, Tankersley 1-0, Marinez 1-0. WP—Strasburg. T—2:52. A—27,037 (38,560).

Reds 3, Rockies 2 CINCINNATI — Brandon Phillips followed his first All-Star appearance with a three-hit game and firsttime All-Star Arthur Rhodes pitched out of a basesloaded, no-outs threat in the eighth inning. The NL Central leaders hadn’t played a home game all month and had dropped five of its last six on the road. Colorado Fowler cf J.Herrera 2b C.Gonzalez rf Giambi 1b S.Smith lf Olivo c Stewart 3b Barmes ss Hammel p a-Hawpe ph b-Spilborghs ph Corpas p Beimel p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 0 0 0 0 31

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 3

SO 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .228 .316 .313 .274 .282 .325 .255 .258 .148 .274 .260 .000 .000

Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Bruce rf

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4

R 2 0 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 3 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 2 0 2

Avg. .299 .248 .314 .287 .277 .263

CHICAGO — Aramis Ramirez homered with two outs in the eighth inning — his third hit of the game — to cap Chicago’s rally. Ramirez’s 11th homer came off Ryan Madson (2-1) and gave him 14 RBIs in his last eight games. Ryan Howard hit his 20th homer with two outs in the sixth, his third home run in two games and it put the Phils up 3-1. Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Werth rf Howard 1b B.Francisco lf Ransom 3b C.Ruiz c W.Valdez 2b Blanton p b-Ju.Castro ph Madson p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 2 1 0 31

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Chicago AB R Theriot 2b 4 0 Colvin rf 4 0 D.Lee 1b 4 0 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 3 Byrd cf 4 1 A.Soriano lf 2 0 S.Castro ss 3 0 Soto c 2 0 Lilly p 1 0 a-Fukudome ph 1 0 Marshall p 0 0 Marmol p 0 0 Totals 29 4

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 3 1 14

Avg. .240 .252 .276 .297 .232 .222 .277 .251 .172 .198 .000

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 4 3

Avg. .276 .262 .236 .220 .318 .273 .281 .280 .000 .251 .000 ---

SO 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 8

Philadelphia 000 102 000 — 3 4 1 Chicago 000 012 01x — 4 6 0 a-struck out for Lilly in the 7th. b-struck out for Blanton in the 8th. E—Blanton (1). LOB—Philadelphia 2, Chicago 4. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (12). HR—Victorino (15), off Lilly; Howard (20), off Lilly; Byrd (10), off Blanton; Ar.Ramirez (11), off Madson. RBIs—Victorino (50), Howard 2 (71), Ar.Ramirez (37), Byrd 2 (42), Lilly (1). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 1 (Blanton); Chicago 3 (Theriot 3). Runners moved up—S.Castro, Soto. GIDP— A.Soriano. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Ransom, W.Valdez, Howard). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blanton 7 5 3 3 3 8 109 6.21 Madson L, 2-1 1 1 1 1 0 0 16 6.57 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly 7 4 3 3 1 10 110 4.07 Marshll W, 6-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.96 Marmol S, 17 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.11 IBB—off Blanton (Soto). WP—Lilly. T—2:12. A—40,622 (41,210).


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 D5

Armstrong

GOLF

Watson says goodbye to Old Course, but not to British Open By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — Tom Watson put one hand on the Swilcan Bridge, bent over and kissed the ancient stones. This was no tearful goodbye. Rather, a fond farewell. Watson played his last round in a British Open at St. Andrews on Friday, assured of missing the cut after shooting a 3-over 75. “St. Andrews, when I first played here, I didn’t like it,” he said. “But I learned to like it. And, eventually, to love it.” Several hundred fans stuck around in the fading light for one last glimpse of Watson on the Old Course, and he didn’t disappoint. With playing partners Padraig Harrington and Ryo Ishikawa well ahead so as not to steal his moment, Watson kissed the bridge and then took a last, nostalgic walk over it. As applause and shouts of “We love you, Tom!” rang out, Watson stood on top of the bridge, took off his cap and waved it at the crowd. He gave a thumbs up and then stood still, soaking it all in — just as his old friends and rivals Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus had done before him. “It just seemed the right thing to do,” Watson said. “I thought of Arnold on the bridge and I thought of Jack on the bridge. Their last Opens were both right here at St. Andrews. My last Open is not, the good Lord willing and the creek don’t rise.” Thanks in large part to Watson, the Royal and Ancient now allows past champions to play the Open until they are 65. He put on a feel-good show for the ages at Turnberry last year, nearly becoming the oldest major champion in history a few months shy of his 60th birthday. He went to the 72nd hole with a one-stroke lead, but there was no magical ending — he missed an 8-foot par putt and then lost the playoff to Stewart Cink.

Alastair Grant / The Associated Press

Tom Watson of the U.S. stands on the Swilcan Bridge during the second round of the British Open on the Old Course at St. Andrews, Scotland, Friday. While almost everyone outside of Cink’s family was crushed, Watson was gracious in defeat. That gentlemanly manner is part of what has drawn fans to him for so many years, and that love was evident Friday night. Fans leaned out second-floor windows of one of the hotels lining the 18th hole to cheer him. Every time he started to walk off the Swilcan Bridge, they broke into a new round of applause to hold him there just a few seconds longer. Finally, with one long, last look around, he waved and left. Caddie Neil Oxman put his arm around Watson when he caught up to him, and the two resumed their last stroll up the 18th

fairway. “The main thing is the respect I have for the way the game is played here. And the respect that the people have for their game,” Watson said. “The Scots invented golf, and they love the game with a passion unlike any other people. I enjoy that.” And Watson gave them one last thrill, chipping on and rolling to the very edge of the cup. The ball refused to drop for an eagle, but it allowed him to walk away with one last birdie. Just like Jack. Watson never did win the claret jug on this course, but he leaves with no regrets. “None at all,” he said. “I had my opportunities here.”

British

Jon Super / The Associated Press

Tiger Woods runs after his windblown scorecard on the 12th hole during the second round of the British Open on Friday.

At age 50, Calcavecchia goes low ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — This year, it’s Mark Calcavecchia doing the old guys proud. The 1989 British Open champion posted the early low score of the day with a 5-under 67 Friday, his best round ever at St. Andrews. With the wind wreaking havoc on the Old Course, the score stood up, leaving Calcavecchia alone in second place, five strokes behind leader Louis Oosthuizen. Not bad for a guy making the shuffle to the senior tour after turning 50 on June 12. “It’s confidence,” Calcavecchia said. “You see a guy like Tom Watson last year almost winning at 60. It doesn’t really matter how old you are

Rodeo Continued from D1 He won the PRCA bareback world title in 1991 and recorded nine other top-three finishes. Culver’s Bobby Mote, who has won three PRCA world titles since 2002, picked up where Corey left off and has established himself as arguably the best bareback rider in the world today. Prineville’s Jason Havens and Redmond’s Steven Peebles — David Peebles’ older brother — also have NFR experience as bareback riders. “Clint Corey was the big start of all this,” says 21-year-old Steven Peebles, who currently is ranked 14th in the PRCA bareback world standings. “He was the biggest (bareback rider) around and it just progressed.” As Corey mentored Mote early in the Culver cowboy’s career, Mote helped Steven Peebles get started when he first turned pro. In turn, Steven Peebles tries to help his younger brother whenever he can.

if you’re feeling good about what you’re doing. I think old guys can hang with the young guys.” While the monstrous lengths at U.S. Open courses and even Augusta National often take their toll on the senior set — heck, they’re tough on the youngsters, too — nowhere does experience matter more than at a links course, where fickle weather, deceptive greens and fairways filled with humps and bumps make every hole an adventure. Calcavecchia hasn’t played the other majors in two years. But he’s missed only two cuts at the British Open since 1999. — The Associated Press

Continued from D1 At least an exasperating day ended with a heartwarming moment. Watson, the 60-year-old who came within an 8-foot putt of winning last year at Turnberry, played his final Open round at St. Andrews, the only Scottish links where he didn’t win the claret jug. “I pulled it just an inch,” Watson said after his 75 to finish at 4over 148. The cut will not be made until today, but it was unlikely to go further than 2-over par. Oosthuizen made seven birdies in his round of 67, finishing with a 15-foot birdie putt. Far more compelling were the players trying to make par as the wind raged off St. Andrews Bay. No one suffered quite like McIlroy. One day after his record-tying 63, the 21-year-old from Northern Ireland was blown away by shots into the rough and putts that he could not control in the wind. He wound up with an 80 and staggered off the course 11 shots out of the lead. “I think all the guys were finding it tough this afternoon, and I just let it get away from me a little bit,” McIlroy said. “I actually did well to par the last three holes, if I’m totally honest. It could have been an 82 or an 83. I’m here for the weekend, so it’s not all bad, but definitely a complete contrast to what it was like yesterday.” How tough? Of the last 75 players who completed the round, none broke par. Thirty players had to return this morning to finish the second round, including British Amateur champion Jin Jeong, who was at

Central Oregon NHSFR qualifiers Bareback riding — Austin Foss, Terrebonne; Wyatt Bloom, Bend; David Peebles, Redmond Saddle bronc riding — Clint Johnson, Madras; Tyrel Azbill, Prineville; Zach Boehmer, Redmond Team roping — Cully Stafford, Prineville; McKennan Buckner, Redmond; Dayton Stafford, Prineville Goat tying — Jessica Wood, Terrebonne; Casey Loper, Powell Butte; Jessie Loper, Powell Butte Bull riding — Nick Armstrong, Redmond Barrel racing — Stevie Rae Willis, Terrebonne Boys cutting — McKennan Buckner, Redmond Girls cutting — Cheyenne Westwood, Prineville; Stevie Rae Willis, Terrebonne NRA shooter — Blaine Corey, Powell Butte; Hunter Hicks, Prineville “They try to help me out with useful tips,” 16-year-old David Peebles says about his older brother and Mote. “But I try not to do everything off what they tell me. I learn off what they tell me and put it together with the stuff I learn from riding.” While Foss, 18, is considered the old pro of the three upstart bareback riders — he won state this year and in 2009 — Bloom,

16, and the younger Peebles are heading to nationals with just this season of bareback riding under their belt buckles. “I’ve rodeoed my whole life,” says David Peebles, who will be a junior at Redmond High this fall. “I’ve team-roped and calfroped … and rode calves and steers. But when I tried bareback, it was the most fun thing I’ve ever done. I just stopped do-

5-under par. Woods won the last two times at St. Andrews by a combined 13 shots. The Old Course was nothing like it was Friday afternoon, and it was rare for the world’s No. 1 player to feel so satisfied after a 73. He three-putted the first two holes as the wind made lag putts difficult to get within 6 feet. Woods finished with the most dramatic shot of this tournament, a driver on the 357-yard 18th hole that climbed the hill and rolled within inches of banging into the pin. His eagle putt caught the left lip, meaning one more stroke he has to make up. Woods was at 4-under 140. “I’m eight back, and today was a day I could have easily shot myself out of the tournament, especially the start I got off to,” Woods said. “But I put it back together again and pieced together a pretty good round.” Phil Mickelson shot a 71 to finish at even-par 144, and the horn sounded to stop play not long after he finished. “They were tough until it got called here, until it got suspended,” Mickelson said, referring to the conditions. Then he added with heavy sarcasm before leaving, “I’m happy for those guys. That’s great.”It was anything but that. Some players came off the course fuming about the onehour delay, noting that conditions didn’t improve. Play was stopped because of gusts that caused the ball to wobble on the green, and at times on the fairway. “Either it should not have been stopped at all or they should not have put us back out,” Tim Clark said after an 80. “If it was unplayable, then why put us back out?”

ing the other events.” Fifteen Central Oregon cowboys and cowgirls have qualified for the 2010 NHSFR in eight different events. Oregon state champions include Madras’ Clint Johnson (saddle bronc), Prineville’s Cheyenne Westwood (girls cutting) and Cully Stafford (who teamed with Ryan Opie of Burns in team roping), Terrebonne’s Jessica Wood (goat tying), and Redmond’s McKennan Buckner (boys cutting). The six-day NHSFR is set to begin at 6 p.m. Sunday. Two rodeo performances are scheduled for each weekday, and the final go-round is set for 6 p.m., Saturday, July 24. “We’re riding every single weekend,” David Peebles says about preparing for the NHSFR since last month’s high school state championship rodeo in Prineville. “This is what I want my career to be.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

Continued from D1 His rivals threw everything they had at Armstrong that day. On a long, steep climb up to the Port de Pailheres pass — which the Tour will cross again on Sunday — they brutally wore down Armstrong’s teammates by riding furiously. Without his support riders to help him, the six-, going on seven-time champion, was forced to fend for himself. Not that isolating him made any difference. “In that situation you either fight back or you run away,” Armstrong said. He, of course, fought. Yet again, he trumped them all. That was the Armstrong of old — in control, seemingly invulnerable, never ready to surrender. Had they ever met face-to-face, it is hard to imagine the Armstrong of then having much time or sympathy for the ersatz version of himself now. Over the years, the Tour has seen many facets of Armstrong: angry, funny, courteous, prickly, triumphant, gracious, mean, considerate and, most of all, determined. Frighteningly determined — sometimes to the expense of everything else. But we had to wait until this Tour, Armstrong’s 13th and last, to see the man who defeated cancer simply capitulate, put his hands on his hips in resignation and ruefully shake his head. It was a giant shock when that happened on stage 8, on the Tour’s very first day in the high mountains. Because it was so unexpected, so unthinkable, the day that Armstrong surrendered will become part of Tour lore, along with all those times when he was so dominant. Armstrong can justifiably point to a host of reasons why his final Tour fell flat. There was the punctured tire on day 4 that hobbled him when the race veered over cobblestones. There was intense summer heat, which he has never liked. There were relentless questions, again, about whether he has ever doped. And there were crashes, nasty ones that left Armstrong with cuts and bruises. But most of all, 38-year-old Armstrong just looks past it, jaded, almost uninterested. As early as day 3, he already was joking that he perhaps should have stayed retired. Four stages later, as he picked through an unappetizing snack of rice, eggs and peas to recharge his energy after another hard day of riding, Armstrong was looking forward to soon never again having to put his body through the discomforts of the Tour. It is to Armstrong’s credit

that he still aims to reach the finish in Paris even though he is no longer in contention for the podium or even for a top 10 place. That is a mark of respect not only for his sponsors and teammates but also to his fans and, most of all, to the race that made him fabulously wealthy and famous. In that way, Armstrong is proving to be more gracious as a loser than he sometimes was as a boorish and arrogant winner. On Friday, as the Tour pedaled hard through the hills of southcentral France, Armstrong playfully stuck out a tongue for the camera. The message: I’m more human than perhaps I seemed when I was beating everyone. “It would be easy to say I’ve had some bad luck, I’ve had some crashes, I’m outta the race and I’m going to go home,” Armstrong said earlier this week. “But that’s not the commitment I made to my team. That’s not the commitment I made to RadioShack. You know, I had a lot of good luck over seven years, and I guess it caught up with me.” Going home early might have made it easier for him to duck reporters’ inquiries about the federal probe in the United States looking into allegations that Armstrong and other riders doped. From the comfort of his mansion, Armstrong could simply have ordered his lawyers to rattle off yet another statement dismissing Floyd Landis’ accusations as garbage. Instead, Armstrong spent 15 minutes with reporters before stage 10 answering dozens of questions about the probe. Granted, his answers have now led to more questions. But at least he didn’t try to hide. Perhaps the investigation will prove that Armstrong cheated when he was at the height of his powers. Or perhaps, as he insists, there’s no wrongdoing on his part to prove. Either way, now just eight days of Armstrong’s era remain. They will take him and the millions of us who have followed his fortunes over the years back through some of his old stomping grounds — the Pyrenees, of course, but also to Bordeaux, through which he passed on the narrowest of his Tour wins in 2003, and finally to Paris. Armstrong could, by now, already have been sunning himself on that beach he has been talking about. But instead he is seeing out his story to its bitter end. For that, he should be applauded. John Leicester is an international sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jleicester@ap.org.


D6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NFL high school football Gritty in pink: Boxer takes fight clinics address character against breast cancer into ring By Rachel Cohen

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Chris Johnson and Adrian Peterson led the NFL in rushing the last two seasons, so why is Peterson in seemingly every commercial while Johnson is rarely seen? “It’s all about image and perception,” Jerry Horowitz, the NFL’s director of youth tackle football, told a group of high school players after making the point about the two running backs at a league-run clinic in Queens last month. “The days of hoodlums are over.” As commissioner Roger Goodell has cracked down on player misconduct, he’s made clear his aim is not only to punish lawbreaking but to prevent actions that tarnish the league’s reputation. Horowitz left no doubt he sees a link between the NFL’s efforts to clean up behavior and the more than 125 High School Player Development clinics the league is running around the country this summer. Speaking to nearly 150 kids at the start of the camp in Queens, he opened his remarks with this: “The landscape of the NFL is changing.” “Commissioner Goodell is very stringent in how he hands out punishment,” Horowitz told them. The HSPD programs, co-sponsored by the National Guard, generally run for 10 hours over five days. In their 10th year, the free clinics will reach more than 20,000 high school football players in 34 states. Participants practice football skills, but also take part in “character development” lessons. Horowitz, a former New York high school football coach who oversees the programs, said NFL officials recognize that by the time many players reach the league, the seeds of misconduct already have been planted — and changing behavior requires more than disciplining players after they go astray. “Once they come to us, it’s too late,” Horowitz said in an interview with The Associated Press after a session at a park in the Jamaica section of Queens on June 14. “I blame a lot of colleges for enabling these kids,” he added. Johnson, incidentally, has never been in trouble off the field. But he conceded in an interview with the Orlando Sentinel in April that “I know people think I’m a bad guy because of my dreads and gold teeth.” As Horowitz said, it’s all about image and perception. Goodell suspended Ben Roethlisberger for six games even though prosecutors decided not to charge the Steelers quarterback in a case involving a 20-year-old college student who accused him of sexually assaulting her in a Milledgeville, Ga., nightclub. “You are held to a higher standard as an NFL player, and there is nothing about your conduct in Milledgeville that can remotely be described as admirable, responsible, or consistent with either the values of the league or the expectations of our fans,” Goodell said in a letter to Roethlisberger. Horowitz’s point about Peterson and Johnson might not have fully registered with the teenagers, though. Asked later why the Tennessee running back is in fewer commercials, one player said he figured it was because Johnson’s Titans didn’t win as much as Peterson’s Minnesota Vikings. But Goodell’s crackdown hasn’t gone unnoticed at the high school level, either. “It’s unfortunate, when you’re blessed to play in the NFL, to have it taken away,” said Da’Quan Williams, a freshman at Queen’s Bayside High School. “You have to pay the consequences,” added Corey Peterson, a ninth-grader at nearby Flushing High. Williams said the lesson of the NFL discipline is clear: “Stay out of trouble.” During that day’s character development session, coaches from Maritime College, a Division III program in the Bronx, told the kids that they care about more than recruits’ rushing stats or 40yard dash times. They observe whether a player looks them in the eye, whether he says “please” and “thank you.” Overall, though, the session focused on how students can be more organized in class. All campers receive an academic planner that includes guidance on goal-setting, inspirational quotes and advice on areas such as sportsmanship and citizenship. Horowitz said the spotlight on

schoolwork was consistent with improving behavior, because an academically motivated athlete is more likely to stay out of trouble. But this particular clinic came with a bit of a mixed message. It overlapped with a week of Regents exams, which New York students must pass to graduate, so players were working on football drills when they might have been studying. The HSPD programs have several alumni in the NFL, including Ravens running back Ray Rice and offensive tackle Jared Gaither, Redskins cornerback Kevin Barnes and guard Edwin Williams, Dolphins cornerback Vontae Davis, Bills defensive end Aaron Maybin, and Lions wide receiver Derrick Williams. Of course, it’s very unlikely any of the kids attending the clinic that week in Queens will ever make it to the league. They were frequently reminded of the long odds they face — and that strong character will serve them well in all walks of life. In his opening speech, Horowitz told the players they were scheduled to have a special visitor three days later: the commissioner himself. When Goodell arrived and spoke to the teens, the strict disciplinarian wasn’t on display. He joked around with the athletes as they peppered him with questions about his job and the league. “You’re going to have a lot of challenges in life,” Goodell told them. “But how you represent yourself, how you represent your family, how you represent your school, how you may represent the National Guard when you’re wearing that uniform — those are all things that people remember and are watching. “At every opportunity, make sure you take that opportunity to do things right.”

Super heavyweight goes after a U.S. title while wearing some colorful gear By Arnie Stapleton The Associated Press

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. — Call him pretty in pink and Lenroy “Cam” Thompson will just smile. Heckle him for wearing pink trunks, pink headgear and a pink T-shirt in the boxing ring and he’ll laugh. The 21-year-old super heavyweight from Lenexa, Kan., is seeking his second title at the USA boxing national championships tonight and has found a unique way to promote both himself and the fight against breast cancer. He fights his opponents decked out in light pink trunks adorned with the cause’s signature pink ribbon, pink headgear and a pink T-shirt that reads “Fighting is a lot easier when your opponent isn’t cancer.” He sells shirts outside the ring to raise funds and he also goes to mixed martial arts fights and sets up shop hawking T-shirts that have all the fighting disciplines from jujitsu to kick boxing listed on one side with a giant pink X over them and the M.M.A. initials standing for Much More Awareness written on the other side. Beneath, is his motto: “Team CAM: Get a mam, ma’am.” He’s adding black tank tops with pink writing to his clothing line for guys who don’t dare don the pink. Thompson doesn’t have any relatives who have had breast cancer. He said he was inspired to

Lenroy Thompson, right, and Michael Hunter, left, exchange blows during their super heavyweight fight at the U.S. Boxing Championships in Denver in June of last year. Thompson wears pink in the ring to promote efforts to cure breast cancer. go pink after fighting at a breast cancer awareness tournament in Tampa, Fla., a few years ago. His awareness campaign has drawn both dollars and dispute. He was admonished at the national championships to cover up another of his sayings, this one stitched into his shorts that reads “I (heart) boobs.” The officials allowed Thompson to put white athletic tape over the last word during his semifinal win over O’Jayland Brown on Thursday night, and he’ll do the same when he fights Danny Kelly of Washington D.C., in the finals. “Every woman knows what the breast cancer symbol is,” Thompson said. “Now, the guys, I put something on my shorts to draw more attention. I’ve never had a problem with it before. I figure guys will find that funny and women will know what I’m doing, so I’ve got everything

covered.” Except for the children. Angel Villarreal, national chief of officials for USA Boxing, said minors in the stands might not understand the nuance of Thompson’s message and mistake it as misogynistic. “Everybody in the sport knows he’s bringing great awareness to the breast cancer cause and we support him, but the kids in the audience might not get it and their parents might find it offensive,” Villarreal said. Ultimately, Thompson said he didn’t mind the flap. “If I wear all pink, I draw attention and what I want is attention,” Thompson said. His pink attire has been a big hit with fans — once the crowd figures it out. “This is kind of a double-edged sword because you can make fun of me because I’m wearing pink, but then you have a mother,”

PRESENTING 5 DAYS OF FREE FUN AT THE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR JULY 28 - AUGUST 1

An old-fashioned, affordable county fair with something fun for everyone!

FAMILY FUN ZONE DC SAYS ... IT’S ALL TIME

WEDNESDAY

11:30 - 12:00 12:00 - 12:30 12:30 - 1:00 1:00 - 1:30 1:30 - 2:00 2:00 - 3:00

Once you’ve paid for general admission, come enjoy games, contests, exhibits, and more! Cash Prizes, Carnival Tickets, and Ribbons

SPONSORED BY:

PRESENTED BY:

THURSDAY

FUN!

FRIDAY JALAPENO EATING CONTEST

IT’S FREE!

SATURDAY

SUNDAY RONALD MCDONALD

WATERMELON EATING CONTEST

PIE-EATING CONTEST

APPLE BOBBING

HULA HOOP DANCE PARTY

WHEELBARROW RACE & SACK RACE

BEARD & MOUSTACHE MAKING CONTEST

HULA HOOP DANCE PARTY

WHEELBARROW RACE & SACK RACE

3-LEGGED RACE SACK RACE

SMOKEY BEAR BIRTHDAY PARTY

FAMILY FIRE BUCKET BRIGADE

3:00 - 4:00 4:00 - 5:00 5:00 - 6:00

CUPCAKE WALK

FOOTBALL THROW

CUPCAKE WALK

TUG OF WAR

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

CHILL OUT

STICK HORSE BARREL RACE

WATER BALLOON TOSS

HULA HOOP CONTEST

RONALD MCDONALD

6:00 - 7:00

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

SHEEP SCRAMBLE & PIG RACES

7:00 - 8:00

ROOSTER CROWING CONTEST

FAMILY FIRE BUCKET BRIGADE

LIMBO

WATER BALLOON TOSS

8:00 - 9:00

COOKIE CHALLENGE

GOLF BALL TOWER

ELEPHANT IN CHINA SHOP

BIKE GLOW PARADE

FEATURED STAGE & FIELD EVENTS Pie-Eating Contest Easy Part: Be the first one to finish your pie. Messy Part: No forks allowed.

3-Legged Race Bring a friend you don't mind being tied to (literally). This traditional race requires teamwork.

Hula Hoop Contest How long can you hula hoop? Swivel your hips for a prize.

Smokey Bear B-day Party Join Smokey Bear and DC for birthday treats, party favors, and photographs.

Cupcake Walk No talent? No problem. There's a reason "cake walk" means easy. Wheelbarrow Race Bring a partner for this time-tested, people-powered race. Water Balloon Toss Less messy than the egg toss, and more refreshing on a hot summer day!

Watermelon-Eating Contest Slurp a slice of simply scrumptious sweetness ... SWIFTLY!

Hula Hoop Dance Party – This is your chance to hone your hooping skills for Friday’s Hula Hoop Contest. Borrow our hula hoop, or bring your own. We’ll provide the music and the space for you to hula hoop to your heart’s content. Cookie Challenge – Start with a cookie on your forehead and move it into your mouth without using your hands. First one to eat the cookie (without cheating!) wins. Golf Ball Tower – Can you stack three golf balls on top of each other so they’ll

Family Fire Bucket Brigade We bet this will be the most fun you’ve ever had hauling water back and forth!

stand alone for a full second? Can you do it faster than anyone else? Enter this contest

Beard & Moustache Making Contest – Can’t grow a beard? Make your

to find out.

Stick Horse Barrel Racing Test your riding skills on a wooden steed.

own, using the supplies provided at the Family Fun Zone stage. Then, show off your

Elephant in a China Shop – We’ll provide the elephant trunk. You use it to

fake facial hair in the Beard & Moustache Contest.

knock over all the “china.” Fastest elephant wins!

Sack Race Hop your way to fame in a sack.

Chill Out – Sometimes, you just need a little break. Bring the whole family to the

Bike Glow Parade - Ever wondered how to make a bike glow in the dark? This

Jalapeno-Eating Contest A spicy way to enjoy the day! Never mind the sweat on your brow. Just keep popping those peppers.

Family Fun Zone stage for some arts and crafts in the shade. We might even break

is your chance to find out how to transform your bicycle into an electro-luminescent

out the popsicles!

piece of art, making it much safer to ride at night.

Apple Bobbing No hands allowed, but teeth are fair game in this old-fashioned game for young children.

Other Activities in the Zone include:

Thompson said. “So, they can’t quite say anything.” Thompson, who fights at 217 pounds and is almost always smaller and quicker than his beefier opponents, has found a following he figures he never would have attracted were it not for the pink attire. “I wasn’t the most-liked fighter in the world because of my fighting style. I run a lot and I just avoid being hit. I’m a superheavyweight. Everyone expects us to knock people out. I don’t knock people out. I don’t hit hard. I score points. People don’t like that. “After this, I’m a much more liked person.” Thompson said none of his opponents has ever given him grief for wearing pink. “I dare ’em,” he said. “I dare ’em.” Flyweight Rau’shee Warren, a two-time Olympian and the headliner at these championships, said Thompson has the admiration of fellow fighters not just for his prowess in the ring but his signature color scheme. “Hey, that’s something we all should be doing, fighting for something,” Warren said. “Everybody should have a reason for fighting.” Thompson has no designs on ever going pro. But he does plan for a lifetime in boxing. When he’s not fighting or hawking T-shirts, he serves as a personal trainer and boxing coach and also works as a special projects director at Ringside, the boxing equipment manufacturer outside Kansas City. He said he wants to put on a boxing event he hopes will raise $40,000 in donations. “In 10 years, I want to be able to say I raised $1 million to fight breast cancer,” Thompson said.

STAGE FIELD FEATURED EVENTS WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE STAGE OR IN THE FIELD AREA Thank you, volunteers! Without volunteers, we’d never be able to offer all these free activities in the Family Fun Zone. Central Oregon Association of Realtors has provided more than a dozen volunteers to help us organize games on the field and stage. Safe Kids is providing volunteers for the Commute Options bicycle corral. If you see them, please give them a pat on the back and thank them for helping out.

Above scheduled events take place in the field/stage area of The Bulletin Family Fun Zone. Presented by St. Charles Medical Center. Sponsored by Central Oregon Association of Realtors, McDonald’s, Old Mill District.

WOOL BUSTERS! Mutton Bustin’ at its best. Up to 55 lbs, helmets provided. 11:00-1:00 Wool Busters 1:30 - 3:00 Wool Busters 3:00 Sheep Scramble 4:00-6:00 Wool Busters 6:00 Sheep Scramble

FREE PIG RACES! FREE PEDAL TRACTOR PULL! FREE I.D. TAGS FOR KIDS! FREE PONY RIDES! FREE PETTING ZOO! FREE INFLATABLE JOUSTING!


E SATURDAY, JULY 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bend’s Best Riverfront at $569,900

VISIT US ON THE COBA TOUR™!

Watch the eagles and swans while you relax on the deck! On the Deschutes River in a private setting, Rocky Point Townhomes feature nearby parks, trails, and an easy walk to downtown. With two floor plans remaining, the 2251 and 2929 sq. ft., three bedroom plans feature beautiful interiors, fabulous outdoor living and breathtaking river views. Primary or secondary residence. From Hwy. 97, west on Revere, right on Harriman. More at www.rockypointbendoregon. com or call Bill Duffey, Principal Broker, (541) 419-8546.

TAFT DIRE LLC (541) 728-0033 / www.taftdire.com

Paid Advertisement

Discover Antler Ridge -- conveniently located on the Southwest side of Redmond. With new homes starting at only $99,990 and nine floor plans, you are certain to find one to call your own. Visit us during the COBA Tour of Homes™ over the next two weekends and learn how you can receive $5,000 towards the purchase of your new Hayden Home! Directions: Highway 126 west, north on SW 35th Street to SW Cascade. Call 541-548-5011 or find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information.

ANTLER RIDGE- REDMOND WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES.COM 541-548-5011

Paid Advertisement

Keeping Cool With 12 Low-Tech Solutions

by Metro Editorial, for The Bulletin Advertising Department The summer sun may have seemed to arrive a little late this year, but it has finally risen. That means the heat has started blazing, and the hum of air conditioning units is filling the air. Why pay high energy bills to cool your home when you can take some energy-saving, low-cost measures to simply keep the house from getting overheated in the first place? Here are some ways to keep your home cool without spending much money.

3. Use windows to your advantage: Heat rises, therefore if you open upper windows, heat can escape from the upstairs floors. 4. Plant vines to grow on your home: Scaling vines, such Virgina creeper, can insulate your home from the heat. Surface wall temperature fluctuations may be reduced by as much as 50 percent, say green advocates. What’s more, you get an Old World feel to your home and extra greenery.

8. Cook outdoors: Using the stove top and oven can put extra heat in the house. Fire up the grill whenever possible. Also, you may consider an outdoor kitchen so you can do all of your prep work, cooking and entertaining outdoors, keeping the house cooler in the process. 9. Use green landscaping: Landscaping with lots of unshaded rock, cement or asphalt on the south or west sides of a home can increase heat gain. That’s because these surfaces trap and radiate heat to the house after the sun has set.

Even mild air movement of one mile per hour can make you feel three or four degrees cooler. 1. Plant trees: Deciduous trees — those that lose their leaves in winter — can shade the south and west sides of your home from hot sun. In the winter when the extra sunlight is needed for warmth, the trees lose their leaves. It’s nature’s programmable thermostat. 2. Invest in awnings: Window awnings and retractable patio awnings are wise investments. They, too, block the sun, and thus extra heat from entering the house. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that awnings can reduce solar heat gain — the amount temperature rises because of sunshine — by as much as 65 percent on windows with southern exposures and 77 percent on those with western exposures.

5. Go white on roofs: Choose light colored roofing materials to help reflect rather than absorb heat. Many cities throughout the nation are instituting policies to paint building roofs white as a cost-saving and environmental measure.

10. Take cool showers: Rather than running the hot water heater for baths, take a quick, cool shower. It can be refreshing and save you money.

6. Install window shutters: Shutters can help block out heat and light during the day. Or consider thick, light-blocking draperies which will keep out the sun and also provide heat insulation.

11. Increase insulation: Add insulation around air conditioning ducts when they are located in unconditioned spaces such as attics, crawl spaces and garages; do the same for wholehouse fans where they open to the exterior or to the attic.

7. Use an attic fan or whole-house fan: Different types of fans placed in the attic can draw air from throughout the entire house and exhaust it to the outside. This can help prevent having to run the air conditioning for trapped hot indoor air, even when it is cool outside.

12. Use ceiling or box fans: Even mild air movement of one mile per hour can make you feel three or four degrees cooler. Use fans in conjunction with air conditioning to cool the house more efficiently.

2010 COBA Tour of Homes

TM

Yesterday marked the start of the 2010 Central Oregon Builders Association (COBA) Tour of HomesTM. The scattered-site home tour features 37 homes throughout Central Oregon. The tour will continue through this weekend and continue next weekend from Friday through Sunday, July 23-25. Homes will be open today and tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The homes will re-open next Friday from noon to 6 p.m. and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. There is no cost to visit tour homes. Official Tour of HomesTM guides are available during business hours at the COBA office and The Bulletin, as well as the offices of Tour sponsors and each Tour home during the event. The guide will also be available on-line 24-hours a day at www.bendbulletin.com. For more information, call (541) 389-1058 or go on-line to www.coba.org and click on Tour of HomesTM.


E2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath Townhouse style apt., W/D hookup, no pets/smoking,120 SE Cleveland, $625, W/S/G paid, 541-317-3906, 541-788-5355

636

½ off first month rent!

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $530. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

1 BDRM $425 2 BDRM $445

Summer Special!

$99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 3 3 0 - 0 7 1 9 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 632

Rentals

600

Beautiful 2 bdrm, quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928. 1039 NE HIDDEN VALLEY 2 bedroom 2 bath, garage, water/sewer/lawn maint includ. Avail now. $695 ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

130 NE 6th St. 1/2bdrm 1 bath, w/s/g pd., laundry room, no smoking, close to school. $395-425 rent+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

1700 NE Wells Acres #40 Cozy 2 bdrm/ 1 bath w/ patio. All kitchen appls., w/s/g pd, no pets. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 #1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $625 + dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615. 2317 NE Mary Rose Pl. #2 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, incl. washer/dryer! garage, W/S paid!! Lawn care provided. $675 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

638

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 45 NW Greeley #2 DOWNTOWN! 1 bdrm, elec. heat, W/D hook-up or onsite laundry. W/S/G paid! Lawn care provided! $550 mo.

541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

642

$99 Move in $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

Country Terrace

1015 Roanoke Ave., $590 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

640

61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

642

61368 SW Sally Lane, 3/2.5 Apt./Multiplex Redmond duplex, W/D, garage, mtn. views. No pets or smoking $795 (1st mo. 1/2 off), W/S/yard pd. 541-419-6500 Old Mill Studio, separate entrance, all utilities pd. $500 mo. plus $500 deposit. Small pet neg. No smoking. 541-382-1941.

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

642

2553 & 2580 SW 20th St.2/1 duplexes, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600+dep, incl. yard maint., no pets/smoking.541-382-1015

642

Call about our Specials Cute Duplex, SW area, 3 S t u dio s t o 3 b e d r o o m units from $395 to $550 •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • West paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our $495 2/1, w/d hookup, carport. Pet on approval. 833 NW Fir $625 3/2, w/d hookup, w/s/g paid, single garage. 1210 SW 18th St. $700 2/2, w/d hookup, yard maint, single garage. 2850 SW 25th St. $750 2/1.5, right on the canyon w/mtn views, AC, garage w/opener. w/s/g pd, 741 NW Canyon $795 3/2 duplex, w/s paid, incl. w/d, yard maint, garage w/opener, new paint. 1740 SW 27th St.

541-923-8222

Summertime Special! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

648

Houses for Rent General BEND RENTALS • Starting at $495. Furnished also avail. For pictures & details www.alpineprop.com 541-385-0844 Powell Butte, in secluded area, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage,wood stove, W/D hookup, first, last, $400 dep, $600/mo, peg. neg., 541-447-4750.

Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, stor- The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE age units available. Close to Rental rate! If you have a schools, pools, skateboard home to rent, call a Bulletin park, ball field, shopping cenClassified Rep. to get the ter and tennis courts. Pet new rates and get your ad friendly with new large dog started ASAP! 541-385-5809 run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008

www.MarrManagement.com

bdrm., 2 bath, garage, private fenced yard, W/D hookup, $700 mo.+ dep., call 541-480-7806.

www.redmondrents.com

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt.

NW-Side, 1/2 mile to COCC, spacious 2 bdrms., 950 sq. ft., $550/mo. W/S/G paid, 2 on-site laundries, covered parking, 541-382-3108

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 Bdrm., 1 bath Duplex, 1400 sq.ft., dbl. attached garage, W/D incl., fenced yard, $695 per mo., please call 541-410-4255.

899 NE Hidden Valley #2 1/2 OFF the 1st Month’s Rent! 2 bedroom, all appliances, gas fireplace, w/s paid, garage. $650 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Move in Special 1/2 Off First Full Month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #2 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $775+dep. with 6 month lease. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany 1st Month Free with 1 year lease or ½ Off first month with 8 month lease. * 1 bdrm $495* * 2 bdrm $575 * W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with deposit. Call 382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

605

Roommate Wanted Female Roomate Wanted to share Tumalo Horse Property, will have private entrance, bdrm., living room & kitchenette, horse neg., $450 +1/2 utils, 541-408-0227

630

Rooms for Rent Awbrey Butte master bedroom. Incredible views. A/C, hot tub. 5 min. walk to COCC. $500mo. Call Gary 306-3977. Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $25/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, $400. 541-317-1879

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

$750 Move In Special: $375 -3/2.5, w/d, w/s/g paid, garage w/opener. 2996 SW Indian Circle

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

ESTATE LIKE FEEL & VERY PRIVATE SAT & SUN 11-3

NE GARDEN BEAUTY SUNDAY, JULY 18 12-3

Located in a great neighborhood, this home has an over all living space of 3952 sq. ft., 5/3.5 in the main house and splendid guest house on 2.39 acres. Mountain 62738 Montara Dr. Bend views, 3-car garage, RV Directions: From E. Hwy 20 or garage and port, plus shop Butler Market Rd. follow Open and much more. Coffee and treat provided. See at House signs on Hamby then east on Paloma Dr. and left on Montara Dr. www.scottmclean.com MLS#201006629

$499,000

Hosted & Listed by: SCOTT MCLEAN Scott McLean Real Estate

Immaculate 1454 sq. ft. single level, 3 BR, 2 Bath, master separation. Great room plan with hardwood and tile accents. Huge fenced backyard, beautifully landscaped, RV area for boat. 20423 Nicolette Dr. Cascade views from front Directions: North on 97. Take deck. Not bank owned or right on Cooley Rd., right on short sale. Boyd Acres, right on Nicolette.

Listed by:

AINSLIE REYNOLDS & KATHY CABA Brokers

Hosted by: AINSLIE REYNOLDS

Principal Broker/Owner

Broker

541-408-6908

541-410-1054

$167,000

GEM OF HOME & LAND SATURDAY 7/17 11 AM - 2 PM Breathtaking Cascade views. Gorgeous pastoral setting with large pond, 10 private acres, tennis court, barn, beautiful home with 5965 sq. ft. 3 bed, 2 1/2 bath, master bedroom with adjoining solarium, 12x17 kitchen with exposed beams, new appliances, eating area.

EAGLE CREST AFFORDABILITY! SATURDAY 7/17 11 AM-1 PM

64415 Old Bend Redmond Hwy Directions: Go north on Old Bend Redmond Hwy and watch for signs on the left.

$1,250,000

One of the least expensive residential homes in Eagle Crest. Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom single story with 2-car garage and Smith Rock views from kitchen and dining room.

Kitty Warner & Kris Warner

Hosted and Listed by: RICK PARROTT

Brokers

KITTY WARNER Broker

541-330-2124

1033 NW Newport Ave Bend, OR

Directions: Cline Falls Hwy, turn west on Cooper Hawk, turn right on Nutcracker, turn left on Tanager.

$289,900

Listed by Hosted by:

427 Tanager Dr., Redmond

Broker

541-480-1856


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 650

656

687

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Real Estate For Sale

1222 NE Burnside 3 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, deck, patio, fenced yard, all new kitchen appl., fireplace. Sm to med. dog neg. $850+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

60944 Aspen Lane

1944½ NW 2nd St Need storage or a craft studio? 570 sq. ft. garage, w/ access from alley. Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat. $275. Call 541-382-7727

700

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 1864 NE Monroe Ln 3 bdrm/ 2.5 bath, all appliances incld, pellet stove, low maint lndscpe, pet neg. $950+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 2262 NE Baron Crt. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, fenced yard, sunroom, all kitchen appl., dbl garage. $895+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414 2 Bdrm. Duplex, gas fireplace, back yard, $825/mo. incl. yard maint & water, no smoking, pet okay, 1225 NE Dawson Dr. 402-957-7261 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1556 sq.ft., family room, w/wood stove, big rear deck, fenced yard, dlb. garage, w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Romaine Village! 2 bdrm w/ all appliances incl. washer & dryer! Carport & extra storage, clubhouse, Pool & Spa!! $625. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

541-322-7253

Lease: 679 SE Business Way, 5000+ sq.ft, light industrial, 3 overhead doors, exc. parking, office suite w/mtn. views. Talk to me! 907-252-2794. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

***

The Plaza in Bend Old Mill District

705

www.ThePlazainBend.com

OPEN HOUSE Sat. & Sun 10am to 4pm Now Leasing

658

Houses for Rent Redmond A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $849 mo. 541-408-0877. New large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq.ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1450. 503-720-7268.

Remodeled 3 bdrm. home, on 5 acres, near Terrebonne, horse property,small barn,new furnace,1765 sq.ft., $1050 avail. 8/5, Chris, 541-504-9373.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796.

725 NE SHELLEY

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Trade your 5+ acres + home for our beautiful home in West Linn (just south of PDX). 503 534-1212. MLS #10013267. Owner/broker.

Call 541-743-1890

John Day: 2003 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1920 sq.ft., wood, stove, forced air heat, vaulted living room, Silestone counters stainless appl., master suite/ walk in closet, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

745

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

The Bulletin Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Email; plazabendapts@prmc.com

719

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Pricing starting from $1200/ month

Real Estate Trades

Immaculate, Updated SW Bend Townhome, 1500 sq.ft,3 bdrm, 3 bath, A/C, new paint, stainless appl, fireplace 2 decks, $245,000, 503-358-6190.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

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Homes for Sale CHECK YOUR AD

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

744

Open Houses

Homes for Sale Amazing mountain view on 5 acres outside of Sisters, 2 bed, 1 bath, 992 sq ft home (interior needs finish work) w/ two car garage, great shop, and detached office, www.sistersviewhome.com, $224,000, 208-921-1436.

Know your neighbors! Nestled in Bend's only environmentally friendly co-housing community. http://home.bendbroadband.com/higherground/. Lots of sunlight! 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 1450 sq. ft., foam panel construction, large decks, cozy loft. Bamboo floors. $239,000 Call Jen: 541 678-5165. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

Nice 3 bed, 2.5 bath, hot tub, A/C, garage, trex decking, large bonus room. $1350/mo ABOVE& BEYOND PROP MGMT 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Available Now, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, no garage, pet? $525 mo., 1st/last+dep. no W/D hookup. 541-382-3672.

NE Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 decks, sunny, skylight, W/D hookup, fenced, private, W/S/G paid, cats ok, great landlord, $650,541-350-0958

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, W/S/G incl., OWWII, $895/ mo. + dep., no smoking, please call 503-651-1142 or 503-310-9027.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

661

Houses for Rent Prineville

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 699 NW Florida 3/ 2.5/ dbl grge. Extra nice, dwntwn, spacious. Lrg deck, Enrgy Effcnt, w/d, gardener, no pets/smkng. $975+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

$450 2/1, w/d hookup, large corner lot. 392 NW 9th St. $995 4/2.5, washer/dryer, AC, gas fireplace, community park/pool, garage w/opener. 1326 NE Littleton Ln

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

WE PAY YOU! Call for a FREE Plan Book

Fantastic 1 bedroom on Awbrey Butte. Just in time for unobstructed view of fireworks! W/D, garage, outdoor living space. $700/mo. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 541-389-8558

Central Oregon (800) 970-0149

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

NW Crossing 2148 Highlakes Lp. 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, master bdrm with walk in closet, frplc,all kitchen appl.,AC $1295+dep. Cr Property Management 541-318-1414 Private 3 bdrm., 2 bath, on 5 acres, Tumalo area, extra large garage, guest house, small barn, fenced, horse & dogs OK, $1350 mo. 541-480-2233

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 20644 SE Redwing Ln. FOXBOROUGH- 3 bdrm, 2 bath, gas fireplace, hardwood floors, dbl. garage, fenced yard with landscaping maintained! $950 mo.. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

752 Breitenbush 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas heat, dbl garage, fenced yard. $875 mo. 541..382.7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Avail. Now, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, fenced yard, deck, close to shopping, garage, no pets or smoking $725 mo., 1st, last, & dep. 541-389-7734.

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

NEW PLAN - SAVE $4,000!

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right


E 4Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

10 Presented by

TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25 Fridays: Noon - 6 pm, Saturdays & Sundays 10 am - 6 pm


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 745

757

775

Homes for Sale

Crook County Homes

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

One story 3 bdrm, 2 bath home on attractive 1 acre lot in Silver Lake. 1940 sq.ft. with pantry & walk in closet. Carpet & vinyl. Monitor oil heater, wood stove & electric wall heaters. Covered patio & porch. Attached oversized 2 car garage. Fenced front & rear lawns with nice landscaping. All appliances included. $149,500. Call Everett Decker, Broker at John L. Scott, Redmond. 541-923-1269 or 541-480-8185.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

541-385-5809 Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bid Start at $10,000 12654 SW Cinder Drive, Terrebonne 3BR 2BA 1,856sf+/12289 SW Horny Hollow Tra, Terrebonne 3BR 2BA 2,145sf+/61210 Paulina Ln, Bend 4BR 2.5BA 1,889sf+/2765 NW Fariway Heights,Bend land All properties sell: 5:00PM Thu., Jul. 22 at 12289 SW Horny Hollow Tra, Terrebonne Open to the Public williamsauction.com 800.801.8003 A Buyer’s Premium may apply. Williams & Williams OR RE LIC#200507303 GLEN VANNOY BROKER www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

746

Northwest Bend Homes COUNTRY LIVING, CITY CLOSE. Near Tumalo park & river, 1.25 acres, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, pond, studio, 4-car garage. Owner/ broker, 541-633-3033. $313,000.

H Multi Family H Prineville Duplex Almost new, fully rented with garage, patio and fireplace. 1200 sq.ft. each side. Great price! $130,000. Lawnae Hunter, Principal Broker Hunter Properties, LLC 541-389-7910 541-550-8635

762

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 E5

Luxury in La Pine

River through 10 acres

MLS# 201002800

MLS# 201005195

2 bdrm, 1 bath, SE Bend New carpet, large yard. Pets okay. $7,900.00 or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130. 3/1 in DRW. Nice yard, W/D, fridge., new furnace, new bath plumbing, quiet park. $8900. 541-728-0529. 60311 Cheyenne Rd., #16

Homes with Acreage

Go to johnlscott.com/maryr for a complete photo gallery of these properties.

FSBO: 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home 1.47 Acres +/- Comm. Water & Sewer Detached. Garage/Shop Sunriver Area $224,900. Call R. Mosher 541-593-2203. Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $147,000, 541-576-2390.

Mary Garcia, Broker 541-536-1188 ext 18 or Ask for Mary cell - 541-788-6919 Move-In Ready! Homes start at $8999. Delivered & set-up start at $28,500, on land, $49,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

763

Recreational Homes and Property

CRESCENT LAKE CABIN Lake front. $399,000 503-329-0959 764

Farms and Ranches 35 ACRE irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, reduced to $395,000. Will consider trade for small acreage or ? 541-447-1039. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

4/2 Ranch home+ 2nd home & studio, 6.64 acres, irrigation, 2 shops. $11,000+ rental income yr. $449,900. 541-815-1216 www.fsbo.com Ad 136190

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

Acreages 7 Mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613 CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $96,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

FSBO, Gated Community w/all amenities on 1/2 acre, 3+2 & bonus studio apt, near river, elec./wood heat, $350,000. 541-617-5787.

747

Southwest Bend Homes

Guaranteed Build Time or ...

WE PAY YOU!

$4000 Down DRW, 24X48 3/2 Golden West mfd. home on 1 acre canal lot, payment $697 mo./30 yrs. Owner for info. 541-505-8000. Eugene.

Call for a FREE Plan Book

749

Southeast Bend Homes

Central Oregon (800) 970-0149

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes 4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes F S B O : Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge, $255,000, owner terms, 541-617-5787.

757

Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

541-385-5809

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

NEW PLAN - SAVE $4,000!

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right


E6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE 486 SW Bluff Dr.

SA OPE T. N 12 -3

Awbrey Butte | $999,000

RE PRI DU CE CE D

Tour of Homes™ Townhome | $299,000

Independently Owned and Operated

Bend, OR 97702

REALTOR

NW Bend | $270,000

Rivers Edge Village| $99,000

NE Bend | $139,000

Hassle Free and Affordable | $139,900

FRI O ., SA PE T., S N UN 12-4

541-382-4123

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

New Earth Advantage townhomes in NORTH WEST CROSSING. Great room with gas fireplace. Secluded patio. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, double garage. Move in today! Builder to contribute $5,000 towards closing costs. MLS#2713334

Single level on a large lot, faces SE. Vaulted ceilings with bonus loft living area. Large under house storage. Dog yard. fenced yard, large deck, and welcoming front entry patio. MLS#201003309

Enjoy the sunrise from this large east facing view lot. Some City, Smith Rock and southern views. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $99,000! MLS#201005716

Bright and affordable with 4 bedrooms Updated/upgraded NE Bend condo. New plus family room. Large windows bring appliances, carpet and stone. 2 master suites in the sunlight while refinished wood with A/C, 2.5 baths. Great room with fireplace, floors, fresh carpet and paint invite you to fans. Large 2-car garage. Pool, Spa, Clubhouse, make this your home. Tennis. All landscaping done for you! MLS#2910497 MLS#2808401

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

JOY HELFRICH, Broker 541-480-6808

LESTER & KATLIN FRIEDMAN FRIEDMAN & FRIEDMAN, P.C., Brokers 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

SE Bend | $145,000

Mountain Views on Acreage | $150,000

La Pine | $150,000

SE Bend | $160,000

NW Bend | $164,900

Redmond | $164,900

LI NE ST W IN G

PR NEW IC E

Stunning contemporary home w/spectacular city and Smith Rock views. Master, 3 bedrooms & office on main level. Bonus & media rooms. 4 bed, 4 ba, 4695 sq. ft. MLS#2900850 DIRECTIONS: MT. Washington Dr by The River House, left on Summit Dr, Right on Farewell, left on Redfield 1162 NW Redfield.

Great Location, Very Clean Single Level. Cascade Mountain and Smith Rock views Single story newer home on .98 acre. New 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home completed Build your dream house on this Nice home with an open floor plan, large 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1472 sq.ft. Built in from this 6.64 Acre Lot at a great price. Great room floor plan has 3 bedrooms June of 2010. Granite kitchen counters, spectacular north facing view lot! .72 acre dining area, gas fireplace and pantry. 1976 on .46 of an acre. New Roof, Carpet Very private, treed lot in area of fine plus den. All appliances included. cultured stone fireplace, bright and open on a quiet cul-de-sac in Skyliner Summit Natural gas furnace plus a heat pump & Water Heater. Plenty of Room for homes. Just 2 blocks to the Deschutes Finished double car garage, 10 x 12 floor plan. This is one of only a few area close to downtown. City lights view meet all your heating and cooling needs. Toys, Convenient to Shopping, Schools River and backs to 120 acres of BLM storage building, and room to build shop. homes left in South Deer Field Park. at night! A must see!! Incredible water feature in back yard. & Hospital. land. MLS#201004358 MLS#201004072 MLS#201005795 MLS#201005616 MLS#201006428 MLS#2905812 1962 Jack Lake Ct.

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

NE Bend | $199,900

NE Bend/ Single Level | $229,900

$229,900

PR NEW IC E

Single Story | $195,000 NW Bend | $198,000 Three Rivers South | $199,900

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

Charming older home in a quiet New construction! Open floor plan with neighborhood. Single level, 3 bedrooms, large great room. Slate tile entry, utility room with sink. Designed with wide doors 1 bathroom, 1008 sq. ft. Laminate, tile, carpet, upgraded fixtures. Corner lot, and halls and no steps! Earth Advantage certified 1700 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. fenced yard. Close to Westside amenities. MLS#201006532 MLS#2909879

This beautiful home in River Meadows includes granite counter-tops, hardwood floors and a gas fireplace. Enjoy the River Meadows lifestyle with tennis, swimming, trails and river access. MLS#201004438

Great single level living in a super neighborhood. Vaulted, gas fireplace, two dining options, large master suite, landscaped, quiet fenced backyard. MLS#201002133

Better than new 3 bedroom, 2 bath! Conveniently located in new neighborhood close to shopping & medical facilities. Great room floor plan with gas fireplace. Large corner lot, fenced backyard & mountain views. MLS#201004596

Updated beautiful 3 bedroom home with 2- car garage + a detached extra garage that has heat. On a cul-de-sac, close to hospital and shopping. Spacious manicured backyard with custom water feature. MLS#201004017

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-408-6720 541-383-4361

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

SW Bend | $250,000

Mountain High | $279,000

NW Bend | $280,000 2 Homes on 1 Lot | $285,000 House + Apartment | $338,000 RE PR DU ICE CE D

La Pine | $233,500

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

Easy Living on the Fairway! Private, peaceful setting in gated community with Golf Course. Views on 1 and a half beautifully treed lots. Single level, 2 Bedroom + Den, 2 Bath. MLS#201001975

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

This NE Bend property has it all – 2.37 acres, 1808 sq.ft. 4 bedroom, 3 bath house, PLUS a separate 720 sq. ft. apartment PLUS a 14X40 pull through RV garage. MLS#201002926

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

City Views | $379,000

SW Redmond | $379,500

SW Bend | $379,500

LI NE ST W IN G

Mountain High | $360,000 Ridge at Eagle Crest | $364,000 5 Acre Homesite | $374,900 RE PR DU ICE CE D

A great westside house, perfect for your Investment or live in one & rent the other. family. Located on a quiet street, within Close to the Old Mill District. One home close proximity to downtown stores. This is 1444 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. The house has been well maintained. other is 1100 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath. MLS#201005956 Gross rent is $1800. 2 single garages. MLS#201006093

RE PR DU ICE CE D

3 bedroom, 2 bath, office, walk in closet, Very cute 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1554 sq.ft. jetted tub & marble tile. Tongue & groved home on a private corner lot near the Old pine vaulted ceiling. 2-car attached Mill. Nice, open floor plan with skylights. garage. Located in Tall Pines north of Beautifully landscaped yard, fully fenced downtown La Pine, privacy on 1 acre. with hot tub. MLS#201003652 MLS#201005340

Immaculate single level home with formal and casual living spaces. Private setting, beautifully landscaped and golf course views. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2422 sq.ft. MLS#201003969

4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2596 sq.ft. single level custom home. Complete with gourmet kitchen, 2 living areas, private master, expansive outdoor living space, & more. Beautiful finishes & great for entertaining. MLS#2911460

One of the nicest small acreage subdivisions. Great views from this level parcel with 1 acre irrigation. Well & power to the home site, existing log structure and stall/storage building. Owner terms. MLS#201005418

NW Bend single level living with city views. Nicely updated and remodeled on .29 of an acre lot. Close to downtown, river trail, shopping and parks. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2248 sq. ft. MLS#2906308

Sparkling clean tri-plex with new paint 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2481 sq. ft. Westside in all 3 units. New appliances and new home close to river & recreation trails. window coverings. Garage with each unit. Hardwood floors, stainless steel kitchen Great location and rental history. appliances. Cascade Mountain views, MLS#2904198 vaulted ceilings & large master suite. MLS#2902962

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, CRS, WCR GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-322-2404 541-420-1111

Ridgewater | $383,000 Riverfront Cabin | $399,000 Barn, Shop, Home | $399,000 Boonesborough | $410,000 Pristine Retreat | $375,000 Acreage Horse Property

Inviting European Country Flair in this 1 of a kind 3 or 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath. 3800 sq. ft. home. Exquisite quality wood work, tile, travertine, stain glass & dramatic 2 story, vaulted living room with loft. . MLS#201003319

Deschutes Riverfront cabin. Direct swimming and boating access steps from the porch. 1.26 acres. 1160 sq. ft., large kitchen, 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Bunkhouse. Outhouse. Storage shed. Garage. MLS#2808997

7.94 acres, 7.5 irrigated. Fenced and cross-fenced, barn and additional set-up for stalls. Includes irrigation equipment and shop. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1542 sq. ft. home. MLS#2812404

2.7 Acres, 2577 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath home. Landscaped with sprinkler system. Vaulted ceilings, 2 Fireplaces, 2 heating systems, 2 hot water tanks & 3-car garage. MLS#201004874 www.tourfactory.com/619625

Cabin on acreage on the Big Deschutes. 3.8 acres with river frontage and deck facing the river. Knotty Pine interior. Vaulted great room, 3+ bedrooms, Near Wickiup Reservoir. 12925 W. Deschutes River Rd. MLS#201006013

9.85 acres with irrigation. Newer Barn/ Covered Arena with 2 stalls/lights/tack room/sink. 3 ponds. Fenced & Cross Fenced. 3 bedroom, 2 bath Single level house. Remodeled Kitchen, Backs Government land. MLS#201006109

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

CHUCK OVERTON, Broker, CRS, ABR 541-383-4363

SUE CONRAD, Broker, CRS 541-480-6621

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

Sunriver | $594,900

Tumalo | $649,600

LI NE ST W IN G

SU OP N. EN 13

NW Bend | $509,900 Tumalo Bare Land | $550,000 River Front Living | $525,000 RE PR DU ICE CE D

NE Bend | $499,900

Home has been upgraded and remodeled. Beautiful Craftsman in Northwest Crossing. Gorgeous 4.6 acres with Deschutes River Awesome riverfront lot in the Cascade Mtn views from private 9.9 acres. Multiple upgrades, extra-tall ceilings Tile floors & counter tops. 1 acre irrigated Great location. Open floor plan with lots of Canyon & Cascade Mountain views. Pine & Downtown/Old Mill corridor. Many upstairs & down, combed cedar siding, Remodeled 3164 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath home with underground system. 2-car garage, vaults and windows, large kitchen, master juniper trees for privacy. Pristine, private parcel additional features make this a great deal! oversize 2-car garage. 2 Master suites + a with high beamed ceilings & open great room dog kennel and new 40X40 shop. Very on main, extensive hardwood and tile. - surrounded by larger parcels. Abuts Deschutes Call for details. plan. Shop & horse set up, pond. Bend schools. lock-out. Expansive views from upstairs private setting on 2.8 acres. Fenced back yard & extra parking. River Ranch. # 20440 Swalley Road. MLS#2807577 MLS#201001782 living area. Previous rental info available. MLS#2713553 MLS#201000475 MLS#201006322 Directions: Hwy 20 west to Old Bend Redmond MLS#201005860 Hwy to Rodeo Dr. 20060 Rodeo Dr.

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

NW Bend/Awbrey Glen | $675,000 Log Home | $683,000 Pristine Equine | $749,900

Custom built home on .6 of an acre lot. Beautiful high end details throughout. 4 bedrooms, office, and bonus room! Main floor master. Private wooded yard with water feature and hot tub. MLS#201003567

Mountain views, gorgeous log home on 9.6 acres. Vaulted ceilings, granite counters, meticulously maintained. 4-car heated garage/shop. 4 acres irrigation. MLS#2904224

Rare facility for man & animals! 9.5 acres with auto irrigation, fenced, Barn, Shop, Pasture, Ponds, Corral, Arena with sprinklers, Stately home, Cascade Mtn View. MLS#201005015

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

CATHY DEL NERO, P.C., Broker 541-410-5280

DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers 541-383-4349

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

SE Bend | $948,000

NW Bend | $995,000

Cascade Views | $1,270,000

Private country estate offers beauty, 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3767 sq. ft. home Exquisite Awbrey Butte home with productivity and seclusion. Immaculate in beautiful condition with gorgeous Cascade Mountain Views from all living home with mature landscaping and pond. mountain views on a 1.6 acre lot, a total areas. African Ribbon Mahogany floors Additional buildings include shop with private setting. Sit on your deck and and cabinetry. 4823 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 3.5 RV storage, and horse barn. 16 acres, watch the sunsets. Triple attached garage. bath on .58 of an acre. 4 irrigated. MLS#201001648 MLS#201002623 MLS#2909521 3230 NW Horizon Dr.

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-480-7647

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 F1

C LASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit w w w .b e n d b u lle t in .c o m or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

General Merchandise

Find Classifieds at

www.bendbulletin.com

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Kittens, just in from foster homes, social, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, free vet visit! Low adoption fee, discount for 2. Nice older kittens & adult cats also available. Sat/Sun 1-5, call re: other days. 317-3931, 389-8420. Info/photos/map: www.craftcats.org.

Mini, AKC Dachshunds, black & tan, short hair, call for more information $275 to $375. 541-420-6044 or 541-447-3060.

200 BEAGLE Bailey is a 5 mo old male that comes from cham202 pion/AKC lines. He has had Want to Buy or Rent his shots and been microchipped. Call 541-848-0434 WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mofor more details. torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! Beagle Puppy - 12 weeks old. First shots. Great with kids. 541-280-6786. $225. 541-416-1507. Wanted washers and dryers, Black Lab Male Puppy, AKC, working or not, cash paid, Dew claws removed, shots 541- 280-6786. given, good show and field pedigree. Raised with love. $200, 541-280-5292. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, Black Lab Pups, AKC, batteries or catalytic conchampion hunting lines, Dew verters. 7 days a week call Claws removed, 1st shots, 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 de-wormed & vet checked, ready to go, $350, 541-977-2551. 208 Border Collie pups, workPets and Supplies ing parents great personalities. $300. 541-546-6171. Adult Cat Adoption Special During the Month of July Boxer Puppies, AKC Registered adoption fee for all adult cats $700 each, 1st two shots is only $20.00. All Cats are 541-325-3376. tested for feline aids/leukemia. Adoption includes spay/ Cavalier King Charles Spaniels neuter, microchip, first set of Breeding pair. Ruby 3 yrs vaccinations and a free female, blenheim male 9 health exam with a local vetmonths. Excellent pets & erinarian. For information breeders. $1000 each. come by the shelter at 1355 541-419-7680 NE Hemlock Ave or call Chihuahua- Absolutely adorable 541-923-0882. . teacups, 2 males, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686 AKC German Shorthair puppies, solid liver, both parents used Chihuahua Pups, Apple for guiding, great pets. Head males well bred, $450. 541-420-1869, msg. small, $175. 541-420-4825. American Eskimo: 1 male 1 fe- Chihuahuas, purebred, 3 males, male. Free can’t keep, moved 15 weeks old, $100 ea., to apt. 541-728-0601 please call 541-763-2018.

German Shepherd puppy, 7 wk old male, Purebred, without papers. $300 and comes with bag of food, collar and leash. I can email or text pictures. Please call (541)410-5788. COCKALIER PUPS, friendly and German Shorthair AKC beautiful, ready to go August Pups, 8 wks, $300 females, 14th. Please all $250 males, 541-815-5921. 1-503-957-7268. German Wirehair Pointer Dachshunds Mini health guarPups, ready now, $200/ea. antee, puppy kit, pics & info 541-408-6099. highdesertdogsonline.com Golden Retriever/Australian $300 each 541-416-2530 Shepherd puppies, 8 weeks English Bulldog, AKC Reg, 1 old. $100. 541-504-2251. male left $1700, all shots puppiesgolden8@hotmail.com 541-325-3376. Griffin Wirehaired Pointer FIND IT! Pups, both parents reg., 5 males, 4 females, born 6/20, BUY IT! ready for home 1st week in SELL IT! Aug, $1000, 541-934-2423 or The Bulletin Classifieds loreencooper@centurytel.net English Bulldog brindle female. 8 wks and ready to go! Please leave msg. 541-588-6490 English Mastiff pups, Pure breed. 3 females left, 2 brindle 1 Fawn. 14 weeks, $500 & up. 541-279-1437 Havanese. AKC, only 1 left from this years litter. Traditional English Springer Spaniel white/cream "cuban silk Puppies AKC Field, ready dog". Hypo-allergenic, non now. Liver & white, males shedding. Bred from cham$500, females $600. Beaver pion lines. For more pics and Creek Kennels 541-523-7951 information go to: millerbeavercreekkennels.com www.oakspringshavanese.com “Free Barn Cats” or call Patti 503-864-2706 The Humane Society of Redmond has Free Barn Cats Heeler Pups, standards & minis,$150 ea. 541-280-1537 available. All Barn Cats have http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com been tested for feline aids/ leukemia, vaccinated, spayed KITTENS, females spayed , /neutered. For more info call white & gray striped. 541-923-0882 or come by 541-647-1318 or 410-9305. the shelter at 1355 NE HemKITTENS free to good home! lock Ave. They are good w/pets & kids, Free to good home with no house-trained, and like to kids: 3-yr spayed Min Pin, travel, great campers! trained. 541-548-4535. 541-419-1365.

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Furniture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, at discounted fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643.

Nice adult companion cats FREE to seniors! Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 541-398-8420.

TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUStart at $99 CHONS), 5 females, 1 male, MODEL HOME FREE DELIVERY! 7 wks. July 15th. CKC reg., FURNISHINGS Lifetime Warranty hypoallergenic, non-shedSofas, bedroom, dining, Also, Wanted Washers, ding, 1st shots $350-$400. sectionals, fabrics, leather, Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups Dryers, Working or Not “Kittens, Kittens, Kittens” 541-460-1277 home office, youth, AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, Call 541-280-6786 The Humane Society of Redaccessories and more. $300, Madras, 541-475-2593 WANTED: mond has Kittens. Adoption MUST SELL! Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! BLACK LAB FEMALE. fee of $40.00 includes spay/ POODLES, AKC Toy,home (541) 977-2864 A-1 Washers & Dryers 541-475-9371. neuter, microchip, first set of www.extrafurniture.com raised. Joyful tail waggers! $125 each. Full Warranty. vaccinations & a free health Affordable. 541-475-3889. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s Westie, 2-yr.-old intact male, exam with a local Veterinardead or alive. 541-280-7355. Sofa, Reclining Berkline, 17 mo. outside dog, loves kids & atian. All kittens are tested for Poodle, standard pups (5), only tention, reg. used for breed- Appliances, new & recondiold, like new, $495 OBO, feline aids/leukemia. For 2 weeks. Put your deposit ing, $300. 541-447-8912. 541-389-7809,541-390-7799 tioned, guaranteed. Overmore information come by down now! 541-647-9831. stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s the shelter at 1355 NE Hem“Westie” male pup, should Table, dark pine, 8 chairs, 2 Maytag, 541-385-5418 lock Ave or call us at PUG female 8 wks, fawn color, mature 15-20 lbs. non-shedleaves, good cond., $500 parents reg., and on-site 541-923-0882. ding hypo-allergenic, great Computer Desk, corner unit, firm, 541-383-2535. $450. 541-610-5133, brown and black, $25. with kids, other animals, Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Rat Terriers, tiny, 2 females 541-526-1186 $500. 541-447-8912. Central Oregon Largest $150 ea., 1 male, $100, Selection. 541-408-3317 Whippet Puppies, whimsical Desk, Solid Pine, 2 drawers, 541-410-6596. has tall back, $250. Call heart stealers, wormed, 541-480-0596. Labradoodles, Australian Shih Poos - Toy, non-shedding shots. $350ea. 541-280-1975 Imports 541-504-2662 puppies, Great family pets, Entertainment Center, w/27” www.alpen-ridge.com Three males left. $350, call Working cats for barn/shop, Hitachi TV, $100; Sleeper companionship. FREE, fixed, Kelly, 541-489-3237 or Couch, queen size, $100; shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 541-604-0716. LABS, AKC, chocolate & black Freezer Upright, Blue Ribbon, male 10 weeks old. Parents 17 cu.ft., off white, $100, Yellow Lab AKC Puppies, on site $250. 541-447-8958 please call 541-598-4714. OFA hips/elbows cert., Wanted washers and dryers, champion bloodlines, dew FREEZER 6’ chest working or not, cash paid, Low Cost Spay & Neuter is claws removed, 1st shots & $100. 541- 280-6786. HERE!! Have your cats & dogs wormed, ready 8/1, $500. 541-350-5425. spayed and neutered! Cats: 541-728-0659. (Taking deps.) $40 (ask about out Mother & FURNITURE. All like new. Twin Washer & Dryer, Whirlpool, plus size, 5 yrs. old, electric, Siberian Husky puppies AKC. Kittens Special!) Dogs: & Full Pine Bunk Bed w/Mat$150/pair. 541-526-1186 Champion lines. $595 & up. $65-$120 (by weight). We tresses $350, Solid Wood stones-siberians@live.com also have vaccines & micro36X48 Dining Table + 4 541-330-8627 chips avail. 541-617-1010. 211 Chairs $80, 541-480-0596 www.bendsnip.org Children’s Items Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 GENERATE SOME excitement in males & 2 females, chocoyour neigborhood. Plan a gaMaltese (3/4)/ Shih Tzu (1/4), Swing Set, metal, with slide, late, black, apricot & cream Yorkie Puppy Very sweet 12 rage sale and don't forget to 7 week male, ready to go, $40, please call week old male. Vet checked $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 advertise in classified! small, $300, 541-419-3082 541-389-4121. $400 541-788-7374 Jabezstandardpoodles.com 385-5809.

IT’S THE FINAL WEEKEND OF OUR

SUMMER SALE! IT’S YOUR LAST CHANCE TO GET A “TEST-DRIVE PRIZE” AND ENTER TO WIN OUR GRAND PRIZE WEEKEND AT THE OREGON COAST! PLUS, GET EMPLOYEE PRICING ON THESE AND MORE AT BOB THOMAS

2008 Chevrolet Cobalt LT

2006 Chevy HHR LT

2009 Kia Rondo LX

2007 Chevy Colorado

2007 Honda Accord SE

#W30273A,VIN: 245835

#W30427A,VIN: 651333

#W30401A,VIN: 7272216

#W30540A,VIN:219331

#W30478A,VIN: 047908

$9,888

$10,750

$12,995

$13,670

$13,888

2007 Jeep Liberty Sport

2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee

2010 Subaru Forester

2008 Toyota RAV4

2008 Ford Explorer XTL

#W30542,VIN: 536396

#W30139A,VIN: 548236

#W30250A,VIN: 732659

#W30207A,VIN: 060526

#W30536A,VIN:A38399

$14,750

$16,840

$17,500

$18,130

$18,675

2008 Subaru Outback i

2007 Toyota Highlander

2008 Honda Accord EX-L

2007 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

2008 Honda CR-V

#W30309A,VIN: 378191

#W30488A,VIN: 203763

#W30481A,VIN: 042702

#W30052A,VIN: 226108

#W30483A,VIN: 050731

$18,995

$19,747

$19,811

$19,995

$20,375

2008 Chevrolet Silverado LS

2007 GMC Yukon SLE

2008 Honda Pilot VP

2009 Chevy Traverse LS

2010 Chevy Equinox LT

#W30404A,VIN: 155199

#W30448A,VIN: 289783

#W30352A,VIN: 048830

#W30430A VIN: 130873

#W30472A,VIN:220260

$22,165

$25,742

$25,888

$26,370

$26,500

2010 Chevy Camaro LT

2007 Chevrolet Suburban LT

2009 Cadillac DTS

#W30409B,VIN:117219

#W30435A,VIN: 361467

#W30470A,VIN: 149414

$26,888

$28,467

$30,386

O N 3 R D S T R E E T J U S T N O RT H O F T H E U N D E R PA S S | W W W. B O B T H O M A S . C O M | ( 5 4 1 ) 3 8 2 - 2 9 1 1 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Photos for illustration purposes only.


F2 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 212

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Antiques & Collectibles

Antiques & Collectibles

Golf Equipment

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Musical Instruments

Misc. Items

Tools

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Wagner Paint Crew, used twice, $90 OBO; 7” wet tile saw, $50, OBO, call 541-306-4632.

Found black lab mix, young female, Prineville Reservoir, July 11th. Call 541-693-4055 to identify.

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SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Snow Removal Equipment

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ANTIQUE DEALERS TAKE NOTE! Extremely ornate walnut burl, 1885 Eastlake shelf, 36x9, $200: Over-mantle 3-panel mirror, gilt Rococo, 37x14 plus 4” crest, $130; Handmade, mahogany lamp table, 18x20 drawer with tea slot, escutcheon missing, $65; Fruitwood commode, original hardware and casters 28x16, 46” top holds elegant, movable mirror, you’ve never seen its likeness, $400. Hand-molded decorated clay salt cellar 4x6 hinged wooden lid, back extends 4”, hole for hanging, $95. Boudour kerosene lamp $55. 1960s birch dining hutch, dish shelves, hidden silverware drawer, linen compartments, attractive, photo available, $75. 541-489-3364.

Journey of Discovery HAS MOVED and we’re having a GIGANTIC SALE! Thursday 7/15 through Sunday 7/18 from 10-5. A new container from Europe has arrived with tons of new antiques and accessories. DON’T MISS THIS SALE! Journey of Discovery has a new location at 52 SE Bridgeford Blvd. 541-382-7333

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Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Bob Dylan Wanted: 1966 Paramount Theater Portland Concert Poster, will pay $3000 Cash, 310-346-1965.

Bicycles and Accessories

Flow Blue and Potato masher collection; vintage African fabric & Saris. 541-419-9406.

Mtn. Bikes, 26” (1) 15-spd, (1) 18-spd., great cond., hardly used, $50 ea., 541-548-7137.

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TV, 52” Big screen, works great, exc. cond, asking $1500, . 541-480-2652.

Furniture

242 Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Exercise Equipment Treadmill, ProForm XP 542E, very good condition $200 541-317-5156.

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Golf Equipment Clubs, Calloway X20,steel irons, 5-PW, w/4 hybrid, 3 mo. old, $300;Taylor Made Tour Burner driver, Pro Force V-2 regular shaft, $100, 541-350-7076. Driver, Great Big Bertha, $100, Sonar Tech, wood, $100, great cond., 541-388-1533.

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Estate Sales 2-FAMILY ESTATE SALE. something for everyone, Fri. and Sat., 8am-4pm. 62720 Stenkamp Road.

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Golf balls, over 200 avail. $0.10 - $0.20 ea. depending on cond., 541-388-1533.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Browning Hi-Power, Pro-9, 9mm, stainless, w/2 mags, $400, call 541-647-8931. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt .45 Stainless Commander $575, Taurus PT92 AF 9mm, extras, $425, custom built .45 auto, beautiful, $500, custom AR-15, stainless bull barrel, $725, all OBO, 541-382-4317. GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036. H&R 410 shotgun, black wood stock, 22” topper. $150. 541-647-8931. Hunting Bow, Golden Eagle, like new, arrows, rest, sight, release, hardcase, $300 OBO, call 541-382-8393. Marlin Papoose 22LR backpack/survival takedown rifle. Wood stock, nylon case, 2 mags, tool. Like new condition. $175 541-647-2426 Mossberg 500, 12 ga. pump, like new with box & accessories, $275, 541-647-8931. Oregon’s Largest 3-Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW July 16-17-18 Portland Expo Center #306B Off I-5

Special Guests: Oregon Military Vehicle Collectors Club of Oregon Fri 12-6 * Sat. 9-5 * Sun 10-4. Adm. $9.00 Children under 12 Free 1-800-659-3440 CollectorsWest.com

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Sage Fly Rod, Z-AXIS, 490-4, 4 weight, Generation 5 Technology, Sage Reel 2540, w/ line, Sage extra spool, w/ line, Sage dbl. carrying case, new never used, paid $1460, asking $750, 541-884-6440 Savage Model 99 Lever action 300, 4X scope, 2 box 180 grain shells, $450, 541-382-8143.

Smith & Wesson, 40 cal., SW40VE, stainless, case & ammo, $400, 541-647-8931.

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953. Buy My Pianos, lessons incl., consoles, digitals, & grands, new & used, 541-383-3888.

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Misc. Items

Springfield XDM 45ACP. New "M" version of this great handgun, $575, 541-549-1599 WIN 73 32/20, 38/40, 71/348, & 94 30/30 & 32. Marlin model 375/375 & 30/30. REM 41, 30 REM, Browning Safari 30-06, Perrazzi 12 ga. single shot, trap. WIN 101 12 ga., single shot trap & O/U 12 ga. WIN model 12, 12 ga. trap. Pumps, auto and side-by-side 12 & 20 ga. H & H Firearms 541-382-9352 Winchester, Model 1894, 32 WS, w/Saddle Ring, made in 1916, $2700; Winchester 1894 32WS, made in 1941, $995; both OBO 541-647-8931

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Art, Jewelry and Furs Jewelry, Beautiful silver, rings earrings, artisan made, call eves. 541-390-6768. Rare Ann Ruttan Original, 6’x4’, $7000 OBO, please call 541-408-4613.

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Computers

All-Metal Trigger & friend, Nancy. Health problems, must sell $1500 OBO. 541-382-8814. Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Carpet Drying Fans (2), commercial grade, $100 each, call 541-788-7488 Concrete Stepping Stones, 16” square, 2” thick, grey, 80 at $2.50 ea., 541-526-1186 Four 2-ply Open Country tires, used, P265/75R16, $40. 541-388-2348. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ HELP YOUR AD TO stand out software, to disclose the from the rest! Have the top name of the business or the line in bold print for only term "dealer" in their ads. $2.00 extra. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Parka, Down, Red/Black reversible, $50, call eves., 541-390-6768.

Trees, Plants & Flowers

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Fri., Sat. & Sun. 10-4. ELIMINATED STORAGE UNIT Too much to list! 60958 Ashford Drive.

Furniture! Toys! Clothes! 3165 NE Barrington Ct., Providence Subdivison, Sat., 7/17 only. 8am-Noon.

Multi-Family Garage Sale: Sat. Only, 8-4, 20840 Cassin Dr, off 18th/Morning Star, follow bright green signs, a large variety of items, along with some antiques.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Cement Blocks, 50 8”x16” $1.50 ea, 100 8”x8”, $0.75 each, 541-447-1039.

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Fuel and Wood

Tools Chainsaws, Stils, 660, w/new top end, $850 OBO; 441, w/ new top end, $750 OBO; 044, very good shape, $600 OBO; Generator, Honda, E3000, low hours, $1350 OBO, 541-419-1871.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177

Complete set - Roberts Carpet tools, w/ box, $160. LOG Truck loads of dry Lodge541-480-5950 pole firewood, $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 Drill Press, American Machine, or 541-536-3561 for more 5-spd., industrial model, information. $225, 541-385-9350.

288 SUPER DUPER GARAGE SALE 61283 Robin Hood Lane, in Nottingham Square. Sat. 8-3. Assorted things to go.

MOVING

Craftsman 18 HP lawn tractor, w/ chains & 44” mower, 8 HP rototiller, 42” blade, 32” disc, 1 bottom plow, 42” cultivator, & fertilizer spreader. $600 OBO. 541-382-9012 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

RIDING LAWN MOWER, John Deere, equipped with bags, $550. 541-389-8433. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found: 7/7 Female Aussie Red Healer mix, in Tumalo area, purple collar, 541-419-8646 FOUND: Baseball Cap, on Brookswood, 7/13, call to identify. 541-617-1052

Found Glasses, bifocals, 7/13, near Rock Creek by Crane Prairie, 541-504-5575. FOUND: gray cockatiel, near Vince Genna stadium. Please call if your bird flew the coop! 541-382-2554. FOUND in Redmond, set of Ford keys, house key, bottle cap opener, and lanyard. 541-548-2360. FOUND male Chihuahua/Pomeranian mix around 9 yrs old, near Les Schwab south. 541-977-8170. Found: Nintendo DS, in Drake Park, 7/10, call to identify, 541-610-4026. FOUND Small black dog in the vicinity of Mt. Bachelor Villiage. Looks to be terrier/dachshund mix with an injured leg. 541-633-5309 Found Sunday, 7/4: case of CDs on SE 27th St., Call 541-382-7680. Found Table saw cutting guide, near O’Neil Junction, 7/15, 541-923-0198 after 2 pm. Lost Ring, brown, wooden, square, has white spiral shell in center, Downtown/West side Bend, afternoon of 7/15, call 541-579-1041. Reward. LOST: silver money clip, 7/3 in Bend, turquoise & coral decoration, 541- 385-6012. Lost: Taylor golf driver head in grey fuzzy cover @ Awbrey Glen 541-280-0397 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Fri-Sat 8-4 Air tools, power tools, tv, furniture, more. Two households. 3568 SW 35th Pl.

Large Yard Sale: Sat. & Sun. 8-5, 2280 NW 101st, lots of misc., something for everyone!

Garage Sale: 157 SW Cascade Garage Sale: Saturday & Sale at Norton Street Super Sale 61937 Lorrin SALE! Sunday 9-5, Lots of tools and Garage Mt View Ct. Redmond., SatStorage, 365 Norton St. bePl., off Pettigrew Rd., Sat. SAT July 17th at 8am Great urday ONLY 9-5, Come and Super Sale! 62865 Eagle Rd. miscellaneous, 19965 Pinhind Dandy’s. Lot of good Only 8-3, electronics, lots of Items at Great prices, Evsee. Fri. & Sat. 8-2, furn., bdrm ewood Rd. stuff. Sat. July 17, 9am-3pm. office, desk supplies, clothes. erything you could imagine. set, desk, fridge, bikes, TV’s, GARAGE SALE July 16-17th 3410 NW Bryce Canyon Ln, Gym, fishing, antiques, house- Garage strollers, dish sets, clothing Sale: Sat. 7 am, 9-3, Household, home decor, hold, tools, A/V, Fri.-Sat. 8-2 Awbrey Park 290 @ $.50/ea., to much to list. 63049 Yampa Pl, contents clothing, furniture, TV's, follow red arrows to 207 SW of house, furniture, washer/ Sales Redmond Area Unique Quilt Sale: Small wheels, construction items. Maricopa Dr off W. Reed Mkt. Multi-Family: Fri., Sat. & Sun. dryer, tools, yard equip., quilt sale, longarm machine 4545 NE Upas Ave, Redmond 10-6, lots of mens & boys Huge Family Sale: Romaine kitchen items, artwork, more. ESTATE SALE - 95 yrs., Fri. & also for sale., Fri. & Sat, 9-4, clothes, household, cameras, Huge Sale! Village, 60917 Ridge Dr., Sat. 8:30 to 4. Antiques, 927 NE 12th St. bikes, furniture, & tools, Garage Sale, Sun., July 18, Attn: Sportsman! Tools, HH FREE HH Fri.-Sat. 8-4, sporting goods, dishes, collectables, ChristUnused Online Shopping sterling silver collectibles, 10 AM - 5 PM. video games, clothes, bikes, hunting, fishing, camping, mas, furniture, TV, freezer, Garage Sale Kit Sale: Sat. & Sun. 8-4, 2116 66300 Gerking Mkt. Rd., 61925 Dobbin Rd. misc. outdoor gear, some LPs & 8-track w/player. JACKPOT!!! Find treasures for Will not sell before 10 AM. NE Monterey Ave, Kitchen, between Bend & Redmond. furniture and camper. Thurs. Household; fishing, Fly tying, everyone @ our awesome jewelry, beauty, women’s Place an ad in The Bulletin & Fri. 10-4, Sat. 8-1 and Sun. camping. 712 NW 19th Pl., sale! Multi-family Fri.-Sat., Garage sale to benefit Mission fashion, travel items, holiday, MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE for your garage sale and 1-4. 2225 SW 24th Street. 8-4, 60473 Pima Rd. DRW. Trips, Furniture, Antiques, lights, misc. 65456 Swalley Rd., Fri., Sat., receive a Garage Sale Kit John Siegworth Flat screen TV, Bar-B-Que, & Sun., 7-11. Tires, propane FREE! 286 288 clothes, etc. Fri. and Sat. stove, furn., carpet, etc. 7/16-17, 8-4, 2415 NE Sales Southeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend KIT INCLUDES: Marie Siegworth Keats. 541-633-9679 • 4 Garage Sale Signs Multi Family Garage Sale, 2 Family Moving Sale. Sports, • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Sat. July 17th, 8-noon. 61351 Robinhood Lane, NotHuge Sale, Fri. & Sat. 8-5, anclothes, household, elecToward Your Next Ad 1922 NW 7th. tingham Sq. off 15th. Sat., tiques, collectables, big block 20391 Illahee Dr. tronics, books, etc. Sunday • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Don’t Miss!! 7/17,8-3 only. Household & Chevy parts, tools, house7/18 from 9am-4pm. 63775 Success!” clothing. 541-408-6154. Friday, July 16 & Saturday, July 17 hold, Don’t miss! 22220 Berg Lane. 771-4802. • And Inventory Sheet 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance NOTICE Parker Ln., take Butler Mar- Garage Sale for Everyone: numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday. ket to Peterman, to Parker, 4 family Sale Sat. 7:30-3, 3061 Sat. & Sun. 9-4, 40 years of Remember to remove PICK UP YOUR (Take Murphy RD. to Benham, go north (left) to Illahee by Bend Airport. NE Byers Ct, Providence, Pet collectors items,59775 Calyour Garage Sale signs GARAGE SALE and turn east to sale site - or take Parrel Rd. to Rae Rd. kennel, furniture, vacuum, gary Loop, private viewing KIT AT: (nails, staples, etc.) after your - go north to Illahee - and go east to sale site) Moving Sale- all must go. Kids lawn mower, baby items. of antiques, 541-389-9282. 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Sale event is over! THANKS! books, crafts, games, & Antique Oak Buffet and round oak table with 6 chairs and four Bend, OR 97702 From The Bulletin and your Keller Supply Company close 62590 Eagle Rd- Red Barn, puzzles. Camping gear, Furleaves: Dining Table with 6 chairs and one leaf: Washer and local Utility Companies out specials, open to the 8-4 Fri. & Sat., Freezer, dishniture, Papasan chair, Fire dryer; Sofa; Loveseat; Hide a bed; Recliners; Rockers; Coffee public, Sinks, faucets, washer, redwood platform escape ladders- lots of stuff! and end tables; Swag Lamps; Queen bed; double bed; dresser toilets, tubs & showers. swing w/cushions, large yard 63493 Crestview, near Skyand night stands; Lamps; Linens; Freezer and garage refrigeraFri. 9am - 3pm. art lanterns, etc., etc. & misc. view MS. Fri. & Sat. 8-2 tor; Books; hand tools; Two Televisions and stands; Lots of picwww.bendbulletin.com Sat. 8am-Noon. tures; Patio table & chairs; 20" snowblower--Electric start; Pots 282 8-3, Fri. & Sat., 3082 NE Madi- Moving Sale: Sun., 9-Noon, 200 SE Bridgeford. & pans; dishes; kitchen tools; lots of electrical appliances; 100 son Ave., off Butler Market. Sales Northwest Bend Something for Everyone! Sat. Kitchenware, love seat, Fu- Kids Toys, Bed Frames, Shoes, records--78 & 33s; Swag lamps; Antique small pot belly stove; LOTS of CLOTHES, shoes, only 8 - 3 (No early birds) ton couch/bed, nice miniRakes, shovels, hoes, lawn & garden tools; ladders; Fishing Car Seats, Faxs, Clothes, household, books & more! 63135 Fresca St., off OB RiBlowout Sunday Sale at Wall fridge/freezer, 10-spd road poles and gear and reels; Movie and Slide projectors and camBooks, Lawn mower, Chicken ley, near Empire Unbelieve- A variety of sports goods, boys Street Storage at 1315 NW bike, 63079 Fairey Ct., in eras; three swivel barstools; Large Sunbeam gas barbecue; LaTractors, Pallets, old camper, able Prices + Free Stuff Wall St., 10am -2 pm only, Woodhill Park, N. on Boyd clothes, household, priced dies & men's clothing; Kneehole desk; Electric typewriter; Drum and much more. 8-3, Saturgreat prices and lots of free Acres from Empire, follow cheap. Fri. & Sat., 7-2, 20915 Table; Christmas items; Food & cleaning supplies; Two rug day, 7/17 only, 60730 Gosstuff too! YARD SALE Sat. July 17 8-1. signs left. Bilyeu Ct, off Butler & Brinson cleaners; Lots & lots of glassware; More of everything! ney Rd. 2642 NW Pickett Ct., Awbrey Presented by: Butte. stroller/car seat, kids Bring your own bag to Spinna- Moving To Africa: Antique Oak Multi-Home Sale: Fri. & Sat. GARAGE SALE $3 bag! Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC stuff, various indoor lights, ker St Garage Sales, 2 neigh8-4, Nottingham Square subSat. July 17 and Sun. July 18, Table, collectibles, tea pots, www.deedysestatesales.com bathroom faucet, Subaru bike bors, Fri.-Sat., 8-?, furniture, division, on Maid Marion Ct., 9 a.m. -? 65160 85th St., off & household, Fri. 8-4, Sat. rack. Lots of odds and ends. desk, patio furniture, misc. Tumalo Road. Bend, OR 9-2, 3047 NE Yellow Ribbon. baby stuff, clothes, toys, more! 541-419-2242 days ~ 541-382-5950 eves DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Found: Female Aussie/Redheeler mix, 7/7,Tumalo area. 3-4 yrs., Purple collar, no tags. Brenda 541-419-8646

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Moving Sale, Fri. & Sat., 8-2, 1224 NW Milwaukie. Twin bed, toys, doll houses, arm chairs, coffee table & more.

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Building Materials

All Year Dependable Wedding/shower decor: cenFirewood: SPLIT Lodgepole terpieces, some floral, bridal cord, $165 or mixed $135. shower games. $5 all; nice Bend Delivery Cash, Check. cut-glass pattern punch bowl, Visa/MC. 541-420-3484 with stand, 10 glass cups, plastic ladle $20; Glass buffet luncheon plates, 1960s Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $115/cord rounds, split style $10 all. Come & see, avail., del., Bend, Sunriver, make offer on any or all. LaPine. Fast, friendly service. 541-419-6408. 541-410-6792 or 382-6099.

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HUGE TREE LIQUIDATION SALE!! 300 Trees left, dont miss out! Shade & Ornamental potted trees. Must Go! $8-$17. Volume discounts avail. Sat. & Sun. 10-4, 6268 W. Hwy 126, Redmond. 541-480-5606.

Found Camera: Cascade Lakes Hwy., morning of 7/10, call to identify, 541-389-4687.

MOVING

SALE

ESTATE

SALE

GARAGE

SALE

with ROSE & LARGE PARROT EXHIBIT. Sat. July 17, 1-6pm 1133 NW Meyers Butte Rd. (Off Houston Lake Rd) Powell Butte 541-416-0386

MULTIPLE FAMILY yard sale, Sat. 8-3. 1623 NW Spruce Pl., left at Spruce Ave., off 10th Huge Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. St., follow signs. Furn., kids 8-5, 11866 SW Latakomia, clothes, toys, baby items. Powell Butte. tools, fishing gear, clothes, household, 4 Neighborhood Sale: Aspen wheeler, bow, lots of misc. Creek Park, 2300 SW Maripsosa Lp., at club- Huge Garage Sale just N. of La house, 3 families, Sat. 8-5, Pine, Sat.-Sun. 9-5, 17522 Derby Ct.,follow signs, quads, SALE: Fri. and Sat. 8 - ? Home lawn mowers,furniture, more decor, kid items, clothing and more. 2391 NW Hazelwood LAPINE LODGEPOLE DODGERS Ave. (23rd & Hemlock) Annual garage sale at Gordy’s Truck Stop, Fri. & Sat., 7-5. Sale to benefit Hugs Adult DisDonations are welcome. Drop abled Social Club, Parking off after 6 p.m. Thursday. Lot of City Center Clinic, at 8th & Forest, Sat. 8:30 - 2:30 Check out the classifieds online Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat. 10-4, 1689 NW Newell Ave., www.bendbulletin.com clothes, household items, Updated daily furniture, toys, and more. SISTERS VIEW RANCH YARD Yard Sale: Hunting, camping SALE. 17337 Hwy 126, beequipment & much more! tween Cloverdale and Geo. Sat. 8:00 to 4:00, 2346 SW Cyrus Road, 9 a.m. – 7 p.m. Umatilla. Sat. & Sun. Great items for college dorms, everyday use, 292 & gift ideas. HAY! We even have hay! “water park” for Sales Other Areas kids, 5-10 yrs old. (541) 521-1031…see you there! After 18+ Years of Collecting, its time for a BIG SALE! Fri. & Sat. 9-4, 55782 Swan Rd., 5 mi. S. of Sunriver, tools, handyman jacks, working Vaughan Drag Saw, hay harpoons, spring tooth harrow, Myers hay trolly, vintage traps, hay hooks, old bottles, insulators, fruit jars, vintage wood skis, oil cans, cotton scale, old sled, Arctic Boy & Igloo water coolers, Sad irons, nice wrought iron fireplace tool set, some clothing & jewelry, + lots of misc.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 F3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

325

476

476

476

Hay, Grain and Feed

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Bends Reliable Handyman For Sale, Zero Down for qualified person. Will assist with start up, Unbelievable marketing strategies, 541-306-4632.

Lead Generator, Part-time, Costco Roadshow 7/29 -8/9, Hunter Douglas & Carpeting. 1-866-298-8607. Email

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

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Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Free: Baby Bunnies! Call 541-923-7501

1998 New Holland Model Free Roosters, variety of breeds, for more info call "1725" Tractor. $13,900. 541-548-6635. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. Ford 8N Tractor, 3 point hitch, 6’ blade, dirt scoop, $1750 for all, 541-382-6028.

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4

Buckskin Morgan 2 yr. gelding. Sport or western prospect. Smart, mannered, has had As low as ground work. $1800. Palo0% APR Financing mino Morgan 3 yr. gelding, The New Kubota RTV500 comwestern prospect. Calm, pact utility vehicle has all the friendly. $3,000. Trained comfort, technology and reMorgans for sale. Western, finements of a larger utility trail and hunt. 541-317-0822. vehicle – but fits in the bed celebritymorgans.com of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on ap- Corral Panels, (2), $50 ea. OBO, please call 541-948-9282 for proved credit. more information.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

DIAMOND J STABLES is re-opening at the end of July! call Lori to hold a stall at 541-389-8164. Limited Stalls available.

Employment

400

Cook

421

Schools and Training Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Utah & British Columbia. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin in Sept. Registration now open, www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Sunriver/Redmond day time hrs., affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

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Domestic & In-Home Positions We are looking for an experienced caregiver for our elderly parents. This is an employee position, and possible live-in. 541-480-0517 or 541-548-3030 jensen.cpa@bendcable.com

476 Equestrian Jumps: 20 standards, 11 poles, 23 steel cups. Like new; ready to use. $850 541-233-3207

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

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Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Cutting Orchard Grass, 2-tie, $110/ton, Alfafla Grass Mix Feeder hay, $90/ton, good quality Alfalfa, $110/ton, 541-475-4242, 541-948-0292 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 first quality hay, 2 twine, 70-75 lb. bales, Redmond. $5 each while they last. 541-923-5931.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. EXCELLENT GRASS HAY FOR SALE, fine stems, leafy green, 80 lb. bales, $125 ton in Culver, 541-475-4604.

Grass Hay, Central Oregon Pasture Mix, $135/ton, will load, barn stored. Please call 541-475-0383 or 503-209-5333. QUALITY 1st cutting orchard grass hay. No rain. Cloverdale area. $110 ton, 2 twine 70-75# bales, 541-480-3944.

Horse Boarding, $100 per month, SE Bend, next to Forest Entrance. Please call 541-389-9282. Horse Shelter, metal, 12’x12’, $500 OBO, please call 541-948-9282.

Large (1) horse trailer, w/small tack area & spare tire. $1000 OBO. 541-318-7523

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

345

Addiction Counselor: Part time schedule, CADC or masters level\ experience preferred. Salary DOE, Fax resume to Pfeifer & Associates, 541-383-4935 or mail to 23 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend, 97701.

APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management

Automotive Front End/Suspension Tech needed. Experience is essential for this fast paced job. Send replies to: 1865 NE Hwy 20, Bend, OR 97701.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dental: Busy Dental Office looking for friendly & dependable Dental Hygienist & Dental Assist. Exp. necessary. Please send resume to Box 16211954, c/o, The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, 97708.

Drivers- Taxi cab drivers wanted. Position is for an independent contractor to drive for Checker Cab of Central Oregon. Are you over 25, have a clean driving history, clean criminal history, have a neat appearance & are ready to work for Central Oregon's fastest growing taxi company? If so please call 541-382-3411 to get started. Experienced National Freight Brokers Satellite Transportation is seeking Experienced National Freight Brokers. Must know all aspects of the industry. Willing to train those with moderate background. Please email resume to: jeff@satellitetrans.com Financial Controller in Health Care Business,. Part Time, experience preferred. Fax resume to Pfeifer & Associates, 541-383-4935 or mail to 23 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend, 97701. Food Service - Line Cooks, full and part time, with recent verifiable experience. Apply in person at Bend Brewing Company, 1019 NW Brooks, between 9-11 am, and 2-5 pm. Downtown Bend.

Host/ Hostess

Automotive

Livestock & Equipment Goats. 4-H, Registered Nubian Buck $300 Milking NubianX 2yr doe $150 541-281-4047

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Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

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Produce and Food KIMBERLY ORCHARDS Kimberly, Oregon U Pick: Dark sweet cherries Rainier Cherries Bring Containers Open 7 Days per week 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. Only. (541) 934-2870

Weed Free Grass Hay, only 3 tons avail., $110 per ton, Prineville, 541-447-1039.

personals

Employment Opportunities

The Ranch has an immediate opening for a seasonal Cook. Knowledge in all areas of food preparation a must. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Some benefits. Salary DOQ. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com . BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

541-322-7253

Seeking witnesses to accident at 4:07 p.m. on 7/3, at Colorado & Wall. 541-389-0662, help greatly appreciated.

Immediate opening for mid level entry Automotive Technician, for super busy shop. Exp. is required, ASE certified is a plus, but not required. Must have own tools, good driving record. Must pass drug test. Wages DOE. We offer full benefit pkg. Drop off resume or pick up application at: 2225 NE Hwy 20, Bend. No phone calls please.

CLASSIFIED

SALES

Don’t miss out on the unique opportunity to work in the Ranch’s newly renovated Lodge restaurant. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a “customer first” attitude? We are looking for an enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual to join Team BBR. This is for afternoon and pm shifts only. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

REPRESENTATIVE

A Classified Inside Sales position is available in The Bulletin’s advertising department. This position sells and services classified advertising for private party advertising customers as well as some commercial accounts with ads in The Bulletin, Redmond Spokesman and Central Oregon Nickel Ads. The position assists customers with ad creation, copy writing, and ad features in an effort to make their advertising successful. The position also makes outbound sales calls to commercial accounts, and does weekly follow up with existing customers. Excellent communication and presentation skills are necessary for success. The successful candidate must be able to manage multiple tasks and information about multiple publications, meeting the needs of the customer and the deadlines of the newspaper. The candidate must also offer outstanding customer service. A minimum of 1 year experience in sales, and / or a solid background in marketing, retail or telephone sales is required for consideration. The position is hourly, 40 hours per week and offers a competitive compensation / bonus plan with benefits. Please send a cover letter and resume to Sean Tate, Bulletin Advertising Manager at state@bendbulletin.com, or mail to Sean Tate at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please. Please submit your application by July 26th, 2010.

Sales

bskinner@customdecorators.com

507 Career opportunity selling the best European cars in the Real Estate Contracts World. Carrera Motors is looking for the right candiLOCAL MONEY date to sell Porsche, Audi, We buy secured trust deeds & Millwrights: VW, BMW and quality used note, some hard money Warm Springs Forest Products automobiles. Auto experiloans. Call Pat Kelley Industries is seeking jourence is not necessary, how541-382-3099 extension 13. neyman level millwrights for ever, a strong background in openings in Warm Springs, sales is mandatory. CandiOregon. Applicants must be dates who possess a book of What are you able to: business of qualified custom• Perform various duties in a looking for? You’ll ers will be the best fit for this fast paced modern sawmill. position. Excellent pay and find it in The • Perform trouble shooting, benefits. Email resumes to maintenance, repairs and Rebecca@carreramotors.com Bulletin Classifieds replacements for produc- or davidt@carreramotors.com. tion equipment. • 1-3 Years of industrial Sales Telephone prospecting posimaintenance experience as tion for important profesa journeyman or equiva528 sional services. Income polent. tential $50,000. (average Loans and Mortgages • Broad trade skills - welding, income 30k-35k) opportupneumatics, hydraulics. WARNING nity for advancement. Base & • Strong mechanical skills Commission, Health and The Bulletin recommends you able to use a variety of use caution when you proDental Benefits. Will train the hand and power tools. vide personal information to right person. Fax resume to: • Good reading skills for companies offering loans or 541-330-0853 or call Mr. drawings, service manuals, credit, especially those Green 541-330-0640. and blueprints. asking for advance loan fees or • Able to work safely. Teacher - Lake County ESD is companies from out of state. Warm Springs Forest Products now accepting applications If you have concerns or offers a safe work environfor a Special Education questions, we suggest you ment as well as competitive Teacher. Applicants must consult your attorney or call wages, benefits packages, have or qualify for Oregon liCONSUMER HOTLINE, and 401K plan. censure as a Teacher with 1-877-877-9392. E-mail: dhenson@wsfpi.com Handicapped Learner Endorsement. This is a partTURN THE PAGE Remember.... time (.5 FTE) position with a Add your web address to For More Ads salary range $17,300your ad and readers on $26,300 DOE, partial benThe Bulletin's web site will The Bulletin efits. Position closes 8/5/10. be able to click through auApplications are available at tomatically to your site. the ESD (357 No. L St. Lake- BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real view, OR, 541.947.3371), estate equity. Credit, no Sales email: problem, good equity is all dgoss@lakeesd.k12.or.us or you need. Call now. Oregon on EdZapp. Submit applicautomobile Land Mortgage 388-4200. tion, resume and cover letter.

541-385-5809

A

S ales P rofessionals N eeded!

We have immediate openings with Smolich Nissan and Smolich Hyundai , THE source for the largest selection of new and used cars, trucks, and suv's in Central Oregon. Sales experience preferred. Applicants must be professional minded, with the attitude and desire to succeed. Professional attire required. We train our salespeople! We offer an aggressive pay plan along with insurance, 401k, and vacation. Call Jack Broome @ 541-749-4025 or Dirk Zanchin @541-389-1178 for more details. Or apply in person at our new Hyundai facility on the corner of Hwy 20 and Purcell (across from Costco) or at our Nissan store at 1835 Hwy 20 (across from Pilot Butte) SALES - Between High School and College? Over 18? Drop that entry level position. Earn what you're worth!!! Travel w/Successful Business Group. Paid Training. Transportation, Lodging Provided. 1-877-646-5050. (PNDC)

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Technical Support Specialist 4 Working with complex informations systems and software applications. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent work experience required. Full time $3,875-$6,310/mo. Plus benefits. Job announcement and online OJD application available at: http://courts.oregon.gov/ojd/j obs. Closes July 28, 2010. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

UBS Financial Services, Reg. CSA, Series 7/63 Req. Minimum 3 yrs Exp. Strong customer focus. Fax Resume to: 503-221-5862 HR Manager

Reporter Seeking Part-Time Sports Reporter The Bulletin is seeking a part-time sports reporter. Writing/reporting experience and good general knowledge of a broad range of sports, especially high school sports, is preferred. Position requires flexibility to work weeknights and Saturdays. Applicant must be able to meet tight deadlines and possess good computer and typing skills. Direct inquiries to sports editor Bill Bigelow at bbigelow@bendbulletin.com. To apply, send cover letter and relevant clips/writing samples to Marielle Gallagher at: mgallagher@bendbulletin.com or The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR, 97708-6020.

Debris Removal

ROOM AVAIL. FOR LADY in lov ing adult foster home, dis counts avail. 541-388-2348.

JUNK BE GONE

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552 Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who Domestic Services contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Anne’s Domestic Services has Construction Contractors openings for new clients who Board (CCB). An active are in need of a helping hand license means the contractor with shopping, meal prep, er is bonded and insured. rands, Dr. appt., house clean Verify the contractor’s CCB ing, etc. Will schedule license through the daily/weekly. Reasonable CCB Consumer Website rates, satisfaction guaran www.hirealicensedcontractor.com teed. Call 541-389-7907 or or call 503-378-4621. The 541-815-7888. Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior Home Is Where The Dirt Is to contracting with anyone. 10 Years Housekeeping Some other trades also Experience, References, Rates require additional licenses To Fit Your Needs Call and certifications. Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933 FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

House Keeping Services: 11 yrs of experience in house keeping. Angelica Lopez House Keeping & Janitorial, 541-633-3548,541-633-5489

Excavating

Handyman

Handyman

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

Opportunities Available! Earnings: No Limit!!

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

BMW 75/7 866xx w/side & tank bags many extras/upgrades eg. shocks, solo seat rack, elec. ignition, dual plugs, crash bars, tool kit, pump & BMW rag, $2750 OBO; RS fairing, white, incl. mounting bracket, $500 OBO, Luftmeister side YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, tanks, black, $500 OBO, misc full windshield, foot pads, parts eg. triple clamp master leather saddle bags, rear seat cylinder head, temp repair rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 manuals, air mail leather vest mi., barely broke in, $4750. & jacket, 541-280-8811 pkg. Please call 541-788-1731, deal $3250 OBO. leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com BMW K1200GT 2007, 8000 for pics. mi., factory warranty, like new, $10,500, 386-334-2427. YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, BMW R65 1983, Fairing, rack, full windshield, foot pads, travel cases. 33K miles. leather saddle bags, rear seat $2250. Call 541-593-3691 rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use mi., barely broke in, $4750. classified to sell those items Please call 541-788-1731, you no longer need. leave msg. if no answer, or Call 385-5809 email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics.

Well Established business for sale. $50,000. Motivated! Call for more info. Dawn Ulrickson, Broker 541-610-9427 Duke Warner Realty 541-382-8262

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $8500, 541-771-8233

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ATVs Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Honda 4Tracks 1986, like new, hunting racks, $1995 OBO, Sunriver area, call 808-373-2721,503-830-6564

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $15,000 obo. 541-693-3975.

541-385-5809

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930. Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

HOURS: Wednesday-Friday - 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday - 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

YOU MUST BE: • 14 or Older • Honest • Outgoing • Reliable

Call 541-508-2784

Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1600 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Yamaha Grizzly 660 2006, 408 mi, 38 hrs, excellent condition with records, Warn winch, snow plow, front and rear racks with bags. Moving, must sell $6200 OBO. Call 310-871-8983

New Hours Beginning July 17 Business Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Classified Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

Ask us about

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

573

SALES PEOPLE PART-TIME

Fire Fuels Reduction

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

W A N T E D:

Weed free bark & flower beds

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

850

Business Opportunities

Own a Pub in the Gorge. Spectacular setting in Cascade Locks, OR. 3-story building, land, & profitable business. Upper floors available for development. Assumable SBA loan. Will consider exchanges. $679,500. 503-780-3945.

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Stage 1 kit, Thunder Headers, upgraded stereo w/100W booster, new windshield, batteries, & tires, incl. full luggage set, $11,500, 541-325-3191.

Snowmobiles

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Motorcycles And Accessories

Independent Sales Contractor

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Boats & RV’s

500 800

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Adult Care

860

Finance & Business

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Weekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

LADYBUG LAWN CARE Clean up, maintenance, pruning, bark, edging, affordable, reliable quality service 541-279-3331, 541-516-1041 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085 RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Roofing Are all aspects of your roof correct? Roofing specialist will come and inspect your roof for free. Roofing, ventilation and insulation must be correct for your roof to function properly. Great rebates and tax credits available for some improvements. Call Cary for your free inspection or bid. 541-948-0865. 35 years experience & training, 17 years in Bend. CCB94309 cgroofing@gmail.com

Power Equipment Repair

Tile, Ceramic

Consolidated Pest Control Ants, spider, rodents and more! Fast, professional service. ccb #187335. 541-389-3282 www.consolidatedpest.net

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


F4 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., $3700, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

870

Boats & Accessories

The Bulletin Classifieds

OUT-CAST Pac 1200, never in water, great for the Deschutes, John Day or small lakes. Cost new $2800, asking $1400 firm. Go to www.outcastboats.com to view boat. 541-420-8954

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO! 818-795-5844, Madras

15’ Crestliner, tri hull walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

Priced lowered! 12’ Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft boat, like new, used twice, has pole holder & folding seats. $1200. 541-617-0846.

Yamaha XS400 1980, years in storage, 3077 actual miles, new windscreen and mirrors, professionally services, $1000. 541-382-0089

875

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882 Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Fifth Wheels

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2 slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Tioga C24' 1996, Exceptional cond. 30K mi., $17,900. Lots of extras. A/C, Onan Gen, Awnings, Sleeps 6, Solar panel, Micro, 541-410-7005.

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 435-229-9415.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

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16 Ft. Hewes Sportsman, aluminum, full curtains, 90 hp. Honda EZ load $20,000. w/extras 541-330-1495. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, & trailer, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302

Kayak:

Pungo120 Wilderness; incl. Yakima car rack w/Thule Brackets; Aquaboard Paddles; Exc. cond.: $800 Call 541-382-7828 or 541-728-8754.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

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Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

“WANTED”

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, 2 slides,

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

18’ 1967 Sail Boat w/trailer, great little classic boat. $1000 OBO. 541-647-7135.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

18’ SEASWIRL, new interior, 165HP I/O, 10HP Johnson, fish finder, much more, $1990,541-610-6150

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Canoe/Kayak Trailer, lightly used, exc. cond., w/winch, $400, call 541-548-4628. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Bounder

34’

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Wheel

Winnebago Sightseeer 27’ 2004 30K, 1 slide, hyd. jacks, lots of storage, very clean, exc cond, $41,900,541-504-8568

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Find It in Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-279-9581. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, Price Reduced, 7.5 KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed, Queen hidea-bed, $90,000. 541-382-1721 Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

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Travel Trailers Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

885 Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

MUST SELL! 2008 Komfort 32’. GORGEOUS, have lots of pics. $16,500 OBO. Call 541-728-6933 or email teryme@aol.com

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Canopies and Campers EAGLE CAP 2007 9.5 w/ slide, like new $22,000; 2001 1 ton Ford Dually 4x4, 88K mi., $22,000. Buy both for $42,000. 541-350-5425.

2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Now asking WHOLESALE for $8750. Frank, 541-480-0062.

1984 Dodge 360 V8 4 speed, 4x4, Edelbrock Cam, 650 4 barrel carb, $1000. 541-977-7596 or 549-5948.

Chevy 3/4 Ton 350 1974, automatic, dual gas tanks, wired for camper and trailer. Dual batteries. One owner. Lots of extras. $2950, 541-549-5711

tow pkg., loaded, runs great, 112K mi. $9,995. 541-383-8917.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $29,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Nash 22’ 2011, queen walk around bed, never used, $17,000, call 541-420-0825.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

South Wind 35P 1997, Back Up camera, Satellite dish, tires 2yr. old Refurbished Interior and fresh service. Sale Price $21,777. VIN# A02441 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Lance 11.5’ 1992, elec. jacks, micro, A/C, awnings on both sides & back, very clean, no dents, non smoker., clean, $6000 OBO. 541-408-4974.

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RVs for Rent 2005 38’ Atasca Motorhome, self contained, 3 slides, private party. 541-536-6223.

Dated and first published this

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Thomas P. Niedzwiecki and Amelia A. Niedzwiecki, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as Beneficiary, dated April 23, 2008, recorded April 29, 2008, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2008-18835, covering the following described real property: Lot 8 of BADGER CROSSING, PHASES I AND II, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay: Regular monthly payments of principal, interest and escrow collection in the amount of $1,024.93, from February 1, 2010, through present, together with late fees, escrow collection for taxes, insurance, and other charges as of April 22, 2010, as follows: Late Fees: $115.29; Escrow Collection: $468.84; and other charges to be determined. Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: 1. Principal: $220,538.57, plus interest thereon at the rate of 5.625% per annum from April 22, 2010, until fully paid; 2. Accrued Interest: $1,356.45 (as of April 22, 2010); 3. Late Charges: $115.29 (as of April 22, 2010); 4. Escrow Collection: $468.84 (as of April 22, 2010); and 5. Other Costs and Fees: To be determined. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on September 14, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale.

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Iron Eagle Utility Trailer 2007, swing

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (3) P186/80R13, All-Trax, M&S, 4 hole 3” center rims, $100. Like new! 541-480-5950 (4) 19560R15, Falken HS404 M&S, 70% tread, $100. 541-480-5950. Tires, (4), All Season, size, 235/65R17, $80, please call 541-598-4714. Tires, Four Maxxis 760 Bravo, P225/70R16 102S mounted on American Racing wheels, like new $500 OBO (541)280-2684 Transmissions, (2), Chrysler, Torque-Flight, $250, no exchange, 541-385-9350.

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Antique and Classic Autos

Dodge Ram 1500 2007 Only 28K Miles! Vin #252936

Only $20,755

smolichmotors.com 366

Dodge Ram 2500 2007

Quad Cab, SLT 4 door, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. Loaded! $31,995 VIN#J590169

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Dodge Ram 2500 2008

A Local Danchuk Dealer Stocking Hundreds of Parts for ‘55-’57 Chevy’s. Calif., Classic, Raingear Wiper Setups, Call Chris, 541-410-4860. Quad Cab, SLT 4 door, 4X4, Short Wide Box, Cummins Diesel, Auto Trans, Big Horn Edition. Loaded! $33,995 VIN#G166872

541-598-3750

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

DLR 0225

Ford F150 Lariat 2001, step side, 4x4, loaded, white w/tan, leather, CD, tow pkg., running boards, alloy wheels, all pwr., exc., 109K, avail. 9/1, KBB private at $9400, call 541-306-4632.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to ORS 86.705, et seq. and ORS 79.5010, et seq. Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Paul Robert Reynolds and Lauren Reynolds, as tenants by the entirety, as Grantor, in which Northwest Community Credit Union is named as Beneficiary, and Western Title and Escrow as Trustee dated October 27, 2008, and recorded October 31, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-44035 of the Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Parcel I: Lot 3 in Section 1, Township 16 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Parcel II: All that part of the West Half (W 1/2) of Section 1, Township 16 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows:

Unpaid payments in the amount of: $24,738.12 Late Fees in the amount of: $ 1,091.87 Collection fees in the amount of: $ 93.00 Unpaid property taxes in the amount of: $ 3,774.43 Total $ 29,697.42 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following:

NISSA N

541-389-1178 • DLR

Kyle Schmid, Attorney for Trustee

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.753 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums:

rear gate, 5x8, 24” sides, $1150, 541-325-2684.

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STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above-named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale.

BEGINNING at the Southeast corner of Government Lot 3; thence Southerly along the North-South centerline of said Section 1 to the Northeast corner of the property described in deed recorded in Book 202, Page 158, Deed Records, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence South 89E54' West along the North line, and extension thereof, of the property described in said deed recorded in Book 202, Page 158, to a point on the East line of the property described in deed recorded in Book 162, Page 513, Deed Records of Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 01E 05' West along the said East line of property described in Book 162, Page 513 to a point on the South line of said Government Lot 3; thence Easterly along the said South line of Government Lot 3 to the point of beginning.

Smolich Auto Mall

The Bulletin Classifieds GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Allen Reel Attorney for Personal Representative 7300 SW Bel Aire Drive Beaverton, OR 97008 Telephone: (503) 643-8999

In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any.

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, now will sell wholesale for $19,500, Frank. 541-480-0062.

GOING IN THE SERVICE MUST SELL!

Chevy Avalanche Super Deal! Z71 2002, 4x4,

Cadillac Coupe Devile 1981, loaded, w/nice red leather, just out of storage, $1375, 541-447-1039. extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Pickups

Carl L. Urben Personal Representative

DATED this 7th day of May, 2010.

Hitch,

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

1996,

No. 10PB0059MS

10th day of July, 2010.

Kyle Schmid, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 382-3011

SuperGlide PullRite Automatic, 16K Lbs., for Short Bed pickup, 541-312-4210.

21,000 miles, great cond., $16,500, 541-389-3237.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $34,000. 541-548-1422.

Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above estate and has qualified. All persons having claims against

said estate are hereby required to presnet the same with proper vouchers within four months from this date at 7300 SW Bel Aire Drive, Beaverton, Oregon 97008 or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings in the administration of the decedent’s estate may obtain additional information from the records of the Court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative.

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291L, 30 & 50 amp service, 2 slides, ceiling fan, A/C, sur- Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th round sound, micro., always wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, stored under cover, under 5K ¾ plywood interior, ramp and mi. use, orig. owner, like double doors, 12 volt, roof new. $19,500, also G M C vent, stone guard, silver with Diesel 2007 tow pickup chrome corners, exc. cond., avail. 9K mi., $37,000, $7800 firm. 541-639-1031. 541-317-0783.

Fifth

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

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Legal Notices

Utility Trailers

Everest 32’ 2004, model

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

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Legal Notices

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Brake, 13 spd. transmission, VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual good tires & body paint Dularto Carbs, trans, stud(white). Also, 1993 27’ step ded tires, brakes, shocks, deck equipment trailer struts, exhaust, windshield, T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. tags & plates; has sheepskin Ready to work! $9500 takes seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ both. 541-447-4392 or subs, black on black, 25 mpg, 541-350-3866. extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454

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Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE ESTATE OF CHARLOTTE CHRISTINE URBEN NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES DEPARTMENT OF PROBATE

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44,000 mi., A/C, awning, in good cond., $39,000, call 541-593-7257.

24' Conquest class C 2006, great floor plan, like new condition 14,000 miles, 1 slide. $43,900. VIN# A82830 Beaver Coach Sales 541-322-2184. Dlr# DA9491

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

VW Cabriolet 1981,

RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 TWO HANGARS at Roberts Field, Redmond, OR. spots for 5 airplanes. Fully leased, income producing. $536 annual lease. $250,000 both For details, 541-815-6085.

Watercraft

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Antique and Classic Autos

X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 spd., 5th wheel hookups, $4000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm.

Outstanding principal amount: Interest to April 1, 2010: Late fees: Unpaid property taxes: Collection fee: Total as of April 1, 2010:

$ 419,254.94 $ 21,091.40 $ 1,091.87 $ 3,774.43 $ 93.00 $445,305.64

WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on 1:00 p.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110 on Tuesday, September 7, 2010, at the front door to Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 Northwest Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503) 684-3763, toll-free in Oregon (800) 452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. DATED this 19th day of April 2010. /s/ Malcolm J. Corrigall Malcolm J. Corrigall, Successor Trustee


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, July 17, 2010 F5

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Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Ford F-250 XLT Superduty 2002, 4X4, Supercab, longbox, 7.3 Diesel, auto, cruise, A/C, CD, AM/FM, pwr. windows/locks, tow pkg., off road pkg., nerf bars, sprayed in bedliner, toolbox, mud flaps, bug shield, dash cover, 32K mi., orig. owner, $22,995, 541-815-8069 Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Dodge Durango 2007

Jeep Liberty 2006

Only 16K Miles! VIN #551428

Only $13,985

Only $19,787

4x4,6.0 Diesel long box, auto, X-liner, Super Hitch, camper ready, 20K, Arizona beige, like new, $32,500, 541-815-1523

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

GMC Sierra 2500 1995, 4X4, 350 auto, club cab, A/C, power, 117K, hideaway gooseneck ball, $4500, please call 541-815-8236.

GMC SIERRA SLT 2004 4x4 EXT Cab, leather, loaded, Michelin tires, shell, showroom cond., Will consider reasonable offer over wholesale. 541-389-0049 eves.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

smolichmotors.com smolichmotors.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $23,000, 541-576-2442

Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

AUDI A4 Quattro 2.0, 2007 37k mi., prem. leather heated seats, great gas mi., exc. cond.! $23,500 41-475-3670 Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111 Mercedes ML350 2006

Super low miles, Moon roof, premium package. Leather

Audi S4 2000, 6spd, V6TT, 112k, AWD, very clean, all maint. records. $9000 541-788-4022 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

$29,995. Stk. ml350 VIN#A087549 DLR 0225 541-598-3750

Hyundai Sante Fe 2009

Ford Focus 2007, 17,982 miles, includes winter tires and rims, $11,000. 541-475-3866 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, v6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

miles, full power, extremely clean!!! $19,995. Stk. 4276 VIN#h260663 DLR 0225 541-598-3750

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884 Toyota 4Runner 1998, 1 owner, 155K, Rare 5-spd, 4WD. $5500, 971-218-5088. Local.

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 366

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., loaded, $20,500 OBO. 541-388-2774.

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

SPECIAL EDITION CONVERTIBLE 6 speed manual, A/C, leather seating, cruise, premium sound, 78,000 mi. $8,995

Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1990, $1500 Firm, Please call 541-536-2836.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Porsche Targa 911SC 1979, 110K, Very sharp and clean car, 2 deck lids, one w/whale tail. Drive an investment $15,800. 541-389-4045

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Smolich Auto Mall

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

VW Cabriolet 1992, 200K miles, fair cond. Runs good. $1200 OBO. 541-318-7523

We will pay CASH for your vehicle Buying vehicles now thru July! Central Oregon's Largest Used Vehicle Inventory Over 150 Used in stock see it on www.smolichmotors.com Smolich Certified Pre-Owned or Factory Certified Pre-Owned Shop with confidence at Smolich Motors

We BUY - SELL - SERVICE all makes

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

Subaru Outback AWD 2006 Only 44K Miles! Vin #323960

Only $15,988

Family Owned and Operated for over 40 years

Smolich Motors www.smolichmotors.com Hwy 20 in Bend (541) 389-1177 • (541) 749-4025 (541) 389-1178

HYUNDAI Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Stk# 4226 VIN#Y0150653

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Volkswagen New Beetle 2003 74,800 mi. $7,000 Blue w/ black charcoal interior, air conditioning, power steering, AM/FM stereo & cassette, moon roof, power windows and more. Call Rick @ 541-788-8662

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Mercedes Benz C300 2008, 4WD, GPS, 24K, take over lease, $646/mo,541-678-5756

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

Mazda Miata MX-5 2000

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Only $12,988

GOING IN THE SERVICE MUST SELL 1987 Chrysler LeBaron convertible, 2.2L turbo, auto., power windows and locks. rebuilt block. $1500. 541-977-7596, 548-5948

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

The Bulletin

Only 18K Miles! Vin #266412

Mazda Miata 1999, 5 spd., 60K mi., loaded, looks/drives great, $6200, 541-389-9836

Top Model, 50K miles, blue, all accessories, need the money, $9200, call Barbara, in Eugene at 541-953-6774 or Bob in Bend, 541-508-8522.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Hyundai Tiburon 2008

541-749-4025 • DLR

SUBARUS!!!

Toyota Corolla LE 2009, Grandma’s Car, in new cond., 1455 mi., why buy new, save $$$. $13,500, 541-389-4608.

Ford Taurus Wagon 1989, extra set tires & rims, $1100, Call 541-388-4167.

Buick Lucerne 2006,

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, good cond., 2 tops, consider trade, 541-593-4437.

Lowest Price of Year Event!

dan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

940

Vans

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mazda 3 i 2008, se-

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

car, great shape, 120K miles, excellent snow car $4995. 541-383-8917

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

NISSAN

GLS , 'all wheel drive", 17,000

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Audi A4 Avant Wagon 1998, great

Vin #246894

Ford F350 XLT CrewCab 2007

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

2 YR/24,000 MILE MAINTENANCE ON ALL NEW CAR PURCHASES!*

541-749-4025 • DLR CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Mercedes 230SLK 1998, exc. cond., extra wheels/studded tires, convertible hardtop, yellow/black leather, many extras. $6300 OBO,541-617-0268

1 AT

$

Subaru Outback Wagon 2002, 81,856 miles, 4-Cyl 2.5L. AWD, Automatic, 6 Disc CD, New Tires, Heated Seats, $9150 / 541-388-5181

NEW 2011 SUBARUS ARE ARRIVING DAILY! STOP IN AND SEE THEM TODAY!

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Manual

366

52

169

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium Package

Manual mo.

42 Month Lease Model AJA-01 SALE PRICE $16,499 Due at signing $2,115.52 MSRP $18,190. Cap Reduction $1,869. Customer Cash Down $1,869. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 56% $10,186.40. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: AG512214 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

$

20,999

Model AAC-02 MSRP $22,384 VIN: A124490

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X

Automatic

Automatic

1 AT

$

19937

mo.

42 Month Lease Model AJB-01 SALE PRICE $17,975 Due at signing $1,999.74 MSRP $19,190. Cap Reduction $1,279. Customer Cash Down $1,478.37. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $10,554.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: AH505521 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X Special Edition 1 AT

$

48

229

mo.

42 Month Lease Model AFA-21 SALE PRICE $20,625 Due at signing $2,480.96 MSRP $21,690. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.48. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,929.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: AG785217 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium

$ 1 AT

80

299

mo.

Model ADC-04 SALE PRICE $24,999 Due at signing $2,620.80 MSRP $26,494. Cap Reduction $1,999. Customer Cash Down $1,999. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 50% $13,247. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: A1363975 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5 GT

37470

$

Model AFB-21 MSRP $22,890 VIN: AH797957

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Wagon Base Model Manual

$

22,999

Model BDA-01 MSRP $24,220 VIN: B1314502

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X SE Premium Package

$

23,288

Model AFE-02 MSRP $24,397 VIN: AG777783

New 2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Wagon Premium Package Automatic

mo.

42 Month Lease Model AAH-04 SALE PRICE $30,299 Due at signing $3,141.70 MSRP $32,693. Cap Reduction $2,495. Customer Cash Down $2,495. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 49% $16,019.57. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: A1212075 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

CALL 888-701-7019

21,999

Manual

42 Month Lease

1 AT

$

CLICK SubaruofBend.com

$

25,999

Model BDD-02 MSRP $27,559 VIN: B3313782

VISIT

2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND

AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through July 18, 2010.


F6 Saturday, July 17, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

23,885

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

$

MSRP ...................... $36,190 Smolich Discount ......... $3,805 Customer Cash ............ $2,500

MSRP ...................... $28,930 Smolich Discount ......... $2,045 Customer Cash ............ $1,000

0% for 36 months on approved credit

J10048 VIN: AL162418 • 1 at this price

2010 DODGE RAM 1500 SLT QUAD CAB 4X4

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

2010 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4X4

Power sliding doors and Rear DVD!

25,885

$

DT10029 VIN: AS182436 • 1 at this price

Plus $2,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC. 0% available for 60 months on approved credit in lieu of $2500 customer cash.

DT09035 VIN: 139196

0% for 60 months on approved credit in lieu of $1000 customer cash.

W 2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4 ALL NE

2010 DODGE RAM 2500 BIG HORN CREW CAB 4X4

2010 DODGE CHARGER AWD

IN STOCK AND READY FOR DELIVERY!

Leather and moonroof! DD9053 VIN: AH25600 • 1 at this price

29,885

$

5.7 Hemi!

MSRP ...................... $34,655 Smolich Discount ......... $2,770 Customer Cash ............ $3,000

MSRP ...................... $49,160 Smolich Discount ......... $3,775 Customer Cash ............ $2,500

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

28,885

$

42,885

$

6.7 Cummins Turbo Diesel! DT10068 VIN: AG179026 • 1 at this price

0% available for 36 months on approved credit in lieu of $1500 customer cash.

0% available for 72 months on approved credit in lieu of $3000 customer cash.

Call us at 541-389-1177 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 7/18/2010. On Approved Credit.

CHRYSLER CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED SALE!! Limited, Leather!

certified pre-owned

Leather, Nice!!

Very Clean!!

Sahara, Less than 2k Miles!

Only 19k Miles!

Only 1,700 Miles!

2007 JEEP COMMANDER $

2008 DODGE DURANGO SLT $

2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4X4 $

2009 JEEP WRANGLER $

2007 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4 $

2010 DODGE CHALLENGER RT $

VIN: 633050, Stk# D10037A

VIN: 134449, Stk# DT09051A

VIN: 6W246894, Stk# J10018B

VIN: 791053, Stk# J10054A

VIN: 340185, Stk# D10084A

VIN: 129754, Stk# D10053A

29,995

23,995

14,995

SM O LI C H N IS SA N

29,995

14,995

• 3 month/3,000 mile Maximum Care Warranty • 6 Years/80,000 Mile Power Train Warranty • 125 pt. Inspection • Roadside Assistance

29,995

S M O LI C H HY UN DA I

• Carfax

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

Visit us at : www.smolichhyundai.com

VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

NEW 2010 NISSAN VERSA Auto, A/C

$

11,995 +DMV

MSRP $17,710 — Smolich Discount $551

SALE $ PRICE

Auto, A/C, CD & more...

$

17,159

-$1,500 HMF BONUS CASH

$15,659

0% 60MOS. $1500 for

+DMV

$

20

10

18,995

HYUN

HMF BONUS CASH*

*On Select Models

DAI ACCENT 3DR HATC PRICE

VIN: 507890. MSRP $22,755; Smolich Discount $2,260, Rebate $1,500

19,995 +DMV VIN: 121490. MSRP $23,690; Smolich Discount $1,945; Rebate $1,750

SMOLICH NISSAN

541- 389 -1178

“ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ” All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday, July 18, 2010 at close of business.

K

$

13,613 +DMV

NEW 2010 NISSAN ROGUE

$

C HBA

MSRP $13,855 — Smolich Discount $242

0% for 60 MOS. SALE

+DMV

AWD, Back-up Camera & more...

*

UP TO

VIN: 648785. MSRP $17,570; Smolich Discount $1,075, Rebate $2,000

AWD, ABS, Traction Control

VIN: 873949

UNDAI ELANTRA G Y H 0 LS 201

14,495

NEW 2010 NISSAN ALTIMA

0% for 60 MOS.

+DMV

VIN: 367619. MSRP $13,115; Smolich Discount $1,120

NEW 2010 NISSAN SENTRA

IT

...HYUNDAI

-$1,000 HMF BONUS CASH

$12,613

VIN: 150981

2010 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS MSRP $26,000 — Factory Rebate $1,000

SALE $ PRICE VIN: 400586

25,000

0% for 48 MOS.

+DMV

WE MOVED SMOLICH HYUNDAI STOP BY! 2250 NE HWY 20

541-749-4025 www.smolichhyundai.com

CENTRAL OREGON’S LARGEST USED SELECTION! 7 Day Exchange Program 3000 Mile/3 Month Powertrain Warranty

SMOLICH Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car CERTIFIED 105 Point Vehicle Inspection

w w w. s m o l i c h m o t o r s . c o m


Bulletin Daily Paper 07/17/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday July 17, 2010

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