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He’s just gotta dance Bend teen accepted into premier ballet school • COMMUNITY, E1

Get on your feet Paddleboarding picking up speed • SPORTS, D1

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400 geese euthanized in Brooklyn

Questions of student Web use rise after allegations

Paint shortage

Authorities thinning birds’ numbers after plane crash in Hudson By Isolde Raftery New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — They have been a familiar sight around the lake in Prospect Park in Brooklyn: Canada geese, scores of them. To some residents, the birds and their fuzzy offspring are charming hints of wildlife amid the bricks of the city. Recently, when one was found with an arrow through its neck, park rangers tried to corral it to administer first aid. But then, over the past few days, parkgoers noticed something strange. The geese were gone. All 400 of them. On Monday, the answer emerged. Wildlife biologists and technicians had descended on the park last Thursday morning and herded the birds into a fenced area. The biologists, working with the federal Agriculture Department, then packed the geese two or three to a crate and took them to a nearby building where they were gassed with lethal doses of carbon dioxide, Carol Bannerman, a spokeswoman, said. Bannerman said the measure was necessary.

How should schools regulate what kids see? By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Last school year, Aaron Chriss lost his school Internet privileges for two months because of questionable websites he allegedly visited during the school day at Summit High School. Aaron’s mom, Susan Chriss, has questioned the high school’s decision to suspend the privileges, whether the sites were inappropriate and whether her son was even at school the day pornography was allegedly accessed on a library computer. Her questions point to one of the great challenges facing schools today: As districts try to embrace technology, they also must find a way to allow access to the Internet while preventing students from wading through its often inappropriate morass. District officials said they’re doing the best they can but face an ever-changing foe in the form of millions of websites and constantly improving technology. See Internet / A4

Believe in gravity? Better think again

Aviation safety “The thing to always remember in this New York situation is that we are talking about aviation and passenger and property safety,” she said. “In New York City, from 1981 to 1999, the population increase was sevenfold.” The authorities have been thinning the region’s ranks of geese since some of them flew into the engines of US Airways Flight 1549 in January 2009, forcing it to ditch in the Hudson River. Last summer, 1,235 were rounded up and killed at 17 sites around the city. But the Prospect Park culling appears to be among the biggest, and its scope mortified some residents. See Geese / A5

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Mark Cloyd with Specialized Pavement Marking Inc. of Portland places a marker near a freshly painted stripe on Colorado Avenue in Bend.

End of the line? National shortfall of road paint leaves roads without guides By Nick Grube The Bulletin

TOP NEWS INSIDE UGANDA: World Cup bombings shine spotlight on terror cell, Page A3

INDEX Abby

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Calendar

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Classified Comics

Horoscope Local

If you’ve driven along the recently resurfaced section of Galveston Avenue between 14th and 17th Streets in northwest Bend in the past several days, you might have noticed something was missing. The once-prominent bike lanes were virtually nonexistent — denoted only by intermittent streaks of white spray paint — and instead of double yellow lines dividing the eastand westbound traffic, two rows of reflective tabs served as the barrier

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Obituaries

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E4-5

Oregon

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Community E1-6

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Consumer

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Crossword E5, G2

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Editorial

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We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 194, 44 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

It’s hard to imagine a more fundamental and ubiquitous aspect of life on the Earth than gravity, from the moment you first took a step and fell on your diapered bottom to the slow terminal sagging of flesh and dreams. But what if it’s all an illusion, a sort of cosmic frill, or a side effect of something else going on at deeper levels of reality? So says Erik Verlinde, 48, a respected string theorist and professor of physics at the University of Amsterdam, whose contention that gravity is indeed an illusion has caused a continuing ruckus among physicists, or at least among those who profess to understand it. Reversing the logic of 300 years of science, he argued in a recent paper, titled “On the Origin of Gravity and the Laws of Newton,” that gravity is a consequence of the venerable laws of thermodynamics, which describe the behavior of heat and gases. “For me gravity doesn’t exist,” said Verlinde, who was recently in the United States to explain himself. Not that he can’t fall down, but Verlinde is among a number of physicists who say that science has been looking at gravity the wrong way and that there is something more basic, from which gravity “emerges,” the way stock markets emerge from the collective behavior of individual investors or that elasticity emerges from the mechanics of atoms. See Gravity / A4

Beyond guns: NRA expands political agenda By Eric Lichtblau New York Times News Service

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partment has already run out of pavement paint, and Hanson estimates that after the three blocks of Galveston are striped, the city will need an additional 8,000 gallons to complete marking roads that are scheduled to be worked on during the summer construction season. Both agencies are expecting to receive more paint in the coming months, but the delays have officials worried that roads might not be properly striped before winter weather arrives. See Paint / A5

New York Times News Service

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Movies

A2

between passing motorists. While the City of Bend intends to re-stripe the roadway this week, an industry-wide shortage of pavement-marking paint is putting the pinch on local jurisdictions and could make Galveston’s temporary traffic boundaries a common sight throughout parts of Central Oregon this summer. “It’s going to be hard to find lines,” Bend Street Division Manager Hardy Hanson said Monday. “A lot of places will not have very good markings.” The Deschutes County Road De-

By Dennis Overbye

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WASHINGTON — Fresh off a string of victories in the courts and Congress, the National Rifle Association is flexing political muscle outside its normal domain, with both Democrats and Republicans courting its favor and avoiding its wrath on issues that sometimes seem to have little to do with guns. The NRA, long a powerful lobby on gun rights issues, has in recent months also weighed in on such varied issues as health care, campaign finance, credit

card regulations and Supreme Court nominees. In the health care debate earlier this year, for instance, the NRA’s lobbyists worked with the Senate majority leader, Harry Reid, to include a little-noticed provision banning insurance companies from charging higher premiums for people with a gun in their home. The NRA worked out a deal last month exempting itself from a proposal requiring groups active in political spending to disclose their financial donors. Its push this spring for tougher gun

rights in the District of Columbia served to effectively kill a measure — once seemingly assured of passage — to give the district a voting seat in Congress.

Credit cards and guns With a push from the NRA, a popular bill last year restricting credit card lenders came with an odd add-on: It also allowed people to carry loaded guns in national parks. And the gun lobby put potential supporters of the Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan on notice this

month that a vote for her will be remembered at the ballot boxes in November. The NRA’s burgeoning portfolio is an outgrowth of its success in the courts, congressional officials and political analysts said. With the Supreme Court ruling last month for the second time since 2008 that the Second Amendment guarantees an individual the right to have a gun, the NRA now finds that its defining battle is a matter of settled law, and it has the resources to expand into other areas. See NRA / A5

“What you’re seeing is a recognition that support for the Second Amendment is a not only a very powerful voting bloc but a very powerful political force.” — Chris Cox, chief lobbyist for the National Rifle Association


A2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Apple employee Franklin Weichelt cleans the glass in front of a display of Apple iPhone 4 phones. Consumer Reports has given Apple’s latest phone a “not recommended” rating.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

2 13 15 28 30 38 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $10.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

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Regardless of criticism and technical problems, gadget is flying off shelves By Jeff Gelles The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — First there was the buzz about something bad — not the usual “amazing” or “awesome” — on the new Apple iPhone 4. Online and off, users shared stories of dropped calls and weakened reception when they gripped their iPhones in certain ways. Then there was Apple’s embarrassing suggestion that the problem was due to a software flaw — and one that existed on previous iPhones, too. The company said iPhones can mislead users about how much signal strength is available, often showing two more “bars” than they should. Now Consumer Reports has added insult to Apple’s self-inflicted injuries: The magazine said Monday that it had given the iPhone 4 its dreaded “not recommended” rating, after its own tests confirmed what many iPhone users had already learned the hard way. “It’s official,” Consumer Reports said in an e-mail announcing its findings. Tests showed that the iPhone’s signal could signifi-

cantly degrade when a user’s finger or hand “touches a spot on the phone’s lower left side — an easy thing, especially for lefties.” The magazine did offer a juryrigged fix: Placing duct tape or similar material over the antenna opening could largely eliminate the problem. “It may not be pretty, but it works,” said senior editor Mike Gikas.

Successful launch AT&T referred questions to Apple, which sells the iPhone 4 at prices that begin at $199 for the lowest-memory model. The Silicon Valley icon, which has called the iPhone’s debut “the most successful product launch” in company history, didn’t reply to requests for comment. Apple has been hanging tough throughout the mini-tempest, even after making a painful admission for a company that built its name by creating a seamless blend of hardware and software. Apple’s website still features its July 2 “Dear iPhone users” letter, which acknowledged that “some users have reported that iPhone 4

can drop 4 or 5 bars when tightly held in a way which covers the black strip in the lower left corner of the metal band.” But the company mostly blamed the newly identified software bug: “Upon investigation, we were stunned to find that the formula we use to calculate how many bars of signal strength to display is totally wrong.” Gikas said Consumer Reports’ lab findings “call into question the recent claim by Apple that the iPhone 4’s signal-strength issues were largely an optical illusion.” He said the problem was serious enough to cause dropped calls in an area of weak reception, and did not occur on several other AT&T phones the group also tested, including the Palm Pre and the earlier iPhone 3GS.

Loved everything else Ironically, the magazine’s product testers otherwise loved the iPhone 4. Consumer Reports called it a step forward “in part because it sports the sharpest display and best video camera we’ve seen on any phone, and even out-

shines its high-scoring predecessors with improved battery life and such new features as a frontfacing camera for video chats and a built-in gyroscope that turns the phone into a super-responsive game controller.” All that praise aside, Consumer Reports said it couldn’t recommend the phone until Apple comes up “with a permanent — and free — fix for the antenna problem.” One possible answer is providing a free phone case for users who complain, a solution Apple has resisted. Consumer Reports said it planned to test whether a case can solve the signal problem. The iPhone’s antenna issues didn’t seem to faze analysts or the market, which sent Apple’s shares down less than 1 percent Monday. “I don’t think ultimately it’s a big deal for most consumers,” said Roger Entner, of Nielsen Co. “There are still waiting periods for the phone. People are lining up, and they can’t manufacturer enough. “From that perspective, people are voting with their wallets.”

Surfing required, and maybe a fee, for online TV By Paul Boutin New York Times News Service

Trying to watch TV on the Internet is frustrating. Sure, cutting off cable service sounds promising, if only for the money you’ll save. But online TV is so fragmented and incomplete that finding a favorite show can be difficult. Watching a complete season of shows, particularly if you want those shows without paying for them, is even harder. Nevertheless, I was able to find seven of last week’s 20 top-rated shows online and I did not pay a dime. If I were willing to pay a small amount, I could have seen a lot more. But it helps to know the tricks. Without Hulu.com, watching TV online would be a trying exercise of hopping from one network site to another searching for a favorite show. The NBC and Fox networks opened Hulu as a free online television hub for their shows in 2007. It was popular enough that last year, ABC joined the experiment and put many of its shows there, too. There are hundreds of programs available that run the gamut from morning shows to sitcoms, dramas and talk shows, most of them appearing online the morning after broadcast. Hulu also has some sports clips and Korean soap operas, which, believe it or not, are popular in Asia and Latin America. There is also a quirky collection of movies. Here is what Hulu does not have. There are no live broadcasts and no sporting events. Fox keeps “American Idol,” the nation’s No. 1-rated show, off Hulu. Only about

a half-dozen recent episodes of most shows are available, though last month Hulu added a $9.99-amonth service, Hulu Plus, that unlocks a larger back catalog. Comedy Central shows used to be on Hulu, but earlier this year, the network pulled up stakes. Hulu also has no programs from CBS, which is not a partner. So you will not find six of last week’s 10 most popular shows. No “NCIS,” no “Two and a Half Men” and no “Big Bang Theory.” Go to CBS’s own site and you discover you can watch only 90-second clips of “Big Bang Theory.” Different networks have varying attitudes and strategies about sharing their shows online. Within each network, there are also inconsistencies. Some shows are fully archived, some only briefly or in snippets, and many are not available at all. The highest-rated shows are often kept off the Internet so cheap online ad rates do not lure sponsors away from costlier broadcast TV advertising.

Online resources With every network alternately serving or denying its own finicky menu of shows and episodes, what is really needed is a Google for TV, but it is not available from Google. Head over to Clicker.com., a site financed with several million dollars of venture capital, that indexes what’s available in a searchable database. Clicker.com does not host the shows. Instead, it links directly to each episode’s location, whether on Hulu, network or pay sites. It clearly marks each result as free

or paid, and includes a screen shot and quick summary of the episode. Clicker takes a while to figure out, but it has filters that let you dig into, for example, only episodes from the second season of a particular show. Once you figure out the interface, it’s impressive. Eventually, though, if you try to watch enough TV on the Internet, you’ll be thwarted by Hollywood’s incomplete online archive. That’s when law-abiding videophiles go rogue and hunt down bootleg versions of shows at sites like NinjaVideo.net. Pi-

rate sites often offer exactly what the Internet audience wants, like all three seasons of “Californication.” But this week, federal law enforcement officials shut down nine of the most popular pirate TV sites. They even got NinjaVideo, whose servers are located in the Netherlands.

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Music subscription services never quite struck gold with Internet users, but now that the smart phone is becoming the era’s standard listening device, a new gold rush is on. Established music services like Rhapsody, Pandora and Slacker continue to improve mobile service, but they are facing new mobile music competition. Depending on a person’s phone, budget and listening habits, the new services may be a better call. The services seem to be converging on the same target — namely, apps that let users hear personalized radio stations, build play lists and store songs for offline listening. No service has all of these features for all mobile platforms, but they are making progress. Rhapsody’s Premier service ($10 monthly), for instance, is great for iPhone users, good for people with Android phones and useless on a BlackBerry. Users can create play lists or listen to a wide range of ad-free radio stations, and the artist information helps users discover similar musicians. Rhapsody’s radio channels are not tailored to personal tastes, as they are on Slacker and Pandora. Thumbplay, which made its debut in June and costs $10 monthly, is the only service that lets users select and download specific songs and listen to personalized radio on the three major mobile platforms. Also, BlackBerry users can download a play list or radio station for offline listening. Thumbplay’s library includes five million songs, and the company said it would reach about nine million by the end of the year. Rdio ($10 monthly for BlackBerrys and iPhones), which also introduced a trial service last month, has roughly five million songs for building a play list, or users can download an iTunes library to the service and store the play lists there. Mog, another new service, costs $5 a month for an online subscription, and later this month it will be bundled with a mobile service on the iPhone and Android phones for an additional $5 a month. Users can build play lists from a library of 7.5 million songs and download them for offline use, or they can start a personalized radio station inspired by a single song or artist.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 A3

FURNITURE OUTLET

T S After attacks in Uganda, worry grows over group

GULF OIL SPILL

By Mark Landler New York Times News Service

BP to test new cap today New York Times News Service

NEW ORLEANS — With crews encountering few snags in installing a new cap on a runaway well in the Gulf of Mexico, BP prepared Monday to test whether the gusher could be stopped completely. Doug Suttles, the company’s chief operating officer for exploration and production, said pressure tests would probably be performed today, once the new cap was fully connected. During the tests, which could last up to 48 hours, valves on the cap will be closed and for the first time since the disaster began in late April, the oil should stop leaking, he said. If the tests on the well show the pressure rising and holding — an indication that the well is intact, with no significant damage to the casing pipe that runs the length of the well bore to 13,000 feet below the sea floor — BP, working with government scientists, could decide to leave the valves closed, effectively shutting off the well like a cap on a soda bottle. On the other hand, the tests could show pressures that are lower than expected, Suttles said, an indication that the well is dam-

3 get life sentences for airline bomb plot LONDON — Three men convicted last week of involvement in a 2006 plot to bomb trans-Atlantic airliners were sentenced in a London court on Monday to life imprisonment, with the judge telling them they would serve a minimum of 20 years for their roles as “foot soldiers.” The sentencing brought an end to an exhaustive court process that began in 2008 — an initial trial and two retrials — and concluded a terrorism case that British officials have described as the longest, costliest and most serious in the country’s history.

U.S. revises rules for drilling ban Interior Secretary Ken Salazar issued revised rules Monday for a sixmonth moratorium on deepwater oil drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, replacing an earlier one that had been declared invalid by federal courts. The revised moratorium would allow some drilling rigs to resume operating under certain conditions. To qualify, the rig’s owners must prove that they have adequate plans in place to quickly shut down an out-of-control well, that the blowout preventers atop the wells it drills have passed rigorous new tests, and that sufficient cleanup resources are on hand in case of a spill. Industry officials said it would be difficult to meet those conditions quickly, which could threaten thousands of jobs. — New York Times News Service

First lady drops the hammer on junk food By Steve Kraske McClatchy -Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — First lady Michelle Obama told the NAACP Convention meeting in Kansas City on Monday that the time had come for dramatic changes to the diets of African Americans and young people across the country. Obama, pushing her “Let’s Move” initiative designed to attack childhood obesity, said the scourge of overeating is threatening the nation’s future. One in every three children in this country is overweight or obese, Obama said. “We need to take this issue seriously,” she said — as seri-

ously as the need for better schools, a halt to gun violence and the threat of AIDS. The nation is confronting what she called a “perfect storm” of “bad habits and unhealthy decisions” that have led to skyrocketing rates of diabetes and other weight-related conditions. The economic gains the NAACP and other groups have fought for over the decades will be lost if today’s young people grow into adults who lack the energy to be good performers on the job. “It is going to take all of us working together to lead healthier lives right from the beginning,” Obama said.

Marc Hoafer / The Associated Press

A man attends an injured woman on Sunday after a bomb went off in a restaurant in Kampala, Uganda.

Swiss reject U.S. extradition request for Roman Polanski By Nick Cumming-Bruce and Michael Cieply New York Times News Service

GENEVA — Roman Polanski’s repeated claims that there was misconduct at his trial for having sex with a 13year-old girl in 1977 ran into a brick wall in U.S. courts. But they were enough apparently to convince Swiss authorities that he should walk free. Switzerland announced Monday that it would not extradite Polanski, a famous film director, to the United States in part because of fresh doubts over the conduct of the judge in his original trial. “He’s a free man,” the Swiss justice minister, Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf, said at a news conference. The ruling means that, after nearly a year of court-

room wrangling in the United States and Switzerland, the case is roughly where it has been for decades: Polanski is free to return to his home in France but remains wanted in the United States. Polanski was arrested at the Zurich airport in September on an international warrant issued by the United States on charges including rape and sodomy dating from 1977. In December, Swiss authorities allowed him to move to his chalet in the ski resort of Gstaad under house arrest on bail of $4.5 million pending a decision on his extradition.

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Israel advances conversion bill JERUSALEM — An Israeli parliamentary committee on Monday advanced a bill that could lead to conversions to Judaism performed by rabbis from the Reform and Conservative movements no longer being recognized in Israel. The bill could give the chief rabbinate, the religious authority in Israel run by ultra-Orthodox Jews, the power to decide which conversions are accepted, overturning a Supreme Court decision that ensures Jews converted by rabbis from all branches of Judaism are eligible for citizenship. The chief rabbinate already holds a monopoly on rituals such as marriage and divorce. — From wire services

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Israeli military finds flotilla killings justified, but errors were made New York Times News Service TEL AVIV, Israel — An Israeli military investigation into its naval takeover of a Gazabound flotilla six weeks ago found that it was plagued by errors of planning, intelligence and coordination but that the killings of nine Turks on board were justified, according to an official summary of the findings released Monday. Giora Eiland, a retired major general who led the probe, presented his classified findings to

the military chief of staff; they were not released to the public. But a statement issued by the military said that the investigators faulted the military for not knowing who was on board one of the ships. A senior officer involved in the report said that at least 65 Turkish Islamic militants armed with metal sticks and knives were on the flotilla’s main ship, and had vowed to fight any effort by the Israeli navy to board.

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aged. That could mean that oil and gas are leaking into the surrounding rock. In that case, keeping the cap closed could damage the well further. The valves would have to be reopened, he said, and oil would start escaping from the well again, although much of it, and perhaps eventually all, would be funneled through pipes to surface ships. A technician with knowledge of the operation said that it was unlikely that the well would be left shut beyond the test period, given the risk that the pressure could eventually cause problems within the well and given that with the new cap BP should soon be able to collect all the oil. Suttles said that engineers and scientists would evaluate risks based on the pressure results, and that the various collection systems would be on standby if it were decided to leave the well shut-in. On Monday evening, video from the seafloor showed the cap being lowered onto a connector pipe that had been installed the day before. The cap’s latching mechanism had a sticker on the side that read, “THINK twice, act once!!”

OVER

By Henry Fountain

SOFAS AS LOW AS

Photos provided by BP PLC

The new containment cap, top, is lowered over the broken wellhead.

200 $ 399 READY TO GO!

Oil flows from the well as the new containment cap is lowered toward the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, on Monday. Deep-sea robots swarmed around BP’s ruptured oil well Monday in a choreographed effort to attach a tighter-fitting cap that could stop crude from gushing into the Gulf.

WASHINGTON — The deadly bombings in Uganda during the World Cup final have deepened worries among U.S. authorities about another oncelocalized Islamic group that is spreading its terrorism across borders, using a playbook written by al-Qaida. The group, the Shabab, claimed responsibility for the coordinated bomb attacks that tore through festive crowds in the Ugandan capital, Kampala, killing at least 70 people, including a U.S. aid worker. The synchronized nature of the attacks, a senior U.S. official said Monday, bore the hallmarks of an al-Qaida strike, suggesting

that the Shabab got support or at least inspiration from alQaida and its affiliates in East Africa. Analysts and officials said the emergence of the Shabab on the world stage fit a pattern of localized Islamic militant groups that have been able to mount sophisticated operations farther and farther afield, including the attempt by an alQaida-linked group to blow up a plane on its way to Detroit on Dec. 25. The bombings also illustrate how the region has become a hive of Islamic militancy, complicating the efforts of the United States, which has thrown its support behind Somalia’s embattled transitional government.

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A4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

NAACP set to denounce Tea Party alleging racism

Gravity Continued from A1 Looking at gravity from this angle, they say, could shed light on some of the vexing cosmic issues of the day, like the dark energy, a kind of anti-gravity that seems to be speeding up the expansion of the universe, or the dark matter that is supposedly needed to hold galaxies together. Verlinde’s argument turns on something you could call the “bad hair day” theory of gravity. It goes something like this: Your hair frizzles in the heat and humidity, because there are more ways for your hair to be curled than to be straight, and nature likes options. So it takes a force to pull hair straight and eliminate nature’s options. Forget curved space or the spooky attraction at a distance described by Isaac Newton’s equations well enough to let us navigate the rings of Saturn, the force we call gravity is simply a byproduct of nature’s propensity to maximize disorder. Some of the best physicists in the world say they don’t understand Verlinde’s paper, and many are outright skeptical. But some of those very same physicists say he has provided a fresh perspective on some of the deepest questions in science, namely why space, time and gravity exist at all — even if he has not yet answered them. “Some people have said it can’t be right, others that it’s right and we already knew it — that it’s right and profound, right and trivial,” Andrew Strominger, a string theorist at Harvard, said. “What you have to say,” he went on, “is that it has inspired a lot of interesting discussions. It’s just a very interesting collection of ideas that touch on things we most profoundly do not understand about our universe. That’s why I liked it.” In a provocative calculation in 1995, Ted Jacobson, a theorist from the University of Maryland, showed that given a few of these holographic ideas, Einstein’s equations of general relativity are just a another way of stating the laws of thermodynamics. Those exploding black holes (at least in theory — none has ever been observed) lit up a new strangeness of nature. Black holes, in effect, are holograms — like the 3-D images you see on bank cards. All the informa-

Internet Continued from A1 Ben Hansen, the assistant director of technology for Bend-La Pine Schools, said the district subscribes to a service that monitors Internet traffic and blocks wide categories of websites. “If we were to try to figure out the entire World Wide Web and what was good and what wasn’t, we would have a whole department full of people working full time on that,” Hansen said. “It’s really kind of an impossible task.” The district doesn’t allow access to websites that fall into any of the following categories: adult content, peer-to-peer file-sharing, gambling, illegal, questionable or R-rated content, chat sites, online communities, instant messaging, adware, alcohol, tobacco and weapons, or dating and personals. “Within those categories are millions upon millions of websites,” Hansen said.

List updated often The list of blocked and unblocked websites is regularly updated, and the district can temporarily block websites of its choosing and contact the company, M86 Security, with new, offensive sites. Hansen said students are sometimes able to get around the filter by going to proxy websites, which fetch content from blocked sites like Facebook or YouTube. But the district’s filter also seeks to block the proxy sites. “It happens, but it doesn’t last very long,” Hansen said of students using proxy sites. “This company’s good about keeping up with that stuff.” Caryl Kempfer, the High Desert Education Service District desktop support supervisor, said the ESD provides Redmond, Crook County and Sisters school districts with similar filters to prevent students access to inappropriate websites. “We have the ability to do it by segment if you will, so staff have a little bit more accessibility than high school students, and high school students have a little bit more than elementary and middle school students,” she said. “We can do it by level so that way a staff member can go

By Kathleen Hennessey and Michael A. Memoli McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Kirsten Luce / New York Times News Service

Dutch physicist Erik Verlinde, a respected string theorist and professor of physics at the University of Amsterdam, is seen in Stony Brook, N.Y. Verlinde is questioning the way we understand the force of gravity. tion about what has been lost inside them is encoded on their surfaces. Physicists have been wondering ever since how this “holographic principle” — that we are all maybe just shadows on a distant wall — applies to the universe and where it came from. In one striking example of a holographic universe, Juan Maldacena of the Institute for Advanced Study constructed a mathematical model of a “soup can” universe, where what happened inside the can, including gravity, is encoded in the label on the outside of the can, where there was no gravity, as well as one less spatial dimension. If dimensions don’t matter and gravity doesn’t matter, how real can they be?

Paper has received little attention Lee Smolin, a quantum gravity theorist at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, called Jacobson’s paper “one of the most important papers of the last 20 years.” But it received little attention at first, said Thanu Padmanabhan of the Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, who has taken up the subject of “emergent gravity” in several papers over the last few years. Padmanabhan said that the connection to thermodynamics went deeper that just Einstein’s equations to other theories of gravity. “Gravity,” he said recently in a talk at the Perimeter institute, “is the

to YouTube but a student can’t.” When Bend-La Pine school administrators hear students are accessing sites they shouldn’t, Hansen’s department puts a temporary block on the site. Then, depending on the situation, the department can determine who accessed inappropriate sites using the computer’s IP address or the student’s username. Hansen stressed the district does not actively monitor student or staff Internet activity. “We’re not the Internet police,” he said. “But when there’s a concern from a school raised, we’ll go in and review it.” Only a few times each year do IT staff have to take such measures. “We really don’t have a lot of problems, but again the Internet is a huge place and it’s an impossible task,” Hansen said. The district is required to use a filter because it receives some federal funding for technology expenses. “We do that filtering because we have to and because it’s the right thing to do,” Hansen said. “We trust our students and our staff and we feel that’s a big part of teaching our students to be good digital citizens, giving them as much flexibility as we can.” But Chriss said her son got caught up in the system. BendLa Pine Schools officials declined to comment on the situation, citing student privacy.

Teacher vouches for student Chriss said her son’s computer privileges were suspended because he accessed Craigslist and GoDaddy.com, a domain-name sales company. Chriss argues her son accessed the websites for class, and that although his teacher was willing to vouch for him, the administrators weren’t interested. Dissatisfied, Chriss said she contacted the district and received a list of sites and the times and dates they were accessed. She also said the district official sent via e-mail the specific, pornographic images in question. The official could not be reached for comment and spokeswoman Julianne Repman said she didn’t know whether that took place. “The site was enough, I could go on and look,” Chriss said. Chriss said when she investi-

thermodynamic limit of the statistical mechanics of ‘atoms of space-time.’” Verlinde said he had read Jacobson’s paper many times over the years but that nobody seemed to have gotten the message. People were still talking about gravity as a fundamental force. “Clearly we have to take these analogies seriously, but somehow no one does,” he complained. His paper, posted to the physics archive in January, resembles Jacobson’s in many ways, but Verlinde bristles when people say he has added nothing new to Jacobson’s analysis. What is new, he said, is the idea that differences in entropy can be the driving mechanism behind gravity, that gravity is, as he puts it an “entropic force.” Think of the universe as a box of Scrabble letters. There is only one way to have the letters arranged to spell out the Gettysburg Address, but an astronomical number of ways to have them spell nonsense. Shake the box and it will tend toward nonsense, disorder will increase and information will be lost as the letters shuffle toward their most probable configurations. Could this be gravity? As a metaphor for how this would work, Verlinde used the example of a polymer — a strand of DNA, say, a noodle or a hair — curling up. “It took me two months to understand polymers,” he said. The resulting paper, as Verlinde himself admits, is a little vague.

gated further she discovered her son wasn’t in school when the sites were accessed. She’s frustrated that the system and the policies in place — both for her son’s appeal process and for technology use — didn’t seem to work as they should have. “It’s something that needs to be addressed,” Chriss said. “There are policies and procedures the administration needs to follow.”

List of unacceptable technology uses The district’s technology use policy provides a long list of unacceptable technology uses, including accessing anything that is “offensive, harassing, or potentially harmful to others”; the appeal process outlined by the district requires the appeal to go first to the principal, then the superintendent, and finally the school board. Chriss and her husband expressed their concerns at a recent school board meeting after meeting with district officials and the principal. Her concern, she said, is that administrators are eager to look for wrongdoing, but not to figure out the whole story. “They’re quick to jump to punishment but they’re not willing to look for the truth,” she said. School Resource Officer Mike Maunder would not comment on Chriss’s case specifically. Maunder said in general, when he hears about students looking at inappropriate images, he contacts the information technology department to determine which sites the student in question has accessed. But that only happens about three or four times each year, he said, because the majority of students follow the rules. “Every kid has to sign on with their own password, even though kids may trade passwords back and forth,” Maunder said. “Some of the kids have actually found ways to bypass the system so we’re working on changing that right now. Then every kid has to sign an Internet agreement and it tells them flat out what they can and cannot do.” Maunder believes the district does a good job of monitoring student Internet use. “If you take just three high

WASHINGTON — The NAACP is expected to approve a resolution at its annual convention condemning the Tea Party movement for harboring “racist elements that are a threat to our democracy,” a spokeswoman for the civil rights organization said Monday. The proposed resolution states the “movement is not just about higher taxes and limited government but something that could evolve and become more dangerous,” NAACP spokeswoman Leila McDowell said. Delegates gathering in Kansas City will consider the resolution as early as today. The resolution would be the latest and perhaps the most pointed denunciation of the Tea Party movement, which has pushed back against recurring accusations of racism since its inception a year and a half ago. Critics have pointed to signs carried by Tea Party supporters that mock President Obama and his Kenyan ancestry and to repeated questions by protesters about Obama’s U.S. citizenship. The accusations intensified after reports a Tea Party protester directed a racial epithet at U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., a longtime civil rights leader, during a Washington

“There certainly are people who have been involved in Tea Party events or call themselves Tea Party leaders who have done these things. And we’ve said we’re not going to put with it.” — Jenny Beth Martin, founder of Tea Party Patriots rally in March. Then and now, Tea Party leaders have distanced themselves from what they described as the work of fringe elements. Several also questioned the legitimacy of the Lewis report, asking why it had not been caught on video. In response to the NAACP resolution, two Tea Party leaders said Monday any racism in the Tea Party was the responsibility of a few bad actors and not the larger movement. “There certainly are people who have been involved in Tea Party events or call themselves Tea Party leaders who have done these things. And we’ve said we’re not going to put with it,” said Jenny Beth Martin, a founder of the online network Tea Party Patriots. Mark Meckler, also of Tea Party Patriots, suggested the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was biased against whites. “It’s a little ironic that an organization that has lost legitimacy through its own racism is trying

to call another racist,” Meckler said. The NAACP’s move comes as the rights group and other parts of the Democratic base are seeking to reactivate the voters who mobilized to elect Obama. The group announced an Oct. 2 rally in Washington as an answer of sorts to the Tea Party protests. The “One Nation” campaign would also involve a coalition of labor groups. “We have to get up off the couch. We have to demand the change that we voted for,” McDowell said. Publicizing what it sees as racist and extreme behavior within the Tea Party is part of that effort. The proposed resolution asserts that “hardcore white supremacist organizations have participated in and occasionally lead Tea Party rallies.” McDowell said the statement was based on academic research on the Tea Party and referred to a faction within the larger Tea Party movement.

North Korea postpones meeting to discuss sinking of ship New York Times News Service SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea abruptly postponed a meeting with the American-led U.N. Command scheduled to take place today to discuss the March sinking of a South Korean warship. North Korea requested a delay “for administrative reasons” but did not immediately propose a new time for the meeting, the command said in a statement. The North Korean move

schools alone we’re dealing with 4,000 people so then you throw in the middle schools and then you’re dealing with more,” he said. “We’re always behind that eight-ball and we try to get caught up.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

comes after the U.N. Security Council adopted a statement last weekend condemning the attack that sank the South Korean warship Cheonan in March, killing 46 sailors. The statement made reference to a multinational investigation in which experts from South Korea, the United States, Britain, Australia and Sweden found that the North was to blame for the attack.

But reflecting strong resistance from China, North Korea’s main ally, the statement did not name North Korea as the culprit.

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Paint Continued from A1 “We are kind of behind the eight ball right now,” Hanson said. “In my view it’s an emergency situation. We’re trying to do everything we can to make sure there are markings down.” According to a June report from the American Traffic Safety Services Association, the current limited supply of pavement-marking paint in the U.S. is attributed to a shortage of the raw materials used to make the various products that are used to stripe roadways. These materials – acrylic resin, rosin esters, liquid epoxy resin and titanium dioxide – each provide different attributes to the finished road products, such as color, brightness and bonding. The report states that several global events led to a “perfect storm” that reduced the amount of raw materials that were produced and in turn increased prices. Some of the factors included the global economic downturn that saw the chemical industry reduce its output in order to maintain profitability, a poor harvest of the gum rosin in 2009 that impacted the production of resins and China consuming more of the products it typically exports to the U.S. because of increased roadway construction. There was also the loss of pro-

NRA Continued from A1 When the NRA had a narrower range of targets, it relied on a core group of political figures and met with stiffer resistance from vocal gun control advocates in Congress and outside groups. It now has freer rein to leave its mark politically on issues that once seemed out of its reach. “The last two years have been a disaster for us,” said Rep. Carolyn McCarthy, D-N.Y., a longtime advocate of increased gun control. “A lot of members are just afraid of the NRA” On Monday, the NRA began broadcasting advertisements urging senators to oppose or filibuster the Kagan nomination. But the group’s top priority is still finding ways to use the Supreme Court ruling in cities, states and courts nationwide to overturn more restrictive gun laws and establish gun rights measures. NRA officials say they are determined to protect gun rights even if it means using the group’s $307 million budget and membership of more than 4 million gun owners to influence ancillary issues. “What you’re seeing is a recognition that support for the Second Amendment is a not only a very powerful voting bloc but a very powerful political force.” Chris Cox, the NRA’s chief lobbyist, said in an interview last week at the group’s Washington office, a few blocks from the Capitol. He pointed to the debate this

Geese Continued from A1 “It’s a horrible end,” said Anne-Katrin Titze, who went to the park nearly every morning to feed the geese. “It’s eerie to see a whole population gone. There’s not one goose on this lake. It looks as though they’ve been Photoshopped out.” Titze and her partner, Ed Bahlman, noticed that the geese were missing on their regular trip to the park Friday. The couple found plastic zip-tie restraints in a pile near gosling feathers. They learned what had happened to the geese from news reports Monday. “The fact that this was done without letting the public know is the first concern,” Bahlman said. “There were so many people in the park over the last four days who noticed the geese were gone.”

Geese were molting In recent weeks, the Canada geese have begun their annual molting, meaning they could not fly. Their capture was timed to the molting. Susan Elbin, conservation director at New York City Audubon, was cautiously supportive of the mass euthanizing. “There are ways to manage birds nonlethally,” Elbin said. “But if you’re trying to manage a population level, sometimes those hard decisions need to be made.” The goal is to eliminate most of the geese within seven miles

duction of a key material that spurred Dow Chemical Company to issue a notification to its customers about its limited supply of liquid and converted epoxy resins, and develop an allocation plan that the ATSSA found affected the productivity of many manufacturers. “These events have had a devastating impact on U.S. production of roadway marking materials,” the ATSSA report states. “Since most manufacturers of these materials are on allocation of raw materials, they in turn have placed their customers (i.e. striping contractors) on allocation as well.”

ODOT has not seen shortages Peter Murphy, a spokesperson for the Oregon Department of Transportation region that includes Central Oregon, said his agency has not yet experienced a shortage of paint and expects to conduct business as usual. “We know there’s a problem, but we’re still painting,” Murphy said. “At this point, where we need to absolutely put paint down, we’re absolutely putting paint down.” He said ODOT recognizes it needs to look at various solutions should the paint shortage exacerbate, and he noted that there is a meeting scheduled among agency officials this week to do just that.

spring over loosening gun laws in the District of Columbia after a 2008 Supreme Court ruling found the city’s gun ban unconstitutional. At the time, advocates for district voting rights saw their best chance in many years to gain a voting seat in the House, but they abandoned their own proposal after gun rights supporters attached a provision weakening local gun laws. “I honestly don’t care about D.C. voting rights,” Cox said of the legislative maneuvering. “I care about reforming D.C. gun laws, and we’re going to use voting rights or any other vehicle at our disposal to address what we consider a blatant disregard for the Constitution.” The NRA was just as aggressive last month in getting congressional Democrats to carve out an exemption tailor-made for the group to exclude it from the so-called Disclose Act, requiring disclosure of donors, rather than risk a defeat of the whole bill because of opposition from Republicans and conservative Democrats supportive of gun rights.

‘Shot holes in the Disclose Act’ “They shot holes in the Disclose Act with such precision and force that it would make an NRA member proud,” said Kenneth Gross, a Washington lawyer who specializes in lobbying issues. But the group’s muscle has generated tensions with some gun owners themselves, who do not like the idea of the NRA

of the major airports in the region. Prospect Park is 6.5 miles from both La Guardia Airport and Kennedy Airport. Seth Kaplan, a teacher who lives two blocks from Prospect Park, said he was crushed when he heard what had happened. Kaplan, who spends nearly every day in the park, had recently circulated a video of the goslings. “It’s really important to remember that the Canada geese that collided with Flight 1549 were tested by researchers at the Smithsonian and they were not populations that lived in our area,” Kaplan said. Most of the Prospect Park geese that were gassed were resident.

Famous geese gone Gone in the roundup, apparently, was a goose known alternately as Sticky or Target, who was discovered with an arrow through his neck last month. Park rangers tried and failed to catch the bird in a bid to nurse him back to health. A goose found last year with a damaged beak, which Brooklynites living near the park had tried to help, was also believed to have been killed. City parks officials granted signed permission for the removal of the birds but said they had not been notified of the specifics. They declined to comment further, referring the matter to the Agriculture Department. Over the weekend, four geese were spotted at the edge of the lake. Most of the geese at the park

“It’s a nationwide problem and we’re developing a solution at this point,” Murphy said. “It affects all the regions of the state and the state as a whole.” Locally, Bend and Deschutes County officials are looking at stopgap measures to mark roadways until the paint becomes available again. These options can include everything from using reflective pads along center lines and bike paths to laying down “thermoplastic,” which is the raised material that can be used to mark crosswalks. Deschutes County Road Department Operations Manager Roger Olson said he plans to stick to his summer schedule, which includes chip sealing about 60 miles of roads — none of which will have stripes until at least the end of August. “We just made the decision to go ahead with that program and hope that we do get those covered,” Olson said. In the interim, he said he expects he will use a lot of the “stick and stomp” tabs that were used on the three-block portion Galveston Avenue to show where the center lines are located. “You’ll see a lot of those this year,” he said. “It helps but it doesn’t work as well as the striping.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

straying into areas outside its core base and cajoling with Democrats as it broadens its agenda. The headline on a recent blog posting from a rival faction, the Gun Owners of America, targeting the NRA’s exemption from the campaign finance bill, captured the sentiment: “The NRA Sells out Freedom to the Democrats.” A point of contention on both the left and the right is the NRA’s close working relationship with Reid, the Senate leader who helped get a number of progun rights measures included in broader bills. That relationship has led some gun rights supporters to lobby against the idea that the NRA might endorse Reid in his tough re-election campaign this November in Nevada. The NRA is not tamping down speculation. While Cox said the group had not decided on any endorsements, he pointed to what he considered an unattractive alternative if Reid loses and the Democrats hold power. “I’ll give you four words — Majority Leader Chuck Schumer,” he said. Reid, for his part, does not run from his support for the NRA. His office noted that he had been a longtime “champion of the Second Amendment.” One reason for the group’s greater political leverage is that battles in Washington are so closely fought now that powerful interest groups hold more sway even if they can only deliver a handful of votes.

were probably year-round residents, said Paul Curtis, an associate professor of wildlife sciences at Cornell University. Curtis said there were two types of Canada geese in the region: those that migrate north to nest during the summer and those that stay close to the city. Even to biologists, Curtis said, they are nearly indistinguishable.

Nearly extinct once In the early 1900s, Canada geese were nearly extinct. In an effort to rebuild the population, they were brought to New York from the Midwest. In the 1930s, more geese were added to be hunted. Agriculture Department specialists started removing geese this year in mid-June. They expect to complete their schedule of roundups by the end of the week, Bannerman said. Elsewhere in the country, nuisance wildlife birds are usually chased away by border collies or firecrackers. But in New York, Bannerman said, there is no relocation program for the geese, and they must be euthanized. Another method for controlling the birds is coating their eggs with corn oil, to prevent them from hatching. The carcasses of the Prospect Park geese will be doublebagged and dumped in a landfill. Other states employ other methods, like turning the geese into food or animal feed. This year, the Agriculture Department donated 900 pounds of goose breast to food pantries in Pennsylvania.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 A5

Archaeologists uncover oldest document found in Jerusalem By Alisa Odenheimer Bloomberg News

JERUSALEM — A tiny clay fragment dating from the 14th century B.C., which was discovered outside Jerusalem’s Old City walls, contains the oldest written document found in the city, researchers say. The 3,350-year-old clay fragment was uncovered during sifting of fill excavated from beneath a 10th century B.C. tower, dating from the period of King Solomon in an area near the southern wall of the Old City, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem said Monday in an emailed statement. Details of the find appear in the current Israel Exploration Journal. “The find, believed to be part of a tablet from a royal archive, further testifies to the importance of Jerusalem as a major city in the Late Bronze Age, long before its conquest by King David,” the statement said. The fragment, which is less than 1 inch by seven-tenths of an inch in size and four-tenths of an inch thick, contains cuneiform, or wedge-shaped, symbols in ancient Akkadian. The fragment was likely part of a “royal missive,” according to Wayne

“The find, believed to be part of a tablet from a royal archive, further testifies to the importance of Jerusalem as a major city in the Late Bronze Age, long before its conquest by King David.” — Hebrew University of Jerusalem statement Horowitz, a scholar of Assyriology at the Hebrew University Institute of Archaeology. Tablets with diplomatic messages were routinely exchanged between kings in the ancient Near East, and it is likely that the fragment was part of such a message, Horowitz said in the statement. The symbols on the fragment include the words “you” “you were,” “later,” “to do” and “them,” according to the statement. The oldest known written record previously found in Jeru-

salem was a tablet found in the Shiloah water tunnel in the City of David area from the 8th century B.C. reign of King Hezekiah. That tablet, celebrating the completion of the tunnel, is in a museum in Istanbul. The latest find predates the Hezekiah tablet by about 600 years. Excavations in the area were conducted by Eilat Mazar of the Hebrew University Institute of Archaeology. Funding for the project was provided by Daniel Mintz and Meredith Berkman of New York. The fragment found in Jerusalem is believed to be contemporary with some 380 tablets discovered in the 19th century at Amarna in Egypt in the archives of Pharaoh Amenhotep IV, or Akhenaten, who lived in the 14th century B.C. The archives include tablets sent to him by the kings who were subservient to him in Canaan and Syria. Among these are six that are addressed from AbdiHeba, the Canaanite ruler of Jerusalem. The table fragment in Jerusalem is most likely part of a message from the king of Jerusalem, possibly Abdi-Heba, back to Egypt, Mazar said.

Experts blast $2 billion cut from bioterrorism funds By Ken Dilanian McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — On its face, it’s just another Washington dispute about money. But a move by House Democrats to strip $2 billion to fight bioterrorism and pandemic flu from reserve funds — without objection from President Barack Obama — has infuriated some of the country’s foremost bioterrorism experts. It’s a symbol, they say, of how the Obama White House is failing to properly address the threat posed by a potential biological attack, which they say could kill 400,000 Americans and do $2 trillion in economic damage. The probability of such

an event is low, bioterrorism specialists acknowledge, but they say the failure to plan for it reflects the same lack of imagination that presaged the 9/11 attacks in 2001, the Hurricane Katrina disaster in 2005 and the ongoing Gulf of Mexico oil spill. The $2 billion reduction in bioterrorism prevention and pandemic funds came in a House appropriations bill that passed July 2. Appropriations Committee Chairman David Obey, D-Wis., added $10 billion to prevent teacher layoffs, and under budget rules he needed to find cuts elsewhere. Among other things, he required the secretary of Health

and Human Services to cut $2 billion from funds reserved for pandemic flu or bioterrorism drugs. On the block is the Project BioShield, a pot of money designed to buy drugs and vaccines to save lives in the event of a biological attack. The money was set aside as a guarantee to private companies that if they produced the medicines, government funds would be available to buy them.


N AT ION & WOR L D

A6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

JOGGING INCENTIVE

Lawyer wants pope’s testimony in abuse case By Mitchell Landsberg Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Pope Benedict XVI is a head of state and the leader of more than a billion Roman Catholics worldwide. To Jeff Anderson, a lawyer who represents victims of sexual abuse by priests, he is also a potential legal witness. Unlikely as it may seem, Anderson intends to demand the pope’s testimony in a sexual abuse case wending its way through court in Oregon. “I don’t think I would require him to come to Oregon,” the attorney said in a recent interview. “I would go to him ... and videotape and transcribe his testimony.” The Vatican, he said, should be treated “like any other corporation that is subject to the power of the American court system.” Increasingly, the Vatican, an independent city-state headed by the pope, stands in the cross hairs of lawyers and investigators probing cases of sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church. The church is fighting back, maintaining both that it is not responsible for the actions of abusive priests and that it enjoys sovereign immunity from the U.S. legal system. Several lawsuits filed in the United States have named the Vatican as a respondent, and attorneys in at least two cases are seeking a court order de-

“I feel really resolute about this, and feel that we now have a great deal of legal authority and traction at our feet and wind at our back, and we’ve never had that before when it comes to the Vatican.” — Jeff Anderson, attorney manding testimony from the pope, among other top church officials. Anderson, who has become the Vatican’s leading legal antagonist in the clerical abuse cases, hailed a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision that dealt a procedural blow to the Vatican in its effort to shield itself from liability. Two days later, Anderson filed a new lawsuit in Los Angeles County Superior Court that targeted the Holy See. “Look, I’ve been working with survivors, handling these cases for 25 years, and I knew that all roads in this scandal or crisis, whatever you want to call it, lead to Rome,” said Anderson, a Minneapolis attorney. “I feel really resolute about this, and feel that we now have a

great deal of legal authority and traction at our feet and wind at our back, and we’ve never had that before when it comes to the Vatican.” Perhaps, but Anderson and others still face a daunting task in stretching the arms of the U.S. justice system over the walls of the Holy See. The Vatican is in the unique position of being at once a complex religious organization and a sovereign nation, both of which make it difficult to penetrate legally. The church’s defenders say that is as it should be. The Vatican, in their view, sets religious policy for the worldwide church but is not involved in day-to-day operations of its far-flung parishes and bears no legal responsibility for abusive priests. During a recent interview in his office in Rome, Father Federico Lombardi, the chief Vatican spokesman, was briefly speechless at the idea that the Vatican should turn over its files on sexual abuse cases to law enforcement authorities in the United States and elsewhere, as advocates for victims have demanded. “I think this argument is rather unrealistic,” Lombardi finally said. “If I go to the United States government and ask them to give me all the documents they have, do you think this would be done? ... No, I don’t see the grounds for such a request.”

Alvaro Barrientos / The Associated Press

Revelers wearing traditional white and red clothing run beside Victoriano del Rio ranch fighting bulls during the sixth run of the bulls at the San Fermin fiesta in Pamplona, Spain, on Monday.

Tug mate in boat accident invokes 5th Amendment By Troy Graham The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — The mate on the tugboat involved in last week’s fatal collision on the Delaware River took the Fifth Amendment and refused to meet with investigators this weekend, the National Transportation Safety Board said Monday. On Saturday, investigators interviewed three members of the

tugboat’s five-man crew, including the master, the engineer and one of the two deckhands. They did not interview the second deckhand, who was asleep at the time of Wednesday collision with Duck 34, a disabled tourist boat adrift in the water. The NTSB did not say why the mate refused to meet with investigators, but noted that he “exercised his Fifth Amendment

right,” which protects against self-incrimination. The NTSB also said in a statement this morning that other vessels in the area heard Duck 34 making radio calls to the tugboat, the Caribbean Sea, on Channel 13. The tourist boat’s master and deckhand told investigators on Friday that calls to the tug were not acknowledged.

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O N 3 R D S T R E E T J U S T N O R T H O F T H E U N D E R PA S S W W W. B O B T H O M A S - H O N D A . C O M (541) 382-2911

O N 3 R D S T R E E T J U S T N O R T H O F T H E U N D E R PA S S W W W. B O B T H O M A S - H O N D A . C O M (541) 382-2911 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Photos for illustration purposes only.


B

Tech Focus

Where the tech industry gets its news, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010

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2,198.36 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +1.91 +.09%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Weyerhaeuser to pay record $5.6B dividend VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Weyerhaeuser Co., the second-largest owner of U.S. timberland, has declared a record $5.6 billion special dividend to lock in the company’s conversion this year to a real estate investment trust. The company is making the payout to signal its determination to convert to a REIT this year and address investor concern that its shrinking market valuation could have derailed the process, Chief Executive Officer Daniel Fulton said in an interview. The dividend, limited to 10 percent cash with the balance in stock, will be paid Sept. 1, the Federal Way, Wash.-based company said Monday. “Market conditions today are not impacting our ability to convert and we wanted to take away the uncertainty and provide the surety for our shareholders that we will complete the conversion this year,” Fulton, 61, said by phone.

Alcoa profit tops analysts’ estimates

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Joblessness hitting hardest among low-income workers Higher-earning workers suffering more locally than in rest of U.S., economist says By David Holley The Bulletin

People who work (or worked) a job that pays less than $40,000 were much more likely to be underemployed or unemployed during late 2009 than those who earned $75,000 or more, according to a study published in February by the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston. Specifically, people who earn less than $12,500 had the highest unemployment rates based on income, at 30.8 percent, during the fourth quarter of 2009. People who

earned slightly more — between $12,500 and $20,000 — had a 19.1 percent rate. Alternatively, the nation’s top earners had sharply lower rates, according to the study. Those who earned more than $150,000 had a 3.2 percent unemployment rate, while earners who made between $100,000 and $150,000 had a 4 percent rate. Bill Watkins, a Californiabased economist who studies the Oregon and Central Oregon economies, thinks the study is true to both the United States and Central Oregon. See Income / B5

Unemployment by income Those who earn the lowest wages nationally are also the people who have the highest rates of unemployment and underemployment, according to a study published in February by the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University. The study used information from the U.S. Census Bureau's monthly current population survey during the fourth quarter of 2009, studying unemployment and underemployment among respondents based on their earnings during the prior year.

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Source: Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

EXECUTIVE FILE

Soul solutions

By Andrew Martin New York Times News Service

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Joan Dudley, the self-described “chief freedom catalyst” of The Sol Center in Prineville, recently opened this office in downtown Bend, where she plans to start treating individuals and small-business clients in the next few weeks.

Joan Dudley left a ‘cash cow’ of a business to start helping people through counseling By Adrianne Jeffries The Bulletin

Joan Dudley, 53, calls herself the “chief freedom catalyst” of her business and advertises “spiritual communion” and “divine synchronicity” as part of her offerings as a counselor and business coach. It’s not what you’d expect from a savvy businesswoman who increased revenue from $600,000 a year to $1.4 million at her industrial pressure-washer company in Modesto, Calif. Dudley bought the family business in 1991 and had some initial challenges before turning it around into a “cash cow.” But after awhile, she started to

Chicago Tribune

37.4% 800-850

Pre-recession

feel trapped. “After 20 years in industrial equipment sales and services, my soul was dying. My counselor said, ‘You’d better start planning your exit strategy,’” she said. Dudley and her husband, Rob, who also worked for the company, were squabbling over work one day when Dudley snapped. “I said, ‘I’m taking the car, and I’m taking a credit card and I’m going to Santa Cruz to become a hippie.’” That idea sounded pretty good to Rob. They decided to drop the argument and sell the business. The couple pulled out a map and

The basics Who: Joan Dudley What: The Sol Center Where: 528 S.E. Fourth St., Prineville The Sol Center Annex 841 N.W. Bond St. No. 14, Bend Website: www.thesolcenter.com Telephone: 541-306-7618

landed 120 days later in Central Oregon, which some friends had described as “heaven,” in 2004. Dudley became a successful real estate agent in Prineville but started pursuing counseling and alternative medicine, which she had been interested in since she was a teenager, on the side. See Sol Center / B5

Hefner makes surprise offer to take Playboy private By Michael Oneal

40%

April 2010

Sources: FICO Inc.; myfico.com

AP

New York Times News Service

With debt piling up, a flood of lawsuits to collect

15.7%

750-799

Bernanke urges banks to step up their efforts WASHINGTON — The chairman of the Federal Reserve urged banks and regulators on Monday to help the nation’s small businesses get the loans they need to create jobs. He also acknowledged that economists could not agree on why such lending has contracted substantially over the last two years. Small businesses — those having fewer than 500 employees — employ half of all Americans and account for about 60 percent of gross job creation. Federal data indicate that loans to such companies fell to below $670 billion in the first quarter of this year from more than $710 billion in the second quarter of 2008. The reasons are unclear. Many entrepreneurs say that bank loan officers are denying loans to creditworthy borrowers as part of an overreaction to the bad loans of the last economic expansion and heightened scrutiny by regulators. But several economists paint a more nuanced picture, arguing that weak economic fundamentals and battered balance sheets have lowered the appetite for new lending. See Fed / B5

Unemployment rate Underemployment rate

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600-649

Small-business lending has declined, but few can explain why By Sewell Chan

J&J to buy medical device company

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$17.897 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.156

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BOSTON — Alcoa, the largest U.S. aluminum producer, reported second-quarter profit that topped analysts’ projections as higher metal prices boosted sales. The shares rose. Earnings from continuing operations were 13 cents a share, exceeding the 11-cent average estimate of 17 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. Net income of $136 million, or 13 cents a share, compared with a net loss of $454 million, or 47 cents, a year earlier, New York-based Alcoa said Monday in a statement. Sales gained 22 percent to $5.19 billion.

The market for medical devices used in the treatment of strokes is heating up. Johnson & Johnson said on Monday that it would buy the Micrus Endovascular Corp., which makes medical devices, for about $480 million in cash, or $23.40 a share. Micrus Endovascular, based in San Jose, Calif., makes catheters and other minimally invasive devices used to treat stroke-related problems in the brain, like arterial thickening or aneurysms. Last year, Johnson & Johnson strengthened its position in the stroke technology market by creating a business unit, Codman Neurovascular, a subsidiary of its neuroscience division, Codman & Shurtleff. Micrus will join the Codman neurosciences group, Johnson & Johnson said in a statement. — From wire reports

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Unemployment and underemployment rates by income

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MARKET REPORT

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CHICAGO — Hugh Hefner may be 84 and more than a little reliant on modern medicine to maintain his lifestyle. But the father of free love isn’t about to go quietly into the night. Faced with a sagging stock price and building pressure from Wall Street, Hefner startled the media world Monday by an-

nouncing a bid to reassert control over Playboy Enterprises Inc., the struggling Chicagobased adult publishing empire he founded in 1953. The proposed deal to buy all the outstanding shares Hefner doesn’t already own would be financed by a Michigan-based private equity fund called Rizvi Traverse Management LLC and would value Playboy at about $185

million, or 40 percent more than it was trading for when the market closed Friday. But it may also put the iconic publisher into play. Marc Bell, chief executive of FriendFinder Networks Inc., which owns dating websites and the rival Penthouse adult franchise, said he is readying a competing bid for Playboy. See Playboy / B2

As millions of Americans have fallen behind on paying their bills, debt collection law firms have been clogging courtrooms with lawsuits seeking repayment. Few have been as prolific as Cohen & Slamowitz, a Woodbury, N.Y., firm that has specialized in debt collection for nearly two decades. The firm has been filing roughly 80,000 lawsuits a year. With just 14 lawyers on staff, that works out to more than 5,700 cases per lawyer. How is that possible? The answer to that question is at the heart of a growing debate over the increasing use of the nation’s legal system to collect on bad debts. Already, some state legislators and judges have tried to crack down on collection lawsuits, and on Monday, the Federal Trade Commission weighed in, saying the system for resolving disputes over consumer debts was broken and in need of “significant reforms.” The commission, which says debt collection is its top consumer complaint, proposed that states require collectors to include more information about debts in their lawsuits, including a breakdown of the current balance by principal, interest and fees, and the relevant terms of the original credit contract, if not the contract itself. The agency also urged states to adopt measures to make it more likely that consumers would show up in court to defend themselves; currently, most do not, resulting in default judgments. See Debt / B5


B2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Playboy

Ruby Washington / New York Times News Service

A Virgin American airplane features video screens that passngers can use to chat with one another.

Social networking taking off on planes By Barbara S. Peterson New York Times News Service

On a flight from Newark, N.J., to the West Coast not long ago, Jeff Jarvis, author of the book “What Would Google Do?” fell into a conversation with a fellow passenger familiar with his work. But it was not a face-to-face chat. Rather, it started as an exchange of Twitter posts at the boarding gate. When the plane landed, Jarvis recalled, the conversation resumed. “It was as if someone had recognized you and come up to say, ‘hello,’ on the flight.” He said it reminded him of the days when passengers could socialize in airborne lounges, “except now it’s happening digitally.” The mobile phone and laptop are not just tools to stay in touch with the office or home anymore. As Jarvis can attest, a growing number of frequent fliers are using their mobile devices to create an informal travelers’ community in airports and aloft. Airlines and social media providers are scrambling to catch up. Airlines are beefing up their presence on networking channels, and travelers’ groups like FlyerTalk.com have created new applications that allow members to find one another while on the road. Business travelers can use these services to share cabs to the airport, swap advice or locate colleagues in the same city. As Jarvis puts it, “Finding a like-minded person to travel with lessens the chance of getting stuck next to some talkative bozo” on a long flight. The increasing availability of Wi-Fi at airports and on airplanes has made the travel networking possible. A survey of 84 of the world’s largest airports by the Airports Council International earlier this year found that 96 percent offered Wi-Fi connections, and 73 percent had connections throughout their terminals. About 45 percent offer the service free; the rest charge an average of about $8 an hour. More than 10 airlines in North America, including American, Delta and Southwest, are wiring their planes for Internet access,

and major foreign airlines like Lufthansa are introducing new technology that will let customers connect on transoceanic flights. In-flight calls are still forbidden on most flights, although several airlines, including Emirates, have been testing calling on shorter trips.

Online As many as 1,200 commercial airliners in the United States will have Wi-Fi capability by the end of the year, according to Chris Babb, senior product manager of in-flight entertainment for Delta Air Lines. “It’s a much different world than it was a year ago,” he said, noting that on a recent flight he exchanged e-mail messages with several colleagues who were in the air at the same time. And Virgin America, which has wired its entire 28-plane fleet for the Internet, said about half of its passengers brought their laptops with them and 17 to 20 percent were online at any given time. On longer flights, about a third of passengers go online. Like airports, most airlines charge a fee for the service, usually ranging from $5 to $13. Some airline passengers may mourn the loss of their last remaining refuge from e-mail intrusions. But the benefits of staying connected became clear several months ago during the eruption of the Iceland volcano that grounded thousands of European flights. Facebook and Twitter set up sites for stranded travelers, who swapped ideas and offered rides to ferry terminals, and Twitter had its own thread. Based on anecdotal reports, the sites helped in getting information out faster than it might have otherwise. For those with time at an airport, FlyerTalk.com has an “itineraries” feature that allows travelers to post their coming flights in the hope that other “flier talkers,” as they call themselves, may be heading the same way. Lufthansa said it consulted with FlyerTalk members in developing its own product to help customers tap into social networking

from any location. The application works on iPhones and this fall will be available on BlackBerrys. A built-in GPS allows users to find fellow fliers who might be nearby. It also has a taxi-sharing feature that travelers can activate upon landing.

Making connections For those who want to connect, few airlines can match Virgin America for mingling opportunities. In addition to its Internet service, it offers seat-to-seat messaging via its seatback video screens. It has also teamed up with match. com to create a party atmosphere on specific flights (reportedly at least one couple who met this way became engaged). But there is also the potential for spurned advances and hurt feelings. “Seat-to-seat chatting could lead to a negative form of social networking,” said Jeanne Martinet, a social commentator who writes the missmingle.com blog. “What if someone spots another passenger doing something annoying?” she asked. In the past, that person might have simply suffered in silence. Now, Martinet said, “It would be tempting to message them, ‘Can’t you get your big feet out of the aisle?’” Porter Gale, Virgin’s vice president of marketing, said there were safeguards against abuse and that a passenger could simply turn off the messaging function. And she said that offering Wi-Fi access had benefits for the airline, like the ability to resolve a customer’s problem before a flight lands. A passenger once sent an email message to the airline from his seat, saying that he was not pleased with the sandwich he had just eaten, she said. A customer service representative on the ground sent a message back to the plane, and shortly thereafter, she said, the passenger was served an acceptable substitute. This can work against the airline, too, as Virgin discovered when a New York-bound flight was diverted and some passengers sent out messages venting their annoyance with the delay.

Bucking a trend, Panasonic keeps its product line broad By Hiroko Tabuchi New York Times News Service

TOKYO — Panasonic makes the world’s biggest 3-D television, a 152-inch, high-definition plasma screen that costs hundreds of thousands of dollars and is big enough to project life-size people. The company also sells no-frills refrigerators for poorer countries that come with extra space for pumped water and are priced at $170. And between those extremes, Panasonic has a vast catalog of other consumer electronics products in various price ranges, including four types of nose-hair trimmers and a separate device for ear fuzz. But how long can Panasonic keep trying to be all things to all consumers? Analysts complain that Panasonic suffers from a case of the attention deficit disorder they say plagues many Japanese consumer electronics giants. The af-

fliction, critics say, has distracted management and ceded markets to more focused, agile players like the American company Apple and Samsung of South Korea. Panasonic, shrugging off criticism that it is spread too thin, seems intent on even further product expansion — despite having lost 103 billion yen ($1.2 billion) on revenue of 7.4 trillion yen (about $83 billion) in the fiscal year that ended in March. “It’s true our business spans a wide area,” Fumio Ohtsubo, the president, said in a recent interview at the Tokyo offices of Panasonic, which is based in Osaka. “But it’s not as difficult as you might think.” In fact, the new drive by Panasonic to sell to its wares in poorer countries like India and Indonesia has yielded early successes. So has its push into 3-D technology, billed as the next revolution in home entertainment in rich countries like the United States and Japan.

To tailor products to local needs, Panasonic says it has conducted “lifestyle research” in various emerging markets. After visiting Indonesian households, for example, the company designed a refrigerator with extra space for the pumped water that families often store in bottles, as well as a dedicated shelf for medicines and cosmetics that are often stored chilled alongside fruits and vegetables. At the opposite end of the pricing spectrum, Panasonic has been pushing its 3-D plasma TVs, rushing early models to market in the United States in March, on the heels of the flat-panel market leader, Samsung. Ohtsubo said that brisk sales had prompted Panasonic to raise its internal target for 3-D TV sales to a million units, up from 700,000, in the first year. A 50inch 3-D plasma TV bundled with a Blu-ray player and glasses costs $2,900.

Continued from B1 And given the active interest among several potential suitors last year, it is possible other bids might emerge, analysts said. “We always knew it would be a good fit (with FriendFinder),” Bell said Monday. Potential bidders can expect a fight from Hefner, whose Sybaritic existence belies a fierce reluctance to cede control of the company he built from scratch. Hefner is famous for his eccentricities: conducting business from bed in his silk pajamas and cavorting in his Los Angeles mansion with multiple girlfriends young enough to be his great-granddaughters. But he also exerts tight control over the production of his increasingly anachronistic magazine, and after a protracted period of negotiation last year, he rejected competing bids from a brand-management company called Iconix Brand Group Inc. and a former Playboy executive that might have fetched as much as $300 million. Hefner currently owns 69.5 percent of Playboy’s Class A common stock and 27.7 percent of its Class B common. The Class B shares outnumber the Class A variety almost six to one. But the Class A shares are the only ones that vote, giving Hefner unquestioned control. Playboy said in a statement that Hefner told the board of directors he is not interested in any sale or merger of Playboy and is not talking with other partners besides Rizvi. The reason, he said, is that he is interested in preserving the Playboy brand, its legacy and the editorial direction of the magazine. But Bell at FriendFinder argued in an interview that despite Hefner’s voting control the board has a fiduciary duty to consider competing offers. Playboy spokeswoman Martha Lindeman said the company had no comment on Bell’s avowed interest in making a bid. What has been clear for a

Playboy founder Hugh Hefner is offering to buy the remaining shares of Playboy Enterprises Inc., a deal that values the company at $185 million. Hefner currently owns 69.5 percent of Playboy’s Class A common stock and 27.7 percent of its Class B common. The Class A shares are the only ones that vote, giving Hefner unquestioned control. The Associated Press file photo

long time is that many investors see untapped potential in the Playboy franchise, despite years of losses at the magazine and the rising threat of digital media. Since media veteran Scott Flanders replaced Hefner’s daughter, Christie, as chief executive in 2009, the company has been outsourcing operations and shedding employees to transform itself from a publisher into a brand-management company. Flanders has transferred all non-editorial functions of the magazine to American Media Inc., the publisher of the National Enquirer, and has struck a deal with IMG Licensing Worldwide to manage licensing of the rabbit-head logo in Asia. Flanders is also seeking similar partnerships to help add scope and critical mass to Playboy’s TV operations. Hefner seems to agree that Playboy’s future is tied to man-

aging the brand and providing content for others to distribute. Hefner recently told the New York Times Sunday Magazine that in the beginning, “It was the magazine that carried the brand; now the brand carries the magazine.” Hefner’s partner in the bid, Rizvi Traverse Management, is a private equity firm based in Birmingham, Mich., but it has focused much of its energy on Hollywood and entertainment. It has a stake in a studio called Summit Entertainment and owns part of International Creative Management Inc., the big talent agency. Hefner’s statement did not spell out the terms of his partnership with Rizvi or how much control he would retain.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 B3

T F Gathering tech news at Internet speed By Claire Cain Miller New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — News lovers in Washington can’t live without Mike Allen at Politico. Hollywood squabbles over the relative merits of Sharon Waxman’s TheWrap versus Nikki Finke’s Deadline. The newspaper industry reads the news collected by Jim Romenesko. One of the first websites loaded on Silicon Valley’s laptops and iPhones each morning — and then again and again throughout the day — is Techmeme. The site, developed by a former Intel engineer, appropriately enough relies on software algorithms to collect technology news in real time into what is essentially the front page of an ever-changing industry newspaper. But Techmeme also turns to humans to filter the ever-growing number of articles and blog posts published online each day, a method that is being used by Mediagazer, a new sister site for media industry news. Techmeme could become a model for other industries as a useful way to harness the increasingly unwieldy Web and arm readers who are preparing for business meetings or cocktail parties. The San Francisco startup also publishes aggregation sites for politics, celebrity gossip and baseball and hopes to expand to topics like business or energy.

News collectors Aggregation works best for “industries where ideas can change people’s view of things, and there’s money on the line,” said Gabe Rivera, Techmeme’s founder. As the Web gets more and more crowded, news aggregators — both general ones like Digg and Google News and industry-specific ones like Techmeme and Politico’s “early morning tip sheets” — become essential for overwhelmed readers. They also play a crucial role in contemporary journalism, as media outlets and amateur reporters churn out an ever-higher quantity of often lower-quality content, said Kristian Hammond, director of the Center for Innovation in Technology, Media

“The editorial strength that may have been lost in terms of writing is going to be re-emerging in control and curation of sites.” — Kristian Hammond, director of the Center for Innovation in Technology, Media and Journalism at Northwestern University

Noah Berger / New York Times News Service

Gabe Rivera, founder of Techmeme, works in his loft in San Francisco recently. Techmeme, a site that relies on software algorithms to collect the latest tech news in real time, is also turning to humans to filter the ever-growing number of articles and blog posts published online each day. and Journalism at Northwestern University. “The editorial strength that may have been lost in terms of writing is going to be re-emerging in control and curation of sites,” he said. “In order to maintain a grip on an industry, you need to be able to go to someplace that looks at and filters all those documents.” Unlike RSS feeds, which gather everything on pre-selected sites or blogs, Techmeme groups stories according to importance, and clusters other reporters’ and bloggers’ perspectives on the same topic. “Techmeme is our go-to primary source,” said Marshall Kirkpatrick, co-editor and lead blogger at ReadWriteWeb, a tech blog. He visits Techmeme up to 15 times a day on his computer and phone and requires the blog’s other writers to track it for breaking news. Some aggregation sites, like Google News, rely on software to crawl the Web and spot key words in news stories. This model is fast, but it often misses nuances and different interpretations or developments on the news.

Google unveils tool that will allow anyone to make Android apps By Steve Lohr New York Times News Service

Google is bringing Android software development to the masses. The company unveiled a tool Monday that is intended to make it easy for people to write applications for its Android smart phones. The free software, called Google App Inventor for Android (http://appinventor.googlelabs.com/about/), has been under development for a year. User testing has been done mainly in schools with groups that included sixth-graders, high school girls, nursing students and university undergraduates who are not computer science majors. The thinking behind the initiative, Google said, is that as cell phones increasingly become the computers that people rely on most, users should be able to make applications themselves. “The goal is to enable people to become creators, not just consumers, in this mobile world,” said Harold Abelson, a computer scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who is on sabbatical at Google and led the project. The project is a further sign that Google is betting that its strategy of opening up its technology to all kinds of developers will eventually give it the upper hand in the smart phone software market. Its leading rival, Apple, takes a more tightly managed approach to application development for the iPhone, controlling the software and vetting the programs available. “We could only have done this because Android’s architecture is so open,” Abelson said.

Abelson is a longtime proponent of making intellectual and scientific resources more open. He is a founding director of the Free Software Foundation, Public Knowledge and the Creative Commons, and he helped initiate MIT’s OpenCourseWare program, which offers free online course materials used in teaching the university’s classes. The Google project, Abelson said, is intended to give users, especially young people, a simple tool to let them tinker with smart phone software, much as people have done with computers. Over the years, he noted, simplified programming tools like Basic, Logo and Scratch have opened the door to innovations of all kinds. Microsoft’s first product, for example, was a version of Basic, pared down to run on personal computers. The Google application tool for Android enables people to drag and drop blocks of code — shown as graphic images and representing different smart phone capabilities — and put them together, similar to snapping together Lego blocks. The result is an application on that person’s smart phone. The Google tool, of course, works only for phones running Android software. A sign-up with a Google Gmail account is required. The tool is Web-based except for a small software download that automatically syncs the programs created on a personal computer, connected to the application inventor website, with an Android smart phone. When making programs, the phone must be connected to a computer with a USB link.

Others, like Digg, ask anyone on the Web to suggest stories, and many readers use Twitter as a user-generated newsfeed. These sites can be amateurish (the link that got the most votes on Digg on a recent morning was a video of someone falling on rollerblades.) Still others, like Arts & Letters Daily and the Poynter Institute’s Romenesko media blog, rely on human editors to gather the important stories of the day. Individuals who filter the news bring more editorial expertise, but they are often slower and less comprehensive than a computer and it is difficult to expand the service to other topics. “We’re more interested in quality than we are in beating other people with deadlines,” said Denis Dutton, the editor of Arts & Letters Daily, which is owned by the Chronicle of Higher Education. It posts three new stories a day and six on Mondays, and sometimes they are a few days old. Techmeme combines all three strategies, automatically searching the Web, employing editors

and accepting tips from readers. Other sites, including Blogrunner, an aggregation site owned by The New York Times Co., also use several of these strategies.

A growing force In 2004, Rivera had received a doctorate in computer science and was working at Intel when he observed that it was difficult to monitor all the blogs sprouting across the Web. He started Memeorandum as an automatic aggregator searching for the political news stories that were most linked to by other sites. He quit his job a year later and started Techmeme, WeSmirch for celebrity gossip and Ballbug for baseball news. At first, he listed stories from mainstream news organizations followed by blogger discussion, but that soon changed as bloggers began breaking news. In late 2008, Rivera hired Techmeme’s first editor, Megan McCarthy. Since then, the site has become more relevant and popular with its 260,000 readers, who check it

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3 million times a month. Humans do things software cannot, like grouping subtly related stories, taking into account sarcasm or skepticism or posting important stories that just broke. “We’re better at anticipating what’s going to be a bigger story than just the algorithm,” said McCarthy, who now manages its new media site, Mediagazer. “The power of it, when it’s done well, is you’re able to find what you need in a way that you not only see the information itself, but you see it in a context that helps you better understand it.” The number of people who visit the rival Romenesko media site monthly is down 19 percent since last year, but Romenesko still sometimes beats Mediagazer’s automated site in posting links. Romenesko says he checks Mediagazer regularly, “to make sure Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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I’m not missing something huge.” Still, Techmeme does not catch everything and sometimes it catches too much of the same thing. So Bijan Sabet, a venture capitalist at Spark Capital who reads Techmeme daily, also visits other aggregators, like Hacker News, because they have more diversity. “Techmeme is often dominated by Apple, Google, Facebook or Twitter news,” he said. “That’s great, but insufficient.” Now that Twitter serves as a broadcast platform, Techmeme plans to include cogent 140-character Twitter posts written by influential people as headlines.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel ADPT AES Corp AFLAC AGA Med n AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL n ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Abaxis AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcadiaRlt Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds AccretvH n Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivIden ActivPw h ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AdvMarsRV AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlancoTc h AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlphaPro Alphatec AlpGlbDD AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev AmTrstFin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AmIntlGrp AmItPasta AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArborRT ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgonSt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv

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Nm AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy Big 5Sprt BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkCpHY VI BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR Blount BlueCoat BluDolp BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CalumetSp CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapitlSrce CapFedF CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardiacSci CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeFn Caseys CatalystH CatalystPh Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CentGard lf

D 1.36 40.98 +.26 202.69 +2.57 23.20 +1.65 22.10 +.09 3.57 99.41 +.43 3.53 +.21 0.80 34.76 +.14 4.05 +.01 10.38 -.30 25.27 +.14 0.88 28.42 +.15 1.68 -.06 0.84 31.69 +.01 0.60 28.12 -.06 1.74 30.35 +.23 26.81 -.46 0.37 5.08 -.08 1.66 66.28 -1.56 1.66 55.11 -1.27 23.10 -.09 44.01 -.40 36.48 +.02 36.76 +2.71 9.71 96.44 +.25 3.82 -.03 1.50 38.38 +.52 0.10 13.49 -.20 1.11 -.15 70.73 -.47 0.60 46.01 -.25 0.68 37.79 -1.29 0.40 53.88 -.43 1.70 32.81 -.36 1.34 55.15 +.60 0.59 12.01 -.20 0.51 18.50 -.48 0.81 12.55 -.19 0.33 12.25 -.02 0.88 18.16 -.11 0.04 15.21 +.10 2.05 25.45 -.08 3.38 +.14 2.16 25.55 -.15 1.80 48.87 -.45 1.04 3.75 -.10 2.80 57.97 +.14 0.36 26.27 +.04 1.96 48.78 +.02 1.54 0.04 2.20 37.83 -.40 21.96 -.41 65.33 +.09 2.03 25.30 -.18 0.22 18.19 -.21 90.57 -.50 25.24 -.31 0.72 78.69 -.41 1.00 12.84 -.44 0.40 43.57 1.16 43.71 -.20 .37 +.02 17.71 +.05 3.49 -.09 1.00 6.96 +.06 0.72 62.02 -.12 1.48 69.08 -.38 37.12 -.33 6.00 -.13 0.92 27.97 +.04 15.87 -.21 0.28 26.90 -.23 79.47 -.28 0.30 27.35 -.42 0.60 34.13 -.24 0.20 11.94 +.28 33.29 +.01 32.02 +.01 5.82 -.11 51.66 -.05 18.85 -.20 0.60 16.39 -.08 1.66 +.02 5.92 -.09 0.38 18.89 -.45 1.28 10.28 -.05 37.61 -.10 4.00 154.15 -.82 0.99 10.89 +.05 0.35 3.85 1.36 9.95 -.02 0.40 10.31 -.19 0.60 14.37 -.23 10.38 -.14 22.47 +.10 .39 -.03 2.02 30.82 1.68 64.34 -.32 5.46 +.03 2.96 -.02 1.47 +.03 39.86 -.07 0.04 6.81 -.14 2.00 75.51 +.28 6.45 -.01 0.22 11.29 +.01 8.39 -.19 0.60 10.51 -.02 0.02 15.35 +.15 15.47 -.51 0.44 17.66 -.70 15.63 -.44 7.26 -.07 0.56 15.36 +.10 0.40 19.62 +.19 1.28 25.26 -.34 31.80 +.05 0.32 36.94 +.64 0.56 20.32 -.02 3.16 -.16 5.09 +.04 14.43 -.35 0.52 23.38 +.16 0.56 14.15 -.01 0.34 9.12 -.22 8.02 -.15 0.31 19.30 -.17 0.28 14.34 -.32 1.20 60.64 -.57 11.22 -.07 0.05 13.67 +.19 10.30 -.50 0.80 28.37 -.06 0.10 52.73 -1.14 0.42 39.30 +.12 0.92 53.58 -.36 0.25 17.51 +.04 0.16 18.89 +.12 13.93 +.03 0.80 12.03 -.22 26.80 -2.17 0.20 14.09 +.05 2.15 -.02 0.40 73.45 -.79 1.00 56.96 -.10 0.04 31.13 -.16 36.98 -.01 0.24 12.55 1.00 27.90 +.02 4.60 277.02 -.17 0.60 15.76 +.09 26.95 -.21 25.75 +.34 5.27 -.01 5.16 167.32 -2.04 0.26 24.86 +.13 0.96 52.46 +.70 0.26 16.60 -.19 0.34 10.35 -.06 0.35 29.97 +.17 14.51 +.31 0.40 25.53 +.19 0.72 26.15 +.28 0.12 33.16 -.33 43.61 +.20 6.15 +.10 6.14 -.01 0.60 7.01 0.63 7.91 +.01 13.15 -.49 14.72 -.01 0.04 6.12 -.09 6.34 -.30 13.41 -.07 1.82 18.75 +.37 1.80 43.05 -.34 0.28 23.85 +1.01 34.90 -.30 1.10 35.96 -.34 3.48 65.71 -.62 1.08 58.95 +.31 0.30 35.37 -.19 1.08 56.58 +.43 11.26 -.19 .54 +.05 39.16 -.17 0.20 43.68 0.04 5.26 -.03 2.00 33.19 -.91 1.96 11.29 -.04 .98 -.03 0.72 80.02 -.11 1.17 -.07 0.78 34.43 -.18 8.56 +.33 4.79 -.14 .32 -.01 22.48 -.13 24.16 -.74 0.64 36.66 -.64 18.84 -.51 0.40 31.67 -.45 0.40 33.54 -.38 0.72 33.86 -1.68 17.28 -.76 25.88 -1.10 .53 +.01 0.40 35.97 +.13 35.46 -.42 1.21 -.11 1.76 64.28 -.44 0.04 11.26 -.14 27.96 +.39 12.54 -.21 .50 +.01 0.20 26.43 +.08 6.44 -.24 8.50 +.02 51.11 -.07 .41 +.01 4.53 -.27 0.43 9.65 +.03 0.86 14.92 -.20 0.80 28.44 +.08 20.63 -.22 0.78 14.07 +.02 1.56 12.63 -.61 24.75 +.30 0.01 14.76 -.17 9.81 -.14

Nm CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChinaCEd Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Circor Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitizRepB CitrixSys ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut ClearEFd n Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogentC Cogent CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmwRe pfD ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Compugn CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conmed ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConsolCm ConEd ConE pfC ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts CornstProg Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Credicp CrSuisInco CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn Cyberonics CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden DaVita DayStr rsh DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut s DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DeutB pf DeutBCT5 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrSCBear rs DREBear rs

D 9.53 -.11 1.50 -.03 9.59 -.18 2.90 34.43 -.02 5.70 -.15 58.57 +.18 14.88 -.08 80.31 +.08 25.65 -.60 34.50 -.32 4.20 -.18 31.01 +.32 24.36 -.40 2.66 -.13 0.30 21.26 -.22 2.88 71.85 +.01 19.28 -.50 0.16 10.20 -.08 44.77 -.48 0.63 3.81 +.03 11.03 -.45 3.28 +.24 17.20 -.26 1.50 -.02 9.31 -.03 2.11 .31 -.01 5.49 +.04 1.54 65.57 -2.13 4.92 +.18 10.60 +1.03 1.81 50.93 -.01 1.78 3.10 +.05 2.64 80.38 -.50 1.34 -.03 5.11 +.04 3.86 -.15 2.85 +.04 0.23 13.41 +.22 5.89 -.11 139.93 -.48 12.60 +.07 0.24 6.89 -.04 1.48 51.92 -.21 1.42 20.69 -.14 0.56 64.71 +.02 12.77 +.05 0.32 73.43 -1.25 2.99 -.04 1.58 27.04 -.04 0.72 13.93 -.11 0.48 25.20 +.22 0.15 27.68 +1.32 17.70 +.06 22.86 +.16 2.13 25.60 4.11 +.07 .86 -.05 45.04 +.42 0.51 39.57 -.62 7.50 -.20 15.13 -.37 64.47 -.42 9.11 -.16 20.40 -.18 6.76 -.24 0.56 47.95 -3.12 2.20 64.37 +.25 0.60 36.03 -.47 7.29 +.06 0.36 27.67 -.01 1.76 52.45 +.05 15.17 -.49 7.89 +.25 8.87 -.05 53.24 -.22 6.44 +.07 0.37 6.58 -.01 46.38 -.58 3.59 -.07 2.12 82.84 +.69 16.06 -.20 0.60 14.94 +.06 0.04 17.61 +.11 1.50 -.08 0.38 18.51 +.44 0.38 17.45 +.41 0.20 38.93 -.22 0.94 37.30 -.30 0.48 13.34 -.34 2.00 24.70 -.17 1.63 18.86 +.06 24.52 -.25 32.25 -.47 23.47 +.08 0.37 71.90 -.76 1.36 14.26 +.15 1.56 75.52 -1.23 12.23 -.90 15.37 +.02 3.75 +.39 0.60 45.87 +.20 8.53 +.18 26.59 -.44 0.40 31.60 +.19 0.80 23.89 -.02 12.75 +.08 54.18 -.46 43.83 -.10 2.27 +.01 17.51 -.42 2.20 52.10 -.20 0.40 36.75 -.34 1.55 17.92 -.15 2.38 45.40 +.13 4.65 83.25 +.17 21.14 -.40 16.07 0.96 33.68 +.17 23.00 +.08 43.76 +.19 10.43 +.29 .65 +.04 1.08 45.28 -.53 0.42 20.05 +.02 2.30 27.83 -.19 0.92 21.02 -.42 0.24 79.23 +.62 19.04 -.06 9.73 -.38 0.56 31.26 +.25 1.24 6.97 -.02 0.20 17.31 -.20 0.44 25.68 -.86 1.57 37.94 +.18 18.83 -.02 10.43 -.03 0.84 55.93 -.26 6.02 +.18 1.75 22.48 -.05 0.16 6.32 +.02 52.54 +.31 1.50 15.65 -.19 19.09 +.32 0.72 40.48 -.28 4.00 -.15 0.80 47.80 -.17 0.80 30.44 -.74 1.70 95.57 +.01 0.32 3.52 -.02 1.85 42.83 +.50 67.17 +1.05 10.28 -.54 .13 -.01 6.15 -.19 37.46 -.56 25.29 -.06 .43 +.00 35.39 -1.34 21.24 -.20 1.80 52.84 -.35 0.70 70.66 -.87 1.46 -.05 125.48 -.52 111.77 +.03 22.67 -.64 25.94 -.02 1.56 -.03 30.89 2.16 +.02 10.89 +.06 2.40 12.63 -.22 .67 0.05 41.96 -.51 3.70 -.04 0.28 4.44 -.01 34.38 +.49 0.78 9.38 +.08 1.21 25.37 +.04 0.15 10.10 -.15 0.60 37.29 -.04 22.82 -.09 2.12 47.67 -.06 10.50 -.10 0.08 37.52 -.21 1.28 39.68 +.25 60.50 +.37 1.45 +.46 0.20 51.00 -.51 16.30 10.94 -.07 2.94 +.29 46.11 -1.05 8.51 +.58 1.20 57.48 -.53 0.36 14.71 -.14 6.90 -.78 12.84 -.01 11.67 +.02 .78 -.04 1.00 19.15 -.42 14.60 -.31 32.45 -.44 1.15 -.01 2.53 -.08 0.20 30.17 -.05 0.93 62.24 -.73 1.66 22.15 +.10 2.01 25.14 -.01 7.01 -.02 31.19 -.56 11.47 +.19 0.08 10.34 +.18 0.64 63.50 +.15 11.07 -.38 2.36 66.32 +.10 0.50 64.09 -.31 0.03 8.72 -.07 12.30 -.10 25.12 -.66 1.08 27.45 -.12 1.92 61.48 +.95 25.32 +.46 25.48 -.37 0.16 21.37 -.08 32.00 +3.13 36.28 +.66 7.51 29.38 +.65 5.66 25.07 -.71 37.78 +1.17 0.20 34.75 -.25

Nm

D

DrTcBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DrxEBear rs DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

0.15 7.35 3.41 4.83 8.17 5.17 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.24 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 42.65 -.95 41.32 +1.10 14.78 -.01 22.01 -.04 43.58 -.01 37.88 +.40 38.64 -1.20 15.80 -.01 44.68 +.03 56.79 +.40 27.55 -.27 14.65 -.20 35.94 -.35 31.16 -.32 .21 -.00 19.34 +.43 33.77 +.02 6.93 -.33 31.44 +.14 11.62 +.11 64.99 +.45 10.57 -.15 27.47 -.67 45.76 -.02 41.37 -.03 40.99 +.09 12.07 -.14 48.26 -1.15 16.84 +.16 2.59 -.11 14.64 +.08 43.45 -.72 25.75 -.20 38.58 +.04 5.44 +.11 30.11 +.11 24.30 -.31 32.82 -.16 4.30 +.05 48.57 -.71 3.08 -.09 3.78 -.13 36.52 -.38 24.35 -.12 11.06 -.12 16.89 +.10 10.60 -.09 67.39 -.07 .11 +.01 2.19 -.06 8.38 -.21 1.99 -.05 3.75 -.04

E-F-G-H ETrade rs 12.14 -.06 eBay 20.22 -.07 ECAMTrI n 20.25 -.22 EFJohnson 1.45 EMC Cp 19.66 +.21 EMCOR 23.76 -.27 ENI 2.84 39.43 -.23 EOG Res 0.62 105.54 -.03 EQT Corp 0.88 36.90 -.17 eResrch 8.67 -.07 EV Engy 3.02 34.22 +.22 ev3 Inc 22.56 +.08 EagleBulk 4.18 -.06 EagleMat 0.40 25.42 -1.16 EaglRkEn 0.10 5.39 +.15 ErthLink 0.64 8.06 -.02 EstWstBcp 0.04 17.06 -.32 EastChm 1.76 55.46 -.86 EKodak 4.44 -.11 Eaton 2.00 66.60 -.90 EatnVan 0.64 29.82 -.43 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.01 -.12 EVRiskMgd 1.80 15.65 -.09 EV TxDiver 1.62 11.28 -.11 EVTxMGlo 1.53 10.10 -.06 EVTxBWIn 1.80 14.76 -.21 EVTxGBW 1.56 11.44 -.06 Eclipsys 19.40 -.03 Ecolab 0.62 47.38 -.48 Ecopetrol 1.75 30.71 -.12 EdisonInt 1.26 32.95 -.11 EducRlty 0.20 6.25 -.03 EdwLfSci s 55.99 -.15 ElPasoCp 0.04 12.30 +.13 ElPasoPpl 1.52 29.40 +.05 Elan 5.00 -.07 EldorGld g 0.05 16.62 -.53 ElectArts 14.81 -.03 EBrasAero 0.38 21.40 -.08 Emcore .78 -.05 Emdeon n 12.58 +.29 EMS 46.62 -.20 EmersonEl 1.34 45.69 -.73 EmmisCm 2.28 +.01 EmployH 0.24 16.05 -.25 Emulex 9.38 -.23 EnbrEPtrs 4.01 54.51 -.07 Enbridge 1.70 49.18 -.10 EnCana g s 0.80 33.14 +.18 EndvSilv g 3.44 -.13 EndoPhrm 23.48 +.01 EndurSpec 1.00 38.98 -.02 Ener1 3.05 -.07 Energen 0.52 45.15 -.56 Energizer 52.31 -.57 EngyConv 4.54 -.27 EnrgyRec 3.69 -.31 EngyTEq 2.16 34.99 +.73 EngyTsfr 3.58 49.00 +.68 EgyXXI rs 15.96 -.68 EnergySol 0.10 5.51 +.38 Enerpls g 2.16 22.18 -.12 Enersis 0.68 20.93 -.17 EnerSys 22.23 -.45 ENSCO 0.14 40.53 +.33 Entegris 4.35 -.06 Entergy 3.32 76.01 -.10 EntPrPt 2.27 36.64 +.21 EnterPT 2.60 39.35 +.15 EntropCom 6.70 -.20 EnzonPhar 10.65 -.09 Equifax 0.16 28.75 -.20 Equinix 82.29 -1.33 EqtyOne 0.88 16.01 EqtyRsd 1.35 44.31 +.26 EricsnTel 0.28 11.05 +.09 EssexPT 4.13 103.30 -.02 EsteeLdr 0.55 62.15 -.04 EthanAl 0.20 13.70 -.48 Euronet 14.86 +.53 EverestRe 1.92 72.97 -.25 EvergrnEn .08 +.01 EvrgrSlr h .71 -.04 ExactSci h 3.92 -.06 ExcelM 4.99 -.09 ExcoRes 0.12 14.40 -.44 Exelixis 3.45 -.15 Exelon 2.10 40.87 +.25 ExeterR gs 5.91 -.34 ExideTc 5.60 -.09 Expedia 0.28 18.82 -.06 ExpdIntl 0.40 36.10 +.19 Express n 16.09 +.30 ExpScrip s 47.88 +.93 ExprsJet 2.59 -.10 ExterranH 25.98 -.41 ExtraSpce 0.23 14.25 +.12 ExxonMbl 1.76 58.94 +.16 Ezcorp 19.65 -.03 F5 Netwks 76.67 +1.44 FBL Fn 0.25 22.10 -.02 FBR Cap 3.41 -.09 FLIR Sys 29.92 -.59 FMC Corp 0.50 58.40 -1.04 FMC Tech 61.24 -.38 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.41 -.09 FSI Intl 3.86 -.22 FTI Cnslt 32.61 -.25 FactsetR 0.92 69.06 -.02 FairIsaac 0.08 23.78 -.13 FairchldS 9.27 +.16 FamilyDlr 0.62 36.11 +.11 Fastenal 0.80 52.62 +.55 FedExCp 0.48 74.16 -.06 FedAgric 0.20 14.22 -.24 FedRlty 2.64 73.43 +.02 FedSignl 0.24 6.06 -.11 FedInvst 0.96 21.12 -.12 FelCor 5.17 +.13 Ferro 7.57 -.20 FibriaCelu 14.50 -.49 FidlNFin 0.72 13.57 -.08 FidNatInfo 0.20 27.75 +.05 FifthStFin 1.28 10.99 -.16 FifthThird 0.04 13.27 -.21 Finisar rs 15.39 -.16 FinLine 0.16 14.63 -.07 FstAFin n 0.24 13.84 -.04 FstBcpPR .53 -.03 FstBusey 0.16 4.75 -.07 FstCashFn 23.05 +.12 FstCwlth 0.04 5.79 +.04 FFnclOH 0.40 15.10 -.08 FstHorizon 0.75 12.13 +.08 FstInRT 4.46 FstMarblhd 2.56 +.08 FMidBc 0.04 12.38 -.11 FstNiagara 0.56 12.89 -.05 FstPotom 0.80 15.44 +.19 FstSolar 129.71 -2.42 FstStBcp h .43 +.08 FT RNG 0.08 15.97 -.15 FirstEngy 2.20 37.26 +.25 FstMerit 0.64 18.00 -.07 Fiserv 46.01 -.25 FlagstB rs 3.14 -.13 Flextrn 6.15 +.08 Flotek h 1.14 +.06 FlowrsFds 0.80 24.97 -.18 Flowserve 1.16 89.98 -2.71 Fluor 0.50 44.67 -.74 FlyLeasing 0.80 10.18 -.40 FocusMda 16.65 -.41 FEMSA 0.32 46.06 +.65 FootLockr 0.60 13.28 -.01 ForcePro 4.15 -.09 FordM 11.10 +.25 FordM wt 3.69 +.21 FordC pfS 3.25 41.85 +.35 ForestCA 11.60 +.21 ForestLab 28.25 -.14 ForestOil 28.76 -.35 Forestar 16.54 -.43 FormFac 10.46 -.20 Fortinet n 16.66 -.31 Fortress 3.39 -.18 FortuneBr 0.76 40.82 +.12 Fossil Inc 37.66 -.73 FosterWhl 22.30 -.53 FranceTel 1.90 18.82 -.13 FrankRes 0.88 91.65 -.59 FrkStPrp 0.76 11.76 FredsInc 0.16 10.36 -.21 FMCG 1.20 63.22 -2.76 FresKabi rt .13 -.00 FDelMnt 20.06 -.17

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h GenesWyo Genomic Genoptix Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoEye GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay GlblXColom GlbXChiFn GlblXChiM Globalstar GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn Grtbatch GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrubbEllis GpTelevisa GuarantyBc Guess GulfportE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc Haemon Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HarteHnk HartfdFn HartFn pfA HrvrdBio HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvcs HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthTroncs Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heico s Heinz HelenTroy HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom Hittite HollyCp Hologic HomeDp HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorMan Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn

D 6.60 +.06 7.20 -.19 12.74 -.14 1.40 28.78 -1.19 1.21 +.06 0.28 19.70 -.47 0.12 10.12 -.13 6.65 -.10 5.31 -.09 8.09 -.36 1.12 27.63 +.07 0.20 5.93 -.27 4.44 6.92 -.22 28.91 -.49 6.13 +.02 0.72 12.56 +.01 0.44 4.58 -.02 1.68 15.72 +.02 0.14 13.53 -.16 1.28 25.12 -.22 19.32 +.29 5.33 -.09 0.16 14.62 -.22 0.40 18.81 +.28 0.20 46.99 -.89 1.50 29.33 -1.01 24.23 -.44 24.91 +.48 46.32 -.60 15.35 -.43 5.11 -.09 26.50 -.60 1.68 59.87 -.97 0.40 14.93 -.02 13.71 -.04 0.50 5.55 -.11 1.12 36.22 +.07 3.07 -.18 2.71 -.06 .35 +.01 37.95 -.36 12.83 -.37 16.93 -.10 0.18 15.61 +.09 0.44 18.37 -.20 24.17 -.17 1.64 40.80 -.32 .47 -.01 14.46 -.13 53.74 -.19 21.23 -.22 32.21 -.34 12.53 +.14 10.98 0.21 13.76 -.44 4.78 -.20 0.18 7.17 +.09 28.97 -.06 34.48 -.26 0.52 15.23 -.09 1.98 35.12 +.28 2.84 -.15 0.40 5.87 -.12 4.31 -.25 0.08 37.56 -.04 1.06 35.39 +.34 13.61 +.01 11.09 +.08 1.62 -.07 0.40 13.06 -.21 0.17 13.12 0.18 41.84 +.25 4.17 -.05 1.40 137.25 -.81 1.08 67.23 -1.79 12.93 -.61 10.88 -.01 475.83 +8.34 22.05 -.56 0.80 30.11 -.61 15.22 -.49 2.16 103.78 +.79 1.32 -.04 5.18 -.04 20.63 -.39 0.52 23.40 -1.15 3.55 -.05 4.40 -.34 1.80 0.07 5.95 -.16 0.83 17.60 -.10 23.24 +.08 26.65 -.50 10.34 -.35 14.00 +.42 1.80 66.15 -1.56 23.50 -.70 1.12 +.03 0.52 18.83 -.05 1.07 0.64 33.46 -.44 12.63 -.11 43.68 -.90 0.54 25.35 -.24 1.86 33.55 +.04 0.81 151.88 +3.05 1.70 47.80 +.23 25.38 -.08 26.76 -.28 55.77 -1.04 0.36 28.17 -.47 6.90 -.18 24.75 -.26 1.46 -.22 1.00 45.12 -.20 2.01 -.06 41.43 -1.30 17.31 -.13 0.40 23.85 +.06 31.35 -.77 5.64 -.09 0.06 10.44 -.14 0.88 42.92 +.02 0.82 24.71 -.19 0.30 10.78 -.29 0.20 23.15 -.38 1.81 24.00 -.38 3.49 +.12 8.14 -.15 1.00 41.77 +.18 4.65 28.68 +.11 1.24 23.54 -.04 5.70 -.20 3.41 +.61 2.72 43.29 +.11 0.88 19.50 -.05 7.36 -.19 1.20 22.69 -.16 24.58 -.22 17.62 -.35 16.52 -.06 4.84 -.30 12.67 +.46 0.08 15.07 4.66 +.01 4.95 -.12 0.12 37.65 -.30 1.80 44.77 -.14 22.66 -1.61 10.10 -.31 0.12 4.04 -.02 0.24 39.74 -.71 .49 +.04 54.76 -.09 0.80 48.51 -.13 2.56 -.11 0.80 9.85 +.02 0.20 4.55 -.11 1.28 50.69 -.03 10.04 -.20 0.40 53.69 +.46 46.79+11.39 0.32 45.68 +.43 16.47 -.36 21.88 +.69 24.46 -.03 14.60 -.10 1.70 28.42 -.13 0.41 30.88 +.05 46.01 +.55 0.60 26.17 -.37 14.12 +.13 0.95 28.31 +.05 2.32 46.34 -.46 30.31 +.49 1.21 40.82 -.45 0.32 15.70 -.44 0.84 42.02 -.17 16.60 +.14 8.34 -.53 58.23 +.06 1.80 19.75 -.08 0.04 14.21 0.28 5.29 -.02 0.02 9.42 -.53 1.00

Nm HovnanE HubbelB HudsCity HudsonTc HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hyatt n Hyperdyn

D 3.83 -.06 1.44 40.70 -.70 0.60 12.58 +.10 2.00 +.22 1.20 19.80 -.25 24.14 -1.09 45.92 -.28 0.48 34.37 +.06 0.04 5.93 +.02 0.40 8.87 -.14 5.11 +.14 36.77 -.21 1.04

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 22.47 +.07 IAMGld g 0.06 16.66 -.36 ICICI Bk 0.53 38.32 +.47 IDT Corp 16.35 +.33 IESI-BFC g 0.50 21.50 +.10 ING GRE 0.54 6.59 ING GlbDv 1.20 10.25 -.02 ING 8.70 -.09 INGPrRTr 0.33 5.54 -.02 ION Geoph 4.18 -.20 iPass 0.48 1.06 -.07 iShCmxG s 11.75 -.09 iShGSCI 27.96 -.44 iSAstla 0.81 20.36 -.14 iShBelg 0.19 11.66 -.05 iShBraz 2.58 65.92 -1.42 iSCan 0.42 26.14 -.07 iShEMU 0.96 31.10 -.18 iSFrnce 0.60 21.24 -.07 iShGer 0.30 19.80 -.07 iSh HK 0.48 15.42 +.04 iShJapn 0.16 9.55 -.05 iSh Kor 0.39 47.54 +.09 iSMalas 0.25 11.86 -.09 iShMex 0.75 49.35 -.61 iShSing 0.38 11.82 -.03 iSPacxJpn 1.37 38.14 -.18 iSSpain 2.26 36.91 -.49 iSSwedn 0.61 24.79 -.08 iSTaiwn 0.21 11.96 -.04 iSh UK 0.44 14.49 +.03 iShChile 0.68 58.97 -.24 iShSilver 17.62 -.11 iShS&P100 1.04 49.15 +.20 iShDJDv 1.67 44.27 -.10 iShBTips 3.69 105.67 -.07 iShEurFn 0.20 20.32 -.11 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 54.84 -.14 iShChina25 0.68 40.47 -.21 iShDJTr 0.94 75.20 +.04 iSSP500 2.24 108.42 +.11 iShBAgB 3.90 106.86 +.12 iShEMkts 0.59 39.65 -.33 iShiBxB 5.51 108.08 +.13 iSh ACWI 0.64 39.69 -.20 iSEafeSC 0.89 34.50 -.15 iShEMBd 5.72 104.34 -.31 iSSPGth 1.09 55.49 +.04 iSSPGlbEn 0.82 31.34 +.11 iShSPLatA 1.22 43.85 -1.06 iSSPVal 1.18 52.01 +.07 iShB20 T 3.73 99.18 -.04 iShB7-10T 3.82 94.82 +.16 iShB1-3T 1.21 84.00 +.01 iS Eafe 1.38 49.87 -.19 iSRusMCV 0.69 37.90 -.15 iSRusMCG 0.50 45.18 -.23 iShRsMd 1.22 83.45 -.41 iSSPMid 0.94 73.53 -.31 iShiBxHYB 8.28 86.53 -.07 iShSft 45.26 +.18 iShSemi 0.44 46.46 +.28 iShMtg 1.50 14.63 +.02 iShNsdqBio 78.29 -1.18 iShC&SRl 1.83 57.05 +.27 iSR1KV 1.20 56.44 -.02 iSR1KG 0.71 47.73 iSRus1K 1.07 59.50 iSR2KV 1.04 58.05 -.60 iShBarIntC 4.66 105.07 iShBarc1-3 3.60 104.31 +.02 iSR2KG 0.44 67.78 -.85 iShR2K 0.77 62.23 -.71 iShBShtT 0.13 110.23 iShUSPfd 2.72 37.68 -.03 iShDJTel 0.74 19.26 -.07 iShDJTch 0.25 54.56 +.40 iShREst 1.81 48.80 +.18 iShDJHm 0.08 11.41 -.13 iShFnSv 0.31 52.84 +.10 iShDJRBk 0.28 23.29 -.06 iShFnSc 0.63 52.14 iShUSEngy 0.49 30.20 -.05 iShSPSm 0.56 55.35 -.51 iShBasM 0.86 56.51 -.98 iShDJOG 0.22 50.09 -.28 iShEur350 1.02 33.91 -.09 iSSCVal 0.81 58.41 -.62 iStar 4.22 -.09 iStar pfF 1.95 12.75 -.24 ITT Corp 1.00 46.28 -.67 ITT Ed 83.53 -1.63 icad h 1.99 -.01 Icon PLC 27.00 -.20 IconixBr 14.80 +.13 Idacorp 1.20 34.67 -.17 IdenixPh 5.35 -.38 IDEX 0.60 29.42 +.14 ITW 1.24 42.86 -.47 Illumina 43.60 -1.12 Imax Corp 12.89 +.16 Immucor 18.60 -.21 ImunoGn 8.66 -.33 Imunmd 3.10 -.09 ImpaxLabs 18.32 -.62 ImperlSgr 0.08 11.56 +.14 Incyte 11.70 -.33 IndBkMI h .28 +.01 Inergy 2.78 39.99 +.09 Infinera 6.49 -.11 InfoLgx rsh 6.17 +1.37 Informat 25.40 -.07 InfosysT 0.54 63.02 +.45 IngerRd 0.28 33.90 -.14 IngrmM 15.56 -.04 InlandRE 0.57 7.61 -.08 InovioPhm .00 -.00 InsitTc 21.49 -.09 Insmed h .65 -.02 InspPhar 4.84 -.19 IntgDv 5.21 +.01 ISSI 8.25 -.17 IntegrysE 2.72 46.59 +.18 Intel 0.63 20.57 +.33 InteractBrk 16.79 -.03 IntractDat 0.80 33.66 -.04 IntcntlEx 106.61 -.03 InterDig 25.42 -.01 Intrface 0.04 10.67 -.53 Intermec 10.50 -.20 InterMune 9.06 -.38 IBM 2.60 128.67 +.71 Intl Coal 4.26 -.14 IntFlav 1.00 44.14 -.49 IntlGame 0.24 15.55 -.31 IntPap 0.50 23.32 -.35 IntlRectif 19.66 -.07 IntlSpdw 0.16 25.43 -.38 InterOil g 49.91 +1.06 Interpublic 7.68 -.04 Intersil 0.48 12.99 +.19 IntPotash 21.56 -.54 Intuit 36.55 +.27 IntSurg 317.47 -1.42 Invernss 26.86 +.16 Invesco 0.44 18.25 -.31 InVKSrInc 0.33 4.49 InvTech 15.19 -.19 InvRlEst 0.69 8.54 -.03 IridiumCm 10.69 -.05 IronMtn 0.25 23.41 -.11 IsilonSys 13.86 -.34 Isis 9.47 -.15 IstaPh 2.38 -.07 ItauUnibH 0.55 21.08 -.44 Itron 60.91 -1.35 IvanhoeEn 1.94 -.01 IvanhM g 14.43 +.43 JCrew 35.57 -1.07 JA Solar 5.88 -.28 JDASoft 22.55 +.32 JDS Uniph 10.34 +.02 JPMorgCh 0.20 39.19 +.34 JPMAlerian 1.79 31.97 +.07 JPMCh pfC 1.68 24.29 +.05 Jabil 0.28 14.08 +.11 JackHenry 0.38 24.52 +.12 JackInBox 19.32 -.05 JacksnHew 1.07 +.06 JacobsEng 37.36 -.61 Jaguar g 8.22 -.22

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K-Sea KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn Kaydon KA MLP Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp Koppers KoreaElc KornFer Kraft Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LCA Vis LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LJ Intl LKQ Corp LNB Bncp LSI Corp LTC Prp LTX-Cred LaZBoy LabCp LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeeEnt LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStrzA n LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LigandPhm LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEl LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g LumberLiq

D

0.04 0.33 0.30

2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70

0.25 0.20 0.40 0.60

0.72 1.92 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.28 4.28 0.10 0.24 0.24 0.08

0.88 1.16 0.38

1.60 0.33

0.04 1.56

0.18 0.04 0.50

2.08 0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

1.96 0.60 0.80 1.12 0.04 0.92 2.52

1.45 2.52 0.25 4.00 0.44 1.44

2.30 -.08 16.54 -.62 9.87 -.22 27.85 -.06 8.59 -.11 23.11 -.02 5.89 -.06 38.34 -.82 2.10 -.11 60.21 -.33 28.33 -.29 15.33 -.15 67.25 -.46 1.19 -.11 54.60 -1.18 53.27 -.66 26.00 +.23 5.75 -.20 42.00 -.67 10.85 -.52 21.49 +.52 7.98 +.08 29.51 -.29 19.10 -.37 .64 37.08 -.16 33.56 -.54 26.07 -.26 51.63 -.14 2.64 +.23 26.22 -.31 3.53 -.10 8.99 -.24 8.23 -.12 30.29 +.04 61.93 +.23 13.68 +.08 67.20 +.29 58.75 +.06 36.73 -.49 8.27 +.14 16.13 -.03 4.27 -.23 14.24 -.16 21.10 +.08 12.24 -.25 3.26 -.01 47.20 -.82 3.45 +.02 23.17 -.96 13.33 -.08 13.90 -.36 29.00 +.01 20.47 +.01 8.39 +.07 9.23 -.01 7.51 -.26 71.86 -1.36 20.05 +.06 5.36 -.12 5.92 -.23 16.80 -.15 24.25 -.58 2.52 -.14 20.18 +.01 4.71 -.17 4.84 +.03 23.99 -.16 2.98 -.03 7.81 -.29 74.87 +.54 1.18 -.05 40.21 +.53 25.79 -.85 40.98 -.03 23.07 -.25 20.68 -.06 5.15 -.11 7.69 +.21 28.54 -.79 12.73 +.17 5.11 +.78 66.98 -1.21 2.52 +.01 24.19 +.08 29.28 -.24 20.43 -.21 33.53 +.59 14.75 +.18 44.39 +.15 20.43 +.02 1.04 +.02 1.25 -.02 5.79 -.15 34.31 -.02 9.93 -.03 4.15 +.02 27.79 +.05 27.68 +.11 11.08 +.12 44.92 +.58 53.56 +.73 28.95 -.18 46.06 -.56 36.63 +.50 1.50 +.01 35.13 -.04 4.47 +.04 23.93 -.49 27.34 +.17 51.42 -.21 25.07 -.51 30.61 +.30 27.69 -.06 6.70 -.14 11.22 -.16 4.74 -.14 3.77 74.74 -.50 3.65 -.04 35.53 -.17 14.43 +.11 31.95 -.52 74.67 +.25 7.39 -.17 20.36 -.07 86.07 +1.73 2.30 -.22 38.87 -.02 22.87 -.13

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MMT MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc MV OilTr Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco

2.80 89.12 -1.11 0.04 18.53 -.29 6.43 -.17 0.11 5.25 -.04 1.00 27.74 -.52 9.26 +.14 0.63 19.28 6.85 -.28 10.90 +.12 5.65 -.16 0.76 7.29 -.02 0.58 6.82 +.02 0.54 6.52 -.02 7.86 -.10 9.82 -.15 9.86 +.22 19.90 +.04 2.95 +.01 0.88 49.05 -.05 30.68 +.02 2.83 27.96 +.09 2.00 39.08 -.50 1.80 29.80 +.05 0.20 17.98 -.55 19.40 -.04 34.96 -.35 2.84 48.15 +.09 3.13 +.02 0.18 68.24 -.51 4.48 -.07 21.21 -.21 0.23 2.24 -.02 0.08 9.44 -.20 6.16 -.30 0.74 46.66 -.36 0.52 15.16 -.15 1.00 32.10 +.02 7.27 -.12 21.83 -.54 0.11 50.15 -.33 0.08 29.53 -.02 26.40 -.42 0.42 38.65 -.47 0.45 45.63 -1.15 0.18 75.18 +.03 2.56 33.99 +.14 0.16 30.97 -.17 0.80 22.64 -.47 0.04 8.15 +.18 21.56 -.30 4.90 -.14 1.60 84.56 -2.08 17.20 +.58 0.30 11.12 -.39

Nm Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg Maxygen McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata Medifast Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith Meritage Metalico Methanx Methode MetLife MetLfe pfA MetroPCS MetroHlth MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk MoleInsP h Molex MolsCoorB MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monotype Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MorgSt pfA MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc Mueller MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Ness Tech NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng NBRESec Neuralstem Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewMarket NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed rs NextEraEn Nextwve rs NiSource NichACv2 Nicor Nidec NikeB NileTher h 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin

D 2.00 23.34 -.49 0.24 28.88 -1.37 10.48 -.27 0.60 213.67 -1.85 0.75 22.76 +.19 3.80 +.05 0.80 17.91 +.08 5.74 +.21 3.65 +.09 1.04 38.46 +.17 23.72 -1.11 2.20 69.94 +.72 0.94 29.78 +.29 0.72 67.07 -.36 11.66 -.34 31.97 +.24 0.90 53.93 +.05 0.12 8.81 -.10 0.92 23.46 -.22 19.00 -.89 23.41 -.24 56.69 +.16 6.98 -.03 0.80 9.59 -.05 7.60 -.36 0.24 23.65 -.10 15.97 -.03 27.93 +.37 52.12 -.31 0.90 37.68 +.45 3.76 -.22 0.36 19.42 -.40 9.06 -.06 58.85 -.27 4.33 +.26 1.52 36.09 -.21 0.92 31.32 -.38 16.60 -.26 3.62 -.35 0.62 20.18 -.58 0.28 10.06 -.54 0.74 39.57 -.53 1.02 22.65 +.29 9.22 +.01 3.63 -.16 116.06 +.16 0.14 10.72 -.01 1.37 29.52 +.29 6.44 -.21 8.55 -.02 34.35 -.08 15.52 -.02 0.52 24.83 +.56 2.95 -.10 23.19 +1.00 2.46 52.75 -.52 0.09 18.04 -.31 7.24 85.21 +.26 106.94 +.01 0.20 31.43 -.45 7.31 -.16 11.34 +.04 4.70 -.13 3.18 -.03 20.54 -.04 9.04 -.09 45.62 -.40 1.38 -.06 0.61 18.25 -.29 1.12 44.34 +.18 2.36 -.12 18.77 +.38 9.07 -.14 1.06 51.20 -.01 12.27 -.06 0.36 15.40 -.23 0.42 22.01 -.03 0.20 24.56 -.14 1.15 15.18 +.05 1.01 17.40 +.16 6.02 -.04 0.20 42.48 -3.65 6.99 +.23 2.24 -.05 0.40 24.38 -.17 0.07 3.82 -.09 1.00 50.60 -.28 17.52 -.09 14.94 -.12 36.18 +.68 9.15 +.18 12.97 -.09 19.40 -.08 0.60 14.21 -.09 1.03 -.02 34.30 -.55 2.26 -.04 23.00 +.37 0.44 12.68 +.08 1.20 28.18 -.06 18.11 -.24 0.14 22.76 -.08 9.24 -.47 7.96 -.20 18.15 -.05 0.31 2.46 -.05 10.04 -.47 1.38 46.97 -.54 7.17 38.00 +.16 0.52 30.62 -.45 0.40 35.57 +.06 0.04 5.95 -.15 1.50 22.38 -.10 0.32 14.24 +.11 1.80 36.46 -.04 9.36 -.21 0.24 4.69 -.17 48.86 -.71 12.62 -.33 1.67 -.01 4.18 -.09 10.70 -.25 30.57 +.47 38.96 +.20 33.66 +.16 14.32 +.06 119.38 +1.85 2.73 -.04 2.83 -.09 0.24 3.34 -.15 2.51 -.04 5.70 +.02 21.54 +.06 11.89 -.09 3.60 .07 -.01 5.13 -.08 99.26 -2.26 2.30 -.14 1.00 16.20 +.03 9.39 +.38 0.28 11.35 -.09 2.63 -.19 0.20 15.19 -.20 50.87 -1.16 1.50 99.24 -.27 0.40 61.58 -.35 6.85 -.18 8.73 -.34 0.15 12.99 +.14 0.15 14.49 +.05 0.20 20.85 +.07 3.13 +.10 2.00 51.91 +.48 .94 +.19 0.92 15.81 -.03 1.02 8.32 -.12 1.86 42.27 -.12 0.17 23.64 +.97 1.08 69.81 -.34 .36 +.03 15.81 +.11 21.18 -.06 0.20 32.22 +.55 0.72 66.31 +.60 0.56 8.41 -.07 5.58 +.02 1.45 27.93 -.32 0.80 34.15 -.39 1.36 54.19 +.38 3.24 -.16 1.03 26.99 +.11 13.66 +.10 1.12 49.09 +.56 2.99 +.03 1.88 54.55 -.90 0.40 3.05 +.13 0.40 11.72 +.03 6.40 -.09 1.99 49.52 -.03 5.82 +.09 2.18 -.07 6.14 +.08 26.71 +.22 1.60 36.43 +.34 0.50 27.37 +.11

D

NuVasive 34.90 -.41 NuanceCm 15.67 +.01 Nucor 1.44 38.67 -.94 NutriSyst 0.70 22.78 -.09 NvIMO 0.86 14.41 -.04 NuvMuVal 0.47 9.86 -.01 NvMSI&G2 0.75 7.92 -.01 NuvQPf2 0.65 7.74 +.04 Nvidia 10.54 +.19 OGE Engy 1.45 38.33 +.08 OM Group 23.60 -.48 OReillyA h 46.19 +.12 OasisPet n 15.61 -.14 OcciPet 1.52 80.91 -.20 Oceaneer 47.00 -1.09 OceanFr rs .78 +.01 Oclaro rs 11.70 -.27 OcwenFn 10.05 -.13 OdysseyHlt 26.80 -.02 OdysMar 1.05 -.02 OfficeDpt 4.20 -.05 OfficeMax 12.89 -.39 OilSvHT 2.66 102.90 -.06 OilStates 41.31 -1.08 Oilsands g .64 -.04 OldNBcp 0.28 10.38 +.07 OldRepub 0.69 12.64 -.21 OldSecBc 0.04 2.08 +.28 Olin 0.80 18.59 -.31 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.97 -.09 OmegaNav 1.68 -.21 Omncre 0.09 24.28 -.21 Omnicom 0.80 34.86 +.25 OmniVisn 22.66 -.78 Omnova 7.92 +.02 OnSmcnd 6.76 +.01 ONEOK 1.76 45.23 -.13 ONEOK Pt 4.44 66.96 +.28 OnyxPh 21.42 -.61 OpenTable 45.62 +.77 OpnwvSy 1.94 -.06 OpkoHlth 2.37 -.03 Oracle 0.20 23.38 +.06 OrbitalSci 16.12 +.03 Orbitz 4.36 -.02 Orexigen 4.16 -.01 OrientEH 7.82 -.28 OrienPap n 7.23 +.28 OriginAg 7.64 -.26 OrionMar 12.83 -.37 Oritani s 9.95 -.09 OrmatTc 0.20 28.90 -.09 OrsusXel .23 -.01 Orthovta 1.80 -.32 OshkoshCp 32.06 -.29 OvShip 1.75 36.84 -1.26 OwensM s 0.71 28.40 -.13 OwensCorn 28.85 -.84 OwensIll 29.56 +.11 Oxigene h .29 -.01 PDL Bio 1.00 5.91 -.07 PF Chng 0.17 40.48 -.07 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.99 +.36 PHH Corp 19.01 +.54 PMC Sra 7.97 -.02 PMI Grp 3.09 -.13 PNC 0.40 61.49 -.30 PNM Res 0.50 11.94 +.05 POSCO 1.71 103.33 -2.67 PPG 2.16 63.78 -.84 PPL Corp 1.40 26.19 -.03 PRGX Glbl 4.36 -.06 PSS Wrld 20.74 -.26 Paccar 0.36 41.54 -.30 PacerIntl 7.74 -.05 PacCapB .72 -.01 PacEth h .48 +.01 PacSunwr 3.55 +.04 PackAmer 0.60 21.83 -.62 Pactiv 28.99 +.03 PaetecHld 3.70 -.17 Palatin .18 +.00 PallCorp 0.64 35.50 -.19 PanASlv 0.05 24.58 -.27 PaneraBrd 75.72 -.34 ParPharm 28.52 +.41 ParamTch 16.42 +.16 ParaG&S 1.26 -.05 Parexel 22.30 +.05 ParkDrl 3.93 -.08 ParkerHan 1.04 56.44 -.88 Parkrvsn .85 -.07 PrtnrCm 3.96 15.81 +.02 PartnerRe 2.00 73.37 -.47 PatriotCoal 12.05 -.50 Patterson 0.40 28.53 -.09 PattUTI 0.20 14.38 -.01 Paychex 1.24 25.75 -.53 PeabdyE 0.28 42.75 -.54 Pengrth g 0.84 9.25 -.70 PnnNGm 23.03 -.40 PennVa 0.23 19.35 -.74 PennVaGP 1.56 18.43 -.12 PennWst g 1.80 19.91 +.10 PennantPk 1.04 9.68 -.20 Penney 0.80 22.56 -.80 PenRE 0.60 11.44 -.28 Penske 11.46 -.15 Pentair 0.76 32.42 -.63 PeopUtdF 0.62 14.11 +.23 PepBoy 0.12 9.36 +.09 PepcoHold 1.08 16.58 -.10 PepsiCo 1.92 63.74 +.24 Peregrne rs 1.87 -.07 PerfectWld 24.69 +.14 PerkElm 0.28 19.47 -.12 PermFix 1.70 -.02 Perrigo 0.25 56.88 -1.17 PetChina 3.72 113.11 -.57 Petrohawk 17.02 -.60 PetrbrsA 1.30 30.96 -.65 Petrobras 1.30 35.75 -.62 PtroqstE 6.69 -.27 PetsMart 0.50 31.46 +.05 Pfizer 0.72 14.93 +.16 PhmHTr 7.49 61.33 -.15 PharmPdt 0.60 26.16 -.21 Pharmacyc 7.35 -.09 Pharmasset 25.75 -.04 PhaseFwd 16.79 -.03 PhilipMor 2.32 48.84 +.25 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.94 +.05 PhlVH 0.15 47.11 -.84 PhnxCos 1.99 -.08 PiedNG 1.12 25.81 -.20 Pier 1 6.69 -.03 PilgrmsP n 7.00 -.07 PimCpOp 1.38 17.10 -.14 PimIncStr2 0.70 10.08 -.03 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.19 -.05 PinnclEnt 9.64 -.22 PinWst 2.10 38.37 +.22 PionDrill 5.98 -.09 PioNtrl 0.08 60.69 -.18 PitnyBw 1.46 23.05 -.01 PlainsAA 3.74 60.06 -.09 PlainsEx 21.62 +.07 Plantron 0.20 28.45 -.40 PlatUnd 0.32 38.06 +.15 PlaybyB 5.55 +1.61 PlumCrk 1.68 35.95 +.33 Polaris 1.60 57.85 +1.67 Polo RL 0.40 76.12 -1.04 Polycom 30.12 -.13 PolyOne 8.65 -.29 Polypore 23.39 -.37 Poniard h .61 +.03 Pool Corp 0.52 21.67 -.35 Popular 2.89 -.05 PortGE 1.04 19.00 -.06 PostPrp 0.80 24.13 -.27 Potash 0.40 92.81 -.19 Potlatch 2.04 35.68 +.09 Power-One 8.86 +.02 PSCrudeDS 77.39 +2.68 PwshDB 21.73 -.25 PS Agri 24.49 -.05 PS USDBull 24.51 +.07 PS USDBear 25.35 -.09 PwSClnEn 8.82 -.20 PwSWtr 0.11 15.33 -.31 PSFinPf 1.34 16.64 -.03 PShNatMu 1.14 23.99 +.03 PwShPfd 1.04 13.81 -.02 PShEMSov 1.66 26.28 -.02 PSIndia 0.11 22.60 -.15 PwShs QQQ 0.26 44.75 +.13 Powrwav 1.58 -.05 Praxair 1.80 81.50 +.17 PrecCastpt 0.12 108.00 -2.08 PrecDrill 7.03 -.17 PrmWBc h .45 -.02 Prestige 7.48 -.24 PriceTR 1.08 47.80 -.09 priceline 204.00 -.09 PrideIntl 24.76 +.12 PrinFncl 0.50 24.61 -.26 PrivateB 0.04 11.48 -.20 ProShtDow 51.54 -.07 ProShtQQQ 43.14 -.15 ProShtS&P 52.37 -.08 PrUShS&P 34.17 -.07 ProUltDow 0.46 42.05 +.11 PrUlShDow 28.18 -.08 PrUShMC 19.29 +.19 ProUltQQQ 55.40 +.30 PrUShQQQ 18.21 -.09 ProUltSP 0.40 35.34 +.08 ProUShL20 37.01 +.02 ProUShBrz 24.24 +1.19 PrUSCh25 rs 37.71 +.35 ProUSEM rs 49.89 +.83 ProUSRE rs 26.96 -.14 ProUSOG rs 67.33 +.27 ProUSBM rs 39.88 +1.31 ProUltRE rs 0.51 37.91 +.22 ProUShtFn 20.88 -.02 ProUFin rs 0.17 55.11 -.02 PrUPShQQQ 62.01 -.54 ProUltSemi 0.17 30.15 +.72 ProUltO&G 0.21 27.71 -.11 ProUBasM 0.13 27.35 -.97 ProUShEur 22.46 +.22 ProShtR2K 42.15 +.45 ProUltPQQQ 84.61 +.95 ProUSR2K 22.04 +.49 ProUltR2K 0.02 27.43 -.56 ProUSSP500 33.96 -.12 ProUltSP500 0.41 130.81 +.38 ProUltCrude 9.40 -.31 ProUShCrude 15.29 +.52 ProSUltSilv 58.13 -1.00 ProUltShYen 18.96 -.02 ProUShEuro 23.51 +.20 ProctGam 1.93 62.09 +.34 ProgrssEn 2.48 40.56 +.09 ProgsvCp 0.16 19.81 -.15 ProLogis 0.60 10.02 -.08 ProspctCap 1.21 9.76 -.07 ProspBcsh 0.62 34.79 -.45 Protalix 6.02 -.30

Nm

D

ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PureBio PMIIT PPrIT

0.56 21.29 -.24 0.72 7.45 +.08 0.70 56.27 -.13 0.61 16.43 +.21 32.93 -.06 1.37 33.45 +.11 3.20 92.90 +.52 8.47 -.13 2.12 +.05 0.64 6.31 0.71 6.64 +.04

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN Qlogic Qualcom QualitySys QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadNet RadianGrp RadntSys RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepFBcp RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RINO Intl RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Rollins Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 n Rural/Met Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrNuBMu SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SXC Hlth SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis SchiffNutr Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn Schwab SchMau SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy SearchMed SearchM wt SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedH n SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp ShengdaTc Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina SiriusXM Skechers SkilldHcre

30.19 -.25 20.01 -.15 18.22 +.09 0.76 35.10 +1.19 1.20 58.40 -.52 21.31 -.32 1.91 -.02 .51 -.01 0.40 49.47 -.26 18.42 -.09 16.24 +.02 9.52 -.43 11.48 -.26 4.01 -.14 0.32 5.45 +.02 2.14 -.05 14.87 -.01 4.08 +.01 0.16 13.81 -.18 0.82 18.32 -.33 4.06 -.02 6.67 -.04 25.01 -.92 16.46 -.59 2.14 -.06 0.01 8.07 -.13 13.43 -.62 .99 +.01 1.34 +.03 0.25 21.52 +.17 55.09 -.44 18.30 -.10 0.17 91.97 -1.33 0.16 41.63 -.16 .51 +.02 0.44 26.18 +.23 2.00 46.39 -.14 1.50 48.10 -.71 3.31 -.09 1.72 31.37 -.23 30.86 +.22 20.38 +.44 1.00 15.13 -.04 0.68 59.06 -.58 0.72 13.77 +.12 1.85 34.69 +.08 22.43 -.79 0.04 7.24 +.09 0.16 13.58 -.29 21.41 +.20 0.48 47.93 -.19 0.40 36.30 -1.17 1.00 56.57 -.81 7.48 -.12 20.90 +.18 1.01 -.01 .35 1.15 22.28 -.11 5.41 +.03 2.35 +.14 0.76 30.59 -.01 53.79 +.46 65.35 +.42 1.00 5.73 -.03 12.52 -.31 1.73 88.09 -.01 8.15 -.08 10.57 -.21 1.36 -.01 3.60 55.31 -.15 13.47 -.39 0.45 46.89 -1.40 0.40 20.01 -.07 .97 29.91 +.09 0.52 25.00 -.38 0.60 51.39 -.83 1.40 51.39 -.63 0.96 54.38 -.51 23.96 -.24 20.19 -.58 1.28 34.11 -.03 0.36 21.50 +.06 0.38 56.58 -.32 22.15 +.22 0.64 53.75 -.34 41.98 -.60 24.53 +.06 2.00 52.33 -.11 13.58 +.02 23.91 -.81 3.36 51.09 -.21 3.36 53.51 0.36 44.85 -.81 10.82 -.06 3.37 -.02 32.52 -.55 9.39 -.16 29.07 +.37 9.13 +.03 29.58 +.18 1.00 40.84 -.28 0.54 39.54 -.08 0.12 17.04 -.08 16.89 +.04 0.67 47.08 -.07 34.43 -.92 1.90 37.85 +.25 0.20 21.66 -.23 5.80 -.09 15.56 -.23 0.40 56.14 -.06 11.33 +.03 0.10 43.88 -.75 2.51 102.25 +.14 117.34 -1.02 1.38 33.12 +.03 0.42 24.83 -.25 1.65 133.59 -.73 2.22 108.03 +.07 1.66 46.95 -.12 0.12 14.66 -.22 0.16 24.59 +.09 0.44 37.17 -.38 1.72 52.72 +.12 4.59 38.60 -.05 0.48 24.17 +.01 0.89 22.98 -.03 45.86 +.01 0.32 24.10 -.17 0.56 36.57 -.38 0.23 40.23 -.24 0.35 47.46 -1.53 1.00 53.07 -1.34 14.35 -.40 0.28 8.40 +.01 22.33 -.85 41.89 -.21 70.04 -2.57 1.30 39.47 -.78 0.48 19.85 -.20 25.75 +.37 36.65 -.05 7.66 -.17 91.85 +.07 41.10 +.07 8.44 -.24 .89 +.04 45.81 +2.91 6.20 -.06 14.13 -.29 1.63 30.39 +.08 2.46 0.35 10.76 -.10 0.44 14.27 -.11 1.19 36.94 -.68 2.81 -.08 5.04 -.08 13.49 -.08 14.93 -.46 0.50 7.52 +.16 0.84 58.25 -.31 0.07 40.87 -1.11 0.60 19.39 -.79 0.24 14.42 +.18 0.60 49.74 -1.87 10.27 -.27 0.50 45.23 +.07 0.30 41.43 -.18 7.38 -.23 28.40 -.84 1.70 20.66 +.40 14.07 +.26 0.48 20.86 +.01 2.53 -.02 2.75 -.08 .41 -.04 63.14 -.25 0.40 10.05 -.08 12.20 -.32 8.27 -.15 6.22 -.29 0.47 27.59 +.29 3.46 -.07 1.56 49.31 +.05 17.09 1.44 21.48 +.01 16.06 -.04 5.65 -.57 0.16 7.57 -.09 6.28 +.28 40.33 +2.72 34.68 -.31 4.22 -.20 1.44 72.02 -.21 1.32 18.42 -.67 0.34 65.32 -.53 7.98 -.10 24.54 -.49 0.58 15.63 -.63 2.41 93.88 +.57 7.93 -.11 10.14 -.04 0.64 52.85 -.41 28.49 -.10 0.42 28.75 -.36 7.07 -.08 3.14 -.07 42.95 +.15 0.40 5.40 -.06 16.72 -.06 19.00 -.32 0.08 6.63 +.01 2.40 82.96 +.30 36.40 +.14 .96 -.04 35.06 -2.64 2.31 +.15

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7.42 21.42 14.49 19.93 26.99 3.88 38.77 9.20 .77 4.65 5.16 12.24 13.42 1.95 23.09 44.59 .12 12.13 35.93 31.60 28.84 27.98 72.69 20.38 41.65 3.90 3.11 32.11 5.80 60.02 9.51 23.77 7.40 33.78 41.51 66.68 49.05 30.04 41.12 19.55 36.40 6.09 22.51 1.00 2.40 .44 33.66 24.75 74.37 5.79 36.15 30.10 25.22 21.78 51.08 .68 17.79 25.16 14.43 31.48 10.73 25.63 6.45 83.28 80.91 81.12 51.02 58.14 60.38 55.39 54.91 46.68 47.92 45.79 80.03 40.76 40.17 49.94 43.45 22.96 31.36 1.21 53.38 29.74

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Sol Center

world. But those clients have been fewer and fewer as the Prineville economy struggles. The bad economy in Prineville — Crook County leads the state in unemployment — is part of the reason she opened another location in downtown Bend, where she will start treating individuals and small-business clients in the next few weeks. We asked her some questions as she was setting up her new office.

Continued from B1 She studied alternative therapies such as hypnotherapy, herbal studies and Reiki, a Japanese practice based on directing energy through the body with the hands, which supplemented her degree from Chapman University in psychology with a focus on addiction studies (she has been a recovering alcoholic for 20 years). She quit real estate and opened The Sol Center about two years ago in a little house in Prineville that she remodeled into a cozy office. Since then, she’s treated clients for addiction — food and cigarettes are the most common — phobias and other mental health issues using a combination of hynotherapy and accupressure, or “tapping” on pressure points. She calls her method “Freedom Development” and sells an audio CD, “6½ Minutes to Freedom,” through her website. Dudley also provides counseling for small-business owners, drawing on her own struggles and successes in the business

Q: A:

Explain why you call your program “Freedom Development.” Life is difficult. You’re not necessarily going to be, “Yea! Happy!” but if you are peaceful, if you can maintain a sense of peace in your mind, it helps to keep your priorities straight and make better decisions … and that’s freedom.

Debt

Q: A:

So you actually put people into a trance? Under very strict ethical guidelines. We’re not stage performers. You bring a person into a trance and then we start with the immediate trauma, what are you experiencing

courts. The litigation boom has been propelled by fundamental changes in the way debts are collected. In recent years, credit card companies have increasingly sold off debt they have considered uncollectible to debt buyers, usually for 5 cents or less on the dollar. The debt buyers, in turn, may try to collect the debt themselves using traditional practices like sending letters or making phone calls to a consumer to try to arrange a payment plan. Increasingly, they are choosing to sue instead.

Continued from B1 “We are pushing very hard to make certain that debt collectors have sufficient substantiation, particularly when a consumer challenges the debt,” said David Vladeck, director of the commission’s Bureau of Consumer Protection. The commission, which has limited authority to write debt collection rules, urged states to take action because most collection cases are filed in state

Fed

Adrianne Jeffries can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at ajeffries@bendbulletin.com.

Collection law firms are able to handle such large volumes of cases because computer software automates much of their work. Typically, a debt buyer sends a law firm an electronic database that contains various data about consumers, including name, home address, the outstanding balance, the date of default and whether interest is still accruing on the account. Once the data is obtained by a law firm, software like Collection-Master from a company called Commercial Legal Software can “take a file and run

three factors have played a role.” In a broad outreach effort, the Fed held 43 meetings on the financing needs of small businesses, starting on Feb. 3 in Lexington, Ky., and ending on June 30 in Shreveport, La. Two of the meetings, in Miami and Davenport, Iowa, focused on Hispanic-owned businesses. One, in Denver, was centered around the Small Business Administration’s guaranteed-loan programs. At yet another, in Detroit, the challenges facing auto-industry suppliers took center stage. A collapse in the value of real estate and other collateral used to secure loans posed a “particularly severe challenge” to small

Continued from B1 They say that demand could take years to recover. The Fed chairman, Ben Bernanke, acknowledged the uncertainty at the start of a daylong forum on small-business lending at the central bank’s headquarters. “How much of this reduction has been driven by weaker demand for loans from small businesses, how much by a deterioration in the financial condition of small businesses during the economic downturn, and how much by restricted credit availability?” Bernanke asked. “No doubt all

How do you approach working with small-business owners? I made some mistakes in the beginning (of operating a business) and I really was at a loss for how to proceed and we almost failed. But I allowed myself to get help and get advice. … So I approach it from a very sensitive point of view. This is a very vulnerable situation. (I am) helping a person overcome the fear, that vulnerability, and getting the help that they need in order to grow the business and push through the scary times, and also facing the situation where maybe it’s time to shut it down, maybe it’s time to move to something else. But you don’t get that when you’re stuck in your own head, and that is the key to a good business coach.

Who can be helped by this program? One of the things that keeps us from believing in our business or personal lives, or from being closer to our family, is a deep, deep sense of not loving yourself just as you are, right now. Psychology and theology and medicine all agree that love really is what we want. We want to love and be loved, that’s what is our driver as human beings. So this program will work for anything.

Q: A:

Continued from B1 But because Central Oregon has higher unemployment rates than most other counties in the state, as well as many other counties nationally, Watkins thinks higher-earning older workers are suffering more in Central Oregon than they are on a national level. “Younger and lower-wage workers’ unemployment is surely higher than that of older, betterpaid workers, even in Central Oregon,” Watkins wrote in an email. “However, Central Oregon just as surely has higher unemployment among the older, betterpaid workers than in the United States.” Unemployment rates in Central Oregon are at the top of the heap among counties in the state. Crook County’s ranked highest in May at 17 percent, while Deschutes County’s was 14.7 percent and Jefferson County’s was 14.2 percent. In the Northeastern study, underemployment, a term coined to define people who have a job but either aren’t working as much as they’d like or are overskilled for the work, was lower across all income levels. The lowest earners had a 20.7 percent underemployment rate, while the highest earners had a 1.6 percent rate. The study’s findings may seem basic: Obviously, people who earn more than $150,000 are less likely to need or even want work than those who earn less than $12,500. But the findings of the study show that people who held low-income jobs — office administration, service workers, warehouse employees — are the ones who have suffered the deepest job cuts during the recession, said Joe McLaughlin, a senior research associate at the Center for Labor Market Studies. “We’ve also called this a blue-

Q: A:

Q: A:

What was your first introduction to alternative medicine? Mom was Finnish. We hardly ever went to the doctor. (She gave us) peppermint oil for upset stomach — most of the time, that’s what a kid has.

Income

right now that’s bothering you, and then … we just let your subconscious mind go back to the memory which was the source of what’s bothering you today. … It’s fascinating.

Freedom from what, exactly? Freedom from external events impacting your peace of mind. Freedom from long-held, limiting beliefs about ourselves, such as that we’re not valuable unless we make money.

Q: A:

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 B5

it through the entire legal system automatically,” including sending out collection letters, summonses and lawsuits, said Nicholas Arcaro, vice president for sales and marketing at the company. Critics say the business model for some debt buyers and law firms relies on such huge volumes of legal actions that mistakes and abuses are inevitable. “It’s the factory approach to practicing law,” said Richard Rubin, a New Mexico lawyer who represents consumers against debt collectors.

businesses, Bernanke said. He recalled that a business owner at the Detroit meeting told him, “If you thought housing had declined in value, take a look at what equipment is worth.” Some entrepreneurs have resorted to borrowing on their personal credit cards or from their retirement accounts, he noted. Banks, for their part, say that they have not so much tightened credit as returned to more traditional underwriting standards after being too lax, Bernanke acknowledged. “But, though some lenders said they were emphasizing cash flow and relying less on collateral values in evaluating creditworthi-

ness,” Bernanke said, “it seems clear that some creditworthy businesses — including some whose collateral has lost value but whose cash flows remain strong — have had difficulty obtaining the credit that they need to expand, and in some cases, even to continue operating.” Bernanke’s cautious diagnosis set the tone for the forum, which included four panel discussions, and was echoed by two other speakers, Karen Mills, the head of the Small Business Administration, and Elizabeth Duke, a member of the Fed’s board of governors. But the ambivalent nature of the discussion — after months

of listening and research by the Fed — prompted expressions of frustration from several of those invited to the event. “With all due respect for my banking colleagues, there is an apparent disconnect between the proclaimed ‘business as usual’ and the widespread lack of demand for loans by small businesses,” said Shari Berenbach, president of the Calvert Foundation, a nonprofit organization in Bethesda, Md., that makes loans to community development financial institutions that serve poor and working-class areas. Bank representatives maintained that meritorious borrowers were getting loans, and econo-

collar depression,” McLaughlin said. Blue-collar workers who suffered job losses in this recession were the most impacted group partially because of their lack of post-secondary education, according to the study. Many of those workers were young men, black men and people in construction, the study says. “Four-year college graduates, professional workers, many managers, and government employees were well protected from job losses,” the study states. The study, subtitled “A Truly Great Depression Among the Nation’s Low Income Workers Amidst Full Employment Among the Most Affluent,” was funded by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, a private grant foundation in Michigan, along with other studies the center has produced, McLaughlin said. The foundation’s website says it offers grants related to civil and human rights, the environment and poverty. He said the study looked at individuals’ incomes during the prior year, meaning that if a person earned $150,000 in the year before the study but became unemployed, the person would still be measured among the higher income group. In addition to people who are underemployed or unemployed, the study also said that people who don’t have a job, aren’t looking for one, but wouldn’t mind having one — known as the labor force reserve — is higher among low-income individuals. Though he didn’t have any specific data on prerecession unemployment rates by income, McLaughlin estimated that it was still higher and took a sharper increase among lower income individuals than higher earners. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

mists agreed that there was not much evidence of a broad refusal to lend. Kevin Watters, chief executive of business banking at JPMorgan Chase, said the bank was taking a second look at borrowers that initially were denied loans, and was eager to make loans. “We’re really trying to get those healthy borrowers to invest again,” he said. William Dunkelberg, an economist in the School of Business and Management at Temple University, said surveys showed that capital spending was at a 35-year low and that companies were still cutting, not adding, inventory. “Credit’s not an issue,” he said. “Customers are the issue.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .20f .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

13 13 72 ... 39 ... ... 22 20 39 20 12 31 19 ... ... 57 ... 14 ... 13

YTD Last Chg %Chg 46.90 20.51 15.21 12.52 64.34 .50 33.61 45.83 55.93 4.63 29.92 45.68 12.70 20.57 8.23 20.47 5.15 7.39 19.28 9.06 24.83

-.74 -.04 +.10 -.25 -.32 +.01 -.44 -.81 -.26 +.08 -.59 +.43 -.20 +.33 -.12 +.01 -.11 -.17 ... -.06 +.56

+35.7 -5.0 +1.0 +1.9 +18.9 -26.5 +22.3 +17.4 -5.5 +92.9 -8.6 -11.3 -4.6 +.8 +48.3 -.3 +90.7 +5.9 -18.3 +2.6 -18.5

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80f 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48f .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

20 16 17 33 97 ... 36 17 ... 19 19 9 25 20 ... 22 ... 11 ... ...

69.81 -.34 +5.7 34.15 -.39 -9.1 44.82 -.43 -.5 12.89 -.39 +1.6 41.54 -.30 +14.5 1.98 +.03 -29.5 35.95 +.33 -4.8 108.00 -2.08 -2.1 19.85 -.20 -6.8 40.87 -1.11 -14.3 72.02 -.21 +16.8 41.87 -.55 +4.6 25.27 -.03 +9.6 6.49 -.01 +8.2 12.13 -.11 -9.5 23.77 -.14 +5.6 16.23 -.15 -16.1 27.06 +.06 +.3 2.70 -.05 +28.6 38.86 +3.02 -9.9

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1198.00 $1198.50 $17.897

Market recap

Pvs Day $1210.00 $1209.60 $18.053

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm BP PLC SPDR Fncl

3645820 1225420 892259 678852 518888

4.11 +.07 108.03 +.07 15.21 +.10 36.76 +2.71 14.53 +.02

Gainers ($2 or more) Name PlaybyB PlaybyA HewittAsc Headwatrs LeapFrog

Last

+40.9 +36.4 +32.2 +21.8 +18.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name BlueLinx CrwfdB Mosaic Primedia BiP GCrb

Last

VantageDrl GoldStr g Taseko NwGold g GranTrra g

3.25 3.25 3.25

29337 21437 17855 14832 12496

Name

1.21 4.17 4.09 5.13 5.18

PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft Cisco MicronT

-.07 -.05 +.04 -.08 -.04

Vol (00) 574937 552336 486902 303804 256928

Last Chg 44.75 20.57 24.83 22.86 8.55

+.13 +.33 +.56 +.16 -.02

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

PacOffPT EstnLtCap Kemet MercBcp StreamGSv

4.85 3.85 2.64 3.00 4.66

+.90 +22.8 +.55 +16.7 +.23 +9.5 +.25 +9.1 +.38 +8.9

OldSecBc HSW Int rsh TrubionPh JohnsnOut DearbrnBc

Last

Chg %Chg

2.08 +.28 +15.6 2.00 +.23 +13.0 2.73 +.31 +12.8 11.18 +1.16 +11.6 2.94 +.29 +10.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

-9.7 -9.1 -7.9 -7.6 -7.3

HMG AdcareH wt Metalico LucasEngy UnivPwr

4.28 2.05 3.62 2.30 2.09

-.51 -10.6 -.20 -8.9 -.35 -8.8 -.22 -8.7 -.20 -8.7

SI Fincl CmtyWest StanlFrn WestwdO n Sequenom

6.27 2.45 3.51 8.37 5.65

-.73 -10.4 -.26 -9.8 -.38 -9.8 -.91 -9.8 -.57 -9.2

1,090 1,934 130 3,154 76 12

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

199 288 40 527 13 10

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.70 -.29 2.98 -.30 42.48 -3.65 2.80 -.23 25.11 -1.97

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

5.55 +1.61 5.54 +1.48 46.79 +11.39 3.41 +.61 5.11 +.78

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Diary 812 1,862 103 2,777 29 42

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,988.88 342.02 5,552.82 1,497.10 1,727.05 869.32 8,900.27 473.54

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,216.27 4,164.09 379.46 6,794.48 1,846.87 2,198.36 1,078.75 11,284.13 621.61

+18.24 +3.19 +1.49 -14.23 -1.51 +1.91 +.79 -12.25 -7.82

YTD %Chg %Chg +.18 +.08 +.39 -.21 -.08 +.09 +.07 -.11 -1.24

52-wk %Chg

-2.03 +1.57 -4.66 -5.43 +1.20 -3.12 -3.26 -2.29 -.60

+22.62 +32.42 +7.77 +17.93 +19.81 +22.59 +19.72 +22.30 +26.01

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

326.56 2,470.27 3,567.66 5,167.02 6,077.19 20,467.43 31,870.55 20,517.92 3,012.03 9,548.11 1,734.05 2,935.32 4,429.50 5,504.63

+.66 s +.31 s +.37 s +.66 s +.20 s +.44 s -.42 t +.19 s +.23 s -.39 t +.64 s +.62 s +.34 s +.54 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.8748 1.5033 .9642 .001855 .1476 1.2598 .1286 .011295 .078046 .0325 .000835 .1333 .9434 .0311

.8758 1.5067 .9685 .001858 .1475 1.2647 .1287 .011294 .078235 .0323 .000827 .1335 .9467 .0311

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.20 -0.01 -1.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.43 -0.8 GrowthI 21.52 -0.01 -2.4 Ultra 18.67 -4.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 16.04 -2.9 AMutlA p 22.51 +0.02 -1.6 BalA p 16.04 +0.01 +0.1 BondA p 12.17 +0.01 +5.3 CapWA p 19.90 -0.01 +1.0 CapIBA p 45.80 -0.06 -2.6 CapWGA p 31.18 -0.06 -6.9 EupacA p 35.84 -0.12 -6.5 FdInvA p 31.48 -0.06 -3.1 GovtA p 14.49 +0.01 +5.2 GwthA p 26.26 -0.01 -3.9 HI TrA p 10.74 +0.02 +5.1 IncoA p 15.08 -0.01 -0.6 IntBdA p 13.46 +0.01 +3.8 ICAA p 24.66 +0.04 -4.0 NEcoA p 21.54 -0.04 -4.2 N PerA p 24.44 -0.02 -4.7 NwWrldA 47.00 -0.03 -0.4 STBA p 10.11 +0.01 +1.7 SmCpA p 31.99 -0.15 +1.5 TxExA p 12.21 +0.01 +3.5 WshA p 23.72 -0.03 -2.6 American Funds B: CapIBB p 45.81 -0.06 -3.0 GrwthB t 25.38 -4.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.00 -0.07 -7.9 IntlEqA 25.35 -0.07 -8.1 IntEqII I r 10.76 -0.02 -8.7 Artisan Funds: Intl 18.56 -0.08 -10.2 MidCap 26.11 -0.13 +2.2 MidCapVal 17.68 +0.07 -1.7 Baron Funds: Growth 41.91 -0.28 +1.5 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.74 +0.02 DivMu 14.57 TxMgdIntl 13.56 -0.01 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.27 -0.01 GlAlA r 17.50 -0.01 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.31 -0.01 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.59 -0.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 42.88 -0.21 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 24.64 -0.20 AcornIntZ 33.68 -0.06 ValRestr 40.10 -0.26 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.44 -0.01 USCorEq2 9.07 -0.04 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 29.93 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.27 NYVen C 28.85 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.44 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.09 -0.03 EmMktV 30.77 IntSmVa 14.21 -0.02 LargeCo 8.52 +0.01 USLgVa 17.03 +0.01 US SmVa 19.66 -0.25 IntlSmCo 13.89 -0.01 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 15.61 -0.04 Glb5FxInc 11.37 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.26 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 62.49 +0.19 Income 13.20 +0.02 IntlStk 29.99 -0.13 Stock 92.17 +0.33 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.97 -0.03

+6.0 +2.8 -11.3 -3.1 -2.2 -2.6 -2.1 -3.6 +0.2 -5.9 -5.5 -0.3 -3.4 -3.3 -3.8 +4.2 -1.5 -4.8 -2.2 +0.4 +0.2 -1.3 +0.8 -7.0 +4.1 +1.2 -1.2 +4.4 -5.8 -3.5 -4.1

NatlMunInc 9.62 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.01 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.69 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.97 FPACres 24.38 Fairholme 31.49 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.55 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 16.92 StrInA 12.25 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.10 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.42 FF2015 10.34 FF2020 12.35 FF2025 10.18 FF2030 12.08 FF2035 9.94 FF2040 6.93 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.19 AMgr50 13.83 Balanc 16.38 BlueChGr 36.82 Canada 48.49 CapAp 21.63 CpInc r 8.61 Contra 57.45 ContraK 57.46 DisEq 20.23 DivIntl 25.70 DivrsIntK r 25.71 DivGth 23.03 EmrMk 21.71 Eq Inc 37.94 EQII 15.72 Fidel 27.15 FltRateHi r 9.41 GNMA 11.84 GovtInc 10.74

+3.9 -0.03 -3.9 +0.02 -3.1 +2.1 -0.06 -0.3 +0.08 +4.7 -0.02 -2.4 -1.7 +3.4 +0.01 -1.5 -0.01 -0.1 -0.1 -0.01 -0.9 -1.4 -1.9 -0.01 -2.5 -0.01 -2.6 -0.01 +0.01 +0.02 -0.28 -0.03 +0.02 +0.02 +0.03 -0.02 -0.02 -0.05 -0.06 +0.02 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01

-2.2 +0.8 +1.1 -3.0 +0.9 +3.1 -1.3 -1.2 -3.7 -8.2 -8.1 -2.7 -4.0 -2.3 -3.0 -3.9 +1.6 +5.9 +4.6

GroCo 67.56 GroInc 15.41 GrowthCoK 67.58 HighInc r 8.50 Indepn 19.34 IntBd 10.50 IntmMu 10.29 IntlDisc 27.76 InvGrBd 11.69 InvGB 7.32 LgCapVal 10.83 LatAm 48.17 LevCoStk 22.65 LowP r 32.03 LowPriK r 32.06 Magelln 60.87 MidCap 23.31 MuniInc 12.67 NwMkt r 15.40 OTC 44.14 100Index 7.64 Ovrsea 27.62 Puritn 15.98 SCmdtyStrt 9.96 StIntMu 10.70 STBF 8.43 SmllCpS r 15.68 StratInc 10.93 StrReRt r 8.59 TotalBd 10.83 USBI 11.43 Value 57.02 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.91 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 38.20 IntlInxInv 30.49 TotMktInv 30.97 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 38.20 TotMktAd r 30.97 First Eagle: GlblA 40.59 OverseasA 20.02

-0.17 -0.02 -0.17 +0.02 -0.04

-0.01 +0.01 +0.02 -0.92 -0.14 -0.14 -0.15 -0.21 -0.16 +0.02 -0.03 +0.02 -0.03 +0.02 -0.09

-0.12 -0.02 +0.01 -0.10

-2.1 -3.8 -2.0 +4.1 -2.9 +5.4 +3.2 -8.5 +5.3 +5.8 -3.7 -7.1 -1.2 +0.3 +0.3 -5.2 -0.2 +3.9 +5.5 -3.5 -3.7 -10.7 +0.6 -9.9 +1.8 +2.6 -1.6 +3.6 +0.9 +5.5 +5.1 +0.1

-0.23 +8.1 +0.03 -2.3 -0.04 -8.8 -0.03 -1.6 +0.03 -2.3 -0.03 -1.5 -0.05 +1.5 -0.04 +2.9

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.87 +0.01 FoundAl p 9.44 +0.03 HYTFA p 10.10 IncomA p 2.03 USGovA p 6.84 +0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.02 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.05 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.88 +0.07 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.98 GlBd A p 13.09 -0.01 GrwthA p 15.49 +0.05 WorldA p 12.87 +0.02 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.11 -0.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 34.89 GMO Trust III: Quality 17.88 +0.07 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.96 -0.01 Quality 17.89 +0.08 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.98 +0.02 HYMuni 8.50 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.71 +0.01 CapApInst 30.78 -0.01 IntlInv t 50.66 -0.15 Intl r 51.20 -0.15 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.96 +0.01 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 28.93 +0.02 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.04 Div&Gr 17.09 +0.01 Advisers 17.28 +0.01 TotRetBd 11.14 +0.01 HussmnStrGr 13.32 -0.02

+3.4 -2.3 +5.1 +2.2 +5.4 +5.3 +2.3 +1.9 -0.9 -8.7 +5.1 -7.9 -7.9 +4.9 -5.3 -7.0 -2.4 -6.9 +4.7 +6.8 +5.7 -6.6 -6.9 -6.7 -5.6 -5.5 -4.3 -2.6 -1.1 +5.3 +4.2

Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.34 +0.01 CmstkA 13.52 +0.01 EqIncA 7.63 +0.01 GrIncA p 16.57 +0.01 HYMuA 9.37 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 20.57 -0.07 AssetStA p 21.13 -0.07 AssetStrI r 21.29 -0.08 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.47 +0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.46 HighYld 7.77 +0.02 IntmTFBd 11.00 ShtDurBd 10.96 USLCCrPls 17.63 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 25.06 -0.03 OvrseasT r 43.04 -0.09 PrkMCVal T 19.61 -0.05 Twenty T 57.03 +0.04 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.67 -0.01 LSGrwth 11.28 -0.01 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 19.29 -0.26 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.36 -0.03 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.61 -0.02 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.85 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.52 -0.02 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.63 +0.01 StrInc C 14.13 +0.01 LSBondR 13.58 +0.01 StrIncA 14.07 +0.02 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.05 +0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.80 -0.01

-4.5 -1.4 -1.1 -3.4 +5.9 -5.6 -5.2 -5.1 +5.1 +5.2 +4.6 +2.7 +2.0 -3.0 -4.6 +1.3 -1.0 -7.4 -0.1 -1.5 -2.7 +1.9 +1.8 +2.8 +1.8 +5.2 +4.4 +5.1 +4.9 +5.8 -3.7

BdDebA p 7.37 +0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.60 MFS Funds A: TotRA 12.99 ValueA 19.95 -0.02 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.04 -0.02 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.70 +0.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.54 -0.02 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.90 +0.03 MergerFd 15.68 +0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.39 +0.01 TotRtBdI 10.38 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 12.05 -0.06 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.74 +0.09 GlbDiscZ 27.09 +0.10 QuestZ 17.02 +0.05 SharesZ 19.04 +0.07 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 37.87 -0.36 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 39.30 -0.38 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.93 +0.01 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 25.03 -0.09 Intl I r 16.78 Oakmark r 36.48 +0.08 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.29 GlbSMdCap 12.72 -0.05 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 36.88 +0.03 DvMktA p 28.92 -0.04 GlobA p 51.55 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.30 MnStFdA 27.47 +0.14 RisingDivA 13.49 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 26.02 -0.16

+3.5 +3.7 +0.2 -3.3 -3.1 +4.7 -7.1 +3.5 +0.9 +7.7 +7.7 -7.5 +0.1 +0.2 -1.3 -0.8 +0.3 +0.1 +4.0 -2.0 -0.4 -1.5 +3.1 -0.4 -7.6 +0.6 -2.8 +0.6 -2.3 -2.7 -2.1

StrInA p 4.09 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.25 S&MdCpVl 22.40 -0.14 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.21 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.28 RcNtMuA 7.11 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.64 -0.03 IntlBdY 6.30 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.87 ComodRR 7.37 -0.06 HiYld 8.92 +0.01 InvGrCp 11.25 +0.03 LowDu 10.50 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.11 +0.01 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.26 +0.02 TR II 10.88 +0.01 TRIII 9.98 +0.02 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.50 +0.01 RealRtA p 11.11 +0.01 TotRtA 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.26 +0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.26 +0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.82 -0.13 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 34.11 -0.07 Price Funds: BlChip 31.46 +0.03 CapApp 18.35 -0.02 EmMktS 29.43 -0.09 EqInc 20.56 -0.01 EqIndex 29.08 +0.02

+7.3 -3.2 -2.5 -3.1 +3.4 +4.7 +0.7 +0.8 +5.8 +5.6 -6.3 +5.8 +6.1 +3.0 +4.4 +1.0 +5.9 +5.4 +6.1 +2.8 +4.2 +5.7 +5.3 +5.8 +5.9 +3.0 -4.1 -4.0 +1.0 -2.2 -1.2 -2.4

Growth 26.52 HlthSci 25.34 HiYield 6.45 IntlBond 9.54 IntlStk 12.05 MidCap 48.90 MCapVal 20.59 N Asia 16.64 New Era 39.83 N Horiz 26.12 N Inc 9.56 R2010 14.03 R2015 10.67 R2020 14.53 R2025 10.51 R2030 14.92 R2040 14.89 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 27.62 SmCapVal 29.83 SpecIn 11.93 Value 20.19 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.49 RiverSource A: DEI 8.42 DivrBd 4.97 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.41 PremierI r 16.29 TotRetI r 10.90 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 32.33 S&P Sel 16.95 Scout Funds: Intl 27.45 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.16 AmShS p 36.13 Sequoia 116.33 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.16 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.79 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.01 -3.6 -0.27 -3.2 +0.01 +4.6 -2.0 -0.01 -4.4 -0.31 +3.0 -0.04 -0.6 +3.1 -0.31 -8.7 -0.28 +2.1 +0.01 +5.3 +0.6

-0.01 -0.01 -0.30 -0.36 +0.01 +0.01

-0.5 -0.9 -1.3 -1.7 +2.1 +2.5 +1.2 +3.4 -1.4 -3.7

-0.02 -3.7 +5.3 -0.09 -0.4 -0.15 -0.1 -0.08 +1.6 -2.0 +0.01 -2.2 -0.08 -5.0 -2.9 -3.1 -0.25 +5.9 +0.01 +6.4 +0.02 -7.8

ValueInst 43.56 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.58 IntValue I 24.10 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 21.30 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.01 CpOpAdl 64.60 Energy 102.72 500Adml 99.40 GNMA Ad 11.02 HlthCr 48.08 HiYldCp 5.49 InfProAd 25.28 ITsryAdml 11.58 IntGrAdm 51.60 ITAdml 13.63 ITGrAdm 10.00 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.32 LT Adml 11.07 MuHYAdm 10.46 PrmCap r 57.97 STsyAdml 10.83 ShtTrAd 15.93 STFdAd 10.87 STIGrAd 10.73 TtlBAdml 10.68 TStkAdm 26.73 WellslAdm 49.92 WelltnAdm 48.98 Windsor 38.38 WdsrIIAd 39.87 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 21.70 CapOpp 27.96 DivdGro 12.65 Energy 54.69 EqInc 17.82 Explr 57.60 GNMA 11.02 GlobEq 15.15 HYCorp 5.49

-0.05 -6.0 -0.03 -4.6 -0.02 -4.4 +0.03 +0.5 +3.7 +0.06 -6.9 -8.3 +0.08 -2.2 +0.02 +5.8 -0.17 -4.2 +0.01 +4.7 +0.03 +3.5 +0.01 +6.5 -0.11 -4.5 +0.01 +3.2 +0.01 +7.1 +1.7 +7.8 +3.2 +4.1 +0.15 -6.0 +2.2 +0.8 -0.01 +2.7 +3.2 +5.2 -0.02 -1.8 +3.1 +0.04 -0.2 -3.9 +0.02 -4.1 +0.02 +1.7 +0.02 -6.9 -2.9 -0.01 -8.4 +0.01 -0.9 -0.45 +0.5 +0.02 +5.7 -0.01 -3.3 +0.01 +4.6

HlthCre 113.91 InflaPro 12.87 IntlGr 16.21 IntlVal 27.77 ITIGrade 10.00 LifeCon 15.29 LifeGro 19.27 LifeMod 17.70 LTIGrade 9.32 Morg 14.90 MuInt 13.63 MuLtd 11.09 MuShrt 15.93 PrecMtls r 19.68 PrmcpCor 11.69 Prmcp r 55.86 SelValu r 16.09 STAR 17.26 STIGrade 10.73 TgtRetInc 10.73 TgRe2010 20.77 TgtRe2025 11.25 TgtRe2015 11.38 TgRe2020 19.96 TgRe2030 19.06 TgtRe2035 11.40 TgtRe2040 18.68 TgtRe2045 11.79 USGro 15.33 Wellsly 20.60 Welltn 28.36 Wndsr 11.38 WndsII 22.46 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 99.39 Balanced 19.35 EMkt 25.34 Europe 23.14 Extend 33.01 Growth 26.27 ITBnd 11.25 MidCap 16.65 Pacific 9.41 REIT r 15.91

-4.3 +3.5 -4.6 -9.3 +7.0 +2.1 -0.9 +0.9 +7.7 -2.4 +3.2 +1.7 +0.8 -3.7 -3.5 -6.0 +0.9 -0.6 +3.2 +2.4 +1.2 -0.6 +0.6

SmCap

-1.3 -1.9 -1.9 -1.9 -6.9 -0.01 +3.0 +0.03 -0.3 -3.8 +0.01 -4.1

-0.41 +0.02 -0.04 -0.03 +0.01 +0.01 -0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01

-0.12 +0.01 +0.15 -0.07

+0.01

-0.01 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01

+0.07 -2.3 +1.1 -0.04 -2.2 -10.8 -0.29 +1.0 +0.04 -3.4 +0.01 +7.3 -0.07 +1.8 -0.04 -2.8 +0.01 +9.0

27.82 -0.28 +1.2

SmlCpGth

16.96 -0.17 +0.8

SmlCpVl

13.27 -0.13 +1.7

STBnd

10.59

+2.9

TotBnd

10.68

+5.1

TotlIntl

13.44 -0.01 -6.7

TotStk

26.72 -0.02 -1.9

Value

18.20 -0.01 -1.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

8.70 -0.01

NS

ExtIn

33.05 -0.29 +1.2

GrwthIst

26.27 +0.04 -3.3

InfProInst

10.29 +0.01 +3.5

InstIdx

98.75 +0.08 -2.2

InsPl

98.75 +0.07 -2.2

InsTStPlus

24.15 -0.02 -1.8

MidCpIst

16.71 -0.07 +1.9

SCInst

27.86 -0.27 +1.3

TBIst

10.68

TSInst

26.73 -0.02 -1.8

+5.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

82.11 +0.06 -2.2

STBdIdx

10.59

+3.0

TotBdSgl

10.68

+5.2

TotStkSgl

25.80 -0.02 -1.8

Victory Funds: DvsStA

13.04

-6.3

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.81

+0.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.68 +0.01 +8.2


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Learn to optimize websites for major search engines with keyword marketing, site content and internal links. Continuing education units are available. Registration is required. Class continues July 20 and 27; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 574-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Sponsored by Imperial River Co; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-771-7625 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

MONDAY WEDNESDAY BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Brian Gingerich, Kim Medford and Heather Hepburn, attorneys with Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt PC, in Bend, will discuss common mistakes business owners make, and tips for avoiding errors that may lead to a lawsuit; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave.; 541-3890803. SAVING & INVESTING: Learn the importance of saving and investing, including strategies to reduce spending and increase income, in this second in a series of classes offered by NeighborImpact. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; Somer Hartvigsen;541318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend.. “INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007”: Registration required. Class continues July 21, 9 am - noon; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY July 20 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 4:305:30 p.m.; Visible Changes Salon & Spa, 636 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com.

THURSDAY

THURSDAY

CITY CLUB FORUM, COMPETITIVE EVENTS IN CENTRAL OREGON: Chuck Kenlan, executive director of the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, and Doug La Placa, president and CEO of Visit Bend, will speak about the recruitment, bidding, creation and economic impact of competitive events. Registration required by July 12. www.cityclubofcentraloregon.com; $15 for City Club members, $30 for nonmembers. Includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; noon2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or www.cocc.edu. GET STARTED WITH INVESTING: Learn to become comfortable with the vocabulary of investing, understand the basics of diversification and asset allocation, feel more confident in making investments and know where to get help. Registration required by July 13; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by Randy and Barbara Knight. Call 541-923-2679 for more information; 5:30 p.m.; Big Dog Saloon, 14217 Commercial Loop S.W., Crooked River Ranch. “OWNING A FRANCHISE”: Learn to choose a franchise, arrange financing and other critical details; $19; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

July 22

FRIDAY BEND CHAMBER TOWN HALL BREAKFAST: Craig Mavis, Deschutes Brewery manager of engineering and maintenance, and Paul Rheault, city of Bend Public Works Department director, will discuss water and sewer issues and why rates are increasing. RSVP to www.bendchamber.org by July 15; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Cougar Springs Assisted Living Center, 1942 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond; 541-923-1807. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER:

ETFS EXPLAINED: Learn why exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are a growing investment option. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by July 21; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com.

and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak on the 26th; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541593-1000 or stacy.jenkins@nfib.org.

WEDNESDAY July 28 “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY July 29 EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. GREEN DRINKS: Central Oregon’s monthly networking for business and sustainability. Hosted by NorthWest Crossing and The Garner Group. Enjoy a truly green drink by bringing your own cup; free; 5-7 p.m.; Discovery Park Lodge, 2868 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www.envirocenter.org.

FRIDAY July 30 COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

FRIDAY

Aug. 2

July 23

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:308:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend.

SUNDAY July 25 SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs, and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak on the 26th; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541593-1000 or stacy.jenkins@nfib.org.

MONDAY July 26 SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs, and hear from and talk to lawmakers and state government officials. Jonathan Williams, director of the tax and fiscal policy task force for the American Legislative Exchange Council and co-author of “Rich States, Poor States,” will speak on the 26th; Sunriver Resort, 1 Center Drive; 541593-1000 or stacy.jenkins@nfib.org. BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend.

TUESDAY July 27 SMALL-BUSINESS SUMMIT: Learn about the issues facing entrepreneurs,

Deschutes County

Leslie M. and Marilyn P. Rosenblatt to Kerri L. Rosenblatt, Hill Crest, Lots 1-4, Block 7, $265,000 Vernon V. and Annabelle L. Cusack to Steven D. Wise, Starwood, Lot 22, Block 4, $199,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Chase Home Finance LLC, Desert Woods III, Lot 40, Block 9, $281,134.75 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Bank of America NA, Estates at Pronghorn Phase 3, Lot 279, $306,000 Guy R. Wolcott II to Rodney C. Miller and Joshua L. Tyler-Fowler, Partition Plat 2007-6, Parcel 2, $265,000

Home Federal Bank to Sage Property Ventures LLC, Sage Townhomes Condominium, Units 1444, 1452, 1454, 1462, 1464, 1472, 1474, 1482 and 1484, $330,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to John E. Batzer, trustee of United Guardian Financial Inc. 401(k) Plan, Northpointe Phases III, Lot 86, $212,430 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Crest Ridge Estates, Lot 6, Block 2, $299,900 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to TruCap REO Corp., Three Pines Planned Unit Development Phases 1-4, Lot 27, $534,197.50 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal National

By James Kanter

By Alan Ohnsman Bloomberg News

TOKYO — Toyota and Tesla Motors will develop battery-powered test versions of the Japanese carmaker’s RAV4 and Lexus RX in the first stage of a partnership in electric vehicles, a person familiar with the matter said. Tesla said Saturday that it will deliver two prototypes vehicles to Toyota this month without identifying the models. While Toyota also aims to test an electric Corolla compact car, the RAV4 and RX light trucks are better suited to the weight of Tesla’s battery pack, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the vehicles haven’t been announced yet. Toyota’s President Akio Toyoda said last week the partnership with Tesla, maker of the $109,000 electric Roadster, is the first of several the Japan-based company wants to pursue in advanced auto technologies. Toyota, the world’s largest seller of hybrid autos, bought a $50 million stake in Palo Alto, Calif.based Tesla this month. “We anticipate range and acceleration exceeding that of other announced electric vehicles of this class,” Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Tesla, said Monday in an emailed message. He declined to discuss project details. Keisuke Kirimoto, a Tokyobased spokesman for Toyota, said he couldn’t confirm the models. Toyota bought its stake in Tesla July 2, he said.

BRUSSELS — European Union finance ministers met Monday to start two days of discussions partly aimed at deciding how much information to reveal after they complete tests on the ability of banks to survive if governments default on their debts. The test results, to be released July 23, could help reassure investors that a $1 trillion rescue package will be sufficient to calm a debt crisis in Europe. But the results could also force banks to seek additional financing to counter potential losses from governments or markets. “The European banking sector is overall resilient,” Olli Rehn, the European commissioner for economic and monetary affairs, said at a news conference. “At the same time, when we publish the stress tests we will have to prepare for any pockets of

vulnerability.” Rehn said finance ministers from all 27 countries in the European Union would continue discussions about the stress tests over breakfast Tuesday. Countries in the European Union along with the International Monetary Fund created a bailout fund worth $1 trillion earlier this year to ease fears about mounting debt in Europe. Some governments want the fund to be available for banks that fail their stress tests and that are unable to recapitalize in the markets. The stress tests on the health of 91 banks are being carried out by the Committee of European Banking Supervisors, which is made up of national regulators from across the European Union.

Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

WEDNESDAY Aug. 4 BANKS & OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about the different kinds of financial institutions in our community. Registration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

THURSDAY

10

Aug. 5 SMALL-BUSINESS RETIREMENT SOLUTIONS: Find out about smallbusiness retirement plan choices, determine key factors to consider when choosing a plan, and learn about SEP and SIMPLE IRAs and Qualified Retirement Plans (QRP). Registration required by Aug. 4; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com.

FRIDAY Aug. 6 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS

EU finance ministers Toyota will test 2 weigh the results electric-car of bank stress tests prototypes New York Times News Service

MONDAY

COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Ola Day Spa, 2600 S.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com.

Mortgage Association, Madison Phases 1-3, Lot 22, $252,593.95 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Timber Estates, Lot 1, $153,062.15 Delmar F. Griebel to Amanda J. Horner, View Acres, Lot 8, Block 2, $150,000 Recontrust Company NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Hayden Village Phase VI, Lot 18, Block 11, $201,591.40 R. Scott Nelson and Angela J. Jacobson to Kristie S. and Hunter T. McEwan, Awbrey Village Phase 5, Lot 160, $360,000 Louis M. and Marilyn K. Warren to Daniel M. and Charlene A. Lawry, T 18, R 12, Section 08, $270,000

Presented by

TWO BIG WEEKENDS

July 16, 17, 18 & 23, 24, 25 Presented by

Fridays: Noon - 6 pm, Saturdays & Sundays 10 am - 6 pm


C

L

Inside

OREGON Missing Portland boy’s father alleges stepmom had affair, see Page C3.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010

DORIS CLAYPOOL JAN. 13, 1907 – JULY 8, 2010

Watching as Bend changed and grew

Attention, photographers! These photos were among dozens readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.

We asked for readers’ photos, and today we’re publishing some of the best

Well sh t!

Installment 22:

Shapes

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The woman who became known as Doris Claypool came to Bend on a stagecoach in 1926 and watched over the next eight decades as the city progressed from dirt streets to paved ones. Meanwhile, the furniture store she ran with her family occupied several downtown addresses on Wall Street. Bend lost one Doris Claypool of the few people who could still remember these things on Thursday, when Claypool died at home at the age of 103. She lived in the same house she bought with her husband for $1,500 in 1929, her son Dale Claypool, 66, said. Her family ran Claypool Furniture for 64 years, until they closed the store on Wall Street in 1999, The Bulletin has reported. Doris Claypool worked at the store until she was in her early 90s, and her dedication to the business and her faith in God marked her life, according to previous reports in The Bulletin. “She’s kind of Bend history,” Dale Claypool said on Monday. Dale described his mother as a businesswoman who handled the financial side of the furniture store, and was caring and optimistic. “That was her big thing ... it was always going to be a little better the next day,” Dale Claypool said. She was born to George and Harriett Marling in Hastings, Neb., on Jan. 13, 1907, according to her obituary. Later, the family moved to Lodi, Calif., where Claypool worked at Marling’s Chocolate Inn, the family’s candy business. See Claypool / C5

Heating aid program may be audited to look for fraud

Submitted by user david hunter

“FLW in San Francisco”

Submitted by user kristin wolter

“In the form of an optical illusion. This is a crystal vase (or at least part of it).”

Sno-park may get off-leash dog area By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

The Deschutes National Forest is considering an idea from a group of dog owners for a new wintertime off-leash dog area east of Swampy Lakes Sno-park, which has some nordic skiers concerned about losing a classic cross-country trail. There are no official proposals yet, said Shane Jeffries, B e n d - F o r t Inside Rock district • Find out how ranger, but to comment, the U.S. ForPage C5 est Service is planning to hold a meeting this fall to get a sense of what members of the public think about off-leash areas. One idea proposed by DogPac, a Bendbased organization, is to allow dogs inside the Tangent Loop — including on the Nordeen Loop, which would be groomed so that dog owners can ski with their pets. “There certainly is a growing user group out there that is looking for more or greater opportunities to take their dog off leash and enjoy their national forest,” said Jeffries, who added that he has been talking with some interested ski and dog-related organizations to get their thoughts on the possibility. See Dogs / C5

Off-leash areas The Forest Service is planning a meeting this fall to discuss ideas including grooming the Nordeen Loop and opening the nearby area to off-leash dogs. Submitted by user Andrew Rowden

Submitted by user Derek Oldham

“Four courts”

“Circle”

Loop Tangent

Nordeen Shelter

Nordeen Lo Cascade

op

Lakes H

w y 46

Swampy Lakes Meissner Sno-park Sno-park

To Bend

Source: U.S. Forest Service Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Submitted by user Alastair

“Roof detail from Portland’s Union Station”

Submitted by user BillMcD

“Mosque in Abu Dhabi”

Tribal police and Jefferson authorities to cooperate

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

By Lauren Dake

WASHINGTON — Oregon may launch an investigation of its heating aid program, a top state auditor said on Monday after a federal audit of the program in seven other states uncovered more than $100 million in fraud. The state’s top auditor said his office doesn’t have the staff to investigate the program this year, but it will likely begin an in-depth examination next year. In response, U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, who asked the Oregon Secretary of State to audit the state’s Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program last week, said the state should take a look sooner, after a Government Accountability Office investigation in seven states found $116 million was given to people who didn’t qualify for benefits. Gary Blackmer, director of the audit division of the Oregon Secretary of State’s office, said he plans to make the program a priority, as soon as three other pending audits are finished this year. See Audit / C5

The Bulletin

Submitted by user Carolyn

“Ceiling, Parliament building, Ottawa, Ontario”

Submitted by user KC

“Roof of covered bridge”

The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

Readers’ photos

May 4 Flash

May 18 Composition

June 1 Emotion

Each installment of Well shot! features photos submitted by readers for the previous week’s theme.

June 15 Lines

June 29 Shadows

Today Shapes

July 27 Black & white

Aug. 10 Color

In a move that may increase public safety, the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office and Warm Springs Police Department are working together to expand both agencies’ jurisdiction. Oregon law does not give tribal police officers authority off the reservation. When something goes down on Highway 26 across the Deschutes River from the reservation, tribal police officers are usually the first to arrive on the scene. But technically, they can’t arrest anyone. Instead, they have to wait for officers from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office to show up. That will no longer be the case. Jefferson County Sheriff Jim Adkins has already cross-deputized some of the supervisory staff of the Warm Springs Police Department and plans to deputize the detectives and quite possibly all of the department’s certified staff, which would give the officers jurisdiction off the reservation. See Deputies / C5


C2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:09 a.m. July 9, in the area of Northwest Portland and Northwest Saginaw avenues. Burglary — A computer was reported stolen at 12:55 p.m. July 9, in the 61700 block of Southeast 27th Street. DUII — Kerry Canby, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:37 p.m. July 9, in the 20200 block of Powers Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 2:40 p.m. July 9, in the 900 block of Northwest Bond Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:05 p.m. July 9, in the 20000 block of Voltera Place. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:55 a.m. July 10, in the 100 block of Northwest Tumalo Avenue. DUII — Clinton R. Graves, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6 a.m. July 10, in the area of Jones and Butler Market roads. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:45 p.m. July 10, in the 61500 block of East Lake Drive. DUII — Robert Dee Martin, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:31 p.m. July 10, in the area of Northeast Otelah Place and Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 9:54 p.m. July 10, in the 400 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:08 a.m. July 11, in the 200 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 3:37 a.m. July 11, in the 800 block of Northwest Brooks Street. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 7:23 a.m. July 11, in the 19600 block of Aspen Ridge Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 7:28 a.m. July 11, in the 100 block of Northwest McKay Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:05 a.m. July 11, in the 19700 block of Dry Canyon Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:16 a.m. July 11, in the 61200 block of Bighorn Court. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:24 a.m. July 11, in the 600 block of Southwest Otter Way. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:22 a.m. July 11, in the 19600 block of Hollygrape Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was

reported entered at 11:54 a.m. July 11, in the area of Northwest Georgia Avenue and Northwest Staats Street. Burglary — A computer and camera were reported stolen at 2:43 p.m. July 11, in the 600 block of Northwest Georgia Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 3 p.m. July 11, in the 400 block of Northwest Florida Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:19 p.m. July 11, in the 19900 block of Heron Loop. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:49 p.m. July 11, in the 19800 block of Hollygrape Street. DUII — Avery Gordon Randall, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:32 p.m. July 11, in the area of Southwest Colorado Avenue and Southwest Emkay Drive. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:01 a.m. July 12, in the 61200 block of Benham Road. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:18 p.m. July 9, in the 1400 block of Southwest 35th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:34 p.m. July 9, in the 3100 block of Northwest 19th Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:32 p.m. July 9, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:52 p.m. July 9, in the 300 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:58 a.m. July 9, in the 1300 block of Northeast Hemlock Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:25 a.m. July 9, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:50 a.m. July 9, in the 3100 block of Northwest 19th Street. DUII — Scott Dixon Coffman, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:27 p.m. July 10, in the 200 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:58 p.m. July 10, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:08 p.m. July 10, in the area of Southwest 11th Street and Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:27 p.m. July 10, in the 1100 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:48 a.m. July 10, in the 1000 block of Northwest Birch Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:34 a.m. July 10, in the area of Southwest 23rd Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. DUII — Michael Edward Hanson, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving

under the influence of intoxicants at 2:52 a.m. July 11, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:01 a.m. July 9, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:15 a.m. July 9, in the area of Northeast Hillside Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:14 p.m. July 10, in the area of South Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:52 p.m. July 9, in the 18600 block of Pinehurst Road in Bend. DUII — Thomas Paul Crowl, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:16 p.m. July 9, in the 60400 block of Umatilla Circle in Bend. DUII — Brett Alan Whitman, 50, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:45 p.m. July 9, in the area of Day Road and Woodchip Lane in La Pine. DUII — John Dille, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:05 p.m. July 9, in the area of Huntington and State Recreation roads in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:21 p.m. July 9, in the 4600 block of state Highway 126 West in Redmond. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:46 p.m. July 9, in the 16400 block of Bluewood Place in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:25 a.m. July 9, in the area of Hamby and Neff roads in Bend. DUII — Kris Lindorf Smith, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:37 a.m. July 9, in the 64900 block of Hunnell Road in Bend. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:02 a.m. July 9, in the 16400 block of Cassidy Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:44 p.m. July 10, in the 8400 block of Fourth Street in Terrebonne. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:35 p.m. July 10, in the area of Baker Road and River Woods Drive in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:03 a.m. July 10, in the 14800 block of Springwood Road in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:10 a.m. July 10, in the 15700 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 11 p.m. July 11, in the 64100 block of Deschutes Market Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 3:54 p.m. July 11, in the 65200 block of 85th Street in Bend. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 3:36 p.m. July 11, in the 54500 block of Huntington Road in La Pine. DUII — Clifford Evan Gardner, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving

L B   under the influence of intoxicants at 2:15 a.m. July 11, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Quimby Avenue in Bend. DUII — Eric Dean Egertson, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:05 a.m. July 11, in the area of Bowery Lane and U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. DUII — Katie H. Rice, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:07 a.m. July 11, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Northeast 27th Street in Bend. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A trailer taillight was reported stolen at 11 a.m. July 4, in the Upper Deschutes Day Use area of Cove Palisades State Park. Burglary — Fishing gear and tools were reported stolen July 4, in the area of Birch Lane and Depot Street in Madras. Theft — Metal target stands were reported stolen July 5, in the area of Grizzly Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported July 5, in the 500 block of Northwest Juniper Lane in Madras. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:05 p.m. June 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 26 and Northwest Fir Lane in Madras. Theft — A cooler with food and beverages was reported stolen at 4:45 p.m. July 10, in the Crooked River Day Use area of Cove Palisades State Park. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:55 p.m. July 10, in the area of Frazier Drive and Jordan Road in Culver. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen from a vehicle at 11 a.m. July 10, in the 500 block of Eighth Street in Metolius.

BEND FIRE RUNS Thursday 11:13 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave. 18 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic short-haired cat — Adult male, gray; found near Third Street in Bend. Pit Bull — Adult female, tan and gray brindle; found near Cline Falls. Labrador Retriever — Adult female, red and gold; found near Brasada Ranch.

‘Live Aid’ concerts held for Africa in 1985 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, July 13, the 194th day of 2010. There are 171 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 13, 1960, John F. Kennedy won the Democratic presidential nomination on the first ballot at his party’s convention in Los Angeles, outdrawing rivals including Lyndon B. Johnson, Stuart Symington and Adlai Stevenson. ON THIS DATE In 1863, deadly rioting against the Civil War military draft erupted in New York City. (The insurrection was put down three days later.) In 1972, George McGovern claimed the Democratic presidential nomination at the party’s convention in Miami Beach. In 1977, a blackout lasting 25 hours hit the New York City area. In 1978, Lee Iacocca was fired as president of Ford Motor Co. by chairman Henry Ford II. In 1979, four Palestinian guerrillas stormed the Egyptian Embassy in Ankara, Turkey, killing

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y two guards and taking some 20 hostages. (The guerrillas surrendered 45 hours later.) In 1985, “Live Aid,� an international rock concert in London, Philadelphia, Moscow and Sydney, took place to raise money for Africa’s starving people. TEN YEARS AGO Fellow Democrat Bill Bradley endorsed Vice President Al Gore for president, four months after conceding their fight for the White House. FIVE YEARS AGO A suicide car bomb exploded next to U.S. troops handing out candy and toys in Iraq, killing more than two dozen people, including 18 children and teenagers and an American soldier. Former WorldCom boss Bernard Ebbers was sentenced to 25 years in prison for leading the largest corporate fraud in U.S. history.

in history, vowed loyalty to “the impartiality of our justice system� at the start of her Senate confirmation hearing. President Barack Obama, back from his overseas trip, stepped forcefully back into the health care debate as he presented his nominee for surgeon general, Dr. Regina Benjamin. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Patrick Stewart is 70. Actor Robert Forster is 69. Actor Harrison Ford is 68. Singerguitarist Roger McGuinn (The Byrds) is 68. Actor-comedian Cheech Marin is 64. Actress Daphne Maxwell Reid is 62. Actress Didi Conn is 59. Singer

Louise Mandrell is 56. Actordirector Cameron Crowe is 53. Tennis player Anders Jarryd is 49. Rock musician Gonzalo Martinez De La Cotera (Marcy Playground) is 48. Country singersongwriter Victoria Shaw is 48. Bluegrass singer Rhonda Vincent is 48. Actor Kenny Johnson is 47. Actor Michael Jace is 45. Country singer Neil Thrasher is 45. Singer Deborah Cox is 37. Rock musician Will Champion (Coldplay) is 32.

Sisters car show to be held Saturday The second annual “Glory Daze� car show will be held in Sisters on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. by the Sisters Area Chamber of Commerce, according to a news release. The car show, which will be held on Adams Street downtown, will cost $25 to enter, and will be accepting vehicle models made before 1989 in the exhibition. In addition to the car show, a raffle will be held at the event to benefit Sisters Kiwanis Food Bank. Food, drink, and entertainment will also be available. Those interested in entering a car in the show should call 541-549-0251, and should do so before Friday, as space is limited.

Area firefighters extinguish 3 blazes Three fires kept the Bend Fire Department and other firefighters busy Monday, as winds whipped up the small fires. A quarter-acre brush fire at Mt. Washington Drive and Northwest Fairway Heights Drive on Awbrey Butte in Bend was reported at 12:47 p.m., according to a news release. Bend Fire Department personnel quickly extinguished the wind-driven blaze, and U.S. Forest Service and Oregon Department of Forestry firefighters who were en route were told they were not needed. The cause of the fire is under investigation. At 2:13 p.m., the Bend Fire Department was called to a two-story home on O.B. Riley Road in north Bend, where improper disposal of “smoking materials� caused a fire on a wood deck behind the home, according to a Fire Depart-

151 SW Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend

ment news release. Firefighters extinguished the fire, which caused an estimated $200 in damage, and some of the firefighters left to work on a blaze near Tumalo. At 2:12 p.m., firefighters from the Oregon Department of Forestry were called to a large home on Tumalo Reservoir Road near Tumalo, where a fire in landscaping bark had spread to the crawl space of the home and black smoke was coming out of vents in the foundation, according to a Bend Fire Department news release. Bend Fire Department units were busy handling a structure fire when the alarm initially sounded, but they were diverted to this incident. Firefighters extinguished the fire, which strong winds had spread from the bark to the crawl space. Damage to the home was estimated at $10,000 and there was $2,000 in damage to the contents, according to the Bend Fire Department. The cause of the fire was undetermined. Cloverdale Fire District also assisted.

Local forester to join national committee Deschutes County Forester Joe Stutler has been appointed to serve a three-year term on the Wildland Fire Policy Committee for The International Association of Fire Chiefs, according to a news release. The committee is made up of prominent fire and rescue professionals from across the country who work on issues concerning wildfire safety and prevention programs at a nation-wide level. As county forester, Stutler has worked on Project Wildfire and several fire prevention programs in Oregon since he was appointed as forester in 2004.

Wallowa Mountains ranger office burns The Associated Press ENTERPRISE — The building that houses the U.S. Forest Service visitor center and ranger district offices for the popular Wallowa Mountains region of northeastern Oregon has burned to the ground. One wall was left standing Monday after the 20-yearold log building erupted in flames late Sunday afternoon. It housed the Eagle Cap and Wallowa Valley ranger districts of the Wallow-Whitman National Forest. A state fire marshal and the local sheriff’s office were investigating the cause of the fire. Forest Service wildfire firefighters pitched in with local volunteer fire departments to keep the flames from spreading in windy conditions, said Forest Service spokeswoman Judy Wing. Two other buildings on the site, a barn and a

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warehouse for firefighting equipment and personnel, were left standing. Officials met in the barn to figure out where to put the 90 Forest Service employees and 10 U.S. Department of Agriculture service center employees whose offices burned. “Our hearts go out to employees and to the community for this great loss,� Northwest Regional Forester Mary Wagner said in a statement.

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O Tenant’s death spurs cleanup at illegal Corvallis apartment By Bennett Hall Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — Three months after the death of a tenant in an illegal basement apartment triggered a cleanup order by the city, remediation work continues at Rudy Wehrmann’s house at 719 S.W. Fourth St. Takaoki “Jim” Kouno, 65, died of natural causes April 7 in the tiny basement room he rented from Wehrmann. The rental unit had previously been deemed uninhabitable by the city because it had no toilet, no running water, no kitchen, no windows and inadequate fire exits. City inspectors got a warrant to search the two-story house, which includes two other apartments plus Wehrmann’s living area, and a detached garage that also had a history of illegal occupancy. They found numerous health code violations, including large amounts of rotting food and cat feces in Wehrmann’s groundfloor living area. In the basement and garage, they found milk jugs filled with human urine and plastic bags containing human feces. Inspectors also cited a number of fire code violations, including exposed wiring, heavy use of extension cords, lack of

adequate smoke detectors, and piles of flammable debris in the backyard. On April 15, the city declared the building dangerous and ordered Wehrmann and his tenants to vacate the premises. The house and garage were boarded up, and Wehrmann was told to clean the place up or tear it down. Corvallis code enforcement supervisor Chris Westfall said the initial 30-day deadline has been extended twice, and Wehrmann now has until July 28 to remedy the sanitation problems. Westfall said progress is being made. With help from his three outof-town siblings, who co-own the house, Wehrmann has hired NorthWest HazMat of Springfield to clean up the property. Workers have been removing garbage from the buildings and hauling away junk from the yard. They’ve also ripped out soiled carpets and disposed of tainted furniture. When the cleanup job is complete, it will have to be approved by a county health inspector. Wehrmann said the cost to abate the sanitation issues was estimated at about $5,000. But more work remains to be done before the city will al-

low Wehrmann to move back in. Once the house has been sanitized, Wehrmann will still have to take care of the fire hazards noted during the initial inspection in April and any structural issues that may have come to light after the initial cleanup was done. “I’m not sure yet what we’ll find,” said Westfall. “Ultimately what we’re looking for is to resolve the fire hazard conditions and any contributing factors to that.” Policing the illegal rental units is another matter. Corvallis officials have warned Wehrmann repeatedly over a period of years not to allow anyone to live in the basement or the garage because they don’t meet minimal health and safety standards. In 2006, a judge fined him for ignoring those warnings. But under the city’s code enforcement policy, there is no mechanism for punishing repeat offenders or checking periodically to make sure they’re complying with the law. As in previous cases, the only way the city would step in is if someone complains. “If those concerns arise again, we will respond on a complaint basis,” Westfall said. “We would not do any surprise inspections.”

O  B ‘Void’ beneath lane of U.S. 101 on coast FLORENCE — Transportation officials say they’ve found a void under the asphalt of U.S. 101’s southbound lane about nine miles north of the Sea Lion Caves on the Oregon coast. Travel has been restricted to the northbound lane. Mike Spaeth is an Oregon Transportation Department district manager. He says it appears the rock base beneath the asphalt has washed away over time. Crews will have to cut into the roadway to determine how bad the problem is. The section of highway is heavily used by tourists as well as locals. Still, delays are estimated to be 15 minutes or less.

Body of Grants Pass teen found in river GRANTS PASS — The body of a Grants Pass teen missing after swimming in the Rogue River has been found. The Josephine County Sheriff’s

Office says residents of the Riviera Mobile Park spotted the body of 18-year-old Shane Patrick Marshall on Sunday afternoon about seven miles downstream from where he was last seen. He had been missing since Wednesday when he and friends were swimming at Baker Park. He was in a group that got caught in the current and floated downstream. His friends called authorities when he did not return for his wallet and cell phone.

Suspect in Gladstone shooting turns self in GLADSTONE — A man suspected of shooting his father at a Gladstone home has surrendered to authorities. Gladstone police Sgt. Lynn Benton says Kent Friesen was booked into the Clackamas County Jail Monday afternoon on charges of assault and attempted murder. Friesen’s father, 50-year-old David James Friesen, suffered a gunshot wound to the abdomen Sunday night. He is recovering from surgery at OHSU hospital

and his condition is stable.

Teen faces adult charges in girl’s death ROSEBURG — A 16-yearold Roseburg boy has been arraigned as an adult on aggravated murder and rape charges in the death of a 5-year-old girl. Authorites say Dustin Michael Wallace entered no plea Monday in Douglas County Circuit Court in the death of Sahara Dwight. The charges filed against the boy in a district attorney’s information are so-called Measure 11 charges. It calls for teenagers 15 and older to be prosecuted as adults. There was no immediate word on when a grand jury would consider it. The boy was arrested Friday at the home he sometimes shares with his father and the victim’s mother. Police say he also lives with his mother in Hugo, Okla. The girl’s mother had called 911 saying her daughter was unconscious. — From wire reports

Missing Portland boy’s dad alleges stepmom had affair Accuses estranged wife of sharing sealed court order By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The father of missing 7-year-old Kyron Horman asked Monday that the boy’s stepmother be held in contempt of court for sharing with an alleged lover a restraining order in which the father says he believes the stepmother was involved in the boy’s disappearance. The motion filed by Kaine Horman is the latest twist in a more than monthlong investigation that has focused attention on the actions of his wife, Terri Moulton Horman. Last week a judge unsealed a restraining order against Terri Horman in which Kaine Horman said he believes she is involved in Kyron’s disappearance and also alleges that she plotted to have Kaine Horman killed late last year. Police have not said Terri Horman is a suspect but have been focusing attention on her. Kaine Horman sought the restraining order after moving himself and their 18-month-old daughter, Kiara, out of the Horman home late last month. He has also filed for divorce. In the new motion filed by Kaine Horman, he accuses Terri Horman of sharing the still-sealed restraining order with a man she had begun having a sexual affair with after Self Referrals Welcome

Kaine Horman moved out of the house. He asks that Terri Horman be fined and possibly jailed for contempt of court for showing the restraining order to a Michael Cook, identified in the motion as a high school acquaintance of Kaine Horman. Kaine Horman said he believes his wife did not know Cook until after Kyron’s disappearance on June 4. Kaine Horman said Cook has told investigators that Terri Horman let Cook use his cell phone camera to photograph the restraining order, including the address of Kaine Hormon’s new residence. The restraining order was unsealed last week, but a judge directed Kaine Horman’s new address to remain sealed. According to Monday’s filing, Cook then searched the Internet for directions from Terri Horman’s house to Kaine Horman’s undisclosed temporary residence. In the filing, Kaine Horman also said that on the same day Terri Horman was served with the restraining order — but before she was served — she showed up at a gym where he works out. The gym also has a daycare center. Kaine Horman said Terri Horman asked the clerk at the gym to let her know if Kaine Horman came to the gym with Kiara, the couple’s daughter. The clerk told the manager about Terri Horman’s visit to the gym, and the manager informed police. In the filing, Kaine Horman accused Terri Horman of going to the gym looking to “abduct”

their daughter. Terri Horman’s attorney, Stephen Houze, did not return calls to The Associated Press. Kaine Horman said in the filing that Cook has provided investigators with information about his relationship with Terri Horman, including “hundreds of text messages as well as several photographs of (Terri Horman) in various stages of undress and graphic sexual activity.” Kaine Horman’s attorney said in the filing that Terri Horman’s “stated personal relationship concerns and sexual overtures to Mr. Cook resemble those made to the man (Terri Horman) previously attempted to hire to murder (Kaine Horman).” Also on Monday, Houze filed a court motion stating that Terri Horman would abide by a request by Kaine Horman that she move out of their house. Kaine Horman has said he wanted his wife out of the house because of the alleged murder plot and because he said he thinks she is involved with Kyron’s disappearance. Kaine and Terri Horman were married in April 2007. Terri Horman also has a teenage son from the first of two previous marriages.

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C4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

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Find a way to expand Bend Farmers Market

B

end’s Wednesday farmers market is in some ways a victim of its own success. It the 11 years it’s been operating, it has filled its traditional space in Drake Park, so much

so that there’s no room to add new vendors. That’s bad news for a growing number of Central Oregon farmers who would like to set up shop there. Now the city of Bend and Bend Park & Recreation District must get together to solve the problem. The market’s current location near Franklin Avenue on the eastern edge of Drake Park has room for 25 vendors. It cannot expand toward the street or the adjacent parking lot, for obvious reasons. Nor can it grow to the west because the slope of a hill there would keep it from meeting Americans with Disabilities Act standards. If it is to grow, it must go north. When vendors first set up shop, nearly all came from the Willamette Valley or the Hood River area, a reflection of both the lack of local growers at the time and this region’s notoriously short growing season. Today, the situation has changed. Central Oregon’s landscape is dotted with small agricultural operations, some of which would like to sell their wares at the Wednesday market. Problem is, with long-term relationships already established, those who operate the local market are reluctant to kick out current growers to make way for new ones. They shouldn’t be put in the position

of having to do so. Rather, the park district, which oversees Drake Park, and the city, which is responsible for such things as code enforcement, should reach out to market operators and come up with a solution that makes everyone happy. That could mean allowing the market to expand to the north, something the park district would certainly consider, says Jan Taylor of the district. The market makes a proposal to district officials each year and could include expansion for next year, she says. It would cost no more to use more space. Meanwhile, local growers should consider taking their wares to another of the city’s farmers markets. They may be more lightly attended than the Wednesday market, but that could change. Allowing the Wednesday market to expand is clearly something both growers and shoppers want. Now officials who can make that happen should find a way to do so.

Home-brew silliness O

regon is known far and wide for the variety and quality of its microbrews. But thanks to a recent Department of Justice analysis, it’s a downright hostile place for the most micro of microbrews, which are the kind produced and bottled in the home. If irony were an intoxicant, the people responsible for this silliness would, to borrow the state motto, be flying with their own wings. But who, exactly, should home brewers blame for treating them like bootleggers? It might be tempting to blame the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, whose blog announced July 2 that state law “only allows for consumption of home brews in the home.” That rules out, among other things, competitions like the one held for decades at the Oregon State Fair. But the OLCC claims to be following legal advice from the DOJ and, to its credit, is working with state legislators to fix the problem next year. You could blame the DOJ, but that’s hard to do without knowing exactly what its lawyers had to say. We asked the agency to send us a copy of the analysis it performed for the OLCC, but spokesman Tony Green replied that any “legal advice that DOJ provides to OLCC or any other agency is covered by att(orne)y-client privilege. Only the client can decide whether to release it.” We called the OLCC repeatedly, but received no response by our deadline. Which leaves the old state statute that received the DOJ’s inconve-

nient interpretation, ORS 471.403. It states, in part, that “the Liquor Control Act does not apply to the making or keeping of naturally fermented wines and fruit juices or beer in the home, for home consumption and not for sale.” According to the OLCC, the DOJ interprets the “home consumption” part literally. Who knew the DOJ had such strict constructionists on staff? Antonin Scalia would be proud. In any case the interpretaton leads to all kinds of interesting possibilities. Does a home brewer break the law by sampling his work in a hotel room? As a rule, people ought to obey the law. But we suspect that this will be one of the most widely ignored and least rigorously enforced laws in Oregon history. Home brewers who want to blame somebody for this silliness should look to the future. Unless an administrative fix to the problem is possible, as suggested by Rep. Judy Stiegler, the 2011 Legislature will be asked to do something. It’s almost certain to comply. But if lawmakers don’t come through, home brewers should be generous with their wrath. In the meantime, perhaps some enterprising Oregonian will develop a concoction that embodies the state’s new position on home brews. It should taste terrible, produce a hangover without a buzz and, of course, be cloudy enough to preserve attorney-client privilege. We’d call it Nanny-state Stout.

My Nickel’s Worth Fees for PERS

Good riddance

A recent headline was “Fees fund effort to prevent spread of invasive species.” It should have been “Fees fund PERS and health care for government employees.” The invasive species should be identified as government acting as organized crime. Daniel Balyeat Bend

Are you kidding me? Did they really hold a memorial service for the slain geese? What happened to our town? A guy moves here two years ago to “rub elbows” with the Central Oregon wildlife and complains about the euthanization of what most of us here understood as a nuisance to our park. Is it just me, or does Bend feel more and more like Eugene every day? As for me, I support the decision of the Bend Park & Recreation District. I just wish they would have let some of us longtime residents break out our shotguns and get some target practice in. Joel McCabe Bend

No war We do need schools, roads, health care that works for “we the people,” living-wage jobs, affordable housing. We don’t need more of our young military people coming home in body bags. We do need our young, and older, military people coming home alive. The latest funding for more war is shameful. This newspaper should be publishing the cost of war to each of us, every day. I challenge it to do so. Frances Davis Terrebonne

The right decision Regarding the killing of the 106 geese at Drake Park! I have a solution to this problem: Find a way to have all the geese fly into the mourning many’s backyards. They will no doubt enjoy seeing the geese and wading through the goose poop! The rest of us and our families will finally be able to enjoy Drake Park again. Problem solved, and I’m so glad to know that many benefited from the USDA’s decision by having a fine roasted goose dinner. Diana MacKenzie Terrebonne

I like geese Since Bend Park & Recreation says those who are pro-geese are not being vocal, then I will speak up. I was eating lunch in Drake Park and specifically chose a table amid the geese because I happen to love all animals. I grew up in the country, and animal droppings do not faze me or disturb my experience (I wear shoes.) Two parks employees (one in uniform and one I’m guessing is a seasonal worker) came over in a cart to scare the geese. One of the men threw things at them and kicked sawdust at them, all of this right next to my table. This ruined my peaceful lunch, of course, especially since I like geese. Then a man walking his dog said to me there was too much goose poop. I told him to go to a park without geese and that goose poop is a cosmetic complaint and is doing no real harm. He

said he didn’t want to drive to another park. I’m getting tired of this self-centered, superficial attitude that the apparent vocal majority has in Bend and their complete disregard for the innocent life of a creature simply minding its own business. It’s not a goose’s fault Bend has beautiful waterways and mowed grass. If the biggest complaint is about something so shallow, I am appalled by the lack of tolerance and gross over-reaction to the point of killing the animals. I’m also disturbed at how paid parks employees are handling it. Nic Moye Bend

What about Kozak? I read with interest the article in a recent Bulletin headlined “Seeking the independent vote” regarding the apparent efforts by Democrat Judy Stiegler and Republican Jason Conger to secure the endorsement of the Independent Party. I was surprised to see that the reporter made no mention of the only true independent in that race, Mike Kozak. Kozak is a former Bend city councilman and former Bend mayor and is gathering petition signatures to have his name placed on the ballot for the District 54 race, as has been noted in previous Bulletin articles. Why was Kozak not interviewed for this piece? Kozak is truly seeking the independent vote, affiliating with neither of the major parties in an effort to take partisan politics out of the works to right the Oregon ship of state. Please give fair coverage to this important race and ask Mike Kozak what he thinks. Lester Friedman Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon is no place for a geothermal project B y Kelly McDonald Bulletin guest columnist

I

believe the majority of Americans want clean energy, such as geothermal facilities, and to reduce their carbon footprints, and to stop global warming, or at least to slow it down. Before you go along for the ride and later wish you would have spoken out, look to other projects. Basil, Switzerland, in 2006 and 2007 had an earthquake of 3.4 followed by 60 smaller aftershocks and another earthquake of 2.5 magnitude one week later. The project was shut down. Landau in der Pfalz in Germany had shaken the city with a 2.7 quake. Also, there was a sonic boom. It set off an inquiry and was allowed to operate while the review panel deliberated. This project was run by AltaRock Energy, which used the same technology there as its other project in Northern California called The Geysers. This project was shut down by AltaRock on Dec. 12, 2009.

The Obama Administration knew of the quake in Germany but OK’d the project in California. On Nov. 6, 2009, Wiesbaden Germany drilled for geothermal energy and flooded the finance ministry and hotel. There were 6,000 liters of water coming out per minute. Here in Central Oregon, we have seismic activity at South Sister, a bulge growing. I don’t know if this is relevant, but there were earthquakes on Sept. 21, 1993, that measured 6.0 and 5.9 in Klamath Falls, approximately 70 miles south of Newberry Crater. It seems to me that dumping water at the Newberry site to create steam could also bring to life the Klamath Falls area once again, if there is seismic activity at Newberry. I sent an e-mail to Gov. Kulongoski and voiced my concern about the Newberry project. My concerns were sent to the Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management. I also wonder if a project like this could occur in the Bull Run wa-

IN MY VIEW tershed on the other side of the mountain that delivers water to possibly one million people in the Portland and surrounding area. If there was any chance of the watershed becoming contaminated with this type of project, could it go forth? Avion Water’s Jason Wick e-mailed me and gave me some unofficial opinions. The Deschutes aquifer recharges at a rate of plus or minus 3,500 cubic feet per second, which will serve to keep the aquifer’s temperature constant. Also that earthquakes could have an effect on older pipelines. There is no way that DEQ or OWRD will allow unclean water to be injected back into the ground. I was given a different story by BLM’s Edward Shepard, Oregon state director. He said that gray water will be used from the town of La Pine in anticipation of a full-scale Enhanced Geothermal System at Newberry Crater. I had concerns that

the process of fracturing that AltaRock and Davenport Newberry LLC plan to do would release toxic chemicals into the Deschutes aquifer, and the steam would be released into the air. One being toxic hydrogen sulfide, along with a number of other less toxic chemicals in the event of an earthquake breaking the pipeline that starts at ground level and goes to the bottom of both the intake and exhaust wells. That pipeline is under incredible pressures deep in the earth. And if a house could be destroyed, what about a buried pipeline? Many Central Oregonians also suffer from respiratory problems, and the air quality in the past when we have had forest fires has kept many of us housebound because of stagnant air advisories. Could this project also have a negative effect as well? My letter from the BLM said, “When venting the wells, hydrogen sulfide concentrations will be monitored and will be abated if found to be too high,” but what does that mean to those of us who already

have existing respiratory problems? Readers need to contact Prineville BLM; county commissioners; local, state, and national leaders, to keep our air and water clean. If more people don’t get involved to keep these plants from being built, all we will be able to do is a knee-jerk reaction to shut them down after an earthquake has occurred and has polluted our drinking water. If pollution does occur, the chances of the operator of the plant paying for the cleanup is low. Central Oregonians will most likely see the companies fold, or the lawyers will be involved fighting to not pay for ecological damages and we will be paying for the cleanup ourselves. Avion water is one of the cleanest and most pristine aquifers in Oregon. Keep this project out of our backyard. We should have a say about what does go into our backyard. Kelly McDonald lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 C5

O Doris T. Claypool January 13, 1907 - July 8, 2010

D

N   James Allen Dinkel, of Culver Jan. 20, 1933 - July 9, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Public Viewing: Wednesday, July 14, 2010 between the hours of 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM at Bel-Air Chapel. Memorial Service: Friday, July 16, 2010 at 11:00 AM at CULVER CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Jeffrey Matthew Shandy, of Bend April 15, 1945 - July 8, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A public viewing was held on July 13, 2010, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Baird Funeral Home at 2425 NE Tweet Place, Bend.

John Charles Mihailov, of Bend Oct. 20, 1916 - July 11, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Graveside services will be held at a later date in Mesa, Arizona. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, Oregon 97701, (541) 382-5882, www.partnersbend.org

Patricia Ann Skillingstad, of Crescent Jan. 3, 1952 - July 8, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, 541-536-5104 Services: 2 to 6 p.m., 7/14/2010,a Celebration of Life will be held at 248 Riddle Rd. in Crescent.

Rita Fahrenbacher Rodgers, of Powell Butte Nov. 27, 1920 - July 8, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: Rosary, Wed., July 14, St. Thomas Catholic Church, Redmond, 7:30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial, Thurs., July 15, 2010, 10:30 a.m., St. Thomas Catholic Church. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice of Redmond, Sisters, 732 SW 23rd, Redmond, OR 97756 or Baker Diocese Priest Health and Retirement Fund.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

After 103 years on this earth, Doris Claypool joined her husband and mother in the arms of the Lord, July 8, 2010. Doris was born in Hastings, Nebraska, to George and Harriett Marling on January 13, 1907. The family Doris T. moved to Lodi, Claypool California, where Doris started working in the family candy company known as Marling's Chocolate Inn. In 1926, she moved to Bend, Oregon. Doris and Guy Claypool were married July 26, 1927, and on July 26, 1977, they celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary. Doris worked for Bontergers Garage, Square Deal Furniture, and in 1935, she and Guy opened Claypool Furniture. In 1960, they purchased the Stipe Furniture Co. and combined the two companies. Doris continued to run Claypools after Guy’s death in 1979, with her son, Dale and brother, George, until she retired in 1999, at age 91. As a long-time business owner here in Bend, Doris was the recipient of many awards including Business Woman of the Year. She served on numerous committees including the Bend Downtowners and Bend Chamber of Commerce. One of her favorites was organizing the Christmas parade in downtown Bend. Doris, along with her mother, Rev. Harriett Marling, founded The True Gospel United Pentecostal Church in Bend. During the Depression, she organized and helped feed over 50,000 transients through the church. She worked as the secretary for the church for many years. Doris graduated from Bible college and later earned degrees in interior design and business. Doris loved to fish and travel with her husband and son. She enjoyed her many friends over the years and cherished her relationship with the Lord. Doris is survived by her son, Dale Claypool; brother, George Marling; sister-in -law, Adena Marling; niece, Rheta Carolyn Marling; nephews, George Dennis Marling and Jeffrey Scott Marling, Don and Paul Opperman of Las Vegas, NV. Doris was preceded in death by her husband, Guy Claypool, her parents, George and Harriett Marling, her sister, Mertdale Opperman and sisters-in-law, Stella Wetsel, Madge Stinett, and Opel Halverson. Dale and his family would like to extend their gratitude and thanks to Laverne, Amber and all of the caregivers at Evergreen In-Home Care for their outstanding care and compassion over the last three plus years. If desired, in lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made in Doris' name to the True Gospel United Pentecostal Church of Bend. A visitation will be held at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home on Tuesday, July 13 from 1-3 p.m. A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, July 14 at Niswonger-Reynolds Chapel, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family. Please visit www.niswonger-reynolds.com to sign the guestbook.

Find Your Dream Home In

Real Estate Every Saturday

Steven Arthur Swarthout

Audit

May 30, 1951- May 26, 2010

Continued from C1 “It’ll be one of those that are toward the top of the list,” Blackmer said. The Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program provides hundreds of dollars each month to low-income families to keep homes and apartments warm. This year, a family of four making up to $40,563 is eligible for $349 monthly. The state gave aid to more than 114,000 families last year, according to its 2010 model plan. In Central Oregon, the heating aid is awarded to poor families through NeighborImpact. The public relations director and energy assistance manager at NeighborImpact were both out of the office on Monday. A Government Accountability Office investigation in Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Virginia found fraud, or failure to provide basic documentation, such as Social Security numbers, by people who received about 9 percent of the program funds. Among the examples it

Steve was born in Puyallup WA, to Mary M. and Dwight B. Swarthout, the youngest of three children. Shortly after his birth, they moved to Glendale, Oregon where his father was a logger and then to Grants Pass where he graduated from Grants Steven A. Pass High Swarthout School in 1969. The summer of 2009, Steve was excited to attend his 40th class reunion where he was re-acquainted with many classmates, some as far back as 1st grade. After High School, Steve excelled in financial services, working for New York Life, Lafayette Life and Swarthout Financial. Steve loved life and had many interests, hunting, fishing, skiing, traveling, country music, dancing, and especially Cabo San Lucas Mexico. Steve is survived by his loving wife, Lori of Sunriver, OR, mother, Mary Swarthout, Salem, OR, brother, Dan Swarthout and wife, Kathy, Bend, OR, sister, Janet Hart and husband, Rick of Seattle, WA, sons, Jason and wife, Dana, Mexico, Brandon, Salem, OR, and Jesse, Bend, OR; grandchildren, Sydney, Tristan, Nyah and Casey. Steve was preceded in death by his father and best friend, Dwight B. Swarthout. Steve was one of Jehovah's Witnesses. A private celebration of his life will be held in Sunriver. Contributions can be made in Steve's memory to Hospice/ Partners in Care, Bend, OR.

Claypool Continued from C1 She graduated from a Bible college in Oakland, Calif., and later earned a degree from a business school in Sacramento, Calif., her son said. In 1926, Doris moved with her family to Bend and soon met Guy Claypool, whom she married in 1927. Guy Claypool, a former captain of the Bend High School football team, worked as an accountant at the Brooks Scanlon mill at the time. But the mill cut Guy Claypool’s hours to three days a week during the Great Depression and he was making $5 a day, Dale Claypool said. “In the middle of the Depression, mom and dad started a business of all things,” Dale Claypool said, referring to Claypool Furniture’s 1935 opening. In the beginning, Guy Claypool drove a Dodge truck to deliver the furniture and Doris Claypool rode in a trailer, holding onto the furniture to keep it from falling off. Later, Doris Claypool earned a degree from an interior design program and “she did a number of the medical offices and better homes in town,” Dale Claypool said. “She was the only registered decorator for a number of years in town.” Guy Claypool died in 1979, and Doris Claypool continued to operate the furniture store with her brother and son. Doris Claypool was active in a number of different civic committees and also founded The True Gospel United Pentecostal Church in Bend, along with her mother, Rev. Harriett Marling. Connie Miller, who lives down the street from the Claypools, said Doris Claypool was a hard worker. “They worked in the store every day, and then they went to the Pine Tavern for lunch and then back to work.” Ray LeBlanc, 93, owned a menswear store next to Claypool Furniture for years, and he remembered Doris Claypool as a small, quiet and nice woman, who was always working. “I wondered how long she could stay behind that desk, she was always there every day,” LeBlanc said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Dogs Continued from C1 Off-leash dogs are currently allowed on groomed trails leading from Wanoga Sno-park, south of the Cascade Lakes Highway, he said, but the snopark is shared with snowmobilers and a sledding area in the sno-play area. “It’s very near where we have snowmobiles,” Jeffries said. “It’s not a really large track, and so one of the points of discussion, at least for the folks who enjoy dog off-leash experiences in the winter, is to explore areas that don’t have motorized use.” Kreg Lindberg, president of the Bend-based group DogPAC, said that he believes more than half of the households in Bend have dogs, and there’s lots of interest in canine-friendly groomed trails. “From our perspective, there’s clearly a need for this and a need for greater opportunities,” he said. “The question is where should that happen.” Traditionally, sno-parks north of the highway have been designed for skiers and snowshoers, while those south of the highway allow motorized vehicles. “Our home is really north of the highway, because we’re fundamentally skiers and snowshoers,” Lindberg said. DogPAC is proposing to open up the area on the Nordeen plateau — east of Swampy, and in-

Deputies Continued from C1 Adkins said he’s not the first sheriff to deputize tribal police officers. He pointed out that all the Warm Springs Police Officers go through the same training as state-certified police officers. And they attend the same police academy as any other state police officer. “With the budget cuts, we have to have more personnel,” Adkins said. “We can’t allow Jefferson County to be a safe haven for thieves and drug runners from the reservation to hide and thieves and drug runners can’t run to the reservation to hide. We need to make the community safer.” And it will work both ways. Members of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office will also be able to investigate cases on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. “When there is a drug deal-

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

cited were 725 people in prison who received heating benefits, numerous people who collected benefits on behalf of dead relatives and at least three U.S. Postal Service employees who earned far more than the income limit and still received the aid. “There are people who seem to make a career out of stealing from the taxpayers in these programs,” Walden said. Walden requested the GAO investigation last year, when he was the top Republican on the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee. Walden said he planned to write Gov. Ted Kulongoski, a Democrat, to ask the Office of Housing and Community Services to examine the heating program this year. “I’d prefer they’d be able to get on it sooner,” Walden said. Blackmer said his office audits the heating program’s finances, but hasn’t been able to examine how local agencies decide whether a person qualifies for heating aid. “Every year we do a financial audit of that program, but we don’t go to the depth that

To comment To comment on the issue of off-leash dogs in the Deschutes National Forest, the idea of an off-leash area inside of Tangent Loop, or what a meeting this fall on off-leash areas should involve, send an e-mail to sjeffries@fs.fed.us or write to Shane Jeffries at 1230 N.E. Third St., Suite A-262, Bend, OR 97701. The Forest Service is also planning to add a link to submit comments to its website at www.fs.fed.us/r6/ centraloregon.

side of the Tangent Loop — to off-leash dogs. The Nordeen Loop would be widened and groomed, and the off-leash area would also include a couple of snowshoe trails. Trails branching off from Swampy would be better, he said, because the parking lot doesn’t get as crowded as the Virginia Meissner lot. The Nordeen area is also more level than some of the nearby trails, which would help prevent incidents between dogs and out-of-control skiers — with flatter trails, people would be able to better maneuver around dogs, he said. Grooming the Nordeen trail would upset some of the classic cross-country skiers who use the route currently, Lindberg said, but currently skiers with

er who is dealing dope on both sides of the river and we need to do surveillance, (their deputies) are freely able to go back and forth without worry about jurisdiction,” Adkins said. “When we go over there, my deputies will work with their officers. When they come over here, we’ll work with them.” Public Safety Manger for the Warm Springs Indian Reservation Jim Soules said the cooperation between agencies will create a win-win situation for everyone. “This gives us peace officer status off the reservation and allows us on and off the reservation to enforce state law without any question of authority on non-Indian people,” Soules said. “As you know, (U.S.) Highway 26 runs right through the middle of the reservation ... It gives us the ability to enforce state law in those areas and it’s a huge benefit for us and the sheriff.” The reservation is entering into a similar agreement with the

the GAO went to in this audit,” Blackmer said. “At this point all of our auditors are completely occupied, so we don’t have anyone to spare at the moment.” Blackmer said his office had yet to do a more comprehensive audit of any state program where the state passed-through funding to other agencies. That’s something he plans to do in the future, Blackmer said. “We are going to be looking at that a lot more,” he said. Although the Secretary of State has never audited community groups, the Office of Housing and Community Service updated its oversight plan this year to begin checking the eligibility of people getting benefits. Starting next year, the state will also visit local groups every two years for more intensive reviews, according to the program’s work plan. Melissa Torgerson, who oversees the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program for the state, is out of the office this week and could not be reached for comment. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

dogs don’t have a lot of other options. “We only have so many acres, and so many miles of trails,” he said. Linda Frost, with the Central Oregon Nordic Club, said that the Nordeen is the easiest-accessible trail for classic skiers — who often prefer ungroomed, narrower trails — and noted that the club just invested time and money to rebuild the Nordeen shelter. It’s two different kinds of skiing,” she said. “They’re making it unfriendly to us.” She said she has concerns about widening and grooming the trail to 18 feet, and is worried the dogs would cause conflicts, including creating holes in the ski tracks. “This is not because we don’t like dogs,” she said. “We don’t want to lose our trail.” But other skiers are more in favor of the idea. Dale Navish, a board member of the Tumalo Langlauf cross country ski club, said that although he wouldn’t want to have dogs on the trails the club currently grooms or in areas where people ski fast, it could work out if people stuck to the rules. “It’s a good idea,” he said. “Hopefully it would work out, and everybody can recreate together.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Wasco County Sheriff’s Office. The Warm Springs Indian Reservation is also working with Oregon’s nine other American Indian tribes to change Oregon law so it includes tribal police officers under the definition of police officers. If that were to happen, the Warm Springs police officers would not need to be deputized by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. They would be considered under state law to have the same power as state police officers. Officials from the reservation said they hope a bill giving tribal officers statewide authority will be introduced in the next legislative session. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

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Locally Owned and Operated by the Daniel Family


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JULY 13 Today: Mainly sunny, cooler, afternoon and evening breezes.

HIGH Ben Burkel

79

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

80s Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

78/48

74/49

80/48

59/42

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

80/43

75/33

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

77/38

78/41

Camp Sherman 74/33 Redmond Prineville 79/36 Cascadia 77/37 78/37 Sisters 77/35 Bend Post 79/36

Oakridge Elk Lake 76/35

67/24

70s

76/33

Hampton

60s

74/33

86 42

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 97° Ontario • 39° North Bend

Vancouver

50s

69/57

Calgary 57/52

Seattle

70s

70/56

60s Missoula 67/47

Helena Bend

82/50

Idaho Falls

80s

Elko

98/70

81/38

Crater Lake

Skies will become mostly sunny.

80s

67/32

77/48

90/53

79/35

Silver Lake

71/47

Boise

79/36

Redding Christmas Valley

78/30

HIGH

Reno

94/60

San Francisco

90s Salt Lake City

66/53

94/67

110s 100s

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

First

Full

Last

New

July 18

July 25

Aug. 2

Aug. 9

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 64/55/0.01 . . . . . 66/52/pc. . . . . . 72/53/pc Baker City . . . . . . 84/47/0.00 . . . . . 73/44/pc. . . . . . . 82/45/s Brookings . . . . . . 64/48/0.00 . . . . . 74/52/pc. . . . . . 76/52/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 88/50/0.00 . . . . . . 78/42/s. . . . . . . 84/44/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 74/60/0.00 . . . . . 78/49/pc. . . . . . 85/54/pc Klamath Falls . . . 87/51/0.00 . . . . . 82/48/pc. . . . . . . 86/49/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 88/50/0.00 . . . . . . 85/49/s. . . . . . . 87/49/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 83/50/0.00 . . . . . . 77/32/s. . . . . . . 84/37/s Medford . . . . . . . 93/64/0.00 . . . . . 91/56/pc. . . . . . . 96/59/s Newport . . . . . . . 63/54/0.00 . . . . . 63/52/pc. . . . . . 60/52/pc North Bend . . . . . . 64/39/NA . . . . . 64/49/pc. . . . . . 66/52/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 97/65/0.00 . . . . . . 84/54/s. . . . . . . 86/54/s Pendleton . . . . . . 79/61/0.00 . . . . . . 84/51/s. . . . . . . 90/55/s Portland . . . . . . . 69/57/0.00 . . . . . 73/54/pc. . . . . . . 82/59/s Prineville . . . . . . . 78/54/0.00 . . . . . . 77/37/s. . . . . . . 85/51/s Redmond. . . . . . . 83/51/0.00 . . . . . 80/43/pc. . . . . . . 86/43/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 79/61/0.00 . . . . . . 79/51/s. . . . . . 86/59/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 72/58/0.00 . . . . . 76/50/pc. . . . . . 83/55/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 81/50/0.00 . . . . . . 77/35/s. . . . . . . 84/45/s The Dalles . . . . . . 73/63/0.00 . . . . . . 81/55/s. . . . . . . 89/60/s

TEMPERATURE

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

8V.HIGH

HIGH 6

8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81/50 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . .100 in 2002 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 in 1943 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.24” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.40” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.94 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.52 in 2001 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

85 40

FIRE INDEX

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly sunny, mild. HIGH

85 40

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:00 a.m. . . . . . .9:49 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:17 a.m. . . . . .10:49 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:43 a.m. . . . . .11:21 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:44 p.m. . . . . .11:53 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . .11:25 a.m. . . . . .11:47 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:35 p.m. . . . . .11:40 a.m.

Moon phases

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:35 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:47 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:35 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:46 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:59 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 9:59 p.m.

SATURDAY Mainly sunny, mild.

90 44

A few showers will be possible over the Cascades today. Expect plenty of sunshine elsewhere.

78/34

Chemult

LOW

BEND ALMANAC

Expect partly cloudy skies 78/49 with a slight chance of Grants Pass showers in the Cascades. 84/50 Eastern

Burns

77/32

70/26

36

73/54

78/34

Fort Rock

HIGH

Eugene

La Pine 78/31

LOW

FRIDAY Mainly sunny, warm.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

72/33

76/32

Mainly sunny, slightly warmer.

Tonight: Mainly clear, chilly.

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

THURSDAY

NORTHWEST

Paulina

75/34

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Mostly cloudy to partly sunny with areas of fog along the coast early. Central

81/42

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34,717 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111,172 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 75,556 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 39,772 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141,953 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 381 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,250 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 69/57

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Bismarck 79/55

Billings 79/53

Boise 82/50

• 110°

Rapid City 82/56

Palm Springs, Calif.

• 36° Leadville, Colo.

S

Saskatoon 59/48 Winnipeg 77/57

Calgary 57/52

Seattle 70/56 Portland 73/54

S

San Francisco 66/53

• 3.75” Memphis, Tenn.

Las Vegas 107/88

Cheyenne 93/60

Salt Lake City 94/67

Los Angeles 71/63

Denver 97/64

Albuquerque 100/70 Phoenix 109/90

Honolulu 87/73

Tijuana 70/60 Chihuahua 95/69

Anchorage 60/51

La Paz 97/68 Juneau 58/50

Mazatlan 88/78

Omaha 90/74 Kansas City 89/74

S

S

S

S

Thunder Bay 75/53 To ronto 82/68 Green Bay 80/60 Buffalo Detroit 78/71 86/69 Des Moines 87/73 Columbus 86/68 Chicago 81/69

St. Paul 85/73

S

S S

Halifax Quebec 63/61 84/66 Portland 78/65 Boston 84/70 New York 84/73 Philadelphia 85/75 Washington, D. C. 87/76

Louisville 84/69 Charlotte 88/72 Nashville Little Rock 87/72 93/75 Oklahoma City Atlanta 90/74 91/72 Birmingham Dallas 92/74 96/78 New Orleans 94/80 Orlando Houston 95/77 96/78 St. Louis 88/72

Miami 92/81 Monterrey 92/58

FRONTS

Finding a cool spot in a hot place

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .91/72/0.00 . 94/72/pc . . 95/75/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.21 . . .83/65/t . . 87/68/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .91/84/0.00 . . .81/70/t . . . .83/67/t Albuquerque. . . .98/64/0.00 100/70/pc . . 99/66/pc Anchorage . . . . .71/52/0.00 . .60/51/sh . . 59/52/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .90/73/1.11 . . .91/72/t . . . .93/74/t Atlantic City . . . .89/64/0.03 . . .83/77/t . . . .87/76/t Austin . . . . . . . . .94/78/0.00 . 96/76/pc . . 97/76/pc Baltimore . . . . . .88/67/0.70 . . .87/77/t . . . .91/75/t Billings. . . . . . . . .93/59/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . 82/55/pc Birmingham . . . .96/80/0.00 . . .92/74/t . . . .95/73/t Bismarck . . . . . . .82/57/0.01 . . .79/55/t . . 77/58/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .93/63/0.00 . . .82/50/s . . . 84/51/s Boston. . . . . . . . .88/69/0.25 . 84/70/pc . . . .80/67/t Bridgeport, CT. . .88/72/0.00 . . .81/73/t . . . .83/71/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .78/71/t . . . 83/69/s Burlington, VT. . .88/66/0.01 . . .80/66/t . . 84/69/pc Caribou, ME . . . .85/63/0.01 . . .83/66/t . . . .80/63/t Charleston, SC . .91/75/0.07 . . .92/77/t . . . .92/78/t Charlotte. . . . . . .85/70/1.54 . . .88/72/t . . . .90/72/t Chattanooga. . . .91/74/0.58 . . .91/74/t . . . .93/73/t Cheyenne . . . . . .85/50/0.00 . 93/60/pc . . 88/54/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . 81/69/pc . . 89/75/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . .86/69/t . . 90/69/pc Cleveland . . . . . .85/70/0.01 . . .83/72/t . . . 84/72/s Colorado Springs 90/56/0.04 . . .95/58/s . . 91/57/pc Columbia, MO . .87/64/0.00 . 88/71/pc . . 93/75/pc Columbia, SC . . .93/75/0.09 . . .93/75/t . . . .95/75/t Columbus, GA. . .92/78/0.14 . . .95/74/t . . . .96/74/t Columbus, OH. . .83/68/1.05 . . .86/68/t . . 91/71/pc Concord, NH . . . .92/64/0.00 . . .82/67/t . . . .81/66/t Corpus Christi. . .94/76/0.00 . 91/81/pc . . 91/80/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .94/80/0.00 . 96/78/pc . . 96/77/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .84/66/1.62 . . .84/67/t . . 90/71/pc Denver. . . . . . . . . .91/57/NA . . .97/64/s . . 93/61/pc Des Moines. . . . .82/69/0.20 . 87/73/pc . . . .92/70/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .84/69/0.24 . 86/69/pc . . 89/72/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .73/51/0.00 . 74/61/pc . . . .81/57/t El Paso. . . . . . . . .94/67/0.16 . 99/72/pc . 100/73/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .74/60/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . 68/49/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .81/63/t . . . .81/58/t Flagstaff . . . . . . .84/51/0.21 . . .86/56/t . . . .88/57/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .81/68/0.19 . 84/64/pc . . . 89/71/s Green Bay. . . . . .79/63/0.00 . 80/60/pc . . . .86/68/t Greensboro. . . . .84/73/0.24 . . .88/73/t . . . .90/72/t Harrisburg. . . . . .87/62/1.32 . . .85/71/t . . 91/71/sh Hartford, CT . . . .92/72/0.00 . . .85/73/t . . . .84/69/t Helena. . . . . . . . .88/55/0.00 . 71/47/pc . . 77/52/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .87/73/s . . . 89/74/s Houston . . . . . . .94/77/0.00 . 96/78/pc . . 96/77/pc Huntsville . . . . . .93/74/0.26 . . .88/72/t . . . .92/71/t Indianapolis . . . .87/69/0.00 . 85/70/pc . . . 89/72/s Jackson, MS . . . .92/77/0.00 . . .96/76/t . . 96/76/pc Madison, WI . . . .78/64/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . . .89/72/t Jacksonville. . . . .92/73/0.82 . . .94/77/t . . . .94/76/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .58/50/sh . . 56/49/sh Kansas City. . . . .85/68/0.00 . 89/74/pc . . 92/74/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .83/68/0.06 . 84/64/pc . . . 90/69/s Las Vegas . . . . .107/88/0.00 107/88/pc . 110/89/pc Lexington . . . . . .84/71/0.13 . . .85/69/t . . 89/73/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .80/68/0.17 . 92/74/pc . . . .94/69/t Little Rock. . . . . .96/78/0.06 . . .93/75/t . . 96/76/pc Los Angeles. . . . .68/61/0.00 . 71/63/pc . . 72/62/pc Louisville . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . . 92/76/s Memphis. . . . . . .93/72/3.75 . . .91/76/t . . . .96/78/t Miami . . . . . . . . .94/79/0.00 . . .92/81/t . . . .90/81/t Milwaukee . . . . .77/67/0.00 . 77/67/pc . . 87/73/pc Minneapolis . . . .79/61/0.00 . 85/73/pc . . . .87/63/t Nashville . . . . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .87/72/t . . 93/74/pc New Orleans. . . .93/77/0.00 . 94/80/pc . . 95/78/pc New York . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . . .84/73/t . . . .88/75/t Newark, NJ . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .84/73/t . . . .87/72/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . .89/75/t . . . .90/76/t Oklahoma City . .87/73/0.06 . 90/74/pc . . . 92/74/s Omaha . . . . . . . .79/66/0.26 . 90/74/pc . . . .93/68/t Orlando. . . . . . . .90/76/0.13 . . .95/77/t . . . .93/78/t Palm Springs. . .110/74/0.00 106/79/pc . 110/85/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . 85/68/pc . . . 90/73/s Philadelphia . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .85/75/t . . . .89/75/t Phoenix. . . . . . .107/87/0.00 109/90/pc . 112/92/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . 88/70/pc Portland, ME. . . .80/63/0.00 . 78/65/pc . . . .77/62/t Providence . . . . .87/70/0.00 . 86/72/pc . . . .84/69/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .87/74/0.00 . . .89/74/t . . . .91/73/t

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .82/53/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . . 78/56/s Savannah . . . . . .92/73/0.37 . . .92/77/t . . . .93/77/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .95/63/0.00 . 94/60/pc . . 95/60/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .67/54/0.00 . 70/56/pc . . 77/58/pc Richmond . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .89/73/t . . . .90/73/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .76/59/0.00 . 87/71/pc . . . .84/59/t Rochester, NY . . .87/65/0.00 . . .85/69/t . . . 87/69/s Spokane . . . . . . .78/59/0.00 . 73/48/pc . . . 82/53/s Sacramento. . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .89/59/s . . . 94/62/s Springfield, MO. .84/68/0.26 . . .89/73/t . . . 92/74/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . . .88/72/t . . 93/79/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .93/77/t . . . .92/76/t Salt Lake City . . .96/68/0.00 . 94/67/pc . . . 90/68/s Tucson. . . . . . . .101/77/0.00 104/78/pc . 107/84/pc San Antonio . . . .92/77/0.00 . 95/77/pc . . 96/77/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .90/74/0.54 . 90/74/pc . . 93/74/pc San Diego . . . . . .71/63/0.00 . 69/62/pc . . 69/65/pc Washington, DC .87/73/0.11 . . .87/76/t . . . .90/74/t San Francisco . . .65/56/0.00 . 66/53/pc . . 67/55/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .92/70/0.00 . . .95/75/s . . . 96/75/s San Jose . . . . . . .80/59/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . 83/59/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .80/58/0.00 . 81/52/pc . . . 88/57/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .94/56/0.00 . 94/60/pc . . 92/62/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .107/84/0.00 106/80/pc . 108/84/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .75/63/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . . .78/59/t Athens. . . . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .91/73/s . . . 90/70/s Auckland. . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . 55/43/pc . . 54/43/pc Baghdad . . . . .106/100/0.00 . .121/88/s . . 121/87/s Bangkok . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .97/77/t . . . .97/78/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .77/70/0.00 . . .88/70/t . . . .87/71/t Beirut. . . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . . .87/74/s . . . 88/75/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .99/70/0.00 . 84/62/pc . . 85/63/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . .65/50/t . . . .64/51/t Budapest. . . . . . .90/66/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . 90/70/pc Buenos Aires. . . .46/37/0.00 . .51/39/sh . . 50/40/sh Cabo San Lucas .93/77/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 87/75/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .93/73/0.00 . .101/70/s . . 100/71/s Calgary . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .57/52/r . . 72/50/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 85/75/pc . . . .86/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .60/55/sh . . 60/55/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .68/50/sh . . 61/46/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . . .89/68/t . . 88/69/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .71/47/sh . . 70/48/pc Hong Kong . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .90/85/t . . . .90/82/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .86/69/s . . 85/70/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .92/69/0.00 . . .92/69/s . . . 91/70/s Johannesburg . . 48/NA/0.00 . 55/35/pc . . 56/36/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .63/59/0.00 . 65/58/pc . . 66/59/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .82/60/s . . . 80/60/s London . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . .75/44/sh . . 74/45/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .97/72/0.00 . . .91/64/s . . . 90/65/s Manila. . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .94/78/t . . . .95/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .102/86/0.00 . .114/90/s . . 115/90/s Mexico City. . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .74/52/t . . . .72/51/t Montreal. . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . .84/69/sh . . 82/71/sh Moscow . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . 85/60/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . . .71/56/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/77/t New Delhi. . . . . .96/75/0.00 . .107/79/t . . .108/80/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .82/77/0.00 . . .74/69/t . . . .75/70/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .69/53/sh . . 68/55/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . . .78/60/t . . 84/60/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .82/62/sh . . 82/63/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .91/73/0.00 . . .80/63/t . . . .80/65/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . 91/66/pc . . . 90/65/s Santiago . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . . .52/30/s . . . 51/30/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .78/60/t . . . .77/60/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . 65/54/pc . . 66/55/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .87/70/t . . . .88/70/t Shanghai. . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . .88/74/t . . . .87/75/t Singapore . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .78/59/s . . 77/58/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .60/45/sh . . 62/44/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .97/82/0.00 . . .94/80/t . . . .95/80/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .94/70/s . . . 95/70/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .82/79/0.00 . . .85/74/t . . . .85/75/t Toronto . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . .82/68/sh . . . 84/68/s Vancouver. . . . . .68/57/0.00 . 69/57/pc . . 75/57/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . 93/66/pc . . 93/66/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . . .87/50/t . . 88/51/pc

FREE LIVE MUSIC | ARTS & CRAFTS | RESTAURANTS | KIDS’ ZONE

2010 PRESENTED BY THE BULLETIN & WHOLE FOODS MARKET

5:30 PM - 9:30 PM DRAKE PARK FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

2010 DRAKE PARK FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

Munch & Music Makers of History Shannon Ellis (Smartt) “Working for Cameron Clark Concert Productions and being involved in the Munch and Music Concert Series for over 10 years, not only gave me a start to my career as an event producer, but also gave me the life skills and aspirations to grow up in a world filled with music, art, and culture. After graduating from the University of Oregon and spending a year abroad in Cape Town South Africa, I now continue to work in the event production industry and consult with various companies around the world producing live shows and global media events. Munch and Music still remains one of my favorite events and is an incredible example of how music and art can inspire a sense of community.”

JULY 29

JULY 22

JULY 15 Jerri Jheto Reggae

Orgone Funk/Soul

Paula Cole Grammy Award-Winning Original Songwriter

AUGUST 12

AUGUST 5 Jah Sun and the Redemption Band Reggae/Hip Hop Infusion

Crazy 8’s Original - SKA- Rock- Reggae

THE MUNCH SUMI’S

A CREPE AFFAIR DEMETRI’S

TRAILS END BBQ

GOODY’S

OREGON DUTCH COOKIE CO.

FAMEOUS KETTLE CORN

SPORK

KEBABA

BURLYWURST

KEOKE

5 FUSION & SUSHI BAR

LONGBOARD LOUIE’S

CAMERON’S SMOKE SHACK

MITA’S ITALIAN ICE

CHICAGO STYLE HOT DOGS

PIZZA MONDO PHILLY STYLE

BRECK MORGAN CATERING

STUFF BANANAS

OLD FASHION FUNNEL CAKES

MOTORS

Matt York / The Associated Press

People cool off in the lazy river at the Arizona Grand Resort on Monday in Phoenix. Temperatures will reach past 110 this week throughout the Phoenix metro area.

For accommodations, please contact C3 Events, 541-389-0995.

www.c3events.com


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D

Golf Inside Tom Watson returns to the British Open with no regrets, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010

LOCAL GOLF Bend golfer in good position at Public Links Championship GREENSBORO, N.C. — Bend’s Andrew Vijarro is in position to advance into match play after Monday’s first round of the 85th U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. Vijarro shot an even-par 71 to finish the first round as part of a 12-way tie Andrew Vijarro for 17th place at Bryan Park Golf & Conference Center. The lowest 64 golfers after 36 holes of stroke play advance to single-elimination match play, which begins Wednesday and ends with Saturday’s 36-hole championship match. Vijarro, a former Bend High School golf standout and a junior-to-be with the University of Oregon men’s golf team, carded three birdies and three bogeys in Monday’s round. He was actually 1 under through his first 17 holes, but he bogeyed the 472-yard, par-4 18th hole to fall back to even par. Entering today’s play, the 20-year-old Vijarro trails leader Derek Ernst, a UNLV golfer from Clovis, Calif., by six strokes. The golfers in the 156player field for the Public Links, one of 13 national championships held by the United States Golf Association, are all bona fide publiccourse players from around the country and beyond. — Bulletin staff report

She’s back — this time riding for a cause HEATHER CLARK

T

he last time Lindsay Kandra was in Central Oregon, she was racing in the cyclocross national championships, which were held here last December. The 33-year-old Portland cyclist will be back in town this Saturday, but this

time she won’t be in the heart-pounding, leg-burning racing environment she encountered in her last appearance here. Just seven months after competing in the cyclocross nationals, Kandra returns to Bend under different circumstances. The Oregon native, who grew up in Klamath Falls, is set to participate in Saturday’s annual Tour des Chutes bike ride as a recent cancer survivor still in the throes of chemotherapy treatment after being diagnosed with breast cancer back in February. She will be joined by roughly 1,000 other riders — almost all of whom have

been directly or indirectly touched by cancer — in what has become one of Central Oregon’s largest cancer fundraisers and certainly its largest noncompetitive organized bike ride. In 2009, the Tour des Chutes raised some $87,000 for local and national cancer charities through corporate donations and rider entry fees. The event, which was created in 2005 by Bend resident Gary Bonacker, a cancer survivor who continues to battle the disease, offers cyclists the option of five ride distances: 7, 25, 48, 70 or 90 miles. Before her diagnosis in late Febru-

ary, Kandra had planned to make several race-related trips to Bend over the spring and summer, including for the Bend Don’t Brake event in May, and again for the criterium and time trial national championships that were held here last month. Those plans were quickly derailed, however, when a lump was discovered in Kandra’s breast. She underwent surgery to remove a tumor from her breast, as well as to remove two smaller tumors in her lymph nodes, and she has been undergoing chemotherapy treatments ever since. See Cause / D5

INSIDE Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

C YCLING Tour leaders look to pull away in week 2 Three riders have the inside track on winning the Tour de France, see Page D2

Randall Barna leads Dennis Oliphant as they glide along Elk Lake during King and Queen of the Lake, a stand-up paddle board race on Elk Lake Sunday morning.

On your feet and race The sport of stand-up paddle boarding has taken off events, including the races.” The SUP following, akin to surf culWhat’s up? You are — on a stand-up ture, has stuck on the dry High Desert. paddle board. Our slivers of open water and waterStand-up paddling (or as paddlers ways — rivers, and little lakes scatcall it for short: SUP) is spreading in tered throughout Central Oregon — are COMMUNITY dotted these days with stand-up padCentral Oregon, almost as fast as the popularity of inflatable rafts on the dlers. The inland growth of SUP is asSPORTS Deschutes River on a 90-degree day. tounding. A new stand-up paddle board “Stand-up paddling has exploded in storefront has opened on Industrial the last five years,” said Bob Jumper, a Way in Bend. Stand Up Paddle Flatwa59-year-old Bend resident who was participating ter/Bend, a stand-up sales company founded in Sunday in the new SUP race series at Elk Lake 2006, was purchased last month. Resort near Mount Bachelor. “I can remember Enthusiasts are not just riding stand-up padwhen we had six people out paddling, we thought dle boards, they are racing them. And Central we had something hot going. Now it’s really tak- Oregon is already host to multiple SUP racing en off and it was just a matter of time before there series. were enough people to start organizing some See Race / D6

By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Cadel Evans, of Australia, poses for photographers on the balcony of his hotel prior to training on the rest day of the Tour de France on Monday.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL First-round games added to tourney Eight teams will play in the opening week of the NCAA Tournament in a round called the “First Four”, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Cycling ......................................D2 Golf ............................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 College sports ...........................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Community Sports ................... D6

HORSE RACING

Crooked River Roundup starts on Wednesday By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

If it’s not broken, don’t fix it. Now in their 44th year, the Crooked River Roundup horse races, which start Wednesday night, are likely to look awfully similar to the popular races that over the years have drawn thousands upon thousands of wagering pony fans to Crook County Fairgrounds in Prineville. “It’s such a unique event and it does so well, there’s no need to change things,” says Bryan Iverson, the CRR’s vice president and promotions director. “Just like in the past, we plan on having a bunch of horses in a bunch of races.” Wednesday through Saturday, spectators age 18 and older will have the chance to bet on races. See Roundup / D5

Local SUP race opportunities King and Queen of the Lake When: Sundays, Aug. 15 and Sept. 26, 10:30 a.m. Where: Elk Lake Resort on Cascade Lakes Highway Contact: Randall Barna, 541389-4547 or randall@footform. com Cost: Free Naish Stand-up Paddleboarding Race When: Every Wednesday through August, 6-8 p.m. Where: Tumalo Creek Kayak &

Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6 in Bend Contact: Geoff Frank 541-317-9407 or geoff@tumalocreek.com Cost: Free Sunriver Resort SUP Champs Summer Race Series When: Sundays, July 18 through Aug. 22, 2:30-4 p.m. Where: Sunriver Resort Marina, River Road in Sunriver Contact: Alex at 541-593-3492 or marina@sunriver-resort.com Cost: Free

WCL BASEBALL

THE HOME RUN KING Boston Red Sox’s David Ortiz holds the trophy after winning baseball’s All-Star Home Run Derby Monday in Anaheim, Calif. Ortiz beat Hanley Ramirez for the title with 11 home runs in the final round. For a complete story, see Page D4. Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Bend struggles, falls to Kitsap Bulletin staff report Struggling at the plate for most of the night, the Bend Elks baseball team fell to the visiting Kitsap BlueJackets 4-1 on Monday at Vince Genna Stadium in Bend. Kitsap starter David Macey earned the win, holding Bend to one run and three hits over seven innings. The Elks’ Jacob Clem took the West Coast League loss, allowing two runs in 6 2⁄3 innings of work. The Elks (21-8 WCL) took an early 1-0 lead in the bottom of the second inning when Lucas Shaw hit an RBI single that scored Andy Hunter. That would be the only run of the night for Bend, though. The BlueJackets evened the score 1-1 in the top of the sixth when Chris Escobar scored on a fielder’s choice, and then took a 2-1 lead in the seventh off a solo home run by Paul Eshleman. Kitsap scored two more runs in the eighth inning to seal the win. Shaw, Chris Viegas and Garrett Queen were the only Bend batters to record a hit Monday. The Elks and the BlueJackets resume their three-game series today at 6:35 p.m.


D2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

CYCLING

CYCLING

TOUR DE FRANCE Standings (After eight stages) 1. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, 37 hours, 57 minutes, 9 seconds. 2. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, 20 seconds behind. 3. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, 1:01. 4. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, 1:03. 5. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, 1:10. 6. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, 1:11. 7. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, 1:45. 8. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, 2:14. 9. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, 2:15. 10. Michael Rogers, Australia, Team HTC-Columbia, 2:31. 11. Robert Gesink, Netherlands, Rabobank, 2:37. 12. Carlos Sastre, Spain, Cervelo Test Team, 2:40. 13. Ivan Basso, Italy, Liquigas-Doimo, 2:41. 14. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, 2:45. 15. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 3:05. 16. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, 3:11. 17. Joaquin Rodriguez, Spain, Katusha, 3:23. 18. Thomas Lovkvist, Sweden, Sky Pro Cycling, 3:30. 19. Rafael Valls Ferri, Spain, Footon-Servetto, 4:27. 20. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 5:03. Also 21. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, 5:39. 23. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, 6:33. 32. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick Step, 10:05. 39. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, 13:26. 40. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, 13:56. 59. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 27:40. 84. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, 41:15. 91. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, 42:20. 141. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, 58:25. 150. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, 1:01:30. 166. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 1:08:50. 172. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 1:14:15. 186. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 1:27:58. NEXT: Monday was a rest day. Stage 9 is today, a 127.1mile high-mountain ride in the Alps from MorzineAvoriaz to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne.

4 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 9, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — WNBA, Los Angeles Sparks at Tulsa Shock, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, All-Star Game, Fox.

SOCCER 6 p.m. — Women’s international, United States vs. Sweden, ESPN.

WEDNESDAY CYCLING 5 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 10, VS. network.

GOLF 7:30 a.m. — Champions Challenge, first round, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, All-Star Game, KICE-AM 940. 6:30 p.m. — WCL, Kitsap Blue Jackets at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 12:35 p.m. — WCL, Kitsap Blue Jackets at Bend Elks, KPOV-FM 106.7. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Basketball • Heat, Timberwolves finalize Beasley trade: The Timberwolves and Heat completed their trade that sends Michael Beasley to Minnesota for two second-round picks and cash considerations. The Heat made the move Monday to clear cap room to re-sign Dwyane Wade and bring in Chris Bosh and LeBron James. The trade also helped Miami to sign forward Udonis Haslem to a five-year deal on Monday. • Derek Fisher says he’s staying with Lakers: Although Derek Fisher thought about joining that burgeoning superteam in Miami, he’s staying in the Los Angeles Lakers’ own collection of stars. The veteran point guard said Monday he’ll re-sign with the Lakers, sticking with Kobe Bryant and the defending two-time NBA champions after speaking with several teams as a free agent. • Magic agree to deal with Richardson: A person familiar with the negotiations says the Orlando Magic have agreed to a deal with free agent Quentin Richardson. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the deal had not been officially announced. Terms of the contract were not immediately known. Richardson’s signing means the Magic are likely parting ways with free agent small forward Matt Barnes. They also have until Friday to decide if they want to match the $19 million, three-year offer Chicago made for restricted free agent J.J. Redick. • Spurs finally sign 2007 draft pick Splitter: The San Antonio Spurs have signed Tiago Splitter, three years after drafting the heralded big man from Spain. The 6-foot11 center has played in the Spanish League since being picked 28th overall by the Spurs in 2007. Bringing Splitter aboard was the main offseason target for San Antonio despite a loaded free agent market. • City, Pacers deal keeps team in Indianapolis: An Indiana Pacers official says the negotiations that led to a deal keeping the team at Conseco Fieldhouse for the next three seasons were the most difficult he’s ever been involved in. Pacers Sports and Entertainment president Jim Morris said Monday the team had hoped negotiations that began two years ago would lead to a 20- to 30-year agreement. But the parties could only agree on a 3-year deal under which the city will pay $10 million a year for three years to help run the 18,000-seat arena. The new agreement is an addition to the existing contract, which runs until 2019 and includes other fees if the Pacers decide to leave early.

Soccer • World Cup viewership on ABC/ESPN rises 41 percent: World Cup television viewership rose 41 percent over four years ago for English-language telecasts in the United States, with Spain’s 1-0 overtime victory over the Netherlands setting a record for a men’s soccer game. Sunday’s game in Johannesburg, which gave the Spanish their first World Cup title, was seen by 15,545,000 viewers on ABC, according to fast national ratings. The previous high was 14,863,000 viewers for the United States’ 2-1 overtime loss to Ghana in the second round on June 26.

Auto racing • NHRA driver dies from severe blunt force injuries: The King County Medical Examiner says an NHRA driver who crashed after crossing the finish line died of severe injuries to his head, neck and torso. Mark Niver, 60, of Phoenix, died Sunday at the NHRA Northwest Nationals. He was competing in the Top Alcohol dragster class in the NHRA Lucas Oil Drag Racing series. The parachutes on his car ripped away after they were deployed, and Niver couldn’t stop his dragster before it slammed into the protective netting at the end of the runway.

Tennis • Serena Williams cuts foot, will miss WTT season: Serena Williams will miss the entire World TeamTennis season after cutting her foot. The WTT said Monday she was to have played four matches for the Washington Kastles, but she hurt the bottom of her foot late last week and needed stitches. It was not clear how she was injured.

Hockey • Ducks sign veteran LW Josh Green: The Anaheim Ducks have signed veteran left wing Josh Green to a oneyear contract. Anaheim announced Monday that Green will return to North America after spending last season with Modo in the Swedish Elite League. The 32-year-old Green has played for eight NHL teams, scoring 74 points in 322 career games. The former Los Angeles draft pick was with the Vancouver Canucks from 2005-07. — From wire reports

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— WORLD TOUR MERCEDES CUP Monday Stuttgart, Germany Singles First Round Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, def. Victor Hanescu (8), Romania, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Mischa Zverev, Germany, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-3. SKISTAR SWEDISH OPEN Monday Bastad, Sweden Singles First Round Potito Starace, Italy, def. Florent Serra (8), France, 6-2, 6-2. Pere Riba, Spain, def. Peter Luczak, Australia, 4-6, 6-2, 7-6 (6). Andreas Vinciguerra, Sweden, def. Daniel Brands, Germany, 7-6 (6), 6-7 (5), 6-4. Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Filip Prpic, Sweden, 6-7 (7), 6-3, 6-4.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— ECM PRAGUE OPEN Monday Prague, Czech Republic Singles First Round Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 0-6, 7-5, 7-5. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-4.

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Monday’s results) ———

s-Ichiro Suzuki, Seattle, fan voting Nick Swisher, N.Y. Yankees, final man Vernon Wells, Toronto, player voting s-starter x-Pettitte replaces Buchholz; Buck replaces Martinez; Kinsler replaces Pedroia; Soriano replaces Rivera; Konerko replaces Morneau. y-Sunday starter, will not pitch z-injured, will not play

IN THE BLEACHERS

West Division W Bend Elks 21 Corvallis Knights 16 Bellingham Bells 19 Kitsap BlueJackets 15 Cowlitz Black Bears 5 East Division W Wenatchee AppleSox 14 Moses Lake Pirates 12 Kelowna Falcons 13 Walla Walla Sweets 8 ——— Monday’s Games Kitsap 4, Bend 1 Bellingham 4, Cowlitz 3 Today’s Games Kitsap at Bend, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Bellingham, 6:35 p.m. Kelowna at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m. Moses Lake at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m.

L 8 12 15 12 18

Pct. .724 .571 .559 .556 .217

L 11 12 17 18

Pct. .560 .500 .433 .308

Monday’s Summary ——— KITSAP 4, BEND 1 Kitsap 000 001 120 — 4 8 2 Bend 010 000 000 — 1 3 2 Macey, unknown (8), Kohorst (9) and Eshleman. Clem, Deaton (7), Lowden (8) and Ausbun. W — Macey. L — Clem. HR — Kitsap: Eshleman.

MLB STANDINGS ——— All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L New York 56 32 Tampa Bay 54 34 Boston 51 37 Toronto 44 45 Baltimore 29 59 Central Division W L Chicago 49 38 Detroit 48 38 Minnesota 46 42 Kansas City 39 49 Cleveland 34 54 West Division W L Texas 50 38 Los Angeles 47 44 Oakland 43 46 Seattle 35 53 ——— Today’s Game All-Star Game at Anaheim, CA, 5:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games No games scheduled NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division

Pct GB .636 — .614 2 .580 5 .494 12½ .330 27 Pct .563 .558 .523 .443 .386

GB — ½ 3½ 10½ 15½

Pct GB .568 — .516 4½ .483 7½ .398 15

W Atlanta New York Philadelphia Florida Washington

L Pct GB 52 36 .591 — 48 40 .545 4 47 40 .540 4½ 42 46 .477 10 39 50 .438 13½ Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 49 41 .544 — St. Louis 47 41 .534 1 Milwaukee 40 49 .449 8½ Chicago 39 50 .438 9½ Houston 36 53 .404 12½ Pittsburgh 30 58 .341 18 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 51 37 .580 — Colorado 49 39 .557 2 Los Angeles 49 39 .557 2 San Francisco 47 41 .534 4 Arizona 34 55 .382 17½ ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE ALL-STAR TEAM Pitchers Andrew Bailey, Oakland, Sunday starter replacement z-Clay Buchholz, Boston, player voting y-Trevor Cahill, Oakland, manager selection Fausto Carmona, Cleveland, manager selection Neftali Feliz, Texas, player voting Phil Hughes, N.Y. Yankees, player voting Cliff Lee, Texas, player voting Jon Lester, Boston, player voting x-Andy Pettitte, N.Y. Yankees, manager selection s-David Price, Tampa Bay, player voting z-Mariano Rivera, N.Y. Yankees, player voting y-CC Sabathia, N.Y. Yankees, manager selection Joakim Soria, Kansas City, manager selection x-Rafael Soriano, Tampa Bay, manager selection Matt Thornton, Chicago White Sox, manager selection Jose Valverde, Detroit, player voting Jason Verlander, Detroit, Sunday starter replacement y-Jered Weaver, L.A. Angels, manager selection, Sunday starter replacement Catchers x-John Buck, Toronto, player voting z-Victor Martinez, Boston, player voting s-Joe Mauer, Minnesota, fan voting Designated Hitter s-Vladimir Guerrero, Texas, fan voting David Ortiz, Boston, player voting Infielders Elvis Andrus, Texas, player voting z-Adrian Beltre, Boston, player voting s-Miguel Cabrera, Detroit, player voting s-Robinson Cano, N.Y. Yankees, fan voting s-Derek Jeter, N.Y. Yankees, fan voting x-Ian Kinsler, Texas, player voting x-Paul Konerko, Chicago White Sox, manager selection s-Evan Longoria, Tampa Bay, fan voting z-Justin Morneau, Minnesota, fan voting z-Dustin Pedroia, Boston, player voting Alex Rodriguez, N.Y. Yankees, manager selection Ty Wigginton, Baltimore, manager selection Outfielders Jose Bautista, Toronto, player voting s-Carl Crawford, Tampa Bay, fan voting s-Josh Hamilton, Texas, fan voting Torii Hunter, L.A. Angels, player voting

NATIONAL LEAGUE ALL-STAR TEAM Pitchers x-Heath Bell, San Diego, manager selection Jonathan Broxton, L.A. Dodgers, player voting Matt Capps, Washington, player voting Chris Carpenter, St. Louis, manager selection z-Yovani Gallardo, Milwaukee, manager selection Roy Halladay, Philadelphia, player voting Tim Hudson, Atlanta, manager selection Ubaldo Jimenez, Colorado, player voting Josh Johnson, Florida, player voting x-Hong-Chih Kuo, L.A. Dodgers, manager selection Tim Lincecum, San Francisco, player voting Evan Meek, Pittsburgh, manager selection Arthur Rhodes, Cincinnati, manager selection Adam Wainwright, St. Louis, player voting Brian Wilson, San Francisco, player voting Catchers Brian McCann, Atlanta, player voting s-Yadier Molina, St. Louis, fan voting Infielders x-Rafael Furcal, L.A. Dodgers, player voting Adrian Gonzalez, San Diego, player voting s-Ryan Howard, Philadelphia, manager selection Omar Infante, Atlanta, manager selection x-Brandon Phillips, Cincinnati, manager selection s-Martin Prado, Atlanta, player voting s-Albert Pujols, St. Louis, fan voting s-Hanley Ramirez, Florida, fan voting xz-Jose Reyes, N.Y. Mets, player voting Scott Rolen, Cincinnati, player voting z-Troy Tulowitzki, Colorado, player voting z-Chase Utley, Philadelphia, fan voting Joey Votto, Cincinnati, final man s-David Wright, N.Y. Mets, fan voting Outfielders Michael Bourn, Houston, manager selection s-Ryan Braun, Milwaukee, fan voting Marlon Byrd, Chicago Cubs, player voting s-Andre Ethier, L.A. Dodgers, fan voting s-Corey Hart, Milwaukee, player voting sz-Jason Heyward, Atlanta, fan voting Matt Holliday, St. Louis, player voting Chris Young, Arizona, manager selection s-starter x-Bell replaces Gallardo; Phillips replaces Utley; Reyes replaces Tulowitzki; Furcal replaces Reyes; Kuo replaces Heyward z-injured, will not play

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Columbus 8 2 4 28 20 12 New York 8 5 2 26 18 17 Toronto FC 6 4 4 22 17 15 Chicago 4 5 5 17 18 19 New England 4 9 2 14 15 26 Kansas City 3 8 3 12 11 19 D.C. 3 9 3 12 11 25 Philadelphia 3 8 2 11 16 25 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Los Angeles 11 2 3 36 25 7 Real Salt Lake 9 3 3 30 28 11 FC Dallas 5 2 7 22 17 13 Colorado 6 4 4 22 16 13 San Jose 6 4 4 22 18 16 Houston 5 7 4 19 21 22 Seattle 4 8 4 16 17 24 Chivas USA 4 9 2 14 17 21 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game Seattle FC at D.C. United, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 12:30 p.m. New York at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Kansas City at Colorado, 6 p.m. Sunday’s Game Los Angeles at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct Atlanta 14 5 .737 Washington 12 5 .706 Indiana 11 6 .647 Connecticut 10 8 .556

GB — 1 2 3½

New York Chicago

8 9 8 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Seattle 16 2 Phoenix 7 11 San Antonio 6 10 Minnesota 6 11 Los Angeles 4 13 Tulsa 3 14 ——— Monday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Game Los Angeles at Tulsa, 4 p.m.

.471 .421

5 6

Pct GB .889 — .389 9 .375 9 .353 9½ .235 11½ .176 12½

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Carolina League WINSTON-SALEM DASH—Announced RHP Tyson Corley has been assigned to the team from Charlotte (IL). American Association LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Sold the contract of C Shawn McGill to Atlanta (NL). Signed C Jeremy Gillan. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Released RHP Justin Robicheaux. SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS—Released LHP Chad Linder. Signed LHP Kedrick Martin and RHP Mark Haynes. SIOUX CITY EXPLORERS—Signed LHP Jamie Arneson. Released INF Thomas DiBenedetto. ST. PAUL SAINTS—Released OF Andrew Schmiesing and LHP Ashton Norris. WICHITA WINGNUTS—Traded RHP Doug Hurn to Fort Worth to complete an earlier trade. Signed RHP JR Boling and LHP David Jensen. Traded INF Michael L. Thompson to Quebec (Can-Am) for INF Mike Bell. Released RHP Clint McKeever. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Fined Cleveland owner Dan Gilbert $100,000 for inappropriate comments regarding Miami F LeBron James. MIAMI HEAT—Signed F Udonis Haslem to a five-year contract. MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES—Acquired F Michael Beasley from Miami for a 2011 and 2014 second-round draft picks and cash considerations. Signed C Darko Milicic, F Wesley Johnson and F Lazar Hayward. SAN ANTONIO SPURS—Signed C Tiago Splitter. FOOTBALL National Football League DETROIT LIONS—Agreed to terms with QB Shaun Hill. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed TE Andrew Quarless. NEW YORK JETS—Waived DT Simi Toeaina. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed CB Walter McFadden. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed TE Nate Byham to a four-year contract. TENNESSEE TITANS—Waived TE Gerald Harris and DE Jay Moore. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Agreed to terms with C Nick Dodge on a one-year contract. CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Named Mike Kitchen assistant coach. Re-signed assistant coach Mike Haviland. Matched San Jose’s contract offer to D Niklas Hjalmarsson. NEW YORK RANGERS—Agreed to terms with RW Jeremy Williams. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Re-signed D Shane O’Brien to a one-year contract and F Tanner Glass and F Alexandre Bolduc. Signed G Tyler Weiman. COLLEGE ARKANSAS—Announced WR Carlton Salters has left the team and to pursue a baseball career. BLACK HILLS STATE—Announced they are switching their athletic programs from the NAIA to NCAA Division II. HOLY CROSS—Named Zowie Tucker field hockey coach. NEW MEXICO STATE—Named Gerald Lewis men’s assistant basketball coach and Trei Steward men’s basketball strength and conditioning coach. SOUTH DAKOTA SCHOOL OF MINES AND TECHNOLOGY—Announced they are switching their athletic programs from the NAIA to NCAA Division II. TENNESSEE TECH—Named Stacey Franklin women’s assistant basketball coach. UAB—Named Walt Fuller and Mike Jaskulski men’s assistant basketball coaches.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,146 248 7,182 4,053 The Dalles 1,183 233 4,023 2,220 John Day 1,215 309 2,217 1,219 McNary 1,164 165 1,128 501 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 332,023 26,237 76548 36,849 The Dalles 260,945 22,275 38,577 20,177 John Day 240,356 21,803 25,074 12,008 McNary 207,582 15,105 14,595 5,887

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

Tou r d e Fran ce is shaping up to b e a 3-way scrap By Jerome Pugmire The Associated Press

MORZINE, France — The Tour de France is shaping up as a three-way race among leader Cadel Evans, of Australia, defending champion Alberto Contador, of Spain, and Andy Schleck, of Luxembourg. Evans leads Schleck by just 20 seconds after Schleck won the hardest stage so far on Sunday — a grueling Alpine trek where Lance Armstrong cracked. “Getting the yellow jersey at the Tour is always something special,” the 33-year-old Evans said on Monday’s rest day in Morzine. “To swap the (world champion’s) rainbow jersey for the yellow jersey is a rare feat that I’ve had the honor to experience.” With two-time Tour winner Contador short of his best form, Evans realizes he has a good chance to win. He slightly injured his left forearm in a minor crash Sunday. “The legs are still going, which is the important thing,” Evans said. “That is what the main concern is right now. It’s a little bit uncomfortable right now. Hopefully with a good night’s sleep, I should be all right. I’ll try to take it as easy as possible, and get as much physiotherapy as possible on my arm.” Contador trails by 61 seconds ahead of today’s ninth stage. The punishing Alpine route featuring two category 1 climbs, and a tougher one that is beyond classification: a mammoth 15.9-mile ride up the Col de la Madeleine, one of the Tour’s most formidable mountain passes. “It will be a really hard and complicated stage, and we should see

Christophe Ena / The Associated Press

New overall leader Cadel Evans, stage winner Andy Schleck and Alberto Contador, left to right, climb toward Morzine-Avoriaz during the eighth stage of the Tour de France cycling race on Sunday. the main contenders in the Madeleine,” Contador said Monday, adding that he welcomes more attacks from Schleck and others to increase the overall speed of the race. “Yes, it’s possible, but that would be good for me,” he said, speaking through an interpreter. “Maybe other riders will feel more confident and that will be good because then we have a stronger rhythm.” Meanwhile, Armstrong finished in 61st place in the eighth stage and is more than 13 minutes behind Evans. “He can’t come back from it ... especially against some of the best climbers in the world,” Armstrong’s former U.S. Postal teammate

Frankie Andreu said. It was a collective victory for all three Tour contenders to see the 38-year-old Armstrong plummet to 39th place overall. “Obviously the Tour’s finished for me,” Armstrong said after Sunday’s stage. “This time it was Contador, Evans and Schleck who decided to eliminate the threat,” Andreu said. “Armstrong’s always a threat, so they had to ride on the front to make sure he’s gone for good.” With British rider Bradley Wiggins also struggling — Wiggins was fourth on last year’s Tour, but is now 2:45 back in 14th — the path to the Paris podium on July 25 is clearing for the main contenders.

“That’s like a mission accomplished. So it’s one or two less guys to worry about,” Andreu said. “Wiggins got dropped, so it starts reducing the number of contenders.” Contador could not match Schleck’s hilltop acceleration on the final part of Sunday’s climb. Schleck said he saw Contador in “difficulty” for the first time and got a big morale boost by winning Stage 8. “Before, I have not seen him in difficulty yet, and I think yesterday he was,” Schleck said. “I was surprised he couldn’t follow, to be honest, because the day before I had a really strong impression of him.” Contador downplayed Schleck’s comments. “For me, he is still one the biggest favorites of this Tour de France,” Contador said. “You might think (what he said) affects my feelings, but it doesn’t change anything.” Schleck appears to be the more comfortable of the three main contenders, but faces a major disadvantage. Both Evans and Contador are much faster than him on time trials. Schleck, whose brother Frank was injured early on in the race and had to pull out because of a broken left collarbone, also has one less teammate to help him in the mountains. The 25-year-old Schleck knows he will have to be in the lead on July 24 for the final 32.2-mile time trial, if he is to stand a chance of winning the Tour. “The only thing I know is that I will need to be in yellow for the time trial,” he said. “I can’t say for now if I will need one minute or two minutes.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 D3

GOLF: BRITISH OPEN

COLLEGE SPORTS

Watson returns with no regrets

With expansion and contraction, neither league has the right number in its name

By Paul Newberry The Associated Press

ST. ANDREWS, Scotland — On a blustery afternoon at the Old Course, Tom Watson had more to do than just work on his shaky iron play heading into another British Open, the major he came achingly close to winning at the ripe ol’ age of 59. He posed for pictures. He doled out local knowledge. All with that impish grin of his. “St. Andrews is a place where people are just happy. They’re just happy to be here. The fans, the players, everyone. It’s a place that people truly enjoy,” Watson said Sunday, strolling off the 18th green after a practice round with pick-his-brain playing partners Brian Gay and Ben Crane. Well, it’s not quite so much fun the way the wind was whipping off the sea, the strongest gust clocked at just under 50 mph. But Watson can find the bright side in just about anything. “It was fun trying to test the golf course in this wind,” he said. “It was tough.” Of course, everyone wants to know: Can Watson pull off another turn-backthe-clock performance at the British Open? A year ago at Turnberry, he lost to Stewart Cink in a playoff after missing an 8-foot par putt on the 72nd hole that would have made him the oldest major champion in golf history. “Ask me Wednesday,” Watson said. “I don’t have my arsenal firing right now. My iron play is sketchy right now. I’ve got to see if I can get it honed down.” But there’s still time for that. With only a sprinkling of fans strolling around the birthplace of golf and many players still en route, Watson could take time to savor all that this course means to the game on a leisurely — if demanding — Sunday afternoon. “I still love to put my game to the test here. It’s a wonderful test of golf,” he said. “This is where people think of when they think of links golf. The first course that comes into your mind is St. Andrews.” Gay and Crane were sure soaking it all in — and trying to get all the inside information they could out of Watson, who’s playing in his seventh Open at St. Andrews. “I tried to pick his brain a little bit about pin positions and how to hit certain shots, what clubs to use,” Gay said. “This was my first go-round out here. It’s pretty overwhelming. There’s so much to try to figure out there. It just seems you can’t play it enough times.” As they walked away from No. 17, the hole that runs alongside the Old Course Hotel, Crane wanted to know what to use as a reference point for his tee shots. “I hit it over the ‘L’ of the hotel,” Crane said, referring to the prominent sign on the building. “I hit ’em over the ‘O,’ ” Watson countered. Gay was eager to get a picture, and Watson’s caddie suggested the perfect photo op after everyone teed off at No. 18 — the famous Swilcan Bridge, with the clubhouse in the background. Watson had no objections, climbing atop the stone structure to pose with Gay. “It was cool,” Gay said. “I’d never played with him before.” History is against Watson pulling off another performance like the one at Turnberry. Even though he’s America’s greatest links champion, having won the claret jug five times on five courses, the one Scottish layout where he’s failed to win is St. Andrews. He came close in 1984, losing on the final holes to Seve Ballesteros. The Spaniard, sadly, won’t be returning for one of the highlights of the week — the Champions Challenge,

By Stu Durando St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Peter Morrison / The Associated Press

Tom Watson on the 18th tee box at the Old Course, St Andrews, Scotland, Monday. The 150th British Open starts at St. Andrews, Scotland, on Thursday.

British Open tee times At The Old Course St. Andrews, Scotland All Times PDT a-amateur ——— Thursday (Wednesday night)-Friday 10:30 p.m.-3:41 a.m. — Paul Lawrie, Thomas Levet, Steve Marino 10:41 p.m.-3:52 a.m. — Loren Roberts, Mathew Goggin, Marcel Siem 10:52 p.m.-4:03 a.m. — Robert Rock, John Senden, Bill Haas 11:03 p.m.-4:14 a.m. — Simon Dyson, Jason Dufner, Soren Hansen 11:14 p.m.-4:25 a.m. — Todd Hamilton, Ryuichi Oda, Alexander Noren 11:25 p.m.-4:36 a.m. — John Daly, Andrew Coltart, Seung-yul Noh 11:36 p.m.-4:47 a.m. — Martin Laird, Nick Faldo, Soren Kjeldsen 11:47 p.m.-4:58 a.m. — David Duval, Ross McGowan, Trevor Immelman 11:58 p.m.-5:09 a.m. — Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano, Ryan Moore, Charl Schwartzel 12:09 a.m.-5:20 a.m. — Robert Allenby, Nick Watney, Oliver Wilson 12:20 a.m.-5:31 a.m. — Lucas Glover, Rory McIlroy, Tim Clark 12:31 a.m.-5:42 a.m. — Thomas Bjorn, Hunter Mahan, Shunsuke Sonoda 12:42 a.m.-5:53 a.m. — Ian Poulter, Ernie Els, Stewart Cink 12:58 a.m.-6:04 a.m. — Sean O’Hair, Yuta Ikeda, Ross Fisher 1:09 a.m.-6:15 a.m. — Tiger Woods, Justin Rose, Camilo Villegas 1:20 a.m.-6:26 a.m. — Padraig featuring past Open winners in a four-hole competition on Wednesday. Ballesteros, still recovering from a brain tumor, has been deemed not fit enough for travel, and perhaps for the emotional response he would surely have received. Watson will surely get a huge response if he somehow plays his way into contention again. But he knows the stars will have to align just right, and even that may not be enough on a course such as St. Andrews, with the daunting length of holes such as the 480-yard fourth.

Harrington, Ryo Ishikawa, Tom Watson 1:31 a.m.-6:37 a.m. — Henrik Stenson, a-Jin Jeong, Matt Kuchar 1:42 a.m.-6:48 a.m. — Jason Day, Chris Wood, Kenny Perry 1:53 a.m.-6:59 a.m. — Mike Weir, Darren Clarke, Davis Love III 2:04 a.m.-7:10 a.m. — Thongchai Jaidee, Fredrik Andersson Hed, J.B. Holmes 2:15 a.m.-7:21 a.m. — Mark O’Meara, a-Byeong-Hun An, Stephen Gallacher 2:26 a.m.-7:32 a.m. — Alejandro Canizares, Michael Sim, Gregory Havret 2:37 a.m.-7:43 a.m. — a-Zane Scotland, Tom Pernice Jr., a-Jamie Abbott 2:48 a.m.-7:54 a.m. — Bo Van Pelt, Phillip Archer, Ewan Porter 2:59 a.m.-8:05 a.m. — Cameron Percy, Tano Goya, Kyung-tae Kim 3:10 a.m.-8:16 a.m. — Mark F. Haastrup, a-Steven Tiley, Tom Whitehouse 3:41 a.m.-10:30 p.m. — Mark Calcavecchia, Peter Senior, Anders Hansen 3:52 a.m.-10:41 p.m. — Louis Oosthuizen, Jeff Overton, Colm Moriarty 4:03 a.m.-10:52 p.m. — Ignacio Garrido, Hirofumi Miyase, Shane Lowry 4:14 a.m.-11:03 p.m. — Tom Lehman, Kevin Na, Marc Leishman 4:25 a.m.-11:14 p.m. — Sandy Lyle, Bradley Dredge, Koumei Oda 4:36 a.m.-11:25 p.m. — Simon Khan, Vijay Singh, Scott Verplank 4:47 a.m.-11:36 p.m. — Luke Donald, Y.E. Yang, Ricky Barnes 4:58 a.m.-11:47 p.m. — Toru Taniguchi, Turnberry was certainly more favorable for a golfer getting by more on guile than brute strength. “It has to be just right,” Watson said. “The conditions have to be right. I have to be firing on all cylinders. That’s one thing I learned early in life. I didn’t have to fire on all cylinders to win. I could just think my way around the course early in my career and still win. But the older you get, the shorter you get.” One thing that won’t be weighing on Watson’s game this week: any lament about letting the claret jug slip

Robert Karlsson, Dustin Johnson 5:09 a.m.-11:58 p.m. — Alvaro Quiros, Jerry Kelly, Katsumasa Miyamoto 5:20 a.m.-12:09 a.m. — Peter Hanson, Francesco Molinari, Ben Curtis 5:31 a.m.-12:20 a.m. — Paul Casey, Angel Cabrera, Rickie Fowler 5:42 a.m.-12:31 a.m. — Miguel Angel Jimenez, Lee Westwood, Adam Scott 5:53 a.m.-12:42 a.m. — Jim Furyk, Graeme McDowell, Geoff Ogilvy 6:09 a.m.-12:58 a.m. — Hiroyuki Fujita, Steve Stricker, Sergio Garcia 6:20 a.m.-1:09 a.m. — Colin Montgomerie, Phil Mickelson, Retief Goosen 6:31 a.m.-1:20 a.m. — Rhys Davies, Edoardo Molinari, Justin Leonard 6:42 a.m.-1:31 a.m. — Zach Johnson, Martin Kaymer, a-Eric Chun 6:53 a.m.-1:42 a.m. — K.J. Choi, Bubba Watson, a-Victor Dubuisson 7:04 a.m.-1:53 a.m. — Ben Crane, Richard S. Johnson, Thomas Aiken 7:15 a.m.-2:04 a.m. — Jason Bohn, Kurt Barnes, a-Laurie Canter 7:26 a.m.-2:15 a.m. — Darren Fichardt, Jose Manual Lara, Heath Slocum 7:37 a.m.-2:26 a.m. — Paul Streeter, Brian Gay, Gareth Maybin 7:48 a.m.-2:37 a.m. — Tim Petrovic, Paul Goydos, Jean Hugo 7:59 a.m.-2:48 a.m. — Gary Clark, D.A. Points, Danny Chia 8:10 a.m.-2:59 a.m. — Glen Day, Josh Cunliffe, a-Tyrell Hatton 8:21 a.m.-3:10 a.m. — Jae-Bum Park, Geroge McNeill, Simon Edwards from his grasp at Turnberry. “Ohhh, that left me in about 24 hours,” he said, shrugging his shoulders. “There’s no regrets at all. I’ve played enough golf to have lost tournaments that I should have won, and I’ve won some tournaments that I should’ve lost. That’s my philosophy about it. There’s nothing I can do to bring it back. So there’s no regrets. No regrets at all. That’s how life is.” Not that he doesn’t appreciate what got away. Said Watson, “It would’ve made a great story.”

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

March Madness will include four first-round games By Cliff Brunt The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — March Madness is about to get a little bit bigger and perhaps it will be better, too. The NCAA unveiled its plans for the newly expanded 68-team men’s basketball tournament Monday: Beginning next March, eight teams will play early the opening week in a “First Four” round, with the winners advancing to games on Thursday or Friday. The NCAA decided against picking the lowest eight seeds. Instead, two of the early games will match the tournament’s lowest seeds, Nos. 65 through 68, with the winners advancing to play a top seed. The other two games will match the last four atlarge qualifiers. The format will probably prevent mid-majors from being over-represented in the first round, and it could also mean that two teams from big-

ger conferences — those generally seeded between 11th and 13th — will be out before the tournament really gets going. “You’re not going to come up with the perfect model,” committee chair Dan Guerrero said. “You’re not going to come up with a model that is going to appease every constituency out there. But we felt that this model provided the opportunity to do something special for the tournament.” The NCAA announced in April that it would add three teams to the field, the first expansion since the tournament went from 64 teams to 65 in 2001 after going from 48 to 64 in 1985. It was a hotly debated decision, with critics saying the tournament is already as close to perfect as any collegiate championship can be. Some pointed to Butler’s run to last season’s championship game and George Mason’s Final Four run in 2006 as ex-

amples of parity. The NCAA decided against a larger expansion to 80 or even 96 teams. It settled on 68 teams and its new 14year, $10.8 billion television package with CBS Sports and Turner Broadcasting not only ensures that every game will be televised but gives the NCAA sole authority to expand again. All four of the “First Four” games will be broadcast on Turner’s truTV cable channel. There has been only one early “play in” game since 2001, when the expansion to 65 teams essentially added a 34th at-large team. Now, there will be 31 automatic bids and 37 at-large bids. The at-large teams will be seeded where they would normally be placed in the bracket, meaning a first-round game between two No. 10 seeds would result in the winner advancing to play a No. 7 seed.

“I think some people are going to look at it and say it looks like a compromise,” said Laing Kennedy, a retired Kent State athletic director who is on the men’s basketball committee that developed the new format. “What we look at is that it really does preserve the integrity of the 31 automatic qualifiers.” Gene Smith, Ohio State’s athletic director and a member of the committee, said there was no consensus on a favored format from the NCAA membership and “we were a little surprised.” “It also made it a little more difficult to come out to where we were,” Smith said. “Where we ended up, we really feel good about.” Bernadette McGlade, the Atlantic 10 commissioner, called the final choice an “interesting approach” and said her members generally supported just having the bottom eight seeds slug it out to make the second round.

ST. LOUIS — During his first venture into the world of conference expansion, Jim Delany made a dangerous assumption. The Big Ten had added an 11th member, and the league’s new commissioner figured adjustments were necessary to signify the arrival of Penn State in 1990. “I just presumed we would be a different group, a different name,” Delany said. “I was going on that presumption and found out quickly the Big Ten was a name that carried a lot of meaning to a lot of people.” That issue has been raised again for not only the Big Ten, which was founded in 1896, but also the Big 12 and the Pac-10. They all must decide whether name brand is more important than accuracy after the first round of conference realignment left all a bit off kilter in terms of membership and monikers. To review: The Big Ten now has 12 schools, the Big 12 has 10, and the Pac-10 has 12. The potential for problems was created when the leagues opted to insert numbers in their names in the first place. Conference expansion has been a popular pastime for the last 20 years, and names have come and gone as many leagues, mostly of lesser prominence, have morphed into new animals. But the BCS conferences have more at stake. The Atlantic Coast Conference and Big East didn’t have to worry about such things in the mid-2000s when their numbers changed. Most assume the Big Ten will stand pat to retain more than a century of tradition. But will the Big 12, a mere teenager, consider alternatives? “Those are two different situations,” said Brett Boyle, associate professor of marketing at St. Louis University. “The Big 12 could probably get away with (changing) because in most people’s memories it’s been something other than the Big 12. The Big Ten brand name has too much value to let it go just to get the math right. They would give up that tradition.” There has been plenty of confusion between conference names and membership through the years, and it continues to be widespread — sometimes within a conference’s own walls. The Big 12 requests that the media not refer to the league in print as the “Big XII,” yet it maintains the Roman numeral as a prominent part of its logo. The Atlantic 10 has 14 members, giving it the biggest numeric discrepancy in the country. And geographic accuracy has never been a particularly important requirement. If it were, Chicago State wouldn’t be in the Great West, Louisiana Tech in the Western Athletic Conference, San Diego State in the Mountain West, or Marquette and DePaul in the Big East. Seemingly the only conference that covered its bases from the start was Conference USA, which was so named because of the wide geographic spread of its members. In 1990, the Big Ten opted to merely change its logo. Al Grivetti, who was a graduate student at Northern Illinois, incorporated the No. 11 into his now-famous design. “I also gave them a 12, a 13 and a 14,” he said. “It wasn’t particularly taken seriously, but I did it to show it could be done if needed. I firmly believe the Big Ten stands for the conference, not the number of schools.” The Big Ten is the oldest college conference in the country, having formed in 1896 as The Intercollegiate Conference of Faculty Representatives. That tongue twister was happily changed to Western Conference, and the league became firmly known as the Big Ten when Michigan State joined in 1950. The next opportunity to change came 40 years later, but tradition trumped the need to keep pace with membership. However, Dan Jenkins, the historian for the National Football Foundation, has a more cynical view. “I don’t think it makes much difference about tradition any longer,” he said in an e-mail interview. “The cast of characters don’t care about anything but TV and money. The Big Ten would call itself the Big Bank of America if it meant more money.” The Big Eight was willing to alter its name to Big 12 when it swallowed the old Southwestern Conference’s Texas schools in 1994. But the league was thinking about the future when it trademarked the name Big 14. Now, with the league moving in the other direction, conference commissioner Dan Beebe has been noncommittal about what might be in store. “I don’t want to give my indication now of what I think and then have my members say, ‘What the heck are you thinking about?’ ” Beebe said. “That will be something we have to fully consider as we go forward.” When the Big Ten added Nebraska several weeks ago, Delany said the matter would be addressed. “We haven’t had a discussion,” he said. “But there are a lot of people out there with computers who manipulate the name and numbers. I think it’s something we’ll have to figure out over the next few months.” The Pac-10 has undergone several changes through the years, starting as the Pacific Coast Conference and changing to Athletic Associates of Western Universities in 1959 and the Pacific 8 in 1968. When Arizona and Arizona State were added, it became the Pac-10. But a common prefix complicates matters for the Big Ten and Big 12. They are among six NCAA Division I leagues that start with “Big,” but the others didn’t plug a number into the name. “I could see both conferences staying the way they are because of the equity they’ve built up,” Big East associate commissioner Tom Odjakjian said. “It indicates who you are with less confusion. And then people can chuckle about how many schools they have.”


D4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E AGU E B A SEBA L L

Big Papi wins Home Run Derby Boston slugger David Ortiz beats Hanley Ramirez for his first title

By Janie McCauley The Associated Press

By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

ANAHEIM, Calif. — David Ortiz believes his power swing is all the way back, and now Boston’s beloved slugger has a trophy to prove it. The Red Sox slugger won his first Home Run Derby title Monday night, hitting 11 homers in the final round to beat Florida’s Hanley Ramirez at Angel Stadium. With plenty of spark in the powerful swing that once made him one of the majors’ most feared hitters, Big Papi put a relentless series of drives into the elevated stands above the right-field wall. Ortiz hit 21 homers in the first two rounds of his fourth derby before holding off Ramirez to emerge from a field missing most of baseball’s top power hitters. Ortiz triumphantly held up the trophy featuring two crossed bats. He dedicated his performance to former major league pitcher Jose Lima, a fellow Dominican Republic native who passed away in May after paramedics found him in cardiac arrest at his Southern California home. “I wanted to come here and make sure the fans enjoy what we do,” Ortiz said. Ramirez matched Ortiz’s 21 homers in the first two rounds, pulling most of his shots over the left-field wall. But Ortiz became just the second slugger to reach double digits in the final round, while Ramirez managed only five. Milwaukee’s Corey Hart and Detroit slugger Miguel Cabrera were eliminated in the second round, with Hart failing to connect after hitting 13 in the opening round. Ortiz finished with 13 in the second round after getting off to a fast start. With Yankees bench coach Tony Pena feeding fastballs straight into his wheelhouse, Ortiz coolly outslugged his younger

AL reign: Can NL win the All-Star game ever again?

Chris Carlson / The Associated Press

Boston Red Sox’s David Ortiz watches the flight of a home run during the first round of baseball’s AllStar Home Run Derby Monday in Anaheim, Calif. Ortiz won the event. competitors to win in his first derby appearance since 2006. He reached the semifinals that year and in 2005. He hadn’t been back in the field since — and Ortiz’s entire career was on the skids after he struggled in 2009 and again in April. Boston’s longtime star is back on his game with 18 homers and 57 RBIs this season, earning his sixth All-Star berth. “It’s good for him,” Ramirez said. “He’s been through a tough time. I know he’s going to come back in the second half.” Ortiz said Ramirez, another Dominican slugger, is “like a son to me.” The derby field wasn’t exactly a murderers’ row, featuring five first-time competitors and no returning champions. Ryan Howard, Albert Pujols, Alex Rodriguez and defending champion Prince Fielder all sat out. So did major league homers leader Jose Bautista, NL co-leaders Adam Dunn and Joey Votto, and Texas’ Josh Hamilton, who

hit 28 homers in a single round at Yankee Stadium two years ago. Still, eight sluggers took aim at the artificial rock pile, moss and trees behind the center-field wall at Angel Stadium, the longstanding Orange County park that underwent a thorough renovation in recent years. The Anaheim crowd booed Ortiz during pregame introductions, still remembering several years of postseason clashes between his Red Sox and the Los Angeles Angels. But Ortiz hadn’t homered at Angel Stadium since hitting a shot during the 2007 AL division series. Ortiz hit eight homers in the opening round, which included plateside delivery of a towel and a refreshing drink from laughing Tampa Bay closer Rafael Soriano. The outs counter on the outfield scoreboard stopped working during the second round — but Ortiz gave it a much-needed break. He barely missed a pitch while connecting on nine of his first 12 swings and hitting 13 overall.

Seventh-inning special: They are still belting out his 102-year-old hit By Mike Anton Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — During the seventh inning of today’s Major League Baseball All-Star Game, some 45,000 fans at Anaheim Stadium will engage in a mass display of Pavlovian conditioning as they stand, stretch and sing a few lines of a 102-year-old song written by a man few of them, if any, could name. Take me out to the ball game. Take me out with the crowd... And then they will sit down not knowing that Jack Norworth, the vaudeville songwriter who in 1908 penned the lyrics to what has long been the national anthem of baseball, is buried nearby at Melrose Abbey Memorial Park in Anaheim. Hardly anyone does. When Orange County author and baseball historian Chris Epting recently went to find Norworth’s grave, he was surprised the cemetery’s staff didn’t know they had more celebrities in residence than they realized. “They said, ‘Carolyn Jones from the (original) “Addams Family” is here,’ ” Epting said. “I have nothing against Carolyn Jones, but, c’mon, Jack Norworth wrote a classic. I guess it says a lot about the pecking order of pop culture.” What really bothered Epting, however, was Norworth’s gravestone. The flat granite marker didn’t note Norworth’s place in baseball history and was so badly worn you could barely read the man’s name. It didn’t speak well for a sport that cherishes tradition. “It’s a great piece of baseball history — of American history,” Epting said. “But it’s really in bad shape.” On Sunday, a new 5-foot-tall black granite monument was installed at the cemetery to honor Norworth’s contribution to baseball. Only Norworth doesn’t lie underneath it. It’s a long story — as is the story of how “Take Me Out to the Ball Game” became an American staple. Norworth had never seen a baseball game when he wrote the song’s lyrics. He was riding the subway in New York when he saw a billboard for the Polo Grounds, the legendary ballpark where San Francisco’s Giants once played. He pulled out a pencil and paper and dashed out the lyrics. The song was a big hit for the prolific Norworth, who followed it up later that

year with another: “Shine On, Harvest Moon.” Norworth didn’t see his first baseball game until 1940. And the first time he heard his song performed at a game was in 1958, when the Dodgers, newly arrived from Brooklyn, honored him at the Coliseum during the tune’s 50th anniversary. The makers of Cracker Jack presented him with a trophy. That the song is played at every professional baseball game is a relatively recent phenomenon. The Baseball Hall of Fame dates it to the mid-1970s, when Chicago White Sox owner Bill Veeck, ever the showman, encouraged announcer Harry Caray to serenade the crowd during the seventh-inning stretch. A tradition was born. Norworth died in 1959 at the age of 80. He was a longtime resident of Laguna Beach, where he founded the city’s Little League. Today, teams still compete for the Jack Norworth Trophy — the one he was given the year before his death. “I played Little League and I still love baseball. But I’m really a history fan,” said JP Myers, a 47-year-old blood courier from Diamond Bar who met Epting at a book signing and learned about Norworth’s grave. “His song is part of American culture. It’s right up there with Happy Birthday.” Myers went to see the faded headstone. “I thought, this is ridiculous. Something has to be done.” He created a Facebook page seeking support to erect a new monument to the all-but-forgotten Norworth. Maria and Charles Sotelo, who operate High Desert Monuments in Hesperia, heard about Myers’ effort and offered to make and donate a monument. “He created something that everybody knows,” Maria Sotelo said. “He really deserves something bigger than that little stone.” There was only one problem: The cemetery required that any changes to Norworth’s grave be approved by his family. But none could be found. So, with donations from two local businesses, an empty grave site was purchased for $5,000. Now, Norworth has a monument befitting his place in history. And, at some later date, some unfortunate soul will get a free grave. “It would be a shame to waste the space,” Sotelo said.

The two finalists did nearly all their damage by pulling their shots to their respective favorite sides, and Ortiz took control of the last round with consecutive homers on his first four swings. Ramirez couldn’t catch up, hitting three straight before ending it by making outs on six of his last seven swings. Hart highlighted the first round with six homers on his first eight swings. He had 11 on his first 15 whacks against Sandy Guerrero, the Nashville Sounds’ hitting coach. Ramirez hit nine homers in the opening round, followed by Ortiz’s eight. Cabrera edged out Matt Holliday with seven homers in the opening round. Nick Swisher hit four, Toronto’s Vernon Wells had two and Arizona’s Chris Young managed only one. The Yankees allowed Swisher to compete in his first derby, but wouldn’t allow second baseman Robinson Cano to take any cuts, saying they were worried about his injured back.

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ryan Howard is sick of all the talk about the American League’s dominance in the All-Star game. The Phillies slugger knows all too well it’s been 13 years of AL bragging rights. And, no, that wacky 7-7 tie in 2002 did little to boost NL morale in baseball’s Midsummer Classic. In this year of the pitcher, the National League is downright loaded, even for an AllStar game with the best of the best coming to Orange County tonight. “This should be the year for us to go out there and hopefully end this drought,” Howard said. “I’m getting tired of hearing about the American League winning and how long they’ve won, every year for the last 13 years or whatnot. Basically go out there and try to change it up.” There’s Colorado’s 15-game winner Ubaldo Jimenez starting at Angel Stadium. In the bullpen: Marlins ace Josh Johnson, Mr. perfect Roy Halladay and two-time reigning NL Cy Young Award winner Tim Lincecum. And so on. The AL run is one of the more perplexing streaks in sports. Is it simply a quirk, or evidence of true dominance? The American League has ruled interleague play for several years, and also done well in the World Series, winning four of the last six titles. You’d think the NL might have caught a break at some point in a span of more than a decade, just getting one ball to bounce its way. In 2008 at Yankee Stadium, the National League had 15 innings to make it happen and came up short. The previous year in San Francisco, a crazy ball off the wall gave Ichiro Suzuki the first inside-the-park home run in All-Star game history.

With a star-studded lineup of New York Yankees gathered in sunny, surf-crazed Southern California, even the Angels’ infamous rally monkey will probably be rooting for the AL if things are close late in the game. The last time the NL won was 1996, when the Milwaukee Brewers were still in the AL. Not that many remember the 6-0 NL victory at Philly’s old Veterans Stadium. “This will be Charlie’s second straight year to try to beat that stupid American League jinx,” Phillies chairman Bill Giles said of the Philadelphia and NL skipper, Charlie Manuel. “Charlie, your job’s on the line, man.” It was Giles’ father, Warren, the former National League president, who used to enter the NL clubhouse and give firedup speeches to help rally and ready his players for the AllStar game. CC Sabathia isn’t sure any of that stuff really matters much. “I can’t say it’s better players,” said the burly Yankees ace, who won’t pitch today. “It’s just one of those things. What is it, 13 years in a row? It’s pretty much luck I guess.” A new rule keeps Sabathia and other pitchers who started on Sunday from being on the active roster. Tampa Bay lefty David Price will start today for the AL. The NL players believe it’s their turn to finally turn the page on this decade-old drought. “We know everyone’s here to have a good time but at the same time our priority is to win the game,” Jimenez said. To do so, Jimenez and Co. must hold down an AL lineup featuring Josh Hamilton in the cleanup hole and Vladimir Guerrero batting fifth — with sluggers Alex Rodriguez and David Ortiz as backups for manager Joe Girardi. Still, with the likes of Albert Pujols and Howard on the NL side, it would look pretty even.

Debate of the best All-Star position players of all time is an ongoing one From A-Rod to Robinson, who are the best to play in the summer classic? By Jim Peltz Los Angeles Times

Pujols or Gehrig? Jeter or Ripken? A-Rod or Schmidt? There are baseball’s All-Stars, and then there are its superlative All-Stars, players not only the best of a generation but arguably the best who ever played their positions. That rarified group could include three players coming to Angel Stadium for this year’s All-Star game on today: first baseman Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals, shortstop Derek Jeter of the New York Yankees and third baseman Alex Rodriguez of the Yankees. Because baseball is nothing if not a rich source of debate about the legacy of its players, let’s ponder this: Do these three deserve to be the starters on an all-time All-Star team? Should Pujols play ahead of Hall of Famers Lou Gehrig or Jimmie Foxx at first base? Would you start Jeter instead of Honus Wagner or Cal Ripken Jr. at shortstop? Who plays third base, Rodriguez or Mike Schmidt — or Eddie Mathews or Brooks Robinson? There are caveats with comparisons, of course. For example, today’s players have access to far superior equipment and training regimens for better conditioning. Conversely, yesterday’s players didn’t face the parade of hard-throwing relief pitchers common today. And any discussion of Rodriguez must include his admission that he took steroids while playing for the Texas Rangers in 2001-03. With all that in mind, let’s start at first base. Gehrig was the “Iron Horse” of the Yankees for 17 seasons in the 1920s and ’30s, playing in what was then a record 2,130 consecutive games. With a career batting average of .340, Gehrig also hit .361 in seven World Series, twice was the American League’s most valuable player and won the league’s Triple Crown in 1934. But Pujols, 30, now in his 10th season, is a three-time National League MVP — including the last two years — with a career batting average of .332. “The Machine” also has hit 30 or more home runs in all nine of his full

seasons, and his fielding percentage at first base is .994. “Before he’s done (Pujols) will be the greatest first baseman of all time,” said Tim Kurkjian, a veteran reporter and television analyst. “You can make a case that nobody has had a more productive first 10 years than Pujols, not even (Joe) DiMaggio or (Ted) Williams.” Still, former DodgDerek Jeter ers manager Tom Lasorda stopped short of proclaiming Pujols the best ever. “Gil Hodges drove in over 100 runs for seven straight years,” Lasorda said of the Brooklyn Dodgers’ first baseman. Albert Pujols At shortstop, Jeter and Wagner might be top picks, but Lasorda said, “With the glove, I didn’t see anybody better than Ozzie Smith” of the Cardinals. Wagner, the Pittsburgh Pirates’ star at Alex the turn of the 20th Rodriguez century, had 3,420 career hits. Jeter, 36, has a .315 batting average in more than 2,200 games. The Yankees captain also has a .313 average in 28 postseason series and is closing in on 3,000 career hits. Experts also say there’s much more to Jeter than his numbers, including his consistency, leadership and clutch plays over 16 seasons. “I marvel at his baseball sense,” said Larry Bowa, the Dodgers’ third-base coach, a former Yankees coach and a shortstop in his playing days. “He’s always in the right place at the right time. You can’t teach that. His instincts are second to none.” In the end, Kurkjian goes with Wagner: “I’m not sure Derek Jeter could ever top Honus Wagner, who was the first real superstar in major league history.” The shortstop rankings might also

include Rodriguez, because he played the position for more than a decade before moving to third base when he joined the Yankees. In ranking Rodriguez at third base, he faces the Phillies’ Schmidt, who combined the offensive power of Mathews and George Brett with the Gold Glove skills of Robinson — all three of whom are in the Hall of Fame. Schmidt hit 548 home runs, was a three-time MVP and was named to 12 All-Star teams. Bowa gave the edge to Schmidt, predicting his former Phillies teammate would have generated even better numbers if he played in today’s smaller ballparks. Plus, Schmidt was “a great baserunner, (had) great instincts, great hands, great arm,” Bowa said. Kurkjian agreed that “Mike Schmidt is the best third baseman of all time, period.” And because Rodriguez, 34, switched to third base from shortstop, “he started too late” at that position “to beat out Mike Schmidt,” he said. And there’s another Yankees player who likely would make the all-time list and join this conversation if he were playing in this year’s All-Star game: closer Mariano Rivera, who was named to the All-Star team but won’t play so he can rest an injury. Trevor Hoffman of the Milwaukee Brewers holds the career saves record with 596. Rivera is second at 545. But Rivera has 39 saves in postseason play, which makes him the best reliever in history, said Dodgers Manager Joe Torre, who won four World Series managing Rivera and the Yankees. “His numbers in postseason are ridiculous,” Torre said. Finally, there’s Minnesota Twins catcher Joe Mauer, last year’s AL MVP and the All-Star game’s top vote-getter this year. With a batting average of .324 over his six-plus seasons, Mauer is increasingly being compared with Hall of Fame catchers Johnny Bench and Yogi Berra, each of whom played more than 16 seasons. Whether Mauer, too, stands the test of time is an open question. This much is certain: The debate over baseball’s best ever will last longer than any player’s career.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 D5

COGWILD SWAMPY SHUTTLE: Tuesday/Thursday shuttle, 5:30 p.m. from Cascade Lakes Brewery, 1441 S.W. Chandler Ave. off of Century Drive; current drop-off location is Swampy Sno-park; $10; reservations 541-385-7002: www.cogwild.com. COGWILD SUNRIVER SHUTTLE: Wednesdays, 3 p.m.; leaves from Cog Wild, 255 S.W. Century Drive; current drop-off location is Sunriver Mall; $10; to reserve seat, call 541385-7002; www.cogwild.com. COGWILD WEDNESDAY SWAMPY SHUTTLE: Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; leaves from the Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; current drop-off location is Swampy Sno-park; $10; call 541385-3062; www.cogwild.com. TOUR DES CHUTES: Multidistance cycling event to benefit cancer survivorship; lunch and post-ride party provided; fees vary; July 17; 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.; High Lakes Elementary, Bend; registration is required; 541-3856502; www.tourdeschutes.org. HIGH DESERT BMX RACES: Race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m.; helmet, long-sleeved shirt and pants required; oneday free membership and gear available; at Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Road; 541-8156208, www.highdesertbmx.org; renegade_sjane@hotmail.com. MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM: Session III continues through July 17; session IV starts July 29; 4:30-6 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. CASCADE CYCLING CLASSIC: July 20-25; professional and amateur cyclists from around the world will compete in Bend; hosted by Mt. Bachelor Sport Education Foundation; call 541-388-0002; e-mail mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION LITE CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Aug. 11, Tuesdays-Sundays, times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE DEVELOPMENT CYCLING: Professional coaching in cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; Sept. 20-Dec. 12; times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE/COG WILD MIGHTY BIKES: An introduction to the basics of mountain biking for ages 8-12; choose between cross-country mountain biking and freeride mountain biking; Tuesdays and Thursdays, through Aug. 27; cross-country meets 9-11 a.m.; freeride meets 4-6 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865 CENTRAL OREGON VELO RIDE: Saturdays, starting 9 a.m. at Nancy P’s in Bend; weekly group road rides; choose one of four routes, ranging in distance from 18 to 57 miles; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675; www.centraloregonvelo.com. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@ deschutesbrewery.com. BIG FAT TOUR: Registration open; for mountain bikers of all skill levels; a varying distances of mostly singletrack riding throughout different regions of the High Desert; Oct. 15-17; $25$139 depending on class, number of days, and day of registration; www.bendsbigfattour.org.

COWBOY ACTION SHOOTING: Pistols, rifles, shotguns; hosted by Horse Ridge Pistoleros at C.O.S.S.A. on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; on the first and third Sundays of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-9233000 or www.hrp-sass.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m. (set-up half hour before); beginner classes available every Wednesday, 5 p.m. from July 21-Aug. 11; cost for beginner classes $96; at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541318-0890; Sean at 267-614-6477, bendtabletennis@yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis.com. OUTDOOR BOOT CAMP CLASS: Six-week class starts July 9; Fridays, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; variety of equipment used including elastic bands, cones, and weighted balls to tone, shape; register at www.bendparksandrec. org; $36-48; 541-389-7665. WAKEBOARD AND WATER SKI CONTEST: July 17-18 at Lake Billy Chinook on the Crooked River Arm by the bridge; wakeboarding on July 17 and water-skiing on July 18; registration 7 a.m. each day; events start at 10 a.m.; $30 with T-shirt or $25 without T-shirt; all ages and skill levels welcome; Russ Brewer at 541-480-0410 or Aspect Wakeboards at 541-389-4667. SHOOTOUT AT HORSE RIDGE: Cowboy Action Shooting tournament; hosted by the Horse Ridge Pistoleros; July 23-25, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; public welcome; free; at Central Oregon Sports Shooting Association Range in Millican (at Milepost 24 on U.S. Highway 20 East); www.hrp-sass.com. BANKED TRACK ROLLER DERBY TRYOUTS: For Bend’s banked-track roller derby league; skaters and gaming officials needed; $7; July 29; 6-7:30 p.m.; register by July 28; 541410-5633; www.renegadesor.com. JR. ROLLER DERBY SUMMER CAMPS: For girls ages 9-17; Lava City Roller Dolls will teach team building, communication and how to roller skate; Mean Satine at sshinemoon@ gmail.com; $125; Aug. 9-12; 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each day. TRAIL HORSE 1: Aug. 14-15, Bend; introduction to trail; biomechanics, fundamental horsemanship, and groundwork skills required for controlling challenging situations with confidence; tips for competition showmanship at the entry level; Bent Wire Ranch; 541-388-1779; info@bentwireranch.com. TRAIL HORSE 2: Oct. 9-10 in Bend; learn intricate riding maneuvers needed for more advanced obstacles encountered in trail competitions or trail riding; gate opening made simple, navigating deep narrow ditches; introduction to water and diverse terrain, and more; Bent Wire Ranch; 541-388-1779; info@bentwireranch.com. YOGA FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 7-8 p.m.; Sundays, 6 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston; vinyasa yoga tailored for athletes to enhance their performance; $5; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY TEAM: 3-5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center, corner of Empire and High Desert, Bend; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com, 541-306-7364. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY PRACTICES: For men and women of all skill levels; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 6-9 p.m., Mondays and Wednesdays; first practice is free, $7 thereafter; skates available for beginners; nicholecp@hotmail.com or 415-3360142.; www.renegadesor.com. THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

HIKING

MULTISPORT

WILD WIMMIN ADVENTURE CLUB: For fit women ages 40-70; hike 3-7 miles with Kathi Seegraves, personal trainer; includes strength training and yoga during each hike, as well as fitness assessment and personal fitness program; next six-week session July 15Aug. 19; $90 for session, or $15 drop-in; 541-389-1678.

TRIATHLON TRAINING CLASS: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; six-week class is a progressive workout program and includes race week taper plan; offered Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. for cycle/run/core, and Sundays 3-4:30 p.m. for triathlon swim and core; starts July 14; register online at www.bendparksandrec. org; $150-$200; 541-389-7665. RUN/CYCLE/RUN & CORE FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; outside warm-up run, form work and drills, then indoor cycle/run intervals, then core work; $6.50 or current fitness pass; 541-389-7665; www.bendparksandrec.org. DESCHUTES DASH: This Saturday and Sunday in the Old Mill District,

Calendar Continued from D6

MISCELLANEOUS OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. and Sundays, 1- 4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

Roundup Continued from D1 (Fans under 18 are welcome to attend with an adult but are not allowed to gamble.) Tickets are $5 each night. One of five Oregon pari-mutuel races held outside of Portland this summer, the CRR is expected to have full fields of eight horses all four nights, with nine races scheduled for both Wednesday and Thursday and 10 races set for both Friday and Saturday.

Bend; Olympic- and sprint-distance triathlons and duathlons; 10K and 5K runs, Kid’s Splash ’n Dash (ages 39), and youth triathlon (ages 10-15); fees vary by race and increase after May 31; www.freshairsports.com; deschutesdash@freshairsports. com; 541-318-7388. MAC DASH: A sprint-distance triathlon and duathlon starting at the Madras Aquatic Center; Saturday, Sept. 11; free triathlon training will be offered each Saturday, 8 a.m. at the Madras Aquatic Center, July 17 through Sept. 4; race fees $35-45 until Aug. 14; www.roguemultisport.com.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE NORDIC SUMMER CAMPS: Aimed at systematically improving nordic technique, fitness, strength, and overall athletic preparation; camps are designed for relative beginners and seasoned veterans alike; ages 14-23; Trout Lake Camp, Trout Lake, Wash., July 21-25; Nor Cal Camp, Silver Lake, Calif., Aug. 18-22. Fee for each five-day camp is $200; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865.

PADDLING WOMEN’S STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING NIGHTS: Every Monday evening throughout the summer; meet at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe in Bend at 5:30 p.m.; board, paddle and PFD rented to participants at half-price ($20) for the twohour session; wear quick-drying clothes, hat and sunscreen; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. BASIC SKILLS KAYAK CLASSES: Saturdays through October 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. or 2-6 p.m.; four hour class will teach new paddlers basic skills through short lawn session discussing gear and safety, followed by three hours in the Deschutes River; $65; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. MOONLIGHT CANOE TOURS: July 21-27, Aug. 20-28, 8 p.m. to midnight; Sept. 18-19 and 23-25, 7-11 p.m; paddle around the mountain lakes; $65; transportation, canoe equipment, instruction, guides provided; ages 8 and older; www. wanderlusttours.com/summer/ mooncanoe.html; 541-389-8359. HALF-DAY CANOE AND KAYAK TRIPS: Available daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; guided by local naturalist guides; transportation, instruction, equipment and all food and drinks provided; $44-$65; 541-389-8359; www.wanderlusttours.com. FULL IMMERSION KIDS’ KAYAK CAMP WEEKENDS: Saturday and Sunday, July 24-25, Aug. 28-29; for ages 8-16; instructors will teach safety, paddle strokes, bracing, rescues and hydrology; two full days on the river; all gear provided; $175; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. FULL IMMERSION WHITEWATER KAYAK CLASS: Two-day sessions; July 10-11, Aug. 14-15, Sept. 11-12 or Oct. 9-10; meets all day each day; includes a pool session on one week night; for beginning whitewater paddlers; learn basic river running skills and all safety guidelines to get into the sport; gear provided; $225; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. STAND-UP PADDLEBOARDING RACE SERIES: Every Wednesday evening from 6-8 p.m. in July and August on the Deschutes River in Bend; a cumulative score will be used at the end of the series to send paddlers on to the championship race on Sept. 29 in Southern California; top three women and three men from each race series will qualify for the championships; www.tumalocreek.com; geoff@ aldercreek.com or 541-317-9407. YAKATAK KIDS KAYAK CAMP: For ages 8–16 to learn whitewater kayaking skills; Mondays-Thursdays, July 12–15 or Aug. 9–12; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursdays; bring lunch; all kayaking equipment is provided and the camp meets at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; $225; 541-3179407 or geoff@aldercreek.com. PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’: The last Wednesday of every month, next gathering on July 28; hosted by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe; free boat demonstrations on the Deschutes River from 4-7 p.m.; also live music at 7 p.m.; fundraiser for Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; www. tumalocreek.com; 541-317-9407. 30TH ANNUAL PIONEER CUP: Canoe and kayak 5-mile race, Saturday, July 31 at Odell Lake; registration from 8-10 a.m., race starts at 11 a.m. from Shelter Cove Resort.

RUNNING WEEKLY TRI TRACK AND HILL WORKOUTS: Thursdays, 6 p.m.; speed work at your own pace; intervals, pacing and more; $5; contact for location; joanne@inmotionbend.com. FLEET FEET’S 5K TRAINING:

“Last year we had roughly 320 (horses) on the grounds, and that’s what we’ve got capacity for,” says CRR treasurer and cochair of the races Doug Smith. “We’ve got the same number this year and a waiting list. ... We’ll have seven-plus horses every time the gate pops.” While the purse for each race will be at least $2,300, the highlight of the four-day event figures to be the Jack Rhoden Memorial race Saturday night, featuring a $16,000 payout. According to Smith, the total prize purse for the 2010 CRR race meet is $106,000.

Program designed for first-time 5K runners or longtime runners who need motivation; all ability levels welcome; Saturdays, 8:30 a.m., July 24-Sept. 11; $65-75; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/10k REGISTRATION FOR SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: Half Marathon scheduled for Saturday, July 10; 5K and 10K also offered; starts and finishes at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne; online registration at www.smithrockrace.com; also register at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave. BLOOD, SWEAT & CHEERS 5-MILE RUN/WALK: Saturday, July 24, 7:25 a.m. at American Red Cross, Twin Knolls Drive, Bend; 5-mile running race a fundraiser for the American Red Cross; dog friendly; $30-35; $22 students; day-of-race registration available or contact 541-749-4100; collinsjm@usa.redcross.org. TRAIL RUNNING 101: Program meets Sundays, 8 a.m., July 25Sept. 12; run on a variety of trails; participants may switch between a half marathon training group and a 10K training group throughout the program; informational meeting on Tuesday, July 20, 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Bend; $65-75; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com. CASCADE LAKES RELAY: July 30-31; running relay from Diamond Lake to Bend; registration is now open; walkers, runners and ultrarunners are welcome; www. cascadelakesrelay.com. FOOTZONE LEARN TO RUN PROGRAM: Train for the Dirty 2nd Half or Bigfoot 10K; starts Aug. 7; meets Saturdays; informational meeting Wednesday, July 28, 6 p.m. at FootZone in downtown Bend; registration forms available July 1; 541-317-3568; www. footzonebend.com; Connie Austin at conzaustin@gmail.com. HAULIN’ ASPEN FULL AND HALF TRAIL MARATHON: Aug. 8 in Shevlin Park, Bend; $60 for marathon; $35 for half-marathon; fees increase on July 15; www.freshairsports.com. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER RUNS: 10K, 5K and Family Adventure Walk on Saturday, Aug. 14 at 8 a.m., walk at 10 a.m.; 10K and 5K are USATF sanctioned and certified; runs begin and end at The Village at Sunriver and follow the bike paths through Sunriver; a benefit for Sunriver Nature Center and Observatory; registration forms available at Footzone in downtown Bend or at www.sunrivernaturecenter. org; 541-593-4442. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet, 1320 Galveston Ave., Bend; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; local running star Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; run up to seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; three to five miles. Two groups; one pace is 10-plus-minute miles, other is 8- to 9-minuteper-mile pace; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone, 845 Wall St., Bend. Personal trainer Kyle Will of Will Race Performance will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injury; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles at slower pace; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SKIING MBSEF ALPINE HIGH SCHOOL SKI CAMP: At Mt. Hood will be held Aug. 2-6; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SOCCER

“Like everything involved in the state of Oregon and gambling across the nation, it’s down a bit,” Smith says of this year’s prize purse. “But it’s not hurting us as much. Our bottom purse of $2,300 is still higher than the other state races, which have a low purse of $1,800. That just shows the success of our race meet.” The fairgrounds open at 6 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, and racing each night is scheduled to begin at 7:15. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-3830305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

MIDDLE SCHOOL & HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER CAMP: For girls entering grades 7-12; led by Oregon Youth Soccer Association technical director Mike Smith; soccer training, conditioning, and game play; Aug. 16, 2-4 p.m. and Aug. 17-19, 10 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m., and Aug. 20, 10 a.m.-noon; all sessions are held at Mountain View High School; $60; download registration form at http://cougargirlssoccer. webs.com/campflyer.pdf. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; Coed from 6-8 p.m., Men’s 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com. ADULT/YOUTH FUTSAL: Futsal open play is for youth and adults to sharpen their foot skills and ball control; $5; every Sunday, 10 a.m. to noon; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL BASICS OF FASTPITCH SOFTBALL PITCHING: Hosted by Central Oregon Pitching Club; local coaches and high school pitchers will be on hand to develop the basic skills necessary for this position; July 14, 21, 28 and Aug. 4, 7-8 p.m. at Mountain View High School softball field; $25; campers must provide their own catcher; Mike Carpenter 541-771-3209 or mike. carpenter@bend.k12.or.us.

SWIMMING SWIM WITHOUT FEAR: Designed for adults who have never learned to swim; July 31-Aug. 28; class on Saturdays, 9:20-10 a.m.; register online at www.bendparksandrec. org; $33; 541-389-7665. WATER POLO INSTRUCTIONAL LEAGUE: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center; for grades 6-8 and grades 9-12; learn individual skills, teamwork; Tuesday and Thursday evenings; grades 6-8 from 5:30-7 p.m. and grades 9-12 meet 6:45-8 p.m.; through Aug. 12; $80-108; www. bendparksandrec.org to register. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER SWIM LESSONS: July and August registration still open; a variety of times and levels offered for age 6 months to adults; Juniper, 800 N.E. Sixth Street, Bend; www.juniperswimandfitness. com; 541-389-7665. WATERBABIES AND CHILD SWIM LESSONS: Age 6 months to 11 years; basic water skills; waterbabies designed for infants and toddlers; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; dates, times and cost vary; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. RAPRD FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:05 to 8:20 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone 18 and younger; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

TENNIS ADULT TENNIS CLINICS: For levels 2.5-3.5; Mondays 9-10:30 a.m.; Saturdays 10-11:30 a.m.; $12; at West Bend Tennis Center 1355 W. Commerce (off Century Drive) 541-330-2112; reservations online at www.reservemycourt.com. TENNIS CARDIO CLASS: Thursdays, 9-10 a.m.; $10; at West Bend Tennis Center 1355 W. Commerce (off Century Drive) 541-330-2112; reservations online at www.reservemycourt.com. TAB TENNIS TOURNAMENT: 12th annual Women’s doubles tennis tournament for charity; proceeds benefit Bend’s high school tennis teams; registration form at www. bendgolfclub.com; $45; today, 7:45 a.m. to 2 p.m.; registration required by Wednesday; 541 3305743; www.bendgolfclub.com. WEST BEND TENNIS CENTER OPEN COURT: Three indoor tennis courts open to the public; 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Drive); reservations encouraged; $16-$20 per hour per court; 541-330-2112; http://reservemycourt.com.

VOLLEYBALL SUMMIT VOLLEYBALL SUMMER CLINICS: For middle school students who will eventually attend Summit High School; technique and skillbuilding and scrimmaging; July 19 or 22, or Aug. 16 or 19, 5-7 p.m. at Summit High main gym; $5; jill@bendbroadband.com. YOUTH VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; $5; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ADULT VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-10:30 p.m.; $5 www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183.

2010 Crooked River Roundup horse races When: Wednesday-Saturday, 7:15 each night Where: Crook County Fairgrounds, Prineville What: Pari-mutuel betting on horse races Admission: $5 Note: Wednesday is Ladies Night; all women get into the races free.

If you go What: Tour des Chutes, an annual multidistance fundraiser bike ride that benefits local and national cancer charities When: This Saturday; start times range from 7 a.m. to 9:20 a.m., depending on ride distance Where: Starts and finishes at High Lakes Elementary School, 2500 N.W. High Lakes Loop, Bend Cost: $55 for adults; $25 for youth ages 15 and younger. Register online at www. tourdeschutes.org, or at Sunnyside Sports in Bend from 4 to 7 p.m. on Thursday or from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Friday

Cause Continued from D1 “It was a crazy-short process of going from being a bike racer to a cancer patient,” she recalls. “That was overwhelming.” Though she had raced cyclocross for several seasons and was active in racing triathlons, Kandra, a lawyer and daily bike commuter, turned her attention to road racing at the beginning of last year — and she found great success. The fierce competitor rapidly emerged from the Category 4 (beginner) ranks and went on to win the next two races she entered as a Category 3. By the time cyclocross season rolled around in the fall, Kandra was again up for the challenge: She won the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association’s state cyclocross championship in the women’s B category, and later she was elevated to the highest level of ’cross racing in Oregon for women. She began the 2010 with high hopes, placing strong at earlyseason races despite little training, she recalls. “There’s something about biking and the freedom it allows,” she explains. “Racing was a natural extension of lifestyle choices I already made, and it turned out that I was a good bike racer. When you finally realize you’re good at something, you just get into it. I didn’t expect to become a hard-core bike racer, but it felt really good to be in a sport where I could win. “For an amateur athlete, that’s kind of cool.” These days, Kandra often struggles to ride her bike for even an hour at a time. But she insists that participating in the Tour des Chutes is an important personal goal. With her boyfriend, she will attempt to tackle the 48-mile route on Saturday but may opt for a shorter loop, depending on how she feels. The Tour des Chutes is also a kind of light at the end of the tunnel for Kandra — her last chemo treatment is scheduled for three days after the ride. “I set some cycling events as landmarks to motivate myself to ride,” says Kandra, who is also scheduled to participate in Cycle Oregon, the annual weeklong bicycle tour of the state, starting the day following her last planned radiation treatment in September. “As treatments have gone on, it’s getting harder and harder to motivate myself. The Tour des Chutes is one of those landmarks — despite (the cancer) and I’m still in chemo, I can still do this. “It also motivated my parents,” she continues. “They both have been riding their bikes and are doing the seven-mile ride (on Saturday). It’s turned into a family event to support me and the experiences I’ve gone through. It’s to prove to myself and to whoever else cares that you can go through all this and still get out there and ride and live.” Money raised by Saturday’s Tour des Chutes supports two charities: the local St. Charles Cancer Survivorship Program, and the national Lance Armstrong Foundation — which was, of course, founded by cycling’s most famous cancer survivor. Sapped of energy and devoid of hair because of her cancer treatments, Kandra certainly may not appear at the Tour des Chutes like the cyclist she was at nationals just seven months ago. But she expects that, both on Saturday and in the months ahead, Bend will play an important role in her recovery. “I’ll probably come to Bend and race at ’cross nationals again,” she says. “I love the community, and it’s fun. I’ve also got this goal of doing master (road) nationals in Bend next year.” Riders can still register for Saturday’s Tour des Chutes, which starts and finishes at High Lakes Elementary School in Bend. Online registration, plus ride details and maps, are available at www. tourdeschutes.org. Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com


C O M M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Ride Continued from D1 “We started a race series last year in Hood River and then it expanded really quickly to (other areas throughout the United States and Canada),â€? said Matt Willett, who works for Naish, a board-sports manufacturer. Willett has helped organize two new stand-up paddle board race series in Central Oregon — one in Bend and one in Sunriver, both staged on the Deschutes River. “This year,â€? Willett continued, “with the growth of stand-up exploding exponentially, we decided to make the (nationwide) series even bigger and better if we could. ‌ Now we have 25 (race series) throughout North America.â€? The Bend series, hosted by Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, started last Wednesday and will continue for seven more weeks. Nearly 30 paddlers turned out for the first night of racing on the stretch of the Deschutes through the Old Mill District. Among the winners was Bend resident Gerry Lopez, a worldrenowned surfer and a board shaper. Tumalo Creek’s and Sunriver Resort’s stand-up race series are championship qualifiers. Cumulative scores will be used at the end of the series to send paddlers on to the championship race in Southern California on Sept. 29. The top three

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin. com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin. com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL ADVANCED SUMMER CAMP: For 12U and 14U baseball players; 30 hours of organized workouts are planned with Bend Elks Baseball Club coaches and Elks college players; eight hours per week, two hours each day, four consecutive days at Vince Genna Stadium and the Fieldhouse; fourth session July 16, 17, 18; www.bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL NNU WOMEN’S BASKETBALL CLINIC: For girls grades 8-12; Wednesday and Thursday, July 14-15, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. both days at La Pine High School; individual development with Northwest Nazarene University coaches; 10 hours of on-court instruction; bring a lunch; $65; checks to NNU Women’s Basketball; 208-467-8451. PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS SUMMER CLINIC: For ages 7-14; at Sky View Middle School in Bend; July 16, 1-3 p.m.; participants will learn the basics: dribbling, passing, shooting, rebounding and defense; led by Adrian Stelly, the Portland Trail Blazers basketball outreach coordinator, along with Trail Blazers staff and alumni; free; preregistration required; register at www.bendparksandrec.org or at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St.; Rich at 541-706-6126. TRINITY YOUTH HOOP CAMP: For grades 3-8; Trinity School; July 19-22; morning and evening sessions; $65-88; 541-389-7275; https://register.bendparksandrec.org. COBO ADVANCED PLAYER CAMP: For ages 9-14; at Mountain View High School; Aug. 9-12; $94-127; 541-389-7275; https://register. bendparksandrec.org.

BIKING TRINITY BIKES WEEKLY SHOP RIDES: Mondays, road rides; 1 1⠄2 hour ride; meet at Trinity Bikes in Redmond at 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, mountain bike rides; moderate 1 1/2 to 2 hour ride at Sisters Trail or Phil’s Trail; meet at shop at 6 p.m., will carpool to trails; www.trinitybikes.com.

and Queen series is a windsurfing race. “When you have an event, you push yourself beyond your regular recreational limits,â€? said Barna. “You learn and you get strong and you see what other people are doing. It’s really a super-good reason to come out and participate.â€? Bend’s Dennis Oliphant, who raced Sunday at Elk Lake, believes the surge in the popularity of stand-up paddling will continue. “Who knows where it’s going to end?â€? said Oliphant, 56. “And the racing has just now taken off.â€? All of the SUP races in Central Oregon offer different competition categories, depending on the length of the paddle board. The longer the board, the faster it is in the water. While a number of the SUP participants in the various races this past week were out to be the fastest, they all said they were enjoying the views ‌ and, the rolling riding. “I’ve raced a lot of different types of sports,â€? said Oliphant. “This is really cool. I think the low-key nature, too, is kind of nice. And you can go hammer your brains out for 45 minutes in a race, it’s kind of funny ‌ but you don’t feel totally trashed.â€?

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Competitors paddle quickly from the starting area during the King and Queen of the Lake race series on Elk Lake Sunday morning. This is one of three stand-up paddling race opportunities in the area this summer. The Elk Lake series is open to any watercraft that can be paddled. women and top three men from each race series will qualify for the championships. Sunriver Resort Marina’s sixweek series started Sunday and attracted 10 riders. Tom Hamilton, manager of Sunriver Resort Marina, said he expects participation in his SUP series to increase throughout the summer. A third local SUP race series

is under way at Elk Lake Resort: the King and Queen of the Lake, a three-race series that started Sunday. “I’ve raced on Elk Lake since the (19)70s, starting with sailboats, then we’ve done windsurfing races,� said Randall Barna, the King and Queen race director. “I’ve been race director and coordinated those races since the ’80s. When I got really

involved in stand-up paddling, it just seem like a natural that we host paddle races.� About 20 participants paddled against some shifty winds on Sunday morning at sunny Elk Lake. The paddle racing series is open to any watercraft that can be paddled, including solo outriggers, surf skis, kayaks and — of course — paddle boards. Also part of the King

Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD TRACK & FIELD STATE GAMES OF OREGON Saturday, July 10 In Gresham ——— 3,000m Steeplechase; Men 30-34 1, Josh Davis, 12:12.87 Javelin; Women 50-54 2, Allison McCormick, 25.68 Men 55-59 3, Steven Banton 41.48 3,000m Walk, Women 40-44 2, Susan Bale, Redmond, 20:23.09 Men 55-59 4, Rodney Hanson, 20:17.85 Shot Put; Men 55-59 1, Steven Banton, 41.2

Girls 13-14 4 X 100 Relay 1, Megan Buzzas; Jenny Velasquez; Briana Katter; Marina Johannesen, Bend, 57.19 Boys 13-14 4 X 100 Relay 1, Connor Gellings; Ty Sahlberg; Keegan Bloss; Shane Cormalis, Bend, 54.95

BASEBALL

HERSHEY’S TRACK & FIELD GAMES OREGON STATE FINAL Saturday, July 10 At Hayward Field in Eugene Girls 13-14 1600 Meter Run 1, Abigail Lange, Bend, 5:30.23 Boys 13-14 1600 Meter Run 1, Dakota Thornton, Bend, 5:03.18 Girls 9-10 Standing Long Jump 2, Cambree Scott, Bend, 6:04.50 Boys 9-10 Standing Long Jump 2, James Otto, Bend, 6:07.50 Boys 9-10 Softball Throw 2, Carson Pies, Bend, 119:01.00 Girls 9-10 50 Meter Dash 4, Taylyn Hadley, Bend, 7.91 Boys 9-10 50 Meter Dash 7, James Otto, Bend, 8.01 Girls 11-12 800 Meter Run 1, Emma Stevenson, Bend, 2:36.85 Boys 11-12 800 Meter Run 4, Brayden Durfee, Bend, 2:33.86 Girls 13-14 800 Meter Run 2, Jessica Cornett, Bend, 2:40.83 Boys 13-14 800 Meter Run 1, Dakota Thornton, Bend, 2:20.91 Boys 9-10 100 Meter Dash 9, James Otto, Bend, 16.56, Girls 11-12 100 Meter Dash 1, Michaela Miller, Bend, 13.99 Girls 11-12 Standing Long Jump 2, Michaela Miller, Bend, 7:03.00 Boys 11-12 Standing Long Jump 2, Samuel Buzzas, Bend, 7:03.75 Girls 11-12 Softball Throw 6, Megan Cornett, Bend, 93:03.00 Boys 11-12 Softball Throw 3, Michael Irwin, Bend, 142:09.00 Girls 13-14 100 Meter Dash 2, Megan Buzzas, Bend, 13.42, Boys 13-14 100 Meter Dash 2, Cody Maguire, Bend, 12.58, Boys 9-10 200 Meter Dash 2, Peyton Sventek, Bend, 33.23, Girls 11-12 200 Meter Dash 1, Sofia Ellington, Bend, 29.43, Boys 11-12 200 Meter Dash 1, Michael Irwin, Bend, 28.40, Girls 13-14 200 Meter Dash 2, Cody Maguire, Bend, 26.29 Boys 13-14 200 Meter Dash 2, Cody Maguire, Bend, 26.29 Girls 13-14 Standing Long Jump 3, Alexa Thomas, Bend, 7:03.00 Boys 13-14 Standing Long Jump 4, Isaak Kanzig, Bend, 7:01.50 Girls 13-14 Softball Throw 3, Madeline Wettig, Bend, 137:08.00 Girls 9-10 400 Meter Dash 1, Kylie Haidet, Bend, 1:17.42 Boys 9-10 400 Meter Dash 1, Henry Rogers, Bend, 1:11.83 Girls 11-12 400 Meter Dash 1, Michaela Miller, Bend, 1:08.54 Boys 11-12 400 Meter Dash 1, Samual Buzzas, Bend, 1:07.12 Girls 11-12 4 X 100 Relay 6, Rebecca Christensen; Anna Popp; Riley Oleson; Izzy Barrett, Bend, 1:07.11 Boys 11-12 4 X 100 Relay 2, Brayden Durfee; Dawson Ruhl; Tucker Duggan; Cole Chrisman, Bend, 1:02.49

DESCHUTES NABA BASEBALL Scores July 5-11 Trojans 4, Desert Reds 3 Trojans 8, Slammers 7 Desert Reds 5, Met Life 3 Trojans 8, Legends 7 Slammers 9, Knights 7 Desert Reds 10, Slammers 1 Trojans 6, Lumbermen 2 Standings W Trojans 9 Desert Reds 8 Lumbermen 6 Met Life 5 Legends 3 Slammers 2 Knights 0

4 5 6 6 9 10 10

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

L 0 2 6 7 8 9 10 10

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Chinburg. 7, Sarah Tisdale. 8, Jessica Kaplan. 9, Sheila Raff. 10, Cary Steinman. 11, Helen Grogan. 12, Kim Rueter. 13, Joanne Schmitz. Women Cat 4 — 1, Brianna Walle. 2, Erica Loder. 3, Amy Champion. 4, Ann Kennedy. 5, Tonya Roe. 6, Tawnie McDonald. 7, Erin Goodall. 8, Stephanie Howe. 9, Jennifer Schweitzer. 10, Eryn Barker. 11, Shawna Palanuk. 12, Lillian Schiavo. 13, Katy Pranian. 14, Courtney Gould. 15, Toni Decker. 16, Kelly Sandow. 17, Emily Ohlin. Men Pro/ Cat 1/2 — 1, Ian Boswell. 2, Carson Miller. 3, Andrew Boone. 4, Elijah Romer. 5, Sean Passage. 6, Roger Worthington. 7, Brad Winn. 8, Derek Stallings. 9, Chris Sheppard. 10, Sloane Anderson. 11, David Gates. 12, Kennett Peterson. 13, John Browning. 14, Scott Gray. 15, Brian Seguin. 16, Chris Swan. 17, Jason Riffle. Men’s Masters — 1, Gregg Strome. 2, Scott Seaton. 3, Richard Albrow. 4, John O’Brien. 5, Dave Masessa. 6, Mark Crawford. 7, Tim Schauer. 8, Jurgen Fennerl. 9, Eric Schusterman. 10, Dave Skinkle. 11, Justin Serna. 12, Bob Grover. 13, Steve Yenne. 14, Ken Rodgers. Men Cat 3 — 1, Michael Brunelle. 2, Marshall Greene. 3, David Wells. 4, Ryan Wilcoxson. 5, Mike Brown. 6, Lee Ordonez. 7, Qayam Jetha. 8, Alex Wentz. 9, Brian Walburn. 10, Spencer Gray. 11, Erik Hofland. 12, Spencer Newell. 13, TJ Paskewich. 14, Larry Jackson. 15, Jurgen Fennerl. 16, Doug La Placa. 17, Peter Christoff. 18, William Laubernds. 19, Cort Buchholz. 20, John Craft. 21, James Shingleton. Men Cat 4/5 — 1, Todd Riley. 2, James Jorgensen. 3, Calon Russell. 4, Bruce Cole-Baker. 5, Austin Line. 6, Matt Keeler. 7, Kendal Johnson. 8, Eric Birky. 9, McKenzie Sampson. 10, Chris Winans. 11, Sean Bagshaw. 12, Ian Bagshaw. 13, Isaac Sullivan. 14, Michael Dennis. 15, Sean Haidet. 16, Tim Dougherty. 17, Matt Engel. 18, Jason Penry. 19, Tony Coca.

PADDLING L 1 3 3 3 6 9 9

SOFTBALL BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT Adult softball team standings Men’s Softball Competitive C American W L Mtn. View Heating 10 3 Red Cloud 9 4 The Krew 8 5 Warm Springs Ridaz 8 4 Sidelines 7 6 Falling Waters 6 7 Summit 6 7 Newman Brothers 5 8 Nugent Strangleholds 4 8 D&D Down & Dirty 1 12 Men’s Softball Competitive C National W L Good Wood 12 1 Amerititle/Summit El 12 1 Brew Crew 10 3 Antioch 8 5 East Cascade Sec. 6 7 Cable Guys 5 8 Big Ballers 4 9 Copia 3 10 Eastmont Eagles 3 10 Choke Up 2 11 Softball-Coed Competitive W L Mtn’s Edge 10 2 Rockchucks 10 2 Courtesy Flush 10 3 DE/Ventures 9 3 Meyer Media 6 7 BAM 4 8 Seven 3 9 Southwest Swingers 2 11 Phoenix 2 11 Softball-Men’s Competitive A & B W L All Options 9 4 Knights 9 4 Mtn’s Edge 8 5 Advantage 7 6 10 Barrel Brewing Co 5 8 Bend Research 1 12 Softball-Men’s Competitive D W L Next of Kin 11 1 US Bank Dress Sox 11 1 The Bucks 8 4 Palmers Cafe 7 5 Westside Church #1 7 5 Cascade Thunder 6 6 Westside Church #2 4 8 Northwestern HM Loan 3 9 Calvary Chapel Bend 2 10 Selco Blues 1 11 Softball-Senior Men’s Competitive W L Clear One 11 2

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 T 0

NAISH SUP RACE SERIES at Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe In Bend July 7 Classes divided by length of board; overall results (Name, board length, time.) 1, Jayson Bowerman, 18-feet, 22:58. 2, Gerry Lopez, 12’6�, 24:36. 3, Randall Barna, 14’, 25:02. 4, John Frachella, 12’, 26:18. 5, Dennis Oliphant, 14’, 26:23. 6, Pam Stevenson, 14’, 26:54. 7, Jimmy Clark, prone, 26:54. 8, Scott Youndt, prone, 27. 9, Jen Kjellesrik, 12’6�, 27:20. 10, Roger Anderson, 14’, 27:34. 11, Travis Busaek, 12’, 28:49. 12, Judy Shasek, 11’6�, 29:11. 13, Steve Landry, 12’, 29:17. 14, Erik Hammer, 12’, 29:21. 15, Lisa Jakubowski, 11’, 30:06. 16, Mier McCombs, 14’, 30:11. 17, Jim Mahoney, 12’, 30:15. 18, Alex Zarganes, 12’, 30:36. 19, Suzie Miller, 12’, 31:34. 20, Chris Smith, 12’, 32:15. 21, Cristina Acosta, 12’, 32:41. 22, Haakon Kjellesrik, 12’, 33:38. 23, David Stewart, 10’4�, 33:38. 24, Rene Hajjar, 12’, 35:48. 25, Carrie Raymond, 12’, 36:58. 26, Melinda Collins, 12’, 39:24.

MULTISPORT 2010 SPLASH-N-DASH In Prineville July 4 Overall results Four Stage M&M, Mixed Team, 1:25 1, Kevin Thompson Team, Mixed Team, 1:30. 2, Slater Chiropractic, Business Team, 1:34. 3, Team Foley, Family Team, 1:34. 4, Team Foley, Family Team, 1:34. 5, High Desert Adventures - SupaFly, Middle School, 1:35. 6, Seth Crawford For County Commissioner, Mixed Team, 1:36. 7, Lee’s Team, Mixed Team, 1:39. 8, DPR/Fortis, Business Team, 1:39. 9, Quinton Metcalf, Individual Male 25, 1:46. 10, Tate Metcalf, Individual Male (2645), 1:46. 11, Rocky, Individual Male 25, 1:47. 12, Radar Fixott, Individual Male (Over 45), 1:49. 13, Too Busy, Male Team, 1:50. 14, Too Busy, Male Team, 1:50. 15, No Boys Allowed!, All Female, 1:52. 16, Walt Carter, Individual Male (Over 45), 1:52. 17, Muscles, Mixed Team, 1:54. 18, Rebound, Business Team, 1:54. 19, High Desert Adventures - 40 Something, Business Team, 1:55. 20, Pickhardt, Family Team, 1:58. 21, Jesus Freaks, High School Team, 1:59. 22, John Macpass, Individual Male (Over 45), 2:01. 23, Wild West Property Management, Business Team, 2:01. 24, Harris Heros, All Male, 2:01. 25, The Four Mosquitos, Family Team, 2:03. 26, Norms Xtreme Fitness Team, Business Team, 2:05. 27, Mosiac Medical, Business Team, 2:05. 28, Senner & Allen, Mixed Team, 2:06. 29, SICK Pythons, Family Team, 2:07. 30, Mom & Kids, All Female, 2:08. 31, The Williams Family, Family Team, 2:09. 32, The “EF� In Family, Family Team, 2:10. 33, Katherine krauel-hernberg, Female Team, 2:18. 34, Crook County Christian School, High School Team, 2:18. 35, Gamigoda, Mixed Team, 2:19. 36, Hogs, High School Team, 2:22. 37, Double Not It, High School Team, 2:22. 38, Norms Xtreme Fitness Team #2, Business Team, 2:23. 39, Woodward Family, Family Team, 2:23. 40, Dunaway Family, Family Team, 2:31. 41, The Binders, Family Team, 2:47. 42, Aimee Metcalf, Individual Female (2645), 2:59. 43, Casey & Kirsten Holden, Family Team, (no time available). Overall three stages 1, Caryl Hosler, Individual Female (Over 45), 1:12. 2, Tony Ramos, Individual Male (26-45), 1:18. 3, Tom Brannan, Individual Male (26-45), 1:20. 4, Bob Trautner, Individual Male (Over 45), 1:23. 5, Khiva Beckwith, Individual Female (26-45), 1:24. 6, 2K, Family Team, 1:26. 7, Mike Tompkiins, Individual Male (26-45), 1:28. 8, Piper McDonald, Individual Female 25, 1:30. 9, Dale Nixon, Individual Male (26-45), 1:32. 10, Onward, Individual Female (26-45), 1:36. 11, David Sarmiento, Individual Male (26-45), 1:38. 12, Norm Smith (Norm’s Xtreme Fitness), Individual Male (Over 45), 1:40. 13, Monique Davis, Individual Female (Over 45), 1:41. 14, Marla Brinkman, Individual Female (26-45), 1:42. 15, Confederates, Mixed Team, 1:56

KING AND QUEEN OF THE LAKE July 11 At Elk Lake Points scoring by class Women 1, Jen Kjellesvik. 2, Pam Stevenson. Race Standup Paddle 14’ Men 1, Randall Barna, super 50. 2, Dennis Oliphant, super 50. Race StandupPaddle 12’6� raceboard Men 1, Rob Rueter, super 50 Race Standup Paddle 12’6� surfboard Women 1, Judy Shasek, super 50 Sport Standup Paddle 14’ Women 1, Jennifer Seelye Sport Standup Paddle 12’6� raceboard 1, Cynthia Hahn Sport Standup Paddle 12’6� surfboard Women 1, Jaye Arney Men 1, Frank Ring, super 50. 2, Bob Jumper, super 50. 3, Steve Morris. Race OC-1 Outrigger Women 1, Lisa Jacobowski. 2, Lisa Kyle, super 50. 3, Rachel Mavis. Men 1, Jason Tedrow Race Surfski Men 1, Scott Letourneau. 2, Gary Klingler, super 50. 3, Patrick Everett, super 50. 4, David Smullin. 5, Craig Mavis.

CYCLING HIGH DESERT OMNIUM July 10-11 In Bend Overall Omnium Results Women Pro/ Cat 1/2 — 1, Jade Wilcoxson. 2, Teri Sheasby. 3, Tina Brubaker. 4, Susan Peithman. 5, Serena Bishop. 6, Lindsay Myers. 7, Jill Howe. 8, Brenna Lopez-Otero. 9, Heather Hill. 10, Karey Miles. 11, Cara Bussell. DNS, Libby Evans. DNS, Elise Huggins. Women Cat 3 — 1, Maire Osborn. 2, Mindy Simmons. 3, Rachelle Jorgensen. 4, Amanda Atwill. 5, Mary Ramos. 6, Megan

CREATIVE LIGHTING

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Cycling • High Desert Omnium, three chances to win: Bend’s Ian Boswell, 19, won the Men’s Professional/Category 1/2 division of the High Desert Ominum threestage cycling event held this past weekend. Boswell won the Men’s Pro road race on Sunday after taking second in the criterium and third in the time trial on Saturday, for the top overall Omnium score. Jade Wilcoxson, 32, of Talent, won the Women’s Pro/Cat 1/2 Omnium overall by winning the criterium and time trial and placing second in the road race. Overall Omnium runner-ups were Carson Miller, of Bend, and Tina Brubaker, of Salem. For overall Omnium results, see Community Sports Scoreboard on Page D6. • Watch the pros: Blitz to the Barrel, a mountain bike race featuring 12 local professional riders, will start at 7 o’clock this evening. The pros will ride from Wanoga Sno-park on trails and road and will finish at 10 Barrel Brewing Company on Galveston Avenue in Bend. A total prize purse of $1,000 will be awarded to the top three finishers. Race organizers say they hope to expand the race in the future and allow all ability levels to enter. For more information, contact Erik at 310-261-4971.

Tennis • Sunriver summer programs receive top rankings: Steve Vaughan’s Wild West Tennis at Sunriver, operators of the Sunriver Homeowners Association summer tennis program, was ranked No. 15 in the world for 2010 by TennisResortsOnline. com. The online company tallies ratings based on surveys by visitors. Vaughan, a Bend and Sunriver resident, coached the Mountain View High School boys tennis team for 13 years. He has been a United States Professional Tennis Association certified pro for 27 years. For the second consecutive year, Sunriver Resort ranked in the top 50 for tennis resorts worldwide on TennisResortsOnline.com. Sunriver Resort was also ranked No. 1 in the world for all-around children’s program, including all of Sunriver’s tennis programs offered by both Sunriver Homeowners Association and Sunriver Resort. — Bulletin staff report

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• Oregon Rush wins club regionals: The Bend-based Oregon Rush Soccer Club 95 girls team claimed its first Northwest regional championship title June 26-29 by winning the U.S. Club Soccer Regionals in Seattle. The Rush team was undefeated, winning 7-2 over Federal Way United, 3-1 over Eugene Metro Futbol Club, 3-2 over Crossfire 95 Baumgardt, 4-1 in the semifinal over Columbia Basin United, and 2-0 in the final match over Lake Oswego Soccer Club. Oregon Rush 95 team members include Natalie Ambrose, Dani Brown, Morgan Caldwell, Jordan Collinsworth, Laura Conway, Delaney Crook, Rachel Estopare, Nelida Ibarra, Margaret Meagher, Taylor Moscoe, Shannon Patterson, Hadlie Plummer, Bailie Reinwald, Grace Schweitzer and Bailey Simmons. The team is coached by Eli Ulvi.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010

Celebrate Hump Day with tunes

At age 17, accomplished dancer Trevor Hayden, of Bend, returns from Kirov Academy of Ballet for a performance of Coppélia

Free, weekly music event to be held at new Century Center By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

On Wednesday night, the Century Center complex on Southwest Century Drive in Bend will kick off a series of concerts by local artists that runs through August. The series is called The Hump Day Hash, and will feature local music each We d n e s d a y, along with food, Inside drinks, and a •See the Hump spotlight on a Day Hash local nonprofit schedule, organization. plus what’s Each week, a planned different nonprofit will have Wednesday, opportusee Page E6 an nity to let folks know about their work and to benefit from a portion of vendor sales and voluntary donations. The Hump Day Hash kicks off this week with music by Mosley Wotta and Kylan Johnson, and the nonprofit beneficiary is PoetHouse Art. Food will be provided by El Sancho, Soupçon and Spork, with libations by Plum and Volcano Vineyards. The show will start at 6 p.m., and it’s free, family friendly and open to the public. Century Center is the name of the group of buildings behind the old Brightwood Mill at Century Drive and Commerce Avenue that is being renovated by owner Dave Hill. See Hump Day / E6

SPOTLIGHT

STAYING ON

HIS TOES By David Jasper • The Bulletin

F

rom the moment he first saw “The Nutcracker” ballet at the age of 3 or 4, Trevor Hayden knew he wanted to dance.

“It was just magical,” he recalls. “My favorite part was the dolls in the first act.” He didn’t have any dancers in his family, but by the time he was 7, his supportive parents enrolled him in dance classes at the Central Oregon School of Ballet, which puts on an annual production of the holiday ballet, including the one he’d seen as a tot. “I started as a rat,” he says. He did that for one production, “and then I progressed to other things.” Indeed, and that progress was not necessarily limited to his roles in “The Nutcracker.” By the time he was 14, at the urging of Sarah and Zygmunt Sawiel, directors of the Central Oregon School of Ballet, he left his hometown of Bend to attend the Kirov Academy of Ballet of Washington, D.C. There, he would attend academic classes in the early morning, take dance for several hours classes and, in the afternoon, undertake more academic classes. His studies at Kirov complete, the 17-year-old is back home in Bend performing in “Coppélia” later this month (see “If you go” on Page E6). The production once again pairs Hayden with dancer Alexandra Crowell; Central Oregon audiences might remember the two danced together in the 2007 production of “Sleeping Beauty.” See Hayden / E6

ABOVE: Trevor Hayden, 17, practices at the Central Oregon School of Ballet. He began dancing at the school when he was 7, and is now off to Europe to dance professionally with the Vienna State Opera Ballet. LEFT: Zygmunt Sawiel, left, directs Trevor Hayden and Alexandra Crowell while practicing for “Coppélia” at Central Oregon School of Ballet last week. The production will be held at Mountain View High School July 24 and 25. Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

The Pottery Games benefits Empty Bowls The Pottery Games, an annual event leading up to Neighbor Impact’s Empty Bowls, will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. July 23 at Cindercone Clay Center (50 Scott St.) in Bend. At the free, family-friendly event, potters will compete for prizes in categories: biggest bowl, best bowl thrown while blindfolded and best bowl thrown with no hands. Come down and try throwing your own bowl, or just enjoy the festivities and live music. Empty Bowls is an annual event to raise awareness and help feed the hungry. NeighborImpact will host the benefit in November. Cindercone will also hold open studios for the public to help make pottery for empty bowls from 5 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays beginning today, rather than Thursdays, as was previously announced. Potter John Kinder will be on hand to assist beginners. RSVP for open studios by calling 541-279-0343. Contact: NeighborImpact at 541-548-2380, ext. 148.

National fiddle contest recognizes Bend man Bend resident and fiddler Roland White, 62, was recently named Best Male Entertainer at the National Oldtime Fiddler’s Contest. The competition was held June 21-26 in Weiser, Idaho. As Oregon State Senior Fiddling Champion, White was eligible to compete in the Certified Showcase Contest. Dressed in authentic period costume, White presented “Colonial Man, a Visitor From the Past.” The performance featured early American fiddle tunes, including “Liberty.” Another Bend resident, Miya Saito-Beckman, 15, placed fifth in the Junior Champion division. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Man schemes to relive his ‘glory days’ without wife Dear Abby: My husband started exercising, is now on a strict diet and listening to love songs from the ’60s. He has never been interested in these things before. I overheard him on the phone talking about going to his high school reunion this summer, 400 miles away. When I asked him why he hadn’t mentioned it to me, he said it’s because I’m not invited. I was shocked. Then he said he’s going with three of his old “buddies.” I asked if their wives were going and he said, “No, they’re divorced, but have girlfriends.” My husband is now giving me the silent treatment. He has a history of keeping things from me, but never anything like this. This is his 50th reunion, and the first one he has ever wanted to go to. I’m sick about it. What do you make of all this? — Heartsick In Oregon Dear Heartsick: I make of it that you don’t trust your husband because he tries to sneak things past you and wasn’t upfront about this from the beginning. If he had said he was planning to attend, and that he and three of his old buddies wanted to pretend they were teenagers again, you might have felt differently. Because he didn’t, I can see why you would find the situation threatening. Since you seem to have trouble communicating your feelings to each other, some sessions with a marriage counselor might help you reach a better understanding. P.S. While he’s gone, arrange to do something fun with some of your women friends. A girls’ weekend might be a pleasant diversion, and at this point you need one. Dear Abby: I left my wife for a much younger woman two years ago. Despite what my ex-wife says, it was not a mid-life crisis. I was very unhappy with my wife and our marriage. Our divorce

DEAR ABBY has been final for seven months — although I’m beginning to wonder if it will ever truly be “final.” My girlfriend, “Nicole,” is anxious for us to be married and start building a life together. I’m still overwhelmed from how unbelievably painful the whole divorce process has been, and I can’t begin to think about getting married again at the moment. I have told Nicole that I’m not ready and I need some time. She says I’m “stringing her along,” and even though she doesn’t want to have kids, she still feels her clock is ticking for finding an acceptable mate. It has reached the point where Nicole says she is going to leave me if I don’t commit to marrying her. What is a reasonable time to expect someone to recover and be emotionally ready to remarry after an extremely bitter divorce? And what do you suggest? — Still Healing In Washington Dear Still Healing: Some people are ready to remarry within months of a divorce. For others, the healing process can take years. I suggest you call Nicole’s bluff. She is anxious because she is beginning to doubt that she’ll get you to the altar — and the “biological clock” business she’s handing you is ridiculous in light of the fact that she doesn’t want children. The feelings you are experiencing are normal after a bitter divorce. Please do not allow yourself to be stampeded. When the time is right for you to remarry, you will know it without my telling you. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

It’s lights, cameras, accent (and opinion) By Leah Rozen

‘The Joy Behar Show’

New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Joy Behar officially gave up teaching three decades ago for a career as a stand-up comic, but this former high school English teacher still feels the need to instruct. “Do you use condoms?” she asked the hard-partying male stars of the MTV reality show “Jersey Shore” when they appeared on “The View.” The guys answered yes. She pursued her point: “And in the hot tub? Because, you know, the, uh, thing can come off in the hot tub.” Over dinner (salad, a crab cake and white wine) on a recent evening at Porter House New York in Manhattan, Behar said, “Someone once told me I’m still teaching, only now I have a bigger classroom.” As a regular at this clubby restaurant on the fourth floor of the Time Warner Center, she was greeted effusively by the senior-dining-room manager, Tim Brown, who guided her, along with a “View” publicist and a reporter, to a window table offering dazzling views of Central Park. Behar had just finished taping “The Joy Behar Show” after shooting a “View” episode in the morning. Her cable show’s offices and studio are also in the Time Warner Center, so Behar said she often unwinds after finishing up her show at 6 or 6:30 p.m. by dining at Porter House, or A Voce Columbus or Landmarc, other restaurants in the center. What, no Masa, the renowned sushi place that’s just feet away from Porter House? “No, it’s too expensive,” Behar said, with mock horror. “It’s outrageous, I’ve heard.” Still wearing her on-air makeup and wardrobe of black pants and a knit top, Behar looked like the person

When: 9 p.m. Monday-Friday Where: HLN Network

‘The View’ When: 10 a.m. Monday-Friday Where: ABC

Elizabeth Lippman / New York Times News Service

Joy Behar, comedian and talk show hostess, right, with Elisabeth Hasselbeck, a fellow host, on the set of the talk show “The View,” in New York. Behar officially gave up teaching three decades ago for a career as a stand-up comic, but this former high school English teacher still feels the need to instruct. she is: a successful woman who, while looking good, is too busy and too sensible to spend hours seeking sartorial and cosmetic perfection. At 67 (“I don’t lie about my age,” she said), she has not had plastic surgery, but likes Botox, receiving injections every several months. “For the 11’s,” she said, pointing to the space between her brows where vertical lines can appear. Josephine Victoria Occhiuto — Joy is a childhood nickname, while Behar is a vestige from her 16-year marriage, which ended in 1981 — was born and raised in Brooklyn. Behar, whose native borough was and still is very much evident in her voice, recalled with amusement how years ago an acting teacher had informed her that she’d have to lose her accent. Her response, she said, was, “What accent?” As a comic, she was blunt but funny, just as she is today. “I want a man in my life — just not in my apartment,” went her most popular stand-up bit. (The man

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in her life for the last 27 years, whom she calls her “spousal equivalent,” is Steven Janowitz, a former New York City schoolteacher.) Her gig on “The View” came in 1997, after Barbara Walters, who helped create the show and appears on it, saw Behar perform at Milton Berle’s 89th birthday tribute. Of the show’s original on-air posse (which included Meredith Vieira, Star Jones and Debbie Matenopoulos), only Walters and Behar remain. “I outwitted, outlasted and outsmarted them all,” Behar joked. The show on HLN, CNN’s sibling network, was offered to her last fall after she’d filled in repeatedly, and racked up ratings, for a vacationing Larry King at CNN. Behar, whose show is opposite King’s and sometimes beats it in the ratings, has been mentioned as a possible successor to him. “I’m flattered just to have my name bandied about like this,” Behar would later say. The HLN show is a platform,

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as is “The View,” for her to share her staunchly liberal ideas. “I have my moments when I get to say what I want to say, and I so appreciate it,” she said, adding her outspokenness derives from childhood. “I was loved, and no one ever told me to shut up, which is a blessing.” She is a realist about the balance she must strike on her HLN show between the erudite and the populist. “Charlie Rose doesn’t have to worry about ratings,” she said. “The rest of us do.” Translation: While she loves having Gore Vidal on (he did his impression of a pistol-packing President George W. Bush), she must twice as often invite reality TV stars, like Omarosa Manigault Stallworth (of “The Apprentice”) and Danielle Staub (one of the “Real Housewives of New Jersey”), both recent guests. Behar paused to check e-mail messages and news bulletins on her iPad. “I love it — it’s like an iPhone for aging baby boomers,” she said, pointing to the bigger screen. Dessert arrived. She bit into a moist forkful of coconut cake and became rapturous: “I’m having an orgasm.” Not a bad way to end a workday.

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Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance 87 43 14 39 Hannah Montana Sonny-Chance Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ After the Catch The Fleet ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Empty Throne ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Cain and Abel ‘14’ Deadliest Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) After the Catch (N) ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Cain and Abel ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Soccer United States vs. Sweden From Omaha, Neb. (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 SportsNation (N) Å 2009 World Series of Poker Å 2009 World Series of Poker Å 2009 World Series of Poker Å NFL Live (N) Sport Science Baseball Tonight (Live) Å X Games Classix From Los Angeles. 22 24 21 24 WNBA Basketball: Sparks at Shock Golf (N) 1972 British Open Film (N) Golf (N) 1978 British Open Official Film (N) USFL Football 1985 Championship -- Baltimore vs. Oakland Å 23 25 123 25 1993 British Open Film (N) ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 Pretty Little Liars ‘PG’ Å Pretty Little Liars ‘PG’ Å Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘PG’ Å Make It or Break It (N) Å Pretty Little Liars ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Extreme Candy Carnivals Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes Cupcake Wars Chopped Against the Tide Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Head to Head The Game 365 Sport Science Big 12 Football: From the Archives From Oct. 13, 2007. 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Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Kate Plus 8 ‘G’ Kate Plus 8 ‘G’ The Little Couple The Little Couple Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Mystery Diagnosis ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order Nowhere Man ’ ‘14’ Bones The He in the She ‘14’ Å Bones ’ ‘14’ Å HawthoRNe Afterglow (N) ‘14’ Å Memphis Beat Polk Salad Annie ‘14’ HawthoRNe Afterglow ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Return ’ ‘14’ Courage-Dog Courage-Dog Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Chowder ‘Y7’ Codename: Kids Codename: Kids King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Extreme Terror Rides ‘G’ Å World’s Best Places to Pig Out ‘G’ Extreme Pig Outs ‘PG’ Å Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ World’s-Game World’s-Game Hot Dog Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Waterparks ‘G’ Å Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Hot in Cleveland Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Withdrawal (N) ‘PG’ Covert Affairs Pilot A trainee is thrust into the CIA. ‘PG’ Law Order: CI 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit The T.O. Show Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez Jennifer Lopez. ‘PG’ ››› “Remember the Titans” (2000, Drama) Denzel Washington, Will Patton. ’ Ochocinco: The Ultimate Catch ’ ‘14’ The T.O. Show 191 48 37 54 Ochocinco: Ult PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:50) › “The Avengers” 1998 Ralph Fiennes. ‘PG-13’ (6:20) ›› “Weekend at Bernie’s” 1989 ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Pineapple Express” 2008, Comedy Seth Rogen. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “The International” 2009, Suspense Clive Owen. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å ›› “Marked for Death” 1990, Action Steven Seagal. ‘R’ Å ››› “The Fly” 1986, Science Fiction Jeff Goldblum, John Getz. ‘R’ Å ›› “Off Limits” 1988 ‘R’ Å Wake Lab Panama The Daily Habit Model Search Moto: In Out Weekly Update Wake Lab Panama The Daily Habit Tampa Pro 2010 Insane Cinema: Trilogy Built to Shred Bowl B Q Bobby Jones’ Year to Remember Golf in America Golf in America Big Break Sandals Resorts Golf Central Inside PGA Golf in America Golf in America Big Break Sandals Resorts Bobby Jones’ Year to Remember M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel Hearts ’ ‘G’ “Relative Stranger” (2009, Drama) Eriq La Salle, Cicely Tyson. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:45) Kevorkian Dr. Jack Kevorkian runs for Congress after Entourage Buzzed True Blood 9 ››› “Spider-Man” 2002, Action Tobey Maguire, Willem Dafoe. A bite from a mutant ››› “Public Enemies” 2009, Crime Drama Johnny Depp, Christian Bale, Marion Cotillard. G-man Melvin HBO 425 501 425 10 leaving prison. ’ ‘14’ Å ’ ‘MA’ Crimes ’ ‘MA’ spider gives a teen unusual powers. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Purvis vows to nab notorious criminal John Dillinger. ’ ‘R’ Å (3:35) In America Trapped in the Closet ‘MA’ Å Food Party ‘14’ Dinner-Band Whitest Kids Monty Python ››› “Chopper” 2000, Drama Eric Bana. ‘R’ Å Dinner-Band Z Rock ‘MA’ Witchblade ‘MA’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ››› “City of Industry” 1997 Harvey (6:15) ››› “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” 2008, Action Ron Perlman. Hellboy and his (8:15) ››› “Cool Runnings” 1993, Comedy-Drama Leon, Doug E. Doug. Based on ››› “Role Models” 2008, Comedy Seann William Scott, Paul Co-Ed Confidential MAX 400 508 7 Keitel. ’ ‘R’ Å team battle an underworld prince. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the true story of Jamaica’s 1988 bobsled team. ’ ‘PG’ Å Rudd, Christopher Mintz-Plasse. ’ ‘R’ Å 4 PLAY ‘MA’ Inside the Body of Henry VIII ‘PG’ Twin Town (N) ‘G’ Explorer Fatal familial insomnia. ‘PG’ Inside the Body of Henry VIII ‘PG’ Twin Town ‘G’ Explorer Fatal familial insomnia. ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Rocko’s NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Ted Nugent Hunting Count. Truth-Hunting Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Zumbo Outdrs Truth-Hunting Wildlife Bow Madness Steve Outdoor Wild Outdoors Trophy Quest OUTD 37 307 43 The Real L Word Gambling With Love (4:30) ››› “Big Fan” 2009 Patton Oswalt. ›› “My One and Only” 2009 Renée Zellweger. iTV. A woman takes her two sons and (7:55) ››› “The Reader” 2008, Drama Kate Winslet, Ralph Fiennes. iTV. A law › “Punisher: War Zone” 2008, Action Ray SHO 500 500 ’ ‘MA’ iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å searches for a rich husband. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å student’s former lover stands trial for Nazi war crimes. ’ ‘R’ Stevenson. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Monster Jam Bullrun ‘14’ Race in 60 (N) Monster Jam Bullrun ‘14’ Race in 60 NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) › “10 Things I Hate About You” 1999 Heath Ledger. ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “Kate & Leopold” 2001 Meg Ryan, Liev Schreiber. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å › “Law Abiding Citizen” 2009, Suspense Jamie Foxx. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:50) ›› “Sex Drive” 2008 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 “The Circuit 2” 2002 Olivier Gruner. A man enters a prison “The Shortcut” 2009 Andrew Seeley. Terror strikes townspeople “Bordertown” 2007, Mystery Jennifer Lopez, Antonio Banderas. An American reporter ›› “Animal” 2005 ›› “A Boy and His Dog” 1975 Don Johnson. A youth and his TMC 525 525 where inmates fight to the death. ’ ‘R’ Å canine face a post-apocalyptic wilderness. ‘R’ who venture down a path. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å probes the murders of women in Mexico. ’ ‘R’ Å ’ ‘R’ Å Cycling Tour de France: Stage 9 From Morzine-Avoriaz to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne. The Daily Line (Live) Cycling Tour de France: Stage 9 From Morzine-Avoriaz to Saint-Jean-de-Maurienne. VS. 27 58 30 Women Behind Bars ‘14’ Å Women Behind Bars ‘14’ Å Women Behind Bars (N) ‘14’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Slam ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives of Women ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. FESTIVAL OF RUCKUS: Includes tricycle races, watermelon bowling and more; free; 4-8 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-608-2423. ABBEY ROAD LIVE!: The Athens, Ga.-based Beatles tribute band performs; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. FOOTZONE SCAVENGER HUNT: Run or walk to complete the hunt; a digital camera or camera phone is required; free; 6-8 p.m.; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3173568, teague@footzonebend.com or http://footzonebend.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring a performance by Americana act CinderBlue; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www .visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by The Konzelman Brothers; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA BOHEME”: Starring Angela Gheorghiu, Ramon Vargas, Ainhoa Arteta and Ludovic Tezier in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS: Featuring a performance by singersongwriter Colin Hay; $16, $57 with dinner; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062 or www.c3events.com. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY “FINDING NEMO”: A screening of the 2003 Pixar film; part of Familypalooza; free; 3 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-617-7099. BARK-B-QUE DINNER: Barbecue with ribs, burgers, hot dogs, potato salad and more; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $15, $11 ages 12 and younger; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Jerri Jheto Reggae, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-389-0995 or www. munchandmusic.com. KELLY JOE PHELPS AND CORINNE WEST DUO: The delta blues act performs; $15-$20; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

PIANO MONSTER CONCERT: Local piano students perform on multiple grand pianos; directed by Michael Gesme; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. POISON CONTROL CENTER: The Iowa-based indie rock band performs; $3; 9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178. THE AGGROLITES: The Los Angeles-based reggae band performs, with Cub Scout; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. randompresents.com. THE WHITE BUFFALO: The acoustic rock act performs, with a full band; $10 in advance, $13 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.bendticket.com.

FRIDAY SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT: Limited to 52 teams; registration required to play; proceeds benefit the Deschutes Children’s Foundation; $650-$2,500 to play; ; Broken Top Club, 61999 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 503-3325000, sagebrushclassic@comcast. net or www.sagebrush.org. STUNT RIDING DEMONSTRATIONS: Chris “Tech” McNeil performs stunt riding at the BMW MOA International Rally; free; noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 314-608-0406. DOGLEG GOLF CLASSIC: 36 foursomes play golf; followed by a barbecue and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; $125; 1 p.m., noon registration; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541382-3537 or www.hsco.org. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook presents a slide show and talks about his book “Bend, Overall”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. STEVE MILLER BAND: The classic rockers perform; $75 reserved or $39 plus service charges in advance, $78 reserved or $43 day of show; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 800-7453000 or www.bendconcerts.com. SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by The Mostest and Shireen Amini; proceeds benefit Commute Options for Central Oregon; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. ORGANIK TIME MACHINE: The Ashland-based electronica jam band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group will perform; $5; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendimprov.com.

SATURDAY TOUR DES CHUTES: Bicycling routes of seven, 25, 48, 70 and 90 miles; live music, food and vendors after the ride; registration required; proceeds benefit the Lance Armstrong Foundation and the St. Charles Cancer Survivorship

Program; $45 before July 12, $55 late registration; 7 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Lakes Elementary School, 2500 N.W. High Lakes Loop, Bend; 541-3856502 or www.tourdeschutes.org. DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races, including a kids Splash ‘N Dash to benefit The Center Foundation; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@ freshairsports.com or www. freshairsports.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. HIGH DESERT GARDEN TOUR: View six Bend-area gardens in a selfguided tour; $10, free ages 16 and younger; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; throughout Bend; 541-548-6088, ext. 7951. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. NEWBERRY’S ANNUAL GARDEN SHOW: Flowers that can be grown in Central Oregon will be on display; free; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Newberry home, 1968 N.E. Hollowtree Lane, Bend; 541-382-7786. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CHILDREN’S FESTIVAL: Featuring more than 40 activity booths, jump houses, dance and karate demonstrations, food and more; proceeds benefit Saving Grace; free admission, 50 cents per activity ticket, $20 all-day pass; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-385-7988 or www. saving-grace.org. GLORY DAZE CAR SHOW: Open to all makes and models; with a beer garden, hot air balloon rides and live music; $25 to register, free for spectators; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or www.sisterscountry.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-389-0995. WAKEBOARD AND WATER-SKI CONTEST: With wakeboarding, an awards ceremony and barbecue for contestants; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Sundance WaterSports Club; $25 or $30, free for spectators; 7 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. start; Lake Billy Chinook, Crooked River Bridge and Jordan Road, Culver; 541-480-0410. STUNT RIDING DEMONSTRATIONS: Chris “Tech” McNeil performs stunt riding at the BMW MOA International Rally; free; noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 314-608-0406. LIBERTY QUARTET: The Boise, Idahobased gospel ensemble performs; free; 1 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Mary Lou Dobbs talks about her book “Repotting Yourself”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook talks about and presents a slide show on his book “Bend Overall”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525.

SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC FEAST: Culinary event includes a sampling of gourmet cuisine, Deschutes Brewery beer and live music; proceeds benefit nonprofit organizations serving children and families in Central Oregon; $195; 5-10 p.m.; Broken Top Golf Club, 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 503-332-5000 or www.sagebrush.org. BARENAKED LADIES: The Grammynominated rock band performs, with Angel Taylor; $34 in advance, $38 day of show, plus service charges; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based blues-punk band performs; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-389-2884 or www.actorsrealm.com. APHRODESIA: The San Franciscobased Afro-beat band performs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY DESCHUTES DASH: The weekend sports festival features triathlons, duathlons, 10K and 5K runs, and youth races; free for spectators; 8 a.m.; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-318-7388, deschutesdash@ freshairsports.com or www. freshairsports.com. WAKEBOARD AND WATER-SKI CONTEST: Water-skiing competition; spectators welcome; proceeds benefit the Sundance WaterSports Club; $25 or $30, free for spectators; 7 a.m. registration, 8 a.m. start; Lake Billy Chinook, Crooked River Bridge and Jordan Road, Culver; 541-480-0410. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Blues/rock act Paul Thorn performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383, info@bendconcerts.com or www.bendconcerts.com. RHAPSODY ON THE RIVER: A catered dinner, with a performance by the Sunriver Music Festival’s Young Artist Scholarship recipients; preceded by a silent auction; reservations required; $55; 4:308:30 p.m.; Mary McCallum Park, River Road, Sunriver; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. MIDDLE EASTERN DANCE SHOWCASE: Featuring performances that highlight various styles of belly dancing; free; 5:30 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, next to Mirror Pond Gallery, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-610-8622 or www .highdesertbellydance.org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.bendticket.com. SUNSET SERENADES: Golf clinic followed by live music by Lino & Company; free; 6 p.m. golf, 7 p.m. music; Brand 33, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-549-3663. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; pay as you can; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or www.actorsrealm.com.

M T For Tuesday, July 13

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CHARLOTTE’S WEB (G) 10 a.m. THE CITY OF YOUR FINAL DESTINATION (PG-13) 12:15, 3, 5:45, 8:30 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:20 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:20, 3:05, 5:25, 8 PLANET 51 (PG) 10 a.m. PLEASE GIVE (R) 12:40, 3:20, 5:55, 8:10 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) Noon, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 SOLITARY MAN (R) 12:30, 3:15, 5:20, 7:55

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 12:15, 4, 6:55, 10:10 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 11:40 a.m., 12:10, 2:20, 2:50, 4:45, 5:15, 7:10, 7:40, 9:35, 10:05 GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 8:05, 10:40 GROWN UPS (PG-13) Noon, 2:30, 5:25, 8:10, 10:35 ICE AGE: DAWN OF THE DINOSAURS (PG-13) 10 a.m.

THE KARATE KID (PG) 11:10 a.m., 2:55, 6:40, 9:45 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:35, 10:15 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3-D (PG) 11 a.m., 1:25, 3:55, 6:45, 9:15 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:25, 7:15, 9:55 PREDATORS (R) 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25 THE RUGRATS MOVIE (G) 10 a.m. TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:05 a.m., 12:05 a.m., 1:35, 2:45, 4:15, 5:20, 6:50, 9:30 TOY STORY 3 3-D (G) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:20, 10 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 12:20, 1:40, 2:10, 2:40, 4:05, 4:35, 5:05, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.)

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

MARMADUKE (PG) 6 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 8:15

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

DESPICABLE ME (PG) 12:15, 2:15, 4:15, 6:45, 8:45 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 TOY STORY 3 (PG) 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BABIES (G) 6 DESPICABLE ME (PG) 5:15, 7:30 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 8 KNIGHT & DAY (PG-13) 8 TOY STORY 3 (G) 5:30 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 5, 7:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 4, 7

Perseverance is key for ‘White Collar’ star Matthew Bomer By Luaine Lee

‘White Collar’

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

STUDIO CITY, Calif. — You can tell he’s a Texan by the way he opens the door for the woman whose arms are full of packages, shakes the hand of one of the drivers in the parking lot, and assaults the stairs to the deck of the coffee shop here. But there’s no trace of the Texas drawl in actor Matthew Bomer, who’s about as far from the cunning conman he plays on “White Collar” as anyone could be. Bomer says he learned the hard way when he was fresh out of Carnegie Mellon (he’d attended four years on a scholarship) and found himself penniless in New York City. “I called my dad and said, ‘Can I borrow ...’ He said, ‘Listen, I got you through college, you’ve got to figure it out now.’ It was tough love, but it was good for me,” he said, settling on a wooden bench at one of the busy tables. “It made me realize, ‘OK, I’m my own man now. I’ve got to make my own way. It was hard. And I got upset, but I thought ‘OK, well, I may go out there and get my own gig because nobody’s going to make this happen but myself. I was staying at a friend’s apartment in New York. It was more the general thinking of him saying, ‘You’re cut off.’ But I think it was good for a man. I think tough love is good for boys.” Bomer’s dad, John, played for the Dallas Cowboys until Matthew was born, and he passed on the competitive spirit to his son. “One thing my parents always instilled in me was perseverance. That’s the one thing I got growing up in Texas and having athletics. A lot of people have the talent. A lot of people have the right look for a part, but not everybody has the perseverance to hang in there and keep going for it. I think I’ve been really blessed. I can’t complain. But when you love what you do, perseverance comes easy.” When he was 5, he saw “ET: The Extra Terrestrial,” and that set his course. “I realized that’s what I wanted to do. I didn’t want the attention, I wanted to be part of the storytelling process. I wanted to be part of the good story. I wanted to be movie people and wanted to be part of stories that were affecting people. I remember coming home and asking my mom to get me a red hoodie.” Like his dad, who owns his own shipping company, Matthew played football in high school. “I did it for fun and the athleticism and the competitive aspect, but it wasn’t something I ever saw myself doing long-term,” he said. “My talent was limited ... I felt like if it was something I was really passionate about I would

When: Season 2 premiere at 9 tonight Where: USA

have invested myself to be better, so my senior year I got cast in ‘Streetcar Named Desire’ at the Alley Theater in Houston, which was my first professional gig, and I quit the football team to do that.” Later, when he was faced with imminent poverty in New York, Bomer, 32, worked two jobs simultaneously, as a bell man and a waiter. “And then 9-11 happened and I lost my job as a bell man because nobody was coming to New York and hotels cut staff. I said, ‘Man, I’m going to have to figure something out here.’ “This casting director for a soap said, ‘If you ever need a job call me.’ I thought, ‘Yeah, sure, I’m NEVER going to do a soap opera.’ But I called him and got a job on ‘The Guiding Light’ for a year.” Then Bomer became the hot ticket to play Superman in “Superman Returns.” But directors changed in the eighth inning and he was out.

Bomer’s break Still, all was not lost. He copped a job filming in Vancouver in a show called “Tru Calling” and signed a holding deal later with Fox. But when the role of the charming grifter in “White Collar” finally came along, Bomer was considering giving up acting. “I looked into going to grad school to get a degree in psychology. I’d gotten the application sent to me and I think maybe two weeks later this audition came up,” he said. “Lord knows I don’t have time for that anymore. I’ve always been fascinated by human nature and human psychology. I think that’s one of the things I find most interesting about acting and playing roles and finding the nuances of character.” So where does a nice guy like Bomer find the sociopathic bravado of his character in “White Collar”? “I’m always as attracted to the darker sides of characters and their flaws as I am to the light side of them, or their strong points,” he said. “So I thought it’s something I’m really interested in and I could study it and it would only enhance my ability as an actor,” he said, adding, “I have a hard time sitting still I’m always trying to study something new, find something new and grow and expand.” “White Collar” returns to USA for its second season this week.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


E4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, July 13, 2010: This year, your emotional and financial security are prime issues. You also have an unrecognized talent that could be a tremendous asset if capitalized on. Your creativity and imagination will be necessary. Sometimes you feel overwhelmed by work-related responsibilities. You might decide to branch out on your own. If you are single, you could meet people with ease. You don’t realize the power of your words and body language. Just don’t decide to relate out of need, but rather out of choice. If you are attached, the two of you often need to work through either/or situations. Know that you both could be right. Respect your differences rather than try to change them. LEO appreciates you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH When working with an associate, child or friend, a light bulb goes off for both of you, fostering unprecedented change. Your vision of being a leader and a boss needs revision. Ask for feedback. Tonight: Let your hair down. TAURUS (April 20-May 21) HHH If you cannot control your mind and prevent your thoughts from floating to other matters, perhaps you need a day off. Handle personal matters then. Your focus is primary. Detaching now could help you gain another perspective. Tonight: Head home.

GEMINI (May 22-June 20) HHHHH You have many questions, and you cannot get them answered quickly enough to suit you. A family member is far more responsive when indulged. Grease the wheels a little, and the nature of a conversation could change. Tonight: Discussions flourish. Be open. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Justifying your spending could be a bit difficult. You want to make a good impression or please another person. Pull back some, and you might realize the folly of your ways. Tonight: Use your imagination and stick to your budget. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Use the Moon in your sign to foster a key project or social event. Others cannot help but respond to you. Knowing this fact, what would you really like to do? Follow through on what is important. Don’t sell yourself short. Tonight: As you like. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Working behind the scenes would be an unusually powerful decision. Others find you quite alluring right now, and you don’t need to say much. A child or a new love affair could knock your socks off. Tonight: Fun and games. Let the child in you out. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Your inner dialogue might be totally unrelated to what is going on around you. Your actions also won’t connect. Under the circumstances, you could be more accident-prone. Focus, if you can. Tonight: Now, follow your thoughts. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHH Take a strong stand. Others need to understand where you are coming from. A friend could be very endearing and/or supportive. Clearly, you can trust this person. Listen to your instincts. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH No matter what is said or what happens, maintain your perspective. You could be taken aback by a boss’s or another respected person’s gesture. Be aware of the changes that could occur if you accept this gesture. Tonight: Listen to music. Allow your imagination to lead. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Sometimes what isn’t said could be more important than what is. In your case, you might sense what a loved one feels. Plan a trip together soon, if possible. Keep conversations on an individual level. Tonight: An offer heads your way that is too good to refuse. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Let others come through for you. Sometimes you do way too much for everyone’s well-being. Understand where someone is coming from. Let this person express his or her thoughts and feelings, even if it is a tad overwhelming. Tonight: Sift through the possibilities. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Maintain an even pace, despite someone’s attempt to distract you. Note his or her need to have your attention. Could there be more than friendship here? At a later point, you might want to find out. Tonight: Take some much-needed personal time. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


COV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Hayden

Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

Upcoming Hump Day Hash dates (performer/ nonprofit beneficiary) July 21: Tim Coffey/Habitat for Humanity July 28:— Blowin’ Smoke/ Deschutes Land Trust Aug. 4: Mark Ransom and The Mostest/KPOV, 106.7 FM Aug. 11: Leif James/Village Works Aug. 18: The Autonomics/ Rise Up Aug. 25: Shireen Amini/ Human Dignity Coalition

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Trevor Hayden and Alexandra Crowell practice for their upcoming performance in “Coppélia” at Central Oregon School of Ballet last week.

If you go What: Coppélia When: July 24 at 7 p.m. and July 25 at 3 p.m. Where: Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend Cost: $10, available from Central Oregon School of Ballet or at the door Contact: www.centraloregon schoolofballet.com

cause you have to keep your body in shape. It’s your tool,” Hayden says. “At the same time, you can’t go around keeping yourself in a box and not let yourself do anything. That’s no fun.” Several of his fellow Kirov graduates are off to Indiana University and New York University, but for now, college is not in his plans. It may be later, “If I need it, or if I get hurt,” he says. “I don’t need a degree until I stop dancing.” How was he so certain, back when he was a pre-teen, that ballet was the thing for him? “I guess you just know,” he says. After a while, being around others driven the same way, “you go with the flow.” Filling out applications for various ballet companies last year, though, led him to contem-

“It was good, because I’d been just going along blindly, because everyone was saying ‘This is what you do, this is what you do, this is what you do in the ballet world.’ Then I finally stopped and was like, ‘Well, I’m doing this for me, too. I’m not just doing this because this is what you do. I’m doing this because I want to.’” — Trevor Hayden, taking about filling out applications for ballet companies plate how important dancing is to him, he says. “It was good, because I’d been just going along blindly, because everyone was saying ‘This is what you do, this is what you do, this is what you do in the ballet world.’ Then I finally stopped and was like, ‘Well, I’m doing this for me, too. I’m not just doing this because this is what you do. I’m doing this because I want to.’” Being back in Bend and dancing with Central Oregon School of Ballet has made for a great summer before embarking on his professional career. “It’s just really nice to be back and give back to them, because they gave me so much. They gave me what I needed to start dancing,” Hayden says. “It’s a wonderful school.” The Sawiels danced professionally in Europe, he notes.

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“They were in real ballet companies in Europe. And so they



FERTILIZERS



know what ballet is.” Says Sarah Sawiel, “To have one of our students be able to (dance in Europe) is pretty much why we started teaching in the first place.” Vienna State Opera Ballet is “one of the upper-class companies in Europe. And we’re just thrilled that he’s starting there.” Says Hayden, “It’s going to be another experience. That’s for sure.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

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Continued from E1 In late September, Century Center will be the new home of the Bend Roots Revival, a popular festival of local arts that was held at Parrilla Grill and Victorian Cafe until it outgrew that space last year. Hill has almost filled Century Center with tenants, and those tenants are putting up the money to pay bands for The Hump Day Hash, said Mark Ransom, founder of Bend Roots and one of the organizers of the series. On Monday, Ransom said Hill offered Century Center to Bend Roots at no cost when he heard the festival needed a new home. Since then, he’s leased much of his complex, but is setting aside a large space in Century Center for events and performing arts, complete with a stage, sound system and lighting, Ransom said. “Along with that decision came this idea to do a weekly music series,” Ransom said. “He contacted me, and I introduced Dave to Erica Reilly (co-owner of Spork and Plum) … and Erica’s really connected with the music community, so I said, ‘Let’s get together, the three of us.’” Ransom, Hill and Reilly decided that Bend is already “super-saturated” with music events, Ransom said, and that if a weekly series were to happen, “it needs to be about more than the music.” So they incorporated local food and drink, signed up local nonprofits to showcase, and decided to do the series on Wednesdays to minimize conflict with other events. “Someone suggested the hump day, and that Wednesday might be a nice night,” Ransom said. “We’ll keep it generally more mellow and acoustic, though there are a couple of more rockin’ bands.” The Hump Day Hash will happen outside in Century Center’s courtyard, he said. Besides a good time and a spotlight for nonprofits, organizers hope the series spreads the word about the complex’s potential for events, and the fact that it’s the new home of the Bend Roots Revival. “I think because Dave’s gotten more interested in performing arts … year-round, he wants people to know what a great venue it is, and that it’s an option for promoters in town. He’s got indoor spaces and outdoor spaces,” Ransom said. “That, obviously, directly benefits the tenants who are in there, so he’s trying to do something to bring awareness to the project, but also how it can be beneficial to the performingarts community in Bend.”

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Hump Day

POTTERY

What: The Hump Day Hash to benefit PoetHouse Art, with Mosley Wotta and Kylan Johnson When: 6 p.m. Wednesday Where: Century Center, at the intersection of Southwest Century Drive and Southwest Commerce Avenue in Bend Cost: Free



If you go

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

Submitted photo

Bend-based hip-hop artist Mosley Wotta will kick off The Hump Day Hash on Wednesday.

Continued from E1 According to the Central Oregon School of Ballet, “Coppélia” features lighthearted music by Leo Delibes and was adapted from the fiction of E.T.A. Hoffman. Hayden plays the role of Franz, who’s in love with a girl named Swanhilde in a village in Central Europe. “Then he sees a doll in the window of a toymaker, and he thinks the doll is real and starts flirting with her. And it’s the story of what happens when Swanhilde sees him flirting with this doll. It’s fun, nice and lighthearted; lots of comedy in there,” explains Sarah Sawiel. In August, Hayden is himself off to Europe. He’ll begin his professional career with the Vienna Staatsoper, or Vienna State Opera Ballet. Its origins go back to the early 18th century and Emperor Leopold I, according to the company’s official website, which says it’s “the oldest theatrical institution with an unbroken record of performing in the German-speaking world.” “It’s the premier company in Austria,” says Hayden, who auditioned there in January. About 100 dancers applied, by his estimate, and Hayden was one of about five males who were accepted. Though he was “definitely nervous … I was not new to the audition process,” says Hayden. “I was ready. I was like, ‘I’ll either get it or I won’t.’” After all, Hayden was somewhat seasoned, having auditioned for Kirov Academy at 14. He explains his reasons for leaving Bend for the school, which he believes is the best ballet school in the country. “Here, there are no boys my age looking for a professional career. I was basically the only boy in my class for all of it. There were a couple of boys here and there, but no one professionally driven,” he says. “I needed people my age who were as interested, to push me. Your teachers can only do so much; your peers are a big part of your learning process.” Zygmunt Sawiel began encouraging Hayden to go by the time he was 12, Hayden says. Though his arrival there ended up occurring a couple of years later, “It ended up being OK.” In the years leading up to it, he’d done some summer programs, so the transition wasn’t as tough as it might sound. “I had been conditioned for a couple of summers before,” he says. In 2006, he’d danced for six weeks with the Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle, and again the following year in New York at American Ballet Theatre’s summer intensive program. During those short periods of time away, he learned to do his own laundry and be responsible with his money, so that “when it came time to leave,” he says, “I was ready.” It’s not uncommon for students to show early promise, says Sarah Sawiel. Central Oregon School of Ballet typically uses proceeds from the “Nutcracker” ballet to help send students to summer courses elsewhere. “Of course, they have to audition to get in them first, so they have to have the talent,” she says. “Lots of kids have gone, but not a lot of them are willing to work that hard. It is so much work. You have to have a real big desire to do it.” Hayden kept busy at Kirov, where, he says, “I was surrounded by people who had had very intense training from a much younger age, but I was able to catch up.” Going from being the main male ballet dancer in Bend to dancing competitively among others “was natural,” he says. “It just felt right, because I was surrounded by all these other people who just loved ballet. It was great.” It pushed his abilities, too: “You’d see these boys who were better than you, and so you’d push yourself harder,” he says. “You have to leave” if you’re a small-town dancer with professional ambitions, he says. He recommends dancers contemplating such a move dip their feet on the dance floor, as it were, via summer programs, as he did. “See if you like that competitive environment,” he says. “That will tell you if you like it or not, if you have what it takes.” Dancing limits the other activities he can do, but when he’s not dancing, Hayden enjoys such activities as riding a Razor scooter. He also enjoys snowboarding in the winter, “but I have to be very careful. I just go really slow and don’t do any tricks or anything,” he says. A hamstring-tear forced him to give up waterskiing some time ago. “It limits what you can do, be-

 PLANTERS 


AH

HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON A movable feast Martha Stewart helps you plan the perfect picnic, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 13, 2010

GARDEN

FOOD

Extension Service’s gardens educate

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

Sweet and baby red onions are among the young onions available now at local markets.

By Liz Douville

These sweet onions won’t make you cry

For The Bulletin

At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets.

By Julie Johnson The Bulletin

Onions don’t make me cry much. In fact, this time of year, onions make me jump for joy. That’s because baby onions, sweet onions and other young, crisp, pungent bulbs are ripe for the taking at local farmers markets, and I can’t get enough. Young onions are usually sold with their green tops still attached. They lack the papery outer skin of dry, mature onions (somet i mes called storage onions), and are generally juicier and less aromatic than their larger, older cousins. What does that mean for the home cook? It means tons of sweet onion flavor without the assertive punch usually associated with onions. These are the onions you want to use raw in salads, lightly cooked in stir-fries or caramelized atop light fare such as fish. I sliced my sweet young onions crosswise and wilted them in a dab of olive oil before adding a few glugs of a summer ale to the skillet and topping the onions with a few salmon filets. Add a tight-fitting lid and let the fish steam and the onions caramelize on low heat until the fish is cooked through, about 10 minutes for my small filets. Serve the fish topped with the onions. Choose young onions with bright green tops and fresh-looking, blemish-free skin. And don’t toss the green tops; they’re delicious in marinades for beef or lamb. As for onions that do make you cry, here’s why, according to www.chemistry.about.com: When you cut an onion, you break cells, releasing their contents. Enzymes that were kept separate now are free to mix with sulfenic acids to produce propanethiol S-oxide, a volatile sulfur compound that wafts upward toward your eyes. This gas reacts with the water in your tears to form sulfuric acid. The sulfuric acid burns, stimulating your eyes to release more tears to wash the irritant away. Cooking the onion deactivates the enzyme.

AT THE MARKET

Julie Johnson can be reached at 541-383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Photo courtesy Maren Caruso, “Coffee Cakes: Simple, Sweet, and Savory” by Lou Siebert Pappas, Chronicle Books, 2006

Wild Huckleberry-Streusel Sunday Coffee Cake is a great way to add fruit to a delicious snack cake.

A piece of Why settle for store-bought coffee cake when it’s so easy to bake your own?

cake By Alison Highberger • For The Bulletin

E

ven people who hate coffee love coffee cake. This simple pleasure has been around for hundreds of

years, accompanying coffee or tea at breakfast, brunch or

In early June, I wrote that improvements and changes in the garden can be accomplished with small projects that are done well. Reflecting on those words seems appropriate when you realize the changes that are taking place on the grounds of Deschutes County’s Oregon State University Extension Service at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. About five years ago, the extension office took the first step with an application to All-America Selections, a nonprofit garden plant testing organization, to become an AAS Display Garden. The application was approved and the result is a garden officials hope will become a handson gardening education center. The AAS Display Garden is cared for by the Central Oregon Master Gardeners under the direction of Amy Jo Detweiler, an OSU assistant professor and the Extension’s horticulture faculty, as well as Steve Edwards, horticulture program assistant. Each year AAS sends award winning flower and vegetable seeds for planting in the display garden. Seeing the specimen growing in place gives us an idea of the plant’s ability to survive in our climate, growth habit and color spectrum. This provides gardeners with information about what works for the next year of planting. The seedling planting of the 2010 AAS winners was done the third week of June and included the following plants: • Gaillardia “Mesa Yellow” Controlled plant habit, prolific flowering, attracts butterflies • Snapdragon “Twinny Peach” Double flower, not hinged, blended peach tones See Demo garden / F5

in the afternoon. But you don’t need a hot drink to enjoy it. Coffee cake is more than food. It’s a reason to relax and take a

A note on baking in high altitudes Recipes are written for cooking at altitudes under 2,500 feet. Bend, at 3,628 feet, can make successful baking tricky. “The higher the elevation, the faster the leavening gases (air, carbon dioxide, and water vapor) expand. Cakes may rise too far too fast and sink in the center or collapse when cooling,” according to Susan G. Purdy at www.epicurious.com. For best results, reduce baking powder and soda by 1 ⁄8 teaspoon, and increase oven temperature 15-25 degrees.

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • MORNING GLORY BREAKFAST CAKE, F2 • WILD HUCKLEBERRYSTREUSEL SUNDAY COFFEE CAKE, F2 • SUN-DRIED TOMATO-PISTACHIO POLENTA CAKE, F2 • LEMON-GLAZED BUTTERMILK BUNDT CAKE, F2 • BROWN SUGAR BUTTERMILK CRUMB CAKE, F2 • SHORT RIBS IN ANCHOMOLASSES SAUCE, F3

F

• COCA-COLA CAKE, F6 • ROASTED GARLIC, F6 • BEEF TENDERLOIN SANDWICHES WITH HERB MAYONNAISE, F6 • FAVA BRUSCHETTA, F6

break — that’s how it became an established ritual around the world, like afternoon teatime in England. Traditionally unfrosted, coffee cake comes in both a “quick” variety, leavened with baking soda and/or baking powder, or a yeast-raised version. It is often topped with streusel crumbs, a sugary glaze, or a mixture of sugar, cinnamon and chopped nuts, and it’s no stranger to fruit — inside or on top. It can also be savory (see recipe for Sun-Dried TomatoPistachio Polenta Cake, Page F2). Lou Seibert Pappas, author of more than 50 cookbooks, including “Coffee Cakes: Simple, Sweet, and Savory,” from Chronicle Books, said in a phone interview that it’s a shame most of us are only eating store-bought coffee cake these days.

“People don’t bother to bake, and it is so easy and delicious to do so, and what you buy is often loaded with sugar and fats that are unhealthy,” she said from her home in Palo Alto, Calif. “I grew up in Corvallis, and my mom baked constantly — wonderful cakes, cookies, muffins, breads and pies. By baking your own, you can use healthful ingredients and cut the sugar and fat or use healthful fats,” she said. Pappas told us she bakes a big batch of coffee cake every couple of weeks because her husband, Ray, loves to have a slice every morning for breakfast. See Coffee cake / F2

Bust the dust: Here’s the dirt on cleaning “Big deal, I’m used to dust.” — Erma Bombeck’s requested epitaph “My theory on housework is, if the item doesn’t multiply, smell, catch on fire or block the refrigerator door, let it be. No one cares. Why should you?” — Erma Bombeck, humorist and columnist, 1927-96

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin The Bulletin file photo

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Diana Hardin, of Redmond, practices square-foot gardening during the planting of the OSU Extension display garden at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center.

Teia Erickson, owner of Bend-based Forever Clean, uses a long-handled duster to clean above a client’s kitchen cabinets.

Erma Bombeck obviously never kept house in Central Oregon, where dust is plentiful year-round, coating all surfaces with a fine

HOME layer of grime in very little time. If Bombeck had lived in Bend, she may have cared about dust. High Desert residents soon learn that it’s good to come up with a system for dust busting. Bend housecleaning expert and Forever Clean business owner Teia Erickson (www.bendhousecleaning.com) deals with dust every day in her work, and has some tips to help you keep it under control. See Dust / F4


F2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Tea party! Relaxing and refueling with easy-breezy tea-time fare.

COVER STORY MORNING GLORY BREAKFAST CAKE

SUN-DRIED TOMATO-PISTACHIO POLENTA CAKE This savory tomato-herb bread has a delicious polenta and nut crunch in each golden slice. Nicely moist, with a fine, crumbly texture, it is excellent warm or cold. Serve it for an Italian-style brunch, lunch, or buffet party. It is also an ideal complement to a Caesar salad or a lentil or bean soup for a light meal. Makes one 9-inch cake; serves 10.

This cake, with shredded apple, blueberries and dried cherries, contains no butter or oil, yet is particularly moist. I cut it into slices and freeze the whole batch, then reheat a few pieces daily for breakfast. — Lou Siebert Pappas Makes one 9-by-13-inch cake; serves 12. ½ C quick-cooking or old-fashioned rolled oats 2 lg eggs 2 ⁄3 C firmly packed dark brown sugar 1½ C low-fat plain yogurt or buttermilk 3 T dark molasses 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 C whole wheat flour 1 C unbleached all-purpose flour 2 tsp baking soda ¾ tsp salt 1 C wheat bran 2 lg carrots, peeled and shredded (2½ C) 1 lg tart apple, peeled, cored, and shredded (1¼ C) 1 C fresh or frozen blueberries ½ C hazelnuts, toasted, skinned and chopped (see note), or chopped walnuts or pecans ½ C sweetened flaked coconut ½ C dried cherries, cranberries, or golden raisins 1 T granulated sugar mixed with 1 tsp ground cinnamon Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 9-by-13inch baking pan. Spread the rolled oats on a baking sheet and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, or until lightly toasted; remove from the oven and let cool. In a large bowl, beat the eggs and brown sugar with a whisk or an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Beat in the yogurt or buttermilk, molasses, and vanilla. In a medium bowl, combine the flours, baking soda, salt, wheat bran, and toasted oats. Stir to blend. Add the dry ingredients to the egg mixture and mix just until blended. Stir in the carrots, apple, blueberries, nuts, coconut, and dried fruit. Spread evenly in the prepared pan. Sprinkle the cinnamon sugar evenly over the batter. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack. Serve warm, cut into squares or strips. Note on toasting and skinning hazelnuts: Place the nuts in a baking pan and bake in a preheated 325-degree oven for 8 to 10 minutes, or until lightly toasted. Let cool for a minute, then place the nuts in a towel and rub them to remove as much skin as possible. Or, hold a handful of nuts over the sink and rub them together with both hands, letting the skins fall away. Muffin variation: Using an ice cream scoop, scoop out mounds of batter and drop into paper-lined, large (2¾ inches in diameter) muffin cups. Bake in a preheated 375-degree oven for 20 minutes, or until a cake tester inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Makes 12 large muffins. — “Coffee Cakes” by Lou Siebert Pappas

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Central Oregon

Dermatology Mark Hall, MD

(541) 678-0020

⁄3 C julienned sun-dried tomatoes 3 T hot water (optional) 2 lg eggs 1 ⁄3 C extra-virgin olive oil 2 T honey 1 tsp dried basil 1 tsp dried oregano 1¾ C unbleached all-purpose flour 1

Photo courtesy Maren Caruso, “Coffee Cakes: Simple, Sweet, and Savory” by Lou Siebert Pappas, Chronicle Books, 2006

Sun-dried Tomato-Pistachio Polenta Cake is a savory version of the classic sweet coffee cake.

“Because coffee cakes are served on their own, rather than as the conclusion to a meal, they signal a time for activity to stop. Coffee cake gives us a chance to nibble something, to take a few minutes to chat or just sit in peace.” — Richard Sax, “Classic Home Desserts”

Coffee cake Continued from F1 “I bake a big 13-by-9-inch panful, cut it into squares, put four or five squares on a pie plate and slide it into a one-gallon plastic bag and freeze it. Every morning I get the newspaper, make coffee and pop a square in the microwave for 45 seconds,” she said. “It’s so fast and convenient to have with cereal and fruit,” she added. In her press photo, Siebert Pappas is a lovely, slender woman, and this reporter wondered how she could bake every week and stay trim. “I don’t gain weight when I bake. I have learned to discipline myself as I have been around so much food all of my life; plus, I have a lucky metabolism,” she said. Pappas also revealed that even though she’s a coffee cake expert, and always has one in the house, she hardly ever eats it. “I love my homemade granola and homemade yogurt in the morning, loaded with strawberries and other fruits in season,” she admitted. Pappas said she eats homemade cake almost every evening after dinner, along with some homemade ice cream. A family favorite is the delicioussounding Chocolate-Almond Souffle Cake in her coffee cake cookbook. “We don’t skimp on dessert!” she said with a laugh. You shouldn’t skimp on coffee cake either. If you love cake, life’s too short not to learn how to make at least one great coffee cake. It’s the kind of treat that can give you the inspiration to carry on. “Because coffee cakes are served on their own, rather than as the conclusion to a meal,” writes Richard Sax in his cookbook, “Classic Home Desserts,” from Chapters Publishing Ltd., “they signal a time for activity to stop. Coffee cake gives us a chance to nibble something, to take a few minutes to chat or just sit in peace.” Sax calls his recipe for Brown Sugar Buttermilk

WILD HUCKLEBERRY-STREUSEL SUNDAY COFFEE CAKE Picking wild huckleberries in the Oregon Cascades was an important summer outing when I was young. Turning the bounty into cakes and tarts was a down-home pleasure. This versatile, sublime cake is ideal with a range of other fruits: blueberries, marionberries, boysenberries, loganberries, raspberries, red currants or sour cherries. — Lou Siebert Pappas Makes one 9-inch cake; serves 8. 1½ C fresh wild huckleberries, blueberries, blackberries, boysenberries, loganberries, raspberries, red currants, or pitted sour cherries 4 T (½ stick) unsalted butter at room temperature 6 T sugar STREUSEL TOPPING: 1 lg egg ¼ C unbleached all-purpose 1 tsp vanilla extract flour 2 tsp grated orange zest 2 T cold unsalted butter, 1 C unbleached all-purpose cut into bits flour ¼ C sugar ½ tsp baking soda 1 tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp baking powder ½ C (1½ oz) chopped pecans ¼ tsp salt or walnuts, plus 10 pecan 1 ⁄3 C buttermilk or walnut halves Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 9-inch pie pan. In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar with a wooden spoon or an electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add the egg, vanilla and orange zest, and beat well. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir to blend. Add to the creamed mixture alternately with the buttermilk in 2 increments, beating just until smooth. Stir in the berries or cherries. Spread evenly in the prepared pan. To make the streusel topping: In a small bowl or a food processor, combine the flour, sugar, and cinnamon. Cut in the butter with your fingers or process until crumbly. Stir in the nuts. Sprinkle evenly over the batter and stud with the nut halves. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold right side up on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature, cut into wedges. — “Coffee Cakes” by Lou Siebert Pappas

Crumb Cake (see recipe at bottom right) the “quintessential coffee cake.” A slice that’s warm from the oven (or microwave) every once in a while would make the world a better place. Pappas suggested that summer is the best time of year to make quick cakes, since they’re much speedier to prepare than yeast cakes. For best results, Pappas writes that it’s important to have all of the coffee cake ingredients at room temperature, and the cake should be baked immediately after mixing, so make sure the oven is preheated and ready to go. Coffee cakes keep well at room temperature, loosely covered, for two to three days, and may be fro-

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zen for up to one month. As Pappas told us, single frozen slices warm up nicely when microwaved for 30 to 45 seconds, or a whole cake may be defrosted at room temperature and then reheated in a preheated 350-degree oven for 10 to 15 minutes. Let’s face it, most of us want more cake (and ritual) in our lives. If we eat a healthy breakfast and lunch and avoid junk food, we can eat a slice of homemade coffee cake in the afternoon, take a few minutes to reconnect with ourselves (and others, if we’re in the mood), and burn off all of the calories before bedtime. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

¾ C finely ground polenta or cornmeal ¾ tsp salt 1 tsp baking powder ½ tsp baking soda ¾ C buttermilk or low-fat plain yogurt 2 ⁄3 C (2.5 oz) unsalted pistachios ½ C (2 oz) grated Parmesan

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Butter and flour a 9-inch springform pan or pie plate. If the tomatoes are dry-packed, cover them with the hot water and let steep for 5 to 10 minutes to soften. In a large bowl, beat the eggs with a whisk or an electric mixer until light. Blend in the oil, honey, and herbs. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, polenta or cornmeal, salt, baking powder and baking soda. Stir to blend. Stir the dry ingredients into the egg mixture alternately with the buttermilk or yogurt in 2 increments. Beat until smooth. Stir in the tomatoes and any liquid. Reserve 2 tablespoons of the nuts and 2 tablespoons of the cheese for the topping and stir the remainder into the batter. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan and sprinkle evenly with the reserved nuts and cheese. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Let cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold right side up on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature, cut into wedges. — “Coffee Cakes” by Lou Siebert Pappas

LEMON-GLAZED BUTTERMILK BUNDT CAKE A tangy lemon syrup gilds this golden cake, offsetting the sweet morsels of cashew nuts. This whips up in a jiffy and is enhanced by a side pairing of fruit: strawberries raspberries, or fresh Bing cherries. Makes one 9-inch Bundt or tube cake; serves 12. 3 lg eggs 1 C sugar 2 T grated lemon zest ¾ C canola oil 2½ C unbleached all-purpose flour ¼ tsp freshly grated or ground nutmeg 1 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda ¼ tsp salt

1 C buttermilk or low-fat plain yogurt 1 C (4 oz) coarsely chopped unsalted roasted cashew nuts or slivered almonds GLAZE: 1 T grated lemon zest ½ C freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ C sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter and flour a 9- or 10-inch Bundt or tube pan. In a large bowl, mix the eggs, sugar, lemon zest and oil with a wooden spoon or an electric mixer until blended. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, nutmeg, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Stir to blend. Gradually add the dry ingredients to the egg mixture alternately with the buttermilk or yogurt in 2 increments. Mix just until blended. Fold in the nuts. Spread the batter evenly in the prepared pan. Bake for 35 minutes, or until the cake is golden brown and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Meanwhile, make the glaze: In a small saucepan, combine the lemon zest, lemon juice, and sugar and heat over medium heat, stirring until the sugar is dissolved; set aside and let cool. Let the cake cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then unmold right side up on a serving plate. Pour the glaze evenly over the warm cake. Serve at room temperature, cut into slices. — “Coffee Cakes” by Lou Siebert Pappas

BROWN SUGAR BUTTERMILK CRUMB CAKE The quintessential coffee cake. For ease, dependability and quick, homey goodness, there is no better coffee cake than this. — Richard Sax, author of “Classic Home Desserts” Makes one 13-by-9-inch cake or two 8-inch square cakes; serves about 12. ¾ C (1½ sticks) unsalted butter, softened 1½ C packed light brown sugar 2½ C all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda

1 C buttermilk, sour cream, or a mixture of plain yogurt thinned with milk 1 lg egg, beaten 1 tsp pure vanilla extract ½ tsp salt

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter at 13-by-9-inch baking pan or two 8-inch square pans. In a medium bowl, cut the butter into the brown sugar and flour with a pastry blender or 2 knives until crumbly. Remove and reserve 1 cup of the mixture for the topping. Beat the baking soda into the buttermilk, sour cream or thinned yogurt and add to the flour mixture. Add the egg, vanilla and salt and stir until smooth. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan; smooth on top. Sprinkle the reserved crumbs over the top. Bake the cake until golden brown, about 30 minutes. Cool to lukewarm on a wire rack. Cut into rectangles and serve warm or at room temperature, directly from the pan. Variation: Try adding nuts to the streusel topping. Remove and set aside ¾ cup of the crumb mixture (instead of 1 cup). To this mixture, add 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans plus 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. Proceed as directed. — “Classic Home Desserts” by Richard Sax

Switching pan sizes? Monitor your cake as it cooks By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

How do you adjust a cake recipe for a different size pan, such as using a 13-by-9-inch pan or cupcakes instead of two or three round cake pans? You don’t need to change the recipe, but you do need to adjust the baking time. But first, you need to make sure volume of the batter will fit in the new pan.

A:

There are charts of pan volumes in some baking books or on websites like www.baking911.com. For a shortcut, remember that a 9-inch round cake pan holds about 6 cups (if the batter is 1½ inches deep). A 13-by-9-inch pan holds 12 cups. And a standard cupcake pan, with ½ cup batter in each of six cups, holds 3 cups. So a two-layer cake batter should convert easily to 12 cupcakes or a sheet cake.

The trick after that is figuring out how to adjust the baking time. You’ll have to rely on your senses and checking the cake for the usual signs of doneness, such as pulling away from the sides of the pan or springing back when you touch the center lightly. E-mail questions about cooking to Kathleen Purvis at kpurvis@charlotteobserver.com.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 F3

F Playing with fire Advice from the king of the coals, Jamie Purviance By Greg Morago Houston Chronicle

Every grilling season brings with it new flavors and shiny toys. Whether it’s a new recipe for the ultimate marinade or revved up tools that make an Edsel of last year’s meat thermometer, the bar keeps getting set higher in the world of meat and fire. After all, every grillmeister wants to improve his flame game. In the end, however, it comes down to knowing key basics. That’s where Jamie Purviance comes in. The author of “Weber’s Way to Grill: The Step-by-Step Guide to Expert Grilling,” which was nominated for a 2010 James Beard Foundation book award, talked to us about how grillseekers can find happiness and achieve satisfaction from their backyard fires. Here’s some smoky insight from the grill king himself:

Q:

You say if someone is new to grilling they need to learn first how to light charcoal safely and to use a chimney starter. Don’t most people just dump briquettes in the bowl of a Weber, squirt them with lighter fluid and light a match? Then you get the towering inferno. You get this tower of fire. Lighter fluid of course lights the charcoal but there is a safer and more environmentally friendly and more effective way of lighting the charcoal. One of the things I like about a chimney starter is that it lights the coals evenly so all the coals are the same temperature. The enemy of a good griller is an uneven fire. If you have some coals barely lit and some are burnt out, you’re starting at a disadvantage. The cylinder of the chimney starter ensures that everything gets lit at the same time. It’s a handy tool to have.

A:

Q: A:

So lighter fluid will ruin the flavor of your food? That’s subjective. There are some people out there who feel a hamburger is not a hamburger unless it tastes like petroleum. That’s the way they were brought up. But that’s not the flavor you want to add to grilled food.

Q:

Tell us about the two-zone fire. I think it’s a step that some charcoal grillers skip. Don’t most grillers like a nice, even fire all the way across the board? The problem with that approach is that you’re locked

A:

into one kind of heat. If things aren’t going the way you want, you have nowhere to go with the food but take it off. You’re stuck. A two-zone fire gives you a little area flexibility. Now you can move things over to the cooler part of the grill. They don’t stop cooking there but it’s a place for them to cook in less intense heat. There are a lot of foods that turn out best when they’re cooked with two different types of heat. A big thick steak or chicken, for instance. Those things do well when you sear them over the direct heat first then move them to a cooler part of the grill to finish.

Q: A:

What should I know about the vents on top of my grill and how to use them? They’re there primarily to control air flow. A charcoal fire needs air. Most of the air is entering underneath the grill. That air needs some place to exit, otherwise it doesn’t flow. In my world, those vents are almost always fully open to maximize the efficiency of the fire. Closing them slows down the fire. You’d want to slow down a fire if it’s too hot. Closing them brings the temperature down and slows down the rate of coals. You also can close them if you’re having flare-ups. Just by restricting the amount of air, you’re restricting the flare.

Q: A:

Is a clean grill a better working grill? It seems like such a chore to clean. The stuff that’s on the cooking grate will probably burn off easily the next time you light the grill. But the burn-off doesn’t get rid of the stuff trapped in the cooking box, where the burners are or where the coals sit. You have to scrape that stuff out. If you don’t, the new fat and drippings fall into the old stuff and create flame.

Q: A:

Any quick tips for better burgers? The most important thing is probably not fiddling so much with the burger, believe it or not. When you put the burger down, immediately, it sticks to the grate. If you try to turn it too early, you leave stuff on the grate. It’s the crust of the burger, and it tastes great. People can’t hold themselves back; they think they’re not grilling unless they’re fooling with the food. The better idea is to leave it alone. Let the crust develop. You want a little

Tools for grilling, and partying Whether you’re grilling a weeknight dinner on the patio or preparing a big bash for your best pals, the difference is in the details. Pay attention to the small things on your table and flavoring your foods for your best meal ever. • Fire Wire skewers: Ever have trouble fitting long metal skewers on your grill? Fire Wire is a flexible, dishwasher-safe, stainless steel cable that allows you to arrange your food on the grill with greater ease than conventional skewers. The skewer is paired for sale with a marinating kit from Urban Accents. Buy it: Ace Hardware, Bed Bath & Beyond and True Value stores, $14.95. • KitchenAid three-piece barbecue set: Having proper grilling tools isn’t just convenient, it’s the safe way to go. A handy set by KitchenAid includes dishwasher-safe tongs, fork and turner that will help you play the part of grill master this summer. Buy it: Target, $19. • Kingsford charcoal: Kingsford has improved its top-selling charcoal, promising a better burn for your grilling pleasure. The new briquettes feature deeper, wider and longer grooves for more edges and air channels. That means a briquette that is 20 percent easier to light. Buy it: Wal-Mart, Target, Costco, Home Depot and Lowe’s stores; prices vary. bit of browning to develop. That’s an indication it’s ready to release from the grate without sticking. That deep brown crust is really important for flavor.

Q:

People always think meat when they hear grilling, but vegetables and even desserts love grill heat. Are people thinking beyond the proteins? Absolutely. There’s a big interest, for health reasons, in cooking more vegetables. Grilling carrots might be a surprise to people, but it makes a really nice side dish for steaks. I blanch them first for a few minutes, then brush them with butter and seasonings, then grill, and they turn out great. When I make salsas, I very often will grill-roast the vegetables.

A:

Photos from Thinkstock

Take a page out of Tex-Mex cookbook By Addie Broyles Cox News Service

Meat of nearly every cut and provenance is the focus of Robb Walsh’s new book, “The Tex-Mex Grill and Backyard Barbacoa Cookbook” ($18.99, Broadway Books), which is part Tex-Mex history and part grilling how-to. In the book, Walsh blends stories of chuckwagon cooks, tailgating grillmasters, taqueria owners and restaurant owners with recipes for dishes like fajitas, San Antonio bean burgers, Perini Ranch rib-eyes, tacos al pastor and armadillo eggs (bacon-wrapped, cheese-filled jalapenos, for the uninitiated) that, if you’ve lived in Texas long enough, are certain to strike a patriotic chord in your belly. The economics of food, especially meat, have always played a big role in Tex-Mex. He has now dedicated two books to exploring and, in many cases, defending, the food that Walsh calls “America’s oldest regional cuisine.”

Grilling tips • If you want to heat tortillas, caramelize onions or fry bacon, invest in a cast iron comal or flat top that creates a flat cooking surface on top of your grill. • Barbecue or basting sauces that contain sweet ingredients will burn, so don’t put them on the meat until the end. Oil- and vinegar-based mop sauces are fine for basting during cooking.

Fruits and veggies: the new barbecue stars By Amanda Gold The San Francisco Chronicle

Vegetables are largely ignored once they hit the grates, when in fact, they require — and sometimes deserve — the most attention. With the right treatment, they can easily be the star of the meal. And, because their time on the grill is short — most need just about 10 minutes’ cooking time — even a last-minute barbecue can come together quickly. One needn’t subscribe to a vegetarian diet to find pleasure in lightly smoky, caramelized vegetables. Numerous varieties — squash, mushrooms, onions, bell peppers, eggplant and fennel, to name a few — take extraordinarily well to this method of cooking. • Start with a salad course. Lettuces like endive and radicchio hold their own on a hot grill, caramelizing just enough to lose a little bit of their natural bitterness. Dress them however you’d like — a citrus-based, walnut vinaigrette, as in the accompanying recipe, works nicely when enhanced with some toasted nuts and shaved Parmesan. • Some vegetables, such as leeks and potatoes, need some doahead preparation before going onto the grill. By boiling potatoes the night before, then slicing and holding them in the fridge, they can be popped on the grates 10

minutes before you’re ready to eat. They’ll come out creamy inside and crisp outside. Serve them with an herbaceous green goddess dressing (see recipe), but they’ll go with just about anything. • Corn on the cob, too, is more about the method than the added flavors. To protect the corn from burning, remove the entire husk, except for the innermost layer, which sticks to the corn by way of a little softened butter. As it grills, the butter melts into the kernels, and the leaves peel back just enough to allow a few random spots of char on the cob. It’s a side dish that will go with anything from steak to seafood. • Fennel, squash and grapes can turn into a light vegetarian main course when grilled and tossed with sweet-tart sherry vinaigrette, and served over couscous. Add whatever you like to bulk it up and give it some added protein — feta cheese, garbanzo beans or even grilled tofu. Though the grapes seem an unlikely addition, they pick up some smoky flavors and add bursts of sweet juice when cooked in a hand-folded aluminum foil basket. I’m sure that I’ll be living the tritip lifestyle at many a forthcoming barbecue. But with an arsenal of new vegetable recipes — and a little more respect for the process — I’m all about the sides.

SHORT RIBS IN ANCHO-MOLASSES SAUCE The key to this recipe is to start the ribs in a roasting pan; turning them in the melted tallow will crisp them up. It’s like frying and smoking them at the same time. Let them get well-done before you add the hot braising liquid. 6 beef short ribs (square cut, about 3 lbs total) 2 TBS Tex-Mex grill blend (see note below) 2 ancho chilies, stemmed and seeded

12 oz cane sugarsweetened root beer 1 TBS vegetable oil 1 ⁄2 onion, chopped 3 cloves garlic, chopped 1 C molasses

Light about 25 charcoal briquettes in a chimney and prepare the grill with the coals on one side only. Rub the ribs with the seasoning blend and place them in a roasting pan. Put the pan on the grill over medium-hot coals and turn the ribs when they start to sizzle. Continue cooking in the dish for 1 hour, turning to caramelize on all sides. Move the pan to the cool side of the grill if the meat begins to burn or stick. Tear the ancho chilies into pieces and combine with the root beer in a saucepan over medium heat. Simmer until the chilies soften, about 15 minutes. Heat the oil in a skillet and add the onion. Cook until softened, about five minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Add the root beer and chili mixture and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. Add more wood and charcoal to the grill if needed. When the ribs are well browned, pour the molasses over each rib, turning to coat. Then add the hot root beer-chili mixture to the pan. Place the pan over hot coals so it simmers. Cover the grill and allow the ribs to smoke and simmer for another hour, turning often. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and allow to steam for 30 minutes. Remove the pan from the grill and put the ribs in a serving dish. Stir the braising liquid and molasses in the pan together and pour over the ribs. (You can pour the sauce in a gravy separator and pour off some of the fat if you want.) Serve immediately with warmed flour tortillas, chopped onions, cilantro and refried beans. Makes about 11⁄2 pounds of meat. Note: To make an all-purpose grill blend, combine 4 tablespoons sea salt, 3 tablespoons powdered chili of your choice — in this case chipotles, 2 tablespoons dried granulated garlic, 2 tablespoons coursely ground black pepper, 1 tablespoons ground thyme, 1 teaspoon ground coriander and 1 teaspoon ground cumin. Store in a spice jar or baby food jar.

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A guide to ... ... grilling vegetables Vegetables should be cut to expose as much surface area to the grill as possible, then brushed with olive oil and seasoned generously with salt and pepper. Feel free to add infused oils or extra seasonings like garlic or chile oils, oregano or rosemary. • Grilling temperature should be medium to medium-high. Depending on how well you like your vegetables cooked, you can leave them longer on the grill or pull them when they’re still crisp. • Bell peppers: Core and seed, and cut into four equal-size pieces. Grill about 4-6 minutes per side. • Mushrooms: These need to be skewered so that they don’t fall through the grates. Slice portobello mushrooms into 1⁄2 -inch-thick slices through the stem, then skewer from the bottom of the stem through the cap of the mushroom, or skewer smaller button mushrooms through the stem and cap. Grill about 4-5 minutes per side. • Onions: Trim both ends of the onion, then peel. Cut into 1⁄2 - to 3⁄4 inch slices crosswise, then thread thin skewers all the way through the onion, so that they will lay flat on the grill. Grill about 6 minutes per side. • Zucchini and summer squash: Trim ends, then cut lengthwise, 1⁄2 inch wide. If the squash is too long, cut it in half through the middle before slicing into strips. Grill about 4 minutes per side.

... grilling fruit Grilling fruit caramelizes the natural sugars, concentrating the flavors and releasing some of the juices. Here are some tips and ideas: • Apricots and plums: Cut in half, pit fruit and brush with oil. Grill, cut side down, about 11⁄2 minutes (apricots should be golden brown). Turn over and continue grilling for 1-2 minutes. To serve apricots: Top with vanilla ice cream and crumbled amaretti cookies. Layer over sponge or pound cake, sprinkle with toasted, slivered almonds and top with whipped cream. To serve plums: Skewer between chunks of chicken and red onions. Dice and make a fruit salsa to serve over grilled pork chops. Serve between shortcakes with whipped cream. • Peaches and nectarines: Cut in half, pit fruit and brush with oil. Grill, cut side down, until golden brown, about 11⁄2 -2 minutes. Turn over and continue grilling for 1-2 minutes. To serve: Top with ice cream. Fill halves with sweetened mascarpone cheese and drizzle with melted chocolate. Dice and toss into a fruit salsa to serve over fish or chicken. • Pineapple: Slice pineapple, brush with a little bit of melted butter and sprinkle with sugar. Grill for about 3 minutes on each side until grill marks are visible. To serve: Eat plain. Drizzle with coconut milk and squeeze of lime juice. Dice into a fruit salsa with jalapenos to serve over fish. Top slices with vanilla ice cream and caramel or rum sauce.


F4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With ... Arts Central’s Cate O’Hagan.

Keep it cool with these A/C tips A splash of green Also: There’s still time to cash in on appliance rebates McClatchy-Tribine News Service Some tips for keeping your air conditioning running smoothly during the ultra-hot months and what to do if it breaks down from Deborah Evans, owner of Evans Heating & Cooling in Elgin, S.C.: Change the air filter once a month. Don’t use the ultra-thick, expensive filters because they will restrict air flow and cause the unit to work harder. Have the unit maintained twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall If the unit ices over from a coolant leak or being clogged with debris, turn off the thermostat and use a water hose to defrost it faster. Once it is defrosted, you can turn it back on for a cool blast

while you wait for a repairman. If the heating and air company has an unacceptably long waiting list, shop around for someone who can fix it faster or ask for a loaner window unit to stay cool while you wait. Remember that the unit might be doing all it can. Most units will drop the temperature inside only 20 degrees from what it is outside.

Appliance rebates Using $300 million from the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, all 50 states are offering financial incentives for residents buying Energy Star-qualified appliances.

Compared with lender bailouts and “Cash for Clunkers,” $300 million wasn’t very much. But the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers reports that in April, factory shipments of major home appliances rose 20 percent from the same month in 2009. Year-to-date shipments of core appliances are up 9.1 percent following four consecutive years of declines, the association said. The return of consumers to stores also helped stimulate the purchase of goods other than appliances. The U.S. Department of Energy estimated that $1.3 billion in consumer spending would result from the rebates being offered on home appliances alone.

Get your rebate From the U.S. Department of Energy: The state of Oregon’s instant rebate program helps low-income residents to replace nonfunctioning or low-efficiency appliances with new Energy Star-qualified models. Rebates for furnaces and air-source heat pumps began Jan. 1. Rebates for refrigerators, clothes washers, dishwasher, electric heat pump water heaters, gas storage water heaters and gas tankless water heaters begin on this month. The program will end when funds are depleted. • For complete information, visit www.energysavers.gov /financial/70020.html.

COVER STORY

Dust

Some tips on dusting around the house

Continued from F1

Clean from the top down “The best way to clean is to start from the top of the house and work your way down, the floors being the last thing that you clean,” Erickson said. Erickson and her crews clean from the ceiling down, tackling fans and light fixtures first, removing cobwebs and dust. They clean cabinets, shelves and furniture next, ending with baseboards and floors.

Vacuum first, mop last Erickson said she gets the best results by vacuuming instead of sweeping. Damp mopping comes last. “I use a canister vacuum versus sweeping with a broom, because you stir up more dust with a broom,” she said. Since vacuums discharge dust particles even as they collect them, people with allergies or asthma should consider the expensive option of a vacuum cleaner with a high-efficiency particulate air filter or a central vacuuming system that vents to the outside of the house, according to Cheryl Mendelson, author of “Home Comforts: The Art & Science of Keeping House.”

What’s dust made of? Central Oregon has more dust than some other parts of the country due to its dry climate and frequent breezes blowing over the Cascade Mountains. Pulverized volcanic rock adds to the copious amounts of dirt and grime we see in our houses in this region. “The rock portion of the ‘dust’ in Central Oregon is mostly volcanic ash and pumice from ancient explosive eruptions of Cascades volcanoes, including Mt. Mazama (Crater Lake), Newberry and others,” said Bob Reynolds, geol-

Wooden blinds: Once or twice a year, wipe wooden blinds with a nearly dry sponge moistened with a few drops of gentle wood cleaner. Curtains: Vacuum them or have them dry-cleaned. Live houseplants: Put plants in the bathtub and spray them with the shower head attachment. For small, delicate plants, wrap the pots in paper towels, and then turn the plants upside down, gently swishing the leaves in a large pot of water. Lampshades: Keep fabric shades dust-free with an adhesive lint roller. Furniture: Regular dusting prevents dirt from building up and minimizes the need for polishing. Clean with a barely damp soft rag; make your own furniture

ogy professor at Central Oregon Community College, in an e-mail conversation about what’s in our local dust. He said cinder from numerous smaller volcanoes such as Pilot Butte and Lava Butte also contribute to the airborne particulate matter. “The ash is already finely grained at the time of the eruption, whereas the cinder and pumice break down over time from the action of water and human activity,” Reynolds added. But dust is made up of more than rock and dirt particles. That powdery film on the piano or windowsill and those dust bunnies under the bed are probably full of gross things that may cause illness. If you have animals, pet hair and dander are in your dust, with the potential to cause allergies. There are also parts of dead insects: “ … their egg cases, saliva and excreta form another irritating and allergenic component of

polish with olive, almond or walnut oil, or experiment with olive oil and white vinegar (or lemon juice) combinations — more vinegar or lemon juice for cleaning and more oil for polishing. Test polish on a small section to make sure it does not react with the furniture’s finish. Light bulbs: Unscrew bulbs and polish with a microfiber cloth dampened with water (avoid wetting the metal screw base). Clean bulbs in recessed ceiling fixtures with a telescoping lamb’s wool duster. Ceiling fan blades: Clean dust off fan blades with a damp cloth. Kitchen floor: Every evening, when dishes are done, sweep the floor. This will help keep tough-toclean dirt and grime from building up, which will make the weekly mopping much quicker. Source: www.marthastewart.com

house dust,” writes Cheryl Mendelson in “Home Comforts.” Mendelson also says pollen and fungi spores mix with house dust, along with bacteria and viruses that can survive in dust. “Nicotine from tobacco smoke attaches itself to house dust and can be inhaled long after the smoker has crushed out the cigarette or cigar butt or emptied the pipe,” Mendelson writes in her chapter “Dust and Dust Mites.”

Cleaning products Erickson, whose 3-year-old housecleaning business serves clients in Bend, Redmond, Sunriver, Eagle Crest and Broken Top, said you don’t need a lot of expensive cleaning products to get dust out of your house. “I use three: vinegar and water, diluted Murphy Oil Soap for the wood, and lemon oil, if requested, to keep the furniture from getting dry,” she said. Erickson said she puts about

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a half-inch of white vinegar in a spray bottle, fills it with water and then puts a small amount on a clean cotton rag to dust and clean most surfaces. For a more flowery scent, add a few drops of lavender oil to the vinegar mixture in the spray bottle, suggests a spring cleaning article in the April-May 2010 issue of MaryJanesFarm magazine (www.maryjanesfarm.org). “Dampen the cloth very slightly. Never get wood damp,” warns Mendelson in “Home Comforts.” “You want just enough moisture in the cloth to make dust adhere to the cloth; you are not trying to dissolve dirt on the surfaces. For heirlooms and valuable antiques, conservators recommend using distilled water,” she added. “Do not use feather dusters. They remove dust poorly and fling it into the air,” Mendelson writes. See “Dusting tips” for specifics on cleaning household items.

Prevention Finally, to cut down on dust, it’s important to prevent it from entering the house. “If people have their windows open in Central Oregon, they’re asking for it. It’s going to get on the wood blinds and everywhere, and it’s a lot of work getting the dust off blinds and windows, so keep things shut up,” Erickson recommended. “Be sure to use doormats; wipe your shoes before entering your home. Clean your floors regularly,” writes Mendelson. Realize that dust is a fact of life in Central Oregon and embrace the knowledge that we all need to do more dusting than the average American. A lot more. To make dusting more fun, set a timer for 10 minutes, crank up the tunes and hand everyone in the family a slightly damp rag for a dusting party a few times each week. I’ll bet even Erma Bombeck would have done something like that. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac.com.

Get cat hair off your furniture McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

Getting cat hair off my furniture, and especially the fleece blankets, seems impossible. Any suggestions? Yes, try the Scotch Fur Fighter. It’s a specially designed hand tool that removes cat and dog hair from furniture, garments and car interiors. It uses disposable pads with tiny grippers that remove embedded pet hair, even dander, according to 3M, its manufacturer. A starter kit of one handle and five refill covers costs about $10 at discount stores such as Target, hardware stores such as Ace and grocery stores such as Cub. For a demonstration of how it works, go to www.3m.com /product/information/fur-fighter .html.

A:

E-mail your questions to Fixit at fixit@startribune.com.

in the pool (and it’s a good thing) By Stacy Downs McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Pools and “green” don’t typically go together. The words “green pool” bring to mind algae, a definite backyard-bliss buzzkill. And using the modern term “green” with pools also seems incongruous. Pools are known for water waste, chemicals and energysucking equipment, not exactly a model for sustainability. But technology and a recent push by the industry are making pools greener in a good way. Operating a pool can be a lighter load on the environment and our pocketbooks. By changing some outdated equipment, a pool owner could save $350 to $700 per year.

Fewer chemicals This year, Terry Aubuchon, of Stilwell, Kan., made the switch from mixing chlorine with other chemicals to using a salt system to sanitize her backyard pool. “From a maintenance standpoint, it’s so much easier to deal with,” Aubuchon said. “You just add a bag of salt, and the water feels and looks great.” The salt is converted into chlorine to kill bacteria using a saltchlorine generator, which costs about $1,400. The old-school way of buying chlorine and other chemicals is $350 to $500 annually compared to $8 for a bag of salt. “It eliminates the chemical soup,” said Roger Banks, whose family has been in the pool industry since the 1960s. Still, less than half of all pool owners have made the switch to salt-chlorine systems. Most people who talk to Aubuchon wonder if her pool turns into saltwater like the ocean. “Not at all,” said Aubuchon, who had Dreamscape Pools install the system. “There’s only a slight taste of salt.” Roughly a teaspoon of salt per gallon, to be exact. Chlorine in chemical form sends hundreds to the emergency room each year. Salt-based chlorine also is gentler on hair, skin and eyes. Some compare the physical feeling of the water to that of a home water-softener system. Aubuchon says her three teenagers appreciate the difference. “There’s still a little bit of eye irritation, but that’s after swimming for 45 minutes with your eyes open,” Aubuchon said. Salt chlorine also might be gentler on her pool liner. She’s on her fourth one in 13 years; the average costs about $3,000. A downside of salt chlorine is that it will corrode metal faster, so her ladder might rust. However, many pools built now don’t use metal and instead use concrete or stone ledges for sitting and to help people get in and out. Moss is another healthier sanitizing option for pools. Creative Water Solutions of Plymouth, Minn., tapped the water-cleansing power of moss and packaged it in a sort of “teabag” filter. The moss filter reduces the amount of chlorine needed by up to half, according to GreenBuilder Magazine. More than 99 percent of bacteria in pools live in a protective shield called biofilm. Moss does a better job than chlorine in fighting biofilm, preventing it from forming. This not only keeps the water clean but stops the corrosion and energy loss that is caused by biofilm.

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oxide emissions of about 10 million tons per year — the equivalent of 1.3 million cars and light trucks on the road per year. If all residential pools were upgraded to reduce pumping energy by one-third, and all heated pools were upgraded to reduce heating energy by one-third, the total annual savings would be more than $360 million. Carbon dioxide emissions would be reduced by at least 3 million tons.

GREEN

Pools and energy use There are 4.5 million inground pools, which use $1.1 billion to $1.6 billion worth of energy per year, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. The nation’s residential in-ground swimming pools consume 9 billion to 14 billion kilowatt hours and 36 million to 63 million therms of natural gas each year, resulting in carbon di-

Pool energy tips From Pentair and the Natural Resources Defense Council: • Heating: Fencing, hedges, landscaping and cabanas that shelter your pool from prevailing winds will reduce heat loss. If you use your pool only on weekends, reduce your heater or heat pump thermostat setting by 8 to 10 degrees during the week. When leaving for vacation for more than a week, turn off the pool heater or heat pump, including the pilot light. Use caution in freezing conditions. The most healthful swimming temperature, according to the American Red Cross and the Association of Pool & Spa Professionals, is 78 degrees. Reducing your heater or heat pump to that temperature or below can help conserve energy. • Circulation: Reduce run time or speed to reduce energy use. If using a one-speed pump, reduce filtration run time. In general, water needs to be circulated through the filter once every 24 hours. Run your pool’s filtration system during off-peak hours when electricity demand is lower, generally between 8 p.m. and 10 a.m. Install a timer or a control system to automate the hours of operation.

Other options From the Natural Resources Defense Council and the U.S. Department of Energy: • Pool covers help reduce heating energy and water losses from evaporation. But the most commonly sold floating bubble covers can be inconvenient and unattractive, making them less likely to be used regularly. Automatic retracting covers (about $5,000) for pools are not only convenient but also save energy. They conserve water by reducing by 30 percent to 50 percent the amount of make-up water needed and cut chemical consumption by 35 percent to 60 percent. Plus they decrease cleaning time, reduce heat loss and boost safety. • Control systems similar to automation systems found inside a home allow pool owners to schedule cleaning and filtration, light shows, water features and temperature for pools and landscape features. Interface options include wireless remotes, wallmounted LCD touch screens, PDAs and iPhone (shown) and iPod Touch mobile apps. • Natural materials such as stone, especially those quarried locally or regionally, leave less of a carbon footprint than concrete or vinyl.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 F5

G

Next week Madras garden of Richard and Francis Turner delights.

COVER STORY

Demo garden

from an Extension Service publication. I heard rumors that there might be some experimentation with hay bale gardening. All are good examples that can bring results to areas big or small.

Continued from F1 • Viola “Endurio Sky Blue Martien” Clear blue flower, unique spreading/mounding growth • Zinnia “Zahara” Three new additions to this series, proven resistance to diseases • Pepper “Cajun Belle” Sweet, savory small bell pepper, 60 days to green, container plant

Other changes

Next step: demo garden With the display garden established, the next step for the program will be establishing a demonstration garden, where gardeners can view different techniques and maybe learn a few tricks that will make gardening in our area more productive. Officials have written a first draft of an explanatory brochure that lays out ideas and visions for designated areas on the grounds. Some of the areas have been in existence for several years, but have gone unappreciated due to lack of plant identification signs. That is changing, with uniform signs being placed throughout the areas. Two shade gardens already exist, viewed as you face the Extension Office building. On the left are plants that love shade and moisture. On the right of the entrance are plants that grow well in shade but appreciate drier soil. Would studying these areas help solve any problems in your landscape? Much can be learned from the native plant garden, which consists of plants that are native to Central Oregon. They are dis-

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Master Gardeners plant the OSU Extension demo garden at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center. The Extension Service would like the garden to be part of a larger learning center/demonstration garden. played in a manner that makes them acceptable to a home landscape. In general these plants share the qualities of being drought-tolerant, pest-resistant, and tolerant of strong winds. The cyclone fence that surrounds the grounds is becoming a display of vines that work well

to help provide a wind break, grow an edible crop, soften the look of a metal fence or perhaps add spring or fall color. Hop vines, several clematis and Virginia creeper are in place and doing well. Already proven to be an asset are the three compost bins built

several years ago. The results prove you don’t need expensive equipment to make your own “black gold.” The addition of organic material is especially important for our soil, which contains so little natural organic material. A small group of dedicated

Master Gardeners worked through the very worst of our spring weather building a raised bed with wheelchair access, a square-foot garden following the precise directions from Mel Bartholomew’s book on squarefoot gardening and a raised bed cover following the instructions

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

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Terra cotta pots are classically attractive, and their porousness allows air to get to the roots. But they dry out quickly on hot summer days. Jeff Bredenberg, author of “How to Cheat at Gardening and Yard Work,” advises smearing petroleum jelly around the inside of the pot before adding soil. This moisture barrier, he says, should last through the growing season.

Learn to accessorize your landscape with containers By Susan Reimer The Baltimore Sun

I consider container gardens the accessories in a landscape. Sort of like the Harry Winston diamonds, the Miu Miu clutch and the Jimmy Choo shoes on Oscar night: nice, but the dress is what really matters. The same is true in the garden. Once you have done the heavy lifting in the yard — the cleanup, the dividing and pruning and the mulching — you can take your time designing the “mini me’s” of gardens — the containers. Containers can accessorize your deck or add curb appeal to your entrance. But they also can find a niche in your garden, on the odd tree stump, hanging from a garden hook or tucked under ornamental grasses, providing a visual bonus. Design faux pas are easier to spot in containers, and you can avoid them altogether by having someone at a garden center design and plant one for you. Likewise, catalogs sell plants in container combinations. Or go monochromatic and plant a clutch of pansies or a patio rose. Jeff Bredenberg, in his book

“How to Cheat at Gardening and Yard Work,” offers shortcuts for all manner of gardening, from growing vegetables to landscape design and container planting. It is a good book for gardeners who don’t want to be caught taking themselves too seriously. Or spending too much money. Here’s some of his advice on cutting corners, saving money and maximizing the longevity of container gardens. • You can convert all manner of found objects into containers for plants, but there must be drainage to prevent root rot. If the container doesn’t have holes, either drill them or create artificial drainage with 2 inches of pea gravel or wood chips. Put screen over the drainage substance to prevent the soil from washing away. Toss that found container if it doesn’t work — or if its whimsy wears out after a season. • Don’t skimp on the size of your container and then cram too many plants into it. The plants are an investment for the season, but the container is an investment you can use again. Besides, the plants will battle for water

and suffer for it. • Container gardens require water every two or three days — more often if they are in full sun. Consider a timer-controlled drip system. • Add compost, and the soil in your container will retain water longer. Use time-release fertilizer and you could be done with that chore for the season. • Stands or those little clay “feet” — anything that lifts the container off the deck or the ground — are a good idea. This will reduce staining on the porch or deck and will keep the container garden away from pests in the yard. Consider putting the planters on small dollies so you can rearrange them or move them easily in and out of sunlight. • Planting a very deep and heavy container? Fill the bottom half with Styrofoam “peanuts” and then add the soil. This makes the planter lighter and allows air to reach the roots. • Small pots dry out quickly on hot days. Give them a big drink before you leave for work — and add a couple of ice cubes to the surface of the soil to give an extra helping of water gradually.

What changes are in store to get the garden closer to becoming a learning center? A pergola with grape vines would serve a dual purpose of providing an introduction to viniculture as well as offering a shady seating area on a hot day. Master Food Preservers would benefit from an herb garden for their public education classes. A children’s garden could be a place for smelling, touching and picking plants, an area where the signs say “Please touch.” Basic classes on identifying good bugs and the importance of bees and butterflies would be as valuable to accompanying parents as they would be to a budding gardener. Wouldn’t a tomato tasting/judging event be a highlight of the harvest season? Yes, Virginia, we do harvest tomatoes; you just have to know which ones to plant. I have seen wonderful, creative scarecrow and pumpkin competitions that draw service clubs, artists, garden clubs and schools together in community spirit. Now take a deep breath. The centerpiece will eventually be a sizeable greenhouse for experimentation, classes and seed germination for the demo and the display gardens. The idea has passed through the dream stage and as the saying goes, “all it takes is money.” Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

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F6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Coca-Cola Cake is sure to satisfy a sweet tooth By Julie Rothman

RECIPE FINDER

The Baltimore Sun

Dorothy Charron, of St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for recipe from many years ago for a moist chocolate cake that had Coca-Cola as an ingredient. Theodora Capezio, of Monkton, Md., sent in a recipe for making a Coca-Cola cake that she said she cut from a newspaper a long time ago. She said her young family, with six sons, always enjoyed this cake. Her original recipe called for the use of oleo, which was what margarine was called when it was first introduced. That gives some idea of what era this recipe dates from. This cake is extremely sweet, one that most kids and adults with a sweet tooth are bound to love. Next time, I think I would be inclined to serve it without the topping and substitute a

“Choose dishes that travel well, can be made mostly in advance, are served at room temperature and don’t involve lots of sauces or other ingredients that will make the fare soggy.” Martha Stewart Living

scoop of vanilla ice cream. RECIPE REQUEST: Jacqueline Maurer, of Pittsburgh, would like a recipe for graham cracker pie similar to the one her mom made in the 1950s and 1960s. The crust was made with graham crackers and the filling was puddinglike with a meringue topping.

If you are looking for a hardto-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published. Letters may be edited for clarity.

COCA-COLA CAKE 2 C flour 3 TBS cocoa 2 C sugar ½ tsp salt ½ C “oleo” margarine or butter 1 C cola ½ C vegetable oil ½ C buttermilk or sour milk 2 eggs 1 tsp baking soda

Plan the perfect picnic

1 tsp vanilla 1½ C mini marshmallows For topping: ¼ C margarine or butter 2 TBS cocoa 3 TBS cola 1½ C confectioners sugar ½ tsp vanilla 1 C chopped nuts or coconut (optional)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift together flour, cocoa, sugar and salt. In a small saucepan combine margarine, cola and vegetable oil and bring to a boil. Pour over the dry ingredients and stir until well mixed. Then add the buttermilk, eggs, baking soda and vanilla. Mix well. Fold in mini marshmallows. Pour batter into a greased and floured 9-by-13-inch pan and spread marshmallows evenly. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes. While cake is baking, prepare topping. Topping: In a small saucepan, combine margarine, cola, and cocoa. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat and add the sugar, vanilla and nuts, if using. Pour topping over cake while hot.

The Washington Post

For fava bruschetta, the beans first must be removed from their cozy, down-insulated pods.

It’s picnic season — time to pack delicious dishes for outdoor concerts and fireworks in the park. Here are some pointers for putting together a great meal, plus a special sandwich recipe suited for an occasion that is also a bit special — it seems fitting that the food match.

A movable feast Containers: Parchment and twine, lightweight serving bowls and baking dishes and tins are environmentally friendly alternatives to plastic wrap and throwaway containers. They look nicer, too. Menu: Choose dishes that travel well, can be made mostly in advance, are served at room temperature and don’t involve lots of sauces or other ingredients that will make the fare soggy. Avoid foods that require cutting; opt for those that need only a fork — or better yet, can be held in hand. Appetizers: Assemble portable servings of bite-size snacks, such as bags of pistachios, to offer people as they arrive. Nuts are a healthy alternative to potato chips and are less likely to be crushed. Main dishes: Choose a hardy bread, such as a baguette, for sandwiches. (Making open-faced sandwiches, such as the beef ones here, keeps the bread-to-filling ratio balanced.) Salads: In place of lettuce-based salads which tend to fade in the heat, serve ones built on sturdy sliced vegetables or grains. Prep work: Do all the cutting at home. Don’t plan on chopping things at the picnic. Tableware: Forgo disposable goods when possible and use lightweight, break-resistant plates, cutlery and glasses. Enamelware dishes, a camping favorite, are sturdy but not heavy. Packing: Use two big canvas bags, one for room-temperature food and an insulated one for anything that needs to stay chilled. After you pack a layer of food in the bottom of a bag, place a small cutting board over it. Then add another layer of food. The board will act as a shelf and prevent the food from toppling over. When you get to the picnic area, place the cutting board in the middle of the serving area and use it as a makeshift table for

Simon Watson / Martha Stewart Living

Beef Tenderloin Sandwiches with Herb Mayonnaise can make a picnic seem like a special occasion.

ROASTED GARLIC

BEEF TENDERLOIN SANDWICHES WITH HERB MAYONNAISE

Makes 1 head. 1 head garlic, papery outer skins discarded, 1 ⁄4 inch cut off top 1 TBS extra-virgin olive oil Preheat oven to 400 F. Place garlic on parchment-lined foil, drizzle with oil, and wrap. Roast until golden and soft, about 1 hour. Unwrap; let cool for 10 minutes. Squeeze cloves from peels.

drinks. Pack a large paper bag, and use it to line one of the canvas bags when toting home dirty dishes. Extras: Bring a cutting board to use as a makeshift table for serving food and drinks. Also include napkins (cloth if possible), tea towels (to use as an added layer around packed foods or as place mats), salt and pepper shakers and serving utensils. Don’t forget a large tablecloth or sheet to use as your “table.”

Makes 6 servings. Beef eye of round may be substituted for the beef tenderloin. Follow the same method, roasting 10 minutes more for medium rare (30 to 35 minutes total). 1 TBS vegetable oil 1 center-cut beef tenderloin (2 pounds), trimmed of excess fat, tied Coarse salt and freshly ground pepper 8 to 10 cloves Roasted Garlic (recipe at left) 1 TBS fresh lemon juice 2 TBS finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 TBS finely chopped fresh thyme 1 TBS finely chopped fresh marjoram 1 baguette, halved horizontally and cut crosswise into 3 pieces 2 C watercress, preferably baby 3 ⁄4 cup mayonnaise

Preheat oven to 425 F. Heat oil in a large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Generously season beef with salt and pepper. Add to skillet and brown on all sides, about 10 minutes total. Transfer skillet to oven. Roast until beef registers 130 F for medium-rare, 20 to 25 minutes. Let beef stand for 20 minutes. Cut into 1⁄4-inch-thick slices. Meanwhile, mash garlic with a fork in a small bowl. Stir in mayonnaise, lemon juice, and herbs. Season with salt and pepper. (Garlic-herb mayonnaise can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 1 day.) Spread 1 tablespoon of the mayonnaise onto each bread slice. Top with beef. Just before serving, add watercress. Season with salt and pepper.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In

Fava, my favorite bean By Cynthia A. Brown The Washington Post

Favas take time to prepare, so grab a glass of something (perhaps Chianti), sit on the deck and decompress. The beans first must be removed from their cozy, downinsulated pods. Then the shelled beans must be dropped into boiling water, cooked for 2 minutes

and dunked into an ice-cold water bath. Finally, the bitter outer skin must be removed, revealing a glistening, scrumptious, shamrock-green nugget. That nugget is the endosperm, the material that would have nourished the embryo as it grew and formed a new plant. In this case, the nugget nourishes the cook and special friends.

Made for each other.

FAVA BRUSCHETTA Makes about 12 appetizer servings. 2 lbs fava beans, in their pods 2 tablespoons olive oil 1 small-to-medium Vidalia onion, cut into small dice (1 scant C) 2 medium cloves garlic, one minced, one left whole (peeled) Leaves from 2 large stems mint, chopped (1 TBS)

Freshly ground black pepper 1 thin French baguette or ficelle (no more than 5 oz total) 2 TBS Greek-style (thick) plain yogurt 1 ⁄4 C finely shredded pecorino Romano cheese

Follow the procedure outlined above for the favas: Peel them out of their pods, blanch in boiling water, shock in an ice-water bath and then pop them out of their bitter seed coats. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan or skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it is translucent. Add the minced garlic and cook for 1 minute, stirring. Add the favas and mint; stir to incorporate. Cook for 1 minute to warm the favas. Season with the black pepper to taste. Transfer the fava-onion mixture to a mixing bowl; use a potato masher to smash the beans into a rough paste. Add the yogurt and the cheese; stir until well incorporated. Cut the baguette or ficelle into thin slices and toast lightly. Cut the remaining whole clove of garlic in half; rub the cut sides on the tops of the slices, then top each toasted slice with a tablespoon or two of the mashed fava mixture. Position the top oven rack 4 to 6 inches from the top broiling element; preheat the broiler. Have a large baking sheet at hand. Arrange the toasted slices with the fava mixture on top in a single layer on the baking sheet. Broil for about 3 minutes or just until the cheese in the mixture begins to soften. Transfer to a platter; serve warm. Nutrition per serving: 140 calories, 8 g protein, 21 g carbohydrates, 4 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 130 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar.

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head males well bred, small, $175. 541-420-4825.

Chi-Pom puppies, Active, 6 weeks old July 8. Healthy, playful & ready for a home. $200 cash for choice. Call for descriptions/photo. 541-480-2824. Dachshunds Mini health guarantee, puppy kit, pics & info highdesertdogsonline.com $300 each 541-416-2530

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Mini, AKC Dachshunds, black & tan, black & brindle, short & long hair, call for more information $275 to $325. 541-420-6044,541-447-3060

Miniature Australian

Shepherd - Show Quality black tri male. Born in Oct., current on shots. Pet price w/o papers/neuter agreement $300. Out of International Champion parents. For more info: www.ArrowBPaints.com or call: 541-576-2056 Min-Pin Puppy, Adorable, Red, 12 weeks old, tail/ dew claw done. UTD shots. $150. 541-598-7996.

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

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D ry ers

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bdrm., Set, queen size, incl. mattress, boxsprings, used 1 mo., 2 night stands, head/ footboard, dresser, chest, $700, 541-419-4260.

FREEZER 6’ chest $100. 541-350-5425. Fridge, Frigidaire, white, dbl. doors, water & icemaker, 21 cu.in., exc. $250. 382-5921

Nice adult companion cats FREE to seniors! Altered, GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gashots, ID chip, more. rage sale and don't forget to 541-398-8420. advertise in classified! Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups 385-5809. AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, Mattresses good $300, Madras, 541-475-2593 quality used mattresses, Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, at discounted 1st shots/worming, 8 weeks fair prices, sets & singles. old, males & female avail., 541-598-4643. 541-447-4399

Pembroke Welsh Corgis 6 wks old. 2 males left, very sweet. parents on-site. $200 OBO Please call 541-385-1785 or 541-610-5225.

MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

English Bulldog, AKC Reg, 1 male left $1700, all shots 541-325-3376. English Bulldog brindle female. 8 wks and ready to go! Please leave msg. 541-588-6490

HAVANESE Male Puppies 8wks Non-Allergy/shed shots $900 Adult $500 541-915-5245

TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUCHONS), 5 females, 1 male, 7 wks. July 15th. CKC reg., hypoallergenic, non-shedHeeler Pups, standards & ding, 1st shots $350-$400. minis,$150 ea. 541-280-1537 541-460-1277 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

KITTENS! Just in from foster homes, social, playful, altered, shots, ID chip, free vet visit, more! Low adoption fees, discount for 2. Nice cats also avail. Open Sat/Sun 1-5 PM, call re: other days. 317-3931, 389-8420, photos/map: www.craftcats.org “Kittens, Kittens, Kittens” The Humane Society of Redmond has Kittens. Adoption fee of $40.00 includes spay/ neuter, microchip, first set of vaccinations & a free health exam with a local Veterinarian. All kittens are tested for feline aids/leukemia. For more information come by the shelter at 1355 NE Hemlock Ave or call us at 541-923-0882.

Adult Cat Adoption Special During the Month of July adoption fee for all adult cats is only $20.00. All Cats are English Bulldog Puppies! tested for feline aids/leukeOnly 3 males left, ready for mia. Adoption includes spay/ new homes July 1st. AKC neuter, microchip, first set of certified and they have been vaccinations and a free vet checked and had 1st health exam with a local vetshots. $1800. each. Contact erinarian. For information Laurie (541)388-3670 come by the shelter at 1355 NE Hemlock Ave or call English Springer Spaniel 541-923-0882. . Puppies AKC Field, ready Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest now. Liver & white, males AKC German Shorthair puppies, Selection. 541-408-3317 $500, females $600. Beaver solid liver, both parents used Creek Kennels 541-523-7951 for guiding, great pets. Australian millerbeavercreekkennels.com Labradoodles, $450. 541-420-1869, msg. Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Beagle Puppy - 12 weeks old. FIND IT! First shots. Great with kids. BUY IT! Labradoodles, multi-generation, $225. 541-416-1507. SELL IT! 4 left, born 5/19, chocolate Black Lab AKC Puppy, dew The Bulletin Classifieds & black, 541-647-9831. claws removed, shots given, good field and show pedi- FOUND male loop-earred bunny LABS, AKC, chocolate & black gree. Price reduced to $200. on 31st St. in Redmond, July male 10 weeks old. Parents 541-280-5292 1st. Call 541-948-5202. on site $250. 541-447-8958

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Furniture & Appliances

Antiques & Collectibles

KITTENS 2 girls, 2 boys, very friendly, and FREE! 541-389-0322.

O r e g o n

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Items for Free HIDE-A-BED, double size, in good shape, you-haul. 541-848-7525

B e n d

Pets and Supplies

Sidewinder Mountain Bikes, 2 New 26” Schwinn, $85 ea (Firm), call 541-317-0184

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Exercise Equipment Treadmill, ProForm XP 542E, very good condition $300 541-317-5156. Treadmill, Sears 400 ProForm Crosswalk, elec. exc. cond. $500. 541-388-3789.

Westie, 2-yr.-old intact male, outside dog, loves kids & attention, reg. used for breeding, $300. 541-447-8912. “Westie” male pup, should mature 15-20 lbs. non-shedding hypo-allergenic, great with kids, other animals, $500. 541-447-8912. Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE, fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 Yellow Lab AKC Puppies, OFA hips/elbows cert., champion bloodlines, dew claws removed, 1st shots & wormed, ready 8/1, $500. 541-728-0659. (Taking deps.)

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Yorkie, AKC, Male, 8.5 mo., weighs 5.5 lbs., very active, housebroken, loves children, $500 Firm. No checks. 541-419-3082

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Furniture & Appliances #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

- Misc.

Surf Board, 9’6”, Jacobs, new, $600 OBO, signed by Hap Jacobs, call 541-306-4632.

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Bob Dylan Wanted: 1966 Paramount Theater Portland Concert Poster, will pay $3000 Cash, 310-346-1965.

Christian Lassen Ocean Serigraphs (3), 20% of 2003 appraisal, 541-306-4632.

Flow Blue and Potato masher collection; vintage African fabric & Saris. 541-419-9406.

Rare Ann Ruttan Original, 6’x4’, $7000 OBO, please call 541-408-4613.

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Computers

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

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THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

256

Coins & Stamps

Photography

WANTED TO BUY

Camera, Nikon FE 35 mm, 36-72 Zoom & 28-200 Zoom, $300 OBO, like new, 541-306-4632.

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

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Musical Instruments

241 Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

Bicycles and Accessories Schwinn Womens High Timber Alum. mnt. bike. Shocks, like new, $170. 541-480-5950

Upright piano, older, Baus Piano Co. NY, dark brown wood, $250 OBO. 541-389-0322.

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Misc. Items

2005 Street-legal Columbia golf cart, new batteries, curtains, like new. $3,950. All-Metal Trigger & friend, 541-410-5423 Nancy. Health problems, must sell $1500 OBO. Adams Idea Hybrid Tech 541-382-8814. OS, P-7, 6,5,4,3, Hybrid Reg. graphite $300. 318-8427. Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & Clubs, Calloway X20,steel irons, R O L E X ’ S For Cash 5-PW, w/4 hybrid, 3 mo. old, 541-549-1592 $300;Taylor Made Tour Burner driver, Pro Force V-2 regular BUYING DIAMONDS shaft, $100, 541-350-7076. FOR CASH Irons, Ping Zing, 2-SW, graphSAXON'S FINE JEWELERS ite, exc., $250 OBO; Call 541-389-6655 541-306-4632. BUYING 246 Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Guns & Hunting

Art, Jewelry and Furs

Furniture

RARE EGCon acoustic guitar some classical, hispanic, western. $239 541-382-2543.

Golf Equipment

and Fishing

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

1950’s Baldwin Baby Grand Piano, w/bench, good cond., needs some intermal repair, $475, 541-408-3215.

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CASH!! “Free Barn Cats” Rolltop desk, Jefferson, 52”, For Guns, Ammo & Reloading The Humane Society of Red- Pomeranians,1 male wolf sable. exc. $275 OBO, call Supplies. 541-408-6900. 1 black & white male & 1 femond has Free Barn Cats 541-306-4632. Hunting Bow, Golden Eagle, male. $350ea. 541-480-3160 available. All Barn Cats have Table, dark pine, 8 chairs, 2 like new, arrows, rest, sight, been tested for feline aids/ POODLES, AKC Toy, home leaves, good cond., $1500 release, hardcase, $300 OBO, leukemia, vaccinated, spayed raised. Joyful tail waggers! firm, 541-383-2535. call 541-382-8393. /neutered. For more info call Affordable. 541-475-3889. Border Collie pups, work541-923-0882 or come by 202 ing parents great personalithe shelter at 1355 NE Hem- Poodle, standard pups (5), only Oregon’s Largest 3-Day The Bulletin ties. $300. 541-546-6171. Want to Buy or Rent lock Ave. GUN & KNIFE SHOW recommends extra caution 2 weeks. Put your deposit July 16-17-18 when purchasing products down now! 541-647-9831. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Mo- Boxer Puppies, AKC Registered Free Kittens (2), 1 calico, 1 or services from out of the Portland Expo Center $700 each, 1st two shots PUG MIX PUPPIES, 3 boys, 1 tabby, spayed/neutered, torcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, area. Sending cash, checks, #306B Off I-5 541-325-3376. girl, $75 each. 1st shots. please call 541-771-9000. ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! or credit information may Special Guests: 541-389-0322 541-280-6786. be subjected to F R A U D . Cavalier King Charles Spaniels - FREE to good home: 4 gray Oregon Military Vehicle Breeding pair. Ruby 3 yrs For more information about Wanted washers and dryers, cockatiels, 1 year old. Schnoodle Pup, 10 week male, Collectors Club of Oregon female, blenheim male 9 an advertiser, you may call 2nd shots, pup kit, very working or not, cash paid, 541-923-9902. Fri 12-6 * Sat. 9-5 months. Excellent pets & the Oregon State Attorney sweet $395. 541-410-7701. 541- 280-6786. * Sun 10-4. Adm. $9.00 breeders. $1000 each. German Wirehair Pointer General’s Office Consumer SHIH-POO adorable toy pups, Wanted washers and dryers, Children under 12 Free 541-419-7680 Protection hotline at Pups, ready now, $200/ea. hypo-allergenic, 1 male, 1 working or not, cash paid, 1-877-877-9392. 541-408-6099. 1-800-659-3440 ChihuahuaAbsolutely adorable female left. $350 ea.. Call 541- 280-6786. CollectorsWest.com teacups, 2 males, wormed, 1st Griffin Wirehaired Pointer Martha at 541-744-1804. shots, $250, 541-977-4686 Pups, both parents reg., 5 We Want Your Junk Car!! Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 Stevens single shot 20 ga. shot males, 4 females, born 6/20, We'll buy any scrap metal, males & 2 females, chocogun, refinished & reblued, ready for home 1st week in batteries or catalytic conVANITY late 1940s, exc. cond, late, black, apricot & cream $150. 541-595-0941 Chihuahua pupAug, $1000, 541-934-2423 or verters. 7 days a week call carved mirror, $265. $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 pies 9 weeks old, 2 fe541-390-6577/541-948-5277 loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-633-3590. 247 Jabezstandardpoodles.com males available $200. Please call 541-460-3247 Sporting Goods 212 205 for more information. Black & Yellow Lab Pups, AKC, champion hunting lines, Dew Claws removed, 1st shots, de-wormed & vet checked, ready to go, $350, 541-977-2551.

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

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BarkTurfSoil.com

Building Materials

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public . Logs sold by the foot and also Log home kit, 28x28 shell incl. walls (3 sided logs) ridge pole, rafters, gable end logs, drawing (engineered) all logs peeled & sanded $16,000 . 541-480-1025.

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Ad must include price of item

Fuel and Wood

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

PATIO SET Tropitone 87” tile stone table, chairs & umbrella, make offer. 388-2348. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Wedding/shower decor: centerpieces, some floral, bridal shower games. $5 all; nice cut-glass pattern punch bowl, with stand, 10 glass cups, plastic ladle $20; Glass buffet luncheon plates, 1960s style $10 all. Come & see, make offer on any or all. 541-419-6408. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

263

Tools Drill Press, American Machine, 5-spd., industrial model, $225, 541-385-9350. Milling Machine, Tree Brand, 42”, power feed articulating head, tools, hold downs, vice, $3200, 541-549-1875.

Wagner Paint Crew, used twice, $90 OBO; 7” wet tile saw, $50, OBO, call 541-306-4632.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT Lodgepole cord, $165 or mixed $135. Bend Delivery Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177 SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449 Lawn Edge Trimmer, Craftsman 4 hp., 3 wheel, like new $195. 541-388-0811. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found: 2 Hats & Scarf after parade on Sun. 7/4, Oregon Ave, call 541-382-4464. Found a cruiser bike. Please call to identify. 541-317-2827. Found: Bag of wrenches, 7/5, Village Westoria, on Revere, 541-383-4107. FOUND CABELA’S 2010 hard cover book by Elton Gregory school. call 541-923-7607. Found Camera: Cascade Lakes Hwy., morning of 7/10, call to identify, 541-389-4687. FOUND: Female Puppy, downtown Bend, on the 4th of July, to identify 771-8523. Found Key Fob with three keys. on Quebec Drive July 5th, Please call 541-280-0452. Found Sanddisk 512mb camera card, 6/17, Powerline Trail at Paulina Lake, 541-383-0882. Found Sunday, 7/4: case of CDs on SE 27th St., Call 541-382-7680. Lost Dog: toy Fox Terrier/Chihuahua mix, female, near Steelehead Falls, white, reddish brown spots, has collar, “Dallas”, 6/30, very friendly, 541-504-4422,541-953-3000 Lost Gold Bracelet, in Drake Park, at Farmers Market or near bridge, 7/7, Reward, 541-617-0240.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Lost: Pomeranian/Chihuhua mix, very small, black, long haired, Glacier Ridge subdivision, NE Bend, 7/9, about 8 p.m., “Gizmo”, REWARD, 541-318-3317,541-647-7899 Lost: Silver Money, Sat. 7/3, Turquoise & coral decoration, in Bend, 541-385-6012. Lost: Taylor golf driver head in grey fuzzy cover @ Awbrey Glen 541-280-0397

New Hours Beginning July 17 Business Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Classified Telephone Hours: Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.


G2 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 270

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Lost and Found

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Host/ Hostess

Millwrights: Warm Springs Forest Products Industries is seeking journeyman level millwrights for openings in Warm Springs, Oregon. Applicants must be able to: • Perform various duties in a fast paced modern sawmill. • Perform trouble shooting, maintenance, repairs and replacements for production equipment. • 1-3 Years of industrial maintenance experience as a journeyman or equivalent. • Broad trade skills - welding, pneumatics, hydraulics. • Strong mechanical skills able to use a variety of hand and power tools. • Good reading skills for drawings, service manuals, and blueprints. • Able to work safely. Warm Springs Forest Products offers a safe work environment as well as competitive wages, benefits packages, and 401K plan. E-mail: dhenson@wsfpi.com

MISSING from 17001 Elsinore Rd., Sunriver: ‘Katie-Kat’ tortoise shell calico with half tail, wearing harness & collar with ID & rabies tags. Missing since 6/11. Reward. 541-977-4288 or 977-3021. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

280

Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

358

Farmers Column

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4

Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, 0% APR Financing cut, rake, bale & stack, servThe New Kubota RTV500 coming all of Central Oregon, call pact utility vehicle has all the 541-891-4087. comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility vehicle – but fits in the bed of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on approved credit. 541-322-7253

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

Employment Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Cutting Orchard Grass, 2-tie, $110/ton, Alfafla Grass Mix Feeder hay, $90/ton, good quality Alfalfa, $110/ton, 541-475-4242, 541-948-0292

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 1st Cutting, Timothy Grass Hay, no rain, no fertilizer, $130/ton, in barn, NE Redmond, Please Call 541-771-4000.

2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. Central Oregon premium grass hay. First Cutting. No Rain, No Weeds, $150/ton or $190/ton delivered to limited areas. 541-475-0383

290 Huge Community Yard Sale to Benefit Animals. July 10-11, 8-5, 8950 S. Hwy 97, in big yellow barn! 100's of items, must sell to vacate barn! All proceeds for nonprofit rescue efforts. 728-4178.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. Big Newhouse cattle squeeze chute needs paint $500. 541-447-1039.

EXCELLENT GRASS HAY FOR SALE, fine stems, leafy green, 80 lb. bales, $125 ton in Culver, 541-475-4604.

QUALITY 1st cutting orchard grass hay. No rain. Cloverdale area. $110 ton, 2 twine 70-75# bales, 541-480-3944. Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com DIAMOND J STABLES is re-opening at the end of July! call Lori to hold a stall at 541-389-8164. Limited Stalls available.

Equestrian Jumps: 20 standards, 11 poles, 23 steel cups. Like new; ready to use. $850 541-233-3207

Ford 8N Tractor, 3 point hitch, 6’ blade, dirt scoop, $1750 for all, 541-382-6028.

Fuel tank 64 inch wide for pickup with pump $235. 541-447-1039. John Deere 2X16 hydraulic rollover plow with 3 pt. hitch $485. 541-447-1039. SWATHER DOLLY, $500; Baler NH 282, PTO, twine, SOLD; Bale Wagon, NH1010 SOLD; Swather Hesston 6400, $3500; J D Swather, Cab, A/C, diesel, A300 Twin Knife header, $5500; all field ready, Prineville, 541-419-9486

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

As low as

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Sales Redmond Area

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

345

Livestock & Equipment BEEF CALVES 300-800 lbs., pasture ready, vaccinated, delivery avail. 541-480-1719.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Automotive Front End/Suspension Tech needed. Experience is essential for this fast paced job. Send replies to: 1865 NE Hwy 20, Bend, OR 97701.

400

Cook

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Sunriver/Redmond day time hrs., affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions CAREGIVER wanted for elderly woman, room/board, + Ref. needed. 541-549-1471. We are looking for an experienced caregiver for our elderly parents. This is an employee position, and possible live-in. 541-480-0517 or 541-548-3030 jensen.cpa@bendcable.com

Employment Opportunities Addiction Counselor: Part time, women’s groups & assesments, Mon., Tue, Wed. 9-3, CADC or masters level, exp.. Salary DOE, Fax resume to 541-383-4935 or mail to 23 NW Greenwood Ave., Bend, 97701.

ADVERTISING

SALES

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Food Service -

Jake’s Diner

is accepting applications for Line Cook. Apply in person.

476

APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management

The Ranch has an immediate opening for a seasonal Cook. Knowledge in all areas of food preparation a must. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Some benefits. Salary DOQ. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com . BBR is a drug free work place. EOE.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

ASSISTANT

Don’t miss out on the unique opportunity to work in the Ranch’s newly renovated Lodge restaurant. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a “customer first” attitude? We are looking for an enthusiastic, customer service oriented individual to join Team BBR. This is for afternoon and pm shifts only. Must be willing to work weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Hotel Part-time positions avail., which included front desk, food service, housekeeping. Apply in person to Pine Ridge Inn, phone calls not accepted. 1200 SW Century Drive, Bend. Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE A Classified Inside Sales position is available in The Bulletin’s advertising department. This position sells and services classified advertising for private party advertising customers as well as some commercial accounts with ads in The Bulletin, Redmond Spokesman and Central Oregon Nickel Ads. The position assists customers with ad creation, copy writing, and ad features in an effort to make their advertising successful. The position also makes outbound sales calls to commercial accounts, and does weekly follow up with existing customers. Excellent communication and presentation skills are necessary for success. The successful candidate must be able to manage multiple tasks and information about multiple publications, meeting the needs of the customer and the deadlines of the newspaper. The candidate must also offer outstanding customer service. A minimum of 1 year experience in sales, and / or a solid background in marketing, retail or telephone sales is required for consideration. The position is hourly, 40 hours per week and offers a competitive compensation / bonus plan with benefits. Please send a cover letter and resume to Sean Tate, Bulletin Advertising Manager at state@bendbulletin.com, or mail to Sean Tate at The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please. Please submit your application by July 26th, 2010.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities Sales

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Duties include but are not limited to: Scheduling ads, organizing paperwork, proofing ads, taking photos, ad layout, filing and working with customers on their advertising programs. A strong candidate must possess excellent communication, multi-tasking and organizational skills. The person must be able to provide excellent customer service and easily establish good customer rapport. The best candidates will have experience with administrative tasks, handling multiple position responsibilities, proven time management skills and experience working within deadlines.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business

Two years in business, advertising, sales, marketing or communications field is preferred. The position is hourly, 40 hours per week offers a competitive compensation plan with benefits. Please send a cover letter and resume by Monday 7/19/10 to Advertising Sales Assistant c/o The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave, Bend, OR 97702. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

&

Call Today &

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend

Career opportunity selling the best European cars in the World. Carrera Motors is looking for the right candidate to sell Porsche, Audi, VW, BMW and quality used automobiles. Auto experience is not necessary, however, a strong background in sales is mandatory. Candidates who possess a book of business of qualified customers will be the best fit for this position. Excellent pay and benefits. Email resumes to Rebecca@carreramotors.com or davidt@carreramotors.com. Sales Position: A prominent National Wholesale Agricultural Parts Distributor is seeking a Territory Sales Representative to cover portions of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Responsible for developing new accounts as well as servicing and growing existing accounts. Overnight travel is required. Farm or farm machinery knowledge is helpful. Base salary plus commission. E-mail resume and cover letter to larry.hansen@smalink.com

541-383-0386

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF A position is available in The Bulletin Advertising department for a Retail Sales Assistant. This position assists outside sales representatives with account and territory management, accurate paperwork, on-deadline ad ordering, and with maintaining good customer service and relationships.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-330-0853 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. Find exactly what you are looking for in the C LA SSIFIED S

573

Business Opportunities Own a Pub in the Gorge. Spectacular setting in Cascade Locks, OR. 3-story building, land, & profitable business. Upper floors available for development. Assumable SBA loan. Will consider exchanges. $679,500. 503-780-3945. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Reporter Seeking Part-Time Sports Reporter

The Bulletin is seeking a part-time sports reporter. Writing/reporting experience and good general knowledge of a broad range of sports, especially high school sports, is preferred. Position requires flexibility to work weeknights and Saturdays. Applicant must be able to meet tight deadlines and possess good computer and typing skills. Direct inquiries to sports editor Bill Bigelow at bbigelow@bendbulletin.com. To apply, send cover letter and relevant clips/writing samples to Marielle Gallagher at: mgallagher@bendbulletin.com or The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR, 97708-6020.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Rentals

600 630

Rooms for Rent Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $25/night. Includes guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365 NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, $400. 541-317-1879

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

640

648

656

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Old Mill Studio, separate entrance, all utilities pd. $500 mo. plus $500 deposit. Small pet neg. No smoking. 541-382-1941.

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $530. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

Summer Special! $99 Move in $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad 2553 & 2580 SW 20th St.started ASAP! 541-385-5809 2/1 duplexes, garage, yard, W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, 634 $600+dep, incl. yard maint., Apt./Multiplex NE Bend no pets/smoking.541-382-1015

Call about our Specials

$99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move-In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. 541-385-6928. #1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $625 + dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615. 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Duplex, 1400 sq.ft., dbl. attached garage, W/D incl., fenced yard, $750 per mo., please call 541-410-4255.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. $ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $675 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $590 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688. Westside Condo, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D, A/C, garage, in quiet 4-plex, at great westside location, $800, 1737 SW Knoll, 541-280-7268

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 1 Bdrm. Condo in 7th Mtn. Resort, all utils. incl., resort amenities, $850/mo., offered by Patty McMeen Real Estate, 541-480-2700

personals Seeking witnesses to accident at 4:07 p.m. on 7/3, at Colorado & Wall. 541-389-0662, help greatly appreciated.

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

Summertime Special! Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

541-923-5008

The Bulletin is now offering a 2550 Sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, built 2005, A/C, large masLOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE ter, oversized garage, access Rental rate! If you have a to pool & exercise, $1250 home to rent, call a Bulletin 509-493-2549,541-999-9535 Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 2 Bdrm. Duplex, gas fireplace, back yard, $825/mo. incl. yard maint & water, no smoking, pet okay, 1225 NE Dawson Dr. 402-957-7261 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 61351 SW Rock Bluff Ln in Elkhorn Estates, immaculate 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1656 sq.ft, A/C, private back yard, gas fireplace, sprinklers, all kitchen appl, pet?, $1045 mo. + $1200 dep., 541-389-0969

Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

648

Houses for Rent General Powell Butte, in secluded area, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage,wood stove, W/D hookup, first, last, $400 dep, $600/mo, peg. neg., 541-447-4750.

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Available Now, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, no garage, pet? $525 mo., 1st/last+dep. no W/D hookup. 541-382-3672.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653

541-385-5809 658

Houses for Rent Redmond 2 bdrm. house near Redmond Rite-Aid. enclosed back yard, extra storage, covered parking, yard maint. $525 mo., 541-548 -4727 or 419-8370. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1120 sq.ft., dbl. garage, fenced, new paint, vinyl, carpet & appl., $800/mo., $1200 dep., no pets/smoking, 541-480-2468

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $849 mo. 541-408-0877.

652

2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796.

Houses for Rent NW Bend

New large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq.ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1450. 503-720-7268.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

WESTSIDE, pet friendly, small 1 bdrm house, fenced front & back, large indoor & outdoor storage, walk town & groceries. $550 incl. water. 541-330-7379

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, W/S/G incl., OWWII, $895/ mo. + dep., no smoking, please call 503-651-1142 or 503-310-9027.

654

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Houses for Rent SE Bend Avail. Now, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, new paint inside, yard, wood stove, single garage, no pets or smoking $750 mo., 1st, last, & dep. 541-389-7734.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 bdrm/1 bath with Murphy bed. $595 mo. includes WST & Wireless •SPACIOUS APTS. 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, near Old Mill Dist. $525/mo. Includes Cable + WST - Only 1 Left! • NICE LARGE APTS. 2 bdrm/1 bath. Near hospital. On-site laundry, off-street parking. $525 WST included. • 2 Bdrm/1 Bath with Garage and Laundry Room inside. Private courtyard in front. Near Hospital. $625 W S T • SPACIOUS UNIT w/ TWO MASTERS. Dbl. garage & +SO MUCH MORE incl. Pool +Tennis courts. Only $750 mo. (½ Off 1st Mo! ) • CLOSE TO PIONEER PARK - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm, 1 bath Upstairs Apts. w/Balconies. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. $495/mo. Includes WSG. •Country Home on the Canal off Hwy 20. 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 2 fireplaces. Detached garage/shop. Has irrigation. See to appreciate. 1500 sq. ft. $750 mo. •Refurbished Townhome near hospital. 2 Bdrm, 1.5 bath, with utility room &garage. $625 mo. W/S • Charming Home w/ character. 1348 Sq.ft., 2 + Bdrm, 1 bath, A/C, Laundry Room, Fireplace, Large yard, Close in SE Side. $725 mo. • Private Home in NE cul-de-sac w/ large fenced yard. 3 bdrm, 2 bath with wood stove. $775 per mo. •1400 sq. ft. house in DRW - 3 bdrm, 2 bath on small acreage. Space & privacy. $795 per mo.

•Beautiful NW Townhome - 2 Masters upstairs, ½ bath in laundry room w/W/D. Vaulted ceilings. $850 includes WS ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Real Estate Trades Trade your 5+ acres + home for our beautiful home in West Linn (just south of PDX). 503 534-1212. MLS #10013267. Owner/broker.

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

745

Homes for Sale Amazing mountain view on 5 acres outside of Sisters, 2 bed, 1 bath, 992 sq ft home (interior needs finish work) w/ two car garage, great shop, and detached office, www.sistersviewhome.com, $224,000, 208-921-1436.

Southwest Bend Homes $4000 Down DRW, 24X48 3/2 Golden West mfd. home on 1 acre canal lot, payment $697 mo./30 yrs. Owner for info. 541-505-8000. Eugene.

749

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Debris Removal DMH & Co. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Lease: 679 SE Business Way, 5000+ sq.ft, light industrial, 3 overhead doors, exc. parking, office suite w/mtn. views. Talk to me! 907-252-2794.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

House Keeping Services: 11 yrs of experience in house keeping. Angelica Lopez House Keeping & Janitorial, 541-633-3548,541-633-5489

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

7 Mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613

3 Bdrm. 2 bath single story on ½ acre, built in 2003, also ½ acre lot with well, same area, So. of Sunriver. Please call 509-585-9050 for info.

Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $147,000, 541-576-2390.

750

757

763

Redmond Homes

Crook County Homes

Cottage Style 3 bdrm., garage, heat pump, landscaped. Clean home, safe neighborhood. $65,000 for home AND .013 lot. 541-815-1216.

Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

Recreational Homes and Property

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

CRESCENT LAKE CABIN Lake front. $399,000 503-329-0959

H Multi Family H Prineville Duplex Almost new, fully rented with garage, patio and fireplace. 1200 sq.ft. each side. Great price! $130,000. Lawnae Hunter, Principal Broker Hunter Properties, LLC 541-389-7910 541-550-8635

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $149,900, 541-350-4684.

764

Farms and Ranches 35 ACRE irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, reduced to $395,000. Will consider trade for small acreage or ? 541-447-1039.

771

762

Lots

Homes with Acreage FSBO: 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home 1.47 Acres +/- Comm. Water & Sewer Detached. Garage/Shop Sunriver Area $224,900. Call R. Mosher 541-593-2203.

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $96,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 2 bdrm, 1 bath, SE Bend New carpet, large yard. Pets okay. $7,900.00 or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

3/1 in DRW. Nice yard, W/D, fridge., new furnace, new bath plumbing, quiet park. $8900. 541-728-0529. 60311 Cheyenne Rd., #16

*** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Know your neighbors! Nestled in Bend's only environmentally friendly co-housing community. http://home.bendbroadband.com/higherground/. Lots of sunlight! 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 1450 sq. ft., foam panel construction, large decks, cozy loft. Bamboo floors. $239,000 Call Jen: 541 678-5165. Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

1 per day

$

693

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Handyman

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809

Power Equipment Repair

Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Weekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Consolidated Pest Control Ants, spider, rodents and more! Fast, professional service. ccb #187335. 541-389-3282 www.consolidatedpest.net

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

773

Acreages

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Office/Retail Space for Rent

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

762

Homes with Acreage

CHECK YOUR AD

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Handyman

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

Excavating

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

755

Southeast Bend Homes Sunriver/La Pine Homes

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

687

The Bulletin Classifieds

$350 MOVE-IN SPECIALS (for APTS. & MULTI-PLEXES) EXTENDED INTO SUMMER

745

Homes for Sale

747 719

www.redmondrents.com

FREE 1st mo. duplex,3 bdrm., 2 bath,garage,gas central heat, W/D hookup, HUD OK, small pet OK, EZ move in,NICE UNIT nice location $695, 815-9848

Real Estate For Sale

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

• Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

Painting, Wall Covering Remodeling, Carpentry

LADYBUG LAWN CARE Clean up, maintenance, pruning, bark, edging, affordable, reliable quality service 541-279-3331, 541-516-1041

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Replacement windows & doors • Repairs • Additions/ Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800 850

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 865

870

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Snowmobiles

880

881

882

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Jayco J Series 1206 2008, loaded, incl. toilet/ Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga C24' 1996, Exceptional cond. $17,900. Lots of extras. A/C, Onan Gen, Awnings, Sleeps 6, Solar panel, Micro, 541-410-7005.

Travel 1987,

Queen

shower/fridge + more, sleeps 8, bought new in 2009, must see, $13,500 MSRP, asking $6500, Fred, 541-516-1134.

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories BMW K1200GT 2007, 8000 mi., factory warranty, like new, $10,500, 386-334-2427.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Yamaha Grizzly 660 2006, 408 mi, 38 hrs, excellent condition with records, Warn winch, snow plow, front and rear racks with bags. Moving, must sell $6200 OBO. Call 310-871-8983

870

Boats & Accessories

MUST SELL! 2008 Komfort 32’. GORGEOUS, have lots of pics. $16,500 OBO. Call 541-728-6933 or email teryme@aol.com Nash 22’ 2011, queen walk around bed, never used, $17,000, call 541-420-0825.

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO!

818-795-5844, Madras

15’ Crestliner, tri hull Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148 16 Ft. Hewes Sportsman, aluminum, full curtains, 90 hp. Honda EZ load $20,000. w/extras 541-330-1495.

OUT-CAST Pac 1200, never in water, great for the Deschutes, John Day or small lakes. Cost new $2800, asking $1400 firm. Go to www.outcastboats.com to view boat. 541-420-8954

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

Harley Ultra Classic 2001,Stage 1 kit, Thunder Headers, upgraded stereo w/100W booster, new windshield, batteries, & tires, incl. full luggage set, $11,500, 541-325-3191.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930. Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225. Motorcycle trailer, Kendon standup two place, Electric wench, straps, storage box. $1295. 503-559-0538, 541-306-7905

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $8500, 541-771-8233

865

ATVs

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985.

17’ Sailboat, Swing Keel, w/ 5HP new motor, new sail, large price drop, was $5000, now $3500, 541-420-9188.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

18’ SEASWIRL, new interior, 165HP I/O, 10HP Johnson, fish finder, much more, $1990,541-610-6150 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Kayak:

Pungo120 Wilderness; incl. Yakima car rack w/Thule Brackets; Aquaboard Paddles; Exc. cond.: $800 Call 541-382-7828 or 541-728-8754.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, 2 slides, 44,000 mi., A/C, awning, in good cond., $39,000, call 541-593-7257.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Fifth

Wheel

Hitch,

SuperGlide PullRite Automatic,14K Lbs., for Short Bed pickup, 541-312-4210.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

ers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

880

Winnebago Sightseeer 27’ 2004 30K, 1 slide, hyd. jacks, lots of storage, very clean, exc cond, $41,900,541-504-8568

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

2000 Hitchhiker II, 32 ft., 5th wheel, 2

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 435-229-9415.

885 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, asking $18,000, 541-536-8105

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

EAGLE CAP 2007 9.5 w/ slide, like new $22,000; 2001 1 ton Ford Dually 4x4, 88K mi., $22,000. Buy both for $42,000. 541-350-5425.

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, asking $22,000 OBO. Frank. 541-480-0062

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-279-9581. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, Price Reduced, 7.5 KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed, Queen hidea-bed, $90,000. 541-382-1721

Jayco JayFlight Expo 2007 Series M-25RKS TT w/ slideout. Used only once. $18,495. 541-573-7827 or junqueor@live.com

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934 COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Lance 11.5’ 1992, elec. jacks, micro, A/C, awnings on both sides & back, very clean, no dents, non smoker., clean, $6000 OBO. 541-408-4974.

rear gate, 5x8, 24” sides, $1150, 541-325-2684.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

933

Pickups

Tires, 4 Studless Michelin on rims, 175/70R13, exc. cond., $200, call 541-312-9725. Transmissions, (2), Chrysler, Torque-Flight, $250, no exchange, 541-385-9350.

932

Antique and Classic Autos Buick Special 1947, 4 dr., stock, newer tires, brakes, uphostery, chorme and paint, $12,500 OBO, 541-548-2808.

916

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

Chevy 3/4 Ton 350 1974, automatic, dual gas tanks, wired for camper and trailer. Dual batteries. One owner. Lots of extras. $2950, 541-549-5711 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Chevy Avalance Super Deal! Z71 2002, 4x4,

tow pkg., loaded, runs great, 112K mi. $10,500. 541-383-8917.

INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Brake, 13 spd. transmission, Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, good tires & body paint w/matching canopy and (white). Also, 1993 27’ step extended cab., all power, deck equipment trailer Chevy Wagon 1957, $5950. 541-923-2738. T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. 4-dr., complete, $15,000 Ready to work! $9500 takes OBO, trades, please call DODGE 1972 ¾ ton Camper both. 541-447-4392 or 541-420-5453. Special, new tires, trailer 541-350-3866. brake, runs good. $675. The Bulletin 541-389-1582. To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to Ford F150 Lariat www.bendbulletin.com 2001, step side, 4x4, Mustang MTL16 2006 loaded, white w/tan, Skidsteer, on tracks, in- Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 leather, CD, tow pkg., runcludes bucket and forks, engine, auto. trans, ps, air, ning boards, alloy wheels, frame on rebuild, repainted 540 hrs., $21,000. all pwr., exc., 109K, avail. original blue, original blue 541-410-5454 9/1, KBB private at $9400, interior, original hub caps, call 541-306-4632. exc. chrome, asking $10,000 Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, OBO. 541-385-9350. clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Ford F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 Cat engine, 10 yd mixer spd., 5th wheel hookups, $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 $4000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm. Corvette 1956,

2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Asking $10,000 OBO. Frank, 541-480-0062.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $39,000. 541-548-1422.

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Ford F350 XLT CrewCab 2007

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $29,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Ford F-250 XLT Superduty 2002, 4X4, Supercab, longbox, 7.3 Diesel, auto, cruise, A/C, CD, AM/FM, pwr. windows/locks, tow pkg., off road pkg., nerf bars, sprayed in bedliner, toolbox, mud flaps, bug shield, dash cover, 32K mi., orig. owner, $22,995, 541-815-8069

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

4x4,6.0 Diesel long box, auto, X-liner, Super Hitch, camper ready, 20K, Arizona beige, like new, $32,500, 541-815-1523

Drastic Price Reduction!

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

GMC Sierra 2500 1995, 4X4, 350 auto, club cab, A/C, power, 117K, hideaway gooseneck ball, $4500, please call 541-815-8236.

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310. Hard to find 32 ft. 2007 Hurricane by Four Winds, Ford V10, 10K mi., 2 slides, 2 Color TV’s, backup cam, hydraulic jacks, leather, cherry wood and many other options, Immaculate condition, $63,900. (541)548-5216, 420-1458

Iron Eagle Utility Trailer 2007, swing

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

EAGLE CAP 2008 short bed camper. slide right side. Canopy on left side. elect. jacks, generator, microwave, radio, AM/FM sound system. $21,500. 541-923-8770

Carriage 35’ Deluxe 1996, 2 slides, W/D incl., sound system, rarely used, exc. cond., $16,500. 541-548-5302

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

925

Canopies and Campers

925

Utility Trailers

Tires, 4 Studded Michelins on rims, 175/70R13, exc. cond., $200, call 541-312-9725.

Utility Trailers

881

Beaver Patriot 2000, hot water heater, diesel elec. motor, Walnut cabinets, solar, passengers foot rest, no smoking, no children, Bose stereo, Corian countertops, tile floors, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, W/D, exc. cond., beautiful! $99,000. 541-215-0077

units, central vac, fireplace, Corian, king bed, prepped for washer/dryer & gen., non-smoker owned, immaculate, $39,900, Call 541-554-9736

slides, very clean in excellent condition. $18,000 (541)410-9423,536-6116.

Travel Trailers 2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Grand Junction 39’ 2008, 3 slides, 2 A/C

Fifth Wheels

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Motorhomes

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

882

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Danc-

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $15,000 obo. 541-693-3975.

908

RV Consignments

12’ 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft boat, like new, used twice, has pole holder & folding seats. $1300. 541-617-0846.

900

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

“WANTED” Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1600 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Autos & Transportation

SECTION!!!

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

CHECK OUT OUR NEW MAP FEATURE ONLINE @ WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM /GARAGESALES

We can show your customers the fastest way to your garage sale.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 G5

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Dodge Neon SXT 2003, 41K mi., A/C, pwr. windows, auto, $5300, 541-480-5097..

Ford Focus 2007, 17,982 miles, includes winter tires and rims, $11,000. 541-475-3866

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818. International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

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Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

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Cadillac Coupe DeVille 1990, $1500 Firm, Please call 541-536-2836. Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583 Ford Excursion XLT 2000, 4WD, V-10, runs great, 4” lift, $8000 OBO, 541-771-0512. Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $23,000, 541-576-2442

Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, perfect cond., 541-610-6074

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Audi A4 Avant Wagon 1998, great

car, great shape, 120K miles, excellent snow car $5400. 541-383-8917

Audi S4 2000, 6spd, V6TT, 112k, AWD, very clean, all maint. records. $9000 541-788-4022

Toyota 4Runner 1998, 1 owner, 155K, Rare 5-spd, 4WD. 971-218-5088. Local.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

We will pay CASH for your vehicle Buying vehicles now thru July! Central Oregon's Largest Used Vehicle Inventory Over 150 Used in stock see it on www.smolichmotors.com

Smolich Certified Pre-Owned or Factory Certified Pre-Owned Shop with confidence at Smolich Motors Pre-Owned vehicles on sale everyday All Makes & Models including Honda - Toyota - Ford - Jeep - Volvo Chevy - Dodge - Audi - VW - Chrysler Nissan - Kia - Hyundai - Suzuki - Acura

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Family Owned and Operated for over 40 years

Smolich Motors www.smolichmotors.com Hwy 20 in Bend

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Mercedes 230SLK 1998, exc. cond., extra wheels/studded tires, convertible hardtop, yellow/black leather, many extras. $6800 OBO,541-617-0268

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Subaru Legacy 1993, 165K miles, 5-speed manual, good condition and maintenance $1300 firm, call Tim Mercedes 300SD 1981, 541-923-3412. never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm sysSUBARUS!!! tem, 5 disc CD, toggle switch Nice clean and fully start, power everything, 197K serviced . Most come with miles, will run for 500K miles 3 year, 36,000 mile easily, no reasonable offer warranty. refused, $2900 OBO, call Call The Guru: 541-848-9072. 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com Toyota Camry Hybrid, 2007, 60k mi., extra snow tires 5k miles,city 31/hwy 39. Extras, $16,950. 541-788-1776 Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Toyota Corolla LE 2009, Grandma’s Car, in new cond., 1455 mi., why buy new, save $$$. $13,500, 541-389-4608.

Mercedes Benz C300 2008, 4WD, GPS, 24K, take over lease, $646/mo,541-678-5756 Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

(541) 389-1177 • (541) 749-4025 (541) 389-1178 Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

Porsche Targa 911SC 1979, 110K, Very sharp and clean car, 2 deck lids, one w/whale tail. Drive an investment $15,800. 541-389-4045

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

4X4 * Truck * SUV * Cars starting at $995

We BUY - SELL - SERVICE all makes

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Vehicle Acquisition S A L E Inventory SALE Certified SALE

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

Mazda 3 i 2008, sedan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., leather, nav. system, alloy wheels, Bose sound, rear spoilers, $21,400 obo.541-388-2774

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

Volkswagen New Beetle 2003 74,800 mi. $7,000 Blue w/ black charcoal interior, air conditioning, power steering, AM/FM stereo & cassette, moon roof, power windows and more. Call Rick @ 541-788-8662

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of JOHN V. JOHNSON, Deceased. No. 10 PB 0075 ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of JOHN V. JOHNSON, Deceased, by the Circuit Court of the state of Oregon, probate number 10 PB 0075 ST. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after this date to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: July 6, 2010. MARCELLA G. JOHNSON Personal Representative MARCELLA G. JOHNSON 3626 NW Coyner Avenue Redmond OR 97756 Personal Representative

EDWARD P. FITCH (OSB#782026) Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP P O Box 457 Redmond OR 97756 Telephone: 541-548-2151 Facsimile:541-548-1895 e-mail: efitch@redmond-lawyers.com Of Attorneys for Petitioners LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Guardianship/Conservatorship of: MARION GRAHAM, Respondent. Case No. 10-PC-0030-ST NOTICE OF PETITION TO APPOINT TEMPORARY AND PERMANENT GUARDIAN AND CONSERVATOR TO: DAVID GRAHAM NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on June 9, 2010, the undersigned has filed a Petition for Appointment of Holly Reeves-Leventhal as Temporary and Permanent Guardian and Conservator of Marion Graham, an incapacitated person. A copy of that Petition can be obtained by contacting Melissa P. Lande, Bryant, Lovlien &

Jarvis, P.C., 591 S.W. Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, Telephone: (541) 382-4331, attorney for Petitioner. Petitioner's address and telephone number are: 19078 Choctaw Road, Bend, Oregon 97702, Telephone: (541) 610-4037. Petitioner's relationship to the Respondent is: Professional Fiduciary. Objections must be filed in the guardianship and conservatorship proceeding in the above court on or before July 29, 2010. Written objections may be made by mailing or delivering the objection to Deschutes County Circuit Court, Probate Department, 1164 N.W. Bond, Bend, Oregon 97701. Oral objections may be made at Deschutes County Circuit Court, Probate Department, 1164 N.W. Bond, Bend, Oregon 97701. NOTICE: If you wish to receive copies of future filings in this case, you must inform the judge and the person named as Petitioner in this notice. You must inform the judge by filing a Request for Notice and paying any applicable fee. The Request for Notice must be in writing, must clearly indicate that you wish to receive future filings in the proceedings, and must

contain your name, address, and telephone number. You must notify the person named as Petitioner by mailing a copy of the Request to the Petitioner. Unless you take these steps, you will receive no further copies of the filings in the case. DATED this 24th day of June, 2010. MELISSA P. LANDE, OSB #91349 BRYANT, LOVLIEN & JARVIS, P.C. 591 S.W. MILL VIEW WAY BEND, OREGON 97702 LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID Sealed proposals for construction of the Tumalo Irrigation District, LAIDLAW BUTTE ACCESS ROAD project will be received at Tumalo Irrigation District 64697 Cook Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701, until, but not after, 2:00 p.m., local time July 27, 2010. Bids received prior to the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids will be publicly opened and read aloud, starting at 2:00pm on July 27, 2010. BID: LAIDLAW BUTTE ACCESS ROAD The work contemplated consists of, but is not limited to the following major items: 1. Clearing and grubbing road alignment corridor.

2. Preparation of native material, including cutting, filling, grading, and compacting. 3. Construction of aggregate base roadway, cul-de-sac, and emergency access to Highway 20. 4. Connection of aggregate roadway to existing paved roadway. 5. Construction of earth barrier at east end of abandoned Highway 20 alignment. 6. Restoration seeding of all disturbed areas within the timeframe shown below. The contract time will commence on August 5, 2010 and end on December 30, 2010. Substantial completion of all work included in the contract agreement must be attained by September 30, 2010. Liquidated damages of $2,000.00 per day shall be assessed should the contractor fail to achieve substantial completion within the time allowed. Restoration seeding is to be completed between November 20, 2010, and December 30, 2010. A MANDATORY PRE-BID MEETING and SITE VISIT for representatives and potential Bidders is scheduled for July 20, 2010 at 1:00pm at the Owner's office, Tumalo Irrigation District 64697 Cook Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701.

Contract documents may be examined in Owner's office, Tumalo Irrigation District 64697 Cook Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701. Contract documents may be procured from David Evans and Associates, Inc., 320 Upper Terrace Drive Suite 200, Bend, Oregon 97702 (Phone 541-389-7614, Fax 541-389-7623) upon payment of a $75.00 non-refundable fee for each set. The attention of Bidders is directed to the State overtime requirements and conditions of employment to be observed. The applicable State prevailing wage rate and provisions are included in the Contract Documents. Each proposal must be submitted on the prescribed forms and accompanied by a certified check or bid bond executed on the form bound within the Contract Documents or one substantially similar, payable to the Tumalo Irrigation District, in an amount not less than ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and payment bond, each in the full amount of the contract price. For information regarding the proposed work, contact Jon Burgi at David Evans and Associates, Inc., phone 541-389-7614, fax 541-389-7623.

The Owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all proposals not conforming to the intent and purpose of the contract documents. Any Bidder may withdraw its Proposal prior to the time of bid opening and no Bidder may withdraw its Proposal after the time of bid opening. Elmer McDaniels, Secretary/Manager Tumalo Irrigation District

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily LEGAL NOTICE Probate No. 10PB0077SF NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON For the County of Deschutes The Estate of Hazel June Huntamer, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that Russell Huntamer has been appointed Personal Representative. All persons with claims against the Estate must present them, with vouchers attached, within four months after the date of first publication of this no-

tice, as stated below, to the Hazel June Huntamer Estate, c/o Attorney Darcy Arriola Kindschy, PO Box C, 122 A Street East, Vale, OR 97918. Claims not presented within the four months may be barred. DATED and first published: July 13, 2010. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

LEGAL NOTICE The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of RICHARD G. METZ, Deceased, by the Deschutes County Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, probate number 10PB0076MS. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after the date of first publication to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: July 13, 2010. Jean M. Metz Personal Representative c/o Ronald L. Bryant Attorney at Law Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP PO Box 457 Redmond OR 97756

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030669592 T.S. No.: 10-09421-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, HALLIE J. STUPSKER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 15, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-45276 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17 12 32CC 1200 PARCEL ONE (1), PARTITION PLAT 2001-4, CITY OF BEND, RECORDED JANUARY 23, 2001, INSTRUMENT NO. 2001-03400, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 146 NW JEFFERSON PL., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,325.08 Monthly Late Charge $53.97 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5136 T.S. No.: 1281399-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-108735

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5592 T.S. No.: 1281993-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Melvin James and Alana James, Joint Tenants., as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Primary Residential Mortgage Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 20, 2006, recorded April 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-27712 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 8 in block 2 of Reindeer Woods, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1932 SW Curry Ct. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,177.59 Monthly Late Charge $48.66. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $145,314.21 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 08, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 13, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEANNINE E PARTRIDGE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of SILVER SIERRA MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/17/2003, recorded 1/28/2004, under Instrument No. 2004Â04429, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by US BANK, NA. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8 IN BLOCK 1 OF NORTH ADDITION, C.W. REEVE RESORT TRACT, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16068 DYKE ROAD LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 23, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2009 11 payments at $ 1,187.36 each $ 13,060.96 (08-01-09 through 06-23-10) Late Charges: $ 331.79 TOTAL: $ 13,392.75 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 8/1/2009 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid ail senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $160,135.61, PLUS interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from 7/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 25, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 6/23/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Cynthia L. Bowser, A Single Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated October 15, 2007, recorded October 19, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-55911 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 10 of Whitehorse, Phase I, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2129 SW 35th St. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $754.53 Monthly Late Charge $37.72. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $122,663.87 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 01, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is October 3, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CAa 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-322477 06/29, 07/06, 07/13, 07/20

ASAP# 3625580 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010, 07/27/2010

R-325287 07/13/10, 07/20, 07/27, 08/03


G6 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 230,282.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.62500 % per annum from January 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure

proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626048 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031169535 T.S. No.: 10-09469-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KATHRYN M. DUNNING, STACEY MCKINNEY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on May 23, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-35731 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17 11 36AA01500 LOT FOURTEEN (14), WESTSIDE PINES, PHASE ONE (1), RECORDED JUNE 25, 1998, CABINET E, PAGE 53, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 2420 NW MONTEREY PINES DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for

which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,305.46 Monthly Late Charge $51.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $307,806.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.62100 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any

successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626120 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031350093 T.S. No.: 10-07733-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMOTHY DEAN GROVES as Grantor to AMERITITLE as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on August 30, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-59563 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 201492 LOT FIFTEEN (15) IN BLOCK THREE (3) OF KENWOOD, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 735 NW OGDEN AVE., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2647 T.S. No.: 1282262-09.

default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's; failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,169.01 Monthly Late Charge $47.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $343,073-57 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.19000 % per annum from June 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 18, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired

after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other

persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626125 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-62664-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SUEANN SMITH as Grantor to AMERITITLE as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-23-Â2006, recorded 06-01-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. , at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-38163 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and Stale, to-wit: APN: 100537 LOT NINETEEN (19), BLOCK ONE (1), NORTH PILOT BUTTE ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1333 NE DEMPSEY DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6252 T.S. No.: 1228457-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1345 T.S. No.: 1206919-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Angella M. Stanfield, as Grantor to Landamerica Onestop, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Nationpoint A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated November 08, 2006, recorded November 17, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-76203 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 17 of Juniper Glen North, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2920 Southwest Indian Circle Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due May 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,127.53 Monthly Late Charge $56.38. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $173,186.47 together with interest thereon at 7.600% per annum from April 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 20, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Mitzi M. Kawakami, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As A Nominee For Pacific Residential Mortgage, LLC., as Beneficiary, dated June 05, 2007, recorded June 08, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-32391 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 of Traditions East, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21335 Livingston Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,339.50 Monthly Late Charge $66.97. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $267,900.00 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 08, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 13, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Leslie Farah, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated October 06, 2006, recorded October 16, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-68897 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 18 of Painted Ridge at Broken Top, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19560 Painted Ridge Loop Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,670.11 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $408,832.01 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 20, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 11, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-323049 07/06/10, 07/13, 07/20, 07/27

R-322111 06/29, 07/06, 07/13, 07/20

R-323060 07/06/10, 07/13, 07/20, 07/27

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5959 T.S. No.: 1277651-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4920 T.S. No.: 1282881-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7163 T.S. No.: 1282542-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Drew R. Logan and Stacy M. Logan Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 12, 2009, recorded March 17, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-11024 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot five (5), block ninety-seven (97), Deschutes River Recreation Homesites Unit 8 Part 11, recorded July 5, 1967, in cabinet A-137, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 15781 Lava Dr. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,263.70 Monthly Late Charge $50.55. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $185,882.51 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 29, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 25, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 30, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Davee, II Ad Bonnie Davee, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc.,("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp.,an Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated April 09, 2007, recorded April 16, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-21803 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 in block 2 of Summit Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16506 Sprague Lp. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,813.28 Monthly Late Charge $128.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $325,666.70 together with interest thereon at 9.150% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 27, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Julia Fleet and John Fleet, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated August 21, 2007, recorded August 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-46625 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot twenty-eight(28), Wheeler Ranch, Phase 2, recorded August 17, 2004, in cabinet G, page 406, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 16671 Wyatt Dr. Lapine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,514.56 Monthly Late Charge $63.03. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $188,082.21 together with interest thereon at 7.620% per annum from October 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 20, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-319421 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13

R-324788 07/13, 07/20, 07/27, 08/03

R-323050 07/06/10, 07/13, 07/20, 07/27


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, July 13, 2010 G7

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been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 06/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,185.94 Monthly Late Charge $0.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $181,989.83 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 05-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 10-22-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Reused Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE Of THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W., BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State

of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" in-

clude their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: June 15, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DE LA TORRE, ASST SEC ASAP# 3624091 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010, 07/27/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031541469 T.S. No.: 10-09437-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GARY L. CLOW as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 22, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-83234 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 18 12 06BA 01300 LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK TWO (2) OF KNOLL HEIGHTS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1523 SW KNOLL AVE, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the

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default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,470.52 Monthly Late Charge $61.68 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $395,622.27 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.48100 % per annum from January 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the

foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626129 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030792717 T.S. No.: 10-09423-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, W. DOYLE OPIE, VICTORIA ANN OPIE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, !NC, as Beneficiary, recorded on October 26, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-73169 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 239795 LOT THREE (3), OF GLENSHIRE, PHASE I & II, RECORDED JUNE 20, 2003, IN CABINET F, PAGE 544, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 894 NE HIDDEN VALLEY DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which be-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-US-94649

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96806

came due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,369.50 Monthly Late Charge $54.36 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared ail obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 247,578.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.28100 % per annum from January 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the

trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Michael Busby ASAP# 3626033 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030628218 T.SNo.: 10-09422-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MONICA BOWMAN, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on June 27, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-40553 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 201009 LOT TWELVE (12), LAVACREST EAST, PHASE TWO (2), DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63315 NW BRITTA ST., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $2,430.92 Monthly

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-364882-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John H. Hindson, A Married Man, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 28, 2007, recorded June 06, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-32022 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot forty-six (46) and the East 55 feet of lot 45 (45) in block SS of Deschutes River Woods, recorded March 22, 1962, in plat book 6, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 19126 Pumice Butte Rd. Bend OR 97702-8948. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,583.63 Monthly Late Charge $67.88. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $341,392.92 together with interest thereon at 7.300% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 20, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 14, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 20, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jeff Maxwell and Virginia Maxwell, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Nationpoint A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated February 07, 2006, recorded February 09, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-09381 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 2 in block 5 of Skyline Ridge, Phase III, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2215 NW Hemlock Pl. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,161.83 Monthly Late Charge $58.09. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $199,198.47 together with interest thereon at 6.999% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 08, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 13, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RANDY A. MOORE AND CYDNEY J. MOORE , HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/17/2006, recorded 4/20/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006-27106, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 186360 PARCEL 3 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 1994-22, BEING A PORTION OF LOT 7, BLOCK 2, VIEW ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2359 SW 26TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 9/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior Hens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,119.24 Monthly Late Charge $40.64 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $121,940.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 8.0000 per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/29/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 10/29/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one- year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under State law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/29/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 EI Camino Real Irvine, CA 92 Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawheIp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 6/28/2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. This office is attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

R-323023 07/06/10, 07/13, 07/20, 07/27

R-322476 06/29, 07/06, 07/13, 07/20

ASAP# 3633331 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010, 07/27/2010, 08/03/2010

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DON N. GAYMAN AND ELENA Y. DEMIDOVA, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 3/9/2007, recorded 3/15/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-15586, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1, BRIER RIDGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2703 NORTHEAST JILL AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 23, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2008 18 payments at $1,377.00 each $24,786.00 1 payments at $2,165.63 each $2,165.63 (12-01-08 through 06-23-10) Late Charges: $1,308.15 Beneficiary Advances: $4,123.65 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $32,383.43 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $244,800.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 26, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/23/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHARMAINE GLENN, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as grantor, to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CORP, A VA CORP, as Trustee, in favor of DOWNEY SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, F.A., as beneficiary, dated 1/1 9/2006, recorded 2/9/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-09264, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by US Bank National Association, successor in interest to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as receiver for Downey Savings and Loan Association, F.A.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 5 OF PHASE 1, WESTBROOK MEADOWS P.U.D. PHASES I AND 2, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19578 SOUTHWEST BROOKSIDE WAY BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 17, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 1 payments at $ 1,107.37 each $ 1,107.37 3 payments at $ 1,968.61 each $ 5,905.83 3 payments at $ 1,987.63 each $ 5,962.89 (12-01-09 through 06-17-10) Late Charges: $ 716.06 Beneficiary Advances: $ 9.50 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 13,701.65 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $321,597.00, PLUS interest thereon at 4.132% per annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 20, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/17/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3625649 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010, 07/27/2010

ASAP# 3618949 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0697 T.S. No.: 1283665-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1315 T.S. No.: 1280023-09.


G8 Tuesday, July 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Late Charge $100.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $400,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000 % per annum from January 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named

in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626143 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031277262 T.S. No.: 10-09431-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAYSON F. TUMA as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 19, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-49434 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 250618 LOT NINETY EIGHT (98), NORTHBOUND-PHASE III, RECORDED DECEMBER 9, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 966, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63829 HUNTERS CIR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's; failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $954.68 Monthly

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-96446 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LAURIE INACY DOTSON AND JOHN A. DOTSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NOVASTAR HOME MORTGAGE, INC. ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 4/1/2005, recorded 4/6/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-20572, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by The Bank of New York Mellon, as Successor Trustee under NovaStar Mortgage Funding Trust, Series 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 9 IN BLOCK 6 OF SADDLEBACK WEST, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63330 PINE KNOLL CIRCLE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 14, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 8 payments at $2,478.81 each $19,830.48 4 payments at $2,483.69 each $9,934.76 (07-01-09 through 06-14-10) Late Charges: $1,966.58 Beneficiary Advances: $353.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $32,084.82 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $245,961.37, PLUS interest thereon at 7.45% per annum from 06/01/09 to 3/1/2010, 7.45% per annum from 3/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/14/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Late Charge $47.73 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 242,335.31 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.53100 % per annum from January 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further

given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is

secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626116 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031463474 T.S. No.: 10-09472-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL K. SIPE, LORENA R. SIPE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on November 17, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-76404 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 17 12 26BD 03600 LOT THREE (3), SUNPOINTE, PHASE I, RECORDED MAY 26, 1995, IN CABINET D, PAGE 123, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 21383 STARLING DR., BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-96931 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, LAURIE LEITHAUSER, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF ORE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 3/11/2005, recorded 3/21/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-1 6390, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-AR8, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-AR8 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated April 1, 2005. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 73 OF MAJESTIC RIDGE, PHASES 1 AND 2, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3932 SOUTHWEST TIMBER AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of July 1, 2010 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 2 payments at $ 1,549.21 each $ 3,098.42 3 payments at $ 1,762.92 each $ 5,288.76 (03-01-10 through 07-01-10) Late Charges: $ 194.36 Beneficiary Advances: $ 66.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 8,647.54 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $289,404.30, PLUS interest thereon at 3.021% per annum from 02/01/10 to 5/1/2010, 3.021% per annum from 5/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on November 3, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 7/1/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3636423 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010, 07/27/2010, 08/03/2010

ASAP# 3612475 06/22/2010, 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6332 T.S. No.: 1269378-09.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0432 T.S. No.: 1281112-09.

became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $999.30 Monthly Late Charge $43.55 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 223,672.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.07100 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and ail trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest

which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing

this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3626168 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FFF-90583 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOHN D. KINGSMITH AND GAIL E. KINGSMITH, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES, as beneficiary, dated 7/21/2008, recorded 7/25/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-31324, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4 SW 1/4) OF SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, WHICH IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE WEST 1/4 CORNER OF SAID SECTION 31; THENCE SOUTH 00º 23' 27" WEST 1023.17 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89º 47' 23" EAST 30.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 00º 23' 27" EAST 767.79 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY 20; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE ON A 3779.72 FOOT RADIUS CURVE RIGHT 397.05 FEET, THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS NORTH 83º 40" 43" EAST 396.87 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00º 23' 27" WEST 170.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 44º 18' 50" EAST 270.62 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00º 23' 27" WEST 450.00 FEET; THENCE-NORTH 89º 47' 23" WEST 584.52 FEET. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PARCEL OF LAND CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF OREGON BY AND THROUGH ITS DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, HIGHWAY DIVISION, BY WARRANTY DEED RECORDED NOVEMBER 24, 1986 IN BOOK 137, PAGE 152. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 22025 EAST HIGHWAY 20 BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 18, 2010 Unpaid Principal $201,118.30 Accrued Late Charges $0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $0.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $201,118.30 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 2/18/2009, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 7 (A), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 18, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 6/18/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3619557 06/29/2010, 07/06/2010, 07/13/2010, 07/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1664 T.S. No.: 1277767-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Dunn, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 16, 2006, recorded August 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-57313 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot four (4), Cambria P.U.D., recorded June 1, 2006, in cabinet G, page 1151, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61543 Baptist Way Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,263.00 Monthly Late Charge $185.19. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $592,614.75 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from September 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 27, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Samuel N. Brown and Stephanie Brown, as Grantor to Transnation Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated March 28, 2002, recorded April 02, 2002, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2002-18190 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot seventy-three (73), Crossroads Second Addition, Recorded May 9, 1973, in cabinet B-31, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 14867 Bluegrass Loop Sisters OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $604.13 Monthly Late Charge $30.21. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $78,170.00 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 29, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 23, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 29, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Phyllis F. Hawes and Brian R. Hawes, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to First American Title Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Meridias Capital, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 05, 2006, recorded April 11, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-24682** covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 10 of Renwick Acres, City of Bend, Deschutes County, re-recorded again on 5/08/2006 as inst.# 2006-31582. Commonly known as: 162 Southeast Dorrie Court Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,269.81 Monthly Late Charge $51.93. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $191,723.00 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 08, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-320545 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13

R-324822 07/13, 07/20, 07/27, 08/03

R-321412 06/22, 06/29, 07/06, 07/13


CENTRAL OREGON MARKETPLACE

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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

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THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

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Tuesday, July 13, 2010

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

ANY 3 AREAS

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OFF

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$

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r offer. Bring this coupon Not valid with any othed through 7/31/10. with you. Goo

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5 Rooms, 1 Hallway Cleaned

$

144

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ntenance Service Subaru Recommended Major Mai ,000/120,000

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Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

$ 00 House Whole ial! c e Sp

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At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597 Expires 8/8/10. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

when you replace your 10 year or older system with a system of 5% or more increased efficiency!

Call Chem-Dry for a deep clean on carpets and upholstery, safe non-toxic solutions and the fastest drying time of any national chain.

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-389-6714 25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments

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$5.00 off

Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

exp. July 28, 2010

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 9/30/10.

Now Serving Real Italian Style Gelato!

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

541-788-8444 Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

“When Taste Matters”

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Excluding RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: July 31, 2010

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12

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WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Expires 7-31-10

Expires 7-31-10

THAI O $500 OFF 10% RESTAURANT

Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

any purchase of $25

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

OFF any meal

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$ 00 OFF 10% OFF any meal

5

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

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Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

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Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

any purchase of $25

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)* *Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

Trust Chem-Dry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets! Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Chem-Dry of Bend

541.548.4883

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

(fred meyer shopping center)

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

Standard Clean Includes: of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

Dryer Vent Cleaning Lint buildup takes more time & energy (and money) to dry your clothes. Prevent a dangerous dryer vent fire caused by lint buildup.

Single Story House Wood Stove Fireplace Insert

IICRC Certified Technician

Natural Gas

GET AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY AND A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $55.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

EXPIRES July 31, 2010

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

*Oregon Chimney Sweeps Association (OCSA) Certified Sweep*

541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

“When Taste Matters”

Selected Signature Series Window Treatments by Budget Blinds

AS

Hw

.

a Rd

. SW Iris Ln.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

TO P

RINE V

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

ILLE

N

BUTTE SEED

SW

N

Hw y . 97

Nels Anderson Rd.

U-Haul

Hwy 97

Cascade Village

A DR

rk Rd

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

Lam

ont

ial Pa

Cu

lve

rH

wy

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541)385-7001

(541)447-5609

(541)546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com

25% OFF

a style for every point of view We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

PURCELL

25% OFF

NorthWest Crossing • Bend

ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

TO M

dustr

Culver Hwy

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349

Nels Anderson Pl.

NW

NW In 3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

7th Ave.

2009 Semifinalists World Pizza Championships 2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

N

SW Larch Dr.

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

Selected Signature Series Window Treatments by Budget Blinds

COSTCO

(REG. $79.95)

HWY 20

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 9/30/10

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

541-550-5555

a style for every point of view

® by Budget Blinds ®

611 NE PURCELL

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 9/30/10

• 541-388-1580

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices! SPECIALIZING IN DODGE, CHRYSLER & SUBARU PRODUCTS

• CERTIFIED CUMMINS DIESEL SPECIALIST

• FULL ACCESSORY DEPARTMENT

• WE INSTALL LIFT KITS

• FRONT-END ALIGNMENTS, BRAKES & SHOCKS

• WE OFFER COMPLETE DETAIL SERVICE

Check & Adjust Front & Rear Wheel Alignment Check Tire Wear & Pressure Check Steering & Suspension EXPIRES 7/31/10

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view

4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT $ 5595

• SPECIALS ON WHEELS & TIRES

• SERVICING SPRINTER VANS 2009 Semifinalists World Pizza Championships 2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY

(541) 389-3031

“When Taste Matters”

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

Full line of Sullivan Show Supplies in stock now! Best 4-H prices in town! Clippers • Blowers Combs • Brushes

ANY 5 AREAS

$149 95

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

SOFA CLEANING

$99 95

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $179 95 (UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

541-389-6714

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

20% OFF

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! M&J CARPET & UPHOLSTERY CLEANING • 541-549-9090

Dryer Vent Cleaning Lint buildup takes more time & energy (and money) to dry your clothes. Prevent a dangerous dryer vent fire caused by lint buildup.

Single Story House Wood Stove

GET AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY AND A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $55.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

Fireplace Insert Natural Gas

2009 Semifinalists World Pizza Championships 2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

EXPIRES July 31, 2010

2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

Standard Clean Includes:

*Oregon Chimney Sweeps Association (OCSA) Certified Sweep*

541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

NorthWest Crossing • Bend

SOFA CLEANING

$99 95

$149 95

(UP TO 500 SQ. FT.)

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

STANDARD SIZE CUSTOM FABRIC EXTRA

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

ANY 7 AREAS ALL ORIENTAL & AREA RUG CLEANING $179 95 (UP TO 650 SQ. FT.)

20% OFF

INCLUDES PRE-TREATMENT & SPOT REMOVAL

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349

“When Taste Matters”

ANY 5 AREAS

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

*Limited number available at this price. Only available from Central Oregon office.

4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT $ 5595

COSTCO

PURCELL

$75,900 $71,900 (limited time)*

PRESENT COUPON AT TIME OF SERVICE. EXPIRES 8/31/10. DOES NOT COMBINE WITH OTHER OFFERS. STAIRS EXTRA.

(REG. $79.95)

HWY 20

On Your Site, On Time, Built Right

Check & Adjust Front & Rear Wheel Alignment Check Tire Wear & Pressure Check Steering & Suspension EXPIRES 7/31/10

541-550-5555 611 NE PURCELL

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

• WE INSTALL LIFT KITS • WE OFFER COMPLETE DETAIL SERVICE

• FRONT-END ALIGNMENTS, BRAKES & SHOCKS • SERVICING SPRINTER VANS

MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT TODAY

(541) 389-3031

U-Haul

Nels Anderson Pl. ROUND BUTTE BUTTE ROUND SEEDSEED GROWERS

TO M

A DR

AS

Hw

NW L ial Pa

rk Rd

.

nta

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS

Rd. SW Iris Ln.

ROUND BUTTE ROUND SEED GROWERS BUTTE SEED

y 26

TO P

RINE

VILL E

C St.

SW Huber Ln.

amo

BUTTE SEED

N

SW

N

Hw y . 97

• SPECIALS ON WHEELS & TIRES

Hwy 97

Cascade Village

• FULL ACCESSORY DEPARTMENT

NW In dustr

7th Ave.

• CERTIFIED CUMMINS DIESEL SPECIALIST

3RD BUSINESS ON THE RIGHT

SW Larch Dr.

SPECIALIZING IN DODGE, CHRYSLER & SUBARU PRODUCTS

N

Culver Hwy

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

Nels Anderson Rd.

ROUND BUTTE SEED THREE TRI-COUNTY LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU Cu

lve rH

wy

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit our Web site: www.rbseed.com

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

of Central Oregon

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

541-593-1799

Trust Chem-Dry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

IICRC Certified Technician

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

• 541-388-1580

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

541-548-5195

Full line of Sullivan Show Supplies in stock now! Best 4-H prices in town! Clippers • Blowers Combs • Brushes

$ 00 OFF 10% OFF any meal

5

541-389-6714

THAI O 2010 Western Region Championship International Gourmet Pizza Winner

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

any purchase of $25

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 7-26-10 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

25% OFF Selected Signature Series Window Treatments by Budget Blinds

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

2009 Semifinalists World Pizza Championships 2008 Semifinalists - U.S. Pizza Championships

“When Taste Matters”

2755 NW Crossing Drive • (541) 312-9349 NorthWest Crossing • Bend

Selected Signature Series Window Treatments by Budget Blinds

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

25% OFF

a style for every point of view We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 9/30/10

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 9/30/10


Bulletin Daily Paper 07/13/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Tuesday July 13, 2010

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