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Columnist Lily Raff

Rapper touts other passion

Mushroom hunting

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Deschutes swaps resort exemptions

SCHOOLS

Marshall, Madras awarded millions in grants

COST-CUTTING IN DESCHUTES

Changes coming to waste centers

‘Cluster developments’ protected from rezoning By Hillary Borrud

Hours shifting at transfer sites; rural drop sites to be operated by local recycling companies

The Bulletin

Deschutes County commissioners jettisoned a controversial destination resort amendment targeted to protect the Cyrus family’s plans Wednesday, in favor of different language that will likely still only apply to the family. Deschutes County is in the midst of updating the map that defines lands eligible for resorts. Much of the land currently zoned for resorts is expected to be removed from the map, because it is ineligible for resorts under state and county laws. Land must be on the map in order for the owners to apply to build a resort. Subdivisions would be removed from the resort zone under the county’s proposed resort remapping ordinances, and that would block the Cyruses’ plans to convert their existing development to a resort.

By Sheila G. Miller and Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Where and when to drop off recyclables

Two area high schools will receive millions in federal stimulus funds designed to help more students pass state benchmarks and graduate, but to receive the money districts must agree to some changes, including replacing the schools’ principals. Marshall High School, a BendLa Pine alternative school, will receive $2 million over the next three years, while Madras High School will receive about $3.7 million. Identifying Oregon’s poorestperforming schools is part of a plan designed by the federal government to move from punishing the schools to offering financial incentives to improve. Through the program, Oregon will receive $32.7 million in school improvement grants from the federal stimulus package passed in 2009, called the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

Transfer stations Knott Landfill and other transfer stations take commingled recycling, corrugated cardboard, glass, electronics, car batteries, motor oil and more. All transfer stations are closed on Tuesday.

Drop-off depots Depots always open; accept cardboard, commingled recycling and glass.

Northwest Transfer and Recycle Station Between Tumalo and Sisters off Fryrear Road

Now closed Sunday and Monday; open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday

Unique type of subdivision The County Commission originally amended the ordinances at the last minute in June, after the three commissioners met with Matt Cyrus about the need to change the ordinances. They then repealed the amendment after discovering a technical problem with the vote. A new exception to the resort remapping ordinances introduced Wednesday would allow a unique type of subdivision, known as a cluster development, to remain on the county’s destination resort zone map by default. There are only four cluster developments in Deschutes County, and the commission further narrowed the exception so it only applies to cluster developments approved prior to 1990. See Resort / A4

Negus Transfer Station, Redmond Sisters

2400 NE Maple Ave.

126

Now closed Sunday; open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday-Saturday

328 W. Sisters Park Dr. 20

Eagle Crest

Knott Landfill, Bend

Maintenance/housekeeping area

61050 S.E. 27th St.

Now closed Sunday; open 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday-Saturday

West Bend/Simpson Now Closed

Alfalfa Transfer and Recycle Station

97

At the end of Johnson Road by Reynolds Pond

No changes; open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays

Sunriver Corporate yard between Circes 3 and 4

Southwest Transfer and Recycle Station

Begin spending in fall

Between Sunriver and La Pine off Highway 97

Now closed Sunday and Monday; open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Wednesday-Saturday

La Pine

Schools applied for the funds through the Oregon Department of Education and can begin using the money this fall. Each school was given one of four options laid out by the federal government. All the plans include replacing the high school principal. According to Chief Academic Officer Vicki Van Buren, Marshall High will use its funds to hire three certified teachers: a reading specialist, math specialist and a teacher to oversee a lab that will be used for online courses. Marshall High School and Madras High School officials both chose the transformation model, which requires districts to come up with a plan to restructure the high school. It also includes extending the time students spend in class and teacher planning time. Bend-La Pine originally applied for a larger amount of money, with an eye toward providing alternative education in a new way. See Grants / A5

20

Industrial Park Source: Deschutes County

California governor campaign a lab for new technology

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

K

nott Landfill and other transfer stations and recycling centers in Deschutes County will now be closed on Sundays due to county budget cuts, and changes are in store for some of the recycling drop-off sites as well. Bend’s Knott Landfill and Redmond’s Negus Transfer Station, which used to be open seven days a week, will now be closed on Sundays. And the transfer stations in Sisters and La Pine will have their days shifted as well, said Timm Schimke, director of Deschutes County’s Department of Solid Waste. While previously those transfer stations were open Friday through Monday, they will now be open Wednesday through Saturday.

That’s in part to accommodate small businesses in the La Pine and Sisters area that wanted to be able to drop off trash or recyclables earlier in the week, he said. “The small business group really needed the service,” Schimke said. Having all the transfer stations closed on Sundays allows the department to cut the work force by four employees, and save between $200,000 and $250,000, he said. The county is also saving between $100,000 and $150,000 a year by stopping its operation of the rural recycling drop-off depots, where people can leave commingled recycled items like paper, bottles and cans as well as glass and corrugated cardboard. “We’re going to get out of the depot business,” Schimke said. Instead, the local recycling companies will take over the de-

pots and decide what to do with them. The West Bend depot on Simpson Avenue will be closed at the end of the month, he said, because the neighborhoods around there all have curbside recycling, but also because people were leaving garbage or the wrong kind of recyclables at the site. While commingled recyclables and glass are accepted at the depots, things like used motor oil and electronics are not. “It was a problem,” he said. And Cascade Disposal and the Sunriver Owners Association are working to see if changes should be made to the Sunriver recycling depot, he said, perhaps moving it to a different location.

By Ken McLaughlin San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

South of the border, racism is alive and well By Tracy Wilkinson Los Angeles Times

MEXICO CITY — Every morning during television coverage of the World Cup, on the Mexican equivalent of the “Today” show, co-hosts chat, trade barbs and yuck it up. Behind them, actors in blackface makeup, dressed in fake animal skins and wild “Afro” wigs, gyrate, wave spears and pretend to represent a cartoonish

MON-SAT

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version of South Africa. Yes, in the 21st century, blackface characters on a major network. But this is Mexico, and definitions of racism are complicated and influenced by the country’s own tortured relationship with invading powers and indigenous cultures. Many Mexicans will say they are not racist and that very little racism exists in Mexico, a nation, after all, of

mestizos, who are of European and indigenous blood. As proof, they point to the fact that slavery was ended in Mexico decades before it was abolished in the United States, and that Mexico never institutionalized racism the way the U.S. did with its segregationist laws that lasted into the 1960s. It is true that Mexico was even seen as a refuge for some American

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blacks. Poet Langston Hughes did some of his earliest writing while living briefly with his father in Mexico, where the older man had gone to escape discrimination. Racism is primarily directed at indigenous communities who account for as many as 11.3 million people, or roughly 10 percent of the national population. See Racism / A4

INDEX Abby

E2

Comics

E4-5

Health

F1-6

Obituaries

C1-6

Outing

E1-6

TV listings

E2

E3

Sports

D1-5

Weather

C6

Business

B1-6

Crossword E5, G2

Local

Classified

G1-6

Editorial

Movies

C4

C5

Stocks

B4-5

SAN JOSE, Calif. — The telephone rings and Meg Whitman, the Republican candidate for governor, is greeting you by your first name. You flip on the TV, and there she is again on a new kind of interactive ad that lets you order a Meg 2010 bumper sticker with the push of a few buttons on your remote control. Surf on over to Whitman’s flashy website and, with the click of your mouse, voila, it’s “Meg 2010 — Una Nueva California,” — the whole site is translated into Spanish. Click again and it’s in Chinese. The former eBay CEO’s carpet-bombing of the airwaves generated the most political buzz during her $80 million march to victory over Steve Poizner in the GOP primary. But behind the scenes, her campaign served as a laboratory for new technology that will be unleashed against her Democratic rival, Jerry Brown, in the months leading up to the Nov. 2 election. A glimpse into Whitman’s tech spending is startling: The latest campaign expenditure reports show she had spent $2.7 million through May 22 on website development and information technology alone — seven times more than Brown spent on his entire campaign. “The incredible amount of money Whitman is spending allows her to buy every bell and whistle ever invented,” said Larry Gerston, a San Jose State political science professor. “And it fosters the perception that Jerry Brown is late to the party.” Whitman’s campaign tech is fueled not only by the eBay billionaire’s wide-open wallet but also her camp’s determination to fight lopsided party-registration numbers and the fierce Democratic ground war looming for the fall. See Whitman / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE FRIENDLY FIRE: U.N. helicopter fires on Afghan soldiers waiting to ambush militants, Page A3


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Colleges employ high tech solutions to dishonesty

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

By Trip Gabriel

School may be out, but the summer is a great time to get a head start on thinking about college. Here are suggestions on how to make the most of this summer:

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Learning cheaters’ tricks

July Freshmen and sophomores: Read. Make it a point to read one article or section of the newspaper every day. Write letters and keep a journal. Strong reading and writing skills will serve you in the classroom and in everyday life. Juniors: Borrow or purchase a college guidebook and begin researching colleges. Take a college assessment test and try to figure out your likes and dislikes regarding distance from home, size of school and urban, suburban or rural environment. Seniors: Prepare your Brag Sheet/Résumé. List any leadership positions and be sure to include your extracurricular activities; community service; honors, scholarships and awards; summer experiences; internships/job shadowing and employment. College freshmen: Get in touch with the financial aid office at your school if there has been any change in your financial status such as a job loss or major illness. Print a packing list of what you’ll bring to college and make a list of items you’ll need to buy before you head off and the ones that can wait until you’re on campus.

August Freshmen and sophomores: Do any assigned summer reading for school. Enjoy your summer! Juniors: Plan two campus visits that are either close to home or near a place you’re vacationing. Sit in on the information sessions and take the formal campus tour. Start a college file. Seniors: Finalize your college list. While there is no magic number, counselors recommend applying to two or three reach, two or three target and one or two safety schools. Try to visit all of your target schools and as many reach and safety schools as possible. Edit your Brag Sheet. College freshmen: Make sure someone in your family is in charge of paying the tuition and room and board bills. Talk with your roommate. Figure out what you’re taking. Spend time thinking about what’s in store for you in just a few short weeks. Spend time with your friends and family.

ORLANDO, Fla. — The frontier in the battle to defeat student cheating may be here at the testing center of the University of Central Florida. No gum is allowed during an exam: Chewing could disguise a student’s speaking into a handsfree cell phone to an accomplice outside. The 228 computers that students use are recessed into desktops so that anyone trying to photograph the screen — using, say, a pen with a hidden camera, in order to help a friend who will take the test later — is easy to spot. Scratch paper is allowed — but it is stamped with the date and must be turned in later. When a proctor sees something suspicious, he records the student’s real-time work at the computer and directs an overhead camera to zoom in; both sets of images are burned onto a CD for evidence. Dr. Taylor Ellis, the associate dean who runs the testing center within the business school at Central Florida, the nation’s third-largest campus by enrollment, said that cheating had dropped significantly, to 14 suspected incidents out of 64,000 exams administered during the spring semester. “I will never stop it completely, but I’ll find out about it,” he said. As the eternal temptation of students to cheat has gone hightech — not just on exams, but by cutting and pasting from the Internet and sharing of homework online like music files — educators have responded with their own efforts to crack down. This summer, as incoming freshmen fill out forms to select roommates and courses, a number of colleges — Duke and Bowdoin among them — are also requiring them to complete online tutorials about plagiarism before they can enroll. Anti-plagiarism services requiring students to submit papers to be vetted for copying is a booming business. Fifty-five percent of colleges and universities now use such a service, according to the Campus Computing Survey. The best-known service, Turnitin.com, is engaged in an endless cat-and-mouse game with technologically savvy students who try to outsmart it. “The Turnitin algorithms are updated on

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

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an ongoing basis,” the company warned last month in a blog post titled “Can Students ‘Trick’ Turnitin?” The extent of student cheating, difficult to measure precisely, appears widespread at colleges. In surveys of 14,000 undergraduates over the last four years, an average of 61 percent admitted to cheating on assignments and exams. The figure declined somewhat from 65 percent earlier in the decade, but the researcher who conducted the surveys, Donald McCabe, a business professor at Rutgers, doubts there is less of it. Instead, he suspects students no longer regard certain acts — such as cutting and pasting a few sentences at a time from the Internet — as cheating. Andrew Daines, who graduated in May from Cornell, where he served on a board in the College of Arts and Sciences that hears cheating cases, said Internet plagiarism was so common that professors told him they had replaced written assignments with tests and in-class writing.

A character test Daines, a philosophy major, contributed to pages that Cornell added last month to its student website to bring attention to academic integrity. They include a link to a voluntary tutorial on avoiding plagiarism and a strongly worded admonition that “other generations may not have had as many temptations

to cheat or plagiarize as yours,” and urging students to view this as a character test. Daines said he was especially disturbed by an epidemic of students copying homework. “The term ‘collaborative work’ has been taken to this unbelievable extreme where it means, because of the ease of e-mailing, one person looking at someone else who’s done the assignment,” he said.

‘I thought we had some geniuses’ At MIT, David Pritchard, a physics professor, was able to accurately measure homework copying with software he had developed for another purpose — to allow students to complete sets of physics problems online. Some answered the questions so fast, “at first I thought we had some geniuses here at MIT,” Pritchard said. Then he realized they were completing problems in less time than it took to read them and were copying the answers — mostly, it turned out, from e-mail messages from friends who had already done the assignment. About 20 percent copied onethird or more of their homework, according to a study Pritchard and colleagues published this year. Students who copy homework find answers at sites like Course Hero, which is a kind of Napster of homework sharing, where students from more than 3,500 institutions upload papers, class notes and past exams.

Another site, Cramster, specializes in solutions to textbook questions in science and engineering. It boasts answers from 77 physics textbooks — but not Pritchard’s popular “Mastering Physics,” an online tutorial, because his publisher, Pearson, searches the Web for solutions and requests they be taken down to protect its copyright. “You can use technology as well for detecting as for committing” cheating, Pritchard said. The most popular anti-cheating technology, Turnitin.com, says it is now used by 9,500 high schools and colleges. Students submit written assignments to be compared with billions of archived Web pages and millions of other student papers, before they are sent to instructors. The company says that schools using the service for several years experience a decline in plagiarism. Cheaters trying to outfox Turnitin have tried many tricks, some described in blogs and videos. One is to replace every “e” in plagiarized text with a foreign letter that looks like it, such as a Cyrillic “e,” meant to fool Turnitin’s scanners. Another is to use the Macros tool in Microsoft Word to hide copied text. Turnitin says neither scheme works. Some educators have rejected the service and other anti-cheating technologies on the grounds that they presume students are guilty, undermining the trust that instructors seek with students.

Students more rested, Violence in Mexico deters U.S. universities less irritable when day starts later, study finds By Marc Lacey

New York Times News Service

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Michael Gorion monitors students as they take exams at the University of Central Florida College of Business Testing Lab in Orlando. In surveys of 14,000 undergraduates over the last four years, an average of 61 percent admitted to serious acts of cheating. Technology used to battle cheating includes cameras, recessed computer desktops and a real-time computer monitoring system. .

By Karen Kaplan Los Angeles Times

Here’s a question for all you high school students out there in cyberspace: If it were up to you, would you rather start your school day at 8 a.m. or 8:30 a.m.? (Sorry, noon is not an option.) If you chose 8:30, you get an Aplus. According to a new study, students were far more likely to get eight hours of shut-eye at night and were less likely to report being unhappy, depressed, annoyed or irritated when they began their first class at 8:30. Researchers from Rhode Island studied the student body of a New England boarding school that once began its day at 8 a.m. but later delayed its start time until 8:30. You might not be surprised to learn that the students slept in later after the change was made. But — get this — they started going to bed earlier too. Here’s how one student explained it to the research team: “Well, for me, ever since the 8:30 start, I have seen how much good 30 minutes of extra sleep does for me, so I have been inspired to ... get an additional half hour on top of the 30 minutes.” Of course, the switch to a later start time made students feel less sleepy. More specifically, the per-

centage of students who got less than seven hours of sleep per night fell from 34 percent before to 7 percent after, while the percentage of students who got at least eight hours of sleep jumped from 16 percent to 55 percent.

Students report drop in levels of depression When school began at 8 a.m., 66 percent of students reported feeling “somewhat unhappy or depressed.” After delaying the first bell until 8:30, that figure fell to 45 percent. Likewise, the percentage of students who said they felt “irritated or annoyed” fell from 84 percent to 63 percent. (They were still teenagers, after all.) But the time change wasn’t a panacea. Grades improved slightly, though the difference wasn’t statistically significant. And 89 percent of the kids still got less than the recommended minimum of nine hours of sleep each night, even after the start time was pushed back half an hour. As a result, 66 percent of students said they got sleepy while doing their homework, 18 percent continued to fall asleep during morning classes and 36 percent relied on naps to get through the day.

MEXICO CITY — From perfecting their use of the subjunctive in colonial Puebla to exploring the anthropological aspects of Tijuana’s gritty underside, American college students have long used Mexico as a learning lab. This summer, however, far fewer will be venturing across the border, as universities and students alike fear the violence tied to drug gangs that have caught some innocents in the crossfire. In March, two Mexican university students were killed at the prestigious Tecnologico de Monterrey when fighting broke out between Mexican soldiers and drug traffickers on the streets outside. Universities in the border cities of Ciudad Juarez and Reynosa have seen violence tread dangerously close to their campuses as well. A direct result of the attention-getting bloodshed has been the mass cancellation of study-abroad programs throughout the country, including those hundreds of miles from the most dangerous areas. Some educators on both sides of the border consider the reaction to be an exaggerated response. “To make an analogy,” said Geoffrey Braswell, an associate anthropology professor at the University of California,

San Diego, “I would not have considered taking students to Mississippi during the early 1960s or to Chicago during the 1968 Democratic convention, but other parts of the U.S. were, of course, safe for travel. Mexico is that way.” This fall, Braswell plans to help students understand ancient Mesoamerica by visiting 28 archaeological sites and numerous other museums in central Mexico. No American students are known to be have been hurt in the violence, and Mexico is not the first country to find many of its foreign students are staying away. Israel, Kenya and Haiti have all experienced the temporary shutdown of study-abroad programs

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after the State Department issued warnings about traveling there. The University of Kansas had 18 students ready to fine-tune their Spanish skills this summer in Puebla, southeast of Mexico City. Then multiple killings in distant Ciudad Juarez in March prompted the State Department to issue a travel warning for northern Mexico. The university canceled its Puebla program, geography aside.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 A3

By Justin Gillis New York Times News Service

‘Honesty as scientists’

killed by NATO friendly fire Soldiers were hiding to ambush militant forces By Richard Oppel Jr. and Abdul Waheed Wafa New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — NATO pilots mistakenly attacked Afghan soldiers who had laid a trap for Taliban militants and killed at least five of the soldiers on Wednesday, a devastating case of friendly fire in a conflict still troubled by miscommunication among allied forces, Afghan officials said. The attack in the Andar district of Ghazni province, about 100 miles southwest of Kabul, suggested a serious lack of coordination between NATO troops and Afghan forces battling militants who hold sway in part of the district known as Rahim Khiel. The Afghan soldiers “had made an ambush for the enemy” when they were attacked early Wednesday morning, said Gen. Zahir Azimi, the spokesman for the Afghan Ministry of Defense. “We condemn this incident,” Azimi said. “Unfortunately this is not the first time this has happened, but we hope this would be the last one.”

British troops to leave Sangin

James Edward Bates / The Associated Press

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NEW DELHI — The Indian Army deployed on the streets of the disputed region of Kashmir on Wednesday, seeking to quell street protests that have convulsed the valley. The protests, aimed at forcing India to withdraw its paramilitary forces from the predominantly Muslim Kashmir Valley, have raged for weeks, killing at least 13 people and paralyzing life in the region, which is claimed by both India and Pakistan. The streets of Srinagar, the state capital, were deserted as authorities enforced a strict curfew. The army presence was light, limited to a few patrols, officials in Kashmir said. — From wire reports

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An exchange would have some advantages for the Obama administration, avoiding costly trials that could be an irritant for months or years in U.S.Russian relations. But the White House might be reluctant to give up the accused Russians, who were the targets of a decade-long FBI investigation, without

TOKYO — A Japanese court Wednesday convicted an anti-whaling activist from New Zealand of assault and obstructing Japan’s whaling fleet in the Antarctic. But his sentence was suspended, meaning that he will not be jailed. The activist, Peter Bethune, a member of the Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, boarded a Japanese whaling ship from a Jet Ski in the southern Antarctic in February and threw bottles of butyric acid at the whalers. One bottle cracked open and three crew members suffered minor burns, prosecutors charged. The Tokyo District Court also found Bethune, 45, guilty of trespassing, vandalism and possession of a knife. The presiding judge, Takashi Tawada, sentenced Bethune to two years in prison, with the sentence suspended for five years. ®

Avoid a costly trial

getting prisoners that the United States valued in return. The reports of a pending exchange, like the spy ring itself, seemed to have the accouterments of cold war espionage without the high stakes for national security. The accused Russian agents were described by U.S. officials as using high-tech methods but acquiring no real secrets. A swap — in Vienna, a favorite rendezvous for 20th-century spies — would serve as a colorful final chapter for the espionage-novel plot. No American accused of spying is known to be in Russian custody. Sutyagin, who is serving a 14-year term, is one of a number of Russian scientists imprisoned for allegedly revealing secrets to the West. His family told reporters that the list of 11 prisoners he saw included Sergei Skripal, a colonel in Russian military intelligence sentenced in 2006 to 13 years for spying for Britain.

Whaling protester gets suspended sentence in japan

®

WASHINGTON — Just days after the FBI’s sensational dismantling of a Russian spy ring, U.S. and Russian authorities Wednesday were negotiating an exchange of some or all of the 10 accused agents for prisoners held in Russia, including a scientist convicted of spying for the United States. Although U.S. officials were closemouthed, they confirmed the talks and there were signs that a swap might be completed quickly. The family of the imprisoned scientist, Igor Sutyagin, said he had been moved to Moscow and told that he would be flown to Vienna for release as early as today. A lawyer for Anna Chapman, one of the Russian defendants in New York, said he had spoken with U.S. prosecutors and Russian officials about an equally speedy resolution.

“I feel our discussions will probably be resolved by tomorrow one way or another,” said Chapman’s lawyer, Robert Baum, on Wednesday. Another defense lawyer, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said it was possible that many of the 10 defendants, or all of them, would plead guilty in federal court in Manhattan today, when they are to appear for arraignment. (An 11th defendant fled after being released on bail in Cyprus.)

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New York Times News Service

PARIS — The former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega was convicted Wednesday of money laundering and sentenced by a French judge to seven years in prison. Noriega, 76, was found guilty by the 11th chamber of the Tribunal Correctionnel de Paris, a spokesman for the prosecutor’s office said. The tribunal also ordered Noriega to forfeit about $2.9 million that had been frozen in his French bank accounts. The prosecutor in the case, Michel Maes, had sought a 10-year prison term. In 1999, Noriega was convicted in absentia of laundering $3 million in illicit funds for the Medellin drug cartel through international banks and into French accounts. The conviction Wednesday came as he was retried on the same charge after his April extradition to France from Miami, where he had been held after serving 15 years of a 30-year sentence in the United States.

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GULFPORT, Miss. — U.S. Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Robert J. Papp answered critics of the Coast Guard’s response to the BP oil gusher Wednesday, saying the nation wasn’t ready for the disaster, which has left crude spewing into the Gulf of Mexico since April 20. He also said a federal law limiting deployments for reservists might force the Coast Guard to lean on the National Guard for help during the long response to the disaster. Papp met with reporters after a flight over the Mississippi Sound on Wednesday. He fired back at those who have criticized the Coast Guard. “There has been criticism, and it always hurts to be criticized,” Papp said. “What I would say is there has never in the history of our country been an environmental disaster of this size. No one in the world has ever had to deal with an oil spill like this — one that does not stop, continues every day and has gone on for 80 days. There were lessons to be learned and frankly, I don’t think this country, as a whole, was prepared for an environmental disaster like this.” — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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WASHINGTON — The battle to contain BP’s massive Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is approaching two critical junctures in coming days that could affect how the months-long catastrophe ends. The first will happen for sure: connecting a third ship to the jury-rigged containment system through which BP has been capturing about 24,000 barrels of oil per day since early June. That may take place as soon as this weekend, depending on how rough the seas are, and it would raise the amount of oil BP can collect from the well to as much as 53,000 barrels per day. That’s 88 percent of the 60,000 barrels per day the government says is the current best guess of the maximum amount that’s gushing from the well. The second may not happen: replacing the “top hat” component of that containment system with a new cap that would fit more snugly but whose installation would require the well be uncapped for as long as 10 days, allowing tens of thousands of additional barrels of crude to spew into the Gulf. The new containment cap was the subject of Cabinet-level meetings in Washington last week, including one with President Barack Obama, and the decision remains uncertain. Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen said Wednesday he’d had more meetings on the topic with BP officials Tuesday in Houston and that more meetings were scheduled for when he returned to Washington this week. “We are still reviewing the techni-

cal specifications ... the amount of time ... and the weather • Obama window that it would appeals take” for installato court tion, Allen said. He to reinstate was unwilling to lay drilling ban, odds on whether the new cap would be Page A6 approved. “I wouldn’t want to attach a percentage right now,” he said. Adding the third ship, the Helix Producer I, has been planned for weeks and was supposed to have happened by June 30. High seas generated by Hurricane Alex and then by an unnamed storm system near the Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula so far have thwarted the final few days of work, however. Allen said he flew to the Deepwater Horizon site on Wednesday in part to assess weather conditions. In a conference call from the Discoverer Enterprise, the drilling ship that’s taking on oil from the well through the “top hat,” Allen said the waves buffeting the area were 4 to 6 feet tall, still too high to complete the final connections between the Helix Producer I and the Deepwater Horizon’s failed blowout preventer. Forecasts anticipate calmer seas in the next 48 hours, he said, after which the last of the work hooking up undersea hoses should take three days. Allen acknowledged people watching the oil well via a video feed on BP’s website will still see crude billowing into the water after the Helix Producer I begins operating.

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Workers remove tar balls from the beach in Waveland, Miss., on Wednesday.

LONDON — Britain announced Wednesday that U.S. Marines would replace 1,000 British troops in the hotly contested Sangin region of northern Helmand province, where the British have lost nearly 100 of their 312 soldiers who have died in the war. Defense Secretary Liam Fox, addressing parliament, also announced a temporary deployment of an additional 300 reserve troops from a logistical unit stationed in Cyprus to add to the force of nearly 10,000 British troops deployed in Afghanistan, the second largest contingent of foreign troops after the Americans. The transition there is part of a major push by the U.S.-led international force to regain the initiative in Helmand, a strategic battle zone in southwestern Afghanistan that has seen some of the worst violence in the war. — The New York Times News Service

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“On the specific allegations made against the behavior of (Climatic Research Unit) scientists, we find that their rigor and honesty as scientists are not in doubt,” said the new report, led by Muir Russell, a retired British civil servant and educator. The Russell panel found little reason

to question the advice that the British scientists had given to the climate panel, or the conclusions of that body. The panel declared in 2007 that the Earth was warming and that human activity was the major reason. However, small errors in the 2007 report keep coming to light. The Netherlands agency found that the climate change panel had tended to emphasize the negative effects of global warming while playing down positive ones, like greater tree growth in northern climates. It recommended better balance and a greater emphasis on fact-checking.

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A British panel Wednesday exonerated the scientists caught up in the controversy known as Climategate of charges that they had manipulated their research to support preconceived ideas about global warming. The new report is the last in a series of investigations of leading British and U.S. climate researchers, prompted by the release of a cache of e-mail messages that cast doubt on their conduct and raised fresh public controversy over the science of global warming. All five investigations have come

down on the side of the climate researchers, rejecting a slew of criticisms raised by global-warming skeptics. Still, mainstream climate science has not emerged from the turmoil unscathed.

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A4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Design world makes space for fuller figures By Robin Givhan The Washington Post

NEW YORK — In the chaos of yellow cabs and black Town Cars that clog the street in front of the Hotel Pennsylvania, a young woman, belted into a black jersey skirt and tunic, emerges from a double-parked vehicle. As she cuts her way through a thicket of confused tourists, three facts are evident. One: She moves with grace and confidence. The self-assured woman is a model named Rosie Mercado, which leads to fact two: She is stunning — head-swiveling stunning, a genetic mash-up of Jennifer Lopez and Nicole Scherzinger. And finally: Mercado is large. She is a super-size woman whose size-20something hips are almost as wide as the door frame through which they pass. This last bit is not a judgment, but a fact. And if American culture made that distinction, Mercado and other plus-size women say, everyone would be better off. Mercado was the face of the second Full Figured Fashion Week, a late June convergence of designers, retailers, bloggers and activists who gathered to discuss the fashion desires of women who are plus-size, curvy, thick, voluptuous or fat — all adjectives the participants embrace. For those who live and work within the plus-size community, FFFW served as a safe space for both defiant anger and group jubilation. Pretty clothes, and who gets to wear them, functioned as the lingua franca for a

Racism Continued from A1 The indigenous remain disproportionately mired in poverty and denied work, political access, education and other rights. And there is a smaller community of black Mexicans, Afro Mexicanos, many descendants of slaves first brought to the region by Spanish conquerors in the 16th century. Often referred to by academics as the “third race” and concentrated in the coastal states of Veracruz, Oaxaca and Guerrero, they have been fighting for years for recognition as a distinct ethnic group, to be included in history books and to be given opportunities to transcend poverty. “Racism in Mexico is covered up,” said Ricardo Bucio, head of the National Council for the Prevention of Discrimination, which has protested the blackface TV caricatures. “There is a lot of denial about it.” Or, as columnist Katia D’Artigues once put it: “Although subtle, discrimination has become something invisible in our society. We no longer see it, or we consider it normal!” Still, in Mexico and other parts of Latin America, people operate with a different comfort level when it comes to physical

Resort Continued from A1 The Cyruses’ Aspen Lakes subdivision qualifies for this exception, but county staff and officials said Wednesday they did not know whether the exception would apply to any other properties in Deschutes County. Matt Cyrus has said converting his family’s Aspen Lakes subdivision and golf course to a resort would allow them to add overnight lodging units and build more homes, which would provide the financial incentive to expand the golf course from 18 to 27 holes. The Cyruses already have the necessary land use approval to expand the golf course. Matt’s father, Keith Cyrus, is a Deschutes County planning commissioner.

Wednesday vote Commissioners still need to adopt two proposed destination resort remapping ordinances, which now contain Wednesday’s change, and they are scheduled to vote on them during a 10 a.m. Wednesday meeting. Planning staff have advised the commission to accelerate the process by adopting the ordinance by emergency, a process that requires a unanimous vote by the three commissioners. County officials want to send out notices to residents impacted by the remapping process in fall tax statements. Commissioner Tammy Baney voted against adding the cluster development language to the ordinances on Wednesday. Baney

Helayne Seidman / The Washington Post

Designer Monif Clarke is helps customer Heather Sells into a dress with assistant Brandon Coates in Clarke’s New York showroom. multi-layered conversation about selfesteem, health, politics and power. “It shouldn’t be about obesity, but it always comes back to that,” says Michele Weston, founding fashion director of the groundbreaking Mode magazine. “That’s what people see.” The women have little desire to be slender. They are uninterested in preventative weight loss to stave off diabetes, high blood pressure or any other disease linked to obesity. Some are even unconvinced that their weight predisposes them to such conditions.

“Although subtle, discrimination has become something invisible in our society. We no longer see it, or we consider it normal!” — Katia D’Atigues, Mexican columnist attributes. It remains common for Mexicans to use nicknames like “Chino” for someone with almond-shaped eyes, “Negrito” for someone with dark skin, “Gordo” (Fatso) for a plump person. These terms are jarring when seen through the prism of U.S. sensibilities, but here they are usually used in a context of affection and friendship.

Racist president? The issue of racism in Mexico exploded a few years back when then-President Vicente Fox, in what was meant to be a defense of Mexican immigration to the United States, told a U.S. audience that Mexican immigrants were necessary because they performed the jobs that “not even blacks” wanted to do. He had to apologize and receive a visit from Jesse Jackson to atone. As the furor died down, an-

said she has not decided how to vote next week, but she could vote to approve the ordinances in order to move destination resort remapping forward and simply state her objection to the cluster development exception. “It’s just that I don’t agree with that particular piece of language,” Baney said. Matt Cyrus said his family was not involved with the latest change to the proposed destination resort ordinances but that it was a pleasant surprise when he heard about it Wednesday morning. “I would concur that it makes sense,” Cyrus said. County Commissioners did not refer to the Cyruses or Aspen Lakes during the discussion that led up to their vote Wednesday, but e-mails suggest Commissioner Alan Unger, who voted for the exception, wanted an exception for Aspen Lakes. Unger said he asked county staff to come up with the latest provision because cluster developments have unique characteristics that could qualify them to convert to destination resorts. Unger called Principal Planner Peter Gutowsky to request language that would allow Aspen Lakes cluster development to remain on the resort zone map, Gutowsky said. Gutowsky referred to their discussion in a July 1 e-mail. “As discussed, in my opinion there are two approaches for tailoring a criterion that applies solely to Aspen Lakes, that if adopted enables them to remain on Deschutes County’s Destination Resort Map,” Gutowsky wrote. One of the options was the change the County Commission

They do not want clothes that make them look thinner. They want Fashion. Fun, fast and disposable or luxurious, glamorous and sexy. If a trendy silhouette makes them look bigger, so what? “People think every plus-size woman is yearning to lose weight. We have body imperfections the same way other women do, but we feel great about ourselves,” New York-based designer Monif Clarke says. “People are willing to call themselves fat.” Accept them or not. Just don’t block their hustle.

other popped up when Mexico printed postage stamps that commemorated a well-known comicbook character from the 1950s, Memin Pinguin. The character is a black boy drawn with exaggerated features. It was seen as racist by many in the U.S. who demanded Mexico withdraw the stamps; many in Mexico, including several leftist intellectuals, defended Memin Pinguin as a beloved part of Mexican culture. (Withdrawing the stamps became a moot point when they sold out within hours of going on the market.) The people at Televisa, Mexico’s pre-eminent broadcasting company, say they mean absolutely no harm with the blackface characters on their morning chat show. It’s just a spoof, they say, a humorous segment when the news is over but the day’s World Cup match hasn’t yet started, and shouldn’t be taken seriously. After all, one of the co-hosts is a green-haired clown. More “Saturday Night Live” than “Good Morning America.” The ratings, by the way, are through the roof, Televisa adds. For Friday’s game between Holland and Brazil, viewers in Mexico, minutes after the morning dose of blackface, saw the two teams read a pledge against discrimination and parade with a huge banner that said: “No to racism.”

adopted Wednesday. Assistant County Legal Counsel Laurie Craghead worked with Gutowsky to draft the language Unger requested, and proposed the provision the commission approved Wednesday in a July 2 e-mail to the planner and the County Commission. “In reviewing this further, it seems to me that, because we all know that the Cyruses do want all the property in Aspen Lakes currently designated as destination resort to remain on the map and, if the (County Commission) wants Aspen Lakes and just Aspen Lakes to be eligible to remain on the map, then, there is no reason to make the developer apply to have those properties remain on the map,” Craghead wrote.

This is not a tipping point in the long struggle to change how the broader culture views plus-size women. There hasn’t been a seismic shift toward acceptance. Instead, this is an angry moment — a mad-as-hell, stoptelling-me-to-lose-weight moment. It’s the rise of the “fatshionista.” On Day 3 of FFFW, dozens of large-size women are gathered for a conversation about everything from the gaps in the plus-size lacy lingerie market to the need for more largesize club clothes that are short, tight and deliciously inappropriate. The plus-size market is beginning to adopt more of a fun, fashion-first attitude. Companies such as Forever 21 have expanded their size ranges. Trend hunters for the plus-size market scour Europe for ideas. Clarke, who launched her Monif C. collection five years ago, has been the go-to designer for plus-size women looking for figure-hugging, sexy clothes. Glamour, InStyle and Essence have all featured Clarke’s work, which makes her a rarity. Clarke has broken through the size divide. After 13 years of specializing in large-size fashion events and being a frustrated shopper, Gwen DeVoe, a tall, zaftig African American former model, created FFFW. “After attending a lot of different events, it became painfully obvious that two huge things were missing: I was looking at clothes that didn’t fit me, and on models who didn’t look like me,” DeVoe says. “What I’m trying to do is bridge the gap between consumers and designers.”

Cuba to free 52 political prisoners By Marc Lacey New York Times News Service

MEXICO CITY — The Cuban government Wednesday agreed to release 52 political prisoners in the coming months, a dramatic move that may ease international criticism as well as save the life of a prominent dissident who has been on a hunger strike for four months to push for the liberation of inmates. The deal, which reduces the number of prisoners of conscience on the island by about a third, came after a meeting that included President Raul Castro of Cuba; Cardinal Jaime Ortega, the archbishop of Havana, and the Spanish foreign minister, Miguel Angel Moratinos. The prisoners to be released, five initially, and then, 47 others, were all detained during a major crackdown on dissent in 2003, when the government of President Fidel Castro rounded up 75 activists and journalists who were accused of acting as “mercenaries” on behalf of the United States. Of the original 75 detainees, some completed their sentences or were released on health grounds. Those who remained behind bars turned into potent symbols to Cuba’s critics of the government’s heavy-handed approach to dissent. The announcement of the decision to release the prisoners came in a statement from Orlando Marquez, the spokesman for Ortega. The five prisoners released Wednesday, whose identities were not released, were to be flown to Spain with their families. The others to be set free will also be repatriated, church officials said. “This process will be concluded in three to four months from now,” the church statement said.

House Historian says U.S. is polarized, but things have been much worse By Michael Leahy The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Every now and then, when the breaking political news from Capitol Hill is in dire need of historical context, journalists and politicians alike go looking for Fred Beuttler. In May 2006, as news unfolded about the controversy over an FBI raid on the House offices of William Jefferson, a Louisiana congressman later to be convicted on corruption charges, several reporters and congressional observers sought guidance from Beuttler, the House’s deputy historian. By then, both the House speaker, Dennis Hastert, R-Ill., and the minority leader, Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., had signed a rare joint letter criticizing the raid authorized by the Bush administration — the executive branch’s first break-in of a congressional office in the nation’s history. Why were congressional figures in both parties getting so hot and bothered about it? Beuttler was asked. For the curious, the answer was offered up in a history lesson. They learned about the Constitution’s speech-and-debate

clause — “Article 1, Section 6,” Beuttler notes — and legislators’ worry that the FBI raid constituted an infringement of Congress’ powers and independence. They learned about England’s imperious King Charles I, who once infamously burst into the House of Commons with an armed guard, hopeful of arresting five members critical of his rule. “Our job in that moment as historians was to explain the importance of the principles to those interested,” Beuttler recalls.

‘We’re doing something different’ For Beuttler, a 48-year-old with glasses, sandy hair and an academician’s rumpled demeanor, it matters little that his quotes or perspectives rarely make news. “We’re historians — we’re doing something different,” he says. A man in love with his job, he smiles while reminiscing about the congressional imbroglio over the Jefferson raid. “It’s a good fun topic,” says Beuttler, who uses “fun” a lot in discussing his work, swapping historical factoids and perspec-

tive with the zest of a kid trading baseball cards. Perhaps nothing the historian’s office does is more valuable than placing the current times into proper historical perspective. “These are some of the more partisan times for (Congress), but not the most partisan times,” he observes, reminding people about the late 1850s, in the march toward the Civil War. “Perhaps an example of one of the most divisive times came in 1856, with Congressman Preston Brooks.” Brooks, a pro-slavery congressman from South Carolina, became enraged after learning of a speech by Sen. Charlie Sumner of Massachusetts, in which Sumner insulted a Brooks relative while castigating proslavery forces for violence in Kansas. Brooks beat Sumner into unconsciousness with his cane. “You had members of the House and Senate carrying pistols and knives into the chamber,” Beuttler says. “The sectional divide created great tensions. ... It’s our job, hopefully, to help communicate that context.”

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Officials unclear on impact Luke asked county Principal Planner Peter Gutowsky on Wednesday whether all the cluster development subdivisions in Deschutes County are currently on the destination resort zone map. Gutowsky told Luke he could not recall the answer, but there are probably fewer than five. Luke responded that there are probably only three or four cluster development subdivisions in the county. “The chance of any of them becoming resorts is very small,” Luke said. “But to select out one of the four or five doesn’t make very much sense.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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Diabetics eye obesity surgery as treatment By Alicia Chang The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — For nearly a decade, Cristina Iaboni tried to tame her diabetes the usual way, through daily shots of insulin and other medicine. Still, her blood sugar raged out of control. So Iaboni combed the Internet for another solution and found a doctor who is testing weight loss surgery on diabetics who, like herself, are merely overweight or a tad obese in an attempt to curb the chronic disease. Scientists in recent years have discovered that diabetes all but disappears in some obese patients soon after the operation. Many were able to achieve normal blood sugar and ditch their medications. But does the benefit extend to diabetics who are not quite as hefty? Performing surgery on the not-as-obese with the goal of reversing diabetes is provocative. Iaboni’s surgeon is one of a handful of doctors around the world stretching the rules to see if the weight loss operation helps. Iaboni had gastric bypass surgery last fall at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center as part of a study. In gastric bypass or stomach stapling surgery, the stomach is reduced to a thumb-sized pouch that holds less food. Now 50 pounds lighter, she has stopped taking diabetes medications. Her blood sugar is almost normal. “I didn’t care if I lost any weight. I just wanted the diabetes to go away,” said the 45-year-old Connecticut mother of two teenagers. The twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes are fueling an international public health threat. In the United States, one out of five people with obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes are morbidly obese — defined as 100 pounds overweight. Surgery is generally a last resort after traditional ways to shed the pounds — such as diet and exercise — fail. Even so, there are strict rules for who can go under the knife. Federal guidelines say surgery candidates must be morbidly obese with a body mass index over 40, or a BMI over 35 plus a weight-related medical problem like diabetes or high blood pressure. Insurers use the cutoffs in deciding whether to pay for the procedure. BMI is a calculation of height and weight used to estimate body fat. Overweight begins at a

Thomas Cain / The Associated Press

Cristina Iaboni stands in her home in Bethany, Conn. Iaboni, a diabetic, has found a doctor who is testing weight loss surgery on diabetics who are merely overweight or a tad obese in an attempt to curb the chronic disease.

“It’s important to tell patients this is a promising option, but of course we can’t promise this is the cure for diabetes for everybody.” — Dr. Francesco Rubino, surgeon measurement of 25, obese at 30 and morbidly obese at 40. A 5foot-6 person is considered overweight at 155 pounds, obese at 186 pounds and morbidly obese at 248 pounds. The current BMI limits for obesity surgery were set by the National Institutes of Health in 1991. Dr. Philip Schauer of the Cleveland Clinic is among those pushing the BMI envelope. For a study, he’s recruiting 150 overweight and obese Type 2 diabetics with BMIs between 27 and 43. Some will have surgery and their progress will be compared to those who manage their dia-

betes with medicine. The goal is to see which group can achieve complete remission. Smaller studies have hinted that stomach stapling and gastric banding — in which an adjustable ring is placed over the top of the stomach to create a small pouch — may work in diabetics who aren’t so fat. “These procedures can cause long-term remission and restore someone to normal blood sugar levels without medication,” Schauer said. How does the surgery help some diabetics beat the disease? Doctors don’t exactly know, but

there is some evidence that it may not all be due to weight loss. Diabetes occurs when the body can’t regulate blood sugar, and some researchers think that the rerouting of the digestive tract after the operation affects the gut hormones involved in blood sugar control. Last year, 220,000 people had obesity surgery, which can cost between $14,000 and $26,000, according to the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. The surgery is fairly safe. In a 2009 study, death, serious complications or the need for a repeat procedure occurred in 1 percent who received bands, about 5 percent who had minimally invasive gastric bypass and nearly 8 percent who had traditional bypass. The American Diabetes Association said there’s not enough evidence to generally recommend surgery for diabetics with a BMI lower than 35 outside of an experiment. That’s how Iaboni got the procedure. At 5-foot-5 and 191 pounds, she was obese with a BMI of 31.8, but not heavy enough to qualify for regular surgery under the federal BMI limits. She paid $30,000 for the surgery and hospital stay to be part of the study. Before the operation, she would be nauseated from the diabetes medications and felt lousy all the time. When people learn that she had surgery, many react in surprise. “They would say, ‘You’re not heavy. Why would you do this?’ People thought I did it for the weight loss,” Iaboni said. Her surgeon, Dr. Francesco Rubino, has been pleased with her progress so far. He has plans to operate on two others as early as this month. Eventually, he hopes to enroll 50 patients with Type 2 diabetes and track if their diabetes goes away after surgery. “It’s important to tell patients this is a promising option, but of course we can’t promise this is the cure for diabetes for everybody,” he said. Some experts question whether achieving normal blood sugar is enough to justify getting surgery. Does the surgery permanently reduce a person’s risk of diabetes complications such as nerve, kidney and foot damage? “I don’t believe we’re at a point where we can tell people that we know the answer to that,” said Dr. Robert Kaplan of the UCLA School of Public Health.

Nationwide, scams against senior citizens are on the rise By Dan Morse The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Murders and violent crimes are down nationwide, but one kind of crime is rising steadily: scams against the elderly. Senior citizens are low-key victims who avoid telling family members for fear of going to nursing homes, or don’t even report swindles for fear of having

Grants Continued from A1 “We just really wanted to develop a whole new vision and a whole new delivery for alternative curriculum,” Van Buren said. The district hoped to use the federal dollars to create the Marshall Education Center with a variety of options in the local high schools and the continued option of attending Marshall. “We could not do that because this money is to be targeted at increasing the four-year cohort graduation rate at Marshall and to increase Marshall students’ performance in reading and in math on the (state tests),” Van Buren said. “It couldn’t be used for that much broader concept of delivery.” So the district reapplied for the funds, asking for money to pay the three new teachers; the district plans to use the teachers to increase student time in math, reading and writing, and will push a credit-by-proficiency model. In that model, students receive credit for a subject when they can prove they’ve mastered the subject, rather than by completing a certain amount of time in the class. Students will balance in-person, traditional classes with online courses, and will work more closely with counselors on personalized education plans. Marshall High School will also

to testify in court. “There’s just a low chance of getting caught and a high chance of getting into a lot of money,” said Kathleen Quinn, executive director of the National Adult Protective Services Association. Senior citizens lose at least $2.6 billion a year to thieves, many of whom are in their own families, according to a study last year by the MetLife Mature

Market Institute. And that estimate is conservative, MetLife says, given the schemes left unreported. As the nation ages, the number of targets increases. By 2030, the United States will be home to 25 million people between 75 and 84. Nine million will be even older. Officials in Washington said the number of financial exploi-

tations against older people has remained flat, but more seniors are falling prey to offshore fake lottery-winning scams. “There’s absolutely more scamming going on,” said Gail Nardi, head of adult services for Virginia’s Department of Social Services. “It’s outrageous to the point you say, ‘Nah, that couldn’t have happened.’ But I see it every day.”

extend its operating hours so that students can attend classes between 8:30 a.m. and 5:45 p.m., allowing students who have jobs or other commitments to continue their studies. As part of the grant’s requirements, Marshall will serve as a demonstration site for the district’s changing teacher evaluation methods. Bend-La Pine Schools has worked with education reform nonprofit Chalkboard Project on the CLASS Project, which seeks to improve student learning by changing teacher performance, evaluation and compensation models.

The Jefferson County School District will focus on improving math and reading scores. Madras High School consistently ranks low on the state’s annual report card. The school’s low test scores in math and reading put it in a category with the 18 lowestachieving schools in the state. The federal funds will help the school start a double-dosing program, in which students who need extra help in language arts and math will start taking two of the classes in a single day in those subjects. Since they will likely have to cut elective classes to accommodate the focus on reading and math, more after-school enrichment classes will be offered. About six new employees will be hired and the district is also starting a freshman academy, which will keep the same group of core teachers with the students throughout the year. The goal behind the freshman academy is to foster strong relationships between the teach-

ers and students. Instructional coaches will also be hired at the high school. Current principal Gary Carlton will continue on through next school year and then will be placed in a different position within the school. Replacing Carlton is a difficult move for the district. “Gary is a well-loved principal,” Boyle said. At the end of the three years, Boyle said the goal is, as always, to improve test scores and student learning. “I think the (district) is really excited about the possibilities and the opportunities this will give our school to make a change and increase student achievement,” she said.

Moving principals Another required change at the school comes in the administration. Kathy Saterdahl, the longtime Bear Creek Elementary principal, will take over at Marshall. Dave Holmberg — previously Marshall’s principal — will handle the school’s student services and will also work at the district level on student safety and security. Van Buren stressed that Holmberg’s role at the high school has been valuable and has improved student performance. “It’s a head scratcher in that Marshall has for the last several years continued to make steady growth in its percentage of students meeting benchmarks in reading and math,” she said. “It’s not that it’s the principal or the leadership, it’s the requirements of the grant.”

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com and Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 A5

Whitman Continued from A1 “Meg is from Silicon Valley, and it’s where our campaign is headquartered,” said Sarah Pompei, Whitman’s spokeswoman. “We will use every tool at our disposal.” In most cases, Whitman’s campaign is adapting existing technology to politics. “Instead of using the technology to send out a DVD of a vacation destination, she’s using it to send out a bumper sticker,” Comcast Spotlight spokesman Chris Ellis said of the new interactive cable TV ads. Whitman has also brought cutting-edge technology to the age-old tradition of snooping on opponents, aka “tracking.” When Brown spoke on June 15 to tech executives at Microsoft’s campus in Mountain View, a Whitman political tracker, apparently for the first time ever, surreptitiously fed video in “real time” back to the opposition camp. It worked like this: A twentysomething with an iPhone used a new app to continuously upload his video to Ustream, a website also popular with musicians who want to stream their performances live. Back at Whitman’s Cupertino headquarters, staffers immediately dissected Brown’s speech for inconsistencies, gaffes and poor word choices. The press team then spun Brown’s speech in e-mails to political reporters before many had even started writing their stories. Digital technology also has reduced the amount of time needed for candidates to get their TV ads on the air statewide. It can now be done in about an hour, compared with a couple of days in the videotape era, said Mike Caprio, senior vice president of sales at DG FastChannel, which last year delivered more than seven million TV ads to cable and broadcast stations. Consider the possibilities: The kind of grainy, “Blair Witch”like amateur video secretly captured from a candidate’s morning speech can now be turned into a negative ad that would run before the afternoon news.

Brown not worried Brown told the San Jose Mercury News that he wasn’t worried about his campaign being overrun by Whitman’s emphasis on technology. “She is a billionaire and can buy up the TV channels” and as many gadgets as she wants, he said. But “at the same time we should never lose sight of the human element” in campaigns, said Brown, who is pushing Whitman to debate him 10 times before the election. Brown said his campaign is certainly not shy about using technology wisely and “frugally.” And he lit up when he noted that he has 1.1 million followers on Twitter, compared with Whitman’s 235,000. And garnering the followers didn’t cost him a cent. But, boy, can money buy you an impressive website. Whitman’s site features the usual political fare — endorsement lists, policy statements and buttons for donating money. But the site also showcases

“(Meg Whitman) is a billionaire and can buy up the TV channels. (But) at the same time we should never lose sight of the human element (in campaigns).” — Jerry Brown, candidate for governor of California high-resolution campaign videos and photos taken by Eric Draper, formerly President George W. Bush’s personal photographer, at perfectly choreographed rallies. By comparison, Brown’s campaign website is reminiscent of the famous 1974 blue Plymouth he used during his first term as governor. Whitman has also made use of increasingly sophisticated database technology to “micro-target” voters through an aggressive mail program. First made popular by GOP strategist Karl Rove in the 2004 presidential election, microtargeting goes far beyond using bare-bones demographic information such as age and income. Voters get targeted mailers and phone calls based on the kind of cars they drive, food they eat and magazines they buy.

Contributing in their pajamas During the primary campaign, many Whitman volunteers eschewed traditional “boiler rooms” and joined online phone banks so they could dial for dollars in their pajamas — or ask voters for their support and record information on them while sitting on a beach with their BlackBerrys. So what effect will all this gee-whiz technology have on the election outcome? Steve Smith, spokesman for the California Labor Federation, which supports Brown, said Whitman campaign officials are “using the latest gadgetry to make up for the fact that they don’t have a big enough base of voters.” Still, he said, labor isn’t taking any chances. The federation, he said, is, also using micro-targeting technology- but depending less on consumer information and more on oneto-one interviews with voters. He said the federation has identified 1.8 million voters in “red” parts of the state such as the Central Valley and Inland Empire who don’t belong to labor unions but “who we know share our values.” Through November unions will reach out to those voters not only through mail and phone calls, but also by “knocking on doors and work site visits.” Democrats, he said, are confident that traditional grass-roots organizing, rank-and-file boots on the ground and “personal contact” will win out over polland focus-group-driven TV ads and glitzy technology. But deep down, no one really knows what will happen — which is one more reason the Brown-Whitman battle will be so fascinating to watch. Said Smith: “We’re going to find out how elections are won.”

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A6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

VA to ease claims process for PTSD By James Dao New York Times News Service

The government is preparing to issue new rules that will make it easier for veterans who have been found to have posttraumatic stress disorder to receive disability benefits for the illness, a change that could affect hundreds of thousands of veterans from the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Vietnam. The regulations from the Department of Veterans Affairs, which will take effect as early as Monday and cost as much as $5 billion over several years according to congressional analysts, will modify a requirement that veterans document specific events like bomb blasts, firefights or mortar attacks that might have caused PTSD, an illness characterized by emotional numbness, irritability and flashbacks. For decades, veterans have complained that finding such

records was time-consuming and sometimes impossible. And in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, veterans groups assert that the current rules discriminate against tens of thousands of service members who did not serve in combat roles but nevertheless suffered traumatic experiences. Under the new rule, which applies to veterans of all wars, the department will grant compensation to those with PTSD if they can simply show that they served in a war zone and in a job consistent with the events that they say caused their conditions. They would not have to prove, for instance, that they came under fire, served in a front-line unit or saw a friend killed. The new rule would also allow compensation for service members who had good reason to fear traumatic events even if they did not experience them.

Shadowy senior al-Qaida leader indicted in absentia

By John Broder New York Times News Service

Alex Brandon / The Associated Press

Patty Wesel, 8, from Marietta, Ga., jumps in the spray of a sprinkler on the National Mall in front of the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. The eastern United States cooked for another day as unrelenting heat promised to push thermometers past 100 degrees.

New tax has tanning salons worried

New York Times News Service

Meeting with violent Salvadoran gangs in Honduras. Seeking radioactive material at a university in Hamilton, Ontario. Running an import-export business and teaching English — wife and child in tow — in Morocco. Hiding out in Suriname. These are just some of the points of interest on the trail of a U.S. citizen who spent part of his youth in Brooklyn, went to college in Florida and has long been on the Federal Bureau of

Investigation’s most-wanted list, a senior al-Qaida operative who over the past seven years has been portrayed as part wraith, part James Bond and largescale bogeyman. On Wednesday, federal prosecutors in Brooklyn formally named Adnan el-Shukrijumah in an official case, charging him in the bomb plot last summer to attack three New York City subway lines and what they said was a related plot, one that British authorities said included a plan to blow up a shopping center in Manchester, England.

WASHINGTON — The sun hasn’t exactly set on Solar Planet, but anxiety over the fate of the Arlington, Va., tanning salon has been running high ever since a “tan tax” took effect Thursday. One of the less-publicized measures in the new health care law, the tax imposes a 10 percent surcharge on the use of ultraviolet indoor tanning beds. Supporters — including the Obama administration, congressional Democrats and dermatologists — have argued that the tax will raise an estimated $2.7 billion toward the cost of ex-

panding health coverage to the uninsured, while discouraging a practice that increases the risk of skin cancer by as much as threefold in frequent users, according to scientific research.

A death blow? But outraged tanning salon owners worry that the levy could deal a death blow to an industry already reeling from the recession. “In 26 years of business, this is the worst I’ve seen it,” said Scott Shortnacy, owner of the Arlington Solar Planet as well as six other branches in the Washing-

N  B Obama fills Medicare, security vacancies WAHINGTON — President Obama on Wednesday appointed health care expert Donald Berwick to administer the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, bypassing the Senate confirmation process over strong objections from Republicans who oppose the choice. Obama used a recess appointment to name Berwick, a 63year-old pediatrician, Harvard University professor and head of a nonprofit health care institute, to the post that oversees the $800 billion-a-year program that provides health care to the nation’s elderly, poor and disabled. He was nominated in April, but no confirmation hearing was scheduled. The appointment during a congressional recess allows him to serve through 2011 without Senate confirmation. Obama also used recess appointments Wednesday to install Philip Coyle III as associate director for national security and international affairs at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and Joshua Gotbaum as director of the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation.

Group drops case against cell phone ban WASHINGTON — Hours after Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood lambasted a lobbying firm he accused of working against efforts to limit drivers’ use of cell phones behind the wheel, the firm announced it was scrapping its plans. LaHood joined other transportation safety leaders Wednesday to condemn the actions of the Seward Square Group, which aimed to fight state laws prohibiting motorists from talking and texting while driving. Instead, the lobbying group encouraged broader laws that would focus on car distractions in general. But shortly after the news conference, the group scrapped its lobbying efforts. “We are pleased that the concept has met its goal of expanding dialogue on distracted driving, therefore the proposed coalition is no longer being pursued,” the lobbying firm said. — From wire reports

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WASHINGTON — The Obama administration has asked a federal court in Louisiana to reinstate the ban on deep-water drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, saying the moratorium was a rational response to the unparalleled emergency of the BP oil spill. In a court filing late Tuesday, the Interior Department said that the six-month ban on drilling in more than 500 feet of water, imposed in late May, was necessary to allow time to adopt stricter safety and environmental regulation of deep-water wells. The action has put hundreds of people who operate and service deep-water wells out of work and brought longterm uncertainty to the Gulf Coast economy. Politicians all along the coast have called the moratorium a case of federal overkill that threatens the livelihood of the region.

‘Punitive’ action By N.C. Aizenman The Washington Post

By William Rashbaum

Obama asks court to reinstate deep-water drilling ban

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ton area. “Normally for people who tan, it’s a part of their lifestyle. They keep doing it even in a recession. But everybody has been looking for ways to cut back on those areas. ... Our sales are down 20 to 30 percent.” Still, plenty of other customers said they had no quarrels with the tax — particularly those who supported the health care law in general. “I know I shouldn’t be tanning, but I do it because it makes me feel better,” said Karie Apicella, 34, a patent examiner. “So I guess I understand the idea behind the tax, and I’m willing to pay it.”

The moratorium was challenged in court by Hornbeck Offshore Services, a Louisiana firm that provides goods and services to offshore drilling and pumping platforms, and by other oil service firms. Judge Martin Feldman of the U.S. District Court in New Orleans agreed with the company, and on June 22 issued an order blocking enforcement of the moratorium. He said the Obama administration had failed to justify the need for “a blanket, generic, indeed punitive, moratorium” on deep-water oil and gas drilling.


B

Personal Finance Looking for a new bank? You have options, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,159.47 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +65.59 +3.13%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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CLOSE 10,018.28 DOW JONES CHANGE +274.66 +2.82%

San Francisco-based Wells Fargo & Co. announced Wednesday it will shutter its Wells Fargo Financial division, which operated standalone financial product stores across the country, including one in Bend. The company said employees in the division’s 638 stores would be transferred to local Wells Fargo Bank branches. It could not say how many employees in the Bend office would be affected. The office is at 20350 Empire Ave., Suite 2, in the Empire Business Park. Wells Fargo Financial originated personal, commercial and real estate loans to customers who “faced difficulty getting credit,” said company spokeswoman Erin Downs. Wells Fargo & Co. cited a desire to eliminate duplication in its markets as a reason for the division’s closing. Most of the division’s services will now be offered through the bank’s existing branches.

1,060.27 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +32.21 +3.13%

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Rising expectations for corporate earnings reports prompt investors to purchase blue-chip shares at bargain prices New York Times News Service

Bend office among Wells Fargo closures

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.98 treasury CHANGE +1.71%

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$1198.60 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$3.80

Dow swings back above 10,000 By Graham Bowley For a day, at least, Wall Street got its groove back. The stock market staged its biggest rally since May on Wednesday, driving the Dow Jones industrial average above 10,000, as investors rushed to buy blue-chip shares near their lowest levels this year. The hope was that coming quarterly earnings reports would show major corporations were

weathering these hard economic times better than many had expected. Many ifs remain. A disappointing showing by any number of companies could easily send the market tumbling anew. So could worrisome developments in Europe, where authorities are in the midst of assessing the financial strength of major banks. But on Wednesday, the old worries were cast aside. The broad stock market jumped 3.13 percent as investors concluded the

recent sell-off was overdone and that the economy might be stronger than many had believed. To some, stocks simply seemed too cheap to resist. Investors who for weeks had sought shelter in the relative safety of U.S. Treasury securities reversed their trades and headed back into stocks. Adding to the buoyant mood was news suggesting that retail sales were growing briskly this year. Sales probably grew at an average annual rate of 4 percent during the first five months of retailers’ current fiscal year, the sharpest gain since 2006, the International Council of Shopping Centers said. See Markets / B5

Picking up the pieces after Nosler explosion

Fed weighs steps to bolster recovery Federal Reserve officials, increasingly concerned over signs the economic recovery is faltering, are considering new steps to bolster growth. With Congress tied in political knots over whether to take further action to boost the economy, Fed leaders are weighing modest steps that could offer more support for economic activity while their target for short-term interest rates is already near zero. They are still resistant to calls to pull out their big guns — massive infusions of cash — but would reconsider if conditions worsen. Top Fed officials still say that the economic recovery is likely to continue into next year and that the policy moves being discussed are not imminent. But weak economic reports, the debt crisis in Europe and faltering financial markets have led them to conclude that the risks of the recovery losing steam have increased.

Europe caps pay at banks to curb risk PARIS — As Wall Street drags its feet on reining in bonuses, the European Union is forcing its banks — by law — to show some restraint. The European Parliament on Wednesday approved one of the world’s strictest crackdowns on exorbitant bank pay, going beyond some of the limits that many banks were pressed to adopt after the financial crisis. Bankers in the union’s 27 nations will be barred from taking home more than 30 percent of a bonus in cash starting next year, and they will risk losing some of the remainder if the bank’s performance erodes over the next three years. Banks that do not curb salaries will have to set aside more capital to make up for risk. — From staff and wire reports

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Reconstruction is in progress at the Nosler bullet manufacturing building, seen here Tuesday. The Bend plant is being rebuilt after an explosion June 3.

Reconstruction is under way; 30 employees put on indefinite leave By David Holley The Bulletin

One month after an explosion that destroyed a portion of Nosler Inc.’s Southwest Columbia Street ammunition manufacturing facility, the Bend company is making headway on rebuilding, with some construction under way and architectural plans for the rest of the renovation being finalized. John Nosler, vice president and general manager, said 100 of the company’s 130 employees are back to work; some are working on the production of ammunition and others are cleaning up the mess created by the explosion. Those

“There’s still going to be a lot of headaches and a lot of hiccups.” — John Nosler, vice president and general manager employees are staffing one full shift of production. Prior to the explosion, Nosler said he ran three eight-hour shifts, allowing the company to operate 24 hours a day. The additional 30 people have been put on

By Miguel Helft

Inside

New York Times News Service

Auto sales rise Most major automakers reported a slight increase in U.S. sales in June. Change in number of vehicles sold in June from same month a year ago Chrysler

35.4%

Ford

13.4

GM

11.9

Nissan

10.8

Toyota

6.8

Honda

6.2

Source: Autodata AP

leave, which could become permanent, depending on the company’s ability to return to its previous production level. Hiring will be based on when the building’s renovation is completed and future sales. “We’re running about half (the production) of what we have been the last couple of years,” Nosler said Tuesday night. A portion of the damage will be covered by insurance, Nosler said, with the company paying for certain things out of pocket. All of the employees working in the factory were able to evacuate the building, unharmed by the explosion, he said. See Nosler / B5

Facebook’s global footprint grows Sergey Brin, a Google founder, takes issue with people who say Google has failed to gain a foothold in social networking. Google has had successes, he often says, especially with Orkut, the dominant service in Brazil and India. Brin may soon have to revise his answer. Facebook, the social network service that started in a Harvard dorm room just six years ago, is growing at a dizzying rate around the globe, surging to nearly 500 million users, from 200 million users just 15 months ago. It is pulling even with Orkut in India, where only a year ago, Orkut was more than twice as large as Facebook. In the last year, Facebook has grown eightfold, to 8 million users, in Brazil, where Orkut has 28 million. In country after country, Facebook is cementing itself as the leader and often dis-

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• Germany takes legal action against Facebook over privacy, Page B5

Illustration by Minh Uong / New York Times News Service

placing other social networks, much as it outflanked MySpace in the United States. In Britain, for example, Facebook made the

formerly popular Bebo all but irrelevant, forcing AOL to sell the site at a huge loss two years after it bought it for $850 million. In Germany, Facebook surpassed StudiVZ, which until February was the dominant social network there. With his typical self-confidence, Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s 26-year-old chief executive, recently said it was “almost guaranteed” that the company would reach a billion users. Though he did not say when it would reach that mark, the prediction was not greeted with the skepticism that had met his previous boasts of fast growth. See Facebook / B5

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$17.979 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.146

State health insurance rates need more scrutiny, regulators say Bulletin staff report Oregon insurance regulators want to increase the scrutiny given to health insurance rates and believe a $1 million grant from the federal government would help them. Recent federal health care legislation includes a five-year $250 million grant program to help states review insurance rates, according to a news release from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services. “As Oregonians continue to pay more for their health care each year, it is critical that we do all we can to ensure rates are reasonable and transparent,” Cory Streisinger, DCBS director, said in the release. Some of the improvements Oregon regulators would like to make include: • Auditing numbers insurance companies submit. • Establishing a process to review rates for businesses with more than 50 employees. Currently, the state does not review rates for large employer groups. It reviews plans that cover small employers, individuals and those that extend coverage to people who stop their group coverage. • Increasing public input for rate reviews by funding a consumer group that would provide in-depth comments on rate requests. See Insurance / B5

Redmond fair aims to connect veterans with jobs, benefits Bulletin Staff Report A free career and benefits fair targeted at veterans is scheduled for Saturday in Redmond. The fair is intended to connect veterans and their spouses with employers, service providers and advocacy groups. In addition to meeting with potential employers, veterans and service members can receive information on the benefits they qualify for, as well as assistance with résumé writing and assessing their work skills. Unemployment for veterans nationally is higher than that of civilians, 10.2 percent in 2009 compared with 9.3 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The rate is even higher among young male veterans between 18 and 24, at 21.6 percent. The event is sponsored by multiple groups, including U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and WorkSource Central Oregon. A flier compiled by WorkSource advises veterans to bring résumés to give to prospective employers, practice potential interview questions, dress appropriately, obtain contact information from people they talk to and follow up with hand-written notes or emails within 48 hours. The flier also recommends giving a strong handshake, which makes for a good first impression. Information will be available to employers about the benefits of hiring a veteran, including financial incentives, according to the flier. Saturday’s event will be 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way. For more information call 541-388-6079.


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Europe presents main threat to global recovery, IMF says Despite caution, agency raises worldwide growth forecast But the outlook for Europe was reduced, as the combined impact of government spending cuts, continued concern over national debt and uncertainty about the banking sector undermines an economy already lagging the rest of the world. The IMF projected that the 16 countries that share the euro as a currency will grow just 1 percent this year and 1.3 percent in 2011. The report and an accompanying analysis of world economic stability emphasized how a problem that was considered limited in scope when it surfaced in Greece last fall eventually expanded to other European countries and is now one of the main issues facing the global economy. Governments throughout Europe

India, once known for knockoffs, becoming major drug producer By Heather Timmons New York Times News Service

It is not only Indian executives, though, who are bullish about the pharmaceuticals industry here. Analysts, research groups and consultants have been making similar predictions in recent months. Big Pharma has come calling, too. Earlier this year Piramal sold his generic drug business to Abbott Laboratories for $3.7 billion, the latest in a string of takeovers and joint ventures here. Daiichi Sankyo of Japan helped kicked off the foreign drug push into India in 2008 by buying a stake in Ranbaxy Laboratories, this country’s biggest drug maker. Last year, among other deals, GlaxoSmithKline formed a partnership with Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories; Pfizer tied up with Claris Lifesciences; Sanofi-Aventis took control of Shantha Biotechnics, and Bristol-Myers Squibb opened

By Jeremy W. Peters New York Times News Service

Kuni Takahashi / International Herald Tribune

Laukik Shetye, a research assistant at Piramal Lifesciences Limited, works on Chromatography at a research laboratory in Mumbai, India, last month. a new research center in India with Biocon. “There is a lot of good talent at a much lower price in India,” said Jim Worrell, the chief executive of Pharma Services Network, a Charlotte, N.C.-based consulting firm that is organizing tours of Indian factories for Western pharmaceutical executives who are considering outsourcing some of their business. “What I see happening now is manufacturing and even packaging and even formulation are moving to India,” Worrell said.

An economic shift The shift to pharmaceuticals is part of a subtle, broader shift in the Indian economy. Moving beyond less sophisticated, outsourced services like telephone call centers, India has been advancing up the business value chain, particularly in law and medical diagnostics. Now it is showing a flair for manufacturing, too, particularly when it comes to goods demanding high-skill production and superlow prices. Until recently, pharmaceuticals has been “an incredibly arrogant industry that has never outsourced,” said Sujay Shetty, an associate director with PricewaterhouseCoopers in Mumbai. But over the next several years, he predicts, “everything in the value chain will move to different parts of the world that are cheaper,” with India a major beneficiary. The next opportunities for India could come at the more sophisticated end of the drug making spectrum, including research and development for the world’s drug giants and even development of proprietary medicines. “We can crack the problem of patented drug discovery in India at a much lower cost” than in the West, predicted Piramal, who held onto his research and development operation, Piramal Lifesciences Limited, when he sold the rest of his company to Abbott. At Piramal’s main laboratory in north Mumbai, about 300 scientists are researching new drugs

aimed at inflammation, metabolic disorders and cancer. Mainly because of lower wages, if it costs big pharmaceutical companies “$1 billion to $1.5 billion to discover a new drug, we can do it in a tenth of the cost,” Piramal predicts. G.V. Prasad, chief executive of Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories, said that Indian drug makers had the “ability to handle product development on a massive scale at a low cost.” Dr. Reddy’s original diabetes drug has completed Phase 3 clinical trials — the last step before seeking Food and Drug Administration approval — the farthest of any of its peers.

Challenges ahead For all the potential, though, India’s drug industry has a long way to go to fulfill its promise. India exported about 384 billion rupees ($8.3 billion) in drugs and services for the pharmaceutical industry in the 2008-9 fiscal year, according to government figures, up 25 percent from the year before. Recent growth, though, has been shadowed by quality problems. The FDA cited Ranbaxy for manufacturing violations several times in recent years, and in February ordered a review of the company’s global manufacturing

operations. In May, Sanofi-Aventis recalled vaccines made by Shantha Biotechnics that were distributed to the World Health Organization after users complained about white sediment in the vials. In June, after floating matter was found in some plastic IV bags, Pfizer recalled injectible drugs made by Claris Lifesciences and sold in the United States. Intellectual property is also an open question. Trying to change its outlaw image as a maker of illegal knockoffs, India toughened its patent laws in 2005. But dozens of intellectual property suits are still being fought between Indian and foreign firms in courts around the world. And big pharmaceutical companies still find securing protection of their intellectual property in India difficult. Meanwhile, outright counterfeit drug making remains rampant in India, executives and analysts here say. A study this year of pharmaceuticals from Indian wholesalers found that 3.6 percent of the “drugs” had no active ingredients whatsoever. All of which is why some drug executives in the United States say that their Indian peers may be too optimistic about their industry’s prospects.

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The Huffington Post is venturing into the wonky but increasingly popular territory of opinion poll analysis, purchasing Pollster.com, a widely respected aggregator of poll data that has been a major draw for the website of The National Journal. The purchase is something of a coup for The Huffington Post, which has been making a more aggressive push into political journalism ahead of the midterm elections in November. “It’s going to beef up our political coverage,” said Arianna Huffington, the website’s editor in chief and founder. “Polling, whether we like it or not, is a big part of how we communicate about politics. And with this, we’ll be able to do it in a deeper way. We’ll be able to both aggregate polls, point out the limitations of them and demand more transparency.” The Huffington Post, which recently started a newsletter devoted specifically to Capitol Hill, plans to add four new reporters to help cover the midterm elections, Huffington said.

Time cuts amount of free online content New York Times News Service Time has decided to dive headfirst into an issue that has bedeviled many a news organization before it: how to cure online readers of their addiction to free content. But Time’s approach is more a process of weaning readers than forcing them to quit cold turkey. Starting this week, it replaced most of the content that appeared in its current issue with abridged articles and summaries online. The move is meant to drive readers to newsstands and Time’s iPad applications, where the magazine costs $4.99. Richard Stengel, the managing editor, says Time plans to experiment and will continually adjust what it decides to keep off its website. “I think we’ll see what works and doesn’t work,” Stengel said in an interview by phone. “We’ll adapt and change. We’re in the hunt like everyone else to figure this out.”

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HALOL, India — Below an ancient hilltop temple to Kali, the Hindu goddess associated with destruction and change, Sun Pharmaceutical Industries churns out generic versions of cancer drugs and epilepsy medications bound for the United States. Business is so brisk that Sun, with revenue of 41 billion rupees ($880 million) last year, predicts sales will grow 20 percent this year and is expanding its Halol factory. “This site specializes in making difficult things,” Sampad Bhattacharya, Sun’s vice president in charge of operations, said during a recent factory tour. The blue and gray concrete building, which will be nearly 800,000 square feet after an expansion, would not look out of place in the pharmaceutical manufacturing centers of New Jersey, except for the herds of cattle and buffalo wandering nearby. India’s drug industry — on track to grow about 13 percent this year, to just over $24 billion — was once notorious for making cheap knockoffs of Western medicines and selling them in developing countries. But India, seasoned in the basics of medicine making, is now starting to take on a more mainstream role in the global drug industry, as a result of recent strengthening of patent law here and cost pressures on namebrand drug makers in the West. And while the Indian industry has had quality-control problems, it nonetheless benefits from growing wariness about the reliability of ingredients from that other historically low-cost drug provider — China. The United States is India’s top export customer for drugs. India is becoming a “base for manufacturing for the global market,” said Ajay Piramal, the chairman of Piramal Healthcare, a drug maker with headquarters in Mumbai. Eventually, in Piramal’s perhaps overly optimistic forecast, only the very first and very last steps of the business — molecular drug discovery and marketing — will be run by the West’s global drug giants. Those companies “don’t create much value” in the steps in between, he said.

CNN on Wednesday removed its senior editor of Middle Eastern affairs, Octavia Nasr, after she published a Twitter message saying that she respected the Shiite cleric Grand Ayatollah Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah. Parisa Khosravi, the senior vice president of international newsgathering for CNN Worldwide, said in an internal memorandum that she “had a conversation” with Nasr on Wednesday morning and that “we have decided that she will be leaving the company.” For her coverage of events like last year’s protests in Iran, CNN had previously called Nasr a “leader” in integrating social media websites like Twitter within its newsgathering process. Nasr, a 20-year veteran of the network, wrote on Twitter after the cleric died Sunday, “Sad to hear of the passing of Sayyed Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah. … One of Hezbollah’s giants I respect a lot.” The ayatollah routinely denounced the United States and supported suicide bombings against Israel. Some supporters of Israel

seized on the Twitter message as an indication of bias. A CNN spokesman said Tuesday that Nasr had made an “error of judgment” that “did not meet CNN’s editorial standards.” In an explanatory blog post on CNN.com Tuesday evening, Nasr said she was sorry about the message “because it conveyed that I supported Fadlallah’s life’s work. That’s not the case at all.” She said she used the words “respect” and “sad” because “to me as a Middle Eastern woman, Fadlallah took a contrarian and pioneering stand among Shia clerics on woman’s rights. She continued, “This does not mean I respected him for what else he did or said. Far from it.” Despite her senior editor title, Nasr did not run CNN’s Middle East coverage, a spokesman said. She reported and provided analysis about the region for CNN’s networks. Her explanation of the Twitter message was apparently not enough for her CNN bosses. Khosravi wrote in the memo, “at this point, we believe that her credibility in her position as senior editor for Middle Eastern affairs has been compromised going forward.”

POTTERY

Europe’s weakened economy is now the central threat to global recovery, as countries there struggle with heavy debt, banks face a reckoning over their lack of capital and growth is slowing, the International Monetary Fund said Wednesday in its first assessment of the world economy since the emergence of a crisis over government borrowing in Greece. While the agency estimated that growth in the United States and emerging Asian and Latin countries remains on track, it scaled back projections for Europe and outlined a series of issues on the continent that could — unless controlled — spark problems rivaling those of the

2008 collapse of Lehman Bros. “Downside risks have risen sharply” in recent months, the IMF said. “The ultimate effect could be substantially lower global demand.” In updating its World Economic Outlook, the IMF slightly raised its overall forecast for global growth, to 4.6 percent for the year compared with 4.2 percent in its April report. The improvement was based on a stronger than expected performance in the first months of the year, particularly in Asia. The IMF said it also expected the United States to grow slightly faster than earlier predicted — about 3.3 percent this year and 2.9 percent next year, less than forecast by the Federal Reserve.

New York Times News Service



The Washington Post

By Brian Stelter

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

By Howard Schneider

are cutting spending and overhauling social programs in an effort to curb record levels of debt, and the Obama administration is studying similar U.S. measures. Although no other country has reached the crisis point hit by Greece — where borrowing costs skyrocketed until a joint European Union-IMF bailout provided emergency funding — the IMF noted that European countries and the United States will be competing this year to refinance some $4 trillion in government bonds maturing in the second half of the year. With the United States and nations such as Germany considered classic havens, there has been pressure felt in Britain, and in weaker euro-area economies such as Portugal and Spain, to make a convincing effort to control deficits to keep the favor of bond investors and analysts.

Twitter post ends editor’s 20-year career at CNN

 PLANTERS 


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 B3

P F   Shopping for a new bank? You have options By E. Scott Reckard

Mark and Roberta Maxwell receive personal service from assistant branch manager Danielle Acuna, left, at Musicians’ Interguild Credit Union in Studio City, Calif., where the couple took their accounts after becoming disenchanted with Chase.

Los Angeles Times

Kirk McKoy Los Angeles Times

If you’re a regular consumer seeking an alternative to the big banks, a credit union might be your best bet. “Consumer banking is what credit unions do,” said Edward Carpenter, an Irvine, Calif., investment banker who has advised hundreds of startup banks. Credit unions don’t actually have customers; they have members. To join one, you have to be in a group the credit union serves. But it’s usually easy to find credit unions you can join. One may serve residents of the area you live in. Another may cater to employees at your workplace. To search for one, go to the National Credit Union Administration website at www.ncua .gov. Services vary greatly, but many credit unions offer a wide range of deposit options, auto and home loans, credit cards, and even loans for boats and RVs. Some provide small-business banking and investment advisory services. Through alliances, credit union members can access ATM networks of as many as 25,000 machines free of charge. Because they pay no taxes and are organized to benefit members, not shareholders, credit unions generally are able to pay higher interest rates on deposits than banks — and charge lower rates on credit cards and auto loans. Mortgage rates tend to be about the same. For many people who switch to credit unions, fees may be the biggest difference they notice. A

Community banks If you’re considering a community bank, make sure it’s a good fit for you by talking with officials at the bank and maybe even some customers. The reason: Community banks generally are set up to accommodate the needs of small businesses, not the average person with a small checking and savings account. “Consumer accounts are very hard to deal with from a regulatory standpoint, and you need a bunch of them to do it efficiently,” said Anaheim-based bank consultant Gary S. Findley. Banks with less than $500 million in assets generally aren’t in a position to do much for consumers, he said. What’s more, Findley said,

Frugality often dovetails with a healthier lifestyle By Dan Serra McClatchy-Tribune News Service

An uncertain economy and high unemployment is enough to make Americans sick to their stomachs. But worrying about surviving the future on less doesn’t have to be painful — and can even make living in the present better. A recent survey has found that living a more frugal lifestyle can make people healthier. Most middle-class families said they are eating better, exercising more and spending less on junk food and alcohol because the economy has made them be more careful about their spending. Forty-nine percent of the 1,000 families surveyed as part of the First Command Financial Behaviors Index said they think their new frugality is making them healthier, and 45 percent said frugal behavior is making at least a part of their life healthier, such as cooking more at home or taking the bike instead of the car.

“The survey results reveal an important connection between personal finance and health,” said Scott Spiker, CEO of First Command Financial Services, a financial planning and investment management firm. “Middle-class consumers who embrace responsible behaviors are also making the types of spending decisions associated with healthy living.” The survey also found that consumers who obtain the help of a financial professional also experience fewer health problems than those who do not. Working with a financial planner results in a 10 percent less likely chance of experiencing at least one mental or physical health issue, the survey claims. While we appear to be living on less yet living better, there remain challenges to maintaining healthy budgets. A big obstacle is the conflict of similarity. We tend to want to be similar to those around us, so if our neighbor or co-worker has

something, we want it. This can be a big budget-wrecker. Whatever happened to the individuality of Americans? Comparing ourselves to others is the sure way of becoming less healthy. Also, in the pursuit of frugality, we tend to fall into traps from marketers who appeal to this sense. Many stores will offer coupons of free items to get customers in the door. This can actually end up causing the customer to spend more once they experience something they want again, or buy something they wouldn’t have if not lured into the store. Finally, another pitfall is overspending by finding a way to buy something when the cash is not available. This often comes in the form or creative financing offers. In the long run, too much of this debt could also lead to an unhealthy state of mind, not to mention an unhealthy credit record if something goes wrong. Take this time of frugality to make choices to create a healthier lifestyle.

small banks are devoting so much attention to raising fresh capital and working out troubled real estate loans that they might not be as free as they’d like to make new loans.

switchers a list of local, financially sound smaller banks. The site can be found at http://moveyourmoney.info/.

In the middle

Because the financial health of credit unions and small banks and thrifts can vary significantly, it’s a good idea to check them out online. You can view independent soundness ratings free

A notch up the food chain are larger regional banks with the wherewithal to do consumer business if they choose. But many of them also are still digging their way out from losses, or don’t aim their services at the mass market, or both. The “find a bank or credit union” button atop the Move Your Money website launched by Huffington can give potential

Check ’em out

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LAST ROUNDUP 1860 –2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 –2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860–2010 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE

Credit unions

study last year by economists at University of California-Davis and Dartmouth College found that fees for overdrafts at credit unions averaged $23, compared with $33 at banks. The typical credit union charge for using an out-of-network ATM was $1.50; at banks it was $2.50. Although they tend to take on much less risk than the megabanks do, credit unions, like all consumer lenders, have suffered loan losses in recent years, some more than others. At the end of 2009, 64 California credit unions had the equivalent of a D or F on their confidential regulatory report cards, five times the number at the end of 2006, said John J. McKechnie III, spokesman for National Credit Union Administration, which regulates federally insured credit unions. Keep reading for tips on how to check out the stability of a credit union or bank.

For many people, a bigger bank may be better. But if you can find the right one for you, a small institution may simply try harder to make you happy. Even in online banking, which is dominated by large banks, a survey this year awarded the highest satisfaction ratings to credit unions, and smaller banks outshined the five biggest institutions. “While the big companies try to outdo each other with lots of flashy bells and whistles, the small banks have had to keep their focus on satisfying the customer because that’s the only way they can compete,” said Larry Freed, president of research firm ForeSee Results, which conducted the survey for Forbes. com. “And as the data shows, it’s paid off.”

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The bottom line

1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE LAST ROUNDUP 1860 – 2010 — THE

LOS ANGELES — Mark and Roberta Maxwell had been zapped by fees for overdrawing funds and using the wrong ATM, and they felt their bank, the former Washington Mutual, had lost its personal touch since a takeover by Chase. Adding insult to injury, Roberta said, they had to pay a special fee for depositing more than $5,000 in cash in their smallbusiness account in a single month — something they might do again because Mark, a saxophone player, earns much of his living selling his smooth-jazz CDs at street fairs. “I thought banks were supposed to want you to put more money in them,” Roberta said. So the Maxwells moved their account last year to the Studio City, Calif., office of the Musicians’ Interguild Credit Union, joining what could be the vanguard of angry consumers abandoning major banks in favor of smaller ones. It’s an appealing notion in an era of outrage over the huge bailouts and high fees of the big banks. Consumers are much more willing to switch banks than they were before the financial crisis, according to a recent survey by market research firm J.D. Power & Associates. Twothirds of the big-bank customers surveyed said they would consider jumping to a smaller institution. It’s too soon to tell whether switch-your-bank campaigns, including the Move Your Money crusade undertaken by website entrepreneur Arianna Huffington, have prompted a significant number of bank customers to trade down. The big banks aren’t exactly giving up on you. In many places, they’re battling one another for market share. And, to be fair, it’s hard to beat them for convenience, cutting-edge technology, pervasive automated teller machines that are free to customers, and a variety of options for deposits and other products. For example, the Maxwells could have increased the amount of cash they were allowed to deposit each month without incurring a fee to $10,000 or even $25,000 — if they had sat down with a Chase small-business specialist and discussed alternative types of deposit accounts, said Gary Kishner, a spokesman for Chase, a unit of JPMorgan Chase & Co. At Bank of America, the country’s largest bank, first-year CEO Brian Moynihan is spearheading an effort to encourage employees to put customers’ needs first instead of simply maximizing revenue, a strategy that sounds much like marketing pitches for smaller banks and credit unions. There are pitfalls as well as potential benefits in switching. If you’re thinking about it, here

at Bankrate.com or from Bauer Financial Inc. at http://bauerfinancial.com/. In addition, credit unions’ quarterly reports to regulators are available online. Similar data from banks and thrifts are available from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Regardless of how big or how highly rated your financial institution is, make sure you stay under the federal deposit insurance coverage limit of $250,000 per customer.


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel ADPT AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed Abraxas AcadiaRlt Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivIden ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmItPasta AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmPubEd AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgonSt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenTech AspenBio AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone

7.46 +.21 16.06 +.55 0.44 18.36 +.67 1.26 51.89 +1.03 8.07 +.44 2.82 9.86 +.96 1.12 45.47 +1.91 28.03 +1.07 1.76 37.15 +.69 0.20 12.55 +1.03 35.34 +1.87 1.12 23.72 +1.48 7.08 +.37 6.74 +.34 20.69 +.62 .41 -.02 0.27 29.58 +.90 1.68 24.33 +.34 14.52 +.35 10.42 +.90 3.98 +.02 0.09 9.34 +.24 1.47 +.02 0.18 12.47 +.31 4.29 +.21 0.05 17.38 +.94 1.51 +.09 1.76 47.71 +1.02 0.70 32.90 +2.19 0.42 6.25 +.12 10.50 +.53 2.96 +.26 0.72 16.65 +.63 6.69 -.03 0.75 39.26 +.85 5.03 +.19 6.37 +.28 0.23 16.20 +.72 28.49 +1.89 30.69 +1.02 1.91 0.15 10.98 +.44 0.04 18.28 +.64 0.52 36.88 +1.47 14.43 +1.08 26.79 +.45 1.04 -.10 0.36 28.11 +1.07 0.25 3.65 +.10 0.24 50.89 +.39 3.18 +.11 12.96 +.78 7.39 +.35 0.08 4.11 +.07 5.94 +.21 22.62 +.47 0.04 20.45 +.46 5.68 +.17 10.75 +.66 30.31 +.70 22.47 +.24 1.07 +.01 0.04 27.17 +.68 62.59 +2.63 5.64 +.25 4.04 -1.51 2.84 -.09 28.57 +.82 0.18 57.98 +1.28 0.11 51.59 +2.07 1.96 67.74 +2.00 5.09 +.43 0.40 8.02 +.34 0.88 63.50 +.50 4.84 +.20 0.18 27.89 +.92 42.73 +2.47 3.13 +.01 47.04 +2.37 0.86 8.94 +.50 0.56 40.87 +1.77 0.34 28.64 +.92 2.70 +.12 0.12 10.55 +.34 3.95 152.32 +2.40 1.40 64.69 +3.86 50.40 -.03 14.88 +.78 12.38 +.29 0.60 21.32 +.83 0.72 46.61 +2.49 0.75 44.98 +2.42 0.20 63.72 +1.90 55.81 +1.18 3.42 -.22 3.69 -.01 0.48 8.19 +.07 2.16 25.97 +1.07 1.58 32.90 +1.07 62.33 +2.01 2.44 +.16 18.75 +.05 0.80 47.06 +1.75 1.84 +.01 5.55 +.27 16.23 +.28 0.80 28.81 +.88 36.43 +2.26 4.40 -.05 0.40 5.60 +.22 0.66 5.23 +.10 .38 +.01 0.20 26.78 +1.70 0.40 18.67 +.47 1.40 20.89 +.35 0.07 5.31 +.13 19.43 +.64 1.79 -.10 2.30 105.16 +1.24 113.43 +3.37 .65 -.01 27.83 +.92 35.29 -.49 1.54 24.69 +.73 32.10 +.63 1.22 49.67 +1.38 1.50 -.10 7.48 +.52 1.35 27.39 +1.20 5.60 26.83 +.86 4.91 +.40 0.44 12.26 +.45 1.68 34.37 +1.11 0.08 10.48 +.44 0.72 41.15 +1.94 0.55 28.34 +1.21 0.56 19.13 +.70 35.34 +1.63 52.90 22.32 +.66 6.38 +.32 2.17 -.16 42.98 +1.68 27.83 +1.15 46.88 +1.77 0.84 21.08 +.79 19.50 +1.13 0.72 38.14 +1.67 0.32 31.78 +.44 0.42 14.76 +.43 0.24 41.41 +1.04 51.40 +.10 5.45 +.26 0.06 40.28 +1.40 18.52 +.51 0.36 41.59 +2.95 4.27 +.31 0.88 29.44 +1.55 0.17 40.95 +.50 0.53 51.33 +.95 42.80 +1.30 17.13 +1.37 2.61 17.91 +.45 41.55 +.74 1.66 +.07 .80 +.05 1.00 7.14 +.17 0.60 38.10 +.86 8.43 -.03 0.60 87.05 +4.16 0.40 19.54 +1.12 0.33 10.97 +.36 42.97 +.70 1.12 9.61 +.37 258.67+10.04 1.15 +.06 0.28 12.19 +.41 10.36 +.49 0.58 18.67 +.82 4.01 +.14 0.75 29.08 +.96 76.05 +1.72 0.40 20.78 +1.04 0.60 26.34 +.56 22.61 +.94 3.64 +.15 33.08 +1.04 1.40 13.15 +.71 34.37 +.00 2.75 +.12 16.86 +.92 0.12 20.41 +1.44 0.11 13.03 +.73 30.37 +1.78 3.07 +.19 10.24 +.29 22.86 +.85 1.06 -.04 3.52 +.24 15.19 +.81 13.16 +1.13 10.27 +.45 6.99 +.50 0.60 45.68 +2.50 23.64 +1.10 0.60 25.40 +.85 11.03 +.10 1.01 +.03 0.04 12.61 +.65 0.68 12.43 +.16 0.64 35.81 +1.42 0.18 14.37 +.79 0.52 14.13 +.66 2.30 48.33 +.56 24.64 +.82 28.39 +1.09 47.95 +.92 28.35 +1.69 9.66 +.50 4.82 +.25 1.34 27.83 +.86 27.17 +1.36 4.88 +.16 18.95 +.65 24.73 +.68 1.20 49.60 +2.11 1.36 40.21 +.80 197.11 +2.45

Nm Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAML pfQ BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BluPhoenx BdwlkPpl BobEvans Boeing Boise Inc BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CRH CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapellaEd CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapFedF Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carmike Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE n Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt

D 20.90 +.36 21.67 +.80 3.57 94.72 +4.98 3.17 +.19 0.80 33.46 +1.79 3.69 +.23 9.41 +.70 1.00 20.19 +.67 25.12 +1.36 0.88 27.83 +1.06 1.57 +.15 0.84 30.75 +1.21 0.68 10.83 +.51 0.60 27.35 +.97 1.74 29.51 +.46 26.36 +1.79 0.37 4.85 -.01 1.66 66.00 +2.16 1.66 55.01 +1.90 22.11 +.67 42.72 -.49 36.28 +1.42 33.19 +1.28 4.11 +.08 1.50 37.02 +1.62 0.10 13.51 +.12 72.37 +4.92 0.60 45.14 +1.21 0.68 37.00 +1.69 0.40 53.55 +1.00 33.13 +.73 10.17 +.14 1.34 52.51 +.24 0.59 11.85 +.97 0.51 18.13 +1.11 0.81 12.60 +1.12 0.33 11.61 +.43 0.88 17.89 +.46 0.04 14.71 +.65 2.16 25.21 +.21 1.04 3.60 +.24 2.80 56.48 +1.11 0.36 26.32 +1.58 1.96 47.12 +.84 1.46 +.07 0.04 2.03 +.01 38.04 +.77 21.87 +.69 64.43 +.49 0.22 17.98 +1.59 93.43 -3.82 26.90 -1.80 0.72 77.86 +.72 1.00 12.52 +.11 0.40 43.88 +.90 8.32 +.51 1.16 42.79 +1.00 2.16 31.81 +1.78 .32 +.01 17.24 +.76 3.41 +.20 1.00 6.91 +.23 0.72 61.74 +.48 1.48 70.28 +2.10 37.20 +1.19 5.87 +.33 0.92 27.03 +.31 15.62 +.65 0.28 26.67 +.69 79.92 +2.35 0.30 26.29 +1.33 0.60 34.43 +1.30 33.40 +.64 3.18 +.12 31.49 +1.63 5.69 +.27 3.64 -.04 49.84 +1.46 18.61 +.37 0.60 15.95 +.98 .40 +.01 1.60 +.01 5.47 +.23 0.38 19.33 +.39 1.44 29.21 +.91 1.28 10.15 +.49 37.90 +1.00 4.00 148.48 +3.27 0.35 3.83 +.03 1.94 13.24 -.02 2.28 16.12 +.52 1.36 9.26 +.40 0.40 9.56 +.36 0.60 15.49 +.19 21.02 +.92 1.29 +.09 2.02 30.82 +.32 0.72 23.42 +.24 1.68 63.30 +1.94 5.16 +.20 8.97 +.43 2.99 +.03 1.30 +.13 38.31 +2.23 0.04 6.75 +.44 2.00 72.77 +3.69 6.28 +.25 0.22 11.26 +.03 8.14 +.40 0.70 25.34 +1.15 0.60 10.26 +.26 0.02 15.41 +.30 15.42 +.49 0.44 17.63 +.97 15.93 +1.06 7.02 +.16 0.56 14.78 +.66 0.40 18.79 +.40 1.28 25.80 +.56 31.03 +1.57 0.32 35.62 +2.12 0.56 19.88 +.92 3.38 +.15 5.08 +.14 14.60 +.53 0.52 22.69 +.44 0.56 13.74 +.55 0.34 9.18 +.32 8.28 +.28 0.31 19.27 +.31 0.28 14.25 +.44 1.20 60.10 +1.42 11.15 -.79 0.05 12.86 +.69 9.66 +.27 0.80 31.71 +.49 0.10 51.71 +2.90 0.42 38.05 +1.14 36.45 +1.20 2.56 +.21 0.92 52.18 +2.12 0.25 16.83 +.35 0.16 18.67 +.60 13.70 +.69 0.80 11.83 +.63 29.23 -.57 0.20 13.33 +.41 2.17 +.11 0.40 69.94 +2.60 1.00 56.40 +.76 0.04 30.70 +.51 35.65 +.73 0.24 12.52 -.01 1.00 27.16 +.75 4.60 278.13 +3.61 0.60 15.24 +.37 26.07 +1.00 24.08 +1.42 5.01 +.28 5.16 167.96 -.16 0.87 20.50 -.96 0.96 49.31 +1.83 0.26 15.82 +.45 0.34 9.71 +.40 0.35 29.13 +.58 13.59 +.62 0.40 24.82 +.93 0.72 24.58 +1.06 0.12 32.34 +1.15 41.23 +.65 5.83 +.18 5.72 +.36 0.60 6.96 +.14 0.63 7.83 +.23 13.42 +.64 13.63 +.44 0.04 6.05 +.20 6.30 +.32 13.12 +.22 3.41 +.07 1.80 41.07 +1.92 0.28 22.48 +1.08 34.06 +1.85 1.10 36.28 +.59 3.48 63.43 +.64 1.08 58.00 +1.27 0.30 34.15 +1.20 1.08 55.11 +1.97 11.12 +.60 .48 -.09 38.89 +.78 79.57 +2.39 3.84 +.22 0.20 42.09 +2.52 0.04 4.80 +.20 2.00 33.40 +.37 0.24 4.57 +.10 1.96 11.18 +.44 1.00 +.05 0.72 79.05 +1.25 0.78 34.80 +.60 4.67 -.10 .30 -.02 22.76 +.04 23.14 +.95 0.64 36.33 +1.14 20.15 +.73 6.61 +1.04 0.40 31.56 +1.07 0.72 34.14 +2.14 18.20 +1.09 26.16 +.75 0.40 35.87 +.11 35.94 +.24 1.76 62.18 +2.37 0.04 10.49 +.72 27.15 +1.43 0.36 5.70 +.19 .46 +.01 0.20 25.22 +1.38 6.55 +.19 8.18 +.13 49.48 +.46 .40 +.01 4.47 +.19 0.43 9.60 +.24 0.86 15.28 +.01 0.80 27.22 +1.07 21.08 -.47 5.00 +.16 0.78 13.71 +.47

Nm CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaGreen ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSky ChinaUni ChinaYuch ChinaCEd Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC Clarcor ClayFront ClayYldHg ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Codexis n Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Compugn CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrgan CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane Cray Inc Credicp CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurrCda CurtisWrt Cyberonics CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytec DCT Indl DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut s DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DirEMBr rs

D 1.56 13.07 +.16 25.53 +3.04 21.36 +.56 0.01 14.66 +.17 9.41 +.55 1.47 -.11 9.19 +.58 2.90 34.22 +.82 5.44 +.07 56.87 +.80 14.77 79.52 +1.54 2.95 +.03 34.33 +.80 3.71 +.34 14.35 +.21 30.29 +1.12 22.81 +1.05 2.75 +.16 0.30 21.42 +.88 2.88 69.45 +1.89 18.84 +.54 0.16 10.19 +.39 44.61 +2.20 0.63 3.73 +.22 10.64 +.45 2.99 16.80 +.62 1.57 -.10 13.02 +1.06 8.71 +.19 1.90 -.06 .31 +.01 5.13 -.04 1.54 67.01 +.64 8.73 -.13 1.81 50.30 +.11 2.64 81.58 +.68 1.27 +.01 7.70 +.15 4.54 +.17 9.61 -.23 0.23 13.60 -.07 0.35 16.46 +.60 5.62 +.03 138.45 +3.19 11.97 +.45 1.48 50.63 +1.43 1.42 20.54 +.11 0.56 63.49 +.73 2.57 +.02 13.05 +.64 0.32 74.76 +3.88 2.88 +.05 1.58 26.32 +.80 0.72 13.80 +.44 0.48 24.44 +.71 17.29 +1.67 22.48 +1.14 2.13 25.00 -.06 3.90 +.11 .81 +.04 44.49 +1.33 0.40 53.20 +2.30 0.39 35.52 +.58 0.38 19.46 +.97 0.93 17.75 +.50 7.33 +.44 14.60 +.16 65.80 +2.45 8.87 +.50 7.09 -.03 0.56 48.43 +3.94 2.20 63.21 +1.29 0.60 36.08 +1.38 7.24 +.11 0.36 27.06 +.66 1.76 51.47 +1.04 7.11 -.14 14.93 +.57 0.40 6.74 +.34 7.15 +.08 8.99 +.22 51.70 +2.13 0.37 6.36 +.38 44.54 +1.82 3.53 +.25 2.12 80.98 +2.21 16.05 +.38 0.60 13.95 +.67 0.04 17.71 +.83 1.40 +.03 0.38 17.84 +.04 0.38 16.69 +.06 0.20 38.44 +2.40 0.94 37.32 +1.63 0.48 12.86 +.46 10.29 +.58 2.00 25.20 +1.45 24.25 +1.07 32.72 +.51 22.87 +.62 0.37 72.87 +.30 1.36 13.43 +.30 1.56 74.83 +1.48 12.87 +1.01 14.38 +.41 3.15 -.13 0.60 45.25 +1.55 8.14 +.20 27.28 +.72 0.40 30.85 +2.04 0.80 23.65 +.39 55.78 +1.78 43.92 +2.10 2.14 +.15 2.20 51.16 +1.96 0.40 35.98 +2.12 2.38 44.75 +1.13 16.04 +.44 0.96 32.56 +1.08 21.33 +1.13 44.37 +1.13 9.96 +.44 .52 -.02 0.06 39.61 +.51 1.08 44.46 +.55 0.42 19.77 +.55 2.30 28.00 +.62 35.30 +.59 0.92 21.81 +.36 0.48 156.24 +5.64 17.78 +.22 8.80 +.10 0.56 30.98 +1.49 0.20 17.08 +.70 0.44 26.30 +.25 1.57 37.13 +1.70 18.64 +.32 10.27 +.24 0.84 54.29 +.29 5.73 +.16 0.16 6.27 +.25 52.04 +.97 1.50 16.79 +.47 18.34 +.72 0.72 40.06 +.81 0.80 46.38 +.77 0.80 30.70 +1.73 5.59 +.30 1.70 91.87 -.99 1.85 41.43 +2.10 66.07 +5.11 10.65 +.61 6.07 +.42 37.80 +.91 25.12 +.54 .40 +.01 34.40 +1.59 20.80 +.24 1.80 52.92 +1.77 0.70 67.41 +3.84 1.40 -.05 126.01 +.21 94.90 +.67 0.32 28.65 +.96 23.61 +.73 25.47 -.03 1.58 +.03 30.01 +1.08 2.16 -.02 10.53 +.59 2.40 12.69 +.20 .67 -.03 0.05 40.86 +3.13 0.28 4.40 +.26 33.70 +1.81 0.78 9.30 +.18 1.21 25.04 +.41 0.15 10.20 +.41 0.60 36.57 +.89 22.02 +.10 2.12 47.35 +1.43 10.18 +.98 0.08 37.21 +1.31 1.28 38.29 +1.00 7.36 +.34 60.76 +.37 0.20 50.28 +.75 15.63 +.05 10.71 +.01 46.72 +2.29 7.20 -.03 1.20 56.60 +1.97 0.36 14.91 +.42 5.89 +.13 12.46 +.56 0.40 23.86 +.57 11.71 +.61 .78 -.01 1.00 19.13 +1.08 6.52 +.14 14.83 +.65 29.09 +1.78 1.15 +.06 2.38 +.03 0.20 30.48 +.83 0.93 61.02 +3.66 6.94 +.47 31.40 +.63 11.39 -.22 0.08 9.59 +.69 0.64 62.45 +1.32 18.44 +.27 2.36 65.41 +1.88 0.50 64.26 +1.36 0.03 8.22 +.41 12.00 +.49 25.41 +.98 1.08 27.17 +.86 1.92 59.35 +2.44 24.70 +.61 26.05 -.10 0.16 20.99 +.72 26.84 +1.85 17.45 +1.25 35.45 +1.13 7.51 27.88 +2.72 9.00 -1.11 5.66 24.49 +1.45 42.44 -2.96

Nm

D

DirFBear rs DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DuffPhelp DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy rs

0.15 7.35 0.04 3.41 4.83 8.17 5.17 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.24 0.98 0.68 1.40

Nm 15.89 -2.25 20.58 +2.27 41.92 +1.51 7.58 -1.31 34.75 +4.18 8.04 -.93 36.53 +3.34 16.67 -1.79 42.40 +3.72 11.93 -1.32 26.41 +2.47 14.57 +.67 36.27 +.64 31.50 +.36 .18 +.00 18.74 +.71 33.14 +1.42 7.01 +.11 31.41 +.31 64.20 +1.82 10.33 +.10 27.95 -.05 43.17 +2.11 41.61 -1.32 40.18 +1.04 11.37 +.21 49.78 +2.83 16.25 +.20 2.46 +.22 10.52 +.06 14.16 +.89 43.12 +1.46 24.29 +1.23 38.00 +.03 5.61 +.24 28.82 +.38 24.59 +.56 32.07 +1.29 4.29 +.05 46.91 +2.29 3.06 +.18 3.59 +.15 35.25 +1.20 24.10 +1.01 10.92 -.94 16.75 +.53 10.75 +.38 66.72 +.80 .09 -.01 2.24 +.14 8.19 +.24 1.99 +.06 17.55 +.02 3.86 +.29

E-F-G-H ETrade rs eBay EDCI Hld EFJohnson eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EPIQ Sys EQT Corp eResrch ev3 Inc EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp EchelonC Eclipsys Ecolab EdisonInt EducMgt n EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElizArden EBrasAero Emcore Emdeon n EMS EmergBio EmersonEl EmmisCm Emulex Enbridge EnCana g s EndvrInt EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs n EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entercom Entergy EnteroMed EntPrPt EnterPT Entravisn EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr Esterline EthanAl Euronet EverestRe EvergrnEn EvrgrSlr ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FBR Cap FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr FannieMae Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FiberTw rs FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar rs FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt FordC pfS ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet n Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FredMac FredM pfL FredM pfS FredsInc FMCG FresKabi rt

11.70 +.05 19.81 +.46 3.12 3.85 +.27 1.43 11.00 +.05 19.11 +.95 23.12 +.58 2.84 39.21 +1.33 0.62 103.80 +3.95 0.14 12.94 -.14 0.88 37.29 +1.41 8.47 +.31 22.46 +.05 4.14 +.18 0.40 25.74 +.71 0.64 7.99 +.13 0.04 16.83 +.79 1.76 54.17 +2.54 4.17 +.05 2.00 65.76 +2.18 0.64 29.12 +1.87 1.62 11.04 +.34 1.53 9.75 +.24 1.56 11.18 +.28 1.60 12.75 +.13 7.46 18.36 +.44 0.62 47.06 +1.81 1.26 32.61 +1.10 15.19 -.05 55.24 -1.36 0.04 11.80 +.72 1.52 28.99 +.20 4.89 +.05 0.05 16.72 +.50 14.95 +.52 14.50 +.71 0.38 21.29 +.44 .74 -.05 12.50 -.02 47.79 +.79 15.53 -.30 1.34 45.09 +1.69 2.18 9.59 +.51 1.70 48.69 +1.64 0.80 31.62 +1.03 1.03 +.03 3.36 +.27 22.82 +.69 1.00 37.90 +.96 3.35 -.05 32.74 +1.13 0.52 44.75 +1.21 51.93 +2.17 4.24 +.42 12.23 +.46 4.06 +.25 2.16 34.25 +.23 3.58 47.99 +1.16 16.20 +1.04 0.10 4.90 +.15 2.16 21.88 +.09 0.68 20.80 +.34 21.39 +.31 0.14 41.09 +.73 4.01 +.24 8.53 +.08 3.32 74.29 +2.11 .33 -.01 2.27 36.10 +.80 2.60 38.75 +2.43 1.94 +.12 6.88 +.65 10.57 +.19 0.16 28.51 +.73 79.41 +.84 1.20 48.69 +1.70 0.88 15.63 +.91 1.35 42.53 +2.31 0.28 11.09 +.33 4.13 99.23 +5.76 0.55 60.39 +1.73 48.17 +1.26 0.20 13.69 +1.19 13.77 +.58 1.92 71.06 +1.82 .08 -.01 .67 4.89 +.18 0.12 15.11 +.54 3.58 +.18 2.10 39.65 +1.32 5.48 +.19 0.28 19.16 +.65 0.40 34.76 +.73 15.78 -.18 45.97 +.33 25.93 +1.07 0.23 13.83 +.79 2.65 +.05 1.76 58.43 +.97 19.29 +.66 75.12 +4.98 3.24 +.01 30.31 +.47 0.50 57.49 +1.24 60.16 +3.56 0.48 8.16 +.42 4.14 +.37 32.14-11.13 0.08 22.95 +.98 8.78 +.52 0.62 36.26 -3.18 .25 -.05 0.80 50.21 +1.38 0.48 72.89 +2.19 0.20 13.74 +1.25 2.64 72.27 +3.36 0.24 5.84 +.35 0.96 21.04 +.65 4.91 +.31 7.32 +.51 4.58 +.36 14.91 +.53 0.72 13.29 +.47 0.20 27.55 +.38 1.28 10.73 +.19 0.04 12.92 +.88 15.00 +.84 0.16 14.49 +.74 0.24 13.57 +.51 .42 +.02 0.04 5.35 +.34 0.40 14.89 +.67 0.75 11.57 +.54 4.48 +.27 0.04 11.86 +.44 0.56 12.82 +.34 128.48 +6.60 0.08 15.82 +.63 2.20 36.03 +1.05 0.64 17.54 +.66 46.36 +.86 2.93 +.54 5.88 +.17 0.80 24.91 +.32 1.16 90.51 +3.78 0.50 44.40 +1.84 16.00 +.78 0.32 44.54 +.30 0.60 12.95 +.52 4.17 +.15 10.59 +.43 3.34 +.24 3.25 40.97 +.74 11.35 +.34 28.08 +.77 27.80 +1.13 16.78 -.25 10.47 +.30 16.70 +.43 3.20 +.19 0.76 39.77 +.66 37.57 +1.69 21.56 +1.03 1.90 19.11 +.71 0.88 89.27 +3.40 0.76 11.72 +.67 .34 -.02 .62 +.06 .65 -.01 0.16 10.64 +.43 1.20 62.96 +3.77 .13 -.01

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Gensco GenesWyo Genoptix Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay Globalstar GlbSpMet n GluMobile GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS GoldS pfA GoldS pfD Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GrWlfRes GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GAeroPac GpTelevisa Guess Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HNI Corp HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HackettGp HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HartFn pfA HrvrdBio HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelenTroy HelicosBio HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HiSoft n HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorMan Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HumGen

D 20.11 +.47 6.17 +.29 1.00 7.17 +.14 12.40 +.12 1.40 29.55 +.95 25.61 +.26 1.15 0.28 19.66 +.97 0.12 9.92 +.57 6.20 +.10 5.10 +.40 1.12 26.92 +.82 0.20 6.02 +.32 4.40 6.93 +.26 28.02 +1.08 5.90 +.34 0.72 12.18 +.36 0.44 4.58 +.14 1.68 15.43 +.38 0.14 13.60 +.74 1.28 24.92 +.63 18.75 +.35 5.40 +.13 0.16 14.16 +1.03 0.40 19.72 +.35 0.20 45.81 +1.62 1.50 29.93 +.99 23.67 +.37 23.83 +1.53 47.64 +.45 15.57 +.94 4.58 +.06 25.96 +.65 1.68 60.22 +1.58 0.40 14.62 +.65 13.22 +.86 0.50 5.51 +.23 1.12 36.44 +.63 3.18 +.21 2.52 +.09 .31 -.01 25.54 +.45 37.24 +.78 17.28 +.21 0.18 15.50 +.33 0.44 17.76 +.32 1.64 40.19 +.75 .45 +.01 13.81 +.92 52.15 +1.01 20.78 +.54 12.01 +.75 10.95 0.21 13.70 +.47 4.61 +.07 27.96 +.71 34.94 +.17 0.52 15.22 +.63 0.36 10.52 +.15 1.98 34.44 +.31 2.34 +.05 0.40 5.68 +.55 6.93 +.28 4.30 +.15 0.08 37.43 +1.18 1.49 +.08 10.57 +.77 1.09 -.11 0.40 12.97 +.44 0.17 13.15 +.44 0.18 41.40 +.84 4.16 +.18 1.40 135.83 +3.57 0.93 18.19 -.01 0.99 18.23 -.09 1.08 67.80 +2.59 12.70 +.90 10.38 +.48 450.20+14.13 20.78 +1.05 0.80 29.65 +.89 15.09 +.66 2.16 99.82 +2.28 1.26 +.01 5.20 +.11 22.05 +.52 0.52 23.74 +.82 3.33 +.14 2.41 +.17 4.68 +.02 1.70 +.04 0.07 6.34 +.21 0.83 17.41 +.33 1.81 -.03 26.60 +.78 10.53 +.53 10.79 +.75 1.80 65.37 +2.32 23.85 +1.36 1.48 30.17 +1.26 0.52 18.59 +.41 0.64 33.37 +1.95 42.43 +.14 0.54 25.04 +.76 1.86 32.84 +1.42 0.86 26.37 +1.69 1.70 47.04 +.70 25.19 +.06 26.39 +.70 2.90 +.01 20.22 +.36 0.36 27.99 +1.53 6.99 +.39 24.45 +.71 18.15 +.16 1.39 +.05 1.00 43.98 +.81 2.10 +.05 41.69 +.93 16.14 +.25 0.40 22.30 +.79 31.29 +1.84 5.54 +.19 0.06 10.64 +.28 0.88 42.56 +1.01 13.01 +.58 0.82 24.17 +1.02 0.20 22.41 +.77 1.81 23.35 +.57 3.43 -.15 7.33 +.17 1.00 41.05 +.97 4.65 27.98 +1.10 1.24 23.28 +.63 5.39 +.21 2.80 +.09 2.72 42.61 +1.33 7.51 +.16 1.20 22.61 +.83 24.48 +.50 17.91 +.08 15.88 +.51 0.08 14.78 +.57 4.55 +.19 4.98 +.16 1.80 44.43 +.93 22.08 +1.00 .42 -.00 9.95 +.40 0.24 39.77 +2.78 .46 -.01 54.73 +.56 0.80 47.76 +2.15 2.54 +.26 0.20 4.47 +.31 1.28 49.98 +.58 9.61 +.88 0.40 53.22 +2.27 34.85 +.92 0.32 44.96 +1.79 15.99 +.93 21.50 +.76 1.70 27.97 +1.43 0.41 30.31 +.92 0.75 21.04 +.09 10.44 -.08 0.60 25.29 +.59 14.02 +.44 0.95 28.01 +.67 38.66 +1.36 2.32 45.24 +2.12 29.46 +.27 1.21 40.19 +1.48 0.32 15.77 +.68 0.84 41.84 +.34 15.79 +.85 8.47 +.29 58.82 +.71 1.80 19.70 +.55 0.04 13.69 +.86 0.28 4.84 +.06 0.02 9.81 +.59 3.70 +.23 0.60 12.37 +.28 23.51 +1.67

Nm Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon Hyatt n Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 45.39 +.93 0.48 33.50 +1.22 0.04 5.76 +.44 0.40 8.74 +.44 18.52 +.66 36.02 +.53 4.74 +.24 1.02 -.02

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICO Glb A IDT Corp IESI-BFC g IHS Inc ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iPass iShCmxG s iSAstla iSAstria iShBelg iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iSSpain iSSwedn iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShIsrael iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShTgtRet iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iShBFxBd iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarIntC iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShBar3-7 iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShDJMd iShBasM iShDJOG iShEur350 iSRsMic iSSCVal iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh Ikanos ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImperlSgr Incyte Inergy Infinera InfoSpace Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioPhm Insmed h InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel Intellichk IntractDat IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntlSpdw InetInfra InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare inVentiv Invernss Invesco InvVKDyCr InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IsilonSys Isis IsleCapri ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB JPMCh pfC Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng

22.31 +.61 0.06 16.61 +.64 0.53 36.78 +.56 1.70 +.10 14.53 +.10 0.50 20.45 +.45 59.71 +1.42 0.54 6.48 +.16 1.20 10.23 +.20 8.42 +.50 0.33 5.48 +.09 4.24 +.16 0.48 1.07 -.03 11.78 +.12 0.81 19.88 +.60 0.76 16.42 +.63 0.19 11.54 +.27 2.58 66.02 +1.89 0.42 25.44 +.62 0.96 30.97 +1.18 0.30 19.74 +.46 0.48 15.19 +.19 0.45 15.26 +.80 0.16 9.64 +.18 0.39 46.03 +.58 0.25 11.85 +.20 0.75 49.47 +1.04 0.39 18.36 +.58 0.38 11.69 +.13 1.37 37.40 +.93 2.26 36.97 +2.23 0.61 24.55 +.78 0.36 20.91 +.49 0.21 11.92 +.16 0.44 14.34 +.49 1.48 48.34 +1.08 1.22 57.18 +1.39 17.65 +.25 1.04 48.23 +1.44 0.75 27.98 +.29 1.67 43.46 +1.22 3.69 105.50 -.44 0.87 53.88 +.87 0.68 40.04 +.28 0.94 73.19 +2.67 2.24 106.50 +3.25 3.90 106.92 -.14 0.59 39.30 +.85 5.51 108.35 +.07 1.09 54.62 +1.72 0.36 31.80 +1.10 1.22 43.90 +1.39 1.18 51.01 +1.58 3.73 100.43 -1.19 3.82 95.14 -.30 1.21 84.01 -.01 1.38 49.53 +1.50 0.69 37.19 +1.37 0.50 44.61 +1.47 1.22 82.20 +2.88 0.94 72.33 +2.42 7.90 86.40 +1.03 76.99 +1.30 1.83 55.30 +2.66 4.07 109.18 -.15 1.20 55.42 +1.80 0.71 46.98 +1.47 1.07 58.47 +1.83 1.04 56.79 +1.87 4.66 105.07 -.01 3.60 104.23 +.10 0.44 66.68 +2.22 0.77 61.10 +2.06 3.03 115.12 -.14 0.13 110.21 +.03 2.72 37.28 +.26 1.14 62.38 +1.98 0.74 19.07 +.52 1.81 47.48 +2.16 0.08 11.32 +.37 0.63 50.89 +2.09 0.56 54.29 +1.73 0.09 54.25 +1.20 0.86 55.36 +2.36 0.22 49.51 +2.06 1.02 33.60 +1.15 0.31 38.73 +1.06 0.81 57.19 +1.87 4.44 +.40 1.28 54.42 +1.41 1.00 46.06 +1.47 81.50 +2.91 27.57 +.24 14.29 +.97 1.20 34.05 +1.03 5.30 +.28 1.63 +.04 1.24 42.49 +1.28 43.82 +1.35 9.01 +.48 12.89 +.64 18.79 +.41 8.99 +.55 3.17 +.15 17.96 +.35 0.08 10.77 +.57 11.27 +.51 2.78 39.84 +.67 6.49 +.19 7.42 +.09 24.96 +.57 0.54 60.77 +1.35 0.28 34.06 +.58 15.49 +.57 0.57 7.71 +.27 .98 -.04 .62 -.03 4.80 +.15 5.17 +.30 8.10 +.82 2.72 45.80 +1.68 0.63 20.14 +.66 1.37 -.23 0.80 33.67 +.18 106.78 +2.87 24.82 +.54 0.04 10.95 +.45 10.27 +.53 9.27 +.63 4.45 +.23 2.60 127.00 +3.54 4.12 +.28 1.00 43.76 +1.72 0.24 16.04 +.59 0.50 23.13 +.80 19.11 +.87 0.16 25.01 -.22 0.05 3.29 +.21 47.36 +.84 7.31 +.21 0.48 12.52 +.54 20.75 +.77 35.97 +1.19 322.22 +7.28 0.05 21.36 +1.06 25.75 +.10 26.50 -.03 0.44 17.61 +.69 1.03 11.43 +.08 0.33 4.35 +.02 15.06 -.03 12.97 +.08 0.69 8.56 +.18 10.75 +.55 0.25 23.06 +.90 12.93 +.88 9.30 +.20 8.94 +.27 0.55 20.53 +1.33 62.03 +2.81 1.91 +.01 13.76 +.70 9.05 +.58 36.12 +1.07 5.48 +.13 21.96 +.60 9.97 +.68 0.20 38.15 +1.82 1.79 31.51 +.65 1.80 25.65 -.01 1.68 23.95 +.03 0.28 13.50 +.62 0.38 24.16 +.68 18.88 +.39 .93 -.07 37.31 +1.24

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden Jefferies JesupLamt JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JonesSoda JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digit n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone Kaydon Kellogg Kemet Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp Kforce KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KonaGrill KopinCp Koppers KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTC Prp LTX-Cred LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark Libbey LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEl LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq

D

0.04 0.33 0.30 0.16

2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70 0.25 0.20 0.40 0.60

0.72 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.28 4.28

0.10 0.24 0.08

0.88 1.16 0.38

1.60 0.33

1.56

0.18 0.04 0.50

2.08 0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40 0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.80 1.12 0.04 0.92 2.52

1.45 2.52 0.25

4.00 0.44 1.44 0.50

8.47 +.42 2.08 +.03 16.42 +1.14 9.49 +.68 26.89 +1.06 21.95 +.87 .03 -.00 5.72 +.26 12.39 +1.60 38.10 +1.72 1.93 +.08 60.61 +1.53 27.91 +1.05 14.89 +.62 66.62 +4.41 1.25 -.09 54.54 +1.60 52.25 +1.66 25.49 +1.40 39.27 -.12 11.14 +.75 20.48 +.74 9.03 +.59 7.68 +.40 28.66 +1.36 18.81 +.15 .61 -.04 36.27 +1.89 10.43 +.04 33.70 +.29 51.99 +.68 2.35 25.59 +1.25 3.50 +.11 9.41 +.34 8.00 +.59 12.11 +.93 29.00 +1.46 61.29 +1.10 13.34 +.68 66.35 +1.45 57.85 +1.27 12.25 +.48 36.66 +.81 8.09 +.51 16.20 +.24 13.83 +.46 20.64 +1.03 12.09 +.32 3.24 +.15 48.53 +.97 3.48 -.02 3.35 +.17 21.59 +.29 12.79 -.16 14.04 +.63 28.79 +.54 3.49 +.21 20.45 +.43 7.58 +.26 8.76 +.66 8.12 -.16 72.80 +2.48 19.82 +.38 5.38 +.18 16.61 +.46 24.17 +.88 19.75 +.73 4.81 +.30 24.01 +.55 2.80 +.21 7.19 +.71 74.99 +.79 4.10 +.06 1.28 +.07 39.68 +2.21 25.79 +1.50 40.05 +1.19 22.95 +1.36 20.19 +.95 4.64 +.28 7.61 +.34 27.74 +.88 12.51 +.43 4.02 +.20 65.46 +1.85 23.60 +.98 28.54 +1.13 20.27 +.94 32.37 +.96 14.27 +.68 43.50 +1.36 19.61 +.56 1.02 1.23 +.03 5.83 +.42 34.20 +1.98 10.86 +.69 4.04 +.10 27.30 +.86 27.34 +.94 10.50 +.15 43.90 +1.92 28.77 +1.36 45.73 -.60 35.14 +2.29 30.09 +.20 1.46 +.07 36.51 +1.29 34.66 +.75 4.50 +.04 23.68 +1.07 26.73 +.30 50.05 +.96 24.58 +1.03 29.70 +1.40 27.49 +.94 4.79 +.42 6.61 -.30 10.65 +.54 6.70 +.17 4.42 +.40 3.62 +.24 75.41 +1.08 3.19 +.01 34.98 +1.12 14.02 +.52 29.48 +2.28 33.81 +1.15 12.15 +.12 72.51 -.14 6.98 +.41 20.39 +.43 82.63 +3.42 40.29 +2.49 37.58 +1.53 22.73 +1.15

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MMT MGIC MGM Rsts MI Homes MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MSG n MagelnHl MagelMPtr Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO Marcus MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MarkWest MarIntA

2.80 89.23 +3.27 0.04 18.33 +.88 6.07 +.46 0.11 5.07 +.35 1.00 27.72 +1.26 0.63 18.74 +.63 7.30 +.16 10.14 +.46 5.68 +.18 0.76 7.49 +.29 0.58 6.86 +.07 0.54 6.55 +.05 7.50 +.44 9.90 +.63 9.11 +.07 5.12 +.23 19.21 +1.34 2.75 +.20 0.88 48.30 +.94 29.63 +1.27 2.00 38.69 +2.74 1.80 29.25 +1.27 0.20 17.91 +.50 21.57 +1.30 35.22 -.02 2.84 47.98 +.80 3.00 -.01 0.18 65.30 +2.76 4.34 +.39 20.79 +1.50 0.23 2.18 +.04 0.08 9.42 +.59 6.19 +.43 0.74 46.03 +2.81 0.52 14.94 +.23 1.00 32.04 +1.03 0.34 8.82 +.06 6.96 +.60 22.23 +.78 0.11 49.99 +1.08 0.98 55.28 +2.13 0.08 29.56 +.86 26.21 +.54 0.42 37.72 +1.23 0.45 45.91 +1.02 2.56 32.40 +.59 0.16 30.75 +1.50

Nm MarshM MarshIls Martek MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL Merck MercGn Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Metalico Methode MetLife MetroPCS MettlerT Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt Middleby MdwGold g MillerHer MillerPet Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk MoleInsP h Molex MolexA MolinaH MolsCoorB MoneyGrm MonPwSys MonroMuf Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Move Inc Mueller MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NMT Med NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstru NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng Neuralstem Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed rs NextEraEn NiSource NichACv NichACv2 Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g

D 0.80 22.87 +.71 0.04 7.62 +.60 21.03 -1.59 1.60 85.75 -1.37 16.57 +.73 0.30 11.24 +.61 2.00 23.60 +.50 0.24 29.28 +2.26 9.91 +.18 0.60 207.57 +7.54 0.75 21.74 +.68 3.72 +.18 0.80 17.58 +.83 3.42 +.14 1.04 38.56 +.63 23.40 +1.36 2.20 67.31 +1.20 0.94 27.72 +.02 0.72 68.08 +.43 11.47 +.77 31.70 +.92 0.90 53.73 +1.95 0.12 8.52 +.23 0.92 22.68 +.50 19.03 +.97 22.99 +.62 55.78 +1.66 0.80 9.42 +.39 7.67 +.30 0.24 22.63 +.66 25.48 +1.38 53.63 +1.35 0.90 37.05 +1.08 3.92 +.20 22.30 +.38 0.36 19.49 +1.25 8.80 +.51 55.42 +2.20 1.52 35.43 +.78 2.36 42.47 +1.17 0.92 30.60 +.27 3.00 +.11 15.94 +.26 3.97 +.17 0.28 10.15 +.15 0.74 38.60 +1.26 8.65 +.32 113.51 +2.10 0.14 10.22 +.33 1.37 29.16 +1.28 6.44 +.43 8.89 +.54 33.88 +1.23 14.84 +.75 0.52 24.30 +.48 2.91 +.12 22.07 +.40 2.46 52.19 +2.09 58.57 +1.45 .44 +.02 0.09 17.50 +.29 4.94 +.11 7.24 85.72 +2.28 106.95 +.20 0.20 31.63 +.66 7.23 +.50 11.05 +.43 4.81 +.06 3.26 +.01 20.38 +.90 8.65 +.73 6.07 +.23 44.50 +.65 1.35 -.12 0.61 18.25 +.41 0.61 15.40 +.37 27.96 +.40 1.12 43.51 +.98 2.43 +.14 18.11 +.75 0.36 37.48 +.40 1.06 47.32 +2.47 11.54 +.45 0.36 15.16 +.40 0.42 20.37 +.63 0.20 23.95 +.98 6.03 +.54 0.20 42.74 +3.61 6.79 +.25 7.00 -.42 2.28 +.08 0.40 23.86 +.36 0.07 3.84 +.24 1.00 50.35 +1.68 17.44 +.42 15.01 +.26 34.65 +1.23 8.26 +.07 12.68 +.48 18.95 +.74 0.60 13.91 +.39 1.03 -.02 34.46 +1.62 2.09 -.01 .46 -.00 6.34 +.28 22.11 +.74 0.44 12.30 +.35 1.20 27.75 +.54 18.65 +1.12 0.14 21.92 +.99 10.86 +.70 8.09 +.18 17.79 +.43 0.31 2.34 +.04 10.20 +.94 1.38 46.64 +1.52 7.17 39.17 +1.82 0.52 31.00 +.35 0.40 35.16 +1.41 0.04 5.73 +.07 1.50 22.05 +1.00 0.32 14.12 +.59 1.80 35.99 +1.39 9.66 +.01 0.24 4.80 +.10 50.09 +2.73 12.10 +.31 13.20 +.24 10.62 +.09 29.56 +2.58 39.60 +2.48 33.48 +.41 13.88 +.79 118.49+11.22 2.82 +.52 2.75 +.19 2.51 +.11 5.63 +.27 21.15 +.56 11.91 +.39 3.56 +.13 .06 -.01 5.13 -.67 1.36 36.27 +1.11 96.29 +3.41 2.37 +.10 1.00 15.81 +.49 8.54 -.03 0.28 11.35 +.25 2.50 +.22 0.20 14.84 +.56 51.06 +2.53 0.40 59.99 +1.37 7.04 +.14 0.15 12.39 +.24 0.15 13.86 +.16 0.20 20.32 +.69 3.20 -.63 2.00 50.80 +1.40 0.92 15.50 +.55 1.08 9.36 +.17 1.02 8.63 +.09 1.86 41.85 +1.41 2.25 -.06 1.08 68.56 +1.35 15.14 +.20 21.14 +.22 0.20 32.64 +.75 0.72 65.55 +2.69 0.56 8.74 +.36 5.47 -.08 1.45 27.79 +.66 0.76 56.98 +2.15 0.80 33.76 +1.79 1.36 51.76 +1.26 3.20 +.21 1.36 27.10 +.54 1.03 26.76 +.74 12.72 +.41 1.12 49.14 +3.18 2.94 +.14 1.88 55.59 +1.47 0.40 2.75 +.05 0.40 11.48 +.18 6.41 +.26

D

Novartis 1.99 49.42 +.78 NovtlWrls 5.67 +.19 Novavax h 2.24 +.10 Novell 5.89 +.05 Novlus 26.05 +.99 NSTAR 1.60 35.85 +.45 NuSkin 0.50 25.89 +.77 NuVasive 35.26 +1.55 NuanceCm 15.52 +.64 Nucor 1.44 39.07 +1.70 NustarGP 1.80 31.21 +.93 NutriSyst 0.70 22.24 +.39 Nvidia 10.63 +.49 NxStageMd 14.05 +.04 NymoxPh 2.75 -.07 O2Micro 6.28 +.27 OGE Engy 1.45 37.85 +1.18 OReillyA h 46.80 +.05 OasisPet n 14.78 +.42 OcciPet 1.52 79.58 +2.58 Oceaneer 46.35 +2.24 OceanFr rs .78 +.01 Och-Ziff 0.76 12.46 +.46 Oclaro rs 11.29 +.64 OcwenFn 9.97 +.17 OdysseyHlt 26.73 +.21 OdysMar 1.07 -.01 OfficeDpt 4.09 +.20 OfficeMax 13.14 +.68 OilSvHT 2.66 101.55 +4.05 OilStates 40.90 +1.87 Oilsands g .62 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 9.89 +.29 OldRepub 0.69 12.61 +.55 OldSecBc 0.04 1.87 -.02 Olin 0.80 18.21 +.75 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.67 +.95 Omncre 0.09 23.94 +.36 Omnicom 0.80 34.43 +.66 OmniVisn 23.18 +2.39 Omnova 7.53 +.13 OnSmcnd 6.64 +.33 ONEOK 1.76 44.11 +1.26 OnyxPh 20.84 +.94 OpenTable 43.20 +2.36 OpnwvSy 2.04 +.10 OpkoHlth 2.31 +.08 Opnext 1.66 +.03 Oracle 0.20 23.09 +.77 Orexigen 4.15 +.25 OrientEH 7.72 +.58 OrienPap n 6.98 +.21 OrientFn 0.16 12.45 +.07 OriginAg 7.20 +.37 OrionMar 13.12 +.19 Oritani s 9.65 -.03 Orthovta 2.16 +.19 OshkoshCp 31.68 +1.30 OvShip 1.75 37.19 +2.33 Overstk 17.97 +.89 OwensM s 0.71 28.51 +.63 OwensCorn 28.59 +.90 OwensIll 28.58 +.78 Oxigene h .29 +.00 PDL Bio 1.00 5.79 +.30 PF Chng 0.17 38.70 +1.18 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.26 +.87 PHH Corp 17.96 +.13 PMC Sra 7.86 +.44 PMI Grp 3.05 +.20 PNC 0.40 61.15 +4.41 PNM Res 0.50 11.33 +.39 POSCO 1.71 101.14 +2.84 PPG 2.16 63.07 +2.51 PPL Corp 1.40 26.20 +.50 PSS Wrld 21.51 +.49 PacWstBc 0.04 19.27 +1.09 Paccar 0.36 40.80 +1.64 PacerIntl 7.25 +.44 PacCapB .72 +.05 PacEthan .48 -.02 PacSunwr 3.12 +.14 PackAmer 0.60 22.02 +.69 Pactiv 28.57 +.20 PaetecHld 3.76 +.20 PallCorp 0.64 34.75 +.98 PanASlv 0.05 24.39 +.60 PaneraBrd 73.82 -.26 ParPharm 26.86 +.84 ParamTch 15.92 +.36 ParaG&S 1.21 +.02 Parexel 21.25 +.73 ParkDrl 3.91 +.23 ParkerHan 1.04 56.87 +2.07 Parkrvsn .86 -.24 PartnerRe 2.00 72.05 +1.68 PatriotCoal 12.28 +.91 Patterson 0.40 28.64 +.44 PattUTI 0.20 14.43 +.70 Paychex 1.24 26.02 +.86 PeabdyE 0.28 41.96 +1.70 Pegasys lf 0.12 31.64 +.79 Pengrth g 0.84 9.57 +.48 PnnNGm 22.94 +.50 PennVa 0.23 19.56 +.67 PennVaGP 1.56 18.47 +.32 PennWst g 1.80 19.59 +.24 PennantPk 1.04 9.45 +.28 Penney 0.80 21.78 +1.15 PenRE 0.60 11.51 +.60 Penske 11.32 +.38 Pentair 0.76 32.34 +.94 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.81 +.39 PeopFed n 10.40 PepBoy 0.12 8.52 +.64 PepcoHold 1.08 16.41 +.50 PepsiCo 1.92 62.93 +1.29 Peregrne rs 1.88 -.01 PerfectWld 23.91 +1.07 PerkElm 0.28 19.53 -.02 PermFix 1.47 -.14 Perrigo 0.25 56.44 -.62 PetChina 3.72 111.86 +.56 Petrohawk 17.92 +.78 PetrbrsA 1.30 31.20 +.80 Petrobras 1.30 35.77 +1.31 PtroqstE 6.82 +.36 PetsMart 0.50 30.74 +.99 Pfizer 0.72 14.62 +.33 PhmHTr 7.49 61.06 +1.47 PharmPdt 0.60 25.33 +.57 Pharmacyc 6.86 +.01 Pharmasset 24.10 +.03 PhaseFwd 16.79 +.05 PhilipMor 2.32 47.54 +.77 PhilipsEl 0.95 31.55 +.90 PhlVH 0.15 45.64 +2.63 PhnxCos 1.92 -.04 PhotrIn 4.49 +.32 PiedNG 1.12 25.68 +.64 Pier 1 6.32 +.45 PilgrmsP n 6.31 +.16 PimCpOp 1.38 17.71 +.43 PimIncStr2 0.70 10.18 +.09 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.35 +.07 PinnclEnt 9.32 +.60 PinWst 2.10 37.82 +1.08 PionDrill 5.95 +.28 PioNtrl 0.08 59.21 +2.25 PitnyBw 1.46 22.44 +.36 PlainsAA 3.74 59.77 +.84 PlainsEx 21.38 +1.18 Plantron 0.20 28.71 +1.27 PlatUnd 0.32 36.89 +1.08 Plexus 27.76 +1.14 PlumCrk 1.68 34.94 +1.43 Polaris 1.60 55.16 +2.52 Polo RL 0.40 74.96 +3.03 Polycom 29.59 +1.00 PolyMet g 1.42 +.02 PolyOne 8.41 +.97 Polypore 22.71 -.62 Poniard h .53 Pool Corp 0.52 21.30 +.70 Popular 2.53 +.08 PortGE 1.04 18.72 +.45 PostPrp 0.80 23.45 +1.46 Potash 0.40 86.82 +2.22 Potlatch 2.04 34.78 +1.31 PwrInteg 0.20 34.18 +1.55 Power-One 8.00 +.39 PwshDB 21.74 +.48 PS Agri 24.43 +.54 PS Oil 23.84 +.63 PS USDBull 24.41 -.08 PwSClnEn 8.68 +.29 PwSFoodBv 0.23 15.44 +.35 PwShMda 0.05 11.44 +.32 PwSWtr 0.11 15.28 +.52 PSFinPf 1.34 16.39 +.10 PwShPfd 1.04 13.70 +.06 PShEMSov 1.66 26.22 +.10 PSIndia 0.11 22.47 +.17 PwShs QQQ 0.26 43.96 +1.36 Powrwav 1.55 +.11 Pozen 6.62 +.04 Praxair 1.80 79.91 +2.45 PrecCastpt 0.12 106.95 +4.41 PrecDrill 6.79 +.26 PremGlbSv 6.33 +.34 PrmWBc h .37 +.01 Prestige 7.21 -.03 PriceTR 1.08 45.94 +2.16 priceline 190.73 +9.23 PrideIntl 24.25 +1.16 Primerica n 21.20 -.19 PrinFncl 0.50 24.07 +1.11 PrivateB 0.04 10.98 +.61 ProShtDow 52.58 -1.56 ProShtQQQ 43.97 -1.43 ProShtS&P 53.36 -1.73 PrUShS&P 35.44 -2.41 ProUltDow 0.46 40.43 +2.20 PrUlShDow 29.33 -1.77 PrUShMC 19.93 -1.53 ProUltQQQ 53.46 +3.19 PrUShQQQ 18.88 -1.27 ProUltSP 0.40 34.09 +2.02 ProUShL20 36.13 +.78 PrUSCh25 rs 38.56 -.69 ProUSEM rs 50.83 -2.27 ProUSRE rs 28.52 -3.06 ProUSOG rs 69.57 -5.00 ProUSBM rs 41.71 -4.14 ProUltRE rs 0.51 35.89 +3.09 ProUShtFn 21.96 -2.07 ProUFin rs 0.17 52.55 +4.17 PrUPShQQQ 65.58 -6.85 PrUPShR2K 59.00 -6.83 ProUltO&G 0.21 26.90 +1.65 ProUBasM 0.13 26.28 +2.17 ProUShEur 22.88 -1.85 ProShtR2K 42.97 -1.58 ProUltPQQQ 80.03 +6.91 ProUSR2K 22.91 -1.76 ProUltR2K 0.02 26.39 +1.72 ProUSSP500 35.86 -3.81 ProUltSP500 0.41 124.03+10.70 ProUltCrude 9.33 +.54 ProUSSlv rs 34.35 -1.01 ProUShCrude 15.41 -1.03

Nm

D

ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgrsSoft ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PureBio PPrIT

1.93 2.48 0.16 0.60 1.21 0.62 0.56 0.72 0.70 0.61 1.37 3.20 0.71

Nm 58.60 +1.38 18.58 +.09 23.33 -.05 60.82 +1.48 40.91 +1.09 29.98 +.59 19.37 +.64 9.71 +.39 9.65 +.33 34.36 +.97 6.22 +.08 22.26 +1.27 7.21 +.34 55.76 +1.39 15.49 +.40 32.91 +.05 32.72 +1.01 90.00 +4.22 8.50 +.36 1.89 -.12 6.55 +.06

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN Qlogic Qualcom QltyDistr QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QksilvRes Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI Biolog RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadioOneD RadioShk RaeSyst Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT h RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn RegeneRx Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailVent RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RightNow RINO Int n RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues rue21 n RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrEMSmC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp SS&C n STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SWS Grp SXC Hlth SABESP Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeadrillLtd SeagateT Seahawk n SealAir Sealy SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedH n SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp ShengdaTc Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicnImg

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Nm 42.08 +1.29 5.72 +.14 16.80 +.47 19.05 +.79 6.50 +.37 8.38 -.01 81.24 +3.96 24.54 +.88 35.90 +1.28 5.61 +.11 .00 +.06 34.29 +1.13 37.07 +.27 1.52 -4.70 11.91 +.43 17.29 +.96 4.26 +.07 5.15 +.26 5.52 +.36 4.05 50.67 +2.49 39.30 +1.40 9.27 +.50 13.91 -.27 62.21 +1.31 18.98 -1.02 42.09 +1.52 33.97 +.86 41.99 +.99 8.13 +.87 16.38 -.10 36.95 +.67 13.09 +.95 2.80 -.24 8.63 +.24 7.55 +.19 7.35 +.41 11.44 +.08 31.21 +.63 2.73 +.08 27.05 +.17 24.21 +1.72 18.58 +.10 .28 44.57 +1.38 34.53 +1.03 28.91 +1.65 22.16 +.64 11.29 +.66 30.64 +1.21 38.24 +.58 16.00 +.08 20.92 +.57 3.80 +.08 20.36 +1.56 8.95 +.60 4.26 +.12 10.46 -.06 29.20 +1.12 28.72 +.55 26.09 +.49 29.86 +.82 51.62 +1.76 14.20 +.60 28.00 +.94 21.15 +.66 29.37 +.88 7.91 +.35 3.19 +.16 51.76 +2.14 19.43 +.31 1.51 +.02 24.40 +.79 43.07 +2.25 36.63 +3.29 20.36 +.73 4.10 -.50 14.06 +.59 6.97 -.03 6.10 +.16 .88 -.01 65.25 +1.28 31.23 +.82 8.93 +.03 4.63 +.15 .53 -.04 13.94 +.14 5.27 +.23 44.58 +1.28 11.83 +.67 11.29 +.62 4.23 +.22 52.25 +1.83 20.12 +.73 .20 -.05 7.39 -.39 27.16 +.68 30.98 +1.41 .44 +.01 33.49 +1.19 13.41 +.72 12.15 +.64 2.57 +.03 9.28 +.25 10.24 +.57 24.48 +1.86 2.03 +.15 20.04 +1.20 16.90 +.31 10.90 +.33 8.35 +.40 7.03 +.12 26.47 +1.12 64.80 +.11 13.72 +.18 14.46 +.43 10.19 +.10 28.44 +.75 19.10 +.89 43.66 -.02 20.63 +.43 25.24 +.19 21.48 +1.02 2.44 +.05 16.92 +.87 29.12 +.73 15.14 +.96 16.58 +.97 15.23 +.28 15.80 +.49 12.72 +.20 4.30 +.24 .71 +.20 8.34 +.14 27.69 +.68 43.51 +1.09 28.16 +1.54 9.48 +.39 18.10 +.51 10.00 +.16 9.75 +.84 11.22 +1.12 21.23 +.18 15.64 +.42 42.52 +1.67 26.48 +.82 20.07 +.60 50.43 +.50 3.75 +.35 3.79 +.05 17.30 +.03 38.00 +2.02 37.12 +1.62 3.15 +.17 32.14 +2.08 26.18 +1.08 11.41 +.72 13.28 +.68 3.61 -.13 15.61 +.48 6.58 +.19 11.86 +.35 37.36 +.71 61.51 +2.96 14.61 +.32 30.87 +1.03 8.01 +.48 12.79 +.36 6.88 +.36 17.92 +.12 20.20 +.97 9.83 +.15 30.35 +1.94 37.55 +1.55 4.33 +.01 20.95 +1.28 30.72 +1.10 9.93 +.44 17.70 +.40 7.87 +.44 15.80 -.31 10.82 +.28 15.73 +.36 18.91 +.06 8.49 +.30 53.39 +.24 17.61 +.52 28.51 +.78 24.25 +1.13 12.44 +.39 17.17 +.89 12.75 +.92 48.64 -.33 35.48 +1.17 9.14 +.38 36.75 +.49 27.35 +1.64 44.46 +1.10 80.52 +2.38 9.75 +.65 12.62 +.72 40.10 +1.54 38.70 +2.41 16.19 +1.04 54.69 +2.14 29.12 +.90 26.60 +1.43 9.84 +.38 18.82 +1.22 7.37 +.38 16.48 +.46 51.19 +2.14 5.77 +.06 49.61 +2.14 67.68 +1.40 47.46 +1.53 14.21 +.50 1.34 +.02 39.53 +.70 2.09 +.17 71.00 +.97 63.76 +2.49 35.31 +.80 48.48 +1.21 3.11 +.11 51.25 +.99 51.14 +2.99 49.95 +1.37 48.06 +1.40 21.65 +1.08 1.42 +.13

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U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It 0.10 7.25 +.37 UAL 20.05 +1.41 UBS AG 14.32 +.66 UDR 0.72 19.26 +1.11 UGI Corp 1.00 26.40 +.70 URS 39.33 +1.29 US Airwy 9.32 +1.24 US Geoth .78 -.01 US Gold 4.76 +.28 USA Tech h .59 +.09 USEC 5.01 +.36 USG 12.36 +.71 UTiWrldwd 0.06 13.64 +.46 UTStrcm 1.97 +.09 UltaSalon 23.35 +1.14 UltraPt g 46.90 +2.19 Uluru .12 -.00 Umpqua 0.20 11.62 +.50 UndrArmr 34.61 +2.10 UniSrcEn 1.56 30.77 +.69 UnilevNV 0.67 28.58 +.64 Unilever 0.67 27.74 +.55 Unilife n 6.16 +.21 UnionPac 1.32 70.24 +2.81 Unisys rs 18.30 +1.20 Unit 41.66 +2.20 UtdCBksGa 4.02 +.32 UtdMicro 0.08 3.06 +.03 UtdNtrlF 30.42 +.44 UtdOnln 0.40 5.66 +.24 UPS B 1.88 59.47 +2.27 UtdRentals 8.83 +.54 US Bancrp 0.20 22.93 +.89 US NGsFd 7.78 -.09 US OilFd 33.65 +1.04 USSteel 0.20 40.39 +2.17 UtdTech 1.70 66.55 +1.96 UtdThrp s 47.79 -.01 UtdhlthGp 0.50 29.20 +.31 Unitrin 0.88 25.62 +1.02 UnivDisp 1 U H U U mG U U m U O

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Facebook

Just over two years ago, Facebook was available only in English. Still, nearly half of its users were outside the United States, and its presence was particularly strong in Britain, Australia and other English-speaking countries. The task of expanding the site overseas fell on Javier Olivan, a 33-year-old Spaniard who joined Facebook three years ago, when the site had 30 million users. Olivan led an innovative effort by Facebook to have its users translate the site into more than 80 languages. Other websites and technology companies, notably

Mozilla, the maker of Firefox, had used volunteers to translate their sites or programs. But with 300,000 words on Facebook’s site — not counting material posted by users — the task was immense. Facebook not only encouraged users to translate parts of the site, but also let other users fine-tune those translations or pick among multiple translations. Nearly 300,000 users participated. “Nobody had done it at the scale that we were doing it,” Olivan said. The effort paid off. Now about

70 percent of Facebook’s users are outside the United States. And while the number of users in the United States doubled in the last year, to 123 million, according to comScore, the number more than tripled in Mexico, to 11 million, and it more than quadrupled in Germany, to 19 million. Industry insiders say that, most of all, Facebook is benefiting from a cycle where success breeds more success. In particular, its growing revenue, estimated at $1 billion annually, allows the company to invest in improving its product and keep competitors at bay. “I think that Facebook is winning for two reasons,” said Bing Gordon, a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers and a board member of Zynga, the maker of popular Facebook games like FarmVille and Mafia Wars. Gordon said that Facebook had hired some of the best engineers in Silicon Valley, and he said that the company’s strategy to create a platform for other software developers had played a critical role. “They have opened up a platform, and they have the best apps on that platform,” Gordon said. With Facebook’s social networking lead growing, it is not clear whether Google, or any other company, will succeed in derailing its march forward. Says Danny Sullivan, the editor of Search Engine Land, an industry blog, “Google can’t even get to the first base of social networks, which is people interacting with each other, much less to second or third base, which is people interacting with each other through games and applications.”

quarter profits. The results — 93 cents a share, excluding one-time items — raised hopes that other big banks would report similarly robust results over the next two weeks. Shares of State Street rose 9.9 percent. JPMorgan Chase, which reports second-quarter results next week, increased 5 percent. American Express and Bank of America each rose more than 4 percent. Small and midsize regional banks posted even bigger gains. Retailers also gained on the news from the International Council of Shopping Centers, a trade group. Thirty of the 31 stocks in the S&P retail industry

index advanced. But beyond the outlook for a particular company or industry was a sense that investors were regaining their nerve after a dismal first half for the stock market. Treasury securities, which had soared in recent weeks, driving the yield on benchmark 10year Treasuries below 3 percent, abruptly reversed course and tumbled. The 10-year Treasury fell 14/32 to 104 13/32. Its yield rose to 2.98 percent from 2.93 percent. The euro rallied to a six-week high against the dollar. “It looks like the ‘re-risking’ trade is coming back on,” said Matthew Rothman, global head of quantitative equities strategy at

Barclays Capital. Analysts said the prospect of authorities in Europe releasing details this week of so-called stress tests of some of the Continent’s banks also fueled the day’s optimism. Even if the tests identified problems within some of Europe’s banks, at least they would end the uncertainty about the state of the financial system that had been weighing on world markets, analysts said. “The market is just happy the tests are coming out,” said Win Thin, currency strategist at Brown Brothers Harriman in New York. “There has always been this suspicion about whether they are hiding something or not.”

Germany takes legal steps against Facebook BERLIN — A German data protection official said Wednesday he launched legal proceedings against Facebook, which he accused of illegally accessing and saving personal data of people who don’t use the social networking site. Johannes Caspar, head of the Hamburg office for data protection, said it had initiated legal steps that could result in Facebook being fined tens of thousands of euros for saving private information of individuals who don’t use the site and haven’t granted it access to their details. “We consider the saving of data from third parties, in this context, to be against data privacy laws,” Caspar said in a statement. Facebook has until Aug. 11 to respond formally to the legal complaint against it. Its response will determine whether the case goes further. The company, based in Palo Alto, California, confirmed in an e-mail to The Associated Press that it had received a letter from Caspar. “We are currently reviewing it and will readily respond to it within the given timeframe,” Facebook said. Germans are protected by some of the world’s most strict privacy laws, which lay out in detail how and how much of an individual’s private information may be accessed by whom. Germany also has launched an investigation into Google Inc. over its Street View mapping program. — The Associated Press

Continued from B1 “They have been more innovative than any other social network, and they are going to continue to grow,” said Jeremiah Owyang, an analyst with the Altimeter Group. “Facebook wants to be ubiquitous, and they are being successful for now.” The rapid ascent of Facebook has no company more worried than Google, which sees the social networking giant as a threat on multiple fronts. Much of the activity on Facebook is invisible to Google’s search engine, which makes it less useful over time. What’s more, the billions of links posted by users on Facebook have turned the social network into an important driver of users to sites across the Web. That has been Google’s role. Google has tried time and again to break into social networking not only with Orkut, but also with user profiles, with an industrywide initiative called OpenSocial, and, most recently, with Buzz, a social network that mixes elements of Facebook and Twitter with Gmail. But none of those initiatives has made a dent in Facebook. Google is said to be trying again with a secret project for a service called Google Me, according to several reports. Google declined to comment for this article. With nearly two-thirds of all Internet users in the United States signed up on Facebook, the company has focused on international expansion.

Markets Continued from B1 And so a few hard numbers — and a lot of hope — sent the market soaring. The Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index, which only two days ago had sunk to a 10-month low, rose 32.31 points, or 3.13 percent, to 1,060.27. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 274.66 points to 10,018.28, its first close above 10,000 since June 28. The Nasdaq composite index rose 65.59 points to 2,159.47. Financial shares paced the gains after the State Street Corp., the big custody bank, posted stronger-than-expected second-

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 B5

Disney near deal on Miramax sale New York Times News Service The Walt Disney Co. is nearing a sale of its Miramax Films unit to an investor group led by a construction executive, Ronald Tutor, and the private equity firm Colony Capital for $600 million to $700 million, people briefed

Insurance Continued from B1 • Requiring insurers to provide consumers with detailed breakdowns of medical costs to better understand the factors that drive health insurance premiums. The new requirements would complement changes the state has made to the rate-review

Nosler Continued from B1 “I don’t think you can plan fully for an event like this,” said Nosler, 32, the grandson of the company’s founder, John Nosler. The fire that triggered the June 3 explosion started in a small room at the midpoint of a 100-yard tunnel used for testing ammunition. What caused the fire remains under investigation. Ammunition manufacturers do have higher insurance rates than the average company, Nosler said, but his company’s rates are set for the rest of this year. Whether this incident affects Nosler’s insurance depends on the results of the investigation and renegotiation for next year. It’s still unclear when work on the facility may be completed. The best estimate Nosler has received is that it will take longer than 30 days. “There’s still going to be a lot

on the matter said Wednesday. A deal for Miramax could be reached within a week, these people said, cautioning that talks were ongoing and could collapse. The individuals spoke on condition they not be identified because the talks were confidential.

process over the last two years, the news release stated. Some of the recent changes include requiring insurers to provide more details on administrative expenses, making rate filings public and establishing public comment periods. For more information on the grant proposal, visit: http://insurance.oregon.gov/consumer/ federal-health-reform/ratereviewgrantapp.pdf.

of headaches and a lot of hiccups,” he said. Despite the explosion, it was Nosler’s offices that were hardest-hit, partially from the water damage caused by the fire sprinklers. “At the end of the day, the offices are what took the brunt of it,” Nosler said. Nosler said employees already back on the job were picked based on their experience, skill sets and the areas of the factory that were able to continue running. He said people who were put on leave were told to file for unemployment benefits, and were paid for any vacation or sick leave they had accrued. If the company begins hiring again, it will first hire the employees who were laid off, Nosler said, if they are available. “At the end of the day, it’s just unfortunate that this happened,” he said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

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PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .32 1.68 ... .20f .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

13 13 70 ... 39 ... ... 22 19 40 21 12 31 18 ... ... 52 ... 13 ... 13

YTD Last Chg %Chg 47.04 20.19 14.71 12.70 63.30 .38 33.94 45.68 54.29 4.82 30.31 44.96 12.71 20.14 8.00 20.45 4.64 6.98 18.74 8.80 24.30

+2.37 +.67 +.65 +.23 +1.94 -.08 +.87 +1.25 +.29 +.13 +.47 +1.79 +.20 +.66 +.59 +.43 +.28 +.41 +.63 +.51 +.48

+36.1 -6.5 -2.3 +3.3 +16.9 -44.1 +23.5 +17.0 -8.2 +100.8 -7.4 -12.7 -4.5 -1.3 +44.1 -.4 +71.9 ... -20.6 -.3 -20.3

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .80f 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .48f .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

20 16 16 34 95 ... 35 17 ... 19 19 9 24 19 ... 21 ... 11 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1201.50 $1198.60 $17.979

Pvs Day $1190.00 $1194.80 $17.833

Market recap 68.56 33.76 44.35 13.14 40.80 1.70 34.94 106.95 19.77 39.16 72.06 41.46 24.40 6.23 11.62 22.93 16.07 26.66 2.72 35.41

+1.35 +1.79 +.74 +.68 +1.64 +.10 +1.43 +4.41 +.51 +1.43 +2.24 +1.33 +.79 +.36 +.50 +.89 +.37 +1.51 +.08 +1.10

+3.8 -10.2 -1.5 +3.5 +12.5 -39.5 -7.5 -3.1 -7.1 -17.9 +16.9 +3.6 +5.8 +3.8 -13.3 +1.9 -16.9 -1.2 +29.5 -17.9

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl GenElec

4548093 2284030 1465276 1040353 901295

3.90 +.11 106.11 +3.24 14.71 +.65 14.20 +.60 14.62 +.65

Gainers ($2 or more) FtBcp pfD FlagstB rs FtBcp pfC PNC wt Raythn wt

Last

Chg %Chg

2.21 +.61 +38.1 2.93 +.54 +22.6 2.29 +.39 +20.5 13.99 +2.30 +19.7 13.85 +2.22 +19.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name FTI Cnslt DrxSOXBr DirREBear MSS&P11 DirFBear rs

Last

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

NwGold g VantageDrl Taseko GoldStr g NovaGld g

99701 44956 33838 32126 19669

Name

5.13 1.28 3.75 4.16 6.41

Microsoft Intel Cisco PwShs QQQ Oracle

-.67 -.15 +.35 +.18 +.26

Gainers ($2 or more) Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Talbots wt AdcareH wt Taseko GerovaFn MagHRes

2.47 2.25 3.75 5.40 4.34

+.46 +.40 +.35 +.50 +.39

Netlist Carmike USA Tc pf ZionsBc wt PerryEllis

Name BovieMed NwGold g HKN NewConcEn ContMatls

+22.9 +21.6 +10.3 +10.2 +9.9

2,687 446 69 3,202 50 63

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

800038 704261 694013 676822 348706

24.30 +.48 20.14 +.66 22.48 +1.14 43.96 +1.36 23.09 +.77

Last

Chg %Chg

2.82 +.52 +22.6 6.61 +1.04 +18.7 10.00 +1.35 +15.6 7.40 +.92 +14.2 19.19 +2.34 +13.9

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

2.10 5.13 2.95 3.42 12.00

-.44 -17.3 -.67 -11.6 -.35 -10.6 -.27 -7.3 -.79 -6.2

Affymetrix XenoPort EndWve OlScCTrI pf CmwlthBsh

4.04 -1.51 -27.2 6.51 -2.36 -26.6 2.72 -.42 -13.4 4.10 -.61 -13.0 2.20 -.28 -11.3

323 158 46 527 5 22

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

-25.7 -15.3 -14.7 -14.4 -12.4

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

32.14 -11.13 32.74 -5.91 7.58 -1.31 10.28 -1.73 15.89 -2.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Diary 2,090 589 106 2,785 14 128

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,988.88 342.02 5,552.82 1,497.10 1,727.05 869.32 8,900.27 473.54

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,018.28 4,058.62 372.03 6,685.78 1,826.83 2,159.47 1,060.27 11,095.30 611.66

+274.66 +152.39 +11.66 +199.66 +27.35 +65.59 +32.21 +343.58 +21.63

YTD %Chg %Chg +2.82 +3.90 +3.24 +3.08 +1.52 +3.13 +3.13 +3.20 +3.67

52-wk %Chg

-3.93 -1.00 -6.53 -6.95 +.10 -4.83 -4.92 -3.93 -2.20

+22.50 +32.48 +7.76 +18.87 +21.19 +23.60 +20.55 +23.20 +27.51

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

317.56 2,415.81 3,483.44 5,014.82 5,992.86 19,857.07 32,035.19 20,013.07 2,961.74 9,279.65 1,675.65 2,861.03 4,277.80 5,368.48

+1.00 s +1.11 s +1.75 s +1.00 s +.87 s -1.13 t +1.59 s +3.39 s +.32 s -.63 t -.55 t -.24 t -.51 t +.10 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.8650 1.5205 .9533 .001862 .1476 1.2650 .1283 .011441 .077537 .0322 .000818 .1322 .9511 .0310

.8498 1.5149 .9472 .001865 .1474 1.2620 .1283 .011437 .077310 .0322 .000818 .1312 .9439 .0310

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 15.93 +0.53 -3.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.35 +0.13 -2.1 GrowthI 21.21 +0.68 -3.8 Ultra 18.38 +0.54 -5.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 15.80 +0.47 -4.4 AMutlA p 22.17 +0.54 -3.0 BalA p 15.85 +0.29 -1.1 BondA p 12.18 -0.01 +5.3 CapWA p 19.88 +0.01 +0.9 CapIBA p 45.43 +0.71 -3.4 CapWGA p 30.85 +0.78 -7.9 EupacA p 35.55 +0.69 -7.3 FdInvA p 30.99 +0.89 -4.6 GovtA p 14.51 -0.02 +5.3 GwthA p 25.86 +0.70 -5.4 HI TrA p 10.66 +0.01 +4.2 IncoA p 14.92 +0.23 -1.6 IntBdA p 13.47 -0.01 +3.9 ICAA p 24.25 +0.67 -5.6 NEcoA p 21.25 +0.54 -5.5 N PerA p 24.09 +0.55 -6.0 NwWrldA 46.60 +0.69 -1.3 STBA p 10.11 +1.7 SmCpA p 31.67 +0.65 +0.4 TxExA p 12.20 +0.02 +3.4 WshA p 23.33 +0.64 -4.2 American Funds B: CapIBB p 45.45 +0.72 -3.7 GrwthB t 25.00 +0.68 -5.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 25.80 +0.43 -8.6 IntlEqA 25.16 +0.43 -8.7 IntEqII I r 10.67 +0.19 -9.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 18.44 +0.47 -10.7 MidCap 25.75 +0.91 +0.7 MidCapVal 17.40 +0.53 -3.2 Baron Funds: Growth 41.45 +1.00 +0.3 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.74 -0.02 DivMu 14.57 +0.03 TxMgdIntl 13.43 +0.30 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.02 +0.42 GlAlA r 17.36 +0.26 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.18 +0.24 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.45 +0.25 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 42.52 +0.96 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 24.30 +0.76 AcornIntZ 33.46 +0.59 ValRestr 39.51 +1.36 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.35 +0.22 USCorEq2 8.91 +0.29 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 29.45 +0.82 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 29.78 +0.82 NYVen C 28.39 +0.78 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.44 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.89 +0.32 EmMktV 30.34 +0.54 IntSmVa 14.05 +0.24 LargeCo 8.37 +0.26 USLgVa 16.63 +0.54 US SmVa 19.23 +0.73 IntlSmCo 13.78 +0.22 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 15.45 +0.45 Glb5FxInc 11.36 2YGlFxd 10.26 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 61.55 +1.31 Income 13.20 -0.01 IntlStk 29.84 +0.77 Stock 90.30 +2.68 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.75 +0.52

+6.0 +2.8 -12.1 -4.7 -3.0 -3.3 -2.8 -4.4 -1.4 -0.5 -7.3 -6.4 -2.0 -4.9 -4.8 -5.3 +4.1 -1.1 -2.9 -5.9 -3.9 -1.9 -2.0 -2.1 +0.8 -8.0 +4.1 +1.2 -2.7 +4.4 -6.3 -5.4 -5.4

NatlMunInc 9.61 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 15.79 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.59 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.97 FPACres 24.29 Fairholme 30.80 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.49 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 16.70 StrInA 12.22 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 16.87 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.33 FF2015 10.26 FF2020 12.24 FF2025 10.07 FF2030 11.94 FF2035 9.82 FF2040 6.85 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.01 AMgr50 13.79 Balanc 16.30 BlueChGr 36.10 Canada 47.57 CapAp 21.21 CpInc r 8.54 Contra 56.70 ContraK 56.72 DisEq 19.88 DivIntl 25.45 DivrsIntK r 25.45 DivGth 22.62 EmrMk 21.52 Eq Inc 37.43 EQII 15.48 Fidel 26.75 FltRateHi r 9.39 GNMA 11.83 GovtInc 10.76

+0.01 +3.7 +0.52 -5.3 +0.13 -4.1 +2.1 +0.24 -0.7 +0.81 +2.4 +0.11 -3.6 +0.46 -3.0 +0.01 +3.1 +0.46 -2.8 +0.18 +0.15 +0.22 +0.20 +0.26 +0.24 +0.17 +0.36 +0.19 +0.29 +1.25 +1.11 +0.80 +0.05 +1.57 +1.58 +0.61 +0.58 +0.58 +0.80 +0.41 +1.30 +0.53 +0.86

-0.8 -0.9 -1.8 -2.5 -3.0 -3.7 -3.7

-3.7 -0.1 +0.1 -4.9 -1.9 -1.0 +2.2 -2.6 -2.5 -5.4 -9.1 -9.0 -4.4 -4.8 -4.0 -4.9 -5.5 +1.3 +5.8 -0.02 +4.8

GroCo 66.42 GroInc 15.19 GrowthCoK 66.44 HighInc r 8.43 Indepn 18.97 IntBd 10.52 IntmMu 10.29 IntlDisc 27.49 InvGrBd 11.70 InvGB 7.32 LgCapVal 10.62 LatAm 48.19 LevCoStk 22.17 LowP r 31.63 LowPriK r 31.66 Magelln 60.19 MidCap 22.96 MuniInc 12.67 NwMkt r 15.31 OTC 43.48 100Index 7.50 Ovrsea 27.40 Puritn 15.87 SCmdtyStrt 10.00 StIntMu 10.70 STBF 8.43 SmllCpS r 15.36 StratInc 10.90 StrReRt r 8.56 TotalBd 10.82 USBI 11.45 Value 55.94 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 45.76 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 37.72 IntlInxInv 30.28 TotMktInv 30.45 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 37.72 TotMktAd r 30.45 First Eagle: GlblA 40.25 OverseasA 19.94

+2.25 +0.52 +2.25 +0.01 +0.77 -0.01 +0.02 +0.55 -0.02 -0.01 +0.35 +1.41 +0.87 +0.69 +0.69 +1.85 +0.92 +0.02 +0.02 +1.66 +0.22 +0.62 +0.30 +0.18 +0.01 +0.68 +0.08 -0.01 -0.02 +2.03

-3.7 -5.3 -3.6 +3.2 -4.8 +5.5 +3.2 -9.4 +5.4 +5.8 -5.6 -7.1 -3.3 -1.0 -0.9 -6.3 -1.7 +3.9 +4.8 -4.9 -5.4 -11.4 -0.7 -9.6 +1.8 +2.5 -3.6 +3.3 +0.6 +5.4 +5.2 -1.8

+0.93 +7.8 +1.16 -4.0 +0.69 -9.4 +0.97 -3.2 +1.16 -3.9 +0.96 -3.2 +0.64 +0.7 +0.19 +2.5

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.86 +0.01 FoundAl p 9.31 +0.16 HYTFA p 10.10 +0.01 IncomA p 2.01 +0.02 USGovA p 6.83 +0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.00 +0.02 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.03 +0.02 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.58 +0.38 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.81 GlBd A p 12.97 +0.04 GrwthA p 15.23 +0.32 WorldA p 12.66 +0.24 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 12.99 +0.04 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 34.37 +1.03 GMO Trust III: Quality 17.58 +0.39 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.82 +0.22 Quality 17.58 +0.39 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.92 +0.01 HYMuni 8.50 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.72 CapApInst 30.37 +0.93 IntlInv t 50.25 +1.26 Intl r 50.79 +1.28 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.46 +0.80 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 28.42 +0.79 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 34.42 +1.05 Div&Gr 16.78 +0.47 Advisers 17.10 +0.34 TotRetBd 11.15 -0.01 HussmnStrGr 13.42 -0.08

+3.4 -3.6 +5.1 +1.2 +5.3 +4.3 +1.3 +0.9 -2.5 NA +4.2 -9.4 -9.4 +3.9 -6.8 -8.6 -3.6 -8.5 +3.7 +6.7 +5.8 -7.9 -7.6 -7.4 -7.2 -7.2 -6.0 -4.4 -2.1 +5.4 +5.0

Invesco Funds A: Chart p 14.18 +0.34 CmstkA 13.28 +0.40 EqIncA 7.53 +0.17 GrIncA p 16.27 +0.53 HYMuA 9.37 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 20.42 +0.31 AssetStA p 20.97 +0.32 AssetStrI r 21.14 +0.33 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.47 -0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.46 -0.02 HighYld 7.69 IntmTFBd 10.99 +0.02 ShtDurBd 10.96 USLCCrPls 17.32 +0.56 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 24.72 +0.66 OvrseasT r 42.17 +0.90 PrkMCVal T 19.43 +0.53 Twenty T 55.93 +1.57 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 11.56 +0.20 LSGrwth 11.14 +0.25 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 18.97 +0.64 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.21 +0.28 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.45 +0.29 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.81 +0.02 Longleaf Partners: Partners 24.25 +0.64 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.56 +0.04 StrInc C 14.06 +0.04 LSBondR 13.51 +0.04 StrIncA 13.99 +0.04 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdA p 12.02 +0.01 InvGrBdY 12.02 Lord Abbett A:

-5.6 -3.1 -2.4 -5.2 +5.8 -6.2 -5.9 -5.8 +5.1 +5.2 +3.5 +2.6 +2.0 -4.7 -5.9 -0.8 -1.9 -9.2 -1.0 -2.7 -4.3 +1.1 +0.9 +2.5 +0.7 +4.7 +3.9 +4.6 +4.3 +5.4 +5.5

AffilA p 9.60 +0.34 BdDebA p 7.31 +0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.60 MFS Funds A: TotRA 12.89 +0.22 ValueA 19.73 +0.58 MFS Funds I: ValueI 19.81 +0.58 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.67 +0.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.43 +0.10 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.66 +0.30 MergerFd 15.62 +0.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.38 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.38 -0.01 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.38 +0.47 GlbDiscZ 26.72 +0.48 QuestZ 16.51 SharesZ 18.74 +0.38 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 37.61 +0.93 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 39.03 +0.96 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 6.87 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 24.94 +0.40 Intl I r 16.64 +0.37 Oakmark r 35.92 +1.09 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.22 +0.05 GlbSMdCap 12.65 +0.30 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 36.32 +1.10 DvMktA p 28.71 +0.51 GlobA p 50.92 +1.47 IntBdA p 6.27 MnStFdA 26.81 +0.81 RisingDivA 13.29 +0.40 S&MdCpVl 25.59 +0.86 StrInA p 4.07

-5.7 +2.5 +3.6 -0.6 -4.3 -4.2 +4.2 -8.5 +2.2 +0.5 +7.5 +7.6 -1.3 -1.1 NA -2.3 -0.4 -0.6 NA -2.3 -1.2 -3.0 +2.1 -0.9 -9.0 -0.2 -3.9 NA -4.7 -4.1 -3.7 NA

Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.07 +0.36 S&MdCpVl 22.04 +0.74 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.03 +0.35 Oppenheimer Roch: LtdNYA p 3.28 RcNtMuA 7.10 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.42 +0.50 IntlBdY 6.27 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.25 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.81 +0.02 ComodRR 7.35 +0.10 HiYld 8.86 InvGrCp 11.23 -0.03 LowDu 10.49 RealRtnI 11.08 -0.04 ShortT 9.86 TotRt 11.25 -0.02 TR II 10.89 -0.02 TRIII 9.98 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.49 RealRtA p 11.08 -0.04 TotRtA 11.25 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.25 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.25 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.25 -0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 39.63 +0.53 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 33.59 +0.99 Price Funds: BlChip 30.90 +1.05 CapApp 18.19 +0.38 EmMktS 29.04 +0.56 EqInc 20.16 +0.64 EqIndex 28.58 +0.88 Growth 26.08 +0.88

-4.6 -4.1 -4.6 +3.3 +4.5 NA +5.7 +5.1 -6.6 +5.0 +5.8 +2.9 +4.1 +0.9 +5.8 +5.5 +6.0 +2.7 +3.9 +5.6 +5.2 +5.6 +5.7 +2.5 -5.5 -5.7 +0.2 -3.5 -3.1 -4.1 -5.2

HlthSci 25.13 HiYield 6.41 IntlBond 9.56 IntlStk 11.91 MidCap 48.39 MCapVal 20.27 N Asia 16.43 New Era 39.22 N Horiz 25.89 N Inc 9.56 R2010 13.90 R2015 10.56 R2020 14.35 R2025 10.37 R2030 14.71 R2040 14.67 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 27.15 SmCapVal 29.37 SpecIn 11.88 Value 19.81 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.26 RiverSource A: DEI 8.28 DivrBd 4.97 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 9.29 PremierI r 16.04 TotRetI r 10.77 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 31.79 S&P Sel 16.66 Scout Funds: Intl 27.08 Selected Funds: AmShD 35.55 AmShS p 35.52 Sequoia 115.88 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 10.15 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.60 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 43.23

+0.48 +0.01 +0.01 +0.30 +1.53 +0.62 +0.23 +1.39 +0.79 -0.01 +0.24 +0.21 +0.32 +0.25 +0.39 +0.41 +0.84 +0.85 +0.05 +0.65

-4.0 +3.8 -1.9 -5.5 +1.9 -2.2 +1.8 -10.1 +1.2 +5.2 -0.4 -1.0 -1.7 -2.3 -2.7 -3.2 +2.1 +0.8 -0.4 +2.9 -3.3

+0.37 -5.7 +0.25 -5.3 +5.3 +0.29 -1.7 +0.45 -1.7 +0.28 +0.4 +0.99 -3.6 +0.51 -3.9 +0.56 -6.2 +0.99 -4.6 +0.99 -4.7 +2.35 +5.4 +6.3 +0.26 -8.8 +0.85 -6.7

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.42 IntValue I 23.93 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 20.99 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 11.00 CpOpAdl 63.33 Energy 100.94 500Adml 97.69 GNMA Ad 11.01 HlthCr 47.80 HiYldCp 5.45 InfProAd 25.19 ITsryAdml 11.60 IntGrAdm 51.14 ITAdml 13.62 ITGrAdm 10.00 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.39 LT Adml 11.06 MuHYAdm 10.45 PrmCap r 56.91 STsyAdml 10.84 ShtTrAd 15.92 STFdAd 10.88 STIGrAd 10.73 TtlBAdml 10.70 TStkAdm 26.27 WellslAdm 49.70 WelltnAdm 48.44 Windsor 37.73 WdsrIIAd 39.22 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 21.45 CapOpp 27.41 DivdGro 12.49 Energy 53.75 EqInc 17.54 Explr 56.69 GNMA 11.01 GlobEq 14.93 HYCorp 5.45 HlthCre 113.25

+0.45 -5.2 +0.46 -5.0 +0.09 -1.0 +0.02 +2.11 +3.37 +3.01 +0.80 -0.10 -0.02 +1.25 +0.03 -0.02 +0.01 -0.08 +0.01 +0.01 +1.72

-0.01 -0.02 +0.83 +0.40 +0.84 +1.16 +1.25 +0.48 +0.91 +0.32 +1.80 +0.49 +1.87

+3.6 -8.7 -9.9 -3.9 +5.6 -4.8 +3.8 +3.2 +6.7 -5.4 +3.1 +7.0 +1.7 +8.5 +3.0 +3.9 -7.7 +2.3 +0.8 +2.7 +3.2 +5.4 -3.5 +2.7 -1.3 -5.5 -5.6

+0.5 -8.8 -4.2 -10.0 -2.5 -1.1 +5.6 +0.38 -4.7 +3.7 +1.89 -4.8

InflaPro 12.83 IntlGr 16.07 IntlVal 27.43 ITIGrade 10.00 LifeCon 15.19 LifeGro 19.03 LifeMod 17.53 LTIGrade 9.39 Morg 14.70 MuInt 13.62 MuLtd 11.09 MuShrt 15.92 PrecMtls r 19.39 PrmcpCor 11.49 Prmcp r 54.83 SelValu r 15.88 STAR 17.11 STIGrade 10.73 TgtRetInc 10.68 TgRe2010 20.61 TgtRe2025 11.12 TgtRe2015 11.28 TgRe2020 19.75 TgRe2030 18.82 TgtRe2035 11.24 TgtRe2040 18.42 TgtRe2045 11.63 USGro 15.11 Wellsly 20.51 Welltn 28.04 Wndsr 11.18 WndsII 22.10 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 97.69 Balanced 19.16 EMkt 25.03 Europe 22.87 Extend 32.50 Growth 25.82 ITBnd 11.27 MidCap 16.40 Pacific 9.38 REIT r 15.50 SmCap 27.35

-0.04 +0.39 +0.64 -0.02 +0.20 +0.47 +0.33 -0.08 +0.48 +0.03 +0.01

+0.09 +0.29 +0.25 +0.20 +0.39 +0.46 +0.29 +0.49 +0.31 +0.45 +0.16 +0.48 +0.34 +0.71

+3.2 -5.4 -10.4 +7.0 +1.5 -2.1 -0.1 +8.4 -3.7 +3.0 +1.7 +0.7 -5.1 -5.1 -7.8 -0.4 -1.5 +3.1 +2.0 +0.4 -1.8 -0.3 -1.1 -2.5 -3.3 -3.3 -3.2 -8.2 +2.6 -1.4 -5.5 -5.7

+3.02 +0.35 +0.46 +0.67 +1.13 +0.80 -0.03 +0.56 +0.14 +0.75 +0.97

-4.0 +0.1 -3.4 -11.8 -0.5 -5.0 +7.4 +0.3 -3.1 +6.2 -0.5

+0.52 +0.35 +1.66 +0.47 +0.30

SmlCpGth

16.70 +0.57 -0.8

SmlCpVl

13.02 +0.48 -0.3

STBnd

10.60

TotBnd

10.70 -0.02 +5.3

+3.0

TotlIntl

13.31 +0.30 -7.6

TotStk

26.27 +0.83 -3.5

Value

17.89 +0.56 -2.9

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

8.62 +0.21

NS

ExtIn

32.53 +1.13 -0.4

GrwthIst

25.82 +0.79 -4.9

InfProInst

10.26 -0.04 +3.2

InstIdx

97.05 +2.99 -3.9

InsPl

97.06 +3.00 -3.9

InsTStPlus

23.74 +0.75 -3.4

MidCpIst

16.45 +0.56 +0.3

SCInst

27.39 +0.98 -0.4

TBIst

10.70 -0.02 +5.4

TSInst

26.27 +0.82 -3.5

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

80.70 +2.49 -3.9

STBdIdx

10.60

TotBdSgl

10.70 -0.02 +5.4

+3.0

TotStkSgl

25.36 +0.80 -3.5

Victory Funds: DvsStA

12.85 +0.35 -7.7

Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p

4.81

+0.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.67 -0.01 +8.0


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M  BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

PREP PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION TRAINING: Three-day certification course and introduction to Prep personality reports for human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners. Continuing education units available. Registration required; $995; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541382-1401, sarah@prep-profiles.com or www.prep-profiles.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by July 6; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. “GREEN REMODELS�: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www. buildinggreencouncil.org.

WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. RISK MANAGEMENT FOR TRADERS: Learn to develop and enforce a sound risk-management strategy. Presented by Keith Wells of Charles Schwab & Co. Limited seating. Registration required; noon-1:30 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794.

SATURDAY “REALIZING THE AMERICAN DREAM�: Learn about the process of shopping for and buying a home, including the basics on budgeting, credit and getting a mortgage loan. Registration required; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506. RIDE TO REAL ESTATE BIKE TOUR: Hosted by Megan Power, broker for Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate. Call 541-610-7318, or e-mail megan@ bendproperty.com for more information and to RSVP; free; 10 a.m.; Jackson’s Corner, 845 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend..

MONDAY BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend. BEGINNING FLASH ANIMATION CLASS: Learn how to create basic animations in Flash that can be used in Web pages. Preregistration required; $59; 6-9 p.m., and class continues July 14 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES: Learn to optimize websites for major search engines with keyword marketing, site content and internal links. Continuing education units are available. Registration is required. Class continues July 20 and 27; $79; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 574-383-7270 or

TUESDAY July 20

BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM: Brian Gingerich, Kim Medford and Heather Hepburn, attorneys with Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt PC, in Bend, will discuss common mistakes business owners make, and tips for avoiding errors that may lead to a lawsuit; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave.; 541-389-0803. SAVING & INVESTING: Learn the importance of saving and investing, including strategies to reduce spending and increase income, in this second in a series of classes offered by NeighborImpact. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; Somer Hartvigsen; 541-318-7506, ext. 109, or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 4:305:30 p.m.; Visible Changes Salon & Spa, 636 N.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com.

THURSDAY July 22 ETFS EXPLAINED: Learn why exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are a growing investment option. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior of Charles Schwab & Co. Registration required by July 21; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794.

FRIDAY THURSDAY

July 23

July 15 “HOW TO START A BUSINESS�: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http://noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; noon2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or www.cocc.edu. GET STARTED WITH INVESTING: Learn to become comfortable with the vocabulary of investing, understand the basics of diversification and asset allocation, feel more confident in making investments and know where to get help. Registration required by July 13; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by Randy and Barbara Knight. Call 541-923-2679 for more information; 5:30 p.m.; Big Dog Saloon, 14217 Commercial Loop S.W., Crooked River Ranch. “OWNING A FRANCHISE�: Learn to choose a franchise, arrange financing and other critical details; $19; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Ola Day Spa, 2600 S.W. Canal Blvd., Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

MONDAY July 26 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend.

WEDNESDAY July 28 “HOW TO START A BUSINESS�: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required. http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY

FRIDAY

July 16

July 30

COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Cougar Springs Assisted Living Center, 1942 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond; 541-923-1807. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Imperial River Co.; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-771-7625 or www. visitredmondoregon.com. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

COFFEE CLATTER: 8:30-9:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-923-1807. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

MONDAY July 19 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend. “INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007�: Registration required. Class continues July 21, 9 a.m.-noon; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY Aug. 2 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT BOOT CAMP: Led by Bob Schuster of Dynamic Coaching. Seating is limited; $75 for five sessions; 7:30-8:30 a.m.; Deschutes Title Insurance Co., 397 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend..

WEDNESDAY Aug. 4 BANKS & OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about the different kinds of financial institutions in our community. Registration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Eric Zelenka, 3425 N.W. Fairway Heights, $430,317 Juniper Water Co., 61850 Country Club Drive, $150,000 Michael Knoell, 20154 Glen Vista Road, $319,571 Greg Welch Construction Inc., 2198 N.W. Clearwater Drive, $212,389

City of Redmond

Crook County

Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon, 835 E. state Highway 126, $182,268 Crystal Park Construction LLC., 2000 S.W. 41st St., $172,268 Highland Marketplace LLC, Gary J. and June W. Miller Revocable Trust, Gary J. and June W. Miller, 885 S.W. 17th St., #103, $100,000 Oregon Joy LLC, 299 S.W. 33rd Drive, $274,746

THE CENTRAL OREGON

COMING

Gerald Jr. and Kelly Hallett, 226 N.W. Saddle Ridge, Prineville, $253,512 Jefferson County

Joe Behrman, 5288 S.W. Quail Place, Culver, $173,642.40 Lonie Rogers, 6883 S.W. Lakeview Drive, Culver, $164,365 R.D. Steigman, 1352 S.E. Dover Lane, Madras, $290,008.68 Richard Hoefer, 626 N.W. Deschutes Drive, Madras, $420,596.69

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com.

Obama pushes exports as a way to create jobs By Tom Raum The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Moving trade to a front burner, President Barack Obama claimed Wednesday that the U.S. was on track to meet his goal of doubling exports in the next five years. While many economists and business leaders see that target as overly ambitious, the president has been increasingly linking his trade push with job creation — and trying to blunt a brewing business revolt against his policies ahead of midterm elections. “Export growth leads to job growth and economic growth,� Obama said as he named 18 business, labor and government leaders to a new export advisory council. “At a time when jobs are in short supply, building exports is an imperative.� Obama said the nation’s sales abroad grew by 17 percent in the first four months of this year, declaring: “Our efforts are off to a solid start.� Yet while the Commerce Department said exports of goods and services from January through April were up 16.9 percent, imports rose even more — up by 19.6 percent over the period. The early 2010 surges in both exports and imports reflected a rebound in global trade from its deep swoon in 2008 and early 2009 at the depth of the global economic downturn. But the manufacturing gains and inventory restocking that drove the early stages of the recovery have begun to fade. Weighing on the global economic recovery are the Europe-

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama, with Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, left, and Boeing President, Chairman and CEO Jim McNerney Jr., speaks about exports, jobs and the economy Wednesday in the East Room of the White House. an debt crisis and lower growth and labor strife in China. Also, recent weak reports on consumer spending, service sector activity and the still-rocky housing market have added to recovery doubts. With shell-shocked consumers unlikely to power the economic recovery by returning to their free-spending ways, White House officials are counting on trade and business investment to contribute a larger role. But Obama’s goal of doubling exports by 2015 “is challenging. It’s going to require a very broad set of initiatives,� said Pat Mears, director of international commercial affairs at the National Association of Manufacturers. The group strongly supports Obama’s export goals.

B  B  Borders launches sales of e-books

comes a week after the Center for Science in the Public Interest sent a letter to McDonald’s threatening to sue if the company didn’t stop using toys to market Happy Meals to young children. “By advertising that Happy Meals include toys, McDonald’s unfairly and deceptively markets directly to children,� the letter stated. CSPI said Happy Meals lead children to develop a lifelong habit of eating meals that are “too high in calories, saturated fat, added sugars and sodium, and devoid of whole grains.� In addition, CSPI said none of the 24 Happy Meal combinations listed on McDonald’s website meets the 430-calorie lunch target — one-third of the 1,300-calorie daily intake recommended for children 4 to 8 years old. McDonald’s said it offers parents choices and variety in Happy Meals, and “makes available in-depth, comprehensive nutrition information.� It emphasized that parents are fully capable of making their own decisions when it comes to feeding their children. “It seems that you purposefully skewed your evaluation of our Happy Meals by putting them in the context of a highly conservative 1,300 calorie-perday requirement,� McDonald’s contended. “I’m sure you know this category generally applies to the youngest and most sedentary children.�

DETROIT — Borders Group launched its eBook store Wednesday morning at Borders. com. The store features more than 1.5 million titles available for immediate download with prices such as 79 cents for “Rules of Deception� by Christopher Reich and $14.99 for “House Rules� by Jodi Picoult. Some digital titles sell for $18, said Borders spokeswoman Mary Davis. The site also offers thousands of free digital titles available in formats such as ePub, mobile and PDF. Borders hopes to capture a 17 percent share of the digital book market by July 2011, said Mike Edwards, CEO for Borders Group . Borders previously introduced the Kobo eReader and Aluratek Libre eReader on its Web site. Both devices are priced under $150 and have surpassed the Ann Arbor, Mich.-based bookseller’s sales forecasts. Borders plans to offer up to 10 e-reader devices in its stores in early September and become the first retailer to embrace more than one e-reader.

McDonald’s stands up for its Happy Meals CHICAGO — McDonald’s defended its Happy Meals on Wednesday against claims by a consumer advocacy group, with McDonald’s CEO Jim Skinner saying that “Happy Meals are a fun treat, with right-sized, quality food choices.� The company’s statement

EU pulls back on biotech crop authority BRUSSELS — After decades of pushing nations to surrender

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The president’s showcasing of his newly energized trade agenda appeared aimed, in part, at quieting increasing vocal criticism from the business community of his decisions on taxes, trade and financial regulation. In one of the sharpest rebukes yet from corporate America, Ivan Seidenberg, chief executive of Verizon Communications Inc. and head of the influential Business Roundtable, late last month blasted the administration for decisions he said “create an increasingly hostile environment for investment and job creation.� Seidenberg was among those named by Obama on Wednesday to the new advisory panel, which also includes executives of Walt Disney Co., Ford Motor Co. and the Boeing Co.

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more power to the European Union, the bloc is pulling back on efforts to assert its authority in one contentious area, genetically modified foods. On Tuesday, the European Commission will formally propose giving back to national and local governments the freedom to decide whether to grow such crops. The new policy is aimed at overcoming a stalemate that has severely curtailed the market for biotech seeds in Europe for years.

Disney to pay $269.2M in ‘Millionaire’ lawsuit LOS ANGELES — In a legal setback for the Walt Disney Co., a federal jury in Riverside, Calif., awarded the creator of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire� nearly $269.2 million in damages from the once-popular prime-time game show. The decision strikes at the heart of the “vertical integration� argument that has buttressed the wave of consolidation that has swept Hollywood over the last 20 years, in which media giants contend that it is economically advantageous to control both the production and distribution of TV programming. Creator Celador International sued The Walt Disney Co. in 2004, claiming that it had been denied its fair share of profits from the show. Celador argued that a series of “sweetheart deals� struck between a clutch of Disney-owned companies kept the show in the red, even as it became ABC’s first No. 1 show in more than a decade. — From wire reports

CALL YOUR BULLETIN SALES REPRESENTATIVE FOR DEADLINES AND NEW 2010 PACKAGE PRICES

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L

Inside

C OREGON Coast Guard helicopter crashes after leaving Astoria, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Met favorite Cesare Siepi dies at 87, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

BEND CITY COUNCIL

LILY RAFF

Agreement drafted on bus merger By Nick Grube

World Cup fans in Bend help our city to go global

The Bulletin

Bend’s public transit system is on schedule to become a regional endeavor, though officials say customers won’t notice the change since bus routes, fares and even the people behind the wheel will stay the same. For the past several months, the city has considered combining Bend Area Transit with the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, which operates the Cascades East Transit system that serves many of the communities outside

B

end can feel pretty homogeneous at times. When I moved here from New York City in 2004, I felt as if I brought some diversity simply because I didn’t come from California. But during the last month, the World Cup has sprinkled a welcome serving of International spice on the High Desert. Likewise, I’m hoping to bring a fresh perspective to The Bulletin as a local columnist. You may recognize my byline from articles I’ve written over the past six years. Since September, I’ve been in Ann Arbor, Mich., on a journalism fellowship. Now I’m back, penning a twice-weekly column that I hope will shed light on parts of our community that too often escape notice. I’ll write about people who aren’t usually in the news, and I’ll make observations about this complicated place that we all call home. Take, for example, how Bend has received the World Cup this year, as opposed to four years ago. This year’s tournament, which started June 11 and ends Sunday with the championship match between Netherlands and Spain, shattered national viewership records, at least until Ghana knocked our team out of competition on June 26. Since then, it’s been fun to watch locals cheer for out-of-the-way countries like Uruguay and Slovakia. And even more fun to hear their reasons. The owner of Cafe Sintra, Portuguese-born Manuel dos Santos, is a lifelong soccer fan. He feared the time difference between Bend and the tournament’s host country, South Africa, would make him miss games while he worked the breakfast shift. So he hung a TV on one of his restaurant’s brick walls. Soccer fans soon flocked there, some donning colorful wigs and jerseys and toting cow bells and air horns. “I’ve been here for almost a month straight,” jokes Ryan Bell, a soccer fanatic who lives in Bend but owns a winery in Argentina. For the ArgentinaGermany match, Bell painted his face blue and white. The cafe’s standing-room-only crowds make Bend feel downright international, with Brazilians, Germans, Swiss and Mexicans, just to name a few. Garry Todd, a Bend resident who is married to Joana Todd, from Portugal, says Bend’s international community is so small that almost everyone knows one another. “They’re like 2-year-olds; you get them in the same room and they just drift toward each other like magnets,” he says. For dos Santos, the raucous morning crowds are bliss. “It makes me feel like I’m at home,” he says with a grin. “To tell you the truth, that’s one of the things I’ve missed most about living in the United States. Don’t get me wrong, I love Bend. But in Portugal, everyone goes to a cafe and watches soccer. It’s just what you do.” Folks at Cafe Sintra started out rooting for the U.S., embracing the rare opportunity to show patriotic pride and root for the underdogs at the same time. As teams fell out of play, they’ve found creative ways to rank the remaining countries. After all, it’s no fun to watch without taking sides. Bend resident John Stolz supported Germany because of his German ancestry. Fourteen-year-old Nick Arnis follows the English Premier League and roots for the national teams of his favorite stars. He cheered for France, but the early ousting of Les Bleus forced him to root for Spain instead. Todd liked Uruguay’s underdog status, thanks to its scant national population. Experts say soccer is becoming more popular across the U.S. Thys Heyneker, who was born in Holland but moved to the U.S. when he was 6 months old, thinks Bend’s growth has spurred local enthusiasm. “There’s more big-city people than there were four years ago,” he says, “and they have more exposure to other countries.” For a city slicker like me, Bend’s mild case of football fever — and its side effect of connecting the city to far-flung cultures — is a refreshing change. Lily Raff can be reached at lraff@ bendbulletin.com or 541-617-7836.

of Bend, such as Redmond, Madras, La Pine and Sisters. Though BAT has only been in operation since 2006, the city would like to relinquish control of the system in order to reduce the yearly $1.1 million strain on its general fund, which helps pay for police and fire protection and other city services. At a Bend City Council meeting Wednesday, City Manager Eric King told Deschutes County commissioners who were present for a joint work session there is now a draft of an agree-

ment with COIC that would lead to the transfer of control to the inter-governmental agency by Sept. 1. “We’re hopeful we’ll have that agreement before the council by July 21, so it’s coming soon,” King said. The COIC Board would also need to accept the agreement. If approved by both parties, both BAT and Cascades East Transit would operate under its jurisdiction, though the city would still own its buses for the first year of the agreement. According to BAT Transit Manager

Heather Ornelas — who was not at Monday’s meeting — the merger with COIC would also limit Bend’s contribution to the transit system to $1 million for fiscal year 2010-11, which is about a $100,000 savings. While that doesn’t seem like much money, she said the amount the city pays to the COIC could continue to be reduced further as the agreement matures and efficiencies from having a single oversight entity are realized. See Transit / C5

The water’s great, but it’s time to go

REDMOND

School district eyes extra cash from bond By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

B

eatrice Griffith, 3, gets one more dip in the cold water of the Deschutes River at Tumalo State Park on Wednesday afternoon as her father, Wes Griffith, 35, helps her to shore. Hot

weather is expected to continue in the coming days, with the National Weather Service forecasting daytime high temperatures above 90 across most of Central Oregon through Saturday.

School officer to receive national award By Erin Golden The Bulletin

When Mike Maunder talks to students about the dangers of substance abuse, he comes armed with some pretty compelling evidence: Recovering addicts willing to share their stories about going to prison and struggling to stay clean. After 16 years with the Bend Police Department, Maunder has met his share of people who have battled with drug addiction. A couple of years ago, after he was assigned to work as the school resource officer at Summit High School, Maunder decided it was time to use those experiences to help keep young people from ending up in the same situation. “I got tired of hearing everybody saying, ‘This only happens in bigger cities,’ ” he said. “People didn’t know what they were talking about, and I started thinking I’ve got to make this to real life.” Now, he’s set to be recognized for his work with a national award. With KOHD News, Maunder produced a documentary about local people — including some he’d helped send to prison — recovering from addiction. He began taking the program to high schools and middle schools around Central Oregon and bringing along some of the people in the documentary to talk with students and answer questions. The program has won support from teachers and administrators, and sparked some students to come forward with questions and concerns about their own drug use or problems in their families. This year, it caught the attention

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin file photo

Bend Police Department School Resource Officer Mike Maunder talks with Summit High School students during a class in April. Maunder, who has worked at the high school for two years, will receive a national award next month for his efforts to teach students about drug addiction. of the National Association of School Resource Officers, which will present Maunder with its Exceptional Service Award at a conference next month. Maunder, 49, was surprised to learn he’d been nominated for the award and even more surprised to hear that he’d won. He said he’s glad the program has prompted good discussions among students, including many who wrongly assume that drug use is no big deal, and the worst that will happen is ending up in juvenile detention for a few days. “I look at why people are in jail ... 85,

90 percent of people are in jail because of drug addiction, and if you focus on that, we can try to stop it at an earlier age,” he said. Before he took over the position at Summit, Maunder worked in a variety of positions, including as a patrol officer and a detective. In 1999 and 2000, he was a school resource officer at Mountain View High School. Bend Police Chief Sandi Baxter said Maunder is a good fit for the schools because he’s willing to use creativity to solve problems. See Award / C5

REDMOND — The Redmond School Board has a rare opportunity to decide how to spend some extra cash because of savings on several projects related to the district’s $110 million bond. The board discussed, but did not finalize, how to use the savings during its Wednesday meeting. Despite its tight budget — all employees have given up scheduled cost-of-living raises for next year — the district cannot spend the money on much that can relieve fiscal pressures. The district, for example, cannot use the money to pay staff salaries. District voters passed the bond in 2008, to pay for a second high school, an elementary school to replace Evergreen Elementary and several building upgrades. Sage Elementary is set to open in September 2010, and the high school is scheduled to open in 2012. But because of unexpectedly low bids, estimates on the projects came in cheaper than the district had originally projected. During its meeting, the board heard a legal opinion that places limits on how it could use the savings. The district can spend the savings on capital improvements or it could return the money as a one-time tax rebate to district residents. The district is not yet sure how much the rebate would be. According to the opinion from the district’s bond attorney, the district could not return the money to residents until all bond-related projects are finished. The new high school will likely be the last project finished. “Before we return any money we have to satisfy the purpose the bonds were sold for,” said Mike Schofield, the district’s chief financial officer. But that doesn’t necessarily mean the board has to wait to spend the money in another way. Board Chairman Paul Rodby said he was concerned that there were not bathrooms near the athletic fields at the new high school. The board could decide to build those before other projects are finished because the bathrooms would be related to a bond project. “It just seems like they need to be included,” Rodby said. “There needs to be facilities out there.” Other ways the district could spend the money include Redmond High School improvements or stands at the track and football field at the new high school. See Redmond / C5

“Before we return any money we have to satisfy the purpose the bonds were sold for.” — Mike Schofield, the district’s chief financial officer.


C2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

MountainStar nursery receives $30,000 grant MountainStar Relief Nursery is the recipient of $30,000 in grant awards from The Pepsi Refresh Project, The Ford Foundation and Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation, according to a news release from the organization. The grant money will go toward purchasing a bus as part of the organization’s Angel Transportation Program, which allows at-risk children to attend classes at the nursery by providing them with transportation. As part of the grants, the nursery was selected to be the recipient of funds raised through The Pepsi Refresh Project, in which Pepsi will donate to the nursery a portion of the revenue it makes from Pepsi products sold at Bend’s Food4Less. MountainStar Relief Nursery is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping at-risk children in the community. For more information about programs offered, visit http://mountainstar family.org/.

Fundraiser to bring wall memorial to area A fundraiser to help bring the American Veteran Traveling Wall to Redmond High school will be held at Boondocks Bar & Grill today from 6 to 10 p.m., according to a news release. The fundraiser will cost $15 per person, and all proceeds raised will go toward paying for the veteran wall event to be held from Aug. 12 through Aug. 15 at Redmond High School. The fundraiser will feature live mu-

sic, a silent auction and a raffle. The American Veteran Traveling Wall is a mobile memorial that will allow Central Oregonians the opportunity to honor veterans and their sacrifices locally.

Free shredding event planned in Sisters An event where the public can shred unwanted documents and papers will be held on July 24 at the Sisters Sheriff’s Office parking lot from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., according to a news release. The event, which is being held by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete of Oregon, will allow residents to shred unwanted documents for free without fear of identity theft. The event will also allow residents to dispose of unwanted prescription medication or overthe-counter drugs safely. The document shredding and medicine disposal is free, though the Sheriff’s Office asks that residents consider bringing donations of nonperishable food to benefit the nonprofit organization, NeigborImpact. The shredding event is offered through the Deschutes Sheriff’s Office several times throughout the year.

1,000 Friends hosting bicycle tours of UGB Land-use advocacy organization 1,000 Friends of Oregon is planning a series of four bicycle tours of Bend’s proposed Urban Growth Boundary over the next four Tuesdays. Spokesman Ben Gordon said

the group organized the tours as a way of exposing people to the lands included in the city’s proposed 8,462 acre expansion of the UGB. The city’s proposal is currently under review by the state Land Conservation and Development Commission, which must approve the city’s map before the expansion takes effect. Each of the tours will start from the 1,000 Friends office at 115 Oregon Ave. in downtown Bend at 5:30 p.m., and cover roughly 10 to 20 miles over 1 1/2 to two hours. The first ride, this coming Tuesday, will focus on the city’s northeast and travel past properties along Butler Market and Hamby roads. Over the following three weeks, the rides will survey lands in the city’s southeast, southwest and northwest. For more information, contact Gordon at 541-728-3812.

Air pollution could rise in Bend this week Hot temperatures and low wind could cause air pollution levels to rise today and Friday in Bend, according to a news release from the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. On hot days, smog from cars, engines, paints and aerosol sprays can reach unhealthy levels, the release stated; to check air pollution levels visit.www. deq.state.or.us/aqi/index.aspx. If the index reaches the “unhealthy for sensitive groups� level, officials advise older adults, kids and people with asthma or lung diseases to limit their outdoor activities.

Oregon loses decision on ownership rights to stretch of the Rogue River The Associated Press MEDFORD — A judge has ruled against the state in its bid to assert ownership rights to a portion of the Rogue River. The case stemmed from the state’s 2008 declaration that a stretch of the Rogue from Lost Creek Dam, near Trail, through Grants Pass to the mouth of Grave Creek, near Galice, was a navigable waterway and has belonged to the citizens of Oregon since statehood. The idea that the state owns the bed and banks of a river goes back to the pioneer era,

when there were few roads. Rivers were important avenues of commerce used by boats hauling freight and passengers, trappers, miners, commercial fishermen, and surveyors. It remains a contentious legal issue because fishermen and rafters want to be able to get out of their boats on the banks of the river, and private property owners want to keep people out of their back yards. Jackson County Judge Ron Grensky, in a decision released Friday, said the river from Gold Beach to Grants Pass was navi-

gable based on historic use, but roughly 58 miles from Grants Pass to Lost Creek Dam was not. The case, which affects some 3,000 private properties, marks the first time the navigability law has been challenged in Oregon. If the river remains listed as non-navigable, users could face heightened restrictions on access to the river banks. The river itself would remain open to the public. Jennie Bricker, an attorney who represented private property owners, said she anticipates an appeal.

Work begins in New York City on U.N. headquarters site in ’47 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, July 8, the 189th day of 2010. There are 176 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On July 8, 1950, President Harry S. Truman named Gen. Douglas MacArthur commander-inchief of United Nations forces in Korea. (But Truman ended up sacking MacArthur for insubordination nine months later, replacing him with Lt. Gen. Matthew Ridgway.) ON THIS DATE In 1663, King Charles II of England granted a Royal Charter to Rhode Island. In 1776, Col. John Nixon gave the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence, in Philadelphia. In 1853, an expedition led by Commodore Matthew Perry arrived in Yedo Bay, Japan, on a mission to seek diplomatic and trade relations with the Japanese. In 1889, The Wall Street Journal was first published. In 1907, Florenz Ziegfeld staged his first “Follies,� on the roof of the New York Theater. In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson received a tumultuous welcome in New York City after his return from the Versailles Peace Conference in France. In 1947, demolition work began in New York City to make way for the new permanent headquarters of the United Nations. In 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower began a visit to Canada, where he conferred with

T O D AY IN HISTORY Prime Minister John Diefenbaker and addressed the Canadian Parliament. In 1989, Carlos Saul Menem was inaugurated as president of Argentina in the country’s first transfer of power from one democratically elected civilian leader to another in six decades. In 1994, Kim Il Sung, North Korea’s communist leader since 1948, died at age 82. TEN YEARS AGO Venus Williams beat Lindsay Davenport 6-3, 7-6 (3) for her first Grand Slam title, becoming the first black women’s champion at Wimbledon since Althea Gibson in 1957-58. The Pentagon’s missile defense project suffered its latest setback when a rocket that had taken off from Kwajalein Atoll in the Pacific failed to intercept a target missile launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. FIVE YEARS AGO Group of Eight leaders meeting in Gleneagles, Scotland, unveiled a $50 billion package to help lift Africa from poverty and pledged new joint efforts against terrorism in response to the deadly London bombings the day before. Hurricane Dennis pounded Cuba, resulting in 16 deaths. ONE YEAR AGO Group of Eight leaders, including President Barack Obama, pledged to dramatically cut

greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 as they met in L’Aquila, Italy. South Korea blamed North Korea for cyber attacks targeting its Web sites as well as those in the U.S. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer Jerry Vale is 78. Singer Steve Lawrence is 75. Actor Jeffrey Tambor is 66. Ballerina Cynthia Gregory is 64. Actress Kim Darby is 63. Children’s performer Raffi is 62. Actress Anjelica Huston is 59. Writer Anna Quindlen is 58. Actor Kevin Bacon is 52. Rock musician Andy Fletcher (Depeche Mode) is 49. Country singer Toby Keith is 49. Rock musician Graham Jones (Haircut 100) is 49. Rock singer Joan Osborne is 48. Writer-producer Rob Burnett is 48. Actor Corey Parker is 45. Actor Billy Crudup is 42. Actor Michael Weatherly is 42. Singer Beck is 40. Country singer Drew Womack (Sons of the Desert) is 40. Christian rock musician Stephen Mason (Jars of Clay) is 35. Actor Milo Ventimiglia is 33. Rock musician Tavis Werts is 33. Singer Ben Jelen is 31. Actor Lance Gross is 29. Actress Sophia Bush is 28. Rock musician Jamie Cook (Arctic Monkeys) is 25. Actor Jake McDorman is 24. Actor Jaden Smith is 12. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “For everything you have missed, you have gained something else, and for everything you gain, you lose something else.� — Ralph Waldo Emerson, American essayist, poet and philosopher (1803-82)

N  R Prineville Police Department

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:02 a.m. July 6, in the 1000 block of Northwest Bond Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 12:35 p.m. July 6, in the 100 block of Northwest Tumalo Avenue. Theft — Cell phones were reported stolen at 2:51 p.m. July 6, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Theft — A lawn mower and kayaks were reported stolen at 3:34 p.m. July 6, in the 1300 block of Northwest Fresno Avenue. DUII — Julie Anne Taylor, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:31 p.m. July 6, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — License plates were reported stolen from a vehicle at 5:48 p.m. July 6, in the 19800 block of Nugget Avenue. Burglary — Golf clubs and bags were reported stolen at 6:41 p.m. July 6, in the 1200 block of Southeast Teakwood Drive. Redmond Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:05 p.m. July 6, in the 900 block of Southwest 12th Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 6:05 p.m. July 6, in the 1200 block of Southwest 27th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:05 p.m. July 6, in the area of Southwest Eighth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 6:11 a.m. July 6, in the 2800 block of Southwest Indian Circle. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:01 a.m. July 6, in the area of Northwest 25th Street and West Antler Avenue.

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:15 a.m. July 2, in the area of North Main Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:48 a.m. July 2, in the area of Northeast Third and Main streets. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:53 p.m. July 2, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:15 a.m. July 3, in the area of Northeast Second Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:12 p.m. July 3, in the area of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Andrew W. Tuter, 18, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:34 a.m. July 5, in the area of Northeast Laughlin Road. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:51 p.m. July 5, in the area of Northwest Claypool Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:26 p.m. July 6, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:25 p.m. July 6, in the area of Burgess Road and Meadow Lane in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:49 p.m. July 6, in the 52800 block of Timber Lane Loop in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:30 p.m. July 6, in the 21800 block of Butte Ranch Road in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:14 p.m. July 6, in the 62800 block of Pearl Lane in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:05 p.m. July 6, in the 52400 block of Pine Drive in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:36 a.m. July 6, in the 51500 block of Ash Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:08 a.m. July 6, in the area of West Barclay and West Sisters Park drives in Sisters. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:11 a.m. July 6, in the 15700

block of Burgess Road in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 12:06 a.m. — Flammable liquid spill, 63251 Boyd Acres Road. 9:09 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 21755 Butte Ranch Road. 21 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 1:25 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 2128 N.E. Edgewood St. 3:53 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 700 N.W. Lava Road. 11:29 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 63138 Riverstone Dr. 11:41 p.m. — Trash receptacle fire, 1525 N.W. Wall St. 29 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 1:48 p.m . — Building fire, 21776 Eastmont Dr. 2:02 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 62110 Bear Creek Rd. 2:08 p.m. — Special outside fire, 88 S.W. Scalehouse Loop. 3:18 p.m. — Building fire, 1657 N.E. Carson Way. 6:40 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, N.E. Bellevue Dr. 7:52 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 63520 Pharoah Court. 8:18 p.m. — Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, Rorick Dr. 11:22 p.m. — Trash receptacle fire, 60 N.E. Bend River Mall. 24 — Medical aid calls. Monday 2:41 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 547 S.W. 13th St. 6:53 a.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 20498 Jacklight Lane. 10:35 a.m. — Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 1000 N.E. Dekalb Ave. 2:57 p.m. — Brush or brush-and-grass mixture fire, 60321 Sage Stone Loop. 4:03 p.m. — Special outside fire, 51 N.E. 13th St. 7:42 p.m. — Building fire, 2500 U.S. Highway 20. 8:19 p.m. — Natural vegetation fire, 62605 Waugh Rd. 11 — Medical aid calls.

Groups try again to ban poisons used on predators The Associated Press GRANTS PASS — Wildlife advocates are hoping that the third time is the charm for legislation to outlaw deadly poisons used by government hunters to kill thousands of coyotes each year. This time the U.S. House bill has bipartisan support, and it is not routed through the Agriculture Committee, where it has died in the past. The one-page bill would completely ban the manufacture and use of Compound 1080, which is used in poison collars put on sheep. And it bans sodium cyanide in spring-loaded devices known as M-44s, which spray the poison into the snout of an animal that trips it. Brooks Fahy of the Predator Defense Institute in Eugene said besides the harm to wildlife, the poisons have killed untold numbers of dogs and even harmed some people. The bill is co-sponsored by U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., and U.S. Rep. John Campbell, R-Calif. “Everyone has said Saddam Hussein had poison gas,� DeFazio said from his office in Eugene. “The only thing they found that came close was they found a bunker with a bunch of 1080 in it, which had been purchased.

So there are concerns, among those who are knowledgeable about terrorism security concerns, that this would be available to anybody because of the fact it is odorless, colorless and there is no antidote. And you die horribly. Compound 1080 and cyanideloaded M-44s are just two ways that Wildlife Services kills coy-

otes to protect livestock, said spokeswoman Carol Bannerman. Both are only used in limited circumstances, where other methods, such as shooting and leg-hold traps, are not appropriate or effective. The bill would limit the agency’s predator control efforts by reducing the methods available to them, she said.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 C3

O After ‘death panel’ furor, Blumenauer to try again By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — When Rep. Earl Blumenauer pitched the idea of reimbursing doctors for end-oflife counseling last year to Congress, it met its demise after Sarah Palin claimed it would amount to setting up “death panels” that decided whether someone was worthy of getting health care. Blumenauer said Wednesday he plans to resuscitate the legislation. He said the substance will be essentially the same but that the bill will be “tailored, renamed and focused” to make it less of a political target. At a news conference, the Oregon Democrat reflected on the furor that played out over his idea last year: “How did something so simple and direct get mixed up with death panels and weirdness? “We think we have a piece of legislation about which there can be no legitimate dispute,” he said. Blumenauer wants to allow Medicare to pay doctors for voluntary counseling sessions that address end-of-life issues. The conversations between doctor and patient would include living wills, making a close relative or a trusted friend your health care proxy, learning about hospice as an option for the terminally ill, and information about pain medications for people suffering chronic discomfort. The sessions would be covered every five years, more frequently

HEALTH CARE REFORM if someone is gravely ill. When Blumenauer introduced the idea in Congress last year, conservatives attacked it as government intrusion into the end-oflife planning process. Palin said in a Facebook message that it would amount to rationed health care doled out by “death panels,” and Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said there shouldn’t be a government program “that determines if you’re going to pull the plug on grandma.” The “death panels” claim was debunked — the nonpartisan factchecking organization PolitiFact named it the 2009 political “Lie of the Year.” Blumenauer’s latest effort could face just as much opposition as the provision he offered last year. Greg Leo, spokesman for the Oregon Republican Party, said: “It should not be a matter of government deciding this kind of counseling.” Leo added, “We are concerned that the health care legislation opens the door to make this kind of counseling mandatory.” Grassley’s spokeswoman, Jill Kozeny, said he is not opposed to end-of-life planning, but rather the idea of government intrusion into the process.

“He’s expressed caution, not specific to any one bill, but as a matter of policy, about pairing end-of-life counseling with government health care programs that are structured primarily to reduce costs,” Kozeny said in an e-mail to The Associated Press. Blumenauer will introduce the legislation next week as its sole sponsor, though a spokeswoman said he expects support from those who co-sponsored the measure in 2009. Blumenauer said the bill could avoid situations like the 2005 Terri Schiavo case, which generated national media attention when her husband asked to have a feeding tube removed but her family resisted. If Schiavo had made her wishes known before she collapsed in 1990, Blumenauer said, the matter would have been avoided. With Blumenauer at the news conference was Colleen O’Kelley, whose father, Richard, agreed to end-of-life planning before dying in 2008. Her doctor, Glenn Rodriguez, oversaw his care. “This journey could have been quite different without candid conversations with Dr. Rodriguez,” O’Kelley said. O’Kelley said her mother likes Rodriguez so much that she wishes he could be cloned, prompting Blumenauer to race to the podium and say that he was definitely not in favor of human cloning. “That’s illegal,” he said. “I don’t want to upset Sarah Palin.”

O  B Mount Hood climber survives 200-foot fall PORTLAND — A Clackamas County sheriff’s officer says a Vancouver, Wash., man injured in a 200-foot fall on Oregon’s Mount Hood has been rescued. Detective Jim Strovink says 25-year-old Bryan Daniel Call reportedly suffered a fractured leg and an elbow injury. After a rescue team brought him safely to Timberline Lodge at the base of the mountain late Wednesday afternoon, he was transported to a Portland hospital. Strovink says fellow climbers reported the fall Wednesday morning and stayed with the injured man until help reached the 9,000-foot level in the early afternoon.

Man dies when fire burns 5 mobile homes HARBOR — Investigators are looking for the cause of a fire that killed a man and destroyed five mobile homes in the southern Oregon coast community of Harbor. Curry County Undersheriff Bob Rector said Wednesday that relatives believe the victim is Carlos Jimenez. Family members tell KDRVTV they think Jimenez may have fallen asleep while smoking a cigarette. The Tuesday morning fire spread quickly to four neighboring homes in a mobile home park. The Sheriff’s Office and state fire marshal are investigating.

3 men charged in stabbing of woman WARRENTON — Police arrested three men following an attack on a Warrenton woman. Sheriff Tom Bergin says the 21-year-old woman was found walking in a field late Tuesday. She was naked and bleeding from multiple stab wounds. District Attorney Josh Marquis says Paul Archuleta, James Tilton and Nicholas Thomas were charged with attempted murder and assault. Like the woman, the three men are 21 years old and from Warrenton. The victim was taken by helicopter to a Portland hospital. She was in critical but stable condition.

Order against stepmom may be made public PORTLAND — A prosecutor says investigators won’t object

to making public a restraining order against the stepmother of the missing Oregon 7-year-old Kyron Horman. The boy’s father, Kaine Horman, sought the order when he filed for divorce from Terri Horman, who investigators say was the last person known to have seen the boy. Kyron Horman disappeared June 4. The search for him has become a criminal investigation. The District Attorney’s Office told Judge Keith Meisenheimer in a letter released Wednesday that investigators now believe releasing the restraining order won’t hurt their work. News organizations asked the judge to make it public. The letter suggests the judge could consider the document today.

Oregon sex offender captured in Idaho SALEM — Marion County authorities say a sex offender on the run since cutting off his GPS ankle bracelet last month was captured Wednesday near Blackfoot, Idaho. According to the Sheriff’s Office, 64-year-old William Althouse was arrested without incident after deputies in Idaho found him sleeping at a campsite. The Salem man reportedly said he was tired of being monitored and having his parole officer know his every move. Althouse has been on postprison supervision since 2006. He has a history of exposing himself and sexually abusing children.

Speed bumps slow emergency response PORTLAND — The Portland city auditor says speed bumps are one of the reasons Portland Fire and Rescue is not always meeting its response goal. The audit released Wednesday says the fire marshal should be involved in decisions on trafficcalming devices and developments that can narrow streets and slow emergency vehicles. Portland Fire and Rescue has a goal of responding to 90 percent of emergencies within five minutes and 20 seconds. The audit found that crews are responding within that period only 75 percent of the time. Traffic, distance from fire stations and hills are other reasons for delays. Most of the emergency calls are for medical problems.

Recession turning more people to college PORTLAND — With the recession making it harder to find jobs, many people in Oregon have decided this is a good time to go to college. The Oregon University System projects enrollment at its seven campuses will climb about 5 percent this fall to a record 96,200 students. The Oregonian also reports the state’s 17 community colleges all expect to grow. Some project increases as high at 30 percent as displaced workers look for new job skills and some students take that path toward higher degrees.

Jackson ends smoking in low-income housing MEDFORD — The Jackson County Housing Authority is expanding a smoking ban to all of its low-income housing units starting Sept. 1. Tenant services director Cara Carter tells the Mail Tribune newspaper that the authority is getting more and more complaints from its 2,500 tenants and expects the ban will protect children from secondhand smoke as well as prevent thousands of dollars in damage. She says the agency is just catching up with no-smoking laws that are sweeping the nation. On Jan. 1 landlords in Oregon must inform renters of smoking policies. Newer apartment complexes built by the housing authority already ban smoking, but enforcement will extend to older units as well.

Lonnie Archibald via Peninsula Daily News

Bystanders in La Push, Wash., watch as a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter flies past James Island in search of another helicopter that crashed near the island on Wednesday. Three U.S. Coast Guard crew members died, and one was in a Seattle hospital Wednesday, the Coast Guard said.

Coast Guard copter crashes after leaving Astoria; 3 die By Sara Jean Green The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Three of four crew members died in the crash of a Coast Guard helicopter in the water off La Push, Wash., on Wednesday. A fourth crew member was hospitalized with a broken arm and broken leg. Petty Officer Nathan Bradshaw, a Coast Guard spokesman in Seattle, said the Coast Guard lost contact with an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter, which was en route from Astoria, Ore., to Sitka, Alaska, around 9:30 a.m., when the helicopter crashed around 9:30 a.m. just northwest of James Island near the mouth of the Quileute River. Two crew members were quickly rescued by five members of the Quileute Nation, who jumped into fishing boats and raced to the crash scene. One of the rescued crew members is believed to have died after being brought ashore. The crew members were all from Sitka, according to the Coast Guard. According to one witness, who is vacationing at a resort run by the tribe, the Coast Guard helicopter hit a large power cable that runs from La Push to James Island just before it crashed. Darryl Penn, the harbormaster for the Quileute Nation, returned to work Monday after vacationing in Los Angeles. “It is my first day back, and I was at my desk, talking to a youth worker for the tribe, when I heard a strange noise,” Penn said. “It’s not a sound you ever heard before. “It was like metal grinding. I thought a hoist had dropped something on a boat,” said Penn, 43. “I think the helicopter hit a power line and went down.” He looked out his office

window to the southwest, saw the wreckage and got on the radio to signal the Coast Guard. He then saw a tribal member run by and fire up his skiff. Penn jumped into the skiff with the other man, while three more men headed out in another boat. Penn said a Coast Guard cutter was nearby but couldn’t get to the crash scene because of shallow water. “We were looking for the orange (Coast Guard) jumpsuits,” Penn said. “We ... didn’t see anything at first.” Penn said they saw what appeared to be boots in the water. The men in the other fishing boat were able to get that crew member out of the water. Within minutes, Penn said, another crew member “popped out of the water and shot off a flare.” Penn’s boat pulled alongside the man. He told Penn his left arm was broken. “We kind of spun him around so his back was facing us and used his coveralls to pull him in,” Penn said. Penn and his companion performed basic first aid on the man and kept him talking so he wouldn’t lose consciousness. As they headed back to shore, they saw a Coast Guard boat heading to the scene. They got the injured crew member to the dock, where he was treated by emergency crews before being taken to a hospital. “There was no thought about it — just reaction,” Penn said of the response by tribal members. “The Coast Guard is here for us when our boys are in harm’s way.” Tedd Judd, a neuropsychologist from Bellingham, Wash., is staying at the tribe’s Oceanside Resort with his wife, brother

and 91-year-old mother. Judd, 57, said he and his brother “watched the helicopter coming in from the south” and commented that it was flying awfully low. They saw items fall off the helicopter just before it crashed on the other side of the jetty. “They definitely hit the power lines — the power lines came down and the transformer went off,” Judd said. “There were these big orange balls on the power line, and now those balls are lying on the beach.” Judd watched as the tribal fishermen rushed to the crash site and saw two Coast Guard Zodiacs join in the search. There’s only one road into La Push and it was clogged with firetrucks and ambulances, he said. People lined up on the jetty to watch the rescue, but have since been cleared away. A Snohomish County sheriff’s deputy, who was also on vacation at the resort, “was pressed into service” and began taking down witnesses’ names, Judd said. “Things have quieted down a bit, but there are still helicopters circling overhead,” he said around 1:30 p.m., noting there are a couple of hundred people staying at the tribe’s resort and adjacent RV park. “The people from the tribe are very saddened and see it as a great tragedy,” Judd said. “They recognize the Coast Guard is here for them when they’re out fishing. It’s a very unforgiving coast out here.”

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Man trapped under RV when supports collapse

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DEPOE BAY — A Depoe Bay, Ore., Fire District spokesman says a 52-year-old man was trapped under a recreational vehicle when the supports he was using to lift it for repairs collapsed. Even before fire crews could arrive Tuesday, neighbors at the Fogarty Creek RV Park jumped into action, raising the vehicle with hydraulic jacks to help the man breathe more easily. Lt. Dennis Knudson says fire and rescue crews used high-pressure air bags to lift the vehicle and free the man, who was taken to a hospital in Lincoln City. Knudson says the extent of the man’s injuries was not immediately known. — From wire reports

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C4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Use spare cash to reduce debt

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hough it’s likely to be a year or so before any spending decision is made, Bend-La Pine schools officials may well find themselves with some extra money on their hands

come next summer. You can thank the tough economy for that. The district has been able to complete a variety of construction projects for less than anticipated and may have a million or two dollars of the current $119 million bond measure left over when all is said and done. That will put the district in the happy position of having to decide what to do with the extra money. There are some things it cannot do. It cannot take leftover bond money and spend it on classroom instruction, for example. It cannot use the money to build something not already listed in the measure that voters approved in 2006. It cannot use the money to replace a sagging roof or fix broken windows unless the roof or windows were somehow connected with voter-approved construction projects. It could, if it wished, use the money to make one of the projects listed in the 2006 bond proposal bigger. It’s done that in the past, as when it added a wing to La Pine Elementary School when it unexpectedly had the money to do so. It also could return the unspent portion to taxpayers, though cutting checks to all property owners within the district is an unlikely proposition, in part because individual refunds would amount to only pennies. Rather, says John Rexford, deputy superintendent in charge of operations, the money would go toward the district’s bond debt bill in the next year, reducing

So far, the amount of savings, if any, is still a matter of speculation. It won’t be until all the bills are paid that district officials will know how much money they have left, and that’s likely to be next summer. the amount property owners would have to come up with. That would mean property tax bills would be a bit lower than they might otherwise be. This seems to us the best use for the money barring the discovery of a truly pressing need elsewhere. So far, the amount of savings, if any, is still a matter of speculation. It won’t be until all the bills are paid that district officials will know how much money they have left, and that’s likely to be next summer, Rexford says. Only then will the district be able to decide what to do with it.

Kids’ commission cut responsibly T

he Deschutes County Commission on Children and Families last month did what so many state-funded agencies are being required to do this year. It decided how to make do with less money than it had expected to receive from the state of Oregon. Faced with the loss of nearly $80,000, the commission decided to dip into reserves to shelter its most critical programs from cuts. That could not have been an easy decision, but the commission approached it as it should have, logically. It rated each of 23 programs it gives state tax dollars to, judging each by such things as effectiveness and whether or not some other program duplicated its offerings. The top dozen will lose no money in the coming year; the remaining 11 will have to do without additional state funds. The shortfall will hurt, make no mistake about it. Such worthy causes as the High Desert Education Service District’s Family Access Network will have to make up the lost revenue or cut services as a result. FAN helps unite schoolchildren and their families with the services they need, and, arguably, that connection will be harder to make if FAN cannot replace its lost funds from other sources. Other agencies face similar problems.

(The Deschutes County Commission on Children and Families) rated each of 23 programs it gives state tax dollars to, judging each by such things as effectiveness and whether or not some other program duplicated its offerings. Yet had the commission not taken the time to rate and evaluate each of its programs, had it simply cut money across the board, unique agencies like the Mountain Star Relief Nursery and Cascade Youth and Family Center also would have been pinched. Both the nursery and Cascade serve some of the region’s most vulnerable children, and the programs they provide are offered by no one else. Unfortunately, CCF’s exercise is likely to be played out across Oregon not just this year, but for the next several years as the state struggles to plug huge gaps between revenue and demand. If all agencies take the same methodical approach used by CCF, there will be pain, but Oregon’s most critical services are likely to survive.

My Nickel’s Worth Gassed geese Kill them! Yes, kill them! Surely that is the answer (isn’t it always?). Kill these procreating, defecating, yin-yang residents of our clipped, fertilized, poisonous and gorgeous green grass in Drake Park. I mean, my God, they’re not even American! They’re Canada geese. Canucks! Round ’em up and gas them all like Jews at Auschwitz, then send the bill to Ottawa, that’s what I’d do. Really, they are an annoyance, an inconvenience. They are costing taxpayer money! What could be worse? Destroy them, yes, yes, that must be the answer. Charles Finn Bend

How to rebound Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said recently that it is not possible to completely secure our southern border. Vice President Joe Biden has said that it is not possible to recover all the jobs lost in the great recession. How quickly “Yes we can!” is turning to “No we can’t.” Here are five ways that we can bring jobs and prosperity back to the U.S. economy: 1. Develop domestic energy, including new oil and natural gas wells and the pipelines to transport it, and build new nuclear power plants. Annually, we import $40 billion in foreign oil. That savings alone would create 1 million jobs at $40,000 per year. 2. Deport 12 million illegal aliens and build the wall. Our recession has lost 12 million jobs. Well, if we deport all the illegals, that would both free up all their jobs for legal Americans

and lift the burden off of government from supporting them. 3. Reduce the burden of government on taxpayers and business. This, along with cheaper energy, would help our industries to compete worldwide. 4. Defy the environmentalists and begin harvesting natural resources again such as Oregon timber. 5. Remove the federal prohibition against breaking unions by allowing companies to replace overly expensive union workers (the average UAW worker costs $76 per hour) with competitive workers. This would help U.S. industry to compete worldwide. John Shepherd Sisters

Legislature has failed to look closely at budgets and instead has increased spending by nearly 40 percent in recent years. Three, Conger recognizes that people here in Central Oregon are bright and innovative people who can contribute ideas to strengthen our community and state. Ideas that will put local families back to work don’t come from Salem lobbyists — they come from people right here in Central Oregon. I hope you will join me in supporting Jason Conger as well. Gloria James Bend

Fix the economy

In the June 29 paper, there was a guest opinion in the Perspective section that claimed it was not a good idea to serve the death penalty upon Randy Lee Guzek or others sentenced to die. I respectfully disagree. Death sentences meted out by four juries are more than enough to warrant that the sentence be carried out. Guzek has had his appeals and failed. The death penalty was never designed to be a deterrent, as many believe. It was designed to be a permanent solution to end a violent criminal’s life so that the public could never again be victimized by that particular individual. That said, I believe one appeal should suffice. The never-ending appeals defeat the purpose of the law. Violent criminals need to be permanently removed from society to ensure no one is ever injured by that individual again … ever. Mike Trotta Redmond

National security also means a strong domestic economy — a healthy, well-educated, fully employed, vibrant middle class in a sustainable society. We need to back the permanent war military industrial complex away from the trough and begin to take care of business here at home. Randy Kessler Bend

Support Conger I’m voting for Jason Conger for the House of Representatives this fall. I’ll give you three simple reasons. One, he understands the government. Economic growth starts in the private sector and he will keep that focus. Two, government can’t keep spending at unsustainable levels. Our schools and vital services are in jeopardy of significant cuts because the

Guzek deserves death

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Law enforcement agencies should ignore Secure Communities Act By Janet Whitney Bulletin guest columnist

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nother euphemism is born! This time it is called the “Secure Communities Act.” It implies that we will be safe and secure if we can identify “criminal aliens” in our midst. Read that to mean undocumented workers. First, let’s explore the limitations of the language. “Illegal aliens” defines immigrants as criminals, not one of us, intent on taking over our land and way of life by insinuating themselves among us. Are they terrorists, people who have come to destroy the American dream rather than live it? Is that how we describe people who work here for low wages, pay taxes without benefits, raise families, and do this while being denied ordinary civil rights? Are you aware that undocumented immigrants are not

eligible for cash support, food stamps, Oregon Health Plan or Medicaid, but often pay taxes and contribute to Social Security? A study in 2005 found that unauthorized immigrants pay $6 billion to $7 billion each year in Social Security taxes that they will never be able to claim (Advocates for Human Rights, Minneapolis, 2006). What sorts of conditions would cause people to confront dehydration and death from increasingly dangerous desert crossings in order to work in the United States? And, once here, how must it be for those families, some that have lived in Oregon for many years, who are forced to live in constant fear of deportation and family separation due to their immigration status? A reality: Immigrants are sometimes deported with charges for minor mis-

IN MY VIEW demeanors, not convictions for serious crimes, whereas the programs of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are supposed to be focused on those convicted of serious crimes. These people can be detained by local law enforcement, transferred within 48 hours to ICE (with no access to a court-appointed lawyer), and taken to a facility far from lawyers, families and witnesses. They are generally deported. Grief-stricken families are often left without adequate income. The Secure Communities Act, an optional collaborative program between local law enforcement and ICE, requires checking the fingerprints of an individual being booked into a jail against

Department of Homeland Security immigration databases, rather than just against FBI criminal databases. ICE is automatically notified if the fingerprints match fingerprints in the DHS system, even if the person has never been convicted of any criminal act. It targets individuals at arrest, not conviction — thereby upending a fundamental feature of our criminal justice system: innocent until proven guilty. This proposed program is a dangerous and disastrous system that erodes public trust, hurts community policing, leaves the door open for racial profiling and police abuse, and runs counter to our state’s history and policy of welcoming immigrants. Central Oregon will not be more secure by initiating Secure Communities Act to promote public safety. If members of the Latino community believe that en-

gaging with police officers or the criminal justice system might bring into question their immigration status, they may be much less likely to report crimes that they either are victims of or witness. We want a safe and secure Deschutes County for everyone. To this end, write to our sheriff to discourage his collaboration with any Secure Communities proposal, calling for public hearings as needed. (Three Oregon counties have already signed on, with no public hearings.) Instead of a Secure Communities Act, petition President Obama to issue a moratorium on detention and deportation until Congress can pass truly meaningful and just immigration reform that puts an end to deportations of hardworking members of our community. Janet Whitney lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 C5

O Dora Hinton Jones

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N   Barbara J. Primeau, of Bend Dec. 19, 1942 - July 3, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private family gathering will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care.

Charles ‘Chuck’ L. Grant, of Bend April 5, 1941 - July 2, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private family gathering of family and friends will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care.

Donald ‘Don’ Judd Lytle, of Redmond April 16, 1925 - June 29, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday, July 14, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., at Culver Christian Church located at 501 W. 4th in Culver. A private family inurnment Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, OR will occur at a later date.

Kathleen V. Yeager, of Redmond April 26, 1930 - July 6, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No Services are planned per her request.

Leslie ‘Les’ James Sullivan, of Prineville Sept. 21, 1915 - July 4, 2010 Arrangements: Loveland Chapel of La Grande, 1-541-963-5022 Services: Graveside service will be Monday, July 12th at 10:00 AM, Juniper Haven Cemetery, Prineville. Following his graveside service will be his memorial service at 11:30 AM, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Prineville.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Feb. 29, 1925 - July 1, 2010 Dora peacefully passed away at home in Redmond on July 1, 2010, with her children by her side. She was born February 29, 1925, in Bucklin, Kansas. Dora was the youngest of 13 children, all of whom preceded her in death. She met and married R.T. "Speed" Hinton in 1949. Dora Hinton They worked Jones side by side on many projects, including a ranch at lower bridge, a cafe' in Terrebonne, and The Redmond Hotel. In later years, they took many fun trips to Reno. Together they raised three children, James, Donald and Charlotte. They lost their youngest son, Donald, in 1967, after a motorcycle accident. After Speed’s death, Dora moved to California where she married Melvin Jones in 1981. They later moved back to Redmond and did some traveling before his death. Dora loved music, going on picnics and being with family and friends. She is survived by her son, James and wife, Phyllis Hinton; and daughter, Charlotte Hinton, both of Redmond; there are eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Dora will truly be missed by all who knew and loved her. Graveside services will be held on Saturday, July 10, 2010, at 11:00 am, at Redmond Memorial Cemetery. Redmond Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements You may visit www.redmondmemorial.com to send condolences to the family.

John Kenneth 'Ken' Kollen February 11, 1933 - June 25, 2010 Born February 11, 1933, to Oscar and Marian Kollen in West Seattle, WA, Ken passed away peacefully in his sleep, at his home in Crooked River Ranch, OR, on June 25, 2010, at age 77. In the short time that he lived there, he met a lot of new friends, who ‘Ken’ Kollen will miss his cheerful smile at the corner store every day. He loved his place and took great pride in everything he did. Ken was a U.S. Air Force Korean Veteran and loved to reminisce about his various adventures in the Air Force and jobs he had. He loved the sport of baseball, the out of doors, animals, as well as meeting people (he had the gift of gab). He had lived and worked in Washington, D.C., Washington state, and Oregon. Ken was preceded in death by his parents, (Oscar and Marian), as well as his step-mother, Lorene; and is survived by his former wife, Gale Milnor; daughter, Vicki (Charlie) Leeson; grandchildren, Kristin, Bret, Kelsi; great-grandchild, Ella; as well as his half-sister, Betty Kollen; uncle, Gordon Spencer and many, many cousins and friends. Remembrances may be made to the Disabled American Veterans, P.O. Box 14301, Cincinnati, OH 45250-0301. Inurnment at EvergreenWashelli, Seattle, WA is pending.

Award Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

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Continued from C1 “He’s approachable to the students and administration,” Baxter said. “He has a lot of his law enforcement experience and training, but he has the ability also to look beyond the citations or the arrests and see what other options are out there to provide resources for students and the administration.” While students are on summer break, Maunder is working as a

Met favorite Cesare Siepi, 87 By Anthony Tommasini New York Times News Service

Cesare Siepi, the renowned Italian bass acclaimed for his vocally suave, swashbuckling portrayal of Mozart’s Don Giovanni, died Monday in Atlanta, where he had lived for 25 years. He was 87. His death was confirmed by his wife, Louellen, who said he had been in failing health. Siepi (pronounced see-EP-ee) was a classic Italian basso cantante, or “singing bass,” with a warm, slightly dark voice that was ideally suited to Mozart. Yet his voice was so robust that he could easily summon the power for Verdi’s King Philip II in “Don Carlo,” Wagner’s Gurnemanz in “Parsifal” and the title role in Mussorgsky’s “Boris Godunov.” In his prime, the tall, handsome Siepi, a natural onstage, was a favorite at the Metropolitan Opera, where he gave nearly 500 performances, singing 17 roles during a 23-year association. His Met debut in 1950, in Verdi’s “Don Carlo,” a new production that opened Rudolf Bing’s first season as general manager, was last-minute, and it saved the day. Congress had just passed an act that prohibited visas to anyone associated with a totalitarian party. The Bulgarian bass Boris Christoff, scheduled to sing Philip, was denied a visa for reasons the government would not specify. Siepi, an anti-Fascist who had fled Italy during World War II to live in Switzerland, flew to New York to take Christoff’s place. “Even with a quick clearance, he missed the first rehearsals,” Bing wrote in his 1972 memoir, “5,000 Nights at the Opera.” But “he did come,” Bing added, “and made an overpowering debut and a well-deserved great career at the Metropolitan.” After his first Don Giovanni at the Met in 1952, Siepi became the Giovanni of choice in houses around the world, bringing a sly blend of vocal refinement and animal magnetism to his portrayal. Critics and audiences

Transit Continued from C1 “It’s not the end solution, but the end solution is a regional solution,” Ornelas said. “The goal is that we need to work as a region for the future to build a transportation district.” A regional transportation district, she said, would provide stable funding for public transit because it would likely have a continual source of income, for instance through increased property taxes or increased payroll taxes. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger, who is the chairman of the COIC Board, said at Monday’s meeting that COIC recognizes the need for a regional approach to public transit, but also said it hinges on forming a viable transportation district. “That’s the critical piece that we need to see within the next five years,” Unger said. Should BAT move under the COIC umbrella, Ornelas said customers will reap all the benefits, and could have a single source for all their transit needs. “There would literally be no impact on the rider,” Ornelas said, referring to routes and fares. “They’ll be riding the same bus. They won’t see a different bus or (the person) who drives it.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

patrol officer. But when the new school year starts in the fall, he’s looking forward to sharing his program with more students and returning to his regular duties. “School is a challenge, and it’s more rewarding,” he said. “It’s like you work in a mini-city; You have the investigation side, we respond to medical issues ... You’re a mentor, not just out there arresting people. And you can see results.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

The Associated Press file photo

Soprano Leontyne Price, right, and Cesare Siepi perform in 1962 in the opening scene of Mozart’s great opera “Don Giovanni,” in New York. Siepi, who performed hundreds of times at the Metropolitan Opera and was well known for the role of Don Giovanni, has died at the age of 87. Siepi, a native of Milan, Italy, died at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta on Monday after suffering a stroke more than a week earlier, his family said. embraced him for a wide range of roles. Assessing an impressive Gurnemanz in a 1970 “Parsifal” at the Met, the critic Herbert Weinstock wrote in the British magazine Opera that Siepi “really sang the role rather than growling it and acted with touching conviction,” articulating Wagner’s words “as if born to them.” He also excelled in broadly comic roles, like Don Basilio in Rossini’s “Barber of Seville.” For some, Siepi’s artistry, though distinguished, lacked

some daring. Peter G. Davis summed up this concern in an entry on Siepi for the 1992 New Grove Dictionary of Opera. He “could always be relied on for intelligent, consistently professional performances, rather than interpretations of arresting artistic individuality,” Davis wrote. Cesare Siepi was born in Milan on Feb. 10, 1923. His father was an accountant; his family loved music but was not musical. As an adolescent he sang publicly in a madrigal group. Initially he took courses to become

a schoolteacher, though he had some training at the conservatory in Milan. At 18, urged on by friends, he entered a voice competition in Florence and won first prize. A manager in the audience quickly engaged him to sing the role of the hired assassin Sparafucile in Verdi’s “Rigoletto” for a production in Schio, near Vicenza. With the outbreak of war he moved to neutral Switzerland, returning to Italy when hostilities ended. He appeared in Verdi’s “Nabucco” at La Scala in Milan in the first postwar production at the reconstructed theater, which had been damaged by bombs. After his breakthrough Met debut, Siepi was in demand internationally. He scored triumphs at the Salzburg Festival during the 1950s and made several live recordings there, including a 1954 “Don Giovanni” conducted by Wilhelm Furtwangler, with Elisabeth Schwarzkopf and Erna Berger among the cast. In 1955, at his peak, he made classic Decca recordings of Mozart’s “Nozze di Figaro” with the conductor Erich Kleiber, and of “Don Giovanni” with the conductor Josef Krips, both conducting the Vienna Philharmonic. Louellen Sibley was a ballet dancer at the Met when she married Siepi 48 years ago. He is also survived by a son, Marco, of Saronno, Italy; a daughter, Lisa Siepi of New York; and two grandchildren. In his day Siepi was considered a natural successor to Ezio Pinza. Like Pinza, who had starred in “South Pacific,” Siepi appeared in a stage musical, “Bravo Giovanni.” The critic Howard Taubman, writing in The New York Times, praised Siepi for bringing “the richest and best cultivated vocal instrument to Broadway” since Pinza. The show, however, unlike Pinza’s “South Pacific,” was a flop. Still, Taubman gave the famous bass credit for trying. “Happily,” he concluded, “Mr. Siepi is at ease in his new surroundings and his voice glorifies them.”

Jim Bohlen, 84, led in creation of Greenpeace environmental group By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Jim Bohlen, whose snap decision to sail to Amchitka Island, Alaska, to protest an underground nuclear test led to the creation of the environmental organization Greenpeace, died Monday in Comox, British Columbia. He was 84 and lived in Courtenay, British Columbia. The cause was complications of Parkinson’s disease, his daughter, Margot Bradley, said. Bohlen was a founder of the Don’t Make a Wave Committee, a group of Sierra Club members determined to oppose nuclear testing at Amchitka Island in the Aleutians, which had begun in 1969. With a test scheduled for fall 1971, little more than a year away, Bohlen complained to his wife, Marie, that the committee was deliberating too slowly. As she offhandedly suggested that they sail a boat to the test site, a reporter for The Vancouver Sun called to check in on the committee’s deliberations. Bohlen, caught off guard, said, “We hope to sail a boat to Amchitka to confront the bomb,” a remark that appeared in the newspaper the next day. The committee made good on Bohlen’s pledge. After Ir-

Redmond Continued from C1 Board member Cathy Miller wondered if the district could use the savings to pay down other debts, including real estate costs. But the law does not allow that, according to Schofield. The board decided to seek a legal opinion to see if

ving Stowe, a core member, organized a fundraising concert in Vancouver with Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, Phil Ochs and the Canadian rock band Chilliwack, the committee leased the halibut fishing vessel Phyllis Cormack, and, after renaming it Greenpeace, sailed to Alaska. Although the boat was intercepted by the Coast Guard, public outcry caused a delay in the test. The program was later abandoned, and Amchitka Island was turned into a bird sanctuary. Today Greenpeace is an international organization with more than 3 million members that carries out environmental campaigns through its offices in 40 countries. James Calvin Bohlen was born on July 4, 1926, in the Bronx. After serving in the Navy during the Korean War as a radio operator, he earned an engineering degree from New York University. He worked for a trucking company on Long Island and an aerospace defense contractor in Princeton, N.J. His first marriage ended in divorce. In addition to his daughter, Margot, of Philadelphia, and his second wife, Marie, he is survived by a son, Lance, of Seattle, and three grandchildren.

In 1967 Bohlen moved his family to Vancouver to put his stepson out of reach of the military draft in the United States. He and his wife became active in anti-war, anti-nuclear and environmental causes. After buying land on Denman Island in the Georgia Strait in 1974, Bohlen and his wife set about creating a farming community with geodesic dome houses that would be self-sufficient in food and energy. The project inspired him to write “The New Pioneer’s Handbook: Getting Back to the Land in an Energy-Scarce World” (Schocken, 1975). In the 1980s, when Greenpeace resumed its campaigns against nuclear weapons, Bohlen, who had left the group, returned to lead actions against testing of the cruise missile and took part in the Nuclear Free Seas campaign, which was intended to prevent nuclear weapons from being brought into port cities aboard the warships of nuclear navies. As a candidate for the Green Party, he ran unsuccessfully for Parliament in Vancouver in 1984 and 1988. He was a director of Greenpeace until retiring in 1993. His memoir, “Making Waves: The Origins and Future of Greenpeace,” was published by Black Rose Books in 2000.

there was a possible waiver that would allow the district to pay some of its debts with the bond savings. “I’m just trying to look for options in the face of the budget crunch,” Miller said. The board also elected officers for the next school year. Jim Erickson, currently the vice chairman, will be the new chairman. And Miller will be

the vice chairwoman. In accepting his new position, Erickson said he did not want to be domineering. “I don’t see the chair doing anything more than facilitating collaborative meetings,” he said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, JULY 8

HIGH Ben Burkel

95

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

80s

Ruggs

90s Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

92/51

90/54

95/54

80/62

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

98/58

91/48

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 90/48 Redmond Prineville 95/51 Cascadia 93/52 94/52 Sisters 93/50 Bend Post 95/51

92/50

83/39

90/48

Vancouver 80/57

95/57

90/48

92/52

Helena Bend

93/58

90s

80s

Idaho Falls Elko

101/70

89/50

Silver Lake

81/52

Boise

95/51

Redding

86/52

70s

92/52

Reno

85/51

95/65

Sunshine and warmth are San Francisco 64/54 expected today.

Crater Lake 77/50

Missoula

97/62

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

City

Eugene Grants Pass

90s

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:31 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:31 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:49 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:12 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:14 p.m.

Salt Lake City 90/68

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

91 48

LOW

PLANET WATCH

New

First

Full

Last

July 11

July 18

July 25

Aug. 2

Astoria . . . . . . . . 93/55/0.00 . . . . . . 80/56/s. . . . . . 73/56/pc Baker City . . . . . . 84/37/0.00 . . . . . . 87/50/s. . . . . . 89/53/pc Brookings . . . . . . 56/47/0.00 . . . . . 65/59/pc. . . . . . 68/59/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 85/39/0.00 . . . . . . 88/52/s. . . . . . 91/55/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 97/50/0.00 . . . . . . 95/57/s. . . . . . . 88/56/s Klamath Falls . . . 88/48/0.00 . . . . . . 90/56/s. . . . . . 88/54/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 86/52/0.00 . . . . . 86/58/pc. . . . . . 89/56/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 87/40/0.00 . . . . . 91/47/pc. . . . . . 90/48/pc Medford . . . . . . 101/58/0.00 . . . . . . 99/62/s. . . . . . . 98/62/s Newport . . . . . . . 72/54/0.00 . . . . . 70/55/pc. . . . . . 66/56/pc North Bend . . . . . . 61/46/NA . . . . . 70/59/pc. . . . . . 67/58/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 90/52/0.00 . . . . . . 93/58/s. . . . . . . 97/63/s Pendleton . . . . . . 92/52/0.00 . . . . . . 96/57/s. . . . . . . 98/63/s Portland . . . . . . . 95/57/0.01 . . . . . . 97/63/s. . . . . . . 90/59/s Prineville . . . . . . . 86/46/0.00 . . . . . 93/52/pc. . . . . . 94/52/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 91/41/0.00 . . . . . . 95/51/s. . . . . . 95/51/pc Roseburg. . . . . . 100/56/0.00 . . . . . 97/62/pc. . . . . . 93/61/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 98/56/0.00 . . . . . . 97/60/s. . . . . . . 90/56/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 85/39/0.00 . . . . . 93/50/pc. . . . . . 92/53/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 98/52/0.00 . . . . . . 99/60/s. . . . . . . 97/63/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88/45 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 1968 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.28” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.30” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.96 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.35 in 1975 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville .........................Mod.

LOW

LOW

90 47

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Abundant sunshine, warm. HIGH

90 50

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:29 a.m. . . . . . .9:42 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .9:07 a.m. . . . . .10:57 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .10:47 a.m. . . . . .11:35 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:07 a.m. . . . . .12:12 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .11:43 a.m. . . . . .12:10 a.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:55 p.m. . . . . .12:00 p.m.

Moon phases

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

MONDAY Abundant sunshine, warm.

LOW

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Portland

Christmas Valley

91/45

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 101° Medford • 35° Meacham

92/59

88/49

HIGH

95 52

Seattle

Skies will be sunny to partly cloudy today.

LOW

An upper-level ridge of high pressure will promote very warm and dry weather today.

94/49

Chemult

51

97/63

Burns

91/47

86/41

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

88/48

92/47

Crescent 91/46

LOW

SUNDAY Mainly sunny, warm.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

Partly cloudy, hot, slight chance of t-storms.

Tonight: Mainly clear, not as cool.

82/55

91/49

SATURDAY

NORTHWEST

Central

La Pine

80s Crescent Lake

Today: Mostly sunny, hot, slight chance of t-storms far south.

93/53

95/56

Oakridge Elk Lake

Skies will be sunny to partly cloudy today.

97/57

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled today by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,218 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119,720 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,202 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 41,213 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144,137 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,850 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86.2 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,157 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 968 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 80/57

S

S

Calgary 82/55

S

Saskatoon 79/56

Seattle 92/59

S Winnipeg 72/54

S

S

Thunder Bay 78/55

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 89/73

Halifax 78/61 Portland Portland (in the 48 80/66 To ronto 97/63 Billings St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): 91/73 Boston 82/63 83/55 80/63 Boise 86/69 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 93/58 92/74 New York 80/56 91/72 • 109° 90/71 Des Moines Goodyear, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia 81/63 70/51 Chicago Columbus 94/74 • 29° Omaha 96/72 San Francisco 84/68 Salt Lake Denver Washington, D. C. 84/61 64/54 Stanley, Idaho City 74/55 94/75 Las St. Louis Louisville 90/68 Kansas City Vegas • 3.17” 88/70 96/75 85/66 104/81 Clines Corners, N.M. Charlotte Nashville 97/72 Los Angeles 96/75 Albuquerque Oklahoma City Atlanta 69/60 86/72 83/66 98/77 Phoenix 110/88 Little Rock Birmingham Honolulu 91/75 87/74 Tijuana Dallas 98/73 88/77 71/58 New Orleans 92/75 Orlando Houston 95/74 Chihuahua 87/79 92/69 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 90/74 94/66 Mazatlan 89/79 Anchorage 62/51 Juneau 69/47 Bismarck 82/55

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .93/72/1.07 . . .85/71/t . . . .84/71/t Akron . . . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . . .92/69/s . . . .81/61/t Albany. . . . . . . . . .96/76/NA . 94/73/pc . . 89/67/pc Albuquerque. . . .89/65/0.00 . . .83/66/t . . 84/67/pc Anchorage . . . . .62/54/0.00 . .62/51/sh . . . 66/50/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .89/74/0.00 . . .98/77/s . . 95/74/pc Atlantic City . . . .98/76/0.00 . 85/72/pc . . 86/75/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .96/74/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .90/73/t Baltimore . . . . .101/75/0.00 . 93/74/pc . . 92/73/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . . .83/55/s . . . .87/59/t Birmingham . . . .95/73/0.00 . 98/73/pc . . 94/73/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .80/52/0.00 . 82/55/pc . . . 83/58/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .89/57/0.00 . . .93/58/s . . . 95/60/s Boston. . . . . . . . .83/73/0.00 . 86/69/pc . . 88/69/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .95/80/0.00 . 82/71/pc . . 84/72/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .92/74/s . . . .84/66/t Burlington, VT. . .95/70/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . . .88/71/t Caribou, ME . . . .93/62/0.00 . . .85/66/t . . . .83/63/t Charleston, SC . .95/69/0.00 . . .94/76/s . . 95/77/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .99/65/0.00 . 97/72/pc . . 94/73/pc Chattanooga. . . .99/70/0.00 . 98/72/pc . . . .93/73/t Cheyenne . . . . . .54/48/0.01 . 70/51/pc . . 77/55/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . .84/68/t . . . 83/65/s Cincinnati . . . . . .94/66/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . . .83/64/t Cleveland . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . . .81/63/t Colorado Springs .71/54/NA . . .66/52/t . . 76/57/pc Columbia, MO . .86/72/0.70 . . .84/68/t . . 83/65/pc Columbia, SC . .101/70/0.00 . .100/74/s . . 99/76/pc Columbus, GA. . 93/74/trace . . .99/76/s . . 98/75/pc Columbus, OH. . .93/69/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . . .83/63/t Concord, NH . . . .97/68/0.00 . 91/65/pc . . 89/67/pc Corpus Christi. . .93/76/0.01 . . .88/78/t . . . .90/77/t Dallas Ft Worth. .93/75/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .90/77/t Dayton . . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . 94/72/pc . . . .83/62/t Denver. . . . . . . . .67/56/0.08 . . .74/55/t . . 82/59/pc Des Moines. . . . .85/73/0.08 . 81/63/pc . . . 84/61/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . . .91/72/t . . 83/66/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . 79/54/pc . . 78/55/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .95/71/t . . 92/71/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .72/49/0.00 . 78/53/pc . . 81/56/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .79/62/0.01 . 79/55/pc . . 82/60/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .83/45/0.00 . 80/52/pc . . 78/52/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .92/73/0.12 . . .86/66/t . . 82/61/pc Green Bay. . . . . .85/66/1.09 . . .80/63/t . . . 81/60/s Greensboro. . . . .99/69/0.00 . 98/72/pc . . 91/73/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .99/32/0.00 . 92/72/pc . . 89/70/pc Hartford, CT . . . .99/76/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . 89/71/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .78/44/0.00 . . .81/52/s . . . 87/56/s Honolulu . . . . . . .85/72/0.03 . . .87/74/s . . . 88/75/s Houston . . . . . . .86/76/2.19 . . .87/79/t . . 91/76/pc Huntsville . . . . . .98/73/0.00 . 98/75/pc . . 91/74/pc Indianapolis . . . .93/73/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .82/67/t Jackson, MS . . . .93/75/0.43 . 95/73/pc . . 96/74/pc Madison, WI . . . .84/70/0.51 . . .82/64/t . . . 82/60/s Jacksonville. . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .97/74/s . . 97/74/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . 64/50/pc Kansas City. . . . .86/71/0.00 . . .85/66/t . . 84/67/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . . .87/67/t . . 82/59/pc Las Vegas . . . . .103/78/0.00 . .104/81/s . . 106/79/s Lexington . . . . . .94/68/0.00 . 95/72/pc . . . .85/66/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .80/70/0.06 . 82/62/pc . . . 84/62/s Little Rock. . . . . .91/76/0.00 . . .91/75/t . . . .88/74/t Los Angeles. . . . .67/60/0.00 . . .69/60/s . . . 70/61/s Louisville . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . . .86/69/t Memphis. . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . . .90/73/t Miami . . . . . . . . .92/81/0.01 . 91/79/pc . . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . .88/73/0.74 . . .83/67/t . . . 81/64/s Minneapolis . . . .87/68/0.22 . 82/63/pc . . 83/62/pc Nashville . . . . . . .97/70/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . . .88/69/t New Orleans. . . .89/79/0.00 . . .92/75/s . . 92/76/pc New York . . . . .100/84/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . 91/71/pc Newark, NJ . . . .101/84/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 93/71/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .98/77/0.00 . . .90/75/t . . 91/76/pc Oklahoma City . .88/70/0.15 . . .86/72/t . . . .87/71/t Omaha . . . . . . . .82/71/0.20 . 84/61/pc . . . 84/62/s Orlando. . . . . . . .89/74/0.00 . . .95/74/s . . 93/74/pc Palm Springs. . .105/70/0.00 . .106/73/s . . 108/76/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .90/71/0.62 . . .84/67/t . . 84/61/pc Philadelphia . . .103/83/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . 90/74/pc Phoenix. . . . . . .107/83/0.00 . .110/88/s . 108/89/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .93/71/s . . . .85/65/t Portland, ME. . . .85/67/0.00 . 80/66/pc . . 83/67/pc Providence . . . . .92/75/0.00 . 86/69/pc . . 89/70/pc Raleigh . . . . . . .102/69/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 93/74/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .74/46/0.00 . . .80/56/s . . . 85/59/s Savannah . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . . .96/76/s . . 97/76/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .92/61/0.00 . . .95/65/s . . . 92/62/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .90/59/0.00 . . .92/59/s . . . 89/57/s Richmond . . . . .104/72/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 94/75/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .76/63/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . 84/60/s Rochester, NY . . .94/67/0.00 . . .94/74/s . . . .88/66/t Spokane . . . . . . .84/54/0.00 . . .91/59/s . . . 91/62/s Sacramento. . . . .87/54/0.00 . . .94/64/s . . . 96/64/s Springfield, MO. .85/68/0.06 . . .83/71/t . . . .83/66/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .93/77/0.14 . . .88/70/t . . . .84/72/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .93/74/0.00 . . .93/77/s . . 92/77/pc Salt Lake City . . .85/58/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . . 92/71/s Tucson. . . . . . . .104/74/0.00 103/80/pc . 100/78/pc San Antonio . . . .94/76/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . . .90/76/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .85/71/0.00 . . .84/72/t . . . .86/70/t San Diego . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . 63/61/pc . . 66/61/pc Washington, DC102/80/0.00 . 94/75/pc . . 92/76/pc San Francisco . . .73/58/0.00 . . .64/54/s . . . 66/54/s Wichita . . . . . . . .84/71/0.00 . . .85/67/t . . 87/66/pc San Jose . . . . . . .77/58/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . . 84/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .92/49/0.00 . . .95/57/s . . . 98/65/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .84/59/0.13 . . .78/54/t . . 82/57/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .105/75/0.00 . .105/76/s . . 107/79/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .77/57/c . . 82/60/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .89/69/0.00 . 84/71/pc . . 83/68/pc Auckland. . . . . . .57/54/0.00 . . .53/43/c . . 51/38/pc Baghdad . . . . . .114/89/0.00 . .113/86/s . . 115/87/s Bangkok . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .92/80/t . . . .91/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 93/68/pc . . . .83/66/t Beirut. . . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .87/75/s . . . 86/75/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . 79/60/pc . . 85/64/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .63/54/0.06 . . .64/49/t . . 64/48/sh Budapest. . . . . . .72/57/0.14 . 77/53/pc . . . 80/55/s Buenos Aires. . . .54/46/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . . 56/38/s Cabo San Lucas .91/73/0.00 . . .87/69/s . . 88/70/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . . .98/73/s . . . 99/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . .75/52/0.08 . .82/55/sh . . . 85/59/s Cancun . . . . . . . .88/75/0.15 . . .85/76/t . . . .86/77/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.01 . .63/51/sh . . 64/52/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .62/50/sh . . 62/51/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .85/63/s . . 88/65/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 66/46/s Hong Kong . . . . .93/86/0.00 . . .92/83/t . . . .91/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . 79/64/pc . . 77/62/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .95/59/0.00 . . .94/69/s . . . 95/70/s Johannesburg . . .64/43/0.00 . . .59/45/s . . . 60/45/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .63/61/0.00 . 64/60/pc . . 63/59/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .88/69/s . . . 94/70/s London . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . .73/56/sh . . . 77/58/c Madrid . . . . . . .100/70/0.00 . .104/74/s . . 102/71/s Manila. . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .91/78/t . . . .90/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .113/93/0.00 . .111/85/s . . 113/86/s Mexico City. . . . .75/59/0.46 . . .77/59/t . . . .79/59/t Montreal. . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . . .85/67/t Moscow . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . . .84/59/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . 71/52/pc . . . 72/55/c Nassau . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . 92/80/pc . . . .91/80/t New Delhi. . . . . .95/80/0.00 . . .88/79/t . . . .90/80/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .88/73/1.40 . 89/75/pc . . 87/74/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .64/52/sh . . . 67/53/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .91/71/t . . . .85/67/t Paris. . . . . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . . .85/62/t Rio de Janeiro. . .81/63/0.00 . 83/64/pc . . 79/62/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .86/67/s . . . 86/69/s Santiago . . . . . . .54/32/0.69 . . .60/39/s . . . 63/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .79/60/s . . 78/60/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . . .75/66/t . . . .79/67/t Seoul . . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .84/71/t . . 83/71/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . 91/79/pc . . 87/78/sh Singapore . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . . .87/78/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 72/58/pc . . . 73/59/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . 60/41/pc . . 61/43/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .99/84/0.00 . . .93/81/t . . . .91/80/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . . .92/75/s . . . 93/76/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .81/73/0.00 . . .87/76/t . . . .87/75/t Toronto . . . . . . . .90/73/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . . .82/65/t Vancouver. . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .80/57/s . . . 78/57/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . .79/56/s . . 84/59/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .72/55/0.13 . . .74/52/s . . 78/55/pc


S

D

Soccer Inside Spain defeats Germany in semifinal, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

BASKETBALL

NBA

Former local star still has NBA hopes

Bosh joins Wade in Miami, as they wait for LeBron’s decision

Redmond High, UO product Maarty Leunen will play for the Houston Rockets in the NBA Summer League

Dwyane Wade’s future was muddled and uncertain, until Chris Bosh told him where he wanted to spend the next few years. “I’m feeling Miami,” Bosh said. Those three words were all Wade needed to make his decision. Will they be enough to sway LeBron James to Miami? Stay tuned. Ending months of speculation, Wade and Bosh announced Wednesday that they’ll sign with Miami, two decisions that vault the Heat back into the NBA championship picture and put them two-thirds of the way to hitting one of the biggest trifectas in NBA history. Wade, Bosh and James all have talked about playing together. On Thursday night, James will say why that will or will not happen. “It’s over,” Wade said in an interview with The Associated Press. “It’s not all over-over, but for me, it’s over.” James can’t say that yet. Wade told the Heat that for him to re-sign, the team had to add either James or Bosh. For good measure, they might get both. “It had to be one or the other,” Wade said in the AP interview. “Of course, there’s a lot of talented players in this league. But you want to look at players that complement my game, and Chris and LeBron are two of those guys. I had a decision to make. Chris had a decision to make. It wasn’t a lock that he would come to Miami. So I had a lot to think about.” — The Associated Press

By Beau Eastes

other season. He re-signed with Cantù last week, but he has a clause in his contract voiding the deal if an NBA team signs him by the 30th of this month. “Honestly, I loved Italy,” Leunen said this week over the phone after a workout in Houston. He added that last season he lived in an apartment with scenic Lake Como and the picturesque Swiss Alps. “You can’t complain about playing basketball for a living and (traveling) all over the world,” Leunen said. “But the ultimate goal is to play in the NBA.” See Leunen / D5

mer League team. After averaging 12.6 points and 5.7 rebounds per game last season for Pallacanestro Cantú of the Italian Serie A league, Leunen will again get a shot to prove to Houston — which selected him in the second round of the 2008 draft — that he deserves an NBA contract. If he does not end up with the Rockets, though, Leunen will return to Italy for an-

The Bulletin

If things don’t work out with the Houston Rockets, Maarty Leunen’s backup plan sounds pretty nice. For the third consecutive year, Leunen, a 6-foot-9 former Redmond High and University of Oregon basketball standout, is gearing up to play for the Rockets’ Sum-

Maarty Leunen, pictured at left, will try to earn an NBA contract with the Houston Rockets.

Jason Bean / Las Vegas Review Journal, file

Raw footage A bowhunting film tour coming to Bend seeks to capture the highs and lows of the sport

TOUR DE F R A N C E AT A GLANCE REIMS, France — A brief look at Wednesday’s fourth stage of the Tour de France: Stage: A 95.4-mile ride from Cambrai to the champagne capital Reims — a mostly flat trek that was tailormade for sprinters. Winner: Alessandro Petacchi of Italy. The Lampre rider collected his second stage victory of this Tour. Julian Dean of New Zealand was second, and Edval Boasson Hagen of Norway was third. Yellow Jersey: Fabian Cancellara of Switzerland, who finished in the main pack along with the expected title contenders. Seven-time champion Lance Armstrong remained 18th, 2:30 back, and defending champion Alberto Contador of Spain is ninth, 1:40 back. Horner watch: Bend’s Chris Horner, a member of Armstrong’s team, finished the stage in 72nd place, the same time as the leaders. He is 43rd overall, 3:17 back. Next stage: Today’s fifth stage also is a mostly flat stage, a 116.5-mile run from Epernay to Montargis. — The Associated Press

Submitted photo

Films on the Full Draw Film Tour seek to capture the emotions of a bowhunter.

By Mark Morical The Bulletin

B

owhunting is a challenging enough endeavor without the extra difficulty of lugging around a camera, batteries and tapes. But a few independent filmmakers have tried to capture the essence of the sport, and they are embarking on a three-city Oregon tour to showcase the close encounters and raw emotions of bowhunting. The Full Draw Film Tour is scheduled for Bend’s Tower Theatre on Wednesday, July 21, after stops in Coos Bay and Winston in southwest Oregon. Four films will be showcased at each stop on the tour. One of those films, titled “Paying Dues,” was produced by Green Gate Pursuits, which was founded by Redmond’s Ryan Bales.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Cycling ......................................D2 World Cup .................................D3 Auto Racing ...............................D3 MLB .................................. D3, D4 Hunting & Fishing .................... D6

Bales says the tour’s films are more about the journey and less about the kill. “A regular hunting DVD is inundated with animal kill after animal kill,” Bales says. “You never get to see the rest of the story. We’re trying to capture the highs and the lows, not just the highs. If you just show the end of the story, it feels like you’re not showing the beginning. We’re trying to show it whether it ends with an animal kill or not.” “Paying Dues” chronicles the struggles and lessons of a seven-day backcountry bow hunt. Other films on the Full Draw Film Tour

Full Draw Film Tour Wh a t: A bowhunting film tour of independent filmmakers, including four films When: Wednesday, July 21, 7 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Where: Bend’s Tower Theatre Tickets: $10 for adults, $7 for kids 12 and younger Contact: www. fulldrawfilmtour.com

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WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL

Elks break tie in ninth inning to defeat Kelowna Bulletin staff report

Overall race leader Fabian Cancellara on Wednesday.

HUNTING & FISHING

include “The Reason,” by Born and Raised Outdoors, which features a Roosevelt elk hunt, and “Raging Roosevelts,” by Angry Spike Productions, which also focuses on Roosevelt elk hunting. “Fist Full of Arrows,” by On Root Films, documents a traditional mule deer hunt, with some elk-hunting footage. Bales, 32, met the guys behind Roseburg-based Born and Raised Outdoors at a sportsmen’s show earlier this year, and they hashed out the plan for the film tour. “We had some groundbreaking ideas we wanted to try out,” Bales says. “Not every film will have animals taken by bow. The main point is showing the struggle and the close encounters they (hunters) had, every aspect of the hunt … bringing a positive light to how hard we work for our game.” See Bowhunting / D6

KELOWNA, British Columbia — The Bend Elks scored a run in the top of the ninth inning to break a tie and went on to defeat the Kelowna Falcons 5-4 in a West Coast League baseball game on Wednesday night. With the game tied 4-4 in the ninth, Bend’s Adam Norton doubled home Tyler Smith for the go-ahead run, but he was thrown at third base trying to get a triple. That ended the Elks’ threat in the top half of the inning. But Kelowna would make things interesting in the bottom half of the inning. The Falcons loaded the bases on a hit batter and two walks by reliever Logan Scott. But Scott struck out Alex Albritton and got Royce Bolinger to pop out to first base to end the game.

Bend took the early lead with three runs in the second inning and led 4-1 through five. But Kelowna scored twice in the sixth and once in the seventh to set up the ninth-inning drama. Riley Tompkins led the Elks with a pair of hits, including a solo home run, and Kerry Jenkins also added a solo homer. The Elks managed just six hits. Scott earned the win with 2 1⁄3 innings of scoreless baseball. James Nygren started for Bend and gave up just three hits and one earned run over five innings, striking out four. Bend travels to Wenatchee, Wash., for a single league game tonight. The Elks’ split squad won a home contest 12-1 against the Tumwater Brewers, a night after they beat Tumwater 6-5, also in Bend.

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D2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

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CYCLING

CYCLING

TOUR DE FRANCE Wednesday At Reims, France Fourth Stage A 95.4-mile leg from Cambrai to Reims 1. Alessandro Petacchi, Italy, Lampre-Farnese, 3 hours, 34 minutes, 55 seconds. 2. Julian Dean, New Zealand, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 3. Edvald Hagen Boasson, Norway, Sky Pro Cycling, same time. 4. Robbie McEwen, Australia, Katusha Team, same time. 5. Robert Hunter, South Africa, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 6. Sebastien Turgot, France, Bbox Bouygues Telecom, same time. 7. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, same time. 8. Daniel Oss, Italy, Liquigas-Doimo, same time. 9. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Cervelo Test Team, same time. 10. Oscar Freire, Spain, Rabobank, same time. 11. Gerald Ciolek, Germany, Team Milram, same time. 12. Mark Cavendish, Britain, Team HTC-Columbia, same time. 13. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 14. Samuel Sanchez, Spain, Euskaltel-Euskadi, same time. 15. Vasil Kiryienka, Belarus, Caisse d’Epargne, same time. 16. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, same time. 17. Sandy Casar, France, Francaise des Jeux, same time. 18. Thomas Lovkvist, Sweden, Sky Pro Cycling, same time. 19. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, same time. 20. Carlos Barredo, Spain, Quick Step, same time. Also 23. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 26. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Team SaxoBank, same time. 34. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, same time. 36. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 52. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, same time. 53. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, same time. 55. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 58. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team SaxoBank, same time. 66. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, same time. 68. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick Step, same time. 72. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, same time. 88. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, same time. 96. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, same time. 119. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, same time. 184. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 2 minutes, 8 seconds behind. 186. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 3:08.

5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 5, VS. network.

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Scottish Open, first round, Golf. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Ford Wayne Gretzky Classic, first round, Golf. Noon — U.S. Women’s Open, first round, ESPN2. Noon — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, first round, Golf.

LACROSSE 4 p.m. — Major League Lacrosse, All-Star Game, ESPN2.

SOCCER 6:30 p.m. — MLS, Real Salt Lake at Chicago Fire, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 11 a.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Chicago White Sox, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, Cincinnati Reds at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

FRIDAY CYCLING 5:30 a.m. — Tour de France, Stage 6, VS. network.

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Scottish Open, second round Golf. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, Ford Wayne Gretzky Classic, second round, Golf. Noon — U.S. Women’s Open, second round, ESPN2. Noon — PGA Tour, John Deere Classic, second round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 3 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Dollar General 300, ESPN.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Atlanta Braves at New York Mets, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Hank Lundy vs. John Molina, ESPN2. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • Firefighter recovering after Rangers Ballpark fall: A firefighter who tumbled about 30 feet from the Texas Rangers stands while trying to catch a foul ball received a hospital visit — and the ball — from team president Nolan Ryan on Wednesday. Tyler Morris, 25, who works at the Lake Cities Fire Department near Dallas, was at Tuesday night’s game with fellow firefighters when he fell over a second-deck railing onto field-level seats below. He suffered a head injury and sprained ankle but no internal injuries, and was expected to be released from the hospital soon, friends said. • White Sox place Peavy on DL: The Chicago White Sox right-hander Jake Peavy was put on the 15-day disabled list because of a detached muscle in the back of his right shoulder, an injury that will almost certainly end his season. “Obviously this isn’t good news,” Peavy said Wednesday after having an MRI. “You know ... having something completely detached from the bone that’s retracted down in my lat. Not good.” Peavy was hurt early in Chicago’s victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Tuesday night. With two outs in the second inning, Peavy delivered a 2-2 pitch to Mike Napoli and then jumped off the mound and raised his right arm before walking straight to the dugout with team trainer Herm Schneider. • Yankees’ Cano out of Home Run Derby: Robinson Cano won’t be swinging for the fences in the Home Run Derby after all. While Cano insists his troublesome lower back is just fine and doesn’t affect him at the plate, Yankees general manager Brian Cashman, manager Joe Girardi and hitting coach Kevin Long came to the decision to keep the All-Star second baseman out of the event Monday in Anaheim. Cano was out of the lineup Wednesday for the first time all season to give him and his back a break.

Football • USC apologizes for accusations: Southern California has apologized to Florida, Alabama, Washington, Oregon and Fresno State for accusing those schools of breaking NCAA rules by contacting one of the Trojans’ players without permission. In a letter dated July 1 and addressed to Florida athletic director Jeremy Foley, USC AD Mike Garrett said freshman running back Dillon Baxter confirmed to Garrett that the player “did not receive a call from your institution.” “I apologize for any inconvenience or embarrassment this matter has caused to you and your institution,” Garrett wrote in a hand-signed letter. ESPN.com reported USC filed a complaint with the Pac-10 in June about several schools tampering with Baxter after the Trojans were hit with NCAA sanctions.

Basketball • Boozer agrees to deal with Bulls: Carlos Boozer is headed to the Chicago Bulls. A person familiar with the negotiations told The Associated Press that the two-time All-Star forward agreed to a deal on Wednesday and is leaving the Utah Jazz after six seasons. The person, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the contract doesn’t become official until Thursday, did not reveal the terms. With about $30 million in salary cap room, the Bulls were looking to make a big splash in free agency after back-to-back first-round playoff exits. Adding Boozer strengthens their standing in the Eastern Conference — and maybe makes them more attractive to LeBron James, his former teammate. • Salary cap set at $58 million: The NBA salary cap for next season has been set at $58 million, a higher number than projected. The cap goes into effect at 12:01 a.m. Thursday, ending the league’s moratorium period and allowing free agent contracts to be signed. Commissioner David Stern said in April the league was projecting the cap to come in at $56.1. • Durant reaches 5-year deal with Thunder: Kevin Durant didn’t go for a spectacle in announcing where he’ll be for the next five years. Instead, Durant simply posted an update on his Twitter page Wednesday, saying he’d agreed to a five-year contract extension with the Oklahoma City Thunder. Durant’s spokeswoman, Mary Ford, said he will receive the maximum deal possible, $85 million over five years. — The Associated Press

Overall Standings (After fourth stage) 1. Fabian Cancellara, Switzerland, Team Saxo Bank, 18 hours, 28 minutes, 55 seconds. 2. Geraint Thomas, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, 23 seconds behind. 3. Cadel Evans, Australia, BMC Racing Team, :39. 4. Ryder Hesjedel, Canada, Garmin-Transitions, :46. 5. Sylvain Chavanel, France, Quick Step, 1:01. 6. Andy Schleck, Luxembourg, Team Saxo Bank, 1:09. 7. Thor Hushovd, Norway, Cervelo Test Team, 1:19. 8. Alexandre Vinokourov, Kazakhstan, Astana, 1:31. 9. Alberto Contador, Spain, Astana, 1:40. 10. Jurgen Van Den Broeck, Belgium, Omega PharmaLotto, 1:42. 11. Nicolas Roche, Ireland, AG2R La Mondiale, same time. 12. Johan Van Summeren, Belgium, Garmin-Transitions, 1:47. 13. Denis Menchov, Russia, Rabobank, 1:49. 14. Bradley Wiggins, Britain, Sky Pro Cycling, same time. 15. David Millar, Britain, Garmin-Transitions, 2:06. 16. Roman Kreuziger, Czech Republic, Liquigas-Doimo, 2:24. 17. Luis-Leon Sanchez, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 2:25. 18. Lance Armstrong, United States, Team RadioShack, 2:30. 19. Thomas Lovkvist, Sweden, Sky Pro Cycling, 2:34.

Budapest, Hungary Singles Second Round Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Peng Shuai (5), China, 6-1, 6-1. Polona Hercog (8), Slovenia, def. Catalina Castano, Colombia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Patty Schnyder, Switzerland, def. Alisa Kleybanova (1), Russia, 6-4, 6-3. Anna Chakvetadze, Russia, vs. Alexandra Dulgheru (2), Romania, 6-7 (5), 6-1, susp., darkness.

IN THE BLEACHERS

SWEDISH OPEN Wednesday Bastad, Sweden Singles Second Round Lucie Safarova (3), Czech Republic, def. Karolina Sprem, Croatia, 2-6, 7-5, 6-3. Arantxa Parra Santonja (5), Spain, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives, Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Ana Vrljic, Croatia, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 7-5, 5-7, 6-4. Flavia Pennetta (1), def. Sloane Stephens, United States, 6-1, 6-1. Gisela Dulko (4), Argentina, def. Tatjana Malek, Germany, 6-2, 1-6, 7-6(1). Jill Craybas, United States, def. Anna-Lena Groenefeld, Germany, 3-6, 6-0, 6-4. Aravane Rezai (2), France, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (8), Czech Republic, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 3-6, 6-4, 6-0.

BASKETBALL WNBA

20. Jose Joaquin Rojas, Spain, Caisse d’Epargne, 2:35. Also 24. Levi Leipheimer, United States, Team RadioShack, 2:53. 27. Janez Brajkovic, Slovenia, Team RadioShack, 3:00. 29. Andreas Kloeden, Germany, Team RadioShack, 3:01. 43. Christopher Horner, United States, Team RadioShack, 3:17. 52. Yaroslav Popovych, Ukraine, Team RadioShack, 3:26. 110. George Hincapie, United States, BMC Racing Team, 9:12. 112. Brent Bookwalter, United States, BMC Racing Team, 10:24. 124. Sergio Paulinho, Portugal, Team RadioShack, 12:17. 125. Gregory Rast, Switzerland, Team RadioShack, 12:35. 148. David Zabriskie, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 17:32. 165. Tyler Farrar, United States, Garmin-Transitions, 22:03. 178. Dmitriy Muravyev, Kazakhstan, Team RadioShack, 24:58.

SOCCER World Cup

8 5 1 25 18 5 4 4 19 16 4 4 5 17 18 3 7 3 12 11 3 7 2 11 15 3 9 2 11 13 3 9 2 11 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 11 1 3 36 25 Real Salt Lake 8 3 3 27 27 Colorado 6 3 4 22 16 FC Dallas 5 2 6 21 16 San Jose 5 4 4 19 16 Houston 5 7 3 18 21 Seattle 4 8 3 15 16 Chivas USA 3 9 2 11 15 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Game Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 6:30 p.m.

17 15 18 17 23 26 25 GA 5 11 12 12 15 22 23 21

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— HALL OF FAME TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS Wednesday Newport, R.I. Singles Second Round Mardy Fish (5), United States, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 6-2, 6-0. Brian Dabul, Argentina, def. Go Soeda, Japan, 7-5, 6-2. Dustin Brown, Jamaica, def. Sam Querrey (1), United States, 6-4, 6-3. Raven Klaasen, South Africa, def. Rajeev Ram (7), United States, 5-7, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Frank Dancevic, Canada, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Olivier Rochus (4), Belgium, def. Sergei Bubka, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-3. Richard Bloomfield, Britain, def. Santiago Giraldo (2), Colombia, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Denis Kudla, United States, 7-5, 7-6 (5).

All Times PDT ——— SEMIFINALS Tuesday, July 6 At Cape Town, South Africa Netherlands 3, Uruguay 2 Wednesday, July 7 At Durban, South Africa Spain 1, Germany 0 ——— THIRD PLACE Saturday, July 10 At Port Elizabeth, South Africa Uruguay vs. Germany, 11:30 a.m. ——— CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday, July 11 At Johannesburg Netherlands vs. Spain, 11:30 a.m.

MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 8 2 3 27 20

New York Toronto FC Chicago Kansas City Philadelphia New England D.C.

WTA GA 12

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— BUDAPEST GRAND PRIX Wednesday

WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 14 5 .737 Washington 12 5 .706 Indiana 10 6 .625 Connecticut 10 8 .556 Chicago 8 10 .444 New York 7 9 .438 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 16 2 .889 San Antonio 6 9 .400 Phoenix 7 11 .389 Minnesota 5 11 .313 Los Angeles 4 13 .235 Tulsa 3 13 .188 ——— Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 108, Connecticut 103, OT Today’s Games Tulsa at Indiana, 4 p.m. San Antonio at Minnesota, 5 p.m.

GB — 1 2½ 3½ 5½ 5½ GB — 8½ 9 10 11½ 12

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE Standings (through Wednesday’s results) ——— West Division W L Bend Elks 18 6 Bellingham Bells 17 12 Corvallis Knights 14 11 Kitsap BlueJackets 12 10 Cowlitz Black Bears 5 14 East Division W L Wenatchee AppleSox 12 9 Moses Lake Pirates 12 12 Kelowna Falcons 10 17 Walla Walla Sweets 7 16 ——— Wednesday’s Games Bend 5, Kelowna 4 Kitsap 3, Bellingham 2 Walla Walla 6, Corvallis 5 Moses Lake 10, Cowlitz 5 Today’s Games Bend at Wenatchee Bellingham at Kitsap Wednesday’s Summary ——— Bend 030 010 001 — 5 Kelowna 001 002 100 — 4

Pct. .750 .586 .560 .545 .263 Pct. .571 .500 .370 .304

6 6

1 0

Nygren, Jones (6), Waardenburg (6), Scott (7) and Higgs. Creel and Jones. W — Scott. L— Creel. 2B — Bend: Norton, Kalfus; Kelowna: Chism . HR — Bend: Tompkins, Jenkins.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended minor league players RHP Daury Aquino (N.Y. Yankees), RHP Alexander de los Santos (N.Y. Yankees), C Jhancarlos Infante (Tampa Bay), RHP Joel Matos (Arizona) and RHP Freddy Rodriguez (Kansas City) 50 games after each tested positive for a performance-enhancing substance in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Selected the contract of 1B Ryan Shealy from Pawtucket (IL). Designated INF Niuman Romero for assignment. CHICAGO WHITE SOX—Placed RHP Jake Peavy on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Jeffrey Marquez from Charlotte (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Agreed to terms with LHP Alexander Burgos, C Bryan Holaday and 2B Corey Jones. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Recalled RHP Mitch Atkins from Iowa (PCL). Placed RHP Brian Schlitter on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 3. COLORADO ROCKIES—Placed 1B Todd Helton on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Brad Eldred from Colorado Springs (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with OF Ariel Ovando on a minor league contract. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed RHP Adam Ottavino on the 15-day DL, retroactive to July 4. Recalled LHP Evan MacLane from Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Traded RHP Sean Gallagher to Pittsburgh for cash considerations. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Named Vinny Del Negro coach. SACRAMENTO KINGS—Signed C DeMarcus Cousins. FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS—Claimed OL Kirk Barton off waivers from the Detroit Lions. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Re-signed F Eric Boulton. Signed F Jared Ross and D Jaime Sifers. BUFFALO SABRES—Signed C Rob Niedermayer to a one-year contract. COLORADO AVALANCHE—Signed F Brandon Yip to a two-year contract. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Signed G David LeNeveu to a one-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Re-signed F Patrick Eaves to a one-year contract. MINNESOTA WILD—Signed G Dennis Endras to a one-year contract. OTTAWA SENATORS—Signed F Corey Locke to a two-year contract. PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Signed D Andrew Hutchinson. SAN JOSE SHARKS—Signed D Jay Leach to a oneyear contract. TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Signed D Brett Lebda to a two-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Agreed to terms with D Jeff Schultz on a four-year contract and LW Kyle Greentree on a two-year contract. Signed D Brian Fahey to a one-year contract. COLLEGE TAMPA — Announced F Victor Rudd is transferring to the school.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,409 299 3,548 2,059 The Dalles 1,235 181 1,739 1,025 John Day 1,606 262 1,634 939 McNary 1,860 242 776 339 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 326,176 24,804 50,711 22,497 The Dalles 255,405 21,040 23,836 11,750 John Day 234,790 20,435 17,050 7,451 McNary 201,418 14,295 9,890 3,817

CYCLING: TOUR DE FRANCE

Armstrong: Blame to share for ‘bad luck’ Team RadioShack looks at what went wrong in previous stage as status quo reigns in flat stage 4 By Jamey Keaten The Associated Press

REIMS, France — Lance Armstrong’s flat tire has done more than just deflate some of his hopes for another Tour de France victory. It’s also caused a bit of second-guessing within his RadioShack team. Before Wednesday’s flat fourth stage, won by Italy’s Alessandro Petacchi in a sprint, Armstrong said he and his teammates could have better managed the cobblestones where he punctured a tire and lost time the previous day. Wednesday’s ride didn’t shake up the overall standings, with Switzerland’s Fabian Cancellara retaining the yellow jersey, and many riders were still pondering the blows suffered by Armstrong and RadioShack on Tuesday. “In hindsight, as a team, I think we all agree we could have ridden differently yesterday,” Armstrong said. “You can look at the position we went into the cobbles (in), you can look at perhaps the amount of the time we spent on the sides, which I think has an effect.” He said “you obviously get more flats” on the roadsides instead of the cobblestones. Some riders use the sides to avoid the jarring bumps over the stones. While Armstrong took about 45 seconds to get a new tire, rivals like Alberto Contador and Andy Schleck zoomed ahead to gain seconds that will be valuable when the three-week race reaches the mountains later on. It was a far cry from Armstrong’s sevenyear domination at the Tour from 1999 to 2005, when he often lavished praise on teammates for their help in his victories — and when luck, more often than not, was on his side. Now, he’s trailing, and the blame is to be shared. “Like they say, you create your own luck, and we created our bad luck yesterday,” Armstrong said. “We made our luck, we can’t blame anybody but ourselves.” Armstrong received a huge fan ovation as he left the team bus Wednesday. He took so long getting to the start line that he didn’t sign in at the starter’s podium — and got a $94 fine for it. The overall standings remained the same after Wednesday’s 95.4-mile ride from Cambrai

Christophe Ena / The Associated Press

Lance Armstrong, right, and Fabian Cancellara, far left, wearing the overall leader’s jersey, ride in the pack during the fourth stage of the Tour de France cycling race over 153.5 kilometers (95.4 miles) with a start in Cambrai and finish in Reims, northern France, Wednesday. to the champagne capital of Reims — a mostly flat trek that was tailor-made for sprinters. Lampre rider Petacchi earned his second stage victory this year in a mass sprint, with Armstrong and other title contenders finishing safely in the pack with the same time: 3 hours, 34 minutes, 55 seconds. Cancellara did too, and retained the yellow jersey for a fourth day. Armstrong crossed 36th, Contador was 32nd and Schleck placed 58th. Johan Bruyneel, RadioShack’s manager and Armstrong’s longtime mentor, said the Texan and the team “are all disappointed” because of his loss of time against Schleck and Contador — two strong climbers who will be tough to get ahead of in the Alps and Pyrenees. “But it’s two and a half weeks to go, what happens to us today can happen to somebody else tomorrow,” Bruyneel said. Overall, among the title contenders, twotime Tour runner-up Cadel Evans was third, 39 seconds back, Schleck sixth, 1:09 back, Conta-

dor ninth, 1:40 back, and Armstrong 18th, 2:30 behind. The 38-year-old Texan knows team strategy now has to change. He’s just not sure how. “You’ve got 200 guys out there who have their strategy, too,” he said. “You have to respond and react accordingly, but we are going to have to be more opportunistic.” After Wednesday’s ride, Armstrong said he was happy to get out of the relatively short course without mishap — after being one of dozens of riders who crashed during a rainy second stage and the flat in Stage 3. “I didn’t want to have a third day in a row of bad luck,” he said. “(It’s) nice that everybody stayed up.” So how does he handle bad luck? “You just deal with it, make it happen,” he said, before cutting his comments short while being heckled by a nearby fan. “There’s always crashes, days like yesterday are so extreme there’s nothing you can do.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 D3

WORLD CUP SOCCER

MAJOR LEAGUE BA S E BA L L C O M M E N TA RY

Some of this year’s All-Stars should be left off the roster By Bill Plaschke Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — wo years ago, on a May day so full of promise, baseball Commissioner Bud Selig reverently announced that the 2010 All-Star game would be played at Angel Stadium. He fibbed. I’ll be a rally monkey’s uncle before I’ll believe that disparate group of 68 players coming to town next week is completely worthy of an All-Star game. Two years ago, Selig filled us with visions of Pete Rose crashing into Ray Fosse. Instead, we could be getting Omar Infante crashing into John Buck. Two years ago, Selig gave us the image of Reggie Jackson going off the light tower, Ichiro going inside the park, and Cal Ripken Jr. going deep into history. Instead, we’re getting Michael Bourn going for ... what exactly? A game once famous for Fernando Valenzuela and Dwight Gooden’s six consecutive strikeouts is now populated with Evan Meek and Matt Thornton. If you don’t know where those two guys play — heck, if you don’t even know what position they play — don’t feel bad. They were among three All-Stars whose names I announced Tuesday to a friend who is a longtime baseball fan. He whiffed on all three. If there are people with baseball photos on their office walls unable to identify three players in the baseball All-Star game, then baseball is picking the wrong team, and, yeah, they’ve really mucked it up this time. Thanks to a convoluted, everchanging selection process that tries to make everyone happy, nobody should be happy with what may be the worst collection of All-Stars in the history of this once-proud game. The National League’s leading power hitter, Cincinnati’s Joey Votto, is thus far not on the team. Neither is any San Diego pitcher, even though the Padres have the league’s top staff. The top strikeout pitcher in the American League, the Los Angeles Angels’ Jered Weaver, is thus far not on the team. Then there is Boston’s Kevin Youkilis, who is in the league’s top 10 in homers, RBIs, runs and on-base percentage. He isn’t an All-Star, either. And don’t even get me started about the arrogant snub of Stephen Strasburg. Instead of those stars, we get these stars ... Infante of the Atlanta Braves is an All-Star who doesn’t even start for his own team. Bourn of the Houston Astros is an All-Star who doesn’t hit for average (.260) or power (one homer) or run production (20 RBIs). Meek of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Thornton of the Chicago White Sox are nice pitchers, but they are setup relievers in a

T

Luca Bruno / The Associated Press

Spain’s Carles Puyo (No. 5) scores a goal past Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer, second right, during the World Cup semifinal match between Germany and Spain in Durban, South Africa, on Wednesday.

Spain knocks off Germany 1-0 to reach first Cup final By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

DURBAN, South Africa — Spain outplayed Germany yet again. And now the Spanish have the biggest prize of all within their sights. Spain will play for the World Cup title for the very first time, thanks to Carles Puyol’s goal on a powerful header in the second half Wednesday night. The 1-0 victory over Germany was a repeat of the teams’ meeting in the European Championship final two years ago, which gave Spain its first major title in 44 years. “This is one of the greatest moments for Spain, for us to be in the final of the World Cup, it’s history,” said David Villa, who remains tied with the Netherlands’ Wesley Sneijder for tournament scoring leader at five goals. “And we want to make more history in the final.” When the final whistle sounded, the Spanish players on the field thrust their arms in the air while the substitutes raced onto the field. Two teammates grabbed Villa, who has scored all but two of Spain’s goals here, and carried him on their shoulders. In the stands, Spanish fans partied deep into the night, waving flags, banging on drums and singing chorus after chorus of “Ole! Ole! Ole!” “We worked hard to get here and now we have made the final,” Villa said. “It’s a great thing.” For Germany, it’s yet another disappointment. The three-time champs were making their third straight trip to the World Cup semifinals. Yet just like in 2006, they are headed for the thirdplace game. “The disappointment is very big. We had a lot as our goal and we didn’t succeed,” said captain

Spain-Netherlands: A first-time winner will be crowned Sunday JOHANNESBURG — The first World Cup in Africa appropriately presents something new: Spain or the Netherlands as a first-time champion. The Spaniards and Dutch will meet Sunday at Soccer City after winning tight semifinals. It’s the first final for the Spaniards, who broke a 44-year major championships drought when they won the European crown two years ago. For the Dutch, it’s a third trip to the title game, having lost in 1974 and ’78. The nations never have met in a World Cup and have split nine games 4-4 with one draw. Spain is a 1-2 favorite to win the final, according to BetUS. Both teams rolled into this tournament with long streaks of success, and the Netherlands’ string remains intact: 25 matches without a loss and 10 straight victories, including all six in South Africa, the only team to manage that. “We know we can play football,” captain Giovanni van Bronckhorst said. “To be mentally strong is now most important.” Mentally fragile has been the World Cup description for both nations. The Dutch in particular regularly have wasted their deep pool of

Philipp Lahm, who was in tears after the game. “Right now, I really don’t feel like playing for third place.”

Schalk van Zuydam / The Associated Press

The Netherlands, above, has never won a World Cup title, and neither has its opponent, Spain. soccer talent by going out early in big events since the loss to Argentina in the 1978 final. They won the ’88 European Championship and fell to Brazil in the World Cup semifinals 10 years later. Other than that, it’s pretty much been rotten Oranje. Spain didn’t even do as well at the Netherlands, consistently flopping in the biggest moments. But the so-called golden generation for La Roja has changed the team’s direction heading into Sunday’s final. — The Associated Press

Indeed, the Germans looked devastated. Bastian Schweinsteiger was on his knees for several minutes, and not even a

consoling pat on the back from Puyol helped. Spain has been the best team in Europe — all the world, really — for much of the last four years. It’s lost all of two games since November 2006, one a shocker to Switzerland in the group-stage opener. With all but two of the starting lineup playing for either Barcelona or Real Madrid, the Spanish play with a seamlessness and fluidity that’s almost intuitive. “They have been playing together for several years, they are very cohesive, their moves come automatically,” German striker Miroslav Klose said. “They were simply the better team.” With the World Cup title so close — not to mention Queen Sofia on hand — the Spanish came through with their best game yet. “We’ve shown that in the big moments we can grow even more,” Villa said. “We should have scored more goals, but one from Puyol has put us in the final.” They dominated possession the entire night, and they peppered Germany goalkeeper Manuel Neuer so many times that a goal seemed inevitable. Finally, they did. Xavi swung a corner kick right into the scrum in front of Neuer in the 73rd minute. With fellow defender — and Barcelona teammate — Gerard Pique next to him and screening Neuer’s view, Puyol leaped up and got the ball. He gave one mighty swing of his head, his long curls flying. Neuer dove to his left, but had no chance to stop the ball as it thundered into the net. “I am sure the Spanish can win any game,” Germany coach Joachim Loew said, “because they are dominant and it’s hard to contain their attack.”

game where the star power is in starters and closers. “We often talk about the importance of a sports property owning a day on the calendar,” said Paul Swangard, managing director of the Warsaw Sports Marketing Center at the University of Oregon. “Baseball owns the midsummer classic, yet I think they often un-deliver on the opportunity. They are happy with what they have, where, instead, a little creativity would go a long way to engage the casual fan the rest of the summer.” Baseball is happy to continue the tradition of picking at least one player from each team. This was a good idea back when fans didn’t have televised access to every team every night, but it’s a bad idea now. Forcing a guy from a last-place team with no good candidates to play in this game diminishes the credibility of everyone else. How can you introduce Thornton and not Weaver, even if the Angels pitcher’s appearance would be symbolic because, if he throws Sunday as scheduled, he’d be ineligible to play in the All-Star game? Baseball is also happy to continue the practice of having the manager pick some of the players. That’s another dumb idea. It’s not the manager’s game, and it’s no longer cute to hear how a manager snubbed a worthy player to take care of his own player. Did you hear how the Phillies’ Charlie Manuel explained taking Ryan Howard over Votto, who is having a better season? “He’s my guy,” Manuel said. Wonderful. Baseball markets itself to the world on the basis of a back slap and a wink. Manuel was even more impressive when he explained why he didn’t pick the mustsee phenom Strasburg, saying, “What’s he got, like five starts or something?” At the time, Strasburg had six starts. Baseball is putting its showcase game in the hands of folks who aren’t even paying attention, and that has to change. Allowing the fans to pick the starters is a wonderful idea. But get rid of the player voting, which is all based on reputation. Get rid of the manager selection, which is all based on fraternalism. And get rid of the one-player-perteam rule, which is as outdated as stirrups. I don’t care if home-field advantage in the World Series is at stake. The perception of baseball’s entertainment value is also at stake, which is more important considering it has fallen behind football and basketball as a national attraction. League officials should pick the reserves and plan out the game like they plan out any other big marketing event. Baseball’s All-Star game is a midsummer classic, not a vacation frat party, and it needs to once again start acting like it.

RCR is NASCAR’s biggest mover at midway point of season With the Sprint Cup’s current top driver in Kevin Harvick, Richard Childress Racing is flourishing By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Richard Childress Racing was shut out of the championship hunt last season, when all four of its drivers struggled through a winless year. A slew of changes followed, from personnel and shop procedures to dropping a driver to make it a three-car team. Now, at the midseason mark in the Sprint Cup Series, RCR is NASCAR’s most improved team. Led by current points leader Kevin Harvick and his two victories, RCR has two drivers currently eligible for the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. All three would be inside the top 12 had an ill-timed caution not cost Clint Bowyer a win Saturday night at Daytona International Speedway. Instead, that late yellow as he closed in on the white flag set up a sequence of events that took Bowyer from certain victory to a 17thplace finish while Harvick got the win. Jeff Burton, who led 11 laps, finished fifth to cap what had been a dominating night for RCR.

AUTO RACING Where RCR now finds itself is a direct result of the commitment owner Richard Childress showed exactly one year ago. “He stepped out on a huge limb to spend the money to start over ... halfway through the year, and it’s paying off now for us,” Harvick said. This time last year Harvick was 26th in the standings, Burton was 15th and Bowyer was 16th. Headed into the 19th race of the season this Saturday night at Chicago, Harvick holds a 212-point lead over Jeff Gordon in the standings, while Burton is eighth and Bowyer 14th — but only 49 points out of the top 12. “It’s pretty remarkable, to tell you the truth,” Harvick said. “Richard is the one who pulled all the triggers to make everything happen.” So who else has made remarkable gains through the first half of this season? The driver who gets the most attention for his improvement this

year is Dale Earnhardt Jr., who cracked the top-12 this week and is up 10 spots from where he was running this time last season. Receiving much less fanfare, though, is Scott Speed. He was 35th in points at the midway point of last year, and currently sits 24th. But because of the disarray at Red Bull Racing — star driver Brian Vickers is out the rest of the year receiving treatment for blood clots — the team gets more attention for what’s not going right than it does for Speed’s improvement. On a broader scale, it appears that RCR and Joe Gibbs Racing have improved their overall organizations to the point that they can now compete with Hendrick Motorsports. Toss Kurt Busch of Penske Racing into the mix, and there are some very serious contenders to Jimmie Johnson’s fouryear hold on the Sprint Cup. JGR, with seven wins between Denny Hamlin and Kyle Busch, has at times this season appeared to be the most dominant organization. But Hamlin and Kyle Busch are streaky, and neither has the consistent finishes that Harvick is knocking down. Kurt Busch has two wins, 11 top-10 finishes and is ranked fourth in the standings. But as the

Jim Cole / The Associated Press

NASCAR driver Kevin Harvick, a Richard Childress Racing driver, is currently leading the Sprint Cup points standings. star driver of the only Dodge team, he may not have enough support from his Penske teammates or the manufacturer to mount a serious challenge on Johnson. And Johnson, by the way, finally silenced that 10-week talk of a slump by winning back-to-back races before he was caught in a late 20-car accident at Daytona that gave him a 31st-place finish. Nobody is counting him out in what’s been a year of crossing off goals on his checklist — he won

at Bristol for the first time, and his win last month at Sonoma gave him his first road-course victory. Next up is Chicago, considered crew chief Chad Knaus’ “home track,” and one of only four active tracks where he’s yet to win. “We have been very close,” he said. “Things get away from us. I feel like we’ve got a good chance there, and certainly hope to (win).” Among the biggest disappointments this year has been Juan Pablo Montoya, who made his

first Chase last season and briefly even flirted with the title. But he’s had no luck at all this year and has dropped 10 spots in the standings to 21st. Tony Stewart had a huge lead in the standings at the midway mark last year, but needed a strong push over the last month to climb to ninth in the current standings. He’s not yet running for wins, though. At this point in 2009, he had two victories and an All-Star win. “It’s kind of like last year — we had a great first half of the season, then just kind of fell off. We didn’t really feel like we were doing anything different. We just weren’t hitting on the things that we needed to in the fall to keep us good,” Stewart said. “I think it’s kind of worked the opposite way this year so far. We just weren’t finding the things to make the car happy. As time is going on, every week we’re just learning a little more about what to do to get the feel in the car that I like.” Stewart-Haas Racing might actually be the most disappointing team so far this season. Ryan Newman is down eight spots in the standings and at 15th in points, needs to make up a lot of ground to make the Chase.


D4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB New York 53 31 .631 — Tampa Bay 51 33 .607 2 Boston 49 36 .576 4½ Toronto 42 43 .494 11½ Baltimore 25 59 .298 28 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 46 37 .554 — Chicago 45 38 .542 1 Minnesota 45 39 .536 1½ Kansas City 39 46 .459 8 Cleveland 33 51 .393 13½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 50 34 .595 — Los Angeles 46 41 .529 5½ Oakland 41 45 .477 10 Seattle 34 50 .405 16 ——— Wednesday’s Games Detroit 4, Baltimore 2 Toronto 6, Minnesota 5 Tampa Bay 6, Boston 4 Texas 4, Cleveland 3 Chicago White Sox 5, L.A. Angels 2 N.Y. Yankees 6, Oakland 2 Kansas City 7, Seattle 3 Today’s Games L.A. Angels (E.Santana 8-6) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 7-7), 11:05 a.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 7-7) at Toronto (Cecil 7-5), 4:07 p.m. Cleveland (Westbrook 5-4) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 5-9), 4:10 p.m. Baltimore (Guthrie 3-10) at Texas (Tom.Hunter 5-0), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 10-2) at Seattle (J.Vargas 6-4), 7:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Minnesota at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Cleveland at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 5:05 p.m. Kansas City at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. L.A. Angels at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 50 35 .588 — New York 47 38 .553 3 Philadelphia 43 40 .518 6 Florida 40 44 .476 9½ Washington 38 47 .447 12 Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 49 37 .570 — St. Louis 45 39 .536 3 Chicago 38 47 .447 10½ Milwaukee 37 48 .435 11½ Houston 34 51 .400 14½ Pittsburgh 30 54 .357 18 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 49 35 .583 — Colorado 46 38 .548 3 Los Angeles 46 38 .548 3 San Francisco 44 40 .524 5 Arizona 32 53 .376 17½ ——— Wednesday’s Games Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 5 Washington 7, San Diego 6 Cincinnati 3, N.Y. Mets 1 Houston 6, Pittsburgh 3 San Francisco 15, Milwaukee 2 Colorado 8, St. Louis 7 Chicago Cubs 8, Arizona 3 Florida 4, L.A. Dodgers 0 Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 1-6) at Houston (Oswalt 5-10), 11:05 a.m. San Francisco (Zito 7-4) at Milwaukee (M.Parra 3-5), 11:10 a.m. St. Louis (Carpenter 9-2) at Colorado (Jimenez 14-1), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Cueto 8-2) at Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 5-3), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Latos 9-4) at Washington (Atilano 6-5), 4:05 p.m. Florida (Ani.Sanchez 7-5) at Arizona (R.Lopez 4-7), 6:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 4-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 8-4), 7:10 p.m. Friday’s Games Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. San Francisco at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Houston, 5:05 p.m. Pittsburgh at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. San Diego at Colorado, 6:10 p.m. Florida at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. Chicago Cubs at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Rangers 4, Indians 3 ARLINGTON, Texas — Michael Young homered and Josh Hamilton stretched his home hitting streak to 27 games. Young’s two-run homer in the fifth drew the Rangers even at three. Hamilton extended the second-longest home hitting streak in club history with an RBI single in the first. Al Oliver hit in 30 straight home games in 1981. Cleveland Brantley cf J.Nix 2b C.Santana c Hafner dh Jh.Peralta 3b Duncan rf Crowe lf A.Marte 1b Donald ss Totals

AB 5 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 34

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 6 2 3 11

Avg. .143 .233 .284 .245 .248 .265 .250 .182 .270

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Dav.Murphy lf Hamilton dh N.Cruz rf Smoak 1b Treanor c A.Blanco 2b Borbon cf Totals

AB 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 2 3 30

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 7 4 4

Avg. .291 .306 .266 .340 .301 .208 .228 .246 .286

SO 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 6

Cleveland 000 210 000 — 3 6 1 Texas 100 021 00x — 4 7 1 E—Donald (9), A.Blanco (4). LOB—Cleveland 7, Texas 7. 2B—C.Santana (10), Duncan (3), Andrus (10), Treanor (6). HR—J.Nix (6), off C.Lewis; M.Young (12), off Talbot. RBIs—J.Nix (13), Jh.Peralta (36), M.Young 2 (53), Hamilton (63), Borbon (25). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (A.Marte, Jh.Peralta, Donald); Texas 4 (N.Cruz 2, M.Young 2). GIDP—Hamilton, N.Cruz. DP—Cleveland 2 (Jh.Peralta, J.Nix, A.Marte), (Donald, A.Marte). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Talbot L, 8-8 5 2-3 7 4 4 3 4 J.Smith 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 Sipp 2 0 0 0 0 2 Texas IP H R ER BB SO C.Lewis W, 8-5 6 6 3 2 2 8 Ogando H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Francisco H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 1 N.Feliz S, 23-25 1 0 0 0 1 1 Inherited runners-scored—J.Smith 2-0. Talbot (A.Blanco). WP—Talbot, C.Lewis. T—2:56. A—24,427 (49,170).

NP ERA 105 3.99 11 5.65 23 5.40 NP ERA 102 3.33 15 0.68 11 3.69 18 2.92 HBP—by

Royals 7, Mariners 3 SEATTLE — Alberto Callaspo turned his failed eighth-inning sacrifice bunt attempt into a three-run home run, lifting Kansas

City to a comeback victory over Seattle. Callaspo came up in the eighth with the Royals trailing 3-2 and runners on first and second. Reliever Brandon League (5-6) had walked the first two batters. Callaspo was unsuccessful twice in making contact on a sac-bunt. Kansas City Podsednik lf Kendall c DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b Callaspo 3b Betemit dh Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Getz 2b Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 37

R H 0 0 1 0 1 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 7 11

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Branyan dh Jo.Lopez 3b F.Gutierrez cf Kotchman 1b M.Saunders lf Ro.Johnson c a-Langerhans ph Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 3 4 2 3 0 4 33

R 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 0 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 6

BB 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

SO 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 4

Avg. .296 .264 .331 .327 .279 .375 .256 .258 .234

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 6 3 6

SO 0 0 2 1 3 1 2 0 0 0 9

Avg. .324 .233 .266 .243 .266 .215 .213 .200 .195 .263

Kansas City 100 000 141 — 7 11 1 Seattle 010 002 000 — 3 6 1 a-walked for Ro.Johnson in the 9th. E—Y.Betancourt (10), Jo.Wilson (9). LOB—Kansas City 8, Seattle 9. 2B—Y.Betancourt 2 (19), Getz (4). HR—Callaspo (8), off League; Maier (3), off Olson; B.Butler (9), off C.Cordero; Kotchman 2 (6), off Davies 2. RBIs—B.Butler 2 (46), Callaspo 3 (41), Maier (27), Kotchman 3 (28). SB—M.Saunders (2). SF—B.Butler. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 4 (Podsednik 3, Betemit); Seattle 5 (Ro.Johnson, Jo.Lopez 3, Branyan). Runners moved up—Podsednik. GIDP—Jo.Lopez. DP—Kansas City 1 (Davies, Kendall, B.Butler). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO Davies 6 4 3 3 4 5 V.Marte W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 1 0 Farnsworth H, 5 1 1 0 0 1 3 Soria S, 25-27 1 0 0 0 0 1 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Fister 6 6 1 1 2 1 B.Sweeney H, 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 League L, 5-6 0 1 3 3 2 0 Olson 1 2 1 1 0 2 C.Cordero 1 1 1 1 0 1 League pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Farnsworth pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Soria 2-0. V.Marte (Branyan). WP—B.Sweeney. T—2:55. A—16,954 (47,878).

NP 111 17 21 17 NP 97 14 17 23 12

ERA 5.57 3.54 1.98 2.34 ERA 3.09 1.00 3.95 5.91 5.19

IBB—off

Rays 6, Red Sox 4 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — David Price pitched into the eighth inning to become the AL’s first 12-game winner and fellow All-Star Evan Longoria ended the longest homerless drought of his career to help surging Tampa Bay beat Boston to finish a three-game sweep. Price (12-4) allowed two runs, including Mike Cameron’s solo homer, while scattering eight hits, walking one and striking out 10 over 7 2⁄3 innings. Boston AB Scutaro ss 5 D.McDonald rf 5 D.Ortiz dh 4 Youkilis 1b 5 A.Beltre 3b 4 Hall 2b 3 a-E.Patterson ph-2b1 Nava lf 4 Cameron cf 3 Cash c 2 b-J.Drew ph 1 Totals 37

R H 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 1 1 1 4 11

Tampa Bay Zobrist rf Crawford lf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b S.Rodriguez 2b Joyce dh B.Upton cf Brignac ss Shoppach c Totals

R 2 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

AB 2 4 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 30

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 2 2 1 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 11

Avg. .277 .268 .263 .292 .334 .225 .218 .310 .274 .143 .279

H BI BB 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5 5 6

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 5

Avg. .286 .318 .296 .201 .279 .172 .225 .271 .216

Boston 000 001 102 — 4 11 2 Tampa Bay 000 231 00x — 6 5 0 a-struck out for Hall in the 8th. b-singled for Cash in the 9th. E—A.Beltre (14), Hall (5). LOB—Boston 9, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—D.McDonald (9), D.Ortiz (20), A.Beltre (25). 3B—Nava (1). HR—Cameron (2), off Price; Longoria (13), off Wakefield. RBIs—D.McDonald (21), D.Ortiz (55), Cameron 2 (11), Crawford (44), Longoria (61), C.Pena (51), S.Rodriguez (30), B.Upton (30). SB—Zobrist (16), C.Pena (3), S.Rodriguez (7). SF—Cameron. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 4 (Scutaro, Hall, E.Patterson, Youkilis); Tampa Bay 3 (Brignac, B.Upton, Longoria). Runners moved up—Crawford. Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wkefield L, 3-7 5 2-3 4 6 6 6 3 112 5.22 Richardson 0 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.45 R.Ramirez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.76 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.60 Manuel 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 7.71 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 12-4 7 2-3 8 2 2 1 10 111 2.42 Balfour 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 16 2.27 Choate 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 5.91 Garza S, 1-1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 20 4.28 Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Richardson pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Richardson 1-1, R.Ramirez 1-0, Balfour 1-0, Garza 1-1. IBB—off Wakefield (Longoria). WP—Wakefield 2, R.Ramirez. PB—Cash. T—3:10. A—24,356 (36,973).

Blue Jays 6, Twins 5 TORONTO — Vernon Wells drove in the go-ahead run with a seventh-inning double, and Jose Bautista hit an inside-the-park homer, his major leagueleading 22nd, for Toronto. Wells snapped a zero for 21 slump with a two-out double off Matt Guerrier (1-5), giving the Blue Jays just their second win in 10 games. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Repko rf Cuddyer rf-1b Kubel dh Delm.Young lf Valencia 3b Hardy ss a-Thome ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 0 3 3 4 4 3 1 34

R H 2 2 1 3 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 5 11

Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 4 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 1 J.Bautista rf 2 2

BI 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .277 .277 .301 .345 .400 .261 .261 .306 .327 .221 .261

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 2 2

SO 0 2 0

Avg. .280 .256 .238

V.Wells cf Lind dh J.Buck c Overbay 1b Encarnacion 3b J.McDonald 2b Totals

4 4 4 4 4 3 32

0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 6 10

1 0 0 0 1 0 6

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 1 0 1 1 0 5

.272 .206 .269 .244 .213 .222

Minnesota 000 211 100 — 5 11 1 Toronto 100 120 20x — 6 10 0 a-flied out for Hardy in the 9th. E—Delm.Young (4). LOB—Minnesota 4, Toronto 5. 2B—V.Wells (25), J.Buck (14). 3B—O.Hudson (3), F.Lewis (4). HR—O.Hudson (4), off Rzepczynski; Delm. Young (10), off Rzepczynski; Ale.Gonzalez (16), off Slowey; J.Bautista (22), off Slowey. RBIs—O.Hudson 3 (22), Kubel (46), Delm.Young (57), Ale.Gonzalez 2 (44), J.Bautista 2 (54), V.Wells (49), Encarnacion (24). CS—O.Hudson (2). SF—Kubel, Ale.Gonzalez. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (Delm. Young, Mauer); Toronto 3 (J.McDonald 2, Lind). GIDP—Kubel, Hardy, V.Wells. DP—Minnesota 1 (Valencia, O.Hudson, Morneau); Toronto 3 (J.Buck, J.Buck, Ale.Gonzalez, Overbay, J.McDonald), (Ale.Gonzalez, J.McDonald, Overbay), (J.McDonald, Ale.Gonzalez, Overbay). Minnesota IP H R ER BB Slowey 6 1-3 9 5 5 1 Guerrier L, 1-5 1-3 1 1 1 1 Duensing 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 Toronto IP H R ER BB Rzepczynski 5 2-3 8 4 4 1 Camp 1 2 1 1 0 S.Downs W, 3-5 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 Gregg S, 19-22 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Guerrier 1-0, Camp 2-0, S.Downs 1-0. T—2:52. A—14,886 (49,539).

SO 4 0 1 SO 7 0 0 0 1-1,

NP ERA 98 4.74 13 3.03 14 1.69 NP ERA 99 6.35 17 2.62 19 2.65 13 3.82 Duensing

Tigers 4, Orioles 2 DETROIT — Max Scherzer pitched seven solid innings and Danny Worth hit his first homer for Detroit, which swept the three-game series. They have won five of six on a homestand that ends against Minnesota. Scherzer (6-6) has won a career-high four straight. He gave up one run, six hits and two walks while striking out six. Robbie Weinhardt gave up a run in his major league debut and Phil Coke got the final three outs for his first save with the Tigers. Baltimore Lugo 2b M.Tejada 3b Markakis rf Wigginton 1b Ad.Jones cf Wieters c Pie lf J.Bell dh a-Fox ph C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 3 4 3 1 2 31

R 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 7 1 2

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf C.Guillen 2b Inge 3b Laird c Worth ss Totals

AB 4 4 5 3 3 4 3 4 4 34

R H 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 4 11

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 4

BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 7

Avg. .256 .277 .308 .249 .275 .243 .367 .214 .224 .245

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 3

Avg. .306 .271 .308 .347 .341 .291 .272 .189 .261

Baltimore 000 000 101 — 2 7 0 Detroit 101 020 00x — 4 11 1 E—A.Jackson (2). LOB—Baltimore 6, Detroit 11. 2B—Ad.Jones (11), A.Jackson (20), Damon (21), Boesch (17), Inge (22). 3B—Ad.Jones (4), Pie (1). HR—Worth (1), off Bergesen. RBIs—Wieters (29), Ordonez (52), C.Guillen (26), Inge (39), Worth (7). S—Damon. SF—Wieters. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (J.Bell, Wigginton, Lugo); Detroit 7 (Boesch, Damon 2, Laird, Ordonez, Worth 2). Runners moved up—A.Jackson, Damon, Ordonez, C.Guillen. GIDP—Markakis, Pie. DP—Detroit 2 (C.Guillen, Worth, Mi.Cabrera), (Mi. Cabrera, Worth, Weinhardt). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergesen L, 3-6 6 11 4 4 3 3 101 6.40 Albers 2 0 0 0 1 0 29 5.09 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer W, 6-6 7 6 1 1 2 6 103 4.61 Weinhardt H, 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 9.00 Coke S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 2.60 Weinhardt pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Bergesen pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Albers 2-0, Coke 1-1. IBB—off Albers (Inge). HBP—by Weinhardt (M.Tejada). T—2:22. A—22,837 (41,255).

White Sox 5, Angels 2 CHICAGO — Freddy Garcia pitched six solid innings, Paul Konerko hit a two-run double and Chicago beat Los Angeles for its fourth straight victory. The start of the game was delayed because of rain for two hours, 20 minutes. Paul Konerko hit a two-run double and Chicago won despite making five errors. The Angels lost their third in a row. Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh Napoli c J.Rivera lf McAnulty 1b Br.Wood 3b Totals

AB 3 3 3 4 2 4 4 4 4 31

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 5 1 2 10

Chicago AB R H Pierre lf 4 0 1 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 2 Rios cf 4 2 2 Konerko 1b 4 0 2 An.Jones rf 2 1 1 R.Castro c 4 0 1 Viciedo 3b 3 1 1 Vizquel 3b 1 0 0 Lillibridge dh 3 0 1 a-Kotsay ph-dh 1 0 0 Beckham 2b 3 0 1 Totals 33 5 12

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 5

Avg. .282 .281 .250 .304 .253 .256 .236 .091 .168 Avg. .262 .280 .302 .298 .195 .310 .281 .240 .429 .229 .208

Los Angeles 000 010 010 — 2 5 0 Chicago 002 003 00x — 5 12 5 E—Vizquel (1), R.Castro (1), Al.Ramirez (10), Beckham (9), Viciedo (1). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Chicago 6. 2B—Konerko 2 (14), Viciedo (1). RBIs—H.Kendrick (52), Konerko 2 (60), Viciedo (4), Lillibridge 2 (9). SB—E.Aybar (13). CS—Tor.Hunter (10), Pierre (10), Lillibridge (1). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (J.Rivera, Napoli 3); Chicago 5 (Lillibridge 2, An.Jones, Rios, Kotsay). Runners moved up—H.Matsui, R.Castro. GIDP—Napoli, Al.Ramirez. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Br.Wood, H.Kendrick, McAnulty); Chicago 1 (Viciedo, Beckham, Konerko). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Saunders L, 6-9 5 2-3 10 5 5 1 S.Shields 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 Rodney 1 1 0 0 1 Chicago IP H R ER BB F.Garcia W, 9-3 6 5 1 0 2 Putz 1 0 0 0 0 S.Santos 1-3 0 1 0 0 Thornton H, 12 2-3 0 0 0 0 Jenks S, 19-20 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—S.Shields

SO NP ERA 3 95 4.76 1 18 5.02 1 20 3.15 SO NP ERA 6 92 4.36 2 10 1.64 1 18 2.00 0 8 2.72 1 11 3.98 1-0, Thornton

2-0. HBP—by S.Santos (E.Aybar, H.Kendrick). PB—Napoli. Catchers’ interference—R.Castro. T—2:48. A—21,135 (40,615).

Yankees 6, Athletics 2 OAKLAND, Calif. — Mark Teixeira hit a three-run homer to help A.J. Burnett win for the first time in more than five weeks, and New York completed a sweep of Oakland with a victory. Derek Jeter had a go-ahead single and Ramiro Pena also singled in a run in New York’s five-run fourth inning. The Yankees won their fifth straight and earned their first road sweep of the season. New York AB Jeter ss 5 Swisher rf 4 Teixeira 1b 4 A.Rodriguez 3b 4 Posada dh 4 Thames lf 2 a-Granderson ph-cf 3 Cervelli c 4 Gardner cf-lf 3 R.Pena 2b 4 Totals 37

R H 1 2 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 6 12

Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf K.Suzuki c Cust dh Kouzmanoff 3b M.Ellis 2b Watson lf Pennington ss Totals

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 31

BI 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

BB 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 5

SO 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .280 .298 .241 .273 .268 .291 .225 .270 .313 .208

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 2 2

SO 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .288 .278 .297 .248 .289 .266 .279 .000 .260

New York 000 501 000 — 6 12 1 Oakland 001 001 000 — 2 6 0 a-flied out for Thames in the 5th. E—A.J.Burnett (2). LOB—New York 9, Oakland 4. 2B—Swisher (18). HR—Teixeira (15), off G.Gonzalez; Swisher (14), off Wuertz. RBIs—Jeter (41), Swisher (48), Teixeira 3 (57), R.Pena (10), Crisp (12), Cust (15). SB—Gardner (25), Pennington (13). Runners left in scoring position—New York 6 (Thames 2, Jeter, Posada, R.Pena, Gardner); Oakland 2 (Barton, Kouzmanoff). Runners moved up—Teixeira, Granderson, Cervelli. GIDP—Jeter, Cervelli, K.Suzuki, Cust. DP—New York 2 (Jeter, R.Pena, Teixeira), (Teixeira, Jeter, Teixeira); Oakland 2 (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton), (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Burnett W, 7-7 7 5 2 2 2 3 110 4.75 D.Marte 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 4.08 Chamberlain 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 4.95 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez L, 7-6 4 8 5 5 5 5 90 3.79 Ziegler 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 3.43 Wuertz 1 1 1 1 0 0 23 5.71 Blevins 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 3.90 Breslow 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 2.77 Bowers 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 4.63 G.Gonzalez pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Ziegler 1-0. WP— G.Gonzalez. T—2:58. A—31,518 (35,067).

NL ROUNDUP Cubs 8, Diamondbacks 3 PHOENIX — Aramis Ramirez hit a three-run homer, Ryan Dempster labored through five innings and Chicago earned its first three-game sweep at Chase Field with a win over free-swinging Arizona. Outscored 35-12 in a recent seven-game homestand, the Cubs heated up in Chase Field’s air conditioning, scoring 23 runs to notch their first three-game sweep at Arizona’s spacious stadium in 16 series all-time. Chicago Fukudome rf Theriot 2b D.Lee 1b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b A.Soriano lf Colvin lf S.Castro ss Soto c Dempster p J.Russell p Cashner p b-Fontenot ph Marshall p Berg p Totals

AB 4 5 4 5 5 2 2 5 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 38

R H 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 10

BI 0 0 0 1 3 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

Avg. .261 .279 .233 .306 .189 .275 .269 .269 .278 .152 .000 --.300 .000 ---

Arizona C.Young cf K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf Montero c M.Reynolds 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b S.Drew ss G.Parra lf E.Jackson p Boyer p a-Ryal ph J.Gutierrez p c-T.Abreu ph Qualls p Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 4 3 4 2 0 1 0 1 0 37

R H 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 10

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 10

Avg. .267 .264 .259 .370 .218 .251 .269 .258 .200 .000 .292 --.237 ---

Chicago 000 320 003 — 8 10 1 Arizona 000 300 000 — 3 10 1 a-struck out for Boyer in the 6th. b-struck out for Cashner in the 8th. c-grounded out for J.Gutierrez in the 8th. E—D.Lee (5), G.Parra (1). LOB—Chicago 8, Arizona 9. 2B—Byrd (27), M.Reynolds (14). HR—Ar.Ramirez (9), off Qualls. RBIs—Byrd (37), Ar.Ramirez 3 (30), A.Soriano (42), S.Castro 2 (22), Dempster (1), C.Young 2 (59), E.Jackson (3). SB—Theriot (16). CS—Montero (1). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Fukudome, Dempster 2); Arizona 5 (G.Parra, Montero, J.Upton 2, K.Johnson). Runners moved up—D.Lee, K.Johnson. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dmpster W, 7-7 5 8 3 3 1 6 98 3.61 J.Russell H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.13 Cashner H, 2 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 3 29 2.65 Marshall H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 2.13 Berg 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 5.74 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson L, 6-7 5 6 5 5 4 1 100 4.92 Boyer 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 5.00 J.Gutierrez 2 1 0 0 0 1 21 7.50 Qualls 1 3 3 3 0 2 18 8.31 Inherited runners-scored—Cashner 1-0. IBB—off E.Jackson (Soto). HBP—by Dempster (S.Drew), by E.Jackson (A.Soriano). T—3:03. A—20,914 (48,633).

Marlins 4, Dodgers 0 LOS ANGELES — Josh Johnson scattered six hits over eight innings and lowered his major leagueleading ERA to 1.70 to help Florida to a victory over Los Angeles. Johnson (9-3) threw 117 pitches and came within three outs of his first shutout in 94 big league starts, striking out eight and

walking one. Jose Veras finished up with a perfect ninth. Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b Veras p H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b-1b Uggla 2b C.Ross cf R.Paulino c Stanton rf Jo.Johnson p b-Helms ph-3b Totals

AB 4 4 0 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 1 35

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 1

SO 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 7

Avg. .273 .301 --.296 .261 .285 .291 .288 .223 .132 .255

Los Angeles Furcal ss Kemp cf Ethier rf Loney 1b Blake 3b G.Anderson lf R.Martin c DeWitt 2b Kuroda p a-Paul ph Ju.Miller p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 10

Avg. .330 .266 .322 .304 .258 .182 .246 .275 .000 .254 ---

Florida 040 000 000 — 4 7 0 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 6 2 a-flied out for Kuroda in the 7th. b-flied out for Jo.Johnson in the 9th. E—Furcal (11), Kuroda (3). LOB—Florida 5, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Uggla (16), C.Ross (19), R.Martin (10). HR—Stanton (4), off Kuroda. RBIs—C.Ross (45), Stanton 3 (19). SB—H.Ramirez (16), Kemp (14). Runners left in scoring position—Florida 3 (Jo. Johnson, R.Paulino, C.Ross); Los Angeles 4 (Blake 2, Paul, Loney). Runners moved up—C.Ross. Florida IP H R Johnson W, 9-3 8 6 0 Veras 1 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R Kuroda L, 7-7 7 6 4 Ju.Miller 2 1 0 T—2:31. A—41,947 (56,000).

ER 0 0 ER 4 0

BB 1 0 BB 0 1

SO 8 2 SO 4 3

NP 117 11 NP 103 28

ERA 1.70 5.27 ERA 3.87 4.35

Rockies 8, Cardinals 7 DENVER — Chris Iannetta hit a leadoff home run in the bottom of the ninth inning and the Colorado Rockies pulled off another late rally against St. Louis, beating the Cardinals. A day after the Rockies scored a remarkable nine runs in the ninth to stun St. Louis 12-9, Colorado came back this time after trailing 5-0 in the middle innings. St. Louis F.Lopez 3b Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Jay rf Y.Molina c Greene ss B.Ryan ss J.Garcia p McClellan p c-Stavinoha ph Boggs p T.Miller p Motte p MacLane p Schumaker 2b Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 40

R H 1 3 0 2 0 0 4 4 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 7 16

BI 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .284 .278 .303 .305 .352 .229 .256 .198 .200 .500 .265 .000 --.000 --.259

Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 4 2 1 J.Herrera 2b 5 0 3 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 3 Mora 3b 3 0 1 Rogers p 0 0 0 b-S.Smith ph-rf 2 0 0 Spilborghs rf 3 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 d-Giambi ph 1 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 Iannetta c 5 1 1 Eldred 1b 4 3 3 Barmes ss 4 1 1 Cook p 1 0 0 a-Stewart ph-3b 2 1 2 Totals 39 8 15

BI 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .244 .320 .307 .252 .200 .289 .262 .333 .234 .000 .217 .750 .257 .207 .257

St. Louis 201 021 100 — 7 16 2 Colorado 000 031 031 — 8 15 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-singled for Cook in the 5th. b-flied out for Rogers in the 7th. c-lined out for McClellan in the 8th. d-struck out for Belisle in the 8th. E—Motte (1), Greene (4). LOB—St. Louis 8, Colorado 10. 2B—Holliday (25), C.Gonzalez (11), Eldred (1). HR—Holliday (13), off Cook; Jay (3), off Cook; Holliday (14), off Rogers; Fowler (2), off Motte; Iannetta (6), off MacLane. RBIs—Rasmus (41), Holliday 2 (44), Jay 2 (8), Y.Molina (33), Fowler 3 (10), Mora (13), Iannetta (13), Stewart 3 (38). S—J.Garcia, Fowler. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 5 (Greene, Y.Molina, F.Lopez, Pujols 2); Colorado 5 (Iannetta, Spilborghs, J.Herrera 2, Giambi). Runners moved up—Rasmus, Mora. GIDP—F.Lopez, Pujols. DP—Colorado 2 (Barmes, J.Herrera, Eldred), (Barmes, J.Herrera, Eldred). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia 5 1-3 9 4 2 1 3 102 2.17 McClellan H, 11 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 17 2.27 Boggs H, 3 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 4 2.78 T.Miller 0 0 1 1 1 0 6 4.05 Motte BS, 1-3 2-3 3 1 1 0 2 25 2.41 MacLane L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 6 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cook 5 10 5 5 1 1 80 4.88 Rogers 2 4 2 2 0 4 40 4.85 Belisle 1 2 0 0 0 0 16 2.65 Street W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.93 T.Miller pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. MacLane pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—McClellan 2-0, T.Miller 1-0, Motte 2-2. T—3:07. A—33,251 (50,449).

Giants 15, Brewers 2 MILWAUKEE — Rookie Buster Posey hit two homers, including his first career grand slam, and Tim Lincecum struck out 10 to lead San Francisco over Milwaukee. Posey drove in six runs, going four for four and scoring three times. He capped a seven-run fourth inning with his slam. San Francisco Torres cf-lf F.Sanchez 2b A.Huff rf-lf c-Rowand ph-cf Burrell lf Schierholtz rf Posey 1b 1-Ishikawa pr-1b Sandoval 3b Renteria ss Whiteside c Lincecum p Mota p Affeldt p Totals

AB 5 6 3 2 3 2 4 1 5 5 5 4 0 0 45

R 1 1 2 0 2 0 3 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 15

H 2 2 1 0 1 0 4 0 2 3 2 1 0 0 18

BI 3 3 1 0 0 0 6 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 15

BB 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 6

Avg. .278 .285 .295 .236 .305 .260 .331 .315 .268 .304 .261 .103 --.000

Milwaukee AB Weeks 2b 5 Hart rf 3 Coffey p 0 Loe p 0 Hoffman p 0 d-A.Escobar ph-rf 1 Braun lf 2 Villanueva p 0 b-Gomez ph-rf-cf 2

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1

Avg. .269 .285 .000 .000 --.244 .286 .000 .225

Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Edmonds cf-rf Axford p Lucroy c Counsell ss Narveson p Capuano p a-Inglett ph-lf Totals

3 3 2 0 3 4 1 0 3 32

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 4 13

.263 .272 .265 --.267 .246 .292 .000 .339

San Francisco 400 704 000 — 15 18 0 Milwaukee 001 000 010 — 2 5 1 a-struck out for Capuano in the 4th. b-grounded out for Villanueva in the 5th. c-flied out for A.Huff in the 7th. d-singled for Hoffman in the 8th. 1-ran for Posey in the 7th. E—Narveson (2). LOB—San Francisco 8, Milwaukee 8. 2B—Torres (24), Fielder (14). 3B—F.Sanchez (1). HR—Torres (5), off Narveson; A.Huff (16), off Narveson; Posey (4), off Narveson; Posey (5), off Capuano; Weeks (15), off Lincecum. RBIs—Torres 3 (27), F.Sanchez 3 (24), A.Huff (50), Posey 6 (19), Renteria (13), Whiteside (10), Weeks (51), Edmonds (12). S—Lincecum. SF—Edmonds. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 4 (Sandoval, Lincecum, F.Sanchez 2); Milwaukee 3 (Narveson, Edmonds, Lucroy). Runners moved up—A.Huff. San FranciscoIP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lnccum W, 9-4 7 4 1 1 2 10 98 3.16 Mota 1 1 1 1 2 1 33 3.24 Affeldt 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 4.70 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Narveson L, 7-6 3 1-3 9 10 9 2 3 87 6.02 Capuano 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 28 4.66 Villanueva 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.15 Coffey 1 5 4 4 0 1 36 4.83 Loe 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 1.74 Hoffman 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 7.96 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 2.74 Inherited runners-scored—Capuano 3-3. WP— Lincecum, Narveson, Coffey. T—3:16. A—29,387 (41,900).

Astros 6, Pirates 3 HOUSTON — Carlos Lee and Lance Berkman homered for the second straight game and Houston hit a season-high four home runs in a win over Pittsburgh. Jeff Keppinger and Hunter Pence added solo shots for the Astros, who came in with a major-league low 50 homers this season. Pittsburgh A.McCutchen cf Tabata lf N.Walker 2b G.Jones 1b Alvarez 3b Doumit c Church rf Cedeno ss D.McCutchen p b-An.LaRoche ph Carrasco p Meek p d-Delw.Young ph Hanrahan p Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 3 3 4 4 2 1 0 0 1 0 37

ERA 3.19 1.36 3.66 1.27 ERA 4.51 4.60 3.75 3.04

Nationals 7, Padres 6 WASHINGTON — Adam Dunn hit three home runs in a game for the first time in his career to lead Washington. Dunn hit a threerun shot in the first inning, added a solo homer in the third and capped his power show with a leadoff drive in the eighth that landed in the seats above the out-of-town scoreboard in right-center field. San Diego Gwynn cf Thatcher p R.Webb p c-Stairs ph Hairston Jr. 2b-ss Ad.Gonzalez 1b Hairston lf Headley 3b Hundley c Cunningham rf E.Cabrera ss b-Salazar ph-2b Garland p a-Denorfia ph-cf Totals

AB 4 0 0 1 5 5 5 5 4 4 2 1 1 2 39

R H 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 4 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 6 13

AB 4 3 4 4 0 3 4 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 31

R 1 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 6

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 5

Avg. .219 ----.200 .245 .302 .226 .272 .259 .310 .200 .231 .172 .268

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 3 5 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 7 3

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .253 .281 .296 .280 .288 .279 .299 .240 .261 .200 .000 --1.000 .000

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .294 .235 .291 .281 .203 .266 .193 .220 .125 .230 .000 --.230 ---

Washington Morgan cf Bernadina rf Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b Alb.Gonzalez 2b Willingham lf I.Rodriguez c A.Kennedy 2b-1b Desmond ss J.Martin p Jo.Peralta p S.Burnett p Storen p Capps p Totals

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 7

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .262 .283 .245 .236 ----.259 .314 .232 .143 .100 1.000 .223 --.278 --.245

San Diego 101 000 121 — 6 13 0 Washington 401 001 01x — 7 9 0 a-homered for Garland in the 7th. b-lined out for E.Cabrera in the 8th. c-homered for R.Webb in the 9th. LOB—San Diego 8, Washington 3. 2B—Ad.Gonzalez (20), Hundley (9), Cunningham (4), Willingham (13). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (17), off J.Martin; Denorfia (1), off Jo.Peralta; Stairs (2), off Capps; A.Dunn 2 (19), off Garland 2; Desmond (6), off Garland; A.Dunn (20), off Thatcher. RBIs—Stairs (8), Ad.Gonzalez 2 (54), Hundley (26), Cunningham (8), Denorfia (12), Zimmerman (47), A.Dunn 5 (54), Desmond (36). S—Garland. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 6 (E.Cabrera, Hairston, Hairston Jr., Cunningham, Salazar, Headley); Washington 1 (J.Martin). Runners moved up—Hairston Jr., Hairston, Cunningham, I.Rodriguez. GIDP—Willingham. DP—San Diego 2 (Headley, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez), (R.Webb, Ad.Gonzalez).

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Pittsburgh 000 300 000 — 3 11 0 Houston 102 011 10x — 6 7 1 a-flied out for G.Chacin in the 4th. b-flied out for D.McCutchen in the 6th. c-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Daigle in the 6th. d-popped out for Meek in the 8th. E—Quintero (4). LOB—Pittsburgh 11, Houston 8. 2B—N.Walker (10), G.Jones (18), Doumit (15), Church (10), Cedeno (10). HR—Keppinger (2), off D.McCutchen; Ca.Lee (12), off D.McCutchen; Berkman (10), off D.McCutchen; Pence (12), off Carrasco. RBIs—Doumit (30), Church 2 (16), Keppinger (30), Berkman (41), Ca.Lee 2 (44), Pence (39). SB—Tabata (7), Bourn (27). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 6 (N.Walker, A.McCutchen, Church 2, Delw.Young, Alvarez); Houston 3 (C.Johnson 2, Keppinger). Runners moved up—Cedeno, Ca.Lee. GIDP—Alvarez. DP—Houston 1 (Keppinger, Ang.Sanchez, Berkman). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB McCtchn L, 1-4 5 4 4 4 3 Carrasco 1 1 1 1 1 Meek 1 1 1 0 2 Hanrahan 1 1 0 0 1 Houston IP H R ER BB Moehler 3 3 0 0 1 G.Chacin 1 3 3 3 1 Daigle W, 1-1 2 2 0 0 2 Byrdak H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 Lyon H, 16 1 1 0 0 0 Lndstrm S, 20-241 2 0 0 0 IBB—off Meek (Berkman). PB—Doumit. T—3:08. A—23,123 (40,976).

SO 3 1 2 1 SO 3 1 2 0 0 1

NP 84 13 23 18 NP 52 22 41 14 14 15

ERA 8.58 3.92 0.94 3.79 ERA 4.92 3.86 6.23 4.64 3.52 2.88

Braves 7, Phillies 5 PHILADELPHIA — Brian McCann hit a go-ahead three-run double during a six-run sixth inning, and Kris Medlen pitched neatly into the seventh and Atlanta beat Philadelphia. Martin Prado had two solo homers and Matt Diaz also connected for the NL East-leading Braves, who roughed up Jamie Moyer (9-8). Atlanta AB R H Prado 2b 5 2 3 Infante rf 5 1 2 C.Jones 3b 4 1 1 Glaus 1b 3 1 0 McCann c 4 1 1 M.Diaz lf 4 1 1 G.Blanco cf 0 0 0 Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 Me.Cabrera cf-lf 4 0 2 Medlen p 3 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 Saito p 0 0 0 c-Hinske ph 1 0 0 Wagner p 0 0 0 Totals 37 7 10

BI 2 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 6

Avg. .336 .307 .253 .257 .266 .202 .327 .237 .257 .182 .000 .000 .278 ---

Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Ibanez lf Howard 1b Werth rf Dobbs 3b W.Valdez 2b Figueroa p a-Gload ph Contreras p Sardinha c b-B.Francisco ph Schneider c Moyer p Baez p Ju.Castro 2b Totals

BI 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .255 .251 .242 .298 .279 .196 .252 .500 .250 --.205 .256 .254 .077 --.212

AB 5 5 3 4 3 4 3 0 1 0 3 1 0 2 0 2 36

Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP Medlen W, 6-1 6 2-3 7 4 4 2 5 88 Venters H, 8 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 12 Saito H, 11 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 21 Wgner S, 19-22 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Moyer L, 9-8 5 1-3 7 7 7 1 3 92 Baez 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 12 Figueroa 2 1 0 0 0 1 22 Contreras 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 HBP—by Medlen (Werth). PB—Sardinha. T—2:53. A—44,282 (43,651).

BB 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

R H 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 3 1 0 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11

Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 1 Keppinger 2b 5 1 Berkman 1b 2 2 Ca.Lee lf 3 1 Lyon p 0 0 Lindstrom p 0 0 Pence rf 2 1 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 Quintero c 4 0 Ang.Sanchez ss 3 0 Moehler p 1 0 G.Chacin p 0 0 a-P.Feliz ph 1 0 Daigle p 0 0 c-Bourgeois ph 1 0 Byrdak p 0 0 Michaels lf 1 0 Totals 31 6

McCann (15), Me.Cabrera 2 (12), Rollins 2 (8), W.Valdez (8). HR—Prado 2 (10), off Moyer 2; M.Diaz (1), off Moyer; Howard (16), off Medlen; Victorino (13), off Medlen. RBIs—Prado 2 (39), McCann 3 (37), M.Diaz 2 (8), Rollins (15), Victorino (47), Howard 2 (62), B.Francisco (12). Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 3 (Medlen, Glaus, Infante); Philadelphia 4 (Dobbs 2, Victorino, Ju.Castro). Runners moved up—C.Jones. GIDP—W.Valdez. DP—Atlanta 1 (Glaus, Y.Escobar, Glaus).

R H 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10

Atlanta 100 006 000 — 7 10 0 Philadelphia 010 020 110 — 5 10 0 a-singled for Figueroa in the 8th. b-singled for Sardinha in the 8th. c-struck out for Saito in the 9th. LOB—Atlanta 4, Philadelphia 7. 2B—C.Jones (16),

San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garland L, 8-6 6 8 6 6 2 4 83 3.56 Thatcher 1 1 1 1 0 1 17 2.08 R.Webb 1 0 0 0 1 0 15 1.65 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Martin W, 1-4 5 2-3 6 2 2 1 4 96 3.35 Jo.Peralta H, 2 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 7 1.23 S.Burnett H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.79 Storen H, 7 1 3 2 2 0 0 23 2.28 Capps S, 23-27 1 3 1 1 0 0 22 3.26 Thatcher pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Jo.Peralta 2-0. IBB—off Garland (Desmond). WP—Garland. T—2:53. A—13,762 (41,546).

Reds 3, Mets 1 NEW YORK — Bronson Arroyo gave up seven hits and one run without walking a batter over eight innings for Cincinnati. Chris Heisey hit a tiebreaking shot in the seventh for the Reds, who won for the fifth time in the last seven games on an 11-game road trip. Brandon Phillips homered in the third and had an RBI double in the seventh inning for the Reds. Cincinnati B.Phillips 2b O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Bruce rf Heisey rf-lf Stubbs cf C.Miller c Arroyo p b-L.Nix ph F.Cordero p Totals

AB 5 3 3 4 4 0 4 4 4 3 1 0 35

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 1

SO 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 9

Avg. .307 .251 .313 .296 .280 .273 .286 .238 .188 .216 .238 ---

New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Bay lf Thole c 1-R.Tejada pr J.Feliciano rf Cora 2b Niese p Parnell p a-Carter ph Dessens p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 0 4 4 2 0 1 0 34

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .277 .303 .316 .257 .271 .538 .221 .288 .230 .185 .000 .239 ---

Cincinnati 001 000 200 — 3 7 0 New York 100 000 000 — 1 8 1 a-grounded out for Parnell in the 8th. b-flied out for Arroyo in the 9th. 1-ran for Thole in the 9th. E—D.Wright (9). LOB—Cincinnati 7, New York 7. 2B—B.Phillips (24), I.Davis (15), Niese (2). HR— B.Phillips (12), off Niese; Heisey (5), off Niese; Pagan (6), off Arroyo. RBIs—B.Phillips 2 (30), Heisey (7), Pagan (40). Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 3 (O.Cabrera 2, Stubbs); New York 4 (Jos.Reyes 2, Bay, Cora). Runners moved up—I.Davis, Cora. GIDP— J.Feliciano. DP—Cincinnati 1 (B.Phillips, O.Cabrera, Votto). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Arroyo W, 9-4 8 7 1 1 0 3 Crdero S, 24-29 1 1 0 0 1 0 New York IP H R ER BB SO Niese L, 6-3 7 2-3 6 3 3 1 8 Parnell 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 Dessens 1 0 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Parnell 1-0. Niese (O.Cabrera). T—2:25. A—30,029 (41,800).

NP ERA 99 4.04 24 3.83 NP ERA 99 3.61 9 2.00 10 1.59 HBP—by


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 D5

N BA C O M M E N TA RY

GOLF

Is the NBA better off if LeBron takes his show on the road? By Israel Gutierrez

Americans are no longer dominating U.S. Women’s Open

McClatch-Tribune News Service

MIAMI — hat’s better for a league, singular dominance or legitimate rivalries with unpredictable results? What’s better for an organization, nightly chaos or a precise focus? What’s better for a city, a foreign king commandeering the hearts and minds of its people or continuing a healthy relationship with a familiar leader who has put in time and work to win over those people? If you choose the first option to all three of those questions, then you should use every last available prayer you have that LeBron James announces Thursday night that he will join Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh in Miami next season. If you prefer the second options, then you probably have the right idea. It’s hard to change your mind when you have been championing the idea of James pairing, at the very least, with Wade in Miami (I’m certainly guilty of that), but now that it’s all actually happening, now that Bosh is officially part of the equation, now that there is a clear picture of what could happen, it’s a reasonable change of heart to have. This team, this league, this city doesn’t need LeBron James wearing a Heat uniform. It’s almost painful just to see the words appear in front of you, but it’s an absolute truth.

By Alan Robinson

W

What’s at stake That’s not to say it won’t happen. Heck, the smart odds are with James heading south now that his buddies already have created this monster. And it’s not to say it wouldn’t be exciting, unprecedented and intriguing in so many ways, but it’s just not what is best for all parties involved. The NBA is probably secretly hoping The Chosen One chooses his hometown again, or even Chicago to team up with his own powerful power forward Carlos Boozer and former No. 1 pick Derrick Rose. Because at least then there will be a competition — perhaps between not just two teams, but three or four — for the championship. If James heads to South Florida, there won’t be any question who will win (assuming healthy, of course), because this would be one quarter of the Olympic team on one squad, all three in or approaching their prime and two of arguably the best three players on that Olympic squad. The league is at its best when there are legitimate rivalries, when there’s at least a chance someone could lose. Even as the Bulls were running through the league in Michael Jordan’s heyday, it was most interesting when you thought Charles Barkley and the Suns could challenge him, or when Karl Malone and the Jazz made a run at them, or when the Knicks tried to bully them and almost succeeded.

The Associated Press

Laura Rauch / The Associated Press file

LeBron James, center, jokes around with Team USA teammates Chris Bosh, left, and Dwyane Wade during an exhibition game in 2006. The three free agents could end up playing in Miami together after Wade and Bosh committed to the Heat today. James is set to announce his decision today during an ESPN special at 6 p.m. PDT. Imagine the drama that could be in place if a Wade-Bosh tandem first has to get through a game Magic team, an experienced Celtics team and, most captivating of them all, a James-led team after he chose not to join in Miami (that’s not even mentioning the idea of a Heat-Lakers Finals that also would have all the makings). That’s what the league wants, certainly. And no matter how greedy a fan you really are, that’s what you secretly want, too, because sports is about entertainment and uncertainty and the exhilaration of overcoming, not just an eight-month crowning ceremony.

Casting shadows Then again, maybe fans are that greedy. Maybe Miami sports fans want the dynasty because, well, not many fan bases get to know what that feels like, and this one certainly hasn’t, in the professional arena, anyway. Even then, this isn’t the way to do it. Because LeBron doesn’t just create the certain dynasty, he overshadows it entirely. He takes a feel-good time and turns it into a “you feelin’ me?” time, because that’s how large a brand, a franchise, an icon he already is, and he doesn’t mind telling you. Just look at how he plans on announcing his de-

cision: with a one-hour “special” that surely will include every detail of LeBron James, from birth weight to latest shoe design. Sure, it ends up being for a good cause, the Boys and Girls Club, but James could help out those organizations with his own dime rather than having others pick up the tab. This announcement extravaganza is more about selling LeBron James. And it’s that type of “lookat-me” behavior that this Heat organization never has been about. Not at this level, at least. It wasn’t appreciated when Shaquille O’Neal brought it with him from Los Angeles, and it shouldn’t be if James takes over an area that already has Wade’s name all over it. If Wade and Bosh could announce their decision together, why couldn’t James do the same? If his decision is Miami, then it’s already disturbingly symbolic that he lets his teammates announce somewhat casually on one day, while he gets an over-the-top announcement show a day later. What’s better for everyone involved? A team around Wade and Bosh that might include a Brendan Haywood, a Mike Miller, or even better, a resigned Udonis Haslem. It would be good enough to win at the highest level, and it would feel purer. No one really needs LeBron James to say he will join the Miami Heat on Thursday night. Not anymore.

Family ties: Patrick Ewing, son aim for NBA jobs By Antonio Gonzalez The Associated Press

ORLANDO, Fla. — The lifelong basketball journeys for Hall of Fame center Patrick Ewing and his son, Patrick Ewing Jr., are at a crossroads this week at the NBA’s Orlando summer league. They’re both leading the Orlando Magic’s squad — dad on the sideline, son on the court — and making strides toward their ultimate goals. Father and son. Coach and player. Two dreams so close to reality. “Wouldn’t that be great? I’m waiting for the day we do it,” said the elder Ewing, now 47. “I’m chomping at the bit.” The former New York Knicks great, Ewing heads into his sixth season as an NBA assistant coach. The last three have come with the Magic, helping mold Dwight Howard into an All-Star center who has won two straight defensive player of the year awards. Ewing is still hoping to land his first head-coaching job, believing it’s only a phone call away and he merely has to pay his dues as an assistant. Despite several openings this offseason, though, that call didn’t come again. “I’m waiting,” he said, smiling. Ewing Jr. has never shied away from his father’s shadow. His dad wanted him to play football — he chose basketball. He went to Georgetown, where his father once anchored those legendary Hoyas teams. And after being drafted in the second round by Sacramento in 2008, he was traded to Houston and later New York. Yes, the Knicks. But he never played in a regular-season game, was sent to the NBA Developmental League and tore a

Leunen Continued from D1 Since leading Redmond to its first and only boys basketball state title in 2003 — he was named the state’s player of the year for his efforts — Leunen’s star has been on the rise. At UO he played on two NCAA tournament teams — including the Ducks squad that advanced to the Elite Eight in 2007 — and received Pac-10 postseason honors his junior and senior seasons. Since completing his career at Oregon, where he ranks second all time in rebounds, Leunen has played the last two seasons overseas. In his first year out of college he competed in a Turkish league, averaging 12.1 points and 6.2 rebounds a game before signing with Cantú, which he helped guide to the playoffs during

John Raoux / The Associated Press

Orlando Magic summer league coach Patrick Ewing, right, talks to his son, Patrick Ewing Jr. ,during a timeout in the second half of a game against the New Jersey Nets in Orlando, Fla., on Wednesday. ligament in his right knee in March 2009 — originally misdiagnosed as a sprain — and hadn’t played an organized game again until this week. So fate would have it that the Magic would give him a shot, and that his father would be the one coaching him to reach his goal. “I always wanted to be just like him,” said the 26-

On tap The Houston Rockets’ 2010 Summer League schedule; all games are at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas’ Thomas & Mack Center • Friday, vs. the Phoenix Suns, 3 p.m. • Saturday, vs. the Dallas Mavericks, 7 p.m. • Sunday, vs. the Portland Trail Blazers, 3 p.m. • Tuesday, vs. the Toronto Raptors, 3:30 p.m. • Wednesday, vs. the Denver Nuggets, 1 p.m.

the 2009-10 season. In what is regarded as one of the better leagues in the world outside of the NBA, Leunen was named to the Serie A

year-old Ewing. “I developed a post game because he was a post player. I’m sure if he was a point guard, I would have tried to be a point guard. Even though dad was often traveling, he still managed to watch his son from afar and keep in touch by phone. When dad was home, basketball always came first.They kept in touch by phone when Ewing Jr. was playing at Georgetown, too. While Ewing was traveling as an assistant coach, father often watched game tapes and coached by phone. It wasn’t until this week that Ewing finally got to coach his son. “It’s good, but it’s different,” he said of coaching his son. “I thought it would be a lot harder, but he’s been working and he’s played well for us. Sometimes I think he’s too unselfish and I get on his butt about passing up open shots. He can shoot the three better than people think.” Both have shown progress toward their goals. Ewing Jr. has been one of the best players on the Magic’s summer squad — that includes draft picks Daniel Orton and Stanley Robinson — but has no contract for this season. He said he won’t go back to the developmental league, and would instead go to Europe or somewhere overseas if he doesn’t make an NBA roster. “He’s not that far away from being an NBA player. He’s shown that in the last few days,” Magic general manager Otis Smith said. His father believes he’s ready for the NBA — and now. “I don’t subscribe to the patience theory,” said Ewing Sr. “I’m not into that Aristotle philosophy that patience is a virtue. I see the talent in the league today, and there’s no way my son shouldn’t be in the league. He’s talented enough. There should be a job in the league for him now.”

all-Import team made up of non-Italians, and to the all-Serie A second team. “It was a great year,” said Leunen, 24, whose fiancee and son spent part of the season in Italy with him. “I know what kind of player I am, nothing’s changed a lot. I wanted to be sound and solid shooting the ball, putting the ball on the (floor) and making good passes.” Criticism of Leunen in the past has been that he is a “tweener.” At 6-9 he is too small to play power forward in the NBA, critics say, and he lacks the perimeter game to play small forward. With Cantú last season, though, Leunen shot 60.3 percent from the field and 42.9 percent from the three-point line in addition to his team-high 5.7 rebounds per game. “Houston knows I’m never going to be the type of player that scores 20 points a game,” said Leunen, not-

ing that Rocket officials visited him several times in Italy last season. “But they understand the things I do bring to a team that helps it be successful: passing, rebounding, doing the little things.” The Rockets will have five Summer League games, which begin this Friday, in which to evaluate Leunen. If the Rockets and the rest of the NBA decide to pass on him, Serie A is set to begin in October. “I’ve got to protect myself,” Leunen says about committing to the Italian league before NBA rosters may be settled. “Houston may not know who is on its team until August, but a lot of (overseas) teams could have full rosters then. If I don’t commit, I might not get a good job.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 541383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin. com.

OAKMONT, Pa — Maybe it’s the growth of the game internationally, or the lack of starquality golfers being groomed on American courses. Whatever the reason, there’s something missing from the U.S. Women’s Open. Namely, the U.S. When the women’s national championship starts this morning at Oakmont Country Club, temperatures will be in the 90s and the USGA’s Mike Davis estimates a few scores will be, too, in a field that includes golfers from 30 countries. The number of qualifiers from Pennsylvania, the home of Arnold Palmer? Zero. An American victory in its national championship, once all but a certainty, now would be a surprise. Cristie Kerr is the only American to win in the last five years and, since 1995, there have been nearly as many South Korean champions (4) as U.S. winners (5). By comparison, Americans won all but five Women’s Opens from 1946-1994. For every homegrown golfer like Michelle Wie who turns pro with pomp and circumstance, there are foursomes after foursomes of skilled and highly trained golfers being exported annually by South Korea, Japan and Thailand. “There are a lot of players that can contend to be the No. 1 player in the world,” Paula Creamer said. “Any given week, that bunch is just so close together.” Increasingly, that bunch includes fewer and fewer Americans. The LPGA Tour, which supplies much of the field, now appears to stand for Let’s Play Globally. Of the 27 LPGA tournaments this year, fewer than half (13) will be played in the United States, due in part to dwindling sponsorship dollars and the lack of big-name American golfers. “As (LPGA commissioner) Mike Whan says, ‘We’re going global and get over it,” Juli Inkster said. “So that’s where we’re going.” The last American to win the tour’s money title was Betsy King in 1993. Ten of the last 15 U.S. Open winners have been non-Americans. That’s one reason why Kerr hopes her remarkable 12-shot victory in the LPGA Championship two weekends ago signals an emerging revival of the American women’s game. Just as South Korean youngsters crowd driving ranges, hire swing coaches and watch video to try to become the next Eun-Hee Ji, Inbee Park or Birdie Kim, all U.S. Open winners since 2005, Kerr hopes young Americans will do the same to emulate her. “I would see the Nancy Lopezes, and Juli Inksters, Patty Sheehan, winning these tournaments and I said, ‘I want to do that,” Kerr said. “If we can touch a couple of them, maybe they’ll turn into great players in 20 years.” Palmer envisioned pro golf’s far-reaching expansion years ago. “You cannot deny the international aspects of women’s golf — it’s very important and it is very good,” Palmer said Wednesday. “The kids from Korea have come on and they will all enhance the game. Keep in mind the American girls will have to hold their own.”

Mickelson could claim No. 1 ranking at Scottish Open By Graham Otway The Associated Press

LUSS, Scotland — Phil Mickelson is choosing competition over course conditions as he prepares for the next major. In a year when several players are skipping the Scottish Open, Mickelson tops the field at Loch Lomond, which also features U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell. A victory by the left-handed American would put him at No. 1 in the world. The Masters winner is the only player from the top 10 entered for the $4 million event which starts Thursday. “I always look forward to these two weeks,” Mickelson said. “I really enjoy this tournament and obviously really Phil enjoy next week’s event, too. Mickelson “I think the best way to get in playing condition for the Open is to play well, get into contention and compete on Sunday for the title here. Having lost a couple of times in close matches here, I would like to win this tournament. It would mean a lot for me to win here.” Mickelson insists reaching No. 1 is not his priority this week. “It would be cool to go to the home of golf as No. 1 but it’s not something I’m thinking about yet,” he said. “I’m just trying to get my game sharp. I always felt like if I play well enough, the results would happen. It would mean a lot to me to break through and finally win.” A lack of topflight players can be traced to a two-day pro-am in Ireland as well as others deciding the tournament didn’t fit their plans. Woods and many top European players took part in the two-day JP McManus pro-am in Limerick, Ireland, an event that raises millions for charity. McDowell of Northern Ireland, who had not played since his win at Pebble Beach, felt rested enough to take on both. Meanwhile, world No. 3 Lee Westwood is resting while attempting to recover from the calf and ankle injury.


H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

D6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Signals from Suttle Lake W

Submitted photo

Ryan Bales, of Redmond, harvested this bull elk after eight days of bowhunting in the Idaho backcountry.

Bowhunting Continued from D1 Bowhunters typically must get much closer to their prey than rifle hunters do, as bowhunters are unable to reach animals from long distances with an arrow. Bales says the biggest challenge of filming a bow hunt is the additional weight of the camera, batteries and tapes. He and members of his crew take turns as the shooter, caller and cameraman. “There’s a lot of sacrifice taking a camera into the backcountry,” Bales says. “The more people you have, the greater the chance you have of being spotted (by the animals).” Bales, a firefighter for the city of Bend, has been bowhunting for 14 years. A few years ago, he took a camera along on an elk hunt in Idaho, where he captured footage of himself bagging a 5point bull elk. He says he was immediately hooked on filming bow hunts.

But getting folks excited about bowhunting is not always easy, he explains, because it’s definitely a niche sport. Yet Bales says he is encouraged by the 200 or so hunters he sees at local 3-D archery shoots, and he believes more and more outdoor enthusiasts are trying bowhunting. “They’re also doing it in the backcountry and really challenging themselves,” Bales says. “There’s some new TV shows that are strictly backcountry, and people really enjoy them.” The Full Draw Film Tour — which Bales says could expand to 10 Northwest venues next spring — is for all ages, and Bales says he hopes to bring youngsters into the sport of bowhunting. “We want to let kids see the rewards and satisfaction of hunting with a bow,” he says. “Everything is so much closer, and so much more intimate.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

FLY-TYING CORNER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Biotic Nymph, courtesy Orvis at the Old Mill.

By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

If this fly looks familiar, it is because it looks like a Pheasant Tail, one of the most popular trout flies of all time. The perfect platform for new patterns, the PT is the basis for the Biotic Nymph, which employs a bead for weight and peacock for pure fishiness. The curved hook gives it a natural appearance suggestive of several types of trout foods. Try this fly when you’re expecting a mayfly hatch or when fish are feeding opportunistically. It is particularly effective for small stream trout or when prospecting pockets on a larger river. Run the Biotic Nymph beneath a strike

indicator set at two-times the depth of the water in swift current. Let the fly drift, lengthening the line to cover more water. Strikes will be subtle, so watch for a slight movement to the line or the flash of a fish. Tie the Biotic Nymph on a No. 12-14 scud-style wet fly hook. Slide a dark bead up against the eye of the hook. Use pheasant tail fibers for the tail. Wrap the body with pheasant tail fibers. Build the thorax with peacock herl. Create the multi-fold wingcase with a burned and lacquered hen saddle feather. Use Hungarian partridge fibers or dyed-brown grizzly hackle for the legs and finish behind the bead.

hen the shadows lengthened, we drifted with the wind. Kevin Friedman ran his trolling motor from a remote control to keep the bow pointed northeast along the bank. Brian Davis had landed a kokanee already, but we hoped to bring a brown to the boat. Brown trout and kokanee are the dominant catch at Suttle Lake at the headwaters of Lake Creek in the Metolius watershed. Fallen timber along the shore provides good cover for the browns that make their living on the lake’s kokanee and whitefish. Our boat may have looked a little out of place. Friedman bought the 22-foot Intrepid with its Kevlar composite hull to fish the inshore saltwater bays of the East Coast. Four years ago, he brought the boat to Bend, a cross between a bass boat and a flats boat, it can be motivated by pole, by trolling motor or by the 225-horse Mercury Optimax. A platform mounted over the motor allows a person to gain some elevation to look for fish. One of the things I learned a long time ago was that if there is a resort on a lake, the owners want the people that fish there to be successful. To that end they have probably prepared a map that gives the best spots to play hooky. A couple of weeks ago, when I ran into Curtis Coronado, the manager of the Lodge at Suttle Lake, I asked if there was a map of the fishy spots. He produced a chart keyed to the prime spots. Armed with information, we hit the lake on a Thursday afternoon. Wind beat the surface to whitecaps on the northeast side, so we launched in glassy water in the southwest corner. In a matter of minutes we located a school of kokanee. From the boat we could see Black Butte on the skyline. I hiked it for my third time last year and looked down on Suttle. Though a lot has changed, from that vantage, Central Oregon looks much the same as it did when I climbed the butte in 1994. I met my friend, the late outdoor writer Ed Park in 1995, and since that time the butte has reminded me of him. In 1948 and ’49, Park worked summers atop Black Butte as a fire lookout for the U.S. Forest Service. It was there, he told me, that he got his start with a story about a bobcat that tried to have his dog for breakfast. The hide from that cat was one of his favorite trophies. To commemorate the event, he made a monument. Today the rock marked with the story is kept inside the cabin on top of the butte. A more accessible marker rests outside the old cupola. It reads ‘Eddie Park, The Bearded Bachelor of Black Butte, 1948-9.’ For a person that was entertained by Ed’s

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

This rock, inscribed by Ed Park in 1949, was for years hidden beneath the cupola on Black Butte. Today it rests beside the old cupola.

GARY LEWIS No fishing report Due to the Fourth of July holiday, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s weekly recreation report was not updated this week. For more information, visit www.dfw.state. or.us.

stories in Outdoor Life, Field and Stream, Sports Afield and in the pages of The Bulletin, the markers on Black Butte are like letters from a friend. I’m guessing Park looked down on Suttle Lake and made time to fish it. If the summers of ’48 and ’49 were anything like the summers we’ve seen in these parts in the last 20 years, Park reported smokes out there between Three-Fingered Jack, Hayrick Butte, Graham Butte and Squaw Back Ridge. It’s easy to chart the destruction of the B&B Fire that swept through here seven years ago. The flames opened up the view and put trees in the water — trees that hide trout.

By Brent Frazee McClatch-Tribune News Service

When Ryan Lambert sees thick, gooey oil roll ashore on waves from the Gulf of Mexico, he wonders how long the state known as the Sportsman’s Paradise will live up to its name. Just a year ago, he was thriving in that Louisiana setting. His Cajun Fishing Adventures business was sending out 12 charter boats a day, his lodge was always full, and he was in demand during the fall as a duck-hunting guide. But that seems like a long time ago. His part of the world has taken a direct hit from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill that is spewing 60,000 barrels

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FLY-FISHING BEGINNING AND BEYOND: Learn all the necessary skills, techniques and information to get you started in fly fishing; both class sessions meet in Camp Sherman and will be taught outdoors; $10 for fly fishing materials paid to instructor; class meets Tuesday, July 13 and Thursday, July 15, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; cost is $69; to register call COCC Community Learning at 541-383-7270. METOLIUS RIVER FLY-FISHING & BAMBOO ROD FAIR: July 17-18; a free event to share knowledge of bamboo rods, fly-tying and fly-fishing; at the Black Butte School in Camp Sherman; free appraisal of old bamboo cane rods and tackle; casting and tying lessons; 541-5956711 or www.campshermanstore.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING OREGON STATE 3-D CHAMPIONSHIP ARCHERY TOURNAMENT: July 17-18, sponsored by Oregon Bow Hunters (OBH) and hosted by Spirit Mountain Archers near Grand Ronde; archers must pre-register online and be a member

Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

Oil spill causing trouble for hunters, anglers of oil into the Gulf daily. And Lambert is fully aware that there is big trouble in paradise. “This is a special place, a national treasure,” Lambert said in a telephone interview. “What we have here, you won’t find anyplace else in the world. “I’ve fished and hunted here my entire life and I’m very attached to it. To see it dying before my very eyes, it makes me literally sick.” Like many others, Lambert watched his life come to an abrupt halt when the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded this spring and began gushing oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Within weeks, that oil began washing ashore in Louisiana,

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FISHING

Friedman aimed a Rapala beneath the claw-like branches of a burned-out log, twitched the lure when it hit the water and started to crank. A brown trout streaked from the shadows and slammed the plug. We saw it when it went sideways — a fish that would have tipped the scales at 4 pounds — with its mouth open and the lure free in the water. My weapon of choice was a 6-foot, 9inch Castaway spinning rod rigged with a Wave Spin reel loaded with 8-pound Toray fluorocarbon. At the business end, I knotted a Lucky Craft Slender Pointer with silver sides and a blue back. A suspending lure, when the Pointer hits the water, it hangs with a neutral buoyancy instead of floating or sinking. Internal weights make it cast like a dream and rattle like a broke-back koke. I fired the Pointer into the shadows, dropped my tip to the water, shook it three times left and right then reeled it back. Wham! A 12-inch brown climbed on. We ended the afternoon with two fish. And the memories that return to mind like a persistent smoke lifts up from green timber at the foot of the Cascades — signals from Suttle Lake.

of OBH to qualify for awards; tournament will consist of 40 lifelike 3-D targets; entry fee is $35; www.oregonbowhunters.com FULL DRAW FILM TOUR: Bowhunting adventure film tour coming to Bend’s Tower Theatre on Wednesday, July 21, 7 p.m.; includes four films from Northwest filmmakers; tickets are $10 for adults and $7 for kids 12 and under; www.fulldrawfilmtour. com and www.oregonpackworks.com. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

MISCELLANEOUS WILDERNESS SURVIVAL CLASS: July 13 and 20, 6 to 9 p.m.; at Redmond Area Park and Rec; class designed for backpackers, hikers, snowmobilers and hunters; a 6-hour introduction on wilderness travel preparation, planning and survival; cost is $35; 541-548-7275. GPS CLASS: July 15 and 22, 6 to 9 p.m.; at Redmond Area Park and Rec; introduction to

the basics of GPS: cost is $40; 541-548-7275.

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; five-stand now open Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; ATA State Shoot July 14-18; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: New 13-station 100-target course and 5-Stand open weekends 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday and Tuesday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Will host a pistol bowling pin match on Sunday, July 18, 12:30 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; trap is Wednesdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. on; sporting clays is July 10 and 24, and Aug. 7 and 28, starting at 9 a.m.; rifle and pistol available Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays, and Sundays, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-408-7027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

not far from Lambert’s base of operation along the Gulf. Many of his favorite fishing waters were closed because of the spill. The oil spill already has impacted 428 miles of shoreline — 259 in Louisiana, 71 in Florida, 52 in Mississippi, 46 in Alabama. The oil is believed to have already caused the deaths of 1,317 birds, 441 sea turtles and 52 mammals, with many others collected and brought to animal rescue centers. No major fish kills have been reported yet, but biologists worry about long-term effects. Oil in the water could affect oxygen levels in water, eggs and the physiology of the fish.

Biologists also worry about the loss of habitat for both fish and wildlife. The oil that already is flowing into marshes could kill critical grass that everything from fish to birds rely on.


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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

OUTING

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

Snow line rises with mosquito numbers

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By David Jasper The Bulletin

With increased temperatures and rapidly melting snow, snow lines and mosquito numbers are on the rise, according to Chris Sabo, trails specialist for Deschutes National Forest. Look for snow lines to be anywhere from 6,000 to 6,500 feet throughout the region, he said. As for mosquitoes, a trail maintenance crew working in the Crescent Ranger District rated the level of bloodthirsty, vampire-like insects at about a 7 or 8. That’s on a scale of 1 to 10, said Sabo, with 10 being “insanity.” Nevertheless, Sabo suspects we’ll be getting off lightly this year. “I hate to predict,” he said, “but I’m going to say it’s going to be a generally lighter-than-normal mosquito year overall. Some areas are going to get hammered, and other areas are going to be a little lighter, especially at lower elevations. Lower elevations have had quite a while to dry out, and the cooler temperatures have kept mosquitoes at bay.” In other news, the Paulina Peak road in Newberry Crater opened to automobiles Tuesday, and Peter Skene Ogden Trail and the Paulina Lake hiker-only trail are both clear of blowdown. Another recently cleared trail is the Cultus Lake loop, open to bicyclists, hikers and horseback riders. See Trails / E3

TRAIL UPDATE

Submitted photo

David Alexander, aka The Dirtball, shows off a morel he found a couple weeks ago in the Cascade Mountains near Bend. Alexander is an avid mushroom hunter who harvests morels, king boletes and matsutakes every year in Central Oregon.

Hunting for morels with local rapper and mycophile David Alexander By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

avid Alexander’s head is hanging out the window of his 1991 Toyota pickup truck, looking for a glimpse of morel mushrooms as we rumble down Tangent Loop in the Swampy Lakes area between Bend and Mount Bachelor. Just a week and a half before, the avid mushroom hunter — who lives in Bend and makes his living as a nationally touring rapper — combed this section of the Cascade Mountains and came home with a bountiful harvest of the mycological marvels that are popular for their complex, earthy taste. On this warm Saturday morning, however, things are looking bleak. He ducks his head back into the cab. “I’d like to call mushroom hunting an art,” Alexander said. “But it’s a chaotic art.” The funny thing is, many folks would describe the man’s music the same way. Over the past 10 years, Alexander (stage name: The Dirtball) has steadily risen in the world of underground hip-hop, releasing several solo albums of his trademark rapidfire raps. The Dirtball’s sound is like Eminem’s, but less violent and with a strong love for the Central Oregon way of life; when he’s home between tours, Alexander loves to ski, split firewood and hunt mushrooms, be they morels, king boletes or matsutakes. Earlier this year, Alexander officially joined the Kottonmouth Kings, an independent, party-happy, rap-rock group that has built an empire among kids through music and clothing. The Dirtball has since become one of the Kings’ featured MCs, and Alexander just got home from a 37-date tour with Insane Clown Posse. Before he arrived back in Bend, Alexander feared he would miss morel

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High Desert Museum names baby porcupine

If you go What: Mushroom hunting Where: Mushrooms can be found in various places in Central Oregon, including the Metolius River basin, across the Cascade and Ochoco mountains, and the Crescent/Chemult area. The Deschutes and Ochoco national forests have maps that show where mushrooms can be hunted. Your best bet is to ask someone who’s in the know. Cost: Personal collection of mushrooms on national forests requires a personal use permit, available free at all Deschutes and Ochoco forest offices. For more information, visit www.fs.fed.us/r6/centraloregon/ products/mushrooms/index.shtml. Contact: 541-383-5300, www. cascademyco.org or www. mushroomsinbend.org season, which usually runs from about May through mid-June. But a wet, cold spring pushed the season back about a month, he said. “I came off tour thinking, ‘Oh, the morels will be gone,’ ” he said. “But it’d been raining so much they never had a chance (to grow), and then as soon as we got that first sunlight, all this area just exploded. So I was surprised. This is an odd season.” Alexander has been hunting mushrooms for 15 years. He was introduced to the pursuit by his mother, Marlene. At one time, he sold morels to local stores and restaurants to make ends meet. These days, he hunts mushrooms mostly for the fun of it. He dries his mushrooms and eats them throughout the year. He also sends bags to friends in the music industry. For Alexander, though, it’s all about the joy of the hunt, which he calls a “chaotic art” for a reason. See Outing / E6

SPOTLIGHT

The porcupine recently born at the High Desert Museum finally has a name. Q’will, a moniker submitted by Jill Hartley, of Bend, was selected by community Courtesy members High Desert Museum when they made donations to the museum’s educational wildlife programs and to the porcupine family. You can see Q’will and other desert animals at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. daily at the museum, located at 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, in Bend. Contact: 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org.

$10,000 grant to fund school greenhouse

Ben Salmon / The Bulletin

David Alexander checks out a king bolete mushroom last weekend in the Swampy Lakes area between Bend and Mount Bachelor.

Pioneer Memorial Hospital and the Crook County Community Health Improvement Partnership received a $10,000 grant from the General Mills Foundation to build a greenhouse on the grounds of Crooked River Elementary School. Students at the school will grow vegetables in the greenhouse, then share them with other students through the school salad bar. The project is one of only 50 sites nationwide to receive a grant. Officials hope to complete construction of the greenhouse in time for the start of the school year in September. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Good old days long gone from decaying relationship Dear Abby: I am an 18-year-old woman and have been with my fiance for 2½ years. I love him and can’t picture my life without him. However, over the last six months he has become emotionally abusive. He’s never wrong, gets mad if I disagree with him about anything, and he yells at me over every little thing. He used to treat me great, and now this. I miss how it used to be, and I cry almost every day. In the past I always told myself I would never put up with something like this, but I have been — and it gets harder every day. I know it’s not physical, but emotional abuse counts for something, right? Or am I overreacting? Please give me some advice. I need to know there IS a light at the end of the tunnel. — Sad In Las Vegas Dear Sad: You’re not overreacting. What you are experiencing now is a preview of how the rest of your life will be if you stay with him. When a partner becomes controlling and emotionally abusive, in most cases it’s only a matter of time until the physical abuse begins. If you’re smart, you will put an end to this NOW. The “light at the end of the tunnel” is the sunshine you’ll see once you exit this relationship and slam the door behind you. Dear Abby: Would you please say something about the practice of choosing teams for group games by having team captains select individuals through the process of elimination? As a child, I was always the person chosen last, and it happened again at a recent community function. I found it just as humiliating and hurtful as an adult. We were asked to stand and then sit down as our names were called. I was the last person standing in a room of 60 people, and it felt like I had just been pronounced the least popular and desirable person in the room. — The Outcast In Allen Park, Mich. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

DEAR ABBY He used to treat me great, and now this. I miss how it used to be, and I cry almost every day. Dear “Outcast”: I’m glad you wrote. When choosing teams for group games, most savvy educators separate students into “odds” and “evens” — or divide them alphabetically — rather than using the old “last man standing” method. That this would happen in a room full of adults shows extreme insensitivity, and I don’t blame you for being upset. Dear Abby: My mom recently married a man with four daughters whose upbringing was very different than mine. Most of the time the “culture clash” doesn’t bother me, except when we get into trouble. When I stay out after my curfew, I am grounded for two weeks. When they do it, they get a minor scolding. While I understand that we were raised with different standards, I resent it when my punishment is worse than theirs. How can I make this equal? — Angry In The West Dear Angry: Yours is a problem that occurs in many families when they become blended — and you are right; the situation is unfair. That’s why I hope you will show this item to your parents. Family counseling can help them arrive at a fair solution and head off resentments before they explode.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Persistence pays off for partners behind ‘Haven’ By Neal Justin (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

LOS ANGELES — Upon graduating from Minnesota’s Macalester College in 1988, roommates Jim Dunn and Sam Ernst took a gamble. They got into the restaurant business. Against all odds, the two newbies struck it big when they opened Table of Contents just a pencil’s throw from the St. Paul campus, drawing long lines of patrons willing to wait hours for a seat. And then they walked away for an even riskier endeavor: Hollywood. This time, there was no overnight success story. The path to becoming top TV writers was littered with rejection letters, wadded-up ideas, unsold scripts and utility bills. But Dunn and Ernst are finally discovering that second dreams can come true — even if it takes a decade. Their series “Haven,” based on a Stephen King novel, debuts Friday on the Syfy Channel with an ironclad guarantee of 13 episodes and an embedded fan base that will flock to anything with King’s imprint on it. The break came just in time. “I was done,” said Dunn, 44, a roly-poly, eager-to-please wit who grew up in smalltown Illinois. “It was just too long chasing stuff that was never actually becoming attainable. It’s one thing when you come out when you’re 20 and you’re working your way up, learning the ropes, but I’ve got a 4-year-old son. I had to start pulling my weight.” Ernst took matters a step further. After helping his cousins come up with a business plan for a design firm, he reluctantly took on part-time duties as the company’s chief financial officer, a decision that brought in much-needed cash but left him on the brink of quitting show business. It was mid-January and the

partners were swapping war stories and celebrating their good fortune in an L.A. office tucked away in the back of a former glass factory, but this is the room that may save Ernst and Dunn. This is the room where they would ping-pong ideas with their mentor, Scott Shepherd, the “showrunner” who is in charge of bringing “Haven” to the screen. This is where they auditioned more than 60 actresses before falling for Emily Rose to play a Fox Mulder-type FBI agent who discovers supernatural spookiness in a sleepy Maine burg. This is where they’d learn how to edit, supervise, cast, cooperate, clash — or leap through the window. This is where they’d either create a fan favorite that will run for five years or yet another TV series that fails to capture a wide enough audience. Shepherd, the veteran of 25 shows, including “Miami Vice” and “Quantum Leap,” is betting on his protégés. “These are the quickest learners I’ve ever met,” he said. “They came here with entrepreneurial skills and maturity, and it makes you look at things differently. That’s why they’ve succeeded as much as they have, even though they don’t have as much on their résumés as other guys.” Of course, if it were up to Ernst and Dunn, they would be wellhoned veterans by now. The two English majors didn’t know each other when Macalester cast them as roomies. “It’s kind of like the prequel to ‘Saw,’” Dunn said. “They threw us both in a box to see who survives a Minnesota winter.” Not only did they survive, but they became fast friends with a common desire to write scripts. “Sometimes it feels to me that

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‘Haven’ When: 10 p.m. Friday Where: Syfy

unofficial Hollywood book of etiquette, they were supposed to lie low and barely mumble during writing sessions. They ignored protocol. Matt McGuinness, who wrote for “Dead Zone” and is now writing for “Haven,” said he knew the pair had something special when Dunn got the writers out of a logistical jam with an idea about how a space station could be signaled without regular communications. “They were as green as green could be,” McGuinness said. “So when Jim stood up, all heads turned and thought, ‘Yes, young Skywalker?’ When he was done I thought two things: Really cool idea and very effectively presented.” He wasn’t the only one impressed. The company was looking at adapting King’s novel “The Colorado Kid,” and asked Ernst and Dunn for ideas. Their pitch — creating a mythology about a town where people struggle with supernatural powers — impressed the company and, most important, King. The subsequent pilot, filled with smart, sexy banter and eccentric touches, including a cop who craves pancakes and a pair of newspaper publishers who shuttle around town on a tandem bike, also impressed the actors.

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people are writing characters based on characters they’ve seen on other TV shows, instead of digging into their own lives,” Dunn said. A winter trip to Los Angeles left the two convinced that if they really wanted to make it in Hollywood, they would have to move there. All they needed was a break. Ernst got a call in 1999 from a friend of a friend who had just gotten promoted at Disney and had an opening for an assistant. Ernst was interested, but only if he could take his partner. The result: Leaving behind a booming business for a menial job with a $30,000 salary, which they’d have to split. Over the next five years they toiled in obscurity, with occasional, less-than-glitzy writing breaks. The video game for “Shrek the Third.” An indie movie called “Myron’s Movie.” In 2005, ABC bought a project they developed called “Thief River Falls,” an offbeat drama about a Minnesota town populated with members of the witness protection program. The network eventually passed, deepening the pair’s funk. “The first time you go through the gates of Warner Brothers or Disney to make a pitch, you think, ‘This is cool,’” Ernst said. “Then after a while, it’s like, ‘OK, let’s get this done because I’ve got to get my kid.’” There was a silver lining. Shepherd’s company, Piller/Segan/Shepherd, was impressed enough by “Thief River Falls” to hire them for an existing show, Syfy’s “The Dead Zone,” based on a King novel. The two were brand-new to a writing room, especially one populated with more than a half-dozen experienced scribes. According to the

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The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Double homicide. ‘14’ The First 48 (N) ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 CSI: Miami Extreme ’ ‘14’ Å (3:00) ››› “The ›› “Eraser” (1996, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Caan, Vanessa Williams. A government agent ›› “Outbreak” (1995, Suspense) Dustin Hoffman, Rene Russo, Morgan Freeman. Army doctor fights spread of deadly virus. Å › “Virus” (1999) Jamie Lee Curtis, William 102 40 39 Terminator” protects a witness from gunrunners. Baldwin. Premiere. Into the Pride Homeward Bound ‘G’ Unexplained, Unexplored ‘G’ Å Monsters Inside Me Lurkers ’ ‘PG’ Wild Russia Primorye ’ ‘PG’ Å Wild Russia Urals ’ ‘PG’ Å Monsters Inside Me Lurkers ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Into the Pride Breakthrough ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NYC Bethenny Getting Married? Bethenny Getting Married? Bethenny Getting Married? Bethenny Getting Married? Bethenny Getting Married? (N) Bethenny Getting Married? 137 44 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Blue Collar TV ’ Blue Collar TV TV › “Cannonball Run II” (1984, Comedy) Burt Reynolds, Dom DeLuise. ’ 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses: Meet-Mommy Biography on CNBC American Greed Mad Money How I Made My Millions Biography on CNBC Wealth-Risk Paid Program 51 36 40 52 How I Made My Millions Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ Futurama (N) ‘14’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Com.-Presents Ride Guide Å Untracked PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon Outside Presents Outside Presents Outside Presents RSN Movie Night PM Edition 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Phineas and Ferb Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana ›› “The Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl” ’ (9:40) Jonas L.A. Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Good-Charlie Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ‘PG’ Colossal Squid ’ ‘G’ Å River Monsters Death Ray ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters Congo Killer ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Cain and Abel ‘14’ River Monsters Death Ray ’ ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 World Cup Primetime (N) MLS Soccer Real Salt Lake at Chicago Fire (Live) World Cup Primetime (N) MMA Live (N) 2009 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 (4:00) MLL Lacrosse All-Star Game From Boston. (Live) NBA From Dec. 25, 2003. (N) I Scored a Goal (N) 30 for 30 Å College Football From Sept. 5, 2009. (N) 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Muriqi vs. Tarver ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. J.K. Rowling’s student wizard has his first adventure. Å The 700 Club Author Stacy Hord. ‘G’ 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Pulp Friction ’ ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor (N) Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Pillsbury Bake-Off. Good Eats ‘G’ Good Eats (N) Iron Chef America Symon vs. Okuwa Ace of Cakes (N) Ace of Cakes Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. MLB Baseball New York Yankees at Seattle Mariners 20 45 28* 26 Air Racing From Perth, Australia. That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ›› “Anger Management” (2003) Adam Sandler, Jack Nicholson. › “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. › “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. 131 Holmes on Homes What a Mesh ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters My First Place My First Sale ‘G’ Selling New York Bang, Your Buck House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Income Property Bang, Buck Cities of the Underworld ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Money ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Chrome ‘PG’ Å The Universe Light speed. ‘PG’ America the Story of Us The U.S. becomes a global superpower. ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Cities of the Underworld ‘PG’ Å Wife Swap Stonerock/Finley ’ ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Dead Will Tell” (2004) Anne Heche, Kathleen Quinlan. ‘PG’ Å Will & Grace ‘14’ Will & Grace ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 Wife Swap Johnson/Blackburn ‘PG’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control Parental Control Fantasy Fact. Fantasy Factory The Real World New Orleans ’ ‘14’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Pranked (N) ‘14’ Pranked ’ ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 Silent Library (N) Disaster Date ’ SpongeBob BrainSurge ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iPie ’ ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob Family Matters Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Sports Crash ‘14’ Knockout Sport Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Half Pint Braw. MANswers ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 Walker, Texas Ranger ‘PG’ Å ›› “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. Å Warehouse 13 Time Will Tell Å 133 35 133 45 ›› “Stephen King’s Desperation” (2006, Horror) Tom Skerritt, Steven Weber, Annabeth Gish. ‘14’ Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land Best of Praise Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Left Behind: World at War 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004) Vin Diesel, Colm Feore. Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Bikini Beach” (1964, Musical Comedy) Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello. A Brit- ›› “Where the Boys Are” (1960, Comedy) ››› “Gidget” (1959, Romance-Comedy) Sandra Dee, James Darren. A girl on sum- ›› “Beach Blanket Bingo” (1965, Musical Comedy) Frankie Avalon, Annette Funi101 44 101 29 mer vacation chases sun, surf and romance. Å cello. Sky diving and kidnapping are just part of fun on the beach. ish singer and an American boy fall for the same girl. Dolores Hart. Å (DVS) Mall Cops Mall Cops Mall Cops Mall Cops: Mall of America ’ ‘PG’ Police Women of Memphis ’ ‘14’ Police Women of Memphis (N) ‘PG’ Mall Cops Mall Cops Police Women of Memphis ’ ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Mall Cops Law & Order White Lie ’ ‘14’ Bones The Man in the Outhouse ‘14’ Bones The Finger in the Nest ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å ››› “Twister” (1996, Action) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton, Cary Elwes. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Entitled ‘14’ Courage-Dog Courage-Dog Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Unnatural History ‘PG’ Total Drama Misadv. Flapjack Adventure Time Total Drama King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Extreme Pools ‘G’ Å Extreme Fast Food ‘PG’ Å Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Extreme Resorts ‘G’ Å Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:33) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Burn Notice Shot in the Dark ‘PG’ Burn Notice Friends Like These ‘PG’ Burn Notice Long Way Back ‘PG’ Burn Notice Double Booked ‘PG’ Burn Notice Enemies Closer ‘PG’ Royal Pains Spasticity ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Burn Notice The Hunter ‘PG’ Å You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ 20 Greatest Celebreality Fights ‘14’ 40 Greatest Pranks 2 ’ ‘14’ The OCD Project ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Dad Camp ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(5:15) ›› “I Am Sam” 2001 Sean Penn. A man tries to regain custody of his daughter. Å In the House › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:35) › “Sorority Boys” 2002 Barry Watson. ‘R’ Å (11:10) › “The Rich Man’s Wife” ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt, Albert Brooks. ‘R’ Å ››› “9 to 5” 1980, Comedy Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Mrs. Doubtfire” 1993, Comedy Robin Williams, Sally Field. ‘PG-13’ Å Surfing Quiksilver Pro: Goldcoast The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Red Bull X-Fighters Calgary Surfing Quiksilver Pro: Goldcoast The Daily Habit Insane Cinema Bubba’s World Moto: In Out Captain & Casey Snowboard Euro PGA PGA Tour Golf John Deere Classic, First Round From Silvis, Ill. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: Wayne Gretzky Classic, First Round Golf Videos Golf in America M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å “Flower Girl” (2009, Romance) Marla Sokoloff, Kieren Hutchison. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Hung Just the Tip ’ Entourage Stunted Taxicab Confessions ’ ‘MA’ Å ››› “Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa” 2008, Comedy Voices of Dare to Dream: The Story of the U.S. Women’s Soccer Team ›› “17 Again” 2009 Zac Efron. A 37-year-old man miraculously (9:45) Inception: HBO 425 501 425 10 Ben Stiller, Chris Rock. ’ ‘PG’ Å ’ ‘PG’ Å ’ ‘MA’ transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å HBO First Look ‘MA’ Å ›› “Southern Comfort” 1981, Action Keith Carradine. ‘R’ Å ››› “Bad Lieutenant” 1992 Harvey Keitel. ‘R’ Å Food Party ‘14’ Z Rock ‘MA’ Witchblade ‘MA’ ›››› “The Crying Game” 1992, Suspense Stephen Rea. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 ›› “Young Guns II” 1990, Western Emilio Estevez. Billy the Kid (6:45) ›› “Men in Black II” 2002, Comedy Tommy Lee Jones, (8:15) ›› “A Perfect Getaway” 2009, Suspense Steve Zahn, Timothy Olyphant. Hon- › “Whiteout” 2009 Kate Beckinsale. An Antarctica law officer has “Co-ed ConfidenMAX 400 508 7 and gang gallop to Mexico. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Will Smith, Rip Torn. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å eymooning hikers find terror in paradise. ’ ‘R’ Å three days to solve a murder. ’ ‘R’ Å tial 2” Break It Down Dam demolition. ‘PG’ Break It Down Navy Tanker (N) Break It Down Bridge project. ‘PG’ Break It Down Dam demolition. ‘PG’ Break It Down Navy Tanker Break It Down Bridge project. ‘PG’ Alaska State Troopers ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Monster Bucks American Hunter Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Steve Outdoor Bushman Show Beyond, Lodge Legends of Fall Bone Collector Pheasants For. Drop Zone OUTD 37 307 43 The Green Room (4:35) ›› “The Octagon” 1980 Chuck Norris. Terrorists force a ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer, Ben Kings- ››› “Big Fan” 2009 Patton Oswalt. A football fan’s meeting with Penn & Teller: The Green Room Penn & Teller: SHO 500 500 kung fu champ out of retirement. ‘R’ ley. iTV. A couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ his idol takes a dark turn. ‘R’ Å Bulls...! (N) ‘MA’ Bulls...! ’ ‘MA’ Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Harley ‘G’ Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Harley ‘G’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (3:10) Spy Game (5:35) ›› “Race to Witch Mountain” 2009 Dwayne Johnson. ‘PG’ Å (7:20) ››› “Bolt” 2008 Voices of John Travolta. ‘PG’ ››› “The Rookie” 2002, Drama Dennis Quaid. ’ ‘G’ Å (11:15) ›› “Spy Game” 2001 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 “The Shortcut” 2009 Andrew Seeley. Terror strikes townspeople “Mother Ghost” 2002 Mark Thompson, Kevin Pollak. A piece of ›› “Soul Men” 2008, Comedy Samuel L. Jackson. Estranged (9:40) ›› “Animal” 2005 Ving Rhames. A brutal convict under- (11:15) “The Butcher” 2007, Suspense TMC 525 525 who venture down a path. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å jewelry changes a grieving man’s life. ’ ‘NR’ singers reunite for a tribute concert. ’ ‘R’ goes a radical change in prison. ’ ‘R’ Å Eric Roberts. ’ ‘NR’ Cycling Tour de France: Stage 5 From Epernay to Montargis. The Daily Line (Live) Cycling Tour de France: Stage 5 From Epernay to Montargis. VS. 27 58 30 Raising Sextuplets ‘PG’ Å Raising Sextuplets ‘G’ Å Raising Sextuplets 10 is Enough ‘G’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Raising Sextuplets ‘G’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY HOME & GARDEN TOUR: The Sisters Garden Club presents a tour of four homes in and around Sisters; tour does not include the Bliven home; proceeds benefit local organizations and will maintain public gardens; $159 a.m.-3 p.m.; 541-389-9554, vtemple@ bendbroadband.com or www. sistersgardenclub.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Mystic River” by Dennis Lehane; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541312-1064 or www.dpls. us/calendar. “FINDING NEMO”: A screening of the 2003 Pixar film; part of Familypalooza; free; 1:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7099. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by Aphrodesia, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-3890995 or www.munchandmusic.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook, author of “Bend Overall,” speaks about his book and presents a slide show; SOLD OUT; 6 p.m.; REI, 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei.com/ stores/events/96. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; adult themes; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. PINBACK: The San Diego-based alternative-rock group presents The Rob & Zach Show, with Little White Teeth; $14 plus fees in advance, $17 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-4084998 or http://bendfarmers market.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond talks about her book “Seeing Stars”; free; 4 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “WHO SHOT THE SHERIFF?”: Buckboard Productions presents interactive murder mystery dinner theater; reservations requested; $60; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress.com. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; $5; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. RAINA ROSE TRIO: The acoustic folk act performs, with the Beth Willis Rock Duo; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: 5K, 10K and half-marathon races, with a kids rock race; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; registration required; $15-$45 to race, kids race free, spectators free; 6:15 a.m. half marathon, 7 a.m. 5K

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

and 10K, 7:30 a.m. kids race; Smith Rock State Park, 9241 N.E. Crooked River Drive, Terrebonne; 541-3881860 or www.smithrockrace.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the church’s building fund; free admission; 7:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-317-0394, early evening only. CHURCH YARD SALE: Proceeds benefit church missions; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. State Highway 126; 541-548-3066. DIRT DIGGERS’ SCRAMBLE: Ninth annual golf tournament hosted by Camp Fire USA Central Oregon; proceeds benefit the programs and services provided by the Camp Fire USA Central Oregon Council; $140 includes 18 holes, cart, continental breakfast and barbecue lunch; 8 a.m. shotgun start, 7 a.m. registration; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-382-4682 or campfirechristine@ bendbroadband.com. FLAPJACK FRENZY: Eat pancakes as a benefit for Teen Challenge; RSVP requested; $5, $3 ages 10 and younger; 8-11 a.m.; Central Oregon Men’s Center, 435 N.E. Burnside Ave., Bend; 541-678-5272. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Approximately 10 vendors sell vegetables, meats, eggs and more; free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 541-280-4097. VFW BREAKFAST: Community breakfast with pancakes, sausage, ham, eggs, coffee and more; $7, $6 seniors and children; 8:30-10:30 a.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541389-0775. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: With a dunk tank; proceeds benefit Renegade Roller Derby; free admission; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Aspect Board Shop, 1009 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-4105633, renegade_sjane@ hotmail.com or www. renegadesor.com. GIANT LIBRARY BOOK SALE: The Friends of the Jefferson County Library hosts a sale of thousands of books, audio books, videos and DVDs; with live music; free admission, $5 per bag of books; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; 541-475-3351. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW: The 35th annual show features a display of about 1,300 quilts; free; 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-1400 or www. sistersoutdoorquiltshow.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015. CLASSIC CAR SHOW: A show of cars from 1974 or earlier, with burgers, hot dogs and more, and a silent auction; free, $20 to enter a car; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-382-1371. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell a selection of produce, meats, baked goods, flowers, lifestyle products and more; with live music; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing center, NorthWest Crossing Drive and John Fremont Street, Bend; 541-3890995. QUILT SHOW LUNCHEON: Featuring turkey roll-ups, salads and pie; proceeds benefit the church; $7; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, 386 N. Fir St., Sisters; 541-815-8858.

BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music, food, drink and more; free; 11 a.m.11 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-3890995, inquiry@c3events.com or www.c3events.com. “THE ZOO STORY”: Volcanic Theatre presents the play by Edward Albee about a transient who confronts a book publisher; $10; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop and Tasting Bar, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-389-2884 or www.actorsrealm.com. RIMROCK RANCH STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky with telescopes and a celestial tour; dress warmly and bring binoculars; registration required; free; 8:30-11:30 p.m.; Rimrock Ranch, 69177 Butcher Block Blvd., Sisters; 541-330-0017 or events@deschuteslandtrust.org. NOT AN AIRPLANE: The Modesto, Calif.-based Americana act performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL: Featuring artists, street performers, performing arts, children’s activities, live music, food, drink and more; free; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-389-0995, inquiry@c3events.com or www. c3events.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Suzanne Burns and Quinton Hallett read from their work; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Funk group Mingo Fishtrap performs; free; 2:30 p.m., gates open 1 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-322-9383, info@ bendconcerts.com or www.bendconcerts.com. CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com. SUNSET SERENADES: Golf clinic followed by live music by Lindy Gravelle; free; 6 p.m. golf, 7 p.m. music; Brand 33, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541-549-3663. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. bendticket.com.

MONDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell local produce, crafts and prepared foods; with live music and activities; noon-6 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-504-7862 or www.redmondfarmersmarket.com. LET’S FIND NEMO!: One of Disney’s most-loved movies “Finding Nemo” will be shown for everyone to enjoy; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050. THE SPEAKEASY: Guy J. Jackson

hosts an open mic storytelling event; stories must be no longer than eight minutes; July’s theme is “NO SWEAT: Stories About Summer!”; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Sid Selvidge and Amy Speace perform folk music; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 day of show; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; 541306-0048 or jherbgirl@yahoo.com. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; adult themes; $11.50 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. bendticket.com. “D TOUR”: A screening of BendFilm’s 2009 best documentary winner, about a struggling band and their drummer who needed a kidney transplant; the filmmaker will be in attendance; $8, $6 BendFilm members; 8:30 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. dtourmovie.com.

TUESDAY TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. FESTIVAL OF RUCKUS: Includes tricycles races, watermelon bowling and more; free; 4-8 p.m.; Play Outdoors, 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd., Suite 110, Bend; 866-608-2423. ABBEY ROAD LIVE!: The Athens, Ga.-based Beatles tribute band performs; $5-$10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. GARDEN CENTER FARMERS MARKET: Local producers sell fruits, vegetables and farm-fresh products; free; 3:30-6:30 p.m.; CHS Garden Center, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; 541-475-2222. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring a performance by Americana act CinderBlue; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www. visitredmondoregon.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance by The Konzelman Brothers; vendors available; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6909. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA BOHEME”: Starring Angela Gheorghiu, Ramon Vargas, Ainhoa Arteta and Ludovic Tezier in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CLEAR SUMMER NIGHTS: Featuring a performance by singer-songwriter Colin Hay; registration requested; $16, $57 with dinner; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062 or www.c3events.com. FREAK MOUNTAIN RAMBLERS: The Portland-based Americana group performs; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

M T For Thursday, July 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

ASTRO BOY (PG) 10 a.m. CASINO JACK AND THE UNITED STATES OF MONEY (R) 12:15, 3, 5:45, 8:30 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 12:10, 2:55, 5:40, 8:20 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:20, 3:05, 5:25, 8 THE PIRATES WHO DON’T DO ANYTHING: A VEGGIETALES MOVIE (G) 10 a.m. PLEASE GIVE (R) 12:40, 3:20, 5:55, 8:10 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES (R) Noon, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 SOLITARY MAN (R) 12:30, 3:15, 5:20, 7:55

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE A-TEAM (PG-13) 1:55, 4:40, 7:45, 10:30 CHARLOTTE’S WEB (G) 10 a.m. GET HIM TO THE GREEK (R) 12:55, 7:35 GROWN UPS (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:25, 2:30, 4:20, 5:25, 7:05, 8:10, 9:35, 10:35

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:50, 10:15 THE KARATE KID (PG) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 10 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:15, 4:10, 5:10, 6:50, 8:05, 9:30, 10:40 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3-D (PG) 11:05 a.m., 1:50, 4:50, 7:20, 9:55 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2:25, 5:20, 7:50, 10:25 PLANET 51 (PG) 10 a.m. TOY STORY 3 (G) 11:25 a.m., 1, 2, 3:55, 4:55, 6:40, 7:40, 9:15, 10:10 TOY STORY 3 3-D (G) 10:55 a.m., 1:30, 4:25, 7:10, 9:40 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 12:40, 1:10, 1:40, 2:10, 3:35, 4:05, 4:35, 5:05, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:20, 9:50, 10:20, 10:50 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 8:15 MARMADUKE (PG) 6

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m.

Couric perfect to succeed King By Joanne Ostrow The Denver Post

Better late than even later. Larry King has finally arrived at the conclusion much of his audience reached years ago. No sense hogging that prime piece of cable-news real estate any longer. Time and tastes have moved on. After countless celebrity shmooze-fests and embarrassing misses (the recent Lady Gaga episode stands as the epitome of King’s cluelessness this millennium), it was past time for the veteran interviewer to hang up the suspenders. At 76, King announced recently that he’ll step aside, to return just for occasional specials. That should be just enough. Nice guy, well-intentioned, obviously dedicated to the task, he should live and be well. But the demands of nightly competition will be left to a younger, more graceful successor, better able to compete with the newer cast of news/talk hosts. Here are the reasons why we shouldn’t give up on the possibility that Katie Couric still might take the job. According to a New York Post story, the CBS News anchor has already turned down the position. Maybe, maybe not. But now that King has announced his retirement this fall, there may be a reopening of negotiations. Let’s hope. Couric’s contract expires next year. Talk of a sharing agreement across two networks — as Anderson Cooper and Christiane Amanpour had with CBS and CNN — has fueled further speculation. Might Couric find a place within CBS to produce occasional specials, perhaps under her own production company, while taking on the prime-time talk show on CNN? The interviewing gig would showcase Couric’s talent for incisive questioning, her obvious clever charm and her ability to get people to talk. Two networks footing the bill would allow her to keep her $15 million salary intact. The much-mentioned “America’s Got Talent” judge Piers Morgan, a former British newspaper editor, could be a con-

Katie Couric

Larry King

tender, if CNN doesn’t favor King’s personal favorite, Ryan Seacrest, for the post. Ryan Seacrest? Really? Anything is possible. Witness CNN’s recent hiring of Eliot Spitzer, the disgraced former governor of New York who admitted to visiting a prostitute, to host a show preceding King’s, opposite conservative columnist Kathleen Parker. Presumably, anything would also be an improvement. “Larry King Live” just finished its worst quarter ever, landing well behind Fox News and MSNBC in the ratings. In prime time, Fox News averaged 1.91 million total viewers to MSNBC’s 758,000 and CNN’s 569,000. That was CNN’s worst performance in nine years. In the three months just passed, Rachel Maddow beat King among adults 25-54 (the key news demographic), 255,000 viewers to 176,000 viewers. Sean Hannity beat both, with 542,000 viewers. King’s self-indulgent style has been eclipsed by faux newscasters like Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert when they weren’t even trying. Without the countervailing presence of Anderson Cooper giving CNN a reason for being, King might have taken the whole network down with him. Let him enjoy Guinness World Record standing while the headlines move on. Cooper, meanwhile, has carved out a well-defined role as a one-man SWAT team in war zones, trouble spots and, lately, tragic oil spills. He’s operating on all cylinders, free from the constraints of the studio and desk job. If he sometimes gets emotionally involved and risks sounding like the Gulf Chamber of Commerce, he’s earned it. The flood of thanks from locals for the attention he’s brought the area testifies to his work.

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 1:30, 4, 7, 9:30 THE LAST AIRBENDER (PG) 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:30 TOY STORY 3 (PG) 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

GROWN UPS (PG-13) 5:30, 8 KNIGHT AND DAY (PG-13) 5, 7:45 TOY STORY 3 (G) 5:15, 7:30 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 5, 7:45

PINE THEATER 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE (PG-13) 4, 7

Trails Continued from E1 None of the popular wilderness trails in Deschutes National Forest — Broken Top, Soda Creek, Green Lakes — have yet been cleared, he said. Though Sabo predicts a lighter-than-usual blowdown year, trail users should use caution in beetle-kill areas such as the B&B Complex Fire burn in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness Area. “That’s a big heads-up for Jefferson — it’s going to be a little bit slower clearing of trails in there,” he said. “We’ve had some reports of people hear-

ing trees coming down during the day. It’s not widespread, but you might be hiking along and suddenly hear a crash out there somewhere and not see it.” Meanwhile, people using trails can expect to see a lot of their peers out there. “It is summer season, so folks are going to see a lot more trail traffic out there in certain areas,” said Sabo, urging trail courtesy. “Yield to the appropriate usage: Bikers yield to horse (riders) and hikers, and hikers yield to the equestrians.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, July 8, 2010: This year, you need to do more reflecting and thinking. Sometimes a haze of confusion surrounds your life. Learn yoga or another technique to reduce stress. By centering, you will make better choices. Often others observe your behavior and leadership. Don’t think that there is anything but admiration there. If you are single, you could meet someone, or actually two people, through work and/or a public commitment. Each person offers a lot, but who suits you best? If you are attached, the two of you enjoy going out and about together. Share more private time together. GEMINI makes an excellent healer. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH You are a sign that is not overly loquacious, though you are verbal. You will need to approach a situation differently. Try all the different ways you can to verbalize the same concept. You might have to repeat yourself more than once with an authority figure. Tonight: Hang with friends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Be aware of how easily you can act out and overspend. Is that what you really want to do? A devil-may-care attitude could provide much discomfort later. Try sagesse in reference to spending and feelings. Tonight: Pay bills first. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You soar with what

might feel like endless energy. Funnel this vitality where it counts. You could waste this cycle if you aren’t careful. Do you really want that? Tonight: A partner or dear friend remains touchy. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Know when to pull back and do some thinking. The unexpected occurs with a boss, at work or within the community. Try not to feel negative, as there is an opportunity to do so within this situation. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH You express your fiery nature in what could be a quizzical situation. Respond naturally, and you will see the results of your particular set of talents. Opportunities come through your intellect or through travel. Tonight: Where people are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Deal with key people directly. Don’t push beyond what can be absorbed. You might be more comfortable with the facts now, as you have had more time to think about them. Tonight: Have a necessary talk over dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Your spontaneity defines a situation. You are probably more willing to take a risk than many. You see more of the big picture and don’t have the same trepidation. Tonight: A family member could be a bit of a drag. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Defer to others. Deal with key people on an individual level. Your daily life could be going through some

unexpected changes. Don’t fight the inevitable. A discussion could be more difficult than you anticipated. Tonight: Hang out with others without judging them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Others seem unusually spontaneous and fun. You might be stunned by a loved one or, if single, by what could blow into your life in the next few days, weeks and months. Remember, as easily as this person enters is as easily as he or she could leave. Tonight: Enjoy the haze created by a special person in your life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH All work and no fun happens with you more than any other sign. You could sacrifice some elements of your personal life. Be sure that there is not another way or approach. Use care with your finances, and avoid any money agreements. Tonight: Put your feet up. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You have a unique outlook that sometimes causes you to do something wacky or different. You might not be comfortable with what you are feeling or with what others are responding to. There could be a schism here. Tonight: Let your hair down. Start the weekend early. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH If you can stay home, do. Your finances could be changing rapidly. You might try to change the situation through interference. Your instincts could be off. Stay with the facts. Tonight: Be a couch potato. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-389-2867. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 5 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. social, 7 to 9 p.m. meeting; The Environmental Center, Bend; www.deschutesdems.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www. redmondoregonrotary.com. SECOND CHILDHOOD DOLL CLUB: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.; call for location; 541-923-8557 or 541-548-4269. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30 to 5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. THINK AGAIN PARENTS (TAPS) SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION TEAM OF REDMOND: 4 to 5:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, Historical Room; 541-548-4481. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15 to 3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social

hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m. to noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. COFFEE FRIDAY: 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.; The Environmental Center, Bend; 541-385-6908 or info@envirocenter.org. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8 to 10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-322-0220 or www. deschutescountyballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9 to 11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4 to 5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY THE ACCORDION CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON: 1:30 p.m.; Cougar Springs Senior Living Facility, Redmond; hmh@coinet. com or kgkment@aol.com. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 3 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. DAR BEND CHAPTER: 1 p.m.;

Deschutes County Historical Society, Bend; 541-771-7771. JUMPIN’ JUNIPER GOOD SAMS: Camping group; 541-382-7031. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB: 1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-9957 or www.otahc.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363. RICE COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BENDUBS CAR CLUB: 7 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Lodge, Bend; www.bendubs.com. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1 to 4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0669. DESCHUTES COUNTY FOURWHEELERS: 5 p.m. dinner, 6 p.m. meeting; Papa’s Pizza, Bend; 541389-0090 or www.deschutes county4wheelers.com.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6 to 9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7 to 9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON INVENTORS GROUP: 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-480-2320.

CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 to 9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-322-0983. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6 to 8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7 to 9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. SOUTH CENTRAL LITTLE LEAGUE BOARD: 6:30 p.m.; Midstate Electric, La Pine; 541-536-9845. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15 to 3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541-385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45 to 6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 3 to 4:30 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: 6 p.m.; Johnny Carino’s, Bend; 541-923-1369. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SADDLE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-923-2605. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Prineville Soroptimist Senior Center; 541-447-6844. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1 to 3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. WOMEN’S GROUP (GRUPO DE MUJERES): 6 to 8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-549-1322.

WEDNESDAY

NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; RSVP required; 10 a.m.; 541-550-7524.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7 to 8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 4 p.m. to close; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Club, Redmond; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS: 7 p.m.;

CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6 to 8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition.org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. EXPERIMENTAL AIRCRAFT ASSOCIATION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Airport; 541-419-5496 or www.eaa1345.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon to 1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. MOMS CLUB OF BEND: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.; First United Methodist Church, Bend; 541-389-5249 or www.momsclubofbendor.org.

OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; China Sun Buffet, Bend; 541-382-7969. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05 to 1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SOCIETY FOR CREATIVE ANACHRONISM (SCA): 6:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; www. corvaria.antir.sca.org. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

Outing Continued from E1 “There are so many factors going into finding mushrooms. You’ve got time of season, temperatures, elevation, direction of growth and, you know, luck,” he said. “They grow at different areas and different times, so when you think you know where they are, you really might not. “It’s a chase,” he continued. “It’s a mind game!” Alexander spends much of his morel-hunting time in the Metolius River area, where recent forest fires have created conditions ideal for the fungus to thrive. But he also likes hunting what he calls “natural” morels, which grow on their own off-root systems, away from burns. “I’ve got veins all over that I’ll go check out,” he said. “It’s all about trial and error, and asking people who know what’s up.” Early in the season, Alexander hunts for morels on the southand east-facing slopes of mountains, paying special attention to land along old logging paths and flat, grassy areas near pine groves, he said. Later in the season, he shifts to the north side of hills, where the sun hasn’t yet had a chance to focus its heat on the mushrooms. When looking for morels, Alexander is a stalker, creeping through the forest with his eyes trained on the ground, watching for the distinctive fungus: the shape and size of pine cones, with an appearance like a honeycomb or a human brain. For king boletes — whose season comes after morels, i.e., right now — Alexander watches for the mushroom’s large cap, which resembles a hamburger bun on the ground. Matsutakes, which are hunted in the fall, are trickier; ideally, you want to harvest them before they’ve even surfaced, he said. The Swampy Lakes area was a new hunting ground for Alexander this year. “I got home and kind of got word that there were mushrooms out in different spots,” he said. The new location proved to be quite fruitful; Alexander said he found a bunch of morels there over the past several weeks. “When you get into ’em, it’s like a kid in a candy store, man,” he said. “As soon as you lock your eyes in on one, then it’s on.”

Mushroom edibility guidelines Many species of wild mushrooms grow in our area. Caution should be exercised as many species are not considered edible and may cause various levels of discomfort if eaten; a handful contain potent toxins that can cause permanent organ damage, or even death. For your safety and enjoyment, follow these guidelines, and always remember: “When in doubt, throw it out!”

• Every mushroom you plan to eat should be accurately identified as an edible species. Despite folklore to the contrary, there are no simple guidelines which will separate edibles from other species. You must assume the responsibility to identify all wild mushrooms you collect to eat with 100 percent confidence. Many edible species have toxic lookalikes; learn what these are, and don’t rely solely on photographs or drawings.

• Never eat raw mushrooms. This applies to all mushrooms: Thorough cooking results in improved digestibility, flavor, available nutrition and the elimination of some potentially harmful substances. However, cooking will not eliminate all types of toxins and will not make poisonous mushrooms edible.

• When trying a mushroom species for the first time, wait at least 24 hours before eating more or a new species. Some people have an allergy to one particular mushroom species. If you are eating new species for the first time, and you eat more than one species and have a reaction, you won’t know which species you are allergic to. Keep a whole, uncooked sample of the mushroom species in your refrigerator in case the

identification must be confirmed later.

• Do not consume alcohol when trying a mushroom for the first time. Wait until you are sure you are not allergic to a particular species before having it with wine or beer. The presence of alcohol may produce stronger allergic reactions. Also, one species of the genus Coprinus (shaggy mane) reacts with alcohol, resulting in uncomfortable symptoms. Before eating any shaggy mane, learn to identify the one which causes this reaction, and its lookalikes.

•Only eat fresh mushrooms. You wouldn’t eat moldy or rotting produce from the grocery store — the same should be true for wild mushrooms.

• Be aware of where you are collecting your edibles. Mushrooms can readily pick up chemicals from the environment. Never consume edible species from a lawn where fertilizers or pesticides might have been applied. Avoid collecting along busy roads or anywhere near old dump sites. Do not eat fungi growing on ornamental trees. In some cases, toxins in the wood may be incorporated into the fungal tissue. Source: Cascade Mycological Society,

www.cascademyco.org

That is, when he can find them. Last weekend, morel season was all but over, but that didn’t dampen Alexander’s passion for Central Oregon’s mushrooming potential. “Our woods are ideal … for edible gourmet mushrooms,” he said. “Our backyard is the best place you can go anywhere in the world, so we’re really fortunate to have this here. “I think everybody should know that, locally, we sit on a gold mine.” The lack of morels also didn’t stop Alexander from keeping his eyes on the ground. And after an hour of no luck, all that wandering in the woods paid off when

he stumbled across a king bolete in a clearing just a couple of hundred feet from his truck. His eyes lit up, and you could hear the excitement in his voice. “Here’s a bolete, dude!” he said. “We’re stoked! This is a king bolete!” Within seconds, he’d made plans for the mushroom. “What you don’t know is I’m going to go home and eat it pretty much instantly,” he said. “I’ll be cleaning this and eating it as soon as possible.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

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H E A LT H

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, JULY 8, 2010

HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS

Local hospitals get high marks in new report

FITNESS

Athletic compression socks have their fans, but the evidence that they give runners and cyclists a boost isn’t definitive — yet

A leg up on

The Bulletin

Many runners say compression socks help improve race times and aid in recovery.

endurance? By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

A

t pretty much any running or cycling race these days, you’ll notice an odd fashion trend. Runners and cyclists are showing up at the starting line wearing knee-high support hose, as if maybe their grandmothers helped them get dressed that morning. Despite their unfashionable look, compression socks have taken the competitive racing world by storm in recent years, putting the dash in haberdashery. Runners and cyclists, from elite level uber-athletes to weekend warriors learning how to run, swear by the elastic knee-highs as both a performance-enhancing tool and an aid to recovery. Do they work? It’s still a matter of debate. There’s better evidence the socks help athletes recover after a race or a tough workout and less evidence they can actually improve race times. “It’s one of those things that a lot of people are understandably skeptical — I was skeptical — until they try them,” said Teague Hatfield, owner of the FootZone running store in Bend. “That’s not to say that everybody will love them because some people don’t enjoy that sheer compression factor. But I don’t know that I’ve talked to anyone who doesn’t think they do something.” See Socks / F4

hospital and their costs rise by an average of $32,000 when they Good news for Oregon’s hos- develop an infection, according pital patients. to the state’s Office for Health A first-ever statewide report Policy and Research, which of hospital-acquired infections produced the new report. found that, overall, Oregon’s The report measured three hospitals do better than the types of hospital-acquired innational average at preventing fections: those that develop in such infections. central line cathCentral Oregon’s M E D I C I N E eters (inserted into a hospitals, too, did blood vein to adminquite well, besting ister fluids or medithe state and national averages cations), those that develop afacross most measures. ter knee replacement surgery, Hospital-acquired infections and those that develop after are infections that occur dur- heart bypass. It used data from ing, and are typically caused 2009. by, a hospital stay. The state’s rate of central They can be quite serious. The line catheter infections was 38 Centers for Disease Control and percent lower than the national Prevention estimates that about average, the rate of heart by99,000 patients die each year as pass infections was 30 percent a result of an infection acquired lower than the national average, while at a hospital, making hos- and the rate of infection after pital-acquired infections one of knee replacement surgery was the top 10 causes of death. about the same as the national In Oregon, patients spend an average. average of 10 more days in the See Infections / F6

By Betsy Q. Cliff

How compression socks work Compression socks, whether worn for therapeutic or athletic reasons, are designed to create greater pressure on the legs down by the ankle and decreasing pressure as they go up toward the knee. They differ from anti-embolism stockings, designed to prevent blood clots in bed-ridden patients, which have a consistent amount of pressure throughout the sock.

THERAPEUTIC

ATHLETIC

The pressure helps to keep blood from pooling in the legs, by forcing it out of the veins near the surface of the skin and into the larger veins deeper in the legs. This helps to avoid conditions like varicose and spider veins and reduces the risk of deadly blood clots.

The gradient pressure helps blood in the legs return to the heart, allowing for increased delivery of oxygen and fuel to muscles, and faster removal of waste products such as lactic acid.

SOCK STRENGTH

SOCK STRENGTH

Medical-grade compression socks, which require a doctor’s prescription, come in different strengths. Over-thecounter compression socks, which can be purchased at most drug stores, generally provide anywhere from 8-15 mm/hg (millimeters of mercury) of pressure to 15-20 mm/hg.

Athletic compression socks often approach the pressures created by medical-grade compression socks but do not require a prescription. The Zoot sock, for example, creates about 28 mm/hg of pressure at the ankle and 20 mm/hg at the knee.

Is vitamin-enhanced water better than plain old water? NUTRITION

By Jennifer LaRue Huget Special to The Washington Post

Vitaminwater was on sale at my local grocery store this week, 10 20-ounce bottles for $10, which made me wonder whether anybody really needs that much of the stuff. The major player in the “vitamin-enhanced water” market, Glaceau — maker of Vitaminwater, Smartwater and Vitaminwater Zero — sold 142 million cases in the United States in 2009, according to John Sicher, editor and publisher of Beverage Digest, which tracks beverage sales by the case, not the dollar. Introduced in 1996, Vitaminwater, owned by Coca-Cola, has built a strong identity in the bottled beverage world. Part of its allure is its hip-looking packaging and its engaging product names, such as Re-

vive, Focus and Connect. Vitaminwater tastes OK, if you like fruity flavor without the fruit. There is almost no actual fruit, even in the Fruit Punch variety, and what little there is mostly provides color. But it’s the added vitamins and electrolytes that define Vitaminwater (and its competitors, including SoBe Life Water and Propel). Do the drinks deliver? Nancy Rodriguez, a professor of nutrition and a sports nutritionist at the University of Connecticut, said that drinking bottled water can help you track how much water you drink. See Water / F5

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Compassionate Care

COST Over-the-counter compression socks usually cost between $15 and $30 a pair. Athletic compression socks can cost upward of $50 to $100.

For The Most Difficult Steps In Life’s Journey.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

INSIDE

MONEY

N U T R IT IO N

Vital stats

Vitamins

At local pharmacies and drug stores, the cost of an antibiotic can vary widely, Page F3

Cheddar cheese is a good source of calcium, which helps keep bones strong, Page F5

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F2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-548-0440 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEAT CANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DOWN SYNDROME PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-0537. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP:

Submitted photo

Cherie Touchette times a student during a triathlon training class at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in June. See the Classes listing for details. 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-318-9093. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-350-1915 or HLACO@ykwc.net. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR

WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES “ARE ACID-BLOCKING DRUGS UNDERMINING YOUR HEALTH?”: Joshua Phillips talks about possible negative impacts of these drugs; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m. Monday; Healing Heart Natural Health Center, 20 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-330-0334 to register. BABY & ME: Bring your baby for workout sessions designed to get you back in shape after giving birth; $36 in-district residents, $48 out-of-district residents; cycling class from 11 a.m.-noon Tuesdays, beginning July 13; yoga class from 1:30-2:30 p.m. Thursdays,

beginning July 15; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665 or www. bendparksandrec.org to register. BONE-MARROW REGISTRATION OPPORTUNITY: Register to become a donor through Be The Match Registry; part of Naturally You Health and Wellness Fair; donations requested; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-390-3191. HEALTH LADDER: Learn about what health is and isn’t, stress, chiropractic care and more; free; 6-7 p.m. Wednesday; Lifestyle Chiropractic, 243 S.W. Scalehouse Loop, Bend; 541-617-9771, chiropracticlifestyle82@gmail.com or www.lifestylechiropracticllc.com. LIVING WELL WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS: Six-week series gives you the tools to feel better, be in control and do what you want to do; registration required; $10; workshops begin at various times, starting Wednesday, in Bend, Madras, Redmond, La Pine and Prineville; see website for details; 541-322-7430, brenda_johnson@co.deschutes. or.us or www.livingwellco.org. SPINAL HEALTH CARE CLASS: Learn to manage and correct neck and back complaints; registration requested; free; 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays; Newport Avenue Chiropractic, 1052 N.W. Newport Ave., #101, Bend; 541-330-5737 or dr.asti@bendbroadband.com. TRIATHLON TRAINING CLASS: Cherie Touchette leads a sixweek progressive workout class to lead you up to race day; $150 in-district residents, $200 outof-district residents; 5:15-6:40 p.m. Wednesdays and 3-4:30 p.m. Sundays, beginning July 14; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665 or www. bendparksandrec.org to register. YOGA FOR INCREASED ENERGY: Introductory class; free; 6:30-7:45 p.m. Tuesday and July 20; Iyengar Yoga of Bend, 1538 N.W. Vicksburg Ave.; 541-318-1186 or nadine@ bendcable.com to register.

• ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

• BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-385-9465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www.pcoco. org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Center for Health & Learning; 541-706-6390 or www.cascadehealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550

or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-306-1672 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or www.redmondhealingyoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-610-4598.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 F3

M A variety of prices Though most pharmacies don’t post their prices, the cost of drugs can vary widely from store to store. As an example, we called around to local pharmacies to get the price of 30 tablets of 250 mg strength amoxicillin, a generic antibiotic used to treat a number of different types of infections. Price

BiMart (Madras)

$11.39

Costco (Bend)

$5.90

Fred Meyer (Bend)

$4

RiteAid (Bend)

$10.99

St. Charles Community Pharmacy (Bend)

$24.37

Walgreens (Redmond)

$12.99

Wal-Mart (Bend)

$4

New York Times News Service

Compiled by Betsy Q. Cliff, graphic by Althea Borck / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Teal Buehler

Don McFerran

Help on the way for part-timers that houses the restaurant where Nordgren works. Sarah Rose Nordgren works Community health centers are 25 to 30 hours a week as a wait- a good option for part-timers and ress at an upscale restaurant in others without insurance. The Chapel Hill, N.C. She also tu- centers serve all comers, and fees tors high-schoolers on their col- are generally charged on a slidlege entrance essays and has an ing scale based on income. Center editorial internship at locations can be found a book publisher. But if on the Health Resources something were to go and Services Adminisseriously wrong with tration website, www her health, she’d be in .hrsa.gov; local pubtrouble because none lic health departments HEALTH of her three jobs offers and primary care assoCARE health insurance. ciations may also list afShe’s been looking for REFORM fordable programs. a full-time job with benStarting in 2014, busiefits for several months, nesses may face penalbut there’s nothing on the hori- ties if they don’t cover full-time zon. So she shuttles between jobs workers, but they won’t be penaland hopes that she stays healthy. ized for not covering employees Nordgren’s situation is not who work less than 30 hours per unusual. Fewer than a third of week. In a recent survey of 800 employers that offer health in- employers by human resources surance make it available to their consultant Mercer, more than part-time workers, according to half of those that don’t provide the Kaiser Family Foundation. insurance to workers at that (Kaiser Health News is a pro- threshold said they would congram of the foundation.) And sider reducing workers’ hours. even if health insurance benefits Fortunately, even if employare offered, part-timers, who of- ers trim workers’ hours, the exten work in lower-paid retail, res- changes will offer an alternative taurant and service jobs, may not for part-time workers. be able to afford them. That can’t happen too soon for The health care overhaul will such workers as Cheneta Forgreatly improve insurance pros- est, who works 20 hours a week pects for part-time workers — but at a restaurant in New Orleans. not right away. Starting in 2014, Forest, 42, has diabetes. Her job the state-based exchanges, de- doesn’t offer health insurance. signed to help people find afford- She goes to the emergency room able health insurance, will offer a two or three times every week choice of subsidized health plans because she feels sick or needs with different levels of coverage insulin. At $45 a visit, plus $50 for part-timers and others who for the insulin, her monthly ER don’t get insurance through their expenses would easily cover a jobs. health insurance premium. But But 2014 is more than three no one will insure her. “I’m a years away. In the interim, part- sickly person, and I need health timers may have limited options. insurance,” she says. “It’s a big In Nordgren’s case, she signed problem.” up for a program through the restaurant that allows her to get This column is produced primary care services for $60 a through a collaboration between visit through Piedmont Health The Washington Post and Kaiser Services, a network of six com- Health News. KHN, an editorially munity health centers. independent news service, is a “It’s not insurance, but it’s ac- program of the Kaiser Family cessible and affordable for ongo- Foundation, a nonpartisan ing needs,” says Briggs Wesche, health-care-policy organization the general manager of A South- that is not affiliated with Kaiser ern Season, the gourmet market Permanente.

By Michelle Andrews

Special to The Washington Post

Comparison shopping site aims to lower health care costs By Claire Cain Miller

Sources: www.costco.com, www.walmart.com, calls made to local pharmacies on June 28, 2010

Teal Buehler, a National Academy of Sports Medicine certified personal trainer, attended a twoday workshop on personal fitness training. She is now a certified corrective exercise specialist. Don McFerran, a psychiatric nurse practitioner, has reopened a private practice at 731 N.W. Franklin Ave., Suite 100, Bend.

Enrollment in federal high risk insurance pools begins this month in Oregon. How does it work?

A push for transparency in doctors’ fees

VITAL STATS

Pharmacy

Next week

SAN FRANCISCO — Americans comparison-shop for items as small as groceries and as big as cars. But they rarely compare prices on their health care. When a doctor recommends a test or a procedure, most patients simply go where the doctor tells them to go. Even if a patient does want to comparison-shop, there is no easy way to obtain complete and useful information. It is a hole in the market that some companies see as an opportunity, especially because many Americans will soon have to pay more attention to what they are paying for rather than count on insurance to cover everything. But there has been no easy way for consumers to shop for the best deal on a colonoscopy or blood test. A startup financed by prominent venture capitalists and the Cleveland Clinic, Castlight Health, aims to change that by building a search engine for health care prices. Patients using Castlight could search for doctors that offer a service nearby and find out how much they will charge that patient, depending on their insurance coverage. A few others are starting to publish health care prices, including Thomson Reuters, a Tennessee startup called Change:healthcare, the New Hampshire government, which created a comparison shopping tool for residents, and health insurers. Aetna, for instance, has built tools to help patients estimate prices and may build more advanced tools, said Lonny Reisman, Aetna’s chief medical officer. Price transparency could significantly change the way health care is bought in the United States. The notion “seems ridiculously simple and obvious, and in any other industry, you would say, ‘Duh, we already have that.’ But in health care, it’s revolutionary,” said Alan Garber, a professor of medicine and the director of the center for health policy at Stanford, as well as an investor in Castlight.

inefficient market,” said Dr. Giovanni Colella, chief executive and a founder of Castlight. “Creating the right incentives changes the way people behave, and that’s where our company comes in.” Colella started RelayHealth, which connects patients and doctors over the Web. RelayHealth was bought by McKesson in 2006. Colella founded Castlight with Todd Park, co-founder of Athenahealth and chief technology officer of the federal Department of Health and Human Services. In June, Castlight announced that it raised $60 million from investors, in addition to the $21 million it previously raised. Safeway, the grocery chain, with 200,000 employees, has signed on as its first customer. Castlight has received money from investment firms including Venrock, Maverick Capital, Oak Investment Partners and from an unlikely source, the Cleveland Clinic. Hospitals’ business models could be turned upsidedown by price transparency. Hospitals are “going to react with horror” to Castlight and Cleveland Clinic’s investment, said Dr. Delos Cosgrove, chief executive of the Cleveland Clinic. But the company invested because “we think ultimately this is going to become an issue that is very much in the public spotlight, and we wanted to be on the inside of knowing how it worked.”

‘Inefficient market’

Lowering costs?

The lack of price information in health care has been a big driver of ballooning health care costs, analysts say, because costs are opaque to patients and heavily subsidized by employers. The patient has no incentive or responsibility to keep costs down. But many employers are switching to health plans that require patients to pay more out of their own pockets. “Since Americans started having employer-sponsored health care, people are paying with someone else’s credit card, so we created a very

Health care pricing became part of the national conversation during the debate over health care reform. Prices will be important for the 30 million to 40 million people expected to join exchanges, which will encourage comparison shopping. But so far, prices have been very difficult to find because health insurance providers and doctors negotiate rates and often agree not to reveal those numbers for competitive reasons. The Cleveland Clinic, for example, has about a hundred different contracts with insurance carriers, each with a different rate for

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

Dr. Giovanni Colella, center, co-founder and chief executive of Castlight Health in San Francisco, talks to Castlight employees Heather Kagin, left, and Nita Sommers. Patients using Castlight could search for doctors that offer a service nearby and find out how much they will charge that patient.

Get Back to Your Life

“(The notion) seems ridiculously simple and obvious, and in any other industry, you would say, ‘Duh, we already have that.’ But in health care, it’s revolutionary.” — Alan Garber, director of the center for health policy at Stanford and an investor in Castlight a given procedure. Ideally, transparency in health care pricing could lead to higherquality, lower-cost health care, and more patient involvement in buying health care, said Cosgrove. “Because they begin to realize that a trip to the doctor is not free, they might stay home and take the aspirin instead of getting the neurologic work-up.” Castlight sells its service to employers and charges by employee per month. (It plans to eventually introduce a Web site for anyone to use.) Employees log on to a search portal, where they enter something like “colonoscopy” to find a list of doctors nearby and how much they charge. Some insurers have shared pricing with Castlight, but the company gleans most of the information from the explanationof-benefits forms that patients receive after a doctor visit. Castlight developed a way to pull the information from the millions of forms provided to it by employers. Safeway has been experimenting with ways to cut health costs,

including by using Castlight. “I’m a big believer in trying to create market forces wherever you can and then let personal accountability really drive the result,” said Steven A. Burd, the chief executive of Safeway. For instance, Safeway pays up to $1,200 for its employees’ colonoscopies, a preventative procedure to detect cancer. If employees wish to go to a doctor who charges more, they must pay the difference. According to Castlight, colonoscopies in the Bay Area, where Safeway is based, range from $500 to $3,000, and sometimes a doctor charges different rates at different hospitals. Castlight plans to add quality measurements to its price information. There are already several providers of that information, though there is no standard set of quality measurements in medicine. But even with quality ratings, there are many procedures for which Castlight’s service is not applicable. Someone suffering a heart attack is not going to check the Web before calling the ambulance, and a patient who discovers he needs emergency brain surgery is likely to prioritize quality above all else. Even for more basic services, pricing is not always cut-anddried. The delivery of a baby, for example, includes the hospital stay and the obstetrician’s fees, but could also include fees for a pediatrician, an anesthesiologist and specialists if there are complications. At this stage, Castlight works best for big companies that are self-insured and for outpatient doctor visits for which quality does not vary greatly.

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F4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F Pickle juice as a remedy for muscle cramps? It’s true! magnesium or calcium levels changed after drinking. Miller found that pickle juice relieved the cramps about 45 percent faster than if the men drank no fluids and about 37 percent faster than if they drank water. “Even more interesting,” he said, “is that study results showed there were no significant changes in the blood following ingestion of either water or of pickle juice.” Miller said cramps are likely not caused by dehydration so much as by muscle exhaustion, and that the pickle juice, which would not have affected fluid levels so quickly, must act in some other way to put the brakes on cramping. Still, Miller does not recommend chugging large amounts of pickle juice, which has a high sodium content. Try stretching the muscle first, which often interrupts the cramps. If not, perhaps a pickle cocktail is in order. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Thinkstock

5 shoes that may rock your world Chicago Tribune

Stability used to be a good thing in a shoe. But the current “fitness” footwear craze takes the opposite approach: By subtly throwing your body off balance, these shoes supposedly help you lose weight and sculpt muscles. The secret is the shoe’s unstable sole. To keep your footing, your body supposedly recruits and strengthens smaller, little-used muscles around the ankle joint. Shoe companies say the increase in muscle activity can lead to more calories burned, improved posture and toned leg muscles. Yet unstable or rocker-bottom shoes have been used for years as therapeutic footwear and there’s little evidence they provide benefits that the manufacturers claim, said Swedish researcher Nerrolyn Ramstrand, who has studied whether instability shoes can improve balance. Moreover, shoes with an unstable base may be inappropriate for those who have poor balance to begin with, said Ramstrand. Still, some published studies show that unstable shoes do change your body’s kinetic patterns and can help reduce knee pain from osteoarthritis. When I tested five pairs of instability shoes — two pairs of walking shoes, one pair of running shoes and two pairs of sandals — I found they all did one thing: increased mindfulness. Here’s a closer look at each shoe: MBT FORA SILVER ($245; www.mbt.com) About the shoe: Dramatically curved rocker-bottom sole simulates walking barefoot on sand and engages core muscles. MBT, which stands for Masai Barefoot Technology, pioneered “natural instability.” MBT shoes are the most researched. What we found: Walking in MBTs feels more like pushing off a rolling pin than shifting sand. If you have stability problems, try them in a safe place. Expensive and therapeutic-looking, but the best of the shoes we tried for serious instability. Not recommended for running. SKECHERS SHAPE-UPS XF: EXTENDED FITNESS FOR WOMEN ($110, www.skechers.com) About the shoe: Rocker-bottom curved sole simulates walking on soft sand. They come with an instructional DVD (start by walking in them 25 to 45 minutes a day)

Roberta Huber runs on the Deschutes River Trail near River’s Edge golf course in Bend wearing her compression socks. She credits the socks with helping her get through her first 5K run last year and the Dirty Half Marathon this year. Now she’s set her sights on the Portland Marathon.

Continued from F1

A study at North Dakota State University showed that drinking pickle juice relieves muscle cramps faster than water.

By Julie Deardorff

Watsu, a combination of water therapy and massage, offers relaxation and therapeutic benefits.

Socks

IN MOTION

When muscle cramps strike this summer, pop open a cold jar of — pickle juice? The briny fluid has long been used as a home remedy to prevent and alleviate cramps. Now there’s scientific evidence to prove that it works. Kevin Miller, a professor of health, nutrition and exercise science at North Dakota State University, tested the effects of pickle juice on 10 cyclists. After a 30-minute cycling session to dehydrate them a bit, Miller stimulated the tibial nerve in their ankles, inducing a cramp in their big toes. When the test subjects drank nothing, the cramps lasted an average of 2.5 minutes. The experiment was repeated, but this time the cyclists immediately drank 2.5 ounces of deionized water or they drank pickle juice strained from a jar of dill pickles. Blood samples were taken before and after the men drank the fluids to see if blood sodium, potassium,

Next week

and a few exercises. What we found: Super-comfy and, unlike with the other brands, I was not embarrassed to wear these in public. The rocker bottom feels less curved than MBT; after a while they start to feel normal, which may diminish the effect. Priced in line with regular running shoes. REEBOK’S RUNTONE ($100, www.reebok.com) About the shoe: No visible rocker sole. Instead, “eight balance pods with moving air are built into the sole to increase energy absorption with every step,” said John Lynch, head of U.S. marketing and merchandising for Reebok. “The effects are similar to running on a soft, sandy beach.” What we found: Springy, versatile, comfortable shoe that doesn’t look like a “fitness” shoe. Will not throw you wildly off stride. Reebok’s similar EasyTone, designed for walkers, features more instability than the RunTone. I used them for running, walking and strength training; simply wearing these made me want to work out more. TRIM TREADS ($39.99, www.trimtreads.com) About the shoe: The severe cut of the shoe forces you to step on the ball of your foot, which may engage muscles in your legs, buttocks and core. The company says the shoes are similar to a combination workout on a bosu/balance board and a step machine. What we found: Impossible to walk in. But if you can survive 30 minutes, your calves may hurt. Though designed by an OB-GYN to improve circulation in pregnant women, they take instability to a new level. Do not drive in these shoes or wear them in a wet area. FITFLOP WALKSTAR SANDAL ($49.95, www.fitflop.com) About the shoe: The middle of the shoe contains what the company calls “muscle-loading microwobbleboard midsole technology” to engage your muscles for a longer period as you walk. But there’s no rigorous evidence showing they tone any better than other shoes or sandals. What we found: Cushy and sporty, but I found them difficult to walk in. In fact, podiatrist Megan Leahy warns that “all flip-flops can exacerbate foot problems due to contractures of foot and toe muscles during gait in a subconscious attempt to keep the shoe on.”

The squeeze Athletic compression socks are an offshoot of the medical version of graded compression socks. Such socks are tighter around the ankle and progressively looser toward the knee. Doctors prescribe them for patients to prevent blood clots from forming when blood pools in the lower leg. “What it’s doing is helping the blood flow from the superficial system to the deep system (of veins) and out of the leg by having increased pressure lower down and less pressure higher up,” said Dr. Andrew Jones, a vein specialist with Inovia Vein Specialty Center in Bend. It improves the circulation of the blood back to the heart, he said. Patients with serious vein issues can be prescribed medical-grade compression socks, which can exert much more pressure on legs than compression socks sold over the counter in drug stores. Compression socks for the athletic market typically exert pressure slightly below that of medical-grade socks but usually more than the over-the-counter socks. Jones said some of the athletic socks are designed specifically for recovery, and there is good evidence that they can help individuals bounce back from a workout. The socks increase circulation in the legs, which may help to remove lactic acid. When lactic acid builds up faster than it can be removed, it starts a cascade of reactions that can lead to fatigued muscles. “Compression socks work on the same theory as the socks that old people wear,” said Don Leet, owner of Sunnyside Sport and a strong proponent of the product. “It helps with the circulation in your legs, helps you recover faster, so you can train harder and race faster.” Chad Sage, a Bend cyclist who competes in a variety of races, said he often uses the socks after workouts or races, particularly when he has to drive back to Bend after an out-of-town competition. “You’re back in the car, traveling back home, that’s two or three hours when you’re actually not moving around,” he said. “They’re just kind of stationary in the vehicle, which isn’t all that great for healing.” Others believe that compression socks can help by limiting the jostling of muscles as you run. “It minimizes the vibration, so if your muscles are sore, you’re not going to get that feeling of your muscles separating,” said Rod Bien, owner of Fleet Feet Sports in Bend. “It keeps them compressed and really alleviates some of that painful feeling of the second day of back-to-back workouts.”

Placebo hosiery? Compression socks are still a rather new development in the athletic field, and so far the scientific evidence hasn’t caught up with conventional wisdom. A 2007 South African study had test subjects run on a treadmill with and without

Rob Kerr The Bulletin

compression socks at progressively faster speeds until they couldn’t run anymore. There was no difference in the athletes’ capacity to use oxygen (known as VO2 max), heart rates or how hard they were breathing. The study did find that compression socks helped to clear lactic acid faster. Another study found that runners completing 10K races had less muscle soreness the day after the race if they wore compression socks. Last year, researchers in Germany found that runners could run longer before reaching exhaustion and could run faster before reaching their anaerobic threshold while wearing the compression socks. The runners’ VO2 Max was slightly higher but not enough to explain the difference in endurance and speed. “The level of compression that they exert, they don’t seem to really do much,” said Abigail Laymon, a kinesiology researcher from Indiana University, Last month, she presented the findings from an evaluation of lower-leg compression sleeves, a sort of footless sock, at a sports medicine conference. Laymon had 16 highly-trained male distance runners perform two 12minute running tests and measured their running economy. By measuring how much oxygen the runners were consuming at different speeds, she could get an idea of how efficient they were. But after conducting the tests with and without the compression sleeve, Laymon could find no difference in oxygen consumption. “There may be a psychological component to compression’s effects. Maybe if you have this positive feeling about it and you like them, then it may work for you,” Laymon said. “Some runners are superstitious. They may continue to use them if they happen to have a good race and attribute it to the compression.” But Laymon’s study tested only the impact over 12 minutes, and there is some evidence to suggest that compression socks might impact performance only in longer duration events, where lactic acid clearance and minimizing muscle damage might be a more important factor. Zoot, a Seattle-based manufacturer of compression garments, recently conducted its own studies asking test subjects to wear a full-body compression suit that

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used graduated compression in both the arms and the legs. Over the first 25 minutes of a one-hour run, the test subjects wearing the suits had no change in lactic acid levels compared with their runs without compression. But they showed a 29 percent reduction in lactic acid over the last 35 minutes of the run. Several racing governing bodies have now banned compression socks and garments from competition, although not necessarily because they view them as performance-enhancing. The World Triathlon Corp., which organizes the Ironman races in Kona, Hawaii, banned compression socks in 2009 because they would cover up the calf where competitors are supposed to write their age group. Several cycling groups have also banned compression socks from competition. Given that performance benefits haven’t shown up in laboratory testing, it’s unlikely the socks could have a measurable impact. But whether for comfort or performance, every little bit helps. “You’re always looking for another key to help out with your racing or recovery,” Bien, the Fleet Feet owner said. “And those little things can really add up.”

Socks appeal All three of the local store owners interviewed said compression socks have been flying off their shelves and have a strong following across the entire spectrum of runners and cyclists. Roberta Huber, 61, of Bend, just started running again for the first time in 30 years. She signed up for a Learn to Run course at FootZone last year and this year took part in the store’s Dirty Half training. Once the training runs hit six to seven miles, Huber’s back started getting sore. She tried a

pair of compression shorts and those helped a lot, so she added compression socks as well. “I felt better the first time I wore them,” she said. “It didn’t bother me at all. It just felt like going out for a stroll. It didn’t feel like five or six miles.” She completed the training and successfully ran the Dirty Half Marathon last month in her knee-high socks. “I felt really dorky out there,” she said laughing. “I thought, ‘Well, I’m the oldest anyway, what does it matter? I’m last and I’m the oldest. I might as well put the socks on, too!’” Hatfield said the unfashionable style of the socks is further proof they work. “We knew this was going to be a real trend when people did start wearing them,” he said. “Because nobody is going to mistake this for a fashion trend.” Still, many cyclists and runners refuse to try them simply because of the look. Hatfield said his employees will often wear the compression socks in the store when they’re on their feet all day. “But I haven’t noticed that as much now that people are in shorts,” he said. It’s certainly becoming less of a fashion faux pas and more of an athlete’s badge of honor in Central Oregon. One of the surest ways to identify an endurance athlete these days is by his or her knee highs. “During the Cascade Cycling Classic or when Nationals are here, you used to be able to tell the bike racers by their shaved legs. Now you can tell them by their compression socks,” Leet, the Sunnyside owner said. “All of a sudden, all these young kids are wearing these socks. It’s become a style, so now when I wear them I don’t feel like such an old geezer.” Jones said the emergence of the athletic version of compression socks has encouraged many of his patients, who wouldn’t wear the standard white medical stockings, to continue to wear compression socks through the summer. “A lot of people come in and say, ‘I don’t want to wear compression stockings. They look like my grandma’s compression stockings,’” he said. “The athletic recovery sock has been targeted toward being more fashionable and so people with venous disease can wear them during exercise and not look so Grandma-ish.” Then again, the racing community has embraced all sorts of fashion statements in the pursuit of performance. Add knee-high compression socks to the list. “People don’t look at them funny at all, certainly not for racing,” Sage said. “If you were to walk around in downtown Burns, you might raise some eyebrows. In Bend, you could probably get away with it.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668

541-322-CARE

www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 F5 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

TThinking hinking ooff SSpinal pinal Surgery? Surgery? R ead tthis his ffiirst rst before before Read you youdo doanything! anthing!

N Whey is worth a taste By Sam McManis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Whey or no whey? Yes, whey! Once a supplement used only by bodybuilders, whey protein has gone mainstream, available in many grocery stores and most pharmacies, and used by endurance athletes and just plain folks. Take our whey quiz:

1.

Whey is a protein extract from which substance? a) cow’s intestines b) curdled milk c) chaff from wheat stalks

2. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Vitaminwater and SoBe Life Water are packed with vitamins and electrolytes, but experts say the products are probably better suited for athletes who need to replenish after a workout. Lona Sandon, a dietitian, said most people would be better off eating whole fruits and vegetables, which contain phytonutrients and fiber. “You don’t find the same benefit in a bottle,” she said.

Water Continued from F1 Your body needs one milliliter — that’s a thousandth of a liter — of water for every calorie you consume, Rodriguez explains, so a daily diet of 1,800 to 2,000 calories requires about 1.8 to two liters of water. That’s close to the commonly recommended six to eight eight-ounce glasses. But tap water works just fine, Rodriguez said. As for electrolytes, she said, only people dedicated to exercising need to replenish them, and then only if they work out vigorously for more than an hour. “Vitaminwater,” she concludes, “is a marketing ploy.” The folks from Vitaminwater were invited to comment but didn’t get back to me before press time. Tap water has the added benefits of being all but free, and free of calories. A single eightounce serving of Vitaminwater has just 50 calories, but a bottle contains 2.5 servings, so you could easily drink 125 calories — just 15 shy of the calories in a can of Coca-Cola — at once. But low- and no-calorie versions are gaining popularity, Sicher said. While sales of regular Vitaminwater dropped 28 percent last year, sales of the zerocalorie, unflavored Smartwater variety jumped 33 percent, he said. A 10-calorie version of fla-

vored Vitaminwater introduced last year sold “very well,” Sicher said. It has been replaced this year by a zero-calorie version, which “also appears to be off to a good start.” Dietitian Lona Sandon, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, said enhanced waters are basically “liquid vitamins, with a little added sugar or stevia.” Vitaminwater focuses on B vitamins and Vitamin C, which, Sandon notes, are water-soluble and not stored in the body, which means you need to replenish them every day. “Once you go beyond what you need, you urinate it out,” Sandon said. “You’re peeing that money away.” A multivitamin is a better option when trying to supplement your diet, she said, because Vitaminwater doesn’t provide a full complement of nutrients as does One-a-Day or Centrum. Better yet, Sandon suggests, food should be the source for vitamins and minerals. “The truth is that the research on supplementing with vitamins does not prove or show that people who take them are healthier than anyone else,” she explains. Indeed, the proposed Dietary Guidelines for Americans for 2010 explicitly say most people don’t need vitamin supplements. “I would hate for someone to choose to use Vitaminwater in lieu of eating fruits and vegetables,” Sandon said. While en-

TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Calcium You have more calcium in your body than any other mineral, yet your body can’t produce it on its own. More than 99 percent of your calcium in stored in the bones and teeth, helping to make them strong. You need calcium to allow muscles and blood vessels to expand and contract, to produce certain hormones and enzymes and to send signals through the nervous system. Each day, we lose calcium through skin, nails, hair, sweat, urine and feces. If you don’t replace that calcium through diet, the body takes it from your bones. It’s why older individuals often lose bone density, a condition known as osteoporosis, and why growing children need an adequate supply. Still, nutritional surveys show that about half of children ages 6 to 11, and more than two-thirds of children ages 12 to 19, do not get enough calcium. Adults do no better. Some 55 percent of men and 78 percent of women don’t meet their daily requirements either. Good sources of calcium include dairy products and leafy green vegetables. Some foods, including spinach, sweet potatoes, nuts and beans, can interfere with the absorption of calcium. Wheat bran, which is high in phytate, a compound found within the hulls of nuts, seeds and grains, is the only food that appears to reduce the absorption of calcium in other foods eaten at the same time.

Good sources: Yogurt (plain, low-fat, 8 oz.): 415 mg Sardines (canned in oil, 3 oz.): 324 mg Cheddar cheese (1.5 oz.): 306 mg

The premise behind enhanced water is that we need more vitamins in our diets. Not so, according to the experts who compiled the proposed Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 released this month: “A daily multivitamin/mineral supplement does not offer health benefits to healthy Americans. Individual mineral/vitamin supplements can benefit some population groups with known deficiencies, such as calcium and vitamin D supplements to reduce risk of osteoporosis or iron supplements among those with deficient iron intakes. However, in some settings, mineral/ vitamin supplements have been associated with harmful effects and should be pursued cautiously.” — Jennifer LaRue Huget

hanced water isn’t likely to do harm, it also cannot provide the complex, quality nutrition that produce does. “Whole fruit, whole vegetables contain phytonutrients and fiber that work together” in ways that scientists don’t yet fully understand, she said. “You don’t find the same benefit in a bottle.”

3.

Critics who say sedentary people don’t need whey supplements point out that the recommended daily allowance of protein for a 150-pound sedentary male is 54 grams, which translate into eating what? a) 3 ounces of chicken, one egg, one glass of milk b) 3 ounces of chicken, six egg whites, two glasses of milk c) a three-egg omelet and a cup of nonfat yogurt

4.

A study in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition showed that athletes should aim for what percentage of the RDA of protein? a) 100-110 percent b) 175-250 percent c) 250-300 percent

5.

Mild side effects from ingesting higher-than-recommended levels of whey protein include bloating and intestinal distress. What is a major, long-term negative side effect? a) liver damage b) kidney damage c) both ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: c; 3: a; 4: b; 5: c Sources: McMasters University; New York Times; www.bodybuilding.com; Los Angeles Times

Milk (nonfat, 8 oz.): 302 mg Orange juice (calcium-fortified, 6 oz.): 200-260 mg Spinach (cooked, ½ cup): 120 mg — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin Source: National Institutes of Health, National Osteoporosis Foundation

The Bulletin file photo

Joint pain may be eased with omega-3 fatty acids By Barbara Quinn The Monterey County Herald

So my doggie gets back from vacation all puffed and fluffed, nails trimmed and teeth cleaned. Nice to have a veterinarian for a son-in-law … My dog also has a new diagnosis … degenerative joint disease. Will is an active dog … lots of wear and tear on his joints these 8 years of life. But isn’t he still too young for osteoarthritis? I ask. “Could be genetic,” Dr. Tom tells me. “Or nutritional …” So we come home with a new prescription dog food especially formulated for Will’s joint disease. I check out some of the main ingredients: Omega-3 fatty acids. These are “essential fats” (ones that must be supplied in the diet because the body cannot manufacture them) for humans (and I suppose for dogs as well). Can omega-3’s “preserve joint cartilage” as the label on Will’s dog food claims? One recent study in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association found that dogs with osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease) were better able to move, walk and play when they were fed food with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Studies on the effects of increased omega-3’s for humans with degenerative joint disease

Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain -- Without Surgery If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self -- Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife. If you have fallen for that trap and are in desperate need of relief of back pain, you should read on. Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion About Surgery -- I Hated

To See My Grandma Suffer How many surgeries does it take to get it right? Two, three, four ... my sweet Grandma had seven before it was a success. Talk about suffering. Maybe you see why I believe surgery should be a last resort. Do you have that kind of time? I have a better solution. People in my office get out of pain fast, and can be back doing the things they love while they are being treated. And you don’t have to feel like you are a drug addict to feel good. The New Solution -- Fast And Long-Lasting Relief

OSTEOARTHRITIS

VITAMINS

Daily recommended amount: Adults (19-50): 1,000 mg Adults (50+): 1,200 mg Children (0-6 months): 210 mg Children (7-12 months): 270 mg Children (1-3): 500 mg Children (4-8): 800 mg Children (9-13): 1,300 mg Children (14-18): 1,300 mg

Experts urge caution

Whey has been shown to enhance lean muscle mass — hence its popularity with bodybuilders — but a Ball State University study shows that it helps runners and cyclists in what way? a) helps them burn fat more readily b) helps them store carbohydrates in muscle mass c) helps them rebuild muscle after “fatiguing exercise”

I am Dr. David Herrin, DC. I run the only Non-Surgical Decompression Center of its kind in Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back -- every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica.

are less clear but promising, according to experts. Antioxidants. Will’s dog food contains “clinically proven antioxidants to support healthy immune function.” Makes sense. In humans with osteoarthritis, scientists have observed excess amounts of “radical oxygen species” — molecules that damage body tissues. Antioxidant nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin E and selenium are considered “scavenger nutrients” that sop up these damaging molecules and render them harmless. Vitamin C is also needed by the body to make collagen — an essential component of connective tissue. And vitamin C assists the body to manufacture L-carnitine — a protein-like compound that helps transport toxic compounds out of active muscle cells. Will’s diet is pretty easy. Everything he needs in one bag. For us humans, the best “antiinflammation” diet is one that includes food sources of omega3 fatty acids (fish, flax, walnuts) and high doses of antioxidant nutrients (fruits, vegetables, whole grains). Barbara Quinn is a registered dietitian and diabetes educator at the Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula. She is the author of “The Diabetes DTOUR Diet” (Rodale, 2009).

We have a non-surgical, non-drug solution. And it’s fast and effective. It’s called non-surgical spinal decompression. Let me give you the low down on this groundbreaking technology. This is a computerized decompression machine that stretches the spine in a unique way. It creates negative pressure deep in the diseased disc. The negative pressure acts like a vacuum that pulls the disc material away from the spinal cord and spinal nerves. Eliminating pain and symptoms. And at the same time the negative pressure pulls nutrients, water and oxygen into the disc. You see with disc diseases, the disc is actually sick! It’s dehydrated. And shrinking. That is how many of our patients regain their life.

Do Any Of These Case Studies Sound Familiar To You? Case #125. Darlene D. After her surgery she was left in some serious pain. This pain lasted 32 years. She came in to us and in three weeks she was out of pain. In five weeks she was on her roof working with her husband. Do you see what we can do for you? We are offering a solution to your pain. To get your life back, FAST! Case #89. Bruce F. After a traumatic car accident, Bruce was left in pain. He went here and there but didn’t find relief. So he came to see us. The treatments were painless. He got out of pain. He now runs, walks the beach, and plays with his kid. All without pain. Does your current therapy offer you this kind of relief? What are you waiting for? Case #320. John M.’s MRI said, “Annular Tear,” Ouch! His episodes of pain put him on his back for two weeks every couple months. He began treatment and his pain decreased almost immediately. Over the course of treatment his back felt stronger and more flexible. No episodes to this day. Do you want to improve the quality of your life? Are your current therapies doing that for you? Case #25. Kevin. Headaches every day of his life since an accident. Headaches gone after first treatment. Peace could be defined as finding a solution to a problem that has you feeling completely crazy. Imagine how Kevin must have felt, and how he feels now! You don’t need a referral to see me. In fact, I want all to come and see me. You are invited to be evaluated by me. I will cover the cost. There is a catch -- you have to qualify. You see, I will not take anyone. I will only treat those I can help.

Don’t Delay Your Pain Relief Come And See If You’re A Good Candidate To Eliminate Your Pain This examination typically costs $245. Right now you can get it for free. That is -- if you qualify. Call now to see if you qualify for this exclusive evaluation. It is a great opportunity to be evaluated by a spinal expert.

It’s A Free Consultation This is what you will discover during your free consultation... ? Why you’re in so much pain? ... You’ll actually get a diagnosis that makes sense. ? How long it will take to get you better? ... It’s less time than you think.

Before you stop reading this, call our number to schedule your free appointment now!

(541) 923-2019 Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic 1655 SW Highland Ave., Suite 6 Redmond, OR 97756


F6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M Infections Continued from F1 St. Charles Bend, Central Oregon’s largest hospital, reported 18 percent fewer central line infections than the state average and 40 percent fewer infections after knee replacement surgery. The hospital’s rate of heart bypass infections was a weak point; the hospital reported 52 percent more infections after heart bypass surgery than the state average. Typically, hospital-acquired infections occur when hospital staff fails to follow proper infection control techniques. Studies have shown that even basic measures, such as washing hands, are routinely left out of patient care. “These particular things are entirely preventable,” said Sean Kolmer, deputy administrator for the Office for Health Policy and Research. “There are strategies to reduce them and eliminate them.” A state law passed in 2007 mandated that hospitals collect data on hospital-acquired infections; this report is the first to come out of that law. The goal of reporting, said Kolmer, is “to shine a light on hospitals that are really great and those that need to improve.” Then, he said, they try to take strategies from those hospitals that do well and implement them across the state. “The goal of this project is to get to zero.” While infections do happen at most large hospitals, they are a relatively rare occurrence. Out of 164 heart bypass procedures done at St. Charles Bend in 2009, 3 percent of patients, a total of five, developed an infection. Out of more than 600 knee replacements, just three patients, less than 1 percent, developed an infection. Still, there was wide variation in just how often the infections occurred. “The thing that popped out to me is the variation,” said Kolmer. “Clearly there are a lot of hospitals that are doing great work, but there are a lot of hospitals that need to improve. For example, Salem Hospital, which performed 350 heart bypass surgeries in 2009, had just

Infection rates In a first-ever report, Oregon published the rates of infection from a number of hospital procedures. St. Charles Bend had a higher-than-average number of infections after bypass surgery but lower rates in two other categories. National average State average

Infections from a central line, per 1,000 days of patients with a central line 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0

.99 0

0

ST. ST. PIONEER CHARLES CHARLES MEMORIAL BEND REDMOND HOSPITAL PRINEVILLE Note: Mountain View Hospital in Madras performed too few procedures for reliable statistics.

Percent of patients with infections after heart bypass surgery 3.0 2.0 1.0

3.05%

0.0 ST. CHARLES BEND Note: St. Charles Redmond, Pioneer Memorial Hospital and Mountain View Hospital did not perform this procedure.

Percent of patients with infections after knee replacement surgery 1.0 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0.0

.49 0 ST. CHARLES BEND

ST. CHARLES REDMOND

Note: Pioneer Memorial Hospital and Mountain View Hospital performed too few procedures for reliable statistics. Source: Office for Health Policy and Research, Oregon Health Authority Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

one infection. By contrast, Oregon Health & Science University, which performed 244 such procedures, had eight infections, giving them more than 10 times the rate at Salem’s hospital. In comments attached to the report, OHSU said that the hospital treats heart bypass patients

that may be at greater risk for infection than those treated in other hospitals. The hospital, the state’s only academic medical center, also said it added three infection control professionals to its staff in 2010. St. Charles Bend was the only Central Oregon hospital to report any infections. St. Charles Redmond and Pioneer Memorial Hospital reported no infections in any of the procedures they measured, though Pioneer had too few knee replacements to provide reliable data. Mountain View Hospital in Madras did not report any infection data because it either had too few procedures done or, in the case of heart bypass surgery, did not do the procedure. St. Charles Bend examined all the heart bypass infections that occurred and found “no commonalties, no clusters and no trends of any sort,” said Laura Mason, risk manager at St. Charles Health System. She said the overall number of infections was low as was the total number of bypass surgeries, so “any infection is going to drive that percentage up or down.” Because the hospital tracks all infections internally, the report did not change any protocols, said Albert DiLuzio, director of cardiovascular services. DiLuzio said each infection is discussed with staff and physicians at the hospital. They talk about where the infection occurred, how it was treated and whether changes in procedure are necessary. “We are not looking for a report to tell us we have a problem,” he said, because the hospital tracks infections so closely. Some changes have come out of these discussions. For example, the group decided to change the air flow in operating rooms to lessen the possibility of contamination and to better educate patients on how to clean stockings they receive after surgery. Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

A little male bonding can go a long way Emotions — a tough topic for men — may affect overall health By Nancy Churnin The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — Men often measure their health in terms of numbers: how many minutes of exercise they have logged and how many calories and nutrients they have eaten. Dallas native Ron Nevelow believes too many men overlook an additional factor: emotional health, the kind that comes from bonding with friends and doing activities you love. When Nevelow was 25 and working as an accountant, he found himself in an emergency room suffering gastrointestinal distress. Figuring out that it was stress-related, he switched careers to a field that made him happier — social work and psychotherapy — and joined an allmale singing group. Now, at 48 and a married father of three, he feels better than ever. “Being socially connected and bonding with other men has helped me tremendously to relax, become more secure and emotionally stable, and given me connections with men who have supported me in taking better care of myself,” he says. This makes perfect sense to Dr. Carlyle Stewart, an internalmedicine physician on the medical staff of Baylor Medical Center at Plano. “The public-health implications of one’s emotional state and its effect on physical health are rather profound, although somewhat controversial,” says Stewart, who says that he has long believed that each one affects the other. “As we speak, research is under way that explores the relationship between one’s state

of mental health and the subsequent development of physical disorders. There appears to be a distinct relationship between the presence of chronic illnesses and an individual’s state of emotional wellness.” At the same time, he acknowledges that this can be a tough sell to many of his male patients.

Talk about it Men tend to be sensitive about discussions that relate to emotions, especially when it comes to sharing feelings of depression or anxiety that may be perceived of as a sign of weakness or loss of control, Stewart says. For this reason he rarely talks to men about their feelings directly. Instead, he asks casually about how life has been in general and more specifically, whether there been a lot of stress at work or at home. If the men mention marital problems or layoffs, he explains how a patient’s mood or emotional state can cause biochemical or hormonal changes, which may affect someone physically and mentally. “An agitated or anxious state may lead to the release of adrenaline, which, in turn, may constrict peripheral arteries, elevate blood pressure and increase blood-sugar levels. On a theoretical basis, and as supported by a growing body of evidence, these changes may aggravate or predispose to hypertension, diabetes, heart attacks and other serious health conditions.” Then he offers tips for a nonmedical way they can treat themselves. “Doing something that makes

you happy, whether it’s hanging out with your buddies, spending time with a friend or loved one, even if it is just watching a funny movie, can boost endorphins, serotonin and levels of other naturally occurring hormones and chemicals that can leave you with a heightened sense of wellbeing and happiness. Not only that, elevated circulating levels of these and related chemicals may function to enable someone to better cope with stress afterward.”

Great friendship Geoffrey Greif, author of “Buddy System: Understanding Male Friendships” (Oxford University Press, $29.95), says too many men feel isolated and alone when problems hit because they don’t know how to make friends or are socialized to believe this is not something that strong men do. At the same time, he says, most men’s friendships are fundamentally different from women’s friendships, and that’s all right. Women may enjoy getting together to talk over lunch. Men are usually more comfortable meeting for a shared activity. When men meet, they may not share anything personal at all. The option to open up should be there if needed, he notes, quoting from his book: “What is a great friendship? For me the answer is ‘Let me sit and watch TV and not talk with my friend about anything other than the game. But, let me also know that if I need to talk to him about something bothering me, I can.’ Many men believe they do not have these or similar options in their friendships.”

VITAL STATS Inadequate maternity care Inadequate maternity care The percentage of women getting inadequate prenatal care in Deschutes County has risen this year to its highest level in a decade. This may reflect fewer women with health insurance or able to pay for prenatal care. In Oregon, the percentage of women with inadequate prenatal care has remained constant at about 6 percent.

6% 5 4.5% 4 3.3% 3.1% 2.8% 3 2.6% 2.5% 2.3% 2.5% 2.7% 2.2% 1.9% 2 1 0 ’00 ’01 ’02 ’03 ’04 ’05 ’06 ’07 ’08 ’09 ’10* * To date Source: Oregon Center for Health Statistics Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Beat the heat: treating sun-exposure illnesses Chicago Tribune

Bring on the beach days and lazy picnics: Summer has arrived. But be careful. Too much of a good thing can be deadly. More than 300 people die each year from heat-related diseases — and thousands get very sick, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The three most common heat problems can affect anyone at any age: heat rash, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. Before you step into the sun, understand the dangers caused by heat.

Heat rash This skin irritation is caused by excessive sweating during humid heat, said Anne Chapas, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at NYU, and dermatologist at the Laser and Skin Surgery Center of New York. Heat rash occurs when the sweat glands are blocked, which causes sweat to accumulate under the skin. It looks like a cluster of small blisters or pimples — and tends to occur under the arm pits, in elbow creases, on the chest, neck or shoulders. You can treat heat rash by keeping the area dry and using overthe-counter products such as baby powder and anti-fungal sprays or creams to lessen the discomfort. If the blisters appear extreme or don’t go away after a few days, you can contact your dermatologist, who may prescribe a topical antibacterial or oral antibiotic, said Joseph Fowler Jr., a dermatologist and clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Louisville.

Heat exhaustion A long day at an outdoor festi-

By Leslie Barker Garcia The Dallas Morning News

Percentage of women in Deschutes County with inadequate prenatal care

By Danielle Braff

5 things guys should do to stay healthy

val can do this to you. Exposure to heat plus dehydration can lead to this nasty condition. Flulike symptoms plus a throbbing headache, cool skin, chills and a pale, weak pulse can all occur, said Dr. Bob McNamara, chairman of the department of emergency medicine at Temple University School of Medicine. Treat it by drinking water and finding a cool area to sit.

Heat stroke This is the mother of all heatrelated diseases, and can cause death or serious disabilities. It happens quickly when you ignore the symptoms of heat exhaustion, and your body is unable to cool down. Normally, your body floats around 98.6 degrees. But it rises to upwards of 103 if you’re out in the sun. Your body simply can’t dissipate all of its heat into the environment, so it starts storing the heat. All that warmth in your body is too much for your organs, which will start malfunctioning, and your body will lose its ability to sweat. Many people will start hallucinating, getting dizzy and even combative, said Rahul Khare, an emergency room physician at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago. The biggest problem with heat stroke is that most people who have it have no idea they’re in any danger, Khare said. There are some immediate things you can do to get someone out of danger, however. First, call 911 and get them out of the heat. Next, grab a drink. Then, get them under cool water, and place ice packs on their armpits, groin, head and neck, Armstrong said.

Staying healthy is more than an addition to your to-do list. Instead, it makes completing your list possible. That said, we asked a doctor, oncologist Eric Nadler, for simple steps men can take to be their healthiest. Nadler practices medicine at Sammons Cancer Center at Baylor University Medical Center and has a master’s degree in public policy. He recommends the following, with a primary-care physician: 1. Have a primary-care physician. Ask friends for recommendations; interview several doctors until you find one you’re comfortable with. Then, no matter how good you may be feeling, have regular checkups. Let that doctor know immediately if you have sudden chest pain, shortness of breath or lightheadedness, as well as changes in strength, stamina or mental status. 2. Pop an aspirin a day. Do so with the approval of your newfound or longtime primary-care physician, of course; aspirin may be detrimental to some people. For others, that deceivingly complex little pill has been shown to lower mortality in the general population. It does so by preventing inflammation, which may be a major factor in the development of illnesses, from coronary heart disease to some forms of cancer. 3. Avoid the big three: obesity, tobacco, alcohol. “These are the three greatest drivers of illness in the United States,” Nadler says. “If we could add exercise and nutrition as countermeasures, we could likely alter more lives than all of the doctors and expensive medications in Texas.” 4. Think of sunscreen as macho. Use it every day, plus avoid the sun as much as possible. Have odd-looking moles evaluated, and go to a dermatologist for regular skin checks. 5. Yes, you really do need to have that test. Colonoscopies, which most men should have at about age 50, can detect even early stages of colorectal cancer. They’re not as bad as you might think.

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

Thyroid Problems? Tim Lind D.C. Is holding an in-office seminar on:

THYROID DISORDERS

Tuesday, July 13th at 7pm. Topics to be discussed: • Why are you taking Thyroid hormones and still feel lousy? • The 6 different patterns to thyroid problems and only one requires hormone replacement • Why doctors don’t run complete thyroid blood tests. • Why your doctor says your lab values are ok when they really aren’t. • Why Hashimotos Thyroiditis is really not a problem in your thyroid. • Natural solutions to correct your thyroid problems.

If you or a loved one is suffering from a Thyroid Condition Then you MUST attend this Seminar on Tuesday night at 7pm.

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Call (541) 389-3072 For more information and to view video testimonials visit: www.bendthyroidcenter.com Our office is located at: 1230 NE 3rd St., Suite A-102, Bend, OR


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T h e

B u l l e t i n :

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Not using your electronic treadmill? Would like to buy at a reasonable price. 541-382-1318. ROCKHOUNDS - BIG SALE! 18” saw, 15” flat lap rock polisher, and sander, rocks, 541-350-7004, Bend. WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

AKC German Shorthair puppies, solid liver, both parents used for guiding, great pets. $450. 541-420-1869, msg. AKC German Shorthair Pups, avail. 8/1 $650. (541)678-0107 905-6644 Black & Yellow Lab Pups, AKC, champion hunting lines, Dew Claws removed, 1st shots, de-wormed & vet checked, ready to go, $350, 541-977-2551. Border Collie pups, working parents great personalities. $300. 541-546-6171.

Boxer Puppies, AKC Registered $700 each, 1st two shots 541-325-3376.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. ½Chihuahua ½ Chinese Crested female, tri-colored hairless, very small, 6 mo., $300. 541-433-2747 or 420-7088. Chihuahua Pups, Apple Head males well bred, small, $250/up. 420-4825.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Chi-Pom puppies, Active, 6 weeks old July 8. Healthy, playful & ready for a home. $200 cash for choice. Call for descriptions/photo. 541-480-2824. Chocolate AKC Lab male $300. Shots, wormed dewclaws. Ready 7-4-10. Please call Stephanie at: 541-932-4868 or email stephsthekid@yahoo.com

Adult Cat Adoption Special During the Month of July Chocolate & Black adoption fee for all adult cats Lab puppies. AKC Regisis only $20.00. All Cats are tered. Ready to go. Call tested for feline aids/leukeJack Jennings at: mia. Adoption includes spay/ 541-633-9113 neuter, microchip, first set of vaccinations and a free Miniature health exam with a local vet- Dachshunds, puppies: purebred $150, or erinarian. For information $200 registered. Call anycome by the shelter at 1355 time. (541) 678-7529. NE Hemlock Ave or call 541-923-0882. . Dachshunds Mini health guarAKC Alaskan Malamute antee, puppy kit, pics & info Pups, ready now, $600-$650 highdesertdogsonline.com eac h. 541-408-4715 $300 each 541-416-2530 mandk@oregonfast.net English Bulldog, AKC Reg, 1 AKC Black Lab Male Puppy. male left $1700, all shots Raised with love and well so541-325-3376. cialized. Dewclaws removed, shots given, paper trained. English Bulldog brindle female. Good field and show pedi8 wks and ready to go! Please gree. $300. 541-280-5292 leave msg. 541-588-6490

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Coins & Stamps

Misc. Items

Building Materials

Lost and Found

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

WANTED TO BUY

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

FOUND: Female Puppy, downtown Bend, on the 4th of July, to identify 771-8523.

Labradoodles, multi-generation, 4 left, born 5/19, chocolate & black, 541-647-9831. Low Cost Spay & Neuter is HERE!! Have your cats & dogs spayed and neutered! Cats: $40 (ask about out Mother & Kittens Special!) Dogs: $65-$120 (by weight). We also have vaccines & microchips avail. 541-617-1010. www.bendsnip.org Mini, AKC Dachshunds, black & tan, black & brindle, short & long hair, call for more information $275 to $325. 541-420-6044,541-447-3060 Miniature American Eskimo 16 weeks, $250 (Sr. Citizen discount) 541-788-0090.

Miniature Australian Shepherd - Show Quality black tri male. Born in Oct., current on shots. Pet price w/o papers/neuter agreement $300. Out of International Champion parents. For more info: www.ArrowBPaints.com or call: 541-576-2056

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers

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Bicycles and Accessories

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Schwinn Womens High Timber Alum. mnt. bike. Shocks, like new, $170. 541-480-5950

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Sidewinder Mountain Bikes, 2 New 26” Schwinn, $85 ea (Firm), call 541-317-0184

245 Comfortaire Hospital Type Motorized Queen Bed The very best, in great condition $950 OBO. 541-788 -6184 Dining table, solid birch, drop leaf, 6 chairs, leaves, pad,good cond. $275, 541-633-3590. Fridge, Frigidaire, white, dbl. doors, water & icemaker, 21 cu.in., exc. $250. 382-5921 Furniture

MINI DOXIE PUPS $300-$350 Visit our HUGE home decor health guarantee. Pics/info consignment store. New www.highdesertdogsonline.com items arrive daily! 930 SE or call 541-416-2530. Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups Bend • 541-318-1501 AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, www.redeuxbend.com $300, Madras, 541-475-2593 English Bulldog Puppies! Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, GENERATE SOME excitement in 1st shots/worming, 8 weeks Only 3 males left, ready for your neigborhood. Plan a gaold, males & female avail., new homes July 1st. AKC rage sale and don't forget to 541-447-4399 certified and they have been advertise in classified! vet checked and had 1st Pembroke Welsh Corgi puppy 385-5809. shots. $1800. each. Contact AKC shots/wormed, $250. Laurie (541)388-3670 541-383-4552 Find It in Free 1 yr. old Male black Pembrook Welsh Corgi female, The Bulletin Classifieds! Lab/Heeler mix needs a lov7 yrs., real sweetheart, owner 541-385-5809 ing home, to give him lots of moving must sell, paid $700 attention 541-923-1180. sell for $220. 541-588-0150 Free Aussie female, 10 mo., Pomeranian Puppies, 2 fe- Log Furniture, lodgepole & juniper, beds, lamps & tables, spayed, loving, protecive, males, 1 male, call for info. made to order, energetic, 541-408-4162 $350 each. 541-480-3160. 541-419-2383 “Free Barn Cats” POODLES, AKC Toy,home The Humane Society of RedMattresses good raised. Joyful tail waggers! mond has Free Barn Cats quality used mattresses, Affordable. 541-475-3889. available. All Barn Cats have at discounted been tested for feline aids/ Poodle, standard pups (5), only fair prices, sets & singles. 2 weeks. Put your deposit leukemia, vaccinated, spayed 541-598-4643. down now! 541-647-9831. /neutered. For more info call 541-923-0882 or come by Pups for sale Lab/Heeler mix the shelter at 1355 NE HemMODEL HOME and Malamute/lab mix $50 lock Ave. FURNISHINGS each, to good home call Sofas, bedroom, dining, 541-923-1180 German Shorthair Pups, 6 sectionals, fabrics, leather, weeks old, $100 Deposit, call Schnoodle Pup, 10 week male, home office, youth, for details, 541-815-5921. 2nd shots, pup kit, very accessories and more. sweet $395. 541-410-7701. Griffin Wirehaired Pointer MUST SELL! Pups, both parents reg., 5 SHIH-POO adorable toy pups, (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com males, 4 females, born 6/20, hypo-allergenic, 1 male, 1 ready for home 1st week in female left. $350 ea.. Call Aug, $1000, 541-934-2423 or RECLINER leather burgundy , Martha at 541-744-1804. loreencooper@centurytel.net swivel, $250. Over stuffed SHIH-TZU MALE, 2 years, chair, make offer. 388-2348. HAVANESE Purebred Male 1yr gold and white, $275. 12lb Black/Tan Shots Very 541-788-0090. Table, 8 chairs, 2 leaves, friendly $500 541-915-5245 dark pine, good cond., $1500 Siberian Husky puppies AKC. KITTEN EXTRAVAGANZA! Open firm, 541-383-2535. Champion lines. $725. Sat., Sun. & the holiday too, stones-siberians@live.com 1 to 5 PM, other days by 541-330-8617 The Bulletin appt. Dozens of kittens just recommends extra caution in from foster homes & great Standard Poodle Jabez Pups, 6 when purchasing products males & 2 females, chocoadult cats at Cat Rescue, or services from out of the late, black, apricot & cream Adoption & Foster Team area. Sending cash, checks, $800 & $750. 541-771-0513 sanctuary! Altered, vaccior credit information may Jabezstandardpoodles.com nated, ID chip, more. Adopbe subjected to F R A U D . tion fees temporarily reFor more information about duced to just $30 for 1 Wanted Pair of young white Doves & large outdoor cage an advertiser, you may call kitten, $50 for 2 (excludes in exc. cond. 541-382-2194. the Oregon State Attorney Siamese). Adult cats just $15 General’s Office Consumer or take home an adult Protection hotline at 'mentor' cat free with a kitWhat are you 1-877-877-9392. ten adoption! Social & most looking for? You’ll are used to kids, cats & friendly dogs. Can hold shortfind it in The term if you are going on vacation. For photos & direcBulletin Classifieds tions visit www.craftcats.com 212 Info: 389-8420 or 317-3931. Antiques & “Kittens, Kittens, Kittens” Collectibles The Humane Society of Red- Whippet Puppies, 6 weeks mond has Kittens. Adoption unique family dogs $350 fee of $40.00 includes spay/ each. 541-280-1975. neuter, microchip, first set of vaccinations & a free health Yellow Lab AKC Puppies, OFA hips/elbows cert., exam with a local Veterinarchampion bloodlines, dew ian. All kittens are tested for claws removed, 1st shots & feline aids/leukemia. For wormed, ready 8/1, $500. Bob Dylan Wanted: 1966 more information come by Paramount Theater Portland 541-728-0659. (Taking deps.) the shelter at 1355 NE HemConcert Poster, will pay lock Ave or call us at Yorkie, AKC, Male, 8.5 mo., $3000 Cash, 310-346-1965. 541-923-0882. weighs 5.5 lbs., very active, housebroken, loves children, Potato masher and Flow Blue Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. $500 Firm. No checks. Central Oregon Largest collection; Vintage African 541-419-3082 Selection. 541-408-3317 fabric & Saris. 541-419-9406.

541-385-5809

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Golf Equipment Adams Idea Hybrid Tech OS, P-7, 6,5,4,3, Hybrid Reg. graphite $300. 318-8427.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

Logs sold by the foot and also Log home kit, 28x28 shell incl. walls (3 sided logs) ridge pole, rafters, gable end logs, drawing (engineered) all logs peeled & sanded $16,000 . 541-480-1025.

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Metal exterior door, 3ft. x 6.5 ft., frame and trim, exc. $70. 541-480-5950

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 Fluorescent Light Fixtures, (2), without bulbs, 10’, 541-385-9350,541-788-0057 Garage Door Opener, $25, please call 541-385-9350, 541-788-0057.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

The Bulletin

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte. Sun. July 11th, 5:30-9:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

Kenmore Gas BBQ’er, side burner exc. shape, $75. 541-480-5950. PATIO SET Tropitone 87” tile stone table, chairs & umbrella. $3000 OBO. 388-2348.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Stevens single shot 20 ga. shot gun, refinished & reblued, $150. 541-595-0941

Punch bowl, stand, 10 glass cups, nice cut glass pattern. $25/OBO. 541-419-6408.

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The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Rare Ann Ruttan Original, 5’x4’, $7000 OBO, please call 541-408-4613.

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Hot Tubs and Spas Hurricane 7 Person Self Contained Spa, wood sides, newer pump, cover, runs great, $995. 541-408-7908

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Computers Fast Dell Computer P4 1.7GHZ 20GB 256MB CD-ROM WinXP PRO Office 2007 Tower only $75 OBO call 541-915-7806. Monitor, Old style Dell 16 inch, excellent condition asking $30. 541-330-1843. THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Wedding decor, centerpieces, floral, bridal shower games. $10/OBO. 541-419-6408. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Medical Equipment Electric Hospital Bed and Mattress, side rails $175. S.E. Bend. phone 541-617-6071

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Tools 1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953. 1950’s Baldwin Baby Grand Piano, w/bench, good cond., needs some intermal repair, $475, 541-408-3215.

RARE EGCon acoustic guitar classical, hispanic, some western. $239 541-382-2543.

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Drill Press, American Machine, 5-spd., industrial model, $225, 541-385-9350.

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Snow Removal Equipment

Buffet-style luncheon plates, glass, 1960s style $10 for all. 541-419-6408.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177 Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg. Tamarack & Red Fir Split & Delivered, $185/cord, Rounds $165, Seasoned, Pine & Juniper Avail. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

Lawn Edge Trimmer, Craftsman 4 hp., 3 wheel, like new $195. 541-388-0811. JET JTAS-10XL Tilting Arbor Tablesaw $850 Inc. DADO-TENON JIG-DUST COLL 541 382 3454

Lost and Found SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

Found Key w/car fob, in river near beach at Farewell Bend Park, 6/27, 541-410-6468. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Found Sanddisk 512mb camera card, 6/17, Powerline Trail at Paulina Lake, 541-383-0882. Lost Dog: toy Fox Terrier/Chihuahua mix, female, near Steelehead Falls, white, reddish brown spots, has collar, “Dallas”, 6/30, very friendly, 541-504-4422,541-953-3000

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Fuel and Wood

Art, Jewelry and Furs

Found Keys: Car & door keys, remote, 15th/Canyon, Redmond, 6/28, 541-923-6116.

Found: 2 Hats & Scarf after parade on Sun. 7/4, Oregon Ave, call 541-382-4464. FOUND CABELA’S 2010 hard cover book by Elton Gregory school. call 541-923-7607.

LOST: Olympus Camera at the Riverbend park Saturday 7/3, Please call 541-388-0244, 808-960-5853 MISSING from 17001 Elsinore Rd., Sunriver: ‘Katie-Kat’ tortoise shell calico with half tail, wearing harness & collar with ID & rabies tags. Missing since 6/11. Reward. 541-977-4288 or 977-3021. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery 1998 New Holland Model "1725" Tractor. $13,900. Very good condition. Original owner. 3 cylinder diesel. 29hp. ~ 1300 hours. PTO never used. Backhoe and box scraper included. Trailer also available. (541) 420-7663. Big Newhouse cattle squeeze chute needs paint $500. 541-447-1039.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Fuel tank 64 inch wide for pickup with pump $235. 541-447-1039. John Deere 2X16 hydraulic rollover plow with 3 pt. hitch $485. 541-447-1039. SWATHER DOLLY, $500; Baler NH 282, PTO, twine, SOLD; Bale Wagon, NH1010 SOLD; Swather Hesston 6400, $3500; J D Swather, Cab, A/C, diesel, A300 Twin Knife header, $5500; all field ready, Prineville, 541-419-9486


G2 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 308

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Hay, Grain and Feed

Horses and Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

2010 Season, Orchard Grass, Orchard / Timothy, small bales, no rain, delivery avail., 5 ton or more, $130/ton, 541-610-2506. QUALITY 1st cutting orchard grass hay. No rain. Cloverdale area. $110 ton, 2 twine 70-75# bales, 541-480-3944.

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4 As low as

0% APR Financing The New Kubota RTV500 compact utility vehicle has all the comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility vehicle – but fits in the bed of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on approved credit.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

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Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies BARD ROCK LAYING HENS, (8), brown eggs. 541-923-5444.

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Hay, Grain and Feed

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc. hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton 541-549-3831 2010 1st Cutting, Timothy Grass Hay, no rain, no fertilizer, $130/ton, in barn, NE Redmond, Please Call 541-771-4000.

BEEF CALVES 300-800 lbs., pasture ready, vaccinated, delivery avail. 541-480-1719. READY TO WORK, Yearling Angus Bulls, range-raised in trouble-free herd, $1000/ea. Delivery avail. 541-480-8096

SWAP MEET & BBQ Saturday July 10th. Hosted by THE O'LE TACK ROOM ALL Vendors Welcome ~ Spaces FREE. Call NOW to reserve your spot. Spaces go FAST! 7th and Cook, Tumalo ~ 312-0082

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Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond/Sisters daytime hrs., affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161.

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Domestic & In-Home Positions CAREGIVER wanted for elderly woman, room/board, + Ref. needed. 541-549-1471.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

541-385-5809

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Farmers Column 4 Horse Trailer & Prefert Arena fencing, 1991 straight load trailer, in good shape, $3500; Prefert metal arena, 15 panels, incl. walk thru, $2800, Sherry, 541-350-9188

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

DIAMOND J STABLES is re-opening at the end of July! call Lori to hold a stall at 541-389-8164. Limited Stalls available.

Custom Haying, Farming and Hay Sales, disc, plant, cut, rake, bale & stack, serving all of Central Oregon, call 541-891-4087.

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Fundraiser Sales

Estate Sale Sat/Sun. 8-4 col- Please help support us building lectables, china, crystal, pk a much-needed orphanage tires & wheels, utility box, for the street kids in Tijuana, camping, household +nuMexico. Fri. & Sat., 9-6, huge merous items 15433 Quail multi-family garage sale. Crooked River Ranch 61581 Twin Lakes Loop. 541-980-5981 282 Family Estate Sale: 19202 Cherokee Rd., Fri. & Sat. 8-4, Sales Northwest Bend go Baker Rd. left on Cinder Butte., go 1 mi. left on Mini- Big Sale, Fri. July 9th, 8-2, jewelry, designer shoes, purses tonka, right on Cherokee to and clothes, lot of books, sale, round oak table with 4 movies & household items. chairs, hide-a-bed, lots of Don’t miss this one. 626 NW hand tools, depression glass, Lindsay Ct. (Off Galveston) 3 china closets oak hight chair, lots of jewelry, 85 Merc Central Oregon Families with Grand Marquis, (4) 5 ft. glass Multiples is having their anshowcases, new fridge, pornual BIG garage sale. Saturtable swamp cooler, too day July 10th from 7-2pm. much to list. MUST SEE, 1164 NW Redfield Circle on 382-6773. Awbrey Butte.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ITS NO ORDINARY GARAGE SALE! Huge estate sale filling an airplane hangar! High end, like new, furniture, accessories, & art from an amazing Tumalo ranch home! Estate Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 2440 July 9-11. Fri 3-6pm, Sat & SW Indian Ave., RedSun 9-3pm. 1120 SE Sisters mond, furniture, antiques, Ave, Redmond. Look for appliances, tools & more. signs, north side of airport.

ESTATE

SALE

Family home since 1921! Lots of old things, bedroom set, small tables, mission rocker & chairs, old wooden tool chests & tools, trunks, WWII items, washtubs & enamelware, copper boiler, linens, childrens items, old paper & sheet music, old photos & albums, some Bend memorbilia, lots of beautiful colored glass of all kinds, figurines, nick-nacks, old pocket watches, coin collection, books, dish sets, plus sofa, lamps, loads of misc. House, yard & shed full.

Fri. & Sat., 9 -4 Crowd Control Numbers issued Friday at 8 a.m.

1375 NW Albany just s. of 14th & Galveston Attic Estates & Appraisals 541-350-6822

For pictures & info go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

347

Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Livestock & Equipment

280

Barn/ Misc./ Collectibles Sale! 68308 Cloverdale R d . Fri. Sat, 8-4. Yard & misc. tools/hardware, Honda 5.5 compressor, p/up tool box, 2001 Toyota Avalon, Roadmaster tow bar, Victorian child’s sled, 1800s walnut chairs, oak rocker, parlor and dining room chairs, dbl. bed, 1920s curved front hutch, folding screen, bookcases, toys, records, TV computer tables, camp cot, Body Solid weight machine, digital camera, lens, collectible glassware, old kitchen, Hoosier spice jars, and canisters, cut depression, Fenton Fry Foval, Bohemian, Carnival and Westmorland, kerosene table and hanging lamps, nic-nacs, old jars, Shawnee Gondor and McCoy pottery, Jewel tea, restaurant-ware, vintage dishes, HL Mossrose, Satsuma tea set, linens, framed 1890s Appanzell lace runner, vintage cookbooks, craft, antique, collectible reference books, leather craftsman, Arabian Horse World, history, biography, vintage sewing machine, art, prints and oil, and more.

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Schools and Training

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Estate Sales All goes, machine, shop tools, antiques, camp, gun cabinet, china, furniture,snow blower, 55836 Wood Duck Dr, Sunriver,Fri-Sat, 9-3, 541-385-7414

400

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

325 1st Cutting Orchard Grass, 2-tie, $110/ton, Alfafla Grass Mix Feeder hay, $90/ton, good quality Alfalfa, $110/ton, 541-475-4242, 541-948-0292

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Employment

We are looking for an experienced caregiver for our elderly parents. This is an employee position, and possible live-in. 541-480-0517 or 541-548-3030 jensen.cpa@bendcable.com

Addiction Counselor: 2 Positions, full & part time. CADC or masters level, experienced. Salary DOE, Fax resume to 541-383-4935.

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

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Reach thousands of readers!

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Automotive Front End/Suspension Tech needed. Experience is essential for this fast paced job. Send replies to: 1865 NE Hwy 20, Bend, OR 97701.

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Garage Sale,NW Crossing, 2465 NW Sacagaewa Ln, alley access, Fri 8-4, Sat. 9-2, home decor, lots of misc. GARAGE SALE Sat.7/10 7-2pm. Toys, tools games, books & more. 20210 Meadow Ln. Hwy 20 to Mtn View to Scenic to Meadow Ln. Liquidation sale 90% of stuff is NEW. Multi-family! Lighting & tile galore! Gifts & drapery, home improv, tools, baby/ toddler clothes & toys. Fri & Sat. 8:30-4. 63290 Lavacrest St. 97701 Multi Family, Fri. thru Sun. 8-5, 21316 Limestone, radial arm saw, plants, weight bench, and so much more!

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

284

Sales Southwest Bend A

TEACHER Retires! 100's Books, Trim, Charts, Bulletin Boards, VINTAGE JEWELRY, Crafts, Homeschool, Juicer, Household Etc. 8-5, SAT. July 10. 19760 Rock Bluff Ln.

Yard Sale: 19220 Cherokee Rd. DRW. Fri. & Sat. 8am-5pm. Too much stuff to list. Tires, boat, Jeep, tools, etc.

Garage Sale: Freight Damaged Swords & knives, like YARD SALE Fri., Sat., Sun, 9-6. 141 SW 15th St. #11. new, Ford accessories for Housewares, furn., appl., Pickup & cars, lots of stuff, tools, boat/motor, fishing. Fri.-Sat., 8-5, 65530 78th St.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Seeking a Parts Driver /Counter Person, some exp. preferred but not necessary. Full time position. May need to work some Saturdays. Drop off resume at: 2225 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

Automotive

Working Service Manager opportunity in beautiful Prineville, OR. Robberson Ford Sales Inc. is looking for a hard-working, highly motivated Service Manager to lead our service team. Don't miss this chance to build your career and join the #1 Ford dealer in Central Oregon. All inquiries are highly confidential. Email resume to tweber@robberson.com Robberson Ford is a drug free workplace. EOE.

for more details and address Fri. and Sat., 8-2. Tools, clothes & kids, 2-4, books, desk, pool, reloading equip., misc. 61371 Ward Rd. Fri.-Sat. 8-4, 61315 Steens Mtn. Lp, off 27th, antiques, housewares, tools, auto, RV, collectibles, golf clubs, more!

Eagle Crest The Ridge, Fri. & Sat. 9-4 at multiple locations starting at Merlin Dr. (directions to West Ridge) Estate: Art, furniture, golf clubs, cart, bikes, clothes, decor & much more.

Customer Service Part-Time

Reps

-

Come join our team! Standard TV & Appliance is the largest, independently owned appliance retailer in the Pacific Northwest. We need professionals who have experience delivering excellent customer service both in person and on the phone. Must have strong ten key and data entry skills, great attitude and professional appearance. Varying shifts including nights and weekends, working 16-21 hours per week. Wages are competitive and come with a monthly bonus. Must pass a background check and drug screen. Send Resume or Apply in Person at: 63736 Paramount Drive Bend, OR 97701

Fishing- Well respected Seattle based Fishing Co seeks hard working dedicated processors for work aboard proven vessels at sea in Alaska - see Informational Meeting Schedule at www.fishermensfinest.com - July 9 Redmond

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Land Surveyor Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Professional Land Surveyor. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information.

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Sales Other Areas

HUGE Garage Sale Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 3131 SW 41st St. , off of Wickiup, a little bit of everything!

Farm/Garage Sale: Fri.Sun., 9-6, Alfalfa area, 62645 Dodds Rd., 9 mi E. of Bend, off Hwy 20, 541-318-7070,

Multi-Family Sale July 9-11. TOOLS; Pet & Golf supply; Housewares; Clothes; MORE! 3024 NW 19th St, Redmond.

Fri. & Sat., 10-2. 16696 Shaw Pine Ct., E. off Hwy 97 at Finley Butte, and R. on Mitts. Accent furn., household, decorative, collectible items, vintage incl. jewelry, serpentine walnut daybed, scrapbook supplies, games, books, mens L and XL Tall suits & clothing, baby gear, Christmas, DVDs, CDs, albums.

HUGE Family

Big garage sale Saturday at 2633 SW Evergreen Ave in Redmond. Furniture, Home kids & more.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Sales Redmond Area

HUGE GARAGE/ESTATE SALE Fri. & Sat. 8-4, 3749 SW You don’t want to miss this TOMMY ARMOUR LN, vinone! 105 SE Bridgeford Blvd. tage linens, kids books, 12th Annual Neighborhood Fri. & Sat., 9-5. records and much more. Sale Alpenview Lane off Bear Creek Rd. Fri. 8-4 & Huge Sale Sat. 8am to 1pm 3 Fri/Sat. 9-5, antiques & colTVs, appliances, light fixlectibles, clothes & home deSat. 8-2 follow the signs! tures, household, clothing, cor & a whole lot more. Table saw, camping, treadshoes, furniture, kitchen sink. Dealers discounts corner of mill, books, crafts, home de1962 SE Fairwood Dr. (Reed NW 22nd & Maple. cor, tools, desk, fabric-fat Mkt., Shadowood, Fairwood) quarters and much more! Garage Sale in Redmond. Friday & Saturday 9-4, Totally cleaned out house HUGE SALE 20628 Obie Way, house& garage! Fri. & Sat. 7/9 & ~Tools, camping gear, hold, furniture, fridge, tools, 10. 9 AM-3PM @ bikes, books, Log Queen and much more! 3590 SW 35th Street. Bed Set, Dining set, home 541-548-2048 decor. Everything's gotta HUGE Estate Sale, Thurs. go! Friday 8 - 4, Saturday Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 22405 8-4. 2234 SE Pilatus Lane, Alfalfa Mkt. Rd. at Powell Bend, 97702. 541-389-7307 Butte Hwy. Antiques, hunting & fishing items, tools and Moving Sale, Fri & Sat. 7-3, much much more! 21115 Merrit Court in PonMulti Family, Fri. 8-5 & Sat. derosa Estates off 27th 8-4, 20687 Flintlock Ct. Street queen bed, camping tools, plumbing, furniture, gear, tools, crafts, hunting & home decor and lots of misc. fishing gear, books, Washe & Dryer available July 28th. Multi-Famiy Sale: Heavenly Aroma Soy Candles, small Multi-Family Sale: Sat. 8-4, HUGE Estate Sale Thurs Clothes, woodworking tools, chest freezer, boys clothes & 7-4, Fri. & Sat. 9-4. glassware, dishes, tires, toys, Heckle & Jeckle cookie antiques, tools, tools tools! packing material, kids clothes jar, collectibles, more! Fri.-Sat. Fishing, camping, lawnmow& toys, 61579 American 9-4,1861 NE Tombstone Way ers, chainsaws, vintage tools, L p. off of American Ln. vintage farm 288 Sporting, camping, household, implements, Craftsman shredder/chipper, 3 wheel, boat tools, automotive, bldg. supSales Southeast Bend motors, yard tools, yard deplies, nice things, good deals. cor, air compressor, vintage Huge Moving Sale 559 SE Centennial. Thru Sun. bikes, utility trailers, colU Name It, I Might Have It! Willow Creek Loop lectibles, Avon bottles, all Fri., Sat. & Sun. 8-4, 61445 household furniture, 200 Mt. High Subdivision SE 27th St. #121, no tools or Chevy Z71 4x4 X-cab, corner Saturday, July 10th & fishing gear, years of stuff! of North Hemholtz& Sunday, July 11th Coyner and much more! 290 Handled by Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., Sales Redmond Area

See ad in Friday-Saturday & Sundays newspaper

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities Automotive

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Garage Sale, Fri., 8-5., Kitchen, exercise equip, tools, clothes, furniture, bikes, etc. Good Stuff! 1731 NW Rimrock.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

541-617-7825

APT. ASSISTANT MANAGER Part-Time Fox Hollow Apts. 541-383-3152 Cascade Rental Management

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Assistant Manager Part time, for apartment community needed to work 20 hrs. a week in Bend, must have strong selling and computer skills, must be able to work Saturdays, must be detail orientated, take directions well and be able to multi task, tax credit housing experience preferred but not required. Pay $10.50/hr., please respond with resume to: kpetersen@princetonproperty. com or fax to: 503-794-9004.

Garage Sale -July 9,10,11, 8AM to 5PM Collectible Books, Collectible Toys, Furniture, Avon Collectibles, Collectible Spoons, Collectible Figurines, Antiques, Clothes, Jewelry. Everything MUST Go! 2109 NW 98th Lane, Redmond, off 101St., Hwy. 126

Park Wide Yard Sale, Mtn.. View Mobile Home Park, 6100 S. Hwy 97. Thurs.Sat., 9am-4pm. Lots of spaces selling many things!!! Unique Garage Sale: 1844 NE 8th, Fri. & Sat. 8-3, lots of unique items and collectibles, much more!

292

Sales Other Areas 4 Family Neighborhood Sale at West Powell Butte Estates on 126 between Redmond & Powell Butte, shop items, tools, antiques,quality clothes, vintage jewelry, Fri-Sat. 8-5. Follow signs from Hwy. 126.

Crooked River - Huge barn sale. July 10 & 11, 10-4pm. So many items at bargain prices-some free. Furniture, rugs, linens, art, kitchen, garden tools, hospital bed, small appliances, aircon, clothes, jewelry, much more. Signs to fire station to 9020 Panorama.

HUGE Estate Sale 50 plus yrs. of accumulation, Fri. & Sat. 8-5, Kent Rd. off Cloverdale Rd, Sisters, collectible cookbooks, carpentry tools, lots of guy stuff

Madras: Sat./Sun 8-4, 2478 SE Bitterbrush Dr., Canyon View Estates quality clothes for men & women +access. decor outdoor pots, decor, & furniture, rugs, bedding etc . Saturday & Sunday 8 am.-5 pm., 3340 NW Odem Avenue, Terrebonne, guns, rifles, sporting goods & more.

541-322-7253


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 G3

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Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

Very nice 3 bdrm., 2 bath home close to shopping & medical facilities, A/C, dbl. garage, pet neg. avail. now $900 mo. +dep. 541-593-2540.

700

Limited Energy LEA or LEB technican proficient at all fire alarms, security, CCTV, and access control systems. NICET certificates a plus. Send resume to Box 16205513, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Natural Resource Specialist Anderson.Perry & Associates, Inc., a La Grande, OR based engineering firm, is seeking to hire a Natural Resource Specialist. Please see www.andersonperry.com for more information.

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions.

Sales Position: A prominent National Wholesale Agricultural Parts Distributor is seeking a Territory Sales Representative to cover portions of Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Responsible for developing new accounts as well as servicing and growing existing accounts. Overnight travel is required. Farm or farm machinery knowledge is helpful. Base salary plus commission. E-mail resume and cover letter to larry.hansen@smalink.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Sales

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

486

Independent Positions

Sales, Sales Manager, Internet Sales, Internet Manager and Finance Manager. Top employees can expect to make $100,000 a year selling the #1 selling brand of vehicle in the world. Toyota. Exp. preferred but will train the right individuals. Must be driven, highly motivated, dressed for success, up for a challenge and ready to learn! If you like to compete and win, please apply in person only at 2225 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

640

Roommate Wanted Beautifully furnished home near BMC East, bdrm. and bath avail. $475/mo. includes utils. & cable, no smok ing/pets, 541-389-9680.

Near Tumalo quiet, full house access, artist pueblo. $350+util. 541-388-2159. NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, $400. 541-317-1879

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Loans and Mortgages W A R NIN G The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Senior Research Assistant / Research Associate: Implement research studies in Prineville area. Recruit and engage clinics with studies; train staff in data collection; recruit and consent patients; conduct qualitative studies. Apply to michaell@ohsu.edu. Full ad at: http://www.ohsu.edu/hr/jo BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? bs/job_details.cfm?job_posti Private party will loan on real ng_id=IRC30660 estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all Summer Work! you need. Call now. Oregon Customer Sales / Service, Land Mortgage 388-4200. $12.25 base/appt. Apply at: www.workforstudents.com or call 541-728-0675.

Spacious 1080 sq. ft. 2 bdrm. townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, patio, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rents start at $495. 179 SW Hayes Ave. Please call 541-382-0162.

Summer Special! $99 Move in $250 deposit Be the first to live in one of these Fantastic Luxury Apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease!

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a 2553 & 2580 SW 20th St.home to rent, call a Bulletin 2/1 duplexes, garage, yard, Classified Rep. to get the W/D hookup, on cul-de-sac, new rates and get your ad $600+dep, incl. yard maint., started ASAP! 541-385-5809 no pets/smoking.541-382-1015

634 CAUTION

541-617-7825

Toyota of Bend is expanding for our new facility! We have positions available for:

605

Rooms for Rent

The Bulletin Classifieds

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

600

Duplex Near Old Mill, 2 bdrm. 1 bath, garage, wood stove, fenced yard, pet neg., W/D hookups, $580. 527 SE Wilson, 541-419-1115.

630

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Rentals

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 & 2 bdrms avail. from $525-$645. Limited # avail. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special

Call about our Specials

Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Ask Us About Our

Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet Summertime complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Special! Charles. $550/mo. Call Chaparral & 541-385-6928. Rimrock 1/2 Off First Full Month 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #2 Apartments 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., Clean, energy efficient nongas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car smoking units, w/patios, 2 garage, no pets. $775+dep. on-site laundry rooms, storWith 6 month lease. age units available. Close to Viking Property Management schools, pools, skateboard 541-416-0191 park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet #1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 friendly with new large dog bath townhouse, W/D run, some large breeds okay hookup, W/S/G paid, $625 with mgr. approval. + dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 244 SW RIMROCK WAY 541-390-5615. 541-923-5008 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Duplex, 1400 www.redmondrents.com sq.ft., dbl. attached garage, W/D incl., fenced yard, $750 Like New Duplex, nice neighper mo., please call borhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, ga541-410-4255. rage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, Attractive 2 bdrm. in 4-plex, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. 1751 NE Wichita, W/S/G paid, on-site laundry, small 648 pet on approval, reduced to $550/mo. 541-389-9901. Houses for $ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $675 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $600 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb 541-420-9848. 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl., W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend Avail. Now, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, new paint inside, yard, wood stove, single garage, no pets or smoking $750 mo., 1st, last, & dep. 541-389-7734. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, w/den, on 1.5 acres, 2 outbuildings, Crooked River Ranch, $600/ mo, $700 security, 541-923-2325.

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1120 sq.ft., dbl. garage, fenced, new paint, vinyl, carpet & appl., $800/mo., $1200 dep., no pets/smoking, 541-480-2468 Eagle Crest, 2700 sq.ft., big & beautiful, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, den, O-sized triple . garage on golf course, gardener paid, 55+community $1100. 541-604-5534 New large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq.ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1450. 503-720-7268.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3/2 in great NE neighborhood avail. 7/15. Fenced backyard, garage. Pets OK w/dep. $900 mo., 1 yr. lease, 1st/last, $500 dep. 1-541-619-6177. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, 1748 sq. ft., wood stove, big rear patio, dbl. lot, fenced yard, storage shed & carport, $950/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Available Now, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, no garage, pet? $525 mo., 1st/last+dep. no W/D hookup. 541-382-3672.

personals

A CLEAN 1 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great location, W/S/G paid, no dogs, $540/mo. 541-318-1973 A clean, quiet, spacious 1 bdrm., river & mtn. views, West hills, laundry, deck, $675 mo., 541 382-7654, karenmichellen@hotmail.com A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $495; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. & parking. 541-389-2389 for appt.

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Seeking witnesses to accident at 4:07 p.m. on 7/3, at Colorado & Wall. 541-389-0662, help greatly appreciated.

Westside Condo, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D, A/C, garage, in quiet 4-plex, at great westside location, $800, 1737 SW Knoll, 541-280-7268

SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653

NOTICE:

2 Story, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, garage. Fenced yard, 1/2 acre. OWWII. $750/mo. 541-598-2796. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, W/S/G incl., OWWII, $895/ mo. + dep., no smoking, please call 503-651-1142 or 503-310-9027.

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Commercial for Rent/Lease Lease: 679 SE Business Way, 5000+ sq.ft, light industrial, 3 overhead doors, exc. parking, office suite w/mtn. views. Talk to me! 907-252-2794. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft.,

30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

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Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

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Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

719

Real Estate Trades Trade your 5+ acres + home for our beautiful home in West Linn (just south of PDX). 503 534-1212. MLS #10013267. Owner/broker.

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Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

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Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809

The Bulletin Classified *** Know your neighbors! Nestled in Bend's only environmentally friendly co-housing community. http://home.bendbroadband.com/higherground/. Lots of sunlight! 3 bdrms, 2 baths, 1450 sq. ft., foam panel construction, large decks, cozy loft. Bamboo floors. $239,000 Call Jen: 541 678-5165. Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted" PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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Southwest Bend Homes $4000 Down DRW, 24X48 3/2 Golden West mfd. home on 1 acre canal lot, payment $697 mo./30 yrs. Owner for info. 541-505-8000. Eugene.

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Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

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Redmond Homes Cottage Style 3 bdrm., garage, heat pump, landscaped. Clean home, safe neighborhood. $65,000 for home AND .013 lot. 541-815-1216.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

Debris Removal DMH & Co.

Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Yard Debris/Clean Up, Hauling Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

I DO THAT!

Remodeling, Handyman, Home Inspection Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

Free Trash Metal Removal Appliances, cars, trucks, dead batteries, any and all metal trash. No fees. Please call Billy Jack, 541-419-0291

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction Domestic Services work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Home Is Where The Dirt Is Board (CCB). An active 10 Years Housekeeping license means the contractor Experience, References, Rates is bonded and insured. To Fit Your Needs Call Verify the contractor’s CCB Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933 license through the CCB Consumer Website House Keeping Services: www.hirealicensedcontractor.com 11 yrs of experience in house or call 503-378-4621. The keeping. Angelica Lopez Bulletin recommends House Keeping & Janitorial, checking with the CCB prior 541-633-3548,541-633-5489 to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also Experienced Housekeeping, require additional licenses good references, reasonable and certifications. prices, 541-550-6994. FENCING, SHELTERS, REPAIRS Cows get out? Neighbors get Excavating in? Call Bob anytime, He’ll come running! 541-420-0966. CCB#190754

Debris Removal

Handyman

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

• DECKS •CARPENTRY •PAINTING & STAINING •WINDOWS AND DOORS and everything else. 21 Years Experience.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

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Acreages

FSBO: 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Home 1.47 Acres +/- Comm. Water & Sewer Detached. Garage/Shop Sunriver Area $224,900. Call R. Mosher 541-593-2203.

14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829.

Silver Lake: Dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, w/covered RV storage, town block w/multiple hookups, $147,000, 541-576-2390.

7 Mi. from Costco, secluded 10 acres and end of road, lots Juniper w/ mtn. views, power & water near by, asking $250,000. 541-617-0613

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Recreational Homes and Property

CRESCENT LAKE CABIN Lake front. $399,000 755 503-329-0959 Sunriver/La Pine Homes 3 Bdrm. 2 bath single story on ½ acre, built in 2003, also ½ acre lot with well, same area, So. of Sunriver. Please call 509-585-9050.

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Crook County Homes Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

H Multi Family H Prineville Duplex

Almost new, fully rented with garage, patio and fireplace. 1200 sq.ft. each side. Great price! $130,000. Lawnae Hunter, Principal Broker Hunter Properties, LLC 541-389-7910 541-550-8635

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

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Employment Opportunities

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $96,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000 Powell Butte: 6 acres in farm field, septic approved, power to property, gorgeous views, OWC, $149,900, 541-350-4684.

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Farms and Ranches

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, raises 85 ton of hay & pasture for 10 cows, sacrifice for $425,000, 541-447-1039

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Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

2 bdrm, 1 bath, SE Bend New carpet, large yard. Pets okay. $7,900.00 or $1,000 down, $200 month. 541-383-5130. 3/1 in DRW. Nice yard, W/D, fridge., new furnace, new bath plumbing, quiet park. $8900. 541-728-0529. 60311 Cheyenne Rd., #16 Move-In Ready! Homes start at $8999. Delivered & set-up start at $28,500, on land, $49,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782.

Smith Rock Mobile Park, Space 17. 55+ Park. 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, A/C, awning, storage, RV parking. $15,000 OBO. 541-499-2845,541-475-2891

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of July 5, 2010

Business Opportunity LOOMIX FEED supplements is seeking dealers. Motivated individuals with cattle knowledge and community ties. Contact Kristi @ 800-870-0356 / kboen@loomix.com to find out if there is a dealership opportunity in your area. .

Employment DRIVERS - COMPANY drivers up to 40k first year. New tem pay up to .48 cents / mile CDL training available. Regional locations! (877) 369-7104 www.centraldrivingjobs.net. COMPANY DRIVERS - (solos & Hazmat teams). Great pay. Great miles. CDL-reqd. New to trucking? We will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. Call 866-692-2612. Swift.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Masonry

Power Equipment Repair

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Consolidated Pest Control Ants, spider, rodents and more! Fast, professional service. ccb #187335. 541-389-3282 www.consolidatedpest.net

Landscape Maintenance

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Randy, 541-306-7492

Fire Fuels Reduction

CCB#180420 Accept Visa & Mastercard

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler installation and repair • Thatch & Aerate • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

MASONRY

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Remodeling, Carpentry

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Gregg’s Gardening, Lawn & Ground Maint. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

LADYBUG LAWN CARE Clean up, maintenance, pruning, bark, edging, affordable, reliable quality service 541-279-3331, 541-516-1041 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Tile, Ceramic

Painting, Wall Covering

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171


G4 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 860

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 860

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Motorcycles And Accessories Motorcycles And Accessories Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & RV’s

800 Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

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Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

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Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, 15K mi. many upgrades, custom exhaust, foot boards, grips, hwy. pegs, luggage access. $16,500. 541-693-3975. Harley Soft-Tail Fat Boy -Lo 2010, 360 mi., mat & glossy black, brushed chrome, lowest Harley stock seat - 24”, detachable windshield, backrest, luggage rack, $16,675, call 541-549-4949 or 619-203-4707, Jack.

Harley Ultra 2001, Near perfect, always garaged and dealer serviced. Tons of upgrades. Ready for road trip today. $12,000 firm for quick sale. Call (541) 325-3191

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda XR50R 2003, exc. cond., new tires, skid plate, DB bars, asking $675, call Bill 541-480-7930. Interested Buyer for older motorcycles, scooters, etc., instant cash, Please contact Brad @ 541-416-0246. Kawasaki 900 Vulcan Classic 2006, always garaged, never down, lots of custom accessories, low miles, great bike over $9000 invested will sell for $4000. 541-280-1533, 541-475-9225.

Kawasaki KLR 2009 dual purpose 650 cc, 890 mi., excellent condition $4,500. 541-815-8744.

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4750. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics.

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, 1700cc, black, excellent condition, extended warranty, 8600 miles. Just serviced, new battery, new Dunlop tires. $8500, 541-771-8233

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ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha 250 Bear Cat 1999, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition $1600 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Yamaha Grizzly 660 2006, 408 mi, 38 hrs, excellent condition with records, Warn winch, snow plow, front and rear racks with bags. Moving, must sell $6200 OBO. Call 310-871-8983

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Boats & Accessories

ATV Trailer, Voyager, carries 2 ATV’s, 2000 lb. GVWR, rails fold down, 4-ply tires, great shape, $725, 541-420-2174.

12’ 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft boat, like new, used twice, has pole holder & folding seats. $1300. 541-617-0846.

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

$550 OBO!

818-795-5844, Madras

15’ Crestliner, tri hull walk thru windshield, Johnson 55 hp., Minnkota 50 hp trolling motor Hummingbird fishfinger, new carpet, electrical, newly painted trailer, new wheel bearings, & spare tire, motor in good running condition., $1795. 541-389-8148

16 Ft. Hughes Sportsman, aluminum, full curtains, 90 hp. Honda EZ load $20,000. w/extras 541-330-1495.

17.3’ Weld Craft Rebel 173 2009, 75 HP Yamaha, easy load trailer with brakes, full canvas and side/back curtains, 42 gallon gas tank, walk through windshield, low hours, $21,500. 541-548-3985.

17’

Seaswirl

1972,

Tri-Hull, fish and ski boat, great for the family! 75 HP motor, fish finder, extra motor, mooring cover, $1200 OBO, 541-389-4329.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

18’ SEASWIRL, new interior, 165HP I/O, 10HP Johnson, fish finder, much more, $1990,541-610-6150 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500.. 541-389-1413 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Kayak, 2 person Emotion, sita-top, 12’, w/seats & paddles, $495, 541-593-4473

K a y a k:

Pungo120 Wilderness; incl. Yakima car rack w/Thule Brackets; Aquaboard Paddles; Exc. cond.: $800 Call 541-382-7828 or 541-728-8754.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of BERNARD J. WESTLUND, II, Deceased, Case No. 10PB0083 MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Elizabeth J. Westlund, Morris R. Westlund and Richard N. Westlund have been appointed co-personal representatives. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Daniel C. Re. Dated and first published: July 8, 2010. Elizabeth J. Westlund, Morris R. Westlund and Richard N. Westlund Co-Personal Representative HURLEY RE, P.C. Attorneys at Law 747 SW Mill View Way, Bend OR 97702 Phone: 541-317-5505 / Fax: 541-317-5507

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-62188-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, IRVING K. ORTON AND SUSANNE C. ORTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-15-2007, recorded 03-20-2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instmment/microfile/reception No. 2007-16531 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 195540 LOT ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN (114), AWBREY GLEN TOWNSITES, PHASE SIX, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3690 NW COTTON PLACE BEND. OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's; INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 09/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS. PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $5,566.08 Monthly Late Charge $278.30 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $87*7.440.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 08-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all

trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, nonce hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 10-15-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash die interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of IN the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" in-

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2487 T.S. No.: 1281995-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Earl H. Cordes, Jr., A Married Person, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. ("mers") As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 18, 2008, recorded June 19, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-26534 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 20 in block 5 of Summerfield Phase III, recorded August 26, 1993, in cabinet D, page 10, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2155 SW 29th St. Redmond OR 97756-8043. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,152.81 Monthly Late Charge $47.41. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $151,084.90 together with interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from February 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-323303 07/01/10, 07/08, 07/15, 07/22

clude their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: June 07, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C.O. CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST SEC ASAP# 3608592 06/24/2010, 07/01/2010, 07/08/2010, 07/15/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030517452 T.S. No.: 10-09460-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TODD E REID as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on April 29, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-26625 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 18 12 16BA01000 LOT SIX (6), OF MURPHY SUBDIVISION, RECORDED JUNE 15, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 307, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20555 SLALOM WAY, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,081.08 Monthly Late Charge $41.41 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said

deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,149.98 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500 % per annum from February 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on October 13, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the

date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 17, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Michael Busby ASAP# 3619982 06/24/2010, 07/01/2010, 07/08/2010, 07/15/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain deed of trust (the "Trust Deed") dated February 19, 2007, executed by Third Street Quarter, LLC (the "Grantor") to U.S. Bank Trust Company, N.A. (the "Trustee"), to secure payment and performance of certain obligations of Grantor to U.S. Bank N.A. (the "Beneficiary"), including repayment of a promissory note dated February 19, 2007, in the principal amount of $382,500 (the "Note"). The Trust Deed was recorded on March 5, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-13215 in the official real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The legal description of the real property covered by the Trust Deed is as follows: Lot One (1), Block Six (6), STATE HIGHWAY ADDITION, recorded July 17, 1925 in Cabinet A, Page 250, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. No action has been instituted to recover the obligation, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed or, if such action has been instituted, such action has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay the Note in full upon its maturity date. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank N.A., as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable which sums are as follows: (a) the principal amount of $379,377.40 as of March 12, 2010, (b) accrued interest of $29,441.10 as of March 12, 2010, and interest accruing thereafter on the principal amount at the rate set forth in the Note until fully paid, (c) any late charges and any other expenses or fees owed under the Note or Trust Deed, (d) amounts that U.S. Bank N.A., has paid on or may hereinafter pay to protect the lien, including by way of illustration, but not limitation, taxes, assessments, interest on prior liens, and insurance premiums, and (e) expenses, costs and attorney and trustee fees incurred by U.S. Bank N.A., in foreclosure, including the cost of a trustee's sale guarantee and any other environmental or appraisal report. By reason of said default, U.S. Bank N.A., as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, and the Successor Trustee have elected to foreclose the trust deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.705 to ORS 86.795 and to sell the real property identified above to satisfy the obligation that is secured by the Trust Deed. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Successor Trustee or Successor Trustee's agent will, on August 4, 2010, at one o'clock (1:00) p.m., based on the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, just outside the main entrance of 1164 N.W. Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell for cash at public auction to the highest bidder the interest in said real property, which Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest that Grantor or the successors in interest to Grantor acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to U.S. Bank N.A., as beneficiary under the Trust Deed, of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and, in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, and the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest of grantor, as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For further information, please contact Jeanne Kallage Sinnott at her mailing address of Miller Nash LLP, 111 S.W. Fifth Avenue, Suite 3400, Portland, Oregon 97204 or telephone her at (503) 224-5858. DATED this 30th day of March, 2010. /s/ Jeanne Kallage Sinnott Successor Trustee File No. 080121-0395 Grantor: Third Street Quarter, LLC Beneficiary: U.S. Bank N.A.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx8731 T.S. No.: 1231349-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Stephen J. Hobson, as Grantor to Chicago Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated June 27, 2003, recorded July 18, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-48231 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 5, Mountain Glenn-Phase One, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2016 NW Poplar Place Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 15, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $888.08 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $126,547.46 together with interest thereon at 5.650% per annum from November 15, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 19, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 11, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-322711 07/01/10, 07/08, 07/15, 07/22

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0042 T.S. No.: 1281467-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Maria R. Thomas, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated January 14, 2008, recorded January 17, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-02285 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 6 in block 2 of First Addition to Whispering Pine Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 65222 Hunnell Road Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,107.44 Monthly Late Charge $91.87. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $310,876.69 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from January 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 09, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-322491 07/01/10, 07/08, 07/15, 07/22


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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, July 8, 2010 G5

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Watercraft

Motorhomes

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Motorhomes

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Travel Trailers

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

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The Bulletin 880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

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Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen., & much more 541-948-2310. Hard to find 32 ft. 2007 Hurricane by Four Winds, Ford V10, 10K mi., 2 slides, 2 Color TV’s, backup cam, hydraulic jacks, leather, cherry wood and many other options, Immaculate condition, $63,900. (541)548-5216, 420-1458

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

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JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

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RV Consignments Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350

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Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

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Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

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Legal Notices

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Frank W. Lee, as Grantor, to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of the Cascades Mortgage Center, as Beneficiary, dated May 23, 2006, recorded May 30, 2006, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Instrument No. 2006-37009, covering the following described real property:

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-360591-SH

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-360583-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Daniel Thebeau, An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to First Land Trustee Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated September 07, 2005, recorded September 21, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-63710 * covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot Twelve, Ridgewater, Phases 1 and 2, P.U.D., Deschutes County, Oregon * deed re-recorded 4/18/2006 inst# 2006-26401 Commonly known as: 61221 Ridgewater Loop Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,899.91 Monthly Late Charge $80.93. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $287,759.66 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from May 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is September 18, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, GEORGE A. HALE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 10/4/2006, recorded 10/31/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006-72688, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 246688 LOT 79 OF JUNIPER GLEN NORTH, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2795 SW INDIAN AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $630.81 Monthly Late Charge $31.54 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $114,259.86 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.6250 per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/8/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 10/8/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU T O MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/8/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 6/2/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOSEPH L. YOUNG AND MARIAH K. YOUNG , HUSBAND AND WIFE AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LIME FINANCIAL SERVICES, LTD.. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 2/1/2006, recorded 2/6/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2006-08455, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 206589 206589 LOT 7 OF YEOMAN PARK, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2201 CASTLE AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,460.28 Monthly Late Charge $73.01 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $225,074.03 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2000 per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 10/8/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 10/8/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one- year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/8/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 6/2/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

R-322652 07/01/10, 07/08, 07/15, 07/22

ASAP# 3597761 06/17/2010, 06/24/2010, 07/01/2010, 07/08/2010

ASAP# 3597766 06/17/2010, 06/24/2010, 07/01/2010, 07/08/2010

Parcel 1 of Partition Plat No. 1998-7, filed January 30, 1998, and located in the East Half of the Southwest Quarter (Ell2 SW114) of Section 12, Township 18 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed, and Notice of Default was recorded pursuant to ORS 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is the Grantor's failure to pay: Regular monthly payments of principal, interest and escrow collection in the amount of $2,053.76, from January 1, 2010, through present, together with late fees, escrow collection for taxes, insurance, and other charges as of March 19, 2010, as follows: Late Fees: $921.52; Escrow Collection: $1,135.54; and other charges to be determined. Due to the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: 1. Principal: $277,283.99, plus interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from March 19, 2010, until fully paid; 2. Accrued Interest: $5,290.94 (as of March 19, 2010); 3. Late Charges: $921.52 (as of March 19, 2010); 4. Escrow Collection: $1,135.54 (as of March 19, 2010); and 5. Other Costs and Fees: To be determined. NOTICE: The undersigned trustee, on August 24, 2010, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with ORS 187.110, on the Front Steps of Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, the City of Bend, the County of Deschutes, the State of Oregon, will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of said trust deed, together with any interest that the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. NOTICE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753, and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under said trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter; singular includes the plural; the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed; and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED this 2nd day of April, 2010. Kyle Schmid, Karnopp Petersen LLP, Successor Trustee 1201 NW Wall Street, Bend, OR 97701 TEL: (541) 382-3011 STATE OF Oregon, County of Deschutes ) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above-named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. Kyle Schmid, Attorney for Trustee

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5923 T.S. No.: 1170829-09.


G6 Thursday, July 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 882

Fifth Wheels

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Autos & Transportation

931

933

935

935

975

975

975

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

900

Toyo LT235/75R15 M&S, on Ford 5 hole rims, $50. 541-480-5950

S m o li c h Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Lowest Price of Year Event!

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

932

Antique and Classic Autos

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085.

Buick Special 1947, 4 dr., stock, newer tires, brakes, uphostery, chorme and paint, $12,500 OBO, 541-548-2808.

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Audi A4 Avant Wagon 1998, great

car, great shape, 120K miles, excellent snow car $5400. 541-383-8917

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Nissan Rogue 2008

Dodge Durango 2008 Dodge Ram 2001, short

Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 435-229-9415.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Only 25K Miles! VIN #134449

Auto, power group, 19K Miles, Moonroof. Vin #110180

Only $21,988

Only $23,755 NISSAN

Ford F250 1992, A/C, PS, 5 spd., 5th wheel hookups, $4000. 541-382-6310 after 4pm. Ford F-250 XLT Superduty 2002, 4X4, Supercab, longbox, 7.3 Diesel, auto, cruise, A/C, CD, AM/FM, pwr. windows/locks, tow pkg., off road pkg., nerf bars, sprayed in bedliner, toolbox, mud flaps, bug shield, dash cover, 32K mi., orig. owner, $22,995, 541-815-8069 Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Ford Excursion XLT 2000, 4WD, V-10, runs great, 4” lift, $8000 OBO, 541-771-0512.

Ford Excursion XLT 2004, 4x4, diesel, white, 80% tread on tires, low mi., keyless entry, all pwr., A/C, fully loaded, front & rear hitch, Piaa driving lights, auto or manual hubs, 6-spd. auto trans., $23,000, 541-576-2442

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Grand Junction 39’ 2008, 3 slides, 2 A/C units, central vac, fireplace, Corian, king bed, prepped for washer/dryer & gen., non-smoker owned, immaculate, $39,900, Call 541-554-9736

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

Montana Keystone 2955RL 2004, 2 slides, loaded, 2 TV’s, CD, Queen bed, all appl., full bath, hitch incl., exc. cond., hardly been used, $21,500. 541-389-8794

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Vans Chevy Avalance Super Deal! Z71 2002, 4x4,

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Canopies and Campers Host Rainier 2006 9.5 DS camper. Fully loaded with generator, Full bathroom, AC, TV, DVD, Stereo, double slides, inverter, back awning, etc. Exc. condition. Retailed for 36 grand, asking $22,000 OBO. Frank. 541-480-0062

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $39,000. 541-548-1422. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Utility Trailers 2008 CargoMate Eliminator enclosed Car Hauler 24’x8’ wide, full front cabinet, also 4 side windows, 2 side doors, rear ramp, diamond plate runners. vinyl floors, lights. All set up for generator. Paid $13,500. Asking $10,000 OBO. Frank, 541-480-0062.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

NOVA SS 1975 4 speed, 454 new, $5600 OBO. 541-546-2206 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $4800 call 541-388-4302.

933

Pickups Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Iron Eagle Utility Trailer 2007, swing rear gate, 5x8, 24” sides, $1150, 541-325-2684.

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4500. 541-617-1888. Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $11,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Lowest Price of Year Event!

975

Automobiles

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826.

Only 18K Miles! Vin #266412

Only $14,988 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

Vehicle Acquisition S A L E Inventory SALE Certified SALE

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

We will pay CASH for your vehicle Buying vehicles now thru July!

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Central Oregon's Largest Used Vehicle Inventory Over 150 Used in stock see it on www.smolichmotors.com

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy 3/4 Ton 350 1974, automatic, dual gas tanks, wired for Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated camper and trailer. Dual seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, batteries. One owner. 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. Lots of extras. $2950, cond., 78K, running boards. 541-549-5711 $13,600. 541-408-3583

Smolich Certified Pre-Owned or Factory Certified Pre-Owned Shop with confidence at Smolich Motors

Jeep Wrangler 2009

Smolich Motors www.smolichmotors.com Hwy 20 in Bend

Only $29,850

(541) 389-1177 • (541) 749-4025 (541) 389-1178

Lexus LS400 1993

smolichmotors.com

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan 350Z Anniversary Edition 2005, 12,400 mi., exc. cond., leather, nav. system, alloy wheels, Bose sound, rear spoilers, $21,400 obo.541-388-2774

Porsche 928 1982, 8-cyl, 5-spd, runs, but needs work, $3500, 541-420-8107.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Volkswagen New Beetle 2003 74,800 mi. $7,000 Blue w/ black charcoal interior, air conditioning, power steering, AM/FM stereo & cassette, moon roof, power windows and more. Call Rick @ 541-788-8662

Vin #173509

Only $2,999 VW Bug 1969, yellow, HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Mazda 3 i 2008, se-

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Lowest Price of Year Event!

4X4 * Truck * SUV * Cars starting at $995

Family Owned and Operated for over 40 years Like New, But for Less $$$ Only 1,000 Miles! VIN #791057

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

SUBARUS!!!

We BUY - SELL - SERVICE all makes Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 67K, reduced $32,000 OBO 541-740-7781

extras, $6800 OBO, Call 541-617-0268.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Pre-Owned vehicles on sale everyday All Makes & Models including Honda - Toyota - Ford - Jeep - Volvo Chevy - Dodge - Audi - VW - Chrysler Nissan - Kia - Hyundai - Suzuki - Acura

Smolich Auto Mall

Mercedes 230SLK 1998, exc. cond., many

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Lowest Price of Year Event!

Hyundai Tiburon 2008

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $4000. 541-548-5302

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

cab, 117K, hideaway gooseneck model, $4500, 541-815-8236

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Ford Mustang Coupe 2005, 18K mi., light blue, like new $19.500. 541-549-3152.

tow pkg., loaded, runs great, 112K mi. $10,500. 541-383-8917.

GMC Sierra 2500 1995, 4X4, 350 auto, club

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

The Bulletin Classifieds

Drastic Price Reduction!

(Private Party ads only) Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Concession Trailer 18’ Class 4, professionally built in ‘09, loaded, $29,000, meet OR specs. Guy 541-263-0706

Lance 11.5’ 1992, elec. jacks, micro, A/C, awnings on both sides & back, very clean, no dents, non smoker., clean, $6000 OBO. 541-408-4974.

4x4,6.0 Diesel long box, auto, Ford Explorer 2004, 4X4, X-liner, Super Hitch, camper XLT, 4-dr, silver w/grey cloth ready, 20K, Arizona beige, like interior, 44K, $14,750 OBO, new, $32,500, 541-815-1523 perfect cond., 541-610-6074

The Bulletin Classifieds

925

Wilderness 21 ft. 1992, exc. cond., full bath, micro., incl. Honda gen., call eves. to see, $3500. 541-549-8155

885

Ford F350 XLT CrewCab 2007

INTERNATIONAL 1981 TRUCK, 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. T-axle-300 Cummins/Jake Matching numbers Brake, 13 spd. transmission, $52,500, 541-280-1227. good tires & body paint (white). Also, 1993 27’ step deck equipment trailer Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, T-axle, Dove tail with ramps. original owner, V8, autoReady to work! $9500 takes matic, great shape, $9000 both. 541-447-4392 or OBO. 530-515-8199 541-350-3866.

Mustang MTL16 2006 Skidsteer, on tracks, includes bucket and forks, 540 hrs., $21,000. 541-410-5454

Buick LeSabre 1996, 108K Mi., 3800 motor, 30 MPG Hwy, leather, cold air, am/fm cassette and CD, excellent interior and exterior condition, nice wheels and tires. Road ready, $3450. 541-508-8522 or 541-318-9999.

940

916 Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Ford Focus 2007, 17,982 miles, includes winter tires and rims, $11,000. 541-475-3866

Mazda SPEED6 2006, a rare find, AWD 29K, Velocity Red, 6 spd., 275 hp., sun roof, all pwr., multi CD, Bose speakers, black/white leather $19,995. 541-788-8626

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Chrsyler Sebring Convertible 2006, Touring Model 28,750 mi., all pwr., leather, exc. tires, almost new top, $12,450 OBO. 541-923-7786 or 623-399-0160.

dan, 4-cyl., auto, 20,300 mi., mostly hwy., like new, still under factory warranty, $12,295, 541-416-1900.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

CHECK OUT OUR NEW MAP FEATURE ONLINE @ WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM /GARAGESALES

SECTION!!! We can show your customers the fastest way to your garage sale.

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!

Bulletin Daily Paper 07/08/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Thursday July 8, 2010

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