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A dispiriting summer of oil and anger looms after fixes fail

Memorial Day: World War II veteran who was at Pearl Harbor heads to San Francisco from Bend to honor fallen comrades

A living link

to the past

By Ted Anthony and Mary Foster The Associated Press

BOOTHVILLE, La. — There is still a hole in the Earth, crude oil is still spewing from it and there is still, excruciatingly, no end in sight. After trying and trying again, one of the world’s largest corporations, backed and pushed by the world’s most powerful government, can’t stop the runaway gusher. Inside As despera• Embattled tion grows and White House ecological misofficials ery spreads, the move back operative word containment on the ground timetable, now is, incredibly, August — Page A3 the earliest moment that a real resolution could be at hand. And even then, there’s no guarantee of success. For the United States and the people of its beleaguered Gulf Coast, a dispiriting summer of oil and anger lies dead ahead. Oh ... and the Atlantic hurricane season begins Tuesday. The latest attempt — using a remote robotic arm to stuff golf balls and assorted debris into the gash in the seafloor — didn’t work. See Oil / A3

AT LEFT: World War II veteran Melvin Fuller, of Bend, will be reuniting with some of his fellow shipmates from the USS San Francisco today at a Memorial Day ceremony in San Francisco. Fuller joined the Navy after high school and remained in the military for more than four decades.

ABOVE: A family photo shows Melvin Fuller, center, dressed in his Navy uniform. “I had a curiosity of that sort, the drive. I was motivated entirely on what I didn’t know,” Fuller said of his decision to join the Navy.

BELOW: The USS San Francisco, on which Melvin Fuller served during World War II. The San Francisco was docked in Pearl Harbor on the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, and Fuller was in the shore patrol office when he heard booming in the distance — it was return fire aimed at Japanese planes.

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

Jolie Van Gilder, left, holds her mother’s hand during a rally against BP and the Gulf oil spill in New Orleans on Sunday.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

TOP NEWS INSIDE KOREAS: U.S. to plug gaps in South Korea’s naval defense, Page A3 AFGHANISTAN: Peace council raises hopes for a new course, Page A3

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By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Whether they know it or not, taxpayers are investing on a much larger scale than they might think. Local governments in Deschutes County alone have hundreds of millions of dollars in short-term investments at any time. Most of the money is in a state pool, and also at banks and in corporate and federal government debt. Finance officials say the conservative investments provide a relatively safe place for the money, and are a prudent use of taxpayer money because they help get the most out of those dollars. They also said good places to put the money are in shorter supply since the financial crisis and recession weakened banks and corporations, so their options are limited. Some state and local candidates in the May primary called for the creation of an Oregon bank to provide an alternative for investors and people seeking loans, and a small political party continues to promote the idea. But the earliest it could gain momentum is in the 2011 legislative session, and it already faces opposition from a national group that represents large banks. Bend-La Pine Schools has about $59 million in investments, Finance Director Brad Henry said, and the city of Bend had approximately $64.9 million, according to the latest quarterly investment report in March. See Investments / A5

ONLINE PRIVACY

At 89, he’s part of an ever-shrinking group of people who can provide a firsthand recollection of the smoke

By Stephanie Clifford

filling the skies over Pearl Harbor or the boom of ex-

As concern increases in Washington about the amount of private data online, and as big sites like Facebook draw criticism that they collect consumers’ information in a stealthy manner, many Web startups are pursuing a more reciprocal approach — saying, in essence: Give us your data and get something in return. The budgeting website Mint .com, for example, displays discount offers from cable companies or banks to users who reveal their personal financial data, including bank and credit card information. The clothing retailer Bluefly could send offers for sunglasses to consumers who disclose that they just bought a swimsuit. And location-based services like Foursquare and Gowalla ask users to volunteer their location in return for rewards like discounts on Pepsi drinks or Starbucks coffee. See Online / A5

M

elvin Fuller’s memories of some of World War II’s most significant events are as sharp as ever.

Every year, he gets newsletters that let him know what’s going on in the lives of his former shipmates from the USS San Francisco — mostly news about who is still living and who has passed away. And every year, he gets an invitation to a Memorial Day ceremony, honoring the sailors who lost their lives during the war. He went once, decades ago, but hasn’t made it since. But this year, after some prompting from a Navy buddy, Fuller, of Bend, decided it was time to make the trip to San Francis-

New York Times News Service

co for Memorial Day, and remember the people and places of his past. He said he’s not sure exactly what made him want to go — but said it probably has something to do with how fast that piece of history seems to have slipped away. “There are very few living people who experienced the events, so the past goes with them, pretty much,” he said. See Veteran / A5

Pirate-chasing warship USS McFaul has a connection to Bend By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Vol. 107, No. 151, 30 pages, 5 sections

In Deschutes County and beyond, local governments have become big investors

Web retailers offering lures: deals for data

By Erin Golden • The Bulletin

plosions during the Guadalcanal Campaign.

INDEX

Your tax dollars at work — being invested

It’s hard to imagine much of a connection between the coast of Somalia and Bend, but right now a warship, the USS McFaul, binds the two places together.

The destroyer, which began shadowing a pirated Panamanian-flagged ship off the coast of Somalia on May 19 in an effort to prevent the pirates’ plans and ensure the safety of the 24-person crew on board, is named for Chief Petty Offi-

cer Donald L. McFaul, a 1975 Bend High graduate. McFaul graduated from the high school and enlisted in the Navy shortly thereafter. See McFaul / A5


A2 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Dr. Howard Jacob, head of the Human and Molecular Genetics Center at the Medical College of Wisconsin, teaches doctors about advances in gene sequencing technology and how they will affect the practice of medicine.

Genetic technology moving from labs to medical practices Doctors and medical schools are realizing that personalized medicine based on gene sequencing is right around the corner By Mark Johnson and Kathleen Gallagher Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

MILWAUKEE — In January, practicing doctors and doctorsto-be entered a new class at the Medical College of Wisconsin with a futuristic name, “Translational Genetics.” The idea was simpler than it sounded: We are fast approaching the time when doctors will use our genetic profiles to treat us. One of the students was Kevin Regner, a practicing kidney doctor at Froedtert Hospital, who had been hearing for years, “Personalized medicine is just around the corner.” Doctors will tailor treatments to each patient’s genes and the risks they reveal. It will all be routine. Regner had doubts. Sequencing of the first human genome in 2003 took more than a decade and cost about $600 million. But he was in for a surprise. As he and his classmates listened, Dr. Howard Jacob, head of the college’s Human and Molecular Genetics Center, described what has happened since completion of the genome project. He showed two photos: a machine that helped sequence the first human genome in 2003, and then a machine the Medical College has today. The new model does the work of 200 of the old ones; it can sequence a human genome in a few months for several hundred thousand dollars. And the Medical College has already ordered next-generation sequencers. Within less than a decade, a complete genetic blueprint could be attainable in 15 minutes for as little as $100. As Jacob described how he and his colleagues used a targeted version of gene sequencing to diagnose and treat an apparently new disease in a young boy at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin, Regner had a moment of recognition. “It’s likely we’ll see this kind of personalized medicine in my lifetime,” he said, “and in the course of my medical practice.”

Overcoming resistance Medical schools are coming to this recognition as well — albeit too slowly for some. Already, companies such as 23andMe and Navigenics are selling personal genetics tests, offering consumers the chance to learn their risks for dozens of diseases. This month, pharmacy giant Walgreens announced it would sell a personal genetic test in thousands of stores across the country, though the company put the plans on hold after federal regulators said the tests had not been approved. “More and more patients are going to be walking into their doctor’s office with genes sequenced,” said George Church, a genetics professor at Harvard Medical School and one of the pioneers of gene sequencing. “Very few doctors even know where to refer them.” In years to come, however, some say gene sequencing and analysis could take a place in the

Leading the way • At Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, doctors started a first-in-the-nation program last fall to teach pathology residents about genomics and to train them to interpret genetic data. Residents all had the option of using a Navigenics test to search their own genes for common mutations. Twelve out of 17 volunteered for the testing and discussed the results with genetics counselors, said Mark Boguski, an associate professor at Harvard Medical School who works in Beth Israel’s pathology department. Boguski said organizers of the program have discussed expanding it to several other hospitals by 2012. • At the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., medical students and thousands of staff, including residents, doctors, nurses and technicians, have been receiving genomics education to get up to speed about the technology and how best to apply it to the practice of medicine, said Eric Wieben, director of the Advanced Genomics Technology Center. Mayo launched the program about four years ago after receiving a multimillion-dollar grant from a Chicago-based foundation. • At Georgetown University School of Medicine, administrators have created a new master’s degree program in “systems medicine,” aimed at teaching a small group of students how to pull together the information from our genes and from environmental factors to improve treatment of patients. The program, set to debut in the 2011-12 school year, would be offered to perhaps five or 10 students as an additional year of medical school. medical tool kit alongside such fundamentals as anatomy and family history. Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute in La Jolla, Calif., said there are now genetic tests that determine how patients will respond to specific medications such as Plavix, a widely used blood clotprevention drug. Some tests even reveal appropriate dosages. Yet when researchers surveyed more than 10,000 physicians, just 10 percent said they had the necessary information and training to use the tests, according to a report in October by the American Medical Association and Medco. “The resistance to change in medicine, which is profound,” Topol said, “is something that is part lack of education.” Some of the country’s leading medical schools and institutions have launched programs to close the education gap. And by the end of the year, a sweeping international effort called the Association for Genomic Medicine will offer a comprehensive online course that practicing physicians can take for no cost to learn the ins and outs of gene sequencing, genetic testing for medications and related topics, said Topol, who heads the association. The project was launched in January with a $600,000 grant from the Life Technologies Foundation, a nonprofit arm of the global biotechnology firm.

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 A3

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Israeli commandos storm activists’ ships OFF THE MEDITERRANEAN COAST — Israeli commandos today stormed six ships carrying hundreds of pro-Palestinian activists on an aid mission to the blockaded Gaza Strip, setting off fierce battles in which at least two people were killed and dozens were wounded, according to the Turkish government. There were conflicting accounts of what happened. The al-Jazeera satellite channel reported by telephone from the Turkish ship leading the flotilla that Israeli navy forces had fired at the ship and boarded it, wounding the captain. Turkey’s NTV channel also reported an Israeli takeover in which gunfire was used. The Turkish Foreign Ministry, citing “preliminary information,” said at least two people were killed and more than 30 wounded. NTV, which had a reporter on board one of the ships, also said two were killed. But Israeli security officials, speaking on condition of anonymity under military guidelines, said activists attacked the Israeli forces with knives and iron rods as they boarded the boats.

Pakistan arrests 7 men in mosque attacks LAHORE, Pakistan — Seven men have been arrested over alleged links to the militants who attacked a minority sect in eastern Pakistan, killing 93 people, police said Sunday. Interior Minister Rehman Malik visited one of the two mosques attacked Friday and promised to work with local officials to tackle the growing problem of militancy in Pakistan’s heartland, Punjab province. Police said the seven men arrested over the past two days in different parts of Punjab belonged to a variety of militant groups but refused to specify which ones. The arrests were fueled by information gleaned from one of the attackers who was captured Friday. Friday’s attacks targeted the Ahmadi sect, a minority reviled as heretics by mainstream Muslims. Seven gunmen attacked two mosques in Lahore with assault rifles, grenades and suicide vests. At least two of the attackers were captured, while some died in the standoff or by detonating their explosives.

Uribe ally dominates Colombia voting BOGOTA, Colombia — A conservative former defense minister closely associated with Alvaro Uribe’s security gains easily defeated a maverick outsider in presidential elections on Sunday but fell short of the votes needed to avoid a runoff. Juan Manuel Santos, who vows to keep up the pressure on leftist rebels that fed President Uribe’s popularity, won 47 percent support in a field of nine candidates. Antanas Mockus, a former twotime Bogota mayor who ran an unorthodox clean-government campaign and promised to raise taxes, got 21 percent. Santos, 58, is a Colombian blueblood, the great-nephew of a president whose family long ran El Tiempo, the country’s leading newspaper. He needed a simple majority to avoid the June 20 runoff. — The Associated Press

DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL

Leak may persist through August, Obama aides say By Clifford Krauss, John M. Broder and Jackie Calmes New York Times News Service

HOUSTON — The Obama administration scrambled to regroup on Sunday after the failure of the latest effort to kill the gushing oil well in the Gulf of Mexico. But administration officials acknowledged the possibility that tens of thousands of gallons of oil might continue pouring out until August, when two relief wells are scheduled to be completed. “We are prepared for the worst,” said Carol Browner, President Barack Obama’s climate change and energy policy adviser. “We have been prepared from the beginning.” Even as the White House sought to demonstrate that it was taking a more direct hand in trying to solve the problem, senior officials acknowledged that the new technique BP will use to try to cap the leak — severing the riser pipe and placing a containment dome over

Continued from A1 On Sunday, as churches echoed with prayers for a solution, BP PLC said it would focus on containment rather than plugging the undersea puncture wound, effectively redirecting the mess it made rather than stopping it. Yet the new plan carries the risk of making the torrent worse, as top government officials warned Sunday. “We failed to wrestle this beast to the ground,” said BP Managing Director Bob Dudley, doing the rounds of the Sunday talk shows.

Hurricane season As the oil washes ashore, crude-coated birds have become a frequent sight. At the sea’s bottom, no one knows what the oil will do to species like the newly discovered bottom-dwelling pancake batfish — and others that remain unknown but just as threatened. Scientists from several universities have reported large underwater plumes of oil stretching for miles and reaching hundreds of feet beneath the Gulf’s surface, though BP PLC CEO Tony Hayward on Sunday disputed their findings, saying the company’s tests found no such evidence of oily clouds underwater. “The oil is on the surface,” Hayward said. “Oil has a specific gravity that’s about half that of water. It wants to get to the surface because of the difference in specific gravity.” Perhaps most alarming of all, 40 days after the Deepwater Horizon blew up and began the underwater deluge, hurricane season is at hand. It brings the horrifying possibility of wind-whipped, oilsoaked waves and water spinning ashore and coating areas much farther inland. Imagine Katrina plus oil spill. The spill is already the

By Alissa J. Rubin New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Western leaders are banking on a national peace council set to begin here on Wednesday to start a new chapter in Afghanistan’s political life, bringing the country together and strengthening President Hamid Karzai, even as security deteriorated Sunday in several areas of the country. In a joint news conference, the NATO commander, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, and the senior civilian representative, Mark Sedwill, emphasized that the West supported the peace council, called a jirga, even as many Afghans question whether those attending will truly represent the many factions in the country. “This is a big week for Afghanistan,” said Sedwill, who described the conference as “the first of a series of major political events that are going to set the agenda of 2010.” The jirga will be followed by the Kabul Conference on economic development in July and parliamentary elections in September. The Electoral Complaints Commission announced Sunday that 85 candidates had been preliminarily barred from participating in the elections because they are members of illegal armed groups. They will have the right to appeal.

McChrystal: Taliban have trained in Iran Gerald Herbert / The Associated Press

Tony Hayward, CEO of BP PLC, right, checks out some oil booms as he visits a Coast Guard command center in Venice, La., on Sunday. Hayward insisted Sunday that there were no oily clouds underwater, as some scientists have reported. “The oil is on the surface,” he said. worst in American history — worse, even, than the 1989 Exxon Valdez disaster. It has already released between 18 million and 40 million gallons of oil into the Gulf, according to government estimates. “This is probably the biggest environmental disaster we’ve ever faced in this country,” White House Energy and Climate Change Advisor Carol Browner said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

Bad timing At some point — the widespread debut of the BP “spillcam” is as good a delineation point as any — this tipped, in the national conversation, from a destructive event into a calamitous, openended saga. And for the bruised and cantankerous American psyche, it could not come at a worse time. Fear is everywhere, and po-

larization prevails. Faith in institutions — corporations, government, the media — is down. Americans are angry, and they long ago grew accustomed to expecting the resolution of problems in very short order, even if reality rarely works that way. So when something undefined and uncontrollable happens, they speculate in all the modern forums about collusion and nefarious dealings. In the process, this tale of environmental disaster and economic damage cripples the sea-to-shining-sea narrative that usually offers Americans comfort during uncertain times. “There are people who are getting desperate, and there are more getting anxious as we get further into the shrimping season and there is less chance they will recover,” said the Rev. Theodore Turner, 57, at Mount Olive Baptist Church in Boothville, near where oil first washed ashore. Fisher-

men make up about a third of his congregation. BP’s next containment effort involves an assortment of undersea robot maneuvers that would redirect the oil up and out of the water it is poisoning. The first step in BP’s latest effort is the intricate removal of a damaged riser that brought oil to the surface of the Deepwater Horizon rig. The riser will be cut at the top of the crippled blowout preventer, creating a flat surface that a new containment valve can seal against. If the containment valve fails, BP may try installing a blowout preventer on top of the existing one. In the end, however, a relief well would ease the pressure on the runaway gusher in favor of a controlled pumping — essentially what the Deepwater Horizon was trying to do in the first place. But that will take at least two months.

The commander of NATO and U.S. forces in Afghanistan said Sunday there is “clear evidence” that some Taliban fighters have trained in Iran. Gen. Stanley McChrystal told reporters that Iran has generally assisted in fighting the insurgents, but there is “clear evidence of Iranian activity — in some cases providing weaponry and training to the Taliban — that is inappropriate.” — The Associated Press

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“This Week,” that the administration must move in quickly with “decisive force and demonstrate that it’s doing everything that it can do.” Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, also appearing on “Meet the Press,” again criticized the administration’s efforts, saying: “We need our federal government exactly for this kind of crisis. I think there could have been a greater sense of urgency.” The administration has left to BP most decisions about how to move forward with efforts to contain the leak. But Browner made a point of saying that the administration, led by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, had told BP that it considered it too dangerous to continue pumping drilling mud into the well because it was concerned that the operation was putting too much pressure on the well. BP announced Saturday evening that it was ending that effort.

Oil

By Thom Shanker and David E. Sanger

Juan Manuel Santos, right, presidential candidate of the Social National Unity Party, and his vice presidential candidate Angelino Garzon, embrace in Bogota on Sunday after Santos won 47 percent of the vote.

the cut riser — could temporarily result in as much as 20 percent more oil flowing into the water during the three days to a week before the new device could be in place. “This is obviously a difficult situation,” Browner said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” “but it’s important for people to understand that from the beginning, the government has been in charge. “We have been directing BP to take important steps,” including the drilling of a second relief well, she added. The White House said that Interior Secretary Ken Salazar would make his eighth trip to the region, and that the number of government and contract employees sent to work in areas affected by the spill would be tripled. But despite the White House efforts, the criticism of it also intensified. Colin Powell, who served as secretary of state and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told ABC’s

Peace council raises hopes for a new direction in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON — Surprised by how easily a South Korean warship was sunk by what an international investigation concluded was a North Korean torpedo fired from a midget submarine, senior American officials say they are planning a long-term program to plug major gaps in the South’s naval defenses. They said the sinking revealed that years of spending and training had still left the country vulnerable to surprise attack. The discovery of the weaknesses in South Korea caught officials in both countries off guard. As South Korea has rocketed into the ranks of the world’s top economies, it has invested billions of dollars to bolster its

defenses and to help refine one of the oldest war plans in the Pentagon’s library: a joint strategy with the United States to repel and defeat a North Korean invasion. But the shallow waters where the attack occurred are patrolled only by South Korea’s navy, and South Korean officials confirmed in interviews that the sinking of the warship, the Cheonan, which killed 46 sailors, revealed a gap that the American military must help address. The U.S. — pledged to defend its ally but stretched thin by the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq — would be drawn into any conflict. But it has been able to reduce its forces on the Korean Peninsula by relying on South Korea’s increased military spending.

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China balks at criticizing North Resisting pressure from South Korean and Japanese leaders during two days of talks, China’s Wen Jiabao gave no public hint on Sunday that his government was ready to join in reproaching the North over the sinking of a Southern warship. In a news conference with President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea and Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama of Japan, Wen said China’s priority was ensuring stability and avoiding a military clash between the Koreas. — New York Times News Service

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A4 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Veteran

Melvin Fuller, of Bend, received several medals during his service in World War II with the Navy. He rarely discussed his wartime experiences, his wife and daughter said, until he joined a veterans group called the Bend Band of Brothers. “But since he joined the club, he’s opened up,” said wife Louise.

Continued from A1

Spirit of adventure Fuller grew up on a farm near Rochester, Minn. After he graduated from high school in 1938, he planned to enroll in a teacher’s college, but was lured away from the Midwest by the chance for adventure. If he had to leave home and find a place to live, he figured, it might as well be on a ship in the ocean, so he joined the Navy. “I had a curiosity of that sort, the drive. I was motivated entirely on what I didn’t know,” he said. The Navy sent Fuller to California to join the crew of the USS San Francisco, a heavy cruiser. His first excursion was to New York, by way of the Panama Canal. After that, it was on to a tour around South America, where Fuller snapped dozens of photos he still keeps in a well-worn scrapbook. In 1940, the San Francisco moved to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Fuller was assigned to the shore patrol. He started keeping a journal, which he filled with details about his work, friends, and notes about books he read and movies he saw at the theater. The war in Europe seemed far away, but Fuller, barely out of his teens, felt like something was about to change. “I am starting this diary because I feel that I am more or less at the crossroads for life,” he wrote. “In the event I am and should I choose the wrong course it may be interesting to know why.”

Pearl Harbor On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, the San Francisco was docked in Pearl Harbor, undergoing major maintenance work. Fuller was in the shore patrol office when he heard booming in the distance — return fire aimed at Japanese planes. “Wake to hear shooting,” he later wrote in his diary. “Bursting shrapnel over Honolulu. They are sending all service men to posts — is it War???” In the chaotic scene, Fuller went to work tracking down sailors and telling them to get back to their ships as quickly as possible. “Things got really confused,” he said. “I didn’t know if I should go back aboard ship or stay on shore patrol doing what I was doing. I didn’t know a damn thing. I just had to stay there until things were straightened out enough to be handled.” In his diary entries for the days following the attack, Fuller

Investments Continued from A1 Deschutes County had $130.9 million as of the end of April, according to the latest available finance update. Money the county can invest includes savings in reserve funds, general fund money used for payroll and operations, and money for capital projects such as the 911 and state police building, said County Finance Director and Treasurer Marty Wynne.

State fund On Dec. 8, 2008, the international investment firm Piper Jaffray sold $9.5 million in bonds that Deschutes County needed to build its 911 center. By approximately 2 p.m. that day, the firm had wired the money to the county, and finance staff had to find a safe place for it. It was a relatively easy decision, Wynne said, because the county has the majority of its investment funds in a short-term pool spread between the state short-term fund and Bank of the Cascades, and the state’s 0.55 percent yield is competitive with other investments the county is allowed to make. Plus, the county can access the money within 24 hours, which is important because the county needs to withdraw money to pay construction bills and payroll, among other things. Wynne listed the criteria for county investment decisions, in order of importance: safety, liquidity and yield. The state’s local government investment pool, which is part

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

“Things got really confused. I didn’t know if I should go back aboard ship or stay on shore patrol doing what I was doing. I didn’t know a damn thing. I just had to stay there until things were straightened out enough to be handled.” — Melvin Fuller, about being at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941 notes that mail was suddenly censored, and rumors were flying about what would happen next. He was put to work getting the San Francisco back in working order as quickly as possible, but the idea of entering into the war still seemed a bit unreal. “It seemed distant from us,” Fuller recalled. “They did the damage, and then they were gone.” But by early 1942, the San Francisco was in the South Pacific, patrolling the seas and participating in several raids. The cruiser was front and center for three months during the Guadalcanal Campaign, a lengthy and costly battle with Japan that Fuller describes as an “Armageddon type of thing.”

After the war At the end of the war, Fuller was commissioned as an Army officer. His background in engineering work with the Navy got him a spot in the Army’s guided missile program, and it became a career that stretched across four decades. Fuller married, had three children and kept up the adventure he’d begun at 17 when he joined the Navy. Over the years, he lived

of the short-term investment fund managed by the Office of the State Treasurer, accounts for a large portion of investments for both Deschutes County and the city of Bend. Bend-La Pine Schools also has money in the fund.

Limited losses Local finance officials credited their own governments’ conservative investment policies, as well as state law, for preventing any major investment losses in recent years. State law outlines where governments can invest, and stocks are off limits. “We’ve not had any losses,” Wynne said. “I think we can attribute that to a conservative investment strategy.” Under state law, government agencies can invest in federal debt and obligations guaranteed by the federal government. The county’s own investment policy is even more conservative than state law, Wynne said. For example, the state allows 35 percent of funds to be invested in corporate notes, while Deschutes County only allows for 10 percent. “Lehman Brothers was an authorized investment under (state law),” Wynne said, referring to the large Wall Street investment bank that failed in 2008. Deschutes County did not invest in Lehman Brothers, but the state’s short-term investment fund did. Finance officials for the city of Bend and Deschutes County said they have not experienced any major losses since the financial crisis. But the state’s Lehman Brothers holdings have dragged down the yield on the state short-term fund, as fund managers spread

around the U.S., including stops in Alabama and New Mexico, and spent time in Taiwan, where he learned to speak Chinese. After a divorce, Fuller met his second wife, Louise — to whom he’s been married for nearly 50 years — in Iran. Though he spent his life in the military, Fuller’s wife and his daughter, Tonya Vaughan, of Bend, said he rarely talked about his wartime experiences. Louise Fuller said that changed after she and her husband moved to Bend in 2002, and Fuller joined a group of local veterans who call themselves the Bend Band of Brothers. “He had a hard time talking about it, a hard time,” she said. “But since he joined the club, he’s opened up.” In the days leading up to his trip to San Francisco, Fuller got out his scrapbooks and started reminiscing. Vaughan said she’s pleased the holiday has gotten her father talking about what happened during the war. “We don’t want all this stuff to go away,” she said. “We want to hear about it.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

the anticipated loss out over time to lessen the impact, said Perrin Lim, senior fixed income investment officer at the Office of the State Treasurer. Currently, the fund’s yield is approximately 0.55 percent, but it could be 0.80 percent or more if the state had not purchased Lehman Securities, Lim said. Sonia Andrews, Bend’s finance director, said the state investment pool is considered to be very safe. “If the (local government investment pool) collapsed, we’d be in trouble,” Andrews said. She added that she believes this is extremely unlikely, and the state fund looked relatively good in recent years when some banks were failing, corporations were struggling and federal agencies such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac required bailouts. “As far as Oregon governments are concerned, that was really our only option, especially when banks were failing,” Andrews said. Lim said the money that local governments invest in the state’s short-term investment fund is not guaranteed, any more than it would be in a money market fund or other security the governments could buy. “There’s no guarantee, there’s no backing, there’s no insurance,” Lim said.

State bank? In the aftermath of the recession and anger at federal bail-

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 A5

McFaul

Online

Continued from A1 He became a Navy SEAL and completed three tours of duty in the Persian Gulf. In 1985, McFaul left the Navy, but returned in 1988 to the SEALs and was a part of the Navy Special Warfare Community. A year later in 1989, he deployed as platoon chief of Gulf Company, SEAL team in Panama. On Dec. 19, 1989, McFaul’s team swarmed the Paitilla Airfield in Panama City in an effort to prevent Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega from using his jet. With the airfield under heavy fire and several members of the team wounded, McFaul was killed while trying to carry a team member to safety. He was one of four killed at the airfield, and posthumously received a Purple Heart and a Navy Cross for his actions. During his life, McFaul also received the Navy Achievement Medal with a gold star, the Navy Unit Citation and a Good Conduct Medal with a bronze star, and he was inducted into the inaugural class of the Bend High hall of fame in October. In 1998, the USS McFaul was named after the Bend man, and the warship has been busy ever since. The ship currently handles maritime security operations in the Persian Gulf, Red Sea and Arabian Sea, and along the coast of East Africa. Back in April, the destroyer captured 10 suspected pirates and rescued eight crew members from a pirated Indian cargo ship near Oman.

Continued from A1 These early efforts are predicated on a shift in the relationship between consumer and company. Influenced by consumers’ willingness to trade data online, the sites are pushing to see how much information people will turn over. “People are a lot more willing to give away a lot of stuff as long as it results in some benefits that they value,” said Stephen Hoch, a marketing professor and director of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Initiative at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. New companies, including WeShop, Aprizi, Blippy and Dopplr, are trying to exploit the data that people seem so willing to give up. Some are even allowing shoppers to set what terms they want — free shipping, half-price discounts, only fair-trade products. They can also list what they are shopping for, like a gray cashmere sweater under $100, for instance, and let the retailers fight it out for the right to make a sale. “The whole privacy debate has grown up around people using your data without your permission,” said Antony Lee, chief executive of WeShop. “If you want to use your data to your benefit, that’s for you to do.”

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Donald L. McFaul was killed on Dec. 19, 1989, and The Bulletin ran an article the following May on how his loved ones were coping with his death.

outs, the idea has arisen of creating an Oregon bank. At least two unsuccessful candidates in the May primary election supported the idea of creating a state bank based on North Dakota’s bank — Bill Bradbury, who sought the Democratic nomination for governor, and John Gist, who sought the Democratic nomination for a seat on the Deschutes County Commission. The Oregon Working Families Party also supports the idea, and plans to continue pushing for it in the 2011 legislative session. The party is focused on “kitchen table” economic issues, which it hopes will unite Oregonians. “We started looking at the recession being caused by the giant financial institutions back on Wall Street and how can we counter that on a state level,” said Barbara Dudley, chairwoman of the party. A state bank could sell bonds to raise its initial capital, then partner with community banks to back their loans, Dudley said. The bank would not compete with the private sector by offering loans directly, but interest from loans it would participate in with community banks would go back to the state general fund. Local governments could invest in the state bank, Dudley added. A lobbyist for large private banks said a state bank is unnecessary at this point and would have an unfair advantage

’It’s refreshing to have it out in the open’ Sponsors are allowed to include their logo and a link to their site, and they pay a referral fee if a consumer signs up, but offers from nonsponsors are listed, too. Daniel Sjoberg, 26, of Manhattan, said he particularly liked how transparent Mint seemed to be. “They put that very clearly for you to see — ‘We think Ally is good for you, and by the way, they’re endorsing us,’” said Sjoberg. “It’s refreshing to have it out in the open who’s giving them money and who’s not giving them money.” Aaron Patzer, who founded Mint in 2007 (the company was acquired by Intuit in 2009 for $170 million), believed that users would give the site private information in return for allowing Mint to analyze their finances to alert them when they had exceeded their budget, or to send them offers from cable companies or banks. “Most venture capitalists, when I was starting this company, said that no one would trust a startup with their financial information,” said Patzer,

against private sector financial institutions. “Right now, depositors’ money is very safe in banks,” said Scott Talbott, senior vice president for government affairs at The Financial Services Roundtable, a group that represents big financial firms. The government could offer lower prices, Talbott said, “and that would harm that competition and the free market on a broader scale, so we’d have some concerns about that idea.”

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But the upfront dealmaking does not quiet all the privacy concerns. “The big problem is that these business models are not very stable. Companies set out privacy policies, consumers disclose data, and then the action begins,” Marc Rotenberg, executive director of the advocacy group Electronic Privacy Information Center, said in an e-mail message. “The business model changes. The companies simply want the data, and the consumer benefit disappears.” But Giff Constable, cofounder of Aprizi, a shopping startup that asks users to enter information about preferences, then selects products for them from throughout the Web, said a changing business model was unlikely, and even if it happened, the consumer could easily disengage. “It’s opt-in, and it’s understood from the beginning what’s going on here,” Constable said. “That level of control is explicit: You can plug in, and you can remove the information that’s there. “It’s a very simple bargain — it’s, ‘You share with me, and I am going to make your life better.’ It’s not about privacy versus lack of privacy — it really does come down to control and giving people choice.” That, and a perceived benefit. “I wasn’t really concerned about giving them information,” said Sjoberg, the Mint user, “I was only considering the things I was getting out of it.”

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now vice president and general manager of Intuit’s personal finance group. “In essence, we would data-mine your own data in order to help you.” While data on Mint is kept private — there is no way to share financial details with other users — WeShop has built a system that allows people to spread information about their shopping habits. After a consumer gives WeShop access to an e-mail account, the system scans email headers to find electronic receipts, then extracts what someone bought and what price they paid. All that information is posted to the WeShop site as a kind of in-depth shopping history. A consumer can keep it private, or share some or all purchase data with other people in WeShop networks (using a nickname). That lets users compare prices and post messages about what Lego sets or prom dresses they are considering.

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OREGON Schools chief election result remains in doubt, see Page B2. OBITUARIES Irwin Rosten made “Incredible Machine” documentary, see Page B5.

Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

Dangerous claw trap in Bend Woman finds injured raccoon in southeast residential area By Lillian Mongeau The Bulletin

A raccoon with its leg caught in a leghold trap was discovered stuck on the top of Bend resident Peryl Johansson’s fence two weeks ago. The animal’s leg was crushed, and he had nearly chewed it off when Johansson found him. “One of my cats hates cold weather, but she would not come off the porch, which I thought was very strange,” Johansson said. “I got down into her vision area and looked where she

was looking, and there he was. said. And though anyone is welWhen an animal’s hurting, I’m come to apply for such a permit, hurting.” George said he hadn’t isLeghold traps, comsued one more than three monly referred to as Inside times in the 19 years claw traps, are effeche’s worked for ODFW. • What to do tively illegal in residenEven then, such permits if you find tial neighborhoods like are issued primarily to an injured the area of southeast professional trappers or wild animal, Bend where Johansson licensed wildlife control Page B5 lives, according to Steoperators. A list of these, ven George, Deschutes by county, can be found District wildlife bioloon ODFW’s website, gist at the Oregon Department George said. of Fish and Wildlife. “They are “It is possible, but not proballowed only by permit,” George able, that the trap was set by a

permitted person,” George said of the trap found dangling from the mangled leg of the raccoon on Johansson’s fence. “Professional trappers wouldn’t set a trap that was able to get loose — it’s defeating their purposes. Usually when that type of setting happens, it’s from someone who doesn’t know what they are doing.” George said people sometimes buy old traps at garage sales or have them sitting around and then decide to set them to catch a pesky wildlife critter, but he said this is a bad idea without training or a permit. See Trap / B5

Photo courtesy of Peryl Johansson

This raccoon, shown here wrapped in a blanket, was severely injured when its leg was caught in a claw trap within the Bend city limits. He is recovering after veterinarian Deb LaPaugh of LaPaw Animal Hospital in Bend performed surgery May 10.

Slightly warmer this week, still cloudy By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

While the month of May is on its way out, the overcast skies and rain showers aren’t likely going anywhere this week. According to Rob Brooks, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Pendleton, temperatures will creep up this week, but the sunny, warm weather is still not quite here. “It’s not going to get super sunny, but we’re going to get a slight warming trend and hold in some of that heat at night,” he said. Today there’s a chance of rain in the morning and in the afternoon. Temperatures are expected to top out at around 67 degrees before dropping overnight to between 35 and 43 degrees. “The clouds will come in and help us out a little bit,” Brooks said of Tuesday. “They’ll hold in the heat from during the day so the night is a little warmer.” See Weather / B5

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Members of Boy Scout Troop 21 and other volunteers work together Saturday morning to construct a pair of raised planting beds at the Bend Senior Center.

plant rows of vegetables in four raised planting beds. The center’s

Big project set to start on U.S. 20 this week

staff hopes the vegetable garden will keep seniors busy, and eventu-

By Sheila G. Miller

A PLACE FOR PLANTING By Sheila G. Miller • The Bulletin

I

n about two weeks, seniors will gather at the Bend Senior Center to

ally that the food will be harvested and then served on the seniors’ plates.

Billy Murphy, left, a member of Boy Scout Troop 21, fills a wheelbarrow with dirt while leveling the foundation for a raised planting bed on Saturday morning at the Bend Senior Center.

The planting was made possible Sunday, as dozens of volunteers — primarily from Boy Scout Troop 21 — built two raised planting beds as part of 15-year-old Greg Shipman’s Eagle Scout project. On Sunday, about 45 people gathered at the Bend Senior Center to build two stone raised planting beds that will match the center’s two existing beds. Greg is a freshman at Summit High School, and this spring he was looking for a possible project that would fulfill part of the requirements for becoming an Eagle Scout. When he heard the Senior Center wanted to build two more planting beds off the center’s patio, he sprang into action. “I was looking for a project that would benefit people, and I’ve always been really good with elderly people,” he said. “These will last forever. They’ll really have a lasting impact.” He also was inspired by his grandmother, who lives in Washington and has a one-acre garden. “She made raised planting beds, and she really likes them because they help with her back,” he said. “I just thought, ‘Why not make it happen?’” Greg consulted his grandmother for help on building the raised beds, and also took a class at Willamette Graystone to learn more about the project. With some research online, he designed the raised beds and was able to

find stone that would match the center’s two existing beds. Greg designed the beds — about 15 feet long and 4.5 feet wide — so that people in wheelchairs could participate in the planting and harvesting as well. Zac Stewart, 17, was helping with Greg’s project on Sunday. Zac completed his Eagle Scout project two years ago, and Greg helped with that. “I think he deserves Eagle, and I’ll help him in any way that I can,” Zac said. To that end, Zac came to the center on Saturday to prepare the areas where the new planters would be located. On Sunday, he helped lay the bases of the planting beds and was working through several minor problems. “Trying to figure out how they’ll go together,” he said, “is like a puzzle.” The troop members receive community service hours for their help with Greg’s project. June 10 will be the official planting day for the seniors, and Greg said he’s glad he can help out. “They can grow nutritious food,” Greg said. “And it might give them something to do. A lot of these people don’t have access to gardens because they live in apartments or other places without yards.” See Planting / B5

The Bulletin

While the weather doesn’t quite feel like summer yet, summer road construction projects are getting under way. In Bend this week, construction crews will begin a largescale reconstruction project on U.S. Highway 20 beginning at Northeast Purcell Boulevard and ending at the Powell Butte Highway. The $2 million project will start this week and run through September, with some temporary lane closures from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m. on Sunday through Thursday nights. Signs will let drivers know when closures will take place. The project will repave about 2.6 miles of the highway where rutting has occurred. The ruts, caused largely by studded tire use, allow rain, snow and ice to accumulate and cause dangerous driving conditions. In addition to repaving, the project will also include repairing and improving sidewalks, drainage channels and ramps. See Roads / B5

ROA D REPORT


B2 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

OFFICIALS, LOVED ONES REMEMBER VETERANS

N  R CIVIL SUITS Deschutes County Circuit Court Civil Log

Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration

By Abby Haight The Associated Press

Filed May 20

10CV0434MA: Joe K. Turner v. Larry M. Grech, complaint, $261,000 10CV0435MA: Citibank South Dakota NA v. RPA Management Consultants Inc. and Ariel Peri, complaint, $25,160.95 10CV0436AB: Atlantic Credit & Finance Inc. v. John C. Gold, complaint, $14,417.65 10CV0437AB: Washington Federal Savings and Loan Association v. Bryan Ball Construction Inc., aka Bryan Ball Construction Incorporated and Jeannine Ball, complaint, $1,079,925 10CV0438MA: Renata Thommen v. Allstate Fire and Casualty Insurance Co., complaint, $85,000 Filed May 24

10CV0441ST: John and Caren Burton v. Maria George dba Deschutes Pet Lodge, Sabaka LLC, and Martie Davidson, complaint, $28,000 economic damages, $55,000 noneconomic damages 10CV0442SF: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Gina R. Wendelin, complaint, $10,128.62 10CV0443AB: Citibank South Dakota NA v. Amy L. Beyer, complaint, $13,439.59 10CV0444MA: Synergy Global Transportation Inc. v. Trimac Industrial Systems LLC, complaint, $13,200 10CV0445MA: State Farm Mutual Insurance Co. v. Dean Stout dba Stout & Sons Construction, complaint, $1,542,749.73 10CV0446ST: A.E. Moore Enterprises LLC v. Blizzard LLC, Charles W. Mohill, and Patrick J. Oliver, complaint, $433,536 Filed May 25

10CV0440ST: Lori Johnson and Trina Wheeldon v. Major Lodging LLC, class action complaint 10CV0447MA: Northwest Bank v. The Trono Group LLC and Stephen A. Trono, complaint, $380,000 10CV0449AB: Paul M. Turnbull v. Progressive Classic Insurance Co., complaint, $75,000 10CV0452AB: Asset Acceptance LLC v. Albert B. King, complaint, $11,634.39

Steve Bloom / The Olympian

Representing the Military Order of the Cootie, Dale and Dianne Fezer, Washington state Grand Commander and President, respectively, toss flowers into Budd Inlet during the annual waterside Memorial Day ceremony Sunday at Percival Landing in Olympia, Wash. For about

26 years, the Thurston County Veterans Council has held the service, where representatives of veterans organizations and family members toss individual flowers into the inlet in remembrance, followed by a 21-gun salute and the playing of taps.

Blood banks for pets take root By Matt Cooper The (Eugene) Register-Guard

SPRINGFIELD — Giving blood can be a bit unsettling, even if you do it regularly, so it helps if afterward you’re rewarded with a big, tasty ... dog treat. So it went for Ginger the yellow Lab on Saturday, who provided her 14th and final blood donation at a local veterinary hospital. The happy hound’s family came out for the occasion, as did media curious about the idea of dogs giving the gift of life to other dogs. For years, Springfield resident Craig Prindel, 62, has taken his faithful sidekick to Oregon Veterinary Referral Associates, a practice in west Springfield that collects canine blood donations through a nonprofit charity called Banner’s Blood Bank. Domesticated dogs and cats have long donated blood to others that are sick or injured, providing critical red blood cells and plas-

ma. Now there is a growing trend in storing the blood in community-based blood banks, where it can be held for months or longer until needed, said Donna Dimski, a veterinarian who co-founded the Springfield referral practice in 1997. “Veterinary medicine is more advanced now and as people are wanting to do more for their pets, (blood banks) are a need that comes up,” she said. About 25 dogs donate regularly to the blood bank, and Ginger has become an old pro at this sort of thing, Prindel said. Labs are generally easygoing by nature, and Ginger is no exception, Prindel said. Trained as a therapy dog, she has regularly accompanied Prindel to Briggs Middle School, where Prindel is an educational assistant. While Prindel worked with a student, Ginger would often find herself happily at the bot-

tom of a pile of dozens of adoring kids, he said. Ginger has also learned to take a doggie biscuit out of the mouths of Prindel’s granddaughters without so much as a nip, and the family proudly shows off pictures of Ginger cuddling up for naps with Willie, the family cat. At Banner’s, dogs are allowed to donate between the ages of 1 and 8, and Ginger’s eighth birthday in March meant Saturday’s donation would be her last. Ginger has received a free physical exam before every donation, and as she gets older she’ll be entitled to free blood products equal to the amount she has donated. But Prindel said the real payoff is knowing that Ginger is helping other dogs and their owners. Two dogs benefit from each donation, so Ginger has helped 28 dogs that are fighting for life, hospital staff said.

‘Deep Throat’ informant revealed in 1995 T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press Today is Monday, May 31, the 151st day of 2010. There are 214 days left in the year. This is the Memorial Day observance. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 31, 1985, at least 88 people were killed, more than 1,000 injured, as over 40 tornadoes swept through parts of Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York and Ontario, Canada, during an eight-hour period. ON THIS DATE In 1819, poet Walt Whitman was born in West Hills, N.Y. In 1889, more than 2,000 people perished when a dam break sent water rushing through Johnstown, Pa. In 1910, the Union of South Africa was founded. In 1911, the British liner RMS Titanic was launched from its building berth at the Port of Belfast. In 1916, during World War I, British and German fleets fought the naval Battle of Jutland off Denmark; there was no clear-cut victor, although the British suffered heavier losses. In 1961, South Africa became an independent republic. In 1970, a magnitude 7.9 earthquake in Peru claimed an estimated 20,000 lives, according to the U.S. Geological Survey’s website. In 1977, the trans-Alaska oil pipeline, three years in the making, was completed. In 1990, the situation comedy “Seinfeld” began airing as a regular series on NBC. In 1994, the United States announced it was no longer aiming long-range nuclear missiles at targets in the former Soviet Union.

TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton, visiting Portugal, tried to calm fears of a nuclear arms race that would leave Europe vulnerable by promising to share any new missile defense technology with U.S. allies. Bandleader Tito Puente died in New York at 77. The reality TV show “Survivor” first debuted on CBS (the winner of the premiere series was Richard Hatch). FIVE YEARS AGO Breaking a silence of 30 years, former FBI official W. Mark Felt stepped forward as “Deep Throat,” the secret Washington Post source that helped bring down President Richard Nixon during the Watergate scandal. President George W. Bush, faced with a string of setbacks on Capitol Hill, shrugged off questions about his political clout and promised during a news conference to keep pushing Congress for a Social Security overhaul. Oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, once Russia’s richest man, was convicted of charges including fraud and tax evasion and sentenced to nine years in prison. ONE YEAR AGO Dr. George Tiller, a rare provider of late-term abortions, was shot and killed in a Wichita, Kan., church. (Gunman Scott Roeder was later convicted and sentenced to life in prison with

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no possibility of parole for 50 years.) Millvina Dean, the last survivor of the 1912 sinking of the RMS Titanic, died in Southampton, England, at 97. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Elaine Stewart is 81. Actor-director Clint Eastwood is 80. Singer Peter Yarrow is 72. Former Anglican Church envoy Terry Waite is 71. Singer-musician Augie Meyers is 70. Actress Sharon Gless is 67. Football Hall of Famer Joe Namath is 67. Actor Tom Berenger is 60. Actor Gregory Harrison is 60. Actress Roma Maffia is 52. Comedian Chris Elliott is 50. Actor Kyle Secor is 50. Actress Lea Thompson is 49. Singer Corey Hart is 48. Actor

Hugh Dillon is 47. Rapper DMC is 46. Actress Brooke Shields is 45. Country musician Ed Adkins (The Derailers) is 43. Jazz musician Christian McBride is 38. Actor Colin Farrell is 34. Rock musician Scott Klopfenstein (Reel Big Fish) is 33. Actor Eric Christian Olsen is 33. Rock musician Andy Hurley (Fall Out Boy) is 30. Actor Jonathan Tucker is 28. Actor Curtis Williams Jr. is 23. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The genius of the United States is not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges, or churches, or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors, but always most in the common people.” — Walt Whitman (1819-92)

PORTLAND — Two weeks after the primary election that typically would have crowned a winner in the race for superintendent of public instruction, the tightest statewide contest in Oregon’s recent history remains in doubt. As of Friday, incumbent Democrat Susan Castillo led Rep. Ron Maurer by 2,835 votes. More important, if her vote percentage holds up, she has enough for the magical 50 percent plus one she needs to hang on to the job she’s held for eight years — by an eyelash. With about 3,800 ballots yet to be counted by June 7, Maurer was not ready to concede. But the conservative Republican from Grants Pass described his race in terms familiar to sports fans. “I left everything on the field,” he said. “There wasn’t anything where I go, ‘Darn, I wish I’d done that differently.’” There’s almost no chance he can win outright. But since there are more than 2,000 write-in votes in the election, Castillo’s margin could shrink to 50 percent or less. It’s now 50.04 percent, or about 300 votes above 50 percent. If both candidates wind up with less than a majority, Maurer gets another shot in a runoff election this fall.

$500 billion shortfall in income. “Susan’s dealing with the stress probably better than the rest of us because she’s keeping busy,” Rabenberg said. “The important thing is that every Oregonian’s vote is counted,” Rabenberg said. “The election is in their hands now.”

New signatures Many of the uncounted votes were from people whose ballot signatures didn’t match their registration cards. Voters were notified and had to sign a new card at their county elections office by last Friday. The counties must submit the ballots to the state elections office by June 7. Both sides of the superintendent’s race have tried to get the word out to those voters to sign new cards. “I just asked them to please do it,” said Rep. Sal Esquivel, a Republican from Medford who sent an e-mail out to his constituents promoting Maurer. “All of a sudden, your vote really does matter.” Jim Moore, a political scientist at Pacific University, said Maurer effectively got his name out to the public, while Castillo probably hurt herself with a low-key campaign that didn’t go after Maurer’s conservative views. Voters also are cool to candidates seeking a third term, he said. ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

Keeping busy Castillo was traveling from Southern Oregon, where she was making an award at a middle school, and was unavailable for comment. But her campaign manager, Jayme Rabenberg, said the superintendent was too busy to dwell on the election. In addition to visiting Grants Pass and Coos Bay last week, Castillo also dealt with a critical report on graduation rates and grim news that Gov. Ted Kulongoski plans to cut $237 million from elementary and secondary education to help make up for the state’s

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 B3


B4 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

The death of Capt. Waskow Editor’s Note: Pulitzer Prize-winning World War II correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote the following column after a stay with the 36th Division units near Mignano and Venafro, Italy. He was killed on April 18, 1945, by Japanese machine-gun fire.

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n this war I have known a lot of officers who were loved and respected by the soldiers under them. But never have I crossed the trail of any man as beloved as Capt. Henry T. Waskow, of

Belton, Texas. Capt. Waskow was a company commander in the 36th Division. He had led his company since long before it left the States. He was very young, only in his mid-20s, but he carried in him a sincerity and a gentleness that made people want to be guided by him. “After my own father, he came next,” a sergeant told me. “He always looked after us, a soldier said. “He’d go to bat for us every time.” “I’ve never known him to do anything unfair,” another one said. I was at the foot of the mule trail the night they brought Capt. Waskow’s body down the mountain. The moon was nearly full at the time, and you could see far up the trail and even part way across the valley. Soldiers made shadows as they walked. Dead men had been coming down the mountain all evening, lashed onto the backs of mules. They came lying belly-down across wooden pack saddles, their heads hanging down on the left side of the mule, their stiffened legs sticking out awkwardly from the other side bobbing up and down as the mule walked. The Italian mule-skinners were afraid to walk beside dead men, so Americans had to lead the mules down that night. Even the Americans were reluctant to unlash and lift off the bodies at the bottom, so an officer had to do it himself and ask others to help. The first one came in early in the evening. They slid him down from the mule and stood him on his feet for a moment. In the half light, he might have been merely a sick man standing there, leaning on the others. Then they laid him on the ground in the shadow of the low stone wall alongside the road. I don’t know who that first one was. You feel small in the presence of the dead men and ashamed of being alive, and you don’t ask silly questions. We left him there beside the road, that first one, and we all went back into the cowshed and sat on water cans or laid on the straw, waiting for the next batch of mules. Somebody said the dead soldier had been dead for four days, and then nobody said anything more about it. We talked soldier talk for an hour or more. The dead man lay all alone outside, in the shadow of the stone wall. Then a soldier came into the dark cowshed and said there were some more bodies outside. We went out into the road.

Four mules stood there, in the moonlight, in the road where the trail came down off the mountain. The soldiers who led them stood there waiting. “This one is Capt. Waskow,” one of them said quietly. Two men unlashed his body from the mule and lifted it off and lay it in the shadow beside the low stone wall. Other men took the other bodies off. Finally there were five, lying end to end in a long row alongside the road. You don’t cover up dead men in the combat zone. They just lie there in the shadows until somebody else comes after them. The unburdened mules moved off to their olive orchard. The men in the road seemed reluctant to leave. They stood around, and gradually one by one you could sense them moving close to Capt. Waskow’s body. Not so much to look, I think, as to say something in finality, to him and to themselves. I stood close by and I could hear. One soldier came and looked down and he said out loud, “Goddammit.” That was all he said, and then he walked away. Another one came. He said “Goddammit to hell anyway.” He looked down for a few moments, and then he turned and left. Another man came; I think he was an officer. It was hard to tell officers from men in the half-light, for all were bearded and grimy dirty. The man looked down in to the dead captain’s face, and then he spoke directly to him, as though he were alive. He said: “I’m sorry, old man.” Then a soldier came and stood beside the officer, and bent over, and he too spoke to his dead captain, not in a whisper but awfully tenderly, and he said: “I sure am sorry, sir.” Then the first man squatted down, and he reached down and took the dead hand, and he sat there for five full minutes, holding the dead hand in his own and looking intently into the dead face, and he never uttered a sound all the time he sat there. And then finally he put the hand down, and then reached up and gently straightened the points of the captain’s shirt collar, and then he sort of rearranged the tattered edges of his uniform around the wound. And then he got up and walked away down the road in the moonlight, all alone. Reprinted by permission of Scripps Howard Foundation.

Our kids deserve better role models By Colette Gilroy Bulletin guest columnist

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he ceaseless flood of bad news these days seems to exempt no one from harsh criticism. Universal lunacy across the political spectrum ranges from proclaiming that George W. Bush planned the attack on the World Trade Center to the notion that Barack Obama instigated the explosion of BP’s oil platform. Groups aver that the government wants to tax them into poverty, endanger their well-being through a new health care system, euthanize their grandparents, and utterly ruin the country through dangerously unbalanced budgets and debts to foreign countries. No area of American life escapes these bombastic complainers who tell us schools are staffed with incompetent teachers, unions constantly prevent progress, global warming is baloney, tree huggers are crippling the economy, and immigrants are bent on destroying the America we all love. The media is often befuddled by aggressive thrusts from both the right and the left, eradicating the middle. We don’t hear news anymore; we hear “infotainment,” oversimplification, ranting, half-truths and lies. Often we hear pundits asking “What kind of world are we leaving to our children and generations of children after them?” We deplore the country’s huge debt, inadequacies of American education with reduced budgets, the vexing immigration situation, deteriorating roads and bridges, and a host of problems in every corner of America. Instead of asking what we will be leaving to our children, we should ask: “What kind of children are we leaving to the world?” This is important because we are their models, their examples. Civilization rests upon four basic institutions: 1) the family; 2) religious affiliations/ethics; 3) government; and 4)

IN MY VIEW a system to impart culture and values to the next generation, and, of course, these institutions often overlap and intertwine. Looking at the models we’re projecting, we’re not doing so well. Our economic system is now totally out of balance: Wall Street’s share of America’s GDP has exploded from 17 percent three decades ago to a destructive 63 percent today, and corporate CEOs everywhere get bloated salaries and benefits even when their companies lose money. A massive transfer of wealth from average Americans to people at the top has the U.S. mired at the bottom of advanced economies in distribution of wealth. Both parents in a family often need to work long hours just to survive, making it difficult to raise the children, provide education, impart good citizenship, encourage discipline and love for one another. Concerning religious values, the outlook is murky at best, with sports (Sunday morning practice) increasingly edging out family participation in religious activities, without substantive focus on ethical/religious discipline. “Love your neighbor as yourself” morphs into “Look out for number one. That’s all that counts!” Young people are exposed to an endless spectacle of inflamed rhetoric spewing forth from every direction. Today’s media/Internet extreme partisanship doesn’t foster calm, thoughtful reflection about what affects them. What values are we imparting to our children through our daily behavior? We need to stand back and recognize what we are doing, not just to our children, but to ourselves as well. Portraying those we disagree with as enemies to be defeated rather than as legitimate opponents with whom we can work to

achieve common ground prevents us from achieving workable solutions that move society forward. As our children look at society, they see outrageous behavior: lying; hating; disregard for rules, regulations and fairness; greed; immorality; amorality; hypocrisy; indifference or hostility to discipline and ethical thinking; refusal to reform and fund adequately their education and disdain for those we disagree with. There’s little agreement about how big or small our government should be. In one instance, we demand a small government and virtually no taxes, but we decry the government’s inability to help more fully in time of dire need such as Katrina and the BP disaster. We scream for a minimum of regulations but are unable to acknowledge that our society needs a discipline that benefits all, not just the few. It is evident to all that Wall Street’s lack of discipline benefited the few, making it clear we cannot trust that “minimum of regulations.” Answering the question “What kind of children are we leaving to the world?” we must recognize that the models we are exhibiting are examples of selfishness, greed, arrogance, hypocrisy, dishonesty, immorality, etc. Do we really want to leave the world with children whose superficial, inadequately funded education will not help them discern what honesty, cooperation and compromise are, who will be consumed by selfishness, hate, extremism, division and unethical behavior, and who will fail to recognize the value of a balanced and fair opposition? We must re-evaluate our actions, our words, our behavior. We must serve as constructive models and examples to help them become honest, generous, selfless and restrained in their judgments. Colette Gilroy lives in Bend.

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A painful global poverty truth: Booze trumps kids MONT-BELO, Congo Republic — here’s an ugly secret of global poverty, one rarely acknowledged by aid groups or U.N. reports. It’s a blunt truth that is politically incorrect, heartbreaking, frustrating and ubiquitous: It’s that if the poorest families spent as much money educating their children as they do on wine, cigarettes and prostitutes, their children’s prospects would be transformed. Much suffering is caused not only by low incomes, but also by shortsighted private spending decisions by heads of households. That probably sounds sanctimonious, haughty and callous, but it’s been on my mind while traveling through central Africa with a college student on my annual win-a-trip journey. Here in this Congolese village of Mont-Belo, we met a bright fourth-grader, Jovali Obamza, who is about to be expelled from school because his family is three months behind in paying fees. (In theory, public school is free in the Congo Republic. In fact, every single school we visited charges fees.)

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We asked to see Jovali’s parents. The dad, Georges Obamza, who weaves straw stools that he sells for $1 each, is unmistakably very poor. He said that the family is eight months behind on its $6a-month rent and is in danger of being evicted, with nowhere to go. The Obamzas have no mosquito net, even though they have lost two of their eight children to malaria. They say they just can’t afford the $6 cost of a net. Nor can they afford the $2.50-a-month tuition for each of their three school-age kids. “It’s hard to get the money to send the kids to school,” Obamza explained, a bit embarrassed. But Obamza and his wife, Valerie, do have cell phones and say they spend a combined $10 a month on call time. In addition, Obamza goes drinking several times a week at a village bar, spending about $1 an evening on moonshine. By his calculation, that adds up to about $12 a month — almost as much as the family rent and school fees combined. I asked Obamza why he prioritizes alcohol over educating his kids. He

NICHOLAS KRISTOF looked pained. Other villagers said that Obamza drinks less than the average man in the village (women drink far less). Many other men drink every evening, they said, and also spend money on cigarettes. “If possible, I drink every day,” Fulbert Mfouna, a 43-year-old whose children have also had to drop out or repeat grades for lack of school fees, said forthrightly. His eldest son, Jude, is still in first grade after repeating for five years because of nonpayment of fees. Meanwhile, Mfouna acknowledged spending $2 a day on alcohol and cigarettes. Traditionally, a young man here might have paid his wife’s family a “bride price” of a pair of goats. Now the “bride price” starts with oversized jugs of wine

and two bottles of whiskey. Two MIT economists, Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, found that the world’s poor typically spend about 2 percent of their income educating their children, and often larger percentages on alcohol and tobacco: 4 percent in rural Papua New Guinea, 6 percent in Indonesia, 8 percent in Mexico. The indigent also spend significant sums on soft drinks, prostitution and extravagant festivals. Look, I don’t want to be an unctuous party-pooper. But I’ve seen too many children dying of malaria for want of a bed net that the father tells me is unaffordable, even as he spends larger sums on liquor. If we want Obamza’s children to get an education and sleep under a bed net — well, the simplest option is for their dad to spend fewer evenings in the bar. Because there’s mounting evidence that mothers are more likely than fathers to spend money educating their kids, one solution is to give women more control over purse strings and more legal title to assets. Some aid groups and U.N. agencies are working on that.

Another approach is microsavings, helping poor people save money when banks aren’t interested in them. It’s becoming increasingly clear that the most powerful part of microfinance isn’t microlending but microsavings. Microsavings programs, organized by CARE and other organizations, work to turn a consumption culture into a savings culture. The programs often keep household savings in the women’s names, to give mothers more say in spending decisions, and I’ve seen them work in Africa, Latin America and Asia. Well-meaning humanitarians sometimes burnish suffering to make it seem more virtuous and noble than it often is. If we’re going to make more progress, and get kids like the Obamza children in school and under bed nets, we need to look unflinchingly at uncomfortable truths — and then try to redirect the family money now spent on wine and prostitution. Nicholas Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 B5

O Randall Gene Lashley Sept. 1, 1948 - May 19, 2010 Randall Gene "Sonny" Lashley, formerly of Missouri, died Wednesday, May 19, 2010, in Bend, Oregon, at the age of 61. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 5, 2010, at 11:00 am, at Nativity Lutheran Church, located at 60850 Brosterhous Road, Bend, OR. Randall was born September 1, 1948, in Wright City, Missouri, the son of Byron Eugene and Helen Margaret (Czapliskie) Lashley. He served in the US Navy during the Vietnam and Gulf War era. Ships he served aboard during his Military Service included the USS Arnold J Isbelle DD 869, USS James E Kyes DD 787, USS Alert David DE 1050, USS Rathburn FF 1057, USS Hector AR 7, USS Constellation CV 64, USS Carl Vinson CV 70, USS Sacramento AEO 1. After a distinguished 26 year military career, he retired from the Navy as a CPO (BTC). Randall was the proud recipient of numerous awards and commendations for his service and acts of bravery, including the Humanitarian Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal (2), Southwest Asia Service Medal, Navy Unit Commendation, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (2), Vietnam Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon (9), Vietnam Gallantry Cross Meritorious Unit Citation, Navy Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal, Combat Action, Good Service Conduct Award (4), USN Expert Marksmanship (Pistol), Navy and Marine Corps Medal (for heroism). He was a lifetime member of service organizations Veterans of Foreign War, American Legion and Fleet Reserve. As a youth, Randall was actively involved both as a cub scout and a boy scout. He played softball while he was in his 20s, was a certified SCUBA diver, and an avid pool player. He had a passion for reading, mostly science fiction, and especially enjoyed watching NASCAR and fast/muscle cars. Survivors include his mother, Helen of Wright City, MO; two sons, Matthew of Bend, OR and Kelley of Oak Harbor, WA; a daughter, Colleen of Seneca; SC, two brothers, Gary and Kelvin of Wright City, MO; two sisters, Karen and Gloria of Wright City, MO; and three grandchildren, Cody, Mackenzie and Gillian. He is preceded in death by his father. Memorial contributions may be made in Randall's memory to Sweats for Vets, payable to American Legion Post #78, at Sweats for Vets Auburn, Post 78 - American Legion, PO Box 668, Auburn, WA 98701. Baird Funeral Home of Bend is in charge of arrangements (541) 382-0903.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Chemist Robert McNeil Irwin Rosten’s film promoted using Tylenol ‘Incredible Machine’ By Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times

Robert McNeil Jr., a Philadelphia chemist who developed a little-known pain reliever called paracetamol into the global blockbuster Tylenol, creating a fortune that he freely distributed to charities, universities and museums, died May 20 of a heart ailment at his home in Wyndmoor, Pa. He was 94. McNeil was not a brilliant synthetic chemist discovering new compounds through long hours in the laboratory, said Arnold Thackray of the nonprofit Chemical Heritage Foundation, whose goal is to preserve the history of chemistry. Instead, he had the insight to discern that paracetamol, also known as acetaminophen, had the potential to become an important drug and the creativity to develop an effective marketing campaign. Paracetamol was discovered by French chemist Charles Gerhardt in 1852, but the discovery languished for nearly a century until British researchers in the late 1940s demonstrated that it could safely and effectively alleviate pain and reduce fevers. About the same time, other research began to link excessive aspirin use to gastric bleeding and other problems. Nonetheless,pharmaceutical companies were not interested in developing paracetamol because they feared that it would take sales away from their profitable aspirin products. McNeil, research director for his family-owned McNeil Laboratories, saw a niche for the drug, guessing successfully that it could be marketed as a safe product for children. After commissioning safety and efficacy trials to obtain Food and Drug Administration approval, the company began marketing Tylenol Elixir for Children in 1955 as a prescription-only product. It was sold in a box shaped like a fire engine and carried the slogan

“for little hotheads.” Eventually, the elixir and other Tylenol products for children and adults became available without prescriptions and the brand became one of the best-known drug names. Annual sales exceed $1 billion a year, despite the plethora of generic and branded products that compete with it. Robert Lincoln McNeil Jr. was born in 1915 in Bethel, Conn., during a visit to his mother’s parents. He graduated from Yale University in 1936, then earned a bachelor’s degree from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science, now the University of the Sciences, in 1938. After graduation, he joined the family business, which had been started by his grandfather as a neighborhood pharmacy in 1879. By the 1920s, the company had abandoned retail sales and was manufacturing drugs for sale to doctors and hospitals. It incorporated as McNeil Laboratories in 1933. In 1955, Robert Sr. retired from the company, and Robert Jr. became chairman of the board; his brother Henry became president. In 1959, the pair sold the company to Johnson & Johnson for about $33 million in stock. Robert Jr. remained as chairman of McNeil Laboratories until 1964 to ease the transition to corporate ownership. After retirement, he became an active philanthropist, establishing the Barra Foundation — named after the McNeil clan’s ancient home, the Isle of Barra off the west coast of Scotland — which gave generously to many Philadelphiaarea institutions. In 2005, he received the prestigious American Institute of Chemists Gold Medal for his pioneering work on acetaminophen — a name, incidentally, that he coined. A colleague suggested Tylenol, an abbreviation of the chemical name N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, for the brand name.

examined the body By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Irwin Rosten, an award-winning documentary filmmaker perhaps best known for “The Incredible Machine,” which took PBS viewers on a revolutionary voyage inside the human body in 1975, has died. He was 85. Rosten died May 23 at his Hollywood home after a brief illness, his family said. He was the writer, director and producer of “The Incredible Machine,” an early National Geographic special that had “extraordinary impact,” said Nicolas Noxon, a documentarian who was Rosten’s longtime business partner. “It was very, very popular and sort of opened people’s eyes to what could be done with a documentary,” Noxon said. “It was groundbreaking for its time.”

A look inside Medical researchers had been making inroads in taking pictures inside the human body — such as sending cameras into the digestive system or taking microphotographs of blood — but Rosten was perhaps the first “to collect all that data and put it together” for public viewing, Noxon said. “The Incredible Machine” remained the highest-rated show in the Public Broadcasting Service’s history until 1982. It was nominated for an Academy Award, the second of two nominations that Rosten received. “The Wolf Men,” a 1969 documentary that he produced about the hunting of timber wolves in North America, also was nominated. Rosten would go on to create such programming as “Mysteries of the Mind,” an Emmywinning documentary for PBS about the human brain, and “Elephant,” one of many projects that featured animals.

‘Catching up’

Roads Continued from B1 Detours will be available when the intersection at Northeast 27th Street and U.S. Highway 20 is under construction. And construction continues south of Bend on U.S. Highway 97, where crews have been working on the expansion of the highway near Sunriver. Between Lava Butte and South Century Drive, crews will continue to work along the west

Trap Continued from B1 Close-up photographs of the trap reveal significant rust, indicating that the trap was old. Based on the information he was given about this particular case, George said there was a strong chance this particular trap was set illegally. Though no one who saw the raccoon could say with certainty where the animal first encountered the trap, both Johansson and the veterinarian who later treated him said the animal was in such bad shape it couldn’t have traveled far. Johansson said the closest wild area was more than a half mile away. “(The jaws of the trap) went right through this animal’s arm ... ,” said Deb LaPaugh, a veterinarian at LaPaw Animal Hospital in Bend, who volunteered her time to operate on the raccoon’s leg. “A child could lose hands, feet, toes or fingers. If they put their face in there, it could cause a lot of damage. It’s a bad trap,” LaPaugh said. Steve Esselstyn, community liaison for the Bend Police, said that this was the first case he’d heard of in years that involved an animal caught by a leghold trap in a residential neighborhood. “The claw traps are extremely dangerous,” Esselstyn said. “One of the reasons some of the larger claw traps were outlawed is that

side of the highway near Cottonwood Road. Drivers are asked to be careful, as trucks hauling rock are entering and exiting the highway throughout the area. The new access road to Lava River Cave at the Cottonwood Road interchange is open Wednesdays through Sundays, but is closed Mondays and Tuesdays so crews can get the road ready for paving. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

The rising popularity of documentaries in the early 1960s “was simply a question of television catching up with the public,” Rosten told the Los Angeles Times in 1963 as he cited the popularity of nonfiction books and magazines. In the 1960s, Rosten worked for David L. Wolper, a major independent producer of documentaries, and made a number of National Geographic specials. They included an early Jacques Cousteau documentary and another about the grizzly bear.

What to do if you find an injured wild animal Do not approach or pick up the animal. Approaching a wild animal could cause injury to you or the animal, according to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Raccoons in Central Oregon are also likely to be suffering from or exposed to distemper, a condition that can’t be transmitted to humans, but that can cause strange or unnatural behavior. Finally, be aware that many times baby animals are “rescued” when in fact their real parents may be nearby, but hiding from humans, according to Kimberly Farasyn, wildlife rehabilitation provider.

AGENCIES YOU CAN CALL Oregon State Police (in charge of enforcing wildlife regulations): 541-617-0617 Bend Police, nonemergency dispatch (ask for animal control): 541-693-6911 Oregon Fish and Wildlife, Bend office: 541-388-6363 If you think an animal needs medical attention, you can also call veterinarian Deb LaPaugh of LaPaw Animal Hospital or Kimberly Farasyn, who runs an animal rehab facility. LaPaw Animal Hospital: 541-389-3902 Kimberly Farasyn’s animal rehabilitation: 541-548-3906

they were hurting people.” No people were injured in the incident on May 10, but Johansson and LaPaugh said they worried that a child could be severely injured if he or she came across such a trap. “An adult would have major trauma and could lose something,” LaPaugh said, “just not as much as a child. A child’s bones are softer, and they have smaller limbs.” Johansson said she called a number of people before finally getting in touch with LaPaugh.

Officer Crea Lancaster of the Bend Police Department also responded to Johansson’s calls, and both arrived in Johansson’s backyard around the same time, Johannson said. Upon tranquilizing the animal, LaPaugh realized how the raccoon had become stuck on the fence. The chain meant to hold the trap in place had broken, and when the animal climbed Johansson’s fence, the chain became caught between two planks. “It was traumatized and in

When “Grizzly” was nominated for an Emmy, Rosten’s friends and colleagues placed an ad in Variety that his family said included this disclaimer: “This space paid for by the admirers of Irwin Rosten, a modest man who cannot be trusted to blow his own horn.” He was born in 1924 in Brooklyn to immigrants from Russia and Poland who owned a drugstore. After working for the DuMont Network in New York, Rosten moved to Los Angeles in 1954 and joined CBS affiliate KNXT. One of his highly regarded projects was “Thou Shalt Not Kill,” a 1958 documentary that examined capital punishment. Writing in 1959, the Times’ Cecil Smith described Rosten as a “young man with magic in his pen.” Two years later, he moved to KTBC-TV to become a writerproducer of documentaries and special programs. One of his final documentaries for the station was 1963’s “Split Image,” which was about Camarillo State Hospital’s patient-operated closed-circuit TV. While working for Wolper, Rosten met Noxon, and the pair eventually jumped to MGM and set up the studio’s documentary unit. Their first venture was a 1968 documentary on Clark Gable. As early as 1963, the Times referred to Rosten and Noxon as “one of the finest young teams of documentary makers.” Rosten was known for mentoring others and was a terrific cook — Chinese food was a specialty, said his son, Peter, a former movie and TV producer.

World travel The elder Rosten traveled the world in pursuit of his subjects, going to Japan to film parts of the 1970s National Geographic specials “Gold” or to Russia to record “The Volga” about the major European river. As was often the case, Rosten returned with a story that amused him. A Soviet news agency official had proposed arm-wrestling to decide whether a Soviet or American film crew would be used on “The Volga.” Rosten’s heftier National Geographic colleague took the challenge, but the match ended in a draw. Crews from each country were used. In addition to his son, Peter, of Darby, Mont., Rosten is survived by his wife of 23 years, Marilyn Ryan.

pain,” LaPaugh said. She said Officer Lancaster helped her to get the tranquilized 1-year-old, 19-pound raccoon down from the fence. She then took the animal to her facility, LaPaw Animal Hospital, and operated on its leg. LaPaugh estimates that the care she gave the raccoon would have cost a paying client about $1,400. Though LaPaugh welcomes donations to the wildlife-care fund she keeps, she said she would do the work anyway. “This is something I’m willing to do,” she said. “Typically every spring, we get a handful of baby raccoons and hawks. We just got eight baby ducklings, a young rabbit that got bit by a dog and a gosling that got hit by a car.” All these animals are doing well now, LaPaugh said. “It’s a life, and part of the reason I got into medicine is to save lives. Sometimes they are so bad that we can’t help, and we’ll put them to sleep, but more often than not, we can help,” she said. Once the raccoon was eating and she knew it would survive, LaPaugh sent the animal to Kimberly Farasyn, who lives in the Terrebonne area and is a licensed wildlife rehabilitation provider. “He’s doing much better,” Farasyn said by phone on Thursday. “I have a pen specifically built for raccoons, so they can climb and get their exercise. He chews the sutures off of course, but you can’t prevent that with an adult raccoon,” she said. “He’s

Weather Continued from B1 Tuesday is expected to be mostly cloudy in the morning before clearing up a bit, with high temperatures expected to reach between 64 and 69 degrees. Overnight temperatures are expected to cool to between 39 and 47 degrees with a 20 percent chance of showers and light winds. Wednesday and Thursday will get a bit of warming, with mostly cloudy skies and a chance of showers, but temperatures are expected to top out in the mid- to high 60s during the day. Nightly low temperatures will likely be between 44 and 50 degrees. On Friday, expect more clouds and a chance of showers, with high temperatures steady in the high 60s and overnight lows in the high 40s. Saturday is expected to bring more cloudy weather, with highs between 66 and 72 degrees. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Planting Continued from B1 Brenda Chilcott works as the senior center’s program coordinator, and said Greg had been organized and easy to work with. Greg kept a notebook with all the details of the project, said his mother, Julie Shipman. “Greg has really pulled it together,” she said. “It’s really intense.” The stone blocks, Chilcott said, were purchased with a donation in memory of Raymond Hamley. Hamley was a regular at the senior center who died in September. In the past, seniors have used the raised beds to plant flowers, but this year Chilcott said they’ll be converted to a vegetable garden. Gardening is a popular activity for many of the center’s visitors, particularly for those who once had gardens but gave them up when they moved to assisted-living facilities or downsized to apartments. “Maybe they used to garden when they were younger,” she said of the senior center visitors. “I hope they’ll sprout new friendships. In this economy, every time you can get something for a little less it’s great, so we can extend people’s food pantries, and the extra will go to senior meals.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

To donate Wildlife rehab: Kimberly Farasyn accepts cash donations but said she is also in need of some specific supplies. Seeds from Petco, gift certificates to Wild Birds Unlimited and paper towels for cleaning out cages are especially appreciated. Mail any donations to P.O. Box 807, Terrebonne 97760. Medical care for wildlife: Deb LaPaugh accepts cash donations from $5 to $100 for her wildlife care fund. Make the check out to LaPaw Animal Hospital, 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite G, Bend 97702.

perked up a little bit and is eating. I’m sure he’ll be able to be rereleased.” Farasyn said LaPaugh was one of only a few veterinarians in the area who regularly offered her services to work on wildlife. Like LaPaugh, Farasyn receives no payment for the work she does with injured birds and small mammals. “Every creature on this earth deserves a chance as far as I’m concerned,” Farasyn said. “My mom raised me this way. It’s just a respect. They have just as much of a right to have a chance at life.” Lillian Mongeau can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at lmongeau@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 31

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western



Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

65/49

63/45

69/47

53/36

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

69/50

63/40

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

70/45

Camp Sherman 60/40 Redmond Prineville 67/43 Cascadia 66/44 66/44 Sisters 63/42 Bend Post 67/43

64/42

64/40

64/39

61/38

Fort Rock

62/40

66/41

58/33

Chemult 61/37

48/33

Vancouver 59/54

Seattle

 City

60/52

Missoula 59/45

Helena

Eugene 64/49

Grants Pass

Bend

73/50



65/42

62/40

Boise

67/43



Idaho Falls



77/58

Elko

67/45

75/45

Reno

Light rain will diminish to scattered showers today.



77/51

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:41 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:25 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:42 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:53 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:43 a.m.

Salt Lake City

65/52

80/60



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Last

June 4

New

First

Full

June 12 June 18 June 26

Monday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 59/49/0.07 . . . . . 58/51/sh. . . . . . 59/53/sh Baker City . . . . . . 63/28/0.00 . . . . . 62/44/sh. . . . . . 65/45/sh Brookings . . . . . . 64/47/0.00 . . . . . 56/50/sh. . . . . . 58/49/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 65/31/0.00 . . . . . 65/41/sh. . . . . . 66/46/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 69/49/0.00 . . . . . 64/49/sh. . . . . . 67/53/sh Klamath Falls . . . 71/34/0.00 . . . . . . 61/40/c. . . . . . . 63/42/c Lakeview. . . . . . . 64/30/0.00 . . . . . . 64/41/c. . . . . . . 63/39/c La Pine . . . . . . . . 70/35/0.00 . . . . . 62/39/sh. . . . . . 63/40/sh Medford . . . . . . . 77/45/0.00 . . . . . 69/51/sh. . . . . . . 72/51/c Newport . . . . . . . 66/50/0.00 . . . . . 57/50/sh. . . . . . 58/52/sh North Bend . . . . . . 64/48/NA . . . . . 55/51/sh. . . . . . 59/53/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 71/39/0.00 . . . . . 72/53/sh. . . . . . 73/50/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 69/41/0.00 . . . . . 71/49/sh. . . . . . 73/50/sh Portland . . . . . . . 63/52/0.01 . . . . . 64/53/sh. . . . . . . 68/55/c Prineville . . . . . . . 68/38/0.00 . . . . . 66/44/sh. . . . . . 68/47/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 71/40/0.00 . . . . . 65/39/sh. . . . . . 68/44/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 73/50/0.00 . . . . . . 64/50/c. . . . . . . 67/54/c Salem . . . . . . . . . 70/52/0.00 . . . . . 65/50/sh. . . . . . 67/53/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 68/40/0.00 . . . . . 63/42/sh. . . . . . 65/44/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 71/51/0.00 . . . . . 70/52/sh. . . . . . 72/53/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 in 1984 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.36” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 1974 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.87” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.95” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.38” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.99 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.57 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:29 a.m. . . . . . .6:28 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:43 a.m. . . . . .11:20 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:26 a.m. . . . . . .1:24 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:27 a.m. . . . . . .2:22 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:05 p.m. . . . . . .2:37 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:27 a.m. . . . . . .2:27 p.m.

1

LOW

67 47

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered rain showers. HIGH

66 48

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 54/34

Christmas Valley 61/34

Crater Lake

Showers and perhaps a few thunderstorms will be likely over much of the Northwest.

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 78° Medford • 28° Baker City

FRIDAY Cloudy, light rain.

65 49

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

Silver Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

69/49

Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Expect cloudy skies with periods of light rain.

LOW

66 47

Portland

64/41

62/39

HIGH

64/53

Burns

La Pine



LOW

THURSDAY

Cloudy, light rain.

NORTHWEST

65/40

Brothers

WEDNESDAY Mostly cloudy, very isolated showers.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, very isolated showers.

43

Paulina

65/41

Sunriver

55/31

Mostly cloudy with occasional light rain showers. Central

69/49 68/48

Oakridge Elk Lake

Today: Mostly cloudy, scattered rain showers.

67

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

TUESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 1 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . . 80-130 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 59/54

S

S

Calgary 54/34

S

Saskatoon 45/36

Seattle 60/52

S Winnipeg 53/40

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 78/60

Halifax 65/46 Thunder Bay Portland (in the 48 62/48 Portland 65/52 contiguous states): Billings To ronto Green Bay 64/53 Boston 81/61 69/45 75/56 St. Paul Boise 74/58 Buffalo Rapid City 79/57 Detroit 73/50 • 104° 81/64 New York 78/52 84/65 Indio, Calif. 83/67 Des Moines Philadelphia Cheyenne 83/60 Chicago 90/71 79/48 • 21° 78/59 Omaha San Francisco Big Piney, Wyo. Salt Lake 82/62 Columbus Washington, D. C. 65/52 St. Louis City 82/66 Las 92/72 86/66 Denver • 1.68” 80/60 Kansas City Vegas 80/55 Louisville Greenville, S.C. 81/64 96/71 Charlotte 85/67 84/66 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 88/61 73/59 90/67 84/67 Phoenix Atlanta Little Rock 100/71 Honolulu 89/69 Birmingham 80/67 86/72 Dallas Tijuana 84/68 96/73 76/56 New Orleans 88/72 Orlando Houston 89/71 93/73 Chihuahua 92/62 Miami 89/77 Monterrey La Paz 91/70 94/62 Mazatlan Anchorage 87/68 65/50 Juneau 69/50 Bismarck 72/44

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .94/68/0.00 . 93/69/pc . . 93/71/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .86/56/0.00 . . .86/63/t . . . .82/57/t Albany. . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . . .78/59/t Albuquerque. . . .86/54/0.00 . 88/61/pc . . 87/58/pc Anchorage . . . . .72/49/0.00 . 65/50/pc . . 61/46/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .83/67/1.06 . . .80/67/t . . . .83/67/t Atlantic City . . . .87/66/0.02 . 84/67/pc . . . .83/67/t Austin . . . . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . 94/70/pc . . 91/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .92/71/t . . . .84/66/t Billings. . . . . . . . .66/42/0.00 . . .69/45/c . . . .66/47/t Birmingham . . . .77/67/0.77 . . .84/68/t . . . .85/70/t Bismarck . . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . 72/44/pc . . 66/46/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . . .70/49/t Boston. . . . . . . . .82/65/0.00 . 74/58/pc . . . .74/63/t Bridgeport, CT. . .86/61/0.00 . 75/61/pc . . . .74/64/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .81/64/t . . . .79/59/t Burlington, VT. . .73/55/0.00 . 79/63/pc . . . .78/58/t Caribou, ME . . . .67/53/0.00 . . .65/47/s . . . .66/51/t Charleston, SC . .86/69/0.00 . 83/72/pc . . . .84/73/t Charlotte. . . . . . .86/64/0.01 . . .84/66/t . . . .85/66/t Chattanooga. . . .82/66/1.68 . . .83/67/t . . . .85/67/t Cheyenne . . . . . .63/38/0.00 . 79/48/pc . . 78/48/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . .78/59/t . . 82/61/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .81/67/t . . 84/62/pc Cleveland . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . 80/61/pc Colorado Springs 69/49/0.00 . . .77/48/c . . 84/51/pc Columbia, MO . .86/67/0.00 . . .83/64/t . . 87/68/pc Columbia, SC . . .87/68/0.00 . . .85/68/t . . . .87/67/t Columbus, GA. . .82/66/0.58 . . .84/68/t . . . .87/69/t Columbus, OH. . .87/62/0.00 . . .82/66/t . . 83/62/pc Concord, NH . . . .79/57/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . . .76/57/t Corpus Christi. . .89/71/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . 90/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .99/73/0.00 . 96/73/pc . . . 95/75/s Dayton . . . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .80/65/t . . 82/62/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . 86/54/pc Des Moines. . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .83/60/s . . . .86/62/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .85/60/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . . 79/60/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .72/49/0.00 . 71/49/pc . . 72/44/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .95/65/0.00 . 97/67/pc . . . .92/64/t Fairbanks. . . . . . .76/58/0.00 . 79/52/pc . . 73/49/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .69/57/0.10 . 76/47/pc . . 67/48/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .74/29/0.00 . . .77/37/s . . . 73/36/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .88/64/0.00 . . .78/58/t . . 80/56/pc Green Bay. . . . . .87/55/0.00 . 75/56/pc . . 78/54/pc Greensboro. . . . .85/68/0.00 . . .87/68/t . . . .83/67/t Harrisburg. . . . . .87/62/0.00 . . .91/68/t . . . .85/64/t Hartford, CT . . . .84/61/0.00 . 82/62/pc . . . .79/61/t Helena. . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . .62/40/sh . . . .64/42/t Honolulu . . . . . . .85/73/0.01 . . .86/72/s . . . 85/72/s Houston . . . . . . .94/73/0.00 . 93/73/pc . . 93/74/pc Huntsville . . . . . .84/69/0.56 . . .84/67/t . . 87/67/pc Indianapolis . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .81/65/t . . 85/63/pc Jackson, MS . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .89/70/t . . . .91/69/t Madison, WI . . . .89/60/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . 81/62/pc Jacksonville. . . . .87/70/0.10 . . .87/69/t . . . .89/70/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .69/48/0.00 . 69/50/pc . . . .59/45/r Kansas City. . . . .88/65/0.00 . . .81/64/t . . 87/70/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .87/61/0.00 . . .79/59/t . . 81/57/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .90/63/0.00 . . .96/71/s . . . 92/71/s Lexington . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . . .84/63/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .73/65/0.00 . 83/62/pc . . 88/63/pc Little Rock. . . . . .89/69/0.00 . . .89/69/t . . 91/69/pc Los Angeles. . . . .74/57/0.00 . 73/59/pc . . 69/58/pc Louisville . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . .85/67/t . . 87/65/pc Memphis. . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .88/72/t . . 91/72/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/78/t Milwaukee . . . . .89/58/0.00 . 72/57/pc . . 78/62/pc Minneapolis . . . .80/68/0.01 . 79/57/pc . . . .80/56/t Nashville . . . . . . .84/66/0.13 . . .84/67/t . . 89/69/pc New Orleans. . . .88/72/2.74 . . .88/72/t . . . .89/74/t New York . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . 83/67/pc . . . .80/66/t Newark, NJ . . . . .87/68/0.00 . 84/68/pc . . . .85/66/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .88/68/0.21 . 91/73/pc . . . .88/70/t Oklahoma City . .92/66/0.00 . . .90/67/t . . . 92/70/s Omaha . . . . . . . .79/65/0.00 . 82/62/pc . . 88/64/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .90/73/t Palm Springs. . .102/66/0.00 . .100/68/s . . . 96/67/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .80/61/t . . 83/63/pc Philadelphia . . . .87/70/0.08 . 90/71/pc . . . .85/68/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .97/68/0.00 . .100/71/s . . . 97/69/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .85/65/t . . . .81/57/t Portland, ME. . . .77/58/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . . .64/55/t Providence . . . . .82/61/0.00 . 76/59/pc . . . .78/65/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . 88/68/pc . . . .85/68/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . 78/52/pc . . . 70/50/c Savannah . . . . . 85/70/trace . . .84/69/t . . . .86/70/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .79/44/0.00 . 77/51/pc . . 77/50/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .57/42/0.03 . .60/52/sh . . . 64/53/c Richmond . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . 91/71/pc . . . .88/69/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .76/57/0.23 . 81/56/pc . . 78/57/pc Rochester, NY . . .83/54/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . . .79/59/t Spokane . . . . . . .66/43/0.01 . .58/47/sh . . 63/47/sh Sacramento. . . . .90/48/0.00 . 82/54/pc . . 82/56/pc Springfield, MO. .83/64/0.00 . . .82/64/t . . 87/66/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . 88/63/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .89/73/0.06 . . .90/74/t . . . .89/74/t Salt Lake City . . .65/40/0.00 . 80/60/pc . . 74/53/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .94/61/0.00 . . .98/66/s . . . 93/62/s San Antonio . . . .89/71/0.00 . . .92/73/s . . 92/75/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . .91/72/t . . 93/73/pc San Diego . . . . . .67/59/0.00 . 69/58/pc . . 67/60/pc Washington, DC .88/68/0.00 . . .92/72/t . . . .85/66/t San Francisco . . .76/53/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 63/51/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .86/67/0.05 . . .86/66/t . . 90/67/pc San Jose . . . . . . .83/51/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . 72/51/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .70/34/0.00 . .70/46/sh . . 72/50/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 . 82/49/pc . . 82/49/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .99/61/0.00 . .101/67/s . . . 97/68/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .57/50/1.32 . . .64/42/s . . 63/44/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .87/62/0.00 . 86/57/pc . . . 79/54/s Auckland. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 62/44/pc . . . .60/48/t Baghdad . . . . . .102/78/0.00 . .106/81/s . . 111/83/s Bangkok . . . . . . .97/81/0.07 . . .95/79/t . . 93/80/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . 71/54/pc . . 83/62/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . .84/69/s . . . 88/70/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .57/44/sh . . . 61/46/c Bogota . . . . . . . .68/50/0.02 . . .70/53/t . . . .72/54/t Budapest. . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .61/50/sh . . 64/53/sh Buenos Aires. . . .59/50/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . . 59/40/s Cabo San Lucas .90/68/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . . 91/70/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .99/69/s . . 100/72/s Calgary . . . . . . . .46/34/0.32 . .54/34/sh . . 61/36/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .89/78/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . 68/50/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . 61/45/pc . . 63/48/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .64/55/0.29 . . .69/48/s . . 71/50/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . 63/51/pc Hong Kong . . . . .84/79/0.26 . . .84/75/t . . . .86/76/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .85/64/t . . 83/51/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . . .90/64/s . . . 93/65/s Johannesburg . . .54/45/0.00 . .60/45/sh . . . 64/48/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 72/62/pc . . 73/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .87/62/s . . . 89/65/s London . . . . . . . .66/52/0.02 . 65/48/pc . . . 63/48/c Madrid . . . . . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .89/59/s . . . 92/66/s Manila. . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .96/82/t . . . .95/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .111/84/0.00 . .107/79/s . . 113/85/s Mexico City. . . . .88/61/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . 81/58/s Montreal. . . . . . .72/59/0.01 . 79/62/pc . . . 71/53/c Moscow . . . . . . .70/55/0.19 . 73/54/pc . . . .75/55/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 75/58/pc . . 77/59/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . 87/74/pc . . . 88/75/s New Delhi. . . . .102/80/0.00 . .110/85/s . . 108/82/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . 68/52/pc . . 66/51/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . 61/42/pc . . . 60/41/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .79/61/t . . . 70/52/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .64/55/0.04 . 68/49/pc . . . 71/50/c Rio de Janeiro. . .88/64/0.00 . .81/64/sh . . . 78/65/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . . 74/57/s Santiago . . . . . . .66/39/0.03 . . .65/37/s . . 65/36/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .71/55/s . . . 70/54/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . 68/45/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .74/53/s . . 68/49/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 78/62/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .90/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . .60/45/c . . . 62/46/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .66/54/sh . . 64/55/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . 86/73/pc . . . .82/74/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .84/67/s . . . 85/68/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .61/55/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 63/49/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .81/61/t . . . 72/52/c Vancouver. . . . . .57/50/0.15 . . .59/54/r . . 63/52/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .68/57/0.05 . 67/47/pc . . 68/48/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . .58/45/sh . . 60/41/sh


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GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

Drug-addled drama “Nurse Jackie” takes masterful turn in new episode tonight, Page C2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

What qualifies as a green job? State is asking By studying occupations, economist aims to distinguish any meaningful differences By David Holley The Bulletin

To land a job as a civil engineer, it’s safe to say there are stringent job requirements, such as knowledge of the field, a master’s degree and an ability to understand technical information, among others. A state economist is now studying what additional abilities, if any, an engineer might need if he or she wants to be considered a green civil engineer. As part of a $1.25 million federal grant, the Oregon Employment Department is examining 13 occupations that boast green jobs — jobs that essentially promote sustainability — in order to study what skills and wage requirements one needs for a green job versus a non-green one. “Our goal is to find out if there’s actually any difference between the two,” said Charlie

Johnson, Oregon’s green economist who is heading the project. “The primary goal for the 13 occupations is to learn more about the skills and education requirements (for green jobs).” During the next year, Johnson and a research analyst will be interviewing and job shadowing people in the 13 occupations — both people who technically have green jobs and those who don’t — to gather data. That data will be published online as it’s discovered, and eventually disseminated at the college level, in hopes of making sure community colleges, primarily, are providing students the skills they need to land green jobs. One tangible result of the research will be the development of a green section for the website www.mypathcareers.org, a part of WorkSource Oregon. See Green jobs / C6

GREEN

Green job growth Two Northwest research firms published a study in October 2008, “Carbon-free Prosperity: 2025,” which provided projections of job growth in Oregon and Washington for five green fields during the next two decades. The study provided estimates for medium growth and accelerated growth, and was cited by a legislatively mandated green job growth plan developed by a statewide Green Jobs Council.

Growth areas Medium growth indicated by dark color; accelerated growth by light color 30K

Solar PV manufacturing Wind power development Green building design Bioenergy Smart grid

25K 20K 15K 10K 5K 0

2008 (CURRENT)

2010

2015

2020

2025

Sources: Climate Solutions and Clean Edge study, “Carbon-free Prosperity: 2025,” page 22 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sunriver resident and application developer Richard Luebke has worked in mobile app development for the past two years and says his iPad runs mobile apps similarly to the iPhone. With his Portland-based partners in Infinity Softworks, Luebke has developed a few successful apps, such as powerOne, a finance calculator with “almost 60 finance, real estate, investment and conversion calculators,” according to the product’s website. The app can be purchased on iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, BlackBerry, Palm and Windows Mobile.

What does it take to develop a killer application? By David Holley The Bulletin

here may be an iPhone app for nearly everything, as the slogan goes, but one app will likely never be created: an app for building applications. For locals hoping to take the next big technological step by developing an app — either for their own enjoyment, to sell or for their business — there is a big learning curve, unless you’re already familiar with software development, according to mobile application developers. Developing an app isn’t impossible if you’ve never programmed any kind of computer software before, said Matt Stoker, a University

T

of Utah Ph.D. student in computer engineering who teaches a class at the university about building apps. “It’s not the place for a programmer to start,” however, said Stoker, 26, adding that “iPhone applications, if they’re done properly, are more difficult (to develop) than desktop applications.” Stoker said it’s people’s creativity that fosters the variety of applications in Apple’s App Store, from video games to financial planners. He thinks no one will develop an application that builds apps for the technologically illiterate, because it would only be able to build the simplest of devices. That’s why Tom Fristoe, owner of Bend-based TeamUnify, a website

OTECH

that manages data on other websites for swim teams, went looking for help when he wanted an app that would collaborate with his Internet software. Though Fristoe is himself computer savvy, he said it would cost more money to invest the time learning the software necessary to develop on Apple’s iPhone or iPad operating system than to outsource the development. In 2008, Fristoe hired a company, California-based PlanV Software, for about $2,000 to $3,000 a month for five months to build a prototype of the iPhone app, OnDeck. With a prototype in hand last year, Fristoe hired a full-time employee who has experience creating apps to further develop it. The company shipped a new version of OnDeck to Apple last week. See Apps / C6

Nanofiber’s promise: charging your gadgets using just body motion By Tiffany Hsu Los Angeles Times

BERKELEY, Calif. — Need juice for a dying iPod? You may soon be able to plug the gadget into a shirt, dance the electric slide and be good to go. Researchers at the University of CaliforniaBerkeley are perfecting microscopic fibers that can produce electricity from simple body motions such as bending, stretching and twisting. The filaments, which resemble tiny fishing lines, may soon be woven into clothing and sold as the ultimate portable generators. It could take three years or more before it hits the store shelves, but the technology is already being hailed as a breakthrough. The so-called nanofibers “will have very significant implications,” said Mihail Roco, senior adviser for nanotechnology with the National Science Foundation, which recently gave a $350,000 grant to the project. In addition to helping reduce electricity demands on local utilities, new industries could spring up to manufacture the tiny personal generators, he said. See Nanofibers / C3

SCIENCE

How small are the fibers? At roughly 500 nanometers thick, a strand is barely noticeable to the human eye. It’s one-tenth the width of a cloth fiber and onehundredth the width of a human hair. It would take about 100,000 fibers to produce enough power for an electrical watch and 1 million fibers to generate enough current to power an iPod. But a bundle of 1 million fibers would be only about the size of a grain of sand.


T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Combat medic’s choice wins praise, veneration

The shaky wonder of ‘Nurse Jackie’ By Mary McNamara

Edie Falco, star of “Nurse Jackie,” plays the character as an addict’s addict. She’s smart, she’s efficient and she lies to everyone. Tonight’s episode brilliantly explores the paradox of control in an addict’s life.

Los Angeles Times

DEAR ABBY also call Military OneSource at 800-342-9647. There are mental health people standing by 24/7 to help. — A Brother Medic in Iowa Dear Abby: The family of that wounded soldier needs to know that his last act of courage probably saved more than one life that day by allowing Doc to move on and treat others who could be saved. They should salute their family member and the actions of the medic. Historically, military medics go into major battles, generally unarmed, with one purpose: to save the lives of wounded soldiers. They have one of the highest per capita casualty rates in the armed forces. It takes a special person to go into a live battle like that. — Navy Veteran in New Jersey Dear Abby: I am an active duty member, and I would like to offer Doc my support and that of those I work with for his courage in performing his duty in a terrible situation. If I were to be lost in combat, I would want someone like him to be near. His caring for the family of that member is to be commended. They may not understand now, but in time they will come to realize that he did all he could for their son and appreciate that he brought the letter home. Bravo Zulu, Doc! — Tricia in Gulfport, Miss. Dear Readers: On this Memorial Day, let us bless the spirits of those servicemen and women who have sacrificed their lives so that we might live in freedom. — Love, Abby Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

LOS ANGELES — Tommy Gavin, Gregory House, Doug Wilson, Andy Botwin, pretty much the entire character list of “Mad Men,” Jesse Pinkman, Andy Sipowicz, Leo McGarry, a few of the “Desperate Housewives,” many of the “Real Housewives,” Chuck Bass, many of the Walkers, Admiral Adama, Richard Webber, Barney Stinson, Cliff and Norm, Homer Simpson ... across the screen the addicts come and go, talking of Vicodin and Frangelico. But none of them is as good at it as “Nurse Jackie.” When Edie Falco followed up her star turn on “The Sopranos” last year as a pillhoovering super-nurse, she seemed just another manifestation of Showtime’s Very Troubled Mother Syndrome. Every network has a niche, and Showtime’s is damaged parenting. What with the banishments and beheadings, Henry VIII on “The Tudors” may be officially the worst, but it’s the moms who put the show in Showtime. Nancy Botwin on “Weeds,” Tara Gregson on “The United States of Tara” and Jackie Peyton are all compelling arguments in the network’s thesis: Being a mother can make a woman crazy. But while Nancy (MaryLouise Parker) and Tara (Toni Colette) are haloed by a fairy-tale outlandishness — Parker’s is an internal luminescence, Colette’s relies more on costume changes — Jackie is laudably, inescapably, skincrawlingly real. With her unblinking lemur eyes and calculating ways, Falco’s Jackie is an addict’s addict. She is smart, she is efficient, and she lies to everyone. Although she is eternally self-justifying, there are times you can practically smell the

Showtime via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

chemically aided anxiety rising off her. She divides her life into neat little compartments just like she tucks her day’s meds into her handy dental floss container. In Season 1, this multilayered creation of Liz Brixius, Evan Dunsky and Linda Wallem was presented as a pharmaceutically fueled wonder nurse, smarter than the average doctor, by turns acid-tongued and soft-hearted with patients, capable of coaxing insurance coverage where none existed and lying straight-faced to her boss to cover any mistake made by herself or her colleagues. She had a quiet affair with the hospital pharmacist (until he got fired) who was happy to hand her a few Oxys for her “back problem.” At home, she was one of those straight-talking moms, abrupt with her affection but loving and genuinely concerned about her older daughter’s anxiety and her handsome husband’s

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happiness. As we head toward the end of Season 2, things have gotten a little messier, as they are wont to do in television and addiction. The lies began to fray at the edges, and life wouldn’t stay in those little compartments no matter how many times she neatened or rearranged them. Pharmacist Eddie (Paul Schulze) did not go gently when he realized the affair did not transcend his employment status and became friends with husband Kevin (Dominic Fumusa), which was easy enough since Kevin’s a bartender. Jackie’s older daughter Grace (Ruby Jerins) has issues that can’t be explained away by the word “phase,” newly

‘Nurse Jackie’ When: 10 tonight Where: Showtime

sober nurse Sam (Arjun Gupta) seemed intent on nailing Jackie to a 12-step program, while even her friends Dr. Eleanor O’Hara (Eve Best) and nurse Zoe (Merritt Wever) began to connect the dots. Through it all, Falco has been riveting to watch because, unlike so many of her male TV counterparts, she is neither morose nor jovial, neither a Eugene O’Neill character nor Falstaffian. Unlike House, say, or Tommy Gavin (“Rescue Me”), she isn’t attempting to blur the pain or find small doses of oblivion — like any good working mom, she’s a multitasking addict, juggling speed and opiates to find the fuel to take her through the day without the sideeffect of making her want to rip the skin right off her face. Any woman who’s had a third glass of Chardonnay or the second half of a Xanax to take the edge off those diet pills can certainly understand. Tonight’s episode is a gorgeous, nerve-rattling example of the paradox of control in an addict’s life. On a much-needed road trip with her family, Jackie misplaces her stash and the subsequent portrait of a woman able to effectively manipulate the situation while suffering an internal breakdown, not to mention withdrawal, is nothing short of a masterpiece.

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Dear Abby: I had to write regarding “Doc in Distress” (March 26), who allowed a critically wounded comrade to push him away so he could save others. I spent eight years as a combat medic in the Army. As hard as it is to hear, that person acted precisely as he was trained. Training in mass casualty situations — triage — dictates that immediate care be given to those who are most likely to survive. Those who are identified as “expectant” are to be treated last. The purpose is to successfully treat the greatest number of people. Putting his energy into trying to save someone who would possibly die anyway could have resulted in even more fatalities. Unfortunately, nothing anyone can say or do will reduce the guilt he feels. “Playing God” is never easy, and many medics have wondered if they would be able to do it. — Kimberly in Southern California Dear Kimberly: Thank you for writing. I have been flooded with mail from medics from all branches of the military, from World War II, Korea, Vietnam and the current combat zones, offering support for Doc. I wish I could print them all. Read on for a sample: Dear Abby: I know his pain. I served in Iraq as a combat medic and watched friends die as I tried to help everyone I could. I still have nightmares and flashbacks. However, with treatment they are now under control. I want Doc to understand that what he did was right. The soldier knew he was going to die no matter what was done. He gave his life for his team and his country. Doc needs to understand that this soldier’s family is grieving and took it out on the person who just happened to be there. I urge Doc to go to a mental health officer on base or to his local vet center for help. He can

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Chicago Blackhawks ’ (Live) Å KOIN Local 6 at 5 News KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News (5:01) Judge Judy Inside Edition ABC World News Be a Millionaire America’s Funniest Home Videos Two/Half Men Two/Half Men According to Jim Malcolm-Mid. The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff This Old House Nightly Business NHL Hockey Philadelphia Flyers at Chicago Blackhawks ’ (Live) Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å King of Queens King of Queens Daisy Cooks! Thai Cooking Steves Europe Smart Travels Wolf: Travels Steves Europe This Old House Nightly Business

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Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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The Bachelorette Ali experiences car trouble on a date. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:02) True Beauty (N) ‘14’ Å KATU News at 11 To Be Announced News How I Met Engagement Two/Half Men Big Bang Theory (10:01) CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å News The Bachelorette Ali experiences car trouble on a date. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:02) True Beauty (N) ‘14’ Å Inside Edition Lie to Me Tractor Man ‘14’ Å The Good Guys Pilot ’ ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ King of the Hill News Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å Oregon Exp American Experience ’ ‘G’ American Masters ’ ‘PG’ Å NW Backroads Inside Edition The Biggest Loser ’ ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Å News One Tree Hill ’ ‘PG’ Å Gossip Girl The Freshman ‘14’ Å Married... With Married... With Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Hometime ‘G’ Gardenstory Sewing-Nancy Dewberry Shw Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Daisy Cooks! Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å Oregon Exp American Experience ’ ‘G’ American Masters ’ ‘PG’ Å

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Hoarders Augustine ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Judi and Gail ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Julie and Shannon ‘PG’ Hoarders Michelle & Kim (N) ‘PG’ Hoarders (N) Å Obsessed Nidia; Rick ‘PG’ Å 130 28 8 32 Hoarders Janet; Christina ‘PG’ Å ›› “Heartbreak Ridge” (1986, War) Clint Eastwood, Marsha Mason, Everett McGill. Marine sergeant sees ex-wife, readies recruits ››› “Courage Under Fire” (1996) Denzel (5:15) ››› “The Big Red One” (1980, War) Lee Marvin, Mark Hamill, Robert Carradine. A veteran leads his battalion of young 102 40 39 troops into battle. Å for Grenada. Washington, Meg Ryan. Å River Monsters Congo Killer ’ ‘14’ River Monsters Alaskan Horror ‘PG’ River Monsters ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters Hidden Predator ‘PG’ River Monsters Demon Fish ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters Hidden Predator ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 River Monsters Death Ray ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ 137 44 World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ World’s Strictest Parents ’ ›› “Footloose” (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer, John Lithgow. ’ ›› “Footloose” (1984) Kevin Bacon, Lori Singer. ’ 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ’ American Greed ID thieves. Escape From Havana ››› “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room” (2005, Documentary) Til Debt-Part Paid Program Paid Program 51 36 40 52 One Nation, Overweight Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) ›› “Beerfest” (2006) Jay Chandrasekhar. Brothers play beer games in Germany. Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:30) ›› “National Lampoon’s Van Wilder” (2002) The Buzz Bend City Edition PM Edition Visions of NW Talk of the Town Local issues. Cooking Outdoorsman Trading Desk RSN Movie Night PM Edition Deschutes Cty. 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Deadliest Catch Sea Tested ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Arctic Quest ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch False Pass ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Arctic Quest ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Breaking ’Em In ‘14’ Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NBA Fastbreak SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. 2009 World Series of Poker 2009 World Series of Poker Main Event, from Las Vegas. Baseball Tonight NASCAR Now Å College Lacrosse NCAA Tournament, Final: Teams TBA 22 24 21 24 Basketball PBA Bowling 1985 Austin Open PBA Bowling PBA Bowling AWA Wrestling Å Boxing Boxing: 1961 Clay vs. Johnson 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 2003 Brown vs. Lamontagne ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 ››› “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” (2007, Fantasy) Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint. Å ››› “Freaky Friday” (2003) Jamie Lee Curtis, Lindsay Lohan. Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ›› “The Flintstones” (1994) Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record-Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Challenge The Great Steak Cook-Off Unwrapped Unwrapped Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive-Ins Diner, Drive-In Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners 20 45 28* 26 Best Damn Top 50 Special ››› “Enemy of the State” (1998) Will Smith. Rogue agents hunt a lawyer who has an incriminating tape. ›› “Next” (2007) Nicolas Cage, Jessica Biel. A clairvoyant sees two minutes into the future. ›› “Cruel Intentions” (1999) Sarah Michelle Gellar. 131 Holmes on Homes Rocky Reno ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters My First Sale ‘G’ House Hunters House Hunters Selling New York My First Place 176 49 33 43 Divine Design ‘G’ Get It Sold ‘G’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ America the Story of Us America becomes a global superpower. (N) ‘PG’ American Pickers American Pickers 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ › “Serious Moonlight” (2009) Meg Ryan, Timothy Hutton. Å ››› “Sleepless in Seattle” (1993, Romance-Comedy) Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. Å Will & Grace ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 ›› “In the Land of Women” (2007) Adam Brody, Meg Ryan. Å Caught on Camera Wild Rides Caught on Camera Full Throttle (N) Caught on Camera Collision! Caught on Camera Extreme athletes. Caught on Camera Trapped Caught on Camera 56 59 128 51 Caught on Camera Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Reunion ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å iCarly ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “Big Fat Liar” (2002) Frankie Muniz, Paul Giamatti. Premiere. ’ Å George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 ››› “The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie” (2004, Comedy) ’ Å (7:12) Band of Brothers The Last Patrol ’ ‘MA’ Å (8:40) Band of Brothers Why We Fight ’ ‘MA’ Å (10:08) Band of Brothers Points ’ ‘MA’ Å Band of Brothers 132 31 34 46 Band of Brothers (5:34) Band of Brothers The Breaking Point ‘MA’ Å Stephen King’s The Stand Abigail takes her flock to Colorado. ‘14’ Å Stephen King’s The Stand Flagg orders Nadine to ditch Harold. ‘14’ Å “Children of the Corn: Revelation” 133 35 133 45 Stephen King’s The Stand Survivors of the virus find one another. ‘14’ Change-Nation Mark Chironna Franklin Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone ‘G’ Van Impe Pres Changing-World ››› “Saints and Soldiers” (2003) 205 60 130 The Office ’ ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ (9:15) ››› “Dirty Harry” (1971) Clint Eastwood, Harry Guardino. Premiere. Harry Cal- ›› “Magnum Force” (1973) Clint East››› “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970, War) Clint Eastwood, Telly Savalas, Don Rickles. An American soldier hatches The Eastwood Factor (Premiere) Richard Schickel examines 101 44 101 29 a plan to steal Nazi gold. Å (DVS) the career of Clint Eastwood. lahan uses unorthodox methods to capture a sniper. wood, Hal Holbrook. Premiere. Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Cake Boss: Ultimate Cake Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Invaders ’ ‘14’ Bones Suspects. ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The Man in the Wall ’ ‘14’ Bones The Man on Death Row ‘14’ Saving Grace So Help You God ‘MA’ The Closer Smells Like Murder ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” ›› “Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed” (2004) Freddie Prinze Jr. Adventure Time Misadv. Flapjack Chowder ‘Y7’ 6TEEN (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Dhani Tackles the Globe Brazil ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Loves Raymond ›› “Sister Act” (1992) Whoopi Goldberg, Maggie Smith, Kathy Najimy. 65 47 29 35 Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Sanford and Son Loves Raymond NCIS Bait ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Forced Entry ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Conspiracy Theory ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW Did “The Animal” Batista actually quit WWE? ’ (11:05) Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Light Sleeper ’ ‘PG’ Å Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ Tough Love Couples ’ ‘PG’ Tough Love Couples (N) ’ ‘PG’ Bret Michaels Dad Camp Responsible fathers. ‘14’ Tough, Coup 191 48 37 54 Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:50) ›› “Pearl Harbor” 2001 Ben Affleck. Friends join a war effort after the Japanese attack Hawaii. ‘PG-13’ ›››› “Patton” 1970, Biography George C. Scott. Gen. George S. Patton fights World War II. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:50) ››› “Black Hawk Down” Decision-Dawn After Film School Fox Legacy (6:19) ›››› “Patton” 1970 George C. Scott. Gen. George S. Patton fights World War II. Fox Legacy ›› “Paradise Road” 1997, Drama Glenn Close, Pauline Collins. ‘R’ Å Fox Legacy Mission V.I. Surfing The Daily Habit Insane Cinema: We’re People Too Props Mission V.I. Surfing The Daily Habit Insane Cinema: We’re People Too Bubba’s World Weekly Update Captain & Casey Haney Project Haney Project Haney Project Haney Project The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center Haney Project Haney Project The Golf Fix Golf Fitness Learning Center Valley of Light (5:45) “Front of the Class” (2008, Docudrama) Patricia Heaton, Treat Williams. ‘PG’ Å “The Magic of Ordinary Days” (2005) Keri Russell, Skeet Ulrich. ‘PG’ Å (10:15) ›› “Plainsong” (2004) Aidan Quinn, Rachel Griffiths. ‘PG’ Å (4:30) “Taking Chance” 2009, Drama ››› “The Hangover” 2009 Bradley Cooper. Three pals must ››› “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” 2008, Action Ron Perlman, Selma Blair. Hellboy Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å (10:45) REAL Sports With Bryant Gum- “The Last House on HBO 425 501 425 10 Kevin Bacon. ’ ‘NR’ Å the Left” 2009 bel ’ ‘PG’ Å and his team battle an underworld prince. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ ››› “Tigerland” 2000, Drama Colin Farrell. ‘R’ Å (6:45) ››› “Black Book” 2006, Historical Drama Carice van Houten. ‘R’ Å (9:15) ›› “The Good German” 2006, Drama George Clooney. ‘R’ Å Whitest Kids Henry Rollins IFC 105 105 (3:40) ›› “Fast & ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009, Science Fiction Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox. Sam Witwicky ›› “Terminator Salvation” 2009, Science Fiction Christian Bale. Humanity fights back ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” 2009, Action Hugh Jackman, will.i.am. Wolverine MAX 400 508 7 Furious” 2009 holds the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å against Skynet’s machine army. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å becomes involved with the Weapon X program. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Hooked Caught Bare-Handed ‘PG’ Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Hooked Caught Bare-Handed ‘PG’ Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Hooked Combat Fishing ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Avatar: The Last Airbender ’ ‘Y7’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Dragon Ball Z Kai Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Top Truck Chal Ride to Adv. Destination ATV World Hunt Adv Zumbo Outdrs Western Extreme Best of the West Top Truck Chal Destination Baja Unlimited Roll With It ATV World Ride to Adv. OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie ’ (4:00) ›› “Hart’s War” 2002, War Bruce (6:15) “American Soldiers: A Day in Iraq” 2005, War Curtis Morgan, Jordan Brown. United States of ››› “Brothers at War” 2009, Documentary iTV Premiere. A filmmaker documents his Nurse Jackie (N) ’ United States of SHO 500 500 Tara (N) ’ ‘MA’ Tara ‘MA’ Å iTV. Fedayeen fighters engage U.S. forces in Iraq. ’ ‘R’ Å Willis, Colin Farrell. iTV. ’ ‘R’ brothers’ experiences in Iraq. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Ultimate Factories Caterpillar ‘G’ Fast Track to Fame (N) The Racing Chef NASCAR Ultimate Factories Caterpillar ‘G’ Fast Track to Fame The Racing Chef NASCAR NASCAR Smarts NASCAR Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ››› “Shakespeare in Love” 1998, Romance-Comedy Joseph Fiennes. ’ ‘R’ Å (7:20) ›› “The House Bunny” 2008 Anna Faris. Å ›› “Hancock” 2008 Will Smith. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:35) ›› “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” 2009 Kevin James. STARZ 300 408 300 (5:15) Reversal of Fortune ’ ‘14’ Å (6:25) ›› “Impostor” 2001 Gary Sinise. An agent pursues a › “Saw V” 2008, Horror Tobin Bell, Costas Mandylor. A new (9:35) ›› “Transporter 3” 2008, Action Jason Statham, Natalya Rudakova. Frank ›› “Twilight” 2008 TMC 525 525 scientist suspected of being a clone. ’ ‘PG-13’ disciple carries on the Jigsaw legacy. ’ ‘R’ Å Martin becomes involved with a Ukrainian woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ ’ ‘PG-13’ (4:00) World Extreme Cagefighting World Extreme Cagefighting World Extreme Cagefighting World Extreme Cagefighting VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Adrienne & Debra ‘14’ Bridezillas Debra & Nicole ‘14’ Å Bridezillas Nicole & Kirsten ‘14’ Bridezillas Kirsten & LaJune ‘14’ Bridezillas LaJune & Lacey ‘14’ Bridezillas Lacey & LaDrienna ‘14’ Bridezillas Karen & Ladrienna ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY MEMORIAL DAY READING: A continuous reading of the names, ages and hometowns of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan; free; 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 970-426-9512 or firstamendmentsightings@live.com. FREE DAY FOR MILITARY: Active and retired military members and a guest are admitted free; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and military; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.high desertmuseum.org. TERREBONNE MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 9 a.m.; Terrebonne Pioneer Cemetery, Smith Rock Way, near Smith Rock State Park; 541-389-0775. PRINEVILLE MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Event begins with a parade down Main Street; followed by services; free; 11 a.m.; downtown Prineville; 541-389-0775. REDMOND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 11 a.m.; Redmond Cemetery, Yew Avenue and U.S. Highway 97; 541389-0775. SISTERS MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 11 a.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-389-0775. BEND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Featuring speaker Brig. Gen. Charles Yriarte and an F-15 flyover; followed by a reception at VFW Post 1643; free; 1 p.m.; Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-389-0775. MADRAS MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION: Featuring a barbecue, live music and a ceremony; donations accepted; 1:30 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-350-8009. JIM LEE’S USO SHOW: Listen to music from the 1940s and celebrate veterans; free; 3 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500.

TUESDAY FREE CLOTHES: FreeStoreRedmond donates clothes to those in need; free; 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-508-6262. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-6339637. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Dirty Business,” which explores the true cost of coal power and looks at alternative energy sources; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Open to all varieties of performers; free; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Christopher Wolsko presents “Why Not Gross National Happiness? Contemporary Obstacles to Psychological Well-Being”; the lecture explores what we need to be happy, with a focus on psychology; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100, info@osucascades.edu or www .OSUcascades.edu/lunchtimelectures. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics

from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $25 per team of four; 6:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-388-2192 or www.kurerafund.org. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7260. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. BAKI: The Californiabased alternative artist performs, with Mindscape; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

THURSDAY GOLF BENEFIT: Play 18 holes of golf; must register for tee time; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $49; 6:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-9234653. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Sparrow” by Mary Doria Russell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: R. Gregory Nokes speaks about his book “Massacred for Gold: The Chinese in Hells Canyon”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www.clear1017.fm. THE HELIO SEQUENCE: The Portlandbased electro-rock duo performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $15 plus service charges; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. CLUMSY LOVERS: The Canadian roots-rock band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. SYNRGY: The Northern California-based reggae act performs; $5; 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

FRIDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes a balloon launch and breakfast; free; 6-7:30 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-323-0964 or www.balloonsoverbend.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com. “ANNIE JR.”: Trinity Lutheran School’s theater department presents the Broadway musical about an orphan and her optimistic outlook on life; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850. “THE LARAMIE PROJECT”: The Rever Theatre Company presents the story of a young gay man found tied to a fence outside Laramie, Wyo; $12, $10 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@gmail.com or www.revertheatreco.ticketleap.com. BELLUS VOCIS AND CENTRAL SINGERS: The Central Oregon Community College choirs perform a spring concert, under the direction of James Knox; $6, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-383-7510. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2010 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310 or www.sunrivermusic.org. “INVICTUS”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-4753351 or www.jcld .org. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. HERMAN’S HERMITS STARRING PETER NOONE: The retro musicians perform; ages 21 and older; $20$30; 8 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5 to 9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. TYRONE WELLS: The Californiabased rock/pop musician performs, with Eric Tollefson; $10 plus service charges in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.bendticket.com. WHISKEY REBELLION: The Richmond, Va.-based Americana band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes dozens of hot-air balloons, live music, juggling, face painting, vendors, a night glow in Riverbend Park and more; free; 6 a.m. balloon launch and breakfast in Riverbend Park, 10 a.m. festival opens, 8:30 p.m. night glow; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive; 541-323-0964 or www.balloonsoverbend.com. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; free; 7 a.m.-2 p.m.; 824 N.W. Stonepine Drive, Bend; 541-3882192 or www.kurerafund.org. AGILITY TRIAL: Bend Agility Action Dogs presents a day of dogs navigating obstacle courses; free

for spectators; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-410-4646. UNITARIAN YARD SALE: Buy household goods, books, dishes and more; proceeds benefit the Unitarian Universalists of Central Oregon; free; 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-385-3908 or uufco@ yahoo.com. BENEFIT POKER RIDE: Featuring an auction, tack swap meet, food and poker; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $3 or three cans of food, $6 per hand; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Ghost Rock Ranch, 148800 Beal Road, La Pine; 541-536-1335, swendsens@yahoo.com or www.ghostrockranch.com. HIGH DESERT RHUBARB FESTIVAL: Dutch oven cooking clubs prepare a variety of dishes that include rhubarb; with vendors selling antiques, crafts, rhubarb and more; proceeds benefit St. Charles Foundation and Community Assistance for Neighbors with Cancer; free admission, $1 per sample; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; L & S Gardens and Land Clearing, 50792 S. Huntington Road, La Pine; 541536-2049. MADRAS SATURDAY MARKET: Approximately 30 vendors selling fresh produce, meats and crafts; with live music; free; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-489-3239 or annsnyder@ rconnects.com. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: A sale of gently used items, with a bake sale, cake walk, barbecue and games; proceeds benefit Camp Sunrise; free admission; 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; RedmondSisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-548-7483. LARKSPUR FESTIVAL: Featuring a plant sale, family activities, games, craft and gift sales, live entertainment, dance demonstrations, food and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Larkspur Park, 1700 S.E. Reed Market Road, Bend ; 541-388-1133. STREAM STEWARDSHIP DAY: Join the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council for a day of stewardship activities to keep local rivers and streams healthy; free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-382-6103, kyake@restorethedeschutes.org or www.restorethedeschutes.org. LOCAL FOOD POTLUCK: Bring a dish and enjoy live music, local products and services, and educational material; free; noon-5 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-279-0841. “ANNIE JR.”: Trinity Lutheran School’s theater department presents the Broadway musical about an orphan and her optimistic outlook on life; SOLD OUT; 2 p.m.; Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend; 541-382-1850. “FOOD FIGHT”: A screening of the documentary, followed by a Q&A with director Chris Taylor; proceeds benefit Harvest of Hope and Smart Food Initiative; $5; 2 and 6 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-4808555, aimee@bendeventco.com or www.bendeventco.com. “THE LARAMIE PROJECT”: The Rever Theatre Company presents the story of a young gay man found tied to a fence outside Laramie, Wyo; $12, $10 students and seniors; 2 and 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@gmail.com or www.revertheatreco.ticketleap.com. NATIONAL BEARD AND MUSTACHE CHAMPIONSHIPS: Watch bearded and mustached competitors compete for top honors; $10 plus service charges; 2 p.m. judging begins, 1 p.m. doors open; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; http://beardteamusa.org or www.bendticket.com. BINGO BASH: Play bingo in support of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; ages 18 and older; $65; 3 p.m.; Bingo Benefiting Boys & Girls Clubs, 531 S.W. Elm St., Redmond; 541-526-0182.

M T For Monday, May 31

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) Noon, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 2:30, 5, 8 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 3:05, 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:15, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:15, 7:15 THE SECRET OF KELLS (no MPAA rating) 12:25, 2:55, 5:25, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 8:05, 10:15

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:40 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 2:25, 4:45, 5:15, 7:45, 8:15, 10:35 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:20 a.m., 2, 5:05, 7:35, 10 MACGRUBER (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:15, 9:35 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 2:10, 4:20, 4:50, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Noon, 4, 7:20, 9:30, 10:25 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 10:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:30, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:30, 8, 10:05, 10:40 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 11:10 a.m., 12:05, 1:50, 2:40, 4:30, 5:25, 7, 8:10, 9:40, 10:45 SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3-D (PG) 10:40 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:15, 2:20, 3:50, 5, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold

are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 11 a.m., 2, 5, 8 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 10:15 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 2, 5:30 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) 8:15

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 2:45 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 2:30, 5:15, 8 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 7:30 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 2:15, 5, 7:45 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 1, 3:15, 5:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 4, 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

Nanofibers

Generating electricity from tiny components has been a distant dream for scientists for deContinued from C1 cades, said Roco, who also leads Researchers are envisioning the National Nanotechnology hikers powering up their digi- Initiative. tal cameras while trekking up a “Up until now, there were too mountain or a jogger charging few ways to effectively do this, up her cell phone in mid-run. too far away to really have a disThe Pentagon is hot for it, too: cussion,” he said. “Now, there’s Soldiers would no longer have to finally a technical solution. Now, carry heavy batteries to power people may finally start to think their gear. Along with the Na- more seriously about it.” tional Science Foundation, the Lin’s work builds on several Pentagon’s secretive advanced years of efforts to mix clothing research agency is helping fund and electricity. the project. A team from the Georgia InFor now, the “smart power stitute of Technology developed suit” is still a lab fibers similar experiment, said to Lin’s several UC-Berkeley me- “Up until now, years ago using chanical engi- there were too few synthetic Kevlar neering professor strands coated Liwei Lin, who is ways to effectively with zinc oxide overseeing the de- do this, too far rods. The resultvelopment of the ing filaments, away to really fibers. which look like Lin and his have a discussion. hair rollers, proteam, including duce energy when researchers from Now, there’s rubbed together. Berkeley, Ger- finally a technical Led by profesmany and China, sor Zhong Lin solution. Now, recently were able Wang, the reto demonstrate the people may finally searchers have fibers’ capacity to start to think more also produced harness the enelectrical curergy from minute seriously about it.” rents from fingers body movements. typing on cell Working in a — Mihail Roco, phones, hamsters small, two-room senior adviser for running on exerlab on the Berke- nanotechnology with cise wheels, even ley campus, the the National Science vibrating vocal researchers were Foundation cords. Tiny modable to convert enules could eventuergy from finger ally be implanted motions into electricity using fi- in the human body to harvest enbers attached to a surgical glove. ergy from muscle movement or Lin said the fibers can soak up blood vessels, Wang said. the untapped energy produced But the fibers from Lin’s by the human body, a remark- team are made with organic ably efficient natural generator. matter that can be spun to infiThe more vigorous the motion, nite lengths, while the Georgia the more power can be harvest- strands used inorganic materied, making knees and elbows als and were limited to just a few and other joints prime spots for millimeters in length. the strands. The strands take advantage of piezoelectricity, which produces Economic questions energy through “applied stress,” At rival Stanford Universimilar to the heat generated sity, researchers are developwhen rubbing hands together. ing fabric-based batteries, or Multiple dips in the washing eTextiles, that could potentially machine won’t hurt — the fi- store the energy produced at bers are flexible and resistant to UC-Berkeley. heat and chemicals. They’re also Ordinary cloth becomes resmall enough to blend unobtru- chargeable batteries and capacisively into most garments. tors when immersed in a special And static shouldn’t be a prob- ink formula and then oven-dried. lem, Lin said. A piece weighing about an ounce The filaments are made from can retain up to three times the a cheap, organic plastic called amount of energy that a cell polyvinylidene fluoride. The ma- phone battery can, while remainterial, known as PVDF, also cam- ing lightweight and flexible. eos in fishing lines, insulation Berkeley’s Lin said he might for electrical wires and paint on seek venture capital funding buildings such as the Taipei 101 within three months, though he tower in Taiwan. hasn’t decided whether he wants to start his own company with the technology or license it out to A dream realized other firms. Lin’s team produces the fibers If the product can be cheaply using a technique it pioneered mass produced, the lack of comcalled near-field electrospinning. petition would give nanofibers A syringe filled with a polymer an easy way to conquer the marsolution is suspended over a ket, Roco said. moving, electrically conductive “It will be determined by ecosilicon wafer. An electrical field nomics — if the nanofibers cost pulls the solution out, forming $10,000, nobody will buy them,” fine fibers on the wafer in regu- he said. “But if they’re $2, everylar patterns. Think of a baker ap- one will buy. People will use nanplying very thin lines of frosting otechnology not because it’s fanon a very small cake. cy but because it’s economical.”

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


C4 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, May 31, 2010: This year, you discover the real meaning of flexibility. You often will go overboard trying to accommodate others. You can understand where others are coming from and often cannot decide whether to defer. The issue will be how much to give and how to establish better boundaries. Your energy soars, making it difficult to limit your role. An issue that arises this year is how much to give. If you are single, you could enjoy dating more than ever. Producing a viable bond could take some thought and skill -- and the right person. If you are attached, learn that neither of you has to be wrong. Look at your opinions and decide how both could be true! SAGITTARIUS knows how to appeal to you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Just when you thought everything was clear, you discover otherwise. Confirm a get-together and make sure everyone is on the same page. Though you might not feel like pitching in, do. Tonight: A good time is had by all (if they are around you!). TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your mind might not be present with others. Don’t even think that they don’t notice your mental drifting. Perhaps you need to hop into a car or make a call

to whomever is distracting you. Tonight: Don’t create a problem; choose to eliminate one. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Your ability to engage others comes out. Your innate understanding of others and your ability to read body language make it easy for others to share matters they usually wouldn’t. Tonight: You are everyone’s confidant! CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Be sensitive to the many possibilities. The question might be simple: who, where and when. You will figure it out by going within and deciding what is important to you. Tonight: Make special time for a special person. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You might want to pitch in a little more. You have more energy than many others right now. If anyone can hit a home run, it is you, especially today. Your efforts do make a huge difference. Tonight: Relax, wherever you are. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH It appears that you take your creativity wherever you go. Often you hold back and don’t share your opinions. Right now, your suggestions -- which often lead to solutions -- will be welcome. Tonight: Let your hair down. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Stay as close to home as possible, whether entertaining or squeezing in some work. Zero in on what is important to you. Don’t allow a low level of worry to take over. Take a walk and release this energy. Tonight: Flipping the burgers.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Keep conversations moving, and worry less about others’ opinions. You might want to rethink an incident or a relationship. You suddenly realize that there is more than there appears to be. Tonight: Hang out with a friend. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Be aware of what you are doing. A loss of self-discipline could be very costly or might become a problem. Be careful when dealing with someone you look up to. Your words could hang around for way too long. Tonight: Remember that there is a tomorrow. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might want to confirm who is doing what before charging in. Misunderstandings seem to happen with ease. Use care, especially around financial matters. You might not be as comfortable as you would like to be. Tonight: The world, once more, is your oyster. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Know when to kick back and do little. Easily, you could be overwhelmed by recent events and happenings. Do rethink plans that revolve around tonight, or at least confirm them. Tonight: Make it OK to do nothing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could feel vaguely out of sorts without a good reason. Don’t over-analyze. Rather, think carefully, knowing what needs to happen. Your instincts could be off, and pushing to get answers won’t work. Tonight: Hang out with friends.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Green jobs Continued from C1 The website, which targets people who are searching for a career, will offer five green job “pathways” that link people with information on how to gain experience and knowledge to get work in environmental and energy-related fields. “It creates a road map for students to be able to go to the website and look up information about each occupation,” Johnson said. “There’s a detailed outline for each, (showing) the education needed to be viable for that occupation.” This work stems from a study the Employment Department produced in June 2009, “The Greening of Oregon’s Workforce: Jobs, Wages and Training.” That study gave a broad overview of how many and what kind of green jobs exist in Oregon, estimating that there are about 51,400 green jobs in 226 of the more than 700 occupations. It also gave a relatively broad definition of a green job. To qualify, a job must produce a service or a product that increases energy efficiency; produces renewable energy; prevents, reduces or mitigates environmental degradation; cleans up and restores the natural environment; or provides education, consulting, policy promotion, accreditation, trading and offsets, or similar services that support any of the aforementioned services. Because it is broad, truck driving qualifies as a green job if the trucker is transporting something considered environmentally friendly, such as ethanol. Johnson said that whether an occupation also contributed to the deterioration of the environment, such as driving a truck, was outside the parameters of the green job qualification. “Our focus is on the activity of the work,” he said. “What is the essential activity being done in that job?”

Early findings Initial findings of Johnson’s team, based on current data of green jobs, show that they don’t require much more education than non-green jobs. He said roughly two-thirds of green occupations don’t require any education beyond high school, the same for occupations in general. That’s why Johnson picked a wide swath of occupations to be among the 13 his crew would examine with the $1.25 million grant, which was provided by the Department of Labor’s Employment Training Administration. Oregon was one of more than 30 states that received grants, which were funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Occupations being studied by Johnson include civil engineers, a field that can require as much as a master’s degree, and construction laborers, who typically only need on-site experience. The study will “focus on occupations where information is lacking and where training is expected to change,” according to a document prepared by Johnson. Johnson said little is known about two fields that will be studied because they have just recently been classified as occupations: solar photovoltaic installers and wind turbine service technicians.

Solar group pushes for government aid A trade industry group that represents solar companies is using job growth projections to push the federal government toward investing in programs that offer substantial cash grants or tax credits to firms that develop renewable energy projects. The Solar Energy Industries Association released a study Wednesday that estimates an additional 15,000 solar jobs would come to Oregon by 2016 — part of more than 200,000 added nationally — if Congress extends a grant program past 2010, when it is now set to expire. Adding that many jobs also would be contingent upon the federal government adding a 30 percent investment tax credit to Internal Revenue Service code for solar manufacturing expenditures, according to the study, which was produced by EuPD Research, a market research firm that analyzes “your information requirements and deliver[s] proactive and tailored information.” Both of Oregon’s Democratic U.S. senators are backing measures or legislation that would implement With the extensive plans for wind farms in the northern part of Central Oregon, and expansion of companies such as PV Powered, a Bend-based solar inverter manufacturer that was purchased by a Colorado company for $90 million in March, some believe that green jobs will show strong growth in coming years.

The big plan To prepare for green job growth, the Oregon Legislature passed a bill in 2009 that created a Green Jobs Council tasked to develop a plan to promote green jobs. That council delivered a draft plan in January to the Legislature and is currently refining it. The 100-page draft report delivers detailed information about green jobs, and makes both general and specific recommendations, such as establishing programs that meet the needs of emerging green industries or implementing green job curricula in high schools and middle schools. Greg White, the executive staff member for the council, said the final plan, to be completed in September, will have more specific recommendations. Cylvia Hayes, CEO of Bendbased 3EStrategies, was contracted as a consultant by the state to help the council create the plan. She said the council wants to create a plan that will give green companies incentives to create jobs. “We’re working really hard to create a plan that doesn’t just get people trained, but gets them hired,” Hayes said.

In education Work is ongoing at the community college level to better understand the green job curriculum that’s already in place. The Oregon Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development held a conference in Eugene earlier this month about the kind of green job training occurring

C OV ER S T OR I ES the changes the association wants. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., introduced a measure in December that would extend a U.S. Treasury grant program, which currently pays energy project developers 30 percent of the cost of the project in cash. Since that grant program was implemented in 2009 through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, $3.513 billion has been awarded to 638 firms nationally, including more than $202 million to 37 firms in Oregon. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said through a spokeswoman Wednesday that he is co-sponsoring the Solar Manufacturing Jobs Creation Act, which would create a manufacturing tax credit for the solar industry. “I hope that tax credits like these will continue to be an economic engine in our state for years to come,” Wyden said in a written statement. The Oregon Employment Department set up a website earlier this month for the researchers working on the $1.25 million grant. For more information, visit www.quality info.org/green. — David Holley, The Bulletin in Oregon, after having spent last year developing an assessment of available green training programs, said Brenda Brecke, an Oregon-based consultant who worked on both projects. Brecke said she sees more and more schools, both community colleges and universities, moving toward a greener curriculum, whether that means programs that promote green jobs or promoting green practices in all occupations. Oregon State University-Cascades Campus is in the final stages of approving a Bachelor of Science degree in energy engineering management, which would give students a kind of hybrid business management-engineering experience that could be used in a company to assess energy use and efficiency, said Christine Coffin, director of communications and outreach for OSU-Cascades. Classes for the degree will be offered in the fall, while the degree program is set to be approved this summer. The program also will collaborate with Central Oregon Community College’s pre-engineering programs, Coffin said. Both Brecke and White, the staff member of the Green Jobs Council, said they think the greening of the workplace and educational system will happen soon, just like computers have become integral to so many different professions, when they were hardly used before the 1980s. Brecke said she thinks that there may not be a huge amount of people getting into careers that focus entirely on green or sustainable practices, but there will be more green practices in all jobs as a whole. White agreed. “That’s kind of the way sustainability is going to be infused into everybody’s jobs,” he said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

On plants, bacteria that cause snow, rain By Jim Robbins New York Times News Service

BOZEMAN, Mont. — Walking across the campus of Montana State University here, David Sands, a plant pathologist, says the blanket of snow draped over the mountains around town contains a surprise. The cause of most of it, he said, is a living organism, a bacterium, called pseudomonas syringae. In the last few years, Sands and other researchers have accumulated evidence that the well-known group of bacteria, long known to live on agricultural crops, are far more widespread and may be part of a little-studied weather

ecosystem. The principle is well accepted, but how widespread the phenomenon is remains a matter of debate. The accepted precipitation model is that soot, dust and other inert things form the nuclei for raindrops and snowflakes. Scientists have found these bacteria in abundance on the leaves of a wide range of wild and domestic plants everywhere they have looked, including Montana, Morocco, France, the Yukon and in the long buried ice of Antarctica. Some of the bacteria promote freezing as a means of attacking plants. They make proteins that will trigger freezing at higher

temperatures than usual and the resulting water ice damages the plant, giving the bacteria access to the nutrients they need. This ability to promote freezing of water at higher-than-normal freezing temperatures has led Sands and other scientists to believe the bacteria are part of an unstudied system. After the bacteria infect plants and multiply, he says, they may be swept as aerosols into the sky, where it seems they prompt the formation of ice crystals (which melt as they fall to earth, causing rain) at higher temperatures than do dust or mineral particles that also function as the nuclei of ice crystals.

Apps Continued from C1 “The path was a very good one for us, getting the thing running on the cheap,” Fristoe said. “We knew what we wanted it to look like — we needed an engineer to tie the front end to the back end.” Not everyone would agree that it’s cheap to pay a few thousand dollars a month to build an application, but it’s the reality of the technological market. Companies and individuals are now building businesses and careers around developing tools, games and other devices for Apple software, as well as other mobile platforms, such as Google’s Android operating system. Plus, having an application on a mobile device is merely one more route by which a business can earn more money and find new customers. Richard Luebke, who lives in Sunriver and has been working on mobile development for the last two years, has developed a few applications with a group out of Portland, Infinity Softworks. He said he, as well as other developers, is often approached by people looking for someone to build an app, adding that it becomes more common as one’s name becomes better known in the development arena. With plenty of his own ideas for applications, and a busy schedule working with Infinity Softworks, Luebke said he typically doesn’t have much time to take on other clients. But there are startup development companies, with full-time engineers on staff, looking to be hired by people in need of an app. “If you’re not already a programmer or up to speed on this kind of stuff, there is quite a healthy contract programmer world,” Luebke said. “It’s not particularly cheap, because they’re quite in demand.” Many people do teach themselves how to develop apps, Luebke said, spending the $99 for Apple’s system development software and reading through the pages upon pages of “how to” information. The program-

ming for the iPhone is specific computer language — literally a foreign language to someone who does not know computer programming — developed by Apple called Objective-C, which is now taught in classes at Stanford University. “I would maintain that anybody who has learned programming can do the homework and assignments, and can put an app in the App Store,” said Luebke, who has taken online classes from Stanford multiple times as a refresher. Stoker, the Ph.D. student, said he thinks University of Utah is the only other school that teaches app development. Though the Apple software is the most popular platform for app development, with more than 100,000 developers worldwide and more than 200,000 apps in the market, other platforms continue to grow in popularity. More than 4 billion apps have been downloaded since the App Store launched, according to Apple. If you develop an app for the iPhone, it can’t immediately be transferred to an Android device. Android programs are written in a different computer language than Apple’s, forcing developers to write two codes for the same program, Stoker said. That’s why Fristoe, of TeamUnify, has only developed a program for the iPhone. He may eventually have his engineer work on developing a program for other mobile platforms, but to do it now would slow down continuing development on the iPhone app, he said. Fristoe doesn’t charge for his iPhone app, but it can only be used by someone who has an account with TeamUnify. His goal for the app wasn’t to make extra money on its sale, but instead to provide an additional useful tool for his customers. Many people do develop applications as a for-profit enterprise, though. Making a sale in the App Store isn’t as easy as it seems, primarily because there are so many apps out there, said Rich Danielson, president and founder of PlanV Software,

which developed Fristoe’s OnDeck application. Since the App Store began selling games and other devices in late 2006 and 2007, app developers have been pushed to make prices as low as possible, if not free, Danielson said. That means it’s not only difficult to make a sale for anything priced higher than 99 cents, but it’s also often hard for buyers to even find your app, Danielson said. (Additionally, Apple takes a cut of the sales for listing it on the App Store.) “It’s really hard to make money unless you have something that will have a very broad appeal to everybody,” Danielson said, adding that the primary question in today’s market is, “How do you get discovered?” Part of being discovered might just be luck. One application Danielson said his business created for a customer, Greatest Road, an app geared toward motorcyclists, was featured on the Apple website as a staff pick, which caused its sales to jump 10 times the previous day’s amount. Before that, Danielson said he had to drop the app’s price by 40 percent to meet customer demand. Luebke said he has pondered the same question: How do you get found on Apple’s market, which theoretically has infinite storage space for thousands and thousands more apps? He said he thinks there’s an opportunity for some sort of application advertising — some method of telling individuals about applications they might be interested in downloading or purchasing. “There’s going to be a need for a lot of innovation and creativity,” said Luebke, who earned a degree in electrical engineering and spent much of his career working in Silicon Valley. “I don’t think anybody has seen an ecosystem of applications this big.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

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Q: Randall, what would your first choice be for an energy efficient heating and cooling system for our area? A: In this area I recommend a “Hybrid” dual fuel system which includes a 95% AFUE gas furnace coupled 9.0 + rated HSPF heat pump (which has air conditioning already built in). AFUE stands for Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency and HSPF stands for Heating Seasonal Performance Factor.

Q: Why a “Hybrid” dual fuel rather than a furnace and air conditioner? A: Hybrid dual fuel systems are the most efficient. The heat pump provides the most energyefficient comfort during moderate heating conditions. As the temperature drops outside, the system automatically switches to your second heating source (gas) and the combination of the two is the most economical way to heat your home.

Q: Are there incentives like rebates and tax credits available when you convert to a high efficient gas furnace or heat pump? A: Yes and they are the best I’ve seen in 25+ years in the industry. What this means to homeowners is that through state and federal tax credits, coupled with local utility and manufacturer rebates, they could end up having as much as half of the installed cost paid for them just by acting wisely and reducing their energy footprint in their home. Doing so will also quickly pay for the remaining balance through the new energy savings they’ll be getting!

Q: How much money can be saved on heating bills by installing a new high efficient system? A: When coupled with duct testing and sealing, which is required now in all utility incentified projects, annual heating and cooling costs can be dropped by as much, or more, than 50%!

Q: Why should we change and upgrade our systems now? A: Obviously, the longer we wait to upgrade, the more waste of our money and energy we are letting be lost and also, none of us know how long these incredible incentives will be available to us. Since there are great finance options as well, this is the best time in history to act in our own best interest, as well as that of our finite resources.

Q: What sets Bend Heating apart from other well known heating companies? A: Bend Heating has served all Central Oregon communities since 1953. That’s 57 years, longer than any other company. We are required to be certified by federal, state and local agencies. We participate in rigorous ongoing training that requires us to perform many different tests to certify the installation is correct and the paperwork is in order for the rebates and tax credits to go through.

Q: How can people contact you for more information? A: You can contact me at 382-1231 or email me at randall@bendheating.com and I’m happy to provide a no obligation estimate of costs and savings.

You can also visit our website at www.bendheating.com. Copyright © 2010 Bend Heating & Sheet Metal and SalesMark Solutions, LLC. All rights reserved.

As a trade ally contractor of Energy Trust of Oregon, we can help with incentives and Oregon Residential Energy Tax Credits to improve the energy efficiency of your home.

541-382-1231 • www.BendHeating.com

® ®


S

D

Golf Inside Tom Lehman wins the Senior PGA Championship in a playoff, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MAY 31, 2010

TRACK & FIELD

COLLEGE GOLF

33 Ducks will stay in Eugene for NCAA Championships

Vijarro ready for national championship challenge

EUGENE — Oregon will have 16 men and 17 women competing at home when the NCAA track and field championships are held at Hayward Field next month. Oregon’s representatives were determined this past weekend at the NCAA West Regional in Austin, Texas. Among them are Olympian Andrew Wheating, who will compete in both the 800 and 1,500 meters. Matthew Centrowitz and A.J. Acosta also will run in the 1,500 at the championships June 9-12. Zoe Buckman, Jordan Hasay and Alex Kosinski advanced to the 1,500 meters on the women’s side. Nicole Blood will run in both the 5,000 and 10,000 meters. Bend’s Ashton Eaton, a Mountain View graduate who set a new world record in the decathlon at the NCAA indoor championships earlier this year, will also compete in the multisport event in Eugene. — The Associated Press

By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Andrew Vijarro likes nothing more than to play against the best. The former Bend High School golf standout will get that chance this week. Now a sophomore on the University of Oregon’s top-ranked golf team, Vijarro will be among the elite competing at the 2010 NCAA Division I Men’s Golf Championships at the Honors Course in Ooltewah, Tenn. And Vijarro cannot wait to tee it up. “Going into it knowing that we have a chance to win the national title is excitement by itself,” Vijarro said by phone from Eugene last week. “But just facing the best teams — and not only that, being one of the best teams — I think is the ultimate excitement.” The national championship is scheduled to begin Tuesday. The 30 qualifying teams will play 54 holes of stroke play, from which the top eight teams will advance to three rounds of match play. The championship round is scheduled for Sunday. Another Central Oregonian — former Redmond

High golfer Tim Sundseth — will also be in Tennessee this week. Sundseth is the assistant coach for the Oregon State men’s golf team, which also earned a bid to the national championships. UO sophomores Eugene Wong, the Pac-10 Conference’s co-player of the year, and Daniel Miernicki, a first-team all-Pac-10 performer, have led the way for the Ducks this season. And what a season it has been. Oregon has won a program-best five tournaments this spring, including winning the NCAA Southwest Regional at Carlton Oaks Golf Club near San Diego last week to help the Ducks land the No. 1 seed in this year’s national championship. Vijarro, an honorable mention to the all-Pac10 team, has been crucial to the Ducks’ success. He ranks third on the team in scoring average at 72.1 strokes per round, and he has logged five top-10 finishes this season in 14 tournaments. But Vijarro has more value to the team than merely his scoring average, according to Casey Martin, the former PGA Tour player in his fourth year as head coach at Oregon. See Vijarro / D5

Geoff Turner / GoDucks.com

University of Oregon sophomore golfer Andrew Vijarro takes a shot at March’s Oregon Duck Invitational at Shadow Hills Country Club in Junction City. Vijarro, a former standout golfer at Bend High School, will be among the Ducks competing this week in the 2010 NCAA Division I Men’s Golf Championships at The Honors Course in Chattanooga, Tenn.

L O C A L M O U N TA I N B I K I N G

BASEBALL

Garagiola warns about chewing tobacco

INSIDE MLB Astros ............2 Reds...............0

Tigers .......... 10 Athletics.........2

Marlins ..........1 Phillies...........0

Yankees .........7 Indians ...........3

Braves............5 Pirates ...........2

Blue Jays .......6 Orioles ...........1

Mets............. 10 Brewers..........4

Red Sox .........8 Royals ............1

Cardinals .......9 Cubs ..............1

White Sox ......8 Rays ...............5

Dodgers .........4 Rockies ..........3

Angels ...........9 Mariners ........7

Padres ...........3 Nationals .......2

Twins .............6 Rangers .........3

By George Vecsey New York Times News Service

Giants ............6 D’backs ..........5

Mariners fall victim to late homer again Angels’ Howie Kendrick belts three-run home run in ninth to beat Seattle, see Page D4

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Riders participating in the female pro category take off from the starting line while competing in the Sisters Stampede Sunday morning. Overall women’s winner Tina Brubaker, of Salem (second from right), finished the 28-mile course in 1 hour, 58 minutes, 40 seconds.

A packed field Inaugural Sisters Stampede mountain bike race draws hundreds of participants By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Los Angeles’ Howard Kendrick hits the game-winning threerun home run in the ninth inning to defeat Seattle on Sunday.

SISTERS — It was certainly a Sistersstyle start to Sunday’s inaugural mountain bike race: a cowboy firing a ivory-handled Colt .45-caliber revolver and galloping on horseback out in front of the pack of riders in the men’s professional class. The wild-West act opened the Sisters Stampede, which drew nearly 370 participants in its first running. “Mountain biking in Oregon is up 30 percent,” said Joel Palanuks, the race director.

“Everything has rolled pretty smoothly.” Bend resident and race favorite Chris Sheppard won the men’s professional class. The 37-year-old completed the 31mile course — over varying terrain on double- and singletrack through the Peterson Ridge Trail System — in 1 hour, 45 minutes, 40 seconds. “I’m racing my buddies, but that’s part of it,” said Sheppard at the dusty and sunfilled finish area in an open field near Three Creeks Brewing Co. “No one ever gave me a win, so I’m going to make them

work hard.” Sheppard still has it in him. He said that a renewed enthusiasm for riding, along with sponsorship from a bicycle company in his native Canada, will carry him this race season to national events like the Teva Mountain Games next weekend in Vail, Colo., and the Leadville Trail 100 in early July, also in Colorado. “I do the local stuff,” noted Sheppard, “but I also have some larger events that I have goals for.” See Stampede / D5

Joe Garagiola has been to too many funerals. Some of them were for friends who chewed tobacco, the way Garagiola used to do. Now Garagiola has been given the gift of time. He intends to use it to speak out against the habit of chewing tobacco. “I tell these guys, ‘You may not like what I say, but with lung cancer you die of lung cancer,’ ” Garagiola said the other day, with the zeal of a convert. “With oral cancer, you die one piece at a time. They operate on your neck, they operate on your jaw, they operate on your throat.” Garagiola is one of America’s gifted talkers — starting in bullpens and dugouts, moving on to broadcasting games, then doing game shows, the “Today” show. He is still talking. In April, he traveled to a congressional hearing to speak against smokeless tobacco. The trip itself was a gesture of courage, because he was recovering from brain surgery for what he calls a nonmalignant ailment, which he said was not linked to the tobacco habit he beat 50 years ago. On Friday, Garagiola received great news. After he underwent a CT scan six months after surgery, doctors told him he was clear. He took a deep breath and celebrated by doing what he does best. See Garagiola / D5

CORRECTION A story headlined “Bend’s Theobold runs off with 800-meter title at state” that appeared in Sunday’s Bulletin on Page D6 included incorrect information about Sara Small of Sisters at the state high school track and field championships. Small, a sophomore, placed third Saturday in the Class 4A girls pole vault with a mark of 10 feet, 9 inches. The Bulletin regrets the error.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Golf ............................................D3 College baseball ........................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 High Gear ................................. D6

IRL: INDIANAPOLIS 500

Franchitti gets a break to win Indy By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — One lap to go, running on empty and a car bearing down on his tail. After having the dominant car and the perfect game plan, Dario Franchitti still needed more Sunday — one break to win his second Indianapolis 500. He got it in the form of a spectacular, airborne crash that brought out a yellow flag and allowed him to cross the line with a scant 1.6 gallons of fuel left. That 1.6 gallons left him holding a quart of milk, a winner at the Brickyard for the second time in four years. “Still running,” the winner told his crew over the radio as he crossed the finish line, while wreckers were moving out to scoop up debris from an accident that sent Mike Conway into the wall and to the hospital with a broken left leg. The victory made Franchitti’s boss, Chip Ganassi, the first owner to win Indy and NASCAR’s Daytona 500 in

the same year. It validated the Scottish driver’s return to the IndyCar circuit two years after celebrating his 2007 Indy victory by making an unsuccessful move with Ganassi to NASCAR. And, of course, it made Franchitti and crew look like the master tacticians they were on this day — working the gas pedal perfectly to stretch their final fill-up for the last 37 laps and edge out 2005 champion Dan Wheldon of England. “Just get to the finish, see if you can get to the finish,” Franchitti said when asked about what was going through his mind over the last few laps. He did, and so the story became about his second victory instead of Helio Castroneves’ fourth. Spiderman’s quest to tie A.J. Foyt, Al Unser Sr., and Rick Mears for most wins ever at the Brickyard essentially ended with a mistake — stalling out while leaving the pits on the 146th lap. See Indy / D5

H IG H GEAR

Mike Groll / The Associated Press

Dario Franchitti celebrates at the finish line after winning the Indianapolis 500 in Indianapolis Sunday. It was his second Indy 500 win.


D2 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

TENNIS

Tuesday Baseball: Class 5A state playoffs, semifinals, Madras at Ashland, 4:30 p.m.

9 a.m. — French Open, round of 16, ESPN2.

BASEBALL

Bobby Wadkins, $3,913 Trevor Dodds, $3,913 Katsuyoshi Tomori, $3,913 Hale Irwin, $3,813 Jim Woodward, $3,813 Jim Roy, $3,813 Bruce Fleisher, $3,813 Roger Chapman, $3,688 Bruce Summerhays, $3,688 Tom Wargo, $3,688 Bob Boyd, $3,688 Ron Vlosich, $3,688 Bob Cameron, $3,688 Dave Rummells, $3,588 Bill Britton, $3,588 Mike Harwood, $3,538 Mike San Filippo, $3,538 Jodie Mudd, $3,500 Dick Mast, $3,475 Keith Fergus

IN THE BLEACHERS

MOUNTAIN BIKING

9:30 a.m. — College, 2010 NCAA Division I selection show, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

LACROSSE 12:30 p.m. — Men’s NCAA Tournament, final, Notre Dame vs. Duke, ESPN.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL playoffs, Stanley Cup finals, Philadelphia Flyers at Chicago Blackhawks, NBC.

TUESDAY TENNIS 9 a.m. — French Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, teams TBA, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — WNBA, Phoenix Mercury at Minnesota Lynx, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — WNBA, Atlanta Dream at Seattle Storm, ESPN2. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Softball • Oregon softball’s run ends with loss to Missouri: The Oregon softball team’s run in the postseason ended with a 7-2 loss to host Missouri Sunday in an NCAA Super Regional. Oregon, ranked No. 20, ended the season 36-21. The Ducks’ victories under first-year coach Mike White were more than double the 16 they had last season. It was the Ducks’ first ever Super Regional appearance. Freshman Jessica Moore (16-13) took the loss Sunday, allowing five hits and two earned runs over three innings. Kristin Nottelman (24-7) scattered eight hits in her second complete game in as many days in the victory for No. 8 Missouri (51-11).

Baseball • Linfield falls to Illinois Wesleyan: Left-handed reliever Joe Froelich pitched seven strong innings and Zach Scott’s only hit provided the game-winning RBI for Illinois Wesleyan, which rallied from a 3-1 deficit in the sixth inning to stun Linfield 4-3 in the winners bracket game Sunday night in Grand Chute, Wis. The Wildcats (36-12), winners of 12 of their last 13 contests, now face the unwelcome prospect of playing second-ranked Heidelberg in an elimination game today at 10 a.m. PDT. Linfield outhit IWU 11-8 and got a solid pitching performance from senior Reese McCulley (Sr., Salem), who allowed just two earned runs while striking out six Titans. But Linfield’s normally reliable defense was shaky, resulting in four untimely errors, including two by All-America shortstop Kelson Brown (Sr., La Canada, Calif.). • SEC has 4 teams selected as NCAA regional hosts: The Southeastern Conference had four schools — Arkansas, Auburn, Florida and South Carolina — selected Sunday as hosts for the NCAA Division I baseball tournament. The Atlantic Coast Conference, with Georgia Tech, Miami and Virginia, had three schools chosen as sites for the four-team, double-elimination regionals, which start next week. Other hosts include: Arizona State, Cal State Fullerton, Coastal Carolina, Connecticut, Louisville, Oklahoma, Texas, TCU and UCLA. All games will be played on campus sites, except for the regionals at Coastal Carolina and Connecticut.

Lacrosse • Maryland beats Northwestern 13-11 to win title: Northwestern’s lacrosse dynasty is over, courtesy of a stunning comeback by Maryland. Maryland won its 10th NCAA women’s lacrosse title Sunday in Towson, Md., rallying from a six-goal deficit to defeat the five-time defending champions 13-11. The Terrapins (22-1) earned their first title since 2001 and preserved their record of seven straight titles, set from 1995-2001. Maryland also ended Northwestern’s run of 23 consecutive tournament wins. The game was played before 9,782 fans, the largest crowd to watch a women’s lacrosse event in United States history.

Soccer • Players not happy with ‘supermarket’ WCup ball: Several players are going all out against the new World Cup ball, with more than one comparing it to those bought at a supermarket. And this time it’s not only goalkeepers who are complaining. Strikers, defenders and midfielders are also lashing out at the Adidas ball just a few days before the monthlong tournament is to begin in South Africa. The ball is called Jabulani, which means “to celebrate” in isiZulu, but not many are celebrating it so far. It’s hard to find a player who is happy with it, and those who don’t like it are not saving adjectives to describe their feelings. Brazil goalkeeper Julio Cesar on Saturday called the ball “terrible” and was the first to compare it to those plastic ones bought on a supermarket. Italy striker Giampaolo Pazzini said the same thing, calling it a “disaster.” — From wire reports

SISTERS STAMPEDE May 30 Sisters Overall Male Pro and Cat 1 — 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend, 1:45:40. 2, Ben Thompson, Bend, 1:46:37. 3, Brett Nichols, Boise, 1:49:55. Overall Women Pro and Cat 1 — 1, Tina Brubaker, Keizer, 1:58:40. 2, Shawna Palanuk, Sisters, 1:59:41. 3, Heather Clark, Bend, 2:01:28 CAT WOMEN 45+ — 1, Debbie Schubert, Bend, 59:13. 2, Janis Morgan, Grants Pass, 1:02:02. 3, Barbara Thiele, Hillsboro, 1:03:30. 4, Valerie Anderson, Bend, 1:04:29. 5, Melissa Boyd, Corvallis, 1:06:24. 6, Heidi Peyton, 1:09:42. 7, Evelyn West, Portland, 2:43:43. CAT WOMEN 35-44 — 1, Cary Steinman, Bend, 57:23. 2, Gina Miller, Bend, 1:02:53. 3, Kara Calmettes, 1:03:14. 4, Stephanie Rouse, Corvallis, 1:03:44. 5, Cheryl Miller, Camp Sherman, 1:05:24. 6, Robine Bots-Jeffre Sisters, 1:09:25. 7, Wendy Dodd, Ridgefield, 1:09:33. 8, Tessa Sugahara, Salem, 1:09:58. 9, Darcy Davis, 1:11:50. 10, Jen Maguire, Corvallis, 1:17:01. 11, Kristen Newton, 1:19:37. CAT WOMEN 19-34 — 1, Kelly Rice, Corvallis, 56:19. 2, Elishah Thomas, Baker City, 1:00:48. 3, Leah Edwards, Corvallis, 1:01:55. 4, Ellene Smith, Portland, 1:03:40. 5, Anna Huber, Springfield, 1:05:28. 6, Allison Halpin, Bend, 1:10:36. 7, Madison Charrier, 1:30:07. CAT WOMEN 10-18 — 1, Julia Christensen, Cedar Hills, 1:18:57. CAT WOMEN 35+ — 1, Jodi Line-Bailey, Sunriver, 2:12:58. 2, Lorin Page, Bend, 2:16:17. 3, Lisa Belair, Portland, 2:19:28. 4, Mary Skrzynski, Bend, 2:27:29. 5, Monica Freeman, Bend, 2:27:38. 6, Jill Ballantyne, Bend, 2:28:05. 7, Karen Kenlan, Bend, 2:32:04. 8, Sage Fuller, Portland, 2:33:18. 9, Jacquie Zanack, Sisters, 2:36:42. 10, Katherine Christen Portland, 2:37:48. 11, Dennette Wood, Enumclaw, 2:41:12. 12, Lynn Albrow, Bend, 2:44:42. 13, Connie Vine, Beaverton, 2:50:57. 14, Vickie Childress, Lakeview, 2:59:36. 15, Marie Tucker, 3:35:26. CAT WOMEN 19-34 — 1, Carla Gibson, Bend, 1:09:54. 2, Taylor Shekell, Portland, 2:18:12. 3, Lindsay Jones, Eugene, 2:20:00. 4, Amy Hale, Leadville, 2:25:52. 5, Patricia Simpson, Mableton, 2:27:25. 6, Holly Clarke, Salem, 2:35:12. CAT WOMEN — 1, Shawna Palanuk, Sisters, 1:59:41. 2, Heather Clark, Bend, 2:01:28. 3, Serena Bishop, Bend, 2:02:37. 4, Brooke McDermid, Portland, 2:04:41. 5, Helen Grogan, Bend, 2:10:05. 6, Kristin Wille, Portland, 2:10:27. 7, Stephanie Uetrecht Bend, 2:11:23. 8, Karen Oppenheimer, Bend, 2:14:35. 9, Elaine Bothe, Portland, 2:19:02. 10, Melissa Norland, Corvallis, 2:24:29 PRO WOMEN — 1, Tina Brubaker, Keizer, 1:58:40. 2, Laura Winberry, Bend, 2:24:52. CYLESDALE — 1, Josh Cobb, Haines, 2:09:43. 2, Paul Patton, Sisters, 2:11:17. 3, Scott Michalek, Sisters, 2:17:12. 4, Jake Slodki, 2:27:16. 5, Scott Pierce, Grants Pass, 2:27:37. 6, Randy Keller, Corvallis, 2:42:36. 7, Robert Jeffey, 2:58:03. 8, Tim Tucker, 3:36:26. CAT MEN 45+ — 1, Mike Reightley, Bend, 1:00:35. 2, Michael Dehner, Portland, 1:04:31. 3, Jim Wodrich, Bend, 1:06:34. 4, Ted Ostrye, Hood River, 1:07:38. 5, Michael Peyton, 1:09:53. 6, Eric Eastland, Bend, 1:10:50. 7, John Weinsheim, Madras, 1:12:04. 8, Cory Faucett, Grants Pass, 1:12:22. 9, Jim Plank, Salem, 1:12:31. 10, Philip Carr, Springfield, 1:13:07. 11, Stratton Poindexte Redmond, 1:15:13. 12, Chuck Humphreys, Sisters, 1:19:06. 13, Mark Latham, Redmond, 1:27:40. 14, Troy Thom, Crooked River Ranch, 1:27:58. 15, Steven Hunt, 1:43:51. 16, Winston Saunders, Hillsboro, 3:05:34. CAT MEN 35-44 — 1, Eric Moran, Corvallis, 54:39. 2, Jeff Evans, Bend, 56:22. 3, Ryan Altman, Bend, 56:29. 4, Nathan Buddie, Bend, 56:34. 5, Jarad Douglas, 56:49. 6, Shawn Diez, Sisters, 1:00:14. 7, Troy Longstroth, Redmond, 1:01:11. 8, Troy Rawlins, Vancouver, 1:01:22. 9, Brian Tompkins, Bend, 1:02:19. 10, Albion Vickery, Bend, 1:03:52. 11, Rob Weston, Bend, 1:05:52. 12, Robert Jaynes, Grants Pass, 1:06:48. 13, Jim Miller, Prineville, 1:11:19. CAT MEN 19-34 — 1, Robert Gilbert, Redmond, 53:39. 2, Daniel Brewster, Bend, 53:40. 3, Nathan Stiewig, Merlin, 57:30. 4, Leland Gilbert, Terrebonne, 57:34. 5, Dan Baumann, Bend, 58:07. 6, Jason James, Wilsonville, 1:01:06. 7, Chris McElfresh, Corvallis, 1:01:08. 8, Dennis Feeney, Corvallis, 1:01:37. 9, Jeff Fairfield, Bend, 1:04:00. 10, Azch Eggers, Haines, 1:04:32. 11, Bill Newton, 1:07:39. 12, Logan Kerns, Baker City, 1:13:27. 13, Guy Olson, 1:58:07. CAT MEN 15-18 — 1, Jack Mahler, Bend, 55:18. 2, Skyler Kenna, 56:32. 3, Tyler Baldessari, Sisters, 58:12. 4, Jimmie Roper, Richland, 58:18. 5, Mason Calmettes, 59:50. 6, Keith Fawcott, Grants Pass, 1:09:32. 7, Bjorn Grindstaff, Richland, 1:11:47. 8, Buddy Pickett, Sisters, 1:14:35. 9, Trevor Elson, Sisters, 1:15:14. 10, Nicholas Crewick, Corvallis, 2:49:37. CAT MEN 10-14 — 1, Lance Haidet, Bend, 56:30. 2, Javier Colton, Bend, 56:47. 3, William Wodrich, Bend, 58:39. 4, Will Churchill, Bend, 1:02:07. 5, Gus Gyorgyfaluy, Bend, 1:02:17. 6, Massimo Larsen, Bend, 1:05:59. 7, Liam Pickhardt, Powell Butte, 1:06:00. 8, Donovan Birky, Bend, 1:06:02. 9, Peyton Logue, Grants Pass, 1:07:45. 10, Blake Knirk, Sisters, 1:10:09. 11, Garrett Walden, Bend, 1:11:40. 12, Zach Jones, Sisters, 1:12:06. 13, Ryan Carr, Springfield, 1:15:22. 14, Gabe Rice, Sisters, 1:18:59. 15, Daniel Hunt, 1:29:56. 16, Shawn Horton, Sisters, 1:35:55 CAT MEN 55+ — 1, Don Leet, Bend, 2:08:23. 2, Martin Rand, Bellevue, 2:10:22. 3, Steve Lacey, Portland, 2:11:16. 4, Rick Gregory, Eugene, 2:14:12. 5, Steve Rearden, Portland, 2:15:44. 6, Ron Strasser, Portland, 2:19:02. 7, Michael Daggett, Portland, 2:22:16. 8, Patrick Coughlin, Portland, 2:22:20. 9, Michael Woods, Sisters, 2:24:08. 10, Eric Buckland, Madras, 2:28:31. 11, Tim Rich, Gresham, 2:29:55. 12, Bill Hasenjarger, Bellingham, 2:33:01. 13, Stuart Honeyman, Sisters, 3:00:32 CAT MEN 45-54 — 1, Mickey McDonald, Bend, 2:02:06. 2, Jim Miller, Portland, 2:04:30. 3, Michael Kender, Portland, 2:06:01. 4, Greg O’Brien, Portland, 2:07:06. 5, Steve McCallion, Portland, 2:07:33. 6, Gregg Leion, Hood River, 2:07:43. 7, Eric Anderson, Aloha, 2:08:26. 8, Warren Cirue, Sisters, 2:09:53. 9, Brian King, Roswell, 2:11:07. 10, Dan Laugtenbach, 2:11:34. 11, Tom Strodtbeck, Beaverton, 2:13:24. 12, Scott Meredith, Bend, 2:13:28. 13, Vern Ward, Troutdale, 2:13:54. 14, Jeff Vine, Beaverton, 2:13:56. 15, James Thiele, Hillsboro, 2:14:26. 16, Wayne Nussbaum, Happy Valley, 2:16:45. 17, Jay Rathe, Portland, 2:17:20. 18, Michael Mann, Portland, 2:17:31. 19, Mark Damon, Portland, 2:18:04. 20, Mike Webb, Florence, 2:18:20. 21, Erick Knirk, Sister, 2:22:10. 22, Stephan Crozier, Bend, 2:23:28. 23, David Blair, Bend, 2:28:25. 24, Marcel Russenberge, Bend, 2:29:00. 25, David Smith, 2:29:22. 26, Vern Krist, Portland, 2:33:06. 27, David Schlatter, 2:38:58. 28, Donald Scott, Grants Pass, 2:43:02. 29, Brian Danner, Lebanon, 2:51:48. 30, Brian Van Doran, Albany, 2:56:17. 31, Jeff Wester, Sisters, 2:58:46. 32, Gary Zaack, Sisters, 3:04:36. 33, David Croslier, 3:07:42. CAT MEN 35-44 — 1, Todd Randy, Bend, 1:57:26. 2, Marcus Biancucci, Bend, 1:58:26. 3, Dave Cockburn, Milwaukie, 1:59:24. 4, Robert Sanders, Portland, 1:59:24. 5, Ryan Russell, Beaverton, 1:59:34. 6, Wade Miller, Bend, 2:00:47. 7, Bob Jacobs, Portland, 2:00:56. 8, Paul Zweigart, Turner, 2:01:02. 9, Stephen Porino, Bend, 2:01:28. 10, Rich Hummel, Sisters, 2:01:58. 11, Eric Birky, Bend, 2:02:09. 12, John Craft, Bend, 2:02:13. 13, Sean Rogers, Bend, 2:02:23. 14, Matthew Lasala, Bend, 2:04:25. 15, David Rosen, Beaverton, 2:04:53. 16, Lee Bauck, Troutdale, 2:05:04. 17, Scott Brennan, Bend, 2:06:01. 18, Mark Miskowiec, Bend, 2:07:41. 19, Tj Paskewich, Bend, 2:07:43. 20, Robert Lee, Portland, 2:07:57. 21, Patrick Miller, Bend, 2:07:58. 22, Rodney Wamsley, Portland, 2:08:16. 23, David Luoina, Portland, 2:08:30. 24, Eric Adams, Albany, 2:08:38. 25, Brian Evans, Bend, 2:10:50. 26, Jason Saunders, Corvallis, 2:11:00. 27, Jason Dimmig, Bend, 2:12:20. 28, T. Kenji Sugahara, Salem, 2:13:44. 29, Paul Kelly, Lake Oswego, 2:13:46. 30, Aaron Ast, 2:16:46. 31, Dave Pickhardt, Powell Butte, 2:17:07. 32, Sean Warner, Gresham, 2:18:00. 33, Aaron Baternik, 2:20:38. 34, Chris Cottingham, Portland, 2:20:53. 35, Rob Kerr, Bend, 2:20:55. 36, Scott Herrick, West Linn, 2:21:06. 37, Sean Denney, Portland, 2:21:14. 38, Dave Hill, Corvallis, 2:21:20. 39, Thomas Holt, 2:21:23. 40, Kevin Skillings, Corvallis, 2:21:42. 41, Nathan Harris, Philomath, 2:21:58. 42, Brian Hightower, 2:22:45. 43, Kyle Gorman, Bend, 2:25:42. 44, Dan Coyle, Corvallis,

76-74-74-76—300 75-76-75-74—300 77-72-78-73—300 76-74-74-77—301 80-71-75-75—301 74-76-76-75—301 73-77-77-74—301 76-74-73-79—302 74-74-77-77—302 74-72-79-77—302 73-72-81-76—302 75-76-77-74—302 76-74-78-74—302 71-77-78-77—303 75-76-76-76—303 75-76-75-79—305 77-73-79-76—305 76-73-81-77—307 73-78-79-83—313 72-75-74—WD

LPGA Tour

2:28:37. 45, Brent Dombrowski, Portland, 2:29:38. 46, Csaba Kormendy, Portland, 2:33:39. 47, William Blanton, San Diego, 2:36:28. 48, Charles Barrett, Portland, 2:37:09. 49, Ed Goldmann, Aloha, 2:45:40. CAT MEN 19-34 — 1, Stephen Fitzgerald Vancouver, 1:57:10. 2, Aaron Edwards, Bend, 1:59:42. 3, Steve Heinrichs, Bend, 1:59:43. 4, Tyler Matheson, Boise, 2:00:43. 5, Tyler Miller, Bend, 2:01:16. 6, Harrison Womack, Sisters, 2:02:43. 7, Dustin Miller, Keizer, 2:05:31. 8, Trevor Pratt, Sandy, 2:05:43. 9, Gabriel Linn, Bend, 2:05:44. 10, Nick Groesz, Portland, 2:10:15. 11, James Kerr, Bend, 2:10:38. 12, Loren Mason-Gere, Eugene, 2:11:33. 13, Nate Agalzoff, Forest Grove, 2:13:00. 14, Pat Thomas, Baker City, 2:13:31. 15, Andrew Vaughn, Corvallis, 2:13:48. 16, Jered Coles, Boise, 2:13:56. 17, Eric Fosdick, Corvallis, 2:13:58. 18, Hogan McDonald, Bend, 2:14:21. 19, Nicholas Yapp, Bend, 2:18:30. 20, Pam Smith, Portland, 2:20:44. 21, Sean Lewis, Bend, 2:20:59. 22, Eric Edwards, Bend, 2:21:04. 23, Cory Tanler, Redmond, 2:22:02. 24, Raymond Conkey, Sublimity, 2:26:33. 25, Gabe Gillan, Sisters, 2:29:11. 26, Sean Connaghan, Stayton, 2:34:14. 27, Thom Toutt, Sisters, 2:34:40. CAT MEN 15-18 — 1, Cole Sprague, Bend, 2:12:14. 2, Brian Fawcett, Grants Pass, 2:14:45. 3, Andy Su, Bend, 2:31:13. 4, Colin Dunlap, Bend, 2:42:33. SINGLE SPEED — 1, Chris Brandt, 1:49:10. 2, Geoffrey Huber, Springfield, 1:49:14. 3, Derek Stallings, Bend, 1:52:18. 4, Tim Jones, Bend, 1:53:55. 5, Brian Jorgensen, Bend, 1:54:24. 6, Jake Rosenfeld, Forest Grove, 1:57:54. 7, Steven Degregorio, Bend, 1:59:06. 8, Mike Olson, Bend, 1:59:12. 9, Wade Goff, Sherwood, 1:59:38. 10, Greg Crewick, Corvallis, 2:00:52. 11, Christian Vedder, Vancouver, 2:00:55. 12, Jack Kelley, Bend, 2:02:07. 13, Stevan Gyetvai, Corvallis, 2:04:41. 14, Justin Serna, Portland, 2:06:03. 15, Erik Weeman, Portland, 2:06:06. 16, Paul Trout, Bend, 2:07:10. 17, Tom Brannon, 2:09:53. 18, John Maestas, Seattle, 2:11:27. 19, Carl Gurney, Corvallis, 2:14:45. 20, Paul Karr, Bend, 2:15:36. 21, Gregg Rouse, Corvallis, 2:19:29. 22, Steven Basden, Portland, 2:29:53. CAT MEN 45+ — 1, Gregg Strome, Bend, 1:53:21. 2, John McCaffrey, Portland, 1:54:34. 3, Jeffery Otto, Beaverton, 1:54:36. 4, Scott Carroll, Corvallis, 1:56:59. 5, Jim Juenger, Bend, 2:01:01. 6, John Mitchem, Portland, 2:01:09. 7, David Hill, Dallas, 2:01:13. 8, Dan Wolnick, Bend, 2:04:09. 9, Todd Rosier, Hillsboro, 2:07:21. 10, Johnny Vergis, Portland, 2:09:02. 11, Dan Packman, Bend, 2:09:55. 12, Wayne Tonning, Lake Oswego, 2:10:07. 13, James Wellington, Bend, 2:11:16. 14, Jim Thornton, Hood River, 2:12:01. 15, Marc Fortier, Bend, 2:12:22. 16, Mark Reinecke, Bend, 2:18:05 CAT MEN 35-44 — 1, David Cloninger, Bend, 1:54:42. 2, William Sullivan, Lake Oswego, 1:56:41. 3, Trevor Norland, Corvallis, 1:57:01. 4, Mike Schindler, Bend, 2:01:49. 5, Sean Haidet, Bend, 2:01:51. 6, Tom Keller, Gold Hill, 2:02:59. 7, Thomas Hainisch, Bend, 2:06:37. 8, Jesse Luckett, Portland, 2:07:31. 9, Alex Accetta, Portland, 2:07:50. 10, Todd Embree, Corvallis, 2:08:55. 11, Robert Christensen Portland, 2:12:29. 12, Martin Baker, Hillsboro, 2:14:55. 13, David Baker, Bend, 2:15:15. 14, Gary Thompson, Sisters, 2:17:05. 15, Mike Ripley, Monroe, 2:18:42. 16, Patrick McEnaney, Corvallis, 2:21:06. 17, Rob Frechette, Vancouver, 2:24:56. CAT MEN 19-34 — 1, Erik Long, Bend, 1:53:22. 2, Austin Line, Sunriver, 1:57:52. 3, Chris Winans, Bend, 1:58:04. 4, Ben Bronson, Bend, 1:59:36. 5, Bill Warburton, Bend, 2:00:55. 6, Ryan Eisele, Dallas, 2:01:48. 7, Lance Walker, Redmond, 2:02:40. 8, Shane Johnson, Redmond, 2:03:40. 9, Jeremy Warnicke, Grande Ronde, 2:06:24. 10, Adam Demarzo, North Bend, 2:09:03. 11, Marcus Benton, Corvallis, 2:27:57. 12, Matt Cline, Portland, 2:32:34. CAT MEN 15-18 — 1, Timothy Jaynes, Grants Pass, 2:08:26. PRO MEN — 1, Chris Sheppard, Bend, 1:45:40. 2, Ben Thompson, Bend, 1:46:37. 3, Brett Nichols, Boise, 1:49:55. 4, Sloane Anderson, 1:50:36. 5, Steve Carwile, Beaverton, 1:52:15. 6, Bruce Cole-Baker, Bend, 1:52:15. 7, Bruce Rogers, Bend, 1:53:51. 8, Damian Schmitt, Bend, 1:54:28. 9, Bear Perrin, Grants Pass, 1:56:00. 10, James Ceccorulli, Portland, 1:56:38. 11, Matt Fox, Bend, 2:01:50. 12, Justin Price, Corvallis, 2:13:13. 13, Matt Russell, Bend, 2:17:27.

GOLF PGA Tour COLONIAL INVITATIONAL Sunday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,204; Par: 70 FedExCup points in parentheses Final Round Zach Johnson (500), $1,116,000 65-66-64-64—259 Brian Davis (300), $669,600 64-65-65-68—262 Jeff Overton (163), $359,600 63-67-66-67—263 Ben Crane (163), $359,600 68-64-64-67—263 Scott Verplank (105), $235,600 67-66-66-65—264 Bryce Molder (105), $235,600 65-62-67-70—264 Ricky Barnes (88), $199,950 66-66-67-66—265 Corey Pavin (88), $199,950 67-64-67-67—265 Boo Weekley (80), $179,800 67-63-67-69—266 Martin Laird (70), $155,000 69-67-66-65—267 Pat Perez (70), $155,000 69-68-63-67—267 Bo Van Pelt (70), $155,000 67-66-65-69—267 Geoff Ogilvy (54), $99,889 70-67-67-64—268 David Toms (54), $99,889 68-67-68-65—268 Paul Casey (54), $99,889 66-70-66-66—268 John Mallinger (54), $99,889 65-66-69-68—268 K.J. Choi (54), $99,889 67-67-66-68—268 Matt Jones (54), $99,889 69-66-64-69—268 Kris Blanks (54), $99,889 65-64-68-71—268 Bill Haas (54), $99,889 65-68-64-71—268 Jason Bohn (54), $99,889 63-65-68-72—268 Cameron Beckman (47), $59,520 67-68-68-66—269 Stewart Cink (47), $59,520 69-68-66-66—269 Carl Pettersson (47), $59,520 65-66-70-68—269 Kevin Na (47), $59,520 67-68-65-69—269 Kenny Perry (47), $59,520 68-64-67-70—269 Henrik Stenson (42), $43,090 67-69-68-66—270

Michael Sim (42), $43,090 Nick Watney (42), $43,090 Blake Adams (42), $43,090 Kyle Stanley (0), $43,090 John Merrick (42), $43,090 Tim Petrovic (36), $33,480 Brian Gay (36), $33,480 Graham DeLaet (36), $33,480 Mike Weir (36), $33,480 Vijay Singh (36), $33,480 Tom Gillis (31), $26,040 Kevin Sutherland (31), $26,040 Fredrik Jacobson (31), $26,040 Steve Stricker (31), $26,040 Rickie Fowler (31), $26,040 Lee Janzen (31), $26,040 Lucas Glover (25), $18,745 Greg Chalmers (25), $18,745 Derek Lamely (25), $18,745 Chad Collins (25), $18,745 J.J. Henry (25), $18,745 Spencer Levin (25), $18,745 Heath Slocum (19), $14,839 Ben Curtis (19), $14,839 Michael Bradley (19), $14,839 Jason Day (19), $14,839 Aron Price (19), $14,839 Angel Cabrera (19), $14,839 Matt Kuchar (14), $14,012 John Senden (14), $14,012 Tim Clark (14), $14,012 Jerod Turner (9), $13,392 James Nitties (9), $13,392 Brandt Snedeker (9), $13,392 Brendon de Jonge (9), $13,392 Stephen Ames (9), $13,392 Paul Goydos (9), $13,392 Jerry Kelly (9), $13,392 John Daly (5), $12,896 Nathan Green (4), $12,710 Alex Prugh (4), $12,710 Billy Mayfair (2), $12,462 Rory Sabbatini (2), $12,462 Justin Rose (1), $12,152 Brett Quigley (1), $12,152 J.P. Hayes (1), $12,152 Kevin Stadler (1), $11,904 Charlie Wi (1), $11,780 Ian Poulter (1), $11,656

69-67-67-67—270 68-66-67-69—270 63-70-68-69—270 68-66-66-70—270 66-66-66-72—270 68-68-70-65—271 68-69-68-66—271 68-68-68-67—271 68-68-68-67—271 67-70-67-67—271 69-69-68-66—272 71-67-68-66—272 68-69-67-68—272 68-67-67-70—272 70-67-64-71—272 70-66-63-73—272 72-65-70-66—273 70-65-70-68—273 67-66-72-68—273 70-66-69-68—273 67-70-67-69—273 65-69-69-70—273 69-69-69-67—274 70-67-69-68—274 67-69-69-69—274 66-71-68-69—274 65-68-71-70—274 68-68-66-72—274 69-69-71-66—275 69-67-71-68—275 67-70-68-70—275 69-68-73-66—276 68-66-72-70—276 71-66-69-70—276 69-66-70-71—276 68-70-66-72—276 69-65-68-74—276 67-70-63-76—276 66-69-75-67—277 65-70-71-72—278 71-65-69-73—278 69-69-70-71—279 67-71-70-71—279 67-70-73-70—280 71-66-72-71—280 67-70-67-76—280 69-68-70-74—281 68-69-69-77—283 69-69-73-76—287

Champions Tour SENIOR PGA CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At Colorado Golf Club Parker, Colo. Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,490; Par: 72 Final Round (x-won on first playoff hole) x-Tom Lehman (720), $360,000 68-71-71-71—281 David Frost (352), $176,000 72-77-65-67—281 Fred Couples (352), $176,000 69-68-75-69—281 Mark O’Meara (192), $96,000 72-73-67-71—283 Nick Price (152), $76,000 70-71-73-70—284 Larry Mize (128), $64,000 73-72-70-70—285 Bill Glasson (128), $64,000 69-75-70-71—285 Robin Freeman (108), $54,000 66-75-75-70—286 Andrew Oldcorn (108), $54,000 73-75-67-71—286 Jay Don Blake (108), $54,000 71-69-70-76—286 Peter Senior, $40,750 74-70-73-70—287 Michael Allen, $40,750 71-72-71-73—287 Chip Beck, $40,750 71-71-71-74—287 Chien Soon Lu, $40,750 70-70-73-74—287 Loren Roberts, $30,333 77-70-70-71—288 Olin Browne, $30,333 73-73-70-72—288 Mike Goodes, $30,333 71-71-70-76—288 Tom Watson, $24,000 73-76-72-68—289 Boonchu Ruangkit, $24,000 73-73-71-72—289 Eduardo Romero, $24,000 73-72-71-73—289 Jeff Sluman, $19,500 77-74-69-70—290 Dan Forsman, $19,500 70-74-69-77—290 Don Pooley, $15,583 74-76-72-69—291 Russ Cochran, $15,583 73-72-74-72—291 Bernhard Langer, $15,583 66-75-75-75—291 Fred Funk, $15,583 72-70-73-76—291 Jay Haas, $15,583 73-73-70-75—291 Brad Bryant, $15,583 68-80-67-76—291 Gene Jones, $12,000 76-72-73-71—292 Joe Ozaki, $12,000 74-72-74-72—292 Lindy Miller, $12,000 71-75-74-72—292 Tom Kite, $12,000 69-69-79-75—292 Tim Simpson, $12,000 76-70-72-74—292 Mike Reid, $10,250 79-72-71-71—293 Bob Tway, $10,250 77-73-71-72—293 Gary Hallberg, $8,620 71-75-76-72—294 John Ross, $8,620 75-76-72-71—294 John Cook, $8,620 78-72-73-71—294 David Eger, $8,620 79-71-73-71—294 Chris Starkjohann, $8,620 71-77-77-69—294 Des Smyth, $7,050 74-72-74-75—295 Nick Job, $7,050 72-78-73-72—295 Scott Simpson, $7,050 71-72-74-78—295 Morris Hatalsky, $7,050 78-73-74-70—295 Ben Crenshaw, $5,700 72-75-74-75—296 James Blair III, $5,700 74-72-74-76—296 Bob Gilder, $5,700 73-77-71-75—296 Jim Rutledge, $5,700 76-72-75-73—296 Angel Franco, $5,700 74-74-76-72—296 Keith Clearwater, $4,538 75-76-72-74—297 Bruce Vaughan, $4,538 73-77-73-74—297 Larry Nelson, $4,538 77-72-75-73—297 David Peoples, $4,538 75-73-76-73—297 Ronnie Black, $4,275 77-72-72-77—298 Bobby Clampett, $4,275 75-74-76-73—298 Gil Morgan, $4,100 76-74-73-76—299 Bill Loeffler, $4,100 69-82-69-79—299 Sam Torrance, $4,100 78-72-73-76—299 Mark James, $4,100 78-71-70-80—299 Chris Williams, $4,100 73-74-76-76—299 Tommy Armour III, $3,913 78-73-71-78—300

BRASIL CUP Sunday At Itanhanga Golf Club Rio de Janeiro Purse: $700,000 Yardage: 6,339; Par: 73 (36-37) Final Round (a-amateur) (x-Won on sixth playoff hole) x-Meaghan Francella, $105,000 69-71—140 Mariajo Uribe 69-71—140 Candie Kung 71-70—141 Maria Hjorth 68-74—142 Kristy McPherson 73-69—142 Hee Young Park 71-72—143 Ilmi Chung 71-73—144 Angela Stanford 76-69—145 Janice Moodie 71-75—146 Karine Icher 72-74—146 Stacy Prammanasudh 73-73—146 M.J. Hur 74-72—146 Eun-Hee Ji 74-72—146 Vicky Hurst 72-75—147 Catriona Matthew 74-73—147 Eunjung Yi 75-72—147 Brittany Lang 71-77—148 Stacy Lewis 77-71—148 Beth Bader 74-75—149 Maria Laura Elvira 76-76—152 Angela Park 76-76—152 Allison Fouch 78-74—152 a-Mariana de Biase 75-78—153 Julieta Granada 80-73—153 Maria Iida 76-78—154 Paige Mackenzie 78-80—158 a-Macarena Silva 76-83—159

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE STANLEY CUP FINALS x-if necessary Chicago 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, May 29 Chicago 6, Philadelphia 5 Today, May 31 Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 2 Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, June 4 Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 6 x-Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 9 x-Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, June 11 x-Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m.

TENNIS French Open Sunday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $21.1 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Fourth Round Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (20), Switzerland, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Marin Cilic (10), Croatia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-2. Mikhail Youzhny (11), Russia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (8), France, 6-2, retired. Tomas Berdych (15), Czech Republic, def. Andy Murray (4), Britain, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3. Women Third Round Justine Henin (22), Belgium, def. Maria Sharapova (12), Russia, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Fourth Round Elena Dementieva (5), Russia, def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-1, 6-3. Francesca Schiavone (17), Italy, def. Maria Kirilenko (30), Russia, 6-4, 6-4. Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, def. Venus Williams (2), United States, 6-4, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (3), Denmark, def. Flavia Pennetta (14), Italy, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 6-2.

SOFTBALL College All Times PDT ——— NCAA DIVISION I REGIONALS Double Elimination (x-if necessary) Super Regionals (Best of 3) ——— Athens (Ga.) Regional Friday, May 28 Georgia 7, California 0 Saturday, May 29 Georgia 10, California 1, Georgia advances Gainesville (Fla.) Regional Saturday, May 29 Florida 8, Arizona State 0 Sunday, May 30 Florida 5, Arizona State 2, Florida advances Ann Arbor (Mich.) Regional Thursday, May 27 Tennessee 5, Michigan 0 Friday, May 28 Tennessee 4, Michigan 3, Tennessee advances Tuscaloosa (Ala.) Regional Saturday, May 29 Alabama 8, Hawaii 0, 5 innings Hawaii 8, Alabama 7 Sunday, May 30 Hawaii 5, Alabama 4, Hawaii advances Columbia (Mo.) Regional Saturday, May 29 Missouri 1, Oregon 0 Sunday, May 30 Missouri 7, Oregon 2, Missouri advances Seattle Regional Thursday, May 27 Oklahoma 6, Washington 1 Friday, May 28 Washington 3, Oklahoma 0 Washington 4, Oklahoma 0, Washington advances Los Angeles Regional Saturday, May 29 UCLA 10, Louisiana-Lafayette 2, UCLA leads series 1-0 Sunday, May 30

UCLA 10, Louisiana-Lafayette 1, 5 innings, UCLA advances Tucson (Ariz.) Regional Friday, May 28 Arizona 2, BYU 1 Saturday, May 29 Arizona 10, BYU 2, 5 innings, Arizona advances

BASEBALL College All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 20 7 .740 47-8 UCLA 18 9 .666 43-13 Washington State 15 12 .555 32-20 Stanford 14 13 .518 32-22 California 13 14 .481 28-23 Oregon 13 14 .481 38-21 Oregon State 12 15 .444 31-22 Arizona 12 15 .444 33-22 Washington 11 16 .407 28-27 USC 7 20 .350 28-32 ——— Sunday’s Games Arizona 3, Oregon State 1 UCLA 6, Washington State 1 Oregon 6, California 5 USC 11, Washington 5 End of regular season

LACROSSE College All Times PDT ——— Women’s Championship Towson, Md. Today, May 30 Maryland 13, Northwestern 11 Men’s Championship Semifinals Baltimore Championship Baltimore Today, May 31 Notre Dame (10-6) vs. Duke (15-4), 12:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL NBA National Basketball Association All Times PDT ——— NBA FINALS x-if necessary Boston vs. L.A. Lakers Thursday, June 3: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 6: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 8: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. Thursday, June 10: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 13: L.A. Lakers at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 15: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, June 17: Boston at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 6 0 1.000 Connecticut 3 2 .600 Washington 4 3 .571 New York 2 2 .500 Indiana 2 3 .400 Chicago 2 4 .333 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 5 1 .833 Phoenix 2 2 .500 San Antonio 2 3 .400 Tulsa 2 3 .400 Los Angeles 1 4 .200 Minnesota 1 5 .167 ——— Sunday’s Games Seattle 84, San Antonio 56 Washington 69, Connecticut 65 Atlanta 101, Los Angeles 82 Today’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games Phoenix at Minnesota, 4:30 p.m. Atlanta at Seattle, 6:30 p.m.

GB — 2½ 2½ 3 3½ 4 GB — 2 2½ 2½ 3½ 4

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Houston at New York, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Columbus at Colorado, 11 a.m. Houston at Los Angeles, noon Kansas City at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at New York, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New England at Seattle FC, 7:30 p.m

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Recalled RHP Jensen Lewis from Columbus (IL). Optioned LHP Aaron Laffey to Columbus. DETROIT TIGERS—Recalled RHP Max Scherzer from Toledo (IL). Designated LHP Dontrelle Willis for assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Placed 1B Kendry Morales on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Robb Quinlan from Salt Lake (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS—Placed OF Nelson Cruz on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 29. Recalled OF Craig Gentry from Oklahoma City (PCL). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Recalled RHP Travis Schlichting from Albuquerque (PCL). Optioned LHP Scott Elbert to Albuquerque.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,282 187 134 43 John Day 1,320 118 15 6 McNary 1,199 181 10 4 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 238,729 12,015 9,741 2,653 The Dalles 176,002 10,289 2,369 1,148 John Day 164,588 10,581 2,565 1,442 McNary 135,360 7,564 2,342 1,240

Venus Williams eliminated at Roland Garros; Federer advances By Howard Fen d rich

TENNIS: FRENCH OPEN

The Associated Press

PARIS — So much for the thought that this might be the year Venus Williams would make a strong showing at the French Open. So much for the thought that she and her younger sister Serena, the tournament’s two top-seeded women, could deliver another all-Williams Grand Slam final. Displaying little of the spark or strokes she regularly produces on grass and hard courts, and playing little like someone with the tour’s best 2010 winning percentage, Williams stalled on the red clay of Ro-

land Garros yet again Sunday, exiting in the fourth round with a 6-4, 6-3 loss to No. 19 Nadia Petrova. “I don’t think the conditions are always ideal here. ... You might not be used to it or you might not get a good bounce,” said the No. 2-seeded Williams, who began the day 29-4 this season, including 15-2 on clay. “That’s just the way this tournament goes.” No. 3 Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark will play No. 17 Francesca Schiavone of Italy in another quarterfinal. Wozniacki, runner-up at last year’s U.S. Open,

scraped together a 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 6-2 victory over No. 14 Flavia Pennetta of Italy, and Schiavone eliminated No. 30 Maria Kirilenko of Russia 6-4, 6-4. None of those encounters featured the big names or big-stage experience of the third-round match between four-time champion Justine Henin and Maria Sharapova, which resumed Sunday after being suspended because of darkness a night earlier. Sharapova began the third set strongly, taking 11 of the first 15 points. But when facing an 0-2, love40 deficit, Henin began playing more aggressively and swung the momentum, taking four consecutive games on the way to winning 6-2, 3-6, 6-3, her

24th consecutive victory at the French Open. There was little suspense in men’s action Sunday, although there was a mild upset: No. 15 Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic beat No. 4 Andy Murray of Britain 6-4, 7-5, 6-3 to reach the French Open quarterfinals for the first time. Berdych now meets No. 11 Mikhail Youzhny of Russia, who advanced when No. 8 Jo-Wilfried Tsonga of France quit because of a hip injury. Defending champion Roger Federer won in straight sets for the fourth consecutive round, dismissing No. 20 Stanislas Wawrinka 6-3, 7-6 (5), 6-2.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 D3

GOLF ROUNDUP

NBA FINALS

Lehman wins in sudden death

Bryant’s great playoffs not over as finals loom

The Associated Press PARKER, Colo. — Tom Lehman has always prided himself on outlasting his flashier opponents by playing steady if unspectacular golf. Never was that more evident than Sunday when Lehman won the 71st Senior PGA Championship with a par on the first playoff hole, where Fred Couples and David Frost double-bogeyed after terrible tee shots. Lehman began the sudden death playoff on No. 18 with a solid shot down the fairway before Couples’ only bad tee shot of the tournament veered left into the shrubs, forcing him to take a drop. Frost’s tee shot ended up in the left bunker and he pulled his second shot left of the gallery. He cleared out dozens of pine cones in between him and the green before striking his ball, which was nestled in a shrub, across the green. “That was just a bizarre playoff,” Lehman said. “I’m not sure I’ve ever experienced anything like that. I turned to my caddie and I said, ‘How many shots have they taken?’ ” Frost and Couples finished with sixes before Lehman’s birdie putt from 12 feet came up a quarter roll short. He smiled, tapped it from there, pumped his right fist and cradled the silver trophy. “I think I had an advantage from the start because I had just finished,” Lehman said. “The longer you have to wait I think the tougher it gets to play in a playoff.” Frost had waited 45 minutes, Couples half an hour. “And I basically just finished signing my card and went back and hit it,” Lehman said. Just getting into the playoff took the kind of gapless golf and dogged determination that Lehman is known for. After bogeys on three of his first five holes, he huddled with his caddie and promised not to beat himself. He didn’t, finishing the last 13 holes bogey-free at 3 under. “And I really didn’t do anything exceptional,” Lehman said, “but I

David Zalubowski / The Associated Press

Tom Lehman kisses the trophy after winning the Senior PGA Championship golf tournament in Parker, Colo., on Sunday. didn’t make any mistakes.” Everyone around him did. Lehman’s first individual Champions Tour triumph — he teamed with Bernhard Langer to win the 2009 Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf — was worth $360,000. Couples and Frost each took home $176,000 of the $2 million purse, which was of little consolation to Couples, who has energized the Champions Tour this season, winning half of the six events he entered before coming to Colorado, where the thin air favored his strong drives — but not in sudden death. After congratulating Lehman,

Couples put his head down and stormed toward the clubhouse, where he quickly grabbed a couple of irons out of his locker and bolted for the parking lot. “It’s pretty disappointing,” was all Couples had to say as he hustled to a waiting car. Behind back-to-back eagles on Nos. 15 and 16, Couples had a chance to win this tournament outright in regulation but his eight-foot putt for birdie on 18 missed by an inch. Just as he was putting, a wind gust of about 25 mph came, but he didn’t back away. His tap-in left him with a 69 and in a tie with Frost (67) and

Tom Lehman (71), who joined the playoff at 7 under par by sinking a 4½-foot putt on 18 in only a slight breeze. Frost simply ran out of miracles on the 73rd hole. “I didn’t have enough guts to aim it way out right and bring it back like Tom did,” Frost said. “But I won’t let one hole bother me when I played so many good holes out there yesterday and today.” Frost was tied for 45th at 5 over par after 36 holes — a dozen shots behind Couples, who led at the halfway mark — before shooting 65-67 over the weekend. Lehman began the day as the co-leader with Jay Don Blake, whose eagle on No. 7 gave him a two-shot lead that was short-lived. Also on Sunday: 64 propels Johnson to victory FORT WORTH, Texas — Zach Johnson shot a closing 6-under 64 in the final round of the Colonial, winning at Hogan’s Alley with a tournament-record score of 21-under 259. The 2007 Masters champion finished three strokes ahead of Brian Davis, who had a closing 68. Jeff Overton and Ben Crane both shot 67 to finish tied for third at 17 under. Scott Verplank (65) and Bryce Molder (70), who led after the second and third rounds, were another shot back. Eagle leads Donald over Davies MADRID — Luke Donald’s late eagle helped secure a oneshot victory over Rhys Davies at the Madrid Masters on the European Tour. Tied with Davies heading to the 16th hole, Donald claimed the lead after hitting his approach shot from 252 yards to within 12 feet of the hole and sinking the eagle putt. Francella gets win in Brasil Cup RIO DE JANEIRO — Meaghan Francella defeated Mariajo Uribe in a six-hole, sudden death playoff to win the HSBC LPGA Brasil Cup 2010. Francella rolled in a 10-foot birdie putt on the sixth extra hole, the par-3 17th, to claim the $105,000 first-place check and take home her first money win on the LPGA Tour.

COLLEGE BASEBALL

UO eyes postseason after beating Cal

The Associated Press

Self Referrals Welcome

From wire reports EUGENE — Madison Boer protected No. 21 Oregon’s onerun lead late, and Eddie Rodriguez launched his team-leading seventh home run of the season as the Ducks ended the 2010 regular season with a 6-5 victory over California on Sunday afternoon at PK Park. The Ducks (38-22, 13-14) finish tied for fifth in the league standings with Cal (29-23, 13-14). Oregon will learn its postseason fate today, when the 2010 NCAA Division I Baseball Championship 64-team field with firstround regional pairings and site assignments, will be revealed in a live, half-hour telecast on

ESPN at 9:30 a.m. PDT. Oregon trailed 5-2 heading into the bottom of the fifth, but Eddie Rodriguez erased that deficit with one swing of the bat. J.J. Altobelli’s two-out single through the left side got the rally started and Jack Marder’s twoout double to left put runners on second and third for Rodriguez. In his last game at PK Park, Rodriguez drove Chris Petrini’s first pitch of the at-bat over the wall in left center to tie the game at 5-5, and record his team-leading seventh home run. It was also Rodriguez’s first and only hit of the three-game series with Cal. Oregon then took the lead in the bottom of the sixth after

Loss to Arizona ends OSU’s regular season on down note From wire reports CORVALLIS — Steve Selsky’s sixth-inning home run for Arizona proved to be the game winner as the Oregon State baseball team concluded its regular season with a 3-1 loss to the Wildcats Sunday in front of 2,823 fans at Goss Stadium. The Beavers, however, took the series from the Wildcats by virtue of victories Friday and Saturday. Oregon State will now await its postseason fate. Selsky’s home run was a tworun shot in the sixth that broke a 1-1 deadlock. It came off OSU reliever Tyler Waldron, who ended the weekend with 6 1⁄3 innings of work against Arizona, where he allowed just two hits and two runs with 10 strikeouts. Both hits and runs, however, came in Sunday’s finale and sent Waldron to a 4-5 record this season. Arizona opened the game with a run-scoring single in the first off the bat by Jett Bandy that gave the Wildcats an early 1-0 lead. The Beavers then scored their only run of the game in the third when Tyler Smith came in on a passed ball. That run was charged to Vin-

cent Littleman, who worked 2 2 ⁄3 innings in a start. Nick Cunningham finished with the win after going 3 1⁄3 innings, limiting the Beavers to four hits and two walks while allowing no runs and striking out four. He improved to 3-2. Bryce Bandilla worked a scoreless ninth for his first save of the season. Ryan Gorton started for the Beavers and worked two innings, allowing four hits and a run while walking one. Smith, Adalberto Santos and Andrew Susac each had two hits for the Beavers, who totaled eight on the afternoon. Susac extended his hit streak to five games with his two-for-four day. Selsky, Bandy and Rafael Valenzuela all had two hits for Arizona. The Beavers finished the regular season with a 31-22 overall record and 12-15 mark in Pacific-10 Conference play. OSU won three of its last four Pac-10 series, and went 10-5 over its last 15 games of the season. Arizona, meanwhile, improved to 33-22 overall and 12-15 in league play.

Danny Pulfer singled off Cal reliever Erik Johnson. Pulfer moved to second on a sacrifice bunt, and advanced to third on a wild pitch before Steven Packard’s pinch-hit, RBI single to left put the Ducks ahead 6-5 for their first lead of the series. In the top of the eighth, Oregon brought Boer out of the bullpen to do a little clean-up work for Scott McGough. With Chadd Krist at first and one out on the board, a passed ball moved Krist — the tying run — over to second. Chad Bunting then put a slow rolling infield single in play that didn’t allow K.C. Serna with enough time to make the throw to first. With runners on the corners

and only one out, Boer recovered to strike out Danny Oh looking before coaxing a ground out of Marcus Semien. In the ninth, an error on a throw from Serna put the tying run on first with no outs. But Boer recovered to retire the side. Johnson (6-3) took the loss for the Golden Bears after pitching one inning and allowing the goahead run on three hits. Petrini lasted 4 2⁄3 innings in his start for Cal, allowing five runs on seven hits while fanning five. Zack Thornton (9-0) was credited with the win for Oregon after tossing six innings, allowing five runs on five hits while striking out five.

Next up

eraged 33.7 points, 7.2 rebounds and 8.3 as• NBA Finals, LOS ANGELES sists in the series while Boston — Among Kobe Brymaking 52.1 percent of Celtics at ant’s myriad of inimihis shots, repeatedly Los Angeles table talents is what’s burning Phoenix for Lakers known to opposing late-game baskets. coaches simply as the • W h en: As for the breath“rise-up.” taking shot that alThursday, That’s when Bryant most nobody else in 6 p.m. has a defender blanthe NBA can make keting him on the pe- • TV: ABC consistently, Bryant rimeter, obstructing • Radio: KICEis almost nonchalant his vision and physiabout his ability to rise AM 940 cally preventing him up when it matters. from driving — yet “I just had to create Kobe simply leaps high enough a little bit of space,” said Bryand leans far enough forward ant, who stretched out his arms or backward to release a per- in imitation of an airplane on fect jumper anyway. the way back to the bench. “I Bryant rose up against Grant had a good look. Looks like a Hill in the final minute of the much tougher shot than it acLos Angeles Lakers’ confer- tually is. I got a good look. Got ence-clinching victory over my legs underneath me. I was the Phoenix Suns on Saturday able to knock it down.” night, putting his stamp on a Bryant likely will get anoth37-point performance that sent er four days off to rest up for the Lakers into the NBA finals the finals. He hasn’t practiced with a chance for revenge on much at all this spring while rethe Boston Celtics. covering from several injuries, Even with Hill right in his but after six previous trips to grill, Bryant leaped up and the NBA finals, Bryant knows away from the veteran forward exactly how to pace his body and drilled a clinching 23- for the two-month playoff haul. footer. The basket essentially Although Bryant claimed clinched the Lakers’ victory, he didn’t care who the Lakers and Bryant punctuated it with played in the finals, Bryant a pat on Phoenix coach Alvin sometimes isn’t exactly forthGentry’s derriere. coming about either his injuries “I said, ‘Good defense,’ to or his passions. It’s tough to beGrant,” Gentry recalled with lieve Bryant isn’t thrilled by the a rueful smile. “(Bryant) said, chance to cap another stirring ‘Not quite good enough.’ ... I playoff run with a revenge victhought Grant was going to tory over his franchise’s biggest block the shot. That was a fal- playoff rival, which sent Bryant laway three-pointer with a home from the finals two years hand in your face, off balance. ago. You know, that’s who he is. “It’s a sexy matchup,” Bryant That really is who he is.” acknowledged. “We’re looking Bryant is enjoying arguably forward to this challenge, lookthe most impressive playoff run ing forward to the test.” of his career, and not because There’s another reason his numbers are any larger many expect Bryant to come than in a previous postseason. out blazing against the Celtics: He has scored 30 points in 10 of He didn’t play terribly well two the Lakers’ last 11 games — and years ago in the finals, his first moreover, he has willed a team without Shaquille O’Neal by his with an injured center, two side. He averaged 25.7 points more inconsistent starters and and made about 40 percent of little bench help beyond Lamar his shots against the Celtics, Odom into its third straight who finished off Los Angeles NBA finals, starting Thursday with an embarrassing 131-92 night at Staples Center. victory in Game 6. The surprising Suns would The Lakers also didn’t have have had an above-average center Andrew Bynum, who chance to knock off the defend- was out for the year with an ining champions if Bryant hadn’t jury, or defensive stopper Trevor been at his absolute best. He av- Ariza, who had a broken foot.

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D4 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M AJ O R L E A GUE B A SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 34 17 .667 — New York 30 20 .600 3½ Toronto 30 22 .577 4½ Boston 29 23 .558 5½ Baltimore 15 36 .294 19 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 30 20 .600 — Detroit 26 23 .531 3½ Chicago 22 28 .440 8 Kansas City 21 30 .412 9½ Cleveland 18 30 .375 11 West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 27 24 .529 — Texas 26 24 .520 ½ Los Angeles 25 27 .481 2½ Seattle 19 30 .388 7 ——— Sunday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 7, Cleveland 3 Detroit 10, Oakland 2 Toronto 6, Baltimore 1 Boston 8, Kansas City 1 Chicago White Sox 8, Tampa Bay 5 L.A. Angels 9, Seattle 7 Minnesota 6, Texas 3 Today’s Games Cleveland (Talbot 6-3) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 6-1), 10:05 a.m. Oakland (Cahill 3-2) at Detroit (Verlander 5-3), 10:05 a.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 4-3) at Kansas City (Hochevar 5-2), 11:10 a.m. Tampa Bay (Garza 5-3) at Toronto (Morrow 3-4), 4:07 p.m. Minnesota (Liriano 4-3) at Seattle (Fister 3-2), 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 28 21 .571 — Atlanta 28 22 .560 ½ New York 26 25 .510 3 Florida 25 26 .490 4 Washington 25 26 .490 4 Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 30 21 .588 — St. Louis 29 22 .569 1 Chicago 24 27 .471 6 Milwaukee 21 29 .420 8½ Pittsburgh 20 31 .392 10 Houston 17 33 .340 12½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 30 20 .600 — Los Angeles 28 22 .560 2 San Francisco 27 22 .551 2½ Colorado 26 24 .520 4 Arizona 20 31 .392 10½ ——— Sunday’s Games Houston 2, Cincinnati 0, 10 innings Florida 1, Philadelphia 0 Atlanta 5, Pittsburgh 2 N.Y. Mets 10, Milwaukee 4 St. Louis 9, Chicago Cubs 1 L.A. Dodgers 4, Colorado 3 San Francisco 6, Arizona 5, 10 innings San Diego 3, Washington 2, 11 innings Today’s Games Philadelphia (Blanton 1-3) at Atlanta (Hanson 4-3), 10:05 a.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 4-2) at Florida (N.Robertson 4-4), 10:10 a.m. Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 3-3) at Pittsburgh (Ohlendorf 0-3), 10:35 a.m. Washington (Atilano 4-1) at Houston (Oswalt 3-6), 11:05 a.m. Colorado (Jimenez 9-1) at San Francisco (Lincecum 5-1), 1:05 p.m. Cincinnati (Arroyo 5-2) at St. Louis (J.Garcia 4-2), 1:15 p.m. Arizona (R.Lopez 2-3) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 6-2), 6:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Takahashi 4-1) at San Diego (Correia 4-4), 7:05 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Angels 9, Mariners 7 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Howie Kendrick hit his second home run of the game with two outs and two on in the ninth inning, giving the Angels the win a day after Kendry Morales broke his leg celebrating a winning grand slam for Los Angeles. Manager Mike Scioscia met with his team before the game to change the club’s policy on home plate celebrations, and it was put to the test in short order. Kendrick had a clear path and touched home without a jump as his jubilant teammates ran on the field and kept a safe distance from the foul line before mobbing him. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Bradley lf M.Sweeney dh Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Alfonzo c Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 3 4 5 4 5 3 4 5 4 37

R H 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 0 2 7 13

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 7

BB 2 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 7

SO 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .342 .205 .290 .220 .282 .228 .193 .600 .276

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss M.Izturis 3b B.Abreu dh H.Matsui lf 1-Frandsen pr J.Rivera rf Napoli 1b H.Kendrick 2b Bo.Wilson c Willits cf Totals

AB 3 4 3 3 0 3 5 5 4 3 33

R H 2 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 2 2 9 10

BI 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 4 0 0 9

BB 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 9

SO 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 5

Avg. .243 .241 .277 .235 .429 .226 .254 .256 .077 .250

Seattle 010 330 000 — 7 13 1 Los Angeles 200 012 103 — 9 10 0 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for H.Matsui in the 9th. E—Alfonzo (1). LOB—Seattle 10, Los Angeles 9. 2B—I.Suzuki (9), E.Aybar (10). HR—Alfonzo (1), off J.Saunders; H.Matsui (7), off Snell; H.Kendrick (3), off Kelley; H.Kendrick (4), off Aardsma. RBIs—I.Suzuki (10), Kotchman (19), Alfonzo 4 (4), Jo.Wilson (10), B.Abreu (27), H.Matsui 3 (27), J.Rivera (21), H.Kendrick 4 (27). SB—E.Aybar (7). CS—B.Abreu (5). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 5 (M.Sweeney, F.Gutierrez, Figgins, Bradley, Alfonzo); Los Angeles 5 (M.Izturis, Napoli 2, J.Rivera 2). Runners moved up—M.Sweeney, M.Izturis. GIDP— Alfonzo. DP—Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick, Napoli). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Snell 4 4 3 3 4 1 82 4.58 Colome 1 0 0 0 2 1 24 5.29 Texeira 2-3 2 2 1 2 0 21 5.30 Kelley H, 2 2 1-3 2 1 1 0 3 37 2.25 Aardsma L, 0-3 1-3 2 3 3 1 0 18 4.41 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Saunders 4 1-3 10 7 7 3 1 86 5.09 T.Bell 1 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 19 2.70 Bulger 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 23 4.58 Jepsen 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 5.60 Rodney W, 4-0 1 0 0 0 2 0 16 3.05 Snell pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Colome 2-1, Kelley 3-1, T.Bell 2-2, Jepsen 1-0. IBB—off T.Bell (I.Suzuki). Catchers’ interference—Alfonzo. T—3:38. A—40,017 (45,285).

Twins 6, Rangers 3 MINNEAPOLIS — De-

nard Span had two hits, an RBI and made a lunging catch while colliding with Orlando Hudson to end the game and Minnesota completed a rare three-game sweep with a victory over stumbling Texas. The Twins gathered around Hudson in center field and watched quietly while trainers attended to him. After several minutes, he got up and walked off under his own power. Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh Hamilton lf Dav.Murphy rf Smoak 1b Treanor c Borbon cf Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 3 4 3 3 4 35

R H 0 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 3 10

BI 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 6

Avg. .311 .315 .282 .332 .281 .252 .175 .211 .236

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 1 4 2 3 3 30

R H 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 6 10

BI 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 6

BB 1 0 1 0 3 0 1 1 1 8

SO 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .293 .305 .329 .368 .270 .232 .266 .238 .228

Texas 002 001 000 — 3 10 0 Minnesota 122 000 10x — 6 10 0 LOB—Texas 10, Minnesota 9. 2B—M.Young 2 (13), Treanor (2), Mauer (13), Morneau (16), Kubel (6). RBIs—Andrus (13), Guerrero (44), Hamilton (27), Span (19), Mauer (24), Kubel 2 (29), Delm.Young (25), Punto (11). SB—Punto (4). CS—Borbon (3), Mauer (1). SF—Hamilton, Delm.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 5 (Andrus 2, Treanor, Guerrero 2); Minnesota 3 (Kubel, Span, Mauer). Runners moved up—Borbon. GIDP—O.Hudson. DP—Texas 1 (M.Young, Kinsler). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland L, 2-1 1 3 3 3 3 0 43 4.19 Harrison 3 4 2 2 1 2 44 5.35 O’Day 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.77 Oliver 1 1 1 1 2 1 22 1.71 F.Francisco 1 1-3 1 0 0 2 1 20 4.03 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S.Baker W, 5-4 6 8 3 3 3 4 97 4.48 Al.Burnett H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.66 Mijares H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.61 Guerrier H, 10 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1.61 Rauch S, 12-14 1 2 0 0 0 0 18 2.70 Holland pitched to 3 batters in the 2nd. Inherited runners-scored—Harrison 2-1, Oliver 1-0, F.Francisco 1-0. HBP—by S.Baker (Treanor). T—3:08. A—39,873 (39,504).

White Sox 8, Rays 5 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jayson Nix hit his first career grand slam, helping Chicago beat Tampa Bay to split a four-game series with the AL East-leaders. Nix put the White Sox up 7-3 on his homer in the sixth. He replaced Mark Teahen, who left in the fourth with a right middle finger injury, at third base. Chicago Pierre lf Pierzynski c Rios cf Konerko 1b Kotsay dh Quentin rf Teahen 3b J.Nix 3b Al.Ramirez ss Vizquel 2b Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 5 3 2 2 4 4 38

R H 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 2 0 2 8 15

BI 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 4 0 1 8

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .245 .211 .312 .262 .208 .211 .255 .167 .254 .220

Tampa Bay AB Zobrist rf-2b 4 Crawford lf 5 Longoria 3b 5 C.Pena 1b 4 Jaso c 4 W.Aybar dh 4 B.Upton cf 4 Brignac ss 3 a-Kapler ph-rf 1 S.Rodriguez 2b-ss 4 Totals 38

R H 1 2 0 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 5 13

BI 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 0 1 1 8

Avg. .303 .321 .325 .177 .310 .241 .216 .311 .246 .207

Chicago 201 004 010 — 8 15 0 Tampa Bay 001 022 000 — 5 13 0 a-struck out for Brignac in the 8th. LOB—Chicago 6, Tampa Bay 8. 2B—Pierzynski (9), Konerko (8), Teahen (7), Vizquel (2), Brignac (8). HR— Rios (11), off J.Shields; J.Nix (1), off J.Shields; Zobrist (4), off Peavy. RBIs—Rios 2 (27), Kotsay (12), J.Nix 4 (5), Vizquel (4), Zobrist 2 (26), Crawford (24), Longoria (42), Brignac (20). SB—Rios (16), Teahen (3), Crawford (16), Longoria (10), B.Upton (15). CS—Rios (4), Al.Ramirez (3), Vizquel (2). SF—Zobrist. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 5 (Quentin 2, Pierre, Vizquel, Pierzynski); Tampa Bay 6 (Longoria 2, B.Upton 2, Jaso 2). Runners moved up—Kotsay 2. GIDP—Pierzynski. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (S.Rodriguez, Brignac, C.Pena). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy W, 4-4 5 1-3 10 5 5 0 5 110 6.23 Santos H, 5 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 11 0.48 Thornton H, 3 2 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 32 1.59 T.Pena 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 4.05 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Shields L, 5-3 5 1-3 11 7 7 1 3 108 3.62 Sonnanstine 2 3 1 1 0 0 30 3.52 Choate 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 6.75 Balfour 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.05 Inherited runners-scored—Santos 1-1, Sonnanstine 1-0, Choate 1-0. HBP—by J.Shields (Quentin), by Sonnanstine (Pierre). WP—Peavy. T—3:14. A—26,878 (36,973).

Red Sox 8, Royals 1 BOSTON — David Ortiz capped his big May with his 11th homer of the season and Jon Lester pitched seven strong innings, helping the Red Sox salvage a split of the four-game series. Mike Cameron doubled twice, drove in two runs and scored three times for Boston. Jason Varitek added a solo homer. Kansas City Bloomquist lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b B.Pena c Y.Betancourt ss Maier cf Totals

AB 3 3 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 31

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 1 4

Boston Scutaro ss D.McDonald lf D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b Beltre 3b J.Drew rf Varitek c Hall 2b Cameron cf Totals

AB 5 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 3 32

R H 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 2 8 10

Kansas City Boston

010 000 000 — 1 5 0 001 033 01x — 8 10 0

BI 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 2 8

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 2 1 8

Avg. .180 .327 .286 .348 .250 .287 .111 .281 .272

SO 0 1 0 1 1 3 2 1 0 9

Avg. .269 .260 .272 .298 .335 .270 .286 .211 .277

LOB—Kansas City 7, Boston 5. 2B—Callaspo (14), Maier (4), Scutaro 2 (10), Cameron 2 (5). HR—D.Ortiz (11), off Thompson; Varitek (7), off D.Hughes. RBIs— B.Pena (1), Scutaro 2 (10), D.Ortiz 3 (31), Varitek (12), Cameron 2 (2). CS—Bloomquist (2). S—D.McDonald. SF—D.Ortiz. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 4 (Y.Betancourt, B.Butler, Bloomquist 2); Boston 2 (Beltre, Youkilis). Runners moved up—Bloomquist, B.Pena, Maier, Scutaro, D.McDonald. Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO Chen 4 2 1 1 2 5 Thompsn L, 0-4 1 2-3 7 6 6 0 1 V.Marte 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 D.Hughes 1 1 1 1 0 1 Boston IP H R ER BB SO Lester W, 6-2 7 4 1 1 4 5 Delcarmen 1 1 0 0 0 1 Nelson 1 0 0 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—V.Marte 1-0. T—2:46. A—37,581 (37,402).

NP 75 50 20 17 NP 105 16 12

ERA 2.70 7.27 2.45 4.19 ERA 2.97 1.80 4.50

Yankees 7, Indians 3 NEW YORK — Mark Teixeira hit a three-run homer in New York’s five-run seventh, leading the Yankees to the victory. Hours after the Indians learned they would be without star center fielder Grady Sizemore for at least six to eight weeks and possibly longer, they were reminded that their problems are more extensive. Alex Rodriguez was zero for three a day after hitting Cleveland pitcher David Huff in the head with a line drive. Huff showed no symptoms of a concussion before the game, smiling and joking around in the dugout. Cleveland Crowe cf Choo rf Hafner dh Kearns lf Branyan 1b Peralta 3b Valbuena 2b Marson c Donald ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 2 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3

H BI BB SO 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 2 0 10

New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Miranda dh Gardner lf Moeller c a-Cervelli ph-c Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 1 35

R H 1 2 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 2 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 12

BI 2 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 8

Avg. .274 .280 .275 .302 .242 .235 .134 .221 .275 Avg. .297 .230 .221 .284 .362 .315 .231 .289 .167 .320

Cleveland 001 000 200 — 3 5 0 New York 000 000 52x — 7 12 1 a-struck out for Moeller in the 7th. E—Jeter (3). LOB—Cleveland 4, New York 6. 2B— Crowe (2), Granderson (4), Cano (16), Miranda (2). 3B— Donald (1). HR—Teixeira (8), off Sipp. RBIs—Crowe (9), Donald (5), Jeter 2 (31), Teixeira 3 (34), Miranda (7), Cervelli (22). SB—Valbuena (1), Gardner (18). CS—Crowe (2). S—Donald. SF—Cervelli. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 2 (Kearns, Crowe); New York 3 (Miranda 2, Jeter). Runners moved up—Hafner, Miranda. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Masterson 6 2-3 7 3 3 1 8 Sipp L, 0-1 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 J.Lewis 1 3 2 2 0 0 New York IP H R ER BB SO Burnett W, 6-2 8 5 3 1 0 8 M.Rivera 1 0 0 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Sipp 1-1. A.J.Burnett (Kearns, Valbuena). T—2:48. A—45,706 (50,287).

NP ERA 103 5.87 11 4.12 17 3.97 NP ERA 115 3.28 14 1.65 HBP—by

Tigers 10, Athletics 2 DETROIT — Max Scherzer struck out 14 in 5 2⁄3 shutout innings hours after he was recalled from the minors, helping Detroit beat Oakland. Scherzer (2-4) allowed two hits, walked four and hit a batter in his first game with Detroit since he was sent to Triple-A Toledo following an awful start. The right-hander fell just two strikeouts short of Mickey Lolich’s team record despite being taken out in the sixth inning. Oakland R.Davis cf c-E.Patterson ph Barton 1b R.Sweeney rf Kouzmanoff 3b Cust dh M.Ellis 2b Gross lf a-Fox ph-lf Powell c Pennington ss Totals

AB 2 1 4 4 4 3 2 2 2 4 3 31

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 4 2 5 17

Avg. .263 .208 .278 .307 .244 .286 .298 .256 .224 .261 .213

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Raburn lf b-Kelly ph-lf C.Guillen 2b Inge 3b Laird c Santiago ss Totals

AB 5 2 4 5 3 2 5 3 3 3 35

R 2 2 1 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 10

H 1 1 2 4 0 1 1 3 2 0 15

Avg. .328 .283 .322 .352 .177 .261 .292 .229 .168 .250

BI 0 0 2 4 0 0 1 1 1 0 9

BB 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

Oakland 000 000 200 — 2 4 2 Detroit 111 101 05x — 10 15 0 a-struck out for Gross in the 6th. b-flied out for Raburn in the 7th. c-struck out for R.Davis in the 9th. E—Powell (2), Mazzaro (1). LOB—Oakland 8, Detroit 8. 2B—Cust (1), A.Jackson (14), Mi.Cabrera (16), Inge 2 (15). HR—Barton (3), off Coke; Inge (6), off Braden; C.Guillen (2), off Braden; Mi.Cabrera (14), off Mazzaro. RBIs—Barton 2 (19), Ordonez 2 (34), Mi.Cabrera 4 (48), C.Guillen (9), Inge (23), Laird (6). SB—R.Davis (20), Pennington (6). S—Damon, Laird, Santiago. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 4 (Kouzmanoff, R.Sweeney, Gross, Fox); Detroit 4 (C.Guillen 3, A.Jackson). Runners moved up—Laird. GIDP—Santiago. DP—Oakland 1 (Pennington, M.Ellis, Barton). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Braden L, 4-5 6 11 5 5 1 5 Mazzaro 2 4 5 0 3 1 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Scherzer W, 2-4 5 2-3 2 0 0 4 14 Coke H, 6 1 1-3 2 2 2 0 1 Zumaya S, 1-1 2 0 0 0 1 2 Inherited runners-scored—Coke 2-0. Scherzer (M.Ellis). T—2:43. A—32,510 (41,255).

NP ERA 95 3.60 41 5.40 NP ERA 113 6.42 15 3.80 33 1.84 HBP—by

Blue Jays 6, Orioles 1 TORONTO — Jose Bautista hit his major leagueleading 16th homer, Ricky Romero threw a six-hitter and Toronto finished off the three-game sweep. Alex Gonzalez and Lyle Overbay also had solo drives for

the Blue Jays, who have a club-record 53 homers in May and a majors-best 88 overall. Toronto, which also swept a series at Baltimore from April 9-11, recorded consecutive three-game sweeps of the Orioles for the first time since August 2001. Baltimore C.Patterson lf Lugo 2b Markakis rf Wigginton 1b M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Ad.Jones cf Wieters c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 3 3 3 2 29

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 1 2

SO 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 7

Avg. .265 .234 .307 .288 .259 .262 .251 .250 .227

Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 4 1 A.Hill 2b 3 0 Lind dh 4 0 V.Wells cf 4 1 J.Bautista rf 3 2 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 Overbay 1b 3 1 J.Buck c 4 0 Encarnacion 3b 4 0 Totals 33 6

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 3 2 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 3

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 4

Avg. .290 .163 .224 .301 .250 .269 .211 .259 .221

Baltimore 100 000 000 — 1 6 0 Toronto 300 001 02x — 6 9 1 E—Ale.Gonzalez (9). LOB—Baltimore 4, Toronto 6. 2B—F.Lewis (16), V.Wells (18). HR—Overbay (7), off Guthrie; J.Bautista (16), off Ohman; Ale.Gonzalez (11), off Ohman. RBIs—Markakis (17), V.Wells (36), J.Bautista (41), Ale.Gonzalez 2 (32), Overbay 2 (24). CS—C.Izturis (5). S—Lugo. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 1 (Wieters); Toronto 2 (J.Buck 2). GIDP—Wigginton, M.Tejada. DP—Toronto 2 (Ale.Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay), (Ale. Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay). Baltimore IP H R ER Guthrie L, 3-5 6 7 4 4 Hendrickson 1 0 0 0 Ohman 1 2 2 2 Toronto IP H R ER Romero W, 5-2 9 6 1 1 Balk—R.Romero. T—2:05. A—15,878 (49,539).

BB 3 0 0 BB 2

SO 2 1 1 SO 7

NP 103 10 15 NP 102

ERA 3.84 5.61 1.08 ERA 3.14

NL ROUNDUP Padres 3, Nationals 2 (11 innings) SAN DIEGO — Pinch-hitter Nick Hundley singled in Lance Zawadzki from second base with two outs in the 11th inning to give San Diego the victory. Zawadzki started the winning rally with an infield single that deflected off pitcher Sean Burnett’s glove. Second baseman Adam Kennedy fielded it and his errant throw went into the Padres’ dugout, putting Zawadzki on second. Matt Capps relieved and Hundley singled to left. There was no throw home as the Padres took two of three. Washington AB Morgan cf 5 S.Burnett p 0 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 0 A.Kennedy 2b 4 Capps p 0 Zimmerman 3b 5 A.Dunn 1b 5 Willingham lf 3 Desmond ss 4 Bernadina rf-cf 4 Nieves c 4 L.Hernandez p 2 Slaten p 0 Storen p 0 b-W.Harris ph 1 Clippard p 0 d-C.Guzman ph-rf 1 Totals 38

R 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

San Diego Venable rf e-Eckstein ph-2b Hairston Jr. ss-rf Ad.Gonzalez 1b Headley 3b Stairs lf Denorfia lf Torrealba c Gwynn cf Zawadzki 2b-ss Garland p a-Durango ph Adams p H.Bell p c-Salazar ph Gregerson p f-Hundley ph Totals

R H 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 11

AB 4 1 4 4 5 3 1 5 5 4 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 40

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 2 10 BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9

Avg. .242 --.326 .250 .000 .299 .270 .275 .263 .241 .194 .100 --1.000 .188 1.000 .321 Avg. .231 .291 .243 .261 .269 .190 .278 .287 .189 .200 .111 .250 ----.242 --.272

Washington 100 001 000 00 — 2 7 2 San Diego 000 200 000 01 — 3 11 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-sacrificed for Garland in the 7th. b-singled for Storen in the 8th. c-struck out for H.Bell in the 9th. d-grounded out for Clippard in the 10th. e-popped out for Venable in the 10th. f-singled for Gregerson in the 11th. E—A.Kennedy (4), Zimmerman (5). LOB—Washington 5, San Diego 10. 2B—Hairston Jr. (5). HR—Zimmerman 2 (10), off Garland 2. RBIs—Zimmerman 2 (27), Torrealba (14), Gwynn (9), Hundley (16). CS—Desmond (1), Denorfia (2). S—Zawadzki, Durango. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 2 (Desmond, Zimmerman); San Diego 4 (Zawadzki, Ad.Gonzalez 2, Denorfia). Runners moved up—Torrealba. GIDP—A.Kennedy, Torrealba. DP—Washington 2 (Desmond, A.Dunn), (Nieves, Nieves, A.Kennedy); San Diego 1 (Garland, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA L.Hernandez 6 1-3 8 2 2 0 4 90 2.15 Slaten 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.13 Storen 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 1.59 Clippard 2 0 0 0 1 3 29 1.82 S.Burnett L, 0-3 1 2-3 2 1 0 1 1 36 3.31 Capps 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 2.96 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garland 7 5 2 2 1 4 97 2.15 Adams 1 1 0 0 1 2 22 3.09 H.Bell 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.17 Gregrsn W, 1-1 2 0 0 0 0 3 25 1.63 Capps pitched to 1 batter in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Slaten 2-0, Storen 2-0, Capps 1-1. IBB—off S.Burnett (Ad.Gonzalez). PB—Torrealba. T—3:37. A—28,591 (42,691).

Giants 6, Diamondbacks 5 (10 innings) SAN FRANCISCO — Andres Torres hit a two-out RBI single in the 10th inning and the Giants handed the Diamondbacks their seventh consecutive loss. Torres hit a sharp liner to right off Carlos Rosa (0-1) for the first game-ending hit of his career and his fourth single of the game. Juan Uribe scored after starting the

rally with a two-out single. Arizona K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf S.Drew ss M.Reynolds 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b C.Young cf G.Parra lf Snyder c I.Kennedy p a-Ryal ph Heilman p c-R.Roberts ph Qualls p Rosa p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 0 34

R H 2 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 10

BI 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 1 0 3 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .270 .249 .294 .225 .272 .275 .244 .223 .136 .310 --.333 -----

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Hart rf Braddock p Gomez cf Lucroy c Wolf p Suppan p Estrada p a-Inglett ph 1-Bush pr Hoffman p Stern rf A.Escobar ss Totals

San Francisco Torres cf F.Sanchez 2b Sandoval 3b A.Huff lf B.Molina c Br.Wilson p Posey 1b Schierholtz rf Rohlinger ss Uribe ss Wellemeyer p S.Casilla p b-Cain ph Affeldt p Mota p d-Ishikawa ph Whiteside c Totals

AB 6 3 5 4 4 0 5 4 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 40

R H 2 4 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 6 15

BI 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .307 .324 .284 .296 .263 .000 .667 .278 .214 .288 .118 --.059 .000 --.273 .291

New York 100 102 204 — 10 16 0 Milwaukee 110 000 200 — 4 9 0 a-singled for Estrada in the 7th. b-walked for Dessens in the 9th. 1-ran for Inglett in the 7th. LOB—New York 12, Milwaukee 4. 2B—Jos.Reyes (10), D.Wright (13), Pagan (7), Francoeur 2 (9), H.Blanco 2 (4). HR—Pagan (4), off Suppan; Weeks 2 (8), off Dickey 2. RBIs—Jos.Reyes (19), L.Castillo 2 (14), D.Wright (34), Pagan 2 (22), Francoeur 2 (27), H.Blanco (4), Dickey (1), Weeks 3 (28), A.Escobar (15). SB—Francoeur (6). CS—Gomez (1). S—Dickey 2, Wolf. SF—D.Wright. Runners left in scoring position—New York 7 (Pagan 2, Jos.Reyes 3, Bay, I.Davis). Runners moved up—H.Blanco. GIDP—McGehee. DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, I.Davis); Milwaukee 2 (A.Escobar, Weeks), (Wolf, Fielder).

Arizona 020 000 021 0 — 5 10 0 San Fran. 200 000 012 1 — 6 15 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for I.Kennedy in the 7th. b-sacrificed for S.Casilla in the 7th. c-singled for Heilman in the 9th. ddoubled for Mota in the 9th. E—Uribe (3). LOB—Arizona 7, San Francisco 11. 2B—J.Upton (9), Posey 2 (2), Ishikawa (4). HR—Snyder (7), off Wellemeyer; A.Huff (6), off Heilman. RBIs— J.Upton (25), Ad.LaRoche (33), C.Young (38), Snyder 2 (24), Torres (13), F.Sanchez (7), Sandoval (21), A.Huff (23), B.Molina (11), Posey (4). SB—K.Johnson (5). CS—K.Johnson (2). S—S.Drew, Cain. SF—C.Young, B.Molina. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 4 (M.Reynolds, Ryal, G.Parra, S.Drew); San Francisco 5 (Schierholtz 2, Wellemeyer, Sandoval, B.Molina). GIDP—A.Huff. DP—Arizona 1 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Kennedy 6 5 2 2 3 6 94 3.38 Heilman 2 3 1 1 1 2 38 3.38 Qualls BS, 4-13 1 4 2 2 0 0 21 7.64 Rosa L, 0-1 2-3 3 1 1 0 1 23 4.76 S. Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wellemeyer 6 2-3 6 2 2 3 7 94 5.03 S.Casilla 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.00 Affeldt 1-3 1 2 2 3 0 18 4.08 Mota 1 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 21 1.53 Wilson W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.33 Inherited runners-scored—S.Casilla 2-0, Mota 3-1. IBB—off Affeldt (M.Reynolds). WP—Heilman. T—3:33. A—41,394 (41,915).

Dodgers 4, Rockies 3 DENVER — Clayton Kershaw struck out nine in five innings and Xavier Paul hit a tiebreaking RBI single in the sixth to lead the Dodgers to the victory. Kershaw (5-3) allowed two runs and four hits, but struggled at times with his control while matching his season high for strikeouts. He walked four, had a wild pitch and hit the first batter he faced. Los Angeles AB Furcal ss 5 R.Martin c 4 Kemp cf 3 Loney 1b 3 Blake 3b 4 Paul rf 3 Re.Johnson lf 4 DeWitt 2b 4 J.Carroll 2b 0 Kershaw p 2 a-Man.Ramirez ph 1 Troncoso p 0 Kuo p 0 Belisario p 0 c-G.Anderson ph 1 Broxton p 0 Totals 34

R 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 2

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .301 .250 .276 .290 .277 .281 .301 .265 .269 .059 .289 .000 ----.158 ---

Colorado C.Gonzalez cf Spilborghs lf Giambi 1b Tulowitzki ss Hawpe rf Iannetta c Stewart 3b Barmes 2b d-Helton ph J.Chacin p R.Betancourt p b-Fowler ph Rogers p e-S.Smith ph Totals

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 5 13

Avg. .316 .224 .220 .311 .296 .132 .277 .211 .260 .000 --.216 .200 .273

AB 4 5 2 3 2 4 4 3 1 2 0 1 0 1 32

Los Angeles 101 002 000 — 4 8 2 Colorado 200 000 001 — 3 5 0 a-struck out for Kershaw in the 6th. b-fouled out for R.Betancourt in the 6th. c-grounded out for Belisario in the 9th. d-struck out for Barmes in the 9th. e-reached on error for Rogers in the 9th. E—Blake (9), Furcal (8). LOB—Los Angeles 7, Colorado 8. 2B—Kemp (12), Loney (14), Blake (12), Stewart (8). RBIs—Loney 2 (32), Paul (6), DeWitt (14), C.Gonzalez (33), Tulowitzki (26), Iannetta (3). SF—Loney. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Blake 2, Loney); Colorado 5 (Stewart, Iannetta 4). GIDP—Iannetta. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Furcal, DeWitt, Loney). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw W, 5-3 5 4 2 2 4 9 97 2.95 Troncoso H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 4.74 Kuo H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.46 Belisario H, 9 1 0 0 0 1 1 13 6.35 Broxton S, 13 1 1 1 0 0 1 16 1.21 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Chacin L, 3-3 5 1-3 7 4 4 2 6 89 3.62 R.Betancourt 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 9 6.75 Rogers 3 1 0 0 0 1 31 5.32 Inherited runners-scored—R.Betancourt 1-0. HBP—by Kershaw (C.Gonzalez), by J.Chacin (R.Martin). WP—Kershaw. T—3:08. A—48,682 (50,449).

Mets 10, Brewers 4 MILWAUKEE — Knuckleballer R.A. Dickey pitched seven innings and Angel Pagan homered to help the Mets avoid a three-game sweep. The Mets battered Milwaukee’s shaky bullpen, which allowed eight runs in four innings, to improve to 4-12 in May away from Citi Field. New York AB Jos.Reyes ss 5 L.Castillo 2b 5 Bay lf 4 F.Rodriguez p 0 Tatis 1b 2 I.Davis 1b 3 D.Wright 3b 3 Pagan cf 5 Francoeur rf 5 H.Blanco c 4 Dickey p 2 Feliciano p 0 Dessens p 0 b-Matthews Jr. ph-lf0 Totals 38

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 10

H 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 4 3 1 0 0 0 16

BI 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 10

BB 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 8

SO 1 0 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .257 .241 .293 --.222 .266 .251 .295 .243 .304 .200 ----.179

AB 4 4 3 4 4 0 4 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 33

R 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 3 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 9 4 1

SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .251 .318 .269 .302 .260 --.261 .400 .296 .200 .000 .349 .091 --.000 .254

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey W, 2-0 7 9 4 4 0 3 99 2.84 Feliciano 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 2.18 Dessens H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.45 F.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 1.80 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf 5 5 2 2 5 3 114 4.46 Suppan L, 0-2 1 2-3 6 4 4 2 2 41 7.22 Estrada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 6.97 Hoffman 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 10.69 Braddock 1 5 4 4 1 2 37 9.00 Feliciano pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Dessens 1-0, Estrada 2-0. IBB—off Suppan (Jos.Reyes). T—3:28. A—36,559 (41,900).

Cardinals 9, Cubs 1 CHICAGO — Albert Pujols hit three long home runs and Adam Wainwright pitched seven impressive innings, leading St. Louis past Chicago. Pujols connected in the first, fifth and ninth innings for his fourth career three-homer game, and first since Sept. 3, 2006, against the Pirates. He has four homers in four games after hitting one in 28 games. St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ludwick rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Freese 3b Jay cf Y.Molina c B.Ryan ss Wainwright p b-Stavinoha ph Motte p McClellan p Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 5 5 5 3 3 1 0 0 40

R H 0 1 2 2 4 3 1 4 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 14

Chicago Fukudome rf Theriot 2b D.Lee 1b Ar.Ramirez 3b Byrd cf A.Soriano lf Soto c S.Castro ss Dempster p Howry p a-Colvin ph Grabow p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 0 1 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 1 4 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 2 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .240 .286 .310 .307 .316 .243 .258 .198 .100 .302 .000 1.000

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 2

SO 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .293 .286 .237 .166 .302 .302 .258 .313 .227 --.310 ---

St. Louis 100 030 203 — 9 14 0 Chicago 000 000 100 — 1 7 1 a-struck out for Howry in the 7th. b-grounded out for Wainwright in the 8th. E—Soto (1). LOB—St. Louis 7, Chicago 6. 2B—Ludwick (13), A.Soriano (16). HR—Pujols 2 (11), off Dempster 2; Pujols (12), off Grabow; Freese (4), off Grabow; Soto (5), off Wainwright. RBIs—Ludwick (24), Pujols 4 (38), Holliday (20), Freese 3 (31), Soto (11). SB—Schumaker (2), B.Ryan (3). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 2 (Jay 2); Chicago 2 (S.Castro 2). Runners moved up—Byrd. GIDP—Holliday, S.Castro. DP—St. Louis 1 (B.Ryan, Schumaker, Pujols); Chicago 1 (Ar.Ramirez, D.Lee). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wnwrght W, 7-3 7 7 1 1 2 8 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 1 McClellan 1 0 0 0 0 0 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO Dempster L, 3-5 6 2-3 9 6 6 3 7 Howry 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 Grabow 2 4 3 3 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Howry 2-1. Dempster (Pujols). T—2:49. A—41,353 (41,210).

NP ERA 107 2.28 18 2.61 11 2.01 NP ERA 125 3.72 6 9.00 43 9.45 IBB—off

Braves 5, Pirates 2 ATLANTA — Pinch-hitter Chipper Jones had a tiebreaking RBI single in the eighth inning and Atlanta completed a three-game sweep. Nate McLouth started the decisive rally with a one-out walk. He swiped second before Joel Hanrahan (1-1) walked pinch-hitter Brian McCann. Martin Prado struck out but Jones followed with a bloop single into shallow left field, just out of the reach of shortstop Ronny Cedeno. Pittsburgh AB R A.McCutchen cf 4 0 N.Walker 3b-2b 4 0 Delw.Young rf 4 0 G.Jones lf 3 1 Clement 1b 3 1 d-Crosby ph 1 0 Cedeno ss 3 0 Jaramillo c 2 0 Iwamura 2b 3 0 Hanrahan p 0 0 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 Maholm p 1 0 An.LaRoche 3b 1 0 Totals 29 2 Atlanta Prado 2b Infante 3b c-C.Jones ph-3b Heyward rf Glaus 1b Y.Escobar ss Me.Cabrera lf D.Ross c a-Hinske ph Wagner p McLouth cf Kawakami p O’Flaherty p Saito p b-McCann ph-c Totals

AB 5 4 1 5 2 5 4 1 1 0 3 3 0 0 0 34

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 2

R H 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 12

BI 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6

SO 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .313 .292 .227 .255 .205 .235 .261 .205 .173 --.000 .000 .254

SO 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .325 .302 .243 .301 .269 .203 .243 .283 .329 --.184 .143 --.000 .263

Pittsburgh 000 000 200 — 2 4 0 Atlanta 101 000 03x — 5 12 0 a-popped out for D.Ross in the 8th. b-walked for Saito

in the 8th. c-singled for Infante in the 8th. d-flied out for Clement in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 12. 2B—Me.Cabrera (6), Kawakami (1). 3B—Heyward (3). HR—Clement (5), off Kawakami; Glaus (7), off Maholm. RBIs—Clement 2 (9), C.Jones (19), Heyward 2 (38), Glaus 2 (34). SB—Me.Cabrera (2), McLouth (4). CS—Heyward (2). S—Maholm. SF—Glaus. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 3 (A.McCutchen, Delw.Young 2); Atlanta 7 (Prado 2, McLouth 2, D.Ross, Heyward, Y.Escobar). Runners moved up—N.Walker. GIDP—Clement. DP—Atlanta 1 (Y.Escobar, Glaus). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO Maholm 6 10 2 2 3 5 Hanrahan L, 1-1 1 2-3 1 3 3 2 2 Ja.Lopez 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO Kawakami 6 2-3 4 2 2 2 2 O’Flaherty 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Saito W, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 Wagner S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez 2-2. T—2:54. A—31,078 (49,743).

NP 113 35 12 NP 93 5 12 10

ERA 3.90 5.66 1.74 ERA 4.66 2.61 3.13 1.80

Astros 2, Reds 0 (10 innings) CINCINNATI — Lance Berkman hit a two-run double in the 10th inning and the Astros salvaged the finale of the three-game series. Micah Owings (3-1) walked pinch-hitter Cory Sullivan and Michael Bourn with one out. Jeff Keppinger fouled out before Berkman hit Owings’ first pitch into the right-field corner. Houston AB R Bourn cf 3 1 Keppinger 2b 4 0 Berkman 1b 5 0 Ca.Lee lf 5 0 Lindstrom p 0 0 Pence rf 4 0 Blum 3b 3 0 Manzella ss 4 0 Quintero c 3 0 F.Paulino p 3 0 Lyon p 0 0 d-Sullivan ph-lf 0 1 Totals 34 2

H BI BB 1 0 2 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 2 5

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .271 .294 .234 .205 --.277 .256 .203 .242 .389 --.182

Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss Cairo 1b B.Phillips 2b Bruce rf Gomes lf L.Nix cf R.Hernandez c Janish 3b b-Rolen ph-3b Leake p Fisher p Rhodes p Masset p a-Heisey ph Cordero p c-Stubbs ph Owings p Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 0 6

SO 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .271 .304 .277 .273 .303 .234 .307 .281 .275 .381 ------.259 --.235 .111

AB 4 5 4 5 5 3 3 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Houston 000 000 000 2 — 2 8 0 Cincinnati 000 000 000 0 — 0 6 0 a-walked for Masset in the 8th. b-popped out for Janish in the 9th. c-walked for Cordero in the 9th. d-walked for Lyon in the 10th. LOB—Houston 8, Cincinnati 11. 2B—Berkman (7), Blum (3), B.Phillips (17). RBIs—Berkman 2 (17). SB— Bourn (17). CS—Bourn (6), Janish (1). S—O.Cabrera. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 6 (Ca.Lee 2, Berkman 3, Manzella); Cincinnati 5 (L.Nix, Bruce 2, O.Cabrera 2). GIDP—Berkman 2. DP—Cincinnati 3 (B.Phillips, O.Cabrera, Cairo), (L.Nix, L.Nix, Janish), (B.Phillips, O.Cabrera, Cairo). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Paulino 8 4 0 0 4 5 113 4.40 Lyon W, 4-1 1 1 0 0 2 0 26 3.38 Lindstrom S, 11 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 2.05 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake 6 7 0 0 3 3 97 2.45 Fisher 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 7.20 Rhodes 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 14 0.44 Masset 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 7.25 Cordero 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 3.60 Owings L, 3-1 1 1 2 2 2 0 24 3.86 Inherited runners-scored—Rhodes 1-0. IBB—off Lyon (L.Nix). HBP—by Fisher (Quintero). WP—Lyon. T—3:12. A—36,038 (42,319).

Marlins 1, Phillies 0 MIAMI — Not even 24 hours after making the final out of Roy Halladay’s perfect game, Ronny Paulino drove in the only run to lift the Marlins to the victory. Paulino’s sixth-inning single drove in Hanley Ramirez and made a winner of Anibal Sanchez (5-2), who gave up three hits and struck out seven in 6 2⁄3 innings. Leo Nunez pitched a perfect ninth for his 10th save in 12 tries as Florida ended a four-game losing streak. Philadelphia Victorino cf W.Valdez ss Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf B.Francisco lf J.Castro 3b Schneider c c-Ibanez ph Moyer p a-Dobbs ph Herndon p Totals

AB 4 3 3 2 4 4 4 2 1 2 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 11

Avg. .262 .250 .277 .288 .295 .194 .253 .174 .245 .111 .130 .000

Florida Coghlan lf Helms 3b H.Ramirez ss Cantu 1b Uggla 2b R.Paulino c C.Ross cf B.Carroll rf Ani.Sanchez p Tankersley p b-Lamb ph Hensley p Nunez p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 3 4 3 2 2 0 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 2

Avg. .217 .290 .298 .281 .268 .306 .296 .191 .211 --.190 .000 ---

SO 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Philadelphia 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 Florida 000 001 00x — 1 6 0 a-struck out for Moyer in the 7th. b-grounded out for Tankersley in the 7th. c-grounded out for Schneider in the 9th. E—W.Valdez (2). LOB—Philadelphia 8, Florida 8. 2B—Victorino (7), H.Ramirez (9), Uggla (10). RBIs—R.Paulino (16). SB—Coghlan (6), H.Ramirez (6). S—W.Valdez. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Werth 3); Florida 5 (C.Ross 2, Coghlan, Helms, R.Paulino). Runners moved up—Utley, Uggla. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Utley, W.Valdez). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moyer L, 5-5 6 4 1 1 2 2 96 4.26 Herndon 2 2 0 0 0 2 20 3.93 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 5-2 6 2-3 3 0 0 3 7 104 2.89 Tankersley H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Hensley H, 5 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 1.30 Nunez S, 10-12 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 2.08 Inherited runners-scored—Tankersley 1-0. IBB—off Ani.Sanchez (Howard). HBP—by Moyer (B.Carroll). T—2:28. A—13,324 (38,560).


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 D5

Stampede

Indy

Continued from D1 Sheppard’s friend and neighbor Ben Thompson, 33, came in a close second (1:46:37). “There was some lap traffic, but overall it was a great race,” noted Thompson. “There was some good technical rocky sections, some good high speed, a good mix of everything.” Men’s pro third-place finisher was Brett Nichols, of Boise, Idaho, clocking in at 1:49:55. Also emerging and resurging back into the bike racing community was women’s Category 1 winner Shawna Palanuks, who placed second overall among women riders. Palanuks, the wife of the race director, finished a roughly 28-mile course in (1:59:41). Cat 2 men, single speed, Clydesdale, and Cat 1 and pro women raced the 28-mile course, while pro men raced 31 miles and Cat 3 riders took on a 13-mile course. Race organizers had to adjust the course slightly at midweek to avoid equestrian trails. “It was a sweet victory,” said Shawna Palanuks, 33, of Sisters, who has taken several years off from professional bike racing to raise her two young children. “It was so awesome, I could cry. … It just felt good to be a mom of two who works and goes to school and still compete with all those other girls. I’m happy, and I’m just overwhelmed by the community support.” Beating out Palanuks for the top spot was Tina Brubaker, of Salem, clocking in at 1:58:40 in the pro women’s division. Brubaker races all kinds of bikes and

Continued from D1 It left Castroneves in need of a yellow-flag miracle at the end that never came, and he finished ninth after one last pit stop on the 192nd lap. “Unfortunately, silly mistakes put us in the back,” Castroneves said. “I’m very disappointed. I’m more disappointed with the mistake.” Meanwhile, Danica Patrick made no mistakes. After being booed during qualifying when she complained about a balky car, she picked and poked her way from 23rd to finish sixth. Patrick never found her comfort zone in the 88-degree weather — at one point saying she wished she could make up as much time on the track as in the pits — but she was patient and disciplined and now has five top-10 finishes in six years. Marco Andretti was third, followed by England’s Alex Lloyd and Scott Dixon. “I’m very happy with the result, and the reasons we got it were that our pit stops rocked and we had a perfect strategy,” Patrick said. Not so for Tony Kanaan, who finished 11th after starting last in the 33-car field and moving as high as second, less than half a second behind. His chance of becoming the first driver in 94 years of Indys to go from worst to first ended when he had to go to the pits for a splash of fuel with four laps to go. “I hope I made it exciting out there,” Kanaan said. More exciting than Franchitti might have wanted. “I was concerned about running out of fuel. I was concerned about Tony. And then he pitted,” Franchitti said. His crew started pressing their driver to conserve fuel with about 15 laps left. He did as he was told, and after leading 154 of the first 199 laps at speeds of up to 224.287 mph, he slowed steadily at the end — to 210 mph, then 209 and 206. Wheldon started bearing down, positioning himself to make the last lap of the Indy 500 the first lap he had led all year on the circuit. That’s when the cars behind them went flying. With the yellow flag out, Franchitti’s wife, actress Ashley Judd, put her hand over her head, hoping her man had enough fuel to make it. He did, and was on his way to a milk mustache in Victory Lane. Both times he’s been there, he’s crossed the bricks without really racing. In 2007, he won when the race was shortened to 166 laps because of rain. This time, the end came under slow, yellow-flag conditions that froze the order of finish.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Chris Sheppard, 37, of Bend, rounds one of the last turns as he heads toward the finish line during the Sisters Stampede mountain bike race sanctioned by the Oregon Bicycle Racing Association Sunday in Sisters. Sheppard clinched his first-place finish in the male pro category with a time of 1:45:40. is known for winning road races around the state. “It was really flat and powery (lots of opportunity to sprint) and that kind of racing really suits me and this bike,” said Brubaker, who would not reveal her age. “I had Shawna on my tail pretty close the whole day. I think she was right behind me.” Heather Clark, 31, of Bend, placed third in the women’s pro field with a time of 2:01:28. For Mike Reightley, his first mountain bike race provided a surprising finish.

Vijarro Continued from D1 “(Vijarro has) been a huge, huge part of our success in more ways than just his golf scores,” said Martin. “He’s done great on the golf course, but he also brings an element of competitiveness and intensity that’s good for our team. “I have a group of fairly quiet, fairly laidback guys. And Andrew is good because he brings a little more passion and just aggressiveness.” This is not the first national championship appearance for Vijarro. As a freshman, he finished stroke play tied for 104th place out of 156 golfers at the NCAA Championships at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio. In that tournament the young Ducks, who were starting four freshmen and one sophomore, finished 22nd out of 30 teams. But this has been a different year, and Vijarro believes the Ducks will improve on that result this year. “Last year we were really young, and I don’t think we had the expectation of winning,” Vijarro recalled. “I think we knew one day we would be good enough. To be honest, I don’t know if we knew it would be this soon.”

Garagiola Continued from D1 Speaking about the lobbyists for new smokeless products, he said: “They tell you it’s a safe alternative, but my answer is, ‘Hey, don’t jump out the 50th floor, jump out the 25th floor. You got 25 floors on your side. The results are going to be the same.’ ” At 84, Garagiola still sounds like the exuberant kid catcher who batted .316 in the 1946 World Series. He doesn’t like to admit he could play — it’s bad for his bench-warmer image. While Garagiola was with the Cardinals in the late 1940s, he picked up the habit of chewing from teammates, many of them rural and Southern. (Young white males are the highest users today — 15 percent.) Garagiola remembers the day he stopped chewing, in the late ’50s, after his baseball career ended. His youngest child, Gina, came home from grade school and asked if he was going to die from cancer because of tobacco. “I said, ‘That’s it,’ and I put it aside,” he said. “It was difficult, but I quit.” He became an activist, going around to training camps with Bill Tuttle, a former outfielder whose jaw was being chipped away by operations for cancer. Tuttle, who had learned to chew from older players, died in 1998 at age 69. There were successes. When Curt Schilling was with the Phillies, Garagiola walked him to the free clubhouse exam by telling endless Yogi Berra stories. Garagiola describes the stricken look on Schilling, who soon had a precancerous lesion removed and has given credit to Garagiola for helping to save his life. In mid-April, the House Energy and Commerce Committee held a hearing, led by its chairman, Rep. Henry A. Waxman, D-Calif. Terry Pechacek of the Centers

“I couldn’t believe when no one was in front of me,” he said. No one was in front of the 53year-old from Bend because he was the winner of the men’s Cat 3 competition. Reightley said he may now be hooked on racing. “It wasn’t any different than getting out on a really aggressive mountain bike ride,” noted Reightley, who completed the 13-mile Cat 3 course in 1:00:35. “There were just a few more people to try to steer around.” “I think the turnout is proof

2010 NCAA Division I Men’s Golf Championships When: Tuesday through Sunday Where: The Honors Course (Ooltewah, Tenn.) Who: Top-ranked University of Oregon, including Bend’s Andrew Vijarro; No. 21 Oregon State, led by Colombian star Diego Velasquez. Other participants: Stanford, Texas A&M, Oklahoma State, Washington, UCLA, Texas, USC, Arizona State, Texas Tech, Florida, UNLV, Augusta State, Georgia Tech, Florida State, Illinois, Virginia, Clemson, North Florida, Duke, Tennessee, TCU, LSU, San Diego, California, Kent State, Baylor, Georgia Southern, Penn State. Format: 54-hole stroke play; top eight teams advance to single-elimination match play.

Martin, too, has been surprised at the pace of his team’s development. But, he said, the Oregon golfers have handled their newfound role as a favorite well. “We’ve had that role most of the spring … so we have some experience with it, although not to the extent of playing at a na-

for Disease Control and Prevention said smokeless tobacco could cause oral cancer and pancreatic cancer and had been linked to fatal heart attacks. He also said the product was highly addictive. Baseball officials agree that smokeless tobacco is dangerous, but they cannot address the issue until collective bargaining for the next contract, after the 2011 season. Some players assert they have the right to chew. “We’d like to discourage players from using smokeless tobacco,” Michael Weiner, the new head of the union, said in a recent interview, adding that he had “no doubt of the effects to habitual users.” Rob Manfred, an executive vice president of Major League Baseball, noted that baseball provides oral exams and literature about the danger of smokeless tobacco. Baseball does not permit smokeless tobacco in the minor leagues, but Garagiola, who has been around clubhouses since he was 15, knows all the tricks. “Kids, they’re smart, they put sunflower seeds in front, dip in the back or whatever, and they’ll spit so the tobacco cop doesn’t get you,” he said. “And when they come to the big leagues, the first thing they do is put a dip in their mouth.” Garagiola talked about a star pitcher he saw on television recently, coming out of a game: “They’re praising him for being a gamer and he sits on the bench and what’s the first thing he does? He takes out some tobacco.” At least baseball could stop players from sticking that familiar circular tin in their hip pocket, Garagiola said. He said he told a baseball official: “Arnold Palmer always walked on the green and flipped a cigarette. Why wouldn’t you let a guy walk up to home plate and flip a cigarette when he got to the batter’s box? You don’t allow that.”

that Central Oregon wants more mountain bike races,” said Cat 1 Stampede rider Bill Warburton, of Bend. “And it’s a holiday weekend. You can race hard today and not work tomorrow.” “As long as everybody is happy with how things went this year,” noted Joel Palanuks, “then we are going to make it a goal to make it an annual event on Memorial Day weekend — Sisters Stampede.” Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

tional championship level,” Martin said. “We talk about it, and I think the guys are excited. And I told them how proud I was just to get a No. 1 seed in the national championship. It’s kind of a reflection of what they’ve done.” Vijarro struggled in April’s Pac-10 championship, finishing 51st out of 60 golfers. That disappointing showing was part of an inconsistent finish to his spring golf season. But the confident Vijarro saw improvement in his 21st-place result in the NCAA regionals. “I had a couple of months there where I wasn’t playing my game,” Vijarro conceded. “It is really starting to come around. I played really well at regionals, but I didn’t score great.” The Ducks will need Vijarro in top form if they want to win a national championship. And Vijarro said he will be ready for the challenge. “Overall, my game is starting to come back to where it was toward the beginning of the year,” Vijarro said. “It’s just a matter of being patient out there and letting it come. But I would say my game is right there on the verge of being really good again.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

Garagiola told about the funeral in 1998 for a high school coach, Bob Leslie, who died of oral cancer at 31. As he delivered the eulogy, Garagiola noticed his friend’s widow “holding this baby and I’m thinking, ‘He’s

not going to see her go to school. He’s not going to see her get married.’ ” His voice quavered, momentarily. Then he resumed. Joe Garagiola still has something to say.

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“One of the worst things you can do, and we’ve done it, is to finish a race with some fuel left,” Ganassi said. Not to worry this time. Ganassi won his fourth Indy and has one of those few pieces of history that aren’t owned by racing’s most successful owner, Roger Penske, who had an unusually bewildering day in his quest for a 16th Indy victory. More than an hour before Castroneves stalled in pit road, teammate Will Power’s crew left part of the fuel rig in his tank — a costly mistake that forced Power to take a penalty run through pit road and dropped him out of the top five. And moments after Castroneves’ error, his other teammate, Ryan Briscoe, careened into the wall and out of the race while Penske, The Captain, looked on — hand on hip, seemingly amazed at how his smooth-running machine fell so far, so fast. “As a team, we made too many mistakes today,” Power said. “We had a bloody fast car. I think we could’ve hung with Dario, no problem. It’s the lesson of this place. You can’t make mistakes.” Power’s problems were part of an overall sloppy day at “The Greatest Spectacle In Racing,” which featured nine caution periods, including one when Davey Hamilton, the oldest driver in the race, crashed before the drivers made it out of Turn 2 on the first lap. Dixon, Franchitti’s teammate, lost his left front tire coming out of pit road. Raphael Matos, who got to second early in the race, dropped back when his right rear tire came off — then went out when he hit the wall on lap 72. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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D6 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

AUTO RACING SCOREBOARD AUTOCROSS AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON 2010 Event No. 2 At Hoodoo Mountain Resort May 23 Results Super Stock — 1, James Hudson, 2009 Corvette Z06, 57.001. E Stock — 1, Thomas Atkins, 1990 Mazda Miata 1.6, 61.627. G Stock — 1, Christian Bartolome, 2002 Audi A6 2.7T, 59.346. H Stock — 1, Gabe Hammond, 1984 BMW 318i, 63.018. B Street Prepared — 1, Steve Krygier, 2009 Mazda Miata, 52.344. 2, Jeffery Fields, 2005 MazdaSpeed MX-5, 53.027. 3, Tim Hagner, 1984 Porsche Carrera, 56.548. 4, Scott Gardner, 1984 Porsche Carrera, 59.668. F Street Prepared — 1, Jack Gassaway, 1984 VW Rabbit GTI 1.8, 56.276. 2, Charles Ray, 1993 Honda Accord 2.2L, 56.300. Over Street Prepared (2.5L and Over) — 1, Dave Arata, 1987 Mustang LX, 62.005. DNF, John Sommer, 2002 Camaro L36. X Prepared — 1, Tyler Shepard, 1985 Toyota MR2, 52.337. 2, David Boyd, 1967 Sunbeam Tiger, 56.664. C Prepared — 1, Nick Kerbs, 1985 Camaro, 60.935. 2, DaWayne Kerbs, 1985 Camaro, 64.254. F Prepared — 1, Jeff Neal, 1974 Datsun 260Z 2.8L, 57.231. E Modified — 1, Luke Smolich, 1992 Nissan Sentra, 58.829. Street Touring S — 1, Robert Clark, Honda Civic Dx, 57.365. 2, Chris Howe, 1990 Mazda Protege, 57.760. 3, Andy Imhof, 1990 Mazda Protege, 59.362. DNF, Thomas Bennett, 1989 Toyota MR2. Stree Touring X — 1, Jeff Ellington, 2002 Subaru WRX, 55.544. Street Touring U — 1, Jolynn Franke, 2004 Dodge SRT4 2.4, 57.659. 2, Rachelle Leach, 2006 Subaru WRX-STi, 59.151. Street Modified — 1, Sean Glaab, 2001 Trans Am, 56.649. 2, Matt Anderson, 1991 Subaru Legacy Turbo, 58.866. Street Modified F — 1, Ryan Davis, Infinity G20, 56.558. 2, Jeovan Lopez, 1992 Honda Civic, 63.995. Street Modified II — 1, Marvin Wodtli, 2008 Pontiac Solstice GXP 2.0L, 54.261. 2, Devon Tomlin, 1984 Mazda RX-7, 64.304. Junior Kart A — 1, Connor Neal, SKM KART 50cc, 76.076. Top Times of Day Raw Time — 52.337; XP 84; Tyler Shepard. Pax — 45.277; BSP 36; Steve Krygier. Stock — 57.001; SS 19; James Hudson. Street Prepared — 52.344; BSP 36; Steve Krygier. Prepared — 52.337; XP 84; Tyler Shepard. Modified — 58.829; EM 55; Luke Smolich. Touring — 55.544; STX 32; Jeff Ellington. Street Modified — 54.261; SSM 6, Marvin Wodtli. Junior Kart — 76.076; FJA 20; Connor Neal.

IRL INDIANAPOLIS 500 Sunday At Indianapolis Motor Speedway Lap length: 2.5 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (3) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 2. (18) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 3. (16) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 4. (26) Alex Lloyd, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 5. (6) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 6. (23) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 7. (11) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 8. (2) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 9. (1) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 10. (5) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 11. (33) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 12. (7) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 13. (27) Mario Romancini, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 14. (22) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 200, Running. 15. (20) Tomas Scheckter, Dallara-Honda, 199, Running. 16. (10) Townsend Bell, Dallara-Honda, 199, Running. 17. (8) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Honda, 199, Running. 18. (17) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 198, Contact. 19. (15) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 198, Contact. 20. (31) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 198, Running. 21. (21) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Honda, 196, Running. 22. (24) Bertrand Baguette, Dallara-Honda, 183, Running. 23. (32) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Honda, 159, Contact. 24. (4) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 147, Contact. 25. (19) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Honda, 139, Contact. 26. (29) Sarah Fisher, Dallara-Honda, 125, Contact. 27. (30) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 105, Contact. 28. (9) Hideki Mutoh, Dallara-Honda, 76, Handling. 29. (12) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 72, Contact. 30. (28) John Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 62, Contact. 31. (13) Mario Moraes, Dallara-Honda, 17, Contact. 32. (25) Bruno Junqueira, Dallara-Honda, 7, Contact. 33. (14) Davey Hamilton, Dallara-Honda, 0, Contact. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 161.623 Time of Race: 03:05:37.0131 Margin of Victory: Under caution Cautions: 9 for 44 laps Lead Changes: 13 among 8 drivers Lap Leaders: Franchitti 1-30, Power 31-35, Franchitti 36, Briscoe 37-38, Franchitti 39-108, Scheckter 109-113, Franchitti 114142, M. Andretti 143, Briscoe 144-146, Franchitti 147-162, Conway 163-177, Wilson 178-188, Castroneves 189-191, Franchitti 192-200. Points: Power 227, Franchitti 216, Dixon 203, Castroneves 199, Hunter-Reay 175, Wilson 167, Briscoe 155, Kanaan 151, Wheldon 142, M. Andretti 134.

NASCAR Sprint Cup COCA-COLA 600 Sunday At Charlotte Motor Speedway Concord, N.C. Lap length: 1.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 400 laps, 147.8 rating, 195 points, $399,623. 2. (27) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 400, 118.5, 175, $299,404. 3. (9) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 400, 110.2, 170, $240,256. 4. (11) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 400, 90, 160, $170,450. 5. (6) David Reutimann, Toyota, 400, 119.7, 160, $177,731. 6. (15) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 400, 94.9, 155, $172,701. 7. (10) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 400, 113.2, 151, $129,075. 8. (33) Paul Menard, Ford, 400, 95.3, 142, $122,825. 9. (1) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 400, 95.1, 143, $196,454. 10. (16) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 400, 94.9, 139, $153,451. 11. (23) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 400, 89.1, 130, $143,331. 12. (4) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 400, 82.9, 127, $145,365. 13. (8) Joey Logano, Toyota, 400, 98.5, 129, $141,065. 14. (18) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 400, 78.2, 121, $139,476. 15. (26) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 400, 87.1, 123, $137,998. 16. (31) Carl Edwards, Ford, 400, 72.3, 115, $136,098. 17. (14) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 400, 62.7, 112, $106,860. 18. (7) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 400, 71.6, 114, $113,800. 19. (32) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 400, 64.9, 106, $104,125. 20. (37) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 400, 66, 108, $122,210. 21. (39) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 400, 60.4, 100, $108,825. 22. (24) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 400, 65.8, 102, $101,150. 23. (3) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 400, 76.3, 99, $96,400. 24. (35) David Ragan, Ford, 400, 67.6, 96, $99,350. 25. (12) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 399, 96.8, 88, $126,040. 26. (28) David Gilliland, Ford, 398, 47.5, 90, $108,048. 27. (25) Bill Elliott, Ford, 397, 49.9, 82, $85,850. 28. (41) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 397, 46.5, 79, $107,085. 29. (13) Casey Mears, Toyota, 396, 46.6, 76, $126,923. 30. (21) Scott Speed, Toyota, 395, 44.7, 73, $104,648. 31. (38) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 395, 38, 70, $88,925. 32. (40) Greg Biffle, Ford, 394, 64.2, 67, $93,075. 33. (36) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 394, 47.8, 64, $101,198. 34. (43) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 393, 35.5, 61, $84,550. 35. (42) Kevin Conway, Ford, 393, 32.4, 58, $86,400. 36. (34) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, accident, 375, 49.4, 55, $104,623. 37. (5) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 364, 79.3, 57, $140,403. 38. (20) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, accident, 306, 54.2, 49, $119,616. 39. (19) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, overheating, 46, 28.5, 46, $83,825. 40. (29) Todd Bodine, Toyota, transmission, 41, 27.3, 43, $83,715. 41. (22) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, transmission, 37, 29.9, 40, $83,555. 42. (30) Michael McDowell, Toyota, brakes, 34, 31.6, 37, $83,475. 43. (17) Dave Blaney, Toyota, transmission, 25, 27.6, 34, $83,838. ——— Race Statistics Top 12 in Points: 1. K.Harvick, 1,898; 2. Ky.Busch, 1,869; 3. M.Kenseth, 1,781; 4. J.Gordon, 1,760; 5. D.Hamlin, 1,732; 6. Ku.Busch, 1,726; 7. J.Johnson, 1,694; 8. J.Burton, 1,657; 9. G.Biffle, 1,648; 10. M.Martin, 1,635; 11. C.Edwards, 1,602; 12. R.Newman, 1,547.

FORMULA ONE TURKISH GRAND PRIX Sunday At Istanbul Park Istanbul Lap length: 3.32 miles 1. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 58 laps, 1:28:47.620, 129.908 mph. 2. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 58, 1:28:50.265 seconds behind. 3. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 58, 1:29:11.905. 4. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 58, 1:29:18.730. 5. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 58, 1:29:29.886. 6. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 58, 1:29:19.886. 7. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 58, 1:29:24.255. 8. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 58, 1:29:34.164. 9. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 58, 1:29:36.649. 10. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 58, 1:29:53.270. 11. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 58, 1:29:53.564. 12. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 58, 1:29:55.420. 13. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 57, +1 lap. 14. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 57, +1 lap. 15. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 57, +1 lap. 16. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 57, +1 lap. 17. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 57, +1 lap. 18. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 55, +3 laps. 19. Lucas di Grassi, Brazil, Virgin, 55, +3 laps. Not Classfied 20. Karun Chandhok, India, HRT, 52, Retired. 21. Bruno Senna, Brazil, HRT, 46, Retired. 22. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 39, Retired. 23. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus Racing, 33, Retired. 24. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus Racing, 32, Retired.

NASCAR

Kurt Busch sweeps at Charlotte Driver pulls away late in the Coca-Cola 600 for his second victory in a two-week span By Jenna Fryer The Associated Press

CONCORD, N.C. — Kurt Busch used a lightning fast final pit stop to chase down the leaders and give team owner Roger Penske a coveted Memorial Day weekend victory. That the win came in the Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Motor Speedway, and not at his beloved Indianapolis Motor Speedway, probably didn’t matter to Penske. After all, it came at the expense of Chip Ganassi, Penske’s top rival in open-wheel racing and the winning car owner of the Indianapolis 500 earlier Sunday. “Roger, this one is for you,” Busch said. Busch and Ganassi driver Jamie McMurray were the class of the field at the end of NASCAR’s longest race of the season, and McMurray was hoping to give Ganassi a sweep of the two prestigious Memorial Day weekend races. Earlier Sunday, Dario Franchitti won in Indianapolis and, after the celebration, Ganassi flew to North Carolina to catch the second half of the NASCAR race. He arrived in time to see McMurray work his Chevrolet through the field and ultimately take over the lead from Busch. But a late caution for a Marcos Ambrose crash with 24 laps to go took it out of McMurray’s hands. He led most of the leaders down pit road, but was beat back onto the track by Busch and Matt Kenseth. Jeff Gordon was the first of three cars not to pit, and restarted as the leader with 19 laps remaining. Busch blew past the three lead cars and steadily pulled away from the pack. McMurray quickly moved into second, but ran out of time to run down Busch, who held on to sweep the May races at Charlotte. Busch won the $1 million AllStar race last weekend. “I thought about the Ganassi car be-

Gerry Broome / The Associated Press

Kurt Busch does a burnout after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series’ Coca-Cola 600 in Concord, N.C., Sunday. hind me,” Busch said in Victory Lane, “he wasn’t getting by us.” Ganassi didn’t seem to mind the defeat. “It was a great race, Jamie did a great job,” he smiled. “My old buddy Penske beat me tonight.” Kyle Busch rallied from a mid-race crash on pit road to finish third in a Toyota for Joe Gibbs Racing. Mark Martin finished fourth — the highest finishing Hendrick Motorsports car — and defending race winner David Reutimann was fifth for Michael Waltrip Racing. Gordon wound up sixth and was followed by Clint Bowyer and Paul Menard, who had the highest finishing Ford. Ryan Newman and Kenseth rounded out the top 10. While Kurt Busch celebrated in Victory Lane, his younger brother was get-

ting an earful on pit road from a furious Jeff Burton. Burton was eighth on the final restart, running right next to Kyle Busch, when contact between the two cars ruined any chance for a solid finish for Burton. He faded to 25th and angrily confronted Busch after the race. “Kyle made it three-wide on the restart, trying to make something happen, which I don’t have a problem with,” Burton said. “So he runs into me and cuts my left-rear tire, then I have a problem with it. He’s real aggressive. That’s cool. But when he starts affecting me with his aggressiveness, I just will not put up with it. I’ve been around here long enough. I just will not tolerate it.” It soured yet another stellar comeback for Kyle Busch, who rallied from two laps

down on Saturday to win the Nationwide Series race. On Sunday, he was the leader when a bizarre sequence of events on Lap 167 changed the entire race. Four-time defending series champion Jimmie Johnson was running fourth when he inexplicably hit the wall, and Denny Hamlin, running fifth, had to weave low through the grass to avoid hitting Johnson. Both cars suffered considerable damage and NASCAR called for a caution that sent everyone to pit road. Kyle Busch, at the time the strongest car in the race, ran into Brad Keselowski on pit road to damage his car. Even worse, NASCAR flagged him for speeding and he was forced to also serve a penalty. It dropped Kyle Busch all the way back to 26th in a race he maybe could have won.

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Hamilton, Button finish 1-2 in Turkish GP The Associated Press ISTANBUL — Lewis Hamilton led McLaren to a 1-2 finish at the Turkish Grand Prix on Sunday after a costly runin between teammates Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel denied Red Bull a shot at the top two spots. The pair touched as Vettel looked to pass along the Istanbul Park Circuit’s fastest section, causing the German driver to spin out of the race. Webber, who had led for the entire 40 laps to that point, recovered for third behind Jenson Button as Red Bull’s pit-lane team looked on in disbelief. The McLaren team also had some nervous moments near the end as its drivers exchanged the lead, but Hamilton eventually earned his first win of the season by 2.6 seconds after rain had sprinkled the circuit. It was

Mc L a r e n’s second 1-2 showing this season. “It was quite an exciting race,” said HamilLewis ton, the 2008 Hamilton champion. “It was great to watch — it was like an action movie.” Webber’s disappointment was obvious after he looked set to take a third straight victory from the pole. “It can happen sometimes. We’re both at the front and it’s not ideal ... but it happens,” Webber said. “There was a long way to go in the race so it wasn’t a guaranteed victory. It was an interesting few meters between us on the track.” Red Bull was heading toward

a second straight 1-2 finish that would have given it a big lead in both the drivers’ and constructors’ standings. Neither driver accepted the blame, with Vettel insisting he had the right of way as he moved up the inside and Webber believing his teammate closed him off too soon. Webber labeled it “a disaster.” “There is no fight. This is something that happens,” Vettel said. “We do not need it, but there is nothing we can do now.” Red Bull team principal Christian Horner was “hugely disappointed” with his two drivers, saying they both deserved part of the blame.

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CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

General Merchandise

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR old watches, old military items, old motorcycle helmets any condition, Central Oregon. 541-706-0891 Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., power, secure, central location in Bend. 541-350-8917. Wanted: Anything you would like to see go. 541-480-8322 Rhyans91@gmail.com WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG puppies. DOB 1/16/10 Good markings & personalities. $1500 $1700 541-383-4578 trinityfarms@bendtel.net

Beagle Pup AKC, $300. Chocolate. One left. Call Dusty at 541-420-8907. Or email kodachromes@gmail.com

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $100. Call for info. 541-923-7501. Black Lab pups, AKC, Dew claws removed, first shots, 60 days free pet insurance, hip guarantee. Grand sire has Wesminster Kennel Club champion. Males $300 and Females $350. Larry 541-280-5292 Boston Terrier, AKC female, 9 wks. old, red & white, 1st & 2nd shots, wormed, $600. 774-487-7933, Redmond. alfloyd7@yahoo.com Cat, adult female, unaltered; also 4 kittens, $30 each, please call 541-678-5205. Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010. CHESAPEAKE Bay Retrievers We have (2) 8 wk old males beautiful dogs, AKC cert w/hips, first shots. $500 Please call 541-390-7384. Photos available. Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Corgi/Chihuahua female, 11 mo., smart & very trainable, $200 to good home, 541-385-5685. ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376. English Mastiff pups, Purebred, 7 wks. Fawns & Brindles. 2 males, 4 females. $600/ea., Redmond 541-410-0186

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

FOSTER HOMES needed for kittens & moms w/kittens! AKC Tiny Yorkie Boys ~ Rescue group provides food, $700-$900 each www. supplies & vet support & you saguarovalleyyorkies.com provide a safe & nurturing (541) 408-0916 environment for about 4 to 8 BASSET HOUND, 1 year weeks so young kittens can old, female, large kennel, get a good start in life. bed, house broke & kennel Contact 541-390-0121 or trained, $200. 541-914-4331 craftfostercats@g.mail.com. Basset Hound AKC pups, 4 FREE CAT, 6 mo. old female weeks, $350 & $375, health tabby, shots/neutered, acguarantee 541-922-4673. tive & curious. 541-389-9239

FREE CATS, shy grey male, needs stable home, healthy. 541-598-7260.

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269

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Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Misc. Items

Log Furniture, lodgepole &

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Hay, Grain and Feed

Mini Dachshund Puppies, 7 weeks old. Two silver dapple females, 1 black/tan male and 1 black male. $400 each. Call 503-863-9172. I'm in Redmond.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

www.thebierwagens.com/puppies

No-kill, nonprofit rescue group seeks donations of items for a huge yard/barn sale! All proceeds to go towards vet costs. May be able to pick up your items. Also seek deposit cans/bottles, it all helps! info@craftcats.org, 728-4178, www.craftcats.org Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups, AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, $500, 541-475-2593

Heeler

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Hound Puppies, blacks & tans, 4 males, 3 females, $50/ea.. 541-508-6883 Kittens & cats ready for homes! 1-5 PM Sat./Sun, other days by appt. Altered, shots, ID chip, more! 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Info/ photos at www.craftcats.org. Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317 Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Lhasa Apso Pups, gorgeous, fluffy, purebreds, $200, Madras, 503-888-0800.

Love cats & kittens? No-kill, nonprofit rescue group needs help at sanctuary with chores, cat grooming, small projects, adoptions, event planning. Even a couple of hours a week would make a big difference! Huge yard sale/fundraiser on June 19-20, need help with pricing, setting up & at the sale. info@craftcats.org, 389 8420 www.craftcats.org, 728-4178 “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882 Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171. Miniature Pincher, AKC Male, cropped, shots, $500, 541-480-0896.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, 7 weeks old, males & female avail., $400-$500. 541-447-4399 Pomeranian/Chihuahua Pups, 2 females, 1 mo. old, 1 silver & white, $325, 1 black w/very little white, $275, 541-416-1878. POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

Washer & Dryer, Whirlpool matching set , white, $350 OBO. 541-317-4636.

PUG MIXES, 2 males, first shots, wormed, ready to go! $200 each. 389-0322

Antiques & Collectibles

Sponsors needed for vet costs for Cimarron, who was abandoned with badly injured eyes that must be removed. He's tame & will also need a quiet forever home when well. Donations are tax deductible. Nonprofit Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, 389-8420, Box 6441, Bend 97708, www.craftcats.org.

FREE RABBIT, small, to approved home, please call Kim, 541-317-3573.

Goldendoodle Pups, sweet, kid conditioned, beautiful, health guarantee, ready 5/28 Taking deposits, $500/ea. 541-548-4574/541-408-5909

juniper, beds, lamps & tables, made to order, 541-419-2383

The Humane Society of Redmond will be opening a new Thrift and Gift shop in early June. We are asking for donations of quality new and used goods to help stock our shelves. Donations are gratefully accepted at the store located on Hwy 97, across from Safeway, South Redmond , Tuesday – Sunday, 10:00AM to 5PM. Proceeds from the store go to support the Humane Society and the animals in our care. Wolf Hybrid Pups, parents on site, $400, taking deps. on 2 liters, ready to go on 6/17 & 7/7, 541-977-2845.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE! Fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420.

SOFA good quality leather 88” wide x 3’ deep. $150 OBO. 541-390-6570.

Whirlpool/Ikea stainless steel NEW IN BOX over range micro $179, 541-389-2530.

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ANTIQUES PARKING LOT SALE Sat. June 5. Antiques, Collectibles, Glassware, Furniture. 20 Area Dealers Participating! 5th & Evergreen Downtown Redmond.

Cowgirl Up! Gently used western wear. Boots, bags & jackets, Double D, Patricia Wolf- Native American Turquoise, Sisters 541-549-6950 Rolltop desk, solid oak, drawers, exc. cond., $395 please call 541-389-0617. Secretary Bookcase, Mahogany, drop front, Maddox brand, 1940’s period, exc. shape, arched top, serpentine front drawers, must see, $399 OBO. 541-536-7408

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Coins & Stamps

210

240 Sewing Machine: HQ Long arm Quilter, 16 Handy Quilter, w/ 12’ wood table, auto shutoff, bobbin winder, support plate, pattern laser & new leaders, $4750; 541-382-8296.

241

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Bicycles and Accessories Recumbent Sun Bicycle, functional usage, $375. Call 360-775-7336.

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Exercise Equipment Weight Machine, Weider Pro 9930, $100, please call 541-389-6420.

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Dining room table w/leaf & 4 chairs, light oak top, white legs $50 OBO. 541-905-9773 Dining Set -solid Birch, 55 yes old, 6 chairs, drop leaf w/pads, 2 lg extenders, good cond., $300. 541-416-1051

S&W M29 44 mag., 4”, 1st yr., 99 % in box, $1595; Colt Cobra 4” 22LR, ANIB, $1250; OBO! Others. 541-389-1392 Taurus 45 ACP sub compact w/ 2 mags., case & ammo, $475. 541-647-8931 Taurus Raging Bull .454 Casull Revolver Call for pics $750 541-647-7212

UNRESERVED AUCTION Sunday, June 6 at 10:00 121 Deady Crossing in Sutherlin, OR Excavators, Dump Trucks, Tractors, Trailers, Forklifts, Farm Equipment, Vehicles, Shop Equipment, Tools, Guns, Welders, Plasma Cutters, ’93 Diesel Hummer, Trailer Manufacturing Supplies, ATVs and More!

For details visit I-5auctions.com or (541) 643-0552 247

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $1750. 541-788-1731, leave msg. Colt Python .357 magnum, S&W 629 Classic .44mag and others. Call 541-610-8370

Dryer, Newer Amana, completely rebuilt, new parts, Fly Rods, (1) 6-piece, handmade, $200, call 541-550-0444. graphite; 1 factory made, GENERATE SOME excitement in $200 ea., 541-550-0444. your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to GLOCK Mdl 27 40 cal., sub advertise in classified! compact, w/2mags, case & 385-5809. ammo. $500. 541-647-8931.

Radio Scanner, Realistic, 200 channel, all emergency frequencies, $75, 541-550-0444 RUGS - 2 quality matching sets, + 2 other misc. sizes. From $50-$100. 541-390-6570. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

270 Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Tools

Found Keys, DRW, Cheyenne & Cinder Butte, fish lure, baseGenerator, Coleman 1750W, ball bat, 5/7, 541-385-5685. portable, mint cond., $375, FOUND: Large collection of 541-318-6108. CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Pressure Washer, elec., 1250 Market Rd. 541-408-2973. psi, extra attachement/case, hot/cold, $100, 541-550-0444 FOUND: MONEY, Bend Walmart, call to identify. Shop Heater, John Deere, 541-617-1052 Turbo Style, 40,000 BTU, $200, 541-550-0444. LOST 2 wks ago, 4”x7” light blue notebook, phone num264 bers, project drawings. Call 541-815-1420. Snow Removal Equipment LOST A HEARING AID on May 16, at some location in Bend. Please call 541-389-3522

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

Building Materials

lent Condition, $600 New, Solid Oak - Honey, Green Top, Clawfoot Oak Legs $300, 541-848-1780.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

265 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

267

Fuel and Wood A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407 Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $125/cord rounds, $150 split & delivered, Bend, Sunriver & La Pine. Fast, friendly service. 541-410-6792 or 382-6099.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. CHAINSAWS! New & Like New! Stihl! Husqvarna! Echo! Up to $200 off! 541-280-5006. DINING TABLE & 3 chairs, $35; couch/loveseat, rose & beige, $30. 1920s Mink collar $75 OBO. 541-382-7556.

LOST: Cat, 5/23/10, Boonesborough area, small grey/ black striped female cat, reward. 541-382-7641 or 541-788-8378

when you're in the market for a new or used car.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177

Prime Seasoned two years, pine, round $140/cord, split $165, two cord minimum No delivery charge in Bend area. 541-536-2136. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

Riding Lawnmower, mechanics special, $250. Call for more info., 541-385-9350.

#1 Superb Sisters Grass Hay no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163. Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377. June 6, 2010 Healthy Horse Day. 10am-6pm, Demos all day & raffle prizes, go to www.ridinginstyle2.com Click on events, scroll to June 6th for more info. 541-617-9243

NEW Rubber Mats 4X6' 3/8" thick, Heavy Duty $28/each CASH 541-728-7004/7200

in last 2 mo. very expensive. Reward! Call 541-536-3383 LOST: Dog, male, Wirehair, Tumalo area off Dusty Loop, 5/22, 541-280-6168 LOST: Old silver & turquoise Navajo Squash Blossom, sentimental gift, REWARD! Lost Sunday afternoon, after 2:30pm. S. handicap parking lot & S. door of East side Safeway. Please call 541-389-6761, in no answer, please leave message. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

286 HUGE GARAGE SALE! Sat. thru Mon. 9-5: 593 Azure off of NE Greenwood. Lots of everything!

J & C Firewood • Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton Eric 541-350-8084

LOST diamond ring, sometime

Sales Northeast Bend CRUISE THROUGH classified

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. 1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Found Dog: Golden Retriever, JD Ranch Estates, near Mailbox, 5/23, 541-388-3029.

Found Dog: Large female, black & tan, Tumalo, off Gerking Bed, automatic single, head, Mkt.., 5/23, 541-410-6396. foot, knees raise & lower, Found Dog Shock Collar: exc. cond. $450 408-2227. Mammoth St., SW Bend, 5/24, call 541-678-5717 263

CANOPY - never used, collapsible, with case, $200. 541-504-0444.

Foosball Table - Excel-

Found Cell Phone, Tracphone, on River Walk trail, approx. 5/17, 541-389-5304.

Medical Equipment

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

COLEMAN electric start 2-burner camp stove, $50. 541-550-0444.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Lost and Found

Sporting Goods - Misc.

242

246

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Spotting Scope, Cabella’s 60x80, Titanium case, tripod, accessories, $200, 541-550-0444.

PROPANE HEATER, Mr. Heater Buddy, elect. start with safety US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & shut off, $75. 541-550-0444. Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, SHIMANO GRAPHITE fishing pole spinning combo, $25. rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold 541-504-0444. coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex WEBER portable gas BBQ grill , & vintage watches. No col$20; Coleman gas lantern, lection to large or small. Bed$20. 541-504-0444. rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Furniture & Appliances

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

Single person pontoon. Bucks Bags 11' Bronco Extreme. $1650 new. For sale: $1000 Please call 541-312-8837.

WANTED TO BUY

Crafts and Hobbies Yorkie/Schipperke Male, Pup, 8 weeks, 1st shot, $240 cash, 541-678-7599

Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sat. June 5th, LaPine Newberry Station. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information.

Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

RED TAG SALE Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo. Reg. 7 yr. “Alves” Quarter Mare w/3 month foal. $1550 OBO. 541-617-5872 Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $2500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

345

Livestock & Equipment 25 ACRES FENCED PASTURE. Call Everett Decker, 541-6881. Babydoll Southdown Sheep. Small starter flock available. Please call 541-385-4989. Feeder Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

SHEEP SHEARING, Nationals Shearers Certified. Scott Hunt, located in Central Oregon. 503-881-7535.

MASSEY-FERGUSON 1240 4x4 27 HP tractor with 1246 hydraulic loader, $8950. 541-447-7150.

Llamas/Exotic Animals

347 Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358 Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

316

Irrigation Equipment Pipe Elbows, galavanized, 30”x90 degree, never used, 3 at $150 ea. 541-421-3222.

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 476

476

486

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Independent Positions

Motel

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Food Service

421

454

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161. Painter Needs Work: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

476

Employment Opportunities

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service provided to our homeowners and guests will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Front Desk Clerk

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 CASE MANAGER Needed full time for a treatment program located in Bend, Oregon. Excellent organizational skills and proven ability to work with at risk clients required. Recovery experience a plus. Good benefits with competitive salary available. Bachelors or Master degree required in social work, psychology, counseling or related fields. Apply by faxing resume to: Human Resources at: 541-383-3176. CNA Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center the premier skilled nursing facility in Central Oregon is seeking an experienced Certified Nursing Assistant to work full-time on our night shift (10:00pm-6:00am). We offer vacation, sick, health and 401k benefits for full-time employees. Please apply if you are certified and eligible for a background check. Please come by and apply at Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center at 1876 NE HWY 20, 541-382-5531 located near Pilot Butte State park. EOE

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

The Ranch is accepting applications for Front Desk Clerks. Responsibilities include checking guests in/out, processing access passes, assisting the group coordinator, and effectively communicating with housekeeping and maintenance. The ideal candidate will be experienced in Parr Springer Miller Systems, Point of Sale, Microsoft Office, Outlook, and Navis. Must be able to work nights, weekend and holidays. PT/FT seasonal positions available. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Front

Desk Teacher/Caregiver: Infant/ Toddlers, must be kind, caring, attentive, 1 yr exp., CPR /First Aid trained, full time+ benefits. 541-385-3236.

Receptionist - Busy HealthOriented Spa in Sisters seeks super friendly, computer savvy, multi-tasking receptionist, who can work various shifts doing everything from appointments to laundry. Bring Resume to Shibui Spa, 720 Buckeroo Trail in Sisters. No calls please.

Maintenance Tech Full-time with benefits, variable schedule, drug free environment. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd. floor of Hotel)

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

-

Part-time position Apply in person at Sugarloaf Mountain Motel at 62980 N Hwy 97. Bend.

Maintenance Tech III/HVACR Progressive multi-specialty clinic in beautiful Bend, OR, is seeking a full-time Maintenance Tech III/HVACR. The ideal candidate will have 5 years experience. EPA Universal License, Boiler certification preferred. To Apply, visit our website at http://www.bendmemorialclinic.com EOE/AA

Massage Therapist - Shibui Spa at FivePine Lodge in Sisters has immediate openings for Licensed Massage Therapists with potential for year round work. Looking for team players who are experienced, responsible, eager and willing to work weekends and evenings. We will train you in our techniques. Bring your resume in person to: 720 Buckeroo Trail in Sisters. Medical

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. RV Sales

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Salesperson. Industry exp. req. Competitive pay and benefits. Fax resume to: 541-330-2496.

Millworkers

BRIGHT WOOD CORPORATION If you are experienced in the following positions we are looking for cutters, fingerjoint operators, lamination operators, moulder operaters, fingerjoint feeders and lamination feeders in our Madras facility. Starting wage DOE. Apply at our headquarters office in Madras at 335 NW Hess St., Madras OR 97741 541-475-7799. EOE/On site pre-employment drug screening required.

Vacation Sales Agent

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Tech, Full Time w/benefits. Apply at: 63500 N. Hwy. 97, Bend .

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

The Ranch is accepting applications for Vacation Sales Agents. Responsibilities include making reservations utilizing the Navis system, and using sales techniques to increase revenue and cross sell all Ranch amenities. This candidate will assist front desk clerks as needed, communicate effectively and efficiently and stay calm and collected in a fast paced environment being able to manage difficult guest situations. The ideal individual will be experienced in hospitality and/or sales, knowledge of Parr Springer Miller Systems, Navis, Microsoft Office, Multi-line Phone Systems and Outlook. Must be able to work nights, holidays and weekends. PT and FT seasonal positions. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Screen Printing Pressmen $10/hr., exp. with manual, auto. preferred. Must be personable and be able to talk to clients. Call 541-385-3104.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Position responsible for assisting with contracting functions including negotiation with physicians/physician groups, facilities and vendors. Must be familiar with contract analysis including both language and financial and regulatory aspects. Must be willing to locate in the Bend/Deschutes County area For more detailed information or to apply visit www.trilliumchp.com /careers.html Mail resumes/applications to P.O. Box 11740 Eugene, OR 97440-1740 attn: HR Installers Seeking experienced DISH Network satellite technician for Deschutes County. 541-382-1552. Livestock Truck Driver Excellent equip., flexible schedules, progressive company, 401K & insurance, $50,000/year. NW only. Call 541-475-6681

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals

Finance & Business

500

Barns

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Nimsis Professional Cleaning Residential, Commercial, Claudia, Alejandro, 541-706-0840

Decks

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Call Today &

&

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492

CCB#180571

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

CCB#180420

Debris Removal

Handyman

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration Weekly Maintenance

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

528

Senior seeks furnished or unfurnished studio or efficiency lock-off in home. Call 360-775-7336.

Apt./Multiplex General

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS FOR SALE. All equipment, supplies and materials for sale with or without business name and/or location. Contact Mike (541) 389-9196 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Same Day Response

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

SUBSIDIZED UNIT 2 bdrm (upstairs) available at this time. 62 & over and/or Disability Multi-Family Housing/ Project-based Greenwood Manor Apts 2248 NE 4th Street Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 389-2712. TDD 800-735-2900 Guardian Management Corporation is committed to “Equal Housing Opportunity” Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Bdrm. $400+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902.

632 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D hookup W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

$99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

630

Rooms for Rent

Mt. Bachelor Motel has rooms, starting at $150/wk. or $25/night. Incl. guest laundry, cable & WiFi. 541-382-6365

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

541-322-7253

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 65155 97th St., in Whispering 541-385-6928. Pines, 2/1 duplex, 2.5 acres, mountain views,1-car garage, A quiet, beautiful garden $750, no smoking/pets. style 55+ community, near 541-388-4277,541-419-3414 hospital, 2/2, A/C, from $750-$850. 541-633-9199. Avail. Now, 1020B NW Portwww.cascadiapropertymgmt.com land Ave, 1 bdrm. upstairs in duplex, W/D incl., water paid, $575 mo., $700 dep. 541-410-4050,541-410-4054 Awbrey Butte Townhomes, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, $825-$850, 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, Avail. Now, Newer Duplex 55+ $550; woodstove, W/S/G near medical, 1 story, 2 paid, W/D hookups. bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/D, gas (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 fireplace, garage, no smoking or pets $800 419-8555.

Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 5/15, 541-389-6720.

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

P r o u d ly S e r vi n g Central Oregon Since 1980

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Masonry MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Remodeling, Carpentry

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Award Winning Design

541-389-4974

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Fertilizer included with monthly program

(Private Party ads only)

Need small, clean, furnished apt. or condo near downtown. must have 1 parking. Will need for 6 to 8 months. 360-921-0640

Ask us about

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Fire Fuels Reduction Landscape Maintenance

Downtown Bend Condo, fully furnished, recently remodeled, plasma TV, 2 full baths, no pets/smoking, $625. 3 mo. min. Util. incl. 382-9940

616

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

Spring Clean Up

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Want To Rent

Nelson Landscape Maintenance More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

507

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

CCB#180420

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903

Room, with private bath, garage, storage, nice house in Old Mill, $500/mo., split some utils, 541-390-2161

Business Opportunities

Child Care Services Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Redmond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

605

Roommate Wanted

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? $350 mo. plus util. room/bath. Private party will loan on real Full house access, artists estate equity. Credit, no pueblo. 541-389-4588. problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Look at: Bendhomes.com Land Mortgage 388-4200. for Complete Listings of 573 Area Real Estate for Sale

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492

Excavating

Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Real Estate Contracts

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

541-617-7825

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

Operate Your Own Business Healthcare Contract Specialist

READERS:

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

RV Tech

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Phlebotomy Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

CAUTION

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Moving and Hauling

• Siding Replacement/Repair • Door/Window Replacement • Drywall Repair/Painting • Decks/Fencing • Shade Structures • Patios/Sidewalks Call David - 541-678-5411 CCB#187972 • 25+Yrs. Exp. 5% Discount to New Customers

D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing

Finish Work • Flooring Painting, Wall Covering ••Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Ex/Interior, Paint/Stain Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

CCB#180420 541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

The Bulletin

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


E4 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 636

650

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870.

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, $680. Near Old Mill off Wilson. Washer/Dryer included, fenced backyard, single car garage. Pets accepted. $720 deposit. Call 541-280-3164 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

640

652

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

$595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

$99 Move-In Special Only $250 deposit! Finally the wait is over, new units available in Bend’s premiere apartment complex. Be the first to live in one of these fantastic luxury apartments. THE PARKS Call 541-330-8980 for a tour today! Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens Inc.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit and carport. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Ask Us About Our

May Special!

Mountain High, 2 bdrm., den, dbl. garage on GOLF COURSE, Whirlpool tub, deck, pool & tennis. $1250. 858-248-5285.

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803. ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Starting at $500 Houses for Rent for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Redmond Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, stor- A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim age units available. Close to Village, Redmond, all appl., schools, pools, skateboard incl,. Gardener W/D, $795 park, ball field, shopping cenmo.. 541-408-0877. ter and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 run, some large breeds okay bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., with mgr. approval. $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. Chaparral Apts. 503-829-7252, 679-4495 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

SPECIALS!

Studios & 1 bdrm

$395 to $415 • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908. Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver NICE DUPLEX on cul-de-sac, 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, sgl. car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. incl. w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 648

Houses for Rent General 2700 Sq.Ft. triple wide on 1 acre, Sun Forest Estates in LaPine, 3/3, exc. shape lots of room $800, 1st & last +$250 dep. 503-630-3220.

Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, owners residence, very peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at 541-306-1039.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds 660

Houses for Rent La Pine 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $650/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432 NEWER stick built 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large garage, forced air heat pump. on 6 acres, $700 month. 541-815-8884.

661

The Bulletin is now offering a Houses for Rent LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Prineville Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice new rates and get your ad lawn, fenced backyard. $800 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961 650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

541-385-5809 Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near shopping & hospital dbl. garage, large fenced yard w/ sprinklers, $950/mo., pets neg. 541-390-2915

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653

Real Estate For Sale

700

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $650 a month. 541-923-7343

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

870

Boats & Accessories

35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, pond & super private well, 75 year old owner will sacrifice for $425,000. 541-447-1039

705

Lots 1 Acre Corner Lot Sun Forest Estates, buildable, standard septic approved $49,000 or trade, owner financing? 503-630-3220..

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

713

Acreages

Real Estate Wanted

14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829.

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $29,900, 541-480-4059. Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Please check your ad on the Will Finance, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fireplace, incl. fridge, range, first day it runs to make sure washer & dryer, new paint & it is correct. Sometimes inflooring, $8900, $1000 down, structions over the phone are $200/mo., 541-383-5130. misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Boats & RV’s

800

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** John Day: 2003 3 bdrm., 2.5 baths, 1920 sq. ft., w/stove, f/a heat, vaulted living room, silestone counters/stainless appl., master suite/wic, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

747

880

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

870

Boats & Accessories

12 Ft. like new 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft, new EZ Loader Trailer, used twice, pole holder & folding seats. $2400 541-617-0846.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

881

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Beaver Thunder 2000, 40’, 2 slides, 425 HP Cat, loaded, exc. cond., time limited price, $98,000, Cell: 480-357-6044. Bounder 34’ 1994, J Model, immaculate, only 34K miles, rare private bdrm., walk round queen island bed, awnings on all windows, 6.5 Gen., garaged, like new in/ out, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, $17,500, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

16’

Seaswirl

1985,

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $98,000. 541-382-1721

541-317-0857

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Tow Vehicle, Chrysler Pacifica 2004, w/all towing accessories, A-1 cond., loaded, 41K mi., $13,950, 541-382-7038.

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

Winnebago Aladdin II 32 ft., 1979 exc. cond., ready for the road, propane or gas, 80 gal. propane tank, 72K mi., call for more info. $5000. 541-306-8205.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Only $4,995.

Weekend Warrior 2008 18’ toy hauler, power tongue jack, sleeps 4+, A/C, used 3 times. $13,300. 541-771-8920

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC. Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat 300, clean w/many options $63,500. 541-279-9581.

KIT COMPANION 1997 22’ travel trailer, sleeps 6, excellent condition, only used about 10 times, like new! Fully loaded, everything goes with it!

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2004 36’ diesel pusher, low mi., fully serviced, very clean, outstanding cond., 2 slides, rear camera, $69,000. Much much more! 541-447-8006.

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes 4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053. BY OWNER, Clean older home in great neighborhood. $107,000. 1429 SW 11th. (503) 440-5072 (503) 717-0403 Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upFIND IT! grades incl. rear vision, BUY IT! ducted air, upgraded appl., Harley Davidson SELL IT! island queen bed & queen Screamin’ Eagle ElecThe Bulletin Classifi eds hid-a-bed, work station, very tric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, nice, one owner, non smoker, candy teal, have pink slip, 20’ Seaswirl 1992, Hummingaraged, $51,000. Call for have title, $25,000 or Best bird fishfinder Matrix 27 w/ more info! 541-350-7220 offer takes. 541-480-8080. gps, rebuilt OMC outdrive, 497 hours on motor, new top less than year old, 2007 9.9 Honda Shadow Aero Mercury outboard tilt and 750, 2004. 5100 miles, gatrim, remote steering, stainraged, like new. Blue/black. Montana 3295RK less steel, & many extras. SisBar, Lug rack, bags. 2005, 32’ 3 slides, $4000. (541) 419-5212 Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and Purchased in 2002 for fishing more. Interested parties enjoyment. November 2009 only $24,095 OBO. 541purchased dream and now no 279-8528 or 541-279-8740 longer need this boat. Dual axle trailer is included with purchase. Call Honda Shadow Deluxe 541-815-1948 American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, ga- 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 raged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail Bikes: 1980 CT110, like new, $2400, 1974 CT90, great hunting bike, $900, both recently serviced, w/new batteries, call 541-595-5723.

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Honda VTX 1800R 2003. Low miles, xlnt cond. $4999. 541-647-8418 YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4995. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444 Nash 28.5’ Bunk Bed Model, 2002, sleeps 8, $12,000 OBO, 541-536-1572

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $82,000. 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

885

Canopies and Campers

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $18,500 541-610-9900.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338 Canopy, top of line ARE, less than 1 year old, fits 2000 to 2007 GM short bed, silver birch, paid $1900 new, asking $1180. 541-389-2270

Southwest Bend Homes 3 Bdrm. + den, 2.5 bath, 1825 sq.ft., master bdrm. on main, near Old Mill, walking trails, schools, upgraded throughout, landscaped, A/C, great neighborhood, ready to move in, great value at $296,000, 425-923-9602, 425-923-9603

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

882

Fifth Wheels

runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen., & much more $60,000. 541-948-2310

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

$550 OBO!

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

880

865

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Motorhomes

ATVs

818-795-5844, Madras

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Motorhomes

850

Snowmobiles

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & All real estate advertising in 1995, must sell, 4 place this newspaper is subject to ride on/off trailer incl., all the Fair Housing Act which in good cond., asking makes it illegal to advertise $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774 "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, 860 color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status Motorcycles And Accessories or national origin, or an intention to make any such HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, preference, limitation or disforward control, excellent crimination." Familial status condition. Only $7900!!! includes children under the 541-419-4040 age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed Harley Davidson Duece that all dwellings advertised 2001, very low miles of in this newspaper are avail1258, corbin seat. Why able on an equal opportunity buy new, only $11,900. basis. To complain of disCall 541-771-2020 crimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Trade your Bend Area Home for my 6 yr. 4 bdrm., 2.5 bath, Central Point home, planned development, nice views, 541-941-6915.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Watercraft

773

for Rent

Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Real Estate Services

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a 757 home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the Crook County Homes new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof 693 and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at Office/Retail Space 503-329-7053. An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

764

Farms and Ranches

771

CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, $700 mo. + last + dep. No REAL ESTATE WANTED. pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, Commercial land in Sisters or Bend and call # off sign for house close to downtown, appointment to see. priced under $200,000. Phone 503-827-3995 Phyllis On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 740 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & Condominiums & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, Townhomes For Sale 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end 654 unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, comHouses for Rent plete remodel $197,000 SE Bend furnished. 541-749-0994.

658

MAY

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Dutchman 26’ 2005,

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Free Garage Sale Mapping included with every Bulletin garage sale ad!

Place an ad for your next garage sale and your ad will appear in the paper and on-line plus be included in our new mapping feature. All this plus lots of customers for just $20*

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

We can show your customers the fastest way to your garage sale.

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

TO PLACE YOUR GARAGE SALE AD JUST CALL US AT

541-385-5809 *$20 for 3 lines. Ads publish for 4 days. Thursday thru Sunday in print and online

762

Homes with Acreage Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Detached Garage/shop, Circle Drive w/RV Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area. $224,900 Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic 2007, 4K mi, windshield, saddle bags, garaged, senior owned, as new cond, $5300 OBO, 541-312-3098,619-306-1227

TO SUBSCRIBE CALL

541-385-5800


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

932

935

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service 2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Sisters Airport, with airport access and room for owner hanger on property. Priced for quick close at $369,000, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, 541-280-9378.

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Pontiac Trans Am 1977, new graphite metallic paint, less than 2000 miles on high performance 455, some new interior, fast and fun classic, 8000 OBO. Call Chris, 541-390-8942.

Jeep CJ7 1981, all original, tow bar, hard top, auto, dependable, very nice oldy! $3000, 541-815-4214

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

VW Super Beetle 1974, JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Car Hauler, 32’ Pace, top cond., $7000 OBO. Call for more info., 541-536-8036 Enclose Trailer, Wells Cargo, 5’x8’, exc. cond., $1595. 541-350-3326

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111 Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,250. Firm Randy, 541-306-1039

FORD F350 1997 4x4

Interstate 2007 20'x102" Cargo Trailer, like new only 350 miles, $4,950 OBO. 541-306-9888

V-8, 7.5L, long bed, with 8’ Boss Power-V snow plow. 35K miles by orig. owner, new tires, exc. cond, with all maint. history avail.,

Utility Trailer, 4X10, 6” Steel I-beam frame, factory w/ lights, $200, 541-550-0444.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Tires (5), 185/70/R14, 541-550-0444.

Studded, $200,

940

Vans

Antique and Classic Autos

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

$18,995 541-598-3750 DLR 0225

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Sport Utility Vehicles

935

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

$6900 OBO (541) 520-8013.

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl.,

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498 Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Tow Vehicle, Chrysler Pacifica 2004, w/all towing accessories, A-1 cond., loaded, 41K mi., $13,950, 541-382-7038.

Toyota Tundra 2006,

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

975

Automobiles

'"DURAMAX DIESEL" SLT, leather, running boards, tow pkg., low miles.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

LEXUS ES300 1999

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

GMC Sierra 2500HD 2001 4x4

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

1957,

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $7450. Firm. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

$11,500.

932

Wagon

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

VIN#E327113

Wheels & Tires, aluminum, off Ford Ranger, great cond., $150. 541-408-1676

Chevy

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$22,600 W/O winch $21,750. 541-325-2684

Call 541-549-0757, Sisters. Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2001, 4.7L, dark blue, AWD, new tires, new radiator, ne battery, A/C charged, new sound system, beautiful, solid ride, $7900, 541-279-8826.

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevy Equinox AWD LT 2006 asking $14,800 below BB book of $16,100, every option available, sandstone metallic w/ leather interior, mint mint condition. (541) 815-1849 or (541) 330-1766

Chevy S10 Blazer 1993, 144K, 4x4, V6 auto., very clean, full power, almost new tires, same owner for 8 yrs., $2100. 541-388-2275, 541-420-7736 Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $13,800, Call 541-390-7780 .

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4700. 541-617-1888.

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931. Buick Park Avenue 2000, 157K, sun roof, heated leather seats w/lots of extras, also 4 mounted studded tires $4000 firm. 541-549-8045.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826. Chevy Equinox 2010, perfect, 3850 miles, $22,243 OBO, 541-548-4677.

Ford Focus ZTS 2004, 5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

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Dated and first published May 24, 2010.

PANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3483466 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0045809167 T.S. No.: WC-239472-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOSEPH COYNER, AN UNMARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNEES, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, dated 4/19/2007, recorded 5/9/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-26576 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 109642 THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY SITUATE IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 1, BLOCK TT, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19245 SHOSHONE RD BEND, Oregon 97702-7941 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Ford F150 XCab 1994, 4WD, 88K mi., goose neck hitch, exc. cond., $3900. 541-728-7188

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

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automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

THE BULLETIN • Monday, May 31, 2010 E5

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

KEYBANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AKA KEY BANK, NA, Plaintiff, v. PETER K. PURDY, Defendants. Case No. 10CV0062 ST SUMMONS TO THE DEFENDANT: Peter K. Purdy. You are hereby required to appear and defend the Complaint filed against you in this case within 30 days from the date of the service of this summons upon you. If you fail to appear and defend, the Plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by Plaintiff, KeyBank National Association AKA Key Bank NA. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days (or 60 days for Defendant United States or State of Oregon Department of Revenue) along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By: John M. Thomas, Attorney, OSB # 024691 Attorneys for Plaintiff 11830 SW Kerr Parkway, Ste. 385 Lake Oswego, OR 97035-1249 (503) 517-7180, Fax (425) 457-7369 jthomas@rcolegal.com NOTICE Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: If you are the consumer who originally contracted the debt or if you assumed the debt, then you are notified that: 1. As of the date of the Complaint herein, the principal balance owed is $31,893.19. Because of interest, late charges, and other charges that may vary from day to day, the amount due on the day you pay may be greater. Hence, if you pay the amount shown above, an adjustment may be necessary after we receive your check. For further information, write or call Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.C. 2. The creditor to whom the debt is owed is KeyBank National Association AKA Key Bank NA. 3. Unless within 30 days after receipt of this notice you dispute the debt or any portion of it, we will assume the debt to be valid. 4. If you notify us in writing within 30 days after receipt of this notice that you dispute the debt or any part of it, we shall obtain verification of the debt and mail it to you. 5. If you so request in writing within 30 days after receipt of this notice, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. I hereby certify that the within is a true copy of the original summons in the within entitled action.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185 VW Beetle TDI 2001, 64K mi., exc. cond., spoiler, chrome wheels, $10,000 OBO, 541-480-8868.

By: John M. Thomas, OSB # 024691 Attorney for Plaintiff Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of GEORGIANA E. COLLINS, Deceased. Case No.: 10-PB-0034-MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

VW Bug 1969, yellow, sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604. VW Cabriolet Convertible 1990, white w/black top, white leather interior, auto, cruise, air, custom wheels, new tires, 118K mi. $2700, 541-548-6447.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Theresa Drake, undersigned, has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at the Albertazzi Law Firm, 44 NW Irving Ave., Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Anthony V. Albertazzi.

Theresa Drake Personal Representative Albertazzi Law Firm 44 NW Irving Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 317-0231 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of JOHN ALLEN ROGERS Deceased. CASE No. 10PB0066ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Paul Heatherman PC, PO Box 8, Bend, Oregon 97709, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Paul B. Heatherman. Dated and first published on March 31, 2010. /s/ Lani Rogers Lani Rogers, Administrator

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601666738 T.S. No.: OR-240786-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MEGHAN M. MALLEN AND BYRON J. LEISEK as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 6/21/2006, recorded 6/23/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-43450 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247539 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWO (102), SUN MEADOW NO. 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20450 JACKLIGHT LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $284,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 12/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,541.04 Monthly Late Charge $77.05 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $284,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/2/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/11/2010 LSI TITLE COM-

Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $182,145.61; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/15/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $938.70 Monthly Late Charge $46.13 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,145.61 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.47% per annum from 7/15/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/2/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his suc-

cessors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3484835 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FBU-94478 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PATRICK E. COLLET, AN UNMARRIED MAN, as grantor, to ESTHER SANTOS, as Trustee, in favor of BANKUNITED, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 4/18/2006, recorded 4/25/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-28435, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BANKUNITED, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 25, THREE SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 20054 DOANNA WAY BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 5, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,639.76 each $6,559.04 (02-01-10 through 05-05-10) Late Charges: $172.95 Beneficiary Advances: $25.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $6,756.99 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $321,734.99, PLUS interest thereon at 3.375% per annum from 01/01/10 to 12/1/2010, 3.375% per annum from 12/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 7, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/5/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3559875 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Alvin Gene Brock and Rita Leah Brock. Trustee: AmeriTitle. Beneficiary: American General Financial Services (DE), Inc. Date: September 20, 2006. Recording Date: September 21, 2006. Recording Reference: 200664120. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Successor Trustee is Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, Anderson & Monson, P.C., 10700 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy., Suite 460, Beaverton, OR 97005. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): Lot Twenty-Five (25), Block Nine (9), NEWBERRY ESTATES PHASE II, Deschutes County, Oregon. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $957.48 beginning July 1, 2009 through the installment due December 1, 2009, less a partial payment credit of $327.52, plus late charges of $10.00. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $98,556.45, together with interest of $6,301.73 through December 14, 2009, plus interest on the principal sum of $98,556.45 at the rate of 9.75 percent per annum from December 15, 2009 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: July 7, 2010. Time: 1:15 P.M. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, Front West Entrance, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes and State of Oregon. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in the next paragraph. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and to http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE: The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. DATED: February 18, 2010./s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy. #460, Beaverton, Oregon 97005, (503) 646-9230. STATE OF OREGON) ) ss. County of Washington) I, Miles D. Monson, certify that I am the Successor Trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee


E6 Monday, May 31, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

quired under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/10/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3481000 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0474443058 T.S. No.: OR-240475-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MIKE D. LARSON AND NAOMI A LARSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, dated 6/27/2007, recorded 7/5/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-37307 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 192899 LOT 77, MOUNTAIN PEAKES, PHASE III & IV, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21278 KEYTE ROAD BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $190,029.04; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 12/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,557.14 Monthly Late Charge $66.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $190,029.04 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/28/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the high-

est bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3477915 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010 PUBLIC NOTICE NOMINATING CONVENTION The Libertarian Party of Oregon will hold a nominating convention at the Oregon State Fair and Expo Center, 2330 17th ST. NE, Salem Oregon (Enter through Yellow Gate on Silverton Road), June 12th at 9:00am. Nominations will be considered for all available partisan offices in the State of Oregon for the November general election. You must be a registered libertarian elector to participate. Observers welcome. www.lporegon.org PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Metro Park & Recreation District Board of Directors will meet in an executive session at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 1, 2010, at the district administrative offices, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e) for the purpose of discussing real property transactions. A regular business meeting will begin at 7:00 p.m. The Board will conduct a public hearing regarding the fiscal year 2010-11 budget and consider adoption of Resolutions 324, 325, and 326 adopting the fiscal year 2010-11 budget, imposing and categorizing taxes and the 2010-11 Capital Improvement Plan. The Board will not conduct a work session on June 1. The agenda and supplementary reports may be viewed on the district’s web site www.bendparksandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441838471 T.S. No.: OR-241117-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JORDAN JUDSON AND MELISSA JUDSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERI TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 7/26/2006, recorded 7/28/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-51894 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133294 LOT FOUR (4) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF GLACIER VIEW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 64941 GLACIER VIEW DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $455,862.25; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,147.88 Monthly Late Charge $137.70 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $455,862.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the

word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/15/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3488788 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7442331807 T.S. No.: OR-155167-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LUCAS A MADDOX as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE IN FAVOR OF HYPERION CAPITAL GROUP, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated 11/6/2006, recorded 11/9/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-74660 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251700 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWELVE (112) HUNTINGTON MEADOWS PHASES 5 AND 6, RECORDED FEBRUARY 21, 2006, IN CABINET G, PAGE 1061, DESCHUTES COUNTY OREGON Commonly known as: 16485 RILEY DRIVE LA PINE, Oregon 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $141,507.69; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,114.48 Monthly Late Charge $45.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $141,507.69 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from 8/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/27/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon

Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/17/2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3494887 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602371802 T.S. No.: OR-241301-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, RICHARD W. YORK as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WEALTHBRIDGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, AN OREGON CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/22/2009, recorded 5/29/2009, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2009-22727 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111016 LOT TWO HUNDRED ELEVEN (211) IN BLOCK PP OF DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY. OREGON. Commonly known as: 19330 GALEN ROAD BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $152,809.33; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,095.89 Monthly Late Charge $34.38 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $152,809.33 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/5/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon

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Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/16/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3493068 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7428584809 T.S. No.: OR-240791-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHAYLYNNE D. CAITO as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 5/24/2006, recorded 5/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-37619 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245321 LOT 271 FOXBOROUGH-PHASE 6, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20651 COUPLES LANE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $263,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,086.13 Monthly Late Charge $76.85 By this reason of said default the

beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $263,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/2/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Dee C. Ortega Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3484255 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0640110100 T.S. No.: OR-240537-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEAN-PAUL AUDETTE, IV AND SUZANNE AUDETTE, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to PACIFIC NORTHWEST COMPANY OF OREGON, INC., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER QUICKEN LOANS INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 2/29/2008, recorded 3/18/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-11976 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 198613 THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS POLICY IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF

DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 52, PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19551 LOST LAKE DR BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $283,675.24; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 12/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Pa yment $2,326.05 Monthly Late Charge $103.16 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $283,675.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/28/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 3/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3478329 05/10/2010, 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0594696304 T.S. No.: OR-240697-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON L. LAFAVER AND SARA J. LAFAVER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 5/30/2006, recorded 5/31/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-37930 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 246898 LOT SIXTY-FOUR (64), NORTHPOINTE PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 63796 HUNTER'S CIRCLE BEND, OREGON 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $222,885.66; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 12/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,314.21 Monthly Late Charge $65.71 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $222,885.66 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 11/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance re-

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1922 T.S. No.: 1276061-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KIP S. SCHONING, as grantor, to MARK H. PETERMAN, as Trustee, in favor of QUALITY MORTGAGE USA, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/23/1994, recorded 1/4/1995 in Volume 362, page 1942, of Deeds of Trust, under Instrument No. 95-00248, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK TWENTY-ONE (21), BOULEVARD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1084 NW FEDERAL STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 3, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 5 payments at $640.10 each $3,200.50 (01-01-10 through 05-03-10) Late Charges: $387.04 TOTAL: $3,587.54 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior Hens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $41,886.03, PLUS interest thereon at 12.490% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 8, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: DATED: 5/3/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, WILLIAM P. CARAM III AND ABBY L. CARAM, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 3/1/2006, recorded 3/3/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-14955, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, SOLELY AS TRUSTEE AND NOT IN ITS INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY FOR THE HOME EQUITY MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED TRUST, SERIES INABS 2006-C UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED JUNE 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 15, SECOND ADDITION TO RIVER FOREST ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16377 BATES STREET BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 20, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2008 19 payments at $ 1,394.74 each $ 26,500.06 (10-01-08 through 04-20-10) Late Charges: $ 615.76 Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,371.25 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 31,487.07 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $219,500.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from 9/1/2008, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 23, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/20/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lawrence Forbis and Cecilia Forbis, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, as Beneficiary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 03, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-30659 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: beginning at a point being the southeast corner of lot 2 in block 4 of View Acres, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence south 89°42' west, 135.00 feet; thence north 0°24' west, 75.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence south 89°42' west, 135.00 feet; thence north 0°24' west, 75.00 feet; thence north 89°42' east, 135.00 feet; thence south 0°24' east, 75.00 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 2602 SW 24th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,099.99 Monthly Late Charge $46.46. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $147,795.31 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on September 01, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 26, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 02, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3556203 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

ASAP# 3567676 05/17/2010, 05/24/2010, 05/31/2010, 06/07/2010

R-313084 05/24, 05/31, 06/07, 06/14

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-BVS-108255

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94392

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/31/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday May 31, 2010