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‘Evers’ invited to the U.S. by a government official

CLINE BUTTES

BLM trail changes rile groups, residents

• Left Bulgaria about 20 years ago with a Reagan administration official

• No contact with his parents for years

• Educated back East, but left after two years — and no one knew where

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Residents along Newcomb Road, a boundary between the sagebrush and juniper Cline Buttes Recreation area and the agricultural land around Tumalo, are worried about the changes they see along the gravel road. A new wire fence has popped up along the Bureau of Land Management’s side of the road, designed to keep out off-highway vehicles. And traffic along the road has increased as mountain bikers discover the trails that stay relatively dry when other trail systems are covered in snow. “It all seems to be pointing (to the idea) that they’re trying to make this the winter Phil’s Trail,” said Steve Newell, a neighbor who rides horses, mountain bikes and motorcycles. The Maston area, which Newell and others are concerned about, is part of the larger Cline Buttes Recreation Area. The BLM has drafted a plan for a network of trails, often separating motorized vehicles, horses and mountain bikes to avoid conflicts between people out enjoying the area. And the agency is also taking into account damage to the soils, plants and wildlife that recreation can cause, said Bill Dean, assistant field manager with the Prineville BLM, and letting some areas recover. “We’re balancing uses and interest,” he said. See Cline Buttes / A7

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Editor’s note: This story was based on reporting by Keith Chu in Washington, D.C., Cindy Powers in Denver, Erin Golden and Scott Hammers in Bend, and Nick Budnick.

By Keith Chu and Cindy Powers The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — The mysterious Doitchin Krasev is a Bulgarian immigrant who spent years changing identities and homes before settling in Bend as “Jason

Evers.” He did it all, said the man who brought Krasev to the U.S., to avoid being deported to his native country. Krasev came to the U.S. when he was 16 or 17 years old, said Michael Horowitz, a prominent Washington, D.C., attorney and human rights advocate who served in the Reagan administration. When he immigrated to the U.S., Doitchin spelled his name Krastev. As a student at Davidson College in North Carolina, and in federal court documents, he is named as

Doitchin Krasev. “Once he dropped out of college he was illegally in the U.S.,” Horowitz said. “There was no other way to stay. He was so smart, and he figured out a way.” Authorities believe Krasev — who faces one federal count of falsifying a passport and an Ohio state charge of identity fraud — assumed the identity of Jason Evers in 1996, while living in Colorado. As Evers, Krasev climbed the hierarchy of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, at one

point becoming a regional manager based in Bend. Horowitz was touring Eastern Europe in the early 1990s as an adviser to several Eastern European academies of science when he met Krasev’s parents, Dincho and Krassi Krastev. Both were accomplished academics. Dincho is now director of the Central Library of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, while Krassi is a prominent scholar of Carl Jung. See Evers / A6

Doitchin Krasev: From Bulgaria to Bend Late 1980s, early 1990s Milwaukie

The real Jason Evers 1979 The real Jason Evers is born in Ohio. 1982 At age 3, the boy is kidnapped and killed in Cincinnati. (Doitchin Krasev assumes the Jason in 1982 name years later.)

Nyssa

Bend Boise, Idaho

“Evers” in Oregon

Krasev leaves Bulgaria, in Eastern Europe, for the U.S. at age 16 or 17 to attend Georgetown Day School near Washington, D.C.

Washington, D.C. Denver

Cincinnati

Early 1990s Krasev uses the name “Danny Kaiser” and tends bar at a Denver pizza place. 1996 A man using the name Jason Evers applies for and “Danny Kaiser” receives a Social in the early ’90s Security number in Colorado. 1997 “Jason Evers” begins working for a window-tinting company in Denver. 1999 “Evers” gets a GED from Arapahoe “Jason Evers” Community College in 1997 in Littleton, Colo.

Italy Greece

2002 “Evers” is hired by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to work as a liquor regulatory specialist in Milwaukie. 2004–2005 “Evers” issues sanctions to Bend liquor licensees “Jason Evers” whose video surveillance in 2000 tapes later contradict his written reports and sworn testimony. 2006 An independent investigator finds that his testimony does not match evidence from surveillance tapes. 2007 The OLCC gives “Evers” a special merit pay increase for “exceptional performance.” 2008 “Evers” is promoted to regional manager in the Bend OLCC office. January 2010 “Evers” requests a voluntary demotion to the OLCC’s office in Nyssa, on the Idaho border. April 2010 “Evers” is arrested in Idaho by the U.S. State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service and is charged with one count of providing false information on a passport application. May 2010 Federal investigators identify “John Doe” in this year’s “Jason Evers” as booking mug Doitchin Krasev. He remains in jail in Portland.

Bulgaria

Davidson, N.C.

1992 Krasev attends Davidson College in North Carolina. 1994 Krasev leaves Davidson College after his sophomore year, without telling his friends why — or where he’s going.

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Source: Bulletin staff reports David Wray and Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

“We’d have these discussions and he’d say, ‘I’m not Bulgarian. He told me, in Bulgaria the rules are unfair so people take what they can. In America people defend the rules even if they’ve lost the game.” — Michael Horowitz, a former Reagan administration official who brought Doitchin Krasev to the United States 20 years ago

Finding clues to Krasev’s life from his chess years Associates of the man best known in Bend as Jason Evers often described him as a skilled and enthusiastic chess player who seldom discussed his past. His fondness for the game may help illuminate where — and as who — the man federal authorities now identify as Doitchin Krasev spent much of the past two decades. Records kept by the United States Chess Federation show a man who appears to be Krasev playing in close to 200 tournaments across the country under four different names, from the early 1990s until just before his arrest in Idaho in April. See Chess / A7

Source: Bureau of Land Management Eric Baker / The Bulletin

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Vol. 107, No. 149, 76 pages, 7 sections

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TOP NEWS INSIDE

Cutting corners?

Veiled resentment in Europe? • These are uneasy times for the estimated 15 million Muslims of Western Europe — not only for fundamentalists but also for the vast majority who want to find their place as Muslims without confronting the Christian and secular traditions of the continent they have adopted as home. Responding to a wave of resentment unfurling across European societies, several governments have begun to legislate restrictions on the most readily visible of Islamic ways. Public sentiment, however, often has gone further. See story in Religion, Page A4.

How BP, under pressure to save time and money, may have contributed to the worst U.S. oil disaster By Tom Fowler Houston Chronicle

BP officials insist safety was a top priority on the Macondo drilling project more than 40 miles off the coast of Louisiana, but there A N A L Y S I S were plenty of reasons for the oil giant to want to cut corners to save time and money. The drilling rig cost BP about $530,000 per day to lease, not including the daily rates for the many contractors on board. And the project was delayed repeatedly, having started in October 2009 by a rig that was later damaged by Hurricane Ida.

Inside: More on the spill • Little progress on the leaking well — what’s Plan B? Page A3 • Obama promises more help, Page A3 • Bend firm feels spill’s effect, Page C3 Later, while drilling with the rig Deepwater Horizon, the project lost more than a week when equipment became stuck at around 13,000 feet, forcing the crew to pull back, cement over a section and drill a wide path around it. See Shortcuts / A3

The Associated Press

Crews clean up oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill off of Louisiana on Friday.

OBITUARY: Gary Coleman, child star of “Diff’rent Strokes” fame with a troubled adult life, Page C7


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By Peter Baker

memorandum providing its first account of what happened with WASHINGTON — The White Sestak, arguing in effect that House lavished attention on such political deal-making hapSen. Arlen Specter when he pens all the time in both parties. switched parties last year, but But Republicans escalated Rahm Emanuel realtheir calls for a criminal ized he had a problem. investigation and disTo secure the seat for missed the everybodythe Republican-turneddoes-it defense. Democrat, Emanuel, “What does that have the White House chief to do with the campaign of staff, wanted to clear pledge and the repeated the path for Specter to pledges by this presiwin his new party’s dent that this would be nomination. Rep. Joe a more ethical White Standing in the way Sestak House?” asked Rep. Darwas Rep. Joe Sestak of rell Issa of California, Pennsylvania, a strongthe senior Republican willed retired admiral on the House oversight who was elected to the committee. House in 2006 with The White House acEmanuel’s help and count said Sestak was who now was eyeing never offered a full-time Specter’s seat. So Emanpaid position like secreuel last summer contary of the Navy. Instead, tacted the one person he President Emanuel wanted Sestak thought could persuade Bill Clinton not only to drop a SenSestak to stand down: ate primary challenge to the president both had Specter but also to keep worked for, Bill Clinton. And to the House seat he took away sweeten the deal, Emanuel told from a Republican, so the White Clinton to dangle an unpaid House considered what Bauer presidential appointment. called “uncompensated advisory For Emanuel, such political board options.” maneuvering is instinctive. As a The White House did not discongressional leader and Presi- close what those options were, dent Barack Obama’s top politi- but people briefed on the matter cal adviser, he has spent years said one was an appointment to trying to position what he con- the President’s Intelligence Advisiders the strongest candidates sory Board, a panel of prominent to run in various races, even if Americans who provide indepenit means enticing or pressuring dent oversight of the nation’s spy other Democrats to get out of the apparatus and advise the presiway. But the conversation with dent. White House officials disa two-term congressman from covered, however, that it would Pennsylvania has grown into a not work because Sestak could dispute over whether business as not serve on the board while still usual is good enough for a presi- serving in Congress. Either way, dent promising reform. Sestak said no and went on to Under pressure, the White beat Specter in the primary this House on Friday released a month. New York Times News Service

Kagan pursued two courses on ‘don’t ask’ at Harvard

Wally Santana / The Associated Press

Firemen practice removing a woman from a mock fire Friday in Seoul, South Korea. Local police, fire, medical and military groups practiced drills ranging from fire to terror attacks.

China hints it could shift its stance on N. Korea By Choe Sang-Hun New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — Prime Minister Wen Jiabao of China promised on Friday that Beijing “will not protect anyone” once it had concluded who was responsible for the sinking of a South Korean warship in March. Wen, who came here for three-party talks this weekend with South Korea and Japan, made his remarks in a meeting with the South Korean president, Lee Myung-bak. China has faced growing pressure to rein in North Korea, its traditional ally, since an international investigative team placed blame for the warship’s sinking, and the death of 46 sail-

Elena Kagan picked up her phone just before Christmas 2004 and, in an uncharacteristic moment as Harvard Law School dean, dialed the home number of a third-year student. She asked him, a leader of a tiny club of military veterans, to come by her office, where she broached the touchy mat- Elena Kagan ter of military recruiting on campus and made a surprising request. Because the law school had just stopped sponsoring armed services recruiters, Kagan said, she hoped the veterans club would arrange recruiting interviews to fill the gap. But the request was more than the few veterans on campus would embrace. After an intense debate, the Harvard Law School Veterans Association turned her down, according to three people who were in the room, deciding that — as one put it — “we are basically students, not recruiters.”

Unclear stance The little-known episode illustrates that, at the time when the issue was most feverish, Kagan was pursuing two courses at once: While staking out a tough stance against the recruiting, because of the military’s ban on gay men and lesbians serving openly, she simultaneously maneuvered to facilitate it behind the scenes. Those watching her up close were divided over whether she was hedging on hard choices or simply trying not to antagonize rival campus factions. Now that President Obama has nominated Kagan to the Supreme Court, her attitudes about the military while dean have emerged as a prominent issue,

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea’s most powerful state organ said Friday that South Korea faked the sinking of one of its own warships and warned that the Korean peninsula was edging ever closer to war. Pyongyang has made similar statements through state media since a multinational probe said last week that a torpedo fired by a North Korean submarine downed the vessel, killing 46 sailors in the worst attack on the South Korean military since the Korean War. — The Associated Press



SUMMER KICK-OFF

House advances end to ban on gays in military

SALE!!

WASHINGTON — The House on Friday passed a defense bill that paves the way for gays to serve openly in the military for the first time, but advocates on both sides geared up for a fight in the Senate. Normally, defense bills pass by wider margins than Friday’s 229-186 vote, but many Republicans and a few conservative Democrats said they would vote against it because of the gay ban, which was added to the $700 billion bill in a 234-194 vote late Thursday.

which her conservative critics are wielding to try to thwart her confirmation. But her interactions with the small cadre of Harvard law students affiliated with the military suggest that the talking points of Kagan’s Republican critics and her Democratic defenders distort history to some degree. Sen. Jeff Sessions (S.C.), the ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee, which will conduct her confirmation hearings, has repeatedly accused her of an anti-military bias and of breaking the law. Veterans who were on campus, however, and many legal experts say that neither is quite accurate. And Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., has said that “recruiting went on at Harvard every single day through the time she was there.” Yet recruiters were not officially sponsored on campus in the spring of 2005 after Kagan changed the policy. Kagan declined through a White House spokesman to comment.

N. Korea accuses South of faking warship sinking

Handcrafted in the USA

By Amy Goldstein The Washington Post

ors, on a North Korean torpedo. South Korea is pushing for the U.N. Security Council to censure the North. Wen told Lee that China would make an “impartial judgment” on who was responsible for the sinking, said Lee’s spokesman, Lee Dong-kwan. South Korean officials have said they do not expect Beijing to rebuke the North at the Security Council, where South Korea, with American and Japanese support, will seek condemnation of the North next month. South Korea is not seeking the imposition of new sanctions but wants to secure broad agreement, particularly with China, on the “existing sanctions.”



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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 A3

Little headway on leaking well Another ‘Plan B’ for the leaking oil well Surface ship carries 50,000 barrels of mud Heavy mud Twice density of water

Oil leak

Bent riser

BP is trying to plug the Gulf oil well by injecting heavy mud into it to reverse the oil flow so it can be capped.

How a “top kill” works: Deep underwater 6 5/8-in. drill pipe

BOP

Mud pumped at a rate of 50 barrels a minute

1 Pipe from surface ship connects to BOP lines

3-in. hoses

Biggest worry Mud goes up and out riser; makes leak bigger

Manifold Underground

2 Ship uses 30,000horsepower pumps to inject heavy mud into well

Manifold controls mud flow

3

Oil flow

4 Enough mud must go Then well can be 5 down well to force oil capped, or killed back into reservoir Blowout If top kill fails preventer Other methods BP could try (BOP) on Lower marine riser plug (LMRP) cap top of well Riser cut from top of BOP; cap inserted; sends oil to surface ship Junk shot Sea floor Debris injected into BOP to clog it, slow oil flow 5,000 ft. down Second BOP Placed on top of first one

Methanol lines

Replacing riser BP says if its “top kill’ procedure fails, it will install a cap-like device to capture oil from the leaking well and bring it to the surface. The next option:

4

1

How the lower marine riser package (LMRP) cap would work

3

1. Surface ship lowers LMRP cap on the end of riser pipe to seabed

3. Sealing grommet on LMRP cap fits on top of BOP to keep out seawater 4. Methanol injected into cap to prevent icy hydrates from clogging riser 5. Oil siphoned to surface ship

By Barbara Barrett

2

2. Damaged riser cut from BOP by robot submarines

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Sealing grommet

Oil flow

5

Blowout preventer (BOP) Sits on top of well

Damaged riser connected well to rig before explosion

© 2010 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Sources: BP, Technology Review

President visits Gulf Coast

Birnbaum replaced at MMS

Bulletin wire reports

WASHINGTON — At the conclusion of a more than twohour meeting Wednesday night in the Oval Office, President Barack Obama turned to Interior Secretary Ken Salazar and made clear that he had to do more to ensure that his agency could manage the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Salazar responded that he had lost confidence in Elizabeth Birnbaum, the director of the Minerals Management Service, adding that he would soon be making changes. The next morning, Salazar and his

GRAND ISLE, La. — Kneeling to pick up tar balls on an oil-fouled beach and listening to “heartbreaking stories” of loss, President Barack Obama personally confronted the spreading damage wrought by the crude gushing into the Gulf of Mexico — and the bitter anger that’s rising onshore. “What can he really do?” said Billy Ward, a developer who comes to his beach house here every weekend and, like many other locals, had little positive to say about Obama’s trip to the beleaguered region on Friday. “If he wants to do something, let him get out there and pump some mud and cement into that hole. Just fix it. Help us.” BP PLC, even less popular here, kept up its efforts to “just fix it,” using its “top kill” procedure to try to stop the deep oil well leak by pumping in heavy mud. If it doesn’t work, something BP says will be known within a couple of days, Obama’s own problems will only compound. BP engineers struggled Friday to plug the gushing oil well a mile under the sea, but as of late in the day they had made little headway in stemming the flow. Obama said he understands people “want it made right” and

Shortcuts Continued from A1 The “time is money” mantra would hardly have been unique to the Deepwater Horizon, or even to the oil industry, said Gregory McCormack, director of the University of Texas’ Petroleum Extension Service. But in the reams of documents and hours of testimony about the accident that have come out in the past month, a number of items can be seen as examples of BP trying to cut costs. According to a January BP well plan the Houston Chronicle obtained, the company had budgeted nearly $98 million for drilling and completion of the well. With the exception of money spent before the rig actually started drilling into the sea floor, the largest portion of that budget — about $18 million — was expected to be spent once the well was drilled to its full depth. Companies feel particular pressure to shorten such “non-rotating” time when drill bits aren’t turning but the clock is still running on the rig. That may help explain one of the first shortcuts noted by workers on the rig — the decision to move quickly from circulating drilling mud in the well to pumping in seawater. Truitt Crawford, a roustabout who worked for the rig’s owner, Transocean, told Coast Guard officials in a written statement about such pressure. “I overheard upper management talking, saying that BP was taking shortcuts by displacing the well with saltwater instead of mud without sealing the well with cement plugs,” Truitt said in a witness statement obtained by the Chronicle. The cement plugs would sit inside the bottom of a long section of pipe that was supposed to serve as the conduit for oil and gas to the surface when the well started producing. But even before the cement

The Washington Post

Congress demands data on Lejeune water

deputy secretary David Hayes knocked on Birnbaum’s office door and told her they planned to move her to another job; Inside she resigned instead. • Ore. timber On Friday, industry laments loss Salazar announced Buof Abbey, reau of Land Page C8 Management director Bob Abbey would return from the Houma Incident Command Center, where he was helping respond to the oil spill, to serve as acting MMS director.

WASHINGTON — Angered by what they consider the military’s reticence to reveal all it knows about decades of water contamination on a North Carolina Marine base, lawmakers want to force the Marine Corps and the Navy to produce an inventory of all the documentation scientists need to understand the contamination. Senators and members of the House of Representatives have inserted language into the 2011 defense authorization bill that would require Defense Secretary Robert Gates to certify that the military has done so. More than a million people are thought to have been exposed to the contaminated water from the mid-1950s to the mid-1980s. Some 156,000 people from all 50 states have registered with the Marines to get information on the contamination, which many say has caused a variety of cancers and other ailments. The House version of the bill gives the Defense Department 180 days to act; the Senate version offers 90 days.

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama and LaFourche Parish president Charlotte Randolph take a tour of areas impacted by the Gulf Coast oil spill on Friday in Port Fourchon, La.

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that their frustration won’t fade until the oil is stopped and cleaned up. “It’s an assault on our shores, on our people, on the regional economy and on communities like this one,” the president said from this small barrier island town threatened by what is now established as the largest oil spill in American history. “People are watching their livelihoods wash up on the beach.”

With more than 20,000 people already working to contain and clean up the oil, the president announced he was tripling the manpower in places where the sticky mess has come ashore or is about to. Obama directed those in the region who are filing claims for damages to count on the government — state and federal — to help cut any red tape. He was joined by the governors of Louisiana, Florida and Alabama.

plugs were put into place, there were other elements of the well design that were less costly — and could have compromised safety. Saving time was also the subject of a 2009 presentation by a Halliburton employee to the American Association of Drilling Engineers. He said “the cement slurry should develop compressive strength rapidly. This is particularly important in the deepwater environment given the associated rig cost.” The final stretch of piping that ran from the wellhead just under the sea floor all the way into the oil reservoir was cemented in place at the very bottom. The cement barrier only went several hundred feet up, however, and did not reach the next section of larger pipe above it. This meant there was no secondary barrier between the reservoir and the well head, so if any gas leaked through the cement it would have an unobstructed path all the way to the surface. A secondary barrier isn’t required in federal well design standards, but as the Chronicle reported earlier this week, taking the time and spending the money to install one would have provided another level of safety. There are other indications that the cement job may have done with an eye toward savings. The final section of the production casing was supposed to be centered in the wellbore the area carved out of the earth by the drill bits by special brackets known as centralizers. Keeping the pipe centered ensures that cement is distributed evenly all around and isn’t thinner on one side. The original well plan called for 21 centralizers, but it was discovered that 15 of the centralizers were not the ideal design for the job. Rather than wait for the right type of centralizers, the decision was made to use just the six on hand that worked. BP also decided not to not run a final, time-consuming test on

the cement job — a cement bond log — in which a device is lowered into the well that using sonic signals to determine how well the cement has adhered to the pipe. There is always a “natural conflict” between oil companies paying the bills for an offshore drilling operation and the owner and operator of a rig doing the work, said Carl Smith, a captain for a rig owned by Diamond Offshore, who was called as an expert witness during the Coast Guard hearings. But Steve Tink, BP’s health and safety team leader for drilling and completions in the Gulf of Mexico, said the company’s drive to control the massive costs of drilling a deepwater well is not in conflict with promoting safe operations. “Our basic philosophy on that is that a safe rig is an efficient rig,” he testified. Oil industry executives say that consequences of a catastrophic failure like the oil spill are so great that they have plenty of incentives, including financial, not to cut corners on safety. Asked whether time pressure might have skewed key decisions on the rig, BP’s senior spokesman Andrew Gowers said, “We have found no evidence that anything of that kind had anything to do with the incident.” He added that “as the investigations go on, all sorts of other things may be drawn in but that will not be found to be an issue.” Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Texas, said at a May 12 hearing of the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations that inquiries “may reveal issues of mechanical failure, systems failure, human error or a combination of the three.” But, he added, “What we hope we do not find is that corners were needlessly cut in order to save time and money, because ultimately now time and money are what are at risk.” The Washington Post contributed to this report.

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A4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R Will 2010 be the year Democrats lose religion? By Michelle Boorstein The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — If 2008 was the year Democrats finally got religion, will 2010 be the year the party loses it again? This is the worry among some religious progressives, who worked to transform the image of Democrats from wary — or even hostile — toward religion to a party that hired faith consultants, advertised regularly on Christian radio and featured candidates, including Barack Obama, who spoke openly about their relationship with God. These days, the Democratic National Committee’s faith staff of more than a half-dozen has dwindled to one part-time slot. Its faith issues website led this week with greetings for Passover (which was in March) and Rosh Hashanah (which was in September).

A N A LY S I S Faith consultants who once had dozens of clients did not play a role in last year’s high-profile Democratic losses in the Virginia gubernatorial race and the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat of the late Ted Kennedy in Massachusetts. And there was little visible new faith outreach in last week’s Democratic Senate primaries, according to some party officials. “Nothing jumps out” said Patrick McKenna, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, where Rep. Joe Sestak defeated party-switching Sen. Arlen Specter in a race that revolved around the recession and political authenticity rather than abortion or other faith-based issues. “I think in this economic climate, I

feel like people are in some ways moving away from that kind of conversation.”

Activists’ dismay With Democratic control of Congress at stake in this fall’s general elections, some party religious activists are dismayed by the loss of momentum. “It’s a mystery to everyone what happened to Democratic faith outreach in the last year,” said Rebecca Sager, a Loyola Marymount University professor who writes and teaches about the religious progressive movement. “There is sort of this, ‘We worked so hard and made so much progress, and 2008 seemed like this great year, and then what happened?’” In previous election cycles, some major Democratic wins were credited in part to spending

by national Democratic organizations on faith outreach and the deliberate recruitment of candidates who framed policy positions in terms of religious morality. The most notable victories included the election of Tim Kaine as governor of Virginia in 2005, a slew of anti-abortion congressional Democrats in 2006 and Obama, who captured more church-going voters in 2008 than any other Democratic presidential candidate in a decade. The Republican Party still has a far more extensive infrastructure to connect with religious voters, especially evangelical Christians. It has databases filled with tens of millions of e-mail addresses as well as long-standing ties to religious broadcasters and conservative religious groups such as the Family Research Council and Focus on the Family.

Veiled resentment? Official restrictions on Islamic garb reflect European public sentiment By Edward Cody The Washington Post

BRUSSELS — Since she started wearing a full Islamic veil almost two months ago, Selma said, she has been stared at, frowned at, muttered to, mocked as a “ghost” and forced by a police officer to lift her veil to show her face. “In Belgium, it is forbidden to carry your religious convictions to their logical conclusion,” the 22-year-old Brussels woman said, speaking on the condition that her full name not be used to avoid trouble for her family. These are uneasy times for the estimated 15 million Muslims of Western Europe, not only for fundamentalists such as Selma, but also for the vast majority who want to find their place as Muslims without confronting the Christian and secular traditions of the continent they have adopted as home. Responding to a wave of resentment unfurling across European societies, several governments have begun to legislate restrictions on the most readily visible of Islamic ways, the full-face veil. Outside the gilded halls of parliaments and ministries, meanwhile, anti-Islamic sentiments have risen to the surface in a surge of Internet insults and physical attacks against Muslim symbols. Belgium’s Chamber of Representatives voted last month to impose a nationwide ban on full-face veils in public, making the country the first in Western Europe to pass such a measure. (The legislation, which needs Senate approval, has yet to take effect.) Some municipalities, including Brussels, have local anti-veil regulations. But legislators explained that they wanted to “send a signal” to fundamentalist Muslims and preserve the dignity and rights of women. Citing the same goals, the National Assembly in neighboring France voted overwhelmingly this month to declare full-face veils “contrary to the values of the republic,” which legislators described as the first step toward enacting legislation similar to Belgium’s. President Nicolas Sarkozy’s conservative government has vowed to pass a nationwide ban by fall. He has persisted in his resolve, despite two opinions from France’s constitutional court that such a law would be unconstitutional and could run afoul of European Union human rights regulations.

Public anger The people of France, which with an estimated 5 million Muslims has the largest such population in Western Europe, by and large have expressed support for Sarkozy’s move. Recent polls found two-thirds of those questioned want a full or partial ban on the full-face veil. Public sentiment has gone further, though. In recent discussions about the ban and during a government-sponsored “national identity” debate, several French Internet sites closed down reader comment sections because of an outpouring of hate mail. A Muslim butcher shop and a mosque were sprayed with automaticweapon fire in southern France

The Associated Press file photo

Faiza Silmi, a 32-year-old Moroccan, walks the streets of Le Mesnil-Saint-Denis, southwest of Paris, just weeks after last year’s Christmas holiday. France’s legislature voted overwhelmingly earlier this month to declare full-face veils “contrary to the values of the republic.” France hosts Western Europe’s largest Muslim population.

“It’s something that frightens them. And so, when they see a woman wearing a burqa ...” — Selma, a 22-year-old Brussels woman who wears the full Islamic veil last month, after Sarkozy decided to pursue a full ban, and vandals last week desecrated a graveyard for Muslim soldiers who died fighting in the French army. Proposals for anti-veil legislation also have been introduced in the parliaments of Italy and the Netherlands, although passage is less certain. Some cities in those countries have imposed local bans; a Tunisian immigrant was fined $650 two weeks ago in Novara, in northern Italy, for walking down the street on the way to a mosque with her face covered. In Switzerland, where construction of minarets was banned in November, Justice Minister Eveline Widmer-Schlumpf said this week that the government plans to use similar administrative powers to forbid full-face veils. But the rules, she noted, will exempt Persian Gulf tourists, who spend lavishly in Swiss hotels and luxury shops. Selma, the Brussels woman, who like many women who wear the full veil in Europe is a recent convert to Islam, vowed to continue covering her face in public despite the opprobrium it brings. She cited respect for “my creator, my husband and my modesty.” The swell of concern over veils, she said, reflects fear of Islam. After the anti-veil legislation passed, a video was posted on the Internet warning of terrorist strikes against Belgium. “It’s something that frightens them,” Selma said in a telephone interview. “And so, when they see a woman wearing a burqa …” she said, her voice trailing off. Isabel Soumaya, vice president

of the government-backed Association of Belgian Muslims, noted that only a few dozen women — among the country’s estimated 600,000 Muslims — wear the fullface veil. Soumaya, who converted to Islam 20 years ago, wears the Islamic scarf, which covers her hair, but does not wear a fullface veil. In focusing on those who do, she said, Belgian legislators were “preying on voters’ fears.” She added, “It is racism and a form of Islamophobia.”

An immigration issue The friction has grown more acute, Soumaya said, because the immigrants, many from North Africa, who came to Belgium in the 1960s and 1970s now have children and, sometimes, grandchildren who grew up here. The second- and third-generation Muslims, she said, have no intention of returning to North Africa and feel no need to “keep their heads” down, as their forebears did on arrival. Fouad Lahssaini, a lawmaker who immigrated to Belgium from Morocco as a youth, said that most Muslims in Belgium do not favor women wearing the fullface veil and that passing a ban was tantamount to “taking out

a bazooka to kill a fly.” He said that requiring women to identify themselves to police or expose their face for a driver’s license photo makes sense, but that a ban seems little more than resentment over the high visibility of Muslims in Belgian society. In the streets around the Midi Station this week, hundreds of Moroccan immigrants sat at coffee shops watching al-Jazeera, the pan-Arab all-news channel, and women shopped in full-length robes with their hair covered by scarves. Those interviewed, who grew up in a country that practices a tolerant form of Islam, professed no desire to see women wear full veils. But they appeared uncomfortable with the new legislation, saying it singles out Muslims and could be the first step toward other problems. “I’m against the full veil,” said Faridh Boughdan, a 35-year-old pastry chef. “That is not required by Islam. I studied Islam back in Morocco. I read the Quran, and there is nothing in there about that.” On the other hand, he said, women must wear scarves to cover their hair whenever they go out into the street. This, he said, is laid down in the Quran.

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R   B Luke Hendrix, executive pastor at Imago Dei Community Church in Portland, will share the message at 9:30 a.m. and host the Redux: Q&A service at 11:15 a.m. Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “Pentecost Plus Seven” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Debbie Borovec will share the message “A Place of Honor” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Celebration Church, 1245 S. Third St., Bend. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Remembering,” based on Deuteronomy 8:2, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Prayer services will be held at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “The Good Thing About a Desert” as part of the series “Great Faith in Terrifying Times” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Guest speaker Al Hulbert will share the message “In the Meantime,” based on Thessalonians 5 at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • Associate Pastor Greg Bolt will speak on the topic “Holy in the Ordinary ... Water” at the 9 a.m. contemporary, 10:45 a.m. traditional and 5:01 p.m. evening services Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “Bright With Eden’s Dawn Light,” based on Psalm 8, at the 10 a.m. service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will continue the series “The Plan” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St., Bend. • Glenn Austin will share the message “Forgive One Anoth-

er” as part of the series “One Another” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Sam Smith will share the message “Things Not Seen” with musical accompaniment at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • A series titled “Amo Dei” will be shared at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Myron Wells will share the message “Got Talent?,” based on Matthew 25:1430 at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Pastor Rob Anderson will share the message “I Just Want to be Loved,” based on John 16:12-15, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary and 11 a.m. traditional services Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond. • Pastor Randy VanMehren will share the message “The Father, Son, and Holy Spirit Pull Together to Rescue Us from Sin, Death and the Devil” at 10:30 a.m. at Emmaus Lutheran Church, 2175 S.W. Salmon Ave., Redmond. • Father Trough will lead a traditional Latin Mass at 6 p.m. Sunday and at 9:30 a.m. Monday at Most Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Chapel, 1051 S.W. Helmholtz Way, Redmond. Confession will be heard before Mass. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “To Know the True God, the Holy Trinity, is to Have Eternal Life,” based on St. John 8:51, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Doing Vine Work Together,” based on Ephesians 4:11-16 at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care plus Teen Ministry 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road, 8 am: Contemporary Worship 11 am: Traditional Worship

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High)

Adult Bible Class & Sunday School - 9:30 am Nursery provided on Sundays

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor

School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.trinity359.tripod.com e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome

“Holy in The Ordinary ... Water”

Christian Schools “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

DO WE HAVE YOUR SUMMER SCHEDULE?

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship Our theme for 2010 is “Expectancy” 10:30 am Children’s Church “Faithtown” WEDNESDAYS 7:00 PM: Fuel Youth Group Adult small groups weekly Child care provided during Sunday morning service. Pastor Michael Johnson www.bendfcc.com

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver OR 97707 “Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am. • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs -6th gr.) • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am. • Home Bible Studies are also available. Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org

LA PINE CHRISTIAN CENTER Assembly of God 52565 Day Road La Pine, Oregon 97739 541-536-1593 SUNDAYS Sunday School 9:30am Coffee Connection 10:15am Morning Worship 10:45am Children’s Church and Nursery Care provided Sunday Night Service 6:00pm Women’s Ministries 2nd Saturday of each month at 10:00am Men of Iron Bible Study Mondays at 6:00pm Ladies’ Bible Study every other Tuesday at 10:00am WEDNESDAYS Evening Service at 7:00pm Youth Group Royal Rangers Missionettes Rainbows 3,4 & 5 year olds Pastor Wayne Wilson www.lpccag.org

Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic

REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service

HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Holy Redeemer Church 16137 Burgess Rd., La Pine, OR 541-536-3571 Mass Sunday 10:00 am HOLY TRINITY, SUNRIVER Masses: Sat. 5:30 pm, Sun. 8 am Rev, Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS/ GILCHRIST Sunday Mass 12:30 pm HOLY FAMILY, FORT ROCK / CHRISTMAS VALLEY Sunday Mass 3:30 pm www.holyredeemerparish.net ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Joe Reinig Fr. Daniel Maxwell Deacon Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM

Guest speaker Al Hulbert shares his sermon “In the Meantime” from 1 Thessalonians 5

Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 7:30 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM

For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org

*No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass.

FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed will lead a Traditional Patriotic Service this Sunday. The service will include singing patriotic hymns, pledges to the American and Christian flags, and a Memorial Day message. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth May 30, 2010 Sermon: “Got Talent?” Matthew 25:14-30 Speaker: Pastor Myron Wells POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.stfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Episcopal TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

Terrebonne Foursquare Church Located in the quiet community of Terrebonne. Overlooking the impressive Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Be inspired. Enjoy encouragement. Find friends. Encounter God. Get away, every Sunday. Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School & Trek (Middle School)) Monday 6:30 PM 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH Amo Dei - Part 1 All Your Heart Pastor Ken Johnson & Mike Alexander Sometimes life gets so complicated, we forget what it is all about. MAIN CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00, 10:45am and 6:30pm Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00, 10:45am and 6:30pm Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th and 5th Grades Meet: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00am 9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 10:45am. SOUTH CAMPUS Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97701 Sunday at 11:00am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 11:00am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Sunday Worship

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond SUMMER SCHEDULE Sunday Worship Service at 10:00 am

Wednesday 5:30 pm The Fold (9th-12th grades) Movie Night 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship

1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Nazarene

Call 541-385-6421 for information. We welcome everyone to our services. TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. We offer a wide range of monthly activities including social functions, services, children’s education, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Alan Berg All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street Friday, June 11 @ 6:00 pm Parent & Student led Shabbat Service Special Adult B’nai Mitzvah weekend services to be held in the sanctuary of the First United Methodist Church lead by Rabbi Alan Berg and Cantor Ida Rae Cahana Friday, June 25 @ 7:30 pm Erev Shabbat Saturday, June 26 @ 9:30 am Adult B’nai Mitzvah For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826 \Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study, Wednesday 7:15 a.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 Worship times: 9:00 AM Contemporary Junior Church 9:15 AM (ages Pre-school–5th Grade) 11:00 AM Traditional May 30, 2010 “It Takes Two to Gospel” Given by Pastor David C . Nagler Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Music, Message, Meal Hospitality, Child Care, Programs for all ages at all services

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Full Children’s Program Active Social Outreach Coffee, snacks, and fellowship hour after service. M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wednesday - Bible Study at noon 3rd Thursday - Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm Youth and Family Programs

BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am & 5 pm Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30am Sunday

May 29 -Torah Service and Bar Mitzvah Henry Mensing 10am June 3 - Taize 7 pm June 5 - Torah Study 10 am June 6 - Religious Education 10 am

9:00 am Contemporary

Sunday Evening 5:46 pm Dinner

JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years, We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 • www.jccobend.com

Shabbat and High Holiday Services Religious Education Program Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study • Adult Education

Rev. Greg Bolt, Associate Pastor

Vacation Bible School June 21-25, 9:00 am - 11:30 am

Jewish Synagogues

Rabbi Jay Shupack Rebbetzin Judy Shupack

All Are Welcome, Always!

WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational ALFALFA COMMUNITY CHURCH Alfalfa Community Hall 541-330-0593, Alfalfa, Oregon Sunday School 9:30, Worship 10:30 We sing hymns, pray for individual needs, and examine the Bible verse by verse. You can be certain of an eternity with Jesus (Eph. 2:8,9) and you can discover His plan and purpose for your life (Eph. 2:10). We welcome your fellowship with us. CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard

Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always! www.bendfp.org 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, May 30, 11:00am Guest Minister Bill Graves: “The Joy of Pilgrimage” As we prepare to enter the summer vacation season we might pause to reflect where we are on our journey. Bill will discuss pilgrimage as a spiritual practice and metaphor for life, reflecting on his walk last September on the Camino de Santiago, an ancient pilgrimage route in Spain. Religious Education and Childcare are provided Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672

CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 · 541-389-8241 Sunday Morning Worship 8:45 AM, 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care Provided

Pastor Thom Larson Change the World Action Sunday Sermon title: “Bright With Eden’s Dawn Light” Scripture: Psalm 8 10:00 am - One Service Only Child Care Provided

Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

*During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship.

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 10:00 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 1:00 pm - Middle School Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program 7:00 pm - Senior High Youth Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH DIRECTORY LISTING Starting May 1, 2010 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105.00 5 Saturdays and TMC:

$126.00 Call Pat Lynch

541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Temples


A6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Evers Continued from A1 Horowitz first met Doitchin at a dinner with the Krastevs, he said. The boy immediately stood out. “I remember this vividly; it was almost 20 years ago now,” Horowitz said. “Doitchin was with us and he was so bright and so engaging and had so much sparkle to him, so much intelligence.” Conditions in post-communist Bulgaria were dismal, as institutions eroded and the country struggled to transition to capitalism. So Horowitz instinctively offered to take Doitchin to the U.S. and help get him a scholarship to the prestigious Georgetown Day School, just outside Washington, D.C., where his own children had gone. Today, Horowitz believes Krasev’s experience growing up during such a dark time must have instilled in him the desire to avoid going back at all costs. “Bulgaria was as bad as any place in the European world,” Horowitz said. “It may show the intensity of his desire to escape that hellhole of a world.” When he came to the U.S., Krasev struggled in his first year to cope with his upside-down circumstances and an unfamiliar culture. Reading Tom Sawyer, with its colorful vocabulary, was especially hard, Horowitz said. But Krasev loved his new homeland. “We’d have these discussions and he’d say, ‘I’m not Bulgarian,” Horowitz said. “He told me, in Bulgaria the rules are unfair so people take what they can. In America people defend the rules even if they’ve lost the game.” But as a senior at Georgetown Day, Krasev flourished, winning awards, including the Socrates Award, given to three students in the D.C. area who demonstrate “an uncommonly inquisitive approach to learning.” “He just blossomed,” Horowitz said.

College years Outside of school, Horowitz said, Krasev was always a diligent worker who got an after-school job to pay for his own car. Krasev’s turnaround earned him a scholarship to Davidson College.

About Michael Horowitz Michael Horowitz is a senior fellow of the Hudson Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C. According to the institute’s website, he is director of its Project for Civil Justice Reform and Project for International Religious Liberty. He served in the Reagan administration as general counsel for the Office of Management and Budget. He had also taught law at the University of Mississippi and Georgetown University.

— Matthew Griffith, a former college roommate

There, a college roommate and former girlfriend remember him as the smartest and most interesting person on campus, but also as moody and mysterious. Shannon Klein, Krasev’s college girlfriend, said she fell in love with the smart, intense Bulgarian. “I definitely loved him, and he loved me,” Klein said. “He was very loving and very smart and very passionate about everything.” Matthew Griffith met Krasev his freshman year at Davidson, where they lived in the same hall. They became close friends and then roommates the next year. “What’s weird is I remember so many details about him, because he is far and away the most intelligent person I’ve met in my entire life,” said Griffith, now an architect in Raleigh, N.C. One detail: Krasev told Griffith he didn’t learn chess until he arrived at Davidson. By his sophomore year, Krasev had won a statewide chess competition. They shared “the usual college shenanigans” and shot pool nearly every night, Griffith said. But their sophomore year, after the pair became roommates, “things started to get kind of weird.” “Some days he would wake up and be really fun, and a really substantial person,” Griffith said. “Some days he would wake up and decide, ‘I’m not going to talk to people today.’” Krasev studied political science and math. But by the second semester of his sophomore year, he mostly stopped going to classes.

Krasev also stood out for his conspicuous spending, which didn’t match up with a job at a nearby Domino’s Pizza. Griffith remembered Krasev taking him to a large warehouse Krasev rented in downtown Charlotte. “All he had in there was a huge drum set that he bought,” Griffith said. And Krasev had at least three cars on campus at the same time: a Ford Probe, a Saab and a battered Toyota covered in bumper stickers, Klein said.

Not what he seemed Eventually, Klein suspected that Krasev might be something other than what he seemed. Looking through his cupboards one day in search of gum, she found a Tupperware container. “I found all these things to falsify documents,” Klein said, such as notary public stamps. Klein and Griffith said Krasev experimented with different names. Griffith said Krasev sometimes went by “Dutch Kraser” or a similar variation. Krasev told Klein he was planning to change his name from Krastev to Krasev, or possibly Kaiser. Krasev later used both Kraser and Kaiser as aliases. At the end of their sophomore year, Klein, whose maiden name is Simmons, left to study abroad. Neither she nor Griffith ever saw him again. Both said they’ve often won-

dered what happened to Krasev. “I’ve been waiting for somebody to call me looking for Doitch for 15 years,” Griffith said. “I was really sad for a long time,” Klein said. “I thought he killed himself. I hoped that Doitch might feel like he owed me an explanation.” Klein did talk to Krasev on the phone a few times after he dropped out of Davidson, she said. At one point he said he was doing voice-over work in Hollywood. Another time he said he thought their conversation was being wiretapped but didn’t explain why. Ultimately, Klein concluded that it was probably money trouble and the desire to avoid being deported that led Krasev to disappear. “I thought in the end that he’s from Bulgaria, and they were trying to deport him because he borrowed a lot of money and was not paying it back,” she said. Their last conversation came in the summer of 1995. Klein was going to Oregon for a summer job. “He said, ‘I’ll find you in Oregon,’” Klein said. Krasev never did. Meanwhile, Krasev cut off communication with Horowitz and his parents at the same time he left Davidson. Horowitz and his wife tried for years to find him, contacting law enforcement agencies and hiring private detectives without success. “There were times we thought we came close, but it never happened,” Horowitz said.

“I definitely loved him, and he loved me. He was very loving and very smart and very passionate about everything.” — Shannon Klein, Krasev’s college girlfriend

Eventually, Klein suspected that Krasev might be something other than what he seemed. Looking through his cupboards one day in search of gum, she found a Tupperware container. “I found all these things to falsify documents,” Klein said, such as notary public stamps.

4.16 Acres with Irrigated Pastures. Updated 2018 Sq. Ft. Home. 3 Bedroom & 2 1/2 Bathrooms. 60’ x 12’ - 5 Stall Stable with Runs. 27’ x 40’ RV Storage. Listed for $649,000. Contact Shauna Riley 541-678-4467

Private Setting 9.18 Acres. 8 Acres 3 Sisters Irrigation. Custom 3400 Sq. Ft Home. 3 Bedroom, Den and 30’ x 34’ Bonus Rm. 24’ x 36’ Shop & 36’ x 36’ Barn. Listed for $689,000. Contact Kim Riley 541-948-2926

3 Bdrm., 2 Ba., 1496 sf. Close to the Village. Sunriver’s popular reverse living plan w/ Master Bdrm & bath in main living area, w/vaulted ceilings, wood-burning frpl, lots of windows, huge deck, cov. entry, Single garage, furnished. Call Darrell Hamel 541-480-7563 dhamel@empnet.com

Open House on the River 10-1 PM, Located off Circle 7 in Sunriver. 3 bd/2.50 ba, with 2 master suites. 1 car garage. Comes fully furnished. Come enjoy the sun on the Deschutes. Contact Mary Hoak at maryhoak@prunw.com or 541-848-8140

1800+ square feet. 3 bed / 2 bath. Large fenced yard with RV parking. Large 500+ sq foot bonus room. Sherry Brooks, broker 541-420-6518 www. hometeambend.com

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Cute bungalow built in 1940 in the heart of old downtown Redmond. Corner lot with white picket fence. Gas fireplace in living room. Bamboo hardwood flooring. Mature trees in front and back yard. 560 square foot garage upgraded to 400 amps. MLS # 201004559 541-420-3287

Cascade Mtn views, newer 3 BR, 2 BA, 1978 sq ft on 2.1 acres. Beautifully landscaped, sprinkler system, 24x32 oversized garage with attic storage. Private well, RV pad w/sewer hookup. Call Barb Gadotti 541-480-5674

Charming A-frame on 1.2 acres. 1 BR, 1 BA, 1296 sq ft built in 1986. Propane free-standing stove, Upper bonus room has laminate flooring. RV sewer hookup, large garage/shop, perimeter fenced. Call Barb Gadotti 541-480-5674.

Wonderful 3 BD/2.5 BA Sunriver home near Village Mall! Greatroom floorplan, gorgeous tongue-in-groove vaulted ceilings & cozy fireplc. Open, bright kitchen. Lrg master on main. Furnished w/hot tub. Established rental history. Elizabeth 541-325-3045

1 Level Home on 1 Acre. Studio/ Hobby House w/ 2 bedrooms & 1 Bath. 36’ x 48’ Shop w/bathroom. Close to Mt Bachelor & River. Listed for $349,000. Contact Mike & Kim Riley 541-9482926

Sunriver Home Close to Bike Path & River. Vaulted Living & Family Room w/Fireplace. 2328 Sq. Ft. 2 Decks & Private Hot Tub. Great Price $409,000. Contact Mike & Kim Riley 541948-2932

$ .50 SQFT

TERREBONNE

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REDMOND

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REDMOND

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SUNRIVER

Charming well kept home located in River Meadows. This 2 story 3 bed 2 bath has reverse living with kitchen, dining, great room, and master bed on the upper level. River Meadows is located adjacent to Big Deschutes River offers bike paths, pool, tennis courts, RV storage & boat ramp. Michael Diven

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BEND

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You’ll never feel cramped in this marvelous 2005 built home. Over 2900 SF. Main floor master suite, 2nd floor bonus rm w/bath. Top quality features throughout. Beautifully landscaped, fenced, water features, covered backyard deck, mountain views. Worth a look at this new price. Pictures at www.dirvine.prunw.com. Diana Irvine, Broker, 541-815-0500

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Sunriver Condo on the Golf Course! Fantastic price on this well maintained 2/Bed/2BA condo w/loft, great rm, family rm & fireplace. Easily sleeps 8! Fully furnished, close to Village Mall. Call Elizabeth 541-325-3045 or Bob 541-350-8558

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When federal investigators contacted Horowitz late Thursday evening with the news Krasev was still alive, and in federal custody, the first reaction was relief. “My wife immediately started sobbing just to know that he was alive,” Horowitz said. He immediately called Krasev’s parents in Sofia, Bulgaria. “It was a state of shock,” Horowitz said. “They never wanted anything from him but to know that he was alive.” After speaking to Krasev’s defense attorney and seeing the support the man has had from his days living as Jason Evers, Horowitz said he’s both proud of the life Krasev built and sad that it will likely evaporate. “We’re so thrilled and grateful for the support that he appears to be getting from the people in (Oregon),” Horowitz said. “In that sense he got what he had hoped for and what his parents had hoped for.”

RE PR DU IC CT E IO N

REDMOND

Contact with his family

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$249,900

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French and Spanish, Galvin said. It was the East Coast connection, though, that was the final confirmation of Krasev’s identity, said Patrick Durkin, a San Francisco-based Special Agent in Charge with the U.S. State Department’ Diplomatic Security Service. “We did some interviews on the East Coast and witnesses there confirmed his identity,” Durkin said.

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20198 SE MURPHY ROAD $99,900

5/3 H OP 0 1OU EN 0- SE 1p m

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After leaving Davidson, Krasev made his way to Colorado sometime in the early to mid-1990s. He rented a basement apartment from an elderly couple in a quiet south Denver neighborhood with manicured lawns and modestly sized homes. The couple has since died. The home’s current owner, Maren Scoggins, said her family moved in four months ago and had no idea Krasev had lived there until federal investigators knocked on her door this week. A few neighbors had vague recollections of Krasev and considered him friendly enough. Bob Barton said he’s lived next door to the Scoggins home since 1994 and remembered Krasev as a painter and a student when he lived there. “He was easy to talk to,” Barton said. Krasev’s OLCC application shows he partnered with a Denver couple in a food-delivery service venture where he worked nights and weekends from 1998 to 2001. Denver fly-fishing guide Chris Galvin considered Krasev a close friend, though Galvin knew the man as “Danny Kaiser.” Galvin said Kaiser went by several names and kept his past to himself. He did make references to East Coast connections and hinted at a troubled relationship with his father. “I think I got about as close as you can get to someone who is so guarded,” he said. Krasev seemed to have a command of several languages, including Russian, Romanian,

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Horowitz and his wife tried for years to find Krasev, contacting law enforcement agencies and hiring private detectives without success. “There were times we thought we came close, but it never happened,” Horowitz said.

5/2 HOOPE 9 1 US N -4 E pm

15676 TRAPPER POINT RD. SISTERS $649,000

“What’s weird is I remember so many details about him, because he is far and away the most intelligent person I’ve met in my entire life. ... Some days he would wake up and be really fun, and a really substantial person. Some days he would wake up and decide, ‘I’m not going to talk to people today.’”

Conveniently located Horse Property in Bend! 5 stall horse barn, 5+ horse pens on 2+ ac. Large lighted outdoor arena. Separately fenced back yard – Dog Kennels. Call Marla at 541-350-7052

Beautiful View Property in an area of million $ homes! 3800+ sf Shop on 7.6 acres with irrigation. The hard part is done! The well, power, septic and driveway are in! Conveniently located between Sisters, Bend and Redmond. Call Marla at 541-350-7052

Prime C1 Commercial Retail for Sale! Shadow Anchored by Walmart & Home Depot. Subdividable 1.98 acres / 3696 sf newer building. Great location with signage and HWY 97 frontage. Call Marla at 541-350-7052

Lease Only. 640sqft OFFICE AREA/50x30 • Warehouse • Monument signage • Wired for CAT5 TV/Phones and 200amp service. MLS#201004796. “Your Central Oregon Broker” Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 jeff@ycob.net

6.8 acres River frontage • MFG allowed • Site analysis available • 410Ft well is in • Incredible Mtn views • MLS# 201004742 “Your Central Oregon Broker” Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 jeff@ycob.net

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE • Lease only 1,400SQFT space • Monument signage * CAM’S included • Corner of 6th & Greenwood • MLS# 201004370 “Your Central Oregon Broker” Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 jeff@ycob.net

Green built home on 20 acres • 3 bedrooms/3 bathrooms • 3,072SQFT. • Radiant floor heat • MLS#2908029 ”Your Central Oregon Broker” Team Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 jeff@ycob.net Terri Cichosz 541-420-4493 terri@ycob.net

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Back yard is like a park and backs up to COI irrigation canal. Cascade Mountain views, Open Greatroom floor plan. New carpet and vinyl installed April 2009. Two Sky-lights, outstanding natural lighting SE. exposure. Space Rent $395 mo. Robert Smith 541-420-3287

Resort living at its best! Relax and enjoy this completed refurbished one bedroom, one bath condo. Easy access, ground floor, great forest views. Located close to Mt. Bachelor Ski Resort and downtown Bend, the amenities include cable TV, WIFI, phone, heated pools, hot tubs, tennis courts, exercise facilities, ice rink and restaurants. Close to rafting, hiking, horse trails, and biking. $89,000 Call Paula 541-977-4009

541-322-8880 377SW SWIndustrial Century Drive 550 Way Suite A, Bend, OR Suite 100, Bend OR

Double wide mobile home with add-ons on nice treed, extra large cul-de-sac lot. Adorable white picket fencing around beautiful green grass areas - front and side. Covered carport and 2 extra storage sheds. Front and back screened porches. This unit is located in a secluded, quiet neighborhood close to park area for walking your pets. Owner will carry loan for the right buyers! Buyers must prequalify with park manager before purchase. Call Paula 541-977-4009

PRICE REDUCED ALMOST 50K!!!! Wonderful 3 bdrm, 2 bath single level 1735 sf. home on 4.69 acres. Property includes a fully insulated 1200 sf. shop, large fenced garden area, RV area w/hookups, U/G irrigation system and a 22 gpm well. For more information on this property call John Lappin at 541-390-7502

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Fantastic opportunity to own a 25% share of this wonderful 3 bdrm,2 bath, 1778 sf home located in the northern part of Sunriver near Woodlands G.C.(North Course). Call John Lappin at 541-390-7502 for additional information on this wonderful Sunriver home.

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REDUCED! Custom home in TRS! Large 1+ acre lot in upscale neighborhood. Roomy 3 bdrm / 3 bath home + Shop. OS 2 car garage – RV Parking/ Hookup. Call Marla at 541-3507052 to take a peek

Extraordinary home with all the extras to include a chef’s kitchen, exercise rm, steam shower, 2 dining, 2 family rooms, sweeping staircase entry. WOW is everywhere. 19 Pro Staff - MLS#201004649. Agent Joy Anderson

541-593-1234


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 A7

Company may raise wages as Chinese suicides mount

Chess Continued from A1 The earliest records identify a Virginia-based player named Doitchen Krastev, who has not played in a tournament since Jan. 1, 1991. Joan DuBois, director of communications for the United States Chess Federation, said records of tournament play before 1991 are on file but have not been added to the federation’s online database. A June 1992 Washington Post story named a Doitchen Krastev from Washington, D.C.’s prestigious Georgetown Day School as one of eight high school graduates to win the Socrates Award, given to students selected by their teachers “for their uncommonly inquisitive approach to learning.” In October 1992, a player named Doitch Kraser from New York acquired a USCF card and entered the 40th annual North Carolina Championship tournament in Charlotte. Over the next two years, Kraser played in 28 tournaments, 19 of which were held in North Carolina. Online databases identify Doitch Kraser as a possible alias used by Krasev, who enrolled in Davidson College in North Carolina as a freshman in fall 1992, and left sometime during his sophomore year. In March 1995, a player entered a tournament in Colorado Springs under the name Danny Kaiser, the name friends said Krasev was using when he lived in Denver in the mid- to late 1990s. “Kaiser” entered 76 tournaments primarily in the Denver and Boulder area over the next two and a half years. He played his last tournament in the area on Oct. 22, 1997, at an event hosted by the Boulder Chess Club. “Jason Evers” played his first USCF-sanctioned tournament in November 2001, at the South Eugene Open. He appeared at a handful of tournaments over the next year in Portland and Gresham, then didn’t play in another tournament until September 2004. He played regularly through 2008, often at Central Oregon Community College but also in online tournaments. DuBois said a player who legally changes their name must provide documentation to the USCF to update their player registration, but when signing up for the first time, players can in theory use any name and date of birth they choose. “Anybody anywhere, whether they’re a current member or not, could sign up under another name and we’d have no idea,” DuBois said. “There’s no way of knowing whether this person is that person under an alias, unfortunately, that’s the truth.” In February this year, “Evers” played his last in-person tournament before he was arrested, finishing in a threeway tie for first in the Idaho Closed State Championship. “Evers” sealed his first-place finish by beating Boise engineer Kurt P. Douglas in the last match of the day at Boise State University. Douglas said he’d never met “Evers” before the tournament, but remembered him as an aggressive player and slightly quiet. Midway though the tournament, a woman came through selling baked goods, Douglas recalled, a fundraising effort for a chess club from a local elementary school or middle school. “Evers” bought everything she had. “He went over and gave her 20 bucks or 40 bucks or whatever and said, ‘I’ll buy the whole thing,’ and then said, ‘Everybody can have one,’” Douglas said. “I thought that was a nice thing to do. And he’s a really tough chess player, too.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

By Janet Ong Bloomberg News

Hon Hai Group, the assembler of Apple’s iPhones, may raise wages in China by 20 percent after a series of suicides at the world’s largest contract manufacturer of electronics. The company plans to implement the plan soon, said Edmund Ding, a spokesman at Taipei-based Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., the flagship of the group that’s also known

BendSpineandPain.com

HONG KONG — Ma Yaohai, the first person jailed in 20 years in China for the crime of organizing sex parties, was to appeal his conviction Friday, his lawyer Yuan Xiaoyong said. Ma signed the appeal at a detention center in the Eastern Chinese city of Nanjing, according to Yuan. Ma, sentenced to 3 1/2 years in prison by the Qinhuai District Court on May 20, intended to sub-

0% FOR 60 MO.

ALL 2010 FORD (541) 647-1646 Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A new fence and increased mountain bike use on neighboring Bureau of Land Management land have upset some residents south of Eagle Crest, including, from left, Dave Meekins, Steve Newell, Fred Stills, Jennifer Newell and Milana Newell, 9.

Cline Buttes Continued from A1 “There’s lots of interest for mountain bike trails, well we’re not putting mountain bike trails everywhere,” Dean continued. “… We’re in here, trying to balance those uses with the environment we’ve inherited.” He said the BLM’s plan calls for 18 miles of mountain bike trails, and 22 miles of equestrian trails. But Newell is concerned that drawing mountain bikers to the area and increasing the number of bikers will make the area less friendly to horse riders. Horses can hear motorcycles from far away, he said, but are easily spooked by a mountain bike that appears without warning. And Newcomb residents just south of the Maston area aren’t thrilled with the increased traffic from mountain bikers, who park at trailheads down the road. “The residents are really upset because they are now subjected to a tremendous amount of traffic with people flying in with mountain bikes on top of their cars, past their houses,” Newell said. The Maston area did not have conflicts before, Newell said, adding that he thinks the BLM is “over-engineering” the trail system, and that divvying up trails

Former Thai leader denies funding riots New York Times News Service BANGKOK — One day after being charged with terrorism, Thailand’s fugitive former prime minister, Thaksin Shinawatra, said in a telephone interview on Wednesday that he did not finance or organize the red-shirt movement that had staged a twomonth sit-in here. Speaking in court during the appeal hearing on Wednesday, one of the opposition leaders, Jatuporn Prompan said the “core leaders of the red shirts were responsible for every move at the rally without any influence from Thaksin.” In denying that he had helped finance the protests, Thaksin said the red-shirt movement was self-sustaining through donations from both poor and wealthy supporters. The government has frozen the bank accounts of dozens of people it says have been involved. The movement is the product of years of political organizing and held major rallies long before the recent, prolonged occupation of Bangkok’s central shopping district. A telecommunications billionaire, Thaksin was one of Thailand’s richest men. In February, a court found him guilty of concealing his wealth and confiscated $1.4 billion in frozen assets, while allowing him to keep nearly $1 billion.

Professor to appeal sex-party conviction Bloomberg News

as Foxconn Technology Group. At least 10 people have died this year at Hon Hai’s manufacturing complex in Shenzhen, and police are treating the deaths as suicides, prompting Chairman Terry Gou to recruit counselors, install nets in dormitories and open his factories to the media. The minimum monthly wage in Shenzhen is between $132 and $146, according to the city government.

mit the appeal to officials there to be sent to the Intermediate People’s Court, his lawyer said. Prosecutors said that between the summer of 2007 and August 2009, Ma, 13 other men and eight women used the Internet to meet up for swinger parties at Ma’s residence and hotel rooms in Nanjing. Ma participated in 18 encounters, according to court documents posted on the website of Yao Yongan, another of Ma’s lawyers.

between different types of recreation just means there’s less area for individuals to use. “We would have loved to see it left alone,” he said. Residents are also upset about a new barbed wire fence and gates the BLM put up recently to keep motorized vehicles out — but also prevents people from entering the area from the road. “You could ride your horse out of the driveway,” said Dave Meekins, who’s lived along the road for 25 years. He’s concerned that it will block wildlife from coming onto his property, and instead funnel deer toward the end of the fence at Cline Buttes Highway. “Watch out for the barbed wire, jack,” he said at the site Wednesday, as a jack rabbit hopped under it and onto BLM land. Greg Currie, landscape architect with the Prineville BLM, said the fence was built to the agency’s wildlife standards, and that it was an overdue addition since the area was closed to motorized vehicles in 2005. And staff with the BLM recognized that once motorized vehicles were off-limits in the Maston area, equestrians, mountain bikers, hikers and others would take a greater interest in it, he said. “It’s located close to Bend, and it’s close to Redmond,” Currie

said. “Once it got closed to motor vehicles in 2005, we pretty much knew that it was going to be a popular place.” The agency involved the public with field trips, and the intent of the plan is to provide trails for both equestrians and mountain bikers, he said, and it was developed with input from different organizations. With many land management decisions, he said, there are people who want the agency to do something as well as people who want it to leave things alone. The Maston area is slowly but surely gaining popularity with mountain bikers in the winter, said Woody Starr, president of the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, since it’s one of the few singletrack areas to ride in the area. But he said the group is trying to be conscientious of the other uses in the area, and avoid bad encounters with horse riders or others. It’s also working with the agency to set up well-defined trailheads and trail system. “There’s enough land to share out there,” he said. “I totally emphasize, they’re kind of accustomed to the idea that it’s their backyard, but it is public land.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

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A8 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

TERRORISM IN INDIA

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Maoists claim to derail train

Sect mosques attacked in Pakistan; 80 dead

Bulletin wire reports SARDIHA, India — Rescuers scoured the wreckage of a passenger express train Friday that derailed and collided with a cargo train in eastern India, killing at least 71 and injuring hundreds. The government accused Maoist rebels of sabotaging the tracks, and a local Maoist militia, the People’s Committee against Police Atrocities, claimed responsibility. Railway officials said they expected the death toll to rise because bodies were still trapped between the trains. Sardiha is a stronghold of India’s Maoist rebels, known as Naxalites, who had called for a four-day general strike here starting Friday. The Naxalites have launched repeated and bold attacks in recent months. Just 11 days ago, the rebels ambushed a bus in central India, killing 31 police officers and civilians. A few weeks before that, 76 soldiers were killed in a rebel ambush — the deadliest attack by the rebels against government forces in the 43-year insurgency. A spokesman for the umbrella Maoist group, however, denied any role in this attack.

The Associated Press

Rescue workers and police gather early Friday at the scene of a train crash near Sardiha, India. Two trains collided along a rural stretch of track near this small town, about 90 miles west of Calcutta in West Bengal state.

Israel partially opens West Bank road to Palestinians By Ben Hubbard

Confusion behind the Gaza blockade

The Associated Press

BEIT SIRA, West Bank — The Israeli military opened part of a major West Bank highway to Palestinian cars Friday to comply with a ruling of the country’s highest court. The road, known as Highway 443, is a major link between Jerusalem and Tel Aviv and is heavily traveled by Israeli commuters. About 12 miles of it run through the West Bank, one of the territories Palestinians and the international community say should form part of a future Palestinian state, and it was built in parts on land expropriated from the Palestinians living there. The Israeli military, which maintains overall control of the West Bank, banned Palestinian cars from the highway in 2002 after a string of Palestinian shooting attacks there killed Israeli motorists. The military later connected some nearby Palestinian

©2 0 0 7 La-Z-Bo y In co rp o rated

The Associated Press

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man holds a banner reading “The land of Israel” on Highway 443 near Beit Sira on Friday. The sign at right reads “We had enough terror, keep Road 443 for Israelis.” villages with alternative roads, many of them passing through tunnels under the highway. The West Bank’s system of separate roads for Israelis and Palestinians has drawn sharp criticism from Palestinians and

human rights groups. In 2007, with the level of violence declining, local Palestinians petitioned Israel’s Supreme Court for access to the road. The court ruled the military’s sweeping closure discriminatory.

Bend, OR: H w y 2 0 E a s t 4 5 5 N E W i n d y K n o ll s D r. • B e n d , O R 9 7 7 0 1 5 4 1 . 6 1 7 . 1 7 1 7 • M o n . - S a t. 1 0 - 7 • S u n . N o o n - 5 w w w.l a - z - b o y . c o m / B e n d

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — Military bureaucrats enforcing Israel’s blockade of Gaza allow frozen salmon filet, facial scrub and lowfat yogurt into the Hamas-ruled territory. Cilantro and instant coffee are another matter — they are banned as luxury items. Over the past three years, Israel has determined down to the tiniest detail what gets into the Gaza Strip and to its population of 1.5 million, using secret guidelines. Critics have long maintained that Israel’s blockade, imposed after Hamas’ takeover in 2007, has not just been confusing, but counterproductive. It has come under renewed scrutiny this week as hundreds of pro-Palestinian activists sail a flotilla to Gaza loaded with goods. — The Associated Press

LAHORE, Pakistan — Islamist gunmen and a suicide squad lobbed grenades, sprayed bullets from atop a minaret and took hostages Friday in attacks on two mosques packed with worshippers belonging to a minority sect in Pakistan. At least 80 people were killed and dozens wounded. The strikes — the deadliest against the Ahmadi community — highlight the threat to minority religious groups by the same militants who have repeatedly attacked Pakistan’s U.S.-allied government and threatened to destabilize the nuclear-armed nation. The tactics echoed those militants have used against government, foreign and security targets in Pakistan. They had never before been directed against a religious minority. Shiite Muslims have borne the brunt of individual suicide bombings and targeted killings for years in Sunni-majority Pakistan, though Christians and Ahmadis have also faced violence.

Lufthansa among first to resume Iraq flights Lufthansa will restart regular service to Baghdad, the first of the Western European and U.S. carriers to resume flights to Iraq’s capital. The airline, Europe’s secondbiggest carrier, will serve Baghdad from Munich beginning Sept. 30, following a 20-year break, as economic growth attracts customers to the former war-ridden country, the German carrier said Friday. The carrier offered Baghdad flights between 1956 and 1990, when it stopped service because of the first Gulf War. Turkish Airlines became the first carrier in Europe to resume Baghdad flights in October 2008.

Dissident Iranian cleric: Sanctions won’t work Stricter U.N. sanctions against Iran, backed by the U.S. to curtail the country’s nuclear program, won’t succeed in isolating its Shiite Muslim rulers, says Mohsen Kadivar, a leading opposition

cleric and a visiting professor at Duke University’s department of religion. “Sanctions are a doubleedged sword; they weaken the regime and put the pressure on the people,” Kadivar said Tuesday. “They will not manage to isolate Iran with sanctions.” The cleric, who lives in the U.S., has close ties to the Green Movement that grew out of protests against last year’s disputed re-election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Stricter sanctions won’t help Iran’s opposition movement, which has already been weakened by a government crackdown over the past year, he said.

Ash covers Guatemala Guatemala’s capital was under a state of emergency, and its airport closed Friday, after the Pacaya volcano spewed black ash for miles in the country’s south. More than 65 people were injured and hundreds of homes damaged. The volcano started erupting Thursday, hurling lava and rocks and raining thick ash over Guatemala City, the capital, some 20 miles away. This mountainous country is dotted by volcanoes, and the 8,373-foot Pacaya is among eight active. Pacaya, part of a national park, has been active almost continuously for 45 years, making it a tourist attraction.

Communists could see gains in Czech election In an election that is unlikely to yield a majority for either the leftist Social Democrats or the rightist Civic Democrats, analysts say the Communist Party could come closer to real power in the Czech Republic than at any other time since the Velvet Revolution here overthrew Communism in 1989. Analysts say the Communist Party is benefiting from a regionwide disappointment over the failure of liberal parties to live up to the promises of that time. The Czech Communist Party, which recent polls indicate could win up to 15 percent of the vote, remains the only one surviving in the former Eastern Bloc. Voting continues through today. — From wire reports


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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

Handcrafted poppies Make your own poppies for Memorial Day, Page B8

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• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

SPOTLIGHT A tribute to Redmond’s Evergreen Elementary Redmond’s Evergreen Elementary School (437 S.W. 9th St.) will host an open house from 2 to 4 p.m. Thursday to celebrate the school, which is closing as a school at the end of the academic year. The open house will include tours, cake and punch. The public is invited and former students are encouraged to attend. Tours begin at 2 p.m. in the library. A DVD of “A Tribute to Evergreen Elementary 1921-2010” will be on sale for $5. Contact: 541-923-4865.

FootGaming event to benefit area schools

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mark Alward, left, and Bronson Walker ride their two-person recumbent pedal kart, which they estimate can reach up to 15 mph on flat ground, assuming it’s functioning properly.

BUILT SOLID Redmond teens have created a lifelong friendship, along with cool go-karts By David Jasper • The Bulletin

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est friends Mark Alward, 18, and Bronson Walker, 17, like to build stuff. The Redmond teens don’t make

run-of-the-mill stuff. They build really cool stuff. sulted in, among other things, a homemade ski-bike and two go-karts. The first, a downhill coaster kart, the other, a pedal-operated kart about the size of a small car. Being young men, they don’t just build the cool things. They test out their durability, by which we mean the durability of their creations, as well as their own. They’ve ridden the ski-bike into snow-covered bowls at Redmond Skatepark and cruised a kart into Dry River See Karts / B7

Mark, 18, left, and Bronson, 17, position their homemade pedal kart before going for a ride in Redmond. With no help from any adults, the lifelong friends have built two go-karts together.

Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center (3075 N. U.S. Highway 97), in Bend. Some firemen will offer to shave their moustaches for charity and as a local radio station broadcasts from the site. All funds will go to Sara’s Project, a breast-health education and outreach partnership created by St. Charles. • June 5, 9 a.m.-noon: The group will be in front of FootZone (845 N.W. Wall St.) in Bend to greet people picking up their packets for the Heaven Can Wait 5K walk/run, which raises money for Sara’s Project. • June 6, 8 a.m.-noon: The group will have one pink fire truck at the Heaven Can Wait event in Drake Park and another along the race route. Contact: 541-390-4870, pinkone338@gmail.com, www.pinkfiretrucks.org.

Redmond’s Community Presbyterian Church is seeking eligible houses for a “Paint Your Heart Out” project on July 17. The project aims to help senior citizens and the disabled. Applicants and nominees must be 60 or older or disabled, own their home, be living at the residence and unable to afford a commercial paint job. Applications are available at the Community Presbyterian Church and the Redmond Senior Center. Deadline is June 17. Contact: 541-548-3367.

Bend’s Community Center has created a monthly sponsorship program for people who want to help the needy in Central Oregon. Donors can choose a program they wish to sponsor and then make one-time or regular contributions. Programs include job training, Feed the Hungry, Keep Them Warm, The Diaper Bank, BikeShed, Becca’s Closet, thrift store vouchers, event space for fundraisers, blood drives, cultural events or general support. Regular contributors can receive an invoice monthly or choose to have an automatic payment charged to their credit card every month. Donations are tax deductible. Contact: Bend’s Community Center, 541-312-2069.

Organization unveils website on poverty

GUARDIANS OF THE RIBBON TOUR COMING TO BEND The Guardians of the Ribbon, shown here in Georgetown, Texas, in October 2009, will be in Bend for several events next week. The organization consists of a group of firefighters from Arizona who offer support for women with cancer and female cancer survivors. They will arrive in their signature pink fire trucks along with a pink trailer with a large silver ribbon sculpture. Bend resident Linda Robson, who is a breast cancer survivor, helped organize the local efforts. She believes seeing the firemen and trucks all decked out in pink, will “make a lot of women out here just feel so uplifted and supported.” Local appearances are: • June 4, 7-10 a.m.: The trucks and firefighters, as well as members from the Bend Fire Department, will be at The

‘Paint Your Heart Out’ seeks homes to paint

Become a sponsor of a local program

So far, the pair’s creativity and elbow-grease have re-

Canyon behind Mark’s house on 15th Street in Redmond.

A FootGaming event will be held from noon to 6 p.m. June 12 at the Liberty Theater (849 N.W. Wall St.), in Bend. PopCap Games will donate game consoles to use during the event, which will allow players to play Bejeweled with their feet. Students and community members will have the chance to rack up points for a local school. The school with the most points will win more than $2,500 in teacher training and workshops from Judy Shasek’s ExerLearning program. Similar games will be set up in participating classrooms the week before the event, and students will be able to log more steps to increase the likelihood of their school winning. Contact: 541-410-1478 or http:// footgamingbj.wordpress.com.

Partnership to End Poverty has launched a new website. Visitors of www.partnership toendpoverty.org can find information on the organization, key poverty indicators for Central Oregon communities, links to resources and research on povertyrelated subjects. By creating a network of partnerships, the organization hopes to help low-income residents become financially stable. Contact: 541-504-1389 or www .partnershiptoendpoverty.org. — From staff reports

Correction

Submitted photo

In a story headlined “Study: Comfort from Mom lowers stress,” which appeared Friday, May 28, on Page E1, the hormone associated with emotional bonding was misidentified. It is oxytocin. The Bulletin regrets the error.


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B2 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Sisters clash over homework help for struggling boyfriend Dear Abby: I’m an “A” student, but my boyfriend, “Rory,” has a difficult time in school, so he often comes over for help. We work at the computer in the room my sister and I share so she listens to everything we discuss. She says we are cheating because I’m doing most of his homework for him. I don’t give Rory the answers to questions, but I do give him “hints” and tell him where he’s likely to find the answers in the textbooks. I always check that the answers are correct. With his math homework, I tell him each step he needs to take, but he actually does the math himself and then I check for accuracy. If he needs to write an essay, I suggest what he might want to write and help him with some of the edits. My sister thinks what I do goes far beyond help, and that I’m enabling him to cheat. She feels that while it may help his grades now, I am doing him no favors in the long run. We had a big argument over this. I don’t think it’s any of her business. I’d really appreciate your opinion. — Helping Or Cheating? Sacramento, Calif. Dear Helping: Thank you for asking. I’m sure you care deeply for Rory, but sometimes — with the best of intentions — a person can do too much. When you suggest topics for your boyfriend’s essays, then edit them so the teacher won’t see where he needs to strengthen his English skills, what you’re really doing is preventing him from learning how to properly spell or construct a sentence. And when you’re no longer around to be his filter, it’s going to become apparent. The same goes for math. If you tell Rory what steps to take to solve his math problems, he won’t master the concepts or memorize the formulas. Heaven help him if he plans to take a college entrance exam! While the argument you had with your sister was regrettable, please try not to be so defensive.

DEAR ABBY She was trying to tell you something important, and it couldn’t hurt to really listen. Dear Abby: I’m a 13-year-old girl in junior high. I am very shy and self-conscious. When I see skinny girls, I look at myself and feel embarrassed or ashamed. I have a lot of friends who support me. They say I shouldn’t worry about my weight and that I don’t need to lose any more. I would like some words of encouragement from you. It seems like nothing can stop the way I feel. I have a boyfriend, but our relationship is long-distance. We talk online and he is as supportive as he can be, but I still feel self-conscious. Please help me with this. — Teen In Need In North Carolina Dear Teen: The harder we stare at our imagined flaws, the bigger they become. So please stop constantly comparing yourself to others. It’s a depressing waste of time. Very few people are completely confident and self-assured at 13, and there are more important qualities to focus on in life than whatever happens to be the ideal of physical perfection at the moment. Your time would be better spent developing qualities that not only make you special, but also will last a lifetime — your personality, your intellect and your talents. So listen to what your friends and your boyfriend are telling you. Spend a few minutes every day reminding yourself of all the things you have going for you and the special qualities you have to offer. If you do you’ll have less time to dwell on the negative. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

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U.S., U.K.’s ‘Special Relationship’ By Ellen Gray Philadelphia Daily News

Before he was introduced to fans of NBC’s “30 Rock” as the man Liz Lemon (Tina Fey) seemed destined to settle for, British actor Michael Sheen had developed a small sideline based on his likeness to Britain’s former prime minister, the charismatic and controversial Tony Blair. Fey, herself the bemused beneficiary of a resemblance to a politician, could probably identify. But where Fey’s “Saturday Night Live” impersonation of Sarah Palin has been played for laughs, Sheen’s portrayals have been in dramas, all written by Peter Morgan (who also wrote “Frost/Nixon,” in which Sheen played the talkshow inquisitor to Frank Langella’s Nixon). In the 2003 film “The Deal,” which came to HBO in late 2007, Sheen was the Labour Party friend and rival to another future prime minister, Gordon Brown. In “The Queen,” he was the new PM to Helen Mirren’s Queen Elizabeth II as they clashed — ever so gently — over the royal family’s response to the death of Princess Diana. Tonight, HBO presents “That Special Relationship,” in which Sheen plays Blair to Dennis Quaid’s Bill Clinton, a pairing that puts Quaid at an automatic disadvantage in his own country, where Clinton’s

face and mannerisms are so much better known. Quaid does a respectable job in a relatively thankless role, Clinton in Morgan’s view having been the less sincere partner in the relationship between the baby-boomer leaders, a political friendship that, like so much in that period, was eventually tested by the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Not only is Sheen on familiar ground with Blair, he’s once again paired with Helen McCrory, reprising her role from “The Queen” as the prime minister’s wife, Cherie. Which makes it all the more remarkable that the one performance in “That Special Relationship” that required not even a moment of mental adjustment was Hope Davis’ as first lady Hillary Clinton. Playing a well-known figure is about much more, and sometimes about much less, than simple impersonation. But Davis manages to look and sound so much like the real Hillary that she transcends whatever bar lies between her and a skeptical viewer. It’s always interesting to catch a glimpse of America as others see us: When Hugh Grant’s prime minister stood up to Billy Bob Thornton’s uncouth U.S. president in “Love Actually,” it probably said as much as any comedy could about how some Britons were feeling about the so-called “special relationship” between our countries, and without even mentioning the

war in Iraq. Blair would eventually have to forge a relationship with another boomer president, George W. Bush, one that would cost him dearly as a politician and help transform him into a far less sympathetic figure.

‘The Special Relationship’ When: 9 tonight Where: HBO

CASCADE MEDICAL IMAGING In conjunction with Central Oregon Radiology Assoc. Has been awarded the accreditation of

BREAST IMAGING CENTER OF EXCELLENCE By the American College of Radiology

As the only imaging center in Central Oregon to achieve the breast Imaging Center of Excellence designation, CMI is continuing its commitment to high quality care in women’s imaging services.

1460 NE Medical Center Dr., Bend, Oregon 97701 To schedule your appointment today, call: 541-382-9383 For all other business: 541-382-6633

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

CSI: Miami Ambush ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami All In ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds P911 ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Damaged ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds In Heat ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami Raising Caine ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 Flip This House ‘PG’ Å “Tell Them Willie ››› “Pale Rider” (1985, Western) Clint Eastwood, Michael Moriarty, Carrie Snodgress. Gold prospectors ››› “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (1976, Western) Clint Eastwood, Chief Dan George, Sondra Locke. A Confederate soldier vows to ››› “Pale Rider” (1985, Western) Clint 102 40 39 Boy Is Here” are harassed by a corrupt power baron. avenge his family’s murder. Å Eastwood, Michael Moriarty. River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ It’s Me or the Dog ’ ‘PG’ Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 12 38 River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Housewives/NJ House Unfaithful ’ ‘14’ Å House The Softer Side ’ ‘14’ Å House The Social Contract ’ Å House Here Kitty ’ ‘14’ Å House Locked In ’ ‘14’ Å House Caregiver’s collapse. ’ ‘PG’ 137 44 (5:45) ›››› “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989) Morgan Freeman, Jessica Tandy. ’ World’s Strictest Parents (N) ’ 16 and Pregnant Amber ‘14’ Å ››› “The Naked Gun” (1988) Leslie Nielsen, George Kennedy. ’ 190 32 42 53 Broken Bridges The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part American Greed Raffaello Follieri The Suze Orman Show Å Til Debt-Part Til Debt-Part Paid Program Profit-Town 51 36 40 52 American Greed Raffaello Follieri Larry King Live ‘PG’ Newsroom Campbell Brown Larry King Live ‘PG’ Newsroom Newsroom 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown ›› “Accepted” (2006, Comedy) Justin Long, Jonah Hill. Å Daniel Tosh: Completely Serious Nick Swardson: Who Farted? Dan Cummins: Crazy/F 135 53 135 47 › “Let’s Go to Prison” (2006, Comedy) Dax Shepard, Will Arnett. Å The Buzz Bend City Edition Get Outdoors Visions of NW RSN Extreme RSN Presents RSN Movie Night RSN Extreme The Buzz Health, Home 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 98 11 American Perspectives Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Hannah Montana Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Deadliest Catch Cashing In ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Slow Burn ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Breaking ’Em In ‘14’ Deadliest Catch Sea Tested ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Slow Burn ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Deadliest Catch Crab grounds. ‘14’ NCAA Update Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å NBA Fastbreak SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Softball: NCAA Tournament Boxing 1993 Bowe vs. Holyfield II Å Baseball Tonight MMA Live (Live) NBA Fastbreak NASCAR Racing 22 24 21 24 College Lacrosse Lacrosse Update College Softball Louisiana-Lafayette vs. UCLA (Live) Å IndyCar Racing 2005 Indianapolis 500 Å 2006 World Series of Poker Å 2006 World Series of Poker Å 2006 World Series of Poker Å 23 25 123 25 IndyCar Racing From May 24, 2009. (N) ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 ››› “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” (2005) Daniel Radcliffe. Voldemort lays a trap for Harry at the Triwizard Tournament. › “Mr. Deeds” (2002) Å 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” (2004) Daniel Radcliffe. Å Glenn Beck Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Jrnl Edit. Rpt Fox News Watch Red Eye Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Sex & the City Cakes Bobby Flay Bobby Flay Amusement Park Eats Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Best Thing Ate Iron Chef America Symon vs. Fraser 177 62 46 44 Iron Chef America Symon vs. Fraser Mariners The Game 365 Soccer International Friendly: Boca Juniors at Portland Timbers (Live) MLS Soccer Seattle Sounders FC at Colorado Rapids Mariners The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Best Damn Top 50 Special (4:00) ›› “Hitman” (2007, Action) ››› “Live Free or Die Hard” (2007, Action) Bruce Willis, Justin Long, Timothy Olyphant. America’s computers fall under attack. ››› “Mission: Impossible 2” (2000, Action) Tom Cruise, Dougray Scott, Thandie Newton. 131 Color Splash ‘G’ Designed to Sell Designed to Sell House Hunters House Hunters Divine Design ‘G’ Sarah’s House Dear Genevieve Curb/Block Battle on the Block (N) ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve WWII in HD End Game ‘14’ Å Modern Marvels Big & Small ‘PG’ America the Story of Us ‘PG’ Å America the Story of Us ‘PG’ Å America the Story of Us ‘PG’ Å The History of Sex ‘14’ Å 155 42 41 36 WWII in HD Edge of the Abyss ‘14’ ›› “Mini’s First Time” (2006) Alec Baldwin, Nikki Reed. Å ›› “The Break-Up” (2006) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer Aniston. Å ›› “The Break-Up” (2006) Å 138 39 20 31 “Like Mother, Like Daughter” (2007) Michelle Stafford, Danielle Kind. Å Lockup: Raw Living the Life Lockup: Raw Killer Next Door Lockup: Raw The Revolving Door Lockup: Raw Hardcore Lockup: Raw Dues and Don’ts Lockup: Raw Pushing the Limits 56 59 128 51 Lockup: Raw Never a Dull Moment When I Was 17 When I Was 17 When I Was 17 ›› “Can’t Hardly Wait” (1998) Jennifer Love Hewitt, Ethan Embry. ’ True Life Cultural boundaries. ’ True Life Creating the perfect body. Parental Control Parental Control 192 22 38 57 When I Was 17 Fanboy-Chum SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ Big Time Rush True Jackson, VP George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 Fanboy-Chum UFC 114: Preliminaries ’ (Live) ›› “Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace” (1999, Science Fiction) Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor. ’ ›››› “Star Wars IV: A New Hope” (1977) Mark Hamill. ’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ “Wrong Turn 2: Dead End” (2007) Erica Leerhsen, Henry Rollins. Å ›› “Wrong Turn” (2003, Horror) Desmond Harrington. Premiere. Å ››› “Shallow Ground” (2005) 133 35 133 45 › “Joy Ride 2: Dead Ahead” (2008) Nicki Aycox, Laura Jordan. Å In Touch With Dr. Charles Stanley Hour of Power ‘G’ Å Billy Graham Classic Crusades Thru History Travel the Road League of Grateful Sons Medal of Honor Virtual Memory Michael English 205 60 130 King of Queens King of Queens The Office ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Last Holiday” (2006) Queen Latifah, Gérard Depardieu. Å (10:05) ›› “Last Holiday” (2006) Queen Latifah, Gérard Depardieu. 16 27 11 28 Loves Raymond (10:15) ›› “Birdy” (1984, Drama) Matthew Modine, Nicolas Cage, Sandy Baron. Pre›››› “The Best Years of Our Lives” (1946, Drama) Fredric March, Myrna Loy, Dana Andrews. Three World War II veterans come ››› “Pride of the Marines” (1945, Biography) John Garfield, Eleanor Parker, Dane 101 44 101 29 home. Å Clark. A blinded Marine struggles to adjust to civilian life. miere. An injured Vietnam vet is obsessed by a desire to fly. 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘PG’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘PG’ Å 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å Dr. G: America’s Most Shocking Dr. G: America’s Most Shocking 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘14’ Å 178 34 32 34 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ‘PG’ Å NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns (Live) Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Leverage A crew of thieves. ‘PG’ Leverage The Ice Man Job ‘14’ ››› “Heat” (1995) Al Pacino. 17 26 15 27 NBA Pregame Chowder ‘Y7’ Adventure Time 6TEEN ‘PG’ Total Drama Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Destroy Build Adventure Time 6TEEN ‘G’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ King of the Hill King of the Hill The Boondocks The Boondocks 84 Samantha Brown’s First Cruise ‘G’ Samantha Brown’s Great Cruises Great Cruises-Samantha Brown Samantha Brown’s Greek Islands Samantha Brown’s Napa (N) ‘G’ Samantha Brown’s Great Cruises 179 51 45 42 Top Ten Hawaiian Beaches ‘PG’ Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Andy Griffith Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond 65 47 29 35 Andy Griffith Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Basketball Wives Basketball Wives ››› “What’s Love Got to Do With It” (1993) Angela Bassett, Laurence Fishburne. ’ What Chilli Wants The OCD Project ’ ‘14’ Tough Love Couples ’ ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Brandy & Ray J: A Family Business PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ›› “Pineapple Express” ‘R’ (6:10) ›› “St. Elmo’s Fire” 1985, Drama Rob Lowe. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “The Karate Kid” 1984, Action Ralph Macchio. ’ ‘PG’ Å (10:10) ››› “G.I. Jane” 1997, Drama Demi Moore. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Vanishing Point” 1997, Action Viggo Mortensen. Å ›› “Vanishing Point” 1997, Action Viggo Mortensen. Å ›› “Vanishing Point” 1997, Action Viggo Mortensen. Å ›› “Best of the Best II” 1993 ‘R’ Insane Cinema: Surf Flick Insane Cinema: We’re People Too Weekly Update Bubba’s World Insane Cinema: Surf Flick Insane Cinema: We’re People Too Check 1, 2 Å Stupidface Danny & Dingo Thrillbillies Å Haney Project Haney Project Haney Project PGA Tour Golf Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, Third Round Golf Central European PGA Tour Golf Madrid Masters, Third Round U.S. Open Golf Highlights “The Wishing Well” (2010, Drama) Jordan Ladd, Jason London. ‘PG’ Å “Always and Forever” (2009) Dean McDermott, Rena Sofer. Å “Ice Dreams” (2010, Drama) Jessica Cauffiel. ‘PG’ Å (10:40) “The Wishing Well” (2010) Jordan Ladd. ‘PG’ (4:30) ››› “A Beautiful Mind” 2001, Biography Russell Crowe, Season 2 of True ›› “Fighting” 2009, Drama Channing Tatum, Terrence Howard, Zulay Henao. A “The Special Relationship” 2010 Michael Sheen. Prime Minister (10:45) ››› “Tropic Thunder” 2008 Ben Stiller. A pampered HBO 425 501 425 10 Ed Harris. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Blood young man becomes a champion street brawler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Tony Blair and President Bill Clinton. ‘NR’ Å actor’s war movie turns into the real thing. ‘R’ ›› “She’s the One” 1996 Jennifer Aniston. ‘R’ Å (6:45) ››› “Secretary” 2002, Drama James Spader. ‘R’ Å (8:45) ›› “The Center of the World” 2001 ‘R’ Å (10:15) ›› “She’s the One” 1996 Jennifer Aniston. ‘R’ Å IFC 105 105 (5:05) ›› “Watchmen” 2009, Action Billy Crudup, Malin Akerman, Jackie Earle Haley. A masked vigilante probes the murder of a (8:15) ››› “Home Alone” 1990, Comedy Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. A left-behind ›› “My Life in Ruins” 2009 Nia Vardalos. A travel guide finds (11:40) Zane’s Sex MAX 400 508 7 fellow superhero. ’ ‘R’ Å boy battles two burglars in the house. ’ ‘PG’ Å her romantic side on a Greek sojourn. Å Chronicles Can It Be Built? ‘G’ Can It Be Built? ‘G’ Hoover Dam Reinvented ‘PG’ Can It Be Built? ‘G’ Can It Be Built? ‘G’ Hoover Dam Reinvented ‘PG’ Taboo Narcotics ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard The Penguins The Mighty B! ’ Fanboy-Chum SpongeBob SpongeBob Tigre: Rivera Tigre: Rivera Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Jimmy Neutron Jimmy Neutron The Secret Show Tak and Power NTOON 89 115 189 Adv. Abroad Best of West Western Extreme Ultimate Hunting Savage Wild Trophy Quest Outdoors The Wingshooter Spirit of Wild Hunt Masters Bowhunting TV Memories/Field Game Chasers Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 (5:50) ›› “W.” 2008, Docudrama Josh Brolin, Elizabeth Banks. iTV. The life and con- Nurse Jackie ’ (4:00) ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008 United States of › “The Spirit” 2008 Gabriel Macht. iTV. A rookie cop, believed to (10:45) ›› “Quantum of Solace” 2008, Action Daniel Craig, SHO 500 500 Daniel Craig. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ troversial presidency of George W. Bush. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å be dead, fights crime in Central City. ‘PG-13’ Olga Kurylenko, Mathieu Amalric. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ Race in 60 Performance NASCAR Smarts NASCAR Hall of Fame Coverage of the opening of the new NASCAR Hall of Fame. Formula 1 Debrief Lucas Oil Off Road Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:50) ››› “Thirteen Days” 2000, Historical Drama Kevin Costner. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (7:25) › “Fired Up” 2009 Nicholas D’Agosto. ‘PG-13’ ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ Å (10:45) ›› “The Proposal” 2009 Sandra Bullock. Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:40) ››› “The Great Debaters” 2007, Docudrama Denzel Washington. Students at (6:50) ›› “The World Is Not Enough” 1999, Action Pierce Brosnan, Sophie Marceau. “The Darkroom” 2006, Horror Reed Diamond. An amnesiac “Laid to Rest” 2009 Bobbi Sue Luther. A girl must evade a serial TMC 525 525 a largely black college form a debate team. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Bond protects the daughter of a late friend. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å begins to piece together his identity. ’ ‘NR’ Å killer to survive the night. ’ ‘R’ Å Bull Riding PBR Nile Invitational Bull Riding PBR Wichita Invitational From Wichita, Kan. Hockey Central Sports Jobs Whacked Out Whacked Out World Extreme Cagefighting VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Valique & Melissa ‘14’ Bridezillas Melissa & Jessica ‘14’ Bridezillas Jessica & Melissa ‘14’ Bridezillas Melissa & Adrienne ‘14’ Bridezillas Adrienne & Debra ‘14’ Bridezillas Debra & Nicole ‘14’ Å Bridezillas Nicole & Kirsten ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 B3

TODAY FREE DAY FOR MILITARY: Active and retired military members and a guest are admitted free; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and military; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. ROD & CUSTOM CRUZ-IN: The Central Oregon Street Rod Association holds a car show, with a DJ, games and prizes; free for spectators, $20 entry fee; 10 a.m.-3 p.m., 8 a.m. registration; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-548-8368. WESTWARD OREGON: Featuring blacksmithing and period demonstrations, wagon rides, food and a presentation on John C. Fremont by Loren Irving; $5, $2 ages 13-17, free ages 12 and younger; 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., lecture at 1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org. “DESERT DWELLERS” SHOW OPENS: New show features lots of live animals that live in the High Desert; exhibit runs through August; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. KIDS DAY IN MAY: Featuring fire engines, police cars, a petting zoo, climbing wall, games, food and more; proceeds benefit New Generations; free admission; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Village Mall, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-617-9374 or www.sunriverfd. org. TALKING TOMBSTONES: The Redmond Historical Commission portrays members of Redmond’s founding families and leads tours of the cemetery; part of the Redmond Centennial Celebration; free; 2 p.m., arrive by 1:30 p.m. to be placed in a tour; Redmond Memorial Cemetery, 3545 S. Canal Blvd.; 541-526-0554. ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: Drum circle followed by a bonfire and community sweat; free; 6-8 p.m.; Steve and Teri’s home, 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204.

SUNDAY FREE DAY FOR MILITARY: Active and retired military members and a guest are admitted free; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and military; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. WESTWARD OREGON: Featuring blacksmithing and period demonstrations, wagon rides, food and a presentation on John C. Fremont by Loren Irving; $5, $2 ages 13-17, free ages 12 and younger; 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., lecture at 1 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-389-1813 or www.deschuteshistory.org.

BAND OF HORSES AND SHE & HIM: The indie rock bands perform, with Dawes; $35 in advance, $38 day of show, plus service charges; 6 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. MORWENNA LASKO AND JAY PUN: The cosmopolitan folk musicians perform, with Steve Gardner and Bruce Lawler; $20, $7 barbecue, free children; 7 p.m., barbecue 5:30 p.m.; Old Richmond Church, RichmondWaterman Road; 541-934-2140.

MONDAY MEMORIAL DAY READING: A continuous reading of the name, age and hometown of soldiers killed in Iraq and Afghanistan; free; 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 970-4269512 or firstamendmentsightings@ live.com. FREE DAY FOR MILITARY: Active and retired military members and a guest are admitted free; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and military; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. TERREBONNE MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 9 a.m.; Terrebonne Pioneer Cemetery, Smith Rock Way, near Smith Rock State Park; 541-389-0775. PRINEVILLE MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Event begins with a parade down Main Street; followed by services; free; 11 a.m.; downtown Prineville; 541-3890775. REDMOND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 11 a.m.; Redmond Cemetery, Yew Avenue and U.S. Highway 97; 541-389-0775. SISTERS MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: In honor of veterans; free; 11 a.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-389-0775. BEND MEMORIAL DAY SERVICE: Featuring speaker Brig. Gen. Charles Yriarte and an F-15 flyover; followed by a reception at VFW Post 1643; free; 1 p.m.; Deschutes Memorial Gardens, 63875 N. U.S. Highway 97; 541-389-0775. MADRAS MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION: Featuring a barbecue, live music and a ceremony; donations accepted; 1:30 p.m.; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets; 541-350-8009. JIM LEE’S USO SHOW: Listen to music from the 1940s and celebrate veterans; free; 3 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500.

TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Featuring a variety of vendors selling baked goods, produce, meats and more; free; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Dirty Business,” which explores the true cost of coal power and looks at alternative energy sources; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541815-6504. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Open to all varieties of performers; free; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

WEDNESDAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Christopher Wolsko presents “Why Not Gross National Happiness? Contemporary Obstacles to Psychological Well-Being”; the lecture explores what we need to be happy, with a focus on psychology; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100, info@osucascades.edu or www. OSUcascades.edu/lunchtime-lectures. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or http://bendfarmersmarket.com. PUB QUIZ: Answer trivia on topics from pop culture to politics; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Kurera Fund; $25 per team of four; 6:30 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-388-2192 or www.kurerafund.org. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7260. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. BAKI: The California-based alternative artist performs, with Mindscape; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

TUESDAY

THURSDAY

FREE CLOTHES: FreeStoreRedmond donates clothes to those in need; free; 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-508-6262.

GOLF BENEFIT: Play 18 holes of golf; must register for tee time; proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon; $49; 6:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road,

M T

Redmond; 541-923-4653. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Sparrow” by Mary Doria Russell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: R. Gregory Nokes speaks about his book “Massacred for Gold: The Chinese in Hells Canyon”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “LEND ME A TENOR”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a comedy about the frantic attempt to salvage an opera performance when the star is incapacitated; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascades theatrical.org. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; dinner included; $45; 7:30 p.m., 6 p.m. dinner; Cafe Alfresco, 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., Redmond; 541-923-2599. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www. clear1017.fm. THE HELIO SEQUENCE: The Portland-based electro-rock duo performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $15 plus service charges; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.tower theatre.org. CLUMSY LOVERS: The Canadian roots-rock band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace. com/silvermoonbrewing. SYNRGY: The Northern Californiabased reggae act performs; $5; 10 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-749-2440.

FRIDAY BALLOONS OVER BEND: The eighth annual event includes a balloon launch and breakfast; free; 6-7:30 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-323-0964 or www.balloonsoverbend.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Vendors selling agricultural and horticultural products, baked goods, cheese, meat and fish; free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or http:// bendfarmersmarket.com.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

‘Lost’ finale delivers viewers By Bill Carter New York Times News Service

Fans of “Lost” clearly came together — much like its cast of players — for one last dive into the pool of sci-fi and spirituality on Sunday night, lifting ABC to its best non-Oscars Sunday night in two and a half years and posting what are likely to be the best finale numbers for any scripted show this television season. A two-hour recap that led into the closing episode also earned strong numbers, and the finale itself displayed almost astonishing consistency for most of its two and a half hours. “Lost” averaged 13.5 million viewers, varying by only about 200,000 viewers from start to finish. Similarly, its rating among viewers ages 18 to 49 (the favored audience for many advertisers) was strong and steady throughout, starting at a 5.6 and finishing up in prime time at a 5.7 (One point represents 1.32 million viewers). “Lost” provided ABC with a full night of strong ratings. The first two hours of the night, filled with a “Lost” special that mostly featured cast members reminiscing, pulled in 9.8 million viewers and a 4.0 rating among those younger adult viewers, a huge boost over ABC’s usual average for those two hours. The 13.5 million viewers represented a bump from the 11.5 million who had been watching

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

For Saturday, May 29

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) Noon, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 2:30, 5, 8 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 3:05, 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:15, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 3:15, 7:15 THE SECRET OF KELLS (no MPAA rating) 12:25, 2:55, 5:25, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 8:05, 10:15 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:40 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 2:25, 4:45, 5:15, 7:45, 8:15, 10:35, 11 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:20 a.m., 2, 5:05, 7:35, 10 MACGRUBER (R) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:15, 9:35 PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME (PG-13) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 2:10, 4:20, 4:50, 7:10, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Noon, 4, 7:20, 9:30, 10:25 SEX AND THE CITY 2 (R) 10:20 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1, 1:30, 3:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:30, 8, 10:05, 10:40, 11:05 SHREK FOREVER AFTER (PG) 11:10 a.m., 12:05, 1:50, 2:40, 4:30, 5:25, 7, 8:10, 9:40, 10:45 SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3-D (PG) 10:40 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:15, 2:20, 3:50, 5, 6:30, 7:40, 9:20, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

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Cowell’s exit draws 24.2M viewers LOS ANGELES — In the eyes of Nielsen Co., Simon Cowell’s last episode as chief justice of “American Idol” was the least-watched finale since its first season. About 24.2 million people tuned in Wednesday night to see Lee DeWyze get crowned the new “American Idol” over Crystal Bowersox, who seemed to be the people’s choice. Although that is a strong number that any network would kill for, it is also about 16 percent off the 28.8 million who watched last year’s finale. Among adults ages 18 to 49, Wednesday night’s finale averaged an 8.2 rating, off 18 percent from last year’s 10.0 rating. — Los Angeles Times regularly this season, though the figure was still a far cry from the 18.5 million who watched the series premiere in 2004.

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B4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

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HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, May 29, 2010 This year, you will swing between socializing and networking and intense one-on-one conversations. Others often seek you out for different reasons, but many cherish your advice, enjoy your presence and like your personality. If you are single, you easily could meet “the one” through this circle of admirers. If you are attached, the two of you learn to be more open, as difficult as it can be. Let a partner take the lead more often. CAPRICORNS like your thinking. They respect new ideas. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Whether you are making travel plans or reaching out for someone at a distance, you will be thinking about taking off. Your instincts help you take charge in touchy situations. Tonight: A must appearance. Everyone will miss you if you don’t show up. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A friend uses a situation to share something important. At times you might be overwhelmed by what is being presented. Let this person express his or her ideas. You might need to rethink your opinions. Tonight: Detach from an issue. The answers will come sooner. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Others seek you out, but don’t assume you will like

everything you hear! Get out of the house and clear out. No more routine! Recharge your batteries in a situation where people surround you. Tonight: The only answer to a request is “yes.” CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Jump into a project early in the day. You could hit a difficult point where you might want to rethink your direction. Tap into a friend’s or loved one’s ideas. Others want to help. Let them. Tonight: In the whirlwind of living. Have fun! LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Your imagination easily fills in the blanks. You might feel like you must say “no” to spending and perhaps try to be realistic about a partner or loved one. Pace yourself as the day gets older. Tonight: Do what feels good for you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You could be harder on a family member or roommate than you intended to. To this person, when you close down, you frighten him or her. Opt for an open conversation, and state your boundaries. Tonight: Let your hair down. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep up talks, even though you might be imagining or sensing the response from others. Work through a sense of being ill at ease with the help of a pal. You need to open up and lessen stress. Tonight: Stay close to home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Expenses could soar,

especially if you need to do some specific shopping. Rethink what you are deciding to do. Is there another more cost-effective manner of handling this purchase? Tonight: Get together with friends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Use the morning for a key project. You also might decide to just let go of errands and responsibilities and go out and join a friend. Whether hiking or playing a game of racquetball, you feel great. Everyone needs a timeout. Tonight: Indulge a friend. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Try to plan a lowkey morning without a lot of interaction. By the afternoon, you recycle and feel ready to take your world by storm. Others demonstrate their delight to see you. Tonight: The world is your oyster. Act that way. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Friends yank you out the door early in the day. Whether you meet for brunch or go for a day outing, you are happiest among people. Still, by midafternoon, a private conversation occurs. Share, too, even if you’re a bit uncomfortable. Tonight: Only with one person. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Others ask you to chip in. The end result is that you could carry more responsibility than you wish. You were well chosen, as you cruise through the task with speed. Make midafternoon plans that please you. Tonight: The center of the party. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Andy Gleeson, 29, graduated in 2003 with a degree in marketing and after pursuing jobs and getting turned down, he has decided to go a different route. The bookstore he has been working at for five years is closing down, leaving Gleeson at a turning point in his life. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside Photos by Michael Tercha / Chicago Tribune

Asha Gray, 29, right, tours Lincoln Park Zoo with 2-year-old Mia Hensler in Chicago. Gray has a master’s degree in forensic psychology and a bachelor’s degree in animal science but is making ends meet as a nanny and waitress.

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Stalled on road to security For Millennials, traditional markers of adulthood prove to be elusive By Bonnie Miller Rubin Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Even though he’s nearing his 30th birthday, Andy Gleeson’s life is far from settled. In June, the bookstore where he has worked for five years is scheduled to close. The lease on his Logan Square apartment will run out, and a long-term relationship has ended. So he is packing up his possessions and moving to New York, lured by nothing more than a buddy with an empty couch. “I thought that by the time I reached 30, I’d be a lot further along in my career,” said Gleeson, who has a marketing degree from University of Illinois, Chicago. “But most of my friends are in the same situation.” The class of 2010 is hearing lots of stirring speeches about the end of a journey. But for a wide swath of young people, earning a diploma or notching a 21st birthday won’t be the culmination of anything. Their trajectories will stall — like Gleeson’s — or go in reverse as they move home, propped up by parents. But parents shouldn’t look at their basement-dwellers and wonder where they went wrong. The transition to adulthood is a long and winding road that can stretch into the early 30s, say some of the country’s most prominent researchers, who spent two years analyzing data on what it means to be a grown-up in modern America. “The world has changed ... and it’s just a lot more difficult to establish an independent household,” said Mary Waters, a sociology professor at Harvard University and one of the contributors to the recently released “Transition to Adulthood,” a collaboration of the Brookings Institution and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

A new world, by the numbers In 1960, 77 percent of women and 65 percent of men had acquired certain traditional markers of maturity by age 30: leaving home, completing school, fulltime employment, marriage and family. In 2005, the figure had plummeted to 27 and 39 percent, respectively, according to the MacArthur Research Network. Given the economic realities, it can take up to age 34 to step into those adult roles, said Waters, citing the “ratcheting up of everything” — from academic requirements to the labor market to explain the lag. The provision in the new health care law extending coverage to children beyond age 22 is an example of government addressing this revised timetable. Compared to some other countries, the United States invests little in this demographic. “We’re in this period of rapid change ... and institutions just haven’t caught up,” Waters said. Gleeson may be living independently, but in every other way his life bears little resemblance to that of his mother, who married at 19, became a parent at 25 and, with just a high school diploma, landed a good job at State Farm Insurance in Bloomington, Ill. — where she has been since. Even so, there was never a question of continuing his post-secondary education — a message embraced by other Millennials. The number of students who enrolled in college swelled from more than 5.9 million in 1965 to

about 17.5 million in 2005, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. In fall 2009, 70 percent of high school graduates were headed to campus, an all-time high. But Gleeson has yet to reap many benefits. As a manager at Barbara’s Bookstore in Oak Park, Ill., he earns less than $30,000. He’s survived, by living “really cheaply.” He doesn’t own property, a car or even a computer. “A bachelor’s degree just doesn’t get you very far these days,” he explained. “If I would have known all this was just a setup for graduate school, I would have done things differently ... such as learning a specific skill.” In 1970, 1.03 million Americans continued their schooling beyond college versus almost 2.3 million in 2007, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Big degree still not a guarantee But Asha Gray — also 29 — has discovered that an advanced degree is no ticket to financial security. The Rogers Park, Ill., resident received a master’s degree in forensic psychology in 2009, on top of a bachelor’s degree in animal science from the University of Illinois. But she has yet to use her credentials on the job — make that three jobs. Gray has cobbled together a trio of part-time gigs, one as a nanny and two waiting tables, to cover expenses and student loans. The psychology degree was supposed to lift her out of the wage cellar, but she finished just as Illinois slashed its mental health budget, forcing her to compete against laid-off employees with experience, said Gray, who estimates she has sent out 200 resumes in the last year. “Honestly, I thought I’d have a job that paid enough to support a family and to afford a vacation once a year. It doesn’t seem like that crazy of a desire ... but it’s almost impossible to make happen right now.” Graduating in a recession doesn’t just mean fewer opportunities, but smaller paychecks compared to peers who launch in a robust economy. The first 10 years of employment is when workers see 70 percent of their overall wage growth, reports the National Bureau of Economic Research. The slow start penalizes 20-somethings whose families have limited resources, say the researchers. Not only have “real” jobs evaporated, but this group must often pass on unpaid internships and valuable training that might pry open doors. When money gets tight, Gray doesn’t even think of asking her parents. “They help me out when they can, but I have three younger siblings behind me ... so I try to pull my own weight.”

cent of 2009 college graduates are back in the nest. Her U-turn isn’t just about the bottom line. Park was diagnosed with a brain tumor in 2007, and while she has fully recovered, exposure to dedicated practitioners also influenced what she calls her “much wiser” decision. Because Park also holds down a full-time job at the Apple Store at Woodfield Mall, it will be awhile before she’s in scrubs. This is where government and institutions could offer a boost, conclude the researchers: from more “learning communities” at community colleges (keeping commuter students more engaged, reducing the drop-out rate) to expanding Pell Grants. “Not only is it an investment in our future labor force,” Waters said, “but it would also shift the high costs off families and onto society, which will ultimately benefit.” Until then, the additional buttressing will come from Mom and Dad. But when does assistance turn into enabling? Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a psychology professor at Clark University in Worcester, Mass., and author of “Emerging Adulthood,” said that knowing when to cut off aid is more art than science. The key question: Is the support helpful or counterproductive? “Look for a plausible plan on how your child plans to move themselves toward self-sufficiency,” Arnett explained. If your rudderless child is intensely jobhunting, making contacts and searching Web sites it could be smarter than taking a minimumwage job. “But if they’re not going anywhere, it’s a drain on you and not good for them,” said Arnett, who is working on an advice book for this phase, due out next year. Whatever happens in the future, Park has learned that career plans are best written in pencil. “I never would have thought I’d be where I’m at now. I thought I’d be doing art, and married. But we’re all doing the best we can ... just trying to figure out life.”

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Back to the nest Jennifer Park, 28, is grateful for her safety net. She recently jettisoned her dream of being an artist to pursue a degree in nursing. She has moved back home to Schaumburg, which has enabled her to cut expenses while picking up prerequisites at Harper Community College. It’s not the script she envisioned, but the stigma has faded. The job site CollegeGrad.com’s online poll reports that 64 per-

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C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 B7

Karts Continued from B1 This reporter has never been happier to rely on a digital recorder. Mark and Bronson are so close that they tend to talk at the same time and finish each other’s sentences. For example: Mark: “We actually knew each other from –” Bronson: “Birth.” Mark: “– from really early on because –” Bronson: “– my grandma was a schoolteacher in early childhood development and stuff.” Mark: “So we’ve known each other a long time.” Bronson: “We have pictures of us sitting out here when we were, like, 3, sitting up there on his porch.” Back when they were tots, 15th Street was the edge of town. None of the houses a block to the north were there, and the street was but a cinder road, they recall.

Summer job, of a sort Back in May 2008, the two were sitting in their sophomore English class when they started discussing what they were going to do that summer, says Bronson, the default spokesman for the pair. “It was like, ‘We gotta come up with something to do this summer. We gotta come up with a project, something fun.’ We were like, Let’s build a go-kart. Another one.’” Mark’s dad, Dave Alward, helped them build a kart about 10 years ago. “It kind of blew up,” recalls Bronson. Attempting another motorized kart would be expensive, he continues, “because we’d have to buy a motor and chains. And it’d probably end up blowing up again.” Their conclusion: build a coaster kart, “something more reliable, something just to coast down hills on.” They drew designs in class, deciding on a one-seater. Once school was out for the summer, they got hold of an arc welder and bought the framing metal — old bed frames — for the kart’s frame for about $5 from the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon. Bronson, who lives a couple of blocks away on 13th Street, has a neighbor who repairs bicycles for the Family Access Network. “Bikes that he can’t fix up … he gives to us. We cut ’em apart for forks and stuff, wheels and tires,” he says. The only real costs they’ve incurred have been for the arc welder and welding wire, about $10 a spool. In the course of building the two karts, they’ve probably been through six or seven spools. They used a pulley to make the steering mechanism on the coaster. “We just had it sitting around. That’s the thing about these. They’re just put together from scrap parts,” Mark says. “Just stuff we find laying around,” adds Bronson. “The only thing we purchased brandnew from the store is the axle.” The coaster kart was pretty much complete — with a horn, brake, roll bar and a perch behind the driver for whoever rides along — by August of that year. “We were able to enjoy it the last bit of summer,” Bronson says. One adventure took place later, after the entry gate at Pilot Butte had been closed to autos for the year. They strapped the kart onto Bronson’s motorcycle trailer to get it to Bend. Then they pushed the kart to the top. “It took quite a while and a lot of work,” Bronson says. “I de-

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mark Alward and Bronson Walker have made, from left, a ski-bike, a sleigh, a coaster kart (front right) and their two-man pedal kart.

Bronson, front, and Mark ride their pedal kart in Redmond last week. Mark estimate the bike weighs “somewhere between 600 and 800 pounds.” “It’s a heavy little booger,” Bronson says. cided to drive because he didn’t have his glasses and it’s like, ‘I don’t want to die.’”

Break something Parents may want to skip the next couple of sentences. On the way up, a chain fell off the kart. No big deal, except that said chain controlled the steering. “We didn’t have a wrench or anything. We just kind of put it on there and hoped it would stay while we were going down the butte,” Bronson says. “We figured what not to do to make it pop off … if we turned too sharply, it would pop right off.” Fear not, they brought helmets with them. Except that they left them in the truck during their stunt. Bronson says he steered with one hand and honked the horn with the other. Mark stood and rode on the back. “That’s the unsafe part,” he says. They estimate the kart got up to 35, maybe 40 mph. “I was looking down there at the highway, and the cars down there weren’t going a whole lot faster than us,” Bronson says. “We had no problem stopping.” It worked well enough, until the last day of summer vacation 2009. “We were on the coaster kart. We were trying to break it, being idiots,” Bronson says. “We figured it was the last day of summer, so we wanted to do something fun. “We were taking it down the stairs” into Dry River Canyon, “just ramming it into stuff,” Bronson says. “Then we ended up finally breaking it.” They figured school would help occupy their time, but they nevertheless started the pedal kart at the start of this school year. Next, the two decided to go for something even more challeng-

ing: a functional, bike-pedal-operated kart. It took a little longer to make the pedal kart go. “About a trimester,” Mark says. It has functioning bicycle gears and works pretty well right now, “until something else breaks on it,” says Bronson. “There are just a lot of moving parts.” The pedal kart can get up to 15 mph, they say. “As long as it’s not uphill at all,” says Bronson, standing in front of the Alward family’s home. “Getting up the driveway here is not an easy task … with us on it, it weighs at least, wouldn’t you say, 800 pounds?” “Somewhere between 600 and 800 pounds,” answers Mark. “It’s a heavy little booger,” Bronson concludes. They made sure to include a bumper on the pedal kart, and have tested its integrity against a top-secret garbage can. There’s also a plastic reflector — “our lone safety measure,” says Mark. The two say they made the karts just for the fun of it, with no involvement from teachers or anyone else — least of all their peers, who, in between video games, make fun of their hobby, they say.

‘Boys and their interests’ Mark enlisted the help of his mother, Tina Alward, when putting together the seats, constructed from bed springs for proper cushion, on the two-man pedal kart. “‘Mark, when are you going to get a job?’” he says, imitating her reaction when he asked. “I’m a helpful mother,” Tina Alward says, laughing. “These kids were so determined. It’s like, you’re out here in the snow, lying on the ground, trying to help Mark. You’re like, ‘I never thought I would be doing this!’ “I’m impressed by the fact that

they have this incredible obsession,” she adds. “They have a lot of enthusiasm, and just a tremendous amount of drive. “Have you ever read Dave Barry?” she adds. “Didn’t he have something about the sorts of things that men and boys do? This is exactly that, like taking the cow and the catapult — whatever that is. So this was something like that. Do you read (Patrick) McManus? There’s something of that in this, too; just boys and their interests. “And this was strictly their own. It’s like, no mentoring, no teachers. It’s for them. They’re going to do it their way,” she says. “It just seems like the sortof Huck Finn thing in life. It’s different for this day and age. Mark doesn’t do Facebook or any of that stuff. Bronson does some.” “I have a Facebook, but I don’t have a cell phone,” Bronson says. “Neither one of us have cell phones.” “That’s why they get along with each other,” Tina Alward says. “They just have to be with each other. They’re almost never bored.” They spend a lot of time repairing the pedal kart. On its maiden voyage they decided to take it down a steep embankment under the bridge across the canyon. “There’s these people at the bottom of the hill. They all just

congregate there,” Bronson recalls. “They all have their video cameras out. They’re like, ‘We’re going to put this on YouTube.’” “It was supposed to be a test,” Mark protests. They made it most of the way down before the kart got stuck in a rut, breaking metal on the kart, although their welds held. The two say they’ve even pedaled to area restaurants, where their fellow Redmond students have gawked at them. “They all think we’re crazy,” Bronson says. They’ve threatened to drive it to Redmond High their last day of school this year, Tina Alward says. “We’ll probably park it in the staff parking,” Bronson says. And what happens after graduation? Bronson answers. “I’m going to COCC … he’s going off to OSU. So not that far away. He almost went to Stanford.” “No, not ‘almost.’ I applied to Stanford. Didn’t get in. Very few do.” Mark thinks he may study computer science next year. Bronson wants to become a helicopter pilot. More immediately, the two are concerned with what to do this summer. Neither has work lined up at the moment. “We’ve been trying to avoid that,” Mark says. “Probably gonna have to get a job this summer,” Bronson says.

Mark says of the pedal kart. “If someone wants to take it off our hands and take on all the pain of maintaining it, you’re more than welcome to have it,” Bronson says. “That’s what we’ve said about the coaster kart many times, ‘Maybe you can just leave it out here, maybe somebody will come by and steal it.’” Mark says. “Wishful thinking.” The two plan to add seat belts to the pedal kart this summer. Bronson wants to add a roll bar as well. Mark murmurs something about adding a motor. “I have all sorts of elaborate ideas for things that don’t work in the end,” Mark says. “He’s the optimist, and I’m the pessimist,” Bronson says. “He likes to think things will always work, and I’m like, ‘No, that’s not going to work.’ Unfortunately, I’m normally right.” When they become fed up with the high-maintenance karts, they take a bike ride, Bronson says. “And then our bikes break.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com. ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

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B8 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Cut some poppies for Memorial weekend By Kathy Antoniotti Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal

Memorial Day is a national holiday that is celebrated on the last Monday in May. Sometimes, it is called Decoration Day because following the Civil War, people went to cemeteries to place flowers on or to “decorate” the graves of loved ones who died in the war. After World War I, it also became known as Poppy Day after Canadian Army Col. John McRae wrote a poem titled “In Flanders Fields.” The poem expresses his grief over the thousands of soldiers who died on the Flanders battlefields in Europe. The poem describes the beautiful red poppies that grow among their graves. After the poem was published in a magazine, Anna E. Guerin, a Frenchwoman, and Moina Michael of the United States, began making and selling artificial flowers to help children who were left orphaned or destitute because of the war. Michael contacted the Veterans of Foreign Wars for help and they began creating the flowers and helped make the poppy a universal symbol of the holiday. To this day, members of VFW posts across the nation offer red paper poppies for donations to help disabled veterans. Memorial Day was traditionally observed on May 30, but in 1971, the federal government designated the last Monday in May as Memorial Day.

DIY poppies You can make your own poppies for decorations this Memorial Day with instructions I found at http://tlc.howstuffworks. com/family/memorial-daycrafts3.htm. I modified the directions for our use.

SUPPLIES: • Red crepe or tissue paper • Black or dark blue crepe or tissue paper • Green chenille stems, one for each poppy • Scissors • Margarine container lid, about 4 inches in diameter • Smaller lid, about 2 inches in diameter • Pen or pencil

Karen Schiely Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal

DIRECTIONS: • Fold crepe or tissue paper three times for each flower you want to make. • Place the large lid on the red stack of paper and trace around it with a pen or pencil. Repeat with black or blue paper and a smaller lid. • Cut the circles out. • Using three circles of each color for each flower, stack the circles together and place the smaller circles in the middle of the larger ones. • Carefully, poke a hole through the center of the stack from the bottom with a chenille stem. Bring the stem up through the hole, leaving about 4-inches of stem above the flower. • Bend the top stem down and poke it through the paper about ½-inch from the first hole. Carefully, pull the stem down and twist the end around the long end of the stem to secure it. • Pull the crepe paper petals slightly away from each other to form the poppy. • Place your poppies inside a vase and use as a meaningful decoration for Memorial Day picnics and get-togethers.

Flowering tribute to Emily By Adrian Higgins The Washington Post

NEW YORK — As the sun strengthens in spring, gardeners spray the glass conservatory at the New York Botanical Garden with a milky, white wash to protect the floral jewels within. For another few weeks, this monumental alabaster urn holds something particularly vital but fragile: the garden — and the story — of Emily Dickinson. In long, glazed galleries, Fran Coelho and her colleagues have planted fruit trees, day lilies and hundreds of other plants tricked into flowering at once in a fanciful re-creation of Emily’s contained world in the village of Amherst, Mass. The crowds are pouring in. There is something about this virginal, plaintive and mysterious poet that touches the American heart. In the eyes of the literary scholar Harold Bloom, Dickinson, apart from Shakespeare, “manifests more cognitive originality than any other Western poet since Dante.” But if her genius is well known, it is often not well defined. Like the glasshouse here, it is luminescent but murky. To some, she is the creator of sweet nature poems taught in grade school. To others, poems obsessed with death. Then there’s the notion of Emily herself, shut in her room, dressed in white, imprisoned by a broken heart. In a period of intense examination of Dickinson, we find Emily in the garden, which, as it turns out, was where she was all along. “When she was alive, people knew her as a gardener first and a poet second, if they knew her as a poet at all,” says the Washington-based Dickinson scholar Judith Farr. Six years ago, Farr wrote “The Gardens of Emily Dickinson” after she realized that “experts” were failing to comprehend that the unnamed subjects of Dickinson’s poems were not dead women or regiments of Russian soldiers, but tulips and other flora dear to her heart. The book, in turn, inspired the show at the botanical garden here. It includes a museum exhibit of the poet’s artifacts and letters and a “poetry walk” in which 35 of her 1,789 poems are placed in outdoor gardens surrounding the Haupt Conservatory. There are marathon readings of her work. The show runs until June 13. The conservatory display loosely replicates the orchard, flower and vegetable garden and woodland of the Homestead, the Dickinson home, and the neighboring house where her brother Austin lived. After the age of 30 until her death in 1886 at the age of 55, this was the poet’s cloistered world. Increasingly during that period, she remained in her upstairs bedroom. Coelho, the associate vice president of glasshouses, and Todd Forrest, vice president of horticulture, take a visitor along a double border of tulips, delphiniums, lilacs, roses, peonies and other treasures. The walk is scented with sweet peas and flowering tobacco. Black grapes hang in clusters from young, tethered vines. Here, all the seasons, all the years, are compressed into a single display.

Poet sees dandelion as sign of immortality Before an age of garden centers and big-box retailers, any floral garden was a labor of love that required horticultural skills lost to most folk today. Gardening then meant raising flowers from seed, cuttings and divisions shared with friends and neighbors. Wildflowers and shrubs were blithely dug from the countryside, and even weeds were embraced. In the now-reviled dandelion, Dickinson saw a plant representing immortality: “The Tube uplifts a signal Bud / And then a shouting Flower — The Proclamation of the Suns / That sepulture (burial) is o’er — .” The show also seeks to convey another aspect of gardening now lost: Flowers were symbols of sentiment, a language that Dickinson not only knew but exploited in her art. The fragrant daphne conveyed glory, the fleeting day lily a sigh, the intoxicating poppy doom. In her poems, she is “Daisy,” symbolic of innocence. Even in its jazzed-up form, the conservatory display conjures the idea that flower gardens existed not for their structure but for the simple joy of raising and admiring herbaceous bulbs, annuals and perennials. No image of her garden has survived, though her favorite plants are well documented.

“No one knows what her garden looked like,” said Marta McDowell, author of “Emily Dickinson’s Gardens.” The book, published in 2004, explores the poet’s conservatory, gardens, woods and fields in a joyful trek through her gardening year. The flower garden around the Homestead “did have that old-fashioned cottage feeling about it, and they have successfully captured that essence here.” Outside the conservatory, the placement of poem-bearing placards brings a cogent pairing of verse and plant. Next to a pink, perfumed rugosa rose, one finds: “She sped as Petals from a Rose — / Offended by the Wind — ?” It’s about a child’s death, but no matter. Next to four honeylocust

A view of of Emily Dickinson’s garden as it might have appeared in Amherst, Mass. “When she was alive, people knew her as a gardener first and a poet second, if they knew her as a poet at all,” says Dickinson scholar Judith Farr.

trees and a lawn, “Four Trees, upon a Solitary Acre.” McDowell says her discovery of Dickinson as gardener drew her into the poet’s life and work, and she hopes the show will work the same magic on others. “I think it would be a wonderful thing if people had their own hook into Dickinson,” she said. “If a child remembers that one day they were at this exhibit, that brings another person to poetry. Poetry is always kind of outside the popular fray.”

Helayne Seidman The Washington Post

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BUSINESS Website connecting local farmers, see Page C3. OREGON Obama extends moratorium on logging roadless areas, see Page C8.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

DOLLS KICK OFF CONCERT SERIES

OREGON SCHOOLS

Rules make success a moving target By Sheila G. Miller T he Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

The Goo Goo Dolls kick off the Bend Summer Concerts series Friday at the Les Schwab Amphitheater in the Old Mill District. Indie bands Band of Horses and She & Him are the next acts slated to perform in the series, with a concert Sunday at 6 p.m. Several acts are booked for the summer series, with Merle Haggard appearing June 20, Steve Miller Band and Barenaked Ladies in July, and Michael Franti & Spearhead and Clint Black in August. Willie Nelson will close out the season Sept. 17.

This week, the Oregon Department of Education released its report on district and high school graduation rates. They looked a whole lot different than they did last spring, because the state had changed the way it calculates them. That’s not unusual. In the past few years, changes have come down the pike on a wide variety of ways that schools, districts and the state are expected to measure students — from the graduation rates and the required classes students must take to graduate from high school to the grades schools received on their state report cards and the federal

“It’s particularly hard on our school districts, especially the smaller ones that don’t have the staff to dedicate to collecting data and processing data and validating the data.” — Susanne Smith, Oregon Department of Education communications director requirements for special education reports. It’s a frustrating situation for all involved; every time schools

and districts adjust to new measurements of their students’ learning and quality of education, it seems, the rules from the state or the federal government change. In addition to creating plenty of work for the school districts and often the state, the changes make it difficult to figure out what is being measured and how schools really are doing. Oregon Department of Education Communications Director Susanne Smith said her office finds it as frustrating as everyone else. “We have a changing game plan, so every few years we get new guidance on how we need to be doing things,” she said. See Schools / C7

Strokes of kindness

WARM SPRINGS

No arrest in police shooting By Erin Golden The Bulletin

A week after they wrapped up a major manhunt on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, local and federal law enforcement officials are still looking for two men they believe fired shots at police officers on the reservation and in Madras. Warm Springs Police Chief Carmen Smith said Friday that officials have received several tips from people who believe they’ve seen the suspects or their vehicle in Bend, Redmond and Warm Springs. Smith said he believes the men are still hiding out in the area. “From what we’re gathering, I think they’re around here,” he said. The search began May 20 after someone in a vehicle stopped by a Madras police officer sped away and fired shots at the officer. Later that morning, a Warm Springs police officer tried to stop a white Ford Explorer on state Highway 3. The SUV sped away and someone inside fired shots at the officer’s car, with one passing through the windshield. After a chase, two suspects in the Explorer took off on foot and one again fired several shots at police. Officials from eight law enforcement agencies spent the next day searching an area of the Warm Springs Reservation near Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, but were unable to find either of the suspects. Police identified one man, 21-year-old Waylon McKie Weaselhead, as a person of interest. Smith and Beth Anne Steele, a spokeswoman for the FBI, said Weaselhead, a Warm Springs tribal member, is still a person of interest and added that officials are gathering more information. See Shooting / C7

SCHOOL REUNION Della Brandt looks at pictures commemorating the history of the Jessie Hill School on Friday at the Redmond Public Library. The library took the place of the school in the downtown Redmond building in 1996. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

C

entral Oregon Community College students, from left, every spring for students living at Juniper Hall. Stacy Lester, Erika Hewlett and Zachary Chandler apply

The Freiboths’ home was selected to be painted after Candy

the first layer of paint to the home of Jason and Candy

wrote a letter describing her husband’s battle with metastatic mela-

Freiboth, of Bend, as part of “Paint the Deschutes” Friday after- noma and the medical care needed for her 9-year-old son, who has noon. Paul Amar, resident director of Juniper Hall at the college,

cerebral palsy. More than 20 Juniper Hall residents are expected to

said the Freiboths’ house is the first to be painted under the pro-

participate in the two-day project. Anyone wanting more informa-

gram, which provides free house-painting for families in need of

tion about Paint the Deschutes can e-mail Amar at Pamar@COCC.

assistance. Amar said he hopes to find a house-painting project

edu.

Measure would guard taxpayers Redmond voters wary of fire service annexation plan By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

More online For video of the Jessie Hill School reunion and more information on the Redmond Centennial celebration, visit www.bendbulletin.com/redmond

Redmond polled local voters this winter about moving the city’s Fire Department into Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1, and discovered few people believed the move wouldn’t result in higher

city taxes. The city wants to shift control of Redmond Fire & Rescue — or annex it — to the rural fire protection district. Under the plan, Redmond would reduce its tax rate to $4.41. Under the current system, the fire protection district pays Redmond, which runs fire stations and pays for firefighters to cover areas including Eagle

ELECTION

Crest, Pronghorn Resort and Terrebonne. The annexation, which is on the November ballot, is designed to stabilize fire department funding by isolating it from shifts in the city’s general fund. The city has said the move would not affect the taxes Redmond residents pay. Currently, the city collects a total tax rate of $6.16 per $1,000. The city funds the fire department with a portion of that money. See Fire District / C7


C2 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

POOL PARTY IN THE STREET

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Police on lookout for drunken drivers

Mark Ylen / The Associated Press

Logan Pledger, 11, is doused with an incoming splash while playing on the flooded Queen Avenue in Albany on Wednesday. Pledger was playing with friends Craig Baker, 13, Bryce Walling, 12, Cole Womack, 12, and Josh Taylor, 13, on the flooded street after a significant amount of rain fell within minutes, slowing traffic to a crawl.

3rd wolf-killed calf; rancher secures kill permit The Associated Press ENTERPRISE — The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has confirmed the third wolfkilled domestic calf this month in northeast Oregon’s Wallowa County. Spokeswoman Michelle Dennehy said Friday the kill was reported Thursday. Earlier this week, state of-

ficials issued permits to five area ranchers, allowing them to shoot wolves caught in the act of attacking livestock. One of the permits went to the rancher whose calf was killed Thursday. The Imnaha wolf pack has been in the area since spring. Dennehy says agencies and livestock producers have tried

nonlethal deterrents such as removing any livestock carcasses, aerial hazing of wolves and watching livestock more closely. Wolves have been spreading through Oregon since crossing into the state from Idaho, where they were re-established by the federal government in the 1990s.

In an effort to lower accident rates this Memorial Day weekend, the Prineville Police Department will conduct a DUII saturation patrol, according to a news release. The Police Department disseminated a reminder to motorists not to drink and drive, and to use caution if they are taking prescription medicine. The department asks that anyone who sees drivers who may be under the influence of intoxicants call 911.

association will no longer allow outdoor burning of debris or agricultural burns after Tuesday. Several scheduled burns planned by the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management after the closing date in higher elevation areas will take place, as will scheduled burning by the Oregon Department of Forestry. Weather conditions may allow for additional burning to continue in certain fire districts. Residents are encouraged to check with their local fire agencies about specific regulations and possible extensions.

Commencement set June 12 at COCC

‘Talk’ panel to address banking challenges

The commencement ceremony for Central Oregon Community College will be held 10 a.m. on June 12 at Mazama Field on campus. The ceremony will celebrate the graduation of 700 students from the associate programs at COCC. About 250 students are expected to participate. Following the commencement address by the retiring dean of instruction, Kathleen Walsh, a reception will be held in the courtyard of the library. In the event of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved from Mazama Field to the gymnasium.

A discussion about local and national banking challenges will take place on June 8 at 6:30 p.m. as part of a series of discussions aired on COTV’s “Talk of the Town� program. The event, which will take place at 2nd Street Theater on 220 N.W. Lafayette Ave., will feature a panel of several presidents and vice presidents from Central Oregon banks. A question-and-answer session will take place after the initial roundtable discussion. Topics to be discussed will be the future of banking in Central Oregon, the impact of sweeping financial reform and key questions to ask your banker. The event is free to the public. Anyone interested in attending can RSVP by e-mailing talk@ bendbroadband.com. For more information about the program, please visit www.talkofthetownco.com.

Scheduled closure for burning in area

Leno hosts ‘Tonight Show’ for last time in ‘09 ... oh, wait The Associated Press Today is Saturday, May 29, the 149th day of 2010. There are 216 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 29, 1953, Mount Everest was conquered as Edmund Hillary of New Zealand and Tensing Norgay of Nepal became the first climbers to reach the summit. ON THIS DATE In 1660, England’s King Charles II was restored to the monarchy after an interregnum of 11 years. In 1765, Patrick Henry denounced the Stamp Act before Virginia’s House of Burgesses. In 1790, Rhode Island became the 13th original colony to ratify the United States Constitution. In 1848, Wisconsin became the 30th state of the union. In 1913, the ballet “The Rite of Spring,� with music by Igor Stravinsky and choreography by Vaslav Nijinsky, had its chaotic world premiere in Paris. In 1917, the 35th president of the United States, John F. Kennedy, was born in Brookline, Mass. In 1932, World War I veterans began arriving in Washington to demand cash bonuses they weren’t scheduled to receive until 1945. In 1943, Norman Rockwell’s portrait of “Rosie the Riveter� appeared on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post. In 1973, Tom Bradley was elected the first black mayor of

T O D AY I N HISTORY Los Angeles, defeating incumbent Sam Yorty. In 1985, 39 people were killed at the European Cup Final in Brussels, Belgium, when rioting broke out and a wall separating British and Italian soccer fans collapsed. TEN YEARS AGO President Bill Clinton left Washington for a weeklong European tour. The space shuttle Atlantis returned from a repair mission to the international space station. Indonesia’s state prosecutors placed former President Suharto under house arrest (however, Suharto’s trial on corruption charges was abandoned because of health concerns). FIVE YEARS AGO French voters soundly rejected the European Union’s proposed constitution, which was also defeated by the Dutch days later. In a deadly rampage at two farmhouses in Bellefontaine, Ohio, 18-year-old Scott Moody shot his grandparents, his mother and two friends before turning the gun on himself. Dan Wheldon won the Indianapolis 500 as Danica Patrick’s electrifying run fell short (she finished fourth). ONE YEAR AGO A judge in Los Angeles sentenced music producer Phil Spec-

tor to 19 years to life in prison for the murder of actress Lana Clarkson. Jay Leno hosted “The Tonight Show� on NBC for what he thought was the final time. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Clifton James is 89. Former Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent is 72. Race car driver Al Unser is 71. CBS News Correspondent Bob Simon is 69. Actor Kevin Conway is 68. Actor Helmut Berger is 66. Rock singer Gary Brooker (Procol Harum) is 65. Actor Anthony Geary is 63. Singer Rebbie Jackson is 60. Movie composer Danny Elfman is 57. Rock musician Michael Porcaro (Toto) is 55. Singer LaToya Jackson is 54. Actor Ted Levine is 53. Actress Annette Bening is 52. Actor Rupert Everett is 51. Actor Adrian Paul is 51. Singer Melissa Etheridge is 49. Actress Lisa Whelchel is 47. Actress Tracey Bregman is 47. Rock musician Noel Gallagher (Oasis) is 43. Singer Jayski McGowan (Quad City DJ’s) is 43. Rock musician Chan Kinchla (Blues Traveler) is 41. Rock musician Mark Lee (Third Day) is 37. Cartoonist Aaron McGruder (“The Boondocks�) is 36. Singer Melanie Brown (Spice Girls) is 35. Rapper Playa Poncho is 35. Actor Brandon Mychal Smith is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “A pessimist and an optimist, so much the worse; so much the better.� — Jean de La Fontaine, French poet (1621-1695)

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:46 a.m. May 27, in the 800 block of Northeast Third Street. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:02 p.m. May 27, in the area of Southwest Canyon Drive and Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:40 p.m. May 27, in the 500 block of Northwest Canal Boulevard. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 3:36 p.m. May 27, in the 1600 block of Northwest Larch Tree Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:13 p.m. May 27, in the 2500 block of Southwest Volcano Way. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 11:09 a.m. May 27, in the

600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 8:35 a.m. May 27, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:27 a.m. May 27, in the 2900 block of Southwest 23rd Street. DUII — Taylor Charles Anderson, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:56 a.m. May 27, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northeast Hemlock Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 12:15 a.m. May 27, in the area of Northeast Seventh Street and Northeast Negus Place. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:14 a.m. May 27, in the area of Madras Highway. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:55 a.m. May 27, in the area of Northeast Yellowpine Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:52 p.m. May 27, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:54 p.m. May 27, in the 62700 block of Juniper Road in Alfalfa. Theft — Tools were reported stolen at 8:59 p.m. May 27, in the 4000 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue in Redmond. DUII — Dalea Diane Young, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:33 p.m. May 27, in the area of East Hood Avenue and South Elm Street in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:03 p.m. May 27, in the area of Sixth Street and U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:03 p.m. May 27, in the 19100 block of Buck Canyon Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:33 p.m. May 27, in the 51300 block of Walling Lane in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:22 a.m. May 27, in the 17000 block of Whittier Drive in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:43 a.m. May 27, in the 400 block of East Hood Avenue in Sisters.

With the beginning of fire season, the Central Oregon Fire Chiefs Association announced that Tuesday will be the closing date for burning across Central Oregon, according to a news release Thursday. Due to the risk of wildfire, the interagency fire chiefs

Got a D.U.I.I. ?

Smith Rock hiker found in good health A man who went missing while hiking at Smith Rock was located Thursday afternoon, according to a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. John Hottman, 21, of Oregon City, was reported missing by family members at around 4:30 p.m. Friday. Hottman’s relatives told a park ranger he might be confused about how to find his way out of the park because of a learning disability, and said he’d last been seen on a trail about an hour earlier. Sheriff’s deputies and search and rescue personnel responded to the park, and notified people in the area that a man was missing. Around 5:40 p.m., a hiker who had talked to a deputy earlier located Hottman on a trail near Monkey Face. Hottman walked out of the park with the hiker, and was in good condition when he was reunited with his family.

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www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

MARKET REPORT

t

2,257.04 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -20.64 -.91%

t

CLOSE 10,136.63 DOW JONES CHANGE -122.36 -1.19%

t

1,089.41 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -13.65 -1.24%

t

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.30 treasury CHANGE -.90%

s

$1212.20 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$0.30

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Bend program offers interest-free loans

VALUE LESSONS FOR CHILDREN OF WEALTH

Thanks to $125,000 from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, the city of Bend is offering no-interest loans for up to $5,000 for base permit fees associated with the construction of a home built with higher energy efficiency, based on residential energy code requirements. The Permit Fee Loan program only applies to new residential construction, according to a news release. The loan cannot be used to pay state taxes, system development charges or other fees, which must be paid when the permit is issued. The loan doesn’t have to be paid back until the home is sold from the original resident to a new owner, according to the release. When that money is paid back, it will be returned to the fund and lent to others. To see if you qualify or for more information, visit www. ci.bend.or.us and click on the building permits link on the left side of the page, call 541-3885528 or visit the permit center located on the main level of City Hall.

Consumer spending stagnant in April Consumers earned more income in April but also spent less, according to government statistics released Friday, raising some questions about the pace of the recovery. The Commerce Department said that personal income rose by $54.4 billion, or 0.4 percent, in April. Spending increased $4 billion and was essentially flat. Both were less than economists had forecast.Savings, on the other hand, grew; the rate rose to 3.6 percent in April from 3.1 percent in March. According to the report, spending decreased on such nondurable items as utilities and groceries. Spending on durables, like cars or household appliances, was flat, compared with 3.7 percent up in March. — From staff and wire reports

Americans’ personal income: Seasonally adjusted Change from previous month March 0.4% April 0.4%

$12.3

$12.5 trillion

12.0

11.5 2009

2010

Source: Department of Commerce AP

Slowly but surely, local retail spaces are filling back up The Bulletin

John Van Beekum / New York Times News Service

Steven Hayworth, chief executive of Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust, says he’s thrilled that his daughter found a summer job at a clothing store. In a tight job market, affluent parents worry as much about how to teach their children the value of work and money as they do short-term swings in their portfolios.

By Paul Sullivan • New York Times News Service

S

teven Hayworth, chief executive of Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust, is thrilled that his daugh-

Roughly two weeks ago, Furniture Outlet opened its third store in Bend, occupying the 23,000square-foot space on South Third Street that had previously been home to Benjamin’s Home Furnishings before it closed last fall. While it’s noteworthy that a furniture store in Bend is expanding, especially since seven furniture stores in Bend closed during the recession, it also is part of a larger local trend. Slowly but surely, many of the large retail spaces in Bend left vacant by recession-related store closures are filling back up. Earlier this month, it was announced Columbus, Ohio-based closeout retailer Big Lots plans to move into the 31,000-squarefoot space in The Forum Shopping Center that previously had housed Linens ’N Things. In addition, Smart Foodservice Cash & Carry will soon complete its move into a 20,000-squarefoot space formerly occupied by McMahan’s Furniture on North Third Street, and renovations are under way at the former Gottschalks in the Pioneer Crossing shopping center on South Third Street to make room for a new 23,000-square-foot Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores. In other words, big retailers are once again projecting sales growth, said Darren Powderly, a broker at Compass Commercial Real Estate Services in Bend. Powderly recently returned from the International Council of Shopping Centers annual convention in Las Vegas and said “there was a very distinct feeling of optimism among national retailers. “There are a lot less store closings going on,” Powderly said. See Retail / C5

ter will be working this summer at a women’s clothing store before heading to college in the fall. It is not the particular job that pleases Hayworth. Rather, he is hoping his daughter will

make the connection between how much she earns each day and what that will buy. “As a parent who has worked his whole life and has had a little bit of success in my career, one of the huge life lessons I learned early on is the value of a dollar,” said Hayworth, whose bank is based in Coral Gables, Fla. “Particularly for children of upper-middle-class and affluent families, there’s no perspective on value. When the new Range Rover pulls into the driveway, there’s no concept of how many hours of hard work went into owning that vehicle.” Unlike many college-bound children today, Hayworth’s daughter would have had no worries if she had not been able to find a job. She could have spent the summer by the pool knowing her parents had the money to put her through college. But the fact that she does not have to work is exactly what worries Hayworth

and many other affluent parents. The recession and tight job market have made it imperative to teach their children the value of work. They worry about that, it seems, more than about any short-term swings in their portfolios. “This is a tremendously confusing time for families,” said Matthew E. Brady, head of wealth advisory in the Americas for Barclays Wealth. “The issue of children is the most important topic that affects our clients. It’s the topic that comes up most consistently in every conversation.” A coterie of experts has sprung up in the past few years to coach the children of affluence into the working world. Gibraltar offers classes in “financial life skills” that cover topics including saving, preventing debt and how money

affects friendships. J.P. Morgan Private Bank offers what it calls “Next Generation Leadership” seminars. This may seem unnecessary, unfair or worse to parents with fewer means and just as many concerns about their children’s futures. But the central issue for all parents is the same: How do you raise children who are productive? With summer near, this is a good time to review how parents can truly help their children.

By David Holley The oil spill on the Gulf Coast may be a couple of thousand miles away, but its effect is rippling all the way to one Bend business. Giant Loop sells black, orange and yellow vinyl-covered polyester motorcycle saddlebags, primarily geared toward offroad bikers looking for a durable container for valuables. Since the BP oil spill, the orange and yellow textile fabrics Giant Loop buys from a U.S. distributor have come into high demand. The reason: Those two colors of that fabric also are used to make oil containment booms, like the booms being used today to contain the oil on the Gulf

By Amy Thomson

Parents of various means are facing the prospect of adult children who have to move home because they cannot find a job. See Money / C5

NEW YORK — Google has been ordered to turn over to a federal district court in Oregon data it collected with people’s emails, files and digital phone records by next week, according to court documents. Google sends out cars to photograph streets and houses that people can see with the Street View feature in Google Maps. The vehicles also scanned for Wi-Fi networks used for Internet access and collected private data from the wireless networks of some homes, according to a complaint filed by two people who may have been affected. Google has said in a blog that it mistakenly collected the Wi-Fi data. Judge Michael Mosman of the Portland-based U.S. District Court of Oregon issued a restraining order this week to stop Google from destroying the data it gathered and to turn over copies of the information, after Google deleted similar data from other countries. Vicki Van Valin and Neil Mertz, who have sued Google for invasion of privacy, said that destroying the data would hurt their ability to prove Google’s wrongdoing and assess damages, according to a complaint filed on May 17.

Giant Loop, owned by Harold Olaf Cecil, left, and Dave Wachs, is unable to purchase fabric it uses for its saddlebags because of the oil spill. Pete Erickson The Bulletin file photo

Coast. Giant Loop’s owners said its distributor, Indiana-based Top Value Fabrics, said last week that they should expect to be without any new shipments of the orange and yellow fabrics for weeks, if not months.

Oregon court orders Google to turn over private data it collected

House rules

Effects of oil spill ripple to Bend company The Bulletin

Personal income

$18.411 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.046

By Andrew Moore

House OKs extension of jobless benefits WASHINGTON — The U.S. House of Representatives approved another extension of unemployment benefits Friday. But this widening of the safety net could be the last as lawmakers grow uneasy over the costs of what is looking to some like an unfunded welfare benefit. In a 215-204 vote, House members approved extending benefits through Nov. 30, which would help nearly 350,000 long-term unemployed people nationwide from falling off the unemployment rolls by next month. But the measure still must be approved by the Senate, which has already left for a weeklong Memorial Day break. That means some workers’ benefits will expire May 31, although they could be restored retroactively.

t

Giant Loop co-owner Dave Wachs said he was watching a news broadcast about the spill last week when he noticed yellow and orange objects floating in the water that looked just like his motorcycle bags. Then he

called Top Value, which confirmed it wouldn’t be able to supply the yellow and orange fabrics, two of Wachs’ most popular sellers. “There isn’t any of that yellow or orange stuff in the world,” Wachs said Friday, adding that he and co-owner Harold Olaf Cecil searched for the material at other distributors, who said they also had sent their supplies to be used in the Gulf. “Interestingly, we use it for a lot of the same reason they’re using it on those oil booms,” Cecil said. “The stuff is super durable. It’s also highly resistant to the elements.” And it’s also not harmed if you get a little gasoline or oil on See Giant Loop / C5

Bloomberg News


B

C4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

U S I N ESS

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C AAR 19.70 ABB Ltd 17.01 ACE Ltd 49.16 AES Corp 10.27 AFLAC 44.30 AGCO 28.77 AGL Res 36.50 AK Steel 14.96 AMB Pr 25.93 AMR 7.67 AOL n d20.63 AT&T Inc 24.30 AU Optron 9.72 Aarons s 19.98 AbtLab 47.56 AberFitc 35.83 Accenture 37.52 AdvAuto u51.76 AMD 8.57 AdvSemi 4.18 AecomTch 25.38 Aegon 5.70 AerCap 11.99 Aeropostl s 27.71 Aetna 29.16 Agilent 32.36 Agnico g 58.58 Agrium g 54.89 AirProd 69.06 Airgas 62.47 AirTran 5.64 AlskAir u46.70 Albemarle 43.06 AlcatelLuc 2.57 Alcoa 11.64 Alcon 140.48 AllgEngy d20.46 AllegTch 54.68 Allergan 60.19 AlliData 70.66 AlliantEgy 32.14 AldIrish d2.64 Allstate 30.63 AlphaNRs 38.37 AlpTotDiv d6.91 Altria 20.29 AmBev 96.34 AmbacF h 1.20 Amdocs 28.50 Ameren 24.66 AMovilL 47.34 AmAxle 8.97 AmCampus 26.77 AEagleOut d13.10 AEP 31.96 AmExp 39.87 AIntlGp rs 35.38 AmOriBio d3.10 AmTower 40.53 AmWtrWks 20.34 Americdt 21.62 Ameriprise 39.79 AmeriBrg s 31.28 Amphenol 42.40 Anadarko 52.33 AnalogDev 29.17 AnglogldA 41.92 AnnTaylr 21.65 Annaly 16.96 Anworth 6.78 Aon Corp 39.47 Apache 89.54 AptInv 20.63 AquaAm 17.45 ArcelorMit d30.32 ArchCoal 21.55 ArchDan d25.27 ArenaRes 32.88 ArrowEl 27.28 ArvMerit 14.54 AshfordHT 7.95 Ashland 53.61 AspenIns 25.26 Assurant 34.70 AssuredG 16.80 AstoriaF 14.88 AstraZen 42.25 AtlasPpln 10.70 AtwoodOcn 27.15 AutoNatn 20.03 Autoliv 47.50 AutoZone u190.88 AvalonBay 98.06 AveryD 34.18 AvisBudg 11.85 Avnet 28.72 Avon 26.49 AXIS Cap 30.40 BB&T Cp 30.24 BCE g 29.21 BHP BillLt 64.84 BHPBil plc 54.89 BJs Whls u40.07 BP PLC d42.95 BPZ Res d5.12 BRE 40.86 BRFBrasil s 12.97 BakrHu 38.14 BallCp 49.25 BallyTech 42.50 BcBilVArg 10.40 BcoBrades 16.34 BcoSantand 10.15 BcSBrasil n 10.42 BkofAm 15.74 BkAm wtA 8.80 BkIrelnd d5.10 BkMont g 58.83 BkNYMel 27.20 Barclay d17.62 BarVixShT 28.58 Bard 80.97 BarrickG 42.08 Baxter d42.23 BeazerHm 4.97 BeckCoult 57.44 BectDck 71.30 Belo 7.27 Bemis 28.68 Berkley 27.26 BerkH B s 70.55 BerryPet 30.74 BestBuy 42.25 BigLots 35.33 BBarrett 32.56 BioMedR 17.01 Biovail 15.01 BlackRock 167.88 Blackstone 10.65 BlockHR 16.08 Blockbst h .34 BlckbsB h .24 Boeing 64.18 Boise Inc 6.14 Borders 1.97 BorgWarn 37.26 BostProp 76.68 BostonSci d6.05

+.44 -2.21 -.38 +.04 -.65 -.78 +.04 +.65 -1.53 +.91 -.38 -.58 +.29 +.79 -.28 +1.20 -.21 +.36 -.11 +.83 -.53 -.65 -.33 -.55 -.03 +.16 -.29 +.03 -.31 +.62 +.23 +.04 -.73 -.62 +.43 +2.29 -.23 +.17 -.13 +.01 -.28 -.19 -.17 -.25 +.19 +1.00 -.03 -.93 -.05 +.42 -.39 +1.02 -.43 +2.02 -1.24 +.03 -1.62 +2.12 -.86 +.77 -.06 +.59 -2.00 +2.35 -.21 +2.24 -.06 +.11 -.18 +.29 +.27 +3.11 +.22 +.56 -.40 +4.86 +.55 +2.14 -1.21 +.85 +.08 +.35 -.06 -.11 -.14 +.29 -.03 +2.54 +.06 -.21 -.25 -.72 -1.07 +1.21 +.25 +.18 -.34 -1.26 +.25 +.52 -1.06 +.83 -.29 +.71 -.56 +.74 +.26 -2.00 -.03 +.50 -.46 +.05 -1.08 -.58 -.03 +.08 -.46 +.15 +.06 +.25 -.38 +.52 -1.15 -.62 -.29 +.45 -.59 +.48 -3.24 -2.50 -.55 +.75 -.53 +3.00 -.38 -.31 +.20 +1.24 +.05 +.25 -.14 -.17 -2.30 -.04 -.28 +.64 +.06 +.54 -1.12 -.29 -.02 +1.14 -.16 -.14 +.38 +2.59 -.59 +.43 -.37 +.95 +.11 +.54 -1.90 +2.08 -.21 -.02 -.60 +.40 -.50 +1.30 -.36 -.02 +.40 +.68 +.31 +.45 -1.00 -.53 -.02 +.75 -1.61 +.97 -1.12 +7.41 -1.58 +3.75 -.26 +.27 -.55 +.77 -.38 +.52 -.57 -.17 -.12 +1.36 -.84 -1.12 -.11 -.05 -2.09 +2.31 -2.02 +1.99 +.46 +1.66 -2.43 -.91 -.07 +.23 -.77 +1.08 -.10 +.59 -2.95 -3.69 -.50 -.68 -.24 +1.82 -.22 -.61 -.27 -.23 -.28 -.83 -.50 -.39 -.44 -.25 -.34 -.03 -.21 -.50 -.50 +2.11 -.83 -.62 -.56 +.48 +.25 -4.73 -.62 +1.40 -.36 +1.26 +.16 +1.56 -.14 -.10 -1.11 +.90 -.91 -.19 -.10 +.33 -.46 -.09 -.10 +.89 -2.80 -2.46 -.50 +1.46 +.01 +.45 -.71 -.94 +.07 +.91 -.11 +1.01 +.21 +.09 -4.51 +1.41 -.37 -.42 -.16 -.29 +.00 -.01 +.02 -.04 -.95 -.38 +.03 +.45 -.17 -.27 -.80 +1.03 -1.44 +1.18 -.15 -.19

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

BoydGm 13.17 Brandyw 11.59 Brinker 17.78 BrMySq 23.21 BroadrdgF 19.12 Brookdale 17.59 BrkfldAs g 23.82 BrkfldPrp 14.63 BrwnBrn 19.60 Brunswick 17.47 Buenavent 36.00 BungeLt d48.76 BurgerKing 19.01 CB REllis 15.83 CBL Asc 14.29 CBS B 14.56 CF Inds 68.59 CIGNA 33.47 CIT Grp n 36.79 CKE Rst 12.36 CMS Eng 14.68 CNO Fincl 5.61 CNX Gas u38.24 CSX 52.25 CVS Care 34.63 Cabelas 17.21 CablvsnNY 24.81 CabotO&G 34.69 CalDive d5.52 CallGolf 8.42 CallonP h 5.70 Calpine 13.70 CamdnP 45.64 Cameco g 24.44 Cameron 36.20 CampSp 35.81 CdnNRy g 57.37 CdnNRs g 69.46 CP Rwy g 55.03 CapOne 41.30 CapitlSrce 4.54 CapsteadM 11.42 CardnlHlt s 34.49 CareFusn n 25.42 CarMax 21.73 Carnival 36.23 CarpTech 38.91 Carters 30.56 Caterpillar 60.76 Celanese 28.67 Celestic g 9.31 Cemex 10.83 Cemig pf 14.37 CenovusE n 26.94 CenterPnt 13.62 CnElBrasil 12.48 CntryTel 34.33 ChRvLab 33.54 ChesEng 22.34 Chevron 73.87 ChicB&I 19.87 Chicos 12.23 Chimera 3.94 ChinaLife 65.45 ChinaMble 46.57 ChinaSecur d4.68 ChinaUni 12.13 Chiquita 12.35 Chubb 50.24 ChungTel 19.06 Cimarex u73.48 CinciBell 3.18 Citigp pfJ 24.90 Citigrp 3.96 CliffsNRs 55.86 Clorox 62.82 CloudPk n 14.76 Coach 41.11 CobaltIEn n d7.00 CocaCE 26.10 CocaCl 51.40 Coeur 15.10 ColgPal 78.09 CollctvBrd 22.38 ColonPT 15.08 Comerica 38.10 CmclMtls 15.57 ComScop 28.20 CmtyHlt 38.98 CompPrdS 13.01 Comptn gh .72 CompSci 49.99 ComstkRs d29.84 Con-Way 34.02 ConAgra 24.18 ConchoRes 52.05 ConocPhil 51.86 ConsolEngy 36.48 ConEd 42.59 ConstellA 16.66 ConstellEn 35.38 CtlAir B 21.10 ContlRes 47.16 Cnvrgys 10.92 Cooper Ind 46.97 CooperTire 18.91 Corning 17.43 CorrectnCp 19.90 Cosan Ltd 8.63 CousPrp 7.71 Covance 52.76 CovantaH 15.43 CoventryH 20.70 Covidien 42.39 CredSuiss d38.69 CrwnCstle 37.03 CrownHold 23.51 Cummins 67.98 CurEuro 122.37

-.08 +.59 -.05 +.15 -.19 +.17 -.13 +.25 -.16 -1.38 -.70 -.12 -.41 +.17 -.05 +.57 -.13 +.50 -.54 -1.06 +.10 +1.79 -.63 +.92 -.03 +.13 -.52 +.81 -.38 +.32 -.29 +.24 -1.67 +.44 -.21 +.82 -.45 +1.34 ... +.14 -.03 -.10 -.15 +.42 +.02 +.08 -.37 +1.40 +.04 +.33 +.25 +.70 -.24 +1.61 -.12 +3.33 -.08 -.09 +.03 +.22 -.27 +.31 -.17 +.93 -.21 +.89 -.16 +.36 -1.88 +.36 -.12 +.33 -.55 +.99 +.06 +4.02 +.04 +2.02 -.91 -.51 -.06 +.07 +.20 +.69 +.83 +1.28 -.16 +.70 -.56 -.14 -.55 +.62 -.91 +2.58 -.93 +.34 -1.30 +.67 -.64 +1.16 +.01 +.45 -.38 +.68 -.25 +.01 +.44 +1.45 +.10 +.29 -.04 +.43 -.17 +1.08 +.22 +1.24 +.12 +1.33 -.49 -.61 -.02 +1.59 -.22 -.11 +.01 +.13 -.56 +1.00 -.82 -.26 -.23 +.01 +.14 +.64 +.02 -.55 -.60 -.15 -.17 -.16 +1.03 +7.63 +.01 -.02 +.18 +1.47 -.06 +.21 -1.83 +5.39 -.55 +.09 -.27 +.80 -.84 +2.68 -.15 -.53 -.48 +.74 +.17 -.19 -.38 +.34 -.68 -1.50 -.04 +1.47 -.21 +.64 -.98 -.55 -.45 +1.17 -.72 +.47 -1.01 +.81 -.34 +.30 -.08 +.01 +.15 +.25 -.16 +.47 -.75 +1.30 -.11 -.58 +.24 +4.05 -.35 +.39 -.62 +1.00 -.15 -.70 -.04 +.36 +.41 +2.03 -.40 +1.65 -.19 +4.03 -.08 -.27 -.81 +.93 -.66 +.62 -.09 +.50 -.21 -.01 -.10 +.27 -.05 +.26 -1.37 +.69 -.23 -.02 -.34 +.70 -.15 +1.06 -1.15 -1.32 -.54 +1.00 +.09 +.07 -1.61 +2.11 -.85 -2.99

Name

Last

Chg Wkly

DrxTcBll s 31.65 DirxTcBear 8.66 DrxEMBll s 22.78 DirEMBr rs 50.30 DirFBear rs 14.93 DrxFBull s 24.14 DirREBear 7.16 DrxREBll s 42.83 DirxSCBear 6.86 DirxSCBull 48.04 DirxLCBear 15.87 DirxLCBull 47.58 DirxEnBear 12.01 DirxEnBull 29.51 Discover 13.45 Disney 33.42 DolbyLab 66.01 DoleFood n d9.15 DollarGn n u30.23 DollarTh 46.70 DomRescs 38.96 Dominos 13.00 Domtar grs 61.20 DEmmett 15.48 Dover 44.89 DowChm 26.91 DrPepSnap 37.86 DresserR 31.83 Dril-Quip 48.71 DuPont 36.17 DuPFabros u25.54 DukeEngy 15.96 DukeRlty 11.88 Dynegy rs d5.23 EMC Cp 18.62 EMCOR 24.97 ENI d37.55

-.67 +1.04 +.15 -.42 -.80 +1.20 +2.11 -4.95 +.78 -.24 -1.41 -.31 +.29 -.74 -1.71 +2.33 +.26 -.48 -1.92 +2.20 +.52 -.42 -1.62 +.64 +.65 -.26 -1.68 -.25 -.25 -.08 -.95 +.55 -.71 +4.05 -.05 -.30 -.41 +.68 -.42 +1.09 -.18 -.11 -.35 +.02 -2.93 +1.84 -.33 +.64 -.72 +.70 -1.16 +.44 -.31 +1.14 -.70 +1.72 -4.84 -4.70 -.62 +.07 +.27 +2.00 -.02 -.04 -.22 +.07 +.12 -.37 -.16 +.66 -.44 -.21 -.90 -.38

Chg Wkly

35.21 .47 5.08 24.71 95.10 46.92 42.18 14.91 11.73 4.51 13.26 25.88 26.64 4.11 47.45 d19.09 98.09 1.24 70.05 7.95 13.91 32.89

-.03 +.33 ... +.03 +.38 +.68 -.53 -1.12 -3.23 -.32 -.89 +1.13 -1.49 +.44 -.11 +.93 -.26 +.47 -.25 +.41 -.59 -.15 -.19 -.24 +.04 +1.76 -.04 +.03 -.29 +1.67 -.38 -.36 -1.70 -4.64 +.01 +.02 -1.02 +3.04 +.07 +.24 -.04 +.19 -.77 +2.22

G-H-I GLG Ptrs GMX Rs Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Gartner GaylrdEnt GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec

4.26 d6.82 11.90 22.79 7.34 15.54 21.80 u24.75 26.59 19.03 31.16 67.90 16.35

+.01 +.02 -.11 +.20 -.26 -.05 -.19 +1.49 -.12 +.40 -.32 +.96 -.19 -.35 -.34 +1.07 -.48 +1.64 -.97 -.18 -.53 +1.34 -.58 +.45 -.31 -.07

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

Last

Chg Wkly

Medtrnic 39.18 -.23 -1.15 MensW 21.74 +.13 +.23 Merck 33.69 +.07 +1.65 MetLife 40.49 -.91 +1.01 MetroPCS 8.99 -.01 +.60 Millipore 106.21 +.07 -.09 MindrayM 29.74 -.76 -.54 Mirant 12.42 +.19 +.75 MitsuUFJ d4.84 -.17 -.17 MobileTel s 19.23 -.77 +.11 MolsCoorB 41.04 +.45 -.57 Monsanto d50.87 +.60 -4.08 MonstrWw 14.79 +.07 +.05 Montpelr 15.61 -.20 +.03 Moodys 20.50 -.38 -1.52 MorgStan d27.11 -.55 ... Mosaic 46.17 -.85 +.46 Motorola 6.85 -.07 +.01 MuellerWat 4.33 -.19 -.10 MurphO 53.38 -.08 +1.06 NBTY 34.24 -.56 +.67 NCR Corp 13.28 -.25 +.96 NRG Egy 23.35 +.33 +1.55 NV Energy 11.79 +.10 +.01 NYSE Eur 28.67 -.17 +.29 Nabors 19.03 +.64 +1.30 NalcoHld 22.66 -.52 -.09 NBkGreece d2.45 -.09 -.16 NOilVarco 38.13 -1.94 +1.24 NatRetPrp 21.98 -.25 +.17 NatSemi 14.05 -.24 +.10 NatwHP 35.49 -.16 +1.80 NaviosAcq d6.56 -.05 -2.47 Navios 6.13 -.20 +.51 Navistar 54.18 -1.61 +.93 Netezza 13.03 -.50 +.14 NeuStar 21.39 -.17 -.15

Last

Chg Wkly

PennWst g 19.20 Penney 27.49 PenRE 13.79 Penske 13.06 Pentair 34.36 PepcoHold 16.13 PepsiCo 62.89 PerkElm 22.69 Petrohawk 19.23 PetrbrsA d30.97 Petrobras d35.62 PtroqstE 6.28 Pfizer 15.23 PhmHTr 59.28 PhilipMor 44.12 PhilipsEl 29.82 PhlVH 54.73 PhnxCos 2.82 Pier 1 7.95 PilgrmsP n d7.98 PimcoHiI 11.23 PinnclEnt 12.10 PinWst 35.11 PioNtrl 63.70 PitnyBw 22.64 PlainsEx d22.10 PlumCrk 35.02 Polaris 58.70 Polo RL 86.86 PolyOne 9.99 PostPrp 25.08 Potash 99.19 PwshDB 21.96 PS Agri 23.58 PS Oil 24.74 PS USDBull 25.34 PS USDBear 24.65

Name

-.05 +.75 -.29 +.16 -.13 +.68 -.15 +.06 -.27 +1.87 -.14 +.24 -.01 -.69 -.39 +.68 +.14 +.97 +.19 +1.23 +.11 +1.55 +.02 +.32 -.14 -.17 -.39 +.12 -.58 -.14 -1.08 -.29 -1.31 +1.75 -.03 +.30 -.19 +.38 -.02 -.02 +.08 -.02 -.31 +.42 -.04 -.06 +.21 +4.25 +.04 +.13 -.52 -.64 -.42 -.19 -1.36 +1.36 -1.42 +2.59 -.20 +.24 -.18 +1.12 -.81 +1.58 -.19 +.48 -.41 -.26 -.24 +1.30 +.14 +.36 -.18 -.43

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AMERICAN OPINION RESEARCH 2006

4.84 25.04 12.19 38.32 45.51 49.19 10.86 79.38 42.90 63.43 57.49 10.65 57.68 14.58 13.58 16.45 59.57 32.15 11.19 11.44 63.85 61.28 d63.10 9.14 13.56 28.51 56.91 28.69

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CaviumNet 26.58 Cbeyond 15.63 CeleraGrp 7.07 Celgene 52.76 CelldexTh 6.71 CenterFncl 5.84 CentEuro 25.56 CEurMed 25.32 CenGrdA lf 9.46 CenJrsyBc u7.00 CentAl 10.51 Cephln 58.86 Cepheid 17.88 CeragonN 8.35 Cerner 83.71 CerusCp 3.16 ChrmSh 4.56 ChartInds 18.42 ChkPoint 30.67 Cheesecake 25.50 ChildPlace 47.13 ChinAgri s 12.88 ChinaBAK d1.93 ChinaDir 1.35 ChinaInfo 5.30 ChinaMed d10.49 ChinaSun 3.83 ChinaTcF 2.65 ChinaCEd 6.61 CienaCorp 15.57 CinnFin 27.19 Cintas 26.00 Cirrus 14.22 Cisco 23.16 CitrixSys 43.61 CleanEngy 14.92 Clearwire 8.14 Clearw rt .33 CogentC 9.05 Cogent 8.92 CognizTech 50.04 Coinstar 53.66 ColdwtrCrk 6.24 ColBnkg 22.33 CombinRx 1.52 Comcast 18.09 Comc spcl 17.22 CmcBMO 37.17 CommVlt 22.54 CompDivHd 14.42 Compuwre 8.19 Concepts 16.69 ConcurTch 42.30 Conexant 2.84 ConstantC 21.46 CopanoEn 24.53 Copart 35.90 CorinthC 13.39 Costco 58.25 CrackerB 49.83 Cray Inc 4.76 Cree Inc 66.37 CrimsnEx n 2.76 Crocs 10.35 CrosstexE 6.76 CrosstxLP 9.66 Ctrip.com s 39.39 CubistPh 21.50 Curis 3.15 CybrSrce 25.69 Cyclacel 2.16

D-E-F

FirstEngy FlagstrB h FlagstB rs FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FEMSA FootLockr FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Fortress FortuneBr FranceTel FrankRes FredMac FMCG FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline

Last

LO C AL ADVE RTI S I N G FACT #3

EOG Res EQT Corp EastChm EKodak Eaton EatnVan EVTxMGlo Ecolab EdisonInt EdwLfSci s ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g EBrasAero EmersonEl Emulex EnCana g s EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis ENSCO Entergy EntPrPt Equifax EqtyRsd EsteeLdr EvergrnEn ExcelM ExcoRes Exelon ExterranH ExtraSpce ExxonMbl FMC Corp FMC Tech FPL Grp FTI Cnslt FairchldS FamilyDlr FannieMae FedExCp FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FstAmCp FstBcpPR FstHorizon FstInRT

DCT Indl DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden DaVita DeVry DeanFds Deere DelMnte DeltaAir DenburyR DeutschBk DBGoldDL DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt Dillards

Name

104.84 39.19 60.39 5.64 69.95 29.89 d10.35 47.23 32.36 50.53 11.34 5.74 16.95 21.78 46.44 10.48 30.85 6.25 22.04 18.85 37.40 75.07 33.60 30.25 45.13 58.27 .20 5.74 17.25 d38.60 25.50 15.04 60.46 60.55 58.15 49.93 42.76 10.00 u40.74 .98 83.49 6.81 d22.21 6.76 9.01 15.96 14.42 27.52 34.03 d1.33 12.45 6.69

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vjGnGrthP 14.02 GenMarit d6.91 GenMills 71.23 GenuPrt 40.61 Genworth 15.59 Gerdau g 7.45 Gerdau 13.46 Gildan 28.92 GlaxoSKln d33.46 GlimchRt 6.96 GlobPay 42.19 GolLinhas 11.32 GoldFLtd 13.75 Goldcrp g 43.09 GoldmanS d144.26 Goodrich 69.40 GoodrPet d12.24 Goodyear 11.90 vjGrace 25.63 GrafTech 16.61 Gramrcy 1.59 GraniteC 29.65 GtPlainEn 17.55 Group1 28.44 GpTelevisa 18.59 Guess 37.99 HCC Ins 25.07 HCP Inc 31.86 HRPT Prp 6.71 HSBC 45.36 Hallibrtn 24.83 HarleyD 30.21 Harman 32.30 HarmonyG 9.68 HarrisCorp 46.91 Harsco 27.21 HartfdFn 25.07 Hasbro 40.15 HatterasF 27.70 HltCrREIT 43.08 HltMgmt 9.30 HealthNet 24.65 HlthSouth 19.86 Heckmann 5.34 HeclaM 5.38 Heinz 44.18 HelixEn 10.89 HelmPayne 37.68 Hersha 4.83 Hershey 46.80 Hertz 11.36 Hess 53.20

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Cymer CyprsBio CypSemi Cytokinet Cytori

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HewlettP 46.01 Hexcel 15.97 hhgregg u30.01 HighwdPrp 29.46 Hill-Rom 27.88 HollyCp 25.90 HomeDp 33.86 HonwllIntl 42.77 Hormel 39.80 Hornbeck d15.28 Hospira 52.06 HospPT 22.50 HostHotls 14.26 HovnanE 6.19 Humana 46.05 Huntsmn 9.98 IAMGld g 17.31 ICICI Bk 36.79 ING 7.92 ION Geoph 5.43 iSAstla 20.11 iShBraz 63.52 iSCan 26.17 iSFrnce 20.56 iShGer 19.15 iSh HK 14.78 iShJapn 9.51 iSh Kor 44.00 iSMalas 11.09 iShMex 48.89 iShSing 11.01 iSPacxJpn 37.01 iSTaiwn 11.36 iSh UK 14.17 iShSilver 18.03 iShS&P100 49.54 iShBTips 106.10 iShChina25 39.38 iShDJTr 78.74 iSSP500 109.70 iShBAgB 105.71 iShEMkts 38.10 iShiBxB 105.46 iSSPGth 55.86 iShSPLatA 42.81 iSSPVal 53.00 iShB20 T 96.50 iShB7-10T 93.10 iShB1-3T 83.84 iS Eafe 48.32 iSRusMCV 38.86 iSRusMCG 46.65

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iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOG iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed ITW IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE IntegrysE IntcntlEx IBM Intl Coal IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Interpublic IntPotash Invernss Invesco IowaTel IronMtn ItauUnibH IvanhM g

85.87 -1.14 +1.42 76.33 -.81 +1.34 84.61 +.14 +.31 58.43 -.71 +1.48 57.52 -.75 +.43 48.48 -.57 +.16 60.56 -.72 +.34 62.57 -.75 +1.06 71.39 -.76 +1.45 66.25 -.86 +1.18 36.62 -.02 +1.11 64.89 -.72 +.45 49.95 -.76 +1.18 13.47 -.15 +.22 52.91 -.96 +.01 58.41 -.69 +.56 58.31 -.97 +1.72 51.35 -.54 +1.40 6.07 -.13 +.32 48.28 -.65 -.28 100.94 -.96 -8.06 46.43 -.50 +.89 37.31 -.37 +1.43 16.96 -.19 +.06 8.33 +.11 +.33 45.22 +.08 -.08 116.13 -1.22 +1.04 125.26 -1.13 -.16 4.33 -.07 +.42 19.57 -.39 +.26 23.23 -.53 +.95 20.96 -.10 +.79 49.28 -.27 -.49 8.35 -.23 +.58 24.66 -.32 +.04 34.81 -.19 +.96 18.56 -.46 -.61 16.66 -.09 +.21 24.52 -.35 -.08 18.41 -.20 +.21 14.52 -.15 +1.07

J-K-L JCrew JPMorgCh Jabil JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g JanusCap Jarden Jefferies

45.64 +1.78 +1.71 39.58 -.84 -.47 13.69 -.29 +.54 1.90 +.29 +.22 41.76 -.67 -.30 9.03 -.13 +.35 10.66 -.14 -.70 29.11 +.74 +1.95 23.33 -.32 -.02

JohnJn 58.30 -.73 -2.04 JohnsnCtl 28.53 -.76 +.34 JonesApp 19.64 -.70 +.70 JnprNtwk 26.62 -.64 +.23 KB Home 14.48 -.24 -.52 KBR Inc 21.98 +.35 +1.21 KKR Fn 8.28 -.04 +.72 KT Corp 18.61 -.42 -.98 KC Southn 38.17 -.63 +3.29 Kellogg 53.43 -.16 -.27 Kennamtl 28.21 -.20 +1.27 KeyEngy 9.56 -.24 +.21 Keycorp 8.02 -.18 +.16 KilroyR 32.90 -.25 +.48 KimbClk 60.70 -.48 -.92 Kimco 14.30 -.26 +.02 KindME 63.50 -.32 +1.73 KineticC 41.40 -.32 +.97 KingPhrm d8.67 +.20 +.11 Kinross g 17.21 -.09 +.58 KnghtCap d14.61 -.10 +.01 KnightTr 19.88 +.01 +.02 Kohls 50.75 +.23 -1.02 KoreaElc 13.48 +.08 -.07 Kraft 28.60 -.46 -1.09 Kroger 20.13 +.28 -1.13 L-1 Ident 7.44 ... +.11 L-3 Com 82.63 -1.19 -1.04 LDK Solar 6.07 -.11 +.33 LG Display 17.89 -.07 +.80 LSI Corp 5.33 -.10 +.02 LabCp 75.61 -.80 -.39 LVSands 23.48 -.35 +2.48 LaSalleH 22.50 -.80 +.39 Lazard 31.54 -1.42 -.73 LearCorp n 67.67 -.36 +.78 LeggMason 29.72 -.85 -.42 LeggPlat 23.28 -.25 +.48 LenderPS 33.94 -.54 -.49 LennarA 17.30 -.27 -.17 LeucNatl 21.92 -.27 -.27 LexRltyTr 6.21 -.14 -.10 Lexmark 37.55 -.64 +2.08 LibtProp 30.81 -.50 +.36 LillyEli d32.79 -.03 -.33 Limited 24.86 -.57 +.04 LincNat 26.46 -.95 +.95 LiveNatn 12.23 +.02 -.40 LizClaib 6.13 -.21 +.23 LloydBkg 3.29 -.11 +.05 LockhdM 79.92 -.64 -.61 Loews 32.51 -.46 +.61

LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol

32.89 -.88 +1.85 71.49 -1.51 -2.20 8.50 -.03 +.28 24.75 -.37 +.55 88.57 -1.87 +5.36

M-N-O M&T Bk 79.24 MBIA 7.45 MDC 31.38 MDU Res d18.70 MEMC d11.35 MF Global 7.70 MFA Fncl 7.33 MGIC 9.36 MGMMir 12.46 MPG OffTr 3.09 MSCI Inc 29.65 Macerich 41.36 MackCali 32.98 Macys 22.21 MagnaI g 67.49 Manitowoc 11.93 ManpwI 45.71 Manulife g d16.69 MarathonO 31.09 MarinerEn 21.38 MktVGold 49.86 MktVRus 29.63 MktVJrGld 27.15 MarIntA 33.45 MarshM 21.81 MarshIls 8.15 MartMM 93.23 Masco 13.35 MasseyEn 33.12 MasterCrd 201.77 McClatchy 4.84 McCorm 38.57 McDermInt 22.18 McDnlds 66.87 McGrwH 27.80 McKesson 70.00 McMoRn 10.75 McAfee d31.80 MeadJohn 49.32 MeadWvco 23.90 Mechel 21.69 MedcoHlth 57.65 MedProp 9.55 Medicis 23.19 Medifast 31.37

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NY CmtyB 16.05 NY Times 9.28 NewAlliBc 11.77 NewellRub 16.66 NewfldExp 52.06 NewmtM 53.82 Nexen g 21.81 NiSource 14.96 NikeB 72.38 99 Cents 15.28 NobleCorp d29.07 NobleEn 59.49 NokiaCp d10.12 Nordstrm 39.70 NorflkSo 56.46 NoestUt 25.95 NorthropG 60.49 NStarRlt 3.15 Novartis 45.01 Nucor 43.05 OcciPet 82.51 Oceaneer 46.27 Och-Ziff 14.36 OcwenFn u12.16 OfficeDpt 5.80 OfficeMax 17.83 OilSvHT 98.21 OldRepub 13.86 OmegaHlt 19.86 Omncre 25.11 Omnicom 37.95 ONEOK 44.47 OrientEH 10.09 OshkoshCp 35.53 OvShip 38.69 OwensCorn 33.33 OwensIll 30.33

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P-Q-R PG&E Cp PMI Grp PNC PPG PPL Corp PackAmer Pactiv PallCorp ParkDrl ParkerHan PatriotCoal PeabdyE Pengrth g

41.50 4.69 62.75 64.07 25.81 22.14 28.58 34.05 4.81 61.46 16.67 38.96 9.48

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Overstk Oxigene

22.50 d.81

-.38 -.55 -.04 -.04

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Name Rackspace RadianGrp RadioShk RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RedHat RedwdTr RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegBkHT RegionsFn RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola Repsol RepubSvc ResMed ResrceCap RetailHT ReynldAm RioTinto s RiteAid RobtHalf RockwlAut RockColl Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland

Last

Chg Wkly

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Nasdaq National Market Name

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A-B-C A-Power 8.05 ADC Tel 8.26 AGA Med n 14.06 AMAG Ph 31.84 ASML Hld 28.26 ATP O&G 10.64 ATS Med 3.96 AVI Bio 1.43 AXT Inc 4.35 Abiomed 9.75 AcadiaPh 1.34 AcmePkt u29.31 AcordaTh 34.38 ActivsBliz 10.75 Actuate 4.49 Acxiom 17.41 Adaptec 2.90 AdobeSy 32.08 AdolorCp 1.62 Adtran 27.43 AdvEnId 12.36 AEterna g 1.69 Affymetrix 6.55 AgFeed 3.36 AirTrnsp 5.62 Aixtron 26.93 AkamaiT 39.72 Akorn 2.89 AlaskCom 8.27 Alexion 50.03 Alexza 3.32 AlignTech 14.92 Alkerm 11.36 AllegiantT 55.29 AllosThera 7.16 AllscriptM 18.81 AlteraCp lf 23.57 AlterraCap 18.71 Alvarion d2.21 Amazon 125.46 Amedisys 49.72 ACapAgy 26.26 AmCapLtd 5.33 AmerMed u22.56 AmSupr 30.66 AmerisBc u11.27 AmCasino 18.02 Amgen 51.78 AmkorT lf 6.81 Amylin 16.52 Anadigc 4.07 AnadysPh 2.37 Angiotch g .00 Ansys 43.73 A123 Sys n 9.10 ApolloGrp 53.16 ApolloInv 10.43 Apple Inc 256.88 +14.56 ApldMatl 12.92 AMCC 11.03 ArQule 6.11 ArchCap 73.52 ArcSight 21.66 ArdeaBio 25.03 ArenaPhm d3.08 AresCap 13.54 AriadP 3.84

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30.27 d4.12 11.39 2.94 4.65

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Regenrn RentACt RepubAir RschMotn ResConn RetailOpp RexEnergy RigelPh RightNow RINO Int n Riverbed RodmanR RofinSinar RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld rue21 n RuthsHosp Ryanair

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 C5

Giant Loop

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Hooker Creek Companies LLC has promoted Michelle Mattis to controller. Mattis graduated from the University of Wyoming in 1999 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. She joined Hooker Creek as a staff accountant in 2005, after working for a large national construction company, and became a licensed CPA in 2006. As controller, Mattis oversees all accounting and administrative functions for Hooker Creek. Michael Nyberg has joined NPG of Oregon as an account manager for News Channel 21 KTVZ, KTVZ.com, Fox Central Oregon KFXO, The CW, and Telemundo. Nyberg comes from Central Oregon Cable Advertising and his background includes extensive advertising experience as a national advertising director and national account manager. Maurices has named Kristina Wilson manager of its outlet in the Bend Factory Stores. Wilson is responsible for the day-today operations including sales performance, visual presentation, and personnel recruitment and training. Maurices operates more than 740 stores in 44 states and offers styles in sizes 1 to 24. Prudential Northwest Properties has announced the addition of Mark Westwood as a new agent in Prineville and Thesa Chambers as a new agent in Sunriver. Sheree MacRitchie, principal broker with Steve Scott Realtors in Bend, has been awarded the National Association of Realtors’ green designation, the only green real estate professional designation recognized by NAR. MacRitchie was trained in what makes a property green, evaluating the cost benefits of green building features, listing and marketing green homes and buildings, and financial grants and incentives available to homeowners. Lester Friedman, broker with Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate and 2010 president-elect of the Central Oregon Association of Realtors, has returned from the National Association of Realtors’ midyear legislative meetings in Washington, D.C., where he attended meetings and seminars on real estate, housing, economic and political issues. He met with Rep. Greg Walden and Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merk-

Money Continued from C3 Brad Klontz, a financial psychologist and co-author of “Mind Over Money” (Broadway Business, 2009), said parents should set ground rules from the outset, including charging children rent. Without rules, there is a risk of what he calls “financial enabling.” “It’s financial help that hurts,” he said. “You condition them that there will always be enough money — whatever my needs are, they will always be taken care of.” In charging them to live back under your roof, you are also forcing them to become aware of expenses, which many of them may know little about.

Bad help Parents usually mean well when they try to help their children financially. They do not want their children to fail or they want their children to have a better life than they had. But providing too much can hurt children. This is not just an issue for college-age children. When chil-

Michale Nyberg

Sheree MacRitchie

Lester Friedman

Helen Brown

Jeff Alford

Continued from C3 it, Cecil said. Giant Loop’s product is sold through dozens of distributors nationally, and through distributors in Australia, Mexico, Spain, Canada and England. Cecil said people from more than 30 countries have purchased at least one of Giant Loop’s four models of bags from the company’s website, www.giantloopmoto.com. Officials at Top Value Fabrics’ Indiana headquarters could not be reached for comment Friday. Wachs said he was in disbelief when he first realized the same material he uses was helping fix the Gulf Coast oil spill. But he

William Anderson

ley to lobby for private property rights, residential and commercial credit reform, and home ownership protection. Larry Browning, president of Discover Sunriver Vacation Rentals, spoke at the “Best in Class” panel at the Vacation Rental Managers Association Western seminar May 5-6 in Reno, Nev. Members of the VRMA selected Browning based on his expertise in strategic partnerships and his experience with several collaborative business efforts in Central Oregon tourism. Tumalo Art Co., an artistowned and operated fine art collective in the Old Mill District, has added Helen Brown as a new member. Brown also is a member of the High Desert Art League and the Watercolor Society of Oregon. She qualified for signature membership in the Northwest Watercolor Society in 2008. She will work and show art in the gallery. Jeff Alford, of Cascade Disposal in Bend, won first place May 15 in the front loader division of Oregon’s first-ever “SWANA Truck Road-E-O” event where employees in the solid waste management field demonstrated their knowledge and skills in a competition in Keizer. Drivers maneuvered industry-standard waste-hauling trucks through a course that challenged drivers’ skills at starting and stopping their vehicles, negotiating the road, and backing up while exhibiting safe driving skills. Some challenges included parallel parking, executing a serpentine route between three orange barrels spaced 37 feet apart, and driving the truck’s right-side tires between two close-set lines of tennis balls set on Dixie cups. Contestants also completed written and oral tests similar to the tests commercial truck drivers are required to take to be licensed.

William Anderson, president and CEO of Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union in Bend since 1994, has been appointed Heather to Southwest Vihstadt Corporate Federal Credit Union’s board of directors. Anderson served on the board of directors of Northwest Corporate Federal Credit Union, including as chairman, for 12 years until the merger with Southwest Corporate in December 2007. Mid Oregon Credit Union is a full-service, memberowned, financial cooperative that has served Central Oregonians since 1957. The Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools has announced the hiring of a new executive director, Heather Vihstadt, and the addition of two new board members, Christy McLeod and Rod Ketner. Vihstadt founded Girls on the Run of Deschutes County, an independent nonprofit organization designed to build self-esteem in young girls through mentorship and running. In 2009 she was selected by GOTR International to serve on the council advisory committee representing more than 20 councils in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California and Hawaii. McLeod is director of marketing and communications at Bend Memorial Clinic. Prior to working at BMC, she was an independent marketing and business consultant and executive director of the Children’s Museum. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ohio University with a specialization in advertising/public relations and a concentration in business. Ketner is a senior research scientist at Bend Research Inc.,

where he develops drug-delivery technologies for new and existing pharmaceuticals. Ketner holds a Ph.D. in physical organic chemistry from the University of California-Santa Cruz. He is the coordinator of Bend Research’s charitable outreach programs and is involved in supporting science education in Central Oregon. Film Oregon Alliance, an economic development and media industry trade organization based in Bend, recently expanded its board of directors with the addition of Oscar award winning makeup artist Jeff Dawn. Dawn, who lives in Bend when not on location, is active in the film and television industry on a national and statewide basis. Dawn recently wrapped up running the makeup department for the last season of “Lost” in Hawaii. He has credits going back to 1983 and won an Oscar for his work on “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” in 1992. Gregg Patterson, CEO and chairman of Bend solar power company PV Powered, has been selected as one of the final 32 Pivotal Leaders from a list of more than 600 community-nominated and peer-selected individuals. Pivotal Leaders, a business network created by the venture capital firm Pivotal Investments, identifies and recognizes the top prospective business leaders in the Northwest and supports them in furthering the region’s leadership potential in the clean technology sector.

dren are younger, overscheduling them into after-school and summer programs robs them of the chance to accomplish things on their own, said Debbie Cox, managing director at J.P. Morgan Private Bank in Dallas. “They don’t have time to get into the community on their own,” she said. “Kids just don’t have time to get a job any more.” Hand in hand with this is parents’ obsessive focus on formal education. It often comes at the expense of what Cox calls social and financial education. One thing a tough summer job market could be good for is improving children’s social education: Volunteering is perfect for this and better than hanging out with friends. “They need to learn what it’s like to get up every morning and get to that job and help someone with something,” Cox said.

launch process, I thought we were dealing with families who had slackers,” she said. “The more we got into it, the more we realized that these were kids who are educated but are having a tough time getting into a purposeful path that will help them maintain their lifestyle.” She urges families to set two goals: Get children living without subsidies and put them on a career track. “Those families that treat their kids’ launch like any other endeavor are having the most success,” she said. This means parents and children need to discuss expectations. If financial help is involved, it cannot be infinite and that must be explained. But most of all, par-

ents have to realize there is more to be done than just educating their children. “Seriously middle-class families have said for a long time that the investment I’ve made in you is giving you a good education and then you’re on your own,” Godfrey said. “But now these families are realizing they have a great education, but yikes, it’s tough for them to be on their own. Now it’s not how much money you have, but how big is your network and how can you connect them.” Klontz said a good way to help is to pay a career counselor for guidance. “What isn’t helpful is, ‘Here’s a check,’” he said. “Once you get them on the parental dole, it’s hard to get them off.”

Christy McLeod

said he and Cecil are turning the situation into an opportunity. Along with the black material that’s still available, Wachs said they now plan to buy a gray vinyl-covered polyester and paint reflective lettering on it. “It’s a really cool opportunity for us, and I’m really psyched,” said Wachs, 52. Cecil, who said the company sells around 100 bags each month, said this situation shows how connected the entire world is nowadays. “Even an oil spill in the gulf can impact our little business here in Bend,” he said. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

Rod Ketner

Retail Continued from B3 “Retailers that were weak coming into the recession or were overladen with debt were wiped out in 2008 and 2009 and that trend is, for the most part, behind us, and we’re seeing that here in Bend.” The city’s retail vacancy fell to 10.9 percent in the first quarter from 12.4 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009, according to a recent vacancy survey from Compass. It was the third consecutive quarterly decline in the city’s retail vacancy rate. However, vacancies for office space and industrial space in Bend remain high, coming in at 20.8 percent and 16.6 percent, respectively, according to Compass. Furniture Outlet is not a national retailer — it’s based in Bend and locally owned — but the company shares the same optimism, said Lance Billow, manager of the company’s new South Third Street store. It also recently opened stores in Prineville and John Day.

“We keep our prices as low as we can and move everything on volume,” Billow said. “It sounds cliché, but it works.” Billow said the former Benjamin’s site is an excellent location that is easily accessible to its customers in Sunriver and other communities in south Deschutes County. It also benefits from being across the street from Walmart, “because everyone knows where that is,” Billow said. And Furniture Outlet got a good deal on the lease, he said. “It’s good for the landlord, too,” he added. “It’s better than having an empty building.” Powderly agreed that attractive lease rates are helping spur the market. “The vacant spaces are being filled by those companies that realize that (now) is a great opportunity to negotiate excellent lease rates and terms, and so those spaces are being filled at lower rental rates than the previous tenants that occupied that space,” Powderly said. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@bendbulletin.com.

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Good help So what is the right way to help a child struggling to find a job or a career? Godfrey said it could be difficult to get children started, or what she calls “launched.” “A year ago, when we started to do fairly serious work on the

David J Bishop Financial Advisor 1020 SW Indian Ave, Suite 103, Redmond 541-923-8848 1-800-441-9902

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Meet Fire Code Standards and Weed Control for vacant lots, fields, and pastures

G.A. Mowing 541-923-5776 or 541-410-3833 (cell)

The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.10 +.04 +.17 AbdAustEq 9.91 +.03 +.62 AbdnChile 17.32 +.20 +.79 AbdGlbInc 10.89 +.03 +.17 AbdnIndo 10.36 -.03 +.46 AdeonaPh 1.27 -.01 +.05 AdvPhot .50 +.00 ... Advntrx rs 2.23 +.30 +.34 AlexcoR g 3.27 -.02 +.22 AlldDefen d3.22 -.73 -.42 AlldNevG 19.14 -.26 +1.55 AlmadnM g .99 -.03 -.02 AlphaPro 2.09 -.05 +.06 AmApparel d1.58 -.10 +.03 AmLorain n 3.12 +.06 +.14 AmO&G 6.44 -.07 +.81 Anooraq g 1.23 +.02 +.14 AntaresP 1.66 +.06 +.14 ApolloG g d.27 -.01 -.02 ArcadiaRs .60 -.02 -.10 Argan d10.77 +.03 +.45 Augusta g 2.00 +.16 +.25 Aurizon g 4.87 +.03 +.08 BMB Munai d.72 +.02 -.02 BakerM 36.26 -1.53 -.12 Ballanty 8.20 +.66 +.49 Banro g 1.88 +.06 +.03 BarcUBS36 37.75 -.44 +.60 BarcGSOil d22.11 -.22 +1.18 BrcIndiaTR 60.82 -.14 +.87

BioTime n BlkMuIT2 BlkMunvst BlkS&PQEq BootsCoots BovieMed BritATob CAMAC n CdnSEn g CanoPet CapGold n CaracoP Cardero g CardiumTh CelSci CFCda g CentGold g ChaseCorp CheniereEn CheniereE ChiArmM ChiGengM ChMarFd n ChinaMda ChNEPet n ChinNutri n ChinaPhH n ChinaNet ClaudeR g CloughGEq ClghGlbOp Cohen&Co

6.50 13.95 9.65 11.12 2.95 d3.65 58.55 4.50 .66 1.11 3.54 5.26 1.12 .51 .53 15.04 49.54 11.69 2.83 16.04 4.35 1.44 5.93 13.25 5.50 3.22 2.99 4.11 1.13 12.63 11.54 4.55

+.07 +.78 +.07 +.22 -.09 +.13 ... +.12 -.01 ... +.09 -.51 -.54 +.80 +.21 +.78 +.01 +.05 +.04 +.14 +.10 +.38 -.08 -.59 +.02 +.02 +.01 +.04 -.01 -.03 +.06 +.47 -.21 +1.05 +.26 -.02 -.13 +.23 -.63 +.64 -.18 +.27 -.12 -.16 -.04 +.31 ... +1.07 ... -.12 +.06 -.08 +.03 +.19 +.58 +.73 -.01 +.12 -.09 +.49 -.03 +.35 -.09 -.38

CompTch u3.17 Contango 50.28 Continucre 3.87 CornstProg 6.73 CornerstStr 10.36 Corriente g 8.10 CrSuisInco 3.34 CrSuiHiY 2.84 Crossh glf .14 Crystallx g u.63 CubicEngy .89 Cytomed .63 DWS RE II 1.32 DWS REst 4.51 DejourE g .31 DenisnM g 1.35 DuneEn rs .25 EV CAMu 12.54 EV LtdDur 15.59 EVMuniBd 13.23 ElixirGam .27 EllswthFd 6.69 eMagin 3.64 EmersnR h 1.74 EndvrInt 1.37 EndvSilv g 3.57 EngyInco 23.20 EntreeGold 2.18 EvgIncAdv 8.99 EverMultSc 14.24 EvgUtilHi d10.31 EvolPetrol 5.65

-.12 -.23 +.37 +.28 ... +.35 -.11 +.03 ... +.05 -.06 +.02 ... +.12 -.08 +.17 ... -.01 +.09 +.13 -.04 -.08 +.08 -.03 -.02 +.04 -.17 +.10 +.01 +.03 ... +.09 -.00 -.03 +.05 +.13 +.14 +.31 +.01 +.27 +.02 +.04 +.02 +.31 +.04 +.01 -.02 +.05 -.11 -.01 +.02 +.15 ... +1.44 -.03 -.04 -.03 +.31 +.04 +.30 +.07 +.42 +.10 +.50

ExeterR gs 7.54 Express-1 1.40 FT WindEn d10.78 FiveStar 3.55 FrkStPrp 12.35 FrTmpLtd 12.18 Fronteer g 5.65 FullHseR 3.09 GSE Sy 4.91 GabGldNR 16.10 GascoEngy .36 Gastar grs 4.21 GenMoly 3.76 GenesisEn 17.68 GeoGloblR 1.23 Geokinetics d5.33 GeoPetro .52 GlblScape 1.74 GoldRsv g .74 GoldStr g 4.25 GormanR 28.35 GrahamCp 16.69 GranTrra g 5.28 GrtBasG g 1.67 GreenHntr 1.13 GpoSimec 7.36 HQ SustM 4.90 HSBC CTI d8.11 HearUSA 1.05 Hemisphrx .66 HooperH .83 Hyperdyn 1.02

-.07 +1.17 +.03 ... -.28 -.25 +.04 +.18 -.04 -.05 -.03 +.29 -.08 +.34 -.02 +.23 +.22 +.28 +.12 +.63 -.01 -.01 +.06 +.31 -.04 +.39 -.47 +.03 +.15 +.24 -.03 +.06 +.02 +.05 +.05 +.13 +.01 -.07 -.04 +.20 -.94 +.97 -.41 +1.31 -.12 +.39 -.01 -.03 -.01 +.19 -.25 +.13 -.02 -.09 ... +.17 +.02 +.08 +.01 -.01 -.01 +.01 -.01 -.03

IGI Labs ImpOil gs IndiaGC IndiaGC wt InovioPhm InterlknG IntTower g Inuvo IsoRay Iteris JavelinPh KeeganR g KimberR g KodiakO g LGL Grp LaBarg LadThalFn Libbey LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LucasEngy MAG Slv g MadCatz g MagHRes Metalico Metalline MetroHlth MdwGold g MincoG g Minefnd g MinesMgt NIVS IntT

1.00 38.19 1.21 d.07 1.16 .46 7.19 d.17 1.16 1.57 1.69 5.62 .92 3.24 12.38 11.94 1.47 14.03 9.90 .75 1.67 6.81 .38 4.85 4.96 .62 4.05 .64 .96 8.84 2.14 2.61

-.01 -.81 +.01 +.01 -.02 -.03 +.01 +.02 -.03 +.01 +.14 -.20 +.02 -.02 -.03 -.08 +.04 -.12 ... -.02 -.04 -.12 -.01 +.05 +.02 -.04 ... -.01 ... -.33 -.05 +.13

+.03 +.34 +.03 +.02 +.02 -.06 +.57 +.01 +.02 -.05 -.11 -.03 -.03 +.10 +.88 +.55 +.17 +.21 -.01 +.07 +.08 +.48 +.01 +.85 +.28 -.03 +.18 +.03 +.10 +.26 -.09 +.36

NeoStem NB IncOp NBRESec Neuralstem Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g NuvDiv2 NuvDiv3 NvInsDv NMuHiOp NuvREst NvTxAdFlt Oilsands g OpkoHlth OrchidsPP OrienPap n OrionEngy OrsusXel OverhillF Pacholder PacRim Palatin ParaG&S ParkNatl PhrmAth PionDvrsHi

Biggest mutual funds 2.80 -.10 -.17 6.75 +.03 +.27 3.51 -.03 +.14 2.97 +.09 +.20 3.01 +.04 +.21 .09 -.00 -.01 6.07 -.04 +.77 3.45 -.07 +.30 7.39 -.06 +.54 14.43 -.18 +1.86 2.95 -.05 +.12 7.17 -.19 +.45 14.68 -.02 +.10 14.09 +.02 +.14 14.45 +.11 +.18 12.53 +.18 +.25 9.13 -.09 +.22 2.49 +.05 +.20 .72 -.04 -.04 1.98 -.07 -.05 13.72 -.22 -.23 9.24 +.11 +.36 3.71 +.13 +.41 d.31 +.01 -.04 6.14 -.10 +.03 7.70 +.08 +.31 .21 +.01 +.01 .26 +.01 +.03 1.55 -.09 -.01 64.70 -1.32 -2.38 1.49 -.01 +.07 18.84 +.14 +.59

PionDrill 5.93 PlatGpMet 2.14 PolyMet g 1.83 ProceraNt .49 ProlorBio 5.28 Protalix 6.07 PudaCoal n 9.40 Quaterra g 1.30 QuestCap g 1.30 RadientPh 1.19 RaeSyst .77 ReavesUtl 18.14 RegeneRx d.34 Rentech 1.05 RexahnPh 1.44 Richmnt g 5.00 Rubicon g 3.50 SamsO&G .60 ScolrPh .88 SeabGld g 34.61 Senesco .56 SinoHub n 2.85 Spansion n d15.95 StreamGSv 5.87 SulphCo .33 Talbots wt 4.00 TandyLthr 5.30 TanzRy g 4.63 Taseko 5.31 Tengsco .44 TianyinPh 2.95 TimberlnR 1.03

-.03 +.40 -.06 +.12 -.02 +.04 +.06 +.07 +.08 +.31 -.10 ... -.07 +.45 +.02 +.03 +.01 +.04 -.04 +.04 +.01 +.06 -.28 +.45 -.02 +.00 -.02 +.04 +.06 +.16 -.06 +.38 -.09 +.27 +.01 +.02 -.02 -.14 -.53 +4.43 +.01 +.03 +.15 +.13 -.15 -.95 +.07 +.06 ... -.02 ... ... -.40 ... -.06 +.16 -.10 +.39 +.01 +.00 -.04 -.05 -.04 -.11

TrnsatlPt n TravelCtrs TriValley Tucows g TwoHrbInv UMH Prop UQM Tech US Geoth US Gold Uluru Univ Insur Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn Uroplasty VKAdM2 VKSelS VangMega VangTotW VantageDrl Versar VirnetX VistaGold WalterInv Westmrld WidePoint WT DrfChn WT Drf Bz WizzardSft Xenonics YM Bio g ZBB Engy

3.20 2.91 1.03 .64 8.56 9.10 3.44 d.84 3.95 .14 d4.73 .95 1.56 2.57 5.03 12.08 11.95 37.39 39.94 1.58 3.27 6.13 1.90 16.30 10.37 .86 24.80 26.17 .20 d.40 1.34 .50

-.02 +.04 +.02 -.00 -.03 -.28 +.19 +.00 -.03 +.00 -.10 +.03 +.15 -.10 +.03 -.01 +.12 -.47 -.76 -.01 +.02 +.21 +.04 +.10 -.49 ... -.03 +.02 ... -.01 -.01 -.02

+.17 +.14 ... -.01 +.33 +.37 -.23 +.07 +.45 -.01 +.02 +.06 +.14 -.10 -.02 +.11 +.12 +.05 -.06 +.07 -.12 +.43 +.04 +.11 -.25 +.09 -.04 +.48 -.01 +.04 +.01 ...

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapInBldA p American Funds A: CapWGrA p Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n American Funds A: IncoFdA p American Funds A: InvCoAA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p American Funds A: WshMutA p Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk American Funds A: NewPerA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n American Funds A: FundInvA p Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n American Funds A: BalA p

IB LG XC LG BL GL SP BL LC SP LV IL LV IL GL IB LC BL XC BL

128,736 67,975 65,222 59,228 57,634 55,402 51,508 50,350 49,825 48,636 43,365 39,521 39,349 38,799 32,886 32,666 32,183 31,694 31,416 30,732

-0.1 -8.1 -8.0 -6.6 -6.4 -10.1 -8.0 -5.8 -8.6 -8.0 -9.4 -10.0 -8.0 -11.4 -8.9 -0.1 -8.5 -5.5 -8.0 -5.5

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

+13.3/C +17.1/E +25.0/B +22.1/B +11.6/E +11.5/E +22.6/A +20.4/A +16.5/E +22.7/A +24.2/A +10.5/C +19.0/D +16.0/A +16.7/C +13.0/C +18.0/D +24.5/A +25.1/B +17.7/C

+42.0/A +10.5/B +4.9/C +21.9/A +13.3/C +20.6/A +0.5/A +12.1/C +4.1/B +1.1/A -6.1/D +29.6/A -1.9/C +18.1/B +24.7/A +40.3/A +17.5/A +20.6/A +5.4/C +9.7/C

1,000,000 250 3,000 2,500 250 250 3,000 250 250 5,000,000 2,500 250 250 2,500 250 1,000,000 250 1,000 100,000 250

Percent Load

NAV

NL 11.10 5.75 26.33 NL 27.25 NL 57.25 5.75 44.83 5.75 30.38 NL 100.68 5.75 15.00 5.75 24.62 NL 100.02 NL 93.77 5.75 34.25 5.75 23.76 NL 28.93 5.75 23.77 NL 11.10 5.75 31.36 4.25 2.01 NL 27.26 5.75 16.06

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

DISCLOSE Act’s arbitrary gag

T

he so-called DISCLOSE Act is, and does, a number of things, not all of them good. Sponsored by Sen. Ron Wyden and several colleagues,

the proposed act responds to the controversial U.S. Supreme Court decision that frees up corporations and unions to spend more money on elections. In part, the act is an attempt to grind out political mileage by flogging a number of popular targets, including large corporations and the five Supreme Court justices who prevailed. As Wyden proclaimed in a press release earlier this month, the act will “ensure that a citizen’s voice doesn’t get buried by new and larger mountains of corporate cash.” There’s nothing inherently wrong with such politicking, of course. And to the extent that the legislation’s provisions reflect its acronym, the DISCLOSE Act makes sense. Shedding light on political expenditures allows voters to consider the interests of contributors while honoring the Constitution’s free speech protections. In at least one respect, however, the legislation actually belies its name. It would prohibit all but the smallest

companies that do business with the federal government from spending on federal campaigns. We understand the desire to eliminate any kind of financial link between federal policymakers and beneficiaries of federal largesse, even if that link is as indirect as supportive advertising. But gagging companies that do at least $50,000 worth of business with Uncle Sam is arbitrary and unfair. Given the size of the federal budget, one can only imagine how many corporations would be affected by the DISCLOSE Act’s contractor provision. Meanwhile, unions would continue to enjoy the spending freedom granted recently by the Supreme Court. If this provision were broken out in a separate bill, Wyden and company would have to call it the MUZZLE Act.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s Note: The following editori-

als, which appeared on Aug. 19, 1990, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

Not that dumb The powers that be in Iran apparently have decided Iraq is the greater of the two Great Satans in the world. It made clear the other day it would not side with Saddam Hussein in his ever-hotter war of words with the United States. That news would be no great surprise if it had come from anywhere but Iran. After all, the two nations were at war — and a particularly bloody war, at that — for eight years or more, and Iran did not come out the winner. Just as important, Iranians generally have been quick to point out they’re Persians, not Arabs, and while they share a religion with Iraq they share almost nothing else. Iran’s made clear, for now at least, that it will take much more than the freeing of a few thousand political (aren’t some of them POWs?) prisoners from Iraqi jails to get it involved in this particular battle.

Who’s racist? Actors’ Equity, the union to which virtually all professional stage actors in this country belong, found itself in hot water the other day. The union leadership, you see, refused briefly to allow a British actor to join so he could repeat his London role as lead character of the play, “Miss Saigon.” Jonathan Pryce, you see, is Caucasian, and the role he played was that of a Eurasian pimp. That action prompted Charlton Heston to resign from Actors’ Equity and has drawn criticism from a variety of sources. The critics are right. As Heston pointed out, if roles were to be assigned solely on the basis of race, Laurence Olivier never would have been permitted to play Othello; only Jewish actors could play Shylock and

he, Heston, never would have been given the role of Moses. Acting jobs, like most other jobs in this country, should be filled on the basis of talent or skill, rather than the shape of the actor’s eyes or the color of his skin — no matter what color that happens to be.

Just cut down Those of us struggling to keep up with the latest medical news received a new blow last week when we found out the unsaturated fat in our margarine may be as bad for us as the saturated stuff in our butter. It may be we’ll have to go to safflower oil on the morning toast, and even that’s certain to be suspect if scientists are given long enough to study it. Really, only a computer can keep track, from week to week and even day to day, what’s on the current dietary hit list. One thing is clear, however. If we eat the way we should — limit all kinds of fat, reduce salt, and so forth — an occasional pat of butter won’t kill us. Moderation, in other words, should give most of us the freedom to eat the truly tasty things from time to time.

Like old times Just in case you consider the state of the world to be near an all-time low, think back a bit to the early 1960s. That was when the Kingston Trio, a folk group, put out a little ditty that went, in part, like this: “They’re rioting in Africa; they’re starving in Spain ...” and so forth. The song seems almost prescient in some respects, what with its references to strife in Iran and the like. The thrust of the song, if we remember correctly, was that the world is a pretty miserable place, and if natural disaster doesn’t get you, well, “Man’s been endowed with a mushroom-shaped cloud.” It all sounds depressingly familiar, doesn’t it, even almost 30 years later?

My Nickel’s Worth Oregon is better “Loss of Jobs” (May 12) responds to the Bulletin May 3 editorial “Measures 66 and 67 taking their toll?” The letter blames Rep. Judy Stiegler’s legislative support of 66 and 67 for the move of a Sisters company to Ohio. Both measures were voted into law by Oregon voters who understood funding education, health care and public safety was necessary. The May 3 editorial claims the tax burden imposed by Measures 66 and 67 hurts companies like the one sold in Sisters and contributed to the buyer’s decision to relocate in Ohio. Ohio, business tax haven? Let’s see! Visiting tax websites yielded: A 2010 State Business Tax Climate Index ranking Ohio as one of “ten states whose tax systems are most inhospitable to economic growth.” The ranking is compiled using a state’s entire tax structure. Thirty eight states, including Ohio, tax all possible revenue sources. Twelve, including Oregon, do not. Their State Business Tax Climate Index, 20062010, gives Ohio a score of 4.04/rank 47 and Oregon a score of 5.59/ rank 14. The higher the score, the more favorable a state’s tax system for business. Another, a 2009 tax chart, state and local business taxes by major tax type, lists Ohio’s state and local business taxes: property, sales, excise, gross receipts (0.26 percent on excess of $1 million); corporate income, individual income tax on business income, unemployment insurance and license/other, for a total business tax of $21.2 billion, of which $3.8 billion is sales tax. Facts, not opinions, show Oregon outcompetes Ohio! Harriett Heisey Bend

Obama and illegal aliens Obama’s derisive remarks about Arizona reveal that he does not represent

all Americans. Only those who agree with his socialistic agenda get his support. He’s had no intention of closing the border because no power or control will be gained and Obama doesn’t engineer any situation unless he gets heaps of positive attention. When Obama is done denigrating the governor as if she counts for nothing, mark my word that amnesty for the illegals will be served soon after. I like every Mexican I know, but, like our Mexican daughter-in-law says, “Multiply those friends by 15 million and you can’t say, ‘but my friends shouldn’t have to leave the country.’” She worked her way to full citizenship, but only after becoming bilingual, and she resents the fact that Obama allows everyone else to get first in line and they never have to earn their way nor learn English. She suggests that there be a sign-up sheet for those who slip over the border from now on to head directly for Los Angeles since they want all the illegals and don’t care if they break the law. Carol Hoffman Redmond

Potholes first Three hundred sixty-seven thousand dollars is a lot of money for the Deschutes Forest supervisor and his transportation manager to spend on a study to see if a 12-year-old kid would want to ride a bus to Elk Lake to fish all day. Another reason for the grant is to see if we should try to shrink the number of cars and their carbon footprint, to reduce the need to build bigger parking lots and to help people who don’t want to drive “way out there.” It’s obvious that today a kid of any age only wants to bankrupt his parents with expenses for iPods and monthly fees, not fishing tackle. Also, the forest supervisor should have his transport manager study their current operations

and look at the access roads into existing campgrounds like the one at North Twin Lake. The dirt road is so bad that when a car’s left front wheel rises on a big bump, the right hind wheel sinks in a deep pothole. That’s one of the reasons people don’t want to drive “way out there.” So, there’s no reason for big parking lots anyhow, and any carbon footprints are inside potholes. Gary Will La Pine

Stop spending An “unsightly” power pole was installed in 2007 southwest of Bend. The primary beneficiary (a resort) requesting the power line move refuses to share in fixing this “in the current [economic] cycle.” The Forest Service and the electric utility are now supposed to pay the $700,000 required for the pole’s relocation. With all U.S. governmental entities operating at mind-numbing levels of debt, must noncritical (borderline trivial) spending even be considered? Supposedly we want lower taxes and reduced government spending, while private enterprises (such as power cooperatives) struggle to maintain staffs and services. Do the agitators for this not understand that it’s a lot of money, or do they subscribe to Sen. Everett Dirksen’s belief: “A billion here, a billion there, and pretty soon you’re talking about real money?” We must begin living a leaner (emaciated?) ethic: When in debt, the first thing to do is stop spending. The alternative is slow, painful financial strangulation. Unhappily, it may be that the taxpaying public is too ignorant or, even worse, too self-indulgent to consider this. We must still ask: Why are the electric utility and we (the taxpayers) obligated to pay for this relocation if the resort owners are not? William Walker Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

County’s terms put facility out of Bethlehem Inn’s reach By Gwenn Wysling Bulletin guest columnist

T

he headline for a May 6 Bulletin article boldly stated, “Shelter won’t buy building from county,” with the subheading “Bethlehem Inn board has no plans to repay county, city for $2M facility.” Though the story itself was accurate, the assumptions built into the headline do not reflect the reality of the situation. It is not that the Bethlehem Inn emergency shelter won’t buy the facility; it is that the Bethlehem Emergency Shelter can’t successfully buy the facility. And it would be more accurate to say the old Highway 97 Motel cost $2 million than it was to declare that it is worth $2 million. And though it may seem a quibble to some, it is exactly those details that have underlined the on again-off again nego-

tiations with Deschutes County over the purchase for the past three years. The process of negotiation has been complex. Most recently, the board of the Bethlehem Inn attempted to purchase the property at the full asking price with a 10-year payment period, not by means of a capital campaign but by actually seeking financing. The county insisted on a three-year term. Our research indicates that any attempt to borrow that amount of money and repay the debt in three years would be met with failure. A failure of that magnitude would do irreparable harm to the organization. Without any seeming way to come to an equitable agreement, the board decided to accept the lease option presented by county officials earlier this year. At this juncture, failure to reach an agreement does not

IN MY VIEW mean both parties have not worked hard. We are all constrained by the art of the possible. I wish to be clear: Both the county and the city of Bend have been very kind to the Bethlehem Inn organization over the entire 10 years of our existence. From the early days when a concerned group of volunteer congregants banded together to offer seasonal emergency shelter at church halls, to today’s Bethlehem Inn, which offers safe, secure and accountable emergency shelter year round, we have depended on the active support of local government. It was the recognition by local governments of the need to address the issue of homelessness leading to the

purchase of the facility back in 2007. For that we are grateful. But we must make decisions based on the realities of today, not the assumptions of yesterday. What was true in 2007 is not necessarily true in 2010. Even though there are encouraging signs of economic growth, it is important to recognize those least able to weather this storm suffer the most. The current unemployment rate for Central Oregon is still in double digits. Unemployment insurance is running out. It will still be some time before the need for emergency shelter becomes less critical. The Bethlehem Inn would not be able to accomplish what it does without the resources and staff of many other non-profits that serve this area. Central Oregon is a remarkable place, not only because of its natu-

ral beauty, but also because of the people who live here. Regardless of where the Bethlehem Inn eventually resides, we will continue on our mission to provide services to the most vulnerable members of the community. People experiencing homelessness are someone’s mother, father, sister or brother. Regardless of circumstance or history, they deserve a chance to reengage with the wider community. I am proud to be a member of an organization that is there for those needing help as well those wishing to help. We remain grateful to all those who have made this organization a vital strand in the web of community we so dearly love. Gwenn Wysling is executive director of the Bethlehem Inn.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 C7

O    D Gary Coleman dead at 42 N David Norman Maxey, of Prineville Nov. 22, 1961 - May 24, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Private - at later date.

Dian Lynn Larsen, of Prineville Dec. 23, 1957 - May 26, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Celebration of Life in Mrytle Point will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Doernbecher Children’s Hospital Foundation, Mail Stop 20, PO Box 4100, Portland, OR 97208-9908 (503) 294-7101 or (800) 800-9583 or Shriners Hospital for Children, 3101 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Schools Continued from C1 “And then we have a dualregulatory system where we have things that have to happen at the federal level, and then we have state regulations and requirements.” Smith said with rules coming from both the federal government and the state, her office must often adapt. For example, in the late 1990s the Legislature required the department to begin producing its report cards, which show how each school statewide is performing in a variety of categories. Later, the federal government began requiring states to produce adequate yearly progress reports for each school. Those reports showed some of the same measures, but included other categories as well. “Sometimes it’s confusing,” Smith said. This year, the state changed its report cards again. Where there were once five categories a school could fall into, there are now three. As a result, schools can’t compare this year’s report cards to previous years. “It’s particularly hard on our school districts, especially the smaller ones that don’t have the staff to dedicate to collecting data and processing data and validating the data,” she said. With a new administration in the White House, the federal government’s way of measuring student success could change again soon. “Especially when our total goal is to educate these children, to work with each and every kid and make sure they’re getting what they need from the system,” Smith said. “It’s challenging to do

‘Diff’rent Strokes’ star suffered fatal head injury in fall By Anita Gates New York Times News Service

Gary Coleman, the former child star of the hit television series “Diff’rent Strokes,” who dealt with a well-publicized string of financial and personal difficulties after the show ended, died Friday in Provo, Utah. He was 42 and lived in Santaquin, a small town near Provo. Coleman was taken to Utah Valley Regional Medical Center on Wednesday after injuring his head in a fall. He suffered a brain hemorrhage and died after being removed from life support, a hospital spokeswoman, Janet Frank, said. Coleman had been hospitalized twice this year with seizurerelated problems and had been in and out of hospitals all his life, receiving treatment for congenital kidney disease. The treatment was said to have stunted his growth. Coleman, who was 4 feet 8 inches tall, had a kidney transplant at 5 and a second one when he was 16. “Diff’rent Strokes,” seen on NBC from 1978 to 1985 and on ABC from 1985 to 1986, was a comedy about a wealthy white New Yorker (Conrad Bain) who adopts two underprivileged black brothers, Arnold (played by Coleman) and Willis (Todd Bridges). Coleman made his character the little-boy version of America’s sweetheart. “When he first strutted into our living rooms in 1978,” Bella Stumbo wrote in The Los Angeles Times Magazine in 1990, Coleman “looked like a lovable, smart-mouthed 6-year-old thrilled to be playing some new game.”

‘He was sunshine’ Viewers loved watching him make short work of bigotry and pretension, Stumbo continued. “He was sunshine, contagious joy,” she wrote, and “such was his natural comedic gift that he was hailed as a child genius by veterans like Lucille Ball and Bob Hope.” But there was an undercurrent to the show’s portrayals. “At the time, Arnold struck audiences as an endlessly en-

that when we’re spending a lot of time” on ever-changing targets. The graduation rates change was required by the federal government, with the state now measuring the number of students who graduate with a regular diploma in four years, while in the past the measurement only included a one-year period. Graduation rates were altered so that, in theory, all states will be able to see how they stack up against one another. By 2011, all states are supposed to use the same four-year measurement. But whether those statistics will be comparable is still unclear.

Different states “States are in various stages of implementation,” Smith said, noting she’d thought all the fouryear rates would be the same but some states were calculating them differently. “That (rate) is going to be the same but some states like Virginia are not including some students. ... So that bumps up their rate.” For Bend High Principal H.D. Weddel, being a longtime educator means learning to roll with the changes. “After you’ve taught or been in the world of education for 30 years, you learn to be a bit more patient. Instead of jumping right on it, you sift through and see where you should go,” he said. Weddel said the graduation rate change was a good example. While the state changed the way it is measured, he said he won’t change the way he educates kids. “I’m not going to not work any harder for the kid that takes (four) years than the kid who takes (five to graduate). It makes no difference to me,” he said. “It’s

Monical Almeida / New York Times News Service

Actor Gary Coleman poses for a portrait in Los Angeles in 2003. Coleman, who starred in the sitcom “Diff’rent Strokes,” died Friday, two days after being hospitalized in a Salt Lake City hospital with a head injury. dearing trickster figure, whose Harlem-based sensitivity to being hustled had been reduced to a sweetie-pie affectation: ‘What you talkin’ about, Willis?’ ” Virginia Heffernan wrote in The New York Times in 2006, quoting Coleman’s signature line. “Arnold was supposed to be shrewd and nobody’s fool, but also misguided; after learning his lessons, he was easily tamed and cuddled.” Heffernan called the characterization a form of latter-day minstrelsy. Looking back at his childhood, Coleman saw himself as having been used. He sued his parents and his former manager in 1989, accusing them of misappropriating his trust fund. In 1999 he filed for bankruptcy protection. (During the same period, his young “Diff’rent Strokes” co-stars were having problems of their own. Bridges was tried on charges of attempted murder in 1990 but acquitted. Dana Plato, who played the daughter of Conrad Bain’s character, was arrested at least

like, ‘OK, state, go ahead and change, but we’re not changing how we do business with kids.’ ” While the schools are careful to comply with the changes, Weddel said, it can be difficult to adjust. He pointed to a change in graduation requirements that will force students, among other things, to take more English and science, and more and higher math classes, in order to graduate. It was left up to him to figure out how to ensure the school employed enough people to teach those additional math classes. “Sometimes it’s a matter of first trying to figure out what it is the state wants,” Weddel said. “Sometimes the state’s timing isn’t our timing, and so we have to figure that gap out a little bit. And I know that the state’s intentions are right, but we have to make those intentions work in the real world.” Before the new graduation requirements, there were the Certificate of Initial Mastery and the Certificate of Advanced Mastery, which were optional programs designed to help students be more competitive in the work force. Now students will be required to have career-related learning experiences, as well as provide essential skills. “We’re good soldiers and we’re going to do it,” Weddel said. “We’ll figure it out. What we have to keep remembering is that those things may be frustrating but the outcome is we want more kids to read and read at higher levels, and that’s the pure outcome we want.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

twice and died of a drug overdose in 1999.) Beginning in the 1990s, Coleman was arrested several times and charged with assault and disorderly conduct. A year ago he was arrested on domestic violence charges. He and his wife, the former Shannon Price, appeared on the reality show “Divorce Court” in 2008 but remained together.

Boy had ‘chemistry with the camera’ Gary Wayne Coleman was born on Feb. 8, 1968, in Zion, Ill., a small city in the state’s northeastern corner. He was adopted as an infant by W.G. Coleman, a forklift operator, and his wife, Edmonia Sue, a nurse practitioner. As a young boy, he was cast in a commercial for a Chicago bank, offering a toy lion as a promotion. “You should have a Hubert doll,” the boy told viewers. Years later, Bob Greene, then a

Fire District Continued from C1 If voters approve the annexation, the fire department would join the fire protection district and receive a set $1.75 tax rate, essentially giving fire services dedicated funding. The apparent distrust emerged because the city’s maximum tax rate would have remained $6.16 even if voters approved the annexation. That left open the possibility that the council could raise taxes without going to voters. To fix that, the city added a charter amendment to the November ballot. The charter amendment, if passed, would bar the council from raising taxes above $4.14 per $1,000 of assessed value. The amendment is designed, in part, to show voters that the annexation won’t cost taxpayers more, according to Mayor George Endicott. If the fire department is annexed into the fire protection district, the city will lower its tax rate to $4.41. The charter amendment will only go into effect if the

Shooting Continued from C1 “I think eventually he’ll be a suspect,” Smith said. Police say Weaselhead is about 5 feet 7 inches tall, 175 pounds, and has black hair and brown eyes. He has a tattoo that reads “5150” on his chest and the words “weasel head” on his back. The FBI and Warm Springs

Chicago Tribune columnist, recalled Coleman’s impact in that local ad campaign: “If there is chemistry with the camera, six words can make you a star.” He was spotted by an agent for the television producer Norman Lear and brought to Hollywood for a project that never came to fruition, a new version of the “Our Gang” comedies. Instead he was cast in “Diff’rent Strokes” and was soon earning thousands of dollars per episode. At his peak he earned $3 million a year. But after the series ended, his career spiraled downward. He made 20 or so television appearances over the next the two decades, as well as a handful of feature films. (His last was the 2009 “Midgets vs. Mascots,” a broad comedy.) But he also tried earning a living outside show business, even working as a security guard at one point. In 2003 he was one of 135 candidates in the carnival-like California gubernatorial recall election; he came

annexation is also approved. “It’s terrible to say, but people didn’t trust us to reduce it and not turn right around and raise it again,” Endicott said. City Counselor Jay Patrick said the charter amendment also would force the city to spend within its means. If the council knew it could easily raise taxes, that knowledge would make it difficult to stay on a disciplined budget, Patrick said. “We can’t just have an openended budget,” Patrick said. “It’s responsible for us to say we have $4.41 and that’s all we have, and let’s make that work.” A city’s general fund has several pressures and must fund departments across the city. Annexing the fire department to the district would remove its funding from those challenges, according to Chief Tim Moor. Service would not be affected, Moor said. With a set $1.75 per $1,000 of assessed value, Moor said the district would be able to operate without cutting services. In fact, he said, the move should ensure that the local fire services won’t be cut because of any future budget issues in

Police are leading the investigation with the help of the Oregon State Police, Madras Police Department and the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office. Smith and Steele said the case remains a top priority for their agencies. “We’re going until we find something,” Smith said. Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

in eighth, right after Larry Flynt, the publisher of Hustler. Coleman’s difficulties are parodied in the Tony Awardwinning musical “Avenue Q,” in which a character named Gary Coleman is the superintendent of a run-down building in an undesirable neighborhood. Coleman talked about suing the show’s producers but never did. His survivors include his wife and his parents, who were estranged from their son. His mother told The Associated Press that she had prayed that “nothing like this would happen before we could sit with Gary and Shannon and say, ‘We’re here and we love you.’ “We just didn’t want to push him,” she added. Coleman readily talked to interviewers about how unhappy his television success and its trappings had made him. “I would not give my first 15 years to my worst enemy,” he said in an AP interview in 2001. “And I don’t even have a worst enemy.”

the city. But, as the winter polling showed, the city and department still must convince people that the move will not cost taxpayers any more cash, Moor said. “Our biggest challenge, I feel, is educating people and making them aware we’re not raising taxes and the service level will remain the same,” Moor said. The charter amendment would guarantee that the tax rates for Redmond residents would increase only with their approval, Moor said. Just as the city would be limited from raising taxes, the fire protection district would need voter approval to raise taxes. Putting the charter amendment on the ballot was not legally required, but Moor thinks it was necessary if the annexation has any chance of passing. “If we didn’t have the charter amendment, I don’t think we’d be successful,” Moor said. “It reassures people their taxes won’t be increased.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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AT HOME Every Tuesday


W

C8 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 29 Today: Morning cloud cover, afternoon clearing, warmer.

HIGH Ben Burkel

65

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western Ruggs

Condon

64/41

60/40

67/40

53/34

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

67/40

61/30

Mitchell

Madras

Camp Sherman 60/30 Redmond Prineville 65/33 Cascadia 64/34 64/34 Sisters 63/32 Bend Post 65/33

62/32

53/21

62/30

Vancouver 59/49

Seattle

67/43

60/27

64/39

Idaho Falls

Redding

Elko

81/56

Christmas Valley

Reno

62/33 51/33

70/45

Isolated showers possible San Francisco 65/50 in the north today.



Crater Lake

56/36

61/33

62/32

Silver Lake

53/36

Boise

65/33



64/31

Chemult

Bend

74/43

Eastern

60/30

Helena

Grants Pass

61/31



53/39

Eugene

Chance for showers in the north today.



Missoula

66/48

Hampton Fort Rock



60/48

Portland

Burns

61/29

Crescent

56/23

Calgary



Salt Lake City 60/42



Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:39 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:26 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:40 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:42 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:39 a.m.

Last

June 4

New

First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Full

June 12 June 18 June 26

OREGON CITIES City

HIGH

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 54/51/0.18 . . . . . 59/45/pc. . . . . . 62/51/pc Baker City . . . . . . 55/36/0.01 . . . . . 57/34/sh. . . . . . 68/44/pc Brookings . . . . . . 60/45/0.00 . . . . . 58/48/pc. . . . . . 64/49/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 57/31/0.00 . . . . . 62/34/pc. . . . . . 69/44/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 62/41/0.00 . . . . . 67/43/pc. . . . . . 71/50/pc Klamath Falls . . . 58/36/0.00 . . . . . . 64/36/s. . . . . . 65/41/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 59/37/0.00 . . . . . 62/36/pc. . . . . . 67/42/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 56/29/0.00 . . . . . 61/29/pc. . . . . . 69/37/pc Medford . . . . . . . 65/48/0.00 . . . . . . 75/45/s. . . . . . 76/49/pc Newport . . . . . . . 61/50/0.00 . . . . . 59/45/pc. . . . . . 59/50/pc North Bend . . . . . . 57/48/NA . . . . . . 58/46/s. . . . . . 60/49/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 67/43/0.00 . . . . . . 68/42/c. . . . . . 75/48/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 58/48/0.02 . . . . . 67/43/sh. . . . . . 77/49/pc Portland . . . . . . . 57/49/0.10 . . . . . . 66/48/c. . . . . . 72/53/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 54/36/0.00 . . . . . 64/34/pc. . . . . . 74/46/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 57/34/0.00 . . . . . 65/33/pc. . . . . . 72/44/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 64/44/0.00 . . . . . 72/46/pc. . . . . . 73/49/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 60/45/0.00 . . . . . . 67/45/c. . . . . . 72/51/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 54/31/0.00 . . . . . 63/32/pc. . . . . . 71/44/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 66/53/0.00 . . . . . 66/46/pc. . . . . . 78/52/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 in 1983 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.30” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 in 1950 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.81” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.89” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.32” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.13 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.61 in 1990 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:31 a.m. . . . . . .6:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:39 a.m. . . . . .11:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:28 a.m. . . . . . .1:29 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:35 a.m. . . . . . .2:28 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:13 p.m. . . . . . .2:45 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:35 a.m. . . . . . .2:34 p.m.

2

LOW

67 49

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers. HIGH

64 44

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

WEDNESDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers.

67 43

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 67° Ontario • 29° La Pine

TUESDAY

Increasing cloud cover, chance of p.m. showLOW ers.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

63/30

62/29

LOW

72 45

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Brothers

Sunriver

60/28

HIGH

33

Central

La Pine

 Crescent Lake

LOW

38/32

63/31

Partly cloudy, significantly warmer, pleasant.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, chilly.

68/35

66/38

Oakridge Elk Lake

Chance for showers in the north today.

67/39

MONDAY

A few showers are anticipated in Oregon today, mainly to northwest of Bend.

STATE

Maupin

Government Camp

SUNDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 1.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . . 80-130 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 59/49

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Seattle 60/48

(in the 48 contiguous states):

S

S

Calgary 38/32

Squaw Valley, Calif.

• 3.23” Warroad, Minn.

San Francisco 65/50

Salt Lake City 60/42 Las Vegas Los Angeles 84/63 78/59

Honolulu 85/73

Tijuana 79/58

Phoenix 96/69

Cheyenne 69/41 Denver 85/49

Anchorage 68/48

Juneau 66/46

S

S

St. Paul 88/64

Green Bay 83/59

Des Moines 85/63 Chicago 81/64 Omaha 88/64

Oklahoma City 92/68 Albuquerque 89/58

S

S S

Quebec 75/50

Kansas City 87/65

Mazatlan 89/68

S

Thunder Bay 85/54

Bismarck 73/46

Chihuahua 89/63

La Paz 92/61

S

Winnipeg 78/48

Rapid City 65/44

Boise 64/39

Tucson, Ariz.

• 20°

S

Saskatoon 44/37

Billings 59/40

Portland 66/48

• 101°

S

Houston 95/71

Louisville 87/70

St. Louis 87/66

Charlotte 81/64

Nashville 86/69

Little Rock 90/67

Dallas 96/74

Halifax 69/46 Portland To ronto 73/54 80/56 Boston 75/61 Buffalo 80/60 New York Detroit 82/63 77/61 Philadelphia Columbus 76/65 85/61 Washington, D. C. 78/67

Birmingham 85/67 New Orleans 88/72

Atlanta 83/66

Orlando 89/70 Miami 89/75

Monterrey 93/72

FRONTS

T h e Associ a t e d Pres s fil e photo

Old growth Douglas fir trees stand along the Salmon River Trail on the Mt. Hood National Forest outside Zigzag. The Obama administration on Friday extended a moratorium on logging in remote backcountry sections of national forests known as roadless areas, where much of the country’s old growth is located, until pending court cases are resolved.

Obama extends moratorium on logging in roadless areas The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is extending for another year the moratorium on most logging and mining in millions of acres of remote and rugged sections of national forests. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said Friday from Washington, D.C., he wants to continue to give decisions on projects in roadless areas a higher level of scrutiny while waiting for federal courts to resolve the legal issues.

The idea of preserving roadless areas for wildlife habitat and clean water came out of the Clinton administration. The Bush administration tried to open them up to more logging and mining by giving states control. One federal appeals court has upheld the socalled 2001 Roadless Rule, while another is expected to rule soon. Under the old moratorium, Vilsack approved 21 projects in roadless areas.

Some sorry to see Abbey go PORTLAND — The timber industry in Oregon is sorry to see the head of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management switching jobs. Tom Partin of the American Forest Resource Council said the departure of Bob Abbey will “foul up” efforts to resolve problems over logging in Western Oregon lands managed by BLM. Abbey was tapped by the Obama administration to take over the Department of Interior’s Minerals Management Service. — The Associated Press

Woman indicted in granddaughter’s death The Associated Press PORTLAND — An Oregon woman has been indicted in the death of her granddaughter. Paramedics were called to the Gresham home of 58-year-old Carolyn Bellamy last October on

a report that her granddaughter was unresponsive after falling from bed. The child, Ariana Magathan, spent four days on life support before dying a week before her second birthday.

The state medical examiner determined the child died from blunt force trauma to the head. Gresham police Sgt. Rick Wilson says investigators don’t believe the injury was consistent with a fall from bed.

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .91/65/0.00 . . .93/69/s . . . .92/68/t Akron . . . . . . . . .83/61/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . . 86/63/s Albany. . . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . .76/58/sh . . . 85/58/s Albuquerque. . . .88/59/0.00 . 89/58/pc . . . 87/56/s Anchorage . . . . .71/46/0.00 . . .68/48/c . . 65/47/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .88/68/0.01 . . .83/66/t . . . .81/66/t Atlantic City . . . .71/53/0.01 . . .68/61/t . . . 83/65/s Austin . . . . . . . . .96/65/0.00 . . .94/67/s . . 94/67/pc Baltimore . . . . . .75/63/0.54 . . .77/63/t . . . 80/68/s Billings. . . . . . . . .59/48/0.02 . .59/40/sh . . 64/45/sh Birmingham . . . .89/66/0.07 . . .85/67/t . . . .83/68/t Bismarck . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .73/46/t . . . 64/44/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .64/39/c . . 71/48/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .69/57/0.00 . 75/61/pc . . . 85/62/s Bridgeport, CT. . .72/55/0.00 . . .65/60/t . . . 79/63/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .80/63/0.00 . 80/60/pc . . . 83/65/s Burlington, VT. . .78/50/0.00 . .78/56/sh . . 76/59/sh Caribou, ME . . . .70/44/0.00 . .71/47/sh . . 68/42/pc Charleston, SC . .89/68/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . 85/69/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .89/64/0.05 . . .81/64/t . . . 88/64/s Chattanooga. . . .89/69/0.00 . . .85/66/t . . . .86/66/t Cheyenne . . . . . .83/49/0.00 . 69/41/pc . . 66/41/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .81/64/s . . . .85/66/t Cincinnati . . . . . .86/67/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . 87/66/pc Cleveland . . . . . .80/65/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . 86/65/s Colorado Springs 90/55/0.00 . . .83/44/t . . 68/42/pc Columbia, MO . .84/66/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . . 87/65/s Columbia, SC . . .94/64/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . 90/64/pc Columbus, GA. . .92/67/0.00 . . .85/67/t . . 85/68/pc Columbus, OH. . .85/68/0.05 . 85/61/pc . . 87/67/pc Concord, NH . . . .77/45/0.00 . .75/52/sh . . . 88/56/s Corpus Christi. . .94/65/0.00 . 91/72/pc . . 92/71/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .96/75/0.00 . . .96/74/s . . 97/75/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 84/63/pc . . 86/66/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . .85/49/t . . 73/48/pc Des Moines. . . . .85/57/0.00 . . .85/63/s . . . .83/57/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . . 85/67/s Duluth . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . 78/51/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .95/69/0.00 . . .95/66/t . . . .95/66/t Fairbanks. . . . . . .78/51/0.00 . 81/51/pc . . 77/53/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .93/66/0.00 . 88/55/pc . . 73/49/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .74/37/0.00 . . .71/32/s . . . 73/35/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .87/58/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 85/63/s Green Bay. . . . . .80/48/0.00 . . .83/59/s . . . 85/59/s Greensboro. . . . .86/67/0.00 . . .78/66/t . . 89/66/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .72/63/0.00 . . .76/58/t . . . 84/62/s Hartford, CT . . . .80/56/0.00 . .72/57/sh . . . 87/60/s Helena. . . . . . . . .44/40/0.10 . .53/36/sh . . . 60/38/c Honolulu . . . . . . .83/69/0.00 . . .85/73/s . . . 87/72/s Houston . . . . . . .97/72/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 93/73/pc Huntsville . . . . . .92/68/0.18 . . .84/67/t . . . .83/66/t Indianapolis . . . .87/62/0.00 . 85/65/pc . . . .87/70/t Jackson, MS . . . .90/67/0.01 . . .87/67/t . . . .89/69/t Madison, WI . . . .83/50/0.00 . . .85/60/s . . 87/58/pc Jacksonville. . . . .91/66/0.00 . . .86/68/t . . . .86/68/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .77/47/0.00 . . .66/46/s . . . 60/46/s Kansas City. . . . .86/62/0.00 . . .87/65/s . . 89/64/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . 84/60/pc . . . 84/64/s Las Vegas . . . . . .81/60/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . . 90/67/s Lexington . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . 86/65/pc . . 86/63/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .87/52/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . .78/51/t Little Rock. . . . . .90/71/0.00 . 90/67/pc . . 91/71/pc Los Angeles. . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .78/59/s . . . 78/57/s Louisville . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . 87/70/pc . . . .89/71/t Memphis. . . . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .88/69/t . . . .89/71/t Miami . . . . . . . . .89/75/0.07 . . .89/75/t . . . .87/75/t Milwaukee . . . . .70/57/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . . 87/61/s Minneapolis . . . .85/61/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . 78/55/sh Nashville . . . . . . .87/68/0.01 . . .86/69/t . . . .86/67/t New Orleans. . . .93/72/0.00 . 88/72/pc . . . .90/75/t New York . . . . . .70/56/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . . 86/70/s Newark, NJ . . . . .69/57/0.00 . . .77/61/t . . . 87/69/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .77/64/0.23 . . .78/69/t . . . 90/72/s Oklahoma City . .91/66/0.00 . . .92/68/s . . 93/67/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .87/53/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . .79/55/t Orlando. . . . . . . .90/71/0.00 . . .89/70/t . . . .88/70/t Palm Springs. . . .87/61/0.00 . . .93/66/s . . . 99/69/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . 86/64/pc Philadelphia . . . .85/58/0.00 . . .76/65/t . . . 88/67/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .98/71/0.00 . . .96/69/s . . . 98/71/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .86/63/0.72 . 81/58/pc . . . 85/62/s Portland, ME. . . .71/46/0.00 . 73/54/pc . . 81/53/pc Providence . . . . .75/56/0.00 . 73/58/pc . . . 87/61/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .78/66/t . . . 91/67/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . . .65/44/t . . . 67/43/c Savannah . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .87/68/t . . 87/68/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . . 79/49/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .53/50/0.45 . .60/48/sh . . 67/51/pc Richmond . . . . . .80/64/0.48 . . .80/69/t . . . 91/73/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .87/58/s . . 73/49/pc Rochester, NY . . .78/60/0.00 . 81/57/pc . . . 87/64/s Spokane . . . . . . .58/46/0.01 . .57/43/sh . . 65/46/pc Sacramento. . . . .70/43/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 86/56/s Springfield, MO. .85/62/0.00 . . .83/62/s . . . 83/64/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . 87/66/pc . . 91/68/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .89/74/t . . . .89/74/t Salt Lake City . . .74/47/0.01 . 60/42/pc . . . 66/50/s Tucson. . . . . . . .101/65/0.00 . . .95/64/s . . . 96/63/s San Antonio . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .94/70/s . . 94/70/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . .91/68/s . . 91/70/pc San Diego . . . . . .67/59/0.00 . . .72/58/s . . . 70/58/s Washington, DC .87/66/0.04 . . .78/67/t . . . 82/68/s San Francisco . . .64/51/0.00 . . .65/50/s . . . 64/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . . .89/65/t San Jose . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . . 75/50/s Yakima . . . . . . . .66/50/0.02 . 69/42/pc . . 76/51/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .82/51/0.10 . 85/46/pc . . 81/49/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .94/66/s . . . 97/66/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .59/43/0.00 . . .61/45/c . . 58/45/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .89/62/0.00 . 86/58/pc . . 87/57/pc Auckland. . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .61/45/sh . . . 61/44/s Baghdad . . . . . .111/78/0.00 . .107/81/s . . 105/80/s Bangkok . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .94/79/t . . . .95/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .75/63/0.18 . 88/66/pc . . . 79/63/c Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . . .80/66/s . . . 83/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . 65/43/pc . . 62/48/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/46/0.06 . . .72/51/t . . . .71/53/t Budapest. . . . . . .75/57/0.03 . .72/54/sh . . 75/55/sh Buenos Aires. . . .66/61/0.00 . .60/50/sh . . 62/42/pc Cabo San Lucas .91/68/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . . 90/69/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . . 95/68/s Calgary . . . . . . . .41/32/1.34 . . 38/32/rs . . 55/35/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .88/72/0.00 . 89/75/pc . . 89/76/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/37/0.00 . .61/49/sh . . 57/42/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . .53/42/sh . . 52/42/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . 72/54/pc . . 68/51/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . 72/54/sh Hong Kong . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .84/76/t . . . .85/75/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 86/63/pc . . 89/65/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .78/64/0.00 . . .84/61/s . . . 88/62/s Johannesburg . . .68/46/0.00 . .65/44/sh . . . 61/47/c Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . 72/61/pc . . 74/62/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 74/61/pc . . 82/64/pc London . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 60/44/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . . 84/57/s Manila. . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .95/82/t . . . .95/81/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .118/88/0.00 . .105/79/s . . 107/80/s Mexico City. . . . .75/57/0.00 . 81/58/pc . . . 83/56/s Montreal. . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 76/52/pc . . 75/51/pc Moscow . . . . . . .61/52/0.02 . 69/47/pc . . 73/52/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/59/0.14 . 78/61/pc . . 77/59/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . 87/75/pc . . 88/75/pc New Delhi. . . . . .98/84/0.00 105/84/pc . . 108/84/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 71/55/pc . . 67/50/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .59/34/0.00 . .53/42/sh . . . 58/44/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 79/54/pc . . 76/52/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/50/0.14 . . .66/47/c . . 64/47/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .77/64/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . . 87/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .78/61/sh . . 79/60/pc Santiago . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . .47/39/sh . . . 65/38/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . 73/63/sh Sapporo. . . . . . . .53/47/0.00 . . .62/45/s . . 64/46/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . .69/56/c . . 71/50/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .68/64/0.09 . . .80/60/s . . . 85/66/s Singapore . . . . . .91/81/0.03 . . .92/79/t . . . .91/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .63/46/0.00 . .55/44/sh . . . 60/46/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .62/55/sh . . 61/52/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .83/75/r . . 85/73/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . . .80/66/s . . . 83/67/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .69/56/sh . . 65/54/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .79/64/0.01 . 80/56/pc . . 85/64/pc Vancouver. . . . . .57/52/0.26 . . .59/49/r . . . 65/50/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .73/55/0.00 . .72/56/sh . . 70/54/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . . .62/42/s . . . 65/48/c


S

NBA Inside Celtics close out Magic to reach finals, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

L O C A L LY

PREP TRACK AND FIELD

PREP BASEBALL

Youth fishing event slated today in Bend

Madras wins to advance to state semis

Boys and girls ages 17 and younger are invited to join the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife today for a free youth fishing event in Bend. From 9 a.m. until noon at Pine Nursery Pond, ODFW staff will be on hand to help young anglers learn how to bait a hook, cast a rod and land the catch. Loaner rods, reels and tackle will be available. To supplement the resident bluegill population, 600 legalsized rainbow trout — including a number of trophy-sized fish — will be stocked in the pond before the event. Youngsters age 13 and younger can fish for free. A juvenile angling license is required for teens ages 14 to 17. All state angling regulations apply for today’s event. Pine Nursery Pond is located at Pine Nursery Park in northeast Bend between Purcell Boulevard, Deschutes Market Road and Yeoman Road. — Bulletin staff report

Turner Gill leads the Buffs on the mound, at the plate in a Class 5A playoff victory Bulletin staff report

BASEBALL Boston puts Ellsbury back on disabled list BOSTON — The Red Sox have put Jacoby Ellsbury back on the 15-day disabled list after the star outfielder complained of more soreness in his ribs. Ellsbury, a Central Oregon native and former Madras High School and Oregon State standout, missed six weeks due Jacoby to hairline Ellsbury fractures in his ribs. He played only three games before experiencing more pain on Tuesday night prior to Boston’s game against Tampa Bay. He was examined by team doctors Thursday and saw a thoracic specialist Friday. Boston manager Terry Francona said there is no timetable for Ellsbury’s return. He will rest for a short time and then Francona said “we’ll go on how he feels.” Ellsbury has played in only nine games so far this season, with 11 hits in 44 at-bats for a batting average of .250. — From wire reports

COLLEGE SOFTBALL Ducks battling for spot in World Series The University of Oregon plays at the University of Missouri today and Sunday in a three-game NCAA softball super regional for a spot in the 2010 Women’s College World Series. The Ducks’ game today against the No. 8-ranked Tigers is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Sunday’s first game is set for 10 a.m. and the third game of the series, if needed, will begin at 2:30 p.m. All three games will be broadcast on ESPN. A series win against Missouri would put Oregon in the Women’s College World Series for just the second time in school history. The Ducks first and only trip to the NCAA WCWS was in 1989. — From wire reports

INDEX S c oreboard ................................D2 College baseball ........................D2 NB A ...........................................D3 MLB .......................................... D4 Golf ............................................D5 Tennis ........................................D5 NHL .......................................... D6 Auto racing ............................... D6 Prep sports ................................D7 Soccer .......................................D8

D

Photos by Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Summit’s Megan Fristoe runs to victory in the 3,000 meters during the Class 5A state track and field championships on Friday at Eugene’s Hayward Field.

Summit starts strong at state Megan Fristoe wins the 3,000 as Storm girls are in third in 5A

Inside • A recap of the state meets for local boys, Page D7

Bulletin staff report EUGENE — Leading for most of the race, Summit sophomore Megan Fristoe kicked off the Storm’s attempt at four consecutive Class 5A state track and field championships Friday, winning the girls 3,000-meter race in 10 minutes, 23.08 seconds. Summit ended the first day of the state meet at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field in third place with 15 points. Glencoe of Hillsboro led after the opening day with 17 points and West Albany was second with 16 points. Fristoe, the 2009 5A state cross-country champion, stayed with the pack for most of the event before taking the lead for good with three laps remaining. See Summit / D7

• Results from the first day of state, Page D7

Sisters’ Taylor Steele, right, finished third in the 3,000 meters in the Class 4A meet.

NHL

Top two picks from ’07 set to face off for Stanley Cup Young players for Flyers, Blackhawks meet in finals starting today Next Up • Stanley Cup finals, Game 1, Philadelphia at Chicago • When: Today, 5 p.m. • TV: NBC

By Rick Gano The Associated Press

CHICAGO — Three years ago, a pingpong ball took a fortuitous bounce for the Chicago Blackhawks, almost like a sliding puck, and they came out winners in a lottery that has revived the franchise. With just little more than an 8 percent chance of winning the top pick in 2007, the Blackhawks were able to leapfrog the team with the worst record, the Philadelphia Flyers, and they made Patrick Kane their No. 1 choice. Kane went to Chicago and became the rookie of the year, while the Flyers took James van Riemsdyk with the second pick. See Cup / D6

MADRAS — And then there was one. The Madras baseball squad will be the sole Central Oregon diamond sports team advancing to the state’s semifinal round. On both the mound and at the plate, Turner Gill propped up the White Buffaloes, who trounced the Crater Comets 11-3 in Friday’s Class 5A quarterfinal playoff game. Next up Gill pitched two-hit ball • Class over five scoreless innings for 5A state Madras while posting three semifinal: doubles and three RBIs on Madras at offense. Ryan Brunner also Ashland belted a double for the White Buffaloes. • W h en: The Buffs (21-8), who finTuesday ished second in the Intermountain Conference this season, will advance to the semifinal round of the 5A state playoffs on Tuesday with a road game at Ashland. The Grizzlies (23-5), winners of the Southern Sky Conference, defeated defending state champion Thurston 8-7 on Friday in another quarterfinal matchup. Madras took an early lead Friday, scoring four runs in the first three innings before rolling to an 11-0 lead by the end of the fifth. Crater scrapped together three runs in the sixth inning, but that was it for the Comets, who ended the year 14-16.

PREP SOFTBALL

Sisters’ playoff run ends with loss to Banks Bulletin staff report SISTERS — The Outlaw softball team enjoyed a good run. After finishing Sky-Em League play 11-1 this season, Sisters advanced as far as the quarterfinal round of the Class 4A state playoffs before being overpowered 10-4 by visiting Banks on Friday. The Lady Braves grabbed a 1-0 lead in the first inning but the Outlaws bounced back with two runs in the third to take a 2-1 advantage. “We have a lot of positives with this team,” said Sisters coach Tom Mauldin, who had predicted a tough game Friday, but one that was winnable. Ultimately errors were Sisters’ undoing, and Banks did not hesitate to cash in on the five Outlaws mistakes in the field. After each team scored a third run, Banks — the No. 1 seed from the Cowapa League — capitalized on a Sisters error and facing two outs, broke open the 3-3 tie in the fifth inning with a three-run homer by Ashley Vancoevering. See Sisters / D7

Chicago’s Patrick Kane, right, and Philadelphia’s James van Riemsdyk were picked one-two in the 2007 draft.


D2 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

TENNIS

Today Track and Field: Class 6A, 5A, 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 10 a.m.

2 a.m. — French Open, men’s and women’s round of 16, Tennis Channel. 9 a.m. — French Open, men’s and women’s round of 16, NBC (same-day tape).

GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Madrid Masters, third round, Golf. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Colonial Invitational, third round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Colonial Invitational, third round, CBS. 3 p.m. — Champions Tour, Senior PGA Championship, third round, NBC.

SOFTBALL 9 a.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Georgia vs. California, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Oregon vs. Missouri, ESPN. 2 p.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Alabama vs. Hawaii, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Alabama vs. Hawaii (if necessary) or Arizona State vs. Florida, ESPN. 6 p.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Louisiana-Lafayette vs. UCLA, ESPN2.

SOCCER 10:30 a.m. — United States vs. Turkey, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — International Friendly, Boca Juniors at Portland Timbers, FSNW. 9 p.m. — MLS, Seattle Sounders at Colorado Rapids, FSNW (same-day tape).

AUTO RACING 10:30 a.m. — American Le Mans Series, CBS (taped). 11:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Tech-Net Auto Service 300, ABC.

LACROSSE 1 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA Tournament, first semifinal, Notre Dame vs. Cornell, ESPN2. 3:30 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA Tournament, second semifinal, Duke vs. Virginia, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, Fox. 2 p.m. — College, Arizona at Oregon State, FSNW. 6 p.m. — College, California at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns, TNT.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Stanley Cup final, Philadelphia Flyers at Chicago Blackhawks, NBC.

SUNDAY TENNIS 2 a.m. — French Open, men’s and women’s round of 16, Tennis Channel. 9 a.m. — French Open, men’s and women’s round of 16, NBC (same-day tape).

GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Madrid Masters, final round, Golf. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Colonial Invitational, final round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Colonial Invitational, final round, CBS. 3 p.m. — Champions Tour, Senior PGA Championship, final round, NBC.

AUTO RACING 7 a.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Lucas Oil Sportsman Series, ESPN2 (taped). 10 a.m. — IndyCar, Indianapolis 500, ABC. 2 p.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Coca-Cola 600, Fox.

SOFTBALL 10 a.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Oregon vs. Missouri, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — College, NCAA super regional, Oregon vs. Missouri (if necessary), ESPN.

BASEBALL 11 a.m. — College, SEC Tournament, final, teams TBD, ESPN2. 11:15 a.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs, TBS. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Angels, FSNW. 1 p.m. — College, California at Oregon, Comcast SportsNet. 5 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at Minnesota Twins, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 2 p.m. — College, Arizona at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Los Angeles Lakers at Phoenix Suns, KICE-AM 940.

SUNDAY BASEBALL Noon — College, Arizona at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

IN THE BLEACHERS

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— x-if necessary PLAYOFF GLANCE STANLEY CUP FINALS Today, May 29 Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Monday, May 31 Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 2 Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, June 4 Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, June 6 x-Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m. Wednesday, June 9 x-Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Friday, June 11 x-Philadelphia at Chicago, 5 p.m.

TENNIS French Open Friday At Stade Roland Garros Paris Purse: $21.1 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Clay-Outdoor Singles Men Second Round Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 6-2, 6-2, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 6-1, 6-4, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer (22), Austria, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-1, 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-4. David Ferrer (9), Spain, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-2, 6-2, 2-0, retired. Lleyton Hewitt (28), Australia, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 1-6, 6-3, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3. Nicolas Almagro (19), Spain, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-3, 6-0, 7-5. Aleksandr Dolgopolov Jr., Ukraine, def. Fernando Gonzalez (12), Chile, 6-3, 6-4, 6-3. Victor Hanescu (31), Romania, def. Yuri Schukin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Philipp Kohlschreiber (30), Germany, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 7-6 (5), 6-3, 7-5. Thomaz Bellucci (24), Brazil, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 1-6, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Robby Ginepri, United States, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 3-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Juan Carlos Ferrero (16), Spain, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (13), 6-2, 6-2. Fernando Verdasco (7), Spain, def. Florent Serra, France, 6-2, 6-2, 0-6, 6-4. Ivan Ljubicic (14), Croatia, def. Mardy Fish, United States, 6-2, 6-7 (8), 4-6, 6-2, 10-8. Third Round Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Julian Reister, Germany, 6-4, 6-0, 6-4. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Marcos Baghdatis (25), Cyprus, 6-2, 6-3, 0-6, 6-2. Stanislas Wawrinka (20), Switzerland, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-3, 6-4, 6-1. Tomas Berdych (15), Czech Republic, def. John Isner (17), United States, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (8), France, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-4. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Albert Montanes (29), Spain, 6-4, 7-5, 2-6, 6-3. Marin Cilic (10), Croatia, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Mikhail Youzhny (11), Russia, leads Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 2-6, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 3-1, susp., darkness. Women Second Round Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-1, 6-1. Anastasia Pivovarova, Russia, def. Zheng Jie (25), China, 6-4, 6-3. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (29), Russia, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-4, 6-1. Justine Henin (22), Belgium, def. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Marion Bartoli (13), France, def. Olivia Sanchez, France, 7-5, 6-2. Maria Sharapova (12), Russia, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-3, 6-3. Daniela Hantuchova (23), Slovakia, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 7-5, 6-3. Yanina Wickmayer (16), Belgium, def. Sybille Bammer, Austria, 7-6 (4), 1-6, 7-5. Sam Stosur (7), Australia, def. Rossana de los Rios, Paraguay, 4-6, 6-1, 6-0. Third Round Venus Williams (2), United States, def. Dominika Cibulkova (26), Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4. Caroline Wozniacki (3), Denmark, def. Alexandra Dulgheru (31), Romania, 6-3, 6-4. Flavia Pennetta (14), Italy, def. Polona Hercog, Slovenia, 6-3, 6-0. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-3. Francesca Schiavone (17), Italy, def. Li Na (11), China, 6-4, 6-2. Maria Kirilenko (30), Russia, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (6), Russia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4. Elena Dementieva (5), Russia, def. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 6-7 (2), 6-3, 6-4. Aravane Rezai (15), France, vs. Nadia Petrova (19), Russia, 7-6 (2), 4-6, 7-7, susp., darkness.

SOFTBALL College All Times PDT ——— NCAA DIVISION I REGIONALS Double Elimination (x-if necessary) Super Regionals (Best of 3) ——— Tuscaloosa (Ala.) Regional Friday, May 28 Alabama vs. Hawaii, ppd., lightning Today, May 29 Alabama vs. Hawaii 9 a.m. Alabama vs. Hawaii, 11:30 a.m. Sunday, May 30 x-Alabama vs. Hawaii, TBA Columbia (Mo.) Regional At University Field Today, May 29 Missouri (49-11) vs. Oregon (36-19), 11:30 a.m. Sunday, May 30 Missouri vs. Oregon, 10 a.m. x-Missouri vs. Oregon, 12:30 p.m. Los Angeles Regional Today, May 29 UCLA (43-11) vs. Louisiana-Lafayette (45-16), 6 p.m. Sunday, May 30 UCLA vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, TBD x-UCLA vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, TBD Gainesville (Fla.) Regional Today, May 29 Arizona State (44-15) vs. Florida (46-8), 4:30 p.m. Sunday, May 30

Arizona State vs. Florida, TBD x-Arizona State vs. Florida, TBD Seattle Regional Thursday, May 27 Oklahoma 6, Washington 1 Friday, May 28 Washington 3, Oklahoma 0 Washington 4, Oklahoma 0, Washington advances Athens (Ga.) Regional Friday, May 28 Georgia 7, California 0, Georgia leads series 1-0 Today, May 29 California vs. Georgia, Noon x-California vs. Georgia, 11:30 a.m. Tucson (Ariz.) Regional Friday, May 28 Arizona 2, BYU 1, Arizona leads series 1-0 Today, May 29 BYU vs. Arizona, 1:30 p.m. x-BYU vs. Arizona, 4 p.m. Ann Arbor (Mich.) Regional Thursday, May 27 Tennessee 5, Michigan 0 Friday, May 28 Tennessee 4, Michigan 3, Tennessee advances

BASEBALL College All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 19 7 .731 46-8 UCLA 17 8 .680 42-12 Washington State 14 11 .560 31-19 Stanford 14 12 .538 32-21 Oregon 12 13 .480 37-21 California 12 13 .480 28-22 Arizona 11 14 .440 32-21 Oregon State 11 14 .440 30-21 Washington 11 14 .440 28-26 USC 5 20 .200 26-32 ——— Friday’s Games Oregon State 6, Arizona 3 Stanford 5, Arizona State 2 UCLA 6, Washington State 1 Cal 4, Oregon 3 Washington 9, USC 7 Today’s Games Arizona at Oregon State Arizona State at Stanford Washington State at UCLA California at Oregon Washington at USC Sunday’s Games Arizona at Oregon State Washington State at UCLA California at Oregon Washington at USC

GOLF PGA Tour COLONIAL INVITATIONAL Friday At Colonial Country Club Fort Worth, Texas Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,204; Par 70 Second Round Bryce Molder Jason Bohn Brian Davis Kris Blanks Jeff Overton Boo Weekley Corey Pavin John Mallinger Carl Pettersson Zach Johnson John Merrick Ben Crane Kenny Perry Ricky Barnes Bo Van Pelt Aron Price Blake Adams Bill Haas Derek Lamely Scott Verplank Paul Goydos James Nitties Nick Watney Spencer Levin Kyle Stanley K.J. Choi John Daly Greg Chalmers Cameron Beckman David Toms Kevin Na Matt Jones Steve Stricker Nathan Green Brendon de Jonge Lee Janzen Alex Prugh Henrik Stenson Paul Casey Angel Cabrera Michael Bradley

65-62—127 63-65—128 64-65—129 65-64—129 63-67—130 67-63—130 67-64—131 65-66—131 65-66—131 65-66—131 66-66—132 68-64—132 68-64—132 66-66—132 67-66—133 65-68—133 63-70—133 65-68—133 67-66—133 67-66—133 69-65—134 68-66—134 68-66—134 65-69—134 68-66—134 67-67—134 66-69—135 70-65—135 67-68—135 68-67—135 67-68—135 69-66—135 68-67—135 65-70—135 69-66—135 70-66—136 71-65—136 67-69—136 66-70—136 68-68—136 67-69—136

John Senden Tim Petrovic Graham DeLaet Michael Sim Chad Collins Mike Weir Martin Laird Charlie Wi J.J. Henry Stewart Cink Jason Day Brian Gay Pat Perez Jerry Kelly Ben Curtis J.P. Hayes Justin Rose Fredrik Jacobson Lucas Glover Tim Clark Geoff Ogilvy Vijay Singh Brandt Snedeker Rickie Fowler Brett Quigley Kevin Stadler Jerod Turner Kevin Sutherland Rory Sabbatini Tom Gillis Billy Mayfair Ian Poulter Matt Kuchar Stephen Ames Heath Slocum Mark Brooks Tim Herron Jim Furyk Ryan Palmer Trevor Immelman Jonathan Byrd Webb Simpson Justin Leonard Chris Stroud Stuart Appleby Michael Connell Woody Austin Steve Marino Shaun Micheel Rod Pampling Sean O’Hair Hunter Mahan Ryuji Imada Chad Campbell Y.E. Yang Kevin Streelman Byeong-Hun An David Duval Steve Elkington D.J. Trahan Ryan Moore Yuta Ikeda Josh Teater Chris Couch Jeev Milkha Singh Tom Pernice, Jr. Scott Piercy D.A. Points Mark Wilson Martin Flores George McNeill Phil Mickelson Steve Flesch Briny Baird Andres Romero Davis Love III Matt Weibring John Rollins Jeff Maggert

Failed to qualify

69-67—136 68-68—136 68-68—136 69-67—136 70-66—136 68-68—136 69-67—136 68-69—137 67-70—137 69-68—137 66-71—137 68-69—137 69-68—137 67-70—137 70-67—137 67-70—137 67-70—137 68-69—137 72-65—137 67-70—137 70-67—137 67-70—137 71-66—137 70-67—137 71-66—137 69-68—137 69-68—137 71-67—138 67-71—138 69-69—138 69-69—138 69-69—138 69-69—138 68-70—138 69-69—138 71-68—139 67-72—139 72-67—139 72-67—139 71-68—139 68-71—139 70-69—139 67-72—139 71-69—140 72-68—140 68-72—140 67-73—140 68-72—140 70-70—140 70-70—140 70-70—140 73-67—140 69-71—140 70-70—140 73-68—141 72-69—141 71-70—141 68-73—141 71-70—141 69-72—141 72-69—141 72-69—141 75-66—141 71-71—142 73-69—142 71-71—142 71-71—142 72-70—142 70-72—142 72-70—142 68-75—143 71-73—144 73-71—144 70-74—144 75-69—144 71-73—144 73-71—144 75-70—145 72—WD

Champions Tour SENIOR PGA CHAMPIONSHIP Friday At Colorado Golf Club Denver Purse: $2 million Yardage: 7,490; Par 72 Second Round Fred Couples 69-68—137 Tom Kite 69-69—138 Tom Lehman 68-71—139 Chien Soon Lu 70-70—140 Jay Don Blake 71-69—140 Nick Price 70-71—141 Robin Freeman 66-75—141 Bernhard Langer 66-75—141 Mike Goodes 71-71—142 Fred Funk 72-70—142 Chip Beck 71-71—142 Scott Simpson 71-72—143 Michael Allen 71-72—143 Peter Senior 74-70—144 Bill Glasson 69-75—144 Dan Forsman 70-74—144 Russ Cochran 73-72—145 Eduardo Romero 73-72—145 Larry Mize 73-72—145 Mark O’Meara 72-73—145 Bob Boyd 73-72—145 Gary Hallberg 71-75—146 Tim Simpson 76-70—146 Boonchu Ruangkit 73-73—146 Tom Wargo 74-72—146 James Blair III 74-72—146 Des Smyth 74-72—146 Joe Ozaki 74-72—146 Lindy Miller 71-75—146 Olin Browne 73-73—146

Jay Haas Keith Fergus Loren Roberts Ben Crenshaw Chris Williams Andrew Oldcorn Bruce Summerhays Jim Rutledge David Peoples Dave Rummells Gene Jones Angel Franco Chris Starkjohann Brad Bryant Katsuyoshi Tomori Ronnie Black David Frost Mark James Tom Watson Jodie Mudd Larry Nelson Bobby Clampett Bob Cameron Bobby Wadkins Hale Irwin Bob Tway David Eger Sam Torrance Bruce Vaughan Nick Job Jim Roy Mike San Filippo Don Pooley Roger Chapman Gil Morgan John Cook Bruce Fleisher Bob Gilder Ron Vlosich Jim Woodward John Ross Keith Clearwater Mike Reid Morris Hatalsky Bill Britton Mike Harwood Jeff Sluman Bill Loeffler Dick Mast Tommy Armour III Trevor Dodds

73-73—146 72-75—147 77-70—147 72-75—147 73-74—147 73-75—148 74-74—148 76-72—148 75-73—148 71-77—148 76-72—148 74-74—148 71-77—148 68-80—148 77-72—149 77-72—149 72-77—149 78-71—149 73-76—149 76-73—149 77-72—149 75-74—149 76-74—150 76-74—150 76-74—150 77-73—150 79-71—150 78-72—150 73-77—150 72-78—150 74-76—150 77-73—150 74-76—150 76-74—150 76-74—150 78-72—150 73-77—150 73-77—150 75-76—151 80-71—151 75-76—151 75-76—151 79-72—151 78-73—151 75-76—151 75-76—151 77-74—151 69-82—151 73-78—151 78-73—151 75-76—151 Failed to qualify

Tsukasa Watanabe Phil Blackmar Gary Trivisonno D.A. Weibring Jeffrey Roth Peter Fowler Ross Drummond Tom Purtzer Leonard Thompson Joey Sindelar Andy Bean Mike Hulbert Walter Hall Sandy Lyle Andy North Rob Gibbons Ted Schulz Kirk Hanefeld Jim White Fred Holton Fulton Allem Mark Wiebe Denis Watson Jet Ozaki David Arbuckle Jon Fiedler James Mason Bob Ford John Harris John Jacobs Tom Jenkins Perry Arthur Joe Bostic Mike Malaska Jerry Tucker Mike Zaremba Glenn Ralph R.W. Eaks Blaine McCallister Darrell Kestner Curt Byrum Mark Carnevale Hajime Meshiai Jeff Coston Robert Thompson Michael Podolak Kevin Spurgeon Rod Nuckolls Jimmy Hamilton Paul Daniels Gary Sowinski Scott Spence Kim Thompson Bertus Smit Dave Merriman Todd Smith Steve Haskins Ralph West Bill Israelson Tony Johnstone Cleve Coldwater David Thore Bill Longmuir George Forster Steve Waugh Ed Sabo Rocky Catalano Freddy Gibson Mark Hayes Steve Veriato Doug Perry Dale Douglass Fuzzy Zoeller

72-80—152 74-78—152 78-74—152 76-76—152 76-77—153 76-77—153 75-78—153 75-78—153 74-79—153 76-77—153 74-79—153 80-73—153 76-77—153 80-74—154 80-74—154 80-74—154 76-78—154 72-82—154 78-76—154 78-76—154 77-77—154 77-77—154 77-77—154 78-76—154 75-79—154 74-80—154 77-77—154 77-77—154 81-74—155 77-78—155 77-78—155 78-77—155 76-79—155 79-77—156 80-76—156 75-81—156 78-78—156 74-82—156 80-76—156 76-80—156 77-80—157 82-75—157 78-79—157 75-82—157 77-80—157 80-77—157 81-77—158 81-77—158 76-82—158 75-83—158 79-80—159 79-80—159 85-74—159 81-78—159 76-83—159 79-80—159 81-78—159 81-78—159 77-82—159 78-82—160 77-83—160 84-77—161 77-84—161 81-80—161 78-83—161 79-83—162 85-77—162 82-81—163 85-80—165 83-85—168 83-85—168 81-91—172 76—WD

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN‘S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Atlanta 5 0 1.000 Connecticut 3 1 .750 Washington 3 3 .500 Indiana 2 2 .500 New York 2 2 .500 Chicago 1 4 .200 Western Conference W L Pct Seattle 4 1 .800 Phoenix 2 2 .500 San Antonio 2 2 .500 Los Angeles 1 3 .250 Tulsa 1 3 .250 Minnesota 1 4 .200 ——— Friday’s Games New York 77, San Antonio 71 Atlanta 96, Phoenix 93 Los Angeles 81, Washington 75 Today’s Games Chicago at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Indiana at Tulsa, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ———

GB — 1½ 2½ 2½ 2½ 4 GB — 1½ 1½ 2½ 2½ 3

EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF 6 0 2 20 14 5 4 0 15 9 4 4 1 13 12 2 3 4 10 12 2 4 2 8 8 2 6 2 8 10 1 5 1 4 7 1 8 0 3 4 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 8 0 2 26 16 Real Salt Lake 5 3 1 16 17 Houston 5 4 1 16 14 San Jose 5 2 1 16 12 Colorado 4 3 1 13 9 FC Dallas 2 2 6 12 11 Seattle 3 4 3 12 9 Chivas USA 3 6 1 10 11 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Los Angeles at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. New York at New England, 5 p.m. Philadelphia at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Colorado, 6 p.m. Kansas City at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Toronto FC at San Jose, 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 2 Houston at New York, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday, June 5 Columbus at Colorado, 11 a.m. Houston at Los Angeles, noon Kansas City at Toronto FC, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chivas USA at New York, 4:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. San Jose at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. New England at Seattle FC, 7:30 p.m. Columbus New York Toronto FC Chicago Kansas City New England Philadelphia D.C.

GA 6 12 13 13 9 15 15 18 GA 2 10 10 7 7 11 13 14

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Fined Tampa Bay OF Carl Crawford and manager Joe Maddon undisclosed amounts for game ejections during a May 25 game against Boston. Announced New York Yankees Minor League pitcher Amauri Sanit has been suspended for 50 games after testing positive for Mephentermine, a performance-enhancing substance, in violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Placed OF Jacoby Ellsbury on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Scott Atchison from Pawtucket (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Reinstated OF Carlos Guillen from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Danny Worth to Toledo (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Activated OF Curtis Granderson from the 15-day DL. Designated OF Randy Winn for assignment. SEATTLE MARINERS—Placed C Josh Bard on the 15-day DL. Purchased the contract of Cr Eliezer Alfonzo from Tacoma (PCL). Designated INF Jack Hannahan for assignment. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Recalled RHP Sam LeCure from Louisville (IL). Optioned RHP Enerio Del Rosario to Louisville. HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed RHP Bud Norris on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Gustavo Chacin and LHP Wesley Wright from Round Rock (PCL). Optioned INF Oswaldo Navarro to Round Rock. LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Recalled LHP Scott Elbert from Albuquerque (PCL). Designated INF Nick Green for assignment. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Recalled OF Adam Stern from Nashville (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Placed RHP Charlie Morton on the 15-day DL. Selected RHP Steven Jackson from Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Recalled INF Lance Zawadzki from Portland (PCL). Placed INF Everth Cabrera on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 24. Activated RHP Sean Gallagher from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Adam Russell to Portland. Eastern League ALTOONA CURVE—Announced LHP Corey Hamman was promoted to Indianapolis (IL). Announced LHP Jack Taschner was added to the roster. American Association GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS—Signed RHP James Morrison. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Released OF Adam Darby. SHREVEPORT-BOSSIER CAPTAINS—Released RHP Jason Herman. Can-Am League NEW JERSEY JACKALS—Released LHP Evan Teague. Signed LHP Luis Fernandez. Frontier League EVANSVILLE OTTERS—Signed RHP James Maxwell and RHP Nathan Stewart. FLORENCE FREEDOM—Activated SS Richard Martines from the suspended list. Released OF Hunter Owen. KALAMAZOO KINGS—Signed LHP Andre Benjamin. Placed RHP Dan Baerlocher on the 14-day injured list. LAKE ERIE CRUSHERS—Released RHP Billy Kitchen and RHP Chris Smith. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS—Signed S Major Wright to a fouryear contract. HOUSTON TEXANS—Signed CB Sherrick McManis. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Waived RB LenDale White. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Signed LW Brandon McMillan to a three-year contract. Acquired a 2010 sixth-round draft pick from Pittsburgh for the rights to G Mattias Modig. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Signed F Jiri Tlusty and D Jay Harrison to one-year contracts. MONTREAL CANADIENS—Agreed to terms with D Kyle Klubertanz on a one-year contract. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed D Roman Josi and G Atte Engren to entry-level contracts. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Signed D Mark Barberio to a three-year contract. ECHL VICTORIA SALMON KINGS—Signed general manager and coach Mark Morrison to a contract extension through the 2011-12 season. COLLEGE ARKANSAS—Named Casey Glass assistant strength and conditioning coach. DAVIDSON—Named Michele Savage women’s basketball coach. DELAWARE—Named Jake Olkkola associate director of athletics for recreation services. LENOIR-RHYNE—Named Mark Johnson assistant baseball coach. PITTSBURGH—Named Pat Skerry men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,829 192 91 24 The Dalles 1,355 157 18 3 John Day 1,166 197 2 0 McNary 1,085 160 7 0 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 234,884 11,676 9,504 2,591 The Dalles 174,449 10,138 2,346 1,142 John Day 161,847 10,325 2,544 1,435 McNary 132,784 7,233 2,310 1,231

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Oregon State wins series opener against Arizona From wire reports CORVALLIS — Adalberto Santos hit two home runs and Greg Peavey threw his seventh quality start of the season as the Oregon State baseball team defeated Arizona, 6-3, to open the three-game series Friday night at Goss Stadium. Santos hit two-run home runs in the third and fifth innings to pace the Beavers to their ninth victory in their past 13 victo-

ries. Santos extended his hit streak to 12 games, and he is 23-for-53 (.471) during it, with five home runs, four doubles and 15 runs batted in. This week alone, in wins over Oregon and the Wildcats, Santos is six for eight. He was three for three with a walk and three runs scored in the third spot of the lineup. Santos’ offensive output helped pace

the eight-hit attack for the Beavers, with Dylan Jones and Danny Hayes finishing with two hits apiece. Hayes accounted for Oregon State’s two other runs with a tworun double in the first. That offensive attack backed up a strong outing from Peavey, who went 7 2⁄3 innings to improve to 5-3 this season. He scattered seven hits and three runs while striking out three.

The right-hander allowed a run in the second and two in the fifth but spun two ground balls that resulted in double plays. Kurt Heyer took the loss for Arizona, falling to 6-4 this season. Arizona’s starter, he allowed eight hits and six runs while striking out four. Oregon State (30-21 overall, 11-14 Pacific-10 Conference) and Arizona (32-21, 11-14) play the second game of the series

today at 2 p.m. Pacific. Also on Friday: Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Oregon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 EUGENE —The No. 21-ranked Ducks fell to Cal in the opener of a three-game series. The Golden Bears (28-22, 12-13) got a two-run double from Chad Krist and a home run from Chad Bunting. Oregon fell to 37-21 overall, and 12-13 in the Pac-10.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 D3

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Football • Seahawks abruptly waive RB White: The Seattle Seahawks unexpectedly waived running back LenDale White on Friday just weeks after the splashy draft-day trade that brought him to Seattle from Tennessee. “It became apparent at this time that LenDale was not ready to be a member of the Seattle Seahawks,” general manager John Schneider said. He did not elaborate. NFL Network, citing unnamed sources, reported Friday that White was “likely” facing a four-game suspension for violating the NFL’s drug policy. The list of players enrolled in the league’s substance-abuse program for a prior incident, and therefore subject to discipline, is confidential. The former USC star was seemingly getting a second chance as a pro in Seattle, maybe to even become a starter again, while being reunited with his former college coach, Pete Carroll. The Seahawks gave up on White after he had only limited chances to display his work ethic — and months before he was even going to put on full pads.

Baseball • Linfield wins first game of DIII championships: Holding Massachusetts Boston without a hit for the first six innings, Linfield College’s Ryan Larson threw eight innings of scoreless baseball in a 12-0 win in the opening round of the NCAA Division III Championships in Grand Chute, Wis. Larson broke the Linfield singleseason record with his 12th pitching victory, helping the Wildcats equal a club record with their 35th win of the year. Linfield (35-11) ended UMassBoston’s winning streak at nine games, including eight straight victories in the postseason. Linfield advances to play SUNY-Cortland today at 2:30 p.m. Pacific time. The Wildcats jumped on UMass-Boston for four runs in the first inning and never looked back. It helped that the Beacons, who were making the program’s first NCAA playoff appearance, committed four errors, two of them coming in the first inning. Cole Bixenman led the Wildcats with three RBIs, including a two-run double. Rhett Fenton had three hits for Linfield, who recorded 15 hits for the game. • West, Guillen and Buehrle fined: Umpire Joe West, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen and pitcher Mark Buehrle were fined by Major League Baseball on Friday for their recent balk flap. Guillen and Buehrle were ejected by West on Wednesday for arguing a pair of balk calls in Chicago’s 5-4 win over Cleveland. Guillen was tossed for arguing the first balk. An inning later, Buehrle threw his glove to the ground after another balk call and had to be restrained. West is the head of the umpires’ union. Asked about the fine before Friday night’s game between Kansas City and Boston at Fenway Park, he said: “I will say that’s none of your business.” • Crawford, Maddon fined for ejections: Tampa Bay left fielder Carl Crawford and manager Joe Maddon have been fined an undisclosed amount but escaped suspensions after being ejected from a game earlier this week. Crawford and Maddon were tossed during the fifth inning of Tuesday night’s game against Boston for arguing about a pitch that plate umpire Bob Davidson called a strike. • Nats’ prospect drawing big crowds: Stephen Strasburg mania is reaching a feverish pitch. The 6-foot-4, 220-pound right-hander with the 100mile-an-hour fastball has had an effect like no other during his stint in the minor leagues. In two of his three Triple-A starts at home for the Syracuse Chiefs, Strasburg has attracted the top two baseball crowds in the history of the city — 13,766 for his Triple-A debut on May 7 and 13,288 on Monday night. The two-time All-American at San Diego State is expected to make his final home start on Saturday night before being called up to the Washington Nationals.

Hockey • Bettman says NHL franchise situation is stable: Gary Bettman sounded a little like a real estate agent in his state-of-the-league address. “The market is not flooded” with teams for sale, the NHL commissioner said Friday at the United Center, a day before Game 1 on the Stanley Cup finals between Chicago and Philadelphia. He was doing his best to quash or at least downplay reports and signs that several NHL clubs are unstable in this shaky economy. Bettman said the league is “not now dealing with any franchise going out of business or moving,” and he expressed hope that such speculation will soon stop. Touting the league’s business growth, with television ratings and sponsorships up, Bettman said the NHL is committed to keeping a team in Arizona. Confirming that an offer for the financially troubled Phoenix club was made by investors in Winnipeg, where the franchise was located first, Bettman said he expects the sale of the Coyotes to take place this summer. There are three groups in the mix to buy the team. • Pittsburgh, Calgary get next outdoor games: Sid the Kid will take his skates outside for a day in Pittsburgh next season, and Calgary will

host game in the elements too. Commissioner Gary Bettman announced Friday that the Penguins will host the Washington Capitals at Heinz Field on New Year’s Day, the fourth installment of the Winter Classic. Also, Bettman said the Flames are expected to host the Montreal Canadiens at McMahon Stadium on Feb. 20.

Basketball • Kentucky visiting Portland in November: The Kentucky Wildcats and Portland Pilots will meet on the basketball court each of the next three seasons. The Wildcats, who recently landed Portland prep star Terrence Jones, visit the Rose Garden Nov. 19. The Pilots then travel to Lexington, Ky., each of the next two seasons. Portland coach Eric Reveno says his players “want big games” and facing a traditional power like Kentucky will prepare his squad for its West Coast Conference schedule. • NCAA: Eight violations in UConn men’s program: Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun and the men’s basketball program he took from obscurity to national titles have been accused of eight major NCAA infractions, with investigators citing hundreds of improper calls and texts from UConn staff to recruits. The school released a notice from the NCAA on Friday that lays out the allegations against the Hall-of-Fame coach, his staff and the school. Besides the calls and texts, the accusations include giving recruits improper benefits and improperly distributing free tickets to high school coaches and others. Calhoun is cited for failing to promote an atmosphere of compliance. • Akron planning day to honor LeBron: LeBron James, Akron’s greatest export this side of rubber tires, is being honored with an event in his hometown. The NBA’s two-time MVP will be recognized on June 19 at “LeBron Appreciation Day” in the University of Akron’s InfoCision Stadium. The celebration is aimed at convincing James to re-sign with the Cavaliers in July, when he is eligible to become a free agent. Akron community and civic leaders, including Mayor Don Plusquellic, are scheduled to participate in the free event for James with a goal “to bring together as many people as possible to send a unified message of support to our hometown hero LeBron James.”

Cycling • Basso takes overall lead of Giro: Ivan Basso moved into the lead of the Giro d’Italia on Friday by finishing second to Michele Scarponi in the mountainous 19th stage. Basso took the leader’s pink jersey from David Arroyo Duran after the Spaniard finished seventh in the 121-mile leg from Brescia to Aprica that Scarponi captured in 5 hours, 27 minutes, 4 seconds. Basso was credited with the same time, as was his Liquigas teammate and former overall leader Vincenzo Nibali in placing third for an all-Italian podium. The race ends Sunday, but the climbs in today’s 110-mile stage from Bormio to Ponte di Legno-Tonale are likely to decide the race. • WADA in favor of blood profiling: The World Anti-Doping Agency has welcomed the suspension of Italian cyclist Francesco De Bonis based on the evidence of blood profile results. WADA commended the International Cycling Union for its use of the biological passport project and encouraged other sports organizations to implement similar programs. WADA director general David Howman called the project a “powerful tool” to fight doping in sport and that it “makes prohibitive preparations harder to implement by those athletes who may take the risk to cheat.”

Soccer • U.S. to play Brazil in New Jersey after World Cup: The U.S. will play Brazil in an exhibition on Aug. 10 at the New Meadowlands Stadium in East Rutherford, N.J., in the first match for the American soccer team after the World Cup. Brazil, a five-time world champion, has won 14 of 15 meetings between the teams. The lone American win was 1-0 in Los Angeles in February 1998 at the CONCACAF Gold Cup.

Winslow Townson / The Associated Press

Orlando Magic forward Vince Carter, center, tries to drive between the defense of Boston Celtics guard Tony Allen, left, and forward Rasheed Wallace, right, during the second quarter in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference finals in Boston Friday.

NBA SCOREBOARD SCHEDULE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT x-if necessary ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 4, Orlando 2 Sunday, May 16: Boston 92, Orlando 88 Tuesday, May 18: Boston 95, Orlando 92 Saturday, May 22: Boston 94, Orlando 71 Monday, May 24: Orlando 96, Boston 92 Wednesday, May 26: Orlando 113, Boston 92 Today, May 28: Boston 96, Orlando 84 WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers 3, Phoenix 2 Monday, May 17: L.A. Lakers 128, Phoenix 107 Wednesday, May 19: L.A. Lakers 124, Phoenix 112 Sunday, May 23: Phoenix 118, L.A. Lakers 109 Tuesday, May 25: Phoenix 115, L.A. Lakers 106 Thursday, May 27: L.A. Lakers 103, Phoenix 101 Saturday, May 29: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 31: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

SUMMARY Friday’s Game ——— CELTICS 96, MAGIC 84 FG FT Reb ORLANDO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Barnes 21:06 0-0 1-2 0-2 1 3 1 Lewis 40:28 3-11 1-2 4-8 2 1 7 Howard 40:52 11-17 6-12 3-12 0 4 28 Nelson 31:55 5-14 0-0 0-1 4 5 11 Carter 39:25 6-15 4-5 2-7 3 3 17 Redick 23:08 2-7 2-2 0-1 2 3 7 Pietrus 12:21 2-3 1-2 0-0 0 1 7 JWilliams 16:05 2-4 0-0 0-2 1 1 5 Gortat 10:10 0-0 1-2 0-2 1 0 1 Bass 4:30 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 240:00 31-72 16-27 9-35 14 21 84 Percentages: FG .431, FT .593. 3-Point Goals: 6-22, .273 (Pietrus 2-3, J.Williams 1-2, Carter 1-4, Redick 1-4, Nelson 1-5, Lewis 0-4). Team Rebounds: 9. Team Turnovers: 12 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Gortat, Howard, Lewis). Turnovers: 12 (Nelson 5, Carter 2, Howard 2, Lewis 2, Redick). Steals: 8 (Redick 3, Howard 2, Lewis 2, Pietrus). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 9:34 first; Defensive three second, 7:14 first. Flagrant Fouls: Nelson, 6:34 second. FG FT Reb BOSTON Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Pierce 44:53 9-15 9-10 2-13 5 5 31 Garnett 32:45 5-10 0-0 2-5 2 4 10 Perkins 33:21 1-4 0-0 2-7 2 3 2 Rondo 35:06 5-13 3-5 0-3 6 1 14 RAllen 38:02 6-13 5-6 1-4 1 3 20 Davis 17:23 2-5 2-2 2-7 0 1 6 Wallace 12:18 0-5 0-0 1-3 0 2 0 TAllen 13:05 0-0 0-0 1-1 1 3 0 Robinson 13:07 4-10 3-4 0-2 2 3 13 Totals 240:00 32-75 22-2711-45 19 25 96 Percentages: FG .427, FT .815. 3-Point Goals: 10-22, .455 (Pierce 4-5, R.Allen 3-7, Robinson 2-6, Rondo 1-3, Wallace 0-1). Team Rebounds: 11. Team Turnovers: 17 (26 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Davis, Garnett, Wallace). Turnovers: 13 (Perkins 3, Rondo 3, T.Allen 2, Pierce 2, R.Allen, Davis, Garnett). Steals: 7 (R.Allen 2, Pierce 2, Davis, Robinson, Rondo). Technical Fouls: None Orlando 19 23 19 23 — 84 Boston 30 25 27 14 — 96 A—18,624 (18,624). T—2:40. Officials—Monty McCutchen, Mike Callahan, Ken Mauer.

Celtics close out Magic, reach finals By Jimmy Golen The Associated Press

BOSTON — One title has never been enough. Not for the Boston Celtics. The league’s most-decorated franchise avoided the biggest playoff collapse in NBA history and earned a chance to hang an unprecedented 18th championship banner from the rafters, beating Orlando 96-84 on Friday night to eliminate the Magic in six games and advance to the NBA finals for the second time in three years. It would be the second title for the new “Big Three,” which won it all in 2008 but failed to repeat last year when the Magic eliminated them in the second round. “Obviously, one is special,” coach Doc Rivers said. “But the other groups have a couple, and we would love to join that club. No one can ever take away that first one, but we want to join the other club, too.” Paul Pierce had 31 points and 13 rebounds, and little-used backup Nate Robinson gave the Celtics a boost with 13 second-quarter points to squelch Orlando’s attempt to be the first team in NBA history — but the second in Boston this month — to come back from a 3-0 deficit in a playoff series. Ray Allen scored 20 points, Rajon Rondo had 14 points and six assists and Kevin Garnett, who missed the playoffs last year with a knee injury, added 10 points for Boston. “This starting five has never lost a series, ever,” Rivers said, alluding to the injury that kept Kevin Garnett out for the postseason last year and kept the new Big Three from defending its ’08 title. “We believed that coming into the season, and we just kept believing.” The finals will begin Thursday in either Los Angeles or Phoenix. The Lakers lead the Western Conference finals 3-2, and a victory over the Suns in Game 6 on Saturday would set up the crosscoast rivals for a rematch of the 2008 finals — and 10 other championship series from 1959-87. The Boston fans have been chanting “Beat L.A.!” since Game 3, when the Celtics cruised to a 3-0 lead in the best-of-seven Eastern Conference finals. Orlando won the next two games and threatened to become the first team ever in the NBA — but the second in

Confident Nash says Suns will win Game 6 By Bob Baum The Associated Press

Horse racing • Romero, Point Given named to racing Hall of Fame: Jockey Randy Romero, who won more than 4,000 races in a 26-year career, and former Horse of the Year Point Given have been elected to the National Museum of Racing’s Hall of Fame. Romero, Point Given, Azeri and Best Pal were elected in the contemporary category by the 182 members of the voting panel, the Hall of Fame announced Friday. Point Given dominated 2001, winning Horse of the Year and Champion 3year-old. After finishing fifth in the ‘01 Kentucky Derby, he rallied to win the final two legs of the Triple Crown, the Preakness and Belmont. Azeri was Horse of the Year in 2002 and Champion Older Female in 2002-04. She won 17 of 24 races, including 11 Grade 1 stakes. Best Pal won 18 of 47 career starts, earning more than $5.6 million during his six-year career. — From wire reports

Boston this month — to come back from a 30 deficit in a playoff series. The Bruins opened a 3-0 lead against Philadelphia in the NHL’s Eastern Conference semifinals before the Flyers rallied to win — in the very same building. The Magic, who dressed in the same locker room where the Flyers celebrated their comeback, couldn’t match it — or even force the series back to Orlando for a Game 7. Dwight Howard had 28 points and 12 rebounds as the defending East champions failed to get back to the finals. Vince Carter scored 17 points, and Jameer Nelson finished with 11 points and four assists as he was outplayed by Rondo, Boston’s starting point guard, and Robinson, his backup. Reporters and fans snickered when Rivers said last month that Robinson, who had struggled to get playing time and contributed little since coming to Boston at the trade deadline and had never appeared in the postseason before, “He’s going to win us a playoff game.” But Robinson came off the bench at the start of the second quarter, when Boston led 30-19, and hit a pair of three-pointers 90 seconds apart to help stretch the lead to 15 points. “You know, he really won this game for us because the game was in the mix to go either direction and he really gave us a spark,” Pierce said of Robinson. “That’s really growing up, really growing into a man tonight.” The free throws gave Boston a 21-point lead — its biggest of the first half. “Nate Robinson was huge in the first half,” Magic coach Stan Van Gundy said. “That was a huge, huge lift for them.” Orlando cut it to 13 points at halftime, but the Celtics scored 11 of the first 13 points in the third quarter and never led by fewer than 14 in the fourth until the final minute. By that point, the Celtics were already dancing on the sidelines, wearing the Eastern Conference championship hats and Tshirts that had been standing by since Saturday, when they cruised to a 94-71 victory to take a 3-0 lead in the series. When it was over, Hall of Famer Dave Cowens presented owner Wyc Grousbeck with the conference trophy and told the team, “Bring home No. 18, now.”

Mark J. Terrill / The Associated Press

Phoenix Suns guard Steve Nash passes the ball during the second half of Game 5 of the Western Conference finals against the Los Angeles Lakers on Thursday in Los Angeles.

PHOENIX — Steve Nash says he’s no “Joe Namath who walked in in his fur coat” but the Suns playmaker is not backing away from his post-game promise that Phoenix will beat the Los Angeles Lakers in Game 6 of the Western Conference finals. Not might win, not try hard to win, not hope to win. “I just said we’re going home and win Game 6 and come back in Game 7,” Nash said after practice on Friday. “Take it how you want to take it.” The Suns didn’t seem devastated by Thursday night’s last-second 103101 loss in Los Angeles. Quite the opposite. The close call seemed to bolster their belief they can win this series, even though the Lakers are up 3-2 and can advance to the NBA finals for the third straight year with a victory in Phoenix tonight. “There’s some really good things that we did last night, some things to build on,” the Suns’ Grant Hill said. “I think the main thing is the confidence that we can beat this team. Obviously we’ve done it

twice, and we’ve got to try to do it twice more.” Nash’s assurance may not have packed the flamboyance of Namath’s famous guarantee that his huge underdog New York Jets would beat Baltimore in the Super Bowl, but it was enough to rile Game 5 hero Ron Artest. “That’s like no respect for us. There’s no respect. That’s how it’s been for a long time this season. I’m sure we’ll talk about it,” Artest said before the Lakers left Los Angeles on Friday. “Coaches have no respect for the Lakers at all. They have no respect for me. The players don’t respect — a lot of the guys don’t respect. ... I’m sure Kobe heard that (what Nash said), and I’m sure he’ll do his part tomorrow.” Artest’s comments came after he was fined for showing up late for practice on Friday. Phoenix rallied from 18 down in the second half to tie at 101-101 when Jason Richardson banked in a three-pointer with 3.5 seconds to play. The Lakers pulled it out when Kobe Bryant threw up an air ball and Artest hustled to retrieve it, then banked in a shot at the buzzer.


D4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 33 16 .673 — New York 29 19 .604 3½ Toronto 28 22 .560 5½ Boston 27 23 .540 6½ Baltimore 15 34 .306 18 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 28 20 .583 — Detroit 25 22 .532 2½ Chicago 21 27 .438 7 Kansas City 21 28 .429 7½ Cleveland 17 29 .370 10 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 26 22 .542 — Oakland 26 23 .531 ½ Los Angeles 23 27 .460 4 Seattle 19 28 .404 6½ ——— Friday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 8, Cleveland 2 Oakland 5, Detroit 4 Toronto 5, Baltimore 0 Chicago White Sox 4, Tampa Bay 2 Kansas City 12, Boston 5 Minnesota 2, Texas 1 Seattle 8, L.A. Angels 3 Today’s Games Cleveland (D.Huff 2-6) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-3), 10:05 a.m. Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Toronto (Cecil 4-2), 10:07 a.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-4) at L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 4-2), 1:05 p.m. Texas (C.Wilson 3-2) at Minnesota (Pavano 4-5), 1:10 p.m. Oakland (Bre.Anderson 1-1) at Detroit (Porcello 4-4), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Danks 4-3) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-4), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Greinke 1-5) at Boston (Buchholz 6-3), 4:10 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Oakland at Detroit, 10:05 a.m. Baltimore at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Kansas City at Boston, 10:35 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Seattle at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m. Texas at Minnesota, 5:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 27 20 .574 — Atlanta 26 22 .542 1½ New York 25 24 .510 3 Washington 25 24 .510 3 Florida 24 25 .490 4 Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 29 20 .592 — St. Louis 28 21 .571 1 Chicago 23 26 .469 6 Milwaukee 20 28 .417 8½ Pittsburgh 20 29 .408 9 Houston 16 32 .333 12½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 28 20 .583 — Los Angeles 27 21 .563 1 San Francisco 25 22 .532 2½ Colorado 25 23 .521 3 Arizona 20 29 .408 8½ ——— Friday’s Games St. Louis 7, Chicago Cubs 1 Cincinnati 15, Houston 6 Philadelphia 3, Florida 2 Atlanta 7, Pittsburgh 3 Milwaukee 2, N.Y. Mets 0 L.A. Dodgers 5, Colorado 4 Washington 5, San Diego 3 San Francisco 5, Arizona 0 Today’s Games St. Louis (Ottavino 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Silva 6-0), 1:10 p.m. Houston (Moehler 0-1) at Cincinnati (Harang 3-5), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Nieve 1-2) at Milwaukee (M.Parra 1-3), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 6-3) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 5-1), 4:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Burres 2-2) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-1), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-2) at Colorado (Cook 1-3), 5:10 p.m. Washington (Martin 0-0) at San Diego (Latos 4-3), 5:35 p.m. Arizona (Buckner 0-2) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 2-4), 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Houston at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Philadelphia at Florida, 10:10 a.m. Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Milwaukee, 11:10 a.m. St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. L.A. Dodgers at Colorado, 12:10 p.m. Arizona at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. Washington at San Diego, 1:05 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Mariners 8, Angels 3 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Cliff Lee struck out 10 in eight innings and Milton Bradley drove in three runs as Seattle beat Los Angeles. Lee (3-2) allowed three runs — two earned — and four hits with two walks in his 200th big league start. Scott Kazmir (3-5) gave up six runs — five earned — and eight hits in 5 1⁄3 innings. The two-time All-Star left-hander is 1-4 with a 6.91 ERA over his last five starts. In his first game at Angels Stadium since leaving Anaheim as a free agent during the offseason, Chone Figgins was one for three with two walks and two runs scored for Seattle. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Bradley lf M.Sweeney dh Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Ro.Johnson c Jo.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 5 4 4 4 4 36

R H 2 2 2 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 8 11

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf K.Morales 1b J.Rivera lf H.Matsui dh Napoli c Frandsen 3b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 33

R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BI 0 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 1 7

BB 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .338 .196 .296 .238 .288 .220 .192 .183 .279

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 5 3 2 10

Avg. .237 .258 .271 .272 .286 .230 .232 .256 .429

Seattle 003 120 002 — 8 11 1 Los Angeles 200 010 000 — 3 5 1 E—Cl.Lee (2), B.Abreu (6). LOB—Seattle 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Figgins (9), Ro.Johnson (4), Jo.Wilson (4), Frandsen (3). HR—Jo.Lopez (2), off Kazmir. RBIs—F.Gutierrez 2 (24), Bradley 3 (18), Jo.Lopez (17), Jo.Wilson (9), H.Kendrick (23), Tor.Hunter (29), K.Morales (35). SF—Bradley. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 2 (M.Sweeney 2); Los Angeles 1 (J.Rivera). Runners moved up—K.Morales. Seattle Cl.Lee W, 3-2 Kelley Los Angeles Kazmir L, 3-5 T.Bell F.Rodriguez

IP 8 1 IP 5 1-3 1 2-3 1

H 4 1 H 8 0 0

R 3 0 R 6 0 0

ER 2 0 ER 5 0 0

BB 2 0 BB 1 1 0

SO 10 0 SO 1 1 1

NP 115 12 NP 86 25 13

ERA 3.22 2.04 ERA 6.34 3.24 0.00

S.Shields 1 3 2 2 1 1 26 6.89 Inherited runners-scored—T.Bell 1-0. HBP—by S.Shields (I.Suzuki). T—2:33. A—41,770 (45,285).

Twins 2, Rangers 1 MINNEAPOLIS— Kevin Slowey allowed a run pitching into the seventh and Minnesota scratched out enough offense to defeat Texas in a matchup of division leaders. Joe Mauer was one for three for the only Twins RBI. Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh-rf Hamilton lf-cf Dav.Murphy rf-lf Smoak 1b M.Ramirez c Borbon cf a-N.Cruz ph Oliver p F.Francisco p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 1 0 0 33

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 1

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .304 .313 .295 .342 .286 .243 .167 .258 .226 .327 -----

Minnesota AB Span cf 4 O.Hudson 2b 4 Mauer c 3 Morneau 1b 2 Thome dh 4 Cuddyer rf 4 Kubel lf 3 1-Delm.Young pr-lf 0 Hardy ss 4 Punto 3b 1 Totals 29

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 1 5

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 3

Avg. .289 .303 .338 .372 .235 .272 .228 .263 .235 .216

Texas 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 Minnesota 001 010 00x — 2 7 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Borbon in the 7th. 1-ran for Kubel in the 8th. LOB—Texas 6, Minnesota 9. 2B—Kinsler (7), Dav. Murphy (9), O.Hudson (9), Thome (6). 3B—Cuddyer (3). RBIs—Guerrero (43), Mauer (23). SB—Kinsler (4). CS—Andrus (8). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 3 (Smoak, N.Cruz 2); Minnesota 5 (Thome 2, Morneau, Hardy 2). Runners moved up—Kubel. GIDP—Span, Mauer. DP—Texas 2 (Andrus, Smoak), (Kinsler, Andrus, Smoak). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Lewis L, 4-3 6 5 2 2 4 1 111 3.41 Oliver 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 25 1.42 F.Francisco 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 10 4.29 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slowey W, 6-3 6 2-3 6 1 1 1 5 102 4.15 Mijares H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.89 Guerrier H, 9 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.64 Rauch S, 11-13 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 2.84 Inherited runners-scored—Mijares 3-0. IBB—off F.Francisco (Kubel). HBP—by C.Lewis (Punto). WP— C.Lewis. T—2:42. A—39,581 (39,504).

Royals 12, Red Sox 5 BOSTON — Yuniesky Betancourt hit a grand slam to cap a seven-run fourth inning and David DeJesus had four hits in Kansas City’s win over Boston. The Royals had 20 hits off six Boston pitchers, including utilityman Bill Hall, making his first big league appearance as a pitcher. The Royals pummeled knockleballer Tim Wakefield for 12 hits and nine runs in just 3 2⁄3 innings. Kansas City Podsednik lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Kendall c Totals

AB 5 6 6 5 5 6 5 5 4 47

R 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 12

H 2 2 4 2 1 1 3 3 2 20

BI 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 4 0 10

BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 5

SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 4

Avg. .290 .341 .290 .349 .261 .294 .277 .289 .285

Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b D.Ortiz dh Youkilis 1b V.Martinez c Varitek c J.Drew rf Beltre 3b Hermida lf Cameron cf D.McDonald cf Totals

AB 5 5 4 2 4 0 4 4 4 3 1 36

R H 1 3 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 5 10

BI 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 7

Avg. .259 .259 .265 .305 .262 .271 .276 .342 .215 .268 .267

Kansas City 002 700 120 — 12 20 0 Boston 302 000 000 — 5 10 1 E—Scutaro (7). LOB—Kansas City 13, Boston 6. 2B—Podsednik (4), DeJesus (13), Callaspo (13), Scutaro (8), V.Martinez (11). HR—Y.Betancourt (4), off Wakefield; Maier (1), off Okajima; V.Martinez (7), off Davies. RBIs—Aviles (5), DeJesus 2 (19), Maier 3 (21), Y.Betancourt 4 (20), D.Ortiz (28), V.Martinez 4 (24). SB—Podsednik (16), Kendall (4). Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 7 (Podsednik 3, Y.Betancourt, J.Guillen, B.Butler 2); Boston 3 (Hermida, D.Ortiz, Scutaro). Runners moved up—DeJesus, Pedroia. GIDP— J.Guillen, Pedroia. DP—Kansas City 1 (D.Hughes, Aviles, B.Butler); Boston 1 (Beltre, Pedroia, Youkilis). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies W, 4-3 5 7 5 5 2 5 102 4.92 Farnsworth 2 1 0 0 0 1 28 2.53 D.Hughes 2 2 0 0 0 1 28 3.93 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wakefld L, 1-3 3 2-3 12 9 9 3 1 88 5.68 Atchison 2 1-3 4 0 0 0 1 38 4.97 R.Ramirez 1 1 1 1 1 1 26 5.85 Okajima 1-3 3 2 2 1 0 23 5.40 Nelson 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 5.40 Hall 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Nelson 2-0. WP—Wakefield, R.Ramirez. PB—Kendall. T—3:07. A—37,945 (37,402).

Yankees 8, Indians 2 NEW YORK — Phil Hughes returned to form with seven strong innings, Robinson Cano hit a grand slam, and New York beat Cleveland. Hughes struck out the first five batters he faced and allowed two runs and five hits in his best start since he tossed seven scoreless innings in a win at Detroit on May 12. Cleveland Crowe cf Choo rf Hafner dh Kearns lf Branyan 1b Peralta 3b Valbuena 2b Redmond c Donald ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 33

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 2 1 11

Avg. .241 .295 .275 .298 .247 .245 .138 .234 .273

New York Jeter ss 1-Russo pr-3b Granderson cf Teixeira 1b

AB 4 0 3 3

R 1 0 1 2

H BI BB 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 2

Avg. .287 .250 .229 .218

SO 1 0 0 0

Cano 2b Swisher rf Miranda dh Gardner lf R.Pena 3b-ss Moeller c Totals

4 4 3 3 4 4 32

3 3 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 8 12

4 2 1 1 0 0 8

1 0 1 0 0 0 6

0 1 0 0 1 1 4

.351 .301 .206 .293 .190 .250

Cleveland 000 100 100 — 2 6 0 New York 020 002 40x — 8 12 0 1-ran for Jeter in the 8th. LOB—Cleveland 5, New York 9. 2B—Peralta (14), Donald (3), Granderson (3), Moeller (1). HR—Branyan (5), off P.Hughes; Swisher (9), off Carmona; Cano (10), off Sipp. RBIs—Branyan (12), Peralta (21), Cano 4 (34), Swisher 2 (27), Miranda (6), Gardner (15). SB—Jeter (5). SF—Gardner. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (Crowe, Valbuena 2); New York 6 (Cano, Granderson, Moeller, R.Pena, Swisher 2). GIDP—Teixeira, R.Pena 2. DP—Cleveland 3 (Carmona, Donald, Branyan), (Peralta, Branyan), (J.Wright, Redmond, Branyan). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Carmona L, 4-3 6 7 4 4 3 3 Sipp 0 3 4 4 1 0 R.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 0 J.Wright 1 1 0 0 2 1 New York IP H R ER BB SO Hughes W, 6-1 7 5 2 2 1 8 Mitre 1 0 0 0 0 1 Park 1 1 0 0 0 2 Sipp pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Perez 1-0. J.Wright (Granderson), by Sipp (Swisher). T—3:06. A—44,634 (50,287).

NP 107 16 13 24 NP 109 11 19

ERA 3.69 3.26 6.43 4.58 ERA 2.70 2.74 7.94

HBP—by

Athletics 5, Tigers 4 DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera hit three home runs in a game for the first time in his career, but it wasn’t enough to beat Oakland. Ben Sheets worked seven innings in his longest start of the season and Landon Powell homered and drove in two runs in Oakland’s win. Oakland AB R.Davis cf 5 Barton 1b 4 K.Suzuki dh 4 Kouzmanoff 3b 4 A.Rosales ss 4 Fox lf 4 1-E.Patterson pr-lf 0 b-R.Sweeney ph-rf 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 Gross rf-lf 4 Powell c 3 Totals 36

R H 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 1 1 2 5 14

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf C.Guillen 2b Inge 3b Avila c Everett ss a-Santiago ph-ss Totals

R 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 2 1 33

BI 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 5

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 5

SO 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 5

Avg. .256 .277 .250 .254 .281 .229 .213 .310 .275 .274 .262

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 4 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 1

SO 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 6

Avg. .328 .275 .325 .341 .330 .313 .219 .153 .197 .257

Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sheets 7 5 3 3 1 6 96 4.91 Ziegler W, 2-2 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.42 Bailey S, 10-12 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 1.37 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Willis 5 1-3 9 3 3 4 5 107 4.98 Galarraga 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.50 Coke 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 14 3.22 Perry L, 1-4 2-3 1 2 2 1 0 10 5.03 Ni 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2.25 Zumaya 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 1.98 Ni pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Galarraga 2-0, Perry 2-0, Ni 3-1, Zumaya 3-1. IBB—off Perry (R.Sweeney). HBP—by Perry (M.Ellis). WP—Willis, Galarraga. Catchers’ interference—Avila. T—2:43. A—40,210 (41,255).

Blue Jays 5, Orioles 0 TORONTO — Aaron Hill and Vernon Wells hit solo home runs, Shaun Marcum allowed six hits in six innings to win his fourth straight start and Toronto beat Baltimore. Marcum (51) walked two and struck out seven to win his fifth straight decision. All his wins have come following a Blue Jays loss. AB 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 4 1 A.Hill 2b 4 2 Lind dh 4 0 V.Wells cf 4 1 J.Bautista rf 3 1 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 Overbay 1b 3 0 J.Buck c 3 0 Encarnacion 3b 3 0 Totals 31 5

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 8 0 2 10

Avg. .250 .288 .304 .271 .274 .255 .254 .000 .228

H BI BB 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 1

Avg. .289 .164 .223 .303 .247 .259 .197 .271 .242

SO 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 5

Baltimore 000 000 000 — 0 8 1 Toronto 300 002 00x — 5 8 0 E—S.Moore (1). LOB—Baltimore 7, Toronto 3. 3B—J.Bautista (2). HR—A.Hill (7), off Millwood; V.Wells (12), off Millwood. RBIs—A.Hill 2 (16), V.Wells (34), J.Bautista (40). SB—F.Lewis (4). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (S.Moore, Ad.Jones 2, Markakis); Toronto 2 (Overbay, J.Bautista). Runners moved up—Lind. GIDP—Ad.Jones, Encarnacion. DP—Baltimore 1 (M.Tejada, S.Moore, Wigginton); Toronto 1 (Ale.Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay). Baltimore IP H R Millwood L, 0-5 6 6 5 Da.Hernandez 2 2 0 Toronto IP H R Marcum W, 5-1 6 6 0 Camp 1 0 0 Janssen 1 1 0 Gregg 1 1 0 WP—Millwood, Gregg. T—2:35. A—16,360 (49,539).

ER 4 0 ER 0 0 0 0

BB 1 0 BB 2 0 0 0

SO 2 3 SO 7 0 0 3

NP 93 30 NP 106 10 10 17

Chicago AB R Pierre lf 2 0 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 Rios cf 3 1 Konerko 1b 4 0 An.Jones rf 3 0 Quentin dh 3 1 J.Nix 3b 3 0 a-Vizquel ph-3b 1 0 R.Castro c 4 1 Beckham 2b 4 0 Totals 31 4

H BI BB 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 5 4 5

SO 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 6

Avg. .251 .241 .309 .248 .230 .207 .143 .196 .158 .201

Tampa Bay Zobrist rf Crawford lf Jaso c Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Blalock dh b-W.Aybar ph B.Upton cf Brignac 2b Bartlett ss Totals

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 5 2 2 11

Avg. .301 .317 .304 .321 .181 .258 .240 .213 .293 .232

AB 4 3 4 3 4 3 1 2 3 2 29

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Chicago 000 210 001 — 4 5 0 Tampa Bay 001 001 000 — 2 5 0 a-flied out for J.Nix in the 9th. LOB—Chicago 7, Tampa Bay 4. 2B—Longoria (15). 3B—B.Upton (1). HR—Rios (10), off Price; R.Castro (1), off Price. RBIs—Rios 2 (25), R.Castro (3), Beckham (10), Longoria (40), Brignac (19). SB—Pierre (19), Longoria (9). S—Pierre, Bartlett. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Konerko 2, Al.Ramirez); Tampa Bay 4 (Crawford, Blalock, C.Pena, W.Aybar). Runners moved up—R.Castro. GIDP—Konerko, Jaso, Brignac. DP—Chicago 2 (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko), (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko); Tampa Bay 1 (Longoria, Brignac, C.Pena). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO F.Garcia W, 4-3 7 4 2 2 2 7 Santos H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Thornton S, 2-3 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Price L, 7-2 7 4 3 3 4 4 Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 1 1 0 1 1 HBP—by F.Garcia (Longoria), by Price PB—Jaso 2. T—2:35. A—20,650 (36,973).

NP ERA 89 5.26 8 0.50 20 1.77 NP ERA 113 2.57 11 0.00 26 2.11 (Quentin).

NL ROUNDUP

Oakland 101 100 002 — 5 14 0 Detroit 200 100 001 — 4 7 1 a-flied out for Everett in the 8th. b-was intentionally walked for E.Patterson in the 9th. 1-ran for Fox in the 7th. E—Avila (3). LOB—Oakland 13, Detroit 3. 2B— R.Davis (7), Barton (12), A.Rosales (6), Damon (13), C.Guillen (6). HR—Powell (1), off Willis; Mi.Cabrera 2 (12), off Sheets 2; Mi.Cabrera (13), off A.Bailey. RBIs—K.Suzuki (18), Fox (11), Gross (7), Powell 2 (5), Mi.Cabrera 4 (44). SB—E.Patterson (3). S—Barton. SF—Powell. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 9 (Fox 2, Barton, Gross 2, K.Suzuki 3, M.Ellis); Detroit 3 (A.Jackson, Avila, Ordonez). Runners moved up—A.Rosales, Avila, Everett. GIDP—K.Suzuki, Fox, Avila. DP—Oakland 1 (Barton, A.Rosales, Sheets); Detroit 3 (C.Guillen, Everett, Mi.Cabrera), (Inge, C.Guillen, Mi.Cabrera), (Ordonez, Avila, Inge).

Baltimore C.Patterson lf Wigginton 1b Markakis rf M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Wieters c Ad.Jones cf S.Moore 2b C.Izturis ss Totals

David Price and Alex Rios hit a two-run homer to help Chicago beat Tampa Bay. Garcia (4-3) won for the fourth time in five starts, giving up two runs and four hits in seven innings. The right-hander is 8-2 against Tampa Bay.

ERA 3.89 5.08 ERA 2.59 2.63 4.22 3.38

White Sox 4, Rays 2 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Freddy Garcia outpitched

Brewers 2, Mets 0 MILWAUKEE — Corey Hart ended the Mets’ shutout streak at 35 innings with a game-winning homer in the ninth and Yovani Gallardo pitched his first career shutout in Milwaukee’s victory over New York. Johan Santana pitched eight scoreless innings, allowing three hits in a super performance, but the Mets’ bullpen couldn’t keep up the string of zeros. New York’s five-game winning streak was snapped. New York Jos.Reyes ss Cora 2b Bay lf I.Davis 1b D.Wright 3b Pagan cf Barajas c Francoeur rf J.Santana p Feliciano p Igarashi p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 1

SO 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .249 .233 .296 .275 .250 .289 .277 .218 .182 -----

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Fielder 1b Braun lf McGehee 3b Hart rf A.Escobar ss Kottaras c Gallardo p Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 3 31

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 5 2 2

SO 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .242 .259 .266 .321 .313 .261 .252 .224 .167

New York 000 000 000 — 0 8 0 Milwaukee 000 000 002 — 2 5 0 Two outs when winning run scored. LOB—New York 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B—Jos.Reyes (9), J.Santana (2), McGehee (13). HR—Hart (10), off Igarashi. RBIs—Hart 2 (25). Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Cora 2, Bay, Jos.Reyes, Pagan); Milwaukee 1 (Gallardo). GIDP—Cora, Francoeur. DP—Milwaukee 3 (Gallardo, Fielder), (Weeks, A.Escobar, Fielder), (McGehee, Weeks, Fielder). New York IP H R J.Santana 8 3 0 Feliciano 1-3 0 0 Igarashi L, 0-1 1-3 2 2 Milwaukee IP H R Gallardo W, 5-2 9 8 0 T—2:27. A—32,773 (41,900).

ER 0 0 2 ER 0

BB 2 0 0 BB 1

SO 5 0 0 SO 7

NP 105 1 6 NP 121

ERA 3.03 2.18 6.48 ERA 2.78

Phillies 3, Marlins 2 MIAMI — Ryan Howard had two hits and scored Philadelphia’s first run in 31 innings on a triple by Raul Ibanez, Chase Utley drove in the go-ahead run and the Phillies snapped out of a dreadful slump to beat Florida. Wilson Valdez had two hits for the Phillies, who had been shut out in each of their last three games — all against the New York Mets — and in four of five overall. They avoided becoming the first team in 18 years to be blanked four straight times.

R.Paulino c Maybin cf Sosa p Volstad p Tankersley p B.Carroll rf Totals

4 3 0 2 0 1 33

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 0 0 0 0 7

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 1

1 0 0 0 0 1 5

.311 .230 --.188 --.197

Philadelphia 000 110 100 — 3 7 1 Florida 002 000 000 — 2 7 0 a-walked for K.Kendrick in the 7th. 1-ran for Cantu in the 9th. E—K.Kendrick (2). LOB—Philadelphia 7, Florida 5. 3B—Ibanez (3). RBIs—Utley (24), Howard (33), Ibanez (21). SB—Victorino (10), W.Valdez (1), Utley (2). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Ibanez, K.Kendrick, Howard); Florida 2 (Cantu, R.Paulino). Runners moved up—Utley. GIDP—Dobbs, G.Sanchez, Uggla. DP—Philadelphia 2 (W.Valdez, Utley, Howard), (J.Castro, Utley, Howard); Florida 1 (Uggla, G.Sanchez). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kendrick W, 3-2 6 5 2 0 0 1 106 5.04 Durbin H, 7 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.38 Baez H, 5 1 0 0 0 1 1 12 4.15 Contreras S, 3 1 2 0 0 0 2 26 0.59 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad L, 3-6 6 1-3 7 3 3 3 6 115 4.31 Tankersley 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Sosa 2 0 0 0 0 0 17 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Tankersley 2-1. IBB—off Volstad (C.Ruiz). HBP—by Volstad (Victorino). T—2:57. A—15,276 (38,560).

Reds 15, Astros 6 CINCINNATI — Drew Sutton hit his first grand slam, joining one of the longest power surges in Cincinnati history, and Sam LeCure went six innings to win his big-league debut against Houston. The Reds maintained a one-game lead over St. Louis in the NL Central, winning for the 22nd time in 31 games. Cincinnati is nine games over .500 for the first time in four years. Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Pence rf Ca.Lee lf Berkman 1b P.Feliz 3b Manzella ss Quintero c W.Rodriguez p G.Chacin p a-Sullivan ph Fulchino p Byrdak p W.Lopez p c-Blum ph Cash p Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 2 5 5 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 37

Cincinnati AB O.Cabrera ss 5 R.Hernandez 1b 1 Cairo 1b-3b 5 B.Phillips 2b 6 Rolen 3b 4 Lincoln p 1 Owings p 0 Gomes lf 4 Bruce rf 4 Stubbs cf 5 Hanigan c 3 LeCure p 3 b-Sutton ph-3b-ss 2 Totals 43

R H 2 2 0 2 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 12

BI 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

BB 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 3 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .276 .295 .273 .205 .239 .200 .207 .250 .278 --.186 ------.266 .125

R 1 0 3 2 2 0 0 2 0 1 2 1 1 15

BI 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 4 1 1 0 0 4 15

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 5

SO 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 8

Avg. .277 .287 .298 .264 .277 .000 .111 .316 .271 .222 .351 .000 .667

H 1 1 3 3 2 0 0 4 0 1 2 0 2 19

Houston 101 000 130 — 6 12 0 Cincinnati 203 306 01x — 15 19 0 a-struck out for G.Chacin in the 6th. b-homered for LeCure in the 6th. c-grounded out for W.Lopez in the 8th. LOB—Houston 10, Cincinnati 9. 2B—Keppinger (16), Ca.Lee (5), Quintero (4), Cairo (2), Rolen (11), Hanigan (6). 3B—Gomes (2). HR—Pence (8), off LeCure; B.Phillips (7), off W.Rodriguez; Gomes (7), off W.Rodriguez; Sutton (1), off Byrdak. RBIs—Bourn (7), Keppinger (18), Pence 2 (23), Ca.Lee (20), Blum (9), R.Hernandez (9), B.Phillips 3 (18), Rolen (31), Gomes 4 (32), Bruce (20), Stubbs (24), Sutton 4 (4). SB—Cairo (1). S—W.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 8 (W.Rodriguez, P.Feliz 3, Bourn, Berkman, Pence, Manzella); Cincinnati 6 (Bruce 2, Stubbs 2, B.Phillips 2). Runners moved up—Ca.Lee, P.Feliz, Blum, Cairo, Rolen. GIDP—P.Feliz. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Rolen, B.Phillips, Cairo). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rodrigz L, 2-7 3 1-3 8 8 8 2 5 86 5.37 G.Chacin 1 2-3 1 0 0 2 1 37 1.29 Fulchino 1-3 3 3 3 0 0 15 5.60 Byrdak 2-3 2 3 3 1 1 17 7.36 W.Lopez 1 2 0 0 0 1 22 4.24 Cash 1 3 1 1 0 0 10 9.00 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeCure W, 1-0 6 6 2 2 4 5 98 3.00 Lincoln 1 2-3 5 4 4 1 2 47 7.50 Owings 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 19 3.22 Inherited runners-scored—G.Chacin 3-3, Byrdak 2-2, Owings 1-0. IBB—off LeCure (Berkman). WP—Lincoln. T—3:19. A—30,813 (42,319).

Cardinals 7, Cubs 1 CHICAGO — Albert Pujols and Yadier Molina each drove in a pair of runs, Chris Carpenter pitched into the seventh inning and St. Louis rolled to a victory over Chicago. Ryan Ludwick hit a two-run homer, and Colby Rasmus also drove in a run for the Cardinals, who knocked Cubs starter Randy Wells (3-3) from the game after 16 pitches. St. Louis F.Lopez 3b Ludwick rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b B.Ryan ss C.Carpenter p D.Reyes p McClellan p Motte p c-Stavinoha ph Salas p Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 4 3 4 4 3 0 0 0 1 0 38

R H 1 2 2 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 7 11

AB 5 3 4 3 4 0 4 4 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 2 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .280 .290 .304 .289 .268 .265 .244 .197 .048 --1.000 .000 .317 ---

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .304 .294 .246 .164 .307 --.299 .256 .289 .214 .000 --.319 --.327 .000 .225

Philadelphia Victorino cf W.Valdez ss Utley 2b Howard 1b Ibanez lf Gload rf J.Castro 3b Dobbs 3b Baez p Contreras p C.Ruiz c K.Kendrick p a-B.Francisco ph Durbin p Werth rf Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 0 4 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 33

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 3

SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .258 .246 .283 .295 .253 .242 .253 .133 ----.291 .000 .219 .000 .309

Chicago Fukudome rf Theriot 2b D.Lee 1b Ar.Ramirez 3b A.Soriano lf Grabow p Byrd cf Soto c S.Castro ss R.Wells p J.Russell p Howry p a-Colvin ph Stevens p b-Fontenot ph Zambrano p Nady lf Totals

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b 1-Barden pr Uggla 2b C.Ross rf-cf

AB 3 4 4 4 0 4 4

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 0 2 0 0 0 1

Avg. .220 .273 .302 .292 .250 .271 .306

St. Louis 500 000 002 — 7 11 2 Chicago 000 010 000 — 1 8 0 a-homered for Howry in the 5th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Stevens in the 7th. c-singled for Motte in the 9th. E—C.Carpenter (1), F.Lopez (1). LOB—St. Louis 6, Chicago 9. 2B—Ludwick (12), Rasmus (10), Y.Molina (8), Ar.Ramirez (6). HR—Ludwick (7), off Grabow; Colvin (5), off C.Carpenter. RBIs—Ludwick 2 (23), Pujols 2 (34),

Rasmus (20), Y.Molina 2 (28), Colvin (13). SB—Y.Molina (6). CS—Fukudome (2). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 4 (C.Carpenter, Rasmus, Schumaker, B.Ryan); Chicago 5 (A.Soriano, Ar.Ramirez, Byrd 2, Fukudome). Runners moved up—Y.Molina, Schumaker. GIDP— Ar.Ramirez. DP—St. Louis 2 (Y.Molina, Y.Molina, F.Lopez), (B.Ryan, Schumaker, Pujols). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carpentr W, 6-1 6 2-3 7 1 1 1 5 108 2.93 D.Reyes 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.54 McClellan 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 2.11 Motte H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.75 Salas 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Wells L, 3-3 0 6 5 5 0 0 16 4.79 J.Russell 4 2 0 0 1 1 56 2.33 Howry 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 9.18 Stevens 2 0 0 0 0 2 25 0.00 Zambrano 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 6.25 Grabow 1 2 2 2 0 0 17 9.00 R.Wells pitched to 6 batters in the 1st. McClellan pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—D.Reyes 1-0, Motte 2-0, J.Russell 1-0. HBP—by McClellan (Theriot). T—2:42. A—39,536 (41,210).

Giants 5, Diamondbacks 0 SAN FRANCISCO — Matt Cain pitched a one-hitter to match a career best, giving up only a two-out double in the second to Mark Reynolds, and San Francisco sent Arizona to its fifth straight defeat. Pablo Sandoval hit a solo home run leading off the eighth, ending a 124 at-bat homerless drought dating to his last drive April 21 at San Diego. Sandoval also had a sacrifice fly and an RBI single, giving him a seasonbest three RBIs. Arizona K.Johnson 2b C.Jackson lf S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b C.Young cf Hester c a-G.Parra ph Snyder c E.Jackson p Qualls p b-Ryal ph Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 2 3 2 1 0 2 0 1 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 0 1 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 9

Avg. .253 .227 .304 .253 .270 .235 .286 .179 .247 .217 .136 --.324

San Francisco Torres lf F.Sanchez 2b Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b Uribe ss B.Molina c Rowand cf Schierholtz rf Cain p Totals

AB 3 3 3 2 4 4 3 3 3 28

R 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 1 1 2 3 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 7 5 6

SO 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 8

Avg. .297 .290 .283 .284 .272 .271 .231 .291 .059

Arizona 000 000 000 — 0 1 0 San Francisco 101 010 02x — 5 7 0 a-flied out for Hester in the 8th. b-flied out for Qualls in the 9th. LOB—Arizona 2, San Francisco 7. 2B—M.Reynolds (10), Torres (14), F.Sanchez (3), Uribe (6). HR—Sandoval (4), off Qualls. RBIs—F.Sanchez (6), Sandoval 3 (19), Rowand (19). SB—Torres (7). SF—Sandoval, Rowand. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 1 (C.Young); San Francisco 4 (A.Huff, Uribe 2, Cain). GIDP—Uribe. DP—Arizona 2 (M.Reynolds, Ad.LaRoche), (C.Young, Ad.LaRoche). Arizona IP H R ER Jackson L, 3-6 7 4 3 3 Qualls 1 3 2 2 San Fran. IP H R ER Cain W, 3-4 9 1 0 0 IBB—off Qualls (Schierholtz). (M.Reynolds). WP—E.Jackson 3. T—2:18. A—31,495 (41,915).

BB SO NP 5 7 102 1 1 21 BB SO NP 0 9 122 HBP—by

ERA 6.03 7.02 ERA 2.50 Cain

Nationals 5, Padres 3 SAN DIEGO — Josh Willingham hit a three-run home run, Ian Desmond had a solo shot and John Lannan earned his first victory since April 10 as Washington held on to beat San Diego. Nationals closer Matt Capps got out of a huge jam in the ninth inning to earn his major league-leading 17th save in 18 chances. Washington AB Morgan cf 4 C.Guzman 2b 4 A.Dunn 1b 4 1-A.Kennedy pr-1b 0 Zimmerman 3b 3 Willingham lf 3 Capps p 0 Desmond ss 4 Maxwell rf 4 Nieves c 3 Lannan p 2 b-Morse ph 1 Clippard p 0 W.Harris lf 0 Totals 32

R 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 2

San Diego AB R H Venable rf 5 0 1 Eckstein 2b 5 1 2 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 1 Headley 3b 4 0 0 Torrealba c 4 1 3 Salazar lf 4 1 2 Hairston Jr. ss 4 0 1 Denorfia cf 4 0 2 Richard p 2 0 0 a-Hundley ph 1 0 0 Thatcher p 0 0 0 R.Webb p 0 0 0 c-Stairs ph 1 0 0 Totals 38 3 12

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .249 .325 .261 .258 .295 .286 .000 .270 .121 .212 .053 .267 1.000 .177

SO 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .236 .299 .267 .269 .292 .250 .241 .313 .133 .250 ----.179

Washington 000 300 101 — 5 6 1 San Diego 000 100 101 — 3 12 0 a-lined out for Richard in the 7th. b-grounded out for Lannan in the 8th. c-struck out for R.Webb in the 9th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 9th. E—Desmond (11). LOB—Washington 2, San Diego 8. 2B—A.Dunn (14), Eckstein (13), Torrealba (6). HR— Willingham (10), off Richard; Desmond (4), off Richard. RBIs—Willingham 3 (34), Desmond 2 (25), Ad.Gonzalez (28), Denorfia 2 (5). CS—Venable (2). Runners left in scoring position—Washington 1 (Maxwell); San Diego 4 (Hairston Jr. 2, Eckstein 2). Runners moved up—Zimmerman, Hairston Jr.. GIDP—Lannan, Headley. DP—Washington 1 (Lannan, C.Guzman, A.Dunn); San Diego 1 (Headley, Hairston Jr., Eckstein). Washington IP H R ER Lannan W, 2-2 7 7 2 1 Clippard H, 11 1 1 0 0 Capps S, 17-18 1 4 1 1 San Diego IP H R ER Richard L, 4-3 7 4 4 4 Thatcher 1 0 0 0 R.Webb 1 2 1 1 IBB—off R.Webb (Willingham). T—2:29. A—23,468 (42,691).

BB 0 0 0 BB 1 0 1

SO 1 2 2 SO 5 2 0

NP 88 22 24 NP 74 16 20

ERA 5.01 1.93 2.96 ERA 3.00 2.16 1.50

Braves 7, Pirates 3 ATLANTA — David Ross and Chipper Jones each drove in three runs, Derek Lowe remained undefeated against Pittsburgh and surg-

ing Atlanta beat the Pirates. The Braves had 13 hits, including three by Ross, and improved to 8-2 in their last 10 games. Pittsburgh Iwamura 2b N.Walker 3b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Doumit c Milledge lf Clement 1b Crosby ss Duke p S.Jackson p b-An.LaRoche ph Hanrahan p Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 4 4 2 0 1 0 31

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 3 3

Atlanta Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b Venters p Glaus 1b Y.Escobar ss Me.Cabrera lf D.Ross c McLouth cf D.Lowe p a-Conrad ph O’Flaherty p Infante 3b Totals

AB 5 3 5 0 5 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 0 37

R H 2 3 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 13

BI 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .170 .294 .314 .260 .279 .252 .202 .237 .059 --.261 ---

SO 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .320 .295 .234 --.265 .194 .235 .286 .184 .118 .242 --.319

Pittsburgh 000 100 020 — 3 7 1 Atlanta 410 002 00x — 7 13 1 a-struck out for D.Lowe in the 7th. b-doubled for S.Jackson in the 8th. E—Clement (2), Prado (2). LOB—Pittsburgh 5, Atlanta 9. 2B—N.Walker 2 (3), G.Jones (10), An.LaRoche (6), D.Ross 2 (3), D.Lowe (1). RBIs—N.Walker (2), G.Jones (31), An.LaRoche (11), C.Jones 3 (18), Glaus (30), D.Ross 3 (11). CS—G.Jones (1). SF—G.Jones. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 4 (A.McCutchen, Clement, G.Jones, Crosby); Atlanta 6 (McLouth, Y.Escobar 3, D.Lowe, Glaus). Runners moved up—Iwamura, Glaus. GIDP— G.Jones, Milledge. DP—Atlanta 2 (Y.Escobar, Prado, Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Glaus). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duke L, 3-5 5 1-3 12 7 7 2 4 93 5.09 S.Jackson 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 18 0.00 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 4.74 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Lowe W, 7-4 7 4 1 1 1 2 87 4.86 O’Flaherty 1 3 2 2 1 0 18 2.66 Venters 1 0 0 0 1 2 19 0.95 Inherited runners-scored—S.Jackson 2-0. HBP—by Hanrahan (Heyward). T—2:26 (Rain delay: 1:10). A—23,442 (49,743).

Dodgers 5, Rockies 4 DENVER — Manny Ramirez broke out of a slump with a go-ahead tworun homer in the sixth inning, and Los Angeles beat Colorado. Ramirez capped the Dodgers’ four-run sixth with his 549th career home run and first at Coors Field, clearing the center field wall and dropping into the visitors bullpen to put the Dodgers on top by a run. Los Angeles Furcal ss Martin c Man.Ramirez lf Broxton p Kemp cf Blake 3b Belliard 1b Troncoso p Kuo p Belisario p c-Paul ph-rf Re.Johnson rf-lf J.Carroll 2b Monasterios p a-G.Anderson ph Loney 1b Totals

AB 3 4 4 0 4 4 2 0 0 0 1 3 3 1 1 1 31

R 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 5

H BI BB 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 5 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .277 .256 .304 --.276 .278 .279 .000 ----.278 .304 .269 .250 .167 .290

Colorado AB C.Gonzalez cf 4 S.Smith lf 3 b-Spilborghs ph-lf 1 Helton 1b 4 Tulowitzki ss 4 Hawpe rf 3 Olivo c 4 Stewart 3b 2 Belisle p 0 Beimel p 0 d-Giambi ph 0 1-Fowler pr 0 Barmes 2b 4 Francis p 2 Daley p 0 Mora 3b 2 Totals 33

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 3 3

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 9

Avg. .317 .261 .239 .267 .307 .294 .303 .272 .333 .000 .229 .219 .216 .000 --.258

Los Angeles 000 014 000 — 5 6 1 Colorado 200 200 000 — 4 6 0 a-doubled for Monasterios in the 6th. b-walked for S.Smith in the 7th. c-grounded out for Belisario in the 9th. d-was hit by a pitch for Beimel in the 9th. 1-ran for Giambi in the 9th. E—Belliard (4). LOB—Los Angeles 3, Colorado 7. 2B—Martin (6), G.Anderson (2). 3B—Olivo (2). HR— Kemp (10), off Francis; Man.Ramirez (3), off Francis; Barmes (4), off Monasterios. RBIs—Furcal (8), Martin (13), Man.Ramirez 2 (24), Kemp (29), Olivo (23), Stewart (26), Barmes (21). SB—C.Gonzalez (7). SF—Furcal, Stewart. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (J.Carroll 2); Colorado 4 (Stewart, S.Smith, Helton, Spilborghs). Runners moved up—Mora. GIDP—J.Carroll. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, Helton). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Monstrs W, 2-0 5 5 4 2 1 1 67 2.20 Troncoso H, 5 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 16 4.94 Kuo H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 19 1.59 Belisario H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 6.75 Broxton S, 12 1 0 0 0 1 2 22 1.27 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis L, 1-1 5 1-3 5 5 5 1 2 84 2.89 Daley 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.78 Belisle 2 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.23 Beimel 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.49 Inherited runners-scored—Kuo 1-0. IBB—off Broxton (C.Gonzalez), off Monasterios (Hawpe). HBP—by Broxton (Giambi), by Daley (Re.Johnson). WP—Monasterios. T—2:54. A—40,162 (50,449).

LEADERS Through Friday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Morneau, Minnesota, .372; Cano, New York, .351; Butler, Kansas City, .349; Guerrero, Texas, .342; Beltre, Boston, .342; MiCabrera, Detroit, .341; ISuzuki, Seattle, .338; Mauer, Minnesota, .338. RUNS—Youkilis, Boston, 45; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 36; OHudson, Minnesota, 36; JBautista, Toronto, 35; Andrus, Texas, 34; Cano, New York, 34; Gardner, New York, 34; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 34; Span, Minnesota, 34. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 44; Guerrero, Texas, 43; JBautista, Toronto, 40; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 40; KMorales, Los Angeles, 35; Morneau, Minnesota, 35; Beltre, Boston, 34; Cano, New York, 34; NCruz, Texas, 34; VWells, Toronto, 34. HOME RUNS—JBautista, Toronto, 15; Konerko, Chicago, 14; MiCabrera, Detroit, 13; Wigginton, Baltimore, 13; Guerrero, Texas, 12; VWells, Toronto, 12; JGuillen, Kansas City, 11; Morneau, Minnesota, 11. PITCHING—Price, Tampa Bay, 7-2; Blackburn, Minnesota, 6-1; PHughes, New York, 6-1; Pettitte, New York, 6-1; Buchholz, Boston, 6-3; Slowey, Minnesota, 6-3; Talbot, Cleveland, 6-3. STRIKEOUTS—Lester, Boston, 72; RRomero, Toronto, 72; JShields, Tampa Bay, 71; JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 68; Morrow, Toronto, 65; ESantana, Los Angeles, 62; Marcum, Toronto, 60. SAVES—NFeliz, Texas, 13; RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 13; Gregg, Toronto, 12; Soria, Kansas City, 12; Rauch, Minnesota, 11; Papelbon, Boston, 11; Aardsma, Seattle, 11; Valverde, Detroit, 11.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 D5

GOLF ROUNDUP

TENNIS

Couples leads Senior PGA in front of 60-year-old Kite By Arnie Stapleton The Associated Press

PARKER, Colo. — Tom Kite doesn’t mind that the thin air, hilly terrain and erratic wind gusts at the Colorado Golf Club conspire to favor the younger golfers on the senior circuit. Kite still considers himself a whippersnapper after celebrating his 60th birthday in December, a point that’s hard to argue as he sits in second place halfway through the 71st Senior PGA Championship, a single stroke behind Fred Couples. Couples shot a 4-under 68 on Friday, putting him at 7 under after 36 holes. He had the best round of the day despite teeing off in the afternoon, when the winds picked up after a lull. Tom Lehman (71) is two strokes behind Couples, and Lu Chien-soon (70) and Jay Don Blake (69) are tied for fourth, three shots back. Bernhard Langer, the coleader along with Robin Freeman after the first round, was making an impressive charge on the back nine until a doublebogey on No. 17 and a bogey on 18 left him with a 3-over 75, same as Freeman. They are tied with Nick Price (71), four shots off the pace. All those familiar names had Couples harkening back to the 1990s when this group of golfers made a name for themselves on the PGA Tour. “It’s a great leaderboard,

that’s for sure,” Couples said. “A lot of great players.” After turning the requisite 50 years old in October, Couples has energized the Champions Tour, winning half of the six events he’s entered this season. He’s trying to become the 12th golfer to win the Senior PGA Championship on his first attempt, something Kite came tantalizingly close to doing himself in 2000, when he finished second to Doug Tewell. Kite is aiming for one of golf’s true rarities, winning a tournament in his 60s. Of the 915 tournaments in Champions Tour history, only 18 have been won by hexagenerians. “I have that as a goal,” Kite said after his second straight 69 moved him to 6 under. “I work hard on my conditioning and my game to try to make it last and I’m very pleased with where my game is right now. I think that at some point I will win in my 60s. And I look forward to that day. I hope it’s this weekend.” Why not? Only Couples has done better on the 3-year-old course co-designed by Ben Crenshaw that cuts through open meadows, wooded hillsides and streams on wind-swept, picturesque land where the Rockies meet the plains. If he etches his name into the silver trophy that awaits the winner Sunday along with a

$360,000 cut of the $2 million purse, Kite will become the oldest golfer to win the Senior PGA championship since the Champions Tour began in 1980. Hale Irwin was three days shy of his 59th birthday when he won it in 2004. Although the winds died down for much of the second round Friday, the scores didn’t exactly drop accordingly, and the gusts picked up again in the afternoon. The midday break in the winds provided the first calm conditions all week and took many by surprise. “We kept expecting it to pick up because the forecast was at noon it was going to start blowing and at 1 it was going to really start howling and at 3 o’clock it was going to be knocking your hat off,” Kite said. “And right now it’s about a 3 mph wind out there.” Also on Friday: Donald leads, Garcia misses cut MADRID — Luke Donald shot a 5-under 67 to take a oneshot lead after the second round of the Madrid Masters, while Sergio Garcia missed the cut of a European tournament for the first time in six years. Donald made seven birdies before bogeys on two of his last three holes left him at 12-under 132. The English golfer was one shot ahead of Rhys Davies, who shot 68, and two in front of Jamie Donaldson, who shot a 70.

Fred Couples follows the flight of his shot off the fifth tee during the second round of the Senior PGA Championship in Parker, Colo., on Friday. Couples leads the tourney. David Zalubowski / The Associated Press

PGA TOUR

Molder leads at Colonial after 62; Mickelson struggles, misses cut By Stephen Hawkins The Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas — Bryce Molder has yet to have the same kind of success that other fourtime All-American collegiate players have had on the PGA Tour. For now, Molder will settle for his career-best round and the lead midway through the Colonial, where four-time All-Americans Phil Mickelson and David Duval missed the cut. Molder shot an 8-under 62 Friday to get to 13 under for a one-stroke lead over first-round co-leader Jason Bohn (65). Kris Blanks (64) and Brian Davis (65) were two strokes back, one ahead of Boo Weekley (63) and Jeff Overton (67). A 31-year-old Georgia Tech graduate who has split time between the PGA and Nationwide tours since his professional debut in 2002, Molder was one stroke off matching the course record of 61 after missing an 8-foot birdie putt on the final hole. “I read it correctly, lined it up correctly, felt like I was playing too much break, and I kind of just let myself pull it, I think, instead of just trusting my line,” Molder said. “But you certainly get a little bit of excitement when you start shooting a low score.” Mickelson would have overtaken Tiger Woods for the No. 1 spot in the world ranking with a win at Colonial, but instead had consecutive over-par rounds. The Arizona State grad shot a 73 on Friday, when he had consecutive bogeys early and then three more in a row after his last birdie, to finish 4 over on the course where Lefty won in last appearance two years ago. Duval, who like Molder was a standout player at Georgia Tech, was 1 over after a round of 73. After two days of ideal scoring conditions with hot temperatures and nearly no wind, 76 players

made the cut at a tournament record-low 2 under. There were 19 other players who broke par or were even and will not play this weekend. While Molder has been bothered by a sore throat, Bohn stayed near the top of the leaderboard despite an inner-ear infection that has made it impossible to hear anything through his left ear while affecting his equilibrium since the tournament started. “I noticed going up and down, standing up and down, that I got dizzy a few times,” Bohn said. “I don’t know whether it was my ear or the heat or a combination of the both. I kind of had to slow it down a little bit out there. I was really cautious.” Davis had a bogey-free 65 Friday, when his face was still swollen because of an abscess inside his mouth that he had treated by a doctor after his opening 64. His concentration apparently wasn’t affected by the medications he is taking to ease the pain. “I might just keep taking them all year if this carries on,” Davis said, with a smile. Since losing in a playoff to Jim Furyk at Hilton Head, when the Englishman who has never won on the PGA Tour called a twostroke penalty on himself, Davis finished tied for 57th at New Orleans and missed the cut his last three tournaments. Mickelson won’t be at Hogan’s Alley for the Colonial’s second “Pink Out” on Saturday, when most players along with PGA Tour and tournament officials are expected to wear pink. New this year, two downtown Fort Worth buildings were being illuminated with pink lights Friday night and donations are being made for each birdie and eagle made during the third round. The first “Pink Out” was held last year when Mickelson wasn’t at Colonial to defend his 2008 title soon after finding out that his

wife, Amy, had breast cancer. A few weeks after that, Mickelson found out that his mother also had breast cancer. “Although I will not be here to partake in it, I will be wearing pink tomorrow,” Mickelson said before going home to San Diego to be with Amy, whose birthday is Monday, and their three children. Mickelson’s return to Colonial started with birdies on the first two holes Thursday. But he had only three more birdies while shooting 6 over his last 34 holes and missing his first cut in 11 tournaments this year.

Lionel Cironneau / The Associated Press

Rafael Nadal returns the ball to Horacio Zeballos during their second-round match at the French Open Friday in Paris. Nadal won the match in straight sets.

Sharapova, Henin set up French Open showdown Nadal, Federer advance in men’s draw By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

PARIS — So much has transpired in the nearly 2½ years since Maria Sharapova and Justine Henin last played each other. Sharapova needed right shoulder surgery and was off the tour for 10 months, then missed time with a right elbow injury. Henin abruptly announced her retirement and stayed away for 20 months, then returned, happier off the court and, so far, almost as good on it. The two former No. 1s, owners of a combined 10 Grand Slam titles, set up an attention-worthy showdown in the French Open’s third round today by wrapping up matter-of-fact victories on a sun-soaked, busy Friday. “Comes very early, of course, third round,” Henin said. “But I feel ready for it.” Relentless rain Thursday created a backlog of matches, meaning that nearly every big name in tennis was swinging a racket somewhere around Roland Garros a day later. Both Williams sisters; Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal; Novak Djokovic, Andy Murray, Lleyton Hewitt — all played and won. The only upset of real significance came when defending champion Svetlana Kuznetsova lost 6-3, 2-6, 6-4 to 30th-seeded Maria Kirilenko in a third-round match that lasted nearly 2½ hours. Even that wasn’t exactly shocking, when you consider Kirilenko already beat Kuznetsova on clay at Rome this month and knocked out Sharapova at the Australian Open in January. Plus, Kuznetsova arrived in Paris with a losing record this year and barely eked through the second round by saving four match points. “I have to move on. I have to grow and to improve,” said Kuznetsova, who will fall out of the top 10 in the rankings for the first time in four years. “I didn’t come here with my best game, but I gave it my all.” With so many other top players

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still around, some must start facing each other. Four-time French Open champion Nadal meets past Wimbledon and U.S. Open winner Hewitt today. That is scheduled to be followed in the main stadium by Sharapova vs. Henin, two women with decidedly different ways of looking at their most recent encounter, a straightset win by Sharapova in the 2008 Australian Open quarterfinals. It turned out to be Henin’s last Grand Slam match before her hiatus. “It seems so far away. I mean, even seems like it never existed, that moment,” the Belgian said after eliminating 79th-ranked Klara Zakopalova of the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-3. “I didn’t want to be on the court anymore at that time, and now I have a lot of motivation to be out there and to fight and try to keep winning.” Here is Sharapova’s take: “Actually, feels like we never left. Or it was just yesterday. That’s so funny. It was a couple of years ago, and here we are. We’re back. It’s a different Slam, but it’s the same drill.” Like Henin’s second-round match, Sharapova’s was halted in the second set because of darkness Thursday night. Like Henin, Sharapova wasn’t challenged much in a 6-3, 6-3 victory, hers coming against 71st-ranked Kirsten Flipkens of Belgium. Other women’s third-round matchups today include No. 1 Serena Williams against No. 29 Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova

of Russia, and No. 4 Jelena Jankovic against No. 27 Alona Bondarenko. Williams needed all of 55 minutes to overwhelm unseeded Julia Goerges of Germany 6-1, 6-1 Friday, while Pavlyuchenkova beat Jill Craybas of Providence, R.I., 6-4, 6-1. “I can learn a lot, like, ‘OK, what am I doing today? How can I get them to all be like that?’” Williams said. “Those are the questions that I ask and I try to answer.” Her older sister, second-seeded Venus, is a step ahead, already moving into the French Open’s fourth round for the first time since 2006 with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over No. 26 Dominika Cibulkova, a semifinalist last year. Defending champion Federer eased into the fourth round by defeating 165th-ranked qualifier Julian Reister of Germany 6-4, 6-0, 6-4. The man Federer beat in last year’s final, No. 5 Robin Soderling, also advanced, along with No. 4 Murray, No. 8 JoWilfried Tsonga, No. 15 Tomas Berdych and No. 20 Stanislas Wawrinka. Tsonga is the last Frenchman still playing; Berdych’s 6-2, 6-2, 6-1 victory over No. 17 John Isner of Tampa, Fla., means Andy Roddick and Robby Ginepri are the only U.S. men left.

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D6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Cup Continued from D1 Now both players are in the Stanley Cup finals, facing each other with Game 1 set for tonight at the United Center. “It seems like it’s almost worked out good for both teams,” Kane said. “They’re here three years later. I’m here three years later, our team is, and that’s the most important thing for this franchise.” The Blackhawks are searching for their first title since the days of Bobby Hull and Stan Mikita in 1961. The Flyers are looking for their first championship since the Broad Street Bullies socked their way to the second of back-to-back Stanley Cup titles in 1975 — long before Kane or van Riemsdyk, both 21, were born. The two played together in the world juniors and remain close. They went to dinner when the Blackhawks were in Philadelphia for their only meeting with the Flyers this season. Now comes a shot at the Cup. “You never know what could have happened. I think going into that draft, the Blackhawks were like fifth to last place or whatever you want to call it at that time,” Kane said. “So it was kind of a shocker they got the first overall pick. ... To be honest with you, I was kind of excited when Chicago got it.” Kane headed right to the NHL after he was selected No. 1 and quickly emerged as a star, a consistent scoring threat with his speed and puck handling skills. Van Riemsdyk took a different route, heading off to college first and then signing with the Flyers a little more than a year ago. “We were both put in different situations and we were in different stages of our hockey development and, you know, I did what I thought was best for me to be a better player,” van Riemsdyk said. “He was obviously ready to make that jump right after the draft. He’s done a good job for himself.” And for his team. The Blackhawks were playing before a half-empty arena before Kane and 22-year-old captain Jonathan Toews arrived and became the centerpieces of the team’s rebirth on the ice and the accompanying marketing campaign. Now the Blackhawks are one of the hottest tickets in Chicago, a young team that made it to the Western Conference finals a year ago before losing to Detroit. Winning four more games will be a challenge against a Flyers team also considered a championship contender entering the season before it had to make a remarkable run to get to the finals for the first time since 1997. The Flyers withstood a coaching change from John Stevens to Peter Laviolette, injuries to key players like Simon Gagne and Jeff Carter, and needed a shootout win on the final day of the season just to get in the postseason. After disposing of New Jersey in the opening round, they staged one of the greatest comebacks in league history, rallying from 0-3 in the series and 0-3 in Game 7 to oust the Boston Bruins, with van Riemsdyk scoring Philly’s first goal to spark the comeback. The Flyers took out giant-killer Montreal in a five-game Eastern Conference finals. “It’s been an unbelievable journey so far,” defenseman Kimmo Timonen said. Chicago beat Vancouver and San Jose in their last two playoff series, high-flying affairs and fast skating and numerous scoring chances. The Blackhawks beat Nashville in the first round and will face that same kind of stingy defense with the Flyers, led by defensemen Chris Pronger, Timonen, Braydon Coburn and Matt Carle. Toews leads all players in the

AUTO RACING: INDY 500

NHL STANLEY CUP FINALS

Long time coming The Chicago Blackhawks are seeking their first title in 49 years, when there were only six NHL teams. The Philadelphia Flyers, who came into the playoffs as a seventh seed, last hoisted the Cup in 1975. Team playoff leaders Chicago Playoff statistics BLACKHAWKS

Goals for/ game Shots/ game

D. Briere D. Byfuglien

FLYERS

3.31 3.18 32.0 27.5

Goals against

2.50 2.12

Power play pct.

22.6 20.7

86.6 87.0

Penalty kill pct.

Philadelphia

GOALS

9 8

POINTS

26

J. Toews M. Richards

21

ASSISTS

J. Toews M. Richards

19 15

SOURCE: National Hockey League

AP

Breaking down the finals No. 2 (West) CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS (52-22-8) vs. No. 7 (East) PHILADELPHIA FLYERS (41-35-6). How they got here: Chicago beat No. 7 Nashville 4-2; No. 3 Vancouver 4-2; and No. 1 San Jose 4-0. Philadelphia beat No. 2 New Jersey 4-1; No. 6 Boston 4-3; and No. 8 Montreal 4-1. 2009-10 series record: Philadelphia 1-0. Playoff History: Chicago leads 1-0. Last meeting: Chicago 4-0 in 1971 quarterfinals. CHICAGO: Blackhawks own longest current championship drought. They last hoisted the Stanley Cup in 1961, their third championship, and are making first appearance in finals since losing to Pittsburgh in 1992. Chicago is 0-5 in finals since previous title. ... Young captain Jonathan Toews brings 13-game point streak into the series — posting seven goals and 18 assists during that stretch. ... Converted defenseman Dustin Byfuglien has been a force up front, scoring eight goals during the postseason — including four game-winners. Byfuglien netted the winning goal in three of four games vs. San Jose. His finals matchup against defenseman Chris Pronger is a highly anticipated battle of heavyweights that should play out often in front of the crease. Byfuglien has goals in five straight games and eight in the past eight. ... Antti Niemi is proving to be up to the challenge in his first full NHL year. He has a 2.33 goals-against average and .921 save percentage in 16 playoff games. ... Veteran forward Marian Hossa will be first player to be in three straight Stanley Cup finals series with three teams. Hossa was on the losing end the past two seasons when Detroit and Pittsburgh split back-to-back title matchups. He has 24 points in 16 career postseason games vs. Flyers, going 3-0 in series with Ottawa and Pittsburgh. ... Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville has coached the most postseason games (120) and earned the most playoff victories (63) without leading a team to the finals. PHILADELPHIA: Flyers are fifth team seeded as low as seventh to reach finals. They finished 24 standings points behind the Blackhawks. ... Won only meeting this season with Blackhawks 3-2 on Pronger’s goal with 2.1 seconds left on March 13. ... Michael Leighton, 6-1 with a 1.45 GAA and .948 save percentage in eight games since taking over for injured regular Brian Boucher, is the fourth goalie to advance to the finals after beginning the season with another team (Carolina). Leighton led the way in the East finals, posting three shutouts in the series. He was drafted by Chicago in 1999 and spent four seasons with the organization. ... Claude Giroux had three goals, six points, and plus-7 rating in East finals. ... Peter Laviolette, who replaced the fired John Stevens on Dec. 4, is the eighth coach to reach the Stanley Cup finals after taking over during the season. Dan Bylsma did it last season and captured the Cup with Pittsburgh. ... The Flyers, who endured a season full of injuries, are healthy following the return of forwards Jeff Carter, Simon Gagne and Ian Laperriere. Laperriere is in the finals for the first time after 1,144 NHL regular-season and playoff games over 16 seasons. ... The Flyers are the third consecutive visiting team in the Winter Classic to reach the finals. ... Pronger is in finals for third time in five years with third team. Was champion with Anaheim in 2007 after being runner-up in 2006 with Edmonton. ... Philadelphia is in championship round for first time since 1997, just three years after having NHL’s worst record. Flyers are 0-5 in finals since winning only Cup titles in 1974 and 1975. OUTLOOK: Philly momentum carries through one more time. Flyers in 6. — The Associated Press

postseason with 26 points, five more than his counterpart and Olympic teammate, gritty Flyers captain Mike Richards. Danny Briere of the Flyers has 18 points, including nine goals, and Kane has 20 points. Former Flyers player Patrick Sharp has blossomed into a steady scorer for Chicago since being traded nearly five years ago. The Blackhawks are hoping to play forward Andrew Ladd, who was injured in the clincher over San Jose and has not been able to practice this week. Two goalies no one expected to see in the postseason have shone. The well-traveled Michael Leighton, who started his career with Chicago, has been a rock in the postseason since taking over in Game 5 against Boston when Brian Boucher hurt his knee. He is 61 and had three shutouts against the Canadiens. And where would the Blackhawks be without Antti Niemi, the 26-year-old first-year goalie out of Finland? After becoming the starter for good in March, he is 12-4 in the playoffs and is a

cool-headed factor in the Blackhawks’ first appearance in the finals since 1992. “Maybe you don’t see the whole picture the way you should take the pressure. You’re just happy to be there and doing your best and you will have more energy,” Niemi said. Some of the biggest Blackhawks goals have come from the biggest player on the ice, 257pound Dustin Byfuglien, who has four game-winners in his eight goals. A matchup between him and the 220-pound Pronger, long one of the game’s nastiest defenseman, could be must-see hockey. Chicago’s Joel Quenneville, who coached Pronger in St. Louis, is making his first appearance in the finals as a head coach. Growing up in Ontario, the Blackhawks were his favorite team, and he has envisioned what another title would mean. “I think that it would be ... great achievement for everybody,” Quenneville said. “I think the city will go wild and crazy.”

Jeff Roberson / The Associated Press

Helio Castroneves spins his tires on his way to winning the pit-stop competition at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis Friday. Castroneves will start from the pole for Sunday’s Indianapolis 500 auto race.

His long climb to the top over, Castroneves enjoys the spoils By Eddie Pells

Also on that list are Tony Kanaan and Danica Patrick, though both Andretti Indy 500 Autosport INDIANAPOLIS — Last year, Helio drivers have issues. Castroneves wasn’t sure if he’d be at the • When: Kanaan, a fan favorite who has never Sunday, Brickyard or headed for a jail cell come won here, crashed twice during qualifythe final Sunday in May. This year, the ing and had to scramble to get his car 10 a.m. buildup to the Indianapolis 500 has • TV: ABC back in shape simply to make the race. come with less baggage for IndyCar’s Now he hopes to become the first permost successful driver. son to win from the dead-last starting Instead of worrying about his freeposition. dom, the defending champion is thinking only Kanaan said a friendly wagering pool has deabout racing — car setup, pit strategy and how veloped in his trailer about how many cars he’ll the speed-boosting “push-to-pass” button’s in- pass during the first lap. Among the tools at his troduction at Indy might affect his strategy. disposal will be the “push-to-pass” button — a And, of course, he might be scoping out the booster that provides 18 seconds of extra horseperfect place to climb the fence if he gets his power but can be used only 15 times in the race. fourth victory. A win Sunday would put Cas“I thought I had no pressure because I’m dead troneves in the elite company of Rick Mears, Al last anyway, I can’t lose any position,” Kanaan Unser Sr. and A.J. Foyt, the only other four-time said. “Now, if I only pass two cars, people are gowinners in the history of “The Greatest Specta- ing to go ‘Only two cars? Geez.’” cle in Racing.” Along with handling his own problems, “It’s nice, because I can just focus a little bit Kanaan spent part of qualifying weekend playmore on the race,” Castroneves said. “Last year, ing psychologist to his teammate, Patrick, who all I was thinking about was the joy of being came unhinged after a poor effort that left her in here. I had doubts about whether I’d be racing at the 23rd starting spot. After complaining about all.” her car’s setup in an interview played over the His future went into flux when the feds indict- track PA system, she was startled to hear loud ed him on tax evasion charges that carried up to booing from the crowd. a six-year prison sentence. Remnants of the case Suddenly, IndyCar’s most popular driver lingered through most of May, and along with might not be that anymore — either because fans worrying about all the usual racing issues that are tired of the excuses, don’t like hearing her come up at Indy, Spiderman came to the year’s turn on her teammates, or are unhappy because biggest race with the specter of possible jail time she is now splitting time between open-wheel on his mind. and NASCAR. Or all of the above. Not until two days before last year’s race was “No way you should speak so badly about a Castroneves cleared of the final charges. On race team that’s worked day and night and so hard day, he started from the pole and was his usual, for you,” said Tomas Scheckter, who will start focused self. He won the race, becoming only the 20th. “And I think it’s a driver’s fault, as well. A ninth driver to kiss the bricks three times at rac- lot of times on a bad car, I blame myself. Maybe ing’s most hallowed track. When it was over, the I wasn’t giving good enough information to the tears flowed freely. “Thanks for giving me my engineers to help them sort it out.” life back,” he said to team owner Roger Penske, When it comes distractions, though, nobody who supported him through the ordeal. handled them better than Castroneves last year. “He’s part of our family, part of our team,” PenThe 35-year-old Brazilian described being on ske said. “The situation, it was very unfortunate. an emotional roller coaster as he remained on I hope he’d expect us to stand by him. Whether the sidelines, his fate undecided while his case it was Helio Castroneves or a crew member hav- wound through the legal system. ing the same situation, we’d do the same thing.” Castroneves, who repeated this year with wins While Castroneves goes for No. 4, Penske is in last week’s qualifying and Friday’s pit-crew at 15 and counting — a record that almost cer- contest, said memories of the fans at the Bricktainly won’t be broken. His main threat this year yard kept him going through the bad times. comes from the three-car team run by Chip Ga“When I came back here, the wound was still nassi, who will become the first owner to win open,” he said. “It was not even a month after the Daytona 500 and Indy 500 in the same year if the whole trial. There was a big wound there. Dario Franchitti, Scott Dixon or Townsend Bell The fans kept me healing. That made a big take the checkered flag. (Jamie McMurray won difference.” for Ganassi in Daytona.) If he wins Sunday, he will join Foyt, Mears and But as has been the case at the Indy 500 for Unser as the fourth driver to win four times at the past several years — pretty much since the Indy. Say what you will about the current stature open-wheel split that devastated the sport back of the Indy 500, there is no more exclusive club in 1996 — there is a short list of true contend- in auto racing. ers. Along with Castroneves, there are the other “For me, they’re the gods of racing,” CastroPenske drivers — Ryan Briscoe and Will Power, neves said. “They drove so many things. Right this year’s IndyCar series leader who will start now, it’s a dream come true just to be in this next to Castroneves in the No. 2 spot. position.”

The Associated Press

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 D7

PREP SCOREBOARD BASEBALL OSAA STATE PLAYOFFS Friday’s Games Quarterfinals ——— Class 6A Tualatin at Lake Oswego, ppd. South Medford at Westview Clackamas 2, Sprague 0. Barlow at Lincoln Class 5A Ashland 8, Thurston 7 Madras 11, Crater 3 North Eugene 3, Klamath Union 2 West Albany 11, Springfield 1 Class 4A Philomath 9, Hidden Valley 8 Astoria at North Marion, ppd. Newport 13, Marist 7 Scappoose 5, Siuslaw 0 Class 3A Grant Union 7, Cascade Christian 6 Valley Catholic 4, Myrtle Point 2 Burns 2, Bandon 0 Santiam Christian at Warrenton, ppd. Class 2A/1A Portland Christian 3, Scio 1 Heppner/Ione 16, Elgin 5 Knappa 5, Bonanza 4 Umpqua Valley Christian 28, Arlington/Condon/Wheeler 6

Class 5A Friday’s Result ——— Crater 000 003 0 — 3 6 4 Madras 103 250 X — 11 9 0 Zelecki, Crawford (4) and Ullom; Gill, Say (6) and Smith. W—Gill. L— Zelecki. 2B—Crater: Wynant, Tracy; Madras: Gill 3, Brunner.

SOFTBALL OSAA STATE PLAYOFFS Friday’s Games Quarterfinals ——— Class 6A McNary at Aloha, ppd. Grants Pass at Canby, ppd. Central Catholic 4, North Medford 1 Sunset at Oregon City, ppd. Class 5A Glencoe 12, Silverton 1 Mazama 8, Liberty 6 Century 3, Crater 0 The Dalles-Wahtonka def. West Albany Class 4A Cascade 9, Yamhill-Carlton 0 Marist 5, Ontario 0 Henley 7, Sutherlin 0 Banks 10, Sisters 4 Class 3A Willamina 3, Regis 1 Rogue River 3, Harrisburg 1 Glide 9, Riverside 7 Rainier 7, Santiam Christian 0 Class 2A/1A Irrigon 6, Enterprise 1 Weston-McEwen 3, Oakland 0 Kennedy 13, Butte Falls 0 Pilot Rock at Union, ppd.

Class 4A Friday’s Result ——— Banks 100 162 0 — 10 13 1 Sisters 002 110 0 — 4 8 5 Masters and Rue; Kosanke and T. Walker. W—Masters. L— Kosanke. 2B—Banks: Masters, Bunn; Sisters: Kosanke, T. Walker, Rowe. HR—Banks: Gooding 2, Masters, Vancoeuering.

GIRLS TRACK OSAA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Friday’s Results At Eugene Top eight individuals ———

Class 6A Team scores — Jesuit 33, Lakeridge 24, Tualatin 17, Sandy 16, Gresham 12, Tigard 10, South Salem 9, McNary 8, Lake Oswego 8, South Eugene 6, Southridge 6, Beaverton 6, Canby 5, Aloha 5, North Medford 4, Milwaukie 4, McKay 4, Centennial 4, Sunset 4, Hood River Valley 3, Redmond 2, Benson 2, Sheldon 1, North Salem 1, Reynolds 1. 3,000 — 1, Annamarie Maag, Jesuit, 9:57.97; 2, Tate Murray, Lake Oswego, 10:04.42; 3, Kelly O’Neill, Lakeridge, 10:06.29; 4, Payton Schutte, Jesuit, 10:06.95; 5, Erin McLaughlin, Milwaukie, 10:12; 6, Emily Wheeler, Tualatin, 10:17.47; 7, Andrea Dettmann, Centennial, 10:21.85; 8, Emily Weber, South Salem. 10:23.17. High jump — 1, Kathleen Pelchar, Sandy, 5-6; 2, Maddie Anderson, Tualatin, 5-5; 3, Kristin Coffman, Tualatin, 5-5; 4, McKayla Fricker, Canby, 5-4; 5, Lexi Ross, Lakeridge, 5-3; 6, Morgan Rennekamp, Beaverton, 5-3; 7, Chelsea Strong, Centennial, 5-3; 8, Jessica Shivers, South Eugene, 5-3. Shot — 1, Elizabeth Brenner, Jesuit, 43-2 1/4; 2, Megan Hingston, McNary, 40-11; 3, Courtney Tripp, Sandy, 40-2 1/4; 4, Kallie Calhoun, South Eugene, 39-10; 5, Samantha Potter, Sunset, 39-8 1/2; 6, Angie Titus, Hood River Valley, 38-7 3/4; 7, Colleen Bailey, Gresham, 38-6 1/4; 8, Gabbi Parker, Sheldon, 38-6 1/4. Javelin — 1, Haley Crouser, Gresham, 161-6; 2, Elizabeth Brenner, Jesuit, 146-6; 3, Lexi Ross, Lakeridge, 142-1; 4, Brianna Bain, Aloha, 141-9; 5, Kim Gomez, North Medford, 135-6; 6, Justine Rennekamp, Beaverton, 132-5; 7, Haley Jordan, Redmond, 124; 8, Allison Burkett, Reynolds, 123-11. Long jump — 1, Kaleigh Morrison, Tigard, 17-10 1/2; 2, Jordan Dufault, South Salem, 17-4; 3, Tiara Prince, Southridge, 16-10; 4, Amy Wiley, Lakeridge, 16-9 1/4; 5, Susannah Philbrick, McKay, 16-8 1/2; 6, Kimberly Weston, Lakeridge, 16-7; 7, Jazmin Ratcliff, Benson, 16-6 1/4; 8, Maylea Tooze, North Salem, 16-5.

Class 5A Team scores — Glencoe 17, West Albany 16, Summit 15, Century 14, Pendleton 13, Hermiston 13, Crook County 11, Silverton 10, Sherwood 10, North Eugene 10, Crater 6, Crescent Valley 5, Ashland 4, Marshfield 3, Madras 3, Thurston 3, Madison 2, Cleveland 1. 3,000 — 1, Megan Fristoe, Summit, 10:23.08; 2, Morgan Anderson, Silverton, 10:28.10; 3, Jessica Vig, Crater, 10:30.91; 4, Kellie Foley, Crook County, 10:31.07; 5, Camelia Mayfield, Ashland, 10:34.53; 6, Meredith Wells, Crescent Valley, 10:35.01; 7, Summer Cano, Century, 10:48.98; 8, Kaytlin Fischer, Glencoe, 10:59.14. High jump — 1, Frances Pavao, Sherwood, 5-5; 2, Rachal Proteau, West Albany, 5-4; 3, Clara LaGrande, Crook County, 5-3; 4, Laney Hayes, Summit, 5-3; 5, Shelby Peterson, Century, 5-3; 6, Laura Sullivan, Madras, 5-0; 7, Samantha Whitaker, Silverton, 5-0; 8, Katie Pagh, Madison, 4-10.

Sisters Continued from D1 The Outlaws, who ended the season 22-6, never recovered. “The real crusher was when they got an extra chance to hit in the fifth,” Mauldin said. Banks (26-1) tacked on another two runs in the sixth to seal the victory. The Lady Braves recorded 13 hits and four home runs to the Outlaws’ eight hits. “We just didn’t make the plays you need to make to get out of the inning,” Mauldin added. “You can’t give a team like that that many chances.” Sisters pitcher Dara Kosanke recorded two hits Friday, finishing the season with a total of 60 in 28 games. The senior slugger notched a hit in ever game this year, scored a run in every game save one, and recorded 20 wins from the mound, according to Mauldin. Taylor Walker and Harley Rowe both posted doubles for the Outlaws who were without

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Javelin — 1, Kaylie VanLoo, Glencoe, 140-7; 2, Kayla Stewart, Pendleton, 131-10; 3, Tayler Feinauer, Glencoe, 129-7; 4, Hope Butler, Hermiston, 124-10; 5, Crystal Schmidt, Hermiston, 123-5; 6, Hannah Francis, Marshfield, 119-1; 7, Taylor Waite, Crescent Valley, 116-11; 8, Jessica Woods, Madison, 115-3. Long jump — 1, Iris Anderson, North Eugene, 17-5 1/4; 2, Shelby Peterson, Century, 17-2 1/2; 3, Jaclyn Silsby, West Albany, 17-0 1/2; 4, Terra Zodrow, Pendleton, 16-10 3/4; 5, Kay-Leigh Barnitz, Hermiston, 16-10 1/4; 6, Aliyah Gallup, Thurston, 16-10 1/4; 7, Katey Barger, Cleveland, 16-9 1/2; 8, Sara Carrasco, West Albany, 16-9.

Class 4A Team scores — Marist 35, Henley 16, Sweet Home 15, Estacada 15, Philomath 13, Cottage Grove 11, Sisters 10, Hidden Valley 9, Brookings-Harbor 8, North Bend 6, Siuslaw 5, Seaside 3, Newport 3, Gladstone 2, Banks 2, Astoria 2, Molalla 1. 3,000 — 1, Allie Sibole, Marist, 10:29.97; 2, Ally Manley, Brookings-Harbor, 10:38; 3, Heidi Gori, Marist, 10:51.53; 4, Sierra Brown, Hidden Valley, 10:52.72; 5, Annette Marinello, Philomath, 10:56.79; 6, Carissa Swanson, Sweet Home, 11:03.29; 7, Sara Reaser, Banks, 11:12.38; 8, Kirsten Farmer, Seaside, 11:18.74. High jump — 1, Chancey Summers, Estacada, 5-7; 2, Laura Shaudt, Philomath, 5-5; 3, Allie Rogers, Marist, 5-4; 4, Amanda Robert, Marist, 5-1; 5, Marie Enman, Henley, 5-0; 6, Ellie Morgan, Henley, 4-10; 7, Kai Davidson, Seaside, 4-10; 8, Madison McClung, Cottage Grove, 4-10. Javelin — 1, Jordan Brunetti, Cottage Grove, 150-5; 2, Annie Whitfield, Sweet Home, 130-8; 3, Cori Wallace, Henley, 129-4; 4, Seabre Church, Siuslaw, 127-0; 5, Joelle Swanson, Hidden Valley, 126-11; 6, Kacie Hargett, Newport, 126-3; 7, Chelsey Olson, Astoria, 119-7; 8, Michaela Farner, Molalla, 119-4. Long jump — 1, Annie Mutchler, Sisters, 16-11 1/4; 2, Olivia Houser, Marist, 16-10 1/2; 3, Brooke Davison, North Bend, 15-8 1/4; 4, Genna Settle, Estacada, 15-7 3/4; 5, Maria Kropf, Sweet Home, 15-0 1/2; 6, Jordin Scholer, Henley, 15-0; 7, Madison Cronin, Gladstone, 14-11 3/4; 8, Sara Ham, Philomath, 14-9 3/4.

BOYS TRACK OSAA STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Friday’s Results At Eugene Top eight individuals ———

Class 6A Team scores — North Medford 19, Reynolds 17, Sheldon 15, South Medford 12, Franklin 11, Gresham 10, Oregon City 10, Benson 8, Beaverton 8, Lincoln 7, McKay 6, Forest Grove 6, Grants Pass 5, Jesuit 5, Redmond 5, Tigard 4, Westview 3, Barlow 2, Sunset 1, West Linn 1, Sandy 1. 3,000 — 1, Drew Jordan, North Medford, 8:40.37; 2, Kevin Kavanaugh, Beaverton, 8:44.92; 3, Ian Burgess, Franklin, 8:45.78; 4, Matthew Melancon, Sheldon, 8:46.65; 5, Willie Milam, Jesuit, 8:50.38; 6, Bekama Jaldi, Reynolds, 8:54.40; 7, Ben Foubert, Barlow, 8:57.71; 8, Cullen Wannarka, West Linn, 8:59.84. Discus — 1, Sam Crouser, Gresham, 182-6; 2, Lanny Hawley, Reynolds, 156-6; 3, Chad Powell, McKay, 155-11; 4, John Tardieu, Grants Pass, 154-11; 5, Will Kunkle, North Medford, 151-4; 6, Duel Christiansen, Redmond, 145-9; 7, Curtis Middleton, Tigard, 143-3; 8, Ricky Kayfes, Sunset, 143-3. Pole vault — 1, J.J. Juilfs, Sheldon, 17-00; 2, Brandon Hooper, South Medford, 15-9; 3, Anthony Huffman, Forest Grove, 14-9; 4, David Formolo, North Medford, 14-6; 5, Aegir Olsen, Lincoln, 14-3; 6, Chris DeLacy, Lincoln, 13-9; 7, Matt Miyamoto, Redmond, 13-6; 8, Irvin Seo, Jesuit, 13-6. Triple jump — 1, Trevor Ferguson, Oregon City, 46-6; 2, Wesley Gray, Benson, 45-7; 3, Kyle Lane, Reynolds, 45-2; 4, Alex Sattley, Franklin, 44-00; 5, Josh Milhollin, South Medford; 6, Connor Taggard, Westview, 43-9; 7, Joseph Hart, Tigard, 43-6; 8, James Myrvold, Sandy, 42-6.

Class 5A Team scores — Thurston 24, Marshfield 21, The DallesWahtonka 16, Crater 14, Mazama 14, Klamath Union 13, Cleveland 10, Summit 9, Wilsonville 9, Glencoe 8, Hermiston 8, Mountain View 6 1/2, Madras 6, St. Helens 6, Springfield 5, Parkrose 5, Pendleton 3, Sherwood 3, Crescent Valley 2 1/2, Churchill 2, Eagle Point 2, North Eugene 2, Woodburn 2, Lebanon 1, South Albany 1, Hillsboro 1, Century 1. 3,000 — 1, Daniel Winn, Cleveland, 9:03.35; 2, Max Runia, Crater, 9:04.18; 3, Josh Elliott, Crater, 9:04.77; 4, Andrew Booth, Wilsonville, 9:06.08; 5, Travis Neuman, Summit, 9:06.69; 6, Crosby Green, Thurston , 9:09.91; 7, Mark Sheridan, Churchill, 9:13.96; 8, Pat Madden, Summit, 9:14.60. Discus — 1, Josh Peck, Mazama, 185-07; 2, Dalton Milburn, Marshfield, 166-10; 3, James Atoe, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 159-5; 4, Javan Gray, Thurston, 145-4; 5, Aaron Koford, Wilsonville, 1428; 6, Cody Rick, Klamath Union, 139-9; 7, Andy Avgi, Woodburn, 138-1; 8, Spencer Jackson, Hillsboro, 137-5. Pole vault — 1, Zach Cramblit, Thurston, 14-6; 2, Austin Maxwell, Glencoe, 14-6; 3, Justin Brown, Madras, 13-9; 4, Chris Krajcir, Marshfield, 13-9; 5, Evan Bassford, Summit, 13-6; 6, Quinn Jacobson, Mountain View, 13-00; 6, Doug Pentland, Crescent Valley, 13-00; 8, Dylan Vandehey, Century, 13-00. Shot — 1, James Atoe, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 54-3; 2, Faafiaula Ena, Hermiston, 53-00; 3, Javan Gray, Thurston, 52-2; 4, Taylor King, Parkrose, 51-7; 5, Josh Peck, Mazama, 49-11; 6, Scott Southwell, Sherwood, 49-10; 7, Michael Bibbee, North Eugene, 49-00; 8, Josiah Olson, 48-1. Triple jump — 1, Deon McLaughlin, Klamath Union, 46-2; 2, Blake Kemp, Marshfield, 44-6; 3, Nieko Jones, St. Helens, 44-4; 4, Kyle George, Springfield, 43-9; 5, Kenny Bent, Mountain View, 436; 6, Brian Barry, Pendleton, 43-1; 7, Austin Marlia, Eagle Point, 42-4; 8, Adam Schamp, South Albany, 41-10.

PREP BOYS TRACK AND FIELD

Madras pole vaulter leads locals at state Bu ffs’ Justin Brown takes third place at 5A meet, while La P ine and Sisters athletes place third in 4A Bulletin staff report EUGENE — Madras senior pole vaulter Justin Brown finally hit his stride this month. On May 7, at a meet in Stayton, Brown set a new personal best with a vault of 13 feet, 6 inches, bettering his old PR by a foot. At last week’s Intermountain Conference district he went even higher, posting a vault of 14 feet to win the district championships. On Friday, during the first day of the Class 5A track and field championships at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field, the White Buffaloes’ three-sport standout ended his high school athletic career with a third-place effort in the boys pole vault. Brown, who was making his state track debut, went 13-9 to lead a trio of Central Oregon competitors. Summit junior Evan Bassford took fifth (13-6) and Mountain View junior Quinn Jacobson tied for sixth (13-0). Thurston’s Zach Cramblit won the 5A boys pole vault with a mark of 14-6. Glencoe’s Austin Maxwell took second with the same mark, 14-6, but Cramblit had fewer misses to claim the state title. La Pine senior Ty Slater also ended the opening day of state with a third-place finish. Slater, who will compete in today’s 4A javelin competition, took third in the Class 4A discus with a toss of 161 feet, 7 inches. Newport sophomore Oshay Dunmore won the event with a mark of 166-07. Slater’s toss on Friday was just three inches of his PR. Sisters junior Taylor Steele had a strong day at the 4A meet as well, finishing third in 3,000. Steele’s teammate, Parker Bennett, placed seventh. Henley’s Jed Tolbert won the 4A 3,000 by almost 6 seconds with a time of 8 minutes, 44.13 seconds. In the 5A triple jump, Mountain View senior Kenny Bent ended his high school track career with a fifth-place finish in the triple jump. And in the Class 6A pole vault, Redmond junior Matt Miyamoto placed seventh. The Class 6A, 5A and 4A state track meets resume today at 9:30 a.m.

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Madras High’s Justin Brown competes in the pole vault during the Class 5A state track and field championships on Friday at Eugene’s Hayward Field. Brown took third.

Class 4A Team scores — Hidden Valley 18, Cascade 16, North Valley 16, Newport 14, Siuslaw 13, La Grande 11, Sweet Home 10, Henley 10, Elmira 10, Marist 9, Gladstone 8, Sisters 8, Douglas 6, La Pine 6, Banks 6, Scappoose 5, La Salle 5, Taft 4, Philomath 3, Ontario 3, Pleasant Hill 3, McLoughlin 3, Central 2, South Umpqua 2, Seaside 2, Estacada 2. 3,000 — 1, Jed Tolbert, Henley, 8:44.13; 2, Jacob Berkner, Siuslaw, 8:50.07; 3, Taylor Steele, Sisters, 8:53.91; 4, Joe Campbell, Siuslaw, 8:55.82; 5, Brady Beagley, North Valley, 8:55.92; 6, Josh Seekatz, Philomath, 8:58.34; 7, Parker Bennett, Sisters, 9:07.86; 8, Brad Prettyman, Estacada, 9:15.62. Discus — 1, Oshay Dunmore, Newport, 166-07; 2, Jefferson Jarvis, Hidden Valley, 165-10; 3, Ty Slater, La Pine, 161-07; 4, Justin Gregory, Cascade, 150-06; 5, Travis George, North Valley, 145-11; 6, Brett Burbee, Pleasant Hill, 144-03; 7, Kaden McFarland, South Umpqua, 141-10; 8, Erik Calhoon, 139-7. Pole vault — 1, Dakotah Keys, Sweet Home, 15-00; 2, Devon Renard, Gladstone, 14-3; 3, Matt Hildago, Banks, 14-00; 4, Caleb Hawkins, Cascade, 14-00; 5, Jonnie Clark, Scappoose, 14-00; 6, Oshay Dunmore, Newport, 13-9; 7, Connor White, La Grande, 136; 8, Zach Brown, Newport, 13-6. Shot — 1, Jefferson Jarvis, Hidden Valley, 54-7; 2, Levi Toller, North Valley, 50-8; 3, Steven Bishop, Cascade, 49-6.25; 4, John Atkinson, La Salle, 48-4.75; 5, Walker Hudkins, La Grande, 47-7 1/2; 6, Zach Conlee, McLoughlin, 47-7; 7, Jesse Peters, Central, 46-4; 8, Nick Gammie, Marist, 45-11. Triple jump — 1, Brett Breding, Elmira, 44-4; 2, Mitchel Wilson, Marist, 43-10; 3, Mike Bodenhamer, 42-11; 4, Ryan Tooke, La Grande, 42-3; 5, Thomas Lovejoy, Taft, 41-11; 6, Joe Delgado, Ontario, 41-8; 7, Jackson Meyer, Seaside, 41-2; 8, Alex Pursel, Estacada, 41-1.

junior starter Amber Milliman on Friday.

Matthew Aimonetti / For The Bulletin

Crook County’s Clara LaGrande competes in the girls high jump during the Class 5A state track and field championships on Friday at Eugene’s Hayward Field. LaGrande finished in third place.

Summit Continued from D1 “Megan ran a fantastic race,” said Summit coach Dave Turnbull. “It was a really, really intelligent race.”

Morgan Anderson of Silverton finished second in 10:28.10, Crater’s Jessica Vig placed third in 10:30.91 and Crook County junior Kellie Foley ended the race in fourth with a time of 10:31.07. “She didn’t have to use her

kick,” Turnbull said, referring to Fristoe’s come-from-behind win at districts over Foley. “Her training’s really paying off. Now she’s just got more energy.” Sisters senior Annie Mutchler also claimed a state title on Friday, winning the Class 4A girls long jump. The favorite entering the event, Mutchler popped off a jump of 16 feet, 11 1⁄4 inches on her final jump to surpass Marist sophomore Olivia Houser, who finished second with a mark of 16-10 1⁄2. Mutchler, who helped the Outlaws’ 400-meter relay team advance past Friday’s preliminary round, will also compete in today’s triple jump. Sisters ended the first day of the 4A state meet in seventh place with 10 points. Marist led all 4A schools with 35 points. While Fristoe and Mutchler

were the only Central Oregonians to win state titles Friday, multiple other area athletes fared well on the opening day of state competition. In the 5A high jump, Crook County senior Clara LaGrande, a foreign-exchange student from France, placed third with a mark of 5-3. Summit freshman Laney Hayes finished fourth (5-3) and Madras sophomore Laura Sullivan took sixth (5-0). Sherwood senior Frances Favao won the high jump, clearing 5-5. At the 6A meet, Redmond’s Haley Jordan posted a top-10 finish in the javelin, finishing seventh with a toss of 124-00. The 6A, 5A and 4A state meets continue today at 9:30 a.m.

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D8 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

U.S. star Donovan finds peace heading into World Cup SOCCER

By Ronald Blum The Associated Press

PHILADELPHIA — Landon Donovan turned inward, trying to find out who he is. He was a joy-filled 20-yearold in 2002 who helped lead the United States to its best World Cup finish in 72 years, filled with optimism and thoughts that one day he and his teammates could lift the gold trophy above their shoulders. Four years later, it was more like world on his shoulders than the World Cup, his mind weighed down by the expectations his precocious talent had created. Soccer had become the burden of his life instead of the passion. Now, two weeks from his third World Cup, he sounds at peace. With the demands, with his talent, and with himself. It’s been a long road. “It started eight years ago on July 4, after an L.A. Galaxy-San Jose Earthquake game where I met my now ex-wife Bianca, who has taught me more about myself than I’ve ever known, and continues to do that,” he said. “And that was the beginning of it all.” In addition to being the top American soccer player, he’s the most well-spoken, a critical analyst of himself and the game. What other player would credit his growth to his former wife, Bianca Kajlich, and speak of her so glowingly? “Bianca is an actress and if any of you know what that life is like, it can be miserable at times, and she has fought very hard for everything she has gotten,” he said. “And I, on the other hand, have been pretty blessed and fortunate with the ability that I’ve been given and also the opportunities I’ve been given. And when you get that perspective and realize that you can’t take things for granted, it hits you real. It hits you hard when it comes from your wife and your best friend.” Setting records with 42 goals and 42 assists, he already is the most accomplished offensive player in American national team history even though he’s just 28. Yet, much of the reputation he made by scoring twice at the 2002 World Cup was unmade when he virtually disappeared at the 2006 tournament, unwilling to get into the flow of the game or

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

U.S. men’s soccer player Landon Donovan gestures while talking with a teammate during practice Friday in Philadelphia.

Goalie hails U.S. coach’s gentle approach LONDON — When the United States takes on England in their World Cup opener, expect a clash of cultures and coaching styles. While Fabio Capello has cultivated a fearsome reputation in the England camp, U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard says his team should thrive in South Africa thanks to the more congenial atmosphere encouraged by Bob Bradley. Howard is based in England with Premier League club Everton, and has been able to observe Capello since he took charge of the national team there in January 2008, when it was at one of its lowest ebbs. “With Bob Bradley there is a huge amount of respect there, but to say that we don’t fear him is the way that he is,” Howard said in an interview. “He is very gentle in terms of how he interacts with his players and he doesn’t want there to be a barrier. “Yes of course there is a hierarchy — he is the manager and what he says goes and as players we respect each other and we respect him — but he doesn’t want there to be a wall.” And players are not afraid to tell Howard what they think. “He wants there to be open lines of communication and he wants to be able to have conversations with players and get their feedback and that allows him to do his job better,” Howard said as he prepares for the June 12 opener against England. England striker Peter Crouch last week praised Capello’s disciplinarian approach — one that is in marked contrast to Sven-Goran Eriksson’s more relaxed rule between 2001-06. “Sven was a lot more laid-back,” said Crouch, who will face Howard in Rustenburg. “This time the atmosphere seems a lot more serious, a lot more focused.” — The Associated Press even to want the ball. He was unsure of his place on the team, uncomfortable leading in a group that included Claudio Reyna and Brian McBride. No longer the just-past-teenage star who was selected MVP of the 1999 FIFA Under-17 World Championship, he was stranded between the goalposts of youth

and maturity. “Landon was in a tough situation. In 2006, we didn’t have quite the leadership we needed,” said Bruce Arena, the former national team coach who now leads Donovan’s Los Angeles Galaxy. “One of Landon’s faults in he’s in some ways a little too intelligent.” Back then, Donovan needed to

be content to perform. When he wasn’t in a good frame of mind off the field, it showed on the pitch, “I think Landon kind of shuts down as a person when he’s not happy,” Kajlich said during qualifying in 2005. He struggled to gain acceptance as a top club player, and that caused him to go back and forth across the Atlantic in search of satisfaction. Although he signed a sixyear deal with Bayer Leverkusen as a 16-year-old in 1999 and left California for Germany, he didn’t play a game in two years and was loaned to the San Jose Earthquakes of MLS in 2001. He rejoined Leverkusen in January 2005 and made nine appearances, but was unhappy being so far from Kajlich. He lasted just two months on his second stint in Europe and returned to Major League Soccer with the Galaxy. Europe stint No. 3 was just as unrewarding. He was loaned to German power Bayern Munich in January 2009 and failed to score in six competitive matches. Listening to Juergen Klinsmann, Bayern Munich’s coach at the time, Donovan was given a mental hazing by Bayern’s stars. “They don’t tell you, you know, ‘Good to have you here, you know. We give you the starting spot.’ They tell you the opposite,” Klinsmann said. Instead of three strikes and you’re out, Donovan returned to Europe for a fourth time when he was loaned to Everton this January. The culture and the soccer were more to his taste (even if the cold, cloudy weather was not). The Toffees were 5-7-7 when he joined, and he scored two goals in 13 games, getting voted player of the month for January. Everton finished its Premier League season at 16-9-13. “Absolutely outstanding,” Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson said. “I think they wanted him to stay but the agreement was he had to go back.” Support from his teammates in England was key. “When I went to Everton, there was immediate respect, and that

was eye-opening for me, because I had never experienced that in Europe,” Donovan said. “I’ve always been pretty confident, but knowing that you can play against the best players in the world, week in, week out is a big boost. And that for me was the biggest thing.” And when he went back to the Galaxy, he played some of his best soccer. With an impact far larger than his 5-foot-8 frame, he had an MLS-leading nine assists, helping the Galaxy to a 7-02 start before he reported to the national team. Even before the latest loan, he made peace with David Beckham following his critical comments about the English star in a book last year. Donovan took over from Becks as the Galaxy captain. And, helped by Donovan’s distribution skills and overall influence, Edson Buddle became MLS’s leading scorer this season with nine goals in nine games. After not playing for the national team for seven years, he made the World

Cup roster this week. “I think that there were a lot of expectations placed on him and in retrospect he realized that he didn’t know how to properly handle those expectations,” said Donovan’s longtime agent, Richard Motzkin. “How he worked through that with David and with his teammates and sort of reinstated himself as a leader of Galaxy was a very important time last summer.” Now Donovan says he’s in the right frame of mind. When he takes the field, the rest of his life gets put on hold instead of holding him back. If the United States is to advance past the first round and make up for its awful exit of 2006, Donovan must lead the charge, starting June 12 against England. “I changed the way I look at my career, the way I play,” he said. “I would almost say I’m a 180, that things have changed completely in almost a 180 from where I was four years ago.”

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E SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Roof Overhead Before you buy or sell a home, be sure to find out the condition of the roof.

by Nicole Werner & Metro Creative Services, for The Bulletin Advertising Department Replacing a roof is a major investment for any homeowner, and it’s important to know the condition of a roof before buying or selling a home. Knowing how to spot signs of roof damage is especially important for people shopping for homes. Local roofi ng experts Craig Junker, owner of River Roofi ng, and Troy Stone, general manager of McMurray & Sons, Inc., help homeowners determine what will work best for their homes when it’s time to replace a roof.

What are the lifespans of different roofing materials? The lifespan of different types of roofi ng materials varies dramatically. According Junker, older composition roofing has a lifespan of 17 to 23 years, while medium shakes typically are replaced every 18 to 20 years. “We see some heavy shake roofi ng that has performed for over 30 years,” said Junker. Metal and tile roofi ng are expected to last 40 to 50 years depending on the quality of the material originally installed. The lifespan of flat roofi ng can range from 10 years to 35 years depending on materials and how well the roof was maintained over the years.

How can you tell if a roof should be replaced? Both experts agree that cracking and blistering may be the most obvious signs of a roof that needs to be replaced. “If your roof is over 15 to 20 years old, you should have it inspected by a certified roofing contractor,” said Stone. Junker explained that other signs that materials need to be replaced are excessive loss of granules from the surface of the material and curling of the shingles, “Shakes that may need to be replaced will blow off in mild winds, show exposed felt paper between the shakes, have holes in the shakes or be worn paper thin at the upper portions of each individual shake,” said Junker. He added that metal roofi ng that may need replacement will show severe wear of the paint fi nish in the form of blistering or peeling from the metal surface. Homeowners with metal roofs should also be aware of rust pits or holes through the metal. “Flat roofi ng may pull away from walls, pipe or drain flashings, or seams in the material may separate,” said Junker. “If a singleply membrane is wearing out, it may show exposed fibers (called scrim) that were originally in the middle of the membrane,

and it can separate at transitions or seams similar to other flat roofi ng materials.”

What types of roofing materials are available in Central Oregon? “It is very important that the correct material is selected for our climate,” said Junker. “Only select materials that are very dense should be installed in Central Oregon because of the freeze and thaw cycles that we experience.” Stone explained that composition shingles, concrete tile, standing seam metal and single-ply membrane materials are available in Central Oregon. Junker added that all roofing materials in Deschutes County and the City of Bend must be “Class A Fire Rated”—fireproof—and made of alternative materials including stone coated steel, clay tile and wood shingles with special fire treatment and special underlayments. “Areas outside of Deschutes County have all of the same options but do not have to meet the special requirements for shakes and wood shingles,” he said.

What are the pros and cons of different roofing materials? “Composition roofing is very solid for Central Oregon, but many people who are replacing a

“It is very important that the correct material is selected for our clients.”

shingle or shake roof.” Standing seam metal roofi ng will hold up very well in Central Oregon with the proper type of paint. “Metal and single-ply can achieve an Energy Star rating and offer a tax break,” said Stone. According to Junker, stone-coated metal is the best roofing material for Central Oregon because it is lightweight, holds snow like a rough tile or a composition roof, is hail-resistant, can be walked on, is fireproof and will outlast many other types of roofing material. Cement tile, clay tile and slate are able to stand up to the elements in Central Oregon; however, they are heavy and the structures on which the materials are installed must be inspected by engineers to ensure proper support. Tile roofs also tend to require more maintenance. “Shakes and wood shingles are beautiful and consistent with historic materials on many projects,” said Junker. “They perform very well for the life of the roof, but the life tends to be shorter than most other materials. Most wood shingle or medium shake roofing last 20 years or less in Central Oregon.” He added that the raw materials are expensive when compared to other materials, and more so for fireproof materials, which also tend to have shorter lifespans. Wood shingles and shakes are most often installed only on projects that have historic value.

What factors make the greatest impact on the cost of roof replacement? shake roof are concerned that the composition roofing does not have as much character in terms of thickness and variation as a shake roof,” said Junker. “In recent years, the composition manufacturers have developed thicker specialty products that do a nice job of simulating the thickness and character of a wood

The type of roofi ng material is of course the biggest factor in the cost of replacing a roof. Other factors that Stone said would impact the fi nal installation cost include the slope of the roof and accessibility. Removal of multiple layers of existing roofing material and the type of roof sheathing will also affect the cost of a new roof.

Which roofing materials would be better options for those who desire “green” materials? Junker and Stone noted that a broad range of materials available are approved as green materials. They include certain brands of composition, metal roofi ng, cement and clay tile, and many of the flat roofing materials.


E2 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 1165 NE Lafayette Attractive home near Pilot Butte, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, corner lot, fenced yard. $895 541.382.7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

NICE DUPLEX on cul-de-sac, 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bdrm, 1½ bath, sgl. car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. incl. w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

1st Month’s Rent Free 4 bdrm/ 2bath on lrg lot, deck, fncd bckyrd, pets ok, all appl. frplce, 1627 NE Cackler ln. $1095+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

$ Pick Your Special $ 2 bdrm, 1 bath $525 & $535 Carports & A/C included. Pet Friendly & No App Fee! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

SUBSIDIZED UNIT 2 bdrm (upstairs) available at this time. 62 & over and/or Disability Multi-Family Housing/ Project-based Greenwood Manor Apts 2248 NE 4th Street Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 389-2712. TDD 800-735-2900 Guardian Management Corporation is committed to “Equal Housing Opportunity”

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1205 NW Stannium Westside! 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas fireplace, w/d hook-ups in garage, water/sewer paid! $695. 541..382.7727

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1 Bdrm. $400+dep. Studio $385+dep. No pets/smoking, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 NW Irving #2, near downtown Bend. 541-389-4902.

899 NE Hidden Valley #2

This Weekend’s

1/2 OFF the 1st Month’s Rent! 2 bedroom, all appliances, gas fireplace, w/s paid, garage. $650 mo. 541-382-7727

541-322-7253

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

SNOWBERRY VILLAGE SATURDAY 1-3 PM Several beautiful homes available in Bend’s premier 55+ community. 1188 NE 27th Location, value, Directions: Hwy. 20 East, left convenience and on 27th St., right into Snowberry the carefree lifestyle Village. you deserve. PRICED TO SELL!

S AT U R D AY & S U N D AY

61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

Tumalo Studio: 2 rooms, own bath & kitchen, separate entrance, util., wi-fi, & satellite TV incl., $475, avail. 5/15, 541-389-6720.

Need small, clean, furnished apt. or condo near downtown. must have 1 parking. Will need for 6 to 8 months. 360-921-0640

First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th St. 1/2bdrm 1 bath, w/s/g pd., laundry room, no smoking, close to school. $495-525 rent+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

1st Month Free 6 month lease!

Country Terrace

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

638

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1785 NE Lotus 'B’ 3 Bdrm, 2½ bath, w/ bonus room, All Appliances, garage, w/s paid. $825 mo. 541-382-7727

$350 mo. plus util. room/bath. Full house access, artists pueblo. 541-389-4588.

631

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

648

Houses for Rent General

(541) 383-3152

Want To Rent

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

Avail. Now, Newer Duplex 55+ near medical, 1 story, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/D, gas fireplace, garage, no smoking or pets $800 419-8555.

642

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr Mt. Bachelor Motel has 3018 NE Canoe Ct. #1 rooms, starting at $150/wk. access, $90/month, Call $200 off 1st months rent! or $25/night. Incl. guest Rob, 541-410-4255. laundry, cable & WiFi. 2 Bdrm, 2½ bath, all appli541-382-6365 ances, gas fireplace, 1130 sq. 605 ft., garage, w/s paid! $725

Roommate Wanted

1/2 off 1st months rent! Spacious, upstairs 3 bdrm near river, all appliances, all utilities included. $700. 541-382-7727

210 NW REVERE #B

(Private Party ads only)

Rooms for Rent Storage Rentals

The Bulletin Classifieds

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

630 604

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

600

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719

616

Rentals

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Hosted & Listed by: MARILYN ROHALY

SUDAY 1-3

SAT & SUN 12-5 3,040 sq. ft. lodge-style home on 8 private acres, large deck and water feature, RV hookups, heritage junipers, close to BLM, in subdivision w/paved streets & low HOA fees. 30 minutes to Redmond Airport, Sisters & 4 golf courses. Great room w/12’ beam ceiling & wood burning fireplace, private master suite, 6’ jetted tub, bonus room over 3-car garage.

2375 NE Buckwheat Court Directions: Hwy. 20 east, north on 27th past Neff, left at Rosemary to back of Mt. View Park.

PRICED TO SELL!

$169,500

Hosted by: CEC DE CLERCK

Bend, Oregon

809 SW Canyon Dr. Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-1250

Hosted & Listed by: MARILYN ROHALY

541-322-9954

Broker

541-420-0548

Broker Bend, Oregon

VIEWS & RIVER FRONTAGE

Gated community features pool, sports court and RV area. This 1716 sq. ft. home extensively upgraded. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, a ‘Martha Stewart’ kitchen, family room, living room and separate dining area.

$59,500 - $149,500

Broker

541-322-9954

DRASTIC REDUCTION

21275 NW Roberts Ct. Directions: From Redmond take Hwy 97 N. approx. 6 miles., turn left on Lower Bridge Way and go approx. 7 miles, take left on Teater St., right on 83rd Pl. and left on Roberts Ct. (in Terrebonne)

$723,500


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 E3

650

650

654

658

660

687

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Houses for Rent La Pine

Commercial for Rent/Lease

159 SE ROOSEVELT #2 1 bedroom 1 bath above

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $650/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

1944½ NW 2nd St NEED STORAGE OR A CRAFT STUDIO? 570 sq. ft. garage, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat $275. Call 541-382-7727

2271 NE PHEASANT LN. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, single car garage, wood stove, fenced yard, new flooring, paint and windows. Avail. now. $875/mo+ dep ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

2652 NE Genet Ct. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, gas heat, dbl garage, large fenced lot on cul-de-sac. $895 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

2843 NE Purcell 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., new carpet & paint, dbl garage, fenced yard on large corner lot. $895. 541-382-7727

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 61150 Ropp Lane

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near shopping & hospital dbl. garage, large fenced yard w/ sprinklers, $950/mo., pets neg. 541-390-2915

$1395 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2100 sq.ft., tile counters, breakfast bar, formal dining, jetted tub, loft, deck, gas fireplace, walk in closets, heat pump, near golf, fenced, dbl garage w/opener. 2424 NW Hemmingway

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

659

20437 WHISTLE PUNK Nice single level 2 bedroom, 2 bath plus den. Hardwood floors, tile counter tops, stainless appliances and much more. A must see. Sorry, no pets $1130/mo. + dep ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558 Mountain High, 2 bdrm., den, dbl. garage on GOLF COURSE, Whirlpool tub, deck, pool & tennis. $1250. 858-248-5285.

A Newly Remodeled 1+1, vaulted ceilings, hardwood floors, small yard, w/fruit trees, dog area/garden, utils incl., $750, 541-617-5787. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, $700 mo. + last + dep. No pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, Bend and call # off sign for appointment to see. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961

682

Farms, Ranches and Acreage ACREAGE with VIEWS Beautiful 79.10 acs with 73.8 acs of flood irrigation plus huge Cascade and Smith Rock views. Located in the much sought after Powell Butte Valley. MLS# 201003565 Priced to sell at $389,000.

Brook Havens, Broker 541-604-0788

60525 Umatilla in DRW

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

661

3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, wood stove, dbl garage, ½ acre lot! Pets ok! $850 541.382.7727

An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803.

699 NW Florida 3/ 2.5/ dbl grge. Extra nice, dwntwn, spacious. Lrg deck, Enrgy Effcnt, w/d, gardener, no pets/smkng. $975+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. 1, 2, 3 & 4 bdrm homes available. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at www.Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Houses for Rent Prineville

656

64 NW MCKAY

The Bulletin Classifieds

Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, owners residence, very peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at 541-306-1039.

NEWER stick built 2 bedroom, 1 bath, large garage, forced air heat pump. on 6 acres, $700 month. 541-815-8884.

Houses for Rent SW Bend

smaller 2 bedroom 1 bath home close to river and downtown. Laundry hook ups, storage and 3rd room for an office or whatever. $675/mo. + dep. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

Houses for Rent Sunriver

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

541-385-5809

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

3 Bdrm, 2 bath manufactured home w/ shop, all appliances, woodstove & pellet stove on 5 acres, fenced, pets ok! $995. 541-382-7727

garage. Washer/Dryer, single car garage, close to Old Mill. Avail now. $550/mo. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558

$425 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 700 sq.ft., range, fridge, gas wall heat, large yard, storage shed, pet considered, close to downtown. 332 SW 10th St. $895 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1600 sq.ft., gas range, fridge, dishwasher, micro, washer/dryer, gas fireplace, sprinklers, dbl garage w/opener. 1028 NW Spruce $925 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1700 sq.ft., single level, range, fridge, dishwasher, micro, w/d hookups, gas fireplace, fenced, sprinklers, dbl garage w/opener. 1986 NW Joshua Tree Ct. $1000 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1800 sq.ft., central air, gas fireplace, great room, skylights, walk in closet, oversized double garage w/opener. Golf Community. 4250 Ben Hogan $1350 4 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 3100 sq.ft., mountain views, walk-in closets, jetted tub, private deck, 5-burner gas range, gourmet kitchen, central air, triple garage w/opener. 2533 SW 43rd Ct.

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717 Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $650 a month. 541-923-7343

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

4225 SW Bend Hogan 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appl., gas heat, dbl garage, fenced yard right on golf course! $895 541.382.7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

5135 NE 15th St. ‘A’ 2 Bdrm mobile in country setting. New carpet and vinyl, extra storage. $475. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

$625 - 2/1, sgl. level, w/d, fridge, range, dishwasher incl. Forced air heat. Covered back patio, fenced back yard. sgl carport. Avail. now. $975 - 3/2, sgl. level, huge living room, all appl., gas heat. lrg. utility, fully landscaped, fenced back yard with pet area. Avail. now.

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

SPOTLESS 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, RV parking, fenced, cul-de-sac, avail. now., lawn care incl., $995/mo. 541-480-7653

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

541-548-9994 • 480-1685 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl,. Gardener W/D, $795 mo.. 541-408-0877.

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

SECTION!!!

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


E4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item $ 00

Under 200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item to be sold.

www.b end b ulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 E5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

747

757

Southwest Bend Homes Crook County Homes 3 Bdrm. + den, 2.5 bath, 1825 sq.ft., master bdrm. on main, near Old Mill, walking trails, schools, upgraded throughout, landscaped, A/C, great neighborhood, ready to move in, great value at $296,000, 425-923-9602, 425-923-9603

Large 2/1 home, large bonus room, living room, new roof and garage. Bring any reasonable offer. Call Keith at 503-329-7053.

Best Price in Bend: 3 Brdm., 2 bath, on .88 acre, 1728 sq.ft., 60283 Cinder Butte, limited time, $129,000 By Owner, Cell, 480-357-6044.

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes 4.22 acres inside city limits. Potential subdivision, contract terms, 1700+ sq.ft., 3/2 ranch home, pond, barn. $559,950. 503-329-7053.

762

Homes with Acreage Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Detached Garage/shop, Circle Drive w/RV Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area. $224,900 Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203.

764

Farms and Ranches 35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, pond & super private well, 75 year old owner will sacrifice for $425,000. 541-447-1039

BY OWNER, Clean older home in great neighborhood. $107,000. 1429 SW 11th. (503) 440-5072 (503) 717-0403 Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

732

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

Government Property for Sale – Sealed Bid Auction for the off-site removal of 3 buildings from the Fremont-Winema National Forests in Lakeview and Bly, Oregon Bid Opening 2:00 p.m. 6/23/2010. Go to www.auctionrp.com and click on Oregon for more info. or call 253-931-7556

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

744

Open Houses Awesome Views, 2068 NW Cascade View Dr, Sat. 11-2, 3/2.5, wraparound deck, recording studio, Stephanie Waugh, Broker,541-306-0741

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** FSBO: $10,000 Down and Take over Payments on a real Log Cabin, 1+1+loft & Garage, on 1.5 acre wooded landscaped lot,541-617-5787 John Day: 2003 3 bdrm., 2.5 baths, 1920 sq. ft., w/stove, f/a heat, vaulted living room, silestone counters/stainless appl., master suite/wic, dbl. garage, .92 acres fenced, decks/views. PUD $289,500. 541-575-0056 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Trade your Bend Area Home for my 6 yr. 4 bdrm., 2.5 bath, Central Point home, planned development, nice views, 541-941-6915. www.dukewarner.com The Only Address to Remember for Central Oregon Real Estate

Foreclosed Property, very clean single level house, 1540 sq. ft., 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, on 9.7 acres, 5.25 acres irrigated. Seller will 3.5% foreclosing cost if closed before June 30th, $260,000. Call Violeta, Broker, 541-419-3522.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes F S B O : Cozy 2+2, dbl. garage, w/decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, near Lodge, $275,000, owner terms, 541-617-5787.

541-322-7253

775

Foreclosed Property, great price at $34,900. 0.43 acre lot, backs to irrigation canal, 651 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend. Call Violeta, Broker, 541-419-3522

Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

775

The Bulletin Classifieds

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $29,900, 541-480-4059.

541-385-5809 Will Finance, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fireplace, incl. fridge, range, washer & dryer, new paint & flooring, $8900, $1000 down, $200/mo., 541-383-5130.

773

Acreages 14 ACRES, tall pines bordering Fremont National Forest, fronts on paved road, power at property. Zoned R5 residential, 12 miles north of Bly, OR. $45,000. Terms owner 541-783-2829.

Own Property on Lake Billy Chinook

713

Real Estate Wanted REAL ESTATE WANTED. Commercial land in Sisters or house close to downtown, priced under $200,000. Phone 503-827-3995 Phyllis

773

Acreages

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

749

Southeast Bend Homes

771

Lots

771

Lots

Check out the LIVE Webcam and view current listings

www.lakebillychinookproperties.com

1 Acre Corner Lot Sun Forest Estates, buildable, standard septic approved $49,000 or trade, owner financing? 503-630-3220..

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., private homesite, great view, gated community $350,000 OWC. 541-549-7268.

Elaine Budden, Broker 541-480-3860

Dick Dodson Realty www.threeriversproperty.com

Getting directions to Central Oregon’s best garage sales has never been EASIER! Go to www.bendbulletin.com/garagesales. You’ll find garage sales accompanied by a local map to make your garage sale trek easier.

We can show you the fastest way to the local garage sales. Save time & money and go to www.bendbulletin.com/garagesales TO SUBSCRIBE CALL

541-385-5800


E6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE 541-382-4123

486 SW Bluff Dr.

MORRIS REAL ESTATE Independently Owned and Operated

Bend, OR 97702

REALTOR

SW Bend | $149,500

Two Masters | $150,000

NW Bend | $247,500

Sisters | $184,900

New Construction | $195,000

Enjoy the sunrise from this large east facing view lot. Some City, Smith Rocks and southern views. Almost 1/4 acre and reduced to $129,000! MLS#201000931

Under construction, estimated completion date 6/10/10. 2 story home with single car garage. Located on a private .82 acre lot with an RV area. Street to property is paved. MLS#201004460

CHECK THIS PRICE!! Can’t be beat NE condo with double garage, clubhouse with pool, spa & tennis. 2 master suites, over 1600 sq. ft. & fresh paint. MLS#2911178

Cottage style house, close to downtown. Original hardwoods refinished. Room next to garage is rented but could be great office. 1-car garage, fenced back yard. Hosted by Lynne Connelley 541-408-6720. Directions: Located between Newport Avenue & Portland Ave. 1532 Awbrey Rd MLS#201002000

Cozy log cabin in Sisters with lots of windows to let in the light. 2 big bedrooms, each with its own private bath. Located on one, treed acre; you can own your own piece of paradise! MLS#201001447

Transition seamlessly and graciously through the stages of your life in this new single-level 1700 sq. ft. home with 3 bedrooms & 2 baths built with your needs in mind. Wide doorways, energy efficient. MLS#2909879

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, WRC President 541-420-1111 541-383-4364 541-383-4349

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

Pronghorn | $200,000 Remodeled on .96 of an Acre | $214,500 Three Rivers South | $225,000 Mid-town Bend | $225,000

SE Bend | $229,000

SW Bend | $235,000

Wonderful 2054 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on a quiet cul-de-sac. Open kitchen/dining area, den/office, spacious master suite. Beautifuly landscaped corner lot, fenced back yard, large deck. MLS#201004435

Elkhorn Estates, a great southwest location. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2278 sq. ft. single level. Vaulted ceilings, like new condition, priced to sell. MLS#201003603 Virtual Tour: www.tourfactory.com/606207

SA O P T. EN 12 -3

Rivers Edge Village | $129,000

LI NE ST W IN G

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

This beautiful home in River Meadows includes granite counter-tops, hardwood floors and a gas fireplace. Enjoy the River Meadows lifestyle with tennis, swimming, trails and river access. MLS#201004438

2 brick houses on 1 lot. Back house is 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. Front house is 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Homes are separated, have separate parking spots & private, large yards. Great rental history. MLS#201002068

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS CHUCK OVERTON, Broker, CRS, ABR 541-383-4361 541-383-4363

La Pine | $239,000

Newer Extra Garage

Deschutes River Lot | $249,000

NW Bend | $270,000

SW Bend/RV Parking | $288,800 Eagle Crest on the Creek | $299,000

3 bedroom, 2 bath, office, walk-in closet, jetted tub & marble tile. Tongue & groved pine vaulted ceiling. 2-car detached garage. Located in Tall Pines north of downtown La Pine, privacy on 1 acre. MLS#201003652

Updated beautiful 3 bedroom home with 2-car garage + a detached extra garage that has heat. Situated on a cul-de-sac. For complete info please call the toll-free recording at 800-909-8572 ext. 111. MLS#201004017

1.0 acre Bend Deschutes River view lot. Level building site amongst mature Ponderosas. River and surrounding forest vistas. Privacy, Wildlife. Nature’s finest water feature. You won’t want to leave. MLS#201002533

Single level on a large lot, faces SE. Vaulted ceiling with bonus loft living area. Large under house storage. Dog yard, fenced yard, large deck and welcoming front entry patio. MLS#201003309

Single story 2185 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath home! New construction completed by 6/15. Granite slab counters, hardwood & tile floors, vaulted ceilings, master has soaking tub & tile shower. MLS#201003291

Eagle Crest Luxury Townhome overlooking creek & waterfalls. Single story, vaulted ceilings, 2 bedroom, 1419 sq. ft. Upgrades galore. Close to pool, tennis, trails & fitness center. Broker owned. MLS#201004579

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159

JULIE GEORGE, Broker 541-408-4631

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

PRNE IC W E

Remodeled home on park-like .96 of an acre. 2-car garage, 12x20 shop with roll door plus 2 additional sheds. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1392 sq. ft. MLS#2909668 55453 Gross Dr.

PRNE IC W E

Premier waterfront building site. Nearly 1/2 acre within the gated community of Pronghorn with 2 world class golf courses. Pronghorn Golf Membership valued at $115,000 included in sale. Call for more info. MLS#201004593

RE PR DU IC CE E D

RE PR DU IC CE E D

Open Sat & Sun 12–4 | $299,900 River Rim | $335,000 House + Apartment | $348,000 Full-Sized Living | $375,000 Ridgewater | $383,000 Barn, Shop, Home | $399,000

Lovely Craftsman in NE Bend, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, 3011 sq. ft., 2 masters; 1 up and 1 down. Hardwoods, granite, stainless, huge bonus/media/play room. Lots of storage. Near hospital, schools and shopping. MLS#2901593

Hendrickson built Ponderosa plan. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2300 sq. ft. Open great room floor plan with 2 dining areas, master on main, den, 3-car garage, room to expand, & more. Beautiful outdoor living area. MLS#201004068

This NE Bend property has it all - 2.37 acres, 1808 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3 bath house, PLUS a separate 720 sq. ft. apartment PLUS a 14x40 pull through RV garage. MLS#201002926

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

LESTER & KATLIN FRIEDMAN FRIEDMAN & FRIEDMAN, P.C., Brokers 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

NW Bend | $399,900

NE Bend | $424,900

Views | $470,000

Move In Ready | $485,000 Ready to Spice Up | $499,900

Immaculate Skyliner Summit Home. 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 3386 sq. ft. Upgraded throughout. Wood, tile & carpet flooring. Beautiful home. Backs to park, trail access. Low maintenance yard, new Trex deck. MLS#201003265

Boones Borough, A rare find in this much sought after neighborhood! 3 bedroom, 3 bath, open floor plan, large kitchen and master, shop with RV storage on 2.5 acres. Mountain views, a must see! MLS#201004751

City lights and Smith Rock, fantastic views from almost every room. Main level living, quality builder. 3009 sq. ft. 4 bedrooms + office & bonus room. 3 car garage. Not a short sale! MLS#2911624

Impeccably maintained home and updated with slab granite and so much more. Fireplace, formal dining, separate family room with built in bar. 3 bedrooms plus office, 3 car garage all on 3/4 of an acre. MLS#201001983

Sunriver Resort single level home. Just off the path to Lake Aspen. Nearly 2600 sq. ft., 4 bedrooms plus flex room. Large lot with 3 car garage and hobby room. MLS#201004791

Beautiful Craftsman in Northwest Crossing. Great location. Open floorplan with lots of vaults and windows, large kitchen, master on main, extensive hardwood and tile. Fenced back yard & extra parking. MLS#201000475

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

CATHY DEL NERO, P.C., Broker 541-410-5280

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436

JOY HELFRICH, Broker 541-480-6808

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

Best of Sunriver | $545,000

SE Bend | $549,000

Awbrey Glen | $575,000

SW Bend | $625,000

Tumalo | $649,600

Powell Butte | $665,000

Standout home! Major remodel in 2001 added “WOW factor” throughout including room over garage. Perfect for multi-generations or two families. Good location & value. 2221 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 3 bath. MLS#201004074

Comfortable 2035 sq. ft. single level home located on 4.75 acres, 2.62 irrigated. 3-bay shop with large office, 24x48 horse barn, two ponds and riding arena. Gorgeous property. MLS#201000514

Warm and inviting home on .58 of an acre. A very private back yard and patio area. Main level master and den. Upstairs has spacious bedrooms and a family room. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 3247 sq. ft. MLS#2907304

3 bedroom, 3 bath, 3189 sq. ft. home completely remodeled in 2005. Nice .60 acre lot in a great location on the way to Mt. Bachelor. Beautiful kitchen, open floor plan, huge master suite & RV parking. MLS#201004368

Cascade Mtn views from 9.9 acres. Remodeled 3164 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath home with high beamed ceilings & open great room plan. Shop & horse setup, pond. Bend schools. MLS#201001782 Directions: Hwy 20 West to Old Bend Redmond Hwy to Rodeo Dr. 20060 Rodeo Dr.

19+ acres with huge Cascade Views from every room. Easy care low maintenance property. Fabulous 1 level, great room, 3 bedrooms + den. Shop, barn, hay storage, paddocks, outdoor riding track. MLS#201004379 11305 Robinson Lane

SUE CONRAD, Broker 541-480-6621

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-322-2404

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

Redmond | $750,000

RV Park for Sale | $750,000 Awbrey Village | $779,000 For Lease - Prime Location

Inviting European Country Flair in this 1 of a kind 3 or 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3800 sq. ft. home. Exquisite quality wood work, tile, travertine, stain glass & dramatic 2 story, vaulted living room with loft. MLS#201003319

7.94 acres, 7.5 irrigated. Fenced and cross-fenced, barn and additional set-up for stalls. Includes irrigation equipment and shop. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1542 sq. ft. home MLS#2812404

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

PRNE IC W E

NW Bend | $519,900

SU OPE N N 12 -3

LI NE ST W IN G

LI NE ST W IN G

RE PR DU ICE CE D

New Earth Advantage townhomes in NORTHWEST CROSSING. Great room with gas fireplace. Secluded patio. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, double garage. Move in today! Builder to contribute $5,000 to closing costs. MLS#2713334 2502 NW Crossing Dr.

NW Bend/Awbrey Glen | $675,000 Awbrey Butte | $719,900

4 bedroom suites, 4.5 baths, 3842 sq. ft. in pristine condition. Tucked away custom home on .72 of an acre. Gourmet kitchen, granite island & counters, alder cabinetry, breakfast nook & formal dining room. Heated Driveway. MLS#201002270 1856 NW Perspective

3 bedroom, 3 bath log home on 20 acres located south of Redmond. 10.5 acres of irrigation, fenced, level property with 2 fish ponds. One with fish. MLS#2910155

Sun Rocks RV Park on 10 acres with 38 full hookups, 22+ tent sites & 4 sleeping cabins. Pool, clubhouse, living quarters and office. Turn key ready for a new owner. MLS#2906843

Superb finishes embrace stunning mountain and city views! Dream kitchen, wine bar, 2 dining options, main level master, separate guest suites, 3-car garage, shop and unfinished bonus area. MLS#2902704

1330–7500 sq. ft. available. Street front, corner of Reed Market & 3rd St. High traffic volume, great visibility & ample parking. Monument & building signage available. $.75–$1.50/sq. ft. 1180 S Hwy 97 MONTH TO MONTH LEASE AVAILABLE

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

Sunriver | $795,000

Tumalo/Mtn Views | $839,900

SE Bend | $998,000

SE Bend | $1,150,000

SE Bend | $1,399,000

Powell Butte | $2,260,000

SUNRIVER SINGLE LEVEL. Very private 10th fairway North Course location, on 1 & 1/2 beautifully treed lots. Offered fully furnished. Contemporary style 3 bedroom, 3 bath + large office 2680 sq. ft. MLS#2808922

Main house has master on main, his & hers baths, gourmet kitchen, dining area and fireplace in living room. 1 bedroom, 1 bath guest house. Shop with 3/4 bath, RV garage and all on 5 acres with huge mountain views! MLS#2812031

Private country estate offers beauty, productivity and seclusion. Immaculate home with mature landscaping and pond. Additional buildings include shop with RV storage, and horse barn. 16 acres, 4 irrigated. MLS#2909521

Beautiful 5 bedroom, 3 bath home with Cascade Mountain views on 19.5 private, fenced acres with 11 acres underground, automated COI irrigation. 8 stall barn with paddocks and turn-outs. MLS#201003999

Take in sweeping Cascade Mountain views from this gorgeous home on over 19 acres. Gourmet kitchen, lots of stone and “Tuscan” accents. Estate-like private setting, swimming pool and detached studio. MLS#2902614

572 acres, large hay/alfalfa operation. All irrigation equipment included. Significant acreage that has been accumulated for future development/uses. Distressed sale! Call John Kelley at 541-948-0062 MLS#2910206

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-383-4351

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

RE PRI DU CE CE D

Custom built home on .6 of an acre lot. Beautiful high end details throughout. 4 bedrooms, office, and bonus room! Main floor master. Private wooded yard with water feature and hot tub. MLS#201003567

D L O

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 F1

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ROBBERSON.COM PRE-OWNED

541-312-3986 BEND’S BEST WARRANTY

NEW 2010 FORD FOCUS

13,998

• 35 Miles Per Gallon • Full Power Options • Satellite Radio • Alloy Wheels

• Air Conditioning • Cruise Control WAS $ 7,998

NEW 2010 FORD FUSION SE

$

$

23,998

Stk#9489; VIN: B70296 • MSRP $35,020-$4,500 Factory Rebate-$1,00 FMCC Rebate-$2,522 RFS Disc.

robberson.com

$

Pizza Hut

McDonalds

Albertsons Revere

4th Street

3rd Street

N

Underwood

2002 FORD F550

• Full Power Options • Premium Alloy Wheels • 6-Speed Automatic • Custom Long Bed robberson.com

541-

239

PER MONTH LEASE

0

DOWN PAYMENT 1st PAYMENT SECURITY DEPOSIT DUE AT SIGNING

Stk# 9170, VIN: JM1BL1SGXA1193060 • After $0 Factory Rebate, RFS Disc. $478, MSRP $16,955, 42 Mo. Lease, $0 cash or trade equity plus rebate down. $168 Ore. Lic. & Title fees, $0 security deposit, $50 admin fee, plus $595 acquisition fee totalling $0 due at inception plus rebate. Total lease charge $10,038 plus rebate and deposit. Residual $9,494. $0 termination fee. 12,000 miles per year. On approved credit.

NEW 2010 MAZDA6 i Sport

$

• Single Compact Disc • Privacy Glass

16,977

• V8 7.3L Turbo Diesel • ABS (4 Wheel)

$

WAS $ 19,998

30

• Dual Rear Wheels • 16’ Stake Body

16,977

VIN: 711897, STK# UC9722T

VIN: 14680, STK# UT9671M

2007 VOLKSWAGEN JETTA GLI

2008 MAZDA CX-9

MPG

$

1

AT

269

PER MONTH LEASE

• MP3 (Multi CD) • Leather

• Moon Roof • Rear Spoiler

$

17,977

• AWD • Single Compact Disc WAS $ 26,998

$

• Leather & AWD • Moon Roof

25,977

24,977

Stk# 9435, VIN: 1YVHZ8BH1A5M23274 • After $0 Factory Rebate, RFS Disc. $1,490, MSRP $22,205, 42 Mo. Lease, $0 cash or trade equity plus rebate down. $168 Ore. Lic. & Title fees, $0 security deposit, $50 admin fee, plus $595 acquisition fee totalling $0 due at inception plus rebate. Total lease charge $11,298 plus rebate and deposit. Residual $12,212. $0 termination fee. 12,000 miles per year. On approved credit.

NEW 2010 Mazda Tribute i Touring 4x4 • 26 MPG • Full Power Options • Premium Alloys • 7-Speaker CD Stereo

2008 FORD F250

• 4WD • Leather

robberson.com

$

• Running Boards • Oversize Off-Rd Tires

WAS $ 36,998

VIN: A65853, STK# UT9708M

robberson.com

• Privacy Glass • Alloy Wheels

0

DOWN PAYMENT 1st PAYMENT SECURITY DEPOSIT DUE AT SIGNING

VIN: 145808, STK# UT9701P

2004 PORSCHE CAYENNE

• Navigation System • Parking Sensors WAS $ 28,998

$

$

34,977

VIN: A96751, STK# UT9658M

800-588-1084

SERVICE DEPARTMENT Mon. - Fri. 7am - 11:30pm Sat. 8am - 5:30pm

Bend, Prineville and www.Robberson.com Main Showroom: 2100 NE 3rd St. Bend • Preowned: On Butler Market & 2nd St.

East

Bend River Promenade

Butler Mkt. Rd. Izzy’s

1

AT

robberson.com

382-4521

ROBBERSON FORD

AT

7,977

2008 SUBARU FORESTER X

VIN: 172118, STK# UC9706M

26,998

SALES HOURS Mon. - Fri. 8am - 7pm Sat. 8am - 6pm Sun. 11am - 6pm

1

$

VIN: A28064, STK# UT9751P

WAS $ 19,998

NEW 2010 FORD F150 XLT 4X4 1 AT

$

• Bed Liner • Alloy Wheels

VIN: 327317, STK# UC9711T

WAS $ 18,998

• 26 Miles Per Gallon • Full Power Options • Sync Activated • Premium Wheels

Stk#9544; VIN: C30396 • MSRP $26,915-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$917 RFS Disc.

5,977

• AWD • Air Conditioning

NEW 2010 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4X4 1 AT

$

• 4WD • MP3 (Multi CD) WAS $ 9,998

19,998

• 31 Miles Per Gallon • Power Glass Moonroof • Custom Rear Spoiler • 2010 Car of the Year!

Stk#9536; VIN: 310612 • MSRP $24,015-$2,000 Factory Rebate-$2,017 RFS Disc.

• Single Compact Disc • Dual Front Air Bags

y

1 AT

MPG

rk wa

Stk#1664; VIN: 130682 • MSRP $17,570-$2,500 Factory Rebate-$500 FMCC Rebate-$572 RFS Disc.

33

2002 FORD RANGER SUPER CAB

3rd St.

$

2004 CHEVROLET IMPALA

Pa

1 AT

NEW 2010 MAZDA3 i Sport

X

ROBBERSON PRE-OWNED SUPERSTORE

North

*Must qualify and finance with FMCC, On Approved Credit, in lieu of special APR. Vehicles subject to prior sale. Pictures may vary from actual vehicles. Not all buyers will qualify. Must be present at dealership to purchase advertised vehicle. No dealers or brokers. Special APR in lieu of rebates. Sale vehicles may have scratches or dents. Offer good through 5-31-10. Thanks for buying at Robberson and reading the small print.

22,998

Stk# 9574, VIN: 4F2CY9C74AKM07828 MSRP $26,095 - $3,097 RFS Discount

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ROBBERSON MAZDA 2100 NE 3rd St., Bend 800-588-1084 • 541-382-4521 Vehicles subject to prior sale. Illustrations may not be identical to actual vehicles. Ask about our creative financing plans. *On approved credit. Minimum 680 Beacon Score, must finance w/MAC. License, title, and doc not included in price. Offers good through 5-31-10.


F2 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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General Merchandise

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Koi, Water Lilies, Pond Plants. Central Oregon Largest Selection. 541-408-3317

Pembroke Welch Corgi Pups, AKC reg., 3 males, 2 females, $500, 541-475-2593

Antiques & Collectibles

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Chaise Lounge, 1950’s style, w/wood legs, $195 please call 541-389-0617.

Spotting Scope, Cabella’s 60x80, Titanium case, tripod, accessories, $200, 541-550-0444.

Basset Hound AKC pups, 4 weeks, $350 & $375, health guarantee 541-922-4673.

202

Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR old watches, old military items, old motorcycle helmets any condition, Central Oregon. 541-706-0891 Wanted: Anything you would like to see go. 541-480-8322 Rhyans91@gmail.com WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. We Want Your Junk Car!! We'll buy any scrap metal, batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Beagle Pup AKC, $300. Chocolate. One left. Call Dusty at 541-420-8907. Or email kodachromes@gmail.com

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $100. Call for info. 541-923-7501.

FOSTER HOMES needed for kittens & moms w/kittens! Rescue group provides food, supplies & vet support & you provide a safe & nurturing environment for about 4 to 8 weeks so young kittens can get a good start in life. Contact 541-390-0121 or craftfostercats@g.mail.com. FREE CAT, 6 mo. old female tabby, shots/neutered, active & curious. 541-389-9239

Boston Terrier, AKC female, 9 wks. old, red & white, 1st & 2nd shots, wormed, $600. 774-487-7933, Redmond. alfloyd7@yahoo.com Cat, adult female, unaltered; also 4 kittens, $30 each, please call 541-678-5205. Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010. CHESAPEAKE Bay Retrievers We have (2) 8 wk old males beautiful dogs, AKC cert w/hips, first shots. $500 Please call 541-390-7384. Photos available. Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org Corgi/Chihuahua female, 11 mo., smart & very trainable, $200 to good home, 541-385-5685.

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376. Need help fixing stuff AKC BERNESE MOUNTAIN DOG around the house? puppies. DOB 1/16/10 Good Call A Service Professional markings & personalities. and find the help you need. $1500 $1700 541-383-4578 www.bendbulletin.com trinityfarms@bendtel.net AKC Tiny Yorkie Boys ~ English Mastiff pups, Purebred, 7 wks. Fawns & Brindles. 2 $700-$900 each www. males, 4 females. $600/ea., saguarovalleyyorkies.com Redmond 541-410-0186 (541) 408-0916

FREE CATS, shy grey male, needs stable home, healthy. 541-598-7260. FREE RABBIT, small, to approved home, please call Kim, 541-317-3573. Free to good home. Spayed 3 yr. Red heeler female dog, very friendly, loves to play ball. 541-977-3599 Free to good home. Spayed 3 yr. Red Heeler mix female dog, friendly w/kids & pets, loves to play ball. 541-977-3599

Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Pembroke Welsh Corgies, AKC, 7 weeks old, males & female avail., $400-$500. 541-447-4399

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Pomeranian/Chihuahua Pups, 2 females, 1 mo. old, 1 silver & white, $325, 1 black w/very little white, $275, 541-416-1878.

Lhasa Apso Pups, gorgeous, fluffy, purebreds, $200, Madras, 503-888-0800.

Love cats & kittens? No-kill, nonprofit rescue group needs help at sanctuary with chores, cat grooming, small projects, adoptions, event planning. Even a couple of hours a week would make a big difference! Huge yard sale/fundraiser on June 19-20, need help with pricing, setting up & at the sale. info@craftcats.org, 389 8420 www.craftcats.org, 728-4178 “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882

Heeler

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Hound Puppies, blacks & tans, 4 males, 3 females, $50/ea.. 541-508-6883 Kittens & cats ready for homes! 1-5 PM Sat./Sun, other days by appt. Altered, shots, ID chip, more! 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Info/ photos at www.craftcats.org.

Mini Dachshund Puppies, 7 weeks old. Two silver dapple females, 1 black/tan male and 1 black male. $400 each. Call 503-863-9172. I'm in Redmond. www.thebierwagens.com/puppies

No-kill, nonprofit rescue group seeks donations of items for a huge yard/barn sale! All proceeds to go towards vet costs. May be able to pick up your items. Also seek deposit cans/bottles, it all helps! info@craftcats.org, 728-4178, www.craftcats.org Parrot Cage, new, $150. Call for more info., 541-504-1791

Yorkie/Schipperke Male, Pup, 8 weeks, 1st shot, $240 cash, 541-678-7599 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

210 #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Log Furniture, lodgepole & Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

Sponsors needed for vet costs 1950s wrought iron kitchen for Cimarron, who was abantable. $35 3 chairs free doned with badly injured w/table. 541-306-4209 eyes that must be removed. He's tame & will also need a Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! A-1 Washers & Dryers quiet forever home when $125 each. Full Warranty. well. Donations are tax deFree Del. Also wanted W/D’s ductible. Nonprofit Cat Resdead or alive. 541-280-7355. cue, Adoption & Foster Team, 389-8420, Box 6441, Bend Appliances, new & recondi97708, www.craftcats.org. tioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Dining room table w/leaf & 4 chairs, light oak top, white legs $50 OBO. 541-905-9773 The Humane Society of Redmond will be opening a new Thrift and Gift shop in early June. We are asking for donations of quality new and used goods to help stock our shelves. Donations are gratefully accepted at the store located on Hwy 97, across from Safeway, South Redmond , Tuesday – Sunday, 10:00AM to 5PM. Proceeds from the store go to support the Humane Society and the animals in our care.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Furniture & Appliances GENERATE SOME excitement in

PUG MIXES, 2 males, first shots, wormed, ready to go! $200 each. 389-0322

Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171. Miniature Pincher, AKC Male, cropped, shots, $500, 541-480-0896.

Goldendoodle Pups, sweet, kid conditioned, beautiful, health guarantee, ready 5/28 Taking deposits, $500/ea. 541-548-4574/541-408-5909

POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889.

Furniture

Dining Set -solid Birch, 55 yes old, 6 chairs, drop leaf w/pads, 2 lg extenders, good cond., $300. 541-416-1051 DINING TABLE, 3 chairs, $35; couch/loveseat, rose & beige, $30. 541-382-7556. DISHWASHER COUNTERTOP by Danby, works well, $35. 541-610-7914. Dryer, Newer Amana, completely rebuilt, new parts, $200, call 541-550-0444.

juniper, beds, lamps & tables, made to order, 541-419-2383

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

Cowgirl Up! Gently used western wear. Boots, bags & jackets, Double D, Patricia Wolf- Native American Turquoise, Sisters 541-549-6950 Desk Chair, caned back, w/arms, $50, please call 541-389-0617. Dining table, round oak with extension & 4 chairs $400. 541-593-1248541-593-1248 End Table, tall square oak, w/Carving, $125, please call 541-389-0617. Rolltop desk, solid oak, drawers, exc. cond., $395 please call 541-389-0617. Secretary Bookcase, Mahogany, drop front, Maddox brand, 1940’s period, exc. shape, arched top, serpentine front drawers, must see, $399 OBO. 541-536-7408 Wingback Chair, fabric, stuffed, good cond., $50, please call 541-389-0617. Wood Desk Chair, leather seat, exc. cond. $35, please call 541-389-0617.

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Coins & Stamps SOFA good quality leather 88” wide x 3’ deep. $150 OBO. 541-390-6570. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wolf Hybrid Pups, parents on site, $400, taking deps. on 2 liters, ready to go on 6/17 & 7/7, 541-977-2845.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Washer & Dryer, Whirlpool matching set , white, $350 OBO. 541-317-4636.

Working cats for barn/shop, companionship. FREE! Fixed, shots. Will deliver! 389-8420.

End Table, Brass, w/wood legs, $25, please call 541-389-0617.

Whirlpool/Ikea stainless steel NEW IN BOX over range micro $179, 541-389-2530.

WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

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Crafts and Hobbies Sewing Machine: HQ Long arm Quilter, 16 Handy Quilter, w/ 12’ wood table, auto shutoff, bobbin winder, support plate, pattern laser & new leaders, $4750; 541-382-8296.

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Bicycles and Accessories

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Estate Sales

Barn/household/Collectibes Sale! Indoors at 68308 Cloverdale Rd. Fri. 8-4, Sat, 9-3. yard/garden & misc tools/ hardware, auto & RV items (tow bar): Furniture Incl. 1800’s walnut chair & Heywood Wakefield Chair, bdrm. set, bow front china hutch,3 folding screens, beveled mirror & shelf/display/ cabinet units; Toys, records, printer, scanner, radio, tv/ computer cables, camping, exercise equip, electronics, photo equip incl. digital cameras, tripods, lens. Collectible Glassware incl. cut, depression, Fenton, Fry Foval, Bohemian & Westmoreland: Kerosene & table lamps, knick knacks, pottery; vintage dish sets, Linens, 1890’s Appenzell Lace runner; Books incl.Vintage cookbooks, craft, antique/collectibles, ref. books, leather craftsmen, Arabian Horse World, Stubben jumping saddle, lightening rod, oak rolling ladder, Much more; new items Sat.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

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Sales Northwest Bend 2 Grandma sale, one day only Sat. 8-12 Corner of Lemhi Pass Dr. & McNeal Way in alley, NW Crossing. Misc. household, wicker trunk. Family of 6 Downsizing Fri. 9-4, & Sat. 9-3, 1646 NW Galveston, clothes, games, home decor, sporting goods.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

GOLF CLUB SALE, Saturday 8-2, Awbrey Glen, Putnam entrance, follow signs. Sets, drivers, putters & misc.

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

HUGE

Big screen TV cabinet, Country wood stove insert, Soft tub Hot tub, lots more. 5/28 & 5/29, 9:00-3:00. 434 SW 12th St.

Yard Sale, May 28th-31st, 8am-5pm. 1517 NW Redwood Ave. off of 15th St. Riding & push mowers, fishing poles, tools, 2 rifles, walker, & lots of misc.

MOVING SALE Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 19694 Buck Canyon Rd, Sat., May 29, 8:00 a.m. Furniteen girls clothes, size small, ture, refrigerator, Western destereo, tools, household, more cor, 63546 Gold Spur Way, Saddleback. 541-318-5256 Moving/Garage Sale, Sat. 8-2, 56693 Solar Dr., Multi-Family Garage Sale: Sunriver (3 blocks S. of Sat. 9-1 only, 310 NW GreySpringriver Rd.) furniture, hawk Ave., great household, appliances, books, pics, jewitems, kids stuff, jogger,more elry, kitchen CD’s & tapes. My House + My Friends Large Indoor/Outdoor The Bulletin Sale : Sat., 8-2 p.m., furniTo Subscribe call ture, clothes,antiques, clocks, 541-385-5800 or go to garden equip., housewares, electronics, 17’ Boston www.bendbulletin.com Whatler boat, 1992 F-350 Dump truck, 6WD, tools, ev- Second Tern Thrift Shop Annual Memorial Day erything goes, 64420 ReStore Wide 1/2 Price search Rd., up hill from Sale. Fri. & Sat., 9am-3pm. Tumalo Feed Co. 408-4496. 17377 Spring River Rd., Sunriver, next to Boondocks NOTICE Restaurant. 541-593-3367. Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs 286 (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sales Northeast Bend Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your HUGE GARAGE SALE! local Utility Companies Sat. thru Mon. 9-5: 593 Azure off of NE Greenwood. Lots of everything! www.bendbulletin.com Huge Moving Sale: Sat. & Sun. 9-3, 1058 NE 12th Rock & roll, sports & collectSt.,next to Pilot Butte, TOOLS ible, household, womens (table saw, band saw,ladders, clothes, bikes, AC unit, Fri., hand tools), sports equip., 9-3, Sat. 8-2. 1399 NW BBQ, record collection, furFort Clatsop, NW Crossing. niture, antiques, collectibles. 284

Sales Southwest Bend Books, games, misc. furniture, misc. cooking items, wine & martini glasses, pwr wash, 10x10 canopy. 541.728.8854 Fri/Sat/Sun 8am-2pm 17297 Jacinto Rd

May 29 & 30, 8-5. 1456 NE Covington. Like new 22” LCD TV, GPS, mtn. bike, stationary bike, furn. & misc. MULTI FAMILY SALE Sat. May 29 from 9-3. Outdoor, Glass, household items. Sycamore Ct, signs from Wells Acres.

286 One Huge Garage Sale: Sat. 9-4, Sun. 9-3, 3311 NE Stonebrook Lp., off Butler Mkt., a lot of everything, some furniture, 2 umbrellas, jewelry, CD’s, DVD’’s, water fountain, flower pots, trellis, bedding, rugs, kitchen items.

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Sales Southeast Bend Antiques, furniture, tools, household items, movies, parakeet with cage, clothing and baked goods. 20430 Klahani Dr., in Tillicum Village. Sat. & Sun., 8am-4pm. Colossal Sale: Fri. & Sat. 8-3, 20557 Peak Ave. Pool table, tools, name brand women’s clothes, purses, shoes, treadmill, Quisenart ice cream machine & more! Estate Sale, Sat. 9-4 & Sun 9-2 60266 Tekampe Road, Antique furniture, dining sets, silver, crystal, pottery, ladies western boots Alumaweld drift boat, bdrm. sets, colletibles, kitchen etc.

Indoor Swap Meet 35 Vendors! Every Sat., 9-4, 380 SE Bridgeford off Wilson/9th St, Bend, 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847. Multi Family Sat. Only 8-2, 21930 Rickard Road. Tools, kids stuff, farming supplies & much more.

Garage Sale: Sat. Only, 9-5, 303 N Canyon Dr., lots of great stuff, something for everyone!

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Sales Other Areas

Jefferson County: Huge barn CRR Seniors Center Annual Yard Sale, Fri.-Sun., May sale! 6 mi. N. of Terrebonne 28-30, 9-4. 6710 Ranch on Hwy. 97, watch for sign 1 House Rd., CRR. mi. N. of Maragus Winery, misc. beyond description, small antiques, quilts, riding DOWNSIZING SALE Wed 26th helmets, household, book-Mon. 31st, 8-5. Wood & cases, clothes, plants, Fri. & metal machines and tools, Sat., 8:30-4, no early sales. rifles, household items, antiques, new items daily. 54651 Huntington Road. Moving & Garage Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-5, 15047 Maverick Rd., CRR, freezer, twin GARAGE SALE - MAY beds, patio set, misc. house 28, 29, & 30. 8 AM to 3 items, sporting goods, more! PM Slot machine, Com541-350-5425. puter Desk, Oak Bookcase, Lots of Misc. Items 11896 Moving Sale, everything must Horny Hollow Trail, CRR go, new and like new preschool supplies, games, toys, MOVING SALE Sat. 12-5, Sun. furniture, household items, 10-4. @ 9394 SW Geneva La-Z-Boy all leather recliner, View Rd. in CRR. Misc. quality clothing, golf clubs, household items, furniture, yard decor & tools. Sat. etc., 541-588-0196. only, 5/29, 9am-4pm. 3637 SW Bobby Jones Outdoor Equip. Sale: Camp ShCt., at The Greens. erman-Metolius Meadows, Sat. & Sun. 10-5, camping, Moving Sale, Sat. only, 5/29, boats, tents, fishing gear & 9am-5pm. 5063 SW Loma more, 26324 SW Metolius Linda Dr., lots of stuff for Meadows Dr. 541-595-5723. guys & gals!

SALE: Sat. & Sun. 10-6, furn., Yard Sale 601 2nd Ave, Culver, AC unit, misc. some like new OR, Motor Cycles and camp cond. 8684 4th St., Terrebtrailer. Saturday May 29th, onne. 541-504-2541. 8am to 4pm.

Excavators, Dump Trucks, Tractors, Trailers, Forklifts, Farm Equipment, Vehicles, Shop Equipment, Tools, Guns, Welders, Plasma Cutters, ’93 Diesel Hummer, Trailer Manufacturing Supplies, ATVs and More!

For details visit I-5auctions.com or (541) 643-0552 Wanted! Springfield Trapdoor, full length military rifle 45/70, 541-382-9352.

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Sporting Goods - Misc. CANOPY - never used, collapsible, with case, $200. 541-504-0444. COLEMAN electric start 2-burner camp stove, $50. 541-550-0444.

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Exercise Equipment

Foosball Table - Excel-

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UNRESERVED AUCTION Sunday, June 6 at 10:00 121 Deady Crossing in Sutherlin, OR

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Recumbent Sun Bicycle, functional usage, $375. Call 360-775-7336.

Weight Machine, Weider Pro 9930, $100, please call 541-389-6420.

Estate Sales

S&W M29 44 mag., 4”, 1st yr., 99 % in box, $1595; Colt Cobra 4” 22LR, ANIB, $1250; OBO! Others. 541-389-1392 Taurus 45 ACP sub compact w/ 2 mags., case & ammo, $475. 541-647-8931 Taurus Raging Bull .454 Casull Revolver Call for pics $750 541-647-7212

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

lent Condition, $600 New, Solid Oak - Honey, Green Top, Clawfoot Oak Legs $300, 541-848-1780. PROPANE HEATER, Mr. Heater Buddy, elect. start with safety shut off, $75. 541-550-0444.

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $1750. 541-788-1731, leave msg. Colt Python .357 magnum, S&W 629 Classic .44mag and others. Call 541-610-8370 Fly Rods, (1) 6-piece, handmade, graphite; 1 factory made, $200 ea., 541-550-0444.

SHIMANO GRAPHITE fishing pole spinning combo, $25. 541-504-0444.

GLOCK Mdl 27 40 cal., sub compact, w/2mags, case & ammo. $500. 541-647-8931.

WEBER portable gas BBQ grill , $20; Coleman gas lantern, $20. 541-504-0444.

GUN

SHOW

MAY 29th & 30th Deschutes Co. Fairgrounds Buy! Sell! Trade! SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-3 Wall to Wall Tables $8 Admission good both days. OREGON TRAIL GUN SHOWS 541-347-2120 Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sat. June 5th, LaPine Newberry Station. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information. Remington SS synthetic 22250, Leupold 4-14 Varix III, bolt action, $750 541-815-0668 Single person pontoon. Bucks Bags 11' Bronco Extreme. $1650 new. For sale: $1000 Please call 541-312-8837.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 260

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Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

RUGS - 2 quality matching sets, + 2 other misc. sizes. From $50-$100. 541-390-6570.

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. CHAINSAWS! New & Like New! Stihl! Husqvarna! Echo! Up to $200 off! 541-280-5006.

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Radio Scanner, Realistic, 200 channel, all emergency frequencies, $75, 541-550-0444

announcements The La Pine Community Health Center (La Pine) is requesting proposals for the acquisition of a direct radiography (dr) digital u-arm imaging system. The proposal shall include all ordinary and necessary cost for the purchase, installation (including site alteration) and testing of the equipment, training of La Pine staff on the proper use and maintenance of the equipment, and equipment warranty. Complete proposal details, including the required proposal format, the minimum content of response, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, are available by e-mail request at gugenberger@lapinehealth.org. A walk-through of the facility will be held on Tuesday May 18, 2010 at 10:00 a.m., to examine the site for equipment installation. If you are interested in a walk-through other than the date and time provided please contact us at 541-536-3435 ext. 209. The building is located at 51600 Huntington Road, La Pine Oregon 97739. Proposals will be accepted until 3:00 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time), Friday, June 4, 2010, at which time proposals received will be opened. Proposals shall be on the forms required, sealed and the supplied return label affixed. La Pine will not consider or accept any proposal received after the date and time specified above.

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo.

Trees, Plants & Flowers

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HUGE TREE LIQUIDATION SALE!! Over 2000 Shade & Ornamental potted trees Must Go! $10-$25. Volume discounts avail. Fri., Sat. & Sun. 10-4 6268 W. Hwy 126, Redmond. 541-480-5606.

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Reg. 7 yr. “Alves” Quarter Mare w/3 month foal. $1550 OBO. 541-617-5872

Respiratory Therapist LINCARE, leading national respiratory co., seeks health care specialist. Responsibilities: disease management program, clinical evaluations, equipment set up and education. Be the doctor’s eyes in the home setting. RN, LPN, RRT, CRT licensed as applicable. Great personalities and strong work ethic needed. Competitive salary, benefits and career path. Drug free workplace. EOE. Fax resume to 541-923-9980 or please call 541-923-1900.

Vacation Sales Agent

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RED TAG SALE

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BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

MASSEY-FERGUSON 1240 4x4 27 HP tractor with 1246 hydraulic loader, $8950. 541-447-7150.

DAN'S TRUCKING Top soil, fill dirt, landscape & gravel. Call for quotes 504-8892 or 480-0449

Tools Generator, Coleman 1750W, portable, mint cond., $375, 541-318-6108. Pressure Washer, elec., 1250 psi, extra attachement/case, hot/cold, $100, 541-550-0444 Shop Heater, John Deere, Turbo Style, 40,000 BTU, $200, 541-550-0444.

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Snow Removal Equipment

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found Cell Phone, Tracphone, on River Walk trail, approx. 5/17, 541-389-5304. Found Dog: Golden Retriever, JD Ranch Estates, near Mailbox, 5/23, 541-388-3029.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

Found Dog: Large female, black & tan, Tumalo, off Gerking Mkt.., 5/23, 541-410-6396.

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

Found Keys, DRW, Cheyenne & Cinder Butte, fish lure, baseball bat, 5/7, 541-385-5685.

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Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Heating and Stoves

FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973. FOUND: MONEY, Bend Walmart, call to identify. 541-617-1052 LOST 2 wks ago, 4”x7” light blue notebook, phone numbers, project drawings. Call 541-815-1420.

Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $125/cord rounds, $150 split & delivered, Bend, Sunriver & La Pine. Fast, friendly service. 541-410-6792 or 382-6099.

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4 As low as

0% APR Financing

Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

J & C Firewood • Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195.

LOST: Dog, male, Wirehair, Tumalo area off Dusty Loop, 5/22, 541-280-6168 LOST: Old silver & turquoise Navajo Squash Blossom, sentimental gift, REWARD! Lost Sunday afternoon, after 2:30pm. S. handicap parking lot & S. door of East side Safeway. Please call 541-389-6761, in no answer, please leave message.

LOG TRUCK LOADS: DRY LODGEPOLE, delivered in Bend $950, LaPine $1000, Redmond, Sisters & Prineville $1100. 541-815-4177 Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

316 Pipe Elbows, galavanized, 30”x90 degree, never used, 3 at $150 ea. 541-421-3222.

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Prime Seasoned two years, pine, round $140/cord, split $165, two cord minimum No delivery charge in Bend area. 541-536-2136.

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377. June 6, 2010 Healthy Horse Day. 10am-6pm, Demos all day & raffle prizes, go to www.ridinginstyle2.com Click on events, scroll to June 6th for more info. 541-617-9243

NEW Rubber Mats 4X6' 3/8" thick, Heavy Duty $28/each CASH 541-728-7004/7200

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Babydoll Southdown Sheep. Small starter flock available. Please call 541-385-4989. Feeder Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

CASE MANAGER Needed full time for a treatment program located in Bend, Oregon. Excellent organizational skills and proven ability to work with at risk clients required. Recovery experience a plus. Good benefits with competitive salary available. Bachelors or Master degree required in social work, psychology, counseling or related fields. Apply by faxing resume to: Human Resources at: 541-383-3176. CNA Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center the premier skilled nursing facility in Central Oregon is seeking an experienced Certified Nursing Assistant to work full-time on our night shift (10:00pm-6:00am). We offer vacation, sick, health and 401k benefits for full-time employees. Please apply if you are certified and eligible for a background check. Please come by and apply at Pilot Butte Rehabilitation Center at 1876 NE HWY 20, 541-382-5531 located near Pilot Butte State park. EOE

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Food Service

Employment

400

Irrigation Equipment

341 in last 2 mo. very expensive. Reward! Call 541-536-3383

25 ACRES FENCED PASTURE. Call Everett Decker, 541-6881.

The New Kubota RTV500 com358 pact utility vehicle has all the Farmers Column comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility A farmer that does it right & is vehicle – but fits in the bed on time. Power no till seedof a full-size, long bed ing, disc, till, plow & plant pickup. Financing on apnew/older fields, haying serproved credit. vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher Midstate Power control. 541-419-4516

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

LOST diamond ring, sometime

345

Livestock & Equipment

347

1st Quality Grass Hay LOST: 5/21 Set of Buick car NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, keys, have an airlife & curves Since September 29, 1991, Exc, hay for horses. tags attached. 541-923-2812. advertising for used wood$120/ton & $140/ton stoves has been limited to Eric 541-350-8084 models which have been LOST A HEARING AID on May 16, at some location in Bend. certified by the Oregon De#1 Superb Sisters Please call 541-389-3522 partment of Environmental Grass Hay no weeds, no Quality (DEQ) and the fed- LOST: Cat, 5/23/10, Boonesrain, small bales, barn stored eral Environmental Protecborough area, small grey/ Price reduced $160/ton. tion Agency (EPA) as having black striped female cat, reFree loading 541-549-2581 met smoke emission stanward. 541-382-7641 or dards. A certified woodstove Orchard Grass, 541-788-8378 can be identified by its certismall bales, clean, no rain fication label, which is per$135 per ton also have . manently attached to the Feeder Hay $75 per ton. stove. The Bulletin will not Terrebonne. 541-548-0731. knowingly accept advertising Premium Quality Orchard for the sale of uncertified Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All woodstoves. Cert. Noxious Weed Free, 267 barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163. Fuel and Wood A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $2500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

SHEEP SHEARING, Nationals Shearers Certified. Scott Hunt, located in Central Oregon. 503-881-7535.

Bed, automatic single, head, foot, knees raise & lower, exc. cond. $450 408-2227. Riding Lawnmower, mechanics special, $250. Call for more 263 info., 541-385-9350.

266 MINK COLLAR from 1920s $75 OBO. 541-382-7556

476

Horses and Equipment

261

Medical Equipment

Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809

341

Farm Market

Gardening Supplies & Equipment Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 F3

421

Schools and Training Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 29 daily newspapers, six states and British Columbia. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service provided to our homeowners and guests will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE Front Desk Clerk

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161. Painter Needs Work: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

476

Employment Opportunities Advertise in 29 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington, Utah & British Columbia. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for caregivers, part/full-time, in Bend, Redmond & Madras area. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Kim or Evangelina for more information. Se habla espanol. 541-923-4041 from 9 am.-6 pm, Mon.-Fri.

The Ranch is accepting applications for Front Desk Clerks. Responsibilities include checking guests in/out, processing access passes, assisting the group coordinator, and effectively communicating with housekeeping and maintenance. The ideal candidate will be experienced in Parr Springer Miller Systems, Point of Sale, Microsoft Office, Outlook, and Navis. Must be able to work nights, weekend and holidays. PT/FT seasonal positions available. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Nimsis Professional Cleaning Residential, Commercial, Claudia, Alejandro, 541-706-0840

Decks

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492

Excavating

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Child Care Services Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Redmond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

Debris Removal

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

Maintenance Tech Full-time with benefits, variable schedule, drug free environment. Please apply at Worldmark Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd. floor of Hotel) Maintenance Tech III/HVACR Progressive multi-specialty clinic in beautiful Bend, OR, is seeking a full-time Maintenance Tech III/HVACR. The ideal candidate will have 5 years experience. EPA Universal License, Boiler certification preferred. To Apply, visit our website at http://www.bendmemorialclinic.com EOE/AA

is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Teacher/Caregiver: Infant/ Toddlers, must be kind, caring, attentive, 1 yr exp., CPR /First Aid trained, full time+ benefits. 541-385-3236. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Teaching UNIVERSITY OF OREGON - OSU CASCADES CAMPUS The University of Oregon seeks to build an applicant pool for temporary part-time or The Bulletin Classifieds is your emergency appointments to Employment Marketplace fill one or more teaching positions at various ranks. ApCall 541-385-5809 today! pointments can range from one term to the full acaMassage Therapist - Shibui demic year. All positions are Spa at FivePine Lodge in Sispossibly renewable based on ters has immediate openings performance, need and budfor Licensed Massage Theraget. We seek applicants in pists with potential for year the following areas: round work. Looking for team players who are experienced, Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Geology, responsible, eager and willHistory, Mathematics, Politiing to work weekends and cal Science, Psychology and evenings. We will train you in Sociology. our techniques. Bring your resume in person to: 720 Candidates should be strongly committed to quality Buckeroo Trail in Sisters. undergraduate instruction, services to students, and to Medical making a value-added contriPhlebotomy bution to the university. CanCertification Workshop didates must have a Masters 1-Day, 100% Hands-On degree or specialized exinfo@cvas.org perience PhD and demon1-888-308-1301 strated teaching competence is desirable. We invite applications from qualified Millworkers candidates who share our BRIGHT WOOD commitment to diversity. Salary is competitive. CORPORATION If you are experienced in the Send letter of interest, curriculum vita, a statement of following positions we are teaching interest, evidence of looking for cutters, fingerteaching performance joint operators, lamination (if available) and three letoperators, moulder operters of recommendation to: aters, fingerjoint feeders and University of Oregon lamination feeders in our Attn: John Moseley Madras facility. Starting 1027 NW Trenton wage DOE. Apply at our Bend, OR 97701 headquarters office in MaFax: 541-617-4664 dras at 335 NW Hess St., Madras OR 97741 The search committee will be screening applications as po541-475-7799. EOE/On site sitions become available and pre-employment drug until positions are filled. Apscreening required. plications are accepted on a continuous basis. Motel Front Desk The University of Oregon is an Part-time position Apply in AA/EO/ADA institution person at Sugarloaf Mouncommitted to cultural divertain Motel at 62980 N Hwy sity. 97. Bend. Receptionist - Busy HealthOriented Spa in Sisters seeks super friendly, computer savvy, multi-tasking receptionist, who can work various shifts doing everything from appointments to laundry. Bring Resume to Shibui Spa, 720 Buckeroo Trail in Sisters. No calls please.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Ranch is accepting applications for Vacation Sales Agents. Responsibilities include making reservations utilizing the Navis system, and using sales techniques to increase revenue and cross sell all Ranch amenities. This candidate will assist front desk clerks as needed, communicate effectively and efficiently and stay calm and collected in a fast paced environment being able to manage difficult guest situations. The ideal individual will be experienced in hospitality and/or sales, knowledge of Parr Springer Miller Systems, Navis, Microsoft Office, Multi-line Phone Systems and Outlook. Must be able to work nights, holidays and weekends. PT and FT seasonal positions. Benefits include swimming, golf and merchandise discounts. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 29 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily PICTURE FRAMING BUSINESS FOR SALE. All equipment, supplies and materials for sale with or without business name and/or location. Contact Mike (541) 389-9196 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Position responsible for assisting with contracting functions including negotiation with physicians/physician groups, facilities and vendors. Must be familiar with contract analysis including both language and financial and regulatory aspects. Must be willing to locate in the Bend/Deschutes County area For more de- RV Sales Big Country RV is tailed information or to seeking exp. RV Salesperson. apply visit Industry exp. req. Competiwww.trilliumchp.com tive pay and benefits. Fax /careers.html resume to: 541-330-2496. Mail resumes/applications to P.O. Box 11740 Eugene, OR RV Tech 97440-1740 attn: HR Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Tech, Full Installers Time w/benefits. Apply at: Seeking experienced DISH 63500 N. Hwy. 97, Bend . Network satellite technician for Deschutes County. Screen Printing Pressmen 541-382-1552. $10/hr., exp. with manual, auto. preferred. Must be perLivestock Truck Driver sonable and be able to talk to Excellent equip., flexible clients. Call 541-385-3104. schedules, progressive company, 401K & insurance, $50,000/year. NW only. Call The Bulletin 541-475-6681

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

CCB#180420

Healthcare Contract Specialist

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

541-389-4974

Fire Fuels Reduction

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

Ask us about

Weekly Maintenance

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Painting, Wall Covering

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Ex/Interior, Paint/Stain

• Siding Replacement/Repair • Door/Window Replacement • Drywall Repair/Painting • Decks/Fencing • Shade Structures • Patios/Sidewalks Call David - 541-678-5411 CCB#187972 • 25+Yrs. Exp. 5% Discount to New Customers

D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS


F4 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

860

870

870

880

880

881

882

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

14’ 1965 HYDROSWIFT runs but needs some TLC.

Humminbird fishfinder Matrix 27 w/gps, rebuilt OMC outdrive , 497 hours on motor, new top less than year old , 2007 9.9 Mercury outboard tilt and trim , remote steering , stainless steel , and many extras.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

RV Consignments All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold!

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

Honda Trail Bikes: 1980 CT110, like new, $2400, 1974 CT90, great hunting bike, $900, both recently serviced, w/new batteries, call 541-595-5723. Honda VTX 1800R

2003. Low miles, xlnt cond. $4999. 541-647-8418

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $4995. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Classic 2007, 4K mi, windshield, saddle bags, garaged, senior owned, as new cond, $5300 OBO, 541-312-3098,619-306-1227

Harley Davidson Duece 2001, very low miles of 1258, corbin seat. Why buy new, only $11,900. Call 541-771-2020 Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

865

ATVs

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

$550 OBO!

818-795-5844, Madras

16’

Seaswirl

1985,

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

870

Boats & Accessories

Honda

Shadow

Aero

750, 2004. 5100 miles, garaged, like new. Blue/black. SisBar, Lug rack, bags. $4000. (541) 419-5212

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

541-923-1655

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp propane gen., & much more $60,000. 541-948-2310

875 Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kamper & Kars

Watercraft

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2004 36’ diesel pusher, low mi., fully serviced, very clean, outstanding cond., 2 slides, rear camera, $69,000. Much much more! 541-447-8006.

880

Motorhomes

Winnebago Aladdin II 32 ft., 1979 exc. cond., ready for the road, propane or gas, 80 gal. propane tank, 72K mi., call for more info. $5000. 541-306-8205.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Thunder 2000, 40’, 2 slides, 425 HP Cat, loaded, exc. cond., time limited price, $98,000, Cell: 480-357-6044. Bounder 34’ 1994, J Model, immaculate, only 34K miles, rare private bdrm., walk round queen island bed, awnings on all windows, 6.5 Gen., garaged, like new in/ out, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Weekend Warrior 2008 18’ toy hauler, power tongue jack, sleeps 4+, A/C, used 3 times. $13,300. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

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Fifth Wheels Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $88,000. 541-848-9225.

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $15,500 Call 541-589-0767.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

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Aircraft, Parts and Service 2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Sisters Airport, with airport access and room for owner hanger on property. Priced for quick close at $369,000, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, 541-280-9378.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

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Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

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Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

12 Ft. like new 2005 Alaskan Deluxe Smokercraft, new EZ

Loader Trailer, used twice, pole holder & folding seats. $2400 541-617-0846.

Discovery 37' 2001, 300 HP Cummins, 26,000 mi., garaged, 2 slides, satellite system, $75,000. 541-536-7580

925 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Dutchman 26’ 2005, Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade,

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Purchased in 2002 for fishing enjoyment. November 2009 purchased dream and now no longer need this boat. Dual axle trailer is included with purchase. Call 541-815-1948

“WANTED”

Autos & Transportation

Utility Trailers MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444 Nash 28.5’ Bunk Bed Model, 2002, sleeps 8, $12,000 OBO, 541-536-1572

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2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Car Hauler, 32’ Pace, top cond., $7000 OBO. Call for more info., 541-536-8036 Enclose Trailer, Wells Cargo, 5’x8’, exc. cond., $1595. 541-350-3326

Canopies and Campers Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 20010w, 2 slides, Cat 300, clean w/many options $63,500. 541-508-2238. Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $98,000. 541-382-1721

everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $2000 firm, as is. Needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

Travel 1987,

Queen

34’

65K mi., island queen bed, oak interior, take a look. $12,500, 541-548-7572.

6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

KIT COMPANION 1997 22’ travel trailer, sleeps 6, excellent condition, only used about 10 times, like new! Fully loaded, everything goes with it!

Only $4,995. 541-317-0857

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $18,500 541-610-9900.

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7800 firm. 541-639-1031.

Canopy, top of line ARE, less Interstate 2007 20'x102" than 1 year old, fits 2000 to Cargo Trailer, like new only 2007 GM short bed, silver 350 miles, $4,950 OBO. birch, paid $1900 new, ask541-306-9888 ing $1180. 541-389-2270

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan Interstate 2008, enclosed car generator, A/C, 2 awnings carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR original owner, no smoking !0K lbs., custom cabs. & or pets $17,500 pics availvents loaded exc. cond. able (541)410-3658. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

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LEGAL NOTICE DIG SAFELY OREGON: The Oregon Utility Notification Center (OUNC) Dig Safely Oregon board is proposing a rate tariff change to take effect July 1, 2010. The OUNC Board is seeking ways to be more cost efficient and control costs for all members when they are dealing with our vendor, One Call Concepts (OCC).

To review the proposed changes in our tariff, go to www.digsafelyoregon.com and click on the red button titled, PROPOSED TARIFF CHANGES. If you have comments you may make and submit them while at our website. Your comments regarding our tariff will then be taken under consideration at our

June 9, 2010 board meeting. If you would like to attend that meeting and make personal comments, below is the location, date and time of our board meeting. OUNC Board Meeting DATE: June 9, 2010 ADDRESS: 305 NE 102nd Ave., Suite 300 CITY: Portland, OR 97220 TIME: 9 a.m.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-108146 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, SANDEEP GARG AND MEENAKSHI GARG, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 9/5/2006, recorded 9/8/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-61419, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 8, ESTATES AT PRONGHORN PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 23103 ANGLER COURT BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 6, 2010 Unpaid Principal $407,070.62 Interest $11,092.67 Accrued Late Charges $543.15 TOTAL: $418,706.44 THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE 10/1/2009 IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ACCELERATION TERMS CONTAINED WITHIN THE NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST, TOGETHER WITH FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES, ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $407,070.62, PLUS interest thereon at 4.500% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in. interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 5/6/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line:(714)730-2727 Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3561427 05/22/2010, 05/29/2010, 06/05/2010, 06/12/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94923 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TERRY L. BLACKWELL AND LINDA S. BLACKWELL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR GROUP ONE LENDING, A DIVISION OF NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as beneficiary, dated 5/17/2007, recorded 5/22/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-28998, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: A PORTION OF LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK 21, NORTHWEST TOWNSITES C'S SECOND ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNT', OREGON, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 9, SAID POINT BEING THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 9 NORTH 00° 01' 37" EAST 120.05 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID LOT 9; THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST LINE AND ALONG THE NORTh LINE OF SAID LOT 9 SOUTH 89° 58' 19" EAST 40.94 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTH LINE SOUTH 00º 05' 45" EAST 54.92 FEET; ThENCE NORTH 89° 50' 52' EAST 16.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00° 05' 45" EAST 65.00 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 10; THENCE ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID LOT 10 SOUTH 89° 50 52" WEST 57.20 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1474 NORTHWEST KINGSTON AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 13, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,233.91 each $ 4,935.64 (02-01-10 through 05-13-10) Late Charges: $ 185.10 Beneficiary Advances: $ 11.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 5,131.74 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $223,501.01, PLUS interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/13/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3569501 05/22/2010, 05/29/2010, 06/05/2010, 06/12/2010

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: William E. True Jr. and Brenda J. True, as tenants by the entirety. Trustee: First American Title Company. Beneficiary: American General Financial Services (DE), Inc. Date: May 25, 2006. Recording Date: May 26, 2006. Recording Reference: 2006-36831. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Successor Trustee is Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Successor Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, Anderson & Monson, P.C., 10700 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy., Suite 460, Beaverton, OR 97005. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): Lot 7, Block 21, SECOND ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, Deschutes County, Oregon. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $1,516.77 beginning April 10, 2009 through the installment due November 10, 2009, plus $1,574.74 for December 10, 2009, plus charges of $440.56. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $153,352.99, which includes lender purchased insurance, together with interest of $13,053.46 through December 14, 2009, plus interest on the principal sum of $153,352.99 at the rate of 10.00 percent per annum from December 15, 2009 until paid, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: July 7, 2010. Time: 1:00 P.M. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, Front West Entrance, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes and State of Oregon. NOTICE TO TENANTS - If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included in the next paragraph. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and to http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE - The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. DATED: February 18, 2010./s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee, 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy. #460, Beaver ton, Oregon 97005, (503) 646-9230. STATE OF OREGON ss. County of Washington. I, Miles D. Monson, certify that I am the Successor Trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 29, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 925

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Utility Trailers

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Utility Trailer, 4X10, 6” Steel I-beam frame, factory w/ lights, $200, 541-550-0444.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Tires (5), 185/70/R14, 541-550-0444.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Dodge Ram 1500 2004, SLT, 4X4, 5 Spd! Quad Cab. Low Miles! VIN#127111

$13,995

AWD, Immaculate Condition! Fully Loaded, Low Miles! Vin #644819

• Dlr#6155

Ford F150 XCab 1994, 4WD, 88K mi., goose neck hitch, exc. cond., $3900. 541-728-7188

360 Sprint Car

Honda Ridgeline 2006 4X4, Reliable, Extra Touches. VIN #568546

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Only $19,995

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Mitsubishi Gallant 2009

Nissan Murano SL 2007

Only $23,987

www.ownacar.com 541-548-5116

Chevy Corvette L-98 1988 Red Crossfire injection 350 CID, red/black int. 4+3 tranny, #Match 130K, good cond. Serious inquiries only $16,500 OBO. 541-279-8826. Chevy Equinox 2010, perfect, 3850 miles, $22,243 OBO, 541-548-4677.

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Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Well equipped and affordable. VIN #014786

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Only $13,670

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

smolichmotors.com

Ford F-150 XLT 2004, 4X4, Short Box, All

Smolich Auto Mall

Nissan Rogue 2008

Power, Very Clean! Sharp Truck! VIN #A15302

AWD, Good Economy & More! Vin #135135

$13,495

Only $19,988

www.ownacar.com 541-548-5661• Dlr 6155 Wagon

Good as New! Save Big! Vin #165601

Only $10,995

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

HYUNDAI

Hyundai Santa Fe GLS 2009

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,250. Firm Randy, 541-306-1039

FORD F350 1997 4x4

$11,500.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

Call 541-549-0757, Sisters.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

GMC Sierra 2500HD 2001 4x4 '"DURAMAX DIESEL" SLT, leather, running boards, tow pkg., low miles. VIN#E327113

$18,995

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Pontiac Trans Am 1977, new graphite metallic paint, less than 2000 miles on high performance 455, some new interior, fast and fun classic, 8000 OBO. Call Chris, 541-390-8942.

541-598-3750 DLR 0225

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Jeep CJ7 1981, all original, tow bar, hard top, auto, dependable, very nice oldy! $3000, 541-815-4214

Sport Utility Vehicles

Smolich Auto Mall

366

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep CJ7 1986, Classic 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., last of the big Jeeps, exc. cond. $8950, 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282

Liberty

2005,

4X4, All Power, Low Miles! VIN #600578

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

$12,995 www.ownacar.com 541-548-5661• Dlr 6155

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Nissan Maxima 2001 Loaded! Good Condition! Vin #316458

Subaru Outback 2001 AWD, Well Equipped, Manager Special. VIN #653683

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

The Bulletin Classifieds

Only $9995

Only $7,995

366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974,

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Chevrolet 3/4 Ton 4WD Suburban 1988. Silverado, A/C, 8 Passenger, Tow, Snow Tires, MUST SEE! $4450. 541-480-3265 DLR.

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $7450. Firm. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Hyundai Tiberon 2008

Smolich Auto Mall

Hard to Find! Great Shape! Vin #266412

Only $14,995

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin Chevy Equinox AWD LT 2006 seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ asking $14,800 below BB subs, black on black, 25 mpg, book of $16,100, every opextra tires, $5500 call tion available, sandstone 541-388-4302. metallic w/ leather interior, mint mint condition. (541) 933 815-1849 or (541) 330-1766

Pickups

Quad Cab! Bed Liner, All Power! VIN #165490.

$15,995 www.ownacar.com 541-548-5661• Dlr 6155

Only $6,995

AS LOW AS

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

2.9

%

541-389-1178 • DLR

smolichmotors.com

975

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$22,600 W/O winch $21,750. 541-325-2684

Chevy Chevy Z21 1997, 4X4, w/matching canopy and extended cab., all power, $5950. 541-923-2738.

Trailblazer 2002

Very Low Miles and Well Equipped. Weekend Special! Vin #424193

Smolich Auto Mall

Hurry in!! Ends May 31, 2010 New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Automatic

$

19937

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Nissan Murano 2005 Loaded, AWD, & More!! VIN #407761

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $13,800, Call 541-390-7780 .

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

LEXUS ES300 1999 152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

$6900 OBO

Acura 3.2 CL-S Coupe 2001, (541) 520-8013. RARE. Black, 260 HP V-6, auto., NAV, leather, moonroof, CD. 1 owner. Exc. 126K. Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will $7999. 541-480-3265 DLR. run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072. Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Only $15,995 Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

366

mo.

42 Month Lease

366

Model AJB-01 SALE PRICE $17,975 MSRP $19,190. Cap Reduction $1,279. Customer Cash Down $1,478.37. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $10,554.50. 42 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 505521 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium

$ 1 AT

28980

mo.

42 Month Lease Model ADC-01 SALE PRICE $23,999 MSRP $25,290. Cap Reduction $1,775. Customer Cash Down $2,064.80. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 51% $12,897.90. 42 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 363893 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium 1 AT

$

22940

mo.

36 Month Lease Model AAC-02 SALE PRICE $21,249 MSRP $22,384. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.40. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 59% $13,206.56. 36 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 244901 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Smolich Auto Mall

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X 1 AT

$

22948

mo.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025• DLR

Model AFA-21 SALE PRICE $20,625 MSRP $21,690. Cap Reduction $1,700. Customer Cash Down $1,929.48. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,929.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 783956

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

(Private Party ads only)

42 Month Lease

Only $10,495

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

*On Approved Credit

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS

Only $18,995

The Bulletin Chevy S10 Blazer 1993, 144K, 4x4, V6 auto., very clean, full power, almost new tires, same owner for 8 yrs., $2100. 541-388-2275, 541-420-7736

Chevrolet 1500 LT 2007, 4X4, Short Box,

AWD, Lots of Room, Plus Great Condition! Vin #169793

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

VW Cabriolet Convertible 1990, white w/black top, white leather interior, auto, cruise, air, custom wheels, new tires, 118K mi. $2700, 541-548-6447.

3 DAYS ONLY!

1 AT

HYUNDAI

Pontiac Montana 2003

4X4, Lots of extra’s and low miles! VIN #192744

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

940

541-749-4025 • DLR

Jeep Liberty 2008

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

MEMORIAL WEEKEND SALE

smolichmotors.com VW Cabriolet 1981,

VW Beetle TDI 2001, 64K mi., exc. cond., spoiler, chrome wheels, $10,000 OBO, 541-480-8868.

Vans

Smolich Auto Mall Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185 VW Beetle 2001, 1.8 gas turbo, sun roof, silver $6500 studded tires 541-593-7313.

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

541-389-1178 • DLR

Toyota RAV4 2007

Leather, Moonroof! To Many to List! VIN #201077.

www.ownacar.com 541-548-5661• Dlr 6155

NISSAN

$10,995 www.ownacar.com 541-548-5661• Dlr 6155

$6,995

Subaru Outback H6 2002, Fully Loaded!

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Jeep

Only 87K Miles! AWD! Must See! VIN #782815.

Ford Focus ZTS 2004,

Only $19,988

Toyota Tundra 2006,

935

541-389-1178 • DLR

Subaru Forester 1998, 5 Spd! All Power,

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

366

smolichmotors.com

Good Package, Low Miles! VIN #018797

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

541-749-4025 • DLR

NISSAN

Only $22,872

Drastic Price Reduction!

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

Power Window, Low Miles!! Vin #271169

HYUNDAI

V-8, 7.5L, long bed, with 8’ Boss Power-V snow plow. 35K miles by orig. owner, new tires, exc. cond, with all maint. history avail.,

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Chrysler Sebring 2008

smolichmotors.com Chevy

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Smolich Auto Mall

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4700. 541-617-1888.

Studded, $200,

Wheels & Tires, aluminum, off Ford Ranger, great cond., $150. 541-408-1676

Smolich Auto Mall

S m o li c h Auto Mall

366

Buick Park Avenue 2000, 157K, sun roof, heated leather seats w/lots of extras, also 4 mounted studded tires $4000 firm. 541-549-8045.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

Mini Cooper 2003 Sporty, Plus Very Low Miles! Vin #E14182

Only $10,995 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

CALL 888-701-7019

CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through May 31, 2010.


F6 Saturday, May 29, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

$500 Mopar Bucks

2010 JEEP WRANGLERS

4,000 CUSTOMER CASH

2010 JEEP COMMANDER

$

ADDITIONAL $1,000 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

ADDITIONAL $1,500 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

0% 36 months + $1,000 GMAC BONUS CASH + $500 Mopar Bucks

4,000

2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

$

2010 JEEP COMPASS

CUSTOMER CASH

0% 60 months + $1,500 GMAC BONUS CASH

2,000

2010 JEEP LIBERTY

$

CUSTOMER CASH

ADDITIONAL $2,000 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

ADDITIONAL $2,500 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

0% 60 months + $2,000 GMAC BONUS CASH

0% 60 months + $2,500 GMAC BONUS CASH

1,500

$

CUSTOMER CASH

2010 JEEP PATRIOT

1,500

$

CUSTOMER CASH

ADDITIONAL $2,000 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

ADDITIONAL $2,000 OFF IF FINANCED WITH GMAC - OR -

0% 36 months + $2,000 GMAC BONUS CASH

0% 36 months + $2,500 GMAC BONUS CASH

Call us at 541-389-1177 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 5/31/2010. On Approved Credit.

SM O L IC H NISSAN

S M O LI C H HY UN DA I

Final Weekend!

VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

NEW 2010 HYUNDAI ACCENT 3-DR HATCHBACK

NEW 2010 NISSAN VERSA

$

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

Visit us at : www.smolichhyundai.com

12,395 +DMV

$

Auto, A/C

3.9% 11,495 and A.P.R. for

- $1,000 HMFC BONUS 60 Months

$

10,495

1 AT THIS PRICE

VIN: 171709. MSRP $13,810, CUSTOMER CASH $1,000, HMFC BONUS $1,000. SMOLICH DISCOUNT $1,315. 3.9% A.P.R. FOR 6 MONTHS, ON APPROVED CREDIT.

HAS

VIN: 367619. MSRP $13,115; Smolich Discount $720

NEW 2009 NISSAN CUBE SL

$

17,495

Your Choice

2010 SONATA

+DMV

$3,000 32 MPG

OFF MSRP

VIN: 126459. MSRP $20,520; $500 Bonus Cash, Smolich Discount $2,525

(includes rebate)

AND

NEW 2010 NISSAN XTERRA 4X4 VIN: 651584; MSRP $20,720

$

22,245 +DMV

0% for 72 Mos. - or -

CLASS LEADING

&

CLASS LEADING

(On approved credit)

...HYUNDAI

IT

VIN: 516421. MSRP $26,650; Smolich Discount $1,655; Rebate $2,250, Bonus Cash $500

NEW 2010 NISSAN MURANO AWD

$

2011 SONATA

36 MONTH L E A S E

25,495

VIN: 028011, MSRP $21,050. Initial Cap Cost $21,050. Cash Cap Reduction $2,377.31. Customer Cash Down $2,899.10. Aqc. Fee $595. Lease End Value $12,630. 36 mo. 12,000 Miles per Year. On approved credit.

+DMV VIN: 104222. MSRP $30,575; Smolich Discount $3,330; Rebate $1,250, Bonus Cash $500

SMOLICH NISSAN

541- 389 -1178

“ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ” All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Monday May 31, 2010 at close of business.

HIGHWAY

“MOST FUEL-EFFICIENT CARMAKER IN AMERICA” -EPA SMO LI C H HY UN D AI 1975 NE Hwy 20 • Be nd

541-749-4025 www.smolichhyundai.com

CENTRAL OREGON’S LARGEST USED SELECTION! 7 Day Exchange Program 3000 Mile/3 Month Powertrain Warranty

SMOLICH Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car CERTIFIED 105 Point Vehicle Inspection

w w w. s m o l i c h m o t o r s . c o m

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/29/10  
Bulletin Daily Paper 05/29/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday May 29, 2010