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Rugby rookies romp Bend Blues to play for state title in 2nd year • SPORTS, D1

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Builders association protests plan to raise fees as premature

LOCAL SOLDIERS RETURN

A colonel in Iraq, back as Prineville’s top cop

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

A local builders association came out in opposition to Deschutes County’s and Bend’s plans to raise building and planning fees Monday, saying it is too early for the county to predict the beginning of recovery in the housing market. In a letter to the county, the Central Oregon Builders Association Inside suggested the • Permit fees county close compared, satellite offices Page A4 in Redmond and La Pine, lay off more staff or spend more tax revenue and other money instead of raising fees. But some county officials, who are in the midst of budget meetings this week, said more layoffs will reduce service levels, which could force builders to wait up to two or three days for inspections, instead of the current 24hour turnaround. Four rounds of layoffs at the county’s Community Development Department have already reduced staffing to about half what it was two years ago. The 15 percent fee increase would contribute $362,447 in additional revenue to the department, according to the county’s proposed budget. See Permits / A4

Why are we here? Lab has new clue By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

Physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are reporting that they have discovered a new clue that could help unravel one of the biggest mysteries of cosmology: Why the universe is composed of matter and not its evil-twin opposite, antimatter. If confirmed, the finding portends fundamental discoveries at the Large Hadron Collider outside Geneva, as well as a possible explanation for our own existence. In a mathematically perfect universe, we would be less than dead; we would never have existed. According to the basic precepts of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, equal amounts of matter and antimatter should have been created in the Big Bang and then immediately annihilated each other, leaving no us. See Matter / A5

Wyden pushes inquiry into claims that proper treatment was lacking By Erin Golden The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Prineville Police Chief Eric Bush returned to work Monday after being deployed in Iraq, where he served for about 14 months as the second-in-command of the 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Oregon National Guard.

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — n Iraq, the middle-of-the-night calls signaled an enemy attack, rockets flying, possibly casualties. Jarred from sleep, Col. Eric Bush regularly received briefings on what was happening at the largest U.S. base in Iraq, outside Baghdad, known as the Victory Base Complex, where he was second-in-command of the Tigardbased 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team of the Oregon National Guard. The calls will still come. But they won’t be as frequent and will likely indicate a robbery or standoff. On Monday, Bush was back in his crisp navy blue uniform for the first time in 14 months, resuming his role as the chief of the Prineville Police Department. And these days, he is getting used to sleeping through the night. “It’s nice being home,” Chief Bush said. “It’s so different from Iraq. In Iraq, you learn to notice the nice things, and there are nice things. Initially you get there, your first take is the air smells bad, it’s dusty, it’s hot. But over time, you can come to appreciate it. … But coming home, to (use) Dorothy’s phrase, there is no place like home.” See Chief / A4

I

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SUPREME COURT: Some youths are spared life sentences, Page A3

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Photo courtesy Eric Bush

“In Iraq, you learn to notice the nice things, and there are nice things. Initially you get there, your first take is the air smells bad, it’s dusty, it’s hot. But over time, you can come to appreciate it.” — Eric Bush

Rare lion success story breeds possessive populace, predicament By Rama Lakshmi

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Military to check on care of Guard troops

GIR, India — With their paws and mouths bloodied from a feast, three sandy-brown lionesses sauntered toward a water hole as the setting sun pierced the trees and the birds grew quiet. The forest ranger turned down his walkie-talkie and whispered, “They are fresh from a kill.” The sprawling, deciduous Gir forest is the only habitat in the world for the free-

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 138, 42 pages, 7 sections

Officials at a Washington military base that served as a transition point for thousands of Oregon National Guard soldiers returning from Iraq are investigating claims that some soldiers did not receive proper medical care and were released from active duty before receiving all of their benefits. Last month, about 2,700 Oregon troops who served with the Guard’s 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team on a year-long deployment spent several days at Joint Base LewisMcChord, south of Seattle. The stop was an important part of the demobilization process, in which soldiers filled out paperwork and received medical treatment and information about benefits. But as the soldiers began returning home, some stated concerns about the demobilization process with their lawmakers. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said he heard from troops — including some he met on a trip to the base last week — who felt they’d been pushed out early and treated as if they were less important than active duty soldiers. Now, Wyden and U.S. Rep. Kurt Schrader, D-Canby, are asking Army officials to investigate all transition programs for National Guard soldiers returning home from wartime deployments. “What disturbs me the most is my concern that the brave men and women who were in the National Guard are still not being treated like members of the Army and the standing military,” Wyden said. “They are being subjected to a different standard even though they make many of the same sacrifices and dodge the same bullets. They deserve the same respect.” In a May 13 letter to Army Secretary John McHugh, Wyden outlined a series of concerns about the process at Lewis-McChord. See Guard / A4

WHIRLWIND LESSON

ranging Asiatic lions, a species similar to its well-known African cousin. At one time, the Asiatic lions spread from the Tigris River valley to the Indian subcontinent, but now they are found in the wild only in Gir, in the Indian state of Gujarat. That fact is a point of pride in Gujarat, where the lions were once close to extinction and today number more than 400. See Lions / A5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

INDEX Business

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C5

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Members of AirLink staff talk to students, parents and staff of Mudpies & Lullabies Preschool about the AirLink Critical Care Transport helicopter after landing Monday in one of the fields at the Skyline Sports Complex in Bend. The preschool contingent walked over from the nearby school, with half of the students watching the helicopter land and the other half sticking around to watch as the specialized medical copter took off to return to its base at St. Charles Bend.


A2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Consumer comeback? Retailers are hopeful

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

2

5

8 10 22 42

Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $6 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

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Shoppers see prices rise as luxury items return to shelves

Among the changes retailers have made in response to increased consumer activity is selling bigger wedges of gourmet cheeses, like Parmesan. The New York and Connecticut grocery chain Stew Leonard, for instance, is stocking larger wedges of the cheese. It had been paring them down so none cost more than $10.

By Anne D’Innocenzio The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Retailers are priming for a consumer comeback. Shoppers have started to show they’re willing and able to spend more, and stores are tweaking their merchandise to accommodate them. Cashmere is making a comeback, and sellers of everything from wine to toys are seeing shoppers move away from the very lowest price ranges. The moves signal optimism that the recovery from the Great Recession is picking up steam, but there’s a downside for shoppers: the return of higher prices. The changes, which have started to crop up this spring, range from bringing back lavish cookware sets that were dumped during the Great Recession to once again stocking big wedges of gourmet cheese instead of cutting them into smaller, less costly chunks. Toys R Us, which carved out a section in the store to sell toys under $3 during the downturn, is now throwing in $5 toys. Home-improvement chain Lowe’s Cos. has tweaked its spring advertising to focus less on low prices and more on the experience of its salespeople. Meanwhile, HSN Inc. is back to showcasing $250 Wolfgang Puck cookware sets and pushing more gold jewelry instead of silver. On the high end, luxury stores are prominently displaying $1,500 python skin shoes instead of the $700 patent leather highlighted during the recession, said Robert Burke, a New York-based luxury consultant.

Cautious steps The steps are moderate because retail decision-makers emphasize they still think consumers will keep many frugal habits amid high unemployment. But stores don’t want to get caught flatfooted in the recovery, either. Last week’s batch of firstquarter earnings reports from Macy’s Inc., Nordstrom Inc., J.C. Penney and Kohl’s Corp. all showed consumers’ willingness to spend more on a variety of items, but spending is still well below what it was before the Great Recession, and shoppers remain pragmatic. “Retailers are testing the waters with more aspirational items and prices to gauge consumer appetites — and there is some early evidence that consumers are responding well,” said John Long, retail strategist at Kurt Salmon Associates. But he pointed out that stores, including luxury merchants, are sprinkling in higher-priced items while continuing to expand store-label offerings,

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“Retailers are testing the waters with more aspirational items and prices to gauge consumer appetites — and there is some early evidence that consumers are responding well.” — John Long, retail strategist which are less expensive. For 18 months, stores cut prices and slashed inventory as nervous shoppers focused on bare necessities. But since January, consumers have been more willing to spend on nonessentials such as denim leggings, and more people are willing to pay full price.

Changing habits Coach Inc., whose handbag prices are now 12 percent lower than a year ago, told investors last month it might raise prices this year as sales of purses priced above $300 recover. However, Coach CEO Lew Frankfort told the Associated Press that its typical shopper is still “not spending at levels she did in 2007, at least not yet.” Stew Leonard Jr., president and CEO of New York and Connecticut grocery chain Stew Leonard, said that he could “feel things pop around Easter.” Customers are tentatively spending more, gravitating toward $30 bottles of wine instead of $10 to $15 wines, but not the $50 versions yet, Leonard said. That’s why he’s making small adjustments. Among them:

Stocking and packaging big wedges of Parmesan Reggiano cheese, which sells for $13.95 per pound. Leonard noted that in late 2008, customers had sticker shock and no longer wanted to pay more than $10 for a block, so the store started to cut wedges smaller to shrink the price to about $9. In recent weeks, Mohan’s Custom Tailors began restocking its shelves with the most luxurious fabrics like cashmere as well as the highest-grade materials from designers Ermenegildo Zegna and Loro Piana, which also create their own fabric. The New York shop turned to ordering fabrics mostly from generic mills when clients, who include investment bankers and hedge-fund managers, were no longer willing to shell out $1,200 or more for a suit, and were sticking to $700 price tags, according to K.J. Singh, sales manager. But since late February, Singh has seen an increase in customers willing to splurge after Wall Street bonuses made a comeback. “We’re feeling OK,” said Singh. “But it’s still too early.”

CHICAGO — A happy consequence of this Great Recession is that Americans are widely expected to be better consumers. That means we’ll only take on loans that we can afford, pay off credit-card debt at the end of each month and sock money away. It also means our credit scores will reach what the industry calls super prime, the top score achievable. Or will they? Turns out our scores are not just a reflection of our ability, or lack thereof, to pay on time. They tell a story of how we run our lives. If there’s a blip in that story, say a 30-day late payment, the red flags pop up and all those years of paying dutifully can fall flat quickly. Much attention has been focused on credit scores during this recession as consumers have struggled to keep up with their mortgage payments and revolving debt. Many consumers — even those who have long had outstanding credit ratings — have complained that their scores have fallen as credit-card companies slashed limits and closed inactive cards. But people shouldn’t worry so much about their scores, according to experts. “It’s less about the score than it is about the information that’s contained in the report,” said Steve Katz, senior director of consumer education for TransUnion. “The score is only a reflection of what’s in the report.”

Bills, bills, bills The most important information in your credit report is your bill-paying history. It bears repeating: Pay your bills on time every single month. A whopping 35 percent of your FICO credit score is tied to that payment history. Another 30 percent of your score is based on your outstanding debt. Lenders expect you to use credit cards but to do so prudently. If you have three credit cards with a total of $30,000 in available credit, they will look at

how much of that you’re using. That’s called your utilization rate. Don’t max those cards out. In fact, don’t even come close to it. Most credit experts, including the credit bureaus, will advise you to keep your credit utilization under 30 percent of the total limit. But here’s a secret: Make sure you do it for each card. If you exceed that threshold on one card — say you use 70 percent of that limit but only 10 percent on another card and nothing on a third card — you’re under 30 percent of the total limit, but you’ll still get dinged for using so much of the limit on the first card. How much of your limit you use in any given month can turn the tide on your card. If, for example, you max out your American Express card every month but pay it in full, you can still get slammed for hitting your limit. The credit card companies don’t report if you’ve paid off your card; only how much you spent. Also, some 15 percent of your score is based on your credit history, which doesn’t bode well for college graduates just getting on the bandwagon. But if you’ve been managing your credit well for a couple of decades or more, chances are your numbers are pretty lofty. But remember this: The higher you climb, the farther and faster you can fall. If you’ve been doing a stellar job of managing your credit for 20 or 30 years and one month you miss a payment — say, you landed in the hospital with a bad leg break — not only do the red flags go up but the warning sirens go off at full blast. You automatically get put into a much riskier credit category than the neighbor who tends to be a bit late on his monthly payments. Seems unfair, you say? It’s because you’re exhibiting uncharacteristic behavior. The system reads that as something is wrong, so wrong that you now might not be able to pay your car loan and the department-store credit card on time.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 A3

T S High court rejects life sentences for some juveniles By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled that juveniles who commit crimes in which no one is killed may not be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Five justices, in an opinion by Justice Anthony Kennedy, agreed that the Eighth Amendment’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment forbids such sentences as a categorical matter. “A state need not guarantee the offender eventual release,” Kennedy wrote, “but if it imposes the sentence of life, it must provide him or her with some realistic opportunity to obtain release before the end of that term.” The ruling marked the first time that the court excluded an entire class of offenders from a given form of punishment outside the context of the death penalty. “‘Death is different’ no longer,” Justice Clarence Thomas wrote in dissent. The overall vote was 6-3, though that is a little misleading. Chief Justice John Roberts voted with the majority in saying that the inmate who brought the appeal had received a sentence so harsh that it violated the Constitution. But the chief justice endorsed only a case-by-case approach, saying that an offender’s age could be considered in deciding whether a life sentence was so disproportionate to the crime as to violate the Eighth Amendment. The case involved Terrance Graham, who in 2003, at age 16, helped rob a Jacksonville, Fla., restaurant, during which an accomplice beat the manager with a steel bar. Graham was sentenced to a year in jail and three years’ probation for that crime. The next year, at 17, Graham and two 20-year-old accomplices committed a home invasion robbery. In 2005, a judge sentenced Graham to life for violating his probation. The Supreme Court has carved out categories of offenders and crimes that are not subject to the death penalty, including juvenile offenders and those who do not take a life. Monday’s decision applied those two decisions to lifewithout-parole sentences.

Justices uphold extended civil commitment of sex offenders In a broad endorsement of federal power, the Supreme Court on Monday ruled that Congress has the authority under the Constitution to allow the continued civil commitment of sex offenders after they have completed their criminal sentences. The 7-2 decision touched off a heated debate among the justices on a question that has lately engaged the Tea Party movement and opponents of the new health care law: What limits does the Constitution impose on Congress’ power to legislate on matters not specifically delegated to it in Article I? The federal law at issue in the case allows the government to continue to detain prisoners who had engaged in sexually violent conduct, suffered from mental illness and would have difficulty controlling themselves. If the government is able to prove all of this to a judge by “clear and convincing” evidence — a heightened standard, but short of “beyond a reasonable doubt” — it may hold such prisoners until they are no longer dangerous or a state assumes responsibility for them. — New York Times News Service

Oil’s spread to Keys Skepticism voiced regarding Iranian deal is latest worry in Gulf to ship nuclear fuel

By Jeffrey Collins and Matt Sedensky The Associated Press

ROBERT, La. — With BP finally gaining some control over the amount of oil spewing into the Gulf of Mexico, scientists are increasingly worried that huge plumes of crude already spilled could get caught in a current that would carry the mess all the way to the Florida Keys and beyond, damaging coral reefs and killing wildlife. Scientists said the oil will move into the so-called loop current soon if it hasn’t already, though they could not say exactly when or how much there would be. Once it is in the loop, it could take 10 days or longer to reach the Keys. “It’s only a question of when,” said Peter Ortner, a University of Miami oceanographer. In the month since an offshore drilling platform exploded, killing 11 workers, BP has struggled to stop the leak, trying in vain to activate emergency valves and lowering a 100-ton box that got clogged with icy crystals. Over the weekend, the oil company finally succeeded in using a stopper-and-tube combination to siphon some of the gushing oil into a tanker, but millions of gallons are already in the Gulf. The loop current is a ribbon of warm water that begins in the Gulf of Mexico and wraps around Florida. Some scientists project the current will draw

By David E. Sanger and Michael Slackman New York Times News Service

NOAA via The Associated Press

A gray angelfish swims among soft corals in the Florida Keys. Despite BP siphoning some of the oil spewing into the Gulf of Mexico, worries escalated Monday about the contamination reaching a current that could carry it through the Florida Keys. the crude through the Keys and then up Florida’s Atlantic Coast, where the oil might avoid the beaches of Miami and Fort Lauderdale but could wash up around Palm Beach. Many scientists expect the oil to get no farther north than Cape Canaveral, midway up the coast, before it is carried out to sea and becomes more and more diluted. The pollution could endanger Florida’s shoreline mangroves, seagrass beds and the third-longest barrier reef in the world, the 221-mile-long Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. In other developments: • Chris Oynes, who oversees

Independent inquiry in the works WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will establish an independent commission to investigate the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, an administration official said Monday, as the federal government came under increasing scrutiny for regulatory failures that might have contributed to the April 20 explosion on the Deepwater Horizon rig. The panel will be similar to others that investigated the space shuttle Challenger explosion and the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island, and would exclude current and former federal officials. It will be announced “in the coming days,” according to the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. — The Washington Post

Today’s primary to test themes, candidates for fall it happens,” said Rep. Pete Sessions of Texas, chairman of the WASHINGTON — For all the National Republican Congresprimaries testing tea party clout sional Committee. and veteran senators’ ability to The district is home to more survive, a special House elec- registered Democrats than Retion in southwestern Pennsyl- publicans. There is a solid bluevania is the multimillion-dollar collar vote, the result of the battleground of choice Tuesday area’s location in the nation’s for the two political parties, coal belt, and opposition to gun previewing themes for control and abortion a fall campaign shadis strong within both owed by recession and parties. The district voter discontent. supported Sen. John Competing ecoMcCain in the 2008 nomic prescriptions, presidential electhe appeal of Presition after siding with dent Barack Obama’s Democrats in the prehealth care legislation, vious two races for the the Republicans’ abilWhite House. ity to woo crossover Private polling support from indepen- Related shows Obama’s apdents and Democrats proval rating in the • Remember all are at issue, accongressional district to vote, cording to officials in in the range of 35 Page C1 both parties, in a race to 40 percent, lower that also features a than it is nationally. struggle for the politiAnd while the Recal high ground as Washington publican Party-paid television outsider. ads and mass mailings attack The House race features Re- his agenda, they have focused publican Tim Burns against even more criticism on House Democrat Mark Critz to fill Speaker Nancy Pelosi. out the final few months in the The Republican Congressioterm of the late Democratic nal Campaign’s sum-up televiRep. John Murtha. But the two sion ad, airing in the final days national parties made it some- of the race, touches on points thing more than that when they the GOP says it intends to stress decided several weeks ago to in the fall. It says the health care invest heavily — roughly $1 overhaul that passed was disasmillion apiece independent of trous and will cut $500 billion their candidates. from Medicare, that the House“This is the kind of district passed energy bill is a “cap and that the Republicans have to trade scheme” that will cost win if their hype is to even be- jobs, that Democratic liberals gin to meet the reality on the voted for runaway spending and ground,” said Maryland Rep. that the “Obama-Pelosi agenda Chris Van Hollen, the head of only makes things worse.” the Democratic Congressional As the TV image of Obama Campaign Committee. He was and Pelosi together gives way poking at GOP boasts that the to one of the speaker standparty will win the 40 seats this ing alone, the announcer says, fall that it needs to take power “Pennsylvania can send Nancy in the House. Pelosi a message. Or send her “This is the fall. This is where Mark Critz.”

By David Espo

The Associated Press

ELECTION

offshore drilling programs at the federal Minerals Management Service, will retire at the end of the month, becoming the Interior Department’s first casualty of the disaster. Oynes has been criticized as too cozy with the oil industry. • BP said it has spent $500 million on the spill so far. • The oil company said it will never again try to produce oil from the well, though it did not rule out drilling elsewhere in the reservoir. “The right thing to do is permanently plug this well, and that’s what we will do,” said Doug Suttles, BP chief operating officer.

WASHINGTON — The United States, Europe and Russia responded with extreme skepticism to Iran’s announcement on Monday that it had reached an agreement to ship roughly half of its nuclear fuel to Turkey, saying they would continue to press for new sanctions against Tehran. Officials from several countries said that the deal, negotiated with the leaders of Turkey and Brazil, was a deftly timed attempt to throw the sanctions effort off track. The terms were similar to those of an accord made with the West last October that fell apart when Iran backtracked. Since then, Iran has added considerably to its stockpile of low-enriched uranium, meaning that it would keep on Iranian territory about half of its current supply — or about enough fuel for one nuclear weapon if it chose to make one. The earlier deal was attractive to Washington because it would have deprived Tehran of enough known fuel to make a weapon, leaving breathing space for negotiations. The sanctions are aimed primarily at an issue that the

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deal does not address: Iran’s refusal to halt further enrichment, as the U.N. Security Council has demanded for four years, or to answer international inspectors’ questions about evidence suggesting research into possible weapons designs and related experiments. The inspectors have also been blocked from visiting many suspect facilities and laboratories, and from interviewing key scientists and engineers. The deal agreed to Monday in Tehran calls for Iran to ship 2,640 pounds of low-enriched uranium to Turkey, where it would be stored for one year. In exchange, Iran would have the right to receive about 265 pounds of uranium enriched to 20 percent from Russia and France, for use in a reactor that makes isotopes for treating Iranian cancer patients. But the White House noted that even while striking the deal, Iran insisted on Monday that it would continue its new effort to enrich fuel at a higher level, taking it closer to bomb-grade material.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Afghan teams continue search for vanished passenger plane By Dexter Filkins New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — An antiquated Soviet commercial plane carrying 43 people disappeared in the fog-shrouded peaks north of the capital here on Monday, with no word on where it had crashed or whether anyone had survived. As many as six foreigners, including at least one American and three Britons, had been aboard the flight, Afghan officials said. The plane, a 37-year-old Sovietmade Antonov 24 purchased three months ago by Pamir Airways, an Afghan airline, vanished as it approached Kabul from Kunduz, the northern city where it took off. The plane crashed during a rain shower that created a fog bank around the capital. Afghan officials said they believed the plane went down near the 12,700-foothigh Salang Pass, which connects the Kabul area to Afghanistan’s northern steppes.

U.S. antimissile plan flawed, review finds By William J. Broad and David E. Sanger New York Times News Service

President Barack Obama’s plans for reducing America’s nuclear arsenal and defeating Iran’s missiles rely heavily on a new generation of anti-missile defenses, which last year he called “proven and effective.” His confidence in the heart of the system, a rocket-powered interceptor known as the SM-3, was particularly notable because as a senator and presidential candidate he had previously criticized anti-missile arms. But now, a new analysis being published by two antimissile critics casts doubt on the reliability of the new weapon. Obama’s announcement of his new anti-missile plan in September was based on the Pentagon’s assessment that the SM-3, or Standard Missile 3, had intercepted 84 percent of incoming targets in tests. But a re-examination of results from 10 of those apparently successful tests by Theodore A. Postol

and George N. Lewis, being published this month, finds only one or two successful intercepts — for a success rate of 10 to 20 percent. Most of the approaching warheads, they say, would have been knocked off course but not destroyed. While that might work against a conventionally armed missile, it suggests that a nuclear warhead might still detonate. In interviews and a statement, the Pentagon’s Missile Defense Agency strongly defended the SM-3’s testing record, and said that the analysis by Postol, an MIT physicist, and Lewis, a Cornell physicist, was fundamentally mistaken. “The allegation is wrong,” Richard Lehner, an agency spokesman, said Wednesday. He said the SM-3 is “attaining test scores that many other Defense Department programs aspire to attain.” The Pentagon later admitted that 4 of the 10 analyzed flight tests carried no mock warheads at all.

ASTRONAUTS GET STARTED ON BUSY WEEK

NASA via The Associated Press

U.S. astronaut Stephen Bowen works on the International Space Station during a spacewalk Monday. The spacewalk, the first of three this week, involved two astronauts working to install a spare antenna on the space station. The astronauts had to be careful handling the fragile 6-foot dish antenna. Space shuttle Atlantis delivered the antenna and other spare station parts Sunday.

Guard Continued from A1 He wrote that some soldiers, who were entitled to 180 days of federal military health benefits, were told to seek treatment at home instead of on the base and pushed off a plan that would entitle them to a paycheck while receiving medical care. Wyden also suggested that officials at the base were denying requests for a second opinion from a doctor, providing incorrect information about special accommodations civilian employers are required to make for soldiers and pushing Oregon troops out early to make room for the approximately 18,000 other soldiers who will be passing through the base this summer for deployments. He said a PowerPoint presentation prepared by a staff member at the base’s Madigan Army Medical Center was evidence that officials were providing two separate standards of care for active duty and Guard soldiers. The presentation, meant to instruct staff on how to handle treatment for incoming soldiers, puts Guard and Reserve soldiers returning from Iraq

Chief Continued from A1 Since he left, there have been the small changes — his teenage son surpassed him in height. And the more difficult — his police department lost about 20 percent of its staff because of budget cuts. The first day back on the job started early. At around 7:30 a.m. he was patrolling the streets of Prineville with Cpt. Michael Boyd, who has been acting police chief. His big challenge at the department will be dealing with the large, three ring-binder on his desk — next year’s budget. But working more than 14hour days in the middle of a

on a separate track from active duty soldiers and refers to them as “weekend warriors.” In a May 14 response to Wyden, Lt. Gen. Eric B. Schoomaker, the Army’s Surgeon General, acknowledged that the presentation included an “insensitive and offensive depiction” of Guard and Reserve soldiers and added that the commander of Joint Base Lewis-McChord plans to investigate the concerns about the demobilization process. Jay Ebbeson, a spokesman for Madigan Army Medical Center, confirmed that the base has begun an investigation into the matter, but said he could not provide any additional details. In the meantime, Oregon National Guard officials are working with officials at the base to determine if any of the soldiers who have been sent home need more assistance with medical care or benefits. Capt. Stephen Bomar, a spokesman for the Oregon Military Department, said soldiers with major injuries have been identified and are being treated within the Army’s benefit system. The more difficult part, he said, is making sure the soldiers who have less serious — but still potentially damaging — medi-

cal problems receive all the care they’re entitled to so they can successfully return to their civilian jobs. “It comes down really to the individual soldier being their own advocate at that area, which can be tough,” he said. “The guy with a hurt ankle may decide he wants to go home.” Maj. Chris Reese, the commander of the 41st Brigade’s Bend-based 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry, said he didn’t believe the claims about improper treatment involved many local soldiers, but added that Guard officials do believe the concerns should be investigated. Reese said it’s important that soldiers receive treatment for their injuries before returning to work for civilian employers who won’t be able to help them out. “The number one thing I want out of it is for the soldiers to return to their civilian occupations,” he said. “They’re citizen soldiers, and we want them to be able to fulfill citizen requirements, go back to their families and employers as soon as possible.”

war zone, being charged with controlling the defense of a base that housed more 65,000 gives a person a sense of perspective. The budget isn’t great, and the economy is rough, he admits. “(But) we have it pretty good here,” he said. In the three weeks he’s been back in Prineville, Bush has enjoyed his wife’s home cooking. He’s been to track meets and horseback riding with his daughter. At work, he’s already looking ahead to where the department needs to be in the next five years. For seven years, the 44-yearold has been the chief of police. His 20th year with the department will be this summer. He’s no rookie. But he believes his trip to the Middle East, his first,

will help him in his role as police chief. “For professional development, it was a tremendous opportunity,” he said. “The leadership, you go into a position like that and there is no safety net. You don’t fail. You don’t have an opportunity to fail, because if you fail people are going to die, and you know that going in and you take it very seriously.” Boyd, who was the acting chief, was in touch with Bush while he was gone. The two exchanged e-mails and traded phone calls. “We’re glad to have him back,” Boyd said.

Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Permits Continued from A1 If the county approves the increase, building fees for a home valued at $140,000 would go up by about $278, according to a county fee study. The county budget committee, composed of the three county commissioners and three community members, will decide Thursday whether to keep the fee increase in the budget or pursue different options. The county’s fees are currently lower than fees in Crook and Jefferson counties and the city of Bend. The city of Bend is also proposing a 15 percent building fee increase. The city’s budget committee, composed of seven city councilors and seven community members, will consider on May 26 whether to increase city building fees. Both the city and county will formally adopt their budgets and any fee increases in June.

Recovery debated The Community Development Department normally depends exclusively on building fees to operate, although the county injected approximately $1.6 million from the general fund in the current budget year to keep the department afloat. This year, the county plans to transfer only $516,200 from the general fund. County officials have pointed to better-than-expected building permit revenues this spring as a sign the Community Development Department’s financial outlook is improving, but the Central Oregon Builders Association responded that it is too soon to know whether recovery has begun in the construction industry. County management was prepared to lay off four more employees, on top of 36 jobs

Permit costs Current building permit fees for a home valued at $140,000: Clackamas County ... $1,162.01 Crook County ........... $1,295.70 Deschutes County .... $1,208.91 Jackson County ........ $1,226.41 Jefferson County ...... $1,480.80 Lane County ............. $1,544.42 Marion County ......... $1,408.48 Washington County ...................... $1,143.86 Bend ......................... $1,520.87 Redmond .................. $1,035.80 Source: Deschutes County

already eliminated in response to the housing market downturn, if building activity did not improve. But officials changed course after building activity in March and April exceeded the county’s projection.

Longer wait? County Administrator Dave Kanner said during a Monday budget meeting that having a smaller staff would add up to 10 days to the time required to review architectural plans for homes and 15 more days to review commercial plans A representative of the association said its board and members are prepared to deal with the inconvenience of longer wait times, and prefer that to higher fees. “It is our belief that it is too early to adjust those projections, and cuts are going to needed to be made anyhow in regards to personnel,” Andy High, director of government affairs for the association, wrote in a letter to the county on behalf of the group’s board.

The county raised building fees by 25 percent in July. During last year’s budget process, department Director Tom Anderson said the increase was necessary at least in part because of the agency’s dire financial situation and would help prevent some layoffs. At the time, local building and real estate groups did not oppose the 25 percent fee increases, but said the fee hikes would hurt their members. That raise was necessary because the county did not raise its building and planning fees for several years of the housing boom, said Community Development Department Director Tom Anderson. On Monday, budget committee members seemed to be interested in a compromise to avoid deeper cuts at the Community Development Department. “If we continue to cut them, we’re gonna strip them so bad they won’t be able to get better,” said budget committee member and former County Administrator Mike Maier. Commissioner Tammy Baney said the county could, for example, increase fees by 7.5 percent, and lay off fewer employees. Anderson said the staff left at the Community Development Department is necessary to handle the current workload, and more layoffs would reduce customer service. “For each of the layoffs we’d had so far, it was tied to a reduction in service demand,” Anderson said. “It is a reality, we are busy now. The remaining staff that we have, nobody’s sitting on our hands. We are fully employed at the current service levels.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 A5

Senate hopeful’s Vietnam service disputed

Matter

Rama Lakshmi / The Washington Post

By Raymond Hernandez New York Times News Service

At a ceremony honoring veterans and senior citizens who sent presents to soldiers overseas, Attorney General Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut rose and spoke of an earlier time in his life. “We have learned something important since the days that I served in Vietnam,” Blumenthal said to the group gathered in Norwalk in March 2008. “And you exemplify it. Whatever we think about the war, whatever we call it — Afghanistan or Iraq — we owe our military men and women unconditional support.” There was one problem: Blumenthal, a Democrat who is now running for the U.S. Senate, never served in Vietnam. He obtained at least five military deferments from 1965 to 1970 and took repeated steps that enabled him to avoid going to war, according to records. The deferments allowed Blumenthal to complete his studies at Harvard; pursue a graduate fellowship in England; serve as a special assistant to the Washington Post’s publisher, Katharine Graham; and ultimately take a job in the Nixon White House. In 1970, with his last deferment in jeopardy, he landed a coveted spot in the Marine Reserve, which virtually guaranteed that he would not be sent to Vietnam. In an interview on Monday, the attorney general said that he had misspoken about his service during the Norwalk event and might have misspoken on other occasions. “My intention has always been to be completely clear and accurate and straightforward, out of respect to the veterans who served in Vietnam,” he said.

The Gir forest in India is the world’s only habitat for free-ranging Asiatic lions. The lions are a point of pride for locals. “We never get angry at the lion. The lion is our king,” says Lakshmiben Ulwa, the matriarch of one village.

Lions Continued from A1 But this rare big-cat conservation success has turned into a political hot potato, with the fate of the lions — featured standing back to back in India’s national emblem — caught up in ethnic pride and arguments over how best to protect them. Conservationists say that the lions are at risk because the entire species is cloistered in one pocket of forestland and inbreeding is widespread. They want to move some of Gir’s lions to another state.

‘Our pride’ Gujarat does not want to part with its lions. “People of Gujarat state are very emotional and possessive about the lions,” said Sudhir Chaturvedi, the chief conservator of forests at the lion habitat. “The lion is a source of our pride — there is a personal connect with the lions. We cannot trust others to care for them like we do here.” In the early 1900s, the lions were close to extinction, with just 20 left in the wild because of relentless trophy hunting. But after authorities banned hunting, declared the habitat a protected lion reserve, built up a robust prey base and moved out scores of forest-dwelling families, the lion population grew steadily. A count last month put their total at 411. “The Gir lion story is clearly one of our crowning conservation successes. The problem is that all the eggs are in one basket now. We are sitting on a time bomb. Entire decades of conservation gains can be wiped out by any catastrophe like disease, drought,

fire or war,” said Ravi Chellam, India director of the Wildlife Conservation Society. More than a decade ago, officials proposed moving some of the lions, and India has spent more than $3 million to prepare a large park called the Kuno Wildlife Sanctuary, in the neighboring state of Madhya Pradesh. But Gujarat resisted. So conservationists went to the Supreme Court in 2007 arguing to move five lions from Gir, citing such dangers as an outbreak of canine distemper in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania in 1994, which killed 30 percent of its lions within weeks. The court’s arguments are in the final stage. Gujarat’s officials say that they have worked very hard to save the lions from extinction. Chaturvedi took a dig at the other Indian wildlife parks, saying that they have been unable to protect their dwindling tigers, now totaling a mere 1,411. “Let those who ask for our lions focus on the disappearing tigers first. If they cannot protect their tiger population, how will our lions be safe there?” Jairam Ramesh, India’s environment and wildlife minister, even offered tigers to Gujarat as an incentive to part with its lions, but without any luck.

this does not provide adequate geographical isolation. Instances of man-lion conflict are rare. Inside the Gir sanctuary, there are 375 families of Maldharis, a traditional forestdwelling community of vegetarian cattle rearers. Their cattle are routinely hunted by the lions. “We never get angry at the lion. The lion is our king. It is our duty to see that its stomach is full,” said Lakshmiben Ulwa, the 54-year-old matriarch of a door-less, mud hamlet. But that bonhomie may not last. Two weeks ago, in a rare incident, a sub-adult lion was axed to death by three woodcutters in Mandalpara village, a few miles from the sanctuary. The lion had attacked seven farm laborers. “As the number of lions rise, they will spill over and conflict with humans will rise. Nobody wants a lion in their back yard,” said Ritwick Dutta, the attorney for the translocation advocates in the Supreme Court case. “But Gujarat state wants a monopoly over the lions and does not want to part with even five lions.”

TE O V

Too many lions? Meanwhile, Gir can no longer contain its growing numbers of lions. In the past four years, lions have begun dispersing naturally into newer areas, traveling along streams, grassland and farms. Gujarat’s forest officials say this is creating a satellite lion population that would insulate them in the event of an infection. But advocates of translocation say that

Continued from A1 And yet we exist, and physicists (among others) would dearly like to know why. Sifting data from collisions of protons and antiprotons at Fermilab’s Tevatron, which until last winter was the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, the team, known as the DZero collaboration, found that the fireballs produced pairs of the particles known as muons, which are sort of fat electrons, slightly more often than they produced pairs of antimuons. So the miniature universe inside the accelerator went from being neutral to being about 1 percent more matter than antimatter. “This result may provide an important input for explaining the matter dominance in our universe,” Guennadi Borissov, a coleader of the study from Lancaster University, in England, said in a talk Friday at Fermilab, in Batavia, Ill. Over the weekend, word spread quickly among physicists. Maria Spiropulu of CERN and the California Institute of Technology called the results “very impressive and inexplicable.” The results have now been posted on the Internet and submitted to the Physical Review. It was Andrei Sakharov, the Russian dissident and physicist, who first provided a recipe for how matter could prevail over antimatter in the early universe. Among his conditions was that there be a slight difference in the properties of particles and antiparticles known technically as CP violation. In effect, when the charges and spins of particles are reversed, they should behave slightly differently. Over the years, physicists have discovered a few examples of CP violation in rare reactions between subatomic particles that tilt slightly in favor of matter over antimatter, but “not enough to explain our existence,” in the words of Gustaaf Brooijmans of Colum-

bia, who is a member of the DZero team. The new effect hinges on the behavior of particularly strange particles called neutral B-mesons, which are famous for not being able to make up their minds. They oscillate back and forth trillions of times a second between their regular state and their antimatter state. As it happens, the mesons, created in the proton-antiproton collisions, seem to go from their antimatter state to their matter state more rapidly than they go the other way around, leading to an eventual preponderance of matter over antimatter of about 1 percent, when they decay to muons. Whether this is enough to explain our existence is a question that cannot be answered until the cause of the still-mysterious behavior of the B-mesons is directly observed, said Brooijmans, who called the situation “fairly encouraging.” The observed preponderance is about 50 times what is predicted by the Standard Model, the suite of theories that has ruled particle physics for a generation, meaning that whatever is causing the B-meson to act this way is “new physics” that physicists have been yearning for almost as long. Brooijmans said that the most likely explanations were some new particle not predicted by the Standard Model or some new kind of interaction between particles. Luckily, he said, “this is something we should be able to poke at with the Large Hadron Collider.” Neal Weiner of New York University said, “If this holds up, the LHC is going to be producing some fantastic results.” Nevertheless, physicists will be holding their breath until the results are confirmed by other experiments. Joe Lykken, a theorist at Fermilab, said, “So I would not say that this announcement is the equivalent of seeing the face of God, but it might turn out to be the toe of God.”

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A6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

CEASE-FIRE OFFER ACCEPTED, BUT SIDES STILL FAR APART IN THAILAND

Threatened Muslim soldier says Army has let him down “No one’s taking this seriously. These are serious issues about WASHINGTON — Two safety, equality and religious months after a Muslim soldier harassment, and it’s simply not complained to the Pentagon a priority here,” said Klawonn, about being harassed in the who has retained an attorney wake of the Fort Hood shoot- to prepare a lawsuit against the ings, Spc. Zachari military. Klawonn said the Post commanders Army has not followed rebutted his allegations, through on its promises saying they’d made evto address problems at ery effort to address the the country’s largest harassment Klawonn military base. has experienced. “This Commanders at Fort base takes the concern Hood, Texas, moved of its Muslim soldiers Klawonn, 20, off post Zachari and all its soldiers very for his safety in March Klawonn seriously,” said spokesafter a threatening note man Christopher Haug. with religious slurs was “His commanders are left at his barracks door. But then really trying to help him.” the military failed to provide him During his two years in the the standard stipend for off-post military, Klawonn said he has housing, Klawonn said. In recent filed more than 20 complaints weeks, he’s had to take out two of harassment for being Muslim. loans, borrow another $300 from Many of the instances have oca nonprofit group and pawn his curred at Fort Hood and were possessions to pay his bills. confirmed by fellow soldiers, Klawonn said he asked for the including times when other solhousing allowance repeatedly, diers jeered him and used relimaking his appeals up the chain gious slurs. Klawonn said the of command. Last week, after a harassment escalated after Maj. reporter asked about the hous- Nidal Hasan, a Muslim psychiaing allowance, Klawonn said trist he’d never met, was charged his commanders had called and with killing 13 people and injurtold him he would begin receiv- ing more than 30 during a masing his stipend June 1. sacre last November.

By William Wan

The Washington Post

Wally Santana / The Associated Press

An anti-government protester gestures toward approaching Thai police Monday in Bangkok. The Thai government said Monday it would accept a cease-fire offer from a Red Shirt protest leader if their fighters ended street battles and return to their main camp in central Bangkok, as the death toll from five days of violence rose to 37. The offer was made by Red Shirt leader Nattawut Saikuwa, who called the government’s chief negotiator, Korbsak Sabhavasu, on his cell phone, Korbsak said. It was the first direct talks between the two sides since the fighting started Thursday,

but Korbsak said it was unlikely to achieve much as the two sides still remained far apart. Earlier, a Thai government ultimatum passed for the thousands of protesters — who have been camping in an upscale commercial district for more than a month — to vacate the barricaded protest zone or face up to two years in prison. Meanwhile, unrest flared in various parts of the downtown area outside the barricades, with troops firing live ammunition at protesters who were lighting tires to hide their positions. — The Associated Press

Suit aims to block Arizona law on migrants Los Angeles Times DENVER — A coalition of civil rights groups on Monday filed a sweeping lawsuit against Arizona’s controversial law that requires local police to enforce federal immigration regulations, hoping to stop the state law before it goes into effect in July. The suit argues that the law, known as SB 1070, will essentially require police to racially profile and that it violates several constitutional provisions, including the First and Fourth Amendments. The groups also contend it is an illegal attempt for a state to regulate immigration, a federal matter. The suit was filed by groups that include the American Civil Liberties Union, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Asian Pacific American Legal Center.

W  B Britain relaxes rules over volcanic ash

At least 23 dead in Indian bus blast

Karzai’s brother accused in land grab

LONDON — Aviation authorities introduced relaxed flight safety rules Monday to minimize further disruptions caused by a volcano eruption in Iceland, as airports reopened after a dense volcanic ash cloud dissipated. Britain’s Civil Aviation Authority said it agreed with airlines, regulators and engine manufacturers on new rules that would let planes fly for a limited time through higher ash densities than currently allowed. The rules — which go into effect midday today — are subject to airlines getting a guarantee from their engine makers that their aircraft can safely tolerate the ash.

NEW DELHI — A bus carrying civilians and Indian police officers through a remote region at the heart of a Maoist insurgency hit an explosive device on Monday. Authorities were still verifying the number of dead, but the local police chief said at least 23 people had been killed. Amresh Mishra, the police chief in the Dantewada District, where the attack occurred, said in a telephone interview that the bodies of 13 officers and the driver had been recovered from the wreckage, while the bodies of an additional nine or 10 victims, believed to be civilians, could not yet be extracted from the mangled bus.

KABUL, Afghanistan — Afghan military investigators have accused Ahmed Wali Karzai, U.S.-backed President Hamid Karzai’s controversial half brother, of intervening to protect powerful allies who are squatting illegally on government property. In response, Ahmed Wali Karzai shut down the Kandahar legislature this week by refusing to lead the provincial council until he can clear his name. Afghan officials told investigators that Ahmed Wali Karzai intervened to stop them from retaking 150 acres that are being used in part by two Karzai allies. — From wire reports

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

MARKET REPORT

s

2,354.23 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +7.38 +.31%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

s

CLOSE 10,625.83 DOW JONES CHANGE +5.67 +.05%

s

1,136.94 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +1.26 +.11%

s

By Nick Bunkley

SAN FRANCISCO — Google Inc. will make an ambitious bid to extend its reach into the living room when it debuts its Internet television software this week. Through a joint initiative with other prominent technology and consumer electronics companies, the Web search giant is expected to showcase technology that TV viewers can use to flip seamlessly among familiar shows, YouTube videos and home videos on their sets. Called Smart TV, the software is expected to be built into Internet-connected TVs, Blu-ray players and set-top boxes. It has not been disclosed when the first of these devices will be available to consumers.

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.47 treasury CHANGE +.87%

s

$1,227.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$0.30

New York Times News Service

DETROIT — General Motors said Monday that it earned its first quarterly profit since 2007 after last year’s governmentsponsored bankruptcy allowed the carmaker to wipe away many of its longstanding obligations. GM reported first-quarter earnings of $865 million as its revenue surged 40 per-

cent, to $31.5 billion. It broke a long string of losses in North America even though industry sales remain near multi-decade lows. The results show that GM is on track to become a public company again as soon as the fourth quarter, allowing the government to recover more of the billions of dollars it spent preventing the company’s collapse.

After nearly running out of money at the end of 2008, GM had positive cash flow of $1 billion in the first quarter. “The fact that GM can be profitable at this level of sales is very, very positive,” said Charles Moore, senior managing director of Conway MacKenzie, a corporate turnaround consulting firm in Birmingham, Mich. “There’s still uncertainty in the economy, which could cause a blip in sales, but based on all of the indicators at this point, one would expect that they should be able to be profitable for the full year.” See GM / B2

Is autopilot breeding cockpit complacency?

More homeowners losing federal aid WASHINGTON — Homeowners taking advantage of mortgage aid under a federal foreclosure-prevention plan are being dropped from the program at an increasing rate, potentially forcing more borrowers out of their homes as the program struggles to make an impact, according to Treasury data released Monday. The program, known as Making Home Affordable, pays lenders to lower the mortgage payments of distressed borrowers, but it has struggled to have a significant effect on the country’s foreclosure crisis. Now it is increasingly losing borrowers who didn’t submit enough documentation to prove they qualified for the help or who fell behind on their new lower mortgage payments. The number of borrowers who were dropped reached more than 280,000 in April, according to the Treasury data. That compares with about 157,000 borrowers who had lost their mortgage aid in March and means that more than one of every five borrowers who have entered the program eventually lost their aid.

Builders turned less pessimistic in May WASHINGTON — Homebuilders in the United States. became less pessimistic in May as a government tax credit boosted sales. The National Association of Home Builders/Wells Fargo confidence index rose to 22, exceeding the median forecast of economists surveyed by Bloomberg News and the highest level since August 2007, from 19 in April, data from the Washington-based group showed today. Readings lower than 50 mean more respondents said conditions were poor. — From wire reports

Seasonally adjusted

$366.4B $365 billion

355

345

335 2009

2010

Source: Department of Commerce AP

posts loss of $24.4M By Andrew Moore The Bulletin

Bend-based Cascade Bancorp, parent company of Bank of the Cascades, reported Monday a loss of $24.4 million in the first quarter of 2010, or 87 cents per share. The quarterly loss was a nearly 50 percent improvement from the $48.5 million, or $1.73 per share, the company lost in the fourth quarter of 2009. But the loss was more than sixfold the $3.9 million, or 14 cents a share, the company lost in the same quarter a year ago. In a regulatory filing made last month with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the bank reported a loss of $22.3 million in the first quarter of 2010. The FDIC filing pertains to the bank’s financial performance and not the company as a whole. See Bank / B5

$30M

$6.04 million 0

-30M

-$24.4 million

-60M

-90M

-120M

-150M

-$137.56 million Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 ’08 ’08 ’08 ’08 ’09 ’09 ’09 ’09 ’10

* Q1 2010 earnings data is from Bank of the Cascades’ first quarter Call Report filed with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Sources: Cascade Bancorp, FDIC John Van Beekum / New York Times News Service

Capt. Gene Rosenthal, left, leads a training session inside a Reflectone A320 flight simulator at the Airbus Training Center in Miami Springs, Fla., on Monday. The issue of cockpit automation will be on the agenda at a conference in Washington this week.

Safety officials scrutinize issue in wake of incidents By Christine Negroni New York Times News Service

A captain returned to the cockpit after taking a bathroom break and found the first officer facing away from the instruments and talking to a flight attendant. Unnoticed was the fact that the autopilot had disconnected and the plane was in danger of stalling. The incident is one of more than a

dozen in an airline industry report in which the pilots failed to properly monitor the flight, the automation or even the location of their airplane. The report, which came out in 2008, is getting new attention in light of the most conspicuous recent example of pilots not paying attention: The Northwest Airlines flight that overshot its destination and traveled on for another 150 miles before turning

back to the airport last October. Whether these incidents are symptoms of a larger problem in the cockpit is the subject of a debate among aviation experts: Are airliners so automated that pilots are becoming complacent? The issue will be on the agenda at a three-day conference in Washington beginning today, when the National Transportation Safety Board considers pilot and air traffic controller professionalism. See Autopilot / B2

EXECUTIVE FILE

In 2005, when the economy was at full throttle, Jeld-Wen 1031 opened an office in Bend. After Salem and Medford, it was the third office for the real estate services company, which facilitates tax-deferred 1031 property exchanges. At the time, business was booming, said Glenda Sibbald, a veteran real estate professional who came out of retirement to open the Bend office of Jeld-Wen 1031. The company is part of Klamath Falls-based Jeld-Wen Inc., which operates several real estate related businesses, including AmeriTitle and local destination resorts Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond and Brasada Ranch in

Q&A: How Europe’s troubles may affect Americans McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The basics What: Jeld-Wen 1031 Where: 15 Oregon Ave., Suite B, Bend Employees: 3 Phone: 541-749-4375 Website: www.jeld-wen1031.com

Powell Butte. But as the economy began to sputter in 2007, Jeld-Wen 1031 saw its transaction volume drop. The company closed both its Salem and Medford offices and hunkered down in Bend. “As goes the real estate market, so goes the 1031 exchange industry,” said Sibbald. See Jeld-Wen / B2

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

By Kevin G. Hall

At 1031 exchange, ‘each month tells its own story’ The Bulletin

Total monthly sales for retail trade and food services rose 0.4% in April.

$18.835 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.367

Cascade Bancorp earnings

By Andrew Moore

Retail sales rise

t

GM sees first profit since ‘07 Cascade Bancorp despite historically low sales As automaker becomes more sustainable, it could pay back government loans and go public again

Google plans foray into television

B

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Glenda Sibbald, the vice president of the Bend branch of Jeld-Wen 1031, came out of retirement to open the business. The company has helped real estate investors defer capital gains taxes with a so-called 1031 exchange since 2005.

WASHINGTON — The rapid slide in value of the common European currency known as the euro continues to rattle global investors amid signs that problems on the other side of the Atlantic could spread and infect other economies, even slowing growth in the United States. The problems in Europe stem from having a single currency in 16 nations with widely varying levels of economic health and debt. Not even last week’s trillion-dollar bailout stemmed concerns, which range from slower growth to fears of an outright crumble of the European Union. Like the United States just a few years ago, Europe now faces a financial crisis of the proportions not seen since the aftermath of World War II. Here are some answers to questions about why problems in Europe offer Americans both risks and opportunities. See Europe / B5


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Senate passes a credit score amendment By David M. Herszenhorn New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Anyone rejected for a credit card, car loan or department store charge account has most likely discovered a frustrating aspect of the free credit reports mandated by the government: the glaring absence of the numerical credit score that lenders rely on to make their decisions. That now stands to change as a result of an amendment adopted by the Senate on Monday as it moved closer toward completing a sweeping financial regulatory bill. The Senate, by a voice vote, approved a proposal by Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., to require that credit reports include the numerical score, which by the most common measure ranges from 300 to 850. Obtaining a score from the major credit reporting bureaus that calculate them typically costs up to $15.95 for each score. “This I believe will empower consumers; it will increase the financial literacy in our country,” Udall said. “It’s a win-win.” His proposal would require the score to be provided if it was used to deny credit, required a higher interest rate on a loan or prevented an applicant from being hired

for a job. Udall’s proposal was one of several amendments addressed Monday in the financial regulations bill, which may be wrapped up later this week. By voice vote, the Senate also approved an amendment to ease proposed restrictions that critics said would cut off so-called angel investing — in which individual investors provide start-up capital to small businesses that typically do not have access to more traditional financing. The original bill included provisions intended to root out fraud, including a 120-day waiting period for certain investors to allow for a review by the Securities and Exchange Commission, but supporters of the amendment said the restrictions would block crucial start-up capital. By voice vote, the Senate also approved an amendment by Sen. John Rockefeller IV, D-W.Va. and chairman of the Commerce Committee, that preserves the authority of the Federal Trade Commission in enforcing consumer protection laws and requires the commission to coordinate with a new consumer financial protection bureau that would be created by the regulatory legislation.

Autopilot Continued from B1 “We at the NTSB are continuing to see accidents and incidents like the Northwest 188 event,” said a safety board member, Robert Sumwalt. “Here it shows we have proof that pilots are still not adequately monitoring the aircraft flight path.” The problem of pilots losing track of some aspect of a flight is not new. It has been around, in fact, almost as long as the technology that allows computers to perform some pilot functions. In 2002, Sumwalt was one three authors of a paper that claimed pilots failed to adequately monitor what the airplane was doing in one-half to three-quarters of the mishaps reviewed. That report was done after several incidents, including one in 1996 when the pilots of a Continental Airlines plane failed to make sure the landing gear had been properly lowered before landing. “Humans are not good monitors over highly automated systems for extended periods of time,” said Sumwalt, who was a pilot for 24 years at Piedmont and then US Airways. “We want to acknowledge that you can’t expect someone to be extremely vigilant for five or seven or three hours.”

Distracted flying Not all experts agree. The Federal Aviation Administration said that neither the Northwest flight nor other incidents examined by the airline industry indicated a bigger problem. “If we had any suspicions or

trend lines, we would be making efforts to bring some change about,” the agency administrator, J. Randolph Babbitt, said in a telephone interview. Babbitt said the FAA was more concerned that pilots, confused by the complex automation, were losing track of what the airplane was doing. But the Northwest pilots were on their laptops, Babbitt said, doing work unrelated to the flight, a prohibited activity. “It doesn’t have anything to do with automation,” he said. “Any opportunity for distraction doesn’t have any business in the cockpit. Your focus should be on flying the airplane.” Automation is generally considered a positive development in aviation safety because it reduces pilot workload and eliminates errors in calculation and navigation. “The introduction of automation did good things,” said Key Dismukes, chief scientist for aerospace human factors at NASA. But it changed the essential nature of the pilot’s role in the cockpit. “Now the pilot is a manager, which is good, and a monitor, which is not so good.” Hugh Schoelzel, the vice president of safety at Trans World Airlines — a carrier acquired by American Airlines in 2001 — said most pilots had at one time or another lost track of where they were in flight. “Anyone who says they haven’t is either being disingenuous, or hasn’t been paying attention,” he said. The episode in which the returning captain had to act quickly to save the airliner from a near stall was discovered by the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, an airline industry group,

as it reviewed thousands of reports filed by pilots to NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System to see if automation caused pilots to mishandle problems or to become confused or distracted. The group’s study, which ran from 2005 to 2008, highlighted 50 events in the five years prior to 2005. In 16 of them, the pilots’ failure to monitor the automation or the location of the aircraft was cited. “I’m inclined to say it’s the very reliability of something that takes us out of the loop,” said Dismukes, who has written about the effects of automation on safety. “You may know, ‘Never turn your back, always check,’ and people may have that intention. But it’s hard to maintain that in practice when you’re not physically controlling the aircraft.”

Underlying issues Finding the balance between too much technology and too little is crucial, according to William Rouse, an engineering and computing professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “Complacency is an issue, but designing the interaction between human and technical so the human has the right level of judgment when you need them is a design task in itself,” Rouse said. “When the person has no role in the task, there’s a much greater risk of complacency.” Some airline pilots confirm this. “We’ve all been there, not intentionally, but because you get distracted from the task at hand,” said a captain at Continental Airlines who did not want to be identified because he was not authorized to speak to the media. Com-

FURNITURE OUTLET

GM Continued from B1 GM last turned an annual profit in 2004, when automakers sold almost 17 million vehicles in the United States. This year, most analysts expect sales of fewer than 12 million. “We used to be breaking even in the middle of the cycle,” Christopher Liddell, GM’s chief financial officer, said. “Now we’re breaking even at the bottom of the cycle.” Given how quickly GM went from bankruptcy to profits, Liddell said he was trying to keep expectations for the company from rising too high, lest it fall into its previous habit of promising more than it could deliver. But he did not dissuade predictions that the automaker would continue to be profitable, saying he sees “nothing that I’m significantly concerned about” standing in the way. Now GM is focused on increasing its profits through higher sales, he said, rather than through additional deep cuts. “We just have to sell more cars,” he said. “If we can do that and the industry improves — and we improve with it — then we have an

Jeld-Wen Continued from B1 The rapidly rising property values in the mid-part of the decade that made 1031 exchanges lucrative ceased and many investors stopped purchasing new properties, she said. But whereas the problem has been acute in Central Oregon, the decline in property values wasn’t as pronounced in other places throughout the West, where Jeld-Wen 1031 operates. The company also performs 1031 exchanges for other forms of property, such as business jets and equipment, that weren’t affected by fluctuating real estate values. This year, the company is seeing more interest in 1031 exchanges, said Sibbald. “Each month tells its own story,” she said. A 1031 exchange is a federally sanctioned real estate transaction that allows an investor to defer paying capital gains taxes on the sale of an investment property if a similar property is purchased within 180 days. A caveat of a 1031 transaction — named after the relevant tax code section — is the proceeds from the sale of the original property must be handled by a third party, who is also required to purchase the replacement property at the direction of the investor. In other words, the investor is not allowed to handle the money involved in a 1031 exchange. Summit 1031 Exchange in Bend filed for bankruptcy in December 2008, partly because it was using its clients’ money to

extremely good profit picture.” GM earned $1.2 billion before interest and taxes in North America, the region where it had sustained most of its losses in recent years. In the previous quarter, GM lost $3.4 billion in North America. GM’s biggest source of trouble is now Europe, where it lost $500 million, but Liddell said operations there could break even next year. Worldwide, GM earned $1.7 billion before interest and taxes. The $865 million net profit compared with a loss of $6 billion by the old GM in the period a year earlier. Liddell would not give a specific time when GM might begin selling its stock to the public, beyond saying it would occur “in good time, when the company’s ready and when the market’s ready.” In April, GM repaid the balance of its $6.7 billion loan from the federal government, along with smaller loans from the Canadian and Ontario governments. GM aired commercials featuring its chief executive, Edward Whitacre Jr., highlighting the loan repayment, but critics, including some members of Congress, accused the company of misleading consumers into thinking all

$50 billion given to the company by the U.S. Treasury had been repaid. The Treasury Department still owns 61 percent of GM, a stake it received in exchange for most of the money it gave to the carmaker. Taxpayers can recoup that money only through the sale of GM stock. In preparation for that action, executives are considering reentering the auto financing business, a move that could increase sales by expanding the pool of consumers who can qualify for attractive loans. GM sold control of its former financing arm, GMAC Financial Services, in 2006. GMAC is now known as Ally Financial and also handles financing for Chrysler. “It’s important in terms of our relationship with GMAC and with other providers that we have a free flow of funding available to all credit limits,” Liddell said. “That’s probably cost us some sales over the last year.” Likewise, Chrysler, which filed for Chapter 11 protection a month sooner than GM, is showing early signs of revival. Chrysler lost $197 million in the first quarter, but executives said last week that the recovery was progressing faster than they had forecast and

invest in real estate, according to court documents. At the time of its filing, Summit 1031 reported on its website that it was short roughly $14.2 million owed to its clients. Sibbald said Jeld-Wen 1031 has always used separate bank accounts for each of its clients and sets them up so that clients can access them electronically and monitor balances. Sibbald said the fallout from Summit 1031’s bankruptcy and other 1031 company failures may bring additional rules to the lightly regulated 1031 industry, but she said she would be fine with additional regulation. Sibbald answered several questions about Jeld-Wen 1031 in an interview with The Bulletin:

A:

Q: A:

How has the recession impacted your business? We do have fewer clients than, say, in 2005-2007, but I think the business is still viable, and as our real estate market changes, the business will grow again.

Q: A:

How did the Summit 1031 bankruptcy affect your business? We offer all of these individualized accounts with protective coverage, and we were able to immediately say, “This is how we do business.” I think people out there are far more cautious, and I think the (1031) industry today is very aware of that, and has risen to the occasion. We didn’t always talk about it before and we welcome questions.

Q:

How do your customers find you?

projected an operating profit for the full year as well. The parent company of Chrysler Financial on Monday repaid $1.9 billion on a $4 billion government loan that the Obama administration had written off. “I don’t think anybody’s ready to declare victory yet,” said Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, R-Mich., who lobbied in favor of federal assistance for the industry. “When you look at the economic conditions out there, it makes the profit look more impressive. You’re going to have a lot of working families that can sleep better at night.”

“WE MAKE IT EASY!” 541-385-0373 • 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend

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placency is very subtle, he said, “No light comes on to tell you that you’re being complacent.” At its meeting this week, the transportation safety board will include discussion of the actions of pilots and air traffic controllers in two accidents in 2009 — the crash of Colgan Air Flight 3407 in Buffalo and the midair collision between a general aviation airplane and a sightseeing helicopter over the Hudson River. Those accidents along with the Northwest incident all occurred within seven months of each other and not long after the Hudson River landing of US Airways Flight 1549 that turned the pilots of that flight into icons of professional airmanship. Chesley Sullenberger III, the captain of the US Airways plane, said in an interview that it would be wrong to use his success in safely bringing down that plane to criticize pilots who make mistakes like those on the Northwest plane. “Something in the system allowed these well-trained, experienced, well-meaning, well-intentioned pilots not to notice where they were, and we need to find out what the root causes are,” he said. “Simply to blame individual practitioners is wrong, and it doesn’t solve the underlying issues or prevent it from happening.”

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Our website, or it’s word of mouth, usually through real estate agents, and lots of long-term clients. We don’t do a great deal of advertising.

Q:

Does it help your customers’ confidence that the company is part of the Jeld-Wen family? It’s surprising when you mention the Jeld-Wen name, (but) it depends on where (in the country) you are … (but) the size of the parent company and the strength of the company is important, and the integrity of our company is of the utmost importance.

A:

Q:

Will the expiration of the Bush tax cuts this year, which will increase the capital gains tax rate, help or hurt your business? The fact that the capital gains tax likely will increase is, of course, causing some exchangers to go ahead and sell and pay the tax this year, anticipating it will never be at lower rate than it is today. So through this year, I would say yes it has an impact on the number of exchange transactions we do, as does the value of properties today. You have people who bought properties in busy years and now with reduced values, they may not have the same value anymore, so those people are not looking to do another exchange for a while, but once we get past this year, and the capital gains tax increases, business will go up.”

A:

Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@ bendbulletin.com.

A

n evening of nostalgia featuring a 1920’s four course meal at one of Bend’s Finest restaurants. Great Gatsby. Bonnie and Clyde. Smooth jazz and gambling. Gangsters and flappers. Moonshine and Model A’s. So much fun it should still be illegal... visit the Historical Museum website for more details! www.deschuteshistory.org $65 per person + cocktails and gaming Gratuity and $10.00 “funny” money for gambling included

Sunday, May 23rd at Staccato at the Firehall For Reservations call: 541-312-3100 By reservation only. Reservations times available between 5:00 - 8:00 pm Acknowledgements: Presented and hosted by Staccato at the Firehall, Monte Carlo Style gaming “speakeasy” provided by Team Casino and generously sponsored by Deschutes Brewery and The Bulletin


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 B3

T F A musical revolution, with a cost in fidelity By Joseph Plambeck New York Times News Service

At the ripe age of 28, Jon Zimmer is sort of an old fogey. That is, he is obsessive about the sound quality of his music. A onetime audio engineer who now is a consultant for Stereo Exchange, an upscale audio store in Manhattan, Zimmer lights up when talking about high fidelity, bit rates and $10,000 loudspeakers. But iPods and compressed computer files — the most popular vehicles for audio today — are “sucking the life out of music,” he says. The past decade has brought an explosion in dazzling technological advancement — including enhancements in surround sound, high-definition television and 3-D — that have transformed the fan’s experience. There are improvements in the quality of media everywhere — except in music. In many ways, the quality of what people hear — how well the playback reflects the original sound — has taken a step back. To many expert ears, compressed music files produce a crackly, tinnier and thinner sound than music on CDs and certainly on vinyl. And to compete with other songs, tracks are engineered to be much louder as well. In one way, the music business has been the victim of its own technological success: the ease of loading songs onto a computer or an iPod has meant that a generation of fans has happily traded fidelity for portability and convenience. This is the obstacle the industry faces in any effort to create higher-quality — and more expensive — ways of listening.

Joshua Bright / New York Times News Service

Mario Suazo, 11, listens to his iPod at the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York in April. Many listeners today prefer the sound of compressed digital audio to high-fidelity recordings, according to Jonathan Berger, a professor of music at Stanford University.

A cultural shift The change in sound quality is as much cultural as technological. For decades, starting around the 1950s, high-end stereos were a status symbol. A high-quality system was something to show off, much like a new flat-screen TV today. But Michael Fremer, a professed audiophile who runs musicangle.com, which reviews albums, said that today, “a stereo has become an object of scorn.” The marketplace reflects that change. From 2000 to 2009,

Americans reduced their overall spending on home stereo components by more than a third, to roughly $960 million, according to the Consumer Electronics Association, a trade group. Spending on portable digital devices during that same period increased more than fiftyfold, to $5.4 billion. “People used to sit and listen to music,” Fremer said, but the increased portability has altered the way people experience recorded music. “It was an activity. It is no longer consumed as an event that you pay attention to.”

Instead, music is often carried from place to place, played in the background while the consumer does something else — exercising or commuting or cooking dinner.

Digital shortcuts The songs themselves are usually saved on the digital devices in a compressed format, often as an AAC or MP3 file. That compression shrinks the size of the file, eliminating some of the sounds and range contained on a CD while allowing more songs to

be saved on the device and reducing download times. Even if music companies and retailers like the iTunes Store, which opened in April 2003, wanted to put an emphasis on sound quality, they faced technical limitations at the start, not to mention economic ones. “It would have been very difficult for the iTunes Store to launch with high-quality files if it took an hour to download a single song,” said David Dorn, a senior vice president at Rhino Entertainment, a division of Warner Music that specializes in highquality recordings. The music industry has not failed to try. About 10 years ago, two new high-quality formats — DVD Audio and SACD, for Super Audio CD — entered the marketplace, promising sound superior even to that of a CD. But neither format gained traction. Last year, the iTunes Store upgraded the standard quality for a song to 256 kilobits per second from 128 kilobits per second, preserving more details and eliminating the worst crackles. Some online music services are now marketing an even higherquality sound as a selling point. Mog, a new streaming music service, announced in March an application for smartphones that would allow the service’s subscribers to save songs onto their phones. The music will be available on the phone as long as the subscriber pays the $10 monthly fee. Another company, HDtracks. com, started selling downloads last year that contain even more information than CDs at $2.49 a song. Right now, most of the available tracks are of classical

or jazz music.

Decibel competition Still, these remain niche interests, and they are complicated by changes in the recording process. With the rise of digital music, fans listen to fewer albums straight through. Instead, they move from one artist’s song to another’s. Pop artists and their labels, meanwhile, shudder at the prospect of having their song seem quieter than the previous song on a fan’s playlist. So audio engineers, acting as foot soldiers in a volume war, are often enlisted to increase the overall volume of a recording. Randy Merrill, an engineer at MasterDisk, a New York City company that creates master recordings, said that to achieve an overall louder sound, engineers raise the softer volumes toward peak levels. On a quality stereo system, Merrill said, the reduced volume range can leave a track sounding distorted. “Modern recording has gone overboard on the volume,” he said. In fact, among younger listeners, the lower-quality sound might actually be preferred. Jonathan Berger, a professor of music at Stanford, said he had conducted an informal study among his students and found that, over the roughly seven years of the study, an increasing number of them preferred the sound of files with less data over the high-fidelity recordings. “I think our human ears are fickle. What’s considered good or bad sound changes over time,” Berger said. “Abnormality can become a feature.”


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n APACC ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G ATS Med AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Acergy AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adaptec Adminstf AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyIn Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexBld AlexREE Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllisChE AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlmostFam AlphaNRs AlpGlbDD AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev AmTrstFin Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntlGp rs AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrg s AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev AnglogldA ABInBev n Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenics Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEnerg ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgonSt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld Arris ArrowEl ArtTech ArtioGInv n ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AspenBio AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG Astec AstoriaF AstraZen Astrotech athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone

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Nm Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BldrsEmg BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR BarcBk prD Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath BellMicro Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip BioSphre BiostarPh Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw Braskem BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp h Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNX Gas CSX CTC Media CTS CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CapGold n CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm CastleAM CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf

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Nm CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Cheesecake CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChiElMot n ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaTel ChinaUni ChiValve n ChinaYuch ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g ClayChinSC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy CleanH ClearChOut Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica ComfrtS CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompCrd CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrgan CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CorinthC CornPdts CornellCos Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane CrSuisInco CredSuiss Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr CumbPh n Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurBrit CurrCda CurJpn CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DearbrnBc DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DB Cap pf DeutBCT5 pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold

D 0.80 25.91 -.28 23.08 +.02 0.78 14.18 +.03 0.03 15.23 +.13 1.56 12.72 -.02 26.83 -.41 25.69 +.41 0.01 14.94 -.26 10.00 +.29 2.66 +.12 11.55 -.38 2.90 34.17 +.04 8.00 -.01 61.80 +1.11 19.44 +.21 8.86 -.09 84.62 +.56 28.89 -1.33 32.50 +.60 5.68 +.18 32.55 -.08 26.90 -.02 3.36 -.01 0.30 22.29 -.33 2.88 77.73 +.62 19.94 -.52 0.16 14.44 -.05 42.94 +.51 0.54 4.00 +.02 15.55 -.27 5.69 +.27 19.32 -.09 1.98 +.01 6.90 -.02 1.52 -.12 6.41 -1.08 11.34 -.75 5.45 -.12 8.93 -.26 1.54 65.07 +.34 12.95 +.06 1.81 47.80 +.53 6.19 -.46 2.64 76.46 +.11 1.82 -.06 8.34 -.47 5.10 -.05 3.95 -.12 1.10 44.84 +.14 0.23 11.60 -.31 9.50 +.29 0.35 16.53 -.42 6.89 -.02 1.75 +.04 139.03 +.42 13.88 -.21 0.24 10.21 +.65 1.48 51.95 +.60 1.42 19.26 -.04 0.56 67.13 +1.53 3.63 +.24 16.70 +.27 0.32 69.66 -1.06 3.41 -.08 1.58 27.79 +.39 0.72 17.36 +.16 0.48 26.94 +.47 13.85 -.45 24.87 -.07 2.13 24.71 -.09 3.86 -.12 1.13 -.02 46.30 -.21 0.40 62.58 +.63 1.14 -.05 0.03 24.59 -.43 0.51 38.93 -.46 6.96 -.23 15.95 -.80 62.86 +1.76 9.91 -.09 8.35 +.22 .39 +.04 0.56 52.92 -1.06 2.00 65.02 +1.29 14.37 -.23 0.60 40.20 +.14 0.36 26.33 -.24 1.76 53.41 +.07 17.35 -.77 0.40 7.05 +.10 9.19 +.02 49.43 -.46 0.37 7.13 -.02 55.66 +.30 6.99 +.16 2.12 83.81 +1.05 22.01 +.87 0.60 15.38 +.39 0.04 22.77 +.12 1.74 -.06 0.38 18.10 +.50 0.38 17.27 +.39 0.20 42.06 -.16 0.20 11.89 +.41 0.94 39.75 +.63 0.48 14.62 -.59 28.81 -.05 40.44 -.05 23.83 +.34 0.37 64.36 -.31 1.36 14.84 +.16 1.56 78.76 +.26 12.65 -.03 14.41 -.45 .81 +.01 0.50 5.91 -.59 49.87 +.02 7.89 -.08 30.59 -.69 0.40 34.92 -.08 0.80 24.48 +.11 51.25 -2.82 41.22 +.09 2.88 -.02 2.20 55.19 -.65 0.40 38.75 -1.46 2.38 44.52 +.08 22.62 -.97 17.87 +.07 0.96 36.54 +.08 20.87 +.22 45.41 -1.24 11.74 +.09 1.00 -.03 0.06 36.62 +.22 1.08 48.94 -.08 0.42 21.02 +.27 1.09 52.68 2.30 24.98 -.15 37.18 +.38 0.92 19.53 +.25 15.99 +1.88 0.56 34.25 -.28 28.05 +.24 0.20 18.32 +.36 1.57 39.46 -.36 20.40 +.01 8.89 -.23 0.84 58.35 +.61 7.96 -.15 0.13 8.24 -.04 54.31 +.02 16.46 +.03 21.37 -.11 0.72 44.59 -.15 4.69 -.21 0.80 33.88 +.01 0.32 3.34 -.04 1.85 41.56 +.39 75.24 +3.14 10.50 -.20 7.59 -.40 36.67 +.15 24.49 +.24 .46 -.01 37.93 -.06 21.84 +.28 1.80 57.94 +.47 7.89 -.70 0.70 71.27 -.28 3.46 +.17 123.48 +.01 2.25 87.84 -.86 144.20 -.57 96.28 -.20 107.12 -.24 25.68 +.08 2.16 -.04 33.92 +.61 11.71 -.01 1.08 -.02 0.05 43.67 -.45 5.15 0.28 5.18 -.07 40.62 -.14 0.78 8.90 -.10 1.21 26.79 +.01 0.15 13.30 +.19 0.60 39.29 -.63 2.12 47.60 +.30 51.11 +.79 11.41 -.62 0.16 84.40 -.63 1.00 43.97 +.50 9.01 -.05 63.73 +.68 0.20 62.03 +2.87 9.81 +.24 2.31 +.07 136.99 +.17 8.87 +1.17 1.12 57.95 -.41 0.20 14.75 +.03 14.69 +1.16 15.22 +.07 0.40 26.98 +.38 13.94 +.20 1.35 +.03 1.00 22.20 +.42 16.39 -.04 43.40 -.36 1.37 -.02 3.37 +.03 0.20 35.00 -.06 0.70 61.24 +.37 1.90 22.70 -.69 2.01 24.17 -.20 6.51 -.17 32.42 -.53 11.14 +.22 1.05 11.26 +.07 0.08 12.18 -.05 0.64 65.37 -.69 2.36 63.98 +.17 0.18 42.45 -.91 0.50 71.50 -.17 0.03 10.32 -.02 13.52 -.42 28.48 +.34 1.08 30.22 -.20

Nm

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DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DirxTcBear DrxEMBll s DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DrxFBull s DirMCB3x rs DrMCBll3x s DirREBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DivX DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DoublTake DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWt n Dycom Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

1.92 57.39 -.07 27.36 +.11 0.16 27.74 -.02 34.39 -.87 38.25 +.91 7.03 35.70 +.17 7.91 -.05 5.77 25.38 -.73 37.74 +1.50 48.85 +1.03 13.77 +.02 0.15 28.00 17.61 -.08 5.77 37.19 +.13 0.04 6.87 3.08 48.32 -.12 17.81 +.02 6.10 -.03 4.85 56.93 +.31 14.41 -.02 8.22 54.18 +.10 10.77 +.28 5.18 34.64 -.98 0.08 14.21 -.03 37.20 -.29 31.47 -.29 .50 -.02 2.00 23.15 +.25 0.35 34.20 +.14 7.24 -.15 0.13 28.26 +.18 64.23 -.43 9.64 -.10 29.45 +.18 50.10 -.19 59.79 -.11 1.83 41.27 +.28 13.71 +.16 1.00 64.05 -1.83 1.04 20.12 +.26 2.75 -.11 10.28 +.62 0.40 16.42 -.03 1.04 49.50 +.01 0.60 26.90 -.44 0.60 38.00 +.75 5.98 -.15 36.27 -.57 28.62 +.35 32.52 57.42 -1.10 3.39 5.12 -.08 1.64 37.65 0.32 24.33 +.10 0.96 16.93 +.15 0.68 13.21 +.01 1.40 75.76 +.78 20.32 +.08 9.75 +.07 1.90 -.01 17.06 +.39 1.32 +.02

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0.25 15.12 +.25 1.53 -.04 22.51 +.26 1.01 -.02 18.67 +.10 26.57 -.33 2.95 -.01 2.84 39.23 -.31 0.62 103.23 -2.86 0.88 41.19 -1.09 8.14 +.04 121.65 -1.08 50.52 -2.15 19.50 +.26 5.04 -.12 0.40 30.26 -.30 0.10 6.01 -.09 0.64 8.94 +.04 0.04 17.99 -.17 1.76 63.26 +.48 5.81 -.04 2.00 73.85 -.07 0.64 33.35 +.55 1.39 15.81 -.25 1.23 12.90 -.10 1.62 12.90 -.23 1.53 11.37 -.03 1.56 12.23 -.11 14.96 -.15 20.55 +.10 19.65 +.45 0.62 47.89 +.41 1.26 33.57 -.09 22.90 +1.24 0.20 6.87 +.08 101.68 +1.07 0.04 11.65 -.42 21.14 -.01 6.25 -.07 0.05 17.22 -.53 17.76 +.34 .24 -.02 0.72 22.48 -.31 1.18 +.03 14.43 -.56 1.34 47.89 -1.17 9.82 -.09 12.61 +.40 4.01 48.97 -.43 1.70 46.24 -.60 0.80 31.44 -.58 2.00 17.22 -.34 1.54 3.96 -.07 21.39 -.03 4.97 +.14 1.00 35.47 +.02 3.40 30.89 +.88 0.52 45.89 -.33 56.99 +1.10 6.23 -.15 4.27 -.07 2.16 30.46 -1.03 3.58 44.46 -.69 15.26 -.22 0.10 6.97 -.06 2.16 22.42 -.34 0.68 18.96 -.21 25.67 +.48 0.14 39.91 -.30 5.49 -.13 3.32 77.47 +.05 .41 -.02 2.27 33.58 -.57 2.35 -.19 2.60 42.89 -.01 4.99 -.05 11.16 +.23 0.16 32.22 -.14 98.74 -.91 0.88 18.12 +.05 1.35 45.91 +.29 0.28 10.69 +.26 4.13 108.94 +1.89 0.55 61.77 +.73 55.16 -.31 0.20 20.88 +.46 1.92 76.81 -.05 .23 +.01 1.00 -.01 5.73 -.20 0.12 16.56 -.52 5.96 +.03 2.10 41.35 -.33 7.43 -.50 .03 -.01 4.67 +.01 0.28 23.11 +.31 0.40 40.93 -.06 16.01 +.15 103.12 +1.43 25.94 -.47 0.23 15.87 +.22 2.93 -.02 1.76 63.27 -.33 18.98 +.38 69.61 -.39 29.78 +.63 0.50 62.88 +.53 60.28 -1.15 0.48 9.35 +.07 2.00 52.62 -.09 3.23 -.13 40.48 +.82 0.92 73.72 +.28 0.08 22.73 -.25 10.02 +.21 0.62 40.51 +.31 1.00 -.01 0.80 53.65 -.01 0.44 85.89 -.02 0.20 16.82 -1.00 2.64 74.87 -.62 0.24 6.95 +.37 0.96 23.29 +.13 7.62 +.40 10.14 +.17 16.85 -1.02 0.72 14.84 +.16 0.20 28.88 -.81 1.28 12.92 +.11 0.04 13.98 -.10 15.14 -.08 0.16 16.14 +.29 0.88 35.15 +.09 1.75 -.02 0.04 6.66 +.36 0.40 17.77 -.31 0.80 13.76 +.14 7.42 +.02 0.04 15.98 +.28 0.56 13.48 +.09 0.80 15.74 -.22 113.17 -7.14 .54 -.07 0.08 16.89 -.30 2.20 36.55 -.19 0.64 19.63 -1.61 50.03 +.30 3.51 +.28 .56 -.03 6.98 +.03 1.73 -.02 0.70 26.66 +.49 1.16 102.64 -4.60 0.50 50.31 -.97 15.74 -.88 0.32 43.99 -.37 0.60 14.39 +.24 4.46 -.01 11.95 -.16 4.54 -.11 3.25 45.97 -.43 14.80 -.38 26.19 -.35

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D 26.52 -.58 13.97 +.21 16.75 +.61 4.66 +.03 0.76 48.89 +.39 39.53 -.44 26.21 -.45 1.90 19.44 +.11 0.88 106.60 +.51 0.76 12.83 +.05 1.33 -.04 1.11 -.04 0.16 13.97 +.42 1.20 67.97 -1.75 .15 -.02 21.56 +.01 5.71 -.17 1.00 7.86 +.02 14.72 -.63 0.90 33.15 -.66 28.15 -1.54 2.42 -.03 0.28 22.21 +.16 0.12 10.34 +.03 9.44 -.10 8.67 +.38 1.12 31.54 -.10 0.20 6.04 -.10 4.36 +1.45 .12 -.01 6.94 -.11 27.41 -.06 5.51 +.07 0.72 13.06 -.06 0.44 4.99 -.03 1.68 16.99 -.36 0.14 11.40 -.56 1.28 25.11 -.02 22.03 +.18 7.72 -.32 0.16 16.19 +.43 0.40 23.22 +.26 1.50 34.01 +.48 24.75 +.18 4.11 -.18 26.99 +.13 20.14 -.68 5.74 -.03 31.43 -.83 1.68 71.77 +.06 0.40 17.56 -.08 14.25 -.25 0.50 7.48 -.02 1.96 73.91 +1.17 3.82 -.19 3.27 -.02 .33 -.02 29.03 -.48 0.18 16.24 -.09 0.44 20.65 +.10 1.64 41.31 +.06 .58 -.02 15.32 -.27 50.87 +.44 21.95 +.38 17.65 +.06 7.76 -.13 0.21 13.87 -.55 5.57 -.05 1.90 21.16 +.44 0.18 7.25 -.13 2.47 -.02 5.46 +.05 29.29 +.04 38.23 +.45 18.23 -1.01 0.52 18.03 +.13 0.84 11.19 -.18 0.36 13.07 -.13 1.98 34.48 +.33 0.40 6.96 -.03 5.99 -.09 0.08 42.34 +.73 15.17 -.44 1.73 +.09 1.66 -.03 0.40 12.45 -.20 0.17 13.59 -.26 0.18 44.75 -.93 4.49 -.18 1.40 142.64 -.59 1.08 74.22 -.03 14.38 -.47 12.95 -.10 507.97 +.44 26.95 -.18 0.80 33.77 -.69 16.68 +.08 12.32 +.09 2.16 108.31 +.64 2.16 -.11 5.18 -.26 25.15 +.89 0.52 32.80 +.92 3.58 +.07 6.22 -.04 1.82 -.02 0.83 18.60 +.04 70.52 -5.33 12.36 -.56 14.82 +.03 1.80 73.89 -1.80 14.65 -.11 28.86 +.05 1.48 -.12 1.19 18.85 -.20 0.64 38.58 +.20 13.71 +.12 .86 -.07 45.44 +.44 0.54 25.90 +.16 1.86 32.63 +.04 0.81 143.88 -2.52 0.48 7.46 -.06 1.70 47.41 +.06 26.55 +.11 21.42 -.41 0.36 27.85 -.24 7.50 +.03 27.77 -.26 19.01 +.46 2.40 +.06 1.00 44.61 +.82 2.31 +.02 38.97 -.03 20.14 -.42 .45 -.02 0.40 32.98 +.64 35.29 -2.33 5.84 +.11 0.06 10.27 -.11 0.88 49.10 +.98 12.16 -.02 0.82 27.44 -.12 0.30 15.37 +.63 0.20 25.96 -.25 1.81 24.82 -.02 8.47 -.08 1.00 41.52 +1.24 4.65 25.94 -.04 2.82 -1.11 1.24 23.12 -.01 7.07 +.05 4.80 -.03 2.72 42.08 +.07 9.30 +.05 1.20 24.34 -.07 23.39 +.15 20.26 -.12 17.61 +.43 4.79 +.01 0.08 16.78 +.14 5.38 -.12 5.95 -.24 1.68 46.71 +.60 13.58 -.28 0.53 4.43 -.21 0.20 36.57 -.99 .72 -.03 57.94 +.30 0.80 46.52 -.50 3.09 +.04 0.80 9.48 -.07 0.20 5.09 -.06 1.28 48.05 +.83 11.87 -.37 0.40 55.50 -.56 38.26 -.11 0.32 47.52 +.09 16.23 -.12 27.82 +1.04 0.63 7.36 -.18 1.70 31.50 +.27 0.41 31.04 -.31 0.30 2.80 -.05 0.60 26.91 -.90

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D

0.95 2.32 1.21 0.32 0.84

1.80 0.04 0.28 1.23 1.44 0.60 0.48 0.04 0.40

9.48 15.78 35.59 36.05 47.79 27.90 32.49 45.44 16.14 41.51 20.60 10.93 52.87 24.56 14.97 6.81 6.46 23.20 46.26 13.14 25.02 45.89 35.81 6.50 9.57 1.00

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23.10 +.51 0.06 18.37 -.55 0.53 39.47 +.29 32.90 -.61 0.54 7.00 +.08 1.50 11.31 -.32 8.41 -.01 1.59 17.12 -.22 2.13 22.00 -.60 0.31 5.61 -.15 5.99 -.10 29.29 +.37 119.44 -1.04 27.80 -.76 0.66 21.00 -.21 2.72 65.09 -.69 0.33 27.04 -.32 1.05 30.79 +.23 0.55 19.92 +.11 0.38 14.90 -.04 0.14 9.91 -.02 0.32 48.05 -.64 0.24 11.86 0.70 50.10 -.36 0.43 18.35 -.02 0.33 11.48 +.06 1.43 38.59 -.29 2.08 56.81 +.12 0.21 12.04 -.04 0.42 14.49 +.10 18.53 -.40 1.04 51.85 +.03 1.65 46.25 +.16 3.63 106.23 -.37 0.55 38.68 -.20 0.95 81.09 -.17 2.22 114.29 +.01 3.91 105.13 -.08 0.58 39.25 -.24 5.57 106.33 +.18 0.82 58.11 0.36 33.86 -.44 0.75 43.96 -.59 1.20 55.26 +.08 3.70 94.53 -.35 3.83 91.74 -.20 1.39 83.74 -.03 1.44 50.06 +.07 0.72 40.33 +.02 0.39 48.06 +.19 1.22 88.80 +.14 0.93 78.96 +.06 8.07 85.86 -.11 0.35 48.05 +.61 85.37 +.19 1.93 60.03 1.22 59.80 +.01 0.51 85.10 +.14 0.69 50.53 +.04 1.06 63.00 +.04 1.00 66.10 3.84 103.74 +.03 0.42 74.52 +.24 0.75 69.69 +.13 2.81 36.57 -.34 1.12 67.49 -.01 1.28 71.70 +.12 0.73 20.06 +.17 0.25 57.33 +.11 1.86 51.37 -.08 0.09 14.11 +.05 0.46 56.63 -.11 0.68 55.19 -.03 0.48 32.15 -.26 0.54 61.90 +.39 0.79 59.20 -.75 0.32 42.51 -.57 0.24 52.39 -.91 1.00 33.62 -.02 0.30 45.42 +.09 1.49 44.88 -.04 0.84 66.99 +.37 0.30 63.37 +.30 6.16 -.14 1.00 51.98 +.30 110.01 +7.50 17.28 +.14 4.03 +.08 0.60 32.97 +.20 1.24 49.72 +.36 41.49 -.45 19.60 +.30 21.02 +.14 9.33 +.17 3.89 +.02 19.87 +.04 13.63 +.14 7.85 +.11 10.72 +4.07 26.46 -.13 0.56 57.88 +.01 0.28 38.74 -.01 17.60 +.02 0.57 8.81 -.12 15.76 +.28 .90 +.01 6.53 +.17 5.90 +.15 10.49 +.11 2.72 48.72 +.32 0.63 22.02 +.13 0.25 16.02 -.19 17.33 -.14 0.80 32.63 -.05 4.28 -.01 119.36 +1.17 26.75 +.43 0.04 13.55 -.12 12.41 +.12 10.29 -.19 5.48 0.34 21.96 -.02 2.60 130.44 -.75 4.26 -.20 1.00 46.18 +.11 0.24 20.81 -.17 0.50 23.60 -.18 21.86 +.37 9.34 -.13 58.21 -.25 8.09 +.04 0.48 13.99 +.35 25.76 -.47 36.07 +.54 341.10 +.98 25.20 +.11 37.04 +.19 0.44 20.50 -.32 2.44 20.09 +.15 16.88 +.30 0.69 9.04 +.11 8.26 -.13 0.25 25.36 +.88 14.22 -.17 9.69 -.07 0.55 19.74 -.26 72.32 -1.38 2.34 -.15 14.66 -.54 9.83 -.16 45.58 +.13 23.99 +.34 5.73 -.36 27.97 +.29 11.68 -.15 0.20 39.84 -.05 13.42 -.03 1.77 29.76 -.47

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D 1.80 1.68 0.28 0.38

0.04 0.33 0.30

2.16 0.52 0.20 0.20 0.70

0.25 0.20 0.40 0.60

0.15 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.28 4.28

0.10 0.24 0.20

1.16 0.38

1.60 0.33

0.18 0.04 0.50

2.08 0.16 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40

0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.92 2.52 0.20 1.43 2.52 0.25

4.00 0.36 1.44

25.97 +.07 23.65 +.11 14.18 +.06 25.09 +.02 23.10 +.30 1.70 -.03 45.89 -.22 9.92 -.62 16.13 +.85 3.06 -.13 17.49 -.64 12.34 +.03 28.84 -.30 2.19 8.65 +.08 25.16 -.29 5.88 +.17 43.89 +1.25 2.21 +.03 63.88 -.09 30.44 -.18 20.46 -.01 76.70 +.80 59.81 -.03 5.47 +.20 49.82 -2.21 27.99 +.49 11.55 +1.14 42.19 -1.35 16.36 +.15 22.71 +.09 12.75 -1.05 8.11 -.17 31.57 +.59 20.43 -.93 1.50 -.01 37.78 -1.07 11.01 +.12 10.66 +.44 55.58 +1.08 29.25 -.73 5.50 -.19 10.49 +.05 8.26 -.17 33.99 -.18 62.29 +.68 15.60 -.13 63.27 -.57 55.35 -.79 16.06 -.03 42.72 +.83 8.82 -.13 18.32 -.63 40.18 -.36 5.57 +.26 15.33 +.16 21.10 +.07 3.55 -.01 53.64 +.19 3.94 -.06 13.68 -.20 16.20 +.22 30.55 +.52 3.92 -.01 22.08 -.16 7.39 +.09 9.73 -.21 7.57 -.02 88.39 +.06 18.52 -.10 5.93 -.15 18.90 -.50 18.95 -.16 18.72 +.38 5.60 +.01 2.91 -.03 12.42 -.24 1.17 -.03 77.52 +.05 5.11 +.18 38.89 +.71 33.98 +.05 44.75 +.76 22.50 -.93 23.51 +.18 5.05 -.02 7.96 +.11 35.00 17.36 +.38 5.88 +.03 70.55 -2.95 21.48 -1.02 33.01 -.56 24.18 +.10 35.77 +.22 18.42 +.01 44.55 -.42 23.20 -.14 1.32 +.07 1.53 +.01 6.77 -.02 36.64 +.49 9.90 -.04 .85 -.09 4.51 +.01 25.60 +.10 25.46 +.05 13.04 -.06 41.75 +.32 32.29 +.27 51.27 -.23 37.03 -.33 34.91 -.10 1.62 -.04 36.05 -.89 34.01 +.09 4.13 -.12 25.37 -.08 45.90 +.70 25.15 +.47 28.00 -.02 28.75 +.57 24.84 -.28 5.19 -.07 6.54 -.16 8.84 +.67 13.43 -.02 6.48 -.06 3.37 +.01 81.31 +.52 33.94 -.16 14.91 +.17 26.01 +.08 30.49 -.65 80.09 +1.26 9.07 -.48 25.26 -.81 86.52 +.32 1.71 -.28 38.53 -.84 29.80 +.07

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MagelMPtr MagelPt MagnaI g MagHRes MaidenBrd ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest

2.80 87.84 +.59 0.04 23.34 -.89 8.19 -.12 1.00 31.88 +.39 1.14 -.01 8.66 -.12 0.63 19.15 -.29 6.27 +.03 11.71 -.08 8.98 +.10 0.96 7.13 +.10 0.58 6.51 -.01 9.01 +.03 13.32 -.33 4.52 +.07 20.88 -.02 3.18 +.05 32.71 -.08 2.00 43.54 +.23 1.80 34.20 +.09 14.36 -.26 0.20 22.31 -.23 2.84 44.70 -.51 1.75 -.16 0.18 72.43 -1.41 4.97 -.24 24.64 +.89 44.97 +1.54 0.08 12.67 -.11 5.64 -.19 0.74 48.99 -.45 0.52 17.44 -.21 1.00 31.61 +.57 12.58 +.79 22.44 -.20 0.11 51.87 -1.28 0.98 57.46 -1.48 0.08 30.73 -.08 28.72 -.85 0.42 39.79 -.17 0.45 42.10 -.60 0.31 33.06 -1.07 2.56 29.93 -.43

Nm MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeritMed Meritage Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MSEMDDbt MSDSEur MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Res NII Hldg NIVS IntT NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs Nautilus Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSuite NetwkEng Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource NichACv NichACv2 Nicor NightwkR NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin

D 0.16 34.93 +.32 0.80 22.92 +.13 0.04 8.79 +.25 6.49 +.03 1.60 93.55 +1.52 18.58 +.09 0.30 14.76 +.02 2.00 23.97 +.10 0.24 33.29 -3.71 12.34 -.26 0.60 210.81 -1.64 0.75 22.47 +.50 4.45 +.22 0.80 18.58 +.13 4.94 +.05 1.04 39.62 +.34 23.70 -.28 2.20 70.14 +.55 0.94 29.40 +.42 0.48 68.60 +.88 10.64 -.44 33.31 -.37 0.90 51.15 +.83 0.12 8.64 +.02 0.92 25.06 +.06 22.15 -1.09 6.70 -.45 24.06 +.07 57.65 +.07 5.62 +.08 0.80 9.76 +.11 7.83 +.13 0.24 24.12 +.04 35.81 +.05 10.53 -.40 58.79 +.51 0.82 42.53 +.14 3.96 -.08 0.36 22.48 +.23 8.99 +.06 49.91 -1.37 4.43 -.06 1.52 32.78 -.10 0.92 34.59 +.37 15.78 -.06 22.80 +.53 15.37 -.68 5.08 -.39 .80 -.04 0.62 21.27 -.50 0.74 41.80 +.48 9.05 +.33 4.31 +.32 0.14 10.95 +.40 1.37 28.27 +.54 9.17 +.23 34.58 +.11 16.84 +.14 0.52 28.94 +.01 2.90 +.07 2.46 56.12 +.26 0.09 20.63 +.12 7.24 87.61 +.64 106.17 +.27 0.20 31.52 -.86 9.55 -.18 9.87 -.22 13.29 +.78 4.91 +.01 3.68 -.05 19.85 -.33 62.98 +1.75 0.61 22.08 +.10 1.12 42.95 +.25 3.00 +.01 20.19 -.32 1.06 55.48 +.87 16.25 -.02 0.36 16.41 +.20 0.42 21.56 -.01 0.20 27.11 +.03 1.10 14.89 -.24 55.07 -.03 6.60 -.03 0.20 46.86 -.90 6.85 +.06 2.12 -.01 0.07 4.82 -.08 1.00 55.46 -1.01 20.60 +.08 1.75 18.80 +.20 5.71 +.09 34.60 +.72 13.05 +.84 12.59 +.17 24.80 +.53 0.60 14.90 -.15 1.18 38.31 +.24 2.35 -.24 22.70 -.01 0.44 12.35 -.06 1.20 30.16 -.20 19.28 -.33 0.14 24.72 +.56 11.65 +.02 19.65 +.01 0.31 2.65 -.06 14.94 +.36 1.34 50.95 -.52 0.40 39.16 -.75 0.04 7.95 +.30 1.50 22.62 -.01 0.32 14.30 +.25 1.80 34.72 -.07 2.16 22.10 -.34 2.63 0.24 6.00 -.34 53.28 -1.15 12.97 -.03 3.17 -.24 15.18 +.04 10.30 -.22 28.24 -.30 33.96 +.21 32.15 -1.10 14.35 -.08 106.35 +5.79 2.91 +.17 15.10 -.31 3.17 -.03 2.86 +.15 22.56 -.15 13.49 -.05 2.92 -.04 .10 +.00 5.84 -.31 1.36 38.19 +.48 93.54 +.73 1.00 16.08 +.09 9.26 +.11 0.28 12.48 +.10 3.37 +.11 0.20 16.79 +.30 52.51 -1.46 0.40 57.04 -.64 6.81 -.11 0.15 14.03 +.08 0.15 16.45 +.06 0.20 21.24 -.42 .40 -.01 .37 -.01 0.92 15.85 +.05 1.08 9.25 -.32 1.02 8.69 -.30 1.86 42.95 +.02 3.74 +.36 1.08 73.63 -.11 14.87 +.19 20.92 +.40 18.95 +.16 0.20 34.16 -.48 0.72 65.93 -1.12 0.56 10.41 +.13 6.46 -.03 8.82 +.02 1.45 29.70 -.43 0.64 39.25 -.51 1.36 58.13 -.16 3.90 -.17 1.03 26.58 -.02 8.26 -.32 13.69 -.69 1.12 53.82 +.64 3.12 -.04 1.72 63.67 +.38 0.40 3.44 -.09 0.40 12.34 +.02 8.03 -.34 1.99 47.04 -.24 6.15 +.06 2.60 +.03 5.88 +.04 24.80 +.36 1.60 36.35 -.15 0.50 30.17 +.79

NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NustarEn NutriSyst NvMulSI&G NvMSI&G2 NuvQualPf NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OCharleys OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OSI Phrm OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFrt h Och-Ziff Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates Oilsands g OldDomF h OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt OmniEnr Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn Omnova OnSmcnd ONEOK OnyxPh OpenTxt OpnwvSy optXprs Oracle OrbitalSci Orexigen OrientEH OrientFn OriginAg OrionMar Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNC wt PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld PacWstBc Paccar PacerIntl PacCapB PacEthan PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld Palatin PallCorp Palm Inc PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd Pantry ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pearson Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PerfectWld PerkElm Prmian Perrigo PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PhmHTr PharmPdt PhaseFwd PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG Pier 1 PilgrmsP n PimCpOp PimcIncStr PimIncStr2 PimcoHiI PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsAA PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlugPwr h PlumCrk Polaris Polo RL Polycom PolyOne Polypore Poniard h Pool Corp Popular PortfRec PortGE PositiveID PostPrp Potash Potlatch PwrInteg Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Engy PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PS USDBear PwShChina PwSClnEn PwSWtr PSFinPf PSVrdoTF PwShPfd PShEMSov PSIndia PwShs QQQ Powrwav Pozen Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDril PrmWBc h Prestige PriceTR priceline PrideIntl PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtDow ProShtQQQ ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltMC PrUShMC ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUShBrz PrUSCh25 rs ProUSEM rs ProUSRE rs ProUSOG rs ProUSBM rs ProUltRE rs ProUShtFn ProUFin rs PrUPShQQQ ProUltSemi ProUltO&G ProUBasM ProUShEur ProShtR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500

D 43.15 +1.41 16.56 +.09 1.44 45.53 -.36 4.26 55.96 -.02 0.70 22.75 +.26 0.75 7.50 -.06 0.75 7.93 -.09 0.58 6.62 -.12 0.65 7.13 -.14 12.99 +.03 13.51 -.55 7.54 +.42 1.45 39.29 +.61 32.89 -.36 48.40 +.48 57.35 -2.45 1.52 80.53 -1.43 56.17 -1.51 .61 -.04 0.72 16.50 +.16 12.55 12.04 +.18 1.41 -.02 6.38 -.05 18.21 +.28 1.74 110.04 -1.23 43.36 -2.05 .79 -.01 37.63 +.52 0.28 13.12 +.16 0.69 13.89 +.15 0.80 19.42 -.13 1.28 19.48 +.07 2.33 -.14 0.09 26.06 -.15 0.80 41.22 +.11 17.23 +.82 8.10 +.21 7.78 +.02 1.76 46.98 -.26 25.26 +.12 45.22 -.77 2.35 +.02 16.84 +.19 0.20 23.74 -.04 17.70 -.21 6.38 -.32 11.74 -.24 0.16 14.52 +.26 8.25 -.05 15.99 -.09 3.40 +.02 38.30 -.04 1.75 40.37 -2.27 0.71 30.77 +.50 34.31 -.44 30.79 +1.10 .99 +.02 1.00 5.84 +.09 0.17 44.31 +.43 1.82 43.92 +.29 22.17 +.03 8.39 +.14 4.48 -.03 0.40 65.85 +.24 17.01 -.20 0.50 13.07 -.02 1.71 96.63 -3.03 2.16 66.12 +1.03 1.40 26.17 +.61 23.71 +.55 0.04 22.68 +.59 0.36 43.51 -.50 9.02 +.15 1.83 +.11 .97 -.09 5.15 +.06 0.60 22.82 -.15 28.44 +4.47 4.58 +.12 .28 -.01 0.64 36.31 -.09 5.70 +.02 0.05 26.97 -.77 0.13 13.52 +.20 77.37 +1.38 15.07 +.59 26.75 +.11 0.20 4.23 -.19 17.80 -.17 1.68 -.07 23.10 +.17 4.85 -.27 1.04 66.27 -.19 2.00 75.96 +.73 16.63 -1.38 0.40 30.37 +.13 0.20 13.47 -.07 1.24 29.99 +.53 0.28 39.61 -2.20 0.55 14.45 -.01 0.84 9.89 -.19 27.26 -.20 0.23 23.50 -.40 1.56 17.48 -.21 1.80 19.37 -.27 1.04 10.06 -.03 0.80 27.62 +.08 0.60 15.87 +.26 13.68 +.12 0.76 34.53 -.05 0.62 14.80 +.25 0.12 12.36 +.12 1.08 16.60 -.04 1.92 66.75 +.68 24.71 -8.23 0.28 22.78 +.07 0.99 17.11 -.75 0.25 59.97 -.54 3.72 109.26 -.91 19.21 -.73 1.34 33.07 -.24 1.34 37.05 -.60 23.28 -.66 6.36 +.02 0.40 33.18 -.09 0.72 16.11 -.09 7.44 61.57 -.14 0.60 27.23 +.48 16.83 +.03 2.32 46.25 -.31 0.95 31.38 +.39 0.15 57.52 -.37 2.90 -.04 5.21 +.13 1.12 27.21 +.16 7.89 -.28 9.14 +.09 1.38 15.30 -.15 0.75 10.64 -.01 0.70 9.07 +.12 1.46 11.71 -.21 13.30 -.01 2.10 36.41 +.24 6.02 -.02 0.08 60.93 -1.98 1.46 23.45 +.11 3.74 56.43 -.60 23.91 -.69 0.20 32.32 +.01 2.41 -.11 0.32 37.98 +.76 .48 -.04 1.68 36.88 +.08 1.60 57.97 +1.07 0.40 86.98 -2.34 31.96 +.57 11.18 +.14 20.87 -.95 1.29 +.01 0.52 25.37 +.43 3.35 -.18 71.45 +2.82 1.04 19.67 +.16 1.15 -.02 0.80 26.10 +.11 0.40 101.46 -1.47 2.04 36.71 +.33 0.20 33.48 -1.55 7.80 +.14 76.69 +2.53 21.94 -.64 23.65 -.73 23.45 -.30 24.65 -.67 18.60 -1.12 25.19 24.82 -.03 0.20 23.17 -.36 9.28 -.10 0.12 17.29 -.02 1.35 16.10 -.21 0.16 24.99 1.03 13.31 -.09 1.66 25.76 -.09 0.13 21.35 -.12 0.21 47.08 +.15 1.67 -.07 8.86 -.11 1.80 78.08 +.18 0.12 120.82 +.59 6.15 -.36 .76 -.02 7.83 -.07 1.08 53.12 +.65 200.15 -8.13 26.30 -.28 0.50 29.31 +.41 0.04 14.59 +.20 50.21 -.03 41.61 -.17 50.42 -.07 32.00 -.06 0.53 45.75 +.03 26.93 +.01 0.11 49.17 +.14 17.49 -.06 61.92 +.38 17.09 -.10 0.41 39.53 +.03 42.08 +.29 26.85 +.51 44.39 +.33 54.73 +.68 26.60 -.02 63.49 +1.24 39.26 +1.01 0.50 42.59 -.04 19.77 +.01 0.30 62.93 -.08 57.52 -.44 0.19 33.25 +.81 0.22 31.83 -.59 0.15 30.59 -.87 25.87 -.07 38.54 -.07 101.25 +1.35 18.75 -.06 0.04 34.81 +.15 46.53 +.16 31.19 -.08

Nm

D

ProUltSP500 0.23 156.78 +.17 ProUltCrude 9.73 -.54 ProSUltGold 54.08 -1.02 ProUSGld rs 39.94 +.60 ProUSSlv rs 32.98 +1.36 ProUShCrude 15.73 +.77 ProSUltSilv 65.91 -3.03 ProUShEuro 24.57 -.03 ProctGam 1.93 63.38 +.84 ProgrssEn 2.48 40.03 +.03 ProgrsSoft 34.10 +.37 ProgsvCp 0.16 20.58 +.28 ProLogis 0.60 12.00 +.49 ProspctCap 1.64 10.49 -.01 ProspBcsh 0.62 39.52 -.06 Protalix 6.73 -.14 ProtLife 0.56 22.26 +.16 ProvET g 0.72 7.32 -.24 Prudentl 0.70 60.86 +.40 Prud UK 0.61 15.79 -.05 PsychSol 32.39 -.24 PSEG 1.37 31.87 +.06 PubStrg 3.20 94.08 +.24 PulteGrp 11.65 +.06 PureBio 3.33 +.07 PPrIT 0.68 6.30 -.11

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RBC Bear RCN RF MicD RPC RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h Repsol RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResConn RetailHT RetailOpp RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RickCab RINO Int n RioTinto s RiskMetric RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Rollins Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Royce Rubicon g RubyTues RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Rdx In2xSP Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF SpdrBiot Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SWS Grp SABESP lf SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy s Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedH n SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SigaTech h SigmaAld SignatBk SignetJwlrs SilganH s SilicnImg

21.47 +.09 1.56 -.15 18.99 +.03 0.76 37.37 +.07 22.44 +.01 2.69 -.09 .64 -.01 1.53 -.08 0.40 54.66 -.31 17.77 +.28 0.52 46.96 -.28 9.30 +.15 12.59 -.24 13.21 +.10 5.46 +.25 0.32 5.32 +.04 2.75 -.08 31.38 -.40 14.38 -.02 5.11 -.02 0.16 11.91 -.35 0.82 20.58 +.17 4.68 +.31 8.33 -.16 26.18 +.10 16.80 -.26 0.01 9.87 +.05 1.23 -.14 0.25 19.73 -.49 61.16 +.41 24.08 -.05 0.17 88.27 -1.55 0.16 46.57 -1.40 .69 -.02 0.44 28.41 -.33 2.00 45.36 +.02 1.50 56.63 +.31 3.94 1.72 31.53 -.20 30.52 +.12 25.74 +.08 1.00 15.09 +.08 0.72 16.20 +.19 1.85 37.97 +.07 1.78 22.65 -.34 28.51 +1.14 0.53 85.85 0.04 8.27 +.01 0.16 19.31 +.40 0.48 48.96 +.46 0.40 45.81 -.79 1.00 56.52 +.37 6.22 -.26 24.90 +.68 1.10 -.04 .70 -.07 1.37 20.43 +.07 6.07 -.01 0.76 29.79 +.21 66.25 +.09 68.72 +.43 16.97 -.29 1.67 101.00 +.47 0.06 9.59 -.18 11.30 -.95 1.61 -.09 3.60 54.09 +.69 10.38 -.26 13.64 -1.80 0.45 45.63 -1.51 22.15 +.04 1.24 -.02 29.51 +.25 0.52 27.10 +.53 0.60 52.51 +.40 1.16 59.31 +.01 0.96 61.70 +.10 28.20 +.32 1.28 35.37 -.18 0.36 22.49 +.27 0.38 60.75 +.45 22.28 -1.47 0.64 53.02 +.73 38.65 -.78 25.15 -.78 2.00 57.61 -.36 13.68 -.08 31.30 +.40 3.36 52.29 -.26 3.36 54.06 -.37 0.36 51.18 -.69 11.80 +.03 3.86 -.05 11.79 +.29 4.62 -.17 23.40 -1.32 1.00 45.57 +.58 0.52 41.92 +.04 51.83 0.12 19.62 +.26 6.60 +.37 17.58 +.36 0.67 43.77 +.10 33.97 -.01 1.90 37.68 +.17 0.18 22.18 +.01 8.81 +.37 16.99 -.32 0.40 63.42 -.57 11.66 -.11 9.40 -.19 2.47 106.52 +.01 119.36 -1.01 0.18 25.29 -.21 1.67 143.61 +.16 2.21 113.95 +.06 56.33 +.19 1.67 49.14 +.27 0.13 17.94 -.02 0.25 26.48 -.04 0.46 39.41 +.17 0.36 46.84 +.61 1.79 56.15 -.03 4.76 38.50 +.06 0.50 24.02 -.01 0.02 45.86 0.36 27.37 +.05 0.50 41.14 +.33 0.25 41.63 -.87 0.14 28.33 -.48 0.37 52.07 -1.85 1.00 64.58 -.38 13.24 -.07 0.28 8.24 +.05 20.66 -1.56 46.92 -.61 0.36 10.97 +.24 1.87 37.87 -.12 0.60 7.93 +.08 0.40 23.66 +.32 28.74 -.79 38.68 +.09 0.10 41.27 -1.98 9.34 +.23 85.24 +.52 37.19 -.03 10.46 +.31 .65 -.03 42.68 +.78 6.77 -.11 5.13 +.13 14.82 -.83 1.63 29.98 +.10 3.09 -.04 0.35 10.37 -.04 0.44 14.90 +.20 1.19 37.23 +.31 2.60 -.09 5.15 +.02 12.42 -.09 19.28 +.19 0.84 64.15 -.73 0.07 49.23 -2.02 0.24 17.38 +.51 0.60 55.90 -.35 3.96 +.06 10.72 -.19 0.50 46.14 +.13 0.30 46.33 33.56 -1.98 2.12 -.07 22.48 -.38 17.84 -.14 0.48 22.32 +1.18 3.60 +.09 1.26 -.03 108.90 +.56 0.40 10.80 -.08 12.88 +.23 10.49 +.26 8.13 -.35 0.55 27.91 +.47 1.56 47.16 -.05 17.67 +.42 1.44 21.25 -.35 0.80 28.97 +.01 6.10 +.57 0.16 8.35 -.23 5.89 -.16 42.43 -1.07 35.48 +.11 1.44 79.12 +1.38 1.20 18.62 -.63 0.34 63.10 +.28 9.90 +.05 0.19 15.01 -.62 2.41 92.51 +.45 7.75 -.05 0.64 54.58 +.35 40.19 -.22 32.77 +.31 0.42 29.90 +.58 3.84 +.33

Nm SilcnLab Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp SimpsnM Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm SolarCap n Solarfun SolarWds n Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SovranSS SpanBdc h SpartnMot SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StageStrs StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StMotr StdPac StanBlkDk Stanley Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden s StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Strayer Stryker SturmRug SuccessF SunCmts SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Symmetry Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synnex Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n Taleo A TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekOffsh TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TlcmArg TelcmNZ TelItalia TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone Tellabs TelmxIntl Telus g TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TerNRoy n TerreStar Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm Texas Inds TexInst TexRdhse Textainer Textron ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3Par TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Tii NtwkT THorton g TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Tongxin Trchmrk Toreador Toro Co TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi TowersWat TownSports Toyota TractSupp TradeStatn TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm TransGlb Transocn Travelers TreeHse n

D 0.28 0.08 2.40 0.40

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.60 1.20 0.62 2.40 0.25

1.12 0.27 0.20 1.82 1.16 0.60 0.02 1.80 0.10 1.00

0.20 0.80 0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 0.20 1.32 0.36 0.40 0.20 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.44 0.06 0.15

3.00 0.60 0.37 2.52 1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.04

0.05 1.13

0.04 1.00 0.90 0.20 0.82 0.28 0.71 0.60

0.46

0.25 1.55 2.07 0.68 0.13 1.66 0.40 1.27 1.90 1.18 2.93 0.90 0.84 0.68 4.78 1.36 0.08 0.25 2.00 0.44 0.54 0.86

0.68 0.30 0.48 0.96 0.08

1.16 0.28 2.10 1.00 0.80 0.52 1.60 0.85 0.52 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.30 0.56 1.60 0.80 7.65 1.44

Nm 46.56 +.49 5.89 -.01 18.69 -1.10 20.52 -.62 7.85 -.36 86.69 -.01 32.45 34.85 -.26 7.19 +.05 4.50 +.09 1.09 +.02 38.30 -.24 37.58 +.69 11.16 +.02 14.67 +.24 15.32 -.27 6.16 -.04 6.19 -.13 7.00 -.26 4.54 +.08 49.21 -.96 43.02 -.52 10.49 +.07 18.41 +.17 58.24 +.45 45.92 +.20 34.29 -.32 44.89 -1.04 21.09 +.09 6.99 -.11 19.96 -.13 38.56 +.29 15.31 -.29 6.65 -.04 10.35 -.08 11.70 +.13 12.57 +.14 32.76 +.65 2.58 +.22 30.67 -.52 32.88 -.71 18.56 -.83 .30 -.37 34.63 +.16 27.48 -.83 22.90 -.38 12.89 +.11 38.46 -.60 40.06 +.30 1.99 -.01 5.26 -.12 21.74 -.27 4.50 -.04 21.75 -.01 8.18 -.10 4.49 +.13 12.44 -.23 15.76 +1.00 43.53 -.08 31.59 29.97 27.56 +.29 33.26 +.25 55.66 -.58 15.36 +.01 31.11 -.08 22.52 +.11 29.96 +.03 9.11 +.43 5.67 -.09 60.11 -.22 36.68 -.03 22.20 +.08 1.61 -.11 26.91 +.40 47.92 -.21 41.54 -.09 22.08 -.15 14.86 -.38 8.16 +.22 1.08 -.01 57.44 +.74 33.58 +.54 6.02 +.27 .82 15.38 -.02 35.45 -.58 54.98 +.02 14.56 -1.03 14.83 -.53 5.10 +.15 245.00+11.09 56.56 +.10 17.18 -.07 21.93 -.11 30.99 +.35 29.10 -.21 30.21 -.78 .97 +.02 30.38 -.37 12.07 -.98 10.56 -.76 4.50 -.15 11.80 -.09 10.06 -.56 29.88 +.06 24.14 -1.02 14.62 +.45 13.75 +.11 10.30 +.06 6.91 -.08 7.02 -.16 30.17 -1.11 64.47 -.18 18.86 -.15 16.28 +.16 12.81 +.02 11.80 +.15 28.57 +.51 47.61 +.42 20.27 -.34 28.02 +.20 22.27 +.35 3.06 -.14 30.37 +.20 14.85 -.80 17.14 +.17 18.57 +.27 16.12 +.10 13.94 -.06 6.44 +.11 26.69 -.31 45.25 31.79 -.65 11.16 -.07 18.12 +.01 9.97 +.10 11.25 +.18 16.21 +.02 17.97 +.24 25.21 -.32 17.20 -.32 41.67 -.33 4.75 -.19 24.83 -.35 56.05 +.88 5.40 -.25 5.06 +.02 17.87 -.64 41.85 +.19 40.59 -.21 32.10 -2.07 24.61 +.57 19.70 -.09 12.02 15.18 +.04 6.05 -.04 15.11 -.23 16.95 -.66 7.40 -.08 12.68 +.18 56.66 +.89 14.02 +.05 10.38 -.58 8.74 +.13 18.60 -.09 35.87 -1.38 21.42 +.24 9.74 -.02 33.88 +.20 37.55 +.04 5.63 +.03 22.33 -.44 31.81 -.49 11.32 +.13 23.27 -1.24 33.50 -1.01 10.38 -1.67 .47 -.05 12.57 -.37 18.46 +.16 24.22 +.38 11.86 -.11 56.81 +.01 37.50 -.27 25.42 +.54 14.81 +.05 24.67 -.37 21.95 -.62 52.81 +.30 40.62 +.18 10.08 -.42 37.32 -.39 33.66 -.03 42.89 +1.83 84.68 9.58 +.06 11.94 -.19 48.59 -.08 45.23 +.32 1.56 +.17 34.01 +.02 1.20 -.06 52.47 +.87 30.63 +.07 32.01 -.65 11.54 +.21 16.63 -.21 10.34 +.18 20.88 -.03 5.21 -.55 51.74 +.71 8.01 -.16 53.55 +.60 69.87 -1.02 48.15 +.04 15.42 +.16 1.45 -.05 49.25 +.49 3.71 +.05 76.88 +1.40 69.54 +1.13 7.75 +.06 34.35 -.27 47.10 +.24 3.35 -.20 55.25 -.26 7.28 -.02 64.99 -1.33 50.12 46.28 +.45

D

TricoMar TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueBlue TrueRelig TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

0.32 0.16

1.00 0.66 0.64 0.83 0.16

1.40 -.23 1.78 -.02 31.17 +1.01 18.29 -1.81 22.88 -.63 6.92 -.08 71.87 -2.48 16.14 -.19 28.63 +.31 5.75 +.45 46.07 +.41 13.49 -.15 23.07 +.25 29.28 +.29 38.12 -.15 17.64 -.06

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USEC USG UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdWestrn UtdhlthGp UnivDisp UnvHlth s UnumGrp UraniumEn UrbanOut Uroplasty VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE Valassis Vale10A Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceTc ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valmont Valspar ValueClick VKSrInc VanceInfo VandaPhm VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangMidC VangSmCp G M M G R D W m N R

M D M m

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R M R Ww m G m N mm

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0.10 0.72 1.00

0.20 0.67 0.67 1.32

0.40 1.88 0.20 0.20 1.70 0.03 0.20 0.33

2.40 3.62 0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.76 0.66 0.64 0.33 2.07 3.09 0.61 0.71 0.65

8.83 +.04 19.95 +.10 14.16 -.01 20.88 +.04 26.90 +.04 48.21 +.14 7.18 +.09 .89 -.01 4.05 -.07 4.47 +.01 20.53 -.42 2.13 -.08 23.76 +.02 45.81 -1.12 .16 +.00 13.82 +.06 32.94 +.13 27.86 -.11 27.47 -.13 74.30 +.12 24.69 -.51 40.40 -1.02 5.60 +.11 3.33 -.06 33.01 +.58 7.22 65.55 -.20 13.38 -.18 25.61 +.10 7.63 +.12 33.88 -.93 51.15 -1.66 71.03 -.55 52.29 +.81 1.28 -.10 30.44 +.05 14.99 +.83 42.14 +3.10 22.59 -.12 3.01 -.08 36.00 +.12 5.54 +.19 26.48 -.01 81.50 -.32 5.07 +.39 34.60 +.43 50.60 +.30 26.99 -.66 23.07 -.66 46.82 -.30 .95 -.06 19.46 -.62 24.77 +.27 15.26 -.06 79.52 +1.34 32.37 +1.41 11.41 +.67 4.63 -.09 21.70 -.76 8.43 +.18 80.39 -.01 80.13 +.01 53.82 -.02 64.50 +.06 64.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Europe

A:

Oil prices are falling sharply, and that should be felt at the pump later this week. For the better part of four years, when the dollar rose against the euro and other currencies, oil prices moved up in tandem. The theory was that oil producers wanted prices linked to the dollar since oil contracts are generally traded in U.S. dollars. But Europe’s problems signal slower global growth, and that means less demand for oil. On Monday, the price of a barrel of oil settled at its lowest price of the year at about $70 on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Just a few months ago it was in the mid-$80s, and talk had been of a return to oil at $100 a barrel.

Continued from B1 Doesn’t the euro’s drop against the dollar make it cheaper to travel there? Yes, for ordinary Americans with the financial means to travel abroad, Europe looks like it will be on sale this summer. “We’re getting quite a few reservation requests for Europe, so we anticipate it will be a good year for Europe” as a destination, said Cindy Evans, a European vacation expert for Journeys, an international travel consultancy in Bend. On Monday, the euro was worth $1.23, well below a peak of $1.60 in late 2007. The euro has lost 8 percent against the dollar this month alone, and analysts are now talking about the real chance of equal value between the euro and the dollar.

Q: A:

Q: A:

Are all European economies overly indebted? No. And not all indebted countries are alike. Problems in Greece, which triggered the crisis, are very different than, say, Portugal, which has taken many tough steps in recent years to raise the retirement age, raise taxes, cut spending and even buy back its outstanding debt. The focus initially was on the so-called PIIGS — Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Greece and Spain. Today, however, the concern has migrated to who loaned to or invested in these nations and companies based in these nations. “For companies, it appears that nationality is increasingly having an impact on borrowing costs, raising all sorts of questions about company valu-

Q: A:

What about neighboring countries? England, a popular tourist destination that doesn’t use the euro, also has seen a steep drop in the value of its currency, the pound, vs. the U.S. dollar. The British pound now trades at $1.44, well off the high of $2 in July 2008. The pound has been hit by concerns that England has too much debt and too slow growth to raise enough revenue to put a dent in its debt load.

Q:

Any other benefits for ordinary Americans?

Bank

(nonperforming assets) and delinquent loans were stable and that the level of charge-offs improved,” Moss said. “With a $52.4 million reserve for credit losses, we believe we have recognized the preponderance of credit quality issues within our portfolio.” The bank had $82.2 million fewer in deposits in the first quarter compared to the previous quarter, which the company credited to a decline in brokered deposits. Brokered deposits are deposits that are purchased by banks, typically to bolster capital, and which earn higher interest rates. The bank also decreased its loan portfolio by $82 million. Per an August order from the FDIC, the bank is required to reduce its loan concentrations in certain portfolios, reduce nonperforming assets and improve its capital position, among other things. In her statement, Moss said

Continued from B1 The company has reported a loss for six straight quarters. Company president and CEO Patricia Moss said in a statement that the company’s first-quarter results were affected by a $25.9 million noncash expense for potential future loan losses. The additional loan loss provision increases the company’s loan loss reserve, which is treated as an asset, to $52.4 million. Moss also said the bank was successful in the quarter with trimming charge-offs, or the amount of loans it is unable to collect, to $12 million in the first quarter from $48.5 million in the previous quarter. Nonperforming assets, or loans in default, decreased slightly in the first quarter, to $160.7 million compared with $161.7 million in the fourth quarter of 2009. “We are encouraged that

A:

ations,” Stephen King, global chief economist for the international bank HSBC, wrote in a note to investors Monday. In other words, a panic is gripping financial markets in Europe as investors everywhere are afraid and fleeing to safer investments such as gold or U.S. treasuries. European companies and countries will face higher borrowing costs for the foreseeable future.

Yes. The fear gripping Europe is leading to a rise in short-term lending rates, and that raises the cost of borrowing, both for consumers and between banks. That was the U.S. experience. In Europe now, it’s getting hard to get a loan, and what loans are made are more expensive. This slows growth, which increases the chances of default. Ratings agencies downgrade European bonds, and the fear of default soars. You get the picture; a rolling snowball gathers speed. In another similarity to Wall Street in 2008, European corporations are now having trouble getting the low-cost, short-term financing from money market funds, which are the lifeblood of how companies finance their day-to-day operations. “It’s just a general heightened caution in extending short-term credit,” said Lou Crandall, chief economist for money market

Q: A:

Why should that hurt stocks in the United States and Asia? Because the problem in Europe isn’t just one of government debt, but corporate debt, too. And in an interconnected world, it’s not entirely clear which investment firm or bank owns government or corporate bonds, nor is it fully clear where the international links to this government and corporate debt might be. For example, German and French banks loaned quite a bit to Greece and Greek companies. U.S. banks were quite active in Spain, which had an unsustainable housing boom and many of the same excesses witnessed prior to the near-meltdown of U.S. financial markets in September 2008. At the end of 2009, U.S. banks had almost $200 billion tied up in Spanish loans and more than $3.8 trillion in loans to European banks, according to the Bank of International Settlements.

Q:

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 B5 researcher Wrightson ICAP, pointing to similarities with fall 2008 on Wall Street. “One of the problems that you have (is that) financial markets rest heavily on trust. And one of the problems you have after any financial crisis is the market’s immune system has been weakened because people are reminded of what can happen.”

Q: A:

Why are problems in Europe our problem? The days of isolationism are long over, and in an interconnected global economy, problems in one major driver of global growth, Europe, are felt everywhere, especially in

the United States as it limps back into an expansion mode. To head off its widening financial crisis, the European Central Bank has pledged up to $1 trillion in lending, and governments could be borrowing to get out of their problems caused by borrowing. Additionally, European countries are under pressure to impose bitter medicine on their economies: tax increases and spending cuts on social welfare programs. “This will result in accelerated — and painful — simultaneous fiscal tightening across Europe,” according to Monday’s weekly credit outlook report by Moody’s Investors Services.

ROBBERSON.COM

OPEN 24/7 365 DAYS A YEAR! WWW.ROBBERSON.COM

Isn’t this reminiscent of the turbulent fall of 2008?

the company is still working to raise $150 million in capital. Two private investors have pledged to invest $65 million if the company can raise the remaining $85 million elsewhere, but the investors’ offer expires May 28. “We remain actively engaged in efforts to secure a significant capital injection and have been working diligently towards that end,” Moss said in the statement. “… we are hopeful that the above factors will strengthen our ability to attract other participants toward our minimum goal of $150 million in new capital. The company can provide no assurance that our efforts to raise capital will ultimately be successful.” In Nasdaq trading Monday, shares of the company were down 2.83 percent to close at 69 cents. The stock’s 52-week range is between $2.60 and 49 cents. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@ bendbulletin.com.

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

13 14 78 ... 43 ... ... 26 22 59 20 13 38 20 ... 11 56 ... 14 ... 15

YTD Last Chg %Chg 45.45 21.06 16.35 14.81 69.68 .69 37.84 52.20 58.35 2.95 29.78 47.52 15.70 22.02 8.26 22.08 5.05 9.07 19.15 8.99 28.94

+.63 +.10 +.01 -.15 -.14 -.02 -.55 +.01 +.61 +.33 +.63 +.09 +.12 +.13 -.17 -.16 -.02 -.48 -.29 +.06 +.01

+31.5 -2.5 +8.6 +20.5 +28.7 +1.5 +37.7 +33.7 -1.4 +22.9 -9.0 -7.7 +18.0 +7.9 +48.8 +7.5 +87.0 +29.9 -18.9 +1.8 -5.1

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 18 18 47 ... ... 37 19 ... 78 21 9 27 21 ... 24 ... 13 ... ...

73.63 -.11 +11.4 39.25 -.51 +4.4 47.14 +.38 +4.7 18.21 +.28 +43.5 43.51 -.50 +20.0 2.27 -.03 -19.2 36.88 +.08 -2.3 120.82 +.59 +9.5 23.66 +.32 +11.1 49.23 -2.02 +3.2 79.12 +1.38 +28.3 43.53 -.08 +8.8 26.91 +.40 +16.7 6.92 -.08 +15.3 13.82 +.06 +3.1 25.61 +.10 +13.8 19.05 +.32 -1.5 31.97 -.07 +18.5 2.99 -.06 +42.4 45.73 -.36 +6.0

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1227.00 $1227.70 $18.835

Market recap

Pvs Day $1234.00 $1227.40 $19.202

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl FordM

9034699 3056985 1759513 1681509 1057312

Last Chg 3.86 113.95 16.35 15.36 11.95

-.12 +.06 +.01 +.01 -.16

Gainers ($2 or more) Name GLG Ptrs GLG Ptr un Pactiv GerberSci TRC Cos

Last

Chg %Chg

4.36 +1.45 +49.8 4.31 +1.26 +41.3 28.44 +4.47 +18.6 7.41 +.73 +10.9 3.09 +.27 +9.6

Losers ($2 or more) Name TerNRoy n AcornIntl MLDJREst10 PSBMetDL BiP Lead

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

10.38 -1.67 -13.9 3.62 -.52 -12.6 5.25 -.70 -11.7 11.61 -1.54 -11.7 44.80 -5.14 -10.3

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Taseko GoldStr g NA Pall g Rentech VirnetX

40856 33695 32915 29803 28058

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

Vol (00)

5.40 4.49 3.90 1.10 6.11

PwShs QQQ Cisco Intel SiriusXM ETrade

1174453 47.08 +.15 719667 24.87 -.07 640924 22.02 +.13 632401 1.09 +.02 472243 1.53 -.04

-.25 -.18 -.17 -.04 -.02

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CorMedix n GerovaFn LGL Grp PacOffPT StreamGSv

Last

2.84 +.38 +15.4 11.50 +1.33 +13.1 8.20 +.85 +11.6 4.25 +.40 +10.4 6.66 +.57 +9.4

Name

Last

VirtualRad TTI Tm DeerCon s CorinthC P&F

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Banro g NIVS IntT EngySvc un ChinaPhH n FieldPnt

2.01 2.35 4.10 2.87 2.58

-.25 -11.1 -.24 -9.3 -.40 -8.9 -.23 -7.4 -.20 -7.2

HaupgDig h PerfectWld Andatee n ChiElMot n MagyarBc

150 342 35 527 4 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

16.90 +3.91 +30.1 2.42 +.33 +15.8 8.87 +1.17 +15.2 15.99 +1.88 +13.3 2.35 +.27 +13.0

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Diary 1,263 1,858 82 3,203 30 26

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Chg %Chg

2.82 -1.11 -28.2 24.71 -8.23 -25.0 4.64 -.91 -16.4 6.41 -1.08 -14.4 3.88 -.60 -13.4

Diary 1,308 1,409 120 2,837 41 50

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,971.98 325.67 5,552.82 1,451.26 1,664.19 869.32 8,900.27 470.37

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,625.83 4,479.08 379.49 7,063.83 1,832.22 2,354.23 1,136.94 11,950.03 695.71

+5.67 -8.65 -.33 -13.81 -16.48 +7.38 +1.26 +9.01 +1.73

YTD %Chg %Chg +.05 -.19 -.09 -.20 -.89 +.31 +.11 +.08 +.25

52-wk %Chg

+1.90 +9.26 -4.65 -1.69 +.40 +3.75 +1.96 +3.48 +11.24

+24.95 +42.37 +14.91 +20.42 +21.30 +35.90 +24.98 +28.57 +40.61

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

326.57 2,439.07 3,543.55 5,262.54 6,066.92 19,715.20 31,580.63 19,826.83 3,170.74 10,235.76 1,651.51 2,833.69 4,500.70 5,678.08

-.20 t -.33 t -.47 t -.01 t +.17 s -2.14 t -.73 t +.23 s -.64 t -2.17 t -2.60 t -.75 t -3.06 t -.04 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.8742 1.4493 .9668 .001853 .1464 1.2392 .1282 .010806 .078309 .0327 .000868 .1293 .8841 .0313

Pvs Day .8855 1.4560 .9689 .001872 .1464 1.2385 .1284 .010845 .079447 .0329 .000885 .1293 .8843 .0314

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.93 +0.01 +3.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.67 +0.02 +2.1 GrowthI 22.64 +0.09 +2.7 Ultra 19.53 +0.02 +0.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.09 +0.05 +3.0 AMutlA p 23.38 +0.05 +1.6 BalA p 16.53 +2.5 BondA p 12.07 -0.02 +3.8 CapWA p 19.78 -0.04 -0.5 CapIBA p 45.91 -0.07 -3.3 CapWGA p 31.44 -0.07 -7.3 EupacA p 35.09 -0.22 -8.5 FdInvA p 32.43 -0.06 -0.6 GovtA p 14.26 -0.02 +3.1 GwthA p 27.29 -0.02 -0.1 HI TrA p 10.86 -0.03 +4.9 IncoA p 15.35 -0.02 +0.1 IntBdA p 13.35 -0.01 +2.6 ICAA p 25.70 +0.03 -0.5 NEcoA p 22.09 -0.04 -1.8 N PerA p 24.54 -0.08 -4.3 NwWrldA 46.01 -0.21 -2.5 SmCpA p 32.81 -0.18 +4.1 TxExA p 12.17 +2.6 WshA p 24.86 +0.05 +1.5 American Funds B: CapIBB t 45.89 -0.06 -3.6 GrwthB t 26.40 -0.03 -0.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.22 -0.21 -7.2 IntlEqA 25.57 -0.21 -7.3 IntEqII I r 10.83 -0.08 -8.1 Artisan Funds: Intl 18.31 +0.09 -11.4 MidCap 26.73 -0.02 +4.6 MidCapVal 18.56 +0.07 +3.2 Baron Funds: Growth 44.19 +0.16 +7.0 SmallCap 20.70 +7.5 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.62 -0.02 +4.5 DivMu 14.50 +1.9 TxMgdIntl 13.72 -0.02 -10.2 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 15.74 -0.02 -0.1 GlAlA r 17.71 -0.05 -1.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.52 -0.05 -1.3 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 17.80 -0.05 -0.9 CGM Funds: Focus 27.94 -0.11 -6.1 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 44.84 -0.12 +0.9 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.82 +0.02 +7.7 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.61 +0.03 +7.8 AcornIntZ 33.59 -0.51 -2.0 ValRestr 42.15 -0.35 -1.4 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.54 -0.06 -5.8 USCorEq2 9.81 +0.01 +7.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.00 +0.03 +0.1 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 31.34 +0.03 +0.2 NYVen C 29.92 +0.02 -0.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.47 -0.02 +3.7 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 17.86 -0.19 -2.0 EmMktV 30.39 -0.38 -3.3 IntSmVa 14.57 -0.19 -3.4 USLgVa 18.22 +0.02 +7.1 US Micro 12.13 +0.05 +14.9 US Small 18.75 +0.04 +13.9 US SmVa 22.65 +0.03 +15.4 IntlSmCo 14.01 -0.17 -1.5 Fixd 10.33 +0.5 IntVa 15.67 -0.01 -8.0 Glb5FxInc 11.33 +3.1 2YGlFxd 10.22 +0.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 65.10 +0.09 +2.3

Income 13.18 IntlStk 30.07 Stock 97.59 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 16.94 NatlMunInc 9.72 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 16.99 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.79 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.03 FPACres 25.11 Fairholme 33.48 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.75 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.41 StrInA 12.21 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 17.58 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.62 FF2015 10.51 FF2020 12.62 FF2025 10.43 FF2030 12.42 FF2035 10.26 FF2040 7.16 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.67 AMgr50 14.05 Balanc 16.79 BlueChGr 39.06 Canada 50.06 CapAp 22.69 CpInc r 8.81 Contra 59.00 DisEq 21.39 DivIntl 25.65 DivGth 24.68 EmrMk 21.58 Eq Inc 40.45 EQII 16.77 Fidel 28.85

-0.01 +2.9 +0.01 -5.6 +0.22 +1.8 +1.4 +4.1 +1.6 -2.2 +1.8 -0.02 +1.2 -0.20 +11.3 +1.9 -0.02 +1.2 -0.03 +2.4 -0.02 +1.3 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01

+1.5 +1.5 +1.2 +1.0 +0.9 +0.6 +0.6

+2.0 -0.02 +1.8 +3.1 +0.07 +2.9 -0.95 +3.3 +0.03 +5.9 -0.03 +4.5 -0.06 +1.4 +0.05 +1.8 -0.05 -8.4 -0.05 +4.3 -0.27 -4.6 -0.03 +3.7 -0.01 +3.0 +0.01 +1.9

GNMA 11.67 GovtInc 10.60 GroCo 71.31 GroInc 16.41 HighInc r 8.59 Indepn 20.65 IntBd 10.41 IntmMu 10.24 IntlDisc 27.90 InvGrBd 11.58 InvGB 7.25 LgCapVal 11.49 LatAm 47.09 LevCoStk 24.73 LowP r 33.95 Magelln 65.16 MidCap 25.82 MuniInc 12.63 NwMkt r 15.27 OTC 47.13 100Index 8.03 Ovrsea 27.81 Puritn 16.49 RealE 23.34 StIntMu 10.66 STBF 8.41 SmllCpS r 16.80 StratInc 10.89 StrReRt r 8.66 TotalBd 10.76 USBI 11.28 Value 61.67 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 47.29 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 33.28 500IdxInv 40.32 IntlInxInv 30.22 TotMktInv 32.74 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 40.33 TotMktAd r 32.74 First Eagle: GlblA 40.84

-0.01 -0.02 +0.08 -0.01 -0.02 -0.05 -0.02

+3.9 +2.9 +3.4 +2.3 +4.1 +3.7 +3.9 +2.2 -0.04 -8.1 -0.02 +3.8 -0.01 +4.3 +2.2 -0.59 -9.2 -0.15 +7.9 -0.01 +6.3 +0.07 +1.4 -0.05 +10.2 +2.9 -0.04 +3.8 -0.12 +3.1 +0.01 +1.3 +0.01 -10.1 -0.02 +3.2 +0.04 +16.2 +0.01 +1.1 +2.0 +0.01 +5.4 -0.03 +2.5 -0.06 +1.8 -0.01 +4.2 -0.02 +3.3 +0.03 +8.3 -0.79 +11.4 +0.03 +10.6 +0.05 +2.7 +0.02 -9.6 +0.04 +4.1 +0.06 +2.7 +0.04 +4.1 -0.25 +2.2

OverseasA 19.80 -0.21 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.88 FoundAl p 9.77 -0.01 HYTFA p 10.10 -0.01 IncomA p 2.06 USGovA p 6.77 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.05 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.08 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.48 +0.01 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 5.90 -0.06 GlBd A p 13.39 GrwthA p 15.77 -0.05 WorldA p 13.12 -0.05 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 15.78 -0.04 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC px 13.29 -0.12 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.99 +0.02 GMO Trust III: Quality 18.69 +0.04 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 11.89 -0.11 Quality 18.70 +0.04 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 31.36 +0.07 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.02 -0.02 HYMuni 8.57 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.54 -0.01 CapApInst 32.47 -0.01 IntlInv t 49.63 +0.12 Intl r 50.13 +0.12 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 30.47 -0.05 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 27.15 -0.05 Hartford Fds Y:

+1.7 +2.8 -0.5 +4.3 +2.4 +3.7 +6.2 +2.5 +2.2 +2.2 -9.9 NA -6.2 -6.1 -6.1 +6.0 +0.4 -3.4 -3.0 -3.3 +8.2 +4.0 +6.8 +3.7 -1.5 -8.8 -8.6 -0.7 -1.0

CapAppI 30.42 -0.05 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 37.00 -0.05 Div&Gr 17.79 +0.04 Advisers 17.97 TotRetBd 11.01 -0.01 HussmnStrGr 12.92 +0.04 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.15 +0.04 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 20.73 -0.16 AssetStA p 21.27 -0.17 AssetStrI r 21.43 -0.17 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.35 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.34 -0.01 HighYld 7.89 -0.02 IntmTFBd 10.93 ShtDurBd 10.94 USLCCrPls 18.43 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 26.22 +0.01 OvrseasT r 42.35 -0.24 PrkMCVal T 20.68 +0.06 Twenty T 60.34 +0.14 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 10.82 -0.02 LSBalanc 11.98 -0.02 LSGrwth 11.61 -0.02 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.57 -0.06 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.19 -0.09 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 18.44 -0.09 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.00 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 25.84 +0.03 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.74 -0.03 StrInc C 14.26 -0.04 LSBondR 13.69 -0.03 StrIncA 14.20 -0.03

-0.6 +1.0 +1.4 +2.8 +4.1 +1.1 +0.9 -4.8 -4.5 -4.5 +3.4 +3.5 +4.7 +1.5 +1.5 +1.4 -0.2 -0.4 +4.4 -2.0 +0.5 +2.0 +1.4 +8.8 +1.0 +0.9 +3.0 +7.3 +5.1 +4.5 +5.0 +4.9

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.05 -0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.48 -0.02 BdDebA p 7.45 -0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.59 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.30 +0.02 ValueA 20.99 +0.07 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.08 +0.06 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.71 -0.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.59 -0.07 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.01 -0.17 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.35 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.35 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 11.99 -0.08 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.89 -0.06 GlbDiscZ 27.23 -0.05 QuestZ 17.40 +0.01 SharesZ 19.63 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 39.97 +0.07 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 41.49 +0.06 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.10 +0.02 Intl I r 16.70 -0.01 Oakmark r 38.82 +0.17 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.38 -0.02 GlbSMdCap 13.03 -0.04 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 38.55 +0.05 DvMktA p 28.35 -0.08 GlobA p 52.22 +0.20 IntBdA p 6.20 -0.02 MnStFdA 28.37 -0.02 RisingDivA 13.96 +0.02

+4.9 +2.8 +3.6 +2.8 +2.1 +1.4 +1.4 +3.6 -6.5 -1.1 +6.5 +6.5 -7.9 +0.6 +0.7 +0.9 NA +5.9 +5.7 +2.2 -0.8 +4.8 +4.4 +2.0 -3.5 -1.4 -1.5 -1.6 +0.9 +0.4

S&MdCpVl 27.82 -0.02 StrInA p 4.07 -0.01 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 12.67 +0.02 S&MdCpVl 23.98 -0.02 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.63 +0.02 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.26 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.06 -0.08 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.13 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.92 -0.04 ComodRR 7.52 -0.19 HiYld 8.95 -0.03 InvGrCp 11.22 -0.03 LowDu 10.46 RealRet 11.53 -0.06 RealRtnI 11.14 -0.04 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.13 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.14 -0.04 TotRtA 11.13 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.13 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.13 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.13 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.48 -0.12 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 36.22 +0.05 Price Funds: BlChip 33.18 +0.05 CapApp 18.95 -0.01 EmMktS 28.89 -0.25 EqInc 21.95 +0.06 EqIndex 30.69 +0.04 Growth 27.76 HlthSci 26.86 +0.07 HiYield 6.53 -0.02

+4.7 +5.7 +4.4

+5.6 -1.3 +4.1 +4.7 -6.9 +4.9 +4.9 +2.3 +6.0 +4.2 +0.9 +4.2 +4.0 +4.0 +3.8 +4.1 +4.2 +4.7 +1.6 +1.3 +4.4 -4.0 +5.0 +2.6 +0.9 +2.6 +4.6

IntlBond 9.27 IntlStk 11.91 MidCap 51.62 MCapVal 22.02 N Asia 16.17 New Era 41.41 N Horiz 28.28 N Inc 9.47 R2010 14.27 R2015 10.91 R2020 14.91 R2025 10.83 R2030 15.42 R2040 15.44 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 30.28 SmCapVal 32.93 SpecIn 11.97 Value 21.35 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.21 VoyA p 20.53 RiverSource A: DEI 8.88 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.26 PremierI r 17.61 TotRetI r 11.65 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 34.03 S&P Sel 17.81 Scout Funds: Intl 27.19 Selected Funds: AmShD 37.43 AmShS p 37.42 Sequoia 119.57 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.41 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.19 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 23.37 IntValue I 23.89 Tweedy Browne:

-0.02 -5.2 -0.03 -5.5 +0.06 +8.7 +0.06 +6.3 -0.17 +0.2 -0.58 -5.1 +0.05 +10.6 -0.02 +3.6 -0.01 +2.3 +2.2 -0.01 +2.1 +2.1 -0.01 +2.0 +1.9 +1.7 +0.05 +12.4 +0.07 +11.7 -0.01 +3.0 +4.2 +0.01 +2.1 +0.01 +4.1 +1.2 -0.01 +8.6 -0.08 +8.0 +0.01 +8.1 +0.05 +3.2 +0.02 +2.7 -0.10 -6.7 +0.02 +0.5 +0.02 +0.4 +0.27 +8.8 -0.11 -9.8 -0.33 -4.6 -0.19 -5.8 -0.19 -5.6

GblValue 21.17 -0.08 VALIC : StkIdx 22.87 +0.03 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.05 +0.06 EqIncA p 7.94 +0.01 GrInA p 17.53 +0.03 HYMuA p 9.35 +0.01 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.99 CpOpAdl 69.98 +0.49 EMAdmr r 32.71 -0.31 Energy 105.23 -1.11 500Adml 104.99 +0.14 GNMA Ad 10.86 -0.01 HlthCr 48.46 +0.11 HiYldCp 5.50 -0.01 InfProAd 25.29 -0.07 ITsryAdml 11.33 -0.02 IntGrAdm 50.81 -0.09 ITAdml 13.56 ITGrAdm 9.90 -0.02 LtdTrAd 11.05 LTGrAdml 9.16 -0.03 LT Adml 11.06 MuHYAdm 10.45 PrmCap r 61.15 +0.15 STsyAdml 10.78 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.73 -0.01 TtlBAdml 10.56 -0.01 TStkAdm 28.41 +0.04 WellslAdm 50.42 +0.02 WelltnAdm 50.27 +0.06 Windsor 41.21 +0.06 WdsrIIAd 42.63 -0.01 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.34 -0.01 CapOpp 30.29 +0.21 DivdGro 13.34 +0.04 Energy 56.03 -0.60 EqInc 18.67 +0.06 Explr 62.02 +0.10 GNMA 10.86 -0.01

-0.1 +2.6 +2.1 +2.4 +1.9 +4.7 +2.9 +0.9 -4.0 -6.1 +2.7 +3.8 -3.5 +3.5 +3.2 +3.8 -6.0 +2.1 +5.2 +1.0 +5.0 +2.4 +3.2 -0.8 +1.6 +0.5 +2.7 +3.5 +3.9 +3.1 +1.6 +2.5 +1.4 +3.8 +0.8 +1.3 -6.1 +3.0 +8.2 +3.7

GlobEq 15.50 GroInc 24.09 HYCorp 5.50 HlthCre 114.82 InflaPro 12.88 IntlGr 15.97 IntlVal 27.67 ITIGrade 9.90 LifeCon 15.50 LifeGro 19.96 LifeMod 18.15 LTIGrade 9.16 Morg 15.65 MuInt 13.56 MuLtd 11.05 MuShrt 15.91 PrecMtls r 19.90 PrmcpCor 12.31 Prmcp r 58.92 SelValu r 17.07 STAR 17.79 STIGrade 10.73 StratEq 16.40 TgRe2010 21.05 TgtRe2025 11.55 TgtRe2015 11.58 TgRe2020 20.40 TgRe2030 19.67 TgtRe2035 11.82 TgtRe2040 19.36 TgtRe2045 12.22 USGro 16.25 Wellsly 20.81 Welltn 29.10 Wndsr 12.21 WndsII 24.01 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 104.97 Balanced 19.97 DevMkt 8.68 EMkt 24.86 Europe 22.50 Extend 35.93 Growth 27.72

-0.04 +0.05 -0.01 +0.26 -0.03 -0.02 -0.07 -0.02

-0.03 +0.02

-0.19 +0.04 +0.14 -0.02 -0.01

+0.01 +0.01

+0.01 +0.03 +0.02

-1.1 +3.0 +3.5 -3.5 +3.2 -6.0 -9.6 +5.2 +3.0 +2.0 +2.6 +4.9 +2.5 +2.1 +1.0 +0.5 -2.6 +1.7 -0.9 +7.0 +1.4 +2.6 +7.3 +2.6 +2.0 +2.4 +2.2 +1.9 +1.7 +1.6 +1.7 -1.3 +3.1 +1.5 +2.5 +1.4

+0.13 +2.7 +3.8 +0.01 -8.9 -0.23 -4.0 +0.10 -13.3 +0.04 +10.0 +0.02 +1.7

ITBnd 11.02 -0.02 +4.4 MidCap 17.60 +0.03 +7.6 Pacific 9.60 -0.05 -0.8 REIT r 16.95 +0.03 +15.0 SmCap 30.69 +0.03 +11.7 SmlCpGth 18.58 +0.03 +10.4 SmlCpVl 14.74 +0.01 +12.9 STBnd 10.54 +2.1 TotBnd 10.56 -0.01 +3.4 TotlIntl 13.27 -0.02 -7.9 TotStk 28.40 +0.03 +3.8 Value 19.25 +0.03 +3.8 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 19.98 +0.01 +3.9 DevMkInst 8.61 +0.01 NS ExtIn 35.96 +0.04 +10.1 GrwthIst 27.73 +0.02 +1.8 InfProInst 10.30 -0.03 +3.2 InstIdx 104.29 +0.14 +2.7 InsPl 104.29 +0.13 +2.7 InsTStPlus 25.68 +0.04 +3.9 MidCpIst 17.65 +0.03 +7.6 SCInst 30.73 +0.04 +11.8 TBIst 10.56 -0.01 +3.5 TSInst 28.41 +0.03 +3.9 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 86.72 +0.11 +2.7 STBdIdx 10.54 +2.1 TotBdSgl 10.56 -0.01 +3.5 TotStkSgl 27.42 +0.04 +3.9 Victory Funds: DvsStA 13.99 -0.02 +0.2 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.4 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.66 -0.02 +7.1


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “EMPLOYMENT BEYOND THE RECESSION”: WorkSource Oregon Employment Department will provide an economic update and analysis. Economists will discuss Oregon’s work force trends, regions that are likely to grow the fastest, the new “normal” for housing and recently completed reports, including one that analyzes Oregon’s green jobs. Registration required by May 11; $50, includes breakfast; 7:30 a.m.-noon; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-6024 or Denise.A.Pollock@state.or.us. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. USING ONLINE DATABASES: Learn about electronic databases and how to search the library’s full-text magazine database, Magazines Online. Registration is required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “FROM HERE TO NET ZERO”: Discover strategies for achieving highly efficient homes and powering homes through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high performance standards. Oregon CCB credits are available. Registration required by May 17; general $25; Earth Advantage builders and certified professionals $15; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7303. “DEMYSTIFYING THE DEFICIT”: An Edward Jones adviser will lead a seminar about the current U.S. deficit crisis and what it means for investors. Topics include four ways the government may seek to reduce the deficit and potential solutions for investors. Hors d’oeuvres will be served. Reservations requested; free; 6 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-330-4329. “EMOTIONAL CONNECTIONS — COPYWRITING”: Part of a graphic design series hosted by Central Oregon Community College Community Learning. Preregistration required; $79, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “HOMEOWNERSHIP ORIENTATION”: If your income is within Bend Area Habitat For Humanity’s guidelines, you may qualify to purchase affordable housing through BAHFH’s no-interest mortgage home ownership program.

Additional details and applications will be available at this orientation; free; 6 p.m.; Habitat for Humanity, 1860 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-385-5387 or www.bendhabitat.org. “HOW TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS PLAN”: First-time business owners will learn how to evaluate finances, target their market and present ideas in a written business plan. Preregistration required; $49, includes workbook; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “WEB SITE FINE-TUNING WITH HTML”: Class offers HTML instruction for users operating Dreamweaver and other Web site development systems. Preregistration required; $59; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA — MANAGING YOUR SITES”: Part of the Marketing Online series; $49; Tuesdays through May 25 from 6:30-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “DEMYSTIFYING THE DEFICIT”: Learn about the current U.S. deficit and what it means for investors. Topics include four ways the government may seek to reduce the deficit and potential solutions for investors. Registration required by May 17; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-617-8861 or www.edwardjones. com/cgi/getHTML.cgi?page=/USA/IR/ market/index.html&CIRN=404566. “SMART MARKETING IN A DOWN ECONOMY”: Robert Sherk will discuss what it takes to be the costumer’s first choice and how to create customer loyalty. Registration is required; free, $10 for optional lunch; noon-2:30 p.m.; Inn at Cross Keys Station, 66 N.W. Cedar St., Madras; 541-383-

7290 or bdc@cocc.edu. “MAKING YOUR MARK AS A YOUNG PROFESSIONAL”: Explore the amenities of The Loft and get tips on building a successful career as a young professional. Amy Tykeson, president and CEO of BendBroadband, will give a brief presentation; members $5 or $10 at the door. Non-members $10 or $15 at the door; 5-7 p.m.; The Loft, 919 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-322-LOFT. “MAXED OUT — LESSONS ON CREDIT CARDS”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Watch and discuss a documentary about the credit card industry. Preregistration required; free; 6-8 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@ neighborimpact.org. “CENTRAL OREGON INTERNET TV REAL ESTATE SHOW”: Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty Bend hosts a live Internet show to discuss how to become a licensed Realtor in Oregon. Visit the website and click on the show icons; free; 7 p.m.; www.ExitRealtyBend.com.

THURSDAY “BREAKFAST WITH THE CHAMBER”: The Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce monthly networking social will be sponsored by Paulette and Jay Nordin of Nordin Enterprises. Refreshments will be served. Open to all; free; 8 a.m.; Nordin Enterprises, 16751 S.W. Dove Road, Terrebonne; 541-923-2679. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction requirements. Successful completion results in an ODOT credential for flaggers. Preregistration required; $69; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “HOMEOWNERSHIP ORIENTATION”: If your income is within Bend Area Habitat For Humanity’s guidelines, you may qualify to purchase affordable housing through BAHFH’s no-interest mortgage home ownership program. Additional details and applications will be available at this orientation; free; 6 p.m.; Habitat for Humanity, 1860 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-385-5387 or www.bendhabitat.org. “OWNING A FRANCHISE”: Terry Rost will discuss how to choose a franchise and arrange financing. Registration

Heroes are made in a blink of an eye. Please join us in honoring our local lifesavers SPC Reid Walsh (Redmond), Military Hero - An Oregon National Guard soldier who survived an ambush in Iraq while serving his country.

Bea Leach (Redmond), Health & Safety Hero - A citizen who saved a life with the help of a TV show.

HEROES’ BREAKFAST

Tonya Harvey (Redmond), Health & Safety Hero - An Applebee’s waitress who saved a choking customer with the Heimlich maneuver.

June 9 at 7:30 a.m. Doors open at 7:15 a.m. National Guard Armory 875 SW Simpson Avenue, Bend

Presented by:

Clay Davis (Sisters), Wilderness Rescue & Safety Hero - A firefighter and EMT who helped save a friend in a serious wilderness accident.

Tickets: $20 To order tickets visit: www.mountainriver.redcross.org All donations from this event support the work of your local Red Cross and help provide assistance to nearly 3,000 people each year and allow us to collect more than 18,000 units of blood.

Ireland the Dog (Redmond), Pet Hero - The pet, who was a member of the family, saved her owner.

Tom York (Redmond), Blood Hero - A dedicated volunteer who has faithfully donated blood for more than 50 years.

PFC Alex Johnson (Madras), Military Hero - An active duty Madras soldier who survived a blast from an 800 lb. IED in Afghanistan.

required; $19; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “SAGE AWARDS DINNER”: The Bend Chamber of Commerce will present the Star Awards for Greatness and Excellence. Preregistration required by May 14; $75, includes dinner; 6 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org/annualdinner. “SENIOR FINANCIAL SCAMS, HOW TO PROTECT FAMILY AND FRIENDS” : Learn about financial exploitation, common examples of senior scams, how to recognize signs of abuse, where to go for help and more. Light refreshments will be served. Call to reserve a seat; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795. “WEB GRAPHICS WITH PHOTOSHOP AND DREAMWEAVER”: Preregistration required; $99, continuing education units available; Thursdays through June 3 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. INTERMEDIATE QUICKBOOKS PRO WORKSHOP: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through May 27 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CREATE YOUR PERSONAL RETIREMENT ANALYSIS”: Define retirement goals, income distribution and tax strategies. Taught by Chad Staskal. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY “REFINE YOUR RESOURCES”: Learn about the viability of benefit auctions as a fundraising tool, and how to make donation and sponsorship requests to media, corporations, restaurants and retailers. RSVP required; free; 8-11:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-480-8700. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches,

NEWS OF RECORD managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. “PAIN MANAGEMENT IN HEALTH CARE”: This course is geared toward health care professionals who are required to complete pain management education through Senate Bill 885. Preregistration required; $119, includes lunch; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CREATING A BUDGET SPREADSHEET WITH EXCEL: Learn to create, edit and save a budget spreadsheet. Prerequisites: “Getting Started with Computer Software” or familiarity with Microsoft Office programs. Registration is required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861.

SATURDAY “DERIVED SYSTEMS”: Continuing education for licensed electricians to learn about separately divided systems and the specific code sections related to the installation of these systems. Preregistration required; $75, continuing education units available; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

DEEDS Deschutes County

Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Fairhaven Phase X, Lot 22, $253,993.37 Carmen R. Allen and Marijosius Cameron to Michael and Alison Burke, Foxborough Phase 2, Lot 77, $161,350 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, Parkview Terrace Phases I and II, Lot 12, $180,840 James B. Fancher, personal representative of the estate of Hal R. Fancher and trustee of the Irene W. Fancher Revocable Trust to William G. and Susan T. Combs, Rimrock West Phase 3, Lot 5, Block 7, $425,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Summit Ridge, Lot 5, $313,595.84 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Homesales Inc., Unicorn Meadows, Lot 2, $350,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Hayden Village Phase II, Lot 24, Block 6, $193,161.62 Bank of America NA to Federal Homeloan Mortgage Corporation, River Bend Estates, Lots 23-4, $340,000 Roger C. and Carmen L. Smith to Freda M. Bruce, Ridge at Eagle Crest 47, Lot 32, $269,000 Timothy R. and Anne J. Kizziar to Steven L. and Tracy A. Harris, Hawksflight Air Park, Lot 1, $299,000 Andrew M. and Kimberley Y. Cole to Greg Froomer, Mountain Village East IV, Lot 9, Block 19, $323,000 Crook County

Homesales Inc. to Bloise L. LaDuke Jr., Ganun LaDuke and Ronald D. Calkins, trustees, T 15 S. R 14 E., Crook County, $201,451 Aurora Loan Services, LLC to Dick and Young A. Van Osdel, High Desert Estates Phase VI, Lot 168, $245,000

www.OasisSpaofBend.com Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


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Inside

OREGON EPA to limit pesticides near salmon streams, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Black Sabbath vocalist Ronnie James Dio dies at 67, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

Voters may be waiting until the last minute Bulletin staff report As they prepare to tally thousands of ballots this evening, local county election officials say they’re not sure if they’ll end up with a big push from last-minute voters or continued low turnout. By Monday, just under 31 percent of Deschutes County voters had returned their ballots, compared to 36 percent in Crook County and 37 percent in Jefferson County. Voters registered as Inside Democrats or • Voting Re p u bl ic a n s information, can weigh in Page C3 on their party’s candidate for the Oregon governor’s race and Republicans could vote for the candidate who will challenge U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., in the November election. The Deschutes County ballot includes contested primaries for both the Republican and Democratic nominations for two seats on the County Commission and contested races for district attorney and a Deschutes County Circuit Court judge position. Voters will also decide whether they want to approve a $44 million bond that would pay to double the capacity of the Deschutes County jail. See Election / C3

Attention, photographers! These photos were among dozens readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.

We asked for readers’ photos, and today we’re publishing some of the best

Well sh t!

Installment 18:

Composition

Submitted by user Jim

“Alabama Hills”

Submitted by user Derek Oldham

“A road less traveled”

‘Evers’ in jail for now Alleged impostor would prefer house arrest here By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

PORTLAND — A federal magistrate judge on Monday ruled that the former Bend-based Oregon Liquor Control Commission regional manager and alleged impostor known as Jason Evers should be re- The man leased to house known as arrest in Bend, Jason Evers but a prosecu- will be back tor immediately in court today appealed — de- for a decision. laying a decision until today. The man being charged as “John Doe, aka Jason Evers,” was controversial in Bend while overseeing liquor law enforcement in more than half the state before requesting a demotion in January. He was arrested late last month for allegedly lying about his identity while applying for a passport in 2002. The man known as Evers — who authorities believe used the identity of a dead Ohio boy to get a Social Security number in 1996 — has said that he won’t reveal his true identity due to “safety concerns.” See E v ers / C3

Submitted by user Carolyn

“Boardwalk, Skunk Cabbage Trail, Revelstoke National Park, BC”

Sisters’ fight for gas tax to weigh in budget

“Lifting fog” Submitted by user BillMcD

Groups fight wind energy at Steens Mountain By Kate Ramsayer

By Patrick Cliff

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The Oregon Natural Desert Association and other conservation groups have asked the state’s energy regulators to put the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area offlimits to wind farms and Inside other energy • Map of development. proposed And if the wind power state agrees, projects, it would block Page C5 Oregon from giving the OK to at least two projects that have been discussed for the area, although its impact on a third project in the scenic southern Oregon location is unknown. “Like many other conservation organizations, we fully support renewable energy development,” said Liz Nysson, climate change coordinator with the Bend-based Oregon Natural Desert Association. “However, we feel like it has to be done responsibly and it has to be done in places where it’s the least impactful.” See Steens / C5

The city of Sisters does not make cuts to employees or services in its 2010-11 budget, but that situation could change after an upcoming legal battle. Not only has the city avoided deep cuts in its budget, but it has managed to keep more than $1 million in its reserve funds. But the budget is built on the assumption that the city will be able to put the 3-cent gas tax into place in the upcoming year, something that is far from certain. Sisters projects the tax will raise about $130,000 annually. If the city loses its legal case for the tax, which goes before a judge Friday, it will have to decide where to make up the difference. The city is putting together a $9.3 million budget for 2010-11, and looks likely to avoid staff or service cuts even though the city’s revenues have been in decline for three years. For instance, three years ago Sisters had about $300,000 left after expenses. In 2010-11, the budget projects the city will have a deficit of about $71,000, with about $70,000 of that going to street work. See Sisters / C5

Correction In a box that ran with the story headlined “Group envisions 4year university in region’s future,” which appeared Saturday, May 15, on Page C1, the location of a forum in Redmond was reported incorrectly due to incorrect information supplied to The Bulletin. The forum will take place in City Council Chambers at 777 S.W. Deschutes Ave., in Redmond. The Bulletin regrets the error.

“Kalapaki Beach, Kauai”

Submitted by user Amber Newell

“The Redwoods”

Submitted by user Carol Ann Thurston

“My wife walking on a NaPali Coast Beach.” Submitted by user kristin wolter

Submitted by user D Heron

“Painted Hills, a different perspective”

The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

Readers’ photos

May 4 Flash

Today Composition

June 1 Emotion

To comment Each installment of Well shot! features photos submitted by readers for the previous week’s theme.

June 15 Lines

June 29 Shadows

July 13 Shapes

July 27 Black & white

Aug. 10 Color

For more information on ONDA’s petition, visit onda.org/tell-efscto-protect-steens-mountain To comment on the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area petition, write to the Oregon Department of Energy, Attn: Energy Siting, 625 Marion St. N.E., Salem, OR 97301, or send an e-mail to energy.siting@ state.or.us by 5 p.m. on May 28. The Energy Facility Siting Council will also take oral comments at its next meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 11 in Burns.


C2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Construction spending by Deschutes will dive Deschutes County injected millions of dollars into the local economy through several large construction projects this year, County Administrator Dave Kanner said Monday. That will change in the budget year that begins in July, when the county’s budget for capital projects it set to decrease 73.9 percent, according to the proposed county budget. That amounts to approximately $7 million less the county will spend on private-sector construction contractors. The county attributed most of the decrease to the anticipated completion of an estimated $8.5 million building in north Bend to house the 911 dispatch center and Oregon State Police offices. Other large projects this year include the Deschutes Market Road overpass, for which the county selected a $2.9 million bid, and the construction of a new cell at Knott Landfill for about $5.4 million. In e-mails, Road Department Director Tom Blust estimated the road project

created approximately 32 jobs, and Department of Solid Waste Director Timm Schimke wrote the landfill project likely created 25 to 30 local jobs.

Prescribed burns planned this week Several prescribed burns are scheduled this week in areas around Central Oregon, according to a news release from the Deschutes National Forest & Prineville Bureau of Land Management. Smoke may be visible in the Bend, Sunriver, Sisters and Black Butte Ranch areas, and residents are advised to keep their doors and windows shut to minimize the effects of the smoke. All prescribed burns are to improve forest health, remove debris accumulation and reduce hazardous fuels, according to the news release. South of Bend, two prescribed burns are set at 1 p.m. Monday in an area approximately five miles south of Lava Butte. The burn is expected to be completed in one to two days. U.S. Highway 97 and Forest Road 9710, 9714 and 1810 may be impacted

by smoke. Also, a 1,000-acre prescribed burn is set southwest of Pine Mountain. Smoke will impact Forest Roads 25, 2510 and 18. In Sunriver, a 170-acre section of land approximately two miles west of Sunriver along Forest Road 41 is scheduled to be lit Monday at 11 a.m. In the Sisters area, burns will occur mid-week, and fuel specialists will ignite a 100-acre area of land next to Black Butte Ranch and two miles north of U.S. Highway 20. Smoke may impact Highway 20 and Forest Roads 14 and 2068. Flaggers will be on call and signs will be posted to assist drivers if any such impacts occur on the highway. All scheduled burns are tentative depending on weather conditions.

Warm Springs fire displaces four families A fire at a tribal apartment complex in Warm Springs Sunday morning left four families without a home, according to officials from the Warm Springs

Fire Department. The cause of the fire is still under investigation. The fire started in a vacant apartment around 5:30 a.m. and spread throughout the complex. No one was injured, according to Juanita Majel, a spokeswoman with the Warm Springs Fire Department. The seven adults and four children are being housed at the Kahneeta High Desert Resort on the reservation. The American Red Cross and the Warm Springs Confederated Tribes are helping the families.

Overnight power outages set for Sisters About 100 homes in the southeast Sisters area are scheduled to have a series of overnight power outages as Central Electric Cooperative workers complete a system upgrade. The outages will take place from midnight to 2 a.m. throughout the week, according to a news release from CEC. The outage area includes the Five Pine Lodge, the release said. CEC mailed notification letters to all affected customers.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:43 p.m. May 14, in the 1900 block of Northwest 18th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:09 p.m. May 14, in the 1900 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 11:35 a.m. May 14, in the 3200 block of Southwest Metolius Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:27 a.m. May 14, in the 1400 block of Southwest 17th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:33 a.m. May 14, in the 500 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:03 a.m. May 15, in the 300 block of Northeast Larch Place. DUII — Isaiah Timothy Jackson, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:27 a.m. May 15, in the area of Southwest 27th Street and Southwest Indian Avenue. Theft — Cash and a cell phone were reported stolen at 5:14 p.m. May 16, in the 3300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:42 p.m. May 16, in the 2700 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 8:26 a.m. May 16, in the 700 block of Southwest Seventh Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 8:22 a.m. May 16, in the area of Southwest Eighth Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:57 a.m. May 16, in the 3200 block of Southwest Pumice Place.

DUII — Harley Roderick Huff, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:42 a.m. May 16, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Canal Boulevard. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:07 a.m. May 14, in the area of Northwest Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:06 a.m. May 14, in the area of Northeast Fairview Street. DUII — Clarence T. Avila, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:04 p.m. May 14, in the area of Southwest Tom McCall Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:08 p.m. May 15, in the area of Hickey Farms Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:49 p.m. May 16, in the area of Southeast Knowledge Street. Black Butte Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:50 a.m. May 14, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 West near milepost 92. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:07 p.m. May 14, in the 21300 block of Stevens Road in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:38 p.m. May 14, in the 16600 block of Shaw Pine Court in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:31 p.m. May 14, in the area of First Street and Huntington Road in La Pine. DUII — Justin Curtis Colcord, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:44 a.m. May 14, in the area of China Hat Road and Forest Service Road 1801 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:10 p.m. May 15, in the 64100 block of O.B. Riley Road in Tumalo. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:14 p.m. May 15, in the 16100 block of Amber Lane in La Pine.

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:07 p.m. May 15, in the 13000 block of Century Drive in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:09 p.m. May 15, in the 52500 block of Antler Lane in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:14 a.m. May 15, in the 5700 block of Northwest 66th Lane in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:08 a.m. May 15, in the area of Baker Road and South U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. DUII — Chase Evert Brooker, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:18 a.m. May 15, in the area of 61st Street and Gift Road in Redmond. DUII — Dustin Wade Eldred, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:21 a.m. May 15, in the area of Northwest Fifth Street and Northwest Dogwood Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported and arrests made at 7:58 p.m. May 16, in the area of First Street and Huntington Road in La Pine. DUII — Mark Lyle Carlton, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:04 p.m. May 16, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Powell Butte Highway in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 3:01 a.m. May 16, in the 60200 block of Crater Road in Bend. DUII — Silvestre O. Rivera Jr., 20, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:07 a.m. May 16, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. DUII — Jerald Jerome Garland, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:07 a.m. May 16, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and South Century Drive in Sunriver. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 5 a.m. May 13, in the 2700 block of Southwest U.S. Highway 97 in Madras. DUII — Gerald Danzuka, 50, was

arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants May 14, in the area of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Ford Lane in Metolius. Theft — Comic books and vintage magazines were reported stolen at 11:33 a.m. May 15, in the 2300 block of Northeast Market Street in Gateway. Oregon State Police

DUII — Jose Refugio Cisneros, 58, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:26 p.m. May 15, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 109. DUII — Ray Fernandez Rubio, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:44 p.m. May 15, in the area of Southwest 27th Street and Southwest Wickiup Avenue in Redmond. DUII — Ellen Louise Good Tafte, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:35 a.m. May 16, in the area of Southwest Helmholtz Way and Southwest Canal Boulevard in Redmond.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic long-haired cat — Adult male, gray tabby; found near Southwest 23rd Court. Pug — Older male, beige and black; found near Northwest Lower Bridge Way. Labrador Retriever — Male puppy, black; found near Sisters. Pit Bull — Young female, brown, pink collar; found near Southwest Quartz Avenue.

Mount St. Helens explodes in 1980 T O D AY IN HISTORY

The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, May 18, the 138th day of 2010. There are 227 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 18, 1980, the Mount St. Helens volcano in Washington state exploded, leaving 57 people dead or missing. ON THIS DATE In 1860, the Republican Party convention in Chicago nominated Abraham Lincoln for president. In 1910, Halley’s Comet passed by earth, brushing it with its tail. In 1920, Pope John Paul II was born Karol Wojtyla in Wadowice, Poland. In 1944, during World War II, Allied forces finally occupied Monte Cassino in Italy after a four-month struggle that claimed some 20,000 lives. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Bill Macy is 88. Hallof-Fame sportscaster Jack Whitaker is 86. Actor Robert Morse is 79. Actor and television executive Dwayne Hickman is 76. Baseball Hall-ofFamer Brooks Robinson is 73. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Reggie Jackson is 64. Actress

Candice Azzara is 63. Country singer Joe Bonsall (The Oak Ridge Boys) is 62. Rock musician Rick Wakeman (Yes) is 61. Actor James Stephens is 59. Country singer George Strait is 58. Rhythm-and-blues singer Butch Tavares (Tavares) is 57. Actor Chow Yun-Fat is 55. Rock singermusician Page Hamilton is 50. Contemporary Christian musician Barry Graul (MercyMe) is 49. Singer-actress Martika is 41. Comedian-writer Tina Fey is 40. Rapper Special Ed is 36. Rock singer Jack Johnson is 35. Rhythm-and-blues singer Darryl Allen (Mista) is 30. Actor Matt Long is 30. Christian-rock musician Kevin Huguley (Rush of Fools) is 28. Actor Spencer Breslin is 18. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “People find life entirely too time-consuming.� — Stanislaw J. Lec, Polish writer (1909-66)

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 C3

O PORTLAND VOTERS TURN IN BALLOTS

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Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Nancy Goodwin drops her ballot off at a drop box Monday in Portland. About 37 percent of Oregon’s 2 million registered voters are expected to vote in time for the ballots to be counted tonight. That’s lower than in similar primary elections. Oregon did away with voting at the polls a decade ago.

Election Continued from C1 In Jefferson County, there is a three-way race for sheriff and a contested County Commission seat. Voters in Madras can decide if Friendship Park should remain a park or if part of the space could be used for a new police station and city hall. Meanwhile, Crook County’s ballot includes a four-way race for a seat on the County Court. Crook County Clerk Dee Berman said she believes the low turnout has something to do with voter indecision. “Usually we have a better turnout at the very beginning than we did this time,” she said. “It was like, ‘Where have all the voters gone?’” Deschutes County Clerk Nancy Blankenship said tallying the ballots will likely take hours, especially if there’s a big lastminute turnout — but she’s still hoping people turn in their ballots today. “There are a lot of important issues on the ballot to consider,” Blankenship said. All ballots must be dropped off by 8 p.m. today.

Have you voted? Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. today. Postmarks do not count. Voters may take their ballots to drop-off locations, listed online at the following sites: Deschutes County: www .co.deschutes.or.us/go/ government/departments/ county-clerk/elections/currentelection/index.cfm • Anyone registered to vote in Deschutes County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541388-6547. Crook County: http://co.crook .or.us/Departments/ CountyClerk/BallotDropSites/ tabid/1031/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Crook County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541447-6553. Jefferson County: www .co.jefferson.or.us/Elected Officials/CountyClerk/Elections/ tabid/1421/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Jefferson County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541475-4451.

ELECTION

So far, the following percentages of registered voters have returned their ballots: Deschutes County:

30.86 percent Crook County:

36.05 percent Jefferson County:

37.2 percent

EPA to limit pesticides near salmon The Associated Press GRANTS PASS — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Monday it will impose restrictions on spraying three agricultural pesticides to keep them out of salmon streams after manufacturers refused to adopt the limits voluntarily. EPA will develop new rules for applying the chemicals diazinon, malathion and chlorpyrifos that will include no-spray zones along streams and restrictions on spraying depending on weather conditions, EPA spokesman Dale Kemery said in an e-mail. There will also be requirements to report dead fish. Even at very low levels, the chemicals have been found by federal biologists to interfere with salmon’s sense of smell, making it harder for them to find food, avoid predators and return

Evers Continued from C1 Federal prosecutor Stacie Beckerman argued in court that even if Evers is telling the truth about why he took on a fake identity, those same safety concerns make him a major flight risk if released pending trial. However, Judge Donald Ashmanskas said that house arrest, with electronic GPS monitoring would ensure that Evers could be tracked by the U.S. Marshal’s Service — even if he fled to Antarctica, he said, in a warning made directly to Evers. “If you go overseas, they will go overseas,” Ashmanskas said. Beckerman immediately appealed the decision to release the defendant, and Ashmanskas agreed to postpone the release until another judge can review it. The defense lawyer, federal public defender Susan Russell, argued that the alleged impostor should not be penalized for using someone else’s identity, arguing that the intent was not to defraud or do harm. She cited the presence of several friends and coworkers who she said “have come here on their own to show their support of his good character.” Russell said that she is already in talks with federal prosecutors about a potential settlement, adding of her client that “his intent is to resolve this and move forward ...” Ashmanskas noted that he was investigated by the FBI as part of his background check before assuming the federal bench; and agents found that he had lied to get a summer job before he was old enough to work. “We’re all sinners, in a sense, when it comes to things of this nature, deception,” he said. If released pending trial, Evers would be confined to his house in Bend, which is currently in foreclosure. He would live there with his fian-

to native waters to spawn. The EPA action stems from a lawsuit filed by anti-pesticide groups in 2001. Manufacturers Dow AgroSciences, Makhteshim Agan of North America, Cheminova and Gharda Chemicals Ltd. notified EPA on Friday that they would not voluntarily adopt the restrictions, said Dow AgroSciences spokesman Garry Hamlin. In a letter to the EPA, a lawyer for Dow AgroSciencies and Makhteshim Agan said the companies feel there is no scientific evidence the pesticides are killing, harming or jeopardizing the survival of salmon, or harming critical habitat, and that the NOAA Fisheries analysis was deficient. They also objected to EPA’s handling of the case. The EPA decision comes a

ce, Russell said. She added that while the state employee is on unpaid administrative leave, he could use unused vacation time to maintain an income. The appeal of the alleged impostor’s release will be heard at 10 a.m. today by federal district court Judge Ancer Haggerty. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-576-9008 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

year and a half after NOAA Fisheries Service found the pesticides threaten the survival of 27 species of salmon and steelhead that are protected by the Endangered Species Act in the West.

Portland schools pull sex crimes booklet

Boy darts off train as dad talks on cell

PORTLAND — After parents complained, the Portland School District is replacing a summer brochure that included information about sex crimes. Spokesman Matt Shelby told The Oregonian the material seems inappropriate for younger children, although it’s up to principals to decide how the booklet is distributed. The parent of one Llewellyn Elementary fourth-grader said he was surprised when the booklet prompted his son to ask questions such as, “What’s sodomy?” The 24-page comic-style booklet, titled “Operation Safe Summer,” was compiled by the Portland Police Bureau and handed out to all students at the elementary. It mostly includes information about summer programs.

PORTLAND — A Portland-area transit agency says a man was briefly separated from his 4-year-old son after the boy darted through a lightrail train’s open doors at a stop while his father was talking on a cell phone. Surveillance video taken inside the MAX train shortly after 10 p.m. Sunday shows the man briefly distracted by the phone with his back turned to the young boy. TriMet says the train left the stop with the boy standing alone at the station. Agency spokeswoman Bekki Witt says the two were reunited about six minutes later. It’s the second time in six months that a father and son have been separated on the MAX system. — From wire reports


C4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Election provides chance to choose better advocates

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ou couldn’t ask for a better illustration of why elections matter than the current negotiations between Deschutes County and one of its employee groups. County officials

are trying to rein in spending, and one union has trotted out a proposal Administrator Dave Kanner likens to a Trojan horse. He said he’d urge the county commissioners to turn the horse away, as is right. The three commissioners are the public’s proxies in county government. They provide policy direction. They oversee the county’s most important employee, the administrator. And they have the final say on contracts, Trojan horses and many other matters that involve your money. In other words, they matter, and voters this year will either re-elect or replace two of them. The Trojan horse Kanner opposes is really a horse trade. In exchange for accepting a handful of unpaid days off next year, the union (AFSCME) requested a change in contract language related to layoffs. According to the union’s current contract, an array of employment decisions, including layoffs, “shall be based on skill, ability, qualifications, recency of experience, training, length of service and work record.” As long as the county decides that all other factors are equal, the most senior employee receives preferential treatment. The union would like to increase the importance of seniority in this equation in exchange for its furlough days. Kanner, to his credit, doesn’t like the trade-off. The county’s constituents, he reasons, aren’t “looking to us to give the union more favorable contract terms at this time.” He’s right. While the furlough days would be a temporary concession, the seniority language would be extremely difficult to weaken once it’s enshrined in a contract. And though it might not seem so at first glance, enhancing the importance of seniority in layoff decisions would have financial consequences for the county. Keeping the most skilled employees on the payroll, regardless of tenure, ensures that county residents get the best service for their money. Increasing the importance of seniority, on the other hand, would inevitably increase expense (more senior employees tend to cost more) even as it decreased the importance of skill. Ultimately, we’d pay more and get less in return. The union isn’t bad for pursuing an agreement that would help its members at the expense of taxpayers. It’s simply doing what unions are designed to do. Taxpayers depend upon their elected officials, and the administrators those elected officials hire, to serve as a counterweight. Unfortunately, the two sides are often unequally motivated. While unions and their members have a personal stake in the outcome of negotiations, commissioners and administrators are spending other people’s money.

The union isn’t bad for pursuing an agreement that will help its members at the expense of taxpayers. It’s simply doing what unions are designed to do. Taxpayers depend upon their elected officials, and the administrators those elected officials hire, to serve as a counterweight. That’s why the county’s mishandling of the employee health insurance plan over the last couple of years isn’t surprising. The county has long enjoyed the authority to raise employee premium copays. But when Commissioner Dave Kanner, echoing the county’s budget committee, recommended such a hike, the idea went nowhere. Any move to boost co-pays would have irritated employees. And leaving co-pays where they were, while fiscally irresponsible, promised to have no seriously adverse consequences as long as the public wasn’t watching. This is a classic example of elected officials following the path of least resistance. By voting today, and again in November, Deschutes County residents have a chance to upgrade their advocates. The incumbents have failed them. Saying “no” to a union proposal publicly characterized by the county administrator as a Trojan horse is easy. Fighting on behalf of taxpayers when nobody’s looking is much harder, but it’s every bit as important. ••• Even as he laudably characterized the AFSCME offer as a Trojan horse, County Administrator Dave Kanner would not discuss the details with a Bulletin reporter. Why not? Because, he snipped, “these types of discussions should take place between the parties and not through The Bulletin.” It seems to us that the taxpaying public is an important party here. Conducting government in the shadows is undoubtedly easier for county and union leaders, but it serves the public badly. Given the county commission’s recent track record, in fact, the county should be going overboard in the opposite direction. Taxpayers deserve enough information to advocate more effectively on their own behalf.

My Nickel’s Worth Vote for DeBone Many folks in Central Oregon have been going through devastating times. Businesses are closing almost every day. Many people have lost their homes. Unemployment is the highest most of us have seen in our lifetimes. We are all struggling to find solutions, and dream about getting back to normal. It will take energetic and purposeful leadership in our county to get the economy moving again. The same old “good enough” attitude that we have been used to will not get it done. The county commissioners need to work with the state and the city councilors in Deschutes County to relax some of the prohibitive regulations and high fees. They should find ways to put together partnerships that will open doors for small business to succeed. If we work together, we can make Deschutes County the place to do business in the Northwest, not the place that is still trying to do business as usual in an economy that is not usual. Tony DeBone has proven he can get creative. He knows how to put together partnerships and teams to “get ’er done,” even in tough times. After his success with the previously struggling La Pine Park and Recreation District, the people of Deschutes County would be wise to put him to work as county commissioner. He will be an eager partner to anyone looking for creative solutions. I am convinced that Tony DeBone will make a difference in Deschutes County. Kacey Hayes La Pine

DAs are political How interesting that Bev Clarno is helping the candidate running against

Mike Dugan for district attorney by participating in a radio ad attacking Dugan for being involved in politics. What a short memory. In 1999, both Clarno and Dugan came out in favor of Measure 31 (regarding pornography) with submissions to the Voter’s Pamphlet: “MEASURE 31 IS ENDORSED BY OREGON COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEYS: … COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY … Deschutes Michael T. Dugan. (This information furnished by Susan M. Marshall, Executive Director, Safe Neighborhoods).” “THE FOLLOWING STATE LEGISLATORS ENDORSE MEASURE 31: … Bev Clarno. (This information furnished by Kevin L. Mannix, Treasurer, Safe Neighborhoods).” Looks like district attorneys statewide have no problem with being political. Why is this a reason to attack Dugan? Marge Moore Bend

Vote for Hill I have had the privilege of first becoming acquainted with, then knowing Tom Hill in a professional capacity for the past 12 years. During that time, I have been a firsthand observer and watched his temperament, legal capabilities and ethics. I have never seen Hill lose his temper, ridicule or demean another person, be it client, colleague, opposing counsel or a judge. Rather, Hill has always taken the time to give a thoughtful opinion or argument on behalf of an issue, and when he does not know the answer, his reply is “Let me go check on that and I will get back to you.” And he does, usually within minutes. I have regularly referred family

members and friends to Hill, in all aspects of legal issues, knowing that he will do the best possible job. I have never gotten any feedback that wasn’t positive and happy. The most common compliment was “he really seemed to care about my problems.” Tom Hill has the brains, judicial temperament and legal ethics to make a great judge in Deschutes County, and I hope you join me in voting for him this election. Seana McMann Ash Bend

Vote for Baney Tammy Baney is the “real deal.” She is the kind of leader tough times demand. She is smart, diligent and creative. While firm in her convictions and clear in her values, Baney remains open-minded, willing to build bridges and create coalitions among unlikely partners. In recent years, I have come to Baney seeking support for the Bend 2030 Vision. I have worked alongside her developing the Deschutes County Recreation Assets agenda of priority projects. I have sought her counsel and endorsement for the Deschutes County Greenprint. Baney shares a vision for our region that is connected, ambitious and future-oriented. She is committed to the hard work required to take Central Oregon from its current state to a vibrant center of economic prosperity and environmental sustainability. Baney is optimistic. I like her spirit. Oh — did I share she is an awesome momma? Please join me in supporting the continued contributions of Tammy Baney as county commissioner. Ruth Williamson Bend

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Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Remembering a 1960 primary that changed the course of history BOSTON — ast Wednesday night, the John F. Kennedy Library marked the 50th anniversary of one of the most significant elections in American history — the West Virginia Democratic primary of May 10, 1960, between Kennedy and Hubert Humphrey. It was an evening for reminiscence — and maybe for exaggeration. Ted Sorensen, who was at Kennedy’s side throughout the campaign fight, argued that if Kennedy had lost to his Minnesota rival, as many had expected, he would have been denied the nomination, which was almost certainly the case. Then, Sorensen said, more speculatively, any of the other Democrats — Humphrey, Stuart Symington, Lyndon Johnson or Adlai Stevenson — would have lost to Richard Nixon. And Nixon would have responded more belligerently to the 1962 installation of Soviet missiles in Cuba — possibly provoking a nuclear war.

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You don’t have to believe all of that to agree that West Virginia was a turning point, like few other votes in the past century. As the library exhibit and the roundtable both emphasized, it was a crucial test for the “religious issue” in American life, measuring whether West Virginia, heavily Democratic but overwhelmingly Protestant, would support a Roman Catholic, Kennedy, for president. Initially, Sorensen recalled, Lou Harris’ pioneering polls for Kennedy showed him leading Humphrey almost 4-to-1 in West Virginia. That was because voters knew Kennedy as a media personality, but not his religion. After the Wisconsin primary, the month before, split along religious and geographic lines between eastern Catholic counties and western Protestant ones, they learned — and Humphrey suddenly led 3-to-2. For five weeks, Kennedy argued against the presumption that Al Smith’s defeat in 1928 as the first Catholic nomi-

DAVID B R ODER nee meant “that I was denied the right to be president on the day I was baptized.” But there was more to the primary than that. Franklin Roosevelt was a saint to the poverty-stricken Democrats and union families in the mining communities, and his widow, Eleanor, was openly hostile to Kennedy. To counter her influence, the Kennedy camp mailed 50,000 personally addressed letters, with a Hyde Park, N.Y., postmark and signed by FDR Jr., to impress West Virginia families. Later, as Charlie Peters, a native son who was the Charleston-area chairman for Kennedy and later founded The

Washington Monthly, confirmed to me in a postforum conversation, he refused requests from above that he tell voters Humphrey had avoided military service in World War II — so that dirty job was given to FDR’s son as well. As it happened, I heard FDR Jr. say this because I’d been sent to West Virginia as a new reporter at the now-defunct Washington Star. I remember Kennedy’s super-cool, almost coldblooded reaction when I asked him if he thought Humphrey’s war record was a legitimate campaign issue: “Frank Roosevelt is here making his speeches, and I’m making mine.” That campaign, my first, was a revelation. I stayed for a week in Beckley, W.Va., the local headquarters for the United Mine Workers of America and the home of Sen. Bob Byrd, who was backing Humphrey in order to slow down the momentum Kennedy had gained in Wisconsin and help his real choice, Johnson.

After watching the bustling activity in the local Kennedy headquarters and observing the almost suspicious lassitude in the Humphrey forces led by Sheriff Okey Mills, who confided that he would be absent himself on Election Day, I concluded — and wrote for the Star — that despite the apparent odds, Kennedy might well win Raleigh County and the primary. Last week, I reached Mills’ widow, Lettie, and what she recalled was not the Kennedys’ contributions to the “slate card” funds local Democratic organizations used to cue the voters but how impressed her husband had been when Kennedy and his kid brother, Ted, came campaigning in Beckley. She had it right. Kennedy carried Raleigh County easily on his way to an equally easy statewide victory. And history was made. David Broder is The Washington Post’s senior political writer.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 C5

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James “Howard” Tweed, of Bend, April 4, 1927 - May 13, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, www.bairdmortuaries.com 541-382-0903 Services: Memorial services at the Partners In Care Hospice Conference Room, located at 2075 NE Wyatt Ct. in Bend on Saturday, May 22nd, 2010, at 2:00pm. Contributions may be made to:

In lieu of flowers, financial donations to Partners In Care Hospice, www.partnersbend.org, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, 97701.

Michelle Lynn Smith~Bell, of Prineville Nov. 29,1969 - May 12, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home 541-447-6459 Services: Funeral services will be held at 2:00 pm, Wednesday, May 19, 2010, at Church of Jesus Christ of Latter -Day Saints, in Prineville. Burial will follow at Mill Creek Cemetery.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Morris Ben Evick November 7, 1933 - May 12, 2010 Morris passed away May 12, 2010. He was born on November 7, 1933 in Bend, OR. His parents, Ben and Vera Evick, were among the pioneer families who lived and settled in the Madras area. Morris was an only child. On November 27, 1955, he married Margaret Ann Raver and together they lived with their two daughters, Elizabeth Kent (Michael) and Rose Mary Clark (Bruce). They have five grandchildren and one great grandson. A grave side service was be held at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park Cemetery in Madras, OR, on May 17, at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please send donations in Morris' name to: Partners In Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701.

Mary Elizabeth Maithonis, resident of Prineville, died May 14, 2010, in Bend. Mary was born December 28, 1937, in Susanville, California. She moved to Prineville in 1992, from Northern California. Three years prior to moving to Prineville, she started Mary's Llamas in 1989. Mary was a great animal lover. Mary was married to Nick Maithonis in Vallejo, California, in November, 1962. Survivors include her husband, Nick; three daughters, Christine Maithonis, Susan Cellini, Cheryl Farris; son, Mark Maithonis; grandchildren, Nicholas Maithonis, Melissa and Corinna Cellini; and brother, Tom Roberts of Santa Rosa, California. At Mary's request, no services will be conducted. Deschutes Memorial Chapel has been entrusted with arrangements. Please visit www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to sign condolences.

Jerry Lester Hartley Aug. 1, 1937 - April 27, 2010 Jerry passed away peacefully at the Hospice House in Bend, OR, with his wife and children at his side on April 27, 2010, after a short battle with brain cancer. Jerry was born to Robert and Lydia (Goode) Hartley in Sedro Woolley, Washington on August 1, 1937. He Jerry Lester was the sixth Hartley of nine children born to his parents. He grew up in the Puget Sound area of Washington, graduating from Marysville High School in 1955. He attended Northwest Nazarene College in Nampa, Idaho where he met and married his wife, Kathryn in 1956. Following the birth of their three children, they moved to Salem, Oregon, where he lived and raised his family. He and his wife moved to Redmond, in August, 2001. Jerry was a sales representative for Prudential Insurance Company in Salem for 10 years. The last 10 years prior to his retirement he was the managing general agent for Regional Health Services in Salem, where he specialized in senior health insurance. He retired in 1994. Jerry was a life long member of the Church of the Nazarene; he was actively involved in the ministry of the First Church of God in Redmond at the time of his death. He traveled with his wife and assisted in her vocal ministry and the music ministry of the King's Envoys for many years. Jerry loved the outdoors and was an avid hunter and fisherman. He gave unselfishly to the needs of those around him and was a blessing to many. Jerry was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and two sisters. He is survived by his wife, Kathryn of Redmond; a son, Kenneth Hartley of Plano, Texas; two daughters, Karol Hartley of Salem, and Kristine Hartley of Bend, two grandchildren, one brother and three sisters. A celebration of life will be held at the First Church of God, 818 NW Elm Avenue, Redmond, OR, on Saturday, May 22, at 1:00 pm. Autumn Funerals of Redmond is in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations may be made in Jerry's memory to the College Scholarship Fund of the Redmond First Church of God.

the county health dept. While serving as bookkeeper for a local creamery Marjorie took night classes during COCC's earliest years. Later she enrolled full-time, and upon graduation in 1956, she received the Helen Leichester Award for her scholarship - having earned all A's. She transferred to Portland State College (now University), earned her degree in education in 1958, and then began her teaching career with the Portland school district. But after the deaths of both her parents (within five days of one another) Marjorie returned to Bend to accept a teaching position here. For the next 22 years she taught third and fifth grade classes at Allen, Kenwood and Pilot Butte Elementary, and she resumed residency of her childhood home upstairs on Wall St. Nearly every summer Marjorie traveled, bringing back souvenir dolls from many parts of the world. But she was active locally as well, holding leadership offices in the Order of Eastern Star and Amaranth sororial societies. The Deschutes Pioneers' Association named Marjorie their queen for 1989. About five years ago, Marjorie's health required that she leave her upstairs home. But even though her mobility slowed, she still read The Bulletin everyday (claiming she took an active interest in the business affairs of her Wall St. Property. She handled her one hundred years with aplomb and lived a life full of activity and meaning. In passing, she has left her estate to the Deschutes County Historical Society and the Central Oregon Community College Foundation, to create a scholarship endowment. Memorial contributions may be made to either organization. A memorial service will be held today, Tuesday, May 18, 2010, at 1:00 pm, at Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 NW Wall St., Bend. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home was honored to serve the family. 541-382-2471. Please visit and sign the online guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Ronnie James Dio, 67, Black Sabbath vocalist By Ben Sisario New York Times News Service

Ronnie James Dio, a singer with the heavy-metal bands Rainbow, Black Sabbath and Dio, whose powerful, semioperatic vocal style and attachment to demonic imagery made him a mainstay of the genre, died on Sunday in Los Angeles. He was 67. His death was announced by his wife, Wendy, on his website, www.ronniejamesdio.com. No cause was given, but in recent months Dio had spoken about suffering from stomach cancer, and his band, Heaven and Hell, canceled its summer tour because of his health. A heavy-metal purist, Dio was known as much for his vo-

Sisters Continued from C1 For now, Sisters’ most dramatic move will be eliminating cost-of-living raises for next year. At least symbolically, that was an important move, according to Mayor Lon Kellstrom. “It was basically an acknowledgment — partly political — to say, ‘Hey, we’re doing what we can,’” Kellstrom said. “We’re not in the soup yet, but that doesn’t mean we couldn’t be.” The city should find out soon whether it will be able to implement the 3-cent gas tax, which the council approved in September. The tax was referred to election by petition, and in March voters approved it. The city was sued shortly after the election, and opponents argued that the city missed a state-imposed deadline

cal prowess as for his Mephistophelean stage persona. He sang about devils, defiance and the glory of rock ’n’ roll with a strong, mean voice that rose to a bombastic vibrato, and he is credited with popularizing the “devil horn” hand gesture — index and pinky fingers up, everything else clenched in a fist. When Ozzy Osbourne was fired from Black Sabbath in 1979, Dio replaced him, staying until 1982. By then he had his own group, Dio. Its first album, “Holy Diver,” was released in 1983. Dio briefly rejoined Black Sabbath in the early 1990s, and in 2006 he began playing again with members of that band, naming the group Heaven and Hell.

to create the tax by September. Sisters might have to rewrite its budget if it loses the legal fight, according to City Manager Eileen Stein. “If our argument does not prevail, we probably have to go back and make some difficult budget decisions,” Stein said. Falling property tax revenues and a lack of development have also squeezed the city budget, according to Stein. As she has said in the past, the city has been spared some of the pressure on other cities because it does not fund its own police department. Funding a Sisters police department would cost more than $1 million a year. Instead, Sisters spends about $432,000 on a contract with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. Without the annual cost of funding public safety, Sisters has managed to save money and maintain reserves,

Cooperative Management and Protection Area

MALHEUR N ATION A L WILDLIFE REFUGE

Echanis Wind Project West Ridge Wind Project

Frenchglen 205

So uth

Nor th

Lo op Rd.

Loo pR d

r ve Ri en Blitz

May 16, 1917 - May 13, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-3820903 bairdmortuaries.com Services: Burial in Porterville, CA.

A true Bend pioneer, born just four and a half years after the town was incorporated in 1905, died on May 7, 2010. Marjorie B. Smith would proudly tell you she had been the first baby born in Bend's first hospital. The date was Sept. 14, 1909. Marjorie B. The "hospiSmith tal" was a modest two-room frame building on Oregon Ave., located about where Bend's downtown post office now stands, which also served as offices for Dr. Urling C. Coe. On that day he delivered "a fine 12-pound girl," the Bend Bulletin reported. Marjorie's parents were Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Smith, proprietors of the N.P. Smith Pioneer Hardware. Their two-story business structure had just been completed three months before Marjorie's birth, with the family's living quarters on the second floor. The building still stands - now the only remaining frame building on Wall St. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Marjorie was an eye-witness to Bend's history. She remembered the dusty streets, churned up by horse-and-buggy traffic, and the wooden sidewalks, and she also remembered helping her father, along with her two older brothers, in his hardware store. It was Bend's first - and carried a little of everything from horse whips to wood stoves to hammers and nails. With the coming of the automobile Nicholas saw another opportunity, and began selling gasoline, too - in five-gallon tins, freighted in wagons from the rail terminal at Shaniko, as was every other commodity. Later he installed a hand-cranked pump at the curb - quite possibly Bend's first "gas station." After her graduation from high school in 1929, Marjorie did filing and typing first for the county clerk, then for three years as secretary for

.

Elsie Lillian Billings, of Bend

Dec. 28, 1937 - May 14, 2010

Oregon Natural Desert Association and others have submitted a petition to the Oregon Department of Energy that would add Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area to the list of areas where the state is prohibited from permitting wind farms and other energy developments.

und ner Don

June 5, 1948 - May 14, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home 541-447-6459 Services: Graveside services will be held on Friday, May 21, 2010, at 12:30 pm, at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, OR.

Proposed wind power facilities near Steens

September 14, 1909 - May 7, 2010

STEENS MOUN TAIN WILDERNESS AREA

East Ridge Wind Project Steens Mountain STEENS MOUN TAIN WILDERNESS AREA

Denio Rd .

Dennis Andrew Perkins, of Prineville

Marjorie B. Smith

Fields-

D

N  

Mary Elizabeth Maithonis

MILES 0

10

OREGON

Alvord Lake 292

Bend AREA OF DETAIL

Sources: Bureau of Land Management, Columbia Energy Partners, Oregon Natural Desert Association Eric Baker / The Bulletin

Steens Continued from C1 The Bend-based Oregon Natural Desert Association, along with the Audubon Society of Portland and Defenders of Wildlife, have submitted a petition to Oregon’s Energy Facility Siting Council, asking the council to add the 428,000-acre Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area to the list of state protected areas. But a wind farm developer in the area said adding the Cooperative Management and Protection area to the state’s list would interfere with private property rights. The list currently includes national parks like Crater Lake, national monuments including Newberry National Volcanic Monument, national and state wildlife refuges, state parks, scenic waterways and more. There, the state can’t approve the construction of power plants, said Diana Enright, spokeswoman for the Department of Energy, although in some cases transmission lines or pipelines are allowed. The state is currently taking comments on the petition until May 28, and will hold a public hearing on the issue at its next meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 11 in Burns. Industrial wind farms should be banned from the Steens Cooperative Management and Protection Area, Nysson said, because the Steens Act states that development on both public and private lands within the area is not consistent with the act’s intent. “It explicitly includes private lands within the Cooperative Management and Protection Area,” Nysson said. And large-scale wind farms leave a footprint on the environment, she said, that could damage wildlife habitat and impact migrating birds. “This area has some of the best natural resources in the state, it has wonderful wildlife habitat,” Nysson said. “The special designation that was afford-

Stein said. The city has four reserve funds, which will total more than $1.3 million next year, according to the budget. Both the rainy day fund, which can be used across the city’s operations, and a police services account each have $500,000. Sisters also expects to have $80,000 in a vehicle reserve fund and about $250,000 in the buildings fund to pay for capital improvements. “Our city has been blessed with a healthy reserve that has been able to cushion the downturn in the economy,” Stein said. Not only does Sisters expect to avoid cuts, but the city has managed to carry several hundred thousand dollars into the next fiscal year. Stein expects the city to have about $477,000 left over at the end of the current fiscal year, with $71,000 covering the projected deficit.

ed this area by Congress shows the value that has already been placed on it ... and the intent to keep this place protected.” Columbia Energy Partners has proposed three projects for the area around Steens Mountain, said Chris Crowley, president of the company. One proposed wind farm — the Echanis Wind Project — would be on private land outside of the Cooperative Management and Protection Area, and has been approved by Harney County. The Bureau of Land Management is currently developing an environmental study to look at the impacts of a proposed power line across BLM land, but it’s unclear what impact the petition would have on the project. Columbia Energy had also submitted applications to Harney County for two other wind farms — the West Ridge and the East Ridge wind projects — which are inside the Cooperative Management and Protection Area. The company withdrew the applications to Harney County in response to the Oregon Natural Desert Association’s requests, Crowley said. Instead, it planned to have the projects approved by Oregon’s Energy Facility Siting Council instead of the county — but if the petition is approved, that would not be allowed. “For two years, they’ve been telling us to go to (the Energy Facility Siting Council), now they’re saying to (the council) ‘Put these properties out of bounds, before they even apply,’” Crowley said. “We’re not too happy about that.” He said the company believes that adding the Steens area to the state’s protected area list would interfere with the rights of private property owners to lease out land to wind farms. “It’s our strongly held view that the Steens Act protects private property rights,” Crowley said. “That was part of the compromise.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Of the remainder, the city will set aside $350,000 as a general fund contingency, in case of any unexpected costs. That’s about $80,000 more than the city originally projected. “(Council) want to leave enough in there in case we don’t hit property tax revenues,” Finance Director Lisa Young said. With the remaining money, the council made several moves, including creating a part-time economic development position and expanding IT services. Kellstrom said he was relieved that Sisters has likely dodged cuts for another year. “We’re in good shape for ’10 and ’11, considering the economy and everything else,” Kellstrom said. “I’m pleasantly surprised.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 18 Today: Isolated morning showers, mostly cloudy afternoon.

HIGH Ben Burkel

60

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western



 Warm Springs

Marion Forks

61/43

56/33

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

63/38

61/41

60/36

Oakridge Elk Lake 48/24

58/33

57/32

55/31

Hampton 55/33

Fort Rock

Vancouver 57/48

61/50

59/34

51/26

Missoula 74/49

Helena Bend

77/46

Boise

60/36

62/43

 Idaho Falls



Elko

70/52

64/39

57/35

60/35

Silver Lake

55/30



Redding Christmas Valley

Chemult



Seattle

Reno



58/37

63/43

Isolated showers possible San Francisco 60/49 today. Mostly cloudy tonight. 

Crater Lake 48/34

Salt Lake City 62/48

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:36 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:28 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:35 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:29 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:59 a.m. Moonset today . . . 12:21 a.m.

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

LOW

Full

Last

May 20 May 27 June 4

New

June 12

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 59/48/0.00 . . . . . 58/49/sh. . . . . . 58/46/sh Baker City . . . . . . 75/51/0.00 . . . . . . 57/39/c. . . . . . 66/40/sh Brookings . . . . . . 56/46/0.00 . . . . . . 56/50/c. . . . . . 55/46/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 69/49/0.05 . . . . . 60/37/sh. . . . . . 64/40/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 70/50/0.11 . . . . . 62/47/sh. . . . . . 63/43/sh Klamath Falls . . . 58/47/0.00 . . . . . . 57/39/c. . . . . . 59/37/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 57/43/0.06 . . . . . . 56/39/c. . . . . . 62/39/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 67/46/0.00 . . . . . . 57/32/c. . . . . . 59/34/sh Medford . . . . . . . 67/51/0.00 . . . . . . 65/50/c. . . . . . 66/45/sh Newport . . . . . . . 57/48/0.00 . . . . . 58/48/sh. . . . . . 58/46/sh North Bend . . . . . . 61/48/NA . . . . . 56/52/sh. . . . . . 55/47/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 79/58/0.00 . . . . . 65/46/sh. . . . . . 75/50/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 80/53/0.00 . . . . . . 68/46/c. . . . . . 71/46/sh Portland . . . . . . . 75/55/0.04 . . . . . 63/49/sh. . . . . . . 63/47/r Prineville . . . . . . . 69/51/0.00 . . . . . . 59/37/c. . . . . . 65/40/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 70/48/0.02 . . . . . . 63/38/c. . . . . . 63/37/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 66/52/0.22 . . . . . . 63/51/c. . . . . . 62/45/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 72/52/0.15 . . . . . 63/48/sh. . . . . . 63/46/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 69/48/0.06 . . . . . . 57/35/c. . . . . . 60/39/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 81/59/0.00 . . . . . . 66/47/c. . . . . . 67/47/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68/48 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.02” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .86 in 2009 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.05” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 in 1971 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.48” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.64” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.99” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.69 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.69 in 1996 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:50 a.m. . . . . . .6:14 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:23 a.m. . . . . .11:06 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:42 a.m. . . . . . .2:00 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:14 a.m. . . . . . .3:02 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:57 p.m. . . . . . .3:29 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:17 a.m. . . . . . .3:16 p.m.

1

LOW

55 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cool. HIGH

53 29

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases First

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, chilly.

55 31

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 82/53

Eugene Isolated showers possible 62/47 today. Mostly cloudy Grants Pass tonight. 63/47 Eastern

59/34

57/32

Crescent

Crescent Lake

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

63/49

Burns

LOW

67 34

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

36

NORTHWEST

58/33

La Pine

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 82° Hermiston • 43° Lakeview

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, cool.

Showers will fall along the Pacific Northwest coast today.

Paulina

58/34

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy, pm showers.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, cooler.

Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today. Isolated showers tonight. Central

62/42

Camp Sherman 54/33 Redmond Prineville 60/36 Cascadia 59/37 59/37 Sisters 57/35 Bend Post  57/35

63/43

62/41

68/44

50/33

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

WEDNESDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . . 92-140 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 57/48

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 63/49

• 3.80” Homosassa, Fla.

Honolulu 86/73

Saskatoon 83/56

Billings 82/51

Boise 62/43

S Winnipeg 78/53

San Francisco 60/49

Juneau 60/44

Mazatlan 88/62

S

Thunder Bay 72/41

St. Paul 76/53

Kansas City 72/54 Oklahoma City 72/60 Dallas 86/68

Houston 89/71

Chihuahua 92/58 La Paz 92/60

S

Green Bay 71/47 Detroit Chicago 63/51 Des Moines 65/49 Cheyenne 73/51 61/45 Columbus Omaha 62/50 75/51

Denver 64/47 Las Vegas Albuquerque Los Angeles 79/60 79/51 64/56 Phoenix 88/65 Tijuana 66/53

Anchorage 60/44

S

Bismarck 76/51 Rapid City 73/49

Salt Lake City 62/48

Goodyear, Ariz. Leadville, Colo.

Calgary 82/53

S

Seattle 61/50

• 99° • 24°

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 72/42 Halifax 64/41 Portland To ronto 63/47 58/46 Boston Buffalo 65/50 63/49 New York Philadelphia 59/51 59/51 Washington, D. C. 60/52

Louisville 63/51 Charlotte Nashville 74/55 69/52 Little Rock Atlanta 79/58 81/58 Birmingham 80/55 St. Louis 72/53

New Orleans 88/70

Orlando 89/69 Miami 88/74

Monterrey 94/73

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .83/61/0.16 . 86/67/pc . . 91/65/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.44 . .57/47/sh . . 67/47/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .74/40/0.00 . 73/49/pc . . 68/49/sh Albuquerque. . . .84/57/0.00 . 79/51/pc . . 75/50/pc Anchorage . . . . .55/34/0.00 . . .60/44/c . . 54/40/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .84/68/0.01 . 81/58/pc . . 79/59/pc Atlantic City . . . .67/48/0.03 . . .59/52/r . . . 63/55/c Austin . . . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . 88/70/pc . . 91/70/pc Baltimore . . . . . .63/55/0.13 . .59/50/sh . . . 67/53/c Billings. . . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . 82/51/pc . . . .76/48/t Birmingham . . . .82/66/0.00 . 80/55/pc . . . 81/60/c Bismarck . . . . . . .76/44/0.00 . . .76/51/s . . 78/51/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . .62/43/sh . . 73/48/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .73/56/0.00 . . .65/50/c . . 56/51/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .73/48/0.00 . . .56/51/r . . 63/51/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .69/45/0.00 . .63/49/sh . . 69/54/sh Burlington, VT. . .74/37/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . 71/49/sh Caribou, ME . . . .69/38/0.00 . 76/45/pc . . . 72/43/c Charleston, SC . .84/70/0.43 . 89/64/pc . . 87/63/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .78/65/0.47 . . .74/55/t . . 74/57/pc Chattanooga. . . .82/66/0.00 . 77/54/pc . . 79/58/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .68/42/0.00 . . .61/45/t . . . .56/43/t Chicago. . . . . . . .58/50/0.01 . . .65/49/c . . . 66/50/s Cincinnati . . . . . .63/57/0.05 . .61/49/sh . . . 64/51/c Cleveland . . . . . .61/55/0.18 . .57/48/sh . . . 67/50/c Colorado Springs 69/40/0.00 . . .61/43/t . . . .58/42/t Columbia, MO . .61/54/0.04 . 71/50/pc . . 70/54/pc Columbia, SC . . .81/69/0.76 . 86/60/pc . . 84/61/pc Columbus, GA. . .84/68/0.31 . 86/61/pc . . 84/61/pc Columbus, OH. . .61/55/0.15 . .62/50/sh . . 67/52/pc Concord, NH . . . .78/34/0.00 . 70/47/pc . . 59/45/sh Corpus Christi. . .90/73/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 89/75/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .90/67/0.00 . 86/68/pc . . 88/72/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .58/53/0.38 . .60/48/sh . . 65/52/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .74/43/0.00 . . .64/47/t . . . .60/45/t Des Moines. . . . .72/54/0.05 . 73/51/pc . . . 74/50/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .67/49/0.08 . .63/51/sh . . . 75/53/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . 72/46/pc . . . 75/48/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .93/57/0.00 . . .91/62/s . . . 86/59/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/38/0.00 . 73/43/pc . . . 65/45/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .78/53/0.00 . 76/51/pc . . . 79/51/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .67/32/0.00 . 61/32/pc . . . 66/36/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .67/48/0.00 . . .68/48/c . . 74/48/pc Green Bay. . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 71/47/pc . . . 78/50/s Greensboro. . . . .66/56/0.34 . . .71/54/t . . 72/57/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .62/53/0.07 . . .57/49/r . . 67/51/pc Hartford, CT . . . .78/42/0.00 . .66/51/sh . . 61/49/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .82/44/0.00 . . .77/46/c . . . .68/41/t Honolulu . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . 86/73/pc . . 85/74/pc Houston . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . 89/71/pc . . 90/73/pc Huntsville . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 75/54/pc . . . 78/55/c Indianapolis . . . .58/52/0.50 . .62/49/sh . . . 67/51/c Jackson, MS . . . .86/63/0.00 . 84/61/pc . . . 88/66/c Madison, WI . . . .68/47/0.00 . 71/45/pc . . . 76/46/s Jacksonville. . . . .83/72/0.28 . . .88/66/t . . 89/65/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .64/34/0.00 . .60/44/sh . . 61/45/sh Kansas City. . . . .68/54/0.02 . 72/54/pc . . . .70/54/t Lansing . . . . . . . .67/45/0.00 . . .65/48/c . . 75/48/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .82/71/0.00 . 79/60/pc . . . 87/66/s Lexington . . . . . .69/57/0.02 . .61/48/sh . . 65/51/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .67/52/0.01 . . .76/53/s . . 71/51/pc Little Rock. . . . . .83/59/0.00 . 79/58/pc . . . 79/61/c Los Angeles. . . . .61/55/0.01 . 64/56/pc . . . 66/57/s Louisville . . . . . . .72/60/0.08 . .63/51/sh . . 68/54/pc Memphis. . . . . . .78/63/0.00 . 76/57/pc . . . 78/62/c Miami . . . . . . . . .87/72/2.48 . . .88/74/t . . . .88/75/t Milwaukee . . . . .57/49/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . . 68/49/s Minneapolis . . . .76/53/0.00 . 76/53/pc . . . 79/54/s Nashville . . . . . . .79/61/0.28 . 69/52/pc . . 73/56/pc New Orleans. . . .90/66/0.00 . 88/70/pc . . 89/70/pc New York . . . . . .74/55/0.00 . . .59/51/r . . 66/55/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .75/53/0.00 . . .59/51/r . . 68/53/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .64/55/0.76 . . .70/56/t . . . 69/58/c Oklahoma City . .75/56/0.00 . 72/60/pc . . . .76/62/t Omaha . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .75/51/s . . 71/52/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .86/70/1.02 . . .89/69/t . . 92/69/pc Palm Springs. . . .84/68/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . . 94/71/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .59/50/1.08 . . .68/50/c . . 73/51/pc Philadelphia . . . .71/57/0.00 . . .59/51/r . . . 67/54/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .97/69/0.00 . . .88/65/s . . . 91/68/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .60/53/1.24 . . .59/49/r . . 66/47/sh Portland, ME. . . .69/41/0.00 . . .63/47/s . . 56/49/sh Providence . . . . .76/49/0.00 . .65/51/sh . . 59/49/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .77/59/2.05 . . .73/55/t . . 72/57/pc

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .72/37/0.00 . 73/49/pc . . 62/45/sh Savannah . . . . . .89/69/0.25 . 89/65/pc . . 88/63/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .63/43/c . . . 72/45/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .69/53/0.01 . .61/50/sh . . . .63/46/r Richmond . . . . . .62/54/0.62 . .68/54/sh . . . 71/55/c Sioux Falls. . . . . .73/40/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 75/49/s Rochester, NY . . .70/42/0.00 . .65/48/sh . . 71/54/sh Spokane . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .64/46/sh . . 69/44/pc Sacramento. . . . .67/52/0.00 . . .73/50/c . . 74/53/sh Springfield, MO. .67/58/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . . .67/54/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .62/55/0.03 . 72/53/pc . . 72/54/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .85/72/0.35 . . .87/73/t . . 89/72/pc Salt Lake City . . .82/55/0.00 . . .62/48/t . . 65/52/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .96/62/0.00 . . .87/58/s . . . 88/59/s San Antonio . . . .88/68/0.00 . 89/72/pc . . 92/72/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 75/58/pc . . . .73/61/t San Diego . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . 65/59/pc . . . 67/59/s Washington, DC .64/55/0.24 . .60/52/sh . . . 68/55/c San Francisco . . .59/52/0.03 . 60/49/pc . . 62/50/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .68/56/0.03 . 70/55/pc . . . .66/57/t San Jose . . . . . . .64/53/0.00 . 67/48/pc . . . 68/50/c Yakima . . . . . . . .76/57/0.02 . . .68/41/c . . 71/44/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .83/43/0.00 . 72/40/pc . . 68/41/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .92/65/0.00 . . .87/62/s . . . 92/66/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .61/45/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . . 64/45/c Athens. . . . . . . . .75/62/0.00 . 71/55/pc . . 71/56/pc Auckland. . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . . .64/53/t . . 64/50/pc Baghdad . . . . . .105/80/0.00 . 99/76/pc . . 98/78/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/1.32 . . .96/79/t . . . .95/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . 74/58/pc . . . 84/61/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .79/65/s . . . 76/61/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . .56/42/sh . . 61/47/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .69/54/t . . 68/54/sh Budapest. . . . . . .50/46/0.56 . .58/49/sh . . 57/47/sh Buenos Aires. . . .59/37/0.00 . .62/47/sh . . 68/47/pc Cabo San Lucas .97/72/0.00 . . .89/68/s . . . 88/68/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .87/61/s . . . 86/61/s Calgary . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . .82/53/sh . . 78/53/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .87/76/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . .58/47/sh . . . 65/49/c Edinburgh . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . . .57/44/c . . 63/46/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . 63/43/pc . . . 59/44/c Harare . . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . 72/52/pc Hong Kong . . . . .86/77/0.00 . 90/74/pc . . 90/73/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . .64/55/sh . . . 64/51/c Jerusalem . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . 74/51/s Johannesburg . . .68/43/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 71/50/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 79/67/pc . . 78/65/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .74/54/s . . . 82/57/s London . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . 62/42/pc . . 64/46/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . 79/55/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . 98/81/pc . . 98/82/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . .117/82/0.00 . .109/84/s . . 108/82/s Mexico City. . . . .73/54/2.05 . 78/59/pc . . 83/60/pc Montreal. . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . . .70/44/s . . 74/46/pc Moscow . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . . .76/58/t . . 74/53/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/63/0.00 . . .78/60/t . . . .77/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .86/76/c . . . 86/77/c New Delhi. . . . .114/89/0.00 . .108/82/s . . 109/83/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 76/54/pc . . 77/63/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . . .64/49/c . . . 64/48/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . . .71/45/s . . 73/46/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . 63/42/pc . . 63/41/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .81/68/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . . .87/68/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . 63/54/sh Santiago . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . . .69/39/s . . . 71/40/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . .75/61/sh . . 73/56/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .73/73/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . . 70/53/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .71/58/r . . . 75/56/s Shanghai. . . . . . .77/66/0.23 . . .82/69/t . . 84/66/sh Singapore . . . . . .90/73/3.60 . . .93/77/t . . . .91/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .72/39/0.00 . . .66/50/c . . . 68/51/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .63/55/sh . . 63/54/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .89/73/sh . . 90/74/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .79/63/s . . . 75/62/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . 69/58/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .70/46/0.00 . .58/46/sh . . 70/42/pc Vancouver. . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .57/48/sh . . . .56/47/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .57/46/0.26 . .60/45/sh . . 58/47/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .54/48/0.92 . .59/48/sh . . 66/51/sh


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Auto Racing Inside Driver Danica Patrick leads a large group of women looking to qualify for the 2010 Indy 500, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

P R E P G O L F : S TAT E TO U R N A M E N T

Storm girls, Panther boys in contention Two-stroke lead puts Summit girls in position to repeat as state champions Bulletin staff report

New York Yankees’ Marcus Thames runs home on his walkoff home run off Boston Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon that gave the Yankees an 11-9 win Monday.

BANKS — For the fourth time in five years, Summit High is in position to win a girls state golf championship. The reigning champion Storm enter the second and final day of the 2010 Class 5A state girls tournament with a two-stroke lead over runnerup Crescent Valley, 335-337. Kristen Parr ended the first day with a 5-over-par 77 to lead the Storm, while Madi Mansberger added an 80, Stacey Patterson carded

an 87, and Marlee Barton recorded a 91. “We’re right where we thought we’d be,” said Summit coach Jerry Hackenbruck after Monday’s 18-hole round at Quail Valley Golf Course. “If we play well (today), we should hold on for the championship.” Parr, a sophomore, and Mansberger, a freshman — the only two underclassmen on the Storm’s state tournament roster — carried Summit on Monday. See Girls / D5

Led by Landon Moore’s 71, Redmond sits in second place at boys Class 6A tournament Bulletin staff report CORVALLIS — It takes more than a little rain to phase the Panthers. Redmond Highs’ Landon Moore, no stranger to playing golf in less than ideal conditions, posted Monday’s best score at the Class 6A boys state golf tournament and helped boost the Panthers into second place after the opening round at Trysting Tree Golf Club. Moore’s 1-under-par 71 led Redmond, which carded a 298 after the first day of state tournament action. Andy Rodby, in a five-way tie for fourth,

finished with a one-over 73 while Panthers teammate Jared Lambert is locked in a seven-way tie for ninth after recording a 74. “About four holes in the wind picked up and it started to rain,” said Redmond coach Ron Buerger. “I just told the boys, ‘Hey, this is Panthers weather.’ ” The back nine proved to be trickier than the front, as both Colton Henshaw and Mason Rodby saw their scores take a small dive after shooting 1-over and 2over par, respectively, on the front nine. See Boys / D5

INSIDE MLB Phillies......... 12 Pirates ...........2

Royals ............4 Orioles ...........3

Mets...............3 Braves............2

Twins .............8 Blue Jays .......3

Reds...............6 Brewers..........3

Rays ...............4 Indians ...........3

D’backs ..........5 Marlins ..........1

Rangers .........4 Angels ...........3

Cardinals .......6 Nationals .......2

Yankees ....... 11 Red Sox .........9

Cubs ..............4 Rockies ..........2

Athletics.........8 Mariners ........4

Padres ...........3 Giants ............1

White Sox ........ Tigers .......ppd.

HEATHER CLARK

Cyclists gear up for road nationals in June

Dodgers .........6 Astros ............2

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Yankees out duel Red Sox for 11-9 win Two late home runs lead New York to victory over rival Boston, see Page D4 Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

NBA Suns snuffed out by Lakers in Game 1 Kobe Bryant scores 40 points as L.A. takes a 128-107 victory over Phoenix, see Page D3

Ben Abbott, 18 and a member of the Bend Blues, a Central Oregon boys high school rugby team, catches and runs with the ball during a touch rugby game at practice last Tuesday in Bend. The Blues are 9-0 in league and seeded No. 1 going into the Rugby Oregon Division II State Championship.

Bend Blues winning with flying colors C.O. boys rugby team is ranked No. 1 going into state championships By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Not bad, for a bunch of rookies. The Bend Blues, a local high school boys rugby team made up mostly of relative novices, have an undefeated record and a No. 1 state ranking in their division, and will play for a state championship in their second year. This past Saturday in Portland, they won a Rugby

Oregon Division II semifinal playoff game 42-0 over North Clackamas. “Our team has tackled really well this year,” says K.C. Greenleaf, head coach of the Blues. “That’s one of the major reasons why we have been getting all these shutouts. We only had one tackling practice … and really good defense all year. And we only had one run against us of more than 20 yards all year.” See Blues / D5

COMMUNITY SPORTS

oad nationals are just over a month away, but riders interested in participating in the criterium, road race and/or time trial national championships can avoid steep late fees by registering in the next two weeks. The 2010 USA Cycling Elite, U23 & Junior Road National Championships, along with the U.S. Paracycling Road National Championships, return to Central Oregon June 22-27 for seven days of national championship racing in three road disciplines: criterium, time trial and road race. Registration for the races, all of which will be staged in Bend, is available online at www. usacycling.org. Entry fees increase by $25 per event for elite and U23 riders and by $10 per event for junior riders after June 1. Though on-site registration will be available in Bend from June 21 to June 26, entry fees by then are expected to be double what riders pay between now and June 1. Junior categories are largely open to any rider age 18 and under, and opportunities are available for the rest of us to test our speed and strength against the country’s best in the individual race against the clock. While only proven category riders may enter the elite men’s and women’s criterium and road championships, the time trial championships in all divisions — junior, U23 and elites — are open to all cyclists regardless of their racing experience or background. See Nationals / D5

OREGON HIGH SCHOOL EQUESTRIAN

Los Angeles Lakers forward Pau Gasol, right, shoots over Phoenix Suns center Channing Frye during the first half in Game 1 of the NBA basketball Western Conference finals in Los Angeles, Monday.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Auto racing ................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D3 NBA ...........................................D3 Major League Baseball ............. D4 Community Sports ................... D6

Championship run for local riders enzie Legg, Taryn Gates, Brittney Bounds and CENTRAL POINT — With Central Oregon Inside Lindsey Soliz placed first in the working 4’s drill riders landing a number of medals, the Central event, and the Redmond team of Brandice Durfee, • OHSET state District successfully defended its championMegen Hopper, Jordan Payne, Danielle Pilon, meet results Nautique Simpson, Jessica Dillon and Hennessey ship over the weekend at the 2010 Oregon High in Prep School Equestrian Teams state meet. Sloter placed first in the short program drill. Scoreboard, The four-day competition, showcasing contesSilver medalists included Mountain View’s Page D3 tants from OHSET’s eight districts, concluded MacWhorter, who placed second in the in hand Sunday at the Jackson County Fairgrounds and trail, stock seat equitation and hunt seat equiExpo Park. tation events. Also winning silver among CenMountain View junior Courtney Thomas claimed several tral Oregon riders were Bobbie Jo Rasauer of Sisters, in high honors at the state meet, including a gold medal for dressage; Karlee Markham of Mountain View, in barplacing first in the poles competition. Thomas received high- rels; Ciara Timm of Bend High, in poles; Abby Beamer point awards in both individual event versatility and overall of Madras, in figure 8; and the Mountain View team of versatility, and she also was overall timed champion. Thomas, Hood, Kyia Sell, Morgan Crabtree and Krystal In addition, Thomas joined Maddie Hood and Laurie Brix in working 4’s drill. MacWhorter on a Mountain View team that captured Another Madras rider, Kayla Vincent, won a bronze first place in the team penning competition. medal in showmanship. Among gold medalists from Central Oregon were two Winner of the $500 state OHSET scholarship for the drill teams: The Sisters team of MacKenzie Gellings, McK- Central District was La Pine High senior Chrystal Bates.

Bulletin staff report

Kristen Russell / Submitted photo

Golden performance: Courtney Thomas, a junior from Mountain View High, rides to a gold medal in the poles competition at the Oregon High School Equestrian Teams state championship meet, which concluded Sunday in Central Point.


D2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

CYCLING

Today Boys golf: Class 6A and 5A state championships at Trysting Tree in Corvallis, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at Emerald Valley in Creswell, 12:15 p.m. Girls golf: Class 5A state championships at Quail Valley in Banks, 7:30 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond, 8 a.m. Baseball: Bend High at Madison, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Grants Pass, 4 p.m.

2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 3, VS. network.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL conference finals, Montreal Canadiens at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL conference finals, Chicago Blackhawks at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, ESPN.

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics, FSNW.

WEDNESDAY CYCLING 2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 4, VS. network.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Tampa Bay Rays at New York Yankees, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Phoenix Suns at Los Angeles Lakers, TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 5:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, KICE-AM 940.

Friday Baseball: Class 6A state playoffs, first round: Redmond at Lincoln, TBA; Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Liberty at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A state playoffs, first round: Sisters at Cascade, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Class 6A state playoffs, first round: Wilson at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Class 5A state playoffs, first round: Crescent Valley at Madras, TBA Track: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championships in Salem, 4 p.m.; Intermountain Conference championships at Bend High, 3 p.m.; Class 2A, 1A state championships at Western Oregon in Monmouth, 11 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Portland Tennis Center, 8 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m. Boys tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 8 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m.

6 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference finals, Phoenix Suns at Los Angeles Lakers, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

TENNIS WTA

BASEBALL 2 p.m. — College, Seattle at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL

S   B Baseball • Oregon’s Rodriguez wins Pac-10 honor: Oregon catcher Eddie Rodriguez has been named the Pac-10 baseball Player of the Week. The senior batted .667 with two home runs as he helped the 22nd-ranked Ducks to a win over San Diego and a weekend sweep of East Tennessee State. Rodriguez capped off his big week by hitting for the cycle in Oregon’s 17-7 win on Sunday. Rodriguez is batting .370 this season and has a team-high six home runs. • Cubs GM says Piniella’s job is safe: Despite the Chicago Cubs’ disappointing start, GM Jim Hendry says he’s “never given any thought” about replacing manager Lou Piniella. Chicago reporters asked Hendry about Piniella’s job status because some national media have begun speculating that the manager could be in trouble if the Cubs don’t improve markedly.

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— POLSAT WARSAW OPEN Monday Warsaw, Poland Singles First Round Alona Bondarenko (6), Ukraine, def. Roberta Vinci, Italy, 6-3, 6-1. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def. Kateryna Bondarenko (7), Ukraine, 6-3, 6-1. Marta Domachowska, Poland, vs. Katarzyna Piter, Poland, 6-7 (3), 6-4, susp., rain. INTERNATIONAUX DE STRASBOURG Monday Strasbourg, France Singles First Round Maria Sharapova (1), Russia, def. Regina Kulikova, Russia, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 2-6, 6-3, 7-5. Alize Cornet, France, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 6-3, 6-3. Vania King, United States, def. Elena Vesnina (2), Russia, 6-4, 6-1.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS

Auto racing • Rain keeps drivers off Indy track: Rain has washed out the third day of practice for the Indianapolis 500. The official announcement came 2½ hours after cars were supposed to take the track and 3½ hours before practice was scheduled to end. None of the 38 cars turned a lap. The weather is causing scheduling problems for teams, which already are dealing with a condensed schedule. If there is more rain today, as expected, drivers would have three more full days of practice before qualifying starts Saturday.

Cycling • Goss wins 9th stage of Giro d’Italia: Matthew Goss, of Australia, won the ninth stage of the Giro d’Italia in a sprint finish Monday while Alexandre Vinokourov, of Kazakhstan, kept the overall lead. Goss, who rides for the HTC-Columbia team, covered the mostly flat 116-mile leg from Frosinone to Cava De’ Tirreni in 4 hours, 8 minutes, 17 seconds. This was the first victory of the season for Goss, who usually sets up sprints for teammates Mark Cavendish and Andre Greipel. Filippo Pozzato, of Italy, was second and Tyler Farrar, of the United States, was third. Farrar, who won the second stage, took over the points jersey usually reserved for the race’s top sprinter. Vinokourov maintained a 72-second lead over Cadel Evans of Australia in the overall standings. • Lancaster grabs lead in Tour of California: Brett Lancaster, of Australia, surged ahead of a group of 26 riders in the waning meters and claimed the rain-soaked second stage and the overall race lead Monday in the Tour of California. Lancaster (Cervelo) who began the day 10 seconds behind in 85th position, completed the 110.1-mile Davis to Santa Rosa road race in an unofficial finishing time of 4 hours, 38 minutes and 45 seconds. Peter Sagan, of Slovakia (Liqiugas), finished second and Lars Boom (Rabobank), of the Netherlands, finished third in the same as the winner. Levi Leipheimer (RadioShack), the three-time defending race winner, and teammate Lance Armstrong both finished in the lead group. Lancaster holds a 4-second race lead because of his 10-second time bonus. — From wire reports

.500 .476 .450 .428 .428 .285

28-18 34-18 30-18 26-19 26-24 24-26

POLLS ——— BASEBALL AMERICA TOP 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through May 16 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Virginia 43-9 1 2. Texas 43-8 2 3. Arizona State 42-6 3 4. Florida 37-12 4 5. Coastal Carolina 45-6 6 6. South Carolina 41-11 8 7. Florida State 39-13 5 8. Texas Christian 40-11 7 9. Cal State Fullerton 34-14 10 10. UCLA 37-11 11 11. Louisville 42-10 9 12. Virginia Tech 36-16 15 13. Georgia Tech 41-10 16 14. Miami 37-13 13 15. Oklahoma 37-14 17 16. Auburn 35-17 18 17. Arkansas 38-14 12 18. Mississippi 36-17 14 19. San Diego 31-17 19 20. Connecticut 41-11 20 21. Rice 32-19 21 22. Oregon 34-18 22 23. Vanderbilt 39-13 23 24. Washington State 28-18 NR 25. UC Irvine 32-17 NR ——— OPEN DE NICE COTE D’AZUR Monday Nice, France Singles First Round Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. David Guez, France, 1-6, 6-1, 6-3. Marco Chiudinelli, Switzerland, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 7-5, 6-2. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-3, 6-1. Simon Greul, Germany, def. Arnaud Clement, France, 6-3, 6-4. Potito Starace, Italy, def. Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-3, 6-1. Lukasz Kubot (8), Poland, def. Gianni Mina, France, 7-5, 6-4. WORLD TEAM CUP Monday Duesseldorf, Germany Red Group United States 2, Australia 1 John Isner and Sam Querrey, United States, def. Carsten Ball and Paul Hanley, Australia, 5-7, 6-4, 10-8 tiebreak. Czech Republic 2, Spain 1 Tomas Berdych, Czech Republic, def. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, 6-7 (4), 6-4, 6-3. Daniel Gimeno-Traver and Marc Lopez, Spain, def. Tomas Berdych and Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, 7-6 (4), 0-6, 10-6.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— x-if necessary PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Philadelphia 1, Montreal 0 Sunday, May 16: Philadelphia 6, Montreal 0 Today, May 18: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Thursday, May 20: Philadelphia at Montreal, 4 p.m. Saturday, May 22: Philadelphia at Montreal, noon x-Monday, May 24: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 26: Philadelphia at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 1, San Jose 0

Sunday, May 16: Chicago 2, San Jose 1 Today, May 18: Chicago at San Jose, 7 p.m. Friday, May 21: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sunday, May 23: San Jose at Chicago, noon x-Tuesday, May 25: Chicago at San Jose, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: Chicago at San Jose, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF New York 5 3 0 15 8 Columbus 4 0 2 14 10 Toronto FC 3 4 1 10 11 Chicago 2 3 3 9 11 Kansas City 2 3 2 8 8 New England 2 5 2 8 10 Philadelphia 1 5 1 4 7 D.C. 1 7 0 3 4 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 7 0 2 23 15 Real Salt Lake 4 3 1 13 15 San Jose 4 2 1 13 11 Houston 4 4 1 13 12 Colorado 4 3 1 13 9 Seattle 3 3 3 12 9 FC Dallas 2 1 5 11 10 Chivas USA 3 5 1 10 10 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Games Columbus at New York, 5 p.m. Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

GA 9 5 13 12 8 14 15 16 GA 2 9 7 10 7 12 9 12

BASEBALL College All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 16 4 .800 43-5 UCLA 12 9 .571 36-12 Stanford 11 9 .550 26-20 California 11 10 .523 27-18

COLLEGIATE BASEBALL POLL TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through May 17, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pv 1. Texas 43-8 494 1 2. Virginia 43-9 493 3 3. Arizona St. 42-6 490 2 4. Coastal Carolina 45-6 489 4 5. Florida 37-12 486 6 6. South Carolina 41-11 485 7 7. CS Fullerton 34-14 482 9 8. Georgia Tech 41-10 480 8 9. Miami, Fla. 37-13 479 5 10. UCLA 37-11 476 13 11. Florida St. 39-13 475 10 12. Texas Christian 40-11 473 12 13. Louisville 42-10 470 11 14. Oklahoma 37-14 465 16 15. San Diego 31-17 460 17 16. Auburn 35-17 458 18 17. Mississippi 36-17 456 15 18. Arkansas 38-14 452 14 19. Connecticut 41-11 451 20 20. Vanderbilt 39-13 448 24 21. Virginia Tech 36-16 446 21 22. Rice 32-19 444 23 23. U.C. Irvine 32-17 441 30 24. Washington St. 28-18 440 — 25. California 27-18 438 19 26. Arizona 31-17 436 — 27. Fresno St. 32-22 432 25 28. Clemson 33-19 430 26 29. Southern Miss. 30-19 427 27 30. Kansas St. 34-16 425 28

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Purchased the contract of RHP Bryan Bullington from Omaha (PCL). Optioned 1B Kila Ka’aihue from Omaha. NEW YORK YANKEES—Activated RHP Chan Ho Park from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Ivan Nova to Scranton/Wilkes Barre (IL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Placed OF Travis Snider on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 15. Activated 3B Edwin

Encarnacion from the 15-day DL. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Acquired RHP Saul Rivera from Cleveland for cash considerations. Placed RHP Bob Howry on unconditional waivers. Signed OF Wagner Mateo. CINCINNATI REDS—Signed OF Felix Perez to a minor league contract. PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Designated INF Wilson Valdez for assignment. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Activated INF Felipe Lopez from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Tyler Greene to Memphis (PCL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed OF Scott Hairston on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 16. Selected the contract of OF Chris Denorfia from Portland (PCL). Transferred RHP Chris Young to the 60-day DL. Eastern League TRENTON THUNDER—Called up RHP Hector Noesi from Tampa (FSL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MINNESOTA TIMBERWOLVES—Named Tony Ronzone assistant general manager/player personnel. FOOTBALL National Football League BALTIMORE RAVENS—Signed CB Travis Fisher and S Brad Jones. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Signed DL Kwaku Danso, DB Matthew Harris, TE Ryan Moya, DL Brian Sanford, DL Martin Tavaseu and PK Leigh Tiffin. DALLAS COWBOYS—Released OL Corey Procter. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Claimed TE Leroy Banks off waivers from Atlanta. Signed DL Jeffery Fitzgerald and DB Andre Jones. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed LB Ryan D’Imperio. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Signed LB Boris Lee and LB Mike Nixon to two-year contracts. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Placed INF-OF Mark DeRosa on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 9. Recalled INF-OF Eugenio Velez from Fresno (PCL). SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released TE Jason Pociask. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed C Jeff TowArnett and LS Chris Mauriello. Released WR Damola Adeniji. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed DL Vonnie Holliday, WR Brandon Banks, WR Shay Hodge and CB Melvin Stephenson. Canadian Football League WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS—Released QB Ricky Santos. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES—Agreed to terms with F Mike Grier on a one-year contract. FLORIDA PANTHERS—Named Dale Tallon general manager. MINNESOTA WILD—Signed C Chad Rau to a twoyear contract. NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Signed F Kelsey Wilson to a one-year contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Signed C Nicklas Backstrom to a 10-year contract and C Marcus Johansson to a three-year contract. COLLEGE LSU—Named Lynn Nance men’s assistant basketball coach. MARQUETTE—Announced sophomore basketball C Youssoupha Mbao will transfer. NEBRASKA—Named Wes Flanigan men’s assistant basketball coach. NEWBERRY—Named Stephen Flynn defensive coordinator POINT PARK—Named Mark Platts women’s soccer coach. ST. JOHN’S—Announced sophomore basketball G Omari Lawrence will transfer. TENNESSEE—Announced basketball F Emmanuel Negedu is transferring to New Mexico. WILLIAMS— Named Aaron Kelton football coach.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,814 574 105 25 The Dalles 3,613 739 22 4 John Day 2,587 900 10 4 McNary 1,880 372 12 6 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 221,282 9,368 8,520 2,375 The Dalles 156,948 7,117 2,194 1,096 John Day 143,237 6,779 2,418 1,398 McNary 113,618 3,663 2,159 1,177

AUTO RACING

Tennis • U.S. beats Australia in World Team Cup: John Isner and Sam Querrey beat Carsten Ball and Paul Hanley in doubles Monday to give the United States a 2-1 victory over Australia at the World Team Cup. With brothers Bob and Mike Bryan still en route from Madrid after claiming their record-tying 61st doubles title, the American duo won 5-7, 6-4, 10-8 in a champions tiebreaker. • Sharapova struggles into 2nd round in Strasbourg: Top-seeded Maria Sharapova has her first clay-court victory of the season, struggling past Russia’s Regina Kulikova 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 in the first round of the Strasbourg International. Sharapova has been hampered by an injury to her right elbow this season and lost in the first round at Madrid last week. The former No. 1 player will next face Tatjana Malek of Germany or a qualifier.

10 10 10 11 9 11 9 12 9 12 6 15 Today’s Games x-San Francisco at California x-Oregon at Portland x-Hawaii at Stanford x-Seattle at Oregon State Washington State at Gonzaga x-New Mexico St. at USC x-nonconference game

Thursday Track: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championships, 3 p.m.; Sisters, La Pine at Sky-Em League championships in Cottage Grove, 11 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Portland Tennis Center, 8 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 5 p.m. Boys tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 8 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 5 p.m.

Saturday Track: Intermountain Conference championships at Bend High, TBA; Sisters, La Pine at Sky-Em League championships in Cottage Grove, 11 a.m.; Class 2A, 1A state championships at Western Oregon in Monmouth, 1 p.m. Boys tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 6A, 5A state championships at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships at the University of Oregon in Eugene, 8 a.m.

WEDNESDAY

Washington State Oregon Arizona Oregon State Washington Southern California

IN THE BLEACHERS

Indy 500 could have record five women in starting field By Michael Marot The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Janet Guthrie can see progress moving at full throttle. The pioneering racer is now watching five women try to duplicate her milestone achievement by qualifying for this year’s Indianapolis 500. There are women climbing over the wall for pit stops and female engineers dissecting data at Indy, giving a male-dominated sport the kind of female touch Guthrie always envisioned. “I thought it would take two generations,” she told The Associated Press by phone Sunday. “But it’s only taken a little more than one.” It’s been 33 years since Guthrie became the first woman to start a race at the famed Brickyard, and for most of that time, Guthrie stood virtually alone. From her breakthrough moment in 1977 until 1999 only one other woman, Lyn St. James, qualified for Indy’s 33-car starting grid. No more than two women were entered in any 500 from 2000-06. Now the numbers — and perceptions — are rapidly changing. This year’s potential female starters at Indy consist of the glamorous Danica Patrick, the first woman to win an IndyCar race; the personable Sarah Fisher, the first woman to win an IndyCar pole; fan favorite Milka Duno and two relatively unknown but promising rookies, Brazil’s Ana Beatriz and Switzerland’s Simona de Silvestro. If each makes the May 30 field, it would mark the first time any has been part of a race featuring five women. “I think it would be neat,” Fisher said. “But what’s really cool is they’re all qualified (drivers).”

Darron Cummings / The Associated Press

Ana Beatriz, of Brazil, removing an umbrella from her car during the opening day of practice for the Indianapolis 500 auto race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis on Saturday. While fans and officials welcome the influx of women, the times haven’t always been so cordial. When Guthrie started her quest to qualify at Indy, she became the target of a letter-writing campaign to keep her out. Companies insisted they feared sponsoring a woman because of racing’s dangers, a refrain that included an airline company telling Guthrie it didn’t want “anything to do with a sport that involved crashes.” Guthrie even remembers her team owner explaining why NASCAR put three women on the 1977 Firecracker 400 starting grid — to prove they didn’t belong. Guthrie’s calm, eloquent demeanor helped stop those arguments, even though it wasn’t until 2001 that Fisher noticed a different clientele at the track. “You’d see fathers bringing their

daughters to the autograph line,” Fisher said as she pointed toward a photo of a girl driving a go-kart. “Now I sign a lot of pictures like this.” Four years later, Patrick joined the circuit and her emergence changed the sport again. A fourth-place finish at Indy in 2005 kicked off Danicamania and instantly turned her into the series covergirl. Suddenly, the questions were no longer about whether Patrick belonged in IndyCars at the age of 23. Everyone wanted to know how long it would take her to win. “I remember coming into the first year and thinking, ‘Well, you know, there’s no guarantee that I would stay if I don’t do well my first year. Who knows what’s going to happen,” she said. “You know, kind of after the first part of the season, which included through Indy and

stuff, I went, ‘I think maybe I’ll get another job next year.” Patrick has been one of the series most popular drivers since that race, and her success had a huge impact for future generations of women. Sponsors that once backed away from Guthrie saw the obvious marketability of having Patrick pitch their products and started lining up to get on Patrick’s team. “I think that would be hard to question,” said Terry Angstadt, president of the IRL’s commercial division. The pace of change cranked up again in 2008 after Patrick’s victory at Japan put the IndyCar women’s movement back on center stage. A month later, Fisher came to Indianapolis as the first woman with full ownership of her own team since Guthrie in 1978. Last May, Anna Chatten, went over the wall as Duno’s air jack operator, a job she has again this year with KV Racing’s Mario Moraes. Why has the IndyCar Series become a world full of women? “I think it’s more open because Danica has been here a couple of years now,” said de Silvestro, who led four laps in her IndyCar debut in March. “I’m sure it will change everywhere else if girls can be competitive.” Winning races, of course, is what matters most — even to the guys. “I think it would cheapen the experience for the fans, for the stakeholders, for the competitors if it was just a circus-act sideshow,” driver Townsend Bell said. “But the fact there are some women who can run at the front of this race here authenticates what they can do.” The 72-year-old Guthrie never doubted this day would come. She just wasn’t sure she’d be around long enough to see it.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

Storm trail by two strokes at 5A boys state tourney REPEAT CHAMPIONS

Bulletin staff report CORVALLIS — One day into the Class 5A state boys golf tournament and Summit High is within striking distance of its first state championship. The Storm, who last weekend won the Intermountain Conference championship by 45 strokes, enter today’s second and final round at Trysting Tree Golf Club in second place with a team score of 311, seven strokes behind firstday leader Corvallis (304). Summit senior Jesse Heinly shot a 1-over-par 73 on Monday to lead the Storm and put him in a four-way tie for first place. Also for the Storm, Dylan Cramer shot a 77, Jordan Schiemer posted a 79, and Cole Ortega added an 82. “In a lot of ways we were very successful,” said Summit coach Mark Tichenor. “We felt like we left some strokes on the course, though.” Today’s final round looks to be a dogfight, as five teams tee off within 15 strokes of one another. Following Corvallis and Summit after Monday’s round were twotime defending state champion West Albany (314), 2009 state runner-up Wilsonville (317), and Cleveland High of Portland (319). “We like our chances,” said Tichenor, whose team finished third at state last year after ending the first day in second place. “A seven-stroke lead can dissolve pretty quickly.” While Summit was the only Central Oregon team to advance to the 5A state tournament, Crook County’s Caleb Henry and Moun-

Kathy Russell / Submitted photo

Riders, coaches and advisers from the Central District pose Sunday at the Jackson County Fairgrounds and Expo Center in Central Point after winning the overall Oregon High School Equestrian Teams state championship for the second year in a row. Central Oregon representatives at the meet included riders representing Redmond, Sisters, Mountain View, Madras, La Pine, Summit, Bend and Crook County high schools. tain View’s Paul Coduti are both competing at Trysting Tree as individuals. Henry ended the first day tied for 20th place after shooting a 79, while Coduti concluded Monday’s round tied for 63rd after posting a 92.

The 5A state championships resume at 7:30 a.m. today. The first Summit golfers tee off at 8:42 a.m. In other prep events Monday: GIRLS GOLF Locals struggle at small-school state tourney

REDMOND — Sisters’ Stephanie Cole and La Pine’s Samantha McPherson had a rough go during the first day of the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tournament at Eagle Crest’s Resort Course. Cole ended the first round with a

31-over-par 103, which put her in 54th place. McPherson shot a 110 during the first day and enters today’s second and final round tied for 64th. Both golfers are competing as individuals. Molalla posted the best team mark of the day with a score of 339. The girls small-school state tournament continues today at 8 a.m. BOYS GOLF Area golfers compete at 4A tourney CRESWELL — Central Oregon golfers shot in the 80s during the first day of the Class 4A state championships at Emerald Valley Golf Club. For Sisters, Jeff Fought landed in a two-way tie for 20th place with a 10-over-par 82 while Jonathan Standen ended up in a seven-way tie for 31st with a score of 86. Travis Knight of La Pine drove his way to a four-way tie for 27th place, registering a score of 85. Tallying a 73, Austin Landis of Gladstone led among individuals after the first day of competition. Among teams, Marist was at the top of the leaderboard with a total score of 323, followed by Brookings-Harbor at 329, and La Salle Prep at 331. BASEBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-0 West Salem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-12 SALEM — Redmond routed West Salem by 10 runs in the first game of a Central Valley Conference doubleheader to grab the league’s fourth and final seed for the Class 6A state playoffs. Parker Vernon, who pitched the entire first game

for the Panthers, registered 11 strikeouts and allowed only three hits. For the Redmond offense, Christian Welsh belted a three-run home run and Jake Branham tallied a two-run double, both in the second inning. Vernon also had one double in the opening game while Lane Rutherford and Noah Westerhuis added two RBIs each. In the second game, West Salem flipped the first game’s lopsided matchup, shutting out Redmond and winning by 12. Redmond’s defense struggled with errors while Westerhuis smacked one double for the offense. The Panthers, who finished the regular season 9-9 in league and 14-12 overall, will play at Portland’s Lincoln High in the first round of the state postseason on Friday. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ——— Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 ELMIRA — The Outlaws won two games in the Sky-Em League playoffs to earn the league’s third and final seed for the Class 4A state playoffs. In Sisters’ first game, Chase Kleint paced the Outlaw offense with a double, a triple and three runs batted. Brandon Morgan went the distance on the mound in the mustwin game for Sisters. Against Elmira, Eric Carlson paced the Outlaw offense with two home runs, a double and four RBIs. Sisters will play at Cascade on Friday in the first round of the 4A state postseason.

Harrison Buller, Madras, 11.35; 42, Justine Hendricks, Redmond, 13.17; 43, Kayla Vincent, Madras, 15.97. Working Rancher — 2, Lindsey Bernbaum, Dufur, silver medal; 8, Jessie Dillon, Redmond; 10, Natalie Nigg, Redmond; 24, Kayla Patterson, Madras. Team Events In Hand Obstacle Relay — 11, Mountain View B (Molly Coehlo, Laurie MacWhorter, Courtney Thomas, Maddie Hood); 21, La Pine A (Chrystal Bates, Kelsi Dozier, Samantha Hollinger, Charisa Bates); 24, Redmond A (Hennessey Sloter, Natalie Nigg, Jordan Payne, Danielle Pilon). Working Pairs — 8, Kaesha Hilton and Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley; 13, Hennessey Sloter and Jessie Dillon, Redmond; 20, Bobbie Jo Rasauer and Cassidy Kinneman, Sisters. Working 4’s Drill — 1, Sisters (MacKenzie Gellings, McKenzie Legg, Taryn Gates, Brittney Bounds, Lindsey Soliz), gold medal; 2, Mountain View (Courtney Thomas, Maddie Hood, Kyia Sell, Morgan Crabtree, Krystal Brix), silver medal; 8, La Pine (Chrystal Bates, Kelsi Dozier, Samantha Hollinger, Dani Schneider); 15, Summit (Linnea Rehn, Charlotte Falk, Kirsten Rehn, Catherine Thelen). Bi-Rangle — 4, Courtney Thomas and Morgan Crabtree, Mountain View, 25.56; 5, Kassi Page and Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 25.62; 33, Karlee Markham and Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View, 33.25; 35, Kayla Vincent and Abby Beamer, Madras, 47.11. Canadian Flags — 8, Redmond A (Brandice Durfee, Kassi Page, Megan Hopper, Jordan Payne), 35.85; 9, Redmond B (Justine Hendricks, Abby Henry, Madison Mills, Nautique Simpson), 35.94; 15, Madras A (Harrison Buller, Ally Bowden, Abby Beamer, Kayla Vincent), 38.41. Short Program Drill — 1, Brandice Durfee, Megan Hopper, Jordan Payne, Danielle Pilon, Nautique Simpson, Jessica Dillon, Hennessey Sloter, Redmond, gold medal. Team Penning — 1, Mountain View C (Courtney Thomas, Maddie Hood, Laurie MacWhorter, 9 cows, 3 goes, 158.79, gold medal; 11, Madras A (Kayla Vincent, Kody Abendschein, Kaylee Patterson, 7 cows, 3 goes, 252.76; 18, Sisters A (Jenna Jacobsen, Katie Yozamp, Cassidy Kinneman, 6 cows, 3 goes, 144.80. High Point Awards High Point District — Central District. Individual Event Versatility — Courtney Thomas, Mountain View. Overall Timed Champion — Courtney Thomas, Mountain View.

Overall Versatility — Courtney Thomas, Mountain View. Central District State Scholarship Winner — Chrystal Bates, La Pine.

PREP SCOREBOARD BOYS GOLF Monday’s Results ———

Anders Hansen 44-43—87. CROOK COUNTY (NA) — Caleb Henry 39-40—79. MOUNTAIN VIEW (NA) — Paul Cuduti 46-46—92. ———

Class 6A

Class 4A

STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Day 1 Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis Par 72 Team scores — Lake Oswego 296, Redmond 298, Tualatin 309, West Linn 312, Westview 313, Jesuit 313, Central Catholic 313, Sam Barlow 314, South Eugene 315, West Salem 315, Lincoln 318, Canby 323, Sheldon 323, Grant 358. Day-one leaderboard — Landon Moore, Redmond, 71; Max Carter, Lake Oswego, 72; Casey O’Sullivan, West Salem, 72; Jordan Egbert, Sheldon, 73; Zach Foushee, West Linn, 73; Jared Lambert, Redmond, 73; Ryan Lile, Gresham, 73; Adam Ruben, Lake Oswego, 73; Tyler Barker, West Linn, 74; Bobby Monaco, South Eugene, 74; Conner Nilson, Sam Barlow, 74; Ray Richards, Tualatin, 74; Andy Rodby, Redmond, 74; Tyler Tompkins, Reynolds, 74; Michael Zupan, Lincoln, 74. REDMOND (298) — Landon Moore 34-37—71; Jared Lambert 35-38—73; Andy Rodby 36-36—72; Colton Henshaw 38-42—80; Mason Rodby 37-46—83. ———

STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Day 1 Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell Par 72 Team scores — Marist 323, Brookings-Harbor 329, La Salle Prep 331, Phoenix 333, Seaside 337, Stayton 338, La Grande 341, Henley 346, North Bend 348, Junction City 350, Newport 360, Tillamook 377, Central 386, Baker 430. Day-one leaderboard — Austin Landis, Gladstone, 73; Brent Pollock, Marist, 74; Nick Galbreath, Phoenix, 76; Tom Graves, Newport, 78; Roger Hults, Illinois Valley, 78; Joey Souza, Marist, 78; Travis Carey, Stayton, 79, Connor Gall, La Salle Prep, 79; Mavric Goss, La Grande, 79; Ryan Melnychuk, North Valley, 79; Chuck Moore, South Umpqua, 79. SISTERS (NA) — Jeff Fought 42-40—82, Jonathan Standen 42-44—86. LA PINE (NA) — Travis Knight 44-41—85.

GIRLS GOLF

Class 5A STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Day 1 Trysting Tree Golf Club in Corvallis Par 72 Team scores — Corvallis 304, Summit 311, West Albany 314, Wilsonville 317, Cleveland 319, Pendleton 323, Thurston 329, Klamath Union 333, Eagle Point 336, Willamette 341, Liberty 343, Marshall 351. Day-one leaderboard — Jesse Heinly, Summit, 73; Conner Kumpula, West Albany, 73; Seth Reynolds, Klamath Union, 73, Jesse Salzwedel, Wilsonville, 73; Hogan Arey, Corvallis, 74; Roan Dickey, Corvallis, 74; Connor Batty, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 75; Jon Grossen, Liberty, 75; Mark Geniza, Crescent Valley, 76. SUMMIT (311) — Jesse Heinly 35-38—73, Dylan Cramer 36-41—77, Jordan Schiemer 39-40—79, Cole Ortega 41-41—82,

Monday’s Results ———

tridge, Thurston, 83; Katie Zajicek, Corvallis, 83. Summit (335) — Kristen Parr 39-38—77, Madi Mansberger 41-39—80, Stacey Patterson 43-44—87, Marlee Barton 44-47— 91, Rebecca Kerry 44-53—97. Mountain View (382) — Kersey Wilcox 41-48—89, Hailey Ostrom 50-44—94, Vanesa Woolhiser 50-49—99, Ashley Moon 50-50—100, Kendra Hobbs 65-61—126. Bend (NA) — Kayla Good 42-43—85, Heidi Froelich 4443—87.

Class 4A/3A/2A/1A STATE TOURNAMENT Day 1 At Eagle Crest Resort Course in Redmond Par 72 Team scores — Molalla 339, La Salle Prep 374, Marist 380, Blanchet Catholic 397, Henley 401, Ontario 401, Tillamook 411, La Grande 414, Reedsport 429, Cottage Grove 445, Gold Beach 447, Taft 473, Seaside 491. Day-one leaderboard —Lindsay Harmon, Valley Catholic, 69; Melissa Tibbons, Molalla, 76; Monica Vaughn, Reedsport, 76; Jennifer Gibbons, Molalla, 78; Scotti Jo Helmick, Ontario, 82; Aubrie Street, St. Mary’s 83; Cassandra Carothers, St. Mary’s, 84; Helen Ferlan, Molalla , 88; Sydney King, McKenzie, 88. SISTERS (NA) — Stephanie Cole 54-49—103. LA PINE (NA) — Samantha McPherson 53-57—110.

Class 5A

EQUESTRIAN

STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS Day 1 Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks Par 72 Team scores — Summit 335, Crescent Valley 337, Liberty 353, West Albany 371, Churchill 372, Mountain View 382, Glencoe 384, Thurston 412, Crater 415, Madison 464. Day-one leaderboard — Caroline Inglis, Churchill, 71; Juhee Lee, Wilsonville, 71; Caitlyn Doyle, Crescent Valley, 75; Kaitlyn Oster, Liberty, 76; Kristen Parr, Summit, 77; Nadia Telles, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 78; Madi Mansberger, Summit, 80; Katie Ortman, West Albany, 80; Brenna Murphy, Crescent Valley, 81; Haley Par-

OREGON HIGH SCHOOL EQUESTRIAN TEAMS State Championships At Jackson County Fairgrounds, Central Point May 13-16 CENTRAL DISTRICT RESULTS Individual Events Reining — 2, Lindsey Bernbaum, Dufur, silver medal; 4, Jessie Dillon, Redmond; 13, Kayla Coulter, The Dalles-Wahtonka; 15, Rachel Fox, Madras. In Hand Trail — 2, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View, silver medal; 7, Nautique Simpson, Redmond; 13, Justin Goss, Redmond; 20, Katie Case, Crook County.

Steer Daubing — 6, Harrison Buller, Madras, 2 daubs, 4.40; 20, Kayla Coulter, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 1 daub, 3.46; 21, Jenna Jacobsen, Sisters, 1 daub, 3.48. Breakaway Roping — 6, Lindsey Bernbaum, Dufur, 1 catch, 4.30. Dressage — 2, Bobbie Jo Rasauer, Sisters, silver medal; 7, Katie Yozamp, Sisters; 9, Ashlyn Brewster, Redmond. Trail — 6, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View; 15, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View; 21, Kaesha Hilton, Hood River Valley; 23, Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley. Saddle Seat Equitation — 12, Bobbie Jo Rasauer, Sisters; 24, Kayla Vincent, Madras. Stock Seat Equitation — 2, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View, silver medal; 4, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View; 17, Jessie Dillon, Redmond. Barrels — 2, Karlee Markham, Mountain View, 14.80, silver medal; 8, Kassi Page, Redmond, 15.21; 17, Ciara Timm, Bend, 15.63; 21, Justine Hendricks, Redmond, 15.76; 28, Morgan Crabtree, Mountain View, 15.91; 31, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View, 16.06; 35, Jenna Jacobsen, Sisters, 16.36. Driving — 15, Bobbie Jo Rasauer, Sisters. Showmanship — 3, Kayla Vincent, Madras, bronze medal; 6, Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley; 10, Molly Coehlo, Mountain View; 13, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. Hunt Seat Equitation — 2, Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View; 19, Kaesha Hilton, Hood River Valley; 24, Taylor Norton, Hood River Valley; 27, Kristin Jasa, Madras. Hunt Seat Over Fences — 4, Cassidy Kinneman, Sisters; 5, Katie Yozamp, Sisters; 5, Bobbie Jo Rasauer, Sisters; 9, Samantha Novotny, Sisters. Poles — 1, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View, 21.03, gold medal; 2, Ciara Timm, Bend, 21.43, silver medal; 6, Hennessey Sloter, Redmond, 22.30; 22, Abby Henry, Redmond, 24.18; 25, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 24.90; 34, Kassi Page, Redmond, 28.28; 36, Megen Hopper, Redmond, 29.08. Individual Flags — 12, Makayla Bashian, Mountain View, 9.89; 18, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 13.33; 27, Sara Marcus, Sisters, 15.08; 28, Jenna Jacobsen, Sisters, 15.37. Keyhole — 5, Brandice Durfee, Redmond, 7.34; 6, Courtney Thomas, Mountain View, 7.49; 21, Abby Beamer, Madras, 8.17; 26, Jenna Jacobsen, Sisters, 8.56. Figure 8 — 2, Abby Beamer, Madras, 10.30, silver medal; 6, Ciara Timm, Bend, 10.99; 17, Kassi Page, Redmond, 11.15; 23,

Lakers rout Suns in conference opener The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Even on a balky knee, Kobe Bryant had no problem giving the Los Angeles Lakers an early leg up in the Western Conference finals. Bryant scored 40 points, Lamar Odom added 19 points and 19 rebounds, and the Lakers opened the series with ruthless offensive efficiency in a 128-107 victory over the Phoenix Suns on Monday night. Pau Gasol had 21 points for the top-seeded Lakers, who won their seventh straight playoff game and snapped the Suns’ six-game streak with a phenomenal second half, highlighted by Bryant’s 21-point third quarter following an off-week during which he barely stepped on the Lakers’ practice court to rest his litany of minor injuries. “He’s the best scorer in the league,” said Odom, who set a career playoff high for rebounds in his most assertive game of the current postseason. “Drives, fadeaways with his back to the basket, inside-outside, with his left hand. Time off is exactly what he needed.”

The defending NBA champions beat the third-seeded Suns at their own uptempo game when necessary, fluidly running the court to set up baskets for Bryant in his sixth straight 30-point game. Bryant then rested his sore knee for most of the fourth quarter in the 11th 40-point game of his playoff career. “They played great, one of the best games I’ve seen them play in the playoffs this season,” Suns coach Alvin Gentry said. “Kobe kind of controlled the whole game. I thought we could have withstood the game that he had ... but when he’s making his jumper like that, there’s not a whole lot you can do about it.” Game 2 is Wednesday night in Los Angeles. Amare Stoudemire scored 23 points and Steve Nash had 13 points and 13 assists for the Suns, who hadn’t lost since April 24. Robin Lopez started at center and scored 14 points in his playoff debut, but Phoenix couldn’t keep up with the champs in its first conference finals appearance since 2006. “They’re probably going to continue to be taller than us as the series goes on, so we’ve

got to ... make everything as tough as possible,” said Nash, whose injured eye didn’t bother him. “We played hard, but we didn’t make enough shots, and we had a few too many breakdowns.” Both teams swept their second-round series to earn their third postseason date in five years, but the Lakers didn’t allow a week off to affect their remarkable execution. Bryant alternated jumpers and strong drives while Los Angeles pulled away. His 13-for-23 shooting performance included three three-pointers and 11 free throws with just one miss. “Kobe carried a lot of the offense tonight, no doubt,” Lakers coach Phil Jackson said. Bryant’s teammates were nearly as impressive despite a game offensive effort by the Suns, who ran into the same height problems faced by Utah and Oklahoma City earlier in the Lakers’ playoff run. Los Angeles made 58 percent of its shots and committed just nine turnovers in Game 1 — its third straight single-digit turnover game — while outrebounding the smaller Suns 42-34.

NBA SCOREBOARD SCHEDULE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT x-if necessary ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Boston 1, Orlando 0 Sunday, May 16: Boston 92, Orlando 88 Today, May 18: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 22: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 24: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 26: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 30: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers 1, Phoenix 0 Monday, May 17: L.A. Lakers 128, Phoenix 107 Wednesday, May 19: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Sunday, May 23: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m.

Tuesday, May 25: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 31: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

SUMMARIES

PHOENIX Hill Stoudemire Lopez Nash Richardson Frye Dudley Dragic

Monday’s Game ——— LAKERS 128, SUNS 107 FG FT Reb Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS 21:45 1-5 5-6 0-1 3 4 7 34:32 8-13 7-10 1-3 2 2 23 24:04 6-7 2-2 2-6 0 2 14 28:19 5-10 3-3 0-4 13 2 13 36:52 6-12 0-2 1-6 3 3 15 19:43 1-8 0-0 0-1 0 2 3 19:07 1-5 2-2 1-4 0 4 5 20:28 5-8 3-4 1-3 2 2 13

CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE First Game Redmond 032 003 3 — 11 8 0 West Salem 010 000 0 — 1 3 2 Vernon and Branham; Keene, Emery (7) and Rice. W—Vernon. L— Keene. 2B—Redmond: Vernon, Branham; West Salem: Bowman. HR—Redmond: Welsh. Second Game (6 innings) Redmond 000 000 — 0 1 6 West Salem 414 021 — 12 9 0 Abbas, Smith (3), Follick and Branham; West Salem pitching not available.; L — Abbas. 2B—Redmond: Westerhuis; West Salem: Pittman. HR—West Salem: Allen. ———

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE First Game Junction City 200 200 0 — 4 5 1 Sisters 040 107 X — 12 12 2 Morgan and M. Stovall; Errecart, Strawbe (6), Rank (6) and Garrigus. W—Morgan. L— Errecart. 2B—Sisters: Kleint; Junction City: Errecart. 3B—Sisters: Kleint. HR—Junction City: Garrigus. Second Game Sisters 014 020 3 — 10 9 0 Elmira 100 210 1 — 5 8 1 Groth, Weigand (4), Hodges (5) and M. Stovall; Boggs, Lay (6) and Keegal. 2B—Sisters: Waters, Carlson. 3B—Sisters: M. Stovall. HR—Sisters: Carlson 2; Elmira: Bryant.

Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday

N B A P L AYO F F S

By Greg Beacham

BASEBALL Class 6A

Barbosa 17:29 5-7 1-1 0-0 2 1 11 Amundson 17:41 1-4 1-2 4-6 0 1 3 Totals 240:00 39-79 24-32 10-34 25 23 107 Percentages: FG .494, FT .750. 3-Point Goals: 5-22, .227 (Richardson 3-6, Dudley 1-5, Frye 1-7, Barbosa 0-1, Dragic 0-1, Nash 0-2). Team Rebounds: 8. Team Turnovers: 12 (19 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Amundson, Lopez, Stoudemire). Turnovers: 11 (Nash 4, Dudley 2, Barbosa, Dragic, Frye, Hill, Stoudemire). Steals: 6 (Amundson, Dudley, Frye, Hill, Richardson, Stoudemire). Technical Fouls: Hill, 6:45 third. FG FT Reb L.A. LAKERS Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Artest 39:34 6-14 1-2 0-5 5 0 14 Gasol 36:57 10-13 1-1 1-4 5 2 21 Bynum 19:10 2-4 0-0 2-4 0 1 4 Fisher 28:52 1-3 3-4 1-2 1 3 5 Bryant 35:28 13-23 11-12 0-5 5 1 40 Odom 30:33 9-15 0-0 7-19 3 3 19

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Mbenga 4:03 1-2 0-0 0-1 1 0 2 Farmar 18:44 4-6 0-0 0-0 5 5 10 Brown 18:13 3-6 2-3 0-1 1 3 9 Vujacic 1:23 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 1 0 Powell 4:19 1-1 0-0 1-1 0 1 2 Walton 2:44 1-1 0-0 0-0 0 1 2 Totals 240:00 51-88 18-22 12-42 26 21 128 Percentages: FG .580, FT .818. 3-Point Goals: 8-17, .471 (Bryant 3-6, Farmar 2-3, Brown 1-1, Odom 1-2, Artest 1-5). Team Rebounds: 5. Team Turnovers: 9 (10 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Gasol 2, Artest). Turnovers: 9 (Bryant 2, Bynum 2, Farmar 2, Brown, Gasol, Odom). Steals: 8 (Artest 2, Fisher 2, Brown, Bryant, Farmar, Odom). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 5:58 second Bryant, 7:48 third. Phoenix 26 29 24 28 — 107 L.A. Lakers 35 27 31 35 — 128 A—18,997 (18,997). T—2:28.


D4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M AJ O R L E AGUE BA SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 27 11 .711 — New York 25 13 .658 2 Toronto 23 17 .575 5 Boston 19 20 .487 8½ Baltimore 12 27 .308 15½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 24 14 .632 — Detroit 22 16 .579 2 Cleveland 15 21 .417 8 Chicago 15 22 .405 8½ Kansas City 15 24 .385 9½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 21 18 .538 — Oakland 19 20 .487 2 Los Angeles 18 22 .450 3½ Seattle 14 24 .368 6½ ——— Monday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 11, Boston 9 Kansas City 4, Baltimore 3 Chicago White Sox at Detroit, ppd., rain Minnesota 8, Toronto 3 Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 3, 11 innings Texas 4, L.A. Angels 3 Oakland 8, Seattle 4 Today’s Games Minnesota (Pavano 4-3) at Toronto (Marcum 2-1), 9:37 a.m. Chicago White Sox (F.Garcia 2-2) at Detroit (Porcello 3-3), 10:05 a.m. Cleveland (D.Huff 1-5) at Tampa Bay (Price 5-1), 10:10 a.m. Boston (Beckett 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-2), 4:05 p.m. Kansas City (Greinke 1-4) at Baltimore (Millwood 0-4), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Jer.Weaver 4-2) at Texas (C.Wilson 3-1), 5:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-3) at Oakland (Sheets 2-3), 7:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Kansas City at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Baltimore at Texas, 5:05 p.m. L.A. Angels at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Detroit at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. Toronto at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 24 13 .649 — Florida 20 19 .513 5 Washington 20 19 .513 5 New York 19 20 .487 6 Atlanta 18 20 .474 6½ Central Division W L Pct GB Cincinnati 22 16 .579 — St. Louis 22 17 .564 ½ Chicago 17 22 .436 5½ Pittsburgh 16 22 .421 6 Milwaukee 15 23 .395 7 Houston 13 25 .342 9 West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 23 15 .605 — San Francisco 21 16 .568 1½ Los Angeles 21 17 .553 2 Colorado 19 19 .500 4 Arizona 16 23 .410 7½ ——— Monday’s Games Philadelphia 12, Pittsburgh 2 Arizona 5, Florida 1 Cincinnati 6, Milwaukee 3 N.Y. Mets 3, Atlanta 2 Chicago Cubs 4, Colorado 2, 11 innings St. Louis 6, Washington 2 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Houston 2 Today’s Games Milwaukee (M.Parra 0-2) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 1-2), 9:35 a.m. Arizona (Buckner 0-0) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 3-1), 10:10 a.m. Pittsburgh (Duke 2-4) at Philadelphia (Halladay 6-1), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 3-2) at Atlanta (Medlen 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (J.Chacin 2-1) at Chicago Cubs (Silva 4-0), 5:05 p.m. Washington (Lannan 1-2) at St. Louis (Carpenter 4-1), 5:15 p.m. San Francisco (J.Sanchez 2-3) at San Diego (Latos 3-3), 7:05 p.m. Houston (Norris 2-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 4-1), 7:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 5:05 p.m. Florida at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 6:40 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 7:10 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Athletics 8, Mariners 4 OAKLAND, Calif. — Kevin Kouzmanoff and Adam Rosales each hit two-run homers, Gio Gonzalez allowed four hits in seven innings and Oakland ended a five-game losing streak, beating Seattle. Rajai Davis drove in two runs, and Daric Barton and Kurt Suzuki also drove in runs for the A’s, who have won eight of their last 11 homes games. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Jo.Lopez 3b Griffey Jr. dh Tuiasosopo lf Kotchman 1b Jo.Wilson ss J.Bard c Totals

AB 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 3 3 31

R 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6 4 4

Oakland Pennington ss Barton 1b K.Suzuki c Kouzmanoff 3b R.Sweeney rf Fox dh Cust lf E.Patterson lf A.Rosales 2b R.Davis cf Totals

AB 5 3 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 36

R H 0 1 2 3 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 2 3 1 2 8 15

BI 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 2 2 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 5

Avg. .354 .185 .299 .221 .182 .156 .183 .184 .167

SO 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 7

Avg. .237 .279 .239 .258 .299 .200 .400 .225 .263 .238

Seattle 100 101 010 — 4 6 1 Oakland 232 001 00x — 8 15 1 E—Jo.Lopez (3), K.Suzuki (3). LOB—Seattle 4, Oakland 5. 2B—Barton (9), R.Sweeney (7), R.Davis (4). 3B—Barton (2). HR—Tuiasosopo (1), off G.Gonzalez; Kouzmanoff (3), off Rowland-Smith; A.Rosales (3), off Rowland-Smith. RBIs—Jo.Lopez 3 (15), Tuiasosopo (2), Barton (15), K.Suzuki (12), Kouzmanoff 2 (20), A.Rosales 2 (14), R.Davis 2 (12). SB—F.Gutierrez (5), Jo.Lopez (3), Pennington (5), R.Davis (13). SF—Barton. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Griffey Jr. 2, Tuiasosopo); Oakland 4 (Fox, Kouzmanoff, Pennington, R.Sweeney). Runners moved up—F.Gutierrez, Jo.Lopez. GIDP— Figgins, Griffey Jr., Kouzmanoff, R.Sweeney, Fox. DP—Seattle 3 (Jo.Wilson, Figgins, Kotchman), (Snell, Jo.Wilson, Kotchman), (Jo.Lopez, Figgins, Kotchman); Oakland 2 (Pennington, A.Rosales, Barton), (Kouzmanoff, A.Rosales, Barton). Seattle IP R-Smith L, 0-4 2 2-3 Snell 2 2-3 Colome 1 2-3 White 1 Oakland IP Gonzalez W, 4-3 7 Blevins 0 Ziegler 2-3

H 10 5 0 0 H 4 2 0

R 7 1 0 0 R 3 1 0

ER 7 1 0 0 ER 3 1 0

BB 0 0 0 0 BB 4 0 0

SO 3 1 1 2 SO 4 0 0

NP 50 38 13 9 NP 104 7 6

ERA 7.62 4.76 4.40 3.09 ERA 4.05 5.52 3.06

Breslow 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 3.00 A.Bailey 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.29 Blevins pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Colome 1-0, Ziegler 2-1, Breslow 1-0. T—2:22. A—10,051 (35,067).

T—2:53. A—38,005 (43,975).

STEALING SECOND

Diamondbacks 5, Marlins 1 MIAMI, Fla. — Edwin Jackson struck out a career-high 12 in eight shutout innings to lead Arizona to a victory over Florida. Stephen Drew, John Hester, and Conor Jackson each drove in a run for the Diamondbacks, who won for just the second time in 10 games.

Yankees 11, Red Sox 9 NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez hit a tying homer off Jonathan Papelbon in the ninth inning and Marcus Thames connected moments later for a two-run shot of his own, giving New York a wild victory over Boston. Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b J.Drew rf Youkilis 1b V.Martinez c D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b Hermida lf Van Every cf D.McDonald cf-lf Totals

AB 5 3 5 5 4 4 4 4 0 4 38

New York AB Jeter ss 4 Gardner cf 4 Teixeira 1b 4 A.Rodriguez dh-3b 5 Cano 2b 5 Cervelli c 4 Thames rf 4 Winn lf 4 R.Pena 3b 3 a-Miranda ph 0 D.Marte p 0 Vazquez p 0 Totals 37

R H 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 9 13

BI 0 0 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 9

BB 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .269 .290 .280 .311 .234 .235 .312 .218 .211 .259

R 1 3 1 2 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 11

BI 0 0 1 4 1 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 11

BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .268 .323 .224 .284 .322 .400 .365 .213 .194 .125 -----

H 1 2 1 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 13

Boston 010 131 030 — 9 13 0 New York 510 010 004 — 11 13 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-walked for R.Pena in the 8th. LOB—Boston 4, New York 6. 2B—Pedroia (14), Gardner (3), Teixeira (8), Cervelli (3), Thames (4). HR—D.Ortiz (7), off P.Hughes; J.Drew (6), off P.Hughes; V.Martinez (4), off Logan; Youkilis (6), off Park; V.Martinez (5), off Park; A.Rodriguez (5), off Papelbon; Thames (2), off Papelbon. RBIs—J.Drew 3 (26), Youkilis 2 (19), V.Martinez 2 (19), D.Ortiz (18), Beltre (21), Teixeira (30), A.Rodriguez 4 (31), Cano (24), Cervelli (15), Thames 4 (10). SB—R.Pena (1). SF—Thames. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 1 (Youkilis); New York 4 (A.Rodriguez, Teixeira 2, Winn). Runners moved up—Gardner, Teixeira. GIDP—Pedroia, Beltre. DP—New York 2 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira), (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Matsuzaka 4 2-3 9 7 7 3 3 105 7.89 Wakefield 2 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 29 5.31 D.Bard H, 8 1 0 0 0 1 2 18 2.61 Pplbn L, 1-10 2-3 3 4 4 0 0 19 3.32 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes 5 6 5 5 1 3 104 2.25 Logan H, 4 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 3.86 Park BS, 2-2 1 4 3 3 0 0 30 8.10 D.Marte 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 26 3.86 Vazquez W, 2-4 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 8.01 Park pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Wakefield 1-0, Vazquez 2-0. HBP—by Papelbon (Cervelli). WP—Matsuzaka, P.Hughes. T—3:47. A—48,271 (50,287).

Rangers 4, Angels 3 ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Holland pitched into the sixth inning, Nelson Cruz drove in two runs, and Texas beat Los Angeles in the season’s first matchup between the AL West rivals. Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b Tor.Hunter cf K.Morales 1b H.Matsui dh J.Rivera lf Napoli c Br.Wood 3b a-B.Abreu ph Willits rf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 3 3 3 1 3 32

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 3 3

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 6

Avg. .230 .284 .281 .272 .234 .250 .233 .171 .268 .208

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b Kinsler 2b Guerrero dh N.Cruz rf Smoak 1b Dav.Murphy lf M.Ramirez c Treanor c Borbon cf Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 3 4 4 2 0 3 30

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 9 4 2

SO 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .321 .287 .317 .340 .299 .188 .222 .318 .208 .230

Los Angeles 000 021 000 — 3 5 2 Texas 004 000 00x — 4 9 1 a-struck out for Br.Wood in the 9th. E—Napoli (4), H.Kendrick (5), Andrus (6). LOB—Los Angeles 5, Texas 6. 2B—Kinsler (6), Guerrero (6), N.Cruz (6). HR—Napoli (3), off Holland; Tor.Hunter (5), off Holland. RBIs—Tor.Hunter (22), Napoli 2 (9), M.Young (22), Kinsler (4), N.Cruz 2 (23). SB—N.Cruz (6). SF—M.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (H.Kendrick, Br.Wood); Texas 5 (N.Cruz, Dav.Murphy 2, M.Young, Kinsler). GIDP—M.Young, N.Cruz. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Br.Wood, H.Kendrick, K.Morales), (H.Kendrick, E.Aybar, K.Morales). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Kazmir L, 2-4 7 9 4 4 1 4 S.Shields 1 0 0 0 1 0 Texas IP H R ER BB SO Holland W, 2-0 5 1-3 5 3 3 2 3 Nippert H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 Oliver H, 4 2 0 0 0 0 1 N.Feliz S, 10-12 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Nippert 1-0. Kazmir (M.Ramirez). WP—Kazmir. T—2:33. A—20,210 (49,170).

NP ERA 102 6.51 19 7.15 NP ERA 97 2.38 13 5.32 15 1.74 10 3.60 HBP—by

Rays 4, Indians 3 (11 innings) ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jason Bartlett laid down a bunt to drive in the winning run in the 11th inning as Tampa Bay beat Cleveland. John Jaso hit a one-out infield single against Jamey Wright (1-2) and went to third on Gabe Kapler’s hit-and-run single to right. Bartlett then laid down a bunt on the first base side of the mound that Wright fielded and was forced to make a desperation toss toward the plate that went over catcher Mike Redmond’s head. Cleveland AB R H A.Cabrera ss 1 0 0 Valbuena ss 4 0 1 Grudzielanek 2b 5 0 1 Choo rf 4 0 0 Hafner dh 4 0 2 Kearns lf 4 1 1 Branyan 1b 5 0 0 Peralta 3b 5 1 3 Redmond c 5 1 1 Crowe cf 5 0 2 Totals 42 3 11

BI 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 3

BB 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 3 0 1 0 2 2 2 2 1 13

Avg. .287 .158 .307 .292 .262 .327 .224 .246 .244 .455

Kathy Willens / The Associated Press

New York Yankees’ Ramiro Pena steals second beneath a leaping Boston Red Sox shortstop Marco Scutaro in the sixth inning of a baseball game at Yankee Stadium in New York, Monday.

Tampa Bay Zobrist rf-2b Crawford lf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b Blalock dh B.Upton cf Jaso c Brignac ss-2b b-Kapler ph-rf S.Rodriguez 2b a-W.Aybar ph 1-Bartlett pr-ss Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 3 2 2 1 0 42

R H 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

BI 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 2 1 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 11

Avg. .266 .313 .313 .181 .250 .218 .302 .282 .222 .220 .254 .236

Cleveland 010 101 000 00 — 3 11 1 Tampa Bay 200 000 010 01 — 4 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-reached on error for S.Rodriguez in the 7th. bgrounded out for Brignac in the 9th. 1-ran for W.Aybar in the 7th. E—Grudzielanek (1). LOB—Cleveland 10, Tampa Bay 10. 2B—Hafner (5), Kearns (11), Crawford (12). 3B—Peralta (2), Crawford (4). RBIs—Valbuena (9), Peralta (15), Crowe (3), Crawford (17), Longoria (32), Blalock (1), Bartlett (19). SB—Grudzielanek (2), Crowe (1), B.Upton (10). S—Bartlett. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 6 (Crowe, Branyan 3, Grudzielanek, Valbuena); Tampa Bay 4 (Jaso 2, Brignac, Zobrist). Runners moved up—Branyan, B.Upton. GIDP— Grudzielanek, Hafner. DP—Tampa Bay 2 (Longoria, S.Rodriguez, C.Pena), (S.Rodriguez, Brignac, C.Pena). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carmona 6 2-3 5 2 2 1 7 105 3.33 Laffey H, 5 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 6 2.79 C.Perez BS, 3-8 1 1 0 0 0 2 14 2.13 Sipp 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 1.69 K.Wood 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 6.00 J.Wright L, 1-2 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 14 5.52 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann 6 10 3 3 3 3 94 2.54 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 9 5.91 Benoit 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 5 19 0.00 R.Soriano 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.59 Cormier 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 3.68 Wheeler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.13 Snnnstn W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.35 Niemann pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Laffey pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Laffey 2-0, C.Perez 1-1, Choate 1-0, Benoit 2-0, Wheeler 1-0. PB—Redmond. T—3:42. A—18,879 (36,973).

Twins 8, Blue Jays 3

AB 5 5 5 4 3 4 5 3 1 4 39

AB 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 4 4 36

R H 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 4 10

BI 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .308 .370 .264 .342 .257 .299 .232 .276 .277

Baltimore C.Patterson lf Markakis rf Wigginton 2b M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Wieters c Ad.Jones cf Atkins 1b 1-Lugo pr C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 2 4 5 5 4 4 4 3 0 4 35

R H 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 10

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .318 .293 .315 .283 .245 .271 .245 .236 .208 .208

Kansas City 110 001 100 — 4 10 1 Baltimore 100 010 100 — 3 10 1 1-ran for Atkins in the 9th. E—Kendall (6), Wigginton (6). LOB—Kansas City 8, Baltimore 10. 2B—B.Butler (9), Callaspo (10), Y.Betancourt (7). RBIs—B.Butler 2 (24), Y.Betancourt (12), Wigginton 2 (26), M.Tejada (19). SB—Podsednik (14), C.Patterson 2 (2). CS—Aviles (2). S—C.Patterson. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 5 (J.Guillen, Podsednik, Kendall 2, Callaspo); Baltimore 4 (C.Patterson, Wieters, M.Tejada 2). Runners moved up—DeJesus, Y.Betancourt, Markakis, Wigginton, C.Izturis. GIDP—J.Guillen, Ad.Jones. DP—Kansas City 1 (Callaspo, Aviles, B.Butler); Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, Wigginton, Atkins). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies W, 3-2 6 7 2 2 1 2 101 4.93 Farnsworth H, 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 17 3.31 Bl.Wood H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Soria S, 10-12 1 1 0 0 2 1 22 3.38 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bergesen L, 3-3 6 2-3 10 4 3 2 2 101 5.45 Uehara 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.08 Ohman 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Uehara 2-0. IBB—off Soria (Markakis), off Bergesen (Maier). HBP—by Farnsworth (C.Patterson), by Bergesen (J.Guillen). Balk—Bergesen. T—2:43. A—9,299 (48,290).

NL ROUNDUP

TORONTO — Justin Morneau homered twice, Delmon Young also went deep and Minnesota beat Toronto. Morneau went three for four with a walk and four RBIs. He hit a solo homer off Rommie Lewis in the sixth inning and added a two-run drive off Shawn Camp in the eighth, his first multihomer game this season and the 13th of his career. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf B.Harris ss Casilla ss Punto 3b Totals

Kansas City Podsednik lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Kendall c Totals

R H 1 1 1 2 2 3 3 3 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 12

BI 0 1 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0 5

SO 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .265 .289 .360 .374 .258 .226 .267 .197 .250 .261

Toronto AB R H F.Lewis rf 5 1 1 A.Hill 2b 5 0 0 Lind lf 4 0 2 V.Wells cf 4 0 3 Overbay 1b 4 0 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 2 J.Bautista 3b 4 1 1 J.Buck c 3 0 1 R.Ruiz dh 4 0 1 Totals 37 3 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 5

Avg. .284 .173 .225 .310 .181 .263 .241 .278 .150

Minnesota 010 401 020 — 8 12 0 Toronto 020 010 000 — 3 11 2 E—Overbay 2 (3). LOB—Minnesota 9, Toronto 8. 2B—Span (6), O.Hudson (6). HR—Delm.Young (4), off Eveland; Morneau (10), off R.Lewis; Morneau (11), off Camp; J.Bautista (11), off Slowey. RBIs—O.Hudson (12), Morneau 4 (29), Delm.Young (15), V.Wells (30), J.Bautista 2 (31). SB—Punto (3). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 5 (Kubel 2, O.Hudson, Delm.Young 2); Toronto 3 (Overbay, A.Hill 2). Runners moved up—Span, Lind, R.Ruiz. GIDP— J.Bautista. DP—Minnesota 1 (O.Hudson, Morneau); Toronto 1 (J.Bautista, Overbay). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Slowey W, 5-3 5 8 3 3 0 2 98 4.70 Al.Burnett H, 1 2 2 0 0 1 0 24 3.26 Guerrier 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 2.00 Crain 1 1 0 0 0 1 20 6.32 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Eveland L, 3-3 4 9 5 3 4 2 88 4.98 R.Lewis 2 1 1 1 1 2 26 3.48 Camp 2 2 2 2 0 0 20 3.38 Roenicke 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 6.00 Eveland pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Lewis 1-0. WP—Slowey, Eveland. PB—Mauer. T—2:57. A—13,892 (49,539).

Royals 4, Orioles 3 BALTIMORE — Kyle Davies allowed two runs in six innings, and Kansas City defeated Baltimore for its third win in four games under new manager Ned Yost.

Cardinals 6, Nationals 2 ST. LOUIS — Albert Pujols had three hits and a walk and helped fuel a four-run first inning from the cleanup slot in St. Louis’ victory over Washington. Kyle Lohse (1-3) became the final member of the rotation to win, a day after the Cardinals fell out of the NL Central lead for the first time since July 30, 2009.

Arizona K.Johnson 2b C.Jackson lf S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b C.Young cf T.Abreu 3b Hester c E.Jackson p c-Ryal ph Heilman p Totals

AB 4 3 5 4 4 3 4 4 2 1 0 34

R H 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Barden ss Cantu 3b Uggla 2b C.Ross rf R.Paulino c Maybin cf Volstad p a-Petersen ph Pinto p Meyer p b-B.Carroll ph Leroux p Totals

AB 4 3 1 3 3 4 3 4 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

BB 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 7

Avg. .265 .260 .307 .252 .262 .282 .328 .212 .176 .355 ---

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 2 13

Avg. .223 .288 .293 .250 .265 .275 .305 .297 .242 .214 .083 ----.220 ---

Arizona 130 000 001 — 5 10 0 Florida 000 000 001 — 1 6 1 a-flied out for Volstad in the 5th. b-struck out for Meyer in the 8th. c-grounded out for E.Jackson in the 9th. E—H.Ramirez (6). LOB—Arizona 7, Florida 6. 2B—C.Jackson (3), Hester (3), Coghlan (2), Cantu (11). 3B—J.Upton (2). RBIs—C.Jackson (5), S.Drew (14), Hester (3), C.Ross (19). SB—Hester (1), Coghlan (5). SF—C.Jackson. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 4 (C.Jackson, S.Drew 2, T.Abreu); Florida 1 (G.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Ryal. GIDP—H.Ramirez. DP—Arizona 1 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). Arizona IP H R ER Jackson W, 2-5 8 4 0 0 Heilman 1 2 1 1 Florida IP H R ER Volstad L, 3-4 5 7 4 3 Pinto 2 1 0 0 Meyer 1 1 0 0 Leroux 1 1 1 1 HBP—by E.Jackson (C.Ross). T—2:48. A—10,870 (38,560).

BB 2 0 BB 1 2 0 1

SO 12 1 SO 4 2 1 0

NP ERA 114 6.33 21 3.78 NP ERA 80 4.47 33 2.25 19 11.57 20 6.60

Reds 6, Brewers 3 CINCINNATI — Jonny Gomes’ three-run homer completed a five-run rally in the seventh inning, and Cincinnati made sure they’d stay in first place for yet another day by beating Milwaukee. Gomes’ homer off Todd Coffey (1-1) sent the Reds to their eighth victory in nine games. Milwaukee Weeks 2b A.Escobar ss Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Hart rf Zaun c Gerut cf Gallardo p a-Inglett ph Coffey p Suppan p c-Counsell ph Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 4 3 4 2 1 0 0 1 38

R H 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 12

Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Bruce rf Gomes lf Masset p Herrera p Cordero p Stubbs cf R.Hernandez c Cueto p b-Heisey ph-lf Totals

AB 5 3 3 3 2 3 0 0 0 2 3 2 2 28

R 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .250 .234 .338 .274 .309 .287 .273 .203 .158 .343 --.200 .290

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 2 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 6 7

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 5

Avg. .275 .265 .297 .273 .273 .295 ------.198 .288 .250 .308

Washington AB W.Harris rf 3 b-Alb.Gonzalez ph 0 c-A.Dunn ph 1 Slaten p 0 Storen p 0 Capps p 0 C.Guzman 2b 4 Zimmerman 3b 4 Willingham lf 3 I.Rodriguez c 4 A.Kennedy 1b 4 Desmond ss 4 Bernadina cf 3 Stammen p 2 a-Morse ph-rf 2 Totals 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 7

Avg. .179 .297 .252 ----.000 .311 .318 .259 .336 .255 .271 .306 .313 .273

Milwaukee 000 100 002 — 3 12 0 Cincinnati 000 001 50x — 6 9 1 a-singled for Gallardo in the 7th. b-tripled for Cueto in the 7th. c-singled for Suppan in the 9th. E—B.Phillips (1). LOB—Milwaukee 9, Cincinnati 8. 2B—Zaun 2 (7), O.Cabrera (6), Votto (7). 3B—A.Escobar (5), Heisey (1). HR—Hart (6), off Cueto; Hart (7), off Herrera; Gomes (5), off Coffey. RBIs—Hart 2 (19), Counsell (11), O.Cabrera (19), Votto (25), Rolen (19), Gomes 3 (24). SB—A.Escobar (1). S—B.Phillips. SF—Rolen. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 4 (Gallardo 2, Braun 2); Cincinnati 4 (Rolen, O.Cabrera, R.Hernandez 2). Runners moved up—Gerut. GIDP—McGehee. DP—Milwaukee 1 (McGehee, Fielder); Cincinnati 2 (Stubbs, Stubbs, R.Hernandez), (O.Cabrera, B.Phillips, Votto).

St. Louis F.Lopez ss Ludwick rf Holliday lf Pujols 1b Rasmus cf Freese 3b Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b Lohse p T.Miller p Motte p McClellan p d-Stavinoha ph Franklin p Totals

R 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 2 1 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 3

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .250 .297 .293 .324 .278 .307 .270 .234 .250 --.000 1.000 .344 .000

Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo 6 4 1 1 6 5 120 2.89 Coffey L, 1-1 1 5 5 5 1 0 21 5.00 Suppan 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 5.91 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cueto W, 3-1 7 7 1 1 1 7 113 3.67 Masset 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 6.63 Herrera 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 20 3.38 Crdero S, 13-15 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.15 Inherited runners-scored—Cordero 1-0. IBB—off Coffey (Bruce). HBP—by Coffey (Stubbs). T—3:02. A—12,409 (42,319).

AB 4 3 3 3 4 3 4 3 2 0 1 0 1 0 31

Washington 000 020 000 — 2 8 0 St. Louis 400 000 02x — 6 9 2 a-popped out for Stammen in the 7th. b-was announced for W.Harris in the 7th. c-struck out for Alb.Gonzalez in the 7th. d-grounded out for McClellan in the 8th. E—Schumaker 2 (6). LOB—Washington 7, St. Louis 6. 2B—A.Kennedy (6), Ludwick (9). 3B—Freese (1). RBIs—W.Harris (10), Rasmus (17), Freese 2 (24), Y.Molina 2 (24), Schumaker (8). SB—Y.Molina (5). CS—W.Harris (2). S—Bernadina, Freese. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 6 (Bernadina, C.Guzman, A.Dunn 2, Morse 2); St. Louis 3 (Schumaker, Holliday 2). Runners moved up—W.Harris, Y.Molina. GIDP— Freese. DP—Washington 1 (Desmond, C.Guzman, A.Kennedy). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stammen L, 1-2 6 6 4 4 2 4 96 5.86 Slaten 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 7 2.08 Storen 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Capps 1 3 2 2 0 0 15 1.77 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse W, 1-3 6 6 2 1 1 4 87 5.11 T.Miller H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.25 Motte H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 8 3.86 McClellan H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 22 2.08 Franklin 1 2 0 0 0 1 16 2.76 Lohse pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Storen 1-0, T.Miller 2-0, Motte 2-0. HBP—by Storen (Ludwick).

Mets 3, Braves 2 ATLANTA — Mike Pelfrey gave New York a lift with 7 2 ⁄3 strong innings and New York beat Atlanta to end a five-game losing streak. Pelfrey (5-1) became the first Mets starting pitcher to win a game this month.

McLouth cf D.Lowe p O’Flaherty p Moylan p a-Me.Cabrera ph Saito p Totals

4 1 0 0 0 0 28

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

2 0 0 0 0 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 4

1 .198 0 .071 0 --0 --0 .193 0 --5

New York 020 001 000 — 3 5 0 Atlanta 000 011 000 — 2 8 0 a-sacrificed for Moylan in the 8th. LOB—New York 4, Atlanta 6. 2B—Carter (2), Barajas (6), Prado (11), Hinske (8), McLouth (8). HR—Hinske (2), off Pelfrey. RBIs—Carter (3), Barajas 2 (22), C.Jones (9), Hinske (18). SB—Jos.Reyes (9), Bay (5), Y.Escobar (3). CS—Prado (3). S—L.Castillo, D.Lowe, Me.Cabrera. SF—C.Jones. Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Pelfrey 2, D.Wright, Francoeur); Atlanta 5 (Y.Escobar, Heyward, McCann 2, McLouth). Runners moved up—Carter, D.Wright, Matthews Jr., Heyward. GIDP—I.Davis, Matthews Jr., Heyward, McCann, Y.Escobar. DP—New York 3 (Jos.Reyes, I.Davis), (L.Castillo, I.Davis, Jos.Reyes), (Jos.Reyes, I.Davis); Atlanta 2 (Prado, Y.Escobar, Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Glaus). New York IP H R ER BB Pelfrey W, 5-1 7 2-3 7 2 2 2 Feliciano H, 4 1-3 1 0 0 1 Rdriguez S, 6-8 1 0 0 0 1 Atlanta IP H R ER BB D.Lowe L, 5-4 7 4 3 3 3 O’Flaherty 2-3 0 0 0 0 Moylan 1-3 1 0 0 0 Saito 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Feliciano D.Lowe (I.Davis). WP—Pelfrey, D.Lowe. T—2:47. A—21,086 (49,743).

SO NP ERA 3 103 3.02 1 14 1.62 1 14 1.83 SO NP ERA 3 93 5.47 1 10 2.25 0 5 2.51 3 15 2.25 1-0. HBP—by

Phillies 12, Pirates 2 PHILADELPHIA — Kyle Kendrick pitched eight impressive innings, Ryan Howard hit a grand slam and had six RBIs, and Philadelphia beat Pittsburgh. Jayson Werth had a three-run homer for the NL East-leading Phillies, who have won four straight and 12 of 15. Pittsburgh AB R Delw.Young 2b 4 1 An.LaRoche 3b 4 0 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 G.Jones rf 4 0 Church lf 4 0 Doumit c 3 0 Clement 1b 3 0 Taschner p 0 0 Cedeno ss 3 1 Morton p 1 0 a-Iwamura ph 1 0 Karstens p 0 0 Pearce 1b 1 0 Totals 32 2

H BI BB 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 1

SO 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .241 .254 .331 .254 .222 .274 .189 --.233 .000 .157 .200 .167

Philadelphia AB Victorino cf 4 Polanco 2b 4 Rollins ss 4 Howard 1b 5 Werth rf 5 Bastardo p 0 Ibanez lf 4 Dobbs 3b 4 C.Ruiz c 4 K.Kendrick p 3 b-B.Francisco ph-rf 1 Totals 38

H 2 1 2 3 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 13

SO 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 5

Avg. .275 .316 .407 .299 .336 --.238 .182 .341 .000 .200

R 3 2 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 12

BI 0 0 1 6 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 11

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Pittsburgh 100 010 000 — 2 5 1 Philadelphia 105 001 14x — 12 13 1 a-grounded out for Morton in the 5th. b-grounded out for K.Kendrick in the 8th. E—A.McCutchen (3), K.Kendrick (1). LOB—Pittsburgh 4, Philadelphia 5. 2B—Cedeno (4), Rollins (4), Werth (20). HR—Delw.Young (1), off K.Kendrick; Werth (8), off Morton; Howard (7), off Taschner. RBIs—Delw. Young 2 (7), Rollins (4), Howard 6 (29), Werth 4 (31). SB—Delw.Young (1), Victorino (6), Dobbs (1). Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 1 (A.McCutchen); Philadelphia 3 (Victorino, Dobbs 2). Runners moved up—Delw.Young, Iwamura, Polanco, Rollins, Dobbs. GIDP—Clement. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, Howard). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB Morton L, 1-7 4 6 6 6 0 Karstens 2 1-3 3 2 1 0 Taschner 1 2-3 4 4 4 2 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB Kendrick W, 2-1 8 5 2 2 1 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Taschner Morton (Victorino). T—2:38. A—45,371 (43,651).

SO NP ERA 3 73 9.68 2 33 5.40 0 40 6.23 SO NP ERA 4 105 5.24 2 12 1.42 1-1. HBP—by

Cubs 4, Rockies 2 (11 innings) CHICAGO — Aramis Ramirez hit a two-run homer in the 11th inning, his first home run in more than a month, lifting Chicago to a victory over Colorado. Starlin Castro opened the 11th with his third hit of the game, a single off Matt Belisle (1-1). Colorado AB R C.Gonzalez cf-rf 5 1 S.Smith lf 5 1 Hawpe rf 3 0 1-Fowler pr-cf 1 0 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 Helton 1b 3 0 Olivo c 4 0 Stewart 3b 5 0 Barmes 2b 4 0 Cook p 3 0 Beimel p 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 a-Giambi ph 1 0 Belisle p 0 0 Totals 39 2

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 2 4 10

Chicago AB R H Fukudome rf 5 1 2 S.Castro ss 5 1 3 D.Lee 1b 5 0 0 Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 1 2 Colvin cf-lf 3 1 1 A.Soriano lf 3 0 0 Grabow p 0 0 0 Marmol p 0 0 0 b-Nady ph 1 0 0 Marshall p 0 0 0 Fontenot 2b 4 0 1 Soto c 0 0 0 K.Hill c 3 0 1 c-Theriot ph-2b 1 0 0 R.Wells p 2 0 0 Byrd cf 2 0 0 Totals 39 4 10

BI 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .328 .270 .338 .233 .295 .265 .289 .280 .219 .250 .000 --.200 .500 Avg. .315 .361 .230 .175 .268 .323 ----.196 --.295 .301 .226 .316 .214 .340

New York Jos.Reyes ss L.Castillo 2b Bay lf Carter rf Francoeur rf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Barajas c Matthews Jr. cf Pelfrey p Feliciano p F.Rodriguez p Totals

AB 4 3 3 2 1 4 2 4 3 3 0 0 29

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 3 3

SO 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .221 .257 .278 .400 .212 .270 .271 .273 .173 .188 -----

Colorado 001 000 010 00 — 2 8 2 Chicago 100 100 000 02 — 4 10 0 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for R.Betancourt in the 9th. b-struck out for Marmol in the 9th. c-flied out for K.Hill in the 10th. 1-ran for Hawpe in the 8th. E—Olivo (3), Tulowitzki (3). LOB—Colorado 8, Chicago 5. 2B—C.Gonzalez (6), Fukudome (8), Fontenot (5). HR—Ar.Ramirez (4), off Belisle. RBIs—S.Smith (16), Olivo (20), Ar.Ramirez 3 (20), K.Hill (2). SB—S.Castro (1). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 5 (Barmes 2, Hawpe, Stewart 2); Chicago 3 (R.Wells 2, Ar.Ramirez). GIDP—Stewart, D.Lee 2, A.Soriano. DP—Colorado 3 (Stewart, Barmes, Helton), (Stewart, Barmes, Helton), (Tulowitzki, Barmes, Helton); Chicago 1 (S.Castro, D.Lee).

Atlanta Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b McCann c Glaus 1b Hinske lf Y.Escobar ss

AB 3 4 1 4 4 4 3

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

H BI BB 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 0 1 2 0 0

Avg. .329 .275 .222 .243 .275 .389 .202

Colorado IP Cook 7 Beimel 0 R.Betancourt 1 Belisle L, 1-1 2 1-3 Chicago IP R.Wells 6 2-3 Grabow H, 5 2-3 Marmol BS, 2-8 1 2-3

H 7 1 0 2 H 7 1 0

R 2 0 0 2 R 1 1 0

ER 1 0 0 2 ER 1 1 0

BB 1 0 0 0 BB 1 2 1

SO 3 0 1 3 SO 3 0 3

NP 84 1 11 36 NP 116 26 25

ERA 5.13 0.66 4.97 2.77 ERA 4.13 8.16 1.37

Marshall W, 3-1 2 0 0 0 0 4 21 2.21 Beimel pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—R.Betancourt 1-0, Marmol 3-1. PB—K.Hill. T—3:18. A—35,760 (41,210).

Padres 3, Giants 1 SAN DIEGO — Adrian Gonzalez homered off Matt Cain, Clayton Richard and two relievers combined on a four-hitter and San Diego stayed atop the NL West by beating San Francisco for the seventh straight time this season in a matchup of the division’s top two teams. San Francisco Rowand cf Torres lf Sandoval 3b B.Molina c A.Huff 1b Uribe ss M.Downs 2b d-Velez ph Schierholtz rf Cain p Runzler p Romo p c-Bowker ph D.Bautista p Totals

AB 4 3 2 3 3 4 3 1 4 2 0 0 1 0 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .257 .288 .283 .330 .280 .271 .242 .182 .309 .071 --.000 .200 ---

San Diego AB R Gwynn cf 4 0 Eckstein 2b 4 2 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 2 1 Headley 3b 4 0 Torrealba c 2 0 Venable rf 2 0 a-Salazar ph 0 0 b-Stairs ph 1 0 Adams p 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0 Blanks lf 3 0 Hairston Jr. ss 3 0 Richard p 2 0 Denorfia rf 1 0 Totals 28 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 3 8

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 6

Avg. .194 .287 .254 .298 .297 .225 .184 .160 ----.157 .217 .154 1.000

San Francisco 000 100 000 — 1 4 0 San Diego 100 010 10x — 3 8 0 a-was announced for Venable in the 7th. b-struck out for Salazar in the 7th. c-struck out for Romo in the 8th. d-struck out for M.Downs in the 9th. LOB—San Francisco 7, San Diego 13. 2B—A.Huff (8). HR—Ad.Gonzalez (8), off Cain. RBIs—Uribe (24), Ad.Gonzalez (19), Headley (15), Blanks (15). SB—Venable (10). CS—Venable (1). S—Gwynn, Ad.Gonzalez, Richard. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 4 (Schierholtz 3, B.Molina); San Diego 6 (Torrealba, Gwynn 2, Hairston Jr. 2, Headley). Runners moved up—Eckstein. GIDP—A.Huff. DP—San Diego 1 (Ad.Gonzalez, Hairston Jr.). San FranciscoIP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain L, 2-3 6 6 2 2 5 5 119 3.33 Runzler 1-3 1 1 1 2 0 17 4.30 Romo 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.63 D.Bautista 1 1 0 0 1 0 20 0.00 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard W, 3-2 7 3 1 1 3 5 98 2.94 Adams H, 11 1 0 0 0 2 2 20 3.00 H.Bell S, 11-13 1 1 0 0 0 2 21 1.06 Inherited runners-scored—Romo 3-1. IBB—off D.Bautista (Ad.Gonzalez), off Runzler (Torrealba). HBP— by Romo (Blanks). T—2:57. A—20,558 (42,691).

Dodgers 6, Astros 2 LOS ANGELES — John Ely pitched his third straight game of six or more innings without issuing a walk, Casey Blake and Blake Dewitt each drove in two runs and Los Angeles extended its winning streak to eight games with a victory over Houston. Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf Pence rf Blum ss P.Feliz 3b Quintero c W.Rodriguez p Sampson p b-Sullivan ph c-Michaels ph Lyon p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 0 0 1 0 32

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 0

SO 2 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .286 .261 .244 .193 .248 .308 .224 .239 .333 --.200 .188 ---

Los Angeles Martin c Re.Johnson rf Man.Ramirez lf Kemp cf Loney 1b Blake 3b DeWitt 2b J.Carroll ss Ely p a-Belliard ph Jef.Weaver p Sherrill p Troncoso p Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 2 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 30

R 0 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .265 .242 .358 .277 .307 .233 .275 .282 .000 .296 ----.000

Houston 100 010 000 — 2 6 1 Los Angeles 300 100 02x — 6 9 0 a-grounded out for Ely in the 7th. b-was announced for Sampson in the 8th. c-grounded out for Sullivan in the 8th. E—Keppinger (4). LOB—Houston 3, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Man.Ramirez (6), Kemp (8), Blake (9). 3B—DeWitt 2 (2). RBIs—Berkman (13), P.Feliz (13), Loney (25), Blake 2 (21), DeWitt 2 (11), J.Carroll (7). CS—Martin (1). SF—Loney, J.Carroll. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 2 (W.Rodriguez, Pence); Los Angeles 2 (DeWitt, J.Carroll). Runners moved up—Keppinger, Quintero. GIDP— Ca.Lee. DP—Los Angeles 1 (J.Carroll, DeWitt, Loney). Houston IP H R ER BB Rdriguez L, 2-5 6 2-3 7 4 1 2 Sampson 1-3 0 0 0 0 Lyon 1 2 2 2 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB Ely W, 2-1 7 5 2 2 0 Jef.Weaver H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 Sherrill H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 Troncoso 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Sampson Lyon (Loney). WP—Ely. T—2:24. A—35,282 (56,000).

SO NP ERA 1 98 4.30 0 3 1.13 1 20 4.41 SO NP ERA 8 96 3.51 0 3 4.15 1 10 6.92 0 16 3.66 1-0. IBB—off

LEADERS AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Morneau, Minnesota, .374; Mauer, Minnesota, .360; ISuzuki, Seattle, .354; MiCabrera, Detroit, .354; Butler, Kansas City, .342; Guerrero, Texas, .340; AJackson, Detroit, .331. RUNS—Longoria, Tampa Bay, 32; Gardner, New York, 31; Youkilis, Boston, 31; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 28; AJackson, Detroit, 28; 6 tied at 27. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 32; JBautista, Toronto, 31; Guerrero, Texas, 31; ARodriguez, New York, 31; Teixeira, New York, 30; VWells, Toronto, 30. HITS—ISuzuki, Seattle, 56; Butler, Kansas City, 52; AJackson, Detroit, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 51; Guerrero, Texas, 49; Morneau, Minnesota, 49; VWells, Toronto, 48. DOUBLES—MiCabrera, Detroit, 14; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 14; Pedroia, Boston, 14; VWells, Toronto, 14; Hunter, Los Angeles, 13; 6 tied at 12. TRIPLES—Crawford, Tampa Bay, 4; AJackson, Detroit, 3; AdJones, Baltimore, 3; Maier, Kansas City, 3; Span, Minnesota, 3; 17 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—Konerko, Chicago, 13; Wigginton, Baltimore, 12; JBautista, Toronto, 11; Morneau, Minnesota, 11; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 10; VWells, Toronto, 10; Cano, New York, 9; AnJones, Chicago, 9; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 9; KMorales, Los Angeles, 9. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 18; Gardner, New York, 17; Andrus, Texas, 14; Podsednik, Kansas City, 14; RDavis, Oakland, 13; Rios, Chicago, 12; Crawford, Tampa Bay, 10; ISuzuki, Seattle, 10; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 10.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 D5

Nationals Continued from D1 Junior entries in the criterium and road races have fewer category restrictions than riders competing in the U23 and elite fields. In fact, the road and criterium races for the junior boys ages 10-14 and junior girls ages 10-18 divisions are essentially all-comers events, and any rider of appropriate age may participate. For all categories, participants must be U.S. citizens and must hold an annual USA Cycling license (which if bought now would be good for cyclocross nationals when they return to Bend in December). For a complete list of eligibility guidelines, go to www.usacycling.org. The 2010 USA Cycling Elite, U23 & Junior Road National Championships in Bend will be staged in conjunction with the U.S. Paracycling Road National Championships, which are governed by USA Paralympics. USA Cycling officials predict that between 750 and 1,000 riders will participate in the national championships. Many of those riders are expected to contest titles in all three road disciplines. Racing will be conducted on a different course in Bend each day during nationals, and an army of volunteers is being sought to ensure that these

Girls Continued from D1 Parr shot a 39 on the front before posting a 38 on the back nine on her way to a 77, which put her alone in fifth place after the opening round of play. Mansberger carded a 41 on the front nine and posted a 39 on the back, shooting even par over the final four holes. “Those two just played lights out,” Hackenbruck said. “And they still thought they gave up a couple of strokes.” Mountain View, which was

2010 USA Cycling Elite, U23 & Junior Road National Championships and U.S. Paracycling Road National Championships HOW TO REGISTER Online: Riders register online through their USA Cycling license accounts at www.usacycling.org. Online registration closes June 15. Entry fees: $60 per event for elite and under-23 riders; $40 per event for juniors (ages 10-18). Late fees: After June 1, prices increase by $25 per event for elite and U23 riders, and by $10 for juniors. Entry fees double for on-site registration. On site: Riders can register up to one day prior to their event. On-site registration will be held from noon to 8 p.m. on Monday, June 21, and from 7 to 9 p.m. June 22 through June 26 in the Old Mill District, 420 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 429, Bend. Note: A current USA Cycling annual license is required upon registration. Licenses can be purchased at www.usacycling.org.

HOW TO VOLUNTEER What’s needed: Hundreds of volunteers for dozens of positions. When: 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., June 22-June 27. Contact: Renee Mansour at 541-771-1094 or at rmansour@ bendbroadband.com.

events run smoothly. Of course, the support of volunteers and communitywide backing are two oft-cited reasons why USA Cycling selected Bend to host road nationals. Volunteers are needed as early as 6 a.m. on some days and as late as 9 p.m. on others. Hundreds of volunteers are being recruited for myriad positions, including course marshals and vehicle drivers, and to hand water to cyclists at aid stations. To learn more, contact volunteer

also competing at the 5A state tourney, ended the first day in sixth place with a score of 382. Kersey Wilcox posted an 89 to lead the Cougars, who advanced to state after placing second at last week’s Intermountain Conference championships. Individually, Bend High’s Kayla Good enters today’s final round in a tie for 10th place after shooting an 85. The Lava Bears’ Heidi Froelich also is at this year’s state tourney as an individual. Froelich is tied for 14th after her 87 on Monday. The 5A state tourney resumes today at 7:30 a.m.

coordinator Renee Mansour at 541-771-1094. In other Central Oregon cycling news this week: The 11th annual Spring Fling trail work party, hosted by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance, is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. this Saturday at Wanoga Sno-park. Volunteers should meet at the old Mt. Bachelor park-and-ride lot on Simpson Avenue at 9 a.m. Volunteers are asked to wear pants and long-sleeve shirts and should bring gloves, eye protec-

Blues

tion and a helmet. COTA will supply tools, directions and refreshments. Following the work party, a barbecue and raffle for volunteers will be held at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend. For more information, visit www. cotamtb.com. Also on Saturday, an official “grand opening” to celebrate the expansion and improvements of the Peterson Ridge trail system will begin at 11 a.m. at the Village Green Park in Sisters. A brief ceremony will be followed by a group mountain bike ride on the newly improved trails. The Bend Bicycle Film Festival returns to Bend’s Tower Theatre this Saturday for its second annual showcase of the Central Oregon cycling scene. An all-ages show will kick off the festival at 4 p.m., followed by a 21-and-older viewing at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at local bike shops or at the Tower Theatre. The Bend Bicycle Film Festival is a fundraiser for the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and the Bend Endurance Academy. Cyclists and volunteers who participated in the Bend Don’t Brake road race on May 7 helped raise some $1,500, which was donated to The Center Foundation and has been awarded in the form of a college scholarship to a junior at Bend High School.

Continued from D1 Out of 20 Blues team members, 12 are new to rugby this year and only eight are returning players from last year. “They are still really green as a team,” says Eric Hansen, a Blues assistant coach who plays for the Bend Rugby Club Roughriders adult senior squad. “I think we have more guys learning the game than the teams that we are playing. But we have more of a clue about HOW to play the game.” Most of the Blues are students at Bend High School. Two players are from Mountain View, two are from Summit, and one player is from Sisters High. Many of the players have been involved with football, wrestling and soccer. “A lot of kids are just looking for an alternative sport,” says Greenleaf. “They have gotten a little disillusioned with traditional sports. Rugby allows you to be creative. It’s continuous action.” The Bend Blues, made up of Central Oregon high school players, started three years ago simply scrimmaging other teams. Last year, the Blues began competing more seriously against teams representing other schools in Rugby Oregon Division II, which includes 10 relatively new teams. (Divisions are decided by longevity and past success in the league. Division I schools are more established than both Division II and III.) The Blues did not win many matches in 2009. “This whole season is kind of a surprise considering last year we were not good, to say the least,” says Kevin Baker, 18 and the top scorer for the Blues with 21 tries in nine games this season. “Last year we covered the basics,” says Ethan Hawes, 18 and a senior at Summit High School, who starting playing rugby five years ago when he lived in Southern California. “We have strategy this year.” Hawes is another of the Blues’ leading scorers. He plays the No. 8 field position, which entails supporting the backs when the backs are on attack.

Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

Boys Continued from D1 But the Panthers, playing with the confidence and comfort that comes with course knowledge, still carded a score which Buerger predicts could be good enough to help Redmond to a state title. “Any time you’re below 300 in the state tournament, well, generally that’s what you have to have (to compete for the win),” Buerger noted. Redmond, only two strokes behind first-day leaders Lake Oswego (296), holds an 11-stroke lead over third-place Tualatin (309). With a chance of rain forecast for today, Buerger likes his team’s chances. “What we did today is not a fluke,” Buerger said. “It’s what happens when we come out and do what we can do.”

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TENNIS ADULT TENNIS CLINIC: For ages 18 and older; beginner clinic meets on Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; intermediate to advanced clinic meets on Wednesdays, 6-7:30 p.m.; May 25-June 9 at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond; $30 or $15 per day; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. WEST BEND TENNIS CENTER OPEN COURT: Three indoor tennis courts open to the public; 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Drive); reservations encouraged; $16-$20 per hour per court; 541-330-2112; http://reservemycourt.com.

VOLLEYBALL BEND HIGH SCHOOL ALL-SKILLS VOLLEYBALL CAMP: For grades 6-8 and freshman; June 28-July 1, 9-11:30 a.m. at Bend High School Gym; skills include passing, setting, spiking, digging, serving and an introduction to blocking; $50; Head Coach Kristin Cooper at kristin.cooper@ bend.k12.or.us; 541-306-3235 . YOUTH VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; $5; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ADULT VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-10:30 p.m.; $5 www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183.

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BRAZILIAN SOCCER CAMP: Oregon Rush Soccer Club and Challenger Sports is offering the camp for ages 6-15; July 5-9; ages 6-10 from 9 a.m. to noon; ages 11-16 from 1-4 p.m.; at Buckingham Elementary School; $150; www.oregonrush. com; John O’Sullivan at 541-9775494; josullivan@oregonrush.com; Challenger Sports at 800-878-2167; www.challengersports.com. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; Coed from 6-8 p.m., Men’s 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com. ADULT/YOUTH FUTSAL: Futsal open play is for youth and adults to sharpen their foot skills and ball control; $5; every Sunday, 10 a.m. to noon; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

KID’S NIGHT OUT AT JUNIPER: Saturdays, through May, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; for ages 3-11; swimming, games, movies; the facility is closed to other patrons while the program is in session; registration required by noon each Saturday; $8-$10; https;//register.bendparksandrec. org; Jen Avery at 541-389-7665. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only; Saturday, May 22, 8-10 p.m. Cascade Swim Center in Redmond. Must have student identification. Cost is $2.50. 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. RAPRD FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:05 to 8:20 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone 18 and younger; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

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BEND ENDURANCE NORDIC SUMMER TRAINING: Coaching for nordic skiers ages 14-23 including strength training, rollerskiing, hiking, running, and exploring all summer long; Tuesdays-Saturdays; June 1-Aug. 22; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. MBSEF FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD SUMMER CAMP: With High Cascade Snowboard Camp and Windell’s at Mt. Hood; June 17-22; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. MBSEF SUMMER NORDIC CAMP: June 18-22, for kids age 8-18, and for seniors and masters; led by Torin Koos, Lars Flora, Kristina Strandberg, Dan Simoneau, and Tim Gibbons; also offering a Memorial Day Camp, May 29-31; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE HIGH SCHOOL SKI CAMP: At Mt. Hood will be held June 19-26; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE SUMMER SKI CAMP: At Mt. Hood for athletes 13 and younger; June 21-24; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE NORDIC SUMMER CAMPS: Three Five-day camp sessions for ages 14-23; June 23-27; July 21-25; August 18-22; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865.

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DRY CANYON RUN: A 5K and 10K running race in Redmond; Saturday, June 19 at 9 a.m.; starts in the American Legion Park across from Redmond High School; fundraiser for Redmond High track and field team; register at www.time2race. com; www.drycanyonrun.com. REGISTRATION FOR SUNRISE SUMMER CLASSIC: Half Marathon scheduled for Saturday, July 10; 5K and 10K also offered; starts and finishes at Smith Rock State Park in Terrebonne; online registration at www.smithrockrace.com; also register at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave. BLOOD, SWEAT & CHEERS 5-MILE RUN/WALK: Saturday, July 24, 7:25 a.m. at American Red Cross, Twin Knolls Drive, Bend; 5-mile running race a fundraiser for the American Red Cross; dog friendly; $30-35; $22 students; day-of-race registration available or contact 541-749-4100; collinsjm@usa.redcross.org CASCADE LAKES RELAY: July 30-31; running relay from Diamond Lake to Bend; registration is now open; walkers, runners and ultrarunners are welcome; www. cascadelakesrelay.com. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet, 1320 Galveston Ave., Bend; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; local running star Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; run up to seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; three to five miles. Two groups; one pace is 10-plus-minute miles, other is 8- to 9-minuteper-mile pace; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone, 845 Wall St., Bend. Personal trainer Kyle Will of Will Race Performance will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injury; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles at slower pace; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

age 50 and over; season runs midApril through July; games on weekday evenings at Skyline Sports Complex; practices at Hal Puddy Field, noon to 2 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, Friday; $60 and free for ages 75 and older; new players contact Brian Crosby at 541-318-0426 or briancrosby@bendcable.com. BEND SHOWDOWN ASA FAST PITCH: Four tournaments scheduled for this spring and summer; 14U Open May 22-23, 16U Open June 12-13 and 12U and 14U B League June 26-27; hosted by Bend Park and Recreation District; $350 per team; 541-3897275; greg@bendparksandrec.org.

Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

Self Referrals Welcome

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Former Walmart

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Continued from D6

SCUBA DIVING

19th St.

Calendar

Much has changed this season for the Blues. The head coach is new, the players’ attitudes have taken an upswing, and the team’s philosophy and goals are more clear. Greenleaf says the team has a maxim: “If we do four things we will be strong. The first one is to communicate, the second one is to support, the third one is to share the ball, and the fourth one is to play as a team. If we do that, we will be strong no matter who we put on the field.” For an upstart rugby team, Greenleaf says, obeying those four rather basic principals has made a big difference and has completely changed the dynamic on the field. “We outscored our opponents something like 367 to 60,” the coach says. “And it’s not because we are running over people.” Greenleaf also attributes the team’s success to community support. “That’s one of the reasons why this has worked this year, is because of the support that we have gotten from the Roughriders and the support from the parents of our kids, too.” While rugby is a rough-andtumble sport, Greenleaf says the Blues have vowed to play clean, to respect their opponents, and to not engage in fights on the field — all dramatic departures from the demeanor of Blues teams in previous years, according to Greenleaf. “I’m still learning the game slowly but surely, but it’s coming to me,” says Baker. “As a team we definitely just click. None of us really have much experience, but together we learn to flow and play well.” The Blues head to the Rugby Oregon Division II State Championship this Saturday in Portland at Delta Park. The match against Tualatin begins at 12:45 p.m. “They have come a long way,” says Hansen, the Blues’ assistant coach. “They are nowhere near where they were when they started. “They are a whole new team.”

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C O M M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

I B Triathlon • Junior triathlon team forming in Bend: The Bend Endurance Academy is coordinating a triathlon team for ages 13 to 16 and will hold the first meeting on Wednesday, May 26, 6 p.m. at the academy office, 500 S.W. Bond St., Suite 142, Bend. The 10-week training program welcomes boys and girls of all abilities and runs from June 8 to Aug. 14, meeting on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. Joanne Stevens, triathlete and certified member of the International Triathlon Coaching Association, will serve as head coach for the Bend Endurance Tri Team. Cost for the program is $250 for individuals without a swim pass at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center (where some of the training will take place), or $200 for individuals with a swim pass. Stevens can be contacted at jlestevens@hotmail.com or 541-848-3691. For more information, visit www.bendenduranceacademy.org.

Running • Registration open for Redmond’s Rockchuck Ramble: The Rockchuck Ramble Fun Run, a 327-yard sprint race, is slated for Saturday, July 3, in downtown Redmond’s Centennial Park. The event, which is designed to be a quick run, begins at 2 p.m. Participants receive a T-shirt, prizes, and a chance to win $507 cash. The entry fee is $10. Registration forms are available online at www.visitredmondoregon.com, and in person at the Redmond Chamber of Commerce and Convention Visitor’s Bureau and Joe A. Lochner Insurance Agency, Inc., State Farm Insurance. For more information, call Joe Lochner at 541-548-6023 or 541-480-7186. • Early — and cheaper — registration deadline for the Deschutes Dash is May 31: The sixth annual Deschutes Dash Weekend Sports Festival is set for July 17-18, with races starting and finishing in the Old Mill District in Bend. Early registration deadline is May 31, after which entry fees will increase. Participants may register until the day before each event. Events include Olympic-distance triathlon and duathlon, sprint-distance triathlon and duathlon, 5- and 10-kilometer running races, Kid’s Splash ’n Dash (ages 3-9), and a youth triathlon (ages 10-15). The Olympic-distance triathlon has been designated a USA Triathlon qualifier race. The top 33 percent of finishers in every age group will qualify to race in the 2010 USA Triathlon Age Group Championships in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on Sept. 25. The course format for the Deschutes Dash Olympicand sprint-distance duathlons have changed from previous years. They will be held in a run-bike-run format. Proceeds from the event benefit The Center Foundation of Bend. To register, visit www.freshairsports.com, or contact deschutesdash@freshairsports. com or 541-318-7388.

Swimming • Olympic pool cover removal at Juniper set for Wednesday: Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend will begin removing the tent cover on the Olympic pool on Wednesday. The process will take approximately one week, and the pool will remain open throughout. For current lap-swim and recreation-swim schedules, visit www.juniperswimandfitneses. com or call 541-389-7665.

Baseball • 12U Redmond Panthers Black wins championship: The Redmond Panthers 12U Black team won the Banks Oregon Junior Baseball Invitational Tournament this past weekend in Banks, beating out 11 other teams for the top spot. The Panthers defeated Lincoln Junior Baseball 9-2 in the quarterfinals and beat Barlow 10-9 in the semifinals before topping Clark County, Wash., 11-4 in the championship. The Panther team members are Brandon Benson, Isaiah Gibson, George Mendazona, Kyler Mason, P.J. Ross, Hayden Smith, Hunter Smith, Cody Shepherd, Chris Snelson-Myers and Kyler Veltman. — Bulletin staff report

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASKETBALL OPEN FULL AND HALF COURT: Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; West Bend Tennis Center, 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Dr.); $5 per person; reservations encouraged; 541-330-2112; http://reservemycourt.com. JAY’S STAR SHOOTER CAMP: Open to grades 5-12; Saturday, May 22 at Redmond High School; 5-7 grade, 8:30 a.m.-noon; grades 8-12, 1-4:30 p.m.; $42; www. starshooter.net; Coach Dustin Porter at dustin.porter@redmond.k12. or.us; 541-923-4800 ext. 2143.

BIKING COTA ANNUAL SPRING FLING WORK PARTY: Central Oregon Trail Alliance work crews needed on Saturday, May 22, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wanoga Sno-park; meet at the old Mt. Bachelor Park N Ride at 9 a.m.; focus on expanding new trail network; after party at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend; 541-306-1409; sgehman@ cocc.edu; www.cotamtb.com. ROAD & FREERIDE CYCLING CAMP: May 29-30; Road: for ages 12-23; riders will preview each course from this year’s National Championships, coming to Bend June 23-27; must be able to ride four hours each day and have some racing experience; Freeride: for kids who have experience jumping, but want progress quickly and safely; freeride cycling includes dirt jumping, riding on enhanced terrain and spending time with both wheels in the air; cost is $55 per day or $100 for the weekend; lunch included; www. BendEnduranceAcademy.org/camp; Bill Warburton at 541-335-1346. HIGH DESERT BMX RACES: Race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m.; helmet, long-sleeved shirt and pants required; one-day free membership and gear available; at Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Road; 541-815-6208, www.highdesertbmx. org; renegade_sjane@hotmail.com. BLAZING PEDALS FUN BIKE RIDE: Saturday, May 22; Sign up and depart 7-9 a.m.; rides will be through Juniper Flat, Maupin, Tygh Valley and Wamic areas; four distances to choose from: 84, 65, 40 and 20 miles; $35; fees will be used for firefighter incentives and awards; support vehicles provided; helmets required; e-mail Blazingpedalsjf@yahoo.com. SISTERS STAMPEDE: New mountain bike race in Sisters; Sunday, May 30; starts near Three Creeks Brewing Company; course follows Peterson Ridge Trail system; mail-in registration until May 20; race-day registration available; $20-$40; www. SistersStampede.com; Sisters Cycling, PO Box 1421, Sisters, OR, 97759. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy.

org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE DEVELOPMENT CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; June 8-Aug. 11 for mountain, road and freeride; Sept. 20-Dec. 12 for cyclocross; times vary; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. CENTRAL OREGON VELO RIDE: Saturdays, starting 11 a.m. at Nancy P’s in Bend; weekly group road rides; chose one of four routes, ranging in distance from 18 to 57 miles; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675; www.centraloregonvelo.com. MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM SESSION II: Begins May 31 from 4:30-6 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

HIKING SILVER STRIDERS GUIDE SERVICE: Three guided hikes per week with trained naturalist, Monday-Saturday; for ages 50 and older; strideon@ silverstriders.com or 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. SAGEBRUSH COUNTRY WILDFLOWERS HIKE: Trip leader, Reid Schuller, has 35 years of experience in plant inventory, ecology and conservation management; classroom orientation Friday, May 28, 6:30-8 p.m., field trip Saturday, May 29; $29; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OVERNIGHT HIKING TRIP OUTBACK TREK: Crack-in-the-ground, Black Hills botanical area, Native American rock art and Derrick cave stay at Lodge at Summer Lake; June 2-3; Silver Striders Guide Service; 541-383-8077 or strideon@silverstriders.com.

MISCELLANEOUS WEST POWELL BUTTE EQUESTRIAN: Western and English riding taught to all levels ages 7 and older; horses and tack provided; at Powell Butte estates from 10 a.m. to noon, Friday, May 28 and June 11; $50 per session; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. and Sundays, 1- 4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m.; every Sunday, 2-5 p.m. (set-up half hour before); no gathering on Sunday, May 30 (Memorial Day); at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Brett Yost 541318-8997, bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: Ages 6 and up; martial arts training; Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 1-24, 7-8 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; $69; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

BIKRAM YOGA COMMUNITY DAYS AND GUEST SPEAKER: Free yoga classes May 22-23 at Bikram Yoga in Bend; also Esak Garcia, 2005 International Yoga Asana Champion, will present and demonstrate hatha yoga postures on Sunday, May 23, 1-3 p.m.; $20; contact Michael Harris, 541-389-8599; michael@bikramyogabend.com. WILD CANYON GAMES ADVENTURE RACE: Seven member teams; geocaching, triathlon, challenge events; June 4-6 in Antelope; $200 (includes room and board); www. wildcanyongames.org; 541-3908379; nancyjohack@yahoo.com. TRAIL HORSE 1: Aug. 14-15, Bend; introduction to trail; biomechanics, fundamental horsemanship, and groundwork skills required for controlling challenging situations with confidence; tips for competition showmanship at the entry level; Bent Wire Ranch; 541-388-1779; info@bentwireranch.com. TRAIL HORSE 2: Oct. 9-10 in Bend; learn intricate riding maneuvers needed for more advanced obstacles encountered in trail competitions or trail riding; gate opening made simple, navigating deep narrow ditches; introduction to water and diverse terrain, and more; Bent Wire Ranch; 541-388-1779; info@bentwireranch.com. PAYS ORIENTATION: Tuesday, June 8, 6:45 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; a requirement for parents of participants of Redmond park district sports programs; class also available online at www.raprd.org. COED DODGEBALL LEAGUE: Starts Thursday, June 3; eight matches plus playoffs; at Morning Star Christian School, 19741 Baker Road in Bend, from 6-10 p.m.; $325 per team; $2 drop-in; jared@ ababend.com; 541-420-3081. EQUESTRIAN POKER RIDE & TACK SWAP MEET: At Ghost Rock Ranch, La Pine, Saturday, June 12, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; three cans of food or $3 and $6 per hand or six hands for $25; register by contacting 541-536-1335; swendsens@yahoo. com; www.ghostrockranch.com. YOGA FOR ATHLETES: Sundays at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; designed to strengthen the body with vinayasa yoga; $5; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com. TAE KWON DO CLASS: Tuesdays and Thursdays; led by USTF/ITF certified black belts Eric and Samantha Gleason; International School of the Cascades, 2105 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; $50 for 10 visits; www.raprd.org. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY PRACTICES: For men and women of all skill levels; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 6-9 p.m., Mondays and Wednesdays; first practice is free, $7 thereafter; skates available for beginners; nicholecp@hotmail.com or 415-3360142.; www.renegadesor.com. RICHARD SHRAKE’S RESISTANCEFREE SEMINAR: An equestrian class teaching the fundamentals of patient, peaceful horse training; get certified to teach Resistance Free Training; starts today, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day; $1,195; at McCall

Ranch in Prineville; richard@ richardshrake.com; 541-593-0321. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: a fundraising event; taking submissions from local filmmakers and photographers; must have cycling and local components; Film festival on May 22 at Tower Theatre; part of a weekend of biking activities to benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Bend Endurance Academy; www.BendBicycleFilmFestival. com; Paul at 541-420-5777; bendbicycleff@yahoo.com.

MULTISPORT RUN/CYCLE/RUN & CORE FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; outside warm-up run, form work and drills, then indoor cycle/run intervals, then core work; $6.50 or current fitness pass; 541-389-7665; www.bendparksandrec.org. FRESHAIRSPORTS TIME TRIAL AND DUATHLON SERIES: Thursday, June 3 and June 10, 6 p.m. at Miller Elementary School on Skyliners Road; 12-mile time trial, with optional 3-mile trail run; 6-mile TT for juniors, 1.5 run option; adult TT $12, adult duathlon $15, Junior TT or Du $7; www. freshairsports,com; register on site 56 p.m.; heather@freshairsports.com. DUEL IN THE DESERT DUATHLON & 5K RUN: Saturday, June 5, 10 a.m. at Summit High School in Bend; duathlon consists of 5K run, mountain or road bike option and 5K run; also a 5K run only will be held; register at FootZone in downtown Bend or online at www.active.com (search duel). LA PINE ROCKS GOING TO THE FLOS: Walk, run and/or bike; Saturday and Sunday, June 19-20, 9 a.m.; Finley Butte Park, La Pine; 2.5-mile walk or 5-mile run on Saturday through the BLM and U.S. Forest Service land; Sunday, 30-mile mountain bike ride to lava flow in La Pine; fundraising event for local nonprofits of La Pine; register by May 28 and save; walk/ run $25-30; bike $40-50; both days $60-70; 541-536-1335; swendsens@ yahoo.com; www.lapine.org.

www.raprd.org; 541-548-7275. YAKATAK KIDS KAYAK CAMP: For ages 8–16 to learn whitewater kayaking skills; two four-day camps this summer: Mondays-Thursdays, July 12– 15 or Aug. 9–12; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Thursdays; bring lunch; all kayaking equipment is provided and the camp meets at Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe; $225; Geoff Frank at 541317-9407 or geoff@aldercreek.com

RUNNING FLEET FEET’S NO BOUNDARIES 5K TRAINING: Run or walk a 5K (3.1 miles) for the first time; meets 8:30 a.m. on Saturdays through May 29; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/5k. FLEET FEET’S 10K TRAINING: All ability levels are welcome, first-time 10K runners to longtime runners; Sundays, 8 a.m., through June 20; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541389-1601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/10k. JUNGLE RUN/WALK: A 2- or 4-mile race at Central Oregon Community College track; this Thursday, 5:30 p.m.; course includes singletrack trails, mud bogs, steep hills and log crossings; day of event registration from 4:30-5:15 $5; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. STORM THE STAIRS: A 2-mile run/walk (300 stairs) or 3-mile ultimate challenge run (450 stairs); at Central Oregon Community College in Bend; Thursday, May 27, 5:30 p.m. at COCC track; entry forms are available in the Mazama building in the club sports office or register from 4:30-5:15 on the day of the event; $3-$6; free for COCC and OSU-Cascade students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu.

See Ca lendar / D5

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407. INTERMEDIATE PADDLE DAYS: Ages 10 and older; explore the class III whitewater throughout Central Oregon via kayak; Current Experience’s instructors will lead the course; Friday, June 4, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; $110; gear and transportation included;

Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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No monthly dues until June 1, 2010 and No initiation fees until June 30, 2011 In addition you will receive a $25 to $50 monthly credit to your member account for up to 18 months beginning June 1, 2010. (Preview Members Only)

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD Choke Up Eastmont Eagles

SOFTBALL Bend Park & Recreation District Standing as of May 14 Men’s Softball Competitive C American W L Red Cloud 4 0 Mtn. View Heating 4 0 Summit 2 2 Falling Waters 2 2 Warm Springs Ridaz 2 2 The Krew 2 2 D&D Down & Dirty 1 3 Newman Brothers 1 3 Sidelines 1 3 Nugent Strangleholds 1 3 Men’s Softball Competitive C National Good Wood 4 0 Amerititle/Summit El 4 0 Brew Crew 3 1 Cable Guys 2 2 East Cascade Sec. 2 2 Antioch 2 2 Copia 1 3 Big Ballers 1 3

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 Softball-Coed Competitive Courtesy Flush 5 Mtn’s Edge 4 Rockchucks 3 Meyer Media 3 Seven 2 BAM 1 Southwest Swingers 1 DE/Ventures 0 Phoenix 0 Softball-Men’s Competitive A & B Knights 4 Advantage 3 All Options 2 Mtn’s Edge 2 Bend Research 1 10 Barrel Brewing Co 0 Softball-Men’s Competitive D US Bank Dress Sox 4 Next of Kin 4 The Bucks 3 Westside Church #1 3 Northwestern HM Loan 2

3 4

0 0

0 0 1 2 2 2 4 3 5

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 1 2 2 3 4

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 1 1 2

0 0 0 0 0

Palmers Cafe 2 2 Cascade Thunder 1 3 Selco Blues 1 3 Westside Church #2 0 4 Calvary Chapel Bend 0 4 Softball-Senior Men’s Competitive Clear One 4 1 Sidelines 3 2 Line-X 3 2 Eagle Wealth Mgt. 3 2 Bend Riverside Motel 2 3 Kozak 2 3 Bear Prints Sr. 2 3 Southside P.T. 1 4 Softball-Women’s Competitive Bear Prints 5 0 Mikes Fence Center 4 1 On Tap 3 2 Fire & Ice 3 2 Ron’s Auto Body 2 3 Elevation Events 2 3 Ogre Knights 1 4 Knife River 0 5

Other memberships are available for as low as $145 per month with initiation fees beginning at $1,200.

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Contact Keith Kessaris in the Membership Department for more details. 541-385-6011 or keith@awbreyglen.com 2500 NW Awbrey Glen Drive | Bend | www.awbreyglen.com | 541-385-6011

ENTER TO WIN A GETAWAY TO THE OREGON COAST! Sign up for our AUTO-RENEW PAYMENT PROGRAM and be entered to WIN A $400 LODGING PACKAGE to the Elizabeth Street Inn on the Oregon Coast!

Plus, you’ll receive a FREE OREGON COOKBOOK with recipes from around the state. The Bulletin’s Auto-Renew Payment Plan is our most convenient and environmentally friendly method of payment. No mailed statements. No envelopes or stamps. No monthly reminders.

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CL

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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

COMMUNITY LIFE

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

HORSE COUNTRY

From wild to wow Tamed Ochoco mustang now helps with Deschutes rescue team By Linda Weiford For The Bulletin

Three years ago, Duncan roamed the Ochoco National Forest as a member of a wild mustang herd. He peered from rimrock, dozed among bunch grass and galloped through ponderosa forests, while his brown mane fanned in the wind. Until he was captured, he might never have seen a human. How amazing, then, that today he is trained to rescue them. Duncan, 8, was one of thousands of wild horses the federal government captures each year in an effort to manage their population or to remove them from private ranchers’ land. These horses have wandered the West for centuries, descendents of Spanish settlers, American Indians and the U.S. Cavalry. See Mustang / E6

A n d y T u lli s / The Bulletin

Duncan, 8, once roamed the Ochoco National Forest. Now the mustang is tame enough to assist the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue horse team.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Owner of Jade’s Jazz Lounge Sheila O’Malley dances while members of the band Stronghold — from left, Richard Taelour, Jeff Ingraham and Andy Armer (not pictured) — play for the crowd Friday evening at the jazz club in La Pine.

New life

Say hello to Lucy, a basset hound.

O’Malley decided to open up the alcohol-free jazz venue after the success of her virtual club on Secondlife.com.

for Jade’s Jazz Lounge

By David Jasper • The Bulletin

I

Second Life.

Second Life is the interactive, virtual world at Secondlife.com. After joining the free site, members create an avatar, or virtual persona, through which they can mingle, barter, create, shop and even run businesses. Sheila O’Malley, of La Pine, successfully created a virtual jazz lounge in Second Life. Her next act: opening a jazz club in the real world. The last Friday in April, O’Malley christened her new, alcohol-free nightclub in the heart of La Pine, making the leap from a virtual business to a real-world one. Second Life was founded in 2003 and, according to its website, members, or “residents,” can “socialize, connect and create using free voice and text chat.” It’s possible for one’s avatar to, among other fantastic feats, fly or teleport in that 3D world created by Linden Lab. A little closer to real life, they can spend money in Second Life’s economy. “Linden dollars” are exchangeable for U.S. dollars. According to Second Life, 250 Linden dollars are equivalent to one U.S. dollar. That may sound like so many nickels and dimes, but Second Life reported in January that its virtual economy grew 65 percent in 2009 to $567 million (U.S. dollars). According to CNET News, Second Life is “remembered by many as one of Web 2.0’s great tales of overhype, (although) the company has actually maintained a steady niche user base and is profitable.”

SPOTLIGHT

Submitted photo

to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

ADOPT ME

This is Tiko, a 2-year-old apricot poodle that loves people and loves to play. Tiko isn’t completely house trained, so he needs a home willing to do appropriate training. Tiko gets along with other dogs and is quite comfortable on a warm lap. If you would like to meet Tiko, or any other animal available for adoption at the Humane Society of Central Oregon, visit 61170 S.E. 27th St., Bend. All adoptions include spay or neuter surgery, first

art. But sometimes life imitates

Sisters Movie House will screen a retrospective of clips from TV series Oregon Art Beat that feature Central Oregon artists Thursday night. From 11 years of broadcasts, the Oregon Public Broadcasting program will touch on the works of Marianne Fellner, Kathy Deggendorfer, Danae Lisa and Lori Lubbesmeyer, Lee Barker, Chester Armstrong, Dennis McGregor, Greg Congleton and Bill Keale. Beth Wood, a singer-songwriter who won the 2006 Sisters Folk Festival Dave Carter Memorial Songwriting Contest, will perform at the event. Wood’s performance will be filmed by

Lucy is the best fishing companion that even enjoys cleaning the fish with her tongue. She has the ability to make everyone around her smile, laugh and love her, especially kids, and has to say hello to everyone she sees. She lives in Bend with Beau Killett, Ann Bourdages and Caleb and Christopher. To submit a photo for publication, e-mail a highresolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos

Loves everyone

t’s been said that life imitates

Oregon Art Beat clips of local artists to screen

YOUR PETS

From left, Sandy Jones, Polly Pfuhl and Pat Rice share an alcohol-free toast while visiting at Jade’s Jazz Lounge last week. Lounge owner O’Malley chose to make the club an alcohol-free, family-friendly venue. “I’ve heard a lot of really positive comments about that,” O’Malley said. Second Life reports that its residents logged a total of 481 million hours in Second Life in 2009, up 21 percent from 2008. One of its steady users, of course, is O’Malley. “Businesses like Nike, IBM, they have whole islands and groups of islands now,” she explains. “They’re doing virtual classrooms. I remember one of the first universities to jump in, (asked me) to be a role model; sit at a desk and look at a screen — my avatar,” she adds, chuckling as she corrects herself. See Jade’s / E6

the Oregon Art Beat crew for a show next season. The lineup for the 2010 Sisters Folk Festival and its poster artwork will also be announced. The retrospective begins between 5 and 7 p.m. Thursday; tickets cost $25. A limited number of tickets are available for the show. An after party will feature a meeting with show hosts and Wood at Thyme at FivePine Lodge & Conference Center. The after party tickets cost $50. Contact: 541-549-8833.

Ten Friends to host benefit, celebration for Nepal Ten Friends, a local organization

that provides aid to communities in Nepal, will hold a spring celebration at 5:30 p.m. Friday at Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. The event will include a Nepali and Indian dinner, a silent auction, music by Blackstrap and children’s activities. Ten Friends was started by two teachers and eight of their friends who traveled to Nepal. The group now provides stretchers to villages near Mount Everest, water filters, supplies and beds to orphanages, and educational assistance to children and women in Nepal. Tickets cost $10 and are available at the door. Children ages 12 and younger will be admitted for free. Contact: 541-390-1419. — From staff reports

vaccination, a health exam at a local vet, microchip, collar, leash or carrying box, ID tag, training DVD, food and more. Contact: 541-382-3537.

Submitted photo

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school functions, coach their soccer team, serve as the Cookie Mom for Girl Scouts and volunteer for anything else I can manage to squeeze into my schedule, but I have a hard time making friends with any other moms. None of the other mothers wants to get to know me. I wait at the bus stop with my girls and the moms talk to each other, but not to me. I get a weird “vibe” from them, as if they think I’m too young to know anything. I try to join in, but it seems they really don’t care for me. I have friends my age, but they don’t have children. I want friends who have families be-

LOS ANGELES — Mick Jagger is going to be jamming with Larry King next week. CNN said Wednesday that King will interview the Rolling Stones singer about his career, the re-release of the Stones’ album “Exile on Main Street” and the new documentary, “Stones in Exile.” The “Larry King Live” interview with Jagger will air 9 tonight.

Ken Burns updates ‘Baseball’ documentary NEW YORK — Filmmaker Ken Burns is wading into baseball’s steroids era for a postscript to his 1994 PBS documentary about the sport. The nine-part 1994 series “Baseball” was a refuge for fans during a year the sport was shut down for a strike. PBS says Burns is following it up with “The Tenth Inning,” a four-hour documentary that will air Sept. 28 and 29, just before playoffs begin. The film essentially covers Major League baseball since 1994. Covered are the rise in

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Winfrey, Ball team up for ‘Henrietta Lacks’ film NEW YORK — Oprah Winfrey is joining with Alan Ball to produce an HBO film based on the nonfiction best-seller “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” The network said Ball, creator and executive producer of HBO’s drama series “True Blood,” will develop the project with Winfrey

and her Harpo Films studio. Written by Rebecca Skloot, “The Immortal Life” tells the true story of Henrietta Lacks, a poor black woman who died of cervical cancer in 1951. Without her consent, pieces of the tumor that killed her were removed and used for medical exploration and to build a billion-dollar research industry. No production schedule or air date for the film was announced. — From wire reports

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What’s “wrong” may be that you’re afraid you have “settled” for someone who isn’t up to the standards of those in your professional circle. If you are happy, why do you feel you must live up to someone else’s standards?

cause they face the same kinds of issues I do. What can I do to make these moms like me? — Friend-challenged In Cypress, Texas Dear Friend-challenged: There is no way to “make” someone like you, and if a clique has already been established, it can be difficult to break in. It is possible that because of your youth and single status you are perceived as a threat to them — but I do have a suggestion, and your youth can be an advantage. Start asking them for advice, and it’s possible they may take you under their collective wing. Dear Abby: What is the proper way to kiss after the wedding officiant says, “You may now kiss the bride”? Should the couple share a simple kiss, or can it be a little more intense? — Danielle In Tampa Dear Danielle: The wedding is a time to demonstrate eternal commitment, not unbridled passion. The kiss can be as intense as you like, as long as it doesn’t last more than six seconds, and doesn’t remove the bride’s lipstick.

performance-enhancing drugs, the sport’s international flavor because of Asian and Latino players, a new Yankees dynasty and the breakthrough of the Boston Red Sox. A DVD and Blu-ray disc will be available a week later with two additional hours of material.



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DEAR ABBY

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Dear Abby: I’m a divorced, middle-aged professional woman with a Ph.D. who has been keeping company with a man my age for seven years. “Burt” treats me well. He takes me out, has helped with some major home renovation projects, sends me flowers and I enjoy his company. I’m perfectly happy in his world, and I like most of his friends. On the flip side, Burt is overweight, has a drinking problem and never finished college. My problem is, I can’t bring myself to introduce him to those in my “professional circle.” I’m afraid he will say something boorish, show up drunk or otherwise embarrass me. Is there something intrinsically wrong with me that I’m ashamed to have the man I love meet people with whom I work and socialize? Is there something wrong with the relationship? — It’s Complicated In Wisconsin Dear It’s Complicated: There doesn’t appear to be anything wrong with the relationship. It has worked for seven years. What’s “wrong” may be that you’re afraid you have “settled” for someone who isn’t up to the standards of those in your professional circle. If you are happy, why do you feel you must live up to someone else’s standards? Of course, this doesn’t have to be a deal breaker. If you and Burt are a happy couple, keep your personal and professional lives separate. Many couples do. Dear Abby: I am a young, single mother of two girls. I work full time and I’m involved in my daughters’ lives. I go to all their

T  B 



White-collar woman keeps her blue-collar beau under wraps

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

E2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

 PLANTERS 

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 5/18/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News (5:01) Judge Judy Inside Edition (N) America’s Funniest Home Videos According to Jim Malcolm-Mid. Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Christina Cooks! Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Travels-Edge Steves Europe

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News ABC World News Be a Millionaire Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ This Old House Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves Europe Travels-Edge This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Access Hollyw’d Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider (N) The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Yankee Shop PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å Lost What They Died For (N) ’ ‘14’ (10:02) V Val’s water breaks. (N) ‘14’ The Biggest Loser Final four contestants run a marathon. (N) ’ Å Parenthood Team Braverman ‘PG’ NCIS Patriot Down (N) ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS: Los Angeles Burned (N) ‘14’ The Good Wife Hybristophilia ‘PG’ Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ Å Lost What They Died For (N) ’ ‘14’ (10:02) V Val’s water breaks. (N) ‘14’ American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å Glee Dream On (N) ’ ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News Mt. St. Helens Special Deal or No Deal Deal or No Deal NOVA Life returns to Mount St. Helens. ’ ‘PG’ “The Fire Below Us: Remembering Mount St. Helens” The Biggest Loser Final four contestants run a marathon. (N) ’ Å Parenthood Team Braverman ‘PG’ 90210 Teddy seeks revenge. (N) ‘14’ Life Unexpected ’ ‘PG’ Å Married... With Married... With Woodsmith Shop Moment-Luxury Art Workshop Joy of Painting Mexico Baking With Julia NOVA Life returns to Mount St. Helens. ’ ‘PG’ “The Fire Below Us: Remembering Mount St. Helens”

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News Inside Edition (N) King of the Hill South Park ‘14’ Oregon Splendor News Roseanne ‘PG’ Christina Cooks! Oregon Splendor

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline My Name Is Earl South Park ‘MA’ Oregon Exper Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Oregon Exper

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 Hard Fall ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Doubt ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Identity ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: Miami Seeing Red ’ ‘14’ Å 130 28 8 32 Cold Case Files ’ ‘14’ Å (2:00) ››› “Super- ››› “Superman II: The Richard Donner Cut” (1980, Science Fiction) Christopher Reeve, Margot Kidder, ›› “Star Trek Generations” (1994, Science Fiction) Patrick Stewart, William Shatner, Malcolm McDowell. (10:45) ››› “Star Trek: First Contact” (1996, Science Fiction) 102 40 39 man” Gene Hackman. The Man of Steel woos Lois Lane, thwarts Krypton outcasts. The Enterprise crew encounters a deranged scientist. Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes. Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ Å Wild Kingdom ’ ‘PG’ Å The Secret Life of Elephants ’ ‘PG’ Rogue Nature Elephants ‘14’ Å The Secret Life of Elephants ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Housewives/N.J. Housewives/N.J. Housewives/N.J. 9 by Design London Calling (N) Housewives/NYC 137 44 Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition World’s Strictest Parents ’ World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents ’ ‘PG’ Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s One Nation, Overweight (N) Mad Money Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s One Nation, Overweight Fast Cash ‘G’ 21st Century 51 36 40 52 Coca-Cola: The Real Story Larry King Live (N) Å Anderson Cooper 360 Black or White: Kids on Race (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ Sit Down, Shut South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 Comedy Central The Buzz Bend City Edition Good Morning Get Outdoors Redmond City Council RSN Presents RSN Movie Night Good Morning Health-Home 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Wizards-Place Hannah Montana “Hatching Pete” (2009) Jason Dolley. ’ ‘G’ Å Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah Montana Wizards-Place Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab: Dark Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Arctic Quest ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch False Pass (N) ‘14’ (10:01) Swamp Loggers ‘PG’ Å Deadliest Catch Arctic Quest ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (Live) Å NBA Fastbreak Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Draft Lottery NBA Basketball Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic (Live) Å Poker Stars PCA High Roller Baseball Tonight (Live) Å SportsNation Å NFL Live (N) Billabong Xxl Big Wave Challenge NASCAR Now Drag Racing 22 24 21 24 Poker Stars PCA High Roller Tennis 1995 Australian Open Men’s Final -- Andre Agassi vs. Pete Sampras Up Close (N) SSA Å AWA Wrestling Å NASCAR Racing Å 23 25 123 25 Classic Boxing From Dec. 14, 1996. ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls Chicken or Beef? ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record-Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record-Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Challenge Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes Chefs vs. City All Star Phoenix Chopped In a Pinch Good Eats Unwrapped 177 62 46 44 B’foot Contessa Ken Griffey Jr. Mariners Mariners Pre. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics From Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum in Oakland, Calif. Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics 20 45 28* 26 Totally NASCAR (4:00) ››› “Live Free or Die Hard” (2007, Action) Bruce Willis, Justin Long. ››› “Mission: Impossible 2” (2000, Action) Tom Cruise, Dougray Scott. Premiere. Justified The Hammer (N) ‘MA’ (11:02) Justified The Hammer ‘MA’ 131 House Hunters House Hunters My First Place My First Place Home Rules (N) ‘G’ Å House Hunters House Hunters My First Place Marriage/Const. 176 49 33 43 Income Property Bang, Your Buck Holmes on Homes What a Mesh ‘G’ How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Mad Electricity ‘PG’ Ancient Aliens Closer Encounters Alien encounters throughout history. ‘PG’ The Universe The Milky Way ‘PG’ That’s Impossible ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 How the Earth Was Made ‘PG’ Grey’s Anatomy Love/Addiction ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å “Panic Button” (2007) Patrick Muldoon, Holly Marie Combs. ‘14’ Å Will & Grace ‘14’ Will & Grace ‘14’ 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann Parental Control Hired (N) ’ True Life I’m Getting Married 2 ’ True Life Couples prepare to marry. The City ’ ‘PG’ The Hills ’ ‘PG’ The Hills (N) ‘PG’ The City (N) ‘PG’ Hills Aftershow The Hills ’ ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 Made An independent woman. ‘PG’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ iCarly A martial arts champion. ‘G’ Malcolm, Middle Malcolm-Mid. Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 Victorious ’ ‘G’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior (N) ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ WWE NXT Another elimination. Å Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ 133 35 133 45 Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Dino ‘G’ Full Flame Å Changing-World Osteen at Yankee Stadium 205 60 130 The Office ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ››› “A Man Called Horse” (1970, Western) Richard Harris, Judith Anderson. A noble- ›› “Windwalker” ›› “Davy Crockett, Indian Scout” (1950, Western) George Montgomery, Ellen Drew. ›››› “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” (1975, Drama) Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher, Brad Dourif. 101 44 101 29 The frontiersman’s nephew uncovers a spy among pioneers. Premiere. An irreverent troublemaker is committed to an asylum. man is converted to the ways of his Sioux captors. (1980) Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Å Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Å World’s Tallest Children ‘G’ Å 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count World’s Strongest Toddler ’ ‘PG’ World’s Tallest Children ‘G’ Å 178 34 32 34 Toddlers & Tiaras ’ ‘G’ Å Law & Order In God We Trust ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones Death metal band. ‘14’ Å Law & Order Chattel ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Rumble ’ ‘14’ The Closer Elysian Fields ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order The Fire This Time ‘14’ Amazing Spiez! Chowder ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield Show Chowder ‘Y7’ Codename: Kid Ed, Edd ’n Eddy King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Extreme Superstores ‘G’ Å Pizza Paradise ‘PG’ Å Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Vegas Revealed ‘G’ Å Las Vegas: Cheaters Beware! ‘PG’ Las Vegas: Adults Only 2 ‘14’ Å 179 51 45 42 Extreme Workplaces ‘G’ Å Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford and Son Sanford and Son The Cosby Show The Cosby Show Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Criminal Intent (N) ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Undateable Hour 5 ’ ‘14’ Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ Brandy & Ray J: A Family Business Basketball Wives What Chilli Wants ››› “New Jack City” (1991) ’ 191 48 37 54 Undateable Hour 4 ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) ›› “The Juror” 1996 ’ ‘R’ (6:05) ››› “About Last Night...” 1986 Rob Lowe. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “G.I. Jane” 1997, Drama Demi Moore, Anne Bancroft. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:10) ›› “St. Elmo’s Fire” 1985, Drama Rob Lowe. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “Wall Street” 1987, Drama Michael Douglas, Charlie Sheen, Martin Sheen. ‘R’ Å ›› “If Looks Could Kill: The John Hawkins Story” ››› “Wall Street” 1987, Drama Michael Douglas, Martin Sheen. ‘R’ Å (11:15) ››› “John and Mary” Oakley Arctic Snowboarding The Daily Habit Free Flow Tour Moto: In Out Weekly Update Oakley Arctic Snowboarding The Daily Habit Ride Open Terje’s Season Moto: In Out Firsthand Å Props The Story of Golf The Story of Golf (N) Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf Golf Central Inside PGA The Story of Golf Trump’s Fabulous World of Golf In the Bag Inside PGA M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å “Back to You and Me” (2005) Lisa Hartman Black, Dale Midkiff. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ››› “A Beautiful Mind” 2001 Rus- (6:15) ››› “Taken” 2008, Action Liam Neeson, Maggie Grace. A former spy uses his ››› “The Hangover” 2009 Bradley Cooper. Three pals must Robin Hood: HBO REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel (N) Treme Toni searches for clues about HBO 425 501 425 10 sell Crowe. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å First Look ‘PG’ ’ ‘PG’ Å old skills to save his kidnapped daughter. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å find a missing groom after a wild bash. ’ ‘R’ Daymo. ’ ‘MA’ Å (5:15) ››› “Bug” 2006, Suspense Ashley Judd, Lynn Collins. ‘R’ Å Food Party ‘14’ Dinner-Band Ideal (N) ‘MA’ Monty Python ››› “Quills” 2000, Drama Geoffrey Rush, Kate Winslet. ‘R’ Å Whitest Kids Henry Rollins IFC 105 105 (4:15) ››› “Training Day” 2001, Crime Drama Denzel Washing- (6:20) › “Collateral Damage” 2002, Action Arnold Schwarzeneg- (8:15) ›› “17 Again” 2009, Comedy Zac Efron, Leslie Mann. A 37-year-old man mi- ›› “Swordfish” 2001 John Travolta. An ex-con computer hacker (11:40) Zane’s Sex MAX 400 508 7 ton, Ethan Hawke, Scott Glenn. ’ ‘R’ Å Chronicles ger, Elias Koteas. ’ ‘R’ Å raculously transforms into a teenager. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å is pulled into a high-tech heist. ’ ‘R’ Å Storm Worlds Cosmic Fire ‘14’ Storm Worlds Alien Wind ‘14’ Storm Worlds Martian dust storm. Storm Worlds Cosmic Fire ‘14’ Storm Worlds Alien Wind ‘14’ Storm Worlds Martian dust storm. Outlaw Bikers Bandido Nation ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Wolverine-XMn Wolverine-XMn OddParents OddParents Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Mighty B! ’ The Mighty B! ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action League Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Zumbo Outdoors Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Game Chasers Dream Season Hunting TV Spirit of Wild Truth Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve Outdoor Inside Outdoors Management OUTD 37 307 43 › “Down to Earth” 2001 Chris Rock. A black comic is reincar› “Bangkok Dangerous” 2008, Action Nicolas Cage, Shahkrit Yamnarm. iTV. A hit Nurse Jackie P.O. United States of Nurse Jackie P.O. United States of ›› “Zoolander” 2001 Ben Stiller. A disgraced male model is SHO 500 500 Tara ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å nated in the body of a white tycoon. ‘PG-13’ Å brainwashed to become an assassin. ‘PG-13’ man becomes an unlikely mentor to a street punk. ’ ‘R’ Å Box ’ ‘MA’ Box ’ ‘MA’ NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography Race in 60 (N) NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography Race in 60 NASCAR Hall of Fame NASCAR Hall of Fame SPEED 35 303 125 (5:10) ›› “Darkness Falls” 2003 Chaney Kley. Å (6:40) ›› “I Am Sam” 2001 Sean Penn. A man tries to regain custody of his daughter. Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo” 1999 Rob Schneider. STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) “Lower Learning” 2008 Jason Biggs. The vice principal of (6:25) “The Go-Getter” 2007 Lou Taylor Pucci. A teen steals a ›› “Enemy at the Gates” 2001, War Joseph Fiennes, Jude Law, Rachel Weisz. Two (10:15) ›› “The Gift” 2000, Suspense Cate Blanchett, Giovanni Ribisi. A psychic atTMC 525 525 a school tries to keep it running. ’ ‘R’ Å car and sets out to find his half-brother. ’ ‘R’ snipers face off during the Battle of Stalingrad. ’ ‘R’ Å tempts to solve a murder case in the Deep South. ’ ‘R’ NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Philadelphia Flyers Hockey Central NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at San Jose Sharks (Live) Whacked Out WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å The Daily Line VS. 27 58 30 Women Behind Bars ‘14’ Å Women Behind Bars ‘14’ Å Women Behind Bars (N) ‘14’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Demon Child ‘PG’ Secret Lives of Women Cults ‘14’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY FREE DAY FOR SENIORS: Seniors ages 62 and older receive free admission to the museum to experience wildlife encounters, animal talks and historical performers; $15 adults, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and seniors; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. “CANADIAN RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Grace Miller; free; 10 a.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. “HUMAN RIGHTS, ECONOMIC REALITIES”: Speakers from education, labor and community groups talk about the connection between immigrant stories and policy implications; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541383-7412 or www.cocc. edu/mcc-events. SCIENCE PUB: Chris Higgins talks about why bridges fail and the contributions of engineering research to bridge construction; RSVP requested; free; 5:30 p.m. food and networking, 6 p.m. presentation; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-737-2351 or www.OSUcascades.edu/ sciencepubs. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. BILL HILLAR: Hillar talks about human trafficking and his experience as the real-life father who inspired the movie “Taken”; $5; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-9486428 or www.cooath.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beatonline.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. SIERRA LEONE’S REFUGEE ALL STARS: A reggae, calypso and dancepop performance by musicians who escaped civil war; $25 or $30; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. SLOW TRUCKS: The San Franciscobased indie rock band performs, with The Dirty Words and Mystery Invention; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Ride the Divide” tells the story of the world’s toughest mountain bike race, which follows the Continental Divide; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

WEDNESDAY IMMIGRATION AND THE AMERICAN DREAM: Loren Smith leads a discussion of how immigration affects us and about our history with immigration; free; 3:30-4:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Multicultural Center, 2600 N.W. College Way , Bend; 541-383-7412. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, ARMIDA”: Starring Renee Fleming, Lawrence Brownlee, Bruce Ford, Jose Manuel Zapata, Barry Banks and Kobie van Rensburg in an

encore presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. PRESENTATION ON HAITI: David and Cindy Uttley talk about and show photographs from their experiences in Haiti after the earthquake; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Fire Hall, 301 S. Elm St.; 541-647-4611. “GREASE”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the musical about a girl falling for a boy from the wrong side of the tracks; $10, $6 seniors and students; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4045. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541923-4800. SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE: The Portland-based soul act performs, with Sean Flinn; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. UGANDAN ORPHANS CHOIR: The choir performs African music and dance, with drums, pipes and more; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822 or www. ugandanorphanschoir.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beatonline.org.

THURSDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art and more; this month’s theme is “Wily Weasels”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 329 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. OREGON ART BEAT RETROSPECTIVE: Watch clips of former Oregon Art Beat shows that featured Central Oregon artists; with a performance by Beth Wood; $25; 5 and 7 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-5498833. RAISE THE ROOF: Featuring live and silent auctions, dinner, keynote speaker Bob Grimm and entertainment; proceeds benefit Redmond Habitat for Humanity; $25; 5:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-548-1406. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: A screening of the film “The Four Feathers,” followed by a discussion May 27; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls. us/calendar. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beatonline.org. DIEGO’S UMBRELLA: The San Francisco-based flamenco-ska band performs; $7; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www.clear1017.fm. TOWNSHEND THIRD THURSDAY: Featuring an all-ages poetry slam of original compositions lasting three minutes or less; hosted by Mosley Wotta; $3; 8 p.m., sign-up begins 7 p.m.; Townshend’s Bend Teahouse, 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541-312-2001.

FRIDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art and more; this month’s theme is “Wily Weasels”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541382-4754, ext. 329 or www.highdesert museum.org. KENWOOD SCHOOL CELEBRATION: Celebrate the school’s 90th anniversary with an open house, tours, music and historical displays; bring memorabilia to share; free; 1-7 p.m.; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-383-6220. STONE LODGE ANTIQUE APPRAISAL SHOW: Event includes appraisals by Karen Stockton and Bend Coin Club, live music, dinner and more; registration requested; free; 2 p.m.; Stone Lodge Retirement, 1460 N.W. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-0450 or carol. morris@holidaytouch.com. SPRING CELEBRATION: Featuring a Nepali and Indian dinner, a silent auction, live music, children’s activities and more; proceeds benefit Ten Friends; $10, free ages 12 and younger; 5:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-390-1419. IRISH CELTIC JAM: Bring an instrument to join a jam session of Celtic music, or come and listen; free; 6-9 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. TUXES AND TAILS: Featuring dinner, dancing, live music by Lindy Gravelle and a live auction; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; $100; 6 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3307096 or www. hsco.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Heidi Durrow talks about her book “The Girl Who Fell from the Sky”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. “GREASE”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the musical about a girl falling for a boy from the wrong side of the tracks; $10, $6 seniors and students; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4045. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. 5 FOR FIDO: Five local bands

perform a benefit for the Lost Dogs Film Project and the Humane Society of Central Oregon; ages 21 and older; $5; 7 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-617-3215. HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — MOUNTAIN TRIO: String musicians will be joined by Isabelle Senger and Carrie Little to play selections from Mozart, Mendelssohn and Schumann; $30, $15 children and students with ID; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-306-3988, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic.com. SUSAN SINGS BROADWAY: Susan Rahmsdorff sings a selection of Broadway tunes, with accompanist Donna Jacobsen; proceeds benefit Family Kitchen; donations accepted; 7-8:30 p.m.; Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-382-5542. “KINKY BOOTS”: A screening of the 2005 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www. beatonline.org. TRIBAL SEEDS: The San Diego-based reggae act performs, with Inhale, 2nd Hand Soldiers and MC Mystic; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com. COYOTE CREEK: The Willamette Valley-based country group performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112. JAMES OTTO: The country musician performs as part of his acoustic trio; ages 21 and older; $15-$25; 9 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. RUNNER RUNNER: The Huntington Beach, Calif.-based pop rock group performs; ages 21 and older; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495 or http:// redmondgrange.org. GREAT STRIDES: A 5K walk-athon for cystic fibrosis; course proceeds along the Dry Canyon Trail; donations accepted; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. walk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-480-6703, greatstrides.redmond@gmail.com or www.cff.org. SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring products and services from students, and merchants and vendors selling locally grown and made products; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800 or lance.hill@redmond. k12.or.us. BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art and more; this month’s theme is “Wily Weasels”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 329 or www.highdesertmuseum. org. JACKS OR BETTER FUNDRAISER: An easy seven-mile loop and poker; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Posse; $15 per hand; 9:30 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; Skull Hollow Camp and Trailhead, Lone Pine Road and F.S. Road 5710, Redmond; 541-647-7613.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

P C  GENERAL

HORSES

PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. COW WORK WITH INSTRUCTION: Develop confidence and cow sense in your horse, while learning to control and move the cow; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-2806622, or Victoria at 541-280-2782. MINI REINING CLINIC: Alternating beginning and advanced sessions focus on refinement of reining maneuvers and skills for showing; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-280-6622, or Victoria at 541-280-2782. BARRELS/POLES PRACTICE: $5 for Rim Rock Riders members, $20 for nonmembers; 6 p.m. Thursdays; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; Deanna at wolkau@gmail.com, 541-317-1488 or 541-323-6040. RESISTANCE-FREE SEMINAR: Richard Shrake teaches fundamentals of patient, peaceful horse training, $1,195, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., today through Friday; McCall Ranch, Prineville; richard@richardshrake. com or 541-593-0321. SCHOOLING HORSE SHOW: Opportunity for novices, starts 8 a.m. Saturday, Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; preregister extension. oregonstate.edu or call 541-447-2233. JACKS OR BETTER: Fundraiser ride, $15 per hand, start times 9:3011:30 a.m. Saturday, Skull Hollow Campground, Lone Pine Road, Lone Pine; Jon or Sue Cox at 541-647-7613. PARELLI ACROSS AMERICA TOUR: Horse lovers learn how to successfully solve problems through love, language and leadership, Saturday and Sunday; Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.E. Airport Way, Redmond; register at Parelli.comcq for free tickets; Kristin Kelly at kkelly@fwv-us.com or 919277-1180. Private lessons available Thursday, Friday, May 25 and 26; trt@coinet.com or 541-788-9922. HEALING REINS THERAPEUTIC RIDING CENTER VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION: Orientation session 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 1, Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center, 60575 Billadeau Road, Bend; Sarah Smith at sarahs@healingreins. org or 541-382-9410, ext. 4.

DOGS PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidence-building skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-6336774 or www.desertsageagility.com. BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. TUXES & TAILS: Annual benefit for homeless animals sponsored by Humane Society of Central Oregon, $100 per person, Friday at Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; tickets at www.hsco.org. LOW-COST VACCINE & MICROCHIP CLINIC: Vaccines, $15; microchips $35; 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Saturday, Bend Spay and Neuter at Bend Pet Express Westside, 133 S.W. Century Drive, Bend, 541-617-1010. OFF-LEASH TRAIN AND PLAY: Build better social skills in your dog; $10 per dog; 10:30 a.m. May 29; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541536-2458, diannshappytails@msn. com or www.OregonDogLady.com. PET ADOPTIONS: Humane Society of Central Oregon has animals available for adoption, 11 a.m.4 p.m. May 29, Best Buy, 63455 North U.S. Highway 97, Bend. PUPPY PARTIES: Bring your puppy to play, 3-4 p.m. Sunday; Bend Pet Express Eastside, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, 541-385-5298, and Bend Pet Express Westside, 133 S.W. Century Drive, 541-385-5298.

M T For Tuesday, May 18

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) 12:15, 3, 5:30, 7:20 CITY ISLAND (PG-13) 12:20, 2:40, 5:20, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 3:05, 5:10, 8:05 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 7:30 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:30, 2:50, 5:15, 8 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Noon, 3:15, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BACK-UP PLAN (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:45, 7:50, 10:20

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG13) 1:20, 4:05, 7, 9:45 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 8:05, 10:30 FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 3:50, 9:35 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:25, 9:55 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 12:05, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 6:55, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10, 10:25 IRON MAN 2 (DLP — PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 2, 5, 8, 10:50 JUST WRIGHT (PG) 11:25 a.m., 2:10, 5:20, 8:10, 10:40 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:20, 4:40, 5:10, 7:10, 7:45, 9:40, 10:15 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) Noon, 2:25, 10:45 OCEANS (G) 1:15, 6:35 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 1:10, 3:40, 4:15, 6:45, 7:20, 9:50, 10:35

SONS OF THE FALLEN: A TRIBUTE TO MILITARY FAMILIES (no MPAA rating) 8 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 5 EDITOR’S NOTE: Part of the WebCyclery Movie Night series, “Ride the Divide” will screen at 9 p.m. tonight.

‘Glee’ tour takes show to its Gleeks REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 4, 6:30, 9 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 5, 7, 9:15 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 5:30, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 7 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 6:45 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 6:45 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 4, 7

By Amanda K w an The Associated Press

PHOENIX — School’s out, but the “Glee” kids haven’t stopped believin’. The cast making up the popular Fox show’s band of singing teens launched its four-city tour Saturday in Phoenix, anxious to bring the theatrics of a major network show to a relatively smaller stage. While the show’s battling adults, played by Jane Lynch and Matthew Morrison, were not part of the stage production, their absence was filled by taped messages to the audience. After an opening act by the excellent dance troupe Legion of Extraordinary Dancers, Lynch took to the screens snarling that the night’s entertainment was about to make the audience ill. “You will be barfing,” she

promised. It was the start of an evening that only a fan would appreciate. The connecting spirit of the show was deeply rooted in fan appreciation, starting with a list of song favorites from the TV show and going all the way to the cast’s dash through an ecstatic crowd as Lea Michele, in character as Glee club co-captain Rachel Berry, belted out “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” The cast is happy to give the show’s rabid fans, who call themselves Gleeks, what they want. “This whole thing kind of feels like a big ‘Thank you’ to the fans because they have made the show such a success so quickly and so early on,” Kevin McHale, who plays the wheelchair-bound Artie, told The Associated Press. “So this is like giving back.”


E 4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H B Y JACQ U ELINE B IG AR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, May 18, 2010: This year, you often stop midsentence to rethink what you are about to say. Your listening skills increase, to the extent that you are even more aware of your words! You have unusual creativity and imagination, and know that there are many different ways of presenting thoughts, ideas and situations. Choosing the best way or the best words can make a difference. If you are single, you could meet someone while simply running an errand. You don’t need to actively look so much. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy colorful conversations. Entertain more at home. LEO can be an anchor. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Don’t worry if you are a turtle crawling along in the a.m., because you could transform into a hare darting along by the p.m. Your creativity opens up. A problematic discussion in the morning could be redone. Tonight: Act like you are done with work! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Keep conservations flowing. You might be uncomfortable with everything that you are hearing. A boss, though vague, continues to meet your standards. You aren’t going to change him or her, so ask more questions in order to get clarity. Tonight: Happily head home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Curb possessiveness or a

feeling of insecurity. You might want to rethink a situation involving your personal life. Given time, you will walk past the issue. A resolution simply isn’t going to happen now, as much as you might like. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Use the morning hours to the max. You could be saddened by some news that you hear. Let that feeling pass, as you will hear more that is less disheartening. Zero in on a primary goal with a friend’s help. Tonight: Order in. Relax. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Take it easy in the a.m., when you just might not be as vigorous or energetic as you might like. You could be far more depressed about a situation than you realize. Look within. You might need to take action. Tonight: Feeling much better. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Use the morning to push a project forward. You could be overwhelmed by everything that you are saddled with. Ask for support in a meeting, or make calls to encourage others to pitch in. Learn to say “no” more often. Tonight: Get a good night’s sleep. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Stay on top of a personal situation. Tackle a project when your enthusiasm is high. You’ll get results, and faster at that. A meeting late in the day presents opportunities to meet new people. Tonight: Allow more fun in. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Keep reaching out for a loved one or someone you care about at a distance. You

could be exhausted by all the thoughts that are flying through your mind. Your creativity surges, encouraging you to take the lead. Tonight: A must appearance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH A close associate wants a lot of your time. You feel pressured, and you need to let that person know. Otherwise, there will be an undercurrent of dissatisfaction running between you. Detach from an immediate issue. Solutions appear. Tonight: Join a pal at a new nightspot. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Others come toward you. Listen, but don’t necessarily decide to do anything more. For a key person, you have done enough already. A discussion with a partner in the late afternoon demonstrates this person’s reliability. Tonight: Talk over dinner. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH An easy pace might be nice, but certain matters must get done, and quickly at that. Block another’s disruption, and let this person know that you will be more available later in the day. Once you can breathe, catch up on messages and news. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Use your ingenuity in the morning. Be smart, and don’t let someone’s grumpiness filter into your day. A meeting serves as a cheerleading session to get a project off the ground. Tonight: Summer is coming; time to exercise.

© 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Jade’s

Mustang

If you go

Continued from E1

Down the rabbit hole O’Malley, 49, who has lived in La Pine for seven years, has been involved in Second Life since 2005. Earlier, she’d been involved in an online game at There.com, a 3D virtual world that has gone defunct. “A friend of mine said, ‘You know, if we go for this game called Second Life, we can make money. Real money. And we can pay for this game.’ It was like going down the rabbit hole in ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ because we went over there to make money, and I never left,” she said last week in her La Pine club. She made her money through “camping,” in which one’s avatar hangs out at one business or another, helping said business increase its traffic. “They don’t allow it anymore. It was almost like a false way for people to show traffic. So you would have avatars sit on your (virtual) land and get paid by the minute, by the 10 minutes,” she explains. “For every segment of time that they measured traffic, they would pay you for sitting there.” She could be Away From Keyboard, or AFK, while her avatar was earning her money. “I was actually not really so much AFK at that time because I was fascinated with it. I was learning things. So I was learning how to build while I would be dancing on a dance pad, earning money.”

Paying the bills Before the practice was banned, “I made a lot of money,” she confesses. At one point, she could pay her mortgage with the money she was extracting from the game. “I mean, I didn’t have a real high mortgage either, though,” she says, laughing. Her avatar is named “SexyJade Echegaray.” A couple of years ago, O’Malley — er, Jade — opened a jazz club in that virtual world called Jade’s Jazz Lounge. “It sits on Jade’s Jazz Island,” she says. Before long, O’Malley felt she had enough know-how to start up a bricks-and-mortar business. Jade’s Jazz Lounge is open daily at 6 p.m. and is named after her online club. Business has been brisk on weekends, she says. Having the Second Life lounge informed her efforts at opening shop in La Pine. “Yeah, most definitely,” she says. “Because people are people, no matter where you’re at.” When someone at the La Pine Chamber of Commerce suggested she should hold events at the club, she responded, “‘That’s funny, because I was No. 2 in popularity in a 10-million-person game,’” she says. “Not currently, because I haven’t been paying as much attention to it. “I was so popular because I used to hold events, all the time. I said, ‘Gee, I need to take a clue from myself,’ you know, just do what I was doing there, the craziness.” O’Malley’s online presence isn’t limited to Second Life. She also has an online jazz station at www.jadesjazz.net, and serves as a disc jockey on KITC 106.5 FM, airing in Gilchrist and La Pine. Her radio program on the station is also called “Jade’s Jazz Lounge”; it airs from 7 to 10 p.m. each Sunday, Tuesday and Friday. O’Malley says she’s a fan of all

What: Jade’s Jazz Lounge When: Opens at 6 p.m. nightly Where: 51470 U.S. Highway 97 #5 (across parking lot from Cinco de Mayo Mexican Restaurant) Cost: Admission is $5 on live music nights; free otherwise Contact: 541-876-1009 or jade@jadesjazz.net

forms of jazz, and the music that plays in the club reflects those eclectic tastes. A divorced mother, O’Malley says everyone who’s helping her at the club is doing so on a voluntary basis. She didn’t take out a loan to open the humble club, with its laminate wood dance floor. “I’m just nuts,” she says, laughing. “I hocked things to get this open.” Additionally, the lounge is nonalcoholic. There are already enough watering holes in this town “where a lot of drinking goes on. It seemed prudent to have a place where people can come listen to live music and not have to be in that crowd.” She also wanted to see if it work to have a family-friendly jazz club. And she didn’t want to wait the amount of time it would take to acquire a liquor license. Patrons seem to like having an alcohol-free option. “I’ve heard a lot of really positive comments about that,” she says. “A lot of people have said, ‘Gee, now I can walk out of (nearby restaurant) Cinco de Mayo and I can have live music.’ They can bring their kids in if they really wanted to hear live music at that moment, instead of feeling, ‘Oh, I can’t go in there.’” Getting jazz artists to La Pine may be a challenge, she says. So far, she’s successfully booked a few acts from the region, bands that have members hailing from La Pine, Terrebonne and points in between. The lounge offers a light dinner menu alongside its virgin cocktails, and O’Malley has hosted her evening radio program from the stage of the small club. “This is the capability I just got: Last night, I was on my radio station. This is where I was doing the mic,” she says, gesturing toward the stage, “and I got it going back through my computer into Second Life. So now a band can set up here and be playing on my stage and be streamed onto my Jade’s Jazz stage in Second Life.”

Continued from E1 Though they reign as living symbols of the open West, many were shot for sport, killed for dog food or meals on dinner tables in foreign countries, according to congressional testimony that led to the passage of the Wild Horse and Burro Act. That changed after the act became law in 1971. Duncan ended up in the loving care of Kate Beardsley, of Tumalo. Beardsley, 44, is a member of the Central Oregon Wild Horse Coalition, part of a vast wild-horse-rescue movement that includes celebrities Sheryl Crow and Bill Maher. “These horses are part of our national heritage. We want to make sure that they are properly managed, and if captured, they’re made available to good adoptive homes,” said Beardsley. Roughly 2,600 wild horses roam Oregon’s High Desert and forests, said Tara Martinak, a spokeswoman for the Bureau of Land Management. Up to 70 of them are in the Ochoco area where Duncan was born, she said. Duncan was captured by the U.S. Forest Service after an irrigation system lured him through a gate and onto private property. “He knew what to do to survive. He’s not stupid,” said Beardsley. Feral horses are wired and wild eyed when captured and view people as predators. Even the sound of a car or truck engine frightens them, said Beardsley. “But my guess is that Duncan was calmer. We’ve observed that the Ochoco mustangs tend to be a little more gentle than wild horses caught elsewhere.” Duncan was driven to the BLM’s Oregon Wild Horse Corral Facility near Burns. He was given vaccinations, checked for diseases, and freeze-branded along his neck. After receiving a clean bill of health, Duncan was adopted by a female friend of Beardsley’s who began desensitizing him in a round pen by touching him and gently prodding him with a pole. Then she transferred him to Beardsley, who worked with him daily. She took him to riding clinics for the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue horse team. At first he was fidgety and barely tolerated being ridden. “When she brought him, he was definitely a green horse,”

Horse adoptions

Jazz festival O’Malley will also host the second annual Jade’s Jazz Festival, slated for Aug. 6-8 at the La Pine Event Center. It will feature jazz artists such as Lino, David Patrone, Nina and Detour:Jazz, among others. Some of the acts also have music careers — represented by avatars, of course — in Second Life. With all her real-world endeavors of late, O’Malley is AFK more often than she used to be. However, she has the ability to keep her avatar dancing in her Second Life nightclub. “I learned to set it so it can’t show that it’s AFK … so if it does that, it can just dance and dance and dance — unless the program crashes.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

Roughly 250 horses are available for adoption at Oregon’s Wild Horse Corral Facility near Burns, said BLM spokeswoman Tara Martinak. The Mustang Heritage Foundation is offering pay incentives to qualified horse trainers who “gentle” the horses and help them find good homes. Prospective adopters will be screened. For more information, contact the BLM office at 541-5734400 or www.blm.gov/or/ districts/burns/wildhorse/ corral.php.

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Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Kate Beardsley’s cat, Little Fish, sits on the back of her mustang, Duncan, awaiting a ride at their Tumalo ranch Sunday. Beardsley trained Duncan to serve as a search and rescue horse.. recalls team coordinator Sue Morgan. And yet, after just 11 months, he earned certification as one of 13 horses with the sheriff’s search and rescue team. Today Beardsley can ride him deep into the wilderness or pack him with supplies. She says he’ll know what to do when a hunter or hiker goes missing. “I’ll simply say, ‘Find him,’ and Duncan will understand that we’re on a rescue mission and to follow a scent,” said Beardsley. From then on, she’ll read his movements and behavior. A shift of his head or ears could mean he detects something that the riders cannot. Duncan has developed into a dependable work partner, said

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Morgan, who welcomes the new 900-pound member to the all-volunteer mounted team. “He has a remarkable mind.” To see just how remarkable, consider that during the 45-minute interview with Beardsley for this story, Duncan stood close to her side in the pasture. And when Beardsley’s cat, Little Fish, wrapped himself around Duncan’s legs, then perched himself upon his back, this once-wild mustang didn’t even flinch. “He’s made me tremendously

proud,” said Beardsley. Duncan nuzzled her cheek as if he understood. Linda Weiford can be reached at ldweiford@gmail.com.

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H OME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTR A L ORE GON

F

Where’s the iron? Martha Stewart offers plenty of ideas for iron-rich foods outside of the animal kingdom, Page F6

AT HOME

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MAY 18, 2010

v

HOME

Magnificent

mushroom melange FOOD Photo illustration. Photo by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Jennifer and TR McCrystal, of Sisters, own Jen’s Garden and Thyme restaurants.

At Home With ... The McCrystals of Jen’s Garden In this monthly feature, we visit with well-known Central Oregonians and get a glimpse into their lives at home.

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

W

By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

Jennifer and TR McCrystal, the owners of the upscale Sisters restaurant Jen’s Garden and their newly opened bistro Thyme, are passionate people. They have passion for each other, passion for their children and passion for their food and restaurants. Jennifer, a graduate of the Western Culinary School in Portland, had been up since 4 a.m. on the day we came to interview her, a wake-up time she has three times a week to bake desserts for Jen’s Garden. TR hurried into his home on this rainy day, having just come back from his restaurant kitchen, where he had started the bread dough. His workdays usually run 12 to 13 hours, and on his two days off, he usually tries to limit it to four to five hours. It’s a grueling schedule, and yet he’s still passionate about food. Mix their schedules with two young daughters, Lizzie, 4, and Delsi, 8, and you have a recipe for busy beyond belief. “We giggle, we laugh, and just grin about our life. You have the kid thing, the restaurant thing, and it somehow miraculously works,” says Jennifer, standing in her immaculate kitchen, where she has just created her own recipe for energy bars out of almonds, pine nuts and apricots drizzled with Belgian chocolate, which she offers to her foodie daughter, Lizzie. “It’s really not as frenetic as it appears, but this is pretty typical — we have Christmas music playing (in April) and a box of Cream of Wheat out on the sink.” See McCrystals / F4

ith spring comes a new crop of wild mushrooms in nearby Northwest forests. Besides the prized

morels, the hunt will be on for boletus, shaggy mane and puff ball mushrooms, to name a few. But unless you’re hunting your own fungi, the ones you’ll encounter in specialty food stores will cost you dearly. On the other hand, since most mushrooms are relatively light for their volume, a little can go a long way. So even the average household budget can accommodate a small indulgence. Perhaps a simple sauté to crown a platter of creamy pasta, or as a flavor boost to a bowl of lightly steamed and buttered asparagus. Then it’s back to the workhorse of the mushroom world, the more affordable and accessible Agaricus brunnescens. This common supermarket variety is my ’shroom of choice when making one of my favorite mushroom-based savories, a finely minced melange of mushrooms, onions and butter created by the great 17th-century chef Francois Pierre La Varenne. He called it duxelles, and it has become a classic. I’ve frequently wondered what possessed him to toss a handful of chopped mushrooms into a tea towel, wring them dry, then sauté them to a deep, rich, flavorful state with butter, onions and wine. The book “Larousse Gastronomique” describes this magical potion — a potion with the power to flavor simple sauces, soups and stuffings in a way that borders on criminal — as “a mushroom hash.”

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

Whole-wheat pasta is served with a duxelles cream sauce and chicken cutlets. The common supermarket mushroom is perfect for a finely minced melange of ’shrooms, onions and butter — basic, classic duxelles. Recipes on Page F2. The book doesn’t dwell on the chef’s creative motivations. But like I said, its official name is duxelles (“dook-SELL”), a word that derives from the name of the town of Uxel in France, and the dish was most likely called this because La Varenne was creating it for his patron, the Marquis d’Uxelles. At any rate, I don’t have to understand the source of his inspiration to take advantage of his genius. And so, on a fairly regular basis, I find myself standing over a skillet of sizzling bits of mushroom, breathing in their musty-rich aroma as they are transported from the state of fresh to divine. Since mushrooms release their liquids during cooking, I eliminated La Varenne’s towel trick early on in my relationship with this recipe; a few extra minutes over the burner takes care of the accumulated liquid. See Mushrooms / F2

GARDEN

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S

Extending our short season By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

Every spring, many Central Oregonians plant their gardens twice. The first planting generally occurs during the first nice weekend of April. The sunshine and warmth trigger an irresistible response in some; they must plant something to get that gardening fix and the accompanying euphoria associated with dirt under their fingernails. Inevitably, these nice days will be followed by a cold snap and frost that kills everything. The second planting is gener-

ally sometime in June, and with a little luck and good weather, it will be a successful, if short, growing season. Central Oregon’s garden season is short and the challenges are many. But for people with greenhouses, the gardening season starts sooner and lasts longer. Here’s how you can use your greenhouse to ease into and extend the gardening season. Master Gardener Betty Faller, of Tumalo, uses her 8-by-12-foot greenhouse mostly for starting seeds and getting plants ready to put in the ground. See Season / F5

• BASIC DUXELLES, F2 • DUXELLES EN CROUTE, F2 • COUSCOUS WITH DUXELLES, F2 • BEANS WITH DUXELLES, F2 • ASPARAGUS PESTO, F2 • CARROT MUFFINS, F3 • WHOLE-WHEAT CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES, F3 • STRAWBERRY BARLEY SCONES, F3 • HONEY-MUSTARD PORK CHOPS, F3 • CHOCOLATE DUMP CAKE, F6 • THIEVES’ PUNCH, F6

Correction Leon Pantenburg / For The Bulletin

Seed-starting trays are full of plants in Betty Faller’s Tumalo greenhouse, which allows Faller to start gardening earlier in the year.

In a story headlined “A place for your television at home,” which appeared Tuesday, May 11, on Page F1, an accompanying photo on Page F4 was credited incorrectly. It was taken by Paula Watts. The Bulletin regrets the error.


F2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Barbecue rubs Learn what works before you grill.

COVER STORY

Mushrooms Continued from F1 In the basic duxelles recipe, the onions and mushrooms are sauteed in butter. The mushrooms release their liquids and the mixture will look like a swamp. Several more minutes over a relatively hot burner produces a dry and thick product. You see, the recipe needs heat and time to achieve its delicate, caramelized character — so don’t fudge with the process. I can think of three very good reasons for converting mushrooms into this delightful melange. First, the basic mushroom flavor is enhanced significantly by the addition of onions and butter. La Varenne had a keen palate and most likely knew instinctively that by bringing these flavors together, the impact would be phenomenal. Second, the mushroom “hash,” if you will, is a handy method of applying mushroom flavor to anything from toast points and beef roulades to sauces and stuffings. Third, by turning mushrooms into duxelles, you will extend their shelf life dramatically, since it’s a concoction that can be refrigerated for at least a week or frozen for several months. It’s also important to know that through time and use in countless kitchens, variations of the classic preparation now abound. Adding heavy cream or crème fraîche to the basic duxelles will thin the mixture slightly and taste wonderful in casseroles. To your favorite creamed pasta sauce, stir in several spoonfuls of the basic duxelles that has been seasoned with a tablespoon of tomato purée. Or add a teaspoon of chopped garlic and crushed chili while sautéeing

By the time the water has evaporated from the duxelles, the mixture will be dark, thick and fragrant.

Photos by Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

To make a duxelles, finely mince the mushrooms, onions and shallots, then cook slowly in a skillet with butter. the onions in the basic recipe to make a savory addition to tacos, refried beans and chili. Duxelles will keep in the refrigerator for more than a week. Make it now and you’ll have a convenient flavor enhancer for soups, sauces, risotto, mashed potatoes and sauteed vegetables. It even makes a delectable hors d’oeuvre when served with small toasts, as you would a fine pâté. Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@proaxis.com.

DUXELLES EN CROUTE Makes 4 generous servings. 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves 1 TBS oil Salt and pepper to taste 1 (17¼-oz) package of

Duxelles served with chicken cutlets and salad. Duxelles can also enhance soups, sauces, risotto, mashed potatoes and sauteed vegetables.

frozen puff pastry ½ C cream cheese, softened ½ C shredded cheddar cheese ½ C duxelles 1 egg, lightly beaten

Place the chicken breasts between two sheets of waxed paper or in a plastic bag and gently pound each one at its thickest portion with the flat side of a rolling pin or wooden mallet until they are of relatively even thickness. Sauté the chicken breasts in oil over medium heat just until the surface is slightly golden, but the meat is still soft and pliable. Salt and pepper to taste; remove from heat and cool slightly. Meanwhile, gently unroll the two thawed sheets of puff pastry. On floured surface, with lightly floured rolling pin, roll each 9-by9-inch sheet to 11-by-11 inches and cut in half to give you 4 individual pastry rectangles, each measuring approximately 11-by5½ inches. Combine the cheeses and place one fourth of the mixture in the center of each pastry rectangle. Trim the cooled chicken breasts into 3-inch squares. Place a trimmed breast on top of the cheeses and top with the trimmed scraps of chicken. Spread one fourth of the duxelles over the surface of each chicken. Brush water around the edges of the pastry, then fold up the long edges toward the center, sealing the edges securely, folding once if possible. Roll up the remaining edges to totally enclose the chicken. Arrange the cases seam side down on a baking sheet and brush them with the lightly beaten egg. Bake in 350-degree oven for 40 minutes. Serve hot, with a tossed green salad.

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BASIC DUXELLES ½ C butter 2 TBS coarsely chopped onion 2 shallots, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 lb fresh mushrooms ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp white pepper

Melt butter in a large skillet over medium-low heat. While the butter is melting, place the onions, shallots, and about one third of the mushrooms in the workbowl of a food processor. Finely mince the mixture by using the “pulse” or “on-off” button on the processor. Scrape the minced mushrooms into the pot with the melting butter and repeat the mincing process with remaining mushrooms, adding them to the pot when they are minced. Stir the minced mushroom mixture with the butter, thoroughly coating, and continue to sauté, stirring frequently, until all of the liquid that is released from the mushrooms has evaporated (about 15 to 20 minutes). Once the mushrooms have darkened slightly, add salt and pepper to taste. Yields about 2½ cups. Note: For a quick and delectable hors d’oeuvre, spoon duxelles into a bowl and surround with melba toast or other fine crackers. It’s wonderful. Duxelles will keep refrigerated for slightly over one week, or frozen for 3 months. Before using, you may want to reheat gently over low heat or in the microwave to soften. TOMATO DUXELLES VARIATION To the basic recipe, add 2 tablespoons tomato paste and ½ teaspoon of sugar (if necessary, to offset the acid in the tomatoes). GARLIC DUXELLES VARIATION Sauté about 1 tablespoon of finely chopped garlic along with the onions during the preparation of the basic recipe. HERBED DUXELLES Stir in about 1½ tablespoons of finely chopped fresh herbs. Basil is a wonderful herb to use, as is fresh dill or savory. However, a combination can also be wonderful, and one of my favorites is a mixture of parsley, thyme, and just a tiny pinch of marjoram (the total measurement shouldn’t be over 1½ tablespoons). CREAM DUXELLES Add ½ cup heavy cream and 2 tablespoons of crème fraîche (or sour cream) at the very end of the process and cook down slightly to evaporate and thicken a bit. QUICK CHICKEN SAUTÉ WITH DUXELLES Place boned and skinned chicken breasts between two sheets of waxed paper or in a plastic bag and gently pound each one at its thickest portion with the flat side of a rolling pin or wooden mallet until it is of relatively even thickness. Lightly season the breasts with salt and pepper, then sauté in a small amount of butter or olive oil until beautifully golden on both sides. Before serving, spoon about 2 tablespoons of warm duxelles over each breast. If desired, deglaze the pan with about ¼ cup of white wine or water, stirring and scraping up all the cooked-on bits of food. Serve with these pan juices and garlic mashed potatoes.

COUSCOUS WITH DUXELLES Makes 6 servings. 1 C duxelles (see basic duxelles recipe) 3 C couscous (see note)

6 slices bacon, diced and fried 3 C boiling chicken broth

In a medium-sized saucepan, reheat duxelles over medium heat to soften. Stir in bacon and couscous and remove from heat. Pour on the boiling chicken broth, stir to coat all of the grains and cover. Let the couscous stand, covered, for 6 minutes. When ready to serve, fluff lightly with fork. It’s a wonderful side dish to poultry, lamb or even meatloaf. Note: Use the “instant” variety of couscous, which is available in most well-stocked grocery stores.

BEANS WITH DUXELLES Makes 6 servings. 1 C duxelles (see basic duxelles recipe) 1 C chopped yellow onions 2 TBS flour ¾ tsp dried thyme leaves 1 (15-oz) can pinto beans, drained

1 (15-oz) can Great Northern beans, drained 1 (15-oz) can red kidney beans, drained 1½ C dry white wine (or vegetable, beef, or chicken broth)

In a medium skillet, heat the duxelles over medium heat until softened. Add onions and sauté until the onions are softened and transparent, about 3 minutes. Stir in the flour and continue to cook and stir another 2 minutes. In a 2-quart casserole, combine the mushroom mixture with the beans, broth and thyme. Bake, uncovered, in 350-degree oven for 45 minutes.

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Few things can be treated as simply as asparagus, which takes almost nothing to be delicious. But how many times can you eat lightly cooked, lightly seasoned asparagus before you tire of it? Enter asparagus pesto, which tastes like asparagus with additional punch. (Pesto is not only made with basil.) Making asparagus pesto lets you use the peel, which contains a ton of flavor even though it’s sometimes too tough and stringy to eat. Puréeing lets you sidestep this issue: you keep the peel, and the flavor, but your food processor pulverizes the fibers, even if you use thick spears. Whether the spears are thick or thin, the woody ends should be cut off and discarded before the spears are boiled. The asparagus is ready when easily pierced by a knife, which might take as long as 10 minutes. (Don’t overdo it; the asparagus will turn gray and flavorless if cooked to death.)

ASPARAGUS PESTO Makes 4 to 6 servings (about 1½ cups). Salt 1 lb asparagus, trimmed and cut into 2-inch segments 1 clove garlic, or more to taste 1 ⁄4 C pine nuts

⁄4 C olive oil, or more as desired 3 ⁄4 C freshly grated Parmesan cheese Freshly ground black pepper Juice of 1⁄2 lemon, or to taste

1

Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt it. Add the asparagus and cook until fully tender but not mushy, 8 to 10 minutes. Drain well, reserving some of the cooking liquid, and let the asparagus cool slightly. Transfer the asparagus to a food processor and add the garlic, pine nuts, 2 tablespoons of the oil, Parmesan, a pinch of salt and a couple of tablespoons of the cooking liquid. Process the mixture, stopping to scrape down the sides of the container if necessary, and gradually add the remaining oil and a bit more of the reserved cooking liquid to moisten, if necessary. Add the lemon juice and season with salt and pepper to taste, pulse one last time, and serve over pasta, fish or chicken (or cover and refrigerate for up to a day). Once the asparagus is soft, drain and let cool, then purée with the quintessential components of pesto genovese: garlic, pine nuts, olive oil and Parmesan. (I add a squeeze of lemon,

which seems to heighten the flavor of the asparagus.) I can eat this stuff with a spoon, but it’s perfect on pasta, fish, chicken, eggs or even other vegetables.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 F3

F Looking at baked goods in a whole different way By Samuel Fromartz Special to The Washington Post

If you’ve ever baked with whole-wheat flour and ended up with something nearly inedible, take heart. That is not unusual, even for professional bakers. Kim Boyce, a talented Los Angeles pastry chef with a new cookbook on whole-grain baking, remembers the first time she tried making whole-grain muffins at home for her kids. “It was just dreadful. They were heavy, almost leaden,” Boyce says. When Peter Reinhart, a wellknown baker, author and teacher, baked his first whole-grain bread, the effort yielded “a thick, dark, leathery crust surrounding an inedible wad of spongy, glutinous paste. It was awful,” he wrote in “Peter Reinhart’s Whole Grain Breads,” which is devoted to rectifying such problems. Granted, Reinhart’s initial whole-grain foray was circa 1970, and the bread included no yeast. Still, for decades, bakers have been tugged between the mounting knowledge that whole grains are nutritious, even essential to good health, and the age-old notion that they taste like dull, earnest bricks. Thankfully, he and Boyce did not give up. They attacked a common problem: How do you temper the weight of whole grains while letting the full range of flavors and textures shine through? If you can manage that, you can win over the most jaded cookie lover. “It’s a genuinely exciting palate of ingredients,” says Heidi Swanson, the author of “Super Natural Cooking” and the popular blog 101 Cookbooks. Just as farmers markets have introduced consumers to a wider range of fresh ingredients, “whole grains kind of bring that ethos of the farmers market into the kitchen pantry,” she says. Now Boyce, 35, who worked as a pastry chef at Spago and Campanile in Los Angeles, has produced “Good to the Grain: Baking With Whole-Grain Flours” (Stewart, Tabori & Chang) with Amy Scattergood. The book takes waffles, scones, cookies and muffins in new directions, using a dozen grains including amaranth and teff. Among the friends, relatives and neighbors who scarfed up the goods I tested, not one mentioned the word “healthy.” In short, by coaxing out the flavors in new ways, Boyce managed to turn the stereotype on its head. When you think about it, Boyce’s approach isn’t entirely new. After all, the culture of cooking with whole grains dates back thousands of years. Think of staples such as Scandinavian rye crackers, French pain de campagne loaves (white, whole-wheat and rye flours), Italian farro risotto (emmer wheat, an ancient grain), Middle Eastern tabbouleh (bulgur wheat), Japanese soba noodles (buckwheat), Indian roti (whole wheat) and Ethiopian injera (teff). But if the past was about whole grains, they largely became a footnote as methods and tastes shifted to white flour. What makes whole grains whole? The grain is made up of three parts: the bran, a fibrous coat that surrounds and protects the seed; the nutritionally rich germ; and the protein- and starchfilled endosperm that feeds the plant and springs from the germ. In white flour, the germ and bran are sifted out, which means many of the grain’s natural vitamins, antioxidants and minerals are lost. The refined flour is later enriched with a handful of nutrients. But enriched flour does not equal whole grains, which have been shown to lower the risk of

James M. Thresher / The Washington Post

Los Angeles pastry chef Kim Boyce’s carrot muffins include spelt flour and oat bran in place of some of the white flour such recipes usually call for.

CARROT MUFFINS Makes 8 muffins (with large tops). Here’s a tip: Fill alternate wells in a muffin pan, so each muffin has room to spread out and bake evenly. For this recipe, use two 12-well muffin pans or one large 24-well muffin pan (with 1⁄3 C wells). FOR THE TOPPING 1 ⁄4 C plus 2 TBS spelt flour 2 TBS oat bran 2 TBS dark brown sugar 1 TBS granulated sugar 1 ⁄8 TBS kosher salt 3 TBS cold unsalted butter, cut into 1⁄4 -inch pieces

FOR THE MUFFINS 4 TBS (1⁄2 stick) unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled, plus more for greasing the pan 1 C spelt flour 3 ⁄4 C all-purpose flour 1 ⁄4 C oat bran 1 ⁄3 C packed dark brown sugar 1 ⁄4 C granulated sugar

For the topping: Combine the spelt flour, oat bran, sugars and salt in a medium bowl. Add the butter, and use your fingers to work the mixture to the consistency of coarse cornmeal. The faster you work, the more solid the butter will remain. For the muffins: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Use a little butter to grease alternating muffin wells in a 12-muffin pan (see headnote). Sift together the flours, oat bran, sugars, allspice, salt, baking powder, baking soda and cinnamon into a mixing bowl, pouring into the bowl any grain or other ingredients that remain in the sifter. Add the carrots and stir to coat. Whisk together the melted butter, buttermilk and egg in a separate bowl until thoroughly combined. Use a spatula to incorporate the butter mixture into the flour mixture.

heart disease and reduce rates of diabetes. They have also been linked with lower weight in people who eat them over a long time. Given that knowledge, the government recommended in 2005 that Americans consume half of their grains as whole grains in at least three or four servings a day, depending on age and gender. Companies responded by rolling out new whole-grain products, boosting consumption by 20 percent by 2008. But whole grains still amounted to just 11 percent of all grains consumed rather than the 50 percent recommended. One reason might be that whole grains throw a wrench into our acquired taste for white flour — and the recipes for cookies, breads and cookies made with it. “If you’re just looking to substitute whole-wheat flour for white flour in a recipe, it’s not going to work,” Reinhart says. Whole grains absorb much more liquid than white flour does. The fibrous bran cuts through strands of gluten, making breads denser. The lack of gluten in grains such as barley and buckwheat may enhance the lightness of quick breads, but another agent such as all-purpose flour is needed to add structure. And the grains can have bitter notes from tannins.

1 tsp ground allspice 1 tsp kosher salt 1 tsp baking powder 1 ⁄2 tsp baking soda 1 ⁄2 tsp ground cinnamon 2 med carrots, peeled and grated (11⁄2 C) 1 C regular or low-fat buttermilk 1 large egg

Use a spoon or ice cream scoop to portion the batter evenly among the 8 prepared muffin wells. The batter should be slightly mounded. Sprinkle the topping evenly over the mounds of batter and press it into the batter slightly. Bake on the middle rack for 32 to 35 minutes; the muffins should smell nutty and the bottoms should be golden brown (twist one out to check). Place the muffin pan on top of the stove and gently twist out the muffins, letting them cool on their sides halfway out of their individual wells; that will help keep them from becoming soggy. Serve warm. Nutrition information per muffin (using low-fat buttermilk): 310 calories, 8 g protein, 49 g carbohydrates, 12 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 55 mg cholesterol, 600 mg sodium, 5 g dietary fiber, 21 g sugar

WHOLE-WHEAT CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES

STRAWBERRY BARLEY SCONES Makes 8 scones. 8 TBS (1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1⁄2 -inch pieces, plus more for greasing the baking sheet 1 C plus 2 TBS barley flour, plus more for the work surface 1 C all-purpose flour 1 ⁄4 C packed light brown sugar 2 tsp baking powder 1 ⁄2 tsp baking soda 11⁄4 tsp kosher salt 1 ⁄2 C regular or low-fat buttermilk 1 lg egg 1 ⁄2 C strawberry jam or marmalade 1 TBS unsalted butter, melted 1 TBS granulated sugar For the scones: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Use a little butter to grease a rimmed baking sheet. Sift the flours, brown sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a bowl, adding any grains that may remain in the sifter. Add the butter, then use your hands or a pastry knife to break the butter into pieces the size of grains of rice. Whisk together the buttermilk and egg, then pour it into the flour mixture and stir until combined. Liberally flour a work surface. Transfer the dough to the surface and dust the top of it and your hands with additional flour, folding the dough a few times so it is not sticky. Divide the dough in half. Pat each piece into a disk 7 inches across and about ¾-inch thick. To assemble: Spread 1 disk of dough with the strawberry jam or marmalade. Place the remaining disk on top, pressing down gently so the dough settles into the jam. Brush the top of the second disk with the melted butter, then sprinkle it with the sugar. Cut the disk into 8 equal wedges. Carefully transfer them to the baking sheet, spaced a few inches apart. Bake on the middle rack for 22 to 26 minutes, rotating the sheet halfway through. The scones are ready when their tops are golden brown and some of the jam or marmalade has bubbled over onto the baking sheet. Serve warm. Nutrition information per scone (using low-fat buttermilk): 330 calories, 5 g protein, 47 g carbohydrates, 14 g fat, 9 g saturated fat, 60 mg cholesterol, 600 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 17 g sugar

Think pork chops for simple and satisfying By Marge Perry Newsday

A boneless center loin pork chop (4 ounces raw or 3 ounces cooked) has only 178 calories and 3g saturated fat, making it a great, healthy choice.

HONEY-MUSTARD PORK CHOPS Makes 4 servings. 2 TBS honey 2 TBS balsamic vinegar 1 C low-sodium chicken broth, divided 1 TBS coarse (stoneground) mustard ½ shallot, minced (about 2 TBS) 4 (4-oz) lean, boneless, center-cut pork loin chops ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp black pepper 1 TBS olive oil 1 (9-oz) bag pre-washed baby spinach (about 9 C) Combine honey, vinegar, ¾ C of broth, mustard and shallot in saucepan, and bring to a boil. Boil until thickened, about 8 minutes. (It will reduce to 1⁄3 C). Set aside. Season pork chops with salt and pepper, and heat oil over medium high in a nonstick skillet. Add pork and cook until browned and cooked through, about 5 minutes on each side. Remove. Add spinach and remaining ¼ C of broth and cook, tossing for 1 to 2 minutes. Drizzle the sauce over the chops and the spinach. Nutrition information per serving: 257 calories, 25 g protein, 18 g carbohydrates, 3 g fiber, 10 g fat, 3 g saturated fat, 652 mg sodium.

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Makes about 24 4- or 5-inch cookies. 3 C whole-wheat flour, plus more for the work surface 11⁄2 tsp baking powder 1 tsp baking soda 11⁄2 tsp kosher salt 16 TBS (2 sticks) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1⁄2 -inch pieces

1 C packed dark brown sugar 1 C granulated sugar 2 lg eggs 2 tsp vanilla extract 8 oz bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped into 1 ⁄4 - and 1⁄2 -inch pieces

Position oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven; preheat to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Sift the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt into a mixing bowl, adding any large bits of grain or other ingredients that remain in the sifter. Combine the butter and sugars in the bowl of a stand mixer or hand-held electric mixer; beat on low speed for about 2 minutes, until just blended. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing to incorporate after each addition, then add the vanilla extract. Add the flour mixture and beat until barely combined. Stop to scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl. Add the chocolate, and beat on low speed just until evenly distributed. Lightly flour a work surface. Transfer the dough to the work surface and use your hands to fully incorporate any remaining flour or chocolate from the bowl. Scoop 3-tablespoon mounds of the dough onto each baking sheet, spacing them 3 inches apart (about 6 mounds per sheet). Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, then rotate the sheets top to bottom and front to back. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until evenly browned. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack to cool before serving or storing. Repeat to use the remaining dough. Nutrition information per cookie: 240 calories, 3 g protein, 33 g carbohydrates, 12 g fat, 7 g saturated fat, 40 mg cholesterol, 240 mg sodium, 3 g dietary fiber, 21 g sugar

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Is your chicken of a certain age? What’s it called? By Kathleen Purvis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Q:

What is the name for an old chicken? Way back, they would use this name in the butcher shop. You may be thinking of a capon. Although some defini-

A:

tions refer to a capon as a castrated rooster, that actually isn’t correct. Male chickens don’t become roosters until they are older. A capon is castrated early and is usually sold when it’s 7 to 10 months old and weighs 4 to 10 pounds. You also might mean a hen,

which is an older chicken that is past egg-laying age. Hens are tougher and a little scrawnier, but they’re great for any slowcooking method, such as a stew, and they make wonderful stock. Here are the standard chicken classifications, based on size

and age: Broiler (2 to 3 months old, 1½ to 2½ pounds), fryer (3 to 5 months old, 2 to 3 pounds), roaster (3 to 8 months old, 2 to 5 pounds), capon (usually 7 to 10 months old, 4 to 10 pounds); stewing chicken or stewing hen (10 to 12 months old, over 3 pounds).

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F4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: Puppy-proof What to do before you bring a pup home.

COVER STORY “We always knew we wanted to open a little restaurant ... so we took five months and traveled to small towns (elsewhere). Then we came back here. ... I looked around and realized, why would we leave here? It’s beautiful, it has art and it has culture, wonderful people and great schools.”

Jennifer McCrystal and her 4-year-old daughter, Lizzie, chat on Lizzie’s antique brass bed. This is Jennifer’s favorite room. “It’s always quiet and peaceful. I have been known to sneak home, slip in and nap in her cozy bed. Makes me feel like Goldilocks!”

— Jennifer McCrystal

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

TR McCrystal looks over cookware in his kitchen, his favorite room. “While it isn’t fancy, I love the fact that there is tons of counter space and you can see everything when entertaining,” he says. “The girls love to watch us cook and help when they can.”

McCrystals Continued from F1 But what keeps the McCrystals a successful couple in the highly competitive restaurant business is their work ethic, and their ability to laugh at things they can’t control. Despite their long hours at both restaurants, the couple always manages to sneak in time for family and fishing. TR, a graduate of California State Polytechnic’s hotel and restaurant management school,

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has used his degree to work at some wonderful jobs, including a stint as a professional fly fishing guide on the Umpqua River. There he landed not only trout but also a blind date set up by Jennifer’s father. “At the time I was living in Ketchum, Idaho, but I came home (to Glide) for a weekend and had a hiking date with TR, and we just knew right away,” said Jennifer. “Four months later we were engaged,” said TR, picking up the story. “I knew the day we met, and that was 15 years ago.” Not surprisingly, their second date that weekend involved picking marionberries, which TR used to make crêpes for his future wife. Baking and cooking are also a big part of Jennifer’s life, and she said she first picked up that

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This scene of the Deschutes River was painted by local artist Susan Higdon and is one of TR McCrystal’s favorite pieces of art at home. passion when she went as an exchange student to Australia, where she cooked for her host families, and they loved and appreciated everything she made. The McCrystals originally owned a small pizza restaurant in Bend, Little Pizza Paradise, but sold it and decided to do a yearlong bicycle tour through New Zealand and Australia. Jennifer calls it their belated honeymoon. Upon returning to the states, they went in search of the perfect place to open their dream restaurant. “We always knew we wanted to open a little restaurant … so we took five months and traveled to small towns in Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, southern Washington and Northern California,” Jennifer recalled. “Then we came back here, and I saw the house — now Jen’s Garden — was being sold. It had been a private home. I looked around and realized, why would we leave here? It’s beautiful, it has art and it has culture, wonderful people and great schools.” At the Five Pines Resort,

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where the new Thyme bistro is located, Jennifer works four nights a week as the dining room manager, and she says the success was immediate. “I know it’s still the honeymoon period, but we’re packed there; it’s just booming,” Jennifer said. “We wanted a good place where people could hang out and get quality food at affordable prices,” TR said. “We needed to fill a niche, and this is a comfortable, casual bistro, where people can also get a cocktail in a nice setting, along with great food.” TR says their daughters are his guinea pigs for new recipes. “My home kitchen is my test kitchen,” he said. “The girls are food freaks … they’ll eat Brussels sprouts with a horseradish sauce, and duck pâté,” Jennifer said. “Sometimes when the girls have slumber parties, their friends are afraid of what we might serve. We’ve expanded the neighborhood kids’ repertoire of foods. We’ve served up quail, which my daughter explained to her friend was like a mini turkey, and one morning we served up chocolate chip-hazelnut pancakes.” We visited with the McCrystals recently to see how they eat at home, what they do in their spare time and what they like about Central Oregon. How long have you lived in Central Oregon? TR: We have lived in Central Oregon for almost 15 years, in Sisters for four years. What I love about my home is … TR: I love the proximity to town, the park, the trails and Jen’s Garden. Jennifer: The sound of family. Little girls jumping on the trampoline, dogs chasing kitties, someone practicing the piano, TR getting coffee in the morning … general mayhem. My favorite room is … TR: The kitchen, of course. While it isn’t fancy, I love the fact that there is tons of counter space and you can see everything when entertaining. The girls love to watch us cook and help when they can. Jennifer: My youngest daughter’s bedroom. There is this antique brass bed with a luxurious mattress. It’s always quiet and peaceful. I have been known to sneak home, slip in and nap in her cozy bed. Makes me feel like Goldilocks! My favorite possession is … TR: Mabel, our trailer (1959 Silver Streak). She represents summer fun. We like to dress her up and take her to the Metolius River. Mom reads, girls play, Dad fishes. Nirvana.

Jennifer: Our piano. Much to TR’s chagrin, I play every day and sometimes late at night. I love to hear the girls making up their own songs. If I had a Monday off to do anything I wanted to do at home, alone, I’d … TR: I wouldn’t stay at home. I’d be fishing! The whole point of being in Central Oregon isn’t about who has the coolest place; it is about enjoying the environment around us. The best part about where we live in Sisters is that the trailhead is 100 yards from our house, Whychus Creek is nearby and three blocks from here, you are in downtown. Jennifer: I would spend the day playing in our yard. I love to garden and I also keep bees, which are always entertaining. Gardening time is definitely downtime for me. Three things you’ll always find in our refrigerator are … TR: Cheese, eggs and beer. Jennifer: And Brussels sprouts, in season. Are you handy around the house? TR: Only when I have to be! Have you had a favorite home improvement project or do-ityourself adventure? TR: Remodeling Jen’s Garden to open as a restaurant. I have learned to appreciate the talents of others, to the extent that I am content to hire the work done now. Jennifer: I love to paint. TR has come home to entire rooms being a different color than when he left. Painting is instant gratification. I like that. My favorite piece of artwork in the house is ... TR: There are two — the piece by Janice Druian in the living room and the piece over our bed by Susan Higdon. Both depict the Deschutes River

at different places that I have a connection to. Jennifer: The piece TR mentioned by Janice hangs over our piano. It is of Lower Bridge and easy to get lost in. I love it. What do you like to cook? TR: Anything. Everything. I just like to try new things, different things. The most fun I have is just opening the refrigerator, see what’s there and create a meal. My success rate is pretty high. If I had to choose one favorite thing to make, it would probably be grilled leg of lamb. Jennifer: I run a lot, so it’s pretty healthy when it’s just me and the girls. Grilled meats with lots of veggies and good whole grains. Do you eat out often? TR: Honestly, with two kids and now two restaurants … not so much. There are a lot of places I would like to try. What’s your idea of the perfect get-together at home? TR: Good food, good wine, good friends — and the friends don’t even have to be that good if the food and wine are. Jennifer: A summer evening on the back porch. Kids playing and everyone brings something. Keep it simple and creative. What do you usually have for breakfast? TR: Most mornings it’s pretty simple as we scurry out the door in different directions, but on the weekends and when I’m home to cook, the girls and I make huckleberry-banana pancakes, or waffles or CORD (Clean Out the Refrigerator Day) omelets. Everybody loves bacon. Jennifer: Whole grain toast with almond butter … I know, boring. If you could have a second home anywhere in the world, where would it be? TR: New Zealand. The people are friendly, the environment is beautiful and the fishing is spectacular. Jennifer: I would have an apartment in a city. Just a little flat for entertainment and getaways. What do you do when you have time to relax and recreate in Central Oregon? TR: Go fishing! Jennifer: Run, mountain bike, ride my horse and play with my girls. Words I live by are … TR: Keep it simple, stupid. Jennifer: Act now, it’s later than you think. Penny Nakamura can be reached at halpen1@aol.com.

This Silver Streak trailer from 1959 — affectionately called Mabel — “represents summer fun,” TR McCrystal says. “We like to dress her up and take her to the Metolius River. Mom reads, girls play, Dad fishes. Nirvana.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 F5

G

Next week: Transplanting What works, what doesn’t in this early-season gardening ritual.

Millets go beyond just the farm

COVER STORY

Season Continued from F1 She’ll use the greenhouse up until she plants the seedlings in her fenced-in garden plot. But there are other tasks to occupy your time while waiting for planting weather, she says, and she starts hands-on gardening sometime about the middle of March. “I make lots of lists. I have a rotation chart for the garden so I’ll know how to plant,” Faller says. “I look at my chart, and I know how to take care of the beds.” One of the first things to consider when planning the planting, she says, is when the last frost date will be for this area. “I just pick the first or second of June, because frost is possible around here 12 months a year,” she said. “The Central Oregon growing season is about 60 days, which is less than that of Fairbanks, Alaska!” Faller, who has been a Master Gardener for 11 years and was the 2009 Oregon Master Gardener of the Year, works backward from the last frost date. She adds up the germination time of individual plants and how long she wants the seeds to grow before they’re planted outside. That gives her a date to plant the seeds in the greenhouse. Starting in mid-April, Faller starts weeding, preparing beds and getting the drip irrigation systems ready. She doesn’t rototill the beds in her garden any more, she says, because she doesn’t want to destroy the soil structure. In the greenhouse, Faller will have some of the cold-season crops, such as broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower, started, and they will be ready to plant sooner than other garden crops. “Some of the cold crop seed packs say to plant as soon as you can work the soil,” Faller said. Regardless of the timing, or when the cold-season vegetables are planted, she added, you must be prepared to cover the young plants in the event of an unexpected temperature drop. Some plants, such as garlic and onions, are very hardy and may come up on their own, starting around mid- to late April. But if you buy plants from a large box store, Faller advises acclimating them before planting. “The plants come from another climate and they need some time to get used to this area,” Faller said. “You can start by putting them outside for a few hours dur-

McClatchy-Tribune News Service Ornamental millets exploded onto the landscaping scene a little more than five years ago, much to the shock of gardeners everywhere. Everyone was used to seeing millets on vast acreages associated with farms, but could they pass as a landscape plant? The answer has proven to be an unequivocal yes. Purple Majesty, an All America Gold Medal Selections winner, was the innovator that paved the way for millets to be brought to the landscape. Botanically speaking, these millets are Pennisetum glaucum, closely related to fountain grass, Pennisetum alopecuriodes. This species is native to the United States and is grown as an annual. It thrives in our summer heat and produces dark purple leaves topped by equally dark, fruited plumes on plants reaching 4 to 5 feet.

ABOVE: Betty Faller works in her garden. Faller, of Tumalo, has been a Master Gardener for 11 years and was the 2009 Oregon Master Gardener of the Year. LEFT: Faller checks a cold frame for plant starts near her greenhouse in Tumalo.

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In Central Oregon, “the rule is amend, amend, amend the soil. Most of the dirt is pumice and there is hardly any nutrients or body to it.” — Betty Faller, Master Gardener

Betty Faller checks her garden journal to inform her planting decisions for this year’s garden. “I make lots of lists,” she says. I have a rotation chart for the garden so I’ll know how to plant. I look at my chart, and I know how to take care of the beds.” ing the day and bringing them in at night. It may take two to three weeks.” Before planting, the soil has to be prepared. Central Oregon’s poor soil means that just about everything has to be added to it to

get plants to grow. “The rule is amend, amend, amend the soil,” Faller says. “Most of the dirt is pumice and there is hardly any nutrients or body to it.” Faller does a lot of compost-

ing for her garden, but that consists mainly of burying the organic materials in the beds. Using a greenhouse as part of the overall gardening effort allows Faller to start earlier and extends the growing season another month, she said. “I like to stretch the envelope and try growing different things every year, like birdhouse gourds,” she says. “If you use the greenhouse with your garden, you get a lot more flexibility.”

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F6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

‘Oodles’ of chocolate cake dumped out oh so delicately

Iron-rich and meatless

By Julie Rothman

My daughter doesn’t eat meat. What should she include in her diet to ensure she gets enough iron? Iron plays a key role in transporting oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body and helps keep the immune system in working order. The recommended dietary allowance for women ages 19 to 50 is 18 milligrams. This daily intake is especially important because iron is lost during menstruation. There are plenty of ironrich foods outside the animal kingdom, and a well-planned vegetarian diet can provide an ample amount. Spinach, kale, collard and similar leafy greens are all good sources, as are beans, nuts, eggs and whole grains, including quinoa and wild rice. Iron-fortified cereals and pastas are also worth seeking out. With iron, though, the amount consumed does not necessarily equal the amount absorbed by the body. The type of iron found in vegetables and grains, called nonheme, is not as bioavailable as heme iron, found in meat, fish and poultry. Plus, certain vegetarian staples, such as soy and legumes, contain a substance called phytate, which inhibits iron absorption. Calcium in dairy products and tannins in tea and coffee also interfere with absorption. Fortunately, vitamin C in citrus and other foods helps counteract these inhibitory factors and converts iron into a form that is more usable by the body, as long as the vita-

described. It is so easy to make, a child could do it, and the result is one super-rich and decadent chocolate mess.

The Baltimore Sun

Nancy Hawkins, of Oliver Springs, Tenn., was looking for the recipe for a cake that a woman she worked with brought into her office for a birthday celebration. It was chocolate cake that was just dumped out of the pan and had “oodles and oodles of scrumptious melted chocolate inside.” Hawkins said the woman who made the cake called it an “Aussie dump cake” but she would never share her recipe. While I did not receive any responses from readers about this cake, I knew that a “dump cake” was not that uncommon. A search of the Internet turned up dozens of recipes for dump cakes — cakes commonly made with a cake-mix base, usually in one bowl or pan — that after baking are simply dumped out for serving. A recipe on allrecipes.com for a chocolate dump cake sounded very close to what Hawkins had

RECIPE FINDER

RECIPE REQUEST With summer coming, Anne Loy, of Knoxville, Tenn., would like to find a recipe for a sweet baked tomato dish made using brown sugar. RICE PUDDING CAKE RECIPE ADDITION The oven temperature for the Rice Pudding Cake recipe published Tuesday, May 4, on Page F6 was omitted: Bake pudding in a greased 9-inch spring form pan at 350 degrees for one hour.

If you are looking for a hardto-find recipe or can answer a request, write Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. Names must accompany recipes for them to be published. Letters may be edited for clarity.

CHOCOLATE DUMP CAKE Makes 24 servings. 1 (5-oz) pkg non-instant chocolate pudding mix 21⁄3 C milk

1 (18.25-oz) pkg chocolate cake mix 2 C semisweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease one 9x13-inch baking pan Combine chocolate pudding and milk in a saucepan and cook over medium heat until thick, stirring frequently. Remove pan from heat and add in dry cake mix. Mix together and pour into a prepared baking pan. Evenly spread the chocolate chips over the top of the cake. Bake at 350 degrees for 40 to 45 minutes. Let cake cool and serve. Nutrition information per serving: 193 calories, 8 grams fat, 4 grams saturated fat, 31 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams protein, 2 grams fiber, 2 milligrams cholesterol, 210 milligrams sodium.

A:

Martha Stewart Living

In my house in Bedford, N.Y., I have a lot of beautiful silver trays and candlesticks on display. At tag sales, I always look for inexpensive silver-plate dishes: service plates, chargers and bowls. They’re gorgeous. When you put potted plants on them, the dishes look like they are real silver. In another area, I use all pewter saucers that I’ve collected just for plants. And in yet another spot, I have all copper. Plates are good because they come in a variety of sizes that fit different plants; I don’t like to see a lot of plate under a plant. Also, I put surface protectors underneath each saucer so that it doesn’t scratch the table or floor.

Q: A:

Q:

New York Times News Service photos

Black beans, above, are one way for vegetarians to get iron, which helps keep the body’s immune system in working order. Spinach, left, and other leafy greens are also among the iron-rich foods that vegetarians should consider. min C and iron are consumed in the same meal. If advantageous pairings and diet planning don’t boost iron levels, consult a physician about taking iron supplements.

Q:

I had a wonderful barley and cucumber salad in Italy and would like to adjust the recipe for a picnic. What other ingredients do you suggest? You can use barley, farro or couscous, all of which are great for cold salads. Chopped celery works well with barley, and I

A:

would also include any crunchy vegetables that taste good uncooked, such as jalapeño chile, yellow bell pepper, fennel or carrot. One more item: I had a salad recently and thought, “What is that odd ingredient?” It turned out to be finely chopped pineapple. Its sweet tartness made such a difference.

Q:

I have a lot of houseplants, large and small, and need to put something underneath them to catch the drainage. Do you have an attractive alternative to unsightly plastic saucers?

I have fallen in love with a bright pea-green paint color and want to use it in my hallway, which already has white wainscoting. How can I incorporate this hue seamlessly into the adjacent living room? You have to be careful if you’re going to use a bright color in the center of your house. If you go with the green, keep the wainscoting and other woodwork the same color in all rooms off the hallway. You could paint the living room a different shade of white or a pale beige; a beautiful buttermilk color would go nicely with that pea green. Then use the green as an accent in the neutral living room, with some pillows and throws.

A:

Questions for Martha Stewart can be e-mailed to mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Questions of general interest will be answered in the Ask Martha column; for more information on the topics covered in this column, visit www.marthastewart.com. Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

How will I use all this? Tips for the buyer of bulk food By Judy Hevrdejs Chicago Tribune

“Big Buy Cooking” from the editors of Fine Cooking, Taunton Press, $19.95 What it is: This slim, 188-page volume addresses America’s appetite for buying food in bulk, offering 75 recipes as solutions to the challenges inherent in purchasing, say, an entire wheel of brie or boneless leg of lamb. The book’s subhead, “The Food Lover’s Guide to Buying in Bulk and Using It All Up” sets the book’s parameters: This book is not for those buying a mega-box of Cheerios; it is for those who bulk-buy capers, haricots verts and Grana Padano. Praise and quibbles: The 100 glam photos dominate this book. Recipes range from a wild mushroom and arugula risotto (using bulk dried mushrooms) to a penne with crisp prosciutto, zucchini and corn (using bulk prosciutto). Some recipes are a tad more mundane: Avocado slices and mashed avocado amp up a BLT, while jalapeño slices spike yogurt for a vegetable dip. Tips are sprinkled throughout the book (how to pit olives, how to store an opened can of tomatoes, etc.) and an equivalency chart (metric conversions for liquid/ dry measures and oven temps).

For a perfect picnic salad, consider combining couscous with chopped celery or other types of raw, crunchy vegetables.

Punch up your party By Jason Wilson Bill Hogan / Chicago Tribune

“Big Buy Cooking” offers 75 recipes as solutions to the challenges inherent in purchasing, say, an entire wheel of brie or boneless leg of lamb. But it would have been even more helpful if storage information for each of the 25 items (pine nuts, bread, fingerling potatoes, beef top loin, etc.) had been consolidated in an appendix. Why we think you’ll like it: “Big Buy Cooking” offers solutions for foodies facing the question: “How am I going to use all of this?”

Special to The Washington Post

The cocktail query I get more than any other seems elementary, but in reality it is not. Generally, it goes like this: I’m having a party. I don’t want to spend the whole time playing bartender. Can you recommend a really great cocktail that I can make ahead of time? Something I don’t have to worry about when the guests arrive? Some come right out and say, “We’re casual, and I don’t want to be that fussy guy with the shaker.” Others plead, “Can I just buy some sort of pre-made mixer?” So in hopes of answering in a way that makes everyone happy, I recently played around with a lot of drinks in pitchers: punches, sangrias and the like.

In the course of that experimentation, I made at least one fortunate discovery. In fact, I might have unwittingly answered a question of my own, something that has been nagging at me for a few years: What do you do with cachaca? The answer, it seems: Make punch with it. Cachaca, as many already know, is a Brazilian sugar cane-based spirit whose production is similar to that of rum. In fact, it’s often misidentified as “Brazilian rum,” in part because the U.S. has no official category for it. Cachaca, due to its popularity in Brazil, is the third-most-consumed spirit in the world. In America, however, it remains a bit of a mystery, even though a number of fine premium brands such as Leblon, Cabana, Weber Haus and Boca Loca have come on the market.

THIEVES’ PUNCH Makes 8 servings. Ice 16 oz cachaca 5 oz ruby or tawny port 10 oz freshly squeezed lime juice (from about 4 limes) 5 oz simple syrup (see note) 20 dashes Angostura bitters Fill 8 old-fashioned or rocks glasses with ice. Combine the cachaca, port, lime juice, syrup and bitters in a pitcher. Add ice, then stir. Strain into the glasses. Note: To make simple syrup, combine 1⁄2 C sugar and 1⁄2 C water in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 5 minutes. Let cool to room temperature. Nutrition information per serving: 220 calories, 0 g protein, 16 g carbohydrates, 0 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 0 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 11 g sugar.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 G1

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Want to Buy or Rent PAYING CASH FOR old watches, old military items, old motorcycle helmets any condition, Central Oregon. 541-706-0891

1 7 7 7

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $150. Call for info. 541-923-7501. Bernese/Newfie puppies, 2 wks., 4 male 1 female ready in 4 wks. Dew claws removed and vet checked. $500 per pup $150 deposit call 541-279-7914

Goldendoodle Pups, sweet, kid conditioned, beautiful, health guarantee, ready 5/28 Taking deposits, $500/ea. 541-548-4574/541-408-5909

BLUE HEELER PUPS! Very nice dogs! family raised, lots of herd, great with kids. these litters go FAST! 150.00 first Wanted: All the things in YOUR shots and dewormed. Tugarage you would like to see Golden Retriever Puppies!! malo 503-871-7440 go. Please call 541-480-8322 AKC, Sweet and Sassy! Only BOXER PUPPIES extra large a few females left. Ready to Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motorlitter. Purebred. $150 each. go May 1st. $600. cylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s 541-815-5999. oregonhomes@hotmail.com RUNNING or NOT! 541-419-3999 Cat breeding season has begun! 541-280-6786. Please have your cats spayed Heeler Pups, $150 ea. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for and neutered before our 541-280-1537 old vintage costume, scrap, shelters become overhttp://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com silver & gold Jewelry. Top crowded with unwanted litdollar paid, Estate incl. Honters. Adult female or male Jack Russell/Schipperke mix. 1 year old Male, very smart & est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 cats, $40. Bring in the litter energetic, needs someone under 3 months and we’ll Wanted rock hounds who want w/ time to train, great dog. alter them for free! Call Bend an 18” rock saw and a flat lap $100. Paid $250. All shots & Spay & Neuter Project for rock polisher. 541-350-7004. neutered. 541-815-2963. more info. 541-617-1010. Kittens & cats ready to adopt! Wanted washers and dryers, Cat Rescue, Adoption & Fosworking or not, cash paid, Find It in ter Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call 541- 280-6786. The Bulletin Classifieds! re: other days. Altered, shots, 541-385-5809 ID chip, more. 65480 78th We Want Your Junk Car!! St., Bend, 389-8420. Info & We'll buy any scrap metal, photos at www.craftcats.org. batteries or catalytic converters. 7 days a week call Lab, Chocolate, 10 wk. female, 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 mother on site, papers, $400. 541-971-1236

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Alaskan Malamute AKC Pups, ready to go, 1st shots, $500 each. 541-408-4715 mandk@oregonfast.net health guaranteed

Chesapeake Retriever Pups, AKC, shots, hips, great hunt/ fam dogs, parents on site, $500-$575. 541-259-4739

Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Chihuahuas (2) tiny babies, looking for new families, $250, 541-419-6445 Cockalier Spaniels 7 weeks old, 1st shots. ADORABLE! Call for picutres. 541-475-3410 Cockatiels, babies and adult pairs, w/ cages, $20 and up. 541-548-0501 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376.

American Pitbull, 17 mo. female, housebroke, approved home only $500. 541-390-1108.

FREE kitty to good home! 3 yr old spayed female dark calico cat. Very loving, playful and affectionate. Indoors preferred. (541)647-4409.

Australian Shepherd female, spayed & rescued $50. (541)576-3701, 576-2188.

FREE Lab Mix, very sweet 10 mo. male, loves kids and other animals. 541-350-4163

Basset Hounds, born 3/18, 5 females, 2 males, $400, parents on-site, 541-350-4000.

FREE: Maine Coon spayed female, needs a quiet & approved home. 541-318-4829

Lhasa Apso Pups, beautiful colors, exc. personality, $300, Madras, 503-888-0800. “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at $55.00. For more information or to schedule an appointment, please call 541-923-0882 Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171.

Miniature

Dachshund

(Doxie) purebred puppies. Males $300 & Females $350. Call anytime (541) 678-7529

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C h a n d l e r

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

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O r e g o n

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Furniture & Appliances

Computers

Misc. Items

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

Orange Kittens & Orange mother in foster care, also Munchkin Cats,541-548-5516 POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Affordable. 541-475-3889. PUG MIXES, 2 males, first shots, wormed, ready to go! $200 each. 389-0322 Rat Terriers, Rescued, 9 mo. to 4 years, blue merle to cameo, 2 females, 2 males, $200 ea. 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

LOST: Braided multi colored, Friendhip/Charm Bracelet, on 5/9 in Mirror Pond parking area Franklin to Newport Please call 541-633-0572.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786. Springer Spaniel Puppies, 8 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, last 2 are ready to go, $300, call 541-633-9755.

Toy Aussie Blue Merle Female, 4yr, retired, potty trained, sweet yet shy, 360-609-3639 Toy Poodle Puppies for sale. They are ready for their new homes. HURRY they won't last for my affordable prices. Call Cindy at 541-771-3195.

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Antiques & Collectibles Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578 Furniture

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bed -Beautiful Custom King Size Barn Wood Bed, $1000. Call 541-548-5657. Chair, dark wood w/upholstered light green seat, exc. cond. $25. 541-905-9773 Couch & Loveseat, floral print, oak claw & ball legs, $300; Twin captains bed bookcase hdbd, 6 drawers, $150, will email pictures. 541-317-8360 Dining Set -Maple, 55 yrs old, fixtures, drop leaf w/pads, 2 large extenders, good cond., $350. 541-416-1051 DOUBLE BED -head/footboard, frame, mattress/box spring, all bedding, $50 cash. 541-330-8349. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com Secretary Bookcase, Mahogany, drop front, Maddox brand, 1940’s period, exc. shape, arched top, serpentine front drawers, must see, $399 OBO. 541-536-7408

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Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

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Golf Equipment

Log Furniture, lodgepole & juniper, beds, lamps & tables, made to order, 541-419-2383

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

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Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

BMG 50 12x36x80 mm scope, 60 extra round $2250 firm 541-420-7773. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $2000. 541-788-1731, leave msg. GUN SAFE STEEL SINGLE WALL, $75. 541-771-8920 Hungarian made, new, AMD-65, 7.62x39, fully tactical, $950; Custom Para-Ordinance 1911 P14-45ACP, SOLD, 541-647-8931

FOR SALE: Campbell Hausfeld Professional 5500 Watt gas generator 240V & 120V. MINT Cond. Used less than 20 hrs., $650. 541-475-6537

• Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407 CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Firewood For this year and next year $150 a cord, please call 541-610-6713.

J & C Firewood

Shindaiwa power broom, near new, shoulder strap & owners manual incl., $500, 541-385-1884, 541-4191-3153

• Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

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Snow Removal Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Hydraulic pump & hydraulic cylinder for log splitter or ? $145. 541-447-1039

Arborvitaes, 12’+/-, make a green screen, will deliver, or your dig. 541-280-1227.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

The Bulletin Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

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Heating and Stoves

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

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The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

Tools

RUGS - 2 quality matching sets, + 2 other misc. sizes. From $50-$150. 541-390-6570.

Golf Cart, elec. w/split windshield, full curtains, exc. cond., must see! 388-2387

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Medical Equipment Lift Chair Recliner, exc. cond., all auto, push button controlled, $400, 541-408-2227.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Golf Carry Bag, w/ dbl. shoulder strap, very light, never used, $50. 541-410-2584

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www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809

Golf Balls, $1 per dozen, quality used, for more information call 541-593-8400.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Cacti, already planted in gallon pots, $6/ea+. Crooked River Ranch, 541-548-0501. Lawn Mower, Riding, 42” Craftsman, hydrostatic trans., $500, 541-280-7024. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found FOUND: 5 Baby kittens, all dark in color, approximately 4 weeks, call 541-389-2098. Found Bicycle: off Century Dr. 5 mi. outside of Sunriver, 5/5, call to ID, 541-598-7925. FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973. FOUND: Money, identify amount and where you lost it, 541-382-3837 Found Ring: Parking lot Fred Meyer, eve 5/12, call Fred Meyer, (541) 385-6667.

Lost: Glasses in Grey Silhouette Case, Mt. Bachelor parking lot, Nordic side, call 541-330-1958,602-692-4429 LOST: Old silver & turquoise Navajo Squash Blossom, sentimental gift, REWARD! Lost Sunday afternoon, after 2:30pm. S. handicap parking lot & S. door of East side Safeway. Please call 541-389-6761, in no answer, please leave message. Lost Wool Stocking Cap, blue & white, w/ “Norge” on front, blue & white tassel, 541-383-3925 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Huge Estate Sale/ Moving / Divorce. Large inventory from everyday household goods, tools to high end merchandise. Something for everyone. Friday May 21 Thru Sunday May 22, starts at 8am. 64460 Rock Springs Rd. Follow the signs from Tumalo Feed Company. 541.410.6067. Credit Cards Accepted with small fee.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

SECTION!!!

Ocean Charters Salmon/Halibut $100, Tuna $200. Guaranteed www.southernoregonfishing. com 541-982-4339.

Office desk & matching book Stevens Model 56 .22 LR, bolt action, nice stock, $160 OBO. shelves (2), cherry color, 541-728-1036/541-647-8931 $199 OBO. 541-536-7408 SOFA good quality leather 88” wide x 3’ deep. $200 OBO. 541-390-6570.

Musical Instruments

Callaway women’s golf clubs with bag. Short set. Like new. $375. Phone 541-788-4844.

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

KitchenAid Stainless Steel Fridge., 21.9 cu. ft., auto water/icemaker, $325 541-388-4324 or sizemore@bendcable.com

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BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

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Furniture & Appliances

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Tikka Model T3 22-250, Nikon 3x9, composite stock, $550. 541-382-7840

DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


G2 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Farm Market

300 308

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476

476

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Horses and Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

Farm Equipment and Machinery

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

Peruvian Paso Gelding and Mare. Reg. 14 yrs. Amazing gaited ride. Perfect trail horses for any age. $3,500 ea. Peruvian tack avail as well. 541-610-5799

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4 As low as

0% APR Financing The New Kubota RTV500 compact utility vehicle has all the comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility vehicle – but fits in the bed of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on approved credit.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

RED TAG SALE Every Saturday At The OL'E TACK ROOM 7th and Cook , Tumalo.

Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $3500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

541-322-7253

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Livestock & Equipment 325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton Eric 541-350-8084 Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731. Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Quality Orchard Grass Hay, Tumalo, small bales, clean no rain $150 per ton. Kennor Farms 541-383-0494

READY TO WORK, Yearling Angus Bulls, range raised in trouble free herd, $1100/ea. Delivery avail. 541-480-8096

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Employment

400

Food Service Business Opportunity: Do you have a sales back- Busy breakfast & lunch restaurant in Bend seeks full time ground? Interested in docook. Hard working, team ing contracted job developplayer, min. 2 year egg & grill ment for State of Oregon exp. Apply in person, 62910 Office of Vocational RehaO.B. Riley Rd. bilitation Services? 421 If so, call to find out more inFood Service formation and meet with Schools and Training Cheryl. (541) 388-6336, ask PASTINI PASTARIA TRUCK SCHOOL for Jamy. AT THE OLD MILL www.IITR.net Church Choral Director: Hiring Food Servers for Redmond Campus First Presbyterian seeks dibusy summer season at PasStudent Loans/Job Waiting rector of Traditional Music tini Pastaria at the Old Mill. Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 Ministries to lead Chancel Seeking team oriented appliChoir and music ensembles. cants with great smiles & at454 Experience in church music, titudes, in a fun fast paced track record of excellence in environment. Applicants Looking for Employment choral conducting, motivatmust have a flexible open ing and recruiting volunteer schedule, 1 yr min full serCAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN singers and instrumental vice restaurant experience Bend/Redmond area, flexgroups. Resume to Adminisand be eligible to obtain a ible daytime hrs., household trator, 230 NE Ninth, Bend, valid OLCC Server Permit. assistance, affordable rates, 97701. blevet@bendfp.org We will be conducting open local refs. 541-678-5161. 541-382-4401. interviews on Tues 5/18, 12-6 pm and Wed 5/19, Advertise your car! CLERK/Gas attendant/Subway 10am-5pm. Please apply Add A Picture! Must be 18+ yrs. Full-time in person at the Old Mill, Reach thousands of readers! and Part-time. Apply at: Suite 621 above O Mo Call 541-385-5809 Riverwoods Country Store, Mo. Interviews are not The Bulletin Classifieds 19745 Baker Rd., Bend. being held at the restaurant. EOE Painter Needs Work: 20 years CRUISE THROUGH Classiexp. in Central OR, fast & fied when you're in the Food Service friendly, 541-977-8329. market for a new or used car. PASTINI PASTARIA AT THE OLD MILL 476 Seeking FOH Managers Employment with a minimum of 3 yr resOpportunities taurant management experiDorm Parent Spray School: ence. We offer great salaBackground in Counseling & ries, benefits & a fun work CAUTION READERS: ability to relate w/high school environment. Qualified apstudents. Call & request applicants must possess great Ads published in "Employment plication, 541-468-2226. leadership & team building Opportunities" include emskills, a strong work ethic & a Drivers: Local Moving Comployee and independent popassion for great food & serpany needs Class A & B drivsitions. Ads for positions that vice. Must be flexible & have ers, top pay, benefits, exp. require a fee or upfront inan unrestricted schedule. preferred, call weekdays vestment must be stated. We will be conducting open 541-383-3362. With any independent job interviews Tues 5/18, opportunity, please investi12-6pm, Wed 5/19, Education gate thoroughly. 10am-5pm and Thurs 5/20, 9am-12pm. Please apply POWELL BUTTE Use extra caution when in person at the Old Mill, COMMUNITY applying for jobs online and Suite 621 above O Mo CHARTER SCHOOL never provide personal Mo. Interviews are not Powell Butte, Oregon being held at the restauinformation to any source rant. EOE you may not have researched Announces the and deemed to be reputable. following positions: Use extreme caution when reGeneral sponding to ANY online emDO YOU NEED A • Part Time Principal ployment ad from GREAT EMPLOYEE with teaching option out-of-state. RIGHT NOW? • 7 Teachers Call The Bulletin before (Part Time/Full Time ) We suggest you call the State noon and get an ad in to • Administrative Asst. of Oregon Consumer Hotline publish the next day! • Custodian at 1-503-378-4320 385-5809. See www.pbccs.org for For Equal Opportunity Laws: VIEW the Classifieds at: complete information Oregon Bureau of www.bendbulletin.com Labor & Industry, PBCCS is an equal Civil Rights Division, opportunity employer 503-731-4075

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Medical - LPN/RN Charge Nurse part time position avail., swing shift. Contact Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667. Medical

Phlebotomy Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301 Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com

Non-Profit Youth Development Prineville afterschool and summer program for kids 6-16, seeks Executive Director to manage all staff, programs, operations, fundraising, community relations, and fiscal responsibilities. Experience with school-age children, management, fundraising, and ability to pass drug and background check essential. Visit www.crookcountykids.org for more details. Email resume to patti@crookcountykids.org or mail to HR, Crook County Kids, P.O. Box 854, Prineville, OR 97754. No calls, please.

Pharmacy

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras, Cashier also needed. 541-325-1059. Receptionist Full time, Tues.-Sat. Appointment Scheduler Full time, Mon.-Fri.

Qualified candidates must be computer literate and be able to multi task, responsibilities include but not limited to check in, check out, appointment scheduling, telephones & patient care, exp. in health care setting preferred. Apply online at www.lapinehealth.org or fax application & resume to 541-536-8047 or mail to Human Resources, PO BOX 3300, LaPine, OR 97739.

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

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Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Administrative Assistant Assist a tax negotiations attorney in casual Bend office. Client contact and clerical support. Clerical or legal support experience and college degree a plus. Benefits after 90 days. Fax cover letter, resume and salary requirement to: 541-330-0641.

Art Picture Yourself Here! Busy frame shop looking for an artistic, friendly, and hardworking part-time salesperson. Art background, outstanding customer service skills and a flexible schedule are required. Submit resume to The Great Frame-Up, 61535 S. Hwy 97, Suite 4, Bend, OR 97702. tgfubend@msn.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

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486

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Independent Positions

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Retail Sales Silverado Jewelry Gallery is now accepting resumes for a full time, lead floor sales position. Must have retial exp. and be a positive, self motivating person who enjoys jewelry and fashion. Please bring your resume to 1001 NW Wall St. Attn: Harmony, who will be avail. Fri.-Tue. 10am.-5pm.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

CAUTION Rare opportunity for a professional individual to join the Sales Team at Bob Thomas Car Company. Exp. preferred, but not required. Excellent continuous training program, low pressure atmosphere, great potential for long term success. Must pass driving/background/drug screens. Please apply in person - see Kelly or Bruce at 345 NE Third Street, Bend. No phone calls, please.

Teacher Therapeutic Boarding School for girls ages 10-15, seeks a full time Certified Classroom Teacher preferably with a Special Ed endorsement and emphasis on elementary eduction. Position is open mid August. Competitive salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefit package. Fax resume to: Carol. 541-388-8465. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Volunteers needed! Gain valuable experience by helping abandoned animals. Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, www.craftcats.org, 389-8420 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

541-383-0386

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras

SALES OF BEND The Perfect Central Oregon vehicle Is Here. Totally redesigned for 2010 models are on the ground. The all New Outback & Legacy design will increase sales dramatically. We are looking for People who enjoy all that Central Oregon has to offer and want to show other Central Oregonians why there isn’t a more perfect vehicle than the "NEW" All Wheel Drive Subarus. We offer the most aggressive pay program in Central Oregon, Guaranteed Income, Profit sharing, Medical Benefits, a mentoring program, and an above average income. No Phone Calls Please. Apply in person at Subaru of Bend, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

H The Bulletin

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

541-385-5809

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

READERS:

Salesperson

Waitstaff

541-617-7825

347

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Independent Contractor

541-385-5809

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain,

Food Service Bend Skippers now has two Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & part-time positions to work clean driving record, pay evenings and weekends. No DOE. Call 541-382-2500 for smokers. Apply in person, info. 61165 So. Hwy 97.

Landscaping Sisters Landscape Co. is hiring for landscape maint. Minimum 2 years exp. must speak English, have driver’s licence in good standing, meet grooming standards, able to multi-task, and manage time well. Call for appointment, 541-549-3001.

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Don’t miss out on the unique opportunity to work in the Ranch’s newly renovated Pub and Restaurant facilities. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a “customer first” attitude? We are looking for enthusiastic, customer service oriented individuals to join Team BBR. There are just a few openings left for the following positions: •Servers •Bussers •Host/ Hostess Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Curves, womens fitness franchise for sale, Bend, $40,000, Redmond, $35,000. Serious inquiries please. 541-617-1533

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Rentals

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650

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Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

Ask Us About Our

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. 604 Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Storage Rentals Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., W/D, W/S, Secure 10x20 Storage, in pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr $725/mo. 541-420-0208 access, $90/month, Call Rent Special - Limited Time! Rob, 541-410-4255. $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 616 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Want To Rent Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 WANTED: 22’+ trailer to rent Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co. at the Cove Palisades for 7 days in June. Non smoking, 636 refs., insured, 360-844-5789

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D hookup W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

LAS VEGAS, next to South Point/Las Vegas Blvd., 2 bdrm. condo, 5/30-6/6, Visit us at www.sonberg.biz $800, call for more info., 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 541-447-1616. bdrn., DW, W/S/G paid, oak cabs., carport, laundry facili630 ties, extra large living room, Rooms for Rent $670 $500 dep., 383-2430. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #4. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

May Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

MAY

SPECIALS!

Studios & 1 bdrm

$395 to $415 • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Newer 2 bdrm., single level duplex, covered parking, decks, separate storage, near Redmond Rite-Aid, $550/mo. 541-548-4727/541-419-8371

648

Houses for Rent General

REDMOND TOWNHOUSE DUPLEX APARTMENT On cul-de-sac, NI CE 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bedroom, 1½ bath, single car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. includes w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

Near Bend High School, 4 CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, Nicely updated 3 bdrm., 2 bath, near Sunriver, vaulted bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 $700 mo. + last + dep. No sq. ft., large carport, no pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, ceiling, gas stove & fireplace, smoking, $995/mo. + deps. Bend and call # off sign for owners residence, very 541-389-3657 appointment to see. peaceful, small dog okay, $875/mo. Call Randy at Newer, spacious 3 Bdrm/2 541-306-1039. Bath, oversized garage, fenced yard, cool great room, 660 quiet neighborhood! $950/ Houses for Rent mo. Call Kurt 541 350-5552 All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

The Bulletin is now offering a Houses for Rent LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE NW Bend Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin 1 BDRM., 1 BATH HOUSE, walk On The River, In Town! 1 & Classified Rep. to get the in closet, W/D incl., nice, starting at $540. W/S/G + new rates and get your ad new kitchen & living room, cable paid, laundry/parking started ASAP! 541-385-5809 view of river, large dbl. gaon site, no pets/smoking, rage, W/S/G paid, close to call 541-598-5829 until 6pm. 650 parks & river trails, 632 SHEVLIN APARTMENTS $750/mo. + $750 dep. NO Houses for Rent Apt./Multiplex General Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granpets/smoking. 67 B McKay. NE Bend ite, parking/storage area, 541-419-0722 Desert Garden Apts., laundry on site. $600/mo. 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, double garage, 2 Bdrm., 2 bath, Lower West 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-815-0688. storage, dishwasher, W/D 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. Hills, with great view & deck, hookup, excellent location, 642 62+/Disabled W/D & garage, $895/mo., $850 mo. plus dep. Pet neg. gas, water, & elec. $100 flat Apt./Multiplex Redmond Avail. June 541-382-8399. rate, 541-420-7357. The Bulletin is now offering a 1807 SW 21st, spacious 2/2 LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 3 Bdrm., W/D, dishwasher, dbl. gorgeous fenced duplex, Rental rate! If you have a sq.ft., gas fireplace, great garage, fenced backyard, w/garage, mint cond. home to rent, call a Bulletin room, newer carpet, overquiet neighborhood, W/S/G W/S/G, paid pet OK reduced Classified Rep. to get the sized dbl. garage, $995, & gas heating paid, to $695. 541549-2228. new rates and get your ad 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 $1150/mo. 541-382-4868 started ASAP! 541-385-5809 The Bulletin

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

$99 1st Month!

1st Month Free 6 month lease!

634

1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. 1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S paid, $675/mo. 541-610-4070

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

A Better Place to Live, May Free • Near Hospital 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Duplex 2/1, fully updated W/D hookup, W/S paid, patio, fully fenced, garage w/opener $650 +dep. No smoking/pets 503-507-9182.

announcements Nonprofit animal rescue group seeks donations of items for big yard sale. Can accept/ pick up items NOW for the sale on June 19-20. 728-4178. www.craftcats.org

personals Need Attorney to represent me in a wrongful termination case for equal share of settlement.Possible discrimination. John, 541-977-2434.

La Pine

NOTICE:

$350 MOVE-IN SPECIALS EXTENDED ONE MORE MONTH for Apts. & Multi-plexes at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •NOT THE TAJ MAHAL but livable. 1 bdrm, 1 bath with large shared yard and extra storage. Near Pioneer Park. NW side. Pet OK. Only $395 mo. • COZY 1 bdrm, 1 bath Apt. upper unit. Where north meets south in town. Just $425 mo. includes WST. • CLOSE TO PIONEER PARK NW Side. Private 2 bdrm, 1 bath upstairs apts. with on-site laundry and off-street parking. Cute balconies. $495 includes W/S/G. • SPACIOUS APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath near Old Mill Dist. $525 Mo. includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 left! • 1/2 MO. FREE RENT + Move In Special - Nice Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Near hospital. On-site laundry & off-street parking. $540 W/S/G included. •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath with Murphy bed. $595 mo. includes W/S/G Wireless (1 @ $550 -minimally furnished) •SPACIOUS DOWNTOWN Cottage duplex. 3 bdrm, 1 bath. Washer/dryer hook-ups. View Pilot Butte fireworks from Living Room. Pets? $595 -includes W/S/G •LARGE SE TOWNHOME - 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath with W/D hookups. Totally private back deck. Covered parking. Extra storage. New paint & carpet! Just $595 mo. incl. W/S/G. • MODERN NE DUPLEX - 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, garage, vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace. Small pet ? $695 Incl. W/S • SITS AT BASE OF PILOT BUTTE - 2 bdrm, 1.75 bath. Unique floorplan. Skylight. Carport. Fenced backyard. W/D included. $695 mo.. •SPACIOUS CONDO w/ TWO MASTERS +Half bath + Washer/Dryer + Dbl. Garage + Space & storage galore + Corner fireplace. Pool +Tennis courts. Cedar Creek Apts. Only $750 mo. (excluded from Move In Special) • WONDERFUL PRIVATE SW HOME: 3 bdrm/2 bath, dbl. garage. Partial fenced backyard, new hardwood floors and carpet. Wood stove. MUST SEE. $875 mo. • 2 STORY 3 bdrm/2 bath house in SE - Double garage. Fenced back yard, storage house, dog house, 1 pet cons. W/D included, 1382 sq. ft. $925 mo.

541-385-5809 On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Tumalo: 5 Min. from Bend, nice 3/2 house, 2150 sq.ft., dbl. garage, $1100/mo., 1st/last/$500 dep. No pets or smoking. (541)317-8794

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

2 Bdrm., near Old Mill, 1000 sq. Light Industrial, various sizes, ft., newer carpet, vaulted ceilNorth and South Bend locaing, wood stove, big deck, tions, office w/bath from fenced yard, single garage, $400/mo. 541-317-8717 $795,541-480-3393, 610-7803 Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803.

LOOK!!! •1800 sq. ft. in Airport Industrial Park, Redmond. $450 mo. gross. No NNN charges, •3600 sq. ft. Airport Industrial Park, Redmond, $900 mo. gross. No NNN charges. THE KOZAK COMPANY 541-389-1317

ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, W/D hookups, nice yard, great in town location, $695 rent + $670 dep., 156 SW 8th St., 541-548-0932. Deluxe Newer 3/2.5, 2245 sq. ft., huge fenced yard. $995/mo. lease to own. or $1095 lease only, 1615 SW Sarasota Ct. 541-350-2206.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds HORSE PROPERTY, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 acres, storage, small shop, private well, CRR near entrance, lease, option possible, $875, 541-771-7750 Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

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Houses for Rent Sunriver

700 705

658

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

Real Estate For Sale

Real Estate Services

Houses for Rent Redmond $200 off 1st mo. 3/2, fenced back yard, new appl., dog OK, $800+security dep., 1617 SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, tmenergyrates@gmail.com

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

DOWNTOWN Various offices available, Bond Street. From $275 to $650 per month GROSS RENT. No NNN charges THE KOZAK COMPANY 541-389-1317

REVERE AVE. •1400 sq. ft. light & bright, 6 offices, reception, work area, conference room. Gross rent. No NNN Charges. •500 sq. ft. interior office gross rent - $475 per month. No NNN charges.

The Kozak Company 541-389-1317

Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

738

Multiplexes for Sale

LOOK!!!!

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale

MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

745

762

Homes for Sale

Homes with Acreage

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Very desirable Westside duplex on NW Knoxville Blvd. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, and 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Built in 1995 Never va748 cant. $284,750. Exclusively Northeast Bend Homes listed with Mike Kozak. THE KOZAK COMPANY MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath 541-389-1317 Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, Westside - 4 Units+ appls., decks, 10x20 wood 2-2 bdrms., 2-1 bdrms.+ huge shop $12,950. 530-852-7704 RV garage, good cash flow, $349,000. 1623 Knoll, Bend. Check out the 650-298-0093 classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com 740 Updated daily

The Bulletin Classified ***

***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Detached Garage/shop, Circle Drive w/RV Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area. $224,900 Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203.

764

Farms and Ranches 35 acre irrigated hay & cattle farm, close to Prineville, pond & super private well, 75 year old owner will sacrifice for $425,000. 541-447-1039

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

Acreages Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521. CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes 2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $34,900, 541-480-4059. Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fridge, range & large storage shed incl., $4500 or $500 down, $175/mo.+ space rent. 541-383-5130.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Domestic Services

Excavating

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

We Clean Houses & Offices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best service for the least cost, 541-390-8073.

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Handyman

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Decks

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Drywall

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Excavating

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492

Child Care Services Summertime baby sitter avail. on June 1st, could continue into Fall. Ages 3-12. Red mond area. Call Carol for more info., 541-279-1913.

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

CCB#180420 Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

541-389-4974

Fire Fuels Reduction

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Weekly Maintenance

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years! FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

Ask us about

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714 Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

COOKS CREATIVE MASONRY Stone projects of all types 23 yrs experience. Wayne, 541-815-1420. L#119139 www.cookscreativemasonry.com

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998. RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tree Services Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


G4 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 881

Travel Trailers

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

Honda Scooter 2005, Reflex 250 cc, 2K mi. , silver, 2 helmets, travel trunk, exc. cond. $2750. 541-389-9338.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $5000. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 870

880

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

12 Ft. Sea King Boat and Trailer, $400 call for more info. 541-389-4411. 14.5’ 1962 completely restored Hydroswift fiberglass boat, $1600. 541-536-6059 14’ Lund, 25 Merc, Calkins trailer, elec. trolling motor, fish finder, down rigger, 2 anchors & other equip., great for fly fishing, $2000. 541-388-6922

16’

Seaswirl

1985,

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574. 2003 Sea Ark Sled, 20.6 MVT, 135 hp., 9.9 kicker too many extras to list $11,750 firm. 541-420-7773.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $21,000. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332.

Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $3,000 or best offer needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

Fleetwood Pioneer 2006 Travel Trailer, 22 ft., Sleeps 6. IMMACULATE condition! $11,400. Call 541-575-4392 or 541-620-2149, John Day.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

880

Motorhomes

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Patriot 2000, 37’, 44K mi., w/options. $119,000. 541-382-9755,541-215-0077 Fleetwood Expedition 38’, 2005, 7.5KW gen. W/D, pwr awning w/wind sensor, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, dual A/C, inverter AC/DC, auto. leveling jacks, trailer hitch 10,000 lbs, 2 color TV’s, back up TV camera, Queen bed & Queen size hide-a-bed, lots of storage, $98,000. 541-382-1721

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Keystone Cougar 2003 33 ft. 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 8, 2 bdrms., elec./gas stove, large rear storage, outside util. shower, full kitchen & micro $12,500. Incl. skirting, very clean, located near Bend. 541-383-0494

Terry 250RKS 26' 2006 $15,250.00. Downsizing forces sale. Equipped with almost every option available. Please contact 541-480-1445

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

885

T Hangar for rent at Bend Airport, bi-fold doors. Call for more info., 541-382-8998.

916

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354 Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

925

Utility Trailers

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Dodge Ram 2500 1999, gas, auto, pd, pw, air, lift, rollbar, Piaa lights, pioneer stereo, $7500 OBO (541)-604-4239

Dodge Sport 1/2-Ton 1999, 4X4, quad cab, Casset/CD Player, running boards, tinted windows A/C, cruise, all bells & whistles, etc., 98,837 mi., $5500, please call 541-420-2206.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Rav4 2008 4 cyl., automatic, all wheel drive. Stk. #3959. VIN #065138 KBB retail … $20,440 AAA Price … $18,199 541-598-3750 DLR 0225

940

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories ARE Canopy with full windows, white, lumber rack, both are off 2000 Dodge Dakota, 541-419-2383.

Ford F150 XLT 2009, matching canopy, always garaged, seat covers, Line-X bed liner, 10K, just like new, $27,950. Call Randy, 541-306-1039

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Vans

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4800. 541-617-1888. Honda CRV 99, Black, Tow pkg., dual bike rack, 2010 studs, runs great. $5,500. 541-325-6000

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking 380SL 1983, or pets $17,500 pics avail- Mercedes Convertible, blue color, new able (541)410-3658. tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Mercedes E320 2003, 35K!!! panoramic roof, $18,250. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 55K mi., 4 cyl.,

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Pontiac Solstice 2007

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Mercedes 300D 1976, 5 cyl., diesel, 145K +/-, great cond., original grey paint, my mothers car, one owner, one dent in rear 1/4 panel, must see, great collectors car, $2000 OBO. 541-536-7408

$6900 OBO (541) 520-8013.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9000 541-504-2878.

1957,

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

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car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Wagon

LEXUS ES300 1999

Automobiles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

Chevy

Hyundai GLS 2006, 4 cyl. 5 spd., 32 MPG, alloy wheels, new tires, snow tires/rims, 41K, like new, $8950. Call Randy, 541-306-1039.

Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Toyota Tundra 2006,

Honda Pilot EX-L 2008

Lance 820 Lite 2004,

Ford Focus ZTS 2004,

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

Canopies and Campers

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $22,500 541-610-9900.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Porsche Carrera 1999, black metallic, 43K careful mi., beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic $20,000. 610-5799. Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Saturn SC2 1994, sun roof, all leather, 5 spd., studless snow tires. $1200. 408-8611

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

933

many extras to list, $12,500 Call 541-589-0767.

875

Watercraft

975

Automobiles

Pickups

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

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Desert Fox Toy Hauler II 1998, 32 ft. 5th 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. Hitchiker wheel, solar system, too

6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Single person pontoon. Bucks Bags 11' Bronco Extreme. $1650 new. For sale: $1000 Please call 541-312-8837.

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Dutchman 26’ 2005,

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

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Antique and Classic Autos

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, VW Cabriolet 1981, new convertible needs restoratires, tion, with additional parts 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy 908 vehicle, $600 for all, mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. 541-416-2473. Best offer! 541-462-3282 Aircraft, Parts Jeep Grand Cherokee and Service VW Super Beetle 1974, 2005, all set to be towed New: 1776 CC engine, dual behind motorhome, nearly all 2800 Sq.ft. home on 2 acres at Dularto Carbs, trans, studoptions incl. bluetooth & Sisters Airport, with airport ded tires, brakes, shocks, navigation, 45K mi., silver, access and room for owner struts, exhaust, windshield, grey leather interior, new hanger on property. Priced tags & plates; has sheepskin tires, all service records for quick close at $369,000, seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ since new, great value, 15821 Kitty Hawk Ln, subs, black on black, 25 mpg, $16,999 OBO, Call Amber, 541-280-9378. extra tires, $5500 call 541-977-0102. 541-388-4302.

Fifth Wheels

The Bulletin Classifieds

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

ATVs

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, cond., non smoker, no pets, perfect pass, loaded, Must $88,000. 541-848-9225. sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

865

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

Hitch, folding tow bar, Stow Master 5000, cables & cover, $200. 541-408-2367

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Autos & Transportation

Moon, leather, 16,000 miles, 1 owner. Stk.#4179 KBB retail ... $34,035 AAA PRICE ... $27,995 Vin# 009493 DLR 0225 541-598-3750 Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

Car Trailer, covered tilt, winch inside, 92 in. x 21 ft. w/tie downs 541-548-2156.

premium package, leather, 6CD, conv. pkg. $17,995 VIN #107436 DLR 0225

541-598-3750

541-322-7253


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, May 18, 2010 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF HOWARD C. THOMPSON; LEE DORAL THOMPSON; OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendants. Case No. 09CV1371AB SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: Unknown Heirs of Howard C. Thompson and Occupants of the Premises: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is April 27, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to fore-

close your interest in the following described real property: THE WEST HALF (W1/2) OF LOT 10, BLOCK 2, SUN COUNTRY ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 16901 Indigo Lane, Bend, OR 97707. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff.

you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is pursuant to ORCP 7.

issued

ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By: Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 3535 Factoria Blvd. SE, Suite 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com

Get your business GRO W

ING

With an ad in The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional"

If you have any questions,

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT

DATED and first published May 11, 2010. Aud Mitchell Personal Representative

Estate of

PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

RICHARD C. MITCHELL,

Aud Mitchell 3561 NW Conrad Drive Bend, Oregon 97701 TEL: (541) 318-9988

Deceased. Case No. 10PB0048MA

ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE:

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Thomas J. Sayeg, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN OSB #873805 that the undersigned has tjs@karnopp.com been appointed Personal Representative. All persons 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 having claims against the TEL: (541) 382-3011 Estate are required to FAX: (541) 388-5410 present them, with vouchers Of Attorneys for attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative Personal Representative at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, The Bulletin is your Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957.

Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise. www.bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE River Forest Acres Special Road District will hold its annual meeting at the Sunriver Library on Saturday, May 22nd at 10:30 am. All River Forest Acres property owners are invited to attend. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 502338453 Title Order No: 100227929-OR-GNO T.S. No.: OR07000022-10-1 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMMOTHY AND CINDY LEROUE, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of 1ST RATE MORTGAGE, INC., A OREGON CORPORATION as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on November 14, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-45708 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 203933 LOT THREE (3), BRIERWOOD, CITY OF REDMOND, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 13, 2001, IN CABINET E, PAGE 700, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2234 SW REINDEER AVE, REDMOND, OR 97756-7004 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon

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Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $2,285.61 Monthly Late Charge $114.28 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $284,824.80 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Darren K. Weeks and Robin Weeks, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated May 30, 2006, recorded June 06, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-39226 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3 in block 35 of Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Inc., Unit 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 17039 Hermosa Road Bend OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,277.96 Monthly Late Charge $54.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $155,903.60 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from May 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 07, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-309017 05/04, 05/11, 05/18, 05/25

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0490 T.S. No.: 1273013-09.

CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, (949) 252 8300 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3546848 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-60927-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARY CATHERINE KOZUSKO as Grantor to AMERITITLE. as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 09-14-2005, recorded 09-22-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-64024 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AP.N: 247690 LOT FIFTY-FOUR (54), CASCADE VISTA P.U.D., DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20085 MOUNT FAITH PLACE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by-said trust

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8025 T.S. No.: 1275199-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7760 T.S. No.: 1272865-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8858 T.S. No.: 1240257-09.

trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 19, 2010 LSI Title Company of Oregon L. Tran, Authorized Signor C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE,

Reference is made to that certain deed made by James C. Nore, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated July 19, 2005, recorded July 27, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-48249 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot six (6), block seven (7), Tillicum Village Second Addition Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61225 Nisika Court Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,750.13 Monthly Late Charge $87.51. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $220,175.52 together with interest thereon at 5.250% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 29, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 05, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Brad L. Maesner and Tiffany Maesner, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For First Franklin Financial Corp., An Op. Sub. of Mlb&t Co., Fsb, as Beneficiary, dated March 26, 2007, recorded March 29, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-18387 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot forty-two (42), Chestnut Park, Phase I, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 20238 Morgan Loop Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,452.86 Monthly Late Charge $62.15. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $270,186.28 together with interest thereon at 5.000% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-306787 04/27, 05/04, 05/11, 05/18

R-310213 05/11, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0158 T.S. No.: 1268250-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx4338 T.S. No.: 1274929-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by John R. Riley, As Sole Owner, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 01, 2006, recorded December 04, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-79372 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot three (3) in block six (6) of South Heights, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3580 SW Antelope Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,679.94 Monthly Late Charge $70.67. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $233,929.31 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 04, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 5, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason D. Neel and Connie L. Neel Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated December 06, 2006, recorded December 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-81507 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot ninety-seven (97), Diamond Bar Ranch, Phase 3, recorded February 14, 2006, in cabinet G, page 1042, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2600 NE 9th St. Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,504.38 Monthly Late Charge $75.22. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $249,000.00 together with interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 11, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 05, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 12, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tessa White, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 09, 2007, recorded July 10, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-38230 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots fifteen and sixteen, Block Eleven, Boulevard Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon.

R-306804 04/27/10, 05/04, 05/11, 05/18

R-307703 05/04, 05/11, 05/18, 05/25

R-310210 05/11/10, 05/18, 05/25, 06/01

Commonly known as: 1119 NW Milwaukee Ave. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,473.62 Monthly Late Charge $73.68. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $223,855.25 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 18, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird


G6 Tuesday, May 18, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $760.90 Monthly Late Charge $38.04 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,874.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-27-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON

County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest m the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors m interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words

"trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 15, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC., P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DE LA TORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3539125 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-93950

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94269 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MARIA R. THOMAS, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGE IT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/19/2006, recorded 12/26/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-83669, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2007-A5, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-E under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated March 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1 AND THE NORTHEAST HALF (NE1/2) OF LOT 2, BLOCK 4, BOULEVARD ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 605 NORTHWEST NEWPORT AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 23, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $4,438.13 each $17,752.52 (01-01-10 through 04-23-10) Late Charges: $1,608.72 Beneficiary Advances: $109.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $19,470.24 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $715,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 26, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/23/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 -Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DOUGLAS L. BUYSMAN AND LUCINDIE W. BUYSMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to LAWYERS TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 12/18/2007, recorded 12/26/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-65725, records of DESCHUTES County, ORASAP# 3542848 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010 EGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LEGAL NOTICE THE SOUTHERLY THIRTY (30) FEET OF THE SOUTHWESTERLY SIXTY (60) FEET OF TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE LOT NINE (9) THE SOUTHWESTERLY SIXTY (60) FEET OF LOT TEN (10) TOGETHER WITH THE ADJOINING PORTION OF MILLICAN DRIVE NOW VACATED, Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by O.C. Henkle Building, LLC, as grantor, to ALL IN BLOCK TEN (10) BEND PARK CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. AmeriTitle as trustee, in favor of Columbia River Bank, as beneficiary, dated March 25, 2005, reThe street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described corded April 28, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Document No. above is purported to be: The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any 2005-25971, and covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. county and state, to wit: Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded Lots Eleven (11) and Twelve (12) in the Re-subdivision of Block Four (4) of Bend, recorded March 3, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the 1910, in Cabinet A, Page 3, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 171 NORTHEAST 10TH STREET BEND, OR 97701 Real property commonly known as 821 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701. Amount due as of April 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,380.12 each $ 5,520.48 (01-01-10 through 04-16-10) Late Charges: $237.08 Beneficiary The undersigned hereby disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above-described street Advances: $151.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,908.56 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes address or other common designation. on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to Note that Columbia State Bank is the successor in interest to Columbia River Bank, ("Beneficiary") reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or The said real property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF Loan No. : 81661 $185,707.05, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the proFailure to pay the total balance due and owing upon the maturity date of March 15, 2009. tection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in By reason of default, the beneficiary hereby declares all sums owing on the obligation secured by accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to wit: DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said Principal balance $2,500,000.00 described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the Interest $398,020.83 execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his Total $2,898,020.83* successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by *Total does not include interest at the rate of $1,250.00 per diem from January 15, 2010, late the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any charges, expenditures, trustee fees, and attorney fees and costs. A total payoff amount as of a time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding specific date is available upon request. dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 2010, the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums at the hour of 2:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses acfront entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, County of Deschutes, tually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masdescribed real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execuculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word tion by grantor of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the trustee. the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time not later SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com and the trust deed reinstated by paying the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with costs, trustee's ASAP# 3534357 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010 fees and attorney fees, and by curing any other default complained of in the notice of default, that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust 1000 1000 1000 deed.

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9640 T.S. No.: 1275156-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Steven E. Thompson and Tamera L. Thompson Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage Co. Dba Commonwealth United Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated August 22, 2003, recorded September 02, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-60583 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot one (1) in block (1) of Villa, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 62988 Florence Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $840.65 Monthly Late Charge $33.39. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $105,059.98 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from November 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 26, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 21, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 27, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-311853 05/18, 05/25, 06/01, 06/08

In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The mailing address for trustee, as referenced herein, is as follows: Erich M. Paetsch P.O. Box 470 Salem, OR 97308-0470 Dated:25, February, 2010. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Erich M. Paetsch Trustee State of Oregon, County of Marion) ss. I, the undersigned, certify that I am the attorney or one of the attorneys for the above named trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original trustee's notice of sale. /s/Erich M. Paetsch Attorney for said Trustee NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of a rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is APRIL 7, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. You may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 1-800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org, or contact the Legal Aid Services of Oregon, Central Oregon Regional Office, 1029 NW 14th Street, Suite 100, Bend, OR 97701 or call (541) 385-6944 or (800) 678-6944. DATED: 25 day of February, 2010. Trustee's name: Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee's signature: /s/Erich M. Paetsch. Trustee telephone number: (503) 399 1070.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94866 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, R.T. VILDIBILL AND JOHN B. WARD III AS TENANTS IN COMMON EACH AS TO A ONE-HALF INTEREST, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 8/1/2007, recorded 8/7/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-43439, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL 2, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2006-45, CITY OF SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 830 EAST CASCADE AVENUE SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 7, 2 010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,174.99 each $4,699.96 (02-01-10 through 05-07-10) Late Charges: $130.77 Beneficiary Advances: $11.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,841.73 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $154,996.79, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from , until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 9, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/7/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: 206-340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3563188 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010, 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-94871 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, R.T. VILDIBILL AND JOHN B. WARD III AS TENANTS IN COMMON EACH AS TO ONE-HALF INTEREST, as grantor, to TRANSNATION TITLE INSURANCE CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 8/1/2007, recorded 8/7/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-43438, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL 1, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2006-45, CITY OF SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 820 EAST CASCADE AVENUE SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2010 4 payments at $ 1,261.63 each $ 5,046.52 (02-01-10 through 05-07-10) Late Charges: $ 130.77 Beneficiary Advances: $ 11.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 5,188.29 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $155,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.75% per annum from 01/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 6.75% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 9, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/7/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3563118 05/18/2010, 05/25/2010, 06/01/2010, 06/08/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-93935 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RICHARD DIAZ AND JUDITH M. ROCKWELL DIAZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 5/4/2006, recorded 5/10/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-32270, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT SEVENTEEN (17), BLOCK THREE (3), FOREST VIEW FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 52591 SUNRISE BOULEVARD LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2010 4 payments at $1,272.74 each $5,090.96 (01-01-10 through 04-16-10) Late Charges: $198.92 Beneficiary Advances: $697.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $5,986.88 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $176,800.00, PLUS interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3534370 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010, 05/18/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/18/10