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What will be the impact if jail bond passes? Fails? Pilot killed By Erin Golden The Bulletin

ELECTION

With just a few days left before the votes are tallied on a proposed $44 million Deschutes County jail expansion bond, Sheriff Larry Blanton is admittedly anxious. Over the last several months, Blanton has attended dozens of

meetings and spoken with people across the county about why he believes the county needs to double the capacity of its current jail. He’s been telling voters that the region’s growing population has created a growing need for more space — and a risk that inmates could be released early

because of overcrowding. Though Blanton said he’s met with many people with some tough questions about spending so much money during a recession, there has been no substantial organized opposition to the bond. Still, he’s not convinced the bond is a slam-dunk.

“I hope it passes because first and foremost, win, lose or draw here, the main thing I wanted to convey to the public is there is a need,” he said. “There will be a significant public safety issue if we do not expand our bed capacity in the near future.” See Jail / A8

POLE • PEDAL • PADDLE

The race for a good space

Friday had 6 decades in cockpit Investigators of Redmond crash say it’s too early to tell the cause By Erin Golden The Bulletin

REDMOND — Sheldon Arnett began flying more than six decades ago as a 20-year-old pilot with the U.S. Army Air Corps. When World War II ended, he started a family and found success in several businesses in Central Oregon, but he never lost interest in seeing the world from several thousand feet up. Early Friday morning, the 87year-old had plans to fly his Piper Sheldon PA-24 Comanche to Burns, posArnett lived sibly to talk with someone about life to the selling the plane. But just after fullest, family he took off from a runway on the members said southeast end of the Redmond Friday. Airport, something went wrong. Around 7:20 a.m., the small, single-engine plane reportedly pitched up, rolled over and hit the ground, killing Arnett, the only person on board. It was the first fatal crash at Roberts Field since 1978. By late Friday afternoon, officials from the National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration and Piper Aircraft Inc. and an investigator from the National Transportation Safety Board were at the scene, looking for clues in the wreckage. See Crash / A8

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Pole Pedal Paddle participants scramble Friday afternoon to get their boats into prime position for the paddle portion of today’s race. The 34th annual version of the six-stage race from Mount Bachelor to Bend’s Old Mill District starts at 9:15 a.m. on Mount Bachelor.

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• Read about the PPP’s multisport After today’s race, log on to Check out The Bulletin in print and siblings, Sports, D1 www.bendbulletin.com/ppp on the Web for full coverage of the • Where to watch, Local, C1 for results, reader photos and more 2010 PPP

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

The twisted fuselage and left wing of Sheldon Arnett’s Piper PA-24 Comanche sit where the plane crashed Friday at the Redmond Airport.

Card fee cut: Big banks lose, retailers win, consumers ... ? Hemp backers eye By Binyamin Appelbaum

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Retailers have begged Congress for years, in vain, to limit the fees they must pay to banks when customers swipe credit or debit cards. Bills never reached a vote. Amendments were left on the

table. The Senate did not even grant the courtesy of a committee hearing. That long record of futility ended in a landslide Thursday night. Sixtyfour senators, including 17 Republicans, agreed to impose price controls on debit transactions over the furious objections of the beleaguered

banking industry. The amendment to the Senate’s sweeping financial legislation could save billions of dollars for family restaurants and dry cleaners, Wal-Mart and Amazon.com, and every other business whose customers increasingly pay with debit cards. It does

not address credit card fees directly. Consumers also could save money, particularly at businesses like grocery stores that compete on price. But some experts warned that lower profit margins could lead banks to curtail bank card reward programs. See Cards / A7

past, and Pentagon, to make their case By Manuel Roig-Franzia The Washington Post

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Vol. 107, No. 135, 66 pages, 6 sections

HOUSTON — Can golf balls save the gulf? That question hangs in the air here at a BP crisis center as hundreds of engineers and scientists work to cap the undersea well that for more than three weeks has spewed oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Officials with BP and other companies involved in the effort, who discussed the plans in detail at some of the operations rooms, said the best

Inside • Obama criticizes “ridiculous spectacle,” Page A2 • Mechanics of the junk shot, Page A8 of several options included a “junk shot,” which could be tried within the week. The method involves pumping odds and ends like plastic cubes, knotted rope, even golf balls — Titleists or whatever,

BP isn’t saying — into the blowout preventer, the safety device atop the well. As Rube Goldberg as it sounds, the basic techniques are straightforward and have been used successfully on outof-control wells around the world. “The problem here is they all have to be executed 5,000 feet under the water,” said Pat Campbell, a well-control expert who is working with BP on the project. See Oil / A8

WASHINGTON — Hemp needed a hero. Needed one bad. The gangly plant — once a favorite of military ropemakers — couldn’t catch a break. Even as legalized medical marijuana has become more and more commonplace, the industrial hemp plant — with its minuscule levels of the chemical that gives marijuana its kick — has remained illegal to cultivate in the United States. Enter the lost hemp diaries. Found recently at a garage The Washington Post sale outside Buffalo, N.Y., Lyster Dewey but never publicly released, works with hemp these journals chronicle the cuttings in 1929. life of Lyster Dewey, a botanist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture whose long career straddled the 19th and 20th centuries. See Hemp / A6


A2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Workers wear protective footwear as they comb the beach Friday on Dauphin Island, Ala. The community was bracing for a possible landfall of the oil spill caused by the Deepwater Horizon oil platform explosion more than three weeks ago.

Depth of oil spill obscures impact By David A. Fahrenthold and Juliet Eilperin The Washington Post

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ELMERS ISLAND, La. — Three weeks after crude oil began billowing into the Gulf of Mexico, this much is clear: The oil slick has not fulfilled environmentalists’ nightmares and re-created the Exxon Valdez disaster in the Louisiana bayous. But the BP spill has developed into a different and unprecedented kind of environmental threat — one that now appears to be growing much faster than scientists first believed. They say it is the first massive spill in U.S. waters whose effects are largely hidden underwater. And because it took place in the crowded commercial corridor of the Gulf, the impact could be much more costly and damaging than that of the Valdez accident. It has already threatened the longterm livelihoods of thousands of residents, enmeshed three major global companies in litigation and could transform one of the nation’s most ecologically valuable areas. In retrospect, the 1989 Valdez accident looks simple by comparison. No one questioned the cause — an Exxon tanker that ran aground — and the oil was released in one massive but finite swoop in Alaska’s pristine and remote Prince William Sound. Now there seems to be much more blame to spread around, whether it’s aimed at BP, the rig’s operator Transocean, the cementing company Halliburton or the Obama administration, which has come under fire for both failing to prevent the spill and its response to what National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Administrator Jane Lubchenco calls “an unprecedented, dynamic challenge.” With half a dozen probes already under way, lawmakers and outside groups are questioning who in the corporate and government worlds are at fault. They also charge that these officials might have vastly underestimated the seriousness of the spill’s impact. Because of the leak’s extreme depth, and the effects of 476,000 gallons of dispersants, they say this spill is breaking the maxim that oil floats. Instead, they fear it is settling on sensitive corals, or poisoning ecosystems that produce shrimp, snapper and sport fish — all in places too deep for scientists to watch or help. “To me, it’s a disaster already. It doesn’t have to go up on the beach,” said Ronald Kendall, a professor at Texas Tech University who studies oil’s effect on ecosystems. He said the spill’s effects on underwater creatures might not be fully understood for years. “It’s a massive eco-toxicological experiment under way,” he said. The unusual behavior of this spill has left the Gulf Coast in limbo since April 22, when the burning Deepwater Horizon oil rig finally sank 50 miles off Venice, La. The oil — squeezed by intense geologic pressure — has been spewing out of the brokenoff drill pipe at a rate that has defied estimation. The leak seems to be growing far faster than the original estimate of 5,000 barrels a day. Experts say the rate could be closer to 70,000 barrels a day, a number that has forced scientists to reassess the leak’s environmental impact. This island is one of the few

Obama takes executives to task WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama Friday singled out executives from BP, Transocean and Halliburton for blaming each other in a “ridiculous spectacle” at congressional hearings on the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico. “The American people could not have been impressed with that display,” Obama said at the White House. “I will not tolerate more finger pointing or irresponsibility.” The president said he still views oil exploration and drilling as part of the nation’s energy strategy, while saying the administration will review environmental rules on future exploration and development. He made the remarks after meeting with Cabinet officials and advisers to discuss efforts to cap the damaged well and address the environmental and economic impact of the spreading oil slick. He vowed the government would continue “relentless efforts to stop the leak and contain the damage.” Also Friday, as Louisiana wildlife officials reported huge tar balls littering a beach, BP PLC technicians labored to accomplish an engineering feat a mile below the water surface. They were gingerly moving joysticks to guide places anywhere in the Gulf where oil has washed up. Dime-size wads of goo called “tar balls” are almost lost on a beach littered with shells, crab carcasses and garbage. Larger tar balls, some of them 8 inches across, washed up on the beach nearby at Port Fourchon. The reason for the oil’s delayed appearance, scientists say, begins

Susan Walsh / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama, standing with Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, on Friday criticized oil executives for the “ridiculous spectacle” of blame-shifting at congressional hearings. deep-sea robots and thread a mile-long, 6-inch tube with a rubber stopper into the 21inch pipe gushing oil from the ocean floor — a task one expert compared to stuffing a cork impaled on a straw into a gushing soda bottle. It’s the latest scheme to stop the flow after all others have failed, more than three weeks since the oil rig explosion that killed 11 workers and set off the disastrous leak. — From wire reports with the oil itself. The Valdez dumped its crude at the water’s surface. But this oil is flowing out nearly a mile underwater, and takes, by one estimate, three hours to reach the surface. That trip changes the oil, mixes it with water, and forms it into something that looks like molasses or chocolate mousse.

BAGHDAD — Many Iraqis are increasingly uneasy that a wave of bombings and shootings may revive all-out sectarian warfare that ravaged the country several years ago. In Baghdad and other cities, some are falling back into old cautionary habits — going outside only when necessary and avoiding busy markets and other crowded places. These small but significant steps show the trepidation many Iraqis feel at a time when the country is floundering without a new government, facing threats of more attacks from al-Qaidalinked groups and making do with a dwindling number of U.S. troops. “If this power vacuum and struggle continues, then everybody is expecting the worst. We are afraid that more attacks and more security deterioration will push the country in a new cycle” of violence, said Qassim Jassim, of Mahmoudiya, about 20 miles south of Baghdad. He said he and his family are staying home more often as a result. On Friday, al-Qaida in Iraq warned Shiites in an announcement that “dark days soaked with blood” lie ahead, with a new campaign of violence in the offing. Hours later, a bomb went off outside a mosque south of Baghdad, wounding 20 people, police said. Ten people were also killed in the northern city of Tal Afar by a suicide bomber near a soccer field. Earlier this week, 119 people were killed across the country on Monday, and a botched car bombing killed nine people in Baghdad’s Sadr City on Wednesday. Such attacks — many targeting Shiites — appear designed to provoke Shiite groups such as followers of anti-American cleric Muqtada al-Sadr to respond in kind. Few people suggest the conditions right now are prime for a full-fledged sectarian war similar to 2006 — violence is still sporadic and nowhere near levels of just a few years ago; militias such as al-Sadr’s Mahdi Army, while throwing their weight around, haven’t taken up arms, and the neighborhood-against-neighborhood violence that marked the earlier fighting is absent. Also, many say they are simply tired of the violence and will be even more wary this time before allowing their country to plunge into fighting. But Iraqis are certainly worried. More than two months have

Manual Baghdad recount finds no evidence of fraud BAGHDAD — Iraqi electoral authorities announced Friday that they had completed a manual recount of more than 1 million votes cast in Baghdad in the March 7 parliamentary elections and had found no evidence of fraud. Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki had requested the recount, alleging that widespread irregularities had contributed to the narrow defeat of his coalition, which won 89 seats in the incoming 325-seat parliament. After counting 1.4 million ballots, however, officials said they had found no such evidence. They plan to release the results of the recount Monday. Also on Friday, two suicide bombers killed at least 10 people at a soccer game in the northern city of Tall Afar, near the Syrian border. The first blast occurred about 6:15 p.m. when one of the bombers rammed a car into a stadium during the final game of a tournament, Col. Suhail al-Qaraghuli said. As spectators ran toward the field to tend to the wounded, the second assailant walked up and detonated explosives packed in his vest, officials said. — The Washington Post

passed since the March 7 election, in which none of the blocs won a majority in parliament. The resulting political stalemate has led to concern about ongoing attacks at a time when, many Iraqis charge, politicians are more focused on retaining their positions than on protecting the country. Al-Qaida seems to determined to exploit any sectarian tensions. In its announcement on Friday, its umbrella group in Iraq also named a new so-called “minister of war” to replace its leader, Abu Ayyub al-Masri, who was killed in April. At the time, U.S. and Iraqi officials touted the deaths of alMasri and another high-ranking al-Qaida figure as a potentially devastating blow, but the Sunni terror group seems determined to show its relevance.


T OP S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 A3

Congress nears tax cut deal By Stephen Ohlemacher The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Congress is finally getting around to extending more than 50 popular tax breaks that expired at the end of last year, including money savers for homeowners, businesses and shoppers in states with no income tax. Lawmakers want to raise taxes on investment fund managers to help cover the cost. Legislation combining the tax breaks with more aid for people who have been unemployed for

long stretches is expected to come up for a vote in the House next week. The bill would extend unemployment benefits for up to 99 weeks in many states and subsidize health insurance premiums for laid-off workers through the end of the year. Details are still being worked out, but lawmakers also plan to expand a federal bond program that subsidizes local infrastructure projects, and to protect doctors from a scheduled 21 percent cut in Medicare payments.

The tax breaks would be retroactive to Jan. 1 but would again expire at the end of December. They include a property tax deduction for people who don’t itemize, lucrative credits that help businesses finance research and develop new products, and a sales tax deduction that mainly helps people in states without income taxes. Delays in extending the tax breaks have left thousands of businesses unable to plan for their tax liabilities. Delays in

passing a long-term extension of emergency unemployment benefits has forced thousands of laid off workers to live month to month with no certainty of income. Unemployment benefits for many will start to run out June 2, unless Congress acts. Congress routinely extends the tax breaks each year — the House and Senate have already passed competing versions for 2010. But lawmakers have been unable to agree on how to pay for them.

Wong Maye / The Associated Press

Thai protesters build barricades Friday around their encampment in Bangkok. The demonstrators battled with government troops Friday as the military tried to clamp down on the camp.

Thai street clashes kill 16 a day after general is shot

SHUTTLE LIFTS OFF FOR LAST TIME Space shuttle Atlantis lifts off Friday from the Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla. The shuttle is bound for the International Space Station with a crew of six and a shipment of fresh batteries and a Russian-built compartment for the space station. The 12-day mission is the last one planned for Atlantis, the fourth in NASA’s line of space shuttles. Only two flights remain after this one, by Discovery and Endeavour. NASA plans to end the 30-year shuttle program by the end of this year.

By Seth Mydans New York Times News Service

BANGKOK — Thai troops on Friday fired tear gas and bullets at protesters, who responded with stones, slingshots and homemade rockets, turning parts of downtown Bangkok into a battlefield as the military tried to tighten its cordon around a broad area where the protesters have camped for weeks. Sixteen people were killed and 141 wounded, according to the government-run Erawan medical center. The fighting followed an assassination attempt on Thursday on a renegade general who had declared himself a protector of the protesters before he was critically wounded by a sniper’s bullet. The antigovernment protest-

ers, mostly poor rural residents known as red shirts, seized and vandalized several military vehicles. Protesters pulled soldiers from their vehicles and beat them severely. Plumes of black and brown smoke rose into the air, and large explosions and gunfire were heard well into the night. Although the violence has been confined largely to the city’s central area, reports of the political chaos in recent months have hurt tourism, one of the country’s main industries, and left some hotels in the downtown area just 20 percent full. The army officer who was shot Thursday, Maj. Gen. Khattiya Sawatdiphol, was on life support late Friday, and his doctor said his chances of survival were “almost nil.”

Marta Lavandier The Associated Press

Afghans protest deadly raid New York Times News Service

Mixed record on abuse Social tensions stoke for Vatican’s top American recent school attacks, By Gillian Flaccus and Brooke Donald The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — In 1997, the Rev. John Conley walked into a dimly lit church rectory to find a disheveled boy standing there and someone else crawling out a back door. The boy told him he had been wrestling with the parish’s head priest. Conley told church leaders and police. After complaining loudly when the archdiocese decided not to remove the Rev. James Aylward, Conley ended up being disciplined himself. Conley said the San Francisco archbishop wanted to send him to a hospital “where they send priests who are disturbed.” “He said, ‘Father Conley, you do know what wrestling is, don’t you?’” Conley recalled. “And I said, ‘As a matter of fact, I do know what wrestling is. It’s usually in a gymnasium with all the lights on. It is not a 60-year-old man and a 14-year-old boy in a hallway.” The archbishop is now Cardinal William Levada, the highestranking American at the Vatican and head of the office that defrocks pedophile priests. While Levada, 73, has played a key role in several church sexabuse reforms, in several cases as archbishop in California and Oregon he kept some accused molesters in the church and failed

to share some allegations with police or parishioners. According to interviews and hundreds of pages of personnel files, deposition transcripts and court records over a 20-year period reviewed by The Associated Press, Levada allowed molesters to remain in the priesthood, didn’t respond to pleas to notify parishioners of an abusive priest and worked with an alleged abuser to establish a lay review board. Aylward later admitted to a history of inappropriate conduct with boys and was removed from the ministry. The archdiocese maintains Conley, who was a federal prosecutor before becoming a priest, was disciplined because of anger management problems, not because he reported suspected abuse. Levada’s supporters say it’s unfair to judge him outside the context of the era, when not only the church but the justice system was more lenient toward abusers and more likely to believe that they could be rehabilitated. Pope Benedict XVI has recently vowed to take action on the issue, after a round of scandals worldwide left the Vatican initially blaming the media and abortion rights and pro-gay marriage groups. Critics of Levada say his past could imperil reform as the Vatican navigates what could be a transformative moment in its history.

China’s premier says

By Edward Wong New York Times News Service

BEIJING — Prime Minister Wen Jiabao of China said Thursday that the Chinese government would examine the deeper social problems that might have led to the recent string of deadly attacks on schoolchildren. His remarks were the first public comments by a Chinese leader on the violence since the latest attack, in which a landlord in a village hacked to death seven kindergartners, a teacher and the teacher’s elderly mother on Wednesday. Wen’s comments were an implicit acknowledgment of the challenge to the Chinese government posed by the five seemingly unrelated attacks, the first of which was in late March. In a brief television interview, Wen told Phoenix Television, based in Hong Kong, that the government attached “great importance” to investigating the assaults, in which 17 people have been killed and nearly 100 wounded. All the assailants have been middle-age men armed with knives or tools and acting alone.

Study dims hope for global warming benefit Los Angeles Times LOS ANGELES — So much for a hoped-for bright spot to global warming. Some biologists had theorized earlier that rising greenhouse gas levels would encourage plant growth over the long term because of the increased amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Plant physiologists from the Uni-

versity of California, Davis, may have further dashed those hopes. They’ve shown that too much carbon dioxide, which plants need for energy, actually can inhibit a plant’s ability to assimilate nitrates — nitrogen-based nutrients pulled from the soil that plants use to make enzymes and other essential proteins. Without those essential proteins,

plant health — and food quality — may suffer, the researchers say in a study published online Thursday in the journal Science. “Here we have this quandary where we thought rising carbon dioxide levels might actually have some benefit, but it proves to be wrong,” said lead author Arnold Bloom, a professor at UC Davis.

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Western China is back online Full Internet service was restored to the vast western Chinese region of Xinjiang on Friday, 10 months after it was blocked following deadly ethnic rioting that convulsed the regional capital, Urumqi. The blockage was the longest and most widespread in China since the Internet became readily available throughout the country a decade ago. The announcement was made in the morning, and many residents in cities across Xinjiang took the day off from school or work to rush to Internet cafes, where they pored through months of unread e-mail. — New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — A night raid by American troops in the eastern province of Nangarhar left at least 10 Afghans dead, and within hours, on Friday morning, protests by their relatives and friends turned violent, killing at least one other person, according to accounts from Afghan officials. Afghan officials said the witnesses described the dead as civilians, but a spokesman for the American military, Lt. Col. Joseph T. Breasseale, said they were insurgents, includ-

ing a Taliban subcommander and several others; he did not have a precise number of fatalities. He said they were killed in a firefight after refusing orders from a joint Afghan and NATO force to come out of a house. Two insurgents were wounded and captured, he said, and “multiple automatic rifles” were found in the house.

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Learn How to Find and Evaluate a Franchise • Learn strategies for finding and researching franchises. • Discover how to “finance” a franchise. • How to use the Federal Franchise Law to your advantage. • Learn the top 6 Greatest Myths about franchising. Date: Thursday May 20th, 6pm to 8pm Registration Required: Email kcondon@cocc.edu or Phone (541)383-7290 Location: Central Oregon Community College


A4 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

R  I B Ken Wytsma will share a sermon titled “Spiritual Theology” at the 9:30 a.m. service and will lead the follow-up Q and A Redux service at 11:15 Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message “How Will You Man the Store?” as part two of the series “How Will You Invest Your Summer?” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “Unabashed Love” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Dean Catlett will share the message “Choosing to Live a Joyful Life,” based on Philippians 4:1-23, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Church of Christ, 554 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “Great Expectations,” based on Acts 1:411, at 10 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor Don Boldt will share the message “…for the Distracted” as the part of the series “Easter Changes Everything” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part one of the message “Expectancy: Casting and ReCasting the Vision” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. Fuel youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “Great Faith in Terrifying Times” as part one of the series “Shaping of a Servant” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Bryon Mengle will share the message “Why Do (and Don’t) We Pray? Why is Prayer a Production?,” based on Matthew 6, at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Dr. Steven Koski will speak on the topic “The Qualities of a Spiritual Life: Openness” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • The Rev. Barry Heath will share the message “Threshold Times,” based on Revelation 22:12-14, 16-17, 20-21 and John 17:22-26, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will continue the series “The Plan,” based on the book of Ephesians, at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St., Bend. • Pastor Randy Myers will

share the message “Pray for One Another” as part of the series “One Another” at 6 p.m. today and 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at New Hope Church, 20080 Pinebrook Blvd., Bend. • Jane Meyers will share the message “Praying with Higher Consciousness: Lifting Up with Laughter Yoga and Akashic Records, an Experiential Service” at 9 a.m. Sunday at Spiritual Awareness Community of the Cascades, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • Pastor Robert Luinstra will share the message “That They Might All Be One,” based on John 17:20-26, at 8 and 11 a.m. Sunday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Tom Wykes will lead a discussion on the topic “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Unitarian Universalist Fellowship of Central Oregon, held at Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Teri Hawkins will speak on the topic “The Mindful Soul” at 10 a.m. Sunday at The Unity Community of Central Oregon, held at Eastern Star Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend. • Two powerful influences, the church and the home, and how they need each other will be the topic at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. and at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Associate Pastor Greg Strubhar will share the message “Jesus Is Coming Back! What Should We Do Until Then?” at the 9 and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Associate Pastor Heidi Bolt will share the message “Come, Lord Jesus,” based on Revelation 22:12-20, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th Street, Redmond. • Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will share the message “Temptation Resisted,” based on Genesis 39:7-20, as part of the series “Joseph — The Hand of Providence” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Community Bible Church at Sunriver, 1 Theater Drive. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “Christ’s Word and Sacraments Bring Men into Intimate and Eternal Communion with God,” based on John 17:20-21, at 11 a.m. Sunday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne. • The Ugandan Orphans Choir will present a concert of music and dance at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend.

Faith and doubt in equal measure Distrustful of the Catholic hierarchy, a Boston priest offers acceptance, compassion to alienated believers By Katharine Q. Seelye New York Times News Service

BOSTON — The questions were heartfelt, especially for women of faith, especially so late in life. “You can still love your God and not go to church,” Mary Jo Keating, 71, asserted forcefully to her friends gathered around a table the other day. And yet a nagging thought poked at her conscience. “Do you have to be a good Catholic or a true Catholic?” Keating asked. “Can’t you just be a Catholic?” The Rev. Robert Bowers, his open, puckish face capped by his gray buzz cut, offered solace, if not a solution. “You are redefining what it means to be Catholic, to be Christian, a religious person, a believer at all,” he told Keating. “The litmus test used to be: Do you go to church every Sunday? Yes. Do you support your pastor? Yes. Do you go to Mass and Communion and confession?” But now, he said, “there is no litmus test.” As he listens to Catholics discussing the fallout from the clergy sexual abuse scandal, Bowers finds himself at the intersection of faith and doubt, of lifelong loyalty and a deep sense of betrayal. A former parish priest, he works at the Paulist Center, a Catholic community in downtown Boston that is dedicated to social justice and service to the poor.

‘A two-way street’ To follow him for a day is to glimpse the ripple effect that the upheaval in the Roman Catholic Church has had on his own spiritual journey — and to appreciate how much some American Catholics have come to rely on their local religious leaders instead of Rome. Bowers, 50, who was ordained as a diocesan priest in 1987, lends a sympathetic ear; he has questions of his own about the church hierarchy. “Obedience is a two-way street — it involves a great deal of trust, and the trust part is very, very low for me right now,” he said. “You can’t promise obedience when you feel like you can’t trust the person you’re supposed to obey.” In the latest New York Times/ CBS News Poll, released last week, 58 percent of American Catholics said the pope and the Vatican had done a poor job in responding to the reports of abuse. And 77 percent said someone who did not believe in the authority of the pope could still be a good Catholic. Many more expressed faith in their local priest, and 77 percent said they were just as involved in their local church’s activities as they had been before the latest reports of abuse. Bowers and his former parish, St. Catherine of Siena, were collateral damage in the abusive priest scandal, which is now in its third wave after an initial round in the 1980s and a second in 2002. In 2004, the Archdiocese of Boston faced reduced attendance at Mass and $120 million in legal bills from settlements in the abuse cases. As a result, it shuttered more than 60 parishes, including St. Catherine’s. Bowers, who had been a vocal critic of the church leadership and was exhausted

Arizona religious leaders call for immigration reform By Clement Tan McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Framing the Arizona immigration situation as a “moral crisis,” a group of seven Arizona religious leaders, including Catholic and Methodist bishops, descended on Capitol Hill on Thursday to lobby for comprehensive immigration reform. “Our role here is to invite dialogue ... on this complex issue with many dimensions,” said Bishop Gerald Frederick Kicanas of the Tucson Diocese of the Roman Catholic Church after a morning meeting with Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. “The church believes there’s a need for respect and dig-

nity, and we speak up for people who have their dignity violated.” Last month, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law a measure that makes it a state crime to lack immigration papers and requires police to determine whether people they stop are in the country illegally. “We agree there’s a criminal network that has developed and that needs to be addressed,” Kicanas said. “But border security alone has its limits on what can be accomplished,” he said before moving on to meetings with officials from the White House and the departments of Justice and Homeland Security.

The group planned to ask Justice Department officials to, at the very least, try to delay the July implementation of the Arizona law to give Congress more time to act on comprehensive changes. Attorney General Eric Holder said Sunday that the department was considering a lawsuit to stall its implementation, among other options. “We are here … not in political capacities, but as religious leaders … to prod, encourage and advocate comprehensive immigration reform,” said Kicanas, who said in a memo to his parishioners last month that the Catholic Church should join lawsuits challenging the Arizona immigration law.

Gretchen Ertl / New York Times News Service

Rev. Robert J. Bowers, in charge of outreach and reconciliation at the Paulist Center in Boston, hugs parishioner Julia Sullivan. Bowers lends a sympathetic ear to Catholics and raises questions of his own about the church hierarchy. from the fight to keep his parish open, took a sabbatical. He also began to reconsider whether to remain in the priesthood. In 2005, he took an official leave of absence from the diocese and joined the Paulist Center. Today, he devotes himself to outreach and reconciliation and once a month serves as head chef for a weekly supper for 200 homeless people (his specialty: macaroni and cheese). But it is not the same as ministering to a parish. “This is a death for me,” he said bluntly, “and there seems to be no resurrection.” He finds considerable solace

in painting, and he began a recent Wednesday taking a class in suburban Newton. There, his colorful canvases of serene scenes — a beach, a cafe, a sun-splashed home — belie his angst. Chatting with fellow students, Bowers lamented that the Vatican was made up of “very, very old men who can’t grasp what’s happening.” Nonetheless, he said, he does not necessarily want Pope Benedict XVI, who is facing accusations that he helped protect abusive priests when he was archbishop of Munich, to resign — unless, of course, he is guilty. He would prefer that the pope stay in place and help Catholics heal. His own way of healing, Bowers said later, was to “help people deal with conflict better, help them realize that forgiveness sets them free and that letting go can make them whole again.” “These things,” he added, “worked for me — are working for me. It is not settled yet.”

Faith vs. leadership Shortly after noon, Bowers was steering his black Sebring convertible to his downtown office, where lush plants fill his window. He met with Paula Cuozzo, 54, a volunteer at the center and an analyst for an insurance firm. Cuozzo’s faith is also being tested. “I’m feeling less Roman Catholic, and it’s bothering me because I appreciate the idea of the Vatican, Rome and the pope representing the best parts of our tradition,” Cuozzo said.

Bowers told her that he, too, was learning to distinguish between his Catholic faith and the Catholic leadership, and he encouraged her to articulate her thoughts. It was advice he would dispense throughout the day, telling those who sought his counsel that expressing feelings “out loud” can help them develop the language to find their way. He helps, he said, by listening, a lesson that he said church leaders had yet to learn. “We’re learning about the truth because people are talking about the truth,” he said. At the end of the day, Bowers sat with Stephen Clifford, 42, who told Bowers long ago that he had been sexually assaulted by his parish priest when he was 14 and by his campus priest when he was 23. He had kept the assaults secret for years, but Bowers has helped him discuss them. “I felt that what happened to me proved I was not lovable, and as a result of hiding it, I wasn’t allowing myself to be loved,” said Clifford, who works in organizational development. He has turned away from Catholicism and said he was not interested in returning. When a reporter asked Bowers if he was trying to bring Clifford back to the church, he said, “No, God will do that.” Clifford laughed. “I totally respect that you still believe it,” he said, but suggested that this was an unlikely outcome. “Good luck with that God thing,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services

Christian

Foursquare

\Lutheran

Presbyterian

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care plus Teen Ministry 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL Missouri Synod • 541-382-1832 2550 NE Butler Market Road, 8 am: Contemporary Worship 11 am: Traditional Worship

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High)

Christian Schools

“Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am SUNDAY EDUCATIONAL CLASSES 10:30 am MORNING WORSHIP Pastor Mike Johnson will share his message in the series, “Crossing over The Crimson Bridge; Illumination for the Soul” 1 John 1:9-18 10:30 am Children’s Church “Faith Town” WEDNESDAYS 7:00 PM: Priority One Youth Group Adult small groups weekly Child care provided during Sunday morning service. Pastor Michael Johnson www.bendfcc.com

COMMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver OR 97707 “Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am. • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs -6th gr.) • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am. • Home Bible Studies are also available. Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org

LA PINE CHRISTIAN CENTER Assembly of God 52565 Day Road La Pine, Oregon 97739 541-536-1593 SUNDAYS Sunday School 9:30am Coffee Connection 10:15am Morning Worship 10:45am Children’s Church and Nursery Care provided Sunday Night Service 6:00pm Women’s Ministries 2nd Saturday of each month at 10:00am Men of Iron Bible Study Mondays at 6:00pm Ladies’ Bible Study every other Tuesday at 10:00am WEDNESDAYS Evening Service at 7:00pm Youth Group Royal Rangers Missionettes Rainbows 3,4 & 5 year olds Pastor Wayne Wilson www.lpccag.org REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Baptist EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary) Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service Why do (and don’t) we pray? Why is prayer a production? Byron Mengle preaches from Matthew 6 on what prayer should be with daily application. For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

Calvary Chapel CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Holy Redeemer Church 16137 Burgess Rd., La Pine, OR 541-536-3571 Mass Sunday 10:00 am HOLY TRINITY, SUNRIVER Masses: Sat. 5:30 pm, Sun. 8 am Rev, Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS/ GILCHRIST Sunday Mass 12:30 pm HOLY FAMILY, FORT ROCK / CHRISTMAS VALLEY Sunday Mass 3:30 pm www.holyredeemerparish.net ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI 541-382-3631 Pastors: Fr. Joe Reinig Fr. Daniel Maxwell Deacon Joseph Levine Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM Masses HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues., Thurs., Sat. 7:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 12:15 PM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM Reconciliation: New Church, 27th St: Sat. 3 - 5 PM* Mon., Fri. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 PM Historic Church Downtown: Saturday 7:30 - 10:00 AM Tues. & Thurs. 6:45 - 7:00 AM* & 7:30 - 8:00 AM Latin Masses at 1:30 pm – sung Sunday, May 16th and May 23rd *No confessions will be heard during Mass. The priest will leave the confessional at least 10 minutes prior to Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth May 16, 2010

Bible Church BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756 We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together. Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

Message: “Jesus IS coming back! What should we do until then?” Speaker: Greg Strubhar, Associate Pastor POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair & Glenn Bartnik 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Principal Mary Dennis www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.stfrancisschool.net TRINITY LUTHERAN SCHOOL 2550 NE Butler Market Rd. 541-382-1850 Preschool ages 3 and 4 - 10th grade High Quality Education In A Loving Christian Environment Openings Still Available www.saints.org

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Episcopal TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Terrebonne Foursquare Church Located in the quiet community of Terrebonne. Overlooking the impressive Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Be inspired. Enjoy encouragement. Find friends. Encounter God. Get away, every Sunday. Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School & Trek (Middle School)) Monday 6:30 PM 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org WESTSIDE CHURCH The Church and The Family There are two powerful influences on the planet - the church and the home. They both exist because God desires to use them to demonstrate his plan of redemption and restoration. They need each other. MAIN CAMPUS 2051 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 97701 Saturday at 6:30pm Sunday at 8:00, 9:00, 10:45am and 6:30pm Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 3rd grade Saturday at 6:30pm and Sunday at 9:00, 10:45am and 6:30pm Kurios - 1st Wednesday of each month at 6:30pm 4th and 5th Grades Meet: Saturday 6:30pm and Sunday 9:00 and 10:45am 6th thru 8th Grades Meet: Wednesday at 6:30pm Students are encouraged to attend main services this weekend. 9th thru 12th Grades Meet: Students are encouraged to attend main services this weekend. SOUTH CAMPUS Elk Meadow Elementary School 60880 Brookswood Blvd, Bend 97701 Sunday at 11:00am Children’s Ministries for Infants thru 5th grade Sunday at 11:00am www.westsidechurch.org 541-382-7504

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years, We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 • www.jccobend.com Rabbi Jay Shupack Rebbetzin Judy Shupack Shabbat and High Holiday Services Religious Education Program Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study • Adult Education May 15 - Torah Study 10 am May 16 - Religious Education 10 am May 19 - Shavout Celebration 6:30 pm May 22 - Torah Study 10 am May 29 -Torah Service and Bar Mitzvah Henry Mensing 10am Call 541-385-6421 for information. We welcome everyone to our services. TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. We offer a wide range of monthly activities including social functions, services, children’s education, Torah study, and adult education Rabbi Alan Berg All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street Rabbi Alan Berg Weekend Saturday, May 15 @ 9:30 am Torah Service Friday, May 28 @ 6:00 pm B’nai Mitzvah lead Shabbat service

Evangelical

Friday, June 11 @ 6:00 pm Parent & Student led Shabbat Service

THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Captains John and Sabrina Tumey

For more information go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826

NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Foursquare CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128 Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission”

\Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773 GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862 Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m. Women’s Bible Study, Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Community Bible Study, Tuesday 7:00 p.m. Men’s Bible Study, Wednesday 7:15 a.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 Worship times: 9:00 AM Contemporary Junior Church 9:15 AM (ages Pre-school–5th Grade) 11:00 AM Traditional May 16, 2010 “True Freedom” Given by Pastor David C . Nagler Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

Adult Bible Class & Sunday School - 9:30 am Nursery provided on Sundays School: 2550 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-382-1850 • www.trinity359.tripod.com e-mail: church@saints.org Pastor Robert Luinstra • Pastor David Carnahan All Ages Welcome ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond

All Are Welcome, Always! Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor Sunday Worship “The Qualities of a Spiritual Life: Openness” 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Gospel Choir of the Cascades Hospitality, Child Care, Programs for all ages at all services Sunday Evening 5:46 pm Dinner

Sunday Worship Times: 8:30 AM: Contemporary 11:00 AM: Traditional

Wednesday 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship

Vacation Bible School June 21-25, 9:00 am - 11:30 am

Through the Week: Bible study, musical groups Study groups, fellowship All are Welcome, Always!

Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Full Children’s Program Active Social Outreach Coffee, snacks, and fellowship hour after service. M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wednesday - Bible Study at noon 3rd Thursday - Women’s Circle/Bible Study 2:00 pm Youth and Family Programs 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-923-7466 Pastor Katherine Hellier, Interim www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am & 5 pm Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational ALFALFA COMMUNITY CHURCH Alfalfa Community Hall 541-330-0593, Alfalfa, Oregon Sunday School 9:30, Worship 10:30 We sing hymns, pray for individual needs, and examine the Bible verse by verse. You can be certain of an eternity with Jesus (Eph. 2:8,9) and you can discover His plan and purpose for your life (Eph. 2:10). We welcome your fellowship with us. CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-385-1342 or 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 · 541-389-8241 Sunday Morning Worship 8:45 AM, 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care Provided Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 10:00 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 1:00 pm - Middle School Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program 7:00 pm - Senior High Youth Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondchurch.org

www.bendfp.org 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday, May 16, 11:00am Discussion Sunday facilitated by Tom Wykes We will utilize the insightful commentary of translator and author Stephen Mitchell to revisit two familiar stories from the Old Testament. Expect some new insights as we look anew at the stories of the “Prodigal Son” and the “Rich Man.” Religious Education and Childcare are provided Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 (541) 385-3908

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. Teri Hawkins Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at the Eastern Star Grange 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569

United Church of Christ ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. Everyone united by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with us at 10 a.m. The next two meetings are: Sunday, May 16th in Bend, and Sunday, June 6th in Redmond at the Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 SW 29th St. For information on location, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call the church at: 541-388-2230 or, email: prishardin@earthlink.net

United Church of God UNITED CHURCH OF GOD Saturday Services 1:30 pm Suite 204, Southgate Center (behind Butler Market Store South) 61396 S. Hwy. 97 at Powers Rd. 541-318-8329 We celebrate the Sabbath and Holy Days of the Bible as “a shadow of things to come” (Col. 2:16-17) and are committed to preaching the gospel of the Kingdom of God (re. Christ’s coming 1000-year rule on earth). Larry J. Walker, Pastor P.O. Box 36, La Pine, OR 97739, 541-536-5227 email: Larry_Walker@ucg.org Web site: www.ucgbend.org Free sermon downloads & literature including The Good News magazine & Bible course

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Rev. Barry Heath Sermon title “Threshold Times” Scripture: Rev. 22:12-14, 20-21 & John 17:22-26 8:30 am Contemporary Service 9:45 am Sunday School for all ages 11:00 am Traditional Service Child care provided on Sunday *During the Week:* Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts, Open Minds, Open Doors Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

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C OV ER S T ORY

A6 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Hemp Continued from A1 Dewey writes painstakingly about growing exotically named varieties of hemp — Keijo, Chinamington and others — on a tract of government land known as Arlington Farms. In effect, he was tending Uncle Sam’s hemp farm. What’s gotten hemp advocates excited about the discovery is the location of that farm. A large chunk of acreage was handed over to the War Department in the 1940s for construction of the world’s largest office building: the Pentagon. So now hempsters can claim that an important piece of their legacy lies in the soil alongside a hugely significant symbol of the government that has so enraged and befuddled them over the years. All thanks to Lyster Dewey. A small trade group, the Hemp Industries Association, bought Dewey’s diaries. The group’s leaders hope that displaying them for the first time on Monday — the start of what they’ve decreed the “1st Annual Hemp History Week” — will convince the universe that hemp is not a demon weed and was used for ropes on Navy ships and for World War II parachute webbing. The ultimate goal is to spur the government to lift the ban on hemp production, a policy that especially riles activists because foreign-produced hemp oils and food products can be legally imported.

Life of a hemp disciple Dewey lived, at various times, in Washington’s Petworth and Shaw neighborhoods. In photographs discovered along with the diaries, he cuts a dapper figure in suit coats with vests and a top hat, or merrily pedaling a bicycle with the District’s iconic rowhouses behind him. Dewey’s meticulously labeled diaries start in 1896 and end in 1944, the year of his death at 79. They read like artifacts of a bygone Washington. In 1937, he goes “downtown by street car and up the avenue past the White House to see the beautiful reproduction of Andrew Jackson’s ‘Hermitage,’ which

“It’s kind of ironic that we dug up DEA’s lawn to plant hemp seeds and highlight the absurdity of the drug war, but you take it back 50 years and that’s what the government itself was doing.” — David Bronner, president of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps and hemp advocate 28, 1929.” In a dress shirt with cuff links and tie, he looks every bit the part of the proud gentleman farmer.

Discovering Dewey

The Washington Post

U.S. government botanist and hemp advocate Lyster Dewey measures a 13-foot hemp plant in 1929 at Arlington Farm in northern Virginia. In the 1940s, the Pentagon was built on land that included Arlington Farm. will be President Roosevelt’s reviewing stand tomorrow, then down to the Capitol to see the inaugural stands.” Adam Eidinger, a consultant to the hemp association, stores the diaries in two sturdy, combination-locked cases. Pages are held together by fraying oxblood leather covers; others live in drab, gray notebooks. “I’m getting the impression he was very disciplined,” Eidinger says. “He was hands-on — preferred digging around in Arlington Farms rather than being in the office.” As early as 1914, Dewey writes of inspecting hemp at Arlington Farms. For nearly a quarter-century, he carefully notes his quotidian progress as a grower and hemp advocate:

“Thursday, October 19, 1922. Fair, cool. Go to Arlington Farm on the 9 a.m. bus and work all day,” he wrote. “Harvesting Kymington, Yarrow, Tochigi, Tochimington, Keijo and Chinamington hemp.” The most powerful piece of evidence for hemp activists might be a photograph contained in an album with a battered black cover. In it, Dewey poses next to a stand of 13-foottall hemp plants, with the caption: “Measuring a hemp plant 4 m. high. Arlington Farm. Aug,

The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin told a group of women who oppose abortion rights Friday that they are responsible for an “emerging, conservative, feminist identity” and have the power to shape politics and elections around the issue of life. Speaking to a breakfast gathering of the Susan B. Anthony List, Palin urged more than 500 audience members to back only those candidates for public office who are uncompromisingly opposed to abortion. “Being a pro-life politician is more than just a convenient title, come election time,” Palin said. “It means making tough decisions even if it means bucking your party.” Palin urged her listeners to stick to those principles, and she delivered a stream of calls to action to an audience dominated by women. “The mama grizzlies, they rise up,” she said, to laughter. “You thought pit bulls are tough. You don’t want to mess with the mama grizzlies. And I think there are a whole lot of those in this room.”

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None of this might have come to light if not for sheer luck and a sequence of coincidences. It all starts last summer at a yard sale in Amherst, N.Y., 15 minutes outside Buffalo, where a man named David Sitarski was prowling for small treasures. For decades, Sitarski has dreamed of starting a Web site that archives historical artifacts from the Buffalo area. Even though he’d recently been laid off from his computerequipment manufacturing job of 20 years, Sitarski decided to pay $130 for the diaries and one of the two albums, thinking they pertained to Buffalo. He would have bought the second photo album, but another man snatched it up. Six months later, Sitarski says, his wife spotted their yard-sale rival while running errands. Sitarski jumped out of the car and talked him into selling the photo album to complete his set. The man casually mentioned that there were hemp pictures within, and Sitarski started Googling. He didn’t make the Pentagon connection, but he quickly figured out that Dewey was a crucial hemp pioneer. Still jobless and needing money, Sitarski listed the material on eBay, asking $10,000. A second man with a dream emerged: Michael Krawitz, 47, a disabled veteran from Ferrum in southwest Virginia. Krawitz has spent 10 years scheming to build a hemp museum that he hopes will inspire construction

of similar museums worldwide. “I picture myself with a team of people dragging some hemp artifact out of a mountain in Tibet,” he says. He spotted Sitarski’s listing but couldn’t afford it. But the hemp association could. The group has a sugar daddy: David Bronner, president of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soaps, which has grown from a $5 million company to a $31 million firm in the past decade since adding hemp oil to its products to “improve skin feel” and produce a smoother lather. Bronner agreed to pay about $4,000 for the trove — an easy call, given his court battles with the Drug Enforcement Administration when it tried to ban food products containing hemp. Bronner was also arrested last October after planting hemp seeds on a lawn at DEA headquarters. “It’s kind of ironic that we dug up DEA’s lawn to plant hemp seeds and highlight the absurdity of the drug war, but you take it back 50 years and that’s what the government itself was doing,” Bronner says in an interview from his company’s Southern California headquarters. Krawitz delivered the Dewey materials to Eidinger’s D.C. apartment. They pulled out a video camera and began to sift through the materials with Eric Steenstra, president of Vote Hemp, a nonprofit dedicated to changing hemp cultivation laws. Each turn of the page brought Dewey into sharper focus. It didn’t take long for Eidinger to conclude they’d found “a major gem” and a kindred spirit. He thought, “I can totally relate to this guy.”

Sarah Palin appeals to ‘mama grizzlies’

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Fabulous Views, one bedroom Resort condo. Stop on by and hear about our “Try and Buy” program. Pre-qualified buyers may get a chance to stay in this beautiful condo FREE while you decide to buy. Located at the Inn of the Seventh Mountain. Call for details and directions 541-977-4009.

Sunny and bright hot Number has fantastic home needs new owner. Contemporary, single level NW Town Home on .25 acres. Luxury and exquisite style for busy people who prefer playing to painting. Sophisticated, classy and contemporary w/professional kitchen and much more.

3 Bedrooms /2.5 Bathrooms /2,016 SQFT Tile upgrades in kitchen & Bathrooms. Separate formal dining room, living room, and a family room The home is on a .25 acre lot with a huge park like setting backyard. Short Sale. MLS#201003362 “ YOUR CENTRAL OREGON BROKER” Team Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 Email: jeff@ycob.net Terri Cichosz 541-420-4493 Email: terri@ycob.net

Custom hill top home on 162+ acres 6 miles from town. 3 Bedroom/2.5 Bathrooms/ 2,298 SQ FT. 2 story shop/ RV area with finished apartment MLS#2808074 RMLS#8067740 YOUR CENTRAL OREGON BROKER” Team Jeff Casserly 541-550-6656 Email: jeff@ycob.net Terri Cichosz 541-420-4493 Email: terri@ycob.net

Close in Horse Property 1.81 Acres w/ 1.2 irrigation 3 Bedroom/ 1.75 Bath/ 1,636 SQ FT. MLS# 2910210 RMLS# 9083154 YOUR CENTRAL OREGON BROKER” Team Jeff Casserly 541-5506656 Email: jeff@ycob.net Terri Cichosz 541-420-4493 Email: terri@ycob.net

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Turn-key home! 3 BR, 2 BA, 1144 sq ft. Lovely well cared for 1999 Fuqua home, new roof in ’07, 5 panel garage door, fenced backyd, cement patio, heat pump, rain gutters, storm door, new kitch cabinet doors & more! Call Barb Gadotti 541-480-5674.

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Cascade Mtn views, 3 BR, 2 BA, 1978 sq ft built in 2004 on 2.1 acres. Upgraded kitch cabinets, cement patio, beautiful landscaping, sprinkler system, 24x32 oversized garage w/attic storage. Priv well, RV pad w/sewer hookup. Call Barb Gadotti 541-480-5674.

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Double wide mobile home with add-ons on nice treed, extra large cul-de-sac lot. Adorable white picket fencing around beautiful green grass areas - front and side. Covered carport and 2 extra storage sheds. Front and back screened porches. This unit is located in a secluded, quiet neighborhood. Buyers must be approved by Park Manager. Owner will carry loan for the right buyers! 5419-977-4009

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Charming well kept home located in River Meadows. This 2 story 3 bed 2 bath has reverse living with kitchen, dining, great room, and master bed on the upper level. River Meadows is located adjacent to Big Deschutes River offers bike paths, pool, tennis courts, RV storage & boat ramp

A lot for A little, built by Palmer Homes. 3 Bed/2 Bath 1498 SQ. FT. Utility Room Hardwood comp Flooring, Covered Patio Breakfast Bar, Private Backyard. Natural Gas. Steve 541.420.3281.

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C OV ER S T ORY

Cards Continued from A1 The Senate approved a series of amendments unfavorable to the banking industry over the last week, but this one was widely regarded as the most surprising. Meddling in dealings between businesses generally is anathema to Republicans and a relatively low priority for Democrats. And this was not an easy vote. Lobbyists for the wounded but formidable banking industry made clear to some senators that this decision would affect future campaign donations, according to people who participated in those conversations. But retailers mounted an unusually effective yearlong campaign to frame the issue as a chance for Congress to help small business. A leading trade group for chain retailers worked with small-business groups to make sure that every time a senator held a town hall meeting back home, a local business owner showed up to ask about card fees. The industry also rode the support of Sen. Richard Durbin of Illinois, the Democratic whip, who wrote the amendment and pushed the sponsor of the banking overhaul bill, Sen. Christopher Dodd of Connecticut, to allow a vote on the Senate floor. The winning margin was provided by several conservative Republicans. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., told SunTrust, the largest bank in his state, that this time he planned to vote against the bank and with Coca-Cola and Home Depot, two other Georgia companies that had lobbied him fiercely. “This was really a decision between helping out small business or helping out large banks,” said John Emling, a lobbyist for the Retail Industry Leaders Association. “No one wanted to pick between friends, and they had friends on both sides, but because of the momentum, we just felt that if Durbin pushed folks to the vote we would win.” The banking overhaul bill still needs to pass the Senate, and then it must be reconciled with

The Associated Press file photo

A customer swipes a MasterCard debit card last year at a shop in Seattle. In a Thursday vote, the Senate agreed to impose price controls on the fees retailers must pay banks when customers swipe credit or debit cards. a House bill that does not mention debit card “interchange” fees. Banking industry groups said that they had not given the issue enough attention in recent weeks, focusing instead on other controversial amendments. But they said they would now redouble efforts to convince legislators that the provision would hurt customers by undermining the debit card system. “Retailers who benefit greatly from the system will pay almost nothing for the costs of maintaining and improving it,” said the American Bankers Association. The Durbin amendment gives the Federal Reserve new authority to regulate and limit the fees that businesses pay to card companies. It specifically addresses payments processed through the Visa and MasterCard networks. American Express and Discover cards are not covered by the bill. Last year businesses paid Visa and MasterCard $19.71 billion on debit card transactions, according to The Nilson Report, a trade magazine that is regarded as the best source of data on the industry. Visa and MasterCard in turn passed about 80 percent of the money, roughly $15.8 billion, to the banks that issued the cards. The legislation directs the Fed to cap those fees at a level that is

“reasonable and proportional” to the cost of processing transactions. The Nilson Report estimated that last year, fees averaged 1.63 percent of the transaction amount. A second set of provisions applies to both credit and debit card transactions. Visa and MasterCard impose an all-or-nothing requirement on businesses, requiring them to accept cards even on small transactions, and prohibiting businesses from offering discounts based on the method of payment. The amendment strikes those rules. Many small businesses already violate the rules. The National Federation of Independent Business reported in a 2008 survey that 13 percent of respondents required a minimum purchase before a customer could use a card, and 14 percent offered a cash discount. The amendment would provide legal shelter for chain stores to implement similar policies. Congress passed a major credit card reform bill last spring, imposing a series of new consumer

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protections but ignoring the issue of fees. In the wake of that failure, proponents developed a new lobbying plan, industry representatives said, that made the issue about small businesses. Durbin said he embraced the issue after hearing a rising chorus of complaints from businesses in his district, including the owner of his favorite restaurant. “I felt there was a fundamental unfairness in the relationship between the giant credit card companies and small businesses,” he said. “And it turned out that it was an issue whose time had come. I had no idea the amount of effort that businesses would put into it. It really made a difference. I think it emboldened a lot of my colleagues to stand up to the banks.” By early in the week Durbin’s staff was confident that a majority of senators would support the measure, particularly after he made changes to limit the impact on small banks, a powerful constituency that many senators are loathe to cross. The largest change limits the new price controls to cards issued only by the very largest banks, those with at least $10 billion in assets. As a result, the pricing controls will only affect about 65 percent of debit card transactions, staff said. Then came what Durbin described as an “unexpected curveball.” Republican leaders insisted that the amendment had to pass with no fewer than 60 votes. Even then, retail trade groups said they knew they had what they needed to win. After the vote, Durbin flew back to Illinois late Thursday night and took his usual car service home from the airport. He said his driver had cheered the victory. “He had never commented before on a vote I cast,” Durbin said. “But he said, ‘We get killed on this.’ He told me he had followed the vote on his computer.”

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 A7

Wary Mexicans shun cell phone database The Washington Post MEXICO CITY — It sounded like a good call. To combat organized crime, especially the phenomenon known as “virtual kidnapping,” the Mexican government ordered the owners of every cell phone in the country to register their names, numbers and addresses. But in a remarkable mass protest, even under threat of service interruption, millions of Mexicans are refusing to submit their personal data, for a very Mexican reason: They don’t trust the government. The burgeoning Mexican cellular class — which now includes city swells with thrumming BlackBerrys and peasants with cheapo Nokias out in the fields — assumes that any personal information they give the state would inexorably flow into the hands of the very criminals the new law seeks to foil, creating a kind of White Pages for crooks and kidnappers. “And these fears are not unfounded,” said José Adán Ignacio Rubí Salazar, a federal legislator and head of the communications commission in the Chamber of Deputies. According to the Federal Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668 www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A8 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Oil Continued from A1 The enormous depth, with its low temperatures and high pressure, greatly complicates planning and execution and could cause the approach to fail, just as earlier stopgap efforts like a large containment dome did not work. One potential problem is the presence of several right-angle turns in the plumbing of the blowout preventer where the objects could become stuck. The goal of the junk shot is to force-feed the preventer, the device that failed when the disaster unfolded on April 20, until it becomes so plugged that the oil stops flowing or slows to a relative trickle. That would be followed by a “top kill,” the pumping of heavy mud into the well to overcome the pressure of the rising oil, followed in turn by cement that would permanently seal it. The officials expressed optimism the methods would succeed; if they did not, they said, there was little risk of making the situation worse until a relief well is finished several months from now. “Where you want to end up is, you want to have killed the well,” said Kent Wells, a BP senior vice president who is overseeing much of the planning. Wells bridled at the term “junk shot,” which he said betrayed the seriousness of the effort. “We don’t pump junk,” he said. The technical term, he noted, is “bridging agent,” because the materials are meant to bridge gaps inside the blowout preventer where the oil is flowing. As with all the other efforts to stop or contain the leak, the underwater work would be done by robotic submersibles. They are operated by pilots aboard surface ships above the well, but the work is coordinated in a darkened room in the Houston center, one wall of which is taken up by live video from the craft. On Friday, seven submersibles were on duty, and the video feed from an eighth was a blank green screen, indicating it was out of service. Technicians and engineers were seated at worktables arranged in a square; one of them, facing the video screens directly, served as a kind of mission controller, speaking to the operators in the gulf. The room was one of many used for the crisis operation, on the third floor of a BP office building west of downtown. People

Jail Continued from A1 Blanton said the issue he’s most worried about — having to release inmates early — almost became a reality last weekend. In one day, the jail got 30 new inmates, which is almost twice the number brought in on an average day. After some reshuffling, the jail was able to accommodate all the inmates, but Blanton said it’s a situation that will likely pop up again in the future. If the bond fails, he said jail staff will continue to do what they can to use the space efficiently and avoid letting inmates out early, but added that the problem isn’t likely to go away anytime soon. “In my 30 years of public safety and trying to predict human behavior and events, I hope this is one thing I’m wrong about,” he said. “I hope we don’t have an issue with the jail population or public safety. … But I don’t think I’m wrong.” Here are answers to some question relating to the jail expansion:

Q: A:

What is the total cost of the bond and the impact on taxpayers? If voters pass the $44 million bond, Deschutes County property owners’ taxes would go up by 18 cents per $1,000 in assessed value, or about $36 for a home with an assessed value of $200,000.

Q: A:

How big is the existing facility? The county’s current jail was built in 1994 and has 228 beds. A work center that opened in 2008 provides another 90 beds, but is only available for male inmates who have already been convicted. With the additional space at the work center, the county has 1.9 beds per 1,000 people, close to the statewide average of 1.8 beds per 1,000 people, according to the Oregon Sheriff’s Jail Command Council.

Q: A:

What would the bond pay for? The bond would expand the jail by 250 beds, with 50 beds for inmates with special needs, such as physical disabilities or mental illnesses. In

Drill ship

Garbage down the well

Mud sent from ship

BP’s latest attempt at stopping oil from gushing out of a deep-water well in the Gulf of Mexico includes a method called the “junk shot,” in which a recipe of golf balls, bits of rubber and other material will be pumped into the blowout preventer, a safety device at the top of the well.

Protesters, interim government clash for 2nd day in Kyrgyzstan New York Times News Service

Collapsed pipe

Blowout preventer

Blowout preventer

How the junk shot may work

Oil

1 Ship pumps mud down to a manifold, which holds two pipes containing junk material.

Wellhead

Pipes CHOKE AND KILL LINES CONTROL POD

3

4

3 A hydraulic control pod operated from the surface opens valves to direct the junk into the bottom of the blowout preventer.

4 The rising oil forces the junk upward into gaps on one of the rams on the blowout preventer, plugging it up and stopping or slowing the oil.

2

1

2 At the manifold, mud forces the junk into “choke” and “kill” lines on the blowout preventer.

RAMS

Mud from ship

Oil

Later, mud will be pumped into the well to overcome the pressure of the oil. The well will then be permanently sealed with cement.

MANIFOLD

Contains junk

Oil Source: BP technical briefings New York Times News Service

work in shifts around the clock on various tasks: the containment team, the “well kill” team, the robot team. Because there is no proper cafeteria, lines for hot food form at mealtimes in the halls around small pantries. Campbell, executive vice president of Superior Energy Services, who used junk shots in the Kuwaiti oil fields after the 1991 Persian Gulf war, among other

places, said the technique was far easier on land. Workers could try one material, and if that did not plug the gaps, quickly try something that was bigger and harder. “If you were on land, you’d hear a big thwap and it just means it sheared and went through,” he said. But in the abyss no one can hear junk shear, and everything

must be planned in advance. Materials had been chosen and tested over the past several weeks, and two 20-foot sections of pipe filled with them are now on the seabed. When various plumbing jobs are finished on and around the blowout preventer, the material will be ready to be injected, although Wells said they may decide to pump just mud first and see if that works.

addition, the funds would help expand education and treatment programs for inmates.

beds in its jail. The county can legally send inmates to other county jails around the state, but would have to pay transportation costs to shuttle inmates back and forth for court appearances. Oregon Department of Corrections officials have said it wouldn’t be feasible to use space in the medium-security

prison, which is currently closed because the state can’t afford to run it. Officials say they’d also need to research the legality of housing county jail inmates in a state facility.

Q: A:

How will the county pay to run an expanded jail? Blanton said the county will likely have to raise rates for District 1, a countywide taxing district that provides funding for the jail, search and rescue operations and courthouse security. The rate is currently 95 cents per $1,000 of assessed value, but Blanton has asked the Deschutes County Commission to cut the rate to 92 cents per $1,000 beginning in July. He said he’s not sure exactly how much the rate would go up or when it would go up, but said it would be related to the ratio of staff members to jail inmates. The maximum rate for the district is $1.40 per $1,000 of assessed value.

Q: A:

How full is the jail?

Q: A:

What is “matrixing?”

Shortly after the jail opened, the average daily population was 89 people. That number had jumped to 243 people within a decade, which led to the early release of some inmates through a process known as “matrixing.” The jail currently brings in about 16 people per day and lets out about 16 people. On Friday, there were 204 inmates in the jail and another 26 in the work center, according to Capt. Ruth Jenkin, who oversees the jail.

Between 2003 and 2007, the jail let out more than 2,600 inmates early because of overcrowding. Jail officials looked at inmates’ criminal histories and current charges and let out lower-risk inmates to make room for new arrivals. A review by The Bulletin in 2007 found that many of the people who got out early had been in jail for drug possession, drunken driving and domestic violence, but some had lengthier criminal histories with charges of robbery, identity theft and other crimes.

Q: A:

Why can’t the jail send inmates to other jails or to the state prison in Madras? Deschutes County currently has a contract with Jefferson County to use up to 10

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MOSCOW — A chaotic day of deadly street violence in southern Kyrgyzstan on Friday ended with the interim government retaking control of administration buildings in two southern cities. The buildings had been over-

Crash Continued from A1 Joshua Cawthra, an NTSB accident investigator, said it was too early to speculate on what caused the crash, but said authorities would be on scene into Friday evening and through the day today trying to piece together a sequence of events by examining the debris scattered across the area. He said the plane would be removed from the airport and transported to another site in Redmond for additional analysis. A preliminary report will be released on the crash next week, though the full investigation into the incident could take up to a year. As they wait for more details about Friday morning’s crash, Arnett’s family members said they’re trying to get over the sudden shock of losing a man who had showed no signs of slowing down — a man who loved debating politics, riding his motorcycle and spending time with his three children, three stepchildren, 11 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Arnett’s daughter, Linda Johnson, of Bend, said her father wasn’t the type to settle quietly into retirement. In fact, he never really retired; last week, he flew to Arizona and back for work. “He was absolutely a risktaker, to the end,” she said. Arnett grew up in Canada and moved to Newberg with his family when he was in high school. He attended college for a short time before enlisting in the military, which shipped him to several bases in the U.S. to serve as a flight instructor.

run a day earlier by followers of the former president, Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who was toppled in an uprising a month ago. At least one person was killed and 37 wounded on Friday in exchanges of gunfire between supporters of Bakiyev and those backing the interim government.

After the war, Arnett enrolled at Seattle Pacific University. A few credits short of completing a degree in history, he dropped out to help with his father’s business. Arnett later took correspondence classes and earned a degree in history at the age of 80. In 1961, Arnett moved to Redmond with his wife and three daughters. There, he worked in a variety of businesses. With his brother, he started a handful of nursing homes and also owned real estate around the area. Arnett frequently bought and sold airplanes, though he never had a formal business. In recent years, Johnson said her father enjoyed spending time in coffee shops with friends and would read a halfdozen newspapers, looking for good business prospects. He was a big reader, particularly of books about history. Johnson said Arnett loved sparring with people about just about anything. “He liked to argue about politics, and whichever side you were for, he’d pick the other,” she said. Arnett’s granddaughter Jodie Barram, a Bend city councilor, said her grandfather was well-known in the community and beloved by the people who knew him best. “He truly was an amazing person who lived life to the fullest,” she wrote in an e-mail. “I admired him greatly, respected him deeply, and loved him wholeheartedly. The tragic loss of such a man will be felt by many who knew him.” Erin Golden can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at egolden@bendbulletin.com.

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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Case closed

Inside

After 20 years, popular series “Law & Order” gets death sentence, Page B2

Will ‘Lost’ viewers get answers?

SPOTLIGHT Celebrate the stars tonight in Prineville

By Frazier Moore The Associated Press

Will “Lost” castaway Jack Shephard (Matthew Fox) stay on the island? The millions of “Lost” fans may or may not find out May 23.

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010

NEW YORK — As a “Lost” fan, I’m well-versed in its many clashing versions of reality. Now the end of “Lost” is near, with its two and one-half hour finale airing at 9 p.m. May 23 on ABC following a two-hour retrospective. But even with that hefty end in sight, I have no difficulty picturing an alternate universe where “Lost” not only isn’t ending, but instead never existed in the first place. Of course, a TV universe that had never known “Lost” would be incalculably duller. It would be a universe where viewers had never been transported, dazzled, hearttugged, ‘Lost’ challenged, series teased and exasperated finale at anywhere When: 9 p.m. appr oac h Sunday, ing the level May 23 “Lost” has Where: ABC staked out. This would be a TV universe untouched by the sprawling ambition of the “Lost” creative team and the generous pocketbook and patience of ABC, which has let the series roam wherever its outrageous, epic vision carried it. Nearly six years after “Lost” arrived on the scene, I’m not counting on another series its equal in scope, majesty and longevity. I’m not holding my breath for another show so unapologetic in how it zigs when the viewer is expecting it to zag, then zigs and zags a few more ways — maybe simultaneously. Consider: Several of the castaways marooned on that island in the middle of nowhere eventually gained rescue and returned to the “normal” world they came from. Then they scooted right back to the island again! The island isn’t done with them, they’re always saying. Or they aren’t done with the island. Except for the ones who want to leave it again. But none of them can leave it alone. That goes double for “Lost” viewers. Lately, everybody’s psyched by the emergence of 3-D television. But “Lost,” from its start in fall 2004, was destined to leapfrog from TV’s traditional flat surface into multiple dimensions of time and space. Flashbacks. Flash-forwards. Parallel narratives. Sideways, too. The pilot episode put us on notice. See ‘Lost’ / B6

B

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Local author Kenneth Fenter holds his new novel, “The Ruin,” a story about a young boy who opts to seek refuge from bullying in the wilderness rather than revenge.

Personal tale that binds Bend man turns childhood of being bullied into novel

ABC via The Associated Press

By David Jasper • The Bulletin

T

hese days, writers who decide to self-publish — rather than go through a traditional commercial publisher — may pay a printer, work with a vanity press or go through a company that offers print-on-demand.

Few writers possess the means and the knowhow to actually publish their own books. Kenneth Fenter does. He does the work in his office, on the second floor of the east-side Bend home he shares with wife Lora. A while back, he printed 150 copies of a book written just for family members. That project made him realize he could print and bind books for less money than printers were asking. “It was a big job for me to do,” he says. “But we got it done, and then what I ended up with was the equipment. That was my payoff on it.” Fenter owns everything he needs to print the text and cover, trim the pages and bind books, including his recently completed “The Ruin.” His first novel, it’s the story of a retiring English teacher who recalls, during a school lockdown, his own experience with bullying 40 years earlier.

“I’m doing the whole process here,” says the plainspoken 70-year-old. Once the pages are printed, it takes him just a minute to bind and trim a copy of the book, which sells at area bookstores such as Paulina Springs in Sisters and Redmond, and Between the Covers in Bend. He began writing the book as short stories in 2004 and spent the last two years editing and rewriting. Printing right at home allows him to keep the price of his book a reasonable $15.50. Fenter is currently putting together an e-book edition of “The Ruin,” and says if he can find the time, he may use his printing equipment to republish a series of nonfiction books he wrote about time his family spent living in Japan in the 1970s. When he wrote those books, of which he sold a few thousand, Fenter knew there was a niche audience for them. See Fenter / B6

Novice stargazers will mingle with advanced astronomers tonight under the Central Oregon stars at Prineville Reservoir. For the 11th consecutive year, professionals and beginners alike will gather for family-oriented star parties held at Prineville Reservoir State Park. “Experts have been coming here every year to share their knowledge of the heavens,” said the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s Paul Patton, interpretive coordinator for Eastern Oregon. Events kick off at 1 p.m. with “How Big is Big?,” an activity led by astronomer Larry Cerullo about the extraordinary size and distance of objects in space, culminating with the stargazing at 9:30 p.m. Other events include the following: • “The Plane Truth” at 2:15 p.m.: A presentation by Jerry Niehuser of the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory focusing on the fundamental, two-dimensional nature of stellar and planetary orbits. • “Meteorites” at 3:15 p.m.: A look by regional astronomer Lynn Carrol at the variety of meteorites and the scientific information they provide. • “Science, Art and Exoplanets; Envisioning Other Worlds” at 4:15 p.m.: A visual exploration, led by Patton and renowned space artist John Foster, of potential life-supporting planets elsewhere in the galaxy. • “Telescopes 101” at 7:30 p.m.: An introduction by Central Oregon astronomer Don Nisewanger to the wide variety of equipment available to stargazers. • “The Solar System and Human Spaceflight” at 8:30 p.m.: An update by aerospace education specialist Tony Leavitt of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Ames Research Center at Moffitt, Calif., on the United States’ ongoing and planned exploration of the solar system. Earlier in the evening, beginning at 6 p.m., Leavitt will help young space enthusiasts design, build and launch their own rockets. There will also be a variety of exhibits, including an “Earthtime/Space-time” display, kayak tours on the reservoir from 9 a.m. to noon and a “High Desert Discovery Hike” at 11 a.m. Admission is free. Food and refreshments will be available for purchase. Prineville Reservoir is located 14 miles southeast of Prineville on U.S. Highway 26. Contact: 541-923-7551, ext. 21, or www.oregonstateparks.org.

End-of-life panel convenes in Bend Decisions about end-of-life care are the focus of a panel that will meet at St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. Sunday. The event is free and open to the public, though an RSVP is required (see contact information below). The panel will include Dr. Laura Mavity, a palliative care physician at St. Charles Bend; George Eighmey, executive director of Compassion & Choices of Oregon, which helps people use the Physician Aid in Dying law; Beth Patterson, a volunteer with Compassion & Choices of Oregon; Rev. Heather Starr and Rabbi Alan Berg. Light refreshments will be provided. Contact: 503-525-1956, or via fax, 800-930-0535. — From staff reports

Correction A Spotlight brief headlined “Religious women’s conference Friday,” which appeared Thursday, May 13, on Page E1, contained incorrect information about lunch at the event. Lunch at the Three Sisters Women’s Conference is only available for those who reserved before May 5. The Bulletin regrets the error.


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Troubled teen wants escape ‘Law & Order’ canceled from unhappy life at home By Frazier Moore

The Associated Press

Dear Abby: I am 13 and have been home-schooled for a few years, but I hate it. My parents recently got a divorce after many years of trying to. Although I was used to the idea of their divorce, I cried when it happened. Mom asked me what was wrong and I told her. Her reply was, “Oh, grow up. You’re 13, not 5!” It showed me she doesn’t care about my feelings. I don’t know why, but sometimes I think I’m the reason behind my parents’ split. Also, I have no idea how to tell Mom I want to go to high school next year. I feel like my life is falling apart. What do I do? — Tennessee Teen in Turmoil Dear Tennessee Teen: Regardless of how old a person is, when parents divorce it can be shocking — even if you saw it coming. It’s normal to be sad about it, but don’t make your burden harder to bear by feeling in any way guilty about the split. Children are seldom, if ever, the cause — or even a factor — in a divorce or separation. The circumstances that led your parents to separate are far more complex than they may appear on the surface. Your parents have probably been deeply hurt by each other. Rarely is one party entirely to blame. Do not feel sorry for yourself or ashamed. Divorce happens in the best of families. Your mother’s reaction to your tears was regrettable. It may have been she felt defensive. Divorce can be an emotional roller coaster — so be prepared for her to have mood swings and don’t personalize it. (She may be having a bad day.) As to your attending high school rather than being homeschooled — a way to approach a discussion would be to tell your mother you would like to try it for “a while.” She may be more receptive than you think, because she may need to get a job or return to

DEAR ABBY Regardless of how old a person is, when parents divorce it can be shocking — even if you saw it coming. It’s normal to be sad about it, but don’t make your burden harder to bear by feeling in any way guilty about the split. school to prepare for one. Dear Abby: I am a 22-year-old college student. My boyfriend, “Jay,” and I have been together four years and plan to become engaged after school. The problem is, I have never told him my mom is a lesbian. She dresses like a man and wears her hair very short. I have always accepted her for who she is — or at least I thought so. I have told Jay lies about my mom and dad being together when, in fact, they are not. My dad is deceased, and Mom has a girlfriend. I will graduate soon and Jay will be there. So will Mom and her girlfriend. I feel like I am losing my mind the closer that graduation comes. Jay is a wonderful person, but sometimes he can be judgmen-

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NEW YORK — The venerable police-courtroom drama “Law & Order” has been axed. NBC announced Friday that the show would end its historic 20-season run on May 24, with a season finale that was never meant to bring the saga to a close. The show starred an ensemble cast currently consisting of Jeremy Sisto, Anthony Anderson, Linus Roache, Alana De La Garza, Sam Waterston and S. Epatha Merkerson, who, unrelated to the show’s abrupt cancellation, had already announced she was moving on. Even as it issued a death sentence to the original “Law & Order,” NBC announced a new drama in the “Law & Order” franchise called “LOLA” (“Law & Order: Los Angeles”). Premiering this fall, “LOLA” is described as a pro-

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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tal. I have wanted to tell him the truth many times, but I’m afraid of what he will think of me or have second thoughts about our relationship. I can’t seem to find the words to tell him even when I try. Please help. — Keeping a Secret in Huntsville, Texas Dear Keeping a Secret: Here are the words: “Jay, there is something I need to tell you — something I haven’t been completely honest about.” Then tell him everything and do it before graduation, so he will have time to forgive you for not trusting him and being truthful about your background. He will probably be more upset about the deception than any impression your mother could make. If Jay loves you, the two of you will get past this. But if he’s not up to it, then your relationship wasn’t meant to be, and you’ll have to accept it.

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cedural crime drama “that will follow the theme and story lines similar to the ‘Law & Order’brand series on the streets of Los Angeles.” Casting for the show is under way, the network said. NBC will also renew “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” for a 12th season. NBC’s full 2010-11 schedule will be officially released Sunday. The sudden end of “Law & Order” could be explained by sagging ratings, production expense and creative fatigue, but its renewal had been widely expected nonetheless. Then, on Thursday, a flurry of reports declared the series to be doomed. NBC refused to confirm the reports. Negotiations were said to be continuing late Thursday.

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Jeff Gaspin, chairman of NBC Universal Television, praised “Law & Order” creator-producer Dick Wolf and said it “will continue to make an impact like no other series before.” But the cancellation denies Wolf his long-held dream of surpassing “Gunsmoke” from a generation ago as TV’s longest-running drama. The two series are tied at 20 seasons each. “Never complain, never explain,” Wolf said in a statement. “Law & Order” won a Peabody Award and the 1997 Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series. It also became a familiar presence on the streets of New York as it went about its on-location filming.

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

CSI: Miami Divorce Party ‘14’ 198196 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 107844 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 187080 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 197467 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 9840950 130 28 8 32 Paranormal State Paranormal State CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 917318 (4:00) ››› “First Blood” (1982) Sylvester ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ›› “Above the Law” (1988, Action) Steven Seagal, Pam Grier, Henry Silva. A CIA››› “True Lies” (1994, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jamie Lee Curtis. A man 102 40 39 Stallone. Å 463860 Ex-Green Beret goes on Vietnam mission. Å 577689 sponsored drug cartel is uncovered by a Chicago cop. 572134 lives the double life of a spy and a family man. Å 373467 SnakesKin ‘PG’ SnakesKin ‘PG’ SnakesKin ‘PG’ Your Pet Wants This ‘PG’ 4556365 It’s Me or the Dog (N) ‘PG’ 8251973 Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å 8156329 Pit Bulls and Parolees ‘PG’ 5906806 Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å 5323912 68 50 12 38 SnakesKin ‘PG’ Housewives/NYC 569641 Housewives/NYC 465486 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 183347 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 888955 ›› “Guess Who” (2005) Bernie Mac, Ashton Kutcher. Å 638432 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 244080 137 44 World’s Strictest Parents 1739738 16 and Pregnant Maci ‘14’ 1742202 World’s Strictest Parents 1752689 World’s Strictest Parents 1856554 190 32 42 53 Redneck 6374134 (5:45) › “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. ’ 25275202 The Suze Orman Show (N) 139711 Debt Part 768950 Debt Part 491776 American Greed 282115 The Suze Orman Show 202979 Debt Part 348370 Debt Part 364318 Paid 555573 magicJack.com 51 36 40 52 American Greed 767221 Larry King Live ‘PG’ 526080 Newsroom 754776 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 730196 Larry King Live ‘PG’ 743660 Newsroom 753047 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 338912 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) 668405 › “Larry the Cable Guy: Health Inspector” (2006), Iris Bahr Å 88028 Larry the Cable Guy: Morning 89757 Jeff Dunham: Spark of Insanity ‘14’ Å 72979 Brian Regan: Standing Up 168134 Dunham 882202 135 53 135 47 (4:00) ›› “The Man” (2005) 60047 The Buzz 7221 Bend City Edition Outdoors 6399 Visions 5509 RSN 4757 RSN 9863 RSN Movie Night 60738 RSN Extreme 89950 Talk of the Town 90370 11 American Perspectives 119554 C-SPAN Weekend 937221 58 20 98 11 American Perspectives 486738 Hannah 201115 Wizards 208028 Wizards of Waverly Place 102252 Sonny 2881405 Phineas 588776 Deck 567283 Good-Charlie Wizards 479689 Phineas 722283 Hannah 731931 Wizards 388863 Deck 532757 87 43 14 39 Hannah 582592 2012 Apocalypse ‘PG’ Å 915950 Bermuda Triangle Exposed 103028 Weird or What? ’ ‘G’ Å 112776 Weird or What? ‘PG’ Å 192912 Weird or What? ‘PG’ Å 102399 Weird or What? ’ ‘G’ Å 701844 156 21 16 37 Area 51 ’ ‘PG’ Å 664554 Baseball Tonight (Live) Å 898844 SportsCenter (Live) Å 574592 Baseball Tonight Å 561028 SportsCenter (Live) Å 564115 SportsCenter (Live) Å 172318 21 23 22 23 College Softball 600776 Boxing 1744660 Boxing 1720080 2009 World Series of Poker 1740844 2009 World Series of Poker 1743931 Baseball Tonight (N) Å 1854196 22 24 21 24 Drag Racing 3976660 Russo/Steele Car Auction 2039660 Boxing 2454689 2006 World Series of Poker 2430009 2006 World Series of Poker 2443573 2006 World Series of Poker 2446660 2006 World Series of Poker 7174196 23 25 123 25 Russo/Steele Car Auction 2813660 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 ›› “The Sandlot” (1993, Comedy-Drama) Tom Guiry, Mike Vitar. Å 403912 ›› “The Goonies” (1985, Adventure) Sean Astin, Josh Brolin, Jeff Cohen. Å 151047 ›› “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” (1993) Å 132912 67 29 19 41 Chronicles-Lion Glenn Beck 2927134 Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ 5437776 Journal 8871221 Watch 8867028 Red Eye 5426660 Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ 5436047 Glenn Beck 4257825 54 61 36 50 Huckabee 8861844 Challenge 4958592 Flay 9519844 Flay 6956509 Unwrap 9528592 Unwrap 9514399 Unwrapped Fried Favorites 6356347 Diners 6859115 Diners 6868863 Iron Chef America 5325370 177 62 46 44 Iron Chef America 9518115 Best Damn Top 50 Special 71825 USSF D2 Soccer A.C. St. Louis at Portland Timbers (Live) 27080 MLS Soccer Seattle Sounders FC at Red Bull New York 97776 Boxing 292414 20 45 28* 26 Championship Billiards 55115 Déjà Vu 9117573 › “The Marine” (2006, Action) John Cena. Thugs kidnap the wife of a soldier. 3457660 ›› “Hitman” (2007, Action) Timothy Olyphant, Dougray Scott. 5422844 ››› “Hellboy” (2004, Fantasy) Ron Perlman, John Hurt. 4354844 131 To Sell 5962950 To Sell 5953202 House 9194711 House 5959486 Design 9394919 Sarah 4144216 Dear 8795776 Block 5979776 Battle on the Block ‘G’ 4930318 House 8790221 House 9244641 176 49 33 43 Battle on the Block ‘G’ 3331392 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 3896134 The Real Robin Hood ‘PG’ Å 3876370 The Dark Ages ‘PG’ Å 94125405 155 42 41 36 How the States Got Their Shapes ‘PG’ Å 8589903 “The Haunting of Sorority Row” (2007) Leighton Meester. ‘14’ Å 976196 › “The Messengers” (2007, Horror) Kristen Stewart. Å 722202 › “The Messengers” Å 216912 138 39 20 31 “The Secret” (2007, Suspense) David Duchovny, Lili Taylor. Å 478979 Lockup: New Mexico 11654863 Lockup: Raw 82139844 Lockup: Raw Ganging Up 82148592 Lockup: Pendleton 82135028 Lockup: Pendleton 82138115 “Robert Blecker” 59146757 56 59 128 51 Lockup: New Mexico 52815202 I Was 17 903080 I Was 17 290028 The Hills 932592 True Life ’ 714283 Dudesons 160496 Parkour 183399 Library 443283 Library 452931 Library 110991 Library 246467 192 22 38 57 True Life 979979 True Life Body Dysmorphia. 443844 Sponge 395912 Sponge 392825 Sponge 316405 iCarly ‘G’ 663825 iCarly ‘G’ 312689 iCarly ‘G’ 672573 Jackson 651080 Big Time 462283 Victorious 992009 Lopez 278931 Lopez 294979 Nanny 474028 Nanny 661775 82 46 24 40 Sponge 683689 Good Pets-Bad 95364554 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 587414 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 587234 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 187478 UFC’s Ultimate Fight Night (N) ’ ‘14’ 98163405 132 31 34 46 When Good Pets Go Bad 27573283 ›› “Jeepers Creepers” (2001) Gina Philips, Justin Long. Å 1117912 ›› “Underworld” (2003, Horror) Kate Beckinsale, Scott Speedman. Premiere. 1237450 › Ultraviolet 133 35 133 45 “Dracula III: Legacy” (2005, Horror) Jason Scott Lee. Premiere. 5706080 In Touch 7990573 Hour of Power ‘G’ Å 4396414 Billy Graham Classic 7305912 History 7900950 Travel the Road “Though None Go With Me” (2006) ‘PG’ 2064221 Conquerors Virtual 2042009 English 4035196 205 60 130 King 392950 Office 383202 Seinfeld 656660 Seinfeld 389486 ›› “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007, Comedy) Ben Stiller. Å 4491283 (10:15) ›› “American Wedding” (2003, Comedy) Jason Biggs. 2593950 16 27 11 28 Raymond 643196 King 379009 ››› “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies” (1960, Comedy) Doris Day. Jean Kerr’s comic ac- ››› “What’s Up, Tiger Lily?” (1966) ››› “The Blue Dahlia” (1946, Crime Drama) Alan Ladd, Veronica Lake. A Navy pilot’s ››› “Days of Wine and Roses” (1962) Jack Lemmon, Lee Remick. A husband and 101 44 101 29 wife is found shot with his gun. Å 3981592 wife struggle to control their alcoholism. Å 1863844 count of a drama critic and his family. Å (DVS) 1745399 Woody Allen. Å 6730080 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ 825844 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ 282842 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ 987450 Disappeared ’ ‘PG’ Å 882806 Disappeared ’ ‘PG’ Å 632383 48 Hours: Hard Evidence ’ 635318 178 34 32 34 Dateline Myst. 934931 ››› “Forrest Gump” (1994) Tom Hanks. A slow-witted Southerner experiences 30 years of history. 608641 ››› “The Green Mile” (1999, Drama) Tom Hanks, David Morse, Michael Clarke Duncan. Å 330738 17 26 15 27 (3:30) ›› “U.S. Marshals” 303028 Ed, Edd 5899509 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ “Scooby-Doo! The Mystery Begins” (2009) Robbie Amell. ‘PG’ 4205115 Dude 8791950 Destroy 5975950 King-Hill 8947863 King-Hill 8923283 The Boondocks The Boondocks 84 101 Chowdown 11654863 101 Chowdown 82139844 Food 52832979 Food 52811486 Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Food 65124283 Food 65133931 Food 52170660 Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 101 Chowdown 52815202 Griffith 2388349 Griffith 8322781 Griffith 9522318 Griffith 4851775 Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond 65 47 29 35 (3:30) “Ghostbusters” 6620757 NCIS Skeletons ‘PG’ Å 551776 NCIS In the Zone ‘14’ Å 749844 NCIS Deliverance ‘PG’ Å 758592 NCIS Love & War ‘14’ Å 745028 NCIS ’ ‘14’ Å 748115 NCIS Knockout ‘PG’ Å 323080 15 30 23 30 House Black Hole ‘14’ Å 653573 Basketball Wives Tough Love Couples ‘PG’ 939793 ››› “Dazed and Confused” (1993, Drama) Jason London. ’ 897221 Greatest Hard Rock Songs 293221 Greatest Hard Rock Songs 263080 Greatest Hard Rock Songs 893405 191 48 37 54 Chilli 753028 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:00) “Tears of the Sun” 59362234 (6:05) › “Never Back Down” 2008 Djimon Hounsou. ’ ‘PG-13’ 15223660 “Don’t Be a Menace to South Central” 2183592 ›› “Murder at 1600” 1997 Wesley Snipes. ’ ‘R’ Å 3147573 American Pie 2 ›› “Robin Hood” 1991, Adventure Patrick Bergin. ‘NR’ Å 2545561 ›› “Robin Hood” 1991, Adventure Patrick Bergin. ‘NR’ Å 5939844 ›› “Robin Hood” 1991, Adventure Patrick Bergin. ‘NR’ Å 3808979 ›› “Terror Train” 1980 3061931 Insane Cinema 3418405 Insane Cinema 8424660 Update 3419134 Bubba 4984009 Insane Cinema 9271912 Insane Cinema 9291776 Check 1, 2 Å Stupidface Danny 2311467 Thrillbill 9213283 PGA Tour Golf 213009 PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: BMW Charity Pro-Am, Third Round 999573 Golf 686776 PGA Tour Golf Champions: Regions Charity Classic, Second Round 108573 LPGA Tour Golf 601931 “Daniel’s Daughter” (2008, Drama) Laura Leighton. ‘PG’ Å 2446775 “For the Love of Grace” (2008) Mark Consuelos. ‘PG’ Å 5944776 “Elevator Girl” (2010) Lacey Chabert, Ryan Merriman. ‘PG’ Å 3873283 “Uncorked” (2010) ‘PG’ 3076863 “Ice Age: Dawn” (5:45) ›› “He’s Just Not That Into You” 2009, Romance-Comedy Ben Affleck, Jennifer Aniston. Men and ››› “The Hangover” 2009, Comedy Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms. (9:45) Boxing Amir Khan vs. Paul Malignaggi, Junior Welterweights ’ Å 7881221 (11:45) The Pacific HBO 425 501 425 10 9499196 women navigate through complex relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 55003221 Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å 9105919 23662405 ›› “The Good German” 2006, Drama George Clooney. ‘R’ Å 6925950 ››› “Sherrybaby” 2006 Maggie Gyllenhaal. 8669115 (8:45) ›› “Another Day in Paradise” 1999 James Woods. ‘R’ 44211392 ›› “The Good German” 2006 ‘R’ Å 9956757 IFC 105 105 (2:45) “Casino” 1995 (5:45) ›› “The Rocker” 2008, Comedy Rainn Wilson, Josh Gad. A failed drummer › “Dreamcatcher” 2003, Horror Morgan Freeman, Thomas Jane, Jason Lee. Four telepathic friends encoun- ›› “Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen” 2009 Shia LaBeouf. Sam Witwicky holds MAX 400 508 7 64669689 gets another shot at fame. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 10774991 ter malevolent aliens. ’ ‘R’ Å 498080 the key to defeating an ancient Decepticon. ‘PG-13’ 84133486 Man-Made ‘G’ 3410863 Supercarrier: USS Ronald 8433318 Break It Down Dam ‘PG’ 9297950 Man-Made ‘G’ 9273370 Supercarrier: USS Ronald 9293134 Break It Down Dam ‘PG’ 9296221 Taboo Spilling Blood ‘14’ 6394399 NGC 157 157 Back, Barnyard Penguin 4907950 Wolverine-XMn Wolverine-XMn Sponge 3493196 Sponge 4991399 El Tigre 3402844 El Tigre 3421979 Avatar 2316912 Avatar 8410467 Neutron 7411202 Neutron 7420950 Secret 2328757 Tak 9220573 NTOON 89 115 189 Adv. 9504912 West 5401414 Western 8651937 Hunting 4956329 Savage 9524776 Trophy 2051793 Outdoor 9500196 Wing. 9512931 Nugent 6396738 Hunt 4935641 Bowhunting TV Field 6840467 Game Chasers Adv. 2670844 OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) “He Was a Quiet Man” 2007 Chris- ›› “Religulous” 2008, Documentary iTV. Comic Bill Maher turns a skeptical eye on Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Red-Nexican (iTV) ‘MA’ 752318 Strikeforce: Heavy Artillery (iTV) Overeem vs. Rogers; Arlovski and Silva. From St. SHO 500 500 tian Slater. ‘NR’ Å 657399 religion. ’ ‘R’ 731825 ‘MA’ 647912 Tara ‘MA’ 666047 Louis. 500399 NASCAR Hall of Fame 7990573 Auto 7069509 Test 7869301 AMA Pro Racing Infineon 7305912 AMA Pro Racing Infineon 7314660 NASCAR Hall of Fame 7301196 NASCAR Hall of Fame 7304283 NASCAR Hall of Fame 7217134 SPEED 35 303 125 Julie & Julia 2009 (5:20) › “Pandorum” 2009 Dennis Quaid. ‘R’ 74994318 (7:15) ›› “The House Bunny” 2008 Anna Faris. ‘PG-13’ Å 52378844 ›› “G-Force” 2009 Bill Nighy. ‘PG’ Å 7147757 (10:35) ››› “Julie & Julia” 2009 ‘PG-13’ 89108405 STARZ 300 408 300 ›› “The Eye” 2008 Jessica Alba. Frightening visions follow a ›› “The Gift” 2000, Suspense Cate Blanchett. A psychic attempts to solve a murder (6:55) ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart. A teen is caught up in an un(10:40) › “Eye See You” 2002, Suspense Sylvester Stallone, TMC 525 525 case in the Deep South. ’ ‘R’ 9261660 orthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ 21505486 woman’s corneal transplant. ’ 9107979 Tom Berenger. ’ ‘R’ 90492689 NHL Hockey Conference Final: Teams TBA 7499221 Hockey 4956329 Bull Riding PBR Pueblo Invitational From Pueblo, Colo. 5341318 Sports 6396738 Sports 4935641 Bull Riding PBR Pueblo Invitational From Pueblo, Colo. 6310318 VS. 27 58 30 ›› “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood” 2002 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ 2107467 ››› “Dirty Dancing” 1987, Romance Jennifer Grey. ‘PG-13’ 2049912 ›› “Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood” 2002 Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ 2119202 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 B3

CALENDAR TODAY ICEBREAKER POKER RUN: South Central Oregon Outreach and Toy Run hosts a benefit featuring a ride open to all street-legal vehicles, food and live music by the Badland Boogie Band; $10 per hand, $6 for Lions Club breakfast; 8 to 10 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. poker run start time; Vic’s Bar & Grill, 16980 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-536-2644 or www.scootr.org. RELAY FOR LIFE GARAGE SALE: Proceeds benefit Relay for Life; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Cancer Care of the Cascades, 2100 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-7063735. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR STAR PARTY: The 11th annual party includes professional and amateur astronomers who will share telescopes with novice stargazers to see the night sky; daytime activities include talks by local astronomers, informative displays and exhibits, and kayak tours on the Prineville Reservoir; food and refreshments available; free; 9 a.m., star gazing begins at 9:30 p.m.; Prineville Reservoir State Park, 19020 S.E. Parkland Drive; 541-923-7551. 34TH ANNUAL POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with food, music and sponsor booths; free; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10 a.m. booths open; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. DOG PARK CELEBRATION: Celebrate Prineville’s first dog park with adoptable pets, a low-cost microchip and rabies clinic, dog CPR, dogsledding demonstrations, a pet blessing, vendors and more; free admission; 10 a.m.; Crooked River Dog Park, 1037 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-1209. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan presents a slide show, “New Hikes in Southern Oregon”; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. BEHIND-THE-SCENES ANIMAL TOUR: Tour animal exhibits and see how food is prepared and how keepers care for animals; $15, plus museum admission; $10 for museum members; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents a gala opening of the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $45; 6:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beatonline.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541526-1491. POETRY EVENING: The Peregrine Poets share their works; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. STRAIGHT NO CHASER: The 10-voice male a cappella group performs pop music; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre .org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www .cosymphony.com. CROWN POINT: The alternative poprock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000. PROFESSOR GALL CD RELEASE: The Portland-based roots band performs, with Grant Sabin; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www .cosymphony.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs under the direction of Julie Hanney; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-3902441 or www.freewebs.com /bendgospel. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com. A TASTE OF UGANDA: Eat a traditional Ugandan dinner, with entertainment, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit the Sisters of the Heart Micro Loan Foundation in Kapchorwa, Uganda; $10 suggested donation; 6 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-595-1818. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. THAT 1 GUY: The funk act performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY THE FACEMELTER TOUR: Featuring performances by Dying Fetus, Arsis, Misery Index, Annotations of an Autopsy and Conducting from the Grave; $15; 7 p.m.; Bend Event Center, 2221 N.E. Third St., lower floor; 541-550-8186 or www.myspace. com/dlproductionsllc. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com. CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO: The jazz act performs, with the Adam Carlson Trio; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www .randompresents.com. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.bendticket.com.

TUESDAY FREE DAY FOR SENIORS: Seniors ages 62 and older receive free admission to the museum to experience wildlife encounters, animal talks and historical performers; $15 adults, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and seniors; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “CANADIAN RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Grace Miller; free; 10 a.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www .orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. “HUMAN RIGHTS, ECONOMIC REALITIES”: Speakers from education, labor and community groups talk about the connection between immigrant stories and policy implications; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541383-7412 or www.cocc .edu/mcc-events. SCIENCE PUB: Chris Higgins talks about why bridges fail and the contributions of engineering research to bridge construction; RSVP requested; free; 5:30 p.m. food and networking, 6 p.m. presentation; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-7372351 or www.OSUcascades .edu/sciencepubs. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. BILL HILLAR: Hillar talks about human trafficking and his experience as the real-life father who inspired the movie “Taken”; $5; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-948-6428 or www .cooath.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beatonline.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. SIERRA LEONE’S REFUGEE ALL STARS: A reggae, calypso and dancepop performance by musicians who escaped civil war; $25 or $30; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. SLOW TRUCKS: The San Franciscobased indie rock band performs, with The Dirty Words and Mystery Invention; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace .com/silvermoonbrewing.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Ride the Divide” tells the story of the world’s toughest mountain bike race, which follows the Continental Divide; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

WEDNESDAY IMMIGRATION AND THE AMERICAN DREAM: Loren Smith leads a discussion of how immigration affects us and about our history with immigration; free; 3:30-4:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Multicultural Center, 2600 N.W. College Way , Bend; 541-383-7412. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, ARMIDA”: Starring Renee Fleming, Lawrence Brownlee, Bruce Ford, Jose Manuel Zapata, Barry Banks and Kobie van Rensburg in an encore presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. PRESENTATION ON HAITI: David and Cindy Uttley talk about and show photographs from their experiences in Haiti after the earthquake; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Fire Hall, 301 S. Elm St.; 541-6474611. “GREASE”: The Sisters High School drama department presents the musical about a girl falling for a boy from the wrong side of the tracks; $10, $6 seniors and students; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4045. “PETER PAN”: The Redmond High School drama department presents the classic play about Never-Never Land and children who never grow old; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE: The Portland-based soul act performs, with Sean Flinn; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. UGANDAN ORPHANS CHOIR: The choir performs African music and dance, with drums, pipes and more; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822 or www.ugandanorphanschoir.org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $15, $10 ages 18 and younger; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beatonline.org.

THURSDAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 experience science, art and more; this month’s theme is “Wily Weasels”; $20 per child, $15 for additional child, or $15 per child and $10 for additional child for museum members; 9:30 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754, ext. 329 or www .highdesertmuseum.org.

M T For Saturday, May 15

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) 12:30, 3:40, 7, 9:10 CITY ISLAND (PG-13) 12:20, 3:15, 6:50, 9:40 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 12:10, 3:10, 6:40, 8:50 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 6, 9:15 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 12:40, 3:30, 6:10, 9 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6:30, 9:30

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16

EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 2:30, 5 KICK-ASS (R) 7:15 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 10

REDMOND CINEMAS 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BACK-UP PLAN (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4:45, 7:50, 10:20 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG13) 1:20, 4:05, 7, 9:45 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:50, 8:05, 10:30 FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 3:50, 9:35 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:25, 9:55 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 12:05, 1, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 6:55, 7:30, 8:30, 9:30, 10, 10:25 IRON MAN 2 (DLP — PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 2, 5, 8, 10:50 JUST WRIGHT (PG) 11:25 a.m., 2:10, 5:20, 8:10, 10:40 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:20, 4:40, 5:10, 7:10, 7:45, 9:40, 10:15 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) Noon, 2:25, 5:25, 8:20, 10:45 OCEANS (G) 1:15, 6:35 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 1:10, 3:40, 4:15, 6:45, 7:20, 9:50, 10:35 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 11 a.m., 1, 3, 5, 7, 9:15 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:30, 5:30, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 3:30, 5:45, 8 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 1:15 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 2:15, 5, 7:45 LETTERS TO JULIET (PG) 1, 3:15, 5:30, 8 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) 1, 4:15, 7:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7, 10

30-60% OFF 30 60% PATIO FURNITURE TENT SALE PATIO FURNITURE TENT SALE 60 SETS ON DISPLAY COME IN TODAY FOR GREAT SAVINGS ON CLEARANCE AND DISCONTINUED PATIO FURNITURE

SUNDAY KID’S MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Teams of six participants, from first-graders to sixth-graders, compete in the relay of river rafting with a professional guide, biking, an obstacle course and a short run; free for spectators; 9:30 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www .mbsef.org. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296.

FF N O A % D 60 JOR N W BRO

311 SW Century Drive - Bend, 541-389-6234, Open 7 Days 10-6


B4 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, May 15, 2010; This year, you break past previous restrictions, especially personally. You will feel freer as a result. At the same time, there could be a change, as in a move or redoing your present digs. You are transforming, thus your home reflects that change. If you are single, you could be more open to settling in, but make time your ally. If you are attached, the two of you might have many differences of opinion. How you handle these variances determines the happiness of the bond. GEMINI can help you spend and make money. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Your expressiveness marks plans. A child, friend or loved one expresses his or her delight at being with you. Plan on a fun excursion or a day outing. Sometimes a change of environment recharges your batteries. Tonight: Dinner at a favorite spot. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH An investment might seem great. Another person certainly pushes you in that direction. You might want to make the leap but simply cannot. Go back and check facts and figures. Don’t act until you feel confident. Tonight: An easy dinner with friends. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Others sense the dynamo that lies within you. You might have a lot of ground to cover, between calls, errands and catching up with

a neighbor’s or sibling’s news. Use care if you’re irritated. You could be accident-prone. Tonight: You are the center of attention wherever you go. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Make this a time for you. If you want to invite someone along, then do. Still, understand that you need time to think and center yourself. Use care with spending, as frustration easily could funnel in that direction. Tonight: Vanish while you can. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH If you note a tendency toward dry wit or sarcasm today, you might want to think about the person you have directed this attitude toward. Are you upset with this person in some way? Talk. Working out problems could be a snap. Tonight: Where the action is, of course. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Don’t forget to drop in on an older friend or relative, or at least make a phone call. Be careful if you are repressing anger, as it could come out in strange ways. Clear out your feelings through a discussion. Anger is only hurt feelings gone too far. Tonight: Do what you must. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH A friend could push very hard to have his or her way. Detach and look at your resistance. Is it worth the long-term problem? A day trip could help resolve some questions. Choose only easy company. Tonight: Add your imagination to plans. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH A partner could be all encompassing and in some form

demanding. You must handle a commitment or responsibility before you can relax. Communicate this fact in one style after another until the other party gets it. Tonight: Go for an old-fashioned date. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH A special person demonstrates his or her imaginative capacity. Whether you enjoy deciding together where to vacation or hop in the car for a drive to explore a favorite spot, it is the process that you both enjoy the most. Tonight: Go with a suggestion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Don’t overthink what you must do. Just go off and do it. Remember, you are the workhorse of the Zodiac. A partner could be critical or touchy. This mood will pass soon enough, once you can spend more quality time together. Tonight: Make it easy. Don’t push too hard. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Your childlike side emerges no matter what. Others could be delighted or judgmental. You couldn’t care less. A partner or friend joins you. Make time for a child or someone who really needs some extra time. Tonight: Keep your dancing shoes on. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Invite friends over for a fun dinner. Make it easy, and you will have a good time preparing for this get-together. You might want to clean an area of the house where you would like to entertain. Squeeze in some exercise. Tonight: Where the action is. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fenter Continued from B1 “A novel is a whole lot different to market than a nonfiction (book),” says Fenter, who has so far given away more copies of “The Ruin” than he’s sold. In the book, Clifton Kelley, a school teacher on the eve of retirement, is in his classroom. A lockdown is taking place because of violence at a school across town, and the incident causes Kelley to flash back on his own troubles 40 years earlier, when he had considered a violent solution. Rather than face down his tormentors, the young Clifton decided to hide in a cliff dwelling in the canyons of Mesa Verde, where the resourceful boy found peace and personal growth as he communed with nature and connected with the spirits of the departed cliff dwellers. In an early draft of the book, the protagonist had fled home for a different reason. Fenter says he was inspired to rewrite it with a bullying theme after hearing a radio report about the Virginia Tech shooting in April 2007. He feels he’s particularly wellsuited to tell the story in “The Ruin.” As a child, he attended a school at a one-room schoolhouse in rural Colorado, where he was the frequent victim of bullying. “I was pretty small, and from third grade on, two (students) in particular pretty well ran me ragged,” he says. His male teacher was very strict and believed in active participation during lunch breaks.

‘Lost’ Continued from B1 Its opening scene showed a bloodied young man (Matthew Fox) regaining consciousness in a bamboo grove, then stumbling to the nearby beach to find a ghastly spectacle: pieces of an aircraft strewn across the sand with his fellow passengers injured or dying. This was Oceanic Airlines Flight 815 from Sydney, which crashed for no clear reason en route to Los Angeles. From that haunting two-hour premiere (which ABC will re-air

C OV ER S T OR I ES 1

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Kenneth Fenter carefully checks his measurements before trimming his novel “The Ruin” at his Bend home Wednesday.

2

Fenter makes sure the pages are flush before gluing while assembling his novel.

3

The students and teacher — “he would be the pitcher” — would play barehanded softball, which isn’t all that soft when being played without mitts. One of the bullies would huck the ball at Fenter as hard as he could, throwing it from a distance of 10 feet as hard as he would if he were throwing it across the field. You could decline to play, but that would invoke the teacher’s

wrath. His form of discipline “was a hard-twist rope, and it hung inside the door,” Fenter says. “If you refused to do what he said, well then, you went in and got the rope. “Sometimes you’d get to the point where you couldn’t stand to catch the ball anymore; you’d just go ahead and take the whipping. The trouble with that was, when you got home, the general rule for most parents in those

days was if you got a whipping at school, you got one at home.” The bullies knew how to play the system as well as they could play ball. “If they could force you to refuse (to play ball), well, you’re going to get a whipping for it, or you could stand it,” he says. In the book, he exaggerates the torment for effect. Summers on his parents’ farm brought relief, as did a new teacher in seventh and eighth grade, Fenter says. She would have him come in early to light the fire and warm the classroom. As often as he could in class, Fenter tried to make himself invisible. “I liked to read, so if I had a book to read, I could spread that on my knees … and I could get by a few hours at a time without ever being noticed.” Still, on the way home from

8 p.m. May 22), “Lost” has never loosened its grip. It has continued to be gorgeous cinematically, from its lush Hawaii locations to its meticulous-in-every-detail art direction. The musical score is evocative and stirring. Dozens of the characters will stick with fans for good, along with the actors who played them. The aforementioned Fox, plus Evangeline Lily, Terry O’Quinn and Michael Emerson spring instantly to mind, just for starters. Other actors — like dimpled hunk Josh Holloway, whose skill set is limited to cockiness and snarling — are also lodged in my mind.

I also marvel at the countless cultural references: The eerie numbered sequence (4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42), Smokey, The Others, The Dharma Initiative, the hatch, polar bears and the frozen donkey wheel. Meanwhile, I bow to the show’s ever-thickening deposits of mythology. Its hairpin, sometimes preposterous plot twists. Nothing has ever been simple on “Lost.” Regular attendance was required to keep up, with many viewers making tracks to blogs, online communities and Google after every episode to dig deeper into what they had witnessed. Or just

get a clue. Dealing with good vs. evil, light vs. dark, faith vs. reason (and whatever else the powersthat-be thought up). In February, a PaleyFest2010 event in Los Angeles gathered executive producers Carlton Cuse and Damon Lindelof, along with cast members, directors and writers. The panel discussion was dense, with granular allusions and overarching speculation, thanks especially to the audience’s esoteric questions. But what about this season, which presumably is pushing toward a satisfying finish?

Moments later, Fenter holds a finished copy of his novel.

school, he faced a gauntlet. “You could try to outrun them, but if they got a head start, they would string out across the road, you know, and you had to run through them. Or you could cut off cross-country and go through fences and neighbors’ (yards),” he says. “The older kids kind of tutored the younger kids; it’s a whole interconnected thing. Each grade level isn’t a level in itself. So you have a third-grader tutoring or using flashcards with the firstgraders,” he says. Some of the younger kids would oblige the bullies, following their cues primarily at and around the school. One on one, if he were to encounter any of them alone, it was peaceful. Johnny was one of the two primary bullies. At the end of eighth grade, Johnny “whipped me the last week of school; I stomped off. Unlike the boy in the book, I went back the next day,” Fenter says, laughing. Johnny’s power seemed to diminish when they attended a larger high school in the nearby town. Fenter is able to chuckle at some of the incidents now, sitting in his office at home in Bend. But as he writes in a news release for the book, the time he was being bullied was a toxic atmosphere “that made life so demeaning there were times that I was driven nearly to the level of rage or depth of depression displayed by the character in my book.” School violence would touch his life again years later when he was a teacher at Springfield High. His retirement party was held on May 20, 1998, and one of the

attendees was friend and colleague Faith Kinkel. Later that evening, she and her husband, Bill, were murdered by their son, Kip, who went to Thurston High the next day and killed two of his classmates and wounded 25 more. Questions about Kinkel’s mental state were raised in his trial, according to “Frontline,” and he was sentenced to 111 years in prison. Fenter says a few weeks before the shooting, Faith Kinkel had confided to friends at Springfield High that students who had bullied her son in middle school had started up again during his freshman year at Thurston. More often than not, the shooter in a school shooting, “whether it was revenge motive or not, had been bullied persistently in the school,” Fenter says. Unlike him when he was all but alone at a one-room schoolhouse, troubled kids today have resources including school counselors they can turn to, he says. “The point I’m trying to make in the book is that kids who go through persistent bullying … at some point, hit rock bottom and have to decide what they’re going to do to get their respect back, to get their lives back,” Fenter says. In character Clifton Kelley’s case, when he hits rock bottom, “he decides he’s going to do it on his own and, if he perishes, it won’t be a whole lot worse than what he’s feeling at the moment. He’ll just see where it goes. And a year later, he comes out of it, standing tall.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

Toward that end, far-flung scenes have placed the characters in alternate situations illustrating what might have happened had the plane not crashed. And, yes, along with these whatifs, viewers have been treated to pieces of the puzzle. Still, it wouldn’t be hard to argue that this every-which-way storytelling scheme has made the saga more scattered by the hour. Like the lady said on this week’s episode, “Every question I answer will simply lead to another question.” I confess: Lately my hopes for full “Lost” enlightenment have ruptured and sunk

like Widmore’s submarine. But so what? What if “Lost” goes out the way it came — trailing unresolved questions and refusing to make sense? What does “making sense” mean, anyway, in the world that “Lost” occupies? With the end of “Lost,” will the island finally be done with all those characters? And with the audience? I’m bracing for the verdict to be “no, not exactly.” But I’ll live with it. “Lost” has taken TV to a new and magic realm. That matters most. However things turn out, I’ll always be glad to have lived in the world “Lost” found.


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OBITUARIES Frank Frazetta, master of fantasy illustration, see Page C7. OREGON Man killed in police shooting is identified, see Page C8.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010

‘Evers’ bail decision delayed Group envisions HIGHER EDUCATION

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

4-year university in region’s future In the shorter term, team foresees a closer relationship between COCC, OSU-Cascades

PORTLAND — A federal judge on Friday postponed a decision on whether a longtime state liquor-law enforcer charged with stealing the identity of a dead boy should be released pending trial. Late last month, the man calling himself “Jason Evers,” the former Bend-based regional manager for the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, was arrested and charged with lying about his identity on a passport application. Agents with the federal Diplomatic Security Service made the arrest after cross-checking passports with death certificates. Authorities say the alleged im-

postor used the birth certificate of a boy murdered 28 years ago in Ohio to form a new identity while living in Colorado. Having become controversial among liquor licensees in Bend, the man The man known as Evers asked for known as a demotion and transfer Jason Evers. to Nyssa in January. That request came one month after a state Department of Justice report questioned his decision-making on several liquor-law enforcement cases. Federal authorities say they don’t know

who “Evers” is or why he took on a new identity. On Thursday, federal magistrate Judge Dennis Hubel said that the alleged impostor has claimed “safety concerns” are behind his refusal to divulge his real name. Hubel said he would consider releasing him from jail in Portland to what amounts to house arrest with the aid of electronic monitoring. On Friday, following a 20-minute recess with “Evers” and his criminal defense lawyer, the judge again postponed the matter of releasing him, this time to a Monday hearing. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-5769008 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

By Sheila G. Miller By 2030, Central Oregon may have its own four-year, freestanding university. The Higher Education Assessment Team is currently sharing its vision for the future of the region’s education offerings, and it envisions aligning Central Oregon Community College more closely with Oregon State University-Cascades Campus while trying to convince the state in the long term to open an independent university in the region. “That’s such a long-term vision that it’s not even a branch campus, it’s its own university,” said Kirk Schueler, the president of Brooks Resources Corp. and chairman of the finance and administration committee for the State Board of Higher Education and who heads the work group. “That’s a great vision, and we’ll put that out there, and maybe someday it will happen. Now we’re asking, ‘What are the interim steps that will primarily increase access and the diversity of programs and helps us down the road toward that vision?’” HEAT’s goal is to increase the education offerings and opportunities for students in the region, and to increase enrollment at OSU-Cascades. According to the Chancellor’s Office, in fall 2009 about 2,700 high school students from Jefferson, Crook and Deschutes counties entered the Oregon Uni-

Have you voted? Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. Tuesday. Postmarks do not count. Voters may mail their ballots or take them to drop-off locations, listed online at the following sites: Deschutes County: www .co.deschutes.or.us/go/ government/departments/ county-clerk/elections/currentelection/index.cfm • Anyone registered to vote in Deschutes County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541388-6547. Crook County: http://co.crook .or.us/Departments/ CountyClerk/BallotDropSites/ tabid/1031/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Crook County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541447-6553. Jefferson County: www .co.jefferson.or.us/Elected Officials/CountyClerk/Elections/ tabid/1421/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Jefferson County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541475-4451.

ELECTION

So far, the following percentages of registered voters have returned their ballots: Deschutes County:

24.5 percent Crook County:

29.4 percent Jefferson County:

32.1 percent

If you go The Higher Education Assessment Team will host two public forums next week to reveal its recommendations for the future of higher education in Central Oregon.

BEND Where: Central Oregon Community College’s student center on College Way When: 6 p.m. Wednesday

REDMOND Where: Redmond City Hall, 716 SW Evergreen Ave. When: 5:30 p.m. Thursday

MARJORIE SMITH, 1910-2010

‘Marjorie was Bend’

100-year-old’s life story was entwined with city’s history versity System schools. Of those, 448 of them went to OSU-Cascades. Schueler wants that number to be higher, and he and his team believe they have a plan to increase the university’s enrollment numbers and the options available to area students. At a Central Oregon Community College board meeting Wednesday, Schueler and OSUCascades Vice President Becky Johnson were on hand to discuss the long-term plan being considered by the team, which is composed of 22 people, including representatives from each of the three counties and various education districts in the area. See Education / C7

Bend UGB proposal sent back to planners State board critical of plans for infrastructure, transportation, density

By Scott Hammers

Marjorie Smith watches the 1997 Bend Christmas Parade from the window of the Wall Street apartment where she lived nearly all of her life. The building was built by her father to house his family and the first hardware store in the city, N.P. Smith Builders Supplies. Now the building, in the 900 block of Northwest Wall Street, is home to Bend Bungalow.

The Bulletin

arjorie Smith, the first person born in Bend’s first hospital, died last week at 100. Born in a small hospital on Oregon Avenue, Smith spent nearly her entire life living in a few blocks away in an secondstory apartment on Wall Street, in a building her father built to house his family and Bend’s first hardware store, N.P Smith Builders Supplies. Until she moved into an assisted living facility six years ago, Smith stayed in the apartment, perched above the present-day home of Bend Bungalow. Climbing stairs, she said in an interview last year, was the secret to a long life. A long time member of the Des Chutes Historical Society, Smith willed the building her father built on Wall Street to the society upon her death. Kelly Cannon-Miller, executive director of the society, said Smith’s accounts of her childhood in are a key piece of the society’s understanding of what life was Bend before the Depression. “Marjorie was Bend,” Cannon-Miller said. “Her life parallels the city, it’s difficult to think of her being gone, because there’s hardly anything that Bend has experienced that Marjorie didn’t experience with the city.” See Smith / C8

M

Bulletin file photos

By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

A state board that oversees land use decisions in Oregon is sending Bend’s proposal to expand its urban growth boundary back to local planners for more work. The city’s expansion plan, originally submitted to the Department of Land Conservation and development in April 2009, was rejected by that agency earlier this year. In January, the DLCD found the city failed to adequately plan for growth in compliance with state land use rules. The city appealed that decision to the agency’s board, known as the Land Conservation and Development Commission. Since then, the LCDC has found Bend officials have made their case for expansion. But the commission has been critical of the city’s planning for infrastructure, public facilities and transportation, questioned the size and location of the proposed expansion and encouraged local planners to increase building density within the existing UGB. On Wednesday, after four days of hearings in two different cities over the last month, the commission voted to remand the city’s appeal, but the DLCD has not yet issued a final order. See UGB / C7

Where to watch the PPP Some roads will be rerouted during the race Spectators planning to watch portions of the PPP staged at Mount Bachelor are advised that Century Drive will be closed between Mount Bachelor and Bend today from 9 a.m. to noon, and that traffic back to Bend will be routed through Sunriver. In Bend, a prime place to watch some of the action unfold is at the bike-to-run transition on Emkay Street off Colorado Avenue. From there, spectators can walk down a staircase to the Deschutes River Trail and watch the run-to-boat exchange just downstream. The footbridges spanning the river in the Old Mill District are good locations from which to watch paddlers and sprinters. The first finishers are expected

lor Co

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Bike corral

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The Bulletin

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Les Schwab Amphitheater

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No Parking Accessible parking only Parking area 1

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American Family Insurance, Shevlin Dental

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Old Mill District parking for retail customers only

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

to be sprinting into the Les Schwab Amphitheater at about 10:50 a.m. Food and beverages will be available from vendors at the amphitheater, where a beer garden will be open

from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Live music is scheduled from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. The last finishers should be trickling into the amphitheater at about 3:30 p.m. An

awards ceremony is scheduled for approximately 3 p.m. Today’s forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a high of 76. — Bulletin staff report


C2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Hit-and-run damages vehicles, property Several fences and vehicles were damaged in Bend in a hitand-run spree at 1 a.m. Friday, according to a news release from the Bend Police Department. Police say Kyler Hildebrand, 20, of Bend, drove his car through Ponderosa Park near Southeast 15th Street, hitting and damaging the fence surrounding the dog park. He then drove the vehicle through the gate of the Bend-La Pine School’s maintenance compound, knocking the gate off of its hinges, according to the news release. Once inside the compound, Hildebrand reportedly drove into a school district vehicle, which in turn struck another vehicle. His car got stuck in the soft dirt at the edge of the road leading into the maintenance ground and was abandoned, the release stated. School district employees reported the incident at 5:40 a.m. when they arrived for work. During the investigation, it was determined that Hildebrand, a registered owner of the abandoned vehicle, was responsible for the incident, according to police. He was arrested on suspicion of two counts of criminal mischief, one count of reckless driving and one count of hit and run, and taken to the Deschutes County jail. Police also determined that there was at least one other person in the car with Hildebrand during the incident.

Habitat for Humanity marks anniversary Bend’s Habitat for Humanity dedicated its 84th home May 8 to

celebrate the organization’s 20th anniversary. The home, which was dedicated to Melissa Evans and her two daughters, was built with a solar energy system and is one of 12 homes constructed by the organization to have this feature. The home was built in Bend Habitat’s new community, Parkway Village, on Empire Boulevard and Boyd Acres Road. The Bend Area Habitat for Humanity is the first affiliate of the organization to include solar energy in such a large number of homes at no charge to the future homeowners. Thanks to a partnership with Sunlight Solar, the organization plans to continue building homes that are energy-efficient. Bend’s local affiliate of Habitat for Humanity has been building homes in Bend and Crook County since 1989. For more information about the organization, visit http://www.bendhabitat.org/, or call 541-385-5387.

Development office in Redmond to relocate Redmond’s office of the Deschutes County Community Development Department will relocate June 3 to an office in the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center Administration Building, according to a news release. The office, which is currently on 657 S.W. Glacier Ave., will retain the same hours, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Thursdays, once it switches to its new location on 3800 S.W. Airport Way. The office will also keep the same telephone number, 541-385-1713. Building and septic permit information and general planning information will continue to be

POLICE LOG

offered through the office.

Two campgrounds reopen at Odell Lake Sunset Cove and Princess Creek campgrounds at Odell Lake have reopened for the season, according to a news release from the Deschutes National Forest. The campgrounds were closed for the removal of trees that posed safety hazards to campers. The 21 campground sites of Sunset Cove will remain open through October, while the 46 sites of Princess Creek will close July 7 because of construction on a new boat launch and day use facility. Odell Lake is along state Highway 58 in the southernmost section of the forest.

Prineville police focus on pedestrian safety Prineville police will be on the lookout for drivers failing to stop for pedestrians May 24, as they hold Pedestrian Safety Operations, according to a news release from the Prineville Police Department. In an effort to alert drivers to pedestrian safety, the operation will be held at the intersections of Northeast Third Street and North Court Street, and Northeast Third Street and Northwest Dunham Street, between 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Motorists should use caution while driving through these areas. Not stopping for pedestrians will result in a $242 fine. Police would like to remind drivers that once stopped at a crosswalk, they should remain stopped until the pedestrian clears their lane and adjacent lanes.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11 a.m. May 13, in the 3000 block of Northeast Laramie Way. DUII — Rick Ernest Nida, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:05 p.m. May 13, in the area of Northeast Eighth Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:11 p.m. May 13, in the area of Brosterhous and Murphy roads. DUII — Reginald Michael Quinn, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:14 a.m. May 14, in the 300 block of Northeast Third Street. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:07 p.m. May 13, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — Keys were reported stolen at 9:31 p.m. May 13, in the 1300 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 7:42 p.m. May 13, in the 2400 block of Southwest Wickiup Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:18 p.m. May 13, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:05 p.m. May 13, in the 1700 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Vehicle crash — An accident

was reported at 1:20 p.m. May 13, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Veterans Way. DUII — Ronald Edwin Gonzalez, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:28 a.m. May 13, in the area of Southwest Fifth Street and Southwest Canal Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:19 a.m. May 13, in the 200 block of East Antler Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:40 a.m. May 13, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way.

.humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane .org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Domestic short-haired cat — Adult female, gray tabby; found in the 100 block of Northwest Second Street. Miniature schnauzer/chow mix — Adult female, gray; found near Cave Junction. Persian/domestic long-haired cat — Adult female, gray calico; found in the 2600 block of Southwest 21st Street.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 5:39 p.m. May 13, in the 51600 block of Huntington Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:38 a.m. May 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and South Century Drive in Sunriver.

Find It All Online

Oregon State Police

bendbulletin.com

DUII — Larry Bert Kofford, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:07 p.m. May 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 127. DUII — Brian James Carroll, 34, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:26 a.m. May 13, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 153.

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The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www

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Nylon stockings introduced in 1940 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, May 15, the 135th day of 2010. There are 230 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 15, 1970, just after midnight, Phillip Lafayette Gibbs and James Earl Green, two black students at Jackson State College in Mississippi, were killed as police opened fire during student protests. ON THIS DATE In 1911, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the breakup of Standard Oil Co., ruling it was a monopoly in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act. In 1929, a fire at the Cleveland Clinic claimed 123 lives. In 1930, registered nurse Ellen Church, the first airline stewardess, went on duty aboard an Oakland-to-Chicago flight operated by Boeing Air Transport (a forerunner of United Airlines). In 1940, nylon stockings were first introduced to the public by DuPont. In 1942, wartime gasoline rationing went into effect in 17 Eastern states, limiting sales to three gallons a week for non-essential vehicles. In 1948, hours after declaring its independence, the new state of Israel was attacked by Transjordan, Egypt, Syria, Iraq and Lebanon. In 1963, astronaut L. Gordon Cooper blasted off aboard Faith 7 on the final mission of the Project Mercury space program. In 1972, George Wallace was shot by Arthur Bremer and left paralyzed while campaigning in

T O D AY IN HISTORY Laurel, Md., for the Democratic presidential nomination. In 1975, U.S. forces invaded the Cambodian island of Koh Tang and recaptured the American merchant ship Mayaguez. (All 40 crew members had already been released safely by Cambodia; some 40 U.S. servicemen were killed in the operation.)

Counterculture icon Wavy Gravy is 74. Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright is 73. Actordirector Paul Rudd (“Knots Landing�) is 70. Baseball Hall-of-Famer George Brett is 57. Musician-composer Mike Oldfield (“Tubular Bells�) is 57. Actor Lee Horsley is 55. Football Hall-of-Famer Emmitt Smith is 41. Actor David Charvet is 38. Rock musician Ahmet Zappa is 36. NFL player Ray

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FIVE YEARS AGO The Czech Republic denied Canada its third straight title and won the world ice hockey championship 3-0 in Vienna, Austria.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Playwright Sir Peter Shaffer (“Equus�) is 84. Actress-singer Anna Maria Alberghetti is 74.

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TEN YEARS AGO By a 5-4 vote, the U.S. Supreme Court threw out a key provision of the 1994 Violence Against Women Act, saying that rape victims could not sue their attackers in federal court. United Press International was sold to the parent company of The Washington Times.

ONE YEAR AGO General Motors told about 1,100 dealers their franchises would be terminated. CIA Director Leon Panetta defended the agency against House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s charge that she was misled in 2002 about the use of waterboarding. Former basketball star and accomplished jazzman Wayman Tisdale died in Tulsa, Okla. at age 44.

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Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Send us a BABY photo to include in our 2009 Graduation Edition, which will publish on Wednesday, June 9. Just bring in or mail your graduate’s baby photo along with the information requested below and a $27 fee by Monday, May 24. Photos will be returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

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Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Graduate’s Name _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Parents’ Names _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ School _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (Please print graduate’s name on back of photo.) Phone # _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,346.85 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -47.51 -1.98%

t

CLOSE 10,620.16 DOW JONES CHANGE -162.79 -1.51%

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1,135.68 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -21.76 -1.88%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.44 treasury CHANGE -3.37%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Retail sales beat expectations

A bigger home for Jo-Ann Fabric

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$19.202 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.274

Kansas fund is linked to stock plunge By Nelson D. Schwartz The flash crash on May 6 that transfixed investors — and has been the source of finger-pointing ever since — may not have originated in the canyons of Wall Street or a hedge fund manager’s European lair. How about Kansas? Futures trades by Waddell & Reed, a conservative 70-year-old mutual fund based in Overland Park, Kan., have been linked to the plunge, during which the Dow dropped hundreds of points in a matter of minutes. The company was identified in a Chicago Mercantile Exchange document, according to Reuters. In a statement Waddell & Reed said it was among the firms that traded the stock index futures contract suspected of being a crucial link in the cascade of events leading up to the plunge that began shortly after 2:30 p.m. See Plunge / C5

Summit 1031 fallout: Umpqua Bank tries to get case dismissed

Details emerge from iPhone warrant REDWOOD CITY, Calif. — The justification for the raid on the home of a tech-site writer at the center of the iPhone “prototype” imbroglio makes no mention of his work as a journalist, but it paints a bleak picture of the man who found the phone — including assertions that he tried to destroy evidence. In a hearing Friday morning, San Mateo County Superior Court Judge Clifford Cretan ordered the release of the affidavit allowing police to search Gizmodo editor Jason Chen’s home. Cretan said some of the sensitive information in the document is already public and that the investigation is not as active as it was April 23, when he signed off on the search warrant. According to the affidavit, Brian Hogan sold the phone to Gizmodo for $8,500 — contrary to published reports that the price was $5,000. He shopped the phone around to several other publications in the hope of starting a bidding war, but eventually sold it to Chen, the affidavit states. Hogan’s roommate, Katherine Martinson, reported the sale to Apple authorities because she was worried the she could get in trouble, according to the affidavit. Hogan then allegedly tried to hide evidence, including photos of the device, from police.

Fed board may add 3 more millionaires WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve Board may soon be adding three millionaires to its ranks. Janet Yellen, nominated by President Barack Obama to be the central bank’s vice chairman, and Peter Diamond and Sarah Bloom Raskin, the picks for two other governor vacancies, each have combined assets of at least $1 million with their spouses, according to financial disclosures with the Office of Government Ethics. The trio awaits Senate confirmation. — From wire reports

Factory output

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

PORTLAND — A bankruptcy trustee’s effort to implicate Umpqua Bank in what he alleges was a defunct Bend-based firm’s “Ponzi scheme” ran into stiff opposition Friday in a Portland courtroom. Trustee Kevin Padrick, as well as a creditors’ group, allege that Umpqua knowingly aided and abetted Summit Accomodators Inc. in improperly using new investors’ money to ease a cash crunch by paying off obligations incurred earlier. Also known as Summit 1031 Exchange, the firm was set up as a financial mechanism called a 1031 exchange that lets real estate investors avoid capital gains taxes on the sale of a property. However, in the courtroom of Multnomah County Circuit Judge Marilyn Litzenberger, lawyers for Umpqua Bank argued that the case should be dismissed, claiming Padrick and the creditors’ group, known as the Miller plaintiffs, had not met the necessary standard of proof to show that Umpqua knew that any laws were being violated. Not only that, but they argued banks enjoy protection similar to attorney-client privilege, meaning they can’t be blamed for their clients’ actions. See Umpqua / C5

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Shaun Lewis of Bend Electric Inc. works with conduit in a section of the former Gottschalks building in Bend’s Pioneer Crossing. Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores will move into the space in five months.

New location in former Gottschalks space will include classroom

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90 A M J J A S O N D J F M A 2009 ’10 AP

Google: Private data collected inadvertently for more than 3 years By Brad Stone

By David Holley The Bulletin

With five months to go before Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Stores is set to move to Pioneer Crossing shopping center on South Third Street, a crew from Sunwest Builders is renovating the space the fabric store will occupy. A Jo-Ann Stores Inc. spokeswoman said Friday that the company plans to close its current location at 61303 S. Third St. in early October and move the store

to the Pioneer Crossing shopping center space, most recently occupied by Gottschalks, which closed in mid-2009. Jo-Ann plans to only occupy about 23,000 square feet of the 55,000-squarefoot space Gottschalks once called home. Aimee Weber, spokeswoman for the Hudson, Ohio-based company, said the Jo-Ann decided to relocate across Third Street for a variety of factors, including more space. The new location will be

about 5,000 square feet larger, she said, thus allowing the store to include a classroom that will host sewing, knitting, crochet and children’s education programs, among others. “With the smaller store, we can’t offer that,” Weber said. Technically considered a new store, not a renovation, the Bend location is one of 30 new stores opening this year. Jo-Ann also plans to remodel about 40 stores. See Jo-Ann / C5

New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — Google said Friday that for more than three years it has inadvertently collected snippets of private information that people send over unencrypted wireless networks. The admission, made in an official blog post by Alan Eustace, Google’s engineering chief, comes a month after regulators in Europe started asking the search giant pointed questions about Street View, the layer of real-world photographs accessible from Google Maps. Regulators wanted to know what data Google collects as its camera-laden cars methodically troll through neighborhoods, and what Google does with that data. See Google / C5

Air bags could do more harm than good, research shows By Jo Craven McGinty

The industrial production index:

Source: Federal Reserve Board

$1227.40 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.40

New York Times News Service

Sales continued to rise at American retail stores in April, an indication that the economic recovery was progressing. The Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales reached a seasonally adjusted $366.4 billion in April, a 0.4 percent increase that was slightly better than industry analysts expected. But there were still signs of fragility. Much of the rise in retail sales was fueled by sales of building materials, which expanded 6.9 percent, while decreases were reported at several categories of retail stores. And the rate of overall increase was lower than in March, when sales expanded at the more robust revised monthly rate of 2.1 percent, the government said.

Seasonally adjusted 2002=100

t

A cutaway of a Ford Edge at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash test facility shows where safety systems are located.

New York Times News Service

New research into front air bags in automobiles is raising troubling questions about their effectiveness for drivers wearing seat belts. The research suggests that when compared with the versions they replaced, the newest air bags, required in all vehicles beginning in 2008 and in some as early as 2004, may place belted drivers at greater risk of death. About 80 percent of all drivers wear seat belts, according to federal estimates, but government standards for air bags are intended to maximize protection for unbelted drivers, a holdover from years ago when very few drivers buckled up.

Insurance Institute for Highway Safety via New York Times News Service

The finding has surprised carmakers, which were required to install the socalled smart bags in response to concerns that older versions were injuring drivers

and passengers, especially shorter and older ones. The research was conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and

will be published this year in The Annals of Epidemiology, a peer-reviewed journal. Safety experts agree that wearing a seat belt is the most effective way to prevent death or serious injury in a crash. Air bags, meanwhile, have been credited with saving more than 25,000 lives, according to federal estimates. But the new research seems to turn some of that conventional wisdom on its head by suggesting the newest air bags are helping unbelted people more than belted people. Specifically, the researchers found that belted drivers had a 21 percent greater chance of dying in cars equipped with the latest model of air bags than those in vehicles with the previous model. The risk for unbelted drivers was unchanged.


B USI N ESS

C4 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

A-B-C ABB Ltd 18.02 ACE Ltd 53.03 AES Corp 10.66 AFLAC 45.90 AGCO 30.30 AK Steel 15.41 AMB Pr 26.61 AMR 7.16 AOL n 23.79 AT&T Inc 25.40 AU Optron 10.55 AbtLab 48.50 AberFitc 40.22 Accenture 38.99 AdvAuto 44.90 AMD 8.80 AdvSemi 4.44 AecomTch 26.84 AegeanMP 27.27 Aegon 6.12 AerCap 12.93 Aeropostl s 27.48 Aetna 29.78 Agilent 33.86 Agnico g 64.37 Agrium g 57.74 AirProd 69.57 Aircastle 10.90 Airgas 62.09 AirTran 5.26 Albemarle 41.99 AlbertoC n 26.83 AlcatelLuc 2.54 Alcoa 12.36 Alcon 151.19 AlexREE 66.97 AllgEngy 21.54 AllegTch 53.70 Allergan 61.06 AlliData u69.93 AlliantEgy 34.12 AldIrish 3.21 Allstate 31.87 AlphaNRs 41.35 AlpTotDiv 7.83 Altria u21.61 AlumChina 22.03 AmbacF h 1.33 Amdocs 30.62 Ameren 25.09 AMovilL 49.23 AmAxle 9.03 AmCampus 25.84 AEagleOut 15.53 AEP 33.00 AmExp 40.64 AIntlGp rs 39.72 AmOriBio d3.29 AmTower 41.18 AmWtrWks 21.38 Americdt 21.96 Ameriprise 43.39 AmeriBrg s u31.31 Amphenol 44.00 Anadarko 57.32 AnalogDev 27.78 AnglogldA 42.96 AnnTaylr 22.22 Annaly 15.97 Anworth 6.59 Aon Corp 41.61 Apache 94.28 AptInv 21.38 AquaAm 17.97 ArcelorMit 32.56 ArchCoal 23.97 ArchDan 26.77 ArenaRes 34.74 ArrowEl 28.96 ArvMerit u15.40 AshfordHT 8.28 Ashland 56.94 Assurant u35.87 AssuredG 16.45 AstoriaF 16.41 AstraZen 42.05 AtwoodOcn 30.76 AutoNatn 19.46 Autoliv 49.19 AvalonBay 100.40 AveryD 35.85 AvisBudg 12.70 Avnet 29.24 Avon 27.51 AXIS Cap 30.17 BB&T Cp u34.05 BCE g u30.83 BHP BillLt 66.39 BHPBil plc 56.12 BP PLC 46.87 BPZ Res 5.34 BRE u41.28 BRFBrasil s 12.78 BakrHu 45.37 BallCp 50.91 BallyTech 45.39 BcBilVArg 10.83 BcoBrades 17.39 BcoSantand 10.44 BcSBrasil n 11.11 BkofAm 16.34 BkAm wtA 9.29 BkIrelnd 7.75 BkMont g 58.57 BkNYMel 29.70 BankAtl A 2.50 Barclay 18.14 BarVixShT 26.86 Bard 82.70 BarnesNob 19.44 BarrickG 45.62 Baxter d43.53 BeazerHm 5.23 BeckCoult 58.85 BectDck 73.26 Belo 7.86 Bemis 28.39 Berkley 27.00 BerkH B s 76.23 BestBuy 43.07 BigLots 36.09 BBarrett 32.67 BioMedR 17.63 Biovail 16.27 Blackstone 12.25 BlockHR 16.97 Blockbst h .41 BlckbsB h .32 Boeing 69.82 Boise Inc 6.41 Borders 2.69 BorgWarn 39.20 BostProp 78.20 BostonSci 6.83 Bowne 11.09 BoydGm u13.20 Brandyw 12.39 Brinker 17.50

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Name

Last

Chg Wkly

BrMySq 23.56 BroadrdgF 21.60 Brookdale 19.45 BrkfldAs g 24.94 BrkfldPrp 15.49 BrwnBrn 19.52 Brunswick 20.62 Buenavent 37.37 BungeLt 50.73 BurgerKing 19.91 CB REllis 15.98 CBL Asc u15.68 CBS B 14.67 CF Inds 72.45 CIGNA 33.43 CIT Grp n 38.35 CKE Rst 12.44 CMS Eng 15.56 CNO Fincl 5.83 CNX Gas u38.18 CSX 55.03 CVS Care 35.78 Cabelas 17.85 CablvsnNY 24.39 CabotO&G 33.83 CalDive 6.03 Calgon 15.42 CallGolf 8.93 CallonP h 5.99 Calpine 13.79 CamdnP u48.92 Cameco g 25.09 Cameron 37.30 CampSp u35.34 CdnNRy g 59.12 CdnNRs g 70.15 CP Rwy g 57.35 CapOne 42.76 CapitlSrce 4.81 CapsteadM 10.77 CardnlHlt s 33.82 CareFusn n 25.84 CarMax 23.22 Carnival 37.57 Carters 32.99 Caterpillar 64.88 Celanese 29.18 Celestic g 9.42 Cemex 11.06 Cemig pf s 15.17 CenovusE n 26.19 CenterPnt 14.15 CnElBrasil 12.74 CenPacF 2.54 CntryTel 34.13 Cenveo 8.01 ChRvLab 31.90 ChesEng 22.62 Chevron 77.83 ChicB&I 20.46 Chicos 14.49 Chimera 3.98 ChinaLife 64.73 ChinaMble 47.27 ChinaSecur 5.15 ChinaUni 11.91 Chiquita 14.09 Chubb 51.35 ChungTel 19.30 ChurchDwt 65.60 Cimarex u70.72 CinciBell u3.49 Cinemark 17.20 Citigp pfJ 24.80 Citigrp 3.98 ClearChOut 10.00 CliffsNRs 53.98 Clorox 63.73 Coach 40.06 CocaCE 26.57 CocaCl 53.34 Coeur rs 18.12 CogdSpen 6.95 ColgPal 82.76 CollctvBrd 21.14 ColonPT 14.99 Comerica 42.22 CmclMtls 15.21 ComScop 28.86 CmtyHlt 40.49 CompPrdS 14.86 Comptn gh .80 CompSci 49.85 ComstkRs 31.28 Con-Way 35.00 ConAgra 24.37 ConchoRes 54.07 ConocPhil 55.84 ConsolEngy 40.21 ConEd 44.44 ConstellA 17.80 ConstellEn 36.46 CtlAir B 20.65 ContlRes 46.65 Cnvrgys 11.65 Cooper Ind 49.02 CooperTire 20.75 Corning 17.96 CorpOffP 39.82 Cosan Ltd 9.12 CousPrp 8.28 CovantaH 16.43 CoventryH 21.48 Covidien 44.74 CredSuiss 41.17 CrwnCstle 36.52 CrownHold 24.25 Cummins 71.55 CurEuro d123.47

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Name

Last

Chg Wkly

DrxTcBll s 35.53 DirxTcBear 7.96 DrxEMBll s 26.11 DirEMBr rs 47.82 DirFBear rs 13.75 DrxFBull s 28.00 DirREBear d6.87 DrxREBll s 48.44 DirxSCBear 6.13 DirxSCBull 56.62 DirxLCBear 14.43 DirxLCBull 54.08 DirxEnBear 10.49 DirxEnBull 35.62 Discover 14.24 Disney 34.06 DoleFood n d9.74 DollarGn n u29.27 DollarTh 50.29 DomRescs 40.99 Dominos 13.55 Domtar grs 65.88 DoralFncl 2.86 DEmmett 16.45 Dover 49.49 DowChm 27.34 DrPepSnap u37.25 Dril-Quip 58.52 DuPont 37.65 DuPFabros u24.23 DukeEngy 16.78 DukeRlty u13.20 DynCorp 16.67 Dynegy 1.30 E-House 14.87 EMC Cp 18.57 EMCOR 26.90

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Chg Wkly

7.40 36.74 .59 107.24 51.28 44.36 14.15 12.11 4.65 15.18 26.54 27.10 4.63 48.50 19.33 106.09 1.37 69.72 7.84 15.35 33.81

-.34 +.23 -.02 +1.68 -.03 +.05 -4.73 +3.74 -1.82 +5.33 -.68 +2.19 -.21 +.21 -.31 +.60 -.29 +.36 -.31 +1.21 -.22 -.03 -.77 +1.19 -.22 +.30 -.87 +1.65 -.77 +.12 -3.45 +1.57 -.01 +.08 -1.99 +2.13 -.11 +.34 -.20 +1.48 -.61 +3.35

G-H-I GLG Ptrs GMX Rs Gafisa s GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GaylrdEnt GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMills

2.91 -.11 +.19 7.05 -.09 +.52 11.96 -.95 -.20 21.85 -.83 -.73 8.04 +.31 +.96 15.76 -.68 +.71 22.96 -.15 +.69 26.86 -.94 +1.13 20.82 -1.23 +1.33 32.26 -1.32 +3.15 71.71 -1.25 +1.21 17.64 -.41 +.76 14.50 -.50 +.43 u72.74 -.69 +3.07

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

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Chg Wkly

Mirant 12.51 -.08 +2.01 MitsuUFJ 4.90 -.05 -.08 MobileTel s 20.18 -.13 +.63 Mohawk 61.23 -.97 +6.21 MolsCoorB 42.70 -.27 +.74 MoneyGrm 2.99 -.20 +.39 Monsanto d54.61 -.93 -4.48 MonstrWw 16.27 -.51 +.57 Montpelr 16.21 -.47 +.85 Moodys 21.57 -.13 -1.79 MorgStan 27.08 -.54 -.67 Mosaic 47.76 -.27 -.40 Motorola 6.79 -.05 +.19 MuellerWat 4.90 -.20 +.34 MurphO 56.47 -.97 +4.02 NBTY 33.88 +.16 -4.02 NCR Corp 12.42 -.24 +.70 NRG Egy 22.71 -.71 +.07 NV Energy 12.41 -.15 +.46 NYSE Eur 30.36 -.97 +1.07 Nabors 19.61 -.53 +.70 NalcoHld 24.16 -.74 +1.05 NBkGreece 2.71 -.08 +.04 NOilVarco 39.91 -.73 +.80 NatRetPrp 22.63 -.27 +.92 NatSemi 14.05 -.30 +.17 NatwHP 34.79 -.91 +1.23 Navistar u54.43 -.75 +7.76 Netezza u14.43 -.46 +2.30 NY CmtyB 15.99 -.31 +.68 NY Times 9.15 -.27 +.21 NewAlliBc 12.38 -.07 +.18 NewellRub 16.49 -.23 +.80 NewfldExp 53.97 -2.37 +2.89 NewmtM u57.68 +.55 +4.29 NewpkRes 6.92 -.20 +.50 Nexen g 21.66 -.59 -.09

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Chg Wkly

PenRE 15.61 Penske 13.56 Pentair 34.58 PepcoHold 16.64 PepsiCo u66.07 PerkElm 22.71 Petrohawk 19.94 PetrbrsA 33.31 Petrobras 37.65 PtroqstE 6.34 Pfizer 16.20 PhilipMor 46.56 PhilipsEl 30.99 PhlVH 57.89 PhnxCos 2.94 Pier 1 8.17 PinnclEnt 13.31 PinWst 36.17 PioNtrl 62.91 PitnyBw 23.34 PlainsEx 24.60 PlumCrk 36.80 Polo RL 89.32 PolyOne u11.04 PortGE 19.51 PostPrp u25.99 Potash 102.93 PwshDB 22.58 PS Agri 23.75 PS Oil 25.32 PS USDBull u25.19 PSFinPf 16.31 Praxair 77.90 PrecCastpt 120.23 PrecDril 6.51 Prestige 7.90 PrideIntl 26.58

Name

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Where to look for local Read The Bulletin and you will find local coupons, special offers, shopping inserts and more worth over $100 every week.

To subscribe to The Bulletin call 541-385-5800

5.25 26.78 13.11 47.30 50.32 12.03 u85.03 43.47 63.05 59.16 d9.57 58.36 14.72 13.74 16.43 60.87 u32.95 d10.92 11.19 12.23 66.06 63.81 71.67 10.34 13.94 28.14 57.46 27.76

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ArcSight 23.48 ArenaPhm 3.23 AresCap 14.25 ArgonSt u24.75 AriadP u4.17 Ariba Inc 13.69 ArkBest 28.36 ArmHld 10.72 ArrayBio 3.69 Arris 11.67 ArtTech 3.91 ArubaNet 12.14 AsiaInfo 23.27 AsscdBanc 13.74 athenahlth 28.18 Atheros 34.45 AtlasAir 51.70 AtlasEngy 32.95 Atmel 5.41 AuthenTec u3.17 Autobytel 1.05 Autodesk 30.77 AutoData 41.80 Auxilium 33.17 AvagoT n 20.23 AvanirPhm 2.69 AviatNetw 4.54 Axcelis 2.21 BE Aero 28.41 BGC Ptrs 6.37 BJsRest 23.36 BMC Sft 37.78 BankFla .63 BannerCp 5.36 BeacnRfg 21.74 BebeStrs 7.27 BedBath 44.46 BigBand 2.85 Biocryst 7.66 Biodel u5.19 BiogenIdc 50.13 BioMarin 20.71 BioSante 2.30 BioScrip 7.10 BioSphre u4.30 BlkRKelso 10.25 Blkboard 40.20 BlueCoat 30.53 BonTon 15.05 BostPrv 7.94 BrigExp 16.96 Brightpnt 7.82 Broadcom 32.29 BrdpntGlch 3.56 Broadwind 3.36 BrcdeCm 6.46 BrklneB 10.81 BrooksAuto 9.10 BrukerCp h 14.06 Bucyrus 55.01 BuffaloWW 38.71 CA Inc 20.51 CDC Cp A 2.29 CH Robins 59.61 CKX Inc 5.00 CME Grp 315.41 CPI Intl u15.69 CSG Sys 22.39 CTC Media 14.77 CVB Fncl 10.33 CadencePh 9.09

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Cadence 6.77 CdnSolar 14.25 CpstnTrb 1.15 Cardiom g 7.96 CardioNet 8.25 Cardtronic 11.02 CareerEd 28.83 Carrizo 19.61 Caseys 37.04 CathayGen 12.75 CaviumNet 25.79 Cbeyond 17.22 CeleraGrp 7.33 Celgene 59.42 CelldexTh 9.01 CentEuro 27.23 CEurMed 25.28 CentAl 11.93 Cephln 60.69 Cepheid 19.23 Cerner 84.06 CerusCp 2.79 ChrmSh 5.50 ChartInds 19.68 ChkPoint 32.63 Cheesecake 26.92 ChildPlace 42.43 ChinAgri s 15.82 ChinaBAK 1.97 ChinaBiot 16.98 ChinaDir 1.64 ChiElMot n 7.49 ChinaInfo 5.57 ChinaNG n d7.51 ChinaRE n 8.81 ChinaSun 4.07 ChinWind n 5.21 ChinaCEd 6.91 CienaCorp 16.43 CinnFin 27.40 Cintas 26.47 Cirrus u14.30 Cisco 24.94 CitrixSys 46.51 CleanEngy 16.75 Clearwire 8.13 Clearw rt .35 CogentC 9.71 Cogent 9.17 CognizTech 49.89 Coinstar u55.36 ColdwtrCrk 6.83 ColBnkg 22.65 ColumLabs 1.14 CombinRx 1.80 Comcast 17.60 Comc spcl 16.88 CmcBMO 39.12 CommVlt 23.49 CompDivHd 14.68 CompCrd 6.50 Compuwre 7.97 Comtech 31.84 Comverge 10.79 Concepts 18.50 ConcurTch 41.13 Conexant 2.90 ConstantC 23.59 CopanoEn 25.13 Copart 36.80 CorinthC 14.11

D-E-F

FstInRT FirstEngy FlagstrB h Flowserve Fluor FEMSA FootLockr FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Fortress FortuneBr FranceTel FrankRes FredMac FMCG FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline

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LO C AL ADVE RTI S I N G FACT #1

ENI 39.54 EOG Res 106.09 EQT Corp 42.28 EastChm 62.78 EKodak 5.85 Eaton 73.92 EVTxMGlo 11.40 Ecolab 47.48 EdisonInt 33.66 ElPasoCp 12.07 Elan 6.32 EldorGld g u17.75 EBrasAero 22.79 EmersonEl 49.06 Emulex 12.21 EnCana g s 32.02 Energizer 55.89 EngyTEq 31.49 EngyTsfr 45.15 EnergySol 7.03 Enerpls g 22.76 ENSCO 40.21 Entergy 77.42 EntPrPt 34.15 Equifax 32.36 EqtyRsd u45.62 EsteeLdr 61.04 EvergrnEn .21 ExcelM 5.93 ExcoRes 17.08 Exelon 41.68 Express n ud15.86 ExterranH 26.41 ExtraSpce u15.65 ExxonMbl 63.60 FMC Corp u62.35 FMC Tech 61.43 FPL Grp 52.71 FairchldS 9.81 FamilyDlr u40.20 FannieMae 1.01 FedExCp 85.91 FedSignl 6.58 FedInvst 23.16 FelCor 7.22 Ferro 9.97 FibriaCelu 17.87 FidlNFin 14.68 FidNatInfo 29.69 FstAmCp u35.06 FstBcpPR 1.77 FstHorizon 13.62

DCT Indl DPL DR Horton DTE Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden DaVita DeVry DeanFds Deere DelMnte DeltaAir DenburyR DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt Dillards

Name

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GenuPrt 41.25 Genworth 15.59 Gerdau g 7.89 Gerdau 14.42 GettyRlty 20.72 Gildan u29.25 GlaxoSKln 34.15 GlimchRt 6.99 GlobPay 41.61 GolLinhas 12.65 GoldFLtd 13.85 Goldcrp g u45.68 GoldmanS 143.23 Goodrich u74.25 GoodrPet 14.85 Goodyear 13.05 vjGrace 27.13 GrafTech 16.60 Graingr 107.67 Gramrcy 2.27 GrtAtlPac 6.26 GtPlainEn 18.56 GpTelevisa 19.05 Guess 38.38 HCC Ins 25.74 HCP Inc 32.59 HRPT Prp 7.52 HSBC 47.35 Hallibrtn 28.09 Hanesbrds 28.03 HarleyD 32.34 Harman 37.62 HarmonyG 10.38 HarrisCorp 48.12 Harsco 27.56 HartfdFn 26.21 Hasbro u40.28 HltCrREIT 42.01 HltMgmt u9.25 HealthNet 23.24 HlthSouth 20.38 Heckmann 5.50 HeclaM 6.19 Heinz 46.11 HelixEn 13.86 HelmPayne 37.56 Herbalife 47.02 Hersha 5.15 Hershey 47.22 Hertz 12.24 Hess 56.06 HewittAsc 38.37

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CostPlus Costco CowenGp CrackerB Cray Inc Cree Inc Crocs CrosstexE Ctrip.com s CubistPh Curis CybrSrce Cyclacel Cymer CyprsBio CypSemi Cytokinet Cytori

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Last

Chg Wkly

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Name

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Last

Chg Wkly

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Nasdaq National Market Name

Last

Chg Wkly

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J-K-L j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JackHenry JackInBox Jamba JamesRiv JazzPhrm

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Oxigene

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Regenrn RentACt RepubAir RschMotn RetailOpp RexEnergy RigelPh RightNow RINO Int n Riverbed RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp RoyGld RubiconTc RuthsHosp Ryanair

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V-W-X-Y-Z VCA Ant 26.49 ValueClick 10.74 VandaPhm 8.25 Varian 51.85 VarianSemi 30.46 VeecoInst 44.80 Verigy 11.19 Verisign 26.71 Verisk n u30.83 VertxPh 37.46 ViaSat 33.80 Vical 3.44 VirgnMda h 16.15 ViroPhrm 13.40 VisnChina d3.43 VistaPrt 46.90 Vitacost n 9.76 Vivus 11.84 Vodafone 19.74 Volcano 23.93 Volterra 22.25 WarnerChil 25.06 WarrenRs 3.31 WashFed 18.73 WebMD 47.51 Websense 22.20 WernerEnt 23.04 WstptInn g u18.10 WetSeal 4.33 WhitneyH 12.37 WholeFd u40.83 Windstrm 10.73 Winn-Dixie 12.66 WonderAuto 8.79 WdwrdGov 31.02 WldAccep 35.44 WrightM 17.72 Wynn 82.21 XOMA h .57 XenoPort 10.79 Xilinx 24.05 XinhuaSp h d.40 Xyratex 16.04 YRC Wwd h .44 Yahoo 16.39 Yongye n 7.92 Zhongpin 12.73 ZionBcp 27.33 Zix Corp 2.39 Zoltek 10.14 Zoran 9.42 ZymoGen 5.36

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B USI N ESS PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Karnopp Petersen LLP has added a new attorney, Clinton L. Todd, to represent the firm in general business, corporate finance, Clinton L. and trademark, Todd has c o p y r i g h t joined Karnopp and licensing. Petersen LLP Todd’s practice also focuses on renewable energy, hydroelectric and energy infrastructure. Prior to joining Karnopp Petersen, Todd practiced in San Francisco, where he represented clients in matters involving breach of contract, antitrust, unfair competition, intellectual property, and general business and real estate matters. He’s licensed to practice in Idaho, California and Oregon. Todd earned his law degree from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College in 2000, where he completed a certificate in business law, served on the Law Review Editorial Board of the law school, and was a pro bono honors award recipient. He received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Wyoming in 1995. Kellie Cook has joined the Shag Salon as a part-time hairstylist. Thesa Chambers has joined the Sunriver office of Prudential Northwest Properties. Julie Fountain has joined Exit Realty Bend as a broker. She comes from a medical business backgound and will specialize in Redmond residential properties. Korren Bower of John L. Scott Redmond was recognized as the top selling agent for April and Bea Leach of was recognized as the top listing agent. David Quiros, principal broker at Taft Dire Real Estate Resources, earned the Graduate Realtor Institute designation from the

Kellie Cook has joined the Shag Salon

David Quiros earned the Graduate Realtor Institute designation

Julie Fountain has joined Exit Realty Bend

Curtis Faulkner was recognized at the RBC Wealth Management President’s Council event

National Association of Realtors. The designation is given to top professional real estate brokers who complete at least 90 hours of specialized courses within the association’s guidelines. Quiros’ education covered contract law, professional standards, sales and marketing, finance and risk reduction. Curtis Faulkner, with The Faulkner Wealth Management Group at RBC Wealth Management, was recognized at the RBC Wealth Management President’s Council event as one of the top 100 producers in the country for 2009. He has 25 years of experience in financial consulting and joined RBC in 2009. Mindy Lyman, interior designer at Pinnacle Architecture, is the chairperson for the High Desert Design Council. As co-founder and chairperson, Lyman is a key

Korren Bower was recognized by John L. Scott Redmond

Mindy Lyman is the chairperson for the High Desert Design Council

Bea Leach was recognized by John L. Scott Redmond

Lisa Nirell has returned from a keynote session and book signing

player in strengthening Central Oregon’s design community by providing educational, promotional and professional events. The HDDC has more than 40 members and is the only networking platform for the Central Oregon interior design community. Lisa Nirell, of EnergizeGrowth LLC in Sunriver, has returned from a keynote session and book signing sponsored by the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland. Her program, “Branding, Innovation, and Growth: Four Ways to Energize Your Business in the New Economy,” helped participants simplify their growth strategies, kick-start innovation, and confront and overcome common areas of resistance to growth planning. Nirell has helped business-to-business organizations improve performance over the last 27 years.

Plunge

Google

Continued from C3 On Tuesday, Gary Gensler, the chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, said at a congressional hearing that during the crucial time period, a single futures trader, which he would not identify, accounted for about 9 percent of trading volume in the most actively traded stock index derivative contract, known as the 500 e-mini futures contract. “One of these accounts was using the e-mini contract to hedge and only entered orders to sell,” Gensler testified. “That trader entered the market at around 2:32 and finished trading by around 2:51.” The Chicago Mercantile Exchange declined to comment on Friday’s report about Waddell & Reed, as did the CFTC, which regulates futures trading.

Continued from C3 Google appears to have acted quickly after questions were raised by the European regulators. Two weeks ago, Google tried to address their questions and criticism in a blog post. It said it did collect certain kinds of data around the world that identify Wi-Fi networks in order to help improve its mapping products. But the company explicitly said then that it did not collect or store so-called “payload data” — the actual information being transmitted by users over unprotected networks. In a confession made Friday afternoon (and late night, European time) that is sure to raise new questions about its privacy policies, Google said that its previous claims were wrong.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 C5

Jo-Ann

Umpqua

Continued from C3 Although the new location is significantly larger, Jo-Ann still considers it a “smallformat” store, Weber said. Stores that are larger than 24,000 square feet are classified as large-format, which means it typically produces larger net sales, according to quarterly public financial filings Jo-Ann made to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in January. The 746 Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft stores averaged $1.7 million in net sales during the company’s fiscal year from Feb. 1 2009, to Jan. 30, 2010, according to the SEC filings. The 228 large-format stores, however, averaged net sales of $4.7 million during the fiscal year 2010. Large stores tend to have 44 to 49 employees, whereas small stores have 15 to 20 employees, according to the filings. Weber could not immediately say whether the new Bend location will have more employees than its predecessor. In March, John Keba, manager of Pioneer Crossing, told The Bulletin he is in preliminary discussions with potential tenants for the other 33,000 square feet of space in the former Gottschalks space.

Continued from C3 “It’s not a get-out-of-jail-free card at all,” said John Spencer Stewart of Stewart Sokol & Gray LLC. But, he added, if a bank obeys Oregon law, it can’t be held liable for its clients’ actions, “no matter whether its customer is acting properly or improperly.” However, Michael Simon of Perkins Coie, representing the Miller plaintiffs, and Daniel Skerill, representing Padrick, say Umpqua had the necessary knowledge to realize there was something wrong with Summit’s finances. Umqua has denied wrongdoing. Litzenberger said she will issue a ruling Friday on Umpqua’s

David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

request to dismiss the suit. Summit filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Portland in December 2008 when it could not repay clients’ exchange funds that Summit’s principals, through another company, had invested in real estate that could not be sold in time to repay clients because of the deteriorating real estate market. The case was later converted to a Chapter 11 liquidation to sell the properties on behalf of creditors. In March, the four principals of Summit agreed to pay $16.8 million in damages to settle a lawsuit filed by Padrick in federal Bankruptcy Court. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

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The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

Chg Wkly

AbdAsPac 6.29 -.14 +.09 AbdAustEq 10.64 -.26 +.20 AbdnChile 17.57 -.24 +.40 AbdnIndo u10.60 -.13 +.63 AdeonaPh 1.61 +.01 -.04 AdvPhot d.52 +.01 +.03 Advntrx rs 2.39 -.06 +.09 AlexcoR g 3.65 -.15 +.29 AlldNevG u19.88 -.37 +1.80 AlmadnM g 1.16 -.05 +.08 AlphaPro 2.23 -.07 +.28 AmApparel 2.79 -.20 +.04 AmDefense .36 +.01 +.03 AmLorain n 3.38 -.07 +.13 AmO&G 6.74 -.31 +.64 Anooraq g 1.23 -.09 -.10 AntaresP 1.66 -.01 +.13 AoxingP rs 2.80 +.08 +.08 ApolloG g .34 -.02 +.04 ArcadiaRs .75 ... +.17 Augusta g 2.03 +.01 -.05 Aurizon g 5.24 -.16 -.18 BMB Munai .89 -.02 +.02 BakerM 40.24 -.25 +4.24 Ballanty u8.79 +.17 +1.03 Banks.com .62 ... +.15 Banro g 2.26 -.06 +.28 BarcUBS36 38.57 -.81 -.17 BarcGSOil 22.64 -.91 -1.14 BrcIndiaTR 63.22 -1.55 +1.28

BioTime n 7.34 BlkMunvst 9.77 BootsCoots 2.95 BovieMed d4.80 BritATob 59.79 CAMAC n 4.38 CdnSEn g .62 CanoPet 1.05 CapGold n 3.66 CaracoP 6.05 Cardero g 1.24 CardiumTh .51 CastleBr .28 CelSci .65 CFCda g u15.20 CentGold g u50.83 CheniereEn 3.37 CheniereE 17.29 ChiArmM 5.42 ChiGengM 2.14 ChMarFd n 6.13 ChinaMda 12.89 ChNEPet n 6.65 ChinaPhH n 3.10 ClaudeR g 1.19 CloughGEq 13.57 ClghGlbOp 12.34 Cohen&Co 5.98 CompTch u3.16 Contango 54.63 Continucre 3.42 CornstProg 7.10

-.08 +.46 +.03 +.33 -.02 +.01 +.39 +.16 -.86 +.19 -.07 -.10 -.05 +.07 -.07 +.02 -.01 +.31 -.15 +.72 -.03 +.09 -.01 +.03 -.02 +.01 +.01 +.04 +.09 -.10 +.38 +1.43 -.20 +.01 -.08 +1.50 -.02 +.87 -.15 +.34 -.27 -.05 -.81 +1.93 -.24 +.01 -.01 -.01 -.02 +.02 -.29 +.33 -.23 +.30 +.06 -.22 -.26 +.49 -.37 +3.61 -.18 +.06 -.12 +.22

Corriente g CrSuisInco CrSuiHiY Crossh glf CrystalRk Crystallx g CubicEngy Cytomed DWS RE II DWS REst DejourE g DenisnM g Dreams DuneEn rs EV LtdDur EVMuniBd ElixirGam EmersnR h EndvrInt EndvSilv g EngyInco EntreeGold EvgIncAdv EverMultSc EvgUtilHi EvolPetrol ExeterR gs Express-1 FieldPnt FT WindEn FiveStar FrkStPrp

8.18 3.38 2.95 .15 .82 u.47 .94 .79 1.33 4.66 .33 1.39 1.50 .28 16.06 13.05 .26 1.91 1.54 4.03 23.19 2.38 9.28 14.71 10.84 5.79 7.93 1.53 u2.78 11.56 3.23 12.78

-.01 +.25 -.14 +.06 -.11 +.15 -.01 -.01 -.04 +.14 -.03 +.03 -.06 -.01 +.06 +.12 -.05 +.04 -.16 +.15 +.01 -.00 -.06 ... -.08 +.04 ... -.01 -.11 +.83 -.11 +.11 -.01 +.02 -.09 +.27 -.09 +.23 +.03 +.40 -.32 +.63 -.14 +.06 -.15 +.29 -.20 +.77 -.15 +.26 -.10 +.56 +.09 +1.43 -.03 +.08 -.15 +.40 -.28 +.21 -.07 +.15 -.31 +.08

FrTmpLtd 13.39 -.01 +.89 Fronteer g 5.88 -.10 +.52 GSE Sy 4.97 -.10 -.32 GabGldNR 17.35 -.39 +.49 GascoEngy .39 -.03 -.00 Gastar grs 4.29 -.23 -.20 GenMoly u4.01 -.21 +.44 GenesisEn 18.35 -.08 +.73 GeoGloblR 1.49 -.03 +.25 Geokinetics d6.42 -.37 -.12 Gerova wt .50 ... +.10 GlblScape 1.64 +.34 +.29 GoldRsv g .94 -.03 -.11 GoldenMin 8.85 +.52 +1.15 GoldStr g u4.67 -.04 +.67 GormanR u29.31 -.79 +1.92 GrahamCp 17.31 -.66 +1.23 GranTrra g 5.44 -.21 +.30 GrtBasG g 1.84 -.02 +.11 GreenHntr 1.13 +.03 -.03 GpoSimec 7.95 -.45 +.41 HQ SustM 5.46 -.13 +.21 HSBC CTI 8.26 -.08 +.04 HearUSA 1.09 -.08 -.01 Hemisphrx .75 -.03 +.09 HooperH .91 -.02 +.03 Hyperdyn 1.06 -.13 +.14 ImpOil gs 40.18 -1.36 +1.86 IndiaGC 1.20 -.07 -.11 Innovaro 3.51 -.01 -.06 InovioBio 1.33 -.03 +.02 Intellichk 1.65 -.05 -.17

InterlknG .62 IntTower g 7.15 Inuvo .19 IsoRay 1.35 Iteris 1.77 JavelinPh 2.19 JesupLamt .27 KeeganR g 6.42 KimberR g 1.04 KodiakO g 3.56 LaBarg u13.12 LadThalFn 1.49 Lannett 4.81 Libbey 14.34 LibertyAcq u9.94 LibAcq wt .94 LucasEngy 1.99 MAG Slv g 7.44 MadCatz g .41 MagHRes u5.21 Metalico 5.47 Metalline .84 MetroHlth u3.99 MdwGold g .69 MincoG g 1.14 Minefnd g 10.09 MinesMgt 2.70 NIVS IntT 2.59 NTN Buzz .64 NeoStem u3.41 NB IncOp 7.02 NBRESec 3.57

-.03 +.05 -.05 +.62 -.01 -.03 +.01 +.07 -.02 +.19 -.01 +.01 -.01 -.04 -.26 +.51 -.01 +.05 -.28 +.07 -.19 +1.30 -.06 +.28 -.02 +.55 -.35 +.54 -.01 -.01 -.06 -.26 -.12 -.27 -.27 +.29 -.01 -.01 +.01 +.72 -.32 +.04 -.03 -.06 +.06 +.81 -.02 -.00 -.03 +.05 +.10 +.97 -.07 +.23 +.01 -.50 -.01 ... +.47 +.86 -.10 +.33 -.11 +.20

Neuralstem u3.17 Nevsun g 2.96 NDragon .10 NwGold g u6.15 NA Pall g 4.07 NDynMn g 8.58 NthnO&G 14.38 NthgtM g 3.16 NovaBayP 2.47 NovaGld g 8.37 NuvDiv2 14.57 NuvDiv3 14.06 NvInsDv 14.50 NuvInsTF 14.63 NMuHiOp 12.85 NuvREst u9.52 NvTxAdFlt 2.45 Oilsands g .80 Oilsnd wtA .25 OpkoHlth 2.11 OrchidsPP d14.01 OrienPap n 9.92 OrionEngy 3.87 OrsusXel .37 OverhillF 6.10 Pacholder 7.86 PacRim .22 Palatin .28 ParaG&S 1.75 ParkNatl 68.68 PhrmAth 1.36 PionDvrsHi 19.47

Biggest mutual funds -.05 +.27 -.15 +.06 -.00 -.01 -.03 +.48 -.11 +.13 -.20 +.46 -.91 +.59 -.09 +.09 +.03 +.10 -.12 +.68 +.01 +.19 -.03 -.03 +.05 +.28 +.05 -.23 -.08 +.35 -.43 +.50 -.05 ... -.05 +.00 -.02 -.05 -.06 +.24 -.02 +.35 ... +.87 -.97 -.43 -.03 -.04 -.18 +.08 -.28 +.17 -.02 +.01 -.01 -.02 -.07 +.12 -.56 +2.48 -.01 +.02 -.43 +1.14

PionDrill 6.04 PlatGpMet 2.52 PolyMet g 2.01 ProceraNt .47 ProlorBio u6.20 Protalix 6.87 PudaCoal n 10.43 Quaterra g 1.61 QuestCap g 1.30 RadientPh 1.37 RaeSyst .74 ReavesUtl 18.86 RegeneRx .56 Rentech 1.14 RexahnPh 1.70 Richmnt g 4.58 Rubicon g 3.91 SamsO&G .68 ScolrPh 1.08 SeabGld g u35.54 SearchMed 4.75 Senesco .70 SinoHub n 2.83 StreamG wt .55 SulphCo .38 Talbots wt 4.65 TanzRy g u4.94 Taseko 5.65 Tengsco .47 TianyinPh 3.20 TimberlnR 1.26 TrnsatlPt n 3.55

-.25 +.56 -.11 +.26 -.11 +.08 -.03 -.02 +.09 +.65 -.03 +.61 ... +1.64 -.06 +.04 +.01 +.01 -.27 +.43 -.06 +.01 -.54 +.76 +.03 +.06 -.04 -.02 -.15 -.27 -.05 +.28 -.03 +.30 +.06 +.09 -.04 +.05 -.06 +4.79 +.05 +.04 +.01 +.18 +.01 +.33 -.10 -.10 -.03 +.02 -.29 +.18 -.02 +.25 -.33 +.65 -.02 +.02 -.15 +.22 -.02 +.11 -.08 -.11

TravelCtrs TriValley Tucows g TwoHrbInv UMH Prop UQM Tech US Geoth US Gold Uluru Univ Insur Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn Uroplasty VKAdM2 VKSelS VangMega VangTotW VantageDrl VantDrl wt VirnetX VistaGold WalterInv WidePoint WirelessT WT DrfChn WT Drf Bz WizzardSft Xenonics Xfone YM Bio g ZBB Engy

3.08 -.02 -.40 1.16 -.04 +.09 .70 -.01 ... 8.50 -.15 -.16 u9.65 -.25 +.91 4.05 -.25 -.15 .90 -.08 +.07 u4.12 +.15 +.85 .16 -.00 -.00 4.99 -.11 +.25 .96 -.02 +.01 1.57 -.05 +.22 3.09 -.15 +.34 u5.35 +.35 +.55 12.10 +.02 +.18 11.90 -.09 +.06 38.95 -.79 +.78 41.57 -1.00 +.84 1.73 -.02 +.13 .03 ... -.01 6.13 +.36 +1.13 2.24 -.11 ... 17.31 -.34 +.55 .93 +.03 +.03 .90 -.04 +.04 25.06 -.02 +.14 26.25 -.40 +.65 .25 +.01 +.05 d.42 ... +.05 1.10 -.07 -.04 1.43 -.07 +.13 .61 -.01 +.01

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n Fidelity Invest: Contra n American Funds A: CapInBldA p American Funds A: CapWGrA p Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 n American Funds A: IncoFdA p American Funds A: InvCoAA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: EupacA p American Funds A: WshMutA p Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk American Funds A: NewPerA p PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRetAd n American Funds A: FundInvA p Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n American Funds A: BalA p

IB LG XC LG BL GL SP BL LC SP LV IL LV IL GL IB LC BL XC BL

128,736 67,975 65,222 59,228 57,634 55,402 51,508 50,350 49,825 48,636 43,365 39,521 39,349 38,799 32,886 32,666 32,183 31,694 31,416 30,732

+0.6 -5.6 -4.5 -4.0 -5.1 -8.7 -4.6 -3.9 -5.5 -4.6 -6.6 -9.5 -4.1 -9.9 -7.4 +0.6 -6.0 -2.7 -4.5 -2.8

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

+13.1/C +25.3/E +32.7/B +29.7/B +17.3/E +20.4/E +29.8/A +25.4/B +24.2/E +29.9/A +30.7/B +20.7/C +25.5/D +28.1/A +25.8/C +12.8/C +26.4/D +30.6/A +32.8/B +22.0/C

+42.9/A +19.7/A +13.9/C +32.1/A +18.6/C +28.3/A +8.8/A +17.6/C +12.3/B +9.4/A +1.0/D +37.0/A +6.2/C +26.2/B +33.7/A +41.2/A +26.8/A +27.8/A +14.3/C +16.1/C

1,000,000 250 3,000 2,500 250 250 3,000 250 250 5,000,000 2,500 250 250 2,500 250 1,000,000 250 1,000 100,000 250

Percent Load

NAV

NL 11.14 5.75 27.31 NL 28.37 NL 59.06 5.75 45.98 5.75 31.51 NL 104.84 5.75 15.37 5.75 25.67 NL 104.15 NL 97.37 5.75 35.31 5.75 24.81 NL 30.06 5.75 24.62 NL 11.14 5.75 32.49 4.25 2.06 NL 28.37 5.75 16.53

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Charter school a good solution

N

othing takes the heart out of a small community like the closure of the school. In places like Powell Butte and Wamic, schools have for years provided the focal point

for community activities and the source of community pride. Without them, much of that simply disappears. Thus it was good news to hear the other day that Powell Butte residents and others have been successful in their effort to convert Powell Butte School to a charter school within the Crook County School District. The school will survive as a charter, something it could not have done as a traditional district elementary school. That was clear before school started this year. The Crook County School Board, faced with having to cut $5 million from the current budget, decided to move upper grades from the K-6 school into Prineville. It took community donations of more than $275,000 to keep fourth- and fifth-graders there, but the money was raised in the nick of time. The situation hardly promises to be better next year — perhaps another $5 million in reductions lie ahead — and given the cuts that had gone before, the school once again was on the chopping block. No longer. The new charter will pay rent on the building to the school district as well as maintenance costs for the school’s boiler. But that’s it. The charter will pick up the cost of teachers and all other expenses, and the district will retain 20 percent of state funding to cover administrative costs for more than 100 students who will attend.

The charter will pick up the cost of teachers and all other expenses, and the district will retain 20 percent of state funding to cover administrative costs for more than 100 students who will attend. As is true of all charter schools in Oregon, the Powell Butte Charter must offer something not readily available in the Crook County School District as a whole. To meet that requirement, its curriculum will be place-based and service-oriented. Its students will routinely go out in the community, both to learn from government agencies, businesses and others and to serve those in the community who need their help. All this comes into being thanks to the efforts of literally dozens of people who spent a year planning and developing a blueprint for the new school and who negotiated with the school district to gain the go-ahead for the charter and to rent the current building. Their work will keep the community’s school and all that means for a far-flung rural area alive.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s Note: The following editorials, which appeared on March 10, 1975, do not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

Term ‘frugal’ justified The president of Central Oregon Community College, Fred Boyle, has termed as frugal the budget on which voters will ballot next Tuesday. Frugal is not a word that is often applied to the budget of a public institution. In the case of COCC’s 1975-76 budget, its use is justified. The proposed levy would require a tax rate estimated at $1.34 per $1,000 of true cash value. That’s only six cents above the rate approved by voters in 1974. In something of a paradox, the college is currently experiencing an enrollment surge at a time when the economy is in a slump. In part, the situation is explained by the increasing attractiveness of colleges close to home when the bucks get tougher to come by. Fortunately for Central Oregon students, they have available a community college that has achieved a high standard of educational quality while at the same time keeping costs both to students and taxpayers within reasonable limits.

The 1975-76 COCC budget measure merits the approval of the district’s voters.

Look further Some members of the U.S. Senate are getting terribly upset over possible purchases of some U.S. companies by Arab oil millionaires. Arabs have tried, in recent weeks, to purchase three U.S. banks, in addition to the one already owned by a Saudi Arabian. Two of the sales were turned down by stockholders. In any event, Congress is considering a variety of suggestions to make it easier for the U.S. government to keep track of foreign money invested in “sensitive” U.S. companies. There already are restrictions on such ownership in certain types of business. A foreigner may not own a radio or teevee station, for example. His ownership of an airline is limited by law. One suggestion from out here in the boonies is that Congress look further. The largest owner of American newspapers is a Canadian, Lord Thompson, who also owns newspapers in England. If it’s bad for Arabs to own banks, why is it good for a foreigner to own more daily newspapers than any American organization has been able to acquire?

Voters should oppose jail bond By Dirk Van Houweling Bulletin guest columnist

G

iven The Bulletin’s endorsement of the $44 million jail bond, I feel obligated to dissent. The foundation of The Bulletin’s endorsement is based primarily on speculation, outdated projections and an attempt to marginalize the $44 million price tag. The Bulletin’s numbers for population growth in Deschutes County and theoretical jail population are based on the boom cycle of the last 15 years and a 2005 outdated projection from Portland State University. The boom is over and the Portland State study has been refuted; estimates are down at least 11 percent and crime has leveled off. The claim of The Bulletin that matrixing will happen in the next two years is based on what? The county jail currently has 318 beds, of which, on average, 220 are occupied. Should we be willing to speculate with $44 million, without current projections and growth figures, that a jail with a vacancy rate of 31 percent will require an additional 250 beds in two years? The Bulletin continues to speculate about “what might happen” given Oregon’s budget gap and “possible” reliance on county jails. With no clear evidence of this and 1,200 empty Deer Ridge state prison beds merely 35 miles away in Madras (also due to previous misguided projections), it is not likely the state will need to occupy our county jail. The Bulletin continues by character-

IN MY VIEW izing the option of utilizing the 1,200 empty beds at Deer Ridge as “not likely to be a workable alternative.” This conclusion is based on one subjective statement by the Oregon Department of Corrections. If the state budget gap plays a role in The Bulletin’s argument, then I’d imagine the state would be eager to discuss a lease arrangement with any county that would be willing to pay for and validate the overzealous construction of 1,200 empty beds at Deer Ridge. Additionally, Sheriff Larry Blanton makes the supportive statement, “You take the best shot at what you’ve got with 30 years experience, other jails in the area, current trends.” No disrespect to Sheriff Blanton, but let’s look at the other jails in the area (i.e. the 1,200 empty beds at Deer Ridge), and let’s look at current trends (i.e. what current trends? Perhaps the 11 percent drop in population estimates and crime leveling off?). With respect to the $44 million price tag for the jail, I find it curious how eager The Bulletin is to marginalize and spend the taxpayers’ money. I found The Bulletin’s statement, “in a way, the $44 million cost is the wrong number to focus on” both patronizing and hypocritical. I am amazed that the same editorial staff that demonized the minimum corporate tax increase of $90 a year would be so frivolous with county taxpayers’ money. I also find it curious

that no one at The Bulletin’s fiscally challenged editorial office questioned the wisdom of dedicating $44 million to a prison without discussing viable, cost-saving alternatives. Clearly, given the increasing costs of incarceration, the high percentage of repeat offenders, the evidence that drug treatment is less costly and more effective than jail and the lack of programs targeting high-risk youth, it would seem logical that we should think outside the concrete and steel box that they so willingly support. Our penal system is broken because we don’t attempt to improve our justice system. No one questions the need for innovative and proactive programs, yet no one in the sheriff’s department or at The Bulletin advocate or propose to allocate any money for such programs. I ask the question: What could $44 million buy in the way of treatment programs, counseling programs for atrisk youth or alternatives to incarceration such as technical job training? I respect the difficult job Sheriff Blanton and Deschutes County correction authorities have, and I thank them for their dedication. However, I am not willing to give them CEO status regarding the use of $44 million of the taxpayers’ hard-earned money without current information regarding prison population projections and a discussion of cost-saving alternatives to incarceration. Between The Bulletin and Sheriff Blanton, I have neither. Dirk Van Houweling lives in Bend.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Age should not be a factor in commission race By Dallas Brown Bulletin guest columnist

I

n the last three weeks, I have knocked on nearly 3,000 doors in Deschutes County and spoken to countless residents in my pursuit of the Democratic nomination for county commissioner. The two questions I get asked the most are: “How old are you?” and “Why are you running?” Because of the frequency of these inquiries, I have decided to state my responses in writing for the public to read. I am 25 years old. I have lived in Bend for 15 years and I plan on living the rest of my life in Central Oregon. Since I can remember, I have only been truly fascinated by one thing: public service. As a child I wanted to change the world. As I’ve aged, I have narrowed my sights on the community I’ve grown up in and the land I call home. To some, I may be rela-

tively young, but with my youth comes energy and an open mind. I am running for Deschutes County commissioner because I believe I can do the best job of representing all citizens of this county. I am a listener and a problem solver. I do not pretend to know everything there is to know about county government, but I strive every day to learn more and to understand the complex issues. I am accessible to a fault. I occasionally neglect sleep so that I can adequately respond to e-mails from concerned residents who have questions on my candidacy. As a county commissioner, my door will remain open and my office welcoming. I believe my candidacy offers something unique for Deschutes County. My perspective is of a different generation than the current commissioners and my occupation is not in building, develop-

IN MY VIEW ment or real estate. I am not beholden to any special interest groups, only the residents of the entire county. I am not ideologically extreme in any matter. I consider each issue on a unique basis with careful consideration of both the long-term and short-term implications. Most of all, I am dedicated and hardworking. I believe that of all the candidates running, I have invested the most labor in campaigning and I believe this to be indicative of the level of dedication I will bring to the county. I have been told I am too young, with too few life experiences. I have been frequently written off because of my age without any further justification. I have been told that my ideas are sound, that my understanding of government

is superior to my opponents’, and that my work ethic is unrivaled, yet my age is presented as an insurmountable obstacle. As a response, I can only quote Teddy Roosevelt, the youngest U.S. president to ever assume office: “Fortunately, age is a curable disease.” I will grow older, but I will never outgrow my desire to learn and my determination to be a catalyst for constructive change. Many of America’s greatest leaders were younger than their counterparts. Many began their public careers in their 20s and, like myself, were considered too young for elected office. In this great country, we are told that if one works hard, one devotes himself fully to his endeavors, then nothing is impossible. I am trying to prove that. I am not asking for your vote at this time; I am asking only that you thoroughly research your options and base your decision on the

merits of the candidates, not the years they have been alive. Please visit my website at DallasforDeschutes.com. Please visit my opponent’s website and the websites of all candidates running for office at any level. Inform yourself on what I stand for and give me the opportunity to earn your vote without a preconceived attitude about my age. My life experiences may not be as extensive in quantity, but in quality I have experienced much. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you have questions or concerns or you simply wish to meet me. I will make myself available to any citizen of the county. Above all, be sure to vote in the May 18th primary. Our form of democracy is healthiest with active participation. Dallas Brown is a candidate for Deschutes County commissioner.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 C7

O D

N   Ida "Mac" Lange, of Madras Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Graveside Services will be held on Friday, May 21, 2010 at 1:30 pm at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park. A gathering will follow at the Madras Senior Center. Contributions may be made to:

Central Oregon Opportunity Center of St. Marks/Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd Church.

Morris B. Evick, of Bend Nov. 7, 1933 - May 12, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Visitation will be held on Monday, May 17, 2010 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. at Bel-Air Chapel. Graveside Services will be held on Monday, May 17, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park.

Pearl M. (Spillars) Wright Ellis, of Bend June 27, 1911 - May 7, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Sat., May 15, 2010 at Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 52680 Day Road, La Pine, OR. Viewing 10 a.m., Funeral 11 a.m. with the dedication of grave at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend, immediately following the funeral service. Reception to follow back at the church. Contributions may be made to:

Newberry Hospice, PO Box 1888, La Pine, Oregon 97739

Reverend Richard G. ‘Dick’ Metz, of Sisters Oct. 26, 1946 - May 13, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial service will be held at 11:00 am, Sat., May 22, 2010, at the Zion Lutheran Church 1113 SW Black Butte, Redmond; a reception will follow.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Norman Hand played for the NFL The Associated Press WALTERBORO, S.C. — Former NFL defensive tackle Norman Hand died after collapsing at his home in Walterboro, S.C., on Friday. The cause of death has not been determined. The 37-year-old’s NFL career included stints with the Dolphins, Saints, Chargers, Seahawks and Giants.

Frank Frazetta, renowned fantasy and sci-fi illustrator Artist whose work appeared on book covers, posters defined ‘sword and scorcery’ illustration

“He created a world and a mood that are impossible to simulate.” — John Milius, director of “Conan the Barbarian,” about Frank Frazetta

By Terence McArdle cently told the Los Angeles Times. He added that his goal in “Conan the Barbarian” was to tell a story shaped by Frazetta and composer Richard Wagner. After a stroke in 1995, Frazetta, a right-handed artist, continued to work first by penciling, then by teaching himself a left-handed handed brush technique.

The Washington Post

Frank Frazetta, the celebrated comic artist and illustrator whose ax-wielding muscular warriors, scantily clad heroines and ferocious beasts of prey graced numerous science fiction and fantasy novels, died Monday at a hospital in Fort Myers, Fla., after a stroke. He was 82. Frazetta, who started as a pencil-and-ink comic book artist, painted movie posters and rock album covers, but he was perhaps best known for the cover illustrations to the paperback reissues of Robert E. Howard’s Conan the Barbarian series and Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan and Pellucidar series. Frazetta’s drawings were credited with renewing the popularity of the character, a mainstay of the 1930s pulp magazine Weird Tales. He helped define the illustration style for the fantasy sub-genre known as “sword and sorcery.” Describing Frazetta’s bold, sexually charged style, the author Donald Newlove wrote in 1977, “There’s no love of decay and fetidness — his swamps and jungles are soft green, lush, aswirl and gently vivid, germinal ... a perfect setting for the erotic.” Although he left comics work in the 1960s, his later paintings influenced such artists as Richard Corben of Heavy Metal magazine and anticipated a trend toward painted graphic novels.

A prolific career Frank Frazzetta — he later dropped the second “z” in his surname — was born Feb. 9, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y. As a child, he was inspired by the drawings of Hal Foster, whose work on the Tarzan comic strip would anticipate many of Frazetta’s jungle scenes. For DC Comics, he drew the

Education Continued from C1 Johnson said the short-term goal is to increase the branch’s relationship with COCC and to create a hub-and-spoke model, in which OSU-Cascades’ Bend campus is a hub that offers all its degrees, with other satellite campuses offering some distance learning. The satellite campuses would likely be COCC’s education centers in Redmond, Prineville and Madras.

Looking toward a ‘four-year experience’ “I imagine there could be some more general degrees that we could offer at our satellite campuses, and have hybrid distance learning where students come to the hub campus once a week or once every two weeks, but the rest of the time they’re getting distance education or are doing real-time synchronized video,” Johnson said. “We want to make it as easy as possible for placebound students to have access to four-year degrees.” Currently, the OSU-Cascades campus offers a 2+2 model, in which students take their first two years of undergraduate at COCC or some other community college, then take their third and fourth years at OSU-Cascades. Johnson said one of HEAT’s goals is to create a more authentic four-year experience for students. “What we miss are those students who want a four-year experience,” she said. To try to entice those students while plans for a full, four-year university are in the works, John-

Conflict in the Frazetta family

The Associated Press file photo

Frank Frazetta, a celebrated fantasy and science fiction artist and illustrator, sits next to one of his paintings in East Stroudsburg, Pa., on Oct. 24, 1994. Frazetta died Monday at age 82. Shining Knight and, for EC Comics, he illustrated a series of science fiction stories. He had his own short-lived racing car strip, Johnny Comet, in 1952. The same year, he joined cartoonist Al Capp as an uncredited artist on Lil’ Abner, a position he held into the mid-1960s. He painted a Mad magazine ad parody in 1964 — featuring Beatles drummer Ringo Starr in an endorsement for Blecch Shampoo — that caught the eye of United Artists films. The company hired Frazetta to do a painted poster for the film “What’s New Pussycat?,” a 1965 comedy written by Woody Allen. His later film poster credits included Roman Polanski’s “The

Fearless Vampire Killers” (1967) and Clint Eastwood’s “The Gauntlet” (1977). His work also appeared on album covers for such hard rock acts as Molly Hatchet, Nazareth and Yngwie Malmsteen, though he professed disdain for most rock music. His illustrations inspired new interest in the Conan the Barbarian franchise. Marvel Comics launched an ongoing comic book series in 1970s, and there was a 1982 movie directed by John Milius with Arnold Schwarzenegger in the title role. “Not that I could ever redo Frazetta on film — he created a world and a mood that are impossible to simulate,” Milius re-

son said HEAT members have expressed interest in working with COCC to create cohort classes for students who know they’re on the four-year degree path. Students on the four-year path would take classes together, enrolling in something Johnson calls “university college” and meeting once a week in a learning community class that builds relationships among the students and connections between classes. That class would also offer an orientation to the campus, with a focus on time management, library work, career services and other important topics. “These two (colleges) should be able to do more together than they can do separately,” Schueler said.

“I believe that is critically needed across the state and country, and we do not have adequate systems for that continuing option for students in career and technical fields,” he said. “It’s an important addition.” The long-term goal is that in 20 or more years, the region will have a freestanding university that offers four years of instruction. That university might be moved off of COCC’s campus, depending on capacity and space issues. As it stands, Johnson said, the branch is nearly at capacity. This year the school has 620 upperdivision students; there are few classroom spaces remaining and office space is tapped.

Long-term goals COCC President Jim Middleton said he believes the HEAT proposal will help the community college fulfill its mission. “We think that these kinds of partnerships can further strengthen our commitment to a high-quality transfer program,” he said. “And we often hear citizens and government agencies say you need to be more efficient and less territorial, and that’s exactly what we are doing.” Middleton believes COCC will gain students with a strong local university in town, and the strengthened university will allow the region to develop an applied baccalaureate program. Applied baccalaureate programs are four-year bachelor’s degrees earned at both four- and twoyear schools that count technical courses as credits toward a degree.

What’s next? The team is still debating whether to recommend whether the university should be affiliated with the University of Oregon, Oregon State University, both or neither. Currently, OSU-Cascades offers degrees from both University of Oregon and Oregon State University. “If we’re trying to make a standalone institution, won’t this come up?” Schueler asked. Getting to the long-term goal, though, won’t be easy. At a State Board of Higher Education meeting on Friday, the board was slated to discuss giving OSU-Cascades and COCC a possible $510,000 to develop the learning communities, purchase hardware and software for distance education, and consultant work on advising and other administrative work to better integrate the two schools.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

His wife of 53 years, Eleanor “Ellie” Kelly, who served as Frazetta’s business partner, died in 2009. Survivors include four children, Alfonso Frank Frazetta, known as Frank Jr., and William Frazetta, both of East Stroudsburg, Pa., Heidi Grabin of Englewood, Fla., and Holly Frazetta of Boca Grande, Fla.; three sisters; and 11 grandchildren. Ellie Frazetta started a small museum to house her husband’s works on family property in the Pennsylvania Poconos in 2000. After her death, the children fought over the custodial rights to Frazetta’s works. In December, Frank Frazetta Jr. was arrested in an attempt to remove 90 of his father’s paintings from the family museum. Frazetta sided with the other three children, who had formed a limited partnership for estate planning. He told the Poconos Record that one of the paintings Frank Jr. had removed wasn’t finished. In April, the family stated publicly that the dispute was resolved after mediation and that charges against Frank Jr. were dropped.

Down the road, OSU-Cascades will ask for the state to consider funding a second building for the branch campus. “We believe this region warrants that investment at the state level. Our growth and projected growth outpaces most of the state,” Schueler said. HEAT expects to report on its recommendations at the State Board of Higher Education’s June meeting. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

UGB Continued from C1 The agency has until July to hand down the order, which will tell city staffers what work they must do before the expansion proposal can go forward. Bend City Manager Eric King said local officials are ready for the remand and, after the recent hearings, believe the LCDC isn’t going to tell the city to start over. “I can say we have gotten pretty good clarity from the agency about what we need to do and, for the most part it’s not a complete redo of the UGB,” King said “It’s more of a matter of having more analysis for the record and clarifying our decisions.” The city can appeal the remand to the Oregon Court of Appeals, but King said that is an unlikely outcome. He said the lengthy appeal process has seemed like a second-guessing of the city’s analysis and conclusions, rather than a review to confirm the UGB expansion proposal meets state land-use standards. “I think this occurred because the agency has felt the need to double check our work and, to me, its not entirely clear as to what the purpose is behind that,” King said. He said he has joined a committee formed by the League of Oregon Cities with the goal of making the UGB expansion process less cumbersome for other cities. “So we’re working on proposals to take to the Legislature for 2011, and the basic concept is, we’ve got to streamline this process and undo some layers of complexity to take it back to the intent of land-use planning.” State land-use planning rules require cities with a population greater than 25,000 to provide for a 20-year need for housing, employment lands, infrastructure and public utilities, and demonstrate a need for additional land before urban growth boundaries can be expanded. The idea behind the rules is to prevent sprawl and the degradation of rural and farm lands. Bend City Councilor Jodie Barram, who worked on the UGB expansion proposal as a member of the city’s planning commission, said she expects the remand will require the city to justify its focus on expanding to the northeast. “I think one of the only real sticking points left ... was around suitability — what lands to bring in,” she said. Commissioners also have encouraged the city to up its planned housing-mix ratio to increase the number of multi-family dwellings versus single-family detached homes. That work, and additional analysis of future infrastructure, public facilities and transportation needs, is likely to take some time, Barram said. “I would expect, with the remand coming in July, that we are going to have a good 12 months of work to do,” she said. “I think we’re still going to be a little ways out.” Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C8 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 15

HIGH Ben Burkel

76

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

80s Maupin

Government Camp

Ruggs

Condon

79/48

78/48

82/51

62/45

78/51

79/52

72/42

Mitchell

Madras 77/50

76/45

73/44

64/33

73/41

74/43

63/54

72/39

74/44

Helena Bend

Eastern

79/49

Idaho Falls

70s

Elko

84/54

73/38

Reno

75/44

Partly to mostly sunny skies today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

70/41

70s

60/39

San Francisco

74/42

Boise

76/45

Redding

Crater Lake

76/46

80s

79/50

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

Missoula

Eugene Grants Pass

Sunrise today. . . . . . 5:39 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:25 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:38 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:26 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:35 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:46 p.m.

72/38

60s

79/50

Salt Lake City

64/50

70/46

80s

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

Moon phases First

HIGH

Full

Last

May 20 May 27 June 4

New

June 12

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 60/45/0.00 . . . . . 62/47/pc. . . . . . 62/50/sh Baker City . . . . . . 72/31/0.00 . . . . . 75/43/pc. . . . . . 74/44/pc Brookings . . . . . . 56/48/0.00 . . . . . 61/46/pc. . . . . . 59/46/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 71/31/0.00 . . . . . 73/45/pc. . . . . . 73/43/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 75/41/0.00 . . . . . 74/44/pc. . . . . . 72/49/pc Klamath Falls . . . 72/37/0.00 . . . . . . 69/42/s. . . . . . 69/40/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 68/30/0.00 . . . . . 70/41/pc. . . . . . 70/41/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 72/31/0.00 . . . . . 74/41/pc. . . . . . . 73/39/c Medford . . . . . . . 82/49/0.00 . . . . . 79/52/pc. . . . . . 77/50/pc Newport . . . . . . . 57/43/0.00 . . . . . 59/46/pc. . . . . . 60/50/sh North Bend . . . . . . 57/50/NA . . . . . 59/49/pc. . . . . . 62/50/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 77/37/0.00 . . . . . . 80/49/s. . . . . . 82/51/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 80/45/0.00 . . . . . . 85/51/s. . . . . . 80/51/pc Portland . . . . . . . 76/49/0.00 . . . . . 75/51/pc. . . . . . . 74/54/c Prineville . . . . . . . 71/40/0.00 . . . . . 78/46/pc. . . . . . . 77/47/t Redmond. . . . . . . 76/35/0.00 . . . . . . 79/44/s. . . . . . . 76/44/t Roseburg. . . . . . . 80/47/0.00 . . . . . 79/49/pc. . . . . . 76/50/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 77/43/0.00 . . . . . 74/48/pc. . . . . . 73/51/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 74/39/0.00 . . . . . 74/44/pc. . . . . . . 74/46/t The Dalles . . . . . . 85/46/0.00 . . . . . . 83/55/s. . . . . . . 79/56/c

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72/41 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 in 1939 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 in 1943 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.39” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.62” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.90” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . 1014.0 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.24 in 1969 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:57 a.m. . . . . . .6:18 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:20 a.m. . . . . .11:02 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:47 a.m. . . . . . .2:09 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:25 a.m. . . . . . .3:12 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:09 p.m. . . . . . .3:41 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:29 a.m. . . . . . .3:27 p.m.

LOW

LOW

66 40

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy.

62 40

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

70/49

75/43

Chemult

Calgary

Seattle

71/42

Fort Rock

67/35

60s

Vancouver

75/51

Hampton

72/40

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 85° The Dalles • 30° Meacham

WEDNESDAY Mostly cloudy, showers, cool.

65 42

BEND ALMANAC

50s

Mostly sunny skies today. Increasing clouds tonight.

HIGH

73 43

Portland

Burns

La Pine

Crescent

HIGH

45

TUESDAY Mostly cloudy, showers, cooler.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

74/42

74/41

Crescent Lake

LOW

Mostly cloudy, isolated High Desert storms, LOW mild.

NORTHWEST

Paulina

Brothers

73/42

Tonight: Partial clearing, relatively mild.

MONDAY

Sunny to partly cloudy skies will be the rule, with a few showers over the Cascades.

Central

74/43

Sunriver

Today: Mostly cloudy, afternoon mountain storms, mild.

70/46

79/47

Camp Sherman 71/42 Redmond Prineville 76/45 Cascadia 78/46 75/56 Sisters 74/44 Bend Post Oakridge Elk Lake

Partly cloudy with a few mountain showers today.

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

SUNDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires.

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 107-130 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 117-122 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-168 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85

Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . . 96-150 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

Vancouver 63/54

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

Calgary 70/46

Saskatoon 72/47

Seattle 70/49

Boise 79/49

• 98° Indio, Calif.

Cheyenne 52/37

• 18° Yellowstone N.P., Wyo.

San Francisco 64/50

• 3.08” Ada, Okla. Los Angeles 67/56

Salt Lak e City Las 70/46 Vegas 88/66

Denver 60/42 Albuquerque 73/48

Phoenix 94/67

Honolulu 86/73

Halifax 54/44 Portland To ronto 65/43 58/37 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 74/51 70/45 69/49 Rapid City Detroit Buffal o New York 54/43 65/48 60/43 74/52 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 70/50 Chicago 73/52 76/53 64/46 Omaha W ashington, D. C. 68/49 77/58 Louisville Kansas City 66/55 St. Louis Nashville 76/60 81/65 69/58 Charlotte Oklahoma City Atlanta 88/63 Little Rock 77/63 86/66 81/65 Birmingham 86/67

Dallas 82/70

Tijuana 74/54

Houston 85/70

Chihuahua 92/55

Anchorage 51/37

La Paz 91/58 Juneau 50/39

Mazatlan 90/68

New Orleans 87/74

Orlando 90/68 Miami 87/76

Monterrey 92/74

FRONTS

Smith Continued from C1 Smith earned a degree in education from Portland State College and returned to Bend, teaching at Pilot Butte and other elementary schools in the area for 22 years. She never married or had children, and outlived both of her older brothers, Elmer and Lester. Friend Bob Greenlee said Smith impressed a certain toughness on him the first day they met. Greenlee and a friend had gone to visit Smith to learn more about her father’s study of Central Oregon geology, and found her recovering from injuries. Smith — around 90 at the time — had fallen all the way down the 24-step staircase from her apartment to the sidewalk on Wall Street, got up, and headed back up the stairs to call 911. “It is probably true that the age of feminism — being your own woman — was born with Marjorie. She was fiercely independent,” Greenlee said. “Being single all her life, she had to work extra hard to look out for her own interests, and that gave her kind of a tough crust.” Greenlee said he was able to partially pierce Smith’s crust, persuading her to call on him when she needed help getting around. When the two would drive through areas Smith hadn’t seen in years, she would express astonishment at how much her hometown had changed, he said. But Smith’s apartment scarcely changed at all over the years. “That apartment, when you walk through that door, its just like walking back into 1930,” Greenlee said. “Filled with old oak furniture, it’s a time machine.” Tereck Beckman, the executive director of the High Desert Assisted Living Community where Smith lived out her last

Quebec 58/37

Thunder Bay 66/39

Bismarck 71/46

Billings 74/47

Portland 75/51

Winnipeg 70/42

Marjorie Smtih, pictured at age 3 with a nurse, was the first baby born in Bend’s first hospital, a small facility on Oregon Avenue. Smith, who died last week at 100, represented a link to the past, said Bend City Councilor Oran Teater. “There’s so many new people in this community that don’t understand the history, and I just think it’s vital they understand there are people like this,” he said. “She was a pioneer.” Bulletin file photo

years, said she became a “keystone of our community,” getting to know every resident who came throughout he facility over the last six years. Beckman said Smith kept up her interest in the city around her until the end, sitting in her chair by the window and scanning the horizon for signs of new construction. “She was a spectacular lady, she really was,” he said. “Her body may have given up on her this last little while, but mentally, she was sharp as a tack and she

was well loved by our staff.” Bend City Councilor Oran Teater said Smith represented a link to the past, when nearly everyone in Central Oregon knew each other. “There’s so many new people in this community that don’t understand the history, and I just think it’s vital they understand there are people like this,” he said. “She was a pioneer.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Portland police identify man killed in shooting The Associated Press PORTLAND — Portland police have identified 25-year-old Keaton Dupree Otis as the man killed in a police shootout that also wounded an officer. Police say Otis refused to obey officers who had pulled his car

over Wednesday evening near a shopping mall. At least three officers fired on Otis after police say he drew a gun and fired. Portland Police Chief Mike Reese said officers had twice fired a Taser to no effect before fatally shooting Otis.

The medical examiner said Friday that Otis died of multiple gunshot wounds to his chest. Officer Christopher Burley was wounded in each leg. Police said late Friday that he has been released from a Portland hospital.

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .68/57/0.95 . . .79/66/t . . . .80/60/t Akron . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.03 . . .68/42/s . . 66/49/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .75/50/0.37 . 66/44/pc . . . 69/44/s Albuquerque. . . .73/54/0.00 . . .73/48/s . . . 80/54/s Anchorage . . . . .48/38/0.00 . .51/37/sh . . 54/40/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . . .84/65/t Atlantic City . . . .86/54/0.00 . . .71/53/s . . 67/52/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .77/67/0.20 . . .84/68/t . . . .87/68/t Baltimore . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .76/51/s . . 74/55/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .71/46/0.00 . 74/47/pc . . . 75/49/s Birmingham . . . .87/69/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . . .85/66/t Bismarck . . . . . . .73/34/0.00 . 71/46/pc . . . 68/46/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . . .79/49/s . . 80/50/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .68/51/0.02 . 69/49/pc . . . 71/53/s Bridgeport, CT. . .72/50/0.21 . . .70/50/s . . . 66/49/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .65/52/0.00 . . .60/43/s . . . 67/46/s Burlington, VT. . .70/48/0.08 . 62/43/pc . . . 69/43/s Caribou, ME . . . .64/36/0.00 . .57/37/sh . . 62/39/pc Charleston, SC . .85/64/0.00 . . .84/68/s . . 84/66/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .88/63/t . . . .83/62/t Chattanooga. . . .88/66/0.00 . . .84/65/t . . . .83/65/t Cheyenne . . . . . .58/33/0.12 . .52/37/sh . . . 63/41/c Chicago. . . . . . . .66/47/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . 62/49/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .78/67/0.00 . 73/55/pc . . . 73/57/c Cleveland . . . . . .75/64/0.82 . 66/45/pc . . 64/48/pc Colorado Springs 49/39/0.17 . . .59/39/t . . 66/41/pc Columbia, MO . .64/52/0.00 . . .66/55/r . . . .69/54/t Columbia, SC . . .90/68/0.00 . 90/65/pc . . . .87/63/t Columbus, GA. . .88/69/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . 87/65/pc Columbus, OH. . .78/68/0.00 . 73/52/pc . . 71/53/pc Concord, NH . . . .68/47/0.13 . 68/41/pc . . . 74/41/s Corpus Christi. . .85/77/0.00 . . .87/73/c . . . 88/74/c Dallas Ft Worth. .79/63/0.54 . . .82/70/t . . . .84/68/t Dayton . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . 71/51/pc . . 70/54/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .61/39/0.02 . . .60/42/t . . 69/44/pc Des Moines. . . . .68/41/0.00 . . .70/50/c . . 66/52/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .69/53/0.02 . 65/48/pc . . 67/50/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .59/39/0.01 . 68/43/pc . . 66/46/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . . 90/58/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . 63/38/pc . . 58/38/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 76/49/pc . . . 67/50/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .68/32/s . . . 72/35/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .62/49/0.00 . 65/46/pc . . 68/48/pc Green Bay. . . . . .62/46/0.00 . 70/45/pc . . 64/48/pc Greensboro. . . . .90/63/0.00 . . .84/64/t . . . 80/60/c Harrisburg. . . . . .85/57/0.12 . . .75/50/s . . . 73/52/s Hartford, CT . . . .78/50/0.42 . . .70/44/s . . . 72/42/s Helena. . . . . . . . .71/37/0.00 . 74/42/pc . . 78/46/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/74/0.00 . . .86/73/s . . . 85/72/s Houston . . . . . . .87/75/0.00 . . .85/70/t . . . 85/71/c Huntsville . . . . . .90/69/0.00 . . .85/65/t . . . .83/66/t Indianapolis . . . .71/58/0.01 . 72/54/pc . . 68/54/sh Jackson, MS . . . .87/69/0.00 . . .90/68/t . . . .85/68/t Madison, WI . . . .66/47/0.00 . . .71/46/c . . 66/49/sh Jacksonville. . . . .85/62/0.00 . . .88/65/s . . 88/66/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .50/39/r . . 56/40/pc Kansas City. . . . .68/44/0.00 . .66/55/sh . . . .60/52/r Lansing . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . 66/47/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .88/66/s . . . 92/68/s Lexington . . . . . .80/68/0.00 . 77/56/pc . . . .77/61/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .69/35/0.00 . . .68/50/c . . . .60/49/r Little Rock. . . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .81/65/t . . . .79/62/t Los Angeles. . . . .65/56/0.00 . . .67/56/s . . . 68/57/s Louisville. . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . .76/60/c . . . .72/61/t Memphis. . . . . . .88/66/0.09 . . .81/67/t . . . .80/67/t Miami . . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .87/76/s . . . .87/75/t Milwaukee . . . . .66/47/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . 60/48/sh Minneapolis . . . .71/46/0.00 . 74/51/pc . . . 70/54/c Nashville . . . . . . .86/66/0.16 . . .81/65/t . . . .80/66/t New Orleans. . . .88/75/0.00 . . .87/74/t . . . .85/74/t New York . . . . . .80/55/0.04 . . .74/52/s . . . 72/51/s Newark, NJ . . . . .83/56/0.02 . . .74/52/s . . . 73/50/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .90/59/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . . .77/62/t Oklahoma City . .59/55/0.98 . . .77/63/t . . . .80/59/t Omaha . . . . . . . .69/40/0.00 . . .68/49/c . . . .60/50/r Orlando. . . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . . .90/70/t Palm Springs. . . .95/61/0.00 . . .95/66/s . . . 96/66/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . 68/52/sh Philadelphia . . . .85/57/0.56 . . .76/53/s . . 73/53/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . .94/67/s . . . 97/68/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .68/44/s . . 69/50/pc Portland, ME. . . .61/50/0.00 . 65/43/pc . . . 70/43/s Providence . . . . .65/49/0.08 . . .70/47/s . . . 75/49/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .94/65/0.00 . . .86/67/t . . . .81/60/t

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .68/31/0.00 . .54/43/sh . . . 63/44/c Savannah . . . . . .85/63/0.00 . . .86/66/s . . 86/66/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .74/40/0.00 . . .79/50/s . . 81/52/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . 70/49/pc . . . 68/53/c Richmond . . . . . .89/59/0.00 . 85/60/pc . . 78/60/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .69/37/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . 63/49/sh Rochester, NY . . .73/52/0.00 . 61/43/pc . . . 67/44/s Spokane . . . . . . .75/46/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . 75/55/pc Sacramento. . . . .82/52/0.00 . . .84/55/s . . . 82/54/s Springfield, MO. .66/53/2.21 . . .69/58/r . . . .72/56/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .65/56/0.30 . . .69/58/r . . . .67/59/r Tampa . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . 88/72/pc . . . .88/73/t Salt Lake City . . .64/40/0.00 . . .70/46/s . . . 75/54/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . .88/58/s . . . 91/60/s San Antonio . . . .76/63/2.72 . . .83/71/c . . . 89/71/c Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .61/54/1.00 . . .74/62/t . . . .76/56/t San Diego . . . . . .65/58/0.00 . . .67/57/s . . . 68/57/s Washington, DC .88/59/0.11 . 77/58/pc . . 75/55/pc San Francisco . . .62/52/0.00 . . .64/50/s . . . 64/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . .67/54/sh . . . .69/52/t San Jose . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 73/49/s Yakima . . . . . . . .83/41/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . . 78/55/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . 68/36/pc . . 74/41/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .92/62/0.00 . . .95/65/s . . . 96/64/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .55/34/0.00 . . .47/40/c . . 55/39/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . .81/64/sh . . . 73/50/s Auckland. . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . . .66/58/t . . . .66/56/t Baghdad . . . . . .102/87/0.00 105/80/pc . . 106/82/s Bangkok . . . . . . .99/86/0.00 . . .99/82/t . . . .98/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . .79/53/s . . 67/54/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . . .83/67/s . . 85/69/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.00 . .52/43/sh . . 57/38/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . .70/51/sh . . 71/51/pc Budapest. . . . . . .68/48/0.02 . . .64/52/r . . 55/48/sh Buenos Aires. . . .72/59/0.00 . .64/50/sh . . . 62/41/s Cabo San Lucas .86/66/0.00 . . .86/68/s . . 87/70/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .99/72/0.00 . .101/71/s . . 108/73/s Calgary . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . 70/46/pc . . . 79/50/s Cancun . . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . 90/78/pc . . . .87/79/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .57/43/0.14 . . .52/39/c . . 50/37/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . .50/37/sh . . 51/39/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .57/48/0.00 . .54/47/sh . . 60/43/pc Harare. . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . . .80/58/s . . . 78/55/s Hong Kong . . . . .86/77/0.00 . . .83/75/t . . . .85/75/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .79/66/0.04 . .83/65/sh . . . 77/57/s Jerusalem . . . . . .88/48/0.00 . . .92/61/s . . . 99/67/s Johannesburg . . .70/50/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . 69/51/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 76/66/pc . . 77/67/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . . .64/49/s . . . 67/51/s London . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . 55/38/pc . . 56/43/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . . 68/48/s Manila. . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . 97/82/pc . . . 97/81/s

Mecca . . . . . . . .106/84/0.00 . .105/83/s . . 106/83/s Mexico City. . . . .81/59/4.95 . 83/58/pc . . 85/58/pc Montreal. . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . 59/39/pc . . . 64/40/s Moscow . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . .72/55/sh . . . .75/57/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/63/0.27 . . .74/60/t . . . .75/61/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 84/76/pc . . . .81/75/t New Delhi. . . . .107/89/0.00 . .113/84/s . . 112/83/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . . 73/55/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .57/44/sh . . 54/43/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .64/46/0.01 . 59/38/pc . . . 64/39/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . . .53/42/c . . 58/41/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .82/66/0.00 . . .83/67/s . . . 84/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .64/55/r . . 64/54/sh Santiago . . . . . . .54/50/0.00 . .59/42/sh . . 55/41/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/55/0.00 . . .78/60/s . . . 79/64/c Sapporo. . . . . . . .46/46/0.00 . 62/48/pc . . . 63/51/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . 71/48/pc . . . 75/52/s Shanghai. . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . .73/61/sh . . 75/65/sh Singapore . . . . . .90/81/0.50 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .64/50/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . 63/48/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . 67/50/pc . . 67/52/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .75/72/0.00 . . .80/70/t . . 83/71/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . . .86/68/s . . . 89/70/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . . .66/53/s . . 66/52/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .68/45/0.22 . . .58/37/s . . . 62/39/s Vancouver. . . . . .66/48/0.00 . 63/54/pc . . 64/48/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .59/48/0.08 . .62/49/sh . . 60/48/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .55/52/0.30 . 63/45/pc . . 63/50/sh


S

D

Horse racing Inside Jockey Calvin Borel brings his unusual racing style to today’s Preakness, see Page D6.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010

P O L E P E DA L PA D D L E

Ours is not the only PPP

PPP Team Names Some Pole Pedal Paddle teams might spend more time coming up with a clever team name than they do training for the competition. The following is a small sample of some of the more imaginative names of teams taking part in today’s race: • Some team names indicate just how fast — or slow — the team expects to be, such as: “Molasses In January.” • Others suggest a degree of indenture, like: “Our Boss Made Us Do It.” • Some names include entirely too much information, such as: “Kilt Lifters.” • Other names point to a team’s motivation for participating, like: “Will PPP For Beer.” • One name is a twist on a government education program: “No Teacher Left Behind.” • But some teams clearly spent more time training than developing an interesting name, and those teams probably should be considered favorites to win. So watch out for “Zack’s Team.” —Mark Morical

Several multisport events throughout the West are similar to the Bachelor-to-Bend race, which started in 1977 Coming Sunday

to Sea in Bellingham, Wash.; the Ridge to River in Wenatchee, Wash.; the Mountains to Sound in SeIn these parts, the U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Padattle; and the Pole Pedal Paddle in Salida, Colo. dle is one of a kind. Likely there are others, and triathlons and Look in But in the world of multisport racing, Cenadventure races abound. But these five multiSunday’s tral Oregon’s PPP is not exactly unique. sport races are more typical of what will play Bulletin for Several other locations throughout the West out today in Central Oregon, from the snowy complete host their own versions of the PPP — two even slopes of Mount Bachelor to the festive finish at coverage of have the same name: Pole Pedal Paddle. Just as Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater. the 2010 PPP thousands of multisport racers and spectators Central Oregonians can thank the Pole Pedal will converge today on Bend, similar throngs Paddle in Wyoming for serving as the model gather at other outdoor-sports meccas for PPP-like for what we have here today. competitions. Our PPP is based on the Jackson Hole PPP, which beRaces akin to Central Oregon’s Pole Pedal Paddle in- gan in 1976. clude the Pole Pedal Paddle in Jackson Hole, Wyo.; the Ski See PPP / D5

By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Seattle Mariners’ Ichiro Suzuki, left, and Mike Sweeney celebrate their 4-3 win over the Tampa Bay Rays in St. Petersburg, Fla., on Friday.

IN SID E MLB Pirates ......... 10 Cubs ..............6

Orioles ...........8 Indians ...........1

Cardinals .......4 Reds...............3

Red Sox .........7 Tigers ............2

Marlins ..........7 Mets...............2

Yankees .........8 Twins .............4

Braves............6 D’backs ..........5

Blue Jays ..... 16 Rangers ....... 10

Phillies...........9 Brewers..........5

Mariners ........4 Rays ...............3

Dodgers .........4 Padres ...........3

Royals ............6 White Sox ......1

Giants ............8 Astros ............2

Angels ...........4 Athletics.........0

PREP SOFTBALL

PREP BASEBALL

Bears’ IMC title hopes are still alive Bulletin staff report The Intermountain Conference baseball title will be decided on the final day of the season. Grant Newton hit a walkoff RBI single in the bottom of the eighth inning Friday to give Bend High a 6-5 home victory over Pendleton. The Buckaroos (15-4 IMC) are still atop the league standings, but with a sweep of today’s doubleheader at Bend High, the Lava Bears (14-5) can win their third consecutive IMC title. Pendleton only needs to win one game today to claim the IMC championship and the league’s No. 1 seed for the Class 5A state playoffs. Madras (13-6 IMC), which lost to Summit on Thursday, can finish no higher than second in the league standings. While Newton was big at the plate for Bend — the Lava Bear junior went three for five with two runs scored and an RBI — Travis Wiest threw all eight innings to earn the victory. Wiest gave up 10 hits and five runs, but shut out the Bucks in the seventh and eighth innings. “He was just as strong late as he was early in the game,” Bend coach Dan Weber said about his senior hurler.” After holding Pendleton scoreless in the top of the eighth, Steven Barrett drew a one-out walk to start the Lava Bear offense. Michael Hirko’s sacrifice bunt put Barrett on second with two outs. Kenny Norgaard was intentionally walked to set up a force at third before Newton lined a ball into right field that ended the game.

Nationals ......... Rockies .....ppd.

Mariners’ offense wakes up in win Seattle hits three home runs in a 4-3 victory over Tampa Bay, see Page D4

GOLF Pak claims lead Se Ri Pak shoots a 66 to take a one-stroke lead at the LPGA Classic, see Page D5

NHL Bruins fall to Flyers Philadelphia overcomes Boston’s 3-0 series lead with a 4-3 victory in Game 7, see Page D3

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View’s Ali Matteis comes up short while diving for a shallow fly ball during the seventh inning against Hermiston Friday at Mountain View. Mountain View was defeated by Hermiston, 7-6.

Homer sinks Cougars Hermiston wins as Mountain View rally falls short Bulletin staff report This one could sting for a while. Fighting for the Intermountain Conference’s fourth and final spot in the Class 5A state softball postseason, Mountain View fell to Hermiston 7-6 at home Friday. The Cougars (7-12 IMC) rallied to tie the game 6-6 with a two-run sixth inning, but the Bulldogs’ Paige Long led off the top of the

seventh with a solo home run to give Hermiston a 7-6 lead. Mountain View put two runners on in the bottom half of the seventh, but Mikayla Bateman was thrown out at the plate in a close play to end the game. “We need to win both games against Hermiston (today) and Madras needs to beat Summit in both their games,” Cougars coach Alana Dusan said about what needs to hap-

pen for Mountain View to make the playoffs. Bateman led the Cougars at the plate, ending the day with two hits, a double and one run batted in. Shelbee Wells went the distance in the circle for Mountain View, taking the loss after allowing 13 hits and seven runs over seven innings. “We expect to win two games (today),” said Dusan, whose team ends the regular season with a home doubleheader against the Bulldogs today. “After losing such a close one, we’ll come out fired up.”

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Glaze Meadow to undergo a $3.5 million renovation By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Boston Bruins’ Milan Lucic skates on the ice after losing 4-3 to the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 7 of a second-round NHL playoff hockey series, Friday in Boston.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D3 Prep Sports ...............................D3 Major League Baseball ............. D4 Golf ............................................D5 Soccer .......................................D5 Horse racing ............................. D6 Auto racing ............................... D6

Black Butte Ranch homeowners this week overwhelmingly approved a $3.5 million plan to renovate the ranch’s Glaze Meadow golf course, the resort announced Friday. The vote was the last step in approval of the project, which will completely overhaul the 35year-old Glaze Meadow course. The project is expected to begin Oct. 1 and will close the course for the entire 2011 golf season, said Charles Kingsbaker, director of sales and marketing for Black Butte Ranch. Kingsbaker said the course is expected to reopen in May 2012. “Greens and tees and bunker complexes break down over time,” Kingsbaker said. “Just like a roof on a house — every so often you need to redo your roof. Thirty-five years of original green, tee, irrigation, and

LOCAL GOLF bunker complexes — it was time to rebuild it.” John Fought — a well-regarded golf-course architect who helped design Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club and Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club in Portland, and who redesigned Sunriver’s Meadows course — has been selected to lead the redesign of Glaze Meadow. Fought is also the brother of Jeff Fought, Black Butte Ranch’s director of golf. Kingsbaker said that the construction work will now go out to bid, and that Black Butte Ranch will decide later this summer on a contractor for the project. More than just upgrading the greens and tees, the redesign will change the landscape of Glaze Meadow. Plans include construction of a new

irrigation system, reconstruction and repositioning of tee boxes, addition or reshaping of bunkers, resurfacing and rerouting of cart paths, and the thinning of some trees on the heavily wooded course. The new design will also stretch Glaze Meadow’s back tees from the current distance of 6,574 yards to more than 7,000 yards, Kingsbaker said. “Rather than just rebuild in the same spot, we asked: ‘Can we rebuild it but get ourselves a better product and a better golf course?’” Kingsbaker said. “And we are definitely going to have that.” Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course will remain open during the reconstruction of the Glaze Meadow course. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

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D2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Baseball ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Iberdrola Open, third round, Golf. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, third round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, third round, CBS. 1 p.m. — LPGA, Bell Micro Classic, third round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Regions Charity Classic, second round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 7 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Heluva Good 200, qualifying, ESPN2. 11:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Heluva Good 200, ABC. 5 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Summit Racing Equipment Southern Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 11 a.m. — WNBA, Los Angeles Sparks at Phoenix Mercury, ESPN2.

HORSE RACING Noon — Rolex Championship, NBC. 1:30 p.m. — Preakness Stakes, NBC (post time at 3:15 p.m.).

BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Mississippi at Alabama, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, Fox. 2 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon State, FSNW.

SOFTBALL 4:30 p.m. — College, SEC Tournament, final, Alabama at LSU, ESPN.

SOCCER 7 p.m. — USSF D2, A.C. St. Louis at Portland Timbers, FSNW.

BULL RIDING 10 p.m. — PBR Pueblo Invitational, VS. network (taped).

BOXING 11 p.m. — Humberto Soto vs. Ricardo Dominguez, FSNW (taped).

SUNDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Iberdrola Open, final round, Golf. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, final round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, CBS. 1 p.m. — LPGA, Bell Micro Classic, final round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Regions Charity Classic, final round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Autism Speaks 400, Fox. 4 p.m. — Drag racing, NHRA Summit Racing Equipment Southern National, final eliminations, ESPN2.

SOCCER 10 a.m. — Spanish Primera Division, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 10 p.m. — MLS, Seattle Sounders FC at Red Bull New York, FSNW (taped).

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees, TBS. 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, FSNW. 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Milwaukee Brewers, ESPN.

HOCKEY Noon — NHL, conference final, Chicago Blackhawks at San Jose Sharks, NBC. 4 p.m. — NHL, conference final, Montreal Canadiens at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 12:30 p.m. — NBA Playoffs, conference final, Boston Celtics at Orlando Magic, ABC.

CYCLING 2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 1, VS. network (taped).

SOFTBALL 4 p.m. — College, Big 12 Tournament, final, teams TBD, FSNW (same-day tape).

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 2 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Milwaukee Brewers, KICE-AM 940.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

Today Baseball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County, 10 a.m. Softball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County, 10 a.m. Track: Culver at Tri-River Conference championships, Salem, noon; Gilchrist at Mt. Skyline League championships, Winston, 10:15 a.m.

19. Danny Gruninger, 6.736, 205.22. 20. John Nobile, 6.762, 205.26. 21. Jimmy Alund, 6.771, 204.23. 22. John Gaydosh Jr, 6.895, 199.91. 23. Rodger Brogdon, 9.162, 102.71. Pro Stock Motorcycle 1. Matt Smith, Buell, 6.940, 191.87. 2. Hector Arana, Buell, 6.941, 193.79. 3. David Hope, Buell, 6.955, 192.19. 4. Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.976, 192.41. 5. Michael Phillips, Suzuki, 6.987, 193.82. 6. Andrew Hines, Harley-Davidson, 6.994, 189.50. 7. LE Tonglet, Suzuki, 7.008, 190.57. 8. Shawn Gann, Buell, 7.009, 189.07. 9. Angie Smith, Buell, 7.040, 187.26. 10. Jim Underdahl, Suzuki, 7.073, 190.38. 11. Karen Stoffer, Suzuki, 7.091, 185.13. 12. Craig Treble, Suzuki, 7.105, 185.84. Not Qualified: 13. Mike Berry, 7.111, 187.34. 14. Steve Johnson, 7.113, 191.48. 15. Gary Moreno, 7.117, 185.51. 16. Wesley Wells, 7.161, 186.67. 17. James Surber, 7.197, 186.02. 18. Junior Pippin, 7.221, 181.89. 19. Joe DeSantis, 7.292, 182.48. 20. Darin McCurdy, 7.532, 185.18.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Orlando vs. Boston Sunday, May 16: Boston at Orlando, 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 18: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 22: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. Monday, May 24: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 26: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Orlando at Boston, 5:30 p.m. x-Sunday, May 30: Boston at Orlando, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers vs. Phoenix Monday, May 17: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 19: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Sunday, May 23: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 25: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 31: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour VALERO TEXAS OPEN Note: Friday’s second round was rained out and will be made up today.

LPGA Tour BELL MICRO LPGA CLASSIC Friday At The Crossings Course, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail’s Magnolia Grove Mobile, Ala. Purse: $1.3 million Yardage: 6,532; Par: 72 Second Round Se Ri Pak 69-66—135 Wendy Ward 71-65—136 Brittany Lincicome 70-66—136 Haeji Kang 69-69—138 Suzann Pettersen 68-70—138 Sun Young Yoo 68-70—138 Azahara Munoz 65-73—138 Shi Hyun Ahn 69-70—139 Na Yeon Choi 69-70—139 Meena Lee 67-72—139 Janice Moodie 67-72—139 Jee Young Lee 66-73—139 Kristy McPherson 73-67—140 Shanshan Feng 71-69—140 Karrie Webb 71-69—140 Jimin Kang 70-70—140 Jiyai Shin 70-70—140 Angela Stanford 70-70—140 Song-Hee Kim 70-70—140 Mika Miyazato 70-70—140 Hye Jung Choi 67-73—140 Katherine Hull 66-74—140 Jeong Jang 71-70—141 Meaghan Francella 71-70—141 Ai Miyazato 70-71—141 Karen Stupples 70-71—141 Amy Hung 70-71—141 Amanda Blumenherst 68-73—141 Cristie Kerr 67-74—141 Kris Tamulis 73-69—142 Sophie Gustafson 72-70—142 Pernilla Lindberg 71-71—142 Stacy Prammanasudh 71-71—142 Juli Inkster 71-71—142 Inbee Park 71-71—142 Katie Futcher 71-71—142 Amy Yang 70-72—142 Morgan Pressel 70-72—142 Karin Sjodin 70-72—142 Hee Young Park 69-73—142 Michele Redman 69-73—142 Alena Sharp 76-67—143 Momoko Ueda 74-69—143 Jennifer Rosales 73-70—143 Yani Tseng 73-70—143 Leah Wigger 73-70—143 Jill McGill 72-71—143 Katie Kempter 72-71—143 Mindy Kim 72-71—143 Chella Choi 71-72—143 Hee-Won Han 71-72—143 Taylor Leon 71-72—143 Marianne Skarpnord 69-74—143 Karine Icher 69-74—143 Eunjung Yi 68-75—143 Jimin Jeong 75-69—144 Pat Hurst 75-69—144 Mi Hyun Kim 74-70—144 Stephanie Louden 73-71—144 Diana D’Alessio 73-71—144 Brittany Lang 73-71—144 Allison Hanna 72-72—144 Natalie Gulbis 72-72—144 Libby Smith 71-73—144 Heather Bowie Young 71-73—144 Mariajo Uribe 71-73—144 Irene Cho 69-75—144 Sarah Jane Smith 74-71—145 Jin Young Pak 74-71—145 Soo-Yun Kang 73-72—145 Giulia Sergas 73-72—145 Wendy Doolan 72-73—145 Michelle Wie 72-73—145 Failed to qualify Marcy Hart 75-71—146 Grace Park 75-71—146 Louise Friberg 74-72—146 Candie Kung 74-72—146 Song Yi Choi 74-72—146 Maria Hernandez 74-72—146 Mina Harigae 74-72—146 Leta Lindley 73-73—146 Christina Kim 73-73—146 Na On Min 73-73—146 M.J. Hur 72-74—146 Moira Dunn 71-75—146 Kyeong Bae 71-75—146 Charlotte Mayorkas 70-76—146 Lorie Kane 69-77—146 Jane Park 77-70—147 Lucy Kim 75-72—147 Silvia Cavalleri 74-73—147 Allison Fouch 73-74—147 Laura Diaz 73-74—147 Anna Grzebien 73-74—147 Lisa Meldrum 72-75—147 Liz Janangelo 70-77—147 Russy Gulyanamitta 77-71—148 Mikaela Parmlid 76-72—148 Beatriz Recari 76-72—148 Beth Bader 75-73—148 Vicky Hurst 74-74—148 Jean Reynolds 74-74—148 Sarah Kemp 73-75—148 Ji Young Oh 73-75—148 Samantha Richdale 73-75—148 Stacy Lewis 72-76—148 Becky Morgan 72-76—148 In-Kyung Kim 76-73—149 Eun-Hee Ji 76-73—149 Paola Moreno 75-74—149 Paige Mackenzie 75-74—149 Nicole Hage 74-75—149 Tania Elosegui 74-75—149 Sherri Steinhauer 74-75—149 Anna Rawson 73-76—149 Kris Tschetter 73-76—149 Sarah Lee 72-77—149 Danielle Downey 70-79—149 Gwladys Nocera 76-74—150 Misun Cho 75-75—150 Ilmi Chung 74-76—150 Jackie Gallagher-Smith 78-73—151 Michelle Ellis 76-75—151 Lisa Strom 78-74—152 Louise Stahle 78-74—152 Dina Ammaccapane 77-75—152 Julieta Granada 76-76—152 Sandra Gal 76-76—152 Nicole Castrale 77-76—153 Liselotte Neumann 77-76—153 Nicole Jeray 76-77—153 .Casie Cathrea 74-79—153 Maria Hjorth 77-77—154 Reilley Rankin 75-79—154 Meg Mallon 76-79—155 Ilhee Lee 75-80—155

SOCCER MLS

Dorothy Delasin Young-A Yang Meredith Duncan Mhairi McKay Gloria Park Kelli Kuehne Brandie Burton Angela Park

78-78—156 76-80—156 76-80—156 78-80—158 79-80—159 79-86—165 77—WD 80—WD

Champions Tour REGIONS CHARITY CLASSIC Friday At RTJ Golf Trail at Ross Bridge Birmingham, Ala. Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 7,525; Par 72 (36-36) First Round Joey Sindelar 31-34—65 Russ Cochran 32-33—65 Bobby Clampett 33-32—65 Peter Senior 33-32—65 David Frost 32-34—66 David Peoples 32-34—66 R.W. Eaks 32-34—66 Blaine McCallister 33-34—67 Trevor Dodds 33-34—67 Tom Kite 33-34—67 Larry Nelson 33-34—67 Ben Crenshaw 34-33—67 Eduardo Romero 32-35—67 Michael Allen 35-32—67 David Eger 33-34—67 Corey Pavin 31-36—67 Tom Jenkins 33-34—67 Fulton Allem 35-32—67 Kirk Hanefeld 34-34—68 John Ross 34-34—68 Ted Schulz 34-34—68 Brad Bryant 35-33—68 Gil Morgan 34-34—68 Bob Tway 35-33—68 Mike Reid 34-34—68 Tom Purtzer 33-35—68 Bruce Vaughan 34-34—68 Dan Forsman 33-35—68 Bernhard Langer 35-33—68 Hale Irwin 34-34—68 Olin Browne 33-35—68 Larry Mize 33-35—68 Jay Don Blake 33-35—68 Joe Ozaki 34-34—68 John Cook 36-33—69 Fred Funk 34-35—69 Andy Bean 32-37—69 Jeff Sluman 34-35—69 Bobby Wadkins 37-32—69 Sandy Lyle 34-35—69 James Mason 34-35—69 Ronnie Black 31-38—69 Chien Soon Lu 35-34—69 Chip Beck 35-35—70 Jodie Mudd 35-35—70 Ron Streck 33-37—70 Hal Sutton 36-34—70 Denis Watson 34-36—70 John Harris 35-35—70 Tim Simpson 36-34—70 Keith Clearwater 35-35—70 Wayne Levi 37-33—70 Bob Gilder 35-35—70 Mike Smith 33-37—70 Bruce Fleisher 35-36—71 Keith Fergus 35-36—71 Mike Goodes 35-36—71 Allen Doyle 37-34—71 Bill Glasson 35-36—71 Fuzzy Zoeller 37-34—71 Steve Haskins 37-35—72 Scott Simpson 35-37—72 Jim Dent 36-36—72 Rick Smallridge 37-35—72 Jack Ferenz 36-37—73 Leonard Thompson 38-35—73 Mark Wiebe 38-35—73 Gary Hallberg 32-41—73 Jim Roy 39-35—74 Bruce Lietzke 36-38—74 Peter Jacobsen 36-38—74 Ken Green 39-35—74 Gene Jones 37-37—74 Mike McCullough 36-39—75 Fred Holton 35-40—75 Joe Inman 39-37—76 Frank Shikle 38-39—77 Jim Colbert WD

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— MADRID MASTERS Friday Madrid, Spain Singles Women Quarterfinals Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Nadia Petrova (16), Russia, 6-1, 1-6, 6-4. Venus Williams (4), United States, def. Samantha Stosur (8), Australia, 6-3, 6-3. Shahar Peer, Israel, def. Li Na (13), China, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Aravane Rezai, France, def. Jelena Jankovic (7), Serbia, 7-5, 6-4.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— MADRID MASTERS Friday Madrid, Spain Singles Men Quarterfinals Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, 6-3, 6-1. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Gael Monfils (12), France, 6-1, 6-3. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. David Ferrer (9), Spain, def. Andy Murray (3), Britain, 7-5, 6-3.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— x-if necessary PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, April 30: Pittsburgh 6, Montreal 3 Sunday, May 2: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 1

Tuesday, May 4: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 0 Thursday, May 6: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2 Saturday, May 8: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 1 Monday, May 10: Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 Wednesday, May 12: Montreal 5, Pittsburgh 2 Philadelphia 4, Boston 3 Saturday, May 1: Boston 5, Philadelphia 4 (OT) Monday, May 3: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2 Wednesday, May 5: Boston 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, May 7: Philadelphia 5, Boston 4, OT Monday, May 10: Philadelphia 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 12: Philadelphia 2, Boston 1 Friday, May 14: Philadelphia 4, Boston 3 WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Saturday, May 1: Vancouver 5, Chicago 1 Monday, May 3: Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Wednesday, May 5: Chicago 5, Vancouver 2 Friday, May 7: Chicago 7, Vancouver 4 Sunday, May 9: Vancouver 4, Chicago 1 Tuesday, May 11: Chicago 5, Vancouver 1 San Jose 4, Detroit 1 Thursday, April 29: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Sunday, May 2: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Tuesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Thursday, May 6: Detroit 7, San Jose 1 Saturday, May 8: San Jose 2, Detroit 1

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF New York 5 2 0 15 8 Columbus 3 0 2 11 9 Toronto FC 3 4 0 9 11 Chicago 2 3 2 8 9 Kansas City 2 3 1 7 6 New England 2 5 1 7 10 Philadelphia 1 5 0 3 6 D.C. 1 6 0 3 4 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 7 0 1 22 15 Real Salt Lake 4 3 1 13 15 Houston 4 4 1 13 12 San Jose 4 2 0 12 11 Colorado 3 3 1 10 8 FC Dallas 2 1 4 10 9 Chivas USA 3 4 1 10 10 Seattle 2 3 3 9 8 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. San Jose at New England, 3 p.m. Chivas USA at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at New York, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.

GA 8 5 13 10 6 14 14 15 GA 2 9 10 7 7 8 11 12

BASEBALL College

CONFERENCE FINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Sunday, May 16: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 18: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Thursday, May 20: Philadelphia at Montreal, 4 p.m. Saturday, May 22: Philadelphia at Montreal, noon x-Monday, May 24: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 26: Philadelphia at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Friday, May 28: Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Sunday, May 16: Chicago at San Jose, noon Tuesday, May 18: Chicago at San Jose, 7 p.m. Friday, May 21: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. Sunday, May 23: San Jose at Chicago, noon x-Tuesday, May 25: Chicago at San Jose, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 27: San Jose at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Saturday, May 29: Chicago at San Jose, 5 p.m.

All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 14 4 .789 41-5 UCLA 11 8 .578 35-11 Stanford 11 8 .578 26-18 California 11 10 .523 27-18 Arizona 9 9 .500 30-16 Oregon 10 11 .476 32-18 Washington State 9 10 .473 26-18 Oregon State 8 11 .421 25-18 Washington 8 11 .421 25-23 Southern California 5 14 .263 23-25 Friday’s Games Oregon State 8, Washington 6 Stanford 8, Washington State 7 UCLA 13, USC 7 x-Oregon 5, East Tennessee State 0 Today’s Games USC at UCLA, 2 p.m. Washington at Oregon State, 2 p.m. Washington State at Stanford, 2 p.m. x-East Tennessee State at Oregon, 5 p.m. Arizona State at Arizona, 6 p.m. x-nonconference game

AUTO RACING NASCAR

BASKETBALL WNBA

Sprint Cup AUTISM SPEAKS 400 LINEUP After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Dover International Speedway Dover, Del. Lap length: 1 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 157.315. 2. (9) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 157.274. 3. (5) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 157.198. 4. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 157.006. 5. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 156.904. 6. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 156.849. 7. (33) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 156.829. 8. (43) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 156.706. 9. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 156.678. 10. (77) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 156.597. 11. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 156.576. 12. (2) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 156.427. 13. (00) David Reutimann, Toyota, 156.406. 14. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 156.331. 15. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 156.25. 16. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 156.236. 17. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 156.223. 18. (20) Joey Logano, Toyota, 156.216. 19. (19) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 156.074. 20. (12) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 155.871. 21. (17) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 155.73. 22. (6) David Ragan, Ford, 155.615. 23. (98) Paul Menard, Ford, 155.534. 24. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 155.092. 25. (46) J.J. Yeley, Dodge, 155.005. 26. (47) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 154.999. 27. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 154.779. 28. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 154.652. 29. (82) Scott Speed, Toyota, 154.573. 30. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 154.487. 31. (26) David Stremme, Ford, 154.361. 32. (09) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, 154.182. 33. (71) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 154.011. 34. (55) Michael McDowell, Toyota, 153.892. 35. (66) Dave Blaney, Toyota, 153.807. 36. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, 153.787. 37. (78) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 153.734. 38. (34) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 153.721. 39. (83) Casey Mears, Toyota, 153.564. 40. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 153.094. 41. (37) Kevin Conway, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (7) Robby Gordon, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (36) Johnny Sauter, Chevrolet, 152.795. Failed to Qualify 44. (64) Todd Bodine, Toyota, 152.698. 45. (13) Max Papis, Toyota, 152.42.

NHRA SOUTHERN NATIONALS QUALIFYING Friday At Atlanta Dragway Commerce, Ga. Qualifying continues today for Sunday’s final eliminations Top Fuel 1. Larry Dixon, 3.822 seconds, 316.08 mph. 2. Doug Kalitta, 3.849, 318.09. 3. Cory McClenathan, 3.924, 308.35. 4. Antron Brown, 3.940, 275.84. 5. Morgan Lucas, 3.960, 303.03. 6. Bob Vandergriff, 3.961, 288.27. 7. Pat Dakin, 4.008, 298.80. 8. Bobby Lagana Jr., 4.011, 302.82. 9. T.J. Zizzo, 4.011, 287.60. 10. Shawn Langdon, 4.056, 298.01. 11. Terry McMillen, 4.151, 287.66. 12. Brandon Bernstein, 4.325, 191.73. Not Qualified: 13. Tony Schumacher, 4.862, 149.10. 14. David Grubnic, 5.129, 136.29. 15. Steve Torrence, 9.187, 78.09. Funny Car 1. Ashley Force Hood, Ford Mustang, 4.104, 304.60. 2. Robert Hight, Mustang, 4.124, 305.98. 3. Ron Capps, Dodge Charger, 4.147, 303.71. 4. Del Worsham, Toyota Solara, 4.153, 302.75. 5. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.167, 299.06. 6. Jack Beckman, Charger, 4.168, 297.35. 7. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.210, 297.35. 8. Bob Bode, Chevy Impala SS, 4.217, 296.63. 9. Cruz Pedregon, Solara, 4.246, 285.77. 10. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.258, 293.03. 11. Jeff Arend, Solara, 4.274, 288.46. 12. Jim Head, Solara, 4.290, 291.95. Not Qualified: 13. Paul Lee, 4.292, 285.71. 14. Tony Pedregon, 4.293, 274.22. 15. Melanie Troxel, 4.311, 294.56. 16. John Force, 4.511, 259.51. 17. Jeff Diehl, 5.637, 130.20. Pro Stock 1. Allen Johnson, Dodge Avenger, 6.634, 208.23. 2. Mike Edwards, Pontiac GXP, 6.641, 208.07. 3. Johnny Gray, GXP, 6.652, 207.34. 4. Jeg Coughlin, Chevy Cobalt, 6.659, 207.88. 5. Ron Krisher, Cobalt, 6.659, 207.08. 6. Greg Stanfield, GXP, 6.659, 206.73. 7. Greg Anderson, GXP, 6.667, 207.08. 8. Kurt Johnson, Cobalt, 6.669, 206.64. 9. Shane Gray, GXP, 6.672, 206.70. 10. Steve Spiess, Cobalt, 6.672, 206.32. 11. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.682, 206.45. 12. Rickie Jones, GXP, 6.686, 206.16. Not Qualified: 13. Bob Yonke, 6.694, 206.39. 14. Warren Johnson, 6.707, 206.73. 15. Ronnie Humphrey, 6.708, 206.39. 16. Erica Enders, 6.708, 206.20. 17. Jason Line, 6.718, 206.70. 18. Larry Morgan, 6.729, 204.73.

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Today’s Games Los Angeles at Phoenix, 11 a.m. Chicago at Connecticut, 12:30 p.m. Washington at Indiana, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Tulsa, 5 p.m. Atlanta at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago at New York, 1 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Washington at Minnesota, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Seattle, 6 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Recalled OF Casper Wells from Toledo (IL). Optioned RHP Alfredo Figaro to Toledo. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Fired third base coach Dave Owen. Shifted first base coach Eddie Rodriguez to third base. Named Rusty Kuntz first base coach. MINNESOTA TWINS—Activated LHP Jose Mijares from the 15-day DL. NEW YORK YANKEES—Claimed RHP Shane Lindsay off waivers from Colorado and optioned him to Tampa (FSL). Released RHP Christian Garcia. TEXAS RANGERS—Reinstated OF Nelson Cruz from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Ryan Garko to Oklahoma City (PCL). National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Announced a two-year player development contract extension with the Brevard County (FSL) through the 2012 season. NEW YORK METS—Signed C J.R. House and OF Valentino Pascucci to minor league contracts and assigned them to Buffalo (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Activated INF Everth Cabrera from the 15-day DL. Optioned INF Lance Zawadzki to Portland (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Named Angela T. Gordon, MPT, ATC, to the team’s physical therapy staff. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association ATLANTA HAWKS—Fired coach Mike Woodson. FOOTBALL National Football League SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Annnounced the resignation of vice president of player personnel Ruston Webster to join Tennessee in a similar position. Promoted Scott Fitterer to director of college scouting and Eric Stokes to assistant director of college scouting. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Signed F Jared Staal to a three-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Signed F Mitchell Callahan to a three-year contract. NEW JERSEY DEVILS—Signed F Mattias Tedenby and F Jacob Josefson. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Signed F Anthony Nigro. ECHL IDAHO STEELHEADS—Announced F Tyler Spurgeon was returned by Abbottsford (AHL). COLLEGE MASS.-DARTMOUTH—Announced the resignation of softball coach Kelly Roy-Sale. NEBRASKA—Signed women’s basketball coach Connie Yori to a three-year contract extension through the 2014-15 season. PARK—Named Kenneth Cooper women’s basketball coach. ST. JOHN’S—Named Derrick Wrobel assistant to the men’s basketball coach. WINGATE—Named Keith Bell women’s assistant basketball coach and recruiting coordinator.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,482 588 130 28 The Dalles 1,807 458 12 3 John Day 2,832 681 19 10 McNary 3,452 159 13 6 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 210,485 7,217 8,121 2,297 The Dalles 148,268 4,867 2,137 1,057 John Day 136,446 4,791 2,377 1,379 McNary 106,857 2,554 2,120 1,160

• Beavers hang on to beat Huskies: Stefen Romero and Jared Norris each hit home runs and Kevin Rhoderick got out of a bases-loaded jam in the ninth as the Oregon State baseball team defeated Washington, 8-6, in Friday night’s series-opener at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. Rhoderick hit two batters and walked another to load the bases with the OSU lead on the line in the ninth. But the closer induced Doug Cherry into a comebacker with two outs, preserving the Beavers’ two-run victory. It sent Oregon State to 25-18 on the year, and 8-11 in Pacific-10 Conference play, and gave Rhoderick his third save of the season. • Oregon shuts out East Tennessee State: No. 22 Oregon opened up its three-game series against East Tennessee State with a 5-0 shutout on Friday night at PK Park in Eugene. With the win, the Ducks improve to 32-18 on the year, while ETSU drops to 29-22. Oregon’s win was the sixth shutout of the season for the Ducks. Oregon starter Tyler Anderson improved to 7-3 on the season, tossing 7 2⁄3 innings of shutout baseball. He allowed four hits and five walks, while striking out six. • Fans ask Cubs to train in Florida: Immigrant rights activists protested outside Wrigley Field, saying the Cubs should move their spring training facility out of Arizona. Members of the group are upset with a stringent new immigration law in Arizona that they believe encourages racial profiling. They also don’t like the Arizona legislature’s failure to fund a new spring home for the team in Mesa.

Basketball • Woodson out as coach of the Hawks: Mike Woodson is out as coach of the Atlanta Hawks after the team was swept in the second round of the playoffs by the Orlando Magic. Hawks general manager Rick Sund said Friday they will not offer Woodson a new contract. Woodson coached the team for six seasons, and improved its record every season after managing just 13 wins his first year. This season, Atlanta won 53 games, its most since 1996-97, and captured the No. 3 seed in the Eastern Conference. But that wasn’t enough to save Woodson’s job. Sund held a morning meeting with Woodson to inform him of the team’s decision. • Cavs, LeBron’s futures uncertain after loss: The Cleveland Cavaliers are keeping coach Mike Brown — for now. Team owner Dan Gilbert refuted a report Friday that Brown had been fired. He says the team is “going through the evaluation process” and stressed the team would not react emotionally after “unexpectedly” losing to the Boston Celtics in the second round of the playoffs. • Calipari: I’ll coach at Kentucky next year: John Calipari is reassuring Kentucky basketball fans that he plans to coach the Wildcats next year, despite speculation he is being pursued by the NBA. Calipari sent a message on Twitter on Friday that said: “I will be coaching at Kentucky next year. Now let’s finish what we started!” Calipari added that Kentucky is “the best job in the country” but that he couldn’t stop the speculation.

Swimming • Phelps wins 100 butterfly and 200 freestyle: Admittedly hurting at the wall and suffering a tad technically, Michael Phelps edged Peter Vanderkaay by 0.04 seconds in the 100-meter butterfly at the Charlotte (N.C.) UltraSwim on Friday, and won both events he entered in the USA Swimming Grand Prix Series event. Phelps, also scheduled to compete in the 100 backstroke on Saturday, needed a final push to hold off Vanderkaay, who passed Chloe Sutton for first place in the series standings by two points. Twotime Olympian Natalie Coughlin edged 17-yearold Felicia Lee to win the women’s 100 butterfly.

Tennis • Federer, Nadal advance to semis at Madrid Masters: Defending champion Roger Federer rallied from a set and a break down to beat Ernests Gulbis 3-6, 6-1, 6-4 Friday and secure a place in the Madrid Masters semifinals. Earlier Friday, Rafael Nadal was close to his clay-court best in beating Gael Monfils 6-1, 6-3. On the women’s side, fourth-seeded Venus Williams reached the semifinals, beating Samantha Stosur 6-3, 6-3. In a strong performance, Williams broke the eighth-seeded Stosur’s serve four times. Williams will play Shahar Peer of Israel, who beat Li Na of China 6-4, 3-6, 6-4.

Golf • Rice disqualified at Nationwide: Maybe Jerry Rice should have stuck to football. The Hall of Fame receiver was disqualified from the Nationwide Tour event Friday in Mill Spring, N.C., because his caddie used a range-finding scope to check yardages. The disqualification came a day after Rice shot a 92. Rice announced after a second-round 82 that he’s done competing on golf’s Triple-A circuit. “Because I can’t commit to golf the way I want to, this is probably my last Nationwide Tour” event, Rice said. “These guys, they’re working their butts off and they deserve to be out here.”

Cycling • Lloyd wins 6th stage of Giro d’Italia: Australian rider Matthew Lloyd held on after an early breakaway to win the sixth stage of the Giro d’Italia in Marina Di Carrara, Italy, on Friday, and Vincenzo Nibali kept the overall lead. Lloyd finished the 106-mile course in 4 hours, 24 minutes, 14 seconds for his first stage win in a grand tour. He also earned 13 mountain points to take the green jersey as the best climber.

Sailing • Australian teen completes round-the-world sail: An Australian teenager completed her round-the-world trek early today, becoming the youngest person to sail solo, nonstop and unassisted around the world after a seven-month journey. Thousands cheered as 16-year-old Jessica Watson maneuvered her pink 34-foot yacht into Sydney Harbour. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

N H L P L AYO F F S

Stafford’s home runs Flyers complete comeback from 3-0 deficit, reach conference final lead Cowboys to win Bulletin staff report PRINEVILLE — Playing in its next-to-last game of the year Friday, Crook County scored its third Intermountain Conference baseball win of the season by besting The Dalles-Wahtonka 4-3. The Cowboys (3-17 IMC) scored first in the opening inning on a Dayton Stafford solo home run. After a pair of second-inning Eagle Indian runs, Crook County tied the game up at 2-2 in the third after another solo homer from Stafford. The Dalles-Wahtonka, however, reclaimed the lead in the fifth and held a 3-2 advantage until the bottom of the seventh. With runners on first and third, Crook County scored the tying run on a balk and Justin Cleveland drove home the winning run in dramatic fashion with an RBI triple. Cleveland led the Cowboys at the plate, going three for four on the day while relief pitcher Cody Pfau kept the Eagle Indians at bay, notching the save for the home team. In other prep events Friday: SOFTBALL Pendleton. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Pendleton’s Alex Hillmick tossed a no-hitter on the road against Bend High in the Intermountain Conference shutout. The league-leading Buckaroos (18-1 IMC) scored runs in the first and second innings and two more in the fifth as the Lava Bears (1-18 IMC) struggled at the plate. The Dalles-Wahtonka. . . . . . . . . 10 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 PRINEVILLE — After a flurry of scoring from both sides, The Dalles-Wahtonka held a 95 sixth-inning lead. The Eagle Indians then added a final run in the seventh — a solo home run which would prove to be the game-winner. The Cowgirls (8-12 IMC) rallied with four runs in the bottom of the seventh but, haunted by their nine walks and four errors earlier in the game, could not quite close the gap. Freshman Miranda Smith led the home team with two doubles, three runs scored and two RBIs. BASEBALL Hermiston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 The Cougars blew a two-run lead in the sixth inning when they allowed Hermiston to score 12 runs on 10 hits and five errors. The hitting streak sunk Mountain View in six innings in an Intermountain Conference game on the Cougars’ home field. Zach Johnson went two for three with three RBIs and a double to lead Mountain View at the plate. Jo Carroll was also two for three with a triple, and John Carroll registered a double. Mountain View dropped to 6-13 in league and 6-17 overall. Junction City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SISTERS — The Tigers rallied for six runs at Sisters High in the top of the seventh inning in the Sky-Em League tie-breaker game to advance to the league playoffs and end the Hawks’ season. La

GLOVING A GROUNDER

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Mountain View shortstop Kylie Durre fields a ground ball to make a play at second base during the sixth inning against Hermiston Friday at Mountain View High School. The Cougars lost the game, 7-6. See story, Page D1. Pine (6-19 overall) grabbed a 53 lead in the bottom of the sixth inning after scoring two runs. Junction City took advantage of three Hawk errors in the top of the seventh, though, and held off La Pine in the bottom half of the inning to win the contest between the two teams that tied for fifth in league. Kyle Pickering started on the mound for the Hawks and gave them a chance to win, allowing three runs in five innings of work. Dylan Wiley led a La Pine offense that produced nine hits with the Hawks’ lone double. With the win, Junction City will play Sisters on Monday in the first round of the league playoffs. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond doubles team advances to state SALEM — Despite a loss in a semifinal matchup, Redmond’s No. 1 doubles team of Kayla Woychak and Karli Christensen secured a state playoff berth and the fourth-place team spot at the Central Valley Conference district tournament. The duo will advance to the Class 6A state championship May 20-22 in Portland and the surrounding areas. In the semifinal round, Ashlee Spencer and Grace Lin of West Salem defeated the Panthers with a score of 6-2, 6-1. Redmond coach Nathan Saito called the matchup “very competitive.” In the third-place matchup, McKenzie Fraser and Lauren Mann of Sprague defeated Woychak and Christensen 63, 6-3. In the singles consolation bracket, Genna Miller won the semifinals against Katie Reeder of South Salem in a matchup that ended 8-6. In the finals, Miller was crowned consolation champion after defeating Tina Lo of McNary 2-6, 6-2, 7-5. Overall, Redmond placed second at districts and tied for first with West Salem in dual matches. West Salem was overall champion, while Sprague placed third.

Outlaw takes third BLACK BUTTE RANCH — Marine Tresnie placed third in the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 singles tournament to lead Sisters to a fifth-place finish at the seven-team event. After falling to North Bend’s Tate Wylie 16, 6-1, 6-2 in the semifinal round, Tresnie rebounded to defeat Haylee Marsh of Marist 6-1, 6-2 in the third-place match. Maggie Schein of St. Mary’s won the singles title, while Ashley Laing and Nikki Demmers of Marist placed first in doubles. With her top four finish at the district meet, Tresnie will compete at next week’s Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state tournament in Eugene. BOYS TENNIS Panthers end CVC tourney in fourth SALEM — Redmond’s Carlo Gangan and Marcus James won the doubles consolation bracket at the Central Valley Conference district tournament at the Salem Tennis & Swim Club to help the Panthers to a fourth-place finish. Sprague won the district title, South Salem finished second and McKay was third. The CVC district tournament ends the season for Redmond, which has no players advancing to the Class 6A state tournament. TRACK AND FIELD Culver boys advance to state SALEM — The Bulldogs Joel Vega and Tyler Funk qualified for the Class 2A track and field championships after posting winning marks on the first day of the Tri-River Conference district meet. Vega won the 3,000-meter boys race, tagging the finish line at 9 minutes, 25 seconds, while Funk was first in the boys pole vault with a personal-best mark of 14 feet. Funk also qualified for today’s finals in the 300 hurdles.

By Howard Ulman

The Associated Press

BOSTON — Simon Gagne and the Philadelphia Flyers put together one more comeback to finish off the Boston Bruins’ collapse. Taking advantage of a too-many-men-on-the-ice call, Gagne scored on a power play with 7:08 left to give Philadelphia a 4-3 victory Friday night in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals. The Flyers overcame a 3-0 series deficit and a 3-0 hole in the first period, rallying to advance to the conference finals against Montreal. “It’s just a great feeling,” Scott Hartnell said. “All the adversity we had fought through, being down, 3-0, in the series, 3-0 in the game, to come back and win, it’s absolutely incredible.” It was humiliating for the Bruins, who became the third team in NHL history to lose a series after winning the first three games. “We got a little carried away from our game plan and lost our composure” in Game 7, Bruins captain Zdeno Chara said. When the final buzzer sounded, the Flyers poured off their bench and surrounded Michael Leighton, who held the Bruins scoreless in the last two periods after starting just his second playoff game for injured Brian Boucher. While the Flyers celebrated, the yellow towels used by fans to spur on the home team came floating to the ice, resting there as signs of frustration for a crowd that won’t need them until next season. Bruins center Patrice Bergeron took a slap shot with one of those cold pieces of cloth. It didn’t go very far. The decisive penalty occurred with 8:50 left and Gagne, a major force since returning from a toe injury for Game 4, scored with 18 seconds left in the power play. “I saw two centermen out there and I said, ‘What’s going on,’” said Milan Lucic, who had two goals for Boston. “I knew there was a miscommunication out there and we got caught.” In Game 7 of the 1979 Stanley Cup semifinals, the Bruins were called for having too many men on the ice, leading to Guy Lafleur’s tying goal with 74 seconds left in the third period. Then Mario Tremblay won it at 9:33 of overtime, costing Boston a chance for the Stanley Cup and sending the Canadiens to the finals. This time it was Gagne. And now the seventh-seeded Flyers get to start the next

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

As Boston Bruins fans, background, react, Philadelphia’s Simon Gagne, left, is congratulated by teammate Mike Richards (18) after breaking a 3-3 tie during the third period of Game 7 of an NHL playoff series in Boston Friday. round at home Sunday night against eighth-seeded Montreal. “When that final buzzer went, it was a sigh of relief,” Philadelphia captain Mike Richards said. The Flyers capitalized on Friday’s penalty when Richards’ shot from the right circle hit players in front of Tuukka Rask. The puck bounced and Gagne, stationed to Rask’s left, flipped the puck over the goalie’s right shoulder. The only other teams to win a series after trailing 3-0 were the 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs, who beat Detroit, and the 1975 New York Islanders, who eliminated Pittsburgh. The other 159 teams that won the first three games in

a series all won them. The Bruins shot out to a 30 lead on power-play goals by Michael Ryder and Lucic and another goal by Lucic. And only 14:10 had been played. Then James van Riemsdyk scored with 2:48 left in the first period. That goal sparked the Flyers. “We started relaxing and playing hockey and feeling more comfortable on the ice,” Richards said. Second-period goals by Hartnell at 2:49 and Danny Briere at 8:39 tied it. Boston lost its third straight Game 7 and first since falling to Carolina in last year’s conference semifinals after battling back from a 3-1 series deficit.

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PREP SCOREBOARD BOYS LACROSSE Friday’s Results ——— High Desert League Tournament at Summit High Harney County 7, Sisters 6 Summit 14, Mountain View 4

BASEBALL Friday’s Results ———

Class 5A

Alex Hillmick and Rayne; Blanchard, Williams (5), Blanchard (7) and Bowe. W—Hillmick L—Blanchard. 2B—Pendleton: Lemberger. ——— Hermiston 312 000 1 — 7 13 0 Mountain View 400 002 0 — 6 9 3 Long and Howard; Wells and Bigbyt. W — Long. L— Wells. 2B — Hermiston: Lawson, Rodriguez; MV: Bateman. HR —Hermiston: Long. ——— The Dalles-Wahtomnka 050 301 1 — 10 9 1 Crook County 000 302 4 — 9 10 4 Guischer, Dick (7) and Barrett; Reece, Smith (4) and Neashem. W—Guischer. L—Reece. 2B—The Dalles-Wahtonka: Park 2; Crook County: Smith 2, Ontko. HR—The Dalles-Wahtonka: Park.

BOYS TENNIS

INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE (8 innings) Pendleton 010 013 00 — 5 10 4 Bend 100 130 01 — 6 11 2 Hensley, Alger (7) and Smith; Wiest and Norgaard. W — Wiest. L— Alger. 2B — Pendleton: Whitten, Alger, Eickstaebt; Bend: Newton. ——— The Dalles-Wahtonka 020 010 0 — 3 6 0 Crook County 101 000 2 — 4 6 2 Harris and Herriger; Mecham, Phau (6) and Cleveland. W— Phau. L—Harris. 3B—Crook County: Cleveland. HR: Stafford 2. ——— Hermiston 002 00(12) — 14 13 0 Mountain View 301 000 — 4 6 7 Rude and Jones; Robinett, J. Hollister (5), C. Hollister (6) and Hester. W—Rude. L— J. Hollister. 2B—Hermiston: Morton; Mountain View: Johnson, John Carroll. 3B—Hermiston: Almaguer. Mountain View: Jo Carroll. HR—Hermiston: Andreason.

CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE DISTRICT MEET At Salem Team results: 1 Sprague, 2 South Salem, 3 McKay, 4 Redmond, 5 North Salem, 6 McNary, 7 West Salem. Championhip matches Singles — Brent Wheeler, S, def. Hal Gordon, SS, 6-1, 6-0. Doubles — Preston Mann/Dillon Triance, S, def. Stephen Corgan/Jeremiah Anderson, MK, 6-1, 3-6, 6-4. Third-place matches Singles — Riley Wulf, SS, def. Jonas Haessig, S, 6-3, 4-1, injury default. Doubles — Jake Triance/Austin Wong, S, def. Peter Chamberlain/Zack Murray, SS, 6-4, 6-4.

Class 4A

GIRLS TENNIS

SKY-EM LEAGUE Junction City 110 010 3 — 6 5 2 Sisters 002 102 0 — 5 9 3 Straube, Errehart (5) and Garrigus; Pickering, Dinger (6) and Morton. W — Errehart. L— Dinger. 2B — JC: Hise, Gerrigus, Errehart; LP: Wiley.

Friday’s Results ———

SOFTBALL Friday’s Results ———

Class 5A Pendleton Bend

INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE 110 020 0 — 000 000 0 —

4 0

8 0 0 3

Friday’s Results ———

Class 6A

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Class 6A CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE DISTRICT MEET At Salem Team results: 1 West Salem, 2 Redmond, 3 Sprague, 4 South Salem, 5 McNary, 6 McKay, 7 North Salem Championhip matches Singles — Kaitlyn Murray, SS, def. Amy Lin, WS, 6-1, 6-2. Doubles — Ashley Spencer/Grace Lin, WS, def. Sarah Miller/ Rachel Heringer, SS, 6-3, 6-2. Third-place matches Singles — Nicola Young, S, def. Krissy Moore, WS, 6-1, 6-0 Doubles — Lauren Mann/Mackenzie Fraser, S, def. Karli Christensen/Kayla Woychak, R, 6-3, 6-3.

1 8 6 5 N E H i g h w a y 2 0 , B e n d • M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6 • 5 4 1 - 3 8 9 - 1 1 7 7 Expires Sunday, May 16, 2010.


D4 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M A JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 24 11 .686 — New York 23 12 .657 1 Toronto 21 16 .568 4 Boston 19 17 .528 5½ Baltimore 12 24 .333 12½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 22 13 .629 — Detroit 20 16 .556 2½ Chicago 14 21 .400 8 Cleveland 13 20 .394 8 Kansas City 13 23 .361 9½ West Division W L Pct GB Texas 20 16 .556 — Oakland 18 18 .500 2 Los Angeles 16 21 .432 4½ Seattle 14 21 .400 5½ ——— Friday’s Games Boston 7, Detroit 2 Baltimore 8, Cleveland 1 N.Y. Yankees 8, Minnesota 4 Toronto 16, Texas 10 Seattle 4, Tampa Bay 3 Kansas City 6, Chicago White Sox 1 L.A. Angels 4, Oakland 0 Today’s Games Minnesota (Liriano 4-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 4-0), 10:05 a.m. Texas (Feldman 1-3) at Toronto (R.Romero 3-1), 10:07 a.m. Seattle (J.Vargas 3-2) at Tampa Bay (J.Shields 4-1), 1:10 p.m. Boston (Lester 3-2) at Detroit (Willis 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (Talbot 4-2) at Baltimore (Matusz 2-3), 4:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 2-2) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Duchscherer 2-1) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 1-3), 6:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Boston at Detroit, 10:05 a.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 10:05 a.m. Texas at Toronto, 10:07 a.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 10:35 a.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 10:40 a.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 11:10 a.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 12:35 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 21 13 .618 — Washington 20 15 .571 1½ Florida 18 18 .500 4 New York 18 18 .500 4 Atlanta 17 18 .486 4½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 21 15 .583 — Cincinnati 19 16 .543 1½ Milwaukee 15 20 .429 5½ Pittsburgh 15 20 .429 5½ Chicago 15 21 .417 6 Houston 13 22 .371 7½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 22 13 .629 — San Francisco 19 15 .559 2½ Los Angeles 18 17 .514 4 Colorado 16 18 .471 5½ Arizona 14 22 .389 8½ ——— Friday’s Games Pittsburgh 10, Chicago Cubs 6 Florida 7, N.Y. Mets 2 St. Louis 4, Cincinnati 3 Atlanta 6, Arizona 5 Philadelphia 9, Milwaukee 5 Washington at Colorado, ppd., rain L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 3 San Francisco 8, Houston 2 Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Maholm 2-3) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 2-3), 10:05 a.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 4-1) at Colorado (Jimenez 61), 11:10 a.m., 1st game Houston (Oswalt 2-4) at San Francisco (Lincecum 4-0), 1:10 p.m. Philadelphia (Blanton 0-2) at Milwaukee (Narveson 3-0), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (R.Lopez 1-2) at Atlanta (Hanson 3-2), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Maine 1-2) at Florida (N.Robertson 3-3), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 5-1) at Cincinnati (Leake 3-0), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Atilano 3-0) at Colorado (Hammel 0-2), 5:10 p.m., 2nd game L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-2) at San Diego (Correia 4-2), 5:35 p.m. Sunday’s Games N.Y. Mets at Florida, 10:10 a.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 10:10 a.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 10:35 a.m. Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. Washington at Colorado, 12:10 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 1:05 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 5:05 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Mariners 4, Rays 3 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Franklin Gutierrez, Adam Moore and Mike Sweeney homered, helping the lighthitting Mariners beat the baseball-best Rays. Righthander Doug Fister (3-1) allowed one run and four hits in five innings as the lastplace Mariners won for just the third time in 13 games. Reliever Shawn Kelley gave up a two-run homer to Evan Longoria, enabling the Rays to pull within 4-3 in the eighth. David Aardsma got the final three outs for his ninth save in 11 opportunities. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf M.Sweeney dh Jo.Lopez 3b Kotchman 1b Jo.Wilson ss Moore c M.Saunders lf Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 36

R H 1 3 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4 10

Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Burrell dh Jaso c Brignac 2b Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 2 32

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 6

Avg. .356 .185 .310 .220 .218 .186 .214 .185 .318

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 6 2 4

SO 0 1 0 2 2 2 0 1 1 9

Avg. .248 .316 .275 .326 .176 .211 .202 .313 .269

H 4 0 2 1

R 1 0 2 0

ER 1 0 2 0

BB 3 1 0 0

SO 2 3 2 0

NP 93 27 17 2

Angels 4, Athletics 0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Joe Saunders matched zeros with Dallas Braden through five innings, then Kendry Morales hit a go-ahead single in the sixth and Hideki Matsui followed with a three-run homer to help Los Angeles beat Oakland. Saunders (2-5) pitched a four-hitter for his second shutout and third complete game in 103 big league starts. Oakland Pennington ss A.Rosales 2b Barton 1b Kouzmanoff 3b Fox lf Powell c Donaldson dh Gross rf R.Davis cf Totals

AB 4 2 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3 0 6

Avg. .244 .252 .276 .264 .215 .171 .154 .241 .224

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf K.Morales 1b H.Matsui dh J.Rivera lf Napoli c Br.Wood 3b Totals

AB 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 2 29

R 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 1

SO 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 5

Avg. .250 .281 .255 .273 .281 .236 .239 .210 .165

Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Los Angeles 000 004 00x — 4 7 0 LOB—Oakland 5, Los Angeles 4. 2B—Donaldson (1), B.Abreu (12), Napoli (5). HR—H.Matsui (5), off Braden. RBIs—K.Morales (23), H.Matsui 3 (18). CS—Pennington (2). S—H.Kendrick, Br.Wood. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (Pennington 2, Fox); Los Angeles 2 (Tor.Hunter, Br.Wood). Runners moved up—A.Rosales, Kouzmanoff. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Napoli, Napoli, Br.Wood). Oakland IP H R ER Braden L, 4-3 8 7 4 4 Los Angeles IP H R ER Sndrs W, 2-5 9 4 0 0 WP—J.Saunders. T—2:05. A—41,290 (45,285).

BB 1 BB 2

SO 5 SO 6

NP 98 NP 109

ERA 3.50 ERA 4.96

Blue Jays 16, Rangers 10 TORONTO — Aaron Hill, Travis Snider and Vernon Wells all hit three-run home runs and Toronto outslugged the Rangers for a wild win. The Blue Jays pounded out 15 total hits and boosted their major league lead in home runs (57) and extra-base hits (162). Texas AB Andrus ss 4 M.Young 3b 4 Hamilton lf-cf 5 Borbon cf 0 Guerrero dh 4 Kinsler 2b 3 N.Cruz rf 4 Smoak 1b 4 M.Ramirez c 3 Gentry cf 1 a-Dav.Murphy ph-lf 2 Totals 34

R 2 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 10

H 2 2 1 0 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 11

BI 0 1 0 0 3 0 4 0 2 0 0 10

BB 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 1 8

SO 0 0 2 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 9

Avg. .317 .288 .284 .213 .341 .308 .318 .186 .368 .214 .227

Toronto AB R H F.Lewis lf 5 3 2 A.Hill 2b 4 3 1 Lind dh 4 3 2 V.Wells cf 5 1 1 Overbay 1b 3 2 3 Ale.Gonzalez ss 5 0 1 J.Bautista 3b 4 1 2 J.Buck c 3 1 1 Snider rf 4 2 2 McCoy rf 1 0 0 Totals 38 16 15

BI 0 3 2 4 3 1 0 0 3 0 16

BB 1 2 1 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 9

SO 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 6

Avg. .301 .184 .223 .306 .189 .255 .222 .272 .241 .229

Texas 351 100 000 — 10 11 0 Toronto 308 400 10x — 16 15 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Gentry in the 4th. E—Ale.Gonzalez (8). LOB—Texas 8, Toronto 7. 2B— N.Cruz (5), F.Lewis (11), Overbay (8), Ale.Gonzalez (14). HR—M.Ramirez (2), off Cecil; Overbay (3), off Harden; Snider (6), off Harden; V.Wells (10), off D.Mathis; A.Hill (3), off D.Mathis; Lind (6), off D.Mathis. RBIs—M.Young (21), Guerrero 3 (31), N.Cruz 4 (21), M.Ramirez 2 (4), A.Hill 3 (9), Lind 2 (20), V.Wells 4 (29), Overbay 3 (14), Ale.Gonzalez (28), Snider 3 (15). SB—Snider (3). SF—N.Cruz, M.Ramirez. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 6 (Smoak 2, Hamilton 3, Dav.Murphy); Toronto 4 (Snider 2, Lind, J.Buck). Runners moved up—Kinsler, A.Hill, V.Wells. GIDP— Andrus, N.Cruz. DP—Toronto 2 (Ale.Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay), (Ale. Gonzalez, A.Hill, Overbay). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harden 2 2-3 4 7 7 6 3 86 4.93 D.Mathis L, 1-1 1 1-3 7 8 8 2 1 49 7.36 Nippert 3 4 1 1 1 1 47 5.48 Ray 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.76 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cecil 2 8 8 8 2 2 48 5.46 Renicke W, 1-0 1 1-3 1 2 2 4 2 45 6.75 Janssen 3 1 0 0 0 3 36 4.15 R.Lewis 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 3.24 Frasor H, 3 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 17 5.74 Camp 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.79 R.Lewis pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Janssen 3-1, R.Lewis 1-0, Frasor 3-0. HBP—by Roenicke (Guerrero). T—3:21. A—16,020 (49,539).

Yankees 8, Twins 4

Seattle 200 010 010 — 4 10 1 Tampa Bay 001 000 020 — 3 6 1 E—M.Saunders (1), Jaso (3). LOB—Seattle 8, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—I.Suzuki (7), Figgins (5), Moore (3), Brignac (5). HR—F.Gutierrez (4), off W.Davis; Moore (1), off W.Davis; M.Sweeney (2), off Wheeler; Longoria (9), off Kelley. RBIs—F.Gutierrez 2 (20), M.Sweeney (5), Moore (4), Longoria 2 (31). SB—M.Sweeney (1). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 6 (Kotchman, I.Suzuki, Jo.Wilson, F.Gutierrez 3); Tampa Bay 3 (B.Upton, Zobrist 2). Runners moved up—Figgins. GIDP—Kotchman, B.Upton. DP—Seattle 1 (Jo.Wilson, Figgins, Kotchman); Tampa Bay 1 (W.Davis, Bartlett, C.Pena). Seattle IP Fister W, 3-1 5 Texeira H, 1 2 Kelley H, 1 1 Aardsma S, 9-11 3.46 Tampa Bay IP

W.Davis L, 3-3 6 5 3 3 3 2 111 3.38 Cormier 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 16 4.05 Wheeler 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 12 2.31 Benoit 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Choate 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 9 6.52 Balfour 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.20 Wheeler pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Wheeler 2-0, Benoit 1-0, Balfour 1-0. IBB—off W.Davis (Kotchman). WP— W.Davis, Choate. Balk—Fister. T—2:59. A—27,856 (36,973).

ERA 1.72 3.07 3.27 12

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

NEW YORK — Alex Rodriguez followed a seventh-inning intentional walk to Mark Teixeira with his 19th career grand slam, powering New York to a victory over Minnesota. A-Rod nearly carried his bat all the way to first base, then raised a fist in triumph after the drive off Matt Guerrier, who had just replaced lefthander Brian Duensing with Minnesota ahead 4-3. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Kubel dh Delm.Young lf Casilla ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 33

R 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

New York

AB R

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 9 4 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 2 7

Avg. .275 .279 .364 .361 .270 .224 .278 .250 .258

H BI BB SO Avg.

Jeter ss Gardner cf-lf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Winn rf Thames lf Golson cf Miranda dh Cervelli c Totals

5 5 3 3 4 1 3 3 1 4 4 36

1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 8 14

0 1 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 10

.267 .333 .209 .281 .338 .294 .184 .341 .400 .143 .415

Minnesota 010 010 200 — 4 9 0 New York 000 210 41x — 8 14 1 E—A.Rodriguez (3). LOB—Minnesota 8, New York 6. 2B—Morneau (9), Jeter (7), Teixeira (7), Cano 2 (8), Miranda (1). 3B—Cervelli (2). HR—Mauer (2), off A.J.Burnett; Gardner (2), off S.Baker; A.Rodriguez (4), off Guerrier. RBIs—Mauer 2 (16), Morneau (24), Punto (9), Gardner (12), Teixeira (26), A.Rodriguez 4 (26), Cano (23), Cervelli (14). CS—Casilla (1), Golson (1). S—Casilla. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 4 (Cuddyer, O.Hudson 2, Kubel); New York 4 (Miranda 3, Gardner). Runners moved up—O.Hudson. GIDP—Span, Cuddyer. DP—New York 2 (A.J.Burnett, Cervelli, Teixeira), (A.Rodriguez, Cano, Teixeira). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA S.Baker L, 4-3 6 10 5 5 1 9 100 4.93 Duensing H, 6 1-3 0 1 1 1 0 7 1.93 Guerrier 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 9 2.16 Mijares 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 7 8.10 Al.Burnett 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 20 3.63 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.J.Burnett 6 2-3 7 3 2 4 4 100 3.31 D.Marte BS, 2-2 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 19 4.91 Chmbrln W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 2.16 M.Rivera 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 S.Baker pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Duensing 2-0, Guerrier 3-3, Al.Burnett 1-1, D.Marte 1-1. IBB—off Duensing (Teixeira), off D.Marte (Cuddyer). T—3:11. A—45,195 (50,287).

Red Sox 7, Tigers 2 DETROIT — David Ortiz had his second multihomer game this month and drove in four runs, lifting the Red Sox to a win over the Tigers. Ortiz hit a three-run homer after Dustin Pedroia’s tworun drive in the first inning. Ortiz added a solo shot in the fourth to restore Boston’s five-run cushion. Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b V.Martinez c Youkilis 1b J.Drew rf D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b Hermida lf a-Hall ph-lf D.McDonald cf Totals

AB 5 4 4 3 4 4 4 2 1 4 35

R H 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 2 7 10

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf Inge 3b S.Sizemore 2b Laird c Santiago ss Totals

AB 4 5 3 4 4 2 3 3 2 30

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BI 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 7

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .268 .297 .234 .304 .283 .213 .311 .234 .234 .254

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 5 2 6

SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 6

Avg. .342 .281 .299 .365 .361 .227 .211 .169 .268

Boston 500 100 001 — 7 10 1 Detroit 100 000 010 — 2 5 0 a-homered for Hermida in the 9th. E—Bard (1). LOB—Boston 3, Detroit 9. 2B—Youkilis (10). HR—Pedroia (8), off Scherzer; D.Ortiz 2 (6), off Scherzer 2; Hall (2), off Ni. RBIs—Pedroia 2 (25), D.Ortiz 4 (15), Hall (5), Boesch (17), Inge (16). SF—Inge. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 1 (D.Ortiz); Detroit 4 (Inge, Boesch, Damon 2). Runners moved up—Damon, Mi.Cabrera. GIDP— Scutaro, Pedroia, Mi.Cabrera. DP—Boston 1 (Pedroia, Scutaro, Youkilis); Detroit 2 (Santiago, S.Sizemore, Mi.Cabrera), (S.Sizemore, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bchholz W, 4-3 6 1-3 3 1 1 5 3 111 3.46 Bard 1 2-3 1 1 0 1 2 28 2.75 Okajima 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 4.38 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer L, 1-4 5 6 6 6 2 1 109 7.29 Thomas 3 3 0 0 0 3 43 4.76 Ni 1 1 1 1 0 0 14 2.51 Inherited runners-scored—Bard 2-0. HBP—by Bard (Santiago). WP—Bard. T—2:57. A—31,732 (41,255).

Orioles 8, Indians 1 BALTIMORE — Jeremy Guthrie allowed two singles in eight innings, Miguel Tejada drove in three runs and Baltimore extended Justin Masterson’s losing streak with a victory over Cleveland. Guthrie (2-4) walked one, struck out five and retired 16 consecutive Indians following Jhonny Peralta’s RBI single in the first inning. He has won two in a row after failing to win in his first six starts. Cleveland A.Cabrera ss G.Sizemore cf Choo rf Hafner dh Peralta 3b Branyan 1b LaPorta lf Valbuena 2b Marson c Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 2 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1

Baltimore C.Patterson lf Ad.Jones cf Markakis rf M.Tejada 3b Scott dh Wigginton 2b Wieters c R.Hughes 1b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 5 5 3 5 3 37

R H 2 3 2 2 1 1 1 2 0 3 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 8 14

BI 0 1 0 3 2 1 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 2 6

SO 0 0 0 0 1 3 2 0 1 7

Avg. .294 .208 .296 .250 .229 .250 .210 .153 .192

SO 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 7

Avg. .462 .245 .301 .288 .232 .304 .270 .213 .202

Cleveland 100 000 000 — 1 3 2 Baltimore 002 004 11x — 8 14 0 E—Branyan (1), G.Sizemore (1). LOB—Cleveland 5, Baltimore 13. 2B—Wigginton (8). 3B—Ad.Jones (3). RBIs—Peralta (14), Ad.Jones (9), M.Tejada 3 (18), Scott 2 (16), Wigginton (22). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 1 (Branyan); Baltimore 8 (M.Tejada, C.Izturis 3, Wieters, Markakis, R.Hughes, Scott). Runners moved up—Ad.Jones, Wieters 2. GIDP— Markakis, Scott. DP—Cleveland 2 (Valbuena, A.Cabrera, Branyan), (Valbuena, A.Cabrera, Branyan). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mastersn L, 0-4 5 1-3 8 6 6 5 4 112 5.92 Laffey 2-3 2 0 0 1 1 20 2.37 R.Perez 1 3 1 1 0 1 17 6.52 Ambriz 1 1 1 1 0 1 11 2.57 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie W, 2-4 8 2 1 1 1 5 113 4.13 Ohman 1 1 0 0 0 2 20 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Laffey 2-2. IBB—off Masterson (Markakis). HBP—by Masterson (Ad.Jones, M.Tejada), by Guthrie (Hafner, Marson). WP—Ambriz. T—2:45. A—25,902 (48,290).

Royals 6, White Sox 1 KANSAS CITY, Mo.

— Mitch Maier lined a two-run single in Kansas City’s five-run seventh inning against Mark Buehrle, and the Royals made Ned Yost’s managerial debut a rousing success with a win over Chicago. The Royals looked like a new team, at least for one night, after Yost replaced Trey Hillman, getting good starting pitching, clutch hitting and a solid effort by the bullpen. Chicago Pierre lf Pierzynski c Rios cf Konerko 1b Kotsay rf Al.Ramirez ss Teahen 3b Beckham 2b Vizquel dh Totals

AB 2 4 4 3 2 4 4 4 4 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 6 1 3

Kansas City Podsednik lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Kendall c Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 34

R H 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 6 10

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 5

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 6

Avg. .248 .198 .311 .282 .161 .214 .216 .202 .143

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Avg. .313 .366 .265 .324 .254 .310 .254 .282 .283

Chicago 000 010 000 — 1 6 1 Kansas City 000 001 50x — 6 10 1 E—Teahen (6), Kendall (5). LOB—Chicago 8, Kansas City 5. HR—Y.Betancourt (3), off Buehrle. RBIs—Pierzynski (11), J.Guillen (22), Maier 2 (12), Y.Betancourt (11), Kendall (6). SB—Kotsay (1), Podsednik (13). S—Pierre. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Pierzynski, Teahen 2); Kansas City 3 (Aviles, B.Butler 2). Runners moved up—Vizquel. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle L, 2-5 6 8 6 5 0 0 86 5.26 T.Pena 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 6.19 Williams 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 4.63 Linebrink 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 4.26 Putz 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 4.50 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Meche 6 5 1 1 2 4 100 7.17 Hughes W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 3.68 Bl.Wood 2 0 0 0 1 1 26 0.00 Buehrle pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—T.Pena 2-1, Williams 2-1, Linebrink 3-0. HBP—by Meche (Pierre). T—2:25. A—27,816 (37,840).

NL ROUNDUP Braves 6, Diamondbacks 5 ATLANTA — Martin Prado’s bases-loaded bloop single drove in two runs in the bottom of the ninth inning to lift Atlanta to a win over Arizona, extending the Diamondbacks’ bullpen woes. Arizona closer Chad Qualls (0-2) couldn’t hold a 5-4 lead in the ninth. It was his third blown save in nine chances, and the Diamondbacks’ bullpen is only seven for 15 in save opportunities. Arizona K.Johnson 2b C.Jackson lf J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b S.Drew ss C.Young cf Snyder c I.Kennedy p J.Gutierrez p c-Ryal ph Heilman p Qualls p Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 4 3 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 36

R 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 2 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 5 4 13

Atlanta Prado 2b Heyward rf C.Jones 3b McCann c Glaus 1b Hinske lf 1-Hicks pr Infante ss McLouth cf Kawakami p Venters p a-Conrad ph Medlen p b-M.Diaz ph Saito p Wagner p d-Me.Cabrera ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 0 4 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 32

R H 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 4 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 12

BI 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

SO 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .274 .258 .237 .246 .228 .302 .295 .230 .133 --.379 ----Avg. .317 .299 .228 .253 .261 .349 .000 .313 .172 .111 --.240 .250 .178 ----.196

Arizona 100 120 001 — 5 9 0 Atlanta 000 000 402 — 6 12 1 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Venters in the 6th. b-struck out for Medlen in the 7th. c-struck out for J.Gutierrez in the 8th. d-was intentionally walked for Wagner in the 9th. 1-ran for Hinske in the 9th. E—Glaus (3). LOB—Arizona 9, Atlanta 6. 2B— K.Johnson (11), C.Jackson (2), J.Upton (7), M.Reynolds (4), Snyder (4), Heyward (6). HR—McCann (3), off I.Kennedy; McLouth (3), off J.Gutierrez. RBIs—J.Upton 2 (18), M.Reynolds 2 (29), Snyder (17), Prado 2 (14), McCann (12), McLouth 3 (10). SB—J.Upton (6), M.Reynolds (2). CS—Heyward (1), Infante (1). S— I.Kennedy, McLouth, Kawakami. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 7 (S.Drew 3, Ad.LaRoche, I.Kennedy, K.Johnson, Ryal). GIDP—Hinske. DP—Arizona 1 (K.Johnson, S.Drew, Ad.LaRoche). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Kennedy 6 1-3 7 3 3 2 5 109 3.58 J.Gutierrez 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 13 9.20 Heilman 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 3.45 Qualls L, 0-2 1-3 3 2 2 1 0 13 7.62 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kawakami 4 1-3 5 4 3 2 7 96 5.79 Venters 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 1 19 1.32 Medlen 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.35 Saito 1 0 0 0 2 2 25 2.40 Wagner W, 2-0 1 2 1 1 0 2 18 2.08 Inherited runners-scored—J.Gutierrez 2-2, Venters 2-2. IBB—off Qualls (Me.Cabrera). T—3:24. A—30,657 (49,743).

Cardinals 4, Reds 3 CINCINNATI — Albert Pujols ended St. Louis’ longest homer drought in three years with a two-run shot that landed in the front row, and left-hander Jaime Garcia pitched into the seventh inning in another Fernando-like appearance, beating Cincinnati. Ryan Ludwick added a two-run shot off Aaron Harang (2-5) that also barely cleared the wall, sparking an offense that hadn’t homered in the last nine games. St. Louis Rasmus cf b-Mather ph-cf Ludwick rf Pujols 1b

AB 3 1 4 4

R 1 0 2 1

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 2 0 1 2 0

SO 0 0 0 2

Avg. .282 .194 .299 .314

Holliday lf Freese 3b Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b J.Garcia p McClellan p T.Miller p Boggs p Franklin p B.Ryan ss Totals

4 3 3 4 3 0 0 1 0 4 34

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 7

.308 .310 .281 .227 .067 1.000 --.000 .000 .167

Cincinnati AB O.Cabrera ss 4 B.Phillips 2b 3 Votto 1b 4 Rolen 3b 4 Gomes lf 4 Bruce rf 3 Stubbs cf 4 Hanigan c 4 1-Heisey pr 0 Harang p 2 Lincoln p 0 a-Cairo ph 1 Masset p 0 Rhodes p 0 c-R.Hernandez ph 1 Totals 34

R 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 1

SO 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .266 .257 .299 .261 .281 .261 .198 .389 .273 .133 --.143 ----.284

St. Louis 002 020 000 — 4 9 1 Cincinnati 000 000 201 — 3 8 0 a-struck out for Lincoln in the 7th. b-popped out for Rasmus in the 9th. c-grounded into a double play for Rhodes in the 9th. 1-ran for Hanigan in the 9th. E—Schumaker (4). LOB—St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Rasmus (8), Schumaker (5), Gomes (5). HR—Pujols (8), off Harang; Ludwick (5), off Harang; Stubbs (4), off J.Garcia. RBIs—Ludwick 2 (15), Pujols 2 (29), Stubbs 3 (16). CS—Y.Molina (2). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 3 (Freese, B.Ryan, Y.Molina); Cincinnati 3 (Bruce 2, R.Hernandez). Runners moved up—J.Garcia. GIDP—Y.Molina, O.Cabrera, R.Hernandez. DP—St. Louis 2 (Freese, Schumaker, Pujols), (B.Ryan, Schumaker, Pujols); Cincinnati 1 (Rolen, B.Phillips, Votto). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia W, 4-2 6 1-3 5 2 2 1 6 96 1.42 McClellan H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.20 T.Miller H, 4 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.45 Boggs H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.05 Franklin S, 8-9 1 3 1 1 0 0 17 2.93 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harang L, 2-5 6 8 4 4 2 5 98 6.02 Lincoln 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.77 Masset 1 0 0 0 1 1 19 7.41 Rhodes 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.64 Inherited runners-scored—T.Miller 1-0, Boggs 1-0. HBP—by McClellan (B.Phillips). T—3:01. A—27,568 (42,319).

Marlins 7, Mets 2 MIAMI — Dan Uggla hit two of Florida’s four homers and drove in four runs, leading Anibal Sanchez and the Marlins to a victory over the Mets. Chris Coghlan hit the first home run by a lefthanded batter for Florida this season, and Gaby Sanchez also connected. New York Pagan cf L.Castillo 2b Jos.Reyes ss Bay lf D.Wright 3b I.Davis 1b Francoeur rf Barajas c O.Perez p Valdes p a-Carter ph Acosta p Mejia p c-Matthews Jr. ph Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 4 4 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 2 5

Florida Coghlan lf G.Sanchez 1b H.Ramirez ss Uggla 2b C.Ross rf Helms 3b R.Paulino c Maybin cf A.Sanchez p Badenhop p b-B.Carroll ph Sanches p Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 2 4 4 3 0 1 0 35

R H 1 1 2 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 11

BI 1 1 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 2 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .272 .260 .215 .265 .272 .289 .222 .255 .111 .500 .250 ----.149

SO 2 1 0 2 2 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 13

Avg. .215 .283 .290 .288 .277 .293 .309 .239 .214 .000 .224 ---

New York 000 020 000 — 2 4 0 Florida 004 300 00x — 7 11 0 a-grounded out for Valdes in the 7th. b-struck out for Badenhop in the 8th. c-flied out for Mejia in the 9th. LOB—New York 7, Florida 7. 2B—Pagan (4), Barajas (5), C.Ross (9). HR—Uggla 2 (8), off O.Perez 2; Coghlan (1), off O.Perez; G.Sanchez (4), off O.Perez. RBIs—Pagan 2 (17), Coghlan (7), G.Sanchez (18), Uggla 4 (23), Maybin (5). S—Valdes. Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (L.Castillo, Pagan, D.Wright); Florida 3 (A.Sanchez 2, G.Sanchez). Runners moved up—R.Paulino. GIDP—D.Wright. DP—Florida 1 (Helms, Uggla, G.Sanchez). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA O.Perez L, 0-3 3 1-3 9 7 7 3 5 88 5.94 Valdes 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 4 34 2.25 Acosta 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 5.14 Mejia 1 2 0 0 0 2 20 2.20 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 2-2 7 4 2 2 2 7 108 3.83 Badenhop 1 0 0 0 2 0 18 5.30 Sanches 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 0.00 HBP—by A.Sanchez (Barajas). PB—R.Paulino. T—2:47. A—21,221 (38,560).

Pirates 10, Cubs 6 CHICAGO — Andrew McCutchen and Garrett Jones both homered and set career highs with five hits each, leading the Pirates to a victory over the Cubs. The Pirates broke loose at the plate after four straight losses and back-toback shutouts at Cincinnati. They scored three runs in the first inning, then rallied from a 6-4 deficit. Pittsburgh Iwamura 2b An.LaRoche 3b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Doumit c Milledge lf Pearce 1b 1-Duke pr Carrasco p b-Crosby ph Meek p d-Church ph Hanrahan p Dotel p Cedeno ss Burres p a-Clement ph-1b Totals

AB 6 5 5 6 5 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 4 2 3 42

R 0 2 5 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10

Chicago AB R Theriot 2b 4 0 Grabow p 0 0 Zambrano p 0 0 e-Fukudome ph 1 0 J.Russell p 0 0 Byrd cf 4 2 D.Lee 1b 4 1 Nady rf 3 0 Colvin rf 1 0 Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 1 A.Soriano lf 4 2 Soto c 4 0 S.Castro ss 2 0 Gorzelanny p 2 0 Caridad p 0 0

H 0 1 5 5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 16

BI 0 0 2 5 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 10

BB 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6

SO 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 2 12

Avg. .161 .282 .336 .264 .271 .244 .143 .100 .000 .234 --.250 ----.234 .125 .182

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 0

Avg. .320 --.000 .313 --.345 .230 .174 .269 .168 .333 .310 .375 .154 ---

Marshall p 0 0 0 0 c-Fontenot ph-2b 2 0 1 0 Totals 36 6 11 5

0 0 --0 0 .313 3 10

Pittsburgh 301 011 031 — 10 16 1 Chicago 401 100 000 — 6 11 0 a-singled for Burres in the 5th. b-struck out for Carrasco in the 6th. c-singled for Marshall in the 6th. dfouled out for Meek in the 8th. e-struck out for Zambrano in the 8th. 1-ran for Pearce in the 5th. E—An.LaRoche (7). LOB—Pittsburgh 13, Chicago 8. 2B—An.LaRoche (3), G.Jones (9), Doumit (6), Byrd (15), Ar.Ramirez (4), A.Soriano (12). HR—G.Jones (5), off Zambrano; A.McCutchen (5), off J.Russell; Byrd (7), off Burres. RBIs—A.McCutchen 2 (12), G.Jones 5 (27), Milledge (12), Pearce (1), Clement (6), Byrd (25), Nady (7), A.Soriano 2 (22), Gorzelanny (1). SB—A.McCutchen 2 (12). SF—Pearce, Nady. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 6 (Cedeno 2, G.Jones, Iwamura, Crosby, Clement); Chicago 3 (Gorzelanny, Theriot, Ar.Ramirez). GIDP—S.Castro. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Iwamura, Cedeno, Clement). Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Burres 4 7 6 5 2 2 77 5.00 Carrasco 1 1 0 0 0 0 6 4.07 Meek W, 2-1 2 2 0 0 0 4 38 0.75 Hanrahan H, 6 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 5.40 Dotel 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 6.91 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gorzelanny 5 9 5 5 4 7 113 3.60 Caridad BS, 2-2 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 13 11.25 Marshall 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 17 2.60 Grabow 1 0 0 0 0 3 13 8.53 Zmbrno L, 1-3 1 4 3 3 0 1 35 7.07 J.Russell 1 2 1 1 0 0 17 3.00 Inherited runners-scored—Marshall 1-0. IBB—off Burres (S.Castro), off Marshall (Milledge). HBP—by Burres (Byrd), by Zambrano (An.LaRoche). T—3:25. A—39,082 (41,210).

Phillies 9, Brewers 5 MILWAUKEE — Jamie Moyer overcame three homers in one inning while Ryan Howard hit a two-run shot for the Phillies in a victory over Milwaukee. Raul Ibanez and Chase Utley hit solo homers for the surging Phils, winners of nine of 12. Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf W.Valdez ss Hoover c Moyer p Herndon p c-Gload ph Baez p Contreras p Totals

AB 5 3 5 5 4 5 5 3 1 0 1 0 0 37

R H 1 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 2 2 2 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 11

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Edmonds cf A.Escobar ss Kottaras c Wolf p a-Stern ph M.Parra p b-Counsell ph C.Vargas p Stetter p Coffey p d-Inglett ph Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 35

R 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 3 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .253 .299 .310 .287 .342 .243 .214 .200 .167 .000 .261 -----

H BI BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 4 3

SO 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .267 .247 .348 .261 .313 .283 .217 .243 .350 .000 .500 .309 .000 ----.333

Philadelphia 210 302 001 — 9 11 2 Milwaukee 030 000 200 — 5 8 2 a-struck out for Wolf in the 5th. b-walked for M.Parra in the 7th. c-flied out for Herndon in the 8th. d-singled for Coffey in the 9th. E—Utley 2 (6), M.Parra 2 (2). LOB—Philadelphia 7, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Ibanez (7), W.Valdez (4). 3B—Victorino (5), W.Valdez (1). HR—Howard (6), off Wolf; Ibanez (3), off Wolf; Utley (9), off Stetter; Fielder (5), off Moyer; Edmonds (3), off Moyer; Kottaras (3), off Moyer. RBIs—Victorino 3 (28), Polanco (19), Utley (20), Howard 2 (23), Ibanez (18), W.Valdez (4), Weeks (20), Fielder (16), Edmonds (8), Kottaras (9). S—Moyer 2. SF—Polanco. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Victorino, Utley, Howard); Milwaukee 2 (Hart, A.Escobar). GIDP—Braun. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Polanco, Utley, Howard). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moyer W, 5-2 6 1-3 5 5 4 3 3 111 4.57 Herndon H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.50 Baez H, 3 1 2 0 0 0 0 21 5.63 Contreras 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.71 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wolf L, 3-3 5 7 6 6 2 2 104 4.66 M.Parra 2 3 2 0 0 3 39 3.98 C.Vargas 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 5.28 Stetter 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 19 18.00 Coffey 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 2.20 Inherited runners-scored—Herndon 3-2, Coffey 1-0. HBP—by Stetter (Werth). T—3:06. A—41,706 (41,900).

Giants 8, Astros 2 SAN FRANCISCO — Andres Torres had an RBI triple, doubled in a run and scored twice as San Francisco produced the timely hits its lacked in recent days to snap Houston’s fourgame winning streak. Todd Wellemeyer (2-3) pitched into the eighth inning to help the Giants bounce back from a three-game sweep by San Diego, giving up Hunter Pence’s solo homer in the fourth for one of his two runs. Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf Pence rf P.Feliz 3b Manzella ss Cash c c-Blum ph F.Paulino p G.Chacin p Moehler p a-Sullivan ph Fulchino p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 33

San Francisco AB Rowand cf 4 Torres lf 4 Sandoval 3b 4 1-Rohlinger pr-3b 0 B.Molina c 4 A.Huff 1b 5 Romo p 0 Uribe ss 4 Schierholtz rf 3 M.Downs 2b 3 Wellemeyer p 2 Mota p 0 b-Ishikawa ph-1b 1 Totals 34

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 2

R H 1 0 2 3 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 8 12

BI 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 5

Avg. .286 .262 .253 .192 .256 .217 .184 .000 .317 .364 ----.152 ---

SO 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 9

Avg. .266 .286 .281 .333 .337 .285 .000 .259 .341 .283 .091 --.250

Houston 000 100 010 — 2 7 0 San Francisco 130 030 01x — 8 12 0 a-struck out for Moehler in the 8th. b-singled for Mota in the 8th. c-struck out for Cash in the 9th. 1-ran for Sandoval in the 8th. LOB—Houston 6, San Francisco 9. 2B—Berkman (6), Torres 2 (7), M.Downs (5). 3B—Torres (1). HR—Pence (6), off Wellemeyer. RBIs—Berkman (12), Pence (15), Torres 2 (7), Sandoval (12), A.Huff (18), Schierholtz (6), M.Downs (4). SB—Schierholtz (4). S—Wellemeyer. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 3 (Ca.Lee

2, Blum); San Francisco 5 (Uribe, B.Molina, Wellemeyer, A.Huff 2). Runners moved up—Sandoval 2, B.Molina. GIDP— Ca.Lee, M.Downs. DP—Houston 1 (P.Feliz, Keppinger, Berkman); San Francisco 1 (M.Downs, Uribe, A.Huff). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Paulino L, 0-6 4 2-3 8 7 7 4 7 100 5.72 G.Chacin 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 1 23 0.00 Moehler 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 3.78 Fulchino 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 4.97 San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wellmyr W, 2-3 7 1-3 5 2 2 2 4 106 5.25 Mota 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 1.42 Romo 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 3.78 Inherited runners-scored—G.Chacin 2-0, Mota 2-1. HBP—by Fulchino (Sandoval). WP—F.Paulino 2, Fulchino. T—2:43. A—38,650 (41,915).

Dodgers 4, Padres 3 SAN DIEGO — Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer in the seventh inning that a frustrated Tony Gwynn Jr. got his glove on as it sailed over the wall, sending surging Los Angeles past the NL West-leading Padres. Gwynn leaped at the center-field wall to take a stab at Kemp’s fly ball, but it hit off the end of his glove and went over. After he came back down, Gwynn punched the padded wall with his right fist. Los Angeles Martin c Kemp cf Ethier rf Man.Ramirez lf Broxton p Loney 1b Blake 3b DeWitt 2b J.Carroll ss Ra.Ortiz p Sherrill p Jef.Weaver p b-Belliard ph Belisario p Kuo p e-G.Anderson ph Re.Johnson lf Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 0 5 3 4 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 35

San Diego AB Gwynn cf 3 Eckstein 2b 4 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 Headley 3b 4 Venable rf 3 d-Salazar ph-rf 1 Stairs lf 2 a-Hairston Jr. ph-lf 2 Hundley c 4 E.Cabrera ss 4 Garland p 2 Gregerson p 0 c-Blanks ph 1 R.Webb p 0 Thatcher p 0 f-Torrealba ph 1 Totals 34

R H 2 2 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10 R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

SO 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .264 .283 .392 .383 --.319 .239 .277 .282 .000 ----.300 ----.135 .241

H BI BB 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 3

SO 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .212 .286 .267 .307 .217 .194 .167 .220 .229 .211 .083 --.172 ----.304

Los Angeles 001 010 200 — 4 10 0 San Diego 101 010 000 — 3 8 1 a-struck out for Stairs in the 6th. b-struck out for Jef.Weaver in the 7th. c-flied out for Gregerson in the 7th. d-grounded out for Venable in the 8th. e-reached on error for Kuo in the 9th. f-flied out for Thatcher in the 9th. E—Ad.Gonzalez (2). LOB—Los Angeles 10, San Diego 7. 2B—Martin (3), Ethier (11), Loney (12), Eckstein (8). HR—Kemp (8), off Gregerson; Ad.Gonzalez (7), off Ra.Ortiz. RBIs—Kemp 2 (24), Ethier (38), Man.Ramirez (17), Ad.Gonzalez (18), Headley (13), Venable (13). SB—Kemp (6). CS—Gwynn (2). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 7 (Ra. Ortiz 2, Blake 2, Loney 3); San Diego 1 (Stairs). Runners moved up—Man.Ramirez. GIDP—Blake, Ra.Ortiz. DP—San Diego 2 (Garland, Hundley, Ad.Gonzalez), (E.Cabrera, Eckstein, Ad.Gonzalez). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ra.Ortiz 4 6 3 3 3 4 86 5.40 Sherrill 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 7.30 Weaver W, 2-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 4.32 Belisario H, 4 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 13 6.10 Kuo H, 6 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 20 2.70 Broxton S, 5-7 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.32 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garland 6 6 2 2 4 2 111 1.88 Gregrsn L, 0-1 1 2 2 2 0 2 14 2.29 R.Webb 1 2-3 2 0 0 2 1 40 1.69 Thatcher 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 6.75 Ra.Ortiz pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Sherrill 2-1, Kuo 1-0, Thatcher 3-0. IBB—off Ra.Ortiz (Ad.Gonzalez), off Garland (J.Carroll), off R.Webb (Ethier). WP—Garland. T—3:26. A—42,056 (42,691).

LEADERS AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .365; Mauer, Minnesota, .364; Morneau, Minnesota, .361; ISuzuki, Seattle, .356; AJackson, Detroit, .342; Guerrero, Texas, .341; Cano, New York, .338. RUNS—Longoria, Tampa Bay, 32; Gardner, New York, 28; AJackson, Detroit, 28; Youkilis, Boston, 28; Cano, New York, 26; Damon, Detroit, 26; VWells, Toronto, 26. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 36; Guerrero, Texas, 31; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 31; VWells, Toronto, 29; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 28; Konerko, Chicago, 28; ARodriguez, New York, 26; Teixeira, New York, 26. DOUBLES—MiCabrera, Detroit, 14; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 14; VWells, Toronto, 14; Pedroia, Boston, 13; BAbreu, Los Angeles, 12; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 12; 6 tied at 11. HOME RUNS—Konerko, Chicago, 13; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 10; VWells, Toronto, 10; Wigginton, Baltimore, 10; Cano, New York, 9; AnJones, Chicago, 9; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 9. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 17; Gardner, New York, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; Podsednik, Kansas City, 13; RDavis, Oakland, 12; Rios, Chicago, 11; ISuzuki, Seattle, 10. PITCHING—PHughes, New York, 5-0; Price, Tampa Bay, 5-1; Garza, Tampa Bay, 5-1; 16 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 59; CLewis, Texas, 49; JShields, Tampa Bay, 49; RRomero, Toronto, 47; Morrow, Toronto, 46; Verlander, Detroit, 46; FHernandez, Seattle, 46; Garza, Tampa Bay, 46. SAVES—Valverde, Detroit, 10; Gregg, Toronto, 10; Aardsma, Seattle, 9; Papelbon, Boston, 9; NFeliz, Texas, 9; RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 9; Rauch, Minnesota, 9. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Ethier, Los Angeles, .392; Braun, Milwaukee, .348; Byrd, Chicago, .345; CRuiz, Philadelphia, .345; Werth, Philadelphia, .342; BMolina, San Francisco, .337; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, .336. RUNS—Kemp, Los Angeles, 32; Braun, Milwaukee, 31; Utley, Philadelphia, 31; Reynolds, Arizona, 27; Ethier, Los Angeles, 25; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 25; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 25; Uggla, Florida, 25; Weeks, Milwaukee, 25; Werth, Philadelphia, 25. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 38; McGehee, Milwaukee, 32; Cantu, Florida, 29; Pujols, St. Louis, 29; Reynolds, Arizona, 29; Braun, Milwaukee, 28; Heyward, Atlanta, 28; Victorino, Philadelphia, 28. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 18; Byrd, Chicago, 15; Loney, Los Angeles, 12; Pujols, St. Louis, 12; ASoriano, Chicago, 12; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 12; Ethier, Los Angeles, 11; KJohnson, Arizona, 11; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 11; Zimmerman, Washington, 11. HOME RUNS—Ethier, Los Angeles, 11; KJohnson, Arizona, 10; Reynolds, Arizona, 10; Barajas, New York, 9; Utley, Philadelphia, 9; 6 tied at 8. STOLEN BASES—AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 12; Bourn, Houston, 11; Headley, San Diego, 9; Venable, San Diego, 9; 7 tied at 8. PITCHING—Clippard, Washington, 7-1; Halladay, Philadelphia, 6-1; Jimenez, Colorado, 6-1; Wainwright, St. Louis, 5-1; Zito, San Francisco, 5-1; Moyer, Philadelphia, 5-2; DLowe, Atlanta, 5-3. STRIKEOUTS—Lincecum, San Francisco, 64; Haren, Arizona, 60; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 56; JoJohnson, Florida, 54; Carpenter, St. Louis, 52; Halladay, Philadelphia, 52; Hamels, Philadelphia, 49; Jimenez, Colorado, 49. SAVES—Capps, Washington, 14; Cordero, Cincinnati, 11; HBell, San Diego, 10; Lindstrom, Houston, 9; Franklin, St. Louis, 8.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 D5

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

WORLD CUP SOCCER

Sprinter Marion Jones seeks U.S.submits bid for to make amends in the WNBA 2018, ‘22 tourneys By Ronald Blum

By Jeff Latzke The Associated Press

TULSA, Okla. — Marion Jones made a mistake and paid the price for it. Her prison term completed, she could have found a quiet place and stayed away from the scrutiny and all the questions about being stripped of her Olympic medals. Instead, she wants to make amends for what she did wrong. The 34-year-old Jones will return to the world of sports today when she makes her debut with the Tulsa Shock, the WNBA franchise that moved out of Detroit in the offseason. Known for her triumphs as a track sprinter at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, and later for having her five medals taken away for using steroids, she’s returning to her roots as a basketball player after more than a decade. “I’ve made the choice not to disappear, not to crawl up in a hole, not to be a hermit, but to put myself out there on the highest stage of sport again and have people judge me, criticize me, watch me and then hopefully it helps them in their lives,” Jones said, taking a seat on the floor of the college practice gym where the Shock work out. “If I see that happening, then all of this would be absolutely worth it.” Jones was a superstar, among the world’s most recognizable female athletes, after she won three gold and two bronze medals in Sydney. All that was washed away as she spent about six months in a Texas prison for lying about her use of performance-enhancing drugs and her role in a check-fraud scam. Jones has maintained that she didn’t know she was taking the designer steroid known as “the clear” until well after the Olympics, and she believed Trevor Graham — her coach at the time — was giving her flaxseed oil. She says her mistake was not stopping to “take a break” before the lies to federal investigators that landed her behind bars. “It’s part of who I am. I think I have really taken and embraced it, and at this point that’s all I can do,” Jones said. “I have learned from it. I think I’m a better person because of it.” Her road back into the public eye began a year ago when she got word that WNBA teams might be interested in the services of a former point guard who won a national championship at North Carolina — albeit back in 1994. Eight months pregnant at the time, Jones could only laugh at the notion of playing pro basketball. But she talked to her husband about it and realized she still had an unquenched passion to play. Plus, it would be

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

Marion Jones prepares to throw the ball inbounds during a team practice for the Tulsa Shock in Tulsa, Okla, last week. Jones will return to sports today when she makes her WNBA debut. a way to promote her “Take A Break” platform of thinking before acting — a chance to lead others away from the path that led her astray. “I have this competitive drive that is kind of hard to kind of channel toward anything else,” said Jones, whose children are now 6, 2, and 10 months. “I love being a mom, love being a wife but it’s just hard to channel that really competitive energy, and so I really missed it. I missed the training, I missed competition and I missed everything related to it.” Jones still has her sleek, athletic frame although she has run into something new going through the Shock’s training camp: She simply isn’t used to being a step slow. It’s not her conditioning. Instead, Jones is still trying to regain her basketball instincts. She catches herself thinking before she releases a pass, an extra split-second she can’t

afford at this level. “I spent so many years perfecting my craft in terms of going over and over certain angles of my body — how my foot should be, my head, my hand, my back — that it’s different,” Jones said. “I’m a perfectionist, so I would practice over and over and over and over again. Here, these ladies are all professionals and the coaches have already said they don’t have time ... to really teach.” Just like Jones, her coach is pursuing a second chance. She’ll be playing for Nolan Richardson, who won a national title with Arkansas in 1994 but was fired eight years later and then lost a discrimination lawsuit against the school. He had never before coached women and was hesitant at first to accept the Shock job, since he wasn’t looking to get back into coaching. Eventually, he bought in and returned to the city where he won an NIT title and made it to the NCAA tournament three times at the University of Tulsa. In what will be the WNBA’s second-smallest market, Richardson is adapting to his role as “the face of the squad,” which has him serving as equal parts ticket-seller and coach. The first player he signed was Jones, a natural fit for his frenetic “40 Minutes of Hell” style and a big splash for a franchise that lost its two top scorers from its championship-winning days in Detroit. The combination has helped the Shock sell out its first game (only the lower bowl of the BOK Center, seating about 7,500, will be used for WNBA games). Richardson insists Jones’ signing is more than a PR stunt and said she has a chance to be good. “It’s just a matter of sharpening up the knife,” Richardson said. “It still can cut if you sharpen it.” In Jones’ mind, there’s still plenty of sharpening to be done. She stays active in practice, shifting back and forth and trying to dart into passing lanes on the defensive end. When she heads to the sidelines to rest, her chest heaves as she tries to catch her breath. But it’s in those moments that Jones catches herself smiling. “I’m tired and, yeah, I kind of want the drill to stop but I’m so happy that I’m here. There’s so many other worse places that people can be,” Jones said. “I could have not awakened this morning or I could be in some other places that — trust me — are not very fun to be in. But I’m here, doing what I love, getting an opportunity to just play basketball. It doesn’t really get much better than that.”

GOLF ROUNDUP

Pak stakes lead over two at LPGA Classic The Associated Press MOBILE, Ala. — Se Ri Pak shot a 6-under 66 on Friday to take a one-stroke lead over Brittany Lincicome and Wendy Ward in the Bell Micro LPGA Classic. Pak, who opened on the 10th tee, had five birdies in a six-hole stretch on her final nine holes to top the second-round leaderboard at 9 under on The Crossings course at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail’s Magnolia Grove complex. Pak won events on the course in 2001 and 2002. “Of course I have such a great memory about it,” Pak said. “I play really well and the scores are really low, too. That helps a lot. “I know so many holes, where to miss, how to play, how to make the shot. That actually helps a lot, especially during this week.” Many of the players wore purple ribbons and wristbands with “EB” and a heart honoring Erica Blasberg, a 25-year-old tour player who was found dead in suburban Las Vegas on Sunday. The flag was at half-staff.

Police have not said if they suspect foul play and the coroner said a ruling on a cause of death was pending blood and tissue tests that could take four to six weeks to complete. Ward had the low round with a 65, six strokes better than her opener. Lincicome got off to a fast start with birdies on six of her opening seven holes, but had a finishing bogey for a 66. First-round leader Azahara Munoz was in a group of four players three strokes back after a double bogey on No. 17 and a 73. The 22-year-old former Spanish amateur star and 2008 NCAA individual champion for Arizona State had navigated the course unscathed in scoring a bogeyfree 65 to open. The Hall of Famer Pak is pushing $11 million in career earnings but hasn’t finished better than 15th in her first five events of 2010 or won since the 2007 Owens Corning Classic. In other events on Friday: Rain washes out Texas Open SAN ANTONIO — Rain

Pole Pedal Paddle Nearly 3,000 racers are expected to compete — as individuals or as members of teams — in Saturday’s 34th annual U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle. The multisport race is made up of six stages: 1. ALPINE SKIING A 200-foot uphill sprint through snow to skis and snowboards, and a race down a gated course on the Leeway Run at Mt. Bachelor ski area. 2. NORDIC SKIING An eight-kilometer loop along the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center trails, first skirting the Bachelor parking lot and then finishing at the Nordic Center. 3. CYCLING A 22-mile mostly downhill ride along Century Drive from Mount Bachelor to Colorado Avenue in Bend. 4. RUNNING A five-mile run along Century Drive and the Deschutes River Trail to the boat exchange across the river from Farewell Bend Park. 5. PADDLING A 1½-mile paddle in a kayak or canoe on the Deschutes River. 6. SPRINTING A half-mile run from the paddle finish along a paved path and grass to the finish at the Les Schwab Amphitheater.

Victor Calhoun / The Associated Press

Se Ri Pak tees off during the second round of the Bell Micro LPGA Classic golf tournament on Friday in Mobile, Ala. washed out play in the Texas Open and PGA Tour officials said more bad weather this weekend could push the tournament into Monday. More than three inches of rain soaked the Oaks Course at TPC San Antonio, where leader Matt

PPP Continued from D1 The first Central Oregon PPP was staged a year later, in 1977, brought to Bend by Dave and Jenny Sheldon, a husband and wife who had been ski bums in Jackson Hole before moving to Bend. The Sheldons wanted to raise money for the Bend Skyliners youth ski-racing program. Since its modest beginnings — with only about 65 participants in the first race in 1977 — the Central Oregon PPP has become the primary fundraiser for that local youth skiing program, which is now known as the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation (MBSEF). Jenny Sheldon said the Jackson Hole PPP — the 35th of

Jones and the rest of the field never got on the course. They’ll try again today, when Jones will start with a one-stroke lead over Paul Stankowski. Four tied atop leaderboard HOOVER, Ala. — Joey Sindelar, Bobby Clampett, Russ Cochran and Peter Senior shot 7-under 65s in the Regions Charity Classic to share the lead after the record-setting opening round. The 77 players in the field had a scoring average of 69.519 on the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail’s Ross Bridge course, breaking the tournament record of 70.397 set in 2002 when the Champions Tour event was played at Greystone. Edberg, Kingston share lead SON SERVERA, Balearic Islands — Sweden’s Pelle Edberg shot a 6-under 64 in stormy conditions for a share of the secondround lead in the Mallorca Open. Edberg had seven birdies and a bogey in the round that was disrupted by lightning to join James Kingston (70) at 5-under 135 on the Pula Golf Club course.

which was staged earlier this spring — is a much more challenging race. It includes, in order, a three-mile alpine ski, a 10-kilometer cross-country ski, a 20-mile bike ride, and a ninemile paddle, some of which is through whitewater. The Central Oregon PPP starts with a two-kilometer alpine ski, followed by an 8K nordic ski, a 22-mile bike ride, a five-mile run, a 1½-mile river paddle and a half-mile sprint. “It was never intended to be an elite race — it was intended to get people off the couch,” Jenny Sheldon said of the Central Oregon PPP in a 2008 Bulletin story. “There’s no reason to go crazy about it … it doesn’t qualify you for any particular thing, it’s just fun to do. I wanted to create a race so somebody could do each leg and not have to train all year.”

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The United States proposed holding the World Cup draw in Miami ahead of a tournament in 2018 or 2022 and suggested the possibility of hosting the opener at the Dallas Cowboys Stadium. The five-volume U.S. bid book, presented to FIFA on Friday, would put the qualifying draw in New York, its location ahead of the 1994 tournament. The U.S. bid committee has steadily been adding big names to its group and scheduled a news conference with former President Bill Clinton at a field in Harlem on Monday. “We’ve got 320 million people. If we get even a small percentage increase of them turned onto the game in a way that follows the team or MLS now, it would be extraordinary growth,” said U.S. Soccer Federation president Sunil Gulati, chairman of the USA Bid Committee. “We don’t have to spend money on infrastructure, and not only don’t we have to do it, we don’t have to ask the U.S. government or any state governments to do it.” Gulati said proposals for the specific sites for the draws and the opener were preliminary. The U.S. bid proposed 18 stadiums, six more than probably would be used. In addition, new stadiums would be considered if they are built for the NFL in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Minneapolis and other places. “There are a number of combinations that would work,” Gulati said. “Clearly New York is an important city. The same goes for Miami, which has become very much the gateway for South America.” The bid committee has reserved 170,000 rooms totaling 12.8 million hotel nights for 2018 and 2022. It has lined up 68 base camps and 118 training sites and projected 5 million tickets sold and over $1 billion in revenue. “I don’t see how anyone else could technically match all of the standards at the level we’ve met,” Gulati said. He said FIFA has not brought up the new immigration law in Arizona, but said he thinks there will be changes in the statute mak-

ing it more favorable to human rights. “I think there will be a better balance struck soon, is my view. It’s being challenged legally. It’s obviously being challenged in public opinion,” he said. “At this stage, they’re part of the bid. We’ve got 18 cities, so we have plenty of options.” Gulati said that if the U.S. were hosting the World Cup in six months, he would have to think “long and hard” about whether to drop Glendale, Ariz., as a proposed site. England, Russia, Australia, Spain-Portugal and BelgiumNetherlands are competing for both tournaments, and Japan, Qatar and South Korea are bidding for 2022 only. Because Europe has eight of 24 votes on the FIFA executive committee, soccer’s top economic continent is likely to host in 2018. FIFA’s executive committee will vote on both hosts Dec. 2, and Gulati said the U.S. starts with the three votes from North and Central America and the Caribbean. Major League Soccer launched after the 1994 World Cup. There are now several all-soccer television networks in the U.S. “In 1994 the World Cup was a kind of pilot, because for the first time in the history of the World Cup not only all the tickets were sold but all the seats were occupied,” FIFA president Sepp Blatter said. “Now it is passe.” USSF officials believe growth would be even greater following another World Cup in America. “The first World Cup changed the landscape of the United States in an extraordinary way,” Gulati said. “If American television gets involved in the World Cup in the same way that American television essentially funds the Olympic movement, that would be a landmark change in the way FIFA’s revenues and therefore FIFA’s programs around the world are. It’s a very large country. We don’t need to rival the NFL to have a multiple increase.” U.S. captain Carlos Bocanegra, who helped hand over the bid, said a successful tournament in South Africa this year will be important to the bid. “America loves winners,” he said. “We’re going to try to go down there and do something special.”

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D6 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H O R S E R AC I N G : P R E A K N E S S C O M M E N TA RY

A good rider keeps a horse out of trouble JIM LITKE BALTIMORE — jockey can change what he does from race to race, but not who he is. Even before Calvin Borel knew how to ride a horse, he knew exactly where he planned to ride nearly every one of them — along the rail, if only because it’s the shortest way around every oval. Never mind that even a single slip-up down at the bottom of the racetrack can ruin your day, not to mention the rest of your life. Borel made peace with that riskreward factor a long time ago. So if nothing else, that should make this Preakness a true test of just how great a rider he has become. Because no matter how loud his instincts are screaming, the last place Borel plans to be late this afternoon is in that wellworn groove. “It’s a different style, I guess,” Borel said about his bread-andbutter tactic. “But you have to have the horse to get through there. At Churchill Downs, you can be along the rail. Somewhere else, you don’t want to be along the rail, no sir.” And what about here at Pimlico? Borel looked up and slowly shook his head from side to side, almost mournfully. “No, sir,” he said. At midday Friday, several hundred fans were lined up in the grandstand at Pimlico for an autograph session featuring Borel, a half-dozen other Preakness riders, and the same number of former great female jockeys. Being a celebrity is still new to Borel, who at age 43 is closing in on 5,000 career wins, yet was largely ignored

A

by elite owners and trainers until almost four years ago. In short order, he rode Street Sense to victories in the Breeders’ Cup Juvenile in the fall of 2006 and then again the following spring in the Kentucky Derby. Since then, Borel has wrapped his hands around nearly every big prize in sight: two more Derbys, a Preakness and the Kentucky Oaks aboard filly Rachel Alexandra. Still in the saddle atop Super Saver and fresh off his latest Derby win, he guaranteed the big bay colt would end thoroughbred racing’s 32-year wait for another Triple Crown champion. “He’s the ‘now guy’, there’s no question about that,” said D. Wayne Lukas, who will send Dublin to the post and leads all active trainers with 13 Triple Crown wins. “He’s riding with such confidence. He’s always been very confident, but he’s riding with extreme confidence right now. He thinks he’s invincible.” The funny thing is Borel felt that way almost from the beginning. He grew up in that part of Louisiana known as Cajun country, which also produced jockeys Randy Romero, Kent Desormeaux, and Shane Sellers. His brother, Cecil, was 12 years older and already training when the only duty Calvin could be entrusted with was walking horses around the barn. One day, Cecil started lining up barrels in Calvin’s path, forcing his kid brother and the horses to go wider and wider. “I was taught everything before I knew how to really ride and before I even got on a horse,” he said. “That helped me a lot, made me come a long way.” Most trainers consider jockeys a necessary evil, one step up the evolutionary ladder from the beasts they ride. Some trainers, though, aren’t convinced it’s a full step. “There’s no use giving them in-

1 3 5 T H

P R E A K N E S S

S T A K E S

Going for the middle jewel in the crown Kentucky Derby winner Super Saver, the early 5-2 favorite for today’s Preakness Stakes, will break from the starting gate next to beaten Derby favorite Lookin At Lucky. Saturday • NBC • 3:15 p.m. PDT Total purse: $1.1 million Winner’s share: $710,000 Weight: 126 pounds Post time: 3:15 p.m. (PDT)

ch stret Back

THE FIELD PP

1

Main track

FINISH Clubhouse

2

Schoolyard Dreams

3

Pleasant Prince

4

Northern Giant

5

Yawanna Twist

6

Jackson Blend

7

Lookin At Lucky

8

Super Saver

9

Caracortado

10

Paddy O’Prado

11

First Dude

12

Dublin

Grandstands Race length: 1 3/16 miles

Running for a place in history

Won

P-Preakness

YEAR

DERBY WINNER

P

Seven of the last 13 Kentucky Derby winners have gone on to win the Preakness, setting up a Triple Crown try.

2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997

Mine That Bird Big Brown Street Sense Barbaro Giacomo Smarty Jones Funny Cide War Emblem Monarchos Fusaichi Pegasus Charismatic Real Quiet Silver Charm

2nd

Winningest post positions (1909-2009) by number of wins

15

PP 6

13 12

4

7

11 11 10 10

2

3

5

8

B-Belmont B

3rd DNF 2nd – DNF – 3rd – 2nd 3rd 8th 6th – 2nd – 3rd 2nd 2nd

Aikenite Javier Castelano 4-0-1-1 • $77,806 • 20-1

Turf course

Pimlico Race Course

Horse • Jockey • 2010 record • Earnings • Odds

Eibar Coa 4-1-2-0 • $147,820 • 15-1 Julien Leparoux 6-0-2-1 • $197,788 • 20-1 Terry Thompson 5-1-1-2 • $158,330 • 30-1 Edgar Prado 3-1-2-0 • $171,000 • 30-1 Mike Smith 4-0-3-0 • $230,000 • 12-1 Martin Garcia 3-1-0-1 • $270,000 • 3-1 Calvin Borel 3-1-1-1 • $1,655,200 • 5-2 Paul Atkinson 3-1-0-1 • $153,000 • 10-1 Kent Desormeaux 4-1-1-2 • $443,150 • 9-2 Ramon Dominguez 4-1-1-1 • $136,640 • 20-1 Garrett Gomez 4-0-1-2 • $180,000 • 10-1

SOURCES: Pimlico Race Course; Maryland Jockey Club

structions,” the late Hall of Famer Charlie Whittingham once complained, “because by the time they go from the paddock to the race track, they’ve already forgotten them. There’s a reason why jockeys wear size 3 1⁄2 hats.” But Borel gets more respect than most. Trainer Bob Baffert, who will

AP

saddle Lookin At Lucky and has won eight Triple Crown races himself, had no problem switching jockeys from Garrett Gomez in the Derby to Martin Garcia here. But when a rider is at the top of his game — the way Borel is at the moment — even topflight trainers know enough to keep those instructions to a minimum.

“Some guys try riding down there, bump off the rail and don’t go back. It takes real nerve, but he’s got a knack where he can really get a horse to really relax. Calvin just gets that loop and gives it this,” Baffert paused, pretending he was holding the reins, “and next thing you know they’re just galloping along free and easy.

“The definition of a great rider is a guy who keeps a good horse out of trouble. A lot of guys don’t learn that until they get older. They get that confidence going and it translates to the horse. They feel fear. They feel when you’re scared. But Calvin is fearless,” Baffert added. “He’s like that guy from Avatar. He just plugs in and goes wherever he wants.” Stopping Borel from doing just that is practically the mission statement for all the other riders in this race. The scuttle on the backstretch barely 24 hours from post time is that Desormeaux, a fellow Cajun who will ride Paddy O’Prado, will do most of the early work. “He’ll be watching Super Saver. That’s going to be his target,” Baffert said. “I think Kent will probably start the tempo and the rest of us will have to fall into it.” If any of that talk is bothering Borel, he isn’t letting on. He’s patiently signing autographs, smiling broadly from beneath a black satin baseball cap with “Super Saver” stitched across the crown in gold letters. An athlete’s life rarely peaks in middle age, but Borel’s did. It hasn’t changed his crazy work ethic — he still rides full cards nearly year-round, besides working horses most mornings — nor dimmed his love for what he does. “I maybe say things that I shouldn’t — that I’m going to win it. But if you’re going to ride, why don’t you want to win it?” he said. “C’mon. That’s me.” With that, Borel flashes that wide grin one more time, suggesting that behind it sits a guy who knows that every once in a while, taking a different route is the only way to get where you want to go. Jim Litke is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. Write to him at jlitke@ ap.org.

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Mears gets shot with Vickers out B y D an G elston The Associated Press

DOVER, Del — Casey Mears is normally the driver watching Cup races on TV. He’ll be in the car at Dover International Speedway while Brian Vickers sits this one out. Mears was needed in a pinch this weekend because Vickers, his friend and Red Bull Racing driver, is hospitalized with blood clots in his veins around his lungs and in his legs. His Chase for the championship chances are all but gone, but he has more pressing concerns. “Dealing with that and doing that right is way more important than being here at the track right now,” Mears said Friday. “It’s never fun to be watching races at home. I’m sure that will wear on him.” Mears knows how Vickers feels. Mears qualified for only two races this season and has bounced around after sponsorship cutbacks cost him his job at Richard Childress Racing. He was on standby after Denny Hamlin had surgery to repair a torn ACL, and he’ll drive weekto-week for Tommy Baldwin’s No. 36 car as long as Baldwin can find funding for each race. He drove the first two months of the season for underfunded Keyed-Up Motorsports. “It’s been crazy, it really has,” Mears said. “Obviously, not what I want. I want something solid and I want to run all season. At the same time, there’s been parts of it that have been fun. It’s enlightened me a lot on what other guys are doing, different teams are doing. In a lot of ways, I learned a lot this year.” Red Bull Racing general manager Jay Frye said Vickers is on medication and was hopeful of being released from the hospital on Friday, but could remain there a few more days. Frye said there is “no timetable” for Vickers’ return. “He’s got great reason for optimism that everything’s going to be fine,” Frye said. Frye says Vickers complained of discomfort on his chest and went to a hospital in Washington. He says the team is not sure what caused the clots. The 26-year-old Vickers is in his seventh full season racing in NASCAR’s Sprint Cup Series. He has two career Cup wins and made the 12-driver Chase for

Truex wins pole at Dover DOVER, Del. — Martin Truex Jr. turned a lap of 157.315 mph and has won the pole at Dover International Speedway for Sunday’s race. Kasey Kahne was second and Mark Martin third in Friday’s qualifying. Truex won his first pole of the season and first since last November at Phoenix. He won his only career Cup race at Dover in 2007. He is 13th in the points standings in his first season with Michael Waltrip Racing. — The Associated Press the championship last season. He’s currently ranked 20th in the standings. Missing a start almost certainly will make it impossible for Vickers to make the Chase this season. “It is a minor setback in a young man’s life and career,” Frye said. “Obviously, it’s a major setback for our race team this weekend.” Jimmie Johnson said Vickers sounded like his usual self when they spoke Thursday night. “There’s still a lot of question marks and concerns and trying to understand just what in the world is going on,” Johnson said. “Until they can find out what’s going on, there’s a lot of worry

and concern.” Mears will replace Vickers in the No. 83 Toyota. Frye said Mears will drive for RBR for as long as the team needs him. Frye did not know if Mears would be allowed to drive for Vickers in the NASCAR Sprint All-Star Race, if needed. Frye said even if Vickers was released before Sunday’s race, running at least one lap for points was not an option. Red Bull Racing was smart to bench Vickers, according to a physician who specializes in venous disease. Suresh Vedantham, a professor of interventional radiology at Washington University School

of Medicine, said there are risks that could occur if he competed. “If he were to get banged up, trauma can promote further blood clotting,” he said. “If he’s known to have blood clots, he’s probably using blood thinning drugs. If he was banged up, he’d be particularly prone to a severe bleeding complication.” Vedantham said there are about 300,000 new cases of reported blood clots each year. He credited Vickers for seeking immediate medical treatment and not trying to drive one lap or 400 miles on the concrete. Johnny Sauter qualified 41st in the Tommy Baldwin Racing No. 36 Chevrolet. Mears, who qualified 39th, was happy to help Red Bull in a pinch. “The opportunity to help out a friend was a good opportunity,” Mears said. Mears would like to find more regular work. He was 14th in the 2006 standings with Chip Ganassi, then moved to Hendrick Motorsports and won the prestigious Coca-Cola 600 in 2007 on Memorial Day.

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E SATURDAY, MAY 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Volunteer Bruce Schroeder and ReStore director Sophie Paez work with one another to install siding on the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity ReStore home.

by Nicole Werner, The Bulletin Advertising Department The term “green building” can conjure the notion of high expense for cost savings that won’t be realized for years. This, however, is not the case for homes built by Bend Area Habitat for Humanity (BAHFH) volunteers. In the past two years, BAHFH has worked with numerous contractors, Earth Advantage and Northwest Energy Star to establish green building practices that could be incorporated into each Habitat home built. Earth Advantage standards are based on energy efficiency, healthy indoor air and minimal environmental impact, and Energy Star rates energy efficiency. During 2009, BAHFH built 11 homes that achieved Energy Star qualification. According to Energy Star statistics, the impact of those homes can be translated as the elimination of emissions from 5.39 vehicles, saving 32,604 pounds of coal,

Half-inch Styrofoam sheathing, donated by Dow Chemical, adds additional wall insulation and protection from water vapor condensation in the wall cavity of the ReStore home.

planting 8.91 acres of trees and saving homeowners $4,917 on their utility bills. Those 11 homes, and the homes currently being built, also meet Earth Advantage Gold standards — standards that go above and beyond Earth Advantage’s minimum standards for green building. According to Bruce Sullivan, building consultant with Earth Advantage in Bend, features that are currently incorporated into all of the Habitat homes include well-designed floorplans with smaller footprints, high-performance insulation, tankless water heaters, solar energy devices, fiber-cement siding, low-flush toilets and low flow faucets and shower heads. The energy use of a Habitat home is up to 65 percent less than that of a 2,400-square-foot home

nization involved in its construction. ReStore is a nonprofit building material outlet affiliated with BAHFH that carries donated and surplus materials, appliances, fixtures and furniture. All proceeds from ReStore benefit BAHFH. “I’ve always tried to encourage the connection between ReStore and Habitat,” said Paez. The use of reclaimed materials in the ReStore home will take the certification standards beyond Gold to make it eligible for Earth Advantage Platinum certification. “Because we build so many homes each year now, we buy in bulk,” said Paez. “We’ve never really had the opportunity to use materials from the store.” Paez noted that using reclaimed materials pur-

“… this principle is not limited to Habitat homes, but applies across a wide spectrum of the housing market.” built to standard Oregon code. While less energy is used, a more healthful environment is created through the use of automatic fresh-air ventilation systems and paints and sealants that are low in volatile organic compounds (VOCs). “While it is difficult to put a price on health, it is safe to say that healthy homes promote healthy people who spend less [money] on health care,” said Sullivan. “They’re very healthy homes, and they’ll keep the costs low for the people [who live] in them,” said Sophie Paez, ReStore Director. One home in BAHFH’s newest community, Parkway Village, will possess all of these qualities while taking one step further in green building to meet Earth Advantage Platinum standards. “BAHFH has billed the ‘ReStore house’ as ‘taking it to a new level,’” said Sullivan. The ReStore house gets its name from the orga-

chased from stores such as ReStore is a sustainable practice, and it also saves money. “It’s not extra,” said Paez. “It’s using the knowledge of what’s available.” During the planning process, the family that is buying the ReStore home was involved in shopping for and organizing materials that came from ReStore. Reclaimed doors and light fixtures from ReStore will be installed in the home. Reclaimed cabinets from Moon Cabinets and Wool carpets from Brilliant Environmental Building Products will also be used in the home’s finishing. “Bend Habitat demonstrates that green homes don’t need to be expensive homes,” said Sullivan. “When Habitat owners accept the keys to their new homes, they know that any extra money they invested in green features will come back to them immediately in energy savings. In other words, the cost to finance the savings through their mortgage

Raised heel roof trusses allow for insulation to be installed across the entire attic for improved energy efficiency in the ReStore home.

is less than the monthly reduction in their energy bills. They save money from day one.” The ReStore home demonstrates the ability to utilize a wide variety of techniques and materials that can fit into many levels of building and remodeling budgets. “… this principle is not limited to Habitat homes, but applies across a wide spectrum of the housing market,” said Sullivan. Bend Area Habitat for Humanity builds homes through volunteer labor and donations of money and materials. Habitat builds and rehabilitates simple, decent houses with the help of the homeowner (partner) families. Habitat houses are sold to partner families at no profit and are financed with affordable loans. The homeowners’ monthly mortgage payments are used to build more Habitat homes. Photos by Nicole Werner


E2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

638

648

650

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658

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

First Month’s Rent Free 20507 Brentwood Ave. #1 3 bedroom/ 2.5 bath, patio, W/D, fridge, W/S pd. & landscaping paid. $829+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414 Near Old Mill, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, wood stove, garage, fenced yard, 603 SE Wilson, $650/$600 dep., please call 541-480-3832.

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $770 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127

When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803.

$200 off 1st mo. 3/2, fenced back yard, new appl., dog OK, $800+security dep., 1617 SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, tmenergyrates@gmail.com

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

ROMAINE VILLAGE 61004 Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, $850, Jim, 541-388-3209.

2300 Sq.ft. Pahlish in Fieldstone, great room, 3 bdrm.+ office+bonus, 537 NW 28th St., $1200/mo., call 541-389-2192,541-350-3219

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255. 616

Want To Rent WANTED: 22’+ trailer to rent at the Cove Palisades for 7 days in June. Non smoking, refs., insured, 360-844-5789

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges LAS VEGAS, next to South Point/Las Vegas Blvd., 2 bdrm. condo, 5/30-6/6, $800, call for more info., 541-447-1616.

OCEANFRONT HOMES Rent now for Summer. Waldport. Sleeps 10-16. www.rodbyroost.com 541-923-0908

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

Near Tumalo, SW Adobe home, furnished, $350 + util., 541-388-2159. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. REDMOND TOWNHOUSE DUPLEX APARTMENT On cul-de-sac, NI CE 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bedroom, 1½ bath, single car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. includes w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

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Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928.

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1027 NE Kayak Lp. #1 3 bdrm/ 2 bath, basic appl., gas heat, gas fireplace, 1 car garage, no pets. $795+dep. Viking Property Management 541-416-0191 1047 NE WATT WAY #2 1/2 off 1st months rent! 2 bdrm, all appliances, w/d hook-ups, gas fireplace, garage & deck. $695 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S paid, $675/mo. 541-610-4070 2061 YORK CIRCLE 2 bdrm, 2 bath immaculate townhome, semi-private yard, close to park. $620. 1700 WELLS ACRES Burning Tree Village charming condos. Storage, sports court & laundry facilities. #4: 1 bdrm, tile counters. $450 . #8: 1 bdrm, freshly repainted. $450. CENTRAL OREGON Leasing & Management 1250 NE 3rd B200, 385-6830 www.centraloregonrentals.com

3018 NE Canoe Ct. #1 $200 off 1st months rent! 2 Bdrm, 2½ bath, all appliances, gas fireplace, 1130 sq. ft., garage, w/s paid! $725 541-382-7727

Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. $725/mo. 541-420-0208 Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636 126 NW Adams. Private downtown 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath town home, garage, W/S/G pd., W/D incl., no smoking, $800/mo. 541-771-4824. 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrn., DW, W/S/G paid, oak cabs., carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 383-2430.

210 NW REVERE #B 1/2 off 1st months rent! Spacious, upstairs 3 bdrm near river, all appliances, all utilities included. $700. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

2 Bdrm., 2 bath, Lower West Hills, with great view & deck, W/D & garage, $975/mo., gas, water, & elec. $100 flat rate, 541-420-7357.

1269 NW Stannium ½ OFF the 1st Month’s Rent! 1 bdrm apartment, range, refrigerator, large deck, vaulted ceilings. AVAIL. 5/26. $475 Mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #4. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803

415 NE DeKalb #1 1/2 Off 1st Months rent!! 2 Bdrm, all appliances, w/d hook-ups, single garage, w/s/g paid! $595 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

737 NE SAVANNAH DR. #3 Cute single level 4-plex. 1 bdrm, 1 bath, w/s/g incl. Single car garage, and w/d. 541-385-1515 www.rentingoregon.com

899 NE Hidden Valley #1 1/2 OFF the 1st Month’s Rent! 2 bedroom, all appliances, gas fireplace, w/s paid, garage. $650 mo. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

A Better Place to Live, May Free • Near Hospital 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Duplex 2/1, fully updated W/D hookup, W/S paid, patio, fully fenced, garage w/opener $650 +dep. No smoking/pets 503-507-9182. First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th St. 1/2bdrm 1 bath, w/s/g pd., laundry room, no smoking, close to school. $495-525 rent+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414 First Month’s Rent Free Laredo Complex 2 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, w/d hook-up, patio, small pets, 1 yr lease. w/s/g pd. $595+dep. CR Property Management 318-1414

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1807 SW 21st, spacious 2/2 gorgeous fenced duplex, w/garage, mint cond. W/S/G, paid pet OK reduced to $695. 541- 549-2228.

1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com $300 Gift Card to Super Walmart, Duplex, 3/2 1400 sq.ft., W/D hookup, garage, gas fireplace, 840 NE Maple Leaf Ct., $750 541-280-9222 Ask Us About Our

May Special!

Chaparral Apts.

• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Duplex in nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, single garage, deck, fenced yard, new paint & carpet, no pets/smoking, $675 per month + security dep. and cleaning fee, 541-447-6390.

Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870.

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany 1st Month Free with 1 year lease or ½ Off first month with 7 month lease. * 1 bdrm $475 * * 2 bdrm $550 * * 3 bdrm $595 * W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with deposit. Call 382-7727 or 388-3113.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

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Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 1/2 Off First Month’s Rent 1630 SE Temptest Dr. #7 2 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, single garage, w/s pd., w/d hook-up, no pets. $675+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 330 SE 15th St. 1st mo. free w/ 1 yr lease! One bdrm apt., refrigerator, range, storage, carport, onsite laundry, w/s/g paid! $450 month. 541-382-7727

MAY

SPECIALS!

Studios & 1 bdrm

$395 to $415

Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. (Move in Incentive) 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 4-Plex, W/D included, new carpets close to shopping, $685/mo. 541-504-8086. Newer 2 bdrm., single level duplex, covered parking, decks, separate storage, near Redmond Rite-Aid, $550/mo. 541-548-4727/541-419-8371

648

Houses for Rent General BEND RENTALS • Starting at $495. Furnished also avail. For pictures & details www.alpineprop.com 541-385-0844

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 708 SE CENTENNIAL

2271 NE PHEASANT LN. 4 bdrm., 2 bath, single

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

car garage, wood stove, fenced yard, new flooring, paint and windows. Avail. now. $875/mo+ dep ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558

Houses for Rent NW Bend

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 1st Month’s Rent Free 4 bdrm/ 2bath on lrg lot, deck, fncd bckyrd, pets ok, all appl. frplce, 1627 NE Cackler ln. $1095+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

Crooked River Ranch $625 First Month $525! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath MFD on 2 acres, range, fridge, dishwasher, w/d hookups, covered deck, f/a heat, extra storage. 5757 SW Shad

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

541-923-8222

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

www.MarrManagement.com

652

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Houses for Rent SE Bend 1 Bdrm., 1 bath, wood fireplace, deck, treed parklike yard, quiet cul-de-sac, garage, Bear Creek & 15th, $675 mo. 541-330-0053. Avail. Now, Older, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, 1 pet w/ extra dep., no garage, $525/mo+1st, last, dep. Refs. 541-382-3672.

656

www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

Houses for Rent SW Bend

3 Bdrm., 2 bath, double garage, storage, dishwasher, W/D hookup, excellent location, $850 mo. plus dep. Pet neg. Avail. June 541-382-8399.

2 Bdrm., near Old Mill, 1000 sq. ft., newer carpet, vaulted ceiling, wood stove, big deck, fenced yard, single garage, $795,541-480-3393, 610-7803

516 NE Franklin Great location! 1 bdrm house close to park & shopping, washer/dryer included! $550 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Near Bend High School, 4 Clean, energy efficient nonbdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 smoking units, w/patios, 2 sq. ft., large carport, no on-site laundry rooms, storsmoking, $995/mo. + deps. age units available. Close to 541-389-3657 schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping cen- Newer, spacious 3 Bdrm/2 Bath, oversized garage, ter and tennis courts. Pet fenced yard, cool great room, friendly with new large dog quiet neighborhood! $950/ run, some large breeds okay mo. Call Kurt 541 350-5552 with mgr. approval.

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2/1, granite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 541-815-0688.

1/2 off 1st months rent! 2 Bdrm, All appliances, W/D Hook-ups, Garage, W/S/G PAID! $450 mo. 541-382-7727

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

61550 Brosterhous Rd. All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727

First Month’s Rent Free 402 NW Bond Charming Twnhse, 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, w/ grage, w/s/g pd. frplce, sm pet neg $700+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

1/2 OFF the 1st Mos. Rent 2 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, w/d hookups, w/s/g paid. $525 mo. 541-382-7727

2 BDRM $445

Country Terrace

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 405 NE Seward #3

½ off first month rent!

Tumalo: 5 Min. from Bend, nice 3/2 house, 2150 sq.ft., dbl. garage, $1100/mo., 1st/last/$500 dep. No pets or smoking. (541)317-8794

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

$1395 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2100 sq.ft., tile counters, breakfast bar, formal dining, jetted tub, loft, deck, gas fireplace, walk in closets, heat pump, near golf, fenced, dbl garage w/opener. 2424 NW Hemmingway

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com

1 BDRM., 1 BATH HOUSE, walk in closet, W/D incl., nice, new kitchen & living room, view of river, large dbl. garage, W/S/G paid, close to parks & river trails, $750/mo. + $750 dep. NO pets/smoking. 67 B McKay. 541-419-0722 2 Homes: 2+1+carport, & large yard, $950mo.; 1+1+1 small yard, $750 /mo., both remodeled, water & elec. incl., 541-617-5787.

3 Bdrm., W/D, dishwasher, dbl. garage, fenced backyard, quiet neighborhood, W/S/G & gas heating paid, $1150/mo. 541-382-4868

64 NW MCKAY smaller 2 bedroom 1 bath home close to river and downtown. Laundry hook ups, storage and 3rd room for an office or whatever. $675/mo. + dep. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT 389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, $700 mo. + last + dep. No pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, Bend and call # off sign for appointment to see.

$250 First Month $150 + $100 Gas Card! 26ft. trailer, propane heat, new flooring/drapes, shared well, storage shed, pet on approval. 4270 SW Canal $425 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 700 sq.ft., range, fridge, gas wall heat, large yard, storage shed, pet considered, close to downtown. 332 SW 10th St. $795 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1800 sq.ft., range, fridge, dishwasher, large laundry room with w/d hookups, .5 acre corner lot, covered deck, fenced, landscaped, RV/boat parking, sprinklers. 1725 SW 23rd St. $895 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1600 sq.ft., gas range, fridge, dishwasher, micro, washer/dryer, gas fireplace, sprinklers, dbl garage w/opener. 1028 NW Spruce $925 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1700 sq.ft., single level, range, fridge, dishwasher, micro, w/d hookups, gas fireplace, fenced, sprinklers, dbl garage w/opener. 1986 NW Joshua Tree Ct.

541-923-8222 www.MarrManagement.com


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 658

687

744

744

744

745

Houses for Rent Redmond

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Open Houses

Open Houses

Open Houses

Homes for Sale

3/2, dbl. garage, shed, patio, fenced, new floors & paint, very clean, no pets/smoking. $750+dep. 2220 SW 34th St. 541-385-0126,541-550-6967

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Open House Forum Meadows Sat. & Sun. 1-4pm

Open House Sat. 1-4pm

OPEN HOUSE SUN. ONLY MAY 16th• 12-3PM 461 Songbird St., Sisters

In NE Bend 27th to Forum Dr.

Spectacular home with amazing views on prestigious Awbrey Butte. Designer feature through out.

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent

5135 NE 15th St. ‘A’ 2 Bdrm mobile in country setting. New carpet and vinyl, extra storage. $475. 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, W/D hookups, nice yard, great in town location, $695 rent + $670 dep., 156 SW 8th St., 541-548-0932. Deluxe Newer 3/2.5, 2245 sq. ft., huge fenced yard. $995/mo. lease to own. or $1095 lease only, 1615 SW Sarasota Ct. 541-350-2206. Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS HORSE PROPERTY, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 acres, storage, small shop, private well, CRR near entrance, lease, option possible, $875, 541-771-7750 Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550

VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. 1, 2, 3 & 4 bdrm homes available. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at www.Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961

675

RV Parking RV LOT, for small RV, full hookups, lease $350/mo. Min. 5 mo. lease. $100 ref. dep., W/G paid. CRR, golf, swim, tennis, etc. privileges incl. 541-505-1412

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 1944½ NW 2nd St NEED STORAGE OR A CRAFT STUDIO? 570 sq. ft. garage, Wired, Sheetrocked, Insulated, Wood or Electric Heat $275. Call 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

Newer Homes 3 & 4 Bedrooms. Close to medical facilities & shopping. Priced from $132,900. For more info., contact

713

Real Estate Wanted Struggling with payments? I will buy your house or take over payments. Rapid debt relief. 541-504-8883 or 541-385-5977

738

Multiplexes for Sale Westside - 4 Units+ 2-2 bdrms., 2-1 bdrms.+ huge RV garage, good cash flow, $349,000. 1623 Knoll, Bend. 650-298-0093

541-385-5809 740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Mike Wilson, Broker 541-977-5345

Aaron Ballweber, Broker 541-728-4499 Hunter Properties 105 NW Greeley Ave. Bend, Oregon www.hunterproperties.info

Hunter Properties 105 NW Greeley Ave. Bend, Oregon www.hunterproperties.info

541-322-7253

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

Not A Short Sale!

3063 NW Duffy Dr. $699,900

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

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Directions: Turn North by yellow Sisters Hotel, 3 blocks to Songbird Lane on left to sign. Price Reduced $138,125. Newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car garage, close to downtown, vaulted great room, fenced yard, covered porch. 385-5809 www.johnlscott.com/ The Bulletin Classified peggyleecombs *** • Hosted by • Candice Anderson, Broker FSBO: $10,000 Down and 541-788-8878 Take over Payments on a Call Peggy Lee Combs, real Log Cabin, 1+1+loft & Broker CRS, Garage, on 1.5 acre wooded 541-480-8653 landscaped lot,541-617-5787 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

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E4Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 E5

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773

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Homes for Sale

Acreages

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $34,900, 541-480-4059.

Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, fridge, range & large storage shed incl., $5900 or $1000 down, $175/mo.+ space rent. 541-383-5130.

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

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748

Northeast Bend Homes MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appls., decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

Redmond Homes Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

755

Sunriver/La Pine Homes REAL

ESTATE AUCTION May 22, 2010 17040 Hermosa Road Off Stellar Rd., Sunriver 1/2 acre - 1512 sq. ft. home outbuildings - fenced. OPEN HOUSE May 16, 1-3 p.m. Stuart Realty Group, Inc. 503-263-7253

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

762

Homes with Acreage Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Detached Garage/shop, Circle Drive w/RV Parking, PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver Area. $224,900 Call Bob Mosher 541-593-2203. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

771

Lots Aspen Lakes, 1.25 Acres, Lot #115, Golden Stone Dr., private homesite, great view, gated community $350,000 OWC. 541-549-7268.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

Awesome mtn. views in Whispering Pines 2.2 acres, septic approved, water hookup pd., $150,000. Grossman & Assoc., 541-388-2159. Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521. CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

541-322-7253


E6Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

COLDWELL BANKER www.bendproperty.com

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

REALTOR

NE Bend | $49,950

NW Bend | $127,000

R E PR DU IC CE E D

Open Sat. & Sun 12–4 | $309,900 New Construction | $324,900 SA OPE T. N 124

SW Bend | $189,900

Independently Owned and Operated

Bend, OR 97702 SAT OP . & EN SUN . 124

SA OPE T. N 123

Golf Course Timeshare | $19,900

486 SW Bluff Dr. SAT OP . & EN SUN . 123

541-382-4123

MORRIS REAL ESTATE

Eagle Crest, remodeled & furnished private end unit condo. Overlooks the 7th fairway with hot tub & deck. 2 pools & trail to the Deschutes nearby. 10 wks/per year of resort living. MLS#201003078 Directions: Eagle Crest Resort entrance, Falcon Crest Dr. to end, Rt. on Redtail Hawk Dr. or call 541-306-9646. 1977 Redtail Hawk Drive, #22

Updated house in Deschutes River Woods. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, great room, tile & hardwood floors. RV parking, shop & large deck overlooking peaceful canal. MLS#201004050 Directions: Hwy 97 South. Baker Rd exit, right on Baker to River Woods Dr., right on Galen Road. 19230 Galen

New Earth Advantage townhomes in NORTHWEST CROSSING. Great room with fireplace. Secluded patio. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, double garage. Move in today! MLS#2713334 2502 NW Crossing Dr.

DIANE LOZITO, Broker 541-548-3598

MARTHA GERLICHER, Broker 541-408-4332

MARGO DEGRAY, Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4347

JULIE GEORGE, Broker 541-408-4631

GREG MILLER, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI SHELLY HUMMEL, Broker, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-383-4361 541-322-2404

Redmond | $154,900

NE Bend | $159,900

Peacefully Yours! | $195,000

SE Bend | $134,900

New Construction/SE Bend | $159,000 Cabin in the Woods | $175,000

Large home in great condition. Living room, family room with gas fireplace plus a huge bonus room. Gas forced air heat for energy efficiency. Great value! 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2880 sq. ft. MLS#201001950

Very nice 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2202 sq. ft. home with covered front porch. RV area, fenced and exterior brick accents. Mountain views from the back deck. MLS#2905313

Enjoy the woods in a beautifully upgraded home on nearly an acre near the foot of Lava Butte. Granite kitchen counters, custom cabinets, and travertine hearth fireplace. MLS#2900269

Fabulous family home, located on deadend street in family neighborhood. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, hardwood floors, open living floor plan. Fenced yard for pets or children. 2-car garage. MLS#201004193 61043 Borden Dr.

New home with single level floor plan, 3 bedrooms and 2 baths. Stainless appliances, upgraded features. Front and back yard landscaped. Not a short sale! MLS#201003736

WENDY ADKISSON, Broker 541-383-4337

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

JOY HELFRICH, Broker 541-480-6808

JJ JONES, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

PAT PALAZZI, Broker 541-771-6996

Sisters | $198,500

Mid-town Bend | $225,000

SW Bend | $235,000

Cozy log cabin in Sisters with lots of windows to let in the light. 2 big bedrooms, each with its own private bath. Located on one, treed acre; you can own your own piece of paradise! MLS#201001447

2 brick houses on 1 lot. Back house is 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom. Front house is 2 bedrooms, 1.5 baths. Homes are separated, have separate parking spots & private, large yards. Great rental history. MLS#201002068

Elkhorn Estates, a great southwest location. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2278 sq. ft. single level. Vaulted ceilings, like new condition, priced to sell! MLS#201003603 www.tourfactory.com/606207

On a cul-de-sac, close to hospital and shopping. Spacious manicured backyard with custom water feature. Bonus: separate heated garage. Come by the open house or call me to see this beautiful home. MLS#201004017 3153 Cromwell Ct.

Rustic elegance cabin, main floor great room and 2nd floor master suite afford panoramic Cascade views. Investment for your own use or for vacation rental. Athletic club, pools and golf. MLS#2805250

ATTENTION INVESTORS: Duplexes & Fourplexes available in Bend & Madras. Priced from $80,000 to $280,000. All with strong rental history & same seller. All in great condition, newly renovated & priced to sell. MLS#2810716

DARRYL DOSER, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

SCOTT HUGGIN, Broker, GRI 541-322-1500

CHUCK OVERTON, Broker, CRS, ABR 541-383-4363

NICHOLE BURKE, Broker 661-378-6487 • 541-312-7295

LYNNE CONNELLEY, EcoBroker, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

JOHN SNIPPEN, Broker, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

NW Bend | $285,000

Tasmine Rise | $295,000

SE Bend | $339,000

House + Apartment | $348,000

NW Bend | $356,000

Desirable River Rim | $366,500

Charming 3 bedroom, 3 bath Westside home, wood floors & great kitchen, new master suite upstairs with park & river views. Master & 3rd bedroom downstairs. Across from Columbia Park & river. MLS#201003699

Light & bright colonial on a large corner lot, quality finishes, vaulted ceilings. Beautiful master suite with a fireplace and soaking tub. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 2438 sq. ft. MLS#2904290

Totally, tasteful remodel! Next door to Bend Golf Club & features great room style with large, open, light rooms. 1900 sq. ft. with den and central gas heat. NOT A SLAB FOUNDATION! MLS#201002467

This NE Bend property has it all - 2.37 acres, 1808 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3 bath house, PLUS a separate 720 sq. ft. apartment PLUS a 14x40 pull through RV garage. MLS#201002926

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath 1993 sq. ft. home in great condition and sits on an easy care .4 of an acre lot. Watch sunsets and city lights from your deck. Nice floor plan with plenty of room. MLS#201001929

Built to suit by Hendrickson Homes. Great kitchen, main level master & office. 2 beds + large bonus up. Hickory wood, granite, slate. Huge garage, fenced yard. Not a short sale! 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2296 sq. ft. MLS#201001652

DARRIN KELLEHER, Broker 541-788-0029

NORMA DUBOIS, P.C., Broker 541-383-4348

DON & FREDDIE KELLEHER, Brokers 541-383-4349

JACKIE FRENCH, Broker 541-312-7260

DAVE DUNN, Broker 541-390-8465

NANCY MELROSE, Broker 541-312-7263

NW Bend | $429,900

Tumalo/Bare Land | $450,000

Large .351 of an acre corner lot directly abuts the 14th green of the world famous River’s Edge Golf Course. Level lot, easterly views, peek-a-boo city view. All utilities at the lot line, quiet location. MLS#201003864

RE PR DU ICE CE D

Dare to Compare! Standards here are upgrades A great duplex lot with Easterly mountain there! Main floor master, granite slab, tile, views, backing a nice common area. Fairly hardwood, Earth Advantage, landscaped & fenced. level and all utilities are in the street. 2491 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, den & bonus room. Good location close to Pilot Butte State MLS#201002397 Park, trails, schools and shopping. Directions: East on Empire, north on Boyd MLS#2803451 Acres, East on Tristar. 63366 Tristar Dr.

LESTER & KATLIN FRIEDMAN FRIEDMAN & FRIEDMAN, P.C., Brokers 541-330-8491 • 541-330-8495

Multiplexes

Ridgewater | $383,000

RE PR DU ICE CE D

LI NE ST W IN G

SA OPE T. N 11 -2

PR NE IC W ES

Move-in Ready! | $239,900 Brasada Ranch | $250,000

SW Bend Chalet in the tall pines. Nearly an acre, horse property. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1152 sq. ft. Wood stove and hardwood floor. 2-car garage with shop, out buildings and RV hook-ups. MLS#201001189

Barn, Shop, Home | $399,000 Sagewood/SW Bend | $410,000 Mountain High | $429,000

Inviting European Country Flair in this 1 of a kind 3 or 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 3800 sq. ft. home. Exquisite quality wood work, tile travertine, stain glass & dramatic 2 story, vaulted living room with loft. MLS#201003319

7.94 acres, 7.5 irrigated. Fenced and cross-fenced, barn and additional set-up for stalls. Includes irrigation equipment and shop. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1542 sq. ft. home. MLS#2812404

Fabulously located lodge style home, softly lived in. Hardwoods, slates, granite, tile, fireplace, plantation shutters and built-ins. On a quiet upside lot with a beautiful outdoor balcony with views. MLS#201004063

Spacious 3052 sq. ft. home on .42 of an acre wooded lot. Traditional sunken living room with fireplace and a great room/family room. Private setting at back of cul-de-sac. Large master suite. MLS#201004189

Immaculate Skyliner Summit Home. 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 3386 sq. ft. Upgraded throughout. Wood, tile & carpet flooring. Beautiful home. Backs to park, trail access. Low maintenance yard, new Trex deck. MLS#201003265

Full Cascade Mountain views on spectacular 27 acres with 23 acres of irrigation. Paved drive. Borders BLM for recreation. Single wide manufactured, build your own home. Owner will carry. MLS#2805179 66318 Black Horse Ln.

SHERRY PERRIGAN, Broker 541-410-4938

DOROTHY OLSEN, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, Brokers 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

CRAIG SMITH, Broker 541-322-2417

RAY BACHMAN, Broker, GRI 541-408-0696

CAROL OSGOOD, Broker 541-383-4366

SE Bend | $549,000

NW Bend | $549,000

River’s Edge Village | $550,000

Comfortable 2035 sq. ft. single level home located on 4.75 acres, 2.62 irrigated. 3 bay shop with large office, 24x48 horse barn, two ponds and riding arena. Gorgeous property. MLS#201000514

Remodeled and updated home on 5 acres with 4 acres of irrigation. 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2540 sq. ft. 24x36 shop, barn and storage building. Landscaped with sprinklers. MLS#2905519

One of the last lots available overlooking the Deschutes River in River’s Edge Village. Gated area of nicer homes on the ridge. River trails, golf nearby. Was $725,000. Now $550,000! MLS#2802546

GREG FLOYD, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

SYDNE ANDERSON, Broker, WCR President 541-420-1111

DICK HODGE, Broker 541-383-4335

Mtn. High Gated Community | $485,000 Sisters Area | $500,000

PRNE IC W E

Views | $470,000

CATHY DEL NERO, P.C., Broker 541-410-5280

ROOKIE DICKENS, Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR JOANNE MCKEE, Broker, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-815-0436 541-480-5159

Sisters | $649,000

Tumalo | $649,600 O SU PE N. N 2-4

40 Acres | $624,900

6.96 acres between Bend and Sisters in Plainview subdivision. 2100 sq. ft. shop with finished living area. 3 roll up doors. Power and utilities to shop. Well and septic installed. Beautiful Cascade views. MLS#2901858

1920 farm house, large barn, 2 large shops, 2 outbuildings, 2 ponds. Peaceful setting located in farming area. Surrounded by other large acreages yet close to town. Fabulous Cascade Mtn views. MLS#201004344

Endless possibilities for the buyer of this Cascade Mtn views from 9.9 acres. Remodeled 3164 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath home with 9.2-acre property, turnkey 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with separate studio. 3-car high beamed ceilings & open great room plan. Shop & horse set up, pond. Bend schools. garage, RV garage, 3 corrals or build MLS#201001782 your dream home. Private neighborhood. Directions: Hwy. 20 West on Old Bend MLS#201001755 Redmond Hwy. to Rodeo Dr. 20060 Rodeo Dr.

NW Bend/ Awbrey Glen | $675,000 Awbrey Butte | $719,900

Redmond | $750,000

SA OPE T. N 1-4

Impeccably maintained home and updated with slab granite and so much more. Fireplace, formal dining, separate family room with built in bar. 3 bedrooms plus office, 3 car garage all on 3/4 of an acre. MLS#201001983

LI NE ST W IN G

City lights and Smith Rock, fantastic views from almost every room. Main level living, quality builder. 3009 sq. ft. 4 bedrooms + office & bonus room. 3 car garage. Not a short sale! MLS#2911624

Custom built home on .6 of an acre lot. Beautiful high-end details throughout. 4 bedrooms, office, and bonus room! Main floor master. Private wooded yard with water feature and hot tub. MLS#201003567

4 bedroom suites. Tucked away on .72 of an acre. Gorgeous kitchen with granite island. Heated driveway. Hosted by Susan Agli 541-408-3773. MLS#201002270 Directions: Mt. Washington Dr. to Perspective Dr. 1856 Perspective Dr.

3 bedroom, 3 bath log home on 20 acres located south of Redmond. 10.5 acres of irrigation, fenced, level property with 2 fish ponds. One with fish. MLS#2910155

SUE CONRAD, Broker 541-480-6621

SUSAN AGLI, Broker, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

MARY STRONG, Broker, MBA 541-728-7905

DIANE ROBINSON, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

VIRGINIA ROSS, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

BILL PORTER, Broker 541-383-4342

RV Park/10 Acres | $750,000

Sunriver | $795,000

Broken Top Contemporary | $839,900

SE Bend | $849,900

SE Bend | $998,000

SE Bend | $1,399,000

Sun Rocks RV Park on 10 acres with 38 full hookups, 22+ tent sites & 4 sleeping cabins. Pool, club house, living quarters and office. Turn key ready for a new owner. MLS#2906843

SUNRIVER SINGLE LEVEL. Very private 10th fairway North Course location, on 1 & 1/2 beautifully treed lots. Offered fully furnished. Contemporary style. 3 bedroom, 3 bath + large office, 2680 sq. ft. MLS#2808922

Custom home. 3 bedroom + den/office, 4.5 bath. Golf course views. Gourmet kitchen, Wolf stove, Sub-Zero refrigerator & granite counters. Master on main with private Atrium & his/hers closets. Will lease/lease to purchase. MLS#201002777

24 shovel ready lots located on South Reed Market Rd & 4th St. with shops & restaurants right around the corner. Lots can be packaged in groups of 4. Great opportunity for an entry level development project. MLS#201004101

Private country estate offers beauty, productivity and seclusion. Immaculate home with mature landscaping and pond. Additional buildings include shop with RV storage, and horse barn. 16 acres, 4 irrigated. MLS#2909521

Take in sweeping Cascade Mtn. views from this gorgeous home on over 19 acres. Gourmet kitchen, lots of stone and “Tuscan” accents. Estate-like private setting, swimming pool and detached studio. MLS#2902614

BOB JEANS, Broker 541-728-4159

JACK JOHNS, Broker, GRI 541-480-9300

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

LISA CAMPBELL, Broker 541-419-8900

CRAIG LONG, Broker 541-383-4351

JANE STRELL, Broker 541-948-7998


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 F1

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: All the things in YOUR garage you would like to see go. Please call 541-480-8322 Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motorcylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Bengal Kitten Mix, Silver, 1 left, vet checked, wormed $150. Call for info. 541-923-7501.

Black Lab Puppies. AKC Registered, 1 female and 7 males. Dewclaws removed, de-wormed, first shots. Puppies ready to go home by 20th, $250 each. 541-480-4625,541-385-5724

Items for Free

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Alaskan Malamute AKC Pups, ready to go, 1st shots, $500 each. 541-408-4715 mandk@oregonfast.net health guaranteed

German Shorthair Pointer Pups, all liver colored, 5 wks, taking dep., 1st shots, $500 ea. 541-420-5914.

Goldendoodle Pups, kid conditioned, beautiful, sweet & health guarantee, ready 5/28 Taking Dep. $500/ea. 541-548-4574/541-408-5909

Pups, $150 ea.

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Cockalier Spaniels 7 weeks old, 1st shots. ADORABLE! Call for picutres. 541-475-3410 Cockatiels, babies and adult pairs, w/ cages, $20 and up. 541-548-0501 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

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The Bulletin Jack Russell/Schipperke mix. 1 year old Male, very smart & energetic, needs someone w/ time to train, great dog. $100. Paid $250. All shots & neutered. 541-815-2963. Kittens & cats ready to adopt! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call re: other days. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 65480 78th St., Bend, 389-8420. Info & photos at www.craftcats.org. Lab, Chocolate, 10 wk. female, mother on site, papers, $400. 541-971-1236

English Bulldog, male, very sweet and loving! Age 3. Relocation causing sale. $800 Call 541-390-6337.

Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

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Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Misc. Items

Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures

Fuel and Wood

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

AUTO SCRUBBER Purchased in 1997, rarely used. Clarke/Alto Encore L28 Mod. L28-00700A SN. VK3537. Dimensions are 44H x 63L x 28W. Color is Grey. Fully functional, new control board, new batteries. Capacity: 30 gallon solution tank and 30 gallon recovery tank. 28" cleaning width. Sealed bids will be accepted until May 26 for this auto scrubber. Minimum bid is $1000. College reserves the right to cancel bid if it is deemed in the best interest of the College. Delivery within College district area a possibility. For more information please call 541-383-7779, Julie.

• Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

Copier,compact Cannon PC300, 15”x15”x3.2” High, works great, $175, 541-504-4142.

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our

Tools

“Low Cost Spay/Neuters” Furniture The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $40.00, Cat neuter starting at $20.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at Visit our HUGE home decor $55.00. For more informaconsignment store. tion or to schedule an apNew items arrive daily! pointment, please call 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 541-923-0882 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171. GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Light Table, for photos, 20”x 38”x102”, custom built, hard wood, $200, 541-504-4142 Miniature Dachshund (Doxie) purebred puppies. Mattresses good Males $300 & Females $350. quality used mattresses, Call anytime (541) 678-7529 discounted king sets, Orange Kittens & Orange fair prices, sets & singles. mother in foster care, also 541-598-4643. Munchkin Cats,541-548-5516 POODLES, AKC Toy MODEL HOME or mini. Joyful tail waggers! FURNISHINGS Affordable. 541-475-3889. Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, Rat Terriers, Rescued, 9 mo. to home office, youth, 4 years, blue merle to cameo, accessories and more. 2 females, 2 males, $200 ea. MUST SELL! 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188 (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com SOFA good quality leather 88” wide x 3’ deep. $200 OBO. 541-390-6570. Springer Spaniel Puppies, 8 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, last 2 are ready to go, $300, call 541-633-9755.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Timberwolf, Husky, Rottweiler Mix to good home only, 1st shots, ready now $200 ea. OBO. 541-647-1232

Toy Poodle Puppies for sale. They are ready for their new homes. HURRY they won't last for my affordable prices. Call Cindy at 541-771-3195. Welsh Corgi, 7+ mo. old, all shots, chipped, spayed female, likes children, $500, 541-504-1908.

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Golden Retriever Puppies!! AKC, Sweet and Sassy! Only a few females left. Ready to go May 1st. $600. oregonhomes@hotmail.com 541-419-3999

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Chesapeake Retriever Pups, AKC, shots, hips, great hunt/ fam dogs, parents on site, $500-$575. 541-259-4739

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Furniture & Appliances

Heeler

Fridge, Side-by-side, GE, works good, FREE, you haul, call 541-410-1685

Pets and Supplies

FREE kitty to good home! 3 yr old spayed female dark calico cat. Very loving, playful and affectionate. Indoors preferred. (541)647-4409.

FREE: Maine Coon spayed feBernese/Newfie puppies, 2 male, needs a quiet & apwks., 4 male 1 female ready proved home. 541-318-4829 in 4 wks. Dew claws removed and vet checked. FREE: Male Lab Huskey mix, 6 yrs., neutered, sweet & pro$500 per pup $150 deposit tective. 541-610-4214. call 541-279-7914

Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, BLUE HEELER PUPS! Very nice silver & gold Jewelry. Top dogs! family raised, lots of dollar paid, Estate incl. Honherd, great with kids. these est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 litters go FAST! 150.00 first shots and dewormed. TuWanted rock hounds who want malo 503-871-7440 an 18” rock saw and a flat lap rock polisher. 541-350-7004. BOXER PUPPIES extra large litter. Purebred. $150 each. 541-815-5999. Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, Cat breeding season has begun! 541- 280-6786. Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our We Want Your Junk Car!! shelters become overWe'll buy any scrap metal, crowded with unwanted litbatteries or catalytic conters. Adult female or male verters. 7 days a week call cats, $40. Bring in the litter 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for 205 more info. 541-617-1010.

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

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Antiques & Collectibles

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bed -Beautiful Custom King Size Barn Wood Bed, $1000. Call 541-548-5657. Chair, dark wood w/upholstered light green seat, exc. cond. $25. 541-905-9773 Computer Armoire, with lots of shelves, cubby holes, file drawers, $125,541-504-4142 Couch & Loveseat, floral print, oak claw & ball legs, $300; Twin captains bed bookcase hdbd, 6 drawers, $150, will email pictures. 541-317-8360 Dining Set -Maple, 55 yrs old, fixtures, drop leaf w/pads, 2 large extenders, good cond., $350. 541-416-1051

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $2000. 541-788-1731, leave msg. H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352 Hungarian made, new, AMD-65, 7.62x39, fully tactical, make offer; Custom Para-Ordinance 1911 P14-45ACP, $900 OBO, 541-647-8931

Ocean Charters Salmon/Halibut $100, Tuna $200. Guaranteed www.southernoregonfishing. com 541-982-4339.

S&W 9mm, stainless, semiauto, $400 OBO; Remington, M10, 12ga Pump, 90%+ Make Offer, Ruger, P97-45 acp, stainless, semi-auto, SOLD; 541-647-8931

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TV, Stereo and Video Receiver, Studio Standard by Fisher RS1022, vintage, A+ cond., $60 541-504-4142. Sony TC377 Vintage, 3-head stereo TapeCorder, working cond., $160, 541-504-4142.

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Vintage galvanized watering can, $39. Call for more info., 541-390-5986.

"Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top line in bold print for only $2.00 extra.

Computers

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Musical Instruments

Antiques Wanted: Tools, fishing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578

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Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Scanner, HP Scanjet 2200C Color flatbed, works great, $50, 541-504-4142.

Coins & Stamps Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786

BMG 50 12x36x80 mm scope, 60 extra round $2250 firm 541-420-7773.

***

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES, AKC Registered $2000 each 541-325-3376.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Entertainment Center, oak, leaded glass, storage, holds 27” TV. $100. 541-383-3346

Golf Bag, Burton Soft Travel bag, brand new, never used, black, $65, 541-504-4142.

Basset Hounds, born 3/18, 5 females, 2 males, $400, parents on-site, 541-350-4000.

FREE CATS, shy grey males, brothers, need stable home, healthy. 541-598-7260.

Lhasa Apso Pups, beautiful colors, exc. personality, $300, Madras, 503-888-0800.

Floating Shelving, Contemporary, set of 4 shelves, 2 boxes, $100, 541-504-4142

Golf Cart, elec. w/split windshield, full curtains, exc. cond., must see! 388-2387

FOR SALE: Campbell Hausfeld Professional 5500 Watt gas generator 240V & 120V. MINT Cond. Used less than 20 hrs., $650. 541-475-6537

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Snow Removal Equipment

NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

Pool Table, custom made, exc. cond., moving, must sell, first $300 incl. accessories. 541-788-4229. RUGS - 2 quality matching sets, + 2 other misc. sizes. From $50-$150. 541-390-6570. Smoker, Meco elec. water, Model 6206, $50, 541-504-4142. The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 7 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised equals $25 or Less • One ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months Call 385-5809 fax 385-5802

261 Lift Chair Recliner, exc. cond., all auto, push button controlled, $400, 541-408-2227.

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Trees, Plants & Flowers HUGE TREE LIQUIDATION SALE!! Over 2000 Shade & Ornamental potted trees Must Go! $10-$40. Volume discounts avail. Fri., Sat. & Sun. 10-4 6268 W. Hwy 126, Redmond. 541-480-5606.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment Arborvitaes, 12’+/-, make a green screen, will deliver, or your dig. 541-280-1227.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Cacti, already planted in gallon pots, $6/ea+. Crooked River Ranch, 541-548-0501.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $2,500. 541-385-4790.

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Medical Equipment BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191.

Chain Hoist, Wright 1-ton Screw, model 45, in good shape, $75, 541-504-4142.

Building Materials

WANTED TO BUY Casio Keyboard CTK510, w/ US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & stand, adapter & manuel Currency collect, accum. Pre $150. 541-803-7005. Culver. 1964 silver coins, bars, The Bulletin reserves the right rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold Piano, 1911 Jewitt Upright, to publish all ads from The good cond., $500 OBO, coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & Bulletin newspaper onto The 541-815-9218. dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex Bulletin Internet website. & vintage watches. No col- Piano, Farrand Upright, lection to large or small. Bedwith bench, fair to good rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 cond. $400 . 541-389-0650. Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi 241 260 audio & studio equip. McInBicycles and Misc. Items tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Accessories Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, Bedrock Gold & Silver NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 Car Bike Carriers (2), HollyBUYING DIAMONDS & wood, $30, Rhodegear $50, R O L E X ’ S For Cash Looking for your next 541-504-4142. 541-549-1592 employee? Place a Bulletin help BUYING DIAMONDS 242 wanted ad today and FOR CASH Exercise Equipment reach over 60,000 SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS readers each week. 541-3 8 9-6655 Weider Universal Gym, $95; Your classified ad will Orbital Strider w/computer, also appear on $70. 541-593-1382. bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 245 1.5 million page views every month at Golf Equipment no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Callaway women’s golf Get Results! clubs with bag. Short set. Call 385-5809 or place Like new. $375. Phone your ad on-line at 541-788-4844. bendbulletin.com

American Pitbull, 17 mo. female, housebroke, approved home only $500. 541-390-1108.

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J & C Firewood

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Lawn Mower, Riding, 42” Craftsman, hydrostatic trans., $500, 541-280-7024. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found FOUND: 5 Baby kittens, all dark in color, approximately 4 weeks, call 541-389-2098. Found Bicycle: off Century Dr. 5 mi. outside of Sunriver, 5/5, call to ID, 541-598-7925.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com FOUND: Dog, on Reed Mkt. near Chevron/Parkway, to identify, 541-788-6577.

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Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407 Best Dry Seasoned Firewood $125/cord rounds, $150 split & delivered, Bend, Sunriver & La Pine fast, friendly service. 541-410-6792 or 382-6099. CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes Market Rd. 541-408-2973. FOUND: Money, at Old Mill Theater, identify, email ea_current@yahoo.com. Found Ring: Parking lot Fred Meyer, eve 5/12, call Fred Meyer, (541) 385-6667. LOST: Braided multi colored, Friendhip/Charm Bracelet, on 5/9 in Mirror Pond parking area Franklin to Newport Please call 541-633-0572. Lost: Glasses in Grey Silhouette Case, Mt. Bachelor parking lot, Nordic side, call 541-330-1958,602-692-4429 LOST: Tri-Tronics transmitter for dog collars, Sawyers Uplands Park on Sunday, 5/9. Reward. 541-382-8559 Lost Wool Stocking Cap, blue & white, w/ “Norge” on front, blue & white tassel, 541-383-3925 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178


F2 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

Hay, Grain and Feed

Horses and Equipment

Livestock & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Advertise in 25 Daily newspapers! $500/25-words, 3-days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana and Washington. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Church Choral Director: First Presbyterian seeks director of Traditional Music Ministries to lead Chancel Choir and music ensembles. Experience in church music, track record of excellence in choral conducting, motivating and recruiting volunteer singers and instrumental groups. Resume to Administrator, 230 NE Ninth, Bend, 97701. blevet@bendfp.org 541-382-4401.

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Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4 As low as

JD 516 5’ HD Rotary Mower, exc. cond., very little use, $795, please call 541-546-6920. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

0% APR Financing The New Kubota RTV500 compact utility vehicle has all the comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility vehicle – but fits in the bed of a full-size, long bed pickup. Financing on approved credit.

Redmond

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Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Exc, hay for horses. $120/ton & $140/ton Eric 541-350-8084 Barn Stored Orchard Grass and grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ ton, Delivery available. 541-548-2668.

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Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581 Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Farmers Column READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

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Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Hay Is Expensive! Protect your investment Let KFJ Builders, Inc. build your hay shed, barn or loafing shed. 541-617-1133. CCB 173684.

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $135 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

COLT STARTING We build solid foundations that stay with the horse forever. Visit us at www.steelduststable.com or call Paul 541-419-3405

Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $3500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

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280 BARN SALE: Fri. & Sat. 8-4, 68308 Cloverdale, Sisters 50’s collectible misc. household dining room set, pink Whirlpool fridge, over 1,000 collector records, Melmac & glass dish sets, linens, lamps, painting & artware, kitchen misc., nightstand, desks, TV lamps, assorted knick knacks, 1970’s vinyl couch, 1940’s chair, chair converts to bed & W/D & much much more! DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-4, #24 Suntree Village off SE 15th St. Entire household, sofa, chairs, recliner, dining set, china cabinet, beds, dressers, cedar chest, linens, rolltop desk, lamps, TV’s, end tables, dishes, BBQ, bookcase, books, Christmas & holiday decor, collectibles, lots of miscellaneous.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

Employment

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Schools and Training

bales, clean no rain $150 per ton. Kennor Farms 541-383-0494

SWATHER JD 2420 diesel, cab A.C., twin sickle, $5500. Rake M.F. 25 3 pt. PTO, $950. 541-419-9486.

Estate Sales

READY TO WORK, Yearling Angus Bulls, range raised in trouble free herd, $1100/ea. Delivery avail. 541-480-8096

541-548-6744

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Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Quality Orchard Grass Hay, Tumalo, small

Peruvian Paso Gelding and Mare. Reg. 14 yrs. Amazing gaited ride. Perfect trail horses for any age. $3,500 ea. Peruvian tack avail as well. 541-610-5799

Midstate Power Products

Hay, Grain and Feed John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

A1 Beef Steers Ready for Pasture 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment CAREGIVER AVAIL. Retired RN Bend/Redmond area, flexible daytime hrs., household assistance, affordable rates, local refs. 541-678-5161. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Painter Needs Employment: 20 years exp. in Central OR, fast & friendly, 541-977-8329.

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Art Picture Yourself Here! Busy frame shop looking for an artistic, friendly, and hardworking part-time salesperson. Art background, outstanding customer service skills and a flexible schedule are required. Submit resume to The Great Frame-Up, 61535 S. Hwy 97, Suite 4, Bend, OR 97702. tgfubend@msn.com

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

CLERK/Gas attendant/Subway Must be 18+ yrs. Full-time and Part-time. Apply at: Riverwoods Country Store, 19745 Baker Rd., Bend. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dorm Parent Spray School: Background in Counseling & ability to relate w/high school students. Call & request application, 541-468-2226.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

541-617-7825 Administrative Assistant Assist a tax negotiations attorney in casual Bend office. Client contact and clerical support. Clerical or legal support experience and college degree a plus. Benefits after 90 days. Fax cover letter, resume and salary requirement to: 541-330-0641.

Cleaning - Person wanted, self motivated, must have own transportation, $9/hr.. Must be in good physical condition. 541-388-8351

Business Opportunity: Do you have a sales background? Interested in doing contracted job development for State of Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services? Drivers: Local Moving ComIf so, call to find out more inpany needs Class A & B drivformation and meet with ers, top pay, benefits, exp. Cheryl. (541) 388-6336, ask preferred, call weekdays for Jamy. 541-383-3362.

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Awbrey Butte Estate Sale: 3181 NW Fairway Heights Dr., Sat. 9 am., no early birds.

HUGE SALE: Everything from A to Z. Friday & Saturday 8-6, 8520 NW 19th Street, Terrebonne.

Multi Family Sale 9am-4pm only. May 14, 15 & 16. Lots of household items; clothes, decor, hardware, books, boat, antiques, appli., furniture, etc. 1047 W. Antler Ave. Near downtown Redmond.

Corner of Bond & Georgia, Fri. & Sat. 9-2, Const., concrete tools, compacter, generator, darkroom & sports equip., books, desk, furniture, misc.

Multi-Family Yard Sale, Fri.- Sun., 8-6, Many items, furniture, & lots of misc., 20683 Overton Pl., S. of Cooley, W. of Boyd Acres. Sat. 9-2, 1059 NE Hidden Valley Drive, kids Stuff Christmas items, saddles, clothing, lots of misc.

1242 SE Shadowood, Fri. & Sat. 9-4, jewelry, clothing, golf, new men’s Dynlap set, near new Wilson set, Protactic left set, woods, 7.,9, big head drivers, bags, much more golf, & more of everything.

4-Family garage sale 9am-5pmSat. 5-15, 61240 Sarah Drive. Saturday Only 5/15, 8-? Estate Sale: Antique clocks, Fri & Sat., 8:30-4 SALE. 19915 lots of nice items priced to Furniture, household, clothes, coins, Dolls, jewelry, glasssell! Porcupine Dr, off Brookmisc. items. 2012 NE Rachel ware,VHS video camera, gold swood. Nice girl toddler & Court off Purcell wedding band, 1016 NW kid clothing, toys, baby gear, GARAGE SALE! Furniture, art, Newport Ave., Sat.-Sun. 9-4. books, audiobooks, DVDs, antiques & household items. Find It in CDs, & much more. Multi Family Moving Sale! Sat. only, 8am-1pm. 221 SE Everything must go! Nice Garage Sale! SAT May 15 The Bulletin Classifieds! Airpark Dr. off Pettigrew. 541-385-5809 things at nice prices. Fri. & 8am-3pm. Lots for Dad, Mom Sat., 9am-4pm. 63351 NW & Kids! Bikes, wagon, power Britta St., behind Sheriffs Ofsaws, ladder, Household & Spring Cleaning Sale: Fri. Garage Sale, Sat., 5/15, only, 8am-1pm. Times strictly en9-4, Sat 8-4, hide-a-bed fice off Pow Scholes. (ParkMore! 61004 Snowbrush Dr. forced. Furniture, tools and couch, recliner chair, old ing on Britta only please). much more! 61447 BarleyMulti Family, Fri. 11-6, Sat. 9-6. Pepsi cooler, display cases, corn Ln. in Nottingham & Sun. 9-3 60095 Mincollectibles, military, ThompFIND IT! Square off 15th St. netonka Ln. Tools large son parts gun, misc., 1520 BUY IT! equip., irrigation equip, more NE Providence. SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com Sat. only, 5/15, 8-3. 1174 NW Redfield Cir. in Awbrey Butte off of Farewell Dr. Classy clutter, fun fashion items & whimsical decor. Tumalo Sale! Sat. only, 8-3. 100’s of items from $1-$100. Antiques, tools, art work, ceramics, cameras, $100 hot tub! 65225 85th St., off Tumalo Rd., look for signs.

Yard Sale Friday & Saturday 10 to 3. Go to the rest then come to the best. Deborah Ct. off Sheriden from Wells Acres. 541-480-4779

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Sales Northeast Bend Annual Multi Family Sale, Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3. 1262 NE Burnside. Scrapbooking, crafts, misc., specialty items, check it out!

BIG HOME & FARM SALE Saturday, 8 to 1 61455 Ward Road Furn., household, etc. Family Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. 9-2, 2046 NE Monroe Lane, some baby & small furniture, computer, jeans & more. Garage Sale: Sat. Only, 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Neff Rd. to 1886 NE Tuscon Ave, All must go, a mix of everything!

MOVING/GARAGE SALE, Sat. & Sun., 8am-3pm. 2936 NE Sandy Dr. off Butler Mkt. Rd. Everything must go! Multi Family/Grandma’s Moving Sale! Household, furniture & collectables. 1155 NE 9th. Sat. 8-3, Sun. 9-2.

Pat Wester

MOVING

SALE

20397 Pine Vista Dr. FRI. May 14 W SAT. May 15 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 a.m. Friday. (Take either 15th St. or 27th St. to Knott Rd. and follow west to Pine Vista Dr., turn south to sale site.) Quality sale!! 1996 Ford Ranger XLT Pickup, only 60,834 miles; Teak Dining table with two leaves and 8 chairs; Teak Buffet-table and buffet -unusual pottery inlay. Teak dresser; desk and nightstand; Basset queen bed and dresser and nightstand; Lynx or Leopard hide??; Hide a bed; Sofa; Massage chair; 5' tall jade plant; milk cart from Sweden; Refrigerator -cross top freezer; Newer Washer with King size tub; Kenmore dryer; Great tall case "Grandfather" clock; Glass top dinette/patio set with wrought iron chairs; Mesh top patio table and chairs; Three rubber rafts; Books; Bose, Criterion and Infinity speakers; Nikkormat and Olympus XA cameras; Collectible glass; Sheet music; 1950s Hawthorne ladies bike in mint condition; Dansk dishes; Books; Coffee and end tables; Life jackets and backpacks; Garden tools and chemicals; Wheelbarrow; Glider bench; Wrought iron bench; pots and pans and kitchen items; lots of linens; mens and women's clothing; Curtains; Push lawn mower; Mahogany kneehole desk; lots of small bags of Turquoise pieces and other rocks and obsidian; Two older TVs; amplifier; turntable; receiver; Set of four studded tires, 205/70R/15. Lots and lots of other items. Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days d 541-382-5950 eves

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READERS:

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend 4-Family Sale at 60872 Onyx St., Fri.-Sun., 8-5, Antique &other furniture, fender drum set, 1982 Corvette, new dbl. pane RV windows, new RV awnings, vintage quilts, lots of good clothing, lots of sizes, so much more of everything, too numerous to mention. Don’t Miss out!

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Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 25 daily newspapers, five states. 25-word classified $500 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC)

CAUTION

Indoor Swap Meet 35 Vendors! Every Sat., 9-4, 380 SE Bridgeford off Wilson/9th St, Bend, 10x10 spaces, $25, 541-317-4847. Multi Family Sat. 8-1, 21100 Tall Mountain Circle, off Ferguson to Mt. Vista. Oak swivel bar stools, child’s table w/2 chairs, micro stand, assorted misc.

Multi Family Saturday Only, 8-4, 61561 Eastlake Drive tires, doll houses, too much to list. Yard Sale, South enterance Suntree Village Mobile Park, #189, off 15th. Sat. only, 8am-12. Lots of clothes!

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Sales Redmond Area FLEA MARKET at Perry’s, 25+ Vendors, Sat. 5/15,9-5, come find great deals on antiques, sporting goods, guns, tools, household items, crafts, jewelry, yard art, garage sale items & so much more, 3000 S. Hwy. 97, just N. of KFC, Redmond, 541-633-6271.

Garage/ Estate Sale: Fri 8-5 Sat 8-5 Sun 10-3 lots of crafts , dishes, and odds and ends. 30 + years of collecton. Priced to move. antique furnure, Model A go cart runs, needs work. too much to list. Aspen Creek MHP off 23rd behind Ray’s food.

Junk Between Us Girls presents Spring 2010 Antique & Garden Market. Sat., May 15, 10am -4pm. 342 SW Canyon Dr. This one day event is back in our original location, come experience casual shopping among the beautifully stocked booths on the lawn of one of Redmond’s early historic homes. Shabby Chic, Country Cottage, French Prairie, Primitive, Farm Rusties, and much more. More info call Lisa at 541-410-7815 or Peggy at 541-460-0357.

MOVING SALE! Leaving the area, furniture, (TV stand, book shelves, twin head board), ping pong table, boys & girls bikes, quality clothing, tools, household items. DON’T MISS THIS ONE! 6931 NW 25th Ln., Cinder Butte Estates off Northwest Way. Follow the signs. Sat. only, 8am-3pm.

SALE, Fri.-Sun., 9am-5pm. Everything must go! 156 NE Willow Ave., Prineville, West of Ochoco Reservoir. 541-447-2498

Spring Cleaning Yard Sale! Fri. & Sat. 8-5, 1691 SW Jericho Lane, Culver, a little of everything!!!

Sat. May 15th, 9am-3pm, 3651 SW Xero Ave. Small safe, printer, backpack, furniture, books & misc. Proceeds for Women’s Scholarships.

SHOP/GARAGE SALE. May 15 & 16, Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tools, camping & sports gear, bicycles, hardware, gun Large Garage Sale: Fri. & cabinet & loading equip., Sat. 9-4, 757 NE Oak Pl., Misc. household items, llarge hand tools, fishing & clothes, collectibles. hunting equip., household, 5540 SW Loma Linda Dr. antique boat motor, furniture

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 HUGE

Sunriver Garage/Estate Sale, gently used: home & office furniture, Weber BBQ, tools, automotive, golf clubs, sporting goods & fishing equip., skis, ski box, & boots, Kirby Vacuum, camera & camera equip, fine art, Gorilla shelves, TONS OF S T U F F . Fri. & Sat., 8-5. Go Hwy 97 S. from Bend Wal-Mart, 14 mi., turn right on Vandervert Rd., 1 mi. turn left on S. Century Dr., 3 mi. turn left on Forest Ln., drive 1.5 mi. to 55070 Forest Ln.

SALE

Complete liquidation of Lark Gardens. The owners are moving to a retirement community and selling most everything! This is Phase I, and will be all the outside items, plants, herbs, much quality outdoor furniture & ornamental iron, 3 Weber BBQs, 12 wheel barrows, 12 directors chairs, tools, garden & nursery items, the contents of the gift shop with flavored vinegars, lavender products & sprays, jellies & teas, gift baskets, displays, contents of an art studio with framing and art supplies, stamping & scrapbooking supplies, many 100s of wonderful cookbooks from Lita's lifetime collection, commercial flower cooler, large outdoor umbrellas, several folding canopies, hoses & MUCH MORE!!

Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun. 9-3, 2314 SW 39th St., Corner of Salmon & 39th, women’s upscale clothes, home decor, hide-a-bed, recliners, etc., kitchen goods & much more!

GREEN PASTURES PARK WIDE SALE, 2633 SW Obsidian Ave., May 15th, Sat. 9-5, please park on Obsidian Ave.

REDMOND MOBILE HOME PARK YARD SALE in Several Spaces. Fri. Sat. Sun., 5/22. 23, 24, 1247 NW 6th.

MOVING

Fri. & Sat., May 14 & 15, 9 -4 Numbers Fri. at 8 a.m.

Multi Family Friday & Saturday 8-4, 2958 NW 19th, clothes, bikes, craft supplies & much much more!

12789 Cornett Loop, Powell Butte. At Powell Butte store/Williams Rd go North and follow signs Sale by Attic Estates & Appraisals, 541-350-6822 for pictures go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 F3

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

MAINTENANCE MACHINIST TECHNICIAN Requires strong mechanical skills and a background in machine shop tools, hydraulics, electro-pneumatics, and basic electricity. Excellent intuitive troubleshooting and diagnostic skills in a high-volume production environment. Must be able to pass mechanical aptitude test. Three years previous experience required. Excellent benefits and wage up to $22 per hour D.O.E. Equal opportunity employer - Drug free workplace. Send resume to noslerhr@yahoo.com

Education POWELL BUTTE COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL Powell Butte, Oregon Announces the following positions:

• Part Time Principal with teaching option • 7 Teachers (Part Time/Full Time ) • Administrative Asst. • Custodian See www.pbccs.org complete information

for

PBCCS is an equal opportunity employer

Food Service Attendants

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Glazier have clean DOE. info.

-- Residential: Must 5 years experience & driving record, pay Call 541-382-2500 for

Grinding Machine Set-up Operator This position requires tight tolerance grinding skills and a background in grinding exotic materials (carbide, tungsten, steel, etc.). Previous experience required. Wage $17 - $19 DOE. Excellent benefits. Equal opportunity employer - Drug free workplace. E-mail resume to noslerhr@yahoo.com

Landscaping Sisters Landscape Co. is hiring for landscape maint. Minimum 2 years exp. must speak English, have driver’s licence in good standing, meet grooming standards, able to multi-task, and manage time well. Call for appointment, 541-549-3001.

Phlebotomy Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301

Medical/Software

Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

announcements Nonprofit animal rescue group seeks donations of items for big yard sale. Can accept/ pick up items NOW for the sale on June 19-20. 728-4178. www.craftcats.org The La Pine Community Health Center (La Pine) is requesting proposals for the acquisition of a direct radiography (dr) digital u-arm imaging system. The proposal shall include all ordinary and necessary cost for the purchase, installation (including site alteration) and testing of the equipment, training of La Pine staff on the proper use and maintenance of the equipment, and equipment warranty. Complete proposal details, including the required proposal format, the minimum content of response, and the factors to be used to evaluate the responses, are available by e-mail request at gugenberger@lapinehealth.org. A walk-through of the facility will be held on Tuesday May 18, 2010 at 10:00 a.m., to examine the site for equipment installation. If you are interested in a walk-through other than the date and time provided please contact us at 541-536-3435 ext. 209. The building is located at 51600 Huntington Road, La Pine Oregon 97739. Proposals will be accepted until 3:00 p.m. (Pacific Standard Time), Friday, June 4, 2010, at which time proposals received will be opened. Proposals shall be on the forms required, sealed and the supplied return label affixed. La Pine will not consider or accept any proposal received after the date and time specified above.

personals

Therapeutic Boarding School for girls ages 10-15, seeks a full time Program Coordinator duties and responsibilities include, customer service, administrative tasks, financial management, scheduling and some supervision of students. Applicant must possess strong computer and organizational skills, excellent customer service skills, flexibility, and the lability to work in a team environment and experience working with youth. Competitive pay and benefits. Fax resume to: Jennifer 541-318-1709.

Partners In Care is accepting resumes for the newly created position of Organization Systems Coordinator. This is a full-time position (generally Mon. - Fri./ 8am - 5pm). Responsibilities include providing support and administration of clinical software application (SunCoast) in order to resolve application incidents and/or to fulfill reNeed Help? quests from internal clients, We Can Help! and participation in new REACH THOUSANDS OF module/application testing POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES and implementation for the organization. Minimum EVERY DAY! qualifications include: Clini- Call the Classified Department cal caregiver knowledge and for more information: experience in hospice/home 541-385-5809 health settings (ie. RN, Social Worker), and a demon- Remember.... strated knowledge in clinical Add your web address to software applications (EMR) your ad and readers on with ability to manage the The Bulletin's web site will development and sustaining be able to click through auof such software applicatomatically to your site. tions. Compensation dependent on qualifications/expe- Respiratory Therapist rience. Qualified candidates LINCARE, leading national respiratory co., seeks health are encouraged to submit care specialist. Responsibilitheir resume via mail to: ties: disease management Partners In Care / Attn: HR, program, clinicla evaluations, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR equipment set up and edu97701 or by fax to: cation. Be the doctor’s eyes 541-389-0813. in the home setting. RN, LPN, RRT, CRT licensed as applicable. Great personalities and strong work ethic needed. Competitive salary, benefits and career path. Drug free workplace. EOE. Please fax resume to 541-923-9980.

MANUFACTURING ASSOCIATE

Come Join Our Manufacturing Team! Excellent benefits package Equal Opportunity Employer - Drug free workplace. Must be a high school graduate or possess GED. Full-time positions available. Starting wage is $10.25 an hour. Send resume to noslerhr@yahoo.com

Manufacturing – Production Labor

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help?

Program Coodinator

Medical

General Production Laborer needed at our Redmond plant to handcraft our custom products. Requirements include thorough attention to detail, reliability, experience with basic hand tools and tape measure, and the ability to read and interpret written work instructions. Must be able to lift 20 lbs. on a regular basis, and 40 – 60 lbs on occasion. Prior experience with mechanical drawings is preferred.

Pacific Truck Center is looking for a Journey Level Diesel Tech. Must have own tools. Able to work in a fast pace environment. Able to work on all makes of heavy duty diesel trucks and chassis repairs. excellent pay and benefits. Send resume to PO Box 730, Redmond Oregon 97756

Hours: 7:00 – 3:30 Mon.-Fri. We have a stable work environment, and are not a seasonal employer. Starting pay range $9.50 - $11.50 hr. DOE, plus excellent benefit package which includes paid sick leave and vacation, health insurance, life and 401(k) Plan. Pre-employment drug screen required. E.O.E.

Pharmacy

Qualified applicants will submit a resume stating relevant experience to: Bobby at WorkSource Redmond Employment Department via email to Robert.E.Swartwood@state.or.us, fax (541) 548-8196, or in person at 2158 SE college Loop, suite B., Redmond, OR 97756.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras, Cashier also needed. 541-325-1059.

CAUTION

RN/Medical Partners In Care is accepting resumes for a part-time (24+ hours/week) RN to work in its in-patient unit; Hospice House. Regular weekly hours include two 12-hour night shifts (7pm 7am) and a weekend rotation. Preference given to candidates with in-patient hospice or general hospice experience. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit their resume via mail to: Partners In Care / Attn: HR, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or by fax to: 541-389-0813

SALES OF BEND The Perfect Central Oregon vehicle Is Here. Totally redesigned for 2010 models are on the ground. The all New Outback & Legacy design will increase sales dramatically. We are looking for People who enjoy all that Central Oregon has to offer and want to show other Central Oregonians why there isn’t a more perfect vehicle than the "NEW" All Wheel Drive Subarus. We offer the most aggressive pay program in Central Oregon, Guaranteed Income, Profit sharing, Medical Benefits, a mentoring program, and an above average income. No Phone Calls Please. Apply in person at Subaru of Bend, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

RV Sales

H Madras

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Salesperson. Industry exp. req. Competitive pay and benefits. Fax resume to: 541-330-2496. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

RV Tech

Need Attorney to represent me in a wrongful termination case for equal share of settlement.Possible discrimination. John, 541-977-2434.

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Tech, Full Time w/benefits. Apply at: 63500 N. Hwy. 97, Bend .

Barns

Domestic Services Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Decks

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Drywall

Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Excavating

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Domestic Services

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

We Clean Houses & Offices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best service for the least cost, 541-390-8073.

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

J. L. SCOTT All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Same Day Response

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

382-3883 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Technical Support Specialist 4 Working with complex informations systems and software applications. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent work experience required. Full time $3,875-$6,310/mo. Plus benefits. Job announcement and online OJD application available at: http://courts.oregon.gov/ojd/j obs. Closes May 20, 2010.

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Real Estate Contracts Don’t miss out on the unique opportunity to work in the Ranch’s newly renovated Pub and Restaurant facilities. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a “customer first” attitude? We are looking for enthusiastic, customer service oriented individuals to join Team BBR. There are just a few openings left for the following positions: •Servers •Bussers •Host/ Hostess Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Volunteers needed! Gain valuable experience by helping abandoned animals. Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, www.craftcats.org, 389-8420

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Qualified applicants will submit resume stating relevant experience to: Bobby at WorkSource Redmond Employment Department via email Robert.E.Swartwood@state.or.us, fax (541) 548-8196, or in person at 2158 SE College Loop, Suite B, Redmond, OR 97756.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392. BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $500/25-word classified ad in 25 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

486

Independent Positions

Pre-employment drug screen required. Equal Opportunity Employer.

528

Loans and Mortgages

573

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Work location is Redmond, Oregon. Hours: 7:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri., with 1/2 hr. lunch. Competitive wages. Great benefit package incl. 9 paid holidays, PTO and vacation, health/dental, and 401(k).

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Business Opportunities

541-385-5809

Seeking reliable team player to join our welding department. Must be able to read a mechanical drawing and be highly skilled in TIG welding on aluminum. Minimum 3 yrs. welding experience. An on-site welding test will be required. Must be able to lift 20 lbs on a regular basis, and 40-60 lbs. on occasion.

READERS:

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

XOCAI: Expanding business opportunity coming to the Bend area offering great health and wealth potential. Event: Eagle Crest Resort, Summit Room, May 14 & 15 @ 6:30 p.m. Call 360-450-5985 for more information. All enthusiasts for a better future welcome! www.healthychocolate.cfdgrp.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

(This special package is not available on our website)

ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

Weekly Maintenance

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

500

Therapeutic Boarding School for girls ages 10-15, seeks a full time Certified Classroom Teacher preferably with a Special Ed endorsement and emphasis on elementary eduction. Position is open mid August. Competitive salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefit package. Fax resume to: Carol. 541-388-8465.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Ask us about

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Waitstaff

Teacher

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, quality work,clean-up & haul, repair & improve, painting, fences, odd jobs, more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Landscaping, Yard Care Fire Fuels Reduction

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Handyman

Finance & Business

Welder/Sheet Metal Fabricator

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

476

Employment Opportunities

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

476

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

Operate Your Own Business Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

541-389-4974 springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507 Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099 COOKS CREATIVE MASONRY Stone projects of all types 23 yrs experience. Wayne, 541-815-1420. L#119139 www.cookscreativemasonry.com

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. • Weatherization • Repairs • Additions/Remodels • Garages 541-480-8296 ccb189290

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. BIG RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714 Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Do You Need Help? Housecleaning, Good Price, Guaranteed Job, Honest Person, Good refs, call anytime, leave msg, Maria, 541-390-4308. MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


F4 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Boats & RV’s

800 850

860

870

880

882

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels

Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

Snowmobiles

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

865

ATVs

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new

fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

14’ Lund, 25 Merc, Calkins trailer, elec. trolling motor, fish finder, down rigger, 2 anchors & other equip., great for fly fishing, $2000. 541-388-6922

16’

Seaswirl

1985,

open bow, I/O, fish finder, canvas, exc. cond., $2695, Call 541-546-6920. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

mi. , silver, 2 helmets, travel trunk, exc. cond. $2750. 541-389-9338.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $5000. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or email ddmcd54@gmail.com for pics.

The Bulletin 2003 Sea Ark Sled, 20.6 MVT, 135 hp., 9.9 kicker too many extras to list $11,750 firm. 541-420-7773.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Autos & Transportation

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933

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

900

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $88,000. 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 T Hangar for rent at Bend Airport, bi-fold doors. Call for more info., 541-382-8998.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Smolich Auto Mall

Diesel, 4X4, Canopy, Tow Pkg., The Works! Vin #

Only $6,985 Dodge Ram 1500 2007

HYUNDAI

Only $25,998

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 880

6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Patriot 2000, 37’, 44K JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, mi., w/options. $119,000. upgraded model, exc. cond. 541-382-9755,541-215-0077 $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Fleetwood Expedition 38’ N Model 2005, 7.5 kw gen. W/D, pwr awning, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, micro & convection, dual A/C, heat pump, AC/DC pwr. inverter, backup camera, etc. $98,000. 541-382-1721

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $3,000 or best offer needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

Keystone Cougar 2003 33 ft. 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 8, 2 bdrms., elec./gas stove, large rear storage, outside util. shower, full kitchen & micro $12,500. Incl. skirting, very clean, located near Bend. 541-383-0494

Terry 250RKS 26' 2006 $15,250.00. Downsizing forces sale. Equipped with almost every option available. Please contact 541-480-1445 Terry Manor 29’ 1989, extra’s, non smoker, $2500 OBO. Call for details. 541-508-6920.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $12,500 Call 541-589-0767.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

875

Watercraft

Smolich Auto Mall

GMC Ex-Cab 1995

SLT, 4X4, A Real Beauty With Lots of Extras. Vin #252936

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

870

14.5’ 1962 completely restored Hydroswift fiberglass boat, $1600. 541-536-6059

Honda Scooter 2005, Reflex 250 cc, 2K

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Boats & Accessories

Dowco Motorcycle luggage system, universal rear roller bag, $125. 541-419-2802

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Industrial Life Vests, 2 Coast Guard approved, Stearns adult med.,$35/ea. 504-4142

Motorhomes

12 Ft. Sea King Boat and Trailer, $400 call for more info. 541-389-4411.

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

Houseboat 38X10 with triple axle trailer. Includes private moorage with 24/7 security at Prinville resort. $24,500. Call 541-788-4844.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo,

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Find It in

POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 925

Utility Trailers

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Dodge Sport 1/2-Ton 1999, 4X4, quad cab, Casset/CD Player, running boards, tinted windows A/C, cruise, all bells & whistles, etc., 98,837 mi., $5500, please call 541-420-2206.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

541-385-5809 MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Ford F-150 EX Cab 2005 4X4, Custom Wheels, Like New! VIN #A60699

Only $16,888

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Smolich Auto Mall smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

VW Cabriolet 1981,

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Ford F250 1973, 2WD, 390, new tires, brakes, ps, rebuilt engine, exc. cond., extra parts, $1900. 541-536-2134.

Chevy Tahoe 2008 3rd Seat, 4X4, New Wheels & Tires, Low Miles! VIN #100767

Only $30,998

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

885

932

933

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Canopies and Campers

smolichmotors.com

541-385-5809

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Smolich Auto Mall

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $22,500 541-610-9900.

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Drastic Price Reduction!

Chevy Trailblazer 2005

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

4X4, Well Equipped and Low Miles! Vin #223182

Only $16,995

541-322-7253 The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, May 15, 2010 F5

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 935

935

975

975

975

975

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Dodge Durango 2007 4X4, Fully Loaded, Local Trade! VIN #551428

Only $22,568

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2008 Diesel, Hard to Find, Local Trade!! VIN #164571

Only $26,875

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

smolichmotors.com

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

Dodge Durango Limited 2005 Leather, Fully Loaded, Local Trade! Vin #537556

Only $15,685

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

940 HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Vans

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

Car Trailer, covered tilt, winch inside, 92 in. x 21 ft. w/tie downs 541-548-2156.

***

CHECK YOUR AD

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $14,400, 541-388-3108.

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classified *** KIA Spectra SX 2006, 4 dr., 49K mi., $6500. (530)310-2934, La Pine.

152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

$6900 OBO Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

(541) 520-8013.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Smolich Auto Mall CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Ford E-250 Cargo Van 2007

smolichmotors.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

541-749-4025 • DLR

(Private Party ads only)

Hard to Find, Long Van, Low Low Miles! Vin #A83753

Only $14,888

HYUNDAI

Honda CRV 99, Black, Tow pkg., dual bike rack, 2010 studs, runs great. $5,500. 541-325-6000

366

Local Trade! Leather, Like New! Vin #E14182

Only $11,888

Saturn SC2 1994, sun roof, all leather, 5 spd., studless snow tires. $1200. 408-8611

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

541-385-5809

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Volvo S40 Sedan 2009

Subaru Legacy Outback 2001 541-322-7253

Only 3900 Miles, Best Color! VIN #453938

4X4, Well Maintained. Nice Equipment! Vin #653683

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Only $27,888

Only $11,995 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl.,

Smolich Auto Mall

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Smolich Auto Mall

Fully Loaded, New Tires! Vin #M08818

AS LOW AS

2.9

%

FOR UP TO 72 MONTHS *On Approved Credit

Only $11,888

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Nissan Maxima 2001

Hurry in!! Ends May 31, 2010

Hard to Find These! Very Nice, Well Equipped! Vin #316458

Only $7995

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Premium

975

Automobiles Acura 3.2 CL-S Coupe 2001, RARE. Black, 260 HP V-6, auto., NAV, leather, moon- Ford Focus ZTS 2004, roof, CD. 1 owner. Exc. 126K. 5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $7999. 541-480-3265 DLR. $4995, 541-410-4354

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

Mazda Tribute 2005

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4800. 541-617-1888.

Mini Cooper 2003

LEXUS ES300 1999

541-385-5809 FJ Cruiser 2007, auto, A/C, PS/PB, 38k mi. $24,000 OBO. 541-475-0109, 8 a.m - 8 p.m.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

HYUNDAI

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure Infiniti J30 1993 Garaged, 114K mi., body and interior it is correct. Sometimes inexcellent, mechanical fair. structions over the phone are $1,200 firm, BB@$2,000. misunderstood and an error See in Redmond days or can occur in your ad. If this Bend nights. 541-350-6564. happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your Jaguar XJ6 1985, orig. 67,000 ad appears and we will be miles, British tan/tan leather happy to fix it as soon as we interior, body & interior a 9, can. Deadlines are: Weekdriven only in summer days 12:00 noon for next months, $4,000, call days day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun541-385-6861 private party. day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you.

385-5809

366

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

Smolich Auto Mall

Porsche Carrera 1999, black metallic, 43K careful mi., beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic $20,000. 610-5799.

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

Mercedes E320 2003, 35K!!! panoramic roof, $18,250. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

1 AT

$

23792

mo.

42 Month Lease

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Model ALC-11 SALE PRICE $19,888 MSRP $20,432. Cap Reduction $1,999. Customer Cash Down $2,236.92. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,237.60. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 822816 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, new tires, all service records since new, great value, $16,999 OBO, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Grand Limited Cherokee 2005 Managers Demo, Like New! 5.7 Hemi & Loaded! Vin #698994

Only $21,995 NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

$ 1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee Sale No.: F10-00182 OR Loan No.: 902145162 Title Order No.: 4416101 Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Richard Taylor, a married man as his sole and separate property, as grantor, Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Ing Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated 10/31/2006, and Recorded on 11/09/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-746356, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property (the "Property") situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 29 in Block 5 of Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 12, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 3021 NW Lawrence Ct , Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which foreclosure is made is: Installment of principal and/or interest, which became due on 07/01/2009 plus amounts that are due or may become due for the following: late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any fees and court costs arising or associated with the beneficiaries effort to protect and preserve its security must be cured as a condition of reinstatement. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable including, without limitation, the unpaid and outstanding principal amount of the promissory note made by the Grantor in connection with the obligation secured by said Trust Deed in the original principal amount of $592,500.00 plus all amounts referenced herein and all subsequent amounts accruing hereafter until paid, including late charges, default interest, costs and expenses, title expenses, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees and further sums advanced by the beneficiary; plus a prepayment premium, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 09/03/2010 at the hour of 01:00 o'clock, PM in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash (Certified funds must be made payable to Assured Lender Services, Inc.) the interest in the described Property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's at the address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject Property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the subject loan documents relating to the Trust Deed. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com Dated: 4/20/2010 By: Maria DeLaTorre, Asst Sec For further information, please contact: Assured Lender Services, Inc. 2552 Walnut Avenue, Suite 220 Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-7373 Fax: 714-505-3831 This communication is from a debt collector and is an attempt to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. P692659 4/24, 5/1, 5/8, 05/15/2010

LEGAL NOTICE DIG SAFELY OREGON: The Oregon Utility Notification Center (OUNC) Dig Safely Oregon board is proposing a rate tariff change to take effect July 1, 2010. The OUNC Board is seeking ways to be more cost efficient and control costs for all members when they are dealing with our vendor, One Call Concepts (OCC). To review the proposed changes in our tariff, go to www.digsafelyoregon.com and click on the red button titled, PROPOSED TARIFF CHANGES. If you have comments you may make and submit them while at our website. Your comments regarding our tariff will then be taken under consideration at our June 9, 2010 board meeting. If you would like to attend that meeting and make personal comments, below is the location, date and time of our board meeting. OUNC Board Meeting DATE: June 9, 2010 ADDRESS: 305 NE 102nd Ave., Suite 300 CITY: Portland, OR 97220 TIME: 9 a.m.

1 AT

29931

mo.

42 Month Lease Model ADC-01 SALE PRICE $24,999 MSRP $24,999. Cap Reduction $2,399. Customer Cash Down $2,698.31. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 51% $12,897.90. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 363893 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium 1 AT

$

22962

mo.

36 Month Lease Model AAC-02 SALE PRICE $21,749 MSRP $22,384. Cap Reduction $2,399. Customer Cash Down $2,628.62. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 58% $12,982.72. 36 Months, 12,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 1244901 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

New 2010 Subaru Forester 2.5X 1 AT

$

22123

mo.

42 Month Lease Model AFA-21 SALE PRICE $20,999 MSRP $21,690. Cap Reduction $2,399. Customer Cash Down $2,620.23. Lease Fee $595. Security Deposit $0. Lease End Value 55% $11,929.50. 42 Months, 10,000 Miles Per Year. On Approved Credit. VIN: 785217 Price does not include dealer installed options. See dealer for details. *In lieu of discount.

CALL 888-701-7019

CLICK SubaruofBend.com VISIT 2060 NE HWY 20 • BEND AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through May 17, 2010.


F6 Saturday, May 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

2010 JEEP PATRIOT 4X4

J09113 VIN: AD512211 • 1 at this price

2010 DODGE JOURNEY SE

MSRP ...................... $20,175 Smolich Discount ............ $790 Customer Cash ............ $1,500

MSRP ...................... $21,165 Smolich Discount ............ $780 Customer Cash ............ $1,500

MSRP ...................... $19,390 Smolich Discount ......... $1,505 Customer Cash ............ $2,000

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

17,885

$

D10022 VIN: AT141963 • 1 at this price

18,885

$

Plus $1,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC

Plus $1,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC

2010 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

2010 DODGE RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

J09093 VIN: AC102154 • 1 at this price

2010 CHRYSLER PT CRUISER TOURING

C10002 VIN: AT164610 • 1 at this price

15,885

$

2010 CHRYSLER 300C HEMI

MSRP ...................... $33,890 Smolich Discount ......... $2,005 Customer Cash ............ $4,000

MSRP ...................... $31,185 Smolich Discount ......... $2,300 Customer Cash ............ $3,000

MSRP ...................... $39,660 Smolich Discount ......... $1,775 Customer Cash ............ $2,000

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

SMOLICH SALE PRICE

27,885

$

Plus $1,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC

25,885

35,885

$

$ DT10003 VIN: AS157573 • 1 at this price

C09024 VIN: AH126298 • 1 at this price

Plus $1,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC

Plus $2,000 Bonus Cash when you finance through GMAC

Call us at 541-389-1177 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 5/16/2010. On Approved Credit.

SM O L IC H NISSAN

S M O LI C H HY UN DA I

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

Visit us at : www.smolichhyundai.com

VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA GLS

NEW 2009 NISSAN CUBE SL

$

$

17,995

159/MO.

VIN: 873949. MSRP $17,710. INITIAL CAP COST $17,159. CASH CAP REDUCTION $1,517.24. CUSTOMER CASH DOWN $1,999. ACQUISITION FEE $700. LEASE END VALUE $11,157.30. 12,000 MILES PER YEAR, 24 MO. LEASE. ON APPROVED CREDIT.

HAS

+DMV

VIN: 126459. MSRP $20,520; Smolich Discount $2,525

NEW 2010 NISSAN ALTIMA Auto, CD, ABS

$

Your Choice

2010 SONATA

19,990

32 MPG

+DMV

$3,000 OFF MSRP (includes rebate)

AND

VIN: 501427. MSRP $23,060; Smolich Discount $1,320; Rebate $1,750

NEW 2010 NISSAN PATHFINDER

VIN: 651584; MSRP $20,720

4x4, 7-Passenger

$

24,995

0% for 72 Mos. - or -

CLASS LEADING

&

CLASS LEADING

(On approved credit)

...HYUNDAI

IT

+DMV VIN: 606588. MSRP $30,530; Smolich Discount $3,035; Rebate $2,500

NEW 2010 NISSAN TITAN CREW CAB

HIGHWAY 2011 SONATA

4x4

$

36 MONTH L E A S E

27,995

VIN: 028011, MSRP $21,050. Initial Cap Cost $21,050. Cash Cap Reduction $2,377.31. Customer Cash Down $2,899.10. Aqc. Fee $595. Lease End Value $12,630. 36 mo. 12,000 Miles per Year. On approved credit.

+DMV VIN: 308521. MSRP $35,635; Smolich Discount $3,640; Rebate $4,000

SMOLICH NISSAN

541- 389 -1178

“ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ” All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday May 16, 2010 at close of business.

“MOST FUEL-EFFICIENT CARMAKER IN AMERICA” -EPA SMO LI C H HY UN D AI 1975 NE Hwy 20 • Be nd

541-749-4025 www.smolichhyundai.com

CENTRAL OREGON’S LARGEST USED SELECTION! 7 Day Exchange Program 3000 Mile/3 Month Powertrain Warranty

SMOLICH Carfax-Vehicle History • Free Rental Car CERTIFIED 105 Point Vehicle Inspection

w w w. s m o l i c h m o t o r s . c o m

Bulletin Daily Paper 05/15/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Saturday May 15, 2010

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