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‘Suddenly, here am I, I’m flying’

Former 911 dispatch director will assume part-time post June 1

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

In popular national parks like Glacier and Zion, shuttles take visitors to and from recreation sites. And now the Deschutes National Forest is planning to take a look at whether a shuttle system or another form of public transportation could work to ferry people from Bend to the area’s popular recreation sites. With a $367,000 Federal Transit Administration grant announced Wednesday, the Deschutes National Forest will do a feasibility study to look at where people are going, whether visitors would use a shuttle system, what its cost would be and more. “Our forest supervisor’s vision is that a 12-year-old kid could get on a shuttle, ride the bus to Elk Lake, fish all day, and ride the bus home,” said Peggy Fisher, the forest’s transportation program manager. Or, she added, a retired couple that didn’t want to drive could instead catch a ride up to a mountain lake. “The intent is just to see if our community is ripe for that kind of service,” she said. The grant, called the Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks Program, is designed to both look at ways to shrink the number of cars and their carbon footprint, but also to help people who can’t or don’t want to drive to get to national forests, national parks and other public land. “The whole purpose is to look for ways to reduce the actual vehicles on the road, and reduce the need to build bigger, more expensive parking lots,” Fisher said, adding that it could look at new bike trails as well. The feasibility study, slated to start this fall, would look at the economics of public transportation system, and whether the Deschutes National Forest would partner with another organization to provide the actual shuttles. See Shuttle / A4

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McDonald reassigned to lower position By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Johnny Pickett, left, a flight director from Las Vegas-based company Flying by Foy, steadies Billy Brant, 13, who will play Peter Pan in a Redmond High School production, as he is lifted off the stage during the first night of flying practice Wednesday evening at the high school. More than 30 students from seven area schools are participating in the musical, which opens May 18 and continues through May 22, with performances at 7 p.m. each night and a 1:30 p.m. matinee May 22. Tickets are $10 in advance, and are available at the Redmond High School main office, at 675 S.W. Rimrock Way.

Deschutes County Commissioners on Wednesday rejected the local 911 district’s decision to fire its director, and voted to sign a deal for her to work part time in a lower ranked job. The 911 district’s board placed former Deschutes County 911 “When we Director Becky Mc- balance the Donald on leave in December, then spent valuable public thousands of dollars service Ms. to hire an interim director and investigate McDonald has McDonald. provided over an In April, the 911 district’s board, com- extensive period posed of local fire and of time against police chiefs, voted to her recent fire McDonald for allegedly lying about de- mistakes which tails of her relationship form the basis of with a dispatcher’s estranged husband. Mc- the (911 board’s) Donald appealed their decision, we decision to the County believe that these Commission. Under a separation events do not agreement the County Commission approved warrant her being Wednesday, McDon- permanently ald agreed not to sue deprived of her the 911 district and resigned from her for- certification.” mer job as director. In return, McDonald will — Letter to the Board be placed in a part-time on Public Safety job at the county’s Pa- Standards and Training role & Probation De- from Deschutes County partment analyzing Commissioners budgets and performance data, and auditing the department’s compliance with its policies and procedures. The job was offered to McDonald during negotiations earlier this year, but last week county officials said it was no longer available. McDonald will begin the part-time job June 1, and will earn about $28 an hour and receive health insurance benefits at the level of a full-time employee. See 911 / A4

Fetal alcohol spectrum Suspected impostor ‘played disorder plagues courts the part good,’ says student stolen goods. “He’d say, ‘Mom, I did it beMcClatchy-Tribune News Service cause they are my friends,’” CHICAGO — As long as his said Kathy Link, recalling one mom could remember, Mat- grim night at a police station thew Link was in 2006. “After impulsive, makhe’d get caught, ing bad choices “Unless we do he would always and not under- a better job of be sorry ... but standing right the lessons never from wrong. He educating court stuck.” required constant professionals ... Adopted as an supervision and infant, her son would tell “off- and modify our has been diagthe-wall” stories strategies, this nosed with fetal that made him alcohol spectrum look tough and population is disorders, or powerful. always going to FASD — an umAs the Carbrella term for fail.” pentersville, Ill., the birth defects boy got older, — Kathryn Kelly, caused by alcothe small prob- FASD Legal Issues hol use during lems grew bigger. pregnancy. Resource Center Link’s cognitive He is now deficits made him 23, and while an easy mark for the “wrong he looks like everyone else, crowd,” who could talk him his maturity is closer to into anything — including mid-adolescence. See FASD / A5 shoplifting and transporting

By Bonnie Miller Rubin and Margaret Ramirez

By Betsy Blaney and Schuyler Dixon The Associated Press

ODESSA, Texas — A lot of guys dream about going back to high school and recapturing their athletic glory days. A man who went by the name of Jerry Joseph did it, police say, and now he’s in big trouble. Authorities say the boyishlooking 22-year-old posed as a 16-year-old sophomore phenom to lead the Permian High School basketball team to the state playoffs. He was jailed on fraud charges, and the rabidly competitive West Texas high school that inspired the movie “Friday Night Lights” may have to forfeit its season. “Everyone just thought he was a big guy,” said Permian senior football player Steven Pipes. “He played the part good, skipping down the hallways acting goofy like a 16-year-old.” Pipes and some teammates

The Associated Press

West Texas student Jerry Joseph, who led his high school basketball team to the state playoffs last season, is actually 22-year-old Guerdwich Montimere, police said Tuesday. approached the 6-foot-5 player they knew as Joseph soon after he enrolled last year, asking him if he wanted to play foot-

ball. Pipes said Joseph, who was attending a junior high at the time, declined. He liked basketball instead, and he was good enough to average about 20 points per game over the final nine games heading into the playoffs, where Permian lost in the first round. Joseph was a starter and played center and forward. But suspicions about the player’s identity first arose when three Florida basketball coaches familiar with a former player named Guerdwich Montimere recognized him last month at an amateur tournament in Little Rock, Ark. Montimere, a naturalized U.S. citizen from Haiti, graduated from Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale in 2007. School officials and immigration authorities initially believed Joseph when he denied the allegations and let him remain enrolled. See Imposter / A5


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Music teacher Chad Bernstein, left, congratulates Rose Joseph, 12, after she successfully played a chord, as Jinny Leroy, 12, back, and Jamal Jacques, 12, center, observe during a session of the Guitars Over Guns Operation program at North Miami Middle School in North Miami, Fla.

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All hail to the high school superstars — the kids who earn straight A’s, ace the SATs, play in youth orchestras, excel in sports, lead student organizations, master multiple languages, mentor fellow students and do substantive volunteer work. They are fabulous, accomplished, impressive young people, and they deserve every honor roll spot, valedictorian designation and selective college acceptance they get. But how about a shout-out to a group rarely mentioned in this season of graduation ceremonies and college acceptance letters? Let’s hear it for slackers. Not for what they’ve done, which is by definition not much. Consider instead what they may yet accomplish. And no raised eyebrows: Many a successful life story includes a chapter titled, “Apparently Going Nowhere.” Take Paul Sereno. In elementary school, teachers wanted to hold him back and make him repeat second grade. In high school, he copied from a friend’s work to pass trigonometry. He did so poorly on the PSAT that he had to study the dictionary to get an SAT score that would get him into Northern Illinois University. And then? A master’s degree in geology from Columbia University, a doctorate in geology from Columbia University and the American Museum of Natural History in New York, and a meteoric rise to world-renowned dinosaur expert and professor of paleontology at the University of Chicago. Or take Eileen Brewer. Bored in high school, she spent her time in class reading novels. Her grades were so bad that she was rejected by most of the colleges she applied to and ended up at a little-known college in upstate New York. And then? A master’s degree in history from Loyola University, a Ph.D. in the history of religion from the University of Chicago Divinity School, a law degree from

Harvard Law School and a law career that led to her election in 2002 as a Cook County Circuit Court judge. Or take Jimmy John Liautaud. He smoked pot at an early age, got poor grades in high school and came close to being ejected before graduating in next-to-last place. And then? He attended Eastern Illinois University for one semester, but then parlayed a $25,000 loan from his father into an empire of 1,000 sandwich restaurants and 40,000 employees; with his father donated $5 million to the University of Illinois at Chicago to establish the Liautaud Graduate School of Business; and gave $1 million to his high school because, he says today, “They deserved it; I gave those guys so much trouble.” So what happened? Sereno discovered art, specifically painting, toward the end of high school. “For the first time I felt I could do something,” he said. Brewer discovered that college classes in history and literature were as interesting as novels. “I had some very good teachers; I took courses I liked, in subjects I liked,” she said. “It made all the difference.” Liautaud, facing a sink-orswim situation when his two buddies quit working at his fledgling sandwich shop, took on their work hours himself, poured time and energy into the enterprise and discovered that he liked working really hard. “I just flipped a switch,” he said. The moral of ex-slackers’ stories: The race is not to the swift, or to the top 5 percent of the graduating class. “You can’t evaluate yourself just by your high school years; that’s a very small part of your life,” said Brewer. “Take some courses ... art, art history, English, chemistry, whatever has that spark for you. And then see where that takes you.” “For those that think that it’s all laid out by high school — that’s crazy,” said Sereno. “Nothing is decided. Everything is ahead of you.”

low musician Augie Haas are leading the “GOGOs” through the mentoring discussion that begins each session. Encouraging the kids to avoid violence and stay in school is another goal of GOGO, which is run with Communities in Schools, a national dropoutprevention group that provides insurance, mentoring help and money for instruments. Bernstein, a big, shaggy, genial guy, tries to talk them through hard-to-navigate situations. “You may not be able to do something because you’ll get jumped,” he says. “But what happens when you fight? You might get hurt, or get in trouble. You’d have to drop out of this program. You need to know there are other options. You don’t have to be with people who make you feel uncomfortable. You guys always have a choice.”

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MIAMI — Edrice Gerbier is small for 11, though he usually makes up for it with an explosion of noise and motion. But the memory of two friends kicking another boy as he lay on the ground can stop him cold. “They were kicking on him ’cause he was small,” Edrice whispers, standing taut and still. On this Wednesday afternoon, however, the diminutive live-wire is flying around a small classroom at North Miami Middle School banging assuredly on drum pads, clamoring for his turn on a keyboard, exuberantly making himself heard. Once a week after school, Edrice and a dozen classmates let go of their worries by making music with GOGO, Guitars Over Guns Operation, a program created by Chad Bernstein, a

Ph.D candidate at the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music and trombonist for popular Miami bands Spam Allstars and Suenalo Sound System. Bernstein, 26, has worked without pay on GOGO for over two years, aiming to help this small group of kids find the inspiration and sense of purpose he discovered in music as an awkward, picked-on adolescent with A.D.D. who hated school. “I don’t know what I’d do besides music, and it’s all because someone gave me that opportunity when I was a kid,” says Bernstein, who grew up in suburban Chicago. Musical opportunities are shrinking for kids in South Florida as budget shortfalls and pressure to improve standardized test scores take their toll on public-school arts programs. On this afternoon, Bernstein and fel-

Group encourages kids to use music instead of muscle and mischief

WASHINGTON — Ivy has twirled itself around the marble columns of the Supreme Court like some smarty-pants weed. Over the past 25 years, it has crept into the chamber and entwined every single justice’s chair, except that of John Paul Stevens. But if Solicitor General and former Harvard Law School dean Elena Kagan is confirmed by the Senate to replace him, the Ivy League’s grip on the court will be complete: Every sitting justice will have attended either Yale or Harvard law schools. Granted, Ruth Bader Ginsburg got her JD from Columbia University, but only after she transferred from Harvard Law School after two years. About half of the justices throughout history attended an Ivy League school. In the past 50 years, 64 percent of justices (18 out of 28) were educated at an Ivy. The luster of an Ivy League degree became paramount after Ronald Reagan’s failed 1987 nomination of Robert Bork, who was assailed for his outspoken right-leaning views on abortion, affirmative action and civil rights, according to Timothy O’Neill, a professor at the John Marshall Law School in Chicago. An Ivy League diploma, O’Neill says, has become shorthand for: This person is objective and scientific, and will come to the single best decision unswayed by personal bias. “The Harvard and Yale pedigree became a way to defuse the ideological split,” he says. “We know how powerful the court is — now we have to pretend it exists above ideology. We have to get nine vestal virgins from Harvard or Yale. Brains trump ideology.” In the current climate, diversity of one kind (gender, racial or ethnic) seems to outweigh diversity of another (economic, geographic or experience outside the law). Gone are the days when a Supreme Court justice could be plucked from outside the East Coast, Ivy-centric ranks. Lately, the lack of an Ivy League diploma can be seen as a deficiency. Former White House counsel Harriet Miers, who was nominated in 2005 by George W. Bush, received her law degree from Southern Methodist University in Dallas. In the uproar that compelled Bush to withdraw her nomination, there was a whiff of disdain for her credentials.

COSTCO HWY 20


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 A3

T S Britain’s leaders promise major changes

Attacks on schoolchildren haunt China By Edward Wong New York Times News Service

By Sarah Lyall New York Times News Service

LONDON — The leaders of Britain’s bold new experiment in coalition government flung off their differences and stood side by side on Wednesday, promising to act in concert to promote economic stability, reform the country’s frayed political system and demonstrate that their unlikely arrangement is more than just a hasty marriage of necessity. The Conservative prime minister, David Cameron, and his deputy, Nick Clegg, a Liberal Democrat, pledged that their jury-rigged government, with a cabinet made up of both parties, would tackle the bloated deficit by cutting 6 billion pounds from the budget this year. They said that the new arrangement, which they were forced into when the Conservatives failed to achieve a parliamentary majority and looked to the Liberal Democrats to provide them with support, represented an end to the old politics of self-interest and partisan shortsightedness. And they said they would work together to tear up the old political system by establishing five-year fixed terms for Parliament — though they left an escape clause for disgruntled legislators, under which Parliament could be dissolved if 55 percent of its members voted in favor of doing so. The moves were designed to demonstrate to a jittery, skeptical public that the new government would act swiftly and that two parties whose past relations have shifted along the spectrum from contempt to indifference, could, in fact, function harmoniously and stably. How this will be done between remains to be seen. Yes, Cameron admitted in response to a reporter’s question during an extraordinary news conference at 10 Downing Street, under the circumstances he did indeed regret having once declared his favorite joke to be “Nick Clegg.”

‘Things that we said’ “We’re all going to have things that we said thrown back at us,” Cameron said, as Clegg, who has in the past said some nasty things of his own about his new boss, feigned hurt feelings. Cameron said that he had moved on from partisan rancor and was looking at “the bigger picture.” He added: “And if it means swallowing some humble pie, and if it means eating some of your words, I cannot think of a more excellent diet.” It was a surreal scene, the two avowed political foes making virtually identical statements about their new purpose and radiating a joshing, chummy bonhomie at odds with the brutal tone of the election campaign. Not everyone, however, was convinced by the men’s youthful good spirits, apparent similarities of outlook and appearance — they are the same age, look vaguely alike, and have eerily similar voices — or sudden about-face into coziness. One blogger in the New Statesman called them “TweedleCam and TweedleClegg.” “Oh, God — the country is now being run by two characters from a Richard Curtis film,” ran one widely circulated Twitter message, referring to the British director of happily-ever-after movies like “Love Actually.” But the ebullient togetherness did not falter. Not only did Cameron and Clegg plan to govern together seamlessly to lead the country out of its worst economic crisis in memory, they announced, but they also intended to remake the political system itself.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama listens while Afghanistan President Hamid Karzai answers a question during their joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday.

Karzai: U.S.-Afghan alliance is ‘strong and well-rooted’ By Scott Wilson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and his Afghan counterpart, Hamid Karzai, appeared side by side Wednesday in a stiff, choreographed effort to demonstrate that they have set aside differences over how to prosecute the war in Afghanistan. Both acknowledged that the war is likely to worsen in the months ahead as U.S. troops push into insurgent strongholds. But the events at the White House, starting in the Oval Office and concluding with a private moment between presidents after lunch in the Cabinet Room, were as much about shoring up the symbolism of a sometimes-troubled partnership as they were about the substance of how to fight the war. Although there were few flourishes of warmth between the men, both Obama and Karzai appear to have gotten what they sought from the Afghan president’s extended visit — a chance to clear the air after weeks of recriminations and public acknowledgments, delivered by each leader in unusually personal terms, of the po-

litical difficulties the other faces in maintaining support for the war at home. Obama talked about his moral stake in protecting Afghan civilians, and Karzai reflected on his visit with a badly wounded American soldier at Walter Reed Army Medical Center the previous day.

‘Campaign against terrorism together’ “We are in a campaign against terrorism together,” Karzai said at a news conference held in the ornate East Room of the White House. “And definitely days have come in which we have had differences of opinion, and definitely days in the future will come in which we have differences of opinion. But the relationship between the two governments and the two nations is strong and well-rooted.” On substance, Obama told reporters he believes the U.S. counterinsurgency strategy is proceeding on schedule, reaffirming his intention to begin withdrawing U.S. forces from the country in July 2011. He also endorsed Karzai’s plan to begin peeling off disaffected Taliban fighters in a peace conference

later this month, saying that an Afghan-led “political component” is essential to the overall strategy. Karzai, who in a recent fit of pique with the United States threatened to join the Taliban, came to Washington in part to secure Obama’s blessing for his “reintegration” plan, though a longer-term approach for dealing with Taliban leaders remains unclear. Addressing U.S. concerns over who would qualify for amnesty, Karzai said he is focusing on the “thousands” of insurgents who are not fighting for ideological reasons or against U.S. long-term interests. The visit comes ahead of an intensive several months of political and military initiatives in Afghanistan that U.S. officials say could determine the success or failure of Obama’s surge strategy. Later this month, Karzai plans to convene the first peace conference to draw out casually committed Taliban foot soldiers, followed in the summer by the Kabul Conference, which will bring together countries that provide military and financial support to the Afghanistan war effort.

N   B Investigators find failures in rig device

said it could handle in its license application.

WASHINGTON — A House energy panel investigation has found that the blowout preventer that failed to stop a huge oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico had a dead battery in its control pod, leaks in its hydraulic system, a “useless” test version of a key component and a cutting tool that wasn’t strong enough to shear through steel joints in the well pipe and stop the flow of oil. In a devastating review of the blowout preventer, which BP said was supposed to be “fail-safe,” Rep. Bart Stupak, D-Mich., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s subcommittee on oversight, said Wednesday that documents and interviews show that the device was anything but. The comments came in a hearing in which lawmakers grilled senior executives from BP and oilfield service firms Transocean, Halliburton and Cameron, the maker of the blowout preventer. In one exchange, Rep. Edward Markey, D-Mass., pressed BP on why it seemed to be “flailing” to deal with a spill only 2 percent as large as what it had

Data show minorities frisked more in N.Y. Blacks and Latinos were nine times as likely as whites to be stopped by the police in New York City in 2009, but no more likely to be arrested. The more than 575,000 stops of people in the city, a record number of what are known in police parlance as “stop and frisks,” yielded 762 guns. The Center for Constitutional Rights, which got the data on stop and frisks after it first sued the city over the issue after the 1999 killing of Amadou Diallo, said its analysis of the 2009 data showed again what it argued

was the racially driven use of the tactic against minorities and its relatively modest achievements in fighting crime.

GOP settles on Florida for 2012 convention WASHINGTON — The Republican Party on Wednesday selected Tampa, Fla., as the site of its 2012 presidential nominating convention. Tampa was a leading contender in 2004 and 2008, but it lost out to New York City and Minneapolis-St. Paul. This time, Tampa was considered the odds-on favorite, considering the state’s big role in presidential elections. The Republican convention is scheduled to begin Aug. 27, 2012. — From wire reports

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BEIJING — Gates and cameras have been installed at schools. Security guards have been trained to fend off knifewielding attackers. China’s top security official convened a nationwide conference call, ordering underlings to protect children when they attend classes. But on Wednesday, the latest in a streak of copycat assaults was also the most deadly: A merchant with a kitchen cleaver barged into a kindergarten in central China, hacked to death seven children, their teacher and her mother and returned home to watch rescuers rush to the scene before taking his own life. What prompted the attack — the fifth assault on schoolchildren since March — was as imponderable to many Chinese as the details were gruesome. They have all involved middle-aged men in small towns expressing violent grievances against the most vulnerable and cherished members of their communities, the children of families often limited to having only one.

Attacks against Communist society? But whether the problem is weak diagnosis and treatment of mental illness, shoddy security and little money for schools, too much media attention to spectacular crimes or too little public debate about social inequality, the killings have presented an unusual political and security challenge to the ruling Communist Party. And in the frenzied speculation about why people might want to mimic horrific attacks on children at schools, causing problems for the powerful is believed to be one possible motive. “They choose children because it’ll have the largest negative impact on society,” said Tang Jun, a sociologist. He said the attackers did not appear to know their victims personally, so the assaults “must be an expression of their dissatisfaction with society.” The senseless suffering of children has become something of an Achilles’ heel for President Hu Jintao and Prime Minister Wen Jiabao. They have presided over an extraor-

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dinary economic expansion and a rapid rise in China’s global influence. But they have not been able to keep tainted infant formula off grocery store shelves or to account for why so many public school buildings collapsed during the 2008 Sichuan earthquake, killing more than 5,000 children.

Patrolling schools Since the first in the recent spate of atrocities took place March 23, when a man stabbed eight children to death outside an elementary school in southeastern China, the authorities have ordered the police and paramilitary troops to patrol schools. They also ordered news outlets to use only the official, terse accounts of the killings provided by the Xinhua news agency, and have kept the news off broadcast television almost entirely. But some commentators argue that the underlying tensions in Chinese society may not be addressed by security measures and censorship. On Wednesday, Dahe Bao, a newspaper in Henan Province, posted on the Internet a fiery editorial that pointed to misbehavior by government officials as the root cause of the problem. “After being treated unfairly or being bullied by the authorities, and unable to take revenge on those government departments that are safeguarded by state security forces, killers have to let out their hatred and anger on weaker people,” said the editorial by a writer named Shi Chuan. Some scholars have speculated that the attacks underscore the absence of pressure-release valves in a society that is going through rapid economic upheaval, where the gap between the wealthy and the destitute is widening, and where corrupt officials often exercise power arbitrarily. The attacks have also prompted talk of how Chinese rarely discuss mental illness.

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A4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Kagan rubs elbows on Capitol Hill Kagan and Marshall: ‘Absurd to compare’ By Sheryl Gay Stolberg

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Elena Kagan’s lack of judicial experience and her stance on the military’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy emerged Wednesday as potential flashpoints in her confirmation hearings. The top Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee said he was not satisfied with her explanation of why she had briefly barred military recruiters from using Harvard Law School facilities when she was dean. “It seemed to me a little bit out of touch,” the Republican, Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama, said after about an hour with Kagan. “That you think you could disagree with a legal policy of the military, and that would allow you to in any way inhibit their ability to come to your campus, I think indicates some of the dangers of being in the rarefied atmosphere of the academy.” Their private talk was one of eight meetings that Kagan, President Barack Obama’s nominee to succeed Justice John Paul Stevens, had with senators on Wednesday as she began paying traditional courtesy calls to some of the 100 men and women who will vote on whether she is qualified to sit on the Supreme Court. In her job as solicitor general, Kagan does plenty of talking; she is the lawyer who represents the government before the Supreme Court. But now, as she concentrates exclusively on winning Senate confirmation, Kagan is practicing a different skill: keeping her mouth shut. She smiled politely Wednesday as she traipsed through the corridors of the Capitol, surrounded by a team of White House officials and trailed by

By Charlie Savage New York Times News Service

Harry Hamburg / The Associated Press

Solicitor General and Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan, rides the Senate Subway during her day of meetings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. camera-toting crews. For her first photo opportunity, she sat mum alongside the Senate Democratic leader, Harry Reid of Nevada, who promised a smooth confirmation process. For her second, with Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Republican leader, she allowed herself precisely five words: “Thank you very much, senator.” (McConnell had just come from the Senate floor, where he had suggested that Kagan would be a “rubber stamp” for the administration — an assertion he did not repeat in her presence.) By afternoon, Kagan was loosening up a bit. “Everybody’s treating me very well,” she said on her way to see Sen. Herb

Kohl, D-Wis. She paused, then added, “That’s the most I’ve said all day.” The White House and its allies are casting Kagan, 50, as a trailblazer and a brilliant academic. An umbrella group of liberal advocacy organizations, the Coalition for Constitutional Values, is running a national television spot that serves up a gauzy vision of her life story: daughter of a lawyer and a teacher, graduate of Princeton and Harvard Law, public servant in the Clinton and Obama administrations. On Capitol Hill on Wednesday, it quickly became clear that Republicans were trying to paint a very different picture, of a woman in an ivory tower who lacks the requisite experience to

serve on the highest court in the nation. “My view is that her experience is very thin,” Sessions said. “You do not have to be a judge to go on the Supreme Court; I acknowledge that. But I think if you’re not a judge, I would like to have seen somebody in the harness of the practice of law for a number of years, who demonstrated discipline.” He said Kagan defended herself. “She felt she had the experience to do the job, and she didn’t hesitate in that answer.” Republicans and Democrats agreed that they intend wrap up Kagan’s confirmation hearings before their August recess, though it is unclear precisely when the hearings will be held.

WASHINGTON — In the spring of 1988, Justice Thurgood Marshall assigned a clerk, Elena Kagan, to write a first draft of his opinion in a case considering whether a school district could charge a poor family for busing a child to the nearest school, which was 16 miles away. A majority on the Supreme Court ruled that the busing fee was constitutional. Marshall, 80, was incensed and wanted a fiery dissent. But the 28-year-old Kagan, now a Supreme Court nominee, thought her boss’s legal analysis was wrong. Kagan, recalling the incident in a 1993 tribute after his death, wrote that after she told him that “it would be difficult to find in favor of the child” under legal doctrine, he called her a “knucklehead.” He “returned to me successive drafts of the dissenting opinion for failing to express — or for failing to express in a properly pungent tone — his understanding of the case,” she wrote. Because Kagan has never been a judge and has produced only a handful of scholarly writings, clues to her philosophy are rare. In that vacuum, liberals and conservatives alike are attributing special significance to her clerkship year with Marshall, who led the civil rights movement’s legal efforts to dismantle segregation before becoming a particularly liberal Supreme Court judge. But while Kagan, a former

In Kagan’s work as solicitor general, few clues to her views By Robert Barnes The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — In her six appearances before the Supreme Court, Solicitor General Elena Kagan has argued some of the term’s most important constitutional challenges to government action. Justice Antonin Scalia has said that she “stepped into the fire.” He ought to know. Just 20 seconds into her first argument before the court, Scalia stopped her midsentence with, “Wait, wait,

Shuttle Continued from A1 It’s still unknown what the cost to riders would be, she said, but establishing a shuttle system would not prevent people from driving themselves. As part of the study, Deschutes National Forest staff or a consultant would conduct a traffic study, visitor capacity analysis, and look at whether people are parking off the asphalt or creating new trails in places because

wait, wait.” His second question began, “I don’t understand what you’re saying.” But when he later said he doubted that Congress could be impartial in writing election law, Kagan politely told him he was wrong. The statute that passed, she said, could hurt incumbents. “This may be the single most selfdenying thing that Congress has ever done,” Kagan told Scalia. Since President Barack Obama nominated Kagan to join her inquisitors on the Supreme

Court, members of Congress, the public and legal experts have been sifting through her background in search of her stances on important issues and the law. She has not been a judge, so there are no legal opinions to peruse; she made few bold declarations in her writings as a professor and dean of Harvard Law School; and she has been circumspect in speeches. She spent several hours on Capitol Hill meeting with key senators Wednesday but said little about

her personal views. Kagan displays a confident, conversational style at the lectern. As the first female solicitor general, she declined — after polling the justices to see if they objected — to wear the traditional morning coat that her predecessors donned, in favor of dark suits. She and Scalia appear to have a rapport — he told National Public Radio he liked Kagan’s pushback in the campaign finance case, Citizens United v. Federal

Election Commission. Like all advocates, Kagan appears to pay special attention to Justice Anthony Kennedy, often the deciding vote in close cases. When she was at Harvard, she heaped praise on her fellow Harvard Law graduate for his “independence and integrity.” Kagan has learned when to accept help from the bench. When Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg once rephrased one of Kagan’s arguments, the solicitor general quickly got out of the way.

they’re parking where they shouldn’t be. Staff with the Deschutes National Forest don’t know yet whether a shuttle would just be along the Cascade Lakes Highway, or whether another route with the Lava Lands Visitor Center, Lava River Cave, High Desert Museum or other sites south of Bend would be included as well. Most of the shuttle systems are to national parks, Fisher said, or from large population centers to nearby forests. A shuttle from Bend to the Deschutes National

Forest, considered a rural forest because it’s not near a big city, one of the first looked at by the Sarbanes program. “We’re a rural forest with a huge amount of visitors,” Fisher said. “They’re trying to see if it will work here.” But the Deschutes does have a lot of visitors who live nearby, as well as a large retired population, who could use a system. And if people did use a system, it could cut down on the maintenance the Deschutes National Forest Service has to do on parking lots, or

reduce the number of parking lot expansion projects. Scott Silver, executive director of the Bend-based conservation group Wild Wilderness, said that it would be nice to have a public transportation option to get to the forest. But he has questions, including who would operate the shuttle and what it would cost — as well as whether enough people would use it and whether it would come frequently enough to be useful for hikers who spend a day in the forest. “The distances are too long,

and the attractions are diffuse,” he said. Dale Navish, a board member with the Tumalo Langlauf Club for cross country skiers, said that any type of public transportation that helps people out or reduces the use of individual cars would be good. “I don’t know how they’d figure out the timing, but that’d be wonderful,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

board member for the Thurgood Marshall Scholarship Fund, clearly relished the experience and admired the justice as a historic figure, she appears to have had a far more ambivalent attitude toward his jurisprudence, according to a review of his papers at the Library of Congress, her comments over the years about him and interviews with her fellow clerks and colleagues. In analyzing why Marshall was adamant about siding with the poor family in the busing fee case, for example, Kagan explained in her tribute that he “allowed his personal experiences, and the knowledge of suffering and deprivation gained from those experiences, to guide him.”

Different experience But Kagan did not share those experiences, notes Charles J. Ogletree, a Harvard law professor who heads an institute named after Marshall’s mentor, Charles Hamilton Houston, and who has talked over the years with Kagan, a former Harvard Law School dean, about her clerkship. “It’s absurd to compare Elena Kagan’s judicial philosophy to Thurgood Marshall’s philosophy,” Ogletree said. “Their times and life experiences are different. They lived in different worlds. The reality is that Elena Kagan learned a lot from Justice Marshall, but she will not be overly influenced by Marshall or anyone else. She is her own person.”

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911 Continued from A1 The job might only exist through June 2011. As 911 director, McDonald earned $98,137 a year. The commission is also sending a letter to the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training on McDonald’s behalf. The state agency trains and licenses police, firefighters and dispatchers. It is investigating McDonald’s firing, and could revoke her dispatcher’s license because the 911 district terminated her employment for dishonesty. It must revoke a dispatcher’s license if she or he was fired for dishonesty, according to the Oregon Administrative Rules. Commissioners critiqued the 911 board’s handling of McDonald’s case in their letter to the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training, and praised McDonald’s work at the dispatch center. “In short, the (911 board) appears from the record not to have considered whether some form of discipline less than termination was appropriate,” the commissioners wrote. “When we balance the valuable public service Ms. McDonald has provided over an extensive period of time against her recent mistakes which form the basis of the (911 board’s) decision, we believe that these events do not warrant

her being permanently deprived of her certification.” Bend Fire Chief Larry Huhn, the current chairman of the 911 board, could not be reached for comment. Deschutes County Sheriff Larry Blanton referred questions to Huhn, and SistersCamp Sherman Fire Chief Tay Robertson declined to comment.

Job ‘not available,’ then back on the table Officials said Wednesday the analyst job already existed, and was not created for McDonald. However, County Legal Counsel Mark Pilliod told the commissioners last week the analyst job was an open and unfilled position when it was originally offered to McDonald but “given the current budget process, the position is simply not available any more.” At the same time, Community Justice Director Ken Hales said he decided not to fill the job and assigned portions of the workload to other employees. “I’m not filling that position now,” Hales said. “I’m taking some things in that position, tagging it onto some other people’s jobs.” Another option was to place McDonald in a dispatcher job at 911, but Commissioner Alan Unger last week expressed concerns about returning McDonald to a job where she might have been in a subordinate position to Theresa Joye, who had filed a

complaint against her. “I was more comfortable with the discussions we were having about the position in parole and probation,” Unger said. Hales and County Administrator Dave Kanner said Wednesday the analyst job was still in the proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year, and they had decided to hire a consultant to do the work. But hiring McDonald to do the job is preferable because it will give the county more control over the work product than if they hired a contractor, Kanner and Hales said. McDonald started out as a 911 dispatcher 15 years ago, then rose through the ranks to become director. The 911 board placed McDonald on paid leave in December after dispatcher Theresa Joye filed a worker’s compensation claim that McDonald’s relationship with her

estranged husband, Kyle Joye, caused her psychological stress. Then, the board hired an interim 911 director at more than $8,000 a month, as well as an investigator to examine whether McDonald created a hostile work environment at the dispatch center. The investigator retained to conduct a personnel investigation and produce a four-page report charged $5,554, and ultimately determined McDonald did not create a hostile work environment. Theresa Joye’s worker’s compensation claim was initially denied, but she appealed it and had a hearing May 6. Now, a judge has 60 days from that date to make a decision, retired Bend Police Chief and 911 Interim Director Andy Jordan wrote in an e-mail.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 A5

Imposter

FASD

Continued from A1 School police and immigration agents confirmed Montimere’s identity Tuesday. When confronted, he confessed, said school district spokesman Mike Adkins. Montimere was arrested and charged with failure to identify himself to a police officer. He posted $500 bond Wednesday, said Ector County sheriff’s Sgt. Debbie Bruce. If convicted of the misdemeanor, he could face a maximum of six months in jail and a $2,500 fine. Bruce said there was no record of an attorney for Montimere. Montimere’s mother, Manikisse Montimere of Tamarac, Fla., said she had not seen her son in about two years. She said basketball was important to him. “I guess he doesn’t want me in his life at all,” she said. “I always pray to wish him the best.” Montimere presented himself as Joseph after moving to Odessa in February 2009 and enrolling as a ninth-grader at a junior high. He showed officials a Haitian birth certificate indicating he was 15 and claimed he lived with a halfbrother in the dorm of a local university, Adkins said. After admitting the person was a friend, not his half-brother, Montimere moved in with Permian boys basketball coach Danny Wright when the friend left the state last summer, Adkins said. On Wednesday afternoon, some players practiced shooting in the Permian gym as Wright looked on. He declined to comment, citing a directive from school officials. Moments later, while speaking with a substitute teacher who had Joseph in classes this year, Wright said he felt compassion for the young man. “I genuinely love that kid and wish him the best,” he told the teacher, Liz Faught. He said he chose to take Joseph into his family and hoped their time together “showed him virtues.” Faught said later than Joseph was a “most respectable young man” and “was well mannered” when she taught him in class.

Continued from A1 The Link family is not alone. The recent case of a Tennessee mother, who sent her adopted son on a plane back to Russia, heightened awareness about fetal alcohol children and the lifewrenching difficulties faced by their families. However, a more intense debate is raging among parents, prosecutors and judges about how to deal with fetal alcohol adults who repeatedly break the law and are unable to understand the consequences of their actions. About 60 percent of people with FASD in the United States have been in trouble with the law, and the disability is pervasive in prisons, according to a new study by Columbia University’s National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Despite the numbers, those with the disability can fall through the cracks in the criminal justice system, which doesn’t know much about the disorder, much less acknowledge it as a mitigating factor, said several experts. In Illinois, the state Department of Human Services found a “lack of understanding in the judicial system when dealing with individuals diagnosed with FASD,” the agency noted in a recent report. Kevin Teichen, 29, was diagnosed with fetal alcohol disorder more than 20 years ago. Since they adopted him as a baby, Walt and Kathy Teichen have struggled to make sense of their son’s behavior. It started in the mid-1980s, when he got kicked out of first grade and placed in a specialeducation class. Then came more academic, social and job failures, followed by petty brushes with the law, which only escalated over time. He once walked out of Target with an armload of electronics, and no worry of getting caught. While driving a cab, he stole a credit card number to treat other drivers to dinner. It wasn’t until December

Wal-Mart pledging $2 billion to food banks By Stephanie Strom New York Times News Service

The Wal-Mart Corporation announced plans Wednesday to contribute $2 billion in cash and food to the nation’s food banks, one of the largest corporate gifts on record. Over the next five years, the giant retail company will distribute some 1.1 billion pounds of food to food banks and provide $250 million to help them buy refrigerated trucks, improve storage and develop better logistics. “Hunger is just a huge problem, and, as the largest grocer in the country, we need to be at the head of the pack in doing something about it,” said Margaret McKenna, president of the WalMart Foundation. While the economy seems to be turning around, the number of people turning to charities to help put food on their tables continues to grow. A recent survey by Feeding America found that 37 million people a year now use its national network of food banks, a 46 percent increase from 2006. The survey drew on interviews with more than 61,000 people who use food banks, as well as reports from 37,000 food banks across the country. More than one-third of those surveyed said they would not have been able to pay for basics like rent, utilities and medical care without relying on food banks to offset the cost of their meals — and more than a third said at least one person in their household was working. “It is not just the unemployed that are going hungry,” said Vicki Escarra, chief executive of Feeding America. Wal-Mart began taking on hunger as a cause in 2005, when it distributed 9.9 million pounds of food to food banks; last year, it provided 116.1 million pounds of food. The company also has donated the services of its staff to help food banks improve lighting and refrigeration, and develop ways to increase the amount of fresh food on their shelves.

Kevin Buehler / The Associated Press

An Odessa Permian high school basketball player, who identified himself as Jerry Joseph, right, drives against Midland High’s Paul Merchant (21) during a basketball game at the Permian Fieldhouse in Odessa, Texas, in January 2010. And, she said, “he was totally dedicated to basketball.” Randy Lee, a former men’s basketball coach at the University of Texas-Permian Basin, said he was introduced to a teenager known as Jerry Joseph last spring. Lee said the young man looked more physically developed than a lot of the basketball players he encountered, but he did not seem older

than 15. “Maybe I’m gullible, but he didn’t look much different from a lot of city kids,” Lee said. The rules of the University Interscholastic League require forfeiture of any games involving an ineligible player. The league will wait to hear from local officials before determining if any other punishment is necessary, said

Mark Cousins, the group’s director of policy. With nearly 1,300 member schools and more than 700,000 athletes, the group counts on schools to determine athletes’ eligibility. “We put a lot of faith in our administrators,” Cousins said. “Ultimately, it’s the school’s responsibility.”

2008 when the then-27-yearold Elmhurst, Ill., man had sex with a 16-year-old girl that the full weight of the justice system came crashing down, sending him to the DuPage County Jail, where he spent 16 months awaiting trial. According to investigative records, the girl said it was her idea to have sex and he agreed. On Monday, Teichen pleaded guilty but mentally ill to having sex with the girl and was sentenced to five years in prison. Judge Kathryn Creswell said that while Teichen suffered from fetal alcohol syndrome, the condition “did not impair his judgment to the degree that he didn’t understand what he was doing was illegal.” Nationally, FASD affects an estimated one in 100 babies — or about 40,000 live births per year. However, no one knows how many adults with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, such as Teichen, are incarcerated. Researchers at the University of Washington estimate that as many as one out of four inmates could be affected, but few states screen for the disability. While FASD has been identified as a public health issue since the 1970s, transgressions are often seen as noncompliance rather than noncomprehension. Unlike Down syndrome, people can show no outward signs and be of normal intelligence — in fact, they are more vulnerable to run-ins than those with lower IQs. Additionally, few alternatives exist for afflicted adults who break the law, beyond incarceration. Once in the system, it’s almost a given that offenders won’t be able to follow rules or probation. Training and awareness are key, said Kathryn Kelly of the FASD Legal Issues Resource Center at the University of Washington, which fields about 500 inquiries annually from judges and others. “Unless we do a better job of educating court professionals ... and modify our strategies, this population is always going to fail,” Kelly said.


W OR L D

A6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

LIBYA

Bangkok protest leaders divided By Thomas Fuller and Seth Mydans New York Times News Service

BANGKOK — Protest leaders appeared deeply divided late Wednesday over whether to end their long occupation of Bangkok’s commercial center, in the face of a warning by the government that it might soon use force against them. Some leaders said they were prepared to break camp, but others stood on a large makeshift stage, vowing to hold their ground as thousands of protesters cheered wildly. One leader, Veera Musikapong, has not been seen in days.

Abdel Meguid al-Fergany / The Associated Press

Rescue teams search the crash site in Tripoli, Libya, on Wednesday, after an Afriqiyah Airways plane with 104 people on board crashed on landing at the airport in the Libyan capital.

Boy survives plane crash; 103 others die By Nicola Clark New York Times News Service

A young boy appeared to be the only survivor Wednesday after a Libyan airliner crashed while landing at the airport in Tripoli, Libya, killing 92 passengers — most of them Dutch tourists — and 11 crew members, Libyan and Dutch officials said. The plane, Afriqiyah Airways Flight 771 from Johannesburg, crashed as it was making its final approach to land around 6 a.m., the airline said. The cause of the crash of the Airbus jet, which occurred in good weather, was under investigation, though Libya’s transportation minister said the Libyan authorities had ruled out terrorism. That determination was made quickly, and the minister, Mohammed Zidan, gave no indication of how officials had reached that conclusion. The flight recorders have been retrieved from the wreckage and will be analyzed, Zidan said. Daniel Hoeltgen, a spokesman for the European Aviation Safety Agency, in Cologne, said the aircraft had been inspected at least three times in recent months by the French civil aviation authority, which did not find any significant safety problems. A spokesman for the Royal Dutch Touring Club ANWB said 61 of the dead were with two Dutch tour groups returning from South Africa, one going to Brussels and the other to Dusseldorf. Ad Meijer, a spokesman in The Hague for the Dutch foreign minister, Maxime Verhagen, said the Dutch Embassy staff had not yet verified whether all of those tourists were Dutch, including the boy, whose age had not been confirmed. “The boy is currently in the hos-

The Associated Press

An unidentified Dutch child receives medical treatment in a hospital in Tripoli, Libya, on Wednesday. The boy is believed to be the only survivor of a plane crash that claimed the lives of 92 passengers and 11 crew members. pital and being operated on, so it has not yet been possible for our embassy colleagues to visit him and confirm his identity,” Meijer said. A spokeswoman for the Dutch Foreign Ministry said the child was undergoing surgery for broken bones. Images released by Libya TV showed a dark-haired boy with a bandaged head who appeared barely awake. In Britain, a spokeswoman for the Foreign Office confirmed that at least one British citizen was on board. According to news reports, 22 victims were Libyan and at least 3 were South African. The Bureau of Investigations and Analyses in France said that it had sent two investigators to Tripoli and that Airbus, which manufactured the plane, had sent a team of five specialists to assist the Libyan authorities. Photos from the scene showed debris strewn across a wide area. Workers wearing surgical masks

picked through gnarled rows of seats, retrieving remains and personal items like passports and cell phones. With the exception of the plane’s tail fin and parts of the wings, few large pieces appeared to have remained intact. Airbus said the plane was delivered in September to Afriqiyah Airways. The plane had accumulated about 1,600 flight hours in about 420 flights. Flight 771 originated in Johannesburg and was due to stop in Tripoli before continuing to Gatwick Airport in London. The airline’s schedule indicated that the plane was an Airbus A330-200 with a capacity of 253 passengers. Afriqiyah Airways said the plane crashed just short of the runway. The skies were clear with visibility of 3 to 4 miles, and the winds were very light, according to weather reports. The crash was the first for Afriqiyah, which was founded in Tripoli in 2001.

Alleged Serbian war criminal arrested in Australia McClatchy-Tribune News Service SYDNEY — Serb warlord Dragan Vasiljkovic was in custody Wednesday after his capture by Australian police after 40 days on the run. It had been feared that Vasiljkovic had used a forged

passport to flee to Serbia to escape extradition to Croatia to face a war crimes trial. Vasiljkovic went missing after losing his four-year legal battle to stay in Australia. Vasiljkovic is to be held in jail pending a determination

on Croatia’s request that he be extradited. Vasiljkovic commanded a unit based in the Serb stronghold of Knin that has been accused of the torture and killing of captured Croatian soldiers and police.

For now, several thousand protesters remain camped on the streets, barricaded behind sharpened bamboo stakes, showering in makeshift stalls and lining up for handouts of food. Hours before the deadline, Korbsak Sabhavasu, the secretary general to Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, said on TV that the election offer had been revoked. He said there would be no more negotiations. But the chief government spokesman, Panitan Wattanayagorn, said the cancellation of the offer would not be definite until the prime minister himself announced it.

The government had said Wednesday that it would cut off water and phone service to the area and limit public transportation as part of its effort to “close down” the protest, which has paralyzed Bangkok’s main commercial district. The plan was delayed late Wednesday after protest leaders remained defiant, saying they would continue to rely on generators for their power. They also said they did not believe the government would cut their water supply, which could affect two hospitals in the area. “Go ahead and try,” said Kokaew Pikunthong, a protest leader.

W   B U.S. funds software, risking China’s ire

Wednesday for the first time in two years.

The State Department has decided to fund a group run mainly by practitioners of Falun Gong, a Buddhist-like sect long considered Enemy No. 1 by the Chinese government, to provide software to skirt Internet censorship across the globe. State Department officials recently called the group, the Global Internet Freedom Consortium, offering it $1.5 million, according to Shiyu Zhou, one of the group’s founders. A State Department official, speaking on the condition of anonymity, confirmed the offer. The decision, which came as the United States and China have recently moved to improve ties after months of tension, appears likely to irritate Beijing just as the two are set to resume a dialogue on human rights

Pope visits shrine FATIMA, Portugal — A day after acknowledging the church’s responsibility for the sexual abuse crisis, Pope Benedict XVI on Wednesday traveled to a popular pilgrim shrine and prayed for priests not to fall short of their “sublime vocation” or “succumb to the temptations of the evil one.” It was Benedict’s first visit as pope to a shrine that was meaningful to his predecessor, John Paul II.

Samsung drops civil suit over column SEOUL, South Korea — Technology giant Samsung Electronics has dropped its civil lawsuit against a freelance newspaper

columnist here, saying both parties had reached a “common consensus” over a Christmas Day 2009 column that poked fun at the company and its chief executives. The British-born columnist, Michael Breen, still faces criminal defamation charges for the satirical column he wrote for the Korea Times that included comments about Samsung and its chairman, Lee Kun-hee. The company had sued Breen, as well as the newspaper and its editor, for $1 million, citing the column’s “mocking tone” and “baseless, malicious and offensive false information.” But the editor and the paper were dropped from the suit after the Korea Times ran a pair of clarifications. Breen insisted that the column was obvious satire and that the company overreacted. — From wire reports


B

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28 restaurant sells; French bistro planned The owners of 28, the bistro and bar in downtown Bend, have sold the business and are shuttering it after the close of operations Saturday to focus their attention on their other downtown restaurant, Zydeco Kitchen & Cocktails. The 28 site won’t be closed for long, however. The new owners, Corey Donovan and his fiancée, Amy Christiansen, plan to reopen the space by mid-June as Tart, which Donovan described as a French global bistro. It will be open for lunch and dinner and operate until at least midnight, he said, adding that it also will have unique cocktails and an extensive wine list. Donovan came to Bend two years ago as general manager of Pastini Pastaria in the Old Mill District and has worked in the restaurant industry for 15 years. Cheri Helt, who co-owns 28 and Zydeco with her husband, Steve, said 28 was not a distress sale. “It was a lifestyle decision and being able to focus on one place,” she said. The Helts operated 28 for about five years in St. Clair Place, at the corner of Bond Street and Minnesota Avenue. Helt said three of 28’s four employees will move to Zydeco. The fourth is leaving town. The Helts moved Zydeco to its Bond Street location downtown last May after previously operating it on South Third Street, near Reed Market Road. “It’s been a great move for us,” Helt said of the 130-seat location, which has about three times more capacity than 28. With a third child on the way and 28’s lease coming up in June, “we’ve decided to … put all of our energy into Zydeco and our new family,” she said.

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.56 treasury CHANGE +.85%

In Bend, an uptick in building permits By Andrew Moore In Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood, builder Matt Cloninger is building a house. It’s a spec house, or a house he’s building on speculation that a buyer will come along and want to call it home. He broke ground earlier this month and plans to complete it by September. It’s the first house he’s built since finishing his last house in January 2009, he said. “I did all the market research and all indicators, especially in NorthWest Crossing, are good,” said Cloninger, owner of Cloninger Custom Homes. “I’m confident I’ll be able to sell it before the end of summer.”

Other builders are sharing Cloninger’s optimism. “We’re definitely seeing an uptick,” said Dennis Pahlisch, president of Pahlisch Homes in Bend. “I hate to be too optimistic — it’s been such a long road — but we’re definitely seeing more units selling and our inventory is down to two homes.” Pahlisch said his company is applying for seven new single-family permits for a residential subdivision in south Bend — The Bridges — it is currently developing. Through the first four months of the year, building permits issued in Bend for singlefamily homes are up nearly 49 percent compared with the same period last year. See Permits / B2

s

$1,242.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$22.80

Bend housing permits Permits for detached singlefamily homes in Bend, January through April 2010, compared to previous years. 300

287

In a story headlined “Europe’s troubles having positive effect on U.S. mortgage rates,” which appeared Wednesday, May 12, on Page B1, the relationship between bond prices and consumer demand was characterized incorrectly. The price of a bond rises with more buyers while the bond’s yield goes down. The Bulletin regrets the error.

U.S. monthly trade The U.S. trade deficit in goods and services: Seasonally adjusted

Imports $188.3B $200 billion 180 160

Exports $147.9B

140 120

MAMJ J ASOND J FM 2009 2010

0 -20 -40 -60

Trade deficit -$40.4B

Source: Department of Commerce AP

$19.640 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.368

Prosecutors ask if banks misled rating agencies By Louise Story New York Times News Service

100

98 64 43

0

2007 2008 2009 2010

Source: City of Bend Community Development Department Eric Baker / The Bulletin

Keeping it real at 10 Barrel

The New York attorney general has started an investigation of eight banks to determine whether they provided misleading information to rating agencies in order to inflate the grades of certain mortgage securities, according to two people with knowledge of the investigation. The investigation parallels federal inquiries into the business practices of a broad range of financial companies in the years before the collapse of the housing market. Where those investigations have focused on interactions between the banks and their clients who bought mortgage securities, this one expands the scope of scrutiny to the interplay between banks and the agencies that rate their securities. The agencies themselves have been widely criticized for overstating the quality of many mortgage securities that ended up losing money once the housing market collapsed. See Banks / B5

Beer bill would ease tax burden for brewers The Associated Press

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

10 Barrel co-owner Garrett Wales, 27, pours a pint of beer while being filmed by a crew from Cosgrove-Meurer Productions, of Burbank, Calif., on Tuesday afternoon at the Bend brewpub. The crew filmed Wales, along with co-owners and brothers Chris Cox and Jeremy Cox, Monday through Wednesday of this week as the three brewpub owners went about their daily business. If all goes well, Cosgrove-Meurer hopes to sell the footage as a television pilot to a network. It would be a reality show about a group of young brewers trying to make it in the industry, Chris Cox said. The production company approached the owners, who are in their late 20s and early 30s and also own JC’s

Correction

s

200

Imports, exports rise Trade data released on Wednesday showed that United States imports and exports increased in March, the latest sign that the economic recovery was progressing. The Commerce Department’s monthly report on trade showed a 3.1 percent increase in imports in March from the previous month and a 3.2 percent increase in exports. The country’s trade deficit, however, increased 2.5 percent. — From staff and wire reports

B

Bar & Grill downtown, while looking nationally for a youthful, growing company, Cox said.

In realigned job market, some workers no longer fit By Catherine Rampell New York Times News Service

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Many of the jobs lost during the recession are not coming back. Period. For the last two years, the weak economy has provided an opportunity for employers to do what they would have done inevitably anyway: dismiss millions of people — like file clerks, ticket agents and autoworkers — who have become displaced by technological advances and international trade. The phasing out of these positions might have been accomplished through less painful means like attrition, buyouts or more incremental layoffs. But because of the recession, winter came early. The tough environment has been especially disorienting for older and more experienced workers like Cynthia Norton, 52, an unemployed administrative assistant in Jacksonville. “I know I’m good at this,” says Norton. “So how the hell

Lori Moffett / New York Times News Service

Cynthia Norton, an unemployed administrative assistant, was laid off from an insurance company two years ago. She hasn’t been able to find work in her field since. did I end up here?” Administrative work has always been Norton’s “calling,” she says, ever since she started work as an assistant for her

aunt at 16, back when the uniform was a light blue polyester suit and a neckerchief. In the ensuing decades she has filed, typed and answered phones for

just about every breed of business, from a law firm to a strip club. As a secretary at RAND Corp., she once even had the honor of escorting Henry Kissinger around the building. But since she was laid off from an insurance company two years ago, no one seems to need her well-honed office know-how. Norton is one of 1.7 million Americans who were employed in clerical and administrative positions when the recession began, but were no longer working in that occupation by the end of last year. There have also been outsize job losses in other occupational categories that seem unlikely to be revived during the economic recovery. The number of printing machine operators, for example, was nearly halved from the fourth quarter of 2007 to the fourth quarter of 2009. The number of people employed as travel agents fell by 40 percent. See Jobs / B5

BOSTON — U.S. Sen. John Kerry says he wants to give the country’s 1,500 small beer makers a tax break. Kerry introduced a bill to the Senate on Wednesday that would reduce the excise tax for small breweries from $7 to $3.50 per barrel for the first 60,000 barrels of beer produced each year. For every additional barrel up to 2 million, the bill would lower the excise tax from $18 to $16. Massachusetts is home to 40 small beer manufacturers including Sam Adams, the country’s largest small brewery. Still, that’s nearly half as many as Oregon, which has more than 70 craft breweries — and likely more than 100 when counting each of the companies with multiple breweries, such as McMenamins. The tax cut would be a substantial break for both large and small brewers. See Beer / B5

Software rivals plan to merge in $5B deal By Ashlee Vance New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — SAP’s top executives who have recently talked about making bolder and more decisive moves on Wednesday did just that by agreeing to buy a fellow business software maker, Sybase, for $5.25 billion. The acquisition puts SAP into the database software market, where its products will overlap with those of its longtime rival, Oracle, more than ever. As such, the deal heats up competition to gather, store and analyze the huge amounts of sales, customer and employee data being produced by modern companies. See Merger / B5


B2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

UAW wants to share in Big 3’s gains

A worker paints a sandal at the Hui Cheng factory in Yongkang, Taiwan, earlier this month. The island’s traditional industries could suffer from a Taiwan-China trade deal that could lower tariffs on handmade shoes and other products from the mainland.

As automakers’ bottom lines grow, union expects benefits to be restored By Nick Bunkley New York Times News Service

DETROIT — As better times return, the United Automobile Workers is not the union it was before Detroit’s carmakers hemorrhaged billions of dollars. The union is now a part owner of General Motors and Chrysler through a union trust fund, and its members are barred from striking against the two companies over compensation for the next five years. All told, hourly workers gave up pay and benefits worth $7,000 to $30,000 each a year during the downturn, the union estimates. But while those changes might blur the traditional battle lines between management and union, the incoming president of the UAW, Bob King, is making it clear some things are not about to change. As one automaker, Ford Motor Co., restores some perks for salaried workers, King is putting the companies on notice that he expects hourly workers to be given back some of the benefits they surrendered as the bottom lines of all three car companies improves — at least to the extent that management and other stakeholders get rewarded. The union is expected to ask that some of its givebacks be reversed during contract talks with the carmakers in 2011, when the contract signed in 2007 — and modified last year with more concessions as General Motors and Chrysler approached bankruptcy — expires. “When there’s equality of sacrifice, there’s got to be equality of gain,” King said during a speech to executives and analysts this week. “We just want to make sure when things turn around we share in the upside.” King’s muscle flexing is bound to be popular with his rank and file, but it comes at a sensitive time. Some of the carmakers are just getting their footing back, and during much of the crisis, critics have portrayed his union as a major hindrance to Detroit’s ability to compete with foreign rivals. There is also the difficult task of navigating volatile public sentiments about the $62 billion in taxpayer money given to GM and Chrysler.

Permits Continued from B1 Permit numbers still pale in comparison with the boom years. According to Bend’s Community Development Department, there were 64 building permits for single-family homes issued in Bend through the first four months of 2010, down roughly 91 percent from the 688 permits issued during the same period in 2005. Still, the number is up from the 43 issued in the same four months of 2009. “This month, for the first time, I’ve heard some of our members say, ‘We are getting busier and are going to be needing to hire people,’ which I haven’t heard in more than two years,” said Tim Knopp, executive vice president of the Central Oregon Builders Association. “There are lots of positive signs, and in general, the public is more positive.” Nationally, building permits rose 7.5 percent in March, the latest month data is available, compared with February, and 34 percent when compared with March 2009, according to the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. April data will be released next week. Knopp credited the local increase in building permits to pent-up demand, especially from homebuyers who prefer newlybuilt, more energy-efficient homes rather than foreclosed homes that — while perhaps less costly — may come with defects, deferred maintenance issues and absence of builder warranties. “There’s no question lots of people want to get the most energy-efficient home, and they want a new home, and obviously we encourage that,” Knopp said. “Those people are committing

“The bankruptcies were structured to protect the union interests at the expense of the creditors and investors,” said Paul Kersey, director of labor policy at the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, a conservative research group in Midland, Mich. “So I don’t see there being a whole lot of public support for them pursuing a restoration of the concessions.” That might be one reason why King, the nominee to succeed the retiring Ron Gettelfinger next month, is trying to frame the union’s position around the issue of equality. He said that while UAW members agreed to give up pay and benefits in recent years, the quality of the vehicles they built improved amid numerous plant closings and uncertainty about their future. “They’re making it quite clear that they don’t want an upstairsdownstairs kind of industry where Champagne is poured in the boardrooms but the UAW members are largely excluded from the festivities,” said Harley Shaiken, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, who specializes in labor relations. The UAW already is upset with Ford, which was the only one of the three big Detroit automakers to avoid bankruptcy. Ford remains publicly held and took no government loans. Ford has been profitable for four consecutive quarters and this year has restored some compensation for salaried workers, including merit pay increases, tuition reimbursement and matching contributions to retirement accounts. King, currently a UAW vice president in charge of the union’s work force at Ford, said the union has filed grievances on the matter, accusing Ford of violating its UAW contract. “We had an understanding about equality of sacrifice,” King told reporters after his speech this week. “None of that, in my view of what the contract is, should have happened without our membership getting the same thing.” A Ford spokeswoman, Marcey Evans, said Wednesday that the company is honoring its contract and said any increases in pay or benefits for hourly workers would need to be negotiated.

to build and buy now, where a couple of years ago they were wondering where the bottom was, and there’s no question we have started to head back up. The proof is in the increase in permits here in Bend.” The rest of the region also showed year-over-year improvement, according to the Central Oregon Housing Market Letter, a Redmond-based newsletter. It reported 45 single-family permits issued in Central Oregon in April 2010, compared with 33 in April 2009, or an increase of more than 36 percent. The majority of permits were issued in Bend, followed by Deschutes County, Jefferson County, Crook County and Redmond, which at two permits issued in April, had the fewest. Redmond also issued two single-family permits in April 2009, according to the newsletter. Statewide, at least two big housing developers have made strides to exit bankruptcy. Lake Oswego-based Renaissance Custom Homes, which had several residential development projects in Bend, exited bankruptcy in January. It filed for Chapter 11 protection in September 2008. Portland-based Legend Homes will exit bankruptcy June 1, according to the Portland Business Journal. Legend’s parent company, Matrix Development, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in June 2008. In April 2006, Matrix, through its Hidden Hills Bend LLC subsidiary, paid $16.1 million for a 31-acre parcel at the corner of Brosterhous and Murphy roads in southwest Bend, according to The Bulletin’s archives. The property was never developed. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or amoore@bendbulletin.com.

Jonathan Adams The International Herald Tribune

In Taiwan, worries over effects of potential trade deal with China By Jonathan Adams New York Times News Service

YONGKANG CITY, Taiwan — In a dimly lighted factory off a dusty road in southern Taiwan, Liao Li-hsin, 29, smacks a leather sandal into shape. Liao is one of tens of thousands of workers making shoes in Taiwan, mostly for the consumers on the island. As negotiations move ahead on a Taiwan-China trade deal that could lower tariffs on handmade shoes and hundreds of other products from the mainland, fears are mounting that the island’s traditional industries — like shoemaking — may suffer, even as high-tech, financial services and other sectors gain from freer access to the giant market across the strait. The government, however, thinks the benefits would far outweigh the costs, and Taiwan’s president, Ma Ying-jeou, hopes to use the agreement to fully normalize economic relations with Beijing while expanding the island’s access to other markets. The Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement, the Ma administration says, would be a prelude to similar deals with Ma-

laysia, Singapore and, eventually, Japan or the United States. In recent years, Taiwan has watched as rivals like South Korea have signed free-trade deals throughout Asia, becoming more competitive in industries like machinery making, and pushing their per capita gross domestic product ahead of the island’s. Taiwan has been hampered in negotiating similar agreements because Beijing views the island as a part of China and objects to other countries signing formal treaties that could strengthen Taiwan’s claims to independence. The island has trade deals only with five Latin American countries, which buy a tiny slice of its exports. The economies of Taiwan and China are already connected. Taiwan has invested $150 billion in China since the early 1990s, according to a Taiwan government estimate. About 40 percent of Taiwan’s exports already go to China, where they face average tariffs of 9 percent. Half of those exports are semifinished goods that are shipped to factories for assembly and other value-added services and then re-exported, according to Ma.

Yet many of the details remain vague and that has fueled economic as well as political worries. The pro-independence opposition says the deal would make Taiwan’s economy too dependent on China and would help conglomerates at the expense of small companies. The opposition Democratic Progressive Party says the agreement would worsen income inequality and would not create jobs. It says the negotiations lack transparency and that the deal is politically dangerous given China’s goal of unification with Taiwan. Ma’s government has sought to allay fears by insisting that the deal would not allow mainland workers into Taiwan or remove restrictions on mainland agricultural imports — at least at first. The government says it will establish a 10-year fund of 95 billion Taiwan dollars ($3 billion) to help traditional businesses compete. Officials have identified 17 industries, including shoemaking, as particularly vulnerable. A special “Made in Taiwan” consumer label has been developed to promote high-quality products made locally.

B  B Court rules website infringed copyrights

to discuss outstanding issues in the case, including damages.

A federal judge ruled on Wednesday that LimeWire, the popular file-sharing service, was liable for copyright infringement, the latest in a growing list of decisions against services that allow users to easily distribute music and videos around the Internet at no cost. Judge Kimba Wood of U.S. District Court in Manhattan said in summary judgments that LimeWire and its creator, Mark Gorton, had committed copyright infringement, engaged in unfair competition and induced others to commit copyright infringement. The suit had been brought by a coalition of the nation’s largest record companies in 2006. A hearing is scheduled for June 1

Disney to pay only half for Club Penguin LOS ANGELES — Club Penguin, the subscription-based online community acquired by the Walt Disney Co. in 2007, has failed to meet profit targets that were tied to $350 million in payouts to the website’s creators. Disney’s purchase of Club Penguin was valued at $700 million, with half of the total paid up front and half coming in two payments based on unspecified growth thresholds. Disney disclosed in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing last May that Club Penguin had missed the first target. On Wednesday, the company con-

firmed that the website did not meet the second one. The upshot: a smartly structured deal prevented Disney from overpaying for a highflying web business that became tangled in the economic downturn. The question now is whether the site can regain its momentum as consumer spending loosens up, and by how much the targets were missed. Club Penguin, where members pay $5.95 a month to dress penguin characters and play games, is stumbling — at least on the surface. The site attracted about 6 million unique visitors in April, a 10 percent decline from the same month a year earlier, according to the marketing research firm comScore. March suffered a 7 percent drop, to about 6.7 million. — From wire reports

Walgreens to hold off on selling personal genetic tests By Andrew Pollack New York Times News Service

Walgreens said late Wednesday that it would postpone selling a personal genetic test through its drugstores because the Food and Drug Administration challenged the legality of the test. The developer of the test, Pathway Genomics, announced Tuesday that it would sell its test product through Walgreens starting Friday. While similar personal genomics tests have been sold over the Internet for more than two years, this would be the first such test sold through drugstores, making such testing more widely accessible. That appeared to catch the attention of the FDA. In a letter to Pathway that was written Monday but made public late Wednesday, the agency said it believed Pathway’s test needed regulatory approval before it could be sold. Walgreens then said in a statement that it would hold off selling the test “until we have further clarity on this matter.” Pathway’s test scans an individual’s DNA to provide information on the person’s risk of getting about two dozen different diseases. It also looks at how a person might react to certain drugs and whether he or she carries mutations that could cause diseases in offspring. Such tests have long raised regulatory issues. One question is whether the tests are medical diagnostics or are simply providing consumer information. The FDA seems to be deciding these are medical tests, in that they might influence the choice of a drug or perhaps cause a couple to terminate a pregnancy. Even if they are medical tests, there is a question of whether they need regulation. The FDA typically does not require approval of tests that are performed by a single laboratory, as opposed to a test kit that is sold widely to hospitals and doctor’s offices. Pathway considers its test such a laboratory-developed test. The FDA, in its letter, gives the company an opportunity to argue that its test does not need regulatory approval.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 B3

S I N E S S

P F   The new money rules for recent graduates New laws should ease pain of transition By Ron Lieber New York Times News Service

Graduation season is a time of oddly mixed emotions for the people finishing college and graduate school. On the one hand, there is pride in a job well done (or relief at simply getting through) and the satisfaction of having finished a long, hard slog. On the other, there is primal fear. Will anyone pay me to do something I’m good at? And will I actually have enough money to live on? We push our graduates out into the world with little or no financial education; that much has been true for years. Meanwhile, their student loan debt has grown over time, with the median debt for bachelor’s degree recipients who did take out loans hitting $20,000 in 2008, according to the College Board’s 2009 Trends in Student Aid study. This year, many graduates are being greeted by an uninterested shrug from employers as they try to pay that all back. There is some good news this graduation season, though. In four crucial areas — health insurance, banking, credit cards and student loans — there have been enormous shifts in the legislative and regulatory landscape in the past 12 months. These changes should ease some of the pain as new graduates try to establish themselves financially. So before you leave for your post-graduation road trip (or buy yourself something nice for the first time in four years to celebrate the end of tuition bills), give the points below a quick skim. So much has happened in the past year, you’ve probably missed at least some of it.

Health insurance First, do no harm. A bad accident or illness could be financially catastrophic for you or your family if you don’t have health in-

surance. Keeping or getting insurance is about to get easier, since the health care bill that President Barack Obama signed in March requires insurance companies that already provide dependent coverage for children to allow unmarried offspring to stay insured on their parents’ plans until they turn 26. This part of the bill doesn’t go into effect until Sept. 23, and there’s still a lot of uncertainty about exactly who will benefit before or after that date as companies and insurers wait for more clarity from regulators on how to put the new rules into place. Many insurers, including independent Blue Cross Blue Shield providers and UnitedHealthcare, have announced efforts to allow graduating students who are currently on their parents’ plans to stay there to avoid any gap in coverage. Ask your human resources department or insurance company about this possibility if you are a parent and your graduating child is still on your health insurance plan. That said, your company might not allow your child to remain on the plan after graduation this year even if the insurance company it works with can make it happen. What if you’ve been on a student health insurance plan and want to switch to your parents’ plan now? Or what about people who are uninsured and 24 and want to return to their parents’ coverage as soon as possible? You might have to wait until the next open enrollment period for your parents’ plan, according to Brett Lieberman, a Blue Cross Blue Shield spokesman. Insurance companies may offer short-term or other plans to bridge the gap during the months until then. Stephen Beckley, a consultant who specializes in student health insurance, notes that most graduating college students enrolled in

Illustration by Robert Neubecker / New York Times News Service

student plans will have coverage through the summer. Call and ask to be sure. Also, some states already have laws similar to (or tougher than) the new federal one.

Banking and debit cards So you’ll need a checking account. Perhaps you already have one. What you might have missed, however, is that starting July 1, banks will no longer allow you to spend more money at a store with your debit card (or withdraw more at the ATM) than you have in your account unless you’ve given them permission first. The federal government made them do this, since banks were infuriating so many customers by charging them repeated overdraft fees when they overspent. Let’s assume that you don’t want to opt in to taking your balance below zero and would rather ask the bank to cut you off if you don’t have enough money in your

Researcher says ‘Simple 6’ steps will lead to financial well-being By Claudia Buck McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Pick the brains of the most “financially fit” Americans, then dissect their good habits. That’s the premise of a new study from Florida State University, where researchers identified the common traits of everyday folks with high levels of financial well-being. The results? Surprisingly, some very basic habits, says Dr. David Eccles, a psychology professor and research scientist at Florida State’s Learning Systems Institute. He boils them down to the “Simple 6”: Talk money with your partner, get advice from employers, work out what you’ll need, forecast what you’ll have, save more and owe less.

Q:

How is it that a British Ph.D. is studying how good/bad Americans are at saving/investing? I came over the week after 9/11 on one of the first aircraft flying out of (London). My first job was at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition ... they work in artificial intelligence on tools that help people do their jobs better. It’s a big area of research in the military and in corporations: trying to preserve experts’ knowledge in a way that novices can access it, even after the person is gone or retired ... It’s called “knowledge elicitation and preservation.”

A:

Q: A:

And that led to studying personal finances? The common thread is skill acquisition. (After coming to Florida State), we began a study on financial fitness. If we can find people who are successful and are knowledgeable about their own finances, we can instill that knowledge — through workshops and resources on the Web — and help (others) get better at personal financial success.

Q:

What’s your definition of being financially fit?

A:

Like it or loathe it, the single biggest difference a person can make in (his or her) life — after your health — is to learn how to look after yourself financially ... It means building the financial reserves to cope with life’s challenges and increase your ability to retire comfortably. We don’t set dollar amounts because it depends on people’s standard of living and their expectations. For some, that’s a husband, wife and three children who each have a cell phone and a laptop. Elsewhere, there is one cell phone and perhaps one laptop in the whole family. These things vary hugely.

Q: A:

How’d you identity these financially savvy Americans whose habits are so laudable? We had a sample of households who were very similar: married, average age 55, all had children, all owned a home, no bankruptcies, no divorces, all within 10 years max from retirement. The salaries ranged from $30,000 to $200,000, but the average was about $120,000 combined for husband and wife ... within each group of our best/worst performers we had incomes in the low/middle/high ranges. We controlled for lifetime income from age 18 (inheritances, huge medical bills) ... then looked at their net worth — from the least to the most — as they were nearing retirement age. We ranked them from best to worst and looked at their personal financial habits.

Q:

Some of the “Simple 6” habits you identified are pretty basic: maximizing savings, minimizing debt, for instance. They’re not astounding. They don’t pass what we in academia call the “grandmother test”: You tell your grandmother the results of your two-year study and she says, “I could have told you that.” The best households aren’t using any sophisticated investing strategies ... but they’ve (adopted) some basic habits that are very important.

A:

account. If enough people do that, banks will lose lots of fee income and might use that as an excuse to tack monthly fees onto your checking account. The lower the balance in your account, the more likely it is that your bank might try to charge you money. Even if this happens, I’m confident that some institutions will remain free of monthly fees. If there’s a credit union at your college that offers fee-free banking, it may let you keep your account after graduation (check to see how much you’ll pay to withdraw money from other institutions’ ATMs, though). Or you can search for a new one at findacreditunion.com. Take a look, too, at banks with no branches, like PerkStreet Financial and ING Direct.

Credit cards The credit card legislation that passed in 2009 contained so many new rules that it went into effect in phases, including a bunch of regulations that began earlier this

year. There are too many to list here, though the Federal Reserve has published an excellent plainEnglish guide (www.federalreserve.gov/consumerinfo/wyntk_ creditcardrules.htm). I’m a big fan of the rule requiring card companies to get your permission before they’ll let you spend more than your credit limit (and charge you fees for the privilege). This always struck me as particularly noxious, and in the wake of the new rules, some card companies like American Express have simply stopped charging the fee to people who go over the limit (or cuts them off if the company thinks the spending is getting out hand). This is particularly helpful to younger people who might have lower credit limits and thus breach them more often. Beth Kobliner, the author of “Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties,” is partial to the new rule requiring better information on the card statement. Now, it must state how long it will take to pay off your balance if you make only the minimum payment that the card company requires. It also must let you know what your monthly payment would be if you want to pay the balance off in three years. “It’s eye-opening for everyone, but particularly for young people who never realized how expensive putting something on the card and paying only the minimum can be,” Kobliner said. One word of caution here. There’s another new rule that will make it much more difficult for card companies to put new plastic in the hands of people under the age of 21. As a result, card issuers might chase newly minted graduates with offers that sound too good to be true. Read your junk mail with caution and skepticism.

Student loans Last July, a new program went into effect that can lower monthly payments on federal student loans

for people who don’t earn a lot of money. It’s called income-based repayment, and it’s a bit complicated. Essentially, if your income is low enough (depending on your family size), it’s possible that your lender will limit the size of your monthly payments. And after 25 years of payments, the lender may even forgive your remaining loans. To see if you qualify, use the calculator at ibrinfo.org, a site created by a nonprofit organization, the Project on Student Debt. The site also has a lot more information about how the program works — and additional information about a program that could forgive federal loan debts after 10 years of repayment for people working in public service jobs. Still confused? Try checking in with a financial aid officer at your school, even if you’ve already left. “They’re the thankless heroes in this, who really want to help,” said Ramit Sethi, author of “I Will Teach You to Be Rich,” another excellent book for young people trying to learn more about money.

Forwarding address This one’s not new, but it trips up enough people that it bears repeating. Your physical address might change in the next few months, perhaps more than once. Or you might start using a new email address or begin getting bills from companies that you haven’t worked with before, both of which can lead to important messages getting caught in a spam folder. You see where this is heading, right? You can’t pay bills that you don’t see. So let people know where to find you. And make sure you have the ability to pay your credit card and student loan bills online from any computer, wherever it is you might go on your victory tour. That way, you won’t return to find the kind of damage to your credit history that can set you far back on the path to financial health.

ENTER TO WIN A GETAWAY TO THE OREGON COAST!

(Such as) “Ask your employer.” Most financially fit households were ones where the wives, in particular, had sought out information from their employer. At the risk of sounding sexist, husbands historically have assumed control for finding out how to manage finances, how to set up a retirement account. But we found our “upper group” was definitely marked by equality: both partners trying to manage and understand their personal finances ... For instance, one partner reads somewhere that there’s a higher limit for contributions this year to a Roth IRA. So the partner goes home and tells (his/her) spouse: “Did you know that?” That’s knowledge being actively shared.

Q: A:

What’s the biggest single obstacle to Americans saving for retirement? It’s too far in the future if you’re young ... and right now, our conventional spending patterns are not aligned with what we earn. Buying lunch out every day is normal; bringing it is slumming. That’s a huge amount of money (spent on eating out) each month. The credit (card) boom of the last 20 years helped create that mindset; the recession may help change those habits. Maybe there’ll be a “new normal” ... bringing your lunch three days a week instead of eating out five days a week.

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B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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9.06 +.09 23.74 +.35 0.44 19.00 +.52 1.24 53.79 +2.16 8.21 +.32 11.11 +.32 1.12 50.04 +1.10 15.20 +.13 33.78 -.08 1.76 39.02 -.41 0.20 16.19 +.62 33.90 +1.36 1.12 28.88 +1.25 9.09 +.16 7.34 +.40 24.50 +.41 .87 +.07 .76 -.03 0.27 31.78 +.95 1.68 25.82 +.18 17.45 +.42 15.95 +.65 3.95 0.09 10.62 -.03 1.33 +.05 4.76 +.29 0.05 21.39 +.10 1.76 49.15 -.25 0.70 43.34 +1.01 0.42 6.45 +.11 48.35 +1.48 2.75 +.10 15.79 +.57 1.48 -.07 0.72 19.11 +.51 0.75 41.46 +.31 8.06 +.44 6.37 -.33 2.70 +.34 27.18 +.77 37.87 +1.58 0.99 4.15 -.25 0.15 11.12 +.22 0.04 23.07 +.61 4.66 +.15 0.52 44.65 +2.20 19.45 +.44 3.05 -.05 34.80 +1.00 0.36 27.28 +.49 0.25 4.84 +.26 0.24 45.96 +.55 4.08 +.36 3.60 +.02 13.15 +.13 9.49 +.42 0.08 4.62 -.03 6.65 +.29 2.43 +.02 28.13 +.75 0.04 26.65 +1.57 6.52 -.02 13.20 +.25 29.49 +.06 2.09 +.26 0.04 30.51 +.90 80.99 +1.98 24.84 -.07 6.90 +.19 3.60 -.03 34.81 +.74 0.18 65.09 -.25 0.11 58.78 +1.17 1.96 72.57 +.90 5.64 +.35 0.40 11.18 +.18 0.88 63.73 +.44 5.44 +.23 0.20 33.66 +1.71 39.42 +.90 2.95 +.19 46.05 +1.74 0.86 8.47 +.37 0.56 43.47 +1.21 0.34 26.96 +.34 2.76 +.11 0.12 12.46 +.33 3.95 152.31 +2.37 1.26 34.71 +.66 1.40 70.97 +1.03 3.90 +.16 53.28 +.36 3.87 +.25 17.46 +.29 12.65 +.67 0.60 21.20 +.73 0.72 56.30 +2.84 0.20 63.31 +.99 77.98 +1.52 1.86 29.21 +.67 5.00 1.20 13.52 +.03 0.48 7.96 +.01 2.16 30.92 +.63 1.58 34.15 +.45 78.45 -.49 3.55 +.11 21.75 +.33 0.80 44.39 +.59 3.83 -.02 7.50 +.25 20.35 +.78 0.80 33.11 +.36 1.29 +.04 43.09 +1.02 5.91 +.04 1.32 9.72 -.09 0.40 6.16 +.09 1.44 8.18 -.06 .57 -.01 0.20 24.75 +.57 15.04 +.13 1.40 21.67 +.08 0.07 5.95 +.18 23.00 +.11 2.70 -.05 2.29 100.67 +1.93 133.87 +3.41 1.36 -.10 0.24 12.31 +.25 31.10 +.28 56.21 +.40 1.54 25.50 +.26 36.30 +.84 1.22 50.81 +.81 10.25 +.50 1.35 27.49 +.28 5.70 27.92 +.28 5.98 +.13 0.40 16.03 -.07 1.68 33.58 +.43 0.72 44.10 +.77 0.55 28.70 -.31 0.56 25.17 +.67 41.40 -1.49 21.90 +.77 7.49 +.50 3.39 -.17 1.20 79.79 +2.93 29.24 +1.80 41.72 +.75 0.84 21.70 +.05 23.00 +.29 0.72 46.32 +.14 0.32 31.79 +.57 0.42 19.63 +.60 0.24 43.47 +.82 56.60 +.67 7.15 +.28 0.06 45.44 +.45 18.15 +.46 0.36 56.96 +1.12 4.76 +.33 0.80 29.36 +.50 1.14 +.02 0.17 43.23 -.02 0.53 49.44 +.27 24.86 +.69 2.69 15.95 -.01 1.39 46.26 +1.23 1.68 +.04 1.38 +.09 1.08 6.63 +.13 0.60 42.99 +.59 10.16 0.60 98.44 +1.78 0.40 22.98 +.63 .36 +.02 55.74 +1.58 1.12 12.03 +.40 262.09 +5.57 1.78 +.12 0.60 30.45 +1.17 0.28 13.77 +.41 11.32 +.25 0.58 18.05 +.36 6.07 +.42 .74 +.10 0.75 35.71 +.14 76.40 +1.21 0.40 24.79 +.32 0.60 27.50 +.48 22.53 +.84 3.43 +.07 35.05 +1.26 1.40 14.88 +.60 25.44 +.12 4.25 +.22 14.34 +.75 0.12 29.50 +.30 0.11 11.21 40.84 +2.69 3.88 +.18 12.01 +.12 29.49 +.34 1.48 +.12 4.19 +.13 0.24 22.02 +1.07 12.11 +.25 16.69 +.48 8.52 +.13 0.30 60.60 +2.20 24.20 +.22 0.60 26.59 11.70 +.21 3.60 -.10 0.04 14.54 +.27 0.60 37.18 +.92 0.18 17.97 -.16 0.52 17.17 +.45 2.30 43.39 +.83 29.32 +.71 37.55 +.59 33.31 +.68 13.71 +.22 5.73 +.13 31.61 +.32 2.07 +.02

Nm Aurizon g AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BldrsEmg BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BWAY Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BalticTr n BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp Banro g BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BeazHEqU BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden BellMicro Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst Biodel BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp h Brunswick Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CEC Ent CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNX Gas CPI Intl CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaGDyIn CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CdnSEn g CapGold n CapOne CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CashAm Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CedarF CedarSh CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh

D 5.51 -.27 20.86 +.45 1.03 -.05 32.77 +1.15 1.20 51.87 +1.72 1.36 43.02 +.52 185.22 +1.36 33.56 +1.04 20.72 +.06 3.57 105.06 +1.27 2.75 +.07 0.80 37.66 +.01 4.65 +.13 13.50 +.36 1.00 21.23 +.32 29.83 +.31 0.88 28.53 -.26 2.30 +.09 0.84 30.83 +.45 0.60 35.61 +.79 1.74 30.53 +.21 29.06 +2.16 1.66 68.62 +.44 1.66 58.10 +.44 24.02 +.26 37.82 +.51 0.85 42.28 +.26 .88 -.04 38.36 +1.37 3.36 48.50 -.24 5.49 +.34 1.50 43.34 +1.22 0.06 12.55 -.11 19.85 -.01 78.21 +6.79 0.60 47.42 +.72 0.68 38.56 +1.08 0.40 52.11 +.59 46.43 +1.92 13.33 +.53 0.59 12.17 +.19 0.76 18.04 +.21 0.82 11.74 +.24 0.20 11.36 +.19 0.04 17.07 -.09 2.05 25.24 +.27 9.50 -.34 3.73 -.10 2.16 25.32 +.33 1.80 53.44 +1.12 8.61 +.21 2.80 60.56 +1.44 0.36 30.92 -.06 1.96 51.57 +.97 2.30 +.12 0.04 6.04 +.60 2.43 +.28 24.01 -.07 65.95 +.63 0.22 19.65 +.32 77.90 -2.59 24.08 -1.55 0.68 84.23 +.21 1.00 21.48 +.32 0.32 21.03 +1.05 0.40 45.66 -.22 9.02 +.16 1.16 44.88 -.62 2.16 32.05 +1.18 .39 +.01 22.63 +.92 5.70 +.01 1.81 24.75 -.25 0.10 7.88 +.12 0.72 61.80 +.11 1.48 75.10 +.35 47.19 +.93 0.20 28.19 +1.27 6.97 +.03 8.29 +.49 0.92 28.57 +.22 21.20 +.62 0.24 27.40 -.34 78.00 +.39 0.30 33.49 +.99 0.56 45.11 +.68 37.30 +.61 2.91 +.05 33.46 +1.41 7.15 -.14 5.47 +.09 52.04 +.66 21.51 +.42 0.56 18.11 +.24 .46 +.04 2.37 +.04 7.85 +.36 0.38 16.82 -.04 1.44 31.35 +.37 1.28 11.18 +.42 41.31 +2.06 4.00 173.97 +2.98 1.82 10.63 +.04 1.09 12.33 +.31 1.20 12.99 -.03 0.60 17.39 +.05 .43 -.01 .36 +.02 31.75 +1.46 2.02 28.29 -.05 1.68 72.87 +1.45 6.72 +.33 .74 +.09 2.97 +.01 2.85 +.18 41.15 +1.19 0.04 8.38 +.26 2.00 81.73 +.57 6.81 +.23 0.22 11.16 -.04 13.45 +.90 0.70 34.00 +.18 0.60 13.07 +.20 0.44 23.18 +.92 18.98 +.93 8.04 +.22 0.56 18.79 +.27 0.40 25.13 -.10 1.28 24.44 +.07 37.59 +1.59 0.32 34.06 +.65 3.78 +.45 0.56 21.94 -.07 3.59 +.20 6.59 +.13 19.74 -.35 0.52 25.49 +.26 0.56 15.89 +.32 9.66 +.39 0.31 19.83 +.26 0.28 18.51 +1.04 1.20 58.89 +1.31 14.31 +.01 0.05 22.48 +1.24 0.80 36.16 +.61 0.10 57.64 +1.87 0.42 36.96 +.53 40.63 +1.63 0.84 54.75 +3.51 0.25 20.50 +.08 0.16 21.93 +.46 16.95 +.41 6.72 +.12 0.80 16.06 +.75 0.20 15.43 +.34 2.44 +.06 40.56 -.41 0.40 74.41 +2.64 16.10 +.70 1.00 61.22 +.54 0.04 33.96 +.83 39.48 +.90 0.24 12.40 -.04 1.00 27.52 +.48 4.60 329.25 +.05 0.60 15.75 +.29 30.46 +1.03 6.25 +.18 38.23 -.04 15.79 +.15 0.96 56.74 +1.16 0.26 15.85 +.37 0.34 10.90 +.25 0.35 36.32 +.57 19.47 +.11 0.40 25.15 +.64 0.72 30.10 +.16 0.12 34.30 +1.17 6.87 +.13 6.23 +.42 1.14 12.56 +.22 0.60 7.60 +.07 0.63 8.79 +.21 15.66 +.17 0.04 9.37 +.38 6.30 +.17 14.02 +.43 4.58 -.09 1.80 51.50 +1.23 0.28 25.29 +.64 39.46 +2.36 1.10 36.02 +.14 1.08 61.16 +1.67 0.60 72.25 +.55 0.99 60.60 +2.09 15.03 +.29 .65 +.07 3.71 +.21 0.20 46.61 +1.83 0.04 5.02 +.17 2.18 10.85 +.23 1.22 +.08 0.72 69.25 +3.14 0.78 35.35 +.32 8.35 +.46 8.43 +.02 .53 -.01 12.00 +.26 26.38 -.09 31.34 +1.23 0.64 40.47 +1.52 24.62 +.68 0.40 40.08 +1.20 0.72 41.35 +1.66 20.14 +.40 33.44 +.88 0.34 37.61 +.31 0.14 36.90 +.80 1.68 68.15 +2.08 0.04 13.41 +.36 28.03 +1.07 16.84 +.82 13.72 +.17 0.36 7.58 +.30 .64 +.00 15.49 +.87 0.20 30.26 +1.22 7.25 +.30 9.92 +.46 59.89 +.82 .54 +.02

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D 8.95 +.87 0.40 11.81 +.57 0.86 15.94 +.20 0.80 28.36 +.34 22.89 +.62 7.05 +.18 0.78 14.29 +.31 1.56 13.29 +.10 29.62 +.43 27.93 +1.75 0.01 15.25 10.27 +.24 2.67 -.05 12.07 -.02 2.90 34.27 +.57 7.97 +.09 62.76 +1.32 18.80 +.04 86.01 +1.34 32.65 +1.24 5.77 +.25 33.07 +.60 21.64 +.79 27.95 +.43 3.55 -.06 0.30 23.53 +.25 2.88 80.06 +.36 22.00 +1.08 0.16 15.47 +.34 45.64 +1.35 0.54 4.09 +.08 15.29 +1.28 5.62 +1.01 20.77 +.72 2.03 +.04 13.95 +1.76 7.12 +.81 4.74 +.02 12.26 +.66 3.23 -.06 .54 +.02 5.65 +.25 9.49 -1.09 1.54 66.55 +.37 13.26 +.05 0.55 12.17 +.01 1.81 48.69 +.05 7.51 +.40 7.06 +.04 5.34 +.15 4.20 +.21 0.23 12.08 +.11 9.76 -.22 4.73 +.96 0.35 19.78 +1.24 6.86 +.11 1.92 +.09 142.37 +4.31 14.50 +.81 1.48 52.21 +.81 1.42 19.38 +.06 0.56 67.13 +.12 3.51 +.12 17.30 +.45 0.32 71.58 +3.50 3.74 +.16 1.58 27.83 +.37 0.72 17.64 -.05 0.48 27.18 +.52 14.31 +.53 26.74 +.78 2.13 25.10 +.30 4.18 +.01 1.50 17.82 +.13 1.26 +.10 47.64 +.99 0.40 64.13 +.99 3.03 -.01 1.25 -.01 0.03 25.24 -.06 0.51 40.72 +.44 7.57 +.12 16.82 +.74 62.29 +1.90 10.80 -.08 8.23 +.22 .36 +.08 6.40 +.11 0.56 57.34 +.69 2.00 63.88 +.74 14.90 +.62 0.60 42.40 +.95 9.07 +.23 0.36 27.85 +.78 1.76 54.02 +.41 18.65 +.42 0.40 7.57 +.12 9.61 +.22 9.50 +.21 0.24 21.02 +.20 52.49 +1.07 0.40 26.04 +.11 0.37 7.49 +.12 53.99 +4.14 7.30 +.22 2.12 83.55 +.72 22.88 +.55 0.60 15.50 +.31 0.04 23.79 +.92 1.19 +.03 1.57 +.06 0.38 18.18 +.10 0.38 17.39 +.09 0.20 43.67 +.52 0.20 11.96 +.75 0.94 40.60 +.04 0.48 15.62 +.64 30.19 +.88 40.89 +.82 22.99 +.79 1.36 14.86 +.88 1.56 78.17 +1.22 12.73 +.54 15.48 +.78 .86 -.00 51.83 +.94 8.17 +.09 30.46 +.44 11.98 +.75 0.40 38.16 +.62 0.80 24.74 +.38 55.40 +1.56 42.09 +.86 3.12 +.11 2.20 57.68 +.40 0.40 41.09 +1.79 2.38 44.85 24.02 +.47 18.11 +.62 0.96 36.48 +.78 21.16 +.81 49.37 +1.54 12.18 +.24 1.11 -.03 0.06 37.09 +.51 1.08 50.55 +2.25 0.42 21.87 +1.20 2.30 25.48 +.65 37.08 +.53 0.92 20.46 +.12 15.10 +.61 0.56 35.95 +.79 27.97 +.27 0.20 18.53 +.31 0.44 32.76 +.34 1.57 41.75 +.45 20.61 +.25 9.70 +.29 5.74 +.29 0.84 57.88 -.06 0.13 8.42 +.13 55.87 +.73 16.77 +.40 7.87 +.37 22.15 +.39 0.72 46.41 +1.88 4.98 -.06 1.70 89.40 +3.54 1.85 44.10 +1.25 77.54 +6.20 10.81 +.53 .16 -.00 8.50 +.44 37.76 +.95 24.83 +.24 .53 -.03 39.99 +3.44 21.54 +.58 1.80 59.52 +.25 0.70 75.09 +3.33 3.31 +.08 125.91 -.54 97.60 +.17 25.68 +.05 2.35 +.01 12.16 +.53 1.14 +.02 0.05 47.48 +1.31 5.30 +.23 0.28 5.63 +.07 43.07 +2.51 11.46 +.02 0.78 9.12 -.02 1.21 27.31 +.18 0.15 14.04 +.24 0.60 41.21 +.70 2.12 47.95 +.23 50.65 +1.85 12.98 +.38 0.16 87.42 +3.20 1.00 45.12 +.39 9.57 +.53 63.70 +.04 0.20 60.90 +.29 9.94 +.36 2.35 -.25 142.01 +4.97 8.23 -.12 1.12 61.14 +1.68 .32 -.02 0.20 15.13 +.18 13.43 +.31 15.72 +.24 0.40 27.88 +.24 13.55 +1.15 1.41 -.02 1.00 22.23 +.88 17.25 +.39 46.42 -.08 1.44 -.01 3.50 -.09 0.20 36.57 +.66 0.70 65.03 +.78 1.90 24.08 +.39 7.07 +.11 33.45 +.39 10.74 -.15 1.05 11.57 +.20 0.08 13.33 +.39 0.64 69.57 +1.70 24.93 +.28

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2.36 65.46 +.33 0.50 75.44 +.37 0.03 10.79 +.34 14.53 +.16 29.57 +.48 1.08 30.50 +.28 1.92 59.85 -.09 28.54 +.26 0.16 27.20 +.60 21.30 +.14 38.15 +.34 7.03 39.17 +2.58 7.26 -.57 5.77 28.42 +.88 30.49 -2.96 43.27 +3.25 43.95 -1.56 12.14 -.45 0.15 32.06 +1.11 0.04 6.03 -.32 3.08 55.94 +2.51 5.64 -.56 4.85 61.92 +5.25 13.23 -.60 8.22 59.35 +2.48 9.71 -.39 5.18 38.71 +1.40 0.08 15.21 +.31 38.72 +.57 32.90 +.44 .56 +.04 2.00 22.37 +.58 0.35 35.13 -.63 7.53 +.68 0.13 28.38 +1.38 13.30 +.40 68.62 +1.53 9.91 -.04 29.36 +1.38 48.68 +.22 61.41 +.61 1.83 41.85 +.05 14.22 +.33 1.00 70.41 +3.72 0.48 46.10 +1.62 1.04 20.06 -.05 3.00 +.01 11.40 -.10 0.40 17.04 +.38 1.04 51.77 +1.30 0.60 28.83 +.94 0.60 37.87 +1.09 6.15 +.10 38.41 +.61 30.18 +.73 0.52 4.20 -.03 61.96 +4.83 3.62 +.01 5.60 +.21 1.64 39.26 +1.57 0.32 23.25 -.74 0.96 16.98 +.06 0.68 14.32 +.52 1.40 76.14 +.34 3.31 +.13 10.18 +.35 1.88 +.07 16.87 +.14 1.33 +.04

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0.25 15.34 +.29 1.60 +.01 22.51 +.13 19.08 +.33 28.30 +1.77 2.84 41.89 +.07 0.62 108.38 +3.64 0.88 42.91 +.78 54.22 +.90 3.02 31.15 +1.12 19.91 +.17 5.44 +.23 0.40 32.26 +1.07 0.64 9.05 +.29 0.04 18.76 +1.07 1.76 66.49 +1.90 6.29 +.55 2.00 77.00 +1.98 0.64 34.25 +.71 1.39 15.93 -.01 1.23 13.23 +.23 1.62 13.33 +.24 1.53 11.72 +.15 1.56 12.63 +.24 15.24 +.34 19.47 +.25 0.62 48.51 -.34 1.26 34.25 +.26 0.20 6.99 +.02 101.48 +1.69 0.04 12.18 +.32 6.43 +.15 17.92 +.26 17.71 -1.09 .26 -.01 0.72 23.00 +.25 1.28 +.04 14.94 +.06 1.34 50.27 +.71 2.25 -.02 1.28 19.26 +.23 0.24 15.55 +.12 10.31 +.19 12.64 +.44 1.70 48.21 +.40 0.80 32.46 +.77 2.00 17.74 +.74 3.45 +.15 1.61 +.07 4.13 +.13 21.91 +.11 5.28 +.50 3.40 +.09 29.92 +2.10 0.52 46.51 +.64 59.27 +1.64 6.58 +.08 13.14 +.19 4.43 -.21 2.16 32.30 -.33 3.58 46.13 -.74 16.93 +.83 0.10 7.37 +.27 2.16 23.60 +.42 0.68 19.39 24.64 +.83 0.14 42.66 -.48 5.85 +.11 13.32 -.16 3.32 78.97 +1.34 .43 -.01 2.27 34.98 +.54 2.60 44.98 +1.32 .72 +.05 2.50 -.02 5.32 +.13 10.90 +.38 9.76 +.27 0.16 33.24 +.42 99.25 +.75 0.88 18.93 +.27 1.35 48.10 +.77 0.28 10.77 +.44 0.32 30.71 -.44 4.13 111.15 +1.69 0.55 63.90 +.76 56.60 -.07 0.20 21.42 +1.22 15.47 +.27 1.92 77.74 +.77 .21 -.01 1.06 6.23 +.23 0.12 17.64 +.86 6.27 +.94 2.10 42.16 +.01 8.07 +.44 4.93 +.20 0.28 23.58 +.40 0.40 42.39 +1.09 104.13 +.96 27.02 +.44 0.23 16.23 +.37 3.09 -.13 1.76 64.91 +.45 19.02 +.07 72.85 +3.06 4.30 +.15 30.41 +.68 0.50 65.14 +1.07 64.99 +1.76 0.48 9.58 +.32 2.00 52.87 +.21 3.48 +.13 40.60 +.17 0.08 22.58 +.40 10.48 +.11 0.62 40.65 +.67 1.03 -.03 0.80 55.45 +1.20 0.44 89.76 +1.65 0.20 18.76 +1.24 2.64 78.86 +.62 0.24 6.95 +.22 0.96 23.82 +.32 8.31 +.22 10.86 +.47 18.38 +.88 0.72 15.14 +.22 0.20 29.70 +.84 1.28 13.45 +.50 0.04 15.00 +.39 15.26 +.72 0.16 16.64 +.68 0.88 37.07 +.96 1.75 +.03 0.04 6.49 +.29 0.40 18.73 +.81 0.80 14.28 +.21 8.12 +.32 0.04 16.24 +.44 0.56 13.51 -.09 128.62 +1.17 0.08 17.70 +.53 2.20 36.44 +.57 0.64 21.34 +.16 52.57 +.18 3.27 +.10 .62 +.02 7.35 +.13 1.82 -.01 0.70 26.59 -.33 1.16 113.17 +1.21 0.50 53.39 +2.92 16.11 +.72 0.32 45.12 +.31 0.60 15.23 +.33 4.70 +.23 12.68 +.37 5.06 +.22

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D 3.25 47.83 +.82 15.54 +.45 27.28 +.16 27.55 +.81 14.40 +.36 17.17 +.42 4.93 +.15 0.76 50.10 +.68 41.88 +.82 28.63 +1.62 1.90 20.40 -.02 0.88 111.29 +1.80 0.76 13.20 +.04 1.34 -.03 0.16 14.02 +.40 1.20 73.00 +2.76 .11 -.00 6.10 +.18 1.00 7.90 +.12 15.13 +.74 0.90 33.98 +.35 31.50 +2.25 2.61 +.12 0.12 10.70 +.35 9.63 -.01 5.40 +.72 8.81 +.39 11.21 +.54 1.12 32.33 +.73 0.20 6.38 +.17 3.06 +.13 7.27 +.55 28.47 +1.26 5.57 +.33 30.39 +1.44 1.68 18.10 +.40 0.14 13.71 +.41 1.28 25.46 +.17 23.14 +.20 7.68 +.08 0.16 17.07 +.48 0.40 24.17 +.34 0.20 51.01 +1.81 1.50 33.94 -.23 24.70 +.30 .43 +.02 4.74 +.08 28.41 +1.14 21.91 +.75 6.13 +.41 33.44 +1.28 1.68 74.09 +1.44 0.40 18.44 +.44 14.96 +.03 0.50 7.78 +.06 1.96 73.51 +1.19 4.30 +.19 3.44 +.13 .36 -.02 29.98 +.33 0.18 16.16 +.14 0.44 21.25 +.49 1.64 42.81 +.29 .63 -.01 16.63 +.18 51.96 -.09 21.82 +.35 18.05 +.16 8.19 +.28 0.21 15.09 +.20 5.73 +.17 0.18 7.47 +.12 2.49 +.16 29.59 +.77 40.15 +.89 19.79 -1.52 0.52 18.39 +.46 0.36 13.82 +.47 1.98 35.40 +.03 0.40 7.16 +.16 8.33 +.26 5.99 +.39 0.08 41.98 +.83 15.87 +.41 12.08 +.48 0.40 12.68 +.27 0.17 13.88 +.13 0.18 46.22 +.02 4.72 +.14 1.40 147.20 +5.23 0.93 18.80 -.23 0.99 19.00 1.08 76.54 +2.32 15.27 +.68 13.15 +.45 505.39 -3.66 28.45 +1.09 0.80 35.66 +.94 17.01 +.58 2.16 110.37 +.04 2.42 -.17 5.83 +.41 25.22 +.37 3.61 +.16 6.72 +.43 1.88 +.02 0.07 5.80 -.08 0.83 18.82 +.16 22.12 +.16 78.47 +1.96 13.45 +.44 15.48 +1.21 30.99 +.97 1.70 +.02 1.19 19.56 +.58 0.64 41.28 -.41 .95 +.05 45.74 +.67 0.54 26.17 -.05 1.86 33.98 +.22 56.25 +.89 0.48 7.68 +.20 1.70 49.65 +.62 28.06 +.86 3.38 +.57 20.77 +.50 0.36 29.09 +.75 7.80 +.16 28.94 +.93 2.49 -.01 1.00 44.33 +.29 2.60 +.10 40.32 +.35 21.56 +.35 0.40 34.22 +.84 40.37 +1.50 5.78 +.24 0.06 10.43 +.19 0.88 50.24 +.61 12.26 +.31 0.82 27.99 +.44 0.30 14.94 +.49 0.20 27.33 +.59 8.68 +.53 1.00 42.40 +1.12 4.65 26.58 +.48 1.24 23.15 +.55 7.10 +.10 5.09 +.19 2.72 43.04 +.13 9.48 +.25 1.20 25.17 +.84 23.88 +.14 20.97 +.24 17.25 +.45 4.79 0.08 16.81 +.61 5.63 +.04 6.33 +.14 1.68 47.07 +.54 27.22 +1.24 15.01 +.67 0.53 5.06 -.01 0.20 37.78 +1.20 .74 +.02 59.53 +.83 0.80 47.12 +.45 3.28 +.04 0.20 5.40 +.12 1.28 47.96 +.08 13.00 -.12 0.40 58.84 +.23 39.60 +.94 0.32 49.56 +1.14 17.28 +1.08 29.63 +1.92 1.70 33.35 +.82 4.48 +.07 0.41 31.76 +.36 11.27 +.06 0.30 2.86 -.02 3.47 +.20 0.60 28.12 +1.80 16.40 +.23 0.95 35.89 +.26 37.08 +2.63

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D 2.32 50.67 +1.32 33.03 +.37 1.21 46.87 +1.02 4.85 +.20 0.32 16.41 +.24 0.84 41.27 +.23 21.92 -.05 11.95 +.97 53.36 -.12 1.80 26.23 +1.18 0.04 16.26 +.34 0.28 7.02 +.10 7.46 +.19 32.99 +1.14 1.44 47.00 +1.56 0.60 13.25 +.18 26.24 +1.17 45.99 +.39 0.48 35.60 -.45 0.04 6.77 +.29 0.40 10.36 +.09 5.91 +.35 4.22 +.14 41.53 +.57 4.53 +.06 1.10

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22.29 +.59 0.06 19.38 -.23 0.46 41.12 +.30 0.50 20.52 +.23 53.30 +.39 0.54 7.20 +.14 1.50 11.93 +.25 8.90 +.38 2.13 22.99 +.36 0.31 5.84 +.11 6.23 +.25 121.45 +.75 29.95 +.31 0.66 22.08 +.16 2.72 68.22 +.77 0.33 28.16 +.49 0.55 20.62 +.48 0.38 15.25 +.06 0.14 10.08 +.09 0.32 49.08 +.11 0.24 12.08 +.11 0.70 52.19 +.90 0.33 11.82 +.21 1.43 40.34 +.42 2.05 37.18 +.35 0.50 24.93 +.92 0.21 12.16 +.08 0.42 15.07 +.13 0.84 59.38 +2.22 19.12 +.17 1.04 53.41 +.64 1.65 47.11 +.65 3.63 106.20 +.13 0.70 55.29 +.42 0.55 39.82 +.20 0.95 84.05 +1.75 2.22 117.77 +1.61 3.91 104.68 -.11 0.58 40.70 +.50 5.57 105.87 -.04 0.82 35.87 +.50 0.82 59.89 +.98 0.75 34.35 +.45 0.36 35.30 +.55 0.75 46.16 +.57 1.20 56.85 +.59 3.70 92.65 -.71 3.83 91.10 -.23 1.39 83.61 -.02 1.44 52.13 +.58 0.72 41.77 +.88 0.39 49.53 +.99 1.22 91.80 +1.86 0.93 81.58 +1.88 8.07 87.01 +1.05 87.92 +1.72 1.93 63.04 +.94 1.22 61.72 +.83 0.69 52.00 +.82 1.06 64.96 +1.00 1.00 68.23 +2.04 3.84 103.77 +.03 0.42 76.31 +2.23 0.75 71.62 +2.13 2.81 37.23 +.16 1.12 69.60 +1.18 0.73 20.13 +.48 0.25 59.01 +1.36 1.86 53.80 +.86 0.09 14.78 +.13 0.78 60.44 +1.34 0.46 59.46 +.74 0.68 57.67 +.70 0.54 63.24 +1.88 1.31 58.87 +.61 50.32 +.84 0.79 62.27 +1.58 0.24 54.72 +1.36 1.00 35.47 +.57 0.30 46.72 +1.49 0.84 68.35 +2.08 6.73 +.25 1.28 52.74 +.22 1.00 53.20 +.61 105.85 +2.69 29.23 +1.41 18.04 +.35 0.60 33.72 +.75 2.55 +.10 1.24 51.49 +1.37 42.82 +.66 19.24 +.30 21.01 +.23 9.40 +.28 3.75 +.20 20.13 +.12 14.19 +.92 1.22 -.06 1.28 33.92 -.08 8.43 +.19 5.12 +2.12 25.83 +1.64 0.56 59.53 +.47 0.28 39.61 +1.50 18.10 2.80 +.13 0.57 9.23 +.10 1.36 +.08 16.00 +.44 .94 +.03 6.50 +.03 6.16 +.25 11.23 +.84 2.72 49.19 +.62 0.63 23.09 +.81 17.24 +.33 0.80 32.95 +.13 4.55 +.13 122.58 +2.15 27.28 +.60 0.04 13.94 +.55 10.76 +.31 5.90 +.27 2.60 132.68 +5.79 4.55 +.09 1.00 47.52 +.94 0.24 21.36 +.27 0.50 24.93 +.64 22.32 +.45 61.18 +1.63 8.42 +.25 0.48 14.52 +.28 4.20 +.66 26.78 +.80 37.06 +1.10 354.50 +9.71 25.21 -.01 37.59 -.10 0.44 21.84 +.65 16.89 0.69 9.12 +.20 8.31 +.36 0.25 25.50 +.47 14.50 +.94 10.01 +.17 0.55 20.89 +.06 77.41 +1.91 2.68 -.01 15.30 +.14 10.54 +.07 48.10 +1.16 6.12 +.18 28.79 +1.11 12.73 +.79 0.20 41.69 +.14 14.05 +.15 1.77 30.80 +.43 1.80 26.35 +.21

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D 1.68 23.92 +.22 0.28 15.47 +.22 0.38 25.52 +.52 23.33 +.52 1.81 -.05 46.80 +2.06 11.01 -.15 3.22 +.10 18.75 +.48 0.04 13.18 +.39 0.33 29.98 +1.16 2.20 8.65 +.33 0.30 25.62 +.65 5.89 +.19 2.18 +.04 2.16 64.90 +.23 0.52 32.13 +.55 0.20 21.84 +1.12 0.20 80.18 +.96 64.13 +1.20 0.70 54.82 +1.50 28.92 +.98 10.34 +.51 43.48 -.65 0.25 17.74 +.18 0.20 21.97 +.38 13.68 +1.15 0.40 8.21 -.03 0.60 33.22 +.55 20.89 -.22 1.61 +.01 40.68 +1.59 11.39 +.59 1.50 54.89 +.51 17.00 +.63 0.48 32.24 +1.69 5.94 -.20 10.92 +.60 0.04 8.73 +.15 1.40 35.47 +.85 2.64 62.80 +.01 0.64 16.60 +.20 4.28 65.67 +.48 16.89 -.29 42.56 +.67 9.58 0.10 19.23 +.52 15.27 +.33 0.20 21.55 +.64 3.94 +.15 57.15 +.43 4.23 +.11 13.88 -.31 16.56 +.65 1.16 30.40 +.03 4.03 +.06 0.38 22.12 +.06 7.80 +.42 9.99 +.21 8.01 +.20 1.60 90.87 +.99 0.33 18.86 +.10 6.46 -.09 19.26 +.09 20.24 +.52 5.96 +.28 3.15 +.13 13.02 +.37 1.20 +.02 77.19 +.25 4.81 +.19 1.50 +.05 39.85 +.84 34.97 +.96 0.18 45.47 +.87 24.02 +.41 0.04 25.33 +.57 5.22 +.09 7.85 +.14 0.50 36.13 +.42 16.90 +1.51 5.93 +.41 75.80 +1.68 0.16 34.18 +.80 1.04 24.63 +.49 0.40 36.40 +.45 0.16 19.46 0.60 45.70 +1.39 24.43 +.69 1.34 +.09 1.54 +.06 0.40 7.14 +.25 37.86 +1.10 9.95 -.02 1.07 -.16 0.29 4.70 +.11 25.89 +.80 25.83 +1.04 13.97 +.38 42.32 +1.05 1.90 33.76 +.40 53.48 +1.03 39.60 +1.08 36.25 +.58 1.69 +.03 0.60 36.30 +.54 8.59 +.40 1.96 34.78 -.01 4.27 +.21 0.60 27.27 +.11 45.99 +.52 0.04 29.71 +.20 0.92 29.64 +.46 2.52 25.45 +.66 5.83 +.53 6.91 -.01 14.56 +.23 7.16 +.02 6.94 +.61 1.43 3.58 -.03 8.66 +.14 2.52 83.41 +.31 0.25 35.36 +.44 15.66 +.36 23.56 +1.71 30.94 +.67 1.77 +.25 4.00 80.20 -.46 10.58 +1.15 0.36 27.06 -.04 1.44 90.75 +1.90 2.19 +.24 43.14 +3.58 31.25 +1.11 17.68 +.22

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MKS Inst MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquarie Macys MSG n MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenBrd ManhAssc Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo

2.80 90.69 +1.92 0.04 24.90 -.09 8.75 0.11 6.28 +.37 1.00 34.28 +.06 1.26 +.07 8.81 +.08 0.63 19.38 +.02 12.39 +.30 8.63 +.05 0.96 7.19 +.10 0.58 6.52 -.02 9.87 +.50 14.70 +.46 21.72 +1.33 34.24 +.54 2.00 45.49 +1.11 1.80 35.47 +.41 15.41 +.41 0.20 24.70 +.80 22.08 +.38 0.18 75.74 +3.82 5.20 +.29 3.57 +.04 25.44 +.54 30.92 +.96 0.08 14.08 +.56 6.80 -.06 0.74 53.68 +1.74 0.52 18.62 +.35 1.00 31.71 +.64 12.60 +.70 23.65 +.43 0.11 53.43 -.17 0.98 61.89 +1.02 0.08 32.29 +1.67 30.60 +.36 0.42 41.30 +.61 0.31 35.34 +.87 2.56 30.79 +.95 0.16 36.71 +1.11 0.80 23.48 +.31 0.04 9.03 +.04 6.81 +.64 1.60 93.83 +2.60 19.94 +.43 0.30 15.60 +.48 2.00 24.49 +.34

Nm MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata n Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MeridRs h Meritage Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Microtune Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Mohawk MolecInsP Molex MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgSt pfA MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Res NICESys NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NaraBncp NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NaviosAc wt Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Ness Tech Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetSolTc h NetwkEng Neuralstem Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NwGold g NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQualPf

D 0.24 37.31 +2.03 12.70 +.69 0.60 232.62 +9.38 0.75 23.15 +.33 4.56 +.46 0.80 19.52 +.24 5.05 +.02 1.04 39.58 +.25 26.43 +1.25 2.20 70.67 +.19 0.94 29.96 -.10 0.48 69.06 +2.96 11.62 +.71 35.07 +1.33 0.90 52.42 +1.17 0.92 25.94 +.68 24.56 +1.33 7.85 +.29 23.53 +1.09 58.82 +.71 5.89 +.23 0.80 10.02 +.17 7.99 +.35 0.24 25.28 +1.04 15.46 +.83 35.54 +2.10 11.17 +.10 60.34 +1.05 0.82 43.30 +.63 4.28 +.08 0.36 24.26 +.12 8.90 +.27 53.08 +2.05 4.58 -.10 1.52 33.64 +.13 .33 -.00 24.05 +.82 16.42 +3.61 5.91 +.12 .90 -.01 0.62 22.73 +.41 0.74 43.84 +.61 8.75 +.50 3.75 +.20 0.14 11.54 +.46 1.37 29.21 +.50 6.81 +.46 9.33 +.51 35.73 +.92 17.37 +.51 0.52 29.44 +.56 2.64 +.22 2.96 +.06 2.46 56.77 +.80 .74 -.03 .26 -.05 0.09 20.45 +.25 7.24 90.75 +2.86 106.22 +.02 1.19 +.02 0.20 33.25 +1.07 10.41 +.51 9.98 +.20 12.21 +.69 4.89 -.13 3.43 -.09 20.91 +.26 64.02 +3.03 1.91 -.20 0.61 22.77 +.62 1.12 42.46 +.27 13.82 +1.35 3.38 +.24 21.30 -.28 1.06 56.83 -.69 17.16 +.61 0.36 16.59 +.24 0.42 22.29 +.53 0.20 27.80 -.58 1.01 18.76 -.54 7.14 +.14 0.20 49.40 +1.73 6.98 -.01 2.22 +.09 0.07 5.05 +.16 1.00 58.04 +2.51 21.60 -.17 1.75 18.34 +.34 5.68 +.10 35.10 +.25 13.00 +1.54 12.59 +.38 0.60 15.16 +.17 1.25 -.21 32.23 +.84 39.64 +1.52 2.75 +.04 7.39 +.30 23.38 +1.41 0.44 12.74 +.28 1.20 31.59 +.87 20.47 +.36 0.14 25.50 +1.41 11.50 +.48 9.29 +.24 20.04 +.43 0.31 2.89 -.02 1.34 52.59 +1.29 0.40 41.09 +.53 0.04 7.90 +.32 1.50 23.27 +.12 0.32 14.60 +.12 1.80 36.35 +.56 1.27 -.03 0.24 6.74 +.34 1.66 17.11 +.66 55.99 +2.13 13.83 +.67 2.90 -.19 6.09 +.15 15.21 +.05 10.86 +.11 31.12 +1.48 34.05 +.59 33.48 +.40 14.47 +.41 107.83 +8.01 3.25 +.60 .85 +.07 3.28 +.13 3.22 -.03 2.90 +.31 22.94 +.38 13.71 +.37 3.20 +.13 6.31 +.17 1.00 16.27 +.24 9.63 +.24 0.28 12.52 -.23 3.40 +.05 0.20 17.11 +.37 56.69 +2.35 0.40 58.71 +.51 7.24 +.30 0.15 14.51 +.03 0.15 17.02 +.16 0.20 22.51 +.30 .43 -.00 .38 +.01 0.92 16.11 +.22 1.86 43.27 +.61 1.08 77.85 +1.42 15.74 +.60 20.44 +.20 19.10 0.20 36.64 +.29 0.72 70.13 +1.58 0.56 11.02 +.05 6.47 -.02 1.45 30.47 +.64 0.64 43.03 +.95 1.36 60.73 +1.58 4.41 +.25 1.03 26.93 +.42 9.04 +.20 15.95 +.36 1.12 55.34 +.89 3.31 -.04 1.72 65.75 +.86 0.40 3.82 -.21 0.40 12.25 +.14 8.69 -.04 1.99 48.74 +.56 6.27 +.23 2.77 +.07 5.75 -.02 25.74 +.60 1.60 36.84 +.49 0.50 29.98 +.48 43.24 +2.47 16.95 +.52 1.44 46.77 +.78 0.70 23.79 +1.35 0.47 10.00 +.07 0.75 8.04 0.58 6.88 +.12

D

NuvQPf2 0.65 7.44 +.08 Nvidia 14.68 +.28 OGE Engy 1.45 39.60 +.72 OReillyA h 48.94 +.71 OSI Phrm 57.30 +.10 OcciPet 1.52 84.75 +1.72 Oceaneer 60.65 +1.87 OceanFrt h .72 +.06 Och-Ziff 0.72 17.32 +.17 Oclaro rs 13.45 +.91 OcwenFn 11.99 +.30 OdysMar 1.46 +.06 OfficeDpt 7.02 +.22 OfficeMax 19.59 +1.12 OilSvHT 1.74 115.38 +.68 OilStates 47.44 +1.86 Oilsands g .84 +.01 OldDomF h 37.99 +.28 OldNBcp 0.28 13.57 +.48 OldRepub 0.69 14.21 +.15 Olin 0.80 20.39 +.67 OmegaHlt 1.28 20.22 +.53 Omncre 0.09 26.91 +.38 Omnicom 0.80 42.03 +.52 OmniVisn 18.09 +1.05 Omnova 8.03 +.24 OnSmcnd 8.08 +.23 1800Flowrs 3.15 +.31 ONEOK 1.76 49.57 +.76 OnyxPh 26.10 +.60 OpenTxt 45.06 +.94 OpenTabl n 41.99 +1.88 OpnwvSy 2.44 +.06 OpkoHlth 2.20 +.16 optXprs 16.63 -.02 Oracle 0.20 24.60 +.41 OrbitalSci 18.07 +.43 Orexigen 6.84 +.39 OrientEH 12.87 +.36 OrientFn 0.16 14.98 +.38 OriginAg 8.51 +.36 OrionMar 17.01 +.37 OrmatTc 0.20 31.00 +1.05 Orthovta 3.45 +.10 OshkoshCp 38.96 +.02 OvShip 1.75 43.72 +.37 OwensM s 0.71 31.12 +.64 OwensCorn 36.18 +1.02 OwensIll 31.49 -.12 Oxigene 1.00 +.11 PAA NGS n 24.10 +.58 PDL Bio 1.00 5.94 +.11 PF Chng 0.17 45.77 +2.03 PG&E Cp 1.82 44.29 -.12 PHH Corp 22.59 +.45 PMC Sra 8.53 +.26 PMI Grp 5.02 +.12 PNC 0.40 68.52 -.09 PNM Res 0.50 13.25 +.11 POSCO 1.71 101.63 -1.16 PPG 2.16 67.64 +1.21 PPL Corp 1.40 25.94 +.34 PSS Wrld 23.45 +.25 PacWstBc 0.04 23.00 +.39 Paccar 0.36 45.32 +.78 PacerIntl 9.03 +1.09 PacCapB 2.06 -.14 PacEthan 1.07 +.03 PacRim .23 -.00 PacSunwr 5.16 +.02 PackAmer 0.60 23.52 +.81 Pactiv 24.33 +.09 PaetecHld 4.61 +.02 Palatin .32 -.00 PallCorp 0.64 37.69 +.82 Palm Inc 5.72 -.03 PanASlv 0.05 27.87 +1.16 PaneraBrd 78.68 +1.19 ParPharm 27.88 +.19 ParamTch 18.07 +.60 ParaG&S 1.85 -.01 Parexel 24.17 +1.34 ParkDrl 5.20 +.23 ParkerHan 1.04 69.06 +2.01 Parkrvsn 2.05 +.28 Parkwy 0.30 18.41 +.01 PartnerRe 2.00 75.54 +.98 PatriotCoal 19.20 +.89 Patterson 0.40 31.40 +.60 PattUTI 0.20 14.11 +.28 Paychex 1.24 30.59 +.34 PeabdyE 0.28 43.39 +1.13 PeetsCfeT 38.13 +.10 Pengrth g 0.84 10.41 -.03 PnnNGm 28.85 +.65 PennVa 0.23 24.43 +1.06 PennWst g 1.80 19.05 +.46 Penney 0.80 29.63 +.56 PenRE 0.60 16.12 +1.00 Penske 14.44 +.16 PensonWw 7.85 -.03 Pentair 0.76 35.54 +1.33 PeopUtdF 0.62 14.83 +.12 PepBoy 0.12 12.80 +.84 PepcoHold 1.08 17.04 +.11 PepsiCo 1.92 66.94 +.39 PerfectWld 32.60 +.06 PerkElm 0.28 23.55 +.49 Perrigo 0.25 64.35 +.92 PetMed 0.40 21.12 +1.92 PetChina 3.72 113.79 +.36 Petrohawk 20.27 +.71 PetrbrsA 1.34 33.67 +.30 Petrobras 1.34 38.18 +.31 PetroDev 24.08 +2.82 PtroqstE 6.55 +.26 PetsMart 0.40 34.76 +1.20 Pfizer 0.72 16.90 -.11 PFSweb 4.51 +.20 PhmHTr 7.44 63.30 +.05 PharmPdt 0.60 27.44 +.80 Pharmacyc 7.34 +.43 Pharmerica 18.10 +1.01 PhaseFwd 16.85 +.05 PhilipMor 2.32 47.99 -.36 PhilipsEl 0.95 32.90 +.96 PhlVH 0.15 61.79 +.61 PhnxCos 2.80 +.08 PhotrIn 5.28 +.20 PiedNG 1.12 27.20 +.05 Pier 1 9.06 +.96 PilgrmsP n 9.28 +.31 PimIncStr2 0.70 8.96 -.04 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.16 +.06 PinnclEnt 13.94 +.50 PinWst 2.10 36.43 +.73 PionDrill 6.31 +.27 PioNtrl 0.08 65.50 +1.65 PitnyBw 1.46 24.56 +.30 PlainsEx 25.27 +.52 Plantron 0.20 33.84 +.92 PlatGpMet 2.64 +.17 PlatUnd 0.32 37.82 +.62 PlugPwr h .54 -.01 PlumCrk 1.68 38.73 +.40 Polaris 1.60 59.92 +1.73 Polo RL 0.40 91.92 +2.89 Polycom 32.28 +1.51 PolyMet g 2.13 +.10 PolyOne 11.58 +.79 Polypore 22.82 +2.07 Poniard h 1.35 +.10 Popular 3.55 +.03 PortGE 1.02 19.41 +.02 PortglTel 0.77 10.10 +.64 PositiveID 1.20 PostPrp 0.80 28.09 +.61 Potash 0.40 104.68 +3.18 Potlatch 2.04 37.87 +.90 PwrInteg 0.20 37.30 +1.39 Power-One 8.13 +.33 PSCrudeDS 68.70 -.08 PwshDB 23.37 +.19 PS Agri 24.34 +.13 PS Oil 26.79 +.01 PS BasMet 20.06 +.22 PS USDBull 24.82 +.07 PS USDBear 25.28 -.10 PwSClnEn 9.70 +.22 PSPrivEq 0.28 9.60 +.20 PSFinPf 1.36 16.73 +.20 PwShPfd 1.04 13.60 +.12 PShEMSov 1.65 26.02 -.08 PSIndia 0.13 22.20 +.17 PwShs QQQ 0.21 48.62 +.90 Powrwav 1.83 +.05 Pozen 8.37 +.08 Praxair 1.80 81.75 +1.36 PrecCastpt 0.12 124.87 +.85 PrecDril 6.97 -.02 PrmWBc h .82 +.03 Prestige 9.89 +.12 PriceTR 1.08 54.98 +.94 priceline 217.88 -1.69 PrideIntl 27.84 +.35 Primerica n 25.15 +.29 PrinFncl 0.50 30.68 +.83 PrivateB 0.04 14.64 +.50 ProShtDow 48.98 -.74 ProShtQQQ 40.35 -.77 ProShtS&P 48.99 -.70 PrUShS&P 30.16 -.88 ProUltDow 0.53 48.11 +1.40 PrUlShDow 25.63 -.79 PrUShMC 16.47 -.77 ProUltQQQ 66.00 +2.37 PrUShQQQ 16.09 -.61 ProUltSP 0.41 42.01 +1.16 ProUShL20 43.91 +.63 PrUSCh25 rs 42.00 -.53 ProUSEM rs 51.06 -1.20 ProUSRE rs 24.36 -.84 ProUSOG rs 59.12 -1.61 ProUSBM rs 35.57 -2.05 ProUltRE rs 0.50 46.69 +1.43 ProUShtFn 18.18 -.45 ProUFin rs 0.30 68.71 +1.71 ProUltSemi 0.19 36.48 +2.31 PrUPShR2K 41.31 -4.19 ProUltO&G 0.22 34.28 +.90 ProUBasM 0.15 33.87 +1.69 ProUPR2K 134.67+11.30 ProUShEur 23.53 -.64 ProShtR2K 37.51 -1.15 ProUltPQQQ 111.49 +5.70 ProUSR2K 17.78 -1.15 ProUltR2K 0.04 36.80 +2.16 ProUSSP500 28.64 -1.25 ProUltSP500 0.23 171.95 +7.00 ProUltCrude 11.48 -.01 ProSUltGold 56.00 +.70 ProUSGld rs 38.71 -.51 ProUSSlv rs 31.03 -.82 ProUShCrude 13.47 -.01 ProSUltSilv 70.53 +1.33 ProUShEuro 23.66 +.20 ProctGam 1.93 63.02 +.65 ProgrssEn 2.48 40.51 +.20 ProgrsSoft 33.04 +.80 ProgsvCp 0.16 20.75 +.41 ProLogis 0.60 12.41 +.38

Nm

D

ProsHldg ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PulteGrp PureBio PPrIT

1.64 0.62 0.56 0.72 0.44 0.70 0.61 1.37 3.20 0.68

Nm 7.35 10.96 40.88 6.92 23.65 7.74 13.39 63.98 16.85 32.00 32.15 98.60 12.19 3.11 6.46

-.14 +.07 +.23 +.27 +.19 +.19 +.27 +.82 +.53 +.54 +.67 +.74 +.05 +.25 +.02

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22.08 +.37 19.74 +.61 0.76 38.16 +.68 0.12 19.99 +.88 21.69 +1.10 2.88 +.07 .66 -.01 0.40 55.39 +.50 17.80 +.70 0.52 48.76 +2.18 9.35 +.36 12.38 +.12 13.25 +.22 5.70 +.28 0.32 5.31 +.15 3.70 +.07 14.57 +.07 5.30 +.11 .26 -.07 0.82 21.30 +.59 4.30 +.30 8.62 +.34 26.08 +1.24 17.29 -.12 0.01 10.42 +.59 .98 -.02 0.25 21.20 +.53 12.68 +.41 61.45 +.12 24.51 +.65 0.17 90.77 +1.02 0.16 48.05 +.38 3.28 -.07 .73 -.07 0.44 30.10 +.51 2.00 47.63 +.29 1.50 58.00 +.54 4.12 +.03 1.72 32.71 +.34 30.12 +.79 26.31 +.58 1.00 15.73 +.43 0.68 64.99 +2.70 0.72 16.56 +.11 1.85 41.61 +.23 1.78 23.30 +.88 27.74 +2.22 0.53 89.77 +.87 0.04 8.81 +.14 0.16 19.44 +.50 0.40 48.36 +.87 1.00 56.54 +.70 6.85 +.16 25.97 +.41 1.20 .76 -.02 1.37 22.19 +.48 6.17 +.02 0.76 30.36 +.37 68.27 +.44 68.77 +1.20 1.00 6.87 +.15 1.67 103.50 +1.09 0.06 9.80 +.06 12.56 +.53 1.81 +.04 3.60 54.11 +.03 11.09 -.31 15.70 +.45 16.22 +1.22 0.45 49.17 +.70 22.29 +.11 0.40 21.14 -.02 1.35 30.42 +1.54 0.52 27.67 +.42 0.60 51.96 +1.38 1.16 62.38 +2.30 0.96 65.07 +1.30 29.51 +2.65 25.49 1.28 35.53 +.54 0.38 61.94 +1.29 24.69 +1.48 0.64 54.26 +.18 38.19 +1.98 27.08 +.15 2.00 59.86 +.99 14.47 -.31 33.24 +1.22 3.36 54.34 +.18 3.36 56.13 -.02 0.36 52.34 +.89 4.06 +.08 28.07 +1.70 11.93 +1.13 5.27 +.41 25.86 +.26 1.00 47.20 +1.16 0.52 43.32 +.78 0.27 39.12 +1.67 0.12 20.11 -.36 6.21 +.06 17.25 +.10 0.67 44.90 -.47 34.11 +.69 1.90 37.31 +.05 0.18 22.76 +.64 17.38 -.03 0.40 67.69 +2.29 11.98 +.39 3.98 +.38 2.47 109.26 +1.59 121.40 +.74 0.18 26.01 +.38 1.67 148.25 +3.30 2.21 117.45 +1.62 57.63 +1.33 1.67 49.88 +.58 0.13 18.89 +.51 0.25 27.77 +.37 0.46 41.15 +.80 1.79 58.86 +.95 4.76 38.95 +.42 0.89 22.86 0.02 45.86 0.36 28.31 +.79 0.50 43.07 +.80 0.25 43.64 +1.30 0.37 55.55 +1.61 1.00 67.48 +1.28 22.30 +.21 13.77 +.28 0.28 8.61 +.05 50.06 -.03 0.36 10.69 +.34 69.74 +4.66 0.40 24.17 +.17 31.03 +.33 39.19 +.79 0.10 43.86 +1.27 9.82 +.39 88.40 +2.20 38.95 +.96 10.68 +.58 .62 -.01 44.27 +2.02 6.97 +.21 5.45 +.05 17.35 +.64 1.63 32.94 +.49 3.30 +.04 0.35 10.51 +.56 0.44 14.35 +.02 2.74 -.01 5.24 +.10 12.66 +.62 0.84 66.65 -.19 0.07 55.35 +1.47 0.60 24.47 +.53 0.13 31.13 +.83 0.24 17.68 +.04 0.60 59.20 +1.85 4.05 +.55 11.37 -.07 0.50 47.90 +.62 0.30 47.97 +1.02 9.24 +.05 36.37 +.72 2.35 +.14 23.55 +.21 18.99 +.59 0.48 21.37 +.32 3.70 +.15 1.38 +.05 115.30 +2.08 0.40 11.20 +.29 13.01 +.25 10.59 +.75 8.98 +.32 0.55 29.04 +.85 1.56 47.17 -.13 18.31 +.38 1.44 22.22 +.03 10.91 +.08 19.09 +.22 0.80 29.29 +.33 5.47 +.10 0.16 8.93 +.15 11.88 +1.02 6.47 -.11 44.41 +.14 37.46 +1.33 1.44 80.42 +.94 1.20 19.94 +.66 0.34 66.22 +2.21 9.89 +.31 0.19 16.58 +.07 2.41 96.52 +1.84 8.25 +.16 7.62 +.13 0.64 57.32 +.80 42.39 +1.46 32.79 +2.10 0.42 29.03 +.07 3.79 +.13 47.80 +.84 0.28 5.95 -.04 20.34 +.04 20.95 +.19 0.08 8.96 +.43 2.40 91.31 +1.29 0.40 33.76 +1.43 35.11 +1.35

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1.16 0.28 2.10 0.10 1.00 0.80 0.52 1.60 0.85 0.52 0.02

0.60 0.72 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.30 0.56 1.60 0.80 7.65 1.44

0.32 0.16

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D

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Banks

is now owned by Bank of America. The companies that rated the mortgage deals are Standard & Poor’s, Fitch Ratings and Moody’s Investors Service. Investors used their ratings to decide whether to buy mortgage securities. Cuomo’s investigation follows an article in The New York Times that described some of the techniques bankers used to get more positive evaluations from the rating agencies.

Continued from B1 The inquiry by the attorney general of New York, Andrew Cuomo, suggests that he thinks the agencies may have been duped by one or more of the targets of his investigation. Those targets are Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, UBS, Citigroup, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Credit Agricole and Merrill Lynch, which

Beer

becomes law. “I’d be stoked on that,” Storey said. “We’d love to see the break right away.” The same reaction is probably true from most craft brewers, said Megan Flynn, publisher and editor-in-chief of Beer Northwest Magazine. She said she’s curious if a tax cut that large would encourage more brewers to start up. “That’s good news,” she said. Republican Sens. Mike Crapo of Idaho and Olympia Snowe of Maine and Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon are co-sponsoring the bill. Reps. Richard Neal, D-Mass., and Kevin Brady, R-Texas, introduced the bill in the House in December. The small brewer tax rate hasn’t been updated since 1976.

Continued from B1 Bend’s Silver Moon Brewing Co., which expects to produce about 4,000 barrels of beer this year, could save as much as $14,000, if the legislation is passed. As for Deschutes Brewery, which brewed about 180,000 barrels in 2008, according to a previous article in The Bulletin, the bill could mean $450,000 in savings. The break would make it easier for Clay Storey to grow his Bend business, Boneyard Beer Co., which he owns with two other partners. Storey said the owners were barreling their beer for the first time Wednesday, adding that he hopes they’ll brew about 1,000 barrels this year. That would translate into $3,500 the Boneyard owners would not have to pay if the bill

Bulletin reporter David Holley contributed to this report.

Merger

closing price of $41.57. A report by Bloomberg News on Wednesday about the merger talks sent Sybase shares up 35 percent, to $56.14. SAP will also assume Sybase’s debt of $400 million. Sybase, based in Dublin, Calif., will operate as a stand-alone unit within SAP under its current management. Assuming that a majority of Sybase shareholders tender their shares to SAP, the deal is expected to close in the third quarter. SAP’s traditional strengths revolve around selling often complex business software that helps companies deal with their day-to-day computing jobs like payroll, inventory tracking and sales.

Continued from B1 Executives of SAP and Sybase said they intended to focus on creating new types of number processing software that rely on Sybase’s strengths in transporting data to and from the smartphones of customers. “This will literally connect the shop floor to the corner office,” said Bill McDermott, the cochief executive of SAP, during a conference call with Wall Street analysts to discuss the deal. Under the terms of the deal, SAP plans to pay $65 a share for Sybase through a tender offer, a 56 percent premium to Tuesday’s

FURNITURE OUTLET

Jobs

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 B5

she looks for other explanations. Employers, she thinks, fear she will be disloyal and jump ship for a higher-paying job as soon as one comes along. Sometimes she blames the bad economy in Jacksonville. Sometimes she sees age discrimination. Sometimes she thinks the problem is that she has not been able to afford a haircut in awhile. Or perhaps the paper her résumé is printed on is not nice enough. The problem cannot be that the occupation she has devoted her life to has been largely computerized, she says. “You can’t replace the human thought process,” she says. “I can anticipate people’s needs. Usually, I give them what they want before they even know they need it. There will never be a machine that can do that.” And that is true, up to a point: Human judgment still counts for something. That means some of the filing jobs, just like some of the manufacturing jobs, that were cut during the recession will return. But a lot of them probably will not.

Continued from B5 This “creative destruction” in the job market can benefit the economy. Pruning relatively less-efficient employees like clerks and travel agents, whose work can be done more cheaply by computers or workers abroad, makes American businesses more efficient. Year over year, productivity growth was at its highest level in more than 50 years last quarter, pushing corporate profits to record highs and helping the economy grow. But a huge group of people is being left out of the party. Millions of workers who have already been unemployed for months, if not years, will most likely remain that way even as the overall job market continues to improve, economists say. The occupations they worked in, and the skills they currently possess, are never coming back in style. And the demand for new types of skills moves a lot more quickly than workers — especially older and less mobile workers — are able to retrain and gain those skills. There is no easy policy solution for helping the people left behind. The usual unemployment measures — like jobless benefits and food stamps — can serve as temporary palliatives, but they cannot make workers’ skills relevant again.

Structural shift Offices, not just in Jacksonville but all over the country, have found that life without a secretary or filing clerk — which they may have begun somewhat reluctantly when economic pressures demanded it — is actually pretty manageable. After all, the office environment is more automated and digitized than ever. Bosses can handle their own calendars, travel arrangements and files through their own computers and increasingly ubiquitous BlackBerrys. In many offices, voice mail systems and doorbells — not receptionists — greet callers and visitors. And so, even when orders pick up, many of the newly de-clerked and un-secretaried may not recall their laid-off assistants. At the very least, any assistants they do hire will probably be younger people with different skills. Economists have seen this type of structural change, which happens over the long term but

Replaced Norton has sent out hundreds of résumés without luck. Twice, the openings she interviewed for were eliminated by employers who decided, upon further reflection, that redistributing administrative tasks among existing employees made more sense than replacing the outgoing secretary. One employer decided this shortly after Norton had already started showing up for work. Norton is reluctant to believe that her three decades of experience and her typing talents, up to 120 words a minute, are now obsolete. So

is accelerated by a downturn, many times before. “This always happens in recessions,” says John Schmitt, a senior economist with the Center for Economic and Policy Research. “Employers see them as an opportunity to clean house and then get ready for the next big move in the labor market. Or in the product market as well.” Economists like Erica Groshen at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York have argued that bigger structural job losses help explain why the last two economic recoveries were jobless — that is, why job expansion lagged far behind overall growth.

Different this time? But there is reason to think restructuring may take a bigger toll this time around. The percentage of unemployed workers who were permanently let go (and so will not be recalled by their former employers) has hovered at a record high of more than 50 percent for several months. Additionally, the unemployment numbers show a notable split in the labor pool, with most unemployed workers finding jobs after a relatively short period of time, but a sizable chunk of the labor force unable to find new work even after months or years of searching. This group — comprising generally older workers — has pulled up the average length of time that a current worker has been unemployed to a record high of 33 weeks as of April. The percentage of unemployed people who have been looking for jobs for more than six months is at 45.9 percent, the highest in at least six decades. And so the question is what kinds of policy responses can help workers like Norton who are falling further and further behind in the economic recovery and are at risk of falling out of the middle class. Norton has spent most of the last two years working part time as a Walmart cashier, bringing home about a third of what she had earned as an administrative assistant. Besides the hit to her

pocketbook, she grew frustrated that the work has not tapped her full potential. “A monkey could do what I do,” she says of her work as a cashier. “Actually, a monkey would get bored.” Norton says she cannot find any government programs to help her strengthen the “thin bootstraps” she intends to pull herself up by. Because of the Walmart job, she has been ineligible for unemployment benefits, and she says she made too much money to qualify for food stamps or Medicaid last year. “If you’re not a minority, or not handicapped, or not a young parent, or not a veteran, or not in some other certain category, your hope of finding help and any hope of finding work out there is basically nil,” Norton says. “I know. I’ve looked.”

Preparation Of course, just as there is a structural decline in some industries, others enjoy structural growth (the “creative” part of “creative destruction”). The key is to prepare the group of workers left behind for the growing industry. “You can bring the jobs back for some of these people, but they won’t be in the same place,” says Thomas Anton Kochan, a professor of management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The White House has publicly challenged the idea that structural unemployment is a big problem, with Christina Romer, the Council of Economic Advisers chairwoman, instead emphasizing that stronger economic growth is what’s needed. Still, the administration has allocated dollars for retraining in both the 2009 stimulus package and other legislation, largely for clean technology jobs.

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1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

541-706-6900

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .84f ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

13 14 81 ... 45 ... ... 27 22 55 21 14 39 21 ... 11 58 ... 14 ... 15

YTD Last Chg %Chg 46.05 21.23 17.07 15.37 72.87 .76 40.13 54.64 57.88 2.73 30.41 49.56 15.84 23.09 8.73 22.12 5.22 10.58 19.38 8.90 29.44

+1.74 +.32 -.09 +.66 +1.45 +.01 +3.47 -.22 -.06 +.08 +.68 +1.14 +.27 +.81 +.15 +.06 +.09 +1.15 +.02 +.27 +.56

+33.2 -1.7 +13.3 +25.1 +34.6 +11.6 +46.0 +40.0 -2.2 +13.6 -7.1 -3.8 +19.0 +13.2 +57.3 +7.7 +93.3 +51.6 -17.9 +.8 -3.4

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44 .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

22 22 17 50 ... ... 39 19 ... 88 21 10 28 22 ... 25 ... 13 ... ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1246.00 $1242.70 $19.640

Pvs Day $1227.00 $1219.90 $19.272

Market recap 77.85 43.03 46.89 19.59 45.32 2.31 38.73 124.87 24.17 55.35 80.42 45.82 27.85 7.29 14.09 26.88 19.01 33.66 3.15 48.37

+1.42 +.95 +1.21 +1.12 +.78 -.01 +.40 +.85 +.17 +1.47 +.94 +.78 +1.15 +.27 +.48 +.20 +.06 +.75 +.10 +1.22

+17.8 +14.5 +4.1 +54.4 +25.0 -17.8 +2.6 +13.2 +13.5 +16.0 +30.4 +14.5 +20.8 +21.5 +5.1 +19.4 -1.7 +24.7 +50.0 +12.1

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM SPDR Fncl

6276379 2006293 1753537 957698 846919

4.18 +.01 117.45 +1.62 17.07 -.09 12.68 +.37 16.05 +.18

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Sybase Furmanite GpoRadio NCI Bld rs Resolute wt

Last

Chg %Chg

56.14 +14.57 5.40 +.72 8.60 +1.10 13.00 +1.54 2.98 +.34

+35.0 +15.4 +14.7 +13.4 +12.9

Losers ($2 or more) Name BkA BM RE BkA SP4-12 TeamHlth n PrUPShR2K DirxSCBear

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.10 -.56 -21.1 9.54 -1.48 -13.4 14.00 -1.91 -12.0 41.31 -4.19 -9.2 5.64 -.56 -9.1

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

GoldStr g NwGold g NovaGld g CFCda g NthgtM g

Last Chg

67232 4.72 +.14 45264 6.31 +.17 44385 8.69 -.04 37101 15.25 ... 35901 3.31 -.04

ChiArmM Banro g LucasEngy EstnLtCap ContMatls

Last

Last 12.37 2.20 2.90 2.45 3.21

Name

Last

Metabolix ChinWind n IntriCon Netlist WaccaBk

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 23.09 48.62 26.74 29.44 18.18

+.81 +.90 +.78 +.56 +.10

Chg %Chg

16.42 +3.61 +28.2 4.73 +.96 +25.5 5.74 +1.08 +23.2 3.25 +.60 +22.6 3.70 +.64 +20.8

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

-.93 -.16 -.19 -.15 -.19

-7.0 -6.8 -6.1 -5.8 -5.6

ZionO&G wt TmbrlndBc P&F DearbrnBc Funtalk n

3.00 -1.00 -25.0 4.20 -.74 -15.0 2.00 -.35 -14.9 2.35 -.25 -9.6 5.20 -.53 -9.2

337 159 32 528 18 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 2,669 466 67 3,202 97 10

818788 754798 569228 463258 458947

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

5.62 +1.01 +21.9 2.43 +.28 +13.0 2.19 +.24 +12.3 3.10 +.32 +11.5 12.75 +1.30 +11.4

Name

Vol (00)

Intel PwShs QQQ Cisco Microsoft Comcast

Losers ($2 or more) Sifco SunLink NeoStem AdcareH wt UnivPwr

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

Diary 2,235 502 90 2,827 132 15

11,258.01 4,812.87 408.57 7,743.74 1,994.20 2,535.28 1,219.80 12,847.91 745.95

8,087.19 2,971.98 325.67 5,552.82 1,451.26 1,664.19 869.32 8,900.27 470.37

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,896.91 4,657.86 384.84 7,316.36 1,901.18 2,425.02 1,171.67 12,318.41 716.11

+148.65 +96.81 +2.44 +94.70 +19.93 +49.71 +15.88 +193.17 +20.63

YTD %Chg %Chg +1.38 +2.12 +.64 +1.31 +1.06 +2.09 +1.37 +1.59 +2.97

52-wk %Chg

+4.50 +13.62 -3.31 +1.83 +4.18 +6.87 +5.07 +6.67 +14.51

+31.53 +55.29 +13.16 +29.12 +29.01 +45.72 +32.55 +36.88 +51.78

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

336.90 2,540.36 3,733.87 5,383.45 6,183.49 20,212.49 32,379.63 21,029.48 3,156.08 10,394.03 1,663.03 2,880.33 4,599.70 5,807.94

+1.03 s +2.29 s +1.10 s +.92 s +2.41 s +.33 s +.81 s +.74 s -.35 t -.16 t -.43 t +.79 s +.58 s +1.13 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.8923 1.4821 .9806 .001885 .1464 1.2631 .1284 .010729 .080462 .0333 .000874 13.2406 .9007 .0316

Pvs Day .8982 1.4959 .9814 .001891 .1463 1.2694 .1285 .010780 .080214 .0331 .000880 .1317 .9010 .0315

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.51 +0.24 +6.6 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.80 +0.06 +4.1 GrowthI 23.32 +0.40 +5.8 Ultra 20.18 +0.32 +3.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.57 +0.25 +5.8 AMutlA p 23.89 +0.26 +3.8 BalA p 16.83 +0.13 +4.4 BondA p 12.04 +3.5 CapWA p 19.87 -0.1 CapIBA p 46.97 +0.34 -1.1 CapWGA p 32.70 +0.41 -3.6 EupacA p 36.64 +0.45 -4.4 FdInvA p 33.55 +0.46 +2.9 GovtA p 14.20 -0.01 +2.6 GwthA p 28.12 +0.36 +2.9 HI TrA p 10.91 +0.06 +5.3 IncoA p 15.65 +0.12 +2.1 IntBdA p 13.31 -0.01 +2.3 ICAA p 26.44 +0.29 +2.4 NEcoA p 22.81 +0.31 +1.4 N PerA p 25.42 +0.35 -0.9 NwWrldA 47.45 +0.57 +0.5 SmCpA p 33.78 +0.60 +7.1 TxExA p 12.16 +2.4 WshA p 25.49 +0.27 +4.1 American Funds B: CapIBB t 46.95 +0.34 -1.3 GrwthB t 27.21 +0.35 +2.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 27.23 +0.45 -3.6 IntlEqA 26.56 +0.44 -3.7 IntEqII I r 11.25 +0.20 -4.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 19.05 +0.36 -7.8 MidCap 27.78 +0.67 +8.7 MidCapVal 18.89 +0.28 +5.1 Baron Funds: Growth 45.15 +0.73 +9.3 SmallCap 21.24 +0.44 +10.3 Bernstein Fds:

IntDur 13.58 -0.01 +4.1 DivMu 14.48 +1.7 TxMgdIntl 14.26 +0.18 -6.7 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.19 +0.19 +2.8 GlAlA r 18.03 +0.15 +0.8 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 16.83 +0.14 +0.5 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.12 +0.15 +0.9 CGM Funds: Focus 29.34 +0.66 -1.4 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.22 +0.71 +4.0 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.63 +0.63 +11.1 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.43 +0.64 +11.1 AcornIntZ 34.77 +0.39 +1.5 ValRestr 43.97 +0.84 +2.8 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.94 +0.14 -1.8 USCorEq2 10.12 +0.20 +10.9 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 31.96 +0.40 +3.2 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.31 +0.41 +3.3 NYVen C 30.85 +0.39 +2.9 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.46 +0.01 +3.6 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 18.42 +0.22 +1.1 EmMktV 31.51 +0.51 +0.2 IntSmVa 15.22 +0.23 +0.9 USLgVa 18.83 +0.30 +10.6 US Micro 12.43 +0.38 +17.8 US Small 19.29 +0.56 +17.1 US SmVa 23.42 +0.69 +19.4 IntlSmCo 14.55 +0.20 +2.3 Fixd 10.33 +0.5 IntVa 16.38 +0.26 -3.8 Glb5FxInc 11.28 +2.7 2YGlFxd 10.21 +0.7 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 66.66 +0.70 +4.7

Income 13.14 IntlStk 31.27 Stock 100.91 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.54 NatlMunInc 9.73 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.59 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 10.98 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.02 FPACres 25.53 Fairholme 34.71 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.89 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 17.93 StrInA 12.25 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.11 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 12.84 FF2015 10.70 FF2020 12.90 FF2025 10.69 FF2030 12.75 FF2035 10.56 FF2040 7.37 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.06 AMgr50 14.28 Balanc 17.10 BlueChGr 40.38 Canada 52.32 CapAp 23.36 CpInc r 8.90 Contra 60.76 DisEq 22.04 DivIntl 26.65 DivGth 25.57 EmrMk 22.39 Eq Inc 41.92 EQII 17.38 Fidel 29.83

+0.01 +2.6 +0.49 -1.8 +1.42 +5.3 +0.25 +5.0 +4.1 +0.25 +5.1 +0.08 -0.5 +1.7 +0.16 +2.9 +0.18 +15.4 +0.11 +4.9 +0.25 +4.2 +0.02 +2.7 +0.26 +4.3 +0.11 +0.10 +0.14 +0.12 +0.16 +0.15 +0.10

+3.3 +3.3 +3.5 +3.5 +3.6 +3.5 +3.6

+0.19 +0.12 +0.17 +0.78 +1.08 +0.47 +0.07 +0.87 +0.54 +0.28 +0.49 +0.39 +0.63 +0.25 +0.48

+5.4 +3.5 +5.0 +6.4 +7.9 +9.0 +5.5 +4.4 +4.9 -4.8 +8.0 -1.0 +7.5 +6.8 +5.4

GNMA 11.62 GovtInc 10.56 GroCo 73.83 GroInc 17.00 HighInc r 8.63 Indepn 21.52 IntBd 10.38 IntmMu 10.23 IntlDisc 28.92 InvGrBd 11.54 InvGB 7.23 LgCapVal 11.85 LatAm 49.20 LevCoStk 25.73 LowP r 34.85 Magelln 67.41 MidCap 26.88 MuniInc 12.62 NwMkt r 15.33 OTC 48.86 100Index 8.27 Ovrsea 28.94 Puritn 16.83 RealE 24.51 StIntMu 10.65 STBF 8.40 SmllCpS r 17.48 StratInc 10.92 StrReRt r 8.82 TotalBd 10.73 USBI 11.24 Value 64.00 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 48.68 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 34.31 500IdxInv 41.55 IntlInxInv 31.35 TotMktInv 33.73 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 41.55 TotMktAd r 33.73 First Eagle: GlblA 41.71

+3.4 -0.02 +2.5 +1.76 +7.0 +0.27 +6.0 +0.04 +4.5 +0.54 +8.0 -0.01 +3.6 +2.0 +0.32 -4.7 -0.01 +3.4 +4.0 +0.16 +5.4 +0.51 -5.1 +0.62 +12.3 +0.55 +9.1 +1.12 +4.9 +0.66 +14.8 -0.01 +2.8 +0.04 +4.1 +1.06 +6.9 +0.10 +4.3 +0.28 -6.4 +0.17 +5.3 +0.45 +22.0 +0.9 +1.8 +0.47 +9.7 +0.01 +2.7 +0.05 +3.6 +3.8 -0.01 +2.9 +1.23 +12.4 +0.57 +14.7 +0.87 +14.0 +0.58 +5.8 +0.29 -6.2 +0.55 +7.2 +0.58 +5.8 +0.54 +7.2 +0.38 +4.3

OverseasA 20.17 +0.12 +3.6 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.87 +2.7 FoundAl p 10.02 +0.11 +2.0 HYTFA p 10.10 -0.01 +4.3 IncomA p 2.09 +0.02 +3.9 USGovA p 6.74 +0.01 +3.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +7.2 IncmeAd 2.08 +0.02 +4.0 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.10 +0.01 +3.2 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 19.90 +0.24 +4.4 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.16 +0.06 -6.0 GlBd A p 13.45 +0.06 +7.2 GrwthA p 16.39 +0.18 -2.5 WorldA p 13.61 +0.11 -2.6 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 16.40 +0.18 -2.4 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.47 +0.06 +7.0 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 38.21 +0.59 +3.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.12 +0.18 -1.1 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.34 +0.23 +0.7 Quality 19.13 +0.18 -1.1 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 32.35 +0.73 +11.6 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.05 +0.03 +4.4 HYMuni 8.58 -0.01 +6.8 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.51 +3.4 CapApInst 33.63 +0.58 +2.0 IntlInv t 51.60 +0.68 -5.1 Intl r 52.12 +0.69 -5.0 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 31.38 +0.59 +2.3 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 27.97 +0.53 +2.0 Hartford Fds Y:

CapAppI 31.33 +0.59 +2.4 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 38.25 +0.74 +4.4 Div&Gr 18.29 +0.21 +4.2 Advisers 18.34 +0.20 +5.0 TotRetBd 10.96 +0.01 +3.6 HussmnStrGr 12.78 -0.06 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.53 +0.21 +3.4 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 21.33 +0.32 -2.1 AssetStA p 21.89 +0.33 -1.8 AssetStrI r 22.05 +0.33 -1.7 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.30 -0.01 +3.0 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.30 +3.1 HighYld 7.92 +0.04 +5.1 IntmTFBd 10.92 +1.4 ShtDurBd 10.92 +1.3 USLCCrPls 19.04 +0.28 +4.7 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.01 +0.45 +2.9 OvrseasT r 44.05 +0.71 +3.6 PrkMCVal T 21.18 +0.31 +7.0 Twenty T 62.29 +0.76 +1.1 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.20 +0.20 +4.0 LSBalanc 12.23 +0.13 +4.1 LSGrwth 11.92 +0.16 +4.1 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.33 +0.60 +12.7 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 18.76 +0.36 +4.2 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.02 +0.36 +4.0 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 16.02 +0.01 +3.1 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.58 +0.35 +10.3 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.81 +0.04 +5.6 StrInc C 14.35 +0.05 +5.2 LSBondR 13.76 +0.04 +5.5 StrIncA 14.28 +0.04 +5.5

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.05 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 10.90 +0.16 BdDebA p 7.51 +0.04 ShDurIncA p 4.59 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.51 +0.09 ValueA 21.60 +0.22 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.70 +0.22 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.72 +0.02 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.90 +0.07 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.32 +0.26 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.32 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.32 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 12.49 +0.12 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 27.52 +0.28 GlbDiscZ 27.86 +0.28 QuestZ 17.75 +0.20 SharesZ 20.07 +0.25 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.88 +0.80 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.44 +0.83 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.59 +0.27 Intl I r 17.26 +0.25 Oakmark r 40.04 +0.57 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.46 +0.05 GlbSMdCap 13.40 +0.22 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 39.92 +0.65 DvMktA p 29.22 +0.57 GlobA p 54.04 +0.95 IntBdA p 6.24 +0.01 MnStFdA 29.21 +0.43 RisingDivA 14.38 +0.19

+4.9 +6.9 +4.4 +2.7 +3.7 +4.3 +4.4 +3.8 -2.7 +0.5 +6.1 +6.2 -4.1 +3.0 +3.1 +3.0 +4.6 +8.3 +8.1 +4.1 +2.5 +8.1 +5.5 +4.9 +1.6 +1.9 -1.0 +3.8 +3.4

S&MdCpVl 28.72 +0.59 StrInA p 4.08 +0.02 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.06 +0.17 S&MdCpVl 24.76 +0.51 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.01 +0.16 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.28 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 28.91 +0.55 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.11 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.95 +0.03 ComodRR 7.90 +0.06 HiYld 8.99 +0.05 InvGrCp 11.19 LowDu 10.47 +0.01 RealRet 11.51 +0.02 RealRtnI 11.14 +0.01 ShortT 9.87 -0.01 TotRt 11.11 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.14 +0.01 TotRtA 11.11 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.11 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.11 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.11 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 41.25 +0.42 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.35 +0.47 Price Funds: BlChip 34.39 +0.62 CapApp 19.36 +0.20 EmMktS 29.81 +0.45 EqInc 22.61 +0.29 EqIndex 31.62 +0.44 Growth 28.84 +0.55 HlthSci 27.60 +0.57 HiYield 6.55 +0.02

+8.1 +5.8 +3.1 +7.7 +3.0 +5.8 +1.7 +3.9 +5.0 -2.2 +5.2 +4.5 +2.4 +5.7 +4.1 +0.9 +4.0 +3.9 +3.8 +3.5 +3.9 +3.9 +6.7 +4.8 +4.9 +6.6 -0.9 +8.2 +5.7 +4.8 +5.5 +4.8

IntlBond 9.35 IntlStk 12.38 MidCap 53.23 MCapVal 22.63 N Asia 16.51 New Era 43.41 N Horiz 29.03 N Inc 9.44 R2010 14.53 R2015 11.14 R2020 15.28 R2025 11.13 R2030 15.88 R2040 15.93 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 31.11 SmCapVal 33.87 SpecIn 12.02 Value 22.07 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.59 VoyA p 21.31 RiverSource A: DEI 9.18 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.58 PremierI r 18.21 TotRetI r 11.93 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.06 S&P Sel 18.35 Scout Funds: Intl 28.32 Selected Funds: AmShD 38.61 AmShS p 38.60 Sequoia 122.59 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 18.13 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 45.34 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.10 IntValue I 24.62 Tweedy Browne:

-0.02 -4.4 +0.18 -1.7 +1.11 +12.1 +0.43 +9.2 +0.25 +2.3 +0.84 -0.5 +0.79 +13.5 -0.01 +3.3 +0.13 +4.2 +0.12 +4.4 +0.18 +4.7 +0.15 +4.9 +0.23 +5.0 +0.25 +5.1 -0.01 +1.4 +0.83 +15.5 +0.90 +14.9 +0.03 +3.3 +0.33 +7.8 +0.17 +5.3 +0.34 +8.0 +0.18 +4.6 +0.24 +12.0 +0.35 +11.6 +0.21 +10.7 +0.52 +6.3 +0.26 +5.8 +0.36 -2.8 +0.51 +3.7 +0.51 +3.5 +1.89 +11.5 +0.15 -6.1 +0.40 -2.1 +0.17 -2.8 +0.16 -2.8

GblValue 21.69 +0.23 +2.3 VALIC : StkIdx 23.56 +0.33 +5.7 Van Kamp Funds A: CmstA p 14.42 +0.16 +4.8 EqIncA p 8.11 +0.08 +4.6 GrInA p 18.07 +0.22 +5.0 HYMuA p 9.34 +4.5 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.98 +2.8 CpOpAdl 72.15 +1.33 +4.0 EMAdmr r 33.80 +0.44 -0.8 Energy 109.70 +1.78 -2.1 500Adml 108.17 +1.51 +5.8 GNMA Ad 10.82 +0.01 +3.3 HlthCr 49.40 +0.48 -1.6 HiYldCp 5.51 +0.02 +3.6 InfProAd 25.28 +0.03 +3.1 ITsryAdml 11.28 -0.02 +3.3 IntGrAdm 52.67 +0.85 -2.5 ITAdml 13.54 +1.9 ITGrAdm 9.86 -0.01 +4.7 LtdTrAd 11.04 +0.9 LTGrAdml 9.04 -0.05 +3.5 LT Adml 11.05 +2.2 MuHYAdm 10.45 +3.2 PrmCap r 63.00 +1.02 +2.2 STsyAdml 10.76 -0.01 +1.3 ShtTrAd 15.91 +0.5 STIGrAd 10.72 -0.01 +2.5 TtlBAdml 10.51 -0.01 +2.9 TStkAdm 29.28 +0.47 +7.1 WellslAdm 50.76 +0.13 +3.8 WelltnAdm 51.13 +0.38 +3.3 Windsor 42.59 +0.77 +5.9 WdsrIIAd 44.10 +0.62 +4.9 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.74 +0.20 +5.6 CapOpp 31.23 +0.57 +4.0 DivdGro 13.66 +0.14 +3.7 Energy 58.41 +0.94 -2.1 EqInc 19.14 +0.22 +5.6 Explr 64.10 +1.63 +11.9 GNMA 10.82 +0.01 +3.3

GlobEq 16.01 GroInc 24.81 HYCorp 5.51 HlthCre 117.05 InflaPro 12.87 IntlGr 16.55 IntlVal 28.79 ITIGrade 9.86 LifeCon 15.66 LifeGro 20.45 LifeMod 18.46 LTIGrade 9.04 Morg 16.19 MuInt 13.54 MuLtd 11.04 MuShrt 15.91 PrecMtls r 20.97 PrmcpCor 12.70 Prmcp r 60.71 SelValu r 17.57 STAR 18.13 STIGrade 10.72 StratEq 16.95 TgRe2010 21.33 TgtRe2025 11.81 TgtRe2015 11.78 TgRe2020 20.80 TgRe2030 20.17 TgtRe2035 12.15 TgtRe2040 19.90 TgtRe2045 12.56 USGro 16.80 Wellsly 20.95 Welltn 29.60 Wndsr 12.62 WndsII 24.83 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 108.15 Balanced 20.30 DevMkt 9.00 EMkt 25.69 Europe 23.54 Extend 37.04 Growth 28.60

+0.24 +0.38 +0.02 +1.15 +0.01 +0.27 +0.33 -0.01 +0.09 +0.24 +0.16 -0.05 +0.33

+2.2 +6.1 +3.6 -1.6 +3.1 -2.6 -5.9 +4.7 +4.1 +4.6 +4.4 +3.5 +6.0 +1.9 +0.8 +0.4 +0.57 +2.6 +0.20 +4.9 +0.99 +2.1 +0.29 +10.2 +0.18 +3.4 -0.01 +2.5 +0.43 +10.9 +0.16 +3.9 +0.13 +4.3 +0.11 +4.2 +0.21 +4.2 +0.26 +4.5 +0.17 +4.6 +0.27 +4.5 +0.17 +4.5 +0.27 +2.1 +0.05 +3.8 +0.22 +3.3 +0.23 +6.0 +0.34 +4.9

+1.50 +5.8 +0.19 +5.5 +0.11 -5.6 +0.34 -0.8 +0.36 -9.3 +0.95 +13.4 +0.48 +4.9

ITBnd 10.96 -0.02 +3.8 MidCap 18.21 +0.39 +11.3 Pacific 9.81 +0.06 +1.3 REIT r 17.77 +0.30 +20.6 SmCap 31.65 +0.83 +15.1 SmlCpGth 19.16 +0.54 +13.8 SmlCpVl 15.20 +0.37 +16.4 STBnd 10.52 +1.9 TotBnd 10.51 -0.01 +2.9 TotlIntl 13.75 +0.16 -4.6 TotStk 29.27 +0.47 +7.0 Value 19.81 +0.25 +6.9 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 20.30 +0.19 +5.5 DevMkInst 8.93 +0.11 NS ExtIn 37.07 +0.96 +13.5 GrwthIst 28.61 +0.49 +5.0 InfProInst 10.30 +0.01 +3.2 InstIdx 107.44 +1.49 +5.8 InsPl 107.45 +1.49 +5.8 InsTStPlus 26.46 +0.43 +7.1 MidCpIst 18.27 +0.40 +11.4 SCInst 31.69 +0.83 +15.3 TBIst 10.51 -0.01 +2.9 TSInst 29.28 +0.47 +7.1 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 89.35 +1.24 +5.8 STBdIdx 10.52 +1.9 TotBdSgl 10.51 -0.01 +2.9 TotStkSgl 28.26 +0.46 +7.1 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.41 +0.16 +3.2 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.4 Western Asset: CorePlus I 10.62 +6.7


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “HOW TO START A BUSINESS”: Covers basic steps needed to open a business. Preregistration required; $15; 10 a.m.-noon; Crook County School District, 471 N.E. Ochoco Plaza Drive, Prineville; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “SELECTING HEALTHY AND SAFE PRODUCTS”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www .buildinggreencouncil.org. “INTERMEDIATE EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 20 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “CREATE YOUR PERSONAL RETIREMENT ANALYSIS”: Define retirement goals, income distribution and tax strategies. Taught by Chad Staskal. Registration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by At Home Care Group; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-312-0051 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. “FREE SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS FOR HOME AND WORK”: Learn how to run a home or business using free software. Preregistration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “INSURANCE BILLING — BEYOND THE BASICS”: Designed for health care professionals and those in the medical field who want to learn about billing insurance companies. Preregistration required; $59,

continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING”: Learn how to select and write grant applications for nonprofit organizations. Taught by professional nonprofit fundraiser Laura Pinckney. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues May 21 from 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “POWERPOINT 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues May 21 from 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or www.cocc.edu. CREATING A RÉSUMÉ IN WORD: Learn to create a résumé using Microsoft Word. Prerequisites: “Getting Started with Computer Software” or familiarity with Microsoft Office programs. Registration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or jenniferp@deschuteslibrary.org. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. “INTRODUCTION TO WORDPRESS”: Learn the basics of small website building, uploading images, writing for the Web and blogging using WordPress; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www .alpineinternet.com/locals. “DISCOVERING YOUR KEYWORD NICHE”: Learn to optimize keyword search-ability, and cover changes made in Google’s search engine algorithm; 11 a.m.-noon; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. “THE FRESH WEB”: A short review of Web news intended to help Web authors and managers understand the ever changing Web environment; free; noon-12:15 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals. “CENTER STAGE REVIEW”:

Learn to manage a Web site using Alpine Internet Solution’s Content Management System, which is designed to simplify engine optimization; free; 12:15-1 p.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704 or www.alpineinternet.com/locals.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO WORKSHOP: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY “PATS AIR TESTING AND SEALING”: Prepares students to evaluate air leaks in a house, seal air leaks and create an energy-efficient home. Performance Air Testing & Sealing certification available. Registration required by May 7; $295; 8 a.m.2 p.m., and class continues May 18 from 8 a.m.-noon followed by an optional certification test; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or www.cocc.edu. “WORD 2007 — BEYOND THE BASICS”: Learn about common and more advanced features of Microsoft Word 2007. Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; Mondays through March 1 from 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-9 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. INTERMEDIATE FLASH ANIMATION CLASS: Preregistration required; $59; Mondays through May 24 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY “EMPLOYMENT BEYOND THE RECESSION”: WorkSource Oregon Employment Department will provide

an economic update and analysis. Economists will discuss Oregon’s work force trends, regions that are likely to grow the fastest, the new “normal” for housing and recently completed reports, including one that analyzes Oregon’s green jobs. Registration required by May 11; $50, includes breakfast; 7:30 a.m.-noon; The Riverhouse Hotel & Convention Center, 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-388-6024 or Denise. A.Pollock@state.or.us. “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401. USING ONLINE DATABASES: Learn about electronic databases and how to search the library’s fulltext magazine database Magazines Online. Registration is required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055. “FROM HERE TO NET ZERO”: Discover strategies for achieving highly efficient homes and powering homes through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high performance standards. Oregon CCB credits are available. Registration required by May 17; general $25; Earth Advantage builders and certified professionals $15; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-480-7303. “DEMYSTIFYING THE DEFICIT”: An Edward Jones adviser will lead a seminar about the current U.S. deficit crisis and what it means for investors. Topics include four ways the government may seek to reduce the deficit and potential solutions for investors. Hors d’oeuvres will be served. Reservations requested; free; 6 p.m.; Greg’s Grill, 395 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3304329. “EMOTIONAL CONNECTIONS — COPYWRITING”: Part of a graphic design series hosted by Central Oregon Community College

Community Learning. Preregistration required; $79, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “HOMEOWNERSHIP ORIENTATION”: If your income is within Bend Area Habitat For Humanity’s guidelines, you may qualify to purchase affordable housing through BAHFH’s no-interest mortgage home ownership program. Additional details and applications will be available at this orientation; free; 6 p.m.; Habitat for Humanity, 1860 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-385-5387 or www.bendhabitat.org. “HOW TO DEVELOP A BUSINESS PLAN”: First-time business owners will learn how to evaluate finances, target their market and present ideas in a written business plan. Preregistration required; $49, includes workbook; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. “WEB SITE FINE TUNING WITH HTML”: Class offers HTML instruction for users operating Dreamweaver and other Web site development systems. Preregistration required; $59; 6-9 p.m., and class continues May 25 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ONLINE SOCIAL MEDIA — MANAGING YOUR SITES”: Part of the Marketing Online series; $49; Tuesdays through May 25 from 6:30-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY “THE PREP PRO PERSONALITY PROFILE ADMINISTRATOR CERTIFICATION”: Human resource professionals, consultants, coaches, managers and business owners may learn to use PREP’s online personality reports to assist in understanding, coaching and managing current and prospective employees. Registration required by May 14; $995; Discounts available for two or more individuals from the same company; 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.; PREP Profile Systems, 19800 Village Office Court, Suite 101, Bend; 541-382-1401.

Spain plans broad cuts in spending New York Times News Service MADRID — Calling for a “collective national effort” to restore investor confidence in Spain’s finances, Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero announced sweeping spending cuts Wednesday that reversed promises to preserve pensions and salaries. Spain’s government is planning pay cuts of about 5 percent for civil servants and 15 percent for government ministers, as well as other measures totaling 15 billion euros, or $19 billion.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Patricia C. Achterman, 20574 Dorchester E., $103,626 Brookswood Bend LLC, 61138 S.W. Montrose Pass St., $178,123 Trinity Episcopal Church, 231 N.W. Idaho Ave., $150,000 School District #1, 230 N.E. Sixth St., $750,000 A 1 Excavation Inc., 63228 Logan Ave., $159,630 Jeremy Kinzer, 19068 Mt. Hood Place, $261,000 Ronald Steinberg, 19909 Alderwood Circle, $186,687 Greg Welch Construction, 2203 N.W. Clearwater Drive, $201,027 Crook County

Lloyd G. Church, 13982 S.W. Meadowlark, Powell Butte, $238,770 Deschutes County

Engweiler-Smith Family Trust, 17650 Mountain View Road, Sisters, $465,479.45


L

Inside

C OREGON Portland police chief fired a day after $1.6M settlement, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Highwaymen lead singer Dave Fisher dies, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010

Fred Meyer digitizes coupons

TEENS teach their ELDERS

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Fred Meyer is launching a new program to digitize all coupons for products available in its stores, allowing shoppers to electronically transfer manufacturer’s coupons to their Rewards Card. Company spokeswoman Amanda Ip said the new system is part of a nationwide rollout by Fred Meyer’s parent company, Kroger, which operates multiple grocery chains across the country. Although Safeway offers a digital coupon service and Albertsons allows shoppers to print out coupons from its website, Ip said Fred Meyer’s new program is the first in the Northwest to put every coupon issued by the store’s suppliers in a single place. “Our competitors, in order for their customers to redeem coupons they have to go to multiple different (web)sites in order to collect all those manufacturers coupons, fredmeyer.com allows you to have access to all of those on one site,” she said. Representatives of Safeway and Albertsons stores did not return calls for comment. The Fred Meyer system requires shoppers to sign up on the company’s website, fredmeyer. com. There, shoppers will be presented with a list of coupons for products available at Fred Meyer stores, sortable by product type, value, expiration date and popularity. Shoppers choose the coupons they’re interested in, transfer them to their Rewards Card and take off the savings at checkout. See Coupons / C5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

S

ummit High School sophomore Andrew Orlich, 16, center, gives John Broderick, 76, both of Bend, instructions on how to use e-mail at Clear One Health Plans in Bend on Wednesday afternoon. Andrew also showed Broderick how to use the camera on his phone. The Central Oregon Council on Aging paired teens with senior citizens for a program that asked the

teenagers to teach their elders about various types of technology, from Facebook to cell phones. Two more classes are scheduled for the

next two Wednesdays, but seniors interested in participating must first contact the council at 541-548-8817 or admin@councilonaging .org. The classes are free.

Have you voted? Ballots must be returned by 8 p.m. Tuesday. Postmarks do not count. Voters may mail their ballots or take them to drop-off locations, listed online at the following sites: Deschutes County: www .co.deschutes.or.us/go/ government/departments/ county-clerk/elections/currentelection/index.cfm • Anyone registered to vote in Deschutes County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541388-6547. Crook County: http://co.crook .or.us/Departments/ CountyClerk/BallotDropSites/ tabid/1031/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Crook County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541447-6553. Jefferson County: www .co.jefferson.or.us/Elected Officials/CountyClerk/Elections/ tabid/1421/Default.aspx • Anyone registered to vote in Jefferson County who has not received a ballot should contact the county clerk’s office at 541475-4451.

ELECTION

So far, the following percentages of registered voters have returned their ballots: Deschutes County:

19.9 percent Crook County:

24.7 percent Jefferson County:

27.4 percent

Powell Butte Charter School signs agreement with district

Merkley amendment aims to stop unfair loans

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley’s amendment banning payments to mortgage brokers for selling more expensive loans to borrowers and ending the practice of no-documentation or “liar loans,” passed on Wednesday, 63-36. The measure is one of several added to the financial regulation reform bill over the past two weeks. Merkley, D-Ore., said the new rules are needed to avoid a repeat of the sub-prime mortgage meltdown of two years ago. “The failure of basic mortgage underwriting was a key factor of bad loans that became bad securities that blew up our economy,” Merkley said. “It’s unfair to the loan originators when they’re paid to make a deal that’s not in their clients’ interest.” The amendment has three main provisions: • Bans mortgage brokers and other lenders from receiving payments based on the terms of loans. That targets the practice of banks awarding “steering payments” to mortgage issuers for pushing borrowers into more expensive loans. • Requires lenders to verify the borrower’s ability to pay back a mortgage, based on income and other assets. This targets the socalled “liar loans” often held up as examples of the worst abuses of the sub-prime mortgage crisis. • Bans the use of temporary “teaser rates” to sell mortgages which borrowers otherwise couldn’t afford. See Mortgage / C5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Heather Harris, standing in the student store at Bend High School on Tuesday, holds the trophy she won for taking second place in the advertising campaign competition at the DECA national competition.

For Powell Butte community members, it’s been a long battle to keep the small town’s only school open, and now it’s official — this September, Powell Butte Charter School will open its doors. The charter school and the Crook County School District have signed a three-year lease and the school is searching for a principal. When the school district fought a budget shortfall last school year, officials decided to cut the upper grades

Bend teen wins 2nd place for DECA ad campaign By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Heather Harris is just 18, but she’s already run an advertising campaign for a local business that won her state and national awards. Several weeks ago, Harris, a senior at Bend High, took second place in a national competition for the advertising campaign she created for Blind Squirrel Comedy, a group of comedians that puts on shows around Central Oregon. She beat out hundreds of other high school students around the country, many of whom ran hypothetical campaigns for major companies with millions of dollars. Bend High DECA adviser Kristen Torkelson said Heather has been her go-to person this year. “I can send her anywhere, she can speak anywhere,” she said. “Anything I need to have done she can do.” DECA is a co-curricular club

that provides students with business, management and entrepreneurial skills, and allows them to compete to prove they’ve mastered those skills. Heather, 18, got involved in DECA as a sophomore after deciding to take the introductory marketing class at Bend High. “I had no idea what I was getting into,” she said. Drawn to the class because it provided real-world experience, Heather stuck with it. “It isn’t just learning something in a book,” she said. “We run the store, we meet with business people.” She’s been a DECA member ever since, competing in the state competition all three years and going to nationals twice. As a junior, Heather took first place in market research at state; this year, she took first place in advertising campaigns at state, then took second at the national competition this spring. See DECA / C5

at the Powell Butte Elementary School to save money. Community members saw the writing on the wall. If the district continued to have budget problems, the elementary school — which has been described as the heart of their community — would likely be on the chopping block. They were right. This school year, board members officially closed the school, which cleared the way for Powell Butte residents to turn the building into a charter school. See Charter / C5

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C2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

T O D AY IN HISTORY

L B  

Pope John Paul II shot, wounded in 1981

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

The Associated Press Today is Thursday, May 13, the 133rd day of 2010. There are 232 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 13, 1940, in his first speech as prime minister of Britain, Winston Churchill told Parliament, “I would say to the House, as I said to those who have joined this government: I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.� ON THIS DATE In 1607, English colonists arrived by ship at the site of what became the Jamestown settlement in Virginia (the colonists went ashore the next day). In 1917, three shepherd children near Fatima, Portugal, reported seeing a vision of the Virgin Mary. In 1918, the first U.S. airmail stamps, featuring a picture of a Curtiss JN-4 biplane, were issued to the public. (On a few of the stamps, the biplane was inadvertently printed upside-down, making them collector’s items.) In 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed into law the St. Lawrence Seaway Development Act. The musical play “The Pajama Game� opened on Broadway. In 1958, Vice President Richard Nixon and his wife, Pat, were spat upon and their limousine battered by rocks thrown by anti-U.S. demonstrators in Caracas, Venezuela. In 1968, a one-day general strike took place in France in support of student protesters. In 1981, Pope John Paul II was shot and seriously wounded in St. Peter’s Square by Turkish assailant Mehmet Ali Agca. In 1985, a confrontation between Philadelphia authorities and the radical group MOVE ended as police dropped a bomb onto the group’s row house; 11 people, including founder John Africa, died in the resulting fire that destroyed 61 homes. In 1994, President Bill Clinton nominated federal appeals Judge Stephen Breyer to the U.S. Supreme Court to replace retiring Justice Harry Blackmun. TEN YEARS AGO Explosions at a fireworks warehouse in the Netherlands killed 22 people and injured nearly 1,000 others. (A suspect was found guilty of causing the blasts, but his conviction was overturned.) FIVE YEARS AGO The Pentagon proposed the most sweeping changes to its network of military bases in modern history. The president of Mexico, Vicente Fox, praised the dedication of Mexicans working in the United States, saying they were willing to take jobs that “even blacks� wouldn’t do, a statement that prompted criticism in the United States. Government troops in Uzbekistan put down an uprising they blamed on Islamic militants; opponents said the troops fired into crowds and killed hundreds of people. ONE YEAR AGO A judge in West Palm Beach sentenced two men to death for the drug-debt slaying of a family of four on the side of a Florida highway, including two young boys who died in their mother’s arms. Atlantis’ astronauts captured the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope for five days of repair work. Pittsburgh’s Adam LaRoche and Florida’s Ross Gload became the first baseball players to have home runs taken away following a video replay review. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Harvey Keitel is 71. Singer Stevie Wonder is 60. Basketball player Dennis Rodman is 49. Actor-comedian Stephen Colbert is 46. Singer Darius Rucker (Hootie and the Blowfish) is 44. Actor Robert Pattinson is 24. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “So you think that money is the root of all evil. Have you ever asked what is the root of money?� — Ayn Rand, Russian-born author (1905-82)

Fatal truck crash on Hwy. 20 east of Bend One person was killed in a single-vehicle crash involving a tanker truck about 10 miles east of Brothers on U.S. Highway 20 on Wednesday afternoon, according to Oregon State Police. The truck pulling two tanker trailers containing an unidentified petroleum product crashed at around 4:15 p.m., rolled, and caught fire. As of 6:30 p.m., the truck was still burning and traffic was closed in both directions along a 22mile section of the highway. The Oregon Department of Transportation declined to estimate when the highway would be reopened. No other information was available Wednesday evening.

Local water strategy meeting set for today Oregon is developing an Integrated Water Resources Strategy to look at water use and resource issues in the state, and is holding a series of open houses to find out what residents think are the challenges and potential solutions when it comes to water resources. The Central Oregon open house will be held from 4 to 7 p.m. today at Redmond Fire and Rescue, 341 Dogwood Ave. in Redmond. Officials will give a presentation at 4 and 5:30 p.m.

Veterans Historic Highway fundraiser A fundraising dinner held at Jake’s Diner in partnership with the Bend Band of Brothers will raise money for the World War II Veterans Historic Highway fund, according to a news release Tuesday. The Spaghetti Feed will be held on May 23, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Jake’s Diner, at 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20. The meal will cost $10 per person and all money raised will go toward the Bend Heroes Foundation to help with the cost of the highway project. The highway fund was established to install World War II Veterans Historic Highway signs along U.S. Highway 97 and state Highway 126, marking former World War II training sites. The goal of the signs is to honor veterans and educate the public on the locations of World War II training grounds. Funding for the project is provided by local government, veterans, historical groups and the community.

Oregonians’ opinions to be topic of forum Nationally recognized public opinion researcher Adam Davis will be the featured speaker at a forum entitled “Weathering the Public Opinion Storm: Aligning Attitudes and Actions,� held by the City Club of Central Oregon May 20, according to a news release. The forum, to be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the St. Charles Bend Center for

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Health and Learning, will present a general overview of Oregonians’ attitudes on government and public policy based on Davis’ research findings. The cost of the event is $15 for members of the City Club of Central Oregon and $30 for nonmembers. Lunch is included. Preregistration is required by Monday, and can be done by calling 541-633-7163.

Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:49 a.m. May 11, in the 1000 block of Northwest Federal Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:52 a.m. May 11, in the 2000 block of Northeast Monterey Avenue. Theft — A camera was reported stolen at 10:55 a.m. May 11, in the 700 block of Northwest Bond Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 11:09 a.m. May 11, in the 400 block of Southeast

Panel to discuss end-of-life issues An educational panel will discuss end-of-life issues at St. Charles Bend on Sunday from 1 to 2:30 p.m. The event will bring together the public and medical professionals to discuss hospice care, terminal illness and the legal aspects of end-of-life choices. A palliative care physician with St. Charles Medical Center and members of the nonprofit organization Compassion & Choices of Oregon will lead the discussion. Religious mentors will discuss the spiritual aspects of terminal illness and death. The public, health care providers, terminally ill patients and their families are all welcome to attend.

Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 1:06 p.m. May 11, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:01 p.m. May 11, in the 2100 block of Northwest Ivy Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:55 a.m. May 11, in the 300 block of Southwest Seventh Street. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:33 a.m. May 11, in the 2100 block of West Antler Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:31 a.m. May 11, in the 2100 block of West Antler Avenue.

Redmond Police Department

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:20 p.m. May 11, in the 100 block of Northwest Dogwood Avenue.

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:28 a.m. May 11, in the 600 block of North Arrowleaf Trail in Sisters.

University of Oregon president proposes new way to fund school The Associated Press EUGENE — The president of the University of Oregon says it’s time to try a new way of operating — and funding — his school. Richard Lariviere is proposing creation of a roughly $1.6 billion endowment, partly funded by state bonds. He plans to present the idea to the Oregon Legislature when it meets next year. If the state sold 30-year bonds worth about $800 million, the annual debt service would be about the same as the $65 million the school will receive in state funding this year, Lariviere said Tuesday. The university would raise another $800 million in private gifts, creating the endowment. The money would be invested, with some of the earnings used to help run the university and the rest reinvested. The state’s annual contribution would remain about what it is now, and would go to pay bond interest over the next 30 years. Lariviere said the plan would avoid large fluctuations in the amount the university receives from the state, and also eliminate the waiting before the school knows what its appro-

Bend man arrested on weapon, drug charges Deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office arrested a Bend man on suspicion of possession of a sawed-off shotgun and on multiple drug charges Tuesday as part of an ongoing investigation, according to a news release from the Sheriff’s Office. Anthony Mauti, 34, was arrested as deputies served a search warrant at a home on Rickard Road. Detectives seized methamphetamine, digital scales, drug records, a marijuana manufacturing operation, a sawed-off shotgun and $900 in cash suspected to be proceeds from drug sales. Mauti was jailed on suspicion of unlawful manufacturing, possession, and delivery of both marijuana and methamphetamine, and unlawful possession of a short barreled firearm. He has since been released on bail.

Prescribed burn near Sisters today Crews with the Deschutes National Forest and the Oregon Department of Forestry are planning to light a prescribed burn in the Metolius area today at around 10 a.m. The 200-acre burn site west of Sisters has been thinned to prepare for a low-intensity burn, and crews expect to conduct multiple ignitions over the next two weeks. Smoke from the prescribed burn may be found along Forest Road 14, and in Camp Sherman and other residential areas along the Metolius River corridor. Signs and flaggers will be available to direct traffic if smoke creates hazardous driving conditions.

McKinley Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:09 p.m. May 11, in the 900 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Theft — Tools in the amount of $1,050 were reported stolen at 3:26 p.m. May 11, in the 100 block of Northwest Jefferson Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:55 p.m. May 11, in the 1800 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. DUII — Michael Jeremiah Healy, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:01 p.m. May 11, in the 1200 block of Northwest Wall Street.

priation will be. “Oregon has led the way, regrettably, in making cuts to higher education,� he said. “So let’s just be realistic and candid about this. There just isn’t going to be enough money. Ever.� Lariviere’s plan would establish the university’s own board of directors that would assume most of the powers now held by the state, including authority to set tuition. In return, the university would be required to meet specific performance goals set by the state to guarantee continued access, quality and affordability. He acknowledges his plan will be a tough sell to lawmakers and higher education leaders. House Speaker Dave Hunt called himself cautiously pessimistic about the plan, which he compared to giving his children a 30-year advance on their allowance. “It has a way of getting spent more quickly, and Mom and Dad don’t have accountability anymore,� he said. Oregon Senate President Peter Courtney said he’s prepared to give the idea a fair hearing, but says it raises some difficult issues. One is whether the state should put itself another rough-

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ly $1 billion in debt after using similar mechanisms to finance seismic improvements to public buildings and road repairs, along with other needs. Another issue is the effect such a change would have on the state’s six other public universities, Courtney said. Paul Kelly, president of the State Board of Higher Education, echoed the latter concern. He said the proposal raises a host of questions about how to deal with other universities that would want to do the same thing, how tuition would be regulated and how much autonomy to grant the university.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 C3

O Father wants bail money back Portland police chief fired By Sanne Specht (Medford) Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — A Central Point man says the Jackson County Circuit Court system is committing theft by refusing to return $100,000 in bail he posted on behalf of his son. And he is vowing to fight all the way to the Supreme Court to get his money back. “I was under the impression I could bail my son out without them stealing my money,” Kent Gutches says. Gutches, 50, says he took out a loan to raise the 10 percent of the $1 million bail necessary to get his son, Brad Gutches, 27, out of jail following his May 2009 arrest on multiple first- and second-degree rape and other sex charges. While the son is in prison, the father still may pay a heavy price for posting the bail. Kent Gutches declined to comment on his son’s offenses other than to say he should not be held liable for them. Or for any pending civil action. “I didn’t commit a crime. Why are they punishing me?” he said. Unlike California and other states, Oregon made it clear in a 1978 state Supreme Court decision that the state would allow no bail bondsmen or bounty hunters. It is up to the defendant or their friends or family to post 10 percent in cash of any bail amount required.

State as bondsman “The state, in effect, acts like the bail bondsman,” says Jackson County District Attorney Mark Huddleston. And the state has set its own terms about liability and release. Kent Gutches acknowledges that he signed a single-page document which advises those posting bail that they may not have their money returned. He even read the part where it said

“I was under the impression I could bail my son out without them stealing my money.” — Kent Gutches he would be held liable for the entire $1 million bail amount if his son skipped town, he says. But he said he was assured by county clerks at the bail window that the maximum amount he might be out would be only $6,500 in “pre-existing judgment.” “They said it was for back child support and things like that,” he said. “I asked them if they were going to steal my money and they said ‘no.’ They said they’d give it back to me.”

‘Horror stories’ Jackson County Sheriff Mike Winters says anyone considering posting bail for someone else should read the county’s release carefully and fully understand the potential financial liability before they put up their cash. “People need to be very careful,” Winters said. “There is a lot of liability in posting bail. There are very few people I’d bail out. I’ve heard horror stories.” Some in the criminal justice system have privately raised concerns that the case will deter people who otherwise may have been willing to post bail for defendants, which could lead to more jail overcrowding. When overcrowding occurs, the Sheriff’s Department releases prisoners based a matrix that quantifies each inmate’s potential danger to the community. Brad Gutches ultimately entered into an agreement with the county DA’s office, pleading

guilty to three forcible rape charges involving two victims. The other charges against him were dropped. He is currently in prison after being sentenced by Jackson County Circuit Judge Ron Grensky in September 2009 to serve just over 11 years in prison for the Measure 11 crimes. Court records show a civil case has been filed against Brad Gutches related to the criminal cases. Kent Gutches said he and his attorneys have appeared before both Circuit Court judges Phil Arnold and Dan Harris trying to get the bail money returned. Both judges ruled against him, he says. “I really think it is criminal what these judges are doing,” says Kent Gutches. “We proved the money was my money. What they’re arguing is that in the state of Oregon, you do not have the right to fair bail.” At the urging of the plaintiff in the civil case, the court decided that any money posted on a defendant’s behalf becomes property of the defendant and, thus, they are holding the money to satisfy any potential judgment in favor of the plaintiff, said Kent Gutches’ attorney, John Rich. Huddleston sides with the judges’ rulings, he says. “It says right there on the document that bail can be used for other purposes,” Huddleston says. “Good for the judges.” Gutches says he is spending $700 a month to cover the interest on the loan, in addition to the $40,000 he has paid in attorneys fees and other expenses. He has also filed a civil suit against his son to protect his assets should the plaintiff prevail in the abuserelated civil case. “I would assume we’re going to be in court for a long time,” he says. “These judges think they can make law. People need to know about this. And I believe somebody is liable for my damages.”

day after $1.6M settlement By William McCall

Portland Mayor Sam Adams announces on Wednesday the firing of Police Chief Rosie Sizer, who was replaced by Central Precinct Cmdr. Mike Reese, right.

The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Portland Mayor Sam Adams fired the city’s police chief Wednesday, a day after the city agreed to pay $1.6 million to settle a lawsuit over the death of a mentally ill man in police custody. Adams said at a City Hall news conference the factors that went into his decision were “cumulative” but that he made up his mind Tuesday night and met with Police Chief Rosie Sizer on We d n e s d a y morning. He praised Sizer for her Rosie Sizer four years as chief, saying she “has accomplished some remarkable reforms” at the Portland Police Bureau. But the mayor added: “Too often though, the reforms have come after, or in reaction to, failures at the bureau. I want to put the bureau on a more proactive reform path.” Adams named Mike Reese, the Central Precinct commander, as the new chief, effective with the announcement. Adams said Sizer would take her remaining vacation time until she can officially retire on July 15 to preserve her full benefits. Sizer could not immediately be reached for comment following the announcement. The mayor also said he would take over immediately as po-

Brent Wojahn The Oregonian

lice commissioner, a traditional role for the Portland mayor but one that Adams had delegated to City Commissioner Dan Saltzman. On Monday, Sizer criticized the mayor’s proposed budget, and was joined by Saltzman. Adams said Wednesday the dispute over the budget “forced the timeline” of his decision to fire Sizer and take over as police commissioner. He did not elaborate. Adams also said budget cuts in many social service agencies are forcing Portland police officers to act as social workers, and they will have to take on more of that role as a practical matter. On Tuesday, Saltzman announced the $1.6 million settlement in the police custody death lawsuit and made a public apology to the family of James Chasse Jr., who died in September 2006 after he was tackled by officers on a street corner, breaking 16 ribs and puncturing his lung. Chasse, 42, suffered from schizophrenia.

Park’s cheetah loses 18 inches off her tail

Conservationists seek butterfly protection

berland, could be damaged by future logging.

WINSTON — Return visitors to the Wildlife Safari animal park will notice its ambassador cheetah sporting a new look. Officials at the Winston-based park say the 4-year-old cheetah named Taini had half her tail amputated last month after suffering an injury. No one saw what happened, but executive director Dan Van Slyke speculates the tail may have gotten caught in a chain link fence. The cheetah has made no public appearances since losing 18 inches off her tail, but will be one of the featured animals at Wildlife Safari’s Big Cat Carnival on Saturday. A belated birthday party for Taini is planned in which she will tear open giftwrapped boxes filled with meat.

PORTLAND — Conservation groups are seeking endangered species protection for a butterfly found only in a six-square mile area of southern Oregon. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Oregon Wild filed a petition Wednesday with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to protect the insect known as Leona’s little blue butterfly. Sarina Jepsen of the Xerces Society says there are only 2,000 of the butterflies left in an area known as the Antelope Desert in northern Klamath County, and they are at high risk for extinction from a wildfire or pesticide spraying. The petition also raises concerns that the butterfly’s habitat, most of which is on private tim-

More public comment taken on field burning PORTLAND — State environmental regulators have extended the time the public has to comment on new rules being written to phase out most field burning in the Willamette Valley. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality says the comment period was extended until May 21 after the group Oregon Toxics Alliance asked for more time. Grass seed farmers have long burned their fields to get rid of pests. Bowing to complaints about the smoke, the Legislature last year cut the amount of field burning allowed from 65,000 acres a year to 15,000 acres. — From wire reports

PORTLAND — The Oregonian reports that one person is dead and a Portland police officer has been wounded in the leg in a shooting Wednesday. Mayor Sam Adams says he has been told the shooting occurred during a traffic stop. The dead person is a civilian. Adams arrived Wednesday evening at Legacy Emanuel Hospital and Health Center to check on the officer. New Police Chief Mike Reese is on the scene, talking to officers. He was promoted to the post earlier Wednesday after Adams fired former Chief Rosie Sizer. — The Associated Press

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C4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

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BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Little money for good idea

A

mong the various study groups created by the 2009 Oregon Legislature was the Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, headed by Attorney General John Kroger. Its

purpose is noble: to improve the state’s “alcohol and drug prevention and recovery strategy.” But in the end, its ability to accomplish that goal may well lie beyond its control. The commission issued its interim report early this month, and it lays out the problem clearly. Oregon and its citizens pay a terrible price for drug and alcohol abuse. Among the problems identified: Almost 70 percent of prison inmates need drug or alcohol treatment. More than half of parents whose children are abused or neglected have substance abuse problems. Drunken drivers account for about a third of all the state’s traffic fatalities. The cost of all this is enormous: In 2006, the report says, Oregonians paid $813 million for drug and alcohol health treatment. Further, the cost to the state’s economy each year amounts to $3.2 billion. According to the report, the commission’s goal is both simple and monumental. It aims to create a system that crosses state agencies with clear policy and budget priorities. It found there is no such system now, or at least no effective one. Further, it should be streamlined, accessible and transparent. Moreover, the report suggests that the commission itself, or its successor, become permanent and be headed by Oregon’s very own drug czar. The czar’s job will be to put all this in place and leave no stone unturned in the search for money to accomplish the new commission’s goals. Every ugly statistic the interim report cites could well be true. Moreover, a coordinated, carefully thought-out ap-

proach to the problems would be better than the scattershot approach the commission says the state employs now. Yet putting the commission’s recommendations in place won’t be easy, especially next year. The problem is, the state is unlikely to be able to pay for much of anything new, much less a brand-new system with brand-new offices and employees, brandnew technology … you get the idea. In fact, money already has scotched much of the state’s most recent effort to get a handle on at least one element of its drug problem. Measure 57, referred to voters by the 2008 special session Legislature, required Oregon’s prison system to make treatment available to addicted prisoners likely to reoffend. Voters approved it by a substantial margin, but so far the state has not had the money to implement it. It’s difficult to see how it will be able to put a more elaborate system in place in a year when budget shortfalls are expected to top $2 billion. We’re not suggesting that, given economic reality, the study commission close up shop and go home. It shouldn’t. There’s, no doubt, value in understanding and publicizing both the scope of the problem and possible solutions. At the same time, however, it should recognize that chances are slim it will get the new agency, drug czar and all the rest it says are necessary. The funds simply are not there.

Bend’s fitting new sculpture T

he Bend Park & Recreation District is the latest recipient of a sculpture from Bend’s Art in Public Places, and a fitting piece it is.

“Yakaya,” three flowers constructed of kayaks and paddles, is the work of Seattle artist Troy Pillow and sits in the center of the roundabout at the park district’s headquarters on the Deschutes River. It’s the second work by Pillow that Bend residents have chosen to grace a roundabout. The first, “Evolution,” was installed at the roundabout at Northeast 15th Street and Bear Creek Road in 2008. Bend’s parks have been the recipients of several pieces from Art in Public Places, funded by the Bend Foundation, which, in turn, is funded by Brooks Resources Corp., BrooksScanlon Inc. and the two companies’ shareholders. Other APP pieces may be seen in Juniper Park, which was an early recipient of APP generosity, Drake Park and McKay Park. In addition, roundabouts along Farewell Bend Park also contain APP donations.

The parks are ideal locations for the pieces. Aside from roundabouts, they’re among Bend’s most heavily used attractions, assuring that resident sculptures will be seen by thousands of people each year. Best, the park district takes good care of the land it’s entrusted with, and it takes equally good care of the art. That’s a boon. In too many communities, parks and the things in them are clearly a low priority. Perhaps nicest for taxpayers, the new sculpture comes at almost no cost to the public, as have virtually all APP pieces. The park district contributed the slab on which “Yakaya” sits and will maintain it, of course, and provide casualty and liability insurance on it. But that’s about it. While the park district wins with a handsome piece to mark its new location, the community wins, as well. “Yakaya” is an outdoorsy piece that reflects our love both of parks and of the Deschutes River. What could be better?

My Nickel’s Worth Experience overrated

Elect DeBone

Vote for Brown

What does it say that letter writer Wes Fisher (“Candidate inexperience,” May 8) seems to be discouraging our youth, namely candidate Dallas Brown, from participating in the political process? Fisher insists that experience with labor issues, regulatory disputes and budgets are requisite to serving the public. Ah, yes, there is that experience factor that the youth lack by virtue of, well, not having lived as long as the “experienced.” The “experienced” have indeed dealt with labor issues, regulatory disputes and budget matters, having architected our current labor market, regulatory environment and budgetary problems. Bend’s fearless “experienced” have, in their mighty wisdom, failed to stem the highest unemployment rate in decades, failed to attract and retain sustainable businesses, and allowed the real estate market to falsely inflate to the point that the debacle in Bend has attracted the attention of economists from London to New York. It is naive to believe that experience is a substitute for intelligence. Brown’s youth and inexperience may be his strongest attributes. At least his generation does not wear the disgraceful mantle of the generation that has left us broke, jobless and bogged down in wars that mainly take the lives of people Brown’s age. Brown certainly can’t do any worse than the “experienced” fools that have brought us to this point. Meri Glade Bend

To the people of Deschutes County, we need to have a new face and a fresh perspective in our local government. We need to elect Tony DeBone for our next Deschutes County commissioner, position 1. He will be dedicated and represent everyone as he did with the La Pine Park and Recreation Association and La Pine Rodeo Association. He brought stability and showed good leadership in these organizations. He will listen to the people. DeBone will work hard to bring new jobs and help those jobs that are already here to stay in Deschutes County. DeBone is very reliable and truthful. If you want a new face and fresh ideas that will put Deschutes County back on its feet, vote for Tony DeBone. Let’s get rid of the old faces and ideas. They haven’t been good for us. Vote for Tone DeBone. I am voting for him! Martha Bauman La Pine

There is one candidate in this election who is truly unique and who deserves consideration when you cast your ballot for the May 18 primary. Dallas Brown, though only 25 years old, has an intimate knowledge of county government and a refreshing perspective on local issues. I, for one, am excited to see someone so committed to his community at such a young age. But that is only one of the reasons I believe Brown is the best candidate for county commissioner, position 1. If you have visited his website, seen him on Third Street and Greenwood Avenue with his sign, or attended any of the numerous forums of late, you would know that Brown is by far the hardest worker in this race. That kind of work ethic is exactly what we need to re-energize county government. I’ve known Dallas Brown for a long time and I can honestly say that he is one of the more thoughtful, articulate and motivated individuals I have ever met. His grasp of the issues is impressive and he is readily accessible. Just e-mail him and likely you’ll get a response in a few days that I am sure will impress. This sort of honest and open communication is what we need in government. Learn the issues, inform yourself and compare the candidates. Once you’ve done the research, I’m sure you’ll agree: Dallas Brown deserves the vote for Deschutes County commissioner. Stephen Cappy Bend

Vote for Hill We need Thomas Hill for our future Judge in Deschutes County. He is diligent, honest, understanding, compassionate and knowledgeable about everything from Deschutes County court and the appellate court in Salem through binding arbitration. You couldn’t ask for anyone better to serve in Deschutes County! Nora Rodriguez Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

There are potholes in Bend’s road maintenance logic By Paul O’Neal Bulletin guest columnist

I

n January, The Bulletin dutifully published the seemingly annual explanation of the pothole situation in Bend, highlighting and explaining (complete with nifty diagrams) the usual culprit causes: snow melt and fluctuating temperatures. The article went on to reiterate the budget woes facing the city as a primary reason for not being able to repair all the potholes riddling the city streets. Recently, we were treated to the second installment of the local road saga: that the city will endeavor to “keep good roads good,” rather than addressing those pockmarked with tooth-jarring and spine-shortening potholes and cracks. To me, such thinking is woodenheaded and short-sighted. A case in point: Last summer the city decided to chip seal the lower section of Century Drive, from the compass

roundabout to just past Entrada Lodge. Mind you, that this section was in very good condition, albeit with a few small cracks here and there, but as compared with other streets in Bend, this was certainly top tier! Puzzled as to the reason for chip sealing a perfectly good road, I stopped and asked a city employee, who responded that they were trying to “keep a good road good.” Sounds like a new slogan! Meanwhile, many roundabouts and roads get worse by the day. In the effort of full disclosure, I hate chip seal! As a road cyclist, chip seal effectively kills a road, and as a motorist it does nothing but crack windshields and chip paint. But my personal biases aside, that chip seal so recently laid down has been peeling off in patches of various size almost the entire length of the project. Whether due to poor workmanship or other factors, the fact remains that the road is in much worse condition than it was before the project! That

IN MY VIEW certainly doesn’t live up to the “keeping good roads good” standard in my opinion! Those funds could have fixed a lot of potholes! But what about when the city in fact does repair a pothole? The January article stated that in winter months, the city employees perform a temporary fix using a “throw and go” methodology. However, I’ve witnessed city crews using this same methodology during warmer spring and summer months: simply shoveling in some asphalt mix, mounding it a bit higher than the street surface, then relying on auto traffic driving over the mound to do the compaction … no mechanical compaction, no sealing of the margins, just “throw and go.” The trouble is, these temporary fixes end up failing within a year, and yep, if we’re “lucky” the city is back

Now, I can fully appreciate budget constraints and the limitations of trying to make do with less. However, it seems to me that the limited funds we do have could be put to better use. The decisions that led to chip sealing Century Drive are a perfect example of a priority system gone awry. for another round of throw and go! But given current budget shortfalls, we may not even get that! Now, I can fully appreciate budget constraints and the limitations of trying to make do with less. However, it seems to me that the limited funds we do have could be put to better use. The decisions that led to chip sealing Century Drive are a perfect example of a priority system gone awry. Rather than burn up scarce funds on such a worthless project, why not apply those funds toward longer-lasting repairs

of the myriad potholes in the city or other longer-lasting projects? Yes, that may mean that some good roads are neglected while the worst get at least some attention, but that neglect could actually be a good thing, since Century Drive will probably now be added to the list of worst roads thanks to the attention it received last year. It’s time for the Public Works Department to start thinking past their throw-and-go mentality. Paul O’Neal lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 C5

O D N   Cheerie C. Williams, of Bend Aug. 18, 1953 - May 6, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday, May 13th at 5:00 p.m. at Calvary Chapel, 20225 Cooley Rd., Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Bethlehem Inn of Bend, 3705 N. Hwy. 97, Bend, OR 97701.

Julitta (Juli) Rebecca Wells, of Bend Mar. 17, 1914 - May 10, 2010 Arrangements: BioGift Anatomical and Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com, Bend Services: Private Christian family celebration of her life has been held. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Marjorie B. Smith, of Bend Sept. 14, 1909 - May 7, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: A memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, May 18, 2010 at Trinity Episcopal Church, 469 NW Wall St., Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Deschutes County Historical Society and/or to the Central Oregon Community College Foundation to create a scholarships endowment.

Richard Scott Albert Joy, of Redmond June 30, 1980 - May 8, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 Services: None.

Pearl M. (Spillars) Wright Ellis, of Bend June 27, 1911 - May 7, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine, Oregon, 541-536-5104, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Saturday, May 15, 2010 at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, 52680 Day Road, La Pine, Oregon, Viewing at 10:00 AM, Funeral at 11:00 AM with the dedication of the grave at Pilot Butte Cemetery in Bend immediately following the funeral service. Reception to follow back at the church. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Richard E. Fallar, of Redmond Feb. 25, 1926 - May 7, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592, www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Private family gathering at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Kids Center, 1375 NW Kingston Ave., Bend, OR 97701.

Glen Dean Blaylock, of Bend Dec. 9, 1916 - May 10, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, May 22, 2010 at 2:00 p.m. at Newport Avenue Church of Christ in Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Coupons Continued from C1 The list of coupons will rotate regularly, Ip said, and individual coupons will remain on a customer’s Rewards card until they expire. Cardholders will be able to print a list of the coupons on their card before going shopping, Ip said, in order to help them remember which products they can purchase with a digital coupon. Ip said the new system should help speed up checkout lines at Fred Meyer stores. “That’s one of the conveniences we really hope this dig-

Charter Continued from C1 So far, about 105 students have sent back a letter of intent to attend the charter school. School officials said they can accommodate 146. The charter school will lease the building from the district for about $48,000 the first year, $52,900 the second year and $57,816 the final year of the lease. The charter school will be in charge of all the building’s maintenance except for the boiler. The district estimated that mothballing the

ital coupon program will provide for our customers, because now, our cashiers won’t have to scan every single coupon you bring in,” she said. “You swipe your rewards card and those discounts are automatically taken off; they don’t have to scan every bar code like they do with paper coupons.” Paper coupons specific to Fred Meyer stores will continue to appear in the store’s print ads, Ip said, and the stores will continue to accept paper coupons issued by product manufacturers. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

building would cost them about $19,000 a year. Superintendent Ivan Hernandez said he hopes the district will break even and not lose any money with the creation of the charter school. The district will receive 20 percent of state funding per student; the charter school will receive the rest. “The goal is the district will break even. It’s not a moneymaker for anyone,” Hernandez said. “It was never intended to be a money-maker.” Powell Butte Charter School will use place-based and service-oriented curriculum. Stu-

Venice LaJoyce Holland

Cleo Iris Grieve

July 31, 1937 - April 21, 2010

Cleo Grieve, a Bend resident since 1964, passed away on May 9, 2010. On January 1, 1926, Cleo was born in Doniphan, Nebraska, to Elza & Norma (Hockenberry) Munroe. On May 11, 1947, Cleo was married to Martin Grieve. She worked for the Bend school district and State Farm Insurance. Cleo enjoyed traveling, music and the outdoors. She is preceded in death by her husband, Martin; parents, Elza Munroe & Norma Munroe Dunn; brother, Phil Munroe. Cleo is survived by her daughter, Robin (Curt) Newell; son, Kim (Debi) Grieve; brother, Bill Dunn; grandchildren, Nicole Grieve, Christi Grieve, Kelsey Grieve. A viewing will be held Friday, May 14, 2010, from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm, at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend, OR. A Funeral Service will be held Saturday, May 15, 2010, at 2:00 pm, at First United Methodist Church, 680 NW Bond, Bend, OR. If so desired memorials may be directed to either the National Breast Cancer Foundation, 2600 Network Blvd. Suite 300 Frisco, TX 75034 or the American Diabetes Association, 1701 N. Beauregard St. Alexandria, VA 22311. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is honored to serve the family. 541-382-2471. Please visit and sign the online register book at

Venice LaJoyce (Worley) Holland, died Wednesday, April 21, 2010, from complications of respiratory failure. She was 72. Mrs. Holland was born July 31, 1937, in Portland, Oregon, the daughter of Frank and Violet (Steinmetz) Worley. Venice Holland Venice grew up in Springfield, Oregon, graduating from Springfield High School in 1956, as Homecoming Queen. She married Richard Nice in 1956, settling in Los Angeles, CA, to pursue a career as a singer/songwriter. She enjoyed success in the world of country music, recording for several top record labels in Nashville and Los Angeles. Several of her releases received wide radio play in the Southern California market. In 1974, she married Lloyd E. Holland of Eugene. The Hollands spent years as foster parents, providing a loving respite for troubled children. Mr. Holland passed in 1989. Mrs. Holland's life was marked by her great faith in Jesus Christ as her Lord and Savior. Survivors include son, Jeffree and wife, Tori Nice; daughter, Shawnee and husband, Steve Gallaher; uncle, Roderick Steinmetz, and numerous grandchildren. She will be greatly missed by her family and friends who loved her so much. A graveside service will be held at La Pine Community Cemetery at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, May 15, 2010. Her Pastor and friend, Ted Gibson, will officiate. The family of Mrs. Holland requests that any memorial contributions be made in her honor to Newberry Hospice, PO Box 1888, La Pine, OR 97739.

Dave Fisher led ’60s folk group the Highwaymen By Randy Lewis Los Angeles Times

Dave Fisher, founding member and lead singer of the 1960s folk group the Highwaymen, whose recording of the Civil War anti-slavery song “Michael, Row the Boat Ashore” became a surprise pop hit in 1962, has died. He was 69. Fisher died Friday at his home in Rye, N.Y., of myelofibrosis, a rare blood disease, family friend Nicole Fiftal said Wednesday. “The original Highwaymen, along with the Kingston Trio and, later, Peter, Paul and Mary, were among those responsible for popularizing original American music — call it folk, blues, country, whatever,” Kris Kristofferson told the Los Angeles Times on Wednesday. “Those of us who were able to walk through the doors they opened are grateful.” The Highwaymen recorded eight albums before disbanding in 1964 amid the British Invasion.

dents will go out into the community and learn from businesses and organizations such as the Oregon State University Extension Office and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The charter school has to meet both state and federal standards. “I believe this is going to be good for the community,” said Lynn Lundquist, who is on the charter school board and also is a county commissioner. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

January 1, 1926 - May 9, 2010

www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

DECA Continued from C1 Her success at nationals started in September, when Heather got a gig with Blind Squirrel Comedy. She asked an old friend and founder of the comedy show, Josh Pyland, to paint an overhang for the DECA coffee shop at Bend High. In return, Pyland asked Heather to work on the comedy show’s ad campaign. She got to work, running the show’s marketing, advertising, business and accounting for three September shows. “She just kind of took off,” Pyland said. “She worked really hard with it, and she was very creative coming up with new ideas and ways to get people’s attention.” The results were impressive, as Pyland said the shows packed the Second Street Theater over the three-night period. “It was unbelievable. I think she called in every favor she ever had,” Pyland said. Heather worked with sponsors, fundraised, dealt with the budget, created the posters and set up radio interviews and giveaways, created various advertising campaigns, and even edited some of the comedians’ bits. “It was fun,” she said. “I was exhausted at the end of the three nights.” The show’s goal was to make $1,000 profit. With Heather’s help, the show raised $1,300. With that experience complete, Heather wrote up what she’d done and used it at the DECA state competition. “I’d done it, so any question they threw at me I knew the answer,” she said. She won the state competition for her advertising campaign, qualifying her for nationals. But she wasn’t sure how she’d fare at the national event, particularly since her entire budget for the comedy show ad campaign was less than $400, while other students were working with hypothetical companies and hypothetical budgets of millions of dollars. Turns out, Heather had little to worry about. She is the first Oregon student to place in the top 10 nationally in the advertising campaign DECA competition in at least a decade. Pyland was impressed with Heather’s work; so impressed, he said, that it’s not surpris-

Mortgage Continued from C1 Five Republicans and every Democrat, except the ailing Sen. Robert Byrd, D-W.V., voted for the measure. Merkley makes a fair point about past abuses by some brokers, said Dave Woodland, senior vice president for Signet Mortgage in Bend. But regulations that went into effect on Jan. 1 have already solved much of the problem Merkley is targeting, Woodland said. The U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department now requires mortgage brokers to disclose any yield spread premium payments on the good faith estimate provided to borrowers earlier in the mortgage application process. That eliminates the possibility that mortgage brokers can get secret kickbacks, Woodland said. “He’s six months late to the party,” Woodland said. Now, yield spread premiums are used by borrowers who want to pay a higher interest rate in exchange for lower upfront costs, Woodland said. It’s essentially the opposite of “buying points,” where borrowers pay a one-time fee to receive a lower interest rate for the life of a loan. “You can have the bank pay you a premium, and your interest rate is a little bit higher,” Woodland said. “If you’re going to be in a loan for a shorter period of time, you might choose to accept a lower interest rate and let the bank pay the closing costs.” Merkley argued that the payments can create a fundamental conflict of interest, and need to be banned, not just disclosed. “Essentially the originators

ing to him that she performed so well at the DECA national competition. “She’d done all this stuff,” he said. “It wasn’t made up. She really went out and did it and I think that really impressed the judges that at such a young age she had completed her first job.” As club president this year, Heather said she’s gotten to see students become leaders. “This is what I want to do. This is the environment I want to work in, one that’s people-oriented,” she said. “I want to work with people who are passionate and get the message out and be creative about how we get the message out there.” She calls DECA her launch pad. “It gave me a foundation,” she said. The only real downside she sees with DECA, in fact, is the unattractive blazers the club members have to wear at competitions. “I just think in the world we live in, business is what it’s all based on,” she said. “There are so many adults who can’t inter-

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

CREATIVE LIGHTING 541-382-0968 635 SE BUSINESS WAY • BEND, OR 97702

have been getting bonuses for selling loans that are good for originator but bad for customer,” Merkley said. The Center for Responsible Lending, which advocates for stronger lending regulations, agrees with Merkley. A study by the center in 2008, as well as an analysis by HUD that year, found that borrowers who paid the premiums often didn’t get a trade-off in lower fees. Although those studies were performed before the new HUD rules went into effect, the center still believes the practice should be banned, said spokeswoman Kathleen Day. “We’re glad they did it, but in some ways it’s amazing you’d have to amend the law to get people to recognize this,” Day said. Asked about Woodland’s argument that the disclosure changes have solved much of the problem, Day said that past abuses justify banning the premiums outright. “The industry should have thought about it before they abused the system,” she said. Merkley noted that the amendment, if it becomes law, would finish an effort he started in 2008, while speaker of the Oregon House, to ban yield spread premiums. A bill passed the House, but ultimately failed in the Oregon Senate, over concerns that it would apply unequally to some lenders based outside Oregon. Now that he’s in the U.S. Senate, Merkley doesn’t have that problem. “The beauty of what happened today is it’s a level playing field,” Merkley said. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

view for a job confidently. DECA is the smartest thing for students to be involved in. It teaches leadership and communication skills and teamwork. You get to do stuff you think you’d never get to do in high school, like running events.” In the fall, Heather will attend George Fox University in Newberg, where she hopes to study business and psychology. “She’s just one of those kids that I feel fortunate to have because a lot of what she does is natural, it’s inherent. She knows it and understands it,” Torkelson said. “My role is just to stand behind her and say that’s good. She’s just going to succeed on every level when she leaves here.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Sewing & Vacuum Center

Central Oregon’s Vacuum Exp ert

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MAY 13

FRIDAY

Today: Mostly clear, warmer.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

73

35

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

73/42

73/40

78/44

61/41

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

76/42

69/32

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

76/37

74/40

Camp Sherman 68/32 Redmond Prineville 73/35 Cascadia 72/36 72/36 Sisters 71/34 Bend Post 73/35

Oakridge Elk Lake 70/34

61/23

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Partly cloudy skies tonight. Central

75/41

Sunriver 69/32

70/31

68/30

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear skies tonight. Eastern

67/33

Hampton 68/32

Fort Rock

64/48

68/38

Seattle

Helena

74/44

Grants Pass

Bend

66/37

Boise

73/35

70/42

81/46

Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

83/53

68/34

Silver Lake

68/29

71/34

Eugene

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

63/33

62/32

Reno

66/36

Mostly sunny and pleasant today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

Crater Lake 57/35

71/42

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

66/51

58/41

LOW

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

May 13 May 20 May 27 June 4

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 57/44/0.00 . . . . . . 64/47/s. . . . . . 60/47/pc Baker City . . . . . . 63/34/0.00 . . . . . . 67/38/s. . . . . . . 70/42/s Brookings . . . . . . 62/43/0.00 . . . . . . 60/46/s. . . . . . 61/47/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 62/36/0.00 . . . . . . 67/38/s. . . . . . 69/40/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 64/42/0.00 . . . . . . 74/44/s. . . . . . 71/46/pc Klamath Falls . . . 59/26/0.00 . . . . . . 67/37/s. . . . . . . 70/40/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 57/34/0.00 . . . . . . 65/37/s. . . . . . 67/40/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 63/30/0.00 . . . . . 67/31/pc. . . . . . 71/36/pc Medford . . . . . . . 67/45/0.00 . . . . . . 80/47/s. . . . . . 81/49/pc Newport . . . . . . . 55/46/0.00 . . . . . . 60/47/s. . . . . . 58/47/pc North Bend . . . . . . 57/41/NA . . . . . . 60/45/s. . . . . . 57/49/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 71/46/0.00 . . . . . . 72/42/s. . . . . . . 76/45/s Pendleton . . . . . . 70/46/0.00 . . . . . . 77/47/s. . . . . . 79/51/pc Portland . . . . . . . 63/48/0.00 . . . . . . 76/50/s. . . . . . 74/50/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 62/30/0.00 . . . . . . 72/36/s. . . . . . 75/41/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 65/30/0.00 . . . . . . 73/40/s. . . . . . 74/38/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 69/46/0.00 . . . . . 78/47/pc. . . . . . 80/48/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 67/47/0.00 . . . . . . 75/47/s. . . . . . 72/47/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 65/28/0.00 . . . . . . 71/34/s. . . . . . 73/40/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 72/51/0.00 . . . . . . 79/47/s. . . . . . 81/48/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 in 2001 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.03” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 in 1985 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.33” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.62” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.84” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.16 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.42 in 2003 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:02 a.m. . . . . . .6:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:18 a.m. . . . . .10:58 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .11:49 a.m. . . . . . .2:15 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:32 a.m. . . . . . .3:18 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .3:17 p.m. . . . . . .3:49 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:37 a.m. . . . . . .3:34 p.m.

7

LOW

64 37

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, rain showers, cooler.

74 45

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

68/49

72/33

64/25

Calgary

76/50

Burns

67/31

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC

Vancouver

Mostly cloudy, mild.

75 42

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

71/32

Brothers

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Portland

71/33

LOW

75 41

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:41 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:23 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:40 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:24 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:04 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:37 p.m.

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, mild.

There will be plenty of sunshine and quiet conditions across the region for today.

Paulina

La Pine

HIGH

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 75° Hermiston • 26° Klamath Falls

SUNDAY

Mostly clear, some afternoon/ evening clouds.

Tonight: Mostly clear.

HIGH

STATE

SATURDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 110-130 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 117-122 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-168 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 103-150 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 64/48

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Calgary 68/38

S

Saskatoon 68/39

Seattle 68/49

Boise 70/42

• 100° Laredo, Texas

Cheyenne 46/31

• 12°

San Francisco 66/51

Wolf Creek, Colo.

• 2.92” Lake Of The Ozarks, Mo.

Las Vegas 78/61

Salt Lake City 58/41

Denver 52/35 Albuquerque 71/49

Los Angeles 69/54 Phoenix 88/63

Honolulu 85/72

Tijuana 74/53 Chihuahua 91/57

La Paz 92/63 Anchorage 52/38

Juneau 48/37

Mazatlan 91/69

Winnipeg 56/38

S

S

Thunder Bay 45/37

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 58/29

Halifax 50/38 Portland To ronto 63/43 59/48 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 56/43 55/44 Detroit 60/48 Buffalo Rapid City 62/50 57/52 New York 54/37 63/53 Des Moines Philadelphia 62/43 Chicago 64/55 Omaha 70/49 Washington, D. C. 62/43 Columbus 81/63 62/57 Kansas City Louisville 62/47 St. Louis 86/66 Charlotte 76/53 89/67 Oklahoma City Nashville 68/52 Little Rock 89/70 84/65 Atlanta 87/69 Birmingham 91/69 Dallas 83/60 New Orleans 89/73 Orlando Houston 90/66 87/72 Bismarck 53/38

Billings 62/40

Portland 76/50

S

Miami 86/77 Monterrey 98/72

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .83/73/0.00 . . .73/55/t . . . .73/60/t Akron . . . . . . . . .56/48/0.25 . . .77/62/t . . 66/44/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .49/42/0.17 . 63/48/pc . . 68/46/sh Albuquerque. . . .66/45/0.00 . . .71/49/s . . 71/50/pc Anchorage . . . . .52/41/0.00 . .52/38/sh . . . .51/38/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .78/68/0.00 . 87/69/pc . . 87/67/pc Atlantic City . . . .61/48/0.45 . 59/53/pc . . . .75/58/t Austin . . . . . . . . .92/73/0.00 . . .88/70/c . . . .87/67/t Baltimore . . . . . .77/53/0.37 . 61/52/pc . . . .86/54/t Billings. . . . . . . . .49/39/0.21 . 62/40/pc . . 69/43/pc Birmingham . . . .85/70/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . 91/68/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .49/37/0.04 . .53/38/sh . . 68/42/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .69/44/0.00 . 70/42/pc . . . 73/46/s Boston. . . . . . . . .53/47/0.00 . . .60/48/s . . 65/50/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .49/44/0.26 . . .61/51/s . . 74/52/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .50/42/0.03 . .57/52/sh . . 62/44/sh Burlington, VT. . .61/38/0.00 . . .60/45/s . . 58/43/sh Caribou, ME . . . .51/38/0.00 . . .58/36/s . . 60/42/pc Charleston, SC . .84/64/0.00 . . .85/67/s . . . 87/70/s Charlotte. . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .89/67/s . . 90/65/pc Chattanooga. . . .84/64/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . . .86/63/t Cheyenne . . . . . .34/28/0.16 . 46/31/pc . . 56/38/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .50/44/0.00 . . .70/49/t . . 66/45/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .73/62/0.71 . . .84/64/t . . . .72/51/t Cleveland . . . . . .55/48/0.00 . . .77/58/t . . 64/45/sh Colorado Springs 50/34/0.00 . 46/36/pc . . 54/37/pc Columbia, MO . .80/55/0.59 . . .68/48/t . . 68/51/pc Columbia, SC . . .86/62/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . 93/67/pc Columbus, GA. . .83/66/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . 90/66/pc Columbus, OH. . .61/57/0.27 . . .81/63/t . . . .71/48/t Concord, NH . . . .57/34/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . 64/43/sh Corpus Christi. . .89/75/0.00 . 88/76/pc . . 86/73/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .87/74/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . . .82/66/t Dayton . . . . . . . .62/56/0.40 . . .81/60/t . . 69/47/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .39/30/0.06 . 52/35/pc . . 60/40/pc Des Moines. . . . .50/45/1.34 . .62/43/sh . . 67/47/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .51/45/0.00 . . .62/50/t . . 65/47/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .57/40/0.00 . .43/38/sh . . 54/41/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .78/63/0.00 . . .85/55/s . . 84/58/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/35/0.00 . .58/34/sh . . 60/39/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .53/41/0.00 . .49/40/sh . . 68/45/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .55/26/0.02 . 60/29/pc . . 66/30/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .52/43/0.00 . . .68/52/t . . 63/42/pc Green Bay. . . . . .56/44/0.00 . .55/44/sh . . 61/42/pc Greensboro. . . . 82/60/trace . 86/67/pc . . 90/66/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .56/46/0.26 . 60/54/pc . . . .80/53/t Hartford, CT . . . .50/44/0.25 . . .65/49/s . . 72/49/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .56/36/0.00 . 66/37/pc . . . 72/42/s Honolulu . . . . . . .85/71/0.00 . . .85/72/s . . . 85/72/s Houston . . . . . . .88/76/0.00 . 87/72/pc . . 86/71/pc Huntsville . . . . . .85/68/0.00 . 90/70/pc . . . .85/66/t Indianapolis . . . .70/55/0.32 . . .80/57/t . . 68/48/pc Jackson, MS . . . .89/69/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . 89/66/pc Madison, WI . . . .49/44/0.00 . . .63/46/t . . 63/41/pc Jacksonville. . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . 89/65/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/43/0.17 . .48/37/sh . . . 55/39/c Kansas City. . . . .64/53/0.54 . . .62/47/t . . 68/50/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .51/42/0.00 . . .67/52/t . . 63/43/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .78/60/0.00 . 78/61/pc . . . 84/64/s Lexington . . . . . .77/63/0.14 . 85/66/pc . . . .74/54/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .49/44/0.19 . 63/41/pc . . 71/45/pc Little Rock. . . . . .88/71/0.00 . 84/65/pc . . . .80/60/t Los Angeles. . . . .68/52/0.00 . 69/54/pc . . . 71/56/s Louisville . . . . . . .81/66/0.69 . . .86/66/t . . . .74/56/t Memphis. . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . . .81/63/t Miami . . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . . .86/77/s . . . 87/76/s Milwaukee . . . . .49/43/0.00 . . .62/48/t . . 59/44/pc Minneapolis . . . .50/42/0.01 . .56/43/sh . . 64/45/pc Nashville . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . . .80/60/t New Orleans. . . .89/75/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . 88/69/pc New York . . . . . .48/44/0.44 . 63/53/pc . . . .75/55/t Newark, NJ . . . . .49/46/0.34 . 64/55/pc . . 79/55/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .87/62/0.08 . 72/62/pc . . . .89/67/t Oklahoma City . .79/71/0.00 . . .68/52/t . . . .74/60/t Omaha . . . . . . . .50/45/0.26 . 62/43/pc . . 72/47/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .84/67/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . . 90/67/s Palm Springs. . . .90/53/0.00 . 91/65/pc . . . 94/65/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.07 . . .73/48/t . . 68/48/pc Philadelphia . . . .55/48/0.08 . 64/55/pc . . . .81/59/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .81/56/0.00 . . .88/63/s . . . 92/65/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .59/52/0.12 . . .77/66/t . . . .72/49/t Portland, ME. . . .60/33/0.00 . . .63/43/s . . 54/43/pc Providence . . . . .50/46/0.00 . . .62/48/s . . 67/52/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . 85/64/trace . 86/67/pc . . 92/69/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .39/32/0.53 . 54/37/pc . . 65/40/pc Savannah . . . . . .80/64/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 89/67/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .71/42/s . . . 75/45/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .61/47/0.00 . . .68/49/s . . 70/51/pc Richmond . . . . . .86/60/0.36 . 73/61/pc . . . .91/65/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .45/41/0.14 . .55/38/sh . . . 68/45/s Rochester, NY . . .52/42/0.07 . .57/51/sh . . 63/45/sh Spokane . . . . . . .67/42/0.00 . . .71/46/s . . 74/50/pc Sacramento. . . . .81/47/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . 84/53/pc Springfield, MO. .81/68/0.00 . . .70/51/t . . 69/53/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .79/55/1.29 . . .76/53/t . . 71/52/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . .90/71/s . . . 89/72/s Salt Lake City . . .55/41/0.00 . . .58/41/c . . . 64/43/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .77/49/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . . 88/58/s San Antonio . . . .90/71/0.00 . . .89/72/c . . . .88/69/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .67/52/t . . 75/60/pc San Diego . . . . . .69/52/0.00 . 68/57/pc . . . 67/56/s Washington, DC .79/57/0.00 . 62/57/pc . . . .88/59/t San Francisco . . .64/49/0.00 . . .66/51/s . . 65/50/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . 66/45/pc . . 69/53/pc San Jose . . . . . . .73/47/0.00 . . .76/50/s . . 76/49/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . . .78/46/s . . 78/48/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .63/36/0.00 . 65/37/pc . . 64/40/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .86/57/0.00 . . .90/63/s . . . 94/64/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .46/41/0.48 . 51/37/pc . . . 49/38/c Athens. . . . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . 90/62/pc Auckland. . . . . . .66/63/0.00 . . .68/58/t . . . .65/57/t Baghdad . . . . . .107/82/0.00 105/80/pc . 102/78/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .97/80/t . . . .97/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . 74/51/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .86/68/s . . . 86/69/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .57/48/sh . . 54/45/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .66/54/0.00 . .69/50/sh . . 71/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .66/54/0.44 . .67/50/sh . . . .69/52/t Buenos Aires. . . .68/46/0.00 . . .67/43/s . . 68/45/pc Cabo San Lucas .86/66/0.00 . . .92/65/s . . 92/66/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . . .95/65/s . . 103/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . .64/32/0.00 . 68/38/pc . . . 69/39/s Cancun . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . 88/76/pc . . 88/77/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .48/32/0.22 . .51/42/sh . . 51/38/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .50/34/0.00 . .46/38/sh . . 48/39/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .63/46/0.02 . .58/49/sh . . 57/47/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .80/58/s . . 81/59/pc Hong Kong . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . . .82/74/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .88/66/s . . . 90/67/s Jerusalem . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . . 90/62/s Johannesburg . . .68/39/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . . 72/51/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 77/65/pc . . 80/67/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . .61/53/sh . . 63/49/pc London . . . . . . . .52/36/0.00 . 51/37/pc . . . 51/41/c Madrid . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .63/50/sh . . . 62/50/c Manila. . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . 96/81/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . .106/86/0.00 100/78/pc . . 100/77/s Mexico City. . . . .86/61/0.01 . 83/57/pc . . . .81/58/t Montreal. . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . 59/37/pc . . 54/39/sh Moscow . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . . .74/56/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/61/0.74 . . .78/60/t . . . 79/61/c Nassau . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .85/74/s . . . 87/74/s New Delhi. . . . .105/80/0.00 . .108/77/s . . 110/81/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . 65/51/pc . . . 64/49/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .54/27/0.00 . .51/39/sh . . 54/45/sh Ottawa . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . 59/36/pc . . 55/38/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . 50/39/pc . . . 51/40/c Rio de Janeiro. . .79/66/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . . 85/67/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . 66/55/sh Santiago . . . . . . .75/37/0.00 . . .77/42/s . . 68/45/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . 74/57/pc . . . 76/59/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .48/45/0.53 . .53/48/sh . . 56/49/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .64/44/s . . . 66/45/s Shanghai. . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . .72/58/sh . . 73/58/sh Singapore . . . . . .93/77/0.11 . . .91/78/t . . . .91/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .61/30/0.00 . .58/47/sh . . 61/50/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .63/52/0.00 . .67/53/sh . . 66/51/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/72/0.00 . .77/68/sh . . 77/69/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .86/66/s . . . 88/67/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . 65/53/pc . . 66/52/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .52/43/0.18 . .59/48/sh . . 57/37/sh Vancouver. . . . . .59/46/0.00 . . .64/48/s . . 66/48/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .65/50/sh . . . .66/51/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . 65/51/sh

Drought forces Klamath farmers to expand potato leases to new lands By Lee Juillerat (Klamath Falls) Herald and News

DAIRY — Rain and snow fell outside Monday, but inside Rice Feed & Supply Store, the conversation, ironically, was about this year’s drought. “I wish it would rain more, like everyone else,” said Ray Hamel, one of several Yonna Valley farmers huddled around the store’s big potbelly stove. It was loaded with firewood and putting out heat as the rain fell. Sharing the fire, and wishes for more water, were Steve Gorden, another area farmer, Dick Walker, a former farmer, and Vern Newlun, who decades

ago ended a family farming tradition by working for the railroad. Store owner Richard Rice mostly listened and let the others talk while Jack, his chocolate Lab, slumbered on the floor. There was much to talk about, but Jack, who’s heard it all before, dozed. Hamel, 80, is a lifetime farmer who has grown hay and grain near Dairy since moving to the Klamath Basin in 1977. But this year, like others in the Yonna Valley, Hamel is leasing out 50 acres to potato growers from the Merrill-Malin area who rely on irrigation water through the federal Klamath Reclamation Project.

Hamel had planned to grow alfalfa, which he irrigates with well water, but changed his mind. “The potatoes pay better than the grain,” he said. That’s not necessarily good news for Rice, who won’t be selling seed to Hamel and his other usual customers. Several Basin growers, under contract to supply potato chip manufacturers, are moving operations to Yonna Valley land with wells. Rice estimates 2,000 acres normally in hay and grain will be used instead for potatoes. “If there’s 2,000 acres of potatoes on this side of the hill, that’s

2,000 acres that’s not going to be in something else,” he said, quickly adding, “There’s nothing against the people coming out here” or those leasing lands. “A lot of people, it bailed them out for another year.” On a normal year, Rice handles 50 tons of seed orders. This year he’s looking at four tons. Hamel, for example, figures on 150 pounds of seed per acre, seed he isn’t buying this year. Normally, Rice also sells 20 pallets of twine for baling, “but with the price of hay in the toilet and people quitting, I don’t have any twine orders.”

Gorden, 39, who’s grown hay and raised cattle for 21 years, thought about leasing some of his 350 acres. “I talked to some potato growers, but I didn’t (lease his land). Business as usual this year,” said Gorden, who uses well water on most of his lease land and irrigates other acres through the Horsefly Irrigation District. “It’s going to be tight for water.” Walker, 67, who is not related to the Walker family with large agriculture operations in the Merrill, Malin and Tulelake areas, is watching this season from the sidelines. He retired in 2007

following a massive heart attack. Until then, he had raised alfalfa and potatoes for more than 40 years. “I wanted to get out anyway. I was old enough,” he said. “I was tired.” Walker, Gorden, Hamel and Newlun were sharply critical of government policies. All favor adding deep-water storage and question decisions that sent water from Upper Klamath Lake to downstream sources through the winter. “Government policies are creating the water shortage. The weather isn’t helping,” Hamel said.


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Hockey Inside Canadiens beat Penguins to advance to Eastern Conference finals, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010

L O C A L LY

GARY LEWIS

P O L E P E DA L PA D D L E

Oregon Club meets today in Bend Paul Swangard, managing director of the University of Oregon’s Warsaw Sports Marketing Center, will be the featured speaker today at a meeting of the Oregon Club of Central Oregon. The luncheon gathering will take place starting at noon at Pappy’s Pizzeria, 20265 Meyer Drive in south Bend. Cost for lunch is $8. The meeting is open to Oregon Club members only. Club memberships will be available for purchase at the door. —Bulletin staff report

Vapor trails in cap rock country O

ut in the desert, south and east of Burns, hot water bubbles up out of the ground. A cluster of buildings surround a clean, dark pool — Crystal Crane Hot Springs. After a plateful of steamed oysters and three helpings of Camp Chef Dutch oven cobbler, I stepped in, felt the gravel beneath my feet and the warm water creep up to my neck. Wind blew in out of the sagebrush and pushed the steam in big rolling clouds out across the parking lot, out across the sage.

FOOTBALL Cushing keeps AP Defensive Rookie of the year award A positive drug test notwithstanding, Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing is still The Associated Press NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year. Five days after he was suspended without pay for four games, a nationwide panel of 50 sports writers and broadcasters who cover the NFL voted again to give Cushing the award. He didn’t receive anywhere near the 39 votes of his previous landslide victory, but the 18 he got in Wednesday’s revote were enough to reclaim the honor. “I was just glad to hear the news, that people stuck by me. Very honored,” Cushing said. “I’m very happy to have the award once again, and I’m just happy with how everything turned out.” Although Cushing said he took a non-steroid substance, the league still considers it a performance-enhancer. In the revote, Cushing finished five votes ahead of Buffalo safety Jairus Byrd. Green Bay linebacker Clay Matthews III got 12, Washington linebacker Brian Orakpo earned three votes, and St. Louis linebacker James Laurinaitis got one. Three voters abstained. In all, 19 voters switched from Cushing to another player, and one voted for Cushing after picking Byrd originally. In the original balloting in January, Cushing received 39 votes to six for Byrd, three for Matthews and two for Orakpo. — The Associated Press

INSIDE MLB

From their base at Crystal Crane Hot Springs, Justin and Nikki Aamodt, of Diamond A Guides, operate hunts for coyotes, badgers, ground squirrels, rockchucks and other varmints. They lease hunting rights from ranchers and farmers that create a win-win-win-win situation for the outfitter, landowner, hunter and consumer. The day I left for Burns and beyond, a thank-you note showed up in the mail from a landowner whose property I’d hunted a couple of weeks before. See Vapor / D6

Low winter flows on Deschutes affect trout Several area streams open to fishing on May 22 By Mark Morical

or cause the brown trout and redband As several Central trout to spawn elseOregon streams are where, Wise said this set to open to fishing week. next week, low winhaven’t seen HUNTING a “We ter flows continue lot to indicate the & FISHING populations are back to be an issue for the health of trout poputo what they were a lations on the Upper few years back, but Deschutes. there’s still some nice brown The river upstream of Ben- trout in there,” Wise noted. ham Falls to its headwaters at “The flows have gotten a little Little Lava Lake opens to an- bit better during the winter, but gling on May 22. there’s still some challenges The stretch of the Deschutes up there we have to work with from Wickiup Reservoir down- to achieve more stable winter stream to Benham Falls has flows.” been particularly hampered According to Wise, flows by low winter flows, accord- on the Upper Deschutes being to Ted Wise, a Bend-based low Wickiup in October 2008 fisheries biologist for the Or- dropped from about 1,000 egon Department of Fish and cubic feet per second (cfs) to Wildlife. about 20 cfs in a matter of The low flows can remove weeks. water from spawning beds See Flow / D6 The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Sarah Max, two-time defending Pole Pedal Paddle champion in the elite female division, poses in her PPP gear on Century Drive in Bend.

Three-peat? Bend’s Sarah Max gears up for another PPP win By Mark Morical

Coming on Friday

week on her introduction to Central Oregon’s signature multisport race. During her first spring in Bend, After serving once as race supSarah Max served as support for Look in Friday’s port, she decided she wanted to her husband as he competed as an take on the Pole Pedal Paddle for Bulletin individual in the 2002 U.S. Bank herself. for a PPP Pole Pedal Paddle. Now, the twin girls are 7 years Elite Men’s The role of one-person support old and are racing in the Kids’ Mini preview team in the PPP is no easy assignPPP. And their mother is vying for ment — especially for a woman six her third straight PPP title in the months pregnant with twins. elite female category. But there was the mother-to-be, hustling “It’s almost the mental challenge,” Max from one exchange point to another, hiking said of what draws her to the six-stage race up a snowy slope to retrieve her husband’s that consists of downhill and cross-counskis, hurrying to get him his running shoes, try skiing, cycling, running, boating and and helping him get his kayak into the Des- sprinting. “There’s still some pieces to put chutes River. together. There’s a personal challenge of “I swore I would never do that again,” improving in different areas.” Max said with a laugh as she reflected this See PPP / D5 The Bulletin

Bulletin fi le photo

The Upper Deschutes has been hampered by low winter flows, but it remains a picturesque fishing hideaway for anglers looking for redband or brown trout.

PREP BOYS TENNIS

Panthers boys second after opening day of CVC tourney

Seattle Mariners third baseman Matt Tuiasosopo throws to first as Baltimore Orioles’ Miguel Tejada was safe with a single.

Orioles beat Mariners 5-2

Bulletin staff report

MLB roundup, see Page D4

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Prep Sports ...............................D3 Basketball ..................................D3 Auto Racing ...............................D5 Hunting & Fishing .................... D6

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Carlo Gangan, right, prepares to return a serve, while playing with his partner Marcus James, racket on the left, against Benji Kreitz and Erik Vigeland of South Salem in the top doubles match at the Central Valley Conference boys tennis tournament at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond Wednesday morning.

REDMOND — Paced by two doubles teams’ run in the consolation bracket, Redmond High ended the first day of the Central Valley Conference boys district tournament in second place. The Panthers’ doubles team of Marcus James and Carlo Gangan, as well as the Redmond duo of Luke Maxwell and Zack Jackson, are both still alive in the consolation bracket. Despite not advancing any players past the championship quarterfinals, the Panthers closed out play Wednesday with 54 points, trailing only district-leader Sprague, which led the tournament with 60 points. The CVC league standings are in part calculated from regular-season dual meets and in part based on wins at

the district tournament. “The guys played pretty well,” said Panthers coach Jim Ferguson, “I was really pleased.” With no seeded players in either the doubles or singles tournament, Redmond defied expectations with several firstround wins. Tyler Wilson and Chase Wilcox made a surprising run to the doubles championship round quarterfinals and Chase Huff and Pascal Damm added an opening-round win before falling in the second round. “This is a good test,” said Ferguson, who expects to return the majority of his team next season. “A lot of kids are already talking about playing more this summer.” The CVC boys district tournament resumes on Friday in Salem.


D2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Baseball: Sprague at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at The DallesWahtonka, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at Sprague, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Track: Summit, Mountain View and Bend at City Meet at Bend High, 3:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championships at Sisters (Black Butte Ranch) 9 a.m.

6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Iberdrola Open, first round, Golf. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, first round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, first round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA, Bell Micro Classic, first round, Golf.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles, FSNW.

MULTISPORT 3 p.m. — Xterra Trail Running World Championship, Vans Triple Crown of Surfing, kayak, FSNW (taped).

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, ESPN.

SOCCER 6 p.m. —MLS, Houston Dynamo at Real Salt Lake ESPN2. 7 p.m. —USSF, Crystal Palace Baltimore at Portland Timbers, FSNW.

FRIDAY GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Iberdrola Open, second round, Golf. 9:30 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, second round, Golf. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, second round, Golf. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Regions Charity Classic, first round, Golf. 9 p.m. — LPGA, Bell Micro Classic, second round, Golf.

AUTO RACING 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Heluva Good 200, final practice, ESPN2.

SOCCER 11 a.m. — USSF D2, Crystal Palace Baltimore at Portland Timbers, FSNW (taped).

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, FSNW.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference semifinals, Philadelphia Flyers at Boston Bruins, VS. network.

BOXING 7 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Julio Diaz vs. Herman Ngoudjo, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, conference semifinals, Boston Celtics at Cleveland Cavaliers, KICE-AM 940.

FRIDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Washington at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

S   B Golf • Woods says he has inflammation of neck joint: Tiger Woods said tests Wednesday showed an inflamed neck joint that causes pain and makes it hard to turn his head, an injury that will require little more than medicine, massages and rest. Woods had an MRI that revealed inflammation in a facet joint of his neck. He said on his website that when facet joints are inflamed, it causes pain in the area along with headaches and difficulty rotating the head. He withdrew from the final round of The Players Championship on Sunday after a week in which he was seen stretching and rolling his neck.

Baseball • Phillies bullpen coach busted using binoculars: The Phillies insisted Wednesday they weren’t trying to steal signs when bullpen coach Mick Billmeyer was caught on camera peering through binoculars from the bullpen bench at Coors Field earlier this week. Manager Charlie Manuel told The Associated Press that Billmeyer simply was watching Philadelphia catcher Carlos Ruiz set up defensively Monday night. FSN Rocky Mountain, the flagship broadcaster of the Colorado Rockies, showed Billmeyer using the binoculars to peer in on Colorado catcher Miguel Olivo while the Phillies were at bat in the top of the second inning. • Ducks knock off San Diego: Oregon put six runs on the board in the first inning and never looked back in a 13-4 victory over No. 19 San Diego on Tuesday at PK Park in Eugene. The No. 22 Ducks snapped a four-game slide with the victory and improved to 31-18 on the season. Oregon scored 13 runs on 13 hits with four players posting multiple-hit days. Eddie Rodriguez, who finished his day three for four with two runs scored and two RBIs, uncorked his team-leading fifth home run of the season in the second inning.

Horse racing • Super Saver is 5-2 favorite for Preakness: Kentucky Derby winner Super Saver was made the early 5-2 favorite Wednesday for the Preakness Stakes, and he’ll break from the starting gate next to beaten Derby favorite Lookin At Lucky. Trained by Todd Pletcher and ridden by Calvin Borel, Super Saver drew the No. 8 post in the field of 12 — two short of the maximum — for Saturday’s 1 3⁄16-mile race at Pimlico.

Cycling • Liquigas wins team time trial; Nibali in lead: The Liquigas team won a time trial and Vincenzo Nibali took the overall leader’s pink jersey Wednesday when the Giro d’Italia returned to Italy after opening with three stages in Netherlands. Liquigas clocked 36 minutes, 37 seconds over the 20.5-mile route from Savigliano to Cuneo. The British SKY team was second, 13 seconds behind, and HTC-Columbia placed third, 21 seconds back. Nibali leads the overall standings by 13 seconds over teammate Ivan Basso, the 2006 winner. Previous leader Alexandre Vinokourov dropped to sixth overall, 33 seconds behind. Vinokourov’s Astana team finished fifth, 38 seconds behind Liquigas. The BMC squad finished 12th, 1:21 behind, leaving world champion Cadel Evans 27th overall — 1:59 behind. — From wire reports

Houston at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. San Jose at New England, 3 p.m. Chivas USA at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Seattle FC at New York, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m

IN THE BLEACHERS

GOLF PGA Tour

Friday Baseball: Pendleton at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Pendleton at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championships, Salem, 9 a.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at Central Valley Conference championships, Salem, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 championships at Sisters (Black Butte Ranch), 9 a.m. Track: Crook County at Ciochetti Invitational, Cottage Grove, 2 p.m.; Culver at Tri-River Conference championships, Salem, 2 p.m.

STATISTICS Through May 9 Scoring Average 1, Anthony Kim, 69.26. 2, Ernie Els, 69.66. 3, K.J. Choi, 69.71. 4, Phil Mickelson, 69.83. 5, J.B. Holmes, 70.00. 6, Steve Stricker, 70.01. 7, Robert Allenby, 70.02. 8, Tim Clark, 70.13. 9, Matt Kuchar, 70.18. 10, 2 tied with 70.20. Driving Distance 1, Bubba Watson, 306.4. 2, Angel Cabrera, 302.5. 3, Dustin Johnson, 302.2. 4, Phil Mickelson, 300.4. 5, Graham DeLaet, 299.3. 6, J.B. Holmes, 297.5. 7, Andres Romero, 297.1. 8 (tie), D.J. Trahan and Lucas Glover, 294.6. 10, Jason Day, 294.3. Putting Average 1, J.P. Hayes, 1.686. 2, Tim Clark, 1.695. 3, Brandt Snedeker, 1.705. 4, Ryuji Imada, 1.720. 5, Brian Gay, 1.723. 6, Chris Couch, 1.724. 7, Paul Casey, 1.728. 8, George McNeill, 1.731. 9, Mike Weir, 1.734. 10, Charles Howell III, 1.735.

Saturday Baseball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Pendleton at Bend (DH), 11 a.m.; Hermiston at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Crook County, 10 a.m. Track: Culver at Tri-River Conference championships, Salem, noon; Gilchrist at Mt. Skyline League championships, Winston, 10:15 a.m.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— MADRID MASTERS Wednesday Madrid, Spain Singles Second Round Jelena Jankovic (7), Serbia, def. Ana Ivanovic, Serbia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-1. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, def. Peng Shuai, China, 1-6, 7-6 (1), 6-3. Third Round Venus Williams (4), United States, def. Francesca Schiavone (15), Italy, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Nadia Petrova (16), Russia, def. Serena Williams (1), United States, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3. Lucie Safarova, Czech Republic, def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 6-7 (4), 6-1, 7-6 (6).

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— MADRID MASTERS Wednesday Madrid, Spain Singles Second Round Marin Cilic (8), Croatia, def. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, 6-3, 6-0. Victor Hanescu, Romania, def. Daniel Munoz-de la Nava, Spain, 6-0, 4-6, 6-3. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Oscar Hernandez, Spain, 6-1, 6-2. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Mikhail Youzhny (10), Russia, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Thomaz Bellucci (16), Brazil, 6-2, 6-2. Gael Monfils (12), France, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 1-1, retired. John Isner (13), United States, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 1-6, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def. Oleksandr Dolgopolov Jr, Ukraine, 6-4, 6-3. Stanislas Wawrinka (15), Switzerland, def. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, 6-4, 4-2, retired. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, 6-4, 7-5. Jurgen Melzer, Austria, def. Mardy Fish, United States, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, 6-3, 6-3. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (7), France, 6-2, retired. David Ferrer (9), Spain, def. Marcos Baghdatis, Cyprus, 1-6, 6-3, 7-5.

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT x-if necessary ——— CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE

Boston 3, Cleveland 2 Saturday, May 1: Cleveland 101, Boston 93 Monday, May 3: Boston 104, Cleveland 86 Friday, May 7: Cleveland 124, Boston 95 Sunday, May 9: Boston 97, Cleveland 87 Tuesday, May 11: Boston 120, Cleveland 88 Today, May 13: Cleveland at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Sunday, May 16: Boston at Cleveland, 12:30 p.m. Orlando 4, Atlanta 0 Tuesday, May 4: Orlando 114, Atlanta 71 Thursday, May 6: Orlando 112, Atlanta 98 Saturday, May 8: Orlando 105, Atlanta 75 Monday, May 10: Orlando 98, Atlanta 84 WESTERN CONFERENCE Phoenix 4, San Antonio 0 Monday, May 3: Phoenix 111, San Antonio 102 Wednesday, May 5: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 102 Friday, May 7: Phoenix 110, San Antonio 96 Sunday, May 9: Phoenix 107, San Antonio 101 L.A. Lakers 4, Utah 0 Sunday, May 2: L.A. Lakers 104, Utah 99 Tuesday, May 4: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 103 Saturday, May 8: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 110 Monday, May 10: L.A. Lakers 111, Utah 96 CONFERENCE FINALS WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers vs. Phoenix Monday, May 17: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 19: Phoenix at L.A. Lakers, 6 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— x-if necessary PLAYOFF GLANCE CONFERENCE SEMIFINALS EASTERN CONFERENCE Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 Friday, April 30: Pittsburgh 6, Montreal 3 Sunday, May 2: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 1 Tuesday, May 4: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 0 Thursday, May 6: Montreal 3, Pittsburgh 2 Saturday, May 8: Pittsburgh 2, Montreal 1 Monday, May 10: Montreal 4, Pittsburgh 3 Wednesday, May 12:Montreal 5, Pittsburgh 2 Boston 3, Philadelphia 3 Saturday, May 1: Boston 5, Philadelphia 4 (OT) Monday, May 3: Boston 3, Philadelphia 2 Wednesday, May 5: Boston 4, Philadelphia 1 Friday, May 7: Philadelphia 5, Boston 4, OT Monday, May 10: Philadelphia 4, Boston 0 Wednesday, May 12: Philadelphia 2, Boston 1 Friday, May 14: Philadelphia at Boston, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Saturday, May 1: Vancouver 5, Chicago 1 Monday, May 3: Chicago 4, Vancouver 2 Wednesday, May 5: Chicago 5, Vancouver 2 Friday, May 7: Chicago 7, Vancouver 4 Sunday, May 9: Vancouver 4, Chicago 1

Tuesday, May 11: Chicago 5, Vancouver 1 San Jose 4, Detroit 1 Thursday, April 29: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Sunday, May 2: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Tuesday, May 4: San Jose 4, Detroit 3 Thursday, May 6: Detroit 7, San Jose 1 Saturday, May 8: San Jose 2, Detroit 1

BASEBALL College All Times PDT ——— PACIFIC-10 CONFERENCE W L Pct. Overall Arizona State 14 4 .789 41-5 UCLA 10 8 .556 34-11 Stanford 10 8 .556 25-18 California 11 10 .523 27-18 Arizona 9 9 .500 30-16 Washington State 9 9 .500 26-17 Oregon 10 11 .476 31-18 Washington 8 10 .444 25-22 Oregon State 7 11 .389 24-18 Southern California 5 13 .278 23-24 Tuesday’s Games Arizona State 7, BYU 2 Washington State 6, Portland 5 Oregon 13, San Diego 4 UC Irvine 2, UCLA 1 Wednesday’s Games Stanford 8, San Jose State 3 USC, Long Beach State

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF New York 5 2 0 15 8 Columbus 3 0 2 11 9 Toronto FC 3 4 0 9 11 Chicago 2 3 2 8 9 Kansas City 2 3 1 7 6 New England 2 5 1 7 10 Philadelphia 1 5 0 3 6 D.C. 1 6 0 3 4 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 7 0 1 22 15 Houston 4 3 1 13 11 San Jose 4 2 0 12 11 Colorado 3 3 1 10 8 Real Salt Lake 3 3 1 10 12 FC Dallas 2 1 4 10 9 Chivas USA 3 4 1 10 10 Seattle 2 3 3 9 8 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Game

GA 8 5 13 10 6 14 14 15 GA 2 7 7 7 8 8 11 12

World Golf Ranking Through May 9 Rank. Player Country 1. Tiger Woods USA 2. Phil Mickelson USA 3. Steve Stricker USA 4. Lee Westwood Eng 5. Jim Furyk USA 6. Ian Poulter Eng 7. Ernie Els SAf 8. Paul Casey Eng 9. Rory McIlroy NIr 10. Anthony Kim USA 11. Martin Kaymer Ger 12. Robert Allenby Aus 13. Padraig Harrington Irl 14. Camilo Villegas Col 15. Geoff Ogilvy Aus 16. Retief Goosen SAf 17. Hunter Mahan USA 18. Luke Donald Eng 19. Henrik Stenson Swe 20. Tim Clark SAf 21. Y.E. Yang Kor 22. Lucas Glover USA 23. Sean O’Hair USA 24. Charl Schwartzel SAf 25. Kenny Perry USA 26. Angel Cabrera Arg 27. Sergio Garcia Spn 28. Nick Watney USA 29. Stewart Cink USA 30. Dustin Johnson USA 31. Robert Karlsson Swe 32. Zach Johnson USA 33. Alvaro Quiros Spn 34. Matt Kuchar USA 35. Ross Fisher Eng 36. K.J. Choi Kor 37. Edoardo Molinari Ita

Rating 10.98 9.67 7.82 7.66 7.02 6.10 5.85 5.78 5.35 5.14 4.99 4.85 4.47 4.41 4.17 4.15 4.08 4.03 3.91 3.86 3.83 3.83 3.72 3.56 3.55 3.47 3.43 3.40 3.37 3.31 3.17 3.17 3.16 3.14 3.03 2.90 2.80

LPGA Tour MONEY LEADERS Through May 2 1. Ai Miyazato 2. Yani Tseng 3. Suzann Pettersen 4. Song-Hee Kim 5. Cristie Kerr 6. Jiyai Shin 7. Inbee Park 8. Michelle Wie 9. Lorena Ochoa 10. Stacy Lewis 11. Karrie Webb 12. In-Kyung Kim 13. Na Yeon Choi 14. Jee Young Lee 15. Candie Kung 16. Karen Stupples 17. Amy Yang 18. Maria Hjorth 19. Catriona Matthew 20. Anna Nordqvist 21. Morgan Pressel 22. Momoko Ueda 23. Hee Young Park 24. Brittany Lincicome 25. Angela Stanford

Trn 5 4 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5

Money $593,284 $460,932 $405,473 $296,267 $276,921 $234,742 $207,525 $184,178 $176,527 $165,817 $152,274 $149,553 $143,202 $142,136 $119,799 $110,703 $108,326 $103,171 $97,882 $95,751 $92,817 $89,012 $76,910 $71,394 $70,330

Champions Tour CHARLES SCHWAB CUP LEADERS Through May 2 Points Money 1. Fred Couples 1,015 $1,049,317

2. Bernhard Langer 3. Nick Price 4. Tom Watson 5. Tom Lehman 6. Tommy Armour III 7. Mark O’Meara 8. Joey Sindelar 9. John Cook 10. Chien Soon Lu 11. David Eger 12. Tom Kite 13. Dan Forsman 13. Ronnie Black 15. Mike Reid 16. Corey Pavin 17. Tom Pernice, Jr. 18. David Peoples 19. Russ Cochran 20. Mike Goodes 21. Keith Fergus 22. Hale Irwin 23. Loren Roberts 24. David Frost 25. Brad Bryant

818 461 437 375 370 366 357 343 264 240 217 211 211 202 199 167 165 162 161 145 143 141 139 136

$847,001 $539,102 $467,883 $380,875 $405,550 $473,899 $371,742 $391,035 $273,360 $351,596 $287,793 $306,284 $279,898 $274,992 $267,060 $182,650 $167,508 $257,300 $277,739 $230,494 $197,931 $307,567 $184,032 $167,730

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Assigned OF Nolan Reimold to Norfolk (IL). Selected the contract of OF Corey Patterson from Norfolk. Transferred 2B Brian Roberts from the 15- to the 60-day DL. DETROIT TIGERS—Selected the contract of RHP Alfredo Figaro from Toledo (IL). Optioned OF Ryan Raburn to Toledo. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Recalled RHP Blake Wood from Omaha (PCL). Designated Josh Rupe for assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned C Wilson Ramos to Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed RHP Alfredo Aceves on the 15-day DL. Recalled OF Greg Golson from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). SEATTLE MARINERS—Placed SS Jack Wilson on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Matt Tuiaososopo from Tacoma (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS—Recalled LHP Derek Holland from Oklahoma City (PCL). Placed LHP Matt Harrison on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 7. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Recalled RHP Carlos Rosa from Reno (PCL). Optioned RHP Daniel Stange to Reno. COLORADO ROCKIES—Reinstated OF Carlos Gonzalez from the bereavement list. Placed LHP Franklin Morales on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 6. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Released RB Walter Mendenhal and C Kyle Mutcher. HOUSTON TEXANS—Signed LB Danny Clark. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Claimed WR Kole Heckendorf off waivers from Detroit. Released WR Chris Duvalt. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Signed RB Cadillac Williams to one-year contract. Claimed G Michael Shumard off waivers from Denver. Released OT Robert Okeafor. HOCKEY National Hockey League ST. LOUIS BLUES—Signed F Tyler Shattock. COLLEGE IONA—Named Garee Bryant men’s assistant basketball coach. MIAMI—Signed Randy Shannon, football coach, to a four-year contract. MONTANA TECH—Named Aaron Woliczko men’s basketball coach. NAVY—Dismissed SB Marcus Curry from the football team for violating team rules. PURDUE—Reinstated QB Justin Siller to the football team. SETON HALL—Named Shaheen Holloway, Chris Pompey and Dan McHale men’s assistant basketball coaches, Stephen Sauers director of basketball operations and Grant Billmeier and Casey Stanley coordinators of basketball operations. WESTERN NEW MEXICO—Named Adam Clark football coach.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,807 509 130 8 The Dalles 4,955 742 29 13 John Day 4,700 465 20 10 McNary 4,555 229 17 11 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 204,322 5,837 7,818 2,237 The Dalles 142,866 3,744 2,110 1,073 John Day 129,434 3,438 2,336 1,363 McNary 99,269 1,957 2,107 1,153

N H L P L AYO F F R O U N D U P

Canadiens eliminate Pens, 5-2 By Alan Robinson The Associated Press

PITTSBURGH — First the Capitals, now the Penguins. The Canadiens, the worst-record team in the playoffs, keep sending home the NHL’s best. Brian Gionta had two power-play goals, Mike Cammalleri scored his seventh goal of a series in which he upstaged Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin and Montreal built a stunning four-goal lead before beating the Penguins 5-2 in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference semifinals Wednesday night. Believe it, Canadiens. Disbelieve it, Penguins. Montreal, about the last team anyone would have picked to beat the top-seeded Capitals, much less the reigning NHL champion Penguins, accomplished what no team has done since the current playoffs format was adopted in 1994. And that’s beat the Presidents’ Trophy winner and Stanley Cup champion in successive rounds as an eighthseeded team. “We played Washington and we were supposed to get killed and we played these guys and we were supposed to get killed,” defenseman Hal Gill said. “It’s nice to be part of a team that gets things done.” When it ended, the Canadiens crowded around goalie Jaroslav Halak, who made 37 saves in a performance not quite as dominating as that in Montreal’s 2-1 elimination win of Washington but one that shut down the NHL’s oldest arena. The Canadiens move on to the Eastern Conference finals against Boston or Philadelphia. The Flyers beat the Bruins 2-1 on Wednesday

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Montreal Canadiens’ Dominic Moore, left, celebrates his first-period goal with P.K., Subban against the Pittsburgh Penguins in the first period of Game 7 of the NHL hockey Eastern Conference semifinals Wednesday in Pittsburgh. night to force Game 7. “I don’t claim we’re this great team, I don’t claim we’re perfect and I don’t claim that everything we do is on purpose,” Cammalleri said. “I think we’re just finding ways to win.” The Canadiens, who trailed the series 3-2 before winning 4-3 in Game 6, silenced the standing room crowd of 17,132 in the last game played at 49-year-old Mellon Arena by seizing a 1-0 lead on Gionta’s power-play goal only 32 seconds into the game. The Canadiens built it to 4-0 with barely 25 minutes gone. “I was stunned,” Crosby said of his penalty for driving Josh Gorges into the boards. “I don’t know how that’s a penalty 10 seconds into the

game.” Dominic Moore made it 2-0 later in the period and Cammalleri scored his playoff-leading 12th goal at 3:32 of the second. “Who would expect it? Nobody gave us a chance and here we are,” Halak said. The tone was set when Crosby drew his penalty — it was the Penguins who couldn’t make plays, made the wrong decisions, stood around as Montreal skated past them. “It’s definitely disappointing,” Crosby said. “Game 7, anything can happen and, unfortunately, we weren’t at our best.” When Travis Moen scored on a short-handed breakaway by skating

past defenseman Sergei Gonchar and wristing a shot past Marc-Andre Fleury, it was 4-0 with 14:46 remaining in the second. Effectively, it was over. It was for Fleury, the Game 7 star of last year’s finals against Detroit. He was pulled after giving up four goals on 13 shots, and Brent Johnson finished up. Also on Wednesday: Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 PHILADELPHIA — The Flyers’ farfetched comeback is nearly complete. Michael Leighton stopped 29 shots in his first start in nearly two months to help streaking Philadelphia beat Boston and force a seventh game in Boston on Friday night. Philadelphia’s postseason appeared over after it lost the first three games of the series. Not now. The Flyers are on the brink of history — and a spot in the Eastern Conference finals against the Montreal Canadiens. The 1942 Toronto Maple Leafs and the 1975 New York Islanders are the only NHL teams to come back from 3-0 deficits to win a best-ofseven playoff series. The Flyers are the first team to trail 3-0 and force a Game 7 since the ‘75 Islanders. Mike Richards and Danny Briere scored for the Flyers. Milan Lucic scored with a minute left for Boston. Leighton was everything the Flyers wanted in his first start since he sprained his ankle March 16. Leighton’s injury paved the way for Brian Boucher to take over and all he did was lead the Flyers into the postseason as the No. 7 seed and an upset over New Jersey in the first round.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 D3

PREP ROUNDUP

N B A P L AYO F F S

Doubles team from Redmond LeBron, Cavs are still confident after rout advances to state in girls tennis By Tom Withers

The Associated Press

RETURN TO SENDER

Bulletin staff report SALEM — Last year, after watching a teammate compete in the Class 6A girls tennis state tournament, Redmond’s Karli Christensen declared she would return to the 6A state championships not as a spectator but as a competitor. On Wednesday, Christensen made good on her promise. The sophomore qualified for this year’s 6A state tournament at the Portland Tennis Center, along with her doubles partner Kayla Woychak, after defeating Sprague’s Carlie O’Connnell and Megan Singleton in the quarterfinal round at the first day of the Central Valley Conference girls tennis district meet in Salem. The top four finishers in singles and doubles play at the CVC district tournament advance to next week’s 6A state championships. “It was what high school sports should be about,” said Redmond coach Nathan Saito of the day’s last match — a heated three-set Panthers win. Saito figures Redmond is in a position to finish among the top-three teams in the overall competition, thanks to seven first-round wins. Genna Miller was the only Panther knocked out in the first round, but rebounded to fight her way through the consolation bracket and now has a shot at fifth place in the CVC tournament. Mandy Dollarhide and Monica Johnson both advanced to the quarterfinals but were knocked out by the tournaments’ No. 1 and No. 3 seeds, respectively. Redmond’s doubles duo Chloe Woodward and Megan McGinty were also eliminated in quarterfinals play. District tournament action resumes on Friday at the Salem Tennis & Swim Club. In other prep events Wednesday: BOYS TENNIS Fullhart qualifies for state tournament MEDFORD — Sisters’ singles player Ben Fullhart placed fourth after advancing as far as the semifinal round in the Class 4A/3A/2A/1A Special District 3 tournament. Fullhart, whose fourth-place finish qualified him for next week’s Class 4A state tournament, lost 2-6, 6-2, 6-2 to Cascade Christian’s Eric Morse in the third place match. Henley’s Al Fahn, who defeated Fullhart in the semifinals, won the singles competition and North Bend took the district team title. The Outlaws finished sixth out of seven teams. While Fullhart, the first Sisters boys tennis player ever to advance to the state tournament in singles play, was the only Outlaw to win a first-round match, Jared

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Kyle Jackson, of Redmond, fires the ball back towards Trevor Thompson, of West Salem, during a match between the two at the Central Valley Conference boys tennis tournament at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond Wednesday morning. Jackson won the first-round match before losing in the second round. For more on the CVC tourney, see Page D1. Schneider won several matches in the consolation bracket and advanced to the consolation finals. SOFTBALL Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Storm took another step toward a spot in the Class 5A state playoffs when the squad defeated Madras in Intermountain Conference league play on Summit’s home field. Although the White Buffaloes outhit the Storm 7-4, Summit managed to push runners around the bases on singles and walks in addition to capitalizing on Madras errors. Stepping up for Summit was Lacey Hice, who went two for three with a double and three RBIs. For Madras, pitcher Maycee Abendschein knocked in a tworun double and Alex Holcomb added another double, both in the third inning. The win bumped Summit to 811 in the IMC and 11-12 overall while Madras dropped to 10-9 in league and 13-11 overall. The Dalles-Wahtonka . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 THE DALLES — The Eagle Indians defeated the Cowgirls in Intermountain Conference play, as Crook County tries to hang on to the league’s fourth and final state playoff berth. The Dalles-Wahtonka of-

fense hammered the ball throughout the six-inning game, while Crook County struggled with defense. For the Cowgirls offense, Miranda Smith went one for three and tallied one RBI. The loss dropped Crook County to 8-11 in league and 9-15 overall. TRACK AND FIELD Hawks grab titles at Salem meet SALEM — La Pine competitors leaped to the top of the field in several events at a nonleague, nonscored track meet against North Salem and South Salem. For the Hawks girls team, Brittany Glenn and Kassi Conditt took center stage. Conditt was strong in the shot put and discus, taking first and second, respectively, while Glenn won the 400-meter race. In the boys competition, Nick Read set a new personal record in the high jump with a mark of 6 feet, 4 inches, which tied him for first. Read also tied for second in the 200. Ty Slater dominated the discus and the javelin with winning marks of 151-3 and 1793, respectively, and Colton George raced to first in the 300 hurdles and placed second in the 110 hurdles. Deion Mock added a second-place finish in the pole vault to give the Hawks a boost among the Class 6A teams.

PREP SCOREBOARD GIRLS TENNIS Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 6A CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE DISTRICT MEET DAY 1 At Salem Tennis & Swim Club (Redmond quarterfinals matches ony) Singles — Kaitlin Murray, South Salem, def. Mandy Dollarhide, Redmond, 6-0, 6-0; Nicola Young, Sprague, def. Monica Johnson, Redmond, 6-1, 6-3. Doubles — Karli Christensen/Kayla Woychak, Redmond, def. Carlie O’Connell/Megan Singleton, Sprague, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1; Ashley Spencer/Grace Linn, West Salem, def. Chloe Woodward/Megan McGinty, Redmond, 6-1, 6-0.

SOFTBALL Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE Madras 033 000 0 — 6 7 4 Summit 250 200 X — 9 4 3 Moe, Abendschein (4) and J. Smith; M. Defoe, Amodeo (3) and Berge. W—M. Defoe. L—Moe. 2B—Madras: Abendschein, Holcomb; Summit: Hice. ——— (6 innings) Crook County 000 100 — 1 2 2 The Dalles-Wahtonka 321 401 — 11 11 1 Gannon, Reece (3) and Ontko; Parke and Barrett. W—Parke. L—Gannon. 2B—The Dalles-Wahtonka: Wilson. 3B—The Dalles-Wahtonka: Parke. HR—The Dalles-Wahtonka: Parke.

BOYS TRACK

GIRLS TRACK

Wednesday’s Results ——— La Pine, North Salem and South Salem At Salem Top 3 individuals 400-meter relay — 1, North Salem (Jacob Kelly, Marcel Brown, Antonio Sierra, Chris Wiggins) 44:1; 2, South Salem, 45.5; 3, La Pine, 46.4. 1,500 — 1, Ramon Villa, NS, 4:33.8; 2, Andrew Jensen, SS, 4:36.7; 3, Slater Broaddus, SS, 4:40.7. 100 — 1, Antonio Sierra, NS, 11.2; 1, Jacob Kelly, NS, 11.2; 3, Josh Henderson, SS, 11.3. 400 — 1, Marcel Brown, NS, 51.2; 2, Dustin Watson, SS, 52.1; 3, Andrew Swayze, LP, 54.4. 110 hurdles — 1, Aron Armstrong, SS, 16.2; 2, Colton George, LP, 16.8; 3, James Pitrof, NS, 16.9. 800 — 1, Mars Jacobson, SS, 2:03.2; 2, Jack Hill, SS, 2:08.5; 3, Sergio Olmos, NS, 2:08.8. 200 — 1, Dustin Watson, SS, 23.6; 2, Drew Bolliger, NS, 24.2; 2, Nick Read, LP, 24.2. 300 hurdles — 1, Colton George, LP, 43.6; 2, James Pitrof, NS, 44.1; 3, Brian Weaver, NS, 45. 1,600 relay — La Pine (Kole Kimmel, Gareth Dahlgren, Deion Mock, Dylan Seay) 3:40.8; 2, North Salem, 3:50.7; 3, North Salem, 3:56.4. Discus — 1, Ty Slater, LP, 151-3; 2, Anthony Toleafoa, NS, 130-6; 3, Josh Dafoe, NS, 127-2. Pole vault — 1, Brett Delfino, SS, 13-6; 2, Deion Mock, LP, 13-0; 3, Dylan Moore, SS, 11-0. Shot — 1, Joel Rocha Torres, NS, 48-4; 2, Josh Dafoe, NS, 47-2; 3, David Kinkade, NS, 44-5. High jump — 1, Chris Wiggins, NS, 6-4; 1, Nick Read, LP, 6-4; 3, Levi Arnett, NS, 6-2. Javelin — 1, Ty Slater, LP, 179-3; 2, James Pitrof, NS, 140-6; 3, Jeremy Desrosiers, LP, 127-2. Long jump — 1, Dustin Watson, SS, 21-1; 2, Levi Arnett, NS, 20-2 1/2; 3, Junior Brewer, NS, 19-11. Triple jump — 1, Dustin Watson, SS, 41-10 1/2; 2, Brett Ragon, NS, 41-4 1/2; 3, Dominic Casillas, NS, 39-4.

Wednesday’s Results ——— La Pine, North Salem and South Salem At Salem Top 3 individuals 400-meter relay — 1, North Salem (Karla Montes, Debra Brown, Lakisha Berry, Maria Gasca) 50.7; 2, South Salem, 52.1; 3, La Pine, 55.6. 1,500 — 1, Sarah Gunn, SS, 5:59.8; 2, Kiera Downs, NS, 6:02.6; 3, Yaritza Torres, NS, 6:03.4. 100 — 1, Kelsey Moe, SS, 13; 2, Whitney Pitalo, SS, 13.1; 3, Laura Willeford, SS, 13.5. 400 — 1, Brittany Glenn, LP, 1:05.2; 2, Stephanie Saunders, NS, 1:05.7; 3, Emily Anderson, SS, 1:06.2. 800 — 1, Sarah Lopez, NS, 2:37; 2, Courtney Hochstetler, SS, 2:39.4; 3, Kellen Friedrich, SS, 2:41. 200 — 1, Kelsey Moe, SS, 26.5; 2, Mackenzie Laursen, SS, 28; 3, Mariyah Hays, LP, 29. 100 hurdles — 1, Maylea Tooze, NS, 16.3; 2, Kelsey Moe, SS, 16.6; 3, Anne Burnham, SS, 16.8. 300 hurdles — 1, Anne Burnham, SS, 48.8; 2, Whitney Lalonde, NS, 51.2; 3, Rebekah Polacek, NS, 52. 1,600 relay— North Salem (Debra Brown, Sarah Lopez, Rebekah Polacek, Stephanie Saunders) 4:41.8; 2, South Salem, 5:01.8; 3, South Salem, 5:13.5. Discus — 1, Shay Miller, SS, 105-6; 2, Kassi Conditt, LP, 102-9; 3, Kayla Russell, SS, 101-8. Pole vault — 1, Whitney Pitalo, SS, 9-0; 2, Sharayah Kreshon, NS, 8-6; 3, Anne Burnham, SS, 8-0. Shot — 1, Kassi Conditt, LP, 41-9; 2, Shay Miller, SS, 40-0; 3, Jordan Dufault, SS, 35-8. High jump — 1, Jordan Dufault, SS, 5-3; 2, Jessica Hardy, NS, 5-0; 3, Samantha Pries, NS, 4-8. Javelin — 1, Kalia Flocker, SS, 114-5; 2, Kristina McColly, NS, 102-5; 3, Kayla Russell, SS, 95-11. Long jump — 1, Jordan Dufault, SS, 17-1 1/2; 2, Maylea Tooze, NS, 16-5 1/2; 3, Alex Howe, NS, 16-4 3/4. Triple jump — 1, Alyssa Neal, NS, 35-2 1/2; 2, Jessica Hardy, NS, 34-0; 3, Alex Howe, NS, 32-10 1/2.

PREP EQUESTRIAN

Central Oregon riders abound at state meet Bulletin staff report Fifty riders representing eight Central Oregon schools have qualified for the Oregon High School Equestrian Teams state championship meet, which begins its four-day run today at the Jackson County Fairgrounds and Expo Park in Central Point. Central District qualifiers for the state meet include 13 from Redmond High: Justine Hendricks, Kassi Page, Ashlyn Brewster, Jordan Payne, Hennessey Sloter, Natalie Nigg, Danielle Pilon, Abby Henry, Madison Mills, Brandice Durfee, Nautique Simpson, Justin Goss and Jessie Dillon. Qualifiers from Sisters are Jenna Jacobsen, Katie Yozamp, Bobbi Jo Rasauer, Samantha Novotny, Cassidy Kinneman, Sara Marcus, Mackenzie Gellings, Brittney Bounds, McKenzie Legg and Taryn Gates. From Mountain View, state qualifiers are Courtney

Thomas, Morgan Crabtree, Karlee Markham, Kyia Sell, Laurie MacWhorter, Krystal Brix, Maddie Hood, Molly Coehlo and Makayla Bashian. Madras qualifiers are Harrison Buller, Abby Beamer, Kayla Vincent, Kristin Jasa, Rachel Fox, Kaylee Patterson and Kody Abendschein. Five riders from La Pine qualified for state: Chrystal Bates, Charisa Bates, Kelsi Dozier, Samantha Hollinger and Dani Schneider. Qualifiers representing Summit High are Charlotte Faulk, Sarah Nave, Linnea Rehn and Kirsten Rehn. Other qualifiers from Central Oregon are Bend High’s Ciara Timm and Crook County’s Katie Case. Also advancing to state from the Central District are Taylor Norton and Kaesha Hilton, both of Hood River Valley, along with Kayla Coulter of The Dalles-Wahtonka and Lindsey Bernbaum of Dufur.

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio — As a nation of critics dissected his rare poor playoff game, questioning his effort, digging for deeper clues about his future and wondering if he has what it takes to win an NBA championship, LeBron James worked on his jumper. As panic spread through the region, swallowing his nearby hometown of Akron and causing further damage to Cleveland’s badly damaged sports psyche, James exuded calm. There’s nothing he can do about Game 5. It’s history. Game 6 in Boston, however, is a chance for redemption and James believes Cavaliers fans should be confident. Why? “They got me,” he said. But which one? The league’s two-time MVP? Or the guy who made one of 11 shots from the outside, stood around passively on offense as the Celtics pulled away to take a 3-2 series lead and then raised eyebrows afterward by not being accountable and saying, “I spoil a lot of people with my play.” One day after scoring 15 points in the 120-88 loss — the Cavaliers’ worst in playoff history — and being booed by fans who wonder if they’ll ever see him play in person again, James, who can leave Cleveland as a free agent on July 1, said he and his teammates understand their season, the one that was supposed to end with a downtown parade, is on the brink. “It’s win or go home at this point,” he said. “All these guys understand what’s at stake and we look forward to it.” Backed up against a wall, both literally and figuratively, James spent nearly 12 minutes after practice on Wednesday answering questions from a media throng about the health of his injured elbow; outside criticism directed at Cavaliers coach Mike Brown; his legacy; and postgame comments by Cavs owner Dan Gilbert that his All-Star laden team isn’t fulfilling high expectations. And for the first time, James referred to his elbow injury as “an issue I’ll deal with in the offseason.” James was in a better mood than after Game 5, when he was somewhat somber and spoke with a sense of resignation that he had done all he could. He engaged in a competitive shooting game — at the basket closest to the TV cameras — with teammates before talking to reporters. At one point, he even joked he should be given preferential treatment because of his elbow, which has been diagnosed as a sprain and is clearly affecting his shot. “I’ve got a handicap sticker on,” he yelled to teammates. “You’ve got to give me special privileges.” His tone and body language on and off the floor in Game 5 were puzzling for Clevelanders, who have rarely seen him in anything but in assault-the-rim mode. James never got into the flow. He attempted just four shots in the first half, didn’t make his first field goal until late in the third quarter and was essentially a non-factor in the Cavs’ biggest game this season. It was shocking. For everyone. James, though, chalked it up to an “off” shooting night and was dismissive about being disheartened by his effort. “Me? Personally?” he said. “Nah, I’m not disappointed. I’m never disappointed in my play. I feel like I could do more, but I’m not disappointed at all.” James said his cool postgame disposition was nothing new. He wasn’t going to bang the table or yell and scream. That wouldn’t be him. But that doesn’t mean he isn’t mad about being one loss from elimi-

Mark Duncan / The Associated Press

Cleveland’s LeBron James (23) walks to the bench late in the fourth quarter of Game 5 of an NBA playoff series against Boston Tuesday. nation and missing his best chance at his first title. “It’s just who I am,” he said. “I’m not going to show you that I’m angry. If I show a sense of panic, guys follow my lead. If I come over here and panic and say, ‘We lost by 30 and we don’t know what to do.’ That’s not right. It’s not who I am. It’s never been who I am.” Cleveland has been outplayed by Boston for the majority of the series. The Cavaliers have had no answer for Celtics point guard Rajon Rondo, the Cavs’ defense has been suspect and the lack of in-game adjustments have brought renewed heat to Brown, who is in his fifth season. Gilbert, who sat courtside in shock as the Cavs were blown out for the second straight home game, expressed frustration at his team’s lack of effort. In comments to cleveland.com, he seemed to lay some of the blame on Brown. “The entire franchise has done everything in its power to put all our players and its coaching staff in the best possible positions to execute when it counts,” Gilbert told the website. “The last two home playoff losses and the manner in which we lost these game does not come close to being anywhere near the high expectations all of us have of our organization. Our fans and supporters deserve more.” James respects Gilbert’s view, even though he may not share it. “I don’t get involved in what owners say,” he said. “That’s how he feels. As players, we go out there and it’s not like we’re not giving a great effort or trying to play hard. It’s not like we go out in a game and say, ‘Let’s not play hard for the fans.’ When you lose bad like that, we hurt just as much as they hurt. But as professionals, we’ve just got to play a little better.” James had better or his image will continue to take a beating. His very un-LeBron-like performance in Game 5 led to a skewering by national columnists and sports talk radio hosts, some of whom questioned his passion and desire to be great. Already considered one of the game’s most skilled players James place among the all-time greats will be judged by the number of titles. And unless he does something drastic, No. 1 will remain elusive. He torched the Celtics for 38 points in Cleveland’s win in Game 3, and he can quiet his doubters by leading the Cavs to victory in Game 6.

BASKETBALL

Coach K and Geno, fresh off national titles, ready for world championships By Doug Feinberg The Associated Press

NEW YORK — It’s going to be a busy summer for both Mike Krzyzewski and Geno Auriemma. Fresh off winning college basketball national championships last month, the two Hall of Fame coaches will prepare for their next challenge — guiding the U.S. men’s and women’s basketball teams to gold at the world championships. Krzyzewski will start training with the men’s national team in July in Las Vegas while Auriemma will have a few days to work with his players during the WNBA All-Star break. “They are very different situations, but we both work for the same boss (Jerry Colangelo),” Krzyzewski said. “He appreciates all the time we, and the players, put in.” The two college coaches, who were honored by the New York Athletic Club on Wednesday, are in a unique situation having to juggle their commitment to their schools and U.S. basketball. Krzyzewski did it over the last five years, guiding the Americans to gold in the 2008 Olympics and bronze in the 2006 worlds before agreeing to return to coach the U.S. through the 2012 London Games. “You just learn that you have to say no to

some things and people,” Krzyzewski said. “You just hope it’s not your family.” Both coaches have learned to appreciate what little downtime they have. Auriemma went from winning his seventh national championship to running a training camp for the U.S. women’s team just a few days later. Throw in some recruiting for UConn and he was happy to have some leisure time. “I’ve had some time to spend with my family and am anxious to get back out there on the court,” Auriemma said. “I haven’t gotten to play as much golf as I normally do, but I’ll make up for it soon.” Krzyzewski’s schedule hasn’t been as hectic since Duke won its fourth title and first since 2001. The national team won’t train until the summer, but he was eager to get back on the court. “I always love coaching USA basketball as you learn so much from the players and assistants,” he said. The longtime Duke coach still isn’t sure who will be playing for the Americans in the world championships that will take place in Turkey at the end of August. “Obviously everyone has a lot of commitments this summer with free agency, family, and other things,” Krzyzewski said. “I’ll worry about that closer to the time.”


D4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 24 10 .706 — New York 22 11 .667 1½ Toronto 20 16 .556 5 Boston 18 17 .514 6½ Baltimore 10 24 .294 14 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 22 12 .647 — Detroit 19 15 .559 3 Cleveland 13 18 .419 7½ Chicago 14 20 .412 8 Kansas City 11 23 .324 11 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 19 15 .559 — Oakland 18 16 .529 1 Los Angeles 15 21 .417 5 Seattle 13 20 .394 5½ ——— Wednesday’s Games Detroit 2, N.Y. Yankees 0, 1st game Minnesota 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Toronto 3, Boston 2 N.Y. Yankees 8, Detroit 0, 2nd game Baltimore 5, Seattle 2 Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 3 Texas 10, Oakland 1 Cleveland 4, Kansas City 0 Today’s Games Seattle (F.Hernandez 2-3) at Baltimore (Millwood 0-4), 9:35 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 4-1) at Detroit (Verlander 3-2), 10:05 a.m. Oakland (Sheets 2-3) at Texas (C.Wilson 3-1), 11:05 a.m. Cleveland (D.Huff 1-4) at Kansas City (Greinke 0-4), 11:10 a.m. Friday’s Games Boston at Detroit, 4:05 p.m. Cleveland at Baltimore, 4:05 p.m. Minnesota at N.Y. Yankees, 4:05 p.m. Texas at Toronto, 4:07 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 4:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m. Oakland at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 20 13 .606 — Washington 19 15 .559 1½ New York 18 16 .529 2½ Atlanta 16 18 .471 4½ Florida 16 18 .471 4½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 20 14 .588 — Cincinnati 19 15 .559 1 Milwaukee 15 19 .441 5 Chicago 15 20 .429 5½ Pittsburgh 14 20 .412 6 Houston 12 21 .364 7½ West Division W L Pct GB San Diego 21 12 .636 — San Francisco 18 14 .563 2½ Los Angeles 17 17 .500 4½ Colorado 16 17 .485 5 Arizona 14 21 .400 8 ——— Wednesday’s Games Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 0 Atlanta 9, Milwaukee 2 Washington 6, N.Y. Mets 4 Chicago Cubs 4, Florida 3 Colorado 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings, 1st game Houston 9, St. Louis 6 Philadelphia at Colorado, 2nd game, ppd., rain L.A. Dodgers 6, Arizona 3 San Diego 5, San Francisco 2 Today’s Games Houston (Norris 1-4) at St. Louis (Carpenter 4-0), 10:40 a.m. San Diego (Latos 2-3) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 2-2), 12:45 p.m. N.Y. Mets (J.Santana 3-2) at Florida (Jo.Johnson 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Lannan 1-2) at Colorado (J.Chacin 2-0), 5:40 p.m. Friday’s Games Pittsburgh at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m. N.Y. Mets at Florida, 4:10 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Arizona at Atlanta, 4:35 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 5:10 p.m. Washington at Colorado, 6:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 7:05 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 7:15 p.m

AL ROUNDUP Orioles 5, Mariners 2 BALTIMORE — Brad Bergesen took a three-hitter into the eighth inning, Luke Scott homered and scored twice, and Baltimore beat Seattle. Adam Jones had three hits and Miguel Tejada drove in two runs for the Orioles, who defeated Seattle for the first time in five tries this season. Baltimore (1024) became the last team in the majors to reach double figures in wins. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Kotchman 1b Jo.Lopez dh Tuiasosopo 3b Langerhans cf Jo.Wilson ss Moore c a-Griffey Jr. ph M.Saunders lf Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 2 3 4 3 0 4 31

R 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 2 3

Baltimore C.Patterson lf Ad.Jones cf Markakis rf M.Tejada 3b Wigginton 2b Lugo 2b Wieters c Scott dh Atkins 1b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 3 3 35

R H 1 1 1 3 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 0 0 5 12

BI 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 4

Avg. .336 .190 .198 .215 .167 .235 .286 .160 .200 .357

SO 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 7

Avg. .200 .245 .302 .291 .280 .224 .281 .200 .253 .211

Seattle 000 000 011 — 2 7 1 Baltimore 002 102 00x — 5 12 1 a-hit a sacrifice fly for Moore in the 9th. E—Tuiasosopo (4), M.Tejada (6). LOB—Seattle 7, Baltimore 8. 2B—I.Suzuki (6), M.Tejada (7), Scott (6), Atkins (6). HR—Scott (5), off Rowland-Smith. RBIs—Figgins (9), Griffey Jr. (6), Ad.Jones (8), M.Tejada 2 (15), Scott (10), C.Izturis (6). SB—I.Suzuki (10). S—Tuiasosopo. SF—Griffey Jr., C.Izturis. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 5 (Jo. Wilson 2, Figgins, Jo.Lopez, M.Saunders); Baltimore 3 (C.Izturis, Wieters, Scott). Runners moved up—Wieters. GIDP—Jo.Wilson 2. DP—Baltimore 2 (C.Izturis, Wigginton, Atkins), (M.Tejada, Atkins). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Smith L, 0-3 3 7 3 3 1 2 55 6.44 Snell 3 4 2 2 0 3 55 4.91 White 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 3.60 Colome 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 4.26 Texeira 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.55 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Brgesen W, 3-2 7 2-3 5 1 1 2 3 102 5.76 Ohman 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Uehara H, 2 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 15 3.86 Simon S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 20 0.00 Ohman pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Uehara pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Rowland-Smith pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored—Ohman 1-0, Uehara 2-0, Simon 2-1. IBB—off Bergesen (Langerhans). T—2:48. A—11,448 (48,290).

two-run homer and Fausto Carmona and three Cleveland relievers combined to help shut out Kansas City. Cleveland AB R H A.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 G.Sizemore cf 4 0 1 Choo rf 4 0 1 Hafner dh 3 0 1 Kearns lf 4 1 1 Branyan 1b 4 1 2 Peralta 3b 4 1 2 Grudzielanek 2b 3 1 1 Redmond c 3 0 0 Totals 33 4 11 Kansas City Podsednik lf Aviles 2b DeJesus rf B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Callaspo 3b Kendall c Maier cf Y.Betancourt ss Totals

AB 5 5 2 4 4 4 3 2 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 6

Avg. .291 .224 .308 .237 .341 .273 .220 .290 .229

H BI BB 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 9 0 5

SO 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 6

Avg. .317 .424 .254 .328 .252 .306 .282 .254 .276

Cleveland 000 022 000 — 4 11 0 Kansas City 000 000 000 — 0 9 0 LOB—Cleveland 5, Kansas City 13. 2B—Callaspo 2 (8). HR—Branyan (3), off Thompson. RBIs—A.Cabrera 2 (6), Branyan 2 (7). SB—Podsednik (12). CS— G.Sizemore (2), Hafner (1), Podsednik (3). S—Redmond, DeJesus, Maier. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 2 (Kearns, Redmond); Kansas City 8 (J.Guillen 5, Podsednik 3). Runners moved up—Grudzielanek. GIDP— G.Sizemore, Peralta, Podsednik. DP—Cleveland 1 (Grudzielanek, A.Cabrera, Branyan); Kansas City 3 (Aviles, B.Butler), (Kendall, Kendall, Aviles), (Callaspo, Aviles, B.Butler). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Crmona W, 4-1 5 5 0 0 2 2 70 3.43 Laffey 1 2-3 2 0 0 2 1 34 2.45 C.Perez H, 1 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 3 28 2.31 Sipp 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.93 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies L, 2-2 5 6 2 2 1 4 81 5.22 Thompson 1 2 2 2 0 1 16 4.22 Bl.Wood 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 0.00 D.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 4.05 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 1 0 22 3.14 Inherited runners-scored—C.Perez 2-0. HBP—by Carmona (Kendall). T—2:43 (Rain delay: 1:36). A—11,803 (37,840).

Rangers 10, Athletics 1 ARLINGTON, Texas — Derek Holland struck out seven in six shutout innings of his first major league start of the season, Josh Hamilton and Vladimir Guerrero hit consecutive homers, and Texas routed Oakland. Oakland AB Pennington ss 2 a-E.Patterson ph-2b1 A.Rosales 2b-ss 4 Barton 1b 3 Kouzmanoff 3b 4 R.Sweeney rf 3 Gross rf 1 Fox lf 4 Powell c 4 Donaldson dh 4 R.Davis cf 3 Totals 33

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 8 1 2 10

Avg. .256 .234 .268 .297 .267 .296 .255 .196 .207 .053 .227

Texas Andrus ss M.Young 3b A.Blanco 3b Hamilton cf-lf Guerrero rf Borbon cf Kinsler 2b Smoak 1b Garko dh Dav.Murphy lf-rf M.Ramirez c Totals

R 0 2 0 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 1 10

H 1 3 0 3 2 1 2 1 1 0 3 17

Avg. .292 .290 .206 .285 .336 .221 .340 .194 .094 .222 .385

AB 5 4 1 5 4 1 4 4 4 5 4 41

BI 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 9

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 4

Oakland 000 000 010 — 1 8 1 Texas 000 232 21x — 10 17 0 a-homered for Pennington in the 8th. E—G.Gonzalez (1). LOB—Oakland 7, Texas 10. 2B— Kouzmanoff (6), Powell (2), Andrus (4), M.Young (5), Kinsler (4). HR—E.Patterson (3), off D.Mathis; Hamilton (7), off G.Gonzalez; Guerrero (7), off Gaudin; M.Ramirez (1), off Gaudin; M.Young (3), off Gaudin; Smoak (4), off H.Rodriguez. RBIs—E.Patterson (7), M.Young (20), Hamilton 2 (23), Guerrero (27), Kinsler (3), Smoak 2 (10), Garko (3), M.Ramirez (2). CS—Andrus (6). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 3 (A.Rosales, Fox, Donaldson); Texas 5 (Guerrero, M.Ramirez, Andrus, Dav.Murphy 2). Runners moved up—Smoak. GIDP—Powell. DP—Texas 1 (D.Mathis, Andrus, Smoak). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gonzalez L, 3-3 4 9 4 4 0 3 97 4.08 Gaudin 1 2-3 4 3 3 0 0 26 7.36 H.Rodriguez 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 0 31 13.50 E.Ramirez 1 2 1 1 2 1 32 4.91 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland W, 1-0 6 5 0 0 1 7 103 0.00 O’Day 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.00 D.Mathis 2 3 1 1 1 1 36 3.71 G.Gonzalez pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—H.Rodriguez 1-0. Balk— G.Gonzalez. T—3:08. A—26,625 (49,170).

Rays 4, Angels 3 ANAHEIM, Calif. — David Price pitched into the seventh inning to win his third straight decision, and Tampa Bay scored twice on passed balls by backup catcher Ryan Budde in a victory over Los Angeles. Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Burrell dh a-W.Aybar ph-dh Jaso c Navarro c Brignac 2b Totals

AB 4 5 4 4 3 4 3 1 4 0 4 36

R 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8 2 2 14

Avg. .248 .316 .268 .326 .183 .218 .213 .255 .341 .172 .262

Los Angeles AB E.Aybar ss 5 B.Abreu rf 2 Tor.Hunter cf 4 K.Morales 1b 4 J.Rivera lf 4 H.Kendrick 2b 4 Napoli dh 3 b-H.Matsui ph-dh 1 Frandsen 3b 2 c-M.Ryan ph 1 Budde c 3 Totals 33

R 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 1 8 3 3

Avg. .250 .254 .282 .281 .237 .288 .205 .226 .500 .250 .400

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 6

Indians 4, Royals 0

Tampa Bay 200 011 000 — 4 8 1 Los Angeles 001 001 100 — 3 8 1 c-flied out for Frandsen in the 9th. E—Longoria (7), Frandsen (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 7, Los Angeles 7. 2B—Bartlett (9), Zobrist (9), Longoria (12), C.Pena (5), E.Aybar (8), H.Kendrick (8). RBIs—Zobrist (15), B.Upton (18), B.Abreu (14), Tor.Hunter (20), H.Kendrick (17). SB—Bartlett (3), B.Upton (8), E.Aybar (5), B.Abreu 2 (6). SF—B.Abreu. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 7 (Burrell 2, Zobrist 2, Jaso, W.Aybar, Crawford); Los Angeles 6 (K.Morales, Frandsen, B.Abreu 2, Napoli, Tor. Hunter). Runners moved up—Bartlett, Crawford. GIDP— Frandsen. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Brignac, C.Pena).

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Russell Branyan hit a

Tampa Bay Price W, 5-1 Choate H, 5

IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA 6 1-3 7 3 2 3 6 111 2.03 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 7.00

Balfour H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 2.25 Wheeler H, 4 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 1.59 Cormier H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.26 Soriano S, 9-9 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 1.93 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver L, 4-2 7 6 4 1 2 12 120 2.47 Jepsen 1 1 0 0 0 1 23 3.77 Rodney 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.70 Inherited runners-scored—Choate 2-1, Balfour 1-0, Cormier 1-0. WP—Rodney. PB—Budde 2. T—3:09. A—35,700 (45,285).

Tigers 2, Yankees 0 (First Game) DETROIT — Phil Hughes was sharp for seven innings and New York beat Detroit to split a day-night doubleheader. Detroit won the opener 2-0 thanks to pitcher Rick Porcello and a two-run sixth. New York Jeter ss Gardner cf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez dh Cano 2b Posada c 1-Russo pr Swisher rf Winn lf R.Pena 3b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 0 4 1 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 4 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 4

Avg. .277 .323 .195 .276 .350 .282 .000 .304 .226 .154

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon lf Kelly lf Ordonez dh Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch rf Inge 3b Santiago 2b Laird c Everett ss Totals

AB 4 4 0 4 3 3 3 2 2 3 28

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 2 2

SO 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 8

Avg. .357 .293 .172 .276 .376 .340 .238 .288 .157 .180

New York 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 Detroit 000 002 00x — 2 5 1 1-ran for Posada in the 9th. E—Inge (1). LOB—New York 7, Detroit 4. 2B—Posada (6). RBIs—Ordonez (23), Boesch (15). SB—Gardner (15). Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (R.Pena 3, A.Rodriguez, Swisher); Detroit 2 (Everett, Inge). Runners moved up—Teixeira. GIDP—R.Pena, Inge. DP—New York 1 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira); Detroit 1 (Inge, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera). New York IP H R ER Vazquez L, 1-4 7 5 2 2 Logan 1 0 0 0 Detroit IP H R ER Porcello W, 3-3 7 4 0 0 Perry H, 7 1 0 0 0 Vlvrde S, 10-11 1 0 0 0 T—2:15. A—27,376 (41,255).

BB 2 0 BB 3 0 1

SO 7 1 SO 2 1 1

NP 97 10 NP 90 14 15

ERA 8.10 2.84 ERA 6.08 3.14 0.57

Yankees 8, Tigers 0 (Second Game) New York Jeter dh Gardner cf-lf-cf Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b 1-Russo pr-3b Cano 2b Swisher rf Winn lf Thames lf Golson cf-rf Cervelli c R.Pena ss Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 0 3 3 1 3 2 4 3 38

R H 2 0 2 3 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 8 10

Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon dh Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b Boesch lf Avila c Kelly 3b Santiago ss S.Sizemore 2b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 1 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

BB 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 4

SO 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 9

Avg. .270 .337 .203 .281 .000 .341 .297 .219 .350 .500 .408 .138

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 0 1 10

Avg. .354 .286 .276 .372 .352 .154 .188 .275 .225

New York 101 000 006 — 8 10 0 Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 1-ran for A.Rodriguez in the 9th. E—Santiago (3). LOB—New York 8, Detroit 6. 2B—A.Rodriguez (8), Cervelli (2), Mi.Cabrera (13). RBIs—Gardner (11), Teixeira 3 (25), A.Rodriguez 2 (22), Cervelli (13). SB—Jeter (4), Gardner (16). Runners left in scoring position—New York 4 (Cano, R.Pena, Golson 2); Detroit 4 (Kelly 3, Ordonez). Runners moved up—A.Rodriguez, Damon. GIDP— Avila. DP—New York 1 (R.Pena, Cano, Teixeira). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hughes W, 5-0 7 5 0 0 1 8 101 1.38 Chmbrlain H, 6 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.30 M.Rivera 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bndrman L, 1-2 7 5 2 2 1 7 99 5.08 Coke 1 1-3 2 4 4 1 2 35 3.63 Figaro 2-3 3 2 2 2 0 34 27.00 Inherited runners-scored—Figaro 3-3. IBB—off Figaro (Cano). HBP—by Coke (Cano). WP—Figaro. T—3:06. A—28,514 (41,255).

Blue Jays 3, Red Sox 2 BOSTON — Shaun Marcum pitched two-hit ball for seven shutout innings and Travis Snider homered, doubled and drove in all three runs, helping Toronto beat Boston. Toronto AB R F.Lewis lf 4 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 R.Ruiz dh 4 0 V.Wells cf 4 0 Overbay 1b 4 1 J.Bautista 3b 3 1 Snider rf 4 1 J.McDonald 2b 3 0 J.Molina c 3 0 Totals 33 3

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 3 1

SO 1 0 0 2 2 0 1 2 0 8

Avg. .296 .257 .156 .309 .169 .214 .232 .211 .214

Boston AB Scutaro ss 4 Pedroia 2b 3 V.Martinez c 4 Youkilis 1b 3 J.Drew rf 4 D.Ortiz dh 4 Beltre 3b 4 Hermida lf 2 a-McDonald ph-cf 2 Van Every cf 2 b-Lowell ph 1 Hall lf 0 Totals 33

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1

SO 0 1 1 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 8

Avg. .270 .299 .242 .303 .284 .200 .313 .240 .239 .188 .269 .217

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

Toronto 000 010 200 — 3 6 0 Boston 000 000 002 — 2 6 0 a-singled for Hermida in the 8th. b-popped out for Van Every in the 8th. LOB—Toronto 4, Boston 6. 2B—R.Ruiz (2), Overbay (7), Snider (10), J.Drew (8). HR—Snider (5), off Wakefield. RBIs—Snider 3 (12), J.Drew (21), Beltre (20). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 2 (J.Molina, V.Wells); Boston 1 (Hermida). Runners moved up—J.McDonald. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marcum W, 2-1 7 2 0 0 1 6 103 2.78 S.Downs H, 9 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 3.12 Gregg S, 10-11 1 3 2 2 0 2 27 2.12 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wkefield L, 0-2 7 5 3 3 1 5 102 5.63 Delcarmen 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 21 2.08 Schoeneweis 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 8.53 Inherited runners-scored—Schoeneweis 1-0. HBP— by Marcum (Pedroia). WP—Wakefield. T—2:32. A—37,198 (37,402).

Twins 3, White Sox 2 MINNEAPOLIS — De-

nard Span and Minnesota picked up Carl Pavano this time, pecking away at John Danks to beat Chicago. Chicago Pierre lf Pierzynski c Rios cf Konerko 1b Kotsay dh Quentin rf Teahen 3b Beckham 2b Al.Ramirez ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 6 1 1

SO 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .252 .196 .322 .290 .133 .180 .226 .191 .221

Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Thome dh Delm.Young lf B.Harris 3b Punto 3b Casilla ss Totals

AB 3 2 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 3 30

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 9 3 3

SO 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 4

Avg. .277 .282 .347 .357 .275 .254 .287 .203 .271 .269

Chicago 200 000 000 — 2 6 0 Minnesota 002 100 00x — 3 9 1 E—Mauer (1). LOB—Chicago 4, Minnesota 8. 2B—Delm.Young 2 (9). RBIs—Konerko (28), Span (17), Mauer (14), Morneau (23). SB—Pierre 2 (17), Rios (11). CS—Beckham (2). S—O.Hudson. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 4 (B.Harris 2, Thome, Punto). Runners moved up—Mauer, B.Harris. GIDP—Mauer 2. DP—Chicago 2 (Danks, Al.Ramirez, Konerko), (Konerko, Al.Ramirez). Chicago IP H R ER Danks L, 3-2 7 7 3 3 Santos 1 2 0 0 Minnesota IP H R ER Pavano W, 4-3 7 6 2 2 Duensing H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 Guerrier H, 6 1-3 0 0 0 Rauch S, 9-10 1 0 0 0 HBP—by Danks (Mauer). T—2:22. A—38,895 (39,504).

BB 3 0 BB 1 0 0 0

SO 3 1 SO 4 1 1 0

NP 109 12 NP 96 9 6 12

ERA 2.25 0.68 ERA 3.30 1.32 1.69 1.93

NL ROUNDUP Padres 5, Giants 2 SAN FRANCISCO — Yorvit Torrealba drove in two runs against his former team for San Diego. The Padres increased their division lead over the Giants to 2½ games and beat San Francisco for the ninth time in the last 12 meetings, including going 5-0 this season. San Diego AB R Gwynn cf 5 1 Eckstein 2b 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 Headley 3b 4 1 Hairston lf 3 2 Venable rf 3 1 Torrealba c 4 0 Hairston Jr. ss 2 0 Richard p 2 0 b-Salazar ph 0 0 Adams p 0 0 H.Bell p 0 0 Totals 31 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 2 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 5 7

SO 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .210 .270 .265 .311 .247 .214 .309 .223 .182 .219 -----

San Francisco Rowand cf M.Downs 2b Sandoval 3b B.Molina c A.Huff 1b Uribe ss Schierholtz rf Torres lf Cain p Runzler p a-Rohlinger ph D.Bautista p Medders p Totals

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 2

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .291 .298 .280 .345 .296 .267 .341 .258 .083 --.333 -----

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 3 1 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

San Diego 020 101 100 — 5 7 0 San Francisco 020 000 000 — 2 8 0 a-grounded out for Runzler in the 7th. b-walked for Richard in the 8th. LOB—San Diego 9, San Francisco 6. 2B—Hairston Jr. (4). RBIs—Hairston (14), Torrealba 2 (13), Hairston Jr. (10), Richard (3), Torres (5). SB—Venable (9), Hairston Jr. 2 (4), Salazar (1). S—Eckstein, Cain. SF—Hairston, Richard. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 6 (Gwynn, Richard 2, Venable, Eckstein 2); San Francisco 5 (Cain, Rowand, Schierholtz 2, Torres). Runners moved up—Venable. GIDP—A.Huff 2. DP—San Diego 2 (Eckstein, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez), (Eckstein, Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard W, 2-2 7 7 2 2 2 2 90 3.21 Adams H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.38 H.Bell S, 10-12 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.13 San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain L, 2-2 6 2-3 6 5 5 6 3 114 3.38 Runzler 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.77 D.Bautista 1 1 0 0 1 2 18 0.00 Medders 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 4.15 Inherited runners-scored—Runzler 2-0. IBB—off Cain (Hairston Jr., Ad.Gonzalez, Headley). WP—Richard. PB—B.Molina 2. Balk—Richard. T—2:29. A—30,924 (41,915).

Astros 9, Cardinals 6 ST. LOUIS — Wandy Rodriguez carried a one-hitter into the sixth inning and Lance Berkman homered for the second straight game. Cardinals shortstop Brendan Ryan endured a second straight two-error game and his fielding miscue in the fourth helped the Astros score five unearned runs to go ahead 6-1. Houston Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Berkman 1b Ca.Lee lf W.Lopez p Lindstrom p Pence rf P.Feliz 3b Quintero c Manzella ss W.Rodriguez p a-Michaels ph Sampson p Sullivan lf Totals

AB 5 4 1 3 0 0 5 4 5 4 2 1 0 1 35

R H 1 2 2 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 11

St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ludwick cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Freese 3b Y.Molina c LaRue c Stavinoha rf B.Ryan ss c-Rasmus ph Lohse p Hawksworth p T.Miller p b-Jay ph McClellan p D.Reyes p d-Greene ph Totals

AB 5 5 4 4 3 2 2 4 3 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 37

R 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 3 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .294 .260 .209 .203 ----.239 .231 .250 .190 .385 .185 --.156

H BI BB 1 0 0 3 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .218 .287 .326 .301 .321 .284 .077 .379 .173 .289 .286 .000 --.333 1.000 --.200

Houston 001 512 000 — 9 11 1 St. Louis 100 004 001 — 6 9 2 a-grounded out for W.Rodriguez in the 7th. b-ground-

ed out for T.Miller in the 7th. c-flied out for B.Ryan in the 9th. d-lined out for D.Reyes in the 9th. E—Keppinger (3), B.Ryan 2 (7). LOB—Houston 9, St. Louis 7. 2B—Keppinger (9), Quintero (1), Ludwick (7), Pujols 2 (12), Freese (8). HR—Berkman (4), off Lohse. RBIs—Keppinger 3 (12), Berkman 2 (10), Ca.Lee (11), Pence (11), P.Feliz (12), W.Rodriguez (1), Pujols 2 (27), Holliday (13), Freese (22), LaRue (2), Stavinoha (6). S—Keppinger. SF—Ca.Lee, P.Feliz, W.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 5 (Manzella, Pence, Bourn, Quintero, P.Feliz); St. Louis 4 (Freese, Holliday 3). Runners moved up—Pence, Ludwick, LaRue. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rdriguez W, 2-4 6 5 5 4 2 3 94 4.81 Sampson 1 1 0 0 1 0 21 1.23 W.Lopez 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 2 23 6.30 Lndstrm S, 8-8 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 4 1.65 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse L, 0-3 5 10 9 4 4 2 92 5.68 Hawksworth 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 2.40 T.Miller 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.57 McClellan 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 2.35 D.Reyes 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.93 Lohse pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Lindstrom 2-1, Hawksworth 2-2. IBB—off Lohse (Manzella). T—2:48. A—36,342 (43,975).

Rockies 4, Phillies 3 (10 innings, First Game) DENVER — Miguel Olivo went five for five, including a leadoff home run in the 10th inning in the opener of a day-night doubleheader. The second game was postponed because of rain and snow with no makeup date announced. Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf C.Ruiz c 1-Hoover pr-c W.Valdez ss Halladay p J.Romero p b-Dobbs ph Baez p Durbin p Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 4 3 2 2 4 3 0 1 0 0 38

R H 0 0 1 2 1 3 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 11

BI 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 6

Avg. .241 .306 .314 .290 .345 .236 .345 .000 .189 .143 --.179 --.000

Colorado AB R H C.Gonzalez cf-lf 5 2 3 S.Smith lf 5 0 2 Corpas p 0 0 0 Beimel p 0 0 0 Mora 2b 1 0 0 E.Young 2b 3 1 0 Hawpe rf 4 0 1 Helton 1b 3 0 0 Stewart 3b 5 0 1 Olivo c 5 1 5 Barmes ss 2 0 0 Cook p 1 0 0 a-Spilborghs ph 1 0 0 R.Flores p 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 c-Fowler ph-cf 0 0 0 Totals 35 4 12

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .330 .266 .000 .000 .273 .250 .360 .252 .286 .274 .221 .308 .235 --.500 .243

Philadelphia 000 120 000 0 — 3 11 2 Colorado 100 000 200 1 — 4 12 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Cook in the 6th. b-struck out for J.Romero in the 8th. c-walked for Belisle in the 8th. 1-ran for C.Ruiz in the 4th. E—Utley (4), Howard (5). LOB—Philadelphia 9, Colorado 12. 2B—Polanco (7), Werth (18), W.Valdez (3), Olivo (3). 3B—Hawpe (1). HR—Olivo (6), off Durbin. RBIs—Utley (19), Werth (27), Ibanez (17), Hawpe 3 (11), Olivo (14). CS—Olivo (1). S—Mora, Barmes, Cook. SF—Ibanez, Hawpe. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 5 (Werth 2, Halladay 2, Hoover); Colorado 7 (Stewart 2, Helton 2, C.Gonzalez 2, S.Smith). Runners moved up—Howard, Mora, Hawpe. GIDP— Ibanez, C.Ruiz. DP—Colorado 2 (Stewart, Mora), (E.Young, Barmes, Helton). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Halladay 6 1-3 10 3 2 2 4 121 1.59 J.Romero 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 11 5.40 Baez 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 6.00 Durbin L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 1 1 23 2.16 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cook 6 8 3 3 2 3 86 5.80 R.Flores 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Belisle 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 17 2.42 Corpas 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 3.09 Beimel W, 1-0 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 0.69 Durbin pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—J.Romero 1-0, Belisle 10. HBP—by Cook (Werth). WP—Halladay. T—3:18. A—23,475 (50,449).

Cubs 4, Marlins 3 CHICAGO — Carlos Silva stayed away from major trouble and Marlon Byrd hit an RBI double. Mike Fontenot, benched when Chicago gave 20-year-old Starlin Castro the shortstop job, added a two-run double to help the Cubs win for only the second time in nine games. Florida AB R H Coghlan lf 2 0 1 b-Helms ph 1 0 0 Pinto p 0 0 0 Sanches p 0 0 0 d-Barden ph 1 0 1 G.Sanchez 1b 5 0 1 H.Ramirez ss 5 1 2 Cantu 3b 3 1 1 Uggla 2b 4 0 2 R.Paulino c 3 0 1 c-Jo.Baker ph-c 1 0 0 C.Ross cf 3 1 0 B.Carroll rf 4 0 1 Volstad p 2 0 0 a-Petersen ph-lf 1 0 0 Totals 35 3 10 Chicago Fukudome rf S.Castro ss Byrd cf D.Lee 1b Soto c A.Soriano lf Colvin lf Fontenot 2b Je.Baker 3b Silva p Marshall p Zambrano p Marmol p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 3 0 3 2 2 0 0 0 28

R 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 6

Avg. .214 .316 ----.300 .257 .292 .260 .281 .317 .218 .274 .236 .231 .111

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 4

SO 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 8

Avg. .316 .364 .341 .229 .313 .327 .275 .308 .212 .083 --.000 ---

Florida 000 200 001 — 3 10 1 Chicago 020 020 00x — 4 8 1 a-walked for Volstad in the 7th. b-grounded into a double play for Coghlan in the 7th. c-struck out for R.Paulino in the 8th. d-singled for Sanches in the 9th. E—H.Ramirez (5), Fontenot (3). LOB—Florida 9, Chicago 5. 2B—Byrd (14), A.Soriano (11), Fontenot (4). RBIs—Barden (1), R.Paulino 2 (11), Byrd (24), Fontenot 2 (12). S—Silva. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 4 (Cantu, Helms, Jo.Baker, H.Ramirez); Chicago 4 (Fukudome 2, Soto, A.Soriano). Runners moved up—Uggla. GIDP—Helms, Cantu, R.Paulino, Soto, A.Soriano, Fontenot. DP—Florida 3 (Cantu, Uggla, G.Sanchez), (H.Ramirez, Uggla, G.Sanchez), (Sanches, Uggla, G.Sanchez); Chicago 3 (S.Castro, D.Lee), (S.Castro, D.Lee), (Fontenot, D.Lee). Florida Volstad L, 3-3 Pinto Sanches Chicago Silva W, 4-0

IP 6 1 1 IP 6 1-3

H 7 0 1 H 7

R 4 0 0 R 2

ER 4 0 0 ER 2

BB 4 0 0 BB 2

SO 5 2 1 SO 2

NP 96 14 10 NP 92

ERA 4.37 2.70 0.00 ERA 3.40

Marshall H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 0 Zambrano H, 2 2-3 1 0 0 1 Marmol S, 5-6 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 Inherited runners-scored—Marshall 2-0. WP—Volstad. T—2:36. A—38,637 (41,210).

0 4 2.70 1 21 6.33 3 33 1.13 2-0, Marmol

Nationals 6, Mets 4 NEW YORK — Roger Bernadina hit his first two major league homers, including a tiebreaking shot off Francisco Rodriguez in the ninth inning, and made a marvelous catch to lead surprising Washington past New York. Washington AB Morgan cf 4 A.Kennedy 2b-1b 4 Zimmerman 3b 5 A.Dunn 1b 5 Capps p 0 C.Guzman ss-2b 5 W.Harris lf 2 Walker p 0 Clippard p 0 e-Desmond ph-ss 1 Bernadina rf 5 Nieves c 4 Stammen p 2 a-Alb.Gonzalez ph 1 S.Burnett p 0 Taveras lf 0 c-Willingham ph-lf 0 Totals 38

R H 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 11

New York AB Pagan cf 4 Cora 2b 5 Jos.Reyes ss 5 Bay lf 4 D.Wright 3b 2 I.Davis 1b 3 Francoeur rf 4 Barajas c 3 Pelfrey p 2 Takahashi p 0 b-Matthews Jr. ph 1 Feliciano p 0 Nieve p 0 d-Carter ph 1 F.Rodriguez p 0 Totals 34

R 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

SO 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .258 .247 .303 .256 .000 .308 .182 .000 1.000 .250 .263 .209 .357 .294 --.182 .257

H BI BB 2 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 4

SO 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .282 .220 .228 .264 .288 .290 .235 .247 .231 .333 .152 ----.500 ---

Washington 020 200 002 — 6 11 1 New York 020 020 000 — 4 8 1 a-grounded out for Stammen in the 6th. b-struck out for Takahashi in the 6th. c-walked for Taveras in the 8th. d-flied out for Nieve in the 8th. e-flied out for Clippard in the 9th. E—Zimmerman (3), Jos.Reyes (3). LOB—Washington 11, New York 8. 2B—A.Dunn (9), Nieves (2), Pagan (3), Jos.Reyes (6). HR—Bernadina (1), off Pelfrey; Bernadina (2), off F.Rodriguez. RBIs—Bernadina 3 (4), Stammen 3 (4), Pagan (15), Cora (5), Jos.Reyes (10), Pelfrey (2). S—Nieves. SF—Pagan. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 6 (Morgan, Bernadina 2, Zimmerman 3); New York 4 (Bay, Cora, Francoeur 2). Runners moved up—Cora, Jos.Reyes, Francoeur. GIDP—Jos.Reyes. DP—Washington 1 (A.Kennedy, C.Guzman, A.Dunn). Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stammen 5 6 4 4 4 2 100 5.84 S.Burnett 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 4.15 Walker 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 4.82 Clippard W, 7-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 1.80 Capps S, 14-14 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.93 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Pelfrey 5 2-3 7 4 4 3 6 119 3.14 Takahashi 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 2.74 Feliciano 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 1.76 Nieve 1 0 0 0 2 0 21 3.32 Rdriguez L, 2-1 1 2 2 2 0 1 14 2.04 Feliciano pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. S.Burnett pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Walker 1-0, Takahashi 10, Nieve 1-0. IBB—off Stammen (Barajas). T—3:33. A—33,024 (41,800).

Braves 9, Brewers 2 MILWAUKEE — Brooks Conrad homered, doubled and drove in four runs while subbing for injured Chipper Jones, and Atlanta roughed up Milwaukee’s bullpen once again. Atlanta AB McLouth cf 3 Prado 2b 5 Wagner p 0 Heyward rf 3 McCann c 4 Glaus 1b 4 Hinske lf 4 Saito p 0 d-C.Jones ph 1 1-Hicks pr-ss 0 Infante ss-2b 5 Conrad 3b 5 D.Lowe p 2 a-M.Diaz ph 1 Moylan p 0 c-Me.Cabrera ph-lf 2 Totals 39

R H 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 12

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gerut lf Edmonds cf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Zaun c Hart rf A.Escobar ss Gallardo p M.Parra p b-Inglett ph Villanueva p Hoffman p Totals

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 2 4 2 0 1 0 0 31

BI 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 9

BB 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 10

Avg. .167 .312 --.301 .242 .267 .333 --.239 .000 .278 .250 .077 .181 --.196

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 4

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .268 .204 .261 .254 .323 .258 .262 .225 .176 .500 .313 .000 ---

Atlanta 000 101 223 — 9 12 1 Milwaukee 000 002 000 — 2 7 1 a-doubled for D.Lowe in the 7th. b-grounded out for M.Parra in the 7th. c-reached on error for Moylan in the 8th. d-doubled for Saito in the 9th. 1-ran for C.Jones in the 9th. E—Infante (5), Fielder (1). LOB—Atlanta 9, Milwaukee 6. 2B—Heyward (5), Hinske (6), C.Jones (7), Conrad (3), M.Diaz (3), McGehee (9). HR—Conrad (2), off Villanueva. RBIs—Heyward (28), McCann (11), Glaus (23), Hinske (13), C.Jones (8), Conrad 4 (5), Edmonds (7), McGehee (32). SB—Heyward (2). CS—Gerut (1), Hart (1). S—McLouth. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 4 (Infante, Conrad 2, Me.Cabrera); Milwaukee 4 (Gallardo, Zaun, A.Escobar 2). GIDP—Gerut, Zaun. DP—Atlanta 2 (Prado, Infante, Glaus), (Infante, Glaus). Atlanta IP H R D.Lowe W, 5-3 6 6 2 Moylan H, 6 1 0 0 Saito 1 0 0 Wagner 1 1 0 Milwaukee IP H R Gallardo 6 5 2 M.Parra L, 0-2 1 3 2 Villanueva 1 2 2 Hoffman 1 2 3 WP—Wagner. T—3:09. A—30,175 (41,900).

ER 2 0 0 0 ER 2 2 2 3

BB 2 0 1 1 BB 3 0 0 2

SO 2 1 0 2 SO 6 0 3 1

NP ERA 87 5.73 17 2.57 11 2.57 30 1.50 NP ERA 108 3.06 20 4.42 22 3.26 32 12.00

Reds 5, Pirates 0 PITTSBURGH — Homer Bailey became the latest Cincinnati starter to pitch a gem against Pittsburgh, tossing his first career complete game in a 5-0 win that completed a three-game sweep. Cincinnati O.Cabrera ss B.Phillips 2b Votto 1b

AB 5 4 4

R 0 1 1

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 2 0

SO 1 0 0

Avg. .266 .263 .309

Rolen 3b Gomes lf Heisey lf Bruce rf Stubbs cf Hanigan c H.Bailey p Totals

4 3 0 3 4 4 3 34

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 0 1 5 10

Pittsburgh Iwamura 2b Crosby ss A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Pearce 1b Milledge lf An.LaRoche 3b Jaramillo c Duke p Ja.Lopez p a-Clement ph Meek p Hanrahan p Dotel p b-Delw.Young ph Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 1 1 0 5

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

1 2 0 1 1 0 2 8

.271 .261 .273 .259 .196 .380 .273

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .169 .239 .310 .235 .154 .241 .286 .250 .100 .000 .176 ------.245

Cincinnati 220 100 000 — 5 10 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 4 0 a-grounded out for Ja.Lopez in the 6th. b-struck out for Dotel in the 9th. LOB—Cincinnati 5, Pittsburgh 2. 2B���B.Phillips (11), Gomes (4), Hanigan (5), G.Jones (8). HR—Votto (8), off Duke; Stubbs (3), off Duke. RBIs—O.Cabrera (17), Votto 2 (24), Stubbs (13), Hanigan (16). CS—B.Phillips (4). S—H.Bailey. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 1 (Stubbs); Pittsburgh 2 (An.LaRoche, Pearce). GIDP—B.Phillips, An.LaRoche, Jaramillo. DP—Cincinnati 2 (B.Phillips, O.Cabrera, Votto), (B.Phillips, O.Cabrera, Votto); Pittsburgh 1 (An.LaRoche, Iwamura, Pearce). Cincinnati IP H R H.Bailey W, 1-2 9 4 0 Pittsburgh IP H R Duke L, 2-4 5 9 5 Ja.Lopez 1 0 0 Meek 1 0 0 Hanrahan 1 1 0 Dotel 1 0 0 T—2:19. A—20,064 (38,362).

ER 0 ER 5 0 0 0 0

BB 0 BB 1 0 0 1 0

SO 6 SO 2 1 2 2 1

NP 90 NP 87 16 11 23 13

ERA 5.66 ERA 5.56 2.40 0.82 5.84 7.43

Dodgers 6, Diamondbacks 3 PHOENIX — Hiroki Kuroda struck out nine and Manny Ramirez had three RBIs to help Los Angeles complete a three-game sweep of Arizona with a win. Kuroda sustained a concussion when he was drilled in the side of the head by Rusty Ryal’s comebacker on Aug. 15. Los Angeles Martin c Kemp cf Ethier rf Man.Ramirez lf Re.Johnson lf Loney 1b Blake 3b DeWitt 2b J.Carroll ss Kuroda p Belisario p Kuo p Broxton p Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 0 4 4 4 2 3 0 0 0 34

R 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 6 4 10

Avg. .259 .277 .385 .393 .241 .324 .245 .278 .280 .000 -------

Arizona AB R C.Jackson lf 4 1 S.Drew ss 5 1 J.Upton rf 3 0 M.Reynolds 3b 3 1 Ad.LaRoche 1b 3 0 C.Young cf 3 0 Heilman p 0 0 a-Ryal ph 1 0 Qualls p 0 0 T.Abreu 2b 4 0 Hester c 3 0 b-K.Johnson ph 1 0 E.Jackson p 2 0 Gillespie cf 1 0 Totals 33 3

H BI BB SO 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 7 3 4 12

Avg. .258 .309 .224 .228 .257 .297 --.393 --.327 .179 .269 .200 .257

Los Angeles 000 210 300 — 6 8 1 Arizona 000 200 010 — 3 7 0 a-flied out for Heilman in the 8th. b-struck out for Hester in the 9th. E—Blake (6). LOB—Los Angeles 6, Arizona 8. 2B— Man.Ramirez (5), Ad.LaRoche (10). HR—Ethier (11), off E.Jackson. RBIs—Kemp (22), Ethier 2 (37), Man.Ramirez 3 (16), Ad.LaRoche 3 (23). SB—Martin (2), J.Carroll (2). S—Kuroda. SF—Ad.LaRoche. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Martin, Loney); Arizona 4 (M.Reynolds, T.Abreu, Ryal, S.Drew). Runners moved up—J.Carroll, S.Drew. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kuroda W, 4-1 7 1-3 6 3 2 1 9 105 2.66 Belisario 0 0 0 0 1 0 5 6.52 Kuo H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 14 3.38 Broxton S, 4-6 1 1 0 0 1 3 23 1.42 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jackson L, 1-5 6 2-3 7 6 6 4 8 121 7.43 Heilman 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 28 3.68 Qualls 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 6.39 Belisario pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Belisario 1-0, Kuo 2-1, Heilman 1-0. IBB—off E.Jackson (Ethier). T—3:13. A—22,714 (48,633).

LEADERS AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .372; Morneau, Minnesota, .357; AJackson, Detroit, .354; Mauer, Minnesota, .347; Cano, New York, .341; Gardner, New York, .337; ISuzuki, Seattle, .336; Guerrero, Texas, .336. RUNS—Longoria, Tampa Bay, 31; AJackson, Detroit, 27; Youkilis, Boston, 27; Cano, New York, 26; Gardner, New York, 26; Damon, Detroit, 25; VWells, Toronto, 25. RBI—MiCabrera, Detroit, 33; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 29; Konerko, Chicago, 28; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 27; Guerrero, Texas, 27; Teixeira, New York, 25; VWells, Toronto, 25. HITS—AJackson, Detroit, 51; MiCabrera, Detroit, 48; ISuzuki, Seattle, 46; Butler, Kansas City, 44; Cano, New York, 43; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 43; Pedroia, Boston, 43; VWells, Toronto, 43. DOUBLES—VWells, Toronto, 14; MiCabrera, Detroit, 13; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 13; Pedroia, Boston, 13; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 12; 6 tied at 11. TRIPLES—AJackson, Detroit, 3; Maier, Kansas City, 3; Span, Minnesota, 3; 15 tied at 2. HOME RUNS—Konerko, Chicago, 13; AleGonzalez, Toronto, 10; Wigginton, Baltimore, 10; Cano, New York, 9; AnJones, Chicago, 9; VWells, Toronto, 9; JBuck, Toronto, 8; JGuillen, Kansas City, 8; Longoria, Tampa Bay, 8; Morneau, Minnesota, 8. STOLEN BASES—Pierre, Chicago, 17; Gardner, New York, 16; Andrus, Texas, 14; RDavis, Oakland, 12; Podsednik, Kansas City, 12; Rios, Chicago, 11; ISuzuki, Seattle, 10. PITCHING—PHughes, New York, 5-0; Garza, Tampa Bay, 5-1; Price, Tampa Bay, 5-1; 14 tied at 4. STRIKEOUTS—JerWeaver, Los Angeles, 59; CLewis, Texas, 49; JShields, Tampa Bay, 49; RRomero, Toronto, 47; Garza, Tampa Bay, 46; Morrow, Toronto, 46; Lester, Boston, 44. SAVES—Valverde, Detroit, 10; Gregg, Toronto, 10; Papelbon, Boston, 9; NFeliz, Texas, 9; Rauch, Minnesota, 9; RSoriano, Tampa Bay, 9; Aardsma, Seattle, 8. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Ethier, Los Angeles, .385; Braun, Milwaukee, .359; Werth, Philadelphia, .345; BMolina, San Francisco, .345; CRuiz, Philadelphia, .345; Byrd, Chicago, .341; CGonzalez, Colorado, .330. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 31; Kemp, Los Angeles, 30; Utley, Philadelphia, 30; Reynolds, Arizona, 26; Ethier, Los Angeles, 25; Weeks, Milwaukee, 25; Werth, Philadelphia, 25. RBI—Ethier, Los Angeles, 37; McGehee, Milwaukee, 32; Cantu, Florida, 29; Braun, Milwaukee, 28; Heyward, Atlanta, 28; Pujols, St. Louis, 27; Reynolds, Arizona, 27; Werth, Philadelphia, 27; CYoung, Arizona, 27. HITS—Theriot, Chicago, 48; Ethier, Los Angeles, 47; Braun, Milwaukee, 46; Byrd, Chicago, 46; Loney, Los Angeles, 45; Prado, Atlanta, 44; Pujols, St. Louis, 42. DOUBLES—Werth, Philadelphia, 18; Byrd, Chicago, 14; Pujols, St. Louis, 12; Loney, Los Angeles, 11; BPhillips, Cincinnati, 11; ASoriano, Chicago, 11; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 11; Zimmerman, Washington, 11.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 D5

PPP

COLLEGE SPORTS

Big 12 athletic directors meet with Pac-10 counterparts about television contracts By Blair Kerkhoff McClatchy Newspapers

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Big 12 Conference athletic directors met with their Pacific-10 counterparts Wednesday and Thursday in Phoenix to discuss collaborating in a future sports landscape and possibly working together on television contracts. Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe confirmed the meetings and called the exchange “very positive.� “It was an informal gathering,� Beebe said. “We talked about how we might cooperate going forward.� The meeting could be seen as preparation for possible Big Ten expansion. The Big Ten announced in December that it was exploring adding members to its 11-team conference, and among those swirling in the speculation are Big 12 members Missouri and Nebraska. The meetings in Phoenix were held as part of the Pac10’s annual gathering which included coaches, athletic officials, network TV officials and sponsors. Last week, Pac-10 commissioner Larry Scott and Beebe agreed to bring the Big 12 athletic directors. Nine made the trip. Scheduling conflicts kept

Kansas’ Lew Perkins, Nebraska’s Tom Osborne and Texas’ DeLoss Dodds away. Beebe said he and Scott had spoken informally about joint ventures since Scott took over the Pac-10 last year. An alliance between the Big 12 and Pac-10 could strengthen their position in television negotiations. As the two BCS automatic-qualifier conferences west of the Mississippi River, their schools are located in or near six of the nation’s top 13 media markets — Los Angeles, Dallas, San Francisco, Houston, Seattle and Phoenix. The Big 12 footprint includes 16 percent of the nation’s households, the Pac-10 is 15 percent. The Big 12 has football television contracts with ABC/ ESPN that go through 2016 and with Fox Sports Net through 2012. The league begins negotiations with Fox starting next spring. The Pac-10 also has deals with ABC/ESPN and Fox through 2012 and is expected to begin negotiating new deals this year. According to a source, a negotiating point for new deals could involve football games between the Pac-10 and Big 12. In 2007, Big 12 schools de-

livered $7 million to $12 million and the Pac-10 $7 million to $11 million to each member through media contracts, according to the Sports Business Journal. The conferences already are partners in basketball. Last week the leagues announced the matchups for the fourth Big 12/Pac-10 Hardwood Series. The leagues also are partners in bowl games, traditionally in the Holiday Bowl and beginning this season in the Alamo Bowl. There are other connections. Scott has filled his office with several administrators familiar with the Big 12 or the territory. Former Big 12 commissioner Kevin Weiberg is the Pac-10’s deputy commissioner/chief operating officer. Gloria Nevarez, formerly of Oklahoma, is the new senior associate commissioner, and Woodie Dixon is a former general counsel and salary-cap manager for the Chiefs. Scott has said his conference is considering expansion — Colorado has been speculated as a possible target — but only if it means more revenue per school. The Big 12 will have its annual meetings next month in Kansas City.

Continued from D1 Despite her run of PPP success as an individual competitor, Max said a bid for Suzanne King’s record five victories in the elite female category (2001, 2004-07) might have to wait, as she is considering racing as part of a team or pair next year. “I feel like this will be my last year for a while doing it as an individual,� said Max, 35. “It definitely puts a damper on the spring. As much as we want to do it for fun, it soaks up your weekends with the logistics and (training for) different sports.� Bend’s Kristina Strandberg and Stephanie Howe figure to challenge Max on Saturday. Both Strandberg, 35, and Howe, 26, who will race as individuals in the PPP for the first time, are Max’s teammates with XC Oregon, an elite nordic ski team based in Bend. Strandberg, from Sweden, fell short in her bid to make the Swedish Olympic cross-country ski team this past winter. The three have trained together frequently, and Max hopes she hasn’t given away all the secrets she has discovered in six years of racing the PPP as an individual. “I catch myself giving them tips on where to be in the river,� Max said, “and how to ride their bike faster.� Max is even lending Strandberg one of her bikes to use in the race. “I told her I’m going to tighten the brakes and see if she notices,� Max joked. “We kind of have a

Drivers use social media to gain All-Star support By Pete Iacobelli The Associated Press

DARLINGTON, S.C. — From Tweet-Ups to YouTube ads, chasing the fan vote for a NASCAR All-Star spot has gone viral. Richard Petty Motorsports teammates A.J. Allmendinger and Elliott Sadler took part in Twitter gatherings at Darlington in which fans waved signs urging others to vote their driver into the May 22 race at Charlotte Motor Speedway. Martin Truex Jr. has a series of YouTube spots for his “Tried and Truex� campaign. And social media sites are filled with race teams not yet in the elite field attempting to get out the vote. “If you’re lucky enough and your fans vote you in,� Clint Bowyer says, “that is awesome.� It can also be lucrative. Kasey Kahne had missed all chances to make the All-Stars in 2008 and was on his way home when he learned he’d won the fan vote. The result? Kahne won the All-Star race, $1 million and a 10-year exemption into the event. He also parlayed the momentum into a Coca Cola 600 victory a week later. “I love it,� Kahne said of the vote. “Hey, the weekend is all about the fans.� Drivers who’ve won a Sprint Cup race in the past year, former NASCAR champions and past All-Star winners make the exclusive field. The top two finishers in the preliminary Showdown race also advance to the final field. The last spot goes to the leading fan vote-getter from those not already in and who also finished the Showdown. As of May 4, the top 10 — which NASCAR gives in alphabetical order to preserve the suspense — were Allmendinger, Marcos Ambrose, Greg Biffle, Bowyer, Jeff Burton, Carl Edwards, Juan Pablo Montoya, Sadler, Truex and Michael Waltrip. Voting continues until an hour before the All-Star race. “I think the fan vote is a great thing,� Bowyer said. “It is a great tool to get the fans involved.� And websites such as Twitter, Facebook and YouTube have given NASCAR teams a new network to tap into their fans’ passion for everything racing. Sadler’s Twitter entry Monday began: “Nice day in VA! It’s a perfect day to pick up your Sprint phone and vote me into

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

TIGHT LINES AUCTION AND DINNER: Today, 6 p.m., at Aspen Hall in Bend’s Shevlin Park; $35 (includes dinner, drinks, and auction); join the Deschutes River Conservancy for the evening and bid on fishing trips throughout the West and other items; to register, call 541-382-4077 (ext. 10) or visit www.deschutesriver.org. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING

Mary Ann Chastain / The Associated Press

NASCAR Sprint Cup driver Brian Vickers, left, talks with ESPN’s Marty Smith, center, as NASCAR driver Elliott Sadler, right, signs autographs during a Twitter gathering at Darlington raceway in Darlington, S.C., in May. the allstar race.� Truex has a video pitch, which made its debut last week ahead of the Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway. He’s seen in the Michael Waltrip Racing race shop sneaking a T-shirt with his “Tried and Truex� slogan over a life-sized mannequin. Another has Truex outside Mac’s Speedshop in Cornelius, N.C., slipping campaign fliers under windshield wipers of parked cars. “It’s fun,� Truex said. “It kind of gives fans an inside look at what we do. It’s really been well received.� Not all drivers in contention are happy about it. Jeff Burton hasn’t won since Charlotte in 2008 and only has Sunday’s race at Dover to join the All-Stars the way he wants. “It is embarrassing that we are not in it,� Burton said. “I’m not going to go politicking to get in.� That hasn’t stopped Richard Childress Racing from pitching Burton’s case to fans. RCR spokeswoman Christine Brownlow says the team keeps the names of Burton and Bowyer out front as often as possible. “Obviously, it’s a big deal for our sponsors to get our cars in the All-Star race,� she said. “I have a lot of fans say they see updates and vote every hour.� Burton, whose first NASCAR win came 13 years ago, says he doesn’t go on Twitter or Facebook. “There might be some tweeting going on, but it isn’t coming from me, how’s that?� he said. Still, Burton says he would be pleased if he were picked. Greg Biffle enjoys the interaction and immediacy of the modern media. “It’s amazing the reaction you get,� he says. Biffle recalled recently tweet-

ing a picture of a rattlesnake found on his mountain property in West Virginia. “Then 10,000 people see it within five minutes. ...� Biffle said. “It’s amazing how stuff travels today.� Not that Biffle’s got it all figured out. “I’m a real novice. People come up to me and say, ‘You won’t accept me as your (Facebook) friend,’� he said. “I’m like, ‘You know I like you.’�

M a rk Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Pole Pedal Paddle Nearly 3,000 racers are expected to compete — as individuals or as members of teams — in Saturday’s 34th annual U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle. The multisport race is made up of six stages: 1. ALPINE SKIING A 200-foot uphill sprint through snow to skis and snowboards, and a race down a gated course on the Leeway Run at Mt. Bachelor ski area. 2. NORDIC SKIING An eight-kilometer loop along the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center trails, first skirting the Bachelor parking lot and then finishing at the Nordic Center. 3. CYCLING A 22-mile mostly downhill ride along Century Drive from Mount Bachelor to Colorado Avenue in Bend. 4. RUNNING A five-mile run along Century Drive and the Deschutes River Trail to the boat exchange across the river from Farewell Bend Park. 5. PADDLING A 1½-mile paddle in a kayak or canoe on the Deschutes River. 6. SPRINTING A half-mile run from the paddle finish along a paved path and grass to the finish at the Les Schwab Amphitheater.

H ďœŚ F  E  C   FISHING

AUTO RACING: NASCAR

running joke about how we’re going to sabotage each other’s races.� Max said that if Strandberg gains a lead on the nordic ski leg she will hope to catch up during the bike stage. But Max herself has become an accomplished nordic skier: This past winter, she competed in three lung-busting ski marathons in a period of eight days, the longest being the 90-kilometer Vasaloppet in Sweden. “Last year (in the PPP), I got off to a bad start,� Max said, recalling how she fell behind Bend’s Muffy and Zoe Roy, mother and daughter, during the race-opening downhill ski stage. But the defending champion passed the Roys on the cycling leg and won the race by nearly a full minute. Muffy and Zoe Roy are not competing as individuals this year, so Max’s main competition in the women’s elite field — which includes just five racers this year — will likely come from Strandberg and Howe. But Max is focused more on her personal goals than on her fellow racers. “Suzanne (King) said years ago, ‘Don’t focus on how you finish,’� Max recalled. “Go into a race with a personal goal. That was the perfect advice. I don’t feel the need to win four times in a row (as King did). “But three does have a nice ring to it.�

THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Stafford Inn, 1773 N.E. Third St., Prineville. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING CHUB EASTMAN TO SPEAK AT COSSA MEETING: Today, 7 p.m., at the VFW Hall at 4th and Olney streets in Bend; admission is free; Chub Eastman, a columnist for Sports Afield magazine and a contributor to a number of sporting journals, will speak to Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association members; www.oregonshooting.com.

No monthly dues until June 1, 2010 and No initiation fees until June 30, 2011 In addition you will receive a $25 to $50 monthly credit to your member account for up to 18 months beginning June 1, 2010. (Preview Members Only)

Other memberships are available for as low as $145 per month with initiation fees beginning at $1,200.

Contact Keith Kessaris in the Membership Department for more details. 541-385-6011 or keith@awbreyglen.com 2500 NW Awbrey Glen Drive | Bend | www.awbreyglen.com | 541-385-6011

CENTRAL OREGON YOUTH SAFARI CHALLENGE: The Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association will host a free youth day at the COSSA Shooting Sports Complex on Saturday, May 29; registration begins at 8:30 a.m.; theme will be cowboys and Indians; guns, ammunition, bows and arrows will be provided; to register, contact Gary Lewis at 541-317-0116 or e-mail mglewis@coinet.com. BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: New 13-station walk-through course open Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 6 p.m., weekdays available for groups of five or more with reservations; 5-Stand on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Trap,

skeet, and sporting clays fields; rifle/ pistol ranges; open to the community; training programs and competition; families welcome; www.rrandgc.com. VARMINT SHOOTERS’ COMPETITION: At Redmond Rod & Gun Club, Sunday, May 20, 9 a.m.; entry is $10; bench shooting at 100 and 200 yards for score; 541-504-1513. MILITARY RIFLE SHOOT: At Redmond Rod & Gun Club, Monday, May 31, noon; use any military rifle with open sights, no optics; $10 entry fee; 541-504-1513. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

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H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

D6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Vapor

Sections of Central Oregon rivers and streams opening to anglers on Saturday, May 22 22

26

Madras Lake Billy Chinook

Metolius River

Metolius River

upstream from Allingham Bridge

97

Camp Sherman 20

Cr

oo

ke

20 126

r

126

Sisters

242

ive r

126

Crooked River open year-round. Use of bait allowed beginning Saturday, May 22

from Benham Falls upstream to Little Lava Lake

De sch ute sR

20

Deschutes River

dR ive

Redmond

97

Bend 20

46

Little Lava Lake

Fall River ive r

downstream from Fall River Falls

De sc hu

tes R

Crane Prairie Reservoir Wickiup Reservoir

Little Deschutes River

LaPine

Davis Lake

entire river

Continued from D1 He explained how much damage the varmints had done to his crops and how necessary it was to keep them under control if he expected to take any orchard grass to market. Producing a crop that was certified organic, he could not use chemicals to control the critters. His best option, he said, was a hunter with a rifle. We eased into the fields when the morning sun was well up, a parade of pickups behind an old Chevrolet with a framed platform built over its top. After a few minutes of watching, we saw the ground begin to move, here, there and there. Belding’s ground squirrels, sage rats, popped out of their dens to feed in the alfalfa. We shot for a few minutes, then Justin called my attention to a canyon a half-mile distant. Situated so close to the green fields, the badlands reeked of rockchucks. Varmint trails spidered into the alfalfa and the crop was damaged for hundreds of yards. It’s not easy to sneak up on a yellow-bellied marmot. In the cap rock, the chucks own the high ground. We’d have to go in quiet. It was a perfect mission for the all-electric four-wheeldrive Bad Boy Buggy. Allen Kallel calls the Bad Boy a golf cart on steroids. It is silent, except for the sound of rocks rolling beneath the tires.

We made our approach from the west and eased into the canyon up the bottom of a wash. Aamodt spotted the first one and I spotted the next, a patch of russet hair against gray rock. We flipped for it and I won the toss. Two chucks fed out into the open on a grassy slide. I thumbed four rounds into the Remington Model 78, snugged the 243 against my shoulder, dialed the Leupold to 7x and sought leg holds for the bipod on the boulder in front of me. About 250 yards or more at a steep uphill angle. My bullet spanged rock and sent the chucks scrambling for cover. My second one was closer. Now I had the range. When Aamodt spotted the next on a rocky outcrop, I held 9 inches high and 6 inches left to compensate for the wind, squeezed. The next one showed to sun himself on a black chunk of lava. And then we spotted another on a slide studded with white boulders. It was Allen’s turn. Kallel leaned back and cracked the rifle. He pushed a bullet into the chamber and closed it. Now he leaned forward, into the rock, into the rifle, solid on the bipod, on the boulder. “See that white slide? There’s a cave below that flat rock. The chuck is right above that.” Justin Aamodt locked into his binocular with both hands and put a finger in each ear. We were both looking over

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

While varmint hunting in southeast Oregon, Justin Aamodt, of Hines, calls the shots while Allen Kallel, of Bend, leans into the rifle. Allen’s shoulder when the bullet left the rifle. At 4,000 feet per second, the air parted around the tip of the bullet and vapor shimmered in its wake. All the way to the chuck. Populations of Marmota flaviventris, absent well-drained fields and major food sources, don’t usually grow out of balance. But to a rancher or a farmer, making a living on the land, colonies of rockchucks, a.k.a. yellow-bellied marmots, can cause no end of trouble. A chuck’s burrow might run 10 to 70 yards and go 25 to 35 feet deep. Chucks consume a con-

siderable amount of a farmer’s crop. Burrows and mounds cause enormous damage to harvesting equipment. In the past, poisons were often employed to keep chucks in check, but if a farmer wants to maintain a certified organic status, the best option is a hunter with a rifle. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

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Odell Lake ake kee

FISHING REPORT

Crescent Lake 58

97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Flow Continued from D1 That kind of rapid, significant decline in water can harm a trout population, particularly because it took place in the middle of brown trout spawning season, Wise explained. The biologist added that once the irrigation season tapers off, the water master starts reducing flows. “That’s when they’re storing water in Wickiup and Crane for next year’s irrigation,” Wise said. “The difference in the river from Oct. 1 to Nov. 1 is so dramatic. I get calls every year that fish are being stranded (because of low water).” But Wise insisted that fishing prospects are still good on the Upper Deschutes below Wickiup. “Browns are not quite as abundant as they were 10 years ago, but they’re there,” he said. “Each year, there’s some beautiful browns caught from Wickiup to Benham (Falls). And it’s boatable, too.” The stretch of the Upper Deschutes from Wickiup Reservoir upstream to Crane Prairie Reservoir also opens May 22, and it holds opportunity for redband and brown trout as well. Farther upstream, from Crane Prairie up to Little Lava Lake, is a catch-and-release-only stretch for redband. Most redband there will eventually move down into Crane Prairie Reservoir before returning upstream to spawn. “It’s a really nice fly-fishing stream,” Wise said. “It’s primar-

ily a rearing stream (for redband), but there are some nice brook trout.” Also on May 22, the Metolius River opens to fishing upstream from the Allingham Bridge near Camp Sherman. Wise said that redband spawning numbers are good on the Metolius, while bull trout numbers are somewhat down. The Metolius also contains a small population of brown trout. “Above Allingham, the difference is it opens up a fair bit and there’s more water that is wadable,” Wise said. “It changes the complexion of fishing. The water above Allingham is a little easier to fish — smaller and less flow. And the rainbow population is doing so well.” The Metolius is a catch-and-release-only river, and it is restricted to artificial flies and lures downstream of Bridge 99. Other Central Oregon streams opening next weekend include Fall River, below the falls, and the Little Deschutes River. Also, the Crooked River, open yearround to fly anglers, opens to bait fishing on May 22. Wise said that the rainbow trout population on the Crooked River continues to increase, and that flows are being reduced to prime fishing range. “They were up at 2,000 (cfs) in April,” Wise said. “They’re headed down to 250 cfs, and that’s good for fishing.”

Fishing improving on Lake Billy Chinook Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Closed to angling through May 21. The reservoir will be restocked with catchable rainbow trout before reopening. BIG LAVA LAKE: The Forest Service ramp at Big Lava Lake is open and there is some open water. The fishing should be good if one is able to get on the lake. Please check with the U.S. Forest Service Bend-Fort Rock R.D. or Lava Lake Resort for updated information on lake access. CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Crane Prairie Reservoir is ice-free and accessible at the ramps located at Crane Prairie Resort, the USFS Crane Prairie Campground, Rock Creek Ramp and Quinn River ramp. The fishing has been great with quite a few rainbow trout in the 5-pound range being caught as well as a good number of brook trout. There should be good fishing for rainbow trout in the 8-inch to 12-inch range and Crane Prairie is known for its larger rainbow trout up to 22 inches. CRESCENT LAKE: Boat launching access to the lake is available at the Crescent Lake Lodge and the USFS boat launch at Crescent Lake Campground. There is currently good opportunity for lake trout, brown trout and kokanee. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Flows on the Crooked River are gradually decreasing and are currently around 400 cfs. Fishing is good and will improve more as flows level out. Redband trout are currently spawning in the river and the Crooked River Flyfishers have marked spawning redds. We ask anglers to avoid disturbing the substrate in these areas. CULTUS LAKE: Cultus Lake is not boat accessible at this time.

EAST LAKE: East Lake is not yet accessible. FALL RIVER: Fall River above the falls remains open to fly angling only. Probably the best fly fishing in the region right now with good hatches of blue-wing olive, midges and tan caddis. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Fishing is good. Spring is often the best time to fish for 12- to 18-inch rainbow and brown trout in Haystack Reservoir. Trolling is the most effective method; however, bank anglers are often successful near the dam and fishing platform. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: Fishing is improving for all species. Several legal-sized bull trout (greater than 24inches) have been caught, but most bull trout being reported are in the 16- to 20-inch range. LITTLE LAVA LAKE: Little Lava is currently inaccessible due to snow conditions. METOLIUS RIVER: Fishing has been up and down but is generally good. There have been strong hatches of blue-wing olive and caddis, with a few March Browns as well. The mainstem Metolius upstream from Allingham Bridge is currently closed to angling. NORTH TWIN: Recent angler reports indicate the fishing at North Twin has been good. North Twin is a great lake to take young kids to as there is a good beach shoreline and it is protected from the wind. Look to catch rainbow trout in the 8 inch to 13 inch size range. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Shore fishing has been good

between the boat ramp and the dam. Opportunities for 12 to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. ODELL LAKE: Some kokanee anglers have seen success and things should be picking up directly. Anglers targeting kokanee should get on the water early. Lake trout angling should also be good. Please note that all bull trout must be released unharmed. PAULINA LAKE: Paulina Lake is ice-free with boat access currently at Paulina Lake Lodge. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is stocked with healthy rainbow trout. The pond is open to children 14 and younger with a bag limit of five fish. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 14 years old and younger with a bag limit of five fish. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: The opportunity for rainbow trout ranging from 8 inches to 10 inches is very good. Anglers are catching a few larger fish up to 20 inches. South Twin is a good lake for younger anglers as it has a good shoreline and is protected from the wind. WALTON LAKE: The U.S. Forest service will be renovating the Walton Lake Campground and its surrounding roads throughout the summer of 2010. All access to the reservoir will be closed as a safety precaution to forest users. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-416-6500 for more information. WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Fishing has been fair with some folks catching kokanee and others catching a few brown trout. Anglers after brown trout and kokanee should get on the water early.

Show off your high school grad in our special edition of CENTRAL OREGON

Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

FLY-TYING CORNER

DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): As the month of May continues, look for the golden stones and salmonflies to start hatching. These giant stoneflies will start hatching about the third week of May, depending on where you’re at on the river. Hatches will start occurring earlier around Maupin and progress upstream as June approaches. These hatches are legendary. If you want to experience great trout fishing on large dry flies, head for the Deschutes this month.

27

$

Graduation Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Send us a BABY photo to include in our 2009 Graduation Edition, which will publish on Wednesday, June 9.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Just bring in or mail your graduate’s baby photo along with the information requested below and a $27 fee by Monday, May 24. Photos will be returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

Norm Wood Special, courtesy The Patient Angler.

Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

The water is warming and the big bugs are moving toward the shore. Here’s a pattern you can use during spring stonefly hatches across the West. The Norm Wood Special is an impressionistic high-floating fly that presents a good profile in riffled runs. Watch for fish rising close to the shore and pay special attention to shoreside brush as big trout will stage in the thick stuff to pluck bugs off the branches. Use a 3X leader to turn this big fly over on the cast. Lay on the fly floatant to

keep the bug on the surface. Fish the Norm Wood Special on a floating line with an upstream or downstream dragfree presentation. Tie this pattern with red thread on a No. 8 extra long hook. Use copper wire for the ribbing. Tie in a brown hackle extending backward. Build a body of yellow/ brown synthetic dubbing. Palmer the hackle with the copper wire ribbing. Use a light rust-colored poly yarn for the wing. Tie in brown rubber legs at the thorax and build the thorax of yellow or orange yarn and wrap with another brown hackle.

Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

P L E A S E T Y P E O R P R I N T C L E A R LY O N LY T H E F O L L OW I N G I N F O R M AT I O N :

Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Graduate’s Name _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Parents’ Names _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ School _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (Please print graduate’s name on back of photo.) Phone # _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Mail to: Bulletin Grad Tab Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Attn: Stacie Oberson

1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School


O

E

ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

Get ‘Twisted’ Twisted Sister frontman gets reality TV show on A&E, Page E2

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010

Anticipate busier trails as spring heats up By David Jasper The Bulletin

You can have faith in your trusty guidebook, but always be

As dark clouds gather in the distance, remnants of an old fence poke through the snow near the summit of Lookout Mountain.

ON THE

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

LOOKOUT

SPOTLIGHT Phagans’ to donate half of Friday proceeds

By Markian Hawryluk • The Bulletin

I

read once that a map represents the ultimate trust in strangers. I suppose that’s true of a guidebook as well. For years, I’ve put my trust

in William Sullivan, the author of a popular series of

If you go

hiking guides for Oregon. In fact, his “100 Hikes in the Central Oregon Cascades” was one of my first purchases when I moved to Bend. It’s helped me find some of the more scenic nooks and crannies in the region. But every now and again I learn how important it is not be totally dependent on the guidebook. Roads close, trails are rebuilt, conditions can render the descriptions in a book temporarily irrelevant. With an old, dog-eared copy of Sullivan’s “100 Hikes in Eastern Oregon” in hand, I headed for Lookout Mountain, about 25 miles east of Prineville. My first clue that things weren’t going to go as planned was the brief stop into the Ochoco Ranger Station at the base of the mountain. The rangers had abandoned their base and relocated to Prineville itself. (The station still bears the Lookout Mountain designation.) I had planned to drive up to the higher Independent Mine Trailhead, and then take the longer, more scenic route Sullivan describes in the book. But upon arriving at the lower Round Mountain Trailhead, I found the road blocked by snow and a fallen tree.

Mother Nature’s starting to get some spring in her step, and for the most part, the warmer, drier weather should hold over the next several days, reports Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest. Pole Pedal Paddle is being held Saturday, and those heading up into the Cascades can expect heavy traffic along Cascade Lakes Highway to Mount Bachelor. Sabo predicts snowfree trails will also likely see an increase in traffic with the influx of out-of-town visitors. Deschutes County road crews continue their plowing efforts on Cascade Lakes Highway. From the south, the highway is open as far as Lava Lake, where lake access is now open. Plowing operations are approaching the Todd Lake road junction (Forest Road 370), and barring mechanical difficulties or other delays, the crew should make it to the snow gate at Dutchman Flat sometime next week. If melting continues over the next couple of weeks, Deschutes County hopes to open the gate and highway in time for Memorial Day weekend. Plowing operations may be under way east of Todd Lake junction by this weekend. Should that occur, snowmobilers should plan to use alternate snowmobile Trail No. 7 to the Moon Mountain area, Sabo said. As of Tuesday, there was as much as 7 feet of snow at Dutchman Flat. Signs that designate separation of winter motorized and nonmotorized use have been removed in preparation for the plowing crew, but Sabo asks that trail users continue to use the winter trail and highway as if the signs were present. Tumalo Falls Road opened on Tuesday. Anyone heading out from Tumalo Falls trailhead can expect snow on trails and plenty of fellow users at this popular weekend destination. See Trails / E3

Lookout Mountain summit 6,962 ft.

Shelter To South Point Greg Cross / The Bulletin

At a minimum, I was looking at an extra mile of hiking time, so I decided to take the most direct route. The mile-long road alternated between snow and bare ground, but the snow was solid enough to walk on sans snowshoes. Just before reaching the upper trailhead, the road passes by three old wooden cabins, a reminder that people did more than simply recreate in this area. I never did catch any sight of the old Independent Mine that’s supposed to be at the main road’s end. Both the roundabout 808 trail and the direct 808A are supposed to start from the upper trailhead. But both trails were under snow. The guidebook was going to be of little help to me now. See Outing / E6

Getting there: From Prineville, drive 16 miles east on U.S. Highway 26. Veer right on state Highway 42 and continue 8.5 miles, past the closed Ochoco Ranger Station, and stay to the right on 42 at the junction. In 6.5 miles, at the sign for Independent Mine, take a right onto Forest Road 4205. If the road is open, you can continue another mile over a rough road to the upper trailhead. If it’s closed, park at the lower trailhead and walk up the road. Cost: $5 parking permit or Northwest Forest Pass required Difficulty: Difficult in early season Contact: Ochoco National Forest, Prineville, 541-416-6500

Phagans’ Cosmetology College will host its biannual Marathon Day on Friday to raise money for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The school recently opened a new facility at 1310 N.W. Cushing Drive, Bend. Its goal is to have students perform as many salon services as possible on Friday, when half of the sales will be donated. The salon is open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and offers hair, skin and nail care services. Contact: 541-350-0749.

Religious women’s conference Friday The Three Sisters Women’s Conference will take place Friday and Saturday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond. The event is designed to bring religious women together for fellowship and worship, and to hear speakers and musicians. The event will take place from 6 to 9:45 p.m. Friday and from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Cost is $16 for Friday, $23 for Saturday and an additional $12 for lunch. Contact: 541-382-8609 or info@threesisterswomensconference.com or www.threesisters womensconference.com. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Man’s shame over infidelity A&E is getting ‘Twisted’ prompts thoughts of suicide Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider gets own reality TV show Dear Abby: I have been married 19 years to a beautiful, accomplished woman. We have two wonderful children. I fooled around throughout my marriage because I could. I justified it by telling myself the women knew what they were doing, and I never made any false promises about leaving my wife. She suspected a couple of times, but always gave me the benefit of the doubt. My last affair ended publicly with every gory detail exposed. My family, work, reputation — everything that mattered to me — have been destroyed. I can’t talk about any of it to a therapist because I am so ashamed. Friends, family and co-workers now shun me. I have hit rock bottom. If you have a hopeful solution, please share it. Otherwise, please print this as a warning to other men like me that when they hit bottom — as will surely happen — there’s nowhere to turn. I want to end my life. — Shattered in Louisiana Dear Shattered: I understand this experience has been painful for all concerned, but stop focusing only on yourself and your pain. Suicide may seem like a solution to your problems, but your children need you alive and functional — and their needs must take precedence. Find a therapist — someone you can relate to, and feel safe enough with to discuss everything that has happened from the beginning. There is life after divorce. And, as many celebrities can attest, there is also life after public embarrassment and career

DEAR ABBY “If you have a hopeful solution, please share it. Otherwise, please print this as a warning to other men like me that when they hit bottom — as will surely happen — there’s nowhere to turn. I want to end my life.”

setbacks. So straighten your backbone and keep marching forward. While it may not seem like it right now, there are better days ahead. Dear Abby: My mother and I rarely get along — mainly because she thinks she’s fabulous and I don’t. I’m in my 30s, married with a child and have a career. I am tired of riding an emotional roller coaster with Mother. She is planning her next visit and I don’t want her to come. Her visits end up lasting a week or more, and her conversation consists of complaining, making snide comments about my house and how I am raising my child (under the guise of being “helpful”), and then whining because I don’t have the time or desire to entertain or placate her. Can you tell me how to tell her that visits to my house are no longer welcomed?

— Done with the Drama Dear Done: When your mother raises the subject of her visit, tell her that she would be more comfortable staying at a hotel when she comes and so would you. That way you can control the amount of time you spend together. Offer to split the cost with her, then pray she agrees. Dear Abby: Here’s a new one for you. A group of friends and I are frequent customers on some of the home shopping channels. When we buy jewelry it arrives in a gift case or box. We hate to throw them away. Any ideas on how we can donate or recycle those gift boxes? — Diana in Lakewood, Calif. Dear Diana: Depending upon how you store your jewelry, you could keep the items in their presentation boxes in a drawer with the tops open, so the drawer becomes a large jewelry box and they don’t become scratched. Or, save the boxes and reuse them when giving small gifts at Christmas or on birthdays. If you know of any people or groups who make jewelry or other crafts, offer the boxes to them. Otherwise, (sob!) it’s off to the landfill.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

By Glenn Gamboa

Twisted Sister frontman Dee Snider extended stardom to the rest of his family when he signed up for A&E’s new reality show “Growing Up Twisted.” The show is set to debut later this year.

Newsday

NEW YORK — Dee Snider says his family is “like ‘The Huxtables’ meets ‘The Munsters’.” “And I’m Dr. Huxtable,” said the Twisted Sister frontman, who has gone on to become a radio talk show host and filmmaker as well. “I’m the normal one.” Well, the world will soon find out how normal as the Sniders — Dee, wife Suzette, and their four kids, Jesse, Shane, Cody and Cheyenne — have signed on to do their own reality show, “Growing Up Twisted,” for A&E, set to air later this year. The show is in production on Long Island, mainly in the Stony Brook area around the Sniders’ home. Snider said cameras will be all over Point Lookout on May 23 for the eighth annual Bikers for Babies Ride, the March of Dimes fundraiser he has been chairman of since it began. The show will also shoot at the Atlantic City Hilton this weekend, covering his appearance in “I Wanna Rock Live,” where he might unveil a new song his son Jesse wrote and where Cheyenne might perform. Those opportunities are why the Sniders got involved with the show, which they see as a way to jump start the careers of rocker Jesse, comic Shane and filmmaker Cody. “I wanted to be the producer for my kids’ careers — not in a stage parent way, since my sons are all in their 20s — so that they can have a better life and an easier time than I had,” he said. “That means there’s a lot more reality in our show.”

The Associated Press file photo

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Å 228690 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4085690 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 6956941 Weird 9655690 Weird 9578597 Wild Pacific ’ ‘PG’ Å 4944455 Wild Pacific ’ ‘PG’ Å 7306482 Weird 6453077 Weird 2629110 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 9572313 Housewives/NYC 255955 Housewives/NYC 864752 Housewives/NYC 405023 Housewives/NYC 414771 Housewives/NYC 507435 Housewives/NYC 404394 Happens 875348 NYC 885665 137 44 Smarter 5851431 Smarter 6100923 Extreme Makeover: Home 1882874 Extreme Makeover: Home 1795394 ›››› “Driving Miss Daisy” (1989) Morgan Freeman, Jessica Tandy. ’ 5598503 Driving 5413868 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ 2352874 Marijuana Inc.: Pot Industry 118110 Total Recall: Toyota Story 774145 Mad Money 687665 Marijuana Inc.: Pot Industry 770329 Total Recall: Toyota Story 773416 Paid 968042 Paid 681459 51 36 40 52 Big Mac: Inside McDonald’s 424023 Larry King Live (N) Å 799936 Anderson Cooper 360 A young American becomes a Jihadist. (N) 598394 Larry King Live 909226 Anderson Cooper 360 902313 Anderson Cooper 360 690706 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 800481 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 46145 Scrubs ’ 43058 Scrubs ’ 54110 Daily Show 34868 Colbert 50394 ››› “Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn. Å 246329 Futurama 12874 Daily Show 38771 Colbert 99955 135 53 135 47 Presents 10232 The Buzz 3597 Bend City Edition PM Edition 9023 Cooking 6503 City Club of Central Oregon 54597 RSN 4416 RSN 86706 RSN Movie Night 41936 PM Edition 85023 Softball 928690 11 Capital News Today 375110 Today in Washington 273077 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 731232 Sonny 972110 Deck 979023 Phineas 538413 Wizards 258042 Hannah 138477 “Adventures of Sharkboy and Lavagirl” 9160787 Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Hannah 235706 Wizards 877706 Deck 768619 87 43 14 39 Sonny 341706 The Legends of Robin Hood 354752 Swamp Loggers ‘PG’ Å 447416 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 440503 The Legends of Robin Hood 248968 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 914503 Cash Cab 560226 Cash Cab 567139 Cash Cab 654619 Area 51 ’ ‘PG’ Å 441232 SportsCenter (Live) Å 225874 Fastbreak 171961 Baseball 521597 SportsCenter (Live) Å 713481 SportsCenter (Live) Å 312936 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Boston Celtics (Live) Å 591058 MLS Soccer Houston Dynamo at Real Salt Lake (Live) 1898435 SportsNation Å 1793936 Live 5920503 NASCAR 7425706 Live 3929752 NBA 3938400 Poker Stars Main Event 1810752 22 24 21 24 SportsNation Å 4152856 Horse 4115690 College Football: 1990 All-American Bowl -- N.C. St. vs. So. Miss. 2495936 30 for 30 (N) 2496665 AWA Wrestling Å 2589329 College Football From 11/21/81. Å 7316771 23 25 123 25 Boxing 2867481 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 267232 70s Show 185684 Funniest Home Videos 225477 Funniest Home Videos 920085 Funniest Home Videos 985771 Funniest Home Videos 675918 The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 134110 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 537503 Hannity 2056690 On the Record 5566232 The O’Reilly Factor 5479752 Hannity 5562416 On the Record 5565503 Glenn Beck 4213481 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor Å 8827400 Home 8705078 Cooking 2756941 Minute 8051333 Challenge 5607459 Good Eats Good Eats Iron Chef America 8756923 Cakes 6815771 Cakes 6904619 Good Eats Unwrap 2638868 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont USSF D2 Soccer Crystal Palace Baltimore at Portland Timbers (Live) 29684 Unscripted 11058 Mariners 41874 NASCAR 18058 Final Scr 27706 Bellator Championships 249400 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Baltimore Orioles 488023 That ’70s Show ›› “There’s Something About Mary” (1998) Cameron Diaz, Matt Dillon, Ben Stiller. 3593416 ›› “27 Dresses” (2008, Romance-Comedy) Katherine Heigl, James Marsden. 8030706 ›› “27 Dresses” (2008) Katherine Heigl. 8948771 131 Buck 5905665 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 5003787 House 7099987 House 5915042 First 6740495 My First Sale ‘G’ Selling New York Selling New York House 8070145 House 8983665 House 8836077 House 9217597 176 49 33 43 Income 2140431 Mega Movers ‘PG’ Å 3839619 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 3925690 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 3838110 Modern Marvels (N) ‘PG’ 3921874 Sliced 3692413 Sliced 6646333 Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å 5426232 155 42 41 36 Star Wars-Lgcy 1608435 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 344400 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 825431 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 978481 › “Georgia Rule” (2007, Drama) Jane Fonda, Lindsay Lohan. Å 988868 Will 249481 Will 599503 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ 540077 Rachel Maddow Show 11790619 Countdown 82195400 Rachel Maddow Show 82284348 Hardball Chris Matthews 82191684 Countdown 82194771 Rachel Maddow Show 59102313 56 59 128 51 Countdown 52951058 Parental 268961 Disaster 265874 Cribs 183226 Ultimate Parkour Challenge 549689 Bam 449394 Bam 531329 Bam 335232 Dudesons 341313 Dudesons 618597 Parkour 790145 Dudesons 347077 Parkour 411771 192 22 38 57 Parental 443110 Sponge 568868 iCarly ‘G’ 558481 Big Time 645961 iCarly ‘G’ 829481 Sponge 641145 Malcolm 918329 Malcolm 824936 Chris 724077 Chris 247503 Lopez 434597 Lopez 516145 Nanny 623394 Nanny 326619 82 46 24 40 Sponge 912145 UFC: Best of 2009 ’ ‘14’ 450503 TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 885690 Jail ‘14’ 419874 Jail ‘14’ 166905 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 600481 Stargate SG-1 ‘PG’ Å 2756042 Stephen King’s Rose Red ’ (Part 1 of 3) ‘14’ Å 1180868 Stephen King’s Rose Red Weird noises and odd rooms. ‘14’ 4764042 Stephen King’s Rose Red 5369619 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ‘14’ Å 8063226 Behind 7944394 David J. 4667954 Winning 4415085 This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å 7357706 Live-Holy Land Praise 2297085 Jeffrey 9295058 Changing-World ›› “The Ride” (1997) 6746394 205 60 130 Office 544313 King 541226 King 638706 Seinfeld 805936 Seinfeld 627690 ›› “Disturbia” (2007, Suspense) Shia LaBeouf, David Morse. 324972 Fam. Guy 154329 Fam. Guy 163077 Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 687232 16 27 11 28 Friends 818400 ››› “The Unforgiven” (1960, Western) Burt Lancaster, Audrey Hepburn, Lillian Gish. (7:15) ›››› “Dances With Wolves” (1990, Western) Kevin Costner, Mary McDonnell, Graham Greene. A Union officer befriends the Lakota. 14731961 ››› “Black Robe” (1991) Lothaire Bluteau. A Jesuit helps the 101 44 101 29 Pioneers feud with Kiowa Indians over a birthright. 23711416 natives of 17th-century Canada. 1020416 Say Yes 341226 Say Yes 348139 Say Yes 435619 Lottery Changed My Life ’ 795023 Police Women of Broward 704771 The Imploders (N) ’ ‘PG’ 897435 Heavy Haulers (N) ’ ‘PG’ 794394 The Imploders ‘PG’ Å 842145 178 34 32 34 Say Yes 616042 Law & Order Hindsight ‘14’ 237684 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 793665 ››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford. Terrorists hijack the president’s plane. 288787 ››› “Air Force One” (1997) Harrison Ford. 196752 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 706619 Amazing 2245085 Chowder 5918139 Johnny 5908752 Garfield 5095232 Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Flapjack 6649446 Adventure Time 6TEEN 5011706 King-Hill 8083619 King-Hill 8996139 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 11790619 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 82195400 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 82284348 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 82191684 Food 65197139 Brown 65279787 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 59102313 179 51 45 42 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 52951058 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 9651874 Sanford 6251351 Cosby 9564394 Cosby 9656329 Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Loves Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Capitol Offense ‘PG’ 880232 NCIS Split Decision ’ ‘PG’ 998110 NCIS SWAK ’ ‘PG’ Å 724918 NCIS The Weak Link ’ ‘PG’ 994394 NCIS Bete Noir ‘PG’ Å 997481 House The Choice ‘14’ Å 685874 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 908077 Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ 116752 Undateable Hour 1 ’ ‘14’ 772787 Undateable Hour 2 ’ ‘14’ 781435 Undateable Hour 3 ’ ‘14’ 698771 Undateable Hour 4 (N) ‘14’ 771058 Basketball Wives Basketball Wives 191 48 37 54 Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ 422665 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

Romance-Stone ››› “Speed” 1994, Action Keanu Reeves. ’ ‘R’ Å 5289139 House 7749232 ›› “You Don’t Mess With the Zohan” 2008 Adam Sandler. Å 5471110 ›› “Spy Game” 2001, Suspense Robert Redford. ’ ‘R’ Å 64392771 ››› “9 to 5” 1980, Comedy Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin. ‘PG’ Å 3797067 ›› “Vital Signs” 1990, Drama Adrian Pasdar. ‘R’ Å 5995400 ››› “9 to 5” 1980, Comedy Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin. ‘PG’ Å 3937435 ›› “Willie and Phil” 1980 3107787 Insane Cinema: Surfing 4036416 Daily 4033329 Bubba 4944481 Red Bull X Fighters ‘G’ 9331348 Insane Cinema: Surfing 3543145 Daily 2478706 Update 8565961 Stupidface Å Check 1, 2 Å Misfits 2377023 Thrillbill 9286139 LPGA 521684 PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, First Round From San Antonio. 541348 Golf 915232 LPGA Tour Golf Bell Micro LPGA Classic, First Round 453077 PGA Tour Golf 910110 M*A*S*H 1607706 M*A*S*H 9092412 M*A*S*H 3840495 M*A*S*H 4199987 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 3923232 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 3836752 ›› “Follow the Stars Home” (2001) Kimberly Williams. ‘PG’ 3846139 Golden 7387232 Golden 6001042 (4:45) ››› “Jurassic Park” 1993 Sam Neill, Laura Dern. Cloned dinosaurs run amok ›› “Dragonball: Evolution” 2009, Action Justin Chatwin, Chow ›› “Four Christmases” 2008, Romance-Comedy Vince Vaughn, Treme Janette cooks for four celebrity Cathouse: Menage a Trois ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 at an island-jungle theme park. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 88531771 chefs. ’ ‘MA’ Å 722139 Yun-Fat. ’ ‘PG’ Å 654042 Robert Duvall. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 141868 314394 ››› “The Proposition” 2005 Guy Pearce. 6068619 (6:45) ››› “Kill Bill: Vol. 1” 2003 Uma Thurman. ‘R’ Å 74225416 (8:45) ››› “The Cooler” 2003 William H. Macy. ‘NR’ Å 34729428 Ideal 3010058 Whitest 5934706 Rollins 7121435 IFC 105 105 (4:00) ››› “Slumdog Millionaire” 2008 ››› “Crimson Tide” 1995, Suspense Denzel Washington, Gene Hackman. U.S. naval ››› “The Incredible Hulk” 2008, Action Edward Norton. Bruce Banner faces an en- › “Collateral Damage” 2002, Action Arnold Schwarzenegger. A fireman goes after the MAX 400 508 7 Dev Patel. ’ ‘R’ Å 459771 officers clash aboard a nuclear sub. ’ ‘R’ Å 979110 emy known as The Abomination. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 981955 terrorist who killed his family. ’ ‘R’ Å 8126684 Naked Science ‘G’ 3556619 World’s Toughest Fixes (N) 8562874 Known Universe (N) ‘PG’ 9333706 Naked Science ‘G’ 9246226 World’s Toughest Fixes 9322690 Known Universe ‘PG’ 9332077 Border Wars ‘PG’ 6350955 NGC 157 157 Avatar 3542416 Avatar 4043706 Iron Man 4040619 Iron Man 4951771 Big Time Rush OddParents Avatar 3468400 Avatar 3550435 Penguin 2389868 Penguin 8476023 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2384313 Rocko 9366329 NTOON 89 115 189 Hunt 9577868 Archer 2857990 Magnum 5007413 Whitetails Bow Madness Adven 2388899 Outdrs 9566752 Steve’s 9658787 Outd. 6352394 Hunt 4908597 Trophy 6993503 Outdoor 6806023 Trophy Hunt Expedition Safari OUTD 37 307 43 The Tudors Catherine’s infidelities. ’ ‘MA’ Nurse Jackie ’ (4:45) › “Black Ops” 2008 Gary Stretch. A ghost terrorizes (6:20) ››› “Poliwood” 2009 Actors go to the Democratic and (7:50) ›› “W.” 2008, Docudrama Josh Brolin. iTV. The life and controversial presiUnited States of SHO 500 500 Å 904771 soldiers aboard a secret prison ship. 72008394 Republican National Conventions. 2169955 dency of George W. Bush. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 89632077 ‘MA’ 365348 Tara ’ 7686459 Fast Track to Fame ‘PG’ 7036329 Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ 1742990 Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ 7378868 Pass Tm 7046706 Hub 7952313 Fast Track to Fame ‘PG’ 7367752 Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ 7377139 Pinks -- All Out ‘PG’ 7346690 SPEED 35 303 125 Traitor 58220145 (5:40) ›› “Blindness” 2008 Julianne Moore. ’ ‘R’ Å 71647868 (7:45) ›› “Happy Gilmore” 1996 Adam Sandler. ‘PG-13’ Å 23302139 (9:20) ›› “Step Brothers” 2008 Will Ferrell. 62668058 Party 8738481 Traitor 9303067 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) “The Dead One” 2007 Wilmer ››› “Lymelife” 2008, Drama Alec Baldwin, Rory Culkin, Emma (9:35) ›› “Grand Theft Parsons” 2003, Comedy-Drama Johnny (11:05) “Take” 2007, Drama Minnie Driver. (6:15) ›› “Hard Cash” 2002, Suspense Christian Slater, Val Kilmer. A thief and an TMC 525 525 Valderrama. ’ ‘PG-13’ 1047435 FBI agent plan to rob a riverboat casino. ’ ‘R’ 55512665 Roberts. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ 1666394 Knoxville. Premiere. ’ ‘PG-13’ 8136042 ’ ‘R’ 53438771 To Be Announced 7433665 Hockey 2388899 The Daily Line (Live) 2966121 Sports 6352394 Sports Soup WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å 8857972 The Daily Line 5476058 VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 7958597 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å 9942918 20/20 on WE (N) ‘G’ Å 7363936 Golden 7031874 Golden 7947481 Golden 2194416 Golden 4992413 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 7468435 John Edward 7348058 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY STUDENTS SPEAK — A WATERSHED SUMMIT: Local students share their watershed projects in art, science, videography and hands-on restoration; with keynote speaker Richard Louv; free, but a ticket is required; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6103, ext. 33 or kolleen@ thefreshwatertrust.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Island of the Blue Dolphins” by Scott O’Dell; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.dpls.us/calendar. CENTRAL OREGON LAW ENFORCEMENT MEMORIAL CEREMONY: The Redmond Police Department honors men and women who have sacrificed their lives while serving the citizens of Oregon; 5:30 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-5191. CHAIR-IT-ABLE AUCTION: Bid on hand-painted chairs designed by Crook County High School students; with live music and drama performances; proceeds benefit the Oasis Food Kitchen; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County High School, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-4166900, ext. 3120 or heidi.barney@ crookcounty.k12.or.us. TIGHT LINES AUCTION & BBQ DINNER: The Deschutes River Conservancy hosts an evening of food, fishing lore, an auction, drinks and more; registration requested; $35; 6 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-382-4077, ext. 10 or www.deschutesriver.org. WOMEN’S BREW REVIEW: Enjoy appetizers paired with beers; tickets available through the website; proceeds benefit the Women’s Resource Center of Central Oregon; $25; 6-8 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-385-8606, info@ deschutesbrewery.com or www .wrcco.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Mary Sojourner reads from her books “She Bets Her Life” and “Going Through Ghosts”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766. ALASDAIR FRASER AND NATALIE HAAS: The duo perform Scottish fiddle and cello music; $20 or $25; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. WORD CAFE: Featuring “Poet Healers II: Gifts for the Journey,” health care students reading poems inspired by patients and families; free; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Robert L. Barber Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999 or www.clear1017.fm. THE PARENTAL ADVISORY TOUR: Loud, sweaty rock ‘n’ roll from Nashville Pussy, Green Jelly, The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Psychostick and High Desert Hooligans; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-410-1049 or www .myspace.comactiondeniroproductions or www.bendticket.com.

FRIDAY “YEAR OF THE FOREST — RESPECTFUL RECREATION”

EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit explores the balance between forest health and recreational activities; exhibit runs through Sept. 12; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL: International touring festival showcases a series of films about people with developmental disabilities; proceeds benefit Full Access; $6 matinee, $10 evening, $25 includes preshow reception and silent auction; 11:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-749-2158 or www.towertheatre.org. CULVER CENTENNIAL DINNER: A dinner with Culver historical presentations; reservations requested; $15; 6 p.m.; City Hall, 200 First Ave.; 541-546-6494. “HAITI, THE EARTHQUAKE AND THE AFTERMATH”: A talk and slide show, with photographer David Uttley; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan presents a slide show, “New Hikes in Southern Oregon”; free; 7 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. SISTERS AMERICANA PROJECT CD RELEASE: Celebrate the release of the latest compilation from the Sisters High School Americana Project; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; The Barn at Pine Meadow Ranch, The Barn, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-549-4979 or info@sistersfolkfestival.org. “SHERLOCK HOLMES”: A screening of the 2009 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. PEPPINO D’AGOSTINO: Italianborn acoustic guitarist and singer performs; $12 plus service charges; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-323-0964 or www .bendticket.com. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8:30-11 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress.com. CRUST REMASTERED: Celebrate the DVD release, with performances by My New Vice and Sumbitch; free; 9 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178.

SATURDAY ICEBREAKER POKER RUN: South Central Oregon Outreach and Toy Run hosts a benefit featuring a ride open to all street-legal vehicles, food and live music by the Badland Boogie Band; $10 per hand, $6 for Lions Club breakfast; 8 to 10 a.m. breakfast, 10 a.m. poker run start time; Vic’s Bar & Grill, 16980 Burgess Road, La Pine; 541-5362644 or www.scootr.org. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR STAR PARTY: The 11th annual party includes professional and amateur astronomers who will share telescopes with novice stargazers to see the night sky; daytime activities include talks by local astronomers, informative displays and exhibits, and kayak tours on the Prineville Reservoir; food and refreshments

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

available; free; 9 a.m., star gazing begins at 9:30 p.m.; Prineville Reservoir State Park, 19020 S.E. Parkland Drive; 541-923-7551. 34TH ANNUAL POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with food, music and sponsor booths; free; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10 a.m. booths open; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. DOG PARK CELEBRATION: Celebrate Prineville’s first dog park with adoptable pets, a low-cost microchip and rabies clinic, dog CPR, dog-sledding demonstrations, a pet blessing, vendors and more; free admission; 10 a.m.; Crooked River Dog Park, 1037 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-1209. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan presents a slide show, “New Hikes in Southern Oregon”; free; 1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.dpls.us/calendar. BEHIND-THE-SCENES ANIMAL TOUR: Tour animal exhibits and see how food is prepared and how keepers care for animals; $15, plus museum admission; $10 for museum members; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754, ext. 241 or www. highdesertmuseum .org. “THE BOYS NEXT DOOR”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents a gala opening of the play about the diverse lives of mentally ill people living in a communal residence; $45; 6:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beatonline.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. POETRY EVENING: The Peregrine Poets share their works; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. STRAIGHT NO CHASER: The 10-voice male a cappella group performs pop music; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. CROWN POINT: The alternative poprock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-3000. PROFESSOR GALL CD RELEASE: The Portland-based roots band performs, with Grant Sabin; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

SUNDAY KID’S MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Teams of six participants, from first-graders to sixth-graders, compete in the relay of river rafting with a professional guide, biking, an obstacle course and a short run; free for spectators; 9:30 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W.

Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3880002 or www.mbsef.org. “FOOLS”: The Summit High School drama department presents the comic fable by Neil Simon; $7, $5 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3296. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www .cosymphony.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Pete Nelson talks about his book “I Thought You Were Dead”; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs under the direction of Julie Hanney; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www.freewebs .com/bendgospel. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-306-3723 or www.bendticket.com. A TASTE OF UGANDA: Eat a traditional Ugandan dinner, with entertainment, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit the Sisters of the Heart Micro Loan Foundation in Kapchorwa, Uganda; $10 suggested donation; 6 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-595-1818. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. THAT 1 GUY: The funk act performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY THE FACEMELTER TOUR: Featuring performances by Dying Fetus, Arsis, Misery Index, Annotations of an Autopsy and Conducting from the Grave; $15; 7 p.m.; Bend Event Center, 2221 N.E. Third St., lower floor; 541-550-8186 or www .myspace.com/dlproductionsllc. “THE NERD”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a comedy about a young architect who receives a visitor who overstays his welcome; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY SPRING CONCERT: The Central Oregon Symphony performs a spring concert, under the direction of Michael Gesme; featuring the Central Oregon Mastersingers, the Cascade Chorale, Melissa Bagwell and James Knox; free but a ticket is required; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. CHARLIE HUNTER TRIO: The jazz act performs, with the Adam Carlson Trio; $17 plus service charges in advance, $20 at the door; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com. “LAMPPOST REUNION”: TWB Productions presents the play by Louis LaRusso, about five friends in a bar in New Jersey, as a pub theater production; $12.50 plus service charges in advance, $15 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3063723 or www.bendticket.com.

M T For Thursday, May 13

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BABIES (PG) 12:15, 2:30, 4:50, 8 CITY ISLAND (PG-13) 12:05, 2:40, 5:20, 7:50 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) Noon, 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 DEATH AT A FUNERAL (R) 12:20, 2:55, 5:05, 8:10 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:10, 8:05 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (no MPAA rating) 11:50 a.m., 3:05, 7:40

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 12:45 THE BACK-UP PLAN (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:15, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15

THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 3:50 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 1:50, 4:50, 7:50, 10:25 CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) 9:40 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 10:45 a.m., 1:40, 4:40, 7:40, 9:55 DCI 2010: THE COUNTDOWN (no MPAA rating) 7:30 FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:15, 4:15, 6:45, 9:35 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 4:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:45, 7:15 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 12:35, 1, 2, 2:30, 3:30, 4, 5, 5:30, 6:30, 7, 8, 8:30, 9:30, 10, 10:55 IRON MAN 2 (DLP — PG-13) 10:35 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10:30 KICK-ASS (R) 1:10, 7:10, 10:10 THE LOSERS (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2:20, 5:20, 8:20, 10:45 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:20, 2:10,

4:20, 5:10, 7:20, 8:10, 9:50, 10:40 OCEANS (G) 10:40 a.m., 12:50, 3:40, 6:40, 9:25 ROBIN HOOD (PG-13) Thu night/Fri morning: 12:01 a.m. EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: DLP technology uses an optical semiconductor to manipulate light digitally. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 6 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 8:30

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

N   N  Sean Penn pleads no contest to vandalism LOS ANGELES — Sean Penn pleaded no contest to vandalism Wednesday, effectively ending a case in which the Oscar-winning actor was videotaped kicking a celebrity photographer. Penn was not present in court and entered the plea through his attorney. He was sentenced to three years of informal probation and Sean Penn ordered to perform 300 hours of community service, said city attorney’s spokesman Frank Mateljan. Mateljan says those hours can be completed through Penn’s earthquake-relief efforts in Haiti. He was also ordered to undergo 36 hours of anger management counseling and stay 100 yards away from the photographer. Penn was charged in February with misdemeanor battery and vandalism for the October dustup and faced up to 18 months in jail if convicted. Penn has made a major humanitarian push in Haiti since the country was devastated by an earthquake in January, cofounding the Jenkins-Penn Haiti Relief Organization. The group provides medical care, water filters and food and has opened a health clinic for mothers and victims of a growing sexual assault epidemic.

Banks to write fantasy series for young people NEW YORK — Tyra Banks wants to spread some truth, and a little fantasy. The talk show host and former model has agreed to a threebook deal with Delacorte Press for a fantasy series for young people. It’s about a girl trying to keep up with the beauty game at an elite school for supermodels, or Intoxibellas.

Trails REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

FURRY VENGEANCE (PG) 4:45, 6:45, 8:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 A NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET (R) 5, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

CHLOE (R) 7 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 7 GREENBERG (R) 6:45 IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

IRON MAN 2 (PG-13) 1, 4, 7

Continued from E1 Thanks to warmer temperatures, Phil’s and other area trails are in good condition, with a retreating snow line. Weekend use of the Deschutes River Trail is increasing. Be aware that some blowdown from last week’s high winds still awaits removal. Sabo has not yet received word on when Forest Road 21 into Newberry Crater will be completely open to vehicle traffic, but it is open as far as the entrance to Paulina Lake Lodge and its boat ramp. Lava Lands Visitor Center and Lava River Cave are now open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays until June 30, when they will be open daily through the summer season. In the Sisters Ranger District, Oregon Department of Transportation crews were plowing state Highway 242 (McKenzie Highway), but only got a mile and a half beyond the gate before

The Associated Press file photo

Country singers Miranda Lambert, left, and Blake Shelton embrace after performing at the ACM Artist of the Decade All Star Concert in 2009. Shelton proposed to Lambert on Sunday. Delacorte said Tuesday that the first novel, “Modelland,” will come out in the summer of 2011. Delacorte is an imprint of Random House Children’s Books.

Singers Lambert, Shelton to wed NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton, two of country music’s hottest singles, are off the market. People.com is reporting that Shelton asked Lambert to marry him on Sunday. Kathy Best, Lambert’s publicist, confirmed the news Tuesday. Lambert tells People the proposal came as a surprise. She says Shelton proposed to her in the woods near her Tishomingo, Okla., home. She answered yes. Shelton went old-fashioned, calling Lambert’s father, Rick, to ask permission. It’s been quite the year for Lambert. She scored her first No. 1 with “White Liar,” won three Academy of Country Music Awards, including album of the year, and now she’s marrying her boyfriend of five years. There’s no word on when the wedding will be. — From wire reports

running into too much snow for the grader. ODOT is holding for now and will wait for warmer weather to help with the process. Forest Road 16 above Upper Three Creek Sno-park has opened, with a mostly solid snow line approximately a mile and a half above the gate. Metolius River trails, East and West, are in good condition. Black Butte trailhead is accessible, but expect snow and ice on the trail. The New Lake Creek Trail, from Suttle Lake to Camp Sherman, is in good condition. Sabo reports that all Three Sisters Wilderness trailheads are blocked by snow. Jefferson Lake, Cabot Lake and Bear Valley trailheads in the Mount Jefferson Wilderness are snow-free and accessible. However, expect snow and blowdown beyond the trailheads. Jack Lake and other wilderness trailheads in the area are still blocked by snow. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H B Y JACQ U ELINE B IGA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, May 13, 2010: This year, many distractions head your way. You will have many choices, more than you ever thought possible. Creativity and detachment blend to give you an even better perspective. If you want to make an adjustment or change your path, you will be empowered to do so. You just need to know what you want. If you are single, others note a high level of charisma and magnetism. The choice will be yours to decide whom to date or whom you want to be in relationship with. If you are attached, the two of you can become much closer if you curb a tendency to be overly me-oriented this year. You can count on TAURUS. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You decide to make a new resolution. Because of your energy and drive, everything falls into place. Remain centered and tap into your intuition. Realize what is happening in your life. Tonight: Act on a resolution. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You might want to try something very different and exciting. You can have a new beginning if you relax and simply go with the flow. A meeting could prove to be most instrumental. You get to see how many supporters you have. Tonight: Whatever makes you happy. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Take your time finding

answers. You understand a lot more than you might be willing to express. Open up to possibilities, and weigh the pros and cons. A boss or someone you look up to has strong ideas. Listen rather than share. Tonight: Vanish while you can. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Zero in on what you want. You have a strong vision of what needs to happen. Test out an idea or two on an expert or someone who has a different perspective from you. You can only gain by brainstorming before acting. Tonight: Where the action is. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You get a new opportunity that appears out of the blue. This is not a situation to placed on hold, as it might not be there later. A partner lets you know what he or she thinks. After that conversation, you feel like you might not have a choice. Tonight: A must appearance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Reach out for others and touch base with them. Discuss an opportunity that might somehow impact them. Travel, education and a different perspective could play into the conversation. Others seem to be more positive. Tonight: Surf the Net. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Work as a team with each individual. You will get a stronger response. Others will feel more important and become more supportive. You have an unusual amount of energy and direction. Tap into these resources. Tonight: Togetherness works. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Others seem to

understand where you are coming from. The opportunity to lead helps others identify with their bosses. If you have allowed others this chance, you will see the positive end results. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Emphasize what is important in your daily and professional life. Is there something you want to change, like improving your health or being nicer to associates? Use today’s New Moon to make a dream a reality. Tonight: Put your feet up and relax. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You cannot help it! You are moving into weekend mode. You might want to take off now, or at least make plans for the upcoming weekend. Allow greater give-and-take between you and a neighbor or sibling. Tonight: Put on your dancing shoes. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Pressure builds on the home front. You cannot cover all the bases, and need to ask for some help or support. You could make promises today and plan to meet them, but life’s demands could be too much. Tonight: Mosey on home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Make a decision to change some part of your communication that impacts your life. Relax with a neighbor and catch up on his or her news. You could be surprised by what comes up. Tonight: Hang out with a family member or roommate.

© 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AIRSHOW OF THE CASCADES: 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Sports Center, Bend; 541-475-6707. AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-389-2867. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. social, 7-9 p.m. meeting; Bend’s Community Center; www.deschutesdems.org. DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETING: 6 p.m.; Morning Star Christian Church, Bend; 541-389-5400. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. SECOND CHILDHOOD DOLL CLUB: 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; call for location; 541-923-8557 or 541-548-4269. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:305 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. THINK AGAIN PARENTS (TAPS) SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION TEAM OF REDMOND: 4-5:30

p.m.; Redmond Public Library, Historical Room; 541-548-4481. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

FRIDAY

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. OPEN DANCE: 7-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. RICE COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:3011:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732. SONS OF NORWAY: Social; 6 p.m. children’s club, 6:30 dinner; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333.

ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. ARTIST CO-OP INFORMATIONAL MEETING: 5-7 p.m.; Arts Central Station, Bend; 541-410-2544. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m. to noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8-10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-322-0220 or www. deschutescountyballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45 to 4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793.

SATURDAY

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. ECKHART TOLLE MEDITATION GROUP: 7:30-9 p.m.; Namaspa, Bend; 541-678-1801 or tolle-bend@bendbroadband.com. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 2 p.m., Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-279-7962.

St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-3859198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-389-0663. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366. MT. BACHELOR KENNEL CLUB: 7:30 p.m.; Bend; www.mbkc.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 3-6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-350-3345. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 79 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. VFW DEXTER FINCHER POST 1412: 6:30 p.m.; Veterans Hall, Prineville; 541-447-7438. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

TUESDAY MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. ARTIST CO-OP INFORMATIONAL MEETING: 6-8 p.m.; Arts Central Station, Bend; 541-410-2544. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster

ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541-385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.;

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON ARCHITECTURE CLUB: 6 p.m.; 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend; 541-408-1225. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PRINEVILLE EAGLES BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; 657 S.W. Glacier Ave., Redmond; 541-323-7413. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30 p.m.-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BOOK-A-LUNCH: Noon to 1 p.m.; La Pine Public Library; 541-312-1090. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541317-5843 or www.coflyfishers.org. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LATINA WOMEN’S GROUP: 10:30 a.m. - noon; Sam Johnson Park, Redmond; 541-5044204 or 541-504-1397. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575. VEGETARIAN CONNECTION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, Bend; 541-948-2596.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229

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Outing Continued from E1 Lookout Mountain has a broad, flat top, so I figured, any route getting to the top would be fine. And once I got onto the summit plateau, perhaps I could find my way to the spot where the old fire lookout once stood. I started heading up what appeared to be a snow-covered road and soon found diamond markers on the trees. Apparently I was on some kind of trail, I just didn’t know which one. I know some people will shudder at the thought of heading into the wilderness without a firm grasp of where you are. But the road was easy to follow and I was leaving a bread-crumb trail of footprints that would make Hansel and Gretel proud. I figured there was little chance of getting lost. When the road faded into the snow-covered slope and the diamond trail markers no longer confirmed the way, I figured I’d just continue heading up the slope. I was reminded of my days as a camp counselor when my troop of Boy Scouts was planning a hike up a nearby peak. “How will we know when we get to the top?” one of the boys asked. When there was no more uphill in front of me, I’d be there. As I crested the lip of the plateau, I found my way through a thinning forest, ending on a broad expanse with willow bushes poking up through the snow. Ahead of me, I could see the remnants of several long fences. From the fence line, I could see the crest of the peak in front of me, a sharp white line dividing white snow from blue sky. With dark clouds gathering to the west, I hightailed it to the crest. To the right, I could see the two trail signs described in the guidebook. I was back in Sullivan’s good graces. Or perhaps he in mine. The signs are just beyond the site of the former lookout tower that was the mountain’s namesake and point the way to a snow shelter. I could see why they chose this spot. It provided an uninterrupted view of acres and acres of land lying below what seemed like the entire Cascade range spread out along the far horizon. I took the hint from the darkening sky and cut my summit visit short, heading out in the direction of a snow shelter just in case the heavens let loose. But with no trail to follow, I couldn’t find the shelter, and opted to

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Time stands still at the site of these old wooden cabins, just off the upper trailhead on Lookout Mountain outside of Prineville. angle sharply to the left to ensure I would rendezvous with my footprints. Soon I had recovered my past and headed back down the mountain, the dark clouds nipping at my heels. By the time I hit the upper trailhead and the road, I was in the middle of a hailstorm. There was little time for admiring the gray, smoky, rolling hills below me. Back at the office, I realized my copy of the guidebook was a bit outdated. Sullivan has published a second edition that up-

dates some of the changes that have occurred in the meantime. The old road I was following was indeed the 808A. From the lower trailhead, the entire route, which is marked for snowmobiles, climbs about 1,500 feet in 2.5 miles. I also noticed he recommends a June to November time frame for the hike. I guess you can put your trust in strangers after all. Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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H

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Money Moira Hundley, 28, doesn’t have insurance, but health reform’s success may depend on people like her buying it, Page F6

HEALTH

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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 13, 2010

Packed with caffeine and sugar, energy drinks are a popular choice for competitive athletes. But experts warn there can be downsides.

Are they worth

the risk? By Markian Hawryluk • The Bulletin

A

few years ago, Bend ultramarathoner Jeff Browning had heard so much buzz about energy drinks, he decided to try one in his next race. About a third of the way into the 50-mile race, he grabbed the drink he had stashed away in a drop bag and quickly downed it. “It just made my stomach squirrelly,” he said. “Normally my stomach is solid. I’ve done over 40 ultramarathons and I’ve never thrown up. That was definitely one of the worst races as far as stomach issues that I’ve ever had.” Browning, 38, said he suffered through another 10 to 15 miles of stomach troubles before it finally eased up. And he’s never touched another energy drink to avoid what he calls the pit-stop F I T N E S S again, factor. “Basically, what it does is make you hit the bushes quite a few times,” he said. “In a race like that, it’s definitely not something you want to do.” Still, thousands of competitive and recreational athletes are lured by energy drinks such as Red Bull, Monster or Rockstar that promise to give an extra kick, an additional edge or metaphorical wings on race or game day. While research suggests there can be some performance benefit from an energy drink, experts warn there can be considerable downsides as well. And with better alternatives providing the same gains, energy drinks might not be worth the risk of ruining your event. “Unfortunately, in so many of the products, people don’t want to look beyond the label,” said Leslie Bonci, a registered dietitian with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and nutritionist for the Pittsburgh Steelers professional football team. “The assumption is that because it says ‘energy’ it will provide energy to me.” See Energy drink / F4 Illustration by Eric Baker / The Bulletin

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one who will listen” to her story. The rest of her family and, to a lesser extent, Bach herself used to be private. That was before kidney M E D failure made her step into the limelight, Bach said, out of sheer desperation. Bach was diagnosed with total kidney failure in 2006. Since then, she has been on dialysis, which she undergoes three days a week for

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INSIDE Clarification In a story headlined “Where’s a patient to go?” which appeared Thursday, April 29, on Page F1, the hours of Cascade Medical Clinic were incomplete. In addition to Monday through Friday hours, the clinic is also open for walk-in urgent care Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Bulletin regrets the error.

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F2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN LTHOK A E H EBO RN. DAT RE TU es L ss WIL Cla 4.

N VITAMINS TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Vitamin K Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is needed to make four of the 13 proteins required for blood to clot. Its role in clotting is so important that patients on anti-clotting medication, such as warfarin (Coumadin), are advised to keep their vitamin K intake extremely consistent and to stay away from foods with very high levels, such as spinach and turnip greens. High doses of vitamin E can interfere with the action of vitamin K as can some herbs and dietary supplements. Low vitamin K levels have been linked with low bone density as well, and supplementation has been shown to improve bone health. Participants in the Nurses’ Health Study conducted by Harvard University researchers were 30 percent less likely to break a hip if they got at least 110 micrograms of vitamin K per day. Vitamin K is found in green leafy vegetables, something many Americans skimp on in their diets. Only about one in four people meet the goal for vitamin K intake from the food they eat. Babies are born with very little vitamin K in their bodies, so they usually receive a shot of it soon after birth. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin Daily recommended amount: Adults: 90 mcg Children (0-6 months): 2.0 mcg Children (7-12 months): 2.5 mcg Children (1-3 years): 30 mcg Children (4-8 years): 55 mcg Children (9-13 years): 60 mcg Children (14-18): 75 mcg

Good sources: Turnip greens (½ cup cooked): 425 mcg Spinach (raw, 1 cup): 145 mcg Broccoli (cooked, ½ cup): 110 mcg Kiwi fruit (1 medium): 30 mcg Blueberries (1 cup): 30 mcg Source: University of Florida, National Library of Medicine

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One cup of blueberries has 30 micrograms of vitamin K, a compound needed for blood clotting.

Try the vegan-before-6 p.m. diet More servings of fruits, vegetables has major benefits By Jennifer LaRue Huget Special to The Washington Post

Do you eat enough vegetables? Me neither. Americans over age 2 should eat at least three servings of vegetables and at least two servings of fruit a day, according to the federal government. But only 27 percent of adults consume that many vegetables, with a third getting their fill of fruit, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported last year. Don’t feel too bad if you don’t fall into either of those groups. Fresh produce can be expensive (though frozen and canned varieties are budgetfriendly, convenient and nutritious). Too many Americans live in “food deserts” with little or no access to fresh or whole foods, where 7-Elevens outnumber grocery stores. And some people simply prefer meat, or doughnuts, or cheese and crackers — or, let’s face it, just about anything — to broccoli, carrots and the like. So what’s a vegetablestarved population to do? We could follow the example of Mark Bittman, one of the strongest advocates for finding your inner vegetable fan. The prolific food writer and columnist for The New York Times is known for the book “How to Cook Everything.” But it’s Bittman’s “How to Cook Everything Vegetarian” (2007) and “Food Matters” (2008) that make his case for shifting our diets away from meat and processed foods to mostly plant-based foods. Still largely an omnivore as he completed his vegetarian cookbook, Bittman says he didn’t make the big change in his diet until he (a) saw statis-

POP QUIZ

What do you know about zinc? By Sam McManis McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Have a seat. Our micronutrient du jour is zinc. Oh, you’ll have the special zinc quiz? An excellent choice. Dig in.

1.

Zinc is beneficial in many ways. Which of the following is not one of them? a) Improves immune response b) Decreases bad breath c) Hastens wound healing Zinc deficiency can lead to which of the following conditions? a) Hypogonadism b) Hypodermatitis

2.

See age F on P

c) Hypochondria Besides ingesting a limited number of zincrich foods, what is one major cause of severe zinc deficiency? a) Gout b) Type 2 diabetes c) Liver disease Which food boasts a whopping 513 percent of the daily value for zinc? a) Olives b) Oysters c) Ostrich meat

3.

4.

ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: a; 3: c; 4: b Sources: NIH Office of Dietary Supplements (ods.od.nih.gov); Linus Pauling Institute (lpi.oregonstate.edu)

tics about the environmental impact of large-scale livestock production; and (b) recognized, as he turned 57, that he had high cholesterol, high blood sugar, sleep apnea, bad knees and 35 extra pounds. “My doctor said, ‘I think you should become a vegan,’ “ Bittman says, referring to a diet that includes no animal products. “That’s when I decided to try the ‘vegan before 6’ thing,” he says. “It worked for me.” “Vegan before 6” entails eating a vegan diet every day until 6 p.m. After that, Bittman enjoys whatever he wants to eat in whatever portions suit him. “In three months, I lost 35 pounds,” he says, adding that he gained five of those back. “My cholesterol went down and stayed down. My blood sugar went down and stayed down. My knees pretty much got better,” and his sleep apnea vanished. “It solved everything.” Dawn Jackson Blatner, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, approves of the vegan-before-6 idea. But like full-time vegans and vegetarians, part-timers need to be aware of getting enough of certain nutrients, she says. Among these are vitamin B12 (found mostly in meats), protein, iron and zinc (all of which are in beans), calcium and vitamin D (mostly in dairy products, and in fortified soy and almond milks), and omega-3 fats (in fish, in flaxseed and walnuts). Blatner also cautions that while Bittman lost weight

through his new way of eating, it’s easy for vegans and vegetarians to consume too many calories. “You can do it wrong,” she says. “You could overeat olive oil, nuts and seeds, or over-portion peanut butter, so you’d eat too many calories.” On the other hand, vegan and vegetarian diets provide more opportunities to prepare your own food rather than buy it prepackaged, which generally leads to a more healthful diet. As Bittman puts it: “You fix your diet by eating more plants. Everything else will take care of itself. … It takes a little thought, but not a lot.”

Drawing on years of experience in his cramped New York apartment kitchen, Bittman says he follows his intuition when cooking. That leads to some unexpected uses of vegetables. For instance, a recent post on his Bitten blog recounts his decision to cook oatmeal with celery: “Creamy oatmeal, crunchy celery, super flavor. A new fave.” Who knew? But it’s just that playful, curious, almost careless approach that Bittman would have us emulate as we experiment with vegetables. I’m, er, game. How about you?

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 F3

N

Next week Is soda pop making us fat?

Calorie effects tough to measure

Many doctors don’t discuss diet with obese patients

One meal’s impact on your weight won’t be known for 24 to 48 hours

Digest this

By Shari Roan

How the body breaks down a piece of candy compared to a carrot:

By Markian Hawryluk

Candy

With the nation’s high rates of obesity and the low odds of weight loss, perhaps weary doctors are just giving up. National statistics show that only about half of obese Americans were advised by their doctors to cut down on fatty foods. The rate, from a 2006 survey, has not changed from a survey taken in 2002. The data, from the recently released 2009 National Healthcare Disparities Report, found that doctors discussed food

The Bulletin

It happens. You go out with friends for Cinco de Mayo or a company happy hour, and before you know it, you’ve eaten way too much and had a few too many margaritas. But how long before you know the damage you’ve done? Well, it turns out it’s not a simple question to answer. “It really depends on your activity level and your meal composition and what the body needs at that time,” said Marisa Moore, an Atlanta-based dietitian and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. Don’t bother hopping on the scale when you get home because it’s not a clear indication of how much weight you’ve gained. For starters, your body’s not done processing the food. “The whole process can take anywhere from 8 to 12 hours,” she said. “We digest some foods a lot faster than others. Simple carbohydrates, they go through a little faster; protein, a little slower. Fat is a little bit slower.” And until your body has eliminated the waste — both solid and liquid — you can’t accurately measure the impact. It’s also very unlikely you’ll see the impact of one dinner on the scale. “It takes an additional 3,500 calories to gain a pound of weight. Unless you’re eating 3,500 calories every single day, you’re not going to gain that much,” Moore said. “You’re going to have to eat that heavy meal three or four days in a row.” People make the same mistake with exercise and weight loss. You might go for a long run, then hop on the scale and conclude you’ve lost a pound of weight. “You will see an immediate weight loss, but it’s fluid loss,” Moore said. “And if you start to drink again, you’ll see that number go back to where your weight would normally be.” True weight gain or loss is a little more complicated to track. Julie Hood, a registered dietitian who teaches nutrition at Central Oregon Community College, explained that only a small part of what you eat actually

contributes to your body weight. Most of the food we eat is water. A big portion is fiber that stays in the digestive tract until eliminated and is never absorbed into the body. Only a small portion of the actual weight of food is nutrients, the protein, fat or carbs the body uses for energy, and the vitamins and minerals needed to support bodily systems. Food consumed stays in the stomach about two to four hours, and then is slowly released into the small intestines, where it is more fully digested and absorbed. Fiber and other nondigested items continue on to the large intestines. It may take another six to 12 hours before it’s excreted. Meanwhile, the carbs, protein and fat is absorbed into the blood stream and carried to various cells in the body. As the body works, it pulls the fuel from the blood stream into cells. Carbs that aren’t immediately burned are stored as glycogen, a form of the sugar glucose, in muscles and the liver. “When we store carbs, we store them with water, so we would hang on to three times as much water as we do actual weight of the carbohydrates,” Hood said. Fat is stored in fat cells. Where it gets tricky is what happens to excess carbs that aren’t burned. The muscles and the liver can only hold so much glycogen. The prevailing thought has been that extra carbs are converted into fat and stored. But recently researchers tried to track where carbohydrate molecules ended up in the body by tagging them with radioactive markers. They didn’t find those markers in fat cells at nearly the rate they thought they would. The research has led to an alternative theory that when glycogen stores are full, the body burns carbs exclusively for energy, possibly even turning up its thermostat to burn more carbs. “But that said, it’s important to realize you can still gain fat by eating too many carbohydrates,” Hood said. “Because you wouldn’t be burning your own fat.” The upshot of all that diges-

Los Angeles Times

Carrot

Mouth Chewed thoroughly Likely to be swallowed in almost one piece Stomach Broken down Contains a lot of fibers and quickly; complex carbohydrates, which converted into take long to break down sugar water

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Small intestine Sugar is absorbed all at once, raising levels of blood sugar and insulin

Enzymes break carrot into sugars; proteins are broken into amino acids and vitamins; minerals are absorbed

Every Friday In

Large intestine

sacroilliac pain

herniated disc

Nothing left of the Fibers broken candy; large down to fatty acid intestine has nothing to work with Digested In about 30 minutes

choices with 52 percent of their obese white patients compared to 45 percent of obese blacks and 42 percent of obese Latinos. Poor adults and less-educated people were less likely to be told to cut down on high-fat and high-cholesterol foods. The report notes that any obese person would likely benefit from counseling about diet and exercise. It would be interesting to see a survey of doctors on why they would choose not to discuss diet with an obese patient. Do they feel it’s useless?

sciatica neuropathy arthritis

back pain TRIGGER POINT

failed back surgery

radiculopathy

degenerative disc disease D A I LY H E A D A C H E

In about 24 hours

neck pain

muscle spasm

reflex sympathetic dystrophy

Source: Institute of Food Research, “Food and Digestion” by Martin Wickham, All About Food

spine arthritis © 2008 McClatchy-Tribune News Service

So many ways to say pain. Here’s a new way to say tion, calorie burning and storage is that it can take a good 24 to 48 hours before the unburned calories from a meal are added to your base body weight as fat. It’s why nutritionists recommend weighing yourself at the same time everyday and tracking the changes over time. Morning might be the best time to do it. You’ve stopped consuming calories, and the overnight hours allow the body to complete its accounting. If you’ve burned more calories than you consumed, it pulls more fat out of storage to burn for energy. If you have an excess of calories, the body builds up its fat stores. “People can get up first thing in the morning, do a first morning void and at least you’re consistent every day,” said Melinda Manore, a nutrition professor at Oregon State University.

By tracking that weight over time, you get a more realistic idea of whether you’re gaining or losing weight. Or you can just see how your clothes fit you. “I think that’s a better gauge than worrying about the scale from day to day,” she said. Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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F4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F Energy drink Continued from F1

Caffeine Most of the performance benefits attributed to energy drinks are thought to come from its caffeine content. A number of studies have shown that caffeine at a dose of about 2.5 mg per pound of body weight can improve performance in aerobic events — such as running, cycling or swimming — lasting more than five minutes. Competitors using caffeine in those studies showed an average of 3 percent improvement over their non-caffeine race times. That means a 125-pound athlete should consume about 300 mg of caffeine per day. “Keep in mind that a grande Starbucks contains more than that amount,” said Bill Nadeau, a dietitian with Trismarter.com, an Internet-based triathlon coaching and sports nutrition service. A 160-pound athlete could go as high as 400 mg per day. Some energy drinks on the market exceed that amount in a single can. Researchers aren’t sure exactly how caffeine helps with endurance. The prevailing theory is that caffeine helps the body tap into its fat stores earlier, sparing more of the carbohydrates in muscles for use later on. Studies that measured how long athletes could go before reaching exhaustion support that notion. It’s why many endurance athletes have turned to caffeine. A survey of 140 athletes competing in the 2005 Hawaiian Ironman Triathlon World Championships found that 89 percent intended to use caffeine on race day. Many drink flat colas before or during the race to get their caffeine dose. Colas, however, have half the caffeine per ounce of energy drinks, minimizing the chance that the athletes will exceed the 2.5 mg per pound recommended intake. “There’s no performance-enhancing benefit from consuming more than that amount of caffeine, but it can be detrimental to your health,” Nadeau said. “The problem with caffeine is that the same things that enhance it can also tip the scale and send you in the other direction.” Indeed, there have been several reported cases of caffeine overdose, where healthy individuals with no underlying heart problems died as a result of ingesting too much caffeine. “Don’t get me wrong, this is not common,” Nadeau said. “But it has happened.” And at higher levels of competition, excessive caffeine can be a violation of the rules on performance-enhancing drugs. The World Anti-Doping Agency, which oversees the drug-testing policy for the International Olympic Committee, considers athletes to be doping if they exceed a certain level of caffeine in their urine. Authorities estimate this to be the equivalent of drinking 8 cups of coffee containing 100 mg of caffeine each.

Illustration by Eric Baker The Bulletin

Many people consider energy drinks to be similar to soft drinks, but most popular brands contain nearly three times the caffeine by volume of a regular Coca-Cola. Drink

Amount

Caffeine

Wired X505

23.5 oz

505 mg

Wired X344

16 oz

344 mg

SoBe No Fear

16 oz

174 mg

Rockstar

16 oz

160 mg

Monster Energy

16 oz

160 mg

Full Throttle

16 oz

144 mg

AMP Tall Boy

15 oz

143 mg

AMP

16 oz

143 mg

Red Bull

8.3 oz

76 mg

Vault

8 oz

47 mg

Coffee (plain brewed)

8 oz

95 mg

Coca-Cola Classic

12 oz

35 mg

Source: MayoClinic.com

Other ingredients Many athletes associate the high sugar content in energy drinks with energy as well. After all, muscles rely on glucose, a form of sugar, for fuel. Most energy drinks contain at least 18 grams of sugar per 8-ounce serving, and many contain more than 25 grams per serving. Sports drinks such as Gatorade, on the other hand, contain about 14 grams per serving. That’s because a high sugar concentration can slow the absorption rate. “The more concentrated something is, the longer it takes to empty from the stomach, so you don’t even get that available energy,” Bonci said. “It’s not in the muscles, so it will not optimize performance.” It may be that the sugar adds little to the performance benefit attributed to energy drinks. Tests comparing sugar-free energy drinks with full-sugar versions, for example, showed no difference in performance. Energy drinks also pack in plenty of other ingredients. Their contents are considered dietary

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Alternatives

The caffeine power of energy drinks

Many people also believe that caffeine is a diuretic and can lead to dehydration. Studies suggest caffeine will not necessarily increase the volume of urine excreted but can make you want to go earlier. Energy drinks may not interfere with hydration levels, but they don’t seem to help much either. Bonci said there is no evidence showing that caffeine will help with shorter duration events, such as a sprint, or stop-and-go sports like football or soccer. “It’s a different utilization of fuel sources, so it’s of pretty limited use,” she said.

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“Vitamins are a critical component in getting the maximum out of the food that the body ingests,” Bonci said. “But by itself, it doesn’t do anything. It’s more there to drive the cost up and as a marketing ploy.” When it comes to athletic performance, “it doesn’t make a difference,” she said.

supplements, and as such aren’t regulated by the Food and Drug Administration as long as they don’t claim a medicinal benefit. As a result, there is scant evidence whether those other ingredients add much to the mix. “Speaking generally, there’s a lot of stuff in there, and we don’t know a lot about it,” Nadeau said. “That’s why we have to proceed with caution.” One of the more common of the other ingredients is taurine, an amino acid found naturally in meat and fish. Some studies have suggested that taurine can boost performance, while others conclude it is effective only in combination with caffeine. Neither finding is considered definitive. Many drinks add B vitamins or herbs, such as ginseng or ginkgo biloba. Neither has been proven to affect performance.

Neither Nadeau nor Bonci routinely recommend energy drinks to athletes. “The only time I might recommend Red Bull to clients during a race is at the very end of the race,” Nadeau said. “The last three miles of a marathon, if they’re really hurting and they need something quick, the sugar and caffeine might be appropriate for them.” But Nadeau, who also runs competitively, said he relies on caffeinated energy gels instead. They provide both carbohydrates and caffeine and should be washed down with water. “They provide that boost you need,” he said. Otherwise, he advises clients to continue their normal daily intake of caffeine on race day as well. If you don’t normally consume caffeine, adding some on race day could prove disastrous. But if you do have coffee every day, there’s no need to cut back on the day of the event either. Bonci suggests making sure you get liquids along with your caffeine, without too much sugar. That could mean an espresso followed by a sports drink. Or if that combination doesn’t sit well with athletes, an iced coffee before the race. “They could do something like a latte, with a relatively small amount of milk and a little bit of sugar. You get the volume of liquid you need, the caffeine would be there, and maybe two packets of sugar at most, would give somebody the carbohydrates,” she said. “Chances are, it’s not going to be at the start line, so you need to bring your barista with you.”

Cherry juice may be just the drink before starting a big marathon Getting ready to run the Pole Pedal Paddle this weekend? You may want to start drinking some cherry juice. Researchers from Northumbria University in the United Kingdom have found that athletes who drank cherry juice before and after running a marathon recovered faster than those drinking a placebo drink. In the study, the runners drank a cherry juice drink or a placebo drink with the same number of calories twice a day for five days

before participating in the London marathon, and then for two days afterward. The cherry juice group recovered their strength more rapidly over the 48 hours after the race and showed less inflammation and less cell damage. With only 20 runners in the study, the results are far from conclusive. However, there appeared to be no adverse effect from drinking cherry juice. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

John Gottberg Anderson / The Bulletin file photo

Bing cherries ripen on the branch at an orchard just outside of Wenatchee, Wash. A British study showed that marathoners who drank cherry juice before and after running recovered faster.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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“SEEKING TREATMENT FOR A MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS”: Robin Henderson talks about current laws for involuntary treatment, Oregon law history and what to expect at St. Charles emergency rooms; free; 78:30 p.m. Tuesday; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-815-6721.

Make You Look Stained, discolored teeth. Old metal fillings. Cracked, chipped or worn teeth. Your smile can make you look older than you are.

STROKE AWARENESS EVENTS: The St. Charles Stroke Committee hosts events to raise stroke awareness; free; 4:30-6 p.m. today at St. Charles Redmond, noon-2 p.m. May 19 at Prineville Soroptimists Senior Center, noon-1 p.m. May 26 at Bend Senior Center, and noon2 p.m. May 27 at La Pine Senior Activity Center; 541-706-3736.

Turn back time. Modern dentistry offers a healthier, more attractive approach to dental care. From natural-colored fillings to porcelain veneers, you can restore your smile’s health and beauty . . . and take years off your appearance at the same time!

TAI CHI AT SUNSET: Learn Tai Chi to build strength, endurance, flexibility and more; $39; 6-7:15 p.m. Fridays, May 21 through June 25; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. WATER RUNNING CLINIC: Stay injury-free and improve fitness; designed for athletes; $40; 4-6 p.m. Sunday; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665 or www. bendparksandrec.org to register.

IN MOTION

You deserve a smile that radiates health, beauty and youth. Call today to schedule your appointment • 541-526-5661

905 SW Rimrock Way, Ste 201 • Redmond

541-526- 5661 www.drschwam.com

LV I G R A D UAT E


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 F5

M

Next week A new registry for end-of-life orders is off to a quick start.

Donor

VITAL STATS

Continued from F1 About half of all donated kidneys come from living donors. For those, there is no national registry, no ready supply, no medical program that will find a fix. For people who want a living kidney donor, they are in charge of finding it on their own. “We don’t solicit living donors for people,” said Tonja Spencer, a coordinator at Oregon Health & Science University’s transplant program where Bach is hoping to have surgery. “They have to call us.”

Reasons for ER visits Reasons for emergency room visits Nationwide, the most common reason to go to the emergency room is abdominal pain, with chest pain not far behind. The top 10 reasons for emergency department visits are below. Stomach or abdominal pain 6.8% Chest pain Fever Back symptoms Shortness of breath Cough

Kelli Bach, right, helps her daughter Katherine, 17, prepare for her high school prom. Bach was diagnosed with kidney failure four years ago and is now looking for a kidney donor.

There are two ways to get a new kidney: from a living donor or a deceased donor. The deceased donor list works considered for donation. much like registries for other Her list can dictate her mood. types of donated tissue: There When asked how she is doing, are registries, waiting lists and she often responds with the numcross-matching for compat- ber of people on the list. “There ibility. Transplant centers such are only three left to contact,” as the one at OHSU manage is a precarious day. The OHSU these lists and help people find transplant center, “turned down donors. two,” was a particularly bad day. Most people, however, would “I’ve got somebody that’s suprather get a kidney from a living posed to get blood drawn this donor for several reasons. For week,” was a little better. one, the kidney lasts longer. On average, said Spencer, kidneys from living donors last 18 years; Living donation those from deceased donors last Becoming a living kidney do11 years. nor is not easy. The work up is Sometimes a living donor extensive, said Regina Klein, is also a quicker way to find a the living donor coordinator at transplant. Oregon’s wait list for OHSU. a deceased donor transplant avWhen someone agrees to be erages just over two years. Find- considered to be another pering a friend or son’s living donor, relative willing to they are first givdonate might take “We don’t solicit en a preliminary much less time living donors for health screening than that. over the phone. To find a living people. They have That screening donor, most peo- to call us.” includes quesple send out an tions about the e-mail to a circle — Tonja Spencer, donor’s past medof close friends, Oregon Health & Science ical history, menrelatives or other University’s transplant tal health history groups, such as program and motivations. doctors and othThen, potential ers who deal with donors are given kidney transplant a blood pressure patients. Bach’s done that and, screening, then a comprehenhaving found no one, has con- sive education packet is mailed, tinued to push for more people which must be read and diswilling to donate. That makes cussed with a nurse. her unique. Once the donor passes those “Usually there’s not this con- hurdles, the transplant center tinued effort to recruit living will request their medical redonors,” said Dr. Michael Feld- cords and check those over. man, a kidney specialist at Bend Then, they run several types of Memorial Clinic who is caring blood tests to determine comfor Bach. patibility. Lastly, they test the Bach has been on a waiting potential donor’s kidneys to list for a new kidney from a de- make sure they will be able to ceased donor for four years. She live healthfully with only one said the wait, coupled with the kidney. grueling life on dialysis, has led The whole process, said her to be “highly proactive.” Klein, takes about two to three Before she got sick, Bach was months. an executive at a communicaJust over half of all living kidtions firm, making and man- ney donors at OHSU are related aging spreadsheets for clients. by blood to their recipients. The Those skills today are put to rest are unrelated, though may use with the one all-important have a legal relationship to the spreadsheet: her list of potential recipient, such as a spouse. donors. Bach’s children are too young She tries hard to build it, ap- to donate, her husband and pearing on local news shows mother are ineligible and her and maintaining a blog (http:// father is dead. That, she said, living-in-grace.net), partially to leaves her with few options. “It solicit donors. Her friends post has to be a nonfamily donor.” notices for her on Facebook and So she maintains her list. “If other networking sites. Bach there’s an opening with OHSU, said she’s had people she’s never I go to the next person on the met e-mail her and offer to be list,” Bach said. She knows the

Hard match Part of the reason Bach is so aggressive about soliciting for her list is because she will have a much harder time finding a person eligible to donate to her than would most people. Bach’s blood has a high number of antibodies in it, making her body more likely to reject a donated organ. “She’s highly sensitized,” said Feldman. He explained that when the body is exposed to foreign tissue, such as the blood of their unborn babies, the body sometimes creates antibodies to it. “Those same antibodies can react to potential donor kidneys and create huge problems.” The creation of these antibodies is not a bad thing in most people. “She has a good immune system,” said Klein. “And that’s good for everything except transplant.” The challenge for her transplant team is to find a kidney that does not have any of the proteins that Bach’s immune system recognizes as foreign, so that her body will not attack it. Because of her unique sensitivity, she will likely need to wait much longer to find a potential donor. Feldman said she could spend a decade or longer on the waiting list. Bach hopes it will be much sooner than that. She keeps trying to find new ways to get her name out and find people willing to donate a kidney. A few weeks ago, she began using a commercial service that matches organ donors and recipients. She contacted nine people, she said, through that service. So far, one has responded. That person was not interested. Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

Put Life Back in Your Life Living Well with Chronic Conditions Workshops Begin May 19 If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart

Workshop series offered: May 19 - June 23

Living Well with Chronic Conditions

5:30 pm to 8:00 pm Deschutes County Services Center

program can help you take charge of

1300 NW Wall Street, Bend

disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the

your life. The six-week workshop and the book “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

(541) 322-7430 www.livingwellco.org

Vomiting Nonspecific pain Throat symptoms 0

process inside out and where each potential donor is on it. “We have one person that’s supposed to get blood drawn this week and the other person is on hold because she just had acupuncture and you have to wait.”

Living Well is brought to you in partnership by:

Deschutes County Health Services HealthMatters Central Oregon Oregon Department of Human Services PacificSource Health Plans Northwest Health Foundation St. Charles Health System Jefferson County Health Department Clear One Health Plans Mountain View Hospital Mosaic Medical Crook County Health Department Pioneer Memorial Hospital

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Headache

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Tittering at all that’s in tatters HAPPY By Linda Davidson The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Catastrophic oil spill. Times Square bomber. Teetering global economies. Even a recall of your kid’s medicine. You need a laugh. Don’t see anything funny? Fake it — you’ll feel better anyway. Some researchers believe the body can’t tell the difference between self-triggered laughter and real laughter so either is restorative physically and psychologically. Nira Berry became

a believer eight years ago when she was diagnosed with breast cancer. “When I was going through treatment, I noticed that I just felt better after having a good laugh,” she says. It was life changing. She got certified in “laughter yoga” and started paying it forward.

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F6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M THE KEY TO HEALTH REFORM’S SUCCESS?

New law helps young people buy insurance By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Moira Hundley wants health insurance. The 28-year-old mountain bike coach and parttime physical therapy aid would love to get it, she said. If she had the money. “It’s just not in my budget if I want to eat.” The recently passed federal health reform bill may change that. Young adults, perhaps more than any other group, stand to gain from the legislation. Twenty-somethings make up the largest age group without health coverage. One-third of people without health insurance are between 19 and 29, according to the Kaiser Family Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin Foundation, a health research Moira Hundley, 28, does not have health insurance. “It’s just not organization. in my budget if I want to eat,” she said. The federal health care The new law expands Medi- reform law offers financial aid to the young and uninsured. caid, often unavailable to single adults, and creates new subsidies to buy private insurance. mandate for everyone to be in,” Hundley, who would almost said Uccello, “healthy people Young people and surely qualify for help are more likely to deinsurance coverage to buy insurance, said cide the premium is not if that’s the case, she worth it, so they don’t Health insurance would gladly buy a participate.” coverage of policy. In the federal reform non-elderly, 2008 The benefit is mutual. bill, with insurance HEALTH The success of reform, companies prohibited Children CARE particularly the expanfrom denying coverage Private insurance: 58% sion of insurance covREFORM based on pre-existing erage, may rest largely conditions, a similar Medicaid/other on the backs of this situation could happen public group. Health policy experts if the healthy, and often young, insurance: 31% say that getting buy-in from were not included. young adults is crucial to keep“In order to have a health inUninsured: 10% ing health insurance affordable surance system where no one for everyone. is turned away based on health Young adults (19 to 29) “Just bringing in the young status, that only works when folks is a vital component of everyone is in the system,” said Private insurance: 57% health reform,” said Cori Uc- Karyn Schwartz, a senior policy Medicaid/other cello, a senior health fellow at analyst at the Kaiser Family public the American Academy of Actu- Foundation. insurance: 13% aries, a nationwide professional society. Swallowing Younger people are typically Uninsured: 30% healthier and, therefore, cost the mandate less to insure than older people, The mandate may be easier Adults (30-64) Uccello said. From an insur- for young adults, and perhaps ance company’s perspective, others, to swallow because of Private insurance: 71% that means taking on a younger the generous subsidies that come Medicaid/other person involves less risk, less with it. public chance they will have to pay The primary issue for most insurance: 12% huge medical bills, than insur- young adults, said Schwartz, has ing an older person. “You’re been affordability. “They tend achieving a broad cross-section to just have such low incomes Uninsured: 17% of risk and that’s what you’re that it would be very, very diffiNotes: Adults ages 65 and older are eligible, looking for to make sure the cult for them to go out and buy and typically covered by, Medicare. Percentages may not add up to 100 because insurance pool is healthier and coverage.” of rounding. more stable over time.” In a survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation, more than half Source: Kaiser Family Foundation of uninsured young adults had Shouldering the cost incomes below $15,000 per year. Greg Cross / The Bulletin Young adults are critical to Young adults, too, are more likekeeping costs low because of ly to work in construction and the way health insurance is service industries, the survey structured. found, which have traditionally Health insurance works, in been less likely to offer benefits principle, like other types of such as health insurance. Many insurance. Take car insurance. work for small employers, who You pay a premium every year may have a harder time obtainso that if you ever get into an ac- ing health coverage for their cident, the insurance will cover workers. the costs. Many people pay auto Under the federal reform leginsurers a premium; a relative islation, about 94 percent of curfew make large claims. rently uninsured young adults When health insurance is will be eligible for coverage unworking well it is similar; many der Medicaid or a subsidy to buy people pay premiums for the rel- health insurance. ative few who make large health People who make up to $14,400 claims. But unlike car insur- per year (133 percent of the fedance, we can predict who will eral poverty level) will be eligible typically make larger health for Medicaid. Those who make claims: older people. The young, up to $43,300 per year (400 perthen, absorb some of the costs cent of the federal poverty level) for the old. will be eligible for subsidies to “Just bringing young adults purchase private insurance. into the (insurance) pool will Other provisions, such as inlower premiums by 7 to 10 per- centives for employers to offer cent,” said Sara Collins, a vice insurance and the requirement president at The Common- that parents be allowed to keep wealth Fund, a private health children on their insurance research foundation. “Having plans until the children are 26 young adults in the plan is really years old, should also make it critical.” easier for young adults to keep Young adults do more than health coverage. just bring costs down initially; How well all of this will work they help keep costs down over remains to be seen. The struca period of time. The principle is ture, with the mandate and genbasic: With more healthy people erous subsidies, is encouraging, over which to spread costs, the said Schwartz. “They have taken costs are lower for everyone. the obvious steps to make sure The mandate that everyone that young adults and others are buy insurance was unpopular able to get in.” but is necessary to avoid concenStill, she said, “there’s no way trating costs in small, generally to know for certain what will older and sicker populations, happen.” policy experts say. In states where insurance companies Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached cannot deny coverage for pre- at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ existing conditions but where bendbulletin.com. there is no mandate, “premiums go up,” said Uccello, often skyFind Your Dream Home rocketing to levels that put them Every Saturday out of reach for most people. In Real Estate In states where “there’s no

Hospital gowns that match skin tones could help detect symptoms By Jeannine Stein Los Angeles Times

Who doesn’t love a hospital gown? They’re so comfy and flattering. But they may not be doing the job they could be, according to researchers. Scientists Mark Changizi and Kevin Rio believe the venerable hospital gown needs a makeover — at least the color, anyway. In a study published recently in the journal Medical Hypotheses, they argue that the typical hospital gown colors — usually a solid blue or green or a print on a white background — may not help health professionals see if skin tones are changing, signaling a serious condition such as cyanosis. Cyanosis produces a blue or purplish color to the skin and mucous membranes, signifying that there may be less oxygen in the bloodstream. Pale or yellow-tinged skin can signal other health problems. One solution, they suggest,

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is to give patients gowns and sheets that are close in color to their skin tone. “If a doctor sees a patient, and then sees the patient again later, the doctor will have little or no idea whether the patient’s skin has changed color,” Changizi said in a news release. Changizi, assistant professor in the department of cognitive science at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y., added, “Small shifts in skin color can have tremendous medical implications.” This, he said, applies to all skin tones.

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The researchers also recommended using biosensor color tabs, matched as well to the patient’s skin tone and placed at several locations on the body. Those, too, would allow physicians or clinicians to notice any changes in skin color. Although pulse oximetry is already available (that’s a noninvasive way of tracking how oxygenated a patient’s hemoglobin is), the authors believe that noticing a skin color change may be a faster method of telling if something is wrong.

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www.deschutes.org/health • (541) 322-7400

Deschutes County Health Services. Be well. Stay well. We’ll help you get there.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 G1

C

The Bulletin

LASSIFIEDS

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contact us:

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General Merchandise

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210

255

267

Furniture & Appliances

Computers

Fuel and Wood

Couch & Loveseat, floral print, oak claw & ball legs, $300; Twin captains bed bookcase hdbd, 6 drawers, $150, will email pictures. 541-317-8360 Dining room table w/leaf & 4 chairs, light oak top, white legs $50 OBO. 541-905-9773 Dining Set -Maple, 55 yrs old, fixtures, drop leaf w/pads, 2 large extenders, good cond., $350. 541-416-1051 Freezer, 2’x4.5’, Energy Efficient, light weight, exc. cond., $100. 541-480-5950. Frigidaire Range/Oven, ceramic top, ivory, exc. cond. $650 OBO. 541-419-8673.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

200

AKC Black Lab and ? puppies. 7 weeks old with shots and worming. $50 541-382-7567 Alaskan Malamute AKC Pups, ready to go, 1st shots, $500 each. 541-408-4715 mandk@oregonfast.net health guaranteed American Pitbull, 17 mo. female, housebroke, approved home only $500. 541-390-1108. Black Lab Puppies. AKC Registered, 1 female and 7 males. Dewclaws removed, de-wormed, first shots. Puppies ready to go home by 20th, $250 each. 541-480-4625,541-385-5724 Bunnies: Adorable cute baby bunnies all black $10 each. Call 541-923-7501 Cat breeding season has begun! Please have your cats spayed and neutered before our shelters become overcrowded with unwanted litters. Adult female or male cats, $40. Bring in the litter under 3 months and we’ll alter them for free! Call Bend Spay & Neuter Project for more info. 541-617-1010.

Chesapeake Retriever Pups, AKC, shots, hips, great hunt/ fam dogs, parents on site, $500-$575. 541-259-4739 Cockatiels, babies and adult pairs, w/ cages, $20 and up. 541-548-0501 Companion cats free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip. 389-8420, www.craftcats.org

Miniature

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Mattresses

good quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

541-598-4643. MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

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Antiques & Collectibles

(Doxie) purebred puppies. Males $300 & Females $350. Call anytime (541) 678-7529 Orange Kittens & Orange mother in foster care, also Munchkin Cats,541-548-5516 Pug Puppies, AKC/pet, fawns, all shots, worming, healthy, happy beauties, $500/ea. 541-536-9495.

Purebred lands 2

Newfoundleft born

3/20/10, now 7 weeks old, reserve your puppy today, 1 female $600, 1 Landseer male $500 ., Ready to go now. Both Dam & Sire onsite, also selling Dam, Medusa $400 born 1/6/08 Amy 541-788-5374 or Josh 541-788-5349. Rat Terriers, Rescued, 9 mo. to 4 years, blue merle to cameo, 2 females, 2 males, $200 ea. 541-576-3701, 541-576-2188

ROTTWEILER WANTED Young Female, Excellent Home! Lost our Rottie. 541-536-2588 donnaandmax1@msn.com

Siberian Huskey/Wolf Puppies, exc. quality, $250-$400. Can bring to Prineville 5/1 & 5/15. 541-755-5335

ing, marbles, wood furniture, beer cans. 541-389-1578

Coca Cola cooler, 1950’s exc. condition $160 or trade for gun. 541-382-8973. Vintage galvanized watering can, $39. Call for more info., 541-390-5986. Vintage galvanized watering can, $89. Call for more info., 541-390-5986.

215

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

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Crafts and Hobbies Crafters Wanted Open Jury May 15th, 9:30 am, Highland Baptist Church, Redmond, Tina 541-447-1640 or www.snowflakeboutique.org

242

Exercise Equipment Weider Universal Gym, $95; Orbital Strider w/computer, $70. 541-593-1382. Springer Spaniel Puppies, 4 weeks, liver & white, absolutely beautiful, reserve yours now, ready 5/25, $300, 541-633-9755.

245

Golf Equipment Golf Balls, 1 case (48 balls) of Pro-V I, new, $160, call 541-390-6081. Golf Cart, elec. w/split windshield, full curtains, exc. cond., must see! 388-2387

Timberwolf, Husky, Rottweiler Mix to good home only, 1st shots, ready now $200 ea. OBO. 541-647-1232

Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Bed -Beautiful Custom King Size Barn Wood Bed, $1000. Call 541-548-5657.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Colt AR-15 with Burris Optic, full case, $2000. 541-788-1731, leave msg. Model 32 O/U Shot Gun w/full set of BRILEY CHOKES $2500. 541-815-8317 Pics Avail.

KRIEGHOFF

Qualify For Your Concealed Handgun Permit. Sat. May 15th, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information. Remington Model 31TC 12 Ga. Trap Gun, $450. 541-548-3408. Ruger, P97-45 acp, stainless, semi-auto, Make Offer; S&W 9mm, stainless ,semi-auto, Make Offer; Remington, M10, 12g. Pump, 90%+$350 OBO. 541-647-8931

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TV, Stereo and Video

Pups, $150 ea. Chair, dark wood w/uphol- TV, RCA Digital, flat screen,

541-280-1537

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stered light green seat, exc. cond. $25. 541-905-9773

20”, like new, 541-480-5950.

$50.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

A-1 Quality Red Fir & Tamarack $185/cord. Ponderosa Pine and Specialty orders avail. Dry & Seasoned. 541-416-3677, 541-788-4407

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

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John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

Grand Piano, Ivers & Pond, walnut, w/bench & 6 mo. of piano lessons, 541-815-3318. Piano, 1911 Jewitt Upright, good cond., $500 OBO, 541-815-9218. Piano, Farrand Upright, with bench, fair to good cond. $400 . 541-389-0650. Pianos - Piano Teacher Selling Studio Pianos, Beautiful Grand Piano, French Provincial Legs, almost new, very nice, $10,050, will del. Piano, nice, $1,295 comes w/6 mo. of lessons 541-383-3888.

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 Pool Table, custom made, exc. cond., moving, must sell, first $300 incl. accessories. 541-788-4229. The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

263

Tools

J & C Firewood

• Cord • Bundle Wood • Split & Delivered Call Joe, 541-408-8195. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment Arborvitaes, 12’+/-, make a green screen, will deliver, or your dig. 541-280-1227.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) Cacti, already planted in gallon pots, $6/ea+. Crooked River Ranch, 541-548-0501. Lawnmower, 4.5HP, 21”, rear bag, push mower, $85, 541-390-6081. Lawn Mower, Riding, 42” Craftsman, hydrostatic trans., $500, 541-280-7024.

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Employment

400 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

Quality Orchard Grass Hay, Tumalo, small bales, clean no rain $150 per ton. Kennor Farms 541-383-0494

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain,

small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found: 2 pistols, call to identify. In Police custody. 541-317-0988. Found Bicycle: off Century Dr. 5 mi. outside of Sunriver, 5/5, call to ID, 541-598-7925.

LOST: Black Lab, 12 week old pup, in Redmond Heights on 5/6/10, REWARD! 541-279-8826 LOST: Braided multi colored, Friendhip/Charm Bracelet, on 5/9 in Mirror Pond parking area Franklin to Newport Please call 541-633-0572. LOST: Tri-Tronics transmitter for dog collars, Sawyers Uplands Park on Sunday, 5/9. Reward. 541-382-8559 Lost Wool Stocking Cap, blue & white, w/ “Norge” on front, blue & white tassel, 541-383-3925 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

275

Auction Sales

476

Employment Opportunities

The New Kubota RTV500 compact utility vehicle has all the comfort, technology and refinements of a larger utility Central Oregon Nickel Ads - Account Executive vehicle – but fits in the bed of a full-size, long bed Do you have what it takes to pickup. Financing on aptake our publication to the proved credit. next level? Central Oregon Midstate Power Nickel Ads is seeking a Media Sales professional to help Products our Central Oregon custom541-548-6744 ers grow their businesses Redmond through a widely distributed and well-read publication. 325 This full time position reHay, Grain and Feed quires a background in consultative sales, extremely 1st Quality Grass Hay strong time management Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, skills, and an aggressive apExc, hay for horses. proach to prospecting and $120/ton & $140/ton closing sales. A minimum of 541-549-3831 1 year outside media sales experience (or similar) is reBarn Stored Orchard Grass and quired to be considered for grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ the position. ton, Delivery available. 541-548-2668. The position offers an estabHay Is Expensive! Protect your lished list of current custominvestment Let KFJ Builders, ers, an aggressive commisInc. build your hay shed, sion-based compensation barn or loafing shed. package that rewards both 541-617-1133. CCB 173684. service AND growth, and includes benefits such as Orchard Grass Hay medical, dental and 401K. small bales covered $150 a ton, Feeder Hay small Please send your resume, cover bales $90 a ton. Tumalo letter and salary history to: 541-322-0101. Advertising Sales Position Orchard Grass, Central Oregon Nickel Ads small bales, clean, no rain 1777 SW Chandler Ave $135 per ton also have . Bend, OR 97708-6020 Feeder Hay $75 per ton. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731. No phone calls please. Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Chip Truck Driver Experience and clean driving Cert. Noxious Weed Free, record required, out of area barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string work call 541-647-7516 bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Small Unique Greenhouse $499 call for details. Ask for Brian 541-508-6920.

Theater, identify, email ea_current@yahoo.com.

265

Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

As low as

0% APR Financing

Snow Removal Equipment FOUND: Money, at Old Mill

$2,500. 541-385-4790.

476

Employment Opportunities

421

T HE L ITTLE G I A N T RTV500 • 4X4

FOR SALE: Campbell Hausfeld FOUND: Dog, on Reed Mkt. Professional 5500 Watt gas near Chevron/Parkway, to generator 240V & 120V. identify, 541-788-6577. MINT Cond. Used less than 20 hrs., $650. 541-475-6537 FOUND: Large collection of CD’s, on 5/2, Deschutes 264 Market Rd. 541-408-2973.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition

476

Employment Opportunities

Schools and Training

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Casio Keyboard CTK510, w/ stand, adapter & manuel $150. 541-803-7005. Culver.

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Musical Instruments

BMG 50 12x36x80 mm scope, 60 extra round $2250 firm 541-420-7773. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

T o a v o i d fr a u d , T h e Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

Farm Market

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

260

Dachshund Antiques Wanted: Tools, fish-

FREE 2 PET RABBITS 6 lbs., mix breed. No equip- Toy Poodle Mix A darling little ment.Call 541-322-5253 male puppy, waiting to fill A FREE Border Collies/Kelpies, 8 Mother's day wish. $200. mos., females, call for more 541 504-9958 info., 541-462-3134. Welsh Corgi, 7+ mo. old, all FREE CATS, shy grey males, shots, chipped, spayed febrothers, need stable home, male, likes children, $500, healthy. 541-598-7260. 541-504-1908. FREE: Maine Coon spayed fe- Working cats for barn/shop, male, needs a quiet & apcompanionship. FREE, fixed, proved home. 541-318-4829 shots. Will deliver! 389-8420 FREE: Male Lab Huskey mix, 6 210 yrs., neutered, sweet & proFurniture & Appliances tective. 541-610-4214. German Shorthair Pointer #1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers Pups, all liver colored, 5 wks, taking dep., 1st shots, $500 ea. 541-420-5914. Golden Lab female, Australian Shepherd female, Rhodesian Redback female, all spayed & Start at $99 rescued $50 ea. FREE DELIVERY! (541)576-3701, 576-2188. Lifetime Warranty Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, Also, Wanted Washers, wormed & shots, great disDryers, Working or Not position, parents OFA cert., Call 541-280-6786 refs. avail., 541-420-1334.

Golden Retriever Puppies!! AKC, Sweet and Sassy! Only a few females left. Ready to go May 1st. $600. oregonhomes@hotmail.com 541-419-3999

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

• Receipts should include,

Furniture

6 Vintage Cardboard goose decoys, $45/all. Call 541-390-5986.

English Bulldog, male, very sweet and loving! Age 3. Relocation causing sale. $800 Call 541-390-6337.

Include your name, phone number and address

Pets and Supplies

ITEMS NEEDED for huge yard sale to benefit abandoned & abused cats! Nonprofit Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team seeks all kinds of items for a yard sale in June. Covered storage is available so we can accept your items 202 NOW. Time to clean out your Want to Buy or Rent garage/closets! Donations are tax-deductible! Call re: Shop space wanted 200 sq.ft., where to drop off & we can power, secure, central locapick up too! Also seeking tion in Bend. 541-350-8917. deposit cans & bottles - it all helps! info@craftcats.org, or Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motorcall 728-4178 or 389-8420. cylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s www.craftcats.org RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-6786. Jack Russell/Skipper Key mix. 1 year old Male, very smart & Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for energetic, needs someone old vintage costume, scrap, w/ time to train, great dog. silver & gold Jewelry. Top $100. Paid $250. All shots & dollar paid, Estate incl. Honneutered. 541-815-2963. est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, Kittens & cats ready to adopt! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Fosworking or not, cash paid, ter Team, 1-5 Sat/Sun, call 541- 280-6786. re: other days. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. 65480 78th We Want Your Junk Car!! St., Bend, 389-8420. Info & We'll buy any scrap metal, photos at www.craftcats.org. batteries or catalytic conLab, Chocolate, 10 wk. female, verters. 7 days a week call 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 mother on site, papers, $400. 541-971-1236 205 Lab Pups AKC exc. pedigree, 3 black & 3 chocolate Items for Free males, 2 chocloate females $400-$500 541-536-5385 Apartment size chest freezer, www.welcomelabs.com works excellent, free, you haul. 541-383-1962 Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 208 www.alpen-ridge.com Pets and Supplies Lhasa Apso Pups, beautiful colors, exc. personality, $300, Madras, 503-888-0800. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” purchasing products or The Humane Society of Redservices from out of the mond now offers low cost area. Sending cash, checks, spays and neuters, Cat spay or credit information may starting at $40.00, Cat neube subjected to fraud. For ter starting at $20.00, Dog more information about an spay and neuter starting at advertiser, you may call the $55.00. For more informaOregon State Attorney tion or to schedule an apGeneral’s Office Consumer pointment, please call Protection hotline at 541-923-0882 1-877-877-9392. Maltese 8 mo old, house broke, great loving pet. $300. Call 541-420-0947 or 610-2286

Heeler

To place your ad visit call 541-385-5809 Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. or visit www.bendbulletin.com

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

COLT STARTING We build solid foundations that stay with the horse forever. Visit us at www.steelduststable.com or call Paul 541-419-3405 Mares (3) Reg. ea. 10 yrs, 1 Paint & 1 Pinto not broke, 1 Palomino, some training make offer 541-546-2453.

Church Choral Director: First Presbyterian seeks director of Traditional Music Ministries to lead Chancel Choir and music ensembles. Experience in church music, track record of excellence in choral conducting, motivating and recruiting volunteer singers and instrumental groups. Resume to Administrator, 230 NE Ninth, Bend, 97701. blevet@bendfp.org 541-382-4401.

CLERK/Gas attendant/Subway Must be 18+ yrs. Full-time and Part-time. Apply at: Riverwoods Country Store, 19745 Baker Rd., Bend. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Dorm Parent Spray School: Background in Counseling & ability to relate w/high school students. Call & request application, 541-468-2226.

Glazier have clean DOE. info.

-- Residential: Must 5 years experience & driving record, pay Call 541-382-2500 for

Job Fair-Suttle Lake May 14th & 15th 9am - 4pm The Lodge at Suttle Lake is hiring for the following seasonal positions •Housekeeping •Frontdesk •Maintenance •Experienced Line Cooks •Banquet Cooks •Dishwashers •Bussers •Back Wait •Servers •Host/ Hostesses •Bartenders •Banquet Servers Please apply on these specific dates at the Main Lodge Landscaping Sisters Landscape Co. is hiring for landscape maint. Minimum 2 years exp. must speak English, have driver’s licence in good standing, meet grooming standards, able to multi-task, and manage time well. Call for appointment, 541-549-3001. Medical

Phlebotomy

Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301 Medical -Registered Nurse: Harney County Home Health & Hospice. Work w/home bound patients who need skilled nursing care & hospice patients who need symptom management. Relaxed, knowledgable & helpful team environment. We pride ourselves in being nurse & patient friendly. To apply e-mail: cherylk1@centurytel.net

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Medical/Software

Partners In Care is accepting resumes for the newly created position of Organization Systems Coordinator. This is a full-time position (generally Mon. - Fri./ 8am - 5pm). Responsibilities include providing support and administration of clinical software application (SunCoast) in order to resolve application incidents and/or to fulfill requests from internal clients, and participation in new module/application testing and implementation for the organization. Minimum qualifications include: Clinical caregiver knowledge and experience in hospice/home health settings (ie. RN, Social Worker), and a demonstrated knowledge in clinical software applications (EMR) with ability to manage the development and sustaining of such software applications. Compensation dependent on qualifications/experience. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit their resume via mail to: Partners In Care / Attn: HR, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or by fax to: 541-389-0813.

Education

Peruvian Paso Gelding and Mare. Reg. 14 yrs. Amazing gaited ride. Perfect trail horses for any age. $3,500 ea. Peruvian tack avail as well. 541-610-5799

QUALITY REGISTERED PERFORMANCE HORSES all ages. 541-325-3376.

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Reg. QH Mare, 8 yr, loads, clips & hauls, doesn’t kick, bite, great w/feet, broke to ride, great bloodlines, Docbar, Peppy Sanbadger, Tivio, $3500 OBO, 541-548-7514.

2 DAY AUCTION: Sat & Sun 345 May 15 & 16 at 10 a.m., Total liquidation of SilverLite Livestock & Equipment Trailer Co. 1291 S. A Street in Springfield. Trailers, Pick- A1 Beef Steers Ready for ups, Forklifts, Welders, AluPasture 541-382-8393 minum, Shop Equipment, please leave a message. Tools & More. 1,500 Sale Lots! For details visit Cow Calf/Pairs (9), young, please call 541-548-1184 for I-5auctions.com or call more info 541-643-0552.

Partners In Care is accepting resumes for a part-time (24+ hours/week) RN to work in its in-patient unit; Hospice House. Regular weekly hours include two 12-hour night shifts (7pm 7am) and a weekend rotation. Preference given to candidates with in-patient hospice or general hospice experience. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit their resume via mail to: Partners In Care / Attn: HR, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701 or by fax to: 541-389-0813

RV Sales

Big Country RV is seeking exp. RV Salesperson. Industry exp. req. Competitive pay and benefits. Fax resume to: 541-330-2496. RV Tech

Big Country RV is

seeking exp. RV Tech, Full Time w/benefits. Apply at: 63500 N. Hwy. 97, Bend .

SALES OF BEND The Perfect Central Oregon vehicle Is Here. Totally redesigned for 2010 models are on the ground. The all New Outback & Legacy design will increase sales dramatically. We are looking for People who enjoy all that Central Oregon has to offer and want to show other Central Oregonians why there isn’t a more perfect vehicle than the "NEW" All Wheel Drive Subarus. We offer the most aggressive pay program in Central Oregon, Guaranteed Income, Profit sharing, Medical Benefits, a mentoring program, and an above average income. No Phone Calls Please. Apply in person at Subaru of Bend, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

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POWELL BUTTE COMMUNITY CHARTER SCHOOL Powell Butte, Oregon Announces the following positions:

• Part Time Principal with teaching option • 7 Teachers (Part Time/Full Time ) • Administrative Asst. • Custodian See www.pbccs.org complete information

RN/Medical

for

PBCCS is an equal opportunity employer Food Service Attendants

The Ranch is accepting applications for food service attendants to work in our Lake Side Bistro next to the Lodge swimming pool. Responsibilities include pizza and grilled burger preparation, serving and bussing tables. The service will be of high quality and fast and courteous. These self starters must be able to work weekends. A valid Deschutes Count Food Handler permit is required. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Loans and Mortgages

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Medical Wallowa Memorial Hospital, Located in Enterprise, OR, currently has two full-time positions available for a Laboratory MT/MLT. Outstanding benefits package. If interested please contact Linda Childers, Human Resource Director at (541) 426-5313, or visit our website at www.wchcd.org. E OE

Pacific Truck Center is looking for a Journey Level Diesel Tech. Must have own tools. Able to work in a fast pace environment. Able to work on all makes of heavy duty diesel trucks and chassis repairs. excellent pay and benefits. Send resume to PO Box 730, Redmond Oregon 97756

Pharmacy

Technician

Full or part time, experience preferred, in Madras, Cashier also needed. 541-325-1059.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

573

Business Opportunities

XOCAI: Expanding business opportunity coming to the Bend area offering great health and wealth potential. Event: Eagle Crest Resort, Summit Room, May 14 & 15 @ 6:30 p.m. Call 360-450-5985 for more information. All enthusiasts for a better future welcome!

www.healthychocolate.cfdgrp.com


G2 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Rentals

600 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $90/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

631

634

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. REDMOND TOWNHOUSE DUPLEX APARTMENT On cul-de-sac, N IC E 1400 sq. ft., 2-story 2 bedroom, 1½ bath, single car garage, small back yard. $725 mo. includes w/s/g. No smoking, no pets. 541-420-5927.

616

Want To Rent

632

Want to Rent acreage to park Travel Trailer east of Bend preferable with horse area. Will rent/lease with possible option to buy 541-610-4100.

Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled

627 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a LAS VEGAS, next to South home to rent, call a Bulletin Point/Las Vegas Blvd., 2 Classified Rep. to get the bdrm. condo, 5/30-6/6, new rates and get your ad $800, call for more info., started ASAP! 541-385-5809 541-447-1616.

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month!

OCEANFRONT HOMES Rent now for Summer. Waldport. Sleeps 10-16. www.rodbyroost.com 541-923-0908

630

Rooms for Rent Furnished Room & Bath, female pref., Victorian decor, $400 incl. utils & cable TV, lovely older neighborhood, walking distance to Downtown & river, 541-728-0626.

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

1 bdrm, 1 bath, on site laundry $550 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

A Better Place to Live, May Free • Near Hospital 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199.

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

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Estate Sales

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-4, #24 Suntree Village off SE 15th St. Entire household, sofa, chairs, recliner, dining set, china cabinet, beds, dressers, cedar chest, linens, rolltop desk, lamps, TV’s, end tables, dishes, BBQ, bookcase, books, Christmas & holiday decor, collectibles, lots of miscellaneous.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636 209 NW Portland: Quiet 2 bdrn., DW, W/S/G paid, oak cabs., carport, laundry facilities, extra large living room, $670 $500 dep., 383-2430.

2 Bdrm., 2 bath, Lower West Hills, with great view & deck, W/D & garage, $975/mo., gas, water, & elec. $100 flat rate, 541-420-7357. Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, A/C, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #4. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G $100 Move In Special paid, W/D hookups. Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Charles. $550/mo. Call Near COCC! Newer 2/1, gran541-385-6928. ite, parking/storage area, laundry on site. $600/mo. 1059 NE Hidden Valley Dr., 2 541-815-0688. bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, garage, W/D hook-ups, W/S 638 paid, $675/mo. 541-610-4070 Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Estate Sales BARN SALE: Fri. & Sat. 8-4, 68308 Cloverdale, Sisters 50’s collectible misc. household dining room set, pink Whirlpool fridge, over 1,000 collector records, Melmac & glass dish sets, linens, lamps, painting & artware, kitchen misc., nightstand, desks, TV lamps, assorted knick knacks, 1970’s vinyl couch, 1940’s chair, chair converts to bed & W/D & much much more!

Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Hospital & Costco, garage, yard maint., W/D, W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Ln. #1. $725/mo. 541-420-0208

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Duplex 2/1, fully updated W/D hookup, W/S paid, patio, fully fenced, garage w/opener $650 +dep. No smoking/pets 503-507-9182.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

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Sales Northwest Bend Awbrey Butte Estate Sale: 3181 NW Fairway Heights Dr., Sat. 9 am., no early birds.

Corner of Bond & Georgia, Fri. & Sat. 9-2, Const., concrete tools, compacter, generator, darkroom & sports equip., books, desk, furniture, misc.

638

642

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend Apt./Multiplex Redmond STONE CREEK APARTMENTS

2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments 3 bdrm, 2 bath townhomes with garages. W/D included, gas fireplaces. 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

MAY

SPECIALS!

Studios & 1 bdrm

$395 to $415

• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. •Screening fee waived • Lots of amenities. •Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties

1807 SW 21st, spacious 2/2 gorgeous fenced duplex, w/garage, mint cond. W/S/G, paid pet OK reduced to $695. 541- 549-2228.

Large 2 bdrm., 1 bath, upstairs unit, W/S/G+gas paid, onsite laundry, no smoking/ pets, $495/mo. 358 NW 17th St., Gael, 541-350-2095.

1st Month Free 6 month lease!

Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 2007 SW Timber. 2 Bedroom, 1.5 bath, $495 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

Near Bend High School, 4 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 newer carpet & paint, woodsq. ft., large carport, no stove, garage fenced yard on smoking, $995/mo. + deps. .92 acre lot $795 541-389-3657 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. Newer, spacious 3 Bdrm/2 Bath, oversized garage, fenced yard, cool great room, quiet neighborhood! $950/ mo. Call Kurt 541 350-5552

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, double garage, storage, dishwasher, W/D hookup, excellent location, $850 mo. plus dep. Pet neg. Avail. June 541-382-8399.

Near Old Mill, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, wood stove, garage, fenced yard, 603 SE Wilson, $650/$600 dep., please call 541-480-3832.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq.ft., gas fireplace, great room, newer carpet, oversized dbl. garage, $995, 541-480-3393/541-610-7803

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On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

Redmond

$200 off 1st mo. 3/2, fenced back yard, new appl., dog OK, $785+sec. dep., 1617 SW 33rd, 541-948-2121, tmenergyrates@gmail.com

Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

Tumalo: 5 Min. from Bend, nice 3/2 house, 2150 sq.ft., dbl. garage, $1100/mo., 1st/last/$500 dep. No pets or smoking. (541)317-8794

Cute, clean 2/1, single garage, W/D hookups, nice yard, great in town location, $695 rent + $670 dep., 156 SW 8th St., 541-548-0932.

WESTSIDE, Near Downtown 1 bdrm., W/D, quiet St., large fenced yard, detached garage, pet OK w/ dep. $650 Avail. 6/1. 541-382-4530

Deluxe Newer 3/2.5, 2245 sq. ft., huge fenced yard. $995/mo. lease to own. or $1095 lease only, 1615 SW Sarasota Ct. 541-350-2206.

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $1300 mo. + security & cleaning. 541-923-0908.

Avail. Now, Older, small 1 bdrm. cottage, fenced yard, 1 pet w/ extra dep., no garage, $525/mo+1st, last, dep. Refs. 541-382-3672.

HORSE PROPERTY, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 5 acres, storage, small shop, private well, CRR near entrance, lease, option possible, $875, 541-771-7750

654

Upscale Home 55+ Community on the Golf Course in Eagle Crest 2700 sq.ft., 3 bdrm. +den, triple garage, gardener paid, $1400 +security dep of $1400. 541-526-5774.

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

2 Bdrm., near Old Mill, 1000 sq. ft., newer carpet, vaulted ceiling, wood stove, big deck, Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, single garage, fenced yard, $625/mo. + $795,541-480-3393, 610-7803 last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. An older 2 bdrm., 2 bath 805-479-7550 manufactured, 938 sq.ft., wood stove, quiet .5 acre lot 660 in DRW on canal $695, 541-480-339 610-7803. Houses for Rent

CLEAN, large older 2 bedroom, $700 mo. + last + dep. No pets. See at 1977 NW 2ND, Bend and call # off sign for appointment to see.

Houses for Rent General

The Bulletin

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Newer 2 bdrm., single level duplex, covered parking, decks, separate storage, near Redmond Rite-Aid, $550/mo. 541-548-4727/541-419-8371

May Special!

Chaparral Apts.

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

Move-in Incentive 1/2 off 1st month rent! SW Redmond duplex 3 bdrm, 2 bath, garage, fenced back yard, all kitchen appl., W/D hookup, $650 + dep. 541-480-7806.

648

244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

1 BDRM., 1 BATH HOUSE, walk in closet, W/D incl., nice, new kitchen & living room, view of river, large dbl. garage, W/S/G paid, close to parks & river trails, VILLAGE 61004 $750/mo. + $750 dep. NO ROMAINE Chuckanut Dr., 1900 sq.ft., 2 pets/smoking. 67 B McKay. bdrm, 2 bath, gas heat stove, 541-419-0722 A/C, + heat pump, hot tub, 3 bdrm., W/D, dishwasher, 2 $850, Jim, 541-388-3209. car garage, fenced back yard, quiet neighborhood, W/S/G 658 & gas heating paid, Houses for Rent $1150/mo. 541-382-4868

Ask Us About Our

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ball field, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval.

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

La Pine 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, nice are, dbl. garage, sprinklers, nice lawn, fenced backyard. $800 mo. +dep., no smoking. pet neg. 541-923-6961

687

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

Real Estate For Sale

700 705

Real Estate Services PRIVATE LENDER WANTED! We own our home outright, looking for private lender to lend us $30,000 for remodel. Call 541-279-8826.

Commercial for Rent/Lease

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Light Industrial, various sizes, Etc. North and South Bend loca- The Real Estate Services classitions, office w/bath from fication is the perfect place to $400/mo. 541-317-8717 reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To Office/Warehouse space place an ad call 385-5809 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

713

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

Real Estate Wanted Struggling with payments? I will buy your house or take over payments. Rapid debt relief. 541-504-8883 or 541-385-5977

290

290

290

292

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Family Garage Sale, Fri. & Sat. 9-2, 2046 NE Monroe Lane, some baby & small furniture, computer, jeans & more. Fri. only, 2389 NE Lynda Ln. off Butler Mkt & Purcell. It’s a big one! Clothing, linens, toys, books and much more! MOVING/GARAGE SALE, Sat. & Sun., 8am-3pm. 2936 NE Sandy Dr. off Butler Mkt. Rd. Everything must go! Multi-Family Yard Sale, Fri.- Sun., 8-6, Many items, furniture, & lots of misc., 20683 Overton Pl., S. of Cooley, W. of Boyd Acres. Saturday Only 5/15, 8-? Furniture, household, clothes, misc. items. 2012 NE Rachel Court off Purcell Spring Cleaning Sale: Fri. 9-4, Sat 8-4, hide-a-bed couch, recliner chair, old Pepsi cooler, display cases, collectibles, military, Thompson parts gun, misc., 1520 NE Providence.

FLEA MARKET at Perry’s, 25+ Vendors, Sat. 5/15,9-5, come find great deals on antiques, sporting goods, guns, tools, household items, crafts, jewelry, yard art, garage sale items & so much more, 3000 S. Hwy. 97, just N. of KFC, Redmond, 541-633-6271.

GREEN PASTURES PARK WIDE SALE, 2633 SW Obsidian Ave., May 15th, Sat. 9-5, please park on Obsidian Ave. HUGE SALE: Everything from A to Z. Friday & Saturday 8-6, 8520 NW 19th Street, Terrebonne. Junk Between Us Girls presents Spring 2010 Antique & Garden Market. Sat., May 15, 10am -4pm. 342 SW Canyon Dr. This one day event is back in our original location, come experience casual shopping among the beautifully stocked booths on the lawn of one of Redmond’s early historic homes. Shabby Chic, Country Cottage, French Prairie, Primitive, Farm Rusties, and much more. More info call Lisa at 541-410-7815 or Peggy at 541-460-0357.

Garage/Estate Sat. May 15th, 9am-3pm, 3651 Sunriver Sale, gently used: home & SW Xero Ave. Small safe, printer, backpack, furniture, office furniture, Weber BBQ, books & misc. Proceeds for tools, automotive, golf clubs, Women’s Scholarships. sporting goods & fishing equip., skis, ski box, & boots, Kirby Vacuum, camera & SHOP/GARAGE SALE. May 15 & camera equip, fine art, Go16, Sat. & Sun. 8 a.m. - 4 rilla shelves, TONS OF p.m. Tools, camping & sports S T U F F . Fri. & Sat., 8-5. Go gear, bicycles, hardware, gun Hwy 97 S. from Bend cabinet & loading equip., Wal-Mart, 14 mi., turn right Misc. household items, on Vandervert Rd., 1 mi. turn clothes, collectibles. left on S. Century Dr., 3 mi. 5540 SW Loma Linda Dr. turn left on Forest Ln., drive 1.5 mi. to 55070 Forest Ln.

MOVING SALE! Leaving the area, furniture, (TV stand, book shelves, twin head board), ping pong table, boys & girls bikes, quality clothing, tools, household items. DON’T MISS THIS ONE! 6931 NW 25th Ln., Cinder Butte Estates off Northwest Way. Follow the signs. Sat. only, 8am-3pm.

Spring Cleaning Yard Sale! Fri. & Sat. 8-5, 1691 SW Jericho Lane, Culver, a little of everything!!!

Multi Family Moving Sale! Everything must go! Nice things at nice prices. Fri. & Sat., 9am-4pm. 63351 NW Britta St., behind Sheriffs Office off Pow Scholes. (Parking on Britta only please).

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com Sat. only, 5/15, 8-3. 1174 NW Redfield Cir. in Awbrey Butte off of Farewell Dr. Classy clutter, fun fashion items & whimsical decor.

284

Sales Southwest Bend Fri & Sat., 8:30-4 SALE. 19915 Porcupine Dr, off Brookswood. Nice girl toddler & kid clothing, toys, baby gear, books, audiobooks, DVDs, CDs, & much more. Garage Sale! SAT May 15 8am-3pm. Lots for Dad, Mom & Kids! Bikes, wagon, power saws, ladder, Household & More! 61004 Snowbrush Dr.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

Estate Sale: Antique clocks, Annual Multi Family Sale, Fri. 9-5, Sat. 9-3. 1262 NE coins, Dolls, jewelry, glassBurnside. Scrapbooking, ware,VHS video camera, gold crafts, misc., specialty items, wedding band, 1016 NW check it out! Newport Ave., Sat.-Sun. 9-4.

288

Sales Southeast Bend 1242 SE Shadowood, Fri. & Sat. 9-4, jewelry, clothing, golf, new men’s Dynlap set, near new Wilson set, Protactic left set, woods, 7.,9, big head drivers, bags, much more golf, & more of everything. GARAGE SALE! Furniture, art, antiques & household items. Sat. only, 8am-1pm. 221 SE Airpark Dr. off Pettigrew. Garage Sale, Sat., 5/15, only, 8am-1pm. Times strictly enforced. Furniture, tools and much more! 61447 Barleycorn Ln. in Nottingham Square off 15th St.

Yard Sale, South enterance Suntree Village Mobile Park, #189, off 15th. Sat. only, 8am-12. Lots of clothes!

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 290

Sales Redmond Area Sale, freezer, antiques, lots of good items. Fri. only, 8: 30am-3pm. 151 NW Canyon Dr.

Downsizing

Garage Sale: Sat. & Sun. 9-3, 2314 SW 9th St., Corner of Salmon & 39th, women’s upscale clothes, home decor, hide-a-bed, recliners, etc., kitchen goods & much more!

Pat Wester

MOVING

SALE

20397 Pine Vista Dr. FRI. May 14 W SAT. May 15 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Crowd control admittance numbers issued at 8:00 a.m. Friday. (Take either 15th St. or 27th St. to Knott Rd. and follow west to Pine Vista Dr., turn south to sale site.) Quality sale!! 1996 Ford Ranger XLT Pickup, only 60,834 miles; Teak Dining table with two leaves and 8 chairs; Teak Buffet-table and buffet -unusual pottery inlay. Teak dresser; desk and nightstand; Basset queen bed and dresser and nightstand; Lynx or Leopard hide??; Hide a bed; Sofa; Massage chair; 5' tall jade plant; milk cart from Sweden; Refrigerator -cross top freezer; Newer Washer with King size tub; Kenmore dryer; Great tall case "Grandfather" clock; Glass top dinette/patio set with wrought iron chairs; Mesh top patio table and chairs; Three rubber rafts; Books; Bose, Criterion and Infinity speakers; Nikkormat and Olympus XA cameras; Collectible glass; Sheet music; 1950s Hawthorne ladies bike in mint condition; Dansk dishes; Books; Coffee and end tables; Life jackets and backpacks; Garden tools and chemicals; Wheelbarrow; Glider bench; Wrought iron bench; pots and pans and kitchen items; lots of linens; mens and women's clothing; Curtains; Push lawn mower; Mahogany kneehole desk; lots of small bags of Turquoise pieces and other rocks and obsidian; Two older TVs; amplifier; turntable; receiver; Set of four studded tires, 205/70R/15. Lots and lots of other items. Deedy’s Estate Sales Co., LLC www.deedysestatesales.com 541-419-2242 days d 541-382-5950 eves

Multi Family Friday & Saturday 8-4, 2958 NW 19th, clothes, bikes, craft supplies & much much more! Multi Family Sale 9am-4pm only. May 14, 15 & 16. Lots of household items; clothes, decor, hardware, books, boat, antiques, appli., furniture, etc. 1047 W. Antler Ave. Near downtown Redmond.

292

Sales Other Areas SALE, Fri.-Sun., 9am-5pm. Everything must go! 156 NE Willow Ave., Prineville, West of Ochoco Reservoir. 541-447-2498

MOVING

HUGE

SALE

Complete liquidation of Lark Gardens.

The owners are moving to a retirement community and selling most everything! This is Phase I, and will be all the outside items, plants, herbs, much quality outdoor furniture & ornamental iron, 3 Weber BBQs, 12 wheel barrows, 12 directors chairs, tools, garden & nursery items, the contents of the gift shop with flavored vinegars, lavender products & sprays, jellies & teas, gift baskets, displays, contents of an art studio with framing and art supplies, stamping & scrapbooking supplies, many 100s of wonderful cookbooks from Lita's lifetime collection, commercial flower cooler, large outdoor umbrellas, several folding canopies, hoses & MUCH MORE!!

Fri. & Sat., May 14 & 15, 9 -4 Numbers Fri. at 8 a.m.

12789 Cornett Loop, Powell Butte.

At Powell Butte store/Williams Rd go North and follow signs Sale by Attic Estates & Appraisals, 541-350-6822 for pictures go to www.atticestatesandappraisals.com


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 G3

738

775

860

870

880

881

882

Multiplexes for Sale

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Motorcycles And Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $59,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

745

Homes for Sale Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

747

Southwest Bend Homes Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

748

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in great shape, vacant & ready to move from Redmond, $34,900, 541-480-4059. Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

YAMAHA 650 CUSTOM 2008, beautiful bike, ready to ride, full windshield, foot pads, leather saddle bags, rear seat rest & cargo bag to fit, 1503 mi., barely broke in, $5000. Please call 541-788-1731, leave msg. if no answer, or WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 email ddmcd54@gmail.com bath, fridge, range & large for pics. storage shed incl., $5900 or $1000 down, $175/mo.+ space rent. 541-383-5130. Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233. Move-In Ready! Homes start at $10,000. Delivered & set-up start at $26,500, on land, $30,000, Smart Housing, LLC, 541-350-1782

Boats & RV’s

800

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

750

850

REAL

ESTATE AUCTION May 22, 2010 17040 Hermosa Road Off Stellar Rd., Sunriver 1/2 acre - 1512 sq. ft. home outbuildings - fenced. OPEN HOUSE May 16, 1-3 p.m. Stuart Realty Group, Inc. 503-263-7253

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $2900 OBO, call 541-280-5524.

ATVs

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new POLARIS 600 INDY 1994 & 1995, must sell, 4 place ride on/off trailer incl., all in good cond., asking $1999 OBO. 541-536-5774

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Polaris Sportsman 500 2007 (2), cammo, fully loaded, low hrs., $5250 each. OBO, call 541-318-0210. Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

762

Homes with Acreage

Yamaha YFZ 450 2006, Special Edition, only ridden in the sand, paddle steer tires, pipe, air cleaner, jetted, ridden very little, $5000, 541-410-1332.

870

Boats & Accessories 10’ Fiberglass Boat, w/ 7 HP motor & trailer, $500, please call 541-233-3357.

Own A Park 1.47 Acres+/- 2 Bdrm 1 Bath Home. Finished Detached Garage/shop, Harley Davidson 1200 XLC Circle Drive w/RV Parking, 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & 12’ Sears Fiberglass boat, ores PUD Water/Sewer, Sunriver & trailer incl., $500. Call for Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, Area. $224,900 Call Bob more info., 541-419-1891. 541-728-5506. $6500 OBO, Mosher 541-593-2203. 14’ Lund, 25 Merc, Calkins trailer, elec. trolling motor, 771 fish finder, down rigger, 2 Lots anchors & other equip., great for fly fishing, $2000. WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in 541-388-6922 SE Bend. Super Cascade Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras Mountain Views, area of nice 19’ Blue Water Execuincl. pipes, lowering kit, homes & BLM is nearby too! chrome pkg., $17,500 OBO. tive Overnighter 1988, Only $199,950. Randy 541-944-9753 very low hours, been in dry Schoning, Broker, John L. storage for 12 years, new Scott, 541-480-3393. camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires 773 on trailer, $7995 OBO, Acreages 541-447-8664.

CHRISTMAS VALLEY L A N D, new solar energy area, 360 acres $140,000. By Owner 503-740-8658 PCL 27s 20e 0001000

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

personals Need Attorney to represent me in a wrongful termination case for equal share of settlement.Possible discrimination. John, 541-977-2434.

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Tioga TK Model 1979, took in as trade, everything works, shower & bathtub, Oldie but Goody $3,000 or best offer needs work, must sell 541-610-6713

882 Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Honda Scooter 2005, Reflex 250 cc, 2K mi. , silver, 2 helmets, travel trunk, exc. cond. $2750. 541-389-9338.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574. 2003 Sea Ark Sled, 20.6 MVT, 135 hp., 9.9 kicker too many extras to list $11,750 firm. 541-420-7773.

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 10 Years Housekeeping Experience, References, Rates To Fit Your Needs Call Crecencia Today! Cell 410-4933

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Decks

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Handyman

I DO THAT! Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

875 Artic Fox 22’ 2005, exc. cond., equalizer hitch, queen bed, A/C, awning, radio/CD, lots of storage, $13,900. 541-389-7234.

880

Motorhomes warranty, always garaged $19,500. 541-549-4834

Drywall

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Thomas Carey Construction 35 yrs. exp. in Central Oregon Custom homes, all phases or remodeling, small jobs, window replacement. 541-480-8378 • CCB#190270

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Excavating

Randy, 541-306-7492

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Domestic Services

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

We Clean Houses & Offices: Over 10 years of experience, good references, best service for the least cost, 541-390-8073.

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Roof-Foundation CCB#180420 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry, •Remodeling, •Decks, •Window/ Door Replacement •Int/Ext Painting ccb176121 480-3179

AVM CONSTRUCTION • Carpentry • Home Repair • Expert Painting • Stain • Decks • Pergolas • Foreclosure Restoration 541-610-6667 CCB #169270 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846

360 Sprint Car

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

925

Utility Trailers

Canopies and Campers Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Big Foot 2008 camper, Model 1001, exc. cond. loaded, elec. jacks, backup camera, $22,500 541-610-9900.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $5000, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Lance 820 Lite 2004, 2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Beaver Patriot 2000, 37’, 44K mi., w/options. $119,000. 541-382-9755,541-215-0077 Fleetwood Expedition 38’ N Model 2005, 7.5 kw gen. W/D, pwr awning, 4 dr. fridge, icemaker, micro & convection, dual A/C, heat pump, AC/DC pwr. inverter, backup camera, etc. $98,000. 541-382-1721

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $2500, call 541-390-1833.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744. Monaco LaPalma 2001, 34’, Ford V10 Triton, 30K, new tires, 2 slides, many upgrades incl. rear vision, ducted air, upgraded appl., island queen bed & queen hid-a-bed, work station, very nice, one owner, non smoker, garaged, $51,000. Call for more info! 541-350-7220

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides, Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $12,000, call 541-447-2498.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

8 ft. 11 in., fits shortbed, fully loaded, perfect cond., always covered, stove & oven hardly used dining tip out, elec. jacks, propane Onan generator, A/C, 2 awnings original owner, no smoking or pets $17,500 pics available (541)410-3658.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Jayco 29 Ft. BHS 2007, full slide out, awning, A/C, surround sound, master bdrm., and much more. $14,500. 541-977-7948 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Keystone Cougar 2003 33 ft. 12 ft. slide, 19 ft. awning, sleeps 8, 2 bdrms., elec./gas stove, large rear storage, outside util. shower, full kitchen & micro $12,500. Incl. skirting, very clean, located near Bend. 541-383-0494

Terry Manor 29’ 1989, extra’s, non smoker, $2500 OBO. Call for details. 541-508-6920.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920 Hitchiker II 1998, 32 ft. 5th wheel, solar system, too many extras to list, $12,500 Call 541-589-0767. Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

Interstate 2008, enclosed car carrier/util., 20x8.5’, GVWR !0K lbs., custom cabs. & vents loaded exc. cond. $6795. 605-593-2755 local.

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of May 10, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-776-3071.

Employment COMPANY DRIVERS- (Solo & Hazmat teams). *Great pay, *great miles, *CDL- A required. New to trucking? We will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. Call 866-692-2612. Swift. DRIVER- CURRENTLY hiring experienced teams with HazMat, Dry Van & Temp control available. O.O’s welcome. Call Covenant (866) 684-2519 or apply at www.covenantdrivers. com. Equal opportunity employer. SLT NEEDS class A team drivers with Hazmat. $2,000 bonus. Split $.68 for all miles. Owner operators paid up to $1.70 per mile. 1-800-835-9471.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/ 300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Painting, Wall Covering

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, Quality Work, Clean up & haul, repair & improve, fences, odd jobs, and more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Nelson Landscape Maintenance ON THE GROUND ALL FOUR SEASONS

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

885

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Barns

908

T Hangar for rent at Bend Airport, bi-fold doors. Call for more info., 541-382-8998.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

881

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Travel Trailers

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Alfa Fifth Wheel 1998 32 feet. Great Condition. New tires, awning, high ceilings. Used very little. A/C, pantry, TV included. Other extras. $13,000. Located in Burns, Oregon. 541-573-6875.

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Wheel & Tire, P185/75R14, 5 lug, $35. Call for more info., 541-410-4596

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

The Bulletin Classifieds

Fifth Wheels

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

541-322-7253

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Desert Fox Toy Hauler 2005 , 28’, exc. cond., ext. COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 ,

12 Ft. Sea King Boat and Trailer, $400 call for more info. 541-389-4411.

Chiloquin: 700 Acres reduced to $600,000 Millican: 270 Acres great horse property only $575,000 160 Acres: Outside of Hines hunting & more reduced to $449,000. Randy Wilson, United Country Real Estate. 541-589-1521.

21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

865

Eagle Crest, 3 bdrn., 2.5 bath reverse living, views, quiet, O-sized garage/workshop $409,000 owner will carry with down. 541-923-0908.

Sunriver/La Pine Homes

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Yamaha V-Star 1100 Custom 2005, less than 3K, exc. cond. $5400. 541-420-8005

Redmond Homes

755

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Snowmobiles

Northeast Bend Homes MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Mfd. Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appls., decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $4,995. 541-610-5799.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

Westside - 4 Units+ 2-2 bdrms., 2-1 bdrms.+ huge RV garage, good cash flow, $349,000. 1623 Knoll, Bend. 650-298-0093

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Autos & Transportation

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

541-389-4974

Fire Fuels Reduction

springtimeirrigation.com LCB: #6044, #10814 CCB: #86507

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Weekly Maintenance Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

382-3883

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Award Winning Design

Ask us about

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

Custom Tailored Maint. Irrigation Monitoring Spring & Fall Clean - ups Hardscapes Water Features Outdoor Kitchens Full Service Construction Low Voltage Lighting Start-ups & Winterization

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Proudly Serving Central Oregon Since 1980

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license. Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

*JAKE’S Yardscaping* Big or Small We Do It All! High Quality, Low Rates 18+Years Exp., Call Jake at 541-419-2985

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD Four Leaf Clover Lawn Service wants to get your

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

lawn off to a great start with our thatch & aeration process at 25% off. Experienced, knowledgable care. FREE Estimates, 541-504-8410 or 541-279-0746

COOKS CREATIVE MASONRY Stone projects of all types 23 yrs experience. Wayne, 541-815-1420. L#119139 www.cookscreativemasonry.com

MASONRY

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Moving and Hauling

Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Holmes Landscape Maint. Clean Ups, Dethatch, Aeration, Wweekly/Biweekly Maint. Free Bids, 15 Yrs. Exp. Call Josh, 541-610-6011.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. BIG RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tree Services Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


G4 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

MGB GT 1971, Valued at $4000, MGD Roadster 1973, Valued at $6000, MGA Roadster, Valued at $18,000, Great Collectors Cars, Make offer, 541-815-1573

Honda CRV 1998, AWD, 149K, auto., tow pkg., newer tires, picnic table incl., great SUV! $4800. 541-617-1888.

Ford F-150 EX Cab 2005

Chevy Tahoe 2008

4X4, Custom Wheels, Like New! VIN #A60699

3rd Seat, 4X4, New Wheels & Tires, Low Miles! VIN #100767

Only $16,888

Only $30,998

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,000, w/o winch $23,000, 541-325-2684

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Ford F250 1973, 2WD, 390, new tires, brakes, ps, rebuilt engine, exc. cond., extra parts, $1900. 541-536-2134.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Trailblazer 2005 4X4, Well Equipped and Low Miles! Vin #223182

Only $16,995

NISSAN

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

JEEP Grand Cherokee Laredo 1999 4x4, 6 cyl., auto, new tires, 1 owner, 123k mostly hwy mi., like new. KBB @ $6210. Best offer! 541-462-3282 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, new tires, all service records since new, great value, $16,999 OBO, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

541-385-5809 Smolich Auto Mall

933

Pickups

Smolich Auto Mall

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Vans

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, PRICE REDUCED TO $1300! Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Only $6,985

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR Dodge Cummins Diesel 2001, quad cab, 3/4 ton, exc. cond. $15,000. 1991 Coachman 29 ft. 5th wheel $3500 or both for $18.,000. 541-546-2453 or 541-546-3561.

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700 orig. mi., Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000 or trade for newer RV & cash; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Smolich Auto Mall

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Dodge Durango 2007

Only $22,568

Jeep Grand Limited Cherokee 2005 Managers Demo, Like New! 5.7 Hemi & Loaded! Vin #698994

Only $21,995

Ford E-250 Cargo Van 2007 Hard to Find, Long Van, Low Low Miles! Vin #A83753

Honda Civic LX, 2006, auto,, CD, black w/tan, all power, 48K, 1 owner, $12,500. OBO. 541-419-1069

Only $14,888

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

HYUNDAI 366

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $14,400, 541-388-3108.

SLT, 4X4, A Real Beauty With Lots of Extras. Vin #252936

Only $25,998

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

366

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $14,000, 541-447-2498

Porsche Carrera 1999, black metallic, 43K careful mi., beautiful, upgrades, Tiptronic $20,000. 610-5799.

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $7900 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Smolich Auto Mall

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Mercedes E320 2003, 35K!!! panoramic roof, $18,250. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

Volvo S40 Sedan 2009 Only 3900 Miles, Best Color! VIN #453938

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $27,888

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Subaru Legacy Outback 2001

Smolich Auto Mall

4X4, Well Maintained. Nice Equipment! Vin #653683

Only $11,995

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $31,500 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

NISSAN

Dodge Durango Limited 2005

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 2008

Leather, Fully Loaded, Local Trade! Vin #537556

Diesel, Hard to Find, Local Trade!! VIN #164571

Only $15,685

Only $26,875

smolichmotors.com

smolichmotors.com

541-749-4025 • DLR

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781 Dodge Sport 1/2-Ton 1999, 4X4, quad cab, Casset/CD Player, running boards, tinted windows A/C, cruise, all bells & whistles, etc., 98,837 mi., $5500, please call 541-420-2206.

541-389-1178 • DLR

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

HYUNDAI NISSAN

366

975

Toyota Tundra 2006,

Dodge Ram 1500 2007

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

smolichmotors.com

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com

Ford Thunderbird Convertible 2003, 5 spd. auto. trans, leather, exc. cond., 74K, $14,999. 541-848-8570

366

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Only $7995

Only $11,888

Saturn SC2 1994, sun roof, all leather, 5 spd., studless snow tires. $1200. 408-8611

4X4, Fully Loaded, Local Trade! VIN #551428

smolichmotors.com

5-spd, 83K, 4-dr, exc. cond, $4995, 541-410-4354

Hard to Find These! Very Nice, Well Equipped! Vin #316458

Fully Loaded, New Tires! Vin #M08818

541-749-4025 • DLR

Ford Focus ZTS 2004,

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

GMC Ex-Cab 1995 Diesel, 4X4, Canopy, Tow Pkg., The Works! Vin #

Nissan Maxima 2001

Mazda Tribute 2005

NAVIGATOR 2004 4x4 loaded 1 owner, 34k miles, like new, mineral gray, Lt parchment leather buckets. $21,500 OBO. 541-389-7108.

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

Toyota Avalon XLS 2001, 102K, all options incl. elec. stability control, great cond! $9880. 541-593-4042

Jaguar XJ6 1985, orig. 67,000 miles, British tan/tan leather interior, body & interior a 9, driven only in summer months, $4,000, call days 541-385-6861 private party.

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Mini Cooper 2003

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

Local Trade! Leather, Like New! Vin #E14182

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Only $11,888 HYUNDAI

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $12,500. 541-408-2111

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

KIA Spectra SX 2006, Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low 4 dr., 49K mi., $6500. mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. (530)310-2934, La Pine.

LEXUS ES300 1999

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

366

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

152K mi., auto., A/C, 6 CD, AM/FM, leather, new timing belt, water pump, hydraulic tensioner and valve. Exc. cond., reg. maint.,

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

(541) 520-8013.

$6900 OBO

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D508746 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 1044718658/CHAPMAN Investor No: 4000863617 AP #1: 243622 Title #: 4375877 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by NEIL CHAPMAN, KRISTINE CHAPMAN as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK O F IN as Beneficiary. Dated June 23, 2006, Recorded July 31, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-52080 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 6, BADGER CROSSING, PHASES I & II, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 10/01/09 TO 02/01/10 @ 1,921.90 $9,609.50 4 L/C FROM 10/16/09 TO 01/16/10 @ 96.10 $384.40 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $73.50 RECOVERABLE BALANCE DUE IN THE AMOUNT OF $150.00 $150.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$10,217.40 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 20059 BADGER RD., BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $275,931.97, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 09/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 22, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/12/10 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 897112 PUB: 05/06/10, 05/13/10, 05/20/10, 05/27/10

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9771 T.S. No.: 1273086-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8813 T.S. No.: 1268611-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Greg Leagjeld, as Grantor to Janet Rinaldi, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Carnegie Mortgage LLC, as Beneficiary, dated August 04, 2008, recorded September 08, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-36952 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 1, block 9, Meadowview Estates Forth Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2129 NE Edgewood Street Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,173.29 Monthly Late Charge $55.54. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $176,026.01 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 05, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 30, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 6, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason R. Jordan and Elizabeth A Jordan, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 02, 2007, recorded August 09, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-43853 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot ninety-five (95), Huntington Meadows Phases 5 and 6, recorded February 21, 2006, in cabinet G, page 1061, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16435 Riley Dr. La Pine OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,384.95 Monthly Late Charge $54.47. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $174,403.98 together with interest thereon at 7.490% per annum from September 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 02, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 3, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

R-306814 04/29/10, 05/06, 05/13, 05/20

R-305481 04/22/10, 04/29, 05/06, 05/13


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 13, 2010 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE 1333-10- Culinary Food Service Equipment Sealed bids for Culinary Food Service Equipment for Central Oregon Community College will be accepted by Gene Zinkgraf, Director of Construction, at the Campus Center building, room 219, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 until 4:00PM, Tuesday, May 25, at which time all bids will be opened and publicly read aloud. Bids received after the time fixed for receiving bids cannot and will not be considered. For the project, a lump sum bid will be received on forms provided in these Specifications. One complete set of Drawings and Project Manual may be ordered by bidders from Ford Graphics, upon deposit of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00). Additional sets or partial sets may be purchased for cost of reproducing same, paid before or at time of delivery. Deposits made upon procurement of Drawings and Project Manuals will be refunded upon return thereof in good condition to Ford Graphics by actual bidders within two weeks after opening of bids and to non-bidders if returned no later than one week prior to bid opening. Ford Graphics: Portland - 401 N.W. 14th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209 | Tel: 503.227.3424 Fax: 503.223.4254 Bend - 1151 S.E. Centennial Ct. #3 Bend, OR 97702 | Tel: 541.749.2151 Fax: 541.749.2154 Specifications may also be viewed at the following plan centers: Central Oregon Builders Exchange, Bend Oregon; Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, Oregon; Eugene Builders Exchange, Eugene Oregon; Salem Contractors Exchange, Salem Oregon. No bid will be considered unless fully completed in the manner provided in the BIDDING PROCEDURES upon Bid Form provided in these Specifications, and accompanied by certified check or bid bond executed in favor of Owner in amount not less than 10 percent of total amount of bid. Said certified check or bid bond shall be forfeited as fixed and liquidated damages should bidder neglect or refuse to enter into Contract and provide suitable bond for faithful performance of Work in event Contract is awarded to contractor. All bids submitted shall contain a statement as to whether the bidder is a resident or non-resident bidder, as defined in ORS279.A.120. No bidder may withdraw his bid after the hour set for the opening thereof and before award of the Contract, unless award is delayed beyond forty-five (45) days from the bid opening date. The College may waive any or all informalities and irregularities, may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public procurement procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding of the College that it is in the public interest to do so. Central Oregon Community College is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Dated this MAY 10, 2010 PUBLICATION AND DATES: Bend Bulletin, Bend, OR Portland Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, OR First Advertisement DAY, MAY 10, 2010 Second Advertisement DAY, MAY 13, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT In the Matter of the Estate of PATRICIA I. DAVID, Deceased. Case No.: 10-PB-0039-SF NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Lauraliegh David Koker, undersigned, has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at the Albertazzi Law Firm, 44 NW Irving Ave., Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Anthony V. Albertazzi. Dated and first published May 13, 2010. Lauraliegh David Koker Personal Representative Albertazzi Law Firm 44 NW Irving Ave. Bend, Oregon 97701 (541) 317-0231 LEGAL NOTICE In the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes. In the matter of the estate of John L. Williams, Deceased. Case # 10PB0036BH. Notice to interested persons. Notice is hereby given that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned attorney for the personal representative, Will Dennis, Attorney at Law, 141 NW Greenwood Ave., Ste. 100, Bend OR 97701, within 4 months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Will Dennis, Attorney at Law, P.C., 141 NW Greenwood Ave., Ste. 100, Bend OR 97701, 541-3883877. Dated & first published on April 29, 2010. Personal Representative, Donald L. Williams

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10986 T-10986 filed by Craig and Patricia A. Apregan, P.O. Box 2184, Sisters, OR 97759, proposes a change in point of diversion under Certificates 81477 and 85970. The rights allow the combined use of 0.339 cubic foot per second (priority date November 1904) from Whychus Creek in Sec. 29, T 15 S, R 10 E, W.M. for irrigation in Sec. 26. The applicant proposes to move the point of diversion approximately 1.5 miles downstream to Sec. 21, T 15 S, R 10 E, W.M. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is May 27, 2010. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No.: 1117080249 T.S. No.: 7100748 Reference is made to that certain deed made by Gordon D. Jenness and Debra-Diane Jennes, Husband and Wife as Grantor to Commonwealth Land Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, dated 7/17/2007, recorded 10/10/2007, in the official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-54385 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to wit: Lot 6, Block 12, Starwood, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 64736 Alcor Place, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's failure to: Make the monthly payments of $1,120.54 each, commencing with the payment due on 9/1/2009 and continuing each month until this trust deed is reinstated or goes to trustee's sale; plus a late charge of $56.03 on each installment not paid within fifteen days following the payment due date; trustee's fees and other costs and expenses associated with this foreclosure and any fur-

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. DAVID M. COLLINS; MARIKA S. COLLINS; GENE ROEDIGER; DOROTHY ROEDIGER; JAMES LEVOE; GERALDINE LASSNER; DONALD ALUMBAUGH; ANN ALUMBAUGH; PHILIP J. ONORI AND LOUISE A. ONORI, TRUSTEES OF THE PHILIP J. ONORI AND LOUISE A. ONORI FAMILY TRUST; Occupants of the Premises; and any and all persons claiming an interest in the Property, Defendants. Case No. 09CV0861ST SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO THE DEFENDANTS: DAVID M. COLLINS AND ANY AND ALL PERSONS CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT: In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is May 13, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the plaintiff requests that the plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: PARCEL ONE (1) OF A PARTITION PLAT NO. 2003-63, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19100 Couch Market Road, Bend, OR, 97701. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by , its successors in interest and/or assigns, plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 3535 Factoria Blvd. SE, Suite 200 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com NOTICE Pursuant to the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act: If you are the consumer who originally contracted the debt or if you assumed the debt, then you are notified that: 1. As of the 24th day of May, 2010, the total amount owed is $825,739.50. Because of interest, late charges, and other charges that may vary from day to day, the amount due on the day you pay may be greater. Hence, if you pay the amount shown above, an adjustment may be necessary after we receive your check. For further information, write or call Routh Crabtree Olsen, P.S. 2. The creditor to whom the debt is owed is BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP FKA Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. 3. Unless within 30 days after receipt of this notice you dispute the debt or any portion of it, we will assume the debt to be valid. 4. If you notify us within 30 days after receipt of this notice that you dispute the debt or any part of it, we shall obtain verification of the debt and mail it to you. 5. If you request validation of the debt within 30 days after receipt of this notice, we will provide you with the name and address of the original creditor, if different from the current creditor. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. I hereby certify that the within is a true copy of the original summons in the within entitled action. By: Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorney for Plaintiff

ther breach of any term or condition contained in subject note and deed of trust. By the reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The principal sum of $171,031.78 together with the interest thereon at the rate 6.625% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on 8/27/2010 at the hour of 11:00 A.M., Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the Front Entrance Entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured (and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee). Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes; has the right to

have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. In construing this, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed; the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 4/26/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee C/O Max Default Services Corporation 43180 Business Park Drive, Ste. A103 Temecula, CA 92590 (619)465-8200 DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# 3544826 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 501288943 Title Order No: 4430907 T.S. No.: OR05000072-10-1 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAVID DOUGLAS WAYLAND as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ASPEN MORTGAGE GROUP as Lender and

MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as Beneficiary, recorded on December 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-79744 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 206377 LOT TWENTY (20), RIVERRIM P.U.D., PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19604 GREATWOOD LOOP, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; Monthly Payment $1725.13 Monthly Late Charge $86.26 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 197,531.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.37500 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, the undersigned trustee will on September 7, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by

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section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default

complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 27, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY MARIA DELATORRE, ASST SEC C/O TRUSTEE CORPS 2112 BUSINESS CENTER DRIVE, 2ND FLOOR, IRVINE, CA 92612 For Sale information contact: (714) 573-1965, (714) 573 7777, (949) 252 8300 State of California County of Orange On 04/27/10, before me, Laura A. Kennedy, (name and title of the officer), personally appeared Maria De La Torre, who proved to me on the

basis of satisfactory evidence to be the person(s) whose name(s) is/are subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged to me that he/she/they executed the same in his/her/their authorized capacity(ies), and that by his/her/their signature(s) on the instrument the person(s), or entity upon behalf of which the person(s) acted, executed the instrument. I certify under Penalty or Perjury under the laws of the State of California that the foregoing paragraph is true and correct. WITNESS my hand and official seal, Signature Laura A. Kennedy, Notary Public My Comm. Expires Oct 27, 2012 THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3550804 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-354914-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DON R. DUNN AND JUDIE A. DUNN , AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR WILMINGTON FINANCE, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 10/19/2006, recorded 10/24/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 200671043, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 123373 LOTS 9 AND 10, BLOCK 13, TOWNS1TE OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 234 SOUTHWEST 9TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 1/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,545.10 Monthly Late Charge $77.26 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $214,534.13 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.5000 per annum from 12/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 8/26/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 8/26/2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one- year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 7/27/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you.YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 4/20/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature BY: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NonSale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3540366 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010

Published 5-13-10


G6 Thursday, May 13, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031761331 T.S. No.: 10-08690-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL E. WETTSTEIN as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on April 6, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-19920 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 195560 LOT ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-THREE (133), AWBREY GLEN HOMESITES, PHASE SIX, CITY OF BEND, RECORDED MAY 14 1998, IN CABINET E, PAGE 24, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 3504 NW CONRAD DR., BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $2,772.30 Monthly Late Charge $138.62 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $1,048,145.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.39400 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 10, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time

prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 15, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lisa Bradford ASAP# 3536221 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031615289 T.S. No.: 10-08641-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHELLY GARROUTTE as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on February 21, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-10669 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 100525 LOT TWELVE IN BLOCK TWO OF NORTH PILOT BUTTE ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1324 NE DEMPSEY DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,095.66 Monthly Late Charge $44.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $308,204.54 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.03200 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 9, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby

secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 15, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TlTLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lisa Bradford ASAP# 3536206 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0572187607 T.S. No.: OR-236204-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHEAREEN B. REDLENER as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/15/2004, recorded 9/15/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-55541 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 103279 LOT 1, BLOCK 11, RIVER TERRACE ADDITION DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1585 NW 1ST STREET BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $148,576.67; plus accrued interest plus impounds and /

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-104064 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by James W. Lovelace and Catherine M. Lovelace, as grantor to Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fidelity Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated October 26, 2006, recorded November 8, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 74148, beneficial interest having been assigned to HSBC Bank USA, National Association, as Indenture Trustee for the registered Noteholders of Renaissance Home Equity Loan Trust 2006-4, as covering the following described real property: Lot Fifteen (15), Block Three (3), North Pilot Butte Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 1323 N.E. Drost Drive, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3): the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,378.44, from December 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,381.03, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $170,419.59, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.89% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 19, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of die sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term tease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 20, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right lo apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR, 16037 S.W. Upper Bonnes Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, Phone (503) 620-0222, Toll-free 1-800-452-8260 Website: http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 4-16-2010 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone:(360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104064 ASAP# 3536318 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010, 06/03/2010

or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $913.09 Monthly Late Charge $37.69 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $148,576.67 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed,

the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3409203 04/22/2010, 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010

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Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FFF-93464 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CLIFFORD O. GRAY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of FINANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FUNDING CORPORATION, A SUBSIDIARY OF INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., as beneficiary, dated 9/7/2007, recorded 9/12/2007, under Instrument No. 2007Â49686, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FINAN-

CIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT THIRTY-FOUR (34), BLOCK EIGHT (8), C.L. & D. RANCH TRACT, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 51414 ASH ROAD LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 20, 2010 Total Amount Due $ 38,673.75 Accrued Late Charges $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 38,673.75 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 1/14/2009, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 7 (A), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 20, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT THE FOREGOING INSTRUMENT SHALL CONSTITUTE NOTICE, PURSUANT TO ORS 86.740, THAT THE GRANTOR OF THE TRUST DEED DESCRIBED BELOW HAS DEFAULTED ON ITS OBLIGATIONS TO BENEFICIARY, AND THAT THE BENEFICIARY AND SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE UNDER THE TRUST DEED HAVE ELECTED TO SELL THE PROPERTY SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain deed of trust dated August 15, 2008, and recorded on January 5, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-00182 in the property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein JOHN V. MCCLEAN, an Individual, and MCCLEAN DEVELOPMENT CORP., an Oregon corporation is the Grantor, and WESTERN TITLE is the original Trustee, and HOME FEDERAL BANK, as successor in interest to COMMUNITY FIRST BANK, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lots 22, 23, 24, 25, and 26, SIX PEAKS-PHASE 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 1336, 1348, 1360, 1368 & 1376 SW 27th Street, Bend, OR 97701. The tax parcel number(s) are: 242766 (Lot 22), 242765 (Lot 23). 242764 (Lot 24), 242763 (Lot 25), and 242762 (Lot 26). The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DAVID W. CRISWELL, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: David W. Criswell, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY GRANTOR AND ELECTION TO SELL: There are continuing and uncured defaults by the Grantor that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: (1) The Loan secured by the Deed of Trust matured on August 15, 2009, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Grantor to Lender. Grantor has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $680,528.68 (the "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $600,902.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including February 19, 2010 of $79,483.68 plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $143.00. Interest on account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after February 19, 2010, at a rate that is currently 18% percent per annum or $296.34 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. (2) As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of your Deed of Trust. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments. Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of February 19, 2010: $600,902.00; Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of February 19, 2010: $79,483.68; Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses to February 19, 2010: $143.00; TOTAL DUE: $680,528.68. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $680,528.68, as of February 19, 2010, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on July 15, 2010, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. DATED February 22, 2010 By: David W. Criswell, OSB 92593, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219, Telephone: (503) 228-2525, Facsimile: (503) 295-1058, Email: dcriswell@balljanik.com.

have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/20/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com SAP# 3540579 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031618960 T.S. No.: 10-08706-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ROBBI AMBER THORNE as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS,

INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on February 26, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-11491 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 247248 LOT ONE (1), COPPER SPRINGS ESTATES PHASE 1, RECORDED FEBRUARY 10, 2005, IN CABINET G, PAGE 604, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 20561 BUTTON BRUSH AVENUE, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735{3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,122.97 Monthly Late Charge $56.15 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 174,003.86 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.37500 % per annum from December 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 12, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further

given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Lorena Enriquez, Authorized Signor ASAP# 3542749 04/29/2010, 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010

Where buyers meet sellers. Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Terry Steckman and Judy Steckman Tenants by the Entirety, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow Co., as trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage a division of National City Bank, as beneficiary, dated 09/25/06, recorded 09/29/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-66168 Loan Mod 10/28/08 AF #2008-43497 and subsequently assigned to by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section Thirty-one (31), Township Sixteen (16) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at a point on the high water line of the Deschutes River whence the South Quarter corner of said Section 31 bears South 15 degrees 25' 45" West, 5146.1 feet; thence around a 4 degree curve to the right, 506.67 feet to a 1/2 inch iron pipe in said road right of way; thence North 06 degrees 23' 30" West, 261.02 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING for this description; thence continuing North 06 degrees 23' 30" West, 30.00 feet; thence North 78 degrees 13' 12" West, 474.80 feet, more or less, to the high water line of Deschutes River; thence Southerly along said high water line, 125 feet, more or less, to the intersection with a line that bears South 88 degrees 57' 30" East and passes through the true point of beginning; thence South 88 degrees 57' 30" East, 500 feet, more or less, to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. More accurately described as: PARCEL 1: A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section Thirty-one (31), Township Sixteen (16) South, Range Twelve (12) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County , Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at a point on the high water line of the Deschutes River whence the South Quarter corner of said Section 31 bears South 15 degrees 25' 45" West, 5146.1 feet; thence around a 4 degree curve to the right, 506.67 feet to a 1/2 inch iron pipe in said road right of way; thence North 06 degrees 23' 30" West, 261.02 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING for this description; thence continuing North 06 degrees 23' 30" West, 30.00 feet; thence North 78 degrees 13' 12" West, 474.80 feet, more or less, to the high water line of Deschutes River; thence Southerly along said high water line, 125 feet, more or less, to the intersection with a line that bears South 88 degrees 57' 30" East and passes through the true point of beginning; thence South 88 degrees 57' 30" East, 500 feet, more or less, to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: An easement for roadway purposes, set forth in instrument recorded December 20, 1973, Volume 201, Page 795, Official Records Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 64775 Laidlaw Lane Bend Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $5,768.73 beginning 10/01/09; plus late charges of $267.32 each month beginning 10/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $31.55; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $827,839.68 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75 percent per annum beginning 09/01/09; plus late charges of $267.32 each month beginning 10/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $31.55; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 2, 2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quo tes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 3, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.ors/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: April 6, 2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. By Chris Ashcraft Assistant Vice President, Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22295/Steckman, Terry and Judy ASAP# 3521796 05/06/2010, 05/13/2010, 05/20/2010, 05/27/2010


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/13/10