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Primary likely will decide who speaks for District 55 in Legislature

WALLS RISE at new high school in Redmond

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — For voters who care about the outcome of the race for state House District 55, the election will essentially be over in May, not November. Republicans enjoy a commanding majority in the sprawling area Inside that includes • More on the Crook and candidates, Lake counties, Page A4 as well as portions of Deschutes, Jackson and Klamath. They make up 46 percent of the district’s 35,264 voters, compared to just 29 percent for Democrats. In fact, no Democrats bothered to file for the seat this year, continuing a trend that started three elections ago, in 2004. In the Republican primary, lawyer Mike McLane, of Powell Butte, is taking on Prineville mayor Mike Wendel. See District 55 / A4

PRG recently closed; Bend police are investigating following owner’s disclosure of $150K embezzlement By Andrew Moore

ELECTION

Gamble, luck in saving teen shot in chest By Lauran Neergaard The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — He felt like he was suffocating, struggling to breathe despite the bullet hole in his chest. Shot in the aorta — near where the body’s biggest artery leaves the heart — somehow 16-year-old Dimitrios Philliou didn’t bleed to death before the ambulance screeched up to the hospital. So doctors took a gamble: Could they save him, not with huge open surgery that itself can kill, but with a patch snaked inside his torn-up aorta? See Shot / A5

TOP NEWS INSIDE IRAQ: Vote recount OK’d; top al-Qaida leaders reported killed, Page A3

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ne of the largest cranes in the Northwest lifts a wall panel into place Monday at the new high school in southwest Redmond. The wall panels weigh up to 183,000 pounds, with the largest measuring 58 feet tall. But that’s hardly a challenge for the crane, which can extend to 200 feet and lift 500 tons — or about 1.1 million pounds. Over about three weeks this spring, the

crane will install 172 wall panels, according to a news release from the Redmond School District. The school district is building the new school, which is set to open in fall 2012, with money from the $110 million bond voters passed in 2008. Once the walls are in place, construction crews will begin installing steel support beams and the roof. — Patrick Cliff, The Bulletin

The investigation into PRG Property Management has expanded, with the Bend Police Department saying more than 50 victims could be ensnared in what it believes may be a case of aggravated theft. In addition, several victims have contacted The Bulletin saying they have lost thousands of dollars in the wake of PRG’s abrupt closure April 9 by its owner, Elizabeth J. Rose. Attempts to contact Rose have been unsuccessful. She has not been arrested or charged with any crime. In September, Rose confessed to embezzling $150,000 from the company to investigators with the Oregon Real Estate Agency, according to an Oct. 5 investigative report issued by the agency. The report states Rose told investigators she put the money “back into the company” in order to pay workers and taxes. Agency investigators notified the Bend Police Department the same day of the confession, but the department did not open an investigation into the matter until April 12. The department maintains it couldn’t open an investigation until a victim had been identified, and it was relying on the agency to find one. The report also states Rose’s husband, Gary Rose, was a retired Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputy and that Bend Police Sgt. Brian Kindel, who learned of the confession from the agency, knew Gary Rose. See Property / A4

WORK AND THE RECESSION

David Walter Banks / New York Times News Service

Michael Sinclair is contracted by the marketing department of a health care manufacturing company. “I think it’s far less risky than being in a full-time job somewhere and cut at will and left with nothing,” he says.

Once reluctant, many now embrace part-time jobs New York Times News Service

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NORCROSS, Ga. — Michael Sinclair knows that in a few months, his stint in the marketing department of a health care manufacturing company north of Atlanta is set to end. He has been with the company for only six months, but he is not dismayed. In fact, he actually prefers his life as an independent contractor — constantly being laid off and rehired, sometimes juggling multiple jobs — to his old corporate position. “I think it’s far less risky than being in a fulltime job somewhere and cut at will and left with nothing,” Sinclair said. “I see this as the way more people will work in the future.” Economists believe that Sinclair’s situation has become increasingly common. What is known as “contingent work,” or “flexible” and “alternative” staffing arrangements, has proliferated, although exact figures are hard to come by. Many people are apparently looking at multiple temporary jobs as the equivalent of a diversified investment portfolio. See Contractors / A5


A2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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ATLANTA — U.S. airlines never met a fee they didn’t like. Until now, it seems. Five major carriers on Sunday agreed not to follow the lead of a small Florida airline that plans to charge for carry-on bags. Their commitment comes just in time to keep travelers from running for the exits during the peak summer flying season, but it is doubtful that it marks a change in strategy. Airlines are going to tack on every fee they feel they can get away with because it bolsters their revenue stream while allowing them to keep base fares lower. They just don’t feel like passengers will tolerate losing their sacred free carry-ons — at least not right now. The promise to New York Sen. Charles Schumer from American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, US Airways and JetBlue Airways comes despite the fact that some of those same airlines are expected to report first-quarter losses next week. They were stung by higher fuel prices and the heavy February snowstorms. Ancillary fees for air travel — including baggage fees, reservation change fees and other miscellaneous operating revenue — have been piling up. For U.S. carriers they totaled $1.95 billion in the third quarter of 2009, roughly 36 percent higher than for the same period a year earlier. For 26 large U.S. airlines, those fees made up 6.9 percent of their total operating revenue in the third quarter of last year, according to the most recent government data available. But major carriers risk alienating customers if they follow Spirit Airlines’ lead and impose a fee on carry-on bags. In August,

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BALTIMORE — Fiona Kramer, looking fashionable in a little black dress, sized up her possible matches and told them why they ought to see themselves with her in the near future: two bedrooms, 1 ½ baths, cute yard. Date, shmate. A good roommate can be hard to find, and that’s the reason Kramer and a dozen others — some with homes, some looking for homes — were chatting last weekend at a “speed roommating” event in Baltimore. It’s like speed dating, except the point wasn’t romance. “It’s smart to help split the expenses,” said Kramer, who lives in Baltimore’s Washington Hill neighborhood. “Why not meet somebody and see if it’s worth doing? It might work out, right?” Lots of people are looking to double up — or triple or quadruple up — these days. Living alone is a luxury that fewer people can afford in this economic downturn, with unemployment near 10 percent nationally and personal income falling. A new study of 80 U.S. metro areas found that the number of households fell by 1.2 million between 2005 and 2008 even as population rose. The recession has so severely shaken people’s lives that it could be 2012 before Americans start forming new households at a normal rate, Gary Painter of the University of Southern California wrote in an April report for the Mortgage Bankers Association. That makes roommate-finding a growth industry. Online roommate services abound, from Roommates.com to GetARoomie. com. “We’re busier than ever,” said Susie Stein, owner of Roommate Finders, a Florida firm that matches roommates across the country. Face-to-face events modeled after speed dating, meanwhile, are popping up across the

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

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The numbers drawn are:

6 30 35 37 41 42 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $3.6 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Spirit will begin charging customers up to $45 to place a bag in an overhead bin. Other fees haven’t stopped people from flying, but many can be avoided. Carry-on bag fees would be hard to avoid. “We believe it is something that’s important to our customers and they value, and we will continue making that available to them at no charge,” American Airlines spokesman Roger Frizzell said. It wasn’t clear how long the five airlines had pledged not to charge for carry-ons. Frizzell couldn’t say, and a spokesman

for Delta declined to comment. Schumer and five other Democratic senators — New Hampshire’s Jeanne Shaheen, Maryland’s Ben Cardin, Minnesota’s Amy Klobuchar, and New Jersey’s Robert Menendez and Frank Lautenberg — support legislation that would tax airlines if they charge carry-on bag fees. Schumer said the legislation will move forward until it becomes clear that no airline will institute the charges. He will have an uphill battle changing the minds of Spirit executives when he meets with them soon. Spirit CEO Ben Baldanza told

The Associated Press on Sunday that his airline is moving ahead with its carry-on bag fee. “Our plan was never predicated on anyone matching us,” Baldanza said. “The fact that other people are saying they won’t has never changed our view that this is right.” He said his competitors’ decision actually puts pressure on those airlines because Spirit has lowered its fares more than the price of the new fee. “We knew we took a risk with this strategy, but we believe on balance it’s one that our customers will buy into,” Baldanza said.

Analysts expect several major carriers to get back in the black in the current quarter — the second quarter — and in the second half of the year, thanks to the summer and holiday travel rushes. They wouldn’t want anything like an uproar over carry-on bag fees to keep passengers from flying. Even so, for the financial improvement airlines have seen to be sustainable, revenue needs to keep rising — either through higher fares, more fees or both — and airlines need to better position themselves in case fuel prices spike even higher. On the last day of the first quarter — March 31 — the price of a barrel of oil closed at $83.76, more than 68 percent higher than on the same day a year earlier. That means if major carriers don’t charge for carry-ons, they could increase existing fees or institute new fees altogether. Any way you cut it, that adds up to less money in the pockets of U.S. air travelers. “As a practical matter, as industry conditions change and if profitability is further challenged, we’re likely to see some sort of price increase,” aviation consultant Mark Kiefer said.

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Passengers wait to check in at Logan International Airport in Boston in December. Five major airlines have agreed not to institute fees for carry-on luggage, thought it is unclear how long the pledge is for. The five airlines are American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, US Airways and JetBlue Airways.

‘Speed roommating’ events bring cost-cutters together under one roof By Jamie Smith Hopkins

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The announcement by a small Florida airline that it would begin charging fees for carryon bags fueled fears that other airlines would follow suit.

The Baltimore Sun

world. A British company called SpareRoom holds 10 “SpeedFlatmating” gatherings in London bars every month, including one on the West End that attracts about 150 people every other week. And some American colleges have turned to the concept to fill on-campus housing before resorting to random assignments. “It’s kind of funny in this age of social networking, where students sit at computers and talk to their friends on Facebook and text and sometimes don’t even pick up the phone, how successful these face-to-face interactions are,” said Jenny Rickard, the community director of an apartment complex on the Binghamton University campus in New York. Live Baltimore Home Center, a nonprofit that encourages people to live in the city, held its speed roommating event last Saturday after getting requests from newcomers and apartment managers to act as a matchmaker. “You’re living with the person — you want to make sure that you gel,” said Anna Custer, Live Baltimore’s executive director. Mark Nowowiejski found four roommates in the last five years through Craigslist, the free classified ad site, and that’s worked for him. He first looked for someone when he realized that getting a two-bedroom rental in Fells Point with a roommate would be cheaper than a one-bedroom alone. Now he owns a home in White Marsh, Md., and still rents out a room. Having a roommate isn’t a financial necessity anymore, “but it’s nice,” said Nowowiejski, a graphic artist in his early 30s. “It’s expensive to live by yourself — it’s not so much just the rent, but the heating, the Internet, the cable and so forth,” he said. “It’s a lot easier to have that split two ways.” His strategy for finding a boarder is a cross between a job interview and a happy-hour con-

versation. He runs a credit check on candidates and makes sure they don’t have a criminal background, but he also chats with them about everything from music to football. “They don’t have to be a (Baltimore) Ravens fan,” Nowowiejski allowed. “They just can’t be (Pittsburgh) Steelers or (Washington) Redskins fans. I can’t live with that.” At Live Baltimore’s speed roommating, one part of a larger renter event last weekend, the common pet peeve was messiness. “They’re wonderful, I love them, but they never clean the house,” Cristina Munk, 23, said of her current roommates — who happen to be her friends. Munk was visiting from New York, talking with potential roommates here in case she decides to pursue a master’s degree at the Johns Hopkins University in the fall. Steve Gondol, who organized the event for Live Baltimore, shepherded everyone into facing chairs and gave them a list of possible questions to ask each other — from “Do you like pets?” to “Are you a vegetarian?” Participants had five minutes to chat. Then Gondol rang a cowbell and people swapped seats. Munk was assured by Scheree McDonald, who is moving to the area from New Jersey and is looking for a place as well as a roommate, that there would be no dirtiness in any home of hers. “Oh, I clean,” McDonald said, when Munk explained that her current roommates have other priorities. Live Baltimore handed out pink “roommate match” sheets for participants to record answers and note their bottom-line response: Would they be interested in living with that person, Yes or No? Everybody got at least one match. For some, who got more than one, the event exceeded expectations. Kramer, the Washington

Hill resident with a two-bedroom rowhome, liked the look of every person she met. “I put ‘yes’ to everybody,” she said.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 A3

T S VOLCANIC ASH FALLOUT

N 

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Amid criticism, Europe plans to relax ban on air traffic

Long Island man convicted in hate killing RIVERHEAD, N.Y. — A jury on Monday found Jeffrey Conroy guilty of first-degree manslaughter as a hate crime but acquitted him of murder in the November 2008 stabbing death of Ecuadorean immigrant Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue, N.Y. In the highly publicized case that drew national attention and cast a harsh light on ethnic tensions in Suffolk County, Conroy, 19, of Medford, N.Y., was convicted following four weeks of testimony from more than two dozen witnesses. He faces a maximum of 8-to25 years in a state prison on the charge — the most severe crime of which Conroy was convicted. Conroy was acquitted on the top charges of second-degree murder as a hate crime and second-degree murder. Both of those charges carry a maximum punishment of 25 years to life.

Shuttle landing nixed, rescheduled for today ORLANDO, Fla. — NASA officials scrubbed Discovery’s two landing attempts Monday at Kennedy Space Center because of poor weather. Weather conditions at Cape Canaveral have been an issue all morning. Discovery was waved off its first landing attempt at 8:48 a.m. EDT, and officials said they hoped weather would clear for the second attempt at 10:23 a.m. However, low visibility, cloud cover and off-shore rain showers prevented Discovery’s crew from coming home. The crew will try again today with landing opportunities at both Kennedy Space Center and Edwards Air Force Base in California. While there are also landing opportunities on Wednesday, weather is not expected to be an issue today at either location.

Gun advocates gather in Virginia park ALEXANDRIA, Va. — Several dozen Second Amendment advocates — many with loaded handguns on their hips and rifles dangling from their shoulders — gathered in a park within view of the U.S. Capitol building on Monday, marking a day of protest against what activists called dangerous breeches of the U.S. Constitution. “It’s paid for in blood and, if necessary, we’ll defend it in blood!” said Bob Wright, one of the speakers at the “Restore the Constitution” protest at Gravelly Point, a national park just across the Potomac River from Washington. Organizers said they chose the spot to highlight what they see as unconstitutional gun laws. A recent law allows gun owners to carry firearms in some national parks, while openly carrying guns is prohibited under the District of Columbia’s strict gun laws. Organizers said it’s the first armed rally in a national park since the law passed. Other, unarmed, advocates rallied on the National Mall.

Air Force, in reversal, will discharge lesbian WASHINGTON — Reversing an earlier decision, the Air Force said Monday it intends to discharge a lesbian Air Force officer who had remained in the military despite openly declaring her homosexuality. An Air Force general earlier this year concluded that Lt. Robin Chaurasiya should not be discharged, saying she had declared her sexual orientation for the purpose of avoiding military service. But after Chaurasiya spoke publicly about that decision, the Air Force announced a further review. On Monday, Air Force officials told Chaurasiya that a more senior officer, Gen. Raymond Johns Jr., reversed the earlier decision and recommended she be honorably discharged. “I am kind of heartbroken,” Chaurasiya said. “I felt my situation was hinting at changes. I really thought I would be able to lead the way for a more equal military.” — From wire reports

By Steven Erlanger and Nicola Clark New York Times News Service

The Associated Press file photo

Electoral workers check ballot box seals in March at a counting center in Baghdad. Iraq’s election commission said Monday that votes cast in Baghdad in the country’s March 7 parliamentary election will be recounted after a complaint by incumbent Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

Iraqi ballots cast in Baghdad to be recounted, panel orders By Ned Parker Los Angeles Times

BAGHDAD — An Iraqi judicial panel on Monday ordered a manual recount of some 2.5 million ballots cast in Baghdad in last month’s national election, an action requested by Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s alliance, which had filed allegations of vote fraud. The legal decision raised the possibility that al-Maliki’s Shiitedominated coalition would now be awarded more parliamentary seats than his rival Ayad Allawi’s secular coalition, which had stunned the nation by winning a slim plurality in the March 7 vote. But it also raised fears that if the results are overturned, Iraq’s minority Sunni Arab population, which had turned out in large numbers to cast ballots for former prime minister Allawi, would view the election as stolen and launch a new revolt. On Monday, al-Maliki, whose State of Law coalition had won fewer parliament seats than expected, described the recount as a way to assure voters the results

Top al-Qaida leaders are reported killed BAGHDAD — The U.S. and Iraq claimed a major victory against al-Qaida on Monday, saying their forces killed the terror group’s two top figures in this country in an air and ground assault on their safehouse near Saddam Hussein’s hometown. Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki announced the killings of Abu Omar al-Baghdadi and Abu Ayyub al-Masri at a news conference and showed photographs of their bloody corpses. U.S. officials later confirmed the deaths, which Vice President Joe Biden called a “potentially devastatwere legitimate. “This is a victory for the blocs who made the complaints and a victory for the rights of Iraqi people who were complaining about their votes,” al-Maliki said at a news conference.

ing blow” to al-Qaida in Iraq. The organization has proven resilient in the past, showing a remarkable ability to change tactics and adapt — most notably after its brutal founder, Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, was killed nearly four years ago in a U.S. airstrike. Still, some analysts contend, the group was far stronger then and would likely have a harder time now replenishing its leadership. “The death of these terrorists is potentially the most significant blow to al-Qaida in Iraq since the beginning of the insurgency,” said Gen. Raymond Odierno, the top U.S. commander in Iraq. — The Associated Press American and other foreign observers have said that the March election appeared to have been run fairly, while al-Maliki’s supporters accused the CIA and State Department of working to help Allawi.

SUPREME COURT

Stevens, 90, passes all but Holmes By Mark Sherman The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — His tenure on the Supreme Court touched four decades, following service in a war that defined his generation and a childhood in a prominent family. He celebrated his 90th birthday among court colleagues at least a dozen years younger. Until today, Oliver Wendell Holmes was the only American who fit that description. Now,

John Paul Stevens becomes the second Supreme Court justice to mark his 90th birthday on the court. Stevens’ recent announcement that he will retire this summer, a few months after turning 90, means Holmes will remain the court’s oldest justice. He retired two months shy of his 91st birthday in 1932. There are similarities between the two justices that extend well beyond their longevity.

Judge Wood’s critics Court continues to resist TV pressure focus on abortion If President Barack Obama nominates U.S. Circuit Judge Diane P. Wood to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, social conservatives say they intend to make her rulings on abortion rights the primary point of contention. “That’s her Achilles’ heel,” said Curt Levey, executive director of the Committee for Justice, which opposes Wood’s rulings on abortion. “It tells you that she’s probably not going to be selected, because Obama doesn’t have the stomach for this to be about an abortion debate.” Obama’s intentions remain unclear, but Levey’s comments encapsulate a message that Wood’s foes are sending as the White House ponders a list of possible candidates. Wood, who turns 60 in July, was on the shortlist of possible nominees when Justice David Souter retired last year.

As two Supreme Court justices submitted to their annual, gentle congressional interrogation last week, it seemed for the briefest of moments that there might be movement on the most perennial of questions about the court: whether its proceedings will ever be televised. Responding to such a query, Justice Stephen Breyer said that, in fact, the U.S. Judicial Conference is considering a pilot program to examine the issue of cameras in federal courts. “And that would be a pilot project in your courtroom?” asked one congressman. Moment over. “No,” Breyer replied. “The judicial conference does not have to do with our court. It has to do with the lower court.” Last week, C-SPAN said the court rejected its request to release same-day audio of Monday’s oral arguments in a First Amendment case. — From wire reports

Both men were decorated war veterans: Stevens spent World War II in naval intelligence, while Holmes was wounded three times in the Civil War. Their appointments to the court had little to do with their political ideology, said G. Edward White, a University of Virginia law professor and Holmes biographer. “Both Holmes and Stevens are not identified in any easy way with national politics,” White said. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668

PARIS — European transport ministers announced a plan to begin easing the ban on aviation traffic around the continent by today, but only after a barrage of criticism that the European Union had failed a fresh test of leadership. The easing could begin to unravel the gridlock that many rate as the worst peacetime air travel disruption, a nearly weeklong halt in flights that stranded tens of thousands and cost airlines hundreds of millions of dollars. Yet even if the ash spewed across European skies by a volcano in Iceland begins to dissipate soon, the region is grappling with a new blow to its ability to act decisively during an emergency. That is a problem that has plagued it repeatedly as it has struggled to manage swine flu, the financial crisis and the problem of Greek debt. Most noisily, the head of the International Air Transport Association said before the announcement of a partial lifting of the aviation ban on Monday that “the decision Europe has made is with no risk assessment, no consultation, no coordination, no leadership.” The industry group’s director general and chief executive, Giovanni Bisignani went further, saying that the crisis is a “European embarrassment” and “a European mess.” Under Monday’s agreement, the aviation authorities would carve airspace above the continent into three zones: one closest to the volcano that would completely restrict air traffic; another zone that would set up partial restrictions on flights; and a third zone, free of ash, where flights could resume completely. It was unclear precisely what portions of Europe’s airspace would be reopened when the agreement takes effect today at 8 a.m. Paris time, but the European Union’s transport commissioner, Siim Kallas, called the deal “good news for Europe’s stranded passengers.” Adding to the uncertainty, however, the British air traffic control agency reported late Monday that the volcano’s eruptions had strengthened, and a new ash cloud was headed south and east toward Britain and might affect the re-opening of some British airports.

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Workers dump rotting produce that will be distributed to farm animals into a truck Monday in Nairobi, Kenya.

Kenya’s produce waits, wilts with nowhere to go NAIROBI, Kenya — When Kenneth Maundu, general manager for Sunripe produce exporters, first heard about a volcano erupting in Iceland, he was excited. “I thought, ‘Oh, wow, a volcano,’” he said. And then reality hit him in the face like a hurled tomato. Because Kenya’s gourmet vegetable and cut-flower industry exports mainly to Europe, and because the cloud of volcanic ash has grounded flights to much of northern Europe since Thursday, the Kenyan horticultural business has been waylaid as never before. If farmers in Africa’s Great Rift Valley ever doubted that they were intricately tied into the global economy, they know now that they are. Because of a volcanic eruption more than 5,000 miles away, Kenyan horticulture, which as the top foreign exchange earner, is a critical piece of the national economy, is losing $3 million a day and shedding thousands of jobs. “It’s a terrible nightmare,” said Stephen Mbithi, the chief executive officer of the Fresh Produce Exporters Association of Kenya. — New York Times News Service


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bangkok stands poised for another demonstration The Associated Press BANGKOK — Soldiers in full combat gear garrisoned the Thai capital’s central business district early today as thousands of antigovernment protesters nearby threatened to disrupt Bangkok with a major rally. More offices closed and at least one hotel reportedly shut down temporarily in face of another possible eruption of violence and a dramatic drop in tourist arrivals. Leaders of the so-called “Red Shirt” protesters said they would stage an “important” demonstration today but did not disclose

District 55 Continued from A1 The candidates share many views in common, such as their belief that Oregon needs lawmakers who will help rein in spending in Salem. Both agree, however, that they will differ in style. McLane says he will immediately be an aggressive agent of change. “If we don’t make the necessary adjustments in state government and the role it plays in business and families, if we don’t make that adjustment quickly, we are going to be in a severe financial crisis, and a lot of people are going to be impacted,” he said. “I’m advocating a focused and quick pushback on the ideology that’s run Salem for two decades.” Wendel, meanwhile, says he will bring a more realistic approach. “I’m the candidate that has been involved in government, that understands what it takes to get things done,” he said. “The city of Prineville is in a better financial position today than when I was elected. We’re paying down debt; we’re not racking up more debt like state government.” In his day job, Wendel works for the Oregon Department of Transportation, driving snowplows and loaders for the maintenance division. With his wife, he also operates a landscaping business, and says he would bring a working-class sensibility to the job of state representative. “I’m not in an office,” he said. “I work for a living.” McLane handles business and construction cases for the Redmond law firm Bryant, Emerson and Fitch, and also serves in the Air National Guard. He says he grew up in a rural area and would try to bring those values to the Legislature. “I grew up working on wheat and cattle ranches,” he said. McLane has capitalized on his agricultural background to rack up endorsements from the Oregon Farm Bureau and the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association, among others. He’s raised about $55,000 for his campaign, including $5,000 from a dentists’ political action committee, $3,500 from a developers’ group, $2,000 from the Oregon Business Association, as well as several other contributions of $1,000 or more. “I think I’ve had close to 350 donors, so my support is widespread,” he said. Wendel has raised about $5,000, with his biggest donor being his wife, Tina; she gave him $1,200. Wendel says his slow fundraising pace is another reason why people should vote for him.

their specific plans. Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva — speaking on governmentrun television channels — said he would not set a date for protesters to be forced out of their encampment at a busy intersection in the heart of Bangkok’s shopping and hotel district. The demonstrators have camped out on the streets of the Thai capital since March 12. A failed April 10 attempt by security forces to remove protesters erupted into the worst political violence Thailand has seen in 18 years, leaving 25 dead and more than 800 wounded.

MIKE MCLANE Age: 45 Hometown: Powell Butte Family: married, three children Employment: Lawyer, Air National Guard Political, community experience: member, Crook County advisory board for Economic Development for Central Oregon; 4H volunteer; former member, Redmond Economic Development Board

MIKE WENDEL Age: 40 Hometown: Prineville Family: married, two children Employment: transportation maintenance specialist, Oregon Department of Transportation Political, community experience: Prineville Mayor since 2006; elected to the Prineville City Council in 2003; member, Crook County Commission on Children and Families; youth coach “I’ve always been a firm believer that government should stay out of people’s wallets, and how can I do that and ask for money at the same time?” he said. In any event, McLane intends to put his money to good use. He said he plans to run radio ads throughout the district, as well as use direct mail and newspaper advertising to make his case. Both candidates made headlines shortly after declaring their candidacy. Last October, Wendel was reported to have not paid property taxes since 2005, a situation he blamed on his mortgage company. He paid the taxes later that month. That same month, it was reported that McLane’s conduct in a contract dispute was being reviewed by the Oregon State Bar, to see whether he ethically handled a dispute between two of his clients. The bar’s investigation remains open. Although no Democrats have filed to run, the winner of the Republican primary would still have to wait until the November election to officially take office. That’s because the nominee could face third-party or write-in candidates. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Mood is troubled as Israel celebrates its 62nd birthday By Ethan Bronner New York Times News Service

JERUSALEM — Every year, Israelis approach the joy of their Independence Day right after immersing themselves in a 24-hour period of grief for fallen soldiers. Before the fireworks that burst across the skies Monday night to celebrate the country’s 62nd birthday, the airwaves filled with anguished stories of young servicemen and -women killed, the Kaddish prayer of mourning and speeches placing the deeply personal losses of a small country into the sweep of Jewish history. So there is nothing new or unusual about Israelis’ marking their collective accomplishments with a strong admixture of sorrow and concern. It happens all the time, especially among those on the political left who are angry that Israel’s occupation of the Palestinians shows no sign of ending. But there is something about the mood this year that feels darker than usual. It has a bipartisan quality to it. Both left and right are troubled, and both largely about the same things, especially the Iranian nuclear program combined with growing tensions with the Obama administration. “There is a confluence of two very worrying events,” said Michael Freund, a rightist columnist for The Jerusalem Post in a telephone interview. “One is the Iranian threat, an existen-

Property Continued from A1 Bend Police Lt. Ben Gregory said Monday the sergeant only knew of Rose and didn’t know him personally. Gregory has emphatically denied the department held off investigating PRG because of Gary Rose. Dean Owens, the agency’s deputy commissioner, said the agency is a regulatory body and does not have the power to pursue criminal investigations, which is why it contacted Bend Police about Rose’s confession. “We had offered to give (the Bend Police Department) our file, and they had declined to take it,” Owens said. “Their thing is they needed someone to come forward saying they had been harmed, but at that time, we didn’t have anyone that had been harmed.” Gregory said the department opened its investigation April 12 after it learned of a victim. Still, a number of PRG clients are upset they were not notified by the state of Rose’s confession last September, saying they could have potentially avoided or lessened their losses. “It’s just bizarre,” said Jackie Evans, a PRG client who had six Central Oregon properties under management with the company. “All these people knew about it except for the owners, the victims.” Evans claims she and her husband have lost roughly $8,000 in security deposits and rent that were either held in

Ariel Schalit / The Associated Press

An Israeli girl walks with flags Monday during Israel’s 62nd Independence Day celebrations in central Tel Aviv, Israel. An editorial in a left-leaning newspaper Monday contended that Israel “is isolated globally.” tial threat. Add to that the fact that for the first time in recent memory there is a president in the White House who is not overly sensitive to the Jewish state and its interests. You put the two together and it will affect anyone’s mood, even an optimist like me.” Haaretz, the newspaper that serves as the voice of the shrinking political left in this country, is in a truly depressed

trust by PRG or were forthcoming from the company. Another PRG client, landlord Ron Larson, estimates he’s allegedly lost rent and security deposit funds amounting to $9,000. “The state board, they found out about it, and then they called the local police, and they say no victims have come forward, and somehow that doesn’t ring right,” Larson said. Owens said the agency is not required to notify clients in cases such as PRG’s, adding that doing so can open the agency to liability if the company or its management is exonerated. While no action was taken with regard to Rose’s confession, Rose was fined by the agency for oper-

mood. Its editorial on Monday contended that Israel “is isolated globally and embroiled in a conflict with the superpower whose friendship and support are vital to its very existence. “It is devoid of any diplomatic plan aside from holding on to the territories and afraid of any movement,” the editorial continued. “It wallows in a sense of existential threat that has only grown with time. It seizes

ating without a licensed property manager. The company’s licensed property manager, Mauna Jones, left PRG Aug. 5 after confronting Rose about missing client funds and later notified the agency of Rose’s activities, according to the report. The agency launched its investigation into Rose shortly thereafter. In November, the agency fined Rose more than $21,000 for operating an unlicensed property management company between Aug. 5 and Sept. 15, 2009. However, Rose stayed in business after the fine was levied. Rose was not a licensed property manager, according to agency records.

on every instance of anti-Semitism, whether real or imagined, as a pretext for continued apathy and passivity.” Yoel Esteron, a political centrist who is publisher and editor of a daily business paper called Calcalist, wrote an essay for Independence Day that praises the islands of high-tech excellence in Israel, but frets that they are surrounded by seas of underdevelopment.

Owens said the agency always follows up its investigations to see if unlicensed activity is continuing, but he couldn’t comment specifically on PRG, saying he could neither confirm nor deny an investigation into PRG is open. Andrew Moore can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at amoore@ bendbulletin.com. Erin Golden contributed to this report.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 A5

Russia threatens to ‘freeze’ U.S. adoptions For cancer, targeted drugs Bloomberg News MOSCOW — Russia may “freeze” adoptions of children by U.S. citizens if the two countries fail to reach an agreement regulating the practice, the Foreign Ministry said Monday. Russia announced a suspension of adoptions last week after a seven-year-old boy was sent back alone to Moscow by his adoptive American mother earlier this month. President Dmitry Med-

vedev, during a visit to the U.S. last week, said adoptions may be banned after the “monstrous act.” Russia “insists that further adoptions be carried out under a bilateral agreement with the U.S., which we’re prepared to work on with the American side,” the Foreign Ministry said on its Web site Monday. “If our partners show a desire to reach such an agreement, this will allow us to avoid freezing the process of adoption by U.S.

citizens. We see no other options for resolving the situation.” Adoption talks, scheduled to begin in Moscow today, were postponed by flight disruptions caused by a cloud of volcanic ash from Iceland, Russian Foreign Ministry spokesman Igor LyakinFrolov said by telephone in Moscow on Monday. “We’re clarifying the timing of the visit. We’ll see how the talks go and make a decision” on a possible ban, he said.

Shot Continued from A1 More than a caution against kids playing with guns, the fight to save Philliou offers a glimpse into the uncharted territories of emergency medicine, where usually fatal injuries can spark unconventional treatments. “I wouldn’t, didn’t, consider it overly gutsy,” recalls Dr. Sean O’Donnell, vascular surgery chief at Washington Hospital Center. “It’s just somebody like this doesn’t show up alive.” His team now is writing up the case for a medical journal, a teachable example of how less invasive treatments are starting to play an increasing role even in the aggressive, seconds-count world of trauma care. It started as a typical Saturday night in November 2008, Philliou and some friends hanging out in his family’s basement in Silver Spring, Md., eating pizza. Then Philliou showed off the small handgun he’d found, one he’d thought was jammed because he couldn’t get it to fire. But as his friends fooled around, this time the gun went off. The 911 call came around 8 p.m.: A teen accidentally shot. Emergency workers found Philliou gasping, his skin bluish. They worked a breathing tube down his throat and bypassed suburban hospitals, headed for a Level I trauma center in the nation’s capital that sees a lot of gunshot wounds. Remarkably, Philliou woke up in the ambulance and yanked out his breathing tube. Arriving at Washington Hospital Center, he was coherent enough to answer some questions of trauma nurse Toby Kyle. Most important, he wasn’t in shock, his blood pressure still OK. Scans showed the bullet hit Philliou’s aorta twice. Medical journals make clear that a chestlevel injury to this huge blood vessel, which runs from the heart to the groin, is fatal 85 percent of the time. Here’s why Philliou was hanging on: The aorta is shaped like a candy cane, its arch coming out of the top of the heart before curving down. The bullet punctured both the arch of the aorta and a large vein that touches it, making a channel between the

Contractors Continued from A1 The notion that the nature of work is changing — becoming more temporary and projectbased, with workers increasingly functioning as free agents and no longer being governed by traditional long-term employeremployee relationships — first gained momentum in the 1990s. But it has acquired new currency in this recession, especially among white-collar job seekers, as they cast about for work of any kind and companies remain cautious about permanent hiring.

More part-timers In just one snapshot of what is going on, the number of people who describe themselves as selfemployed but working less than 35 hours a week because they cannot find full-time work has more than doubled since the recession began, reaching 1.2 million in December 2009, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Economists who study flexible work arrangements believe that the increase has been driven in large part by independent contractors like Sinclair and other contingent workers, struggling to cobble together whatever work they can find. As the economy continues its halting recovery and employers’ confidence remains shaky, economists believe that it is likely that the ranks of these kinds of workers will continue to grow. “To the degree there’s more uncertainty coming out of this recession than in past recessions, we would expect companies to be more cautious about taking on

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

Dr. Sean O’Donnell holds an example of a heart graft that was used in an innovative technique to save a 16-year-old boy who was accidentally shot in the aorta. two — and because pressure is higher in an artery, blood was flowing back into his own vein, preserving it. “He was lucky enough it bought him some time,” says Kyle. Then the bullet exited from the descending part of the aorta, leaking blood into the chest.

New alternative Not too long ago, cardiac surgeon Dr. Ammar Bafi would have had one choice: Cut open the breastbone, deep-cool Philliou, stop his heart and sew up the arch — plus make another big incision on the side of the chest to repair the second hole. He says the operations bring more than a 25 percent risk of death. Artery specialist O’Donnell’s alternative: Fix the lower hole by threading a sleeve-like stent up through a leg artery and popping it open, blocking the leak with what’s essentially an artificial lining. Car crashes that throw the driver against the steering wheel can tear that descending part of the aorta, and in 2005 doctors began fixing those blunt injuries with this kind of graft. O’Donnell bet it would seal the more dangerous penetrating injury of a gunshot, too. It took a graft more than half an inch wide and 2 inches long to fit this teen athlete, but it worked, stabilizing him. On to the upper hole. This one

more permanent employees,” said Susan Houseman, senior economist with the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, who studies contingent workers. “So they’d be looking for more of these nonstandard employees to hire.” Some, like Sinclair, have embraced this lifestyle, influenced by a growing sense of just how precarious traditional employment can be and reveling in the other benefits, like flexibility and diversity. Others, however, would vastly prefer permanent jobs. They have struggled to deal with the instability, the second-tier status often accorded contractors and other temporary workers and the usual lack of benefits. In most states, they are ineligible for unemployment insurance and worker’s compensation. Indeed, it is not at all clear that the shift to these kinds of arrangements is good for workers. Federal and state officials have recently stepped up efforts to crack down on companies that have sought to save money by avoiding paying taxes and benefits on behalf of workers they classify as independent contractors who should actually be treated as full-time employees. The universe of contingent work and alternative employment arrangement is broad. The largest segment appears to be independent contractors, which includes consultants like Sinclair, as well as freelance writers, nurse practitioners, information technology specialists and myriad other professionals. In 2005, the last time the Bureau of Labor Statistics attempted to track these kinds of workers, independent contractors accounted for 7.4 percent of total employment There is also a much smaller

sat on a curve, and O’Donnell threaded in a smaller patch but it didn’t form a complete seal. Time to reassess. “When they say they’ve never seen this before, it kind of throws you,” says Jim Philliou, the teen’s father, who remembers doctors heading off to brainstorm the next step and returning to say, “It’s still 50-50, but here’s what we want to do.” The next day, surgeon Bafi cracked the teen’s chest after all — but the earlier patching meant he could skip stopping the heart for a far safer, easier surgery to seal that remaining hole. More than 150 children and teens die every year from unintentional firearm injuries, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates nearly 4,000 more received emergency room treatment for them in 2008. Philliou had joined the survivors: Home in a week, and back on the high school football field nine months later. He remembers bits of the trauma — the taste of gunpowder, trying to suck in air, his mother crying. And as he recovered, he says he learned to let go of the anxiety that has characterized his teen years. “I always felt socially awkward around a lot of people. … I was scared of a lot of things,” says Philliou, who’s looking forward to college next fall. “This year, I’ve actually been happy the entire year.”

group whose ranks have been expanding in recent months — workers who draw their paychecks from temporary help agencies. Still others are employed directly by contracting firms, and there are also temporary workers, like seasonal retail hires, brought on directly by companies.

Consultant plunge Despite the drawbacks, there are many who have entered this world voluntarily. In Sinclair’s case, he had been working at a marketing and strategy consulting firm in the Atlanta area but was laid off last year. After realizing that companies were mostly not hiring but still had short-term work to be done, Sinclair plunged into selling himself as a consultant. After taking a few months to get started, he found himself juggling a steady stream of part-time projects. His current position at Molnlycke Health Care, which makes surgical gloves and other medical products, started out as a shortterm assignment but has morphed into a full-time job as the company’s interim head of marketing. The company plans to hire someone permanent but has been busy with other priorities, which is fine with Sinclair. If he is offered the position, he said that while he would be tempted, he was not certain he would take it. His experience with his last company — the first time he had been laid off — taught him a lesson. “I just saw you really can’t rely on a company,” he said. “I think too many people, even in this day, still think you can rely on a company for security.” He would rather rely on himself.

offer hope, but tests unclear By Gina Kolata New York Times News Service

Linda Griffith was at a conference in Singapore in January when she felt a lump in her breast. She assumed it was nothing — a cyst. And anyway, she had no time for it. But she had a mammogram, ultrasound and biopsy within hours of getting off the plane. The news was not good: She had cancer. Then the complications began. Griffith, director of the Center for Gynepathology Research at MIT, had a test to see whether her tumor had extra copies of a protein, HER2. If it did, it would respond to a drug, Herceptin, which blocks the protein and stymies the tumor’s growth. Drugs aimed at disabling proteins that spur cancer are, many oncologists say, the future of cancer therapies. Only a few are available now but almost every new drug under study is designed to disable cancer-fueling proteins.

Therapy flaw But these so-called targeted therapies are only as good as tests to find their protein targets. And while most patients do not yet know it, those tests can be surprisingly unreliable. Acknowledging the problem, cancer specialists on Monday announced new testing guidelines for one protein target, but as new targets are identified, the problem continues to grow. The test on Griffith’s tumor was negative. Or was it? One area of her tumor stained brown, indicating lots of HER2. The rest was a cream color, indicating no extra HER2 protein. Yet her treatment hinged on this result. A HER2 positive tu-

Erik Jacobs / New York Times News Service

Linda Griffith had extra copies of a protein and would respond to targeted therapy. The test was unclear, but her treatment hinged on the result. mor has a bad prognosis. Herceptin can make that prognosis good, reducing the chances that the cancer will come back by 50 percent and reducing a woman’s risk of dying by 40 percent. But Herceptin, costing $100,000 a year, causes flulike symptoms and also has a rare, serious, side effect, severe heart damage that can even be fatal. And if a tumor does not have high levels of HER2, Herceptin would be, as Dr. Antonio Wolff, a breast cancer specialist at Johns Hopkins put it, “a toxic and expensive placebo.” Griffith had come face to face with an emerging, but rarely acknowledged, problem in today’s era of new cancer tests and therapies.

False positives HER2 tests can give false positives up to 20 percent of the time, wrongly telling women they need the drug when they

do not. Five percent to 10 percent of the time the tests can falsely tell a woman that she should not take the drug, when she should. The Food and Drug Administration says it is concerned about the quality of tests developed by clinical laboratories for their own use, said Alberto Gutierrez, who oversees diagnostic products for the agency. Some tests are increasingly complex, Gutierrez said, adding that there is a proliferation of laboratories offering tests without FDA oversight. But, for now, the agency has no specific plan to regulate the tests, in part because of lack of money. The College of American Pathologists wants to develop testing guidelines for every molecular target for cancer drugs. On Monday, for example, it released new guidelines for estrogen receptor testing. Medical experts say there are no easy answers. For now, their best advice is for women to ask that their breast cancer tissue be sent to experienced labs that follow accreditation procedures like those recommended by the College of American Pathologists. But Griffith did all that. And Griffith, a scientist whose own research involves the HER2 protein, also read and examined the literature on HER2 to prepare for a discussion with Winer. “Here I sit as a patient. My situation is ambiguous,” Griffith said. Griffith decided not to take Herceptin, but she is having standard chemotherapy. “I am very comfortable with my decision,” she said.


A6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

W OR L D

Rainy season threatens Haitian camps

W  B

By Joe Mozingo Los Angeles Times

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Every afternoon the clouds pile upon the high ridges above this collapsed city and the breeze descends with a tell-tale earthy smell. The rain usually waits until dark, when short but spectacular bursts deluge random bits of the capital and unleash torrents of rock and gray mud. The rainy season is bearing down, and Haiti is not ready. Three months after the earthquake killed more than 200,000 people, more than 2.1 million Haitians remain in tents and under tarps, many on dangerous hillsides and tidal flats. Ernst Y’Voyelle, 38, studies the clouds warily from his hut clinging to the edge of a ravine in a hillside tent camp housing as many as 50,000 people. “There’s going to be a lot of people buried here,” he said. A short rain the night before had turned his patch of loose dirt into a sticky slop. Half an inch of clay clung to his loafers. Aid workers had been talking about moving people out of dangerous spots like this one for weeks, but only last weekend did they begin — with 62 people. Y’Voyelle was not one of them. Nor was Saluido Desauguste. He was sleeping the other night when water poured out from a drainage ditch near his tent. He had time only to get him and his two children out before the water swept away the tent and all he had left after the earthquake took everything else. A tall man with ropy muscles, he dug through the muck the next morning looking for anything that may have been spared. He found only his little girl’s purple sandal. Certainly much has been done in Haiti. The bodies in the street were buried. Residents in Portau-Prince have more access to medical care than they have had in decades. Aid groups are still distributing food and water. And

South Korean leader vows to find ship culprit

Photos by Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times

ABOVE: Saluido Desauguste, left, says his makeshift home, which sat on this plot of land, was swept away with the rain. He and his family live at the Petionville Club golf course, one of the largest tent camps for displaced people in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. LEFT: Abela Markanzie, 13, lives uphill from where people’s tents and personal items were swept away with the rains on Friday.

although fallen buildings remain in stratified heaps of concrete and great knots of rebar, excavators are picking away at them, clearing out clogged drainage canals and shoring up low areas prone to flooding. But everyone agrees the next steps require a coordinated plan to get people into safer camps and, ultimately, housing. Humanitarian groups and the government have been talking about this since days after the quake, and set a target date of Thursday to relocate those in the most danger. That deadline has

come and gone. There is a feeling that the temporary is settling into the permanent. Tin and wood are slowly transforming tent camps into shantytowns, and trails are forming on the heaps of shattered concrete as if they were part of the natural topography. Claire Basiler, 80, still can’t go beyond the 4-foot-wide alley behind her home on Rue Champs Mars downtown because she is too feeble to climb over 20 feet of rubble. “I haven’t left once since the earthquake,” she said.

In a sprawling camp on the Petionville Club golf course, engineers have identified 7,500 people to be moved immediately. By Friday, 1,629 had been relocated. That camp is getting far more attention than any of the more than 1,300 others in Haiti: It’s managed by a relief organization co-founded by actor Sean Penn. Work crews are scrambling to shore up a hillside with sandbags and dig drainage. Nearby in a lush canyon called La Vallee de Bourdon, no one was scrambling on a recent day to help the residents of a fallen shantytown. After the quake, residents simply moved to open land next door. They cut trees and brush, dug shelves in an escarpment and used the sticks they gathered to hold up tarps. Some are on the edge of a cliff; some are on a dry river bottom. Relocation is also difficult culturally. Haitians rely on their

communities to survive. They borrow money from neighbors, share food, watch one another’s children, sell things they pick up in the central markets. The camp where residents of the Petionville Club are being moved is on a dust-blown, desolate slope far from the city, where people will be wholly reliant on aid to survive. Brizard Brigarde, 59, plans to hold out on the golf course. His family of six lives with four other families in a cluster of sweltering rooms made of orange tarps that cast an almost hellish glow. Brigarde is a tailor. He started building his home in 1973, and by the day of the earthquake it had three stories, a television, running water, a dining room set — all the accouterments of the middle class. Now, he has what fits in a tent. The baby falls asleep in his arms, and he lays her down on a pillow in a laundry bucket.

SEOUL, South Korea — Pausing to wipe away tears with a handkerchief, South Korea’s president, Lee Myung-bak, vowed Monday to respond “resolutely and unwaveringly” to last month’s deadly sinking of a South Korean warship in disputed waters near North Korea. But South Korean political experts and politicians said there was little their country could actually do if investigators find the North was responsible for the March 26 explosion, which left 46 sailors dead or missing. South Korean salvage cranes are still trying to raise the front half of the 1,200-ton Cheonan, which was torn in two by the blast during a routine patrol.

Bomber strikes near Pakistani political rally ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A teenage suicide bomber struck near a protest rally in the northwestern frontier city of Peshawar on Monday, killing a prominent police officer and as many as two dozen protesters, the police said. A bomb disposal official said the young bomber was wearing a vest with as many as 15 pounds of explosives. Television cameras showed a frenzied scene of Islamic youths from the protest helping people onto stretchers and clapping their heads in grief. Though no one claimed responsibility for the attack and it was not officially confirmed, the target appeared to be one of the city’s senior police officers, Gulfat Hussein, said his colleague, Karim Khan. The blast, which took place in the Qisa Kawani market area, also killed more than 20 others, including Dost Muhammad, a local leader for the political party Jamaat-e-Islami, which had gathered to protest electricity cuts. — From wire reports


B

Tech Focus Embracing the cloud, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,480.11 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -1.15 -.05%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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CLOSE 11,092.05 DOW JONES CHANGE +73.39 +.67%

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1,197.52 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +5.39 +.45%

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WASHINGTON — Toyota Motor Corp. will recall 9,400 Lexus GX 460 sports utility vehicles to correct a problem that could lead to a loss of control, it said Monday. It is the latest in a string of safety recalls for the automaker in recent months. The company confirmed last week that it had isolated a defect — identified by Consumer Reports magazine during routine testing — that could cause the vehicle’s rear end to lose traction while turning in certain circumstances. Although Toyota did not identify the cause of the instability, it said it had duplicated and confirmed the Consumer Reports test and would fix the problem by modifying the onboard vehicle stability control software. Separately on Monday, Toyota agreed to pay a record $16.4 million fine to the federal government for failing to promptly disclose that gas pedals in eight models could stick and cause sudden acceleration. Transportation Department officials said Monday that additional fines are possible as regulators press forward with a trio of investigations concerning how Toyota handled recalls in recent years.

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.80 treasury CHANGE +.80%

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$1135.20 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.10

Small businesses may qualify for new health care tax credit It’s the first part of health care reform to hit public

Toyota agrees to pay fine, recalls Lexus SUV

By David Holley The Bulletin

Small businesses are now eligible for a federal tax credit that could be worth hundreds or thousands of dollars a year, depending on how much a business pays on employees’ health insurance premiums. And if a business doesn’t currently pay any of its employees’ premiums, the tax credit is meant to encourage owners to do so. The credit is one of the first provisions of the recently enacted federal health care reform bill to hit the public. “We want to make sure small employ-

ers across the nation realize that — effective this tax year — they may be eligible for a valuable new tax credit,” IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman said in a news release. “We urge every small employer to take advantage of this credit if they qualify.” To qualify, a company or tax-exempt organization must have fewer than 25 fulltime equivalent employees and pay an average annual salary of less than $50,000. It also must pay at least 50 percent of the cost of some employees’ insurance costs or premiums. If the employee adds other people, such

Learn more For more information on the health care credit, visit http://www.irs.gov/newsroom/ article/0,,id=220809,00.html?portlet=6. The size of the credit varies depending on how much money employers pay employees, how many people they employ and the amount of health care employers pay for.

as family members, to his or her plan, and subsequently raises the cost of the plan, an employer isn’t required to pay the higher cost to qualify for the credit, according to the IRS. See Tax credit / B5

EXECUTIVE FILE

Inking anything and everything

Citigroup reports $4.4 billion profit Citigroup on Monday provided the strongest signs yet that it was beginning to recover after nearly two years of being drenched in red ink, reporting a $4.4 billion profit in the first quarter. The positive results more than cushioned the impact of the civil fraud suit filed by Washington regulators against Goldman Sachs. Fears that the regulatory scrutiny could spread to other Wall Street firms have dragged down shares throughout the sector. Citigroup shares closed at $4.88 Monday, up 7 percent, compared with almost 1 percent among banks overall. Citigroup’s earnings handily beat analysts’ expectations and were its best since the financial crisis began in mid2007. Bank officials attributed them to the resurgence in the bond market and improvements in the economy, particularly overseas. — From wire reports

Questions sought on health care reform The Bulletin wants to know what questions businesses have about how the new health care law will affect them. If you’re a business owner who can’t figure it out or you’ve researched the details and think you have an idea how you’ll be affected but aren’t sure, drop us a note with your questions. We will try to find answers for a story to be published in the coming weeks. E-mail Keith Chu at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Dan Wellisch, owner of Flash Ink, says he has learned to love his screen-printing business. “You get blank items that come in the door and they go out with cool stuff on them,” he said.

Happenstance led Dan Wellisch to his growing screen-printing business By David Holley The Bulletin

ore than anything, it was a fluke circumstance that led Dan Wellisch to buy Flash Ink, a custom screen-printing shop in Bend. While driving to work at Joe’s Sports, Outdoor & More nearly three years ago, Wellisch’s wife, Cody, called to tell him that a co-worker’s family was selling Flash Ink. The business sounded right for Dan, Cody told him. “I told her she was crazy,” he said. “At that point, all I knew about T-shirts was how to wear them.” But Wellisch did some investigating, talked to the former owner and eventually followed his wife’s advice. Since, he has expanded Flash Ink from some-

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The basics What: Flash Ink custom screen printing Who: Dan Wellisch, owner Where: 588 S.E. Ninth St., unit No. 5, Bend Phone: 541-408-1308 Employees: None permanent, some on a contractual basis

thing run out of a garage to a profitable company operating in a 2,700-squarefoot warehouse in southeast Bend. The products the business delivers also have expanded, with Wellisch now selling promotional materials such as

pens, business cards, coffee mugs and banners, along with the T-shirt printing that was its foundation. The work is a field Wellisch had no prior experience in, but is something he learned to love. “You get blank items that come in the door and they go out with cool stuff on them,” he said. “There’s an emotional attachment to the clothes because sometimes it’s people’s livelihood.” Much of Wellisch’s work comes from printing logos, designs and promotional material on T-shirts for various businesses, primarily local ones, but also others along the West Coast. Plenty of other groups use Flash Ink, he said, such as a Pole Pedal Paddle team for whom he recently made shirts. See Flash Ink / B5

Leading indicators The index of leading indicators: 2004=100 Seasonally adjusted 109.6

SEC faces difficult path in Goldman case

111 Percent 109 107

change +1.4%

By Binyamin Appelbaum

105

New York Times News Service

103 101 99 97 2009

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Source: The Conference Board AP

WASHINGTON — In accusing the Wall Street giant Goldman Sachs of defrauding investors, regulators are not only taking aim at a company with deep pockets and a will to fight — they are also pursuing an unusual claim that could be difficult to prove in court, legal experts said. Rather than asserting that Goldman misrepresented a product, the most commonly

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Inside • Goldman employees rally around their chief executive, Page B2 used grounds for securities fraud, the Securities and Exchange Commission said in a civil suit filed Friday that the bank misled customers about how that product was cre-

ated. It is the rough equivalent of asserting that an antiques dealer lied about the provenance, but not the quality, of an old table. To a layperson, the case against Goldman may seem clear cut. After all, investors did not know some information about the product that they might have considered vital, and they lost $1 billion in the end. But the rules that govern these kinds of transactions are not so plain. See Goldman / B2

s

$17.725 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.560

Hoodoo, having set a record for days open, calls it quits Ski area had a busy winter, owner says By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Hoodoo Mountain Resort wrapped up its ski season Sunday, setting a new record for number of days open and nearly equaling its record for skier visits, owner Chuck Shepard said Monday. Now Shepard will turn his attention to summer recreation. His company manages about 6,000 campsites in five national forests in Oregon and Washington. He also has a residential rental business, but that operates year-round. Hoodoo, the ski area atop Santiam Pass about 20 miles west of Sisters, opened on Thanksgiving weekend and remained open for 116 days this season, surpassing the previous record under Shepard’s ownership by one day, he said. For the 2008-09 season, Hoodoo was open 99 days, he said. Hoodoo recorded between 95,000 and 96,000 skier visits this season, Shepard said, several thousand short of the record, 98,000 set in 2007-08. The number of skiers and snowboarders hitting Hoodoo’s slopes in recent years more than doubles the 41,000 visits at Hoodoo in 1998-99, the year before Shepard bought the ski area. “We’ve probably done better than almost any ski area in the country,” he said. See Hoodoo / B5

Hackers breached Google’s password system By John Markoff New York Times News Service

Ever since Google disclosed in January that Internet intruders had stolen information from its computers, the exact nature and extent of the theft has been a closely guarded company secret. But a person with direct knowledge of the investigation now says that the losses included one of Google’s crown jewels, a password system that controls access by millions of users worldwide to almost all of the company’s Web services, including e-mail and business applications. The program, code named Gaia for the Greek goddess of the earth, was attacked in a lightning raid taking less than two days last December, the person said. Described publicly only once at a technical conference four years ago, the software is intended to enable users and employees to sign in with their password just once to operate a range of services. The intruders do not appear to have stolen passwords of Gmail users, and the company quickly started making significant changes to the security of its networks after the intrusions. But the theft leaves open the possibility, however faint, that the intruders may find weaknesses that Google might not even be aware of, independent computer experts said. See Google / B5


B2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Lilly profit falls on health overhaul

Goldman Continued from B1 Several experts on securities law said fraud cases like this one, which focuses on context rather than content, are generally more difficult to win because it can be hard to persuade a jury that the missing information might have led buyers to walk away. They added, however, that the strength of the SEC’s case is impossible to gauge until the agency discloses more of the evidence it has assembled. The stakes are huge. The SEC, battered by its failure to iden-

Detroit Free Press

came out of equity trading. The co-chiefs of asset management also came from fixed income trading. Even if Blankfein were to step aside — a move that seems unlikely now, insiders say — his creation would largely endure. Most of the executives who might succeed him share his vision for Goldman. Gary Cohn, the president, rose through the ranks along with Blankfein, from their days at J. Aron, Goldman’s commodities-trading unit. “The trading side has become senior management,” said Brad Hintz, a securities analyst at Sanford Bernstein. “When trading is doing well it takes the leadership of the company.” To Hintz, Blankfein’s position looks secure. “I’m skeptical you will see heads roll on this,” he said. “The partnership will link arms and hold strong.” Others seem less certain. Richard X. Bove, an outspoken independent analyst, has called for Blankfein to resign. Gordon Brown, Britain’s prime minister, said Sunday that he was shocked by the “moral bankruptcy” that the SEC suit seemed to suggest. “Someone must fall on their swords for the devastating decline in this company’s persona, and they may be forced to do so for public relations reasons,” Bove said. Blankfein left a voice-mail message for employees Friday evening and then another Sunday night. “As we prepare for the opening of markets around the world, I want to remind all of you of the fundamental values that have served Goldman Sachs throughout our history: teamwork, ex-

cellence and service to our clients,” Blankfein said on Sunday, according to a transcript of the call obtained by The New York Times. “The extensive media coverage on the SEC’s complaint is certainly uncomfortable, but given the anger directed at financial services, not completely surprising. “ The board of Goldman appears firmly behind Blankfein, according to people briefed on the matter. One reason is that Blankfein has been enormously successful running Goldman. After guiding Goldman through the near collapse of the nation’s financial system and then deftly extricating his bank from a federal bailout, Blankfein is now presiding over one of the richest periods in the bank’s history. Today, Goldman Sachs is expected to post another set of robust quarterly profits, although its legal troubles seem certain to overshadow its results. A Goldman Sachs spokesman declined to comment. Over the years, the balance of power at Goldman has tilted back and forth between traders and bankers, mostly depending on which business was ascendant. Blankfein rose to the top as trading took on an outsize role at Goldman and, indeed, all of Wall Street. Some people now wonder whether the pendulum is starting to swing back in the bankers’ favor, as regulators step up scrutiny of trading. As the pendulum shifts, so too will Wall Street’s leadership — including Goldman’s. “These organizations will respond. The partnership culture is Goldman’s great strength,” Hintz said.

tify or prevent several major frauds in recent years, is eager to reestablish its credibility as an enforcer. Goldman’s sterling reputation, a foundation of its financial success, is also on the line. Rather than settling with the government, it has so far chosen to fight back. The company says it provided its investors with all the information required by law. It has also stressed that it sold the securities to two financial firms that were sophisticated investors. The commission’s core accusation is that while Goldman provided to those firms a detailed list of the assets contained in a

security it built and sold in 2007, it concealed the role of John Paulson, a hedge fund manager who worked with Goldman to pick what went into the security. Paulson then placed bets that the security would lose value. In essence, the buyers bet that housing prices would go up, while Paulson bet that prices would fall. Goldman was not legally required to provide any information to the investors because Goldman found the buyers without going to the open market. But for any information that Goldman chose to provide, it was required by law to give a complete and accurate account.

aise A Child’s Awareness by Giving the Love of Books Council on Aging RSVP “Books & Bears” Read Together Outreach

April 13 - April 27 Presenting sponsor - Rotary of Greater Bend Community Stakeholders ~ COCOA • OfficeMax • Bend Factory Stores • • Week of the Young Child/CCF Books may be dropped off at the Book Donation Center (61334 South Hwy 97/Bend) Monday through Friday 11:30am-6:00pm Saturday-Sunday Noon-3:00pm Storytime at the Book Donation Center 2:30 - 3:00 April 17, 18, 24, 25 *children must be accompanied by an adult

Red Barrels will be at drop off sites throughout Deschutes County (Fred MeyerRays Food Place - Newport Market Albertsons - most Elementary Schools)

Thank you for helping!

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WASHINGTON — General Motors CEO Ed Whitacre will announce Wednesday that the automaker will soon pay off $5.8 billion in loans from the U.S. and Canadian governments well ahead of a June deadline, a move it has promised since last year. Whitacre is set to announce the payment at GM’s Fairfax plant in Kansas City, Kan., and then fly to Washington to meet with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Michigan’s congressional delegation, among others, people familiar with the plans said Monday. GM will use the move to highlight its steps toward issuing shares to the public and helping the U.S. government get out of its 60.1 percent ownership stake in the automaker. GM officials have said the company could break

even this year, thanks to the massive cost cuts and reorganization under bankruptcy. The automaker’s payments will include $4.7 billion to the U.S. Treasury and $1.1 billion to the Canadian government. The money comes from a $16.4 billion escrow fund set up by the two governments as part of GM’s bankruptcy that the automaker is required to pay back by June. The U.S. government has put nearly $50 billion into saving GM from collapse, an amount that Obama administration officials have contended was unlikely to be returned entirely when GM begins selling shares publicly. But based on analysts’ estimates of its value, the government’s stake could approach the $30.1 billion spent by the Obama administration solely on GM’s bankruptcy.

New York Times News Service file photo

Lloyd Blankfein, the chairman and chief executive of Goldman Sachs, appears to have the support of the bank’s board of directors. One reason is that he has led the bank through a tremendously lucrative period.

Whether it is newfound green consciousness ahead of Earth Day — or just the allure of a big discount on a new washing machine or air-conditioner — consumers across the country are snapping up government rebates for energy-efficient appliances. In Florida, which began offering the rebates Friday, the $17.6 million allocated for the program lasted a day and a half, as more than 72,000 claims were filed. In Illinois, the second half of its $12.4 million, made available on Friday, disappeared in 11 hours. In Missouri, which started doling out $5.67 million in rebates on Monday and was also waiving related sales taxes, applications were not so brisk. As of late afternoon, 4,748 rebates worth $407,350 had been reserved, or roughly 7 percent of the state’s rebate money, said Judd Slivka, a spokesman for the Missouri Department of Natural Resources. “We’re fairly comfortable saying there will be a Day 2,” he said. Nationwide, $300 million in rebate money has been allocated by the federal government to 56 states and territories to encourage residents to buy furnaces, clothes washers, refrigerators and other appliances with the government’s Energy Star label. Typically, rebates run about $75 for a clothes washer and several hundred dollars for home heating and cooling systems. Colorado, which began its rebate program Monday, is offering $15,000 back for installing a commercial solar thermal system. But in an experience reminiscent of last year’s popular “cash for clunkers” program, which paid consumers to trade in gas-guzzling automobiles, interest in the appliance programs has been so been intense that the state programs are often running dry in a matter of days. In some cases, retailers and states have promoted the rebates in advance, allowing shoppers to plot their strategies as carefully as the day after Thanksgiving. For example, Melissa Woodall, a single mother of three in Miami, said she began scanning appliance ads a few weeks ago for a new stove. She noticed an article about the rebates and decided to replace her old, leaky dish-

TOOLS

By Justin Hyde

New York Times News Service

washer and refrigerator. The day before qualified purchases were allowed, she visited Sears to pick out the appliances. On Friday, she arrived at the store at 6:30 a.m. and found 49 customers in line. Fortunately for her, the store had given her a printout the night before. All she had to do was pay and arrange delivery, which still took an hour and a half in the crowded store. And the ordeal was not over, Woodall said — she still had to get the rebate itself. At 11 a.m., when online signups began, she and her sister went to the state’s rebate site. “The Web site was flooded. It kept crashing,” she said. It took her an hour and fifteen minutes to get registered for the rebate. It was worth it, Woodall said. She paid about $1,500 for the dishwasher and fridge and will be getting about $500 back. Each state has structured its own program, sometimes excluding certain appliances like air-conditioners or requiring proof that old appliances were recycled before paying out the cash. The amount of money available varies widely, from more than $35 million in California, where the program is scheduled to start Thursday in connection with Earth Day, to $100,000 in American Samoa. The high interest is understandable. The rebate programs come on top of existing discounts on Energy Star appliances, recycling and take-back rebates for old units, and specials provided by individual retailers. In some cases, consumers may qualify for federal or state tax credits, too. Kateri Callahan, the president of the Alliance to Save Energy, a nonprofit coalition that promotes efficiency measures, praised the rebates as stimulating the economy while providing “an immediate, point-of-purchase incentive for consumers by ‘buying down’ the price of new, energy-efficient appliances.” BrandsMart USA, an electronics and appliance superstore with nine locations in Florida and Georgia, said customer interest was so strong Friday and Saturday, when Florida’s rebates were available, that the chain decided to offer its own discounts after the state money ran out. “We are still getting a lot of business from it,” said Bobby Johnson, a senior vice president at the company.

TREES & SHRUBS

GM to repay loans ahead of schedule

By Tom Zeller Jr. and Catharine Skipp

SEEDS

NEW YORK — Eli Lilly & Co., maker of the antipsychotic drug Zyprexa, said firstquarter profit fell 5 percent on higher costs from health-care legislation. Net income declined to $1.25 billion, or $1.13 a share, from $1.31 billion, or $1.20, the Indianapolis-based company said Monday in a statement. Adjusted for some items, profit was $1.18 a share, beating by seven cents the average $1.11 estimate of 15 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. President Barack Obama’s health-care overhaul, passed in March, reduced earnings by 12 cents a share, Lilly said. The company lowered its profit forecast for 2010 to include effects from the legislation. — From wire reports

The message went out from Lloyd Blankfein: Circle the wagons. Hours after the accusations of fraud at Goldman Sachs began to reverberate through Wall Street on Friday, voice-mail message indicators inside the bank began to light up. Blankfein, the bank’s leader, was calling to assure anxious employees that Goldman was unbowed. In the days since, Goldman’s board and employees have rallied around senior management, including Blankfein, the chairman and chief executive officer. Goldman employees are shocked, even angry, that the Securities and Exchange Commission has filed a civil fraud suit against their bank. Goldman is ready for a fight, and Blankfein, his defenders insist, will prevail. And yet, for the first time in recent memory, Goldman’s aura of invincibility has been punctured. To Goldman’s many critics, both on and off Wall Street, the claims seem to confirm the worst suspicions about the Wall Street powerhouse — and, indeed, about Blankfein. His detractors say Blankfein has built a money machine that puts itself before its customers. At least one banking analyst has gone so far as to call for him to resign, a scolding that, until now, would have seemed unthinkable. Publicly, Goldman has long prided itself on its No. 1 business principle: “Our clients’ interests always come first.” But the accusations that Goldman devised a complex mortgage investment that was designed to fall apart and then sold it to benighted investors calls that credo into question. Even insiders acknowledge that Blankfein, a former trader, has remade Goldman Sachs. He has built a Wall Street giant powered by a formidable trading operation, rather than by bankers who give advice to corporate clients and help them raise money. In the past, Goldman was often run by two senior executives: one from trading and one from banking. Under Blankfein, the traders have consolidated their power. Blankfein has surrounded himself with like-minded executives — “Lloyd loyalists,” as they are known — plucked from the trading ranks, particularly the fixed income division, which handles bonds, currencies and commodities. Three of the four executives who run the powerful securities division hailed from fixed income trading. The fourth

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DETROIT — Chrysler Group LLC says it has settled a lawsuit against one state but is suing three others because of laws that give dealers the right to block the automaker’s plan to thin its dealership ranks. The automaker said in a statement Monday that North Carolina has agreed not to enforce a recently passed law that gives dealers who were cut by Chrysler the right to challenge or stop the company from awarding new franchises in their areas. But Chrysler says it will pursue its lawsuit against Oregon, Maine and Illinois, which recently enacted similar laws. Chrysler contends in a lawsuit filed last year with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in New York that the state laws are trumped by the bankruptcy court order approving plans to shed 789 dealerships.

New York Times News Service

GIFT ITEMS

Chrysler settles dealership lawsuit

By Jenny Anderson

BIRDBATHS

WASHINGTON — Neither Lehman Brothers’ chief executive nor regulators at the Federal Reserve were aware of questionable accounting practices by the investment bank in the run-up to its failure, according to new congressional testimony. Lehman Brothers, which went bankrupt in September 2008, triggering a broad financial panic, hid the degree of its indebtedness by shifting money around right before the end of each quarter, according to a bankruptcy examiner’s report. The transactions were known as “Repo 105” and allowed Lehman to move $50 billion off the balance sheet it reported to the public. “I have absolutely no recollection whatsoever of hearing anything about Repo 105 transactions while I was CEO of Lehman,” former Lehman Chief Executive Richard Fuld said in written testimony to be delivered today to the House Financial Services Committee. “The first time I recall ever hearing the term ‘Repo 105’ was a year after the bankruptcy filing, in connection with questions raised by the Examiner.”

POTTERY

Accounting practices unnoticed at Lehman

Goldman employees States offering rally around Blankfein appliance rebates — for the swift

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

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C OV ER S T ORY

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 B3

S I N E S S

T F More corporations embracing the cloud Amazon and others need to earn trust of bigger companies before computing model catches on

Kevin McEntee, the vice president of engineering at Netflix, works with Santosh Rau, the cloud system manager, at Netflix headquarters in Los Gatos, Calif. Netflix decided to use Amazon’s cloudcomputing service, freeing it to focus on its movie business.

By Brad Stone and Ashlee Vance New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — This year, Netflix made what looked like a peculiar choice: The DVDby-mail company decided that over the next two years, it would move most of its Web technology — customer movie queues, search tools and the like — over to the computer servers of one of its chief rivals, Amazon.com. Amazon, like Netflix, wants to deliver movies to people’s homes over the Internet. But the online retailer, based in Seattle, has lately gained traction with a considerably more ambitious effort: the business of renting other companies the remote use of its technology infrastructure so they can run their computer operations. In the parlance of technophiles, they would operate “in the cloud.” Ah, the cloud — these days, Silicon Valley can’t seem to get its head out of it. The idea, though typically expressed in ways larded with jargon, is actually rather simple. Cloud providers, large ones like Amazon, Microsoft, Google and AT&T, and smaller ones like Rackspace and Terremark, aim to persuade other companies to give up building and managing their own data centers and to use their computer capacity instead. The concept of renting computing power goes back decades, to the days when companies would share space on a single mainframe with big spinning tape drives. The technology industry has matured to the point where

Peter DaSilva New York Times News Service

there is now an emerging mass market for this rental model. Led by Amazon, most cloud services have largely been aimed at startups, like the legion of Facebook and iPhone applications developers who found they could rent a first-class computing infrastructure on the fly. Now cloud providers are trying to bring these types of flexible services to the more conservative and lucrative world of large corporations. Although most large companies have taken their first cautious steps into the cloud, many are anxious about data failures and slow delivery of data over a network. They also fear that their confidential information could be vulnerable on another company’s systems, out of their control. To alleviate those concerns,

Google held a daylong conference last week called Atmosphere at its headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., selling its cloud computing services — like e-mail and business software — to executives of large corporations. Employees of the Amazon Web Services subsidiary are currently on a multicity tour to persuade even those companies that might compete with Amazon, like Netflix, to stop building their own data centers and move their data onto Amazon’s servers instead. Kevin McEntee, Netflix’s vice president of engineering, said Netflix switched in order to “focus our innovation around finding movies, rather than building larger and larger data centers.” As for tethering Netflix’s future to a rival, McEntee said, “It’s

In the world’s most wired country, Web sites fill a void of entertainment By David Barboza

Li Yufei, a student at Shanghai Maritime University, has a busy life online that includes maintaining a blog, downloading television shows, managing two Web sites and playing an online game called “Rongguang Hospital.” The Internet has become the primary venue for entertainment in China.

New York Times News Service

SHANGHAI — The daily Web habits of a typical 18-year-old college student named Li Yufei show why American Internet companies, one after another, have had trouble penetrating what is now the world’s most wired nation. He writes a blog, downloads Korean television shows, manages two Web sites devoted to music and plays an online game called “Rongguang Hospital,” at Baidu.com. “I started doing a lot of this when I was about 11 years old,” says Li, a freshman at the Shanghai Maritime University. “Now, I spend most of my leisure time on the Internet. There’s nowhere else to go.” Google’s decision last month to remove some of its operations from China has overshadowed a startling dynamic at work in this country, a place where young people complain that there is not a lot to do: the Internet, already a potent social force here, has become the country’s prime entertainment service. Frustrated with media censorship, bland programming on state-run television and limits on the number of foreign films allowed to be shown in China each year, young people are logging onto the Web and downloading alternatives. Homegrown Web sites like Baidu, Tencent and Sina.com have captured millions of Chinese youths obsessed with online games, pirated movies and music, the raising of virtual vegetables, micro-blogging and instant messaging. Even though Facebook, Twitter and YouTube are blocked by censors here, Chinese social networking sites like QQ Zone, Tianya.cn and Kaixin001.com are flourishing in surprisingly inventive ways. A study conducted by the Boston Consulting Group found that people in China (which now has nearly 400 million Internet users) are far more connected than Americans, and that globally only the Japanese spend more

Jackson Lowen New York Times News Service

in their interest to make us successful in the cloud. That’s why we felt comfortable.” In Amazon’s model, businesses pay only for the computing cycles they use. Customers eliminate the upfront cost of computer hardware and can then buy more time on Amazon’s data center as needed. Companies have also used Amazon as a backup system, either to handle sudden spikes in computing demand or to keep information in a secondary spot in case of a disaster. In another cloud model, advocated by companies like VMware and IBM, tech companies help large businesses develop “private clouds” in their own data centers, so that various departments and employees can rent computing capacity as they

need it without making big budget commitments. Though Amazon characteristically releases few statistics about its Web Services effort, Citibank estimates that it will generate between $500 million and $700 million this year. That’s less than 3 percent of Amazon’s annual revenue. Still, Jeffrey Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive, has predicted that its cloud computing division will one day generate as much revenue as its retail business does now. For that to happen, Amazon and other cloud providers will have to convince big business. Almost every big company is cautiously testing the waters these days. 3M, the St. Paul, Minn., conglomerate, is using Microsoft’s new Azure cloud ser-

vice to allow advertisers to tap into a service that mathematically analyzes promotional images and evaluates how visually effective they are likely to be. “It took a lot of the risk out of whether to commercialize it or not,” said Jim Graham, a technical manager at 3M. But most big organizations say they are wary of placing more critical software and business operations on another company’s computers. “We are no different than anybody else. We are concerned about privacy and security and compliance,” said Dave Powers, a senior systems engineer at Eli Lilly, the pharmaceutical giant based in Indianapolis, which uses Amazon’s cloud services for some research and development efforts. “We are very careful about what we are putting out there today.” When given a clean slate, many new companies have chosen a full embrace of the cloud model, figuring the technology industry has matured to the point where these types of services make basic business sense. For example, Arista Networks, a 5-year-old company that makes networking equipment, runs its sales software with a cloud software company called NetSuite, its corporate e-mail on Google Apps and other Web infrastructure with Amazon.com. “It’s so much easier,” said Andreas von Bechtolsheim, the co-founder of Arista and Sun Microsystems and one of the earliest investors in Google and VMware. “For a new company like us, you would just never build a traditional data center anymore.” Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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time on the Web. Analysts say Google struggled to gain market share in China partly because the company had failed to build a big enough online community around its search engine, unlike its chief rival here, Baidu.com. The surprising power of online communities in China has Communist Party leaders worried about the ability of online social networks to spread viral messages that could ignite social movements, and pose a challenge to the party and its leaders. “For the government, the scary part of the Internet is the unpredictable power of its organization,” said Yang Guobin, an associate professor at Barnard College and author of “The Power of the Internet in China” (Columbia University Press, 2009). “Although people are there socializing, it can provide a platform for lots of other activities, and even turn political,” he said. But young people in China say they are excited about the Web not because it offers a

means to rebellion, but because it gives them a wide variety of social and entertainment options. One of the more remarkable developments in the Internet in recent years has been the informal network of young people who volunteer to produce Chinese subtitles for popular American television series like “Prison Break” and “Gossip Girl.” The Chinese subtitles are often translated within hours of the program’s showing in the United States, and then attached to the video and made freely available on Chinese file-sharing sites. Chinese Internet companies have gleaned a lesson from this: entertainment trumps politics on the Web in China. “The Web is really a reflection of real life,” says Gary Wang, founder and chief executive of Tudou, one of China’s biggest video-sharing sites. “What people do in real life is they go to karaoke rooms, they go to bars, they get together with friends and they shop. And that’s what they do online.”

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B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp Aarons s AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed Abraxas AcadiaPh Accenture AccoBrds Accuray AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivPw h ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaSol Akorn AlancoTc h AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlphaNRs AlphaPro Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AltairN h AlteraCp lf AltraHldgs Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon AmbacF h AmbasInt h AmcorFn h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Ameriprise AmeriBrg s AmCasino Ametek Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Angiotch g AnglogldA ABInBev n AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigncs h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap ArgoGpInt AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdRsh ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG Astec AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone

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Nm Auxilium AvagoT n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvidTch AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJsRest BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BankMutl BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BankFla BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil BrcIndiaTR Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR Blockbst h BlckbsB h BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing BofI Hld Boise Inc Boise wt BonTon BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BrasT C n BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker Brinks BrinksHSec BrMySq Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF Broadwind BrcdeCm BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp h Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt BurgerKing C&D Tch CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNH Gbl CNX Gas CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC n CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusn n CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH CatalystPh Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g

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Nm CenGrdA lf CenPacF CentAl CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChathLT n ChkPoint Cheesecake ChemFinl CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChAdvCns n ChinAgri s ChinaArch ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChiElMot n ChiGerui n ChGerui wt ChinaGreen ChinaGrnT ChHousLd ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinIntE n ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve n ChXDPls n ChinaYuch ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRepB CitrixSys CityNC CityTlcm Clarcor ClaudeR g ClayChinSC ClayBRIC ClayGSol CleanEngy Clearwire Clearw rt ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogdSpen Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompDivHd CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh Compugn CompSci Compuwre CmstkHm h ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CorinthC CornPdts CornellCos Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc h CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Credicp CredSuiss Cree Inc CrimsnEx n Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CybrSrce Cyclacel CyprsBio CypSemi CytRx Cytec Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE Daimler Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DeanFds DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DltaPtr Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply DeutschBk DeutBCT5 pf DBGoldDL

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Nm

D

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13.04 +.01 1.05 13.48 -.06 0.08 12.59 -.01 0.64 65.19 2.36 70.49 -.40 0.50 87.79 +.58 0.03 10.34 +.01 14.58 -.38 28.19 -.67 1.08 33.21 +.15 1.92 54.72 -.21 0.16 27.63 +.31 43.66 -.03 23.25 -.36 36.16 +.61 28.11 173.09 +.05 7.04 +.01 23.09 132.94 -1.91 42.31 +.51 11.84 -.34 0.46 107.10 +2.71 0.04 8.31 -.12 12.32 185.60 +2.58 6.15 +.08 4.85 62.67 -.87 12.92 -.13 8.22 63.96 +.53 9.30 +.01 5.18 43.05 0.08 15.67 +.31 35.34 +.15 29.99 -.02 .53 -.02 2.00 21.50 -.02 0.35 36.17 +.34 0.13 26.75 +.15 11.24 +.17 11.88 +.14 29.01 +.41 34.44 -.19 59.20 -.69 1.83 41.28 +.10 14.86 +.04 73.04 -1.27 0.48 45.79 -.26 1.04 21.40 -.22 5.43 -.91 1.28 24.58 +1.88 10.84 -.08 0.40 16.27 +.07 1.04 47.75 -.03 0.60 30.77 +.23 0.60 34.09 +.06 9.81 -.03 1.81 +.16 41.57 +.99 28.66 -.35 33.76 -.05 3.67 -.07 6.20 -.21 1.64 39.37 +.71 0.32 21.96 -.43 0.96 16.07 +.06 0.68 12.83 +.06 .22 -.00 26.90 -1.34 3.55 -.10 1.46 +.02 17.25 -.04 1.17 -.03

E-F-G-H E-House 0.25 17.13 -1.30 ETrade 1.73 -.01 eBay 26.32 -.01 eHealth 15.04 -.32 EMC Cp 19.25 -.11 EMCOR 26.32 +.11 EOG Res 0.62 107.99 +.52 EQT Corp 0.88 43.68 -.08 ev3 Inc 16.26 -.22 EagleBulk 5.31 -.08 EagleMat 0.40 28.84 -.38 ErthLink 0.56 8.56 -.01 EstWstBcp 0.04 17.94 -.35 EastChm 1.76 65.56 +.26 EKodak 7.40 +.01 Eaton 2.00 79.15 -.24 EatnVan 0.64 34.28 -.15 EV LtdDur 1.39 16.36 +.12 EV TxDiver 1.62 13.45 +.03 EVTxMGlo 1.53 12.40 +.01 EVTxGBW 1.56 13.57 Ebix Inc s 15.75 -.46 Eclipsys 20.56 +.01 Ecolab 0.62 45.51 +.23 EdisonInt 1.26 33.85 -.08 EducRlty 0.20 6.71 +.01 EdwLfSci 103.60 -.75 ElPasoCp 0.04 11.18 +.08 Elan 7.53 -.19 EldorGld g 13.73 +.15 ElectArts 19.71 +.14 EFII 12.60 +.13 EBrasAero 0.72 23.75 -.13 Emcore 1.45 -.04 EmersonEl 1.34 51.65 -.15 EmpDist 1.28 18.81 +.12 Emulex 12.81 -.07 EnCana g s 0.80 31.00 -.14 Encorm rs 4.67 -.79 EndvrInt 1.47 -.02 EndvSilv g 3.48 -.02 EndoPhrm 24.18 +.96 EndurSpec 1.00 38.39 +.04 Ener1 4.29 -.11 EnerNOC 28.25 +.75 Energen 0.52 48.02 -.02 Energizer 61.24 -.04 EngyConv 7.13 -.10 EnrgyRec 6.29 -.05 EngyTEq 2.16 35.00 -.01 EngyTsfr 3.58 48.83 +.47 EgyXXI rs 20.06 -1.59 EnergySol 0.10 6.94 +.07 Enerpls g 2.16 23.41 -.12 Enersis 0.53 20.07 -.19 EnerSys 26.17 -.11 ENSCO 0.10 47.27 +.09 Entegris 5.69 -.03 Entercom 14.50 -.41 Entergy 3.32 80.55 +.36 EnteroMed .54 -.01 EntPrPt 2.27 35.94 +.34 Enterra gh 2.83 -.02 EnterPT 2.60 43.67 +.44 EntreMd h .60 -.02 EntropCom 5.16 -.12 EnzonPhar 10.51 +.13 Equifax 0.16 34.87 +.04 Equinix 97.85 -1.77 EqtyOne 0.88 18.43 +.12 EqtyRsd 1.35 41.15 +.04 EricsnTel 0.19 10.95 +.13 EscoTech 0.32 29.94 -1.95 EssexPT 4.13 96.15 -.20 EsteeLdr 0.55 67.42 -.47 Esterline 52.13 +.03 EthanAl 0.20 21.59 +.03 Euronet 20.41 +.73 EverestRe 1.92 81.77 +.57 EvergrnEn .24 -.01 EvgIncAdv 1.02 9.48 -.04 EvrgrSlr 1.18 +.06 ExactSci h 4.37 +.05 ExcelM 6.55 ExcoRes 0.12 19.55 -.39 Exelixis 5.89 -.14 Exelon 2.10 43.58 -.04 ExeterR gs 7.33 -.25 ExideTc 6.05 Expedia 0.28 24.71 -.14 ExpdIntl 0.38 39.33 -.07 ExpScripts 102.79 +2.01 ExterranH 27.26 -.30 ExtraSpce 0.23 13.50 +.14 ExtrmNet 3.64 +.19 ExxonMbl 1.68 68.23 +.30 EZchip 19.11 -.90 Ezcorp 21.95 +.56 F5 Netwks 65.76 -.49 FEI Co 22.60 +.41 FLIR Sys 29.10 -.19 FMC Corp 0.50 64.11 +.12 FMC Tech 65.01 -.97 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.76 -.09 FPL Grp 2.00 48.41 -.02 FSI Intl 4.10 -.04 FTI Cnslt 39.82 +.74 FacetBio 27.00 +.01 FactsetR 0.80 74.66 +.10 FairchldS 11.92 -.11 FamilyDlr 0.62 38.03 -.38 FannieMae 1.21 -.03 FMae pfP 1.08 +.03 Fastenal 0.80 54.87 +.55 FedExCp 0.44 92.55 -1.32 FedRlty 2.64 73.43 +.15 FedSignl 0.24 9.60 FedInvst 0.96 26.76 FelCor 7.91 -.13 Ferro 9.55 -.16 FibriaCelu 22.49 -.05 FidlNFin 0.60 15.04 +.29 FidNatInfo 0.20 25.16 -.03 FifthStFin 1.20 12.70 -.09 FifthThird 0.04 14.24 +.04 Finisar rs 16.35 -.41 FinLine 0.16 17.01 -.54 FstAmCp 0.88 36.00 +.17 FstBcpPR 2.72 -.04 FstCwlth 0.12 7.45 +.07 FFnclOH 0.40 19.29 +.44 FstHorizon 0.80 14.04 +.02 FstInRT 8.33 +.16 FstMarblhd 3.25 +.24 FMidBc 0.04 14.60 -.02 FstNiagara 0.56 14.41 +.03 FstSolar 132.80 -1.52 FT RNG 0.08 18.31 -.24 FirstEngy 2.20 37.54 -.31 FstMerit 0.64 22.90 +.07 Fiserv 53.19 +.18 FlagstrB h .66 -.03 Flextrn 7.77 -.15 Flotek h 1.69 -.05 FlowInt 3.48 +.05 Flowserve 1.16 114.81 -.33 Fluor 0.50 50.80 +.14 FocusMda 17.07 -.37 FEMSA 0.34 46.51 +.24 FootLockr 0.60 15.54 -.24 ForcePro 6.10 -.02 FordM 13.60 +.18 FordM wt 5.68 +.16 ForestCA 15.13 -.21 ForestLab 28.01 +.21 ForestOil 26.30 -.10 FormFac 19.60 -.63 Fortress 5.04 +.17 FortuneBr 0.76 51.74 -.26

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D 39.85 -1.22 29.86 +.12 1.97 23.17 -.03 0.88 119.22 +.77 1.43 -.08 1.30 -.01 1.62 +.02 0.16 13.23 +.43 0.60 80.80 -.38 0.24 28.19 -.83 .17 +.00 5.59 -.14 1.00 7.72 -.04 13.00 -.15 0.90 35.37 -.19 33.87 +.29 2.88 +.05 0.28 23.56 +.05 0.12 10.81 -.06 11.40 -.10 7.60 +.11 11.77 -.20 1.12 32.61 -.51 0.20 6.21 -.02 3.14 -.10 8.73 -.69 28.17 -.31 5.59 -.05 28.40 -.32 0.44 5.27 -.01 1.68 17.61 -.29 0.09 13.58 -.03 1.28 25.40 +.03 25.30 +.49 6.99 +.02 0.16 17.81 -.23 0.40 25.04 +.04 0.20 47.01 -.23 1.50 36.65 +.53 23.11 -.09 .40 -.01 30.87 +.45 21.13 -.35 5.77 +.26 29.78 -.17 1.68 76.14 +.10 0.40 18.94 -.03 15.10 -.28 0.50 7.90 1.96 70.31 +.11 3.58 -.05 3.97 .47 -.02 33.73 -.15 0.18 17.44 -.06 0.44 21.79 +.23 5.49 +.09 1.64 42.92 +.24 .72 -.00 18.34 +.24 53.58 -.06 18.91 -.25 .29 -.02 19.92 -.52 7.54 -.06 0.16 16.76 -.29 5.52 +.03 0.18 7.85 -.08 2.98 -.09 27.68 +.08 45.74 +.04 0.52 17.21 +.25 0.36 15.16 +.16 1.94 39.38 -.19 0.40 6.32 -.03 6.45 +.09 0.08 45.85 -.02 1.36 0.40 12.91 -.22 0.17 12.60 +.03 0.18 38.84 -.10 3.92 1.40 163.32 +2.62 1.55 24.50 0.96 21.40 -.40 1.02 21.70 -.30 1.08 70.18 -1.02 17.94 -.23 14.11 -.16 550.10 -.05 1.60 26.10 +.14 27.13 -.68 0.80 31.47 -.13 13.92 -.46 1.84 105.75 +.82 3.03 +.06 6.20 -.07 26.99 +.03 0.52 31.61 -.28 3.81 -.07 3.19 -.06 8.47 -.10 1.73 -.01 0.83 18.76 +.06 90.69 -3.66 14.69 -.01 33.53 -.17 2.11 +.04 6.12 +.05 1.19 21.10 +.15 0.64 46.43 -.59 13.03 -.42 0.05 1.12 -.03 52.23 0.54 27.22 +.29 1.86 31.45 +.28 0.60 146.06 +1.85 0.48 7.49 -.02 1.70 53.31 -.30 30.81 -.78 18.77 -.38 0.36 31.57 -.07 8.26 -.23 29.09 -.25 3.15 +.16 1.00 43.93 +.26 2.25 41.49 -.13 22.40 -.85 0.40 32.77 -.31 48.27 -.86 7.00 -.08 0.06 9.40 +.02 0.88 49.55 +.29 9.98 -.31 0.82 32.75 -.35 0.20 27.60 +.58 8.79 +.25 1.00 40.91 +1.06 4.65 25.04 +.34 1.24 22.85 +.10 7.29 +.09 5.15 +.03 2.72 43.25 -.03 1.91 24.59 -.11 0.88 21.70 -.15 8.29 +.03 1.20 23.15 +.40 23.55 +1.40 19.97 +.22 17.70 +.30 3.43 -.25 0.08 16.64 +.51 5.97 -.21 5.56 -.08 1.68 46.31 +.16 .78 -.04 15.97 -.18 0.53 5.80 -.12 0.20 39.45 -.30 .76 +.00 60.65 -.21 0.80 44.25 -.79 4.12 -.07 0.20 5.28 -.10 1.28 44.31 +.44 11.70 -.12 0.40 63.48 -.17 40.20 -.05 0.32 53.64 -.11 14.10 -.08 22.95 +.06 1.70 31.28 +.22 0.41 30.27 +.06 0.75 24.45 +.41 0.60 24.60 -.37 11.03 -.48 18.11 -.03 0.95 35.17 +.16 32.92 -.59 2.32 46.83 -.44 30.49 -.53 34.70 +.21 1.21 45.75 -.07 0.20 5.91 +.10 0.84 41.82 -.01

Nm Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hypercom Hyperdyn

D

1.80 0.04 0.28 0.02 0.60 0.83 0.48 0.04 0.40

19.55 55.57 25.46 14.83 8.21 12.70 5.38 14.44 17.56 31.49 44.66 37.04 5.49 11.71 6.90 4.06 1.58

-.62 -1.53 -.12 +.22 -.22 -.30 -.01 +.04 +.15 -.93 +.73 +.09 -.07 -.36 +.01 -.06 -.05

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D

0.30

1.96 0.52 0.20 0.20

0.70 0.25 0.20 0.28 0.60 0.96 1.92 1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.20

0.10 0.20 0.08

1.16 0.38

1.60

0.18 0.04 0.50

0.12 1.04 0.40 0.16

0.40

0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 1.12 0.04 0.92 2.52

1.43 2.52 0.25 4.00 0.36 1.24

2.18 +.01 9.81 -.74 27.57 +.17 6.70 +.07 42.95 -1.25 2.75 +.02 66.03 +1.01 32.71 +.02 21.13 -.26 75.75 +.06 1.07 -.03 60.30 -.58 5.29 +.26 59.58 -.90 31.18 -.03 50.09 -.36 17.09 -.01 22.69 -.17 8.52 -.03 33.26 -.12 20.40 -.13 1.66 -.12 40.01 +.08 37.34 -.84 26.73 -.55 53.78 -.26 19.29 +.88 31.64 -.56 4.53 -.16 10.06 -.14 8.13 +.13 34.58 +.74 1.06 -.02 62.15 +.33 15.15 +.02 66.95 +.52 17.43 -.01 47.79 -.13 11.42 -.15 2.51 -.08 17.76 +.07 14.72 +.11 21.34 +.03 12.72 +.22 3.60 -.06 56.76 -.38 7.44 -.41 4.37 +.02 15.71 -.30 17.81 -.44 30.79 +.13 4.06 -.16 23.50 -.14 8.18 -.45 12.10 -.31 8.73 +.14 95.15 +.35 7.73 -.03 18.78 -.20 7.63 -.06 20.58 +.15 6.44 -.04 3.43 13.25 -.24 1.57 -.03 79.33 +2.35 5.98 +.09 1.35 -.12 39.85 -.09 36.81 -.42 44.08 -.69 5.06 +.17 22.77 -.13 23.38 +.22 4.33 -.06 7.76 -.09 38.25 -.10 18.04 6.74 +.02 82.00 -1.02 4.40 +.05 32.07 -.22 22.12 +.05 37.63 +.64 17.24 +.09 26.97 +.17 1.64 -.03 1.55 -.03 7.00 +.08 38.61 -.04 10.15 1.63 +.16 4.80 28.55 -.40 16.33 -.06 43.27 +.37 32.76 +.06 52.25 +.43 33.81 -1.03 36.91 -.17 1.75 -.03 36.67 +.22 8.81 -.06 36.58 +.04 27.26 +.19 47.20 -.07 59.22 +.62 32.12 +.81 31.12 -.16 25.84 +.02 6.80 -.07 15.15 -.24 8.45 -.10 8.53 -.02 4.04 +.02 84.20 +1.21 38.20 +.40 17.10 -.01 35.43 +.02 78.06 +.71 11.15 +.08 26.45 +.25 91.31 +.68 1.05 -.03 42.33 -2.29

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys Magma MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr MaidenBrd Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarineMx MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg Maxygen McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH

2.80 84.10 -.15 0.04 24.34 +.04 9.53 +.66 6.30 +.15 1.00 33.54 -.11 1.22 +.01 8.98 +.08 0.63 21.77 -.09 15.51 -.74 9.25 -.06 0.96 7.24 +.04 0.58 6.60 +.11 12.51 -.09 14.03 -.34 0.80 55.71 -.11 36.49 -.76 0.24 40.14 +.31 1.80 35.17 0.20 22.90 -.08 3.39 -.08 63.36 -.01 4.41 3.75 -.05 23.03 -.06 0.08 14.82 -.47 6.48 -.05 0.74 57.75 +.40 0.52 19.30 +.15 0.96 32.05 +.03 11.07 +.01 25.37 -.08 0.11 46.59 -.06 0.98 67.45 -.92 0.08 34.87 -.36 27.08 -.16 0.42 43.60 -.16 0.45 46.06 -.09 0.31 38.32 -.39 2.56 31.28 +.02 0.16 33.88 0.80 24.75 +.09 0.04 8.41 6.70 +.20 1.60 89.79 -1.04 21.62 -.48 0.30 17.24 +.28 2.00 24.49 -.39 0.24 44.41 +2.14 12.58 -.12 0.60 257.30 -2.20 0.75 23.52 -.32 5.21 +.17 0.80 20.58 -.34 6.79 +.07 6.47 +.01 1.04 38.76 +.12 26.90 -.32 2.20 69.92 +.89 0.94 34.58 -.18

Nm McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp MediCo Medicis Medidata n Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio MeridRs h Meritage Mesab Metalico Metalline MetUSA n Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore Mind CTI MindrayM Mindspeed MineSaf Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel Mohawk MolecInP h Molex MolsCoorB MoneyGrm Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China MSEMDDbt MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Movado Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NTTDoCo NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr Nanosphere NasdOMX NBkGreece NatCineM NatFnPrt NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NavigCons Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng Neuralstem Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR nTelos NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvQPf2 Nvidia O2Micro OGE Engy OReillyA h OSI Phrm OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFrt h Och-Ziff Oclaro

D 0.48 64.43 +.24 13.19 -2.17 40.02 -.21 0.90 51.44 +.04 0.92 26.80 +.22 28.16 -.88 63.06 +1.24 6.60 +.34 0.80 9.71 +.08 8.42 -.05 0.24 25.12 -.15 15.71 -.25 29.89 +.39 10.91 +.09 58.17 -.12 0.82 44.83 -.07 4.64 -.11 24.95 -.14 0.36 24.92 -.84 9.31 -.02 49.25 -1.56 5.33 -.40 1.52 35.90 +.19 0.92 35.78 -.23 0.76 19.40 +.13 .29 -.01 20.10 -.29 0.90 21.38 +.64 6.26 +.06 1.20 -.06 19.05 -.59 0.62 24.13 -.10 0.28 11.11 -.21 0.74 45.98 +.61 7.48 +.01 0.14 11.79 +.06 1.36 29.88 -.26 7.77 -.14 10.79 -.13 34.57 -.35 17.18 -.39 0.52 31.04 +.37 3.43 +.05 2.46 51.19 +.67 .41 -.07 0.09 20.18 +.02 1.24 87.15 +.70 106.10 +.10 1.00 2.09 +.12 0.20 35.91 +.25 8.59 -.40 0.96 29.44 +.07 9.45 -.11 12.00 +.01 5.41 -.06 3.99 -.04 56.55 -.61 58.78 +1.58 2.61 +.35 0.61 21.75 -.13 0.96 43.76 -.22 3.30 -.08 1.06 66.75 +2.02 15.51 -.10 0.36 16.90 +.13 0.42 27.04 -.37 0.20 29.56 +.40 4.26 27.85 -.40 1.10 15.66 +.24 7.21 -.12 0.20 53.19 -.94 7.39 +.08 12.99 -.16 2.10 -.09 0.07 5.16 +.03 1.00 60.08 -.12 21.57 -.18 1.75 22.78 -.31 47.40 -1.59 13.85 -.73 15.00 -.12 26.66 +.20 40.93 +.06 3.63 +.21 6.35 +.25 22.06 +.21 0.54 16.49 +.22 0.44 12.32 +.06 1.20 31.59 -.62 19.66 +.14 0.14 24.75 -.30 10.46 -.24 5.53 +.51 21.58 +.18 0.31 3.48 -.13 0.64 19.06 +.43 15.50 +.47 1.34 52.54 -.11 0.40 42.54 +.06 0.04 7.61 +.06 1.50 23.63 +.20 0.32 15.57 -.10 1.76 33.93 +.20 2.16 25.47 +.21 12.69 -.11 0.24 6.64 -.19 1.64 18.90 +.28 49.99 -.15 14.11 -.17 1.98 -.04 16.64 +.18 12.13 +.25 32.31 -.38 34.79 -.36 35.16 +.06 13.34 -.25 84.80 -.51 3.11 -.25 2.85 +.23 2.28 -.06 3.15 +.04 25.49 -.83 16.73 -.08 2.88 -.01 .11 -.00 5.14 -.01 1.36 37.33 -.34 92.01 +1.43 1.00 17.57 +.01 12.11 -.24 0.28 12.65 -.01 3.63 -.01 0.20 16.75 +.09 52.61 -.13 0.40 52.22 +.07 6.12 -.15 0.15 15.78 +.03 0.15 18.20 +.08 0.20 25.62 +.18 .45 -.00 .44 -.00 0.92 16.39 +.07 1.86 43.28 +.12 1.08 75.58 +.41 15.85 -.06 0.29 20.92 -.13 0.20 40.22 -.16 0.72 77.32 +.02 0.56 15.15 +.21 7.28 +.01 1.73 31.32 -.08 0.64 42.19 -.76 1.36 59.39 -.08 5.18 -.05 1.03 27.46 +.08 9.68 -.22 16.60 -.25 1.12 58.37 +.98 3.00 -.01 1.72 66.42 +.45 0.40 4.56 +.05 0.40 11.73 -.07 7.37 -.13 1.99 53.37 +.02 6.82 +.05 2.54 -.02 5.74 -.02 26.48 -.12 1.60 36.44 -.04 1.12 19.85 +.04 0.50 30.46 -.52 43.03 -.02 17.41 -.40 1.44 45.53 -.11 0.70 19.69 +.31 0.65 7.76 -.11 16.98 -.08 7.40 +.05 1.45 39.67 -.15 43.84 +.26 59.28 -.24 1.32 84.69 -.37 62.65 -.43 .76 -.02 0.72 17.37 +.41 2.56 -.04

D

OcwenFn 11.83 -.30 OdysseyHlt 19.17 +.16 OdysMar 1.38 -.02 OfficeDpt 7.94 -.07 OfficeMax 15.16 -.50 OilSvHT 1.81 125.39 -.25 OilStates 45.05 -1.08 Oilsands g .86 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 12.76 +.19 OldRepub 0.69 13.88 +.15 Olin 0.80 21.06 +.11 OmegaHlt 1.28 19.60 +.30 Omncre 0.09 29.72 +.20 Omnicom 0.80 41.12 +.59 OmniVisn 17.82 -.33 Omnova 7.56 -.18 OnSmcnd 8.51 -.18 1800Flowrs 3.17 +.08 ONEOK 1.76 47.39 -.06 OnyxPh 29.62 -.51 OpnwvSy 2.69 +.29 OpexaTher 2.33 -.04 OpkoHlth 2.28 -.07 Opnext 2.32 -.01 optXprs 17.76 +.55 Oracle 0.20 26.19 +.24 OraSure 6.36 -.25 OrbitalSci 19.13 +.12 Orexigen 5.87 +.22 OrientEH 13.80 -.42 OrientFn 0.16 15.32 -.39 OriginAg 9.31 -.55 OrmatTc 0.48 30.27 +.32 Orthovta 4.55 -.05 OshkoshCp 42.40 -.52 OvShip 1.75 46.87 -.72 OwensM s 0.71 31.76 +.40 OwensCorn 28.98 +.20 OwensIll 35.59 -.37 PDL Bio 1.00 6.57 +.29 PF Chng 45.49 -.42 PG&E Cp 1.82 42.75 +.22 PHH Corp 24.26 -.07 PMC Sra 9.26 -.16 PMI Grp 6.72 -.36 PNC 0.40 63.50 +.48 PNM Res 0.50 12.78 +.01 POSCO 1.71 117.56 -.77 PPG 2.16 70.20 +1.04 PPL Corp 1.40 27.40 -.07 PSS Wrld 23.66 -.03 Paccar 0.36 46.64 +.75 PacerIntl 6.75 -.23 PacCapB 2.91 +.03 PacEthan 1.06 -.09 PacSunwr 5.79 -.16 PackAmer 0.60 24.68 -.64 Pactiv 25.52 -.36 PaetecHld 4.40 -.23 Palatin .30 +.05 PallCorp 0.64 39.23 +.23 Palm Inc 4.92 -.67 PanASlv 0.05 25.13 +.20 PaneraBrd 83.16 -.58 ParPharm 27.72 -.65 ParagShip 0.20 4.63 +.01 ParamTch 19.24 -.02 ParaG&S 1.60 +.06 Parexel 24.15 +.24 ParkNatl 3.76 70.06 +5.21 ParkDrl 4.97 +.01 ParkerHan 1.04 69.39 +.32 Parkrvsn 1.78 -.10 PartnerRe 2.00 79.65 +.06 PatriotCoal 21.63 -.27 Patterson 0.40 31.80 -.22 PattUTI 0.20 14.48 +.04 Paychex 1.24 31.08 +.26 PeabdyE 0.28 45.42 -.60 Pengrth g 0.84 11.25 +.06 PnnNGm 28.84 -.41 PennVa 0.23 27.17 -.39 PennVaGP 1.52 18.45 +.36 PennWst g 1.80 20.04 Penney 0.80 31.46 +.37 PenRE 0.60 14.54 +.29 Penske 15.05 -.37 Pentair 0.76 36.23 -.23 PeopUtdF 0.62 16.00 -.40 PepBoy 0.12 12.02 -.38 PepcoHold 1.08 16.83 +.16 PepsiCo 1.92 66.12 -.02 Peregrne rs 4.09 +.09 PerfectWld 34.78 +.46 PerkElm 0.28 23.44 -.06 Prmian 0.91 18.09 -.16 Perrigo 0.25 59.47 -.88 PetMed 0.40 22.87 -.34 PetChina 3.72 117.89 -.17 Petrohawk 21.82 -.53 PetrbrsA 1.07 38.16 +.78 Petrobras 1.07 42.88 +.60 PtroqstE 5.74 +.02 PetsMart 0.40 32.24 -.27 Pfizer 0.72 16.79 -.01 PFSweb 4.00 +.05 PhmHTr 7.52 65.40 +.50 PharmPdt 0.60 26.22 +.27 Pharmacyc 7.85 -.08 PhaseFwd 16.81 +.01 PhilipMor 2.32 51.35 +.61 PhilipsEl 0.95 33.53 +.71 PhlVH 0.15 62.84 -.87 PhnxCos 3.45 -.01 PhotrIn 5.44 -.13 PiedNG 1.12 27.52 -.01 Pier 1 8.73 -.23 PilgrmsP n 11.95 -.22 PimCpOp 1.38 15.80 -.24 PimcIncStr 0.75 10.62 -.30 PimIncSt rt .29 +.00 PimIncStr2 0.70 9.33 PimIncS2 rt .23 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.02 -.20 PinnclEnt 11.24 -.24 PinnaclFn 17.94 -.29 PinWst 2.10 37.49 -.03 PionDrill 7.22 +.04 PioNtrl 0.08 61.40 +.66 PitnyBw 1.46 24.94 +.18 PlainsAA 3.74 58.72 -.01 PlainsEx 32.27 -.77 Plantron 0.20 31.88 +.12 PlatGpMet 2.40 +.04 PlatUnd 0.32 36.18 +.02 PlatoLrn 5.68 -.08 PlugPwr h .63 -.03 PlumCrk 1.68 40.23 +.54 Polaris 1.60 56.88 +.70 Polo RL 0.40 90.76 +.75 Polycom 31.82 -.14 PolyMet g 2.29 -.05 PolyOne 11.32 +.17 Poniard h 1.26 -.01 Pool Corp 0.52 24.93 +1.04 Popular 3.78 -.02 Popular cvpf 31.25 -.22 PortGE 1.02 19.52 +.04 PostPrp 0.80 24.00 +.29 Potash 0.40 106.75 -1.05 Potlatch 2.04 37.46 +.39 PwrInteg 0.20 43.34 -1.31 Power-One 4.89 +.02 PSCrudeDS 60.37 +1.52 PwshDB 23.94 -.31 PS Agri 24.57 -.01 PS BasMet 22.54 -.28 PS USDBull 23.69 +.04 PwSClnEn 10.12 -.10 PwSWtr 0.12 17.75 -.16 PSFinPf 1.36 17.30 PSVrdoTF 0.19 24.99 PwShPfd 1.04 13.80 -.03 PShEMSov 1.65 26.43 -.03 PSIndia 0.13 22.70 +.12 PwShs QQQ 0.21 49.50 -.03 Powrwav 1.56 -.01 Pozen 10.16 -.06 PranaBio 2.41 +1.06 Praxair 1.80 87.13 +.32 PrecCastpt 0.12 122.92 -.84 PrecDril 7.30 -.10 PrmWBc h .71 -.03 PriceTR 1.08 57.65 +.93 priceline 247.58 -7.28 PrideIntl 32.01 +.09 Primerica n 23.30 +.52 PrinFncl 0.50 29.67 +.63 PrivateB 0.04 14.23 +.21 ProShtS&P 48.31 -.16 PrUShS&P 29.47 -.25 ProUltDow 0.53 49.78 +.61 PrUlShDow 25.24 -.31 PrUShMC 16.82 +.07 ProUltQQQ 68.95 -.12 PrUShQQQ 15.84 +.04 ProUltSP 0.41 44.02 +.31 ProUShL20 47.90 +.20 ProUShBrz 22.40 -.02 PrUShtSem 14.15 +.17 PrUSCh25 rs 39.25 +.78 ProUSEM rs 49.29 +.42 ProUSRE rs 28.97 -.27 ProUSOG rs 56.79 -.03 ProUSBM rs 34.22 +.21 ProUltRE rs 0.50 41.63 +.33 ProUShtFn 17.78 -.33 ProUFin rs 0.30 72.83 +1.18 ProUltSemi 0.19 39.41 -.49 PrUPShR2K 45.07 +.68 ProUltO&G 0.22 36.65 -.08 ProUBasM 0.15 36.66 -.34 ProUPR2K 135.91 -2.18 ProShtR2K 38.21 +.19 ProUltPQQQ 120.38 -.19 ProUSR2K 18.62 +.17 ProUltR2K 0.04 36.73 -.30 ProUSSP500 27.84 -.35 ProUltSP500 0.23 185.52 +1.72 ProUltCrude 12.99 -.38 ProUSSlv rs 39.13 -.05 ProUShCrude 12.21 +.33 ProSUltSilv 59.16 -.23 ProUShEuro 20.82 +.08 ProceraNt .59 +.06 ProctGam 1.93 63.22 +.37 ProgrssEn 2.48 39.02 +.32 ProgsvCp 0.16 20.73 +.37 ProLogis 0.60 13.69 +.08 ProspctCap 1.64 11.99 +.12 ProspBcsh 0.62 42.18 -.35 Protalix 6.67 -.08 ProtLife 0.48 23.85 -.04 ProvET g 0.72 7.78 +.02 ProvidFS 0.44 12.45 Prudentl 0.70 63.67 +.83 PsychSol 31.24 +.43 PSEG 1.37 30.26 +.01 PubStrg 2.60 92.46 +.60 PudaCoal n 9.62 -.28 PulteGrp 11.11 +.01

Nm

D

PureBio PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

0.53 0.64 0.68

Nm 2.71 7.35 6.11 6.59

+.08 -.05 -.05 -.02

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QiaoXing Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfG RC2 RCN RF MicD RHI Ent h RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadNet Radcom RadianGrp RadientPh RadioOneD RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalEnt RgcyCtrs Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h RepubAir RepubSvc ResCare RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn ResrceCap RetailHT RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RichrdElec RigelPh RINO Int n RioTinto RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prM RBSct prN RBSc prP RBSct prQ RBSct prR RBSct prS RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubyTues Rudolph RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntlSC SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwCM SpdrKbwIns SpdrSemi SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrMetM SPX Cp STEC STMicro STR Hld n SVB FnGp SWS Grp SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SavientPh Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schulmn SchwUSMkt SchwUSLgC SchUSSmC Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames ScolrPh Scotts ScrippsNet ScrippsEW SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy s Seanergy SearsHldgs SeattGen SelCmfrt SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous Sensata n Sensient Sequenom ServiceCp 7DaysGp n ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin Shire Shutterfly SiderNac s Siemens Sify SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilganHld SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp SimpsnM

23.76 +.04 1.80 -.03 20.94 -.15 0.76 42.75 +.01 19.47 +.14 2.88 .71 +.01 0.40 59.86 +1.60 18.23 -.05 0.52 45.51 +.16 8.50 -.08 3.40 -.03 14.24 -.09 5.05 -.09 0.32 5.32 -.03 2.39 +.03 1.52 14.01 -.09 17.35 +.72 14.68 -.10 5.43 -.05 .37 -.08 0.82 20.95 -.23 4.14 +.01 7.87 -.11 26.42 +.20 19.93 -.13 3.40 -.25 5.88 +1.60 0.01 17.61 -.28 1.12 -.10 4.79 -.01 0.25 23.36 +.04 66.43 +.25 22.79 -.21 0.17 79.09 -.83 0.16 48.52 -1.23 .90 -.00 0.44 29.76 +.35 2.00 47.32 +1.21 1.50 58.61 +.29 4.40 -.02 1.72 31.51 +.08 30.70 -.40 26.27 -1.51 3.10 +.20 1.00 15.90 +.25 0.72 17.49 +.49 1.85 38.11 -.27 25.53 -.87 0.59 91.37 +.42 0.04 8.33 +.03 0.16 19.24 +.05 28.66 -.02 0.48 55.33 +.93 0.40 51.59 -.47 1.00 57.24 +.34 6.46 +.13 23.85 -.01 1.09 -.04 .71 -.02 6.36 -.15 0.76 30.29 -.09 12.06 -.06 71.09 -.94 61.87 +.25 12.87 -.07 1.00 6.79 +.07 1.54 104.51 +.23 12.94 -.26 2.47 -.37 3.60 54.17 +.33 0.08 10.66 +.61 8.05 -.20 18.99 -.30 1.80 235.05 +.08 1.37 +.01 27.95 -.80 0.52 30.52 -.14 0.60 48.30 -.64 1.16 59.27 -.74 0.96 63.93 -.27 27.54 +.37 1.28 34.46 +.33 0.38 60.65 -.15 22.68 -.38 25.89 -.15 0.64 56.06 -.36 36.87 -.73 30.50 +.07 2.00 61.04 +.59 15.61 +.56 1.60 14.09 -.02 1.59 14.10 -.01 1.56 14.09 -.01 1.69 14.36 +.11 1.53 14.10 1.65 14.25 +.09 1.81 15.08 +.07 33.72 -.81 3.36 58.84 -.02 3.36 61.00 -.11 0.36 47.71 -.33 3.82 -.09 11.51 -.03 9.62 -.18 5.50 -.20 29.46 +.23 1.00 43.36 +.01 0.52 43.67 +.01 0.12 22.63 +.06 6.15 -.11 18.19 +.22 0.67 48.50 -.12 34.25 -.57 1.90 38.54 -.12 0.18 23.80 +.01 8.35 -.06 17.95 -.11 0.40 59.39 +1.03 12.65 -.03 9.83 -.36 2.47 110.84 +.66 111.15 -.09 0.18 27.18 -.28 1.67 148.40 -.46 2.21 119.81 +.45 1.67 50.29 +.11 0.13 17.88 +.02 0.25 27.47 +.21 0.26 38.75 +.26 0.46 42.80 +.52 0.36 50.97 -.62 1.79 54.42 +.23 4.86 39.59 -.17 0.36 27.73 +.14 0.50 43.03 -.34 0.25 43.42 -.29 0.37 56.95 -.63 1.00 66.89 -.47 13.72 +.40 0.12 10.31 +.06 21.96 +1.20 48.00 -.60 0.36 11.61 -.03 0.60 8.03 +.01 0.40 26.22 -.12 35.22 +.01 40.90 +.02 0.10 38.00 -.32 9.39 +.07 82.65 -.83 38.81 +.09 9.13 +.16 .83 +.18 0.96 23.03 +.21 36.69 -1.05 6.98 -.21 6.07 +.02 18.01 -.16 1.63 36.66 -.05 3.44 -.15 0.35 9.77 -.07 0.44 14.14 +.18 1.19 39.98 -.54 2.73 -.06 5.39 +.07 14.89 -.07 0.84 65.24 -.56 0.07 55.18 -1.36 0.30 27.68 +.36 0.60 25.06 -.03 0.17 28.54 +.06 0.15 28.33 +.08 0.13 30.99 -.18 0.24 19.06 +.10 0.60 52.41 +.04 4.17 -.13 14.28 -.17 1.33 +.05 0.50 47.95 -.53 0.30 43.55 +.17 9.95 -.13 27.78 -.22 1.98 -.32 25.51 -.61 19.09 -.16 0.48 22.56 +.11 3.62 -.08 1.34 -.02 107.77 11.39 -.13 8.54 -.16 0.45 29.91 -.13 1.56 49.50 +.40 18.66 -.19 1.44 21.68 -.11 19.07 -.17 0.76 31.67 +1.04 6.05 +.25 0.16 9.54 +.02 10.24 -.09 7.05 -.35 44.05 -1.00 36.25 +.48 1.44 73.17 +.21 1.20 19.82 -.04 0.34 67.40 -.65 23.69 -.69 0.19 19.25 -.21 2.41 97.94 +1.56 1.80 +.08 11.74 -.38 0.64 56.04 +.47 33.56 -.42 0.84 63.63 -.60 10.01 -.09 3.52 -.04 50.34 -1.71 5.70 -.29 0.28 6.48 -.09 18.93 +.05 17.11 -.11 0.08 7.37 -.08 2.40 82.90 +.63 0.40 30.80 +.27

Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM h SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkilldHcre SkyWest SkywksSol SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWds n Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwtGas SwstnEngy SovranSS SpanBdc h SpartnMot SprtnStr Spartch SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n StageStrs Stamps.cm StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite StewEnt StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker StuLnCp SuccessF SulphCo Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunPowerA SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperMicro SuperGen SupEnrgy SuperWell Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwERCmTR SwftEng Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Symmetry Synaptics Syneron Syngenta Syniverse Synnex Synopsys Synovus Syntroleum Sysco TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots Taleo A TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Targacept Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl TeckRes g Teekay TeekOffsh TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone TeleTech Telik h Tellabs TelmxIntl TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TerNRoy n Terremk TerreStar Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis Thrmogn ThmBet ThomCrk g Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3Par TianyinPh TibcoSft Tidwtr TierOne hlf Tiffany TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMach TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros TomoThera Trchmrk TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi Towerstm Toyota TractSupp TradeStatn TrnsatlPt n TransGlb Transocn TranSwt rs TravelCtrs Travelers TreeHse n TriValley TricoMar TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Tri-Tech n

D

0.16

0.78 0.48 1.40 1.20 0.62

0.25

1.08 0.27 0.20 1.82 0.76 0.60 0.02 1.00 1.80 0.10 0.20 1.00

0.20 0.80 0.52 0.53 0.73 0.41 1.00 0.20 0.59 0.31 1.26 1.32 0.36 0.20 0.40 0.20 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.44 0.06 0.07 0.12

0.60 1.40 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

1.13

0.04 1.00 0.09 0.20 0.80 0.28 0.71 0.60

0.46

0.23 1.55 2.07 0.68 0.13 1.66 0.10 1.27 1.80 1.40 2.93 0.76 4.20 1.33

0.02 0.25 0.44 0.50 0.86

0.64 0.48 0.08

0.28 2.10 0.10 1.00 0.80 1.60 0.85 0.36 0.02

0.60 2.44 3.23 0.28 0.28

0.56

1.32

0.32

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D

Triumph TrueBlue TrueRelig TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

0.16 72.21 15.21 29.88 8.31 1.00 47.15 0.79 15.70 0.64 28.34 0.80 39.81 0.16 19.90

+.79 -.04 -.21 +.07 -.64 -.08 -.15 -.11 +.02

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R M R Ww m G m D N mm O&G m m w mG

0.10 0.72 0.80

0.20 1.56 0.67 0.67 1.08

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0.20 1.70 0.03 0.20 0.33

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1.60 1.36 2.1

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+.14 -1.17 -.08 +.27 -.02 -.02 -.26 -.02 +.02 -.06 -.01 -.24 -.11 -1.44 -1.14 -.01 +.46 -.09 -.26 -.28 -.20 -.56 -.10 -.21 -.03 -.02 +.02 +.08 +.10 +.16 -.15 -.12 -.49 -1.89 +.07 +.33 +.50 +.90 +.16 -.15 -.44 +.13 +.10 -.48 +.14 -.48 -.13 -.37 -.05 -.14 +.22 +.09 -.51 -.03 +.30 -.11 +.09 +.12 -.15 +.15 -.07 -.10 +.11 -.36 -.60 +.16 +.22 +.18 -.15 -.20 -.18 -.07 +.30 -.09 -.06 -.25 -.44 +.09 -.46 -.65 -.01


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Tax credit

lent employees, according to the IRS. If a company employs 10 or fewer people at an average annual salary of $25,000 or less, it would receive the maximum credit: 35 percent of whatever it paid on employees’ insurance premiums, said Richard Panick, a spokesman for the IRS. Take, for example, a company that pays 70 percent of its employees’ $100 monthly insurance premiums. If there are 10 employees, the company would pay $8,400 a year on the premiums. And if that company is paying each of those 10 employees less than $25,000 a year, the company would be eligible for $2,940 a year in tax credits. The tax credit will increase in

Continued from B1 For an employee’s premium that costs $100 a month, an employer would be required to contribute $50. If an employee adds family members and it increases the cost of the premium to $120, the employer would still qualify for the credit if it only pays $50, according to the IRS, even though that is less than 50 percent of the premium. Additionally, a company could have more than 25 employees and still qualify if some of those people work only part-time. Potentially, an employer could have 50 part-time workers, and therefore 25 full-time equiva-

Hoodoo

ski business, he has stepped down as CEO and turned over management to son-in-law Matthew McFarland, ski area general manager, although Shepard still works on the butte through the season. He’s also still thoroughly involved in Hoodoo Recreation, which operates campgrounds in five national forests: the Deschutes and Willamette, in Oregon, and the Gifford Pinchot, Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie and Okanogan-Wenatchee, in Washington. Shepard plans on handing the recreation business off to the next generation, too, he said. Hoodoo manages more campgrounds in Oregon than the state does, he said, and it’s the same in Washington. The Forest Service contracts with concessionaires to operate campgrounds in national forests

Continued from B1 “We’ve gone from about 8 percent of what (Mt.) Bachelor did a decade ago, to about 25 percent of what they do, while we’re open,” he said, noting that Mt. Bachelor ski area has a longer season. This year, Mt. Bachelor has scheduled May 16 as the final day of alpine skiing. Under Shepard’s ownership, Hoodoo added a 60,000-squarefoot lodge, which fully opened for the 2002-03 season, high-speed chairlifts in the same season and the Autobahn Tube Area in 200304, according to The Bulletin archives. Financially, Hoodoo did not set any records this season, “but still, it’s OK,” he said. While Shepard still owns the

Google

her) personal computer and then to the computers of a critical group of software developers at Google’s headquarters in Mountain View, Calif. Ultimately, the intruders were able to gain control of a software repository used by the development team. The details surrounding the theft of the software have been a closely guarded secret by the company. Google first publicly disclosed the theft in a Jan. 12 posting on the company’s Web site, which stated that the company was changing its policy toward China in the wake of the theft of unidentified “intellectual property” and the apparent compromise of the e-mail accounts of two human rights activists. The accusations became a significant source of tension between the United States and China, leading Secretary of State

Continued from B1 The new details seem likely to increase the debate about the security and privacy of vast computing systems such as Google’s that now centralize the personal information of millions of individuals and businesses. Because vast amounts of digital information are stored in one place, a single breach can lead to disastrous losses. The theft began with a single instant message sent to a Google employee in China, according to the person with knowledge of the inquiry, who spoke on the condition he not be identified. By clicking on a link and connecting to a “poisoned” Web site, the employee inadvertently permitted the intruders to gain access to his (or

2014 to 50 percent of what a business pays in health care costs. As a company begins paying its employees more money, and starts hiring more of them, the amount it can earn in tax credits is phased out. Once employees’ average annual salary exceeds $50,000, or a company hires more than 25 full-time equivalent workers, the credit is no longer available, according to the IRS. “The credit is specifically targeted to help small businesses and tax-exempt organizations that primarily employ low- and moderate-income workers,” according to an IRS release. The IRS is mailing postcards to eligible companies this week, but it encourages all businesses

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 B5

to inquire about the credit, Panick said. Trina Robison, owner of the Pack, Ship & More in Prineville, will likely receive one of those letters because of her two parttime employees. Robison said she doesn’t think a credit of that size would be enough of a financial incentive to buy insurance for either of her employees. If she hired a full-time manager for the store, Robison said she might consider it. “I’d have to really look,” she said. “It would really depend on how much that health care would cost.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

under a law passed in 1950, and Shepard said Hoodoo Recreation has invested more than $500,000 in improvements in Deschutes National Forest campgrounds, over and above maintenance. Hoodoo’s campground contracts in the Willamette National Forest are up for renewal this year, and Shepard said he would like to manage all the forest’s campgrounds. Currently, Hoodoo manages about 75 percent. “This year, we are bidding on all of it,” he said. Hoodoo also plans to bid on contracts in the Siuslaw and Mt. Hood national forests. In 2007, Hoodoo Recreation received permission from the Forest Service to build an alpine slide and a zip line for summertime use. Shepard said those plans have been delayed, at least until the campground management

contracts settle out. Along with managing federal campgrounds, Shepard’s company owns five recreational vehicle parks, and last year, he bought the Crescent Lake Lodge & Resort. Another Shepard company, Umbrella Properties, operates about 2,100 rental units, mostly in the southern Willamette Valley. It’s now expanding east of the Cascades. Shepard said he is scheduled to close on a 133-unit apartment building near Central Oregon Community College on May 1. All together, the three legs of Shepard’s business — the ski area, campground, RV and resorts and rental properties — employ about 500 people. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

said privately that the company had been far more transparent about the intrusions than any of the more than two dozen other companies that were compromised, the vast majority of which have not acknowledged the attacks. Google continues to use the Gaia password system, now known as Single Sign-On, but has tightened the security of its data centers and further secured the communications links between its services and the PCs of its users. Hours after announcing the intrusions, for example, Google said it would activate a new layer of encryption for Gmail service. Several technical experts said that because Google had quickly learned of the theft of the software, it is unclear what the consequences of the theft have been.

Hillary Clinton to urge China to conduct a “transparent” inquiry into the attack. In March, after difficult discussions with the Chinese government, Google said it would move its mainland Chinese-language Web site and begin rerouting queries to its Hong Kong-based site. The company also gave a classified briefing to the Senate Intelligence Committee in March, but it did not describe the nature of the stolen software, according to a person familiar with the testimony. Company executives on Monday declined to comment about the new details of the case, saying that they had dealt with the security issues raised by the theft of the company’s intellectual property in their initial statement in January. Google executives have also

Flash Ink Continued from B1 Whether it’s a business or a sports group, Wellisch said prices are typically the same, unless orders get into the thousands. Then, he can pass along discounts from his distributors, he said. Having worked in various small businesses from the time he was a teenager until now, Wellisch said price is something he always takes into consideration. “In an economy like this, if you can be remembered, you’re ahead of the game,” he said about trying to keep competitive pricing. Wellisch learned much of his trade on the job. He frequently produces T-shirt designs using Adobe Illustrator, which he previously had no experience using, for clients such as Motorcycles of Bend. Before moving to Bend, Wellisch spent more than a decade working in the snowboarding and skateboarding industry, most recently as a sales representative for Arizona, Southern California and Nevada at Arbor board company. “I learned a lot about business-to-business sales, which has helped me with this,” said Wellisch, 31. Wellisch said his customer base varies, from the grocery chain Whole Foods to Bend Garbage & Recycling. Currently, he’s working on about eight different projects, giving him a full plate. “He’s pretty good at trying to help us with what our specific needs are,” said Susan Baker, marketing manager of Bend Garbage & Recycling. Those needs have been as typical as a T-shirt order, Baker said, and as unusual as a flying disc made out of recycled content, with Bend Garbage & Recycling advertising on it. Sustainable products are important to Wellisch. He

uses environmentally friendly inks, he participates in the Blue Sky program through Pacific Power and all of his solvents and chemicals are from citrusbased cleaners, he said. Most important, he said, is finding more local customers and getting the word out about his company’s mantra: “If you can think of it, we can put your name on it.” Wellisch answered the following questions:

Q: A:

Why did you move to Bend? We came up and visited (from Arizona), and we were like, “Yeah, man.” It’s got everything that we really like to do.

Q: A:

What actually made you decide to buy Flash Ink? It was something totally different. I’d been a commssion-only employee for a long time. It was just the next step. (It had) been established for three years. Pioneering a brand is hard work. The fact that I didn’t have to completely pioneer it (was appealing).

Q: A:

Do you have any plans to expand? We’re constantly expanding. Every week we get new customers.

Q: A:

Why is making your company as green as possible important? It kind of goes hand-inhand with a lot of things. I believe in buying local. I buy from as many local vendors as I can. Recycling is huge, man. The less impact you can make on the earth is how you can make it go.

David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

www.educate.com

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

TONY

DeBONE Deschutes County COMMISSIONER ★ ★ ★ ★ REPUBLICAN CANDIDATE ★ ★ ★ ★ PAID FOR BY CITIZENS FOR TONY DEBONE

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

15 13 88 ... 40 ... ... 29 23 51 20 15 28 22 ... 12 ... ... 16 ... 17

41.88 -1.21 +21.2 21.45 +.20 -.6 18.39 -.02 +22.1 14.30 -.03 +16.4 70.96 +.17 +31.1 .67 +.02 -1.6 33.60 -.42 +22.2 57.82 +.29 +48.1 59.47 +.28 +.5 2.57 +.01 +7.1 29.10 -.19 -11.1 53.64 -.11 +4.1 15.79 -.14 +18.6 24.00 +.08 +17.6 8.13 +.13 +46.5 23.50 -.14 +14.5 4.33 -.06 +60.4 11.15 +.08 +59.7 21.77 -.09 -7.8 9.31 -.02 +5.4 31.04 +.37 +1.8

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1135.00 $1135.20 $17.725

Pvs Day $1135.00 $1136.30 $17.669

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

22 22 17 89 95 ... 27 18 ... 88 19 12 48 59 ... 28 ... 13 ... ...

75.58 +.41 +14.4 42.19 -.76 +12.3 47.59 +.19 +5.7 15.16 -.50 +19.5 46.64 +.75 +28.6 3.52 +.02 +25.3 40.23 +.54 +6.5 122.92 -.84 +11.4 26.22 -.12 +23.2 55.18 -1.36 +15.7 73.17 +.21 +18.7 49.61 +.90 +24.0 24.90 -.06 +8.0 7.73 -.18 +28.8 14.29 +.46 +6.6 27.61 +.16 +22.7 20.41 -.02 +5.5 33.02 +.46 +22.3 2.80 -.04 +33.3 48.30 +.44 +12.0

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name Citigrp BkofAm SPDR Fncl S&P500ETF AmbacF h

Vol (00)

Last Chg

17157607 4.88 +.32 3494306 18.39 -.02 2467124 16.52 +.16 2002573 119.81 +.45 1443249 1.94 +.18

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CornellCos ConE pfC BiP GCrb StratABK37 CAI Intl

Last

Chg %Chg

24.50 +6.03 100.55 +16.75 26.26 +3.00 2.36 +.26 13.01 +1.04

+32.6 +20.0 +12.9 +12.4 +8.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name W Holding DoralFncl McMoRn McMo pfM SunriseSen

Last

Indexes

Most Active ($1 or more) Name RexahnPh BootsCoots GoldStr g NwGold g NA Pall g

53785 37275 33320 32739 31380

Name

2.47 2.95 3.92 5.14 5.18

PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft Cisco Palm Inc

-.37 +.01 ... -.01 -.05

MtnPDia g ContMatls ParkNatl NIVS IntT IEC Elec n

Last

B&HO RexahnPh Sifco CheniereEn BovieMed

1,334 1,728 129 3,191 101 12

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last

Vol (00) 894594 704598 634641 433969 388938

Last Chg 49.50 24.00 31.04 27.07 4.92

-.03 +.08 +.37 +.09 -.67

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.35 +.23 +10.9 16.50 +1.50 +10.0 70.06 +5.21 +8.0 3.63 +.21 +6.1 5.43 +.29 +5.6

Name

-18.7 -14.4 -14.1 -11.3 -9.4

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

5.49 -1.26 5.43 -.91 13.19 -2.17 98.51 -12.49 4.54 -.47

Nasdaq

Name

Last

Fst M&F MolecInP h KonaGrill ValueLine Webzen

Chg %Chg

3.97 +.71 +21.8 2.61 +.35 +15.5 4.80 +.64 +15.4 24.90 +3.17 +14.6 3.47 +.44 +14.5

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.10 -.81 -16.4 2.47 -.37 -13.0 14.45 -1.54 -9.6 4.50 -.47 -9.5 5.32 -.43 -7.5

Name

Last

EmmisC pf PrvtMed rs ChGerui wt TricoMar Palm Inc

Diary

Chg %Chg

18.64 -4.76 -20.3 2.25 -.40 -15.1 2.09 -.30 -12.6 2.50 -.35 -12.3 4.92 -.67 -12.0

Diary 222 274 39 535 14 1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,020 1,673 119 2,812 116 14

11,154.55 4,758.19 408.57 7,743.74 1,984.72 2,517.82 1,213.92 12,743.55 725.13

7,791.95 2,883.88 324.39 5,177.30 1,336.87 1,598.93 826.83 8,441.04 448.93

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,092.05 4,608.59 379.79 7,596.56 1,936.96 2,480.11 1,197.52 12,551.71 711.40

+73.39 -37.16 +.33 +11.94 +1.20 -1.15 +5.39 +34.12 -3.22

YTD %Chg %Chg +.67 -.80 +.09 +.16 +.06 -.05 +.45 +.27 -.45

52-wk %Chg

+6.37 +12.41 -4.58 +5.73 +6.14 +9.30 +7.39 +8.69 +13.75

+41.45 +57.57 +15.65 +45.52 +42.86 +54.22 +43.87 +47.72 +57.22

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

348.57 2,667.96 3,970.47 5,727.91 6,162.44 21,405.17 33,439.77 22,785.78 3,282.20 10,908.77 1,705.30 2,960.93 4,939.40 6,032.99

-.34 t -.72 t -.41 t -.28 t -.30 t -2.10 t -.54 t -.96 t -.88 t -1.74 t -1.68 t -1.54 t -1.36 t -.53 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9219 1.5314 .9850 .001903 .1464 1.3475 .1288 .010822 .081090 .0342 .000900 .1391 .9398 .0316

Pvs Day .9258 1.5394 .9857 .001908 .1464 1.3497 .1288 .010855 .081466 .0343 .000902 .1391 .9421 .0317

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.95 +0.04 +6.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.99 +0.07 +9.6 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.89 +0.02 +5.5 GrowthI 23.69 +0.04 +7.5 Ultra 20.74 +0.04 +6.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.97 +0.02 +8.3 AMutlA p 24.31 +0.07 +5.6 BalA p 17.05 +0.05 +5.8 BondA p 12.01 -0.02 +3.0 CapWA p 20.22 -0.05 +1.7 CapIBA p 48.38 -0.05 +1.9 CapWGA p 34.41 -0.10 +1.4 EupacA p 38.78 -0.24 +1.1 FdInvA p 34.64 +0.06 +6.2 GovtA p 14.06 -0.03 +1.4 GwthA p 28.96 +0.04 +6.0 HI TrA p 11.09 -0.01 +6.5 IncoA p 16.00 +0.01 +4.4 IntBdA p 13.25 -0.02 +1.6 ICAA p 27.24 +0.08 +5.5 NEcoA p 23.67 -0.07 +5.2 N PerA p 26.51 -0.07 +3.4 NwWrldA 49.10 -0.29 +4.0 SmCpA p 34.47 -0.27 +9.3 TxExA p 12.11 +1.7 WshA p 25.98 +0.12 +6.1 American Funds B: BalB p 16.98 +0.05 +5.5 CapIBB t 48.38 -0.05 +1.7 GrwthB t 28.03 +0.03 +5.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 28.96 -0.30 +2.5 IntlEqA 28.25 -0.29 +2.5 IntEqII I r 11.93 -0.12 +1.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.18 -0.10 -2.3 MidCap 27.91 -0.14 +9.2 MidCapVal 19.06 +0.04 +6.0 Baron Funds:

Growth 45.54 -0.19 +10.2 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.56 -0.03 +3.7 DivMu 14.45 +0.01 +1.3 TxMgdIntl 15.53 +1.6 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.64 +0.05 +5.2 GlAlA r 18.39 +2.8 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.17 +2.6 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.48 +2.9 CGM Funds: Focus 31.02 -0.11 +4.3 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.86 -0.27 +5.4 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.61 -0.14 +11.0 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.41 -0.15 +11.1 AcornIntZ 36.25 -0.23 +5.8 ValRestr 45.83 -0.01 +7.2 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.62 -0.04 +4.9 USCorEq2 10.23 +12.1 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.98 +0.13 +6.5 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.33 +0.13 +6.5 NYVen C 31.85 +0.13 +6.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.54 -0.02 +4.1 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.05 -0.19 +4.6 EmMktV 32.71 -0.36 +4.0 IntSmVa 16.28 -0.12 +7.9 USLgVa 19.32 +0.09 +13.5 US Micro 12.22 -0.05 +15.8 US SmVa 23.46 -0.07 +19.6 IntlSmCo 15.35 -0.08 +7.9 Fixd 10.33 +0.4 IntVa 17.66 -0.04 +3.7 Glb5FxInc 11.24 -0.01 +2.3 2YGlFxd 10.21 +0.7 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 68.42 Income 13.13 IntlStk 33.30 Stock 104.58 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.06 NatlMunInc 9.68 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 18.11 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.69 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.33 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.99 FPACres 26.16 Fairholme 35.08 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.99 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.17 StrInA 12.40 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.35 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.08 FF2015 10.91 FF2020 13.21 FF2025 10.98 FF2030 13.13 FF2035 10.89 FF2040 7.61 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.32 AMgr50 14.49 Balanc 17.27 BlueChGr 41.03 Canada 51.90 CapAp 23.66 CpInc r 9.06 Contra 61.52 DisEq 22.48 DivIntl 28.47 DivGth 26.08 EmrMk 23.31

+0.15 -0.01 -0.05 +0.31

+7.5 +2.6 +4.6 +9.1

+0.06 +8.1 +0.02 +3.2 +0.06 +8.2 +2.8 +2.7 +1.5 +0.01 +5.4 +0.22 +16.6 -0.01 +7.1 -0.02 +5.6 -0.02 +3.6 -0.02 +5.7 -0.02 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01 -0.01

+4.6 +4.7 +5.3 +5.7 +6.0 +6.1 +6.3

+0.01 +7.7 -0.03 +5.0 +6.1 -0.03 +8.1 +7.1 -0.13 +10.4 -0.01 +7.0 -0.03 +5.7 +0.03 +7.0 -0.12 +1.7 -0.02 +10.2 -0.25 +3.1

Eq Inc 42.65 EQII 17.72 Fidel 30.30 GNMA 11.53 GovtInc 10.48 GroCo 75.10 GroInc 17.36 HighInc r 8.77 Indepn 21.76 IntBd 10.34 IntmMu 10.20 IntlDisc 30.89 InvGrBd 11.49 InvGB 7.19 LgCapVal 12.19 LatAm 51.51 LevCoStk 25.73 LowP r 35.62 Magelln 68.84 MidCap 27.15 MuniInc 12.56 NwMkt r 15.66 OTC 49.82 100Index 8.50 Ovrsea 31.22 Puritn 17.01 StIntMu 10.64 STBF 8.38 SmllCpS r 17.87 StratInc 11.06 StrReRt r 8.74 TotalBd 10.71 USBI 11.18 Value 64.36 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 42.40 IntlInxInv 34.04 TotMktInv 34.31 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.40 TotMktAd r 34.31 First Eagle: GlblA 42.26 OverseasA 20.48

+0.11 +9.3 +0.05 +8.9 +0.10 +7.0 -0.01 +2.4 -0.01 +1.6 -0.37 +8.9 +0.03 +8.2 -0.02 +5.7 -0.10 +9.2 -0.02 +2.9 +0.01 +1.5 -0.18 +1.8 -0.02 +2.8 -0.02 +3.2 +0.05 +8.4 -0.20 -0.7 -0.11 +12.3 -0.08 +11.5 -0.03 +7.0 -0.14 +15.9 +0.01 +2.1 -0.01 +6.0 -0.10 +9.0 +0.05 +7.2 -0.13 +0.9 +0.01 +6.4 +0.01 +0.7 -0.01 +1.5 -0.17 +12.1 -0.01 +3.8 -0.03 +2.7 -0.02 +3.4 -0.02 +2.1 -0.03 +13.0 +0.19 +8.0 -0.16 +1.9 +0.10 +9.1 +0.19 +8.0 +0.10 +9.1 -0.19 +5.7 -0.20 +5.2

Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.80 +1.7 FoundAl p 10.31 -0.01 +5.0 HYTFA p 10.03 +3.2 IncomA p 2.12 -0.01 +4.8 USGovA p 6.70 +2.2 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +7.4 IncmeAd 2.11 +4.9 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.14 +4.6 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.40 -0.02 +7.0 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.64 -0.06 +1.4 GlBd A p 13.47 -0.04 +7.4 GrwthA p 17.30 -0.06 +2.9 WorldA p 14.38 -0.05 +2.9 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.31 -0.06 +3.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.49 -0.05 +7.2 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.34 +0.13 +6.7 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.82 +0.09 +2.5 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.85 -0.09 +4.8 Quality 19.83 +0.10 +2.6 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 32.39 -0.03 +11.8 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.15 -0.01 +5.3 HYMuni 8.54 +0.01 +6.0 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.46 -0.01 +3.0 CapApInst 34.50 -0.01 +4.6 IntlInv t 55.37 -0.08 +1.8 Intl r 55.91 -0.08 +1.9 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.34 +0.03 +5.4 Hartford Fds C: CapApC t 28.84 +0.02 +5.2 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.29 +0.04 +5.5

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.33 -0.01 +7.4 Div&Gr 18.76 +0.07 +6.9 Advisers 18.58 +0.01 +6.3 TotRetBd 10.94 -0.02 +3.4 HussmnStrGr 12.66 -0.04 -0.9 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.01 -0.13 +1.1 AssetStA p 22.57 -0.14 +1.3 AssetStrI r 22.74 -0.13 +1.4 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.24 -0.01 +2.1 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.23 -0.02 +2.2 HighYld 8.04 -0.02 +5.9 IntmTFBd 10.90 +1.0 ShtDurBd 10.91 -0.01 +1.0 USLCCrPls 19.56 +0.08 +7.6 Janus S Shrs: Forty 33.11 +0.05 +5.0 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.67 +0.05 +5.4 OvrseasT r 45.92 -0.33 +8.0 PrkMCVal T 21.44 +0.02 +8.3 Twenty T 64.74 +0.07 +5.1 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.52 -0.03 +7.0 LSBalanc 12.42 -0.02 +5.8 LSGrwth 12.18 -0.01 +6.4 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 22.31 -0.11 +12.6 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.20 -0.17 +6.6 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.47 -0.18 +6.5 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.98 +2.5 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.92 +0.04 +11.7 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.97 -0.03 +6.3 StrInc C 14.53 -0.02 +6.1 LSBondR 13.92 -0.02 +6.2 StrIncA 14.46 -0.02 +6.3 Loomis Sayles Inv:

InvGrBdY 12.11 -0.02 +5.0 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.16 +0.03 +9.4 BdDebA p 7.60 -0.01 +5.2 ShDurIncA p 4.61 +2.9 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.72 +0.03 +5.2 ValueA 22.13 +0.13 +6.9 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.23 +0.13 +6.9 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.78 -0.01 +4.2 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.42 -0.06 +3.7 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 19.76 -0.12 +2.8 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.28 -0.02 +5.3 TotRtBdI 10.28 -0.02 +5.4 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.35 -0.09 +2.5 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.23 -0.06 +5.7 GlbDiscZ 28.58 -0.06 +5.7 QuestZ 18.18 -0.01 +5.5 SharesZ 20.56 -0.02 +7.1 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.91 -0.13 +8.3 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.48 -0.14 +8.2 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.08 -0.04 +6.0 Intl I r 17.97 -0.16 +6.7 Oakmark r 40.75 +0.09 +10.0 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.52 -0.02 +6.4 GlbSMdCap 13.69 -0.09 +7.2 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.78 +4.6 DvMktA p 29.86 -0.22 +3.8 GlobA p 56.79 -0.06 +7.1 IntBdA p 6.48 -0.01 +2.5 MnStFdA 30.19 +0.15 +7.3 RisingDivA 14.80 +0.06 +6.4 S&MdCpVl 29.14 -0.09 +9.6

StrInA p 4.12 -0.01 +6.4 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.45 +0.06 +6.2 S&MdCpVl 25.14 -0.07 +9.4 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.40 +0.05 +6.1 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.25 +0.01 +4.9 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 29.55 -0.21 +3.9 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.09 -0.01 +3.5 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.85 -0.03 +4.1 ComodRR 7.95 -0.12 -1.6 HiYld 9.15 -0.01 +6.6 InvGrCp 11.27 -0.02 +4.9 LowDu 10.48 +2.4 RealRet 11.17 -0.04 +2.4 RealRtnI 10.98 -0.02 +2.4 ShortT 9.88 +0.9 TotRt 11.09 -0.01 +3.6 TR II 10.64 -0.01 +2.6 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 10.98 -0.02 +2.3 TotRtA 11.09 -0.01 +3.5 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.09 -0.01 +3.2 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.09 -0.01 +3.5 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.09 -0.01 +3.6 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.37 -0.04 +4.4 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 38.36 +0.11 +7.6 Price Funds: BlChip 35.02 +0.05 +6.9 CapApp 19.56 +0.04 +7.7 EmMktS 31.06 -0.22 +3.2 EqInc 23.04 +0.05 +10.2 EqIndex 32.28 +0.15 +7.9 Growth 29.26 +0.02 +6.4 HlthSci 28.80 +0.01 +10.0 HiYield 6.67 +6.2

IntlBond 9.73 IntlStk 13.09 MidCap 53.03 MCapVal 22.73 N Asia 16.80 New Era 45.24 N Horiz 28.90 N Inc 9.41 R2010 14.74 R2015 11.32 R2020 15.55 R2025 11.34 R2030 16.21 R2040 16.27 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 30.78 SmCapVal 33.22 SpecIn 12.15 Value 22.53 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.99 VoyA p 22.05 RiverSource A: DEI 9.42 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.52 PremierI r 18.15 TotRetI r 12.01 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.74 S&P Sel 18.73 Scout Funds: Intl 30.26 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.82 AmShS p 39.82 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.98 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.39 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 47.43 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.31 IntValue I 25.86

-0.02 -0.7 -0.07 +3.9 -0.26 +11.7 +0.03 +9.7 -0.16 +4.1 -0.16 +3.7 -0.18 +13.0 -0.02 +2.7 +5.7 +6.1 +6.5 +6.9 +7.2 +7.4 +1.5 -0.14 +14.3 -0.11 +12.7 +4.2 +0.08 +10.0 +0.04 +8.6 +0.01 +11.8 +0.01 +7.4 -0.03 +11.3 -0.07 +11.3 +11.4 +0.12 +8.4 +0.09 +8.0 -0.11 +3.8 +0.14 +6.9 +0.14 +6.8 -0.01 +2.6 -0.15 +0.5 -0.29 +2.4 -0.22 +2.0 -0.23 +2.1

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.18 -0.13 VALIC : StkIdx 24.05 +0.11 Van Kamp Funds A: CapGro 11.97 -0.02 CmstA p 14.97 +0.07 EqIncA p 8.33 +0.01 GrInA p 18.80 +0.05 HYMuA p 9.28 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.93 +0.01 CpOpAdl 74.55 -0.14 EMAdmr r 35.12 -0.29 Energy 114.72 -0.25 500Adml 110.40 +0.50 GNMA Ad 10.74 -0.01 HlthCr 51.19 +0.21 HiYldCp 5.61 InfProAd 24.84 -0.05 ITsryAdml 11.15 -0.02 IntGrAdm 55.85 -0.18 ITAdml 13.50 ITGrAdm 9.85 -0.02 LtdTrAd 11.03 LTGrAdml 9.01 -0.03 LT Adml 11.01 MuHYAdm 10.40 PrmCap r 64.99 +0.12 STsyAdml 10.73 -0.01 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.74 TtlBAdml 10.45 -0.02 TStkAdm 29.80 +0.08 WellslAdm 50.98 -0.02 WelltnAdm 52.10 +0.10 Windsor 43.67 +0.06 WdsrIIAd 45.63 +0.25 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.87 +0.06 CapOpp 32.27 -0.06 DivdGro 13.87 +0.06 Energy 61.09 -0.13 EqInc 19.44 +0.07

+4.6 +7.9 +6.6 +8.8 +7.5 +9.2 +3.5 +2.1 +7.4 +3.1 +2.4 +8.0 +2.3 +1.9 +5.0 +1.3 +1.9 +3.3 +1.4 +4.3 +0.6 +2.8 +1.6 +2.4 +5.4 +1.0 +0.4 +2.5 +2.1 +9.0 +4.3 +5.3 +8.6 +8.6 +6.2 +7.4 +5.3 +2.3 +7.3

Explr 64.59 GNMA 10.74 GlobEq 16.68 GroInc 25.29 HYCorp 5.61 HlthCre 121.29 InflaPro 12.65 IntlGr 17.55 IntlVal 31.36 ITIGrade 9.85 LifeCon 15.75 LifeGro 20.86 LifeMod 18.68 LTIGrade 9.01 Morg 16.48 MuInt 13.50 MuLtd 11.03 MuShrt 15.91 PrecMtls r 21.51 PrmcpCor 12.98 Prmcp r 62.62 SelValu r 17.68 STAR 18.48 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 16.96 TgRe2010 21.52 TgtRe2025 12.04 TgtRe2015 11.93 TgRe2020 21.14 TgRe2030 20.61 TgtRe2035 12.45 TgtRe2040 20.40 TgtRe2045 12.88 USGro 17.31 Wellsly 21.04 Welltn 30.16 Wndsr 12.94 WndsII 25.70 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 110.39 Balanced 20.45 DevMkt 9.78 EMkt 26.70 Europe 26.00

-0.38 +12.7 -0.01 +2.3 -0.03 +6.4 +0.10 +8.2 +4.9 +0.50 +1.9 -0.02 +1.3 -0.06 +3.3 -0.09 +2.5 -0.02 +4.3 +0.01 +4.7 +0.03 +6.6 +0.02 +5.6 -0.03 +2.8 -0.01 +7.9 +1.3 +0.6 +0.3 -0.22 +5.3 +0.01 +7.2 +0.11 +5.3 +0.02 +10.8 +0.01 +5.4 +2.5 -0.04 +11.0 +4.9 +0.01 +6.4 +5.5 +0.02 +5.9 +0.02 +6.7 +0.02 +7.1 +0.03 +7.1 +0.02 +7.2 +0.02 +5.2 -0.01 +4.2 +0.05 +5.2 +0.02 +8.6 +0.14 +8.5 +0.49 +0.03 -0.02 -0.22 -0.02

+8.0 +6.3 +2.6 +3.1 +0.2

Extend 37.00 -0.17 +13.3 Growth 29.31 +0.08 +7.5 ITBnd 10.89 -0.03 +2.9 MidCap 18.26 -0.04 +11.6 Pacific 10.38 -0.04 +7.2 REIT r 16.46 +0.09 +11.7 SmCap 31.58 -0.16 +14.9 SmlCpGth 19.17 -0.16 +13.9 SmlCpVl 15.13 -0.03 +15.9 STBnd 10.49 -0.01 +1.4 TotBnd 10.45 -0.02 +2.1 TotlIntl 14.80 -0.05 +2.7 TotStk 29.79 +0.08 +8.9 Value 20.15 +0.10 +8.7 Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst 20.45 +0.03 +6.3 DevMkInst 9.71 -0.01 NS ExtIn 37.02 -0.18 +13.3 GrwthIst 29.31 +0.07 +7.6 InfProInst 10.12 -0.02 +1.4 InstIdx 109.66 +0.49 +8.0 InsPl 109.67 +0.50 +8.0 InsTStPlus 26.93 +0.07 +9.0 MidCpIst 18.31 -0.05 +11.7 SCInst 31.61 -0.16 +15.0 TBIst 10.45 -0.02 +2.1 TSInst 29.80 +0.08 +9.0 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 91.20 +0.41 +8.0 STBdIdx 10.49 -0.01 +1.5 TotBdSgl 10.45 -0.02 +2.1 TotStkSgl 28.76 +0.08 +9.0 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.90 +0.03 +6.7 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.3 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.57 -0.02 +5.8


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY “INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET”: Learn how to use Internet Explorer, the Web and how to browse the library’s Internet links. Familiarity with Windows operating system required. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or lesliw@dpls.us. VISIT BEND BOARD MEETING: Free; 9 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-382-8048 or laurel@visitbend.com. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Free; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Santiago’s Mate Company, 528 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. “BUSINESS ON THE GO — LAPTOP AND CELL”: Learn how to work from anywhere at any time. Preregistration required; $59; 6:30-8:30 p.m., and class continues April 22 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “SEARCH ENGINE STRATEGIES — MORE”: Learn how to optimize a Web site for major search engines. Preregistration required; $79, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through May 4 from 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY DUCT TESTING AND SEALING COURSE: Prepares students to evaluate duct performance on seal ducts and heating/cooling systems. The course also prepares students for the Performance Tested Comfort System certification test. Registration required by Feb. 8; $485, continuing education units included; April 21-22 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m., and April 23 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97,

Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS CLASS IN SPANISH: Learn basic computer skills. Taught in Spanish. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 2-4 p.m., and class continues April 22 from 2-4 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “BORROWING BASICS”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn about credit and loans. Preregistration required; free; 5:307:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org. “BEGINNING EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; Wednesdays through April 28 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “MARKETING TO YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS”: Part of the Marketing Online series; $59 or $139 for the series that runs through May 25; Wednesdays through April 28 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “IRRIGATION BASICS”: Learn how to design, construct and repair residential irrigation systems. Preregistration required; $69; Wednesdays through May 12 from 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY “TRAIN THE TRAINER — HOW TO TRAIN SUPERVISORS ABOUT LEAVE LAWS”: Tamara Russell, attorney, will discuss employee leave laws. Preregistration required; $10; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 503-234-5770. MICROSOFT EXCEL PARTS 1, 2 AND 3: Learn how to enter data, format, adjust columns and rows, problem-solve, apply colors and

borders, and create formulas, charts and worksheets. Keyboarding and Microsoft Word experience required. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon, and class continues April 26 and 27 from 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction requirements. Successful completion results in an ODOT credential for flaggers. Preregistration required; $69; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “UNDERSTANDING SUSTAINABILITY, THE ISSUES, THE TREND AND BRANDING”: AdFed of Central Oregon will host a lunch with presenter Kierstin De West, who will discuss “Cultural Shift to Sustainability: Understanding the Sustainability + People + Brand Equation (aka More Than Green).” Preregistration required by noon April 20; $10 for AdFed members, $30 for nonmembers, includes lunch; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992 or www.adfedco.org. CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESS EXPO: Offers business networking, breakout sessions and workshops. Luncheon features speakers Linda Navarro, president and CEO of the Oregon Bankers Association, and Jeffrey Savage, senior vice president and senior director of investment for Wells Fargo. They will discuss “How Did We Get Here and Where Do We Go?”; free to attend; $15 for luncheon, reservations required; booth space $275 for members of a Central Oregon chamber of commerce and $325 for nonmembers; 1-6 p.m., and luncheon runs from 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.cobusinessexpo.com. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Robin L. and Gail L. Myers to Brent Sullivan and Jamie Dorey-Sullivan, T 15, R 10, Section 25, $425,000 Henry C. and Angeline R. Rhett to Stephen C. Jaqua, McCaffery’s First Addition to the Townsite of Sisters, Lots 4-8, Block 3, $342,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Vergent LLC, Riverrim Planned Unit Development Phase 1, Lot 157, $288,000 Joey J. and Rebecca R. Shaw to Brian A. Bellew, Morningstar First Addition, Lot 17, Block 1, $190,000 Orrin D. and Rene M. Libolt to Monte A. and Vicki J. Ellis, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 8, Block CCC, $195,000 Aurora Loan Services LLC to Jeffrey Thomas and Amy Enid Gautschi, Hawks Ridge Phase 2, Lot 28, $323,500 Dale Hollis Clark, as trustee of the Dale Hollis Clark Revocable Trust to Ronald O. and Mary Jane Doan, Cottages of Westside Terrace A Condominium Stage 2, Unit 17, $160,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Gorilla Capital of Deschutes County 4 LLC, Parks at Broken Top, Lot 29, $300,001 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Resolution Fund Management Services, Mill Addition to Bend, Lot 9, Block 9, $620,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Zachary C. Violett, Northwest Townsite CO’S Second Addition to Bend, Lot 14, Block 45, $203,000 Reconstruct Company NA, trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Brentwood, Lot 29, $207,116.62 Larry D. and Cynthia D. Marshall to Rajkumari Mendez, First Addition to Whispering Pines Estates, Lot 21, Block 15, $254,000 Rosemary E. Sellew to Gregory J. and Catherine M. Watt, River’s Edge Village Phase X, Lot 111, $477,000 LibertyBank to Michael J. and Julie Levesque, Shevlin Reserve, Lot 12, $410,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Second Addition to Los Pinos Subdivision No. 219, Lot 4, Block 7, $155,787.01 Betty Lou and Richard Vernon Segerstrom and Cynthia Lee Blair to Kenneth R. Mathers and Kandy

K. Gies, Highland Addition, Lots 7-8, Block 25, $202,000 Keith Irwin Taylor to Larry W. and Susanne J. Hayward, Ridge at Eagle Crest 41, Lot 28, $165,000 JPMorgan Chase Bank NA and Washington Mutual Bank to Howard and Lucas Widoff, Pines at Pilot Butte Phases 1-2, Lot 15, $178,200 Frederick T. and Nancy J. Waller to Randall L. and Jonathan H. Platt, Cluster Court, Unit 16, $200,000 Daniel J. Drazan to Virtual Realty Enterprises LLC, T 18, R 11, Section 12, $8,020,000 Daniel J. Drazan, trustee to Virtual Realty Enterprises LLC, Tetherow Phase 1, Lot 111, $300,000 Daniel J. Drazan, trustee to Virtual Realty Enterprises LLC, Tetherow Phase 1, Lot 112, $300,000 Deutsche Bank National Trust Co., trustee to Nathan and Beth Edgell, Larkwood Estates, Lot 4, Block 1, $190,000 Triad Homes Inc. to Walter W. Nisbet, Rocky Point Phases 1-2, Lot 16, $535,281.90 Aaron J. and Selah A. Ewert to Mike and Debbie Everidge, Promise Lane, Lot 24, $155,000 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to K3 Inc., Terrango Glen South, Lot 7, $175,400 Dwain and Cheryl C. Herschbach to Mary C. Ferguson, T 14, R 13, Section 24, $150,000 Michael G. and Holly N. Ellsworth to Marie A. Garrett, Views at Oaktree Phase 2, Lot 15, $155,500 James R. and Judy C. Thompson to Tom Ragghianti, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Lot 24, Block 23, $229,000 Jennifer D. and Adam J. Durand to Michael S. Smith and Amanda B. Blockley, T 16, R 11, Section 26, $327,615 John Michael and Rita Carol Delaney to Julie D. Marrs, Cascade View Estates Phase 3, Lot 4, $207,000 UC Home Inc. to Robert and Maria Denouden, Stonehaven Phase 2, Lot 41, $159,700 Corey and Valerie Anderson to Norma J. and Lewis N. Brainerd III, Shevlin Ridge Phase 4, Lot 41, $470,000 Quiet River Townhomes to Roger A. and Gail A. Sabbadini, as trustees of the Roger A. & Gail A. Sabbadini Family Revocable Trust, River’s Edge

Village Phase 3, Lot 33, $477,500 Fannie Mae and Federal Nation Mortgage Association to Terrance M. and Brenda K. Shine, Angus Acres Phase 1, Lot 7, $201,000 Kevin and Michelle Halligan, trustees of the Halligan Family Revocable Trust to Linda and Charlie SchraderPatton, NorthWest Crossing Phase 4, Lot 137, $277,316 Reconstruct Company NA, trustee to Vergent LLC, View Ridge, Lot 10, $169,500 Holly A. Ingels, trustee of the Holly A. Ingels Revocable Living Trust to Jodi M. and Robert W. Husband, Canyon Point Estates Phase 6, Lot 84, $166,500 Wells Fargo Bank NA, trustee to Eric and Tanya Halvorson, River Canyon Estates No. 3, Lots 220-221, $235,000 BAC Home Loans Servicing LP to Marc and Jennifer Noble, River Village, Lot 17, Block 1, $190,000 DR Horton Inc. Portland to Matthew Alan Johnson, Summit Crest Phase 1, Lot 38, $168,000 Wells Fargo Bank NA to Secretary of Housing & Urban Devlopment, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 54, Block S, $239,625.22 Larry Blanton, Deschutes County Sheriff to Sandie Russo, Village Wiestoria Phase 2, Lot 37, $341,314.30 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to JPMorgan Chase Bank NA and Washington Mutual Bank, High Pointe Phase 1, Lot 18, $150,000 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Awbrey Road Heights Phases 1-3, Lot 44, $350,000 Stephen B. and Suzan N. Oldroyd to Lynn H. Mayers, trustee of the Lynn H. Mayers Family Trust, Mountain Village West 1, Lot 7, Block 12, $430,000 Daniel L. and Connie M. Heun to Paul G. Leeberg, Two Bar Estates, Lot 10, $150,000 Vergent LLC to Donald P. and Markele C. Dorazio, Pinebrook Phase 1, Lot 8, Block 2, $227,000 Crook County

Lori K. and Jimmy D. Wilson, co-trustees of the Lori K. Wilson Revocable Trust to Frederick R. and Rita H. Hall, Ponderosa Ranch, Lots 43-44, Block 3, $200,000 E*Trade Bank to Ivar M. and Jane E. Pihl, T 15, R 14, Section 26, $350,000


L

C

Inside

OREGON Mexican drug lord sentenced to 30 years, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Cuban tobacco legend dies at 91, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010

Forestry building looking green Brisk interest in contract to build new Bend facility

DESCHUTES

Attention, photographers! These photos were among dozens readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.

We asked for readers’ photos, and today we’re publishing some of the best

Well sh t!

Installment 16:

Family events

The Bulletin

“Jump in the lake” Submitted by user Suebe

Submitted by user Robert

“A world without worries”

2 agencies, 1 office The new Forest Service facility, at the old Bend Pine Nursery site on the city’s east side, would house both the Deschutes National Forest supervisor’s office and the Bend-Fort Rock ranger district. The agency currently pays about $1 million a year to lease offices in Bend, Allen said, so the new building should save money in the long run. See Building / C6

Bend High International Baccalaureate program on track for fall

Submitted by user Keith Bagwell

“At the zoo”

Deschutes County commissioners voted 2-1 to add the 19th Street extension to the county’s road development plan Monday, after residents of nearby neighborhoods and a land use watchdog group said some commissioners did not appear to be listening to opponents of the project. Commissioners Dennis Luke and Alan Unger voted to add the project to the county’s blueprint for road development, known as the transportation system plan, and Commissioner Tammy Baney cast the lone dissenting vote. Extending 19th Street south from Redmond to Deschutes Junction is expected to cost about $8.7 million, and Redmond Mayor George Endicott has said the road is crucial because developers might not be able to build in south Redmond without it. Baney said information presented during the county’s public process did not convince her it was necessary to plan for the extension of 19th Street, and she wanted cities that could benefit from the project — Redmond and Bend — to participate in decisions and commit money for the project. “I need to have some sort of assurance that we’re not going at this on our own,” Baney said. “I just think it’s also important to state that (the Oregon Department of Transportation) said this is not a capacity problem for them and not a priority for them, either.” Luke and Unger said the 19th Street extension would benefit both Bend and Redmond. See Extension / C5

Low-income renters get federal aid By Diane S.W. Lee The Bulletin

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Bend High has received the official go-ahead from the International Baccalaureate Organization to run its IB program at the high school beginning this fall, and school officials report that hundreds of students have already signed up for the new classes. Pandie Anderson, the coordinator of the IB program, said Bend High already has 114 students slated to take the IB prep class next year as sophomores, and there will be 38 students in the first group of IB diploma candidates. Usually, Anderson said, schools have a first cohort consisting of around 25 students. In addition, another 600 slots of IB classes have been filled by juniors and seniors for the 2010-11 school year. “It’s a wonderful opportunity for students, and I’m glad it’s available districtwide,” Anderson said. The official certification is the culmination of a two-year application process. The school now will be able to offer its students IB certificates and diplomas, distinctions recognized at colleges and universities around the world. The organization sent representatives for a two-day visit in September to make sure Bend High was prepared to get the program under way. The International Baccalaureate program is recognized worldwide as a special, highly rigorous global curriculum. See Program / C5

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Well, shoot! returns next week with a new series featuring photography advice from The Bulletin staff!

By Kate Ramsayer The U.S. Forest Service’s new local headquarters, designed to be a 46,000-square-foot, LEEDcertified building heated with wood pellets, is attracting a lot of attention 11⁄2 years before it’s slated to open. Bidding for the building’s construction contract opened last month, and already more than 30 companies have contacted the federal agency about the project, and 60 are listed as interested vendors on a federal Web site. “I’m encouraged by the level of interest,” said John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor. “It wouldn’t surprise me if we get companies from Seattle to Redding (California), all the way to Boise (Idaho), possibly bidding.”

County OKs 19th Street project

Submitted by user Becky

“Tahitian dancing”

Submitted by user Amber

“Newell/Symons family reunion” Submitted by user Allison Jones

“Hawaii” The Bulletin assumes that submitted photos are the original work of the entrants and that no excessive postprocessing has altered the content of the images.

Readers’ photos

Each installment of Well shot! features photos submitted by readers for the previous week’s theme.

Jan. 12 Jan. 26 Feb. 9 Feb. 23 March 9 March 30 April 6 Today Landscapes Flowers Morning light On stage Architecture Close-ups Pets Family events

It’s no secret that the recession forced cities, businesses and schools to tighten their finances. A housing authority serving Central Oregon recently received federal funding to help relieve pressure from its budget. U.S. Housing and Urban Development announced Friday housing authorities in the state will receive an estimated $418,282 to help address temporary cashflow shortfalls. Central Oregon’s Housing Works received $8,417 in federal funding to provide an estimated 17 local families with rental vouchers to help pay a portion of their rent. The Redmond-based organization offers affordable housing to low-income families living in Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties. Kenny LaPoint, the organization’s director of housing and resident services, said the money will help reimburse the housing authority for one month’s worth of rent to cover 17 families. “Their income is fairly low already,” LaPoint said. “There would be almost 1,100 people that would be on the verge of homelessness if they weren’t receiving rental assistance.” HUD reviewed more than 1,000 housing authority applicants across the county, and awarded funding to nearly 600 agencies in need, according to HUD’s news release. Housing Works has received funds for more than a decade, and re-applies every year for the money. There are currently about 1,200 people on the housing authority’s waiting list requesting rental vouchers, LaPoint said. See Rent / C5


C2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Logger to pull cars from forest

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

By Mark Baker The Register-Guard

SOMEWHERE ON BLUE MOUNTAIN — Unlike that daring, angst-ridden scene of youthful bravado and stupidity in “Rebel Without a Cause,� the 1955 James Dean classic, it’s unlikely anyone was playing a game of “chicken run� and racing stolen cars to the edge of a rocky cliff high above the clouds up here. But fly off the cliff they did, somehow, someway, these nowtwisted pieces of metal surrounding Norm Maxwell some 150 to 200 feet below the cliff — most likely when someone put them in neutral and gave them a shove. “I’ve known about them for years,� says Maxwell, a forestry technician with the Bureau of Land Management’s Eugene district, of the smashed vehicles that all tumbled to their deaths. Until now, though, Maxwell wasn’t sure what to do about the “dead cars.� Then last summer he noticed that someone had re-

moved the front end and V-8 engine from the remains of a fourwheel drive vehicle. But how? How do you lift a car engine out of a wooded area that’s hardly accessible by foot? “Whoever did it must have had a 25-foot tower and the skills to go with it,� Maxwell says, referring to what he believes was a logger who hauled the parts out. “So that made me think of how we can start doing this,� he said. Now, about a decade after Maxwell who has specialized in orchestrating the removal of more than 700 junk cars from Lane County woods since 1996 first discovered the hillside wreckage of cars here, a contracted logger plans to lift them out using a high-lead system, probably in June after a BLM botanist checks the plant life in the area around the cars. The BLM will pay logger Bob Bateman Jr. about $6,000 to do the job, Maxwell says. “It should

be easier than logs because cars weigh a lot less than logs,� he says. Easier except for the fact that Bateman will have to pluck the cars from the cliff above. An old gravel logging road off Mosby Creek Road, southeast of Cottage Grove, twists and turns on its way to the top of 3,012-foot Blue Mountain. It ends in a culde-saclike area where the remnants of a bonfire, burned logs and trash, are piled. Smashed beer cans and shotgun shells litter the ground above the nearby cliff looking to the west. “We’re going to boulder off the top (of the cliff) so it doesn’t happen again,� Maxwell says, gazing out at the striking view of clouds and forest below. Maxwell believes the most recent things run off the cliff were the trailer and gasoline tanker, with the words Bend Oil Co. on it, probably a year or two ago. Maxwell called the Bend Oil Co. and confirmed that the white gasoline trailer was stolen. That

and the large trailer have been tied to a property where a drug bust occurred, according to a special agent with the BLM. The agent referred questions to assistant U.S. attorney Jeff Sweet in Eugene, who refuses to comment on the case. Part of any arrested individual’s restitution could be the cost of hauling all the vehicles out of the woods, Maxwell says. “I have the budget to pay for it, but I’d rather do it on his dime,� he says. After vehicles are hauled from the woods, Maxwell takes them to Schnitzer Steel on state Highway 99 in Eugene, where they are shredded and sold for scrap metal. He gets about $300 a car on average, he says. Many of them are stolen vehicles whose license plates and vehicle identification numbers have been removed. Maxwell thinks some of the vehicles that met their death on Blue Mountain where probably pushed off by drunken youth.

Teen gunmen kill peers, teacher, selves in 1999 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, April 20, the 110th day of 2010. There are 255 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 20, 1980, Cuban President Fidel Castro invited any of his countrymen who wanted to leave their country to do so, sparking the massive Mariel Boatlift from Cuba to the United States. ON THIS DATE In 1812, the fourth vice president of the United States, George Clinton, died in Washington at age 72, becoming the first vice president to die while in office. In 1836, Congress voted to establish the Wisconsin Territory. In 1889, Adolf Hitler was born in Braunau am Inn, Austria. In 1940, RCA publicly demonstrated its new and powerful electron microscope. In 1945, during World War II, allied forces took control of the German cities of Nuremberg and Stuttgart. In 1968, Pierre Elliott Trudeau was sworn in as prime minister of Canada. In 1971, the Supreme Court,

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y in Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, unanimously upheld the use of busing to achieve racial desegregation in schools. In 1972, the manned lunar module from Apollo 16 landed on the moon. In 1978, a Korean Air Lines Boeing 707 crash-landed in northwestern Russia after being fired on by a Soviet interceptor after entering Soviet airspace. Two passengers were killed. In 1999, the Columbine High School massacre took place in Colorado as two students, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, shot and killed 12 classmates and one teacher before taking their own lives. TEN YEARS AGO Littleton, Colo. paused to remember the victims on the first anniversary of the Columbine High School massacre. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush signed a bill making it harder for debt-ridden people to wipe clean their financial slates by declar-

ing bankruptcy. In his first Mass as pontiff, Pope Benedict XVI pledged to work for unity among Christians and to seek “an open and sincere dialogue� with other faiths. Ecuador’s Congress voted to remove embattled President Lucio Gutierrez from office and swear in vice President Alfredo Palacio to replace him. ONE YEAR AGO In Geneva, the United Nations opened its first anti-racism conference in eight years; dozens of Western diplomats walked out as Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad called Israel the “most cruel and repressive racist regime.� (Nine countries, including the United States and Israel, had already boycotted the conference.) Medical student Philip Markoff was arrested in the death of Julissa Brisman, a masseuse he’d met through Craigslist and whose body was found in a Boston hotel. Ethiopia’s Deriba Merga won the Boston Marathon in 2:08.42, almost a full minute ahead of Kenya’s Daniel Rono; Salina Kosgei of Kenya won the women’s race in 2:32:16.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens is 90. Actor Leslie Phillips is 86. Sen. Pat Roberts (R-Kansas) is 74. Actor George Takei is 73. Singer Johnny Tillotson is 71. Actor Ryan O’Neal is 69. Bluegrass singer-musician Doyle Lawson (Quicksilver) is 66. Rock musician Craig Frost (Grand Funk; Bob Seger’s Silver Bullet Band) is 62. Actor Gregory Itzin is 62. Actress Jessica Lange is 61. Actress Veronica Cartwright is 61. Actor Clint Howard is 51. Actor Crispin Glover is 46. Actor Andy Serkis is 46. Country singer Wade Hayes is 41. Actor Shemar Moore is 40. Rock musician Mikey Welsh is 39. Actress Carmen Electra is 38. Reggae singer Stephen Marley is 38. Rock musician Marty Crandall (The Shins) is 35. Actor Joey Lawrence is 34. Country musician Clay Cook (Zac Brown Band) is 32. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Taste. You cannot buy such a rare and wonderful thing. You can’t send away for it in a catalogue. And I’m afraid it’s becoming obsolete.� — Rosalind Russell, American actress (1911-76).

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 5:33 p.m. April 16, in the 3100 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:46 a.m. April 16, in the 2500 block of Southwest Quartz Avenue. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 4:46 p.m. April 17, in the 1200 block of Southwest 28th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:27 p.m. April 17, in the 3100 block of Southwest 27th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:14 p.m. April 17, in the 2100 block of Northwest Sterling Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:28 a.m. April 17, in the 1600 block of Northwest Cliff Side Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 9:20 a.m. April 17, in the 3000 block of Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:22 p.m. April 18, in the 900 block of Southwest 23rd Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:54 p.m. April 18, in the 300 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 4:57 p.m. April 16, in the area of Southeast Combs Flat Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:08 p.m. April 16, in the 4100 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:58 p.m. April 16, in the 21400 block of Modoc Lane in Bend. DUII — Tonty Marie Petruzzi, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of

intoxicants at 7:53 a.m. April 16, in the area of Buck Canyon and Rocking Horse roads in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 7:57 p.m. April 17, in the 1700 block of Central Avenue in Terrebonne. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:31 p.m. April 17, in the 62800 block of Hamby Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:43 p.m. April 17, in the 64900 block of Deschutes Market Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:05 p.m. April 17, in the Rosland OHV Play Area. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:15 p.m. April 17, in the area of Forest Service Road 2310 near trail 76. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:30 a.m. April 17, in the 15700 block of Park Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:16 a.m. April 17, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:47 a.m. April 12, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 75. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:45 a.m. April 12, in the 600 block of Butte Avenue in Metolius. DUII — Shelly Tucker-Bolan, 45, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:23 p.m. April 12, in the area of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Fairgrounds Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:30 p.m. April 12, in the 300 block of Southeast 10th Street in Madras. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:05 a.m. April 13, in the 400 block of Eighth Street in Metolius. Theft — Bicycles were reported stolen April 13, in the 400 block of Second Avenue in Culver. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered April 14, in the 400

block of Adams Avenue in Metolius. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:13 p.m. April 15, in the area of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Dover Lane in Metolius. Oregon State Police

DUII — Ronald Lewis Ramsey, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:44 p.m. April 17, in the area of State Highway 126 and 27th Street in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:34 p.m. April 16, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost seven.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 9:50 a.m. — Unauthorized burning, in the rear of 19171 Kiowa Road. 1:27 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, adjacent to 60280 Ridgeview Drive E. 6:49 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, in the rear of 19835 Second Street. 10:44 p.m. — Building fire, 66405 Cline Falls Road. 12— Medical aid calls. Saturday 22 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 12:37 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 63588 Hunters Circle. 6:59 p.m. — Special outside fire, 60855 Jennings Road. 20 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Web site at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Web site at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s Web site is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pomeranian — Adult male, black;

found near 36th Street. Siamese cat — Adult neutered male, seal point; found near Southeast Reindeer Avenue. Border Collie mix — Young male, white and black; found near Evergreen Avenue. Greyhound mix — Adult male, tan; found near Northwest 17th Street. Prineville

Border Collie — Adult male, black with white, black collar; found near Northeast Third Street. Pit Bull mix — Adult female, black and white; found near Prineville Reservoir. German Shepherd mix — Adult female, black with white, pink harness; found near Northwest Brookfield Lane. Llasa Apso mix — Adult female, yellow and tan; found in the 2000 block of Northeast Third Street.

2 arrested after police find heroin

Mt. Bachelor raises $95,000 for charities

Two Portland residents were arrested Friday after police found heroin, marijuana and other drugs and drug paraphernalia in their vehicle. On Friday evening, detectives from the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team stopped Laurence Eugene Berg, 52, and Ann Marie Hauck, 45, near the intersection of U.S. Highway 97 and Northwest Larch Avenue in Redmond, according to a news release from CODE. With the help of a drug detection dog from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, police found about 13 grams of heroin, a methamphetamine pipe with methamphetamine residue, a small amount of marijuana, measuring scales and three prescription medications for which neither Berg nor Hauck had a prescription. The heroin was worth about $4,000, the release said. Berg and Hauck were lodged in the Deschutes County jail on suspicion of possession and distribution of heroin and possession of methamphetamine. Both remained in jail on $35,000 bail on Monday, according to jail records.

A Mt. Bachelor program that provides discount ski vouchers and sets aside the proceeds for local nonprofit organizations raised $95,000 this year, up from last year’s total of $70,750. The ski resort’s Charity Ski Weeks program provides $25 ski vouchers to five nonprofit groups, and people who purchase the vouchers can ski during a 10-day period in January or April, according to a news release from Mt. Bachelor. This year, the organizations that participated in the program were NeighborImpact, the United Way of Deschutes County, The Environmental Center, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon and Volunteers in Medicine.

Third Street closure today Three lanes of Third Street in north Bend near the intersection of Revere Avenue will be closed intermittently today as Pacific Power crews do maintenance on overhead power lines. The work is scheduled to run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., according to a news release from the city of Bend. Flaggers, signs and cones will be used to control traffic in the area.

Nonaffiliated voters shake up state politics The Associated Press SALEM — Voters who don’t identify themselves as either a Democrat or a Republican now make up onefourth of Oregon’s registered voters. Three decades ago, they only accounted for 14 percent of voters, or about one in every seven voters, the Statesman Journal reported. Jim Moore, who teaches political science at Pacific University, says the group includes new voters who haven’t developed party loyalties “and a bunch of former Republicans and Democrats who are fed up with their parties and decide to register as independents.� In the November 2008 presidential election, Democrats accounted for 43 percent of Oregon’s 2 million registered

voters, Republicans 32 percent, nonaffiliated voters 20 percent and other parties 5 percent. Nonaffiliated voters, however, cast fewer ballots than Democrats and Republicans in a primary election when choices are limited to ballot measures and nonpartisan offices. April 27 is the last day to register to vote for the May 18 primary election — and to change party affiliation if voters want to choose Democratic or Republican candidates. The Independent Party of Oregon now has more than 50,000 voters.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 C3

O Drug boss gets 30 years By Abby Haight The Associated Press

PORTLAND — The man authorities say was the kingpin of one of the biggest drug organizations in Oregon history was sentenced Monday to 30 years in prison. Prosecutors say Jorge OrtizOliva, 40, oversaw three large “super” labs in the Salem area that produced at least 230 pounds of methamphetamine and ran marijuana plantations on secluded public land and national for-

ests in several states. More than 40,000 plants were seized from one site in southern Oregon. “When you’re flooding a state with methamphetamine in the middle of a meth epidemic, you’re damaging babies in the womb, you’re damaging communities,” said Assistant U.S. Attorney Kathleen L. Bickers, who sought a life sentence for Ortiz-Oliva. “They were creating a super demand of addicts. They did so much damage to the United States.” Ortiz-Oliva was sentenced

by U.S. District Judge Anna J. Brown on charges of drug trafficking, conspiracy to traffic in drugs and illegal re-entry to the United States. She also sentenced 31-year-old Pablo Barajas-Lopez, who worked for Ortiz-Oliva, to 15 years in prison on similar charges. The two will be deported to Mexico when their sentences are completed. Barajas-Lopez and Ortiz-Oliva, who had been convicted of assault in the shooting of a man in Salem

in 1995 and deported, were found guilty by a jury in October. Attorneys for the two have said they would appeal their convictions. A dozen others have been convicted or pleaded guilty to charges that grew out of the multi-agency investigation involving drug traffickers in 12 states. Using wire taps and interviews with co-conspirators, investigators identified Ortiz-Oliva as the leader of an organization that had ties to a Nocupetaro, Mexico, drug cartel.

E. coli tests prompt beef recall

FLY LIKE AN EAGLE

By Shannon Dininny The Associated Press

Brent Wojahn / The Oregonian

Bob Sallinger, conservation director for the Audubon Society of Portland, releases a young adult bald eagle Sunday in George Rogers Park in Lake Oswego. The eagle had been rescued following a territorial fight with another eagle in late February in a residential area near George Rogers Park.

Darkness to Light course combats child sex abuse in Southern Oregon By Sanne Specht Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — The diverse group taking Darkness to Light training at the Children’s Advocacy Center last week had a common goal: Get educated about the realities of child sexual abuse. A lawyer, a therapist, an adult survivor and others attending the class received their lessons from survivors’ stories and child abuse prevention experts. “This is a crash course in being human,” said Marlene Mish, director of the advocacy center. Mish is one of 36 trainers in the United States who teach the research-based course that provides seven specific steps adults can take to protect children. “There is only one person responsible for children, and that is every single adult,” Mish said.

In your area The KIDS Center is coordinating the Darkness to Light program in partnership with a strong group of county and nonprofit agencies throughout Central Oregon. To learn more about or to schedule a ‘Darkness to Light’ training for your organization or for yourself as a concerned adult, please visit the KIDS Center Web site at www.kidscenter.info or call 541-383-5958. “What are you going to commit to do?” There are 39 million survivors of child sexual abuse in America

today. One in four girls and one in six boys are sexually abused by their 18th birthday, said Mish. “If I told you one in four children would be hit by a bus, what do you think would happen?” she said. “Don’t you think we’d do something? Like right now?” Mish’s bus analogy rang a chord in Anne Kellogg, a therapist specializing in trauma mental health. Prevention always is the best option. A single incident of molestation can create significant and ongoing damage, Kellogg said. Medford attorney Dennis Black took part in the training as a new CAC board member. “I need to learn as much as I can about this issue,” said Black. “I believe that if we can solve the problem of child abuse in our society, every other problem would be greatly diminished.”

YAKIMA, Wash. — A ground beef recall that has expanded to WinCo Foods stores in six Western states was prompted by a law firm’s investigation of contaminated beef products. Saying the meat could be contaminated with E. coli, California officials issued the recall Sunday for WinCo Foods fresh ground beef that was packaged in Styrofoam trays at the stores and marked with sale dates from March 28 to April 9. The warning covers about 70 stores in California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. The announcement expanded a voluntary recall last week at one store in Modesto, Calif. California officials say an additional sample from that store tested positive for E. coli Friday, prompting the expanded recall. No illnesses have been reported. The supermarket chain learned about the bacterial contamination from an independent lab that was conducting a nationwide survey of ground beef for Marler Clark, a Seattle law firm specializing in food-borne illness cases. The ground beef likely came from one of two national beef companies that supply many grocery stores, said Michael Read, WinCo Foods vice president of public and legal affairs. WinCo has no reason to believe any ground beef that was sold was contaminated, he said. Read had no estimate of how many pounds of ground beef could be affected, but he noted that much of the meat has probably already been consumed and no illnesses have been reported.

O  B Wash. father, son arrested in pot bust ASHLAND — Police arrested a Washington father and son after discovering more than 3 pounds of marijuana during a traffic stop in southern Oregon. Sgt. Steve Mitchell of the Oregon State Police says a trooper found the marijuana in the trunk of a BMW he pulled over Sunday on Interstate 5 south of Ashland. Mitchell says 56-year-old Richard Miller and 24-yearold Jonathan Miller, both of Kirkland, Wash., were charged with unlawful possession of marijuana and lodged in the Jackson County Jail.

PORTLAND — Sgt. Scott Westerman has resigned as president of the Portland police union. The Oregonian newspaper reports that Westerman faxed his letter of resignation to precincts Monday afternoon. Westerman is under investigation for two road-rage incidents in January. Westerman said last week he would resign if he could no longer be an effective president of the 950-member Portland Police Association.

Thieves told police they were bored

Band leader guilty of embezzlement

WEST LINN — Two boys who were caught stealing cell phones, GPS units and sunglasses from cars and garages in West Linn told police they were bored and did it for something to do. The Oregonian reports officers caught the 16- and 17-year-old before 6 a.m. Friday and referred them to the Clackamas County Juvenile Department on counts of burglary and theft.

COQUILLE — The founder of a respected youth music program in the Coos Bay area will be serving a year and a half in prison for embezzling $86,000. Greg Young told the judge in Coos County Circuit Court on Monday that he accepts full responsibility for the crime, and never meant to hurt the kids in the Oregon Coast Lab Band. Young and his wife, Patricia, had pleaded guilty last week.

Police: Gresham girl abused for years GRESHAM — Police say a 5-year-old Gresham girl found dead last week suffered years of abuse and neglect at the hands of her father and his live-in girlfriend. Christopher Rosillo and Guadalupe Quintero were arrested Friday — three days after Oleander Labier was pronounced dead on arrival at a Portland hospital. The official cause of death won’t be released until the medical examiner’s report is complete, but Gresham police Sgt. Rick Wilson says investigators have described it as the worst case of child abuse they have ever seen. Rosillo and Quintero, both ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

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C4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

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Wyden deserves Democrats’ votes

W

e hesitate to call any contested political race a formality. As long as there are multiple candidates, each one theoretically has a chance to win. So we’ll call

the Democratic primary for U.S. Senate a near formality and urge voters to support Ron Wyden. Wyden is the incumbent, of course, having served in Congress for the past 30 years. He’s seeking his third full term in the Senate, to which he was elected for the first time in 1996. His two opponents are Loren Hooker, a Glendale farmer who has reported no campaign contributions; and Pavel Goberman, a perennial candidate for major office. Just two years ago, Goberman ran for commissioner of the Bureau of Labor and Industries. During his tenure in the Senate, Wyden has done what many statewide officeholders merely promise to do: He’s sought to represent all of Oregon, not merely the Willamette Valley regions that contain huge numbers of voters. He has been instrumental in securing so-called “timber payments,” which have helped Eastern and Central Oregon counties devastated by the collapse of logging on federal land. He’s now working on legislation that would boost harvests in federal forests. And with Rep. Greg Walden and former Sen. Gordon Smith, Wyden worked hard to pass the legislation necessary to transfer the Pine Nursery property from the Forest Service to Bend’s park district. On important national issues, meanwhile, Wyden has earned a reputation for the kind of independence

some members of his own party find problematic. This independent streak is best exemplified by Wyden’s sponsorship of the bipartisan Healthy Americans Act, and his determined support for competition in the provision of health care. More recently, Wyden has joined up with Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H., on legislation that would simplify the U.S. tax code. Like any elected official with a substantial track record, Wyden has his vulnerabilities. These include his decision to vote for the staggeringly expensive Senate health care bill even after subjecting it to withering (and appropriate) criticism. But Wyden’s record is, on balance, a very good one. And even if it were less good than it is, it would be more than enough to justify a victory next month. If Wyden has a worthy opponent this year, it’s Jim Huffman, the former Lewis & Clark Law School dean who seeks the Republican nomination for Senate. Should the two square off in the fall, Oregonians will have the luxury of choosing between two very good candidates, neither of whom will treat the election as a formality. But first things first. Democrats should choose Ron Wyden. And Republicans, as we recommended Monday, should choose Huffman.

Stop the dipping T

here may be good reasons for giving Oregon Treasury Department officials a pass when it comes to the expense account rules that apply to most other state employees. Money managers are, after all, working in pretty rarified circles and it requires them to eat and sleep in places far more expensive than Ruby Tuesday and Motel 6. That said, they should not be allowed to charge the state for living expenses picked up by somebody else. That’s what’s happening now, according to The Oregonian. State money managers, who are charged with selecting and overseeing investment companies to handle state retirement, accident insurance and common school funds, routinely travel to check up on those companies. Frequently, meal, hotel and other expenses are picked up by the investment firms. Allowing companies you oversee to pay your bills strikes us as a glaring conflict of interest. Meanwhile, it makes no sense at all for Treasury’s folks to come home, turn around and bill Oregon taxpayers for the perks that have been provided to them at no cost. Yet that’s what is happening now. State money managers return from expense-paid trips only to bill the state for their meals, even if meals are provided by the companies they’re visiting.

Treasury officials defend the practice, noting that incidental expenses in some places eat up the $64-per-day allowance provided for meals. Incidentals at Treasury include such things as magazines at airports, dry cleaning and tips. Clearly a more honest system would be one in which Treasury officials paid for all their own meals and incidentals and the state reimbursed them. As things now stand, it’s difficult to tell if a $32 dinner actually was dinner for a state employee or a magazine and tip to an airport red cap. If Treasury needs special rules, they might cover the very real possibility that dinner with investment executives cannot possibly be bought for the amount provided by the state. It’s difficult to imagine the atmosphere at Treasury that allowed for such double dipping in the first place. Investing the public’s money requires a level of trustworthiness beyond that required in most other jobs, it seems to us. Allowing employees to double-dip compromises that trustworthiness in two important ways. First, the doubledipping itself is wrong. Second, the practice — not to mention the state’s comfort with it — encourages the public to wonder what other sorts of unsavory activity might be occurring.

My Nickel’s Worth My lost homes I’ve lost three homes under the Federal Reserve policies, Wall Street scandals and loan freezing done by our banks since 2009. Where were our congressmen protecting “we the people?” Was owning a home and making an investment based on an economy that was a lending credit-based economy an error on my part? Apparently so. Who is responsible for making sure that our money comes back to us in the form of staying in our homes or getting our credit restored? What about all the livable wage jobs that we gave away to Mexico and overseas? How about getting the manufacturing industries going again but not giving away the labor next time? Daniel Root Redmond

Feed the hungry At 72 years old I don’t need much: food, roof, good running car and Medicare. If, at my age, I had more than I needed to see me through the next 10 years of life, I would take that excess money that I can’t take with me to eternity and show you where my heart really is and donate at least 50 percent of that excess to local food banks. I’m sure glad I have enough to eat, but there are hundreds of local people who are out of work through no fault of their own who need your honest help. Only you can decide. But remember, I’ve never seen a Brinks truck following

a hearse. Have you? Dale Jones Bend

Birth control Letter writer Father Arsenius, from his sheltered existence in the Hermitage, instructs us that birth control is immoral. Apparently he has no concern that disease, starvation and death of millions are direct results of overpopulation, not to mention environmental destruction and war. What could be more immoral? Bill Raleigh Bend

Use Bend docs After reading the Bulletin article “VA to boost Bend veterans services,” I would like to suggest an alternative solution to the problems of minimal veteran care in Bend and the need to commute to Portland for services. The current proposal entails creating expensive facilities, adding medical staff, and installing all the required overhead. Why do we need to create an entire duplication of services and structures, when, in my opinion, some of the best medical staff and services in the country are already in place in Bend, and ready to use? My solution: Allow all veterans to have access to a federal health insurance plan, maybe the same used for federal employees. Veteran contribution costs to participate in the plan would be subsidized and use a

sliding scale based on current income and needs, with fully paid coverage available for those unable to afford it. What does this accomplish? First, it ends all of the trips to Portland for veterans to get medical treatment. Second, having the government create and maintain a duplicate medical services organization doesn’t seem very costeffective. Third, and most important, wouldn’t the best way to say “thank you” to all of our veterans be to give them full access to the best medical treatment available, without traveling to other cities to get it? Veterans, wouldn’t it be nice to choose the doctor you want to visit, when you want to, and in your own hometown? As an Air Force veteran, I would welcome this option and would be the first to sign up. John Cullen Bend

‘Broke’ state Will wonders never cease? Remember, the state is out of money, per The Bulletin, April 8. So what are they doing? Moving 500 Oregon Department of Transportation employees (why do they need 500?) out of their offices in Salem into temporary offices, which were once home to high-tech companies, so they can spend $65 million — yes, $65 million — to renovate their offices on the Capitol Mall. Makes sense to me. How about you? Bob Roth Redmond

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

The Vatican should promote a church that Mary would love

I

heard a joke the other day about a pious soul who dies, goes to heaven, and gains an audience with the Virgin Mary. The visitor asks Mary why, for all her blessings, she always appears in paintings as a bit sad, a bit wistful: Is everything OK? Mary reassures her visitor: “Oh, everything’s great. No problems. It’s just ... it’s just that we had always wanted a daughter.” That story comes to mind as the Vatican wrestles with the consequences of a patriarchal premodern mind-set: scandal, cover-up and the clumsiest self-defense since Watergate. That’s what happens with old boys’ clubs. It wasn’t inevitable that the Catholic Church would grow so addicted to male domination, celibacy and rigid hierarchies. Jesus himself focused on the needy rather than dogma, and went out of his way to engage women and treat them with respect. The first-century church was inclusive and democratic, even including a protofeminist wing and texts. The Gospel of Philip, a Gnostic text from the third cen-

tury, declares of Mary Magdalene: “She is the one the Savior loved more than all the disciples.” Likewise, the Gospel of Mary (from the early second century) suggests that Jesus entrusted Mary Magdalene to instruct the disciples on his religious teachings. St. Paul refers in Romans 16 to a firstcentury woman named Junia as prominent among the early apostles, and to a woman named Phoebe who served as a deacon. The Apostle Junia became a Christian before St. Paul did (chauvinist translators have sometimes rendered her name masculine, with no scholarly basis). Yet over the ensuing centuries, the church reverted to strong patriarchal attitudes, while also becoming increasingly uncomfortable with sexuality. The shift may have come with the move from house churches, where women were naturally accepted, to more public gatherings. The upshot is that proto-feminist texts were not included when the Bible was compiled (and were mostly lost until modern times). Tertullian, an early Christian leader, denounced women as “the gate-

NICHOLAS KRISTOF way to the devil,” while a contemporary account reports that the great Origen of Alexandria took his piety a step further and castrated himself. The Catholic Church still seems stuck today in that patriarchal rut. The same faith that was so pioneering that it had Junia as a female apostle way back in the first century can’t even have a woman as the lowliest parish priest. Female deacons, permitted for centuries, are banned today. That old boys’ club in the Vatican became as self-absorbed as other old boys’ clubs, like Lehman Brothers, with similar results. And that is the reason the Vatican is floundering today. But there’s more to the picture than that. In my travels around the world, I

encounter two Catholic Churches. One is the rigid all-male Vatican hierarchy that seems out of touch when it bans condoms even among married couples where one partner is HIV-positive. To me at least, this church — obsessed with dogma and rules and distracted from social justice — is a modern echo of the Pharisees whom Jesus criticized. Yet there’s another Catholic Church as well, one I admire intensely. This is the grass-roots Catholic Church that does far more good in the world than it ever gets credit for. This is the church that supports extraordinary aid organizations like Catholic Relief Services and Caritas, saving lives every day, and that operates superb schools that provide needy children an escalator out of poverty. This is the church of the nuns and priests in Congo, toiling in obscurity to feed and educate children. This is the church of the Brazilian priest fighting AIDS who told me that if he were pope, he would build a condom factory in the Vatican to save lives. This is the church of the Maryknoll Sisters in Central America and the Cabrini

Sisters in Africa. There’s a stereotype of nuns as stodgy Victorian traditionalists. I learned otherwise while hanging on for my life in a passenger seat as an American nun with a lead foot drove her jeep over ruts and through a creek in Swaziland to visit AIDS orphans. After a number of encounters like that, I’ve come to believe that the very coolest people in the world today may be nuns. So when you read about the scandals, remember that the Vatican is not the same as the Catholic Church. Ordinary lepers, prostitutes and slum-dwellers may never see a cardinal, but they daily encounter a truly noble Catholic Church in the form of priests, nuns and lay workers toiling to make a difference. It’s high time for the Vatican to take inspiration from that sublime — even divine — side of the Catholic Church, from those church workers whose magnificence lies not in their vestments, but in their selflessness. They’re enough to make the Virgin Mary smile. Nicholas Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 C5

O

Harley Wayne Carroll, of Madras January 19, 1923 - April 16, 2010 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 762 NE 10th St., Madras, OR 541-475-2241 Services: Thursday, April 22, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. at the United Methodist Church in Madras, OR. Burial will follow at Mt. Jefferson Memorial Park. Public visitation will be Tuesday, 12 noon - 5:00 p.m.; Wednesday 9-5, & Thurs. morning, all at the funeral home. Contributions may be made to:

Mt. View Hospice c/o Mt. View Hospital, Madras, OR 97741.

Samuel Scott Stipe, of Redmond Aug. 30, 1991 - April 16, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond 541-504-9485 Services: Memorial Service is at 12 :00 pm, on Friday, April 23, 2010, at Carey Foster Hall at Crook Co. Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville, Oregon.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Rent Continued from C1 The organization uses a lottery to select people from its waiting list. It recently issued an additional 260 rental vouchers. It distributes over 1,080 vouchers every month. HUD spokesman Lee Jones said tenants may not be able to afford rent, because of lost jobs or cuts in work hours. “(Tenants) are sitting with less money at their disposal, and these folks are trying to make due with less,” Jones said. “If there’s a way we can help a housing authority address a shortfall and continue assisting the number of families it wants to assist — we want to help them do that, and that’s what this program does.” Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

Watchdog group complains

Rob O’Neal/The Associated Press

Cuban tobacco farmer Alejandro Robaina puffs on a cigar at his home in San Juan y Martinez in the province of Pinar del Rio, Cuba, in September 2009. Robaina, 91, the only Cuban to have a cigar brand named after him, died Saturday from cancer.

Tobacco-growing legend dies in Cuba By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Alejandro Robaina, Cuba’s most revered tobacco grower, whose leaves wrap the country’s finest Habano cigars, died Saturday at his home near San Luis. He was 91. Habanos S.A., the state company that distributes and markets Cuban cigars, announced on its Web site that he had died after a long illness. Robaina began working on his family’s tobacco fields in western Cuba when he was 10, a year after he smoked his first cigar. He went on to achieve cult status among cigar smokers worldwide for the silken leaves that he produced on his 40-acre plantation, Finca la Pina in Cuchillas de Barbacoa. Their quality could be appreciated in top-of-the-line cigars like Cohiba Esplendidos and Hoyo de Monterrey Double Coronas, renowned for their smoothness and richness. As his reputation grew, he became a roving ambassador for Cuban cigars, traveling around the world to represent Cuba’s most admired export. When old age made travel inconvenient, he stayed put and the world came to him. Cigar lovers by the hundreds beat a path to tour the plantation, hoping to catch a glimpse of the old man or, per-

Program Continued from C1 Any student can take IB classes, which include both required and elective courses, and students interested in earning an IB diploma must study at least six IB subjects and complete a variety of additional requirements, including a longform essay and community service. This fall, the high school began offering eight classes as part of a pilot program for stu-

haps, have him autograph a box of Vegas Robaina cigars, a brand created in his honor. In later years his tobacco operation was largely run by his grandson, Hiroshi, who survives him, as do four children, nine other grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Robaina was born in Alquizar on March 20, 1919, to a family that had been growing tobacco since 1845 in the Vuelta Abajo region, the cigar world’s equivalent of Bordeaux or Burgundy. He remained an independent grower after Fidel Castro came to power. “He wanted me to join a cooperative, and I told him no — I would not do it and that I would remain working with my family,” he told Cigar Aficionado magazine in 2006. “At the end he has understood to the point that a lot of the land is now in the hands of small farmers.” In the mid-1990s, when the Cuban government named him the country’s best tobacco grower, Castro himself handed out the award. In 1997, Habanos, a joint venture between the Cuban government and Britain’s Imperial Tobacco Group, created Vegas Robaina, making him the only Cuban grower to have a brand of cigars named after him.

dents interested in the IB program. The classes are: English, French, Spanish, 20th-century history, biology, chemistry, music and a required IB course called theory of knowledge. Anderson said the IB classes being offered at the school will expand this fall to include various math courses, psychology, art, physics, another history class, and a class called Environmental Systems and Societies. At least 20 teachers have already taken the required IB training, and more training will

Residents of nearby neighborhoods and a land use watchdog group have complained county officials seemed to have already made up their minds to build 19th Street, because of statements they made during meetings and the money set aside and spent on the project. The county has received about $1 million in federal earmarks since 2008 to pay for the design, environmental review and preliminary work on the 19th Street project. At the same time, county commissioners have made 19th Street a fiscal priority and set aside $2 million in road funding for the project in the last two budget years. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

REDMOND

19th St. connections

97

Redmond Airport

The Deschutes County Commission voted 2-1 Monday to add the 19th Street extension to its plan for future road projects.

Yew Ave.

.

Police Memorial Fund, RE: Fallen Firefighters/ Police License Plate, 4190 SW Aumsville Hwy, Salem, OR 97137.

Hazel Spence passed away Saturday, April 10, 2010, at the age of 97. Hazel was born in Prineville, Oregon, June 10, 1912. Hazel is the daughter of James J. and Mary Coffelt. She is one of five siblings Margaret, Claud, Orville and Maxine Spence Marie. She is survived by her sister, Marie Cordon. Hazel grew up in Springfield and Prineville, Oregon. She graduated from Crook County High School, Prineville, Oregon, in 1931, and went on to attend Business College in Portland, Oregon. Following the completion of her college work, Hazel took a job in the offices of Hudspeth Pine Lumber Company in Prineville. In 1941, Hazel married George Spence. George was serving in the U.S. Army at the time as a Master Sergeant Engineer stationed in the South Pacific. After retiring from Hudspeth Pine in 1973, George and Hazel moved from Prineville to Bend, Oregon. During these years they enjoyed camping, visiting with family and making their Bend home a place to be proud of. Hazel and George were married for 53 years until George’s passing in May of 1995. Shortly after the passing of her beloved George, Hazel moved to Sutherlin, Oregon, to be near her sister and her husband, Marie and Don Cordon. In 2005, after Don's death, Hazel & Marie moved to Creekside Retirement Village in Beaverton, Oregon, to be close to niece, Deanna Martinson. Hazel enjoyed reading, sewing and spending time with family. Hazel was proud to be a great-great-great-Aunt to her nieces and nephews. Hazel was a member of the Soroptimist International. Contributions to the Soroptimist International can be made in Hazel's memory at: Soroptimist International of Bend, P. O. Box 1843, Bend, Oregon, 97709. The care and support Hazel received from Providence Hospice, Portland, Oregon, was greatly appreciated by Hazel and her family. As an alternate way to honor Hazel, donations can also be made to Providence Hospice of Portland, Oregon. Hazel will be laid to rest in Greenwood Cemetery, Bend, Oregon. The family has placed their trust in Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home for the final arrangements. Please visit our website www.niswonger-reynolds.com and sign the electronic guest register book for the family.

Blv d

Contributions may be made to:

Continued from C1 “Deschutes County has four cities, and we need to work together as cities and counties to promote livability in the whole county,” Unger said. “Cities are where economic development occurs.” Luke said he asked an ODOT official whether the 19th Street extension and improvements at Deschutes Market Road would convince the state agency to allow more development at Juniper Ridge, which has been held up by traffic problems at the congested U.S. Highway 97 and Cooley Road intersection. The official said “yes,” Luke said.

na l

Feb. 6, 1952 - April 15, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend. 541-382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A committal service will be held on 1:00 pm, on Wed., April 21, 2010, at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, Oregon.

June 6, 1912 - April 10, 2010

19th St.

Ca

Clarence Eugene “Gene” Murray, of Bend

Extension

Juniper Golf Course Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center

BurlingtonNorthern Railway

Pronghorn development

97

19th St./Deschutes Market Rd. preferred connection route

Deschutes Junction Tumalo Rd.

Juniper Ridge industrial and mixed-use site

Cooley Rd.

Morrill Rd.

Deschutes Mkt. Rd.

D

N  

Hazel Maxine Coffelt Spence

Dale Rd. Boonesborough development

Bureau of Land Management land

. wy

ll we Po

B

eH utt

MILES

97 0

BEND

1

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

take place over the summer. “There’s also a wait list of teachers that are excited to be trained,” Anderson said. One of the few tasks remaining, Anderson said, is to figure out a calendar that ensures testing and assessments aren’t piled up into the same days and weeks, to prevent an overload of student tests. According to Chief Academic Officer Vicki Van Buren, there’s not much left to do because of the intense application process. “The application is so thorough that really we have done

all the necessary teacher-training, we’ve been purchasing instructional materials for the courses,” she said. “I don’t anticipate any major issues as far as supporting the program.” Currently, the Redmond School District operates an IB charter school, International School of the Cascades. Bend High will be the second high school east of the Cascades to offer the program. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Masterson was expert on personality disorders, narcissism By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Dr. James Masterson, an internationally recognized psychiatrist who helped inaugurate a new approach to the study and treatment of personality disorders, including narcissism, died on April 12. He was 84 and lived in Rye, N.Y. His death at a hospital in Greenwich, Conn., was from complications of pneumonia, his daughter, Nancy Masterson, said. A trained psychoanalyst, Masterson was an authority on narcissistic and borderline personality disorders. At his death, he was clinical professor emeritus of psychiatry at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He was also the founder and director of the Masterson Institute for Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. Established in 1977, the institute offers psychoanalytic training at its headquarters in Manhattan, its West Coast branch in San Francisco and, via the Internet, locations around the world. Personality disorders affect millions of people in the United States alone. Patients with nar-

cissistic personality disorder can be grandiose, attention-seeking and demanding. Those with borderline personality disorder tend toward self-destructiveness, manipulativeness and flash-flood anger. Masterson was one of the first people to bring the psychoanalytic approach known as object relations theory to bear on the study of personality. In so doing, he helped widen the lens through which personality disorders are viewed beyond the classical Freudian one that analysts had favored for decades. “The enormous contribution he made was in the understanding of personality disorders and the evolution of personality per se,” Allan Schore, a psychoanalyst and neuroscientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, said Thursday. “He really helped psychiatry shift to offer more complex, more effective models in the treatment of personality disorders.” Most closely associated with the British psychoanalysts Donald Winnicott and Melanie Klein, object relations theory centers on infants’ early attachment to their mothers. This at-

tachment is vital, the theory holds — so vital that disruptions can cause psychological disturbances later on. Object relations theory was primarily meant to explain human behavior. But in work he began in the mid-20th century, Masterson came to believe that it also held the key to personality, in particular the origin and treatment of personality disorders. (The psychoanalysts Heinz Kohut and Otto F. Kernberg also played seminal roles in applying the object relations model to the realm of personality.) Classical Freudianism roots personality disorders in the Oedipal period, roughly between the ages of 4 and 6. Applying the object relations model, Masterson placed the roots even farther back, between about 18 months old and 36 months old. “The pre-Oedipal disorders, which include all the personality disorders by definition, are much more concerned with the issue of maternal availability,” Judith Pearson, director of the Masterson Institute’s East Coast division, said Thursday. “In the Oedipal phase, the conflict really includes the child’s rivalry

with the same-sex parent for the love of the opposite-sex parent.” With its emphasis on the Oedipal, the Freudian approach was ill suited to treating personality disorders, Masterson argued. He maintained that these disorders crucially involve the conflict between a person’s two “selves”: the false self, which the very young child constructs to please the mother, and the true self. “The psychotherapy of personality disorders,” Pearson explained, “is an attempt is to put people back in touch with their

real selves.” Besides his daughter, Nancy, Masterson is survived by his wife, the former Patricia Cooke, whom he married in 1949; two sons, Jim and Richard; a brother, Richard; a sister, Joan Masterson; and three grandchildren.

541-322-CARE

DESCHUTES MEMORIAL CHAPEL & GARDENS Where Every Life is Celebrated Central Oregon Veterans Memorial Vietnam Memorial • Korean Monument 9 Distinct Gardens • Mausoleum On-Site Crematory

Mike Garcia, Funeral Director

541-382-5592 63875 N. Highway 97 • P.O. Box 5992 • Bend www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Locally Owned and Operated by the Daniel Family


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, APRIL 20

WEDNESDAY

Today: Cloudy, rain showers, breezy, cooler.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

54

32

STATE Western





Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

57/37

54/32

60/37

38/27

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

57/39

50/29

Mitchell

Madras

57/34

56/37

Camp Sherman 48/29 Redmond Prineville 54/32 Cascadia 54/33 53/33 Sisters 51/31 Bend Post 54/32

Oakridge Elk Lake 51/31

42/20

Brothers

Sunriver 49/29

51/28

Showers likely today. Chance of rain or snow tonight. Eastern

57/30

Hampton

47/27

50/29

Fort Rock

Vancouver 55/45

56/44

Eugene

55/35



Helena 73/39

54/32

Boise



72/43



Idaho Falls 74/43

59/41

58/31

Reno

47/24

Breezy with showers today. Chance of rain or snow tonight.

Crater Lake 29/20

Missoula

Elko

52/34

San Francisco

67/35

Salt Lake City

56/48



77/53

LOW

Moon phases First

Full

Last

April 21 April 28 May 5

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

New

May 13

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 60/46/0.03 . . . . . 55/41/sh. . . . . . 56/41/pc Baker City . . . . . . 76/30/0.00 . . . . . 63/38/sh. . . . . . 51/33/sh Brookings . . . . . . 58/46/0.00 . . . . . 54/45/sh. . . . . . 57/45/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 75/34/0.00 . . . . . .55/30/rs. . . . . . 46/30/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 67/45/0.00 . . . . . 56/36/sh. . . . . . . 55/37/c Klamath Falls . . . 64/35/0.00 . . . . . 50/30/sh. . . . . . . 46/27/c Lakeview. . . . . . . 64/28/0.00 . . . . . .48/28/rs. . . . . . 48/28/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 61/32/0.00 . . . . . .47/28/rs. . . . . . . 48/26/c Medford . . . . . . . 73/45/0.00 . . . . . 55/37/sh. . . . . . 57/36/pc Newport . . . . . . . 59/45/0.00 . . . . . 56/39/sh. . . . . . . 56/42/c North Bend . . . . . . 61/46/NA . . . . . 55/41/sh. . . . . . 55/38/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 79/37/0.00 . . . . . 69/46/sh. . . . . . 58/38/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 77/44/0.00 . . . . . 62/42/sh. . . . . . 57/40/sh Portland . . . . . . . 68/51/0.01 . . . . . 58/40/sh. . . . . . 58/41/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 67/39/0.00 . . . . . 54/33/sh. . . . . . . 52/31/c Redmond. . . . . . . 68/36/0.00 . . . . . 57/34/sh. . . . . . . 51/27/c Roseburg. . . . . . . 67/47/0.00 . . . . . 51/39/sh. . . . . . 56/36/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 67/50/0.00 . . . . . 57/37/sh. . . . . . . 58/37/c Sisters . . . . . . . . . 64/33/0.00 . . . . . 51/31/sh. . . . . . 49/32/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 77/44/0.00 . . . . . 64/46/sh. . . . . . . .58/41/

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/39 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 in 1934 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.33” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 in 1966 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.41” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.39” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.22” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.78 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.25 in 1965 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:26 a.m. . . . . . .8:55 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:16 a.m. . . . . .10:05 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .12:27 p.m. . . . . . .3:23 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .4:52 a.m. . . . . . .4:25 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .4:52 p.m. . . . . . .5:22 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:05 a.m. . . . . . .5:00 p.m.

1

LOW

57 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy.

61 30

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

78/42

Redding

Silver Lake

47/26



Bend

56/36

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

74/46

Seattle

53/30

45/22

Calgary

58/40

Burns

47/28

Crescent

BEND ALMANAC Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:14 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:56 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:12 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:57 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:54 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 1:41 a.m.

SATURDAY Partly cloudy, slightly warmer.

56 27

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Portland



HIGH

50 31

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 80° Rome • 28° Lakeview

FRIDAY Partly cloudy.

NORTHWEST

52/29

52/30

HIGH

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers, breezy, LOW cool.

Showers and isolated thunderstorms will extend from the Pacific Northwest to California today.

Paulina

La Pine

 Crescent Lake

Showers likely today. Chance of showers early tonight. Central

56/38

Tonight: Cloudy, rain showers, breezy.

THURSDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . .Carry Chains / T.T. I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . . . . .Carry Chains / T.T. Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . . . . .Carry Chains / T.T. Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . .Carry Chains / T.T. Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 79-125 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 110-140 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 119-124 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 125-168 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 25-85 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 55-57 . . . . 120-165 . . . no report . . . . . . . 181 . . . no report . . . no report . . . no report

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 55/45

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Seattle 56/44

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Boise 72/43

Goodyear, Ariz.

• 18°

San Francisco 56/48

Stanley, Idaho

• 0.78”

Las Vegas 83/52

Orlando, Fla. Los Angeles 64/51 Honolulu 83/72

Calgary 74/46

S

Saskatoon 73/44

S Winnipeg 64/34

Tijuana 68/50

S

Thunder Bay 56/29

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 58/40

Halifax 53/30 P ortland Billings To ronto 50/38 75/42 61/40 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 72/47 66/39 61/48 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 63/41 New York 62/41 64/45 68/51 Cheyenne Des Moines Philadelphia Chicago 59/37 Columbus 72/47 67/48 63/46 66/45 Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 66/48 City 68/48 Denver Louisville 77/53 Kansas City 66/42 68/46 St. Louis 69/48 Charlotte 69/49 68/51 Albuquerque Oklahoma City Little Rock Nashville Atlanta 72/50 72/53 67/44 67/51 74/46 Phoenix Birmingham 87/61 72/46 Dallas 75/57 Houston 74/58

Chihuahua 76/48

Anchorage 43/36

S

Bismarck 72/35

Portland 58/40

• 90°

S

La Paz 85/60 Juneau 49/38

Mazatlan 84/65

New Orleans 74/57

Orlando 81/61 Miami 82/67

Monterrey 80/65

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .71/55/c . . 81/61/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . . .67/42/s . . 65/40/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .62/36/0.00 . . .66/38/s . . 68/42/pc Albuquerque. . . .70/52/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . 73/43/pc Anchorage . . . . .41/33/0.00 . .43/36/sh . . 44/35/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .74/50/0.00 . .67/51/sh . . 71/53/pc Atlantic City . . . .68/42/0.00 . . .58/48/s . . 58/49/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . . .74/52/c . . 79/59/pc Baltimore . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . 66/48/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . 75/42/pc . . 73/44/sh Birmingham . . . .75/46/0.00 . . .72/46/c . . 75/49/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . 72/35/pc . . . 71/38/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .80/45/0.00 . . .72/43/c . . 61/38/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .61/40/0.00 . . .61/48/s . . 66/47/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .61/42/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . 63/45/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .58/35/0.00 . . .63/41/s . . 63/39/pc Burlington, VT. . .58/37/0.00 . 61/39/pc . . . 66/45/c Caribou, ME . . . .54/35/0.03 . . .54/34/c . . 55/36/pc Charleston, SC . .72/51/0.00 . .71/56/sh . . 77/50/sh Charlotte. . . . . . .68/38/0.00 . .68/51/sh . . 69/47/sh Chattanooga. . . .72/50/0.00 . .66/45/sh . . . 73/49/c Cheyenne . . . . . .65/36/0.00 . . .59/37/c . . 58/41/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .56/35/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . 55/39/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . 68/44/pc . . 71/44/pc Cleveland . . . . . .60/32/0.01 . 57/42/pc . . 64/45/pc Colorado Springs 68/37/0.00 . . .66/43/t . . . 58/41/c Columbia, MO . .68/45/0.00 . 69/47/pc . . . .68/47/t Columbia, SC . . .73/41/0.00 . .73/52/sh . . 75/50/sh Columbus, GA. . .80/53/0.00 . .71/50/sh . . . 77/51/s Columbus, OH. . .63/34/0.00 . 66/45/pc . . 71/45/pc Concord, NH . . . .60/27/0.00 . 63/34/pc . . 69/38/pc Corpus Christi. . .75/60/0.00 . . .76/57/t . . 80/65/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .67/51/0.00 . . .75/57/c . . 79/62/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .62/35/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . 70/43/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .71/42/0.00 . . .66/42/t . . . 62/41/c Des Moines. . . . .72/46/0.00 . 72/47/pc . . 72/49/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .64/36/0.00 . 64/45/pc . . 65/39/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .61/33/0.00 . . .62/37/s . . 54/30/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . 76/54/pc . . . 81/55/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . .53/25/sh . . . 53/30/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .73/38/0.00 . . .71/38/s . . 67/38/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . 61/38/pc . . .45/28/rs

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .65/34/0.00 . 65/41/pc . . 62/37/pc Green Bay. . . . . .59/32/0.00 . 66/39/pc . . 53/33/pc Greensboro. . . . .69/43/0.00 . .69/48/sh . . 68/48/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .66/40/s . . 66/43/pc Hartford, CT . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .68/43/s . . 69/45/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .73/37/0.00 . 73/39/pc . . 68/40/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .83/71/0.00 . 83/72/pc . . 82/71/sh Houston . . . . . . .65/57/0.16 . . .74/58/c . . 79/61/pc Huntsville . . . . . .73/47/0.00 . . .69/45/c . . 72/48/pc Indianapolis . . . .64/41/0.00 . 65/42/pc . . . 68/46/c Jackson, MS . . . .71/58/0.00 . 72/46/pc . . 78/54/pc Madison, WI . . . .61/32/0.00 . 66/43/pc . . 63/36/pc Jacksonville. . . . .74/59/0.00 . .74/57/sh . . 79/55/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/42/0.06 . .49/38/sh . . 47/37/sh Kansas City. . . . .70/46/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . . .68/51/t Lansing . . . . . . . .61/30/0.00 . 64/41/pc . . 62/36/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . 83/52/pc . . . 64/47/c Lexington . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . . .66/42/c . . 69/45/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .69/32/0.00 . . .64/46/c . . . 68/50/c Little Rock. . . . . .71/54/0.00 . 74/46/pc . . 76/56/pc Los Angeles. . . . .66/57/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 63/51/sh Louisville . . . . . . .67/42/0.00 . 68/46/pc . . . 72/49/c Memphis. . . . . . .67/55/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . . 76/57/c Miami . . . . . . . . .78/69/0.00 . 82/67/pc . . 82/67/pc Milwaukee . . . . .52/35/0.00 . 59/41/pc . . 53/37/pc Minneapolis . . . .69/45/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . 64/42/pc Nashville . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .67/44/c . . . 70/50/c New Orleans. . . .78/65/0.01 . 74/57/pc . . 79/59/pc New York . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .68/51/s . . 69/50/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .65/44/0.00 . . .68/50/s . . 68/46/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .64/48/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 65/53/sh Oklahoma City . .62/48/0.00 . . .72/53/c . . 76/59/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .70/37/0.00 . . .66/48/c . . 69/49/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .79/62/0.78 . .81/61/sh . . 83/59/pc Palm Springs. . . .89/65/0.00 . 75/53/pc . . 69/51/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .61/41/0.00 . 68/45/pc . . 69/47/pc Philadelphia . . . .67/46/0.00 . . .67/48/s . . 67/50/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 87/61/pc . . 72/50/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .61/32/0.00 . . .65/42/s . . 66/43/pc Portland, ME. . . .61/32/0.00 . 50/38/pc . . 60/42/pc Providence . . . . .62/42/0.00 . . .65/44/s . . 67/46/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .68/40/0.00 . 71/49/pc . . 68/46/sh

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .67/39/0.00 . .62/41/sh . . . 65/40/s Savannah . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . .72/55/sh . . 78/51/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .81/44/0.00 . .52/34/sh . . .47/32/rs Seattle. . . . . . . . .69/50/0.00 . .56/44/sh . . 56/43/pc Richmond . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . 65/52/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .67/35/0.00 . 69/43/pc . . . 68/43/s Rochester, NY . . .61/37/0.00 . . .64/40/s . . 65/39/pc Spokane . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . . .71/45/c . . 56/41/sh Sacramento. . . . .69/51/0.00 . .62/45/sh . . 60/45/sh Springfield, MO. .66/49/0.00 . 70/44/pc . . 67/53/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .66/47/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . . .70/52/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .80/63/0.00 . .80/64/sh . . 80/63/pc Salt Lake City . . .78/48/0.00 . 77/53/pc . . 64/40/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . 81/57/pc . . 76/47/pc San Antonio . . . .66/56/0.00 . . .76/57/c . . 80/62/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . 72/55/pc . . . .75/58/t San Diego . . . . . .70/59/0.02 . .66/56/sh . . 59/53/sh Washington, DC .66/46/0.00 . . .68/48/s . . 66/50/sh San Francisco . . .66/50/0.00 . .56/48/sh . . 57/47/sh Wichita . . . . . . . .68/45/0.00 . . .68/51/c . . . .68/56/t San Jose . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . .59/45/sh . . 61/45/sh Yakima . . . . . . . .78/40/0.00 . .64/43/sh . . 61/38/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .71/41/0.00 . 67/39/pc . . 68/38/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . 83/57/pc . . 76/51/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .54/43/0.00 . 54/33/pc . . . 50/33/c Athens. . . . . . . . .73/53/0.10 . . .68/57/t . . 70/51/pc Auckland. . . . . . .66/59/0.00 . . .68/59/s . . . 68/58/s Baghdad . . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .91/62/s . . 94/66/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .99/81/0.00 . 99/80/pc . . . .98/81/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .64/50/0.03 . 66/48/pc . . 53/39/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . 82/65/pc . . 73/59/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . . .57/41/c . . . 50/36/c Bogota . . . . . . . .63/54/0.54 . . .69/55/t . . . .72/54/t Budapest. . . . . . .61/45/0.37 . 64/44/pc . . . .64/45/t Buenos Aires. . . .77/61/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . . 69/52/c Cabo San Lucas .82/64/0.00 . . .86/62/s . . 85/62/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .99/73/0.00 100/73/pc . . . 85/60/s Calgary . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 77/48/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .86/72/t . . . .85/74/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/34/0.00 . 49/29/pc . . 48/29/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . . .44/34/c . . 44/29/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . .63/47/sh . . . 62/41/s Harare . . . . . . . . .66/64/0.00 . . .80/64/t . . . .71/60/t Hong Kong . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .83/72/t . . 85/71/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .67/53/t . . . .61/48/t Jerusalem . . . . . .73/58/0.00 . 87/61/pc . . 75/54/sh Johannesburg . . .72/52/0.39 . . .68/51/t . . 67/51/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 85/71/pc . . 83/70/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . .66/52/c . . . .67/55/t London . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . 50/32/pc . . 49/30/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . 68/48/pc . . . 68/49/c Manila. . . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .93/78/t . . 94/79/pc

Mecca . . . . . . . .108/75/0.00 . .104/79/s . . 105/80/s Mexico City. . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .79/53/s . . . 81/54/s Montreal. . . . . . .59/36/0.15 . . .59/41/c . . 60/46/sh Moscow . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . . .56/39/c . . . 56/41/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . . .75/60/t . . . .74/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .84/72/1.96 . .80/69/sh . . . 80/70/c New Delhi. . . . .105/91/0.00 105/74/pc . 101/72/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . .64/53/sh . . 65/56/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . . 40/30/rs . . .39/28/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .59/41/c . . 60/46/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .68/43/0.00 . . .57/39/s . . 55/34/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .88/73/0.00 . . .90/69/s . . . 92/71/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . 68/47/pc . . 69/49/pc Santiago . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . 79/47/pc . . . 81/48/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . 90/72/pc . . 91/72/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .50/50/0.00 . .48/43/sh . . 44/38/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . 67/46/pc . . . .61/47/r Shanghai. . . . . . .68/61/0.27 . .72/60/sh . . . .74/61/t Singapore . . . . . .91/77/0.57 . . .90/78/t . . . .90/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . .44/31/c . . .41/30/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 76/60/pc . . 77/59/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .83/71/t . . . .84/70/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . 72/61/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .62/50/sh . . 69/52/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .59/39/0.00 . 61/40/pc . . 61/46/sh Vancouver. . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .55/45/sh . . . 57/41/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . 66/43/pc . . . 59/43/c Warsaw. . . . . . . .63/41/0.00 . 49/32/pc . . .45/31/rs

Building Continued from C1 About $6.8 million of the building’s price tag, estimated to be somewhere between $10 and $12 million, will come from federal stimulus money. Other funds will come from the previous sale of property, including land near Sunriver, which was authorized under the Bend Pine Nursery Land Conveyance Act in 2003. U.S. Forest Service

Fall 2011 move-in “We’re looking forward to getting into the building, and I’m glad that some people are going to get some good work,” Allen said. The agency had previously planned to do the building in different phases, moving into one floor at a time, said Doug Seaman, a civil engineer with the Deschutes National Forest. But the stimulus money means that the whole building can be done at once.

State police investigating suspicious death on coast

Construction of the new U.S. Forest Service building, to be built at the old Bend Pine Nursery site, could start this July, according to Forest Service officials. The project also includes constructing a parking lot, improving a stretch of Deschutes Market Road and building a bridge over a canal. “Now we’re able to do the whole thing, and we’ll plan on moving in fall 2011,” Seaman said, adding that construction could start this July. Seaman said the building is the largest facility project he’s

worked on in 30 years with the Deschutes National Forest, and has attracted more interest than he’s seen in years.

‘A lot of competition’ Andy High, with the Central Oregon Builders Association, said that he would expect lots of inquiries for the multi-milliondollar construction effort.

“Projects like this just bring a lot of competition in, and even more so that we’re in a down market,” High said. “Companies may find ways to make a bid, even if they’re not based in Central Oregon. It definitely could be worth it.” The only major commercial jobs in the area at the moment are a new U.S. Bank building on Century Drive and a Toyota building off of Third Street,

he said. But there are several schools projects in the area ongoing as well, High said. “A lot of it’s all government jobs right now,” he said. “Unfortunately right now, you don’t see any real private sector jobs.”

“We’re looking forward to getting into the building, and I’m glad that some people are going to get some good work.”

Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

— John Allen, Deschutes National Forest supervisor

Compassionate Care To Manage The Most Difficult Steps In Life’s Journey.

Providing care for loved ones and their families in their time of need.

NEWPORT — Detectives with the Oregon State Police are investigating the death of a 49-year-old woman who apparently fell from a vehicle late Saturday. Lt. Gregg Hastings says Olissa Jackson of Lincoln City was driven to a hospital on the Oregon coast after an incident at Tierra Del Mar Beach near Pacific City. Jackson died soon after she was airlifted to a Portland hospital. The Tillamook County District Attorney’s Office is coordinating the investigation.

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S

Running Inside Winners of Boston Marathon crowned, local runners compete, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010

EQUESTRIAN Equestrians land medals, state bids REDMOND — Team champions were crowned, medalists were recognized, and state qualifiers were determined over the weekend at the third and final Oregon High School Equestrian Teams (OHSET) Central District meet of the 2010 season. In competition staged at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond won the Large Team division, La Pine placed first in the Medium Team division, Dufur was first in the Small Team division, and Pendleton was tops in the Mini Team division. Gold, silver and bronze medalists in all individual and team events — and a number of other high-scoring riders — qualified for the 2010 OHSET state meet, set for May 13-16 at the Jackson County Fairgrounds in Central Point. District year-end award winners included Laurie MacWhorter of Mountain View (high point performance rider), Harrison Buller of Madras (high point timed rider), and Courtney Thomas of Mountain View (high point team contributor and high point versatility rider). Crook County received the team sportsmanship award. And Central District scholarships were awarded to Chrystal Bates of La Pine and Lindsey Bernbaum of Dufur. Results from the threeday district meet, including medalists and other state qualifiers, are listed in Prep Scoreboard on Page D5. —Bulletin staff report

Helping young athletes play THEIR game Well-known speaker gives parents advice about how their kids can succeed in sports By Katie Brauns The Bulletin

Advice is often best given by those who have lived through mistakes. Bruce Brown, a well-known speaker on the subject of sports coaching, has a field full of topics to share with his audiences. “My passion is character-based athletics,” said Brown, minutes before he addressed a gathering of parents and student-athletes Friday night in the Sisters High School auditorium. “I’m a teacher and somebody who tries to have coaches and athletes see the value of a character-based culture and how that helps them win.” Brown has spent 35 years as a teacher, coach and athletic administrator at the junior high, high school, junior college and collegiate level. He has coached football, basketball, baseball and volleyball.

COMMUNITY SPORTS Since the mid-1980s Brown has traveled around the United States, Canada and beyond to share his experience through public speaking. In front of the audience at Sisters High, Brown recounted an instance when he saw himself through the eyes of his athletes. “I remember I videotaped myself (coach) one time,” he said, “I wanted to see what the kids were seeing. What I thought was intensity was like scary ugly. … I needed to be the face that the kids needed to see and the model of behavior I expect them to exhibit on the floor.” See Game / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Motivational speaker Bruce Brown talks with parents and athletes about how an athletic experience should provide an opportunity for character growth and the roles parents and coaches play in their experience Friday evening at Sisters High School.

PREP BOYS GOLF

HEATHER CLARK

Get up off your rumps and ride, race, help

INSIDE MLB Rays ...............8 Red Sox .........2

Nationals .......5 Rockies ..........2

Blue Jays .......8 Royals ............1

Mets...............6 Cubs ..............1

Mariners ........8 Orioles ...........2

Padres ...........3 Giants ............2

Angels ...........2 Tigers ............0

Cardinals .......4 D’backs ..........2

M’s pitcher falls short of no-hitter Seattle takes an 8-2 victory over Baltimore, see Page D3

NBA Utah ties series by beating Denver The Jazz take a 114111 win over Nuggets, see Page D4

Denver forward Carmelo Anthony, right, works the ball inside as Utah guard Wesley Matthews defends on Monday.

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Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Jared Lambert clears his ball from a sand trap on the 11th hole Monday at The Bend Golf and Country Club.

Panthers take Bend Invite Despite Summit’s Jesse Heinly receiving medalist honors, it’s Redmond’s team finishing on top Bulletin staff report Riding the momentum from its victory at the High Desert Challenge on Friday, Redmond won the Bend High Invitational boys golf tournament Monday, topping runner-up Summit 315-326 at the Bend Golf and Country Club. The Storm’s Jesse Heinly took medalist honors with a par 72 after shooting a scorching 3-under on the back nine, but the Panthers, who were led by Landon Moore’s 73, had four golfers shoot 83 or lower. “We’re playing with a lot of confidence right now,” said Redmond coach Ron Buerger. “Usually as a coach you look back at a meet and see where you left some things on the table. I couldn’t say that after Friday’s win (in which the Panthers shot 289). I think some of that’s carried over.” Andy Rodby placed third overall and shot a 79 for Redmond while teammates Jared Lambert and Colton Henshaw re-

corded scores of 80 and 83, respectively. The win was the first for the Panthers at the Bend Invitational, a tournament the program has been coming to since the late 1980s. Just as impressive as Redmond’s team win was Heinly’s dominance of the final nine holes to put him at even par for medalist honors. Heinly ended the front nine at 3-over and tied for second before posting four birdies on the back nine. “What a great back nine for Jesse Heinly,” Buerger said. “And he birdied (hole No.) 17, which may be one of the toughest holes on the golf course.” Overall, Crook County placed fourth (350 strokes), Sisters finished fifth (351), host Bend took sixth (365), Mountain View ended the day in seventh (368) and La Pine placed 10th (398). Eleven teams competed in Monday’s tournament. “We’ve got huge momentum right now,” Buerger said, “and we’re going to ride it as long as we can.”

Summit’s Jesse Heinly hits his tee shot on the 10th hole Monday at The Bend Golf and Country Club.

hen spring is in full swing on the High Desert, so too is the Central Oregon cycling season. April and May in these parts are chock-full of cycling activities, from races and rides and training programs to a number of bike-related volunteer opportunities. And with the racing season heating up across Oregon and the U.S., a local cyclist is sure to be popping up at the top of a results board somewhere. Read on to catch up on all the latest cycling happenings throughout Central Oregon and beyond: ——— Whether it’s lending a hand with young riders, building singletrack or helping out at a race, volunteers are in high demand at area cycling events over the next couple of weeks. In Sisters, volunteers are needed to assist with Bike Safety Education classes being held on school days at Sisters Middle School through April 30. The youth cycling instruction is part of a Commute Options program aimed at teaching bike safety to kids. To volunteer, contact Sami Fournier at sami@commuteoptions.org, or visit www. commuteoptions.org for more information. Fans of the Lair freeride mountain bike park, located within the Phil’s Trail complex west of Bend, are invited to volunteer at a trail work party from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Saturday. The second annual “Get Off Your Rumps and Build Some Jumps” trail day, hosted by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA), is a community effort to renovate terrain at the mountain bike skills park. See Ride / D5

New permit required for manually powered boats at Pole Pedal Paddle INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 NHL .......................................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Community Sports ................... D6

Bulletin staff report Participants in this year’s U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle should be aware of a new law that requires a permit for certain manually powered boats. The annual Pole Pedal Paddle, a popular multisport race from Mount Bachelor to Bend that this year is set for May 15, includes a 2-kilometer water stage during which competitors paddle boats

such as kayaks, canoes and paddle boards along a stretch of the Deschutes River in Bend. Under the new law, any such manually powered boats 10 feet or greater in length are required to carry an Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention Permit. The annual permit costs $7 and can be purchased at any Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife license agent or online

at or.outdoorcentral.us/or/license. According to the Oregon State Marine Board, the new law is designed to help protect Oregon’s waterways from invasive species, and failure to carry a permit is a Class D violation, which includes a $142 fine. Chuck Kenlan, director of the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which organizes the PPP, said PPP race

officials are advising racers to purchase permits, but he added that acquiring a permit is not part of the PPP registration process. Race officials will not be checking boats for permits, Kenlan added. For more information on the permit, visit www.boatoregon.com. For more information on the PPP, visit www.mbsef. org.


D2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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ON DECK

BASKETBALL

Today Baseball: Redmond at Sprague (DH), 1 p.m.; Culver at Salem Academy, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Sprague at Redmond (DH), 1 p.m.; Culver at Salem Academy, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: North Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Madras, 4 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at North Salem, 3:30 p.m.; Madras at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Mountain View at Sisters, 5 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 5 p.m.

5 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Miami Heat at Boston Celtics, TNT. 7 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Portland Trail Blazers at Phoenix Suns, Blazer network (Ch. 39). 7:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Oklahoma City Thunder at L.A. Lakers, TNT.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Pittsburgh Penguins at Ottawa Senators, VS. network. 6 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Chicago Blackhawks at Nashville Predators, VS. network (joined in progress). 7 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, San Jose Sharks at Colorado Avalanche, VS. network (joined in progress).

BASEBALL 7 p.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

WEDNESDAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Atlanta Braves, ESPN. 7 p.m. — MLB, Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners, FSNW.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Buffalo Sabres at Boston Bruins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL playoffs, conference quarterfinal, Vancouver Canucks at Los Angeles Kings, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Charlotte Bobcats at Orlando Magic, TNT. 7:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, San Antonio Spurs at Dallas Mavericks, TNT.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Portland Trail Blazers at Phoenix Suns, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Track & field • Ducks’ Wolff honored for javelin victory: The Pacific10 Conference has named Oregon’s Alex Wolff its men’s field athlete of the week. The junior from Newberg won the javelin with a personal-best throw to help lead the third-ranked Ducks past UCLA in Saturday’s dual meet at Hayward Field in Eugene. Wolff was recently granted a sixth year of eligibility due to medical hardship by the NCAA. Wolff suffered season-ending injuries during both the 2006 and 2007 seasons, but came back to win AllAmerica honors in 2008 and 2009.

Boxing • Boxer Valero kills himself in jail, police say: Former boxing champion Edwin Valero, who had a spectacular career with 27 straight knockouts and flouted a tattoo of President Hugo Chavez on his chest, hanged himself in his jail cell Monday after being arrested for stabbing his wife to death, police said. The former lightweight champion used the sweat pants he was wearing to hang himself from a bar in the cell, said his lawyer, Milda Mora. Valero, 28, had problems with alcohol and cocaine addiction and struggled with depression. He had previously been suspected of assaulting his wife and was charged last month with harassing her and threatening personnel at a hospital where she was treated for injuries.

Football • Goodell: Roethlisberger violated NFL policy: At the same time Ben Roethlisberger was practicing for the first time this spring, NFL commissioner Roger Goodell was telling a radio audience Monday that the quarterback violated the NFL’s personal-conduct policy with his “pattern of behavior” and “bad judgments.” Roethlisberger was accused of sexually assaulting a 20-year-old college student in a Georgia nightclub last month, although he will not face criminal charges. Roethlisberger does face disciplinary action by the NFL, including a likely suspension, following the release of documents outlining tawdry behavior by the two-time Super Bowl winner. • Vikings re-sign backup QB Jackson: The Minnesota Vikings re-signed backup quarterback Tarvaris Jackson Monday as they wait for Brett Favre to decide if he will return for another season. Jackson was a restricted free agent who was given a one-year tender worth $1.176 million.

Basketball • Fred Hill resigns as Rutgers basketball coach: Fred Hill has resigned as Rutgers basketball coach. The university had told Hill that he would not return to his coaching job after an incident in which he yelled at Pittsburgh coaches following an April 1 baseball game at Rutgers. The Scarlet Knights baseball team is coached by Hill’s father. Rutgers athletic director Tim Pernetti told Hill not to attend another game between the teams later that week, but Hill disobeyed the instructions. Pernetti eventually investigated the incidents and told Hill he would not be back as coach.

Olympics • No single reason caused Georgian luger’s death: Gravitational force overpowered out-of-control Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili and left him unable to avoid the crash that claimed his life hours before the opening ceremony at the Vancouver Olympics, the International Luge Federation concluded in a report Monday. Still, the FIL insisted Kumaritashvili was “absolutely qualified” to be at the games. The FIL reaffirmed that the crash was an “unforeseeable fatal accident” caused by a number of factors.

Baseball • Rays manager Maddon banned from wearing hoodie: Baseball’s fashion police have raided Joe Maddon’s hood. The Tampa Bay Rays manager has been told by Major League Baseball that he can no longer wear his favorite hoodie. Maddon likes to put on the pullover during cold days at the ballpark, but MLB said it’s not approved for use during games. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

Wednesday Baseball: Cottage Grove at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: La Pine at Cottage Grove, 4:30 p.m. Track: Redmond, Sprague at West Salem CVC threeway meet, 3 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 3:30 p.m.; Summit at The Dalles-Wahtonka, 3:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Madras, TBA. Boys golf: Redmond at Liberty Invitational at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Course, 10 a.m.; Madras at Burns, 11 a.m.; Sisters at Mallard Creek, Lebanon, 1 p.m. Girls golf: Redmond at Quail Valley, 10 a.m.; Summit at Forest Grove at Quail Valley Country Club, 10 a.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at Sprague, 11:30 a.m.; Redmond at McKay (Chemeketa Community College, Salem), TBA. Thursday Softball: Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4 p.m. Baseball: Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; The Dalles-Wahtonka at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at Crook County, 4:30 p.m. Girls tennis: Sprague at Redmond, TBA; Bend at Crook County, 4 p.m.; Madras at Sisters, 4 p.m. Girls golf: Bend, Crook County, Sisters, Madras at Mountain View Invitational at Eagle Crest, noon. Boys golf: Summit at McKenzie High School Invitational at Tokatee, 11 a.m. Track: Sisters, Cottage Grove, Gilchrist at La Pine, 4 p.m.; Culver at Scio three-way, TBA. Friday Girls golf: Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Crook County at Sunriver/Crosswater, noon. Baseball: McKay at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Western Mennonite (DH), 2:15 p.m. Softball: Redmond at McKay, 4:30 p.m.; Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Western Mennonite (DH), 2:15 p.m. Boys tennis: Redmond at West Salem, 3:30 p.m.; Bend at Summit Tourney, TBA; Madras at Bend, 4 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: West Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Bend at Madras, 4 p.m.; Burns at Sisters, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Summit, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Summit at Bend, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at The Dalles-Wahtonka (DH), 1 p.m.; Crook County at Madras (DH), 11 a.m.; Sherman County at Culver, 1 p.m. Softball: Summit at Bend, 11 a.m.; Mountain View at The Dalles-Wahtonka (DH), 1 p.m.; Crook County at Madras (DH), 11 a.m. Track: Redmond, Mountain View, La Pine, Sisters, Culver, Gilchrist at Summit Invitational, 10 a.m.; Mazama at Madras, TBA; Crook County at Prefontaine Rotary Invitational, Coos Bay, 11 a.m. Boys tennis: Bend at Summit Tourney, TBA Boys lacrosse: Bend at Riverdale, noon.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— PLAYOFF GLANCE FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington 2, Montreal 1 Thursday, April 15: Montreal 3, Washington 2 Saturday, April 17: Washington 6, Montreal 5 (OT) Monday, April 19: Washington 5, Montreal 1 Wednesday, April 21: Washington at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Friday, April 23: Montreal at Washington, 4 p.m. x-Monday, April 26: Washington at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 28: Montreal at Washington, TBD Philadelphia 2, New Jersey 1 Wednesday, April 14: Philadelphia 2, New Jersey 1 Friday, April 16: Philadelphia 3, New Jersey 5 Sunday, April 18: Philadelphia 3, New Jersey 2 Tuesday, April 20: New Jersey at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Thursday, April 22: Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 25: New Jersey at Philadelphia, TBD x-Tuesday, April 27: Philadelphia at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Boston 2, Buffalo 1 Thursday, April 15: Buffalo 2, Boston 1 Saturday, April 17: Boston 5, Buffalo 3 Monday, April 19: Boston 2, Buffalo 1

Wednesday, April 21: Buffalo at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Friday, April 23: Boston at Buffalo, 4 p.m. x-Monday, April 26: Buffalo at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 28: Boston at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa 1 Wednesday, April 14: Ottawa 5, Pittsburgh 4 Friday, April 16: Pittsburgh 2, Ottawa 1 Sunday, April 18: Pittsburgh 4, Ottawa 2 Tuesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 4 p.m. x-Thursday, April 22: Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 24: Pittsburgh at Ottawa, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: Ottawa at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Colorado 2, San Jose 1 Wednesday, April 14: Colorado 2, San Jose 1 Friday, April 16: San Jose 6, Colorado 5, OT Sunday, April 18: Colorado 1, San Jose 0 Tuesday, April 20: San Jose at Colorado, 7 p.m. x-Thursday, April 22: Colorado at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 24: San Jose at Colorado, TBD x-Monday, April 26: Colorado at San Jose, TBD Nashville 1, Chicago 1 Friday, April 16: Nashville 4, Chicago 1 Sunday, April 18: Chicago 2, Nashville 0 Today, April 20: Chicago at Nashville, 9 p.m. Thursday, April 22: Chicago at Nashville, 8:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 24: Nashville at Chicago, 3 p.m. x-Monday, April 26: Chicago at Nashville, TBD x-Wednesday, April 28: Nashville at Chicago, TBD Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 1 Thursday, April 15: Vancouver 3, Los Angeles 2 Saturday, April 17: Los Angeles 3, Vancouver 2 (OT) Monday, April 19: Los Angeles 5, Vancouver 3 Wednesday, April 21: Vancouver at Los Angeles, 7 p.m. x-Friday, April 23: Los Angeles at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 25: Vancouver at Los Angeles, TBD x-Tuesday, April 27: Los Angeles at Vancouver, TBD Phoenix 2, Detroit 1 Wednesday, April 14: Phoenix 3, Detroit 2 Friday, April 16: Detroit 7, Phoenix 4 Sunday, April 18: Phoenix 4, Detroit 2 Today, April 20: Phoenix at Detroit, 3:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 23: Detroit at Phoenix, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 25: Phoenix at Detroit, 11 a.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD

BASEBALL College COLLEGIATE BASEBALL POLL TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through April 18, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pv 1. Arizona St. 31-3 494 1 2. Texas 30-7 492 3 3. Georgia Tech 31-5 490 6 4. Arkansas 31-6 487 8 5. South Carolina 28-8 486 5 6. Louisiana St. 30-6 485 7 7. Coastal Carolina 32-5 483 9 8. UCLA 27-5 482 2

9. Miami, Fla. 10. Virginia 11. Florida St. 12. Florida 13. Louisville 14. Texas Christian 15. California 16. Ca. St. Fullerton 17. Kansas St. 18. Arizona 19. Connecticut 20. Oklahoma 21. Rutgers 22. Stanford 23. Oregon 24. Pittsburgh 25. Oregon St. 26. Clemson 27. Mississippi 28. Vanderbilt 29. Auburn 30. Northwestern St.

27-9 29-9 28-9 25-10 29-6 27-7 22-11 20-13 26-8 26-9 27-7 26-10 21-13 18-13 23-12 26-9 20-11 23-14 24-13 29-9 24-13 25-10

479 478 476 473 470 466 463 460 458 456 452 446 442 441 440 437 434 432 430 429 426 423

13 4 10 12 15 17 19 22 20 — — 11 — — — 24 14 16 18 30 23 —

BASEBALL AMERICA TOP 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through April 18 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Arizona State 31-3 3 2. Virginia 29-9 2 3. Texas 30-7 4 4. Georgia Tech 31-5 5 5. UCLA 27-5 1 6. Florida State 28-9 6 7. Florida 25-10 7 8. Louisiana State 30-6 8 9. Arkansas 31-6 9 10. South Carolina 28-8 10 11. Texas Christian 27-7 11 12. Coastal Carolina 32-5 12 13. Louisville 29-6 13 14. Miami 27-9 14 15. California 22-11 21 16. Cal State Fullerton 20-13 22 17. Arizona 26-9 24 18. Oregon 23-12 NR 19. Mississippi 24-13 14 20. Virginia Tech 25-13 20 21. Connecticut 27-7 25 22. Stanford 18-13 NR 23. Vanderbilt 29-9 NR 24. Oklahoma 26-10 16 25. SE Louisiana 29-9 NR

AUTO RACING NASCAR Sprint Cup SAMSUNG MOBILE 500 Monday At Texas Motor Speedway Fort Worth, Texas Lap length: 1.5 miles

(Start position in parentheses) 1. (29) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 334 laps, 111.6 rating, 190 points, $501,800. 2. (4) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 334, 127.4, 175, $359,378. 3. (7) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 334, 95.6, 165, $277,706. 4. (11) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 334, 100.6, 165, $239,123. 5. (5) Kasey Kahne, Ford, 334, 91.9, 155, $202,640. 6. (30) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 334, 79.9, 150, $163,450. 7. (19) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 334, 85.1, 146, $181,526. 8. (9) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 334, 116.5, 147, $143,975. 9. (14) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 334, 73, 138, $133,775. 10. (3) Greg Biffle, Ford, 334, 96.2, 139, $135,350. 11. (10) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 334, 82.5, 130, $155,579. 12. (6) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 334, 103.1, 132, $155,540. 13. (17) AJ Allmendinger, Ford, 334, 81.8, 124, $157,251. 14. (37) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 333, 63.3, 121, $144,810. 15. (13) David Ragan, Ford, 333, 68.6, 118, $125,500. 16. (23) Scott Speed, Toyota, 333, 60.9, 115, $132,473. 17. (32) Marcos Ambrose, Toyota, 333, 63.6, 112, $136,873. 18. (39) Elliott Sadler, Ford, 333, 55.8, 109, $118,700. 19. (2) Sam Hornish Jr., Dodge, 333, 70.3, 106, $118,450. 20. (28) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 332, 68, 103, $153,551. 21. (26) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 332, 55.9, 100, $114,000. 22. (27) Max Papis, Toyota, 332, 47.7, 97, $101,100. 23. (41) Bobby Labonte, Chevrolet, 332, 42.5, 94, $103,850. 24. (35) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 331, 44.5, 96, $101,300. 25. (36) Bill Elliott, Ford, 331, 49.2, 88, $97,100. 26. (38) Robby Gordon, Toyota, 329, 36.6, 85, $112,773. 27. (40) Kevin Conway, Ford, 329, 32.9, 82, $117,360. 28. (18) Joey Logano, Toyota, 329, 60.2, 79, $131,340. 29. (31) David Gilliland, Ford, 328, 34.6, 76, $105,573. 30. (15) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, accident, 319, 74, 78, $128,979. 31. (12) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, accident, 317, 116.4, 80, $135,276. 32. (1) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, accident, 317, 101.7, 72, $152,748. 33. (20) Carl Edwards, Ford, accident, 317, 79.2, 64, $122,498. 34. (21) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, accident, 317, 76, 66, $120,031. 35. (25) Paul Menard, Ford, accident, 317, 64.7, 58, $91,500. 36. (8) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, accident, 316, 87.7, 55, $91,350. 37. (16) David Reutimann, Toyota, engine, 310, 86.7, 52, $111,656. 38. (42) Brian Vickers, Toyota, accident, 192, 41.5, 49, $121,548. 39. (43) Reed Sorenson, Toyota, electrical, 121, 39.7, 46, $79,975. 40. (22) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, transmission, 75, 35.8, 43, $79,850. 41. (33) Michael McDowell, Toyota, transmission, 60, 30.4, 45, $79,690. 42. (34) Mike Bliss, Chevrolet, vibration, 50, 27.3, 37, $79,595. 43. (24) Dave Blaney, Toyota, suspension, 20, 34.4, 34, $79,920. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 146.230 mph. Time of Race: 3 hours, 25 minutes, 34 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.152 seconds. Caution Flags: 7 for 32 laps. Lead Changes: 29 among 12 drivers. Lap Leaders: T.Stewart 1-15; G.Biffle 16-28; M.McDowell 29; T.Stewart 30-47; J.Johnson 48-75; D.Earnhardt Jr. 76-79; T.Stewart 80-101; T.Kvapil 102; D.Earnhardt Jr. 103-116; J.McMurray 117126; D.Earnhardt Jr. 127-136; J.Gordon 137-165; J.Montoya 166-167; D.Earnhardt Jr. 168-181; J.Gordon 182-204; J.Johnson 205-209; J.Gordon 210-218; D.Earnhardt Jr. 219-220; J.Johnson 221-225; J.Gordon 226-233; D.Earnhardt Jr. 234; T.Stewart 235-252; J.Gordon 253-285; T.Stewart 286; Ku.Busch 287-288; J.Johnson 289; J.Gordon 290-311; D.Earnhardt Jr. 312; J.Burton 313-322; D.Hamlin 323-334. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): J.Gordon, 6 times for 124 laps; T.Stewart, 5 times for 74 laps; D.Earnhardt Jr., 7 times for 46 laps; J.Johnson, 4 times for 39 laps; G.Biffle, 1 time for 13 laps; D.Hamlin, 1 time for 12 laps; J.Burton, 1 time for 10 laps; J.McMurray, 1 time for 10 laps; Ku.Busch, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Montoya, 1 time for 2 laps; T.Kvapil, 1 time for 1 lap; M.McDowell, 1 time for 1 lap. Top 12 in Points: 1. J.Johnson, 1,248; 2. M.Kenseth, 1,140; 3. G.Biffle, 1,120; 4. K.Harvick, 1,107; 5. J.Gordon, 1,028; 6. Ky.Busch, 1,020; 7. D.Earnhardt Jr., 1,013; 8. J.Burton, 1,005; 9. Ku.Busch, 999; 10. M.Martin, 994; 11. D.Hamlin, 973; 12. J.Logano, 941.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ———

Barcelona Open BancSabadell Monday Barcelona, Spain Singles First Round Jan Hajek, Netherlands, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-1, 6-4. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 6-1, 6-0. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Christophe Rochus, Belgium, 5-7, 6-1, 6-3. Thomaz Bellucci (13), Brazil, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-4, 6-4. Eduardo Schwank, Argentina, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-1, 6-3. Nicolas Almagro (15), Spain, def. Santiago Ventura, Spain, 6-1, 6-2. Oscar Hernandez, Spain, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-7 (2), 6-2, 6-4. Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def. Filip Krajinovic, Serbia, 6-1, 6-4. Marcel Granollers, Spain, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-4, 6-3. Simon Greul, Germany, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 6-4, 6-4. Pablo Cuevas, Uruguay, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Richard Gasquet, France, def. Igor Andreev, Russia, 7-6 (5), 6-4.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Optioned OF Michael Brantley to Columbus (IL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Placed OF Conor Jackson on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Esmerling Vasquez from Reno (PCL). NEW YORK METS—Selected the contract of 1B Ike Davis from Buffalo (IL). Optioned RHP Tobi Stoner to Buffalo. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms with LHP Ron Villone on a minor league contract. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Acquired INF Matt Imwalle from Edinburg (United) for future considerations. FORT WORTH CATS—Acquired C Justin Holloway from Rio Grande (United) for a player to be named. GRAND PRAIRIE AIRHOGS—Traded RHP Greg Johnson and RHP Miles Morgan to Windy City (Frontier) for future considerations. LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Signed LHP Adam Daniels. PENSACOLA PELICANS—Signed RHP Jason Franzblau. FOOTBALL National Football League CHICAGO BEARS—Signed LB Nick Roach to a oneyear contract. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Re-signed QB Tarvaris Jackson. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES—Traded a 2010 fifth-round draft pick to Denver, who will send TE Tony Scheffler and a 2010 seventh-round draft pick to Detroit, who will send LB Ernie Sims to the Eagles. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Signed WR Roydell Williams, WR Marques Hagans, DL Howard Green, and RB Ryan Torain. HOCKEY National Hockey League DETROIT RED WINGS—Recalled G Thomas McCollum and D Logan Pyett from Grand Rapids (AHL). COLLEGE AIR FORCE—Named Maj. Mike Kazlausky interim baseball coach for the 2011 season. ALBANY, N.Y.—Named Katie Abrahamson-Henderson women’s basketball coach. COLORADO—Named Tad Boyle men’s basketball coach. OHIO STATE—Named Dave Dickerson men’s assistant basketball coach. RICHMOND—Announced junior G Kevin Anderson will enter the NBA draft. RUTGERS—Announced the resignation of men’s basketball coach Fred Hill. ST. JOHN’S—Named Rico Hines men’s assistant basketball coach. TOLEDO—Named Angres Thorpe and Jason Kalsow men’s assistant basketball coaches.

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,510 18 110 49 The Dalles 5,929 40 90 55 John Day 3,519 30 124 70 McNary 1,456 11 125 80 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 40,133 167 5,640 1,715 The Dalles 23,859 69 1,449 726 John Day 12,634 63 1,575 930 McNary 4,967 34 1,372 704

Cheruiyot — not that one! — wins the Boston Marathon, sets new course record By Jimmy Golen The Associated Press

BOSTON — Let him be known from Copley Square to Kenya as “Robert the Younger” — the second man named Robert K. Cheruiyot to win the Boston Marathon and the first person ever to run the legendary course in under 2 hours, 6 minutes. Robert Kiprono Cheruiyot won the 114th Boston race Monday, finishing in 2:05:52 to shatter by 82 seconds the course record set by unrelated four-time winner Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot. American Ryan Hall, who finished third last year, missed another spot on the podium by 2 seconds, but his time of 2:08:41 was the fastest ever for a U.S. runner in Boston. “Today was a breakthrough day,” said Hall, who was 6 seconds faster than Bob Kempainen was in 1994. “Guys are paving new territory, and that’s good for us, too.” Teyba Erkesso of Ethiopia took the women’s title in 2:26:11, sprinting to the tape to win by 3 seconds in the event’s third-closest women’s finish. Russia’s Tatyana Pushkareva smiled and waved at the TV cameras as she closed what had been a 90second gap, but she could not quite catch Erkesso on Boylston Street. Cheruiyot, 21, surpassed the time of 2:07:14 set in 2006 by his namesake, who is 10 years older. The younger Cheruiyot, who owns a farm back home, earned a bonus of $25,000 for the course record on top of the $150,000 — and a golden olive wreath from the city of Marathon, Greece — that goes to the men’s and women’s winners. “I am going to buy some cows,” Cheruiyot said. Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot won his first Boston in 2003 and three

BOSTON M A R AT H O N more times from 2006-08 to cement his place among the Boston Marathon greats. On Monday, acting on the advice his elder gave him in a meeting two months ago, “Robert the Younger” produced a blistering pace to join them. “Most of the people already confuse me with Robert Kipkoech Cheruiyot,” said the 2010 champion, who finished fifth in Boston last year after winning in Frankfurt in his marathon debut. “With me and Robert, we talk the same language, but in different stripes. I think people can see me and they can see him and compare.” Cheruiyot finished 91 seconds ahead of Ethiopian Tekeste Kebede to give Kenya its 18th men’s victory in 20 years. Defending champion Deriba Merga was third, followed by Hall and fellow Californian Meb Keflezighi, the reigning New York City Marathon winner; no U.S. man has won the race since Greg Meyer in 1983. A temperature of 49 degrees and a 13 mph headwind greeted more than 26,000 runners at the start in Hopkinton, including an unprecedented 71 competitors who came from Greece to help celebrate the 2,500th anniversary of the Battle of Marathon. This year’s edition of the world’s oldest annual marathon was decided, like so many before it, at Heartbreak Hill. Merga surged ahead at the firehouse that marks the start of the Newton hills, drawing Cheruiyot along with him, while the rest of the lead pack — including Keflezighi and Moroccan Abderrahim Goum-

Local Results: (Place, name, hometown, time.) 146, Ian Sharman, Bend, 2:36:51. 1,283, Andrew Merrell, Bend, 2:59:50. 1,971, Ken House, Bend, 3:06:10. 5,860, Tim Carpenter, Redmond, 3:26:25. 7,925, Chae G. Ha, Bend, 3:33:47. 11,335, Sarah Peterson, Bend, 3:45:47. 11,422, Bill Rhoades, Bend, 3:46:05. 11,817, Nicole Smith, Bend, 3:47:45. 17,188, Jessi Massingale, Redmond, 4:12:01. 17,473, Diane Faist, Bend, 4:13:57.

Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

Robert Cheruiyot of Kenya crosses the finish line in Boston, breaking a course record, at the 114th running of the Boston Marathon Monday. ri — fell off the pace. Goumri, the fastest man in the field, dropped out of the race around Mile 18. Merga and Cheruiyot ran shoulder-to-shoulder through parts of Newton and into Brookline, before the Kenyan inched ahead at Coolidge Corner with about 2.5 miles left and pulled away. Hall, who led most of the way last year, led early again before falling to 17th in Natick and then retaking the lead in Wellesley. He lost ground at the halfway point but with a sprint through the final mile was almost able to catch Merga on Boylston Street.

“I always thought I had a shot to get back in it,” said Hall, who is neighbors with Keflezighi in Mammoth Lakes, Calif. “If you’re trying to be the big elephant — the guy who gets to sit wherever — you’ve got to be confident.” Erkesso opened a lead of more than 90 seconds and held on, grabbing her side as she ran along Beacon Street in the last four miles. Defending champion Salina Kosgei was third, and Paige Higgins of Flagstaff, Ariz., was the top American woman, in 13th. The men’s wheelchair race was also close, with South African Ernst Van Dyk finishing 4 seconds ahead of Krige Schabort for his ninth win — an all-divisions record in Boston. Van Dyk has won three in a row, and he also won six consecutive years from 2000-06; Jean Driscoll won eight Boston women’s wheelchair races.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 10 3 .769 — New York 9 3 .750 ½ Toronto 8 6 .571 2½ Boston 4 9 .308 6 Baltimore 2 12 .143 8½ Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 9 4 .692 — Detroit 7 6 .538 2 Cleveland 6 6 .500 2½ Kansas City 5 8 .385 4 Chicago 4 9 .308 5 West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 9 5 .643 — Los Angeles 7 7 .500 2 Seattle 7 7 .500 2 Texas 5 7 .417 3 ——— Monday’s Games Tampa Bay 8, Boston 2 Toronto 8, Kansas City 1 L.A. Angels 2, Detroit 0 Seattle 8, Baltimore 2 Today’s Games Kansas City (Davies 1-0) at Toronto (Eveland 2-0), 4:07 p.m. Texas (C.Lewis 2-0) at Boston (Wakefield 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-1) at Minnesota (Slowey 1-1), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Price 2-0) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 1-0) at L.A. Angels (Kazmir 0-1), 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Vazquez 0-2) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 1-0), 7:05 p.m. Baltimore (D.Hernandez 0-2) at Seattle (J.Vargas 1-1), 7:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Kansas City at Toronto, 9:37 a.m. Texas at Boston, 4:10 p.m. Cleveland at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay at Chicago White Sox, 5:10 p.m. Detroit at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Oakland, 7:05 p.m. Baltimore at Seattle, 7:10 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Philadelphia 8 4 .667 — Florida 8 5 .615 ½ Atlanta 7 5 .583 1 Washington 7 6 .538 1½ New York 5 8 .385 3½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 9 4 .692 — Pittsburgh 7 5 .583 1½ Milwaukee 5 7 .417 3½ Chicago 5 8 .385 4 Cincinnati 5 8 .385 4 Houston 3 9 .250 5½ West Division W L Pct GB San Francisco 8 5 .615 — San Diego 7 6 .538 1 Los Angeles 6 6 .500 1½ Colorado 6 7 .462 2 Arizona 5 8 .385 3 ——— Monday’s Games Washington 5, Colorado 2 N.Y. Mets 6, Chicago Cubs 1 St. Louis 4, Arizona 2 San Diego 3, San Francisco 2, 10 innings Today’s Games Colorado (De La Rosa 1-1) at Washington (Olsen 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Bush 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Morton 0-2), 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 1-1) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 2-0), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 1-0) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 0-0) at Atlanta (Hanson 1-1), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Volstad 1-1) at Houston (Myers 0-1), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 0-1) at Arizona (Haren 1-1), 6:40 p.m. San Francisco (J.Sanchez 1-0) at San Diego (Latos 0-1), 7:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games San Francisco at San Diego, 3:35 p.m. Colorado at Washington, 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs at N.Y. Mets, 4:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at Cincinnati, 4:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Atlanta, 4:10 p.m. Florida at Houston, 5:05 p.m. St. Louis at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Mariners 8, Orioles 2 SEATTLE — Doug Fister took a no-hitter into the seventh inning and Ken Griffey Jr. and Casey Kotchman combined to drive in five runs as Seattle beat Baltimore. After a two-out walk in the first, Fister (2-1) retired the next 16 batters in a row before Nick Markakis opened the seventh with a clean single to center. Griffey had a two-run single in the Mariners’ 7-run third inning and Kotchman hit a two-run home run in the third and an RBI double in the seventh. Jack Wilson also had three hits, including two doubles. Orioles starter Brad Bergesen (0-2) lasted only 22⁄3 innings. He was charged with six hits, seven runs, though only four

Kyle Busch wins 5 in a row at Texas FORT WORTH, Texas — Kyle Busch has completed an impressive drive for five — and a long NASCAR doubleheader. Busch won his fifth consecutive Nationwide race at Texas Motor Speedway on Monday, joining two-time series champion Jack Ingram and Dale Earnhardt Sr., as the only drivers to win five consecutive races in NASCAR’s second-tier series at the same track. Only about an hour after finishing third in the rainpostponed Sprint Cup race earlier in the day, Busch led 153 of the 200 laps in the 300-mile Nationwide race, that was originally scheduled Saturday. It was Busch’s second consecutive Nationwide victory and 33rd of his career. Busch beat Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Joey Logano, the polesitter, by 0.688 seconds. — The Associated Press

Niese p 2 Nieve p 0 b-Matthews Jr. ph-rf2 Totals 33

SAFE AT HOME

STANDINGS

0 0 0 6

1 0 0 9

0 0 0 5

0 0 0 3

0 .143 0 --1 .185 6

Chicago 000 001 000 — 1 9 1 New York 000 010 50x — 6 9 1 a-was hit by a pitch for Cora in the 7th. b-struck out for Nieve in the 7th. c-struck out for Berg in the 9th. E—Ar.Ramirez (1), Cora (1). LOB—Chicago 12, New York 7. 2B—A.Soriano (5), Bay (2). HR—Pagan (1), off J.Russell. RBIs—Byrd (10), Pagan 2 (6), Castillo (4), Bay (3), I.Davis (1). SB—D.Wright (5). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 6 (R.Wells, Theriot, Ar.Ramirez 2, Je.Baker, Fukudome); New York 4 (Barajas 2, D.Wright 2). Runners moved up—Je.Baker. GIDP—Je.Baker, Theriot, Barajas. DP—Chicago 1 (Ar.Ramirez, Je.Baker, D.Lee); New York 2 (Castillo, Cora, I.Davis), (Castillo, I.Davis). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Wells 6 6 1 1 2 5 93 2.45 J.Russell L, 0-1 2-3 1 2 2 0 1 14 3.60 Samardzija 0 1 3 1 1 0 10 18.90 Marshall 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.16 Berg 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 5.06 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese 5 2-3 8 1 0 3 7 112 4.32 Nieve W, 1-1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 5.00 Mejia 2 0 0 0 2 2 37 2.00 Samardzija pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Marshall 2-2, Nieve 21. IBB—off Niese (Theriot). HBP—by J.Russell (Jos. Reyes), by Mejia (Byrd). WP—Marshall. T—3:02. A—27,940 (41,800).

Nationals 5, Rockies 2 WASHINGTON — Willie Harris hit a homer and drove in four runs, Craig Stammen recovered from his shortest start in the majors with eight strong innings, and Washington moved back over .500 by beating Colorado before the smallest announced crowd in Nationals Park history. Elaine Thompson / The Associated Press

Seattle Mariners’ Franklin Gutierrez (21) scores as Baltimore Orioles catcher Matt Wieters waits for the throw in the third inning during a baseball game Monday in Seattle. Gutierrez scored on a single by Ken Griffey Jr. in an 8-2 win. were earned, and walked three without a strikeout. Baltimore Ad.Jones cf Wigginton 3b Markakis rf Reimold dh Wieters c Scott 1b Montanez lf Lugo 2b C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 1

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b F.Gutierrez cf Byrnes cf Jo.Lopez 3b Griffey Jr. dh Bradley lf Kotchman 1b Ro.Johnson c J.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 4 2 0 5 4 4 4 4 4 35

R H 1 2 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 3 8 12

BI 0 0 1 0 1 2 1 3 0 0 8

BB 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 5

Avg. .230 .294 .240 .162 .286 .205 .125 .125 .243

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 5

Avg. .321 .217 .426 .143 .263 .229 .146 .286 .143 .250

Baltimore 000 000 101 — 2 5 2 Seattle 007 000 10x — 8 12 0 E—Wigginton (2), Ad.Jones (2). LOB—Baltimore 4, Seattle 8. 2B—Scott (3), I.Suzuki (3), Bradley (2), Kotchman (4), J.Wilson 2 (3). HR—Wigginton (5), off Kelley; Kotchman (3), off Bergesen. RBIs—Wigginton (11), Scott (5), F.Gutierrez (9), Jo.Lopez (4), Griffey Jr. 2 (3), Bradley (9), Kotchman 3 (12). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 2 (Wieters, Montanez); Seattle 6 (Jo.Lopez 2, Bradley, Figgins, Ro.Johnson 2). GIDP—Reimold, Jo.Lopez. DP—Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, Lugo, Scott); Seattle 1 (Fister, J.Wilson, Kotchman). Baltimore IP H R ER Bergesen L, 0-2 2 2-3 6 7 4 Berken 3 1-3 3 0 0 Mickolio 2 3 1 1 Seattle IP H R ER Fister W, 2-1 7 3 1 1 League 1 0 0 0 Kelley 1 2 1 1 HBP—by Fister (Wigginton). T—2:24. A—14,528 (47,878).

BB 3 0 2 BB 1 0 0

SO 0 3 2 SO 3 0 2

NP ERA 54 12.19 64 1.50 49 6.00 NP ERA 95 1.42 10 2.35 14 3.38

Angels 2, Tigers 0 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Joel Pineiro pitched into the eighth inning and Fernando Rodney got the save against his former team, closing out Los Angeles’ win over Detroit. The Angels won their fourth straight after beginning the season 2-6. Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon lf Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b C.Guillen dh Inge 3b Avila c S.Sizemore 2b Everett ss

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 3

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0

Avg. .333 .279 .321 .360 .275 .289 .111 .278 .231

Totals

34 0

9

0

5

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh K.Morales 1b J.Rivera lf H.Kendrick 2b J.Mathis c B.Wood 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 2 3 2 3 2 26

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 1 3

SO 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

0

Avg. .275 .214 .333 .314 .216 .255 .340 .324 .100

Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 9 1 Los Angeles 002 000 00x — 2 4 0 E—Ordonez (1). LOB—Detroit 8, Los Angeles 4. 2B—Mi.Cabrera (4), Tor.Hunter (6), J.Mathis (3). RBIs—B.Abreu (8). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 6 (Avila 2, Ordonez, Everett, C.Guillen 2); Los Angeles 3 (H.Matsui 2, B.Wood). Runners moved up—Mi.Cabrera, Inge, Avila, E.Aybar. GIDP—Mi.Cabrera, K.Morales. DP—Detroit 2 (Everett, S.Sizemore, Mi.Cabrera), (Damon, Damon, S.Sizemore); Los Angeles 2 (Pineiro, K.Morales), (Pineiro, H.Kendrick, K.Morales). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Willis L, 0-1 6 4 2 2 2 2 Bonine 2 0 0 0 1 0 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Pineiro W, 2-1 7 1-3 9 0 0 0 4 Jepsen H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Rodney S, 4-4 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Jepsen 2-0. Willis (K.Morales), by Pineiro (Inge). T—2:19. A—36,006 (45,285).

NP ERA 91 4.24 17 2.35 NP ERA 104 1.77 8 3.00 14 5.14 HBP—by

Rays 8, Red Sox 2

J.Drew rf Hall cf Hermida lf Totals

0 1 1 2

1 1 1 5

0 0 2 2

1 0 0 3

1 .146 0 .091 1 .219 4

Tampa Bay 105 200 000 — 8 12 0 Boston 000 000 200 — 2 5 1 E—Hermida (1). LOB—Tampa Bay 5, Boston 5. 2B—Bartlett (3), Longoria (3), Burrell (4), Brignac (2), J.Drew (1). 3B—Bartlett (1). HR—B.Upton (4), off Lackey; Hermida (2), off Niemann. RBIs—Bartlett (5), Crawford (9), Zobrist (6), Longoria 2 (12), B.Upton 3 (11), Hermida 2 (8). SB—Crawford (6). S—Crawford, Pedroia. SF—Crawford. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Brignac 2, Longoria 2); Boston 4 (Youkilis, Hermida, Hall 2). Runners moved up—Zobrist 2, Navarro. GIDP—Brignac, V.Martinez. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (C.Pena, Longoria, C.Pena); Boston 1 (Beltre, Pedroia, Youkilis). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Niemann W, 1-0 7 5 2 2 3 4 Sonnanstine 2 0 0 0 0 0 Boston IP H R ER BB SO Lackey L, 1-1 3 1-3 9 8 8 1 3 Atchison 2 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 R.Ramirez 2 2 0 0 0 0 Schoeneweis 1 0 0 0 2 0 Inherited runners-scored—Atchison 1-1. T—2:49. A—37,609 (37,402).

NP 100 19 NP 79 26 31 21

ERA 2.93 3.24 ERA 5.63 3.12 6.43 4.05

Blue Jays 8, Royals 1 TORONTO — Jose Bautista hit two home runs, Brandon Morrow pitched seven innings and Toronto snapped a three-game losing streak. Travis Snider also homered to help the Blue Jays win for the 18th time in 22 home games against Kansas City.

BOSTON — B.J. Upton capped a five-run third inning with a three-run homer, and Tampa Bay completed a four-game sweep of Boston with a victory in the annual Patriots Day game. Jeff Niemann (1-0) pitched seven sharp innings to help Tampa Bay win its seventh straight, all on the road, and match the club’s best winning streak away from Tropicana Field in one season.

Kansas City DeJesus rf Callaspo 2b B.Butler 1b J.Guillen dh Ankiel cf B.Pena c Gordon 3b Maier lf Y.Betancourt ss Totals

Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Burrell dh Brignac 2b Navarro c Totals

AB 5 2 5 5 3 4 4 4 3 35

R H 3 3 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 3 1 1 0 0 8 12

Boston Scutaro ss Pedroia 2b V.Martinez c Varitek c Youkilis 1b D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b

AB 3 3 3 1 4 3 4

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 1 1 1 2 0 3 0 0 0 8

3 3 3 30

AB 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 3 3 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 5 1 2

SO 0 1 0 1 3 1 1 1 1 9

Avg. .302 .269 .294 .377 .255 .000 .167 .100 .319

SO 2 1 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 8

Avg. .111 .300 .309 .333 .115 .216 .143 .154 .320

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 3

SO 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 5

Avg. .245 .304 .245 .298 .273 .234 .270 .364 .162

Toronto AB R H F.Lewis lf 4 0 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 5 0 1 Lind dh 4 0 0 V.Wells cf 4 1 1 Overbay 1b 2 2 2 Bautista 3b 4 2 2 Snider rf 5 1 2 J.Molina c 4 0 0 McCoy 2b 4 2 3 Totals 36 8 11

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0

SO 0 1 0 0 1 0 0

Avg. .289 .346 .212 .385 .217 .158 .295

Kansas City 000 001 000 — 1 5 1 Toronto 001 131 20x — 8 11 0 E—B.Pena (1). LOB—Kansas City 4, Toronto 11. 2B—Maier (1), Ale.Gonzalez (8), V.Wells (4), Overbay (2), McCoy (3). HR—Snider (2), off Bannister; Bautista (2), off Bannister; Bautista (3), off Mendoza. RBIs—DeJesus (6), Ale.Gonzalez (9), Bautista 5 (10), Snider (4). SB—McCoy 2 (3).

BI 0 1 0 0 0 5 1 0 0 7

BB 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 6

Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 2 (B.Butler, DeJesus); Toronto 9 (J.Molina 2, Bautista 2, V.Wells 2, Ale.Gonzalez 2, Snider). Runners moved up—Maier, Snider. GIDP—B.Butler, B.Pena. DP—Toronto 2 (McCoy, Ale.Gonzalez, Overbay), (Ale. Gonzalez, Overbay). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bannister L, 0-1 5 1-3 7 6 6 4 6 99 4.58 Mendoza 1 3 2 2 1 0 28 22.50 Tejeda 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 12.71 Farnsworth 1 1 0 0 1 1 20 3.86 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Morrow W, 1-1 7 3 1 1 2 8 90 7.31 Camp 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 1.08 Janssen 1 1 0 0 0 0 13 1.50 Inherited runners-scored—Mendoza 2-0, Tejeda 2-0. WP—Bannister 2, Morrow. Catchers’ interference—B.Pena. T—2:42. A—10,314 (49,539).

NL ROUNDUP Mets 6, Cubs 1 NEW YORK — Angel Pagan hit a tiebreaking tworun homer in the seventh inning for New York’s first extra-base hit since Friday and top prospect Ike Davis had an RBI single in his debut for the Mets as they beat Chicago. New York’s Jonathon Niese and Chicago’s Randy Wells each allowed a run. Fernando Nieve (1-0) pitched 11⁄3 innings for the win after Niese went 5 2⁄3 innings and allowed eight hits and an unearned run, striking out seven. Chicago AB R Byrd cf 4 0 Je.Baker 2b 5 0 D.Lee 1b 3 0 Nady rf 4 0 J.Russell p 0 0 Samardzija p 0 0 Marshall p 0 0 Berg p 0 0 c-Fukudome ph 1 0 Ar.Ramirez 3b 4 0 A.Soriano lf 4 0 Soto c 2 1 Theriot ss 3 0 R.Wells p 3 0 Colvin rf 1 0 Totals 34 1

H BI BB 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 9 1 5

SO 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 1 9

Avg. .286 .286 .262 .250 --------.297 .157 .286 .286 .222 .400 .222

New York AB Pagan cf 4 Castillo 2b 4 D.Wright 3b 3 Bay lf 3 Francoeur rf 4 Mejia p 0 I.Davis 1b 4 Barajas c 4 Cora ss 2 a-Jos.Reyes ph-ss 1

H BI BB 1 2 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0

Avg. .297 .256 .250 .245 .327 --.500 .200 .192 .150

R 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1

Colorado C.Gonzalez cf S.Smith lf Helton 1b Tulowitzki ss Hawpe rf Olivo c Stewart 3b Barmes 2b Cook p Corpas p R.Flores p Daley p a-Fowler ph Beimel p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 31

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 2 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .333 .188 .310 .269 .355 .308 .333 .216 .333 .000 ----.156 ---

Washington Morgan cf A.Kennedy 2b-1b Zimmerman 3b A.Dunn 1b 1-Taveras pr-rf Willingham lf Alb.Gonzalez 2b I.Rodriguez c W.Harris rf-lf Desmond ss Stammen p b-Maxwell ph Capps p Totals

AB 3 3 4 2 0 3 0 4 3 3 3 0 0 28

R 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 4 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8 5 7

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

Avg. .250 .257 .273 .179 .200 .333 .313 .450 .217 .250 .167 .143 .000

Colorado 001 100 000 — 2 6 0 Washington 032 000 00x — 5 8 0 a-grounded out for Daley in the 8th. b-was intentionally walked for Stammen in the 8th. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 7th. LOB—Colorado 3, Washington 7. 2B—Helton (3), Stewart (2), Barmes (5), A.Dunn (2), W.Harris (2). HR—W.Harris (2), off Cook. RBIs—Olivo (4), Barmes (7), Morgan (3), W.Harris 4 (6). CS—Morgan (2), Taveras (1). SF—W.Harris. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 2 (S.Smith, Hawpe); Washington 4 (Zimmerman 2, A.Kennedy 2). Runners moved up—C.Gonzalez, Desmond. GIDP— Tulowitzki. DP—Washington 2 (A.Kennedy, Desmond), (Desmond, A.Kennedy, A.Dunn). Colorado IP H R ER Cook L, 0-2 3 7 5 5 Corpas 2 0 0 0 R.Flores 1 0 0 0 Daley 1 0 0 0 Beimel 1 1 0 0 Washington IP H R ER Stmmen W, 1-0 8 5 2 2 Capps S, 6-6 1 1 0 0 IBB—off Beimel (Maxwell). T—2:41. A—11,623 (41,546).

BB 4 0 1 1 1 BB 1 0

SO 2 0 0 0 0 SO 5 0

NP 83 25 20 15 10 NP 94 18

ERA 7.53 1.80 0.00 0.00 3.00 ERA 8.16 1.23

Padres 3, Giants 2, 10 innings SAN DIEGO — David Eckstein homered in the bottom of the 10th inning to give San Diego its fifth straight win over San Francisco. Eckstein’s leadoff shot against Jeremy Affeldt (2-2) just made it inside the left-field foul pole against the brick Western Metal Supply building. Tim Stauffer (2-0) pitched the 10th. San Francisco Velez lf Renteria ss Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b B.Molina c

AB 5 5 5 5 4

R 0 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 0 1 0 0

Avg. .280 .320 .302 .292 .361

Uribe 2b Torres cf Schierholtz rf Cain p a-DeRosa ph Runzler p Mota p c-Bowker ph Affeldt p Totals

3 4 3 2 1 0 0 1 0 38

1 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 10

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 2 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 9

.348 .111 .353 .000 .216 ----.200 .000

San Diego AB R H E.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 Eckstein 2b 5 1 2 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 0 Headley 3b 3 0 0 Blanks lf 4 1 2 Venable rf-cf 2 0 0 Hairston cf 3 0 1 Gregerson p 0 0 0 b-Salazar ph 1 0 0 Bell p 0 0 0 Stauffer p 0 0 0 Torrealba c 4 0 2 1-Hundley pr-c 0 0 0 Richard p 1 0 1 Hairston Jr. rf 1 0 1 Totals 31 3 10

BI 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .235 .279 .318 .353 .233 .213 .214 --.000 --.000 .267 .267 .333 .229

San Francisco 000 100 001 0 — 2 10 0 San Diego 100 001 000 1 — 3 10 1 No outs when winning run scored. a-struck out for Cain in the 7th. b-fouled out for Gregerson in the 8th. c-struck out for Mota in the 9th. 1-ran for Torrealba in the 9th. E—Hairston (1). LOB—San Francisco 8, San Diego 8. 2B—Renteria (3), A.Huff (3), Richard (1). 3B—Blanks (1). HR—Uribe (2), off Bell; Eckstein (1), off Affeldt. RBIs—Sandoval (6), Uribe (11), Eckstein (2), Ad.Gonzalez (6), Venable (9). SB—Schierholtz (1), Headley (2). S—Schierholtz, E.Cabrera, Richard, Hairston Jr.. SF—Ad.Gonzalez, Venable. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 6 (Velez 3, Torres, B.Molina, Bowker); San Diego 6 (Blanks, E.Cabrera 3, Venable, Ad.Gonzalez). Runners moved up—B.Molina, Cain. GIDP—Torres. DP—San Francisco 1 (Schierholtz, Uribe, Renteria); San Diego 1 (Headley, Ad.Gonzalez). San Francisco IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain 6 7 2 2 1 4 97 3.86 Runzler 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 24 0.00 Mota 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Affeldt L, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 0 11 2.84 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard 6 1-3 7 1 1 1 5 100 3.38 Gregerson H, 2 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 21 4.50 Bell BS, 1-4 1 2 1 1 0 2 23 3.60 Stauffer W, 2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Affeldt pitched to 1 batter in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Mota 1-0, Gregerson 2-0. Balk—Richard. T—2:52. A—17,087 (42,691).

Cardinals 4, Diamondbacks 2 PHOENIX — Matt Holliday went three for five with his fourth home run of the season, Brad Penny had his third strong outing and St. Louis opened a six-game road trip by handing Arizona its fifth loss in a row. St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ludwick rf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf F.Lopez 3b Y.Molina c Ryan ss Penny p b-Stavinoha ph Motte p T.Miller p Franklin p Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 5 3 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 36

R H 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

BI 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .229 .300 .321 .340 .216 .243 .208 .184 .000 .250 .000 -----

Arizona AB K.Johnson 2b 4 S.Drew ss 4 J.Upton rf 4 Ad.LaRoche 1b 4 1-T.Abreu pr-3b 0 M.Reynolds 3b-1b 4 C.Young cf 4 G.Parra lf 3 c-Ryal ph-lf 1 Snyder c 4 R.Lopez p 2 a-Ojeda ph 1 Boyer p 0 Qualls p 0 d-Hester ph 1 Totals 36

R H 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 10

BI 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .282 .298 .212 .286 .316 .208 .255 .227 .250 .259 .143 .000 ----.273

St. Louis 000 020 011 — 4 11 0 Arizona 200 000 000 — 2 10 2 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for R.Lopez in the 7th. b-struck out for Penny in the 8th. c-struck out for G.Parra in the 8th. d-struck out for Qualls in the 9th. 1-ran for Ad.LaRoche in the 8th. E—Ad.LaRoche (2), K.Johnson (2). LOB—St. Louis 11, Arizona 8. 2B—Holliday (4), Rasmus (2), Ad.LaRoche (4), M.Reynolds (1), G.Parra (3). HR—Holliday (4), off R.Lopez. RBIs—Holliday 2 (8), Rasmus (7), M.Reynolds 2 (11). SB—F.Lopez 2 (2). S—F.Lopez, Penny. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 8 (Penny, Rasmus 2, Schumaker 2, Y.Molina, Stavinoha, F.Lopez); Arizona 5 (C.Young, S.Drew 2, R.Lopez, Ryal). GIDP—S.Drew. DP—St. Louis 1 (Ryan, Pujols); Arizona 1 (C.Young, C.Young, M.Reynolds). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Penny W, 2-0 7 8 2 2 1 5 Motte H, 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 T.Miller H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Franklin S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO R.Lopez 7 7 2 2 4 3 Boyer L, 1-2 1 1 1 0 0 1 Qualls 1 3 1 1 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—T.Miller 2-0. T—3:08. A—24,167 (48,633).

NP 106 14 5 12 NP 109 14 24

ERA 1.29 3.00 0.00 5.14 ERA 3.50 3.00 8.44

AUTO RACING: NASCAR SPRINT CUP

Hamlin survives wreck, wins in Texas By Stephen Hawkins The Associated Press

FORT WORTH, Texas — Monday, Monday for hobbling Denny Hamlin. Three weeks after winning another rain-postponed race, and since having surgery to repair the torn ACL in his left knee, Hamlin gingerly climbed out of his car in Victory Lane at Texas Motor Speedway on Monday. “I’m still not 100 percent by any means right now,” Hamlin said. “I feel like I’m 60 at best.” That was still good enough to win at Texas. Hamlin led the final 12 laps, the only time he was up front after starting the 334-lap race 29th. The final shootout came after a spectacular nine-car wreck took out polesitter Tony Stewart and dominating Jeff Gordon, and Hamlin held off points leader Jimmie Johnson at the end for his 10th career NASCAR Sprint Cup victory. Two days after his Monday victory at Martinsville, Hamlin had the surgery

on the knee he injured playing basketball in January. The Easter weekend break provided some recovery time, but he was back in the car to run the entire race last weekend at Phoenix International Raceway. He completed 376 laps at the mile track, finishing two laps back and bypassing a chance to get out of the cockpit during an extended stop for repairs on the No. 11 Joe Gibbs Racing Toyota. Hamlin was still hurting in Texas, the soreness irritated by the cool and wet weather that persisted throughout the weekend. “I did this for September. I knew that if I did it now, come Chase time, if I’m lucky enough to be in one of those top 12 positions, it was going to make me more prepared to make a run for the championship at that time,” Hamlin said. “A win like today obviously makes you feel a little bit better. Gives you a little bit of confidence from here on out. “ On the first lap after a restart with 18 laps left — following yellow-flag stops

when Stewart was among the drivers who took only two tires and Gordon took four — they ended up three-wide with Gordon in the middle and Johnson on the inside coming out of Turn 4. Stewart got loose in the pack and there was contact with Gordon, who had three-time Texas winner Carl Edwards coming up behind and trying to follow him. Then things spun out of control along the frontstretch, though Johnson escaped that wreck unscathed. “Definitely my fault,” Stewart said, taking the blame for the accident. When Gordon got out of his mangled No. 24 Chevrolet, he walked directly to Stewart, who was only halfway out of the car, still sitting on the door frame. Stewart put his hand on Gordon’s shoulder and they then walked away toward the pits talking to each other and trying to figure out what happened. Gordon had led six times for a racehigh 124 laps and was trying to get back to the front when the accident happened. He wound up 31st.

LM Otero / The Associated Press

Driver Denny Hamlin takes the checkered flag winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Samsung Mobile 500 at Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas, Monday.


D4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N H L P L AYO F F ROUNDUP

NBA ROUNDUP Utah Jazz guard Wesley Matthews drives for a shot past Denver Nuggets forward Kenyon Martin in the second quarter of Game 2 of the teams’ NBA Western Conference first-round playoff series in Denver on Monday. Utah scored a 114-111 win.

King take lead over Canucks in series The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — If the Los Angeles Kings’ fearsome power play keeps lighting up Roberto Luongo and the Vancouver Canucks, their long-suffering fans won’t have to wait eight years for their next playoff series. Michal Handzus scored two power-play goals, Drew Doughty had a goal and three assists, and the Kings chased Luongo during a 5-3 victory Monday night, taking a 2-1 series lead in their first home postseason game since 2002. Brad Richardson and Ryan Smyth also scored and Jonathan Quick made 25 saves as the sixthseeded Kings moved ahead in the best-of-seven series with another standout game from their relentless power play, which has seven goals after connecting three more times in Game 3. Mikael Samuelsson scored his fourth goal of the series for Vancouver, which trimmed a three-goal deficit to 4-3 before the Kings finished strong. Game 4 is Wednesday night at Staples Center, where the increasingly shaky Luongo doesn’t exactly feel at home. The Canucks’ star goalie and Canadian Olympic hero gave up eight goals in an embarrassing loss to the Kings just 18 days ago, and he stopped just 12 shots before getting pulled late in the second period of Game 3 in front of a raucous Hollywood crowd watching its first home playoff game since April 27, 2002. Mason Raymond and Daniel Sedin also scored for third-seeded Vancouver, and Sedin had another apparent goal disallowed by video review. Doughty and defenseman Jack Johnson, who had three assists, expertly ran the show as Los Angeles’ power play again shredded the Canucks, scoring on each of its three chances in Game 3 — and connecting each time before the first power-play unit even left the ice. Yet the Kings’ defensive play against Vancouver’s vaunted Sedin twins line was just as important, holding the Sedins and Alex Burrows to one shot in the first 40 minutes. NHL scoring champion Henrik Sedin has no goals and three assists in the series, while Burrows is scoreless. Each club won a 3-2 overtime game to open the series in Vancouver, with the Kings evening it by rallying from a two-goal deficit and shutting out the Canucks for the final 57½ minutes of Game 2 before Anze Kopitar’s winner. After frenzied pregame festivities including a live punk band, Vancouver silenced the crowd just 2:09 in on Raymond’s goal. Yet after stressing discipline before traveling to Los Angeles, the Canucks couldn’t have been happy with their three penalties in the first two periods — and did the Kings ever make them pay. Doughty evened it midway through the first with a low slap shot through traffic for the first career playoff goal by the 20-yearold Canadian Olympian, who has emerged as a star this season. After Henrik Sedin took a holding penalty early in the second period, Handzus connected on a rebound of Johnson’s shot for his first goal of the postseason. Smyth accidentally skated over Luongo’s hand during the play, leaving the goalie in apparent pain. Also on Monday: Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Sabres. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 BOSTON — Patrice Bergeron scored the go-ahead goal with just over 6 minutes left to give Boston a win and a 2-1 lead over Buffalo in their Eastern Conference playoff series. Mark Recchi bumped Tim Kennedy off the puck in the right corner behind the Buffalo net and fed it to Bergeron, whose quick shot from the right circle beat Ryan Miller. Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 MONTREAL — Alexander Ovechkin scored the fourth goal of Washington’s second-period outburst, leading the Capitals past Montreal for a 2-1 lead in their Eastern Conference series. Semyon Varlamov, who got the nod over Jose Theodore, made 26 saves in his first start of the series for Washington, which has won two in a row after losing the opener 3-2 in overtime.

Jack Dempsey / The Associated Press

Banged-up Jazz get a road win over Nuggets The Associated Press DENVER — With Utah running out of big bodies, Deron Williams carried an even bigger load in leading the Jazz to a 114-111 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Monday night in Game 2 of their Western Conference playoffs. Williams had 33 points and 14 assists and Carlos Boozer added 20 points and 15 rebounds as the injury-riddled Jazz tied the series at a win each with the series shifting to Salt Lake City for Game 3 on Friday night. Chauncey Billups’ three-point attempt from the top of the key in the closing seconds hit off the back iron and the Nuggets walked dejectedly off the court. Williams and Kyle Korver made two free throws each in the final 11 seconds to hold off the Nuggets, who had overcome a 14-point thirdquarter deficit to take a 102-98 lead with 4½ minutes left. Utah was playing without two of its most experienced playoff performers in forward Andrei Kirilenko (calf), who is out for this series, and center Mehmet Okur, who tore his left Achilles’ tendon in Game 1 and is done for the playoffs. The Nuggets couldn’t capitalize as Kyryo Fesenko played effectively on Nene, and Carmelo Anthony was flustered despite scoring 32 points just 48 hours after his playoff-best 42-point performance in the opener. Anthony made 14 of 15 free throws but was just nine of 25 from the field. Denver is 1-11 all-time when Anthony fouls out and he was whistled for his sixth foul with 25 seconds left and the Nuggets down by a point. The officials blew the call, however. C.J. Miles stepped out of bounds before Anthony fouled him, but the crew didn’t see it and Miles made both free throws for a 110-107 lead. Trailing by 12 points at halftime, the Nuggets floundered through the first 7 minutes of the second half, falling behind 76-62 on Boozer’s putback dunk before using a 14-0 run to tie it. J.R. Smith hit a long three-pointer during the run, and Anthony stole the ball at the other end, nearly lost it several times dribbling through traffic up court but still managed to put a rim-rattling floater through the net to make it 76-71 and force the Jazz to call a timeout. When they returned to the court, the Nug-

gets continued their run and Anthony’s four free throws tied it at 76 with 3 minutes left in the third quarter. Williams ended a 5-minute scoring drought for Utah with two free throws, and the Jazz recovered to take an 88-82 lead into the fourth quarter thanks to Korver’s three jumpers in the final 90 seconds. The Jazz shot 68 percent in the first half and took a 63-51 lead after closing the half on a 17-3 run that had Denver’s fans booing them through the tunnel almost as much as they jeered the officiating crew moments later. Boozer had four baskets in the run, and rookie Wesley Matthews swished a wide-open threepointer from the left corner as the crowd sat in stunned silence as the short-handed Jazz manhandled the Nuggets on both ends. During Utah’s run, Smith missed an uncontested layup, Billups picked up uncharacteristic fouls on both ends of the court and the Nuggets couldn’t even get off a final shot, whistled for a shot-clock violation with half a second left in the first half. Fesenko, who packs 300 pounds on his 7-foot-1 frame, gave the Jazz more bulk inside after they allowed 52 points in the paint in the opener. “I’m not going to expect him to go out and get 20 rebounds. I think that’s unfair. Or get 20 points,” Utah coach Jerry Sloan said before the game. “Just come and play hard, try to understand what we’re doing. Try not to make any mistakes.” In another Monday game: Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102 CLEVELAND — LeBron James scored 40 points and took over in the fourth quarter as Cleveland, fueled by a rabid home crowd that booed every move by Chicago’s Joakim Noah, maintained home-court advantage by beating the Bulls to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference playoffs. James added eight rebounds and eight assists for the Cavs. James dropped a three-pointer that he capped with a quick dance move and wink toward Chicago’s bench, made two free throws, a layup and two jumpers, scoring 11 straight as Cleveland opened a 107-98 lead with 1:36 left.

Defensive strategy works well as Blazers take Suns By Bob Baum The Associated Press

PHOENIX — Andre Miller has played in more than 900 games in his 11 NBA seasons, so the Phoenix Suns certainly knew what to expect from the Portland point guard — relentless drives to the basket. Still, the Suns couldn’t stop him. The Trail Blazers clogged the middle to prevent those thunderous pick-and-roll dunks from Amare Stoudemire. If the Suns were to win, they would have to do it from long range. They didn’t. Portland, despite the absence of leading scorer Brandon Roy, was the only team to win a series opener on the road with its 105-100 victory over Phoenix on Sunday night. The Trail Blazers, who last made it out of the first round 10 years ago, would head home up 2-0 in the best-of-7 series with a win in Game 2 tonight. Miller knows to expect a stiffer challenge. “They’re definitely going to come out and play harder, shoot the ball better and force-feed Amare a little bit more,” he said before practice on Monday. “So it’s going to be a tough test, the second game.” Portland’s guards dissected the Suns in the decisive fourth quarter, pulling away after the Suns led by two with five minutes to go. Miller matched his playoff career high with 31 points, with 15 in the final period. Jerryd Bayless scored 10 of his 18 in the fourth quarter. “Me and Jerryd were the guys trying to get to the basket and not rely on jump shots to give them easy transition baskets,” Miller said. “Normally when you take bad jump shots or shots out of rhythm it leads to scores and transition baskets. By us driving to the basket and keeping the floor balanced we were able to control the tempo.” The league’s highest-scoring team at 110 per game, Phoenix managed just four fastbreak points all night. Meanwhile, the Blazers scored 20 points off turnovers. Portland had the second-best road record in the West (24-17) but lost Roy for the series when he had to undergo arthroscopic surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his right knee. After losing Greg Oden and Joel Przybilla to injuries earlier in the year, the Trail Blazers were accustomed to such situations. “It’s got to be a team effort to make up for the loss of Brandon,” coach Nate McMillan said. “I thought the guys last night, they did that.” Besides, the Suns’ Steve Nash said, Roy wasn’t necessarily the reason Phoenix has had so much trouble with the Trail Blazers. “Most teams have a guy similar to Brandon, a superstar who can carry the load offensively,” Nash said. “A lot of teams don’t have two 7-footers or a long, athletic front line like they have that make it difficult for us.” Stoudemire took 19 shots to score 18 points. And the best three-point shooting team in the NBA made 11 of 32, three of 13 in the final quarter. Portland’s LaMarcus Aldridge sensed Stoudemire’s frustration. “A little bit because we had so many guys around him,” Aldridge said, “and he really couldn’t get anything going.” Stoudemire had enough trouble with primary defender Marcus Camby, but said he had never had so many players collapse on him inside.

Portland, Camby close to new deal The Portland Trail Blazers are closing in on securing a contract extension for Marcus Camby, according to sources with knowledge of the talks. Sources said Monday that the two sides had already been negotiating toward a new deal that would keep Camby off the free-agent market this summer, according to reports on ESPN.com. One source said that the looming deal is likely to span two years in excess of $20 million. Portland acquired Camby before the trading deadline from the Los Angeles Clippers after losing centers Greg Oden and Joel Przybilla to seasonending knee injuries. One source said Monday that the Blazers have been hopeful of reaching an extension with Camby since acquiring him from the Clippers. — From wire reports “Every time I caught the ball in the post you had five guys inside the lane,” Stoudemire said. “I’ve never seen that before in my career, that sign of respect. The whole team is trying to guard me out there. For the most part what we’ve got to continue to do now is shoot with confidence, play with confidence and realize how good we really are.” Stoudemire worked on his jumper after practice Monday. “Just trying to get into a rhythm,” he said, wiping off the sweat as he talked to reporters. “Offensively we didn’t quite have our rhythm last night so I figured get a few extra shots up and we should be able to get our rhythm back.” Phoenix coach Alvin Gentry said before the series began that his team would be fine if it made its shots. After shooting an NBA-best 49 percent in the regular season, the Suns shot 41.8 percent in Game 1. “We shoot 41 percent we’re going to struggle,” Gentry said. Nash, though, said the loss cannot be simply attributed to missed shots. “You look at the tape and you look back at the game and you think ‘We made a lot of mistakes,’ ” he said. “We made a lot of errors defensively, we gave away a lot of opportunities offensively — and we missed shots. To generalize it that we just didn’t make our shots, I think that’s hanging our hat on shooting too much. Yes, we’re a great shooting team and we want to rely on that. But we want to be able to win games like we did the last game against them in the regular season when we didn’t score a lot of points.” That 93-87 victory in Phoenix on March 21 was the Suns’ only one in four tries against Portland. In Game 1, the performance was not just about the numbers for a Phoenix team that entered the playoffs winner of 14 of its last 16 games. “We didn’t quite have the spirit or the energy collectively that we had in the last few games of the regular season,” Nash said. “Sometimes that happens.” But in a game this important? “You can never predict. I mean, I thought we played hard. I just thought we didn’t quite have that spark that we needed,” he said. “I don’t know — biorhythms.”

NBA SCOREBOARD SCHEDULE NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Cleveland 2, Chicago 0 Saturday, April 17: Cleveland 96, Chicago 83 Monday, April 19: Cleveland 112, Chicago 102 Thursday, April 22: Cleveland at Chicago, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 25: Cleveland at Chicago, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: Chicago at Cleveland, TBD x-Thursday, April 29: Cleveland at Chicago, TBD x-Saturday, May 1: Chicago at Cleveland, TBD Orlando 1, Charlotte 0 Sunday, April 18: Orlando 98, Charlotte 89 Wednesday, April 21: Charlotte at Orlando, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 24: Orlando at Charlotte, 11 a.m. Monday, April 26: Orlando at Charlotte, TBD x-Wednesday, April 28: Charlotte at Orlando, TBD x-Friday, April 30: Orlando at Charlotte, TBD x-Sunday, May 2: Charlotte at Orlando, TBD Atlanta 1, Milwaukee 0 Saturday, April 17: Atlanta 102, Milwaukee 92 Today, April 20: Milwaukee at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 24: Atlanta at Milwaukee, 4 p.m. Monday, April 26: Atlanta at Milwaukee, TBD x-Wednesday, April 28: Milwaukee at Atlanta, TBD x-Friday, April 30: Atlanta at Milwaukee, TBD x-Sunday, May 2: Milwaukee at Atlanta, TBD Boston 1, Miami 0 Saturday, April 17: Boston 85, Miami 76

Today, April 20: Miami at Boston, 5 p.m. Friday, April 23: Boston at Miami, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 25: Boston at Miami, 10 a.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: Miami at Boston, TBD x-Thursday, April 29: Boston at Miami, TBD x-Saturday, May 1: Miami at Boston, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE L.A. Lakers 1, Oklahoma City 0 Sunday, April 18: L.A. Lakers 87, Oklahoma City 79 Today, April 20: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 22: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Saturday, April 24: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Friday, April 30: L.A. Lakers at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Sunday, May 2: Oklahoma City at L.A. Lakers, TBD Dallas 1, San Antonio 0 Sunday, April 18: Dallas 100, San Antonio 94 Wednesday, April 21: San Antonio at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Friday, April 23: Dallas at San Antonio, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, April 25: Dallas at San Antonio, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 27: San Antonio at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 29: Dallas at San Antonio, TBD x-Saturday, May 1: San Antonio at Dallas, TBD Portland 1, Phoenix 0 Sunday, April 18: Portland 105, Suns 100 Today, April 20: Portland at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 22: Phoenix at Portland, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 24: Phoenix at Portland, 1:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 26: Portland at Phoenix, TBD x-Thursday, April 29: Phoenix at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, May 1: Portland at Phoenix, TBD Denver 1, Utah 1 Saturday, April 17: Denver 126, Utah 113 Monday, April 19: Utah 114, Denver 111

Friday, April 23: Denver at Utah, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 25: Denver at Utah, 6:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 28: Utah at Denver, TBD x-Friday, April 30: Denver at Utah, TBD x-Sunday, May 2: Utah at Denver, TBD

SUMMARIES Monday’s Games ——— CAVALIERS 112, BULLS 102 FG FT Reb CHICAGO Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Deng 40:34 7-15 5-5 1-6 5 2 20 TGibson 23:03 5-7 1-1 2-7 0 3 11 Noah 41:25 10-18 5-5 7-13 3 3 25 Rose 42:53 10-24 3-4 0-2 8 3 23 Hinrich 35:49 2-8 0-0 0-1 6 4 5 Miller 22:06 2-6 0-0 2-7 1 0 4 Johnson 4:52 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 3 0 Murray 29:18 5-14 2-2 1-1 2 1 14 Totals 240:00 41-93 16-17 13-37 25 19 102 Percentages: FG .441, FT .941. 3-Point Goals: 4-13, .308 (Murray 2-6, Deng 1-2, Hinrich 1-3, Miller 0-2). Team Rebounds: 6. Team Turnovers: 4 (5 PTS). Blocked Shots: 3 (Deng, T.Gibson, Noah). Turnovers: 4 (Miller 2, Hinrich, Rose). Steals: 3 (Rose 2, Noah). Technical Fouls: None. FG FT Reb CLEVELAND Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS James 41:05 16-23 6-6 1-8 8 2 40 Jamison 30:22 6-12 1-1 0-4 3 3 14 O’Neal 15:16 2-4 4-4 1-7 1 4 8

MWilliams 37:50 2-8 8-8 0-3 6 1 12 Parker 24:04 3-5 0-0 0-1 0 0 9 Varejao 27:40 3-5 1-2 0-5 1 4 7 Ilgauskas 16:26 1-2 1-2 3-4 0 2 3 West 27:15 3-7 1-1 0-1 5 1 7 Moon 19:52 4-5 0-0 0-3 0 2 12 Hickson 0:10 0-0 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 240:00 40-71 22-24 5-36 24 19 112 Percentages: FG .563, FT .917. 3-Point Goals: 10-20, .500 (Moon 4-5, Parker 3-5, James 2-4, Jamison 1-3, West 0-1, M.Williams 0-2). Team Rebounds: 7. Team Turnovers: 12 (16 PTS). Blocked Shots: 9 (Ilgauskas 2, James 2, Moon 2, Parker, Varejao, M.Williams). Turnovers: 11 (O’Neal 4, Jamison 3, James 2, Varejao, West). Steals: 2 (James, Parker). Technical Fouls: None. Chicago 22 28 27 25 — 102 Cleveland 28 24 25 35 — 112 A—20,562 (20,562). T—2:25. ——— JAZZ 114, NUGGETS 111 FG FT Reb UTAH Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Miles 38:18 5-10 6-6 0-3 6 5 17 Boozer 40:51 10-16 0-2 3-15 2 3 20 Fesenko 19:44 2-2 0-2 0-2 1 5 4 Williams 44:40 7-14 16-18 0-2 14 4 33 Matthews 30:35 1-7 4-4 0-3 1 4 7 Millsap 33:48 5-9 8-12 2-5 0 4 18 Korver 24:01 5-7 2-3 0-1 1 3 13 Price 3:20 0-0 0-0 0-0 1 2 0 Jeffers 3:07 0-1 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Koufos 1:37 1-2 0-0 1-1 0 0 2 Totals 240:01 36-68 36-47 6-32 26 30 114

Percentages: FG .529, FT .766. 3-Point Goals: 6-13, .462 (Williams 3-4, Korver 1-2, Matthews 1-3, Miles 1-3, Millsap 0-1). Team Rebounds: 12. Team Turnovers: 18 (20 PTS). Blocked Shots: 4 (Millsap 2, Miles, Williams). Turnovers: 18 (Williams 7, Boozer 3, Miles 3, Fesenko 2, Korver 2, Matthews). Steals: 7 (Matthews 2, Millsap 2, Korver, Miles, Williams). Technical Fouls: Coach Sloan, 6:00 second. FG FT Reb DENVER Min M-A M-A O-T A PF PTS Anthony 41:44 9-25 14-15 2-6 4 6 32 Martin 31:54 7-10 1-2 2-3 2 5 15 Nene 41:36 7-10 4-7 0-6 0 5 18 Billups 37:16 4-11 7-8 0-3 11 5 17 Afflalo 21:48 2-5 4-4 0-1 2 5 9 Smith 29:30 3-10 2-2 0-6 2 3 9 Andersen 17:24 1-2 2-2 0-5 0 3 4 Petro 5:06 2-2 0-0 0-0 0 2 4 Lawson 13:42 0-0 3-4 2-2 1 3 3 Totals 240:00 35-75 37-44 6-32 22 37 111 Percentages: FG .467, FT .841. 3-Point Goals: 4-18, .222 (Billups 2-7, Afflalo 1-4, Smith 1-6, Anthony 0-1). Team Rebounds: 14. Team Turnovers: 19 (28 PTS). Blocked Shots: 6 (Martin 3, Andersen, Petro, Smith). Turnovers: 17 (Anthony 5, Billups 5, Andersen 2, Nene 2, Lawson, Martin, Smith). Steals: 9 (Anthony 3, Nene 2, Martin 2, Afflalo, Smith). Technical Fouls: Defensive three second, 8:05 second. Flagrant Fouls: Anthony, 3:33 first. Utah 33 30 25 26 — 114 Denver 30 21 31 29 — 111 A—19,155 (19,155). T—2:56.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 D5

Ride Continued from D1 Join COTA to clean up, repair and improve the trail flow at the Lair, as well as to help with weed removal. COTA will supply tools, direction and refreshments. A barbecue and jump jam will follow the trail work effort. For more information or for directions to the Lair, go to www.cotamtb. com. Volunteers are also being sought for the inaugural Bend Don’t Brake road race, which rolls into southeast Bend on May 8. Organizers of this one-day Oregon Bicycle Racing Association road race are looking for volunteers to help in four-hour shifts at setup and registration, in support vehicles and on the course. To sign up for a volunteer position, go to www.freshairsports. com and click on the link to Bend Don’t Brake. ——— Several riding and training opportunities aimed at junior cyclists in Central Oregon are on tap next month. Enrollment is now open for the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation’s junior cycling program, which kicks off on May 3. MBSEF offers mountain bike programs for juniors ages 8 to 18 and road bike programs for riders ages 12 to 18. Four threeweek sessions run May through August, with each session culminating in a daylong cycling adventure. The goal of the program is to help young cyclists improve their bike-handling skills, riding etiquette, fitness and strength, as well as to expose them to the sport in a team atmosphere. New this year, MBSEF will offer flexible-day options, overnight adventure camps and junior coaching internships. Racing opportunities for interested riders and loaner bikes are also available. For more information, call 541388-0002 or go to www.mbsef. org. Also in May, the Bend Endurance Academy is scheduled to host a junior cycling camp particularly aimed at youngsters planning to compete at the 2010 Junior Road National Championships coming to Bend in June. The two-day weekend road cycling camp is set for May 29-30 and is open to riders ages 12 to 18 with some road racing experience. Participants will receive guided previews of all the nationals race courses while learning about race skills, tactics and preparation. Estimated cost for the two-day camp is $100, which includes lunch and transportation around town. A second camp hosted by the Bend Endurance Academy will also be held May 29-30 in Bend. This version, however, is designed for freeride mountain bikers. During the camp, junior riders ages 12 to 18 will be exposed to progressions and stunts on jumps and other enhanced terrain features. Estimated cost for the two-day camp is $100, which includes coaching, transportation and lunch. For both camps, check bendenduranceacademy.org for the latest details and online registration. ——— “Dominance” sums up the performances of Central Oregon riders competing over the weekend at the Table Rock Road Race held near Medford. Of the nine racing categories offered, six were won by riders from Bend: Serena Bishop, Brig Brandt, David Cloninger, Susanna Julber, Scott Seaton and Teri Sheasby. ——— The popular Cascade Chainbreaker Mountain Bike Race is just around the corner on May 8. And ladies, here’s an insider’s tip worth sharing with your girlfriends: The Chainbreaker is annually held on privately owned land in northwest Bend on singletrack trails available to ride just once a year. Typically, the race course is marked and open for pre-riding only on the day prior to the Chainbreaker. But that will not be the case this year. Women ONLY are invited to pre-ride the Cascade Chainbreaker course an entire week in advance of the race. On Saturday, May 1, local mountain biker Heidi Faller will join forces with the Bend Bella Cyclists — a local women’s cycling club — to lead a women’s group ride on the Chainbreaker course. Interested riders should meet at Shevlin Park at 10 a.m. Participants need not be registered for the Chainbreaker to take part in this free event. Heather Clark can be reached at bulletinheather@gmail.com.

PREP ROUNDUP

Outlaws stay perfect in Sky-Em Bulletin staff report SISTERS — Dara Kosanke struck out 13 and Missie Calavan had three hits and two runs batted in to lead Sisters to a 64 Sky-Em League softball victory over Elmira on Monday. Kosanke went the distance in the circle for the Outlaws (4-0 Sky-Em, 13-3 overall) to keep Sisters undefeated in league play. At the plate, the Outlaws recorded nine hits. In addition to Calavan’s big day, Taylor Walker added two hits and an RBI. Sisters grabbed a 4-0 lead in the bottom of the first inning and appeared to be headed for a shutout victory until the

Falcons rallied to tie the game 4-4 with a four-run sixth inning. The Outlaws responded in their half of the inning, though, scoring two runs on a double by Calavan. In other prep action Monday: SOFTBALL Pleasant Hill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 LA PINE — Pleasant Hill foiled the Hawks’ defense with a solid day at the plate, recording 13 hits to defeat La Pine in a Sky-Em League matchup. Casey Wright led the Hawks in the losing effort with an RBI double. The loss dropped La Pine to 0-13-1 overall and 03 in league.

Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21-18 Siletz Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-0 SILETZ — The Bulldogs scored 39 runs over 10 innings of play in a Special District 3 doubleheader against Siletz Valley to blow out the Warriors in both games. Culver registered 26 hits and several walks to continuously reload the bases. In the first five-inning game, Samantha Donnelly led the offense with a three-run triple and one double. Mariah Daugherty and Kelsie Stafford also tallied one double a piece. In the second game, Culver shut out the opposition, while Kymber Wofford and Amanda Treadway both smacked doubles. The wins boosted the Bulldogs to 9-0 in league and 12-5

overall. BASEBALL Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SISTERS — The Outlaws never got going offensively against the Hawks and dropped to 2-3 in Sky-Em League play. Jordan Hodges paced the Sisters offense with a double. The Outlaws are now 11-4 overall. Pleasant Hill. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 LA PINE — The Hawks fell to 3-3 in Sky-Em League play after getting shutout by the Billies. Pleasant Hill no-hit La Pine and went ahead 13-0 in the fifth inning after a grand slam by Derek Smith.

PREP SCOREBOARD Bend

BASEBALL Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE Standings W Bend 7 Pendleton 7 Summit 6 Hermiston 5 Madras 5 The Dalles-Wahtonka 4 Mountain View 2 Crook County 0

9

0-13

Monday’s Results ———

Class 4A L 2 2 3 4 4 5 7 9

Ov’ll 8-6 12-3 7-8 9-5 9-6 5-10 2-11 4-10

Monday’s Results ———

Class 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— Pleasant Hill 313 05 — 13 8 1 La Pine 000 00 — 0 0 5 Williams and Smith; Steinbach, Morton (4) and Ebner, Pickering (4). W — Williams. L — Steinbach. HR — PH: Smith. ——— Elmira 030 100 0 — 4 8 1 Sisters 100 000 0 — 1 3 2 Boggs and Keegal; Weigand and Warner. W—Boggs. L— Weigand. 2B—Elmira: Daniels; Sisters: Hodges. HR—Elmira: Daniels.

SOFTBALL Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE Standings W Pendleton 9 The Dalles-Wahtonka 8 Mountain View 5 Summit 4 Hermiston 4 Madras 3 Crook County 3

0

SKY-EM LEAGUE Elmira 000 004 0 — 4 7 3 Sisters 400 002 x — 6 9 2 Boytz and Thoms; Kosanke and T. Walker. W — Kosanke. L— Boytz. 2B — Sisters: Calavan, T. Walker. ——— Pleasant Hill 013 011 5 — 12 13 5 La Pine 100 050 0 — 6 10 4 Morgan and Burnhart; Owen and Jackson. W—Morgan. L—Owen. 2B—Pleasant Hill: Shepard, Winsor; La Pine: Wright. HR—Pleasant Hill: Warner. ———

Class 2A/1A Special District 3 First Game (5 innings) Siletz Valley 120 00 — 3 2 4 Culver 537 42 — 21 15 2 n/a; O’Gorman and Donnelly. W—O’Gorman. L—n/a. 2B— Culver: Daugherty, Stafford, Donnelly. 3B—Culver: Donnelly. ——— Second Game (5 innings) Culver 3(10)5 0X — 18 11 1 Siletz Valley 000 00 — 0 1 4 Hood and Daugherty; n/a. W—Hood. L—n/a. 2B—Culver: Wofford, Treadway.

BOYS GOLF L 0 1 4 5 5 6 6

Ov’ll 13-1 14-1 8-6 7-6 6-9 6-8 4-10

Calendar Continued from D6 OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m., Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m., Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. and Sundays, 1- 4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Every Wednesday; 6-9 p.m.; every Sunday, 2-5 p.m. (set-up half hour before) at 1355 N.W. Commerce (off Century Drive), Bend; drop-in fee, $5; Brett Yost 541-318-8997, bendtabletennis@yahoo.com; www.bendtabletennis.com. INCLIMB ROCK ‘N’ TIME: Indoor rock climbing for grades 6-12; Friday, May 7, 1-4:15 p.m. at Inclimb Rock Gym, Bend; transportation provided from Redmond; $20; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: Ages 6 and up; martial arts training; Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 29-May 25, 7-8 p.m. at RAPRD Activity Center; $69; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. DIANE’S RIDING CENTER CLINIC: For beginner and intermediate riders, ages 7-14; learn cinch, saddle and prepare to ride; Saturdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22; beginners 1-2 p.m.; intermediate 2-3 p.m.; at Diane’s Riding Center in Tumalo; $100; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. BLUE DRAGONS MARTIAL ARTS: Ages 4-6; Kung Fu based, mixed martial arts program; Tuesdays and Thursdays, May 4-27, 4:30-5:15 p.m. at Redmond Activity Center; $30; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOGA FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 7-8 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston; vinyasa yoga tailored for athletes to enhance their performance; $5; 541-389-1601. LIFEGUARD CLASS: Provides certification in CPR/PR, standard first aid and lifeguarding; April 24 and 25, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day at the Athletic Club of Bend; open to the public; must be age 15 and older and have swimming skills; $175; Rob at 541-322-5856. TAE KWON DO CLASS: Tuesdays and Thursdays; led by USTF/ITF certified black belts Eric and Samantha Gleason; International School of the Cascades, 2105 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; $50 for 10 visits; www.raprd.org. BEND BICYCLE FILM FESTIVAL: a fundraising event; taking submissions from local filmmakers and photographers; must have cycling and local components; Film festival on May 22 at Tower Theatre; part of a weekend of biking activities to benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance and Bend Endurance Academy; www.BendBicycleFilmFestival. com; Paul at 541-420-5777; bendbicycleff@yahoo.com.

Monday’s Results ——— BEND INVITATIONAL At Bend Golf and Country Club Par 72 Team scores — Redmond 315, Summit 326, Pendleton 348, Crook County 350, Sisters 351, Bend 365, Mountain View 368, Hermiston 383, The Dalles-Wahtonka 385, La Pine 398, Burns 413. Medalist — Jesse Heinly, Summit, 72

MULTISPORT POLE, PEDAL, PADDLE PREP CLINIC: The focus of the clinic will be on the bike and the importance of a good bike fit to achieve maximum aerodynamics, power and comfort; May 12, 7 p.m. at Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 SW Century Drive; Gina Miller at 541-585-2540. POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Saturday, May 15; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. KIDS’ MINI POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Hosted by MBSEF; Sunday, May 16; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. RUN/CYCLE/RUN & CORE FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 5:15-6:40 p.m. at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; outside warm-up run, form work and drills, then indoor cycle/run intervals, then core work; $6.50 or current fitness pass; 541-389-7665; www.bendparksandrec.org.

PADDLING PRIVATE AND GROUP KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Thursdays, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; instruction by Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe staff, gear is provided; $45; 541-317-9407. SPRING PADDLE FEST: Saturday and Sunday, April 24-25, 10 a.m.; kayak instructors will teach free two-hour basic skills clinics all day Saturday at Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; On Sunday, boat demos at River Bend Park; 541317-9407; geoff@aldercreek.com.

RUNNING FOOTZONE LEARN TO RUN PROGRAM: Six-week program starts Wednesday, April 21, 5:30-7 p.m. at the FootZone in downtown Bend; training beginners to run or walk 5K; get ready for the Heaven Can Wait 5K in June; cost is $55; 541-317-3568; www.footzonebend.com; Connie Austin at conzaustin@gmail.com. FLEET FEET’S NO BOUNDARIES 5K TRAINING: Run or walk a 5K (3.1 miles) for the first time; meets 8:30 a.m. on Saturdays through May 29; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-389-1601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/5k. FLEET FEET’S 10K TRAINING: All ability levels are welcome, first-time 10K runners to longtime runners; Sundays, 8 a.m., April 25-June 20; Fleet Feet, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 541-389-1601; www.fleetfeetbend.com/10k. SOLAIRE SALMON RUN: 5K and 10K run or walk; benefiting The Environmental Center; $24 adults, $14 youth; 1K for kids $14; May 1, 9 a.m. at McKay Park, Bend; registration is required by April 30; 541-480-8555; aimee@bendeventco. com; www.solairesalmonrun.com. COCC 6-MILE RELAY: Thursday, May 6, 5:30 p.m. at Central Oregon

Redmond (315) — Landon Moore 37-36—73, Andy Rodby 39-40—79, Jared Lambert 41-39—80; Colton Henshaw 4142—83, Mason Rodby 42-43—85. Summit (326) — Jesse Heinly 39-33—72; Dylan Cramer 42-38—80, Jordan Schiemer 41-43—84, Anders Hansen 4644—90, Stephen Drgastin 53-43—96. Crook County (350) — Caleb Henry 46-42—88, Jared George 49-39—88, Kurt Russell 45-43—88, Dillon Russell 4937—86, Ben McLane 53-49—102. Sisters (351) — Jeff Fought 40-41—81, John Standen 4146—87, Cody Farr 47-44—91, Aaron Simundson 48-44—92, Zack Cummings 46-48—94. Bend (365) — Carter McGowan 43-42—85, Ryan Crownover 44-46—90, Tanner Cherry 44-48–92, Martin Marquez 50-48—98, Jaired Rodmaker 54-44—98. Mountain View (368) — Jacoby Donaca 47-40—87, Paul Conduti 46-45—91, Ryan Vieira 46-47—93, James Harper 4948—97, Cameron MacKenzie 55-46—101. La Pine (398) — Travis Knight 47-43—90, Drew Smith 47-47—94, Niko Cummings 50-49—99, Jacob Watkins 6055—115.

EQUESTRIAN OREGON HIGH SCHOOL EQUESTRIAN TEAMS Central Oregon District Meet At Redmond, April 16-18 Team Points Large (14 or more riders) — Redmond 633, Mountain View 599, Sisters 509, Madras 485. Medium (8-13 riders) — La Pine 248, Crook County 173, Summit 133. Small (4-7 riders) — Dufur 232, Hood River Valley 189, Bend 176, The Dalles-Wahtonka 67. Mini (1-3 riders) — Pendleton 182, Lakeview 47, North Lake 2. Individual Events (All medal winners are state qualifiers) Hunt seat over fences — 1, Katie Yozamp, Sis, gold. 2, Cassidy Kinneman, Sis, silver. 3, Samantha Novotny, Sis, silver. Bobbi Jo Rasauer, Sis, bronze. Hunt seat equitation — 1, Laurie MacWhorter, MV, gold. 2, Kristen Jasa, Mad, state qualifier. 3, Jamie Faulkner, MV, state qualifier. Kylee Schimel, Pen, silver. Taylor Norton, HRV, bronze. Dressage — 1, Katie Yozamp, Sis, gold. 2, Bobbi Jo Rasauer, Sis, bronze. 3, Crystal Mitchell, Pen. Ashlyn Brewster, Red, silver. Saddle seat equitation — 1, Bobbi Jo Rasauer, Sis, gold. 2, Hennessey Sloter, Red, silver. 3, Kayla Vincent, Mad, bronze.

Community College track in Bend; teams of two, three or four; register on event day; $5; free for COCC and OSU-Cascades students; Bill Douglass at bdouglass@cocc.edu. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet, 1320 Galveston Ave., Bend; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; local running star Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone, 845 Wall St., Bend. Personal trainer Kyle Will of Will Race Performance will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injury; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles at slower pace; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@footzonebend.com. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

SKIING BEND ENDURANCE SPRING NORDIC SKIING: An opportunity for ages 14-23 to explore nordic skiing; Tuesdays, Thursday, Fridays, 1:15-4 p.m., through April 30; FREE; meet at 500 S.W. Bond St., Bend; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865. FULL MOON X-COUNTRY SKI TRIPS: Meet at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend and carpool to the various snoparks for an evening ski; 6:30 p.m.; April 28; bring a headlamp; free ski rentals available, pick up rentals from 5:30-6 p.m.; free; 541-385-8080. MBSEF ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET: April 23, 5:45 p.m. at W.E. Miller Elementary School; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MAY DAY RACE: April 23-25 at Mount Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SOCCER SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; Coed from 6-8 p.m., Men’s 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com. ADULT/YOUTH FUTSAL: Futsal open play is for youth and adults to sharpen their foot skills and ball control; $5; every Sunday, 10 a.m. to noon; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@

Showmanship — 1, Katie Cramer, MV. 2, Kayla Vincent, Mad, gold. 3, Crystal Mitchell, Pen. Taylor Norton, HRV, silver. Molly Coehlo, MV, bronze. Laurie MacWhorter, MV, state qualifier. In hand trail — 1, Laurie MacWhorter, MV, bronze. 2, Nautique Simpson, Red, silver. 3, Kersey Stegman, CC. Justin Goss, Red, gold. Katie Case, CC, gold. Trail — 1, Kylee Schimel, Pen. 2, Laurie MacWhorter, MV, gold. 3, Courtney Thomas, MV, gold. Kaesha Hilton, HRV, silver. Taylor Norton, HRV, bronze. Samantha Hollinger, LP, state qualifier. Stock seat equitation — 1, Courtney Thomas, MV, silver. 2, Laurie MacWhorter, MV, gold. 3, Kylee Schimel, Pen. Taylor Norton, HRV, bronze. Jessie Dillon, Red, bronze. Molly Coehlo, MV, state qualifier. Working rancher — 1, Lindsey Bernbaum, Dufur, gold. 2, Jessie Dillon, Red, gold. 3, Kaylee Patterson, Mad, silver. Natalie Nigg, Red, bronze. Driving — 1, Bobbi Jo Rasauer, Sis, gold. 2, Jordan Payne, Red, silver. Reining — 1, Jessie Dillon, Red, gold. 1, Lindsey Bernabum, Duf, gold. 3, Rachel Fox, Mad, bronze. Kayla Coulter, TDW, silver. Breakaway roping — 1, Kayla Vincent, Mad. 2, Ailee Aschoff, Duf. 3, Harrison Buller, Mad, gold. Lindsey Bernbaum, Duf, silver. Kyia Sell, MV, bronze. Steer daubing — 1, Harrison Buller, Mad, gold. 2, Ailee Aschoff, Duf. 3, Jenna Jacobsen, Sis, silver. Kayla Coulter, TDW, bronze. Barrels — 1, Ciara Timm, Bend, 15.04, gold. 2, Morgan Crabtree, MV, 15.13, state qualifier. 3, Courtney Thomas, MV, 15.30, silver. Justine Hendricks, Red, bronze. Kassi Page, Red, state qualifier. Morgan Crabtree, MV, state qualifier. Karlee Markham, MV, state qualifier. Poles — 1, Ciara Timm, Bend, 21.43, gold. 2, Ailee Aschoff, Duf, 22.04, state qualifier. 3, Courtney Thomas, MV, 22.54, silver. Hennessey Sloter, Red, gold. Megen Hopper, Red, bronze. Brandice Durfee, Red, state qualifier. Kassi Page, Red, state qualifier. Abby Henry, Red, state qualifier. Figure eight — 1, Abby Beamer, Mad, 10.510, gold. 2, Kassi Page, Red, 11.130, silver. 3, Harrison Buller, Mad, 11.19, state qualifier. Kayla Vincent, Mad, bronze. Justin Hendricks, Red, state qualifier. Ciara Timm, Bend, state qualifier. Individual flags — 1, Makayla Bashian, MV, 10.55, gold. 2, Kristin Jasa, Mad, 10.89. 3, Jenna Jacobsen, Sis, state qualifier. Brandice Durfee, Red, silver. Sara Marcus, Sis, bronze. Keyhole — 1, Kassi Page, Red, 7.70. 2, Harrison Buller, Mad, 7.860, bronze. 3, Courtney Thomas, MV, 7.90, silver. Brandice Durfee, Red, gold. Charisa Bates, LP, state qualifier. Abby Beamer, Mad, state qualifier. TEAM EVENTS

cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SWIMMING KID’S NIGHT OUT AT JUNIPER: Saturdays, through May, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; for ages 3-11; swimming, games, movies; the facility is closed to other patrons while the program is in session; registration required by noon each Saturday; $8-$10; www.register.bendparksandrec. org; Jen Avery at 541-389-7665. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only; Saturdays, April 24, May 8 and 22, 8-10 p.m. Cascade Swim Center in Redmond. Must have student identification. Cost is $2.50. 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. ADULT STROKE CLINIC: For ages 18 and older; must have some swimming experience; meets Mondays and Wednesdays, April 5-28, 5:45-6:15 at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8; advanced swim-lesson program; meets Tuesday and Thursdays, May 4-27, 5:45-6:30 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $30; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOUTH SWIM LESSONS: For ages 12-17; learn to swim or improve ability; games and challenges; ; Fridays, April 9-May 14, 9:30-10:15 a.m. at Cascade Swim Center; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SWIM-A-THON: Fundraiser for the Cascade Aquatic Club; two-hour or 200-lap swim being conquered by CAC swimmers; Saturday, April 24, 9-11 a.m. at Cascade Swim Center; donations will be accept starting this Thursday at Cascade Swim Center; free for spectators; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. WATERBABIES: Age 6 months to 3 years; basic water skills; parents are in the water with their children; May 4-27, Tuesdays and Thursdays, 5:45-6:15 p.m., at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $25; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. RAPRD FAMILY SWIM NIGHT:

Working pairs — 1, Kaesha Hilton and Taylor Norton, HRV, gold. 2, Crystal Mitchell and Kylee Schimel, Pen. 3, Hennessey Sloter and Jessie Dillon, Red, silver. Bobbi Jo Rasauer and Cassidy Kinneman, Sis, bronze. In hand obstacle relay — 1, Mountain View B (Molly Coehlo, Laurie MacWhorter, Courtney Thomas, Maddie Hood), gold. 2, Redmond A (Hennessey Sloter, Natalie Nigg, Jordan Payne, Danielle Pilon), silver. 3, Mountain View A (Jamie Faulkner, Katie Cramer, Rylynn Elliott, Morgan Crabtree). La Pine A (Chrystal Bates, Kelsi Dozier, Charisa Bates, Samantha Hollinger), bronze. Bi-rangle — 1, Brandice Durfee and Kassi Page, Red, 24.84, gold. 2, Courtney Thomas and Morgan Crabtree, MV, 25.72, silver. 3, Kayla Vincent and Abby Beamer, Mad, state qualifier. 4, Karlee Markham and Laurie MacWhorter, MV, state qualifier. Team penning — 1, Kaylee Patterson, Kody Abendschein and Kayla Vincent, Mad, gold. 2, Jenna Jacobsen, Katie Yozamp, Cassidy Kinnerman, Sis, silver. 3, Harrison Buller, Trevor Suppah, Rachel Fox, Mad. Maddie Hood, Laurie MacWhorter, Courtney Thomas, MV, bronze. Canadian flags — 1, Madras Team A (Harrison Buller, Ally Bowden, Abby Beamer, Kayla Vincent, Kayleee Patterson), 34.39, gold. 2, Redmond Team A (Brandice Durfee, Kassi Page, Megan Hopper, Jordan Payne), 34.41, silver. 3, Madras Team B (Trevor Suppah, Sierra Davis, Kristin Jasa, Jose Orosco), 38.400. Redmond Team B (Justine Hendricks, Abby Henry, Madison Mills, Tiffani McDevitt), 39.090, bronze. Drill short program — 1, Redmond (Brandice Durfee, Megen Hopper, Jordan Payne, Danielle Pilon, Nautique Simpson, Jessica Dillon, Hennessey Sloter). Drill working fours — 1, La Pine (Chrystal Bates, Kelsi Dozier, Dani Schneider, Samantha Hollinger), gold. 2, Sisters (MacKenzie Gellings, Lindsay Soliz, Brittney Bounds, McKenzie Legg, Taryn Gates), silver. 3, Mountain View (Kyia Sell, Courtney Thomas, Maddie Hood, Krystal Brix), gold. Summit (Linnea Rehn, Sarah Nave, Jessie Foster, Kristen Rehn, Catherine Thelen, Case Resor), bronze. CENTRAL DISTRICT YEAR-END AWARDS Team sportmanship — Crook County. High point performance rider — Laurie MacWhorter, Mountain View. High point timed rider — Harrison Buller, Madras. High point team contributor — Courtney Thomas, Mountain View. High point versatility rider (two performance classes and three timed events) — Courtney Thomas, Mountain View. Central District scholarships — Chrystal Bates, La Pine; Lindsey Bernbaum, Dufur.

7:05 to 8:20 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone 18 and younger; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; Redmond Area Park and Recreation District, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

TENNIS YOUTH TENNIS LESSONS: Friday and Saturday, May 7-29; ages 6-9 from 9-10 a.m.; ages 9-12 from 10-11 a.m.; ages 13-17 from 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; $39-$59; Sam Johnson City Park Tennis Courts, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. TENNIS OPEN HOUSE: A free open house at the Juniper Park tennis courts, Saturday, May 8, 11-1 p.m.; youth demonstrations for ages 6-14, 11-noon; adult cardio tennis for ages 18 and older, noon to 1 p.m.; 541-7066123; kevin@bendparksandrec.org. TENNIS FOR ADULTS: For ages 18 and older; Saturdays, May 8-29, 12:30-2 p.m. at Sam Johnson Tennis Courts, Redmond; $40; 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org. WEST BEND TENNIS CENTER OPEN COURT: Three indoor tennis courts open to the public; 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Drive); reservations encouraged; $16-$20 per hour per court; 541-330-2112; http://reservemycourt.com.

VOLLEYBALL YOUTH VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; $5; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ADULT VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop-in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-10:30 p.m.; $5 www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183.

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D6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

I B Gymnastics

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bruce Brown, a teacher and coach, talks with parents and athletes about how an athletic experience should provide an opportunity for character growth and the roles parents and coaches play in their experience Friday evening at Sisters High School.

Game Continued from D1 During his time as a coach, Brown says, he has learned how to instill character, and he has witnessed transformation of teams and individual players. He has also, he says, come to understand his athletes. He has asked them what they need. Friday in Sisters, Brown aimed part of his message directly at parents. “What can we do to improve (our children’s) performance,� he asked, “and create good memories before the games begin, during the game itself, and after the game is over?� He asked parents to think about why they want their children to be involved in athletics. Essentially, his message to parents can be boiled down to a few words: Motivation and intention can make or break a young athlete. “One of the best gifts you can give a kid is to release them to their activity,� said Brown. “Releasing them basically means it’s more about them — it’s THEIR sport. That’s a powerful thing for kids to have ownership of their sport.� Brown revealed a list of several red flags that parents should watch for to ensure that they

are “releasing� their children. Items on that list, he said, include “continuing to share credit when things go well (in a game or competition),� and, “if you catch yourself yelling at an official during a game.� Many among the intimate audience of about 30 parents and young athletes laughed at Brown’s reference to a wild parent on the sidelines. “Let’s think about what that looks like from an athlete’s perspective,� said Brown. “One adult, yelling at another adult in a public place. And you used to teach your kids to respect authority. And they (the kids) are going, ‘That doesn’t fit.’ � A mother in the audience guiltily nodded her head and confessed that she had, at one youth sports event or another, been THAT mom. The audience went somber when Brown told the story of an All-America volleyball player. Brown recounted how the player approached him after one of his recent presentations in a Midwestern city. She told him that she now realized why she chose a college thousands of miles away from home: So that she would not have to listen to her dad in the car after each match. The dad, Brown recalled, would pick apart every move she made on the court and never once say

something positive and supportive, like, “Good game. I love you. Where do you want to eat?� Brown recalled the volleyball player saying of her father: “In his mind, I never played a good game.� Without realizing it, parents can have a significant impact on their children’s self-confidence. Brown emphasized the need for parents to be positive models for their children. And a young athlete’s No. 1 need from their parents? Support. “Be there,� said Brown, simply. “He brings so much to the table with respect to respecting the kids and their thoughts,� said Tammy Ambrose, of Sisters, who was in attendance Friday in Sisters and has a 14-year-old daughter who plays for a competitive youth soccer club based in Bend. “He really drives home the good message that these kids know what they are doing. We as parents need to acknowledge that and nurture them and not try to control them.� “His message transcends athletics,� noted Bob Macauley, Sisters principal and former longtime football coach at the school. “His message is about life, and how to approach life.� Katie Brauns can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at kbrauns@ bendbulletin.com.

• Two local gymnasts qualify for national competition: Bend’s Katelyn Ohlrich, 16, of Cascade All-Stars Gymnastics, has qualified for the Level 10 USA Gymnastics Nationals, to be held in Dallas, Texas, later this month. Ohlrich qualified on April 10 by placing third overall in her Level 10 category at the USA Gymnastics Region 2 meet in Auburn, Wash. (Region 2 includes Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Montana, Alaska and Hawaii.) Teammate Courtney Miller, 14, qualified for the Level 9 USA Gymnastics Western Nationals, also to be held later this month, in Des Monies, Iowa. Miller took fifth in the Level 9 division at the regional competition. Three other Cascade All-Star Gymnasts competed in the Region 2 meet in their respective levels: Annica Balentine, Shelby Kine and Brandi Jacobson. Jacobson placed fourth in the Level 8 division. In addition to their individual regional competition, Balentine and Jacobson (alternate), represented Oregon on the regional Level 8 team. The state team is composed of eight Level 8 gymnasts who achieved the highest all-around scores at the recent Oregon state meet. The Oregon state team placed fourth overall at regionals.

Wrestling • Bend wrestler wins weight class at nationals: Khyler Emerson, 7, of Bend, won his weight class on April 11 at the Cliff Keen Reno World of Wrestling Nationals. Khyler is now one of the top wrestlers in the nation in both the under 6 light heavy weights and the under 7 bantam weights. The World of Wrestling Nationals drew 2,800 entrants. Leading up to the world competition, Khyler won the state title and the northwest regionals.

Skiing, snowboarding • Bend Endurance Academy launches collegiate summer team: The Bend Endurance Academy is forming a summer nordic ski team for collegiate

and older junior skiers (ages 18-23). The Bend Endurance Academy collegiate summer training includes roller-skiing, bounding, running, hiking, strength and agility training, and late-season snow skiing. The academy is designed to prepare participants to meet their ski-racing goals. For more information, visit www.bendenduranceacademy. org/collegiate-summer-team/. • MBSEF coaches build credentials: Eight Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation freeride snowboard and freeride ski coaches recently earned their Level 3 advanced freestyle accreditation. The accreditation was obtained at a three-day Professional Ski Instructors of America/American Association of Snowboard Instructors Freestyle Specialist clinic at Stevens Pass in Washington. PSIA/AASI Level 3 are the highest levels of certification that ski and snowboard instructors can obtain. The newly accredited MBSEF coaches are Chris Jordan, Sean Charlton, Taylor Beamis, Chris Smith, Coggin Hill, Adam Sather, Kevin Prieto and Justin Schoonover.

Multi-sport • Pole Pedal Paddle prep this Wednesday: A free Pole Pedal Paddle preparation session will be held Wednesday at U.S. Bank in downtown Bend. Tips and advice regarding the annual multisport race in Central Oregon will be provided by former PPP champions and other experts. Former PPP champions expected to lead the discussion include Marshall Greene, Sarah Max, Muffy Roy and Dan Simoneau. Participants will learn about PPP race logistics, transitions, training tips, the course, and how to shave time. The meeting will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. U.S. Bank’s downtown Bend branch is located at 1025 N.W. Bond St. For more information, contact Molly at 541-388-0002 or at molly@mbsef.org.

again: The Bend Blues, a Central Oregon high school boys rugby team, continued their winning streak Saturday in Troutdale, beating the Reynolds Raiders 34-10. Ethan Hawes led the Blues, scoring two tries. Colton Nye, Tyler Bergrud and Kevin Baker each added one try apiece for the Bend squad, and Ben Abbot added three conversions and a penalty kick to finish the scoring. Bend will take on Columbia County today at 6 p.m. at Ponderosa Park in Bend. The Blues, now 4-0, currently lead the Rugby Oregon South Division.

Rowing • Rowing event to raise funds: An “erg-a-thonâ€? and rowing clinic will take place this Friday in Sisters to benefit a Sisters High School student who is raising funds to take part in an educational travel program. Bethanne Kronick, who serves as rowing coach for Sisters High junior Lauren White, is sponsoring the benefit event. (An ergometer is an apparatus for measuring the work performed as by a person exercising, in this case it will be measured by a rowing machine). White, a Camp Sherman resident, has been selected to travel in July to Europe as part of the People to People Ambassador program. Participants can sign up for a 20-minute time slot between 4 and 8 p.m. to erg along with Kronick, who will be rowing a marathon (26.2 miles) in an attempt to break her personal speed record. Participants are encouraged to donate $20. Prizes for the longest distance erged in 20 minutes will be awarded in different gender and age categories. To register, call Sisters Athletic Club at 541-549-6878. For more information, contact Kronick at 541-595-1857 or at bethanne@simplifynw.com. — Bulletin staff report

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BADMINTON BEND BADMINTON CLUB: Public play, Tuesdays and Sundays through winter; rackets, instruction available; cost is $7.50. Tuesdays, 7 to 9 p.m.; Sundays, 4 to 6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Mt. Bachelor Drive; 541-382-4994.

BASEBALL FRIDAY NIGHT WORKOUTS: For Little League players; Fridays, April 23, 30; ages 10 and under 6-7:30 p.m.; ages 11 and older 7:30-9 p.m.; $10 per session, three for $25; at Bend Fieldhouse, located at Vince Genna Stadium, 401 S.E. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-312-9259; www. bendelks.com; jr@bendelks.com. BEND SENIOR SOFTBALL: For players age 50 and over; season runs midApril through July; games on weekday evenings at Skyline Sports Complex; practices at Hal Puddy Field, noon to 2 p.m., Monday, Wednesday, Friday; $60 and free for ages 75 and older; new players contact Brian Crosby at 541-318-0426 or briancrosby@bendcable.com. REDMOND PANTHERS BASEBALL CLUB: Seeking players ages 7-10 (by April 30) and interested in learning to play baseball while having fun; 541-788-8520, dmerisman@ bendbroadband.com; www. leaguelineup.com/redmondbluesox.

BASKETBALL OPEN FULL AND HALF COURT:

Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; West Bend Tennis Center, 1355 W. Commerce (off NW Century Dr.); $5 per person; reservations encouraged; 541-3302112; http://reservemycourt.com.

BIKING HIGH DESERT BMX RACES: Race registration and practice 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, races at 6:30 p.m.; helmet, long-sleeved shirt and pants required; one-day free membership and gear available; at Big Sky Park, 21690 Neff Road; 541-815-6208, www.highdesertbmx. org; renegade_sjane@hotmail.com. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Dec. 12, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE COMPETITION LITE CYCLING: Professional coaching in the disciplines of mountain, road, freeride and cyclocross for participants ages 13-18; through Aug. 11, Tuesdays-Sundays from 3:45-5:45 p.m.; www.BendEnduranceAcademy. org; 541-678-3865. ROLLER RUMBLE — GOLD SPRINTS RACE SERIES: Sunday nights through May 9 at Silver Moon Brewing in Bend; registration at 6:30 p.m., races 7-10 p.m.; $5 racers; $3 spectators; 541-610-7460; info@velosprints. com; www.velosprints.com.

YOUR AWARD-WINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE:

MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE SESSION I: Begins May 3, from 4:40-6 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. CASCADE CHAINBREAKER MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE: May 9; open to all skill levels; at Cascade Timberlands’ property west of Bend off Shevlin Park Road; online registration open through May 3; $10-$28; www.webcyclery.com. CENTRAL OREGON VELO RIDE: Saturdays, starting at noon at Nancy P’s in Bend; weekly group road rides; choose one of four routes, ranging in distance from 18 to 57 miles; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675; www.centraloregonvelo.com. DIRT RIDERS NIGHT RIDES: Casual mountain bike rides on Tuesday nights; cnightingale@deschutesbrewery.com. MBSEF’S SUMMER CYCLING PROGRAM SESSION II: Begins May 31 from 4:30-6 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

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LIVING A locally written magazine devoted to the latest trends and techniques in interior design, home building, remodeling, and landscaping ... especially those that reflect the best of Central Oregon’s creative lifestyle.

MISCELLANEOUS GPS CLASS: Today, 6-9 p.m.; Redmond Area Park & Recreation District Activity Center; $40; introduction to the basics of GPS; mix of classroom and field exercise; GPS units for boats and cars are not covered; 541-280-0573. WEST POWELL BUTTE EQUESTRIAN: Western and English riding taught to all levels ages 7 and older; horses and tack provided; at Powell Butte estates from 10 a.m. to noon, Saturdays and Sundays, April 24 & 25; $50 per session; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

See Calendar / D5

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD GYMNASTICS REGION 2 CHAMPIONSHIPS In Auburn, Wash. April 9-11 (Vault, bars, beam, floor, all-around.) Cascade All-Stars results Level 10 Senior A Katelyn Ohlrich: 9.30, 9.275, 8.95, 9.05, 36.575 third place all-around (first-place bars champion; national qualifier) Level 9 Senior 1 Shelby Kine: 8.475, 8.375, 8.425, 8.75, 34.025 10th place all-around Level 9 Junior 8 Courtney Miller: 9.20, 7.775, 9.20, 8.70, 34.875 fifth place all-around (national qualifier) Level 8 senior A Brandi Jacobson: 9.175, 9.325, 9.27, 9.325, 37.10 fourth place all-around Level 8 Junior

Annica Balentine: 8.825, 9.00, 8.20, 9.30 35.325 Acrovision results Level 8 Kristen Place: 9.15 (13), 9.225 (10), 8.375 (26), 9.15 (23), 35.90 (20). Megan Markle: 8.30 (25), 8.85 (15), 8.20 (28), 8.85 (20), 34.20 (23).

BOWLING League standings and high scores April 2-8 Lava Lanes Tea Timers — The Bowling Stones, Chris Gray 234/651. Afternoon Delight — Two Dawgs and a Hot Bun, Josh Dagenais 297/624. Patti Sundita 231/559; League Champions Latecomers — No Threat, Deb Rosenthal 199/514. Progressive — CRS, Ron Wood 268/658. Free Breathers — Team Zero, Gary Davis 233/635. Ellen

Tucker 223/597. T.G.I.F. — Grayakers, Dave Whitson 253/680. Deanna Olsen 257/663. Casino Fun — Sore Thumbs, Dieryel Wade 287/749. Shelley Schwimmer 198/518. Win, Lose or Draw — No Names, Connie Preiss, Mike Preiss, Kayla Bruno, Sonny Bruno; League Champions His and Hers — Lava Lanes Pro Shop, Jayme Dahlke, Mary Stratton, Erika and Travis Holmes; League Champions Jack and Jill — Extinguishers, Zin Watford 289/708. Pennie Olson 266/595. Guys and Gals — The Weakest Link, Karen Nelson, Bill root, Ray Smith, Michelle Wallace; League Champions Early Risers — Banana Splits, Edith Roebuck 214/546. Rejects — Three Queens and a King, Roger Oleman 195/562. Sandy Weaver 198/567. Lava Lanes Classic — Leprechans, Dave Grimes 237/685. Bonni Reeves 205/555. Wednesday Inc. — At Your Site Storage, Allyn Hayes, 279/762. Jayme Dahlke 279/739.

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COMMUNITY LIFE

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

TV on the iPad Could a new class of tablet computers change how we watch TV? Page E2

E

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010

HORSE COUNTRY

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Teresa Rozic, aboard Bugsy, gets riding support from Michele Morseth during a lesson Friday near Sisters.

Fear can keep you from feeling snug in the saddle By Anne Aurand For The Bulletin

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Off-leash dog park advocate and volunteer Bob Wenger stands last week with his dog, Ryder, and his friend’s dog, Foxy, left, along a wall he built at the Ponderosa Park in Bend.

HORSE COUNTRY

Volunteerism Bob Wenger has impressed local dog owners by transforming off-leash areas

unleashed

By David Jasper The Bulletin

You can walk right by a rock wall and barely notice it’s there. Charles Pearlman, who lives in the Tanglewood neighborhood near Ponderosa Park in east Bend, is a frequent visitor to the park’s offleash area, one of the six dog parks opened last May by Bend Park & Recreation District. Pearlman says he takes Foster, his 10-yearold Australian shepherd, to the park three or four times a week. Over the past couple of months, he’s witnessed the transformation of an area roughly the size of an acre as one volunteer has cleared it of stumps and rocks, the latter used to build a low stone wall, of which he took notice. But, as impressive as that wall is, it’s the wall’s builder, Bob Wenger, who most impressed Pearlman. “He built that rock wall by himself, he pulled up all those stumps by himself. He did get some help at the end, as far as when they brought the (wood) chips in, and someone helping him spread the chips. But he was there every afternoon and did everything alone,” Pearlman says. “Quite, quite impressive.” “(He’s) out there when it’s snowing, raining, 25 degrees. I asked him, ‘Aren’t you cold?’ He’d have a T-shirt on, and he said, ‘Well, when you’re working and everything, you stay warm.’” Wenger hasn’t cooled off yet. When The Bulletin met with him last week at the park, he was spreading bark chips, his dog Ryder keeping him company. As a board member with DogPAC, a Bend nonprofit for dog owners, Wenger, 58, has long lobbied for the kinds of off-leash spaces dogs and their owners in Central Oregon craved. Wenger came to know and love Bend years ago when he was a Northwest sales rep for Pioneer Electronics, and decided to move here in 1987. “I thought this was one of the best places in the country to live,” he says. “When I had the opportunity to move here, I did.” He now owns his own business doing LED lighting, and when he’s not working, he’s often at one of Bend’s off-leash parks, building trails, lev-

SPOTLIGHT Kendama tournament at Riverfront Plaza Wabi Sabi, purveyor of “cool Japanese stuff,” will host Bend’s first kendama tournament at 1 p.m. Saturday at Riverfront Plaza in downtown Bend. Contestants will compete in

A little fear is normal, perhaps even healthy, when dealing with a thousandpound horse. “There certainly are things to be fearful of,” said Pat Marquis, a longtime rider and secretary of the local chapter of Oregon Equestrian Trails. In most accidents, “You’re the one who is going to get hurt, not the horse.” But too much fear and anxiety can interfere with the enjoyment of riding and can make a horse more challenging or dangerous. See Fear / E6

YOUR PETS Playa in the house, and out Say hello to Playa, a 3-year-old American Labrador Retriever. Playa goes to work every day with her owner Kirsti Wolfe and has become a favorite on construction job sites. She loves the beach as well as the snow. Some people call her the “rocket dog” because she can run so fast — when she’s awake. Her love is the orange rubber ball. To submit a photo for publication, e-mail a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@ bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

Bob Wenger, 58, spreads bark chips at the Ponderosa Park in Bend. Wenger is a board member with the nonprofit DogPAC, which is “dedicated to keeping Central Oregon dog-friendly and providing off-leash opportunities in city parks and on forest trails,” according to its Web site.

Get involved If you’re interested in volunteering with Bend Park & Recreation District’s off-leash areas, contact Kim Johnson, 541-389-7275.

eling ground to give dogs more room to roam and building a rock wall by hand, stone by stone, Why does he do it? “In the first place, you’re out in a great park, so you spend time out here, getting to meet lots of great people and lots of great dogs come out, so most of the experiences are really positive and rewarding. That’s part of why I do it, just to be able to improve the off-leash areas and have

divisions determined by expertise in this competition, which will be judged by Turner Thorne, Bend resident and KendamaUSA pro. Kendama is a competitive ball and cup game from Japan, believed to have come to Japan via the Silk Road during the Edo period, between 1603 and 1868, and was apparently first played by adults as a drinking game. The craze is now catching on in the United States, according to a press release for the event. Proceeds from the tournament will provide ken-

something that’s hopefully going to be here a long time.” Ponderosa isn’t even his home park. He mostly takes his dog, Ryder, to Hollinshead or Pine Nursery. At Pine Nursery, he’s made considerable contributions in the form of trails and filling 5-gallon water containers for dogs after the water is shut off for the winter. “But I always felt that this one was one that needed more open space,” he says of Ponderosa. Much of the off-leash area at the park is rough and rocky. What turf it does have was getting pretty beaten from games of fetch. “That’s one of the things that people really like is to have turf, but when you get a lot of dogs, it gets really tough. See Wenger / E6

dama for local homeless kids and will be distributed by various service organizations. Contact: 541-633-7205.

Tell the Bulletin about your social media trials Have you run into awkward situations because your boss follows you on Twitter? Have you had faceto-face reunions with old friends thanks to Facebook? Ever been “unfriended” due to perceived slights

or other drama? What did you do when your mother-in-law sent you a friend request? Ever gotten upset when you’re on deadline and your coworkers are tending their crops on Farmville? Are you the Mayor of McDonald’s thanks to your Foursquare fanaticism? The Bulletin wants to hear how social media has improved or complicated your life. Contact features reporter David Jasper at djasper@ bendbulletin.com. — From staff reports

Submitted photo

ADOPT ME Meet Goose This is Goose, a 4-year-old with a beautiful soft coat. He has been an office cat for several years, but his companion kitty just passed away and he is really lonely. He is very sweet and gentle and should be an indoor-only cat. Goose has no tail, but makes up for it with lots of extra toes. All he needs is lots of love and snuggles and someone to take extra special care of him. Veterinary support is provided for Goose. He has been neutered, is up to date on his vaccines and he is microchipped. If you would like to visit Goose, or any other animal available for adoption at the Bend Spay and Neuter Project, stop by 61344 Parrell Road in Bend or call 541-617-1010.

Submitted photo


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Teenager’s puppy love delivers a painful bite Dear Abby: I’m 13, and my “first kiss” just broke up with me. My dad says it’s just puppy love, which may be true, but I have a feeling that I need to be with him. What hurts even more is he had a new girlfriend the next day. I have tried moving on, but I don’t think I want to. I want to try to get back with him, but I don’t know how. Can you help me? — Aching Heart In Iowa Dear Aching Heart: If your “first kiss” broke up with you and had a new girlfriend the next day, what it shows about him is that he has a short attention span. I know you would like to get him back, but the word from here is: Don’t waste your time. While the end of a romance is painful, chalk it up to experience and a part of growing up. There is no growth without a little pain; and it only hurts for a little while. Trust me on that. Now a little advice womanto-woman: Once it’s over, all the note writing, phoning or conniving will not help your cause. Accept that it’s time to forget him. The longer you linger, the more foolish you will appear. So stand up straight, smile and move on. There are better days — and better boys — ahead. Dear Abby: Would you please print this to educate your readers about something I witness every summer — parents encouraging little kids to take native wildlife. I watched a 6-year-old girl show off the two palm-sized baby turtles her dad had “given” her from the lake, and put them into a plastic container to take home. Abby, they were snapping turtles! Mom won’t be pleased when those “pets” snap a finger. Then there was the mom who thought it would be fun for her 7-year-old boy to play with a few frogs in their dry, dense, sun-drenched backyard. Within an hour, the amphibians had escaped and, best guess is, they died and became dehydrated, sun-dried critters or dog food. Abby, not only is it illegal to

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DEAR ABBY take wildlife on a whim, but it’s also selfish. At a time when we’re already damaging our planet for our recreational pastimes, we need to be teaching our kids that living beings are not toys, but rather a valuable part of natural ecosystems. It’s so much more fun to observe and learn from a turtle swimming free in the lake. Please urge parents to stop being so thoughtless, or they may end up with a ticket or a missing digit. — Wildlife Preserver In Lafayette, Colo. Dear Wildlife Preserver: Well said. Children — and too many adults — act on impulse when they pick wild plants and flowers, or decide to “adopt” little feral creatures that are destined to die when taken from their natural habitat. Earth Day is April 22 — that’s Thursday — and it offers a chance for all of us to do something positive for the planet. Many parents use it as an opportunity to bond with their children, and some schools offer credit to students who participate. (Hint, hint.) Dear Abby: How do you attract single women while on a budget? — Gary In Longwood, Fla. Dear Gary: Matinees cost less for admission than late shows, and if there are any museums that are not too far away, check out free museum days. A picnic in the park or a day at the beach doesn’t cost a lot — and neither do outdoor activities such as biking or hiking. You really don’t have to have a lot of money to attract a nice woman. And anyone who makes you feel otherwise is someone you should run from. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

How the iPad could change how we watch TV By Dale Roe

The iPad’s high-resolution 9.7 inch screen is perfect for watching video content. Getting that content on the iPad is not quite so perfect.

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AUSTIN, Texas — Just over 20 years ago, a book called “The Mac is Not a Typewriter” was published. It aimed to explain the world of typography to users of Apple computers and, in a larger sense, to alert them to the expanded world of possibilities the devices afforded desktop publishers. I’m probably giving away a million-dollar idea here, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a similar title soon: “The iPad Is Not a Television.” And I believe the device has the potential to fundamentally change the way we consume television. Oh, you can watch TV on it — sort of. But it’s not a TV. The iPad is a tablet computer with a gorgeous, high-resolution 9.7-inch backlit display. The iPad is operated by touch — there are no input devices except for the 10 at the ends of your hands. It’s Wi-Fi enabled, so users can connect to the Internet to browse the Web and access e-mail (a 3G version is on the way). It’s an eBook and news reader. It runs applications, both new apps written especially for the device and the thousands that already exist for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Still, when you see it, it just looks like a screen, and its video capabilities, Internet connectivity and stunning (if smallish) display naturally spur thoughts of television-on-the-go. But if you’re one of those viewers who have ditched cable or a satellite provider in favor of watching shows online at Hulu, the iPad will probably disappoint you as a television. For starters, the device doesn’t support Flash, the format in which much online video — including the content on Hulu — is encoded. There is no Hulu app in the iTunes store, and if you surf to Hulu on the iPad and try to watch

Photo illustration by Andy Zeigert

a video, you’ll be instructed to install the uninstallable Flash plug-in. Lack of Flash is a sticking point with some people, while others (yours truly included) consider the lack of endless blinking and intrusive ads worth the inconvenience. Meanwhile, forward-thinking Web sites are moving their video content to the new HTML 5 standard supported by the iPad, and I suspect the rest will follow suit as the user base grows. Hulu executives have acknowledged that they are seeking ways to charge viewers for content (the site is currently free but generates revenue by embedding advertising into shows) and there is speculation that an iPad app with a monthly subscription fee might be forthcoming. In the meantime, if you want to watch television shows on your iPad, you do have a few options. Many series have iPad-compatible episodes available in Apple’s iTunes Store, often the day after they air on television. Individual episodes are

$1.99 for standard definition and $2.99 each for HD. Viewers with a monthly Netflix subscription (starting at $8.99) can download a free app that allows instant streaming to the iPad, although the TV and movie selection is limited and less current than iTunes’. If you’re looking for free TV, ABC has an app that streams the latest episodes of 22 primetime and four daytime shows for free, with embedded advertising. CBS.com offers full episodes of only one show, “Survivor,” but clips of other shows are available. NBC has reportedly developed an iPad app, but has not yet released it. No word from Fox. But let’s get back to that fundamental change I mentioned earlier: I believe the iPad’s real value to TV fans lies in its ability to enhance, not replace, the television watching experience. I envision living rooms with iPads (or other future tablet devices) lying on couches, ready to be picked up and cradled by TV viewers for this purpose.

Next-level apps such as MLB’s “At Bat 2010” for iPad add content for specific programming. “At Bat” offers during-game video highlights, a live game pitchby-pitch simulation, scores, stats and live audio. Subscribers to MLB.TV can also watch full, regular-season live games with play, pause and rewind capabilities (similar, though less-impressive and navigable features have been available on MLB’s iPhone app for some time). There will always be TV viewers who just want to sit alone and watch their favorite shows in silence. For those folks, the iPad offers a slightly inconvenient (and expensive) way to do that.

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EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 4/20/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News 5681 World News 204 News 98391 NBC News 17914 News 9049 News 1372 Judge Judy 8575 Inside Ed. 7198 Funniest Home Videos 5020 Jim 3285 Malcolm 5136 Electric 9407 Fetch! Ruff 730 News 4117 NBC News 6440 Reba ‘PG’ 33858 Reba ‘PG’ 66339 Christina 14488 Burt Wolf 33001 Travels 1169 Europe 2662

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 11285 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 19556 News 8285 CBS News 2865 World News 7339 Millionaire 1391 Two Men 2049 Two Men 6001 The Office 2049 The Office 6001 This Old H’se 643 Business 223 News 6681 News 7933 King 56952 King 47204 Europe 30914 Travels 54594 Old House 9575 Business 5317

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! 2117 Wheel 681 Jeopardy! 85827 Wheel 27391 Access H. 9285 Scrubs ‘14’ 8049 Ent 8339 The Insider 7575 Simpsons 3049 Simpsons 2285 Simpsons 3049 Simpsons 2285 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 7759 Live at 7 (N) 7681 Inside Ed. 3117 ’70s Show 10662 ’70s Show 43488 Garden 27952 Workshop 50778 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 67440

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 2681 Lost The Last Recruit ‘14’ 4782117 The Biggest Loser A contestant gets devastating news. (N) ’ ‘PG’ 10198 NCIS Faith ’ ‘PG’ Å 73420 NCIS: Los Angeles ‘14’ Å 94556 Dancing With the Stars ‘PG’ 45204 Lost The Last Recruit ‘14’ 2891223 American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å 89662 (8:59) Glee (N) ‘14’ Å 41775730 News 89662 Smarter 48827 Smarter 94681 The Brain in Love With Dr. Daniel Amen ’ ‘G’ Å 7533 The Biggest Loser A contestant gets devastating news. (N) ’ ‘PG’ 73484 90210 Rats and Heroes ‘14’ 15402 Life Unexpected ‘PG’ Å 94198 Woodsmith 33812 Moment 22407 Art Work 73117 Painting 52943 The Brain in Love With Dr. Daniel Amen ’ ‘G’ Å 87204

10:00

10:30

11:00

(10:02) V We Can’t Win (N) ‘14’ 2204 News 9768662 Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 22933 News 7034989 The Good Wife Bad ’ ‘14’ 97643 News 4395933 (10:02) V We Can’t Win ‘14’ 35827 Inside 47113310 News 61865 TMZ ‘PG’ 47285 King of Hill 43372 Deal-Deal 61865 Deal No 47285 South Park 43372 Magic Moments: The Best of 50’s Pop ’ ‘G’ Å 6914 Parenthood (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 22339 News 4380001 Married 63827 Married... 72575 Roseanne 61372 Mexico 70117 Julia 89865 Christina 78662 Magic Moments: The Best of 50’s Pop ’ ‘G’ Å 59933

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Name Earl 64049 South Park 64049 Jay Leno Roseanne 82049 Burt Wolf 99339

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 200575 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 423339 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 409759 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 412223 Criminal Minds ‘PG’ Å 415310 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 6661223 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 984865 (3:00) ››› “Traffic” (2000) Michael Doug- ›› “The Invasion” (2007, Science Fiction) Nicole Kidman, Daniel Craig. An epidemic ››› “Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. A hot-shot Navy jet pilot ››› “Space Cowboys” (2000, Adventure) Clint Eastwood, 102 40 39 las. Å 534914 of alien origin threatens humanity. Å 862204 downs MiGs and loves an astrophysicist. Å 208339 Tommy Lee Jones. Å 676001 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4472136 Wild Kingdom ‘PG’ Å 1843440 Fatal Attractions ‘PG’ Å 1869488 Fatal Attractions ‘14’ Å 1872952 Fatal Attractions ‘14’ Å 1882339 Fatal Attractions ‘PG’ Å 5135372 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 7094001 The Millionaire Matchmaker 885136 The Millionaire Matchmaker 750001 The Millionaire Matchmaker 317310 The Millionaire Matchmaker 393730 The Millionaire Matchmaker 313594 9 by Design (N) Å 316681 9 by Design Å 579223 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home 4608846 Smarter 6384827 Smarter 1172204 Extreme Makeover: Home 3739488 True Blue: Ten Years 3742952 Blue Collar Comedy 3752339 Gator 911 ’ Coast 3658681 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents 6383198 Marijuana Inc.: Pot Industry 385846 Carbon Hunters ’ Å 575372 Mad Money 584020 Marijuana Inc.: Pot Industry 571556 Carbon Hunters ’ Å 574643 Sexy Bodies! Business 443469 51 36 40 52 Biography on CNBC 699858 Larry King Live (N) Å 842575 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å 658223 Larry King Live Å 371515 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 121092 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 654407 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 960310 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 73556 Scrubs ’ 70469 Scrubs ’ 94049 Daily Show 41469 Colbert 83933 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 50117 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 62952 South Park 40827 South Park 96681 South Park 63865 South Park 49285 Daily Show 45372 Colbert 22594 135 53 135 47 Meet Wally The Buzz 3643 Bend City Edition G Morning 2407 Outdoors 3759 Redmond City Council 10961 RSN 22865 RSN Movie Night 65827 G Morning 27310 Health 88594 11 Capital News Today 428759 Today in Washington 213198 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 704681 Montana 510310 Phineas 517223 Deck 508575 Wizards 888223 Montana 504759 ›› “Cadet Kelly” (2002, Comedy-Drama) Hilary Duff. ’ ‘G’ Å 306204 Phineas 540858 Montana 245466 Wizards 673488 Deck 827372 87 43 14 39 Montana 875759 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 407391 Deadliest Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ 494827 Construction Intervention (N) 497914 Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Å 773579 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 970662 Cash Cab 606575 Cash Cab 603488 Cash Cab 687440 Deadliest Catch: Best of 498643 SportsCenter (Live) Å 679681 Baseball Tonight Å 867759 SportsCenter (Live) Å 876407 Baseball Tonight Å 856643 SportsCenter (Live) Å 859730 SportsCenter (Live) Å 474223 21 23 22 23 30 for 30 (N) 328285 College Football All-Star Challenge Å 5369730 Nation 1170846 30 for 30 (N) Å 3720730 SportsNation Å 3740594 NASCAR 7470914 NBA 7489662 Drag Racing 6011448 22 24 21 24 (4:00) SportsCenter Å 6394204 Boxing 5859952 Seats 9927533 Seats 4777830 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 5855136 College Basketball 1992 NCAA Tournament -- Duke vs. Kentucky 8901310 23 25 123 25 College Football 2004 UCLA at Washington From Sept. 18, 2004. 3592136 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 216001 70s Show 230681 Funniest Home Videos 472858 Funniest Home Videos 177466 America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Å 927943 The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 278001 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 586372 Hannity (N) 2356020 On the Record 1042778 The O’Reilly Factor 1028198 Hannity 1031662 On the Record 1041049 Glenn Beck 2684643 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 5514374 Home 4792440 Cooking 4722681 Minute 4713933 Challenge 1852198 Cakes 7013136 Cakes 7092643 Chefs vs. City 1874310 Chopped (N) 1851469 Good Eats Unwrap 9785681 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Mariners 78001 Mariners 92681 MLB Baseball Baltimore Orioles at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. (Live) 522914 Mariners 45469 MLB Baseball: Orioles at Mariners 272407 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 8 48372 That ’70s Show ›› “Untraceable” (2008, Suspense) Diane Lane, Billy Burke. 1965402 ›› “S.W.A.T.” (2003, Action) Samuel L. Jackson, Colin Farrell, Michelle Rodriguez. 5436556 Justified (N) ‘MA’ 4960117 (11:01) Justified ‘MA’ 2699575 131 Buck 6589594 Holmes in New Orleans ‘G’ 1228010 House 2707575 House 6566643 First 2716223 My First Place Home Rules (N) ‘G’ Å 9903579 House 5600846 House 5619594 My First Place Marriage 1314827 176 49 33 43 Income 2727339 How the Earth Was Made 8399136 Modern Marvels ‘G’ Å 4856827 Ancient Aliens Seeking clues about ancient aliens. (N) ‘PG’ Å 4869391 Ancient Aliens Investigating aliens. ‘PG’ Å 95952846 155 42 41 36 How the Earth Was Made 8441914 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 471001 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 749152 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 777420 ›› “The Brave One” (2007, Suspense) Jodie Foster, Terrence Howard. Å 437914 Will 560594 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ 599846 Rachel Maddow Show 41284020 Countdown 76629952 Rachel Maddow Show 76605372 Hardball Å 76625136 Countdown 76628223 Rachel Maddow Show 75088846 56 59 128 51 Countdown 57003662 16 and Pregnant Nicole ‘14’ 737097 16 and Pregnant Leah ’ ‘14’ 741933 16 and Pregnant Lizzie ‘14’ 527932 16 and Pregnant Kailyn ‘14’ 327169 16 and Pregnant (N) ’ ‘14’ 258933 192 22 38 57 Pregnant 255846 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ Å 752049 Sponge 604117 iCarly ‘G’ 694730 Big Time 618310 iCarly ‘G’ 958440 Sponge 614594 Malcolm 974488 Malcolm 986223 Chris 771488 Chris 218594 Lopez 561198 Lopez 570846 Nanny 776933 Nanny 380310 82 46 24 40 Sponge 978204 Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ 322778 Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘MA’ 910117 Deadliest Warrior (N) ’ ‘14’ 963830 Deadliest Warrior (N) ’ ‘14’ 336310 Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ 919827 132 31 34 46 Deadliest 449240 Deadliest Warrior ’ ‘14’ 963010 Stargate SG-1 ‘PG’ Å 3346223 Star Trek: Next Gener. 9119310 Star Trek: Next Gener. 9195730 Star Trek: Next Generation 9115594 WWE NXT ’ ‘PG’ Å 9118681 › “Beowulf” (1999) Å 3828223 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘PG’ 3579484 Behind 7621310 J. Meyer 7083865 Hagee 7080778 Hillsong 7064730 Praise the Lord Å 2378223 ACLJ 5721223 Dino ‘G’ 8146339 Heritage 4145049 Changing-World The Lazarus Phenomenon 3612827 205 60 130 Friends 697952 Friends 694865 Office 685117 Seinfeld 965865 Seinfeld 674001 Office 941285 Office 953020 Office 328310 Office 841846 Office 110488 Office 129136 Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 641933 16 27 11 28 King 945001 ›› “Knights of the Round Table” (1953) Robert Taylor, Ava Gardner. A royal love ››› “Quo Vadis?” (1951, Historical Drama) Robert Taylor, Deborah Kerr, Peter Ustinov. A Roman officer is persecuted for loving ››› “Ivanhoe” (1952, Adventure) Robert Taylor, Elizabeth Taylor. A 12th-century 101 44 101 29 a Christian. Å 1668049 Saxon defends King Richard the Lion-Hearted. Å 3746778 triangle divides Arthur’s Round Table. Å (DVS) 7243575 Say Yes 957827 Say Yes 971407 Ultimate Cake Off ‘PG’ Å 339407 Your Kid Ate What? (N) ‘PG’ 315827 19 Kids 607310 19 Kids 113556 Little 473440 Little 499488 Your Kid Ate What? ’ ‘PG’ 937223 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ 236846 NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Lakers (Live) Å 521407 Inside the NBA (Live) Å 329020 Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ 935865 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Boston Celtics (Live) Å 500914 Chowder 2790285 Chowder 6552440 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 6573933 Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Garfield 2796469 Chowder 2708204 Codename: Kid Ed, Edd 5659541 King-Hill 5606020 King-Hill 5682440 Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 41284020 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 76629952 Bizarre Foods: Asia 76605372 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 76625136 Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ Food Wars ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 57003662 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 7000662 Sanford 4715391 Home Improve. Home Improve. Raymond Ray 4459285 Ray 5752846 Ray 5761594 Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ Law & Order: SVU 837643 Law & Order: SVU 971579 Law & Order: SVU 971399 Law & Order: SVU 828653 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 826420 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 649575 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 962778 Chilli 702339 Beauty 786391 Tough Love Couples ’ ‘14’ 573914 Brandy & Ray J 582662 RuPaul’s Drag Race ’ ‘14’ 579198 Basketball Wives Chilli 657575 Sober House With Dr. Drew 188020 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives Chilli 772198 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ›› “Hancock” Å 8272310 (6:10) ›› “Mars Attacks!” 1996 Jack Nicholson. ‘PG-13’ Å 14238285 ››› “The Mask” 1994 Jim Carrey. ‘PG-13’ 9619198 (9:45) ›› “Bachelor Party” 1984 Tom Hanks. ‘R’ Å 68492402 › Surfer, Dude ›› “The Vanishing” 1993, Suspense Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ Å 4568407 ›› “The Fly II” 1989, Science Fiction Eric Stoltz. ‘R’ Å 4073933 ›› “The Adventures of Ford Fairlane” 1990, Comedy ‘R’ Å 4851372 “Weekend at Bernie’s” 5351402 Snow 1058020 Snow 3596049 Daily 3586662 Free Flow Tour Moto 1045556 Update 3573198 Snow 1054204 Snow 1073339 Daily 2057594 Ride Open Terjes 7757372 Moto 7766020 Firsthand Props 3083469 John Daly 963372 John Daly 699285 Being John Daly (N) 208117 Fabulous World of Golf 414681 Golf 969556 PGA Tour 971391 Being John Daly 410865 Fabulous World of Golf 413952 Lessons 761001 PGA Tour 382778 7th Heaven ’ ‘G’ Å 8449556 Golden 9475952 Golden 9466204 Golden 8440285 Golden 9462488 Touched by an Angel ‘G’ 4863117 “Daniel’s Daughter” (2008, Drama) Laura Leighton. ‘PG’ Å 4866204 Golden 6564543 Golden 8602372 (3:15) ›››› “The Dark Knight” 2008 › “Bride Wars” 2009, Comedy Kate Hudson, Anne Hathaway, ›› “Four Christmases” 2008, Romance-Comedy Vince Vaughn, “Burma VJ: Reporting From a Closed Country” 2008, Documen- Treme LaDonna receives news. ’ ‘MA’ Treme: Beyond HBO 425 501 425 10 Christian Bale. Å 87447827 270812 tary Premiere. ’ ‘NR’ 996020 Å 476681 Kristen Johnston. ’ ‘PG’ Å 109407 Robert Duvall. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 184198 (3:45) ››› “Seven” ‘R’ 33305223 Arrested 1152440 Arrested 1176020 Wrong 6384827 Modern 1172204 Ideal (N) 6393575 Monty Python ››› “Bad Lieutenant” 1992 Harvey Keitel. 4820933 Advantage ‘MA’ The Business Rollins 3658681 IFC 105 105 (4:15) ›› “In Dreams” 1999 Annette Ben- ›› “The Mothman Prophecies” 2002, Suspense Richard Gere. A moth-like being is a ›› “Orphan” 2009, Horror Vera Farmiga, Peter Sarsgaard. An adopted child’s angelic ›› “Ronin” 1998, Action Robert De Niro, Jean Reno. Five espionage specialists must MAX 400 508 7 ing. ’ ‘R’ Å 50530952 town’s harbinger of doom. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 822579 face hides a demonic heart. ’ ‘R’ Å 872074 find a special briefcase. ’ ‘R’ Å 6098575 Titanic: How It Really Sank 1046285 Naked Science ‘G’ 4375778 Explorer (N) 5075169 Titanic: How It Really Sank 3075989 Naked Science ‘G’ 3170533 Explorer 9313710 Hard Time Breakout ‘14’ 1499310 NGC 157 157 Avatar 1065310 Avatar 3503339 Back, Barnyard Back, Barnyard OddParents OddParents Avatar 1061594 Avatar 1040001 Mighty B 2031556 Mighty B 4352827 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2036001 Rocko 3090759 NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Outdrs 4707372 Hunting 4704285 Hunting 4728865 Game Chasers Dream 4724049 Hunting 7088440 Nugent 7007575 Hunting 5677469 Hunting 4451643 Bone 5754204 Steve’s 5763952 Inside Outdoors Manage. 9767285 OUTD 37 307 43 ››› “Music From Another Room” 1998, Romance Jude Law. iTV. A man feels fated ›› “But I’m a Cheerleader” 1999, Comedy-Drama Natasha Nurse Jackie ’ › “I Hate Valentine’s Day” 2009, Romance-Comedy Nia VarUnited States of Nurse Jackie ’ United States of SHO 500 500 to marry an engaged woman. ’ ‘PG-13’ 105556 Lyonne, Bud Cort. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å 819933 dalos, John Corbett. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ 749440 ‘MA’ 118020 Tara ‘MA’ 194440 ‘MA’ 312759 Tara ‘MA’ 902556 Race in 60 (N) 7617117 NASCAR Hall of Fame 8134594 Dangerous Drives ‘14’ 7601989 Pass Tm 7627594 Hub 7606001 Race in 60 5706353 NASCAR Hall of Fame 2556830 Dangerous Drives ‘14’ 2374407 SPEED 35 303 125 (5:05) ›› “Race to Witch Mountain” 2009 Dwayne Johnson. 18619198 (6:50) ›› “Spy Game” 2001 Robert Redford. ’ ‘R’ Å 40753488 ›› “Bedtime Stories” 2008 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG’ Å 7921759 (10:50) “Rush Hour 2” ’ 54020310 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) “Spiral” 2007, Drama Joel Moore. ’ “Nobel Son” 2007, Suspense Alan Rickman, Bryan Greenberg, Shawn Hatosy. A › “Bangkok Dangerous” 2008, Action Nicolas Cage, Shahkrit Yamnarm. A hit man ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer, Ben KingsTMC 525 525 ‘PG-13’ Å 69606662 becomes an unlikely mentor to a street punk. ’ ‘R’ Å 931914 ley. A couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ 212391 prize-winning scientist’s son is kidnapped. ’ ‘R’ 936469 NHL Hockey: Penguins at Senators 3616339 NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Nashville Predators 6908001 NHL Hockey 2729681 Hockey 4451643 Sports Soup Sports 5763952 The Daily Line 5142662 VS. 27 58 30 48 Hours on WE ‘14’ Å 7602285 48 Hours on WE ‘14’ Å 8129662 48 Hours on WE ‘14’ Å 9306317 Golden 7612662 Golden 7608469 Golden 5716391 Golden 8131407 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 8269718 I Want to Save I Want to Save WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY TALK OF THE TOWN/TOWN HALL: A televised town hall with gubernatorial candidates; each will speak on their vision for Oregon, followed by questions from the audience; $25 in advance, $35 day of event; 8 a.m., registration begins 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www. bendchamber.org. “ALTERNATE METHODS OF RESEARCH — CASE STUDIES”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Teddie Allison; free; 10 a.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-8978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. SCIENCE PUB: James Cassidy talks about organic produce, clean soil and local food; free; 5:30 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “CABINS, MOCKINGBIRDS AND HELP, WHITE WOMEN WRITING BLACK STORIES”: Annemarie Hamlin talks about white women novelists who have produced some of America’s most enduring portraits of racism; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www. dpls.us/calendar. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: ”Asiemut” tells the story of a FrenchCanadian couple who bike through Asia; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174.

WEDNESDAY “STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS”: A screening of the documentary about the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and 1960s, from the point of view of female grass-roots leaders; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 5:30 p.m.; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541536-0515 or www.dpls.us/calendar. BOOMERS AFTER HOURS: Learn ways to stay engaged and participate in volunteer opportunities after retirement; registration required; $25; 5:30-7 p.m.; Trattoria Sbandati, 1444 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “STANDING ON MY SISTERS’ SHOULDERS”: A screening of the documentary about the civil rights movement in Mississippi in the 1950s and 1960s, from the point of view of female grass-roots leaders; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541312-1070 or www.dpls.us/calendar. THE GREATEST SILENCE — RAPE IN THE CONGO: A screening of the film about sexual assault in the Democratic Republic of Congo; free; 6:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Wille Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837412 or www.cocc.edu/mcc-events. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

THURSDAY GARDEN CLEANUP DAYS: Clean, prepare and plant in the garden; bring gloves and garden tools; free; 1-4 p.m.; Willow Creek Community Garden, Northeast 10th and B streets, Madras; 541-460-4023. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: Discuss the book and the film “Wonder Boys” by Michael Chabon; free; 6 p.m.;

Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls.us/calendar. COWBOYS 4 KIDS: Featuring Western entertainment, including live music, swing dancers and a cowboy poet; event also includes a silent auction and a raffle; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon, KIDS Center, Saving Grace and SMART; $12; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-355-5600 or http:// cowboys4kids. kintera.org/CrookCounty. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Suzanne Burns reads from her poetry chapbook “The Widow,” with presentations by Will Akin and Tony Topoleski; free; 7-8:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. INTERNATIONAL DOCUMENTARY CHALLENGE SCREENING: A screening of short films from the challenge; $10; 7 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541549-8800. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. COMEDY SHOW: Randy Liedtke will perform a night of comedy, with Kyle Kinane; ages 21 and older; $10; 8 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541749-2440. LAST BAND STANDING: Preliminaries for a battle of the bands, which will compete through a series of rounds; $3 in advance, $5 at the door; 8-11 p.m.; Boondocks Bar & Grill, 70 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-388-6999. THE EXPENDABLES: The Santa Cruz, Calif.-based ska band performs, with Tomorrows Bad Seeds and Dirty Penny; $15 plus service charges in advance, $18 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Sisters Chorale presents a festival under the direction of Irene Liden, with guest appearances by the Cascade Brass Quintet, Adele McCready, The Forefathers and the Sisters High Desert Bell Choir; followed by a reception; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037, lidenmezzo@bendbroadband.com or www.sisterschorale.com. UNCLE PHIL’S DINER: Experience the fabulous ’50s, with live music, dancing and food; proceeds benefit the church’s mission trip; $10; 7-9 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822 or info@ eastmontchurch.com. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.cascadestheatrical. org. “THE BLIND SIDE”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. OREGON CANNABIS TAX ACT AWARENESS TOUR: Featuring performances by John Trudell, Tim Pate and friends and The State of Jefferson; proceeds benefit the tax act; $29.50 in advance, $35 at the door; 8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Hooker Creek Event Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 800-723-0188 or http://cannabistaxact.org. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8-11 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846 or drjhammond@ oldshoepress.com. TONY FURTADO: Portland-based roots rocker performs; $10 plus service charges; 8 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; www.bendticket.com. HILLSTOMP: Portland-based junkyard blues duo performs; $8; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

SATURDAY

FRIDAY “AMERICAN SUENO”: The bilingual production tells the story of four marginalized individuals in pursuit of the American dream; preceded by a recital of student work; free; 6 p.m.; Obsidian Middle School, 1335 S.W. Obsidian Ave., Redmond; 541-923-4900, ext. 3304. “BACK TO THE GARDEN”: A screening of the documentary about people who lived off the land in the 1980s, and how their lives have changed since then; $8.50, $6.50 students 18 and younger with ID, $6 ages 65 and older and ages 12 and younger; 6 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800. YOUTH MUSIC EVENT: Featuring live music by We Are Brontosaurus and The Autonomics, an open mic and gaming; proceeds benefit HospitalTeenFund.org; free, donations accepted; 6 p.m.midnight; CAT6 Video Game Lounge, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #1003, Bend; 541-815-2259 or www. hospitalteenfund.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from and discusses her novel “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5261491. SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL: The

REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 12 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495 or http:// redmondgrange.org. HOPE ON THE SLOPES: See how many vertical feet you can ski in a day; registration requested; proceeds benefit Relay for Life; $25 registration, $20 lift tickets; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Clearing Rock Bar at Mt. Bachelor, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-504-4920, Stefan.Myers@ cancer.org or http://bendrelay.com. MARCH FOR BABIES: A 5K walk to raise awareness and support for March of Dimes; donations accepted; 9 a.m., 8 a.m. registration; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-686-2170 or www. marchforbabies.org. ARBOR DAY: Event includes special talks, nature walks, kids’ activities, crafts and more; $3, $2 children, free for members of the nature center; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. FUR TRADER DAYS: Learn what it was like to be a fur trapper in 1825; talk to live trappers, dig roots, make pemmican and more; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free

ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. GARDEN MARKET: Featuring a variety of garden products, tools, plants and more; part of the Spring Gardening Seminar and Garden Market; 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-548-6088, ext. 7969. EARTH DAY FAIR: Includes interactive displays, art, live music, performances and handson activities; sculptures from Trashformations will be on display; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908, ext. 15 or www.envirocenter.org. PROCESSION OF THE SPECIES: Parade features people of all ages dressed as their favorite plant or animal; free; 11 a.m. parade, 10:30 a.m. staging begins on Louisiana Avenue; downtown Bend; 541-3856908, ext. 15 or www.envirocenter. org. UNCLE PHIL’S DINER: Experience the fabulous 50s, with live music, dancing and food; proceeds benefit the church’s mission trip; $10; noon-2 p.m.; Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; 541-382-5822 or info@ eastmontchurch.com. KENDAMA TOURNAMENT: Contestants compete in the ball-and-cup game, in divisions determined by expertise; proceeds will purchase kendama games for homeless children; $5; 1 p.m.; Riverfront Plaza, next to Mirror Pond Gallery, 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-633-7205. “CABINS, MOCKINGBIRDS AND HELP, WHITE WOMEN WRITING BLACK STORIES”: Annemarie Hamlin talks about white women novelists who have produced some of America’s most enduring portraits of racism; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541312-1080 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “ICONS OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT”: Regina Sullivan highlights the iconic men and women of the civil rights movement; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177040 or www.dpls.us/calendar. “BACK TO THE GARDEN”: A screening of the documentary about people who lived off the land in the 1980s, and how their lives have changed since then; $6; 4 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800. “JUSTICE FOR GAZA”: Jessica Campbell speaks about her participation in the Gaza Freedom March in December; donations accepted; 4-6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. CYCLING PRESENTATION: Peter Strause speaks about biking through Oregon and Washington; reservations requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. SEVEN PEAKS SCHOOL AUCTION: Featuring a dinner, with live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit Seven Peaks School and Family Access Network; $75; 5 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-382-7755. “BACK TO THE GARDEN”: A screening of the documentary about people who lived off the land in the 1980s, and how their lives have changed since then; $8.50, $6.50 students 18 and younger with ID, $6 ages 65 and older and ages 12 and younger; 6 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541549-8800. ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: Drum circle followed by a bonfire and community sweat; free; 6-8 p.m.; Steve and Teri’s home, 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. DANCE PERFORMANCE: Gotta Dance presents a showcase of tap, ballet, hip-hop, jazz and aerial dance; proceeds will offset travel costs for students; $10; 6 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-0807.

M T For Tuesday, April 20

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

CHLOE (R) 12:20, 2:55, 5:40, 8:20 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8:10 GREENBERG (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:30, 8:15 THE LAST SONG (PG) Noon, 2:45, 5:25, 7:55 A PROPHET (R) 12:30, 5, 8 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:20, 8:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 9:50 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 11:50

a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 7:55, 10:25 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) Noon, 2:35, 5:20, 6:45, 8, 9:25, 10:35 CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:20, 10:05 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 1:45, 2:25, 4:10, 5:10, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 9:55 DEATH AT A FUNERAL (R) 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 6:40, 9:15 GREEN ZONE (R) 11:45 a.m., 3:50, 6:35, 9:30 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) 12:15, 2:40, 5:25, 8:05, 10:30 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 11:10 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:30, 9:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:40 KICK-ASS (R) 11:25 a.m., 12:20, 2:10, 4:20, 5, 7:10, 7:50, 10, 10:40 THE LAST SONG (PG) 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:15

LETTERS TO GOD (PG) 12:25, 3:55 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

13) 3:45, 6:15, 9:15 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30 KICK-ASS (R) 4, 6:30, 9

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) AVATAR (PG-13) 5 EDITOR’S NOTE: “Asiemut” will screen at 9 p.m. tonight as part of the WebCyclery Movie Night Series.

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 6:30 DATE NIGHT (PG-13) 7 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 6:30 KICK-ASS (R) 6:45

PINE THEATER

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 4, 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

Judu Bottoni / The Associated Press

Chef Emeril Lagasse hosts his radio show “Cooking with Emeril,” on Martha Stewart Living Radio, at his flagship restaurant, Emeril’s Restaurant in New Orleans, on March 25. Chef Emeril opened Emeril’s Restaurant twenty years ago on March 26, 1990.

With Martha’s help, Emeril going strong 20 years on By Mary Foster The Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS — Nearly 20 years after Emeril Lagasse begged, borrowed and scrounged every penny he could to open his own restaurant, the celebrity chef worried it was all slipping away. Lagasse’s 17-year run on the Food Network was over. Hurricane Katrina had caused at least a $1 million loss to his three New Orleans-based restaurants and cut his profits by a third. But just when things were looking bleakest — Bam! — Martha Stewart kicked it up a notch and the 50-year-old Lagasse is back. “She showed up at a tough time when I thought the whole ship might be going down,” Lagasse said during a recent interview. “Basically, what I have now is a business partner.” He also has a string of successful restaurants, a new television program, regular appearances in Stewart’s magazines, and has a 10-cookbook publishing deal (the third of which will be released in June). Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, the New York-based media and merchandising company founded by the domesticity maven, in 2008 bought the rights to Lagasse’s franchise of cookbooks, television shows and kitchen products from him for $45 million in cash and $5 million in stock. The final price could rise to up to $70 million. “Maybe it didn’t save me, but it sure gave me some breathing room and got the banks off my back,” Lagasse said. Stewart said she has admired Lagasse since before he opened his first restaurant, and credits him with helping take food television mainstream. “His remarkable talents in the kitchen and his high-energy exuberance delight and inform,” she said. “He made television cooking programs mainstream, opening the category to new audiences and proving that cooking is something everyone can enjoy.” Despite his astounding success, Lagasse, who celebrated the 20th anniversary of opening his first restaurant last month, said the restaurant business is fraught with peril, and a big blow can topple even the most carefully built achievements. “It takes a lot more than good cooking to make a restaurant

a success,” said Eric Linquest, president of Emeril’s corporation, who has been with Lagasse from the start. “You have to watch thefts, food that’s not used, all kinds of expenses. Part of his success is that Emeril has built a core group of people who are very loyal to him and put them in his restaurants.” There was no problem giving up the rights to the 15 cookbooks he has written, Lagasse said. Or products, like “Emeril’s Kicked Up Seafood,” his essences and rubs, sauces and salsas, his cookware, cutlery, tableware and textiles, apparel and gifts. “I don’t have any regrets,” he said. “The experience with Martha Stewart has been delightful. She’s a smart lady and a hard worker. My little bit just fits into a corner of her empire, and I’m happy to be there.” Lagasse’s troubles started when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, flooding 80 percent of the city and forcing a complete evacuation of residents. The storm damaged his three restaurants — Emeril’s, NOLA and Delmonico’s — and destroyed Lagasse’s Mississippi home. “What a tough time,” said Linquest. “We spent easily a million dollars getting the restaurants back in shape. And overnight a third of the revenue of the company disappeared.” There were also uninsured losses like $650,000 in wine at Delmonico’s and $550,000 in wine at NOLA. And even though Emeril’s was reopened in early December 2005, and NOLA a few weeks later, Delmonico’s was closed for over a year because of damage to the building. In the deal with Stewart, Lagasse retained his 13 restaurants that dot the landscape from Las Vegas to Pennsylvania, each an obvious labor of love. Sitting in his namesake restaurant in New Orleans, in his crisp, white chef’s coat with “Emeril’s” stitched in green over his heart, his winning smile quick, the conversation ebullient. It’s hard to imagine that Lagasse feels more comfortable in any other setting. He’s not sure if he wants more restaurants in his chain, however. He says he turns down 40 to 50 proposals a year. “I’m finally off the roller coaster ride I’ve been on for 35 years,” said Lagasse, who has two grown daughters, a 7-year-oldson and 5-year-old daughter.


E4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, April 20, 2010: Opportunities will knock on the door of positive Rams. Your circle of friends will grow larger and larger. Networking for business or pleasure could be more important than you can imagine. You develop a whole new group of friends who are always there for you, pushing the cause. Be careful what you wish for. You are a strong manifester. If you are single, you could meet someone very alluring and enticing. Give yourself a full year to get to know this person. If you are attached, the two of you will enjoy realizing one of your life goals together. CANCER’s moods make him or her interesting. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might be surprised by the effect a family member or a domestic issue has on you. You cannot get around this problem. It needs to be handled. Your innate resourcefulness emerges. Tonight: Happy at home. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your way of making a point works better than you think. Others heartily agree. A meeting nearly seems like a celebration and could surprise you. When people relax, you get to know them even better. Tonight: Hang out. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Whether you are dealing with your budget or someone else’s, you could have a devil-

may-care attitude. Optimism seems to stem from you, and that can create greater lucre. Still, be very careful, especially if the budget is not yours. Tonight: Buy a small treat on the way home. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your happy-go-lucky way draws a lot of people. It is apparent, however, that someone feels very challenged. Don’t get into a power play or a game. Allow this person to deal with his or her feelings, not you! Tonight: Whatever pleases you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Whether consciously or not, others bestow a lot of power and respect on you. With the feedback of others, you hear news that makes you rethink a situation. Someone certainly does everything he or she can to ease your path. Tonight: Count on being up late. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Someone seems to be doing all your footwork and asking all your questions for you. Decide if this is OK, or would you prefer to take a stand and not let others walk all over your boundaries? You might be surprised by how nice someone can be when given an ultimatum. Tonight: Schedule a getaway. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Once more, a partner goes out of his or her way. You might be uncomfortable with this person’s gestures, but on the other hand, it helps you. Let this person make a difference and lighten your load. Tonight: Visit over dinner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Others think they are

making the choices. Let them. But without your imagination, others would experience less success. A brainstorming session emphasizes that point one more time. You don’t need to toot your own horn! Tonight: “Yes” works well. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Focus on accomplishing what you must. Your mind is on other matters closer to home. You might be surprised by what greets you involving your house, real estate and/or a domestic matter. Be upbeat. Tonight: Hurry home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your energy soars when dealing with a problem. Try to take an overview. Sometimes this might look like walking out the door for a walk or taking a drive. Others receive your good will in much the same way that you receive theirs. Tonight: Make weekend plans. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You want to bottom-out an issue and strip it down to the very basic elements. You are willing to give a lot, not just financially but emotionally, intellectually and any other way you can. Talk about alternatives. Tonight: Your home is your castle. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Your upbeat style attracts many people. The problem lies in getting anything done. You could be overwhelmed by everything that you have to deal with. Sort through and prioritize. Schedule a talk for the end of the day. Tonight: Out and about. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Fear Continued from E1 Marquis, a trail rider, said it’s crucial that the rider has the right frame of mind before working effectively with a horse: “It’s hard to get the respect of your animal if you’re fearful,” he said. An anxious rider is likely to stiffen up, pull the reins, squeeze with his legs, or breathe high in the chest, all things that compromise the rider’s balance and send stress and mixed messages to the horse, said Sisters trainer Michele Morseth. Once a horse is feeling nervous, she said, it looks for danger in the environment, is more like to spook and less likely to pay attention to the rider, and that’s generally a recipe for trouble. “Horses are very sensitive to the emotions and actions and tensions in the rider,” Morseth said. As a teacher, Morseth kept hearing about people’s fears during riding lessons. But she didn’t feel equipped to deal with the fear aspect of riding. So, last year she called on her sister, a psychologist, to team with her and offer clinics to help riders

If you go What: Ride Without Fear Clinics When: May 8–11; June 26–29; Sept. 4–7 Where: 17277 Kent Road, Sisters Cost: $600 for four days; six to eight participants maximum; bring own horse Contact: 541-504-0494 or SitTheTrot.com

overcome fear. One four-day clinic is coming up in May (see “If you go”). Morseth said her clinics draw recreational and competitive riders, and everyone in between. Some attendees have had accidents that they haven’t gotten over, some are just inexperienced or lack confidence in their riding. “Fear is rational. Something happens and you’re afraid. Anxiety is anticipation of something happening, when the world is calm and you’re anticipating something bad happening and you’re anxious. We teach the difference,” Morseth said. The clinics, at Morseth’s prop-

erty in Sisters, teach mental and physical exercises for overcoming anxiety and riding with a confident, comfortable posture that should improve the conduct of the horse. Morseth, 52, relies heavily on her experience with the Feldenkrais method of body awareness and movement in teaching how to ride with calm, balanced breath and movement. Deb Pence, a 46-year-old Oregon State University teacher in Corvallis, brought her horse over for a clinic after she found her riding handicapped by her fear. Pence didn’t start riding lessons until her mid-30s. She says she was probably too inexperienced for the fancy dressage horse she bought: “He was a bit more than I could handle.” She realized her tense body language — grabbing the horse with her knees, tightening her muscles into a fetal position — disrupted her balance and created behavioral problems in the horse. During Morseth’s clinic, she realized the source of her anxiety was unfounded. “I was afraid off falling off my horse, which had only happened once,” she said. “I was not even

hurt in the process.” “He would react badly to my attempts to balance myself using (the) reins, understandably so, which in turn made me grab harder onto (the) reins. This began his spooking spell. He seemed to be always worrying, anticipating that at any second without warning, I would balance myself with (the) reins,” she said. (Tension on reins is uncomfortable in a horse’s mouth.) “If he saw a cat, he was sure I would lose my balance and grab his face,” she said. He would lunge forward, as if to pre-empt her pulling the reins. In the clinic she learned a visualizing technique. She imagined “the cat who was about to jump up on the wall floating away in a soap bubble. I would then pop the bubble, by saying out loud, ‘pop.’ Of course this made my fellow boarders think me a lunatic, but I never gave it a second thought because it worked so well,” she said. “I have found that the balance was essential and the ability to remove anticipation has been crucial to my success,” she said. Anne Aurand can be reached at aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

PETS CALENDAR Please e-mail event information to pets@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0358.

GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS ALL FOR DOGS: In-store adoptions; 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 1; Bend Pet Express – East, 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive, Bend; www.allfordogsrescue.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidence-building skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-312-3766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desertsageagility.com. BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. DOG SCOOTERING FUN RUN:

How to help Fido fight fat The Washington Post Adapted from a “Checkup” wellness blog article by Dr. Ernie Ward, author of “Chow Hounds: Why Our Dogs Are Getting Fatter.” For the past decade we’ve been assaulted with frightening facts about obesity, obesity-related diseases, obesity-related deaths, obesity-related everything. While we were obsessing over our own obesity, man’s best friend has been turning into man’s best blimp. For the past three years our organization, The Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), has been tracking the rate of super-sized pets. In 2009, our study estimated 45 percent of adult dogs and 58 percent of U.S. cats were too heavy. Worse yet, about 9 percent of dogs and 21 percent of cats were classified as clinically obese. That equals 89 million pets that need to lose weight. What’s a pet lover to do, then? Step one: Calculate how many calories your pet needs each day. It’s probably a lot less than you’re currently feeding. Talk with your veterinarian or visit APOP’s Web site to get started. Step two: Trash your treats. Pet treats are so loaded with sugar and fat I call them “kibble crack.” If the treat contains added sugar or fat or has more than 15 calories, give it to a shelter.

Starts at 9 a.m. May 1; location to be announced based on weather and conditions; Karen Yeargain, 541-410-8475.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. COW WORK WITH INSTRUCTION: Develop confidence and cow sense in your horse, while learning to control and move the cow; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie, 541-2806622, or Victoria, 541-280-2782. MINI REINING CLINIC: Alternating beginning and advanced sessions focus on refinement of reining maneuvers and skills for showing; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo;

Stephanie, 541-280-6622, or Victoria, 541-280-2782. BARRELS/POLES PRACTICE: $20 non-Rim Rock Riders members, $5 members; 6 p.m. Thursdays; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Rd., Powell Butte; Deanna at wolkau@gmail or 541317-1488 or 541-323-6040. SPRING FLING ALL-BREED OPEN HORSE SHOW: High-Point series with prizes and ribbons; $8 per class, $50 per day; 7:30-9:30 a.m. registration, show starts 10 a.m. Saturday; Old Twin Willows Ranch, 65745 White Rock Loop, Bend; Ashley at 541-419-4855 or tumaloequestriancenter@gmail.com. 2ND ANNUAL TRAIL COURSE EVENT: Oregon Trail Appaloosa Club invites all breeds to participate; 10 a.m. Saturday; Rolling M Ranch, 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Donita Elbert at 541420-6846 or www.otahc.org. WINTER PLAYDAY: Four events;

$35 per person; 8:45-9:45 sign up, 10 a.m. start Saturday; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; Pam at 541410-3536 or pam@bendcable.com. WINTER BARRELS SERIES: Cosponsored race sign up 8:30-9:30, 10 a.m. start Sunday; barrels sign up 10:30-11:30, noon start; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; Deanna at 541317-1488 or wolkau@gmail.com. WESTERN VERSATILITY HORSE SHOW: All breeds welcome; $10 fee per rider, $30 per event; 9 a.m. May 2, Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Rd., Powell Butte; Bobbi at 541-4080865 or rrrfacility@yahoo.com. OREGON EQUESTRIAN TRAILS MEETING: Social hour and potluck 6 p.m., meeting 7 p.m. May 4; Deschutes County Posse Building, 65432 Pleasant Ridge Rd,; 541420-9398 or centraloregon@ oregonequestriantrails.org.

Wenger

areas in the country. “It’s a 17acre park, so there’s a lot of potential,” he says. Continued from E1 The off-leash areas are for dog “You either have to close off owners as much as they are for areas and rotate it and reseed dogs. Maybe more so, he says. “It’s really not for dogs. It’s it, and hopefully have other areas that don’t have turf that for people with dogs. They’re people can use for heavy dog probably the largest user group play or fetch activities. That’s that I see out here, other than people who are playing orgawhat this project’s all about.” The open area in the park nized sports. They’re the people who are in the parks the has been increased most, and we do need to by about a third. provide space and opThe wall separates portunities for them to the newly leveled recreate with their dogs open area from the the way that they prefer, more wooded space which is off-leash.” to the north. Stell says there are “All that rock for about 37 people officially the wall pretty much volunteering with Bend’s came out of this area,” Wenger seven off-leash areas. he explains. “I fig- believes offWenger “has given ured rather than have leash areas us a lot of sweat, you to haul it off, I want- are as much know? He really has,” ed to make a back- for people as Stell continues. “And stop so when people dogs. “It’s for he seems to just love throw their balls up people with there … they’ve got dogs. They’re doin’ it. He seems like one of those people something to bounce probably the who’s just all kinds of off of.” largest user enthusiastic.” He estimates he’s group that I For Wenger, it’s just a spent some 100 hours see out here, matter of giving back. volunteering at Pon- other than “One of the things derosa since the be- people who that’s always impressed ginning of March. He are playing me about Bend is the works most evenings, organized park system,” he says. getting as much work sports,” he “I became a dog owner in as he can before says. about 10 years ago, when dark. I finally had a home and Paul Stell, natural resources manager for Bend had a place to keep one. I spend a Park & Recreation District, lot of time in the parks.” So does an appreciative Pearlrecalls the work Wenger did man, who marvels at the work at Pine Nursery. “We met out there and we Wenger has accomplished: “It talked about it, and I kept was strictly just scrub. It was saying to myself, ‘I gotta get nothing. It was rocky and hilly. back out there,’” Stell says. All those rocks came from the Meanwhile, Wenger had gone soil.” “He’s an amazing man,” Pearlto work. About three months man adds. “He and other volwent by. “I went back out there, and unteers have done an amazing, holy smokes. I couldn’t be- amazing job. They really have.” lieve all the work he’d done out there. I mean, real painsDavid Jasper can be reached taking work, raking and pick- at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ ing rocks out of things, mak- bendbulletin.com. ing a smooth trail, and lining the trail with rocks,” Stell says. “He just really went to town out there, did some really great stuff.” Wenger thinks the Pine Nursery has the potential to be one of the nicest off-leash


A H AT HOME

HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTRA L ORE GON New life for your tablecloth Can’t part with an heirloom? Make it into napkins. Also from Martha Stewart: yogurt from sheep’s milk, Page F6

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, APRIL 20, 2010

Multilayered

masterpiece Constructing what might just be the perfect ‘wet sandwich’ (and a few other gourmet recipes, too)

green• house n. A structure in a variety of styles that helps your High Desert garden grow

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

My tomato plants and I had bonded, and it was only my first attempt at gardening in Central Oregon. The tomato plant variety had been thoroughly researched, the soil around them was carefully composted, fertilized and watered, and I watched the weather carefully. At the slightest hint of a cold night, the plants were covered. And my care had been rewarded with what promised to be a bumper crop. It was mid-August, and hot, and each plant had close to a bushel of fruit on it. It was so hot one weekend, my family decided to go camping for a few days in the cooler High Lakes area. Longtime Central Oregonians saw the rest of the story coming in the last paragraph. The night we were gone, the nighttime temperature plunged below freezing. The frost killed the tomatoes, and with them, my will to garden. I haven’t cared about growing tomatoes since. If you intend to effectively garden in Central Oregon, you may want to consider buying a kit greenhouse. Our region has hundreds of microclimates, plus wildly fluctuating temperatures. It can be 80 degrees in the daytime and freeze that night. Frost is possible 12 months a year. A greenhouse can help you adapt to these gardening challenges, and will typically extend your growing season by several months. It can serve as a place to start seeds in the spring, and grow lettuce, tomatoes and greens into the fall. See Greenhouse / F5

t was lunchtime in Hawaii and our pal Clarence Callahan was on the phone, boasting about the sandwich he had just constructed. My husband, who worked with

Clarence when he lived here on the mainland, says he hasn’t entirely gotten over the sandwich envy inspired by Clarence’s lunches. But that was many years ago ... before Clarence

GARDEN

A freestanding greenhouse. See Page F5 for more options.

By Jan Roberts-Dominguez • For The Bulletin

I

F

FOOD

retired and started life anew on his very own sailboat near Honolulu. “Okay, Jan. I call it Clarence’s Hot and Wet Sandwich. You’ll understand why in a sec. You start with two slices of multigrain bread. Spread each slice with some mayonnaise and spicy brown mustard.” Clarence is like that — very specific in his descriptions, particularly when it comes to food. So it wouldn’t just be mustard. It’d be spicy brown mustard. “Once you’ve got your bread prepped,” he continued, “get two eggs frying in a skillet. Then, just as the whites congeal and turn color, lay fresh spinach over them, onto which you dust dried chili pepper flakes and

T O DAY ’ S RECIPES

powdered garlic. “Then, on top of that, as the spinach wilts, you put

• AVOCADO BLT, F2 • THE VALLEY’S VALLEY MELT, F2 • HARVEST THYME SANDWICH, F2 • LEEK & SHRIMP SUPPER ON A ROLL, F2 • CHICKEN TORTILLA SOUP, F2 • GUACAMOLE EN MOLCAJETE, F3 • SALSA VERDE, F3 • ENCHILADAS VERDES DE POLLO, F3 • ORANGE SOY GINGER MARINADE, F6

a slice of provolone cheese.” I oohed my approval on the provolone maneuver, noting that it would add just the right layering of smoky flavor. But Clarence was not through. See Sandwich / A2

Illustration by Eric Baker / The Bulletin

Shabby and chic, showroom and home By Penny Nakamura For The Bulletin

Mike and Tess Price love it when guests enter their Orchard District ranch home and say, “That’s so shabby.” In fact, the shabbier, the better. The couple make a living with their shabby chic furniture business, Beach House. Their east Bend home is the showroom, and inventory and furnishings come and go, which allows for frequent redecorating. “We can let go of anything, and even

though we may really love a piece that we’ve rehabbed, we know that something else, probably even better, will come along,” said Mike Price, a former home contractor, who HO now works with his wife full time at Beach House. “It’s about moving on.” Entering through French doors into the Prices’ living room takes on an almost dreamy quality, as the soft, creamy white interior with silver accents provides an elegant, vintage look that’s not

only inviting, but also comfortable — the hallmark of shabby chic decor. Mini white Christmas lights strategically hung for effect stay up M E year-round, as do the vintage silver Christmas bird ornaments hanging off willow branches. Soft lights sparkle off the silver accents. Soft white cotton fabric drapes gracefully over the sofas, making visitors want to curl up with a good book and a hot cup of tea. See Price / F4

Mike and Tess Price’s east Bend home functions as a showroom for their shabby chic furniture business, Beach House. Rob Kerr The Bulletin


F2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week: Spring lamb A guide to cooking this tasty meat.

Healthy, tasty avocados abundant, not too costly By Susan M. Selasky

AVOCADO BLT

Detroit Free Press

Serves 4. 8 slices ( ¼ inch or about ½ oz) roasted garlic bread or other favorite bread 2 TBS butter, softened 1 C mixed salad greens Red onion slices, optional 1 large tomato 8 slices cooked bacon 8 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, sliced into 8 slices 1 large ripe avocado, halved, pitted and sliced Salt and pepper to taste ¼ C cilantro leaves, optional Have ready a panini maker, George Foreman-type grill or a skillet. For each sandwich, butter one side of each slice of bread. Build your sandwich starting out with one slice of the bread, butter side down. Place a layer of salad greens; red onion slices, if using; tomato slices; 2 slices cooked bacon; 2 slices mozzarella and several slices of avocado. Sprinkle the avocado with salt and pepper to taste and 1 TBS cilantro leaves. Top with another slice of bread, butter side up. Place in the panini maker or grill and follow manufacturer’s instruction for cooking. Or place in the skillet and cook until golden brown on one side; turn over and cook on the other side. Serve these sandwiches immediately or wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve. From and tested by Susan M. Selasky for the Free Press Test Kitchen. 421 calories (69 percent from fat ), 32 grams fat (13 grams sat. fat ), 19 grams carbohydrates, 16 grams protein, 472 mg sodium, 63 mg cholesterol, 4 grams fiber

Pity the poor avocado. It’s often misunderstood. It’s not the typical fruit that you eat fresh out of hand. Once an avocado is ripe, it goes bad quickly. And avocados have a reputation of getting smashed, mixed with other ingredients and presto — you have guacamole. Not that that’s a bad thing. You can serve guacamole as a dip or as a spread for sandwiches or put a dollop of it on grilled chicken or a burger. But the avocado has many more culinary uses other than making a big bowl of guacamole for a Super Bowl party — the day when Americans consume 160 million of them, according to the California Avocado Commission. Fine Cooking’s February/ March issue uses avocados in soup, salads and even a frozen yogurt. Currently, Hass avocados from Mexico are in abundance, and growers in California are shipping theirs out as well. This time of year, avocados have a rich buttery taste and chances are you will find them at a decent price. Like many other fruits, avocados have good-for-you qualities. Nutrition experts have been touting them for years. Avocados are high in monounsaturated fat — the kind of fat that helps lower LDL (bad) and helps increase HDL (good) cholesterol. Avocados are one of the five MUFAs (monounsaturated fatty acids) in Prevention Magazine’s popular Flat Belly Diet. The diet calls for eating one MUFA at every meal.

Many varieties of avocados are available year-round, with the pebbly skinned Hass being the most common grocery store variety. Hass avocados are shipped in from California and Mexico. Some stores also carry the smoother-skinned Fuerte variety from Florida. It is larger but has more water content. The Fuerte is a favorite of Florine Mark, president and CEO of the Weight Watchers Group in Farmington Hills, Mich., because she gets more avocado and less calories and fat. “I love avocados and honestly eat them every single day,” Mark says. “They are very good in the good kinds of fats, but higher in calories so I eat in one-eighth increments.” Mark puts avocados on salads and tops grilled salmon with slices, saying it’s “absolutely delicious.” And she even uses mashed avocado on her face, saying it’s a good moisturizer. “They are also very pretty to put on my kitchen table mixed with lemons and tomatoes and used as a centerpiece,” Mark says. When using as a centerpiece, buy hard, unripe avocados and place them in a bowl — they’ll ripen in about four days. Mark doesn’t make guacamole much because she says you “use too much avocado and then it becomes too fattening for me.” Instead, she mixes onions, tomatoes, lime juice, cilantro and cooked white or red beans and then adds chunks of avocado at the last. “This way, I get more of the chunky wonderful flavor of the avocado,” Mark says.

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COVER STORY

Sandwich Continued from F1 “Once the egg is almost cooked and the spinach has started wilting, and the cheese has almost melted, you sliiiide it out of the pan onto the bread. Then, on top of that, you lay on two or three

slices of turkey. You can add pickles if you want.” At this point, I could tell that Clarence’s narration was moving away from recipe construction over to what I call his sell-thesizzle. He was getting cute: “So you’ve got the other slice of bread on top. Then you cut it in half to make it delicate. (Here comes

THE VALLEY’S VALLEY MELT Makes 1 sandwich. The Valley Restaurant in downtown Corvallis had a long run but closed many years ago. Its famous sandwich, however, lives on. About ½ C thinly sliced mushrooms ¼ C minced onions ½ TBS vegetable oil Salt and pepper to taste 2 slices Bavarian rye or

pumpernickel 2 1-oz slices of Swiss cheese 1 TBS Thousand Island dressing 2 heaping TBS Valley Cole Slaw (recipe follows)

In small skillet, saute the mushrooms and onions in the vegetable oil until softened and mushrooms are slightly golden; salt and pepper to taste; set aside. Top one bread slice with the Thousand Island dressing. Top other slice with the coleslaw mixture. Divide the mushroom mixture between the two sides, then place a slice of cheese on each portion. Lightly brush a griddle or frying pan with margarine, then place both portions on the grill (with the cheese side up). Cover the sandwiches with a large lid and cook until the cheese is melted and the bread is crisp on the bottom. Carefully put the sandwich together and cut in half. Serve with extra napkins! Valley Cole Slaw: Coarsely chop ½ head of green cabbage, 3 green onions, 2 large carrots and 3 medium Gravenstein apples (or other tart variety). Toss together in a medium-sized bowl. Combine 2 cups of mayonnaise with ¼ cup honey, and salt and pepper to taste. Coat tossed vegetables with enough of the dressing to evenly coat the mixture. Refrigerate until ready to use. This makes enough coleslaw for several sandwiches (or one sandwich and a salad for the family dinner).

HARVEST THYME SANDWICH Makes 4 sandwiches. This sandwich, created by Mary Lou Newhouse, of South Burlington, Vt., won first place in the Indoor category of the 1989 National Beef Cook-Off. I know for a fact that it blew the judges away, because I was one of them! Great flavor and texture combination. The only way that I would consider it “improved” is if the meat was grilled over charcoal instead of broiled under an oven broiler. MUSTARD-THYME DRESSING: ¾ C plus 2 TBS extra-virgin olive oil ¼ C fresh lemon juice ¼ C red wine vinegar 1 TBS Bavarian-style mustard, or other strong, spicy brown mustard 1 tsp salt ¾ tsp crumbled dried thyme leaves ½ tsp coarsely cracked black pepper

FOR THE SANDWICH: 1½ lbs boneless beef top sirloin steak, cut about 1½-inch thick 4 French rolls, split and lightly toasted 1 C each: finely shredded carrot, turnip 4 large leaves red leaf lettuce ¼ C thinly sliced green onion Thin apple slices dipped in lemon juice ¼ C drained prepared horseradish Paprika (optional)

To prepare the Mustard-Thyme Dressing, whisk together the olive oil, lemon juice and vinegar. Slowly whisk in the mustard until blended. Add the salt, thyme and pepper; set aside. (Makes about 1½ cups.) To prepare the sandwich, trim the excess fat from the steak. Place the steak and ¾ cup of the Mustard-Thyme Dressing in a resealable plastic bag, turning to coat. Close the bag securely and marinate in the refrigerator for 1 to several hours, turning occasionally. When ready to prepare the sandwiches, broil or grill the meat to desired degree of doneness, turning once during cooking. Remove the meat to a carving platter and let sit for about 10 minutes to allow its internal juices to redistribute. Carve the steak diagonally into thin slices. Place the French rolls face up on plates. Combine the carrot and turnip together, then layer on one side of each roll. Place one lettuce leaf on the other side of each roll; top with beef and green onion. Drizzle remaining dressing not used for marinade over both sides of the sandwiches. Garnish the sandwiches with the apple slices. For most dramatic presentation, serve sandwiches open-face. Diners may wish to add horseradish and/or paprika before closing their sandwiches.

the pitch!) Then as you’re eating it, oh Jan! You taste the eggs that are still soft in the yellows, mixing with the spinach and the garlic and the peppers. You’ve got all these great tastes and textures, with the little pepper zinging at you and the crunchiness of the whole-wheat bread. “I’m telling you Jan. If you like a wet sandwich, this one’s out of this world.” Did I mention that he was pairing it with an Erath Winery pinot noir? Well, Clarence’s sandwich construction got me thinking about other hand-held, multilayered masterpieces. Over here in Corvallis, I have fond memories of Valley Restaurant’s Valley Melt. It was a heavenly melange of sauteed mushrooms and onions, layered with a zesty coleslaw mixture and anchored in place with some — as the title implies — melted cheese. Then there was the extra zip you got from the dollop of Thousand Island dressing (I’m starting to sound like Clarence!) and the hearty rye bread it was served on. I know it sounds labor-intensive. But you can tame some of the chaos by preparing most of the components in advance. It’s still a sandwich that requires focus and determination, but I encourage you to give it a try, perhaps on one of these afternoons when you deserve a reward for slogging around in your winter garden getting it ready for spring. This sandwich would be the ticket. Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@proaxis.com.

LEEK & SHRIMP SUPPER ON A ROLL Makes 4 servings. Spring leeks and spring Pacific shrimp, two delicate flavors, combine for a powerful sandwich. Use only fresh or freshfrozen shrimp. The canned ones absolutely will not do. 4 C chopped leeks, white and pale green portions only 1 TBS olive oil ¼ C half & half ¼ tsp white pepper 1 ⁄3 C sliced black olives Salt to taste 4 French rolls, split and toasted Sliced tomatoes (when local tomatoes aren’t available, consider using the roma style, which have more flavor) In a medium skillet over medium-high heat, saute leeks in olive oil until softened, about 3 minutes. Stir in broth, cream and white pepper. Simmer until the liquid is reduced and leeks are very tender. Let mixture cool slightly, then stir in the shrimp and olives. Adjust seasoning, adding salt and additional white pepper to taste. Divide the mixture between the 4 French rolls, garnish with tomatoes and serve.

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Flavor-filled stock makes a tasty soup By Susan M. Selasky Detroit Free Press

A big bowl of soup is an easy way to fill the belly and warm the spirit. The idea for today’s Chicken Tortilla Soup began with cans of no-salt-added diced tomatoes, leftover cooked chicken and a stash of frozen chicken pieces saved to make stock. What’s the difference between stock and broth? Stock is liquid flavored by meat, poultry or fish bones and sometimes meat trimmings and vegetables. It is then strained. A broth is made by simmering meats and vegetables in water. It can be strained as well or served as is. I take all those chicken pieces and roast them first to intensify their flavor and render some of the fat that’s on any skin. If you don’t want to make your own stock or broth for this recipe, you can substitute canned fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth.

CHICKEN TORTILLA SOUP Makes 12 cups. 2 TBS canola oil, divided 1 garlic clove, peeled and minced 1 med onion, chopped ¾ lb cooked, shredded chicken 1 TBS chili powder 1 tsp favorite all-purpose seasoning or to taste 1 tsp cumin, optional

2 cans (14.5 ounces each) no-salt-added tomatoes 6 C homemade chicken stock or canned, low-sodium, fat-free chicken broth 8 corn tortillas, cut into strips Salt and ground black pepper to taste 1 C of shredded Mexicanblend cheese

Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add the garlic and saute 1 minute or until fragrant; do not allow the garlic to brown. Add the onion and saute until translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the cooked chicken and sprinkle it with the chili powder, all-purpose seasoning and cumin. Stir and cook 1 minute. Add the tomatoes and the stock or broth. Bring just to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer 15 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place the tortilla strips on a baking sheet with sides and drizzle with the remaining 1 tablespoon oil and sprinkle with salt and black pepper. Place in the oven and bake 10-12 minutes or until the strips are crisp. Remove from the oven. Taste and adjust seasonings for the soup if needed. Ladle into bowls and serve topped with the baked tortilla strips and a sprinkling of shredded cheese.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 F3

F Mexican chef shares his history with food By Joan Obra McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Ever made guacamole in a molcajete before? Or baked a mature coconut? These were some of the lessons from Agustin Gaytan, a Mexican chef who recently taught a class at Kitchen & Bath Plus in Fresno,

Calif., with Wendy Carroll of Seasoned to Taste, a personal chef service, to demonstrate recipes and talk about his childhood. Growing up in San Miguel de Allende, a historic town in central Mexico, Gaytan had an intimate relationship with food. His family grew corn and chiles, and

slaughtered farm animals. His love of food turned into a profession. The former owner of Dos Burros restaurant in Berkeley, Gaytan now teaches cooking classes at Ramekins Inn and Culinary School in Sonoma. He also conducts culture and culinary tours of San Miguel de Al-

lende and the Mission District in San Francisco. Here are a few of his easier recipes: enchiladas verdes de pollo (chicken enchiladas with green sauce), guacamole and salsa verde. You’ll find all of the ingredients at Hispanic markets. Also buy a molcajete (stone

mortar and pestle) at these markets. But before you cook with one, season it to avoid adding pieces of rock to your dish. First, grind the pestle against the mortar until the surfaces of both are smooth. Rinse the molcajete and dry it well. Add a small handful of rice to

the mortar and use the pestle to grind it into powder. Repeat with a couple more handfuls of rice. Rinse the molcajete, rub some vegetable oil on both parts, then rinse again. “After each use, wash it with soapy warm water and a brush,” Gaytan says.

ENCHILADAS VERDES DE POLLO Makes 6 servings. FOR THE CHICKEN: 1 small chicken, cut into 8 parts 8 C water ½ medium white or yellow onion, skin removed 6 large garlic cloves, peeled 2½ tsp sea salt, divided, or to taste 8 sprigs of cilantro 3 large sprigs fresh mint 3 TBS olive oil ½ small red onion, finely chopped ½ tsp freshly ground black pepper FOR THE SAUCE: 2 C salsa verde (see recipe at lower left) 1 C chicken stock (from boiled chicken, above)

Photos by Eric Paul Zamora / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Enchiladas Verdes de Pollo, foreground, was paired with Tamales de Marisco, background, during a class led by guest chef Agustin Gaytan called “Introduction To Mexican Cooking,” held last month at Kitchen & Bath Plus in Fresno, Calif. Corn tortillas are quickly and lightly fried in vegetable oil prior to making Enchiladas Verdes con Pollo during a class conducted last month by guest chef Agustin Gaytan in Fresno, Calif.

2 TBS olive oil ½ tsp salt, or to taste Heaping ¼ tsp ground cumin 8 cilantro sprigs FOR THE ENCHILADAS: 2 C Monterey Jack cheese, grated ½ C vegetable oil 12 fresh (machine-made) corn tortillas 24 small red onion rings, very thinly sliced 6 small leaves of romaine lettuce hearts, dried well after washing 1 small bunch radishes, sliced into rounds 1 C queso fresco, crumbled (see notes) 1 C Mexican crema or creme franche (see notes)

To make the chicken: Place the chicken parts in a large, heavybottomed pot and cover with water. Add the onion, garlic cloves and 2 teaspoons sea salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Simmer uncovered over medium heat for about 20 minutes, or until chicken starts to smell good. Add cilantro and mint sprigs. Continue to simmer chicken for 25 more minutes or until chicken is tender enough to eat. Cool chicken in the broth. Strain the stock and reserve. Discard onion, garlic and herbs. Roughly shred the chicken. Discard the bones. Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the red onion and cook, stirring, for 30-45 seconds. Stir in shredded chicken, ½ teaspoon sea salt and pepper. Add 1/3 to 1/2 cup of the reserved chicken stock to moisten the meat. Taste and add more salt, if necessary. Continue to cook chicken for about 10 more seconds, then remove from heat and set aside. To make the sauce: Heat the olive oil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the salsa verde and cook for about 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add the chicken stock, salt, cumin and cilantro. Simmer over medium heat for about 4 minutes. Remove from heat, cover and set aside. To assemble and serve: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Combine the chicken with half the Monterey Jack cheese. In a large skillet, heat about 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil over medium-high heat. Lightly fry a tortilla for about 5 seconds on each side just until it becomes soft. Transfer to a plate. Repeat process with each tortilla, adding a tablespoon of vegetable oil to the skillet before cooking each one. Do not allow the tortillas to become brown or crisp around the edges. Stack the tortillas on top of each other on a plate. Dip a tortilla in the sauce and place it on a separate plate. Spoon about 3 tablespoons of the chicken mixture across the tortilla and roll. Repeat with the remaining tortillas, placing each enchilada side-by-side in a baking dish. Cover the enchiladas with the remaining sauce and sprinkle with the rest of the Monterey Jack cheese. Place the dish in the preheated oven and bake 10 minutes. Serve hot, garnished with onion rings, lettuce and radishes. Sprinkle with queso fresco and top with crema. Notes: Queso fresco is a type of farmer’s cheese with a crumbly texture that is available in Hispanic markets. Mexican crema and creme franche are similar types of cultured cream. Crema is available at Hispanic markets; creme franche is available at some supermarkets, such as Trader Joe’s. —Agustin Gaytan, agustincooks.com

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GUACAMOLE EN MOLCAJETE

SALSA VERDE

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Makes about 2 cups.

Since 1971

Makes 4-6 servings. For the guacamole: 2 serrano chiles 3 large tomatillos, husks removed and washed 3 garlic cloves, unpeeled ¼ small white onion, peeled 4 sprigs cilantro, chopped

Find It All Online

2 Hass avocados, mashed ½ tsp fine sea salt, or to taste 12 fresh corn tortillas Special equipment needed: Molcajete, or another large mortar and pestle (see note)

Pierce chiles with a fork. Cook tomatillos, chiles, garlic and onion on a griddle over medium-high heat, turning them until softened and somewhat blackened in spots — about 8 minutes for garlic and chiles and 12 minutes for tomatillos and onion. Remove from heat. Let cool, then peel garlic and chiles. Remove and discard outermost layer of onion. Slice off the onion’s tip. Finely chop onion. Place garlic, chiles, onion and cilantro in the mortar. Mash with the pestle. Chop the tomatillos and add them to the mortar. Continue mashing until the mixture turns into a smooth paste. Add avocado and salt to the mortar. Mash until combined. Serve the guacamole in the molcajete with fresh, warmed corn tortillas. Note: A molcajete is a mortar and pestle made of stone. —Agustin Gaytan, agustincooks.com

15 large tomatillos, husks removed and washed 2-3 serrano chiles or 1 jalapeño (to desired heat level)

5 cloves garlic, unpeeled ½ small white onion, unpeeled 1 tsp salt, or to taste 10 sprigs cilantro

Pierce chile(s) with a fork. Cook tomatillos, chile(s), garlic and onion on a griddle over medium-high heat, turning them until softened and somewhat blackened in spots — about 8 minutes for garlic and chiles and 12 minutes for tomatillos and onion. Remove from heat. Let cool, then peel garlic, onion and chiles. In a blender, combine the onion, garlic, cilantro, chiles, tomatillos and salt. Blend until smooth. —Agustin Gaytan, agustincooks.com

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F4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week Pet door types and tricks.

COVER STORY

Price Continued from F1 With a shabby chic look, fabrics tend to be cotton and linen, inspired by old French linens. Newer fabrics are often bleached, faded or tea stained to achieve the relaxed, vintage look. The living room also includes an elegant iron chandelier with clear crystals reflecting the soft white light. Almost every room in their home has a unique, vintage chandelier hanging from the ceiling, which is often a trademark of a shabby chic room. Tess Price, who started Beach House, is proud of their four-bedroom, two-bath house. Most of the furnishings and accents in her home are secondhand, and have come from thrift shops, salvage stores, Habitat for Humanity resale stores, antique junk shops or any number of local garage sales. “We were green and recycling before it became fashionable,” says Tess with a laugh. “When you don’t have a lot of money to start with, you do green — that’s all we know. Friends and family would say, ‘you got that where?’ They love what we can do with used furnishings.” Tess says she loves the shabby chic look because she has three children, two of them teenagers. The look is never stuffy or fussy, so it tends to be easy and family friendly, and of course, the price is right. “We’ve been remodeling our ranch house since we bought it in the 1990s. It’s always a work in progress,” said Mike Price. “But I’d have to say at least 90 percent of what we’ve used has been reused materials, and of course we’ve saved tens of thousands of dollars over the years.”

The Price home includes many rehabbed pieces of furniture and decor. Here, metalwork adorns the upper part of a handcrafted bedroom door.

A cottage in the backyard creates a storybook look for the Prices’ property.

“We were green and recycling before it became fashionable. When you don’t have a lot of money to start with, you do green — that’s all we know. Friends and family would say, ‘you got that where?’ They love what we can do with used furnishings.” — Tess Price

Tess Price saw this idea — hanging a plate rack in front of a window — in a magazine and tried the look in her own home.

Ideas and freebies Tess says a black distressed wooden plate and cup rack, which was placed against a window, was an idea she found in a magazine. The effect lets natural light stream through the plates, adding additional interest in the small but efficient kitchen. “We tore down an entire wall in this kitchen, so we could have an open area that flows into the living room,” explained Tess, leaning against a kitchen island that Mike made from reclaimed wood. “The Jenn-Air stainless steel stove was something Mike got for free when he was working on a home he was remodeling, and the owners didn’t want it anymore. These slate tiles on the floor were also extra from a job site.” When they remodeled their kitchen, they also added two additional windows, one they bought from The Home Depot, and the other one, which is identical, they found at the Habitat for Humanity Restore, which sells discount and reused building materials. They added another set of French doors, also found at the Habitat for Humanity store, to their dining room, which leads out to their backyard. Tess considers herself a “treasure hunter,” and confesses she shops and hunts for items almost every day. “Sometimes I’ll come back with something really, really ugly, and Mike shakes his head, but underneath the ugliness is something really great,” says an enthusiastic Tess. “We’ve had some really bad pieces that have turned out into something totally different, something useful and really beautiful.” The couple has been married for 18 years, and their working styles complement each other in a business that requires a lot

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Mike and Tess Price in their east Bend home, which functions as a showroom for their shabby chic furniture business, Beach House.

A decorative tin panel finishes this piece of furniture. Mike Price likes to embellish old furniture with decorative pieces to create a new look. of give and take. “She really is an artist. She knows how to use colors,” explains Mike. “I may have the ability to make something, but she’s the one with the vision.” Mike points to the dining room wall as proof of Tess’ ability to use

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Even the master bathroom has interesting furnishings.

colors. The accent wall is a beautiful robin blue, marbled with muted browns and gold. “That wall actually has five different colors on it,” explained Tess. “You use sheetrock mud for texture. It gives it a plaster look from the olden days. I used a rag,

(Minneapolis) Star Tribune

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Old and new Mixing old with new is something else that sets Tess’ deco-

want some light touches,” advised Tess. While a lot of shabby chic furnishings are painted a muted white, Tess has used some extreme colors for some furnishings, including a distressed lime green dresser and a turquoise lowboy chest. She also says they’re incorporating more natural wood into their pieces. The couple say that, depending on the furniture, they are always experimenting and evolving new ideas. And if remodeling their 1,700square-foot home wasn’t enough, Mike took it upon himself to build a quaint, storybook-looking cabin in their backyard, which warehouses more furnishings from their company. Just outside of the one-bedroom cabin, Mike has built a small waterfall from the natural lava rock outcroppings he found on the property. Already, spring greenery is sprouting from between the rocks. “I actually got those plants from a neighbor who was redoing his landscaping, and he asked if I wanted some plants,” recalled Mike. “So I replanted those plants he was throwing out, and now they’re doing really well.” Whether it’s a plant, a piece of furniture or a decoration, the Prices will breathe new life into it. Penny Nakamura can be reached at halpen1@aol.com.

Keep bed b u g s out of your home after travel By Karen Youso

Every Friday

a brush, water and five different paints. The water will dilute the paints, and it changes the color.”

rating apart from the ordinary shabby chic. Underneath her distressed white dining room table is a faux zebra rug she received from a friend. On the dining room buffet, which Mike made, Tess has placed a horse statue, which she says is the one thing in her home that is not for sale. Customers have asked, but Tess says she loves the horse, and it’s staying. Making something beautiful, new and usable out of old pieces of furniture and decor items is what excites the Prices about pieces they have in their home. “Mike took this old tin panel from the early 1900s and incorporated it into this piece of furniture,” said Tess, pointing to a dresser in her bedroom. “He’s also taken glass doors from the 1920s and incorporated (them) into different furnishings. It’s so much fun to see what something will become.” The Prices have experimented on their home much like they have with the furniture they remake. The couple took the original family room in the back of this 1950s ranch home, and turned it into their master bedroom and master bathroom. The golden-hued master bedroom is a mix of rustic with a touch of elegant shabby chic. “I think what people should remember is that you don’t want too much rustic. If everything is rustic, it will be too dark — you

This vintage horse statue is one item Tess Price says she’ll never sell.

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With bedbugs, there are few instances where one can rule out any possibility of an infestation, said Jeff White, research entomologist at the Bed Bug Central Web site. But the chances of picking up bedbugs on an airplane, such as in an overhead bin or from a seat, are slim, he said. Some of the best bedbug precautions are taken when you return home: • Keep luggage out of the house while you unpack. • Check bags carefully for bedbugs, in seams, creases and folds.

• Because high heat kills bedbugs and their eggs, wash and dry your clothing at the hottest setting the fabric can withstand. (For dry cleaning, keep items in plastic and tell the cleaner that items might have been exposed to bedbugs.) • Most suitcases can be handwashed. The University of Minnesota Extension recommends using soapy water and the hottest water possible — 100 to 120 degrees. Test the item to make sure it will not be affected by hot water. Use a scrub brush or old toothbrush along the seams and folds.

• Some experts say you can freeze bedbugs to eradicate them; others disagree. The extension office says the core of the articles being frozen must reach 23 degrees Fahrenheit or lower for at least five days. Most home freezers are set between 20 and 30 degrees. If you’re uncertain of the freezer temperature, keep items frozen at least two weeks. Send your questions to Fixit, c/o Star Tribune, 425 Portland Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55488, call 612-673-7032 or e-mail fixitstartribune.com.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 F5

G

Next week: Mother’s Day A few gift ideas for the gardening mom.

April’s a good month for lawn and garden repairs

COVER STORY

Choose your greenhouse Greenhouse kits, such as these from Landsystems Nursery in Bend, are available in a variety of sizes. Look for models that include a way of venting heat. Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

THE HERB TENT

By Ad rian Higgins

The Herb Tent is a mini-greenhouse that’s good for seed starts, but plants would have to be relocated before they got too big for the shelter.

April offers a moment to make minor repairs to the lawn; major lawn renovation is best left until September. Patches of bare soil can be cultivated and seeded for spring, but expect seedlings to wilt and possibly die once summer heat sets in. Areas of the lawn often die back from shade or poor drainage and may be best converted to garden beds for ground covers suited to those conditions.

The Washington Post

BIG BUT QUICK TO ASSEMBLE Quick-assemble greenhouse kits like this one are good options for people who don’t have the money for a custom greenhouse but still want the benefits of early-season gardening.

“You can have a continuous supply of radishes, broccoli, chard, spinach, cabbage and vegetables for several months. You could be growing lettuce right now.”

Adrian Higgins blogs about vegetable gardening Mondays at www.washingtonpost .com/allwecaneat.

— Cindy Jeffers, of Landsystems Nursery in Bend

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FREESTANDING BUT SEDENTARY

ENCLOSED SHELVES

This freestanding greenhouse is more permanent than the portable, zippered varieties. Some greenhouses will require a foundation before they can be constructed.

This simple style includes shelves and a zippered plastic enclosure and is perfect for starting seeds before transplanting them into the ground.

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Greenhouse Continued from F1 Deciding which model will work best for you depends on where it will be located, how involved you intend to be and the budget. Greenhouse kits range in size from portable, tiny seed-starters to complete buildings with automatic venting and heating. Prices range from under $50 to more than $4,000 for a complete building. Custom greenhouse prices are only limited by the depth of your pockets.

Greenhouse types There are two broad categories of greenhouse: free-standing and home-attached, or lean-to. Free-standing greenhouses are the most common, and include traditional peaked and curvedeave (or curved-roof) free-standing structures. Their square or rectangular shape provides maximum growing space. Home-attached, or lean-to greenhouses, are designed to attach directly to your house or any existing external wall, provided there is enough height to accommodate the peak. Then, the decision is between using glass or polycarbonate, a type of plastic. Glass is a favorite, because it allows plants to be visible from the outside and allows plenty of natural light in. Polycarbonate has insulating features that can cut heating costs. Once these basic decisions have been made, it’s time to go shopping. Most people aren’t sure of what they want in a greenhouse, says Gary English, of Landsystems Nursery in Bend. But there is an increased interest in greenhouses, he added, possibly because more people are considering growing their own food. The most basic greenhouse approach is to cover raised beds with plastic sheeting, supported by bent or bowed PVC pipe or rebar, an approach known as a hoop

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frame. Such a structure can work well, and most gardeners could build it themselves. But there are inherent problems, English said. “Standard contractor’s plastic will be damaged by ultraviolet rays and deteriorate rapidly,” he said. “The constant sunshine and high winds will cause the plastic to degenerate into small pieces within about one season.” One solution to that problem is to use greenhouse plastic, English said, which is UV-resistant and thicker than most contractorgrade plastic. In some instances, he says, the greenhouse plastic has lasted up to five or six years in this area.

Venting Surprisingly, English said, excess heat inside a greenhouse is more of a problem than keeping the plants warm. “People are usually concerned about plants freezing, but it is easy for them to get overheated,” English said. “The area’s intense

Central Oregon Chapter

sunshine, combined with the high altitude here, means it can get very hot inside, very quickly.” Plants shut down when it gets much over 90 degrees, he said, and some cold-weather plants could die. All kit greenhouses have ventilation systems, he added, and some of the higher-priced models have heat-activated venting. “It’s also important to have shade cloth, which cuts down on the sunshine, that you can put over the greenhouse,” English said. Once the greenhouse is chosen and correctly placed, you can start planting, and the benefits can be reaped almost immediately. “You can have a continuous supply of radishes, broccoli, chard, spinach, cabbage and vegetables for several months,” says Cindy Jeffers, of Landsystems. “You could be growing lettuce right now.”

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F6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Ever tasted yogurt from sheep’s milk?

This marinade adds a little kick to steaks By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Also, turn your heirloom tablecloth into napkins By Martha Stewart

ventilation, and lets the dog shift position. Regulations aside, do what you can to keep your dog calm. A few weeks before, get her used to the carrier by placing food and toys inside, says Greg Kleva, host of “It’s a Dog’s Life” on Martha Stewart Living Radio. At the airport, take her for a walk or do obedience exercises before putting her in the crate, so she’ll be tired and relaxed. In lieu of a tranquilizer (not recommended by the American Veterinary Medical Association), try a natural alternative, such as Bach’s Rescue Remedy, says veterinarian Marty Goldstein, host of “Ask Martha’s Vet” on Martha Stewart Living Radio. Don’t feed the dog just before takeoff, Goldstein says. Pets can experience motion sickness, too. For more information and ideas for your pet, go to marthastewart.com/pets.

Martha Stewart Living

Q:

In addition to cow’s milk yogurt, I’ve seen goat and sheep varieties at the supermarket. How do they differ? Sheep and goat products are fixtures at the cheese counter, but these yogurts are relative newcomers to the dairy aisle. As with cheese, sheep and goat yogurts have a tangy quality — think of the bright citrus notes in chevre. But the best ones have subtle flavor differences, without a strong “sheep” or “goat” taste, says Bill Wendorff, professor emeritus of food science at the University of Wisconsin. In terms of nutrition, sheep’s milk contains twice as much fat and 40 percent more protein than goat’s or cow’s milk. Sheep’s milk also has the most calcium: Two cups of milk or yogurt fulfill the minimum daily requirement, compared with 3 cups from a goat or cow. Because sheep’s milk has a higher solid content, no thickeners are needed to make a fullbodied, slightly grainy yogurt. Thinner cow and goat yogurts usually rely on additives, such as nonfat dry milk. Goat yogurt is uniformly smooth and easier to digest, Wendorff says. Sheep and goat products are not good options for lactose-intolerant people; both have about as much lactose as cow products do. But they are worth a try for people with cow’s milk allergies and those looking for something new.

A:

Q: A:

I’d like to keep my small dog with me on a domestic flight. Any advice? The Federal Aviation Administration leaves some policies — including whether dogs can fly in the passenger cabin — up to the airlines. Check with a representative, or

Q: Tony Cenicola / Martha Stewart Living

If you stain an heirloom tablecloth that has sentimental value, consider cutting it into smaller pieces to create a table runner, place mats, napkins or coasters. Then you can hang on to the memories in a more updated and useful way. consult the airline’s Web site. You might have to pay a travel fee each way. Some airlines limit the number of pets in the cabin, so reserve a space early. Proof of vaccinations and a health certificate from a veterinarian may also be required. Dogs must be at least 8 weeks old and fully weaned, and they often have to remain in a carrier during the flight. The carrier counts as a carry-on and must fit under a seat. Look for one that is leak-proof and sturdy, has cross

My heirloom tablecloth is stained beyond repair, but I can’t bear to part with it. Can I reuse it somehow? Refashion the cloth into smaller pieces for the table, such as napkins or coasters. For a table runner, cut a long rectangle, and sew a 1/2-inch hem along each side. Or for a chic presentation, make two shorter runners to lay across the table’s width. Place mats are another option. (For neat seams, sew mitered corners.) Not a sewer? Dye the cloth an inky blue or another dark color to give vintage lace or linen a fresh look. You’ll find plenty of simple sewing projects at martha stewart.com. For more creative ideas from our resourceful crafts editors, visit their blog at thecraftsdept.com.

A:

E-mail questions to Ask Martha at mslletters@ marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number.

Anita Charles, of Greensboro, N.C., was looking for a marinade recipe for flank steak that contained orange juice, garlic and possibly soy sauce. Donald Van Ostrand, of Sykesville, Md., sent in a recipe that he first used on tuna but that he says works equally well for grilled flank steak, pork tenderloin or chicken. Now that grilling season has arrived, this seemed like a recipe worth trying. I tested his marinade on a 2-pound piece of flank steak, since that was what Anita Charles was looking for, and it gave the meat a wonderful flavor. I also liked that he suggested turning the marinade into a sauce once the steak was removed by boiling it with the addition of some brown sugar. It made a nice accompaniment for the sliced meat. I can’t wait

RECIPE FINDER to try this on grilled chicken and fish. RECIPE REQUEST: Paula Rees, of Columbia, Md., would love to have the recipe for the Chiffonade dressing that was served on top of shredded lettuce in the cafeteria in her Baltimore County public school in the late 1960s and early 1970s. She said it was pale yellow with a light and creamy consistency and a savory/sweet taste. If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or e-mail recipefinderbaltsun.com.

ORANGE SOY GINGER MARINADE Makes 1 cup. ¼ C soy sauce (low sodium is fine) ¼ C dry sherry (or substitute orange juice) ¼ C olive oil 2 TBS grated orange rind ¼ C fresh orange juice 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 TBS fresh ginger, minced 2 TBS brown sugar (for sauce) Whisk all ingredients together (except brown sugar). Cover flank steak (or whatever you choose) with the marinade in a shallow bowl or plastic bag, and marinate for at least 2 hours or up to 8 hours in the refrigerator. Remove steak from marinade and grill to desired doneness. Allow meat to stand for 10 minutes before serving. To make sauce: Pour marinade into a small saucepan. Add brown sugar. Bring to boil over medium-high heat then reduce to simmer, stirring often, and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until sauce thickens slightly. Remove from heat. Add any collected meat juices to the sauce, stir and serve with sliced meat.

Illinois town conducts gnome census By Steve Schmadeke Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — Ever since the tiny town of Strasburg, Ill., adopted the garden gnome as its mascot about two years ago, the pint-sized mythological figures have arrived in increasing numbers, residents say. And so town leaders have decided to launch their first Gnome Census, sending volunteers door-to-door Saturday to ask the roughly 600 residents how many bearded figurines they have, as well as their gender, age and place of origin. It’s a bit of fun that leaders hope will bring members of the community about 80 miles southeast of Springfield closer together. The results will be published in Strasburg’s unofficial newspaper — a town newsletter launched last year called Gnome News that goes by the motto, “Gnome News is

“There was a need to have people slow down and see what’s going on (here). And with the Gnome Census, more people are going to be saying, ‘I need to get myself a gnome.’” — Les Sentel, Strasburg, Ill., business leader Good News.” The “gnome thing” — as some residents call it — is part of a larger effort Strasburg started in 2008 to keep the town alive. It created a tax-incentive district for businesses, started an effort to beautify the town and put up welcome signs. “The town was dying,” said

longtime resident Jane Giertz, who sits on the “gnome committee” and dressed as one last Halloween. “We had no grocery store; we had no gas station; we had nothing.” Since the gnomes arrived, Strasburg has won a Governor’s Hometown Award and seen two businesses — including a gas station and convenience store — open. A Strasburg business leader said tax incentives have more to do with that than garden gnomes, but Les Sentel, who came up with the gnome idea, thinks tax breaks and garden kitsch are jointly responsible. “There was a need to have people slow down and see what’s going on (here),” said Sentel, who has 40 gnomes himself. “And with the Gnome Census, more people are going to be saying, ‘I need to get myself a gnome.’”

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The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

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Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com Life Magazine collection, 19351945, also Playboy collection, 1958-1980. Make offer. 541-923-1615 Victorian Platform Rocker, 100% restored, exc. cond., sacrifice $195. 541-923-1615

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C h a n d l e r

Pets and Supplies

Looking for a mobile food trailer, used, class 2 or better, & equipped. Minimum size 8’ x 15’. Please send photos, details of trailer, Lhasa Poo male, 4 yrs. grizzled equipment and asking price coat needs a new home with to jmosier@cocc.edu lots of love. Very affectionate and loyal. $250. 541Wanted: Cars, Trucks, Motor480-2852. cylecs, Boats, Jet Skis, ATV’s RUNNING or NOT! “Low Cost Spay/Neuters” 541-280-6786. The Humane Society of Redmond now offers low cost 205 spays and neuters, Cat spay starting at $45.00, Cat neuItems for Free ter starting at $25.00, Dog spay and neuter starting at VW Beetle Exhaust System, $60.00. For more informaFREE, please call tion or to schedule an ap541-536-4002. pointment, please call 541-923-0882 208 Pets and Supplies MALTESE/JACK RUSSELL puppies, 8 weeks., $250 each. 541-420-3048, La Pine. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the Mini Aussie Pups, 7 weeks, 1st area. Sending cash, checks, shots, $240 cash. or credit information may 541-678-7599 be subjected to fraud. For more information about an Mini Schnauzers AKC, 8 weeks, advertiser, you may call the home raised. $500. each. Oregon State Attorney cute and healthy, Blacks, General’s Office Consumer black and silver, salt and Protection hotline at pepper. 541-416-0941 or 1-877-877-9392. 541-771-8563 Parrot, Blue Quaker male with wrought iron cage. No time for him. $225. 541-788-4560 Aussie Shepherd Mix Puppies, Pomeranian Puppies, Shots, rescued, 8 wks., 4 males, 2 CKC reg., wolf sable, cream females, $50. 541-576-3701 sable, black masks, $450 ea., 503-310-2514. 541-549-1839,541-549-1150 Pomeranian Pup, pure black female 1st shots, $400. 541-408-1657 Bengal Kittens Mix, beautiful, great markings, serious in- Pomeranian Puppy Male $250 call 541-316-0638 or e-mail quiries only, ready on Mothsurfaddress@msn.com ers Day for their new homes, POODLES, AKC Toy $225/ea. 541-923-7501 or mini. Joyful tail waggers! Boston Terrier Puppies, pureAffordable. 541-475-3889. bred, 8 weeks, black & white PUREBRED CHIHUAHUAS and brindle & white, male & PUPPIES FOR SALE. female $500 each. 541-977-4817. 774-487-7933 Redmond. BOXER, AKC dewclaw, tail dock, Shih Tzu, male, 6 mo., shots, cute personality, $250. very playful, ready to go 541-536-5538 home $499 1-541-556-8224 Cat breeding season has begun! Shih Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and Please have your cats spayed females avail. 541-874-2901 and neutered before our charley2901@gmail.com shelters become overcrowded with unwanted lit- The Humane Society of Redters. Adult female or male mond has received 15 dogs cats, $40. Bring in the litter from a Rescue group in Caliunder 3 months and we’ll fornia . Many are small dogs, alter them for free! Call Bend all are available for adoption. Spay & Neuter Project for For more information about more info. 541-617-1010. these dogs or any of the wonderful animals we have Chihuahuas, Applehead available, Please call the brindles 2 female, 1 male shelter at 541-923-0882. $300 ea., 541-593-0223. Wirehaired Terrier Griffin, Rescued, 6 mo. old, male, $50, call 541-576-2188..

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES ready after 4/28, $2000 each 541-325-3376.

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

A-1 Washers & Dryers

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Taylor R7 Tour 3 NV 65 Gram S Shaft $110. Call for more info. 541-389-9345. Taylor Tour Rescue 3 19 degree w/steel shaft $65. 541-389-9345.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812.

Baretta 22LP Semi-Automatic pistol, Model 21A-22LR, exc. cond., w/holster, $200, call 541-388-4429. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Grizzly BMG 50 w/extras $2750; 30 Model 94 Takedown $750; 32 Model 94 Carbine $400 or $1000 for both. 541-420-7773. Hipoint 9mm pistol, semi-auto, case, lock & ammo $225 OBO. Phoenix Arms 22lr pistol, semi-auto w/3 10 Round mags, Case & Ammo $220. or trade? 541-647-8931 LIKE-NEW Ruger SR-22 (.22LR AR-15) w/ sling, hard-case, holographic sight, and 500rnds ammo. $480; Leupold spotting scope / telescope w/ hard case and tripod. $240. 541-322-6861

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? N o n-c o m m e r cial a d v e r ti s e r s c a n place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809 HP 1215 COLOR LASER PRINTER Brand New In Box $200 Call 541- 548-0345 Pandigital Photo Frame, 6400 pics., many features, still in box, $70, 541-388-7555 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

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Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Ruger .06 M77 Mark II, synth stock, Nikon 3x9, sling. Excellent condition. $550 firm. (541)815-5679 Ruger .38 Special GP-100, blue, 4” barrel, brand new in box, $485 firm, 541-536-9075. Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolver, model 195, 4” barrel, exc. cond., w/holster, $400, call 541-388-4429. Smith & Wesson 38 Special Military & Police (Model of 1905 - 4th change) - 6 shot fluted cylinder, 6" barrel. Blued finish with checkered walnut grip. 1915-42. $300 OBO; Harrington and Richardson M48 12 ga shotgun, needs work, $40. (208)720-8777 S & W 40 cal. stainless w/black frame & 3 mags $450 or possible trade. 541-647-8931. S & W 9 mm stainless w/gray frame & 2 Mags $400 or possible trade. 541-647-8931.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

262

Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures

Brand New In Box Wanted: 20 Guage Citori Shot- HP COLOR LASER PRINTER gun, vent rib, call $200 ::::::: Call 541 548-2653 541-447-9199. Wanted WWII Colt Commando S & W Victory 1911 & M1 Carbine M1 Garand John 541-389-9836.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Tools IRONWORKER, Universal Mubea 55 ton punching pressure. Punch needs gear drive and dyes. Shear and notcher work fine, single phase motor $1,200 See it at 6855 SW Quarry Avenue Redmond. 541-408 3043.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords, 1-$150, 2-$270. Bend Del. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days 269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 Riding Lawn Mower, new John Deere, 11 hours, call for inquires, 541-923-8702.

Musical Instruments

Small Unique Greenhouse $499 call for details. Ask for Brian 541-678-4940. 1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

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Shop full of tools/heavy equip., all must go, $1100/all, CRR. 541-923-4161,541-788-3896

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Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS SUPER TOP SOIL

www.hersheysoilandbark.com Snow Removal Equipment Screened, soil & compost

Misc. Items

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3050. 541-385-4790.

FOUND: Bike in Mirror Pond parking lot. Call to identify, (541)693-3613. FOUND: Cat, very friendly, dark tabby, no collar, Old Bend/ Redmond Hwy. 541-385-5283 Found on 4/14, backpack at roundabout in SW Bend. Call to identify at 541-382-1811. Found: Toy Poodle, small, grey, Near Summit High, 4/18, call to ID, 541-390-6859. FOUND: Young Female cat on Georgia & Bond on 4/13/10, to identify 541-408-5395. LOST: 4/11 Male Toy Aussie in Chemult, red & white markings, answers to John Wayne Reward 541-923-2353. LOST Day Planner/Appt. Book, 4/14, NE Bend near Twin Knolls Dr. 541-520-7602.

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Farm Equipment and Machinery

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Estate Sales

small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com Gelding, 7 yr. old dark brown King Fritz breeding, 15.2 hands, gentle trail hors $3,750. 541-447-7780.

QUALITY REGISTERED PERFORMANCE HORSES all ages. 541-325-3376.

Special Low 0% APR Financing New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $13,975

Sale Price $11,975

Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your ga316 rage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility Irrigation Equipment poles! www.bendbulletin.com 7’ WHEEL LINES, 5” pipe, approx 1/4 mile self levelors, good cond. $7000 each. 541-546-2492.

H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit

Hay, Grain and Feed

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Excellent hay for horses. $120/ton & $150/ton 541-549-3831

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

341 John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Hay, Grain and Feed

S u p e r b S is t e r s G r a s s H a y no weeds, no rain,

Reach thousands of readers!

LOST: Horse in Culver, Grula/Gray mare, in the area of Green Drive & King Lane. Please call 541-480-5221.

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Farm Market

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

325

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Reg. AQHA Black Mare & Colt, Bunny Bid, Truly, Truckle, Barred, Skookum Bars, He’s A Commander, on papers, 541-480-7085.

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Livestock & Equipment Feeder Steers, pasture ready, 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

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Sales Redmond Area

2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small Farmers Column bales, in barn, exc. quality, load any time, $150/ton. A farmer that does it right & is Lonepine, 541-480-8673 or on time. Power no till seed541-548-5747 ing, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying serCheaper Than Feed Store! vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher Premium Orchard Grass Hay, control. 541-419-4516 small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy Looking for your next 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll employee? store the rest until needed. Place a Bulletin help By ton, 1st cut/$125, 2nd wanted ad today and cut/$135. Near Alfalfa Store. reach over 60,000 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail readers each week. kerrydnewell@hotmail.com Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard currently receives over Grass $115 a ton. Madras 1.5 million page views 541-390-2678. every month at no extra cost. Orchard Grass Hay Bulletin Classifieds small bales covered $150 Get Results! a ton, Feeder Hay small Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bales $90 a ton. Tumalo bendbulletin.com 541-322-0101.

Garage Sale - Sat. April 24, 8:30-4:00. Four-wheeler and lots of misc. 3180 SW Wickiup Ave., Redmond. 541-923-5222

Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $150 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $3 per bale. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

(Private Party ads only)

BarkTurfSoil.com

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O r e g o n

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Sales Northwest Bend Multi Family Sat. 9-4 & Sun. 9-3, 1550 NW Milwaukie sporting goods, antiques, housewares, tools clothes.

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HEY!

HAY!

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

DEALS ABOUND! LOOK IN OUR

mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Weed Wacker, Sears Craftsman 4 cycle, used 4 time, sacrifice $95. 541-923-1615

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS

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*Additional charges may apply.

Building Materials

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .


G2 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

CAUTION

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

541-322-7253

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

454

Looking for Employment Looking for caretaker job. Have exp. w/all livestock, ranch mgmnt. and security. Honest & reliable. 541-921-8748.

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-610-2799

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Automotive Service Advisor Needed. First class automotive dealership is looking for a experienced, hard working, honest, CSI driven individual to compliment our dealership. Send resume and work history to: PO Box 6676, Bend, OR 97708. "CAREER OPEN HOUSE" Meet and introduce yourself to key Real Estate Principal Brokers in Central Oregon Thurs. April 22 5:30 to 7:00 at Superior Schools 61419 S Hwy 97 Bend, OR 541-388-1021 CAREGIVERS NEEDED In home care agency presently has openings for caregivers, part/full-time, in Bend & Sunriver area. Must have ODL/Insurance & pass criminal background check. Call Doreen or Evangelina for more information. Se habla espanol. 541-923-4041 from 9 am.-6pm, Mon.-Fri.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Front Desk - position for WorldMark/Eagle Crest. 2 graveyard shifts. Part- time. Year Round, Drug Free Workplace. Please apply at Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel) General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

HVAC/Service Technician HVAC company looking for experienced Service Technician, must be refrigerant certified. Fax resume & qualifications to: 541-382-8314.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Machinist Minimum 5 years lathe and milling experience. Operate CNC equipment, including set-up, adjustment and tool change. Read and edit machine programs. Competitive pay and benefits. Please send resume to Box 16150477, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288. Medical

Harney District Hospital, 25 bed Critical Access Hospital in Burns OR is growing and needs additional staff. Medical Positions: •House Supervisor, Nights – RN required •Surgical Service Manager – RN, Experienced in OR •Surgical Scrub Tech •Cert. Nursing Assistants •MT or MLT Denise Rose Harney District Hospital 541-573-5184 drose@harneydh.com

Medical - LPN/RN Charge Nurse part time position avail., swing shift. Contact Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667.

Medical RCM Position RN with knowledge of MDS/RAPS, contact Kim, Ochoco Care, 541-447-7667. dns@ochococare.com Office Position: Manufacturing company seeking to fill office position. Successful applicant will be qualified, high energy, detail oriented and accept responsibility as an individual and as part of a team. Responsibilities incl. answering 5 line telephone, taking, quality checking & invoicing customer orders, some accounts receivable, processing incoming & outgoing mail. Pre-employement drug screen. Benefits package after 90 days. Please apply in person at 320 SE Bridgeford Blvd., Ste. 1, Bend, 97702. Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

541-383-0386

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

SALES AGENT Real estate new home sales agent needed for largest builder in Oregon. Only apply if you have a proven track record. High pressure environment. Email your resume to resume01@pdxdhi.com.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

H Sunriver

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

H

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

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Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Sales

Operate Your Own Business

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

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Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted A-1 Room in nice clean, SW Redmond home, $350 incl. utils. 548-4084 for more info.

616

Want To Rent Female, Active Senior, needs to rent bedroom & bath in clean home for a few months after July 1st. 760-777-8360.

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges OCEANFRONT EXECUTIVE HOMES Rent now for Summer. Waldport. Sleeps 10-16. www.rodbyroost.com 541-923-0908 Vacations For Sale! $950 ea. 3 diff. weeks; 1 week for 5/25-6/1, 3 bdrm penthouse sleeps 6, kid friendly! Pick your favorite spot & call ASAP! 541-480-9407.

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Rooms for Rent NE Bend, area of 8th & Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., pet OK, $400. 541-317-1879 Room in nice spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath home, huge fenced yard, pets? Fully furnished, all util. pd., near shopping & bus stop, $500,541-280-0016 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

1302 NW Knoxville, Westside 2 bdrm. condo, W/S/G paid, woodstove, W/D hookups, deck storage, $575 + $550 dep. Cat okay, 541-389-9595. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 1st Month! 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special

573

Training Provided; I am selling my 1/2 of a license to provide services for Central OR people w/learning disabilities. Req. exp. working w/children 541- 504-2536 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570 Great location at 1628 NE 6th St., 2 bdrm., 1 bath, 675 sq. ft. duplex w/ new glass top range & fridge., W/D hook-up, spacious yard & flower garden, underground sprinkler system w/ lawn care, $650./mo. Call 541-382-0162,541-420-0133

HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, Move in Special! Quiet Town home 2/1.5 W/D. Private W/D hookups, near St. Balcony and lower Patio, Charles. $550/mo. Call storage W/S/G paid $650 541-385-6928. 2022 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

Business Opportunities currently bidding the “Bend Pine Administration Project” for the US Forest Service in Bend Oregon. All local subcontractors and vendors are encouraged to submit proposals. If you would like to be included in our pool of Subcontractors and Suppliers please contact us at robb@dwg1.com or marlon@dwg1.com prior to the 22th of April. DWG looks forward to hearing from you.

www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

1/2 OFF 1ST MO. Duplex, 2/1, W/D hookups, dbl. garage, very spacious, new, W/S incl., no smoking, avail. now, $700 Rob, 541-410-4255

1/2 off 1st month! 2 bdrm, 1 bath duplex at 1777 NE Tucson. Gas stove, gaNext to Pilot Butte Park rage, W/D hookup, W/S/G 1989 Zachary Ct. #4 included. $625 month + de1962 NE Sams Loop #4 posit. Pets okay! Call 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full 541-815-4830 baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with 1/2 OFF 1ST MONTH! opener. $675 mo., $337.50 PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 1st mo., incl. w/s/yard care, 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireno pets. Call Jim or Dolores, place. Only $710/mo. w/ one 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260 year lease. 541-815-2495

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

DWG & Associates is

1/2 Month Free! 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, A/C, from $750-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199.

Call 541-385-5809


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 634

640

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Newer Duplex 2/2 close to hospital & Costco garage w/opener. yard maint., W/D, W/S no smokimg. pet? $725 +$725 dep. 541-420-0208. Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave., $610 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, near college, no smoking/pets. 420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

$595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D in unit. front balcony, storage, no pets. 1558 SW NANCY, 541-382-6028.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 1st Month Free 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. Close to schools, on-site laundry, no-smoking units, storage units, carport, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com 3 Bdrm, 2 bath duplex, 2605 SW 24th St., garage, fenced yard, sprinkler system, small pet & section 8 okay, $725, avail. 4/15, 541-480-2233 A Large 1 bdrm. cottage-like apt in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs. Reduced to $550+utils. 541-420-7613

Ask Us About Our

April Special!

541-385-5809 209 NW Portland: Quiet one bedroom, W/S/G/cable paid, oak cabinets, appl., microwave. Carport, laundry, no smoking, cat OK. $575/mo. $500 dep., 541-383-2430.

65155 97th St., 2/1 duplex on 2.5 acres, $850; 1/1, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No smoking/pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414

Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS!

Awbrey Butte Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Great Westside Location! 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath in 4-Plex close to COCC, Century Dr. 1506 NW Juniper. $575/mo. 541-350-9421 On The River, In Town! 1 & 2 bdrms. starting at $540. W/S/G+cable paid, no pets/ smoking, call 541-598-5829 until 6pm. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 1/2 Off First Month’s Rent 1630 SE Temptest Dr. #7 2 bdrm/ 1.5 bath, single garage, w/s pd., w/d hook-up, no pets. $675+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

20350 SE Fairway, 2/1.5, large duplex unit, fenced back yard, garage, W/D hook-up, W/S paid, $695+ $650 dep. 541-280-7188

STONE CREEK APARTMENTS 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments 3 bdrm, 2 bath townhomes with garages. W/D included, gas fireplaces. 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend Call about Move-In Specials 541-312-4222

personals New to Bend, very fit 40 good looking male, looking for girl to get to know. Like metal detecting, jogging, working out and having fun 280-9759 Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. J.D.

• 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 G3

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775

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880

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Commercial for Rent/Lease

Homes for Sale

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

WEST SIDE walk to downtown 1 plus bdrm. W/D, quiet St., large fenced yard, detached garage, W/D, pet OK w/dep. $750 mo., Avail 6/1. 541-382-4530.

3000, 1500, & 2500 Sq.ft. Units, light industrial, 1 block W of Hwy 97, 2 blocks N. of Greenwood. Lets make a deal! Call Tom 541-408-6823

650

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent NE Bend 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, single car garage, storage, W/D hookup, fenced yard, exc. location, additional parking, $750 mo+dep. 541-382-8399. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. garage, wood stove, micro, fenced yard, near hospital, $895 + dep., pets considered, 541-389-0573,541-480-0095

654

Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $995/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

656

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Houses for Rent SW Bend

1 Mi. S. of Walmart, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1340 sq.ft., “Super Good Cents” dbl. wide Near Bend High School, 4 w/carport, all appl. incl W/D, bdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 $765+utils, 541-312-8633. sq. ft., large carport, no smoking, $995/mo. + deps. 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. 541-389-3657 newer carpet & paint, woodstove, garage fenced yard on .92 acre lot $795 652 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. Houses for Rent 3 Bdrm., 1 bath 1144 sq.ft., NW Bend gas fireplace, garage, $795 mo., 1st/ last, $700 cleaning Awbrey Butte: 3 Bdrm., dep. 60847 Emigrant Circle 2.5 bath newer home, quiet 541-389-8059,541-480-9041 side street, hardwood, pet OK $1250 +dep. 808-895-3868 3 Bdrm., 2 bath mfd. 1440 sq.ft, family room w/wood or 541-383-0941 stove, all new carpet, pad & Awbrey Butte, Huge City Views, paint, big lot, db l. garage, Custom Cedar, 3/2.5, 2500 $ 895. 541-480-3393,610-7803 sq.ft., large yard, hardwoods, 650 NW Sonora Dr, $1700, DRW 2+2+2, Above Dillon Falls, Cozy Cabin, Quiet 541-389-7499. Avail. 6/1. Neighborhood, 1 yr. lease, $850+$1100 cleaning dep. Near Shevlin Park, 1 level 541-549-1611, 541-350-6216 open floorplan, great kitchen 3/2, gas fireplace, A/C, Walking Distance to Old W/D, dbl. garage, fenced Mill, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. yard $1400. 541-678-5064. garage w/opener, fenced yard, sprinkler sys. pet OK On 10 Acres between Sisters & $1150 $700 dep. 815-5141. Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ 658 wood stove, all new carpet & Houses for Rent paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, Redmond fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803.

• Providence • 3 Bdrm, 2.5bath, A/C, 1800 sq.ft., $1125 mo. 3011 NE Charleston Court 541-306-5161 Tumalo: 5 Min. from Bend, nice 3/2 house, 2150 sq.ft., dbl. garage, $1100/mo., 1st/last/$500 dep. No pets or smoking. (541)317-8794

Westside, Cute 3 bdrm., 1 bath house, tile & hardwood, attached carport, fenced yard, dog okay, $900/mo. (1416 NW 5th St.) 541-389-5408

$350 MOVE-IN SPECIALS EXTENDED for Apts. & Multi-plexes at: COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053 •NOT THE TAJ MAHAL but livable. 1 bdrm, 1 bath with large shared yard and extra storage. Near Pioneer Park. Pet OK. Only $395 mo. • COZY 2 bdrm, 1 bath Apt. with small fenced back yard. Just $425/mo includes WST. • CLOSE TO PIONEER PARK Private 2 bdrm, 1 bath upstairs apts. with on-site laundry and off-street parking. Cute balconies. $495 includes WSG. •REDMOND APT. -2 bdrm, 1 bath lower unit, end of quiet dead-end st., A/C and Private patio. $495 includes WST. •CLOSE TO KIWANIS PARK - 2 bdrm, 1bath apt., some new carpet and refurbishment. Upstairs unit close to laundry room. Only $495 per mo. •SPACIOUS APTS. 2 bdrm, 1 bath near Old Mill District. $525 mo. includes CABLE + WST - ONLY 1 left! •NICE APTS. NEAR HOSPITAL - 1 Up/1 Down 2 bdrm/1 bath. On-site laundry and Off-street parking. $540 mo., WST included. •FURNISHED Mt. Bachelor Condos - 1 bdrm/1 bath, $595, $645 mo. includes WST & Wireless. (1 @ $550 - only partially furnished) •NEAR DOWNTOWN - Spacious cottage, 3 bdrm/ 1 bath. W/D hookups. Pet Considered. Just $595 includes WST. •LARGE TOWNHOME - 3 bdrm, 1½ bath w/W/D hookups. Totally private back deck. Covered parking. Extra storage. New paint & carpet! Just $595 mo. incl. WST. • BEST DEAL! SW TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath with garage, & W/D included. Gas heat. Not far from Old Mill Dist. $650/ mo. includes garbage. ½ Mo. FREE Rent! •PEACEFUL SERENITY Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath mfd home on Huge Lot in DRW. Must see. $650 mo. •NEAR TOWN & RIVER 3 bdrm, 1½ bath townhome w/W/D hookups and extra storage. Small pet considered with deposit. $695 incl. WST. •HUGE FENCED YARD comes with this 2 bdrm/1 bath house with garage and W/D hookups. gas forced air heat. $695 per mo. •MODERN DUPLEX 2 bdrm/2bath, garage, vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace, small pet? $725 Includes WS. •SPACIOUS CONDO w/ 2 MASTERS +½ bath + Washer/Dryer + Dbl. Garage + Space & storage galore + Corner fireplace + Pool +Tennis courts. Only $750 mo. (excluded from Move In Special) • WONDERFUL PRIVATE HOME: 3 bdrm/2 bath, dbl. garage. Partial fenced backyard, new hardwood floors and carpet. Wood stove. MUST SEE. $875 mo.. ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website (REDMOND PROPERTIES, TOO!) www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

$1095, Immaculate 3/2.5, Charming Craftsman, mountain views, fireplace, avail now, open Sat 1-3 pm, 4144 SW Rhyolite, 541-923-6677. 2 Bedroom, 1 bath on 1326 SW Obsidian Avenue, $550 mo. +635 deposit. 541-447-1616 or 541-728-6421 3 Bdrm. Duplex, garage, fenced yard, $650/mo. No Application Fee, Pets considered, references required. Call 541-923-0412.

Beautiful 3 bdrm., 2 bath w/4th bdrm./den in Majestic Ridge. 3 car garage. Great room style plus bonus room. Mountain views. $1,350/mo includes landscaping. Pet OK. 4038 SW Summit Ave. Call 541-598-4413. Nice 2/2 double garage, $700/mo.+dep. Clean 3/2 dbl. garage, $850/mo.+dep. C R R No smoking pet neg. 541-350-1660,541-504-8545

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver Cozy, Quiet 2/1, fridge., W/D, fenced yard, $625/mo. + last & $450 dep. Pets? Avail. 5/10. 54789 Wolf St. 805-479-7550 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds GREAT OF

SELECTION RENTALS

Visit our web page at www.village-properties.com Or call 866-931-1061

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 3+ BDRM., 1 BATH, stick built, on 1 acre, RV carport, no garage, $675/mo. Pets? 16180 Eagles Nest Rd. off Day Rd. 541-745-4432

676

Mobile/Mfd. Space Mobile Home Lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464.

Shop With Storage Yard, 12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. storage Yard. Small office trailer incl. Redmond convenient high visibility location $750 month. 541-923-7343

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Office/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

700 705

Real Estate Services

Northwest Bend Homes 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1100 sq. ft. recently upgraded w/ granite counters, tile and laminate flooring. Hot tub with privacy deck. Dbl. garage plus 3 storage/shop bldgs. On approx. 1/3 acre w/ irrigation, near Tumalo School. $199,500. 541-419-6408

747 FSBO: $198,000 Golden Mantle Subdivision 1234 sq.ft., 3/2, 1/3rd acre treed lot, decking, fully fenced backyard. 541-312-2711. Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

Debris Removal

Appliance removal, reinstalled, gas lines, handyman services. CBC#49072. Since 1969. Special: $89 Local! 541-318-6041 or 408-3535.

JUNK BE GONE

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Concrete Construction

Three Generations Of Local Excavation Experience. Quality Work With Dependable Service. Cost Effective & Efficient. Complete Excavation Service With Integrity You Can Count On. Nick Pieratt, 541-350-1903 CCB#180571

Domestic Services Desert Rose Cleaning Now taking new clients in the Powell Butte, Redmond & Prineville areas. 20 Years Exp., Honest & Reliable. Call Gina, (541)788-0986 Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., References. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 541-390-5033

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

C-2 Utility Contractors Avail. for all of your Excavation Needs: Backhoe, Trench, Plow, Rock Saw, and Boring. 541-388-2933.

Decks Handyman

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Excavating

I DO THAT!

Decks * Fences New-Repair-Refinsh Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Cascade Concrete

Drywall

where square, plumb & level is not an extra, commercial, residential, 34+yrs. in Bend. No job too big or small, ccb16071 call for FREE estimates. 541-382-1834.

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Handyman

All Home Repairs & Remodels,

Roof-Foundation

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

850

Snowmobiles

mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $3000, call 541-280-5524.

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

713

Real Estate Wanted Struggling with payments? I will buy your house or take over payments. Rapid debt relief. 541-504-8883 or 541-385-5977

740

Condominiums & Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE C O N D O , ski house #3, end unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, complete remodel $197,000 furnished. 541-749-0994.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

745

Homes for Sale ***

CHECK YOUR AD

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541390-1609 or 541-390-1527. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

860

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvas enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080. Honda Shadow 1100 Spirit 2005, red, windshield, glass bags, sissy bar & rack, 16K mi., $4500. 541-815-8025 Yamaha Road Star Midnight Silverado 2007, Black, low mi., prepaid ProCaliber maint. contract (5/2011), Yamaha Extended Service warranty (2/2013), very clean. $8900 541-771-8233.

865

762

Golden West 1995, top of the line, in Queens Garden in Prineville, 28x40, 3/2, like new inside & out, reduced to $28,000, 541-233-2027

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

ATVs

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Polaris Predator 90 2006, new paddles &

wheels, low hours, $1400; Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, SOLD both exc. cond., all 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

870

Boats & Accessories

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. PONTOON BOAT, 9’ Outcast/Aire, Oars and bags, $400, David. 541-771-8762.

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Fire Fuels Reduction

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Low rates, Quality Work, Clean up & haul, repair & improve, fences, odd jobs, and more. 541-306-4632, CCB#180267

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Ask us about

Landscape Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

541-385-5809

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

881

Travel Trailers

Dutchman 26’ 2005, 6’ slide, excellent condition, with Adirondack Package, $14,000, call 541-447-2498. JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds 12 FT. Valco, 7.5 Merc., Calkins trailer, trolling motor, licensed thru 2011, cover, exc. cond. $2,500. 548-5642.

Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

(This special package is not available on our website)

FIND IT! Find It in BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds! The Bulletin Classifieds

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Weed free bark & flower beds

Tioga 31’ SL 2007, Ford V-10, dining/kitchen slide out, rear queen suite, queen bunk, sleep sofa,dinette/bed,sleeps 6-8, large bathroom, 12K, rear camera, lots of storage, $64,900 OBO, 541-325-2684

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NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Motorhomes

Masonry

Spring Clean Up

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833.

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Please check your ad on the Homes with Acreage first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes in- Sunriver Area, framed 2 bdrm., structions over the phone are 1 bath, “U” driveway w/ exmisunderstood and an error tra parking, large detached can occur in your ad. If this garage/shop, groomed 1.47 happens to your ad, please acres, $224,900. Call Bob, contact us the first day your 541-593-2203. ad appears and we will be 771 happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: WeekLots days 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun- WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. SE Bend. Super Cascade If we can assist you, please Mountain Views, area of nice call us: homes & BLM is nearby too! 385-5809 Only $199,950. Randy The Bulletin Classified Schoning, Broker, John L. *** Scott, 541-480-3393. Foreclosures For Sale 775 BANK OWNED HOMES Manufactured/ 100’S TO CHOOSE FROM Oregon Group Realty, LLC. Mobile Homes 541-389-2674 Beautiful Smith Rock 55+ Looking to sell M H P 2 bdrm., 1 bath, all your home? appl., very cute mobile, RV Check out space $9000 terms w/down Classification 713 payment. 541-647-2992.. "Real Estate Wanted" Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153.

Motorcycles And Accessories

Southeast Bend Homes

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

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FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty. Price reduced! NOW $98,000. 541-389-7596

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* Real Estate Agents * Northeast Bend Homes * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Mountain View Park 1997 Etc. 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in The Real Estate Services classigated community $169,900. fication is the perfect place to Terry Storlie, Broker John L. reach prospective B U Y E R S Scott Realty. 541-788-7884 AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To 749 place an ad call 385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Appliance Sales/Repair

Boats & RV’s

16.5 FT. 1980 Seaswirl, walk through windshield, open bow, EZ Load trailer, 2003 Suzuki outboard, 115 hp., 55 mph or troll 1.5 mph all day on 2 gal. of gas $5,500. 541-420-2206

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100

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Southwest Bend Homes

Real Estate For Sale

MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appliances, decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704 Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. 541-390-3382

MASONRY Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD Four Leaf Clover Lawn Service wants to get your lawn off to a great start with our thatch & aeration process at 25% off. Experienced, knowledgable care. FREE Estimates, 541-504-8410 or 541-279-0746

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Mahler Homes, LLC

Painting, Wall Covering

Additions, Kitchens, Bathrooms, General Remodeling. Design Services Available. CCB#158459. 541-350-3090

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012. RODRIGO CHAVEZ LAWN MAINTENANCE Full Service Maintenance 10 Years Experience, 7 Days A Week, 541-408-2688 *JAKE’S Yardscaping* Big or Small We Do It All! High Quality, Low Rates 18+Years Exp., Call Jake at 541-419-2985 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Exterior/Interior, Carpentry & Drywall Repairs

Randy, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

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The Bulletin

All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765. Don 385-4949

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-4977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN 881

Travel Trailers

Komfort 26’ 2006, slide, solar, equalizer hitch, very clean, Reduced $14,500, 541-548-0525/541-728-8658

Autos & Transportation

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Aircraft, Parts and Service

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 933

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Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Chevy Silverado 1500 1994 4WD, 123K, X-Cab, Gemtop canopy $5500,541-593-6303

1978 Bonanza A36, 1/3 partnership, $60,000. 1959 C150 1/3 $4,000. 541-390-9877 Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465

Terry Dakota 30’ 2003, Ultra Lite, upgraded, 13’ slide, 18’ awning, rubber roof queen island bed, 2 swivel rockers $12,000 541-923-1524

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718 Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Fifth Wheels

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig., $2500, please call 541-389-8971 for more info.

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

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Utility Trailers

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Ford F250 XLT Lariat 1989, 111K, 460, 7.5 litre,

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Tires, Set of (4) 265-70-17, exc. cond. $200 call for more info. 541-280-7024.

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

MONTANA 3400RL 2005, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., loaded, $34,000. Consider trade for a 27’-30’ 5th Wheel or Travel Trailer. 541-410-9423 or 541-536-6116.

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Buick Lucerne 2008, V6, auto, OnStar, MP3, loaded famtastic cond. good tires, $12,500. 541-953-6774.

Find It in

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classifieds

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

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Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

CHEVY C10 V8 1968,

all original, newer engine, new gas tank, exc. cond., $3900. 541-923-1615.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

CHEVY NOVA 1972, 454, 4 speed, 10 bolt, wheels & tires. Nice, Fun Car! $8500. 541-693-4767.

Wagon

1957,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Ford Expedition 2006 XLT 4X4 V8, Loaded, New Tires, A Must See, $14,999, Call 541-390-7780 .

Mini Cooper S 2005, red & white, 14K mi.,premium pkg., dynamic stabilization, fog & Xenon lights, nose mask, $18,500, 541-923-8001.

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The Bulletin Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

Pontiac Solstice 2006 convertible, 2-tone leather interior, par. everything, air, chrome wheels, 11,900 mi, $16,000, 541-447-2498 Rare 1999 Toyota Celica GT, red w/black top convet., 5 spd., FWD, 90K, $8995 541-848-7600, 848-7599.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARU FORESTER 1998, ABS All Wheel Drive, automatic, air conditioning, snow tires and rims, ps, pl, pw, 159,000 miles, AM/FM, roof rack, runs great! Retiree. Blue book price $5,700. will sell for $3,700. 541-306-6883.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Ford Thunderbird Convertible 2003, 5 spd. auto. trans, leather, exc. cond., 74K, $14,999. 541-848-8570

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, loaded, Extended warranty, $23,900, 541-549-4834

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $17,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,500, w/o winch $23,500, 541-325-2684 Jeep Wrangler Sahara, 2008 2 door, only 27K, factory warranty, hard top with removable T-tops, auto, side air bags, loaded many extras, A/C, premium chrome wheels & tires, 6 CD, BB $28,000 Reduced to $22,950. 928-210-8323 Bend. See Craig’s List for pics.

Volvo XC90 2008, Mint cond., Black on Black, 17,700 mi., warranty $33,000 541-593-7153,503-310-3185

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

KIA Spectra SX 2006, 4 dr., 49K mi., $6500. (530)310-2934, La Pine.

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $700 OBO. 541-536-3490

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

VW Super Beetle 1974,

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Ford Mustang GT Premium Coupe 2010, 2K mi. Candy Red/Saddle , auto, 6 options, $32,900. 541-728-0843

Ford Excursion Limited 2001, 4WD, loaded, 100,400 mi., exc. shape, $11,500 OBO, call 541-944-9753.

Mercedes E320 2003, 32K!!! panoramic roof, $19,950. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203.

SUBARUS!!!

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, flawless, only 1700

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, micro., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Drastic Price Reduction!

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

(Private Party ads only)

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

Antique and Classic Autos

Chevy

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

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Automobiles

Audi Quattro 20V 1990, Manual Transmission, Pearl White, 4-Door, 218K, New Timing Belt and Water Pump, Good Tires, Selling this for $1800 O.B.O call Larry at 541-610-9614

360 Sprint Car

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

4x4, long bed, good cond. in & out, power windows & locks, auto., A/C, CD, tow pkg., new tires & water pump, both window motors new, new brakes, runs & drives great, well maint. $3,300 OBO. 541-350-9938.

Jeep Comanche 1990 Sportruck w/canopy 78K miles runs well but needs work $700. 541-383-2939.

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

940

Vans

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red,

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500 OBO541-689-1351

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884 Saturn Vue 2003, AWD, 90K, burnt orange, 4 door, A/C, auto., cruise $8,400. 541-848-7600 or 848-7599.

Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, $6210. Call 541-350-7017.

Mercedes 300SD 1981, never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Sealed bids for construction of the Central Oregon Community College #1324-10 Pence/Pinckney Building Tenant Improvement will be received by: Joe Viola, Construction Project Manager at Metolius Hall, Room 214, 2600 NW College Way Bend, Oregon until 2:00 P.M., local time, Thursday May 6, 2010, and then publicly opened and read aloud. Bids received after this time will not be accepted. A mandatory pre bid walk through will be held on Wednesday April 28, at 9am at the project location in Pence Hall. Please gather in the lower parking lot under Pence. Briefly, the Work is described as follows: Interior renovation of existing spaces to provide offices and classrooms, exit stair, and increase ADA accessibility for the building. The project will be located at 2600 NW College Way, Bend Oregon and will incorporate approximately 8,540 square feet of floor area. For the project, lump sum bid will be received on forms provided in these Specifications. Two complete sets of Drawings and Project Manual may be ordered by prime bidders only from Ford Graphics, upon deposit of One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) per set. Prime bidders are defined as General Contractors. Additional sets or partial sets may be purchased for cost of reproducing same, paid before or at time of delivery. Deposits made upon procurement of Drawings and Project Manuals will be refunded upon return thereof in good condition to Ford Graphics by actual bidders within two weeks after opening of bids and to non-bidders if returned no later than one week prior to bid opening. Ford Graphics: Portland - 401 N.W. 14th Avenue, Portland, OR 97209 | Tel: 503.227.3424 Fax: 503.223.4254 Bend - 1151 S.E. Centennial Ct. #3 Bend, OR 97702 | Tel: 541.749.2151 Fax: 541.749.2154 No bid will be considered unless fully completed in manner provided in the BIDDING REQUIREMENTS upon Bid Form provided in these Specifications, and accompanied by certified check or bid bond executed in favor of Owner in amount not less than 10 percent of total amount of bid. Said certified check or bid bond shall be forfeited as fixed and liquidated damages should bidder neglect or refuse to enter into Contract and provide suitable bond for faithful performance of Work in event Contract is awarded to him. The College may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public contracting procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause all bids upon a finding of the agency that it is in the public interest to do so. The College reserves the right to waive any or all minor informalities or clerical errors as described in OAR 137-047-0470. No bidder may withdraw his bid after the hour set for opening until after lapse of forty-five (45) days from the bid opening. This project is subject to prevailing wage laws and is subject to Oregon Revised Statutes (ORS) 279C.800 through 279C.870 dealing with payment of prevailing wages. No bid will be received or considered by the College unless the bid contains a statement by the bidder that ORS 279C.838 or 279C.840 will be complied with. This project is subject to ORS 279C.370 dealing with disclosure of first tier subcontractors, 279A.120 giving preference to resident bidders, 279A.125 giving preference to recycled materials and 279A.110 discrimination in subcontracting. Central Oregon Community College By: Joe Viola PUBLICATION AND DATES: Bend Bulletin Portland Daily Journal of Commerce First Advertisement Tuesday, April 20, 2010, Second Advertisement Monday April 26, 2010 Mandatory Site Walk 9:00am, Thursday April 28, 2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031520836 T.S. No.: 10-08584-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ROBERT E. JOHNSON II AND DONNA J. JOHNSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 13, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-81431 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 264473 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLUE RIDGE, RECORDED NOVEMBER 15, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 514, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as; 60630 KIGER GORGE WAY, BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,480.59 Monthly Late Charge $58.44 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 446,615.03 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.35700 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FI-

DELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 30, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 6, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3522042 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.No.:T10-60575-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRIAN JOSEPH as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-10Â2005, recorded 03-31-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-19229 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AI'.N: 105841 LO T THREE (3) AND THE EAST FIFTEEN (15) FEET OF LOT TWO (2) IN BLOCK TWO (2) OF BEAR CREEK ROAD ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1115 NE BURNSIDE AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real properly to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,123.56 Monthly Late Charge $56.17 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared ail obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $175,577.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 11 -01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-12-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors m interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by die trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days

before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; March 31, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE CO CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORRE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3522299 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359046564 T.S. No.: OR-234952-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, OSCAR A MARTINEZ, A MARRIED MAN as Grantor to FIRST LAND TRUSTEE CORPORATION, as trustee, in favor of FIRST BANC MORTGAGE, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 3/30/2004, recorded 4/2/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-18066 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209096 LOT 29, FAIRHAVEN, PHASE V, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2121 NW CEDAR AVENUE REDMOND, OREGON 7756-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $128,378.70; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $957.23 Monthly Late Charge $36.10 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $128,378.70 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 8/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 5/11/2010 **Sale will postpone to 07/12/2010** at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 12/22/2009 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature ByCindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3387665 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031422439 T.S. No.: 10-08544-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHARLES A SCOTT, FRANCES F. SCOTT as Grantor to AMERTITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 31, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-72442 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 139468 LOT TEN (10), BLOCK

NINETY-SIX (96), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES UNIT 8 PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15632 TWIN DRIVE, LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $665.93 Monthly Late Charge $33.30 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 220,932.27 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.45700 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 28, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 6, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3522062 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601691693 T.S. No.: OR-238462-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JAMIE BERRY AND JASON BERRY, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LOANCITY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION., as Beneficiary, dated 8/30/2006, recorded 9/6/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-60868 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 244927 LOT 47, SUN MEADOW NO. 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61277 DAYSPRING DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $240,792.74; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,105.05 Monthly Late Charge $77.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $240,792.74 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/25/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, April 20, 2010 G5

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Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the

grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/4/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3440134 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031368913 T.S. No.: 10-08512-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WESLEY A. BOONE, HEATHER L. BOONE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-62843 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 245258 LOT SIXTY-SIX (66), DIAMOND BAR RANCH, PHASE 2, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2004, IN CABINET G, PAGE 451, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 784 NE QUINCE PLACE, REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obli-

gations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $843.49 Monthly Late Charge $32.92 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 233,058.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.85700 % per annum from October 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 26, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, to-

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030183271 T.S. No.: 10-08370-6. Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KENNETH B. CLARKE, MICHAEL ANN CLARKE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 19, 2003, as Instrument No. 2003-86079 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 114549 THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, STATE OF OREGON, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: THAT PART OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (W 1/2 NE 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, LYING SOUTH OF BURGESS ROAD. TOGETHER WITH A TRACT OF LAND IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NE 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4), SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 10, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE NORTH 89º49'41" EAST, A DISTANCE OF 486.56 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 01º31' 58" WEST, A DISTANCE OF 266.13 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 01º31'58" WEST, 87.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 89º47'01" EAST, 16.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 08º56' 26" WEST, 87.98 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (W 1/2 NE 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4 NW 1/4) OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 22 SOUTH, RANGE 10 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, WHICH DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 4; THENCE SOUTH 02º09'35" WEST, 144.07 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE BURGESS COUNTY ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89º10'33" EAST, 325.57 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY LINE NORTH 89º10'33" EAST, 16.50 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 00º32'43" EAST, 213.04 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89º47'01" WEST, 25.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01º44'31" EAST, 212.98 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 15631 BURGESS RD. LA PINE. OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $491.64 Monthly Late Charge $20.37 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared al! obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $57,532.27 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.87500 % per annum from November 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on August 2, 2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 6, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY LISA BRADFORD ASAP# 3522775 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0835 T.S. No.: 1267173-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Richard L. Brannin and Heidi N. Brannin, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Hyperion Capital Group, Llc, as Beneficiary, dated April 14, 2006, recorded April 21, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-27514 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 15 in block 13 of woodside ranch phase v, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known as: 60598 Ridge Heights Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due april 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,044.59 Monthly Late Charge $87.08. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $327,836.95 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from March 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest idder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 15 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299912 Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20

gether with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 6, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY JUAN ENRIQUEZ ASAP# 3522044 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359520704 T.S. No.: OR-239067-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JEDREK T. RZEGOCKI, ELIZABETH M. OLIVER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT , as Beneficiary, dated 6/7/2007, recorded 6/18/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-34202 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 242634 LOT THIRTY-ONE (31), VILLAGE POINTE PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2821 SW CASCADE AVENUE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $187,263.43; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $828.43 Monthly Late Charge $31.06 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $187,263.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late

charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/30/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed,

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359442893 T.S. No.: OR-203203-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CLIFF LYLE SCOTT, ALSO KNOWN AS C. LYLE SCOTT as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 12/8/2006, recorded 12/15/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-81806 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 149858 Beginning at a point on the East right of way line of Sherwood Road, now known as SW 61st Street, from which the Southwest comer of Section 1, Township 16 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, bears South 00º31'50" West 2009.74 feet; thence North 00º17'15" West along said right of way line 630.00 feet; thence North 89º55' East 195.00 feet; thence South 00º17'15" East, 630.00 feet; thence South 89º55' West 195.00 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 6392 SW 61ST STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $487,210.23; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, nd all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,086.53 Monthly Late Charge $65.74 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $487,210.23 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.625% per annum from 3/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/11/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/28/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3431728 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/9/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3446643 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0307721805 T.S. No.: OR-238535-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BARBARA CHABOT as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 6/1/2006, recorded 6/9/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-40057 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133697 That portion of the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 SE1/4) of Section 2, Township 17 South, Range 12, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at a point whence the South Quarter corner of said Section 2 bears South 34º43'55" West, 1201.15 feet; thence South 89º51'21" East, 673.57 feet; thence North 00º25'22" East, 330 feet; thence North 89º51'21" West, 672.98 feet; thence South 00º31'27" West, 330 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known

as: 64050 DESCHUTES MARKET RD. BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $427,667.77; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 8/1/2009 plus late ch arges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,143.04 Monthly Late Charge $91.83 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $427,667.77 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.375% per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/25/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of

the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/4/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3441323 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713903775 T.S. No.: OR-225063-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LISA ANN CUMMINS as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MIT LENDING, as Beneficiary, dated 11/30/2004, recorded 12/6/2004, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2004-72576 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 162930 A portion of the Southeast Quarter Southwest Quarter Southeast Quarter (SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4) of Section Twenty-six (26), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of the SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence North along the West line of said SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4, 660.65 feet to the Northwest corner of the SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence East, 166.10 feet; thence due South to a point which is 166.07 feet East of the Southwest corner of the SE1/4SW1/4SE1/4; thence West, 166.07 feet to the Point of Beginning. Commonly known as: 21456 NEFF ROAD BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $304,751.37; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,298.74 Monthly Late Charge $36.50 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $304,751.37 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 5/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/1/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3436313 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0655 T.S. No.: 1268267-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RONALD GUTHRIE AND DONNA GUTHRIE, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 1/31/2008, recorded 2/4/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-05296, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A tract of land located in the Southwest Quarter Southwest Quarter (SW1/4SW1/4) Section Twenty-six (26), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13) East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Section 26, also the true point of beginning; thence North 00º17'25" West along the West line of said Section 357.17 feet; thence North 8901413511 East, parallel with the South line of Section 26, 304.90 feet; thence South 00º17'25" East parallel with said West line 357.17 feet to the South line of said Section 26; thence South 89º14'35" West along said South line of Section 26, 304.90 feet to the true point of beginning. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1723 NORTHEAST ONEIL WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of April 7, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 6 payments at $ 2,351.99 each $ 14,111.94 (11-01-09 through 04-07-10) Late Charges: $ 588.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 112.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 14,811.94 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $369,525.18, PLUS interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on August 10, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 4/7/2010 By REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1St Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Todd E. Wilde and Heather M. Wilde, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 01, 2007, recorded August 10, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-44004 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A portion of lots seventeen (17) and eighteen (18), block three (3) of Clear Sky Estates, recorded April 7, 1977, in cabinet B, page 225, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Lot 18, Block 3, the true point of beginning of this description; thence West 130 feet to the East right of way of Sun Lane; thence North 0 deg, 4' 10" West 46.17 feet; thence along a curve to the right having a central angle of 41 deg, 24' 35" a radius of 30 feet, an arc distance of 21.68 feet; thence South 88 deg, 35' 17" East 122.54 feet; thence South 0 deg, 4' 10" East 63.00 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 728 SE Sun Ln. Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,699.33 Monthly Late Charge $69.75. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $195,506.99 together with interest thereon at 7.500% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 02, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 24, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is July 3, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird

ASAP# 3524146 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010, 05/11/2010

R-305478 04/20/10, 04/27, 05/04, 05/11

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92355


G6 Tuesday, April 20, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7429034796 T.S. No.: OR-158841-C Loan No: 7470991118 T.S. No.: OR-238030-C Loan No: 7472524909 T.S. No.: OR-200384-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, WILLIAM O. CHAPEL as Grantor to FIRST AMERI- Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRAE D RUNNELS AND KATHI A RUNNELS, AS Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KEVIN T. SAWYER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as CAN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTtrustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC., as Beneficiary, dated GAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER HOMEHOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Ben6/5/2006, recorded 6/12/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in COMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIeficiary, dated 2/22/2007, recorded 3/7/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-40219 (inABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 10/15/2006, recorded 10/17/2006, in official records book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-13793 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microdicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 111524 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK YY, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED file/reception No. 2006-69505 (indicated which), covering the following described real property to-wit: APN: 250897 LOT THIRTY-ONE (31), WESTBROOK VILLAGE, PHASE II, RECORDED JANUMARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 18891 situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247211 LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-THREE ARY 18, 2006, IN CABINET G, PAGE 1007, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: CHOCTAW ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the (123), CANYON RIM VILLAGE, PHASE 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61648 GEMINI WAY BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been re1619 NORTHWEST HEMLOCK AVENUE REDMOND, OREGON 97756 Both the beneficiary and the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foretrustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust corded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $224,415.16; plus accrued interest deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the closure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $280,638.20; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subdefault for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and $205,253.51; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on sequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,585.43 Monthly Late Charge $68.96 By 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon paylate charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,842.84 Monthly Late Charge $80.39 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of ments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $1,474.09 Monthly Late Charge $62.00 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $224,415.16 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from 1/1/2009 until all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the $280,638.20 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 3/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums following, to-wit: The sum of $205,253.51 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.25% per paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Stattrust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the underthe hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Dessigned trustee will on 6/18/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by ues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the exStreet, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his succesbidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had ecution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligapower to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any insors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the terest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust tions thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statdeed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, intrustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by cluding a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Secutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said princition 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dispayment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and missed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due pal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), toattorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before gether with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the mascuand the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is seline gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, cured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective succesin interest, if any. Dated: 1/29/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" sors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/1/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/28/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Marvell L. Carmouche Authorized Signatory OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 BurSale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory bank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized ASAP# 3433131 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010 Signatory ASAP# 3433548 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7492 T.S. No.: 1268916-09.

ASAP# 3431891 03/30/2010, 04/06/2010, 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0487 T.S. No.: 1263867-09.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Stephanie Perkins, A Single Woman, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Lehman Brothers Bank, Fsb, A Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 26, 2005, recorded September 30, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Or- Reference is made to that certain deed made by Andrew D. Bumstead And Norma J. Bumstead Tenegon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. ants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Di2005-66413 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, vision of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated July 10, 2007, recorded July 16, 2007, in offito-wit: cial records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, Lot 48 of Arrowhead, Phases I, II, III, and IV, City of Bend, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-39223 covering the following described real Deschutes County Oregon. property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lots one (1), two (2), and three (3), block four Commonly known as: (4), hillman city of terrebonne, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known as: 1845 C Ave Ter2887 Northeast Sedalia Loop Bend OR 97701. rebone Or 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real propBoth the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the oblierty to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to gations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due february 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsepounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced quent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment Monthly payment $1,461.46 Monthly Late Charge $60.70. By this reason of said default the ben$1,047.83 Monthly Late Charge $43.16. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared eficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $182,036.08 together with interest thereon at following, to-wit; The sum of $172,653.72 together with interest thereon at 6.000% per annum 6.875% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconof the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corpoveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Stanration the undersigned trustee will on July 19, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as dard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street enestablished by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Destrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State chutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest actrust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired afquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured ter the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under otice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. NOTICE TO March 12, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could afTENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A fect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be ennotice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or titled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evi60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental dence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the the date of the sale is June 19, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address sale is June 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal povOregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty erty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upobtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper per Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-WestDirectory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance ern Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299882 R-303433 04/06, 04/13, 04/20, 04/27 Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-9351 0

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx0101 T.S. No.: 1268630-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jason M. Higham and Angie K. Higham, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial Network, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated April 05, 2006, recorded April 17, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-26000 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 7 of Bradetich Park, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21417 Bradetich Loop Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,205.63 Monthly Late Charge $110.28. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $574,795.50 together with interest thereon at 3.500% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 22, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 10, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 22, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-303425 04/06, 04/13, 04/20, 04/27

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4499 T.S. No.: 1265121-09.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1464 T.S. No.: 1267131-09.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO Reference is made to that certain deed made by Sara A Schwarz, as Grantor to Western Title & EsCOLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. crow Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DONALD D. MCALLISTER, A MARRIED Beneficiary, dated May 24, 2007, recorded May 31, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon MAN, as grantor, to TICOR TITLE COMPANY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Trustee, in favor in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR PACIFIC MUTUAL 2007-30882 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, FUNDING, INC. DBA PACIFIC RESIDENTIAL FINANCING, as beneficiary, dated 1/18/2007, reto-wit: Lot fourteen (14), block fourteen (14) of northwest townsite co's second addition to bend, corded 2/1 2/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-08812, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. recorded november 6, 1912 in cabinet a, page 19, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently as: 1424 Nw Milwaukee Ave Bend Or 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to held by OneWest Bank, FSB Successor in Interest to IndyMac Federal Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the LOT 26 OF FAIRHAVEN, PHASES VII, VIII AND IX, CITY OF REDMOND, foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due august 1, 2009 of DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO DONALD D. MCALLISTER BY DEED together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions FROM FAIRHAVEN ASSOCIATES LLC RECORDED 02/27/2006 IN DOCUMENTS 200613273, of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,445.59 Monthly Late Charge $62.88. By this reason of IN THE LAND RECORDS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediThe street address or other common designation, if any, ately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $236,736.53 together of the real property described above is purported to be: with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late 386 NORTHWEST 25TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the benefiThe undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address ciary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 31, 2010 Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the 15 Delinquent payments $ 11,900.60 (01-01-09 through 03-29-10) Late Charges: $ 480.18 ighest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had Beneficiary Advances: $ 4,463.60 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 16,844.38 ALSO, if you have power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, $183,388.23, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 12/01/08 to 3/1/2009, 6.25% per at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the annum from 3/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and August 3, 2010, at the hour of 11:00AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is sale is June 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org 3/31/2010 By REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee CHAD JOHNSON, Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Information: http://www.rtrustee.com Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299897

Reference is made to that certain deed made by Christopher Ellingson and Karen R. Ellingson, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Group One Lending, A Division of Northwest Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated November 27, 2006, recorded November 29, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-78328 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 426 of riverrim pud phase 5, city of bend, Deschutes county, oregon. Commonly known as: 19568 Sager Loop Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due november 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,403.24 Monthly Late Charge $70.16. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $217,184.34 together with interest thereon at 6.375% per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction o the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 02, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a tixed-tenn lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is june 15, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-299911

ASAP# 3515702 04/13/2010, 04/20/2010, 04/27/2010, 05/04/2010

Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13/, 04/20

Publication Dates: 03/30, 04/06, 04/13, 04/20


Bulletin Daily Paper 04/20/10