Issuu on Google+

Bend’s back problems

A lesson in hiking with kids

Doctors want to decrease the high rate of surgeries here • HEALTH, E1

OUTING, E1

Tumalo Falls

WEATHER TODAY

THURSDAY

Morning showers High 45, Low 15 Page C6

• April 8, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Most of what’s $18M in debt, filing bankruptcy left of Epic Air Local commercial mogul’s restructuring will have ripple effects to stay in Bend By Cindy Powers The Bulletin

Its former customers will share marketing rights to the LT model with a Chinese company, but there’s still a dispute over the rent

A once controversial area businessman who owns about $6 million in real estate throughout Central Oregon has filed for

bankruptcy in a case that involves “one of the largest” Deschutes County property tax delinquencies in recent memory. Federal court documents show Patrick Gisler has about $18 mil-

lion in outstanding debt including loans for commercial properties in downtown Bend and Tumalo. In the documents, Gisler also lists about $8 million in assets. Gisler’s petition was originally

NEWLY HATCHED, BUT TOO LATE FOR EASTER

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

PORTLAND — Bankrupt Bend aircraft maker Epic Air will fly again — or at least the vestiges of the company will, under new ownership. A group of former customers of the kit airplane maker, located at Bend Municipal Airport, emerged from a bankruptcy hearing Tuesday with control of the company after initially being ranked third of three suitors. Following the hearing, its leaders vowed to continue building airplanes in Bend. “We did it,” said Daryl Ingalsbe, flashing a grin and a thumbs-up. Ingalsbe and Doug King had joined with other former customers in an effort to keep the company building its “Epic LT” kit model in Bend, only to be outbid by a Kansas firm as well as a Chinese government-owned company, both of which initially proposed to move Epic’s assets with them. Last week, however, federal bankruptcy judge Randall Dunn required that the highest bidder, a Beijing subsidiary of Aviation Industry Corp. of China, cut a deal with the customers’ group, called LT Builders Group. See Epic Air / A5

With forecasts calling for even more snow in the Central Cascades through early next week, the Oregon Department of Transportation announced Wednesday it would extend the studded tire deadline again, now until April 17, to help drivers deal with potentially difficult conditions. But the extra snow and cold weather is welcome to irrigators Inside and conservationists. • A snapshot “I always like to call the snowof the pack ‘white gold,’” said Steve snowpack, Johnson, director of the Central Page A6 Oregon Irrigation District. “What that represents is the flow in the rivers in the summer.” The snowpack jumped from its low of 57 percent of average on March 25 to 76 percent as of Wednesday morning — a welcome improvement, said Kyle Gorman, region manager with the Oregon Water Resources Department. “We’re making pretty good progress. It just builds our water supply up to a much better picture to what it was two weeks ago.” See Show / A6

Recent earthquakes offer tough lessons for the West Coast

Arrests may be the militia movement’s ‘gut-check’moment

By Brad Haynes The Associated Press

By Nicholas Riccardi and Richard Fausset Los Angeles Times

MON-SAT

U|xaIICGHy02329lz[

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

A gosling soaks up the afternoon sun Wednesday from the edge of its nest in southwest Bend after recently hatching. Canada geese usually begin nesting from late March to early May, according to the Wild Goose Chase bird management service based in the Midwest. A female goose will incubate her eggs until they hatch, about 28 days after laying. During the nesting and incubation period, the male stays near the nest and keeps a close eye on the female and the eggs. Goslings usually stay with their parents for a full year after they hatch. Geese have nested in this location, atop a boulder near The Bulletin building, for years.

Abby

E2

Business

B1-6

Calendar

E3

Classified G1-6

Comics

E4-5

Local

Crossword E5,G2

Movies

Editorial

Obituaries

Health

C4 F1-6

Outing

SANTIAGO, Chile — As the Easter earthquake shook Southern California, the state’s disaster management chief was thousands of miles away in Chile, examining what experts say is the best case study yet for how a truly catastrophic earthquake could impact the United States. Chile and America’s Pacific coast have more in common than their geology; they share advanced construction codes, bustling coastal cities, modern skyscrapers and veteran emergency services. These were all put to the test in Chile, which, despite extensive planning, lost 432 lives in the 8.8-magnitude earthquake and resulting tsunami — lessons that California, Oregon and Washington have yet to fully learn despite experience with lesser quakes. They include: Coastal flood maps mean nothing without local enforcement. Hospitals need to not only stay upright but also stay open. Stringent building standards require stringent inspections. And tourists need to be taught about the dangers of tsunamis, which caused the greatest loss of life in Chile, wiping out seaside campgrounds on the last weekend of summer vacation. See Quakes / A5

Clarification

INDEX

The Bulletin

Vol. 107, No. 98, 42 pages, 7 sections

It’s bad weather for drivers, but to area irrigators, it’s ‘white gold’ The Bulletin

HUTAREE AFTERMATH

An Independent Newspaper

• Map of the properties in and near Bend, Page A6

By Kate Ramsayer

The Associated Press

We use recycled newsprint

Inside

With the snowpack at 76%, officials aren’t as worried about water shortages next summer

A tattered American flag taped to a van’s antenna at the Whiting, Ind., home of a suspected Hutaree militia associate. The Michigan-based group is accused of planning attacks to spark an uprising against the U.S. government.

DENVER — Even in the extreme world of the militia movement, the Hutaree — eight men and one woman in southeastern Michigan accused of plotting to kill police to foment a revolution — stood out. They trained with other survivalist groups and attended at least one militia conference in Kentucky, according to court papers filed by federal prosecutors. But their neighbors in the militia movement were suspicious of the Hutaree’s Christian ideology and obsession with a coming apocalypse. “It’s just sad,” said Lee Miracle of the Southeast Michigan Volunteer Militia, which included some of the men who later joined the Hutaree. “They kind of drifted away and ended up more with a kind of cultlike group.” To experts who follow militias, the existence of the Hutaree — and the cool reaction it generally received from other militia groups — are reminders that the movement is far from monolithic. See Militias / A5

filed in Las Vegas in January, but Bank of the Cascades and Home Federal Bank have had the case moved to Oregon, according to a document showing that nearly $13 million of that debt is owed to Oregon creditors, including the Deschutes County Assessor. See Bankruptcy / A6

C1-6

Sports

D1-6

E3

Stocks

B4-5

C5

TV listings

E2

Weather

C6

E1-6

A misleading map appeared with a story headlined “VA soon will offer better care in Bend,” which published Wednesday, April 7, on Page A1. A map on Page C1 shows the locations of Bend Vet Center and Bend Community Based Outpatient Clinic.

TOP NEWS KYRGYZSTAN: Upheaval in Central Asia could imperil key U.S. air base, Page A3


A2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

541-385-5800 Phone hours: 5:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri., 6:30 a.m.-noon Sat.-Sun.

GENERAL INFORMATION

541-382-1811 NEWSROOM AFTER HOURS AND WEEKENDS

541-633-2157 NEWSROOM FAX

541-385-5804 ONLINE

www.bendbulletin.com E-MAIL

bulletin@bendbulletin.com

F / Education

MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY

New school lunch bill Concerns for Texas focuses on nutrition textbook changes By Kristen Wyatt Associated Press Writer

THORNTON, Colo. — A school food crackdown looming in Congress that aims to reduce childhood obesity went over like a wet potato chip at a suburban Denver elementary school where federal agriculture officials pitched the plan Tuesday. Under a bill pending in the

Senate, more schools could be taking treats away from pupils, or at least making them healthier under tighter national nutrition standards. The bill would add $4.5 billion over the next decade for school meals for poor students. The measure also gives schools grants to help them buy local produce. Under the change, the Agri-

culture Department could create new standards for all foods in schools, including vending machine items. For example, federal authorities could deem that school pizzas be made with whole-wheat crusts. The bill would ban canned fruit in heavy syrup and tuna packed in oil. Also off-limits — sweetened apple sauce.

E-MAIL THE NEWSROOM Business. . business@bendbulletin.com City Desk . . . . news@bendbulletin.com Community Life . . . . . communitylife@bendbulletin.com Sports . . . . . . sports@bendbulletin.com

OUR ADDRESS 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Mailing address: P.O. Box 6020, Bend,OR 97708 Street address:

ADMINISTRATION Chairwoman Elizabeth C. McCool 541-383-0374 Publisher Gordon Black 541-383-0339 Editor-in-Chief John Costa 541-383-0337

DEPARTMENT HEADS Advertising Director Jay Brandt. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0370 Circulation and Operations Keith Foutz . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5805 Finance Karen Anderson. . 541-383-0324 Human Resources Sharlene Crabtree . . . . . . 541-383-0327 New Media Jan Even . . . 541-617-7849

Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times

Kayla Eland, 20, and Lindon Pronto, 21, are not boyfriend and girlfriend, just pals who share same room in a dorm at Holden Hall at Pitzer College in Claremont, Calif.

TALK TO AN EDITOR At Home, GO! Julie Johnson . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0308 Business Editor John Stearns . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7822 City Editor Patti Epler . . . 541-383-0367 Community Life Editor Denise Costa . . . . . . . . . . 541-383-0356 Editorials Erik Lukens. . . 541-617-7816 News Editor Jan Jordan. . 541-383-0315 Night City Editor Cathy Kessinger . . . . . . . 541-383-0348 Photo Editor Dean Guernsey . . . . . . . . 541-383-0366 Presentation Editor . . . . 541-383-0315 Regional Editor . . . . . . . 541-383-0367 Sports Editor Bill Bigelow . 541-383-0359

REDMOND BUREAU Street address: 226 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond, OR 97756. Mailing address: P.O. Box 788, Redmond, OR 97756 Phone 541-504-2336 Fax 541-548-3203

CORRECTIONS The Bulletin’s primary concern is that all stories are accurate. If you know of an error in a story, call us at 541-383-0358.

TO SUBSCRIBE

Home delivery and E-Edition: One month, $11 By mail in Deschutes County: One month, $14.50 By mail outside Deschutes County: One month, $18 E-Edition only: One month, $8 TO PLACE AN AD Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5809 Advertising fax . . . . . . . . 541-385-5802 Other information. . . . . . 541-382-1811

OTHER SERVICES Photo reprints. . . . . . . . . 541-383-0358 Obituaries. . . . . . . . . . . . 541-617-7825 Back issues . . . . . . . . . . 541-385-5800 All Bulletin payments are accepted at the drop box at City Hall. Check payments may be converted to an electronic funds transfer. The Bulletin, USPS #552-520, is published daily by Western Communications Inc., 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702. Periodicals postage paid at Bend, OR. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Bulletin circulation department, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. The Bulletin retains ownership and copyright protection of all staff-prepared news copy, advertising copy and news or ad illustrations. They may not be reproduced without explicit prior approval.

Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

04 36 40 44 52 33 Power Play: 2. The estimated jackpot is $150 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

01 04 08 12 30 48 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $2.6 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Coed dorms in a ‘post-gender world’ Universities rooming men, women with new options By Larry Gordon Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — They weren’t looking to make a political statement or to be pioneers of gender liberation. Each just wanted a familiar, decent roommate rather than a stranger after their original roommates left to study abroad. That’s how Pitzer College sophomores Kayla Eland, female, and Lindon Pronto, male, began sharing a room this semester on Holden Hall’s second floor. They are not a couple and neither is gay. They are just compatible roommates in a new, sometimes controversial, dormitory option known as gender-neutral housing that is gaining support at some colleges across the nation. Eland, a biology major who hopes to become a doctor, said that a roommate’s personality and study habits are more important than gender. “This might not be right for everyone,” she said of sharing the small, cinder blockwalled room with a man. “But I think it’s important to have the right to choose where you want to live, how you want to live and who you want to live with.” Pronto, an environmental studies major who works each summer as a forest firefighter, agreed. Apart from remembering to lower the toilet seat, he said, living with a woman friend is not much different from rooming with a man. “As far as I’m concerned, a roommate is a roommate,” he said. Although the number of participants remains small, gender-neutral housing has gained attention as the final step in the integration of student housing. In the 1970s, many U.S. colleges moved from having only single-sex dormitories to providing coed residence halls, with male

and female students typically housed on alternating floors or wings. Then came coed hallways and bathrooms, further shocking traditionalists. Now, some colleges allow undergraduates of opposite sexes to share a room. Pitzer, which began its program in the fall of 2008, is among about 50 U.S. schools with the housing choice, according to Jeffrey Chang, who co-founded the National Student Genderblind Campaign in 2006 to encourage gender-mixed rooms. Participating schools include UC Berkeley, Stanford, Cornell, Dartmouth and the University of Michigan.

Oregon schools Both Oregon State University and University of Oregon are among the state’s schools that provide gender-neutral housing, according to www.kdrv.com. College officials say the movement began mainly as a way to accommodate gay, bisexual and transgender students who may feel more comfortable living with a member of the opposite sex. Most schools say they discourage couples from participating, citing emotional and logistical problems of breakups. Officials say most heterosexuals in the

programs are platonic friends. “College students are adults,” said Chang, who is gay and is now a law student at Rutgers University in New Jersey. “They have every single right to choose the person they feel most comfortable living with.” He estimates that at schools where the option exists, only 1 percent to 3 percent of students living on campus choose a roommate of the opposite sex. Officials at the Association of College & University Housing Officers-International say the trend has accelerated, but they don’t expect most schools to adopt it. Experts note that most students prefer a same-sex roommate, and some colleges are reluctant to antagonize parents, legislators and donors who view the option as immoral or even dangerous. Harvey Mudd College, next to Pitzer in the Claremont Colleges, began gender-neutral housing last fall mainly as an option for gay and transgender students, said Guy Gerbick, dean of residential life. Parents cannot veto such a decision at Harvey Mudd, but Gerbick asks students to discuss it with their families ahead of time. He also asks applicants whether they are romantically involved. If they were, the school could not forbid them from rooming together. “If we are going into a postgender world, then the regulation of private behavior is just not practical,” he said.

may be unnecessary By Richard Fausset Los Angeles Times

ATLANTA — When Texas’ conservative-leaning Board of Education voted for new social studies standards this month, parents, teachers and lawmakers far beyond the Lone Star state — particularly the liberal ones — took notice. With the changes, Texas’ curriculum is likely to de-emphasize the concept in U.S. history of separating church and state, and the influence of Thomas Jefferson on 18th century world history. It would also cast a positive light on conservatives, such as Phyllis Schlafly and the late Sen. Joseph McCarthy. Concerned observers have warned that those ideas could seep into textbooks throughout the country, because Texas is one of the nation’s largest textbook buyers. In California last week, Democratic state Sen. Leland Yee announced that he was working out the details of legislation that would inoculate California students from the Texas version of history. “While some Texas politicians may want to set their educational standards back 50 years, California should not be subject to their backward curriculum changes,” he said. But it is far from clear that non-Texans will be subjected to the proposed changes, once they are finalized, as expected, in May. Though none of the three major K-12 textbook publishers — Pearson Education Inc., Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and McGraw-Hill — would comment for this article, observers of the $8 billion industry offered differing views on the likelihood that Texas could wield such influence beyond its borders — in part because the textbook business, like American history itself, is a fluid affair influenced by commerce, culture, legislation and technology.

‘Adoption’ states Texas and California are not just the two largest textbook markets in the nation. They are among 20 states that industry insiders refer to as “adoption” states, meaning that they choose which textbooks can be used statewide. The remaining states let local schools and districts essentially choose whatever books they want, so long as the students who read them meet state-mandated standards. Many states did not adopt such standards until they were compelled to by the 1994 Improving America’s Schools Act, a major plank of former President Bill Clinton’s education reform effort. Before 1994, many schools bought largely uniform “national editions” of textbooks, said Jay Diskey, executive di-

(541)549-6406 370 E. Cascade, Sisters License #78462

“It’s gotten to be an exaggeration, if not an urban legend, about how curriculum in Texas automatically hops state lines.” — Jay Diskey, Association of American Publishers school division executive director rector of the school division for the Association of American Publishers. Back then, he concedes, big states like California and Texas were able to muscle in extra pages in national textbooks on, say, the Gold Rush or the Battle of the Alamo. But since then, Diskey argues, publishers have grown accustomed to regularly printing different textbooks to conform to different states’ needs. The new Texas standards, he said, won’t change that. “It’s gotten to be an exaggeration, if not an urban legend, about how curriculum in Texas automatically hops state lines,” he said.

Computers make changes easier Diskey also notes that the computerization of the publishing industry has made it possible to swap pages and chapters in textbooks to meet differing expectations. Publishers may become even more nimble as digital publishing becomes more widespread, and as educators move closer to the e-book model promised by the iPad and the Kindle. “It’s already happening in the college textbook market,” said Laura Dawson, a New Yorkbased consultant to the publishing industry. “Professors can put together what would amount to a mash-up, where they can mix and match content to create a custom book.” Critics of the current system argue that textbook manufacturers don’t so much offer variety as they do texts crammed with every special request from around the country. They also point to forces that may be limiting market variety. One is the consolidation of the textbook industry. Ten or 15 years ago, there were more than a dozen major players cranking out schoolbooks; now the three largest companies are responsible for about 80 percent of the core K-12 textbook market, Diskey said.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 A3

T S Russia warms to U.S. with nuclear pact

Study: Risky surgeries for back pain raise costs By Carla K. Johnson The Associated Press

N 

 B Lethal gases keep rescuers out of mine MONTCOAL, W.Va. — Two full days after the worst U.S. mining disaster in a generation, dangerous gases underground prevented rescuers late Wednesday from venturing into the Upper Big Branch coal mine to search for any survivors of the explosion that killed at least 25 workers. Crews drilled holes deep into the ground to release the gases. By evening, a federal safety official said the levels of lethal carbon monoxide and highly explosive hydrogen and methane measured at the top of the holes were steadily dropping. Officials could not say specifically when rescuers might be able to go in, but if the readings at the bottom were good, they want them on the move as soon as possible.

Busy hurricane season predicted LOS ANGELES — This could be a big year for hurricanes, with four major storms predicted to hit the Atlantic basin in 2010. According to a forecast released by a team of Colorado State University researchers Wednesday, eight hurricanes could occur this year. Four of them could have winds exceeding 110 mph. The average is six per year. There’s a 69 percent chance a major hurricane will hit the U.S. coastline and a 45 percent chance it will strike the East Coast, including the Florida peninsula. The team also predicted a 58 percent chance of a major storm entering the Caribbean. This is the team’s second 2010 forecast. It’s now predicting more hurricanes than before because of weakening El Niùo conditions combined with higher temperatures. The season, which starts June 1 and typically peaks around Sept. 10, could see a total of 15 named tropical storms. — From wire reports

By Margaret Talev and Jonathan S. Landay McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The Associated Press

A protestor sets fire to an overturned vehicle during clashes with police near government buildings in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, on Wednesday. Kyrgyzstan’s opposition said earlier today it had taken power after reports of a mounting death toll during protests in the capital. The State Department expressed concerns about violence in the former Soviet republic. At least 41 people were killed.

Protests upend government in Kyrgyzstan, a key U.S. ally New leaders call to close air base crucial to war in Afghanistan By Peter Leonard The Associated Press

BISHKEK, Kyrgyzstan — Opposition leaders declared they had seized power in Kyrgyzstan, taking control of security headquarters, a state TV channel and other government buildings after clashes between police and protesters killed dozens in this Central Asian nation that houses a key U.S. air base. President Kurmanbek Bakiyev, who came to power in a similar popular uprising five years ago,

6QIFBWBMJOB TUSBUFHJDSFHJPO

Large-scale protests appear to have overthrown the government of Kyrgyzstan after riot police opened fire Wednesday. Police kill dozens of protesters

NJMFT

KAZAKHSTAN Bishkek

KYRGYZSTAN CHINA TAJIKISTAN AFGHANISTAN PAKISTAN 4PVSDF&43*  64(4

ÂĽ.D$MBUDIZ5SJCVOF /FXT4FSWJDF

was said to have fled to the southern city of Osh, and it was difficult to gauge how much of the impoverished, mountainous country the opposition controlled Wednesday. “The security service and the Interior Ministry ... all of them are already under the management of new people,� Rosa Otunbayeva, a former foreign minister who the opposition leaders said would head the interim government, told the Russian-language Mir TV channel. The opposition has called for the closure of the U.S. air base in Manas outside the capital of Bishkek that is a key transit point for supplies essential to the war in nearby Afghanistan. A senior U.S. military official said Kyrgyzstan officials halted flights for 12 hours on Wednesday at Manas air base. The official, who was not authorized to speak publicly, said the base closed around 8 p.m. local time and was expected to reopen around 8 a.m. Thursday. Other military officials said the suspension was not expected to impact military operations because fewer flights were scheduled during overnight hours. During the day, protesters who were called into the streets by opposition parties stormed government buildings in Bishkek and battled with police amid volleys of tear gas. Groups of elite officers then fired with live ammunition. The Health Ministry said 40 people died and more than 400 were wounded. Opposition activist Toktoim Umetaliyeva said at least 100 people were killed by police gunfire. Crowds of demonstrators took control of the state TV building and looted it, then marched toward

W  B N. Korea sentences U.S. man to hard labor TOKYO — An American has been sentenced to eight years of hard labor and fined the equivalent of $700,000 for illegal entry into North Korea. Aijalon Mahli Gomes, 30, who had taught English in South Korea, is the fourth U.S. citizen in the past year to walk into North Korea from China and get arrested. Two television journalists received 12-year sentences last June, but were allowed to leave the country after former President Bill Clinton flew to Pyongyang. Gomes, a human rights activist, seems likely to be used by North Korea as a bargaining chip, as it negotiates with the United States over the resumption of stalled nuclear disarmament talks.

Putin condemns WWII-era massacre MOSCOW — Prime Minister Vladimir Putin on Wednesday became the first Russian or Soviet leader to join Polish officials in commemorating the anniversary

of the murder of thousands of Polish officers by the Soviet Union at the beginning of World War II. Putin cast the executions as one tragedy out of many wrought by what he called the Soviet Union’s “totalitarian regime.� The circumstances surrounding the massacre have long been a major source of tension between Poland and Russia, and Wednesday’s tribute appears to be the latest step in an effort by both countries to patch up relations.

State of emergency declared in Bangkok BANGKOK — Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva of Thailand declared a state of emergency in the Bangkok area on Wednesday after antigovernment demonstrators broke into the Parliament building, forcing government ministers to flee by helicopter. The televised announcement came after nearly a month of street demonstrations by the red-shirted protesters. They are demanding that Abhisit dissolve Parliament and call new elections. — From wire reports

the Interior Ministry, according to Associated Press reporters on the scene, before changing direction and attacking a national security building nearby. They were repelled by security. After nightfall, the opposition and its supporters appeared to gain the upper hand. Opposition leader Keneshbe Duishebayev, the former interior minister, told the AP that “we have created units to restore order� on the streets.

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s meeting today in Prague with Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, where they’ll sign a new nuclear arms reduction pact, will highlight a thaw in relations between the former Cold War enemies that’s occurred since the U.S. called for the two countries to hit the “reset button� just over a year ago. The new Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty is the most visible measure of improving cooperation on an array of fronts, from intelligence sharing to Iran and the war in Afghanistan. Moscow quietly has allowed more than 130 planes carrying U.S. troops to Afghanistan to transit its territory, the first armed Americans ever permitted on Russian soil. Some analysts cautioned

that some thorny issues could stall the warming trend, such as the expansion of U.S. missile defenses in Eastern Europe and Moscow’s insistence on the primacy of Russian influence over former Soviet republics such as Ukraine and Georgia. Obama will have to balance his outreach to Russia with the concerns of Eastern and Central European NATO allies who remain anxious about their former overlord.

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

CHICAGO — A study of Medicare patients shows that costlier, more complex spinal fusion surgeries are on the rise — and sometimes done unnecessarily — for a common lower back condition caused by aging and arthritis. W hat ’s more alarming is that Related the findings • Is Bend suggest getting these more adequate challenging back care? operations Page E1 are riskier, leading to more complications and even deaths. “This is exactly what the health care debate has been dancing around,â€? said Dr. Eugene Carragee of Stanford University Medical Center. “You have one kind of operation that could cost $20,000 and another that could cost $80,000 and there’s not good evidence the expensive one is being used appropriately in the majority of cases,â€? Carragee said. Add to that the expense for patients whose problems after surgery send them back to the hospital or to a nursing home and “that’s not a trivial amount of moneyâ€? for Medicare, said Carragee. He wrote an accompanying editorial in the Journal of the American Medical Association where the federally funded study appears Wednesday.

We accept any competitor’s coupon

r Oil & Filtee Chang * $24.95 4.5 Quarts

Oil Blend *Synthetic des Subaru and Inclu il Filter Factory O SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

541-389-3031


A4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bomb scare prompted by smoker By Ivan Moreno And Devlin Barrett The Associated Press

DENVER — A Qatari diplomat trying to sneak a smoke in an airplane bathroom sparked a bomb scare Wednesday night on a flight from Washington to Denver, with fighter jets scrambled and law enforcement put on high alert, officials said. No explosives were found on the man, and officials do not believe he was trying to harm any-

one, according to a senior law enforcement officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. An Arab diplomat briefed on the matter identified the diplomat as Mohammed Al-Madadi. Two law enforcement officials said investigators were told the man was asked about the smell of smoke in the bathroom and he made a joke that he had been trying to light his shoes — an apparent reference to the 2001 so-called “shoe bomber”

Richard Reid. The sources asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to discuss the ongoing investigation. Officials said air marshals aboard the flight restrained the man and he was questioned. The plane landed safely as military jets were scrambled. Hours after the plane landed, the man was still being interviewed by investigators, and it was unclear what if any charges

he might face. Jayne Smith, 61, of Laramie, Wyo., said her husband, Scott, was on the United flight and was being interviewed by authorities. Jayne Smith also flew in from Washington, D.C., on Wednesday but on a different flight, and was waiting for her husband at the airport. She said he called her and said he didn’t see anything on the flight because the incident occurred in the first-class section

and he was at the back of the plane. “He just said someone had a temper tantrum,” Jayne Smith said. She said her husband told her that he and the other passengers were being interviewed at a fire station. “He just said there were scads of officers around,” she said. “I’m sure he was rolling his eyes.” Emergency vehicles’ flashing red lights surrounded a fire

station at Denver International Airport, and two buses, apparently carrying passengers from the flight, left the station for an unknown location. Inside the terminal, passengers from other flights picked up their luggage at baggage carriers, apparently unaware of any emergency. The airport remained open during the incident, and spokesman Jeff Green said no flights were delayed or canceled.

Bill would block secret financing of campaigns through nonprofits By Jonathan D. Salant and Mark Drajem Bloomberg News

Pier Paolo Cito/The Associated Press

Pope Benedict XVI greets the faithful during the weekly general audience in St. Peter’s Square at the Vatican on Wednesday.

Scandal means tough vetting for future pope Accusations of Benedict’s role in cover-ups has church looking for media-savvy leader By Victor L. Simpson The Associated Press

VATICAN CITY — The sex abuse crisis engulfing the Catholic Church will mean more vigorous background checks when it comes to appointing cardinals, and future popes. Among the requirements: no taint of scandal and the ability to speak comfortably to the world and the media. While leading Catholic conservatives have vigorously defended Benedict XVI from accusations that he was complicit in covering up sex abusers, they have also pointed to management failures. As a model for the future pope, the church will need to consider someone “able to talk to the world and the media, not be destroyed by it,” said the Rev. Thomas Reese, a Jesuit priest and senior fellow at the Woodstock Theological Center at Georgetown University. Even as the clerical sex abuse crisis has swept across Europe in recent months — touching even Benedict — the Vatican has responded with the disarray and media ineptitude that’s been symptomatic of the German-born pope’s five-year papacy. The church was rocked by scandal again Wednesday, when

Norwegian officials revealed that a 58-year-old Catholic bishop who resigned last year did so after admitting he molested a child two decades earlier. As churchmen have closed ranks to defend Benedict, even some of his biggest supporters have pointed to the need for change. Leading Catholic conservatives such as George Weigel in the United States and Vittorio Messori in Italy have vigorously defended Benedict from accusations he was involved in covering up sex abusers while serving as archbishop of Munich and later as a Vatican official. But they have both underlined management shortcomings in the papacy, with the Italian noting a “certain naivete.” One test will come when the pope names new cardinals, with Vatican insiders suggesting this will happen in November. The Holy See will need to carry out a vigorous vetting process to try to ensure that none of the new cardinals are tainted by the sex abuse scandal — a potentially monumental task considering the scope of the crisis. When the search begins for a successor to Benedict, Vatican

experts say the need for someone with no skeletons in the closet on abuse might give advantage to cardinals who didn’t head a diocese. In choosing top officials, the church may give preference to a younger generation of conservative clergy, looking beyond the current church leadership that has been so sullied by the scandal. Just this week, Benedict tapped a 58-year-old Mexican-born prelate, Jose Gomez, as the next archbishop of Los Angeles, a post that traditionally gets a red hat. Lost in the drumbeat of accusations and the Vatican’s counterattack have been indications that change is indeed being placed on the agenda for a future pope. The idea that Benedict might step down over the crisis has been roundly dismissed as speculation raised only by those bent on destroying his papacy. Still, Benedict himself seemed to consider the possibility that popes might not serve unlimited terms. With people living longer “one also would consider new norms,” he said in a 2004 interview with an Italian religious affairs magazine, Famiglia Cristiana, a year before his election.

Karzai ousts 2 linked to vote fraud By Laura King Los Angeles Times

KABUL — In an apparent capitulation to international pressure, the government of President Hamid Karzai on Wednesday announced the removal of two top election officials who were implicated in widespread fraud in last summer’s presidential elections. The legal framework for upcoming parliamentary elections has been a key point of contention between Karzai and Western governments. Karzai has resisted demands for what diplomats called “root-and-branch” reform of Afghanistan’s electoral system prior to the parliamentary vote, which is set for September. Word of the electoral shake-up came from Karzai’s spokesman, Waheed Omar, who told reporters in Kabul that Azizullah Ludin, the director of the Indepen-

dent Electoral Commission, had stepped down, together with Daoud Ali Najafi, the commission’s chief electoral advisor. President Several forHamid Karzai eign monitoring groups had accused Ludin and Najafi of abetting massive vote-rigging during August’s balloting. A separate fraud-auditing body stripped Karzai of about one-third of the votes cast for him, throwing the race to a runoff. That second round was averted, however, when the Afghan leader’s main challenger, Abdullah Abdullah, dropped out of the race. Despite its name, the Indepen-

dent Electoral Commission, the main body vote-overseeing body, is appointed by the president. During and after last August’s race, Karzai’s opponents had accused Ludin of favoring Karzai, who had handpicked him. Replacements for the two officials have not yet been named. Arrangements for the parliamentary vote have been an inflammatory topic in recent days, driving a wedge between Karzai and his Western patrons just as NATO is preparing for a massive military offensive in Afghanistan’s south this summer. Escalating discord between Karzai and the Obama administration began last Thursday, when Karzai, addressing election officials, blamed vote fraud on foreign interference and called it part of a Western conspiracy to weaken his government.

WASHINGTON — U.S. companies would lose their ability to secretly finance political advertising run by organizations such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce under a bill being considered by Democratic lawmakers. The proposed legislation is a response to a Supreme Court ruling that allows corporations to spend unlimited amounts of their own money on political ads. The Jan. 21 decision triggered concern that companies would funnel unprecedented sums of cash into the Chamber’s decades-old system of anonymously funded pro-business campaigns. President Barack Obama criticized the court opinion in his Jan. 28 State of the Union address, saying it would “open the floodgates for special interests.” The bill, which may be introduced as early as next week, would require nonprofit groups, unions and trade associations including the Chamber to identify who pays for ads designed to sway opinion on candidates for federal office. “The Chamber is going to end up with at least one very undesirable element: The public is going to know exactly which corporations are the major funders,” said Craig Holman, who handles campaign finance issues for Public Citizen, a Washington group that supports more regulation of political giving. The nation’s biggest business lobbying group, the Chamber spent $47 million on so-called issue advertising last year, mostly on health care policy, according to Kandar Media’s Campaign Media Analysis Group in Arlington, Va. The Chamber has said it plans to spend $50 million on candidatefocused ads alone this year. An additional $144 million of Chamber spending went for lobbying last year, more than five times that of the secondlargest spender, Exxon Mobil Corp. That spending isn’t affected by the court ruling or proposed legislation. The Chamber had fought

what it called the suppression of company participation in elections, and hailed the Supreme Court decision in the case, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission. The proposed legislation would gut what appeared to be a victory for the group.

‘Broader regulations’ “Citizens United is being used as a pretext to pursue much broader regulations of the private sector in the political arena,” said Steven Law, the Chamber’s general counsel. “Their interest is to intimidate the business community into unilateral disarmament” while allowing unions to spend millions of dollars, he said. Should Congress fail to act, “the vast majority of corporate money will move through trade associations and independent organizations,” said Michael Toner, a former Republican

chairman of the Federal Election Commission. “You don’t want a disclaimer to say, ‘Paid for by Exxon Mobil.’ It’s far more effective to say, ‘Paid for by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.’” Rep. Chris Van Hollen, DMd., and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said in February that they planned to introduce the legislation. The proposed legislation would require disclosure of contributors to ads urging voters to support or oppose a federal candidate, Van Hollen said. It also may extend that requirement to so-called issue ads that favor or oppose an office seeker without explicitly recommending a vote, he said.

Why pay retail? 541-385-5950 New Bend Location:

2nd & Greenwood

www.extrafurniture.com

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store

2660 NE Hwy 20, Bend • (541) 330-0420 By Costco, across from Safeway, in the Forum Center. HOURS: Mon - Sat 10 - 6 • Sun 12 - 5


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Quakes Continued from A1 “People living there know that when the earth shakes, it’s like an alarm going off: Get out. But visitors aren’t conditioned like that,� said Matthew Bettenhausen, the secretary of California’s Emergency Management Agency.

The Associated Press

An armored police vehicle heads down a dirt road in Hillsdale County, Mich., during a March 29 standoff with a suspected militia member. Eight men and one woman believed to be part of the Michigan-based Hutaree militia were arrested that weekend in raids in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio.

Militias Continued from A1 The best-known militias are mainly concerned with perceived violations of constitutional protections against government power, but there has long been a minority that, like the Hutaree, took a more religious view, said Robert Churchill, a University of Hartford history professor and author of “To Shake Their Guns in the Tyrant’s Face,� a history of the 1990s militia movement. The group uses uniforms emblazoned with CCR for “Colonial Christian Republic,� and believes that former NATO leader Javier Solana could be the Antichrist. On Friday, a federal judge ordered the nine Hutaree members to remain jailed until trial, calling evidence against them “very disturbing.� They face charges of sedition and use of weapons of mass destruction. Authorities said they planned to act in the coming weeks; their defense attorneys counter that the group was guilty only of swagger. The militia movement has been mostly out of the public eye since the late 1990s, but it began to regain strength during George W. Bush’s presidency and has experienced a renaissance under the nation’s first black president. Since Barack Obama’s inauguration last year, the number of militias in the country has tripled, according to a recent report from the Southern Poverty Law Center, which monitors extremist groups. The center identified 512 active “patriot groups� in 2009. Churchill said the Hutaree’s alienation from some of its militia brethren corresponds to a split in the movement that was also evident during its last time in the limelight, during the 1990s. The Hutaree, he said, appeared to be part of a “millennialist� militia movement largely concerned with end-times prophecy and full-blown, New World Ordertype anti-government conspiracy theories. After the recent arrest, some

5IFTQSFBEPGBOUJHPWFSONFOUHSPVQT Extremist anti-government “patriot groups,� including armed militias, in 2009:

XX/XX

Total patriot groups: 512

Unarmed groups

127 Militias

7/1

8/3 8/1 12/2

3/0

3/0

7/4

13/0 13/34

7/0

9/1

9/1

18/4 6/4

6/1 5/0

5/0

4/2 7/0 R.I. 3/0 8/1 6/2 Conn. 6/0 5/0 6/7 7/1 Del. 3/0 6/15 5/0 8/2 D.C. 2/0 6/1 6/7 8/1 6/4 11/1 7/0 5/1 9/6 4/2 5/2 8/2 9/2

7/1

3/0 4/0

7/0

Militias

49/3

12/5

4/1 3/0

Groups on the rise: 149

2008 2009

4PVSDF4PVUIFSO1PWFSUZ-BX$FOUFS

militia groups were sympathetic to the Hutaree, while stopping short of endorsing violence. But several militias distanced themselves from the Hutaree. Michael Vanderboegh, a former militia member who is prominent in the anti-government constitutionalist movement, called it “nuttery.� This separation reflects an earlier pattern. In the 1990s, Churchill said, the constitutionalist groups also made serious efforts to distinguish themselves from the millennialists. Miracle, the Michigan militia member, said one of his group’s affiliated organizations, called the Lenawee Brigade, was contacted by a Hutaree member seeking help when federal heat was becoming evident. Miracle said the Lenawee turned the Hutaree down. Mark Potok of the Southern Poverty Law Center contended that the Hutaree had plenty in common with the mainstream militia movement. He said many groups fear a new world order and globalist conspiracy against the U.S., but lack the Hutaree’s overt Christian rhetoric. He also

512

ÂĽ.D$MBUDIZ5SJCVOF/FXT4FSWJDF

pointed to the group’s MySpace page, which he said had more than 300 friends listed from other wings of the movement. “They weren’t viewed as the lunatic fringe two weeks ago,� he said. Potok acknowledged that only a tiny minority of militia members seek violence. Aitan Goelman, who was part of the team that prosecuted the Oklahoma City bombing, said that when people start to act on violent rhetoric, it frequently produces divisions. “It goes beyond fantasy and your purported ideals and becomes a real gut-check moment,� he said. The distinctions among militia groups may hark back to the Clinton era, but Churchill notes one new trend in the age of Obama: the increased use of patriot-style rhetoric in mainstream discourse. Referring to the angry vocabulary used by lawmakers and media pundits such as Glenn Beck, Churchill said the wall between the patriots’ sphere of conversation and that of mainstream conservatives “is starting to break down, is starting to erode.�

“I think it’s really good that essentially control over the intellectual property remains here, that the physical assets remain here.� — Gary Firestone, an assistant city attorney who represented Bend in the Epic Air proceedings

Epic Air Continued from A1 The LT uses super-light composite materials, cruises at more than 400 mph and sells for nearly $2 million — about half of what an equivalent factory-built aircraft costs. LT Builders had expected to license the LT’s composite fiber technology from the Chinese, but in negotiations were able to persuade the Chinese to instead grant the American firm the intellectual property and physical assets. Under the final deal, the Chinese will license the technology from LT Builders Group, Ingalsbe said. Gary Firestone, an assistant city attorney who has represented Bend in the proceedings, said the new deal was even better news for the city. “I think it’s really good that essentially control over the intellectual property remains here, that the physical assets remain here,� he said. The new deal gives more control to the domestic firm, making it less dependent on the goodwill of the Chinese firm, and “that’s why i think it’s good news,� Firestone said. Under the arrangement, LT Builders Group will market the

Epic LT kit in North America, while the Chinese can market it elsewhere. The kit-built planes are called “experimental,� since they have not yet been certified by the government as airworthy. LT Builders and the Chinese would both be able to sell the plane anywhere if it is eventually certified, a designation that could lead to a significant increase in the Bend plant. Ingalsbe, who has vowed to support the new Bend company with his own Omaha, Neb., firm, Independent Technologies, said there is one hangup: a dispute with the firm’s landlord, a limited liability company known as ER1 LLC. The company includes the former CEO of Epic, Rick Schramek. Ingalsbe’s partner in LT Builders, Doug King, said the number of people who can be hired in part depends on what rent ER1 agrees to. So far, he said, ER1 has been unreasonable and is “holding Bend hostage.� The lawyer for ER1, Las Vegas attorney Thomas Fell, disagreed, saying it was the LT Builders who appeared to be driving a hard bargain. Still, he said negotiations had resumed after the hearing, at which the judge encouraged Ingalsbe and King to keep trying. “We are not looking to profit off

of anybody at this point,� Fell said, adding that the firm was trying to cover its mortgage, insurance and related costs. “Our goal is to have a tenant operating in that building, as the city of Bend wants and desires, and obviously to provide the employment and the tax base that most communities are in desperate need for right now.� He expressed hope the two will reach a deal today on rent. Officially known as Aircraft Investor Resources, Epic started in Bend in 2004 with the help of state loans and grants totaling $1.3 million, building a $4.5 million plant on the east side of the airport. It vowed to create 400 jobs. Before layoffs last year, the firm employed about 150 people. Epic filed for bankruptcy last September after a breach of contract lawsuit was filed against it. The only other airplane maker at the Bend Airport, Columbia Aircraft Manufacturing Corp., filed for bankruptcy in September 2007. Cessna Aircraft Co. bought Columbia but shut down its Bend facility last year. Contacted by telephone, Schramek, the former Epic CEO, declined to comment. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In

Most of Chile’s modern buildings emerged with little more than broken plaster, but there were some spectacular failures among recently built structures. Some experts blame code violations that lax inspections failed to catch. “It’s not enough to have a good law — you have to follow it,� says Rodolfo Saragoni, the University of Chile’s top seismic engineer. Chileans who lost their homes are asking how building firms got away with cutting corners. “I’ve never made walls this thin for this kind of building,� said civil engineer Carolina Astorga, showing the AP the damaged foundations of her 19-story apartment building in Santiago. She moved in a month before the quake. Now the building is sunken, leaning and uninhabitable. “They save more rebar, more money and it comes out cheaper for the contractor. But here are the consequences.� Code enforcement here, as in Chile, falls to local governments. Some are sticklers, but others are essentially “paper building departments, where they’re pushing paper but not actually rigorously enforcing building codes,� said Fred Turner, a structural engineer with California’s Seismic Safety Commission.

Tsunami response Likewise, the tsunami responsible for most of Chile’s death toll was perfectly predictable from official flood maps published on the navy’s Web site. But the coastal cities devastated by the waves did nothing to incorporate the

charts in public planning. “At the least, it indicates a profound lack of coordination between institutions,� said Hugo Romero, a geographer at the University of Chile. At worst, he said, it may reflect commercial interests overwhelming the public interest. Chile’s landscape is similar to built-up stretches of the West Coast, where state and federal officials have worked to make flood maps available, but local authorities don’t always pay heed. Some cities — Long Beach, Crescent City and Santa Barbara among those in California — now incorporate tsunami risks in their public planning. “Other jurisdictions just haven’t gotten around to doing anything yet,� Turner said. “California is catching up,� he added, noting that Oregon and Washington have a fraction of the population exposure along the coast, but have done more to prepare for the next tsunami.

/PSUIXFTURVBLF[POF The Cascadia subduction zone is a 680-mile-long fault located 50 miles off the coast of the Pacific Northwest. It is where the Juan de Fuca plate dives beneath North America. In 1700, it caused a magnitude-9 earthquake — among the largest in recorded history.

Seattle JUAN DE FUCA PLATE

PACIFIC PLATE

Cascadia subduction zone

Up to code

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 A5

WASHINGTON

Portland OREGON

GORDA PLATE CALIFORNIA 

NJ

Sacramento "1

4PVSDFT&43* 64(4

Northwest at risk In other respects, the Pacific Northwest is at risk. Scientists say a nearby coastal fault like Chile’s will likely slip within a few decades, releasing a similarly devastating megaquake. A magnitude-9 quake struck the area in 1700. Washington’s building codes were updated to international seismic standards in recent years, but Chile has shown that great standards on paper do nothing when a city is full of older buildings that were grandfathered in. University of California at Berkeley’s Jack Moehle, who led a team of engineers assessing Chile’s damage, takes that lesson from two cities near the epicenter: Chillan was almost entirely rebuilt with stronger buildings after a 1939 quake, and survived this one more or less OK. Nearby Talca was full of earlier architecture — and devastated. “To see Chillan versus Talca, it’s like day and night,� he said. California’s older cities would suffer more like Talca did if a major quake struck them today, Moehle warns. Hospitals and other key buildings in parts of California could fare even worse than those in Chile, said structural engineer Bill Holmes, who has been examining Chile’s hospitals. Many had

72 hours worth of gas and water on site, which proved invaluable in the catastrophe’s aftermath. California’s hospitals are not expected to meet that standard until 2030. And 1 in 10 won’t even be safe from collapse by 2015, according to a report prepared for the California Senate’s Health Committee in February. The rare intensity of Chile’s earthquake is also teaching engineers about how international seismic standards might be improved. Chile’s temblor included an unexpected amount of vertical shaking in addition to the usual horizontal movement, according to structural engineer Jay Guin, who runs risk modeling for Applied Insurance Research Worldwide. Both Chile and the U.S. may need to update building codes accordingly — perhaps applying tougher standards to shakier ground, like the volcanic ash under Concepcion or the landfill under parts of San Francisco. “It acts like Jell-O. You get that extra violent shaking,� said Bettenhausen.

Solar Electric & Hot Water

$200 OFF ANY SYSTEM CCB# 187622

EXPIRES 3-31-10

541-548-7887 • www.ismartsolar.com


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Bankruptcy

Properties involved in bankruptcy case

Pinehurst Rd.

Patrick Gisler owns numerous commercial properties in Central Oregon now subject to bankruptcy. 11 20 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend

1

19555 Pinehurst Road, Tumalo Tumalo Mall 19889 Eighth St., Tumalo 3 64095 Tamoli Lane, Bend 4 19775 Destiny Court, Bend 5 63576 North U.S. Highway 97 6 63270 Lyman Place, Bend 7 1345 N.W. Wall St., Bend 8 1430 N.W. Wall St., Bend 9 21 N.W. Kearney Ave., Bend 10 8 N.W. Pinecrest, Bend

20

TUMALO 2

1

12

2

13

3

4

Cooley Rd. 5

Rd. ley . Ri O.B

97 20

6

BEND

7 Empire Ave.

DOWNTOWN BEND Portland Ave.

BUS 97

7

Newport Ave.

8

W Bo all S nd t. St .

Fra nk lin Av e.

Bend Parkway

9 11 12

Butler Market BUS 97

Eighth St.

10

Newport Ave.

Ave.

W all S

t.

Greenwood Ave. 20

Franklin Ave.

Bend Parkway

Colorado Ave.

Wilson Ave. 13

Dr .

Continued from A1 Gisler, 64, said Wednesday the bankruptcy was primarily brought on because he has reduced commercial rents in recent years to keep his tenants, who are mainly small-business owners. “I have accommodated them rent-wise and that really led to the problems because I didn’t think it was good business to let them bleed to death and be gone,” Gisler said. “So even though the rents declined below the level that would sustain the operations of the buildings, I have done my best to keep the buildings in operation.” Gisler said he “deferred the property taxes” on his buildings so that he could make the payments, and has appealed the amount of taxes assessed. But county records show he now owes nearly $300,000 in back taxes, an amount Deschutes County Deputy Tax Collector Dave Lilley called “one of the largest I’ve seen” in his 12 years on the job. Nearly $60,000 of that tax debt is related to the Old Penny Galleria in the 1000 block of Wall Street in downtown Bend. Roberta Johnson, owner of Sports Vision Bend, said she has been a tenant in that building since 1989 and that Gisler has given her breaks on rent, including an unexpected one-third reduction in December. “He didn’t say a thing, he just took it off the bill. I didn’t even have to ask,” Johnson said. Gisler said he was driven to help his 150 tenants in various locations “survive the challenges of these times.” But Gisler, who owns Oregon Lifestyles Realty and is the CEO of a Coloradobased oil and gas exploration company, may not survive financially himself. He now owes debts to about two dozen creditors for real estate as well as property including a private plane, a boat, 11 several cars, a $12,000 irrigation system and a tractor.

Gisler’s family has lived in Central Oregon for decades and developed more than 1,000 acres from La Pine to Redmond. The family also discovered a freshwater well in La Pine that now bears the Gisler name, according to Bulletin archives. But in the late ’90s, Gisler stirred controversy in Bend when he bought a former Moose Lodge building near the Bend Parkway that he rented to a strip club. The building was later burned by the club’s owner in an arson. In 2000, Gisler was part of a movement to develop Bend’s northeast side, resulting in a master plan covering about 700 acres in the area of 18th Street and Cooley Road where housing developments now sit. A year later, Gisler and his brother gave the city of Bend

ntu ry

Reed Market Rd.

Ce

A local history

97

BUS 97

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Two weeks after President Barack Obama signed the big health care overhaul into law, Americans are struggling to understand how — and when — the sweeping measure will affect them. Questions reflecting confusion have flooded insurance companies, doctors’ offices, human resources departments and business groups. “They’re saying, ‘Where do we get the free Obama care, and how do I sign up for that?’” said Carrie McLean, a licensed agent for eHealthInsurance.com. The California-based company sells coverage from 185 health insurance carriers in 50 states. McLean said the call center had been inundated by the uninsured, who were hoping that the overhaul would translate into instant, affordable coverage. That widespread misconception may have originated in part from distorted rhetoric about the legislation bubbling up from the debate about it in Washington and some media outlets, such as when opponents denounced it as socialism. “We tell them it’s not free, that there are going to be things in place that help people who are lowincome, but that ultimately most of that is not going to be taking place until 2014,” McLean said. Adults with pre-existing conditions are frustrated to learn that insurers won’t have to cover them

In other areas of Oregon 160 acres in Crescent Undeveloped, subdivided lots in Crescent Lake 1995 North U.S. Highway 97, Maupin

Out of state 3242 Ludlow, Las Vegas, Nev. 315 E. Main St., Quartzsite, Ariz.

debts and each of those loans will be renegotiated with the lender,” Gisler said. Gisler also will have to pay in full 5 the back taxes he owes to Deschutes County or the properties will be foreclosed on, said Lilley, the deputy tax collector. The county can foreclose when the taxes owed are three years past due, though the bankruptcy process puts the possibility of foreclosure on hold. “We are precluded from foreclosing while the properties are in bankruptcy,” Lilley said. “And clearly it can delay the collection of the taxes but it won’t affect the ultimate outcome.” He said Gisler’s biggest past-due tax debt, about $151,000 on a building in the 1300 block of northwest Wall, is about a 10 year past due. Gisler said he anticipates paying off his debts but does not expect to sell property to make that happen. Gisler said he has tried to sell properties in recent years but commercial investors aren’t buying in this economy. “We found that there is very limited or no financing for investor-owned buildings,” Gisler said. “There is limited financing for owner-occupants, but we don’t really have any occupants that are big enough to acquire those buildings.” A hearing on Gisler’s bankruptcy case has been scheduled in federal bankruptcy court in Portland in June.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

a 12-acre plot near the corner of Empire Avenue and Purcell Boulevard along with $25,000 to maintain the land as a park and open space. The family, which owns property in the Tumalo area, tried to make their presence in Central Oregon more permanently known when they made a failed bid to have a road in the area named “Gisler Trail.” More recently, Gisler’s financial troubles have resulted in civil lawsuits filed in Deschutes County Circuit Court alleging he had failed to repay loans to both banks and private individuals. Last year, a lien was placed on

a home Gisler owns in Tumalo when a tenant there failed to pay the water bill. Earlier this year Gisler said he was fighting the district’s lien, in part because it wanted to charge him $3,000 for its attorney fees.

The bankruptcy Gisler said Wednesday he considered what to do for several months before filing bankruptcy. He has filed under a section of the code that allows him to enter into negotiations with lenders about how to pay the debts, not discharge them outright. “We’re going to restructure the

Mass confusion over what, when health initiatives kick in By Margaret Talev

1002 N.W. Wall St., Bend 650 S.E. Ninth St., Bend

HEALTH CARE REFORM until 2014 (though those under 18 will be protected in late September); then they become both hopeful and confused upon learning that a federal high-risk pool for them will be established in the next few months. “Health insurance is so confusing. You add this on top of it and it makes it even more confusing,” McLean said. The Obama administration is embarking on a years-long public education campaign about the overhaul, including a Web component. However, much of the guidance will depend on Department of Health and Human Services regulations that are still being developed. Parents of young adults, including those who are preparing to graduate from college this spring, have heard that the overhaul will let them keep their children on their insurance plans until they reach age 26. That starts in September, however; they have to determine how to cover them until then. A new wave of inquiries could come next month as federal COBRA subsidies for laid-off workers dry up. Americans who already have good coverage aren’t so worried about the immediate implications, but some admit that they’re plenty

confused. “Why does it take so long for certain health care things to take effect?” said Sandra Preston, a state employee in Paterson, N.J. Ben Wiesen, a software engineer who works for a small company in Tarrytown, N.Y., said he’d read up on the overhaul but remained concerned about the unknowns. “The timelines have been pretty clearly stated,” he said. “It’s the execution and the details: How are they really going to roll out the changes, and who ultimately will be the arbiter and decision-maker?” Many small-business owners are nervous about requirements being phased in. “Members are still trying to wrap their head around everything that’s in this law,” said Michelle Dimarob, the manager of legislative affairs for the National Federation of Independent Business, the small-business lobby. Dimarob said the lobby’s primary concern was that its costs would rise over the next four years as a result of fees, taxes and coverage mandates related to the overhaul. “The next question that comes out of their mouths is: ‘What do I have to do right now?’ They need to start talking with their accountant, depending on how they’re organized, what industry they’re in and whether they’re offering insurance now and what kind they’re offering. We’re suggesting they talk to their agent or broker.”

Cindy Powers can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at cpowers@bendbulletin.com.

Snow

concern would be that a dry winter next year would lead to empty reservoirs in summer 2011. And Continued from A1 then the irrigation districts that “But,” Gorman continued, “it’s rely on stored reservoir water still 25 percent below average, would see their supply drop. “That would be the concern which isn’t as good as we would — another winter like it to be.” like this one,” JohnThe snowpack is son said. usually most deep “But (the Typically, after an around the first of snowpack is) El Niño year, which April in the Deschutes Basin, Gor- still 25 percent brings below-averman said, which below average, age snowfall, the following year will means that by this bring above-averpoint in an average which isn’t as age snowpacks, he year, the snow in good as we said — but that’s the mountains has not a guarantee. started to melt away. would like it With the recent But this winter, the to be.” bump in the snowsnowpack has had pack, the water a late push, and it is — Kyle Gorman, Oregon Water flows in the Desstill growing. chutes River should And the recent Resources be OK this year, said storms, which Department Tod Heisler, execusince Friday have tive director of the dropped more than three feet of snow at Mount Deschutes River Conservancy. “All looks, for now, pretty Bachelor, have helped in the lower elevations as well, he said. good for both fish and farmers “It was a welcome respite on the Deschutes,” Heisler said. But because other waterways from the dryness we had,” Gorman said, noting that because like Tumalo Creek, McKay fields got some rain and weather Creek and Whychus Creek don’t has been cool, irrigation districts have reservoirs to save up water have been able to postpone the for the summer months and act as a buffer during dry years, start of irrigation season. “It’s a few days different, but the below-average snowpack at this point we’ll take anything could lead to less runoff in those creeks this summer. we could get,” he said. “Whychus, I’d say, would be And the less water irrigators have to use this year, Johnson the creek to watch out for,” he said, the more water can re- said. main in the reservoirs for next summer. Kate Ramsayer can be If irrigators need to draw on the reached at 541-617-7811 or reservoirs a lot this year, the big kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Snowpack The Upper Deschutes and Crooked River basin snowpack has inched closer to average in the past couple weeks, thanks to recent storms.

Water year comparisons as of Jan. 21: 2010 percent of average: 76% Percent of last year: 66%

Snow-water equivalent 40 inches 35

April 7

KEY Water year 2010 Water year 2009 Average 1971 to 2000

30 25 20

Note: Water years begin in October.

15 10 5 0

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Source: Natural Resources Conservation Service

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS IN

TEE TO GREEN

GOLF P R E V I E W

2 0 1 0

CENTRAL OREGON’S PREMIER GOLF GUIDE IS COMING MAY 1ST On May 1, The Bulletin will drive headlong into the Central Oregon golf season with Tee to Green, our annual spring golf preview! This highly anticipated product will be packed with information on the courses that make this one of the finest golf destinations in the nation. Tee to Green will reach over 70,000 Bulletin print readers and thousands more online, making it the premier locals guide to golf in Central Oregon

FEATURES INCLUDE: • What’s new in 2010 • Central Oregon course index • Comprehensive tournament schedule • Central Oregon Junior Golf Association coverage …and much more! Advertising deadline: Friday, April 16 Publication date: Saturday, May 1.

www.bendbulletin.com

ALSO TO ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS PUBLISHES TO OVER 70,000 LOCAL READERS ONLINE!

CALL

541-382-1811

O


B

Personal Finance Teens might be saviors for struggling retailers, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

MARKET REPORT

t

2,431.16 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -5.65 -.23%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Medford-based bank raises $33.3 million Medford-based PremierWest Bancorp, parent company of PremierWest Bank, announced Wednesday it raised $33.3 million in a stock sale. The company also announced the bank, which has a branch in Bend and another in Redmond, has entered into a consent order with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Oregon Division of Finance and Corporate Securities. According to the company, it has agreed to, among other things, raise its capital levels within 180 days. The company received $41.4 million from the federal Troubled Asset Relief Program in February 2009, making it one of four bank holding companies in Oregon to receive money from the program. Shares of the company closed Wednesday at 74 cents, up 21 cents, or 39.62 percent, in Nasdaq trading.

State fines American General Finance

t

CLOSE 10,897.52 DOW JONES CHANGE -72.47 -.66%

t

1,182.45 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -6.99 -.59%

t

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.86 treasury CHANGE -2.53%

US Airways in talks with United Airlines Merger would create second-largest U.S. airline By Jad Mouawad New York Times News Service

United Airlines and US Airways are in merger talks that, if successful, would create the nation’s secondbiggest airline. It is the third time in a decade that they have attempted to make a deal. The negotiations mark the latest efforts to consolidate the struggling airline industry, which lost $60 billion over the last decade as fuel costs soared and the number of travelers

fell in the recession. Both companies have been vocal in calling for greater partnerships. In fact, none of the major airlines, except low-cost carrier Southwest Airlines, turned a profit last year. And analysts have said that despite the steep cuts in capacity by all the airlines in the last couple of years, there are still too many airlines chasing too few travelers. A combination of United and US Airways could help both return to profit faster than go-

ing it alone by achieving greater efficiencies. But mergers in the airline industry have been notoriously difficult to pull off, in part because complex labor contracts can offset the promised cost savings. The latest combination, involving Delta Air Lines and Northwest Airlines, creating the nation’s largest airline, took nearly two years to complete. One reason that merger succeeded was because Delta and Northwest negotiated a seniority plan and a new collective bargaining agreement with the pilots. See Airlines / B5

INVESTIGATING THE ORIGINS OF THE FINANCIAL CRISIS

Greenspan says it’s not his fault

American General Finance, which has one branch in Bend, was fined $75,000 by the state of Oregon for an incident in Salem that could have led to identity theft of its customers, the Department of Consumer and Business Services announced Wednesday in a news release. The department is requiring heightened supervision of employees to ensure the protection of customers’ personal information. The incident that caused the fine happened in the Salem branch office in April 2007. An American General branch manager threw away 773 checks made to the firm by Oregonians, according to the department. But the manager did not shred the checks, and instead merely placed them in a trash can on a commercial thoroughfare. The checks had names, addresses, bank account numbers and, in one instance, a Social Security number, the news release said. American General has taken corrective action since and the fine included a $25,000 contribution to the Department of Consumer and Business Services consumer education fund, the release said.

s

$1152.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$17.20

s

$18.185 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.268

Nonprofit offers free legal advice on low-income bankruptcy filing By David Holley The Bulletin

When the collection agencies come calling, but paying back debt isn’t possible, some immediately turn to one option: filing for bankruptcy. But bankruptcy might not be smart for many low- or no-income individuals because they could have few assets to sell off in a Chapter 7 liquidation, meaning the bankruptcy could potentially be more detrimental than beneficial. A group of attorneys offered pro bono advice like that to low-income people who are considering bankruptcy at an April 2 clinic put on by the Bend office of Legal Aid Services of Oregon. Ten people attended and received free legal counseling at the clinic, which was based on a similar operation in Portland that has occurred for more than a decade. The April 2 event will be followed by two more on July 23 and Nov. 19 at the Rosie Bareis Community Campus in Bend. Legal Aid Services, a nonprofit organization with offices throughout Oregon that offers legal services to low-income clients, chose to host the clinics in response to growing demand for bankruptcy legal advice, said Leigh Dickey, the Bend regional director. See Bankruptcy / B5

Paul Sakuma / The Associated Press

Joann Weber of Midtown Realty changes the sign from “Sale Pending” to “Sold” at a home in Palo Alto, Calif. The average rate on a 30-year mortgage jumped from 5 percent to more than 5.3 percent in the past week.

Homebuyers scrambling as mortgage rates start climbing By Alan Zibel and Adrian Sainz The Associated Press

Bernanke sounds warning on deficit Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke warned Wednesday that Americans may have to accept higher taxes or changes in cherished entitlements like Medicare and Social Security if the nation is to avoid staggering budget deficits that threaten to choke off future economic growth. His stern lecture came even as the economy is emerging from the worst recession in years. — From staff and wire reports

B

J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press

Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan is sworn in on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday prior to testifying before the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission. The panel is examining the causes of the collapse of major financial institutions.

WASHINGTON — The era of record-low mortgage rates is over. The average rate on a 30-year loan has jumped from about 5 percent to more than 5.3 percent in just the past week. As mortgages get more expensive, more would-be homeowners are priced out of the market — a threat to the fragile recovery in the housing market. And if you wanted to refinance at a super-low rate, you may have missed your chance. Mortgages under 4 percent are still available, but only for loans that reset in five or seven years, probably to higher rates. Rates are going up because of the improving economy and the end of a government push to make mortgages cheaper. For people putting their homes on the market this spring, rising rates may actually be a good thing. Buyers are racing to complete their purchases and lock in something decent before rates go even higher. See Mortgage / B5

Borrowing less

Former Fed chairman grilled mercilessly but doesn’t budge in defending tenure

In February, consumers borrowed less reflecting weakness in credit cards and auto loans. Outstanding consumer debt Seasonally adjusted $2.60 trillion

By Kevin G. Hall

$2.45T

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

2.55 2.50 2.45 2.40 F M AM J J A SON D J F 2009

’10

Source: Federal Reserve AP

WASHINGTON — Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan defended his legacy Wednesday, telling a special panel that’s looking into the origins of the financial crisis that insufficient bank capital and poor business decisions brought the nation to the brink of ruin, and it wasn’t his fault. Greenspan’s appearance before the congressionally created Finan-

cial Crisis Inquiry Commission was much anticipated and didn’t disappoint. It included revelations that the Fed’s own internal reviews had found insufficient policing of Citigroup, which taxpayers later rescued. A regulator whom Greenspan had silenced also grilled him mercilessly. “The Fed utterly failed to prevent the financial crisis,” Brooksley Born told Greenspan, after reeling off a litany of what she called failures by the central bank that

helped bring about what Greenspan himself now labels the worst financial crisis ever. Born was the chairman of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission in the late 1990s, and her unheeded warnings to Greenspan and other top Clinton administration officials came back to haunt the nation. On Wednesday, she tried in vain to get Greenspan to acknowledge that deregulating the markets in 2000 allowed for an explosion of complex insurance-like products called credit-default swaps, which helped spark the collapse and rescue of insurer American International Group. See Greenspan / B5

HP closer to mimicking real brains in computers By John Markoff New York Times News Service

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Hewlett-Packard scientists on Thursday are to report advances in the design of a new class of diminutive switches capable of replacing transistors as computer chips shrink closer to the atomic scale. The devices, known as memristors, or memory resistors, were conceived in 1971 by Leon O. Chua, an electrical engineer at the University of California, Berkeley, but they were not put into effect until 2008 at the HP lab here. See HP / B5


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M 

in cash reserves and marketable securities at year’s end, including $12.5 billion in government loan money being held in an escrow account. GM had just $14.2 billion on hand a year earlier. GM reiterated a commitment to pay off the balance of its debt to the American and Canadian governments by June. It made payments totaling $2.8 billion, including interest, in December and March toward an initial balance of $8.3 billion. Most of the $50 billion GM borrowed was converted to a 61 percent equity stake held by the Treasury Department. The only way the Treasury can recover that debt is through the sale of its stock. Liddell said a public stock offering would occur “as soon as it makes sense,” but only “when the markets and the company are ready.”

Nearly half of U.S. households escape 2009 federal income tax By Stephen Ohlemacher The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Tax Day is a dreaded deadline for millions, but for nearly half of U.S. households it’s simply somebody else’s problem. About 47 percent will pay no federal income taxes at all for 2009. Either their incomes were too low, or they qualified for enough credits, deductions and exemptions to eliminate their liability. That’s according to projections by the Tax Policy Center, a Washington research organization. Most people still are required to file returns by the April 15 deadline. The penalty for skipping it is limited to the amount of taxes owed, but it’s still almost always better to file: That’s the only way to get a refund of all the income taxes withheld by employers. In recent years, credits for low- and middle-income families have grown so much that a family of four making as much as $50,000 will owe no federal income tax for 2009, as long as there are two children younger than 17, according to a separate analysis by the consulting firm Deloitte Tax. Tax cuts enacted in the past decade have been generous to wealthy taxpayers, too, making them a target for President Barack Obama and Democrats in Congress. Less noticed were tax cuts for low- and middleincome families, which were expanded when Obama signed the massive economic recovery

package last year. The result is a tax system that exempts almost half the country from paying for programs that benefit everyone, including national defense, public safety, infrastructure and education. It is a system in which the top 10 percent of earners — households making an average of $366,400 in 2006 — paid about 73 percent of the income taxes collected by the federal government. The bottom 40 percent, on average, make a profit from the federal income tax, meaning they get more money in tax credits than they would otherwise owe in taxes. For those people, the government sends them a payment. “We have 50 percent of people who are getting something for nothing,” said Curtis Dubay, senior tax policy analyst at the Heritage Foundation. The vast majority of people who escape federal income taxes still pay other taxes, including federal payroll taxes that fund Social Security and Medicare, and excise taxes on gasoline, aviation, alcohol and cigarettes. Many also pay state or local taxes on sales, income and property. That helps explain the country’s aversion to taxes, said Clint Stretch, a tax policy expert Deloitte Tax. He said many people simply look at the difference between their gross pay and their take-home pay and blame the government for the disparity. “It’s not uncommon for people to think that their Social Security taxes, their 401(k) contribu-

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS Jefferson County

David Bodenhamer, 13260 S.W. Golden Mantel, Terrebonne, $318,101.86 Adair Homes, 400 N.E. Meadowlark Lane, Madras, $215,866.12 Hiline Homes, 4664 S.W. Smith Lane, Culver, $172,367.29 Deschutes County

Karen B. Cardin Trust, 69131 Barclay Lane, Sisters, $216,209.22 Bend-La Pine school district No. 1, 56900 Enterprise Drive,

Sunriver, $6 million Leo Dugan, 56431 Stellar Drive, Bend, $242,966 Ray B. Wheeler, 64723 Boones Borough Court, Bend, $118,887.28 City of Sisters

Bill Hall, 839 S. Locus St., Sisters, $471,368 Habitat for Humanity, 130 N. Cowboy St., Sisters, $108,141 Habitat for Humanity, 130 N. Cowboy St., Sisters, $108,141 City of Sisters, 912 S. Locust St., Sisters, $516,000

tions, their share of employer health premiums, all of that stuff in their mind gets lumped into income taxes,” Stretch said. The federal income tax is the government’s largest source of revenue, raising more than $900 billion — or a little less than half of all government receipts — in the budget year that ended last Sept. 30. But with deductions and credits, especially for families with children, there have long been people who don’t pay it, mainly lower-income families. The number of households that don’t pay federal income taxes increased substantially in 2008, when the poor economy reduced incomes and Congress cut taxes in an attempt to help recovery.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

FERTILIZERS

POTTING SOIL

BARK

SOD

Eastside Gardens

GREEN-UP SALE ON NOW!

FREE

Fertilizleedr if schedu in March

Spring aeration & thatch, special rates.

Lawn Service & Spring Cleanup Available!! FREE LANDSCAPE ESTIMATE

61780 SE 27th Street • Bend 541-383-3722 GIFT ITEMS

GARDEN SUPPLY

SOD

“NABCEP SOLAR PV ENTRYLEVEL EXAM PREP”: Prepare to take the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners entry-level certification exam. For licensed electricians. Registration required by April 5; $349, continuing education units included; 8 a.m.-5 p.m., and class continues April 16 from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. and April 17 from 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/building. FILE MANAGEMENT CLASS: Learn how to create, organize and delete files or folders. Keyboarding and Introduction to Computers are required prerequisite classes. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541389-9661 or www.coic.org. RV, BOAT AND ATV SHOW: See new RVs, boats and ATVs; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-5009.

selling its desirable assets to a new company, to Dec. 31. The old GM, which remained in bankruptcy protection as it liquidated closed plants and other discarded assets, exhausted $13.1 billion in cash in the second half of 2008. Excluding one-time charges, the successor company lost about $600 million in the fourth quarter, GM’s chief financial officer, Christopher P. Liddell, said. GM reported an operating loss of $5.9 billion in the same period a year earlier. The results comprise GM’s first official financial report since bankruptcy. Under “fresh start” accounting principles, which reset valuations of assets and liabilities, the results were not directly comparable to those from previous quarters. The report listed $36.2 billion

ORGANICS  GIFT CERTIFICATES

“LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS”: Business owners learn how to develop a working plan. Preregistration required; $49; course combines four coaching sessions starting April 12 and classes on April 21 and May 5 and 19 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “BEGINNING EXCEL 2007”: Preregistration required; $59, continuing education units available; 9 a.m.-noon and class continues April 14 from 9 a.m.noon; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. “ENERGY EDUCATION IS FOR EVERYONE”: Presented by Diane Hanson of NeighborImpact; free; 9 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org.

April 15

The Associated Press file photo

GM said Wednesday it had positive cash flow of $1 billion in the six months after it emerged from bankruptcy protection.

WASHINGTON — Standard & Poor’s, the McGrawHill Cos. unit facing increased regulation after flawed assessments of mortgage bonds, is enlisting Republican lawmakers to kill legislation that may make it easier to sue credit-rating firms. Senate Banking Committee members Bob Corker of Tennessee and Judd Gregg of New Hampshire are being asked to help defeat a proposal that may make judges less likely to dismiss lawsuits against ratings firms, McGraw-Hill lobbyist Cynthia Braddon wrote in a March 22 e-mail to congressional staff members. The banking panel approved legislation last month that includes the liability measure as part of a sweeping plan to tighten regulation of Wall Street. Republicans could force Democrats to drop the provision in exchange for votes needed to ensure passage of the broader rules overhaul, according to a copy of Braddon’s e-mail obtained by Bloomberg News. Democrats “cannot bring this bill to the Senate floor” unless it’s supported by Republicans, Braddon wrote in the e-mail. The liability of creditrating companies “remains a bone of contention,” she wrote. Braddon didn’t return a phone call. Corker’s spokeswoman said he wasn’t available to comment and Gregg’s office didn’t respond to a request for comment. Public pension funds say S&P and Moody’s Investors Service helped cause the global financial crisis by giving top rankings to mortgage bonds after receiving fees from banks to rate the assets. The blame isn’t guaranteeing legal victories, a point underscored March 31 when a federal judge in New York dismissed a suit accusing S&P and Moody’s of defrauding investors who relied on their ratings before buying $63 billion of securities. Without legislative changes, litigation against a creditrating firm has little chance of succeeding, said Michael Perino, a securities-law professor at St. John’s University in New York. “It’s going to be virtually impossible to hold the creditrating agency liable,” he said.

TOOLS

MONDAY

THURSDAY

Bloomberg News

TREES & SHRUBS

EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-5041389 or www.yourmoneyback.org.

DISCOVERING YOUR CORE BRAND ENERGY: Steve Curley, of Kinetic Branding, will lead a presentation on how companies can make an emotional connection with consumers. He also will discuss the Core Brand Energy principles and how to integrate them into a business. Registration is requested; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS CLASS: Learn basic computer skills. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9 a.m.-noon; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “ROTH IRAS — RETIREMENT CAN BE LESS TAXING”: Learn about the differences between traditional and Roth IRAs and new tax law changes for conversion; free; noon-1 p.m.; Edward Jones financial adviser Mark Schang’s office, 1180 S.E. Third St., Bend; 541-617-8861 or www.edwardjones.com. “INTERVIEWING — THE SECRETS”: Learn how to prepare for an interview. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 1:15-3:15 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. “CREDIT MANAGEMENT AND CREDIT REPORTS”: Part of NeighborImpact’s financial fitness series. Learn how to use a credit card responsibly. Preregistration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109 or somerh@neighborimpact.org. “INTRODUCTION TO PAYROLL ACCOUNTING”: Learn the basics of payroll accounting including laws, calculations, deductions and reporting in Excel and QuickBooks. Preregistration required; $129, continuing education units available; Wednesdays through June 2 from 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

By Jesse Westbrook

FREE ESTIMATES

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

DETROIT — The first detailed financial report from General Motors since its bankruptcy showed a company that has largely stanched the hemorrhaging in its day-to-day business, but is still cleaning up problems left over from its collapse last year. GM said Wednesday that it had positive cash flow of $1 billion in the six months after it emerged from bankruptcy protection last July, but that it lost $4.3 billion in that period, mostly because of the cost of settling with the United Auto Workers union over retiree health benefits, one of the burdens that helped bring the company to its knees. The automaker said that with those matters behind it and the economy improving, it could make a profit in 2010, echoing previous predictions. Officials said the company made progress toward that goal in the first quarter, without being specific. The bankruptcy cleared $83 billion in liabilities from GM’s balance sheet, the company said. Wiping out that debt already has saved GM billions of dollars in interest; it paid $28.6 million a day in interest in the months before bankruptcy, but those payments dropped 86 percent, to $4 million a day, after bankruptcy. With those debts gone, GM said gross margins on vehicle sales edged into positive territory, at 1.9 percent, compared with negative 18.5 percent in early 2009. Cash-flow was a positive $1 billion from July 10, when GM emerged from bankruptcy by

S&P enlists GOP senators to fend off ratings liability

SEEDS

“GETTING STARTED WITH GMAIL”: Must have familiarity with Windows operating system and Internet Explorer. Preregistration required; free; 9-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or jenniferp@dpls.us. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Mark Schang, Edward Jones financial adviser, will discuss current updates on the market and economy; free, coffee provided; 9-10 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-617-8861. EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; M.A. Lynch Elementary School, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., Redmond; 541-504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org.

KEYBOARDING CLASS: Class for beginners or those wanting to improve. Features an introduction to Ultra Key typing software. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9-11 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541389-9661 or www.coic.org. E-MAIL CLASS: Learn how to sign up for a free e-mail service. Basic computer experience required. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 2-4:30 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541389-9661 or www.coic.org. “ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT”: Human resource professionals will learn practices to help lead an organization to success. Preregistration required; $89, continuing education units available; Tuesdays through June 1 from 6-8:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

New York Times News Service

GIFT ITEMS

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

By Nick Bunkley

BIRDBATHS

2010 CENTRAL OREGON CAMPAIGN SCHOOL: Features political experts and local government leaders who will discuss topics such as election and campaign finance law, fundraising, contacting voters and working with media. Preregistration required by April 6; $25, includes breakfast and lunch; 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Association of Realtors, 2112 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541585-2066 or bill@coar.com. “TAKE CHARGE — PROTECT YOUR MONEY”: Seminar about fraud prevention. Presented by Department of Consumer and Business Services and AARP Oregon. Reservations requested; free; 9 a.m.- noon and 6:30-8 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 877-926-8300 or http://takecharge bend.eventbrite.com. POWERPOINT CLASS: Learn how to construct a basic PowerPoint presentation. First come, first served, and registration is 20 minutes before class starts; free; 9-11:30 a.m., and class continues April 12 from 9-11:30 a.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-389-9661 or www.coic.org. EMPLOYMENT TRANSITION GROUP: Networking group to help with the unemployment process by exchanging tips and learning about resources; free; 1-3 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010 or bendetg@gmail.com. “BEYOND THE COURTROOM — THE ROLE OF LOCAL JUDGES AND WHY YOUR VOTE MATTERS”: Meet judicial candidates and panel discussion about the role local judges play in the legal system. Registration required by April 5; free; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; robyn@ cityclubofcentraloregon.com or www.karnopp.com. “DROUGHT TOLERANT LANDSCAPING”: Part of the Building Green Council of Central Oregon Green Pathways educational series; free; 5:30-6:30 p.m.; Atlas Smart Homes, 550 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-389-1058 or www.buildinggreencouncil.org. “PESTICIDE APPLICATOR — HERBICIDES ORNAMENTAL TURF”: Prepare for the Oregon commercial pesticide certification exam, or for recertification credit for Oregon applicators and consultants. Preregistration required; $99, continuing education units available; Thursdays through April 22 from 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

EARNED INCOME TAX CREDITS PREPARATION SESSION: Presented by Partnership to End Poverty. For Central Oregonians eligible for EITC. Offers access to TaxWise Online. Registration requested; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-504-1389 or www.yourmoneyback.org. “RÉSUMÉS AND APPLICATIONS”: Learn to prepare applications, résumés and cover letters. Arrive 20 minutes early for registration; free; 2-4 p.m.; COIC WorkSource Bend, 1645 N.E. Forbes Road; 541-3899661 or www.coic.org.

POTTERY

TODAY

GM lost $4.3B in 6 months after its bankruptcy filing

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS

BUSINESS CALENDAR

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact John Stearns at 541-617-7822, e-mail jstearns@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com.

PLANTERS


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 B3

P F   Free-spending teenagers seen as retailers’ salvation While adults boost savings, teens are eager to spend every penny they get By Andrea Chang

A sigh of relief At a shopping center recently in Canoga Park, Calif., Sabrina Sigal, 14, was browsing through racks of brightly colored dresses and striped shirts at trendy retailer XXI Forever, one of her favorite stores. “Last year, I didn’t shop as much,” the eighth-grader from Calabasas, Calif., said. But now, “the urge has come.” Sabrina, who was shopping for spring clothing and a friend’s birthday present, said she visits the mall about once a week. Her favorite trends include highwaisted skirts, cardigans, florals and small details such as lace, zippers and studs. “I don’t really set a budget for myself,” she said. “I just buy what I love.” Nearby, her best friend, 14year-old Makenna Spiegel, was checking the price tag on a bright red jacket with silver shoulder embellishments. “The deals are great, and it makes us want to shop,” Makenna said. “So we may as well get more.” That has retailers breathing a sigh of relief. “2009 was a very difficult year for us, and we’re starting to see the uptick,” said Patti Whisler, regional planning manager of Macy’s southwest region. “Juniors is at the forefront of our improved business, so it’s outpacing some of the other businesses that we have right now.” At surfwear seller Billabong, teens appear to be less concerned about price lately as they buy dresses, tops and shorts for beach season, said Candy Harris, women’s brand director. “Last year, there was a hesitation when it came to making the final purchase,” she said. “Teens were second-guessing their premium purchases and instead were really focusing on price-

But longer range, economists say, less spending and more Lee Rousseau is drilling his savings will be a key require12-year-old daughter on the ment for a return of the endurimportance of saving — in a ing prosperity that Americans bowling alley in northwest like Lee Rousseau had grown Michigan. up considering their birthright. Every Saturday, after Ra- Besides increasing financial chael finishes her three league security, greater savings gengames, Rousseau sits down erates more private investwith the seventh grader and ments and will help soften the calculates her allowance damage from the government’s based on her scores. He adds huge budget deficits. dollars and cents for strikes “There were things we wantand spares, deed now, so we ducts for gutter bought on credit,” balls. And the “We think there’s says Lisa Lanrule is that she going to be a lot ham, a Huntingmust sock half of ton Beach, Calif., of money talks it away. homemaker who “I want her taking place at has three boys, to understand ages 4, 11 and 19, money and fi- the kitchen table and balances on nances,” says the this year.” six credit cards, 48-year-old. five of which she As he ruefully — Pamela Codispoti, has cut up. admits, those are a senior vice president Lanham is subjects Rousseau at American Express teaching her 11himself came year-old about to understand what things cost, almost too late. He’s mired explaining even the sales tax in debt — $25,000 in credit rate in Orange County (currentcard balances, first and sec- ly 8.75 percent) so he can take ond mortgages on the family that into account as he saves home, a $12,000 personal loan for the next big toy. “I tell him, for a travel trailer. But he’s de- you have to pay taxes on it,” she termined that his daughter will says. “He thinks it’s stupid.” do as he says, not as he’s done. Past studies have suggested “I’m from the school of hard that most American parents knocks,” he said. don’t teach their children much Across America, the deep about money management. recession has taught harsh And just how much the receslessons to millions of fami- sion has changed that isn’t lies. In some, it has stirred a clear yet. A survey last summer passionate determination that by the financial firm Credit their children not make the One found that 80 percent of mistakes they made — and to parents had not worked out a learn what the parents wish budget with their teenage chilthey’d learned as kids: how to dren for back-to-school shopmanage spending and to save. ping. In 2005, that figure was If those impulses persist and 91 percent. have their intended effect, the In a more recent poll for result could be a watershed American Express, 71 percent moment with profound impli- of parents said their children, cations for the nation’s future. ages 6 to 16, understood that “It may be a harbinger of a they were in a recession. And kind of cultural shift,” says Eu- about half of the respondents gene Steuerle, a senior fellow said they were seizing the opat the Urban Institute, a social portunity to teach their kids and economic research institu- about finances, debt and good tion. And for many families, credit card use. he says, the change may be un“We think there’s going to avoidable: “It will be harder for be a lot of money talks taking households to borrow, so it will place at the kitchen table this increase their savings rate.” year,” said Pamela Codispoti, a In the short term, concern senior vice president at Ameriover debt and job insecurities can Express, which, like many have slowed consumer spend- bank-card firms, has been ing and contributed to the pushing the higher savings still-anemic recovery from the trend by reducing credit limits recession. and the number of accounts.

By Don Lee

Tribune Washington Bureau

Los Angeles Times

The most coveted shopper these days isn’t a wealthy housewife toting a Chanel handbag. It’s more likely her daughter. By most accounts, teenagers are ideal consumers: Typically unhampered by debt, bills and mortgages, they spend freely and impulsively. Unlike their time-strapped parents, they hit the malls frequently and stay longer. And peer pressure at school makes it easy to justify dropping all of last week’s allowance on the latest Lady Gaga album, Xbox 360 video game or premium jeans. So retail industry watchers were alarmed when teen spending plunged during the recession. “Bank of Mom and Dad — on pretty much all income levels — basically shut down in the back end of ‘08 and the beginning of ‘09,” said Christine Chen, a retail analyst at Needham & Co. But now teen shoppers are making a comeback. For two months in a row, teen retailers have soared past sales expectations. Notably, Abercrombie & Fitch Co., known for its sexy advertising and casual-but-pricey fashions, snapped its 20-month streak of negative sales with an 8 percent increase in January. Teens are hanging out at the mall after school again, goofing around with friends in dressing rooms, snacking on junk food at the food court — and giving retailers hope that they’ll help kickstart a greater wave of spending industrywide. “Whether it be sports equipment, whether it be athletic footwear, whether it be fashion, whether it be electronics, the teen market is showing signs of life and positive growth,” said Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at market research firm NPD Group. To be sure, not everyone is joining the spending party, and many teens say they are more cautious than before and continue to hunt for bargains. Yet teens today are spending about 6 percent to 8 percent more in general compared with a year ago, Cohen said. “Clearly the teen is leading the charge when it comes to the return.”

Once-burned parents school their children on personal finances

Bob Chamberlin / Los Angeles Times

Billi Marder, 14, left, and Jordan Dicker, 15, look through the racks at Forever XXI in Los Angeles on March 5. The teen sector has suffered during the recession with parents giving kids less money to spend, but the demographic that retailers love the most is bouncing back. point items. The tide has started to turn this year.” Since the holidays, the Best Buy in West Los Angeles has seen business pick up among teen boys, who are snapping up the latest video games, celebrity headphones and online game cards, said Jackie Martinez, a store supervisor. “They always come in. It was just a matter of whether they were buying or not,” she said. “Before, they were probably just getting a main product, but now they’re also getting the accessories to go with it because they have more to spend.”

Growth And many retailers have gotten the go-ahead to move forward with plans for new merchandise, stores or concepts. Macy’s is working on expanding its juniors assortment and increasing its social media and digital marketing efforts. Los Angeles retailer Forever 21 recently launched HTG81, a kids’ line, and Love & Beauty, a cosmetics line. It also added categories such as swimwear and active wear, expanded its plus-size Faith 21 line and relaunched its men’s line. JCPenney is also upping its social media efforts and recently launched a celebrity fashion line for teens with Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen called Olsenboye. Meanwhile, H&M, which sells merchandise for men, women, teens and kids, is aggressively opening new stores. “We’re inspired by how teens dress — they’re influencers, they’re not afraid to take fashion risks,” H&M spokeswoman Nicole Christie said. “When we do trend forecasting for seasons ahead, we definitely look to them on new takes on existing trends. They are key to our design process, but they’re also key to our business, saleswise.” In January, Billabong launched its Runway swim collection, which features higher-ticket pieces that focus on novelty trims, prints and silhouettes. “This could have been a tougher sell in 2009 but is enjoying some great success this season,” Harris said. Alexander Keto, 19, of Newport Beach, Calif., said he usually spends nearly $250 a week on eating out, entertainment and shopping, which he charges to two credit cards bankrolled by his dad. His favorite clothing items include shirts and jeans from Urban Outfitters and Nike skateboarding shoes. “I would consider myself a free spender,” the Ohio State University freshman said. “If I really want it, I usually do purchase the item. I really haven’t had too many restrictions.”

Pent-up demand The resurgence in spending has led to two straight months of year-over-year sales increases

for teen retailers after 18 months of declines, according to Thomson Reuters. In January, the sector — which includes American Eagle Outfitters Inc., Aeropostale Inc. and Wet Seal Inc. — posted a 6.5 percent year-over-year increase, making it the month’s biggest outperformer. Last month, teen retailers again beat expectations with a 5 percent sales increase, far better than the 2.3 percent decline analysts had forecast, Thomson Reuters said. At the top of the pack was action sports retail chain Zumiez Inc. of Everett, Wash. Results are based on sales at stores open at least a year, known as same-store sales, and considered a reliable measure of retail health. “You’ve seen teens come back pretty aggressively in terms of spending,” retail analyst Chen said. “Teenagers are not a savings-oriented bunch. They spend every dollar they get.” Part of the strength comes from easy-to-beat 2009 sales figures, but it’s also due to pent-up demand among an age group that derives a lot of enjoyment and a sense of identity from material purchases, analysts said. Also, as parents slowly recover from the downturn, money tends to get funneled to their children first, industry analyst Cohen said. And because teens are still growing, there’s often a real need for a new jacket or pair of sneakers.

Social media Beyond giving retailers a muchneeded sales boost, teen shoppers may also be growing in importance thanks in part to the rise of

social media, which allows them to reach an audience far wider than their usual circle of friends, industry watchers said. With Web sites such as Twitter and Facebook, tech-savvy teens can publicly post what they’re thinking of buying while they’re at the mall and even shoot and upload photos of merchandise. Young shoppers are also using YouTube to post videos of themselves showing off their latest purchases. “Teens set the trends of pop culture,” Harris, of Billabong, said. “Their preference toward fashion, music and lifestyle trends are studied and adopted by everything from electronics to record labels and beyond. They are also becoming more global by nature, and their influences aren’t restricted by economic or geographic boundaries.” Of course, many teens continue to be hampered by tight budgets. Some complained of difficulty finding part-time jobs or said their parents had cut them off to save money. “I used to spend $100 a week, and now I spend like nothing,” said Ali Ghassemi, 18, of Irvine, Calif., while hanging out at the Fashion Island shopping center recently. So retailers say they’ll carefully monitor teen shopping patterns in the months to come. “It’s very important to keep our eye on that and make sure it’s moving in the right direction and not take anything for granted in assuming that everything we’ve done is right,” Whisler, of Macy’s, said. “Juniors tends to be a faster business in every way. When you get it wrong, you learn that quickly.”

'CTP %CUJ for your Organization, Group or School for information email: organizations@bendbulletin.com

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.denfeldpaints.com


B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADC Tel AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL n AP Pharma ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp Aarons Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed Abraxas AcadiaPh Accenture Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivPw h ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adaptec AdeonaPh Adminstf AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlancoTc h AlskAir Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptM Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlteraCp lf Altisrce n Altria AlumChina Alvarion AmBev Amazon AmbacF h Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIntGr pfA AIntlGp rs AmItPasta AmerMed AmO&G AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Americdt Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrg s Ametek Amgen Amicas AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry n AnglogldA Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigncs h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys n Apache AptInv ApolloG g ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArborRT ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArcSight ArenaPhm ArenaRes AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmstrWld ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhdR h ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfo AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvidTch AvisBudg

10.55 +.35 0.44 22.00 -.31 1.24 53.56 +.83 7.73 +.11 11.40 -.41 1.12 55.28 -.68 37.51 +.13 1.76 38.55 -1.03 0.20 24.10 -.90 35.05 +.42 1.12 27.53 -1.11 9.01 -.10 8.55 -.24 27.44 +1.05 .99 +.00 5.14 +.04 0.27 35.89 +.04 1.68 25.65 -.24 19.08 +.17 0.09 11.57 -.09 1.15 -.02 0.16 14.63 +.23 0.07 33.89 -.07 1.70 -.02 1.76 52.50 -.34 0.70 47.54 -.29 0.42 6.54 -.04 9.64 -.29 2.10 +.07 1.54 -.05 0.75 41.56 +.04 3.02 +.07 19.85 -.28 36.02 -.55 .75 -.01 0.15 12.11 +.04 0.04 20.14 +.14 0.52 45.82 -.94 18.74 -.15 3.28 +.01 1.48 -.07 0.52 22.02 +.02 35.06 -.64 0.36 27.44 +.17 0.25 6.28 -.14 0.24 42.10 -.46 3.82 -.04 9.66 +.31 0.08 4.79 +.04 7.07 -.11 .25 +.01 28.69 -.54 0.04 27.35 -1.31 7.02 -.03 13.19 +.19 29.33 -.07 24.57 -.61 .86 -.04 0.04 34.30 -.81 82.53 -1.15 7.47 -.17 4.39 -.03 34.29 -.27 0.18 59.93 +1.70 0.11 68.30 -1.16 1.96 74.06 -.57 4.13 +.13 0.40 10.86 +.29 0.88 63.76 +.09 5.19 +.05 0.20 37.56 -1.00 32.66 -.17 1.49 -.09 .28 +.05 40.04 -.94 0.56 43.61 -.01 0.34 26.77 +.13 3.05 -.10 0.12 14.74 -.29 3.95 159.48 -.47 1.40 71.02 -.82 3.99 +.04 54.58 +.06 18.17 -.27 13.10 -.06 0.60 23.09 -.13 0.72 54.71 -.93 0.20 63.15 -1.33 65.75 -.22 5.38 -.03 0.52 8.06 -.01 1.77 32.06 -.49 1.50 33.87 -.29 82.60 +.70 3.93 +.26 16.92 -.05 8.42 +.08 20.15 +.41 0.80 32.77 +.15 1.13 +.12 53.47 -.92 6.38 +.01 0.40 6.64 -.05 1.44 9.14 -.05 0.20 25.09 -.08 25.55 +1.29 1.40 20.79 -.19 26.70 +.10 3.98 -.07 4.14 92.68 -1.32 134.87 -.69 .61 +.05 30.25 -.35 57.04 -.39 1.54 26.46 -.19 33.38 -.93 1.22 50.98 -.74 3.27 -.05 10.39 -.19 1.35 28.85 -.59 5.70 26.33 +.07 5.58 +.01 0.40 18.64 -.06 1.64 34.08 -.22 0.08 10.87 0.72 42.37 -.75 0.55 29.33 +.02 5.31 10.89 +.46 39.69 +3.78 39.19 +.11 18.66 -.19 6.70 -.27 4.15 +.01 29.12 -.20 41.83 -.98 0.84 21.71 -.43 24.91 +.29 10.03 +.01 0.68 45.29 -.70 0.32 29.04 +.01 0.24 42.10 -.14 60.35 +.06 6.03 -.01 7.30 0.06 42.79 -.18 23.29 +.46 0.36 72.49 -1.46 5.00 +.01 2.83 +.14 0.80 29.46 +.17 18.29 +.79 0.17 41.11 +.75 47.83 +.17 21.81 -.22 2.69 17.21 -.12 1.65 -.01 43.73 -.55 1.67 +.03 .73 +.00 1.12 6.82 -.01 0.60 43.07 +.06 14.05 +.51 0.60 105.47 -1.07 0.40 19.50 -.67 .36 +.01 64.47 +.71 1.12 12.92 -.30 240.60 +1.06 1.23 -.03 0.60 25.91 +.51 0.28 13.58 +.10 9.01 +.06 0.58 17.89 -.14 6.44 +.10 0.40 26.43 -1.14 4.00 +.08 .52 +.13 0.75 45.98 -.97 74.68 +.14 0.36 25.32 +.22 0.60 28.25 +.02 26.26 -1.52 3.18 -.04 37.03 -.77 1.40 14.99 -.08 3.41 -.05 13.84 +.34 0.12 29.33 -.52 0.11 11.16 -.16 37.29 -2.10 2.69 -.11 12.58 +.21 30.43 +.30 1.21 +.10 4.44 +.04 13.40 -.36 14.27 -.25 13.99 +.23 7.90 +.05 0.30 58.44 -.09 26.93 +.21 0.60 28.99 +.30 0.04 14.35 -.22 0.60 34.90 -.57 0.18 22.25 -.49 0.52 15.04 +.13 2.30 44.87 +.24 36.47 -1.78 39.64 -.44 51.77 -.04 32.02 -1.01 13.87 -.18 5.24 +.04 1.34 29.54 -.10 35.71 -.27 2.92 +.14 5.13 +.14 18.65 30.65 -.26 51.49 -.82 1.36 43.93 -.36 176.00 +2.03 33.21 -.41 3.57 91.00 -1.42 2.69 +.11 0.80 37.31 +.18 6.98 -.03 16.11 +.91 13.81 +.39

Nm Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJ Svcs BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPW Acq BPW Acq wt BPZ Res BRE BRF-Brasil BWAY B&B Air Baidu Inc BakrHu Baldor BallCp Ballanty BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcSBrasil n BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A BannerCp BarcGSOil Barclay BarVixMdT BarVixShT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath BellMicro Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBand BBarrett Biocryst BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR Bionovo h BioSante BioScrip Biovail BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blckbaud Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR Blockbstr BlckbstrB BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BootsCoots Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci Bowne BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brinker BrinksHSec BrMySq Broadcom BrdpntGlch BroadrdgF BrdwindE n BrcdeCm BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp h Brunswick BrshEMat BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt BurgerKing CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp A CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp n CKE Rst CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNOOC CNX Gas CNinsure CRM Hld CSG Sys CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaCvOp CalaStrTR Calgon CalifPizza CalifWtr CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CamdnP Cameco g Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs g CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapsteadM CpstnTrb CarboCer CardnlHlt s Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusn n CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carmike Carnival CarnUK CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CastleBr Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarF CelSci Celadon Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf s CenovusE n Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBrasil CentEuro CFCda g CentGard lf CenPacF CentAl

D 31.07 -.13 0.88 33.78 +.04 1.99 0.84 31.94 +.30 0.68 10.52 -.02 0.60 33.22 -.16 1.74 29.97 -.42 29.48 -.42 0.32 6.33 -.06 1.66 80.78 -1.54 1.66 69.20 -1.66 0.20 22.27 -.32 36.67 -.47 1.03 -.03 38.12 -.41 3.36 58.78 -.58 7.98 101.90 -3.18 13.15 +1.05 4.25 +2.47 7.22 -.05 1.50 37.05 -.84 0.26 55.14 +.85 20.20 +.01 0.80 11.69 +.23 617.74 -1.67 0.60 49.00 -.92 0.68 38.81 +.21 0.40 53.86 -.26 6.52 +.41 2.57 -.06 40.53 +.02 13.95 +.05 1.34 48.10 +1.10 0.59 14.22 +.40 0.76 18.64 -.28 0.82 13.63 +.05 0.20 12.26 -.21 0.88 21.90 +.06 0.04 18.62 +.13 10.06 -.02 4.11 +.03 1.80 46.75 +.07 9.54 -.04 2.80 60.92 -.33 0.36 31.46 -.24 1.96 49.79 -.65 1.94 -.07 0.04 5.14 +.39 27.50 -.34 0.16 21.97 -.28 66.10 +.54 20.00 +.43 0.68 84.14 -.39 1.00 22.01 -.55 0.32 19.83 -.11 0.40 40.70 +1.28 1.16 57.97 -.23 .42 -.02 19.69 -.28 4.81 -.06 0.10 9.42 -.12 0.72 62.00 -.30 1.48 78.50 +.07 44.67 +.05 6.99 -.03 7.44 +.29 0.92 29.53 -.35 21.40 +.05 0.24 26.32 +.12 79.95 -.96 0.30 31.61 -.19 0.56 44.20 +.09 38.71 +1.28 3.57 +.10 31.02 -.88 7.66 +.30 57.27 -.23 24.56 -.13 0.56 17.02 -.37 .42 -.02 1.86 9.15 -.29 0.36 16.77 -.13 1.42 31.69 -.16 1.28 10.82 +.07 0.44 24.68 -.82 42.85 -.01 4.00 199.02 +.47 0.37 4.28 -.02 1.82 11.17 -.12 1.09 13.49 -.06 1.20 14.68 +.04 0.60 18.10 +.09 .30 +.05 .24 +.06 31.76 +.23 1.68 72.10 -.26 7.01 +.20 .88 +.08 2.35 -.05 2.57 -.21 37.47 -.58 0.04 8.21 -.05 2.00 77.24 -2.17 7.15 +.01 0.22 11.15 +.02 10.87 -.06 0.60 12.58 -.37 0.97 19.09 -.20 0.44 21.91 +1.33 18.29 -.04 7.80 -.18 0.56 20.16 +.29 42.80 +.01 1.28 26.55 +.17 0.32 34.13 -.27 4.20 +.02 0.56 21.31 +.04 4.35 -.11 6.12 +.15 0.52 25.63 -.18 0.56 15.69 -.26 9.00 +.07 0.31 17.99 +.08 0.28 16.31 +.04 14.53 -.18 0.05 16.50 +.05 26.23 -.26 14.01 +.01 0.80 39.07 +.21 0.10 69.03 -1.37 0.42 34.76 +1.37 50.51 +1.59 3.48 +.07 0.84 59.78 -.40 0.25 21.20 -.04 0.16 22.63 -.77 16.23 -.30 0.80 14.89 -.34 0.20 14.47 -.12 3.14 0.40 91.23 -1.20 1.00 55.15 -.13 0.04 36.25 -.84 38.92 -.06 0.24 11.81 +.73 5.95 +.07 0.90 27.07 -.49 4.60 314.31 -2.59 0.60 15.94 -.04 32.18 -.97 5.16 176.42 +5.13 38.10 +.03 0.22 27.43 -.01 .53 +.02 20.92 -.26 0.96 51.92 -.54 0.34 9.63 8.80 -.40 0.35 35.66 -.19 18.12 +.01 0.40 24.91 -.37 0.72 32.08 +.19 0.12 38.18 -.81 48.99 -.44 6.82 +.06 7.52 -.13 1.14 12.76 -.07 0.63 9.21 -.05 17.93 +.23 17.67 +.58 1.19 37.95 -1.32 0.04 9.36 +.20 6.90 +.15 12.16 -.25 1.80 43.94 -.99 0.28 26.96 -.08 45.08 -.57 1.10 35.40 +.07 1.08 60.64 -.74 0.60 77.87 -1.19 0.99 56.36 -.34 25.97 +1.56 1.24 47.03 -.48 0.20 43.15 -.11 1.70 +.02 0.04 5.79 -.11 2.18 11.70 -.10 1.30 -.01 0.72 64.74 -1.32 0.70 35.68 -.42 6.92 -.42 8.48 +.20 .45 -.01 26.25 -.13 31.93 -.36 0.64 38.83 +.16 24.97 -.49 16.56 +1.10 0.40 38.30 -1.03 0.40 40.48 -.95 0.72 38.32 -.13 24.60 -.08 31.77 -.33 0.34 31.54 -.33 .24 -.01 1.68 64.47 -.82 0.04 12.62 -.03 25.75 -.01 12.87 +.50 .67 +.02 14.03 -.04 0.16 32.93 -.22 7.43 +.14 10.91 +.02 63.24 -.16 .60 +.05 6.34 +.20 0.40 10.46 -.45 0.98 16.85 -.25 0.80 27.57 -.91 24.27 -.32 0.78 14.47 -.27 0.03 18.12 -.37 1.56 14.82 -.19 35.77 -.20 0.01 14.35 +.01 10.02 2.19 +.21 16.03 -.32

Nm CntryTel Cenveo Cephln Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChiArmM ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaDir ChiElMot n ChiINSOn h ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChinaMda ChinaMble ChinaNG n ChNEPet n ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaRE n ChinaSecur ChinaSun ChinaUni ChinaCEd ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita Chordiant ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs n CitizRep h CitrixSys CityNC CityTlcm Clarient h ClaudeR g ClayChinSC ClayGTimb ClayBRIC ClayYldHg ClayGSol CleanEngy Clearwire Clearw rt CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPk n Coach CocaCE CocaCl Coeur rs CogentC Cogent CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk Colfax ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT CombinRx Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS Comptn gh CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil Conolog Conseco ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn CtlAir B ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrgn h Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copel CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CrackerB Crane CredSuiss Cree Inc CrimsnEx n Crocs Crossh glf CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CybrSrce Cyclacel CypSemi CypSharp n CytRx Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DARABio h DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE DUSA Daimler DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DayStar h DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut DeerCon s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Delek Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DltaPtr DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldSh DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DeutTel DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DirxTcBear DirxEMBull DirEMBr rs DirFBear rs DirFBull rs DirREBear DirREBull DirxSCBear DirxSCBull

D 2.90 35.83 -.13 9.86 +.14 66.80 -.49 84.89 -1.16 3.16 +.09 39.70 -.41 5.09 +.10 35.93 -.30 22.70 -.28 28.10 +.50 4.89 +.23 1.70 17.61 +.47 0.30 24.09 -.43 2.72 77.37 -.51 24.02 -.82 0.16 14.27 -.39 45.68 -.31 0.54 3.91 -.01 23.00 -1.24 8.50 -.53 22.27 -.68 2.41 -.01 1.62 -.05 6.37 +.17 .58 -.01 6.68 -.32 0.51 73.34 -1.16 12.74 +.30 1.81 48.89 -.36 9.88 +.17 9.75 +.67 1.46 83.92 -1.88 2.18 -.07 10.40 -.06 7.82 +.08 4.42 +.31 0.29 11.33 +.07 7.28 +.09 .82 +.02 122.47 +.30 16.48 +.28 5.07 +.02 0.24 9.12 +.08 1.48 51.48 +.17 1.42 19.70 +.10 0.56 67.66 +.10 4.22 +.12 16.29 +.16 0.32 61.15 -1.21 3.36 -.01 1.58 29.23 -.14 0.72 18.76 -.16 0.48 27.82 -.32 9.66 +.29 26.34 +.12 2.13 25.71 -.01 4.36 +.07 7.50 129.00 +1.75 1.26 -.02 47.21 -.04 0.40 55.78 +.08 0.49 17.32 -.01 2.79 -.06 1.21 +.05 0.03 28.32 -.33 0.05 19.27 +.02 0.51 43.58 -.36 0.89 18.98 -.15 8.77 +.23 21.87 -.79 7.02 -.07 .17 -.01 0.35 72.41 -1.61 2.00 63.37 -.34 16.44 -.33 0.30 40.49 -.24 0.36 28.14 -.04 1.76 53.82 -.47 16.09 +.39 10.26 +.13 10.42 -.10 51.11 -1.14 0.37 7.46 +.04 34.30 -.35 7.57 +.24 11.82 -.28 2.12 85.11 +.18 23.05 -.38 0.60 13.92 +.09 1.20 0.38 18.29 -.47 0.38 17.53 -.41 0.20 40.79 +.22 0.48 16.25 +.10 31.42 +.52 38.24 -.10 20.75 -.03 0.47 72.65 +2.55 1.56 78.89 -1.12 17.56 +.12 12.09 +.17 1.00 -.04 53.77 -.12 8.51 +.02 34.75 -.65 0.40 35.32 -.43 0.80 25.19 +.17 19.34 -.57 54.05 +.86 41.91 -.74 3.83 +.03 2.20 52.91 -.39 1.57 +.12 6.49 +.06 0.40 45.20 -.74 2.38 44.91 -.45 23.10 -.18 16.84 -.16 0.96 37.40 -.50 20.50 -.55 44.47 -.38 3.77 -.11 12.62 -.08 .83 -.02 1.08 47.88 -.03 0.42 19.22 -.09 0.37 60.28 +.52 2.30 25.10 -.41 0.81 20.93 -.36 18.11 +.06 0.56 34.64 +.27 0.20 20.07 -.38 1.57 41.02 -.86 19.55 -.12 9.57 +.20 2.53 +.12 0.72 61.72 -.02 8.00 -.06 0.13 8.33 -.14 61.38 -.84 17.04 -.23 24.76 -.66 0.72 50.32 -.38 0.80 49.93 +1.48 0.80 35.80 -.36 1.85 49.90 -1.48 76.85 -.22 3.26 +.13 8.61 -.29 .19 -.00 37.22 -.36 27.25 -.25 .40 -.03 39.32 -.39 1.12 +.04 23.04 -.45 1.72 56.69 -.35 0.70 64.71 -.41 133.22 -.51 18.20 -.46 2.34 -.11 11.92 +.12 2.20 13.50 +.03 1.08 -.04 0.05 49.32 -.20 3.50 +.10 4.64 -.27 .44 0.28 5.24 -.14 32.83 -.46 3.96 -.07 1.21 27.62 -.29 0.15 11.93 -.59 0.60 41.93 +.05 2.12 46.12 -.36 2.14 +.39 47.04 -.66 12.49 +.03 0.16 80.40 -.17 1.00 46.39 +1.38 9.02 64.61 +.64 .26 +.00 0.20 65.07 -.05 17.24 -.16 16.65 +.26 141.30 -1.81 11.93 -.07 1.12 60.40 -.28 .40 -.04 0.20 15.53 +.70 8.75 +.35 0.15 7.68 -.15 15.69 +.12 0.40 26.49 +.07 14.17 -.49 1.57 -.06 18.12 +.12 39.35 -.05 1.54 -.07 3.82 -.13 0.20 34.37 -.49 3.46 -.10 0.70 76.36 -1.95 18.98 -.29 28.82 +.70 12.71 -.37 1.05 13.39 -.11 0.08 12.77 -.25 0.64 65.83 -.66 9.56 -.31 2.36 68.29 -.50 0.50 90.45 -1.49 0.03 10.24 -.26 15.19 -.33 26.82 -.32 1.08 32.54 +.13 1.92 55.18 -1.09 30.97 -.46 0.16 25.94 +.30 41.86 +1.90 34.68 -.06 7.61 +.05 23.09 142.80 -4.06 39.65 +1.04 12.45 +.21 0.46 103.97 -1.70 0.04 8.11 +.51 12.32 194.17-13.83 6.51 +.05 4.85 59.59 -.52

Nm

D

DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBear DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolanMda DolbyLab DoleFood n DollarGn n DollarTh DllrTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragnW g n DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuneEn rs DuoyGWt n DyaxCp Dynavax DynCorp Dynegy

8.22 5.18 0.08

2.00 0.35 0.13

1.83 0.48 1.04 0.40 1.04 0.60 0.60

0.42 1.64 0.32 0.96 0.68 1.40

Nm 13.44 +.21 61.85 -1.09 9.58 +.22 41.88 -1.11 15.17 -.21 34.11 -.51 29.60 -.33 .52 +.01 20.78 -1.23 35.32 -.15 28.88 -.20 10.37 -.12 59.30 +.21 11.69 -.11 26.55 -.46 34.20 +.08 59.57 +.08 41.65 -.05 14.01 +.07 70.45 +2.80 46.65 +.22 22.08 +.21 5.07 +.17 16.04 -.36 47.34 -.31 30.79 -.37 34.95 -.50 9.13 -.24 38.54 +.09 27.58 -.22 33.88 +.38 4.28 -.03 3.77 -.04 6.26 -.13 38.79 -.02 22.82 -.08 16.37 -.18 13.01 -.21 74.04 -.42 .22 +.00 27.99 -1.45 3.62 +.10 1.36 +.01 12.05 +.24 1.25 -.05

E-F-G-H E-House 0.25 20.12 -.03 ETrade 1.71 eBay 26.85 -.42 eHealth 15.11 -.43 EMC Cp 18.53 -.17 EMCOR 25.85 +.29 ENI 2.84 46.36 -1.12 EOG Res 0.62 103.74 +6.36 EQT Corp 0.88 43.41 +.02 ETF Pall n 50.89 +.08 ev3 Inc 16.55 -.09 EagleBulk 5.35 -.22 EagleMat 0.40 27.12 ErthLink 0.56 8.65 +.05 EstWstBcp 0.04 18.10 -.10 EastChm 1.76 65.85 +.08 EKodak 6.61 -.11 Eaton 2.00 78.44 +.78 EatnVan 0.64 33.83 -.51 EV FltRt 1.02 15.67 -.01 EV LtdDur 1.39 15.98 +.02 EV SrFlt 1.03 15.60 -.72 EV SrInc 0.38 7.00 EV TxAG 1.23 14.32 +.05 EV TxDiver 1.62 13.38 -.04 EVTxMGlo 1.53 12.24 -.02 EVTxGBW 1.56 13.45 -.05 EVTxBWOp 1.60 14.14 -.19 Ebix Inc s 16.55 -.31 Eclipsys 19.80 -.40 Ecolab 0.62 44.70 +.14 eDiets.com 1.14 +.03 EdisonInt 1.26 34.38 -.29 EducRlty 0.20 6.29 EdwLfSci 103.00 +.57 EinsteinN 12.08 +.77 ElPasoCp 0.04 11.40 -.26 Elan 7.56 -.04 EldorGld g 13.59 +.89 ElecOptSci 7.33 +.02 ElectArts 19.18 +.07 ElixirGam .24 -.01 EBrasAero 0.72 24.08 +.20 Emcore 1.32 -.01 EMS 54.88 -.06 EmergBio 16.53 -.09 EmersonEl 1.34 50.45 -.53 EmersnR h 1.10 2.31 +.10 EmpIca 10.37 -.23 Emulex 13.57 +.13 EnCana g s 0.80 32.16 -.65 Encorm rs 3.72 +.65 EndvrInt 1.32 -.03 EndvSilv g 3.45 +.14 EndoPhrm 23.47 -.17 EndurSpec 1.00 38.26 +.85 Ener1 4.37 EnerNOC 29.14 -.08 Energizer 61.91 -.07 EngyConv 7.28 +.02 EngyPtrs n 13.43 -.17 EngyTsfr 3.58 47.66 -.34 EgyXXI rs 20.26 -.28 EnergySol 0.10 7.20 +.32 Enerpls g 2.16 24.00 -.26 Enersis 0.53 20.70 -.08 EnerSys 25.54 ENSCO 0.10 47.40 -.49 Entegris 5.04 +.01 Entercom 12.43 -.12 Entergy 3.32 82.10 -1.97 EnteroMed .52 +.01 EntPrPt 2.24 35.97 +.09 EnterPT 2.60 42.91 +.86 EntreMd h .70 -.02 EntropCom 4.89 -.39 EnzonPhar 10.39 -.07 Equifax 0.16 35.44 -.35 Equinix 101.63 +.18 EqtyOne 0.88 18.87 -.38 EqtyRsd 1.35 40.63 -.93 EricsnTel 0.19 10.36 -.18 EssexPT 4.13 94.92 -1.08 EsteeLdr 0.55 63.48 +.20 EthanAl 0.20 21.19 -.77 EuroTech 2.15 +.05 Euronet 18.53 -.07 EverestRe 1.92 81.86 +1.30 EvergrnEn .20 +.01 EvrgrSlr 1.16 +.04 ExceedCo 8.70 -1.08 Exceed wt 3.47 -1.03 ExcelM 6.31 -.08 ExcoRes 0.12 19.47 -.08 Exelixis 6.55 -.11 Exelon 2.10 44.73 -.35 ExeterR gs 7.73 +.45 ExideTc 5.83 -.13 Expedia 0.28 24.94 -.35 ExpdIntl 0.38 36.53 -.11 ExpScripts 101.68 -.38 ExterranH 25.62 -.22 ExtraSpce 0.23 13.56 +.16 ExtrmNet 3.43 +.11 ExxonMbl 1.68 67.34 -.56 Ezcorp 21.08 -.60 F5 Netwks 64.56 -.56 FBR Cap 4.57 -.06 FLIR Sys 28.93 +.27 FMC Corp 0.50 63.51 +.26 FMC Tech 67.68 -1.28 FNBCp PA 0.48 8.69 FPL Grp 2.00 49.10 -.09 FSI Intl 3.75 +.12 FTI Cnslt 39.56 -.12 FX Ener 3.72 +.08 FactsetR 0.80 75.08 +.46 FairchldS 11.09 +.08 FamilyDlr 0.62 38.94 +1.15 FannieMae 1.10 +.02 Fastenal 0.80 51.72 +1.64 FedExCp 0.44 90.67 -1.70 FedAgric 0.20 14.90 +1.10 FedRlty 2.64 74.07 -2.00 FedInvst 0.96 26.52 -.26 FelCor 7.34 -.08 Ferro 9.15 -.25 FiberTw rs 4.98 +.15 FibriaCelu 21.73 -.92 FidlNFin 0.60 14.61 -.28 FidNatInfo 0.20 24.21 +.31 FifthThird 0.04 14.30 -.05 Finisar rs 16.37 -.31 FinLine 0.16 17.13 -.14 FstAmCp 0.88 34.36 -.25 FstBcpPR 3.69 +.69 FstCwlth 0.12 7.38 -.05 FFnclOH 0.40 18.67 +.02 FstHorizon 0.80 14.72 +.06 FstInRT 8.71 -.27 FstMarblhd 2.79 FMidBc 0.04 13.99 -.21 FstNiagara 0.56 14.43 +.13 FstPotom 0.80 15.93 +.19 FstSolar 126.60 +6.07 FT Matls 0.25 21.53 -.18 FTChnd 0.09 22.74 -.18 FT Wtr 0.19 20.33 -.09 FT RNG 0.08 18.24 -.12 FirstEngy 2.20 39.52 -.35 FstMerit 0.64 22.44 -.03 Fiserv 51.17 -.30 FlagstrB h .63 -.04 Flextrn 7.84 -.10 Flotek h 1.54 +.06 FlowrsFds 0.70 24.61 -.07 Flowserve 1.16 114.89 -.86 Fluor 0.50 49.34 -.63 FocusMda 17.13 -.66 FEMSA 0.34 48.57 -.06 FootLockr 0.60 15.30 -.26 ForcePro 6.07 FordM 12.58 -.12 FordM wt 4.87 -.09 FordC pfS 3.25 47.10 -.04 ForestCA 15.40 -.04 ForestLab 32.46 +1.98 ForestOil 27.07 -.53 Forestar 19.29 -.33 FormFac 19.02 +.54 Fortress 4.69 +.09 FortuneBr 0.76 49.41 -.29 ForwrdA 0.28 26.09 +.06 Fossil Inc 39.21 -.54 FosterWhl 29.32 -.78 FranceTel 1.97 23.53 -.28 FrankRes 0.88 112.83 -1.17 FredMac 1.34 +.03 FredsInc 0.16 12.52 +.17 FMCG 0.60 85.93 -1.40 FMCG pfM 6.75 118.98 -2.57 FresKabi rt .16 +.01 FrontrD g 5.93 -.17 FrontierCm 1.00 7.45 -.09

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl FurnBrds GATX GFI Grp GLG Ptrs GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec vjGnGrthP GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenSteel GenBiotc h Gensco Genomic Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec Genworth Genzyme GaGulf rs Gerdau g Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GloblInd GlobPay Globalstar GlbSpMet n GolLinhas GoldFLtd GoldRsv g Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GtPlainEn GrWlfRes GtChina rt GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Group1 GrubbEl h GpTelevisa Guess GulfRes n GulfportE GushanEE Gymbree HCC Ins HCP Inc HRPT Prp HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelicosBio HelixEn HellnTel HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewittAsc HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HghldsCrdt HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HimaxTch HollyCp Hollysys HlywdMda Hologic HomeDp HomeProp HomexDev HonwllIntl Hormel Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HstnAEn HovnanE HuanPwr HubGroup HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon Hyatt n Hyperdyn

D 13.74 -.76 0.90 32.82 +.07 30.28 -.63 2.88 -.08 0.12 10.57 -.11 11.17 -.19 6.71 -.24 1.12 29.43 -.19 0.20 5.42 -.15 3.20 +.01 8.86 +.12 28.45 -.25 5.37 +.21 3.31 -.05 0.44 5.16 -.03 1.68 18.50 +.33 0.09 14.09 -.27 1.28 24.68 -.05 22.68 +.17 7.33 -.01 0.16 17.52 +.18 0.40 23.86 +.02 1.50 38.64 +.06 22.24 -.36 .38 +.02 30.70 +.27 48.31 -1.43 20.51 -.78 5.93 +.01 29.02 +.43 1.68 76.47 -.52 0.40 18.50 -.10 16.16 -.11 0.50 7.80 +.07 1.96 70.13 -.38 3.60 -.11 4.12 -.05 .51 +.01 31.93 -.55 16.98 -.41 0.18 17.74 +.45 0.44 19.81 -.20 1.64 42.95 +.06 .75 +.03 18.20 -.29 51.88 -.15 20.01 -.11 8.03 -.18 0.16 17.52 -.25 5.78 -.10 7.73 +.07 3.13 -.07 27.22 -.34 45.45 -.06 0.52 16.40 +.26 0.36 14.35 -.10 1.94 38.76 +.02 0.40 5.85 +.36 6.63 -.09 0.08 44.21 -1.01 1.40 +.02 11.36 +.11 0.40 12.96 +.27 0.17 13.23 +.15 1.22 +.11 0.18 39.87 +1.59 4.15 +.11 1.40 176.36 +3.46 1.08 70.43 -.12 17.18 +.40 12.79 -.18 563.54 -4.68 28.16 -.66 0.80 32.37 -.12 14.46 -.13 1.84 113.92 +1.22 2.95 -.12 6.18 -.05 0.52 31.11 -.14 3.70 2.65 +.13 8.50 +.05 1.77 +.02 0.83 18.90 -.08 3.15 -.16 .38 +.02 95.98 -1.68 15.60 -.28 12.50 +.43 32.14 -.11 2.24 -.03 1.19 21.10 -.40 0.64 47.00 -.18 11.08 -.49 13.66 -.38 0.05 1.17 55.27 +.44 0.54 27.62 1.86 32.61 -1.00 0.48 7.93 -.03 1.70 51.38 -.08 30.49 -.46 18.23 +.38 0.36 31.63 -.57 8.12 -.10 29.07 -.22 1.00 43.86 -.11 2.38 -.02 42.55 -1.07 23.24 -.23 0.40 31.23 -.08 48.54 -1.08 6.66 +.23 0.06 10.22 +.03 0.88 48.45 -.25 10.98 -.13 0.82 33.09 -.23 0.20 28.50 -.53 7.86 -.20 1.00 38.40 -.53 4.65 25.25 -.17 1.24 23.08 -.21 7.07 -.18 4.98 -.02 2.72 45.13 -.78 8.58 -.26 1.20 23.77 -.26 23.83 -1.08 18.77 -.06 17.46 -.47 0.08 16.40 -.03 5.90 -.11 .95 -.02 6.03 +.13 1.68 45.84 -.01 .74 -.01 14.53 -.47 0.53 5.98 -.07 0.20 39.07 -.58 .74 +.01 59.21 -.05 0.80 46.44 -.09 4.48 -.16 0.20 5.42 -.05 1.28 43.33 -.02 11.64 -.20 0.40 63.07 -1.22 41.06 +.16 0.32 53.29 -.57 14.07 -.13 26.58 -.02 0.63 8.10 -.03 1.70 31.57 -.89 0.41 28.69 +.25 0.75 24.07 +1.43 0.30 3.13 -.02 0.60 27.34 -2.09 12.62 +.17 1.19 +.02 17.57 -.46 0.95 32.61 +.06 2.32 48.36 -.80 28.85 -.03 1.21 45.25 -.21 0.84 41.76 -.03 21.05 -.22 56.06 -.58 1.80 25.29 -.19 0.04 14.93 -.45 7.06 -.04 0.02 14.51 -5.84 4.57 -.07 0.59 23.14 -.61 28.71 -.15 0.60 14.20 +.04 0.83 17.54 -.05 32.35 +.82 46.49 -1.34 0.48 35.07 -.81 0.04 5.89 +.04 0.40 12.65 -.21 22.02 +.02 38.21 -.78 1.49 +.01

I-J-K-L

Nm IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IESI-BFC gn ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph iPass iSAstla iShBelg iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iShEMBd iSMnMG iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iSR3KV iShBShtT iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShCnsG iShBasM iShDJOE iShDJOG iShEur350 iSRsMic iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Icon PLC IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX iGo Inc h Ikanos ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs Incyte IndBkMI h IndoTel Infinera infoGRP Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM InlandRE InovioBio InsitTc Insmed InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk interClick n IntcntlEx InterDig Intermec InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterntCap InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare Invernss Invesco InvTech InvRlEst IronMtn IrvinSens IsilonSys Isis IsleCapri ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g JCrew JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian JPMCh pfC Jabil Jacada JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHew JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JavelinPh JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesApp JonesLL JosphBnk JoyGlbl JnprNtwk K Swiss

D 23.08 +.18 15.60 +.71 44.52 -1.27 18.16 +.15 7.47 -.16 12.72 10.20 -.41 0.31 6.29 +.00 5.18 +.05 0.48 1.28 +.07 0.66 24.60 -.18 0.23 13.01 -.13 2.72 74.41 -1.17 0.33 28.37 -.24 1.05 35.96 -.47 0.63 25.14 -.30 0.55 21.91 -.22 0.38 16.57 -.10 0.14 10.60 0.32 51.65 -.50 0.24 12.00 -.03 0.70 54.11 -.68 0.33 11.82 -.04 1.43 44.06 -.30 2.08 61.95 -.55 2.05 42.67 -.21 0.21 12.93 -.02 0.42 16.51 -.16 0.54 49.37 -.42 0.60 57.03 +.32 0.84 60.53 +.71 17.77 +.16 1.04 54.10 -.27 1.65 46.85 -.24 4.09 103.85 +.73 0.55 43.56 -.28 0.95 79.41 -.53 2.22 118.76 -.63 3.93 103.77 +.44 0.58 43.36 -.38 5.59 105.34 +.53 5.83 103.90 +.05 0.23 82.95 -.48 0.82 60.49 -.39 0.36 35.69 -.24 0.75 49.23 -.54 1.20 57.28 -.31 3.68 88.73 +1.12 3.82 89.07 +.55 1.48 83.22 +.13 1.44 56.47 -.40 0.72 41.41 -.32 0.39 49.49 -.33 1.22 91.27 -.64 0.93 80.63 -.64 8.02 88.16 +.13 92.08 -.50 1.93 58.66 -1.53 1.22 62.12 -.43 0.51 86.91 -.65 0.69 52.41 -.25 1.06 65.43 -.34 1.00 66.26 -.05 3.74 104.20 +.09 0.42 74.96 -.33 0.75 69.90 -.22 1.55 81.58 -.46 0.23 110.16 -.01 2.84 38.52 -.01 1.12 69.87 -.39 0.73 20.20 -.18 1.86 50.96 -1.12 0.09 13.45 -.16 0.68 58.47 -.30 0.48 34.02 -.39 0.54 61.31 -.14 1.31 58.89 -.38 0.79 65.76 -.36 0.32 45.98 -.56 0.24 56.44 -.47 1.00 38.48 -.43 0.30 44.56 -.08 4.88 +.21 1.28 56.18 -.23 1.00 53.87 -.07 114.63 +.27 27.08 +.01 16.26 +.36 1.20 35.56 -.35 3.11 +.14 0.60 33.53 -.14 1.96 -.10 3.25 -.16 1.24 47.24 -.46 38.94 -.26 11.48 -.13 18.10 -.45 20.49 -.18 8.35 +.20 3.60 +.01 18.05 +.13 14.23 -.31 .67 -.01 1.28 35.89 -.42 8.76 -.08 7.94 +.04 26.76 -.10 0.49 59.86 -1.27 0.28 36.66 +.22 18.21 +.03 0.57 9.80 -.19 1.32 +.03 27.95 +.07 1.10 -.03 6.08 -.12 6.45 +.10 11.77 +.53 2.72 48.10 -.72 0.63 22.45 +.05 16.35 +.09 3.80 +.14 106.17 -.90 29.35 +.44 13.56 -.11 45.51 -.71 5.57 -.03 0.34 23.58 +.05 2.20 128.48 -.45 5.01 -.12 1.00 48.87 0.24 19.41 -.29 0.10 27.01 +1.10 23.49 +.21 7.14 +.24 9.22 -.40 74.83 +1.91 8.54 +.02 0.48 15.69 +.29 28.40 -.35 34.58 -.39 333.37 -9.93 0.05 27.01 +.70 38.74 -.04 0.41 22.23 -.43 18.21 -.08 0.69 8.87 -.08 0.25 26.72 -.29 .31 +.02 9.41 +.37 10.79 -.21 9.61 0.49 21.92 -.46 73.44 -.57 3.30 -.07 17.66 +.21 46.85 -.34 6.22 +.55 27.53 -.11 13.31 -.01 0.20 45.32 -.52 1.77 31.15 -.05 1.68 24.29 -.01 0.28 16.76 -.08 1.73 +.25 0.38 24.53 -.21 24.50 +.21 1.81 -.13 44.37 -1.04 10.79 +.22 3.04 +.07 17.40 -.55 0.04 14.90 -.40 0.33 33.93 -.17 1.33 +.05 11.59 -.34 0.30 25.49 +.16 5.73 -.03 3.38 +.04 1.96 65.22 -.09 0.52 31.77 -1.13 0.20 19.90 +.10 0.20 72.61 -2.29 59.37 +.23 0.70 59.01 -1.73 31.49 -.15 12.14 +1.36 0.06 0.46 0.50 0.54 1.50

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KKR Fn KLA Tnc KMG Ch KT Corp KV PhmA lf KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMM KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kngswy g Kinross g KirbyCp Kirklands KiteRlty KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc Knot Inc KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp Koppers KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LDK Solar LG Display LIN TV h LKQ Corp LSI Corp LTX-Cred LaZBoy Labophm g LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp n LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LibertyAcq LibAcq wt LbtyASE LibGlobA LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH LigandPhm LihirGold Lihua Int n LillyEli Limited Lincare LincNat Lindsay LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LithiaMot LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM Loews Logitech LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g Luminex

D 0.25 0.20 0.28 0.60 0.08

1.50 0.48 0.04 1.40 2.64 0.64 4.20 4.20

0.10 0.24 0.20 0.08

0.88 1.16 0.38

1.60

0.18 0.04 0.50

0.12 1.04 0.40 0.16 0.60

0.40

0.29

1.90

0.60 1.96 0.60 0.04 0.32 0.92 2.52

1.43 2.52 0.25 4.00 0.36 1.24

46.95 -1.94 16.32 -.19 22.33 -.64 8.44 -.24 31.69 -.25 21.19 +.47 20.82 +.49 1.75 -.05 36.95 -.20 12.07 -.48 52.65 -.39 30.02 +.79 3.33 +.15 10.03 -.03 8.52 +.05 32.80 -.59 61.54 -.66 15.99 -.54 66.74 -.06 59.46 -.12 18.00 48.72 -.82 12.10 +.12 2.46 -.09 18.30 +.55 38.26 -.61 22.30 +.04 5.17 -.01 15.20 -.11 20.74 -.11 11.41 -.04 8.11 +.05 3.89 +.14 57.14 -.36 3.93 +.12 27.02 -1.34 16.05 -.45 17.66 -.12 30.07 -.01 19.09 +.26 4.42 +.11 22.25 +.31 7.58 +.43 14.14 -.15 8.83 +.04 92.67 -.43 7.05 +.28 18.73 -.23 6.70 +.50 20.16 +.01 6.19 -.05 3.14 +.08 13.28 -.69 1.43 -.04 76.46 -.69 5.34 +.05 1.08 +.06 38.58 +.29 35.11 -.30 42.08 +.05 22.93 -.50 23.94 -.44 3.99 +.10 6.96 +.05 36.40 -.35 17.22 -.26 6.73 -.15 81.00 -.41 31.25 -.55 21.53 -.24 36.84 -.09 16.95 -.34 45.18 +.25 25.60 -.31 1.65 1.61 +.01 6.98 -.05 35.80 -.89 9.98 +.09 .95 -.02 4.73 -.08 29.07 -.29 16.08 38.44 +.71 33.72 -.91 51.45 -.56 32.26 +.36 37.81 1.75 +.02 36.39 +1.56 8.25 -.01 36.52 +.01 25.68 -.04 46.16 +.03 31.36 -.85 39.06 -.03 29.03 +.25 26.05 -.09 6.14 -.09 7.19 +.40 15.59 +.13 8.26 +.05 7.80 -.19 3.96 -.10 82.19 -.33 38.06 -.22 16.76 -.41 35.54 +1.35 77.32 -.58 10.10 +.09 25.25 +.27 92.91 -1.39 .99 +.07 42.58 -.50 17.50 -.06

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDRNA MDS g MDU Res MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGMMir MKS Inst MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macquar h Macys MSG n MagnaI g MagHRes MaguirePr ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinerEn MktVGold MktV Steel MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MktAxess MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDermInt McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel MedAssets MedcoHlth

2.80 83.35 -1.11 0.04 23.23 -.27 7.13 -.11 5.59 +.01 1.00 33.26 -.98 1.22 -.06 8.68 +.08 0.63 22.01 -.36 15.82 +.08 9.25 +.35 0.96 7.49 +.01 0.58 6.63 +.02 11.51 -.39 13.35 -.21 20.65 +.29 0.80 57.47 +4.27 37.31 -.06 0.24 40.47 -2.00 1.80 36.75 -.58 14.57 -.37 0.20 22.46 -.15 22.02 -.04 63.03 -.48 3.75 +.10 3.79 +.12 50.00 +.25 0.08 13.74 -.22 6.89 -.14 0.74 58.44 -.44 0.52 20.12 -.15 0.96 31.95 -.63 16.69 -.36 0.11 48.18 +1.37 0.98 70.59 -1.20 0.08 35.07 -.64 27.80 +.42 0.42 44.87 -.34 0.45 45.73 -.43 0.31 39.37 -.54 0.28 15.92 +.01 2.56 31.31 -.08 0.16 32.35 -.35 0.80 24.18 -.15 0.04 8.70 -.11 22.75 +.23 5.56 +.03 1.60 85.59 -.03 20.69 -.16 0.30 15.85 -.35 2.00 25.70 -.54 0.24 45.22 -3.23 12.93 -.07 0.60 255.66 -2.94 0.75 23.14 -.17 4.86 +.14 0.80 19.90 +.16 5.69 +.25 1.04 38.17 -.20 27.50 -.15 2.20 67.70 -.11 0.94 35.39 -.12 0.48 66.17 -.45 16.16 -.59 40.07 -.70 0.90 51.84 -.45 0.92 26.37 +.07 29.65 -.82 20.43 -.08 64.24 +.20

Nm MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MergeHlth MeridBio MeridRs h Meritage Metalico Methanx Methode MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn Micrus MidAApt MiddleBk h MdwstBc h MillerHer Millicom Millipore MindrayM Minefnd g Mirant MitsuUFJ MobileTel Modine ModusLink Mohawk MolecInP h Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Momenta MoneyGrm Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl MortonsR Mosaic Motorola Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO MyersInd Mylan MyriadG NABI Bio NBTY NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NFJDvInt NGAS Res NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NBGre pfA NatlCoal h NatFuGas NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NtWst pfC NatwHP NatResPtrs NatusMed NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetServic NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netezza Netflix Netlist NetwkEng NBRESec Neurcrine NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc NewStarFn Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NexMed Nextwave h NiSource NichACv Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura NordicAm Nordson Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoWestCp NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMed NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax h Novell Novlus NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvEPOp NvMulSI&G Nvidia OGE Engy OM Group OReillyA h OSI Phrm OcciPet Oceaneer OceanFrt h Och-Ziff Oclaro OcwenFn OdysseyHlt OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates

D 0.80 10.85 8.41 0.24 26.30 27.31 10.85 58.79 0.82 44.78 5.32 23.35 0.36 24.18 8.23 48.08 5.80 1.52 36.79 2.40 0.76 19.58 .27 20.47 6.26 0.62 24.96 0.28 10.42 0.74 44.08 7.16 0.14 11.09 1.36 28.71 7.96 10.56 33.40 16.93 0.52 29.35 3.36 18.48 2.46 51.41 .30 .25 0.09 18.86 1.24 88.22 105.85 0.20 34.88 9.57 10.42 5.42 56.69 12.22 8.46 53.21 1.49 0.61 21.31 0.61 17.96 0.96 42.92 14.71 3.69 1.06 68.09 16.38 0.36 16.85 0.42 29.34 0.20 30.02 7.12 6.82 0.20 56.99 7.23 2.13 0.07 4.98 1.00 59.36 0.26 10.63 22.72 1.75 23.12 5.33 49.50 11.86 15.17 0.60 15.98 1.71 0.30 7.33 42.47 3.47 5.24 21.45 0.44 12.44 1.20 31.03 20.36 0.14 24.78 10.18 21.42 0.31 3.73 2.25 21.35 .46 1.34 52.14 0.40 42.94 0.04 7.81 1.50 23.70 0.32 14.88 1.94 21.26 1.76 35.10 2.16 24.97 16.03 12.06 0.24 6.61 47.06 14.63 16.53 12.86 31.51 35.12 36.02 13.88 79.73 3.49 2.32 0.24 3.54 2.59 16.02 3.23 .11 5.01 1.00 16.94 11.28 0.28 12.48 6.44 3.80 0.20 16.03 55.57 0.40 54.09 6.07 0.15 14.48 0.15 17.14 0.20 25.61 .45 .44 0.92 16.33 1.08 9.84 1.86 42.21 1.08 73.59 16.65 0.29 21.08 0.20 42.10 0.72 75.87 0.56 15.49 7.56 1.73 31.04 0.76 71.09 0.64 42.10 1.36 57.68 10.24 4.68 1.36 27.86 1.03 27.92 10.03 16.68 1.12 56.91 3.09 1.72 65.22 0.40 4.63 0.40 11.87 3.67 7.76 1.99 52.25 6.85 2.34 5.88 25.44 1.60 35.63 0.50 29.02 44.25 16.82 1.44 47.61 0.70 17.75 1.34 13.39 0.75 7.98 17.16 1.45 39.76 35.99 41.73 59.94 1.32 86.30 65.86 .78 0.72 17.56 2.89 12.34 18.80 1.35 8.10 16.08 1.78 126.66 45.99

-.19 -.29 +.36 +.79 -.05 -.30 -.45 -.03 -.19 +.23 +.11 -1.89 +.01 -.46 +.01 -.29 +.00 -.15 -.06 -.83 +.25 -.76 -.16 +.06 +.02 -.23 +.33 -.02 -.08 +.03 -.18 -1.02 -.58 -.01 +.01 +.07 -1.39 -.05 -1.29 +.01 -.31 +.13 -.80 +.06 -.08 -1.06 +.13 -.04 -.04 +.03 +.02 -.06 -1.44 -.17 +.21 -.10 +.66 +.32 +.54 -.55 -.05 -.07 -.01 -.37 -.01 -.11 -.32 -.04 -.31 +.06 +.07 -.04 +.04 +.05 -.25 -.18 +.13 -.19 -.14 -.01 -.32 -.15 -.13 -.27 -.12 -.73 +.03 -.17 -.28 -.07 -.03 +.13 +.16 -.84 -.15 -.18 -.02 -.21 -.69 -.47 -.51 -.17 +.16 +.29 -.48 +.23 -3.64 -.14 +.13 -.03 +.04 -.35 +.03 -.00 +.28 -.01 +.03 -.22 +.04 +.35 +.02 -.21 +.82 +.30 -.22 -.20 -.66 -.00 +.01 -.12 -.09 +.05 -.32 +.32 +.09 -.70 -.03 -.07 +.19 -.41 +.58 -1.27 +.09 -.15 +.19 -.12 -.28 -.01 -.91 -.54 +.01 -.51 +.18 +.01 +.14 +.16 -.44 -.13 -.01 -.03 +.13 -.46 -.03 -.61 -.05 -.03 -.09 -.09 -.08 +.11 +.06 -.45 -.18 -.02 -2.19 -.57 -.01 +.60 +.04 -.11 -.26 -.07 -.22 -.64 -2.08 -.79

D

Oilsands g OldDomF h OldNBcp OldRepub Olin OmegaHlt Omncre Omnicom OmniVisn OnSmcnd ONEOK OnlineRes OnyxPh OpnwvSy OpexaTher Opnext OptimerPh optXprs Oracle Orbitz Orexigen OrientEH OrientFn OriginAg Orthovta OshkoshCp OvShip Overstk OwensM s OwensCorn OwensIll Oxigene PC Grp h PDL Bio PF Chng PG&E Cp PHH Corp PMC Sra PMI Grp PNC PNM Res POSCO PPG PPL Corp PSS Wrld Paccar PacerIntl PacAsiaP n PacCapB PacEthan PacSunwr PackAmer Pactiv PaetecHld Palatin PallCorp Palm Inc PalmrM PanASlv Panasonic PaneraBrd Pantry ParPharm ParagShip ParamTch ParaG&S Parexel ParkDrl ParkerHan PartnerRe PatriotCoal Patterson PattUTI Paychex PeabdyE Pengrth g PnnNGm PennVa PennVaGP PennWst g PennantPk Penney PenRE Penske Pentair PeopUtdF PepBoy PepcoHold PepsiCo PerfectWld PerkElm PermFix Perrigo PetMed PetChina Petrohawk PetrbrsA Petrobras PetroDev PtroqstE PetsMart Pfizer PFSweb PhmHTr PharmPdt PhaseFwd PhilipMor PhilipsEl PhlVH PhnxCos PhotrIn PiedNG Pier 1 PimIncSt rt PimIncStr2 PimIncS2 rt PimcoHiI PimcoStrat PinnclEnt PinWst PionDrill PionFltRt PioNtrl PitnyBw PlainsEx Plantron PlatGpMet PlatUnd PlatoLrn PlugPwr h PlumCrk PokerTek h Polo RL Polycom PolyMet g PolyOne Polypore Poniard h Pool Corp Popular PortGE PostPrp Potash Potlatch Power-One PSCrudeDS PwshDB PS Agri PS Oil PS BasMet PS USDBull PwSClnEn PSFinPf PSETecLd PSVrdoTF PwShPfd PowerSec PwShs QQQ Powrwav Pozen Praxair PrecCastpt PrecDril PrmWBc h PriceTR priceline PrideIntl Primerica n PrinFncl PrivateB ProShtS&P PrUShS&P ProUltDow PrUlShDow ProUltQQQ PrUShQQQ ProUltSP ProUShL20 ProUSL7-10T PrUShCh25 ProUltSEM ProUShtRE ProUShOG ProUShtFn ProUShtBM ProUltRE ProUltO&G ProUltFin ProUBasM ProUPR2K ProUltPQQQ ProUSR2K ProUltR2K ProSht20Tr ProUSSP500 ProUltSP500 ProUltCrude ProSUShGld ProUShCrude ProSUSSilv ProSUltSilv ProUltShYen ProUShEuro ProceraNt ProctGam ProgrssEn ProgsvCp ProLogis ProspctCap ProspBcsh Protalix ProtLife ProvET g ProvidFS Prudentl Prud UK PsychSol PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal n PulteGrp PureBio PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

Nm

.90 -.05 34.66 +.28 0.28 12.72 +.28 0.69 13.31 +.12 0.80 20.55 +.15 1.28 20.18 -.45 0.09 29.66 +.03 0.80 38.90 -.50 18.78 -.19 8.47 +.17 1.76 47.60 -.40 4.00 -.07 29.41 -.28 2.37 -.05 2.60 +.08 2.36 -.06 11.67 -.41 17.04 -.07 0.20 25.91 +.08 7.00 -.04 5.65 -.25 15.32 +.13 0.16 14.57 -.31 10.04 -.23 4.52 +.07 40.30 +.11 1.75 43.16 -.19 19.71 -.16 0.71 31.55 -.34 26.76 +.15 36.90 -.63 1.23 +.03 .49 -.09 1.00 6.42 +.07 45.54 +.10 1.82 42.71 -.45 24.15 -.05 9.12 +.06 6.81 0.40 62.50 -.08 0.50 12.82 -.09 1.71 122.59 -1.80 2.16 67.45 -.15 1.40 28.17 -.39 23.83 -.06 0.36 44.43 -.26 5.86 -.18 4.16 +.07 2.45 +.30 1.36 -.08 5.86 +.22 0.60 24.50 -.59 25.55 -.16 4.79 -.16 .24 -.01 0.64 39.81 -.83 4.62 +.77 11.33 -.24 0.05 24.73 +.41 0.13 15.33 -.18 81.72 +.49 14.29 +1.16 25.33 +.02 0.20 4.69 -.12 19.31 +.04 1.46 +.02 23.61 -1.07 5.28 +.10 1.00 66.50 +.18 2.00 80.80 +.51 21.95 -.64 0.40 30.82 -.24 0.20 14.31 -.25 1.24 30.65 -.33 0.28 47.15 +.70 0.84 11.66 -.21 28.36 -.02 0.23 26.30 +.53 1.52 18.45 1.80 21.65 -.36 1.04 10.63 +.01 0.80 32.79 -.43 0.60 13.92 +.43 15.72 -.12 0.76 35.93 -.35 0.61 16.17 +.36 0.12 10.87 +.36 1.08 17.64 -.03 1.92 65.99 -.40 38.33 +2.03 0.28 23.88 -.13 2.15 -.12 0.25 59.58 -1.11 0.40 22.18 +.11 3.72 119.53 -1.72 22.32 +.42 1.07 40.33 -.90 1.07 45.55 -.80 23.19 -.72 5.61 -.06 0.40 32.05 -.31 0.72 17.07 +.11 3.38 +.38 7.59 66.08 0.60 24.00 +.16 13.26 -.16 2.32 52.52 -.13 0.95 32.25 -.55 0.15 59.93 -.15 3.14 +.25 5.43 +.18 1.12 27.91 -.16 7.26 -.17 .14 -.18 0.70 9.53 -.12 .14 -.06 1.46 12.61 +.06 0.78 9.84 -.16 10.46 -.32 2.10 38.59 -.48 7.12 -.09 0.90 12.61 +.08 0.08 59.58 -1.38 1.46 24.71 -.08 34.15 +2.23 0.20 31.90 -.33 2.25 +.17 0.32 36.84 -.03 5.69 +.06 .72 +.01 1.68 39.43 -.53 .68 +.19 0.40 88.86 +.77 30.67 -.34 2.44 +.06 11.19 +.25 18.10 -.45 1.18 +.01 0.52 22.84 -.31 3.15 +.02 1.02 19.77 -.10 0.80 23.82 +.03 0.40 113.42 -1.82 2.04 36.84 -.83 4.27 +.11 56.26 +1.37 24.25 -.09 24.54 +.08 29.12 -.28 22.68 -.27 23.90 +.05 10.12 +.09 1.37 17.39 -.03 0.11 15.94 -.09 0.23 24.99 -.01 1.04 13.89 -.04 9.58 +1.06 0.21 48.63 -.12 1.37 +.08 10.49 -.49 1.80 84.44 +.17 0.12 125.04 -1.21 7.94 -.14 .74 +.21 1.08 55.54 -.39 259.81 -1.79 30.90 -.69 20.01 +.21 0.50 29.63 -.69 0.04 14.12 -.53 48.92 +.28 30.25 +.31 0.53 48.12 -.60 26.15 +.31 66.66 -.25 16.42 +.06 0.41 43.00 -.47 49.04 -1.28 51.65 -.71 7.31 +.08 9.44 +.17 5.72 +.24 11.60 +.21 18.30 +.21 6.58 +.06 0.10 8.52 -.38 0.22 35.98 -.71 0.03 7.13 -.08 0.15 38.31 -.28 129.14 -1.28 114.45 -.65 19.35 +.13 0.04 35.46 -.24 50.11 -.68 28.95 +.46 0.23 179.54 -2.89 13.84 -.33 9.12 -.24 11.52 +.25 3.79 -.07 62.22 +1.17 21.31 -.21 21.28 +.15 .47 -.01 1.76 62.50 -.61 2.48 40.16 -.17 0.16 19.45 +.12 0.60 13.65 -.62 1.64 12.03 -.08 0.62 41.41 -.63 6.63 -.02 0.48 23.29 -.19 0.72 7.87 -.04 0.44 12.04 -.27 0.70 62.84 -.97 0.61 17.30 +.15 30.51 +.46 1.37 30.68 -.42 2.60 93.18 -1.52 11.30 -.01 10.88 -.28 3.10 +1.07 0.53 7.30 +.07 0.64 6.30 +.14 0.68 6.48 +.02

Q-R-S-T QIAGEN QKL Strs n QiaoXMob QiaoXing

23.13 5.74 2.83 1.93

+.11 -.19 +.23 +.04

Qlogic Qualcom QltyDistr QualitySys QuanexBld QuantaSvc QntmDSS QuantFu h Quaterra g QstDiag QuestSft Questar Questcor QksilvRes Quidel Quiksilvr QwestCm RAIT Fin RBS pfE RBS pfG RCN RF MicD RPM RRI Engy RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadioShk Ralcorp Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RaserT RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealNwk RltyInco RedHat RedRobin RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosTh h RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed ResoluteEn Resolute wt ResrceCap ResConn RetailHT RetailOpp RetOpp wt RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynldAm RigelPh RINO Int n RioTinto RiskMetric RiteAid Riverbed RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RBScotlnd RBSct prL RBSct prM RBSct prN RBSct prQ RBSct prR RBSct prS RBSct prT RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Ruddick rue21 n RuthsHosp Ryanair Ryder RdxSPEW RdxSPVal Ryland S1 Corp SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SFN Grp SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SORL SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrEMSmC SP Mid S&P500ETF SpdrBiot Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrWilRE SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrLe1-3bll SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPX Cp SS&C n STEC STMicro SVB FnGp SWS Grp SABESP lf SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude StMaryLE Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty n SamsO&G SJuanB SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge Sanmina rs Sanofi Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h Satyam lf SauerDanf SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Scholastc Schulmn SchwUSMkt SchUSSmC Schwab SchMau SciClone SciGames ScorpioT n Scotts ScrippsNet SeabGld g SeacoastBk SeagateT SealAir Sealy s Seanergy SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SelMedH n SemiHTr SemiMfg SempraEn Semtech Senesco SenHous SenoRx Sensata n Sequenom ServiceCp ShandaG n Shanda ShawGrp Sherwin ShipFin ShufflMstr SiderNac s Siemens SigmaDsg SigmaAld SignatBk SilganHld SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp

D 20.81 +.09 0.76 42.77 +.34 7.69 +.08 1.20 62.33 +.96 0.12 17.22 -.27 19.76 -.20 2.76 -.02 .68 +.00 1.71 -.10 0.40 58.21 -.19 18.02 +.05 0.52 45.04 -.47 8.79 -.01 14.96 -.39 14.04 -.14 5.58 -.11 0.32 5.33 +.08 2.40 +.16 1.47 13.43 +.63 1.52 13.50 +.71 15.14 +.01 5.15 +.06 0.82 21.96 -.23 3.78 -.14 8.20 +.11 28.92 -1.50 19.41 -.15 0.01 16.16 -.68 .38 +.04 0.25 22.43 -.02 66.82 -.17 21.71 +.13 0.65 11.72 -.07 0.17 83.00 +2.16 0.16 47.93 -.97 1.16 +.14 0.44 28.33 +.22 2.00 47.21 -.85 1.50 56.81 -.26 4.63 -.23 1.72 31.72 +.19 30.34 -.05 26.34 +1.20 1.00 15.76 -.03 0.64 62.34 +.12 0.72 17.94 -.25 1.85 38.12 -.93 1.78 22.51 -.33 26.31 -.33 1.11 89.94 -.76 0.04 8.37 -.18 0.16 19.34 +.20 29.09 +.06 0.48 53.27 +.34 0.40 52.96 -.69 1.00 57.30 +.56 6.56 +.46 23.78 -.34 1.03 .71 +.01 6.30 +.40 0.76 29.68 -.07 69.83 -.26 62.64 -.57 13.10 +.11 2.87 +.08 1.00 7.31 -.05 18.45 -.36 1.51 101.94 -.19 10.15 -.05 .97 -.01 12.82 -.11 2.19 +.40 3.60 53.88 -.74 7.67 -.10 20.21 -.36 1.80 241.76 -4.45 22.92 +.03 1.42 -.03 29.53 +.02 0.52 31.02 -.50 0.60 48.11 +.09 1.16 57.61 -.43 0.96 62.48 -.56 27.15 -.29 1.28 33.79 -.15 0.38 59.52 +.15 25.28 -.52 0.64 54.14 -.54 36.60 -.43 29.95 -.85 2.00 58.52 -.80 13.67 -.16 1.44 16.20 +.12 1.60 14.05 +.03 1.59 14.06 +.04 1.69 14.01 +.09 1.53 14.07 +.07 1.65 14.03 -.02 1.81 14.64 +.05 33.10 -1.67 3.36 56.44 -.63 3.36 58.80 -.82 0.36 50.68 +.80 4.15 +.25 24.40 +.11 11.64 +.39 0.48 32.32 -.38 33.91 -1.23 5.75 +.06 29.58 -.29 1.00 41.73 +.17 0.52 43.30 -.27 0.37 27.29 -.20 0.12 21.64 -.91 6.08 +.07 17.20 -.10 0.67 48.05 -.39 35.83 -.79 1.90 38.28 -.20 0.18 22.51 -.26 8.73 17.78 +.16 0.40 59.85 -3.64 12.35 -.17 9.55 +.02 2.51 109.05 -.67 112.49 +1.46 0.75 50.87 -.23 1.67 146.63 -1.03 2.21 118.36 -.68 60.75 -.31 1.67 49.88 -.28 0.13 16.92 -.25 0.25 27.08 -.11 0.46 41.84 -.42 1.79 55.14 -1.27 4.86 39.50 +.04 0.51 23.91 -.02 0.02 45.84 0.36 27.20 -.30 0.50 42.24 -.24 0.25 43.78 -.40 0.14 30.89 -.42 0.37 59.35 -.60 1.00 68.44 +.07 15.10 -.19 11.76 -.21 0.12 10.09 -.21 48.92 -.28 0.36 12.36 +.19 2.29 38.54 -.12 0.60 8.03 -.04 0.40 25.51 +.01 33.15 -.31 40.81 -.41 0.10 37.75 -.61 9.17 -.20 77.18 -1.65 38.46 -.70 8.95 -.04 .68 -.11 0.96 22.84 +1.01 0.60 54.46 +.24 35.74 -.10 7.58 -.23 16.71 -.24 1.63 36.91 +.08 5.39 -.14 0.35 9.51 -.07 0.44 14.07 -.13 1.19 42.77 +.23 2.65 +.10 5.57 -.06 13.40 14.55 -.13 16.98 -.69 0.84 66.04 -.75 0.07 54.42 -.24 0.30 27.01 -.04 0.60 23.52 +.10 0.17 28.21 -.17 0.13 30.46 -.12 0.24 19.27 +.03 0.60 51.90 +1.00 3.59 -.06 14.12 -.18 12.44 +.17 0.50 46.45 -.11 0.30 43.43 -1.14 27.45 +1.51 1.88 +.09 18.85 -.21 0.48 21.51 -.25 3.73 +.07 1.31 106.11 -1.80 0.40 10.44 +.01 11.54 -.32 8.24 +.13 8.29 -.11 0.50 28.50 +.15 6.33 -.37 1.56 50.85 -.51 18.12 +.08 .37 -.01 1.44 22.91 -.44 8.32 +.24 18.31 +.35 6.17 -.31 0.16 9.56 +.02 7.51 +.08 45.96 +.48 35.52 -.21 1.44 69.85 -.02 1.20 19.25 +.13 8.40 -.35 0.19 19.79 -.69 2.41 99.99 -2.06 11.65 +.20 0.64 54.83 -.05 37.80 +.14 0.84 62.82 -.56 3.30 +.23 50.49 +.53 5.63 +.64 0.28 6.30 19.84 +.63 17.33 +.38 0.08 7.38 +.10 2.40 84.53 -3.18

Nm SimpsnM SimsMetal Sina Sinclair Sinovac SiriusXM h SironaDent Skechers SkillSoft SkyWest SkywksSol SmartBal SmartM SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO SmithIntl SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M SoftHTr Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWds n Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SncWall SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthFn h SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SpanBdc h SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottGld n SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT n StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stericycle Steris SterlngBcp SterlBcsh StrlF WA h Sterlite SMadden StewEnt StewInfo StifelFn StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SturmRug SuccessF SulphCo SunHlthGp SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisPh Sunoco SunPowerA SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupEnrgy Supvalu SusqBnc SwERCmTR SwftEng Sybase SykesEnt Symantec Symetra n Synaptics Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus SynthEngy Syntroleum Sysco TAM SA TBS IntlA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisB n TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData Technitrl Techwell TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelefEsp TelMexL TelData Telestone TeleTech Telik h Tellabs TelmxIntl Telvent TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terra TerNRoy n TerreStar Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron TheStreet Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g Thor Inds Thoratec 3Com 3M Co 3Par TibcoSft Tidwtr TierOne hlf Tiffany THorton g TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken TitanMet TiVo Inc Tix Corp TollBros Trchmrk TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi TowersWat Toyota TractSupp TradeStatn TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransDigm TransGlb Transocn Travelers TriValley TricoMar TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueRelig TuesMrn Tuppwre

D 0.40 28.46 -.06 0.18 20.47 -.08 38.81 -.41 5.70 +.13 5.89 +.26 .95 +.08 37.87 -.32 37.45 11.11 +.01 0.16 14.28 -.05 15.74 -.16 6.32 +.06 8.23 +.04 9.59 -.37 4.07 -.06 0.78 53.56 -.37 0.48 44.58 -.53 20.82 -.53 1.40 60.78 +.08 1.20 44.56 +.09 0.62 38.24 +.36 0.33 42.45 -.40 54.04 -.44 8.58 +.63 23.19 -.20 0.25 39.55 -.08 17.61 -.01 8.35 -.11 12.10 +.05 11.57 +.06 9.25 +.23 1.08 31.34 -.31 2.72 0.27 36.87 -.55 0.20 33.14 -.52 24.21 -.11 .82 +.03 1.75 33.56 -.32 0.76 34.03 -.46 0.60 26.27 -.30 0.02 13.30 -.15 40.78 -1.15 .79 -.06 1.00 23.06 -.15 4.51 22.93 -.12 5.99 -.22 3.88 10.49 +.21 0.52 34.77 -.22 0.53 32.06 -.14 0.73 27.84 -.18 0.41 33.40 -.12 1.00 58.99 -.59 0.20 16.35 -.06 0.59 31.50 -.18 0.31 23.26 -.09 1.26 30.20 -.30 4.96 +.23 1.32 59.37 -.35 0.36 24.40 +.39 0.20 2.98 +.04 2.48 -.47 0.40 24.91 +.31 0.20 48.40 -.25 0.33 19.37 +.57 0.04 46.41 -.20 1.02 23.65 -.30 0.30 18.05 -.61 0.16 6.63 +.13 1.15 -.01 54.57 -.57 0.44 35.78 +1.82 0.36 10.32 -.04 0.06 5.91 -.07 .70 +.05 0.07 19.15 -.32 51.70 +2.13 0.12 6.52 +.01 0.05 14.60 +.10 52.00 -.06 14.98 +.76 18.82 -.48 5.09 +.09 0.60 57.17 -.61 0.37 13.18 +.30 19.83 -.25 .32 +.01 10.15 -.06 1.44 32.84 +.31 0.40 34.39 -.72 1.09 +.03 0.60 30.40 -1.04 19.29 +.48 5.46 11.59 -.49 14.89 +.89 0.04 28.53 -.18 23.01 -.20 0.35 16.58 -.24 0.04 10.40 -.17 7.79 -.06 34.05 -.27 46.42 -.48 23.00 +.02 16.69 -.04 13.76 +.27 28.99 +.05 1.13 52.78 -2.01 19.72 +.18 22.73 -.18 0.04 3.44 -.18 1.20 -.04 2.13 -.03 1.00 29.81 -.17 0.09 17.95 -.19 8.20 +.37 0.20 16.93 +.01 20.20 +.24 0.80 16.25 -.10 0.28 13.56 +.21 7.52 -.12 0.47 27.68 -.43 0.60 44.62 -.08 31.35 +.55 9.16 +.02 18.38 -.25 0.46 10.85 +.02 10.32 -.10 13.47 +.26 19.91 +.15 0.23 17.33 -.49 1.53 43.11 -1.32 4.50 +.07 2.07 28.32 -.16 0.68 54.01 -.08 5.52 +.06 5.54 -.08 0.13 19.03 +.04 1.66 41.02 -1.01 44.08 +.45 0.10 5.65 +.01 18.61 +.01 45.23 -1.40 1.27 24.50 -.52 1.40 11.81 -.34 19.24 +.15 7.49 -.02 1.17 18.46 -.09 0.76 7.96 -.01 4.20 70.47 -.80 0.67 15.98 0.45 34.09 -.54 15.24 +.15 17.31 +.06 .92 +.05 0.02 7.96 -.01 0.25 19.42 -.13 0.49 28.62 +.72 0.44 21.50 -.10 0.50 10.15 +.06 30.30 -.66 0.86 44.64 -.79 5.94 +.11 .53 -.01 24.32 -.47 28.65 -.62 11.62 +.16 24.75 41.43 -1.16 0.40 45.76 -.24 14.17 +.06 1.24 +.05 13.30 -.50 20.86 +.15 23.58 -.27 13.19 -.25 0.64 63.51 -.26 0.48 25.32 +.27 14.51 +.37 0.08 22.18 +.61 0.10 3.60 -.08 13.75 -.09 51.58 -.12 40.39 +.28 14.09 -.33 0.28 31.58 +.22 34.16 -.17 7.89 +.15 2.10 83.66 -.69 10.50 +.03 10.95 -.03 1.00 48.90 -.50 .30 0.80 48.81 -.39 0.52 33.54 +.12 1.19 +.02 1.60 51.53 -.94 0.85 32.09 +.10 0.36 30.81 +.06 16.72 -.31 17.16 -.38 1.47 +.23 20.14 -.28 0.60 53.94 -.77 2.44 73.01 -1.11 3.23 58.24 -1.35 0.28 16.11 +.02 0.28 22.10 -.04 1.61 -.02 0.30 48.26 +.10 79.92 -.92 0.56 66.55 +5.07 7.27 -.03 0.80 53.00 +.04 3.68 +.03 7.65 54.41 -.44 6.31 -.05 86.89 -1.45 1.32 52.50 -.09 1.37 +.05 2.35 -.11 1.84 +.03 28.61 -.38 26.08 +.88 0.32 21.26 -.17 7.32 -.05 0.16 68.75 +1.22 29.20 -.78 6.68 -.27 1.00 48.75 -1.01

Nm

D

Turkcell TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

0.79 0.64 0.80 0.16

15.75 28.54 39.22 19.24

+.31 +.26 -.18 +.26

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UAL UBS AG UDR UGI Corp URS US Airwy US Cncrt h US Geoth US Gold USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever Unilife n UnionPac Unisys rs Unit UtdCBksGa UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US Enr US GasFd US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdThrp s UtdWestrn UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnvHlth s UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE Valassis Vale10A Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceTc h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValueClick VKSrInc VanceInfo VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangMidC VangSmCp VangTSM VangValu VangREIT VangDivAp VangAllW VangEmg VangEur VangEurPc VangFncl VantageDrl Varian VarianMed VarianSemi VectorGp Vectren VeecoInst Venoco Ventas

m

m m

m M m

G

Mw m

M W& O WH WM W W W R W M W W W W W R W WR W W M W W W W W W W W MD W W WW W R W W W W W W W W W H W H O WD W R W U W m W W W W W W H W W W Wm Wm W G Wm W mm D W m W D W W W W D W D W m W W W Ww G W W W W M W W m W OM O m

M R Ww m G m m

N mm m w w mG

0.10 0.72 0.80

0.06

0.20 1.56 0.67 0.67 1.08

0.40 1.88 0.20

0.20 1.70 0.03 0.20 0.33

2.40 3.73 0.52 0.52 0.20 0.88 0.76 0.64 0.30 2.11 3.06 0.61 0.71 0.65 1.15 1.25 1.85 0.93 0.86 0.55 1.91 0.81 0.47

1.60 1.36 2.14

8.00 18.95 16.50 18.35 26.88 48.86 6.82 .42 .97 3.12 6.38 17.50 16.02 2.94 22.20 47.81 .16 13.49 31.55 32.66 30.80 30.02 6.89 73.68 36.96 44.31 5.14 3.85 7.75 63.67 9.83 26.70 6.15 38.20 7.16 41.52 67.25 73.99 57.62 1.59 32.93 15.59 36.78 25.36 .94 1.91 3.45 38.29 27.43 82.13 5.24 29.24 58.21 33.09 28.28 44.05 1.03 20.11 27.40 15.79 29.57 9.92 5.23 22.91 79.64 78.83 56.19 66.46 64.88 60.45 51.15 50.16 49.20 45.04 43.34 48.23 34.76 33.29 1.56 51.84 55.28 33.90 15.60 25.20 46.33 14.66 47.

-.06 -.52 -.38 -.44 +.07 -1.37 -.26 +.02 +.02 +.16 +.08 -.08 +.11 +.04 -.99 -.29 +.01 -.01 +.19 +.16 -.03 +.09 -.08 +.04 -.47 -.44 -.04 -.04 +.09 -.55 +.09 -.38 -.06 -.60 -.19 -.50 -2.46 -.68 -.54 -.06 -.48 -.41 +.09 -.24 +.07 -.07 -.06 -.86 -.42 -.38 +.14 +.13 -.27 +.10 -.18 -.24 +.02 -.63 +.28 -.38 -.23 -.23 +.03 +.14 +.30 -.22 -.64 -.26 -.32 -.33 -1.13 -.19 -.41 -.34 -.62 -.36 -.21 -.01 +.01 -.53 +.40 -.17 -.40 -1.17 +.21


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Mortgage

Airlines

Continued from B1 “We are seeing some panic among potential buyers who have not found houses yet,” said Craig Strent, co-founder of Apex Home Loans in Bethesda, Md. “They’re saying: Man, I should have found a house three weeks ago or last month when rates are lower.” It’s all about affordability. For every 1 percentage point rise in rates, 300,000 to 400,000 wouldbe buyers are priced out of the market in a given year, according to the National Association of Realtors. Good economic news is the first reason rates are rising: U.S. government debt, a safe haven during the recession, is losing its appeal as investors turn to stocks and riskier corporate bonds. Lower demand for debt means the government has to offer a better interest rate to sell its bonds. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which is closely tracked by mortgage rates, hovered above 4 percent this week, the highest since June, before falling back slightly. The second reason is the Federal Reserve. Last week, the Fed ended its program to push mortgage rates down by buying up mortgage-backed securities. When demand from the central bank was high, rates plummeted to about 4.7 percent for much of last year. And business boomed for mortgage lenders as homeowners raced to refinance out of adjustable-rate mortgages and into fixed loans. As of Wednesday, the Mortgage Bankers Association put the national average for a 30year fixed-rate mortgage at 5.31 percent. One week ago, it was 5.04 percent. Many analysts forecast rates will rise as high as 6 percent by early next year. If they go much higher, the already shaky housing recovery could stall. And that could slow the broader economic rebound. In a normal market, with home prices steadily rising, a jump in rates doesn’t cause a big dip in demand. That’s because people know their homes will eventually rise in value, and are willing to accept a higher mortgage payment. But now home prices are flat nationally and still falling in some places. Potential buyers are nervous about jumping in. “In this environment, any rise in mortgage rates does significant damage because people don’t think they’re going to get their money back” if prices fall, said Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

Continued from B1 “The success of the DeltaNorthwest merger is reinvigorating consolidation discussions in the industry,” said Bill Swelbar, a research engineer with MIT’s International Center for Air Transportation. In contrast, one of US Airways’ challenges is that it still has not integrated pilot senior-

Bankruptcy Continued from B1 Dickey said the number of people who requested and are eligible for bankruptcy assistance from Legal Aid — a person’s income level must be at or below 125 percent of the federal poverty level — increased by 55 percent from 2008 to 62 people in 2009. She expects about 100 people will seek and qualify for bankruptcy assistance in the Bend area during 2010. Already, 24 people have. “The volume of people who have been asking about bankruptcy, or collections-type issues, has about doubled in the last two years,” Dickey said. Those numbers reflect Oregon as a whole, which saw a rapid increase in bankruptcy filings between 2008 and 2009. About 45.5 percent more individuals filed for bankruptcy in 2009 — 17,484 total — compared with 2008. The number of businesses filing for bankruptcy in Oregon also has soared. It rose to 575 in 2009, up 42 percent from 2008. Through March 31 of this year, nearly 4,400 individuals have already filed, meaning 2010 is on schedule to have more bankruptcies than 2009.

HP Continued from B1 They are simpler than today’s semiconducting transistors, can store information even in the absence of an electrical current and, according to a report in Nature, can be used for both data processing and storage applications. The researchers previously reported in The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that they had devised a new method for storing and retrieving information from a

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 B5

ity since its merger with America West in 2005 due to union infighting. The labor issue could turn out to be the biggest hurdle to overcome in any merger with United. People briefed on the matter said Wednesday that a transaction involving US Airways and United was not expected to be announced for several weeks. One issue being worked out is the management structure of the combined company, these

people said. They cautioned that the discussions could still collapse. Terms of the deal could not be immediately learned. United’s chief executive, Glenn Tilton, has made no secret in recent years of his desire to find a partner, and has held extensive talks to merge with Continental in 2008 but was rebuffed. Some analysts speculated that the renewed talks with US Airways might provoke Continental to come back to the table.

“There’s a lot of people who are filing for bankruptcy,” said Brian T. Hemphill, a Bend attorney who was one of about a dozen attorneys offering free legal advice at the April 2 event. Hemphill added that because there are so many more people filing now than a few years ago, people should realize that attorneys working with Legal Aid are only offering free advice to people who meet the income restrictions. He said people may file for bankruptcy without an attorney, but having one is beneficial because an attorney can help people understand whether they actually need to file. Sometimes low-income individuals don’t need to file, even if creditors are on their tails, because they have no or few assets to liquidate to pay off their debts, Hemphill said. If they do have some assets, a $10,000 car for example, it might not be worth having that sold to pay off $15,000 in credit card debt, he said. Some people, especially those with little income, might just go ahead and file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, without the help of an attorney because attorneys can be so expensive. This program resolves that problem, Hemphill said. “It’s a rewarding experience for us to use our training and our skills to help out those in

need,” he said. At the April 2 clinic, Dickey said many individuals’ questions were resolved on the spot, and others are still considering bankruptcy. If a person does file, the attorney that assisted them last week will also provide free legal work during the bankruptcy proceeding, she said. Various groups collaborate to offer monthly bankruptcy clinics in Portland, from which Bend’s clinics stemmed. The Lawyers’ Campaign for Equal Justice, a nonprofit that works to support the various Legal Aid programs in Oregon, helped Bend Legal Aid start the program in Bend. “The legal aid office in Bend was being flooded with requests for bankruptcy requests they couldn’t handle,” said Sandra Hansberger, executive director of Campaign for Equal Justice. In addition to the one-on-one legal counseling on July 23 and Nov. 19, there also will be a general overview of bankruptcy during each session, Dickey said. For more information on Legal Aid, or to attend one of the events, call 541-385-6944 or 1-877-803-9584. David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@ bendbulletin.com.

vast three-dimensional array of memristors. The scheme could potentially free designers to stack thousands of switches in a high-rise fashion, permitting a new class of ultradense computing devices even after two-dimensional scaling reaches fundamental limits. Memristor-based systems also hold out the prospect of fashioning analog computing systems that function more like biological brains, Chua said. “Our brains are made of memristors,” he said, referring to the function of biological syn-

apses. “We have the right stuff now to build real brains.” In an interview at the HP research lab, Stan Williams, a company physicist, said that in the two years since announcing working devices, his team had increased their switching speed to match today’s conventional silicon transistors. “Not only do we think that in three years we can be better than the competitors,” Williams said. “The memristor technology really has the capacity to continue scaling for a very long time, and that’s really a big deal.”

Greenspan Continued from B1 Greenspan said those products weren’t an issue at the time of deregulation, but Born reminded him that they became one of the principal causes of the financial meltdown in September 2008. “Are you aware that the collapse of AIG was caused by its commitments under credit-default swaps that it had issued? The taxpayer has had to bail out AIG because of its exposure to credit-default swaps to the tune of more than $180 billion,” she told Greenspan. At the end of the bitter exchange, Greenspan told Born, “I really fundamentally disagree with your point of view.” He said the financial crisis occurred because regulators were unaware at the time that capital requirements — how much banks have to sock away to offset potential losses — were insufficient. Even this begrudging mea culpa from Greenspan, however, had a caveat. Regulators “were undercapitalizing the banking system for 40 or 50 years,” he said, suggesting that the problem predated his 18-year tenure. The other major cause, he said, was a breakdown at the originating point of mortgage finance, where lenders failed to know their clients, the borrowers, sufficiently. This can’t be regulated, he suggested, but it’s a fundamental part of doing business. The explanation, however, misses the fact that regulators allowed popular no-documentation loans, in which a borrower who was willing to pay a quarter-point more on a lending rate could avoid having to document any income. Commission Chairman Phil Angelides, a former California state treasurer, read Greenspan a long list of warnings from within the Fed about brewing problems in housing finance that were ignored. “You could’ve, you should’ve and you didn’t,” he said. Greenspan said the Fed couldn’t be blamed for insufficient bank regulation since it didn’t have supervisory powers over investment banks, which pooled millions of poorly underwritten loans for sale to investors. That responsibility fell to the Securities and Exchange Commission, which monitored the banks for investor protection but not for their safety and soundness, however, as it wasn’t a bank regulator.

As to why the Fed’s own inspectors within big banks failed to see problems, Greenspan said they relied on creditrating agencies to determine the riskiness of complex securities backed by pools of U.S. mortgages. Under questioning from Heather Murren, a former Merrill Lynch research analyst, Greenspan appeared surprised that two internal reviews by the Fed, obtained by the commission, were critical of how the Federal Reserve Bank of New York policed the risks taken by Citigroup and other Wall Street banks. A so-called closeout report by the Fed in May 2005 found that “there are insufficient resources to conduct continuous supervisory activities in a consistent manner.” A similar report in December 2009, after Greenspan was gone, concluded that the “supervision program for Citigroup has been less than effective” and cited “significant weaknesses in the execution of the supervisory program.” Greenspan seemed vexed. “I’ve heard those things, and I must say I don’t recall a single instance where a request for funding for supervision and regulation was turned down by the (Federal Reserve) Board,” he said. “I find this notion of inadequacy not verifiable.” He also disputed the idea that Wall Street banks with seats on the board of directors of the New York Fed have a conflict of interest. “I personally have seen no evidence that members of the board ... had any influence on policy” other than giving advice, he said. Much of Wednesday’s hearing focused on subprime lending to the weakest borrowers and the growing exposure of quasi-government entities Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to risks from these bad loans. Members disagreed about whether these entities were the cause of the housing crisis or simply the enablers. Today, the commission will hear from Chuck Prince, the former Citigroup CEO who famously explained Wall Street’s inability to step back from the abyss by saying that as long as the music was playing he had to dance. Robert Rubin, a Citi CEO before he became the economic face of the Clinton administration as treasury secretary, also will go before the commission. On Friday, the commission grills the former heads of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascadeB h CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.00f .04 .32 1.68 ... .04 .72 .72 ... ... .32 .22 .63 .04 .38 ... ... .63 ... .52

14 13 ... ... 40 ... ... 28 24 52 20 15 26 29 ... 11 ... ... 16 ... 16

YTD Last Chg %Chg 40.04 20.93 18.62 14.28 72.10 .55 34.47 54.74 61.72 2.62 28.93 53.29 14.67 22.45 8.52 22.25 3.99 10.10 22.01 8.23 29.35

-.94 -.14 +.13 +.16 -.26 -.02 +.24 -.02 -.02 +.12 +.27 -.57 ... +.05 +.05 +.31 +.10 +.09 -.36 +.11 +.03

Name

+15.9 -3.1 +23.6 +16.2 +33.2 -19.1 +25.4 +40.2 +4.3 +9.0 -11.6 +3.5 +10.2 +10.0 +53.5 +8.4 +47.8 +44.7 -6.7 -6.8 -3.7

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1149.00 $1152.30 $18.185

Pvs Day $1136.00 $1135.10 $17.917

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.08 .64 1.66 ... .36 ... 1.68 .12 .40 .07 1.44f .80f .40 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20

21 22 17 95 91 ... 27 19 14 ... 19 11 48 56 ... 33 65 38 ... ...

73.59 -.32 +11.4 42.10 -1.27 +12.0 47.86 +.17 +6.3 16.08 -.64 +26.7 44.43 -.26 +22.5 3.16 +.10 +12.3 39.43 -.53 +4.4 125.04 -1.21 +13.3 25.51 +.01 +19.8 54.42 -.24 +14.1 69.85 -.02 +13.3 48.85 +.01 +22.1 24.91 +.31 +8.0 7.32 -.05 +22.0 13.49 -.01 +.6 26.70 -.38 +18.6 20.21 -.06 +4.5 31.99 -.29 +18.5 2.65 -.01 +26.2 45.97 -.35 +6.6

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF Pfizer FordM

4138071 1623617 1424896 682424 666222

Last Chg 4.36 18.62 118.36 17.07 12.58

+.07 +.13 -.68 +.11 -.12

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

FstBcpPR ZaleCp Wabash BkA BM RE Goldcp wt

3.69 3.60 8.07 2.29 5.13

+.69 +.67 +.89 +.24 +.53

BPW Acq wt BPW Acq un RexahnPh Engex WhiteRiv

+23.0 +22.9 +12.4 +11.7 +11.5

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Name

2.19 4.89 4.68 9.98 5.01

Palm Inc PwShs QQQ Intel Microsoft MicronT

+.40 +.23 +.19 +.09 +.28

Last

4.25 +2.47 +138.8 18.00 +4.50 +33.3 2.19 +.40 +22.3 7.72 +.97 +14.4 15.50 +1.70 +12.3

Name

-8.3 -7.6 -7.5 -7.3 -7.2

SearchM un AmShrd SDgo pfC AlldDefen ProlorBio

1,102 1,970 122 3,194 325 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Last

Vol (00) 800998 565786 477242 405997 344945

Last Chg 4.62 48.63 22.45 29.35 10.56

+.77 -.12 +.05 +.03 +.33

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

DUSA AntheraP n Palm Inc PacCapB SRISurg

2.14 +.39 +22.3 8.38 +1.45 +20.9 4.62 +.77 +20.0 2.45 +.30 +14.0 3.85 +.45 +13.2

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

55510 40057 39387 38255 31961

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

10.00 -.90 2.57 -.21 3.21 -.26 20.82 -1.65 2.05 -.16

Vol (00)

RexahnPh CheniereEn NA Pall g LibertyAcq NwGold g

Last

FstPfd pfA Borders MLSPRt5-10 GlbSAsiaxJ KV PhmB lf

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

4.50 -.50 -10.0 2.55 -.25 -8.9 15.85 -1.15 -6.8 6.76 -.45 -6.2 3.86 -.25 -6.1

Name

Last

HstnAEn StarScient FstBcMiss ChiRecyE n ChNuokg n

Diary

Chg %Chg

14.51 -5.84 -28.7 2.48 -.47 -15.9 8.57 -.88 -9.3 4.50 -.45 -9.1 5.54 -.50 -8.3

Diary 256 248 32 536 33 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,229 1,466 118 2,813 184 6

10,988.06 4,439.24 408.57 7,616.26 1,971.20 2,443.50 1,191.80 12,487.32 702.65

7,750.85 2,757.79 324.39 5,107.95 1,336.87 1,559.46 814.53 8,292.40 431.69

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

10,897.52 4,395.99 384.22 7,546.18 1,956.42 2,431.16 1,182.45 12,394.90 699.46

-72.47 -35.43 -3.47 -58.26 -4.45 -5.65 -6.99 -69.69 -2.02

YTD %Chg %Chg -.66 -.80 -.90 -.77 -.23 -.23 -.59 -.56 -.29

52-wk %Chg

+4.50 +7.23 -3.46 +5.03 +7.20 +7.14 +6.04 +7.33 +11.84

+39.05 +55.34 +14.07 +45.78 +40.99 +52.84 +43.30 +47.39 +58.21

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

353.89 2,696.96 4,026.97 5,762.06 6,222.41 21,928.77 33,632.35 23,151.30 3,325.08 11,292.83 1,726.60 2,988.10 4,983.20 6,012.51

-.48 t +.01 s -.67 t -.32 t -.48 t +1.82 s -.50 t -.84 t +.49 s +.09 s +.03 s +.42 s +.18 s -.57 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

.9284 1.5272 .9961 .001936 .1464 1.3373 .1288 .010727 .081759 .0341 .000892 .1383 .9327 .0316

Pvs Day .9276 1.5277 .9999 .001923 .1464 1.3396 .1287 .010654 .081653 .0340 .000890 .1388 .9352 .0315

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret AIM Investments A: ChartA p 15.77 -0.07 +5.0 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 17.74 -0.08 +8.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.81 -0.03 +4.3 GrowthI 23.30 -0.10 +5.7 Ultra 20.59 -0.10 +5.8 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.73 -0.08 +6.8 AMutlA p 23.96 -0.10 +4.1 BalA p 16.89 -0.03 +4.8 BondA p 11.96 +0.05 +2.4 CapWA p 20.10 +0.06 +1.1 CapIBA p 48.24 -0.12 +1.6 CapWGA p 34.23 -0.16 +0.9 EupacA p 39.06 -0.16 +1.9 FdInvA p 34.37 -0.20 +5.4 GovtA p 14.03 +0.07 +1.1 GwthA p 28.78 -0.13 +5.3 HI TrA p 10.99 +0.02 +5.4 IncoA p 15.89 -0.04 +3.7 IntBdA p 13.21 +0.04 +1.2 ICAA p 26.91 -0.12 +4.2 NEcoA p 23.59 -0.09 +4.9 N PerA p 26.52 -0.09 +3.4 NwWrldA 49.63 -0.09 +5.1 SmCpA p 34.53 -0.01 +9.5 TxExA p 12.06 +1.2 WshA p 25.62 -0.19 +4.6 American Funds B: BalB p 16.83 -0.03 +4.5 CapIBB t 48.25 -0.13 +1.4 GrwthB t 27.86 -0.14 +5.1 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.17 -0.09 +3.3 IntlEqA 28.45 -0.10 +3.2 IntEqII I r 12.04 -0.04 +2.2 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.31 -0.09 -1.7 MidCap 27.62 -0.26 +8.1 MidCapVal 18.79 -0.09 +4.5 Baron Funds:

Growth 44.88 -0.22 +8.6 SmallCap 20.74 -0.14 +7.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.48 +0.06 +2.9 DivMu 14.40 +0.8 TxMgdIntl 15.55 -0.12 +1.8 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 16.51 -0.12 +4.4 GlAlA r 18.38 -0.02 +2.7 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.16 -0.02 +2.5 BlackRock Instl: GlbAlloc r 18.47 -0.02 +2.8 CGM Funds: Focus 31.42 -0.37 +5.6 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.65 -0.25 +4.9 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 26.27 -0.15 +9.5 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 27.06 -0.15 +9.6 AcornIntZ 36.21 -0.08 +5.7 ValRestr 45.97 -0.26 +7.5 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.59 -0.06 +4.6 USCorEq2 10.08 -0.05 +10.5 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 32.64 -0.13 +5.4 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 32.99 -0.13 +5.4 NYVen C 31.53 -0.13 +5.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.49 +0.03 +3.4 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.47 -0.05 +6.9 EmMktV 33.48 -0.15 +6.5 IntSmVa 16.24 -0.02 +7.6 USLgCo 34.90 -0.19 +6.6 USLgVa 19.00 -0.14 +11.6 US Micro 11.92 -0.02 +12.9 US Small 18.70 -0.04 +13.6 US SmVa 22.91 +0.02 +16.8 IntlSmCo 15.29 -0.03 +7.5 Fixd 10.33 +0.01 +0.4 IntVa 17.59 -0.15 +3.3

Glb5FxInc 11.17 2YGlFxd 10.19 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 67.62 Income 13.06 IntlStk 33.34 Stock 103.14 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 17.94 NatlMunInc 9.63 Eaton Vance I: LgCapVal 17.99 Evergreen A: AstAll p 11.64 Evergreen C: AstAllC t 11.28 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.96 FPACres 26.06 Fairholme 34.66 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 4.97 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.07 StrInA 12.31 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.24 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.01 FF2015 10.85 FF2020 13.13 FF2025 10.91 FF2030 13.04 FF2035 10.81 FF2040 7.56 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.21 AMgr50 14.48 Balanc 17.22 BlueChGr 40.53 Canada 52.20 CapAp 23.44 CpInc r 8.97 Contra 61.15 DisEq 22.28

+0.03 +1.6 +0.5 -0.38 +0.02 -0.23 -0.83

+6.2 +2.0 +4.7 +7.6

-0.15 +7.4 -0.02 +2.5 -0.15 +7.5 -0.02 +2.4 -0.03 +2.2 +0.01 +1.2 -0.08 +5.0 -0.03 +15.2 -0.03 +6.7 -0.05 +5.0 +0.01 +2.7 -0.05 +5.1 -0.02 -0.01 -0.03 -0.03 -0.04 -0.04 -0.03

+4.0 +4.1 +4.6 +5.0 +5.2 +5.4 +5.6

-0.06 -0.01 -0.01 -0.24 -0.43 -0.19 -0.01 -0.17 -0.12

+6.8 +4.5 +5.3 +6.8 +7.7 +9.4 +5.7 +5.1 +6.0

DivIntl 28.55 DivGth 25.84 EmrMk 23.86 Eq Inc 42.37 EQII 17.60 Fidel 29.99 GNMA 11.49 GovtInc 10.44 GroCo 74.35 GroInc 17.22 HighInc r 8.70 Indepn 21.65 IntBd 10.30 IntmMu 10.15 IntlDisc 31.04 InvGrBd 11.44 InvGB 7.16 LgCapVal 12.09 LatAm 52.59 LevCoStk 25.47 LowP r 35.40 Magelln 68.81 MidCap 26.85 MuniInc 12.50 NwMkt r 15.53 OTC 48.96 100Index 8.37 Ovrsea 31.10 Puritn 16.93 StIntMu 10.61 STBF 8.37 SmllCpS r 17.61 StratInc 10.98 StrReRt r 8.75 TotalBd 10.65 USBI 11.14 Value 63.88 Fidelity Spartan: 500IdxInv 42.03 IntlInxInv 34.09 TotMktInv 33.99 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 42.04 TotMktAd r 33.99

-0.14 -0.09 -0.03 -0.19 -0.08 -0.13 +0.05 +0.03 -0.36 -0.09

+2.0 +9.2 +5.5 +8.3 +7.8 +5.8 +2.0 +1.1 +7.8 +7.2 +4.7 -0.17 +8.7 +0.04 +2.4 -0.01 +0.9 -0.13 +2.3 +0.05 +2.2 +0.04 +2.6 -0.07 +7.5 -0.55 +1.4 -0.12 +11.1 -0.12 +10.8 -0.21 +7.0 -0.18 +14.6 +1.4 +0.01 +4.9 -0.09 +7.1 -0.04 +5.5 -0.13 +0.5 -0.03 +5.4 -0.01 +0.3 +0.01 +1.3 -0.09 +10.5 +0.01 +2.9 -0.01 +2.8 +0.04 +2.7 +0.05 +1.6 -0.46 +12.2 -0.23 +6.6 -0.14 +1.9 -0.18 +7.7 -0.23 +6.6 -0.18 +7.7

First Eagle: GlblA 42.33 +0.06 +5.9 OverseasA 20.68 +0.10 +6.3 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.75 +1.3 FoundAl p 10.23 -0.03 +4.2 HYTFA p 9.98 +2.5 IncomA p 2.11 +4.3 USGovA p 6.67 +0.03 +1.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +7.5 IncmeAd 2.10 NA Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.13 NA Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.28 NA Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.61 -0.04 +0.9 GlBd A p 13.53 +7.5 GrwthA p 17.24 NA WorldA p 14.23 -0.06 +1.9 Frank/Temp Tmp Adv: GrthAv 17.14 -0.10 +2.0 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.56 NA GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.04 -0.18 +5.9 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.59 -0.08 +1.3 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.06 -0.06 +6.5 Quality 19.59 -0.08 +1.3 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 32.33 -0.26 +11.6 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.10 +4.4 HYMuni 8.45 +4.6 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.40 +0.04 +2.5 CapApInst 34.23 -0.15 +3.8 IntlInv t 55.18 -0.60 +1.5 Intl r 55.72 -0.60 +1.5 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.32 -0.08 +5.3 Hartford Fds C:

CapApC t 28.83 -0.07 +5.1 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 32.26 -0.08 +5.4 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 39.10 -0.17 +6.8 Div&Gr 18.57 -0.12 +5.8 Advisers 18.41 -0.04 +5.4 TotRetBd 10.86 +0.04 +2.7 HussmnStrGr 12.70 +0.02 -0.6 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.40 +0.02 +2.8 AssetStA p 22.97 +0.03 +3.1 AssetStrI r 23.13 +0.02 +3.1 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.19 +0.03 +1.7 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.18 +0.02 +1.7 HighYld 7.96 +0.01 +4.9 IntmTFBd 10.84 +0.4 ShtDurBd 10.89 +0.02 +0.8 USLCCrPls 19.43 -0.10 +6.9 Janus T Shrs: Janus T 27.44 -0.05 +4.5 OvrseasT r 46.86 -0.32 +10.3 PrkMCVal T 21.20 -0.10 +7.1 Twenty T 64.38 -0.18 +4.5 John Hancock Cl 1: LSAggr 11.47 -0.06 +6.5 LSBalanc 12.35 -0.03 +5.2 LSGrwth 12.11 -0.04 +5.8 Keeley Funds: SmCpValA p 21.96 -0.11 +10.8 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.55 -0.04 +8.6 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.83 -0.04 +8.5 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.95 -0.02 +2.2 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.38 -0.14 +9.5 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 13.86 +0.03 +5.5 StrInc C 14.42 +0.03 +5.3 LSBondR 13.82 +0.04 +5.5 StrIncA 14.35 +0.03 +5.5

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.04 +0.05 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.11 -0.06 BdDebA p 7.53 ShDurIncA p 4.59 +0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.60 -0.02 ValueA 21.84 -0.11 MFS Funds I: ValueI 21.93 -0.11 MainStay Funds A: HiYldBA 5.75 +0.01 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.40 -0.06 Matthews Asian: PacTiger 20.33 +0.06 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.17 +0.05 TotRtBdI 10.16 +0.04 MorganStanley Inst: IntlEqI 13.38 -0.03 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 28.25 -0.03 GlbDiscZ 28.60 -0.02 QuestZ 18.08 -0.04 SharesZ 20.44 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 40.44 -0.17 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 42.00 -0.17 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.94 -0.09 Intl I r 17.97 -0.12 Oakmark r 39.96 -0.14 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.46 -0.01 GlbSMdCap 13.65 -0.04 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 41.61 -0.24 DvMktA p 30.40 -0.02 GlobA p 56.46 -0.50 IntBdA p 6.43 -0.02 MnStFdA 29.91 -0.21 RisingDivA 14.61 -0.08

+4.4 +9.0 +4.1 +2.3 +4.2 +5.5 +5.5 +3.7 +3.4 +5.7 +4.1 +4.0 +2.8 +5.7 +5.8 +4.9 NA +7.1 +7.0 +5.5 +6.7 +7.9 +5.5 +6.9 +4.2 +5.7 +6.5 +1.5 +6.3 +5.1

S&MdCpVl 28.93 -0.15 StrInA p 4.07 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.28 -0.07 S&MdCpVl 24.96 -0.13 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.24 -0.06 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 7.16 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 30.08 -0.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.03 +0.03 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AllAsset 11.76 +0.07 ComodRR 8.02 +0.03 HiYld 9.09 +0.02 InvGrCp 11.19 +0.05 LowDu 10.45 +0.01 RealRet 11.07 +0.14 RealRtnI 10.92 +0.08 ShortT 9.87 TotRt 11.03 +0.03 TR II 10.58 +0.04 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.45 +0.01 RealRtA p 10.92 +0.08 TotRtA 11.03 +0.03 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.03 +0.03 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.03 +0.03 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.03 +0.03 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 40.30 +0.07 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 37.90 -0.22 Price Funds: BlChip 34.61 -0.13 CapApp 19.37 -0.05 EmMktS 31.87 -0.04 EqInc 22.66 -0.13 EqIndex 31.87 -0.17 Growth 29.00 -0.14

+8.8 NA +4.8 +8.6 +4.9 +3.4 +5.8 +2.9 +3.3 -0.7 +5.6 +4.0 +2.1 +1.4 +1.8 +0.8 +3.0 +1.9 +2.0 +1.7 +2.8 +2.6 +2.9 +2.9 +4.2 +6.3 +5.6 +6.7 +5.9 +8.4 +6.5 +5.4

HlthSci 28.68 HiYield 6.61 IntlBond 9.64 IntlStk 13.24 MidCap 52.70 MCapVal 22.42 N Asia 17.29 New Era 45.82 N Horiz 28.58 N Inc 9.37 R2010 14.63 R2015 11.24 R2020 15.43 R2025 11.25 R2030 16.08 R2040 16.14 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 30.34 SmCapVal 32.68 SpecIn 12.05 Value 22.19 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 12.85 VoyA p 21.75 RiverSource A: DEI 9.35 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.33 PremierI r 17.88 TotRetI r 11.84 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 35.31 S&P Sel 18.49 Scout Funds: Intl 30.09 Selected Funds: AmShD 39.45 AmShS p 39.45 Sequoia 119.70 St FarmAssoc: Gwth 50.76 TCW Funds: TotRetBdI 9.88 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 19.39

-0.16 +9.6 +5.0 -0.01 -1.7 -0.08 +5.1 -0.22 +11.0 -0.15 +8.2 +0.13 +7.1 -0.33 +5.0 -0.12 +11.7 +0.03 +2.1 -0.03 +4.9 -0.03 +5.3 -0.05 +5.7 -0.04 +6.0 -0.06 +6.3 -0.07 +6.5 +0.01 +1.2 -0.12 +12.6 -0.09 +10.9 +0.01 +3.2 -0.12 +8.3 -0.07 +7.5 -0.06 +10.2 -0.05 +6.6 -0.02 +9.3 -0.04 +9.6 -0.01 +9.9 -0.19 +7.1 -0.10 +6.6 -0.29 +3.3 -0.16 +5.9 -0.16 +5.8 -0.29 +8.9 -0.33 +3.3 NA -0.10 +0.5

Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 48.42 +0.02 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 25.66 -0.01 IntValue I 26.21 -0.01 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.31 -0.05 VALIC : StkIdx 23.75 -0.13 Van Kamp Funds A: CapGro 11.85 -0.10 CmstA p 14.78 -0.07 EqIncA p 8.26 -0.03 GrInA p 18.62 -0.13 HYMuA p 9.24 +0.01 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.86 CpOpAdl 73.66 -0.34 Energy 114.97 -1.16 500Adml 108.99 -0.60 GNMA Ad 10.71 +0.06 HlthCr 51.69 -0.10 HiYldCp 5.57 +0.01 InfProAd 24.72 +0.18 ITsryAdml 11.10 +0.05 IntGrAdm 56.15 -0.39 ITAdml 13.43 -0.01 ITGrAdm 9.79 +0.05 LtdTrAd 11.01 -0.01 LTGrAdml 8.92 +0.09 LT Adml 10.96 MuHYAdm 10.35 PrmCap r 64.13 -0.29 STsyAdml 10.71 +0.02 ShtTrAd 15.90 STIGrAd 10.70 +0.02 TtlBAdml 10.41 +0.04 TStkAdm 29.42 -0.15 WellslAdm 50.47 +0.04 WelltnAdm 51.61 -0.15 Windsor 43.43 -0.29 WdsrIIAd 45.02 -0.23 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.60 -0.02 CapOpp 31.89 -0.14

+4.5 +3.4 +3.5 +5.2 +6.6 +5.5 +7.4 +6.6 +8.2 +2.8 +1.3 +6.2 +2.6 +6.6 +1.9 +2.9 +4.0 +0.8 +1.3 +3.9 +0.7 +3.5 +0.4 +1.6 +1.0 +1.7 +4.0 +0.7 +0.3 +2.0 +1.6 +7.6 +3.2 +4.3 +8.0 +7.1 +5.0 +6.2

Energy 61.23 EqInc 19.16 Explr 63.67 GNMA 10.71 GlobEq 16.68 GroInc 25.05 HYCorp 5.57 HlthCre 122.49 InflaPro 12.59 IntlGr 17.65 IntlVal 31.38 ITIGrade 9.79 LifeCon 15.63 LifeGro 20.66 LifeMod 18.52 LTIGrade 8.92 Morg 16.30 MuInt 13.43 MuLtd 11.01 MuShrt 15.90 PrecMtls r 22.18 PrmcpCor 12.76 Prmcp r 61.80 SelValu r 17.55 STAR 18.33 STIGrade 10.70 StratEq 16.82 TgRe2010 21.36 TgtRe2025 11.93 TgtRe2015 11.84 TgRe2020 20.97 TgRe2030 20.43 TgtRe2035 12.34 TgtRe2045 12.76 USGro 17.16 Wellsly 20.83 Welltn 29.88 Wndsr 12.87 WndsII 25.35 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 108.99 Balanced 20.25 DevMkt 9.74 EMkt 27.32

-0.61 +2.6 -0.09 +5.7 -0.25 +11.1 +0.06 +1.9 -0.08 +6.4 -0.11 +7.1 +0.01 +3.9 -0.22 +2.9 +0.10 +0.8 -0.12 +3.9 -0.25 +2.5 +0.05 +3.5 +3.9 -0.07 +5.6 -0.03 +4.7 +0.09 +1.6 -0.07 +6.7 -0.01 +0.7 -0.01 +0.3 +0.2 -0.12 +8.6 -0.07 +5.4 -0.28 +4.0 -0.07 +10.0 -0.03 +4.5 +0.02 +2.0 -0.08 +10.1 -0.01 +4.1 -0.04 +5.4 -0.02 +4.7 -0.05 +5.1 -0.08 +5.8 -0.05 +6.2 -0.06 +6.2 -0.08 +4.3 +0.02 +3.2 -0.09 +4.2 -0.09 +8.1 -0.14 +7.1 -0.60 -0.03 -0.07 -0.11

+6.6 +5.2 +2.2 +5.5

Europe 25.73 -0.25 -0.8 Extend 36.52 -0.18 +11.8 Growth 28.90 -0.14 +6.0 ITBnd 10.82 +0.06 +2.1 MidCap 18.15 -0.14 +11.0 Pacific 10.47 -0.01 +8.2 REIT r 16.66 -0.38 +13.1 SmCap 31.05 -0.10 +13.0 SmlCpGth 18.85 -0.09 +12.0 SmlCpVl 14.87 -0.03 +13.9 STBnd 10.46 +0.02 +1.1 TotBnd 10.41 +0.04 +1.6 TotlIntl 14.84 -0.08 +3.0 TotStk 29.41 -0.16 +7.5 Value 19.94 -0.13 +7.6 Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst 9.67 -0.06 NS ExtIn 36.54 -0.18 +11.8 InfProInst 10.07 +0.08 +0.9 InstIdx 108.26 -0.60 +6.6 InsPl 108.27 -0.59 +6.6 InsTStPlus 26.58 -0.14 +7.6 MidCpIst 18.20 -0.14 +11.0 SCInst 31.08 -0.10 +13.0 TBIst 10.41 +0.04 +1.6 TSInst 29.42 -0.16 +7.6 Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl 90.03 -0.50 +6.6 STBdIdx 10.46 +0.02 +1.1 TotBdSgl 10.41 +0.04 +1.6 TotStkSgl 28.39 -0.15 +7.6 Victory Funds: DvsStA 14.71 -0.05 +5.4 Wells Fargo Instl: UlStMuIn p 4.81 +0.3 Western Asset: CorePlus 10.48 +0.05 +4.7


B6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Thank You To All The Following Businesses For Your Generous Support! B&B Group

FROM OUR PEOPLE

BIG

JERRY’S

COUNTRY RV

B&B Group

Big Country RV

FROM OUR PRODUCTS

COPPER SPONSOR

OUTDOOR

61561 American Lane, Bend • 541-382-8947

Jerry’s Outdoor Power & Outerwear

Microsemi

Bank of the Cascades

Advantage g Dental Services

COCC

Newport Market

US Bank

Car Kare, Inc. 541-382-4896 carkare@rio.com

Bank of the Cascades 541-330-7529 www.botc.com

Texaco Food Mart 541-548-1009 539 NW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Brightwood Corporation 541-475-2234 335 NW Hess Rd., Madras, OR 97741

Premier Printing Solutions 541-617-9899 2474 NW Monterey Pines, Bend, OR

Stereo Planet 541-382-9062 www.stereoplanet.com

High Desert Wheelchair Transport 541-385-9238 541-480-6073 The Downtowner Deli/The Summit Restaurant 541-749-2440 125 NW Oregon Ave., Bend, OR 97701

Butler Aircraft Company 541-548-8166 1050 SE Sisters Ave., Redmond, OR Pine Lodge 541-549-5900 www.5pinelodge.com

Mountain View Heating Inc. 541-389-6714 110 SE 9th St, Bend, OR 97702

Wagner Mall 541-382-9423 1900 NE 3rd St., Ste. 200 Bend, OR William C. Dahling 541-389-2905 2590 NE Country Dr., Ste. 2 Bend, OR 9th Street RV Storage 541-389-6740 169 SE 9th St., Bend, OR 97702

Oregon Wholesale Hardware, Inc. 541-382-3371 653 NE 1st St., Bend, OR 97701

The Pita Pit 541-389-7482 806 NW Brooks St., Ste. 110, Bend, OR Timbers Redmond 541-923-7604 3315 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Redmond Dairy Queen 541-548-2616 704 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Infocus Eye Care Center, LLC 541-318-8388 2450 NE Mary Rose Place, Bend, OR

LibertyBank 541-693-8560 805 NW Bond St, Bend, OR 97701

R.V. Outfitters, Inc. 541-312-9758 www.rvoutfitters.net

B&B Group, LLC 541-923-8740 PO Box 208, Redmond, OR 97756

Inovia 541-318-8388 2200 NE Neff Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Scenes From The West 541-385-7794 www.scenesfromthewest.com

1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 www.1stratemortgageinc.com

GFP Enterprises, Inc. 541-549-8167 www.gfpenterprises.com

Public Information Verification 541-548-5306 344 SW 7th, Redmond, OR 97756

Elemental Eyecare 541-323-3937 2736 NW Crossing Dr., Ste. 120, Bend, OR

Subaguru 541-382-6067 www.subaguru.com

McDonald’s Redmond 541-923-1923 2456 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Mirror Priorities Full Service Salon 541-923-0222 307 SW 7th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Black Butte Ranch 541-595-1235 www.blackbutteranch.com

Skjersaas 541-382-2154 www.skibend.com

Redmond Surgery Center 541-316-2500 244 NW Kingwood Ave., Redmond, OR Maxine Hoggan Licensed Psychohlogist 541-526-0969 mhogganpsyd@bendbroadband.com

Dana Signs Custom Designs 541-548-5312 615 SW Umatilla Ave, Redmond, OR Certified Personnel Service Agency 541-504-9675 www.cpsagency.com

Central Oregon Association of Realtors 541-382-3452 2112 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701

The Loft of Bend, LLC 541-322-5638 86 SW Century Dr, Bend, OR 97702

Tornay Insurance Agency, Inc. 541-388-2136 www.allstate.com/paultornay

Ray’s Food Place 541-318-7297 www.ckmarket.com

Sterling Transportation 800-627-5123 1927 SW 1st St., Redmond, OR 97756

Northwest Brain and Spine 541-585-2400 2275 NE Doctors DR, Bend, OR 97701

College Excel 541-389-2905 www.collegeexcel.com

Northwest Premiere Builders 541-383-1721 nwpremierebuilders@bendbroadband.com

Energy Efficient Construction, LLC 541-316-1426 eeci@bendbroadband.com

Wal-Mart Redmond 541-923-5972 300 NW Oaktree, Redmond, OR 97756 Small Engine Repair of Central Oregon 541-548-4994 2319 SW 58th St., Redmond, OR 97756

Juniper Paper & Supply 541-312-4070 1028 SE Paiute Way, Bend, OR 97702

Northern Energy Propane 541-383-1721 www.northernenergy.com

Stormwater Services 541-548-4049 www.stormwateroregon.com

Victorian Café 541-480-1989 1404 NW Galveston Ave., Bend, OR

Red Robin 541-382-9234 www.redrobin.com

Grocery Outlet 541-389-3095 www.groceryoutlets.com

Tumalo Therapeutics 541-420-8577 Marian McCall & Laurie Mason

Taco Time 541-388-1964 40 NW Pine Crest CT, Bend, OR 97702 FlickFive Films 541-317-5055 20020 Glen Vista, Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Electronic Medical Records 541-585-2580 www.coemr.com

Exceptional Real Estate 541-317-8909 62472 Eagle Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Joe A. Lochner Insurance Agency, Inc. 541-548-6023 www.joelochner.com

Law Offices of Scott H. Terrall 541-388-0709 65965 Gerking Market Rd., Bend, OR TNT Performance 541-815-3923 tntperformance@bendbroadband.com Twin Rivers Plumbing 541-923-3096 www.twinrp.com

Mill Point Dental Center - Marika Stone, DDS 541-388-0078 715 SW Bonnett Way, Ste. 100, Bend, OR Ponderosa Heating & Cooling 541-948-1853 www.ponderosaheating.com

High Desert Disaster Restoration 541-312-2999 61386 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR 97702

Cart-Tek Golf Carts 541-330-0405 www.cart-tekgolfcarts.com

Central Oregon Ranch Supply 541-548-5195 www.centraloregonranchsupply.com

Newhouse Manufacturing Company, Inc. 541-548-1055 www.newhouse-mfg.com

Desert Valley Equine Center 541-504-5299 21199 NW Spruce Ave., Redmond, OR

Lazerquick Copies 541-317-5577 1245 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702

Ewing Bookkeeping Services 541-389-0357 smartzse@hotmail.com

Hip Chicks Salon 541-419-7213 322 NW 7th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Marathon Business Machines 541-548-5248 302 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756

The Law Offices of Bryan W. Gruetter, PC 541-585-1140 www.gruetterlaw.com

Midstate Electric Cooperative 541-536-2126 P.O. Box 127, Lapine, OR 97739

Bryant, Lovlien, & Jarvis 541-382-4331 www.bljlawyers.com

Brian T. Hemphill, Attorney at Law 541-382-2991 339 SW Century Dr., Ste. 101, Bend, OR

Deschutes Insurance 541-389-8785 225 SW Scalehouse Loop, Bend, Or 97702 Gould and Associates Realty 541-536-2900 P.O. Box 14, Lapine, OR 97739

Fluid Images Inc. & Bob Johnson 541-815-0818 69687 West Meadowpark Way, Sisters, OR Cascade Insurance Center 541-382-7772 www.cascadeinsure.com

CS Construction, LLC 541-617-9190 www.cscdllc.com

Butch’s Place 541-923-7677 1515 N. Highway 97, Redmond, OR Brookman Revere, LLC 541-389-3288 19479 Bounty Lake Ct., Bend, OR 97702 Smolich Motors 541-389-1178 www.smolichmotors.com

Merrill Lynch 541-382-4373 755 SW Bonnett Way Suite 2200, Bend, OR Key Constructors Inc. 541-389-9952 18781 Kuhlman Rd, Bend, OR 97701 Outback Steakhouse 541-383-8104 269 SE Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR

Arco AM/PM 541-318-5110 61112 S. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 CA Rowles Engineering 541-585-2207 720 SE Business Way, Ste. 200, Bend, Aspen Homes, Inc. 541-385-9633 www.aspenhomesoforegon.com

John L. Scott Lapine Real estate 541-536-1188 P.O. Box 796, Lapine, OR 97739

Avion Water Company 541-382-5342 60813 Parrell Rd., Bend, OR 97701 Pacific Power 888-221-7070 www.pacificpower.net China Doll 541-312-9393 547 NE Bellevue Dr., Ste. 113, Bend, OR Computer Heroes 541-312-2300 frank@compheroes.com Big R Stores 541-548-4095 3141 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

ATI 800-597-9311 www.ati-sales.com

U.S. Bank 541-388-8804 www.usbank.com

Woodside Development, LLC 541-318-0500 60025 E. Ridgeview Dr, Bend, OR 97702 Samual A. Ramirez, Attorney at Law 541-5361408 51470 Highway 97, Lapine, OR 97739 Lapine Community Health Center 541-536-3435 P.O. Box 3300, Lapine, OR 97739

Artisan Outdoor Living & Landscape 541-383-2551 www.artisanbend.com

Middleton Septic Pump Service 541-475-5322 2876 SW Hwy 97, Madras, OR 97741 Stan R. Stieben Agency - All State Insurance 541-318-8536 612 NE Savannah Dr., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

All Position Welding 541-548-6329 308 SW Evergreen, Redmond, OR 97756

Quality Coat Asphalt Maintenance 541-480-6655 P.O. Box 1574, Bend, OR 97709

High Desert Aggregate & Paving 541-504-8566 8500 NW Lone Pine Rd., Terrebonne, OR Gregg Geser Construction 541-549-9434 68990 N. Pine St., Sisters, OR 97759 Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic 541-923-1638 2630 S. Canal Blvd., Redmond, OR Aeries Mini Storage, LLC 541-383-3365 1300 2nd. Ave., Bend, OR 97701

Impact Graphix & Signs, Inc. 541-548-8544 www.impactgraphixandsigns.com

Jody’s Drive In Restaurant 541-923-5639 807 SW 14th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Powers of Automation, Inc. 541-330-1687 61533 American Lp., Ste. 1, Bend, OR

Animal Land, Inc. 541-548-1007 338 SW 6th St., Redmond, OR 97756 RE/MAX Town & Country Realty 541-549-3333 www.sistersoregonproperties.com

The Pony Express 541-549-1538 160 S. Oak, Sisters, OR 97759

In Tune 541-923-1636 1614 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR Centwise True Value 541-548-2334 433 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Robinson & Owen, Inc. 541-549-1848 750 Buckaroo Trail, Sisters, OR 97759

A Greener Cleaner 541-318-7153 210 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Accurate Mold, LLC 541-279-9572 2040 SW Quartz Ave, Redmond, OR

Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate 541-382-4123 486 SW Bluff Dr., Bend, OR 97702

Lodge at Suttle Lake 541-595-2628 www.thelodgeatsuttlelake.com

The Rental Connection 541-383-1780 60970 Alpine Ln., Bend, OR 97702

Piloto Ranch 541-504-4602 www.pilotoranch.com

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe 541-617-9866 818 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701

Central Oregon Audiology & Hearing Aid Clinic 541-389-6669 www.centraloregonaudiology.com

Redmond A&W 541-923-8881 1501 SW Highland Ave., Redmond, OR Greenridge Physical Therapy & Wellness 541-549-3534 325 N. Locust St., Sisters, OR 97759

Cold Stone Creamery 541-382-5466 63455 N. Highway 97, Bend, OR 97701

Etrix Group 541-0354 20756 High Desert Ct. # 6, Bend, OR 97701 Longboard Louie’s Inc 541-383-5889 62080 Dean Swift Rd, Bend, OR 97701

Veloski Sports 541-318-5053 www.veloski.com

Bend Surgery Center, LLP 541-318-0858 www.bendsurgery.com

H2O To Go Opal Springs Water Company 541-389-1773 www.opalspringswater.com

Sisters Dental 541-549-9486 P.O. Box 1027, Sisters, OR 97759

Law Office of Foster Glass 541-317-0703 339 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702

Bell-Air Motel 541-382-1885 8790 S. Highway 97, Redmond, OR

Bush Animal Clinic, Inc. 541-382-7671 www.bushanimalclinicinc.com

Centro Print Solutions 541-382-3534 www.centroprintsolutions.com

Patrick Casey & Company 541-322-2142 796 SW Bradbury Way, Bend, OR 97702 Susan Daly Sterns Esq. 541-306-6753 www.stearnstmlaw.com

MST Corporation 541-416-9000 1659 SW Baldwin Rd., Prineville, OR Van Handel Automotive 541-549-0416 127 W. Sisters Park Dr., Sisters, OR Commercial Ceramics 541-323-2902 20554 Builders Ct., Bend, OR 97701

South Valley Bank & Trust 541-330-1894 www.southvalleybank.com

Jiffy Lube 541-383-1513 525 S 3rd St, Bend, OR 97702

Lowes Group 541-312-2113 www.lowes-group.com

Bend Research 541-322-9002 www.bendres.com

Del Taco 541-322-8702 612 SE 3rd St., Bend, OR 97702

Seventh Mountain Resort 541-419-7902 www.seventhmountain.com Trailer World 541-389-9849 64601 Bailey Rd., Bend, OR 97701

Lumbermen’s Insurance 541-382-2421 965 SW Emkay Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Johnson Benefit Planning 541-382-3571 516 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702

Advanced Cabinets 541-447-7024 2853 SW high Desert Dr, Prineville, OR Lapaw Animal Hospital 541-389-3902 www.lapaw@wvi.com

First Oregon Title Company 541-475-0125 116 SE D St., Madras, OR 97741

Sunriver Resort 800-801-8765 www.sunriver-resort.com

Moffit Investigations 541-388-1477 560 NE Greenwood Ave., Bend, OR Three Sisters Backcountry, Inc. 541-549-8101 info@threesistersbackcountry.com

Cascade Gypsum & Building Supply 541-389-1054 689 Glenwood, Bend, OR 97702

Valentine Ventures Your $12.99 Store 541-549-2059 216 West Cascade, Sisters, OR 97759 TK Jacobson Investments, Inc. 541-383-8502 23451 Butterfield Trail, Bend, OR 97702 Real Time Research, Inc. 541-382-3836 52 SW Roosevelt Ave., Bend, OR 97702 Scott Hatcher River Guide & Ocean Charter 541-317-8474 www.scotthatcherfishing.com Salvation Army 541-389-8888 www.salvationarmybendoregon.org The Brew Shop 541-323-2318 www.homesuds.com William Delgado MD-Bend Dermatology 541-382-5712 www.bendderm.com Western Title & Escrow Company 541-389-5751 www.westerntitle.com Trimble, Everton, Farrens, & Mode 541-385-0534 15 SW Colorado, Ste. 220, Bend, OR Century West Engineering Corporation 541-322-8962 www.centurywest.com Strictly Organic Coffee Company 541-383-1570 www.strictlyorganic.com El Burrito Restaurant 541-382-2177 335 NE Dekalb, Bend, OR 97701 JICA Construction, LLC 541-548-5012 2316 Xero Ln., Redmond, OR 97756 Century Insurance Group, LLC 541-382-4211 695 SW Mill View Way, Bend, OR Cascades Biosciences 541-588-6209 69215 Singletree, Sisters, OR 97759 Celebrating the Sacred - Wendy Schechter 541-504-3151 www.celebratingthesacred.com Action Typesetting & Printing 541-388-1480 www.actiontype.com Microsemi 541-382-8028 www.microsemi.com Bladt’s Custom Woodworking Inc. 541-408-4095 21575 Bear Creek, Bend, OR 97701 Redmond Gymnastics Academy 541-923-3513 www.RGAGymnastics.com B&R Continuous Guttering Company, Inc. 541-389-8008 8276 SE Business Way, Bend, OR Robert E. Rufener, CPA, PC 541-475-7228 ruf@madras.net PGC Building & Design 541-771-9199 www.PGCBuilding.com Madras Sanitary Service 541-475-2071 www.madrassanitary.com Coldwell Banker - Dick Dodson Realty 541-475-6137 www.liveinmadras.com Central Oregon Nutrition Consultants 541-388-0694 61456 Elder Ridge St., Bend, OR Central Lake Marine 541-385-7791 61076 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702 Miller Lumber 541-382-2022 www.miller-lumber.com Alpine Pest Management 541-389-4942 www.alpinepest.com HSW Builders 541-388-9898 www.hswbuilders.com Home Comfort Design & Drafting 541-923-6719 69765 Goodrich Rd., Sisters, OR 97759 Dutch Pacific Properties 541-588-9226 P.O. Box 3500 TMB 303, Sisters, OR Baptista Tile & Stone Gallery 541-382-9130 www.baptistatile.com Umpqua Bank - NW Crossing 541-312-4811 www.umpquabank.com

Central Oregon Pathology 541-389-7490 1348 NE Cushing, Ste. 200, Bend, OR Redmond Community Church 541-923-1782 www.redmondcc.org Shlesinger & DeVilleneuve - Attorneys 541-749-4255 www.sgilletusfightforyou.com

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory 541-383-1718 61334 S. Hwy 97, Bend, OR 97702 CanalBargeCruises.com, LLC 541-504-6264 www.CanalBargeCruises.com Caudell Landscapes 541-548-7077 www.caudell-landscapes.com Kelly J. Witt Construction 541-408-5683 19430 Apache Rd., Bend, OR 97702 R&H Construction Company 541-312-2961 www.rhconst.com Northwest Crossing 541-382-1662 www.northwestcrossing.com The Ski Inn Restaurant 541-447-1338 310 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters, OR 97759 Juniper Rock Products 541-447-3534 P.O. Box 119, Prineville, OR 97754 Westside Bakery & Café 541-382-3426 www.westsidebakeryandcafe.com Alert Safety Supply 541-548-6155 416 SE Jackson, Unit 7, Redmond, OR Midstate Fertilizer 541-548-2311 120 SW Glacier Ave., Redmond, OR Gravity Labs Bike Park 541-480-5252 201 NE 2nd St., Bend, OR 97701 Eagle Crest 800-682-4786 www.eagle-crest.com Del Barber Excavation, Inc. 541-504-1100 1686 SW Veterans Way, Redmond, OR Heights Assisted Living Center 541-923-5452 3000 SW 32nd St., Redmond, OR 97756 HCT Contracting, Inc. 541-548-6942 2388 SW Pumice Ave., Redmond, OR 1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 www.1stratemortgageinc.com Gerdes Electric 541-548-8426 2602 SW 1st St., Redmond, OR 97756 Cascade Door 541-548-2215 www.cascadedoor.com Century 21 Gold Country Realty 541-548-2131 www.century21centraloregon.com

Village Interiors Design 541-549-3431 www.villageinteriorsdesign.com Bend Garbage & Recycling 541-382-2263 www.bendgarbage.com The Lady Bug Flowers & Gifts 541-548-6188 527 NW Elm St., Suite 2, Redmond, OR O’Keefe’s Company 541-549-1479 www.okeefescompany.com

Barb’s Helping Hands 541-536-2180 15960 Green Forest Rd., La Pine, OR Bend Veterinary Specialists 541-312-2114 www.bendvetspecialists.com Gary’s Small Engine & Tool Repair 541-388-3380 61568 American Lane, Bend, OR 97702 McMurray & Sons Roofing 541-385-0695 www.mcmurrayandsons.com Sisters Mainline Station- Chevron 541-549-5400 1001 Railway, Sisters, OR 97759

Starting Small 541-388-2072 1929 NE Neff Rd, Bend, OR 97701 Lakeside Lumber Company 541-382-3693 1320 Armour Dr, Bend, OR 97702

Leading Edge Aviation Inc 541-383-8825 www.leadingedgeavn.com ADG Bookkeeping Inc 541-317-8389 2994 NE Sady Dr, Bend, OR 97701 Agnes’s Alterations 541-389-9587 1271 NW Wall St, Bend, OR 97701 Affordable Auto Repair 541-548-2991 347 SW 2nd St, Redmond, OR 97756 Allan Clark, LLC 541-771-5535 www.allanclarkllc.com Arctic Circle, LLC 541-447-5075 318 NW 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Creative Experiences Salon 541-322-0156 www.creativeexperiencessalon.com R & W Engineering 503-292-6000 www.rweng.com

Rimrock Trails Adolescent Treatment Services 541-447-2631 1333 NW 9th St., Prineville, OR 97754 Aspect 541-389-4667 1009 NW Galveston Ave., Bend, OR Steve the Appliance Dr. 541-382-7205 86 SW Century Dr., Bend, OR 97702 Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 244 NE Franklin Ave., Bend, OR 97701 Secure Storage 541-389-1382 www.securestorage.com

Jerry’s Outdoor Power & Outerwear 541-382-8947 61561 American Ln Bend, OR 97702 Central Oregon Community College 541-383-7700 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR www.cocc.edu Big Country RV 541-330-2495 63500 N Highway 97, Bend, OR www.bigcrv.com Advantage Dental Services 541-504-3901 442 SW Umatilla Ave. #200, Bend advantagedental.com Schnitzer Steel Industries 541-382-8471 110 SE 5th St, Bend, OR 97702

Central Oregon Insurance, Inc 541-475-2215 www.centraloregonins.com

Snap Fitness at Brookswood Meadow Plaza 541-389-2550 19550 Amber Meadow Dr., Bend, OR Snap Fitness at Northwest Crossing 541-389-2550 2753 NW Lolo Dr., Bned, OR 97701 White Star Enterprises 541-318-1447 www.wsplaster.com

Ryder Graphics 541-382-5934 370 SW Columbia St, Bend, OR 97702 Original Pancake House 541-317-0380 1025 SW Donovan Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Severson Plumbing and Mechanical Inc. 541-382-3720 220 SE Davis Ave, Bend, OR 97702 Potter’s Piano Service 541-382-5411 61592 SE Orion Dr, Bend, OR 97702 Soothing Hand Massage, OR Lic# 12423 541-389-2865 19142 Choctaw Rd, Bend, OR 97702

Far West Real Estate, LLC 541-447-6294 www.farwestrealestatellc.com

Coactive Partners 541-388-1590 www.easypaywest.com Wright Design Studio 541-389-9178 915 NW Gasoline Alley, Bend, OR 97701

Remax Town and Country Realty 541-549-2500 178 S Elm St, Sisters, OR 97759 Ascent Capital Management 541-382-4847 www.ascentcap.com At Your Site Storage 541-280-6363 P.O. Box 7948, Bend, OR 97708 Active Towing, LLC 541-416-8003 www.activetowingllc.com

Apple Peddler Restaurant 541-416-8949 1485 NE 3rd St, Prineville, OR 97754 Bend Fencing 541-382-4400 www.bendfencing.com Bend Pawn and Trading Co. 541-317-5099 61420 S Highway 97, Bend, OR 97702 Newport Market 541-382-3940 www.newportavemarket.com

Mid Oregon Credit Union 541-382-1795 www.midoregon.com Tesoro Moe’s Food Mart 541-548-1225 516 SW 5th St., Redmond, OR 97756 Highland Veterinary Hospital 541-548-6114 839 SW Highland, Redmond, OR 97756 CoEnergy Propane 541-738-6733 www.coenergy.net

To everyone listed, Thank You, and thanks to your support, our local Newspapers In Education Program can continue to deliver newspapers to most Central Oregon schools. Thank you to all of our generous sponsors. If you would like to donate to the local Newspapers In Education Program, please call 385-5800. We thank you, our Central Oregon teachers thank you, and our Central Oregon students thank you.


L

Inside

WASHINGTON Seattle officer saw imminent threat, jury says, see Page C2. OREGON Corvallis environmentalist lives a low-impact lifestyle, see Page C3. OBITUARIES First female chief of modern Cherokee Nation dies, see Page C5.

C

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

REDMOND

Wyden dedicates vet center

Friday programs for kids uncertain

U

.S. Sen. Ron Wyden addresses the crowd during the ribbon-cutting ceremony for a new Veterans Center, located in downtown

Bend at 639 NW Franklin Ave., on Wednesday morning. The new facility provides a location for counseling and other services and is the first of its kind in Central

As 5-day school week returns, organizers hope to offer different options

or Eastern Oregon. Wyden’s office approached Bend city officials to identify a home for veterans programs, and city officials

By Patrick Cliff

offered the 3,000-square-foot office on Franklin, which

The Bulletin

is currently owned by the city’s urban renewal agency. A more permanent home for veterans programs is expected to open sometime later this year in Bend. Photo by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

VA facilities in Bend

In a brief headlined “Nursing scholarship to be presented,” which appeared Wednesday, April 7, on Page C3, the date of a scholarship presentation was reported incorrectly. The correct date is May 8. The Bulletin regrets the error.

18th St.

2115 Wyatt Court, Suite 201 The clinic is a separate facility that offers primary care services. It's planning to more than double in size sometime after the end of this year and expand the range of services to include eye care, hearing specialists and mental health services.

27th St.

Galveston Ave.

Neff Rd.

8th St.

Bo nd S

Newport Ave.

t. 3rd St.

639 NW Franklin Ave. The center opened Wednesday in a temporary location downtown. It offers individual, group and couples counseling and is looking to move into a permanent facility later this year.

Greenwood Ave.

BEND

BUS 97

9th St.

Franklin Ave.

Source: Department of Veterans Affairs

Sisters may limit fast-food joints By Patrick Cliff

If you go

If Sisters City Councilor Sharlene Weed gets her way, a long strip of fast-food restaurants won’t greet drivers as they enter the city. Weed has proposed that only four fast-food restaurants be allowed to open west of downtown. Sisters city staff has been reworking the entire development code for several months and may finish this month. During that process, staff and the city

What: Sisters City Council workshop and meeting When: 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Where: City Hall, 520 East Cascade Ave. council have considered how many drive-through businesses — from banks to fast-food restaurants — should be able to open in its highway commercial

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

BEND CITY COUNCIL

Low SDCs to impact transportation budget

Councilor concerned about appearance at town’s entrance The Bulletin

Correction

Bend Community Based Outpatient Clinic

Bend Vet Center

14th St.

REDMOND — When the Redmond School District adopted a four-day school week last year, nonprofits and community groups attempted to fill the void by creating a program called Choice Friday. Now the future of that program is in doubt because the district has decided to return to a five-day week next year. Dozens of Choice Friday options, mostly run by community nonprofits, emerged at schools across the district. Children could take a fly-tying class, learn karate, play soccer or have an extra tutoring session. But with class back in session on Fridays beginning this fall, organizers must remake the program. Organizers hope to offer at least 50 options next year, according to Jamie Christman, Choice Friday board of directors chairwoman. The group plans to focus on programs that will supplement school subjects. Students may even be able to earn class credit, Christman said. For instance, if the program partners with a local engineering firm, a student might be able to demonstrate math proficiency through a project organized by the company. The Redmond Area Park and Recreation District ran programs at four schools this year. Executive Director Katie Hammer said she considered the program a success because the district reached about 40 more students than in years past. And now that RAPRD understands how to work with the school district, Hammer hopes she will be able to expand even more into the schools next year. See Fridays / C5

zone. The only available lots in that zone are northwest of downtown. Currently, the code requires drive-through businesses to be 400 feet apart. It limits not just fast food, but also any business with a drive-through window, according to Councilor Pat Thompson. Weed’s proposal would allow such businesses to open on any available lot in the highway commercial zone. See Sisters / C5

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Bend’s road construction budget stands to take a big hit if development does not pick up in the next few years, according to a presentation by city Finance Director Sonia Andrews. Andrews presented an overview of the city’s budget to the city council Wednesday night,

highlighting the various funds that have been hurt by the slow economy. The end of March marked the three-quarter point in the city’s current budget year. Once the primary source of funding for road construction, the systems development charges paid by new development have fallen steadily over the past three years. See Budget / C2

Stimulus funds smoothing out streets in Bend 20

6

MILES

0

1

Knott Rd. 97

determines which roads are most in need of repair, and a lot of streets, like Bond Street for example, are due for resurfacing, Linkof said. “Bond is in pretty terrible shape, so it made the list,” he said. See Roads / C5

Simpson Ave. 5

Road and SE Brosterhous Road, will be closed April 13-14. 3

1

Bond Street

Two sections are scheduled to be closed. The first, between SW Industrial Way and SW Scalehouse Loop, will be closed April 11-12 and 18. The second, between the Reed Market Road roundabout and 300 feet north of SW Columbia Avenue, will be closed April 11-12. 2

Third Street

Two sections are scheduled to be closed. The first, between SE Davis Avenue and SE Wilson Avenue, will be closed April 11-13 and 15. The second, between SE Reed Market

Mt.

Butler Market Road

The section between the Eighth Street roundabout and NE Sandy Drive, will be closed April 13-14. 4

Portland/Olney Avenues

Two sections are scheduled to be closed. The first, NW Portland Avenue between NW First Street and NW Wall Street, will be closed April 19. The second, between NW First Street and NE Second Street, will be closed April 20. 5

Colorado Avenue

The section between SW Simpson Avenue and SW Century Drive will be

Second St.

27th St.

Ma rke

Brosterhous Rd.

Reed Mkt. Rd.

27th St.

arkw dP

tu

Ben

Cen

r. ry D

Jones Rd.

St.

9

ay

5 1 2

BUS

ket Rd 97 .

. Ave do a r lo Co

Wa sh. Dr.

closed April 18-19. 6

Bear Creek Road

The section between SE 27th Street and the urban growth boundary will be closed April 22 and 25. 7

7

Purcell Boulevard

The section between NE Full Moon Circle and NE Neff Road will be closed April 20-21.

8

27th St.

4

3 2

Th ird

Par k RdNewport Ave. . Skyliners Rd.

3rd St.

vlin

6

Greenwood Ave.

14

Bon 3 7 8 Neff Rd.

M

She

Reed Mar

ton Dr. ing

Hamby Rd.

t. Wa

sh

er Wells Acr es Rd.

Olney Ave.

Portland Ave. 4 Ne wp ort Av e.

Purcell Blvd.

Over the coming weeks, Bend drivers may have fewer potholes and bumps to avoid as nine of the city’s problem-area streets are repaved. The paving will be paid for with $1.23 million in federal stimulus money the city received for road construction projects. Bend’s street supervisor Mike Linkof said repaving the city’s streets will help minimize damage to cars. “A clean, paved street is better than one that’s full of potholes and ruts,” Linkof said. Repaving is scheduled to begin Sunday and continue through the end of April. Among the roads scheduled to be resurfaced are Bond Street, Butler Market Road and Third Street. The city

tl Bu

Bear Creek Rd.

t.

Cooley Rd.

The Bulletin

t. dS

Wi lso nA ve.

t

Revere Ave. 97

Eig ht hS

1

By Diane S.W. Lee

Third St.

Bond

. Rd

Purcell Rd.

97

97

20

Ei

Colorado Ave.

Streets around Bend will be closed to traffic from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. on the following dates.

. vd

Street closures

St.

Repaving work planned through end of April

Neff Rd.

8

Neff Rd.

9

27th Street

The section from NE Connors Avenue to NE Rosemary Drive will be closed April 20-21. 9

Neff Road

The section between NE Covington Lane and NE Eagle Road will be closed April 20 and 22. Source: City of Bend Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


C2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Seattle officer Jimmy Swaggart saw imminent steps down amid threat, jury says scandal in 1988 By Jennifer Sullivan and Jonathan Martin The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — An inquest jury has ruled that Seattle police Officer Benjamin Kelly believed he was in imminent danger when he fatally shot Maurice Clemmons on Dec. 1, ending a twoday manhunt that started when Clemmons ambushed four officers in Pierce County. Answering a series of questions, the six-member jury was unanimous in its finding that Kelly believed Clemmons presented an imminent threat of “death or serious bodily injury” when he encountered the felon in a South Seattle neighborhood while investigating a stolen car. The jury also determined that Kelly saw Clemmons move his hands toward his waist before the officer opened fire, hitting Clemmons with four of seven gunshots. The two questions were considered key among the 19 that were weighed by the six-person jury. Clemmons had also suffered a fifth wound from a gunshot fired by Greg Richards, one of four Lakewood police officers killed by Clemmons Nov. 29 in a Parkland coffee shop. Two of the wounds inflicted by Kelly were considered fatal, jurors in King County District Court were told. Clemmons, who was armed, died at the scene.

Adequate warning? Jurors, however, could not determine whether Kelly repeatedly ordered Clemmons to show his hands before he fired. Jurors voted 6-0 that it was “unknown” whether Kelly had issued the warning. Kelly had testified that he repeatedly warned Clemmons to show his hands before he fired. The inquest jury, which heard testimony Monday afternoon and Tuesday morning, began weighing a series of questions Tuesday afternoon but did not conclude its deliberations until Wednesday morning. Rather than reach a conclusion of guilty or not guilty, inquest juries oversee fact-finding hearings to weigh evidence after a police officer uses lethal force while on duty. The King County Prosecutor’s Office will now review the jury’s findings to determine whether criminal charges should be filed. The jurors declined to comment after their findings were announced.

Closure for families King County Senior Deputy Prosecutor Kristin Richardson, who spoke with the jurors, said they believed Kelly’s actions that night were appropriate and they appreciated the decisions he made. “I’m thankful to have had the opportunity to present the facts in this matter,” Kelly said afterward. “I hope this brings some closure to the families of the Lakewood officers.” Since the hearing began Monday afternoon, jurors heard tes-

Budget Continued from C1 Collections from transportation SDCs peaked in 2006 at more than $7 million — this year, the city expects to bring in less than $1.3 million, the amount needed to pay the debt service on past road construction projects. Andrews told councilors that between reserves, money transferred from the city’s general fund, and the use of franchise fees collected from sewer and water ratepayers, the transportation fund should have about $8.6 million in the upcoming 2010-11 budget. In the following year, the budget would drop to $6.1 million, with just $14,000 left in carryover funds for 2012-13. To help close the budget gap, Andrews told councilors city staff have been looking at the idea of combining the city’s transportation engineering department and its street maintenance department. Gas taxes, franchise fees, and general fund dollars would fund the day-today operations of the combined department, she said, while any

timony from Kelly, the South Precinct patrol officer who encountered Clemmons while investigating a stolen car left running on a quiet residential street. Kelly testified Monday that Clemmons ignored several commands to remove his hands from his waistband area as he approached the officer in the dark. Kelly, fearing for his life, fired three shots at Clemmons, who began running. Kelly quickly fired another four shots as Clemmons moved away. Two of Kelly’s bullets were later determined to be fatal wounds. A third bullet — a “through-and-through” that entered Clemmons’ lower back, hit his kidney and bowel before exiting his upper abdomen — also could have been fatal if left untreated, Dr. Aldo Fusaro, of the King County Medical Examiner’s Office, testified Tuesday morning.

Manhunt On Nov. 29, Clemmons killed Lakewood Sgt. Mark Renninger and Officers Ronald Owens, Tina Griswold and Richards, setting off an intense two-day manhunt. Kelly testified Monday that when he started his overnight patrol shift on the night of Nov. 30, the thought that he might encounter the region’s most-wanted felon crossed his mind. But when Kelly actually came face to face with Clemmons, the officer’s first thought was, “I’m in trouble here.” Kelly testified he repeatedly ordered Clemmons to show his hands as the officer drew his gun. “I thought I could be dead in a matter of seconds,” Kelly said. Instead, Clemmons moved his hands toward his sweat shirt pocket and raced around the front of Kelly’s car, the officer testified. Kelly said he fired three shots, then four more as Clemmons ran away “in a dead sprint.” “I believed he was going for a gun. I discharged my duty weapon,” Kelly said. “My intent was to stop him.” A video shot from Kelly’s patrol car — shown several times to the inquest jurors — shows Clemmons racing around the front of the car, limping slightly. Clemmons, 37, made it to the sidewalk, out of Kelly’s view, before collapsing face down on a walkway leading to a home. In testimony Tuesday, Seattle police Detective Al Cruise said investigators now believe the stolen Acura Integra was left for Clemmons by an unknown associate. That car had been reported stolen at 12:38 a.m. from a home just a few blocks from where Kelly later found it. Officer Daina Bogg, among the first to arrive on the scene after the shooting, testified that she found the duty weapon belonging to Richards, the slain Lakewood police officer, in Clemmons’ pocket. She said she had trouble removing it because the gun was caught on the zipper.

SDCs that are received would be set aside for new construction. Andrews told councilors that most of the city’s revenue sources are at or near where they were expected to be when the current budget was adopted last spring. Building, planning, and engineering fees, also tied closely to the construction industry, are off significantly from last year, $1.9 million between July 2009 and March 2010 compared to $2.7 million the year before. Other funding sources have been slightly more stable. Gas tax collections are up, at $2.7 million for the first three-quarters of this year compared to $2.3 million the year before. Room tax revenues are down slightly, with $2.3 million collected compared to $2.4 million the year before and $2.7 million the year before that. Property tax collections, the city’s single-largest source of funding, are a little less than $1 million shy of the $20.2 million anticipated in the current budget. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

T O D AY IN HISTORY

The Associated Press Today is Thursday, April 8, the 98th day of 2010. There are 267 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 8, 1974, Hank Aaron of the Atlanta Braves hit his 715th career home run in a game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, breaking Babe Ruth’s record. ON THIS DATE In 1513, explorer Juan Ponce de Leon and his expedition began exploring the Florida coastline. In 1913, the 17th Amendment to the Constitution, providing for direct popular election of United States senators (as opposed to appointment by state legislatures), was ratified. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Emergency Relief Appropriations Act, which provided money for programs such as the Works Progress Administration. In 1946, the League of Nations assembled in Geneva for its final session. In 1952, President Harry S. Truman seized the steel industry to avert a nationwide strike. (The U.S. Supreme Court later ruled that Truman had overstepped his authority.) In 1970, the Senate rejected President Richard M. Nixon’s nomination of G. Harold Carswell to the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1973, artist Pablo Picasso died at his home near Mougins, France, at age 91. In 1988, TV evangelist Jimmy Swaggart resigned from the Assemblies of God after he was defrocked for rejecting an order from the church’s national leaders to stop preaching for a year amid reports he’d consorted with a prostitute. In 1990, Ryan White, the teenage AIDS patient whose battle for acceptance gained national attention, died in Indianapolis at age 18. In 1994, Kurt Cobain, singer and guitarist for the grunge band Nirvana, was found dead in Seattle from an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound; he was 27. TEN YEARS AGO The Central Intelligence Agency confirmed that personnel action had been taken following the mistaken bombing of the Chinese embassy during the NATO war against Yugoslavia; one employee was reportedly fired. Oscar-winning actress Claire Trevor died in Newport Beach, Calif. at age 90.

FIVE YEARS AGO With presidents and kings looking on, hundreds of thousands of pilgrims in St. Peter’s Square sang, applauded and chanted for the Catholic Church to declare John Paul II a saint as the pope was laid to rest. ONE YEAR AGO Somali pirates hijacked the U.S.-flagged Maersk Alabama; although the crew was able to retake the cargo ship, the captain was taken captive by the raiders and held aboard a lifeboat. (Richard Phillips was rescued five days later by Navy SEAL snipers who shot three of the pirates dead.) A Russian spacecraft carrying a crew of three, including U.S. billionaire space tourist Charles Simonyi, landed safely in Kazakhstan. David “Pop” Winans Sr., patriarch of the award-winning Winans gospel music family, died in Nashville, Tenn. at age 74. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former first lady Betty Ford is 92. Comedian Shecky Greene is 84. Actor-turned-diplomat John Gavin is 79. Author and investigative reporter Seymour Hersh is 73. Former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan is 72. Basketball Hall-of-Famer John Havlicek is 70. Singer J.J. Jackson is 69. Singer Peggy Lennon (The Lennon Sisters) is 69. Rock musician Steve Howe (Yes) is 63. Former House Republican Leader Tom DeLay is 63. Movie director John Madden (“Shakespeare in Love”) is 61. Rock musician Mel Schacher (Grand Funk Railroad) is 59. Actor John Schneider is 50. Rock musician Izzy Stradlin is 48. Singer Julian Lennon is 47. Rock singer-musician Donita Sparks is 47. Actress Robin Wright Penn is 44. Actress Patricia Arquette is 42. Rock singer Craig Honeycutt (Everything) is 40. Rock musician Darren Jessee is 39. Actress Emma Caulfield is 37. Actress Katee Sackhoff is 30. Actor Taylor Kitsch is 29. Rock singer-musician Ezra Koenig (Vampire Weekend) is 26. Actor Taran Noah Smith is 26. Actress Kirsten Storms is 26. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The truth is always something that is told, not something that is known. If there were no speaking or writing, there would be no truth about anything.” — Susan Sontag, American author and critic (1933-2004)

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 9:30 a.m. April 6, in the 2000 block of Northeast Linnea Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:59 p.m. April 6, in the 200 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:42 p.m. April 6, in the 900 block of Northwest Wall Street. Burglary — Cash and a gift card were reported stolen at 5:24 p.m. April 6, in the 1200 block of Northeast Dawson Drive. Theft — A cell phone was reported stolen at 5:31 p.m. April 6, in the 1100 block of Northwest 12th Street. Theft — A license plate was reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:19 p.m. April 6, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Redmond Police Department

Theft — Tools were reported stolen at 9:44 a.m. April 6, in the 2700 block of Southwest Wickiup Avenue. DUII — Jacob Scott Smith, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:31 a.m. April 6, in the area of Southwest 17th Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:26 p.m. April 6, in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:33 p.m. April 6, in the area of Northwest 14th Street and Northwest

Knoll Avenue in Bend. Robbery — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 5:21 p.m. April 6, in the 500 block of East U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:31 a.m. April 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 172 in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:29 a.m. April 6, in the area of Cold Springs Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:37 p.m. April 6, in the area of Day and Strawn roads in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 3:12 p.m. — Building fire, 2255 N.E. Second St. 16 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the Web site at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the Web site at www.redmondhumane. org. The Bend shelter’s Web site is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pit Bull — Adult neutered male, silver and white, black collar, microchipped; found near Southwest 24th Street. Australian Shepherd mix — Adult female, black and brown, blue collar; found near Northwest Way and Northwest Coyner Avenue. Domestic short-haired cat — Adult neutered male, black, microchipped; found near Southwest 32nd Court.

Feds want to barge salmon on Snake The Associated Press GRANTS PASS — The Obama administration is asking a federal judge to let it stop spilling water over four Snake River dams this May and rely instead on barges to carry young salmon and steelhead downstream on their spring migration. The NOAA Fisheries Service proposal filed in U.S. District Court in Portland argues that the science shows

Got a D.U.I.I. ? Want to save hundreds of dollars?

this is the best course for fish in low-water years like this one. Salmon advocates counter that spilling water over the dams — rather than running it through power-generating turbines — has the proven track record.

Sewing & Vacuum Center

For all your vacuum & sewin needs g

CALL NOW Pfeifer & Associates State Licensed/DUII Treatment Services

541-383-4293

541-382-3882

304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

The Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 1 is looking for

VOLUNTEER BUDGET COMMITTEE MEMBERS If interested, please contact the Redmond Main Fire Station at 541-504-5000 by April 12, 2010 for further information.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 C3

O 2 Democratic candidates weigh in on tax increases By Tim Fought The Associated Press

Andy Cripe / The Corvallis Gazette-Times

Forty four-year-old Corvallis resident Jonathan Carroll gestures in front of solar panels in his yard last month in Corvallis. Carroll is a master of modification, all in pursuit of saving resources.

Corvallis resident lives a low-impact lifestyle By Cheryl Hatch Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — Like so many homeowners, Jonathan Carroll, 44, chose his home for its size and its view. It’s a 750-square foot bungalow with purple trim and a southern exposure. Unlike many homeowners, he paid off his mortgage on his 40th birthday — a personal goal — and it costs him precious little to maintain it. The home — like much in Carroll’s life — is powered by the sun. He has a “Powered by the Sun” bumper sticker on the Zap electric car parked in his driveway, inspired by the “Powered by Biodiesel” campaign. “I took their font and their color,” Carroll said, describing his adaptation. Carroll is a master of modification, all in pursuit of saving resources. He reconfigured the battery array in his Zap car to get three times the usage. He fashioned a bike light that runs on solar power and created multiple solar arrays on his roof to power his home, his tools — his life. “I’ve always gravitated to living like this,” Carroll said. “I’ve always been this staunch environmentalist. I’m a little obsessed, but I sleep well at night.” He remembers the energy crisis of the 1970s and its long lines for gasoline and the commercial,

“I’ve always been this staunch environmentalist. I’m a little obsessed, but I sleep well at night.” — Jonathan Carroll with “the Indian paddling a canoe through all this garbage. I’ll never forget that.” A graduate of Brookfield High School in Connecticut, Carroll learned innovation from his father, an industrial arts teacher. “I was making digital clocks when I was 12 years old,” he said. In his backyard, he makes the most of his southern exposure. He has a series of solar panels that create four times the electricity he needs — including one panel that he glued together with clearcoat body paint. “I never pay for electricity.” He has nearly a dozen raised beds, a grape arbor and fruit trees. “This is only a tenth of an acre. You can grow a ton,” Carroll said. “I eat out of my garden year-round.” He grows kiwis, figs, plums, Asian pears, raspberries, blueberries and cherries. A Santa Rosa plum tree was blooming.

“That’s the beauty of this valley; it’s temperate.” He times his water usage with the seasons, too. He recycles the gray water from his washing machine in the summer to irrigate his garden. He uses phosphate soap because the plants appreciate the chemicals. In the winter, it’s non-phosphate soap because the water is returned to the city system and phosphates can create algae blooms. His toilet uses no water: It’s a composting toilet, basically a bucket and sawdust. “It’s a closed loop,” Carroll said. “I eat. I poop. I compost. I put it in the garden, and I grow food.” He can understand if his neighbors think he’s a bit eccentric. “I use a real (push) mower. They use a two-cycle gas engine mower,” he said. He thinks they’re missing out and missing the point: “Get some exercise, talk to your neighbors, hear the birds sing.” He’d like more people to simplify their lives, but he’s not a zealot. And he wants people to understand he’s not wanting for anything. “I live by example. I bike to work every day,” Carroll said. “I don’t live like a monk. I have electric guitars, a TV and a microwave. I just try to live my live with integrity.”

PORTLAND — The two Democratic contenders for governor of Oregon took a step away from their party’s legislative leadership Wednesday, suggesting they’d have supported temporary rather than permanent tax increases a year ago. Bill Bradbury and John Kitzhaber appeared in a Portland debate sponsored by business groups, including the Oregon Business Association. During the 2009 legislative session, the association argued that a tax increase proposed to fill a budget gap should be only temporary, saying that could avoid a referendum fight. Majority Democrats in the Legislature opted instead for permanent tax increases on the wealthy and on business, touching off a hard-fought campaign over Measures 66 and 67. Voters upheld the tax increases in January. The first question at the debate was what Bradbury and Kitzhaber might have done differently. Although they supported the measures as passed, both suggested that imposing them only long enough for the state to get clear of the recession might have avoided what Bradbury called “a rather divisive debate” that led to what Kitzhaber called deep wounds that have yet to heal. “I would have been encouraging the Legislature to make Measures 66 and 67 temporary,” said Bradbury, a former secretary of state. “I would have done my best to keep it from getting on the ballot in the first place,” said Kitzhaber, a former governor who noted he’d worked as a legislator on raising taxes

temporarily during the administration of Republican Gov. Vic Atiyeh. The two candidates offered few specifics for dealing with the budget next year, when the Legislature must draw up a two-year plan and face what state analysts say could be a shortfall of more than $2 billion. Bradbury said final revenue estimates are months away, and Kitzhaber said he would offer specifics during the general election campaign. That reflected his confidence that he’s ahead in the race to the May 18 primary, a view many Democrats have shared. On several questions, the two returned to campaign standbys. Bradbury said a central proposal of his campaign is putting state revenues in a state-owned bank instead of private institu-

www.educate.com

541-389-9252 Bend • 2150 NE Studio Rd. Redmond • 1332 SW Highland Ave.

EUGENE — A new report from the Eugene police department says officers are now using Tasers more frequently than pepper spray when confronting resistant people. The Eugene Register-Guard reports that in 2008 and 2009 officers used Tasers 49 times to subdue people, while pepper spray was used in 43 cases. In 2007 alone, a year before officers began carrying Tasers, officers used pepper spray 57 times. The police department is considering buying more Tasers, but is awaiting for Police Chief Pete Kerns to sign off on changes to Taser use policy the city police commission is now considering. Lt. Doug Mozan says the use of Tasers would lead to a drop in officer and suspect injuries.

Lane County labeled drug-dealing area EUGENE — Lane County has been designated a “high intensity drug trafficking area” to make law enforcement eligible for federal funding to help fight heroin and methamphetamine dealing. Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden announced the designation Tuesday for the county, along with the Warm Springs

Reservation. The Register-Guard reports seven other counties have received the drug problem label: Multnomah, Clackamas, Washington, Marion, Deschutes, Jackson and Douglas.

Portland mayor warns of budget shortfall PORTLAND — Portland Mayor Sam Adams sent a memo to city commissioners Tuesday warning that revenue this year is expected to come up short of projected spending. The Oregonian reports business licenses revenue is down more than $2 million while the police bureau could overspend its budget by up to $5 million. Adams has called for a hiring freeze and no more overtime, except in an emergency. The mayor is scheduled to release his budget on April 30.

DR. PAUL EDMONDS   . Dr. Edmonds grew up in Central Oregon and graduated from the OSU and WSU Colleges of Veterinary Medicine in 2005. After graduation, he completed a one year internship and a three year surgery residency with Equine Sports Medicine and Surgery in Weatherford, TX. Dr. Edmonds’ training with performance horses and lameness makes him a great addition to Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic.

For appointments call

541-923-1638

C R E AT E D W I T H T H E H I G H D E S E R T H O M E O W N E R I N M I N D .

YOUR AWARD-WINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE:

CENTRAL OREGON

NEW HOME

LIVING

Salem ODOT employees moving SALEM — More than 500 Oregon Department of Transportation employees will likely move into two vacant buildings in Salem that were once home to hightech companies. Spokeswoman Christine Miles told The Statesman Journal leases are being reviewed by

A locally written magazine devoted to the latest trends and techniques in interior design, home building, remodeling, and landscaping ... especially those that reflect the best of Central Oregon’s creative lifestyle.

state attorneys. The workers could move into the new space in October to make way for a $65 million renovation of ODOT’s building on the Capitol Mall.

$30M for Klamath asbestos site cleanup KLAMATH FALLS — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says cleanup of a site north of Klamath Falls will cost as much as $30 million. But no source of funding is in place for the operation. The 125-acre site is contaminated with asbestos from past structures, including medical barracks used by the U.S. Marine Corps, single-family homes and apartments. Oregon Department of Environmental Quality officer Cliff Walkey says few options are available for funding. He says the department is considering asking Gov. Ted Kulongoski to recommend the site be added to the National Priorities List, which would designate it for federal money. While the site has been treated in the past, asbestos continues to be brought to the surface through frost and erosion. EPA cleanup plans include excavating the site, and burying contaminated materials under caps. — From wire reports

541-388-4418

Cinder Rock Veterinary Clinic is pleased to announce the addition of

O  B Eugene police use Tasers more often

tions, and then lending the money within Oregon for economic development. In a campaign paper, he says his idea is modeled on “the enormously successful” state-owned bank in North Dakota. Kitzhaber emphasized what he calls “redesigning the systems” to get the state beyond political and institutional logjams. Among those proposals are a 10-year budget cycle for state finances and putting education from kindergarten through graduate school under a single budget.

CENTRAL OREGON NEW HOME LIVING Publishes: May 1st

READ BY OVER 70,000 LOCAL READERS

ADVERTISE IN OUR NEXT EDITION FOR AS LITTLE AS $339 CALL 541-382-1811


C4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

The geese win

A

ll feathers and no honk. That’s what the Bend Park & Recreation District’s new geese strategy looks like.

The district will “implement the GeesePeace Canada goose con-

trol model with the help of a core of volunteers,” the district announced Tuesday. The park district has tried a number of methods over the years. It’s tried birth control. It’s tried oiling eggs, loud noises and a dog giving chase. In the end, the district spends about $22,000 a year on goose control and clean up of goose droppings. Nothing has really worked. What’s new about GeesePeace? Well, there’s oiling eggs. There’s a dog herding geese. In other words, there’s not much new. Paul Stell, who is the district’s natural resources manager, hopes that by getting volunteers involved and perhaps by making feeding geese punishable with a fine, maybe a new, more determined effort will be more successful. Maybe. He pointed us to the Rockford Park District in Rockford, Ill., as a place that has successfully implemented the GeesePeace strategy. We called Jan Herbert, the project’s manager in Rockford. She does believe the program has had success — after nine years. The district oils eggs. The district also does harassment. It uses two dogs and has found that shining a laser on a goose when it’s dark can make geese nearby fly away. Signs discourage people from feeding the birds. Herbert said the goose control program costs her district about $25,000 a year. (We have no idea

how that compares, because we don’t know the relative size of the problem in Rockford.) In Rockford, there’s even a person who every winter day drops off five gallons of corn for the geese at a park, Herbert said. Rather than ask the person to stop, a park district employee comes by and shovels it all away, each day. Is that what we have to look forward to in Bend’s GeesePeace approach? Herbert has not done a goose count, but she counts the number of eggs that the district has oiled each year. The first year, the district oiled 1,200. That number rose for a few years up to a peak of about 2,400, as the district got better at locating nests. Last year, the district oiled 1,000 eggs. In government, that is probably called success. Without an actual goose count, though, nobody knows. Bend’s park district has two choices. It can pour its taxpayers’ money down that same hole for nine years. Or, as the district considered, it could trap and kill the bulk of the geese and eliminate most of the problem immediately. Then, it could follow up with a much smaller program of oiling eggs. The park district has seemingly tried to pick a policy to displace geese without ruffling any feathers. We suppose that’s like making an omelet without breaking any eggs.

Cyrus should resign I

t doesn’t take the refined nose of a sommelier to recognize the bad smell rising from the Deschutes County Planning Commission. All it takes is a quick look at commission member Keith Cyrus’ actions with regard to something he and his family want very much, indeed. The Cyruses, long-time Central Oregonians from the Cloverdale area, want to convert their Aspen Lakes subdivision and golf course into a destination resort, a move that would allow them to expand the golf course and add overnight lodging. Problem is, as things currently stand, the development does not meet the requirements of either county or state law. The family hopes that having cluster developments like theirs included on the county’s soon-to-becompleted resort land-use map will improve their chances of getting what they want. They’ve been fighting an uphill battle. The state Department of Land Conservation and Development opposes the change, as do neighbors, and the planning commission itself had earlier decided to exclude cluster developments from the new map. Cyrus has been unwilling to leave

it at that. As a member of the planning commission, he has been careful to declare his clear conflict of interest regarding cluster developments and has not voted when the issue of including them on the map has arisen. Unfortunately, he’s been far less circumspect about jawboning his fellow planning commissioners about his wishes. In one such episode at a planning commission retreat he took planning staff members to task for their treatment of his request. In fact, he has been forceful enough on the subject to leave at least three current and past planning commission members uncomfortable with his actions. In a perfect world, Cyrus would recognize the problems he has caused — he has attempted to wield influence denied members of the public with similar desires — and resign his post on the planning commission for the good of that body. Short of that, the county commission, which appoints members of the planning commission, should decline to extend Cyrus’s term when it expires at the end of June, even if he seeks to have them do so. The planning commission badly needs a breath of fresh air, and as long as Cyrus remains on the body, it can’t get one.

My Nickel’s Worth The new U.S. Obama∙nation — def: noun 1) A nation that slumps into a legalized pot smoking stupor because the federal government condones it for the first time (tens of thousands registered in Oregon alone). 2) A nation that is hopelessly drowning in debt ($1.4 trillion this year alone). 3) A nation that lacks the courage to stand up to Iranians building nukes but harasses our Israeli allies instead (over Jerusalem housing). 4) A nation that puts global warming and environmental restrictions ahead of job growth (Environmental Protection Agency stops coal mine, rules CO2 is a pollutant). 5) A military degraded by open homosexuality (as per Secretary of Defense Robert Gates’ new guidelines). 6) A socialist nation devoted to the redistribution of wealth. John Shepherd Sisters

Tea Party cuts Since Tea Partyers wish to return our country’s political and tax posture to the days of the Articles of Confederation, it’d be more convincing that they’re sincere if we were told which specific “big government” items they wish to discard on the way to their Nirvana. For example, here in Central Oregon, would they give up studded tires to save the $10 million that these cost the state in annual road repairs, or would they happily pay a large premium for those tires to cover repair costs? Would they vote for abandonment of the interstate

highway system in favor of a nationwide network of privately-owned toll roads — the way it used to be (with suitable weight-mile premiums for their fifth-wheels and motor homes)? Would the older Tea Partyers give up their Medicare/Medicaid and Medicare prescription benefits in favor of self-funding, as well as giving back Social Security payments? Would any hyper-conservative farmer give up all crop subsidies and pay the real costs for bringing water to the fields rather than depending upon government to fund it? How about those pseudo-farmers with Christmas tree plantations — will they gladly give up the associated tax breaks? Would Tea Partyers prefer the elimination of city, state and federal police agencies in favor of town marshals hired by the community (shades of Dodge City, Kan., Abilene, Texas, etc.)? When lists of specific big-ticket items, with their associated tax rate reductions, are published by Tea Party organizations it may be possible to believe that they’re both serious and rational. Until then, their flaming rhetoric is less useful than a pile of “heifer dust.” William Walker Redmond

Health bill harm Despite the overwhelming and angry objection of America’s general public, the Democratic Party, with the support of the nation’s unions, has finally succeeded in passing Barack Obama’s health care bill. I am glad none of my immediate family is a practicing doctor or contemplating becoming one.

It will be very interesting (perhaps frightening) to see the effect this has on the enrollment in the nation’s medical schools. Were I a pre-med student, I would be giving serious thought to switching majors — especially if I were interested in family practice. I do not think enough consideration has been given to the long-term effect that this legislation is going to have on our country. I think it comes at a very high price. Ted Lyster Bend

Take a day off April 1 came too early for many a reader of The Bulletin. The March 19 editorial headline, “Furlough Friday,” must have made many a Bend heartbeat skip. Be still my heart! Too good to be true! You must be joking! Well, yes, you were. The editors yanked the mat from beneath their readers by giving us an editorial opinion after all. Well, they let somebody else do the work apparently. Loyal Bulletin readers will recover from their disappointment soon enough, because we’re used to such shallow reflection. Indeed, we know that The Bulletin’s editors return all too often to their stock 10 or 12 pet peeves. Since so many editorials are but a minor variation on the same tune, one might easily be led to believe that The Bulletin’s editors enjoy more furlough days than workdays. As a loyal Bulletin reader, I would encourage the editors to take a Furlough Friday. Enjoy your day off. I know many of your readers will. Robert Currie Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Massage therapy is not a substitute for physical therapy By Ch u ck Brockman an d Lau ra Coop er Bulletin guest columnists

A

fter reading The Bulletin’s March 18 article, “Deschutes paid $136K last year for massages,” and following a few weeks of deliberation, we have decided — as concerned citizens, active members of the Central Oregon medical community, employers, and taxpayers — to respond to this article and share some of our expertise. The comments suggest that the county administration is electing to replace “medically necessary care” for its employees with massage therapy. Massage therapy has therapeutic benefit; however, to imply that it can replace standard medical care is not realistic. Timm Schimke made the comment, “I think our feeling was that if we can divert people from physical therapy, which is very expensive, and have their problem taken care of through massage therapy, we would save a lot of money.” This comment suggests that Schimke lacks infor-

mation about the differences between physical therapy and massage therapy. The county’s effort to save money by diverting employees from physical therapy to have their problems taken care of through massage therapy has not been tracked or to our knowledge has not been proven to save the county money. The county has not demonstrated that the money spent on massage therapy was for medically necessary care. Because our expertise is in the field of physical therapy, we would like to provide information about why physical therapy is a unique and important service. While both physical therapists and massage therapists have licensure exams and state requirements for continuing education and emphasize hands-on treatment, we are different. Physical therapists are licensed medical providers by the state of Oregon with advanced post-graduate training and ability to evaluate and treat patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction. Physical therapy

IN MY VIEW intervention is based on “medically necessary care,” as governed by states’ workers’ compensation laws. Many people do not realize the extent of a physical therapist’s education and the high standards to which we are held by ourselves, our colleagues and our professional organizations. A physical therapist’s scope of practice extends beyond the treatment of soft tissue and muscle soreness to include a full assessment of joints, neurological integrity and cardiovascular conditioning, as well as many other specialties. In addition, we assess the patient’s social and work environment to provide a holistic approach to improve the patient’s function as it relates to specific life demands. For example, a physical therapist might provide a variety of services in the case of a patient who has developed neck pain secondary to his/her work posture. For

this, individual physical therapy may include assessing work station ergonomics, prescribing specific stretching and strengthening exercises as part of a home exercise program, manual therapy to decrease pain, and workplace strategies to minimize current symptoms and prevent recurrences. The goal is to return patients to their active and healthy life as quickly and cost effectively as possible. This includes an emphasis on patient education and the patient’s role in helping themselves. As a profession, physical therapy is based more and more on critically appraised evidence. For this reason, most physical therapists in Central Oregon monitor functional outcomes. These measures can demonstrate that our medical interventions are effective and return our patients to a higher level of function. We actively engage our patients in their own treatment plan to achieve more meaningful outcomes for the patient as well as the employer. We work with physicians to

ensure our therapeutic interventions are focused toward a safe return to work and maximizing previous levels of physical function. The average medically necessary episode of physical therapy, from start to finish, costs less than $1,500. In many cases, visiting a physical therapist could save the county money in health care costs, both short and long-term, by getting county employees back to work with less likelihood of further medical intervention. We do not dismiss the role of alternative therapies and recommend these services when appropriate for our patients. We are not suggesting that physical therapy intervention is the only medically necessary option. Our goal is that the public and health care consumers are informed of the important role of physical therapists. Chuck Brockman and Laura Cooper, of Bend, are physical therapists.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 C5

O D

N   Arlet Avery Campbell, of Bend June 13, 1936 - April 4, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond, 541-504-9485. Services: Viewing 12noon-5p.m., Friday 4/9, followed by burial in IOOF Cemetery in Fossil 1p.m., Saturday 4/10.

Fred W. Schaffer, of Bend Dec. 9, 1926 - April 4, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmemorial.com Services: A Memorial Service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Judith A. Nolan, of Bend Aug. 20, 1940 - Mar. 21, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Bend, 541-318-0842 Services: Her request, no services will be held.

Malcolm C. ‘Chuck’ Barrows, of Bend Oct. 16, 1925 - April 5, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Private Full Military Honors Service at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, Oregon.

Mark Steven Dunigan, of Bend Jan. 25, 1964 - April 2, 2010 Arrangements: Autumn Funeral - Bend, 541-318-0842 Services: Celebration of Life, Saturday, April 10, 2010, 1:00 p.m., Church of God, 990 Boche Road, Salem, Oregon.

Ronald James Carper, of Bend Mar. 3, 1954 - April 4, 2010 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592, www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: No services are planned at this time.

Virdie Matilda Hackett, of Bend July 2, 1923 - April 5, 2010 Arrangements: Niswonger-ReynoldsFuneral Home 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No Public services will be held at her request.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Malcolm 'Chuck' Charles Barrows October 16, 1925 - April 5, 2010 Malcolm "Chuck" Barrows passed on April 5, 2010, after a fight with cancer at age 84. A private full military honors Service will take place at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland, Oregon. He was honorably disMalcolm 'Chuck' charged from the Air Force Charles after a thirty Barrows year career as a navigator. He was a veteran of World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. He had in excess of 20,000 flying hours, and was Squadron Commander in Morrocco Airway Communication Service and had 35 combat support missions over southeast Asia. He was an assistant professor of Air Science ROTC Unit in Ohio Westlyan University. Upon retiring from the Air Force in 1973, in Bend, he worked as a Veterans Counselor for the State of Oregon Employment Division for fifteen years and retired in 1991, at age 66. He is survived by two younger sisters, Maxine Monroe of Leon Iowa and Lois Hillman of Lee's Summit Missouri. His younger brother, Gene Barrows of Pasedena, California passed last year. He has four living children; Karen Barrows/Hunt of Bend, Ken Barrows of Bend, Kim Job of San Diego, and Kathy Barrows of Bend. He is also survived by five grandsons and one great-grandson. Chuck had requested no services. Inurnment will take place at Willamette National Cemetery Columbarium in Portland, Oregon. The family has placed their trust in Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home for the final arrangements. Please visit our website at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

to sign the electronic guest register for the family.

Fridays Continued from C1 Plans are not finalized, but Hammer said options include after- or before-school programs. RAPRD will also likely join with 4-H to run science programs, including Lego Robotics, Hammer said. “We weren’t frustrated (by the return to five-day weeks). We did put a lot of work into Choice Friday,” Hammer said. “We saw it as an opportunity to expand and we see going back to five days as another way to expand.” Choice Friday struggled to attract students this year. About 7 percent of students attended the programs, which cost up to $15 a day. Organizers believe that more students didn’t attend for various reasons, including transportation issues and confusion

Sisters Continued from C1 Council calculated that under the 400-foot restriction, there is only room for two more drivethroughs in the highway commercial zone. The proposed change would only limit the number of fast-food drive-throughs. “I think we’ve all seen the fastfood entrances to towns and it’s not pretty,” Weed said. Despite the limits on fast food, Weed said more drive-through businesses would be allowed to open than currently can under existing code. “What that (does) is really open up a lot of opportunities for those lots that weren’t there before while still making sure we have an attractive entrance to town,” Weed said. The changes have not been written yet and are still subject to change. If Weed’s proposal is included in the code, the council must still hold public hearings before the proposed code chang-

Mankiller, first female chief of modern Cherokee Nation en to be willing to take risks, to stand up for the things they believe in, and to step up and accept the challenge of serving in leadership roles.”

By Patricia Sullivan The Washington Post

Wilma Mankiller, 64, the first female chief of the Cherokee Nation in modern times, whose leadership on social and financial issues made her tribe a national role model, died Tuesday at her home in Adair County, Okla. She had metastatic pancreatic cancer. Mankiller, principal chief of the Cherokee from 1985 to 1995, tripled Wilma her tribe’s enMankiller rollment, doubled employment and built new housing, health centers and children’s programs in northeast Oklahoma, where most of the 200,000 or so tribal members live. In 1990, she signed an unprecedented agreement in which the Bureau of Indian Affairs surrendered direct control over millions of dollars in federal funding to the tribe.

‘Nickname’

The Associated Press file photo

A role model Although women have long played leadership roles in Native American communities, few before Mankiller were elected to the top position of one of the country’s largest tribes. “She was the first to step forward, although that’s vastly changed in last 20 years. Many (women) are now heads of their tribes because of her,” said Susan Masten, past chairman of the Yurok tribe, who also founded Women Empowering Women for Indian Nations. “She helped create the aspiration of other women who maybe wouldn’t have thought to run for office.” Under her leadership, infant mortality declined and educational achievement of tribal members rose, although she was quick to say much more needed to be accomplished. Her attention to social and family issues sometimes caused

President Bill Clinton hugs former Cherokee Nation chief Wilma Mankiller on Jan. 15, 1998, after presenting her with a Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony at the White House. Mankiller, one of the few women ever to lead a major American Indian tribe, died Tuesday after battling pancreatic cancer. She was 64. grumbling as other tribes poured more of their resources into casinos and tobacco stores, but Mankiller said, “I’d like to see whole, healthy communities again, communities in which tribe members would have access to adequate health care, higher education if they want it, a decent place to live and a decent place to work, and a strong commitment to tribal language and culture.” President Bill Clinton awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1998, and she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1993. Kevin Gover, director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian, said, “Wilma in some

about the cost. Students on free or reduced lunch were eligible for scholarships. But organizers always understood the district could return to five days. The program will continue to try to supplement classroom activities, Christman said. “It’s still about the concept of fostering opportunities for continued learning,” Christman said. Choice Friday leaders expected it would take at least two years to fully implement the program, according to Thom Bell, one of the original organizers. The program developed mostly options for younger students, but still needs to expanded professional training or internship options for high school students, Bell said. Whatever form Choice Friday takes next year, Bell hopes options for older students will be more robust. Those, though, are

more complicated to create because many of them — particularly internships — are set up on a student-by-student basis. Expanding the programs for high school students will also require more volunteers, Bell said. “There’s all these different ways of gaining knowledge and the community can take an active role that contributes,” Bell said. Before any programs are finalized for next year, Choice Friday organizers have to make a few changes, including figuring out a new name, according to Christman. “One thing we’re about to do is rebrand and come out with something that... doesn’t include Friday,” Christman said.

es are finalized. The council is expected to discuss Weed’s proposed change during a workshop today at 8 a.m. Weed’s proposal also includes new set-back requirements, requiring any new drive-through business to be set back 40 feet from the road, up from 5 feet, Weed said. In her proposal, Weed defines a fast-food — or formula-food — restaurant as one that, by contract, has a standardized menu, employee uniforms, design standards and color schemes. But focusing the code changes on fast-food restaurants is unnecessary, argued Mayor Lon Kellstrom. City staff may end up spending hours arguing with businesses about what is or is not fast food. And, Kellstrom said, market conditions will likely limit how many fast-food places would open. The town is small and has high land costs, he said. Buildings must also conform to the city’s 1880s Western theme. “It’s a non-issue,” Kellstrom said. “We might get one or two

more (without restrictions).” Councilors agree the code must be changed. Thompson said the previous code was too broad and affected too many types of businesses. Any revision to the code should allow for more drive-through development, Thompson said. “I think we need to loosen the restrictions to allow for other types of drive-throughs ... and not group those with fast-food restaurants,” he said. The future commercial development northwest of downtown is important because that part of the highway serves as the gateway to Sisters, Councilor Bill Merrill said. Merrill said the code was still being rewritten and Weed’s proposal was not final. “The highway commercial (zone) is at the entry to town,” Merrill said. “It’s the first and last impression you get of the city of Sisters. Yeah, we want to get it right.”

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

ways became larger than life and something of a legendary figure because of the force of her personality. She has a very compelling personal story ... and established herself as a leader not just in the Indian community, but beyond that.”

Cherokee values In her 1993 autobiography, “Mankiller: A Chief and Her People,” she said she wanted to be remembered for emphasizing that Cherokee values can help solve contemporary problems. “Friends describe me as someone who likes to dance along the edge of the roof,” she wrote. “I try to encourage young wom-

Roads Continued from C1 “Butler Market, Third Street — those are all streets that have significant wear, tear, rutting, ponding — lots of water. So we had the federal money and that’s how they made the list. It’s fairly spread out over the city and no one area is getting all of the work,” Linkof said. Bend resident Chuck Arnold, 42, drives or rides his bicycle to work at the Downtown Bend Business Association each day, traveling along Colorado Avenue between Simpson Avenue and Century Drive. That’s one of the stretches set to be repaved. The pavement there is split and cracked, making it hazardous for bicyclists and drivers, he said. “Taking it down and grinding it down and replacing it is going to be really huge for safer bicycle-riding around there, and also for cars too,” Arnold said, adding that commuters won’t have to avoid obstacles in the road. “It’s going to make it a lot better and safer when I come downtown with my kids on bikes too.” Access to affected homes and businesses between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. will be limited, and some streets will be closed for about 12 hours, Linkof said. Equipment problems or wet weather conditions could postpone projects, Linkof said. Depending on weather conditions, each project should take at least one day to complete, he said. “The nights of work, for instance on Bond, we’ll work on

She was born Nov. 18, 1945, in Tahlequah, Okla., one of 11 children and a fifth-generation Mankiller. Her surname was an old term of respect for Indian warriors who guarded tribal villages. “It’s a nickname — and I earned it,” she would sometimes tease inquirers. After drought devastated her family’s land in the 1950s, the U.S. government moved them to a housing project in California. She married an Ecuadoran accountant, Hector Olaya, in 1963, and they had two daughters, Felicia Olaya and Gina Olaya, both of whom survive her. But hers was an unhappy marriage, she wrote, especially after she began taking college classes and bought a car without her husband’s knowledge. She started visiting the Indian activists who had occupied the abandoned federal prison on Alcatraz Island in 1969, a controversial protest that was “a tremendous wake-up call,” she later said. After divorcing Olaya, she moved back to her family’s Oklahoma land in 1977, graduated from college through the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities and became the tribe’s community development director, leading the creation of community water systems and rehabilitating houses. Kidney ailments eventually required a transplant. In 1979, she was severely injured in a head-on traffic accident that killed the other driver, her best friend. Mankiller endured 17 operations during her recovery. In 1980, Mankiller came down with myasthenia gravis, a muscle disease. She later battled lymphoma and breast cancer. Throughout her illnesses, friends described her as resilient.

that one night,” Linkof said. “We’ll come back the next night and try to finish it. That’s the idea — is to spread it out and not gang up on one neighborhood for a week. We just want to make it maybe a night or two nights and be finished.” There will be no parking on streets in the construction zone, and drivers who do park in the area risk having their cars towed, according to a news release from the city. People with property in the construction zones are asked to water their lawns less frequently and keep their pets away from construction areas, according to the release. Flaggers, cones and detours signs will help direct traffic, Linkof said, but lane closures and traffic delays are expected. The paving projects are expected to create work for more than 40 people, Linkof said. “It’s putting people to work that wouldn’t be working,” Linkof said. “I know a lot of asphalt and local concrete companies have laid off quite a bit of staff, and this means they can bring quite a bit of them back.” The paving projects are expected to end April 30. Linkof said it will help save the city money in the long term, because federal money will help pay for the projects. “Our revenues have been shrinking, so this federal money is a huge shot in the arm,” he said. Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, APRIL 8 Today: Morning showers, afternoon clearing, windy.

HIGH Ben Burkel

45

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

52/28

49/26

54/29

34/22

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

48/22

41/12

 Mitchell

Madras

48/17

46/20

Camp Sherman 40/12 Redmond Prineville 45/15 Cascadia 47/16 44/16 Sisters 43/14 Bend Post 45/15

Oakridge Elk Lake 42/14

33/3

42/12

42/11

A chance of showers today. Rain and snow showers ending tonight. Eastern

43/13

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

41/10

40/12

Fort Rock

Vancouver 49/39

56/26

Seattle

57/26

50/34

Bend

Boise

45/15

58/28

52/27



59/28



Idaho Falls 55/28

Elko

Reno



57/23

69/37



33/18

Missoula Helena

Grants Pass

44/14

A chance of showers today. Rain and snow showers ending tonight.

City

Eugene

66/40

46/19

Crater Lake



49/38

San Francisco 62/49



Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:34 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:41 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:32 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:42 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 3:53 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 2:13 p.m.

Salt Lake City 61/38



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers.

LOW

HIGH

56 28

Moon phases New

First

Full

Last

April 14 April 21 April 28 May 5

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/45/0.06 . . . . . . 49/36/r. . . . . . 51/35/sh Baker City . . . . . . 54/24/0.00 . . . . . 46/23/sh. . . . . . 46/25/pc Brookings . . . . . . 57/36/0.00 . . . . . 52/42/sh. . . . . . 58/41/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 55/22/0.00 . . . . . . . 46/19/. . . . . . 45/21/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 64/39/0.00 . . . . . . 50/34/r. . . . . . 52/32/pc Klamath Falls . . . 59/21/0.00 . . . . . 47/18/sh. . . . . . 48/24/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/21/0.00 . . . . . . 49/21/c. . . . . . 48/24/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 61/26/0.00 . . . . . .43/11/rs. . . . . . 46/20/pc Medford . . . . . . . 67/34/0.00 . . . . . . 52/29/r. . . . . . 57/34/pc Newport . . . . . . . 55/43/0.00 . . . . . . 51/37/r. . . . . . 52/37/pc North Bend . . . . . . 54/37/NA . . . . . . 50/36/r. . . . . . 52/37/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 59/26/0.00 . . . . . . 56/28/c. . . . . . 53/29/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 63/34/0.00 . . . . . 55/31/sh. . . . . . 54/28/pc Portland . . . . . . . 53/43/0.01 . . . . . . 50/38/r. . . . . . 52/37/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 63/28/0.00 . . . . . 47/16/sh. . . . . . 51/20/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 66/23/0.00 . . . . . 48/17/sh. . . . . . 47/21/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 69/37/0.00 . . . . . 48/33/sh. . . . . . 54/35/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 61/38/0.00 . . . . . . 50/35/r. . . . . . 52/33/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 62/26/0.00 . . . . . . 43/14/r. . . . . . 47/23/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 58/39/0.00 . . . . . 53/35/sh. . . . . . 51/32/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/28 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 in 1996 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.28” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 in 1973 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.17” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.34” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.98” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.08 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.45 in 1960 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:04 a.m. . . . . . .9:29 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:25 a.m. . . . . . .9:33 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . .12:52 p.m. . . . . . .4:01 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .5:33 a.m. . . . . . .4:58 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .5:44 p.m. . . . . . .6:11 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:51 a.m. . . . . . .5:44 p.m.

2

LOW

55 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, chance of showers. HIGH

54 27

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Redding

Silver Lake

41/9

HIGH

Rain will be likely in the west with rain and snow over the Cascades. Showers will fall in the east.

Christmas Valley

Chemult

LOW

50 20

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 70° Roseburg • 21° Klamath Falls

MONDAY

Mostly cloudy, slightly warmer.

BEND ALMANAC

44/13

36/5

15

50/38

Burns

43/11

HIGH

Portland

Brothers

Sunriver

LOW

SUNDAY

Partly cloudy, cool.

Tonight: Continued clearing, very cold, winds subsiding.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

43/12

43/13

SATURDAY

NORTHWEST

Paulina

La Pine



Rain with snow above 1,500 feet today. Rain and snow tonight. Central

47/21

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 73-79 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 50-96 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 88-133 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . 123-152 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . 141-146 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 63 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . 170 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 34-96 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

. . . . . . 57-67 . . . . 140-184 . . . . . 89-116 . . . . . . . 181 . . . . . . 23-81 . . . no report . . . . . . 64-75

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 49/39

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Boise 58/28

S Winnipeg 64/38

• -4° San Francisco 62/49

Las Vegas 75/53

Salt Lake City 61/38

St. Paul 54/34

Phoenix 86/57

Kansas City 59/38 Oklahoma City 65/39 Dallas 69/43

Tijuana 77/54

Houston 72/49

Chihuahua 86/52

Anchorage 40/24

La Paz 88/58 Juneau 42/26

Mazatlan 88/63

S

S

S

Green Bay 47/28

Boston 64/48

To ronto 62/45 Detroit 51/33

Buffalo

60/35

Columbus 57/36

Louisville St. Louis Nashville 59/40 58/37 61/39 Charlotte 76/49 Little Rock Atlanta 67/43 69/44 Birmingham 66/41 New Orleans 73/52

FRONTS

Halifax 66/48 Portland 55/45

New York 80/54 Philadelphia 84/53 Washington, D. C. 85/57

Orlando 85/65 Miami 84/71

Monterrey 73/50

S S

Quebec 49/37

Des Moines 57/35 Chicago 46/31 Omaha 60/36

Denver 63/33 Albuquerque 65/40

Los Angeles 73/54 Honolulu 81/71

S

Thunder Bay 49/24

Bismarck 63/34

Cheyenne 53/32

Yellowstone N. P., Wyo.

S

Rapid City 63/34

Ashland, Va.

Newton, Iowa

S

Billings 67/34

Portland 50/38

• 93°

• 1.42”

S

Saskatoon 68/34

Calgary 56/26

Seattle 49/38

(in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .71/45/0.00 . . .67/41/s . . . 74/50/s Akron . . . . . . . . .77/67/0.00 . .60/34/sh . . 48/32/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .86/40/0.00 . . .70/49/t . . 55/32/sh Albuquerque. . . .56/33/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . . 73/43/s Anchorage . . . . .30/21/0.00 . . .40/24/s . . . 38/30/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . . .69/44/t . . . 66/43/s Atlantic City . . . .91/63/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . 59/42/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.01 . . .71/38/s . . . 75/44/s Baltimore . . . . . .90/61/0.00 . . .84/56/t . . 59/44/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .54/33/0.00 . 67/34/pc . . 57/34/pc Birmingham . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .66/41/t . . . 67/40/s Bismarck . . . . . . .61/22/0.00 . . .63/34/s . . . 57/31/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .55/30/0.00 . . .58/28/c . . 51/31/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .90/45/0.00 . 64/48/pc . . 57/43/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .81/46/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . 58/41/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .70/51/0.35 . .60/35/sh . . 44/33/sh Burlington, VT. . .79/53/0.11 . .64/46/sh . . 54/35/sh Caribou, ME . . . .49/41/0.17 . .49/38/sh . . 51/34/sh Charleston, SC . .81/64/0.00 . . .74/58/c . . 70/50/sh Charlotte. . . . . . .83/60/0.00 . . .76/49/t . . . 64/36/s Chattanooga. . . .80/62/0.00 . . .67/42/t . . 64/37/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .43/27/0.01 . . .53/32/s . . 60/33/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .49/43/0.11 . .46/31/sh . . . 55/37/s Cincinnati . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . .55/36/sh . . 55/36/pc Cleveland . . . . . .79/62/0.00 . .59/34/sh . . . 48/33/c Colorado Springs 47/28/0.02 . . .59/33/s . . . 68/36/s Columbia, MO . .70/55/0.48 . . .58/35/s . . . 67/44/s Columbia, SC . . .86/60/0.00 . . .81/51/t . . . 69/41/s Columbus, GA. . .86/54/0.00 . . .73/45/t . . . 71/43/s Columbus, OH. . .77/66/0.00 . .57/36/sh . . 51/33/pc Concord, NH . . . .87/39/0.00 . .65/45/sh . . 59/33/sh Corpus Christi. . .77/70/0.06 . . .75/51/s . . . 75/57/s Dallas Ft Worth. .74/58/0.00 . . .69/43/s . . . 74/50/s Dayton . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . .53/34/sh . . 52/34/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .48/30/0.04 . . .63/33/s . . . 67/38/s Des Moines. . . . .52/44/0.49 . . .57/35/s . . 66/43/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .71/57/0.35 . .51/33/sh . . . 50/36/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .45/31/0.00 . . .45/28/s . . . 57/33/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .65/45/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 81/50/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .34/25/0.00 . . .33/9/sn . . 36/12/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .51/30/0.00 . . .59/36/s . . 66/37/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .47/22/0.00 . . .58/24/s . . . 61/29/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .69/50/0.23 . .39/29/sn . . 47/32/pc Green Bay. . . . . .47/43/0.06 . . 47/28/rs . . . 54/36/s Greensboro. . . . .86/60/0.00 . . .79/52/t . . 64/38/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .88/56/0.00 . . .84/47/t . . 56/39/pc Hartford, CT . . . .93/48/0.00 . 85/49/pc . . 63/37/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .52/31/0.00 . . .59/28/c . . 49/26/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .79/70/0.00 . 81/71/pc . . . 81/71/s Houston . . . . . . .80/70/0.00 . . .72/49/s . . . 74/51/s Huntsville . . . . . .79/64/0.00 . . .62/37/t . . . 63/35/s Indianapolis . . . .72/65/0.01 . . .51/35/c . . 57/38/pc Jackson, MS . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .68/43/t . . . 71/43/s Madison, WI . . . .50/39/0.53 . 48/28/pc . . . 57/38/s Jacksonville. . . . .83/62/0.00 . 83/59/pc . . 75/46/sh Juneau. . . . . . . . .40/33/0.02 . .42/26/sh . . .43/28/rs Kansas City. . . . .60/46/0.08 . . .59/38/s . . . 69/47/s Lansing . . . . . . . .68/51/0.13 . .41/30/sh . . . 45/31/c Las Vegas . . . . . .67/50/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . . 81/54/s Lexington . . . . . .75/62/0.00 . .57/38/sh . . 54/34/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .55/39/0.23 . . .61/36/s . . . 69/42/s Little Rock. . . . . .73/64/0.14 . . .67/43/s . . . 71/46/s Los Angeles. . . . .77/52/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 65/52/s Louisville . . . . . . .77/69/0.00 . .59/40/sh . . 60/39/pc Memphis. . . . . . .73/68/0.00 . 63/44/pc . . . 68/47/s Miami . . . . . . . . .83/70/0.00 . . .84/71/s . . . 85/67/s Milwaukee . . . . .45/39/0.30 . . 43/31/rs . . . 52/38/s Minneapolis . . . .56/39/0.00 . . .54/34/s . . 65/41/pc Nashville . . . . . . .78/66/0.00 . . .61/39/t . . . 62/36/s New Orleans. . . .81/67/0.00 . . .73/52/t . . . 73/52/s New York . . . . . .92/56/0.00 . 80/54/pc . . 63/39/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .91/59/0.00 . 81/54/pc . . 64/38/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .90/66/0.00 . 82/58/pc . . 62/44/sh Oklahoma City . .63/45/0.00 . . .65/39/s . . . 72/48/s Omaha . . . . . . . .55/43/0.00 . . .60/36/s . . 71/42/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .83/58/0.00 . 85/65/pc . . . .77/55/t Palm Springs. . . .81/59/0.00 . . .89/56/s . . . 87/56/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.32 . 53/33/pc . . 62/40/pc Philadelphia . . . .89/62/0.00 . . .84/53/c . . 59/39/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .75/59/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . . 87/58/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .79/71/0.00 . .65/36/sh . . . 46/33/c Portland, ME. . . .84/40/0.02 . .55/45/sh . . 50/39/sh Providence . . . . .91/48/0.00 . 78/52/pc . . 61/41/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .87/61/0.00 . . .82/53/t . . 67/38/sh

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .54/26/0.00 . . .63/34/s . . 58/36/pc Savannah . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .79/56/c . . 70/48/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .69/37/s . . . 63/36/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .50/44/0.08 . . .49/38/r . . 49/35/sh Richmond . . . . . .92/68/0.00 . . .83/53/t . . 63/41/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .52/35/0.00 . 59/35/pc . . . 68/38/s Rochester, NY . . .73/54/0.05 . .62/37/sh . . 47/35/sh Spokane . . . . . . .49/32/0.00 . .48/29/sh . . 44/29/pc Sacramento. . . . .72/40/0.00 . . .69/46/s . . . 70/44/s Springfield, MO. .68/52/0.00 . . .58/37/s . . . 65/44/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .78/64/0.00 . 58/37/pc . . . 64/42/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .81/65/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . . .75/57/t Salt Lake City . . .48/27/0.00 . . .61/38/s . . 56/40/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .72/43/0.00 . . .85/51/s . . . 84/53/s San Antonio . . . .78/66/0.03 . . .74/44/s . . . 76/50/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.03 . . .64/42/s . . . 72/47/s San Diego . . . . . .79/52/0.00 . . .71/55/s . . . 66/55/s Washington, DC .88/63/0.00 . . .85/57/t . . 59/44/pc San Francisco . . .68/46/0.00 . . .62/49/s . . . 63/50/s Wichita . . . . . . . .51/39/0.00 . 63/39/pc . . . 72/47/s San Jose . . . . . . .71/42/0.00 . . .66/45/s . . . 67/47/s Yakima . . . . . . . .56/36/0.00 . .54/29/sh . . 51/30/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .55/20/0.00 . . .63/34/s . . . 67/32/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . . .87/56/s . . . 87/56/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .66/46/0.00 . 59/40/pc . . 53/36/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .62/50/0.00 . 65/47/pc . . 65/48/pc Auckland. . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . .66/53/sh . . 68/54/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .91/69/0.16 . . .83/57/s . . . 80/55/s Bangkok . . . . . . .99/84/0.00 101/82/pc . 100/82/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .68/34/0.00 . 69/50/pc . . 64/49/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . .70/57/sh . . 70/58/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . 63/44/pc . . 53/34/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .69/52/sh . . 69/53/sh Budapest. . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .62/39/s . . 65/41/pc Buenos Aires. . . .75/54/0.00 . . .72/50/s . . . 73/50/s Cabo San Lucas .88/64/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . . 88/59/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . 79/59/s Calgary . . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . .56/26/sh . . . 44/23/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .86/73/t . . . 83/71/c Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/36/0.00 . . .51/38/c . . 59/41/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .54/36/0.00 . . .49/32/c . . . 49/34/c Geneva . . . . . . . .59/37/0.04 . .63/44/sh . . 66/44/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .78/63/t . . . .81/64/t Hong Kong . . . . .75/66/0.06 . .74/66/sh . . . 81/67/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .55/48/0.64 . .56/41/sh . . . 59/40/s Jerusalem . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .70/46/s . . . 70/44/s Johannesburg . . .72/59/0.07 . . .77/58/t . . . .70/56/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . .80/69/sh . . 80/70/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . . 71/54/s London . . . . . . . .52/45/0.02 . 56/39/pc . . 58/42/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .63/46/0.00 . . .66/38/s . . . 68/39/s Manila. . . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . . .95/79/s . . . 94/78/s

Mecca . . . . . . . .100/77/0.00 100/76/pc . . 98/75/pc Mexico City. . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .77/56/t . . . .77/55/t Montreal. . . . . . .55/50/0.40 . .56/39/sh . . 49/34/sh Moscow . . . . . . .63/32/0.00 . 51/27/pc . . 49/26/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .79/60/t . . . .76/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .79/67/s . . 80/68/pc New Delhi. . . . .102/69/0.00 . .103/72/s . . 104/73/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .52/46/0.00 . . .61/43/s . . 65/49/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .45/36/0.03 . . 42/29/rs . . 40/22/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .57/48/0.70 . .56/38/sh . . 48/34/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .57/35/s . . 60/39/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .79/68/0.00 . .81/64/sh . . 80/65/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . .65/45/sh . . . 65/47/c Santiago . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . 86/57/pc . . . 90/57/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .76/62/sh . . 79/64/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .39/37/0.39 . . .39/26/s . . 44/30/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . . .58/37/s . . . 63/40/s Shanghai. . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . . 70/51/s Singapore . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .89/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .52/34/0.00 . . .52/33/c . . . 48/31/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . 79/64/pc . . . 77/64/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . .71/64/sh . . . 83/68/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .70/54/s . . . 70/55/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .57/41/s . . 63/46/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .63/46/0.02 . .62/45/sh . . . 46/34/c Vancouver. . . . . .48/43/0.04 . .49/39/sh . . 48/37/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .57/36/0.00 . . .63/41/s . . 66/46/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . . .58/36/s . . 56/35/pc


S

D

NBA Inside Blazers take care of business in L.A., beat Clippers, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

GOLF

An image from a Nike commercial with Tiger Woods.

Nike releases Tiger Woods commercial featuring late father NEW YORK — Nike aired a new TV commercial Wednesday featuring Tiger Woods and the voice of his late father, an edgy move that calls out his personal problems on the eve of his return to competitive golf. The ad aired on ESPN and the Golf Channel just one day before the Masters begins. In the stark, black-andwhite ad, a solemn Woods looks directly into the camera without speaking while a recording of his late father is heard, speaking about taking responsibility. “Did you learn anything?” Earl Woods says. Woods is returning to golf after a leave that followed revelations of infidelities and a stint in rehab. The ad marks the first TV ad for Woods, who had been the face of many companies, since his problems surfaced in late November. Nike Inc. is one of the few sponsors to stand by Woods during his troubles. Woods is the face of the company’s golf line and will be using its products when he plays in Augusta, Ga. today. “We support Tiger and his family. As he returns to competitive golf, the ad addresses his time away from the game using the powerful words of his father,” Nike said in a statement. — The Associated Press

PREP GIRLS GOLF

PREP SOFTBALL

Summit defeats Mountain View in match-play contest

Panthers stay perfect in CVC Bulletin staff report

Bulletin staff report They changed the format, but that did nothing to keep the Summit Storm from doing what they normally do — win. Summit, the reigning Class 5A girls golf state champion, won four of the six match-play contests Wednesday afternoon for a 4-2 team victory over Intermountain Conference rival Mountain View at Broken Top Club. The match-play format paired six golfers from each team in head-to-head competition. “I think all the girls enjoyed it,” said Summit coach Jerry Hackenbruck, who noted that a handicapping system was also used for the tournament. “(Match play) changes the game — you have to strategize quite a bit. So this was something new to them, and it was learning experience.” In the pairing of the teams’ top players, Summit’s Marlee Barton defeated Mountain View’s Kersey Wilcox by a score of 4 and 3. In the No. 2 pairing, the Storm’s Kristen Parr prevailed by the same score over the Cougars’ Hailey Ostrom. Other winners for the Storm were Madi Mansberger and Anna Schwab. Scoring victories for Mountain View were Vanessa Woolhiser and Ashley Moon. Summit is back in action Friday at the Redmond Invitational at Eagle Crest Resort. Mountain View is off until Monday, when the Cougars play in the Hermiston Invitational.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Marlee Barton watches a putt while playing the eighth hole of Broken Top Club in a match against Mountain View on Wednesday. Barton won her match.

SALEM — Redmond remained unbeaten in Central Valley Conference softball play Wednesday by overpowering North Salem in both ends of a road doubleheader. The Panthers (4-0 CVC, 9-2 overall) combined for 31 hits in the sweep, and junior Justine Callen was the complete-game winning pitcher in both games. Redmond won the first game 13-2 and completed the sweep with a 10-3 victory in the second game. Callen was especially sharp in the opener, striking out eight batters while allowing just three hits in a game halted after five innings via the 10-run rule. Aubrey Nitschelm cracked a two-run homer in the fifth inning for Redmond and joined Nicole Barber with three hits in a 15-hit Panther attack. Kathleen Heiberger, Ashlie Ostrander and Callen added two hits apiece in the first-game romp. Callen smacked a solo home run in the second game, part of a four-for-five performance. Another offensive star for the Panthers in the second game was Heiberger, who had a double and two triples in five turns at bat. Also in the second game for Redmond, Cheyenne Friend was three for three and Nitschelm was two for four. The Panthers return to Salem today for a CVC game against West Salem.

Ski resorts prepare for future with fewer baby boomers By Catherine Tsai The Associated Press

C YCLING Armstrong pulls out of race with illness ANGERS, France — Lance Armstrong pulled out of the second stage of Circuit de la Sarthe because of a stomach illness and Tiago Machado of Portugal won the time trial on Wednesday. The seven-time Tour de France champion was suffering from diarrhea, vomiting and a fever, Team RadioShack spokesman Philippe Maertens said by telephone. He plans to return to the U.S. when he’s feeling better. “It’s really bad, believe me,” Maertens said. Machado won in 8 minutes, 26 seconds on the 4.2-mile course. He finished ahead of race leader Luis Leon Sanchez of Caisse d’Epargne and Anthony Roux of France. Team RadioShack released a statement Wednesday saying Armstrong had come down with a “viral intestinal infection” after the first stage Tuesday. Overnight, Armstrong wrote on his Twitter page: “Sicker than a dog now. This sucks.” Armstrong was competing in the four-day race to prepare for the Tour de France in July. — The Associated Press

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Robert Campbell, of Oregon City, caught this winter steelhead, fresh from the ocean, while fishing the Sandy River last week. Spring steelheading for winter fish will continue for a couple more weeks.

Steelhead in spring Fishing the Sandy River yields some large holdovers from winter

“W

HUNTING & FISHING

e’re going to fish the Sandy for late winter steelhead. It’s dropping hard. With the rains we’ve had, there could be a good push of late fish. We’re fishing with an expert,” Robert Campbell told me the night before. “Are you ready for hairy whitewater?” “Never heard of him. Cool name, though.” Campbell’s expert was no less than Jason Hambly, from Lamiglas fishing rods. We set it up to meet

GARY LEWIS

at a parking lot in Sandy and run from Dodge Park to Oxbow in the morning. I had fished the Sandy River with Robert Campbell before, so I knew what to expect. That day, Campbell, manager of the Fisherman’s Marine store in Oregon City, carried three rods and a backpack with 30 pounds of gear. We hit the river before daylight and waded several runs in the dark to get first water. See Steelhead / D6

VAIL, Colo. — As a Brooklyn transplant, Denver businessman Sid Wilson did not start skiing until he was 43. He took up the sport at the urging of a Colorado co-worker. Now at 65, he won’t ski anymore. “The last thing you want to do when you’re in your 50s or 60s is break something,” Wilson said. Yet the ski and snowboard industry could use more people like him: While his friends are shifting to cross-country skiing or snowshoeing as they age, Wilson still goes to ski areas regularly to foster his newer love for snowboarding. “To be my age and be able to still participate in a new venue, there’s a great ‘cool factor.’ It’s really fun,” said Wilson, who has a season pass to Echo Mountain outside Denver. Resorts have planned for at least a decade for a fast and furious decline in visits from baby boomers who helped build the industry but who will likely cut back as aching knees, hips and backs set in. Older baby boomers, now 55 to 64, started dropping out more rapidly at 54, said Nate Fristoe of the research firm RRC Associates. And now younger boomers, ages 45-54, are approaching that birthday. “It’s pretty darn urgent. Now we’re on a roller coaster that we’re just at the crest of,” Fristoe said Wednesday at an industry conference sponsored by Avon-based Resort Technology Partners. See Ski / D5

GOLF

All questions at Masters aren’t about Tiger Lance Armstrong in the Circuit de la Sarthe Tuesday.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 Baseball .................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Hunting & Fishing .................... D6

The Masters

By Teddy Greenstein

What: First major tournament of the professional golf season Where: Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. When: Today-Sunday On TV: Today and Friday, 1 p.m., ESPN; Saturday, 12:30 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. on CBS

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

AUGUSTA, Ga. — What passed for a juicy storyline last year was whether Masters officials had sapped all the joy from Augusta National with the addition of trees, a second cut of rough and 400-plus yards. Turns out, they hadn’t. Chad Campbell, for one, played his first 16 holes in 9 under par. This year’s top storyline does not involve alleged Tiger Woods mistresses named Jaime and Jaimee or Rachel and Raychel. Not directly, anyway. But the major question heading into Thursday’s opening round is simple: How will Woods play? Will a layoff that spanned the

length of the college basketball season leave him as rusty as a 20-year-old wheelbarrow? Here are other key questions:

Is the Tiger mystique a thing of the past? Jack Nicklaus dismissed that possibility, saying, “(Players) see Tiger on the leaderboard, and they start worrying about Tiger.” But others say Woods’ marital issues prove he’s human. Plus he didn’t win a major last year, got cut from the British Open and blew a final-round lead in the PGA Championship to Y.E. Yang. See Masters / D5

David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

Tiger Woods walks past a leaderboard on the first hole during a practice round at the Masters Wednesday. The tournament begins today.


D2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics, FSNW.

GOLF 1 p.m. — The Masters, first round, ESPN.

HOCKEY 2 p.m. — NCAA tournament, semifinal, RIT vs. Wisconsin, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m. — NCAA tournament, semifinal, Boston College vs. Miami (Ohio), ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Cleveland Cavaliers at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets, TNT.

FRIDAY AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Bashas’ Supermarkets 200, final practice, ESPN2 (taped). 2 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Bashas’ Supermarkets 200, qualifying, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Bashas’ Supermarkets 200, ESPN2.

GOLF 1 p.m. — The Masters, second round, ESPN.

BASEBALL 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Los Angeles Clippers, KBNDAM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

FRIDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, UCLA at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND_AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

NHL ROUNDUP

Rangers keep playoff hopes alive, top Leafs The Associated Press NEW YORK — When the New York Rangers lost at Boston two Sundays ago, their playoff hopes were all but lost. The deficit was big, the games were few, and a road trip loomed. But the bumbling Rangers got hot. They routed the New York Islanders at home and raced to a 4-0-1 start on the sixgame trip that made believers again that a fifth straight trip to the playoffs was possible. A loss at Buffalo on Tuesday night dashed the spirits again. New York, however, shook that off one day later and began its final three-game push with a 5-1 victory over the lowly Toronto Maple Leafs on Wednesday night. All that is left on the Rangers’ schedule is a home-andhome series with Philadelphia — a team in front of them that can be caught. A pair of wins, with at least one in regulation, guarantees the Rangers a spot in the postseason. “It’s fun to be here,” said Henrik Lundqvist, who made 26 saves one night after being pulled from the game. “A couple of weeks ago I thought we were out, but we never gave up and we’re back in the race. The whole season comes down to the last two games.” Erik Christensen scored two of New York’s three first-period goals that essentially put the game away. The Rangers stormed out and seemed to take away the will of the Maple Leafs — the last-place team in the Eastern Conference. “If we can’t at least match or be more aggressive than they are, more desperate, there is something wrong,” Lundqvist said. “In the first period, we really showed what we’re fighting for here. I don’t think they were really ready for it.” Christensen gave New York the lead 21 seconds in, then combined with Vinny Prospal for goals 30 seconds apart. Although the Rangers wouldn’t have been eliminated with a loss, their prospects would have been all but dashed. “It’s good to come back after getting spanked,” said Christensen, who didn’t finish the game after getting his wind knocked out in the third period. “Everyone had a solid effort in a game we had to win.” Also on Wednesday: Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CHICAGO — Duncan Keith, Ben Eager, Bryan Bickell and Kris Versteeg scored in a 3:08 span in the first period in Chicago’s fifth straight victory. Andrew Ladd and Jordan Hendry also scored to help Chicago reach a franchise-record 109 points and tie San Jose for first place in the Western Conference. Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 EDMONTON, Alberta — Ryan Whitney scored at 3:50 of overtime to give Edmonton a victory over playoff-bound Colorado. Matt Hendricks tied it at 4 for Colorado with 7:02 left in regulation. Colorado clinched a playoff spot Tuesday. Red Wings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DETROIT — Tomas Holmstrom scored twice and Dan Cleary added a goal in a 1:16 span of the third period in Detroit’s comeback victory. Niklas Kronwall added a goal and an assist, and Jimmy Howard made 21 saves for Detroit. Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 GLENDALE, Ariz. — Shane Doan ended a 23-game goal drought, Wojtek Wolski scored his career-high 23rd goal and Phoenix Coyotes clinched the No. 4 seed in the Western Conference and home-ice advantage for the first round of the playoffs.

ON DECK Today Baseball: Mountain View at Bend, 4;30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Marist at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Redmond at West Salem, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Pendleton at Madras, 4:30 p.m.; Marist at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Bend, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Sisters at Madras, 4 p.m. Boys golf: Madras, La Pine, Sisters at Crook County (Meadow Lakes), 11 a.m. Track: Sisters at Elmira, 4 p.m.; La Pine at Marist, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Mountain View at Redmond, 5 p.m.; Bend at Harney, 5 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Girls golf: Summit, Madras at Redmond Invite at Eagle Crest, 1:30 p.m.; Bend at Pendleton Country Club, 1 p.m. Baseball: Redmond at McNary, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Delphian (DH), 2:15 p.m. Softball: McNary at Redmond, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Culver at Delphian (DH), 2:15 p.m. Boys tennis: West Salem at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Hermiston at Madras, 1 p.m. Girls tennis: Bend Invitational (first round): Summit vs. Churchill at Juniper, 8:30 a.m.; Bend vs. Wilsonville at Bend High, 8:30 a.m.; Sherwood vs. Mountain View at Mountain View, 8:30 a.m.; Madras vs. Hermiston at Summit, 8:30 a.m.; Corvallis vs. Klamath Union at Juniper, 11 a.m.; Redmond vs. McMinnville at Bend High, 11 a.m.; Crescent Valley vs. Crook County at Mountain View, 11 a.m.; Central Catholic vs. Sprague at Summit, 11 a.m. Boys golf: Sisters at Shadow Hills, noon. Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Harney, 5 p.m. Saturday Baseball: Bend at Mountain View (DH), 11 a.m.; Summit at Crook County (DH), 11 a.m.; Madras at Pendleton (DH), 1 p.m.; Sisters at Sweet Home (DH), noon; Burns at La Pine (DH), noon. Softball: Bend at Mountain View, DH, 11 a.m.; Summit at Crook County (DH), 11 a.m.; Madras at Pendleton (DH), 1 p.m.; Sweet Home at Sisters (DH), noon; Grant Union at Culver (DH), noon. Girls tennis: Summit, Mountain View, Redmond, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA. Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View, Sisters at Madras Tournament, TBA; Crook County at Treasure Valley Tournament, Ontario, TBA. Track: Summit at Sandy, 9 a.m.; Madras, Culver at Burns, noon. Gilchrist Dual in the Woods, noon. Boys lacrosse: Sprague at Mountain View, 1:30 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour THE MASTERS Tee Times All Times PDT Today-Friday First-Second Rounds At Augusta National Golf Club Augusta, Ga. a-amateur 4:50 a.m.-7:57 a.m. — Nathan Green, Heath Slocum, Louis Oosthuizen 5:01 a.m.-8:08 a.m. — Craig Stadler, John Merrick, Jerry Kelly 5:12 a.m.-8:19 a.m. — Ian Woosnam, Brian Gay, Marc Leishman 5:23 a.m.-8:30 a.m. — Bernhard Langer, Scott Verplank, a-Brad Benjamin 5:34 a.m.-8:41 a.m. — John Senden, David Toms, Graeme McDowell 5:45 a.m.-8:52 a.m. — Mark O’Meara, Rory Sabbatini, a-Nathan Smith 5:56 a.m.-9:14 a.m. — Martin Kaymer, Geoff Ogilvy, Luke Donald 6:07 a.m.-9:25 a.m. — Tom Watson, Tim Clark, Steve Marino 6:18 a.m.-9:36 a.m. — Bill Haas, Todd Hamilton, Anders Hansen 6:29 a.m.-9:47 a.m. — Dustin Johnson, Oliver Wilson, Alvaro Quiros 6:40 a.m.-9:58 a.m. — Mike Weir, Lee Westwood, a-Matteo Manassero 7:02 a.m.-10:09 a.m. — Chad Campbell, Francesco Molinari, Paul Casey 7:13 a.m.-10:20 a.m. — Ernie Els, Anthony Kim, Ryo Ishikawa 7:24 a.m.-10:31 a.m. — Angel Cabrera, Jim Furyk, aByeong-Hun An 7:35 a.m.-10:42 a.m. — Phil Mickelson, Robert Allenby, Y.E. Yang 7:46 a.m.-10:53 a.m. — Retief Goosen, Hunter Mahan, Robert Karlsson 7:57 a.m.-4:50 a.m. — Ben Crane, Simon Dyson, Michael Campbell 8:08 a.m.-5:01 a.m. — Larry Mize, Ryan Palmer, Chris Wood 8:19 a.m.-5:12 a.m. — Sandy Lyle, Justin Leonard, Kevin Na 8:30 a.m.-5:23 a.m. — Ben Crenshaw, Steve Flesch, aBen Martin 8:41 a.m.-5:34 a.m. — Ryan Moore, Ross Fisher, Nick Watney 8:52 a.m.-5:45 a.m. — Trevor Immelman, Soren Hansen, John Rollins 9:14 a.m.-5:56 a.m. — Vijay Singh, Jason Dufner, Sean

O’Hair 9:25 a.m.-6:07 a.m. — Thongchai Jaidee, Ben Curtis, Soren Kjeldsen 9:36 a.m.-6:18 a.m. — Camilo Villegas, Kenny Perry, Rory McIlroy 9:47 a.m.-6:29 a.m. — Zach Johsnon, Henrik Stenson, a-Chang-won Han 9:58 a.m.-6:40 a.m. — Fred Couples, Sergio Garcia, Shingo Katayama 10:09 a.m.-7:02 a.m. — Miguel Angel Jimenez, Edoardo Molinari, Lucas Glover 10:20 a.m.-7:13 a.m. — Charl Schwartzel, Stewart Cink, Padraig Harrington 10:31 a.m.-7:24 a.m. — Yuta Ikeda, Ian Poulter, Steve Stricker 10:42 a.m.-7:35 a.m. — Tiger Woods, Matt Kuchar, K.J. Choi 10:53 a.m.-7:46 a.m. — Adam Scott, David Duval, Ricky Barnes.

BASKETBALL College WOMEN USA Today/ESPN Women’s Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the final USA Today-ESPN Women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final record, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Connecticut (31) 39-0 775 1 2. Stanford 36-2 744 2 3. Oklahoma 27-11 678 12 4. Baylor 27-10 676 18 5. Xavier 30-4 652 5 6. Duke 30-6 591 6 7. Nebraska 32-2 550 4 8. Tennessee 32-3 538 3 9. Kentucky 28-8 537 15 9. Florida State 29-6 537 11 11. Notre Dame 29-6 500 7 12. Gonzaga 29-5 397 14 13. Iowa State 25-8 357 16 14. Texas A&M 26-8 336 9 15. Ohio State 31-5 306 8 16. West Virginia 29-6 287 10 17. Georgetown 26-7 218 13 18. St. John’s 25-7 215 17 19. Georgia 25-9 202 — 20. San Diego State 23-11 174 — 21. Mississippi State 21-13 170 — 22. Oklahoma State 24-11 121 19 23. UCLA 25-9 106 22 24. Vanderbilt 23-11 74 — 25. Texas 22-11 53 20 25. LSU 21-10 53 — Others receiving votes: Michigan State 52, WisconsinGreen Bay 46, Hartford 29, Virginia 29, Middle Tennessee 19, Arkansas-Little Rock 15, Dayton 11, California 7, Vermont 5, Princeton 4, Marist 3, DePaul 2, Gardner-Webb 2, Temple 2, Lehigh 1, Tulane 1.

TENNIS WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ———

GP W L OT Pts GF GA 79 46 26 7 99 211 186 79 45 27 7 97 244 228 80 40 34 6 86 231 220 80 37 33 10 84 217 213 79 34 35 10 78 213 244 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Buffalo 79 44 25 10 98 228 200 x-Ottawa 80 44 31 5 93 220 229 Montreal 80 39 32 9 87 212 214 Boston 79 36 30 13 85 195 194 Toronto 81 29 38 14 72 210 264 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA z-Washington 80 53 15 12 118 310 227 Atlanta 80 34 33 13 81 231 251 Carolina 80 34 36 10 78 223 250 Florida 79 31 36 12 74 201 235 Tampa Bay 79 31 36 12 74 206 253 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Chicago 80 51 22 7 109 264 204 x-Detroit 80 42 24 14 98 225 214 x-Nashville 81 46 29 6 98 223 224 St. Louis 80 39 32 9 87 218 218 Columbus 81 32 35 14 78 216 258 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Vancouver 80 48 27 5 101 263 215 x-Colorado 80 43 29 8 94 241 226 Calgary 80 40 31 9 89 200 201 Minnesota 80 37 36 7 81 214 241 Edmonton 80 26 46 8 60 208 274 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-San Jose 80 49 20 11 109 257 211 x-Phoenix 80 49 25 6 104 220 197 x-Los Angeles 79 45 27 7 97 234 211 Anaheim 79 38 31 10 86 226 240 Dallas 80 35 31 14 84 230 249 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Rangers 5, Toronto 1 Detroit 4, Columbus 3 Chicago 6, St. Louis 5 Edmonton 5, Colorado 4, OT Phoenix 5, Nashville 2 Today’s Games Buffalo at Boston, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4:30 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Pittsburgh, 4:30 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. New Jersey at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Anaheim at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Washington, 4 p.m. Detroit at Columbus, 4 p.m. Anaheim at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Chicago at Colorado, 6 p.m.

x-New Jersey x-Pittsburgh Philadelphia N.Y. Rangers N.Y. Islanders

ANDALUCIA TENNIS EXPERIENCE Wednesday Marbella, Spain Singles First Round Laura Pous Tio, Spain, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-1, 6-3. Beatriz Garcia Vidagany, Spain, def. Kristina Barrois, Germany, 7-5, 6-4. Flavia Pennetta (2), Italy, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-1. Kim Clijsters (3), Belgium, def. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, 6-4, 6-7 (1), 6-2. Second Round Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (5), Spain, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-0, 6-2. Tatjana Malek, Germany, def. Aravane Rezai (4), France, 6-4, 6-2. THE MPS GROUP CHAMPIONSHIPS Wednesday Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla. Singles Second Round Aleksandra Wozniak (6), Canada, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 2-6, 6-3, 6-2. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (5), Russia, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 6-2. Dominika Cibulkova (3), Slovakia, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-3, 6-1.

ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— GRAND PRIX HASSAN II Wednesday Casablanca, Morocco Singles Second Round Potito Starace, Italy, def. Oscar Hernandez, Spain, 6-2, 6-1. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (2), Spain, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Florent Serra (8), France, def. Stephane Robert, France, 2-6, 6-1, 6-3. Lukasz Kubot (4), Poland, def. Arnaud Clement, France, 6-4, 6-1. U.S. MEN’S CLAY COURT CHAMPIONSHIPS Wednesday Houston Singles Second Round Juan Ignacio Chela, Argentina, def. Eduardo Schwank (7), Argentina, 6-1, 6-7 (5), 6-1. Nicolas Massu, Chile, def. Ryan Sweeting, United States, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (3), 6-4.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

NHL SCORING LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Games GP G Henrik Sedin, Van 80 29 Alex Ovechkin, Was 70 48 Sidney Crosby, Pit 78 48 Nicklas Backstrom, Was 80 31 Brad Richards, Dal 78 24 Martin St. Louis, TB 79 27 Steven Stamkos, TB 79 47 Joe Thornton, SJ 77 19 Patrick Kane, Chi 79 30 Marian Gaborik, NYR 73 41 Patrick Marleau, SJ 80 43 Ilya Kovalchuk, ATL-NJD 73 40 Alexander Semin, Was 71 39 Dany Heatley, SJ 80 39 Daniel Sedin, Van 61 26

A PTS 78 107 58 106 52 100 67 98 67 91 63 90 42 89 68 87 55 85 42 83 38 81 41 81 41 80 41 80 54 80

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF New York 2 0 0 6 2 Kansas City 1 0 0 3 4 Columbus 1 0 0 3 2 New England 1 1 0 3 2 Chicago 0 1 1 1 2 Toronto FC 0 1 0 0 0 Philadelphia 0 1 0 0 0 D.C. 0 2 0 0 0 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 2 0 0 6 3 Houston 1 0 1 4 3 Colorado 1 0 1 4 3 Real Salt Lake 1 1 0 3 4 Seattle 1 1 0 3 2 FC Dallas 0 0 1 1 1 San Jose 0 1 0 0 0 Chivas USA 0 2 0 0 0 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie.

GA 0 0 0 1 3 2 2 6 GA 0 2 2 2 1 1 3 3

——— Saturday, April 10 New York at Chivas USA, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 3 p.m. Toronto FC at New England, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Columbus at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.

BASEBALL 2010 Baseball Franchise Values All dollar figures in millions, change is percentage increase from 2009, revenue is after adjustments for revenue sharing Current 1-year Rk. Team Value Change Revenue 1. New York Yankees $1,600 7 $441 2. Boston Red Sox $870 4 $266 3. New York Mets $858 -6 $268 4. Los Angeles Dodgers $727 1 $247 5. Chicago Cubs $726 4 $246 6. Philadelphia Phillies $537 8 $233 7. Los Angeles Angels $521 2 $217 8. St Louis Cardinals $488 0 $195 9. San Francisco Giants $483 3 $201 10. Chicago White Sox $466 3 $194 11. Houston Astros $453 2 $189 12. Texas Rangers $451 11 $180 13. Atlanta Braves $450 1 $188 14. Seattle Mariners $439 3 $191 15. San Diego Padres $408 2 $157 16. Minnesota Twins $405 14 $162 17. Cleveland Indians $391 -2 $170 18. Washington Nationals $387 -5 $184 19. Colorado Rockies $384 3 $183 20. Arizona Diamondbacks $379 -3 $172 21. Baltimore Orioles $376 -6 $171 22. Detroit Tigers $375 1 $188 23. Milwaukee Brewers $351 1 $171 24. Kansas City Royals $341 9 $155 25. Cincinnati Reds $331 -3 $166 26. Toronto Blue Jays $326 -8 $163 27. Florida Marlins $317 15 $144 28. Tampa Bay Rays $316 -1 $156 29. Oakland Athletics $295 -8 $155 30. Pittsburgh Pirates $289 0 $145 League Average $491 2 $197

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALITMORE ORIOLES—Announced that INF Robert Andino cleared waivers and was sent outright Norfolk (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Announced RHP Anthony Lerew cleared waivers and was outrighted to Omaha (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Claimed OF Chad Huffman off waivers from San Diego and assigned him to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). National League PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Claimed RHP Nelson Figueroa off waivers from New York (NL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER—Assigned F D.J. White to Tulsa of the NBA Development League. FOOTBALL National Football League BUFFALO BILLS—Signed RB Walter Mendenhall. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Re-signed C Kyle Cook. DALLAS COWBOYS—Signed LB Pat McQuistan to a tender offer. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Agreed to terms with DE Alex Brown on a two-year contract. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed LB Na’il Diggs. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Recalled D Brendan Mikkelson from Toronto (AHL). Assigned G Joey MacDonald to Toronto. ATLANTA THRASHERS—Reassigned D Chris Chelios and RW Tim Stapleton to Chicago (AHL). CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled LW Bryan Bickell from Rockford (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Assigned D Karl Alzner and F Jay Beagle to Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE CINCINNATI—Announced freshman G Lance Stephenson will enter the NBA draft. DAYTON—Announced junior F Chris Wright will enter the NBA draft. KANSAS—Announced freshman G Xavier Henry will enter the NBA draft. OHIO STATE—Announced junior G Evan Turner will enter the NBA draft. ROCHESTER—Announced the retirement of men’s basketball coach Mike Neer, effective at the end of the academic year. SAN JOSE STATE—Named Tim Landis offensive coordinator and John DeFilippo quarterbacks coach. ST. FRANCIS, N.Y.—Announced the resignation of men’s basketball coach Brian Nash. UTAH—Announced freshman G guard Marshall Henderson is leaving the men’s basketball team. VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH—Dismissed sophomore F Terrance Saintil from the men’s basketball team. WAKE FOREST—Fired men’s basketball coach Dino Gaudio. XAVIER—Announced sophomore G Jordan Crawford is entering the NBA draft.

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Butler could do it again — if everyone comes back By Michael Marot The Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Butler wants the sequel to be better than the original. All it needs is the same cast and a new ending. Less than 15 hours after losing Monday night’s NCAA title game, the Bulldogs were back in Hinkle Fieldhouse and already pondering another made-for-TV script next season — if they can keep Gordon Hayward and coach Brad Stevens. “We’ve got to have the same mindset,” Matt Howard said. “You can’t let things get to your head. You can’t not work anymore. You’ve just got to keep doing the things that you have been. Our system works well. That’s been proven over the last couple games.” Or the entire remarkable season. From Christmas to Easter, Butler (33-5) didn’t lose a game. It was America’s only league champ to finish with a perfect conference record and had a 25-game winning streak. The Bulldogs took down Syracuse, Kansas State and Michigan State and came within a bounce of taking out Duke in the closest title game in two decades. Most people never gave the undersized guys from the 4,200-student school a chance. Many didn’t even know Butler was located 5.6 miles from the Final Four venue until they actually made it to Lucas Oil Stadium. Things will never be the same in this oldschool program, and people are already asking the obvious question: Can Butler do it again? “You could have great teams and never do this again,” Stevens said. “It’s as much about taking advantage of opportunities in 40-minute games as anything else. You know, there’s going to be a lot of 25- and 30-win teams that never play for a national championship.” But the Bulldogs have one advantage the big boys don’t — continuity. If Hayward returns, the Bulldogs will have four of their starting five back. And with only a couple of BCS jobs open, the Bulldogs just

Amy Sancetta / The Associated Press

Butler’s hopes of duplicating this season’s NCAA tourney run next season may hinge on the return of Gordon Hayward. might keep their 33-year-old coach, too. Hayward, this season’s Horizon League player of the year, has been moving rapidly up NBA draft boards. Some projections have him going in the first 15 picks, a major accomplishment for a school that has never produced an NBA player. With millions of dollars at stake, the 6-foot9 forward with the point guard skills doesn’t have to look any further than West Lafayette to understand the risk of returning. Purdue forward Robbie Hummel tore his ACL in February and missed the rest of the season, an injury that

may have kept the Boilermakers out of the Final Four. Hummel will spend months recuperating, hoping he can be his old self sometime next season. Hayward also genuinely enjoys being around these teammates and his twin sister, Heather, who plays tennis for the Bulldogs. He also has some unfinished business. A return could put Hayward in the discussion for national player of the year, make him a top-five pick and, perhaps, end with a national title. It’s a lot to ponder. “I haven’t thought about it yet, I still haven’t talked to my dad,” Hayward said. “I don’t know even what the time table will be.” Stevens’ decision will be watched just as closely. Oregon is expected to throw a multimillion dollar offer at him soon, the Clemson job opened Tuesday when Oliver Purnell left for DePaul, and Wake Forest began looking for a new coach after parting with Dino Gaudio on Wednesday. All of those jobs would presumably pay Stevens more than the $750,000 total package he had with the Bulldogs this season. If Hayward and Stevens both return, the Bulldogs would only lose two key contributors off this year’s squad: starting forward Willie Veasley and backup center Avery Jukes. They will get bigger with two new power forwards, 6-9 Erik Fromm and 6-7 Khyle Marshall, who is rated among the top 25 at his position by Rivals.com. Butler will be more athletic with the addition of 6-1 guard Chrishawn Hopkins, too. That means the Bulldogs will be deeper and more experienced, and that combination could be enough for the Bulldogs to make it back to the Final Four and maybe even the championship game — if Hayward and Stevens return and they stay true to their principles. “We’re going to have to be ready every single night,” Howard said. “You’re going to have a target on your back, especially if we return all four of the guys that could be coming back.”


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

S  B

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

Basketball • Officials blew call in Thunder-Jazz game: The NBA announced Wednesday officials missed a foul in the final seconds of Utah’s overtime victory over Oklahoma City the previous night. “On the final play of last night’s Oklahoma City-Utah game, the officials missed a foul committed by the Jazz’s C.J. Miles on the Thunder’s Kevin Durant during a three-point shot attempt,” NBA president of league and basketball operations Joel Litvin said in a statement. Deron Williams’ jumper with 1.1 seconds left in overtime gave Utah a 140-139 lead and Miles clinched the win with a block on Durant’s shot at the buzzer. • Raptors’ Bosh has surgery: Toronto AllStar forward Chris Bosh had surgery to repair a facial fracture suffered during a freakish oncourt accident. The Raptors said Bosh had a displaced nasal fracture repaired during an operation performed Wednesday. Bosh will remain in the hospital overnight, and it’s unknown when he will return to Canada or whether he will play again this season. The Raptors have a one-game lead over Chicago for the final spot in the Eastern Conference playoffs with five games left. Bosh is averaging 24.3 points and 11 rebounds per game. • Paul out for season: New Orleans Hornets star Chris Paul will miss the remainder of the season because of a ligament tear in the middle finger of his right hand. Paul has been struggling with the injury for several games, but appeared to aggravate it further in practice on Tuesday. Team officials say no surgery is required. • Five Wildcats heading to NBA: Freshman All-Americans John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins are among five Kentucky players who have declared for the NBA draft. Junior forward Patrick Patterson, freshman guard Eric Bledsoe and freshman center Daniel Orton are also entering the draft. Wall and Cousin are expected to be among the first few players selected. The five player comprised the core of a team that went 35-3 this season and won the Southeastern Conference regular season and conference tournament titles before falling to West Virginia in the regional finals of the NCAA Tournament. Also declaring for the draft on Wednesday were Ohio State’s Evan Turner, the national player of the year, and Kansas’ Xavier Henry. • Nuggets’ Karl completes chemo: Denver Nuggets coach George Karl has finished up his last round of chemotherapy and issued a thank-you to all his well-wishers. In a statement to the team’s Web site on Wednesday, Karl said his intense six-week regimen of treatment for throat and neck cancer were the “toughest of my life.” Karl hasn’t been on the sideline since a March 16 win over Washington. Assistant Adrian Dantley has coached the Nuggets in his absence. There’s no timetable for Karl’s return, although the team expects Dantley to continue leading the team in the playoffs.

Baseball • Ortiz still in lineup after losing cool: David Ortiz remained in the Red Sox lineup Wednesday night after losing his cool just two hitless games into the season. The designated hitter has started the season zero for seven, leaving three runners in scoring position. After Boston lost 6-4 Tuesday night, Ortiz initially declined to talk with reporters. He then reacted to a question about his poor start. “What’s up with that, man?” he said. In an expletive-filled tirade, the slugger said there were still 160 games left. • Yankees worth $1.6 billion: The New York Yankees are worth nearly twice as much as any other team in baseball, according to the annual estimates by Forbes magazine. The Yankees were valued at $1.6 billion, Forbes said Wednesday, up 7 percent from a $1.5 billion value last year. Boston was next, going up 4 percent to $870 million and was followed by the New York Mets, who dropped 6 percent to $858 million.

Cycling • Italian takes stage: Lampre rider Franceso Gavazzi won the third stage of the Tour of Basque Country in Spain in a sprint finish with overall leader Oscar Freire. Freire, riding for Rabobank, overtook Alejandro Valverde in the overall standings at 14 hours, 41 minutes, 30 seconds, two seconds ahead of the Caisse D’Epargne rider.

Football Roethlisberger investigation goes to DA: Authorities in Georgia have finished their investigation into a 20-year-old college student’s claim that Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger sexually assaulted her at a nightclub, police said Wednesday. Milledgeville police Chief Woodrow Blue said in a statement that his department and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation handed the investigation report and witness statements to local District Attorney Fred Bright Tuesday.

Tennis • Navratilova has breast cancer: Tennis great Martina Navratilova has been diagnosed with a noninvasive form of breast cancer and her prognosis is considered excellent. Navratilova said in a phone interview Wednesday that a routine mammogram in January found a lump, and a biopsy the following month determined it was ductal carcinoma in situ, or DCIS. The nine-time Wimbledon women’s singles champion will start six weeks of radiation therapy next month.

Winter sports • New U.S. women’s alpine coach: U.S. speed coach Alex Hoedlmoser has been hired to take over the American women’s alpine program after Jim Tracy stepped down last week. Hoedlmoser is a former World Cup racer for Austria who has been on the U.S. coaching staff since 1998. — From wire reports

Chris Pizzello / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ Jerryd Bayless, left, dribbles past Los Angeles Clippers’ Steve Blake during the first half of Wednesday’s game in Los Angeles.

Blazers move up in West with win The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Even after the Portland Trail Blazers moved up two spots in the Western Conference playoff picture with a single victory, LaMarcus Aldridge and Brandon Roy claimed they don’t care who they’ll face in the first round of the playoffs. After all, the way they’re finishing the regular season, it’s clear the Blazers could be big trouble for anybody. Aldridge had 27 points and 12 rebounds, Roy added 23 points and the Blazers ascended to sixth place in the playoff standings with a 93-85 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Wednesday night. Andre Miller scored 13 points for the Blazers, who began the night in eighth place before their 11th win in 13 games. After holding off the Clippers’ late rally, Portland improved to 48-30, pulling even with Oklahoma City and San Antonio, which both lost. “We feel like if we finish out strong, we could easily go to sixth,” Aldridge said. “But it doesn’t really matter. Every series is going to be hard, but you have to finish strong for your own sake, not for who you play.” The Blazers already know they’re headed back to the playoffs for the second straight season after a fiveyear absence, but Roy doesn’t think his teammates are looking ahead. “All we’ll do is keep playing, and when the official standings come out, we’ll figure out what we have to do,” Roy said. “You can’t be worried about where you match up or who you want to play.” Aldridge missed practice Tuesday with a sinus infection, but played with a clear head against the Clippers, scoring from everywhere on the court against a succession of defenders. Roy missed Portland’s last two workouts with a sore back, but he kept the Blazers rolling early before scoring just two fourth-quarter points. With five games in eight days to close the regular season, Portland let the easiest matchup get far too interesting. The Blazers managed just 16 points and didn’t shoot a free throw in the fourth quarter, but Juwan Howard and Miller had big baskets in the final 90 seconds of their 16th win in 20 games. Although just three games separate second place from eighth in the West playoff standings, Portland coach Nate McMillan said he isn’t rushing off the court every night to check the standings. He’s well aware of the Blazers’ need for a strong finish to avoid facing the Lakers in the first round, although the defending champions aren’t playing nearly as well as the four teams below them in the standings. Marcus Camby had two points and nine rebounds for the Blazers before straining his right hamstring in the second half of the former Clippers shot-blocker’s first game back in Los Angeles. Camby said he only sat out as a precaution, and he plans to practice today. Portland scored 10 straight points midway through the third quarter to take a 71-54 lead, and led 81-60 early in the fourth quarter. Led by Butler and Blake, Los Angeles made runs of 13-2 and 8-2 to get within 89-81 before Portland put the game away. Also on Wednesday: Warriors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 MINNEAPOLIS — Don Nelson set the NBA career record for victories by a coach in Golden State’s win over Minnesota. Nelson won his 1,333rd career game, surpassing Lenny Wilkens to move atop the list. Stephen Curry had 27 points, 14 assists, eight rebounds and a career-high seven steals, and Anthony Tolliver scored a career-high 34 for the Warriors, who

mobbed their 69-year-old coach as the game came to a close. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Spurs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 PHOENIX — Amare Stoudemire scored 29 points and Phoenix dominated San Antonio most of the night in a victory that snapped the Spurs’ four-game winning streak and kept the Suns tied for second in the Western Conference with four games to play. Bobcats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 NEW ORLEANS — Charlotte clinched its first playoff berth since its founding six years ago, as Stephen Jackson scored 29 points and D.J. Augustin hit a crucial three-pointer with 16 seconds left in a victory over New Orleans. Celtics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 TORONTO — Rajon Rondo scored 21 points, Paul Pierce had 20 and Boston capitalized on another injury to a Toronto player. Toronto, which already was missing All-Star Chris Bosh with an injury, saw Hedo Turkoglu leave late in the first quarter after bumping heads with Boston’s Tony Allen. Turkoglu sustained a nasal contusion and was taken to hospital for a CT scan. Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 OKLAHOMA CITY — Chauncey Billups scored 31 points and Carmelo Anthony added 24 as Denver charged back from a 13-point deficit in the fourth quarter to beat Oklahoma City. The Nuggets held Oklahoma City without a basket for the final 9 minutes while finishing the game on a 22-5 run to pick up a crucial road win in their chase for the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference playoffs. Kevin Durant scored 33 points for the Thunder. Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Wizards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 17 points and 10 rebounds, and Orlando beat Washington. J.J. Redick and Mickael Pietrus added 16 points apiece for Orlando. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 DALLAS — Caron Butler scored 23 points, Dirk Nowitzki added 22 points and nine rebounds, and Dallas stopped a two-game skid with a victory over Memphis. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 HOUSTON — Aaron Brooks and Kevin Martin scored 28 points apiece, and Rick Adelman became the 11th coach to reach 900 career victories in Houston’s win over Utah. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 MILWAUKEE — John Salmons scored 22 points on 10-of-13 shooting and Milwaukee beat New Jersey after clinching a playoff berth a day earlier. Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored eight of his 22 points in the final four minutes, Dorell Wright added 19 off the bench and surging Miami rallied past Philadelphia for its ninth straight win. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 AUBURN HILLS, Mich. — Ben Gordon scored 22 points and made two key defensive plays in the final minute, leading injury-riddled Detroit over Atlanta. Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .113 Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 INDIANAPOLIS — Danny Granger scored 33 points to help Indiana beat New York for its 10th win in the last 11 home games.

Wednesday’s Games ——— PORTLAND (93) Batum 5-8 0-1 11, Aldridge 12-26 3-4 27, Camby 1-5 0-0 2, Miller 5-9 3-4 13, Roy 10-17 2-3 23, Fernandez 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 5-8 0-0 10, Bayless 1-3 1-1 3, Webster 2-4 0-0 4, Pendergraph 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-81 9-13 93. L.A. CLIPPERS (85) Butler 6-11 0-0 14, Gooden 5-11 0-0 10, Kaman 7-14 0-2 14, Davis 5-14 1-2 11, Gordon 4-9 0-0 9, Jordan 4-6 0-0 8, Blake 6-10 0-0 14, Collins 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 1-1 3-4 5, Novak 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-77 4-8 85. Portland 27 23 27 16 — 93 L.A. Clippers 18 28 14 25 — 85 3-Point Goals—Portland 2-7 (Roy 1-3, Batum 1-3, Fernandez 0-1), L.A. Clippers 5-15 (Blake 2-5, Butler 2-5, Gordon 1-1, Davis 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 45 (Aldridge 12), L.A. Clippers 42 (Jordan 11). Assists—Portland 23 (Roy 6), L.A. Clippers 24 (Davis 8). Total Fouls—Portland 17, L.A. Clippers 11. Technicals—L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—16,790 (19,060). ——— GOLDEN STATE (116) Maggette 4-10 0-0 8, Tolliver 14-22 5-7 34, Turiaf 1-2 0-0 2, Curry 12-22 0-0 27, Williams 47 3-3 12, Morrow 1-7 8-8 11, Hunter 7-8 0-0 14, George 3-4 0-0 8. Totals 46-82 16-18 116. MINNESOTA (107) Gomes 6-13 3-3 19, Love 6-9 5-6 17, Milicic 8-17 0-2 16, Flynn 7-14 2-2 19, Brewer 6-12 3-5 17, Wilkins 2-5 3-4 7, Hollins 0-2 0-0 0, Sessions 3-6 3-5 9, Pavlovic 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 39-81 19-27 107. Golden State 31 37 31 17 — 116 Minnesota 28 29 21 29 — 107 3-Point Goals—Golden State 8-16 (Curry 35, George 2-2, Williams 1-1, Tolliver 1-4, Morrow 1-4), Minnesota 10-20 (Gomes 4-6, Flynn 3-7, Brewer 2-4, Pavlovic 1-1, Love 0-1, Wilkins 0-1). Fouled Out—Brewer. Rebounds—Golden State 45 (Tolliver, Curry 8), Minnesota 43 (Love 18). Assists—Golden State 33 (Curry 14), Minnesota 25 (Flynn 8). Total Fouls—Golden State 23, Minnesota 15. A—15,863 (19,356). ——— PHILADELPHIA (95) Kapono 6-13 0-0 13, Brand 2-9 2-2 6, Dalembert 8-9 3-5 19, Holiday 3-4 0-1 6, Iguodala 5-12 4-7 16, Williams 5-9 0-1 12, Green 3-6 2-2 10, Speights 2-5 0-0 4, Smith 1-3 0-0 2, Meeks 3-5 0-0 7. Totals 38-75 11-18 95. MIAMI (99) Richardson 4-7 0-0 9, Beasley 2-9 0-0 4, O’Neal 2-10 0-0 4, Arroyo 5-9 5-5 15, Wade 818 6-11 22, Haslem 3-8 5-6 11, Anthony 1-1 1-1 3, Chalmers 4-12 3-4 12, Wright 7-12 1-3 19. Totals 36-86 21-30 99. Philadelphia 25 22 30 18 — 95 Miami 27 26 24 22 — 99 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 8-18 (Williams 2-2, Iguodala 2-3, Green 2-4, Meeks 1-3, Kapono 1-5, Holiday 0-1), Miami 6-19 (Wright 4-6, Richardson 1-3, Chalmers 1-6, Arroyo 0-1, Wade 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 51 (Dalembert 16), Miami 52 (Haslem 11). Assists—Philadelphia 21 (Iguodala, Holiday 6), Miami 16 (Chalmers 5). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 26, Miami 16. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second, Miami defensive three second. A—18,221 (19,600). ——— ATLANTA (88) Williams 7-13 3-6 17, Jos.Smith 6-10 1-5 13, Horford 6-13 2-2 14, Bibby 6-14 0-0 14, Evans 3-9 2-3 8, Crawford 8-20 3-3 19, Pachulia 0-1 3-4 3, J. Smith 0-3 0-0 0, Teague 0-0 0-0 0, West 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-83 14-23 88. DETROIT (90) Daye 6-12 0-0 13, Jerebko 3-8 3-3 9, Wallace 2-2 4-4 8, Bynum 7-15 3-3 17, Stuckey 0-2 0-0 0, Gordon 7-17 5-5 22, Villanueva 4-8 1-1 10, Summers 1-5 0-0 2, Brown 3-7 0-0 6, Atkins 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 34-79 16-16 90. Atlanta 20 28 24 16 — 88 Detroit 25 23 17 25 — 90 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 2-17 (Bibby 2-7, Williams 0-1, Evans 0-2, Crawford 0-7), Detroit 6-14 (Gordon 3-7, Daye 1-2, Atkins 1-2, Villanueva 1-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 57 (Horford 12), Detroit 44 (Daye 10). Assists—Atlanta 21 (Horford 6), Detroit 19 (Gordon 7). Total Fouls—Atlanta 17, Detroit 16. A—22,076 (22,076). ——— WASHINGTON (94) Miller 6-9 2-2 16, Blatche 5-19 3-4 13, Oberto 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 3-6 1-1 7, Young 9-15 2-3 21, McGee 4-5 2-2 10, Singleton 2-5 2-2 6, Boykins 4-5 0-0 8, Thornton 0-4 0-0 0, Martin 4-6 0-0 9, Jackson 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 3978 12-14 94. ORLANDO (121) Barnes 4-6 3-4 11, Lewis 3-7 3-4 10, D.Howard 7-10 3-4 17, Nelson 3-9 0-0 8, Carter 2-7 6-6 10, Redick 5-10 4-4 16, Williams 3-4 0-0 8, Pietrus 6-9 0-0 16, Gortat 3-4 0-0 6, Anderson 4-6 1-2 11, Bass 2-2 0-0 4, Johnson 2-2 0-0 4. Totals 44-76 20-24 121. Washington 25 19 21 29 — 94 Orlando 24 26 34 37 — 121 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-10 (Miller 23, Martin 1-2, Young 1-3, Blatche 0-1, Boykins 0-1), Orlando 13-22 (Pietrus 4-5, Williams 2-2, Nelson 2-3, Redick 2-3, Anderson 2-3, Lewis 1-3, Barnes 0-1, Carter 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 32 (Miller 9), Orlando 45 (D.Howard 10). Assists—Washington 18 (Miller 5), Orlando 24 (Nelson 6). Total Fouls—Washington 24, Orlando 17. A—17,461 (17,461). ——— BOSTON (115) Pierce 5-11 9-11 20, Garnett 7-12 5-6 19, Perkins 2-2 3-3 7, Rondo 8-11 4-5 21, R.Allen 7-15 3-3 18, Wallace 2-5 1-2 5, Davis 1-3 2-2 4, T.Allen 3-5 1-1 7, Finley 5-7 0-0 14, Daniels 0-0 0-0 0, Williams 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-71 28-33 115. TORONTO (104) Turkoglu 1-1 0-0 2, Evans 1-6 0-0 2, Bargnani 8-22 0-0 17, Calderon 2-6 0-0 4, Weems 8-13 5-5 21, Johnson 1-2 2-2 4, Wright 6-11 3-3 17, Jack 6-14 2-2 17, Nesterovic 3-6 0-0 6, DeRozan 7-9 0-0 14, Belinelli 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-90 12-12 104. Boston 30 22 30 33 — 115 Toronto 25 29 22 28 — 104 3-Point Goals—Boston 7-17 (Finley 4-5, Rondo 1-1, Pierce 1-3, R.Allen 1-4, Davis 0-1, T.Allen 0-1, Wallace 0-2), Toronto 6-17 (Jack 3-5, Wright 2-4, Bargnani 1-7, Calderon 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 45 (Perkins 9), Toronto 38 (Wright 7). Assists—Boston 22 (Rondo 7), Toronto 24 (Calderon 9). Total Fouls—Boston 17, Toronto 27. A—18,793 (19,800). ——— NEW YORK (105) Gallinari 6-10 4-4 17, Lee 7-16 2-3 16, Barron 6-13 3-4 15, Duhon 3-6 2-2 10, McGrady 2-12 0-0 4, Douglas 7-14 2-2 20, Walker 5-10 2-2 15, Rodriguez 4-8 0-0 8. Totals 40-89 15-17 105. INDIANA (113) Granger 11-27 6-8 33, Murphy 4-12 8-8 17, Hibbert 6-8 3-6 15, Watson 3-7 0-2 6, Rush 3-4 0-1 6, Dunleavy 6-14 0-1 13, McRoberts 2-3 0-0 4, D.Jones 4-8 0-0 8, Price 4-5 0-0 11. Totals 43-88 17-26 113. New York 25 34 31 15 — 105 Indiana 38 34 20 21 — 113 3-Point Goals—New York 10-25 (Douglas 4-10, Walker 3-5, Duhon 2-2, Gallinari 1-1, Rodriguez 0-2, McGrady 0-5), Indiana 10-28 (Granger 5-11, Price 3-3, Murphy 1-5, Dunleavy 1-7, Watson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 50 (Lee 16), Indiana 55 (Murphy 12). Assists—New York 22 (McGrady 6), Indiana 23 (Watson 6). Total Fouls—New York 20, Indiana 16. Technicals—New York defensive three second 2. A—15,330 (18,165). ——— MEMPHIS (84) Gay 9-16 4-6 23, Randolph 6-14 5-8 17, Thabeet 4-4 1-2 9, Conley 7-18 3-4 17, Mayo 5-8 0-0 11, Haddadi 0-0 0-0 0, Young 0-3 0-0 0, Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Arthur 1-2 3-4 5, D.Carroll 1-3 0-0 2, Tinsley 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-71 1624 84. DALLAS (110) Butler 10-17 3-4 23, Nowitzki 9-14 3-3 22, Dampier 1-1 0-0 2, Kidd 4-9 0-0 12, Stevenson 0-4 2-2 2, Terry 6-13 2-2 16, Najera 2-4 0-0 4, Haywood 4-5 3-4 11, Barea 4-6 5-6 14, Beaubois 1-1 0-0 2, M.Carroll 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 42-76 18-21 110. Memphis 20 25 21 18 — 84 Dallas 33 24 21 32 — 110 3-Point Goals—Memphis 2-10 (Gay 1-2, Mayo 1-2, Williams 0-1, Randolph 0-1, Conley 04), Dallas 8-14 (Kidd 4-5, Terry 2-5, Nowitzki 11, Barea 1-2, Butler 0-1). Fouled Out—Randolph. Rebounds—Memphis 41 (Randolph 13), Dallas 42 (Nowitzki 9). Assists—Memphis 12 (Conley 7), Dallas 28 (Kidd 10). Total Fouls—Memphis 22, Dallas 21. A—20,105 (19,200). ——— DENVER (98) Anthony 7-21 10-11 24, Nene 2-6 3-4 7,

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division y-Boston Toronto New York Philadelphia New Jersey

W 49 38 28 26 11

L 29 40 50 52 67

y-Orlando x-Atlanta x-Miami x-Charlotte Washington

W 55 49 44 42 24

L 23 29 34 36 54

z-Cleveland x-Milwaukee Chicago Indiana Detroit

W 61 44 37 30 25

L 17 34 40 48 53

Pct .628 .487 .359 .333 .141

GB — 11 21 23 38

L10 5-5 4-6 4-6 2-8 4-6

Str W-1 L-3 L-1 L-5 L-2

Home 24-15 24-15 17-22 12-27 7-32

Away 25-14 14-25 11-28 14-25 4-35

Conf 32-16 27-21 19-29 14-35 7-41

Away 23-16 17-22 21-18 12-27 10-29

Conf 35-13 28-20 29-19 25-24 16-32

Away 26-13 16-23 15-23 8-31 8-30

Conf 38-10 29-19 24-23 21-27 17-32

Southeast Division Pct .705 .628 .564 .538 .308

GB — 6 11 13 31

L10 8-2 5-5 9-1 7-3 3-7

Str W-2 L-2 W-9 W-2 L-1

Home 32-7 32-7 23-16 30-9 14-25

Central Division Pct .782 .564 .481 .385 .321

GB — 17 23½ 31 36

L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 8-2 2-8

Str W-1 W-3 L-1 W-2 W-2

Home 35-4 28-11 22-17 22-17 17-23

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division x-Dallas x-San Antonio Houston Memphis New Orleans

W 51 48 40 39 35

L 27 30 38 39 44

Pct .654 .615 .513 .500 .443

GB — 3 11 12 16½

L10 5-5 7-3 4-6 3-7 2-8

Str W-1 L-1 W-2 L-3 L-4

Home 27-13 28-11 22-17 23-17 23-16

Away 24-14 20-19 18-21 16-22 12-28

Conf 29-19 29-19 27-22 21-28 24-25

Away 19-21 19-20 23-16 23-17 5-34

Conf 32-16 29-20 26-22 31-17 8-41

Away 22-16 21-18 8-32 7-32 7-33

Conf 33-14 32-16 13-35 13-35 15-33

Northwest Division W x-Denver 51 x-Utah 51 x-Oklahoma City 48 x-Portland 48 Minnesota 15

L 27 28 30 30 63

W y-L.A. Lakers 55 x-Phoenix 51 L.A. Clippers 27 Golden State 24 Sacramento 24 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference

L 22 27 51 54 54

Pct .654 .646 .615 .615 .192

GB — ½ 3 3 36

L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 8-2 1-9

Str W-3 L-1 L-2 W-2 L-3

Home 32-6 32-8 25-14 25-13 10-29

Pacific Division Pct .714 .654 .346 .308 .308

GB — 4½ 28½ 31½ 31½

L10 6-4 9-1 2-8 5-5 1-9

Str L-1 W-1 L-6 W-1 L-8

Home 33-6 30-9 19-19 17-22 17-21

——— Wednesday’s Games Indiana 113, New York 105 Orlando 121, Washington 94 Miami 99, Philadelphia 95 Milwaukee 108, New Jersey 89 Charlotte 104, New Orleans 103 Dallas 110, Memphis 84 Phoenix 112, San Antonio 101

Boston 115, Toronto 104 Detroit 90, Atlanta 88 Houston 113, Utah 96 Golden State 116, Minnesota 107 Denver 98, Oklahoma City 94 Portland 93, L.A. Clippers 85 Today’s Games

Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 7:30 p.m.

L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m. Friday’s Games

Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Indiana at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Charlotte at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Dallas at Portland, 7 p.m.

New York at Orlando, 4 p.m. Washington at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Utah at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Chicago at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Memphis at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. ——— All Times PDT

Petro 1-2 1-2 3, Billups 9-20 9-9 31, Afflalo 7-14 0-0 17, Graham 3-4 0-0 6, Smith 4-13 2-3 10, Allen 0-2 0-0 0, Carter 0-0 0-0 0, Lawson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-82 25-29 98. OKLAHOMA CITY (94) Durant 9-21 14-15 33, Green 5-14 1-4 11, Krstic 1-1 2-2 4, Westbrook 10-19 1-2 21, Sefolosha 2-5 0-0 4, Collison 4-7 4-6 12, Ibaka 3-3 1-2 7, Harden 1-7 0-0 2, Maynor 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 35-80 23-31 94. Denver 30 21 22 25 — 98 Oklahoma City 33 19 28 14 — 94 3-Point Goals—Denver 7-17 (Billups 4-8, Afflalo 3-3, Anthony 0-1, Smith 0-5), Oklahoma City 1-14 (Durant 1-5, Harden 0-2, Sefolosha 0-2, Green 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 56 (Nene 13), Oklahoma City 50 (Durant 11). Assists—Denver 14 (Billups, Nene, Afflalo 3), Oklahoma City 17 (Green 5). Total Fouls—Denver 26, Oklahoma City 20. Technicals—Afflalo, Oklahoma City defensive three second 2. A—18,332 (18,203). ——— CHARLOTTE (104) Wallace 2-6 4-6 8, Diaw 3-9 2-2 10, Chandler 7-9 2-2 16, Felton 5-11 2-2 12, Jackson 9-18 8-8 29, Augustin 5-7 0-0 14, Mohammed 2-4 1-2 5, Brown 0-0 2-2 2, Graham 1-2 0-0 2, Hughes 2-8 0-0 6. Totals 36-74 21-24 104. NEW ORLEANS (103) Peterson 3-8 0-0 8, West 6-16 1-1 13, Okafor 3-4 1-2 7, Collison 8-14 7-8 24, Thornton 1426 4-5 36, Gray 1-3 0-0 2, Songaila 3-4 0-0 6, Wright 0-0 2-4 2, Posey 1-6 2-2 5. Totals 39-81 17-22 103. Charlotte 32 28 19 25 — 104 New Orleans 21 17 40 25 — 103 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 11-24 (Augustin 4-5, Jackson 3-8, Diaw 2-3, Hughes 2-5, Graham 0-1, Felton 0-2), New Orleans 8-20 (Thornton 4-10, Peterson 2-4, Collison 1-1, Posey 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 48 (Chandler 10), New Orleans 40 (Okafor 9). Assists—Charlotte 22 (Felton 7), New Orleans 23 (Collison 9). Total Fouls—Charlotte 20, New Orleans 23. Technicals—New Orleans Coach Bower 2. Ejected— New Orleans Coach Bower. A—13,333 (17,188). ——— UTAH (96) Miles 5-8 2-4 12, Boozer 8-12 2-2 18, Okur 4-9 0-0 9, Williams 3-9 6-7 12, Matthews 0-5 0-0 0, Millsap 6-11 1-2 13, Korver 4-7 1-2 10, Price 4-6 0-0 9, Koufos 1-4 0-0 2, Gaines 2-3 1-2 5, Jeffers 2-5 2-2 6. Totals 39-79 15-21 96. HOUSTON (113) Ariza 2-5 2-4 7, Scola 9-14 6-8 24, Hayes 3-4 0-0 6, Brooks 11-22 1-1 28, Martin 9-20 9-9 28, Lowry 2-5 2-2 6, Hill 0-4 0-0 0, Budinger 3-5 0-0 8, Jeffries 2-5 1-2 6, Taylor 0-0 0-0 0, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 41-84 21-26 113. Utah 22 24 31 19 — 96 Houston 33 27 36 17 — 113 3-Point Goals—Utah 3-15 (Okur 1-3, Korver 1-3, Price 1-3, Williams 0-1, Gaines 0-1, Miles 0-2, Matthews 0-2), Houston 10-19 (Brooks 58, Budinger 2-2, Jeffries 1-1, Ariza 1-2, Martin 1-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Utah 52 (Millsap, Boozer 11), Houston 42 (Hayes 18). Assists—Utah 25 (Williams 7), Houston 27 (Brooks, Lowry 5). Total Fouls—Utah 23, Houston 20. Technicals—Williams. A—15,004 (18,043). ——— NEW JERSEY (89) Hayes 2-6 0-0 4, Yi 2-8 7-8 11, Lopez 1-6 3-4 5, Harris 9-15 4-5 25, Lee 8-15 0-0 19, Humphries 1-5 5-6 7, Williams 2-13 2-2 6, Dooling 3-4 1-1 8, Boone 0-1 0-0 0, Douglas-Roberts 2-3 0-0 4, Quinn 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 30-76 2226 89. MILWAUKEE (108) Delfino 2-9 3-4 7, Mbah a Moute 2-4 2-2 6, Thomas 6-11 0-0 12, Jennings 4-10 1-1 12, Salmons 10-13 1-2 22, Ridnour 3-6 3-3 9, Ilyasova 7-12 0-1 15, Stackhouse 6-9 4-4 18, Gadzuric 2-4 1-2 5, Bell 0-3 0-0 0, Brezec 1-2 0-0 2, Ivey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 43-83 15-19 108. New Jersey 38 20 17 14 — 89 Milwaukee 33 25 24 26 — 108 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 7-16 (Harris 3-4, Lee 3-5, Dooling 1-1, Yi 0-1, Douglas-Roberts 0-1, Williams 0-1, Hayes 0-3), Milwaukee 7-22 (Jennings 3-6, Stackhouse 2-2, Salmons 1-2, Ilyasova 1-4, Ridnour 0-1, Bell 0-1, Delfino 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 41 (Yi 8), Milwaukee 53 (Thomas 10). Assists—New Jersey 14 (Lopez 7), Milwaukee 27 (Salmons 5). Total Fouls—New Jersey 20, Milwaukee 21. Technicals—Harris, New Jersey defensive three second, Salmons. A—16,037 (18,717). ——— SAN ANTONIO (101) Jefferson 6-10 4-7 17, Duncan 5-10 4-7 14, McDyess 3-5 0-0 6, Temple 4-9 2-4 11, Ginobili 5-14 0-0 10, Parker 5-10 0-0 10, Mason 7-14 0-0 18, Blair 2-4 2-3 6, Bonner 2-4 1-3 5, Hairston 0-2 4-4 4. Totals 39-82 17-28 101. PHOENIX (112) Gr.Hill 6-10 3-3 17, Stoudemire 13-22 3-4 29, Collins 0-1 0-0 0, Nash 8-14 2-2 18, Richardson 7-13 3-4 20, Frye 4-8 2-2 12, Dudley 1-3 0-0 3, Amundson 2-4 0-0 4, Dragic 2-8 3-3 7, Barbosa 1-4 0-0 2, Clark 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 44-87 1618 112. San Antonio 29 23 28 21 — 101 Phoenix 29 32 27 24 — 112 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 6-25 (Mason 49, Temple 1-3, Jefferson 1-5, Hairston 0-1, Bonner 0-2, Ginobili 0-5), Phoenix 8-22 (Richardson 3-6, Gr.Hill 2-4, Frye 2-4, Dudley 1-3, Nash 0-1,

Dragic 0-2, Barbosa 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 58 (Blair 8), Phoenix 41 (Gr.Hill, Stoudemire 8). Assists—San Antonio 21 (Parker 5), Phoenix 28 (Nash 12). Total Fouls— San Antonio 20, Phoenix 23. Technicals—Blair, Bonner, Amundson. A—18,422 (18,422).

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Games SCORING G FG FT PTS Durant, OKC 77 742 702 2303 James, CLE 76 768 593 2258 Anthony, DEN 64 644 479 1819 Bryant, LAL 72 708 438 1950 Wade, MIA 73 682 507 1942 Ellis, GOL 61 603 280 1556 Nowitzki, DAL 76 671 497 1882 Granger, IND 57 449 328 1371 Bosh, TOR 70 600 470 1678 Stoudemire, PHX 77 651 459 1762 Roy, POR 62 476 336 1360 Johnson, ATL 73 609 211 1550 Randolph, MEM 76 619 332 1584 Jackson, CHA 77 574 323 1593 Lee, NYK 76 643 256 1542 Rose, CHI 73 616 233 1478 Maggette, GOL 67 445 449 1351 Evans, SAC 68 498 329 1361

AVG 29.9 29.7 28.4 27.1 26.6 25.5 24.8 24.1 24.0 22.9 21.9 21.2 20.8 20.7 20.3 20.2 20.2 20.0

REBOUNDS G OFF DEF Howard, ORL 77 268 755 Lee, NYK 76 213 688 Randolph, MEM 76 312 582 Camby, POR 70 235 579 Boozer, UTA 75 176 673 Bosh, TOR 70 205 554 Murphy, IND 67 113 579 Wallace, CHA 72 145 597 Duncan, SAN 74 211 544 Bogut, MIL 69 208 493

TOT 1023 901 894 814 849 759 692 742 755 701

AVG 13.3 11.9 11.8 11.6 11.3 10.8 10.3 10.3 10.2 10.2

AST 836 480 762 744 680 651 622 575 404 481

AVG 11.0 10.7 10.6 9.8 9.1 8.6 8.1 8.0 6.8 6.6

TEAM OFFENSE G Phoenix 77 Golden State 77 Denver 77 Utah 78 Toronto 77 Memphis 77 Cleveland 78 L.A. Lakers 77 Houston 77 Orlando 77 New York 77 Atlanta 77 Dallas 77 Oklahoma City 77 San Antonio 77 Indiana 77 New Orleans 78 Sacramento 78 Boston 77 Portland 77 Minnesota 77 Milwaukee 77 Philadelphia 77 Chicago 77 Miami 77 Washington 77 L.A. Clippers 77 Charlotte 77 Detroit 77 New Jersey 77

Pts 8497 8366 8224 8148 7999 7906 7977 7861 7847 7846 7840 7835 7832 7806 7786 7724 7777 7769 7632 7565 7561 7514 7493 7465 7404 7396 7362 7326 7218 7076

Avg 110.4 108.6 106.8 104.5 103.9 102.7 102.3 102.1 101.9 101.9 101.8 101.8 101.7 101.4 101.1 100.3 99.7 99.6 99.1 98.2 98.2 97.6 97.3 96.9 96.2 96.1 95.6 95.1 93.7 91.9

TEAM DEFENSE G Charlotte 77 Miami 77 Portland 77 Orlando 77 Cleveland 78 Boston 77 San Antonio 77 Milwaukee 77 L.A. Lakers 77 Atlanta 77 Oklahoma City 77 Utah 78 Chicago 77 Detroit 77 Dallas 77 Washington 77 New Jersey 77 Philadelphia 77 L.A. Clippers 77 Denver 77 Houston 77 New Orleans 78 Memphis 77 Indiana 77 Sacramento 78 New York 77 Toronto 77 Phoenix 77 Minnesota 77 Golden State 77

Pts 7205 7237 7301 7314 7416 7329 7384 7387 7468 7491 7519 7699 7622 7633 7689 7751 7785 7807 7849 7876 7893 8003 7962 7974 8115 8110 8144 8147 8275 8667

Avg 93.6 94.0 94.8 95.0 95.1 95.2 95.9 95.9 97.0 97.3 97.6 98.7 99.0 99.1 99.9 100.7 101.1 101.4 101.9 102.3 102.5 102.6 103.4 103.6 104.0 105.3 105.8 105.8 107.5 112.6

Nash, PHX Paul, NOR Williams, UTA Rondo, BOS Kidd, DAL James, CLE Westbrook, OKC Davis, LAC Harris, NJN Wade, MIA

ASSISTS G 76 45 72 76 75 76 77 72 59 73


D4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL STANDINGS All Times PDT ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Tampa Bay 2 0 1.000 — New York 2 1 .667 ½ Toronto 1 1 .500 1 Boston 1 2 .333 1½ Baltimore 0 2 .000 2 Central Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 2 1 .667 — Chicago 1 1 .500 ½ Cleveland 1 1 .500 ½ Detroit 1 1 .500 ½ Kansas City 1 1 .500 ½ West Division W L Pct GB Oakland 2 1 .667 — Texas 1 1 .500 ½ Los Angeles 1 2 .333 1 Seattle 1 2 .333 1 ——— Wednesday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Baltimore 3 N.Y. Yankees 3, Boston 1, 10 innings Toronto 7, Texas 4 Cleveland 5, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 3, Detroit 2, 11 innings Minnesota 4, L.A. Angels 2 Oakland 6, Seattle 5 Today’s Games Toronto (Romero 0-0) at Texas (C.Wilson 0-0), 11:05 a.m. Detroit (Willis 0-0) at Kansas City (Bannister 0-0), 11:10 a.m. Seattle (Fister 0-0) at Oakland (Anderson 0-0), 12:35 p.m. Baltimore (Matusz 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (Masterson 0-0) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Slowey 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Pineiro 0-0), 7:05 p.m. NATIONAL LEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 2 0 1.000 — Philadelphia 2 0 1.000 — Florida 1 1 .500 1 New York 1 1 .500 1 Washington 0 2 .000 2 Central Division W L Pct GB Pittsburgh 2 0 1.000 — St. Louis 2 0 1.000 — Milwaukee 2 1 .667 ½ Chicago 0 2 .000 2 Cincinnati 0 2 .000 2 Houston 0 3 .000 2½ West Division W L Pct GB San Francisco 3 0 1.000 — Arizona 2 1 .667 1 Colorado 1 2 .333 2 San Diego 1 2 .333 2 Los Angeles 0 2 .000 2½ ——— Wednesday’s Games Milwaukee 5, Colorado 4 San Francisco 10, Houston 4 Pittsburgh 4, L.A. Dodgers 3, 10 innings Philadelphia 8, Washington 4 Atlanta 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Florida 7, N.Y. Mets 6, 10 innings St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 3 Arizona 5, San Diego 3 Today’s Games L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 00), 9:35 a.m. St. Louis (Penny 0-0) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 0-0), 9:35 a.m. Philadelphia (Kendrick 0-0) at Washington (Stammen 0-0), 1:35 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Wells 0-0) at Atlanta (Hanson 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Robertson 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-0), 4:10 p.m.

AL ROUNDUP Athletics 6, Mariners 5 OAKLAND, Calif. — Kurt Suzuki hit an RBI double with one out in the ninth inning to lead Oakland past Seattle. Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 2b Kotchman 1b Bradley lf Griffey Jr. dh Jo.Lopez 3b F.Gutierrez cf Ro.Johnson c b-Langerhans ph Moore c J.Wilson ss Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 1 0 3 33

R 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 5

H 1 0 0 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 1 8

BI 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 5

BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 1 6

Avg. .273 .091 .182 .100 .143 .333 .455 .200 .000 .000 .091

Oakland R.Davis cf Ellis 2b R.Sweeney rf Kouzmanoff 3b K.Suzuki c Barton 1b Fox dh a-E.Chavez ph-dh T.Buck lf 1-Patterson pr Gross lf Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 3 3 3 1 4 0 0 4 37

R H BI BB 2 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 6 14 5 1

SO 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

Avg. .286 .417 .308 .308 .364 .125 .000 .100 .273 ----.375

Seattle 200 021 000 — 5 8 2 Oakland 101 110 101 — 6 14 0 One out when winning run scored. b-flied out for Ro.Johnson in the 9th. 1-ran for T.Buck in the 8th. E: I.Suzuki (1), Ro.Johnson (1). LOB: Seattle 6, Oakland 10. 2B: Kouzmanoff (1), K.Suzuki 2 (2), T.Buck (2). HR: Bradley (1), off Duchscherer; R.Davis (1), off RowlandSmith. RBIs: Figgins (1), Bradley 2 (2), F.Gutierrez (1), J.Wilson (1), R.Davis (2), R.Sweeney (2), K.Suzuki 2 (3), Barton (1). SB: Jo.Lopez (1), F.Gutierrez (1), R.Davis (2). SF: Figgins, R.Sweeney, Barton. Runners left in scoring position: Seattle 2 (J.Wilson, Ro.Johnson); Oakland 6 (Barton 2, R.Davis, Fox, Ellis 2). DP: Oakland 1 (Duchscherer, Pennington, Barton). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rowland-Smith 5 8 4 3 1 1 96 5.40 White H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 League BS, 1-1 1 2-3 4 1 1 0 0 40 3.38 M.Lowe L, 0-1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 22 5.40 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duchscherer 5 2-3 7 5 5 2 4 101 7.94 T.Ross 2 1-3 1 0 0 1 2 48 0.00 Ziegler 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Blevins W, 1-0 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 6 0.00 HBP: by Rowland-Smith (K.Suzuki). WP: Duchscherer 2. PB: Ro.Johnson. T: 3:11. A: 18,194 (35,067).

Yankees 3, Red Sox 1 (10 innings) BOSTON — Curtis Granderson led off the 10th inning with a tiebreaking homer off Jonathan Papelbon and New York beat Boston. New York Jeter ss N.Johnson dh Teixeira 1b A.Rodriguez 3b Cano 2b Posada c Granderson cf Swisher rf Winn rf Gardner lf Totals

AB 3 4 3 5 4 4 4 4 0 3 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 3

H 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 6

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

BB 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

SO 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 7

Avg. .308 .000 .000 .133 .417 .417 .333 .364 --.333

Boston Ellsbury lf Pedroia 2b Martinez c Youkilis 1b D.Ortiz dh Beltre 3b J.Drew rf Cameron cf

AB 5 4 5 2 4 4 4 4

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

H 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

BB 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2

Avg. .200 .308 .308 .444 .091 .364 .167 .300

Ja.Lopez 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 Carrasco 1 0 0 0 0 0 Dotel 1 1 0 0 1 1 Donnelly W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 2 0 IBB: off Ja.Lopez (M.Ramirez). WP: Dotel. T: 4:00. A: 31,061 (38,362).

NO BALL, NO GLOVE, NO OUT

12 15 23 25

0.00 16.20 0.00 0.00

Phillies 8, Nationals 4 WASHINGTON — Ryan Howard hit a two-run homer and an RBI double, and Philadelphia beat Washington for its first 2-0 start to a season since 2003. Philadelphia Rollins ss Polanco 3b Utley 2b Howard 1b Werth rf Ibanez lf Victorino cf C.Ruiz c Hamels p a-Gload ph Durbin p c-Dobbs ph Baez p Bastardo p Madson p Totals

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

New York Yankees pitcher Andy Pettitte, right, goes airborne as he loses the ball and tumbles while trying to cover first on a grounder by Boston’s Jacoby Ellsbury (2) during the first inning of Wednesday’s game in Boston. Scutaro ss Totals

3 35

0 1

0 7

0 1

1 3

New York 000 000 100 2 — 3 Boston 001 000 000 0 — 1

0 5

.300 6 0 7 0

LOB: New York 7, Boston 8. 2B: Posada (2), Pedroia (1), Cameron (1). HR: Granderson (2), off Papelbon. RBIs: Teixeira (2), Granderson (2), Swisher (2), D.Ortiz (1). SB: Granderson (1), Gardner (2). CS: Cano (1). Runners left in scoring position: New York 4 (Gardner, A.Rodriguez 3); Boston 3 (D.Ortiz 2, Ellsbury). GIDP: A.Rodriguez, Martinez, J.Drew. DP: New York 2 (A.Rodriguez, Cano, Teixeira), (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira); Boston 1 (Beltre, Pedroia, Youkilis). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP Pettitte 6 6 1 1 3 4 94 Park W, 1-1 3 1 0 0 0 1 36 M.Rivera S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP Lackey 6 3 0 0 2 3 100 Schoeneweis 2-3 1 1 1 0 2 13 Bard BS, 1-1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 15 Papelbon L, 0-1 1 1-3 1 2 2 2 1 28 Atchison 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 HBP: by Pettitte (Youkilis), by Lackey (Jeter). T: 3:21. A: 38,238 (37,402).

ERA 1.50 4.91 0.00 ERA 0.00 5.40 0.00 7.71 4.50

Blue Jays 7, Rangers 4 ARLINGTON, Texas — Vernon Wells homered two more times and Jason Frasor pitched an uneventful ninth after blowing a save on opening day. Toronto AB R Bautista rf 3 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Lind dh 4 1 V.Wells cf 3 4 Overbay 1b 3 1 J.Buck c 4 0 Encarnacion 3b 3 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 5 1 Snider lf 3 0 Totals 32 7

H 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 1 5

BI 1 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 1 7

BB 2 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 2 10

SO 1 1 2 0 1 3 1 1 0 10

Avg. .000 .125 .429 .714 .000 .125 .000 .222 .143

Texas AB Borbon cf 4 M.Young 3b 3 Hamilton lf 4 Guerrero dh 4 N.Cruz rf 3 C.Davis 1b 4 J.Arias 2b 3 a-Dav.Murphy ph 1 Teagarden c 2 b-Saltalamacchia ph1 Andrus ss 4 Totals 33

H 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

BI 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 9

Avg. .000 .143 .000 .571 .429 .143 .000 .000 .000 .200 .143

R 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

Toronto 001 220 101 — 7 5 3 Texas 100 200 100 — 4 5 1 a-struck out for J.Arias in the 9th. b-struck out for Teagarden in the 9th. E: Ale.Gonzalez (1), Encarnacion (2), Bautista (1), M.Young (1). LOB: Toronto 11, Texas 5. 2B: J.Buck (1), Snider (1), C.Davis (1). HR: Ale.Gonzalez (1), off Harden; V.Wells (2), off Nippert; V.Wells (3), off Oliver; Guerrero (1), off Tallet; N.Cruz (2), off Tallet. RBIs: Bautista (1), V.Wells 3 (6), Encarnacion (1), Ale.Gonzalez (1), Snider (1), Borbon (1), Guerrero (1), N.Cruz (5). SF: Encarnacion. Runners left in scoring position: Toronto 5 (A.Hill 2, Ale.Gonzalez 2, Snider); Texas 3 (C.Davis, M.Young, Andrus). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tallet W, 1-0 6 2-3 4 4 2 3 6 93 2.70 Gregg H, 1 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 Frasor S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 13.50 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harden 3 2-3 1 3 1 5 8 90 2.45 Nippert L, 0-1 2 2-3 1 3 3 4 2 46 10.13 O’Day 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 19 0.00 Oliver 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 13 6.75 Ray 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 8 0.00 HBP: by Harden (V.Wells), by O’Day (J.Buck). T: 2:56. A: 22,890 (49,170).

Rays 4, Orioles 3 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Evan Longoria homered and drove in three runs and Matt Garza allowed two runs over eight innings. Baltimore AB R Roberts 2b 5 0 Ad.Jones cf 4 1 Markakis rf 3 1 M.Tejada 3b 3 0 Scott dh 4 0 Wieters c 4 1 Reimold lf 4 0 Atkins 1b 4 0 1-Pie pr 0 0 C.Izturis ss 2 0 a-Wigginton ph 1 0 Totals 34 3 Tampa Bay Bartlett ss Crawford lf Zobrist rf Longoria 3b C.Pena 1b B.Upton cf Burrell dh Shoppach c Brignac 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 32

H 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 6

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2

SO 1 2 1 0 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 9

Avg. .000 .444 .167 .125 .143 .500 .250 .250 .250 .333 .000

R H BI BB 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 4 10 4 2

SO 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 8

Avg. .375 .250 .375 .375 .375 .286 .143 .250 .667

Baltimore 200 000 001 — 3 6 0 Tampa Bay 000 120 01x — 4 10 1 a-grounded out for C.Izturis in the 9th. 1-ran for Atkins in the 9th. E: C.Pena (1). LOB: Baltimore 7, Tampa Bay 6. 2B: Atkins (2), Longoria (1), C.Pena (1). HR: Longoria (2), off Meredith. RBIs: M.Tejada (1), Atkins (1), Longoria 3 (4), B.Upton (1). CS: Brignac (1). Runners left in scoring position: Baltimore 3 (Reimold, Roberts 2); Tampa Bay 3 (Shoppach 2, C.Pena). GIDP: Burrell. DP: Baltimore 2 (M.Tejada, Atkins), (Wieters, Wieters, Roberts). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie L, 0-1 6 1-3 8 3 3 2 6 95 4.26 Ohman 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00

Meredith 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 12 13.50 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza W, 1-0 8 4 2 1 2 9 114 1.13 R.Soriano S, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 4.50 Inherited runners-scored: Ohman 1-0. HBP: by Garza (M.Tejada). PB: Shoppach. T: 2:47. A: 15,220 (36,973).

Indians 5, White Sox 3 CHICAGO — Fausto Carmona allowed one hit over six wild innings and Cleveland rallied for its first win under manager Manny Acta. Cleveland AB R H A.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 G.Sizemore cf 5 0 1 Choo rf 3 2 2 Hafner dh 4 0 0 Peralta 3b 4 1 1 LaPorta 1b 4 1 2 1-A.Marte pr-1b 1 0 0 Valbuena 2b 3 0 1 Redmond c 4 1 0 Brantley lf 4 0 1 Totals 36 5 10

BI 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 5

BB 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 6

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 2 8

Avg. .375 .111 .286 .125 .167 .286 .000 .333 .000 .286

Chicago Pierre lf Beckham 2b Quentin rf Konerko 1b Kotsay dh Rios cf Pierzynski c Teahen 3b Al.Ramirez ss Totals

BI 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 7

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2

Avg. .000 .286 .200 .500 .000 .167 .250 .000 .000

AB 3 3 3 2 3 3 4 2 3 26

R 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2

Cleveland 000 300 101 — 5 10 0 Chicago 102 000 000 — 3 2 0 1-ran for LaPorta in the 7th. LOB: Cleveland 12, Chicago 4. 2B: Peralta (1), LaPorta (1). HR: Konerko (2), off Carmona. RBIs: G.Sizemore 2 (2), LaPorta (1), A.Marte (1), Brantley (1), Konerko 3 (5). SB: A.Cabrera (1), Choo 2 (2), Pierre 2 (2). CS: A.Cabrera (1). SF: Konerko. Runners left in scoring position: Cleveland 5 (Hafner 3, Redmond 2). GIDP: Pierzynski, Teahen. DP: Cleveland 2 (Peralta, Valbuena, LaPorta), (Valbuena, A.Marte). Cleveland IP H R ER BB Carmona W, 1-0 6 1 3 3 6 Laffey H, 1 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 J.Smith H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 C.Perez S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 1 Chicago IP H R ER BB Peavy 5 7 3 3 2 Williams L, 0-1 1 1-3 1 1 1 1 T.Pena 2-3 1 0 0 1 Thornton 1 0 0 0 0 Jenks 1 1 1 1 2 HBP: by Peavy (Valbuena, Redmond). T: 3:10. A: 19,514 (40,615).

SO 1 0 0 1 SO 5 0 0 1 2

NP 109 11 6 19 NP 106 21 17 11 28

ERA 4.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 ERA 5.40 6.75 0.00 0.00 9.00

Twins 4, Angels 2 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Carl Pavano pitched seven sharp innings in his season debut and Justin Morneau and J.J. Hardy each homered for the second straight game. Minnesota Span cf O.Hudson 2b Mauer c Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Thome dh Delm.Young lf Hardy ss Punto 3b Totals

AB 3 4 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 4

H 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 2 7

BI 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 0 2 7

Avg. .083 .083 .273 .400 .455 .000 .273 .333 .250

Los Angeles E.Aybar ss B.Abreu rf Tor.Hunter cf H.Matsui dh K.Morales 1b J.Rivera lf H.Kendrick 2b Napoli c B.Wood 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 4 4 35

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2

H 0 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 9

BI 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 6

Avg. .200 .182 .400 .455 .250 .167 .364 .250 .083

Minnesota 000 220 000 — 4 7 0 Los Angeles 000 001 001 — 2 9 0 LOB: Minnesota 5, Los Angeles 7. 2B: H.Matsui (1), H.Kendrick (1). 3B: Punto (1). HR: Morneau (2), off E.Santana; Hardy (2), off E.Santana. RBIs: Span (1), Morneau 2 (3), Hardy (2), J.Rivera (2), Napoli (1). SB: Cuddyer (1), Punto (1). CS: Tor.Hunter (1). SF: Span. Runners left in scoring position: Minnesota 2 (Delm.Young, O.Hudson); Los Angeles 3 (B.Wood 2, K.Morales). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP Pavano W, 1-0 7 6 1 1 0 6 102 Guerrier H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 15 Rauch S, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 0 16 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP E.Santana L, 0-1 6 5 4 4 1 4 105 Bulger 2 1 0 0 0 1 26 S.Shields 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 HBP: by Pavano (H.Kendrick). WP: E.Santana. T: 2:38. A: 41,533 (45,285).

ERA 1.29 0.00 4.50 ERA 6.00 0.00 0.00

Royals 3, Tigers 2 (11 innings) KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Alberto Callaspo hit a tying homer to lead off the bottom of the 11th and pinch runner Willie Bloomquist scored on an error to lift Kansas City past Detroit. Detroit A.Jackson cf Damon lf

AB R 5 0 5 0

H 2 0

BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 2 .300 0 0 2 .200

Raburn lf Ordonez rf 2-Kelly pr-rf Mi.Cabrera 1b C.Guillen dh Inge 3b Avila c 1-Laird pr-c S.Sizemore 2b Santiago ss Totals

0 5 0 5 5 5 3 2 1 4 40

0 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 11

0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2

0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

--.400 --.444 .400 .222 .333 .000 .000 .333

Kansas City DeJesus rf Podsednik lf Callaspo 3b B.Butler 1b 3-Bloomquist pr Ankiel cf J.Guillen dh Y.Betancourt ss Kendall c Getz 2b Totals

AB 5 3 5 5 0 5 3 3 2 2 33

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 3

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

BB 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 5

SO 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .200 .167 .200 .222 .000 .222 .143 .286 .400 .500

H 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 1 7

Detroit 000 000 001 01 — 2 11 1 K.C. 000 000 100 02 — 3 7 0 No outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for Avila in the 8th. 2-ran for Ordonez in the 11th. 3-ran for B.Butler in the 11th. E: S.Sizemore (1). LOB: Detroit 8, Kansas City 8. 2B: Ankiel (1). 3B: A.Jackson (1). HR: Mi.Cabrera (1), off Soria; Callaspo (1), off Valverde. RBIs: Mi.Cabrera (3), C.Guillen (1), Callaspo (1), Getz (1). SB: Podsednik 2 (2). CS: Mi.Cabrera (1). S: S.Sizemore, Getz. Runners left in scoring position: Detroit 5 (Damon 2, A.Jackson, Inge, Laird); Kansas City 5 (DeJesus 3, B.Butler, Podsednik). GIDP: Damon, Avila, Callaspo, J.Guillen. DP: Detroit 2 (S.Sizemore, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera), (Santiago, S.Sizemore, Mi.Cabrera); Kansas City 2 (Y.Betancourt, Getz, B.Butler), (Getz, Y.Betancourt, B.Butler). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer 6 1 0 0 2 3 91 0.00 Ni 1 2 1 1 1 0 17 9.00 Thomas 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 0.00 Zumaya 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 15 0.00 Coke 2 1 0 0 1 0 25 0.00 Valverde L, 0-1 0 3 2 1 0 0 10 9.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar 7 2-3 5 0 0 1 2 89 0.00 Soria BS, 1-1 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 3 31 6.75 Tejeda 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 24 27.00 Parrish 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Frnswrth W, 1-0 1 3 1 1 0 0 17 4.50 Valverde pitched to 3 batters in the 11th. HBP: by Scherzer (Y.Betancourt, J.Guillen). WP: Soria. T: 3:33. A: 10,574 (37,840).

NL ROUNDUP Pirates 4, Dodgers 3 (10 innings) PITTSBURGH — Ronny Cedeno singled over a drawn-in infield with the bases loaded and one out in the 10th inning, and Pittsburgh rode Garrett Jones’ third homer in two games to the victory. Los Angeles Furcal ss Kemp cf Ethier rf M.Ramirez lf Loney 1b Blake 3b DeWitt 2b Martin c Kershaw p Jef.Weaver p b-G.Anderson ph Ru.Ortiz p Sherrill p d-J.Carroll ph Troncoso p e-Belliard ph Ra.Ortiz p Totals

AB 3 5 3 4 4 4 3 4 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 34

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5

BI 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 2 0 2 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

SO 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .143 .300 .250 .333 .000 .250 .286 .286 .000 --.500 ----1.000 --.000 ---

Pittsburgh Iwamura 2b A.McCutchen cf G.Jones rf Doumit c Milledge lf Clement 1b An.LaRoche 3b Ohlendorf p a-Delw.Young ph Meek p Ja.Lopez p Carrasco p c-Crosby ph Dotel p Donnelly p f-Church ph Cedeno ss Totals

AB 3 5 5 5 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 35

R 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H 0 3 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 9

BI 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BB 2 0 0 0 1 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 9

SO 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7

Avg. .000 .444 .333 .444 .222 .143 .000 --.000 ------.000 ----1.000 .444

L.A. 000 030 000 0 — 3 5 1 Pittsburgh 300 000 000 1 — 4 9 1 One out when winning run scored. a-popped out for Ohlendorf in the 5th. b-grounded out for Jef.Weaver in the 6th. c-lined out for Carrasco in the 8th. d-doubled for Sherrill in the 9th. e-popped out for Troncoso in the 10th. f-walked for Donnelly in the 10th. E: DeWitt (1), An.LaRoche (1). LOB: Los Angeles 12, Pittsburgh 13. 2B: Kemp (2), J.Carroll (1). HR: Martin (1), off Ohlendorf; G.Jones (3), off Kershaw. RBIs: Kemp (3), Ethier (1), Martin (1), G.Jones 3 (6), Cedeno (2). SB: Furcal 2 (2), Loney (1). S: Blake, Kershaw, Clement. Runners left in scoring position: Los Angeles 6 (Kemp, DeWitt, G.Anderson, Loney, M.Ramirez, Belliard); Pittsburgh 5 (Clement 2, A.McCutchen, Delw.Young 2). GIDP: Iwamura. DP: Los Angeles 2 (Ru.Ortiz, DeWitt, Loney), (Loney). Los Angeles Kershaw Jef.Weaver Ru.Ortiz Sherrill Troncoso Ra.Ortiz L, 0-1 Pittsburgh Ohlendorf Meek

IP H 4 2-3 5 1-3 0 2 2 1 0 1 1 1-3 1 IP H 5 4 1 1-3 0

R 3 0 0 0 0 1 R 3 0

ER 3 0 0 0 0 0 ER 2 0

BB 6 0 0 1 0 2 BB 3 2

SO 4 0 1 2 0 0 SO 1 1

NP ERA 109 5.79 1 0.00 24 0.00 15 16.20 15 0.00 25 9.00 NP ERA 91 3.60 30 0.00

AB 3 4 4 5 3 3 4 4 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 35

Washington AB Morgan cf 4 Capps p 0 Desmond ss 5 Zimmerman 3b 4 Dunn 1b 3 Willingham lf 4 I.Rodriguez c 5 Morse rf 3 C.Guzman rf 1 A.Kennedy 2b 3 Marquis p 2 Walker p 0 b-Alb.Gonzalez ph 1 English p 0 Clippard p 0 d-W.Harris ph-cf 1 Totals 36

R H 1 1 3 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 11

BI 0 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 2 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .429 .556 .429 .364 .125 .143 .222 .500 .500 .000 --.000 ----.000

R H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 3 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4 10 4 5

SO 0 0 3 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .250 --.286 .250 .167 .571 .444 .250 .333 .143 .000 --.000 ----.200

Philadelphia 200 130 101 — 8 11 1 Washington 002 100 010 — 4 10 1 a-fouled out for Hamels in the 6th. b-grounded out for Walker in the 6th. c-popped out for Durbin in the 8th. d-doubled for Clippard in the 8th. E: Howard (1), Desmond (2). LOB: Philadelphia 10, Washington 11. 2B: Rollins (1), Polanco (1), Howard (1), Desmond (1), W.Harris (1). 3B: C.Guzman (1). HR: Howard (2), off Marquis; Desmond (1), off Hamels. RBIs: Utley (1), Howard 3 (5), Ibanez (1), Hamels (1), Desmond 2 (2), Willingham (1), A.Kennedy (1). SB: Morgan (2), Willingham (1). SF: Ibanez, A.Kennedy. Runners left in scoring position: Philadelphia 7 (Victorino 2, Polanco 2, Rollins, Madson 2); Washington 8 (Dunn, A.Kennedy, Morse 2, Zimmerman, I.Rodriguez 2, Desmond). GIDP: Rollins, Polanco, Howard, I.Rodriguez. DP: Philadelphia 1 (Utley, Rollins, Howard); Washington 3 (A.Kennedy, Desmond, Dunn), (A.Kennedy, Desmond, Dunn), (Clippard, Desmond, Dunn). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels W, 1-0 5 5 3 2 4 5 103 3.60 Durbin H, 1 2 1 0 0 1 2 36 0.00 Baez 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 6 13.50 Bastardo H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0.00 Madson S, 1-1 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquis L, 0-1 4 8 6 6 3 2 70 13.50 Walker 2 0 0 0 0 3 22 0.00 English 1-3 1 1 1 1 0 12 5.40 Clippard 1 2-3 1 0 0 2 0 25 0.00 Capps 1 1 1 0 2 1 24 0.00 Marquis pitched to 3 batters in the 5th. IBB: off Capps (C.Ruiz). HBP: by Marquis (Polanco). WP: Marquis. T: 3:19. A: 27,240 (41,546).

Cardinals 6, Reds 3 CINCINNATI — Albert Pujols hit a tiebreaking single in the seventh inning and Matt Holliday followed with a two-run double, sending St. Louis to the victory. Adam Wainwright (1-0) gave up only three hits in seven innings. St. Louis Schumaker 2b Ryan ss Pujols 1b Holliday lf Rasmus cf Ludwick rf Y.Molina c Freese 3b Wainwright p McClellan p D.Reyes p Franklin p Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 2 5 3 4 4 0 0 0 36

R H 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 2 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 10

BI 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 0 0 8

Avg. .100 .125 .556 .333 .667 .222 .429 .375 .000 -------

Cincinnati Stubbs cf O.Cabrera ss Votto 1b Phillips 2b Rolen 3b Bruce rf Gomes lf R.Hernandez c Cueto p a-Dickerson ph Herrera p Ondrusek p Rhodes p Masset p b-L.Nix ph Cordero p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 31

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BI 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 9

Avg. .400 .222 .333 .250 .250 .125 .000 .333 --.167 --------.333 ---

H 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

St. Louis 011 000 400 — 6 10 0 Cincinnati 000 002 010 — 3 6 0 a-struck out for Cueto in the 6th. b-struck out for Masset in the 8th. LOB: St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 4. 2B: Holliday (1), Rasmus (1), O.Cabrera (1), R.Hernandez (1). HR: O.Cabrera (1), off Wainwright. RBIs: Pujols (4), Holliday 2 (2), Ludwick (1), Freese 2 (3), O.Cabrera 3 (3). SB: Holliday (1), Rasmus (1), O.Cabrera (1). CS: Phillips (1). S: Rasmus, Cueto. Runners left in scoring position: St. Louis 5 (Schumaker, Y.Molina 2, Wainwright 2); Cincinnati 2 (O.Cabrera, Votto). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO Wnwright W, 1-0 7 3 2 2 2 6 McClellan 2-3 2 1 1 0 2 D.Reyes H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Franklin S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Cueto 6 5 2 2 3 3 Herrera L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 0 0 Ondrusek 0 2 3 3 1 0 Rhodes 1 1 0 0 1 2 Masset 1 0 0 0 0 2 Cordero 1 1 0 0 0 1 Herrera pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Ondrusek pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. HBP: by Cueto (Y.Molina). T: 3:01. A: 28,132 (42,319).

NP ERA 94 2.57 19 5.40 4 0.00 12 9.00 NP ERA 109 3.00 2 9.00 9 27.00 20 0.00 10 22.50 17 0.00

Braves 3, Cubs 2 ATLANTA — Chipper Jones hit a go-ahead, tworun homer in the eighth inning and Atlanta held on for the win. Martin Prado hit a one-out double off John Grabow (0-1), ending a string of 15 consecutive outs by Braves batters, before Jones connected for his first homer of the season. Chicago Theriot ss Fukudome rf D.Lee 1b

AB 3 4 3

R 0 0 0

H 0 1 0

BI 1 0 0

BB 0 0 1

SO 0 1 1

Avg. .000 .429 .000

Ar.Ramirez 3b Byrd cf A.Soriano lf Fontenot 2b c-Nady ph Soto c Dempster p a-Tracy ph Marshall p Grabow p Caridad p Totals

4 3 4 3 1 3 2 1 0 0 0 31

0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

.375 .143 .250 .167 .000 .167 .500 .000 -------

Atlanta Me.Cabrera lf Prado 2b C.Jones 3b McCann c Glaus 1b Y.Escobar ss Heyward rf McLouth cf Jurrjens p Medlen p b-Diaz ph Moylan p Wagner p Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 4 3 3 2 2 0 1 0 0 29

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 0 4 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 12

Avg. .111 .500 .250 .400 .143 .250 .375 .200 .000 --.000 -----

Chicago 000 020 000 — 2 7 0 Atlanta 010 000 02x — 3 5 1 a-flied out for Dempster in the 7th. b-popped out for Medlen in the 7th. c-struck out for Fontenot in the 9th. E: Glaus (1). LOB: Chicago 6, Atlanta 5. 2B: A.Soriano (1), Prado (1), Heyward (1). HR: C.Jones (1), off Grabow. RBIs: Theriot (1), C.Jones 2 (3), Heyward (5). SB: Fukudome (1), McCann (1). SF: Theriot. Runners left in scoring position: Chicago 3 (Fontenot, Fukudome, Ar.Ramirez); Atlanta 3 (Jurrjens, Y.Escobar 2). GIDP: Theriot, Ar.Ramirez. DP: Atlanta 3 (Prado, Y.Escobar, Glaus), (Glaus), (Y.Escobar, Prado, Glaus). Chicago IP H R ER Dempster 6 3 1 1 Marshall H, 1 1 0 0 0 Grabow L, 0-1 1 2-3 2 2 2 Caridad 1-3 0 0 0 Atlanta IP H R ER Jurrjens 5 3 2 0 Medlen 2 2 0 0 Moylan W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 Wagner S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 IBB: off Dempster (McCann). (McLouth). T: 2:41. A: 36,170 (49,743).

BB SO 2 9 0 2 0 0 0 1 BB SO 2 2 0 2 1 0 0 3 HBP: by

NP ERA 95 1.50 13 0.00 15 13.50 4 0.00 NP ERA 94 0.00 27 0.00 19 0.00 13 0.00 Dempster

Giants 10, Astros 4 HOUSTON — Edgar Renteria tied a career high with five hits and the Giants completed a season-opening, three-game sweep. The Giants are 3-0 for the first time since 2003. San Francisco Rowand cf Renteria ss Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b Mota p DeRosa lf Affeldt p b-Ishikawa ph-1b Bowker rf Schierholtz rf Uribe 2b Whiteside c Cain p Velez lf Totals

AB 6 5 6 6 0 3 0 1 4 1 5 3 2 1 43

R 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 10

H 4 5 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 19

BI 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 8

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 3

Avg. .250 .727 .308 .286 --.333 --1.000 .333 .500 .417 .333 .000 .000

Houston Bourn cf K.Matsui 2b Pence rf Ca.Lee lf Blum 1b Moehler p P.Feliz 3b-1b Keppinger ss Towles c Myers p Byrdak p a-Sullivan ph Gervacio p Sampson p Fulchino p C.Johnson 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 0 4 4 4 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 35

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

H 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .167 .250 .000 .167 .222 --.250 .429 .125 .500 --.500 ------.000

San Fran. 021 000 124 — 10 19 1 Houston 000 100 300 — 4 7 1 a-tripled for Byrdak in the 7th. b-homered for Affeldt in the 9th. E: Sandoval (1), Gervacio (1). LOB: San Francisco 12, Houston 4. 2B: Sandoval (1), Uribe 2 (2), P.Feliz 2 (2). 3B: Rowand (1), Sullivan (1). HR: Bowker (1), off Myers; Ishikawa (1), off Fulchino. RBIs: Rowand 2 (2), Renteria 2 (3), Ishikawa (1), Bowker 2 (3), Uribe (3), Bourn (1), P.Feliz (2), Sullivan 2 (2). S: Whiteside, Cain. Runners left in scoring position: San Francisco 8 (A.Huff 3, Rowand, Bowker 2, DeRosa 2); Houston 2 (Keppinger 2). GIDP: Sandoval, DeRosa. DP: Houston 2 (K.Matsui, Keppinger, Blum), (Keppinger, K.Matsui, Blum). San Francisco IP H R ER BB Cain 6 2-3 6 4 3 0 Affeldt W, 1-0 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 Mota 1 0 0 0 0 Houston IP H R ER BB Myers 6 12 4 4 1 Byrdak 1 0 0 0 1 Gervacio L, 0-1 1-3 2 2 1 0 Sampson 2-3 0 0 0 1 Fulchino 1-3 4 4 4 1 Moehler 2-3 1 0 0 0 Myers pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. WP: Gervacio. T: 3:01. A: 21,599 (40,976).

SO 5 1 0 SO 3 0 0 0 0 0

NP ERA 98 4.05 20 0.00 9 0.00 NP ERA 100 6.00 12 4.50 9 6.75 16 5.40 16 27.00 8 0.00

Brewers 5, Rockies 4 MILWAUKEE — Jim Edmonds’ leadoff single set up a two-run rally in the sixth inning that put Milwaukee ahead and Trevor Hoffman earned his 593rd career save as the Brewers held off the Colorado Rockies. Colorado AB R C.Gonzalez lf-rf 5 1 Fowler cf 3 1 d-Hawpe ph 1 0 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 Giambi 1b 2 0 Olivo c 3 1 Stewart 3b 3 0 Mora 2b 4 0 Spilborghs rf 3 0 b-S.Smith ph-lf 1 0 Cook p 2 0 R.Flores p 0 0 Corpas p 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 c-Helton ph 1 0 Totals 32 4

H 2 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 2 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .533 .333 .125 .250 .000 .333 .400 .000 .400 .000 .000 ------.500

Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b Edmonds rf McGehee 3b Kottaras c A.Escobar ss Coffey p a-Gerut ph Narveson p Stetter p Villanueva p Hawkins p Hoffman p D.Davis p Counsell ss Totals

H 1 0 1 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 3 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 10

Avg. .333 .333 .364 .364 .333 .455 .000 .200 --1.000 ----------.000 .200

AB 4 3 3 4 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 31

R 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

Colorado 301 000 000 — 4 8 1 Milwaukee 010 112 00x — 5 8 0 a-doubled for Coffey in the 6th. b-struck out for Spilborghs in the 8th. c-flied out for R.Betancourt in the 9th. d-flied out for Fowler in the 9th. E: Giambi (1). LOB: Colorado 7, Milwaukee 5. 2B: Fowler (1), Tulowitzki (1), Edmonds (1), A.Escobar (1),

Gerut (1), Counsell (1). HR: Olivo (1), off D.Davis. RBIs: Tulowitzki (2), Olivo (1), Mora (1), Weeks (2), Kottaras 2 (2), A.Escobar (2), Gerut (1). SB: Tulowitzki (1). CS: C.Gonzalez (2). S: Cook, Gomez. SF: Kottaras. Runners left in scoring position: Colorado 6 (Spilborghs, C.Gonzalez, Olivo 3, Cook); Milwaukee 3 (D.Davis, Fielder, Weeks). GIDP: Olivo. DP: Milwaukee 1 (Counsell, Weeks, Fielder). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cook L, 0-1 5 1-3 7 5 4 1 5 91 6.75 R.Flores 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Corpas 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 17 0.00 R.Betancourt 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 0.00 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Davis 4 6 4 4 3 4 88 9.00 Coffey W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 2 2 31 0.00 Narveson H, 1 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 6 3.86 Stetter H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Villanueva H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 0.00 Hawkins H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 Hoffman S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 4.50 D.Davis pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. IBB: off Coffey (Giambi). WP: D.Davis 2, Coffey 2. PB: Olivo. T: 3:16. A: 35,793 (41,900).

Marlins 7, Mets 6 (10 innings) NEW YORK — Wes Helms slid home headfirst to barely beat Rod Barajas’ sweeping tag, scoring on Ronny Paulino’s pinch-hit single to help Florida get the victory. Florida Coghlan lf Maybin cf Nunez p e-R.Paulino ph T.Wood p H.Ramirez ss Cantu 3b-1b Uggla 2b Jo.Baker c C.Ross rf G.Sanchez 1b Barden 3b Veras p Bonifacio cf Nolasco p Pinto p Helms 3b Totals

AB 5 4 0 1 0 5 6 5 5 5 4 0 0 1 2 0 2 45

R H 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 1 2 2 0 3 1 4 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 7 17

BI 1 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 7

Avg. .222 .125 --.200 --.444 .222 .250 .600 .444 .375 ----.000 .000 --.500

New York Cora ss Castillo 2b Feliciano p F.Rodriguez p d-R.Tejada ph-2b D.Wright 3b Jacobs 1b Takahashi p Nieve p Bay lf Matthews Jr. cf Francoeur rf Barajas c Maine p a-Pagan ph Mejia p Green p b-Catalanotto ph c-Tatis ph-2b-1b Totals

AB 4 2 0 0 1 3 5 0 0 3 3 4 4 1 1 0 0 0 2 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BI 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

BB 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 9

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

Avg. .125 .000 ----.000 .333 .111 ----.429 .333 .333 .250 .000 .500 ----.000 .500

H 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6

Florida 102 011 100 1 — 7 17 1 New York 100 000 230 0 — 6 6 0 a-grounded out for Maine in the 5th. b-was announced for Green in the 7th. c-singled for Catalanotto in the 7th. d-fouled out for F.Rodriguez in the 9th. e-singled for Nunez in the 10th. E: Uggla (1). LOB: Florida 13, New York 9. 2B: Maybin (1), G.Sanchez (2), Bay (1). 3B: Cora (1). HR: Cantu (1), off Maine; H.Ramirez (1), off Maine; Uggla (1), off Green. RBIs: Coghlan (1), R.Paulino (1), H.Ramirez 2 (2), Cantu (2), Uggla (1), Jo.Baker (1), Castillo 2 (2), Barajas (2), Tatis (1). SB: D.Wright (1). S: Coghlan, Nolasco. SF: Castillo, Barajas. Runners left in scoring position: Florida 6 (Jo.Baker, Coghlan, G.Sanchez, H.Ramirez, Bonifacio, Uggla); New York 4 (Matthews Jr. 2, Cora 2). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco 6 2-3 3 3 3 3 5 104 4.05 Pinto 0 1 0 0 1 0 16 0.00 Veras H, 1 1 2 3 3 2 0 26 27.00 Nunez W, 1-0 1 1-3 0 0 0 3 0 40 0.00 T.Wood S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Maine 5 8 4 4 1 3 92 7.20 Mejia 1 3 1 1 0 1 13 9.00 Green 1 2 1 1 0 1 20 9.00 Feliciano 1 0 0 0 1 0 17 0.00 F.Rodriguez 1 2 0 0 0 2 16 0.00 Takahashi L, 0-1 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 19 27.00 Nieve 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Pinto pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. IBB: off Nunez (Bay), off Takahashi (H.Ramirez). HBP: by Pinto (Cora). WP: Maine. Balk: Nunez. T: 4:12. A: 38,863 (41,800).

Diamondbacks 5, Padres 3 PHOENIX — Kelly Johnson hit two of Arizona’s four homers, helping the Diamondbacks rally past San Diego. San Diego AB R E.Cabrera ss 4 0 Eckstein 2b 4 0 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 Blanks lf 4 0 Headley 3b 4 1 Venable rf 4 1 Hairston cf 4 1 Torrealba c 4 0 Correia p 2 0 b-Salazar ph 1 0 Gallagher p 0 0 Ramos p 0 0 Mujica p 0 0 Totals 34 3

H 0 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 7

BI 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 4 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 10

Avg. .273 .125 .417 .083 .385 .182 .500 .000 .500 .000 -------

Arizona K.Johnson 2b S.Drew ss J.Upton rf Ad.LaRoche 1b M.Reynolds 3b C.Young cf G.Parra lf Snyder c I.Kennedy p a-Ryal ph Norberto p Boyer p Heilman p c-T.Abreu ph J.Gutierrez p Qualls p Totals

H 3 0 1 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

BI 3 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 1 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .300 .154 .417 .000 .111 .273 .250 .333 .000 .500 ------.500 -----

AB 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 31

R 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

San Diego 030 000 000 — 3 7 0 Arizona 100 021 01x — 5 9 1 a-singled for I.Kennedy in the 5th. b-flied out for Correia in the 7th. c-grounded into a double play for Heilman in the 7th. E: M.Reynolds (1). LOB: San Diego 5, Arizona 3. 2B: Eckstein (1), Ad.Gonzalez (2), G.Parra (1). HR: Hairston (1), off I.Kennedy; K.Johnson 2 (2), off Correia 2; C.Young (1), off Correia; J.Upton (1), off Mujica. RBIs: Hairston 3 (3), K.Johnson 3 (3), J.Upton (2), C.Young (2). Runners left in scoring position: San Diego 3 (Blanks, Headley, E.Cabrera); Arizona 1 (Snyder). GIDP: Torrealba, T.Abreu. DP: San Diego 1 (Ad.Gonzalez, E.Cabrera, Ad.Gonzalez); Arizona 1 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Ad.LaRoche). San Diego IP H R ER Correia L, 0-1 6 7 4 4 Gallagher 1 1 0 0 Ramos 1-3 0 0 0 Mujica 2-3 1 1 1 Arizona IP H R ER I.Kennedy 5 6 3 3 Norberto 2-3 0 0 0 Boyer W, 1-0 1-3 0 0 0 Heilman H, 1 1 0 0 0 J.Gutierrez H, 1 1 0 0 0 Qualls S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 T: 2:54. A: 17,673 (48,633).

BB 0 1 0 0 BB 0 0 0 0 1 0

SO 6 0 1 1 SO 8 0 0 0 1 1

NP 108 12 6 15 NP 94 13 4 11 23 9

ERA 6.00 0.00 0.00 5.40 ERA 5.40 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.50


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 D5

Masters

PREP ROUNDUP

Cougars lose close ones on the track SO CLOSE

Bulletin staff report Despite the absence of a number of their strongest competitors, the Mountain View boys stayed close Wednesday in an Intermountain Conference track and field dual meet against The Dalles-Wahtonka. The Cougars were beaten on their home track, 73.5-71.5. The girls half of the meet was closer still, The Dalles-Wahtonka winning by a single point, 72.5-71.5. Several underclassmen posted first-place finishes for the Cougar boys, including freshman Mitch Modin, who won the 400-meter race in 55.34 seconds. Senior Solomon Helms took first in both the 110-meter hurdles (16.42 seconds) and the long jump (20 feet, 8 inches). Senior Kenny Bent added wins in the high jump (6-2) and in the triple jump (42-9.5). Mountain View head coach Dave Hood said he was also impressed with sophomore Dylan Johnson’s winning discus throw of 139 feet. On the girls side, Hopper Cashman’s mark of 105-11 in discus proved good enough for first place for the Cougars. Danika Noel notched another win for Mountain View with her mark of 93-0 in javelin. BOYS TENNIS Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 The visiting Cowboys took the No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles matches, but Mountain View won everything else — including three matches by default — en route to the team victory. Crook County’s Trevor Brown scored a straight-sets win over Matt Laranetta in the No. 1 singles match, and the Cowboys’ Zac Thompson and Brady Slater came from behind to beat Kevin Kyger and Matt VanHemelryck in three games at No. 1 doubles. Winners for Mountain View included Mason Marel and Nolan King in singles, and the team of Nick Nizinski and Eric Watson in doubles. GIRLS TENNIS Sprague . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ———

Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 West Salem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 SALEM — Redmond resumed play against Sprague, playing both No. 3 and No. 4 matches to complete last week’s match.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit’s Kristen Parr reacts after missing a shot on the ninth hole while playing Broken Top Club Wednesday in a match against Mountain View. Summit won the contest. See story, Page D1. Genna Miller gave the Panthers (1-1-1 Central Valley Conference, 2-1-1 overall) a win at No. 1 singles and teammates Abby Cranston and Leslie Teater scored a win at No. 4 doubles. Against West Salem Redmond fared better, with wins from Megan McGinty and Chloe Woodward at No. 3 doubles and Leslie Teater and Abby Cranston at No. 4 doubles. Candace Siangco scored an important victory for Redmond at No. 4 singles, besting Becca Papendieck 5-7, 7-5, 6-1. SOFTBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 JUNCTION CITY — The Out-

laws came out swinging in their Sky-Em League opener against Junction City, scoring eight runs in three innings and shutting out the Tigers in the six-inning contest. Sisters pitcher Dara Kosanke registered nine strikeouts and gave up only two hits. Leading the Outlaws on offense were Kosanke, Taylor Walker, Carly Kreminski and Amber Milliman, each posting run-scoring doubles. The win boosted the Outlaws to 7-2 overall and 1-0 in league. BASEBALL North Salem . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14-2 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3 REDMOND — The Panthers (2-3 Central Valley Conference,

6-5 overall) were quick to get on the scoreboard in the first game and took an early 2-0 lead, but the home team struggled on the mound. Redmond trailed 7-2 in the fourth inning, but sophomore Daulton Hanks’ grand slam kept the Panthers in the game until the Vikings broke it open in the seventh with a fiverun uprising. Redmond pitcher Brian Follick put the Panthers back on track in the second game and held the Vikings to two runs on six hits. J.D. Abbas relieved in the sixth inning to earn the save. Redmond was led at the plate by Christian Welsh, who was two for four, and Cory Lucas, who was two for three. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SISTERS — The host Outlaws broke it open with seven runs in the fifth inning and won their Sky-Em League opener via the 10-run rule. Jordan Hodges scored the game-ending run on a bases-loaded walk to Eric Carlson with two outs in the bottom of the fifth. Hodges hit a two-run double earlier in the inning, and Brandon Morgan also had a two-run single in the decisive rally. Hodges finished three for four at the plate with three RBIs. Morgan was the winning pitcher, allowing four hits over five innings. Chase Kleint was two for two for Sisters (1-0 SkyEm, 8-1 overall). TRACK AND FIELD Bend defeats Crook County in relay event The host Lava Bears defeated Crook County 60-10 in the coed Bruin Relays meet. The low-key meet included unconventional races such as the shuttle hurdles: a 60-meter course run by each competitor of a coed four-person team. Crook County win the all-girls 800-meter relay (divided by distances of 100, 300 and 400 meters) in a time of 2 minutes, 5 seconds. The Cowgirls’ Tasha Stever clocked a fast split time of 1:05 in the 400-meter leg. Crook County also took the win in the 4-x-200 relay in 1:48. Bend competitors won the remaining events. Among the Lava Bears posting impressive marks, according to Bend coach Matt Craven, was Caleb Buzzas, with a winning 43-foot triple jump and a winning long jump of 22 feet, 1 inch. Bend’s J.C. Grim placed first in both the javelin (158 feet) and the high jump (6-2).

PREP SCOREBOARD BOYS TENNIS

Class 6A

Wednesday’s Results ———

CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE First game (5 innings) Redmond 430 42 — 13 15 0 North Salem 002 00 — 2 3 2 Callen and McCarthy; Luke and Whitney. W—Callen. L—Luke. 2B—Redmond: Friend, Au. Nitschelm, Heiberger. 3B—North Salem: Nordlien. HR—Redmond: Au. Nitschelm. Second game Redmond 015 200 2 — 10 16 1 North Salem 000 300 0 — 3 5 3 Callen and McCarthy, Friend (7); Nordlien, Luke (5) and Whitney. W—Callen. L—Nordlien. 2B—Redmond: Friend, Au. Nitschelm, Heiberger, Callen; North Salem: Nordlien. 3B— Redmond: Heiberger 2. HR—Redmond: Callen.

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE MOUNTAIN VIEW 6, CROOK COUNTY 2 At Mountain View Singles — Trevor Brown, CC, def. Matt Laranetta, MV, 6-3, 61; Mason Martel, MV, def. Marc Dawen, CC, 6-2, 6-0; Nolan King, MV, def. Dakota Umbarger, CC, 6-0, 6-1; Alek Mauldin, MV, won by default. Doubles — Zac Thompson/Brady Slater, CC, def. Kevin Kyger/ Matt VanHemelryck, MV, 4-6, 6-1, 6-4; Nick Nizinski/Eric Watson, MV, def. Gabe Alvarez/Josue Lopez, CC, 6-1, 6-2; Jake Robinson/ Dillon Warner, MV, won by default; Austin Sears/Brandon Hargous, MV, won by default.

GIRLS TENNIS Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 6A CENTRAL VAllEY CONFERENCE SPRAGUE 5, REDMOND 3 At Sprague Singles — Nicola Young, S, def. Lissa Brock, R, 6-2, 6-4; Landis Kwong, S, def. Monica Johnson, R, 7-2, 7-6, 7-5; Genna Miller, R, def. Lauren Mann, S, 7-5, 7-5; Bailey Brooks, S, def. Mandy Dollarhide, R, 2-6, 6-2, 6-2. Doubles — Carlie O’Connoll/Mackenzie Fraser, S, def. Haley Hartford/Karli Christensen, R, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2; Kamala Lapray/Megan Singleton, S, def. Emmalee Cron/Kayla Woychak, R, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4; Meagan McGinty/Chloe Woodward, R, def. Diana Goodwaters/Mallory Davis, S, 6-4, 6-1; Abby Cranston/Leslie Teater, R, def. Kylie Brooks/Maura Casad, S, 6-1, 7-5. ——— REDMOND 4, WEST SALEM 4 At West Salem Singles — Grace Linn, WS, def. Genna Miller, R, 6-0, 6-0; Krissy, WS, def. Mandy Dollarhide, R, 6-2, 6-0; Monica Johnson, R, def. Shayla Boyle, WS, 6-4, 6-0; Candace Siangco, R, def. Becca Papendieck, WS, 5-7, 7-5, 6-1. Doubles — Amy Lin/Ashley Spencer, WS, def. Karli Christensen/Kayla Woychak, R, 6-2, 6-3; Hollie Hurtley/Torrie Mogre, WS, def. Haley Hartford/Emmalee Cron, R, 6-4, 5-7, 6-2; Jesse McGinty/Chloe Woodward, R, def. Madi Weide/Krsitin Miller, WS, 6-4, 6-1; Leslie Teater/Abby Cranston, R, def. Chandler Redding/Maggie Fischer, WS, 6-2, 6-2.

SOFTBALL Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 4A SKY-EM CONFERENCE Sisters 233 003 x — 11 10 1 Junction City 000 000 x — 0 2 3 Kosanke and T. Walker; Steimetz and Bonstein. W—Kosanke. L—Steimetz. 2B—Junction City: Steimetz; Sisters: Kosanke, T. Walker, A. Milliman, Kreminski.

BASEBALL Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 6A CENTRAL VALLEY CONFERENCE First game North Salem 004 302 5 — 14 14 2 Redmond 200 700 0 — 9 10 2 Hartl, Snider (3), Hamilton (6) and Ferguson; Lucas, Young (3), Anderson (6), Abbas (6) and Branham. W—Hartl. L—Lucas. 2B—North Salem: Hamilton, Velasco. HR—North Salem: Ferguson 2, Hamilton, Velasco; Redmond: Hanks. ——— Second game North Salem 010 010 0 — 2 6 1 Redmond 001 110 x — 3 9 1 Rodriguez and Ferguson; Follick, Abbas (6) and Branham. W— Follick. L—Rodriguez. 2B—North Salem: Ferguson. HR—North Salem: Ryan.

gan. L—Rank. 2B—Sisters: Hodges 2, Hudson.

BOYS TRACK Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE THE DALLES-WAHTONKA 73.5, MOUNTAIN VIEW 71.5. At Mountain View 400-meter relay — 1, MV (Solomon Helms, Evan Malone, Cody Davis, Joel Skotte) 45.07; TDW, 45.42. 1,500 — 1, Cody Carter, TDW, 4:38.21; 2, Donnie Coulson, TDW, 4:38.66; 3, Sergio Valenciano, TDW, 4:46.70. 3,000 — 1, Donnie Coulson, TDW, 9:56.92; 2, Daniel Davidson, TDW, 11:00.38; 3, Greg Glessner, TDW, 11:33.68. 100 — 1, Joel Skotte, MV, 12.11; 2, Matt Murphy, MV, 12.17; 3, Cody Davis, MV, 12.32. 400 — 1, Mitch Modin, MV, 55.34; 2, D.J. Taphouse, TDW, 55.35; 3, Cody Carter, TDW, 57.31. 110 hurdles — 1, Solomon Helms, MV, 16.42; 2, Evan Malone, MV, 18.71; 3, Ryan Johnston, TDW, 18.79. 800 — 1, Ben Iremonger, TDW, 2:13.71; 2, Justin Holman, MV, 2:20.28; 3, Greg Glessner, TDW, 2:25.52. 200 — 1, Colton Rowland, TDW, 24.69; 2, Matt Murphy, MV, 24.71; 3, Kyle DePriest, TDW, 25.21. 300 hurdles — 1, Ryan Johnston, TDW, 41.68; 2, Evan Malone, MV, 43.24; 3, Jake Murray, TDW, 45.25. 1,600 relay — TDW, (Cody Carter, Ben Iremonger, Tyler Holeman, Colton Rowland), 3:48.57; 2, MV, 4:02.34. High jump — 1, Kenny Bent, MV, 6-2; 2, Blake Bosch, MV, 6-0; 3, Luke Conklin, TDW, 5-10. Discus — 1, Dylan Johnson, MV, 139-0; 2, James Atoe, TDW, 137-4; 3, Justin Warren, MV, 115-8. Pole vault — 1, Ben Iremonger, TDW, 12-7; 2, Tyler Holeman, TDW, 11-6; 3, Brent Dugick, TDW, 10-6. Shot — 1, James Atoe, TDW, 47-8; 2, Ryan Johnston, TDW, 41-6; 3, Hayden Czmowski, MV, 37-8.5. Javelin — 1, Justin Warren, MV, 152-10; 2, Jacob Whitmire, TDW, 146-3; 3, Tyler Martini, MV, 141-1. Triple jump — 1, Kenny Bent, MV, 42-9.5; 2, Harlin Wood, TDW, 36-10.5; 3, Hugo Chavarria, TDW, 36-9. Long jump — 1, Solomon Helms, MV, 20-8; 2, Kenny Bent, MV, 20-7; 3, Cody Davis, MV, 18-3.

400-meter relay — 1, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 53.36; 2, Mountain View, 54.08. 1,500 — 1, Marie Miller, TDW,5:51.91; 2, Amanda Lawrence, MV, 5:54.40; 3, Audrey Miller, TDW, 6:21.76. 3,000 — 1, Kallee Salber, MV, 14:36.15; 2, Sarah Brown, MV, 16:27.03. 100 — 1, Brianna Rosen, MV, 13.47; 2, Nikki McCall, TDW, 13.72; 3, Lindsey Rose, TDW, 14.53. 400 — 1, Laura Shrum, TDW, 62.73; 2, Anndria North, TDW, 63.73; 3, Logan Brown, MV, 66.83. 100 hurdles — 1, Madison Whitfield, TDW, 16.94; 2, Larissa Pless, MV, 19.60; 3, Kristen Linck, MV, 19.65. 800 — 1, Hayati Wolfenden, MV, 2:36.40; 2, Ayla Rosen, MV, 2:42.81; 3, Ana Olivan, TDW, 3:02.91. 200 — 1, Brianna Rosen, MV, 27.77; 2, Krysta Kroeger, MV, 28.84; 3, Shirley Allan, TDW, 30.03. 300 hurdles — 1, Laura Shrum, TDW, 52.51; 2, Kristen Linck, MV, 53.66; 3, Madison Whitfield, TDW, 53.76. 1,600 relay — 1, The Dalles-Wahtonka, 4:53.47; 2, Mountain View, no time. High jump — 1, Madison Whitfield, TDW, 5-4; 2, Madison Seevers, MV, 4-10; 3, Ciera Waldrup, MV, 4-08. Discus — 1, Hopper Cashman, MV, 105-11; 2, Leah Wilson, TDW, 95-6; 3, Shanna Cashman, MV, 94-5. Pole vault — 1, Jordan Blackwell, MV, 8-0; 2, Janelle Noga, MV, 7-6; 3, Sage Barnard-Davidson, TDW, 7-0. Shot — 1, Leah Wilson, TDW, 35-3; 2, Anna Roshak, MV, 338; 3, Meghan Ridling, MV, 32-4. Javelin — 1, Danika Noel, MV, 93-0; 2, Hannah Steria, MV, 89-10; 3, Ava Green, TDW, 89-5. Triple jump — 1, Laura Shrum, TDW, 32-3; 2, Lindsey Rose, TDW, 31-6; 3, Cassidy Smith, MV, 29-10. Long jump — 1, Lori Moore, TDW, 14-10.5; 2, Shirley Allan, TDW, 14-6; 3, Ciera Waldrup, MV, 13-5.

GIRLS GOLF Wednesday’s Results ———

Class 5A

Class 4A

Wednesday’s Results ———

INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE At Broken Top Club Team scores — Summit 4, Mountain View 2. Match play — Marlee Barton, S, def. Kersey Wilcox, MV, 4 and 3; Kristen Parr, S, def. Hailey Ostrom, MV, 4 and 3; Vanessa Woolhiser, MV, def. Rebecca Kerry, S, 7 and 5; Madi Mansberger, S, def. Kendra Hobbs, MV, 8 and 7; Ashley Moon, MV, def. Stacey Patterson, S, 5 and 4; Anna Schwab, S, def. Sierra SwiDrak, MV, 9 and 7.

SKY-EM LEAGUE (5 innings) Junction City 000 20 — 2 4 2 Sisters 040 17 — 12 10 1 Rank, Stroche (5) and Garrigos; Morgan and Stovall. W—Mor-

Class 5A INTERMOUNTAIN CONFERENCE MEET At Mountain View THE DALLES-WAHTONKA 72.5, MOUNTAIN VIEW 71.5.

BOYS LACROSSE

Ski Continued from D1 Despite a 12-year-old campaign to get snow-sport newcomers to take lessons and become avid mountaingoers, the conversion rate from newbie to active participant has risen only from about 15 percent since 1999 to about 16.7 percent today, according to RRC’s research. Women are dropping out faster than men around age 40, Fristoe said, which in turn can affect vacation plans for the whole family.

GIRLS TRACK

In the midst of those shifts is a slumping economy that helped dampen skier visits to 57.3 million last season, down from a record 60.5 million or so in the 2007-2008 season, according to the National Ski Areas Association. For now, the industry is still in the sweet spot of attracting baby boomers and their children, said Vail Resorts Inc. CEO Chris Jarnot. In fact, skier visits nationwide have routinely been about 57 million for the last decade. Yet there are shifts. Destination resorts like Aspen or Vail in Colorado have watched boomers fall in love with a mountain, make

Late Tuesday Result Thurston 7, Sisters 4

a tradition of bringing their families there every year, and maybe even buy property nearby, Jarnot said. “I think that pattern is going to die with that generation,” Jarnot said. Younger generations are looking for diverse, novel, extreme experiences, which might mean resorts reconnecting with visitors every four or five years, instead of every year, he said. Customers under age 30 are also more culturally and ethnically diverse and may have other ideas for vacation besides ski resorts, Fristoe said. “For years, the infrastructure was set up to appeal to the 55-year-old white

Continued from D1 “Guys don’t see his name (on the leaderboard) now and say, ‘It’s over,’” two-time PGA Tour winner Hunter Mahan said. “In 2000, when they saw his name, it was over.” Even Woods said winning isn’t everything — or the only thing. “It’s not about championships,” he said Monday. “It’s about how you live your life.”

Will a hangover afflict several of the favorites? The Houston Open prides itself on Augusta-like conditions that make for a perfect warm-up event. But several big names hope their play in Houston is not a predictor of things to come. Ernie Els tied for 44th. Phil Mickelson shot a second-round 76. And Padraig Harrington closed with a 77. Ugh. Steve Stricker, in his final Masters preamble, slogged through a 79-74 weekend at Bay Hill. “My focus was not good,” Stricker said. “Hopefully I got those shots out of my system.”

Can Fred Couples pull a Watson? Tom Watson came within one stroke of winning the British Open at 59. Perhaps that’s why people are giving Couples, 50, a legitimate chance this week. That, and he still hits it a mile. Many of his drives rolled within a few feet of Woods’ during their practice round Monday. And Couples has won three times in four starts this season on the Champions Tour. “He’s coming into this tour-

nament with championship trophies under his belt, holding on to these big, glass, crystal things, as well as huge checks,” Mickelson said. Couples’ take? The 1992 champion said winning would be a “pipe dream.”

Who will be the low Molinari brother? Edoardo has the height, a 3-inch edge over younger brother Francesco, who stands 5-foot-8. Francesco, 27, is also shorter off the tee. “But he hits a lot of fairways and greens,” Edoardo, 29, said recently. Whatever the edge in skills, the Molinaris will become the first brothers to compete together at Augusta National since Jumbo and Joe Ozaki in 2000. There have been 26 other sibling rivalries on display during the Masters.

Could the weather be a factor? Indeed. It’s expected to rain tonight. That could make the course play even longer than usual and spell trouble for relatively short knockers such as Stricker, Luke Donald and Mike Weir. Was Tiger serious about dialing down his emotions? Woods said as a consequence of being more respectful to the game — i.e. fewer flying clubs and f-bombs — he will try to “not get as hot” when he plays. “I’m not going to be as exuberant, either,” he said. “I’ve made a conscious decision to try to tone down my negative outbursts, and consequently, I’m sure my positive outbursts will be calmed down as well.” So, have we seen the last Woods fist pump? “No, no, no,” Woods pal Mark O’Meara said. “He’s still going to show some emotion.”

GOLF

Solid season has Big Easy at ease ahead of Masters By Nancy Armour The Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. — Ernie Els shook hands with fans between holes, and stopped to take a picture with one on his way up the 17th fairway. He even posed with a “Flat Stanley” as he made his way to the putting green. Don’t make too big a deal of it, but the Big Easy is feeling mighty at ease at this Masters. “I don’t want to get too overconfident,” Els said Wednesday at the Par-3 tournament. “But at least I’ve brought a little game here.” That’s a bit of an understatement. The three-time major champion comes to Augusta National playing his best golf in years. He ended a two-year drought at the World Golf Championship at Doral, then became the tour’s only double winner two weeks later with a victory at the Arnold Palmer Invitational. It was the first time Els had won backto-back tournaments in seven years. He has four top-10 finishes in his eight PGA Tour starts this year, and has climbed to eighth in the world rankings, up nine spots from where he finished last season. “I haven’t been in this kind of form coming in here for many years,” Els said. Not that it’s drawn much notice. Els, Steve Stricker, Anthony Kim — no one is getting anything more than a cursory glance with Tiger Woods playing his first tournament since the shocking sex scandal that turned the world’s most famous athlete into tabloid fodder. Even defending Masters champion Angel Cabrera was able to walk by a group of reporters without being stopped Tuesday. They

male,” Fristoe said. Things are changing, though. In the last decade, more resorts have embraced snowboarding, added terrain parks and boosted offerings beyond skiing, for instance with summer mountain biking. Blue Mountain Ski Area in Palmerton, Pa., is considering getting into the water-park business, CEO Barbara Green said. Vail Resorts has started offering guided skiing for groups, so customers can still ride the mountains like a local without shelling out big bucks for individual private lessons. Customer service is key, and so is

Masters chairman scolds Tiger AUGUSTA, Ga. — On the day Tiger Woods arrived at the Masters, he changed out of his spikes after playing nine holes, walked across the parking lot and went upstairs to the office of Augusta National chairman Billy Payne. Payne would not discuss details of their Sunday afternoon meeting. Based on his blunt criticism of Woods during his annual press conference Wednesday, they probably weren’t talking about how Woods was hitting the ball or his chances of winning a fifth green jacket. “It is simply not the degree of his conduct that is so egregious here,” Payne said. “It is the fact that he disappointed all of us, and more importantly, our kids and our grandkids. Our hero did not live up to the expectations of the role model we saw for our children.” — The Associated Press

were all too busy keeping an eye out for Mark O’Meara, Woods’ playing partner Tuesday and Wednesday. “People are not going to be talking about who’s in form until probably Thursday morning when we start the event,” Els, who didn’t make the cut for the formal pre-tournament interviews, said after his win at Bay Hill. “It’s going to be all about Tiger and him coming back and everything. So I think we will all be sideshows until Thursday morning. And I think we’re fine with that. Everybody is fine with that.”

grooming for families, resorts said. And there is room for growth, said Mt. Hood Meadows Ski Resort CEO Matthew Drake, who expects low, double-digit percentage growth in skier visits this season, thanks to good snow. His region of the Pacific Northwest places a strong value on outdoor recreation over sitting on the couch. “The snow-sports industry can do a lot to improve the health of the nation, get folks out improving their fitness with family and friends,” Drake said. That sounds about right to Wilson. “It’s no fun to go up and just watch other people ski,” he said.


H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

D6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

FLY-TYING CORNER By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

The Hemingway Special (aka Hemingway Caddis and Sheralee’s Speckled Sedge) was originated by Sheralee and Mike Lawson in the 1970s to imitate an adult caddis. The Lawsons named the pattern in honor of Jack Hemingway, the noted writer and conservationist. This is a tent-wing style caddis fly great for fishing slow-moving streams where the trout have a long time to examine a fly before they sip it in. Carry this pattern in several variations to match hatches on different streams. Tied in black, it can represent a caddis or a little black stone. Apply dry fly floatant and fish with a long leader to rising fish. To get the fly to present a lower-profile, trim the underside hackle. Tie the Hemingway Special with thread to match the body on a No. 12-18 TMC 100. Build the body with Superfine or Antron dubbing, wrapped with a medium hackle. Tie in an underwing of wood duck flank fibers. For the wings, use mallard quill segments tied tentstyle. Tie a thorax of peacock herl and finish with a medium hackle.

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

Hemingway Special, courtesy of Camp Sherman Fly Shop.

Steelhead Continued from D1 On the Sandy, with a boat to carry the load, I expected Campbell to come wellarmed. He was, with graphite spinning rods, casting rods and a 1970s vintage Garcia fiberglass stick sporting a Zebco Cardinal 4. Rigged with spoons, drift gear or floats, each rod was ready for action. Not to be outdone, Hambly brought five of his own rods. I laid my spinning setup next to a dozen other rods and looked to my perch. A pontoon boat is not properly classified as a boat, in my opinion. Rather, it’s a modern version of Tom Sawyer’s raft. Hambly, who has launched some wellknown anglers from the front seats of his craft, warned me: “When we start down through the whitewater, you’re going to want to hang on to the boat. I’ll show you where Dave Eng and my dad went in the river. That day was a lot colder than this one.” You put your feet on an aluminum bar, wedge your rear into the seat and try not to look down, because there is no floor. We donned our life jackets and pointed downstream into the rollers. A big wave came over the pontoon and drenched me to the eyebrows. A halfgallon of 43-degree snowmelt went down the front of my waders. Ah yes, that Harry Whitewater. Know him well. We drifted beneath the big green pipeline and pulled in to the bank, river left. Campbell handed me a Lamiglas rigged with a Thill float and a pearl leadhead jig threaded through a bubblegum-pink plastic worm. A tactic responsible for the undoing of many a British Columbia sea-run rainbow, fishing pink plastic under a float has become fashionable on rivers in the western United States. I had employed smaller versions of the bait for resident rainbows, but never for steelhead. “Let’s let Lewis get the first fish,” Campbell said. “Stand there,” he pointed. “The fish will be between that rock and the riffle.” I love it when people talk

N 

 B

 Fly-fishing class slated this month

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Jason Hambly, of Troutdale, battles a bright hatchery fish in the shallows while fishing the Sandy River last week. to me that way. Third cast, as far as I could throw it. The line swept down on the surface current in a large belly and I lifted the rod tip for an upstream mend. My float went down, straight down, out of sight. When I swept the rod up and over my head, a fish rolled — a flash of silver in green water. After a few minutes, I guided a 7pound native into the shallows. The pink worm trailed out of her mouth. For a moment we admired the fish, then we watched her kick away. Downstream, in a long, deep run, Hambly stood on a high rock and cast across, feathering the inside of an unseen ledge. When he set the hook, a husky hatchery fish flashed. Five minutes later, Hambly brought the 8-pound female to hand. One for the freezer. We paddled to the far bank and worked the ledge from a different angle. My float plunged. Three head-shakes later, the line broke at the knot and the last thing I saw of that fish was the pink worm in its jaw and a broad tail that broke the surface as it turned away. Campbell’s first fish took a pink Okie

Drifter with white yarn in the tailout of a long run. This one was fresh, chrome, probably 10 days out of Astoria. Campbell played it skillfully to keep Harry Whitewater from claiming it in the rapids. We bounced over submerged boulders, through rock gardens and narrow chutes where the water stood tall. “That’s where Dave and my dad went in the river,” Hambly said. I held on, not wishing to have my name added to the local lore. Seven fish for eight hookups. The only thing better than catching steelhead in winter is catching winter steelhead in late March and early April. When the snowmelt runs cold, and those chrome and rainbow rockets charge upstream to their ancestral spawning grounds, bubblegum pink is my favorite color. Gary Lewis is the host of High Desert Outdoorsman and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

FISHING REPORT

Fall River offers best fly angling in the region Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon as provided by Oregon Fish and Wildlife Department fisheries biologists: CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Closed to angling through May 21, 2010. The reservoir will be restocked with catchable rainbow trout in May of 2010. CRESCENT LAKE: Boat launching access to the lake is available at the Crescent Lake Lodge. There is currently good opportunity for lake trout and brown trout. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing has been excellent. Population estimates from 2009 show an increase in redband populations and a decrease in whitefish populations; fishing is good. Dry fly action is increasing; however, nymphs are still providing the most success. Flows on the Crooked River are currently 77cfs. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the northern boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Anglers can advantage of these early spring-like days by targeting trout with dry flies. Look for blue-winged olive and caddis hatches during mid-day. Stonefly nymphs will also start getting more active, and fish

will certainly start keying in on them. DESCHUTES RIVER (Lake Billy Chinook to Benham Falls): No recent reports. The flows are now well-suited for fishing. This reach of the Deschutes provides winter angling opportunity for brown trout and redband trout. Please note this reach of river is restricted to the use of flies and lures only. FALL RIVER: Fall River above the falls remains open to fly angling only. Probably the best fly fishing in the region right now with good hatches of bluewing olive, midges and tan caddis. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Spring is often the best time to fish for 12 to 18-inch rainbow and brown trout in Haystack Reservoir. Trolling is the most effective method, however, bank anglers are often successful near the dam and fishing platform. HOOD RIVER: Flows are good on the Hood River with good numbers of winter steelhead being caught by anglers. Spring weather has been warming the Hood and increasing catch rates as the water warms. The peak of the winter steelhead run on the Hood will be the end of March and beginning of April. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The Metolius Arm is open. Angler effort has been light. Several legal-sized bull trout (greater than 24inches) have been caught, but most bull trout being reported are in

the 16 to 20-inch range. METOLIUS RIVER: Fishing has been up and down but is generally good. There have been strong hatches of blue-wing olive and October caddis, with a few March Browns as well. The mainstem Metolius upstream from Allingham Bridge is currently closed to angling. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: Anglers should continue to consider lunchtime outings, as hatches are strong in the noon hour. Anglers should be aware that beginning in 2010 new fishing regulations go into effect that permanently restricts fishing to artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Shore fishing has been good between the boat ramp and the dam. Opportunities for 12 to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: No recent reports. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: The Prineville Youth Fishing Pond is temporarily closed for repairs. SUTTLE LAKE: No recent angler reports, though the lake is accessible and fishable. TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake has been stocked with rainbow trout and should

offer a great opportunity to catch trout this winter. WALTON LAKE: Closed to angling through May 21, 2010. The reservoir will be restocked with catchable rainbow trout

in May of 2010. The boat ramp and campground will remain closed for repairs until fall 2010. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-4166500 for more information.

Fly Fishing Beginning and Beyond, a class on the basics of fly-fishing, will be offered this month through Central Oregon Community College Community Learning. Students will learn about fly-fishing skills and techniques, as well as about fish habitat, fly tackle, equipment, knots and casting. One class session will meet at a local pond, where students will be able to practice their skills. The class will meet at a Sisters High School classroom on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 to 8:30 p.m., from April 20 through April 29, and at a local pond from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, April 24. Cost is $10 for fly-fishing materials, paid to the instructor. For more information, call COCC Community Learning at 541-383-7270 or go to http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Class scheduled to cover basics of GPS REDMOND — A two-session class introducing the basics of how to use GPS (Global Positioning System) will be offered starting next week at the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District office. Cost is $40 for the class, a mix of classroom and field practical exercise. The class will cover system setup and operation, marking waypoints and more, all while working with a map and compass. The class is designed for GPS owners. GPS units for boats and cars will not be covered. The RAPRD office is located at 465 S.W. Rimrock Drive. Reservations are required. To reserve a seat in the class or for more information, call Blake Miller at 541-280-0573. — Bulletin staff reports

THE SILENT ALL ELECTRIC F OUR W HEEL DRIVE VEHICLE IS HERE! • Full service dept. on all electric vehicles • Financing Available

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BOATING BOATER CLASS AND BOAT INSPECTIONS: The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office has scheduled a free boater education class on Saturday, April 17; the Sheriff’s Office Marine Patrol Division will conduct boat safety examinations in Crooked River Ranch at the Fire Hall and Madras at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m; the boater education class will be held at the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office in Madras from 6-8 p.m.; Contact: 541-475-6520.

FISHING DESCHUTES STEELHEADERS: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Central Oregon Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; contact eflowerchild@yahoo.com. TIGHT LINES AUCTION AND DINNER: May 13, 6 p.m., at Aspen Hall in Bend’s Shevlin Park; $35 (includes dinner, drinks, and auction); join the Deschutes River Conservancy for the evening and bid on fishing trips throughout the West and other items; to register, call 541-382-4077 (ext. 10) or visit www.deschutesriver.org THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB:

Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 SE Reed Market Road. Contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK FOUNDATION BANQUET: Saturday, April 17, 5 p.m., at the Deschutes County Fairgrounds; RMEF protects and enhances elk and other wildlife habitat; tickets must be purchased in advance; registration is required by April 1; 541-383-8518 or www.rmef.org. THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Stafford Inn, 1773 N.E. Third St., Prineville. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION:

Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

• 160 pounds of torque • 40 hp

SHOOTING BEND TRAP CLUB: Trap shooting Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: Two 5-stand courses with towers; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; open Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m.; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Trap, skeet, and sporting clays fields; rifle/ pistol ranges; open to the community; training programs and competition; families welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

• 4x4 • Warn winch • FREE gun rack with purchase PERFECT UTILITY VEHICLE FOR THE HUNTER, RANCHER AND FARMER

www.cascadebadboys.com 541-389-2259 1155 SW Division off Reed Mkt. Rd.


O

E

ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

‘Breaking Bad’ Bryan Cranston calls his dark role as Walt White a dream come true, Page E2

OUTING

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

Winter shows its face on high trails By David Jasper The Bulletin

After struggling to get a foothold this season, winter seems to be gaining ground, at least at the middle and higher elevations. That’s according to Deschutes National Forest Trails Specialist Chris Sabo, who said winter trail conditions have improved greatly. The area west of U.S. Highway 97 is experiencing “probably some of the best winter conditions we have had all winter,” he said. “Probably 5 feet, 6 feet (of snow) up in the high country … over the last week.” Dutchman Flat is seeing very good conditions for motorized and nonmotorized users, while use has dropped off substantially, a trend that will likely continue as spring attempts to advance. Trail users who do venture up should not let their guard down where avalanche risk is concerned. Sabo recommends users “do their avalanche assessments along the way. With this new snow, there’s likely some instability layers deep in the snowpack from earlier in the winter.” Deschutes County has begun plowing operations along Cascade Lakes Highway, an effort that has reached Elk Lake from the south and is proceeding north toward Devils Lake. Sabo said snowmobilers should travel no further south than Elk Lake for the remainder of the season. See Trails / E6

TRAIL UPDATE

Photos by Betsy Q. Cliff / The Bulletin

Reporter Betsy Q. Cliff and her husband enjoyed a wintry hike with their 6-month-old son Charlie at Tumalo Creek near the Tumalo Falls last weekend. The Cliff family found packing a baby for a hike can add extra work but is rewarding and definitely doable.

Hike with your tyke Sh

evl

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST Tumalo Creek

in

Pk .

BEND Rd

.

.

Rd ners

i

Skyl

rive ry D

tu Cen

Tumalo Falls 46

Cure cabin fever with a trek toward Tumalo Falls

Cascade Lakes Hwy. 97 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

BELOW: Tumalo Creek cuts through the snow on a late winter day last weekend.

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

fter a week of nasty weather, cabin fever had taken hold at my house last weekend. If we didn’t leave the house soon, both my husband and I were going to go crazy. The problem: We have a 6-month-old son. As much as I was resisting bundling myself up in snow gear (in April!) I was even less excited to bundle him up, too. But the dog needed to run and we needed to get out. So we bundled. And we got in the car and headed up to Tumalo Falls. Hiking with a baby brings challenges, for sure. First, there’s the hassle factor. Because we didn’t know exactly what the conditions would be when we got to the trail, we tried our best to be prepared for whatever weather we found. We made sure we packed extra bottles, extra toys and extra clothes. Then, there’s the issue of expec-

A

Cabin fever set in at the Cliff house last weekend, even for family dog Dublin. Here, she goes for a chunk of snow near Tumalo Creek. tations. My husband and I have never been hard-core trail rats, but we try to find easier hikes now than we did pre-baby. To keep hiking enjoyable for kids at any age, Dr. Rick Cuddihy, a pediatrician at Bend Memorial Clinic, suggests being conservative in where you go and how long you plan to be gone. Take what you would typically do and “divide by two,” he said, “in terms of distance and hours out.” We decided to tromp around in the snow near the Tumalo Falls. We didn’t think we’d make it all the way to the falls, a four-mile trip out and back, so we decided to pack our snowshoes and wander near Tumalo Creek. See Outing / E6

SPOTLIGHT Free equestrian expo set for Saturday T&T Ranch, located at 15477 Sky Ranch Lane, Haines, will host Celebrate the Horse, an equestrian expo. The event will include presentations throughout the day on equine acupuncture, equine podiatry and nutrition. Vendors will also be on hand selling a variety of items for horses and riders. The event is from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, and admission is free. Contact: 541-856-3356 or www.tnthorsemanship.com.

Banff film tour to stop at Tower Theatre One of the most prestigious mountain festivals in the world, The Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour, will bring the spirit of outdoor adventure to the Tower Theatre in Bend on April 25. The festival features awardwinning films and audience favorites from approximately 300 films entered in the annual festival in Banff, and this year’s tour includes an excerpt from “Mont-Blanc Speed Flying,” a sequel to the 1980s cult ski film “Apocalypse Snow,” as well as “MedeoZ,” the story of a photographer’s mission to capture six mountain sports in a single shot. The show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $23 and are available at the Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend. Contact: 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

When adopting a pet, Cranston’s turn as a drug trader is rewardingly dark older is often better By Greg Braxton Los Angeles Times

Dear Abby: We are seniors like “Thinking About Adopting in Las Vegas” (Feb. 2), who wants to adopt a dog. He may find it difficult to adopt one, especially since big hearts and lots of love and patience many times aren’t considered “enough” today. We were denied every dog we wanted to adopt until a volunteer at Petfinder.com advised us that considering our ages, we should adopt a senior dog. We took their advice and have been blessed with 9-year-old Benji for almost a year. Puppies are like grandchildren — full of love, but they can leave us seniors exhausted. Senior dogs nap, are more mellow than puppies and are usually housebroken. If that man outlives his dog, he’ll know he gave his precious little one a good home and lots of love. If Petfinder is in his area, they will make sure your little one is adopted into the perfect home — not just “any” home. — Benji’s Parents In Washington State Dear Benji’s Parents: Thank you for supporting the adoption of older dogs. Readers provided some doggone good resources for adopting — or acting as a foster parent — for an abandoned or abused dog. Read on: Dear Abby: In most states people can now create a trust for their pet. They can put funds into it and, in this way, benefit their pet by naming a trustee and caretaker to assure it will be taken care of until it passes away. In the trust they can state all their wishes, as singer Dusty Springfield did in stating she wanted her dog fed only imported baby food, its bed lined with her nightgowns and her records played when it went to sleep. — Marc S. In Cleveland Dear Abby: Most Humane Societies now offer a “senior for

DEAR ABBY senior” discount where a qualified senior citizen can adopt a senior companion animal, usually 7 years old or older, with all the fees waived. Please tell “Thinking” that he can find what he’s looking for in companionship, and a middle-aged or older dog that would usually be passed up at the pound will get a new leash on life. — Tanna, Diamond Bar, Calif. Dear Abby: Many dog rescues need kind, loving foster homes for abused and abandoned animals who are awaiting adoption. It is hard to give up a dog after you have fostered and taken care of it for a while, and you do have the option of adopting it yourself, but believe me, this is definitely a worthwhile cause. When you take in a foster, their eyes are dull. But after receiving love and attention from a caregiver, those eyes sparkle and you know you have done something wonderful. — Jillie In Humble, Texas Dear Abby: After practicing as a vet for 35 years, may I offer a suggestion to your readers? Wonderful older pets are put to sleep every day at shelters across the country. These pets are usually house-trained, leash-trained, calm and eager for love and attention. Puppies (and kittens), on the other hand, need constant attention, training and activity. Visit a pet shelter, and you may find your “perfect” companion patiently waiting for your love. — Ken Cohn, Tucson, Ariz. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

LOS ANGELES — It’s a tough job, and Bryan Cranston is more than glad to do it — playing Walter H. White, the frazzled antihero at the center of AMC’s “Breaking Bad,” that is. Though playing White, a meek chemistry teacher who gradually transforms into a hard-core drug dealer after he finds out he has life-threatening cancer, is “a dream come true,” Cranston pointed out that the character and the series’ increasingly dark tones have taken an emotional and physical toll on him. “At the end of the day, I take two moist towels, put them on my head and wash all of Walt’s energy off of me, and leave him at work,” Cranston said, sighing heavily. After decades of being mostly relegated to guest shots and supporting roles in TV and film, the actor has found a breakout role in AMC’s “Breaking Bad.” Cranston was previously best known as the buffoonish father on “Malcolm in the Middle,” but “Breaking” has scored him two consecutive Emmys for outstanding actor in a drama series, an achievement that has propelled him to the top tier of TV dramatic actors. And the character of White, whose initial rationale for getting into the drug trade was to give his family a financial foundation after he died, now joins a gallery of prominent antiheroes such as gangster Tony Soprano (“The Sopranos”), corrupt detective Vic Mackey (“The Shield”) and advertising hotshot Don Draper (“Mad Men”) at the center of complex dramas. Additionally, the show has established on AMC, which also airs “Mad Men,”

Bryan Cranston stars in his Emmywinning role as the drug-dealing ex-teacher in AMC’s “Breaking Bad.” Before playing Walter White, Cranston played Hal the dad on “Malcolm in the Middle.”

‘Breaking Bad’ When: 10 p.m. Sundays Where: AMC

Courtesy AMC via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

as a venue for quality original programming. In its third-season premiere this month, the series drew its largest audience ever, attracting more than 3 million viewers. “Breaking Bad” has grown consistently darker as creator Vince Gilligan maps out what he calls White’s journey from “Mr. Chips to Scarface.” Cranston, who directed the season opener, says he is particularly excited about the upcoming episodes: Even though he had his doubts when “Breaking Bad” started that it would work, he now has total confidence in its direction. “What made me want to do this in the beginning was the notion of taking a character and completely changing him from one kind of person to another,” he said last week while relaxing in the immaculately tasteful San Fernando Valley home he shares with his wife, actress Robin Dearden, and their young daughter. He added, “That’s never happened on TV before. I knew

we would have to find a way to make this man sympathetic. If we didn’t make him relatable or identifiable to the majority of the audience, we wouldn’t have a show. His actions are indefensible. All we were hoping for was to get an understanding of why he’s doing this, not to condone his actions.” Still, despite the critical ac-

claim surrounding “Breaking Bad,” Cranston and its cast, including Aaron Paul, Anna Gunn and Dean Norris, catching the cultural zeitgeist has been more elusive than it has been for other A-list dramas such as “The Sopranos,” “Mad Men” or “The West Wing.” Entertainment-oriented magazines have passed him by for covers. Though “Mad Men’s” Jon Hamm and January Jones, who have not won Emmys, have hosted “Saturday Night Live,” Cranston has not gotten the call. Gilligan, who praised Cranston as a solid and “courageous” actor, said he is mystified: “Bryan truly deserves to be more noticed. He is much more a chameleon than most actors, and he truly disappears into his role. “Perhaps it’s that quality that has kept him from getting more covers or things like that. Hopefully that will change because he can absolutely do anything. If he hosted ‘Saturday Night Live,’ he would hit it out of the park.”

Find Your Dream Home In

cPh

s Turf, Inc.

SERY ” R U ro w n N g y l l a c

Real Estate

M

W e s p e c i a li z e i n “ l

Every Saturday

o

TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

541.306.3750

541-546-9081 decden@bendbroadband.com Window Treatments • Lighting • Furniture • Bedding & More

2019 SW Park Lane • Culver

Serving Central Oregon Since 1946

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com

CREATIVE LIGHTING 541-382-0968 635 SE BUSINESS WAY • BEND, OR 97702

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

THURSDAY PRIME TIME 4/8/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News 4595 World News 156 News 69021 NBC News 11972 News 3381 News 9934 Judge Judy 5885 Inside Ed. 4408 Funniest Home Videos 8750 Jim 9243 Malcolm 8866 Electric 1021 Fetch! Ruff 682 News 2779 NBC News 7330 Reba ‘PG’ 92408 Reba ‘PG’ 11021 Christina 57458 Burt Wolf 28311 Travels 3069 Europe 5392

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 99205 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 28682 News 9175 CBS News 7917 World News 4021 Millionaire 8601 Two Men 5779 Two Men 9359 Simpsons 5779 Simpsons 9359 Wolf: Travels 595 Business 175 News 4243 News 5595 King 18934 King 32514 Europe 25224 Travels 16576 Burt Wolf 2205 Business 6885

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! 4359 Wheel 205 Jeopardy! 89885 Wheel 98021 Access H. 3525 Scrubs ‘14’ 9311 Ent 5021 The Insider 4885 Simpsons 6779 Simpsons 8243 The Office 6779 The Office 8243 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 1137 Live at 7 (N) 5243 Inside Ed. 1779 ’70s Show 57412 ’70s Show 38798 Garden 89934 Workshop 45088 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 52750

8:00

8:30

FlashForward (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 3359 Community 65205 Parks 77040 Survivor: Heroes vs. Villains 92330 FlashForward (N) ‘14’ Å 30514 Bones ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å 74972 News 74972 Art Beat 7205 Field Guide 9040 Community 1663 Parks 8458 The Vampire Diaries (N) ’ 92972 Woodsmith 98682 Moment 17717 Art Beat 2953 Field Guide 1088

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Grey’s Anatomy Blink ‘14’ 4144953 (10:01) Private Practice ’ ‘14’ 6682 The Office 86885 30 Rock 30427 The Marriage Ref (N) ’ ‘PG’ 91205 CSI: Crime Scene Investigat’n 89866 The Mentalist (N) ‘14’ Å 82953 Grey’s Anatomy Blink ‘14’ 2260359 (10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ 20137 Fringe (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å 61408 News 32595 TMZ ‘PG’ 41243 ›› “My Super Ex-Girlfriend” (2006) Uma Thurman, Anna Faris. ’ 84359 ››› “The Rape of Europa” (2006, Documentary) ’ 3972 The Office 55311 30 Rock 56514 The Marriage Ref (N) ’ ‘PG’ 77021 Supernatural 99 Problems ‘14’ 89408 Married... 66392 Married... 75040 Art Work 75717 Painting 96309 Mexico 73682 Julia 82330 ››› “The Rape of Europa” (2006, Documentary) ’ 71885

11:00

11:30

News 9137798 (11:35) Nightline News 1438345 Jay Leno News 4764069 Golf 53603779 Inside 47582446 (11:35) Nightline King of Hill 38682 Name Earl 59359 South Park 38682 South Park 59359 House of Life: Jewish 70363 News 4759137 Jay Leno Roseanne 63972 Roseanne 53779 Christina 47934 Burt Wolf 60069 House of Life: Jewish 67866

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 868595 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 993791 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 193999 The First 48 Hale Storm ‘14’ 593755 Fugitive Chronicles (N) ‘PG’ 343232 Fugitive Chronicles ‘PG’ 6030359 130 28 8 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å 533137 ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York ››› “Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Anthony Edwards. A hot-shot Navy jet pilot ››› “Top Gun” (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, 102 40 39 Mafia. Å 511682 downs MiGs and loves an astrophysicist. Å 840311 Anthony Edwards. Å 838576 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4834972 Lost Tapes ‘PG’ Lost Tapes ‘PG’ Tape 7473514 Lost Tapes ‘14’ Lost Tapes ‘14’ Lost Tapes ‘PG’ Tape 5109750 Lost Tapes ‘PG’ Tape 5067088 Lost Tapes ‘14’ 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 7463137 Real Housewives of Jersey 450446 Real Housewives of Jersey 341359 Real Housewives of NYC 966682 Real Housewives of NYC 975330 Real Housewives of NYC 962866 Real Housewives of NYC 9274934 Real Housewives of NYC 137243 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Lewis Family ’ ‘PG’ Å 3190595 Smarter 6755311 Smarter 6774446 Blue Collar Comedy 3111088 True Blue: Ten Years 3114175 Blue Collar Comedy 6739175 190 32 42 53 World’s Strictest Parents 6745934 The NEW Age of Wal-Mart 943866 Biography on CNBC 157972 Mad Money 133392 The NEW Age of Wal-Mart 153156 Biography on CNBC 156243 Ripped 413040 Fast Cash ‘G’ 51 36 40 52 Big Money East 618408 Larry King Live (N) Å 424175 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å 290205 Larry King Live Å 627175 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 697934 Anderson Cooper 360 Å 229717 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 511040 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 68866 Scrubs ’ 65779 Scrubs ’ 89359 Daily Show 36779 Colbert 78243 Tosh.0 ‘14’ 45427 Futurama 24934 Futurama 35137 Ugly 50507 South Park 40392 South Park 59040 Daily Show 30682 Colbert 12595 135 53 135 47 Married... 49243 The Buzz 5363 Bend City Edition PM Edition 9717 Cooking 9999 City Club of Central Oregon 72446 RSN 8972 RSN 91137 RSN Movie Night 50137 PM Edition 96682 Health 64156 11 Capital News Today 747589 Today in Washington 802088 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 346663 Deck 173885 Wizards 420205 Montana 179069 “Return to Halloweentown” (2006) ’ ‘PG’ 6629840 Phineas and Ferb Phineas 615446 Montana 691866 Wizards 248798 Deck 485392 87 43 14 39 Jonas ‘G’ 440069 Jonas ‘G’ 152392 Phineas 159205 Life Mammals ’ ‘PG’ Å 993971 Life Fish ’ ‘PG’ Å 898327 Life Mammals ’ ‘PG’ Å 648804 Life Fish ’ ‘PG’ Å 685359 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab 529934 Cash Cab 271885 Cash Cab 278798 Cash Cab 252750 Life ’ ‘PG’ Å 298363 SportsCenter (Live) Å 441717 Baseball Tonight Å 421953 SportsCenter (Live) Å 424040 SportsCenter (Live) Å 395935 21 23 22 23 Golf The Masters, First Round From Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Ga. 524156 SportsNation Å 3199866 SportsNation Å 3102330 NASCAR 7832750 Winter X Games Europe 6600953 Poker 3025359 22 24 21 24 Baseball 6620717 College Hockey NCAA Tournament -- Boston College vs. Miami (Ohio) (Live) Å 2055311 Boxing 2795866 Boxing 5228088 Who’s Number 1? Å 5204408 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 5217972 College Football 1979 Sugar Bowl -- Alabama vs. Penn State 8370446 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Jones Jr. vs. Ruiz 5916862 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 70s Show 872663 70s Show 896243 › “Billy Madison” (1995) Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. Å 863175 › “Billy Madison” (1995) Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. Å 693243 The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 869359 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 142934 Hannity (N) 2725156 On the Record 1404514 The O’Reilly Factor 1480934 Hannity 1400798 On the Record 1403885 Glenn Beck 2053779 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 4519250 Home 4161576 Cooking 4191717 Minute 4182069 Challenge 1214934 Good Eats Good Eats Iron Chef America 1243446 Cakes 5118408 Cakes 5127156 Good Eats Unwrap 9154717 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont NASCAR 73798 Beavers 63311 Unscripted 54663 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Oakland Athletics 197224 Bellator Fighting Championships 24021 20 45 28* 26 Birding 54175 That ’70s Show That ’70s Show ››› “Double Jeopardy” (1999, Suspense) Tommy Lee Jones. 1494137 ›› “Along Came a Spider” (2001, Suspense) Morgan Freeman. 1499682 ››› “Double Jeopardy” (1999, Suspense) Tommy Lee Jones. 5969069 131 Buck 6941330 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 1127066 House 2169311 House 6935779 First 2185359 My First Sale ‘G’ Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters House 5071330 House 8816601 House 1776663 176 49 33 43 Income 2189175 Hooked: Illegal Drugs 8751972 Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 4218663 Modern Marvels (N) ‘PG’ 4227311 Food Tech ‘PG’ Å 4247175 Pawn 4924069 Pawn 4933717 The History of Sex ‘14’ 9512088 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Hippies ‘PG’ Å 8823514 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 844791 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 687682 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 696330 Project Runway ‘PG’ Å 683866 Project Runway (N) ‘PG’ 686953 Models 967330 Runway 199798 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘PG’ 155408 Maddow Show 41653156 Countdown-Olbermann 76098088 Maddow Show 76074408 Hardball Å 76087972 Countdown-Olbermann 76097359 Maddow Show 75440682 56 59 128 51 Countdown-Olbermann 57472798 Disaster 870205 Cribs 894885 The Challenge 672750 America’s Best Dance Crew 698798 America’s Best Dance Crew 678934 America’s Best Dance Crew 671021 Taking the Stage (N) ‘PG’ 850601 192 22 38 57 (4:30) 16 and Pregnant ‘14’ 909576 Sponge 279427 iCarly ‘G’ 269040 iCarly ‘G’ 250392 iCarly ‘G’ 530040 iCarly ‘G’ 256576 Malcolm 556088 Malcolm 535595 Lopez 346798 Lopez 876514 Chris 136408 Chris 145156 Chris 341243 Chris 922392 82 46 24 40 Sponge 527576 The Unit Security ‘PG’ Å 781953 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 979021 CSI: Crime Scene 995069 ›› “Blade: Trinity” (2004, Horror) Wesley Snipes, Kris Kristofferson. ’ 811514 Jail ‘14’ 865514 132 31 34 46 DEA Up the Ladder ’ ‘14’ 883750 Stargate SG-1 ‘PG’ Å 3715359 ›› “Hostel” (2006, Horror) Jay Hernandez, Derek Richardson. 8533243 ›› “Hostel Part II” (2007, Horror) Lauren German, Roger Bart. 9567953 › “See No Evil” (2006) 3297359 133 35 133 45 Stargate Universe Space 7973840 Behind 7090446 David J. 7445601 Winning 7442514 This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å 2747359 Live-Holy Land Praise 8508175 Jeffrey 4507885 Changing-World Evolution Experiment 2736243 205 60 130 Friends 248682 Friends 245595 Office 269175 Seinfeld 516595 Seinfeld 265359 ››› “Men in Black” (1997) Tommy Lee Jones, Will Smith. Å 605953 Fam. Guy 792088 Fam. Guy 778408 Lopez Tonight (N) ‘14’ 216243 16 27 11 28 King 536359 ›››› “Libeled Lady” (1936) Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Myrna Loy. Editor’s fian- ››› “Dangerous” (1935) Bette Davis. A man offers an alcoholic ›› “Slightly Dangerous” (1943, Comedy) Lana Turner, Robert (10:15) ››› “A Slight Case of Murder” (1938, Comedy) Edward “Dangerously” 101 44 101 29 cee, lawyer trick heiress suing paper. Å (DVS) 7867446 36352953 actress a chance to fix her life. 4760069 Young, Walter Brennan. Å 51195514 G. Robinson, Jane Bryan. Å 9455137 Say Yes 539427 Say Yes 520779 LA Ink ’ ‘PG’ Å 904717 Police Women of Maricopa 980137 Police Women of Maricopa 993601 LA Ink Feeling the Heat ‘PG’ 903088 Police Women of Maricopa 579205 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear ’ ‘PG’ 818446 NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets (Live) Å 172137 Inside the NBA (Live) Å 994330 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 500175 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Chicago Bulls (Live) Å 184972 Chowder 2152021 Chowder 6921576 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 6942069 Stoked 2172885 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Dude 2160040 Adventure Time Flapjack 9237817 King-Hill 5075156 King-Hill 5051576 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Weird Travels ‘G’ Å 41653156 Ghost 57473427 Ghost 37758953 Ghost 57482175 Ghost 57461682 Mysteries of Smithsonian 76087972 Creepiest Destinations 76097359 Ghost 54564040 Ghost 94613232 179 51 45 42 Weird Travels ‘G’ Å 57472798 Bewitched ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford 7479798 Sanford 4184427 Home Improve. Home Improve. Ray 5060175 Ray 4811021 Ray 5114682 Ray 5123330 Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ 65 47 29 35 Bewitched ‘G’ NCIS Angel of Death ’ ‘14’ 419243 NCIS Yankee White ’ ‘PG’ 623359 Law & Order: SVU 609779 Law & Order: SVU 612243 Law & Order: SVU 615330 Burn Notice ‘PG’ Å 214885 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: SVU 513408 ›› “Be Cool” (2005, Comedy) John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Vince Vaughn. ’ 983205 Sober House With Dr. Drew 151798 Sober House With Dr. Drew 154885 Sober House With Dr. Drew 753330 191 48 37 54 Slimmed 487446 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 884175 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

Mars Attacks! ’ ››› “Contact” 1997 Jodie Foster. A scientist seeks alien life in deep space. ‘PG’ 5801866 ›› “The House Bunny” 2008 Anna Faris. ’ 9070205 (9:40) ›› “So I Married an Axe Murderer” 12097717 (11:15) › “Surfer, Dude” 2367866 ››› “My Cousin Vinny” 1992, Comedy Joe Pesci. ‘R’ Å 4920243 ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt. ‘R’ Å 7243430 › “A Night in Heaven” 1983 ‘R’ Å 7234972 “Weekend at Bernie’s” 5250458 Vans Triple Crown 1406663 Daily 3955798 Bubba 3939750 Red Bull X Fighters Å 1279507 Vans Triple Crown 9279327 Daily 2419330 Update 4730601 Stupidface Å Check 1, 2 Misfits 2421175 Thrillbill 3445205 (4:30) Live From the Masters (Live) 199137 Live From the Masters 840750 Live From the Masters 575934 Live From the Masters 370601 Martha 8822885 Martha 9847175 7th Heaven ’ ‘PG’ Å 8759514 7th Heaven Gratitude ‘PG’ 4216205 7th Heaven ’ ‘PG’ Å 4225953 “Elevator Girl” (2010) Lacey Chabert, Ryan Merriman. ‘PG’ Å 4228040 Golden 7712249 Golden 8071408 (5:15) ›› “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” 2009 Matthew McConaughey. Spirits of ex-lov- ››› “A Mother’s Courage: Talking Back to Autism” 2009, Documentary Narrated by ››› “Gran Torino” 2008, Drama Clint Eastwood, Christopher Carley, Bee Vang. A Cathouse: The Mu- Clash of Titans HBO 425 501 425 10 ers show a cad his failed relationships. ‘PG-13’ 53067885 sical 9095088 73891779 Kate Winslet. ’ ‘NR’ Å 490589 veteran faces his longtime prejudices. ’ ‘R’ Å 413934 ››› “Ginger Snaps” 2000, Horror Emily Perkins. Å 6206663 (7:15) ››› “Layer Cake” 2004 Daniel Craig. ‘R’ Å 20886408 (9:05) ›› “Hard Candy” 2006, Drama Patrick Wilson. ‘R’ Å 80794137 Dinner 7613330 Jon Dore Show IFC 105 105 (4:15) › “12 Rounds” 2009 John Cena. ’ (6:05) ›› “Ronin” 1998, Action Robert De Niro, Jean Reno. Five espionage specialists (8:15) ›› “Baby Mama” 2008, Comedy Tina Fey, Amy Poehler, Greg Kinnear. A ›› “Death Race” 2008, Action Jason Statham, Tyrese Gibson. Prisoners compete in a MAX 400 508 7 ‘PG-13’ Å 50900717 must find a special briefcase. ’ ‘R’ Å 32466309 career woman hires a surrogate mother. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 20372021 brutal car race to win their freedom. ’ ‘R’ Å 5102885 Naked Science (N) 1408021 Aftermath: Earth Stops 4737514 Known Universe (N) ‘PG’ 9479525 Naked Science 7479345 Aftermath: Earth Stops 3079589 Known Universe ‘PG’ 3991086 Hitler’s Hidden City ‘PG’ 1868446 NGC 157 157 Avatar 1434446 Avatar 3965175 Parents 1965330 OddParents Big Time Rush OddParents Avatar 1423330 Avatar 1419137 Penguin 2493392 Penguin 4714663 Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Action 2405137 Rocko 3452595 NTOON 89 115 189 Hunt 7451392 Archer 4176408 Magnum 4166021 Whitetails Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Outdrs 7457576 Steve’s 7469311 Outd. 5039205 Hunt 4820779 Trophy 5116040 Outdoor 5132088 Trophy Hunt Expedition Safari OUTD 37 307 43 Nurse Jackie ’ (3:15) ›› “Wolf” ››› “Music From Another Room” 1998 Jude Law. A man feels (7:15) Kevin Nealon: Now Hear Me Out (8:15) ›› “Meet the Browns” 2008 Tyler Perry. iTV. A woman meets her late father’s Gina Yashere: Skinny B...tch (iTV) (N) United States of SHO 500 500 Tara ‘MA’ 577866 ‘MA’ 699392 11912934 fated to marry an engaged woman. 8207779 (iTV) ’ ‘14’ Å 8373750 uproarious family for the first time. ’ ‘PG-13’ 60040392 ‘MA’ 987069 Fast Track to Fame 7079953 Bullrun 8596330 Bullrun (N) ‘14’ 1005345 Pass Tm 7089330 Hub 7075137 Fast Track to Fame 5605309 Bullrun 2455886 Bullrun ‘14’ 2736243 SPEED 35 303 125 (5:15) ›› “Prom Night” 2008 Brittany Snow. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 86136514 (6:50) ›› “Angels & Demons” 2009, Suspense Tom Hanks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 84799224 (9:17) ›› “Reign of Fire” 2002 ‘PG-13’ Å 15132886 Spartacus: Blood and Sand 4686595 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) “Keith” 2008 Elisabeth Harnois. Natalie has life all figured (6:20) ›› “Mozart & the Whale” 2005, Comedy-Drama Josh › “Gang of Roses” 2003, Western Monica Calhoun, Stacey (9:35) ››› “Transsiberian” 2008, Suspense Woody Harrelson, Emily Mortimer. A “Bangkok DangerTMC 525 525 ous” 1220156 out, then she meets a guy. ’ ‘PG-13’ 88179021 Hartnett, Gary Cole. ’ ‘PG-13’ 53389224 Dash, LisaRaye. Premiere. ’ ‘R’ Å 8665205 couple’s train journey takes a deadly turn. ’ ‘R’ 70708137 (4:00) NHL Hockey Teams TBA (Live) 3078175 Hockey Central (Live) 8348514 NHL Hockey Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks (Live) 3060156 Countdown to UFC 1228137 The Daily Line 5511798 VS. 27 58 30 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å 7064021 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å 8598798 20/20 on WE (N) ‘G’ Å 3700773 20/20 on WE ‘PG’ Å 7405381 20/20 on WE ‘14’ Å 3005525 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4150214 Locator 5180972 Locator 2944972 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY

SATURDAY

GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.dpls.us/calendar. HANDS AROUND THE COURTHOUSE: Show your commitment to efforts to prevent and eliminate child abuse and sexual assault; free; noon; Jefferson County Circuit Court, 75 S.E. C St., Suite C, Madras; 541-475-1880. “THE DESCHUTES LAND TRUST AND YOU”: Learn about the land trust, what it does and how it will continue its work during the slowed economy; free; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 800-8242714 or ctrinfo@ uoregon.edu. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626.

TRASHFORMATIONS: Pakit Liquidators hosts a 36-hour artmaking event centered on making new creations from reused and recycled materials; raw materials provided; participants should bring tools and fasteners; registration required; proceeds benefit Bend’s Community Center; free for spectators, $20 adults or $10 children to compete; 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. April 11; Pakit Liquidators, 903 S.E. Armour Drive, Bend; 541-2809301 or sacredbuffalo@gmail.com. EVERY DAY IS TAG DAY: A microchip and rabies clinic to support the Every Day is Tag Day campaign; $20 for microchip implants; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Humane Society of Central Oregon, 61170 S.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3537. VACCINATION CLINIC: Bring dogs and cats for vaccinations; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $20 per vaccine, $25 microchip; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Oregon Feed & Irrigation, 2215 N. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond.. BENEFIT DINNER FOR DAWNA DITMORE-AZICH: Featuring music, a silent auction, raffle and dinner; proceeds benefit Ditmore-Azich, who was injured in an automobile crash; $8, $5 children and $25 for families; 5-9 p.m.; Elks Lodge, 262 S.W. Second St., Madras; 503-642-7506. A NIGHT IN WONDERLAND: A silent auction and fashion show to benefit the Bend High School DECA team; registration requested; $10, $5 students; 6 p.m. auction, 7 p.m. fashion show; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-322-5005 or kristen.torkelson@bend.k12.or.us. ART FOR A CAUSE: Local artists showcase their work; with desserts and champagne; a portion of proceeds benefits MountainStar Family Relief Nursery; free; 6-9 p.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Company, 1054 N.W. Milwaukee Ave., Bend; 541-322-6820 or www. mountainstarfamily.org. MY OWN TWO HANDS: An art auction and party; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; $55; 6 p.m.; Ponderosa Forge and Iron Works, 207 W. Sisters Park Drive, Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical. org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Silas Maynard and music by Hands 4; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Highland Magnet School, 701 N.W. Newport Ave.; 541-330-8943. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY DONOR CONCERT: The Vinca Quartet performs; free for members, or $50 for symphony season membership; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-3173941 or www.cosymphony.com or www.vincaquartet.com. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. BEER RELEASE PARTY: Featuring a performance by Leif James; proceeds benefit Bend Spay & Neuter Project; $5-$10; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.myspace. com/silvermoonbrewing. DOUG BENSON: The stand-up comedian performs; $23 in advance, $28 day of show; 8 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.tower theatre.org.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “Traveling Light,” features a parade and art stroll throughout Sisters, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. “PRECIOUS”: A screening of the Rrated 2009 film; representatives from local assault and child abuse service agencies will be on hand before and after the film for questions and discussion; part of Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Awareness Month; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an electric rock ‘n’ roll set, with Vicious; $15; 8 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178. SEAN HAYES: The San Franciscobased indie-folk musician performs; $16 in advance, $18 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Mandala Yoga Community, tbd loft, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-326-7866 or www. mandalayogabend.com. STARS OVER SISTERS: Learn about and observe the night sky; telescopes provided; bring binoculars and dress warmly; free; 8-11 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-8846. TONY SMILEY: The Portland-based one-man rock band performs; free; 9 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or www.myspace. com/bendistillery.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

FLOATER: The veteran Oregon trio play an acoustic rock ‘n’ roll set, with Vicious; $15; 8 p.m.; Mountain’s Edge Sports Bar and Grill, 61303 U.S. Highway 97, Unit 115, Bend; 541-388-8178. KABLE ROC: The Portland-based MC performs; free; 10 p.m.; Bendistillery Martini Bar, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or www. myspace.com/bendistillery.

SUNDAY RIDERS FOR THE CURE: With a rail jam, live music, booths, a barbecue, costume competition and more; proceeds benefit Sara’s Project; $35 entry fee or $150 or more in donations; 8-10 a.m. registration, 10:30 a.m. event; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-382-2442 or bkinney@ mtbachelor.com. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. A NOVEL IDEA OPENING: Jason Graham and the Gospel Choir of the Cascades kick off the 2010 A Novel Idea ... Read Together program; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034. CENTRAL OREGON SYMPHONY DONOR CONCERT: The Vinca Quartet performs; free for members, or $50 for symphony season membership; 2 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541317-3941 or www. cosymphony.com or www.vincaquartet .com. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 3 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. CELTIC MUSIC SESSION: Celtic musicians play traditional Irish music; session players welcome; free; 3-6 p.m.; JC’s Bar & Grill, 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-647-4789. U2CHARIST: Listen to live U2 songs and their messages of justice and caring; free; 5:01 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-382-4401 or www.bendfp.org. ICON CITY MEETING: Listen to live music and inspiring stories, and learn about ways to volunteer, creating awareness of social and economic issues in Central Oregon; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 661717-0433 or www. volunteerconnectnow. com. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 500 meters on single-speed bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; a portion of proceeds benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7 p.m., sign-up at 6:30 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-6107460 or www.myspace.com/ silvermoonbrewing.

MONDAY “BACKWARDS IN HIGH HEELS”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the play by Jim Henry about a couple that dance their way through war, peace, fame and fortune; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677.

TUESDAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Help” by Kathryn Stockett; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541536-0515 or www.dpls.us/calendar. OPEN MIC WITH TALL ADAM: Two sessions, open to all varieties of performers; free; 5-6:30 p.m.

all ages, 8 p.m. to close ages 21 and older; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Diane Hammond reads from and discusses her novel “Seeing Stars”; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. FREEDOM SUMMER — “AIN’T GOIN LET NOBODY TURN ME ROUND”: Marion Davidson recalls her year in Mississippi in 1964 and her hostess, Carrie Clayton; part of A Novel Idea ... Read Together; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY HORSE-DRAWN AUCTION AND SWAP MEET: Continuous auctions of items including horse and farm gear, antiques, horses and mules, and more; free; noon-6 p.m.; Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-549-2064 or www. smallfarmersjournal.com. “REDUCING WATER USE BY HARVESTING AND REUSING RAINWATER”: Learn about what rain harvesting is, why it’s important and the types of systems that are available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7093 or www. dpls.us/calendar. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, HAMLET”: Starring Simon Keenlyside, Natalie Dessay, Jennifer Larmore, Toby Spence and James Morris in an encore presentation of Ambroise Thomas’s adaptation; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347. FRONTIER RUCKUS: The Michigan-based folk-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174. “SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a comedy of manners about a young man and the woman who sets out to woo him; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “COUPLE DATING”: Susan Benson directs the play by Cricket Daniel; adult content; $20, $18 students and ages 62 and older; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626. POETRY SLAM: A live poetry reading open to competitors and spectators; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. myspace.com/bendpoetryslam. BEND COMEDY COMPETITION: Competition preliminary features eight-minute sets by eight comedians, four of which will advance; $25 plus service charges in advance; 9 p.m.; 900 Wall Restaurant and Bar, 900 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3236295 or www.bendnights.com/ bendcomedy.

THURSDAY April 15 HORSE-DRAWN AUCTION AND SWAP MEET: Continuous auctions of items including horse and farm gear, antiques, horses and mules, and more; free; 8 a.m.-7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-549-2064 or www. smallfarmersjournal.com. RV, BOAT AND ATV SHOW: See new RVs, boats and ATVs; free; 9 a.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-382-5009. READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: A screening of the film “Wonder Boys,” followed by a discussion April 22; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls. us/calendar.

M T For Thursday, April 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG13) Noon, 2:45, 5:25, 7:55 CHLOE (R) 12:20, 3, 5:45, 8:20 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 2:55, 5:35, 8:10 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8 GREENBERG (R) 12:10, 2:40, 5:30, 8:15 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:20, 8:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 10:50 a.m., 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55

AVATAR (PG-13) 12:05, 3:35, 6:55, 10:20 THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 5, 7:55, 10:40 CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 10:55 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:20, 5:20, 6:50, 8, 9:30, 10:35 CLASH OF THE TITANS 3-D (PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 11 a.m., 1:20, 3:55, 6:35, 9:15 GREEN ZONE (R) 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 HOT TUB TIME MACHINE (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5:15, 8:05, 10:40 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 10:45 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:15, 2:15, 4:05, 5:05, 6:40, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3-D (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 THE LAST SONG (PG) 11:05 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 1:35, 2:25, 4:10, 5:10, 7, 7:50, 9:35, 10:25 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) Noon, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50

TYLER PERRY’S WHY DID I GET MARRIED TOO (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE BOOK OF ELI (R) 8:50 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond 541-548-8777

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG13) 3:45, 6:15, 9:15

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 5, 7:15, 9:30 THE LAST SONG (PG) 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

CLASH OF THE TITANS (PG-13) 6:45 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON (PG) 6:30 THE GHOST WRITER (PG-13) 6:30 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID (PG) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 4, 7

N   N 

ABC via The Associated Press

Kate Gosselin , left, and her partner Tony Dovolani perform on “Dancing with the Stars” on March 29.

Jon: Kate ignores kids for ‘Dancing’ By Michael Rubinkam The Associated Press

ALLENTOWN, Pa. — Jon Gosselin plans to sue ex-wife Kate for primary custody of their eight children because her appearances on “Dancing With the Stars” have turned her into an absentee mom, a lawyer for the former reality show dad told The Associated Press on Tuesday. Jon Gosselin’s new lawyer, Anthony List, said he plans to file papers in Berks County Court in Pennsylvania this week to reopen their divorce settlement. List said that Kate Gosselin’s participation in the smash ABC dance competition show has taken her away from the children, and that she has delegated most child-rearing responsibilities to three nannies. “Without a doubt, she’s an absentee parent,” he said. Kate Gosselin’s attorney, Mark Momjian, called the allegation reckless and “patently false.” “It’s deplorable to make a comment like that,” he said. “I know Kate Gosselin is all about her

children, and she’s always been about her children. Let him file what he says he’s going to file and we’ll respond accordingly.” The two formerly starred on the hit TLC reality show “Jon & Kate Plus 8,” which chronicled the lives of the Gosselins and their large brood — twins and sextuplets — at their home in eastern Pennsylvania. The show ended its run in November, and their divorce became final in December. The no-fault divorce settlement gave Kate Gosselin primary custody of the children and the family home in Wernersville, Pa., about 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia. List said Kate Gosselin has been pursuing her career at the expense of the children. “If she’s truly committed and dedicated to these children, as I believe she is, then she should open her eyes and see what’s happening to these children,” List said. “Their life is topsy-turvy. Jon can give them stability.”

AG says Haim obtained 553 pills before death By Anthony McCartney The Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Actor Corey Haim employed “doctor shopping” to obtain 553 prescription pills in the two months before his death, California Attorney General Jerry Brown said Tuesday. Haim obtained the meds, which included Valium, Vicodin, Corey Haim Xanax and Soma, through seven different doctors and seven pharmacies, Brown said, and he used an alias on at least one occasion. Brown said it did not appear the doctors knew Haim was ob-

taining prescriptions through multiple sources. He said investigators verified Haim filled the prescriptions this year, but have also found that thousands of pills were obtained in Haim’s name before then. He called Haim — the star of 1980s films such as “The Lost Boys” and “License to Drive” — a “poster child” for prescription drug abuse. He said that it wasn’t just celebrities who were obtaining massive quantities of prescription drugs through doctor-shopping. Haim, 38, died March 10 after collapsing in his mother’s apartment. Haim struggled with drugs throughout his life. He was also suffering from flulike symptoms before his death and his official cause of death has not been released.


E4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, April 8, 2010: This year, often you will choose to be with your friends. You also could become far more civicminded, and get involved in an important cause. Be careful not to spread yourself too thin. On some level, you revitalize through letting go and being with your friends. Learn to be more frugal than in the past, especially as you will need to counteract a tendency to overspend. If you are single, a new relationship could come through a friend. If you are attached, the two of you need to have a solid friendship as well. Treat each other as your best friend more often. You can count on AQUARIUS. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Aries generally is directed, but today you will tend to linger and over-indulge. You wonder what is going on. Perhaps you need to take a break. Do something just for you, even if it is just getting a haircut. Help yourself recycle. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Be aware of your efforts to court the boss’s or someone else’s favor. Is it worth it? Your instincts tell you which way to go, and experience tells you to follow them. Be willing to nix a new project, or at least your involvement in it. Tonight: Out late. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Seek out new

perspectives and knowledge. Your instincts tell you one thing, and reality tells you something different. Zero in on what is important, especially in a meeting. Share your thoughts. Tonight: Where you can relax most. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH A partner goes out of his or her way to help you, especially with a public or community matter. You could be on overload with all the feelings that come up. Be happy for the support and caring. Tonight: A must appearance. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You could be overwhelmed by a boss and his or her efforts. Accept the compliments. Know that you are being observed with care. A key friend, family member or loved one cannot do enough. He or she brings you important information. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Tension builds wherever you are. The only way to dissipate some of this energy is to detach. Focus on what you must do, and you will get it done. A co-worker or associate pitches in. Tonight: Have a long-overdue chat. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Partners, associates and friends all want command of the ship. Let them have it, while you go off and do something you really enjoy. Creativity, humor and friendship could merge. Enjoy every moment. Tonight: Go with the flow. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH If you can continue working

from home, please do. You could be overwhelmed by everything that is on your plate. Your efforts to clear out work, errands and all that might be weighing you down help. Tonight: Order in. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You have to field more than your share of calls and requests, and a meeting could be exhausting. Your creativity helps cut through the fat and get down to brass tacks. Recognize that you have limited energy. Try not to put in overtime. Tonight: Catch up on another person’s news. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might be shooting yourself in the foot if you continue to go for a risk. Use your funds to build greater stability, or plug some money into your home. Find another way of letting off steam. Try more people time. Tonight: Be a wild thing. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You could feel drained by a family member or domestic situation. Know when you can do nothing more, and go about your day. Many people appreciate your efforts and time. Stay where you do make a difference. Tonight: As you like it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH How you handle a close friend and the choices you make come from within. Treat people as you would like to be treated, and see how easy it can be. A call could cause you to withdraw, think and maybe daydream. Tonight: Lie low. © 2009 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 4: 6:30 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-389-2867. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. DESCHUTES DEMOCRATIC PARTY MEETING: 6:30 p.m. social, 7-9 p.m. meeting; Bend’s Community Center; www.deschutesdems.org. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SECOND CHILDHOOD DOLL CLUB: 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; call for location; 541-923-8557 or 541-548-4269. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010. THINK AGAIN PARENTS (TAPS) SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION TEAM OF REDMOND: 4-5:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, Historical Room; 541-548-4481. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

FRIDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Social hour; 4:15 p.m.; 541-388-4503. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229

or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www. bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. DESCHUTES COUNTY BALLROOM DANCE CLUB: 8-10 p.m.; 175 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3220220 or www.deschutescounty ballroom.com. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. RAWBENDALIVE! POTLUCK: 6:307:30 p.m.; The Cascades Living Water Store, Bend; 541-550-7520. TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

SATURDAY THE ACCORDION CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON: 1:30 p.m.; Cougar Springs Senior Living Facility, Redmond; hmh@coinet. com or kgkment@aol.com. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND AREA SCALE MODELERS: Model show-off day; noon-3 p.m.; D’s Hobbies, Bend; 541-389-1330. BENDUBS CAR CLUB: 7 p.m.; Cascade Lakes Lodge, Bend; www.bendubs.com. DAR BEND CHAPTER: 1 p.m.; Deschutes County Historical Society, Bend; 541-771-7771. JUMPIN’ JUNIPER GOOD SAMS: Camping group; 541-382-7031.

MOSAIC GUILD OF CENTRAL OREGON: 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Arts Central Station, Bend; 541-948-5430. OREGON TRAIL APPALOOSA HORSE CLUB: 1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-9957 or www.otahc.org. RICE COMPANEROS FRIENDS SPANISH/ENGLISH GROUP: 9:3011:30 a.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, Redmond; 541-447-0732. SISTERS GARDEN CLUB: 9:30 a.m.; Sisters City Hall; 541-588-6189.

SUNDAY A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0669. DESCHUTES COUNTY FOURWHEELERS: 5 p.m. dinner, 6 p.m. meeting; Papa’s Pizza, Bend; 541-389-0090 or www. deschutescounty4wheelers.com. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 2 p.m., Ray’s Food Place, Redmond; 541-279-7962.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-3859198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON INVENTORS GROUP: 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-480-2320. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30 to 9 p.m.; Redmond

Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-322-0983. LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE: 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. MOUNT BACHELOR QUILTERS GUILD: 6:30 p.m.; Partners in Care, Bend; www.quiltsqq.com or mbqginfo@gmail.com. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 3-6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-350-3345. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. SOUTH CENTRAL LITTLE LEAGUE BOARD: 6:30 p.m.; Midstate Electric, La Pine; 541-536-9845. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AGILITY DOG CLUB: 541-385-6872 or 541-385-5215. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon to 1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45- 6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS: 3-5 p.m.; Deschutes Services Building, Bend; 541-815-0482. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499.

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT CORVETTES CLUB: 6 p.m.; Boston’s, Bend; 541-923-1369. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SADDLE CLUB: 7 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-923-2605. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: 7 p.m.; 541-318-8799. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: 6:30 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, Bend; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.com. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. PRINEVILLE EAGLES BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTERS: Noon; Housing Works, Community Room, Redmond; 541-323-7413. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Soroptimist Senior Center; 541-447-6844. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. WOMEN’S GROUP (GRUPO DE MUJERES): 6-8 p.m.; Grace Baptist Church, Bend; 541-382-4366.

CLUB: 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077.

WEDNESDAY

PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05 to 1:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549.

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63156 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE

Continued from E1 The road was clear about halfway up to Skyliner Sno-park but, by the time we got to the bridge across Tumalo Creek and parked near the gate closing off the summer access road, it was all snow. The access road becomes a popular cross-country ski and snowshoe route in the winter. Last weekend, the snow was well packed on the road and would have been easy to hike in boots. Because we had snowshoes, we headed off the trail to the edge of Tumalo Creek. Here, the snow was light and largely untracked. The creek, a stream of black cutting through the pristine snow field, was beautiful. Few people were out last weekend and it felt like we had the whole canyon to ourselves. We had put the baby, Charlie, in a backpack, the first time we had given it a try. When babies are younger than 6 months, your best bet is usually a front carrier, said Dr. Brenda Hedges, a pedia-

If you go What: Tumalo Falls Getting there: Drive west on Galveston Avenue, which turns into Skyliners Road. After about 10 miles, the road crosses Tumalo Creek, park near the gate just over the creek. Difficulty: Moderate if you go all the way to Tumalo Falls, Easy if you just walk around near the bridge. Cost: Free Contact: Deschutes and Ochoco national forests: 541-383-5300

trician at Central Oregon Pediatric Associates. The main issue, Hedges said, is head control. If a baby can’t consistently hold his head up, “you run the risk of having them slump their head forward and block their airway.” Hedges also said that, especially when babies are very young, it’s a good idea to check

on them every few minutes while you are carrying them. Often, as happened when our son was younger, the rhythmic motion of the walking will induce nap time. On this hike, however, Charlie was all eyes and ears open. At 6 months, he’s much more interested in new surroundings than he used to be. As we walked, we narrated: the burbling of the river, the dusting of snow on the canyon walls and the crunch of the snow beneath our feet. We headed back after about half an hour of slow meandering along the creek side. Our baby had seemed to enjoy himself; we had no crying or even whimpering. I know my husband and I had fun, taking in the creek and dreaming about the day when our son would throw rocks in it. For all the bundling and hassle, sharing the outdoors with kids, we decided, was well worth it. Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY GAY/STRAIGHT ALLIANCE NETWORK SUPPORT GROUP: 6 -8 p.m.; office@humandignitycoalition.org or 541-385-3320. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. EFT CIRCLE: 7 p.m.; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT AMATEUR RADIO GROUP (HIDARG): 11:30 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-388-4476. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org./ LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; Newberry Hospice, La Pine; 541-536-7399. MOMS CLUB OF BEND: 10:30-11:30 a.m.; First United Methodist Church, Bend; 541-3895249 or www.momsclubofbendor.org. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee for women; RSVP required; 10 a.m.; 541-330-6309. OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.; China Sun Buffet, Bend; 541-382-7969.

RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732. SOCIETY FOR CREATIVE ANACHRONISM (SCA): 6:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; www. corvaria.antir.sca.org. TRI-COUNTY WOMEN IN BUSINESS: 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m.; Redmond; 541-548-6575.

FURNITURE OUTLET “WE MAKE IT EASY!” 541-385-0373 • 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend

www.furnitureoutletbend.com

Outing

CASCADES MOUNTAINEERS: 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Environmental Center, Bend; 541-549-1322.

1052 nw newport ave. | bend, or | 541 617 0312

LOOKING FOR A GOOD REASON TO ADVERTISE IN THE BULLETIN?

How about 70,000 good reasons. Every day The Bulletin delivers new, and in-depth insight into your community through local news, business, sports and entertainment. Plus, every week we deliver local coupons, special offers, shopping inserts and more worth over $100 every week. Add it all together and it’s easy to see why The Bulletin is read by 70,000 local readers every day, more than any other locally produced print product, and that’s why so many

Trails Continued from E1 Three Creek Lake and Swampy Lakes Sno-park areas are also seeing good conditions, with the latter having a snow depth of about 5 feet. Edison Sno-park picked up 6 to 8 inches in the last several days. Groomers have stopped their activities at Virginia Meissner Sno-

park for the season, although Sabo said conditions there were fair as of Sunday. From a winter standpoint, Skyliner Sno-park is kaput because of low snow. Forest Road 4603, the road to Tumalo Falls, will likely remain closed for another few weeks. Snow conditions have improved at Newberry Crater, but plowing is also under way on Forest Road 21 there, Sabo said.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

“Riding conditions, at least on that road, are not going to be good, and (snowmobilers) need to be aware that there’s going to be quite a substantial drop off on the 21 road all the way into the crater. If they’re going to ride there, big heads up on that.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment In

Every Friday

businesses trust us to deliver their advertising message to Central Oregon and deliver results for their advertising dollars. So if you’re looking for a good reason try local advertising, remember, The Bulletin has 70,000 good reasons every day.

Want to know more? Call and ask for your FREE marketing consultation. We can help you review all your advertising options and maximize your local advertising dollars, in the newspaper and on the web. Call our Advertising Manager, Sean Tate at 541.383.0386


H

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Medicine Bethany Marshall doesn’t remember anything about her life before age 17, Page F4

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 2010

INSIDE

FITNESS MONEY

Exercise tips The bicep curl strengthens the muscles in the upper arm, Page F3

10

9.6

#FOE 8

6

5.5

/BUJPOBMBWFSBHF

4.3

4

Farm Strong

2.5

One gym in California is putting the old-school back into a real-world workout, Page F3

2 ’92

100 DS sufferers per Rate of HIV/AI Hood op Colu mbia Clats 64.2

’94

’95

’96

’97

’98

’99

’00

’01

’02

’03

3BUFPGCBDLTVSHFSZQFS .FEJDBSFFOSPMMFFT

’04

’05

4PVSDF5IF%BSUNPVUI "UMBTPG)FBMUI$BSF

Can they bend the

MEDICINE the d s in 2001. tracking HIV case

’93

,000 by county

curve?

Rive r Morr ow 74.3 Sher man 53.9 0 Mult nom ah Wall owa Uma tilla 383 .6 29.6 55.8 Unio n Was hing ton Gillia m 40.1 80.9 k Tilla moo Yam hill Clac kam as 0 co Was 52.2 38.7 71.5 Bake r 54.7 Whe eler Gran t 18.8 Polk 0 Jeffe rson 57.8 Linc oln 35 Mari on 106 .2 58.5 76.2 Croo k Linn 45.1 Malh eur 30.4 Bent on Lane Desc hute s 58.2 41.5 79.4 46.1 Harn ey Lake 0-15 14.8 Doug las 27.6 Coos 62 5 16 44 52.6

A group of doctors is beginning to address the high rate of back surgeries in Bend

Vital stats The rate of Central Oregonians diagnosed with HIV/AIDS is less than most of the state, Page F4

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

group of Bend physicians has come together to address one of the community’s long-standing medical issues: Are people with back problems given the best possible care? At issue is the rate of back surgeries done in Bend. According to the latest data from 2005 from The Dartmouth Atlas of

A

Grin for your health Turn that frown upside down and add a few years to your life, Page F4

NUTRITION

Health Care, which tracks variations in care across the country, Bend has the second highest rate of back surgeries in the nation. Only Casper, Wyo., does more. The concern is that, because the community is so different from the norms in the rest of the country, patients may not be getting the most effective treatment for their condition. “We’re spending lots of money,� said Dr. Ray Tien, a neuro-

surgeon in Bend, who said that data he’s seen show a continuing trend of high back-surgery rates in more recent years. “I don’t think that patients are necessarily getting quality care for the money.� Last winter, the surgeons and other back specialists quietly began regular meetings to examine just how they are treating patients. See Back / F6

/VNCFSPGCBDLTVSHFSJFTJO#FOETJODF Below is the total number of commonly done back procedures in Bend, including cervical fusion, removal of implanted devices, discectomy, laminectomy and lumbar fusion. 1,500

1,435

#FOE

Vitamins

1,200

Almonds are a good source of vitamin E, but what else is there? Page F5

939 900

Healthy, tasty

600 ’97

You don’t need to sacrifice flavor when cutting calories, Page F5

’98

’99

’00

’01

’02

’03

’04

4PVSDF4U$IBSMFT#FOE

’05

’06

’07

’08

(SBQIJDTCZ"OEZ;FJHFSU5IF#VMMFUJO Thinkstock

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

MONEY Vital stats More than 57 percent of surgeries in the U.S. in 2007 were outpatient procedures, Page F6

Diabetes drug A recent study shows that a drug for Type 2 diabetes comes with a risk, Page F6

HEALTH DATEBOOK For a listing of health-related community events, see Page F2

Counting on calorie counts New laws will require restaurants to post nutritional data By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

Across the country, restaurants will soon be required to post their calorie counts on the same boards as their Big Macs and their $5 Footlongs. The new regulation was passed as part of the federal health re- N U T R form bill. And though it got much less publicity than the insurance or student loan changes enacted, it could have a profound effect on the behavior, or at least the lunch experience, of most Americans. It requires restaurants with 20 or more outlets, including all large chain restaurants, to post calorie information on their menus. The law also applies to vending machines when they are operated by someone with more than 20 machines. The idea is that people will be able to know

how many calories they are about to consume before they order. “Studies show that people don’t eat as well when they eat out compared to when they eat at home,� said Margo Wootan, director of nutrition policy for the Center for I T I O N Science in the Public Interest, who worked on the legislation for about eight years. A big part of the reason, she said, is “because they don’t have the nutrition information; they don’t know what they are getting.� For example, Wootan said, salad dressings can range from about 40 calories to several hundred calories. Different types of chicken sandwiches at the same place, she said, can vary by hundreds of calories depending on what is in them and how they are cooked. See Labels / F5

“This (federal law) will provide a very easy way for people to cut hundreds or thousands of calories from their diet.� — Margo Wootan, Center for Science in the Public Interest

Compassionate Care For The Most Difficult Steps In Life’s Journey.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Experts in Chronic and Terminal Care Serving 24 Hours Everyday. A non-profit, mission driven organization for over 30 years

Call or visit our website at:

541.382.5882

www.partnersbend.org


F2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-548-0440 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243. BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEAT CANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-4202759 or 541-389-6432. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DOWN SYNDROME PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-317-0537. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479.

Submitted photo

Davon Cabraloff, center, leads a Zumba class last year at Central Oregon Community College’s Mazama Gymnasium. See the Classes listing for details. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-318-9093. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133. HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-350-1915 or HLACO@ykwc.net. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MLS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In

SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541-322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-3885634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOT LINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES BREAST HEALTH SCREENINGS: Karmen Lawson offers digital infrared thermal imaging screenings of breast tissue to detect disease; $190; by appointment, Monday and Tuesday; Westside Family Clinic, 1245 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; 541-383-3424. “FAITH AND HEALTH REFORM IN OREGON”: A workshop and dialogue about how faith communities can help create more just and effective health care; free; 10 a.m.-noon Saturday; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 503-221-1054. FRESHSTART TOBACCO CESSATION: Get the tools to quit smoking for good; identify triggers and manage withdrawal; registration required; $35; 5:30 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays beginning April 13 through May 4; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-706-6390 or trshelby@cascadehealthcare.org. MARATHON TRAINING PROGRAM: A 26-week course to prepare for a marathon; registration required;

$115, $100 for returning members; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541610-1649, info@usafitbend. com or www.usafitbend.com. RUN/CYCLE/RUN AND CORE FOR ATHLETES: A workout for crosstraining and for athletes of all disciplines; $6.50, or current fitness pass at the center; 5:156:40 p.m. Wednesdays; Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, 800 N.E. Sixth St., Bend; 541-389-7665. ZUMBA: Dance workouts for beginners; $39; 4 p.m. Wednesdays or 6 p.m. Thursdays for Zumba gold (lower intensity), 6:15 p.m. Tuesdays; locations vary, see Web site for details; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541390-5286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr,

541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-385-9465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www.pcoco. org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Center for Health & Learning; 541-706-6390 or www.cascadehealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com.

where fitness gets personal

• NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-306-1672 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND HEALING YOGA: Sante Wellness Studio, 541-390-0927 or http://redmondhealingyoga.vpweb .com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STEPPING SENIORS/STEPPING SENIORS TOO: Bend Senior Center; 541-728-0908. • STROLLER STRIDES: Strollerfitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: Latin rhythms dance-based fitness classes; 541-610-4598.

Stabilize your denture with implants as low as *

Only $1,995

Implant & Crown Combo * as low as *With this ad

$1,495

Call Kathy for details

541-475-3801 www.neosforlife.com

Dr. James Row

Community Education Series

Treat Your Feet! The Importance of Foot Care • Discuss how your feet can affect quality of life • Discover the benefits of foot care • Learn what you can do to keep your feet healthy

A research study with a pharmaceutical company evaluating the safety and effects of an investigational drug for Type 2 Diabetes is being conducted.

New Location:

Date

Aspen Ridge Assisted Living 1010 NE Purcell, Bend

Wednesday, April 28, 2010

RSVP | Contact – Type 2 Diabetes – 18-80 years of age – Currently treated with metformin If eligible, you may receive at no cost, these items: – Office study visits – Study-related laboratory tests – Study-related physical exams – Diet and diabetes counseling – Study medication

Seating is limited RSVP Jean at Partners In Care 541-382-5882

Cost - Free Lunch provided by Aspen Ridge with RSVP

Time 12:00–1:00 pm Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions Serving Central Oregon 24 Hours Everyday

Experts in Chronic and Terminal Care To learn more about the diabetes research study, please call Dr. McCarthy with Endo NW, at 541-317-5600

A nonprofit, mission driven organization for over 30 years

www.partnersbend.org 541.382.5882 | 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 F3

F

Next week Fire up that treadmill. New study shows women need 60 minutes of exercise a day to prevent weight gain.

From the farm to the gym

EXERCISE TIPS PROPER TECHNIQUE:

Bicep curl

Trainer uses old-school techniques to help build real-world strength By Landon Hall The Orange County Register (Calif.)

COSTA MESA, Calif. — Brad Davidson teaches people how to get strong by bringing some of his childhood experiences on an Oregon dairy farm to his gym on in Costa Mesa, Calif. Milking cows and carrying 50pound sacks of powdered milk, as well as watching his grandfather and uncles perform grueling tasks every day, inspired a lifelong passion for studying the science of strength. His conclusion: The most effective techniques were invented between the end of the Civil War and the 1930s, many of them in Eastern Europe. Some of the exercises he uses in the parking lot of his gym, Synergy Training Centers, are borrowed straight from the farm, or a 19th-century logging camp: Clients tip over 475-pound tractor tires, swing sledgehammers or use a thick rope to pull slabs of weights stacked on a sled that grinds against the asphalt. “We call it Country Strong or Farm Strong,” Davidson said. “That’s real-world strength.” “You can’t beat what works,” he added. “Nothing great has been invented the last 70, 80 years. There’s been no new ideas. Just the same old ideas renamed or repackaged.” Davidson, 34, who played football at Golden West College in Huntington Beach, Calif., and took a shot at making the U.S. Olympic bobsled team four years ago, is 5-foot-10 and 180 pounds. He pulls half a dozen books from his bookshelf in his office. They’re all thin and mostly old and obscure, loaded with black and white photos featuring barrel-chested men in tootight shorts, hoisting massive weights straight out of a cartoon — matching cannonballs with a bar in between. Their trailblazer is Arthur Saxon, the handlebar-mustachioed German billed as the world’s strongest man in the early 20th century. He is said to have been able to raise a plank carrying 12 men. And he once lifted a 315-pound barbell over his head, with one hand, and tossed it to the other hand. “Look at this guy,” Davidson

said, pointing to Saxon’s bulging biceps. “Every man wants to look like him, and every woman wants a man to look like him. He was unbelievably strong. No steroids, no supplements, just ate well and used training protocols. It’s just insane. He makes us look like a bunch of pansies these days.” In his 1906 book “The Development of Physical Power,” Saxon wrote that “the usual idea about strength — I mean the idea of the average reader of health magazines — is generally a wrong one. Genuine strength should include not only momentary strength, as proved by the ability to lift a heavy weight once, but also the far more valuable kind of strength known as strength for endurance.” Much of what Saxon and others preached has been vetted, tested and expanded on by research and by modern-day experts like Canadian Charles Poliquin, who has coached Olympic and professional athletes and is a mentor of Davidson’s. To get stronger without getting bigger, Davidson said, reduce repetitions, increase the weight and keep the “time under tension” below 20 seconds. “You have to be using 70 percent of your 1RM (one-rep maximum) or heavier to get a strength response.” He said deep squats (bending the knees so that the rear touches the heels) has proved far more effective at building strength and preventing injuries to lower legs than just going parallel. While a quarter of Davidson’s clients are elite athletes, the rest are regular people who want to get stronger to live better lives — to be able to pick up their children or grandchildren without pain or make it through a workday without tiring out. Davidson does intensive assessment early on and develops workouts to suit whatever they want to achieve. Saxon wrote that bicyclists should be able to “jump on your machine and ride 100 miles at any time without undue fatigue.” But in the real world, a “businessman” should be able to work “morning, afternoon and night with unflagging energy, holding tightly in his grasp the reins of

1 Morri Stewart, a trainer at the Athletic Club of Bend and Energize Fitness, demonstrates the correct way to perform some classic strengthening exercises. Doing these with proper form helps prevent injury and maximize benefits. This exercise can be done individually or you can try all nine, which are running every other week in The Bulletin through June 3. The bicep curl strengthens the bicep muscles in the upper arm.

New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — When Laurie Davis wakes up in the morning, she sometimes feels like skipping her workout. But two days a week, hitting the snooze button is not an option: She knows that at 7 a.m., Yvette Rose will ring the buzzer at her Manhattan apartment with hand weights and resistance bands in tow. “Even when you don’t want to get up and put your workout clothes on, there’s just no excuse,” said Davis, an account executive at a New York advertising agency. Many people find that hiring a personal trainer who makes house calls is the only way to ensure they stick to their fitness goals. Although it may sound like a luxury, training at home has grown more affordable since the economy soured because more instructors are willing to strike deals. There are plusses and minuses to an at-home workout. For the client, training in the living room means giving up commercial-gym amenities — spinning rooms, saunas, the latest elliptical machine — in exchange for privacy, convenience and, most important, an iron-clad appointment. For the trainer, making house calls means not having to split fees with a gym or invest in a lot of equipment. On the down side, it can mean having to lug heavy weights and operate in spaces that may not be ideal for a vigorous workout.

“Even when you don’t want to get up and put your workout clothes on, there’s just no excuse.” — Laurie Davis, of New York “Every time you go in, you have to scout around and make sure there isn’t stuff lying around or that the floors aren’t sticky,” Rose said. Children and dogs can also be a problem. “I’ve taught yoga classes where the client will be in a plank position, and her son jumps on her back,” she added. Although the price for at-home training is usually about the same as for meeting a trainer at a gym — in the New York area, it usually costs $75 to $225 an hour — many personal trainers and yoga and Pilates instructors are hungry for work, so it is a buyer’s market. Liz Neporent, president of Wellness 360, which manages residential gyms in co-ops and condominiums, said that since the downturn she has seen a sharp increase in the number of highly qualified trainers asking to get on Wellness 360’s payroll, which offers steadier work but lower hourly pay than independent contracting. “It used to be like pulling teeth to get them to come,” she said. Many private trainers do not want to admit that they will low-

How to do it: Start holding free weights with elbows at sides and palms facing legs (1). Slowly bring up one arm, keeping wrist stiff and aligned with forearm (2). Alternate arms. Keep the rest of the body still during this exercise and do not swing arms. Go to a lower weight if you need to swing your arms or feel your pelvis moving to lift the weights, Stewart said. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

Photos by Ana Venegas / Orange County Register

The old-fashioned sledgehammer is a workout tool for Brian Barss at Synergy Training Centers in Costa Mesa, Calif. The workout is part of a technique that incorporates farm work into strength exercises. business, retaining all the while a clear mind and untiring energy, both of body and brain.” That notion appeals to Bert Selva, CEO of Shea Homes, the nation’s largest privately owned homebuilder. Selva, 48, who lives in Newport Beach, Calif., had back problems for years because of herniated discs. He has worked with Davidson for about five years and said “I’ve never felt better.” “I run a big company, so I’ve got to have energy all day,” he said. “Now I don’t really feel a lapse in energy.” Another Newport Beach client, Brian Barss, just likes the challenge of the farm gear out back. “I love taking a beating, so this is a good workout for me,” said Barss, 31. “It’s not for the meager or the timid, that’s for sure.” Davidson said one reason for his obsessive emphasis on strength training is that his father, Mike, who is 54, has myotonic dystrophy, a disease that

Having trouble getting to the gym? Hire a trainer; it can be affordable By Sara Eckel

2

er their rates, but some clients are quietly passing on the word. Karen Hochman, editorial director of TheNibble.com, an online food magazine, said that her Pilates teacher gives her a halfprice discount. Without it, she said, she would not be able to afford twice-a-week lessons in her Manhattan apartment. “I’m grateful the recession has provided me with this opportunity, though I wish I could pay my teacher more,” Hochman said. For Andrea Albicocco, meeting a personal trainer at the gym in her condominium in Hoboken, N.J., helped her get in shape for her wedding last fall. “I’m the kind of person who doesn’t push myself at the gym,” she said. Though Albicocco had previously worked with trainers at a fitness club, she found the setting too public. “I didn’t like the way people were watching me,” she said. “You feel self-conscious while the trainer is showing you how to do it and pushing you.” At her home gym, she was able to negotiate a rate of $65 an hour — down from $75 — by paying for 25 sessions up front, she said. Some people are able to afford at-home training by teaming up with a friend to share the cost. “Trainers are realizing that they may not be able to charge their regular fee of $80 an hour for a solo session, but they can charge two people $50 an hour and train them together,” said Neal Pire, a personal trainer from Ridgewood, N.J. “So they are charging less per person, but they are also making more money.”

slowly attacks the muscles. “He’s wasting away, and he falls multiple times a week,” Brad said. “If he gets in a car wreck, he’s not going to be able to prevent bones from breaking. He gets sick a lot. You and I, we get bronchitis, we get antibiotics and it’s gone in a week. He’s had it for three weeks and can’t get rid of it. “So strength matters. The more muscle mass you have, the greater your chance to live long.”

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

www.OasisSpaofBend.com

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Healthy by Choice Not by Chance Dr. Hans Diehl’s Coronary Health Improvement Project A world-leading, five-week lifestyle enhancement journey to better health.

April 19th thru May 20th Hans A. Diehl, DrHSc, MPH - Director, Lifestyle Medicine Institute Loma Linda, CA. Best selling author, dynamic speaker, presenter of seminars on four continents of scientifically sound, and often humorous video lecture series. Lisa Duncan - CHIP Graduate - “The CHIP program inspired me to up my exercise levels and my cholesterol dropped 20 points as a result. It really brought home to me the power of exercise, and a healthy diet to relieve or eliminate many chronic health issues.”

Kris Garland - CHIP Graduate “At the end of the 5-week CHIP program, I had lost 7 pounds, my blood pressure had gone down 15 points, and my cholesterol was down 20 points. It has been over a year since the CHIP graduation, and I’m still benefiting greatly from the life-style changes that I have made, and I’ve now lost a total of 26 lbs.”

T. Colin Campbell, PhD -

Professor Nutritional Biochemistry at Cornell University and author of the bestselling book “The China Study” - “I have often told audiences around the U.S. that CHIP is the premier community-

Tom Bush - CHIP Graduate - “It’s been over a year since I first

participated in the CHIP program. My cholesterol and triglycerides has continued to drop. By continuing to eat right and keeping up a diligent exercise program with drinking lots of water, I continue to receive the health benefits that are well worth giving up on foods and drinks that are high in fat, calories, cholesterol and I have lost nearly 40 lbs. In the beginning I thought this was going to be a pain. Believe me when I tell you it is not in fact I have been able to give up one of the biggest pains in my life, Type II Diabetes.” based program in the country. I have observed the CHIP program first hand on several occasions, and I could hardly be more positive. Every community in the country should know about the CHIP program and give it a try.”

CHIP can help change the good life into the best life. “Concerned about overweight? Cancer? High Blood Pressure? Diabetes? Osteoporosis? High Cholesterol? Heart Disease? Your Health in general? I invite you to take charge now and join a life-time opportunity journey … just 40 dynamic hours … that can revolutionize the way you feel from day to day, and can add years to your life through some simple lifestyle adjustments.”

Free introductory/registration meetings will be held • Sunday, April 11 at 3:30 p.m. Bend Public Library, Upstairs Conference Room | 601 NW Wall Street • Wednesday, April 14 at 6:30 p.m. Bend SDA Church, Fellowship Hall | 21610 Butler Market Rd Nurses earn 17 contact hours continuing education

For more information, call: 541-480-6525 E-mail: BendCHIP@gmail.com


F4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week Studies challenge conventional wisdom about weight loss for the elderly.

Starting life over at age 17 Rare virus caused Bethany Marshall to lose her past, but she found her future By Elizabeth Leland McClatchy-Tribune News Service

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gary Marshall found his daughter lying in bed, squeezing her temples and screaming. Her cheeks were red from fever, her eyes red from crying. She complained of a pounding headache, and was disoriented. She didn’t know where she was. She didn’t understand why there was a tree — their Christmas tree — in the living room. On the way to the emergency room, she didn’t recognize any landmarks. Gary didn’t realize it then, but Bethany didn’t recognize him either. She had no idea he was her father. She didn’t even know what a father is, or why she was supposed to love him. A virus had invaded her brain and stolen her memories. On that December morning 10 years ago, Bethany Marshall started life over at 17. Bethany’s parents have wonderful memories of her first 17 years: Bethany at Disney World. Sweet big sister to Caleb and Jessica. Drum major in the high school marching band. Pianist. First baseman on the softball team. Soprano in the church choir. Miss North Iredell High. Bethany remembers none of that. Her first memory begins the day she woke up feeling sick and confused, Dec. 11, 2000. She remembers looking at the Christian rock posters on the walls of the bedroom and the piles of clothes on the floor. She didn’t know who all the stuff belonged to. She remembers screaming in pain. Then a man walked in. “Babe?” Something about the stranger reassured her. She felt she could trust him. She let him pick out clothes for her to wear and let him drive her to the hospital. It was her room, she would learn. Her clothes. Her father. She would have to figure out exactly what a father was, but that would come later. First, she had to figure out who she was.

Trillions of memories Memories make us who we are. Precisely how we store trillions of bits of information — more than any computer can store — remains one of the mysteries of the mind. Scientists are equally baffled by how we lose that information. They do know this: New memories are encoded in the brain’s hippocampus. They suspect memories go from there to the frontal lobes for long-term storage. Amnesia results when the frontal lobes are damaged, sometimes by a blow or sudden jarring or, in Bethany’s case, by a viral infection. The same virus that caused cold sores on her lips migrated to her brain, resulting in a rare and often fatal condition known as herpes encephalitis. The virus attached itself to neurons in her brain and either wiped out her memories or wiped away her ability to retrieve them. Scientists aren’t exactly sure what happens.

Remember me? As she waited in the emergency room that first day, a strange woman rushed up and covered Bethany’s bare feet with a blanket. Baby, are you OK? Somebody is squeezing my head in two, Bethany told her politely. Bethany looked over to the man who had driven her there, the man she would eventually come to know again as her father. She needed his help. She wanted the woman to leave her alone. Patricia Marshall could tell Bethany didn’t want her hovering. She blamed Bethany’s odd behavior on the pain. Patricia was her mother, after all. They had always been close. But as the hours in the hospital passed, then days, Patricia realized that the Bethany she once knew no longer existed. Word spread through Olin, N.C., their rural community of 1,500 people north of Statesville, and family and friends rushed to the hospital. Her dad explained to Bethany

VITAL STATS HIV/AIDS in Oregon People living with HIV/AIDS in Oregon Though the rate of people living with AIDS is lower in Central Oregon than in many other parts of the state, the Deschutes County Health Department considers the rate here an underestimate because people move into the area with the disease but do not alert the county and because the county only began tracking HIV cases in 2001.

Rate of HIV/AIDS sufferers per 100,000 by county Clatsop Columbia 64.2 52.6

Hood River Morrow 74.3 Sherman 53.9 Multnomah 0 383.6 Umatilla Washington Wallowa 55.8 29.6 Tillamook 80.9 Union Gilliam Yamhill Clackamas 52.2 40.1 0 Wasco 38.7 71.5 54.7 Polk Baker Wheeler Lincoln 35 Grant 18.8 Marion 106.2 Jefferson 0 76.2 58.5 57.8 Linn 45.1 Crook Benton Deschutes 30.4 41.5 Lane Malheur 79.4 46.1 58.2 Coos 55.2 Curry 41.8

Douglas 62.5

Josephine 63.7 Jackson 67.1

Harney 14.8

Lake 27.6 Klamath 33.1

Source: Oregon Department of Human Services, Deschutes County Health Department

0-15 16-44 45-60 60-100 101-400

Jeff Willhelm / Charlotte Observer

Bethany Marshall, pictured with her father Gary Marshall, woke up one day when she was 17 and didn’t know who she was, didn’t know who her father was, or even know what a father was. Viral encephalitis caused amnesia. She eventually went on to college and is now working as a receptionist for a doctor and hoping to get into graduate school.

Bethany Marshall via Charlotte Observer

In this undated family photograph, a teenage Bethany Marshall, right, is seen having her nails done at a sleepover party she can’t remember. who each visitor was: This is your brother, Caleb. Your sister, Jessica. Your teacher. Our neighbor. One of your friends. A member of our church. Bethany stared as if she was seeing each person for the first time. They meant nothing to her. She could tell that her lack of recognition dismayed them. To be the one forgotten seemed as painful as being the one who forgot.

Bethany was like a child. She didn’t know what a microwave oven was, or how to work it. She didn’t realize TV cartoons are not real. She didn’t understand how leaves changed color, or how a new year follows the old. She remembered how to tie her shoes and how to walk and talk. Those unconscious muscle memories are stored in the basal ganglia and cerebellum, parts of the brain largely unaffected by amnesia. She could instinctively do a lot, but didn’t remember learning how. The first time she heard her sister play the piano, she was mesmerized. It sounded beautiful! Her parents told Bethany she knew how to play, too, that she performed in church and accompanied a high school choir. Bethany didn’t believe them, refused to even try. Then one day, while talking with her mother, she sat down at the piano and rested her hands on the keyboard. Without intending to, she began playing chords, and Beethoven’s “Fur Elise” emerged from her fingertips. That moment was a turning point. Bethany understood for the first time that she really did have a life before.

Dr. Alan Finkel in Chapel Hill. He weaned Bethany from all the medicines, a horrible experience in itself. Then he prescribed topiramate, an anticonvulsant often used for migraines. It reduced the frequency of her headaches, though she still endures daily headaches that might send another person to bed. Learning to tolerate the pain and understanding the importance of coping with chronic illness allowed her to think about moving on with her life. A reality TV show, of all things, helped her do it. She was watching “Starting Over” on NBC in 2004. Six women were living together on the show and working on problems in their lives with help from a psychologist and two life coaches. Bethany sent in a video of herself. “People were telling me what’s right. I had to figure out what’s right for myself,” she said. “I wondered what values were mine, and which were theirs.” A few months later, the same Bethany who once was content to live in Olin for the rest of her life was living in Los Angeles with five women and starring in a TV show. She assumed her problem was her lack of memory. She felt sorry for herself, wondering why it had to happen to her. On the TV show, she said she discovered that selfesteem — not amnesia — was her real problem. She was scared to try anything, scared to live. She remembers saying she couldn’t go to college because she didn’t know anything. That’s why you go to college, her life coach said: to learn. If she had no past, Bethany wondered, could she have a future?

Tolerating the pain

Discovering who she is

Her memories never came back and the headaches never went away. They were her biggest hurdle to recovery. She felt locked in a world of chronic pain and frustration, sometimes anger and depression. The pain was so severe some nights, she raged like a mad woman. Her father rushed her several times to the emergency room. After three years, multiple doctors, dozens of drugs, but little improvement, they sought out

She enrolled at UNC Greensboro in 2005 with her brother, Caleb. She was 22, older than most freshmen, but younger in many ways. They lived off campus, and Caleb helped her with homework, answered her endless questions, looked out for her. She carried a dictionary wherever she went. She didn’t remember a lot of words. Or maybe she never knew them. She enrolled as a music major

A piano revelation

because people told her she loved to perform. But that was the old Bethany. The new Bethany had no desire to sing or play piano in public. She switched her major to communications studies. She wanted to understand herself and others. She was like a sponge, soaking up all kinds of knowledge and experiences. She not only had to relearn her history, she had to relearn the history of the world. She watched how her classmates interacted, and began to understand the nature of relationships and the importance of family and friends. She finally realized why her amnesia upset her mother so. “I feel,” Bethany said, “I need to double-love her now.” Bethany graduated in May 2009 and works as a receptionist for Piedmont HealthCare Family Medicine in Statesville, N.C. She interviewed last week at UNC Greensboro, where she hopes to return in the fall to get a master’s degree in communication. She wants to teach. She appreciates the irony that someone who knew almost nothing may one day teach. She is still surprised nine years later to occasionally discover little things about herself. “I feel like my family has this secret I don’t know.” And what if suddenly she did know everything? What if all her memories flood back tomorrow? Bethany is 26, and she’s not sure she wants those memories back. She is a different person now, formed from nine years of new experiences, and she’s happy being that person. It’s all she remembers.

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Smile your way to a long life By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — People who smile a lot are usually happier, have more stable personalities, more stable marriages, better cognitive skills and better interpersonal skills, according to research. Science has just uncovered another benefit of a happy face. People who have big smiles live longer. Researchers at Wayne State University used information from the Baseball Register to look at photos of 230 players who debuted in professional baseball before 1950. The players’ photos were enlarged and a rating of their smile intensity

was made (big smile, no smile, partial smile). The players’ smile ratings were compared with data from deaths that occurred 2006 and 2009. For those players who had died, the researchers found longevity ranged from an average of 72.9 years for players with no smiles (63 players), to 75 years for players with partial smiles (64 players) to 79.9 years for players with big smiles (23 players). This isn’t a bunch of psychohooey, the authors said. Smiles reflect positive emotion. Positive emotion has been linked to both physical and mental well-being. The study was published in the journal Psychological Science. Treating all Foot Conditions 541.383.3668

541-322-CARE

www.optimafootandankle.com Bend | Redmond | Prineville

Precision Liposuction gentle | safe | effective

The Tumescent technique is the superior method of liposuction providing unparalleled safety and the comfort of local anesthesia. Creating smooth and precise results for you to look your very best. Dr. Daniel Teng, M.D. www.aesthetics-md.com for your personal consultation. Call 541.330.6160


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 F5

N

Next week When you cut saturated fat from your diet, pay attention to what replaces it.

Cutting calories, keeping tastiness

VITAMINS TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Vitamin E Vitamin E is a collective name for a group of fat-soluble vitamins occurring naturally in nuts, oils and green leafy vegetables. While there are eight natural forms of vitamin E, only one — alpha-tocopherol — can be used by the body. Vitamin E is stored in the liver, which releases it into the bloodstream as needed. The compound is an antioxidant, which prevents cell damage and is needed for a healthy immune system. It also helps to dilate blood vessels and to prevent blood clots from forming. Several studies have found that people who consume more vitamin E have a lower risk of heart disease and cancer. But randomized clinical trials found that vitamin E supplements did not prevent heart attacks or strokes and might increase the rates of heart failure. And other randomized trials found no benefits in preventing cancer either. Vitamin E supplements were also tested for the prevention of cognitive decline, such as dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, but results have been inconclusive. People with higher intakes of vitamin E tended to have lower rates of macular degeneration and cataracts, but supplements have not proven to be effective in preventing those eye disorders. Vitamin E can interact with various medications, including blood thinners, certain cholesterol medications and chemotherapy or radiotherapy treatments. Higher doses of vitamin E can lead to bleeding or interfere with normal clotting. The safe upper limit for vitamin E has been set at 1,000 mg, but some studies have shown a small increase in the risk of death in people who take supplements of 400 mg per day or more. Vitamin E deficiency is rare, except in people who have trouble digesting fat. Synthetic vitamin E, listed on product labels with the designation “DL,” is only half as active as naturally occurring vitamin E, designated with a “D.” As a result, you need twice as much of the supplement to reach the same amount of the nutrient. Most vitamin E supplements contain at least 45 mg of alpha-tocopherol and many contain 180 mg. Daily recommended amount: Adults: 15 mg Lactating women: 19 mg Children (0-6 months): 4 mg Children (7-12 months): 5 mg Children (1-3 years): 6 mg Children (4-8 years): 7 mg Children (9-13 years): 11 mg Children (14-18): 15 mg

Good sources: Almonds (dry roasted, 1 oz.): 7.4 mg Sunflower oil (1 TBS): 5.6 mg Peanut butter (2 TBS): 2.9 mg Broccoli (cooked, 1 cup): 1.2 mg Fortified breakfast cereal (1 cup): 20 to 40 mg Sources: National Institutes of Health, University of Florida

— Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

Thinkstock

One ounce of almonds contains 7.4 mg of vitamin E, about half the recommended daily amount for adults.

By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Images courtesy Burger King, Subway

Chain restaurants, including many fast-food establishments, are required to give customers a copy of their nutrition information upon request.

Labels Continued from F1 “This (law) will provide a very easy way for people to cut hundreds or thousands of calories from their diet,” she said. Oregon was already on the path to putting calorie labels on menus and may implement calorie labels before the federal legislation is in place. It’s unlikely the provision in the federal law will take effect before 2012, said Wootan. The state passed a law in 2009 mandating that chain restaurants, beginning in 2010, make nutrition information available, typically in brochures that customers can pick up at the restaurant. Next year restaurants must post calorie counts on menus. Though chain restaurants had previously resisted efforts to post calorie information on their menus, they didn’t put up a big fight during the most recent health reform debates, said Wootan. “One of the key reasons the restaurant industry went along with this was they saw so many states and localities were looking into this.”

Oregon was instrumental, she said, in helping gain momentum for the movement. “We would have never been able to pass this law without the work in Multnomah County (which passed a menu labeling law before the state) and Oregon.” At least one area restaurant chain is happy about the move. “We are really happy to be able to provide nutritional information to customers,” said Nanette Bittler, co-owner of McDonald’s franchises in Bend, Sisters and La Pine. She said the restaurant currently provides information on the back of tray linings, in nutritional brochures at restaurants and online. Some restaurants, Wootan said, have changed their menus since laws took effect, making them healthier and more appealing to calorie-conscious consumers. Starbucks, she said, cut calories and fat out of some drinks and pastries, and Denny’s cut down on the calories in their Grand Slam Breakfasts. “When you are just making food to taste good, you just add fat and cheese,” she said. “But when you start to think about calories, you start to think about, ‘How much do I really

need to add?’” There are a few technical differences between the federal and state law, said Cathryn Cushing, communications manager for the state’s Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section. However, those differences should not interfere with full implementation of the state law in 2011. The differences revolve around which restaurants must post calorie information. Oregon law applies to restaurants with 15 outlets or more; federal law applies to those with 20 or more. Oregon law exempts drive-through restaurants; federal law does not. Despite the technical details, Cushing said, she is hopeful the law will produce positive changes for Oregonians’ health. More than two-thirds of Oregonians are overweight, Cushing said. “It’s unacceptable that we don’t do something about that.” The new laws, she said, “will give people those tools that they need to start making more healthy choices.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

Dieting doesn’t have to mean giving up taste — and that’s for real, nutritionists say. A few tips: Wait to remove skin. Cooking chicken without its skin can leave the meat too dry. Take the skin off once the meat is cooked and rub on spices for added taste. Substitute meats. Try ground chicken or turkey instead of beef and Canadian bacon in place of regular strips. Use extra flavorings and vegetable toppings to boost the flavor of meat dishes. Flavor your water. In place of lemonade, squeeze some fresh lemon into a glass of water. For a lower-calorie “juice,” stir in a sugar-free mix such as Crystal Light. Cut the fat in recipes. Most baked goods do fine with a third to a half less oil, butter or margarine. Make gradual cutbacks and experiment with healthier ingredients such as applesauce or fat-free sour cream. Also use nonstick pans and cooking spray. Emphasize egg whites. Use one egg white and one whole egg instead of two whole eggs in scrambles and omelets (the yolk is higher in calories). Buy reduced-fat dairy. These versions of milk, cheese, sour cream and buttermilk taste good and will work in most recipes. Cut down on high-fat extras. Use half the amount of frosting on cakes or replace it with a sprinkle of powdered sugar. Put fewer chocolate or peanut butter chips into cookies — you’ll still get the flavor. Move slowly. When switching to diet soda or another low-calorie product, don’t give up after a few tries. Your taste buds often will adjust.

Vitamin D shows plenty of promise, but research still lagging By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tribune

As far as Dr. Joseph Mercola is concerned, Vitamin D is the magic bullet we’ve all been looking for. A lack of this wonder nutrient, the controversial natural health advocate says, can set the stage for no fewer than 33 disorders, including autism, cancer, diabetes and infertility. “Vitamin D appears to reduce your risk of dying from virtually ANY disease,” he wrote on his popular Web site. His recommendation? Get more sun, relax in a tanning bed or try supplements such as “Sunshine Mist,” a vitamin D spray he sells. Long ignored and feared in high doses, vitamin D is now being hailed as the answer to nearly every health issue under the sun. The excitement stems from a flurry of preliminary studies finding

links between vitamin D deficiencies and various illnesses, and this summer the federal Institute of Medicine plans to announce revised recommendations regarding dietary intake of vitamin D and calcium that almost certainly will be higher. But despite the scientific attention being paid to vitamin D, experts caution that claims of wideranging health benefits are not yet supported by clinical evidence. Though D is thought to hold tremendous promise, we’ve been down this garden path before: Hopes for the powers of vitamin E, beta carotene, antioxidant vitamins, selenium and other nutrients collapsed under the weight of rigorous randomized clinical trials. “It’s premature to go out and make a big deal out of vitamin D supplementation when we don’t

sacroilliac pain

herniated disc

sciatica neuropathy arthritis

back pain TRIGGER POINT

failed back surgery

radiculopathy

degenerative disc disease D A I LY H E A D A C H E

neck pain

muscle spasm

have the evidence,” said endocrinologist Anastassios Pittas, codirector of the Diabetes Center at Tufts University Medical Center. “We’ve been burned before on nutrition-based interventions,” he said. Yet already bread, pasta, orange juice and soy foods are being fortified with vitamin D, and sales of vitamin D supplements grew 116.5 percent from 2007 to 2008, from $108 million $234 million, according to estimates from Nutrition Business Journal. The body naturally makes the vitamin when the sun’s ultraviolet rays hit the skin, but fear of health risks and modern lifestyles have limited sun exposure for many. Mercola, a non-practicing os-

Skin Cancer? Let Allison Dermatology give you Peace of Mind

1 IN 5 AMERICANS WILL DEVELOP SKIN CANCER IN THE COURSE OF A LIFETIME

reflex sympathetic dystrophy

spine arthritis So many ways to say pain. Here’s a new way to say PA I N R E L I E F

Bend Spine & Pain Theodore Ford, MD Board Certified Anesthesiologist · Board Certified Pain Specialist · Non-surgical Pain Management

2041 NE Williamson Court, Suite B • Bend www.BendSpineandPain.com • (541) 647-1646

teopathic physician who owns a clinic in Hoffman Estates, Ill., is one of the nutrient’s most public and ardent supporters, with an evangelical style that can grate on the nerves of more cautious physicians. Unlike most doctors, Mercola recommends universal baseline testing and widespread highdose supplementation. “I’ve been preaching about this for a long time,” said Mercola, who started his campaign 10 years ago. “Eventually the evidence comes out.” Mercola said children should get almost six times the amount of vitamin D currently recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, while adults and pregnant women should be receiving

Early detection is key. Diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer Mole Evaluation and removal Acne, Eczema & Rashes

Warts & Lesions Parisian Peel® Microdermabrasion Skin Rejuvenation Products/ Sunscreens, M.D. Forte

Allison Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center Dawn S. Allison, M.D.

Cassidy Juda

Board Certified Dermatologist Mayo Clinic Trained

PA-C

Call

“The Skin Cancer Specialists” today!

541-322-9000

1510 SW Nancy Way, Suite 1 | On Bend’s west side (Near the Century/Colorado roundabout)

5,000 IUs per day. Most leading vitamin D researchers recommend no more than 1,000 to 2,000 IUs a day to the general public, citing insufficient evidence for higher doses. The current federal guidelines, which are widely considered to be woefully inadequate, range from 200 to 600 IUs, depending on age.

“Dr. Mercola popularizes and promotes vitamin D in a very passionate way,” said Dr. Gregory Plotnikoff, a senior consultant at the Center for Healthcare Innovation in Minneapolis who is conducting vitamin D trials. Mercola’s high dosing recommendations “may be correct, but we need supportive data,” he said. Self Referrals Welcome

382-6293 1645 NE Lytle St. #2, Bend

541-706-6900


F6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week New program helps families pay for health insurance for their kids.

Study finds diabetes drug has fracture risks

V ITA L STATS Ambulatory care Ambulatory care More than 57 percent of all surgeries performed in U.S. hospitals and surgery centers in 2007 were lower-cost outpatient procedures. Outpatient surgeries were most common for eye procedures and least common for surgeries related to blood or lymph conditions.

Percent of total surgeries of each type done as outpatient procedures

By Patricia Anstett Detroit Free Press

Dr. Ray Tien, left, and Ken House both say there’s reason for concern over the high rate of back surgeries in Bend. Tien is leading a group of physicians who are beginning to address the issue.

Back Continued from F1 The meetings, say those involved, came from the recognition that the way back patients in Central Oregon are cared for may have to change. “I think finally people have come to an understanding that something’s not quite right,” said Ken House, director of quality at St. Charles Bend. This type of gathering is somewhat unusual, both for this community and nationwide. These are people who compete with each other for business. But organizers say that they need to be proactive. With health reform efforts and insurers taking a closer look at the use of high-cost services such as back surgery, the issue will not go away. “The physicians need to take control,” said Tien, who is leading the effort, “or someone else is going to.”

back pain without neurological symptoms does not require surgery. “But it’s still happening.” The issue was more contentious, Tien said, than he thought it would be. Still, the group emerged with some guidelines of how they, as a community, intend to deal with the problem. In the future, they will tackle increasingly difficult topics — about a dozen in all. Tien anticipates that the process will take about a year.

Disagreement lingers

Building consensus won’t be an easy process. Currently, there isn’t even agreement among surgeons that Bend’s rate of back surgeries is too high. Even though Dr. Brad Ward and Tien are both neurosurgeons in the same practice at The Center: Orthopedic & Neurosurgical Care & Research, Ward said he didn’t think the number of back surgeries in Bend was excessive. “I don’t think the feeling among spine surgeons is that someCommunity guidelines thing’s got to change,” he said. “I The meetings so far, which in- don’t see people coming in that I clude about 15 to 20 physicians, have operated on that shouldn’t have focused on trying to estab- have had surgery.” lish clear guidelines for common Dr. Kathy Moore, a spine surback problems. They are using geon at Desert Orthopedics, said national standards written by a she does not fully believe data professional organization and showing Bend had a higher rate based on evidence of what works of surgeries than other places. and what does not. “I’m still a little bit of a skepThe idea is to come to a con- tic,” she said. “We are really sensus about how certain prob- reasonable about how we work lems should be things up and how treated. As it we treat it before stands, there can “I think finally surgery.” be huge variation people have At Northwest in how the same Brain & Spine, ofproblem is treated come to an fice manager Kim by one physician understanding Brehm said their versus another. office wasn’t part Some of that, that something’s of the problem. doctors say, leads not quite right.” “We ran the numto wasteful probers, and we are cedures. “There — Ken House, nowhere near that” are a lot of MRIs director of quality high rate cited by being done for at St. Charles Bend The Dartmouth people who just Atlas. have a back ache,” The dissension said Dr. Stephen Mann, a Bend highlights one of the main diffamily physician who is also in- ficulties that the spine commitvolved in the effort. For mechani- tee may face in trying to develop cal back pain, he said, “MRI does universal guidelines: Physicians not provide any information that don’t like rules. improves the level of care.” Physicians point out that each For people with back pain, sur- patient is an individual with gery may not be the best option. unique problems. Much of their Something as simple as massage training involves how to look at or acupuncture may work just as each patient and figure out what well. Exercise often helps. is best for that person. Patients But, Mann said, surgery has trust their doctors precisely bebecome the default option in this cause of that kind of clinical area. “I think it’s just become judgment. part of our culture,” he said. “There’s so much subjectivity “When you have spine surgeons in medicine,” said Dr. Mark Belhanging out all over town and za, a neurosurgeon at The Cen(an active population) looking ter. “That’s why we have physifor a quick fix, it creates this self- cians rather than robots.” fulfilling thing.” Physicians also have their own Mann said one issue is that treatment preferences that have patients can go from doctor to nothing do with individual padoctor until they find a special- tients. “Everyone has different ist who will give them an MRI training backgrounds and attior other specific procedure, if tudes,” said Ward. That variation that’s what they want, regardless can mean that some doctors act of whether it will help. That, he more aggressively, deciding on said, puts pressure on all physi- surgery more quickly than othcians, even those who don’t want ers, perhaps even more quickly to do the test. “They have to do it than evidence shows is prudent. or the next guy will.” The goal of the spine group, While the idea of develop- Tien said, is to look at what eviing guidelines isn’t to discour- dence shows are the best treatage people from seeking second ments for various types of back opinions, said Tien, “we would problems. Then, if that can be like for doctors to deliver the accomplished, he wants the sursame message.” geons to agree to stop performing At the first meeting, the focus procedures that are not supportwas on how to treat acute low ed by evidence. That will likely back pain, which has some of mean stopping some back surthe most clear-cut guidelines, geries that have not been shown said Tien. In general, he said, low in studies to help patients more

than less-invasive techniques. “We’re trying to look at the national guidelines,” said Tien, “and say we want to eliminate technique x, y and z because they don’t work.”

More data, less surgery Once there are community guidelines in place for the care of backs, the group hopes to begin collecting data on what treatment is given for various back problems. Using either the hospital or insurers, Tien said, they hope to build a database that will show what treatments patients are getting from each back surgeon and how they are doing with those treatments. That phase, Tien said, is not yet fully conceived and is likely to be more contentious. As is often the case when collecting data on patient outcomes, there will probably be disagreement over what types of measures should be used to determine how well patients do. Tien said, too, that many physicians will probably resist having others looking over their shoulder. Still, he said, that phase of the initiative could be the most important. “That’s where the rubber meets the road,” said Tien. “It’s only in that manner, when you look at yourself in the mirror, that you understand where the problem is located.” And it’s that kind of data that could begin to bring change to the way back problems are treated in Central Oregon. At other institutions that have set some standards and tracked individual physician outcomes, care has changed and often patients have done better. For example, physicians at Intermountain Health Care in Salt Lake City, one of the leaders in these efforts, developed a protocol to deal with pneumonia among the elderly. Though pneumonia is a common ailment that physicians deal with every day, having set standards helped. According to a 2001 study, the hospital was able to decrease mortality from pneumonia by 30 percent. Organizers of Bend’s committee hope that their efforts will result in similarly improved care. Tien cites the area’s high rate of second back operations as evidence that something needs to change. So far, nothing is settled as to how the data will be collected and what, exactly, will be measured. Tien said it was brought up briefly at the first meeting, but it was “force fields up immediately.” They quickly turned to more amicable topics, he said. The days of data collection and analysis are probably some ways off. Right now, the focus is on talking about the issue. “The fact that there’s a consensus that we need to be looking at evidencebased medicine,” said Belza, “is a lot closer than we were five years ago.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

Eye Ear Nose/mouth/throat Skin Digestive Urinary Musculoskeletal Nervous system Female genital Endocrine Respiratory Cardiovascular Male genital Blood/lymphatic

99% 96% 94% 70% 67% 62% 54% 48% 47% 46% 32% 29% 9% 9% 0

20%

40%

60%

Source: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

80%

100%

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Jim Diegel, the president and CEO of St. Charles Health System, has been named the vice chair of the board of directors of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems. The term lasts through 2011. Diegel will also serve as the chairman of the association’s 2010 public policy committee. Dr. Brad Bryan has been appointed a cancer liaison physician for the cancer program at St. Charles Bend. These physicians spearhead initiatives put forth by the American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer.

Jim Diegel

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

HOME EIGHTEENTH

&

ANNUAL

GARDEN S H O W PRESENTED BY:

The Bulletin file photo

Women with Type 2 diabetes who take a commonly prescribed drug for the problem are at a higher risk of bone fractures, a Henry Ford Hospital study has found. The drugs, a class of medicines called thiazolidinediones, or TZDs, help control blood sugar levels. But women, particularly white women, taking the drugs for a year had a 50 percent higher chance of developing a bone fracture, according to the study in the February issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Dr. Keoki Williams and his team studied 10,070 Henry Ford patients for the study. Men were not at increased risk of fractures if they took the diabetes drugs. Diabetic patients already are at higher risk for fractures, he noted. The findings suggest that diabetic patients taking the drugs be checked for bone loss periodically. They might need to switch to other medicines, or take bone-fracture prevention drugs if tests find potential problems, Williams said. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin for the body or the insulin is not metabolized properly, according to the American Diabetes Association. The body needs insulin to absorb sugar for energy. Some people must take insulin or oral medication, but the condition is usually treated through diet and exercise.

APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2, 2010

Reach more than 70,000 Central Oregon readers in the official Home & Garden Show guide. Official Show Guide Publishes: in The Bulletin Saturday, April 24 Advertising Deadline: Thursday, April 8

For show information visit: www.centraloregonshow.com

Food, Home & Garden In

AT HOME Every Tuesday

To Advertise, call your Bulletin Sales Representative at 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

EMPLOYMENT

GENERAL MERCHANDISE

LEGAL NOTICES

www.bendbulletin.com

RENTALS/REAL ESTATE

contact us:

TRANSPORTATION

hours:

Place an ad: 541-385-5809

FAX an ad: 541-322-7253

Business Hours:

Place an ad with the help of a Bulletin Classified representative between the business hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Include your name, phone number and address

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Subscriber Services: 541-385-5800

Classified Telephone Hours:

Subscribe or manage your subscription

24 Hour Message Line: 541-383-2371

T h e

B u l l e t i n :

1 7 7 7

S . W .

General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent Student wants CAR OR TRUCK running or NOT! Call anytime. Daniel 541-280-6786. $$$ WANT TO BUY $$$ Old Men’s WATCHES, Old MOTORCYCLE HELMETS, & Old SUNGLASSES 541-706-0891

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

210

Pets and Supplies

Furniture & Appliances

Labradoodles, Australian Imports 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

#1 Appliances • Dryers • Washers

Minature Schnauzer, born 1/16, 1st shot, AKC reg. salt/ pepper or black/silver, $350. 541-536-6262,541-610-8836 MINI-GOLDENDOODLES, red, mom on-site, family raised, hypo-allergenic, males $800, avail. in May, please call Gina, 541-390-1015.

205

Items for Free Free rock & dirt fill, located at 1270 NE 27th St., Bend. 541-382-5496

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie Shepherd Mix Puppies, rescued, 8 wks., 4 males, 2 females, $100. 541-576-3701 503-310-2514. BOXER, AKC dewclaw, tail dock, very playful, ready to go home $499 1-541-556-8224 Chihuahuas, Applehead brindles 2 female, 1 male $300 ea., 541-593-0223.

Papillon-poodle mix pups. Will be under 10 lbs., low shed. Sweet and healthy $275. 541-350-1684. Pomeranian Male Puppy. Tiny, cute, loveable and fun. $350 541-316-0638

Start at $99 FREE DELIVERY! Lifetime Warranty Also, Wanted Washers, Dryers, Working or Not Call 541-280-6786 Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

246

261

267

Medical Equipment

Fuel and Wood

MODEL HOME FURNISHINGS Sofas, bedroom, dining, sectionals, fabrics, leather, home office, youth, accessories and more. MUST SELL! (541) 977-2864 www.extrafurniture.com

Pillow-top twin mattress. $200. Pop-up trundle day bed with twin mattresses, metal frame, $60. Bottom frame needs minor repair. Cash only. 385-0542

FREE Geese, 5 Chinese white, beautiful, friendly to good home only. 541-536-6167.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

HAVANESE Purebred Puppies Non-Allergy, Shots, 9 weeks $700 541.915.5245 Eugene

Washer/Dryer Set, white, Whirlpool, large tub, new cond., $285. 541-389-6510

Pups, $150 ea.

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com/

Lab Puppies

Tzu/Maltese Cross pups and older dogs, males and females avail. 541-874-2901 charley2901@gmail.com

Shih

AKC,

excellent pedigree, 2 males, 1 female 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, good blood lines, $300 males, $350 females, 541-447-1323. LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & blacks, champion filled lines, OFA hips, dew claws, 1st shots, wormed, parents on site, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. www.kinnamanranch.com

212

Antiques & Collectibles Furniture

Shih Tzu purebred puppies. One male, one female. Both tri-color. 1st and 2nd shots. 15 weeks old. $400 each. 541-447-0141. Yorkie Puppies, vet checked, wormed, 5 wks. males $500 females$600 .541-932-4714

240

Crafts and Hobbies QUILTING FRAME, BERNINA $1500 OBO, unused, assembled for crib to king size quilts.541-419-1151

243

Ski Equipment Down Hill Racing Poles, Scott 4 Series $40 OBO, please call 541-306-8115. Helmet, Bern Brentwood Size Large black with black insert $35 OBO. 541-306-8115. Helmet, Bern Brentwood Size Large Black w/Red Plaid Visor Insert $35 541-306-8115

245

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

T/C Contender 14"/.223 & 10"/ 7mmTCU, both with scopes, $850; Detonics Pocket 9, 9mm compack, S/S, semiauto, $400; Ruger M77R, 6mm Rem/scope $300; Yamaha EF 3000iSE Generator $1500 541-306-0653. Winchester 32 WS Model 94, 60% $400 & 1989 O/U 45 cab. muzzle loader $200, Mark III Remington Arms Flair Pistol Collector $400 firm. 541-420-7773 Winchester 94 WCF 30 (take down 80%) $750. 541-420-7773. Winchester Mag 300, no scope, needs stock work $250 & 45 Muzzle load pistol kit $75. 541-420-7773.

253

TV, Stereo and Video TV, Magnavox Color, 27”, with built in VCR & DVD, $150 OBO, call 541-382-0879.

255

Computers

Golf Equipment Cleveland 900 Series Wedges 56 degree & 60 degree $45 each OBO. 541-389-9345. GOLF CART Yamaha 2002 electric, curtain, new batteries, great shape. $1700 OBO. 541-480- 5014. Golf Clubs, Just in time for golf season, women’s, Taylor Made Hybrids, $275, bag, $45, 541-279-0006. Mizuno MP-32 w/rifle Project X 6.0 Shaft 3-P wedges. $395. 541-389-9345. Ping I/10 Irons, 4-W+ Tour 56 degrees & 60 degrees. $425. 541-389-9345. Ping I/3 Irons, 3-LOB $375, call for more information. 541-389-9345.

246

541-598-4643. Sheltie Puppies, APRI -1 female black & white, $350, 2 Sable and White, 1 Brown & White, 1 Black & White Male $250, each to loving homes, 541-977-3982.

US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 541-549-1658

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gaPomeranian Pup, pure rage sale and don't forget to black female 1st shots, advertise in classified! housebroke $400. 408-1657 385-5809. POODLES, AKC Toy or mini. Joyfull tail waggers! Mattresses good Affordable. 541-475-3889. quality used mattresses, discounted king sets, fair prices, sets & singles.

B e n d

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Closet Organizer Cubicles (4), 2 adjustable shelves in ea., 4 hanging rods, $70, 318-9138

A v e . ,

215

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Overstock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

C h a n d l e r

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

Place, cancel, or extend an ad

Heeler

Find Classifieds at

A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Grizzly 50 BMG 12x36x80 mm Electronic scope, 3000 yd. bullet crop compensator, custom leaded ammo 160 to 750 grain, hard case & info on replacement ammo. $2,750. 541-420-7773. GUNS: Buy, Sell, Trade call for more information. 541-728-1036. HK 91 .308, pre-ban, beautiful condition, $3000 OBO. 541-420-0577. H&K USP 45, 2 mags., $595; H&K Univ Tac Light, $100. Both $650. 541-948-5018 Mossberg semi auto 250c 22 rifle SHV-L-LR, case & ammo $100 or trade. 541-647-8931 Norma Mag Custom 358 $400 & 20 gauge break down. $75. 541-420-7773. QUALIFY FOR YOUR CONCEALED HANDGUN PERMIT Sunday, April 11, Redmond Comfort Suites. Carry concealed in 33 states. Oregon and Utah permit classes, $50 for Oregon or Utah, $90 for both. www.PistolCraft.com or call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) for more information. .Remington 700 7 mm rifle sling, case & Leupold 3x9 scope w/lens covers $600 OBO or trade. 541-647-8931. Remington 788 .308 Winchester w/ sling, case, ammo & Bushnell 3x9 scope $400 or trade. 541-647-8931 Ruana Knives - Buying Ruana knives and bowies, Jerry 360-866-5215 Sig 5.56 Assault Rifle w/ holographic sight+3x9 scope w/ laser, 4 grip, 5-30 round mags, hard case, fired less than 200 rounds, $1600. 541-410-0922 Taurus Judge 410/45 stainless with a 6 1/2 inch barrel. Like new! $550. 541-610-5638

Wheelchair with pedals, light blue, very good condition $100 OBO. 541-647-2621

262

Commercial / Office Equipment &Fixtures Desks, Office, some with credenza’s, all in one inkjet printers, bookcases, eraser boards, computer work desk, in Redmond, 541-420-0427

263

Tools Generator, gas, JD 9750 starting watts, 6200 running used 1x $500. 541-598-7219.

264

Snow Removal Equipment Troy-Bilt 21 inch, 6 hp. snowthrower, model 42027. Two speed drive. $499. 541-322-0537

Printer w/4 new toners. $200 Call 541-548-0345 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Building Materials

Trex Decking, $2/lineal foot, limited to stock on hand; Raised Garden Materials, 2x12 rough cedar, $1.35/lineal ft., 2x10 rough sawn cedar, $1.05/lineal ft., Backstrom Builders,541-382-6861

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Senior Music Special 4 Lessons & Lowrey Organ Rental, book & party only $19.95 Moore Music established 1971 541-383-8863

260

Misc. Items 6 Cemetery Lots, Deschutes Memorial Gardens, $875/ea. 541-312-2595 Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Cemetery Plot, in Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Aspen Garden section, $695, call 208-442-0909 or call Deschutes Memorial Gardens. Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

261

Medical Equipment Pronto M51 Wheel Chair, exc. cond., $695. Call for more info., 541-550-8702. Wheelchair carrier for a regular hospital chair only, unfolds & tilts $150. 322-0983

Firewood For this year and next year $150 a cord, please call 541-610-6713. Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

John Deere Rider LX 277 lawnmower all wheel steering, 48” cut, low hrs., new $5200 now $2500. 541-280-7024.

SEASONED JUNIPER $150/cord rounds, $170/cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords, 1-$150, 2-$270. Bend Del. Cash, Check. Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

BarkTurfSoil.com

New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23 HP Was $13,975

Sale Price $11,975 Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond STEEL FLATBED, 16’x 8’, for farm truck, $200 541-447-1039.

270

FOUND: Garage door opener on Boyd Acres Road, Bend, call to identify. 541-389-4837.

316

Irrigation Equipment

FOUND: Hitch receiver 3/31 on 27th and Forum by E. Safeway, identify 617-1716. LOST: Gold charm bracelet with charms in Bend, REWARD. 541-678-2232.

Hay, Grain and Feed

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Consigned Farm Machinery & Equipment Auction 2 Day Sale Saturday & Sunday April 10th & 11th 2010 At: 9:00 AM Sharp

Woodburn Auction Yard 1/2 mile south of Woodburn, Oregon on HWY 99E

Saturday, April 10th Small amounts of miscellaneous tools, approximately 50 tractors, forklifts, & of various sizes. Approximately 70 cars, trucks, pick ups & trailers. Customers purchasing vehicles must have current proof of insurance before the purchase of a vehicle - no exceptions!!! All titled vehicles need to be checked in by 4:00PM on Friday, April 9th, with the titles in the consignors name. Dealers need updated certificates.

Sunday, April 11th Misc. farm equipment Loading facilities & hauling available. Some items may have a reserved bid Consignments accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, April 9th NO RECEIVING OR LOADING OUT ON TUESDAYS PLEASE NOTICE: There is a 5% buyers fee added to all purchases. Terms of sale are cash,credit card, debit card (not over $500.00) No credit card checks, or credit union checks. All personal checks will be direct deposited with ID. Note: 9% buyers fee on Visa, Mastercard, Discover, with ID on the day of the sale. All bills must be pd for the day of the sale. Lunch on Grounds • Not Responsible for Accidents No children under the age of 13 please. Children 13 and older are welcome but must be accompanied by a parent at all times. Auctioneers:

Skip Morin, Emery Alderman, Chuck Boyce Sale Conducted by:

Woodburn Auction Yard Inc. Phone: (503) 981-8185 ext. 1 Fax: (503) 982-7640 WOODBURNAUCTION.COM woodburnauction@aol.com

Superb Sisters Grass H a y no weeds, no rain, small bales, barn stored Price reduced $160/ton. Free loading 541-549-2581

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Special breed hens! 4 weeks old: Light Brahmas, New Hampshire Reds, Cuckoo Maran, Turkens and Black Australorps. $8 each. Crooked River Ranch, 541-408-4884.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

341

Horses and Equipment

Annual Reduction Sale. Performance bred APHA, AQHA, AHA, 541-325-3377.

7’ WHEEL LINES, 5” pipe, approx 1/4 mile self levelors, good cond. $7000 each. 541-546-2492.

Lost: Golf Shoe, men’s Footjoy, white, w/cleats, between Shopko and IHOP, Bend, 4/1, 541-923-3926.

Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Lost and Found FOUND: Craftsman 3/4” wrench, found on Ferguson Dr., to ID, 541-382-8880.

HAY!

333

Special Low 0% APR Financing

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

HEY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678. Orchard Grass, small bales, clean, no rain $150 per ton also have . Feeder Hay $3 per bale. Terrebonne. 541-548-0731.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Riding Lawn Mower, new John Deere, 11 hours, call for inquires, 541-923-0724.

Hay, Grain and Feed

Top Quality Grass Alfalfa Mix Hay, 2 string bales, no rain, barn stored, $115 per ton, Burns, delivery avail., please call 541-589-1070.

(Private Party ads only)

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

9 7 7 0 2 325

Farm Market

269

265 Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

HP 1215 Color Laser

O r e g o n

Free Older white Mare, to good home, refs. req, great w/kids, needs love, 541-410-0685. Horse Trailer, 18’, $2750, also Saddle, western, 15”, $600, call 541-447-1699.

325 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, no rain, 2 string, Excellent hay for horses. $120/ton & $150/ton 541-549-3831

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

345

Livestock & Equipment

541-322-7253

Healthy Beef Steers del. for small fee 541-382-8393 please leave a message.

Longhorn Cows & Trophy Steers, Registered Texas Longhorns. www.kbarklonghornranch.com, $300. Joel, 2nd Cutting Grass Hay, small 541-848-7357. bales, in barn, exc. quality, load any time, $150/ton. 347 Lonepine, 541-480-8673 or Llamas/Exotic Animals 541-548-5747 Alpacas for sale, fiber and FIND IT! breeding stock available. BUY IT! 541-385-4989. SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & green, clean, no rain, in barn, 1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or ton, $115/ton & up, 541-408-5463, 541-475-6260 Barn Stored Orchard Grass, and grass mix,70 lb. bales, $150/ ton, 3x3 Alfalfa feeder & premium, $100/ton & $125/ ton, Delivery avail. 548-2668. Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$135, 2nd cut/$145. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $130/ton. FREE grapple loading, 1st & 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available.541-382-5626,480-3059

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


G2 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 454

476

Looking for Employment

Employment Opportunities

Caretaker job wanted, exp. with all livestock, ranch management and security, honest and reliable. 541-921-8748

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 470

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Domestic & In-Home Positions Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-610-2799

Advertising Account Executive Media sales professional needed to help our Central Oregon customers grow their businesses through a widely distributed and well read publication. This full time position requires a demonstrable background in consultative sales, extremely strong time management skills, and an aggressive approach to prospecting and closing sales. A minimum of 2 years outside advertising sales or similar experience is required to be considered. The position offers a commission-based compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive salesperson with unlimited earning potential.

Business Manager Needed, full time, to oversee the operation & fiscal activities of growing youth development non profit. 5+ year exp. & a degree preferred. Send request for position description & resume to: jen.petrie@heartoforegon.org by 5pm, April 26th, 2010.

476

476

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Medical Billing Specialist Crook County Fire & Rescue in Prineville Oregon is seeking a highly qualified medical billing specialist. This is a part time position with full time potential. Salary DOE, application period closes April 15, 2010 at 5 pm. Some of the essential functions of the position are performs receptionist duties and provides clerical support for the district . One year experience in a position of similar responsibility and complexity. Experience with medical insurance terminology preferred, experience and or training in computer medical billing applications, training in ICD-9 codes. Must have experience and understanding of HIPAA. Contact jdean@ccf-r.com for information packet.

Sous Chef

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Food Service - Bruno’s Grocery & U-bake is hiring for Cashier & Pizza Maker. Apply in person at 1709 NE 6th St., Bend. No phone calls. Food Service KFC Management If you have proven management experience, we can train you for a career that has no layoffs, competitive salaries & paid vacations. Starting salaries from $24,000-$34,000. We have immediate openings for management in Bend, Redmond, & Klamath Falls. Fax resume Attn. Robert Loer to 541-773-8687 or mail to Lariot Corp., Attn. Sally, 390 E McAndrews, Medford, OR, 97501. Food Service

McMenamins Old St. Francis School McMenamins Old St. Francis in Bend, OR is now hiring Line Cooks. Must have flex schedule including days, evening, weekends, holidays. Please apply on-line 24/7 at www.mcmenamins.com or pick up a paper application after 2pm at any McMenamin location. Mail to 430 N. Killingsworth, Portland OR, 97217 or fax: 503-294-0837. Call 503-952-0598 for info on other ways to apply. Please no phone calls or emails to individual locations!! E.O.E.

GATEHOUSE ATTENDANTS Part-time day & swing shift positions available immediately. Applicants must be flexible - willing to work weekends and holidays. Must have excellent customer service skills and either possess or have the ability to obtain DPSST certification for Unarmed Security Guard. BTCA will pay all associated fees. Must be drug free and have valid OR Driver's License. Send resume to: janieduncan@brokentop.org or fax to 541-312-4051 or mail to Broken Top Community Association, 855 SW Yates Drive, Ste. 102, Bend, OR 97702.

Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Box 16151536, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

HOUSE CLEANER - wanted for home cleaning service. Drivers license, no smoking, bondable, no weekends, no holidays. 541-815-0015. HVAC/Service Technician HVAC company looking for experienced Service Technician, must be refrigerant certified. Fax resume & qualifications to: 541-382-8314. Machinist Minimum 5 years lathe and milling experience. Operate CNC equipment, including set-up, adjustment and tool change. Read and edit machine programs. Competitive pay and benefits. Please send resume to Box 16150477, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Management Redmond Non-Profit wants thrift store manager, manager will run a staff of employees and volunteers, set work schedules, develop pricing, oversee inventory, display goods and have direct P&L responsibility. Retail and merchandising exp. is req. Starting salary, $22,000/year. No benefits. Availability May 1st, 2010. Respond email with cover letter and one page resume to: noprofit7777@aol.com.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

The Ranch is accepting applications for a year round full time Sous Chef. Need dedicated individual who possesses good supervisory and leadership skills that has an extensive knowledge of food preparation. Shifts will include weekends and holidays. Apply on-line at www.blackbutteranch.com. BBR is a drug free work place. EOE

Medical

541-385-5809

Harney District Hospital, 25 bed Critical Access Hospital in Burns OR is growing and needs additional staff. Medical Positions: •House Supervisor, Nights – RN required •Surgical Service Manager – RN, Experienced in OR •Surgical Scrub Tech •Cert. Nursing Assistants •MT or MLT Denise Rose Harney District Hospital 541-573-5184 drose@harneydh.com

WILDLAND FIREFIGHTERS NEEDED-- we are looking for FFT2's, FFT1's, and ENGB's to work on engine crews. If interested please call 1-877-867-3868

Real Estate Contracts

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU?

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Thurs. -Sun. 9am-5pm Corner of Bear Creek and Craven, 1823 SE Bear Creek Rd., Bend. TV, Lefton figurines, kitchen items, tools, bed frames, fridge, freezer, antique picture frames, etc,

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

288

Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Southeast Bend $$ BAG LADIES $$ Of Union Street Yard Sale. All items ONE DOLLAR! Sat. 10-3, Weather Permitting, 1319 NW Union St. “Grandpa Moved” Sale, you name it, its here! Sat. 4/10, 9am-3pm. 3174 NW Fairway Heights Dr.

H ESTATE SALE! H

284 Moving Sale, Fri. & Sat., 9-5pm. 18914 Shoshone Rd. off Baker. 27” TV, keyboard, mower, household, rocker.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

290

Sales Redmond Area

families’ useful stuff. Quality new & used. Saturday only, April 10, 8-4. 61524 Twin Lakes Loop off 15th.

GARAGE SALE April 9th & 10th (Fri & Sat) starts at 8 am clothes, W/D, lots of misc. 2467 SW 33rd St., Redmond

Huge Sale Fri. & Sat. 9-3pm Sporting goods, rec. equip., bldg material, household, jewelry, 61899 Dobbin Court.

Garage/Yard Sale, Fri. & Sat., 8am-2pm. Push mowers, Avon bottles, housewares, hardware. 710 NW 21st Ct.

6

528

Loans and Mortgages WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTIONPROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FINANCING

NEEDED

First Position Loans 2 Newer Bend Homes I Own Free & Clear 2 Points & 9% 3 Year Term Be The Bank Joel 949-584-8902

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Fri. & Sat., 7:30-5, Name brand, teens, women’s & mens clothes, books, games, Multi-Family Sale: Sat. Only, HUGE GARAGE SALE Sat. 9-2, Antique glassware, Royal Christmas decorations gaOnly, in heated arena in Tu- Receptionist Moving Sale: Fri. 10-6, Sat. Dalton, ceramic dolls, TV, enlore, many household & yard malo to Benefit Chimps, Inc, Big Country RV 10-5, Sun. 10-3, 64380 tertainment center, comitems. 2403 NE Ravenwood Sat. 4/10, 8:30-5, 65525 seeking experienced RecepCrosswinds Rd. off Old puter armoire, elliptical, lots Dr. between 8th & 12th St., Gerking Market Rd, Tumalo. tionist, Full time with benBend-Redmond Hwy., of misc., 61180 Ladera Rd Sat. after 3 p.m, $1/bag sale. efits. Fax resumes only to: Garage Sale, Remodeling mate541-330-2496. SALE Multi-family sale! rials, tools, furniture, etc. Linda & Phil Hanna MOVING included Estate items Baby/children's items, furni1270 NE 27th St. Sat., April Remember.... ture, clothing, sports. Sat., 60380 Sunridge Drive 10th, 8am-4pm. Add your web address to 9:00am-2:00pm, NW Terra FRIDAY April 9, 2010 • SATURDAY April 10 ,2010 your ad and readers on Inside Garage Sale, furniture, Meadow. 9:00 AM TO 5:00 PM • Crowd control admittance The Bulletin's web site will office equip., misc. Fri., 9-3 & numbers issued at 8:00 am Friday. be able to click through auSat., 9-12. 911 NE 4th St., 1 (Take Rickard Rd. to Groff Rd., turn right, follow keeping to the Multi Family Sale, rain or tomatically to your site. Block S. of Greenwood. right to Butterfield, turn left to Chickasaw turn right follow to shine, Sat. & Sun., 9am-3pm. Kona, turn left up the hill to Sunridge drive go right, to sale site 1145 NW Kingston Ave., corMoving Sale! Saturday, in Conestoga Hills.) ner of 12th & Kingston. Need Seasonal help? April 10th, 8-2: furniture, yard equipment, electronNeed Part-time help? Very Nice Sale!!!! Whirlpool washer and Dryer; Antique oak ics, kid stuff, etc. 3022 NE china cabinet; Corner cupboard; Antique fitted writers box; AnNOTICE Need Full-time help? Quiet Canyon Dr. Bend. tique French glass clock; Seth Thomas mantel clock; Twilight Remember to remove 541-633-3187 Silver plate set; Large storage cupboard; Oak drop front secreyour Garage Sale signs tary; Two unique sofa /console tables; Three door large oak Advertise your open positions. (nails, staples, etc.) after your icebox-converted; Glass topped patio table and four chairs; An288 Sale event is over! THANKS! tique oak tavern style table and four chairs; King size bed; The Bulletin Classifieds From The Bulletin and your Sales Southeast Bend armoire' style dresser; wicker chests; wicker and iron tall dislocal Utility Companies play unit; Techniques turntable; Men's and ladies clothing; lots Resort/Inn 3 Party Sale, Sat. 9-4 & of household misc. and decorator items-pots and pans and food Sun. 10-2, 20974 Front End person for Reserand cleaning supplies; Books; Wicker night stand and small Greenmont Dr. Estate & vations/Check in etc., some stands; Marble topped table; 10 cu.ft. Upright freezer; barbewww.bendbulletin.com night calls, computer skills handicap items vans, ramps, cue; Lots of art work and frames; two file cabinets; Magna binot necessary, furnished apt. misc. tools, camping, fishing, cycle; 600 foot pound Torque wrench; New rigid shop vacuum Two family Garage Sale. Appliw/utilities included time off bbq, electronics, gaming in box; Ryobi drill and Skil saw, new; other hand tools. Plastic ances, kids toys and clothes, & salary negotiable. Let’s consoles, & camera stuff. storage tubs; Few golf clubs; Sunshade roller screens; Office truck tool boxes, much more. hear about you. Send reMerchandising stands, accessupplies; lots and lots of other items. Fri 9-3, and Sat. 8-3pm. sume to: Job, PO Box 1176, sories & office items. Framed www.deedysestatesales.com 63286 Lavacrest, Bend. Crescent Lake, OR 97733. poster art, see Craigs list. 541-419-2242 days--541-382-5950 eves.

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

Estate Sales

282

507

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

280

500

Sales

Medical Part Time Medical Records Specialist needed to process medical records requests at medical clinics in Bend, OR. Strong customer service and medical administrative experience. Must have reliable transportation. Tuesday – Friday, day shift; 25-30 hours a week. Competitive compensation offered. To apply visit http://www.healthport.co m/careers.

Finance & Business

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of April 5, 2010

Business Opportunity ALL CASH vending! Do you earn $800 in a day? Your own local candy route. Includes 25 machines and Candy. All for $9,995. 1-888-776-3071.

Employment SLT NEEDS class A team drivers with Hazmat. $2,000 bonus. Split $.68 for all miles. Regional contractor positions available. 1-800-835-9471. COMPANY DRIVERS- (Solo & Hazmat teams). *great pay, *great miles, *CDL- A required. New to trucking? We will train. Variety of dedicated positions available. Call 866-692-2612. Swift. INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL exchange representative: Earn supplemental income placing and supervising high school exchange students. Volunteer host families also needed. Promote world peace. 1-866-GO-AFICE or www.afice. org.

Miscellaneous NEW NORWOOD sawmills. LumberMate-Pro handles logs 34” diameter, mill boards 28” wide. Automated quick-cycle-sawing increases efficiency up to 40%! www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-661-7746 ext 300N. IF You used type 2 Diabetes drug Avandia and suffered a stroke or heart attack? You may be entitled to compensation. Attorney Charles Johnson. 1-800-5355727.


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted 3/2 house in Redmond, no pets, $275/mo. +util. Call Jim, 541-280-4185.

616

Want To Rent Retired couple looking to lease nice home in Sisters or Bend. Moving to area from out of state 818-517-0948 - Bob

630

Rooms for Rent NE Bend, Own Bed & Bath, incl. util., pasture avail., great seasonal rental, no pet /smoking, background check req., $375. 541-388-9254.

Room in nice spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath home, huge fenced yard, pets? Fully furnished, all util. pd., near shopping & bus stop, $500,541-280-0016 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent 1302 NW Knoxville, Westside 2 bdrm. condo, W/S/G paid, woodstove, W/D hookups, deck storage, $575 + $550 dep. Cat okay, 541-389-9595. Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Next to Pilot Butte Park 1989 Zachary Ct. #4 1962 NE Sams Loop #4 2 master bdrms each w/ 2 full baths, fully appl. kitchen, gas fireplace, deck, garage with opener. $675 mo., $337.50 1st mo., incl. w/s/yard care, no pets. Call Jim or Dolores, 541-389-3761 • 541-408-0260

632

Apt./Multiplex General Desert Garden Apts., 705 NW 10th St. Prineville, 541-447-1320, 1 Bdrm. apts. 62+/Disabled

634

642

652

676

745

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent NW Bend

Mobile/Mfd. Space

Homes for Sale

Duplex, beautiful 1100 sq. ft., 2 bdrm., 2 bath townhouse, cul-de-dac, newer, clean, vaulted, spacious, W/S paid, $635/mo. 541-815-1643 Great location at 1628 NE 6th St., 2 bdrm., 1 bath, 578 sq. ft. duplex w/ new glass top range & fridge., W/D hook-up, spacious yard & flower garden, underground sprinkler system w/ lawn care, $650./mo. Call 541-382-0162,541-420-0133 HOSPITAL AREA Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appliances, w/d hook up, garage w/ opener, gas heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. $645/mo + deposit. 541-382-2033 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Move in Special! Quiet Town home 2/1.5 W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2022 NE Neil. 541-815-6260 Newer Duplex 2/2 close to hospital & Costco garage w/opener. yard maint., W/D, W/S no smokimg. pet? $725 +$725 dep. 541-420-0208.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Rent Special - Limited Time! $525 & $535 1/2 off 1st month! 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $650 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS A Westside Condo, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, $550; woodstove, W/S/G paid, W/D hookups. (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2620 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad Small studio, $395/mo. 1st/ started ASAP! 541-385-5809 last + $200 security dep. 362 NW Riverside, Close to 634 Drake park, downtown & Old Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Mill District. 541-382-7972.

$99 1st Month! 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. $675 mo. - $250 dep. Alpine Meadows 330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

$100 Move In Special Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet complex, covered parking, W/D hookups, near St. Charles. $550/mo. Call 541-385-6928. 1/2 OFF 1ST MONTH! PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fireplace. Only $710/mo. w/ one year lease. 541-815-2495 #1 Good Deal, 3 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $675+dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615. 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, 992 sq.ft., near hospital, fenced back yard, large deck, gas heat, A/C, all appl., W/D, pets OK, $750+dep., 541-280-3570 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, 1 level, attached garage, A/C, gas heat, from $825-$925. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

A

Good Deal! 2 Bdrm. Townhouse, 1.5 bath, W/D hookup, W/S/G paid, $625+dep., 2922 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Duplex, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, W/D hookups, dbl. garage, very spacious, new, W/S incl., no smoking, avail. now, $700 mo. Rob, 541-410-4255

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 G3

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Ask Us About Our

April Special! Starting at $500 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Clean, energy efficient nonsmoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park, ballfield, shopping center and tennis courts. Pet friendly with new large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr approval.

Chaparral Apts. 244 SW Rimrock Way 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Bringin’ In The Spring SPECIALS! • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. • $200 security deposit on 12-mo. lease. • Screening fee waived Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from $395. Lots of amenities. Pet friendly, w/s/g paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 GSL Properties Like New Duplex, nice neighborhood, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, garage, fenced yard, central heat & A/C, fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825. Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RENTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

Avail. 5/1, West Hills, energy efficient, 3 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/D,new gas furnace, $800, 1st, last, dep., no pets or smoking drive by 1278 NW Vicksburg, then call 541-382-9470.

On 10 Acres between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Mobile Home lot for rent in Beautiful Prineville! No deposit. Will pay to move your home! Call Bobbie at 541-447-4464. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 3000, 1500, & 2500 Sq.ft. Units, light industrial, 1 block W of Hwy 97, 2 blocks N. of Greenwood. Lets make a deal! Call Tom 541-408-6823

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $995/mo. + deps. Pets okay. 20561 Dorchester East. 541-410-8273,541-389-6944

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Sun Meadow, 1400 sq. ft., 3/2.5, W/D, appl., dbl. garage, yard maint. incl., pet ?, $995/mo, 61173 Daysprings Dr, call 541-388-4533.

Office/Warehouse space 3584 sq.ft., & 1792 sq.ft. 30 cents a sq.ft. 827 Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., Contact Paula, 541-678-1404.

656

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Houses for Rent SW Bend

2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. Shop With Storage Yard, newer carpet & paint, wood12,000 sq.ft. lot, 1000 stove, garage fenced yard on Newer Duplex, 2/2 wood sq.ft shop, 9000 sq.ft. .92 acre lot $795 floors, granite counters, back storage Yard. Small office (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. deck, garage W/D hookup, trailer incl. Redmond convequiet st., 2023 NW Elm, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, 900 sq.ft., w/ nient high visibility location $600. 541-815-0688. $750 month. 541-923-7343 attached single garage, incl. W/D, newly remodeled bath, The Bulletin is now offering a W/S incl., $725/mo. + dep., LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE pet neg., 541-350-2248 Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin 3 Bdrm., 1 bath 1144 sq.ft., Classified Rep. to get the gas fireplace, garage, $795 Fully subsidized new rates and get your ad mo., 1st/ last, $700 cleaning 1 and 2 bdrm Units started ASAP! 541-385-5809 dep. 60847 Emigrant Circle 541-389-8059,541-480-9041 Equal Opportunity Call The Bulletin At Provider $850 - Newer, 3/2 full bath, 541-385-5809. 1300 sq. ft., dbl. garage, on Place Your Ad Or E-Mail Equal Housing dbl. cul-de-sac, fireplace, At: www.bendbulletin.com Opportunity avail. 4/1, 19833 Sprig Ct., 541-848-1482, 541-385-9391

NOW RENTING!

Ridgemont Apartments

2210 SW 19th St. Redmond, OR (541) 548-7282

Studio, 1 bdrm, furnished, fenced backyard, all util. except phone +laundry facilities $500 mo+$250. dep. Pet? 541-508-6118.

648

Houses for Rent General Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. 14 Timber, please call 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

$950 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

Cute updated 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq. ft., nice appliances, elect. heat + woodstove, fenced backyard, trees, lots of parking, dbl garage on about 3/4 acre in DRW, $950 month. 541-550-7364. Nice, Quiet, Fully Furnished House on 2 acres with detached garage. Incl. basic cable and W/S. No smoking. Pets neg. $800/mo. 503-539-2871/503-658-4927

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 2 Bedroom, 1 bath on 1326 SW Obsidian Avenue, $550 mo. +635 deposit. 541-447-1616 or 541-728-6421

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 dbl wide/shop & farm equip. 40 acre lot fenced/gated. Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance Sharon 541-408-0337 Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

747

Southwest Bend Homes FSBO: $198,000 Golden Mantle Subdivision 1234 sq.ft., 3/2, 1/3rd acre treed lot, decking, fully fenced backyard. 541-312-2711.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Single Story, 3/2.5, over $150,000 in upgrades, fenced, 1/3+ acre, RV Pad, w/hookups, $499,000, 503-812-0363 www.owners.com/jpm5553

748

Northeast Bend Homes

693

Mountain View Park 1997 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in gated community $169,900. Terry Storlie, Broker John L. Scott Realty. 541-788-7884

Office/Retail Space for Rent

749

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Appliance Sales/Repair Concrete Construction

Automotive Service

where square, plumb & level is not an extra, commercial, residential, 34+yrs. in Bend. No job too big or small, ccb16071 call for FREE estimates. 541-382-1834.

A & R Paintworks

Debris Removal

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Desert Rose Cleaning Now taking new clients in the Powell Butte, Redmond & Prineville areas. 20 Years Exp., Honest & Reliable. Call Gina, (541)788-0986

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

Home Is Where The Dirt Is 13 Yrs. Housekeeping Exp., Refs. Rates To Fit Your Needs. Call Angela Today! 390-5033 or 948-5413.

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Remodeling, Handyman, Garage Organization, Professional & Honest Work. CCB#151573-Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595

Carpet & Vinyl

Drywall

Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

Carpet & Vinyl Installation & Repairs, Carpet binding & area rugs, 30 yrs. exp. in OR, CCB#21841, 541-330-6632, or 541-350-8444.

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

American Maintenance Fences • Decks • Small jobs • Honey-do lists • Windows • Remodeling• Debris Removal CCB#145151 541-390-5781

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Southeast Bend Homes

762

Homes with Acreage GETAWAY on 9+ acres, will accommodate up to 12 ppl. Close to Sisters in private location. Only $485,000! Bachelor Realty, 389-5516

Real Estate For Sale

700

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

Landscaping, Yard Care Fire Fuels Reduction

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Weekly Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Same Day Response

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

382-3883

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Beautiful Smith Rock 55+ M H P 2 bdrm., 1 bath, all appliances, very cute mobile, RV space $9000 or half down w/terms. 541-526-5870.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classifieds

MUST SEE! 2 Bdrm., 1 bath Rock Arbor Villa, completely updated, new floors, appliances, decks, 10x20 wood shop $12,950. 530-852-7704

2000 Fuqua dbl. wide, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, approx 1075 sq.ft., in Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new great shape, vacant & ready roof, heat pump, A/C, new to move from Redmond, carpet, $10,000. $35,000, 541-480-4059. 541-390-3382

SECTION!!! DON’T MISS OUT ON FINDING CHEAP DEALS! PRICE TO PLACE AD: 4 DAYS $20 • 70K READERS *Additional charges may apply.

Call 541-385-5809 to advertise and drive traffic to your garage sale today!!

(This special package is not available on our website)

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326 BIG

SPRING

CLEAN-UP

Thatch, aerate, weekly maintenance, weeding, fertilizing, sprinkler activation. Free Estimates Contact Hal, Owner, 541-771-2880. hranstad@bendbroadband.com

Masonry

Remodeling, Carpentry

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Mahler Homes, LLC

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Additions, Kitchens, Bathrooms, General Remodeling. Design Services Available. CCB#158459. 541-350-3090

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-410-9642

Painting, Wall Covering

Doug Laude Paint Contracting, Inc.,

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Commercial and Residential “YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

Own your Home 4 Price of Rent! Starting at $100 per mo+space Central Or. 541-389-1847 Broker

LOOK IN OUR

705

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

J. L. SCOTT

771

Affordable Housing of Oregon *Mobile Home Communities*

Real Estate Services

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE

Sunriver Area, framed 2 bdrm., 1 bath, “U” driveway w/ extra parking, large detached garage/shop, groomed 1.47 acres, $224,900. Call Bob, 541-593-2203.

DEALS ABOUND!

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

C-2 Utility Contractors

I DO THAT!

762

Homes with Acreage

Hauling Services

Avail. for all of your Excavation Needs: Backhoe, Trench, Plow, Rock Saw, and Boring. 541-388-2933.

Handyman

750

Redmond Homes

Hauling Everything from pine needles to horse manure. Best prices in town. Little Whiskey Farm CCB #68496 • 541-408-2262

DMH & Co. Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Wild Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Building/Contracting

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

Excavating

Cascade Concrete

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

775

3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $169,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Appliance removal, reinstalled, gas lines, handyman services. CBC#49072. Since 1969. Senior Discount. 541-318-6041 or 408-3535.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

The Bulletin Classifieds

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * 3 Bdrm. Duplex, garage, Etc. 650 fenced yard, $650/mo. No Application Fee, Pets consid- The Real Estate Services classiHouses for Rent ered, references required. fication is the perfect place to NE Bend reach prospective B U Y E R S 510 SE 6th St. - 3 bdrm, 1.5 Call 541-923-0412. AND SELLERS of real esbath, all appl. W/D hookup, A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 tate in Central Oregon. To new carpet & paint, garage, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, dbl. gabath, 1600 sq. ft., family rage, w/RV parking, close to place an ad call 385-5809 W/S/G pd., no pets. $625 & room, mostly fenced, nice schools, off Cooley Rd., pet $600 dep. 541-419-6964. yard, RV parking, $850. on approval, $800 per mo., Duplex - 2 bdrm, 1 bath, ga541-480-3393,541-389-3354 541-678-0229. rage, W/D hookup, gas heat. Newly Renovated in SW 740 $600/month, W/S included, A quiet 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 1751 1100 sq. ft, 2/1, hardwood $600 dep., No pets. Call sq. ft., family room with pelCondominiums & floors large yard, pet? $600 541-408-1151 for info. let stove, fenced yard, stor+dep. Near High School, Townhomes For Sale age shed, RV parking, $995. Refs. req. 541-350-3321. 640 541-480-3393/541-610-7803 MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Near Bend High School, 4 Nice 2/2 double garage, C O N D O , ski house #3, end $700/mo.+dep. Clean 3/2 unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, combdrm., 2 bath, approx. 2050 $595 Mo + dep., large 1 bdrm dbl. garage, $850/mo.+dep. plete remodel $197,000 sq. ft., large carport, no secluded, W/S/G paid. W/D C R R No smoking pet neg. furnished. 541-749-0994. smoking, $995/mo. + deps. in unit. front balcony, stor541-350-1660,541-504-8545 541-389-3657 age, no pets. 1558 SW New Listing! Mt. Bachelor VilNANCY, 541-382-6028. lage., priced for quick sale at 659 NOTICE: $150,000. Turnkey ComHouses for Rent All real estate advertised 642 pletely Furnished, sleeps 6, here in is subject to the FedSunriver 1/1 nice deck w/grill FSBO Apt./Multiplex Redmond eral Fair Housing Act, which for showing 541-550-0710. makes it illegal to advertise 1/2 Off 1st mo., OWWII, .5 1st Month Free any preference, limitation or acre, 55948 Snowgoose Rd., 6 month lease! discrimination based on race, short walk to river, commu2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. color, religion, sex, handicap, nity boat ramp, $795,pets neg, Close to schools, on-site familial status or national no smoking, 541-420-0208 laundry, no-smoking units, origin, or intention to make storage units, carport, dog any such preferences, limita661 run. Pet Friendly. tions or discrimination. We Houses for Rent OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS will not knowingly accept any 541-923-1907 advertising for real estate Prineville www.redmondrents.com which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby LARGE DBL. wide mfd. & small A Large 1 bdrm. cottage. In informed that all dwellings cabin, on 40 acres of horse quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, advertised are available on property, 15 mi. E. of PrinevSW Canyon/Antler. Hardan equal opportunity basis. ille, $900 - $1100mo. woods, W/D. Refs. Reduced The Bulletin Classified 907-315-0389 , 907-373-5524 to $550+utils. 541-420-7613 20350 SE Fairway, 2/1.5, large duplex unit, fenced back yard, garage, W/D hook-up, W/S paid, $695+ $650 dep. 541-280-7188

***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s, Install New Bark, Fertilize. Thatch & Aerate, Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

RODRIGO CHAVEZ LAWN MAINTENANCE Full Service Maintenance 10 Years Experience, 7 Days A Week, 541-408-2688 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

In your neighborhood for 20 Years, interior/exterior, Repaints/new construction, Quality products/ Low VOC paint. Free estimates, CCB#79337,

541-480-8589 WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184 MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Remodeling, Carpentry D Cox Construction • Remodeling • Framing • Finish Work • Flooring •Timber Work • Handyman Free bids & 10% discount for new clients. ccb188097. 541-280-7998.

All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765. Don 385-4949

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-4977-4826•CCB#166678


G4 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN Boats & RV’s

800

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

860

865

870

870

870

875

880

880

Motorcycles And Accessories

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

Motorhomes

Motorhomes

HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

POLARIS 2007 800 4x4 4-wheeler. New Mossy Oak Break-up camo pattern. 70 hours, 361 miles, Polaris winch with snowplow, Po laris ATV cover, Brushguard, rear access rack. Excellent condition. $7,282.31 OBO. Call 541-208-1676.

16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153.

21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

850

Snowmobiles Harley Davidson 1200 XLC 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, $6500 OBO, 541-728-5506.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541390-1609 or 541-390-1527. 18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, 100 hrs., always garaged, beautiful boat, many extras to incl. stereo, depth finder, two tops, travel cover & matching bow canvas, $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066

Arctic Cat F5 2007, 1100 mi., exc. cond., factory cover, well maintained, $3000, call 541-280-5524.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, Polaris $2400; also Predator 90 2006, new paddles & wheels, low hours, $1400; both exc. cond., call 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

19’ 2002 Custom Weld, with 162 hrs. on inboard Kodiak, Extreme Jet, with split bucket, Hummingbird 967C color gps - 3d sonar & maps, & more. $17,500, please call 541-977-7948. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx6335 T.S. No.: 1217881-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tessa M. White and Kevin J. White As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Loancity, A California Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated April 27, 2006, recorded May 02, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-30396 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot eleven (11), in block twenty-seven (27),bonne home addition, recorded April 1, 1925, in cabinet a, page 249, Deschutes county, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1599 NW Fresno Ave., Bend OR 97701.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMG-91918 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GONZALO O. NAJAR AND RAMONA NAJAR, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MERITAGE MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/14/2005, recorded 4/27/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-25642, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Meritage Mortgage Loan Trust 2005-2. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1, FORREST COMMONS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1364 NORTHWEST 19TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 9, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 1 payments at $1,066.31 each $1,066.31 4 payments at $856.55 each $3,426.20 (11-01-09 through 03-09-10) Late Charges: $181.77 Beneficiary Advances: $35.50 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $4,709.78 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens r encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $167,813.10, PLUS interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from 10/01/09 to 12/1/2009, 7.625% per annum from 12/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 12, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/9/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1ST AVENUE, SUITE 500, SEATTLE, WA 98104 PHONE: (206) 340-2550 SALE INFORMATION: http://www.rtrustee.com

Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,601.92 Monthly Late Charge $62.45. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $211,998.29 together with interest thereon at 5.500% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State f Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 6, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in ASAP# 3479895 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010 writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and 1000 1000 1000 meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) LEGAL NOTICE 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Peter C. Mann and Kathryn A. Mann, as grantor, to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon, as 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird trustee, in favor of National City Bank, as beneficiary, dated 09/15/06, recorded 09/25/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-64747, covering the following described R-296713 03/18/10, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08 real property situated in said county and state, to wit: PARCEL 3 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2000-68, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. More Accurately described as: Parcel 3 of Partition Plat NO. 2000-68, recorded December 11,2000, in Cabinet 2, Page 138, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 17295 Emerald Valley Road Sisters, OR 97759 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed 1000 1000 1000 and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $4,885.42 beginning 06/01/09; plus late charges of $244.27 each month beginning 06/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $1,495.86; toLEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE gether with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of Loan No: xxxxxx9240 T.S. No.: 1265580-09. said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Casey Carnahan, as Grantor to Deschutes Title, as By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $700,000.00 Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Homecomings Financial, Llc (f/k/a Homecomings Financial Network, Inc.), as Beneficiary, dated with interest thereon at the rate of 8.375 percent per annum beginning 05/01/09; plus late January 11, 2007, recorded January 24, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in charges of $244.27 each month beginning 06/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of S0.00; plus advances of $1,495.86; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-04847 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for to-wit: the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penLot 6 in unit 1 of bend cascade view estates, tract two, alties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee Deschutes county, Oregon. will on June 24,2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time estabCommonly known as: lished by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at 24865 Alpine Lane Bend Or 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligapublic auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described tions secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of eal property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent inacquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further stallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $895.88 given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must Monthly Late Charge $44.79. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligabe timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call tions secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $274,703.33 together with interest thereon at 4.000% per annum from Octofor address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons ber 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com. Notice is further given that any person named in undersigned trustee will on July 06, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to Deschutes ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the public auction to the highest beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not idder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided y said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 19, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who or after the date of sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the date of the sale is May 25,2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is June 06, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for the Internet at http://www.osbar.ora/public/ris/lowcostletJalhelp/legalaid.hrml. The trustee's free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid www.USA-Fofedosure.com. Northwest/Trustee Services, Inc. Dated: February 12, 2010 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22224/Mann, Signature/By: Tammy Laird Peter C. and Kathryn A. R-297502 03/18, 03/25, 04/01, 04/08

880

Motorhomes

ASAP# 3451583 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

FLEETWOOD BOUNDER 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty. Price reduced! NOW $98,000. 541-389-7596

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Reach thousands of readers!

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition, runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833. Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

Jamboree Class C 27’ 1983, sleeps 6, good condition, runs great, $6000, please call 541-410-5744.

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Loan No: xxxxxx1640 T.S. No.: 1248312-09 AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE AMENDED TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by ESTELLE FIELD AND KEVIN L. FIELD, WIFE AND HUSBAND as grantor(s) to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS") AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL CORP., AN OP SUB. OF MLB&T CO., FSB as beneficiary, recorded March 16, 2007 as no.2007-15808 in book XX, page XX, in the official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon, covering the following-described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 228 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES NO.3, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60967 SNOWBERRY PL. BEND OR 97702 There is a default by the grantor(s) or other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, or by their successor in interest; The default is: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly Payment $2,263.88 Monthly Late Charge $110.00 By reason of said default, the beneficiary or the beneficiary's successor in interest has declared all obligations secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: $335,189.03 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.750% per annum, from July 01, 2008 until paid, plus monthly late charges of $110.00 each, beginning ugust 01, 2008 until paid; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary or the beneficiary's successor in interest for protection of the above-described real property and its interest in it. The beneficiary and trustee or their successors in interest, have elected and do hereby elect to cause the property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and the expenses of the sale, including the compensations of the trustee or successor trustee and the reasonable attorneys fees incurred. The Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property would be sold on April 08, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, in the City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of Oregon; however, subsequent to the recording of said Notice of Default the original sale proceedings were stayed by order of the Court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy Act or for other lawful reasons. The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said stay was terminated on February 10, 2010 WHEREOF, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on April 12, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at AT THE BOND STREET ENTRANCE TO DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE 1164 NW BOND, City of BEND County of DESCHUTES State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and by curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. Dated: March 11, 2010 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 (619) 590-9200 SIGNATURE/BY: 03/18/10 R-302038 Publication Dates: March 18, 25, April 1, 8, 2010.

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by David W. Harms and Coral J. Harms, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to Fidelity National Title Insurance Company, a California corporation, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Encore Credit Corp, as beneficiary, dated 06/08/06, recorded 07/05/06, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as 2006-45824 and subsequently assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee, on behalf of the holders of the Credit Suisse First Boston Mortgage Securities Corp. Home Equity Pass Through Certificates, Series, 2006-8 by Assignment, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Lot 14, Crescent Creek, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 16567 Daisy Place La Pine, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1,758.43 beginning 09/01/09; plus late charges of $76.64 each month beginning 09/16/09; plus prior accrued late charges of $919.68; plus advances of $156.08; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: $264,846.74 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25 percent per annum beginning 08/01/09; plus late charges of $76.64 each month beginning 09/16/09 until paid; plus prior accrued late charges of $919.68; plus advances of $156.08; together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 28, 2010 at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, A.M. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: inside the main lobby of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that for reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must be timely communicated in a written request that complies with that statute addressed to the trustee's "Urgent Request Desk" either by personal delivery to the trustee's physical offices (call for address) or by first class, certified mail, return receipt requested, addressed to the trustee's post office box address set forth in this notice. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the lender's estimated or actual bid. Lender bid information is also available at the trustee's website, www.northwesttrustee.com Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Requests from persons named in ORS 86.753 for reinstatement quotes received less than six days prior to the date set for the trustee's sale will be honored only at the discretion of the beneficiary or if required by the terms of the loan documents. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words trustee and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of sale. , If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser s requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 29, 2010. The name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar Association (16037 Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, toll-free in Oregon (800)452-8260) and ask for lawyer referral service. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance; a county-by-county listing of legal aid resources may be found on the Internet at http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html. The trustee's rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. Dated: 2/22/10 By: Chris Ashcraft Assistant Vice President, Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. For Further information, please contact: Chris Ashcraft Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. P.O. Box 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 (425) 586-1900 File No.7236.22285/Harms, David and Coral THIS COMMUNICATION IS FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3461047 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010, 04/22/2010


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 8, 2010 G5

881

881

881

882

931

933

Travel Trailers

Travel Trailers

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Pickups

Fleetwood Terry 2001, 34p slide-out, awning, self contained, less than 100 "on-the-road" miles. NICE! $13,000 OBO. 541-475-3869

Terry Dakota 30’ 2003, Ultra Lite, upgraded, 13’ slide, 18’ awning, rubber roof queen island bed, 2 swivel rockers $12,000 541-923-1524

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $16,900. 541-771-8920

L o o kin g for y o ur n e x t e m plo y e e ? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Tires, (4) on rims P23578R15 for Dodge Dakota or similar vehicle, 541-419-4018 Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

882

Fifth Wheels

Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

LEGAL NOTICE Harold Marken Storage 559 SE Centennial, Bend, OR 97702 Unit 2 will be sold at public auction on April 23, 2010 at 11:00 a.m. for non-payment of rent and other late fees. Eric Lowe.

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

360 Sprint Car and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036

2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

46th Annual

PORTLAND SWAP MEET

Portland Metro Expo Center 503-678-2100 Fax 503-678-1823 pdxswap@aol.com Ride the Max Yellow Line to the Expo! Swap meet tickets avail at

Baxter Auto Parts! Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted Fleetwood Prowler Regal original blue, original blue 31’ 2004, 2 slides, gen., interior, original hub caps, solar, 7 speaker surround exc. chrome, asking $10,000 sound, mirco., awning, lots of OBO. 541-385-9350. storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-92358 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KEVIN T. WILSON AND JOY E. WILSON, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR LOANCITY, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 6/7/2006, recorded 6/13/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-40737, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 21, PHEASANT RUN, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61149 MONTANA 34’ 2006 SOUTHWEST LODGEPOLE DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the benefielectric awning w/ wind & ciary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured rain sensor, kingsize bed, by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes sage/tan/plum interior, 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the $29,999 FIRM. following sums: Amount due as of March 12, 2010 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2009 541-389-9188 4 payments at $2,312.39 each $9,249.56 (12-01-09 through 03-12-10) Late Charges: $346.86 Beneficiary Advances: $237.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,833.42 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, he beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence Mountaineer by Montana that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the 3 slide outs, used only 4 undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the months, like new, fully obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the equipped, located in LaPfollowing: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $338,748.33, PLUS interest thereon at 6.875% per ine $28,900. 541-430-5444 annum from 11/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured 885 by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 15, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS Canopies and Campers 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Tahoe, always stored indoors, beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not loaded, clean, Reduced to then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is $20,900, 541-330-0206. capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/12/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com 908

Autos & Transportation

900 Aircraft, Parts and Service

ASAP# 3486176 03/25/2010, 04/01/2010, 04/08/2010, 04/15/2010

Toyota Tundra 2006,

APRIL 9, 10, 11, 2010 Stalls for sale inside & out. Inside cars-for-sale stalls.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Legal Notices

Antique and Classic Autos

Collectors Cars & Parts

Everest 2006 32' 5th wheel, 3/slides many add-on extras. exc. cond. Reduced to $37,500. 541-689-1351.

1000

932

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Tires, Set of (4) 265-70-17, exc. cond. $200 call for more info. 541-280-7024.

Ford Excursion Limited 2001, 4WD, loaded, 100,400 mi., exc. shape, $11,500 OBO, call 541-944-9753.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

VW Cabriolet 1981, convertible needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102. Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $17,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Chevy 1/2-Ton 4X4 1992, V8, auto, A/C, PW, PDL, etc., runs & drives fantastic, $2950, 702-557-7034, Bend.

Chevy Scottsdale 1984, 4x4, 6 in. lift, less than 3K mi. on 35 in. tires & new eng. no dents, new Leer canopy, red/gray $4500 or trade for ATV. 541-416-0654.

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931. Chevy Corsica 1996, 196K, well maint., all records $1000 OBO. 541-317-9006

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford Mustang Cobra Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 2003, flawless, only 1700 5-spd,runs great, minor body original miles, Red, with black cobra inserts, 6-spd, Limited 10th anniversary edition, $27,000; pampered, factory super charged “Terminator”, never abused, always garaged, please call 503-753-3698,541-390-0032

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024

Ford F150 2002, 118,000 miles, dark blue, FX4, Snow tires, PW/PL/AC, Good Condition. $8200. 541-728-3871. HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $8150. 541-639-1031.

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, IRON EAGLE 10’ TRAILER, 390-1600. Payload tool box, spare tire bar with tire, 32.5” side and rail with tarp hooks on front and sides, 49.5” expanded metal load gate. Set up for 2” ball receiver. Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super $1250 OBO! Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short Call 541-208-1676. bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great 931 cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709. Automotive Parts,

Service and Accessories Studded Wintercat Radial 16” snow groove, 225/70R16 $150. 541-312-8226 or 760-715-9123 ask for Mike.

Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990.

975

Automobiles

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Pre-Owned Clearance Sale HHHHHHHHHH Starting as low as $4588. 1997 Subaru Legacy Wagon White, roof rack, nice car! VIN #308911 2009 Subaru Tribeca Limited, 7 passenger, loaded, leather, moonroof, 1600 miles. VIN #400947 2009 Subaru Impreza 2.5l WRX, 5 door, manual, Blue, 11K mi. VIN #800292 2002 Subaru Outback 2.5l Limited, auto, leather, loaded. VIN #607885 2002 Subaru Outback 2.5l Green, low miles, roof rack. VIN #607496

2005 Subaru Outback 2.5l Silver, auto, heated seats, alloy wheels. VIN #328355 Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, $6210. Call 541-350-7017. never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

Mercedes E320 2003, 32K!!! panoramic roof, $19,950. Located in Bend. Call 971-404-6203. Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Audi Quattro 20V 1990, Manual Transmission, Pearl White, 4-Door, 218K, New Timing Belt and Water Pump, Good Tires, Selling this for $1800 O.B.O call Larry at 541-610-9614

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

2008 Subaru Forester 2.5l Dark gray, low miles, Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #726681

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

model, immaculate condition, $2995, please call 541-389-6457 or 541-480-8521.

940

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

2007 Subaru Forester 2.5l Auto, gold, low miles. Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #736924

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Vans

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586.

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604.

Lincoln Towncar 1992, top of the line

Mercedes 300SD 1981, Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

& interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,800, please call 541-419-4018.

Drastic Price Reduction! GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $1995, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Toyota Camry LE 2005 4 cyl FWD, 4 dr auto w/ 109k mls. Silver ext. w/ grey cloth int. 6 disc in dash CD changer, factory power moonroof, A/C, cruise, keyless entry, ps, pw, pm, pl, ABS braking, factory floormats w/ trunk mat, PIAA Fog Lights, tire chains, professionally tinted windows, 2” receiver hitch used for bike/ski racks, all services done at Toyota of Bend. 2nd owner, NON SMOKER & PET FREE. $8900 OBO Call 541-749-8409 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$24,500, w/o winch $23,500, 541-325-2684

Chevy Silverado 1500 1994, 4WD,

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer - Dodge 3500 1999, 24V, Diesel, 76K, auto, hydro $10,000. Call 541-771-4980 dumpbed, Landscaper Ready! Water truck, Kenworth 1963, $14,995, OBO 541-350-8465 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs Dodge Ram 1500 1998, great, $4000. 541-977-8988 4X4, Club cab, 148,500 miles, too many options to 925 list, $6500, 541-617-5291. Utility Trailers

975

Automobiles

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490

Lexus GX470 2004, all factory options, great cond., 56K, $21,500, 541-419-6967.

X-Cab, 123K, $5500, call 541-593-6303.

975

Automobiles

KIA Spectra SX 2006 blue, 4 door 49K mi.$6500. 530-310-2934 LaPine.

933

Legal Notices

975

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Automobiles

Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 541-330-5818.

Pickups

916

Chevy Trailblazer 2005, in good condition, with extras, Assume loan. Call 541-749-8339.

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227.

1000

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

1000

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig., $2500, please call 541-389-8971 for more info.

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, loaded, Extended warranty, $23,900, 541-549-4834

1000

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

2009 Subaru Legacy 2.5l Special Edition, auto, moonroof, low miles. Certified Pre-Owned. VIN # 215109 2007 Subaru Outback 2.5l Gold, auto, low miles. Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #313234 2008 Subaru outback 2.5l All weather pkg., white, heated seats, alloy wheels, low miles. Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #344601 2009 Subaru Outback 2.5l All weather pkg., white, heated seats, alloy wheels, low miles, Certified pre-Owned. VIN #334993 2008 Subaru Impreza 2.5l 5 door, black, 5 speed, roof rack, low miles, Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #813562 2008 Subaru Outback 2.5l All weather pkg., white, heated seats, alloy wheels, low miles, Certified Pre-Owned. VIN #302188 2007 Subaru Legacy 2.5l Special Edition, blue, 5 speed, low miles, premium wheels, rear spoiler, very nice, 21K miles. VIN #212630 2006 Subaru Impreza 2.5l Silver, 4 door, alloy wheels, low miles, very nice. VIN #508484 2005 Subaru Forester 2.5l 5 Speed, blue, low miles, roof rack. VIN #742793 2001 Subaru Outback 3.0l H6 Limited Black, auto, dual moon roofs, leather, loaded. Very Clean! VIN #635641 2005 Subaru Forester 2.5l Gold, auto, low miles, alloy wheels, very nice! VIN #730335 1997 Subaru Outback 2.5l Auto, blue, heated seats, all weather pkg., VIN #600057 2006 Subaru Impreza 2.5l Black, 5 speed, 4 door, low miles, alloy wheels, very nice. 37K miles! VIN #511341

HHHHHHH

Subaru of Bend 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend 541-389-3031• 888-701-7019 www.SubaruofBend.com Dlr #354


G6 Thursday, April 8, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item $ 00

Under 200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item to be sold.

www.bendbulletin.com

To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


Bulletin Daily Paper 04/08/10