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Warm Springs police seek the authority to enforce law off tribal land

Taxpayers:

This is your 15 1-month 15 warning

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

WARM SPRINGS — The call from dispatch came Wednesday night around 10:30 p.m., a possible drunken driver headed from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation to Rainbow Market. The driver crossed the Deschutes River — the reservation’s boundary — before Warm Springs officers could reach the vehicle. So, the tribal police pulled up next to the river, killed their lights and waited. After an Oregon Court of Appeals ruling last month, the Warm Springs officers are being cautious about enforcing the law off the reservation. But Police Chief Carmen Smith worries the ruling could threaten public safety. Although Oregon law does not give tribal police officers authority off the reservation, they still have a duty to protect people, he said, but not the power — and that’s something he hopes will change. “We’re going to fight for a change in the law to give us authority statewide as police officers,” Smith said. Smith said the conversation with tribal attorneys has just started, but he hopes the discussion goes to the Legislature. See Reservation / A5

Mark Twain, baseball fan

April

March

Thur sday

day Mon

By David Holley The Bulletin

Know who’s preparing your taxes. That’s the advice from state and federal officials as taxpayers enter the final month to file returns by the April 15 deadline. There are a number of options for reporting income to the state and federal governments, including

filing federal returns for free electronically and using tax preparation software. But if you hire a professional to handle more complicated returns, the Oregon State Board of Tax Practitionersandothergovernmentagencies warn taxpayers to be wary of whom they hire. “Remember, you are giving this person the most intimate details

Here are your options Taxpayers have options when filing 2009 tax returns, whether it be through the IRS Free File program or via a tax preparer. Returns are due by April 15. Deciding how you file impacts how much you pay to turn in your tax forms. What

Cost

Traditional Printing and paper forms postage and direct mail

Fillable forms with e-filing or direct mail

Where

How

Deschutes Public Library has People with tax law savvy can fill out traditional tax forms by copies of federal tax forms, and hand and mail them into the IRS. will print Oregon forms. Oregon Department of Revenue has state forms. Internal Revenue Service has federal forms. Both types can be found online.

Free for federal, www.freefilefillableforms.org Oregon prices start at about $10

Free File Free for federal, www.irs.gov/efile/article/ with e-filing possibly free 0,,id=118986,00.html or direct for Oregon mail

New York Times News Service

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CD software for companies like TurboTax can be purchased in stores. Taxpayers can access downloadable or online software through companies’ Web sites. Various companies can be found at http://apps.irs.gov/app/ freeFile/jsp/index.jsp?ck

If you don’t qualify for Free File, you can purchase similar software that will guide you through the process. The software becomes more expensive as your tax situation becomes more complicated, ramping up in cost for people who have investments, rentals or other more complicated financial issues. Downloadable software, which can be used again year after year, is generally more expensive than online-only software.

Paid preparer with e-file or direct mail

About $70 to Licensed tax consultants and more than $300 preparers, certified public accountants, public accountants, enrolled agents and even attorneys can all be paid to prepare tax returns in Oregon.

Make sure that any tax preparer is licensed through the Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners or Board of Accountancy before giving him or her any personal information. You can find out whether a person is licensed at www.oregon.gov/ OTPB/index.shtml or www.oregon.gov/BOA/index.shtml.

Free preparers with e-file or direct mail

Free

AARP primarily works with people on simpler returns. E-filing is offered at most AARP sites, according to the company’s Web site. Visit www.aarp.org/money/taxaide. The IRS offers tax preparation and advice at its Bend office at 250 N.W. Franklin Ave. Call 541-388-6739 for more information.

Between $10 and $75 for online-only software; about $15 to more than $100 for downloadable or CD software

AARP offers advice and preparation services to low- and moderate-income people; the IRS offers tax preparation services.

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The county says the massage benefit for employees aims to reduce costs by keeping health issues in check, but it has no data to support that By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Deschutes County paid more than $136,000 for massages for its employees in 2009. County officials say the massages are intended to save the public money by preventing employees’ health issues from worsening. But they Inside haven’t explored whether that’s • Insurance true since the massage benefit costs and started in 2001. alternative Neither the city of Bend nor care benefits Jefferson or Crook counties covfor local ers massages for employees. And at least one county official, governments, Assessor Scot Langton, has periPage A4 odically questioned the massage benefit in the past, according to minutes from meetings of the Employee Benefits Advisory Committee, of which he is a member. The county, which is self-insured, covers the massages as “alternative care,” a category that also includes acupuncture, naturopathic and chiropractic treatments. Co-payments for massage are $15, and the county pays up to $45 per massage treatment. If employees use all of their $1,500 alternative care allotment for massage, they can get about 33 treatments a year. Employees don’t have to get referrals or other proof of medical necessity for massages to be covered. See Benefits / A4

Alternative care benefits Employee benefits for alternative care paid by Deschutes County in 2009 Chiropractic $231,880

Massage Therapy $136,310 Acupuncture $88,298 Naturopath $21,018

Total for all alternative care in 2009....$477,506

Sources: Internal Revenue Service, Oregon Department of Revenue, Oregon Board of Tax Practitioners, Oregon Board of Accountancy, H&R Block, and various tax preparers and preparation Web sites

MEXICO: U.S. couple slain in likely drug hit, Page A3

Calendar

Online or personal software with e-filing or direct mail

This allows all federal taxpayers, no matter their income, to file tax returns for free online. Users fill out electronic versions of tax forms, and can save their progress online. The Oregon Department of Revenue does not have a similar program. To e-file Oregon tax returns for free, you must meet certain income and age limits, depending on the company you hope to use. You can print out and mail in forms for the cost of postage. Your 2009 adjusted gross income must be less than $57,000 in order to use Free File, allowing preparers to use online software such as TaxSlayer or TurboTax for free. Some companies have additional income and age restrictions, however, which limit options. Additionally, some companies will let you file your Oregon tax returns for free if certain age and income limits are met. Otherwise, you can pay fees, which typically start at about $10 for Oregon returns.

By Darryl Brock River rafting and billiards, sure. But who knew that the creator of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn was a devotee of baseball? The answer: Lots of folks, in his time. “Mark Twain contributes liberally to the support of the Hartford base ball club,” The Sporting News asserted in 1886, adding wryly, “Mark’s reputation as a first-class humorist is now firmly established.” The zinger was prophetic. Hartford’s entry, and the entire Eastern League, folded that season. See Twain / A4

of your life,” said Ron Wagner, executive director of the Board of Tax Practitioners, which licenses tax preparers. Even if a taxpayer’s return was filed by a tax preparer, the taxpayer is liable if the preparer provides false information to the Oregon Department of Revenue or the Internal Revenue Service. See Taxes / A5

Deschutes paid $136K last year for massages

David Holley and Anders Ramberg / The Bulletin

Sheila Wilton, a licensed tax consultant with H&R Block, goes over an online tax form last week in the Bend office on Northeast Third Street. Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Source: Deschutes County

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Runaway Prius? Doubt raised; mystery deepens By Elliot Spagat and Ken Thomas The Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — The mystery surrounding a Toyota Prius whose driver reported a stuck accelerator deepened Sunday as the motorist’s attorney dismissed a congressional memo that questions his client’s version of events. The memo said technicians with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and Toyota could not duplicate the sudden, unintended acceleration that James Sikes said he experienced March 8 when he reached 94 mph on a California freeway. Investigators tried during a two-hour test drive Thursday. See Prius / A6

James Sikes says he reached 94 MPH because of unintended acceleration by his Prius. AP file photo


A2 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Telling your friends where you are (or not) Constantly showing your location isn’t for everyone; the latest idea is to let users ‘check in’ from a bar, restaurant or wherever they happen to be

From left, Harry Heymann, Dennis Crowley, Nathan Folkman and Tristan Walker of Foursquare introduced their location service concept at the South by Southwest Interactive conference in Austin, Texas, a year ago.

By Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

AUSTIN, Texas — As Jordan Viator roams the conference rooms, dimly lighted bars and restaurants here at the South by Southwest Interactive conference, she often pulls out her cell phone and uses the Foursquare service to broadcast her location. Such a service might sound creepy to the privacy-minded. But it came in handy for Viator when she arrived Friday at a party in a bar called Speakeasy and could not find anyone she knew. Her friends who also use Foursquare could see where she was, and some joined her a few minutes later. “I only share my location with people I am comfortable meeting up with, and when I want to be found,” said Viator, a 26-year-old communications manager at a nonprofit company. Mobile services like Loopt and Google’s Latitude have promoted the notion of constantly beaming your location to a map that is visible to a network of friends — an idea that is not for everybody. But now there is a different approach, one that is being popularized by Foursquare. After starting the Foursquare application on their phones, users see a list of nearby bars, restaurants and other places, select their location and “check in,” sending an alert to friends using the service. This model, which may be more attractive than tracking because it gives people more choice in revealing their locations, is gathering speed in the Internet industry. Yelp, the popular site that compiles reviews of restaurants and

Photos by Bryce Harper / New York Times News Service

Austin residents Jordan Viator and David Neff check on their Foursquare updates while visiting a bar in downtown Austin last week during the South by Southwest convention. After firing up the Foursquare application on their phones, users see a list of nearby bars, restaurants and other places, select their location and “check in,” sending an alert to friends using the service. other businesses, recently added a check-in feature to its cell phone application. And Facebook is expected to take a similar approach when it introduces location features to its 400 million users in coming months. If checking in goes mainstream, it could give a lift to mobile advertising, which is now just a tiny percentage of overall spending on online ads. If a company was able to pitch offers to people who say they are at a particular spot,

it would “allow for the sharpening of mobile advertising,” said Anne Lapkin, an analyst at the research firm Gartner Inc. The check-in idea got its start in 2004, when Foursquare’s predecessor, a service called Dodgeball, started to let people tell their friends where they were with a text-message blast. Most cell phones at the time did not have GPS location features, “so using text to check in was a necessity,” said Dennis Crowley,

who created the service with a classmate in the Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University. In 2005, Crowley sold Dodgeball to Google, which eventually shut it. He decided to expand on the idea with Foursquare. “Each time you check in, you’re giving permission to share your location and get pinged with information about interesting things nearby,” Crowley said. Since it was introduced at South

by Southwest a year ago, Foursquare has swelled to more than 500,000 users. It now has 1.6 million check-ins a week. This year, Foursquare and other location services are the talk of the conference, which has become a launching pad and testing ground for Internet startup companies. One of the drawbacks to the check-in model, as opposed to constant tracking, is that people have to remember to use a service, said Josh Williams, co-founder of Gowalla, a location game. Gowalla revolves around finding virtual objects in real-world locations, something like a scavenger hunt. “Just as people had to get into the habit of tweeting, they’ll have to learn the habit of checking in,” Williams said. Many of these services are building in incentives to encourage regular use, often in the form of points and virtual badges. Gowalla, which says about 100,000 people are using its application, is working with several companies to spread the word about its service at South by Southwest. Users who find a virtual drink coaster can redeem it at a participating bar for a free beverage. And the company teamed up with Palm to offer free cell phones to conference attendees who find a phone icon. Other services are trying the check-in approach. Hot Potato allows users to create instant chat rooms around locations or events, like a concert. Whrrl hopes to lure users by treating check-ins as keys to exclusive virtual “societies.” And a service called MyTown lets people buy virtual property around them, in a twist on Monopoly.

Forgive me, confession Web site, for I have sinned Several such sites play host to admissions of everything from infidelity to homicide By Selwyn Crawford The Dallas Morning News

DALLAS — The young man heading out of the convenience store wanted to do the right thing. He really did. But Zagros Bigvand was in a hurry that day last summer, and the elderly lady with the cane “was walking really, really slow.” So he let go of the door he had been holding open for the shuffling stranger just as she neared it. “It felt like I held the door for that lady for five minutes,” said Bigvand, of Dallas. “But finally, I just felt like I had to go. So I let it go, and she looked at me and I looked at her. I felt bad about it all day. And I said I wish I could apologize to that woman.” So he did. His online mea culpa became the genesis for apolo.gy, one of a growing number of so-called confession Web sites aimed at allowing people to anonymously admit — and apologize for — anything, from being a shopaholic to cheating on a partner to murder. “Human beings have a need to confess,” said Dr. James Campbell Quick, a distinguished professor in the Goolsby Leadership Academy at the University of Texas at Arlington. “There’s no question about that. Confession is therapeutic. “We often, I think, like to carry on appearances that we’re all fine and dandy, and we don’t always want people to know the depths of our souls,” added Quick, a fellow with the American Psychological Association. “So anonymity lets us flush that stuff out there and walk away.” Confession Web sites such as apolo.gy, postsecret.com, grouphug.us and ivescrewedup .com, have proliferated over the past few years. Most of them are inundated with often-graphic descriptions of sexual misdeeds, but some apologies are for criminal acts, some of them

Miller said. “That’s what I find with all crooks, that they’re leery and I just wouldn’t think it (the confession) is real.” Whether the claims are real or going back years. not, online confession sites seem A sampling of some recent popular. confessions: “In terms of number of sites, • “Sorry ... we were broken up we’re definitely seeing more,” and I had sex with someone else. said Bill Tancer, general manager I feel like I cheated of global research on you and obvifor Hitwise, a Web ously you agree. I “Human beings site research firm. hope that one day have a need to Tancer, author you’ll be able to of “Click: What forgive me. I’m so confess. There’s Millions Do Ontruly sorry. I don’t no question about line and Why It know what else Matters,” said that to say ... that’s my that. Confession is data show that apology.” (From therapeutic.” traffic to confesapolo.gy) sion sites, though • “I felt no re- — Dr. James Campbell comparatively morse when I Quick, professor, small, doubled got arrested for University of Texas at from January shoplifting and I Arlington 2008 through last will keep stealing August, when it whether it be from inexplicably levstores or individuals, for the rest eled off. of my life.” (From noteful.com) Bigvand, whose site features • “I’m an online shopaholic. I both paid and public service ads, go online to pay bills or look for said that it is slightly profitable, something simple like a calen- but he’s surprised at its populardar and instead wind up buying ity. He said it has a heavy emphathings like a leather laptop bag. sis on sexual improprieties. The saddest part is, I don’t even “It’s gone in a direction that I own a laptop. My husband has no never intended,” he said. “People idea because I hide the purchas- have a very heavy, twisted cones from him and when I maxed science. I’m not the morality poout my cards I started using his.” lice. I think this is more a reflec(From shopandconfess.com) tion of what society is really about when no one is watching.” Former Austin, Texas, resident Allure of anonymity Gabriel Jeffrey started grouphug Almost all online confession .us in 2003 as a site for his friends sites promise anonymity and are to talk about whatever was on rarely filtered for content. Web their minds. He said he initially site operators say there is no way opened with about six people to know which claims are factual and within two weeks, the site and which are not, and there is no had garnered more than 2 million way to track participants either. page views. Last year on apolo.gy, a womBut he rarely visits the site now an “confessed” to murdering her because many of the confessions husband and getting away with it are too negative and gloomy, in“Scott (sic) free.” cluding confessions of suicidal But Dallas police homicide Lt. thoughts. Craig Miller says he doubts that “It was never a long-term interanyone who commits a serious est of mine to read a lot of really crime would confess to it on a dark thoughts,” said Jeffrey, who Web site, even one that promises now lives in Los Angeles. “It’s anonymity. rare that I’ll read anything that “There’s a level of uncertainty I haven’t read before. There are that they can’t be tracked down,” only so many things that Ameri-

cans feel guilty about; overwhelmingly it’s sex.” Like Bigvand, Jeffrey said that he believes most people who post on his Web site are truthful, even if some of the confessions are outlandish.

‘Natural evolution’ “It’s just a natural evolution of the tradition of storytelling,” Jeffrey said. “It sort of seems like sort of a natural thing for people to do. People have been confessing for thousands of years.” Of course, for Catholics and other Christian faiths, confessions have always been considered good for the soul. But a 2005 study at Georgetown University found a significant decline in the number of Catholics going to confession. Could it be that online confession sites are taking up the slack? “I could never take the place of a priest or some type of clergyman,” Bigvand said. “But less people are going to church than before. Does that mean that people have a less guilty conscience about what they do? No, people

still feel guilty.” Dr. Timothy Wolff, an associate professor of psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center, said he doesn’t view online confessions as the best way to absolve guilt or handle a crisis. But he does believe they may be helpful and, in some cases, could lead to a face-to-face apology. “There’s an element of separation, physically, that allows people to do it without fear of reprisal,” Wolff said. “Say someone puts it out there and the response is not quite so bad, then they might put it out there in reality.”

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THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 A3

T S Scramble for health bill votes The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Democratic leaders scrambled Sunday to pull together enough support in the House for a make-or-break decision on health care reform later this week, expressing optimism that a package will soon be signed into law by President Barack Obama, despite a lack of firm votes for passage. The rosy predictions of success, combined with the difficult realities of mustering votes,

HEALTH CARE REFORM underscore the gamble that the White House and congressional Democrats are poised to make in an attempt to push Obama’s health care plans across the finish line. The urgency of the effort illustrates growing agreement among Democratic leaders that passing the legislation is key to

limiting damage to the party during this year’s perilous midterm elections. But House Minority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, pledged to do “everything we can to make it difficult for them, if not impossible, to pass the bill.” He also joined other Republicans on Sunday in warning that Democrats would pay for the legislation by losing even more seats than expected in November. The most optimistic talk on Sunday came from the White

House. Senior Obama adviser David Axelrod predicted that Democrats “will have the votes to pass this,” and press secretary Robert Gibbs declared that “this is the climactic week for health care reform.” But Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., the Democrats’ chief head-counter in the House, cautioned that the party has not yet found the 216 votes needed to win approval of the health care bill passed by the Senate in December.

Soldiers stand guard Sunday near the crashed car of a U.S. consulate employee in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. The consulate worker and her husband were shot to death Saturday in their car, where their baby was found unharmed in the back seat, near the Santa Fe International Bridge linking Ciudad Juarez with El Paso, Texas, according to Mexican authorities.

By Thomas H. Maugh II Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — It seemed like a good idea at the time. Diabetics are at an unusually high risk of heart disease, heart attacks and strokes, so treating them intensively to sharply reduce blood pressure, cholesterol levels and sugar levels should be highly beneficial. But a decade of studies in thousands of patients shows that is not the case. Two new reports from a major nationwide trial called ACCORD released Sunday show lowering either blood pressure or cholesterol levels below current guidelines do not provide additional benefit and, in fact, increase the risk of side effects. A third arm of the study, released two years ago, shows lowering blood sugar levels excessively actually increases the risk of heart disease. The results are very disap-

Nods to both sides in finance reform bill

The Associated Press

By Sewell Chan New York Times News Service

U.S. consulate worker, husband killed in Mexico By Marc Lacey and Ginger Thompson New York Times News Service

LA UNION, Mexico — Gunmen believed to be linked to drug traffickers shot an American consulate worker and her husband to death in the border town of Ciudad Juarez over the weekend, leaving their newborn baby wailing in the back seat of their car,

authorities said Sunday. They also killed the husband of another consular employee and wounded his two young children. The shootings appeared to be the first deadly attacks on U.S. officials and their families by Mexico’s powerful drug organizations. They came during a particularly bloody weekend when nearly 50 people were killed around the

China use global trade rules to its advantage By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

HONG KONG — With China’s exports soaring, even as other major economies struggle to recover from the recession, evidence is mounting that Beijing is taking advantage of international trade rules to spur its own economy at the expense of others, including the United States. Seeking to maintain its export dominance, China is engaged in a two-pronged effort: fighting protectionism among its trade partners and holding down the value of its currency. China vigorously defends its economic policies. On Sunday, Premier Wen Jiabao criticized international pressure on China to let the currency appreciate, calling it “finger pointing.” He said that the renminbi, China’s currency, would be kept “basically stable.” To maximize its advantage, Beijing is exploiting a fundamental difference between two major international bodies: the World Trade Organization, which wields strict, enforceable penalties for countries that impede trade, and the International Monetary Fund, which acts as a kind of watchdog for global economic policy but has no power over countries like China that do not borrow money from it. China had a $198 billion trade surplus with the rest of the world last year, with its exports to the United States outpacing imports by more than 4-1. Despite that, in the last 12 months, Beijing has filed more cases with the WTO’s powerful trade tribunals in Geneva than any other country complaining about others’ trade practices. In addition, Beijing has worked to suppress a series of IMF reports since 2007 documenting how the country has substantially undervalued its currency, the renminbi, said three people with detailed knowledge of China’s actions. China buys dollars and other foreign currencies — worth sev-

pointing, researchers say, because they suggest clinicians may have reached the limit for what they can do for diabetic patients without the development of totally new therapeutic approaches. But the good news is, the findings “reduce the cost and potential side effects of drug therapy” and mean patients will not have to work as hard at reducing blood sugars, lipids and blood pressure, said Dr. Denise Simons-Morton of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, which funded the trial. “The take-home message is that the standard care approaches are pretty good. If we try to go beyond them, it doesn’t provide additional benefit.” Diabetes has become a tremendous problem in the United States, with at least 21 million people now afflicted with Type 2 diabetes.

China’s Wen takes U.S. to task Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao on Sunday lectured the United States, criticizing its call for China to let its currency rise against the dollar to boost U.S. exports, advising it to work harder to improve its financial system and directing it to change its foreign policy to improve relations with China. Wen’s comments — during a news conference at the end of China’s annual session of its non-elected legislature — seemed to indicate that China would generally pursue a relatively tough line in its relations with the United States this year. The comments underscored China’s increasing self-confidence on the international scene following its success at coping with the global financial crisis. But Wen also continued to show caution about the course of domestic events, mentioning “the unsteady, uncoordinated and unstable development of the Chinese economy.” — The Washington Post eral hundred billion dollars a year — by selling more of its own currency, which then depresses its value. That intervention helped Chinese exports to surge 46 percent in February compared with a year earlier. Many prominent academic economists see a basic contradiction in the global system of oversight on trade and currency. “Many of us would like to see the WTO-style commitments — with people’s feet being held to the fire — at other international agencies, like the IMF,” said Jagdish Bhagwati, a Columbia University economist.

country in drug-gang violence, including attacks in Acapulco as American college students began arriving for spring break. The killings followed threats against U.S. diplomats along the Mexican border and complaints from consulate workers that drugrelated violence was growing untenable, U.S. officials said. Even before the shootings, the State

Department had quietly made the decision to allow consulate workers to evacuate their families across the border to the U.S. In Washington, President Barack Obama expressed outrage at the “brutal murders” and in a statement from the White House vowed to “work tirelessly” with Mexican law enforcement officials to bring the killers to justice.

W  B

Netanyahu apologizes, offers no policy shift JERUSALEM — Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel told his Cabinet on Sunday that the ill-timed announcement of new housing plans for a Jewish neighborhood in East Jerusalem during a visit here by Vice President Joe Biden last week had been “regrettable” and “hurtful.” But he did not indicate that the building project would be canceled — a move that might mollify the Obama administration and ease the start of indirect, American-mediated peace talks.

Thai protesters march on army HQ BANGKOK — Army reinforcements were rushed into Thailand’s capital as tens of thousands of anti-government demonstrators marched today on a key military headquarters

demanding that the government dissolve Parliament. Some 100,000 Red Shirt protesters who have been camped out along a boulevard in the old part of Bangkok have given Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva a noon deadline to meet their demand for new elections.

Al-Maliki courts allies following Iraqi vote BAGHDAD — Buoyed by preliminary results from last week’s parliamentary elections, Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is courting allies in hopes of forming a new governing coalition that will let him keep his job. Maliki, a divisive figure many politicians would like to unseat, and his State of Law slate made a strong showing in Baghdad and Basra. Maliki’s slate is ahead in five other provinces among Iraq’s total of 18, giving his bloc a narrow overall lead in partial returns. — From wire reports

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WASHINGTON — Senate Democrats will press forward this week on legislation to overhaul the nation’s financial system in a critical test of whether Washington can pass reform two years after the collapse of Bear Stearns touched off a financial tailspin that nearly wrecked the economy. The bill that Christopher Dodd, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, will introduce today appears crafted with the goal of forging a consensus that can overcome partisan division, with provisions that incorporate ideas from both Democrats and Republicans. The legislation would create a consumer protection agency within the Federal Reserve to write rules governing mortgages, credit cards and other financial products. In a concession to liberals, states attorneys general could

sue violators of those rules, and the agency would have enforcement powers over large banks, mortgage originators and servicers. But in a nod to Republicans, the bill would allow a council of regulators, led by the Treasury, to overturn proposed consumer rules by a two-thirds vote.

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A4 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Twain Continued from A1 Twain’s penchant for bad financial risks was highlighted along with his continuing attraction to the game. In 1874, Twain and major league ball had arrived in the so-called Nutmeg City. He built a mansion in a sylvan neighborhood that his family occupied for the next 20 years. The Hartford Dark Blues stayed barely one-seventh of that time but generated tremendous excitement as they rose to challenge the rival Boston Red Stockings for the National Association (forerunner of the National League) pennant. “When professional baseball was the new thing in town,” the baseball historian John Thorn said, “local and national celebrities, from authors to actresses, from mayors to magnates, lined up in public support, much as they do today, to see and to be seen. The celebrities lent tone and luster to the game.” The Mark Twain Project via New York Times News Service

Learning the lingo Being seen certainly suited Twain, but at the local ball grounds, he had another purpose, too. Under the heading “Red Stockings vs. Blue” he made notes during at least one of those Boston-Hartford contests, filling a sheet of his stationery that is now part of the Mark Twain Project at the University of California at Berkeley. His notations include basics — behind the bat, left field, safe hit — that suggest a crash course in baseball lingo, much as Twain had absorbed steamboat pilots’ vernacular. A few plays are described, some with references to the Dark Blues players Lipman Pike and Tom Carey. That Pike and Carey played in different years suggests that the jottings were

Benefits Continued from A1 “I think our feeling was that if we can divert people from physical therapy, which is very expensive, and have their problem taken care of through massage therapy, we would save a lot of money,” said Timm Schimke, the director of the county solid waste department and a member of the benefits advisory committee. Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney is the only member of the commission who said she had used the county’s massage benefit, and that was related to an injury. Commissioner Dennis Luke said asking elected officials if they’ve used it was “inappropriate” and refused to say whether he’s had a massage under the county plan. Commissioner Alan Unger said he has not. At meetings of the benefits advisory committee, Langton has raised the issue of covering massages. He’s concerned that paying for massages that aren’t medically necessary looks bad to the public if the county does not have proof of cost savings. When Luke noted at a September 2008 committee meeting that alternative care costs were going up every year, Langton asked members of the committee how it would look if someone published how much the county spends on massage, chiropractic, naturopathic and acupuncture on the front page of The Bulletin, according to meeting notes. At a November 2008 meeting, Langton brought up the issue again. “He wondered what the public perception would be on items such as massage therapy when we are laying employees off in some departments, and suggested we take a close look at the policies relating to these benefits,” according to meeting minutes. Langton said last week the county needs to do a better job of justifying coverage of massage.

Cost of coverage How much local government employers and employees pay for health insurance:

BEND Insurance premiums cost $1,364.70 a month. The city pays 90 percent of most employees’ premiums, and 93 percent of premiums for members of the police union.

CROOK COUNT Y The county pays 90 percent of premiums for employees and 80 percent of premiums for any dependents. For law enforcement, the county pays 90 percent of premiums

It is not quite a modern scorecard, but Mark Twain took notes that show a grasp of baseball argot during a game between the rival Hartford Dark Blues and Boston Red Stockings. made over several seasons. Twain witnessed a memorable contest of undefeated clubs on May 18, 1875. The Dark Blues had begun that season 12-0; the visiting Red Stockings were 16-0. A record crowd of 10,000 saw the Blues suffer a disappointing loss, 10-5. Twain also had a more personal setback, as evidenced by his ad several days later in The Hartford Courant. TWO HUNDRED AND FIVE DOLLARS REWARD At the great base ball match on Tuesday, while I was engaged in hurrahing, a small boy walked off with an English-made brown silk UMBRELLA belonging to

Alternative care benefits at local governments BEND The city’s health insurance pays up to $1,000 per enrollee each year for chiropractic and naturopathic treatments, and acupuncture. Employees have co-payments of $5.

CROOK COUNTY The county only pays for chiropractic care, with an annual limit of $1,000 per enrollee. The co-payment is $25.

DESCHUTES COUNTY The county pays up to $1,500 per calendar year for each employee and enrolled member for acupuncture, chiropractic and naturopathic treatments, and massage. Co-payments are $15, and massage coverage is limited to $45 per visit.

JEFFERSON COUNTY County law enforcement and non-represented employees: $500 annual limit, with $20 copayments for naturopathic and acupuncture treatments. “Even though it might be hard to quantify, I think it’s important. We need to quantify what the benefit is,” Langton said. Since Deschutes County selfinsures for employee health care, it uses a third-party administrator to process insurance claims and pays claims out of a county fund. The county charges premiums to departments based on how many employees they have. The county’s health insurance plan paid approximately $12.5 million for all employee health care claims in 2009, said Ronda Connor, the county’s benefits coordinator. The county is one of the largest employers in the region, and its insurance plan covers as many as 2,555 people, including about 850 full-time employees, for both employees and dependents. This means that for most employees with family coverage, the county pays $1,013.83 a month, and the employee pays $191.82 a month. For law enforcement employees with family coverage, the county pays $1,085.09 per month, and the employee pays $120.56.

DESCHUTES COUNTY Employees pay $35 per month for their insurance, and county departments pay premiums of $1,028.41 per full-time employee each month. Employees of Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council are also covered under the county’s health

me, and forgot to bring it back. I will pay $5 for the return of that umbrella in good condition to my home on Farmington avenue. I do not want the boy (in an active state) but will pay two hundred dollars for his remains. SAMUELL.CLEMENS

Twain spoofed the game’s arcane language, players’ elaborate posturing — even fans’ yearning for bygone teams. In his acidic narrative, the umpire is bludgeoned with a bat and the perpetrator’s skull cracked in turn by a lethal pitch.

Perhaps that day’s events influenced the tone of the single baseball-related piece he created in those years. “Methuselah’s Diary” (circa 1876) uses the term “low ball” directly from the note sheet as it depicts teams in Hartford and Boston colors conducting familiar rituals. (“At once did all that are called Basemen and Fielders spit upon their hands and stoop and watch again.”)

Mark Twain, umpire?

their families and employees of the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, county Personnel Services Manager Debbie Legg said. Robb Hayden, an insurance agent at Northwest Benefits Group, said most private sector employers do not have health insurance plans that cover massage. Connor said Deschutes County’s coverage of massage and other alternative care was added in 2001, when the county realized it needed to reduce its overall benefits package to keep the insurance plan financially healthy. The county went from a $100 annual deductible and 100 percent coverage of claims, to a $500 deductible and 80 percent coverage, Connor said. Adding the alternative care benefit was not supposed to increase the total cost of the county’s insurance plan, according to minutes from a 2001 Employee Benefits Advisory Committee meeting. Baney said she does not believe employees should use the county’s massage benefit routinely as a preventive measure, but instead should use it only for injuries, particularly work-related ones. In Baney’s case, she used massage therapy a couple of times after the fingers on her right hand started to go numb after excessive computer use during her first year as a commissioner, she said. “(The massage benefit) has not proven to be a big strain on the budget, and I’m OK with it unless it proves to cause our plan some problems,” Luke said. Unger noted that the massage benefit was an incentive that county officials used several years ago to convince county employees to accept the county’s self-insurance plan. “In some ways, I think we’re losing the big picture for the little stuff,” Unger said of questions about the massage benefit. “The big picture is, we got control of our health costs in terms of what premiums cost us. insurance. Employees pay $50 a month for insurance, and COIC pays $1,013.41 a month.

JEFFERSON COUNTY The amount paid by the county and its employees depends on where the employees work. Public works and service workers: The county pays $756 a month toward employee premiums, and employees pay $84 per month. County law enforcement: The county pays $1,076 a month, and employees pay $120 a month. Non-represented employees: The county pays $833 a month, and employees pay $93 a month.

Twain once volunteered for umpire duty, with foreseeable results. He was to officiate a Fourth of July celebrity game in Elmira, N.Y., but the afternoon was hot, and he promptly abandoned his duties for the shade of the grandstand. The nation’s news media duly expanded this cameo appearance.

“The next thing we need to do is convince people to lead healthier lives,” he said. “You know, if a few massages and perks like that help people support a plan and they become healthier, it’s a good result.” Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

The Boston Globe ran a tongue-in-cheek account wherein Twain proclaimed, “Any ball is a strike that passes within eight feet of the plate;” and “Parties who guy the umpire will be killed.” The Philadelphia Times reported him toting a package onto the field and declaring that it contained dynamite. When his decisions “gave dissatisfaction,” the article stated, “he coolly placed one foot upon it, and the hubbub immediately ceased.” “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” (1889) demonstrated Twain’s mastery of the game’s idiom. His Yankee, Hank Morgan, exclaims of favored ballplaying knights: “The very best man in my subordinate nine! What a handy right-fielder he was!” and “My peerless short-stop! I’ve seen him catch a daisy-cutter in his teeth!” An armor-plated runner sliding into a base, Twain wrote, “was like an iron-clad coming into port.” He enjoyed the image sufficiently that he repeated it at a Manhattan banquet the same year for Albert Spalding’s round-the-world touring players. Toasting “the boys who plowed a new equator round the globe stealing bases on their bellies!” Twain then delivered a tribute to baseball as “the very symbol, the outward and visible expression of the drive, and push, and rush and struggle of the raging, tearing, booming 19th century!” That night, by all accounts, he was at the peak of his game. One appreciative reporter wrote that Twain played his position “without an error” and understood baseball “from A to Z.” Had he been so inclined, Twain might have explained that his knowledge of the nation’s game derived from years of close, pleasurable scrutiny, and that it had enriched his leisure hours while influencing his imagination.

Contractors tied to effort to track and kill militants New York Times News Service KABUL — Under the cover of a benign government information-gathering program, a Defense Department official set up a network of private contractors in Afghanistan and Pakistan to help track and kill suspected militants, according to military officials and businessmen in Afghanistan and the United States. The official, Michael Furlong, hired contractors from private security companies that employed former CIA and Special Forces operatives. The contractors, in turn, gathered intelligence on the whereabouts of suspected militants and the location of insurgent camps, and the information was then sent to military units and intelligence officials for possible lethal action in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the officials said. While it has been widely reported that the CIA and the military are attacking operatives of al-Qaida and others through unmanned, remote-controlled drone strikes, some American officials say they became troubled that Furlong seemed to be running an off-the-books operation. The officials say they are not sure who condoned and supervised his work. Officials say Furlong’s operation seems to have been shut down, and he is the subject of a criminal investigation by the Defense Department for a number of possible offenses, including contract fraud.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Georgia panics as mock newscast reports that the Russians are invading By Andrew E. Kramer New York Times News Service

MOSCOW — Some people placed emergency calls reporting heart attacks, others rushed in a panic to buy bread, and residents of one border village staggered from their homes and dashed for safety — all after a television station in Georgia broadcast a mock newscast on Saturday night that pretended to report on a Russian invasion of the country. The program was evidently intended as political satire, but the

depiction was sufficiently realistic that viewers headed for the doors before they could absorb the point. Producers at the Imedi television station taped the episode in the studio normally used for the evening news broadcast, using an anchor familiar to the audience. Looking nervous and fumbling with papers as if juggling the chaos of a breaking news story, the anchor announced that sporadic fighting had begun on the streets of Tbilisi, the capital,

that Russian bombers were airborne and heading for Georgia, that troops were skirmishing to the west and that a tank battalion was reported to be on the move. The broadcast showed tanks rumbling down a road, along with jerky images of a fighter jet racing out of the sky and dropping bombs. Bidzina Baratashvili, a former director of Imedi, compared the mock news broadcast and its effect on the population to the ra-

dio depiction of an invasion from Mars in Orson Welles’ adaptation of “War of the Worlds.” Lines formed at gas stations in Georgia, and cell phone service crashed under the weight of calls, the authorities said. “If you hear that war started, of course you run for the bank machine, then run home. It’s natural,” Jumber Jikidze, a taxi driver in Tbilisi, said in a telephone interview, describing the scene as “a little chaos” that lasted for about three hours.

In Haiti, a crash course in damage assessment By Ken Ellingwood Los Angeles Times

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Hector Marie Suze and her family have bunked on a bare lot with 22 other families since the Jan. 12 earthquake here toppled two interior walls and big patches of ceiling plaster in her home. The building appears inhabitable, but Suze still refuses to sleep indoors because she is afraid the continuing aftershocks will finish the job. “I want a specialist to come and say, officially, that I can come in,” said Suze, 47. Help is on the way. U.S. structural engineers, including earthquake specialists from California, are putting their Haitian counterparts through a crash course on how to assess earthquake damage and determine whether a property is safe to live in. The immediate goal is to get thousands of displaced residents to move back into houses that are livable, relieving pressure on the 300-plus impromptu en-

Ramon Espinosa / The Associated Press

Women carry a bag of rice on their heads Sunday at a food distribution center in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The 7.0-magnitude earthquake that hit Haiti on Jan. 12 left more than a million people living in makeshift camps. campments before the impending spring rains. An untold number of people are living in tents or under tarps, even though their homes suffered relatively light damage.

“Many people are not going inside because no one has done damage assessment,” said H. Kit Miyamoto, a private Los Angelesbased earthquake engineer who

was recruited to train Haitian officials by the Pan American Development Foundation based in Washington. Miyamoto, who uses photographs of damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake in his class, said half the remaining houses in the Port-au-Prince quake zone are probably livable. An additional 30 percent can be repaired, while the rest are probably lost causes, he said. The process for designating Haitian buildings will be familiar to Angelenos who lived through the magnitude-6.7 Northridge quake. Buildings are to be classified by level of damage, with sound structures tagged green, those that require work tagged yellow and unsafe ones tagged red. About 1,000 buildings in one area of Port-au-Prince have been graded, but authorities won’t be able to conduct inspections on a wide scale until hundreds of Haitian engineers and architects are ready to help.

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Taxes Continued from A1 That means the taxpayer could wind up paying back taxes, as well as fines and interest. And it’s why the Board of Tax Practitioners is encouraging people to be certain they use a licensed preparer, who could lose his or her license for providing false tax information. Plus, a taxpayer can also better hold a licensed preparer accountable if he or she provides false income data, making the preparer less likely to make false claims, Wagner said. Even so, it doesn’t matter to the IRS or the Department of Revenue who prepared or filed the false tax information, Wagner said. What matters is whose name is on the return. “What they’ll come back with is the taxpayer should have known better,” Wagner said. Some 70 percent of taxpayers — about 98 million people with an income of $57,000 or less — can access about 20 different online tax programs that will calculate their tax and file their return for free through the IRS Free File program, said David Williams, director of electronic tax administration for the IRS. Still, Williams said, about 60 percent of taxpayers use a preparer to file their return. At H&R Block on Northeast Third Street in Bend, people with both simple returns and more complex ones are coming through the doors. Sheila Wilton, a licensed tax consultant at H&R Block, said people should have a professional prepare their taxes at least once every few years, even if people don’t want to spend the money to have a professional prepare their taxes every year. H&R Block’s prices start at $68 for 1040EZ returns, and rise to more than $300 for people who have dependents, own a business, have investments or utilize the earned income credit — the more complex returns. Wilton said consultants and preparers stay up-to-date on the newest tax laws, and typically can get people the largest return. H&R Block also will review selfprepared returns for $29. “I have a feeling, in just about every case, we do a better job,” she said. But the word free is difficult for most people to resist. Taxpayers with incomes lower than $57,000 can access online tax software through the IRS Free File Web site and use it to prepare federal tax returns for free. The software, provided by companies ranging from TurboTax to 1040NOW.net, asks the

Getting your refund check The timeline for receiving a refund check varies, depending on when you file the tax return and the method by which you file it. Whether you choose direct deposit or mail affects the time frame as well. If you file a federal return and are wondering where the refund is, visit www .irs.gov or call 800-829-1954. Mailin return, refund via direct deposit • Oregon: before April 1, four to six weeks; after April 1, six to eight weeks • Federal: four to six weeks Mail in return, refund via check • Oregon: before April 1, four to six weeks; after April 1, six to eight weeks • Federal: Six to eight weeks E-file return, refund via direct deposit • Oregon: five to 10 business days • Federal: 14 business days or less E-file return, refund via check • Oregon: 10 to 15 business days • Federal: 21 days or less Sources: Internal Revenue Service and the Oregon Department of Revenue

user detailed questions to develop a tax return. Some taxpayers, if more stringent age and income requirements are met, also can file Oregon returns for free. Those returns can be filed electronically, which results in the IRS and state of Oregon refunding any tax overpayment more quickly. Even if a taxpayer makes more than the income threshold for Free File, he or she can use the IRS Fillable Forms, which are online versions of federal tax forms that can be filed electronically. Oregon lacks its own version of the Fillable Forms, so people who file federal returns electronically must either pay for a service to complete their Oregon forms or fill out the old-fashioned paper returns and mail them in, according to the Department of Revenue. Using Fillable Forms or filing paper returns typically requires a strong knowledge of tax law, which has thousands of provisions. “Often, people with more complicated returns feel that it’s beyond their knowledge,” said Wagner, of the Tax Practitioners Board. Richard Panick, a spokesman for the IRS, said paper returns

are the longest-standing method, but becoming less common every year. That’s in part because filing electronically is more efficient for the IRS and for the taxpayer waiting for a refund check. Some people who purchase tax preparation software — often a cheaper alternative to paying someone else to prepare a return — will use the program to prepare the return, then print it out and mail it in. Instead, Panick said people should file it electronically and have the refund deposited into a bank account. “The fastest combination is electronic filing with direct deposit,” Panick said. When choosing a preparer, Panick said people should ask the person about things like how long they have worked in the field and how they stay on top of tax law. People also should look for someone who will be around after tax season is over. One benefit of a paid professional is that he or she can represent a taxpayer to the IRS or Department of Revenue if the person is audited or the return is questioned. In Oregon, six different kinds of tax preparers can represent a taxpayer in this situation: certified public accountants, public accountants, enrolled agents, licensed tax preparers, licensed tax consultants and attorneys. The Board of Tax Practitioners handles licensing of preparers and consultants, while the Board of Accountancy handles licensing of accountants. Most accountants in Oregon are certified public accountants — 7,000 — compared with public accountants — 40 — according to the Accountancy Board. Enrolled agent is a designation that means a person can practice tax preparation in front of the IRS, Panick said. When looking for a tax preparer, Wagner said, avoid those who ask for a percentage of the refund as payment — that’s not legal. Also, make sure the refund check is mailed directly to the taxpayer, not the preparer, he said. Knowing the background of a person who will be preparing your taxes — and knowing that he or she is licensed — also is important, Wagner said, because of the information he or she will have access to: Social Security numbers, information about family members and bank account numbers. “They have the most personal details of your life,” he said. “Don’t just turn it over to anybody unless you’ve checked it out and they are legitimate.” David Holley can be reached at 541-383-0323 or at dholley@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 A5

Reservation Continued from A1 In January 2005, a Warm Springs officer began following a vehicle on U.S. Highway 26, still on the reservation. When the driver crossed the center line and into the oncoming lane of traffic, the officer, Joseph Davino, turned on his lights. The car sped across the reservation’s boundary. The driver eventually pulled over, and Davino arrested him. Thomas Kurtz was charged and convicted of attempting to elude a police officer and resisting arrest by a police officer. But the Court of Appeals overturned the Jefferson County Circuit Court’s decision to charge Kurtz. The court ruled Kurtz couldn’t be charged with resisting a police officer or attempting to elude a police officer — because Davino wasn’t a police officer. A police officer is someone acting on behalf of an Oregon governmental entity, the statute reads, and tribal police aren’t acting on behalf of the state. Smith thinks it’s a concept that needs to change. He points out that during the weekends there’s nonstop traffic on Highway 26 coming from Portland and headed to either the casino on the reservation or to Bend. If a tribal police officer sees someone driving while intoxicated and that person has crossed the reservation, the Warm Springs officer now pulls the driver over but waits for either Jefferson or Wasco County sheriff’s officers to arrive and make the arrest. Tony Green, a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Justice, said his agency, which argued the case on behalf of Davino, is asking the Oregon Supreme Court to review the case. But, he noted, this was a narrow ruling that deals with two specific situations — resisting arrest and eluding a police officer. Both include “police officer” in the crime. He said the ruling doesn’t say tribal police officers are no longer cops off the reservation. He uses the crime of burglary

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as an example. “There is no definition of police officer that is part of the commission of that crime,” Green said. “You can be arrested for committing that crime, and it doesn’t define who can arrest you. Part of proving that crime doesn’t (require proof) the police officer is a police officer.” Howard Arnett, a Bend attorney, represents the tribes. He said that within the next couple of weeks the Warm Springs Confederated Tribes will speak with other tribes in Oregon to further discuss the next step. The tribes felt the Kurtz case left them in limbo, with too much ambiguity to know exactly what is allowed. The way they see it, Kurtz got off because tribal police officers don’t have jurisdiction off the reservation. Arnett pointed out that the Warm Springs officers go through the same state training and certification as all other police officers in Oregon. Changing the law to give tribal officers the same jurisdiction off the reservation may be what’s required, he said. “Maybe we’ll get to the Legislature,” Arnett said. “This is a developing story.” Back on the reservation last week, the Warm Springs officers waited until the old sport utility vehicle they were following crossed back into their territory. They pulled the car over and verified the driver was able to drive. But in case the driver headed toward Bend, they also called Jefferson County dispatch and let operators know to be on the lookout for a blue SUV. “Unless we change the state statute regarding police officers, we’re not going to have the authority like we did before,” said Smith, whose department is the largest tribal police force in the state. “And that’s what we’re trying to work on. ... It’s a public safety (issue), but I can’t violate what’s in the ruling.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Prius Continued from A1 The memo was based on a congressional staffer’s observations of a two-day inspection last week at a dealership in suburban San Diego. A Toyota official who was at the inspection explained that an electric motor would “completely seize” if a system to shut off the gas when the brake is pressed fails, and there was no evidence to support that happened, according to the memo. “In this case, knowing that we are able to push the car around the shop, it does not appear to be feasibly possible, both electronically and mechanically that his gas pedal was stuck to the floor and he was slamming on the brake at the same time,” according to the report for the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

‘New questions’ Kurt Bardella, a spokesman for the committee’s top Republican, Darrell Issa of California, said Sunday that the findings “certainly raise new questions surrounding the veracity of the sequence of events” reported by Sikes. “We’re not saying Mr. Sikes is wrong or that he lied, we’re saying that questions have arisen in the investigation,” Bardella said. John Gomez, Sikes’ attorney, said the findings fail to undermine his client’s story. “I don’t put a whole lot of stock in their explanation,” he said. “It’s not surprising they couldn’t replicate it. They have never been able to replicate an incident of sudden acceleration. Mr. Sikes never had a problem in the three years he owned this vehicle.” Brian Pennings, a spokesman for the California Highway Patrol, said his agency’s view that there is no evidence of a hoax is unchanged. The CHP does not plan to investigate the incident because there were no injuries or property damage. “Unless they can completely disprove Mr. Sikes, we’re done,” Pennings said. “It doesn’t sound like they can do that.” Messages left with three Toyota spokesmen at the automaker’s U.S headquarters in Torrance were not returned Sunday. However, the company said in a release it will hold a news conference today in San Diego to dis-

cuss its preliminary findings. Transportation Department officials did not immediately comment Sunday. NHTSA is looking into claims from more than 60 Toyota owners that their vehicles continue to accelerate unexpectedly despite having their vehicles repaired. Toyota has recalled millions of cars because of floor mats that can snag gas pedals or accelerators that can sometimes stick. Sikes’ car was covered by the floor mat recall but not the one for sticky accelerators. He later told reporters that he tried to pull on the gas pedal during his harrowing ride, but it didn’t “move at all.” The Prius is powered by two electric motor-generators and a small gasoline engine, all connected by transmission gears. A computer, which Toyota calls the “hybrid control computer” determines what combination of motors is needed and which would be most efficient. Craig Hoff, a professor of mechanical engineering at Kettering University in Flint, Mich., said that for the Prius to accelerate out of control, at least two systems would have to fail simultaneously. They are the sensor signal that tracks the brake and gas pedal positions when the driver presses on them and the hybrid control computers. “The chance of them both going wrong, plus the fact that the signal is bad, it just seems very, very, very remote,” Hoff said. “Could it happen? Statistically, yes. But it just doesn’t seem very likely.” Several events usually combine to cause problems with cars, and it’s difficult to reproduce them, Hoff said. “It’s going to make it really hard to find, because you’ve got to line up the multiple effects,” he said. The incident happened only a few hours after Toyota held a high-profile news conference at its Torrance headquarters rejecting assertions of sudden unintended acceleration by an Illinois engineer. Sikes, 61, could not be reached for comment, but his wife said he stands by his story. “Everyone can just leave us alone,” Patty Sikes said Saturday night. “Jim didn’t get hurt. There’s no intent at all to sue Toyota. If any good can come out of this, maybe they can find out what happened so other people don’t get killed.”

U.S. faces a daunting repair bill as its aging water lines crumble By Charles Duhigg New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — One recent morning, George Hawkins, a long-haired environmentalist who now leads one of the largest and most prominent water and sewer systems, trudged to a street corner here where water was gushing into the air. A cold snap had ruptured a major pipe installed the same year the light bulb was invented. Homes near the fashionable Dupont Circle neighborhood were quickly going dry, and Hawkins,

who had recently taken over the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority despite having no experience running a major utility, was responsible for fixing the problem. As city employees searched for underground valves, a growing crowd started asking angry questions. Pipes were breaking across town, and fire hydrants weren’t working, they complained. Why couldn’t the city deliver water, one man yelled at Hawkins. Such questions are becoming

common across the nation as water and sewer systems break down. Today, a significant water line bursts on average every two minutes somewhere in the country, according to a New York Times analysis of Environmental Protection Agency data. In Washington alone, there is a pipe break every day, on average, and this weekend’s intense rains overwhelmed the city’s system, causing untreated sewage to flow into the Potomac and Anacostia rivers.

State and federal studies indicate that thousands of water and sewer systems may be too old to function properly. For decades, these systems — some built around the time of the Civil War — have been ignored by politicians and residents accustomed to paying almost nothing for water delivery and sewage removal. So each year, hundreds of thousands of ruptures damage streets and homes, and cause dangerous pollutants to seep into drinking water supplies.

N  B New England mops up after heavy rains EGG HARBOR CITY, N.J. — Last month, the Northeast was smothered by blizzards. Now, it’s waterlogged by torrential rains. The region mopped up Sunday following a bout with high wind and heavy rains that uprooted trees, downed power lines, and flooded creeks and rivers. At least seven people died in storm-related accidents, and hundreds of thousands were without electricity. More than a half-million customers in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York and Connecticut lost electricity at the peak of Saturday’s storm, which carried wind gusts of up to 70 mph. The storm came about two weeks after heavy snow and hurricane-force winds left more than a million customers in the Northeast in the dark.

Obama transparency efforts criticized WASHINGTON — In his first full day at the White House almost 14 months ago, President Barack Obama declared openness and transparency to be touchstones of

Craig Ruttle / The Associated Press

Businesses in a low-lying area of Greenburgh, N.Y., are surrounded by water Sunday after storms that ripped through sections of the Northeast. his administration, and he ordered federal agencies to make it easier for the public to get information on the workings of government. Indeed, Obama’s administration has posted White House visitor logs online, it has made public the once-classified memorandums on torture policies in the George W. Bush administration, and it has developed an internal

system for archiving its own unclassified e-mail messages.

Internet fraud’s U.S. price tag put at $550M LOS ANGELES — U.S. citizens reported losing more than $550 million in 2009 in Internet fraud, falling prey to a variety of increasingly sophisticated scams,

according to a report by the Internet Crime Complaint Center. The loss was more than twice that reported in 2008, according to the agency, a partnership of the FBI and the privately funded National White Collar Crime Center. Based in West Virginia, the center tracks Internet crime around the world. — From wire reports


L

B

Inside

OREGON OSU scientist working toward nuclear renaissance, see Page B3. OBITUARIES Peter Graves starred in TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” see Page B5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 15, 2010

“There’s only so much food (the food banks) can buy ... And this helps supplement it a little bit and extend their program just a little bit more.”

School board: No drastic cuts planned Sisters board members refute comments by superintendent By Patrick Cliff

— Floyd Courtain, of the Jefferson County United Way, on a $21,000 federal grant

Groups that help those in need get some help of their own By Diane S.W. Lee

The Bulletin

Sisters schools Superintendent Elaine Drakulich caused a stir last week by detailing how budget cuts could affect the district’s operations.

Drastic cuts in the Sisters School District spending plan, including closing the middle school, are not being considered anytime in the near future, according to several school board members. The board members are taking issue with comments made last week by Superintendent Elaine Drakulich, who detailed a number of ways that looming budget deficits could affect district operations. But now, board members are saying Drakulich spoke prematurely, before the board had considered ideas such as merging the Sisters

district with another district, closing a school and sharing services like special education or human resources. Drakulich did not return calls for comment.

‘Totally off the table’ The district estimates that it will face a $667,000 budget gap for the 2010-11 school year, and the shortfall could increase to $1.2 million by the following year. The district has a budget of about $12 million. On Wednesday, the day after The Bulletin reported Drakulich’s view of how budget cuts will be handled,

board members received calls from parents and community members who were in “shock, panic,” according to board member Glen Lasken. Board members say they don’t know yet exactly how they will make up the shortfall, though Lasken has said the district may rely in part on staff attrition and leave those positions open. But the ideas Drakulich described have not reached board consideration and will not anytime soon, he said. The board spent last week working to dispel the notion that significant cuts could happen this year. “They’re totally off the table,”

Lasken said. “This is going to be a tough budget cycle, and we’re going to have to make some tough budget decisions. Cutting off our hand is not one of them.”

Crunching the numbers The district expects to lose about a dozen students next year. The Sisters district has also cut ties with two charter schools, and when those close at the end of the year, the district will have about 119 fewer students. The district will also not have $315,000 in stimulus money that it has had. And it will need to save more than $500,000 to pay for employees’ retirement costs. See Schools / B5

CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMEN’S SHOW

The Bulletin

A handful of organizations that assist people in need in Jefferson County may soon get help from a new federal grant. The $21,000 grant from the Federal Emergency Management Agency will go to emergency food and shelter programs. Jefferson County United Way will select qualifying agencies and distribute the money. The deadline to apply is Saturday. Floyd Courtain, spokesman for Jefferson County United Way, said the grant means a great deal to organizations that may not have enough money to meet the current demand for services. And with the county’s high unemployment rate, Courtain said, more people are now seeking help. “The food banks that we have at Warm Springs and here in Madras, there’s only so much food they can buy with the funding that they have,” he said. “And this helps supplement it a little bit and extend their program just a little bit more.” About six organizations received FEMA funding last year. Funding is divided based on the needs of the organization, Courtain said. For example, Jefferson County Victim Assistance received $500 last year to help pay for hotel rooms to temporarily house crime victims, director Twila Rosenberg said. See Grant / B5

Sporting chance for ducks

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Painted decoys wait for their owners to pick them up from the Ducks Unlimited decoy painting area at the Central Oregon Sportsmen’s Show on Sunday.

“I wanted to just be helping Ducks Unlimited, so I did.” Marrin Nyman, 8

Ducks Unlimited volunteer Marrin Nyman, 8, of Redmond, grabs some decoys while helping with cleanup after a day of free decoy painting at the Central Oregon Sportsmen’s Show at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center on Sunday.

Seeking funds? To apply for FEMA’s emergency food and shelter program, contact Floyd Courtain at 541-475-2783 or Jerry Broker at 541-475-3817. The deadline to apply is Saturday. Grants will be distributed before the end of March.

Region can look forward to blue skies, warmer days

Kids get creative with decoys to help restore waterfowl habitat

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

By Sheila G. Miller

Daylight saving time is here, and this week there will likely be clear skies and mild daytime temperatures to go with the extra hour of daylight. Today is expected to be partly cloudy, with high temperatures between 56 and 62 degrees. Overnight temperatures could drop as low as 31 degrees. On Tuesday, there’s a chance of rain in the afternoon and into the evening, with breezy winds. “That’s a pretty fast-moving system though, so it’s nothing to worry about,” said Mary Johnson, meteorologist for the National Weather Service in Pendleton. Highs on Tuesday could range from 53 to 59, with lows dropping to between 30 and 35 at night. Similar temperatures are likely Wednesday, with partly cloudy skies and highs expected to top out around 59 before the temperature drops overnight to as low as 26 degrees. See Weather / B5

The Bulletin

REDMOND – n Sunday, dozens of children spent some quiet minutes away from the crowds at the Central Oregon Sportsmen’s Show exercising a little artistic muscle. An occasional quack broke through the quiet in the room, as children used green, white, black, brown and yellow paint to decorate decoy ducks in all manner of ways. The decoy painting event, sponsored by Ducks Unlimited at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, was a popular destination for families. Slater Turner, a Redmond Ducks Unlimited member, said he expected to go through about 250 plastic decoy ducks on Sunday. That was on top of the 350 that were painted on Saturday and the 200 painted on Friday. “It’s a good thing for kids to come out and see,” Turner said. “The kids have fun, and a lot of times the parents really want to be involved and take pictures of

O

Kroftan Nyman, 5, of Redmond, gets instructions from Joe Brennan, 45, of Portland, while putting away unpainted decoys Sunday at the sportsmen’s show. Kids pitched in to help paint hundreds of decoys in an effort sponsored by Ducks Unlimited.

them painting their first duck.” Turner said it’s also a good way for young people to get interested in restoring habitat for waterfowl, which is Ducks Unlimited’s primary purpose. Once complete, decoys were placed on a table to dry, showing off the creativity of the painters. While some children focused on painting a copy of a real duck, others took a more modern approach of splattering or striping their ducks. Kroftan and Marrin Nyman were volunteering at the event, helping refill paint, replace decoys and clean up after kids finished with their masterpieces. “I wanted to just be helping Ducks Unlimited, so I did,” Marrin, 8, said. Her favorite part was meeting all the people at the event. And Kroftan, 5, was glad to help out but noted that he’d painted his own decoy on Thursday, which had turned out pretty well. “It was brown with some green and white and yellow,” he said. See Ducks / B5


B2 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

For homeless student at OSU, ‘classes were a place of refuge’ Doug Meuler, who died at age 54, made an impression on campus By Cheryl Hatch Corvallis Gazette-Times

CORVALLIS — On his deathbed, Doug Meuler wrote his last will and testament in big block letters on a simple sheet of white paper. He left everything he had to the Native American Longhouse and the Ethnic Studies Department at Oregon State University. He didn’t leave much. He carried everything he owned in a big backpack and a folding camping chair with a blanket tucked inside. Homeless and hard of hearing, Meuler, 57, died of a brain tumor Feb. 18, a senior at OSU with a 3.43 grade point average. Jo Alexander, of OSU’s Disability Access Services, and Kurt Peters, a professor of ethnic studies, were at his side. Meuler started classes at OSU in the summer of 2008. He previously attended Linn-Benton Community College and Walla Walla Community College. At OSU, he made an impression everywhere he went on campus — sometimes favorable; sometimes not.

Overcoming challenges He faced challenges to doing his schoolwork and persevered. “He’d look for a light and a heat vent and settled in for the night to study,” Alexander said. “Classes were a place of refuge for him,” Peters said. “School for him was revitalizing. It represented life.” Cuauhtli Hernandez, a graduate student, taught Meuler in a class in Native American architecture. The students were required to build a model of a home. “When he was building the mod-

el, he was living under a bridge,” Hernandez said. Meuler frequently would sleep on a couch in the Memorial Union Lounge. Several times people complained and asked for him to be removed. “He faced a lot of discrimination on campus,” said Stephanie Dunn, who works at OSU’s Human Services Resource Center. Her office helps students with hunger and poverty issues. She provided Meuler with “meal bucks” so he could purchase food on campus. He found a welcome reception and a comfortable couch in the Ethnic Studies Department. “People here are very aware of how uncomfortable this community can be to marginalized people,” said Leonora Rianda, office manager. “Everybody treated him with respect. This was sort of his home away from home.” Alexander believes Meuler ultimately found far more compassion than discrimination at OSU. “People in the financial aid office. The MU business office. Human Services Resource Center. Student life. Oregon State Police and campus security. Across the board, people’s kindness toward him was amazing.” “He was really open about who he was,” Alexander said. “He admitted to his faults. He knew he was no saint.”

‘A colorful past’ A member of the Albany Union High School Class of 1971, Meuler had a criminal record nearly as long as his college transcripts. For years, he was addicted to heroin. He had felony convictions

for possession of a controlled substance and possession of a firearm. He served more than a decade in jail. In 2000, he was convicted of criminally negligent homicide and driving with a suspended license related to a car accident on July 2, 1999. Albany resident Bob Santos, then 47, died at the scene. Deylene Santos, his daughter, was seriously injured. Judge Janet Holcomb increased Meuler’s jail time from a standard 25-month sentence to 52 months because of his criminal record, probation violations and failed attempts at rehabilitation. At the sentencing, Meuler asked the Santos family for forgiveness. “I am very sorry. I truly wish it was me who died in the car wreck. But I refuse to give up on myself. I want to stay clean.” A check of Meuler’s criminal record after his release from prison suggests that he did stay clean. And higher education played a part in that.

A dedicated student Gail Woodside taught Meuler at OSU. She said he’d once brought in a paper held together with “14 different pieces of Scotch tape,” yet the content of his thoughts and writing made for some of her most rewarding reading. “He was never afraid to speak when 85 other voices were not saying a thing,” she said. Said Dunn, of OSU’s Human Services Resource Center: “Doug has a colorful past, but in his life as I knew him, he was trying to make right a wrong he had created,” Dunn said. “He was willing to sleep under overhangs on the campus, shave in public restrooms and carry his camping chair because that was his resource at the time to make higher education possible. And that is what I will miss about him;

a man who refused to see the normal roadblocks that get in one’s way. And he did this without complaint.”

Seeking redemption Last week, at the start of a memorial service for Meuler, student David Hunter carried an abalone shell and a burning smudge stick of sage. Peters walked by his side, his left hand placed gently on Hunter’s back, his right hand wafting the sweet smoke with a “sacred eagle feather.” They passed slowly from room to room, cleansing and blessing the space in the Native American Longhouse. Meuler was Modoc. “Doug was very proud of his Native American heritage,” Peters said. Nearly 70 people were at the longhouse for the service. A photograph of Meuler from his student days at Linn-Benton Community College was on a display table. His trademark camping chair and denim jacket sat next to the table. People told stories about Meuler as a teenager, as a student at LBCC, as an OSU student. Childhood friend Randy Glaser, of Albany, said “he was a natural-born leader, very bright, very cocky.” But Glaser also remembered Meuler’s teenage problems with drugs and his tragic family life. “His family was just doomed,” he said, citing the early death of his father, his invalid mother and a car crash that killed his sister and her husband. Robert Thompson, an assistant professor of ethnic studies, said Meuler “found what’s important in life in terms of love, of family, a true meaning of life. And people caring for him, and he cared for us. He’s found maybe what he was always looking for.” “Doug was really, really truly on the road to redemption.”

N  R CIVIL SUITS Deschutes County Circuit Court Civil Log

Cases involving less than $50,000 are subject to mandatory arbitration Filed March 4

10CV0204AB: Bank of the Cascades v. Ronald H. Cole and Morgan Mackenzie Inc., complaint, $660,133.57 10CV0206ST: Palisades Collection LLC v. Lorna J. Glaspey, aka Lorna Glaspey, complaint, $13,051.74 Filed March 5

10CV0208SF: Asset Acceptance LLC v. Jessica Olson, complaint, $11,877.08 10CV0209MA: Ray Klein Inc., dba Professional Credit Service v. Aaron A. Zacharek and Angela Zacharek, complaint, $29,377.63 10CV0210SF: Eoff Electric Supply Co. v. Mid Oregon Electrical Services Inc., Jeffrey J. Gakstatter, trustee, South Valley Bank & Trust, Paula Gakstatter, Paul Fraser and Gregory W. Dixon, complaint,

Burrowing owls get new homes

$36,687.79; v. Mid Oregon Electrical Services Inc., complaint, $36,402.79; v. Paul Fraser and Gregory W. Dixon, complaint, $36,402.79 10CV0212AB: Gary D. Roberts and Kimberly A. Roberts, co-trustees v. Glen W. Ernst, complaint, $105,000 Filed March 8

10CV0215AB: Citibank (South Dakota) NA v. Edward M. Rives, complaint, $18,666 10CV0216ST: DKC Investments LLC, aso Bank of America v. Gerald Brown, complaint, $22,151.34 10CV0217MA: Wells Fargo Bank NA v. Stephen P. Pilling, complaint, $32,772.17 10CV0218ST: Wells Fargo Bank NA v. Robert P. Helfer, complaint, $44,657.43 Filed March 9

10CV0211SF: Pneumercator Co. Inc. v. Bennett Inc., complaint, $10,269.76 10CV0219ST: State Farm Bank v. Daniel L. Clanton, complaint, $22,738.63

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The Associated Press KENNEWICK, Wash. — Burrowing owls are getting more places to live in eastern Washington. Volunteers and biologists with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have been installing artificial burrows to encourage the small owls to nest. Fifty have been installed this spring in the Mid-Columbia area and 24 on the Hanford Reach National Wildlife Refuge.

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Julius Caesar assassinated in 44 B.C. T O D AY IN HISTORY

The Associated Press Today is Monday, March 15, the 74th day of 2010. There are 291 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 15, 44 B.C., Roman dictator Julius Caesar was assassinated by a group of nobles that included Brutus and Cassius. ON THIS DATE In 1493, Christopher Columbus returned to Spain, concluding his first voyage to the Western Hemisphere. In 1767, the seventh president of the United States, Andrew Jackson, was born in Waxhaw, S.C. In 1820, Maine became the 23rd state. In 1913, President Woodrow Wilson met with reporters for what’s been described as the first presidential press conference. In 1919, members of the American Expeditionary Force from World War I convened in Paris for a three-day meeting to found the American Legion. In 1944, during World War II, Allied bombers again raided German-held Monte Cassino. In 1956, the musical play “My Fair Lady,” based on Bernard Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” opened on Broadway. In 1964, actress Elizabeth Taylor married actor Richard Burton in Montreal; it was her fifth marriage, his second. In 1970, the musical “Purlie,” starring Cleavon Little in the title role, opened on Broadway. Expo ’70, promoting “Progress and Harmony for Mankind,” opened in Osaka, Japan. In 1975, Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis died near Paris at age 69. TEN YEARS AGO Their presidential nominations secured, Al Gore and George W. Bush dug in for the eight-month battle to Election Day, with Bush saying he was braced for Gore’s “politics of personal destruction and distortions,” and Gore arguing that Bush’s “risky tax scheme” would hurt the economy. TV funnyman Durward Kirby died in Fort Myers, Fla.; he was in his late 80s.

FIVE YEARS AGO Former WorldCom chief Bernard Ebbers was convicted in New York of engineering the largest corporate fraud in U.S. history. (He was later sentenced to 25 years in prison.) In a symbolic but stunning rebuke, Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences passed a motion saying it lacked confidence in President Lawrence Summers — the first such action in the nearly 400year history of the university. ONE YEAR AGO A chorus of outrage greeted news that some $165 million in executive bonuses was being paid by bailed-out insurance giant American International Group. The space shuttle Discovery was launched on a mission to the International Space Station that had been delayed five times. Mauricio Funes won El Salvador’s presidential election. Tony Award-winning actor Ron Silver died in New York City at age 62. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Musician DJ Fontana is 79. Former astronaut Alan L. Bean is 78. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 77. Actor Judd Hirsch is 75. Rock musician Phil Lesh is 70. Singer Mike Love (The Beach Boys) is 69. Rock singer-musician Sly Stone is 67. Rock singer-musician Howard Scott (War; Lowrider Band) is 64. Rock singer Ry Cooder is 63. Actor Craig Wasson is 56. Rock singer Dee Snider (Twisted Sister) is 55. Actress Park Overall is 53. Movie director Renny Harlin is 51. Model Fabio is 49. Singer Terence Trent D’Arby (aka Sananda Maitreya) is 48. Rock singer Bret Michaels (Poison) is 47. Rhythm-and-blues singer Rockwell is 46. Rock singer Mark McGrath (Sugar Ray) is 42. Actress Kim Raver is 41. Rock musician Mark Hoppus is 38. Actress Eva Longoria Parker is 35. Rapper-musician will.i.am (Black Eyed Peas) is 35. Rock DJ Joseph Hahn (Linkin Park) is 33. Rapper Young Buck is 29. Actor Sean Biggerstaff is 27. Rock musician Ethan Mentzer is 27. Ac-

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

tress Caitlin Wachs is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “People are, if anything, more touchy about being thought

silly than they are about being thought unjust.” — E.B. White, American author and humorist (1899-1985)

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M A R C H City Forecast Breakfast The Bend Chamber’s annual City Forecast Breakfast is Thursday, March 18 at 7:30 a.m. at the Bend Golf and Country Club. City Manager Eric King and Mayor Kathie Eckman will discuss Bend’s 2009 accomplishments and what City officials are planning for 2010 and beyond. Topics will include economic development, operational efficiencies, City finances and the City Council’s goals for 2010. For prices and more information, visit www.bendchamber.org or call 541-3823221.

What’s a UGB? By state law, all cities in Oregon are required to have a 20-year supply of

2 0 1 0

land for employment and housing in their Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). Bend’s UGB proposal is the first major expansion of the City’s UGB since the original boundary was established in 1981. In that time, Bend’s population has grown from 17,425 to 82,000 or 365 percent. During that same period, the UGB expanded by only three percent or about 600 acres. To find out more, visit CityFactCheck.com.

ABC Awards The City of Bend Arts, Beautification and Culture Commission is currently seeking nominations for The Arts, Beautification & Culture Awards (the ABC Awards) for 2010. These annual awards recognize

individuals, organizations and businesses who have made significant contributions to the celebration, promotion, beautification or preservation of the City’s arts, culture, natural environment or public spaces completed in 2009. The deadline for nominations is Friday, April 23. Visit www.ci.bend.or.us/abc_ awards.html to learn more and to download a nomination form.

City Council The Bend City Council meets the first and third Wednesdays of each month. For upcoming meeting dates, agendas and more information, visit www.ci.bend. or.us.

For more information, go to www.ci.bend.or.us • City Hall 541-388-5505


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 B3

O OSU engineer designing new-generation reactor Head of nuclear engineering program foresees a nuclear power renaissance By Scott Learn The Oregonian

CORVALLIS — Jose Reyes was working at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1979 when the nuclear core in a reactor at Three Mile Island partially melted down. Reyes and four other members of a grand jury task force discovered plant operators were hit with multiple alarms in a complicated control room. “We set them up for failure,” he says. Three decades later, as head of Oregon State University’s nuclear engineering program, Reyes is responsible for OSU’s safety tests of a next-generation Westinghouse reactor likely to be the first one commissioned in the United States since the accident in Pennsylvania. He’s also chief technology officer for an OSU spinoff company in Corvallis, NuScale Power, that hopes to win NRC approval for a far smaller, simpler reactor than the Three Mile Island plant. Reyes, 54, hopes it will help spark a nuclear power renaissance. “There have been huge advances in maintenance, operations and safety,” Reyes says. “There’s no carbon dioxide, no acid rain. Nuclear has a lot of advantages over coal-fired plants.”

Nuclear power and the Northwest The Northwest has a humbling history with nuclear power, including the premature shutdown of Portland General Electric’s Trojan plant and the abandonment of partially finished plants by the Washington Public Power Supply System, more commonly known as “Whoops.” The Obama administration has dropped Nevada’s Yucca Mountain as a long-term storage site, meaning waste will continue to be stored at the plants. Under a ballot measure approved in 1980, Oregon voters would have to approve any new nuclear plant in the state. But WPPSS successor, Energy Northwest, is studying adding

PORTLAND — State officials boast more than 7,500 jobs have been “created or retained” by the 2009 Legislature’s trumpeted economic stimulus package, a feat just shy of the 8,000-plus jobs reported for Oregon under the far bigger federal stimulus program. Yet Oregon reports spending about $93 million so far compared with $1.3 billion in federal stimulus spending in the state. The state makes an eye-opening claim, and raises an obvious question: How did the “Go Oregon” package, as it is called, outperform the federal program by such a huge margin? The short answer: It didn’t. An analysis by The Oregonian shows that, on average, Go Oregon jobs lasted about two weeks and did little or nothing to dent the state’s bleak employment outlook. It also shows the state counted anyone working on a stimulus-related project as a job, regardless of whether the worker was already employed and in no danger of being laid off. Furthermore, one in four workers employed in Go Oregon jobs was not a resident of the state. The analysis also shows a disproportionately high amount of the stimulus money was spent in

MCMINNVILLE — Marion County sheriff’s deputies are looking for two inmates who failed to return to the county’s Jail Work Center after being granted three-hour passes. Inmates who show good behavior can earn the passes to take care of personal matters or visit family. But the sheriff’s office says in a news release that Felipe Morales Jr. didn’t return Friday evening, and David Torres failed to return Saturday morning. Both men are from Salem. Torres was convicted of vehicular attempt to elude and possession of methamphetamine. He was to be released in August. Morales is serving time for an assault conviction and was due out next January. Both men face additional jail time if caught.

PORTLAND — Wildlife officials have killed five more sea lions at Bonneville Dam

on the Columbia River as part of the campaign to protect fish. So far this season, a total of six sea lions on a list of 64 have been euthanized. With the spring salmon run ready to get under way, it’s possible that many more sea lions will show up at the dam in search of food and end up being captured and then killed by lethal injection. — From wire reports

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Bruce Ely / The Oregonian

Jose Reyes is responsible for Oregon State University’s safety tests of a nuclear reactor that is likely to be the first one commissioned in the U.S. since the Three Mile Island accident in 1979. more nuclear power after 2020 and likes NuScale’s approach. Thanks in part to Reyes, Oregon State is well positioned to benefit if nuclear power surges. After he arrived in 1987, Reyes parlayed a $4,000 grant into building a small-scale model of the Trojan plant for testing. Westinghouse got interested, and funded construction of a quarter-scale model of its planned new reactor at OSU. Reyes, who regulated safety at the NRC and serves as a safety expert for the United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency, oversaw about 100 comprehensive safety tests on the reactor. The college has a small, 1megawatt nuclear reactor. But the model that Reyes works on uses electrical coils that heat water up to 420 degrees. NRC testing protocols require simulating hundreds of breaks through the system — stuck valves, burst pipes, steaming leaks — then evaluating how the reactor responds with 750 sensors measuring pressure, temperature and liquid levels. The Westinghouse reactors are designed for “passive safety,” using water tanks and gravity to circulate water to cool the reactor core, not pumps and valves subject to breaking and useless

in a power failure. To be certified, the plant has to be able to cool itself without operator intervention for three days after a malfunction. “We’ll open a valve to make a 2-inch break in the pipe, then we just sit back and watch the safety system run,” Reyes says. “It’s a reality check.”

A new approach Reyes started working on what would become the NuScale reactor in 2000. The first design came out in 2003, along with a one-third scale model at OSU. In 2007, OSU transferred the technology to NuScale in exchange for an equity stake. On the outside, the NuScale plant looks like a huge — 65 feet by 15 feet — stainless steel pellet. That’s the “containment vessel.” Inside that vessel sits a second, smaller pellet: a 45-foot by 9-foot steel “reactor vessel.” Inside that sits the uranium fuel and steam generator. The whole unit floats underground on hangers in a lined pit filled with water, a blueprint that Reyes says is far more flexible in an earthquake: “Ours is definitely a West Coast design,” he says. Cooling water moves by convection inside the reactor ves-

Officials overstated impact of jobs program, analysis suggests The Oregonian

2 Marion County inmates missing

5 more sea lions killed at dam

‘GO OREGON’ STIMULUS PACKAGE

By Harry Esteve

O  B

Marion and Polk counties — two areas favored by Senate President Peter Courtney, D-Salem, who championed the measure. Courtney and other Democratic leaders pushed for the spending as a desperately needed jobs bill, saying it would put thousands to work quickly at a time when Oregon’s unemployment rate was among the highest in the nation. The plan was to borrow $172 million, then spend the money on hundreds of long-neglected maintenance projects, from mossy roofs to peeling paint. Senate Bill 338 was put on a fast track and zipped through both legislative chambers. Gov. Ted Kulongoski signed the bill just hours after it emerged from the House, saying it would “help families and get our economy moving.” But contractors say the program, which will cost Oregon’s general fund more than $300 million over 20 years because of interest rates, has done little to cushion their industry’s free fall. “It’s been a huge disappointment,” said John Killin, president of Associated Builders and Contractors. “The construction industry was looking for a glimmer of hope” and backed the stimulus proposal when it was first proposed, Killin said. But it soon

became clear that the promised jobs “were not full time and were certainly not sustainable.” The inflated nature of the state’s job claims is especially apparent when judged against the far bigger federal stimulus program. Under the Go Oregon stimulus rules, any new hire is a job “created,” whether for two days or two months. If the worker was already on staff, that’s a “retained” job. Federal stimulus spending requires more rigorous reporting of job numbers. Regardless of how many people are hired for a particular project, only the hours worked are counted, then translated into yearlong, full-time jobs. Hundreds of workers may have gotten a paycheck from a federal stimulus contract, but they’re not each counted as a separate job. If that formula were applied to the state stimulus, the number of created and retained jobs would be about 600 — fewer than onethirteenth of the 7,577 claimed in the most recent Go Oregon progress report, released by the Department of Administrative Services. Of those, 1,862 were new hires, and about a quarter of them weren’t from Oregon because some contractors hired out-of-state crews.

sel — rising as the uranium fuel heats it, transferring that heat to water that fuels steam generators, then falling as it cools back to the uranium rods at the bottom. There are small pumps for water fueling the generators. If they fail, the pool of water in the pit acts as a passive safety system. For conventional nuclear plants, regulators estimate the frequency of a complete reactor meltdown at about once every 1 million years. The NuScale reactor’s odds are once every 100 million years, Reyes says.

But is it safe? Among the skeptics is Lloyd Marbet, an Oregon activist who helped lead the drive to close Trojan. Conservation and renewables are the way to target climate change, he says. Nuclear plants are risky and expensive, Marbet says, requiring big taxpayer subsidies to get built. They’re prime terrorist targets. And waste disposal problems are far from resolved. “If they’re so safe, why do we need to subsidize them?” Marbet says. “Wherever you’ve got a human hand, you’ve got the potential for human error.”

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B4 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Support Wyden forestry efforts

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nce again, an Oregon congressman is tackling the thorny problem of logging in Oregon’s national forests. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., last week proposed legisla-

tion that would increase the number of thinning projects in Central and Eastern Oregon in exchange for limits on road building and cutting larger trees. The proposed legislation is the result of negotiations among what just a few years ago would have been the strangest of bedfellows, Ochoco Lumber’s president, John Shelk, and the former conservation director of the Oregon Natural Resources Council, Andy Kerr. That the two could agree on how to treat at least some eastern forests is surprising, and it lends credence to the idea that what Wyden proposes just might make it beyond the talking stage. It won’t be easy. One problem may come from the Obama administration itself, which initially expressed concern about a provision that places a three-year moratorium on administrative appeals of thinning projects. Another concern is that the bill deals with a small number of forests rather than with the entire national forest system. Yet both make sense. It’s more effective, surely, to acknowledge up front the difference between national forests in Eastern Oregon and those in western California, for example, differences of climate, native species of both plants and animals, and even problems, among other things. For-

estry is not a one-size-fits-all proposition, and it makes no sense to treat it that way. As for the worry about an appeals moratorium, it fails to recognize reality. If the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which manages the national forests, seriously hopes to improve the health of those forests, it’s going to have to find a way to keep appeals and objections in check. Failure to do so dooms any attempt to improve the forests before it gets off the ground. USDA Undersecretary Harris Sherman testified last week that the harvest target set in the bill — 80,000 acres of timber in the first year — is too high. That may be, though if appeals are not held in check it certainly won’t happen. As one example, just less than half of all projects in the Deschutes National Forest last year that involved cutting timber took extra time because of appeals or objections. The numbers may vary from forest to forest and region to region, but it’s clear the problem is a major stumbling block to restoring forest health. Wyden’s bill recognizes that. It’s worthy of support.

Why does the state protect bad teachers?

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hat should be done about bad teachers? Oregon law isn’t written in a way that’s best for students. It’s written to protect teachers — bad and good — from losing their jobs. School districts get fairly reasonable legal room to get rid of teachers in their first three years. But there’s a reason districts work very hard to scrutinize teachers then. When probation’s over and teachers become contract teachers, it’s difficult to get an inept or uncaring teacher out of the classroom. Teachers in Oregon work on two-year contracts. In theory, even contract teachers can be quickly dismissed under Oregon law. That’s theory. The fact is, dismissal is expensive. It’s time consuming. The outcome is uncertain. And it’s not even the school district that gets the final say. That belongs to a state board, the Fair Dismissal Appeals Board. Another alternative for school districts is to tell a contract teacher his contract will not be renewed. The teacher is put on a “plan of assistance” to identify problem areas and hope for and encourage improvement. At any

given time, for instance, Bend-La Pine Schools has about six teachers on a plan. Up to about that many teachers a year agree to resign instead of going on a plan. The district has 820 on its teaching staff. Let’s assume then, you are a principal. You have an inept contract teacher. The teacher has been put on a plan. The plan doesn’t make a difference. The teacher’s incompetence is documented again and again. The teacher, though, doesn’t want to resign. The teacher is going to fight it. The district could just dismiss the teacher. That’s the most legally risky. So more than likely, the teacher will be kept on in the classroom in a wait for the contract to end and a hope that the teacher’s appeals will fail. The district could temporarily move the teacher into another licensed position. That only moves the problem. A district could put the teacher on administrative leave with pay. That’s paying somebody bad to go on an extended vacation. The Legislature pushed districts into this corner by designing a law to protect teachers. Education, though, should be about doing what’s best for students.

In My View Bulletin blurs news and opinion By Lance Bloch Bulletin guest columnist

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have read The Bulletin regularly for the past 18 years, and I generally read the editorial page first. I have found that it is the best way to get a snapshot of what residents think about current events. I disagree with the Bulletin editors more often than I have agreed with them, but when I turn to the news I would give the news editors a grade of “B” over the years for separating opinion from news. No news media is unbiased. Some are more subtle than others. Sometimes it’s story placement. Sometimes it’s presenting only one side of a story. Sometimes it’s placing the favored argument first so that fewer people see the other side of the story. Sometimes it’s just the adjectives and adverbs that are used by the writer (or editor). However, recent political discourse has become less and less information based and more and more opinion based. Or to put it more bluntly, there is only one political issue left: “Is this a Republican issue, or a Democrat issue?” Taxes are a great example. And, for the editors of The Bulletin, Measures 66 and 67, which were passed by the voters of the state on Jan. 26, provide the latest examples of opinion ruling over information. Both sides claimed failure of their position would lead to massive layoffs. Neither claim is testable because the economy is affected by much more than the votes on those two measures. State Rep. Judy Stiegler of Bend supported the measures. The Bulletin opposed them multiple times in editorials

both before and after the election. So, with this issue in mind, The Bulletin presented us with its Sunday edition for Feb. 21. On that day I read an editorial titled: “Stiegler’s district needs a centrist.” And a supposed news article on Page A1 was titled: “Stiegler’s tax votes factor into House race.” Since the race hasn’t begun, and no candidates are officially in the race, that is, at best, an odd headline. However, the first paragraph clarifies that this is the opinion of Jason Conger, a Republican who intends to oppose Stiegler if his party nominates him. The first four paragraphs go on to clarify Conger’s position before finally quoting Stiegler in the fifth paragraph. The “news article” goes on to use most of the same statistics that were used in the editorial. Among the statistics included in the editorial were that Stiegler’s District 54 includes “... about 17,000 Democrats, 15,300 are Republicans and a further 11,200 describe themselves as Independent or unaffiliated.” Combining the last two is interesting because “Independent” is a political party, while “unaffiliated” are registered voters who belong to no political party. I am in that last group. The Bulletin editors conclude from these numbers that “... District 54 belongs to the third group ...” as if “Independents” and unaffiliated votes were similar, and that Democrats and Republicans will simply vote counter to each other. They generally do, and that is a problem. The editorial goes on to imply that if Stiegler disagrees with 54 percent of the voters in her district on these two issues, then she is “... politically out of

step with her constituents.” I remember not so very long ago that these same editors supported the Bend City Council for starting a bus system after it was voted down three times by larger margins than 7 percent. Since when did disagreeing on a single issue (Measures 66 and 67 are essentially a single issue) mean you need to be replaced? The answer is, since politics became solely about supporting the party line. On the same day I read John Costa, Bulletin editor-in-chief, defending the paper against another writers’ claim of news bias. And there was another editorial promoting PERS reform. PERS reform is the Bulletin editors’ preferred choice for balancing the state budget. I would like to see that, too. The problem is that Oregon’s public employees have contracts. Many are already retired and are receiving pensions that are supported by contracts during and after their employment. The guaranteed payouts in the pensions were bad ideas when our state government agreed to them, but they are supported by law now. I would also love to see a centrist running for office, but our political climate does not allow them to succeed. A candidate who starts out moderate is pushed by his or her party, and the voters, and the newspaper editors into polarized, partisan positions. And the Bulletin editors clearly don’t want a centrist. They want Stiegler out and Conger in. That opinion was obvious from their Page A1 “news article” on Feb. 21. Lance Bloch lives in Bend.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Political gridlock is not bringing any glory to Washington By Lea Lambert Bulletin guest columnist

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ridlock in Washington makes passing significant new legislation doubtful. Those obstructing President Barack Obama’s agenda want you to believe gridlock — when neither party can advance its agenda — is just great. The next election may yield no clear majority in Congress. And some ask, “What’s wrong with that?” Instead, ask yourself who wins with gridlock. On Wall Street, no government is good government. Sounds a lot like “the only good _____ is a dead _____.” Bigots used to fill the blanks in this racist slur with the name of their “favorite” minority. Today, a lot of wealthy and corporate interests are privately filling in the word “regulator.” What’s wrong is this: With political gridlock, decisive action happens only in times of crisis. When a problem is glaringly obvious, and no politician dares to appear obstructionist, things happen. But waiting for the crisis to become obvious can be disas-

IN MY VIEW trous. If you can see the tsunami coming, it’s probably too late to run for high ground. If you can already hear the avalanche, you may be toast. If it’s not too hot yet, why worry about global warming? And many special interests are playing on the fears of well-intentioned independents via the “tea party” movement. Lower taxes and less government are the bait. But their real goal is gridlock, so they can keep on picking your pocket without regulatory interference. Taxes are the price of civilization. But special interests want the Wild West. We could have avoided the real estate bubble that brought us subprime loans, the banking crisis and TARP. But we didn’t regulate vigorously. Instead, we eased regulatory requirements and cut regulatory budgets. We were lulled to complacency through ideology: “Free markets solve everything.” For example, the depressionera Glass-Steagall Act was repealed. And

a favorite Bush-era tactic was, if you don’t like actions by “independent” regulators, cut the daylights out of their budgets. The Glass-Steagall Act (hard-won wisdom from 1933) partly mandated that banks could either be savings institutions or commercial investment banks, but not both. You expect a savings banker to say, “Are you sure you can repay this loan?” But an investment banker says stuff like, “Boy, have I got an investment deal for you!” (Sounds like Bernie Madoff.) These two outlooks are so incompatible, they shouldn’t co-exist in the bank that holds your savings deposits. Speaking of Bernie, folks are still asking how the Securities and Exchange Commission missed Madoff. Short answer is, regulatory appointees that didn’t really believe in regulation, and anemic regulatory budgets. And the SEC missed a lot more than just Bernie. The Glass-Steagall repeal helped enable two bad things — banks too big to fail, and investment bankers risking small depositors’ funds and home values. Also, unscru-

pulous (and unregulated) mortgage brokers went wild with all sorts of subprime loans. And then there’s Alan Greenspan. Greenspan testified to Congress about new ways to spread risk so widely that the price of risk became almost zero. What he was talking about were unregulated things few people understood — CDOs, credit default swaps and the like. He was right about spreading the risk widely — the whole world took a hit — but the cost of risk was much greater than Greenspan wanted to believe. We taxpayers had to cover that risk with TARP. Now, since nothing is happening in Washington, “tea party” promoters urge us to throw Obama supporters out. Since it’s been a whole year, and nothing has changed, we are supposed to restore power to those who don’t want any change. Those who dug the hole deeper for eight years and have resisted change tooth and nail. Excuse me? Tea party sponsors tell us that government is too big. Lemme see now. Ahhh, yeah, that’s it! We need to balance the

budget and cut deficits! But, on a vote to establish a congressional commission to control deficits, seven Republican senators — get this, sponsors of the bill — voted against it! Give me a break! It all comes down to “follow the money.” If you followed your money, job, health insurance, home value or your chance at college down the drain during the financial crisis of ’08, you probably voted for change. Now, the folks that brought you that disaster want to bring you a rerun. If they’ve convinced you that small government, lower taxes and especially less regulation are what we need, hang on to your wallet. They’re getting ready to issue new hunting licenses to the special interests, with no bag limits and no game wardens allowed, starting with health insurance. Excuse me if I don’t watch the rerun. I hear it was awful in the 1930s, and the second run (’08 until when?) isn’t much better. No thanks, tea party — I’d rather throw out some obstructionist scoundrels. Lea Lambert lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 B5

O Bill Taub’s photos chronicle NASA’s evolution

Peter Graves starred Betty Villemarette in ‘Mission: Impossible’ won benefits for

By Emma Brown

By Michael Pollak

The Washington Post

New York Times News Service

Bill Taub, a self-taught NASA photographer who documented the country’s major aeronautics and space-flight events from 1958 to 1975, including the missions that sent the first men into orbit and onto the moon, died Feb. 20 at Doctors Community Hospital in Lanham, Md. He had pneumonia and multiple organ failure. He was 86. Taub took nearly every official picture of the astronauts who led the nation’s early forays into space and played a central role in shaping public perception of NASA’s work. He was often the only photographer with access to training sessions and closed engineering meetings during the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo missions. “We were really pioneering in so many ways, even the training exercises, there was tension — and I think Bill captured that,” astronaut Alan Shepard, whose 1961 Mercury flight made him the first American in space, said in a NASA video about Taub. Charged with documenting NASA’s work for publicity and posterity, Taub was often one of the last people to see the astronauts before liftoff, earning the nickname “Two More Taub” for his insistence on snapping just a couple more shots. His photographs appeared in Life, Look and National Geographic magazines, among others. They captured such iconic moments as John Glenn entering the Friendship 7 capsule that carried him into orbit in 1962 and such tragedy as the aftermath of the 1967 Apollo 1 accident, in which three astronauts were killed during a training exercise.

Peter Graves, the cool spymaster of television’s “Mission: Impossible” and the dignified host of the “Biography” series, who successfully spoofed his own gravitas in the “Airplane!” movie farces, died Sunday. He was 83. He died of a heart attack at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., said Fred Barman, his business manager. It was a testament to Graves’ earnest, unhammy ability to make fun of himself that after decades of playing square he-men and straitlaced authority figures, he was perhaps best known to younger audiences for a deadpan line in “Airplane!” (“Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?”) and one from a memorable GEICO car insurance commercial (“I was one lucky woman”).

Ducks

exhibits. The family likes to hunt and fish, and the girls said they planned to keep their ducks when they were finished painting them. “We have a pond, so maybe we’ll be able to put it to use,” Anne Anasn said. Stacy, 9, had another idea. “Maybe we can use it to train Gracie,” she said, referring to her dog. That was Austin Hemmann’s plan, too. Austin, 12, has a Jack Russell Terrier named Jake, and he hoped his decoy might be useful in preparing Jake for duck hunting. Austin’s friend Jake Coffindaffer, 12, said he had a golden retriever named Molly who could probably use some training as well. The pair were working on their decoys while the rest of their group looked at all the motorized vehicles, as well as hunting and fishing gear. “We hunt, so I figured this would be a good bird to paint,” Austin said. “I’ll probably try to train my dog to have a soft mouth and to use it to track ducks.”

Continued from B1 Over the past few days, Turner has seen plenty of creative paint jobs. His favorite, he said, was the one which was painted to include the duck’s feet on the back. Emily Roberts, 10, started at the tail of her decoy, applying a stripe of white and then painting the body brown. Emily chose to follow one of the examples, with a brown body and a few white stripes. “I’ve painted a lot of smaller models of stuff like zebras,” she said. “So this is a little bit easy.” But there was one area where she expected a challenge. “I think the eye is going to be the hardest,” she said. Across the room, Stacy and Michelle Anasn were also hard at work, although they were painting their decoys to look like mallards. “I wanted mine to look realistic,” Michelle, 8, said. “The hardest part is getting (the paint) in the tight spaces.” The girls were painting their decoys with their mother, Anne Anasn, while other family members wandered the fairgrounds looking at campers and other

TV and film actor first became famous for his gravitas, then again for spoofing it

Success in movies ... Born Peter Aurness in Minneapolis, the blond, 6-foot-2 Graves served in the Army Air Forces in 1944 and ’45, studied drama at the University of Minnesota under the GI Bill of Rights and played the clarinet in local bands before following his older brother, James Arness, to Hollywood. His first credited film appearance was in “Rogue River” (1950), with Rory Calhoun. Graves’ getting a Hollywood contract for the picture persuaded his fiancee’s family to let her marry him. He changed his name for that movie to Graves, his maternal grandfather’s name, to avoid confusion with his older brother. He soon found himself in classics like Billy Wilder’s “Stalag 17” (1953), Charles Laughton’s “Night of the Hunter” (1955) and John Ford’s “Long Gray Line” (1955). Graves became known for taking all his roles seriously, injecting a certain believability

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

The Associated Press file photo

Actor Peter Graves died Sunday at his home in Pacific Palisades, Calif., at the age of 83. into even the campiest plot. He appeared in Westerns like “The Yellow Tomahawk” (1954) and “Wichita” (1955); a Civil War adventure, “The Raid” (1954); and gangster movies (“Black Tuesday,” 1954, and “The Naked Street,” 1955). He played earnest scientists in science fiction/horror films: “Killers from Space” (1954), “It Conquered the World” (1956) and “Beginning of the End” (1957), about giant grasshoppers in Chicago).

... and on television In 1955, Graves began his career as a television series regular as the star of “Fury,” a Western family adventure series about a rancher named Jim Newton, his orphaned ward and the boy’s black stallion. It ran until 1959 on NBC, helped pioneer television adventure series and solidified Graves’ TV credentials. Some of his hundreds of television credits include “Alfred Hitchcock Presents,” “Whiplash” (1961), “The Dean Martin Show” (1970), “Fantasy Island” (1978-83) and “7th Heaven” (1999-2005). He served as the host or narrator for numerous television specials and performed in television movies of the week like “The President’s Plane Is Missing” (1973), “Where Have All the People Gone” (1974)

Grant Continued from B1 She said they get money from various sources, and the FEMA grant was only a small portion. Meals for Seniors received more than $2,500 to pay for food, which volunteers deliver to senior citizens in Jefferson County. Pamela Norr, executive director of the Central Oregon Council on Aging, which sponsors the group, said it provides help for seniors who may not be able to afford meals. Although the grant is aimed at shelter and food relief, Cour-

and “Death Car on the Freeway” (1979). Graves played his most famous TV character from 1967 to 1973 in “Mission: Impossible,” reprising it from 1988 to 1990. He was Jim Phelps, the leader of the Impossible Missions Force, a super-secret government organization that was given dangerous undercover assignments. The team would use not violence, but elaborate con games to trap the villains. Starting in the mid-1980s, Graves was the host of a number of TV science specials on “Discover.” In 1987, he became the host of the Arts and Entertainment Network’s long-running “Biography” series, narrating the lives of figures like Prince Andrew, Muhammad Ali, Edward G. Robinson, Sophia Loren, Jackie Robinson, Howard Hughes and Steven Spielberg. He won a Golden Globe Award in 1971 for his performance in “Mission: Impossible,” and in 1997, he and “Biography” won an Emmy Award for outstanding informational series.

‘Airplane!’ But he was appalled when his agent sent him the script for the role of a pedophile pilot in “Airplane!” (1980). “I tore my hair and ranted and raved and said, ‘This is insane,’ he recalled in 1997. Some of the role’s lines (“Have you ever been in a Turkish prison?”) looked at first as if they could get him thrown in jail, never mind ruining his career. He told his agent to tell David and Jerry Zucker and Jim Abrahams, the director-producers, to find themselves a comedian. He relented when the Zucker brothers explained that the secret of their spoof would be the deadpan behavior of the cast; they didn’t want a comedian, they wanted the Peter Graves of “Fury” and “Mission: Impossible.” Graves used his familiar earnest, all-American demeanor in service of some of the comic movie’s most outrageous moments. He reprised the role of Captain Oveur in “Airplane II” in 1982.

tain said the money has been used for other expenses. Last year, Madras Gospel Mission received about $2,900 to help pay for a mortgage on the property. The mission provides a variety of services — from food and shelter to transportation for those in need. “In a broad sense, it went to creating housing, a place where meals can be served, a place where people are sheltered,” said Mark Harner, the mission’s director. Diane S.W. Lee can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dlee@bendbulletin.com.

former CIA spouses

By Emily Langer The Washington Post

Housewives had Betty Friedan. CIA wives had Betty Villemarette. For almost two decades, Villemarette served the agency in what she called “the traditional partnership role of ‘two employees for the price of one,’” accompanying her husband, a CIA officer, on his secret and dangerous assignments around the world. When the marriage fell apart in the early 1970s under the stresses of CIA life, Villemarette learned that she was not entitled to a share of her ex-husband’s pension and that many other women, as well as some men, were in the same financial straits.

‘A tireless advocate’ On their behalf, Villemarette waged and won a quiet decadelong battle to secure benefits for former CIA spouses. And from inside the CIA, where the former Potomac resident pursued her own career after her divorce, she built the first real family-support system, transforming the culture of the clandestine agency. “Betty Villemarette was, for half a century, a tireless advocate for Agency employees and families,” CIA Director Leon Panetta said in a statement. “Her hard work and dedication

Schools

Continued from B1 “Things will start to warm up as we get into Thursday,” Johnson said. Thursday and Friday should bring mostly clear skies, with highs creeping into the 60s, but could get cold at night,

with lows expected to be around 29. Clear skies and mild temperatures should continue Saturday, with highs between 57 and 62 degrees and nighttime lows between 29 and 34. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Breaking their silence Villemarette led CIA divorcees in a campaign similar to one that won pension rights in 1980 for former spouses of State Department employees. Some were destitute, a situation made more maddening to them when their ex-husbands remarried, and women who had not endured the hardships of overseas CIA postings began collecting benefits for life. But they never went public. “None of them ever spilled any secrets,” Doyle said. “They were very loyal to the agency and the country, in spite of being badly treated by the system.” Villemarette was one of several women who testified before congressional intelligence committees in closed hearings on the matter. Those efforts resulted in the passage of a series of laws in the 1980s that entitled former agency spouses to shares of lifetime benefits, survivor benefits and health insurance.

Obituary Policy

Continued from B1 While those numbers are bad, board members said they are not so dire as to require closing a school or merging with another district. “Yes, we will have some difficult financial decisions to make, but we are not in a position where those options are going to be necessary,” board member Jeff Smith said. School board Chairwoman Christine Jones is urging patience. The budget numbers look bad now, but they could improve before the district has to make drastic decisions. She acknowledged the district will have to make cuts, and some changes — such as sharing operations with other districts — could happen in coming years. Closing the school or merging with another district do not appear to be likely options. “I think we need to take things one year at a time,” Jones said. “But completely eliminating the Sisters School District is completely off the table for years to come.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Weather

did much to improve the quality of life for our officers and their loved ones.” Villemarette had become a celebrity within the CIA by the time of her death, at age 88, on Feb. 23 in Los Angeles after a stroke. When she received the agency’s prestigious Trailblazer Award in 2007, CIA women waited in line to thank the whitehaired woman in a wheelchair.

Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Kenneth B. Ludlow March 14, 1922 - March 8, 2010

Kenneth B. Ludlow passed peacefully at home March 8th, 2010, a few days shy of his 88th Birthday. His family was with him. Ken led by example and was an adored partner, husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather and friend. Ken was married to Lois Ludlow for 47 years, and after her death shared his life with his partner Ellie Nelson. They had 16 rich years filled with travel and friends. Family was paramount and he was a consistent, loving and stable support. Ken served in the US Navy on the USS McCook and participated in D-Day at Normandy. Ken excelled professionally and spent his career with Champion International Paper. With his work, Ken and his family lived in many lovely places throughout the US, and then retired to Sunriver, Oregon. Ken was a life-long golfer and enjoyed playing many world-class golf courses. On his 80th Birthday he played Bandon Dunes with family, and shot an 81. At the moment of his passing a flock of geese flew overhead and their identifiable calls could be heard - bringing poignancy - as Ken loved duck hunting, fly fishing and training his many black Labradors.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

He is a cherished and deeply loved man. Friends are invited to our Celebration of Life at the Bend Country Club Sunday, March 21st, 2010, 2 pm. Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home is privileged to serve the family. Please visit Niswonger-Reynolds.com/obits to express your written condolences. Donations in Memory of Ken Ludlow are suggested to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, MARCH 15

TUESDAY Tonight: Partly cloudy.

Today: Partly cloudy.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

HIGH

LOW

62

31

STATE Western

 Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Ruggs 60/42

56/43

62/40

51/38

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

64/38

57/38

Mitchell

Madras

64/33

62/36

Camp Sherman 56/28 Redmond Prineville  61/31 Cascadia 63/32 60/42 Sisters 59/30 Bend Post 62/31

Oakridge Elk Lake 58/40

49/19

Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of showers early today. Central

63/37

58/28

58/27

Burns

La Pine

59/29

59/27

Crescent Lake 52/21

Hampton

Crescent



57/26

56/28

Fort Rock

Rain and higher elevation snow showers will fall over portions of the Northwest today. Vancouver 52/48

58/32

Partly cloudy skies with pleasant conditions expected today. Eastern

57/25

Helena

65/47

Bend

59/37

69/43

Idaho Falls



Elko

72/45

46/25



53/26

60/30

Reno

57/35

Partly to mostly sunny skies can be expected today.



52/34

56/30

Boise

62/31

Grants Pass

Redding

Silver Lake

Crater Lake

58/30

Eugene

Christmas Valley

City

Missoula

Portland

60/29

Chemult



59/47

63/35

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

68/50

53/34



LOW

First

Full

Last

Mar. 15 Mar. 23 Mar. 29 April 6

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

59 29

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/36/0.00 . . . . . 59/48/sh. . . . . . 56/40/sh Baker City . . . . . . 49/18/0.00 . . . . . 53/32/pc. . . . . . 55/33/pc Brookings . . . . . . 55/34/0.00 . . . . . 61/49/pc. . . . . . 54/40/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 45/17/0.00 . . . . . 49/28/pc. . . . . . 55/31/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 57/30/0.00 . . . . . 65/47/pc. . . . . . 58/33/sh Klamath Falls . . . 51/18/0.00 . . . . . 58/36/pc. . . . . . 56/28/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 46/18/0.00 . . . . . 56/36/pc. . . . . . 57/29/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 52/15/0.00 . . . . . 59/27/pc. . . . . . 52/23/rs Medford . . . . . . . 62/29/0.00 . . . . . 69/42/pc. . . . . . 61/35/sh Newport . . . . . . . 55/39/0.00 . . . . . . 62/49/c. . . . . . 58/38/sh North Bend . . . . . . 57/36/NA . . . . . . 61/49/c. . . . . . 55/40/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 52/30/0.00 . . . . . 59/33/pc. . . . . . 65/38/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 54/26/0.00 . . . . . 62/43/pc. . . . . . 62/37/pc Portland . . . . . . . 58/33/0.02 . . . . . . 65/51/c. . . . . . . 59/41/r Prineville . . . . . . . 54/18/0.00 . . . . . 63/32/pc. . . . . . 60/28/rs Redmond. . . . . . . 57/15/0.00 . . . . . 62/32/pc. . . . . . 60/24/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 62/30/0.00 . . . . . 68/46/pc. . . . . . 62/38/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 56/30/0.00 . . . . . 66/49/pc. . . . . . 59/36/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 56/15/0.00 . . . . . 59/30/pc. . . . . . 53/26/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 59/27/0.00 . . . . . 60/39/pc. . . . . . 58/37/sh

3

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

HIGH

4

6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/25 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 in 1934 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.07” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -11 in 1977 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.42” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.16” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.31” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.20 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.90 in 1987 *Melted liquid equivalent

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

60 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny.

LOW

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases New

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:28 a.m. . . . . . .7:22 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .7:55 a.m. . . . . . .8:30 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .1:59 p.m. . . . . . .5:26 a.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:56 a.m. . . . . . .6:04 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:28 p.m. . . . . . .7:49 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .7:22 a.m. . . . . . .7:11 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Seattle

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:17 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:12 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:16 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:13 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:52 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:29 p.m.

FRIDAY Mostly sunny.

59 26

BEND ALMANAC

65/51



HIGH

59 31

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 62° Medford • 8° Meacham

THURSDAY

Partly cloudy.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

59/28

Brothers

Sunriver

Partly cloudy, chance of afternoon rain, LOW breezy.

NORTHWEST

Paulina

59/29

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 53-74 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-70 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 82-116 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 97-104 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 108-113 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 28-41 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 101-111 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 20-58

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 47-48 . . . . 126-165 . . . . . . . . 77 . . . . 123-182 . . . . . . 29-73 . . . . . . 89-97 . . . . . . . . 45

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 52/48

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 58/32

S

Saskatoon 43/19

Seattle 59/47

S Winnipeg 46/28

S

S

Thunder Bay 57/27

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 52/30

Halifax 45/27 P ortland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 41/35 60/36 48/36 65/51 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 52/36 56/34 Boise 44/34 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 59/37 46/32 New York 44/26 • 87° 49/34 47/37 Des Moines San Angelo, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 54/39 Chicago 44/28 46/36 48/36 52/36 • 1° Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 47/35 68/50 Angel Fire, N.M. City 50/40 Las Denver Louisville 53/34 Kansas City Vegas • 4.61” 51/32 50/39 55/39 St. Louis 70/50 Charlotte Bedford, Mass. 57/41 62/37 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 51/32 76/53 56/40 52/39 61/44 Phoenix Atlanta 77/55 Honolulu 56/39 Birmingham 80/67 Dallas Tijuana 55/40 64/47 68/51 New Orleans 65/47 Orlando Houston 71/46 Chihuahua 73/51 78/42 Miami 77/55 Monterrey 77/55 La Paz 80/59 Mazatlan Anchorage 75/62 36/24 Juneau 42/32 Bismarck 37/28

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .77/42/0.00 . . .59/41/c . . 63/38/sh Akron . . . . . . . . .45/34/0.17 . . .44/34/c . . 50/31/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .49/40/0.01 . .42/32/sh . . . 51/32/s Albuquerque. . . .50/36/0.01 . .51/32/sh . . . 58/35/s Anchorage . . . . .29/20/0.00 . . 36/24/rs . . . 34/18/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . 56/39/pc . . . 58/42/s Atlantic City . . . .51/44/0.34 . .46/39/sh . . 54/36/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .81/35/0.00 . . .73/51/c . . 65/39/sh Baltimore . . . . . .54/46/0.29 . .49/38/sh . . 56/37/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . 60/36/pc . . . 65/35/s Birmingham . . . .52/44/0.01 . 55/40/pc . . 57/42/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .37/33/0.00 . 37/28/pc . . . 43/24/s Boise . . . . . . . . . .49/26/0.00 . . .59/37/s . . 65/40/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .45/40/2.95 . .44/34/sh . . . 48/36/s Bridgeport, CT. . .50/44/0.42 . .44/33/sh . . 51/34/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .40/34/0.12 . .46/32/sh . . . 51/31/s Burlington, VT. . .47/38/0.04 . . 45/29/rs . . . 49/30/s Caribou, ME . . . .51/21/0.00 . 44/24/pc . . . 46/25/s Charleston, SC . .61/45/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . . 64/44/s Charlotte. . . . . . .58/40/0.20 . 62/37/pc . . 60/41/pc Chattanooga. . . .51/45/0.00 . . .53/39/c . . 57/41/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .36/28/0.00 . 44/28/pc . . . 57/29/s Chicago. . . . . . . .50/39/0.00 . 52/36/pc . . . 53/36/c Cincinnati . . . . . .45/40/0.12 . .48/37/sh . . . 55/36/c Cleveland . . . . . .42/37/0.02 . . .45/34/c . . 50/33/pc Colorado Springs 39/31/0.06 . . .47/29/c . . . 58/30/s Columbia, MO . .46/44/0.08 . 57/41/pc . . 54/39/pc Columbia, SC . . .60/41/0.00 . 65/40/pc . . 64/42/pc Columbus, GA. . .58/40/0.00 . 60/40/pc . . 63/44/pc Columbus, OH. . .48/41/0.06 . .46/36/sh . . 54/34/pc Concord, NH . . . .39/35/1.42 . . 41/27/rs . . . 51/26/s Corpus Christi. . .78/55/0.00 . . .76/56/c . . 69/52/sh Dallas Ft Worth. .73/42/0.00 . . .64/47/c . . . 62/42/c Dayton . . . . . . . .42/35/0.18 . .46/34/sh . . . 54/35/s Denver. . . . . . . . .44/27/0.00 . . .51/32/c . . . 62/33/s Des Moines. . . . .55/41/0.00 . 54/39/pc . . 49/36/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .43/37/0.10 . 49/34/pc . . 56/34/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .47/34/c . . . 46/30/c El Paso. . . . . . . . .72/47/0.00 . .56/37/sh . . . 62/39/s Fairbanks. . . . . . 11/-15/0.00 . . 18/-8/sn . . .18/-5/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .38/34/0.00 . .40/28/sh . . 41/27/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .45/21/0.00 . . .47/23/s . . . 55/24/s

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .45/39/0.00 . 55/34/pc . . 57/30/pc Green Bay. . . . . .55/40/0.00 . 56/34/pc . . 55/30/pc Greensboro. . . . .59/43/0.00 . . .60/39/c . . 57/39/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .50/46/0.21 . .48/36/sh . . 56/34/pc Hartford, CT . . . .50/44/0.45 . .44/32/sh . . 53/32/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .50/26/0.00 . 56/30/pc . . 58/32/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .83/68/0.00 . .80/67/sh . . 81/68/pc Houston . . . . . . .81/45/0.00 . 73/51/pc . . 68/48/sh Huntsville . . . . . .53/46/0.00 . . .51/38/c . . 55/40/pc Indianapolis . . . .48/39/0.05 . . .50/34/c . . 55/37/pc Jackson, MS . . . .68/42/0.00 . 63/42/pc . . 60/44/pc Madison, WI . . . .57/39/0.00 . 56/34/pc . . 56/34/pc Jacksonville. . . . .65/44/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 65/45/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .41/37/0.17 . . .42/32/r . . 43/32/sh Kansas City. . . . .50/39/0.00 . . .55/39/c . . . 52/37/c Lansing . . . . . . . .43/37/0.02 . 52/34/pc . . 56/27/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . . 74/53/s Lexington . . . . . .46/40/0.08 . .47/37/sh . . 51/36/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .46/37/0.00 . . .48/35/c . . 48/32/pc Little Rock. . . . . .64/44/0.00 . 61/44/pc . . . 60/42/c Los Angeles. . . . .65/49/0.00 . . .76/53/s . . . 79/54/s Louisville . . . . . . .45/40/0.07 . . .50/39/c . . 55/39/pc Memphis. . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . 57/43/pc . . 59/43/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .79/58/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . . 73/56/s Milwaukee . . . . .48/40/0.00 . 49/36/pc . . . 51/35/c Minneapolis . . . .64/39/0.00 . 52/36/pc . . 45/33/pc Nashville . . . . . . .49/43/0.02 . . .52/39/c . . 55/42/pc New Orleans. . . .74/47/0.00 . . .65/47/s . . 63/50/pc New York . . . . . .50/43/0.22 . .47/37/sh . . 54/39/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .51/45/0.54 . .47/37/sh . . 56/37/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .58/45/0.02 . .53/41/sh . . 50/40/pc Oklahoma City . .53/36/0.00 . . .56/40/c . . 58/36/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .48/37/0.00 . . .47/35/c . . 46/32/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .71/53/0.00 . 71/46/pc . . . 72/49/s Palm Springs. . . .76/51/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 89/55/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .50/42/0.00 . 53/36/pc . . 55/38/pc Philadelphia . . . .50/45/0.25 . .48/36/sh . . 55/38/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .66/51/0.00 . . .77/55/s . . . 80/57/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .46/39/0.05 . . .46/34/c . . 54/33/pc Portland, ME. . . .41/36/1.50 . .41/35/sh . . . 45/36/s Providence . . . . .52/43/1.11 . .45/33/sh . . 50/34/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .62/45/0.22 . . .61/41/c . . 57/39/pc

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .40/30/0.00 . 44/26/pc . . 56/30/pc Savannah . . . . . .60/43/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 65/44/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .53/24/0.00 . . .63/35/s . . 68/36/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .53/35/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . . .55/43/r Richmond . . . . . .55/48/1.11 . .55/40/sh . . 56/37/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .44/35/0.02 . . .44/32/c . . 45/28/pc Rochester, NY . . .41/35/0.30 . .47/32/sh . . . 53/33/s Spokane . . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . 57/39/pc . . 61/33/pc Sacramento. . . . .63/38/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . 70/48/pc Springfield, MO. .45/39/0.03 . 57/40/pc . . 54/36/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .49/45/0.03 . 57/41/pc . . . 57/42/c Tampa . . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . 68/48/pc . . . 68/52/s Salt Lake City . . .48/33/0.00 . . .53/34/s . . . 59/40/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .64/47/0.00 . . .71/47/s . . . 75/48/s San Antonio . . . .79/47/0.00 . . .74/53/c . . 66/46/sh Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .60/37/0.00 . . .60/41/c . . . 59/38/c San Diego . . . . . .64/49/0.00 . . .79/54/s . . . 80/56/s Washington, DC .52/48/0.28 . .50/40/sh . . 56/38/pc San Francisco . . .63/42/0.00 . . .68/50/s . . 63/50/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .51/38/0.00 . . .53/37/c . . . 55/32/c San Jose . . . . . . .64/39/0.00 . . .73/47/s . . 67/48/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .54/24/0.00 . 57/35/pc . . . 59/35/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .47/29/0.25 . . 47/24/rs . . . 55/29/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .73/52/0.00 . . .81/54/s . . . 85/56/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .100/73/0.00 . .105/76/s . . 104/75/s Mexico City. . . . .81/55/0.00 . 77/50/pc . . 80/48/sh Montreal. . . . . . .41/36/0.02 . . .54/32/s . . . 52/27/s Moscow . . . . . . .30/10/0.01 . . 32/15/sf . . . 26/8/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .80/60/t . . . .70/57/t Nassau . . . . . . . .81/68/0.00 . . .79/61/s . . 73/62/pc New Delhi. . . . . .91/60/0.00 . . .87/59/s . . . 91/64/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .61/37/0.00 . .66/46/sh . . 53/32/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .36/18/0.00 . 37/15/pc . . .39/21/rs Ottawa . . . . . . . .41/34/0.08 . 55/32/pc . . . 55/23/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .48/39/0.00 . 53/33/pc . . 55/37/pc Rio de Janeiro. .100/77/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . . .82/71/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . . .55/35/s . . 57/39/pc Santiago . . . . . . .84/48/0.00 . . .86/51/s . . . 82/51/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .80/68/t . . . .71/64/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/27/0.09 . . 41/35/rs . . 41/21/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .55/30/0.00 . .48/32/sh . . 37/28/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .63/50/0.27 . .51/37/sh . . . 50/41/s Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.31 . . .89/75/t . . . .91/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .34/21/0.00 . 32/15/pc . . 28/15/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . . 78/60/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/66/0.00 . .80/53/sh . . 58/56/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .93/61/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . 68/48/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .66/62/sh . . 68/41/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .43/39/0.93 . . .48/36/c . . . 54/28/s Vancouver. . . . . .48/39/0.16 . .52/48/sh . . . .52/41/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . .39/35/sh . . 37/28/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .36/30/0.08 . . 28/18/sf . . 56/30/pc

Amsterdam. . . . .48/41/0.00 . .44/30/sh . . . 46/33/c Athens. . . . . . . . .51/48/0.22 . 55/44/pc . . . 57/36/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . 71/59/pc . . 66/59/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .91/60/0.00 . 98/71/pc . . 89/60/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .95/77/0.00 . 96/80/pc . . 95/80/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .36/30/0.25 . . .41/24/s . . . 44/24/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 77/51/pc . . . 64/48/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . 37/24/rs . . 37/26/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . 69/48/pc Budapest. . . . . . .46/37/0.00 . .42/32/sh . . 41/28/sh Buenos Aires. . . .75/59/0.00 . 75/60/pc . . 75/66/pc Cabo San Lucas .81/57/0.00 . 77/62/pc . . 78/60/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .99/68/0.00 . . .98/62/s . . . 69/46/s Calgary . . . . . . . .48/18/0.00 . . .58/32/s . . . 61/34/s Cancun . . . . . . . .82/53/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . 82/60/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . 48/26/pc . . 48/32/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .54/36/0.00 . .50/35/sh . . 50/35/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .46/25/0.00 . .44/32/sh . . 46/32/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .78/59/t . . . .73/57/t Hong Kong . . . . .79/68/0.00 . . .78/60/s . . 71/66/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . 46/33/pc . . 48/37/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .83/53/0.00 . 78/44/pc . . . 62/33/s Johannesburg . . .81/59/0.00 . . .82/57/t . . . .72/56/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 82/69/pc . . 80/69/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . 62/51/pc London . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . 51/32/pc . . 51/32/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .60/33/s . . 57/39/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . 91/71/pc . . 91/73/pc

A SPLASH OF COLOR THE CHOICE IS YOURS, IT’S TIME TO

VOTE

FOR CENTRAL OREGON’S BEST PET!

2010

pet pals PHOTO CONTEST

promoting pets and literacy in Central Oregon ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE LOCAL NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION PROGRAM

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We are narrowing the field to the Top Twelve Pet Pals in Central Oregon. The top three pets will win fabulous prizes from these local businesses!

DANCIN WOOFS DAY CARE | TRAINING CENTER Diane Stevenson / (Salem) Statesman-Journal

Cherry trees in bloom display their colors at the Capitol Mall in Salem, brightening up a recent cold and windy afternoon.

Northwest farmers, researchers scrambling to stop Asian fruit fly The Associated Press PORTLAND — Farmers and researchers in the Northwest are racing to control an Asian fruit fly that first appeared last summer and ruined some late-season peach and berry crops. The fly is known as the spotted wing drosophila and appears to have migrated from California, where it appeared in 2008. Some growers in Oregon reported losing 20 percent of their blueberry and raspberry crops, and up to 80 percent of late-variety peaches. The pest has also been detected in western Washington. Growers worry it could spread to the states’ valuable cherry crops as well as pears, prunes and plums — not to mention wine grapes. Growers, working with crop consultants and university researchers, are trying to deter-

“It’s the most devastating insect I’ve ever seen in agriculture.” — Stuart Olson, farmer in Marion County mine whether insecticides will control the flies. “It’s the most devastating insect I’ve ever seen in agriculture,” said Stuart Olson, a farmer in Marion County. Olson, who raises cherries and peaches, shut down his peach orchard last summer after discovering damaged fruit. He estimates he lost the last 10 days of picking and at least 25 percent of the revenue he would normally expect

from late-variety peaches. The fly is unusual because it attacks ripe and ripening fruit, while most fruit flies are attracted to rotting produce. Female flies cut into the fruit skin and lay eggs just below the surface. The damage goes undetected until the larvae hatch and begin feeding, and the fruit collapses in a gooey mess. “The fruit looks great when you buy it, and it would totally disintegrate within three days,” said Vaughn Walton, who is heading a crash research project at Oregon State University. The fly is prolific, capable of producing 10 generations of pests per crop growing season, “which is absolutely phenomenal,” Walton said. The rapid reproduction could help the flies adjust to pesticides.

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MAIL OR BRING YOUR VOTE TO: The Bulletin, 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702 or The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708-6020

Name ______________________________________________________________________ Mailing address ________________________________________________________________ City __________________________________ State _______________ Zip _______________ PET’S NAME • NUMBER OF VOTES X 25¢ EACH = AMOUNT (Example: Sparky • 50 x 25¢ each = $12.50)

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___________ Enter my vote for the pet(s) indicated and accept my fee to fund NIE ___________ Enter my vote(s) for the pet(s) indicated. Vote to support newspapers in your schools! All proceeds go to Newspapers in Education. Vote as many times as you like, but only 50 votes per form. Mail form to - The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708-6020. All votes for the Pet Pals Contest must be received by March 15. The final twelve pets will be published on March 17, 2010. Rules: First 2 votes are free, additional votes must be purchased. More voting forms are available at The Bulletin reception desk at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend between 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM or in The Bulletin or vote online at www.bendbulletin.com/petpals Make checks payable to NIE. Vote as many times as you like, but the maximum number of votes per newsprint form is 50. The Bulletin employees and their immediate families are not eligible to win. Ties will be decided by random drawing.


C

GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

GREEN, ETC.

Inside

‘Teach’ Tony Danza tries his hand at teaching for a reality show, Page C2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/greenetc

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 15, 2010

Using goats, not chemicals, to kill weeds By Kimberly Bowker The Bulletin

Hundreds of goats browse through a field, nibbling and foraging through the available fare. These aren’t just any goats, though — they are the work force of Lariat Ranch Ecological Services. The business, based in Powell Butte, owns nearly 400 head of Spanish Boer and San Clemente goats. The goats’ job is to pursue their love of eating. Their tastes include noxious weeds found on the High Desert, such as medusahead, hemlock and Russian thistle. Lariat Ranch is the only pre-

scribed grazing company in Central Oregon. Prescribed grazing is a green way to clear fields without using chemical herbicides. A certain number of goats are placed in a fenced area and eat the noxious weeds that have overtaken the normal ecosystem. Noxious weeds are non-native, invasive and sometimes toxic plants that easily seed and destroy the natural ecosystem. Nationally, it’s estimated that invasive weeds are taking over 4,600 acres of land every day, or 1.5 million acres a year, according to research conducted by the University of Idaho. See Goats / C6

GREEN

Photos by Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Tom Ryan, business unit manager in the Bend office of Nanometrics Inc., holds a 2-inch-diameter sapphire wafer that serves as the base for growing a light-emitting diode. Nanometrics makes the VerteX machine, seen in the background, to provide quality control in the LED manufacturing process.

Tools for

tiny technology

Nanometrics’ products make it possible to measure things on an atomic level By Tim Doran • The Bulletin

A

s its name suggests, Nanometrics Inc. operates on a small scale. At the company’s Bend office, employees conduct

research related to products measured in angstroms. One ang-

Light-emitting diodes LEDs use chips of semiconducting material to convert electricity into light, unlike incandescent lighting, in which electricity heats a tungsten filament to make it glow and emit light, and fluorescent lights, in which ultraviolet radiation is converted and emitted as visible light.

PAST AND POTENTIAL While most modern conventional lighting can be traced to technology advancements from the 1800s and early 1900s, the first practical, visible light-emitting diode was created in 1962. In less than a decade, commercial production of red light LEDs began. Some might recall seeing them in the digital calculators from the early to mid-1970s. Early LEDs were inefficient, but that has changed with 40 years of research. The best LEDs now exceed the efficiency of compact fluorescent bulbs. And advancements continue to improve quality and reduce costs. The current challenge: making less-expensive LEDs that emit warm, white light, similar to that generated by incandescent light for a similar cost. However, even current LEDs last much longer than incandescents. High-brightness LEDs can be found today in traffic signals, street or parking-lot lights and in some consumer products, like portable lamps for desks and under-cabinet lighting in homes. For the nation, the use of LEDs could mean incredible savings. Lighting accounts for the second-highest end use of energy in buildings, and in 2001, lighting consumed 22 percent of the total electricity in the U.S. LED lighting could reduce electricity used for lighting by 50 percent by 2025.

strom is about the size of one atom, said Tom Ryan, business unit manager in Nanometrics’ Bend office, and the light-emitting lay-

Source: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

er inside a light-emitting diode is 25 angstroms thick, Ryan said. Some of the dozen employees — five of whom hold Ph.D.s — in the Bend office make quality-control systems to ensure that layer meets manufacturing standards. “We make stuff that measures that layer,” Ryan said. Based in Milpitas, Calif., Nanometrics provides machinery and systems for companies that make semiconductors, photovoltaics and highbrightness LEDs, which help light cell phone displays, televisions, headlamps used by hikers and other products. In 2006, Nanometrics acquired Bend-based Accent Optical, which also provided equipment used for quality control in high-tech manufacturing plants. Bruce Rhine, the former chairman and CEO of Accent and current Nanometrics board chairman, said in 2006 the two companies would complement one another, according to a news release announcing the acquisition. While both companies provided quality-control products, they only had a few overlapping customers, according to company statements. The merger resulted in the company essentially having three business units, Ryan said, making quality-control systems for the semiconductor, high-brightness LED and photovoltaic industries, with the latter two a focus

in Bend. The Bend-based employees deal with customers conducting research and development on new, and improved, LEDs. “As their work transitions into mass production ... we have metrology (or measurement) tools for that production,” he said. Many of the LEDs used for cell phone and television backlighting were made in plants that use Nanometrics’ equipment for quality control, Ryan said. “What we do here enables that industry,” Ryan said. Customers listed in its 2008 annual report, the latest available, include a couple who bill themselves as among the world’s top LED makers, or lighting companies, such as Philips Lumileds Lighting Co. and Osram Opto Semiconductor. The names of some of Nanometrics’ semiconductor clients — Intel Corp., Micron Technology, Samsung Electronics and Toshiba Semiconductor — might be better known. They essentially use Nanometrics’ systems to detect defects and measure the thickness, uniformity and other characteristics of computer chips during manufacturing, according to an investment research report from Morningstar. See Nanometrics / C6

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Rachel Jones, 35, owner of Lariat Ranch Ecological Services, stands among Spanish Boer and San Clemente goats that are clearing a hay field owned by The Great American Egg in Powell Butte.

Still marveling at seals after 31 years in the field By Joe Mozingo Los Angeles Times

SAN MIGUEL ISLAND, Calif. — The marine biologist picks his way down a mud ravine into the belching, bellowing madness of Cardwell Point. All eyes are upon him, this short ruddy creature with an orange jacket, red beard and sturdy legs that seem to glide effortlessly across the sand. Brent Stewart has studied elephant seals for 31 years and knows they are watching him. He scans the wind-scoured sand

spit for rogue bulls — bilious giants of blubber, muscle, whisker and teeth. They come here from the deepest, coldest reaches of the North Pacific to mate, and they don’t like interlopers. Stewart has witnessed epic battles among them, pendulous snouts flailing like medieval maces, chunks of bloody flesh flung into the air, deep thwacks piercing the endless din of the wind. There is no way not to ponder the fragility of the human spine in such moments. See Seals / C3

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T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Aunt drowns out dinner conversation

Tony Danza says class act isn’t just for show By Kristen A. Graham The Philadelphia Inquirer

Dear Abby: Last night, I attended an elegant dinner party at the home of a friend. She served a delicious meal on a table set with crystal, bone china, silver and a low centerpiece of fresh flowers. Everything was perfection — with one exception. As soon as we were seated, our hostess’s elderly Aunt “Ethel” began talking about her health, with graphic details of every symptom, every allergy and every pain she had ever endured. Other guests tried changing the subject several times, but Aunt Ethel evidently believed she was being entertaining. Among those at the table were a lawyer, a teacher and a friend who had recently returned from living several years in Africa. Each had more to contribute in the way of conversation. But not one got the opportunity to speak more than a few words before Aunt Ethel was reminded of yet another ailment she “knew” we’d find interesting. How does one handle an awkward situation like this? In spite of her age, the woman is essentially in good health, and ours is a small town. She’ll probably be present at many more dinners. — Frustrated in New Hampshire Dear Frustrated: (And I’m sure you were.) Your hostess lost control of her party. A way to have handled it would have been for her to say to Aunt Ethel, with a SMILE: “That’s very interesting, Aunt Ethel, but I invited everyone to come here for a reason — so each person can tell us what they’ve been doing since we were last together, since I know a lot has been going on.” Then she should have started around the table. Dear Abby: When my husband, “Vic,” and I met, we discussed having children. Although he is 25 years my senior, he was in accord with my desire to have kids. He even said we should have

DEAR ABBY them right away because he is so much older. I have had reproductive issues in the past, so before we married I went through several tests to verify that I could conceive a child. Three months after the wedding, Vic told me he had “changed his mind” and no longer wants a child. (He has one from a previous relationship.) When I told him how upset his decision made me, he said he would be “dying soon” and then I’ll be able to have all the children I want. I’m not sure where things should go from here. I feel Vic lied to me and never intended to have another child. Aside from this issue and a few others, he’s a good husband. He would be there for me until one of us dies, but I don’t know if I can settle for that. Vic refuses counseling, and when I told him I was going to go alone, he made me feel like it was the dumbest idea ever. Please help. — Longs for Motherhood in Louisiana Dear Longs for Motherhood: You are asking yourself very important questions, and talking about the decisions you are facing with someone who is not emotionally involved isn’t a dumb idea — it’s an intelligent one. However, right now you have another issue that needs to be addressed. When your husband told you he would be dying soon, did you ask him exactly what he meant by that? If he was being literal, you may have your hands full for a while. And counseling to help you through that would be beneficial, too. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

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With the blessing of Philadelphia School District and city officials, Tony Danza became a first-year English teacher at Northeast High School in Philadelphia and the star of a reality show called “Teach.” their jobs were. So far, Danza has guided his 26 sophomores through units on poetry and social justice, “Julius Caesar” and “Of Mice and Men.” Although he teaches only one class, a double period midmorning, he signs in at 7 a.m. like everyone else. He submits lesson plans, attends daily meetings with his colleagues and covers others’ classes. Yes, it’s a show, but it’s also a real 10th-grade English class, a real school year at a real high school in a working-class neighborhood of apartments and rowhouses. “I just come to work every day; it’s not like there’s a makeup trailer outside,” said Danza, 58. “I iron my own pants sometimes, pain in the neck that it is.” One of the first times Kelly Barton, Northeast’s administrative liaison to “Teach,” met the actor, Danza was sprawled on his classroom floor with cleaning supplies

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and a scrub brush. (Danza is a neat freak, and the floor wasn’t clean enough for him.) “You have this image of what a celebrity is, but he’s not that way here,” Barton said. “When I saw him on his hands and knees, I thought, ‘This is a normal guy.’” And, yes, Danza is swimming in paperwork — student work, interim reports, you name it. “It ruins my manicure,” he said, laughing, extending his hands. “It’s overwhelming. There’s a lot of rigmarole that teachers are forced to deal with aside from just teaching.” On a recent morning, Danza started his class with a discussion of the previous night’s cheerleading competition. Northeast’s squad took second place, and students were crushed. Danza, who often shows up at after-school events to support Northeast students, had attended. He was taken aback by the students’ reaction.

“Sometimes you work your butt off, and it doesn’t pay off,” said Danza, who was dressed in gray pants, a crisp blue buttondown and black Northeast tie. “There should be some pride in what you did.” Then it was on to the vocabulary word of the day, “compassion,” and the group projects on themes setting up “To Kill A Mockingbird,” which mostly fizzled. He switched to his backup plan, diving into the novel. In his neat classroom decorated with student work and motivational posters, Danza was energetic and upbeat. Students ignored the cameraman, three techs sitting along the wall and the microphone cord peeking out of Danza’s pocket. After class, Danza was philosophical. “You get a great class, you go home feeling like you just scored on Broadway,” he said. “But I’ll go home after this class, and I’ll be sick. You have to have a tremendous amount of determination, because you get up in the morning and you come back again.”

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

MONDAY PRIME TIME 3/15/10 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News 1931 World News 912 News 57432 NBC News 17467 News 5399 News 8450 Judge Judy 1283 Inside Ed. 6776 Funniest Home Videos 2486 Jim 3979 Malcolm 5202 Electric 5757 Fetch! Ruff 738 News 9757 NBC News 2318 Reba ‘PG’ 30979 Reba ‘PG’ 42202 Daisy 30711 Sara 59592 Burt Wolf 3955 Europe 9028

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å 11738 NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) 35047 News 7863 CBS News 8115 World News 3689 Millionaire 7641 Two Men 2115 Two Men 3467 Simpsons 2115 Simpsons 3467 This Old H’se 979 Business 931 News 2931 News 3283 King 49115 King 30467 Europe 56405 Travels 47757 Old House 9641 Business 3221

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! 8467 Wheel 689 Jeopardy! 94028 Wheel 27844 Access H. 8863 Scrubs ‘14’ 4399 Ent 1047 The Insider 3825 Simpsons 3115 Simpsons 2979 The Office 3115 The Office 2979 PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å 7825 Live at 7 (N) 3931 Inside Ed. 9467 ’70s Show 10115 ’70s Show 69979 Garden 27405 Old House 36641 PBS NewsHour ’ Å 74283

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

20/20 Behind the scenes of “The Bachelor.” (N) ’ Å 3863 Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 32863 Trauma Protocol (N) ’ ‘14’ 29399 How I Met 4283 Rules 3318 Two/Half Men Big Bang 52009 20/20 Behind the scenes of “The Bachelor.” (N) ’ Å 49573 House Black Hole (N) ’ ‘14’ 96405 24 (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 76641 PDX TV Prime News (N) 96405 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 76641 History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å 7689 Chuck (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 92641 Trauma Protocol (N) ’ ‘14’ 12405 Life Unexpected (N) ’ ‘14’ 16863 Gossip Girl (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 12329 Make ‘G’ 30775 Cultivating 15660 Sewing 82318 Dewberry 96196 History Detectives ’ ‘G’ Å 94047

10:00

10:30

11:00

Castle ’ ‘PG’ Å 2370 News 6490115 Law & Order Innocence ‘14’ 22486 News 1919318 CSI: Miami ’ ‘14’ Å 97196 News 9282370 Castle ’ ‘PG’ Å 28080 Inside 90449028 News 61318 TMZ ‘PG’ 47738 King of Hill 43825 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 86028 South Park 43825 On Assignment: An Oregon Field Guide Special 6080 Law & Order Innocence ‘14’ 15592 News 9284738 Married... 89318 Married... 65738 Roseanne 70573 Ming 56080 Italy 72028 Daisy 87863 On Assignment: An Oregon Field Guide Special 59486

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Name Earl 64592 South Park 64592 Jay Leno Roseanne 84950 Sara 68912

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å 919776 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å 190554 Intervention Sharon ‘14’ 109202 Intervention Amy W. ‘14’ 196738 Hoarders ‘PG’ Å 199825 Paranormal State Paranormal State 130 28 8 32 The First 48 Past cases. ‘14’ 651080 (3:30) ›› “The Secret of My Success” ›› “The Whole Nine Yards” (2000, Comedy) Bruce Willis, Matthew Perry. Someone ›› “Something to Talk About” (1995, Comedy-Drama) Julia Roberts, Dennis Quaid, Robert Duvall. Pre›› “Raising Helen” (2004) Kate Hudson. A woman gains cus102 40 39 (1987) Michael J. Fox. 774912 wants a hit man and his neighbor dead. Å 579047 miere. A betrayed wife stirs up trouble at the family horse farm. Å 984202 tody of her late sister’s children. Å 972467 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ 4083660 Reptile Kings: Lost Viper 7596592 Animal Cops Miami ’ ‘PG’ 7572912 Pit Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å 7592776 Pit Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å 7595863 Pit Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å 2930979 68 50 12 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ 1179641 The Millionaire Matchmaker 578399 The Millionaire Matchmaker 467844 The Marriage Ref ‘PG’ Å 383365 Real Housewives of NYC 149783 Real Housewives of NYC 983329 Kell on Earth (N) Å 733806 Kell on Earth Å 253738 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Helping needy families. ’ ‘PG’ 8382738 Smarter 2125405 Smarter 2104912 Blue Collar Comedy 8396931 True Blue: Ten Years 8306318 White-Tater 2582115 190 32 42 53 Trading Spouses 2115028 House of Cards 283844 Mad Money 284573 Tom Brokaw Reports: Boomer$! 287660 Paid 557931 Profit In 169950 51 36 40 52 Biography on CNBC 776979 Larry King Live (N) ‘PG’ 535738 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ Å 341486 Larry King Live ‘PG’ 752318 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 755405 Anderson Cooper 360 ‘PG’ 330370 52 38 35 48 Campbell Brown (N) 660863 Married... 99047 Scrubs ’ 89660 Scrubs ’ 70912 RENO 911! 43370 RENO 911! 76196 Futurama 69318 Futurama 48825 South Park 33080 South Park 70196 South Park 56028 South Park 65776 Daily Show 45825 Colbert 22047 135 53 135 47 Married... 63134 The Buzz 6979 Bend City Edition PM Edition 8757 Visions 9009 Talk of the Town 54405 Cooking 5863 Desert 4370 Trading 99080 RSN Movie Night 58080 PM Edition 98775 Deschutes 64467 11 Capital News Today 111912 Today in Washington 946979 58 20 98 11 Tonight From Washington 488196 Phineas 200486 Deck 291738 Wizards 571486 Montana 213950 ›› “Eloise at the Plaza” (2003, Comedy) ‘G’ 3570757 Phineas and Ferb Phineas and Ferb Montana 9386370 Wizards 380221 Deck 534115 87 43 14 39 Montana 6001689 Montana 203573 Sinking of an Aircraft Carrier 984080 Pacific Secrets 105486 Two Weeks in Hell ’ ‘14’ Å 118950 Tragedy: USS Indianapolis 104757 Two Weeks in Hell ’ ‘14’ 627979 156 21 16 37 Overhaulin’ ’ ‘G’ Å 666912 NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Golden State Warriors (Live) 269405 SportsCenter (Live) Å 566573 SportsCenter (Live) Å 174776 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Detroit Pistons at Boston Celtics From TD Garden in Boston. (Live) 248912 SportsNation Å 8305689 SportsCenter (Live) Å 8381009 30 for 30 3078660 NBA 7570776 NBA Basketball 9512115 22 24 21 24 College GameNight Å 7574592 PBA Bowling: 1993 Senior 1674047 PBA Bowling 9218950 AWA Wrestling Å 9294370 American Gladiators ‘PG’ 9214134 NBA Western Conference first round game 3, from April 28, 2001. 9020825 23 25 123 25 Boxing: Barkley vs. Coetzee 9184931 ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS ESPNEWS 24 63 124 8 Rules 923844 8 Rules 914196 Secret-Teen 749979 Secret-Teen 725399 Secret-Teen 738863 Greek (N) ‘14’ Å 731950 The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 994592 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å 293115 Hannity (N) 9860931 On the Record 9386738 The O’Reilly Factor 9395486 Hannity 9308950 On the Record 9385009 Glenn Beck 8452283 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) 1271825 Home 7358689 Paula 7348202 30-Min. 7339554 Challenge 7598950 Good Eats Good Eats Unwrap 8716776 Unwrap 4097863 Diners 7524196 Diners 7533844 Good Eats Unwrap 6362080 177 62 46 44 Barefoot Cont Mariners 58202 Mariners Mondays From Aug. 12, 2009. (N) 263554 Mariners 54660 Unscripted 30080 ATP Tennis 492432 20 45 28* 26 High School Basketball 41196 ›› “The Transporter” (2002, Action) Jason Statham, Shu Qi. 8467711 ›› “Mr. & Mrs. Smith” (2005) Brad Pitt. A husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. 1422689 Damages (N) ‘MA’ 9383641 Damages ‘MA’ 8467115 131 Get Sold 6330496 Holmes on Homes ‘G’ 8379202 House 1070202 House 3980775 Dream 1089950 Property 1075757 Home Rules (N) Å 2964573 House 9663370 House 9689318 The Unsellables My First Place 176 49 33 43 Divine 1067738 American Pickers ‘PG’ 7497221 American Pickers ‘PG’ 6495009 Pawn 1887950 Pawn 1873757 American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ 6417221 Pawn 6216931 Pawn 6232979 American Pickers ‘PG’ 2059221 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ 1877573 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 188844 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 712825 Grey’s Anatomy ‘14’ Å 721573 “Who Is Clark Rockefeller?” (2010) Eric McCormack. ‘PG’ Å 724660 Will 910793 Will 253757 138 39 20 31 Desperate Housewives ‘14’ 206689 Maddow Show 67580979 Countdown-Olbermann 90625134 Maddow Show 90601554 Hardball Å 90621318 Countdown-Olbermann 90624405 Maddow Show 79141370 56 59 128 51 Countdown-Olbermann 93935399 Parental 924573 Going 921486 Made 912738 True Life ’ 730221 True Life ’ 716641 True Life ’ Å 736405 True Life (N) ’ 739592 True Aftershow True Life 235047 192 22 38 57 Parental 205950 Sponge 397370 iCarly ‘G’ 394283 Jackson 318863 iCarly ‘G’ 665283 Sponge 314047 G. Martin 674931 Malcolm 660738 Chris 464641 Chris 994467 Lopez 287689 Lopez 263009 Lopez 476486 Lopez 861793 82 46 24 40 Sponge 685047 CSI: Crime Scene 832134 UFC Unleashed ‘14’ Å 787432 TNA Epics X-Division (N) ’ 787252 TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 2877028 MANswers ‘MA’ God of War III 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Invstgtn. 941221 Stargate SG-1 Heroes ‘PG’ 4821660 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4456931 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4472979 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4452115 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4455202 Monster 9937738 Monster 3585399 133 35 133 45 Stargate Atlantis ’ ‘PG’ 1650283 Behind 8893641 Mark Chironna Franklin 4524689 Jesse Duplantis Praise the Lord Å 6167405 Osteen 3614009 P. Stone 1138196 Van Impe Pres Changing-World Spring Praise-A-Thon Å 4760592 205 60 130 Friends 371467 Friends 361080 Office 385660 Seinfeld 665318 Seinfeld 381844 Fam. Guy 641738 Fam. Guy 653573 Fam. Guy 620293 Fam. Guy 534009 Fam. Guy 810931 Fam. Guy 836979 Lopez Tonight ‘14’ 334196 16 27 11 28 King 645554 (7:15) ››› “The Prince and the Pauper” (1937, Adventure) Errol Flynn, Claude Rains, Billy Mauch. Tudor ›› “Penrod and His Twin Brother” (1938, Comedy) Billy Mauch, ››› “The Great Lie” (1941) Bette Davis, ››› “Boom Town” (1940, Adventure) Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy. Two wildcatters 101 44 101 29 attempt to create a Texas oil empire. Å 53628757 prince and look-alike beggar trade places. Å (DVS) 78288196 Frank Craven, Spring Byington. 3310950 George Brent. Å 9527047 Say Yes 640080 Say Yes 664660 Little 944318 Little 660844 Little 920738 Little 932573 Ultimate Cake Off (N) ‘PG’ 440404 Cake 199931 Cake 115979 Little 379080 Little 992115 178 34 32 34 What Not to Wear Mimi ‘PG’ 943689 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ 825844 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 282842 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 987450 Bones ’ ‘14’ Å 882806 The Closer Red Tape ‘14’ 632383 Law & Order Enemy ’ ‘14’ 635318 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Cry Wolf ‘14’ 934931 Chowder 1063912 Chowder 2603950 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN 9485365 Stoked 1083776 Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Chowder 1069196 Chowder 1071931 Flapjack 5991467 Flapjack 8387221 King-Hill 9676844 King-Hill 9685592 Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 67580979 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 90625134 Bizarre Foods W/Zimmern 90601554 Bourdain: Reservations 90621318 Bourdain: Reservations 90624405 Bourdain: Reservations 79141370 179 51 45 42 Bizarre Foods-Zimmern 93935399 All in the Family Sanford 1185202 Sanford 7331912 Griffith 1194950 Griffith 1180757 Home Improve. Home Improve. Home 7520370 Home Improve. Boston Legal ‘PG’ Å 2905283 65 47 29 35 Bewitch 1172738 Bewitch 7354863 All in the Family NCIS Suspicion ‘PG’ Å 553134 NCIS Tribes ’ ‘14’ Å 741202 NCIS Stakeout ’ ‘14’ Å 750950 WWE Monday Night RAW ’ ‘PG’ Å 3266202 (11:05) Psych ‘PG’ Å 42417825 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Criminal Intent 655931 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 139711 Sober House With Dr. Drew 273467 Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ Å 282115 Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ Å 202979 Beauty 348370 TRANS 364318 Celebrity Fit Club ‘PG’ Å 895863 191 48 37 54 Tool Academy ’ ‘14’ 767221 PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) › “Get Carter” 2000 ’ ‘R’ Å 46466399 (6:20) › “Mallrats” 1995 Shannen Doherty. 22247738 ››› “The Breakfast Club” 1985 ‘R’ Å 6502554 (9:40) ›› “Fast Times at Ridgemont High” 39860221 (11:15) ›› “Blow” 2001 79470592 ››› “Night and the City” 1992 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ Å 6229405 ››› “Rising Sun” 1993, Drama Sean Connery. ‘R’ Å 73967776 (9:15) ››› “Night and the City” 1992 Robert De Niro. ‘R’ 97929979 ››› “Miller’s Crossing” 2661318 Vans Triple Crown 5182467 Daily 6427955 Surfing 9267432 Snowbrd 5618781 Vans Triple Crown 5761196 Daily 3819979 Insane Cinema 1077028 Danny 4493573 Update 3881196 Casey 7007283 Haney 670115 Haney 399738 Haney 329979 Haney 303931 The Golf Fix 198196 Golf 676399 Learning 688134 Haney 466009 Haney 912863 The Golf Fix 197467 Lessons 461554 Learning 766509 7th Heaven Suspicion ‘G’ 1875115 7th Heaven Drunk ‘G’ Å 7495863 7th Heaven Hot Pants ‘G’ 6426979 7th Heaven I Really Do ‘G’ 6402399 “Before You Say I Do” (2009) Jennifer Westfeldt. ‘PG’ Å 6405486 Golden 5018738 Golden 2386478 (4:15) ›› “Nights in Rodanthe” 2008 ›› “The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor” 2008 Brendan Fraser. A young Real Time With Bill Maher Sen. Michael ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action Vin Diesel. Fugitive Dom Torretto and Brian Ricky Gervais The Life & Times of HBO 425 501 425 10 Richard Gere. Å 50972919 849318 Tim ’ 422825 archaeologist awakens a cursed Chinese emperor. ‘PG-13’ 584979 Bennet (D-Colo.). ‘MA’ 545080 O’Conner resume a feud in Los Angeles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 555467 ››› “Layer Cake” 2004, Crime Drama Daniel Craig. ‘R’ Å 3760283 The IT Crowd ‘14’ ››› “Kurt Cobain About a Son” 2006 64452283 (9:15) ›› “The Crossing Guard” 1995 Jack Nicholson. ‘R’ Å 6359486 (11:15) “Layer Cake” 2004 31756486 IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›› “P.S. I Love You” 2007, Romance Hilary Swank, Ge- (6:40) ›› “Street Kings” 2008, Crime Drama Keanu Reeves. A Los Angeles cop walks ›› “Dr. Dolittle 2” 2001 Eddie Murphy. Woodland creatures ask ››› “Taken” 2008 Liam Neeson. A former spy uses his old › “Showgirls” 1995 MAX 400 508 7 rard Butler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å 4039950 ’ 4491399 an ethically ambiguous path. ’ ‘R’ Å 73428931 for help in saving their habitat. ’ 438912 skills to save his kidnapped daughter. ’ 780486 The Skyjacker 5184825 CIA Secret Experiments 3444863 Unabomber: Secret History 5787134 The Skyjacker 5763554 CIA Secret Experiments 5783318 Unabomber: Secret History 5786405 Lockdown ‘14’ 9857509 NGC 157 157 Avatar 5103950 Fant. 4 3077234 Inv. ZIM 6227757 Back, Barnyard OddParents OddParents Avatar 5109134 Fant. 4 5188641 Phantom 3886641 Back, Barnyard Three 4491115 Three 4400863 Secret 3898486 Mikey 7014573 NTOON 89 115 189 SnowTrax Å Ride 7356221 Polaris 7353134 Fishers 7344486 Hunt Adv Zumbo Outdrs Extreme 1163080 Best of the West Roll With It Polaris 4079467 SnowTrax Å Top Truck Chal Ride 8793825 Fishers 6377912 OUTD 37 307 43 Secret Diary of a Diary-Call Girl Secret Diary of a Diary-Call Girl › “An American (5:25) ››› “King of California” 2007, Drama Michael Douglas, ›› “The Lucky Ones” 2008, Drama Rachel McAdams, Tim Robbins. iTV. Three sol- Nurse Jackie ’ United States of SHO 500 500 Call Girl 3671318 70573370 Tara ‘MA’ 532641 Call Girl 9001486 31289080 Carol” 2851115 Evan Rachel Wood. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ 84308221 diers on leave take a road trip across America. ’ ‘R’ 343844 ‘MA’ 669757 Fast Track to Fame 8812776 The Racing Chef NASCAR 4508641 NASCAR 8813405 Deal? 4504825 Car Crazy ‘G’ Hub 8801660 Fast Track to Fame 4993825 The Racing Chef NASCAR 2752863 NASCAR 3619554 Deal? 6763196 SPEED 35 303 125 Cadillac Records ›› “The Taking of Pelham 123” 2009 Denzel Washington. ‘R’ 67400202 (7:20) ›› “Nothing Like the Holidays” 2008 17291221 ›› “Confessions of a Shopaholic” 2009 Isla Fisher. ‘PG’ Å 8325370 “Cadillac Records” 2008 33477405 STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Convict Cowboy” 1995 Jon (6:15) › “Witless Protection” 2008, Comedy Larry the Cable Guy. A small-town law- › “Gigantic” 2008, Romance-Comedy Paul Dano, Zooey Deschanel. A mattress sales- › “Disaster Movie” 2008 Matt Lanter. Attractive 20-somethings “Virgin Territory” TMC 525 525 Voight. ’ ‘R’ Å 1294028 man gets mixed up in a big-time FBI case. ’ ‘PG-13’ 46352979 man falls in love with a quirky young woman. ’ ‘R’ 655047 dodge catastrophic events. ‘PG-13’ 696554 2007 ‘R’ 6369554 NHL Hockey: Bruins at Devils 8928660 Hockey 7344486 IndyCar Racing Izod Series: Streets of Sao Paulo 2918757 Sports 8781080 Bull Riding PBR Glendale Invitational From Glendale, Ariz. 2699009 Sports 6377912 VS. 27 58 30 Golden 8895009 Golden 4512844 Golden 4519757 Golden 4500009 Golden 8808573 Golden 4522221 Golden 8817221 Golden 8803028 Locator 3632405 Locator 1156592 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ 4981080 John Edward 6158757 WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 C3

CALENDAR TODAY BOOKS & BEARS RSVP VOLUNTEER AND PARTNER MEETING: Learn about volunteer and partner opportunities for the 2010 Books & Bears book drive; free; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; Deschutes County administration building, 1300 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-548-2206, marie@ rsvpco.org or www.rsvpco.org. MR. SHS “EVER AFTER” PAGEANT: A male beauty pageant for seniors at Sisters High School; proceeds benefit the neonatal intensive care unit at St. Charles Bend; $5; 6:30 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-633-8639. “THE CONTINUUM PROJECT”: A screening of the film that follows climbers around the globe as they participate in daring ascents; $10; 7 p.m.; InClimb Gym, 1182 S.E. Centennial Court, Bend; 541-3886764 or http:// alstrinfilms.com.

TUESDAY “OREGON GENEALOGICAL AND HISTORICAL RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-3178978,541-317-9553 or www .orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. SCIENCE PUB: Frank Bernieri talks about “The Science of First Impressions”; RSVP requested; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-737-2351, osualum@ oregonstate.edu or www .OSUcascades.edu/sciencepubs. MACEO PARKER: The legendary funk musician performs; $35 in advance, $38 day of show; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by the New Orleansbased funk-rock band Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue; $15, $10 students; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org.

WEDNESDAY BENEFIT GOLF TOURNAMENT: Nine holes of golf, with prizes and a raffle; proceeds benefit Denise Donnelly, who is waiting for a lung transplant; registration required; $30; noon registration, 1 p.m. tee-off time; The Greens at Redmond, 2575 S.W. Greens Blvd.; 541-504-3803. CENTRAL OREGON IRISH DANCERS: Featuring 25 dancers performing traditional Irish dance; free; 1:15-2 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Community, 1010 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-8500. REBECCA HILARY SMITH: The harpist performs a St. Patrick’s Day concert; free; 2-4 p.m.; Strictly Organic Coffee Co., 6 S.W. Bond St., Bend. FIVE PINT MARY: The Celtic folkrock band plays a St. Patrick’s Day celebration; ages 21 and older; $5, free for Harp Hall members; 8 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend. ST. PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION: Featuring live music by the Tune Dawgs, Steve Allely, The Sweet Harlots and the Moon Mountain Ramblers, and Irish dancers; free; 511 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. BRANDI CARLILE: The fast-rising, rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Eoin Harrington; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.random presents.com. MARK RANSOM AND THE MOSTEST: Local roots musicians perform a St. Patrick’s Day concert; $5; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing &

Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. TENTAREIGN AND THE SOFA KINGS: Local rock bands perform a St. Patrick’s Day concert; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House of Central Oregon; $5, $3 if wearing green, free with a donation of nonperishable food; 8 p.m.; The Black Horse Saloon, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 541-382-4270. BLOWIN’ SMOKE: Local funk and hip-hop band performs a St. Patrick’s Day concert; free; 9 p.m.; The Summit Saloon & Stage, 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-7492440. SMOKESTACK AND THE FOOTHILL FURY: The Ohio-based blues musician performs for a St. Patrick’s Day party; free; 9 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www.myspace.com/ smokestackand thefoothillfury.

THURSDAY READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: A screening of the film “Field of Dreams,” followed by a discussion March 25; free; 5:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039. “BEYOND BARS — RE-ENVISIONING THE PRISON SYSTEM”: Walidah Imarisha talks about the role of prisons in our country and discusses alternative justice systems; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. BRANDI CARLILE: The fast-rising, rootsy singer-songwriter performs, with Eoin Harrington; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.random presents.com. GREAT AMERICAN TAXI: The Americana musicians perform, with Smokestack and The Foothill Fury; $10; 8 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing. KNOBODY: Hip-hop performance, with Germane, The Tones, Cloaked Characters and more; ages 21 and older; $5; 8 p.m.; The Annex, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.myspace.com/ actiondeniroproductions. TOWNSHEND THIRD THURSDAY: Featuring an all-ages poetry slam of original compositions lasting three minutes or less; hosted by Mosley Wotta; $3; 8 p.m., sign-up begins 7 p.m.; Townshend’s Bend Teahouse, 835 N.W. Bond St.; 541-312-2001.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 5-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-3179351 or www .centraloregon carshow.com. CANDLELIGHT DINNER DANCE: Featuring dinner, live music and dancing; proceeds benefit the Bend Senior Center; tickets must be purchased in advance; $10; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Alan Contreras talks about his books “Handbook of Oregon Birds: A Field Companion to Birds of Oregon” and “Afield”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BEND FOR HAITI: Featuring performances by David JacobsStrain, Rootdown, Reed Thomas Lawrence and Eric Tollefson; proceeds benefit relief efforts for earthquake survivors in Haiti; $35, $50 for VIP seating and admission to an afterparty; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-0700 or www.bendforhaiti.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

“THE ITALIAN”: A screening of the PG-13-rated 2007 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. COME ALIVE TOUR: Mark Schultz and Point of Grace perform a concert of faith; free; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-633-6804.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-317-9351 or www .centraloregoncarshow.com. DOCUMENT SHREDDING AND DRUG DISPOSAL: The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Data Delete of Oregon partner to safely destroy personal documents and provide identity theft prevention tips; outdated or unwanted prescription medications will be accepted for disposal; donations of nonperishable food accepted; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, 63333 W. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-388-6655 or www.deschutes.org. USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-593-6885. DULCIMER DEMONSTRATION: Richard Neises plays an Appalachian dulcimer; free; 1-2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1051. “MAD CITY CHICKENS”: A screening of the film about raising urban chickens, with a discussion of how to keep urban chickens, a silent auction and more; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact’s food bank; $8 in advance, $10 at the door; 5:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-244-2536 or 541chicken@gmail.com. GOSPEL CONCERT: The sixth annual Redmond Community Gospel Concert, featuring local gospel groups, choirs and soloists; free; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-447-5650. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 21: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Rebecca Kilgore, with PDXV; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-9775637, joe@justjoesmusic.com or www.justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. IRISH ROVERS: The Celtic band performs Irish music; $35 or $40; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com. NETTLE HONEY: The Seattle-based bluegrass act performs, with Mai from Moon Mountain Ramblers; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing.

SUNDAY CENTRAL OREGON ROD & CUSTOM SHOW: Featuring hot rods, custom cars and bikes; $11, $6 ages 6-15, free ages 5 and younger; $2 off adult admission with two cans of nonperishable food; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-317-9351 or www .centraloregoncarshow.com.

USED BOOK SALE: Friends of the Sunriver Area Public Library hosts a sale of fiction and nonfiction books; free admission; 1-5 p.m., bag sale from 3-5 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541593-6885. JOHN CRUZ: The Hawaiian singersongwriter performs; ages 21 and older only; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .myspace.com/silvermoonbrewing or www.bendticket.com.

MONDAY March 22 NIGHTSOUNDS AT THE PAC: Featuring a performance by singersongwriter Marianne Thomas; $5; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-9775677.

TUESDAY March 23 FREE ICE CREAM CONE: Ben & Jerry’s hosts a free cone day; donations benefit Healthy Beginnings; free; noon-8 p.m.; Ben & Jerry’s, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-383-6357 or http://benjerry.com/ben. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Stompin’ Stu Thomsen” tells the story of Stuart Thomsen, a dominant BMX racer; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; ages 21 and older only; $5; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174. DANGER DEATH RAY: The Portland-based pop-punk group performs, with Tuck and Roll; free; 10 p.m.; Players Bar & Grill, 25 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-389-2558 or www .myspace .com/dangerdeathrayus.

WEDNESDAY March 24 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Glass Castle” by Jeannette Walls; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1072 or www.dpls.us/calendar. LISTENING AT THE LIBRARY: Listen to a short story; for adults; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-617-7085 or www.dpls.us/calendar. HERSTORY OPEN MIC: A celebration of women’s history month; proceeds benefit the Human Dignity Coalition; $5; 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.myspace .com/silvermoonbrewing. PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT: Cello fusion group performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. DEBBIE FRIEDMAN: The composer and singer performs contemporary Jewish music; proceeds benefit the Jewish Community of Central Oregon; $29, $21 students and children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3823138 or www.towertheatre.org. “BOBBY GOULD IN HELL”: Volcanic Theatre and The Actors Realm present the play by David Mamet about a misogynistic narcissist interrogated by the devil; ages 21 and older; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 8 p.m.; The Wine Shop, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-215-0516 or volcanictheatre@ bendbroadband.com.

THURSDAY March 25 READ! WATCH! DISCUSS!: Discuss the film “Field of Dreams” and the book “Shoeless Joe” by W.P. Kinsella; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1039 or www.dpls.us/calendar.

M T For Monday, March 15

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 5:15 CRAZY HEART (R) 12:25, 3, 5:40, 8:20 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) Noon, 2:30, 5:10, 7:50 THE LAST STATION (R) 12:15, 2:50, 5:30, 8 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 5:25, 8:10 A SINGLE MAN (R) 2:40, 8:05 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 12:10, 2:55, 5:35, 8:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 11:55 a.m., 1:25, 2:25, 4:05,

5:15, 6:40, 7:50, 9:15, 10:35 ALICE IN WONDERLAND 3-D (PG) 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 AVATAR 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:35, 7, 10:30 BROOKLYN’S FINEST (R) Noon, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40 COP OUT (R) 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 7:55, 10:30 THE CRAZIES (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 DEAR JOHN (PG-13) 3:55, 10:05 GREEN ZONE (R) 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 2:20, 4:15, 5, 6:50, 7:40, 9:30, 10:15 OUR FAMILY WEDDING (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 5:10, 7:30, 9:45 PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 REMEMBER ME (PG-13) 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:10, 9:50 SHERLOCK HOLMES (PG-13) 12:10, 6:35 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R)

11:20 a.m., 2, 5:20, 8, 10:25 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25 VALENTINE’S DAY (PG-13) 12:05, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE BLIND SIDE (PG-13) 6 IT’S COMPLICATED (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road,

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Four games weekly

Redmond 541-548-8777

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 4, 6:45, 9:15 GREEN ZONE (R) 4, 6:30, 9 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE (R) 3:45, 6:15, 8:30 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 5:30, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (PG) 6:30 CRAZY HEART (R) 6:45 GREEN ZONE (R) 6:45 SHUTTER ISLAND (R) 6:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF (PG) 4, 7

Seals Continued from C1 He walks warily into the fray this February afternoon, hundreds deep, keeping an eye open for escape routes. “They’re quiet and sneaky,” he says. “When their eyes get all scrunched up, that’s when you want to run.” As a senior scientist for HubbsSea World Research Institute, Stewart has studied all types of sea life, in the waters off Antarctica, Greenland, Russia, the uninhabited outer Hawaiian Islands, the Maldive Islands in the Indian Ocean, Alaska, Iceland, Mexico. After all that, he still marvels at what he sees every winter so close to home. “How many people do we have now?” in Southern California, he says. “Twenty million. Just offshore, we have the most diverse area of seabirds and sea mammals anywhere in the world.” Late January and February is the time to behold it, when the elephant seals haul up and fill the beaches, after the longest migration of any mammal on Earth. Year after year, Stewart takes in the spectacle mostly alone. San Miguel Island, the westernmost of the Channel Islands, 25 miles off the Santa Barbara coast, is raw. No one lives here permanently, and few people visit. Ocean swells blast the jagged shoreline, making it impossible to land a boat most of the year. The relentless wind drives sand and grit over the 15-square-mile hump of land, raking scars through the scrub and stunting the indigenous shrubs.

Creatures of the deep Stewart, 55, figures he has spent eight or nine years of his life out here. When he started in 1979, northern elephant seals were a mystery — otherworldly pinnipeds larger than walruses. In the early 20th century, scientists had thought they were gone, hunted out of existence for their blubber. By the time Stewart came on the scene, they were rebounding, colonizing beaches for several months a year on San Miguel, San Nicholas Island 70 miles south and remote stretches of the Central Coast. No one knew where they went for the other nine or so months. The assumption was that they were feeding just off the coast. Stewart and Robert De Long, a marine biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, began to attach depth and light sensors to the animals in the late 1980s to see what they were up to. Of the first eight depth sensors they recovered, four had been flooded out. The underwater pressure had blown out the rubber gaskets. What they learned over the ensuing years was astonishing: When the seals left the Channel Islands, they headed far into the northern Pacific, hunting alone. They dived for 20 minutes at a time or more — sometimes for more than two hours and up to 5,000 feet down. The only other mammals known to reach such depths were beaked whales. The seals would surface for about three minutes to breathe and then go back down, repeating the cycle for months on end before returning to California in winter to breed and in summer to molt. In one year, they might spend a full nine months at sea, travel 13,000

miles and spend 80 percent of the time underwater. “They live in a world we have little reference to,” Stewart says. “They live at 1,500 feet or deeper, under tremendous pressure, without breathing, for most of their lives.”

On San Miguel At Cardwell Point, Stewart trudges across the triangular beach toward the sand spit, where waves bending around both sides of the island collide in fantails of white water. The channel beyond is a pinwheel of cobalt blue and turquoise. The shoreline is so clotted with seals there is nowhere to walk. Many have gashes from fights or deep cylindrical scars from shark bites. To his enduring surprise, the population keeps growing. At the animal’s nadir in the 19th century, there were fewer than 100 seals, all on Guadalupe Island off Baja California. They began repopulating California’s Channel Islands in the 1950s and on the mainland in the 1960s. By 1983, Stewart figured they would hit their peak within 10 years, as food sources and safe beaches for mating reached capacity. With an estimated 200,000 northern elephant seals today, he is still waiting for that point. “It’s just astounding. They keep coming out of nowhere, more and more every year,” he says. “We can’t find the fish, but they can. The elephant seals evidently are using a part of the ocean we haven’t got to yet.” Stewart walks the three miles back to the bunkhouse at the National Park Service ranger station. At night, he gazes up at Orion and the universe he rarely sees at home, bleached out here only low in the east, by the orange glow of Los Angeles. In the cold morning, he steps out after a cup of coffee, hikes to a bluff covered in a strange dwarf forest of coreopsis and threads down a steep canyon to Cuyler Harbor 400 feet below. This is the most sheltered water on the island. Today it is awash in roiling currents and 10-foot surf. The sand is vanishing fast, exposing the buried wood-plank bow of an old shipwreck. The tide is high, and the elephant seals are in an uproar. The pups can’t swim yet, and if the beach disappears they will all die. The seals climb higher into the dunes, agitated and roaring, a briny steam rising off them in the cold. “I’m not going to tag down here today,” Stewart says. “There’s too much commotion.” A bull comes out of the surf, harrumphing up like a monster inch-worm. A bigger bull rises from the group to confront him. They wobble up to each other, puffing their chests out. The big one weighs as much as a Lincoln Continental, the smaller one more like a Plymouth Voyager. Stewart stops to watch. The Lincoln swings his snout at the other’s chest. The Plymouth absorbs the blow and ratchets up for his shot. They seem to take turns, gentlemanly. The scent from a dead gray whale up the beach wafts down. The blows ring out. The upstart eventually retreats and swims off in the cold waves. The surf thunders down, the sand keens in the wind, the babies cry, and another day comes and goes on San Miguel Island.


C4 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN CATHY

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BI GAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, March 15, 2010: This year, you enter a new luck cycle. You are able to make some major changes that you have been considering. Determine what you want out of your life and the path to get there. Possibilities evolve. If you are single, be more open to new people. You have unusual charisma and magnetism. Others respond. If you are attached, you open up to more possibilities. Your partner finds you happier and sunnier. A fellow PISCES reads you cold. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You get a new beginning. The unexpected occurs; process it rather than react. Reflect and plan. Behind-the-scenes activities are favored. You might be quite stunned by what emerges. Tonight: Vanish while you can! TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Use the good will of others and a meeting to move a key project forward. You have the ability to mobilize others. A new beginning becomes possible. Zero in on the unexpected. Act quickly in the moment. Tonight: Vanish while you can. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Focus on your career. Deal with those in power and the people you must answer to. You could be surprised by the responses you get. Your direction becomes clear; you know where you are heading. Realize your limits, which might even

be self-imposed. You can break past them. Tonight: A must statement. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Your ability to detach and take an overview emerges. You also might decide to head in a new direction or do something very differently. Keep smiling, and think about solutions and an option for travel or higher education. Tonight: A must show. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH New beginnings become possible to those who defer and work well with others. Trust that there could be a surprise or two in your immediate financial or partnership world. Know that you can handle whatever comes along. Tonight: Togetherness is the theme. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Do know when to defer and say you have had enough. Your way of handling a personal matter could impress some and draw a strong reaction from others. Don’t be surprised by the different reactions you might receive. Tonight: Let someone else be in charge. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Whatever you take on could have a very interesting twist or two. You might not be so sure of yourself when the day ends. You probably will like the dynamic ideas that infuse a key project or idea. Working with others tightens plans so that what you want will work. Tonight: Hook up with a friend or two. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Sometimes you do better by kicking back and just brainstorming away. Your sense of well-being is enhanced by a

willingness to work with others. Creativity bubbles up from out of nowhere, while just hanging out with inspiring people. Listen to what is being shared. Tonight: Do what is best for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH New beginnings are likely, especially concerning your home and personal life. You could be looking at a purchase or an investment. Check out your decision with care. Think positively. The world is your oyster. Tonight: Head on home. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You might want to try a different approach or do something far differently. Communication flourishes. You discover the power of your words. Honestly look at why someone shocks you. Understanding helps you be more effective. Tonight: Chatting with a friend. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Expenses need moderating. Use your ability to understand what is going on behind the scenes. Understanding why you have difficulty keeping a solid, even budget might be more important than you realize. Discussions are animated. Tonight: Take a serious look at spending, bills and expenses. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH A new beginning can happen, whether it is an event that triggers it or a situation. Let go and work with what is happening. Understanding evolves to a new level. You understand much more than you realize. Laughter surrounds a fun discussion. Tonight: Be spontaneous. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C6 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Save water easily in the bathroom ready on demand. The best pump system is one that has a temperature-controlled bypass valve and a timer on the pump that can be programmed to operate only during the times you need it most. A hot water recirculator ranges from $200 to $600 depending on the model and installation. Even the simple act of turning off the water while you brush your teeth can save more than 500 gallons a year for every person in your home.

By Terri Bennett McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Doug Muck has two Akbash dogs, Josie and Mary, and a Great Pyrenees (not shown) that protect Lariat Ranch’s goats from coyotes, cougars and other predators.

Goats Continued from C1 “Noxious weeds are up there with global warming and depletion of water,” said Rachel Jones, 35, owner of the company. “This is actually a huge deal, but it’s on the back burner because people don’t understand that we are losing our native habitat.” Lariat Ranch incorporated as a business last year after the Central Oregon Irrigation District approached Jones and her husband, Doug Muck, 44, to experiment with prescribed grazing on a small piece of land next to an irrigation canal. “I like to experiment with all methods of noxious weed treatment,” said Larry Roofener, COID operations manager. “That includes chemical application, mowing and biological methods that I would consider the goat operation to be.” Roofener was satisfied with the results, he said, adding that the goats did a great job of eating the noxious weeds. Lariat Ranch offers services to business and residential customers. Former clients include Bend Municipal Airport, which had the goats clear areas around its hangers, and Dutch Pacific Properties, which had the goats eat weeds around the Sun Ranch Business Park in Sisters.

How it works It is important for people to learn about noxious weeds and the goats’ process to clear them, Jones said. “It’s bad if nobody understands the science of what the animals are capable of and the end product,” she said. The goats enter a field and first eat off the seed head of the weeds so the plant thinks it has already reproduced. Next, the goats browse through the field and pick off the leaves of the stem, and finally eat the stems. The root system remains, stabilizing the soil, and the plant reverts to a dormant stage until the following year. Goats prefer eating weeds rather than native species in Central Oregon, according to Jones. Foliage is often leafier and has a high protein content compared with native plants, such as bunch grass. Seeds that are consumed by goats and reappear in their feces are 98 percent nonviable, according to Jones. Giant molars in the goats’ mouths grind the seeds down, and acid in the stomach destroys the seeds’ ability to germinate. Goat excrement also fertilizes the property. It can take the goats days or weeks to complete a job, de-

Nanometrics Continued from C1 Improving the manufacturing process helps the chip makers increase output and lower production costs, according to a Nanometrics news release. The company’s revenues improved in the fourth quarter, its statements and filings show, although it posted a net loss of $0.3 million, according to a February announcement. In the fourth quarter of 2008, the company recorded a net loss of $2.6 million. Nanometrics reported fourthquarter revenues of $26.3 million, a 2 percent increase from the third quarter and a 29 percent increase from the fourth quarter of 2008, according to a news release. The company had about 400 employees, total, at the end of December, Chief Financial Officer Jim Moniz told analysts in February, according to a transcript posted on the Nasdaq Web site. Nanometrics completed a stock offering in December that

Spanish Boer goats feed on alfalfa in their temporary pen in a hay field they are clearing for The Great American Egg.

pending on the percentage of weeds and property size. Generally speaking, it takes 100 goats one day to eradicate seeds from a one-acre parcel. It takes about a week for the goats to fully eradicate the weeds. Cost also depends on weed load, size of the property and work involved. Lariat Ranch charges approximately $3 per head for a 24-hour period.

‘A whole solution’ The cost, in the long run, is less than using chemicals, according to Jones. Herbicides don’t fix the problem, according to Jones, and must be applied every year, which can cost more in the end. “It’s a whole solution rather than pieces of a solution,” she said about how the business operates with clients. It takes the goats three to five years of annual visits to completely eradicate a noxious weed problem. If clients want a quick fix, the goats come in once, the area is sprayed with an herbicide and then Lariat Ranch replants the land with native species. Replanting is vital, according to Jones. If the exposed land is not replanted, the noxious weeds will reinhabit the area. Prescribed grazing with goats can be a successful green alternative to herbicides, depending on the situation, according to Jones and Kim Leval, executive director of the Northwest Coalition for Alternatives to Pesticides, based in Eugene. “The goats come in and can clear an area and really keep it controlled,” Leval said, citing research the organization has conducted. “They can get to hard-to-get places like hillsides and overgrown, stickery places most people wouldn’t want to get to, even if you have a weed eater.” There are various techniques that can be used to destroy noxious weeds, such as herbicides, prescribed grazing and mowing. The best solution depends on the situation at hand. “To get a handle on the problem, you have to use all the tools in the toolbox, unless you are devoted to it (prescribed grazing),” Jones said. Herbicides and other tools are often needed, unless the goats can con-

brought the company $23.3 million in net proceeds. For the year ending Tuesday, Nanometrics’ stock price ranged from around $1 a share on March 9, 2009, to $13.27 on Dec. 8, according to a Nasdaq stock report. Tim Stultz, president and CEO, told analysts in February he expected the semiconductor industry to show continued improvement, which would increase demand for Nanometrics’ products, according to the transcript. Stultz also predicts a potential increase for business in the highbrightness LED manufacturing sector, a sector that provided orders in November. Customers in Asia placed multiple orders, Nanometrics reported, for equipment to support the expanding use of high-brightness LEDs in netbook computers and LCD televisions, Ryan said in a news release. The vast majority of the Bend unit’s business comes from Asia, Ryan said in an interview. That translates into a lot of travel, some video conferencing with

tinually return to a site until the weed problem is eradicated.

‘Weed-eating machine’ Lariat Ranch’s goats are seasonal workers, typically working from early spring to late fall. As browsing animals, they are eager to complete their work and see who can eat the most seed heads after they are initially released into an area. “They are the perfect employees,” Jones said. “You don’t have to pay their insurance, workman’s comp or give them breaks. You can yell at them and not get in trouble, and what other employees can you sic your dog on?” Jones and Muck own two Akbash dogs and one Great Pyrenees to protect the herd from various predators. Goats prefer to eat foliage and weeds instead of grass, unlike cattle. Spanish goats are particularly well adapted to rougher landscapes. About 70 of the goats in Jones’ herd are San Clemente goats. This breed was originally brought to North America by the Spanish explorers in the 1400s and placed on San Clemente Island off Southern California, according to Jones, where they were not diluted with domesticated or meat-goat breeds. In the 1980s, the U.S. Navy began to exterminate the goats, and now they are an endangered species. “It’s like a mustang horse,” Jones said of the San Clemente breed. “It’s bred to be out there in the wild and foraging and not a pet. It’s a weed-eating machine.” Jones’ San Clemente herd was rescued two years ago when the government confiscated the goats in Christmas Valley from someone who wasn’t caring for them adequately. “We had to rehab all of these goats, and worm them and inoculate them,” Jones said. The goats are now healthy employees that forage and enjoy their work in the High Desert, contributing to the environment in more ways than they know. “It’s hugely in-depth,” Jones said. “There is a whole science behind the animals.”

Water is our planet’s most valuable resource. Providing enough clean water for every person will be one of the biggest challenges we face in the coming decades. Americans use more water per person than any other country. On average, each one of us uses about 100 gallons of drinking water a day, and almost half of that is in the bathroom. Do your part and install some easy fixes in the bathroom that will save water and money instantly. For many of us, the toilet is where we flush away most of our water. Toilets made before 1992 use more than 3 gallons of water with every flush. New, improved low-flow toilets use just 1.6 gallons of water per flush. Making the switch can save 4,000 gallons of water every year. If you’re not quite ready to make the upgrade, there’s a free alternative. Make a water displacement device for a regular toilet tank using a plastic half-gallon jug. Put some gravel or sand in the bottom of the jug and fill with water. Place the jug in the tank away from the flushing mechanism. This no-cost solution will save you a half-gallon of water every time you flush. A low-flow showerhead is another easy way to conserve water and save money. These water-conserving devices use air to create water pressure, saving up to 3 gallons of water every minute. That’s 11,000 gallons of water a year for every person in your home who takes a daily 10-minute shower. Taking shorter showers will conserve even more. To maximize your water conserving efforts, look for fixtures with the WaterSense logo. This certifies that the product meets the Environmental Protection Agency’s

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criteria for water efficiency. Some low-flow fixtures include a built-in valve that will shut off the water while maintaining the water temperature — ideal for those who like to shave in the shower. When you install a lowflow showerhead, you’ll be using less water, but don’t forget about the energy savings you’ll create by heating less water. If you find yourself waiting more than a few seconds for hot water when you turn on the faucet, investing in a hot water recirculator will save you both water and time. These devices keep hot water circulating through the pipes in your home so it’s

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customers and employees who speak multiple languages. Most of the Bend employees, some of whom came from Israel, Poland and other countries outside the U.S., speak more than one language. “We can operate a global business from Bend,” said Christopher Raymond, technology development director. “All we need is a T1 line.” And an airport with frequent service. Along with sales, installation and other customer-related travel, Bend employees rely on flights from Redmond Airport to reach company headquarters in the San Francisco Bay area. Two of Nanometrics’ senior executives live in Bend and commute to California regularly. “There’s a very strong Bend connection into that technology company,” Ryan said. “We could not survive without that airport. “It’s our lifeline.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

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S

Ernie Els ends drought with CA Championship victory, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, MARCH 15, 2010

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

PREP BASKETBALL

Beavers headed back to CBI

Teams are set for big dance

Oregon State will have a chance to defend its title in the College Basketball Invitational. Despite a 14-17 overall record, the Beavers were one of the 16 teams selected to compete in the CBI, one of three postseason tournaments held in men’s college basketball other than the NCAA tournament. OSU was 8-10 in the Pac-10 Conference, tied for fifth in the regular season. Oregon State will host Boston University (19-13 overall, 11-5 America East Conference) in a first-round game in Corvallis on Wednesday at 7 p.m. “We are very excited to have the opportunity to continue our season and play a first-round game in front of our home crowd,” head coach Craig Robinson said. Oregon, which finished the season 16-16, was not selected for postseason play on Sunday. Portland (21-10) will play in the CollegeInsider. com Basketball Tournament. — From wire and staff reports

Kansas earns No. 1 overall seed in the NCAA tournament By Eddie Pells The Associated Press

HORSE R ACING Rachel Alexandra vs. Zenyatta is off LOS ANGELES — Rachel Alexandra won’t be going to Arkansas next month to face Zenyatta in their highly anticipated $5 million showdown, leaving racing’s other female superstar to take on all comers. Rachel Alexandra’s owner, Jess Jackson, said Sunday that his 2009 Horse of the Year is not in top form after her defeat in the New Orleans Ladies at the Fair Grounds. So the scheduled meeting between racing’s most talked about horses is off, leaving the spotlight to Zenyatta on April 9 in the Apple Blossom Invitational at Oaklawn Park. “Yesterday’s race, while a disappointment, helped us define Rachel Alexandra’s racing condition,” Jackson said in a statement. “While she is healthy, just as I had anticipated, she is not in top form. Therefore, I decided today she will not be going” to Oaklawn for the race. Rachel Alexandra and Zenyatta were making their first starts of the year Saturday in what were supposed to be prep races for next month’s event, which saw its purse raised to $5 million from $500,000 only if both horses started. — The Associated Press

INSIDE NBA

Photos by Matthew Aimonetti and Laura McCracken / For The Bulletin

Clockwise, from top left: La Pine’s Sammie Mellott, Mountain View’s Mark Claar, Bend High’s Amelia Salazar and Summit’s Cody Absalon. All four teams just played in their respective state tournaments in basketball.

C.O.statement With four Central Oregon squads competing in the state tournaments that just ended, it was a historic season for local hoops teams

W

hat a run. The winter sports season is now officially over for Central Oregon high school athletes, but what an amazing ride four local basketball teams took us on over the past week. Collectively, has Central Oregon ever experience such a fantastic hoops season? Mountain View put a scare into powerhouse Jefferson of Portland in the Class 5A state boys final. La Pine finished third in the Class 4A girls tournament. Summit won three of its five postseason games to finish sixth in the 5A boys tourney. And the Bend High girls advanced to the state tournament for just the second time since 1991. OK, the 2002-03 season — when a Maarty Leunen-led Redmond squad won the boys title in Class 4A (then Oregon’s highest classification) and Madras claimed the Class 3A state girls championship — is pretty tough to beat. But three teams bringing home state trophies in the same season? I sure enjoyed it. Here are a few of my favorite memories from four days in Eugene

BEAU EASTES covering the boys and girls 5A state tournaments: • Mountain View going toe to toe with one of the best basketball teams in the Pacific Northwest in Jefferson. Yes, that was the Democrats you saw on ESPN2 earlier this season, led by McDonald’s All-American Terrence Jones. But the Cougars never backed down in a game many expected to be a rout. Seth Brent and Mark Claar hit three-pointers over Jones, and James Reid consistently drove through a Jefferson starting lineup featuring three players over 6 feet 6 inches tall — all of whom could fly up and down the court — in what was almost one of the biggest upsets in Oregon state finals history. With Jefferson ahead by 12 points and only 12 seconds left in the game, Mountain View coach Craig Reid

LOCAL GOLF Portland forward Nicolas Batum drives to the basket.

Blazers win again Portland tops Toronto for fourth straight victory, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 College basketball ............ D3, D4 High Gear ..................................D5

D

Golf Inside

Astoria pro celebrates good weather with win By Zack Hall The Bulletin

WARM SPRINGS — With all the sunshine and warm weather, it might have been hard for the golfers in the field at the Kah-Nee-Ta Invitational to believe that it is still March. But the opportunity to play in the relatively warm, dry climate on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is exactly what attracted the two dozen professionals in the Oregon PGA’s season-opening tournament. Nobody took advantage of Kah-

Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino’s spring-like conditions Sunday more than John Kawasoe. The head professional from Astoria Golf & Country Club shot a 10under-par 68-66—134 to run away with the pro-am’s $1,300 first prize. “Obviously, playing well is a bonus,” Kawasoe said. “It’s just fun to come over here every year, this is my ninth or 10th year playing, with some of your (Astoria) members and get away for a couple of days. See Golf / D5

pulled his regular unit and inserted his reserves. The crowd at Mac Court gave the Cougars a standing ovation. Jefferson’s players applauded Mountain View as well, happy to have escaped with the win. • Summit going home with a state tournament trophy — for sixth place — after winning only four of its first 11 games this season. Summit seniors Cody Absalon, Justin Huckins, Brandon Norby, Jesse Heinly and Matt Meagher took the Storm to another level this season by not only becoming the first boys basketball team in school history to win a playoff game, but also the first to bring home a trophy from the state tournament. Having watched some of those same kids go through such a tough football season, I enjoyed seeing them do so well in basketball. • Bend High’s blue-collar defense. The Lava Bears went two and out at the 5A girls tournament, but not without turning some heads. Bend High held its two opponents, Crater and West Albany, to 43 and 35 points, respectively. Heck, it took West Albany two overtimes to score 35 points against the stingy Lava Bear defense. Bend loses point guard Amelia Salazar to graduation, but with 2010 Intermountain Conference player of the year Karleigh Taylor expected back, as well as starters Kenzi Boehme and Ally McConnell, the Bears could be making a return trip to Eugene.

An injury hurts as much as a loss in the days before the brackets are drawn up for March Madness. Syracuse endured both and will have to rack up some major airplane time to make a run to the Final Four. Kansas, Kentucky and Duke won their conference tournaments and the top seeding that went with them when the selection committee rolled out its 65-team NCAA tournament bracket Sunday. The Orange, meanwhile, also got a No. 1 seed, but was ranked fourth of the four top teams and sent West — the result of an early loss in the Big East tournament in which center Arinze Onuaku injured his right quadriceps. Onuaku, who averages 10 points, five rebounds and 1.1 blocks a game, isn’t expected to play Friday when Syracuse opens against Vermont. Syracuse’s road to the Final Four, set for April 3-5 in Indianapolis, will have to go through Salt Lake City, a 2,100-mile trek from home. “We’re proud to be a No. 1 seed,” Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim said. “This team has worked extremely hard, been consistent all year. Obviously, the tournament is always going to be challenging. It’ll be challenging right off the bat.” America’s largest, three-week office pool starts getting sorted out Tuesday with an opening-round game between Arkansas-Pine Bluff and Winthrop. The tournament goes into full swing Thursday, with Kansas the overall No. 1 seed. The Big East led the field with eight teams, tying its own record and marking the third time the conference has put that many teams in the tournament. See NCAA / D5

Inside • The bracket and capsules on all 65 teams, Page D4

Astoria’s John Kawasoe putts on hole No. 5 at Ka-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, while competing in the Oregon PGA’s Kah-Nee-Ta Invitational on Sunday afternoon. Kawasoe won the event. Andy Tullis / The Bulletin


D2 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY SOCCER 12:55 p.m. — English Premier League, Liverpool vs. Portsmouth, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m.— NHL, Boston Bruins at New Jersey Devils, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m.— Women’s college, NCAA tournament selection show, ESPN. 5 p.m. — NBA, Detroit Pistons at Boston Celtics, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Golden State Warriors, ESPN.

TENNIS 11 p.m. — BNP Paribas Open, FSNW (same-day tape).

TUESDAY SOCCER 11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, Chelsea vs. Inter Milan,

FSNW. BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, first round, teams TBA,

ESPN2. 4:30 p.m. — Men’s college, NCAA Tournament, play-in game, teams

TBA, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, first round, teams TBA,

ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, first round, teams

TBA, ESPN. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, NIT Tournament, first round, teams TBA,

ESPN2. HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — Montreal Canadiens at New York Rangers, VS. net-

work. TENNIS 7:30 p.m. — ATP, BNP Paribas Open, early round, FSNW. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations

S   B Baseball • Beavers get weekend sweep: Tanner Robles scattered two runs and four hits over 6 2⁄3 innings, and Parker Berberet went two-for-four with two runs batted in as the No. 21 Oregon State baseball team defeated Portland, 92, Sunday at Goss Stadium in Corvallis. With the win, the Beavers improved to 10-3 on the year and swept through their Spring Tournament, taking all three games over the weekend. OSU is now on a four-game win streak. Robles allowed two runs in the first, then proceeded to get into the seventh allowing just two hits until being replaced by Kraig Sitton. Robles ended the game with seven strikeouts and improved to 3-1 on the year. • Early lead helps Seattle overtake Oregon: Seattle took a three-run lead in the top of the first and never looked back, defeating Oregon 6-4 on Sunday afternoon at PK Park in Eugene. With the loss, the Ducks’ seven-game winning streak was snapped and Oregon falls to 12-6 on the season. Seattle, which came into the game losers of four straight, improves to 3-11 on the season. Oregon did not surrender an earned run in the game as three errors proved costly. At the plate, the Ducks offense was limited to four runs on seven hits.

Football • Browns trade QB Brady Quinn to Broncos: Brady Quinn will get a chance to start over in Denver. Whether he’ll get to start is up in the air. The Broncos acquired the former first-round draft pick from the Cleveland Browns for fullback Peyton Hillis, a 2011 sixth-round draft pick and a conditional pick in 2012. The teams announced the trade Sunday and said the deal is pending physicals. • Tomlinson signs 2-year deal with Jets: The Jets have signed running back LaDainian Tomlinson to a two-year contract, adding an aging star to an offense that ranked No. 1 in rushing last season. Tomlinson’s agent, Tom Condon, confirmed the deal Sunday night. The 2006 NFL MVP was cut last month by San Diego. He chose New York over Minnesota after visiting the Vikings on Thursday.

Soccer • David Beckham to miss World Cup with torn Achilles: A person familiar with the injury says David Beckham will miss the World Cup after tearing his left Achilles’ tendon while playing for AC Milan. The person, speaking Sunday on condition of anonymity because an official announcement had not been made, said Beckham was certain to miss playing for England at this year’s tournament in South Africa.

Winter sports • Mackey, King begin dash up coast in Iditarod: Two former champions threatened to turn the 2010 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race into their own two-man contest Sunday along the western coast of Alaska. Reigning champ Lance Mackey reached Unalakleet at 3:32 a.m., rested just more than six hours, then took off north for the 40mile run to Shaktoolik, 224 miles from the finish line in Nome. Pressing him was the last man other than Mackey to win the title, Jeff King. The four-time champion, who last won in 2006, rested his team for three hours, 47 minutes and left Unalakleet 28 minutes after Mackey. • Czech Republic wins team event at World Cup finals: The Czech Republic edged Switzerland to win the Nations Team Event at the World Cup finals in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. The competition Sunday involved four skiers from each nation — two men and two women — who competed individually against each other in a parallel slalom format. Each win is worth one point. The fastest time is used as a tiebreaker. The Czechs and Swiss were 2-2 in the final and the Czechs won on Ondrej Bank’s fastest time. Bank was undefeated in all his heats.

Cycling • Contador wins Paris-Nice again: Alberto Contador of Spain won the Paris-Nice race for the second time Sunday after successfully defending his narrow lead over Alejandro Valverde in the seventh and final stage. Amael Moinard of France won the 73.8-mile stage around Nice in a sprint finish, finishing less a wheel’s length ahead of Frenchman Thomas Voeckler after overtaking him at the line. Valverde was second overall, 11 seconds behind Contador. Bend’s Chris Horner finished the final stage in eighth place. — From wire reports

BASKETBALL College

13. Skip Kendall

IN THE BLEACHERS

Sunday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Atlantic 10 Conference Championship Temple 56, Richmond 52 Atlantic Coast Conference Championship Duke 65, Georgia Tech 61 Big Ten Conference Championship Ohio St. 90, Minnesota 61 Southeastern Conference Championship Kentucky 75, Mississippi St. 74, OT POLLS USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 14, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Kansas (31) 32-2 775 1 2. Kentucky 32-2 744 2 3. Duke 29-5 699 4 4. Syracuse 28-4 667 3 5. West Virginia 27-6 661 6 6. Ohio State 27-7 626 7 7. Kansas State 26-7 566 9 8. Butler 28-4 511 12 9. Villanova 24-7 471 10 10. New Mexico 29-4 467 8 11. Purdue 27-5 462 5 12. Michigan State 24-8 409 11 13. Temple 29-5 403 17 14. Tennessee 25-8 352 13 15. Georgetown 23-10 341 22 16. Brigham Young 29-5 265 15 16. Pittsburgh 24-8 265 16 18. Gonzaga 26-6 245 14 19. Wisconsin 23-8 215 18 20. Maryland 23-8 184 19 21. Baylor 25-7 177 20 22. Vanderbilt 24-8 127 23 23. Texas A&M 23-9 126 24 24. Northern Iowa 28-4 122 25 25. Texas-El Paso 26-6 67 21 Others receiving votes: Saint Mary’s 37; Richmond 24; San Diego State 16; Cornell 14; Washington 10; Marquette 9; Utah State 5; Xavier 4; Old Dominion 3; Georgia Tech 2; Siena 2; Minnesota 1; Texas 1. NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT All Times PDT First Round Tuesday’s Games Northeastern (20-12) at Connecticut (17-15), 4 p.m. N.C. State (19-15) at South Florida (20-12), 5 p.m. Coastal Carolina (28-6) at UAB (23-8), 5 p.m. Texas Tech (17-15) at Seton Hall (19-12), 6 p.m. William & Mary (22-10) at North Carolina (16-16), 6:30 p.m. Jackson State (19-12) at Mississippi State (23-11), 7 p.m. Jacksonville (19-12) at Arizona State (22-10), 8 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Tulsa (23-11) at Kent State (23-9), 4 p.m. Illinois State (22-10) at Dayton (20-12), 4 p.m. Weber State (20-10) at Cincinnati (18-15), 4 p.m. Quinnipiac (23-9) at Virginia Tech (23-8), 4 p.m. Northwestern (20-13) at Rhode Island (23-9), 4 p.m. Troy (20-12) at Mississippi (21-10), 5 p.m. Nevada (20-12) at Wichita State (25-9), 5:05 p.m. Illinois (19-14) at Stony Brook (22-9), 6 p.m. St. John’s (17-15) at Memphis (23-9), 6 p.m. ——— Second Round March 18-22 Illinois-Stony Brook winner vs. Tulsa-Kent State winner, TBA Illinois State-Dayton winner vs. Weber State-Cincinnati winner, TBA Jacksonville-Arizona State winner vs. Texas Tech-Seton Hall winner, TBA St. John’s-Memphis winner vs. Troy-Mississippi winner, TBA Quinnipiac-Virginia Tech winner vs. Northeastern-Connecticut winner, TBA Nevada-Wichita State winner vs. Northwestern-Rhode Island winner, TBA Jackson State-Mississippi State winner vs. William & Mary-North Carolina winner, TBA N.C. State-South Florida winner vs. Coastal CarolinaUAB winner, TBA ——— Quarterfinals March 23-24 Illinois-Stony Brook-Tulsa-Kent State winner vs. Illinois State-Dayton-Weber State-Cincinnati winner, TBA Jacksonville-Arizona State-Texas Tech-Seton Hall winner vs. St. John’s-Memphis-Troy-Mississippi winner, TBA Quinnipiac-Virginia Tech-Northeastern-Connecticut winner vs. Nevada-Wichita State-Northwestern-Rhode Island winner, TBA Jackson State-Mississippi State-William & Mary-North Carolina winner, vs. N.C. State-South Florida-Coastal Carolina-UAB winner, TBA ——— Tuesday, March 30 At Madison Square Garden New York Semifinals First Game, 4 p.m. Second Game, 6:30 p.m. Championship Thursday, April 1 Semifinal winners, 4 p.m. COLLEGE BASKETBALL INVITATIONAL All Times PDT First Round Tuesday, March 16 Indiana State (17-14) at Saint Louis (20-11), 6 p.m. Virginia Commonwealth (22-9) at George Washington (16-14), 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 17 Wisconsin-Green Bay (21-12) at Akron (24-10), TBA College of Charleston (21-11) at Eastern Kentucky (2012), TBA Boston U. (19-13) at Oregon State (14-17), 7 p.m. Morehead State (23-10) at Colorado State (16-15), 6 p.m. IUPUI (24-10) at Hofstra (19-14), 4 p.m. Duquesne (16-15) at Princeton (20-8), 4 p.m. ——— Quarterfinals Monday, March 22 Indiana State-Saint Louis winner vs. Wis.-Green BayAkron winner Virginia Commonwealth-George Washington winner vs. College of Charleston-Eastern Kentucky winner Boston U.-Oregon State winner vs. Morehead State-Colorado State winner

IUPUI-Hofstra winner vs. Duquesne-Princeton winner ——— Semifinals Wednesday, March 24 Indiana State-Saint Louis-Wis.-Green Bay-Akron winner vs. Virginia Commonwealth-George Washington-College of Charleston-Eastern Kentucky winner Boston U.-Oregon State-Morehead State-Colorado State winner vs. IUPUI-Hofstra-Duquesne-Princeton winner ——— Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, March 29 TBD Wednesday, March 31 TBD Friday, April 2 TBD WOMEN Sunday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Big 12 Conference Championship Texas A&M 74, Oklahoma 67 Big South Conference Championship Liberty 68, Gardner-Webb 66 Colonial Athletic Association Championship James Madison 67, Old Dominion 53 Horizon League Championship Cleveland St. 66, Butler 57 Missouri Valley Conference Championship N. Iowa 54, Creighton 53 Northeast Conference Championship St. Francis, Pa. 77, Long Island U. 68 Pacific-10 Conference Championship Stanford 70, UCLA 46

TENNIS BNP PARIBAS OPEN Sunday Indian Wells, Calif. Singles Men Second Round Marcos Baghdatis (27), Cyprus, def. Arnaud Clement, France, 7-6 (7), 6-1. Tommy Robredo (18), Spain, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 3-6, 6-3, 7-5. Simon Greul, Germany, def. Gael Monfils (12), France, 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, def. Janko Tipsarevic (30), Serbia, 3-2, retired. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-4, 6-4. Nicolas Almagro, Spain, def. Ivo Karlovic (23), Croatia, 7-5, 7-6 (5). Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (9), France, def. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-1, 6-3. Feliciano Lopez (28), Spain, def. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Robin Soderling (6), Sweden, def. Evgeny Korolev, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-4. Jurgen Melzer (22), Austria, def. David Nalbandian, Argentina, 6-4, 6-1. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Radek Stepanek (14), Czech Republic, 6-4, 1-6, 6-2. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 6-3, 6-7 (5), 6-1. Michael Russell, United States, def. Igor Andreev (32), Russia, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2. James Blake, United States, def. David Ferrer (13), Spain, 6-1, 6-4. Women Third Round Agnieszka Radwanska (5), Poland, def. Gisela Dulko (31), Argentina, 6-1, 6-0. Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-2, 6-0. Aravane Rezai (19), France, def. Francesca Schiavone (15), Italy, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (2), 6-4. Alicia Molik, Australia, def. Elena Baltacha, Britain, 6-0, 6-2. Elena Dementieva (4), Russia, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2. Zheng Jie (18), China, def. Maria Sharapova (10), Russia, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3.

GOLF WGC WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS CA CHAMPIONSHIP Sunday At TPC Blue Monster at Doral

-9

5

Completed Second Round

Doral, Fla. Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,334; Par 72 Final Round (Fed Ex Cup points in parentheses) Ernie Els (550), $1,400,000 68-66-70-66—270 Charl Schwartzel (0), $850,000 67-70-67-70—274 Matt Kuchar (152), $426,667 71-71-67-68—277 Martin Kaymer (0), $426,667 70-72-66-69—277 Padraig Harrington (152), $426,667 70-68-67-72—277 Alistair Presnell (0), $214,300 72-70-72-64—278 Graeme McDowell (0), $214,300 74-68-70-66—278 Alvaro Quiros (0), $214,300 72-69-69-68—278 Paul Casey (90), $214,300 69-72-68-69—278 Bill Haas (90), $214,300 71-66-70-71—278 John Senden (69), $126,667 69-70-71-69—279 Vijay Singh (69), $126,667 68-71-70-70—279 Robert Allenby (69), $126,667 68-67-71-73—279 Phil Mickelson (61), $107,500 71-69-72-68—280 Francesco Molinari (0), $107,500 69-71-72-68—280 Steve Stricker (56), $97,500 73-69-71-68—281 Camilo Villegas (56), $97,500 72-68-70-71—281 Jason Dufner (52), $89,000 73-69-75-65—282 Sean O’Hair (52), $89,000 71-71-74-66—282 J.B. Holmes (52), $89,000 69-70-73-70—282 Soren Hansen (0), $89,000 69-69-71-73—282 Anthony Kim (48), $81,000 71-73-71-68—283 Heath Slocum (48), $81,000 74-71-70-68—283 Yuta Ikeda (0), $81,000 71-68-74-70—283 Tim Clark (48), $81,000 70-69-74-70—283 Nick Watney (44), $75,500 73-72-71-68—284 Mike Weir (44), $75,500 73-66-75-70—284 Peter Hanson (0), $75,500 74-66-74-70—284 Luke Donald (44), $75,500 70-75-69-70—284 Y.E. Yang (38), $70,000 73-72-75-65—285 Brian Gay (38), $70,000 74-69-74-68—285 Scott Verplank (38), $70,000 76-72-69-68—285 Ross McGowan (0), $70,000 76-71-70-68—285 Lee Westwood (0), $70,000 74-68-74-69—285 Wen-Chong Liang (0), $70,000 72-69-71-73—285 Hunter Mahan (38), $70,000 72-70-69-74—285 Ian Poulter (31), $62,500 72-78-72-64—286 Stewart Cink (31), $62,500 75-74-72-65—286 Sergio Garcia (31), $62,500 74-72-71-69—286 Zach Johnson (31), $62,500 76-70-71-69—286 Ben Crane (31), $62,500 74-73-69-70—286 Jim Furyk (31), $62,500 70-76-69-71—286 Henrik Stenson (31), $62,500 71-72-71-72—286 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (0), $62,500 72-68-71-75—286 Anders Hansen (0), $56,000 76-70-74-67—287 Ryan Palmer (24), $56,000 79-68-72-68—287 Geoff Ogilvy (24), $56,000 72-71-75-69—287 Ross Fisher (0), $56,000 73-72-70-72—287 Kenny Perry (24), $56,000 73-74-68-72—287 Simon Dyson (0), $50,500 72-73-73-70—288 Kevin Na (19), $50,500 78-70-70-70—288 David Toms (19), $50,500 72-72-72-72—288 Jerry Kelly (19), $50,500 70-72-73-73—288 Angel Cabrera (19), $50,500 74-71-70-73—288 Adam Scott (19), $50,500 74-69-71-74—288 Retief Goosen (14), $45,500 76-71-73-70—290 Thongchai Jaidee (0), $45,500 73-72-73-72—290 Dustin Johnson (14), $45,500 69-72-76-73—290 Lucas Glover (14), $45,500 72-72-71-75—290 Soren Kjeldsen (0), $43,000 74-78-73-66—291 Edoardo Molinari (0), $42,500 72-74-72-74—292 Robert Karlsson (0), $42,000 78-70-73-72—293 Marc Leishman (8), $41,250 78-73-71-72—294 Miguel A. Jimenez (0), $41,250 73-75-73-73—294 Steve Marino (6), $40,625 75-71-77-72—295 Rory McIlroy (6), $40,625 76-73-73-73—295 Oliver Wilson (0), $40,250 78-74-77-67—296 Michael Sim (3), $40,000 75-74-77-74—300

PGA Tour PUERTO RICO OPEN Sunday At Trump International Golf Club Rio Grande, Puerto Rico Purse: $3.5 million Yardage: 7,569; Par 72 (36-36) Third round suspended due to darkness with no player completing the round Leaderboard SCORE THRU 1. Kevin Streelman -12 7 1. Chad Collins -12 5 3. Derek Lamely -11 13 3. Steve Wheatcroft -11 6 3. Kris Blanks -11 7 6. Kirk Triplett -10 12 6. Woody Austin -10 9 6. Kevin Johnson -10 8 6. Paul Stankowski -10 7 6. Jeff Overton -10 7 6. James Nitties -10 6 12. Michael Bradley -9 12 12. Graham Delaet -9 9 12. Craig Barlow -9 8 12. Jeff Maggert -9 9 12. Jhonathan Vegas -9 7

James Nitties Chad Collins Skip Kendall Kevin Streelman Steve Wheatcroft Kris Blanks Paul Stankowski Jeff Overton Jhonattan Vegas Craig Barlow Jeff Maggert Kevin Johnson Graham DeLaet Nicholas Thompson Woody Austin Brendon de Jonge Aron Price Guy Boros Steve Elkington Tom Pernice, Jr. Cameron Tringale Spencer Levin Jay Williamson Michael Bradley Steve Flesch Kirk Triplett Robert Garrigus Henrik Bjornstad Kevin Stadler Johnson Wagner Matt Bettencourt J.J. Henry Carl Pettersson Jarrod Lyle Chris DiMarco Michael Connell Daniel Barbetti Peter Gustafsson Derek Lamely Jeff Klauk Jeev Milkha Singh Jeff Gove Mathias Gronberg Bill Lunde John Merrick Phil Tataurangi Mark Calcavecchia Jeff Quinney Martin Flores Chez Reavie Steve Lowery Marco Dawson Manuel Villegas Jerod Turner Erik Compton Cameron Percy Roger Tambellini Bryce Molder Boo Weekley Kent Jones Shaun Micheel Chris Stroud Jimmy Walker Omar Uresti Richard S. Johnson John Daly Jonathan Kaye Billy Mayfair Rich Barcelo Brent Delahoussaye Failed to qualify Greg Kraft Tim Herron John Mallinger Brenden Pappas Brian Stuard John Bloomfield Dean Wilson Brian Bateman Cliff Kresge Chris Wilson Andy Matthews Mark Brooks Joe Ogilvie Deane Pappas David Lutterus Tim Wilkinson Alex Cejka Todd Hamilton Chris Smith Charles Warren Jay Delsing Chris Riley Notah Begay III Michael Clark II Rory Sabbatini Frank Lickliter II Andrew McLardy Shigeki Maruyama Charley Hoffman Eric Axley Glen Day Fran Quinn Grant Waite Tom Kite Ken Duke Ronnie Black Chris Baryla Justin Bolli Cesar Costilla Max Alverio Vance Veazey David Morland IV Len Mattiace Robert Damron Matt Weibring Garth Mulroy Rocco Mediate Joe Durant Alex Prugh Eric Morales Pierre-Henri Soero Harrison Frazar Julio Santos Ryan Garrity Rafael Campos Miguel Suarez

68-66—134 69-65—134 65-70—135 67-68—135 68-67—135 65-70—135 66-70—136 66-70—136 69-67—136 71-65—136 69-67—136 70-66—136 67-69—136 68-69—137 69-68—137 69-68—137 72-65—137 71-67—138 68-70—138 71-67—138 69-69—138 69-69—138 70-68—138 71-67—138 72-66—138 69-69—138 68-70—138 70-68—138 72-67—139 70-69—139 67-72—139 70-69—139 72-67—139 69-70—139 68-72—140 71-69—140 68-72—140 67-73—140 69-71—140 72-68—140 70-70—140 72-68—140 69-71—140 68-72—140 71-70—141 72-69—141 68-73—141 72-69—141 71-70—141 70-71—141 71-70—141 70-71—141 72-69—141 71-70—141 72-69—141 69-72—141 70-71—141 71-71—142 74-68—142 68-74—142 73-69—142 76-66—142 73-69—142 70-72—142 70-72—142 69-73—142 73-69—142 69-73—142 70-72—142 69-73—142 72-71—143 72-71—143 73-70—143 73-70—143 71-72—143 71-72—143 68-75—143 74-69—143 73-70—143 71-72—143 70-73—143 73-71—144 72-72—144 71-73—144 69-75—144 71-73—144 67-77—144 75-69—144 73-71—144 70-75—145 71-74—145 73-72—145 75-70—145 73-72—145 77-68—145 74-71—145 68-77—145 70-75—145 68-77—145 73-72—145 74-71—145 76-69—145 75-71—146 73-73—146 72-74—146 77-69—146 73-73—146 71-75—146 76-70—146 72-74—146 72-74—146 75-71—146 74-73—147 75-72—147 74-73—147 73-74—147 73-74—147 75-72—147 73-74—147 76-71—147 72-75—147 73-76—149 72-78—150 75-78—153 81-73—154 79-76—155

BASEBALL MLB SPRING TRAINING SCHEDULE Subject to change Times PDT ——— Sunday’s Games Atlanta (ss) 8, Toronto 5 Houston 8, Atlanta (ss) 5 Detroit 9, Tampa Bay 6 St. Louis 7, Washington 3 Pittsburgh 10, N.Y. Yankees 5 Boston 6, Minnesota 4 Florida 5, N.Y. Mets 1 Baltimore 4, Philadelphia 3 Milwaukee 10, San Francisco 8

L.A. Angels 7, Chicago Cubs 7, tie Cincinnati 5, Chicago White Sox 5, tie Arizona (ss) 9, Texas (ss) 3 Oakland 10, Kansas City 3 San Diego 5, Cleveland 3 L.A. Dodgers 6, Texas (ss) 4 Arizona (ss) 8, Colorado (ss) 7 Colorado (ss) 5, Seattle 4 Today’s Games Minnesota vs Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Toronto vs Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Philadelphia vs Pittsburgh at Bradenton, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Baltimore vs Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis vs N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Seattle vs Arizona at Tucson, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Cleveland vs Milwaukee at Phoenix, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Oakland vs Cincinnati at Goodyear, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 1:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs Colorado at Tucson, Ariz., 1:10 p.m. Atlanta vs Washington at Viera, Fla., 4:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 6:05 p.m. Kansas City vs Chi. White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (ss) vs San Diego at Peoria, Ariz., 7:05 p.m.

College Sunday’s Games Oregon State 9, Portland 2 Seattle 6, Oregon 4

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 69 41 23 5 87 217 197 New Jersey 67 40 24 3 83 180 162 Philadelphia 68 36 28 4 76 203 185 N.Y. Rangers 69 31 29 9 71 181 188 N.Y. Islanders 69 28 32 9 65 180 214 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Buffalo 67 36 21 10 82 183 170 Ottawa 69 37 27 5 79 186 197 Montreal 70 35 29 6 76 191 194 Boston 67 30 25 12 72 167 172 Toronto 69 23 34 12 58 183 234 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA y-Washington 69 46 14 9 101 270 195 Tampa Bay 68 28 28 12 68 182 209 Atlanta 68 28 29 11 67 200 221 Florida 67 28 29 10 66 174 193 Carolina 68 28 32 8 64 189 211 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 68 44 18 6 94 225 170 Nashville 69 38 26 5 81 193 198 Detroit 68 33 23 12 78 185 185 St. Louis 68 32 27 9 73 186 188 Columbus 69 27 31 11 65 178 223 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 69 43 23 3 89 228 176 Colorado 68 39 23 6 84 204 179 Calgary 68 34 25 9 77 173 170 Minnesota 68 33 29 6 72 188 197 Edmonton 68 21 40 7 49 171 236 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 68 43 15 10 96 224 172 Phoenix 69 42 22 5 89 187 169 Los Angeles 68 40 23 5 85 206 182 Dallas 68 29 26 13 71 191 218 Anaheim 68 31 29 8 70 189 209 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. y-clinched division Sunday’s Games Phoenix 3, Atlanta 2, SO Washington 4, Chicago 3, OT N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia 1 Colorado 5, Dallas 3 Nashville 3, Los Angeles 2 N.Y. Islanders 4, Toronto 1 Pittsburgh 2, Tampa Bay 1 Minnesota 4, St. Louis 2 Anaheim 4, San Jose 2 Vancouver 3, Calgary 1 Today’s Games Boston at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Columbus, 4 p.m. Detroit at Calgary, 6:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Optioned SS Jose Iglesias to Portland (EL). Reassigned RHP Randor Bierd, RHP Casey Kelly, RHP Robert Manuel, RHP Adam Mills, RHP Kyle Weiland, LHP Kris Johnson, C Luis Exposito, INF Lars Anderson, INF Yamaico Navarro, OF Ryan Kalish and OF Che-Hsuan Lin to their minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS—Optioned RHP Deolis Guerra, RHP Loek Van Mil and INF Estarlin De Los Santos to New Britain (EL). Reassigned LHP Jose Lugo, C Jair Fernandez, C Danny Rams, INF Steve Singleton and OF Rene Tosoni to their minor league camp. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Reassigned RHP Sam Demel, RHP Matt Wright, LHP Cedrick Bowers, C Joel Galarraga, C Max Stassi, INF Grant Green, INF Dallas McPherson, INF Jemile Weeks, INF Matt Whitney and INF Corey Wimberly to their minor league camp. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Optioned RHP Mitch Atkins to Iowa (PCL) and RHP David Patton to Tennessee (SL). Assigned RHP Jeff Kennard, LHP Vince Perkins, C Steve Clevenger, C Blake Lalli, INF Matt Camp, INF Josh Vitters and OF Brett Jackson to their minor league camp. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Optioned OF Brandon Jones and INF Argenis Diaz to Indianapolis (IL) and RHP Ronald Uviedo, RHP Ramon Agueroto and OF Gorkys Hernandez to Altoona (EL). Assigned INF Brian Friday to their minor league camp. FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS—Acquired QB Brady Quinn from Cleveland for FB Peyton Hillis, a 2011 sixth-round draft pick and a conditional pick in 2012. NEW YORK JETS—Signed RB LaDainian Tomlinson to a two-year contract. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Acquired LB Kamerion Wimbley from Cleveland for an undisclosed draft pick. HOCKEY National Hockey League LOS ANGELES KINGS—Reassigned G Jonathan Bernier to Manchester (AHL). COLLEGE SETON HALL—Dismissed junior F Robert Mitchell from the men’s basketball team, effective immediately.

GOLF ROUNDUP

Els gets victory at Doral to end drought The Associated Press DORAL, Fla. — Ernie Els showed his South African protege what it takes to win a World Golf Championship. Just as important was that he showed himself how to win again, too. Ending the longest drought of his 20-year career, Els played the final 23 holes on the Blue Monster without a bogey and closed with a 6under 66 on Sunday to win the CA Championship by four shots over 25-year-old Charl Schwartzel. It was far closer than the margin suggested. Schwartzel, in his first time on a world stage, refused to let Els get away from him. Els was clinging to a one-shot lead as he stood over a 25-foot par putt on the 14th hole, and the Big Easy was relieved to

see it fall on the final turn. Schwartzel, a houseguest of Els the last two weeks, caught a bad break on the 15th hole when his ball plugged in a front bunker, and he knocked that into a back bunker on his way to a crucial bogey. He missed short putts on the next two holes and closed with a 70. That allowed Els a strange sensation, walking up to the 18th green with his cap in hand, waving to the gallery, unable to contain a smile that showed equal parts relief and satisfaction. “I’m 40 years old. I’ve had a tough run,” Els said. “Whew! The hairs are standing up. It’s just great.” Els last won two years ago at the Honda Classic, which he won while warming up on the range for a possible playoff. He became

only the fifth player with multiple victories in the World Golf Championships, joining Tiger Woods, Darren Clarke, Geoff Ogilvy and Phil Mickelson. It was his 61st victory worldwide, and 17th on the PGA Tour, and moved Els to No. 8 in the world ranking. “My game was in good shape,” said Els, who finished at 18-under 270. “I just wanted to prove to myself for once. Charl came at me all day. I had to come up with the goods.” Also on Sunday: Two hold lead at Puerto Rico Open RIO GRANDE, Puerto Rico — Chad Collins birdied the par-5 fifth hole for a share of the Puerto Rico Open lead with Kevin Streelman just before third-round play

was suspended because of darkness in the rain-delayed PGA Tour event. Collins and Streelman, who birdied the par-4 seventh hole as darkness descended over Trump International Golf Club-Puerto Rico, were 12 under. Yani Tseng wins Women’s Australian MELBOURNE, Australia — Taiwan’s Yani Tseng won the Women’s Australian Open, birdieing seven of the last 12 holes for a bogey-free 7under 66 and a three-stroke victory over 2009 winner Laura Davies. The sixth-ranked Tseng, the 2008 LPGA Championship winner, had a 9-under 283 total on the Commonwealth Golf Club course. She opened with rounds of 74, 71 and 72 to begin the day four strokes behind third-round leader Karrie Webb.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division Boston Toronto New York Philadelphia New Jersey

W 41 32 23 23 7

Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Miami Washington

W 47 42 34 35 21

L 24 33 43 43 59

Pct .631 .492 .348 .348 .106

GB — 9 18½ 18½ 34½

L10 5-5 1-9 4-6 1-9 2-8

Str L-1 L-5 W-1 L-4 L-4

Home 19-12 22-10 14-21 10-21 3-28

Away 22-12 10-23 9-22 13-22 4-31

Conf 28-15 23-18 16-27 11-27 6-34

Away 20-14 16-16 10-23 15-18 9-21

Conf 32-12 23-14 20-19 21-18 15-27

Southeast Division L 21 23 31 32 43

Pct .691 .646 .523 .522 .328

GB — 3½ 11½ 11½ 24

L10 8-2 7-3 7-3 6-4 1-9

Str L-1 W-2 W-6 W-3 L-7

Home 27-7 26-7 24-8 20-14 12-22

The Associated Press

Central Division x-Cleveland Milwaukee Chicago Detroit Indiana

W 52 36 31 23 21

L 15 29 34 43 45

Pct .776 .554 .477 .348 .318

GB — 15 20 28½ 30½

L10 9-1 9-1 2-8 2-8 2-8

Str W-3 W-6 L-7 L-1 L-2

Home 29-4 23-9 19-13 16-18 14-16

Away 23-11 13-20 12-21 7-25 7-29

Conf 31-9 26-15 19-20 15-23 16-24

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division Dallas San Antonio Memphis Houston New Orleans

W 45 39 35 33 32

L 22 25 32 31 35

Denver Utah Oklahoma City Portland Minnesota

W 45 42 41 41 14

L 21 24 24 28 53

W L.A. Lakers 48 Phoenix 41 L.A. Clippers 25 Sacramento 23 Golden State 18 x-clinched playoff spot

L 18 26 42 44 47

Pct .672 .609 .522 .516 .478

GB — 4½ 10 10½ 13

L10 9-1 8-2 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 W-3 L-1 W-2 L-3

Home 23-10 24-10 20-15 18-14 21-12

Away 22-12 15-15 15-17 15-17 11-23

Conf 24-16 24-17 18-23 23-18 21-20

Away 17-16 17-16 19-13 19-15 5-28

Conf 28-14 25-17 22-18 26-15 7-35

Away 18-13 16-17 7-28 6-28 4-28

Conf 27-11 26-16 12-29 14-28 9-29

Northwest Division Pct .682 .636 .631 .594 .209

GB — 3 3½ 5½ 31½

L10 8-2 6-4 8-2 8-2 1-9

Str W-6 L-2 W-5 W-4 L-9

Home 28-5 25-8 22-11 22-13 9-25

Pacific Division Pct .727 .612 .373 .343 .277

GB — 7½ 23½ 25½ 29½

L10 6-4 7-3 1-9 5-5 2-8

Str W-2 W-1 L-7 W-1 W-1

Home 30-5 25-9 18-14 17-16 14-19

——— Sunday’s Games Milwaukee 98, Indiana 94 Miami 104, Philadelphia 91 Oklahoma City 119, Utah 111 Portland 109, Toronto 98

Cleveland 104, Boston 93 Charlotte 96, Orlando 89 Sacramento 114, Minnesota 100 Phoenix 120, New Orleans 106 Today’s Games

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge, left, backs in on Toronto Raptors center Andrea Bargnani during the first half of Sunday’s game in Portland. Aldridge finished with 22 points and 12 rebounds in the victory.

Blazers push streak to four games with win over Raptors The Associated Press PORTLAND — Not so long ago, coach Nate McMillan had a talk with Nicolas Batum suggesting the forward get back to what has worked best for him in the past: defense. The 6-foot-8 Frenchman, in his second season, said McMillan told him to “just play defense first, then the offense will come.” It all clicked on Sunday night, when Batum scored 22 points, making five of six three-point attempts, to help the Portland Trail Blazers take a 109-98 victory over the Toronto Raptors. “I let the game come to me,” Batum said. LaMarcus Aldridge added 22 points and 12 rebounds for the Blazers, who have won four straight and nine of 11. Brandon Roy had 20 points. Chris Bosh had 28 points and seven rebounds for the Raptors, who have lost five straight, matching a season high. The Blazers led by as many as 15 points, but Andrea Bargnani hit a pair of free throws that pulled the Raptors within four before Sonny Weems’ long jumper made it 93-91 with 6:15 left. Portland kept Toronto at bay, going up 101-93 on Roy’s hook shot and a pair of free throws from Batum. With 1:11 left, Batum nailed a threepointer that sealed it. “He’s going to get open shots just because who he’s on the floor with,” McMillan said. “It’s just a matter of knocking those shots down. Tonight, he knocked those threes down, and he can continue to do that.” Portland held the eighth and final playoff spot in the Western Conference, five games in front of Memphis, and just a half-game back of seventh-place San Antonio and a game back of Phoenix. The Raptors were also in eighth place in the Eastern Conference, struggling while just a game up on Chicago. “There’s no science to it. It’s not rocket science or brain surgery. You just have to win,” Bosh said. “If you make it complicated, it will be complicated. We just have to win games. That’s all.” Toronto’s Hedo Turkoglu was close to signing with the Blazers last summer as a free agent. The 6-foot-10 forward even came to Portland and met with general manager Kevin Pritchard. But the deal abruptly fell through and Turkoglu, who helped Orlando to the NBA finals last season, agreed the next week to join the Raptors. Turkoglu was booed loudly during pregame introductions. Conversely, former Blazers guard Jarrett Jack received a warm round of applause. Turkoglu then made a three-pointer 19 seconds into the game. But Aldridge got off to a quick start for the Blazers, with 10 points in the first six minutes, capped by a jumper that pulled Portland to a 15-all tie. It was Rudy Fernandez who helped swing the game in Portland’s favor in the second quarter. Fernandez had 10 points in 12 minutes, including three threepointers that put the Blazers up 45-35 midway through the second quarter. He also had three assists, including a

no-look, behind-the-back pass to Martell Webster, and an alley-oop to Aldridge that drew cheers from the Rose Garden crowd. The Blazers led by as many as 14 points en route to a 60-49 advantage at the break. Turkoglu’s three-pointer with 1:16 left in the third quarter narrowed it to 83-76. But on the other end he fouled Fernandez, who made both shots. Bargnani closed the Raptors to 85-80 early in the fourth quarter, but the Blazers responded and went up 91-80 after Batum’s three-pointer. Bosh was playing in his fifth game after missing seven games with a sprained ankle and a stomach virus. “I’ve had to have a few games to get back to my normal self,” Bosh said. “It took a toll on us but that’s the reality. We’re just going to have to dig ourselves out of this hole and nobody can do it for us but ourselves.” The Blazers were coming off a 11094 victory over the Sacramento Kings. Portland hosts the Wizards on Friday. Also on Sunday: Cavaliers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 CLEVELAND — LeBron James scored 30 points, 24 in the second half, and Cleveland wore down aging Boston for a victory, the Cavaliers’ second decisive win over one of the East’s premier teams in less than a month. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 ORLANDO, Fla. — Stephen Jackson scored 28 points, Raymond Felton had 16 and Charlotte held on for its sixth straight victory. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 MILWAUKEE — Jerry Stackhouse tied his season high with 20 points and Milwaukee survived a late rally from short-handed Indiana to win its sixth straight. Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 MIAMI — Dwyane Wade scored 38 points and his supporting cast came through during a decisive stretch in the fourth quarter, helping Miami beat Philadelphia. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .111 OKLAHOMA CITY — Kevin Durant scored 35 points, Russell Westbrook added 30 points and 11 assists, and Oklahoma City made up ground in the race for home-court advantage in the playoffs with a victory over short-handed Utah. Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Rookie Tyreke Evans had 29 points, 11 assists and nine rebounds to lead Sacramento over Minnesota, which has lost nine straight. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 PHOENIX — Steve Nash had 13 points and 12 assists in his 1,000th NBA game, and his favorite receiver, Amare Stoudemire, had a dominant 36-point, 12rebound performance as Phoenix beat injury-depleted New Orleans.

New York at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Denver at Houston, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Detroit at Boston, 5 p.m. Washington at Utah, 6 p.m. New Orleans at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday’s Games

Charlotte at Indiana, 4 p.m. Atlanta at New Jersey, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Memphis, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Cleveland at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. San Antonio at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Washington at Denver, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Phoenix, 7 p.m. All Times PST

SUMMARIES Sunday’s Games ——— TORONTO (98) Turkoglu 5-7 0-0 14, Bosh 9-14 10-12 28, Bargnani 5-13 1-2 11, Jack 3-5 0-0 7, DeRozan 5-7 2-2 12, Johnson 6-10 1-1 13, Weems 1-3 0-0 2, Calderon 5-11 1-2 11, Evans 0-0 0-0 0, Wright 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 39-71 15-19 98. PORTLAND (109) Batum 7-9 3-3 22, Aldridge 9-21 4-5 22, Camby 6-11 0-0 12, Miller 5-12 3-3 13, Roy 616 6-7 20, Howard 0-1 2-2 2, Fernandez 3-8 3-3 12, Bayless 1-4 0-0 3, Webster 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 38-83 21-23 109. Toronto 30 19 29 20 — 98 Portland 32 28 25 24 — 109 3-Point Goals—Toronto 5-15 (Turkoglu 4-5, Jack 1-2, Johnson 0-1, Bosh 0-1, Bargnani 0-3, Calderon 0-3), Portland 12-20 (Batum 5-6, Fernandez 3-5, Roy 2-4, Webster 1-1, Bayless 1-3, Miller 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 38 (Bosh 7), Portland 45 (Aldridge 12). Assists—Toronto 21 (Calderon 7), Portland 21 (Roy, Miller 5). Total Fouls—Toronto 25, Portland 18. Technicals—Toronto defensive three second 2. A—20,639 (19,980). ——— PHILADELPHIA (91) Iguodala 5-15 5-5 15, Brand 3-10 2-4 8, Dalembert 3-7 0-0 6, Holiday 4-9 0-0 12, Williams 2-9 3-3 8, Smith 2-5 1-2 5, Meeks 0-1 0-0 0, Young 5-12 3-3 14, Carney 2-4 0-0 6, Kapono 6-14 2-2 17. Totals 32-86 16-19 91. MIAMI (104) Richardson 2-8 2-2 8, Anthony 0-1 0-0 0, O’Neal 3-10 4-6 10, Arroyo 6-9 0-0 12, Wade 1425 9-11 38, Haslem 6-10 1-2 13, Magloire 2-3 0-2 4, Chalmers 2-6 0-0 5, Jones 4-7 3-3 14, Cook 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-79 19-26 104. Philadelphia 21 28 24 18 — 91 Miami 31 26 21 26 — 104 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 11-24 (Holiday 4-5, Kapono 3-8, Carney 2-3, Young 1-2, Williams 1-3, Meeks 0-1, Iguodala 0-2), Miami 7-22 (Jones 3-6, Richardson 2-7, Chalmers 1-4, Wade 1-4, Arroyo 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 48 (Brand 10), Miami 56 (Haslem 12). Assists—Philadelphia 20 (Iguodala 9), Miami 24 (Arroyo 10). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 20, Miami 17. Technicals—Dalembert, O’Neal 2. Ejected— O’Neal. A—18,129 (19,600). ——— CHARLOTTE (96) Graham 4-8 3-3 12, Diaw 4-5 0-0 9, Ratliff 4-10 2-2 10, Felton 5-12 6-7 16, Jackson 10-20 5-6 28, Thomas 3-9 3-4 9, Augustin 2-5 1-2 5, Chandler 3-4 1-2 7, Henderson 0-2 0-0 0, Brown 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-75 21-26 96. ORLANDO (89) Pietrus 7-13 1-2 20, Lewis 1-7 0-0 3, Howard 12-14 3-10 27, Nelson 2-10 0-0 4, Carter 7-13 6-7 23, Williams 2-6 0-0 6, Bass 0-3 0-0 0, Gortat 0-0 2-2 2, Redick 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 33-72 12-21 89. Charlotte 26 25 21 24 — 96 Orlando 25 28 15 21 — 89 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 5-10 (Jackson 3-5, Graham 1-2, Diaw 1-2, Augustin 0-1), Orlando 11-32 (Pietrus 5-7, Carter 3-8, Williams 2-4, Lewis 1-6, Howard 0-1, Redick 0-3, Nelson 03). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 53 (Ratliff, Thomas 9), Orlando 40 (Howard 16). Assists—Charlotte 20 (Felton 7), Orlando 16 (Carter 6). Total Fouls—Charlotte 22, Orlando 25. Technicals—Howard, Orlando defensive three second. A—17,461 (17,461). ——— BOSTON (93) Pierce 6-14 3-3 18, Garnett 5-11 8-8 18, Perkins 3-5 0-2 6, Rondo 6-11 4-4 16, R.Allen 7-14 3-4 20, Wallace 1-8 3-4 5, Davis 2-4 0-3 4, Daniels 0-3 0-0 0, Robinson 0-3 0-0 0, Finley 2-7 0-0 4, S.Williams 0-0 2-2 2, T.Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-80 23-30 93. CLEVELAND (104) James 9-21 11-16 30, Jamison 6-17 2-8 15, Hickson 4-10 4-6 12, M.Williams 5-13 0-0 14, Parker 2-6 1-2 6, Varejao 6-8 5-8 17, West 1-3 2-2 4, Moon 0-2 0-0 0, Powe 0-0 6-6 6. Totals 33-80 31-48 104. Boston 18 30 24 21 — 93 Cleveland 24 30 26 24 — 104 3-Point Goals—Boston 6-17 (R.Allen 3-5, Pierce 3-5, Rondo 0-1, Robinson 0-1, Wallace 0-2, Finley 0-3), Cleveland 7-22 (M.Williams 4-7, James 1-3, Parker 1-4, Jamison 1-7, Moon 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Boston 54 (Rondo 8), Cleveland 65 (Jamison 12). Assists— Boston 18 (Rondo 6), Cleveland 20 (James 7). Total Fouls—Boston 33, Cleveland 19. Technicals—Garnett, Hickson, Cleveland defensive three second 2. A—20,562 (20,562). ——— INDIANA (94) Granger 8-18 11-11 29, Murphy 4-11 5-6 14, Hibbert 1-5 4-4 6, Watson 5-11 2-2 15, Rush 5-14 2-3 13, McRoberts 0-0 0-0 0, D.Jones 0-2 2-2 2, Price 1-7 4-4 6, S.Jones 3-4 3-4 9. Totals 27-72 33-36 94. MILWAUKEE (98) Delfino 1-4 2-2 5, Mbah a Moute 4-7 2-3 10, Bogut 7-18 3-7 17, Jennings 3-7 1-1 8, Salmons 3-11 6-6 12, Stackhouse 7-13 2-2 20, Ridnour 58 2-3 13, Ilyasova 3-10 0-0 7, Thomas 3-5 0-0 6, Bell 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 36-84 18-24 98. Indiana 19 22 21 32 — 94 Milwaukee 23 26 27 22 — 98 3-Point Goals—Indiana 7-21 (Watson 3-5, Granger 2-5, Rush 1-3, Murphy 1-6, S.Jones 0-1, D.Jones 0-1), Milwaukee 8-16 (Stackhouse 4-6, Ridnour 1-1, Jennings 1-1, Delfino 1-3, Ilyasova 1-3, Salmons 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 49 (Murphy 13), Milwaukee 53 (Bogut 12). Assists—Indiana 19 (Granger, Rush, Price, Watson 3), Milwaukee 22 (Jennings

8). Total Fouls—Indiana 19, Milwaukee 25. Technicals—Indiana Coach O’Brien, Price. Flagrant Fouls—Thomas. A—15,107 (18,717). ——— UTAH (111) Miles 3-12 0-0 8, Boozer 8-14 2-3 18, Millsap 6-14 1-2 13, Williams 8-14 10-11 27, Matthews 9-11 5-6 29, Korver 4-9 1-2 11, Fesenko 1-3 2-8 4, Gaines 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 39-77 22-34 111. OKLAHOMA CITY (119) Durant 10-17 13-13 35, Green 5-11 4-5 14, Krstic 5-8 3-4 13, Westbrook 12-16 6-11 30, Sefolosha 5-9 2-2 13, Collison 4-6 0-0 8, Ibaka 0-0 0-0 0, Weaver 0-2 0-0 0, Maynor 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 44-73 28-35 119. Utah 26 23 30 32 — 111 Oklahoma City 29 30 31 29 — 119 3-Point Goals—Utah 11-19 (Matthews 6-7, Korver 2-3, Miles 2-6, Williams 1-3), Oklahoma City 3-12 (Durant 2-6, Sefolosha 1-2, Green 0-2, Weaver 0-2). Fouled Out—Williams. Rebounds— Utah 41 (Boozer 11), Oklahoma City 45 (Ibaka, Sefolosha 6). Assists—Utah 27 (Williams 14), Oklahoma City 22 (Westbrook 11). Total Fouls—Utah 25, Oklahoma City 27. Technicals—Boozer, Utah Coach Sloan. A—18,203 (18,203). ——— MINNESOTA (100) Gomes 7-13 0-0 14, Jefferson 10-17 2-4 22, Hollins 3-6 0-0 6, Flynn 3-13 5-5 12, Brewer 2-7 0-2 5, Wilkins 1-6 0-2 3, Jawai 0-2 2-2 2, Sessions 5-12 3-5 13, Ellington 4-9 3-4 15, Pavlovic 2-4 0-0 5, Pecherov 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 38-91 15-24 100. SACRAMENTO (114) Greene 8-11 2-2 19, Landry 5-13 3-3 13, Hawes 4-9 0-1 8, Udrih 1-8 0-0 2, Evans 10-19 7-7 29, Garcia 2-7 0-0 4, Nocioni 5-11 0-0 12, Thompson 6-7 3-6 15, Udoka 0-0 0-0 0, Casspi 4-8 0-0 9, Dorsey 0-3 1-2 1, May 1-3 0-0 2. Totals 46-99 16-21 114. Minnesota 28 21 12 39 — 100 Sacramento 32 32 30 20 — 114 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 9-15 (Ellington 4-5, Pavlovic 1-1, Wilkins 1-1, Pecherov 1-2, Flynn 1-3, Brewer 1-3), Sacramento 6-24 (Evans 2-5, Nocioni 2-6, Casspi 1-1, Greene 1-3, Hawes 0-1, Garcia 0-4, Udrih 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 57 (Jefferson 10), Sacramento 63 (Evans 9). Assists—Minnesota 12 (Sessions 4), Sacramento 22 (Evans 11). Total Fouls—Minnesota 21, Sacramento 21. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second. A—10,736 (17,317). ——— NEW ORLEANS (106) Wright 3-8 1-4 7, West 7-15 10-10 24, Okafor 7-12 1-3 15, Collison 6-14 1-1 13, Peterson 4-11 2-2 13, Thornton 12-21 0-0 28, Gray 1-3 0-0 2, Songaila 2-6 0-0 4. Totals 42-90 15-20 106. PHOENIX (120) Hill 2-5 2-2 6, Stoudemire 11-17 14-14 36, Lopez 4-5 2-3 10, Nash 5-7 1-1 13, Richardson 9-15 0-2 20, Dudley 4-6 3-4 13, Frye 1-4 0-0 2, Dragic 2-5 0-0 5, Amundson 3-5 2-5 8, Clark 1-3 4-4 7, Griffin 0-1 0-0 0, Collins 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-73 28-35 120. New Orleans 22 27 22 35 — 106 Phoenix 34 21 28 37 — 120 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 7-15 (Thornton 4-7, Peterson 3-6, Collison 0-1, West 0-1), Phoenix 8-16 (Nash 2-2, Dudley 2-4, Richardson 2-5, Clark 1-1, Dragic 1-3, Frye 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Orleans 44 (Okafor 12), Phoenix 47 (Stoudemire 12). Assists—New Orleans 22 (Collison 10), Phoenix 29 (Nash 12). Total Fouls—New Orleans 23, Phoenix 16. Technicals—West, New Orleans defensive three second 2, Stoudemire, Phoenix defensive three second. A—18,218 (18,422).

LEADERS Through Saturday’s games SCORING G FG FT PTS James, CLE 64 648 500 1913 Durant, OKC 64 622 559 1899 Anthony, DEN 53 524 419 1512 Bryant, LAL 61 618 373 1687 Wade, MIA 62 572 428 1633 Ellis, GOL 54 539 248 1383 Nowitzki, DAL 66 588 442 1650 Bosh, TOR 57 490 384 1372 Roy, POR 53 415 290 1185 Stoudemire, PHX 66 550 366 1467 Johnson, ATL 65 548 192 1396 Randolph, MEM 66 539 279 1368 Jackson, CHA 64 477 273 1326 Rose, CHI 64 548 201 1303 Maggette, GOL 55 361 379 1112

Howard, ORL Randolph, MEM Lee, NYK Camby, POR Boozer, UTA Bosh, TOR Wallace, CHA Duncan, SAN Bogut, MIL Haywood, DAL

No. 2 Kentucky rallies late, wins SEC title in OT

REBOUNDS G OFF DEF 67 232 651 66 273 506 66 178 593 61 201 502 62 143 556 57 169 471 62 127 520 61 192 444 58 178 426 62 242 376

ASSISTS G Paul, NOR 38 Nash, PHX 65 Williams, UTA 59 Rondo, BOS 63 Kidd, DAL 65 James, CLE 64 Westbrook, OKC 64 Davis, LAC 65 Harris, NJN 50 Wade, MIA 62

AVG 29.9 29.7 28.5 27.7 26.3 25.6 25.0 24.1 22.4 22.2 21.5 20.7 20.7 20.4 20.2

TOT AVG 883 13.2 779 11.8 771 11.7 703 11.5 699 11.3 640 11.2 647 10.4 636 10.4 604 10.4 618 10.0

AST 424 724 605 618 607 547 507 510 335 410

AVG 11.2 11.1 10.3 9.8 9.3 8.5 7.9 7.8 6.7 6.6

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — John Calipari only had questions once he and his Kentucky Wildcats finished celebrating their Southeastern Conference tournament championship. “How did we win this game? How did we go to overtime? I don’t know,” Calipari said. Credit his fantastic freshmen who scored to get them to overtime and then won the game, even if they celebrated a little prematurely. John Wall scored seven of his 15 points in overtime, and No. 2 Kentucky rallied from five down with 2:28 left in regulation to beat Mississippi State 75-74 on Sunday. The Wildcats rewarded their faithful by adding their 26th SEC tournament championship and an automatic berth to the NCAA tournament to their 44th regular season title. Two down, one to go? That might be why the Wildcats ran around the arena waving and yelling with their fans without ever cutting down a net. “We will cut down nets,” Calipari promised. “It’s just not the SEC tournament nets. Maybe hopefully in the NCAA tournament somewhere, but I think these guys they have a big picture. ... This is a game we should’ve lost.” The Wildcats (32-2) blew earlier chances with freshmen Wall and DeMarcus Cousins missing free throws and making youthful mistakes. But they came through over the defending tourney champs as Cousins’ layup

off Wall’s missed three-pointer from the right corner beat the regulation buzzer to give them some extra time. Also on Sunday: No. 4 Duke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Georgia Tech. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 GREENSBORO, N.C. — Kyle Singler scored 20 points and Jon Scheyer hit a critical threepointer with 18 seconds left to help Duke win the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Scheyer finished with 16 points for the top-seeded Blue Devils (29-5), who let an 11-point lead with 6 minutes left slip to one before Scheyer’s big shot. No. 5 Ohio State . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 Minnesota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61 INDIANAPOLIS — Evan Turner had 31 points and 11 rebounds to lead Ohio State in the Big Ten championship game. Ohio State (27-7) made nine three-pointers in the second half to pull away after leading by three points at halftime. David Lighty scored 20 points and Jon Diebler added 19 for the Buckeyes, who tied the record for largest victory margin in a Big Ten tournament game. No. 17 Temple . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Richmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. — Ryan Brooks hit four free throws over the final 50 seconds and the top-seeded Owls won their third straight Atlantic 10 tournament. Tournament MVP Juan Fernandez scored 18 points and Brooks and Ramone Moore finished with 12 each for Temple (29-5), which won its ninth conference title.

Dave Martin / The Associated Press

Kentucky’s John Wall, right, shoots over the defense of Mississippi State’s Jarvis Varnado in the second half of the Southeastern Conference tournament final in Nashville, Tenn., Sunday.

NHL ROUNDUP

Ducks get solid 4-2 victory over Sharks The Associated Press ANAHEIM, Calif. — Teemu Selanne scored his 599th goal to help the Anaheim Ducks snap a five-game winless streak with a 4-2 victory over the Western Conference-leading San Jose Sharks on Sunday night. Selanne gave the Ducks a scare early in the third period, when his head and left shoulder slammed into the boards after he failed to convert a pass from Saku Koivu and lost his balance. Selanne remained on the ice hunched over for a couple of minutes before making it back to the dressing room under his own power, but did not return. Jonas Hiller made 31 saves, Corey Perry started a threegoal first period, Bobby Ryan scored into an empty net with 1:13 remaining, and Lubomir Visnovsky had his third goal in five games. In other games on Sunday: Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 CHICAGO — Nicklas Backstrom raced up the ice and scored at 3:10 of overtime and Washington completed a remarkable comeback without star Alex Ovechkin to beat Chicago. Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TAMPA, Fla. — Pascal Dupuis and Sergei Gonchar scored in a 2:57 span in the third period, and Marc-Andre Fleury made 21 saves for Pittsburgh. Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 NEW YORK — Sean Avery returned from a one-game

benching to score twice and help New York climb within a point of eighth-place Boston in the Eastern Conference. Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ATLANTA — Adrian Aucoin scored the shootout winner, Lee Stempniak had his sixth goal in five games with Phoenix, and the Coyotes won their fifth straight. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LOS ANGELES — Patric Hornqvist scored the tiebreaking goal with 3:31 to play, and Pekka Rinne made 18 saves for Nashville. Wild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ST. PAUL, Minn. — Josh Harding made 36 saves, and Mikko Koivu had a power-play goal and two assists, propelling Minnesota past St. Louis. Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 DALLAS — Craig Anderson made 48 saves, Paul Stastny scored twice, and Colorado rallied to beat Dallas. Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Richard Park scored a short-handed goal and added an assist, and Martin Biron made 26 saves for New York. Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Flames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Identical twins Henrik and Daniel Sedin set each other up for first-period goals, and Roberto Luongo made 32 saves for Vancouver.


M EN ’S C OL L EGE B A SK ET BA L L

D4 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Breaking down the NCAA tournament bracket Midwest region 1 KANSAS JAYHAWKS How they got here: Won Big 12 Conference tournament. Key players: G Sherron Collins (5-11 sr.), 15.3 ppg, 4.3 apg; G Xavier Henry (6-6 fr.), 13.9 ppg, 4.2 rpg. Noteworthy: The scary thing for Bill Self, coach of the No. 1-ranked Jayhawks? They rank 265th (of 344 teams) in average experience. 2 OHIO STATE BUCKEYES How they got here: Won Big Ten Conference tournament. Key players: G-F Evan Turner (6-7 jr.), 19.5 ppg, 5.8 apg, 9.4 rpg; G William Buford (6-5 so.), 14.3 ppg, 5.5 rpg. Noteworthy: Thad Matta led Ohio State to a share of the Big Ten regularseason title, its third in six years. 3 GEORGETOWN HOYAS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: C Greg Monroe (6-11 so.), 16.0 ppg, 9.5 rpg, 3.5 apg, 1.5 bpg; G Austin Freeman (6-4 jr.), 16.9 ppg. Noteworthy: The Hoyas, at 10-8, didn’t have a great Big East showing, but they made a statement by defeating third-ranked Syracuse in the conference tournament. 4 MARYLAND TERRAPINS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Greivis Vasquez (6-6 sr.), 19.6 ppg, 6.3 apg; F Landon Milbourne (6-7 sr.), 12.4 ppg, 4.9 rpg. Noteworthy: Led by Greivis Vasquez, the ACC Player of the Year, the Terrapins closed the season as the hottest team in the ACC. They won seven consecutive games entering the conference tournament. 5 MICHIGAN STATE SPARTANS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Kalin Lucas (6-1 jr.), 14.8 ppg, 3.9 apg; F Raymar Morgan (6-4 sr.), 11.1 ppg, 6.2 rpg. Noteworthy: Michigan State clinched a share of its 12th Big Ten title, sharing the crown with Purdue and Ohio State. Tom Izzo became the sixth coach in Big Ten history with at least six conference titles. 6 TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G/F Scotty Hopson (6-8, so.), 13.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg; F Wayne Chism (6-9 sr.), 12.8 ppg, 6.9 rpg. Noteworthy: Coach Bruce Pearl deserves praise for keeping the Volunteers together after the dismissal of Tyler Smith, the Vols’ best player, and the suspension of three others for drug and gun charges. 7 OKLAHOMA STATE COWBOYS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G James Anderson (6-6 jr.), 22.9 ppg, 6.0 rpg; G Obi Muonelo (6-5 sr.), 13.4 ppg, 5.2 rpg. Noteworthy: Anderson scored at least 20 points against every Big 12 rival. 8 NEVADA-LAS VEGAS REBELS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Tre’Von Willis (6-4 jr.), 17.7 ppg, 4.1 rpg, G/F Chace Stanback (6-8, so.), 10.6 ppg, 5.8 rpg. Noteworthy: UNLV’s roster features transfers from high-profile programs Kentucky, UCLA, Arizona State and Memphis. 9 NORTHERN IOWA PANTHERS How they got here: Won Missouri Valley Conference tournament. Key players: G Kwadzo Ahelegbe (6-2 jr.), 10.5 ppg, 3.1 rpg; C Jordan Eglseder (7-0 sr.), 12.2 ppg, 7.5 rpg. Noteworthy: Northern Iowa won the MVC tournament for the second straight year, the first team to do that since Illinois State in 1997-98. 10 GEORGIA TECH YELLOW JACKETS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Gani Lawal (6-9 jr.), 13.5 ppg, 9.0 rpg; F Derrick Favors (610 fr.), 11.7 ppg, 8.3 rpg. Noteworthy: Georgia Tech has a lot of talent — Lawal and Favors are both likely future lottery picks in the NBA draft. But they won just twice in their final seven games entering the ACC tournament. 11 SAN DIEGO STATE AZTECS How they got here: Won Mountain West Conference tournament. Key players: F Kawi Leonard (6-7 fr.), 12.6 ppg, 9.6 rpg; F Malcolm Thomas (6-9 jr.), 11.1 ppg, 7.9 rpg. Noteworthy: San Diego State coach Steve Fisher is 20-8 in the tournament. 12 NEW MEXICO STATE AGGIES How they got here: Won Western Athletic Conference tournament. Key players: G Jahmar Young (6-5 jr.), 20.5 ppg, 3.2 apg; G Jonathan Gibson (6-2 sr.), 17.7 ppg, 3.0 rpg. Noteworthy: The Aggies had a terrible start to the season, but that can be attributed mostly to the absence of forwards Troy Gillenwater and Wendell McKines, who had to work their way back from academic problems. 13 HOUSTON COUGARS How they got here: Won Conference USA tournament. Key players: G Aubrey Coleman (6-4 sr.), 26.0 ppg, 7.5 rpg, 2.8 spg; G Kelvin Lewis (6-4 sr.), 15.1 ppg, 4.1 rpg. Noteworthy: Senior guard Aubrey Coleman, an NBA draft prospect, was the nation’s leading scorer and ranked second in steals per game during the regular season. 14 OHIO BOBCATS How they got here: Won Mid-American Conference tournament. Key players: G Armon Bassett (6-2 jr.), 15.5 ppg, 3.4 apg; G D.J. Cooper (511 fr.), 13.5 ppg, 6 apg. Noteworthy: Five players are doubledigit scorers, and a sixth averages 9.7 points per game. 15 UC-SANTA BARBARA GAUCHOS How they got here: Won Big West Conference tournament. Key players: F Orlando Johnson (6-5 so.), 17.9 ppg, 5.4 rpg; F James Nunnally (6-5 so.), 14.9 ppg, 5.7 rpg. Noteworthy: Johnson, the Big West Player of the Year, and Nunnally scored 47.5 percent of the team’s total points during the regular season. 16 LEHIGH MOUNTAIN HAWKS How they got here: Won Patriot League tournament. Key players: G C.J. McCollum (6-3 fr.), 18.9 ppg, 4.9 rpg; G Marquis Hall (6-0 sr.), 11.3 ppg, 3.5 rpg. Noteworthy: McCollum is the first player in league history to win conference player of the year and rookie of the year awards in the same season.

First Round

Second Round

National Semifinals

Regionals

Second Round

Men’s Division I Basketball Championship

1 Kansas (32-2) 6:40 p.m. 16 Lehigh (22-10) Oklahoma City – March 18 8 UNLV (25-8)

National Semifinals

Regionals

First Round E. Tenn. St. (20-14) 16 New Orleans, La. – March 18 6:45 p.m.

4:10 p.m.

Texas (24-9) 8

Wake Forest (19-10) 9

9 Northern Iowa (28-4)

Temple (29-5) 5

9:30 a.m.

5 Michigan St (24-8)

Cornell (27-4) 12

12 N.M. St. (22-11) 4:20 p.m. Spokane, Wash. – March 19

Jacksonville, Fla. – March 19

4 Maryland (23-8)

St. Louis

13 Houston (19-15) 6:50 p.m.

Syracuse, N.Y.

MIDWEST

Wisconsin (23-8) 4 Wofford (26-8) 13

noon

EAST 4:20 p.m. Marquette (22-11) 6

6 Tennessee (25-8) 6:55 p.m.

Washington (24-9) 11

11 San Diego St. (25-8) Providence, R.I. – March 18

San Jose, Calif. – March 18

Championship Game

3 Georgetown (23-10) 14 Ohio (21-14)

East region

4:15 p.m. Kentucky (32-2) 1

4:25 p.m.

New Mexico (29-4) 3 6:50 p.m. Montana (22-9) 14

Indianapolis 7 Oklahoma St. (22-10)

11:45 a.m. Clemson (21-10) 7

April 5

Missouri (22-10) 10

10 Ga. Tech (22-12) 4:15 p.m. Milwaukee – March 19

Buffalo, N.Y. – March 19

2 Ohio St. (27-7) 6:45 p.m.

West Va. (27-6) 2

NATIONAL CHAMPION

15 UC Santa Barbara (20-9)

Indianapolis

Morgan St. (27-9) 15

Indianapolis

April 3

1 Syracuse (28-4) 7:40 p.m.

April 3

4:25 p.m.

Duke (29-5) 1

Ark.-P.B./Winthrop 16

16 Vermont (25-9) Buffalo, N.Y. – March 19

Jacksonville, Fla. – March 19 6:55 p.m.

8 Gonzaga (26-6) 4:10 p.m.

Cal (23-10) 8

Louisville (20-12) 9

9 Florida St. (22-9)

Texas A&M (23-9) 5

5 Butler (28-4) 2 p.m.

Utah St. (27-7) 12

2 p.m.

12 UTEP (26-6)

Spokane, Wash. – March 19

San Jose, Calif. – March 18 4 Vanderbilt (24-8) 11:30 a.m.

Salt Lake City

13 Murray St. (30-4)

11:30 a.m. Purdue (27-5) 4

Houston

Siena (27-6) 13

SOUTH

WEST

9:25 a.m. Notre Dame (23-11) 6

6 Xavier (24-8) 9:25 a.m.

Old Dominion (26-8) 11

11 Minnesota (21-13) Milwaukee – March 19

New Orleans, La. – March 18

3 Pittsburgh (24-8)

11:55 a.m.

Play-in-game

7 BYU (29-5) 9:20 a.m. 10 Florida (21-12) Oklahoma City – March 18

Ark.-P.B. (17-15)

Richmond (26-8) 7

Noon

Dayton, Ohio – March 16, 4:30 p.m. Winthrop (19-3)

2 Kansas St. (26-7) 11:50 a.m. 15 North Texas (24-8)

Baylor (25-7) 3

Sam Hou. St. (25-7) 14

14 Oakland (26-8) 11:55 a.m.

Saint Mary’s (26-5) 10 Providence, R.I. – March 18 9:30 a.m.

16

Villanova (24-7) 2

Robert Morris (23-11) 15 AP

West region 1 SYRACUSE ORANGE How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Wesley Johnson (6-7 jr.), 15.7 ppg, 8.5 rpg; G Andy Rautins (6-5 sr.), 11.6 ppg, 4.8 apg. Noteworthy: Despite a hiccup against Georgetown in the Big East tournament, ’Cuse is as deep and talented as any team in the country. Five players average in double figures. 2 KANSAS STATE WILDCATS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Jacob Pullen (6-0 jr.), 18.9 ppg, 3.6 apg; G Denis Clemente (6-1 sr.), 16.0 ppg, 3.9 apg. Noteworthy: Setting aside a 17point loss at Kansas, the Wildcats’ other four losses were by a combined 16 points. 3 PITTSBURGH PANTHERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Ashton Gibbs (62 so.), 16.2 ppg, 40.4% three-point shooting; G Brad Wanamaker (6-4 jr.), 12.0 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 4.7 apg. Noteworthy: It has been a relatively up-and-down season for the Panthers, who showed promise by winning eight of their last nine games before losing in the Big East tourney. 4 VANDERBILT COMMODORES How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Jermaine Beal (6-5 sr.), 14.5 ppg, 2.3 rpg, 3.1 apg; C A.J. Ogilvy (6-11 jr.), 13.9 ppg, 6.2 rpg. Noteworthy: There isn’t much Vandy is lacking as one of the country’s most complete teams. The Commodores are disciplined, shoot well and have ample size. 5 BUTLER BULLDOGS How they got there: Won Horizon League tournament. Key players: G-F Gordon Hayward (6-9 so.), 15.4 ppg, 8.5 rpg; G Shelvin Mack (6-3 so.), 13.9 ppg, 3.1 apg. Noteworthy: Butler takes a 20game win streak into the NCAA tournament, including an 18-0 regular-season Horizon League Record. 6 XAVIER MUSKETEERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Jordan Crawford (6-4 so.), 19.7 ppg, 4.7 rpg; F-C Jason Love (6-9 sr.), 11.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg. Noteworthy: Terrell Holloway led the Atlantic 10 in free throw percentage (84.9 percent) during the regular season. 7 BRIGHAM YOUNG COUGARS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Jimmer Fredette (6-2 jr.), 20.6 ppg, 4.7 apg, 47.2% three-point shooting; G Jackson Emery (6-3 jr.), 12.6 ppg, 4.4 rpg. Noteworthy: Fredette is one of the nation’s most prolific scorers, but BYU proved it could win without him when he was sidelined with mononucleosis and stomach problems earlier this season. 8 GONZAGA BULLDOGS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Matt Bouldin (6-5 sr.), 15.8 ppg, 4.1 apg; F Elias Harris (6-7 fr.), 14.7 ppg; 7.2 rpg. Noteworthy: It was another very good regular season for Gonzaga, but the Bulldogs suffered a blowout 81-62 defeat against St. Mary’s in the West Coast Conference tournament. That defeat hurt Gonzaga’s seed in the NCAA tournament, but March’s perennial Cinderella favorite is still plenty capable of a deep run.

South region 9 FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Chris Singleton (69 so.), 10.4 ppg, 7.2 rpg; C Solomon Alabi (7-1 so.), 11.6 ppg, 2.3 bpg. Noteworthy: After building his program from the ACC’s abyss, coach Leonard Hamilton is turning the Seminoles into a regular contender in the league. This is the second consecutive NCAA tournament appearance for FSU, which went 10-6 in the ACC for the second consecutive season. 10 FLORIDA GATORS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Chandler Parsons (6-9 jr.), 12.0 ppg, 6.8 rpg, 2.5 apg; G Kenny Boynton (6-2 fr.), 13.5 ppg, 2.7 apg. Noteworthy: Florida snaps a twoyear NCAA tournament drought after coach Billy Donovan led the Gators to back-to-back national titles. Florida made the tournament despite shooting 30.8 percent from the three-point line during the regular season. 11 MINNESOTA GOLDEN GOPHERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Lawrence Westbrook (6-0 sr.), 12.9 ppg, 2.4 rpg; G Blake Hoffarber (6-4 jr.), 10.7 ppg, 3.6 rpg. Noteworthy: Minnesota led the Big Ten in the regular season in blocked shots (5.7 per game), steals (8.1), assists (17.2) and three-point field goal percentage (.401). 12 TEXAS-EL PASO MINERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Randy Culpepper (6-0 jr.), 18.1 ppg, 2.0 apg, 1.7 spg; F Derrick Caracter (6-9 jr.), 14.3 ppg, 8.4 rpg. Noteworthy: UTEP relied on a slew of talented players from Memphis, Tenn., to claim its first regularseason conference title 1987. 13 MURRAY STATE RACERS How they got here: Won Ohio Valley Conference tournament. Key players: C Tony Easley (6-9 sr.), 10.3 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 2.3 bpg; G B.J. Jenkins (6-0 jr.), 10.7 ppg, 1.9 spg. Noteworthy: This is about as balanced as a team can be. Five players average between 10 and 11 points per game, and a sixth is at 9.9. 14 OAKLAND GOLDEN GRIZZLIES How they got here: Won Summit League tournament. Key players: C Keith Benson (611 jr.), 17.0 ppg, 10.5 rpg; F Derick Nelson (6-5 sr.), 12.4 ppg, 6.1 rpg. Noteworthy: Benson was the only Summit League player to finish the season averaging a double-double. 15 NORTH TEXAS MEAN GREEN How they got here: Won Sun Belt Conference tournament. Key players: G Josh White (5-10 jr.), 14.9 ppg, 3.5 apg; G Tristan Thompson (6-5 jr.), 14.1 ppg, 3.3 rpg. Noteworthy: North Texas, which carries an 11-game winning streak into the tournament, has won more games than any team in school history. 16 VERMONT CATAMOUNTS How they got there: Won American East Conference tournament. Key players: F Marqus Blakely (6-5 sr.), 17.2 ppg, 9.1 rpg; G Maurice Joseph (6-4 sr.), 14.1 ppg, 38.1% three-point shooting. Noteworthy: Blakely leads the team in points per game, field-goal percentage, rebounds, assists, blocks, steals and double-doubles.

1 DUKE BLUE DEVILS How they got here: Won Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Key players: F-G Jon Scheyer (6-5 sr.), 18.9 ppg, 5.2 apg; F Kyle Singler (6-8 jr.), 17.2 ppg, 6.8 rpg. Noteworthy: A lack of depth and consistent guard play has hurt Duke in recent NCAA tournaments. The Blue Devils still don’t have great depth, but their guard play has been terrific. Scheyer and Nolan Smith form one of the nation’s best backcourts. 2 VILLANOVA WILDCATS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Scottie Reynolds (6-2 sr.), 18.8 ppg, 3.4 apg; G Corey Fisher (6-1 jr.), 13.6 ppg, 4.0 apg. Noteworthy: Led by super senior Reynolds, the Wildcats rely on strong play from their guards, but they lost five of their final seven games. 3 BAYLOR BEARS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Tweety Carter (5-11 sr.), 15.8 ppg, 6.3 apg; G LaceDarius Dunn (6-4 jr.), 19.2 ppg, 4.7 rpg. Noteworthy: Baylor ended a streak of 24 losses to Texas in last year’s Big 12 tournament, then extended its winning streak to three against the Longhorns with a sweep this season. 4 PURDUE BOILERMAKERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: C JaJuan Johnson (610 jr.), 14.9 ppg, 7.2 rpg; G E’Twaun Moore (6-4 jr.), 16.7 ppg, 3.6 rpg. Noteworthy: Purdue claimed a share of its first Big Ten title since 1996 despite losing F Robbie Hummel late in the year with a torn ACL. 5 TEXAS A&M AGGIES How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Donald Sloan (6-3 sr.), 17.9 ppg, 3.6 rpg; F Bryan Davis (6-9 sr.), 10.0 ppg, 8.0 rpg. Noteworthy: Freshman F Khris Middleton is beginning to assert himself. He moved into the starting lineup during Big 12 play and scored a team-high 15 points in the regularseason finale at Oklahoma. 6 NOTRE DAME FIGHTING IRISH How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Luke Harangody (68 sr.), 23.2 ppg, 9.7 rpg; F Tim Abromaitis (6-8 jr.), 16.9 ppg, 4.9 rpg. Noteworthy: Harangody is one of the better scorers in the country, and his return from a knee injury was essential for the Irish heading into the Big East tournament. 7 RICHMOND SPIDERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Kevin Anderson (6-0 jr.), 17.8 ppg, 3.4 rpg; F Justin Harper (6-10 jr.), 10.7 ppg, 5.5 rpg. Noteworthy: Richmond — a school with a history of NCAA tournament upsets — has the ingredients to make a run. Guard play is huge in the Big Dance, and the Spiders’ guards are top-notch. 8 CALIFORNIA BEARS How they got here:At-large bid. Key players: G Jerome Randle (5-10 sr.), 18.7 ppg, 4.5 apg; G Patrick Christopher (6-5 sr.), 16.0 ppg, 5.5 rpg. Noteworthy: The Bears entered the Pac-10 tournament as the No. 1 seed for the first time, taking advantage of a down year among the usual league stalwarts. 9 LOUISVILLE CARDINALS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Samardo Samuels (6-9 so.), 15.3 ppg, 7.0 rpg; G Edgar Sosa (6-2 sr.), 13.3 ppg, 4.5 apg. Noteworthy: The Cards struggled on the boards in their conference tournament loss to Cincinnati, getting

Capsules by McClatchy-Tribune News Service

outrebounded 54-33. 10 ST. MARY’S GAELS How they got here: Won West Coast Conference tournament. Key players: C Omar Samhan (611 sr.), 20.9 ppg, 11.0 rpg; G Mickey McConnell (6-0 jr.), 13.7 ppg, 5.3 apg. Noteworthy: After a one-year absence, the Gaels are back in the tournament. St. Mary’s avenged two regular-season losses against Gonzaga by defeating the Bulldogs in the West Coast Conference tournament championship game. 11 OLD DOMINION MONARCHS How they got here: Won Colonial Athletic Association tournament. Key players: F Gerald Lee (6-10 sr.), 14.8 ppg, 5 rpg; F Frank Hassell (6-8 jr.), 8.9 ppg, 6.5 rpg. Noteworthy: The Monarchs are tireless on the defensive end, holding opponents to just 57.3 points per game. 12 UTAH STATE AGGIES How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Tai Wesley (6-7 jr.), 13.8 ppg, 6.5 rpg; G Jared Quayle (61 sr.), 12.0 ppg, 4.2 apg. Noteworthy: The Aggies had won 16 consecutive games entering the Western Athletic Conference tournament semifinals and it’s no secret why: defense. Utah State held opponents to a conference-best 40.4 percent shooting from the field. 13 SIENA SAINTS How they got here: Won Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference tournament. Key players: F Alex Franklin (6-5 sr.), 16.1 ppg, 7.9 rpg; F Ryan Rossiter (6-9 jr.), 14.1 ppg, 11.1 rpg. Noteworthy: Siena has a strong and experienced starting unit, but the Saints nearly missed out on a guaranteed slot in the NCAA tournament after trailing at halftime in all three of their games in the MAAC tournament. 14 SAM HOUSTON ST. BEARKATS How they got here: Won Southland Conference tournament. Key players: F Gilberto Clavell (6-6 jr.), 16.9 ppg, 6.5 rpg; G Corey Allmond (6-1 sr.), 16.3 ppg, 38 percent three-point shooting. Noteworthy: Sam Houston State leads the nation with 20.9 assists per game, and the Bearkats average more than 80 points per game. 15 ROBERT MORRIS COLONELS How they got here: Won Northeast Conference tournament. Key players: G Karon Abraham (5-9 fr.), 12.9 ppg, 2.1 rpg; F Rob Robinson (6-8 sr.), 10.2 ppg, 5.3 rpg. Noteworthy: The Colonials have won a league-record seven NEC tournament championships. 16 ARKANSAS-PINE BLUFF GOLDEN LIONS How they got here: Won Southwestern Athletic Conference tournament. Key players: G Terrance Calvin (62 sr.), 10.8 ppg, 4.1 apg; G Savalance Townsend (6-1 so.), 38 percent threepoint shooting. Noteworthy: Arkansas-Pine Bluff won 12 of its final 13 games to earn an NCAA tournament berth. 16 WINTHROP EAGLES How they got here:Won Big South Conference tournament. Key players: G Reggie Middleton (6-1 so.), 10.3 ppg, 2.9 apg; C Matt Morgan (6-9 so.), 9.6 ppg, 4.6 rpg. Noteworthy: As a three seed in the league tourney, the Eagles went 3-0 and raised their overall tournament record to a Big South-best 34-15.

1 KENTUCKY WILDCATS How they got here: Won Southeastern Conference tournament. Key players: G John Wall (6-4 fr.), 17.0 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 6.2 apg; C DeMarcus Cousins (6-10 fr.), 15.9 ppg, 10.1 rpg. Noteworthy: Kentucky has the most talented freshman class since Michigan’s Fab Five. Kentucky knows it’s talented, and it often lacks a killer instinct. 2 WEST VIRGINIA MOUNTAINEERS How they got here: Won Big East Conference tournament. Key players: F Da’Sean Butler (6-7 sr.), 17.2 ppg, 6.3 rpg, 3.3 apg; F Kevin Jones (6-8 fr.), 13.5 ppg, 7.4 apg; F Devin Ebanks (6-9 soph.), 12.4 ppg, 8.3 rpg. Noteworthy: The athletic Mountaineers lost to Syracuse, Notre Dame, Villanova and Pittsburgh by a combined 13 points. 3 NEW MEXICO LOBOS. How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Darrington Hobson (6-7 jr.), 15.8 ppg, 9.1 rpg, 4.6 apg; F Roman Martinez (6-6 sr.), 14.1 ppg, 6.3 rpg, 41.1% three-point shooting. Noteworthy: The Lobos have been seeded as high as No. 3 in 1997, but New Mexico has not advanced to the Sweet 16 since 1974. 4 WISCONSIN BADGERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Jason Bohannon (6-2 sr.), 12.0 ppg, 3.7 rpg; G Trevon Hughes (6-0 sr.), 15.4 ppg, 4.7 rpg, 4.7 apg. Noteworthy: Wisconsin has had seven 20-win seasons in Bo Ryan’s nine years at Wisconsin. 5 TEMPLE OWLS How they got here: Won Atlantic 10 Conference tournament. Key players: F Lavoy Allen (6-9 jr.), 11.7 ppg, 11.0 rpg; G Ryan Brooks (6-4 jr.), 14.5 ppg, 4.5 rpg. Noteworthy: This season the Owls have cracked the Top 25 for the first time since 2001 and posted the program’s most regular-season wins (26) since 2001. 6 MARQUETTE GOLDEN EAGLES How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Lazar Hayward (6-6 sr.), 18.1 ppg, 7.9 rpg; F Jimmy Butler (6-6 jr.), 14.8 ppg, 6.4 rpg. Noteworthy: The Eagles are right there with the Big East powers, losing five of their seven conference defeats by five points or less. 7 CLEMSON TIGERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Trevor Booker (6-7 sr.), 15.3 ppg, 8.3 rpg; G Demontez Stitt (6-2 jr.), 11.2 ppg, 3.3 apg. Noteworthy: This is the Tigers’ third consecutive NCAA tournament appearance, which ties a school record. 8 TEXAS LONGHORNS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G-F Damion James (6-7 sr.), 17.7 ppg, 10.2 rpg; C Dexter Pittman (6-10 sr.), 10.3 ppg, 5.8 rpg. Noteworthy: Texas became the fifth team in history to reach a No. 1 ranking then fall completely out of the poll in the same season. 9 WAKE FOREST DEMON DEACONS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: F Al-Farouq Aminu (69 so.), 15.9 ppg, 10.8 rpg; G Ishmael Smith (6-0 sr.), 13.3 ppg, 6.0 apg. Noteworthy: The Demon Deacons seemed assured of a spot in the NCAA tournament until a four-game losing streak late in the season put their season in doubt. 10 MISSOURI TIGERS How they got here: At-large bid. Key players: G Kim English (6-6 so.), 14.1 ppg, 3.5 rpg; G Marcus Denmon (63, so.), 11.0 ppg, 3.1 rpg. Noteworthy: Missouri is 1-3 since losing F Justin Safford (8.6 points, 4.1 rebounds) to a knee injury. 11 WASHINGTON HUSKIES How they got here: Won Pac-10 Conference tournament. Key players:F Quincy Pondexter (6-6 sr.), 20.2 ppg, 7.8 rpg; G Isaiah Thomas (5-8 so.), 17.2 ppg, 4.2 rpg, 3.0 apg. Noteworthy: Washington reached its first Pac-10 championship game since 2005, and won it. 12 CORNELL BIG RED How they got here: Ivy League regular-season champion. Key players: F Ryan Wittman (6-7 sr.), 17.5 ppg, 4.0 rpg, 1.9 bpg; C Jeff Foote (7-0 sr.), 12.3 ppg, 8.2 rpg, .623 FG%. Noteworthy: Wittman finished the season with an Ivy League record six three-pointers in the season finale en route to becoming the first Cornell player to hit 100 in one year. 13 WOFFORD TERRIERS How they got here: Won the Southern Conference tournament. Key players: F Noah Dahlman (6-6 jr.), 16.8 ppg, 6.3 rpg; F Jamar Diggs (62 jr.), 9.4 ppg, 2.9 rpg. Noteworthy: Wofford could make some NCAA noise after showing toughness against high-major programs. The Terriers defeated South Carolina and lost by 3 to Pittsburgh. 14 MONTANA GRIZZLIES How they got here: Won Big Sky Conference tournament. Key players: G Anthony Johnson (6-3 sr.), 19.6 ppg, 3.0 apg; C Brian Qvale (611 jr.), 9.7 ppg, 6.9 rpg. Noteworthy: Despite frequent use of 6-11 Qvale and 7-foot Derek Selvig on the court at the same time, the Grizzlies outrebounded opponents by a little less than three per game. 15 MORGAN STATE BEARS How they got here: Won MEAC tournament. Key players: G Reggie Holmes (6-4 sr.), 22.4 ppg, 4.2 rpg; F Kevin Thompson (6-9 so.), 12.6 ppg, 12.0 rpg. Noteworthy: Morgan State was able to make it back despite losing three of five starters from last year’s tournament team. 16 EAST TENNESSEE STATE BUCS How they got here: Won the Atlantic Sun Conference tournament. Key players: F Tommy Hubbard (6-4 jr.), 14.1 ppg, 8.3 rpg; G Micah Williams (6-4 jr.), 12.5 ppg, 3.5 rpg, Noteworthy: The Bucs win without superior three-point shooting. Williams is the only ETSU player among the team’s top 10 scorers shooting better than 35 percent from three.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 D5

NCAA Continued from D1 But winning the toughest conference’s regular-season title wasn’t the accomplishment it might have been for Syracuse. The Orange (28-4) lost to Georgetown in the Big East tournament quarterfinals. That pushed Syracuse down, below Duke, which was expected to vie with West Virginia for the final No. 1 spot. Winning the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament helped Duke vault over Syracuse and the Mountaineers. “Once again, we’re talking about the entire season,” selection chairman Dan Guerrero said. “We place value on that. Obviously, the big center for Syracuse got banged up. That’s an issue to some degree.” Before the committee even met, there was no question there will be a new national champion. Defending titlist North Carolina was on a long list of traditional powerhouses that didn’t receive spots in this year’s tournament. That list also included UCLA, Indiana, Connecticut and Arizona, which saw its NCAAleading string of appearances snapped at 25 years. It will mark the first time since 1966 that all five of those bigname schools failed to make the tournament. “It is strange because obviously those are formidable teams with great traditions,” Guerrero said. “But I believe it’s reflective of the culture of college basketball this year.” Now holding the longest current streak is Kansas (32-2), making its 21st straight appearance and coming into 2010 as the early 5-2 favorite in Vegas to win its second national title in three years. Leading the Jayhawks in the Midwest Region are Sherron Collins and Cole Aldrich, two key pieces in the team’s 2008 title run. The Jayhawks earned the overall No. 1 seed based on an 18-1 record against Big 12 foes, which includes three wins over Kansas State, a team in the mix for a top seed until falling to KU in the conference final Saturday. Among Kansas’ competition in the Midwest are Ohio State, Georgetown and last year’s national runner-up, Michigan State. “It will be a good recruiting mailout this week,” coach Bill Self said of the No. 1 overall seed. “After you look at the bracket,

you say, ‘Well, I don’t think we had a lot of favors done for us.’ ” Kansas and Kansas State were two of seven Big 12 teams in the draw. Another so-called power conference, the Pac-10, struggled all year and got punished. Only two teams — tournament champion Washington and regularseason champion Cal — made it. The Huskies got an 11th seed in the East. Those two spots were only half of what the Mountain West Conference received, led by regular-season champion New Mexico, which was seeded third in the East and watched the selection show in front of a packed crowd at The Pit. In all, eight at-large slots went to teams from smaller conferences. That was double the number of last year. Among those left out were Virginia Tech, Mississippi State — a 75-74 overtime loser to Kentucky in the SEC tournament final — and Illinois, which is 19-14 after a double-overtime loss to Ohio State in the Big Ten tournament semis. “It’s a close game, a call, a basket going in and out, and they don’t get the opportunity to be part of a special thing,” Illini coach Bruce Weber said. “I feel bad for them. I reminded them we let some things go early and that put us in a bind.” Weber refused, however, to play the expansion card: One of this season’s biggest topics has been the potential expansion of the field to 96 teams, an idea supported by some coaches but not so much by pundits. “This is the weakest at-large field in the history of the tournament,” ESPN’s Jay Bilas said, leading to the question of whether there were truly another 32 teams that were worthy. Those at-large teams included Florida, a No. 10 seed in the West after missing the last two years following two straight titles. “It was a stressful 48 hours not knowing if we were in or out,” forward Chandler Parsons said. Tubby Smith and Minnesota got in as a No. 11 seed, and UTEP made it as a 12th seed despite losing the Conference USA final to Houston, which stole a spot. Another spoiler was New Mexico State, which defeated Utah State in the Western Athletic final. Utah State made it anyway, as a No. 12 seed that gets to play its first games in nearby Spokane, Wash. — not a bad reward for one of the very last bubble teams. Last week, Guerrero said the committee wouldn’t weigh teams’ performances in their

last 12 games as heavily as in the past. How closely the committee toed that line, however, was still in question. Not up for debate was the reality that key injuries at tournament time make a difference to the committee. Onuaku hasn’t practiced since he was hurt, and Boeheim didn’t paint an optimistic picture for the first week. “I’m looking at it positive, taking it day by day,” Onuaku said. “It’s getting better, so I’m hoping for the best.” Purdue, meanwhile, was 24-3 and in contention for a top seed as late as Feb. 24. Then, highscoring forward Robbie Hummel tore up his right knee, and the Boilermakers lost two of the last five, including a 27-point loss to Minnesota. They dropped to the No. 4 seed in the South. “To have integrity in the field, you’ve got to place them in a place that’s appropriate without Robbie Hummel,” Guerrero said. “Without Robbie Hummel in the lineup, they’re a different team, no question about that.” Led by freshman John Wall, Kentucky (32-2) won its 26th SEC tournament and earned a top seed to try for its eighth national title. In his first year with the Wildcats, John Calipari became the first coach to post five straight 30-win seasons, and he’ll need six more to bring the first title back to the Bluegrass State since 1998. That’s a big task for a team that has three freshmen — Wall, DeMarcus Cousins and Eric Bledsoe — among its top four scorers. “We’re one of the youngest teams. We do so many dumb things,” Calipari said. “You’re up 18, then you look up and you’re up two. You have to keep your emotions in check, stay together, understand teams are going to come at you and you have to play harder than they play.” Duke and coach Mike Krzyzewski are seeking their first trip to the Final Four since 2004 and first national title since 2001. Led by Jon Scheyer and Kyle Singler, the Blue Devils (29-5) have won 12 of their last 13 and will open Friday against the winner of the opening-round game. “Our committee felt there was some value in that kind of season,” Guerrero said. “In the end, we just felt that kind of season Duke had, winning the conference, having some great wins and, of course, just winning the postseason tournament carried the day.”

HIGH GEAR: IRL

Andre Penner / The Associated Press

Mario Moraes, right, leaves his car after crashing with Marco Andretti at the start of the IndyCar race in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Sunday.

Rain-shortened IndyCar opener won by Power ed raining, finishing 15th. “I feel awesome,” Power said. “We battled it out, SAO PAULO, Brazil — Will Power made a it was a great day.” late overtaking move to grab the lead from Ryan There were only about three minutes left when Hunter-Reay to win the rain-shortened IndyCar Power overtook Hunter-Reay, breaking late to season opener on the streets of Sao Paulo on make the pass at the end of the long backstretch. Sunday. The win was extra special for Power, The Australian passed the American who last year sustained a season-ending with three laps to go, clinching the inauback injury in a crash in Sonoma and gural Sao Paulo Indy 300 for his second only landed a full-season deal with Pencareer victory. ske late. Power crossed the line 1.858 seconds “It’s been a tough recovery,” he said. ahead of Hunter-Reay when the race end“I’m very grateful to be given this oped at the two-hour time limit with only 61 portunity. I laid in bed at the hospital and of the 75 scheduled laps completed. never thought it was going to happen.” The race had to be red-flagged near Will Power The start of the race was marked by its halfway point after heavy rains made a scary incident involving U.S. driver track conditions unsafe, marking anothMarco Andretti, who escaped injury afer setback for the track which was initially being ter his car was hit from behind. The car of Brahailed as one of the highlights of the season but zilian driver Mario Moraes finished on top of faced problems throughout the weekend. Andretti’s and they slid tangled for several yards. Home crowd favorite Vitor Meira was third, The bottom of Moraes’ car appeared to be touchfollowed by compatriot Raphael Matos at the 2.6- ing Andretti’s helmet, and it took more than five mile, 11-turn Anhembi temporary circuit. minutes for officials to remove Moraes’ car so the Danica Patrick lost control of her car as it start- medical team could attend to Andretti. Andretti

By Tales Azzoni

The Associated Press

FORMULA ONE

Alonso takes victory in his Ferrari debut after a life-threatening crash last July in Hungary. SAKHIR, Bahrain — Fer“We were lucky with the rari’s decision to give up on problems of Sebastian Vetlast season and begin looking tel to pass,” Massa said. “I’m ahead paid off when very happy. It’s also Fernando Alonso the best start of led the Italian team my season. I rode to a 1-2 finish at the through the race norseason-opening Bahmal, with very good rain Grand Prix on pace. Thanks to God, Sunday. I’m fine.” The two-time Ferrari gave up world champion from on last season — its Spain passed team- Fernando worst run of results mate Felipe Massa at Alonso since 1993 — early to the second corner affocus on 2010. ter the start and then “After the very difovertook pole-sitter Sebastian ficult decision we had to take Vettel on the 34th lap for a lead last year — this shows the dehe would never relinquish. cision was right,” Ferrari team After two frustrating years principal Stefano Domenicali at Renault, Alonso pounded said. “The only way to react is his chest after jumping on to come back with results.” top of his car as Ferrari got Lewis Hamilton overtook off to its best start since 2004 Vettel at the same spot and — when Michael Schumacher the McLaren driver finished led a 1-2 start. Alonso was third ahead of his Red Bull signed in the offseason to re- opponent. place Kimi Raikkonen, who “We had control of the race also won in his Ferrari debut today and things we were on three years ago. top of the strategy — every“A very special day for me, thing was running smoothly,” coming back to the top of the Vettel said. “We should have podium is always special, but won today. It cost us a lot.” also more special with Ferrari Reliability cost Red Bull and the history of the team again — as it did last season and the expectations,” Alonso — something team principal said. “There is no better way Christian Horner called “very to start the relationship.” annoying. We really had the Affected by an engine prob- race under control.” lem, Vettel was soon after Nico Rosberg was more passed by Massa, who claimed than 40 seconds behind second on his return to racing Alonso in fifth place.

By Paul Logothetis

The Associated Press

Golf Continued from D1 “I love it over here. This is such a neat place.” The temperatures hit a sunny 60 degrees on the canyon floor that is home to Kah-Nee-Ta’s golf course. It is just the kind of weather that attracts some of the best club pros to the Kah-Nee-Ta Invitational each year. For most of the pros, the twoday tournament represents the first competitive round they have played since fall. That was the case for Scott Erdmann, the head pro at Oswego Lake Country Club. Erdmann shot a 2-over 74 Saturday, but shook off the rust to card a tournament-best 64 Sunday to finish in second place and win $1,000. “It’s an adjustment,” said Erdmann, who is used to playing this time of year on the soggy fairways of the Willamette Valley. “Those who play through the winter, you’re not used to seeing the ball bounce. It’s different.” George Mack Jr., the director of instruction at Black Butte Ranch, logged the best score of the Central Oregonians. Mack finished 1-over 145 to finish in eighth place. Chris Points, an assistant pro at Sunriver Resort’s Woodlands course, started the day in a tie for third place after shooting a 1-under 71 Saturday. But Points struggled to find his game Sunday and fell out of contention. “Yesterday was my fifth round of the year and today was the sixth round,” Points said. “So overall, I guess that wasn’t so bad.” John Delong, of Broadmoor Golf Course in Portland, shot a 1-over 145 to win the amateur gross competition. Satch Miller, of Kah-Nee-Ta, fired a 138 to win the amateur net division. Like the amateurs, Kawasoe was in midseason form. At 44 years old, the Astoria pro was among the oldest pro golfers in the field. And beating golfers who are at least a decade younger gave Kawasoe something other than the weather to celebrate. “It’s always fun to win,” Ka-

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Bend amateur Jon Matthys tees off on No. 2 Sunday during the sunny final round of the Kah-Nee-Ta Invitational, an Oregon PGA pro-am tournament at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino.

Results Oregon PGA, Kah-Nee-Ta Invitational, March 13-14 36-Hole Stroke Play Professionals — 1, John Kawasoe (Astoria Golf & CC), 134. 2, Scott Erdmann (Oswego Lake CC), 138. 3, Brian Nosler (Vanco Golf Range), 139. 4, Bruce Stewart (Arrowhead GC), 140. 5 (tie), Casey McCoy (Hood River Golf & CC), 142; Matt Dehlin (Corvallis CC), 142. 7, Bob Rannow (Sandpines GL), 144. 8, George Mack Jr, (Black Butte Ranch), 145. Senior Professionals — 1, Doug Hixson (Quail Valley GC), 142. 2, Scott Krieger (Broadmoor GC), 146. Amateurs — Gross: 1, John Delong (Broadmoor GC), 145. 2 (tie), Byron Patton (Broadmoor GC), 147; Dick Iverson (The Childrens Course), 147. 4 (tie), Eric DuLong (Broadmoor GC), 150; Patrick Woerner (Juniper GC), 150. 6 (tie), Ken Bartocci (Heron Lakes GC), 151; Anthony Guidon (Gearhart GL), 151, 8, Bruce Neelands (Kah-Nee-Ta), 152. 9, Jeff Keller (Awbrey Glen GC), 153. Net: 1, Satch Miller (Kah-Nee-Ta), 138. 2 (tie), Nick Miesle (Heron Lakes GC), 139; Fred Hamel (Astoria Golf & CC), 139. 4 (tie), Harry Paik (Kah-Nee-Ta), 140; Emerson Miller (Kah-Nee-Ta), 140. 6 (tie), Dennis Wade (Rock Creek CC), 141; Tyler Jacques (Oswego Lake CC), 141. 8 (tie), Kory Callantine (Juniper GC), 142; Jim Miller (Kah-Nee-Ta), 142; William Poole (Broadmoor GC), 142. Team (One Gross, Two Net of Foursome) — 1, Vanco Golf RangeBrian Nosler/Richard Gamble/Allen Gamble/Harry Paik/Jeff Keller, 389. 2, Astoria Golf & CC-John Kawasoe/Fred Hamel/Ron Johnson/Rob Nicholas/ Mark Utti, 395. 3, Black Butte Ranch-George Mack/John Delong/Steve Hval/John Kosydar/William Poole, 396. 4 (tie), Broadmoor Golf ClubScott Krieger/Eric DuLong/Byron Patton/Tim Kerr, 397; Kah Nee Ta-Cruz Bocanegra/Emerson Miller/John Matthys/Frank Knychief/Jay Keys, 397. 6, Juniper GC- Corey Beelke/Kory Callantine/Dave Ratzlaff/Patrick Woerner/ Mark MacLeod, 398.

wasoe said. “I’m not like the young guys who come out here and expect to win when they tee it up. So it’s fun to get it going and beat the young kids once in a while.”

“It’s a good way to start the year.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Schumacher gets 62nd victory in Top Fuel class The Associated Press GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Sixtime defending series champion Tony Schumacher has won the NHRA Top Fuel class at the Gatornationals. Schumacher beat teammate Antron Brown in the final Sunday. It was Brown’s first event since his deadly crash at Phoenix three weeks ago, when a tire spun off his dragster, bounced into the grandstands and killed a Wisconsin woman. The Top Fuel victory was the 62nd of Schumacher’s

NHRA career. It also was his fourth win at the Gatornationals, which tied him for the alltime record with Larry Dixon and Joe Amato. Tim Wilkerson, who hadn’t won a single heat this season, beat defending race winner Bob Tasca III in the Funny Car final. Jason Line won the Pro Stock class, and Eddie Krawiec claimed the Pro Stock Motorcycle title.

RACING SCOREBOARD IRL SAO PAULO INDY 300 Sunday At Sao Paulo Street Circuit Sao Paulo, Brazil Lap length: 2.6 miles (Starting position in in parentheses) 1. (5) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 2. (4) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 3. (16) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 4. (12) Raphael Matos, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 5. (18) Dan Wheldon, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 6. (7) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 7. (1) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 8. (19) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 9. (9) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 10. (6) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 11. (3) Justin Wilson, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 12. (17) EJ Viso, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 13. (22) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 14. (8) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 61, Running. 15. (13) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 60, Running. 16. (11) Simona De Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 58, Running. 17. (20) Mario Romancini, Dallara-Honda, 46, Contact. 18. (15) Alex Lloyd, Dallara-Honda, 30, Contact. 19. (2) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 28, Contact. 20. (14) Hideki Mutoh, Dallara-Honda, 27, Contact. 21. (24) Milka Duno, Dallara-Honda, 20, Contact. 22. (10) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 0, Contact. 23. (21) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 0, Contact. 24. (23) Mario Moraes, Dallara-Honda, 0, Contact. Race Statistics Winners average speed: 76.733. Time of Race: 2:00:57.7112. Margin of Victory: 1.8581 seconds. Cautions: 5 for 19 laps. Lead Changes: 7 among 5 drivers. Lap Leaders: Franchitti 1-23, De Silvestro 24-27, Hunter-Reay 28-36, Franchitti 37-42, Hunter-Reay 43-49, Briscoe 50-53, Hunter-Reay 54-57, Power 58-61. Points: Power 50, Hunter-Reay 40, Meira 35, Matos 32, Wheldon 30, Franchitti 29, Dixon 28, Conway 24, Castroneves 22, Kanaan 20.

FORMULA ONE BAHRAIN GRAND PRIX Sunday At Bahrain International circuit Sakhir, Bahrain Lap length: 3.91 miles 1. Fernando Alonso, Spain, Ferrari, 49 laps, 1:39:20.396, 115.744 mph. 2. Felipe Massa, Brazil, Ferrari, 49, 1:39:36.495 seconds behind. 3. Lewis Hamilton, England, McLaren, 49, 1:39:43.578. 4. Sebastian Vettel, Germany, Red Bull, 49, 1:39:59.195. 5. Nico Rosberg, Germany, Mercedes, 49, 1:40.609. 6. Michael Schumacher, Germany, Mercedes, 49, 1:44.559. 7. Jenson Button, England, McLaren, 49, 1:45.676. 8. Mark Webber, Australia, Red Bull, 49, 1:46.756. 9. Vitantonio Liuzzi, Italy, Force India, 49, 1:413.404. 10. Rubens Barrichello, Brazil, Williams, 49, 1:422.885. 11. Robert Kubica, Poland, Renault, 49, 1:429.489. 12. Adrian Sutil, Germany, Force India, 49, 1:443.354. 13. Jaime Alguersuari, Spain, Toro Rosso, 49, 1:453.052. 14. Nico Hulkenberg, Germany, Williams, 48, +1 lap. 15. Heikki Kovalainen, Finland, Lotus, 47, +2 laps. 16. Sebastien Buemi, Switzerland, Toro Rosso, 46, +3 laps, retired. 17. Jarno Trulli, Italy, Lotus, 46, +3 laps, retired. Not Classfied 18. Pedro de la Rosa, Spain, BMW Sauber, 28, retired. 19. Bruno Senna, Brazil, HRT, 17, retired. 20. Timo Glock, Germany, Virgin, 16, retired. 21. Vitaly Petrov, Russia, Renault, 13, retired. 22. Kamui Kobayashi, Japan, BMW Sauber, 11, retired. 23. Lucas di Grassi, Brazil, Virgin, 2, retired. 24. Karun Chandhok, India, HRT, 1, retired.

NHRA GATORNATIONALS Sunday At Gainesville Raceway Gainesville, Fla. Final Results Top Fuel Tony Schumacher, 3.797 seconds, 322.04 mph def. Antron Brown, 6.632 seconds, 101.17 mph. Funny Car Tim Wilkerson, Ford Mustang, 4.097, 303.78 def. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.192, 287.17. Pro Stock Jason Line, Pontiac GXP, 6.580, 210.14 def. Mike Edwards, GXP, 6.556, 211.16. Pro Stock Motorcycle Eddie Krawiec, Harley-Davidson, 6.899, 195.68 def. Shawn Gann, Buell, 6.908, 194.21. Top Alcohol Dragster Duane Shields, 5.362, 267.27 def. Darren Nicholson, 8.334, 114.93. Top Alcohol Funny Car Frank Manzo, Chevy Monte Carlo, 5.475, 265.33 def. Mickey Ferro, Monte Carlo, 5.498, 262.44. Pro Modified Kenny Lang, Chevy Corvette, 5.908, 243.68 def. Michael Gullqvist, Chevy Camaro, foul.


D6 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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HiLine Homes 24’x30’ Garage from HiLine Homes 2009 Hot Spot Mallorca Hot Tub from Oregon HotSpring Spas Smile Makeover: seen on Extreme Makeover from Steve Schwam, DDS Above-Ground Swimming Pool from Absolute Paradise Brand New 7 Person Artesian 744B Spa from Bend Spa & Hearth, LLC 2008 Smokercraft 12’ Aluminum Fishing Boat from All Seasons RV & Marine $5000 Eclipse Motorized Retractable Awning from Classic Coverings and Design

24 Light Crystal Chandelier - Installed from Quality Builders Lighting & Design

Amish Handcrafted 60” Round Table and Four Chairs from Dovetails Furniture

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Annual 7 Day Single Membership from Widgi Creek Golf Club

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Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set with Pedestal, Energy Star from Lance and Sandy’s Maytag

Cristal Brand 7 Light Pendant from Quality Builders Lighting & Design Outdoor Fire Pit from Cement Elegance Milgard Window Package ith installation from High Desert Glass Annual 7 Day Family Membership from Widgi Creek Golf Club

Six 40-Minute Body by Laser Weight Loss Sessions from Body by Laser $2500 Gift Certificate for Hunter Douglas Window Fashions from Classic Coverings and Design Down Filled Modern Sofa from Furnish

Energy RC-70 Tower Speakers from Better Ideas Audio & Video Hand-Knotted Rug from India from Area Rug Connection Carrier Furnace and Installation from Tri County Climate Control

Pair of Polk RTSFX 250 Watt In-Wall Speakers from Quality Builders Digital Living 16-Foot Esquif Ultra Light Canoe from Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe Cristal Brand Light Pendant from Quality Builders Lighting & Design Aspen Wardrobe Armoire Base with Top from Great American Home Furnishing New Lowrey Organ Purchase with 6 Classes from Moore Music Cristal Brand 5 Light Pendant from Quality Builders Lighting & Design

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Browse, Bid and Buy These Great Auction Items Online at www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Emerilware 10 Piece Stainless Steel Cookware Set

Keyano Aromatic Facial

Private Skate Party for 100 People

Laser Hair Removal

Private Skate Party for 50 People

Annual Golf Combo Passes and Combo Packages

Energy RC-30 Tower Speakers - Black

Luxury Table Linen by Karen Lee Ballard

Radiator Coolant Flush

Energy RC-70 Tower Speakers

Rega P-1 Turntable with Ortofon Cart.

3 Oil Changes for Car or Light Truck

Anti-Aging Algae Facial

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Luxury Table Linen by Patricia Spratt for Home

3-Night RV stay for two people

Aspen Wardrobe Armoire

MacGregor Bobby Grace GT Putter

Romance Package

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Aspen Wardrobe Armoire Base with Top

Family of Four Annual Golf Pass - 18 Holes Per Day

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Auto Remote Start System/Keyless Entry

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Shiatsu Massage Chair and Chi Weightloss

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10 Week Acoustic Piano RENTAL with 6 Lessons 10 Week Digital Piano RENTAL with 6 Lessons $100 Gift Certificate for Light Fixtures or Lamps

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Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set with Pedestal, Energy Star

Balcony Height 3 Piece Patio Set

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Foursome Package for 4 golfers

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500 Blocks of Jumbo Nursery Stone

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French Face Lift Facial

$500 Chiropractic Gift Certificate

Callaway FT-iQ Men’s Driver, 10 Degree

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French Face-Lift Facial with Vitamin Infusion and Exfoliation

Nevo C2 Universal Remote, Programmed

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Capresso MT500 Drip Coffee Maker

$1000 Gift Cert. toward Lennox System $1000 Gift Certificate for Carpeting and Pad $1000 Home Furnishings Gift Certificate $1000 Treatment Certificate 14 Carat White Gold Diamond Pendant 14 Karat White Gold Diamond Pendant $150 Gift Certificate for High Quality Horse Blankets $150 Gift Certificate for High Quality Saddle Pads $1500 Gift Certificate for Western Saddle, Crates, Circle Y or Rainsmen 16-Foot Esquif Ultra Light Canoe

$500 Gift Certificate for a Personalized Academic Program

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FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 541-382-1811


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Over& boys, 1st shots, well so541-401-3033 or 401-4334. batteries or catalytic constock sale. Lance & Sandy’s cialized, parents have pointverters. 7 days a week call Brittany Spaniel, neutered Maytag, 541-385-5418 541-390-6577/541-948-5277 ing traits, 541-389-0978 male, 16 mo, knows sit, stay, whaoa, heel & kennel, Lab Puppies, yellows, AKC, Bed, Juniper post & slab, queen size, $1600, this is a must housebroke, points & honors good blood lines, $300 205 for your bdrm, 541-923-3700 points, $500, 541-526-5004. males, $350 females, Items for Free 541-447-1323. Dick Idol Elk chair, exc. cond., burnished red pattern. Alpaca manure ready for all LAB PUPS, AKC yellows & $375. Call 541-383-2062 your landscaping and garden blacks, champion filled lines, needs. FREE 541-385-4989 OFA hips, dew claws, 1st Dining Room table and six upholstered chairs (two arm shots, wormed, parents on chairs). Wonderful new consite, $500/ea. 541-771-2330. Mower, Craftsman, hard startdition, warm brown, slightly www.kinnamanranch.com ing, runs, lots of good parts, Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, distressed solid wood. Made FREE, 541-390-8892. Labradoodles, Australian $250, 541-977-4686. in Hickory, NC. $375 Imports 541-504-2662 541-306-4582 RABBITS-one dutch rabbit adult Chihuahua/Sheltie pups (3), 10 www.alpen-ridge.com and one rex rabbit baby for weeks, look like mini Collies, Dining Table, glass top, 42” free w/ extras, 541-475-3893 $150, 541-536-5538 Labs, AKC, round, 4 chairs, gold leaf, exc. cond., $250. Companion cats free to seniors! excellent pedigree, 6 males, FIND IT! 541-548-9910 3 females 541-536-5385 Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. www.welcomelabs.com BUY IT! 389-8420, www.craftcats.org GENERATE SOME excitement in SELL IT! Electronic underground fence, Low cost vaccine and microyour neigborhood. Plan a gaThe Bulletin Classifieds rage sale and don't forget to chip clinic. Eastside Bend Pet INNEX, 2 collars, 1200’ 18 ga. advertise in classified! Express, Sat. Match 20th, wire, $200, 541-526-5004 385-5809. 10am-1pm. Call the Bend 208 English Bulldog Pups, 1 male & Spay & Neuter Project for 1 female, brindle w/white Pets and Supplies Great condition leather more info. 541-617-1010 $1200 ea. 541-290-0026 furniture set. Aspen Brand Miniature Pincher/Poodle – Prescott (#89) dark Feral Cats make great rodent The Bulletin recommends Mix Pups, look like poodles, brown in color, café sofa, control! Contact the Bend extra caution when 2 females, 1 black, 1 black & café loveseat and single Spay & Neuter Project for purchasing products or brown, $160 ea., born recliner all power/electric more info. All cats are alservices from out of the 1/2/10, 541-593-7455. motored – five recliners in tered and vaccinated. Availarea. Sending cash, checks, all. Pet free / non smokable on a donation basis. Mini Dachshund Pups, or credit information may 2 ing home. 2-yr. old set, Help us give them a second be subjected to fraud. For girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 parts remain under warchance. 541-617-1010 more information about an ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604. ranty. Call for photos or to advertiser, you may call the Free Dachshund, neutered view. $2,800. Call Oregon State Attorney male, 15 mo., reddish brown, More from Madras & Munch541-420-0794 kins, too! Cat Rescue, AdopGeneral’s Office Consumer to good home. 541-548-2203 tion & Foster Team rescued Protection hotline at FREE PET RABBIT - Senior 16 Munchkins from a Bend Log Bed, Twin, beautiful wood, 1-877-877-9392. mixed breed doe. Call backyard breeder last week, $200, please call (541)-322-5253 & another dozen cats & kit541-923-3700. tens from the Madras FREE to good home Pit Bull’s, 2 hoarder on Thurs. Some can MATCHING PIECES: full size sisters from same litter, headboard, night stand and be adopted soon, while othgreat with kids, housebroke, mirror, $50. 541-526-1068. Adoptions - Rescues: Do you ers have health issues that 1 black with white & 1 blue have an Aviary Bird that no will require some time to with white, 5 years old. Mattresses good one wants to take care of treat. We have baby kittens 541-480-8293 quality used mattresses, anymore? Or you’re working in foster homes, ready in a discounted king sets, too many hours? Or they are French Bulldog Pups, purecouple of weeks. See fair prices, sets & singles. just too demanding? I will bred, reg., dame and sire on www.craftcats.org for the full adopt your small or large site, born Valentines week541-598-4643. Munchkin story & to see our FREE birds for my private end, ready to go to new available cats, for an adophobby aviary, feather pickers, home April 10th, call to make tion application & directions. MODEL HOME loud & noisy, or just plain appnt. to visit. 541-771-0981 Open for visits/adoptions FURNISHINGS mean, all are welcome. I ask for Rob. Sat. & Sun., 1-5, other days Sofas, bedroom, dining, guarantee they will have a by appt. 389-8420, 65480 sectionals, fabrics, leather, Golden Retriever, female, 9 mo. good home. 541-410-9473. 78th St, Bend/Tumalo area. home office, youth, old, spayed, shots, not paaccessories and more. pered, $275. 541-306-0035 Norwich Terrier Pups, AKC, Adorable Bichon and poodle MUST SELL! rare, 2 males, 9 weeks, mix boy. Very cute markings. Golden Retriever Pups exc. (541) 977-2864 quality, parents OFA, good $1500 each, 360-378-1364 Ready to love $250. 541www.extrafurniture.com hips, $650. 541-318-3396. or sharonm@rockisland.com 504-9958

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O r e g o n

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Hot Tubs and Spas

Computers

Carbon 15 223 cal. pistol, 20 round clips, great gun - need cash. $650. 541-350-3616

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Aspen Wardrobe Armoire Base with Top Retail Value $1600 From Great American Home Furnishing

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

H&K USP 45 with H&K Universal Tactical Light. 2 mags. $850 541-948-5018 You Can Bid On: Maytag Front Load Washer and Dryer Set with Pedestal, Energy Star Retail Value $2299 From L a n c e & S a n d y ’ s M a yta g Sofa & Loveseat set, great cond., $600/both; Drexel Heritage Coffee Table & 2 end tables, $600/set; Thomasville Queen Anne 7 piece dining set, $800; China cabinet, $500; 2 Leather chairs, $300, 541-389-5519

Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW March 19, 20 & 21 Portland Expo Center NEW SHOW HOURS Fri. 12-6, Sat.9-5, Sun.10-4 I-5 exit #306B - Adm. $9 1- 800-659-3400 CollectorsWest.com

541-322-7253

SKS CHINESE RIFLE, very good condition, $300. 541-617-9348.

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Sporting Goods - Misc. Fully guided Spring Turkey Hunts w/ Webfoot Outfitters, Call for a free brochure, 541-661-6313. goosehunts@gmail.com

Washer/Dryer, GE, White, 4 yrs. old, exc. condition, $250, 541-548-5516, 541-548-6195

Health and Beauty Items

Pump Organ, Antique, 1883 Western Cottage, call 541-312-9592.

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US & Foreign Coin, Stamp & Currency collect, accum. Pre 1964 silver coins, bars, rounds, sterling fltwr. Gold coins, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental gold. Diamonds, Rolex & vintage watches. No collection to large or small. Bedrock Rare Coins 549-1658

241 You Can Bid On: Huntington House Love Seat and Chaise Lounge Retail Value $2800 From Dovetails Furniture Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Amish Hand-Crafted Sideboard with Small Hutch Retail Value $2400 From Dovetails Furniture

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Down Filled Modern Sofa Retail Value $2460 From Furnish

Bicycles and Accessories

You Can Bid On: 82" x 82" x 36" Spa, Fits 7 Retail Value $5995 From Bend Spa & Hearth, LLC

253

TV, Stereo and Video Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: New Lowrey Organ Purchase with 6 Classes Retail Value $1600 From Moore Music

259

Memberships Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

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You Can Bid On: Smile Makeover Retail Value $7600 From Steve Schwam, DDS

Coins & Stamps WANTED TO BUY

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Keyboard, Casio, $250 OBO, seen by appointment only, 541-536-9869

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

1910 Steinway Model A Parlor Grand Piano burled mahogany, fully restored in & out, $46,000 incl. professional West Coast delivery. 541-408-7953.

Bid Now!

Antiques & Collectibles You Can Bid On: Hand-Knotted Rug from India Retail Value $2000 From Area Rug Connection

Pre-owned jetted Phoenix Spa w/ wood skirting, newer pump & motor, comfy lounger, seats 4, w/ cover, buyer removes, $800. 541-526-0356, Eagle Crest.

Musical Instruments

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

248 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541- 280-6786.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257 You Can Bid On: Mallorca Hot Tub By Hot Spot Retail Value $7795 From H o t S p r i n g s S p a s

Student wants CAR OR TRUCK running or NOT! Call anytime. Daniel 541-280-6786. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Pups, $150 ea.

HUMANE SOCIETY OF REDMOND GARAGE SALE Fridays and Saturdays, March 5, 6, 12 and 13th from 9:00 - 5:00. For more information call 541-923-0882.

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Furniture & Appliances Furniture & Appliances

Furniture & Appliances

541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com/

A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

You Can Bid On: Pair of Polk RTSFX 250 Watt In-Wall Speakers Retail Value $2000 From Quality Builders Digital Living

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Bid Now!

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You Can Bid On: (6) 40 Minute Body by Laser Weight Loss Sessions Retail Value $2800 From Body by Laser

You Can Bid On: Annual 7 Day Family Membership Retail Value $3300 From Widgi Creek Golf Club

You Can Bid On: Energy RC-70 Tower Speakers Retail Value $2200 From Better Ideas Audio and Video

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Annual 7 Day Single Membership Retail Value $2400 From Widgi Creek Golf Club

Mongoose XTR Comp, 24 spd., disc’s, trail tires, exc., $400. 541-548-9910.

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing 1952 Winchester Model 12, 12 ga. Trap, SOLD; Winchester Model 97, 12 ga. pump, $475 OBO, Call 541-389-7385. 8mm Mauser, new, $275; SKS, Drugnav stock, $300; Russian SKS, new, $375; .22/S/A rifle, $130; Swarovski 6x18x50 scope, new, $1000; Browning, Belgium made, 12 ga., Gold Hunter w/ Pattern Master chokes, never fired, $975; Browning Citori, 12 ga., perfect, $1000; Rem. 1100 12 ga., $325. Ammo avail. 541-728-1036. A Private Party paying cash for firearms. 541-475-4275 or 503-781-8812. ATTN. BIRD HUNTERS Gateway Canyon Preserve is offering special March pricing on Pheasant and Chukar hunting while supplies last located just 11 miles North of Madras. Steve & Faith 541-475-2065 email: micmcm@madras.net

www.gatewaycanyonpreserve.com

AUTOMOTIVE Bob Thomas Car Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-2911 . . . . . . . . . . www.bobthomas.com Thomas Sales and Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-389-3031 . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.tsands.com

EMPLOYMENT Barrett Business Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-6946 . . . . . .www.barrettbusiness.com Flex Force Staffing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-749-7931 . . . . . . . . . . . .www.flex-force.com

MEDIA The Bulletin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .541-382-1811 . . . . . . . . . www.bendbulletin.com

For as low as $2.00 per day, your business, phone number, and Web address can be listed. Call 541-382-1811 to add your business and reach more than 80% of the market 7 days a week, 365 days a year.


E2 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 8:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 260

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Misc. Items

Misc. Items

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

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Bid Now!

Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 549-1592

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

BUYING DIAMONDS FOR CASH

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS 541-389-6655

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 408-2191. Crypt, Inside double companion, # 46604B in Deschutes Memorial Park, best offer. 541-207-3456 Corvallis

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

Bid Now!

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You Can Bid On: Cristal Brand 7 Light Pendant Retail Value $3806 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design Find exactly what you are looking for in the C LA SSIFIED S

Bid Now!

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You Can Bid On: $2500 Gift Certificate for Hunter Douglas Window Fashions Retail Value $2500 From Classic Covering & Design

You Can Bid On: Stick-Built 24’x30’ Garage Retail Value: $24,920. from HiLine Homes Used kitchen cabinets & bathroom vanities, $200 OBO or trade. 541-279-8826

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Farm Equipment and Machinery You Can Bid On: Outdoor Fire Pit Retail Value $3500 From Cement Elegance SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 548-3949.

270

FOUND: Cat, grey long haired, Redmond, collar/bell-behind High School. 541-548-8719

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www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

You Can Bid On: Cristal Brand Light Pendant Retail Value $1690 From Quality Builders Lighting & Design

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You Can Bid On: 15’x25’x52’ Swimming Pool Retail Value $6500 From Absolute Paradise

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TIMBER WANTED Warm Springs Forest Products Call Dean Rowley 503-260-5172 Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Wine Barrel, authentic, used, European, great shape, $250. 541-279-8826 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

261 You Can Bid On: 24 Light Crystal Chandelier - Installed Retail Value $4800 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

Medical Equipment Invacare Patient Lift, Hydraulic, new seating sling with capacity for over 400 lbs. $250. Can email pics upon request. 541-504-0975.

264

Snow Removal Equipment MTD Snow Blower, 5.5 HP, 24”, like new, $400. Call 541-548-9910

265

Building Materials You Can Bid On: 6 Light Pendant Retail Value $4232 From Quality Builders Lighting and Design

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

• Receipts should include,

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole cords for as low as $150. Bend Del. Cash, Check, Visa/MC. 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Log Truck loads of dry Lodgepole firewood, $1200 for Bend Delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more information. Seasoned Doug Fir, Juniper or Lodgepole $170 a cord split and delivered. Call 541-977-2040.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 John Deere Rider LX 277 AWS, 48” low hours, new $5200 now $2500. 280-7024. Need help fixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and find the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Log bridge, decorative, 8’ long, 2’ wide, great for dry creek bed or small creek, $350, 541-923-3700.

Wheat Straw: Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Compost, 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

345

Livestock & Equipment

Bid Now!

267

Quality Hay,small bales in barn, Alfalfa 1st, 2nd, & 3rd, Orchard Grass 2nd, Feeder hay delivery avail. $85/ton & up. 541-771-9270,541-475-3379

Saddles, 1 Circle Y Show, mint cond. $1200, 1 (Dressage) made by Hans Biglizer good cond. $600 480-4342

FOUND: Keys at Deschutes Country Fair Grounds on 3/7. To identify, 541-548-5516. Nokka grapple loader/trailer. Heavy duty loader and trailer ideal for a variety of lifting and hauling jobs. $15,000 (541) 554-5759

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Eclipse Motorized Retractable Awning Retail Value $5000 From Classic Coverings & Design

Hay, Grain and Feed

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

FOUND: Black metal cane on 3/7 on Newport Avenue, Bend. 541-410-1093.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Carrier Furnace and Installation Retail Value $2000 From Tri County Climate Control

MacDon 1991 Swather 14’ Cummins Diesel 920 header conditioner, exc. cond. heat, A/C, radio, everything works $16,500. 541-419-2713.

Lost and Found

Bid Now!

You Can Bid On: Milgard Window Package with installation Retail Value $3500 From High Desert Glass

300 308

Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 385-5809

325

Farm Market

Found: Large set of car keys & others on the corner of Savannah & Derek Dr. 389-5845

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

LOST: Black male short hair cat, Near SW 35th & Metolius Meadow Ct. "Max". Reward! 541-749-0393 Lost Brown Tabby Cat, with pretty green eyes, off Boyd Acres/Fred Meyers Rds, very shy, reward, 541-312-0054 LOST: Little gray cat on 2/27, Tumalo Rd. & Valeview, missed by children, reward on return no questions asked, 541-977-5409, 647-2630 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

280

Estate Sales DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

SKYJACK SCISSOR LIFT, 26' height, factory re-condition 7/09, excellent condition $5145, 541-416-0246.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay, barn stored, no rain , 2 string , 425 tons at $140/ton & tons $120/ton 541-549-3831 Patterson Ranch Sisters Alfalfa hay, 2 string, very nice & green, clean, no rain, in barn, 1st & 3rd cuttings, bale or ton, $115/ton & up, 541-408-5463, 541-475-6260 Barn Stored Bluegrass Straw, clean & green, 3X3 mid-size bales, $22/bale, volume discounts available, Madras, call 541-480-8648. Cheaper Than Feed Store! Premium Orchard Grass Hay, small, square, no rain, weedless, in barn, $8.50/bale. Buy 1 or a few/you pick up, we’ll store the rest until needed. By ton, 1st cut/$165, 2nd cut/$175. Near Alfalfa Store. 1-316-708-3656 or e-mail kerrydnewell@hotmail.com

Corriente Long Horn Cross Roping Steers 1 year old $300 each 541-420-4379 please leave a message.

Small Nubian Dairy Goat Herd bred does, dry yearlings & one mature Buck, will sell single also discount for multiple purchase call evenings 541-548-1857. THE OL'E TACK ROOM is back . Along with Home Grown Furnishings. OPENING March 17th at 10:00am. Located on the corner of 7th & Cook in Tumalo. Phone: 541-312-0082. Come see us & our NEW Additions ~ The Coffeee is on!

347

Llamas/Exotic Animals Alpacas for sale, fiber and breeding stock available. 541-385-4989.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Custom Farming: Roto-till, disc, fertilize, seed, ponds, irrigation, sprinkler systems, irripod irrigation systems, call 541-383-0969.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Excellent grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $160/ton. FREE grapple loading, 2nd cutting avail. Delivery available. 541-382-5626,541-480-3059

HEY!

HAY!

Alfalfa $115 a ton, Orchard Grass $115 a ton. Madras 541-390-2678. Orchard Grass Hay, shed stored, guaranteed quality, 25 bales/ton, $145/ton, 3 plus ton, $140/ton, 541-382-3023. Tumalo Area. Premium Quality Orchard Grass, Alfalfa & Mix Hay. All Cert. Noxious Weed Free, barn stored. 80 lb. 2 string bales. $160 ton. 548-4163.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Caregivers VISITING ANGELS is looking for compassionate and reliable caregivers for all shifts incl. weekends. 1 year experience required. Must pass background check and drug test. Apply at Whispering Winds, 2920 NW Conners, Bend.

Management Team of 2 for on-site storage facility, exc. computer skills and customer service req., Quickbooks a plus. Apt., util. + salary incl. Fax resume to 541-330-6288.

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

454 Caregiver, female, RN, background in Dementia & elder- Customer Service Working as part of our Sercare, will travel & transport, vice Support department, competitive rates, Yellowknife Wireless is look541-548-3660. ing for innovative, highly motivated Customer Service 470 Technicians. Interested parties please respond to our Domestic & job offer form at: In-Home Positions http://www.ykwc.com/jobs/ Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female part time, transportation & refs. 541-385-0177

476

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

541-617-7825

Unique Alpaca Apparel. We’re located just outside of Sisters off Hwy 20. Call 541-385-4989 or visit us at www.alpacasofidyllwild.com

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Looking for Employment

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Alcohol & Drug Counselor: Adult/Juvenile. Seeking full time, state Certified, salary DOE, send resume to: Pfeifer & Associates, 23 NW Greenwood Ave. Bend, OR 97701 or fax to 541-383-4935.

DRIVER Tow Truck Operator Must have clean driving record. Part time, including weekends. Apply or send resume to: American Towing, 61532 American Lp. #3, Bend, OR 97702 Front Desk /CSR Prineville Disposal Front Desk Receptionist/CSR Specialist. Tired of the commute? Small family owned local business has a fast paced full-time position available. Hours are 7:00am-4:00pm Mon.-Fri. Pay DOE and full benefits. Application available at www.prinevilledisposal.comsubmit with resume to our office in person. No phone calls please.

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist

Looking for stellar stylist to join our accomplished four at Planet Hair. Lease station, graduated rent, professional, comfortable, unpretentious centrally located stable salon. Call Gail at 541-388-4090.

Janitorial The Bulletin has an opening for a janitorial position. Hours are 11:00pm to 7:30am, Sun. - Thurs. Must be able to lift 50 lbs. Experience is preferred. Please send resume to: Box 16093163, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Medical Billing/Collection Professional Incl. receptionist & office duties; part-time; must have exp. in medical field; holds current certification in coding & billing; incl. cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. 16073734 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Medical MA/LPN Fall Creek Internal Medicine is seeking dynamic skilled individual for full time 4 day a week position experience required, successful candidate will have basic triage skills, working knowledge of medications, enjoy multi tasking practice OSHA compliance and participate in team culture, competitive salary, health & dental benefits, 401K package, fax resume to: 541-389-2662 attn: Nita Medical

Phlebotomy

Certification Workshop 1-Day, 100% Hands-On info@cvas.org 1-888-308-1301 Quality Control Earn up to $100 a day, evaluate retail stores, training provided, no exp. req. Sign up fee. 877-664-5362

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386 Laboratory Assistant Interpath Laboratory is looking for a full-time lab assistant. Experienced phlebotomy skills, customer service and computer skills preferred. Mon. - Fri., variable day shifts and locations in Bend & Redmond. Schedule flexibility required. Competitive pay + benefits. Email resume to jobs@interpathlab.com or fax to (541)278-8316

Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments. 16073460 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!


THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 E3

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 476

Employment Opportunities Sales & Marketing Professional for medical practice. Looking for proven local networking skills, up to $40K. prior sales & work in medical field req., incl. cover letter outlining qualifications & accomplishments.Bx 16073460, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 Tele Fundraising for Non-profit Organization: Students, seniors, homemakers & others, great suplimental income. Part time permanent AM/PM shifts. Mon.-Fri. $8.40-$12.00 hr. to start DOE. 541-382-8672

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

486

Independent Positions CAUTION

Finance & Business

500 600

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

650

Spacious Quiet Town home 2 Bdrm. 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private Balcony and lower Patio, storage W/S/G paid $650 2024 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

Foxborough, cute 3/2 fenced yard 1200 sq.ft. W/D $850+dep. 541-389-2260 The Rental Shop www.rentmebend.com

Houses for Rent NE Bend

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Real Estate Contracts

Rooms for Rent

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

Quiet furnished room in Awbrey Heights, no smoking etc.$350+dep 541-388-2710

1015 Roanoke Ave., $610 mo., $550 dep., W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, near college, no smoking/pets. 420-9848.

Room in spacious 3 bdrm. home, Wells Acres area, utils incl., $500, 541-280-0016. Secluded Guest House, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, semi-furnished, all appl., W/D, no pets/smoking, $750/mo. All util. paid. 541-390-0296

528 WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

631

Condominiums & Townhomes For Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll fi nd it in The Bulletin Classifi eds

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

W IN N IN G T E A M O F S A L E S / P R O M O T IO N P R O F E S S IO N A L S A R E M A K IN G A N A V E R A G E O F $400 - $800 PER WEEK D O IN G S P E C IA L E V E N T , T R A D E S H O W , R E T A IL & G R O C E R Y S T O R E P R O M O T IO N S W H IL E R E P R E S E N T IN G THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL (253) 347-7387 DAVID DUGGER OR BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz 65155 97th St., newer 1/1 duplex on 2.5 acres w/ kitchen, 1 garage, mtn. views, $750 incls. util. No pets. 541-388-4277,541-419-3414

Furnished studio condo, all utils paid, no pets, swimming pool & hot tub, close to town & river, references, $550, 1st, last, dep, 541-382-3672 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES: Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Move In Special $99 2007 SW Timber. 2/1.5 $545 mo.+ dep 541-389-2260 THE RE.NTAL SHOP www.rentmebend.com

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/D incl. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 382-3678 or

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall St., Bend. To see, is to appreciate, no smoking/pets, $1000/all util. paid. Call 541-389-2389 for appnt.

Loans and Mortgages

Sales

WE

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

630

507

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Rentals

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Move In Special, Townhome, garage, gas heat, loft/office, W/D, 2640 NW College Way, #3. 541-633-9199 www.cascadiapropertymgmt.com

Small cute studio, all utilities paid, close to downtown and Old Mill. $450/mo., dep. $425, no pets. 330-9769 or 480-7870.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Newer 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath townhouse, many upgrades, W/D, kitchen appl., dbl. garage, near Downtown & schools, $825/mo. 707-322-3305 Newer Tri-Plex, 2 bdrm., 2 bath. 1300 sq. ft., garage w/ opener, W/S/G paid, W/D + all kitchen appl. incl., next to park, near shopping, $650/mo.+sec. dep. 541-604-5534

NOW RENTING!

Fully subsidized 1 and 2 bdrm Units Equal Opportunity

2400 sq. ft. home, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, gas fireplace, dbl. garage, 3 years old, 63070 NW Angler Ave. Pet neg., $800/mo. 541-610-5801 $950, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, fenced yard, all gas, some appl., no smoking, pets okay, 1648 NW Elgin, 541-633-0572, 541-323-6965 A Rent-To-Own -- or Not: Westside 2 bdrm, 1 bath cottage with loft & upper deck, large fenced yard, gas heat, alley parking, across from Columbia Park & river access, $900, 541-617-5787. Great NW Location! 3 bdrm., 2 bath, garage & driveway short walk to downtown, river & Old Mill, pet? $1000 Avail. 4/1. 503-729-3424 .

Cabinetry

Excavating

A & R Paintworks

All Aspects of Construction Specializing in kitchens, entertainment centers & bath remodels, 20+ yrs. exp. ccb181765.. Don 385-4949

Three Phase Contracting Excavation, rock hammer, pond liners, grading, hauling, septics, utilities, Free Quotes CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393

Debris Removal

Check out the classifieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Find It in

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

Hauling, Spring Clean-Up, Fire Fuel Removal. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Building/Contracting

Drywall

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex 419-3239 CCB#170585

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

Excavating

A

COZY 2+2, garage, w/ decks & lots of windows, hot tub, wood stove & gas heat, furnished/unfurnished. Near Lodge $1050. 541-617-5787

Real Estate For Sale

700

Ridgemont Apartments

Automotive Service

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Provider Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest & Ter- Westside Condos, 2 bdrm., 1 Equal Housing LOVELY WESTSIDE 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595; 1 bdrm., 1 bath, rebonne. Appl. included, Opportunity bath home, Riverside neigh$550; woodstove, W/S/G Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with borhood, pets accepted with Sunriver, 3/2, dbl. garage, wapaid, W/D hookups. garages, 541-504-7755. 705 dep. & ref. $790/mo. + dep. ter paid, .5 acre, short walk (541)480-3393 or 610-7803 Heather, 541-815-7476. to river, community boat ramp, Real Estate Services NE Bend, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, 2 $795+$795 dep., no smok638 decks, sunny, skylight, W/D On 10 Acres between Sisters & ing, pet neg. 541-420-0208. hookup, fenced, private, Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 2210 SW 19th St. Private Money for Real Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 Redmond, OR W/S/G paid, cats ok, very Estate Loans no credit, sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ 675 (541) 548-7282 nice, $650 mo, 541-350-0958 A Cute, Clean 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath bad credit OK. Alan, Redwood stove, all new carpet & RV Parking wood Financial Services EHO duplex, on quiet street near paint, +1800 sq.ft. shop, Rent/Lease Option, 650 541-419-3000 (ML-3100) Country Club, nearly new Private secluded studio atfenced for horses, $1095, sq.ft. 1 bdrm., 2 bath Near KEYSTONE RV PARK carpet, dishwasher, fireplace, tached to large shop, W/D, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803. Park, River, downtown & * Real Estate Agents * Downtown, near shopping, W/D hookup, large private fridge, W/S/G incl, NW RedCOCC, indoor pool $750 incl. * Appraisers * 305 E Burnside, 18-40’ backyard w/ storage, 20360 mond, 3 mi. to High School, Westside Cutie! 2 Bdrm., 1 util. Sharon 541-408-0337 * Home Inspectors * spaces, W/S/G/cable, OverFairway Dr., $665/mo. Small bath, gas, W/D, fenced yard, $550, pets ok, 541-548-5948 Etc. nighters OK. 541-382-2335 pet neg. Call for specials, no smoking or pets $825/ 632 The Real Estate Services classiDays, 541-306-1378. Evemo.+ dep. Close to Newport 648 Apt./Multiplex General 676 fication is the perfect place to nings, 541-382-2716 Mkt. & COCC. 541-388-7541. Houses for reach prospective B U Y E R S Mobile/Mfd. Space The Bulletin is now offering a AND SELLERS of real es640 Rent General 654 LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE tate in Central Oregon. To Mobile Home lot for rent Houses for Rent Rental rate! If you have a Apt./Multiplex SW Bend A 1+1 Log cabin w/loft & place an ad call 385-5809 in Beautiful Prineville! home to rent, call a Bulletin SE Bend balcony in the pines, wrap No deposit. Will pay to move Old Mill Studio, separate enClassified Rep. to get the around deck, 1.5 acres, front your home! Call Bobbie trance, new carpet & paint, new rates and get your ad & back landscaping, garage, Clean 3 bdrm., 1.75 bath, large at 541-447-4464. all utilities paid $500 mo. started ASAP! 541-385-5809 fenced yard, quiet cul-de-sac, $900/mo., 541-617-5787. plus $500 deposit. Small pet 740 $1100/mo. + deps. Pets negotiable. 541-382-1941. 634 Sunriver: Furnished 3 bdrm, 2 okay. 20561 Dorchester East. Condominiums & bath, 3 decks, 2 car garage, 541-410-8273,541-389-6944 Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 642 Townhomes For Sale W/D incl., $875 mo. w/lease. Apt./Multiplex Redmond 14 Timber, please call 656 MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE $99 1st Month! 541-345-7794,541-654-1127 Houses for Rent C O N D O , ski house #3, end 2/1.5 $545, Clean Units, Great 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, with garage. Location, Move In Special, Hud The Bulletin is now offering a unit, 2 bdrm, sleeps 6, comSW Bend $675 mo. - $250 dep. plete remodel $197,000 LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE OK, 2007 Timber Ave. The Alpine Meadows 330-0719 furnished. 541-749-0994. Rental rate! If you have a 2 Bdrm., 1.5 bath 1084 sq.ft. Rental Shop. 541-389-2260 Professionally managed by home to rent, call a Bulletin www.rentmebend.com newer carpet & paint, woodNorris & Stevens, Inc. 687 Classified Rep. to get the 744 stove, garage fenced yard on 2553 SW 20th St.- 2/1 dunew rates and get your ad .92 acre lot $795 Commercial for Open Houses plex, garage, yard, W/D started ASAP! 541-385-5809 (541)480-3393 or 610-7803. Rent/Lease hookup, on cul-de-sac, $600 FSBO: Open house, Sat.-Sun., + dep, incl. yard maint., No 2 Bdrm., 1 Bath Mobile Home 650 654 SW 25th, Redmond, pets/smoking. 541-382-1015 w/ stove & W/D, W/S/G Light Industrial, various sizes, 1370 Sq.ft., 3 bdrm., 2 bath, Houses for Rent North and South Bend locapaid, $565/mo.+$250 sec. new carpet, tile, windows, 3/2, Newer 1 Story Duplex, tions, office w/bath from dep. Pets okay. NE Bend $119,000, 541-979-1920 w/big yard, vaults, garage $400/mo. 541-317-8717 541-382-8244 w/opener, all appl., central 2200 sq. ft. 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, gas heat, no smoking, pets 745 fenced backyard. Available On the way to the Mt. Bachelor, neg., $725, 541-280-3152. near downtown Bend 3/2.5, now. $1150, first, security, Have an item to Homes for Sale 2000 sq.ft. open floor plan, and screening. Pets neg. Ask Us About Our dbl. garage 19424 SW Brooksell quick? If it’s 541-306-7968. *** MARCH IN SPECIAL! side Way. $1200. 408-0086 CHECK YOUR AD 2 bdrm, 1 bath starting at under $500 you 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, single car gaPlease check your ad on the $550 mo. Close to schools, rage, storage, W/D hookup, 658 can place it in first day it runs to make sure on-site laundry, non-smokfenced yard, exc. location, $100 Move In Special Houses for Rent it is correct. Sometimes ining units, stg. units, carport, additional parking, $750 The Bulletin Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1 bath, quiet structions over the phone are dog run. Approved pets Redmond mo+dep. 541-382-8399. complex, covered parking, misunderstood and an error okay. 541-923-1907 Classifi eds for W/D hookups, near St. can occur in your ad. If this OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS A newer Redmond 4 bdrm., 2 $ Charles. $550/mo. Call happens to your ad, please www.redmondrents.com 10 - 3 lines, 7 days bath, 1600 sq. ft., family 541-385-6928. contact us the first day your room, mostly fenced, nice $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days Ask Us About Our ad appears and we will be yard, RV parking, $850. 55+ Hospital District, 2/2, happy to fix it as soon as we (Private Party ads only) March in Special! 541-480-3393,541-389-3354 1 level, attached garage, A/C, can. Deadlines are: WeekStarting at $500 gas heat, from $825-$925. days 12:00 noon for next Office/Warehouse space Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 for a 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Call Fran, 541-633-9199. day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sun3584 sq.ft., & 1680 sq.ft. bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., Clean, energy efficient nonwww.cascadiamgmt.com day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. $695/mo. 1st, last. No in30 cents a sq.ft. 827 smoking units, w/patios, 2 If we can assist you, please side pets. Mtn. views. Business Way, 1st mo. + dep., FREE MONTHS RENT on-site laundry rooms, storcall us: 503-829-7252, 679-4495 Contact Paula, 541-678-1404. Beautiful 2/2.5 , util., garage, age units available. Close to 385-5809 gas fireplace, no smoking orschools, pools, skateboard Office/Warehouse Space, Cute 2 bdrm, 1 bath cotThe Bulletin Classified pets. $650 1st+last+sec. park, ballfield, shopping cennice 350 sq. ft. office w/ tage on corner lot, well *** (541)382-5570, 420-0579. ter and tennis courts. Pet bath, 1250 sq. ft. warehouse, established neighborhood, friendly with new large dog 14’ overhead door, 63065 FSBO: $249,000 Furnished 2/2 fully fenced yard, 1.5 car deCheck out the run, some large breeds okay Sherman Rd., Bend. 1 block tached garage, new carpet/ dbl wide/shop & farm equip. classifieds online 3 bdrm., 2 bath, large dbl. gawith mgr approval. from Empire & Hwy 97. paint, W/D, fridge provided, 40 acre lot fenced/gated. rage, large fenced yard, RV www.bendbulletin.com Chaparral Apts. $650/mo. 541-815-9248. walk to schools, shopping/ Pond, good well. 2 mi. E. of or toy parking, near schools, 244 SW Rimrock Way Updated daily downtown, well behaved Mitchell, OR. Seller Finance 541-385-1515 541-923-5008 pet(s) okay, $650, 1st & $800 FIND IT! Sharon 541-408-0337 www.redmondrents.com HOSPITAL AREA BUY IT! dep., call 541-280-4825. Clean, quiet townhouse, 2 NOTICE: SELL IT! AVAIL. NOW (2) nice duplexes, master bdrms, 2.5 bath, all All real estate advertised Fabulous 3/2.5 on corner Looking for your next quiet neighborhood 2 bdrm., The Bulletin Classifieds kitchen appliances, w/d hook here in is subject to the Fedlot, great neighborhood, near employee? 2 bath, 1 car garage, fenced up, garage w/ opener, gas eral Fair Housing Act, which Place a Bulletin help high school,community pool/ The Bulletin is now offering a backyard, fully landscaped, heat, a/c, w/s/g pd. makes it illegal to advertise wanted ad today and park, $1200, 925-978-5304 LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE more info call 541-545-1825. $645/mo + deposit. any preference, limitation or reach over 60,000 suzanneverhaeg@hotmail.com Rental rate! If you have a 541-382-2033 discrimination based on race, readers each week. Bringin’ In The Spring home to rent, call a Bulletin color, religion, sex, handicap, Great Location, freshly Your classified ad will Classified Rep. to get the SPECIALS! PILOT BUTTE TOWNHOME familial status or national painted, 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, also appear on new rates and get your ad 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, fire- • 1/2 off 1st mo. rent. origin, or intention to make dbl. garage, fenced yard, pets bendbulletin.com which started ASAP! 541-385-5809 place. Only $710 per month • $200 security deposit on any such preferences, limitaokay, $625/mo. + dep. currently receives over w/ one year lease. 12-mo. lease. tions or discrimination. We 541-788-9027 1.5 million page views 693 Call 541-815-2495 • Screening fee waived will not knowingly accept any every month at Offi ce/Retail Space Studios, 1 & 2 bdrms from Nice 2 bdrm., 2 bath , dbl. advertising for real estate no extra cost. Rent Special - Limited Time! $395. Lots of amenities. Pet garage, 5724 SW Shad Rd., which is in violation of this for Rent Bulletin Classifieds $525 & $535 friendly, w/s/g paid CRR. $700/mo.+dep. law. All persons are hereby Get Results! 1/2 off 1st month! THE BLUFFS APTS. informed that all dwellings Clean 3 bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. An Office with bath, various Call 385-5809 or place 2 Bdrm with A/C & Carports 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond advertised are available on garage, 13879 SW Cinder sizes and locations from your ad on-line at Fox Hollow Apts. 541-548-8735 an equal opportunity basis. Dr., CRR. $850/mo.+dep. $250 per month, including bendbulletin.com (541) 383-3152 The Bulletin Classified 541-350-1660,541-504-8545 utilities. 541-317-8717 GSL Properties Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140

Quality & affordable, auto body & paint work. Rocky Fair, 541-389-2593 after 4 p.m.

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. Visa & MC. 389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded, Insured, CCB#181595 Home Help Team since 2002 541-318-0810 MC/Visa All Repairs & Carpentry ADA Modifications www.homehelpteam.org Bonded, Insured #150696

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching and Aeration Weekly Maintenance Thatching * Aeration Bark * Clean Ups Lawn Over-Seeding Commercial & Residential Senior Discounts Serving Central Oregon for More than 20 years!

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Debris Hauling •Aeration /Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds Ask us about

FREE AERATION AND FERTILIZATION With New Seasonal Mowing Service

Fire Fuels Reduction

“YOUR LAWN CARE PROFESSIONALS”

Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Pruning •Edging •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

382-3883

Landscape Maintenance

Fertilizer included with monthly program

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

748

Northeast Bend Homes Mountain View Park 1997 3/2, mfd., 1872 sq.ft., in gated community $179,000. Terry Storlie, Broker John L. Scott Realty. 541-788-7884

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

749

Southeast Bend Homes 3 Bdrm., 1.75 bath, 1736 sq. ft., living room w/ wood stove, family room w/ pellet stove, dbl. garage, on a big, fenced .50 acre lot, $189,900. Randy Schoning, Broker, Owner, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393.

771

Lots WOW! A 1.7 Acre Level lot in SE Bend. Super Cascade Mountain Views, area of nice homes & BLM is nearby too! Only $199,950. Randy Schoning, Broker, John L. Scott, 541-480-3393.

773

Acreages 2.26 ACRES, NE Bend, exclusive neighborhood. $285,000. Reduced to $260,000 541-306-7357 See www.bigbrick.com/3590

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Single Wide, 2 bdrm., 1 bath, Pines Mobile Home Park, new roof, heat pump, A/C, new carpet, $10,000. 541-390-3382

WILL FINANCE, 2 Bdrm., 1 bath, new carpet, fireplace, large backyard, range, W/D, fridge, incl., $1000 down, $175/mo., 541-383-5130.

541-279-8278 Roof/gutter cleaning, debris hauling, property clean up, Mowing & weed eating, bark decoration. Free estimates. Yard Doctor for landscaping needs. Sprinkler systems to water features, rock walls, sod, hydroseeding & more. Allen 536-1294. LCB 5012.

Repair & Remodeling Service: Kitchens & Baths

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Moving and Hauling U Move, We Move, U Save Hauling of most everything, you load or we load short or long distance, ins. 26 ft. enclosed truck 541-279-8826

BIG

RED’S LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Weekly Maintenance Clean Up’s. Free Estimates Call Shawn, 541-318-3445.

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, Spring Cleanup Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Structural Renovation & Repair Small Jobs Welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. We move walls. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate Steve 977-4826 •CCB#166678 CLASSIC TILE BY RALPH Custom Remodels & Repairs Floors, Showers, Counter Tops Free Estimates • Since 1985 541-728-0551 • CCB#187171

Painting, Wall Covering

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

ecologiclandscaping@gmail.com

Remodeling, Carpentry

Gregg’s Gardening & Lawn Maintenance. I Can Take Care Of All Of Your Yard Care Needs! Free estimates, 233-8498. Redmond area only.

Reach thousands of readers!

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Offering up to 3 Free Visits. Specializing in Pavers. Call 541-385-0326

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Home Improvement Collins Custom Woodworks: Provides honest, reliable service, specializing in carpentry, decks, remodels & furniture, CCB#173168, 541-815-2742.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Looking to sell your home? Check out Classification 713 "Real Estate Wanted"

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT

745

Homes for Sale

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

Tree Services Three Phase Contracting Tree removal, clearing, brush chipping, stump removal & hauling. FREE QUOTES CCB#169983 • 541-350-3393


E4 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels COLORADO 5TH WHEEL 2003 , 36 ft. 3 Slideouts $27,000. 541-788-0338

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 870

870

Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

800

16’ FISHER 2005 modified V with center console, sled, 25 HP Merc 4-stroke, Pole holders, mini downriggers, depth finder, live well, trailer with spare, fold-away tongue. $8500 OBO. 541-383-8153.

850

17’ MARLIN 1993, 30 hours on motor. Only $3700! Call 541390-1609 or 541-390-1527.

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 700cc 2001 1 Mtn. Max $2500 OBO, 1 recarbed $2200 O B O low mi., trailer $600, $5000 FOR ALL, 541-536-2116.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON 1200 Custom 2007, black, fully loaded, forward control, excellent condition. Only $7900!!! 541-419-4040

Harley Davidson 1200 XL-C 2005, stage 2 kit, Vance & Hines Pipes, lots of chrome, must see, $8000, 541-408-7020

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail 1988, 1452 original mi., garaged over last 10 yrs., $9500. 541-891-3022

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 2-tone, candy teal, have pink slip, have title, $25,000 or Best offer takes. 541-480-8080.

18.5’ Reinell 2003, 4.3L/V6, 100 hrs., always garaged, beautiful boat, many extras to incl. stereo, depth finder, two tops, travel cover & matching bow canvas, $13,500 OBO. 541-504-7066 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

19 Ft. Bayliner 1978, inboard/outboard, runs great, cabin, stereo system with amps & speakers, Volvo Penta motor, w/trailer & accessories $3,000 OBO. 541-231-1774

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

V-Star 650 Custom. 500+ miles. Always garaged. $3,500. (541)536-7402.

865

ATVs

Polaris 90 Sportsman 2004, 4-wheeler with Mossy Oak finish. Great condition. Perfect for beginning riders. $1,650. Call 541-923-0924 before 9:00 p.m.

Polaris Phoenix 2005, 2X4, 200 CC, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Suzuki 250 2007, garage stored, extra set of new wheels & sand paddles, Polaris $2400; also Predator 90 2006, new paddles & wheels, low hours, $1400; both exc. cond., call 541-771-1972 or 541-410-3658.

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

You Can Bid On: Smokercraft Fishing Boat Retail Value $5995 From All Seasons RV & Marine

Bid Now!

www.BulletinBidnBuy.com Buy New...Buy Local

19 FT. Thunderjet Luxor 2007, w/swing away dual axle tongue trailer, inboard motor, great fishing boat, service contract, built in fish holding tank, canvass enclosed, less than 20 hours on boat, must sell due to health $34,900. 541-389-1574.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

You Can Bid On: 16-Foot Esquif Ultra Light Canoe Retail Value $1995 From Alder Creek Kayak & Canoe

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $500 OBO, 541-548-3711.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

2000 BOUNDER 36', PRICE REDUCED, 1-slide, self-contained, low mi., exc. cond., orig. owner, garaged, +extras, must see! 541-593-5112

Expedition 38’ 2005 Ideal for Snowbirds Very livable, 23K miles, Diesel, 3-slides, loaded, incl. W/D, Warranty, $99,500, please call 541-815-9573.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

24' Splash: Like new, gently used by two adults, step in tub/shower, double bed, micro, oven, 4 burner, accessories, awning. $8500 OBO. 541-420-6234. JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds Jayco Jayflight 2006, 29’ BHS w/ custom value pkg., 20’ awning, gas grill, tow pkg., $14,500. 541-593-2227

Jayco Quest 2003 Tent Trailer, sleeps

Weekend Warrior 2008, 18’ toy hauler, 3000 watt gen., A/C, used 3 times, $18,500. 541-771-8920

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 26 ft. 2007, Generator, fuel station, sleeps 8, black & gray interior, used 3X, excellent cond. $29,900. 541-389-9188.

541-385-5809

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Columbia 400 & Hangar, Sunriver, total cost $750,000, selling 50% interest for $275,000. 541-647-3718

Helicopter 1968 Rotorway Scorpion 1, all orig. needs radiator/muffler $5000 trade for motorcycle 541 389-8971

Fleetwood Prowler Regal 31’ 2004, 2 slids, gen., solar, 7 speaker surround sound, mirco., awning, lots of storage space, 1 yr. extended warranty, very good cond., $20,000, MUST SEE! 541-410-5251

MONTANA 34’ 2006 Like new, 2-slides, fireplace, electric awning w/ wind & rain sensor, kingsize bed, sage/tan/plum interior, $29,999 FIRM. 541-389-9188

Mountaineer by Montana 2006, 36 ft. 5th wheel 3 slide outs, used only 4 months, like new, fully equipped, located in LaPine $28,900. 541-430-5444

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-322-7253

933

935

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevy 1500 1992, 4x4, X-cab, V8, 5 litre, w/6 in. lift, alloy wheels, good condition $3,299. 541-536-5774.

Cadillac Escalade 2007, business executive

360 Sprint Car

and lots of extra parts. Make Offer, 541-536-8036 Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500, 280-5677.

Chevy 2500 2002, HD crew cab , 4x4, V8, 6 litre w/6 in. lift, 18” chrome wheels, lots of extras, great cond $9,999. 541-536-5774.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 OBO. 541-385-9350.

KBDN, hangar space available in shared heated hangar, up to medium twin-turbine size. 541-419--9510 e@fractionalexchange.com

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $52,500, 541-280-1227. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Water truck, Kenworth 1963, 4000 gal., CAT eng., runs great, $4000. 541-977-8988

925

Utility Trailers 2006 Enclosed CargoMate w/ top racks, 6x12, $2100; 5x8, $1300. Both new cond. 541-280-7024 6 X 12, w/ metal stake sides and ramp, sides and front are removable. $1000 OBO. 541-504-4081

HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel Cargo Trailer, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, wired, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $9,500. 1-907-355-5153.

Ford Tudor 2 Door Sedan, All Steel, 327 Chevy, T-350 Trans., A/C, Tilt, Cruise, Disc. Brakes. Many Time Show Winner and Great Driver. Displayed at Professional Auto Body, South, 61210 S. Hwy. 97, Bend. $34,900. 541-306-5161, 209-993-6518

Karman Ghia 1970 convertible, white top, Blue body, 90% restored. $10,000 541-389-2636, 306-9907. Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Ford F150 2005, XLT, 4x4, 62K, V8 4.6L, A/C, all pwr, tilt, CD, ABS, bedliner, tow pkg. $15,500. (541) 390-1755, 390-1600.

Ford F250 XLT 2004, Super Duty, Crew, 4x4, V10, short bed w/ liner, tow pkg., LOW MILES, 56K, great cond., well maint., below KBB, $17,500, 549-6709.

Ford Pinnacle 33’ 1981, good condition,

Fifth Wheels

PRISTINE COND. Everest 2006 32' 3/slides many add-on extras. Reduced to $37,900. 541-689-1351.

Freeway 11’ Overhead Camper, self contained, A/C, reconditioned, $1900 OBO. 541-383-0449

5th Wheel hitch (heavy duty) mounts in truck $200. 541-382-4115.

runs great, $5200, call 541-390-1833.

Alfa See Ya Fifth Wheel 2005! SYF30RL 2 Slides, Now reduced to $31,999. Lots of extras Call Brad (541)848-9350

Holiday Rambler Neptune 2003, 2 slides, 300hp. Diesel, 14K, loaded, garaged, no smoking, $77,000. 633-7633

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Chevy Tahoe 2001, loaded, 3rd seat, V8, leather, heated seats, 6" lift Tough-Country, 35" tires, A/C, CD, exc. cond., 78K, running boards. $13,600. 541-408-3583 Chevy Tahoe LS 1999, loaded, low miles, perfect, 1-owner, $6500. 541-350-0527. Chevy Trailblazer 2005, in good condition, with extras, Asking $17,000 or assume loan. Call 541-749-8339.

Chevy Trailblazer Extended XLT 2002, loaded, 3rd row seat, extra set of tires, great cond., all maintenance records, $7500. 541-771-1451.

GMC Yukon 2007, 4x4, SLT, 5.3L V8 FlexFuel, 63K, 100K extended warranty, loaded, $25,500, 541-549-4834

FORD F350 2000 4x4 7.5 diesel Crewcab Super Duty 1 ton long bed, tow pkg, 5th wheel hitch, auto., air, Winter pkg, great cond., 179,740 road mi. $13,500. 907-355-5153. Ford F350 2003 FX4 Crew, auto, Super Duty, long bed, 6.0 diesel, liner, tow, canopy w/minor damage. 168k, $14,750 trade. 541-815-1990. Ford Ranger XLT 1999, V6 4 litre, auto., 4x4, pwr. steering, dual air bags, off road pkg. pwr windows, tilt, cruise, CD, matching canopy, & mounted snow tires, low mi. $7,450. 541-388-6751

GMC 1-ton 1991, Cab & Chassis, 0 miles on fuel injected 454 motor, $2500, no reasonable offer refused, 541-389-6457 or 480-8521.

Hitch for 5th wheel, Valley PowerPro, 16,000 lb., $300 or trade, 541-517-3622.

MUST SELL! 1969 Chevelle SS clone 1963 SS Nova Convertible. $8,500 each. Call for more info., 541-788-7884.

GMC 2005, 1/2 ton, Crew cab short box, low mi., 1 owner, extras, charcoal, very sharp, mint cond., all records, always maintained $18,900 541-350-0775

885

882

car Perfect cond., black,ALL options, 62K mi.; $36,500 OBO 541-740-7781

Isuzu Trooper 1995, 154K, new tires, brakes, battery runs great $3950. 330-5818.

Jeep CJ7 1986, 6 cyl., 5 spd., 4x4, 170K mi., no rust, exc cond. $8950 or consider trade. 541-593-4437 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2005, all set to be towed behind motorhome, nearly all options incl. bluetooth & navigation, 45K mi., silver, grey leather interior, studded snow tires, all service records since new, great value, $18,444, Call Amber, 541-977-0102.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 2004, loaded, nav., heated leather seats, tow pkg., sun roof, $13,500 OBO. 541-280-2327

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Canopies and Campers

Motor, 1968 396 Chevy, everything from air cleaner to the pan $1500 OBO. 541-788-7884

SBC 3X2 Offy, intake, Rochester carbs, rebuilt, new linkage, ready to run. $1200. OBO. 541-410-4069 Tires, Michelin, siped winters, 235/ 75R15 on stock Chevy 4.75 lugs, a lot of tread left, $295. 541-593-1598

Host 10.5DS Camper 2005, Tahoe, always stored indoors, loaded, clean, Reduced to $20,900, 541-330-0206.

The Bulletin

VW Convertible 1981, needs restoration, with additional parts vehicle, $600 for all, 541-416-2473.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

VW Super Beetle 1974, New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires, $5500 call 541-388-4302.

H I G H

Toyota Tundra 2006, 2WD, 4.7L engine, 81,000 miles, wired for 5th wheel, transmission cooler, electric brake control, well maintained, valued at $14,015, great buy at $10,500. 541-447-9165.

Jeep Wrangler 2009, 2-dr, hardtop, auto, CD, CB, 7K, ready to tow, Warn bumper/ winch,$25,500, w/o winch $24,500, 541-325-2684

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $75,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota

Sequoia 2008, Platinum Edition 20,320 mi., white pearl, exc. cond., $40,995. 541-610-5070.

D E S E R T

Jamboree Sport 25G 2008, Class C, with slide, sleeps 6, low miles, perfect condition, $45,900, call 541-923-8333.

Montana 3295RK 2005, 32’ 3 slides,

Yamaha YFZ 450 2005 exc. shape, new rebuilt eng., stock wheels & brand new sand wheels & tires, lots of extras $4500 or trade for 4x4 truck 503-437-5763.

908

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Fleetwood 355RLQS 2007, 37’, 4 slides, exc. cond., 50 amp. service, central vac, fireplace, king bed, leather furniture, 6 speaker stereo, micro., awning, small office space, set up for gooseneck or kingpin hitch, for pics see ad#3810948 in rvtrader.com $38,500, 541-388-7184, or 541-350-0462.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

900

880

Motorhomes

21.5' 1999 Sky Supreme wakeboard boat, ballast, tower, 350 Fleetwood Bounder 38L 2006, 350 Cat, garaged, warranty, V8, $17,990; 541-350-6050. price reduced, now $108,000. 541-389-7596 21.9’ Malibu I-Ride 2005, perfect pass, loaded, Must sell $29,000. 541-280-4965 21’ Reinell 2007, open bow, pristine, 9 orig. hrs., custom trailer. $22,950. 480-6510

881

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Travel Trailers

8, furnace, fridge, awning, $3700. Please call 541-604-0586 for more information.

(Private Party ads only)

Honda CB750C 1981 25K, 50 mpg., excellent condition $1,295. 541-548-3439.

Yamaha 2007

Bid Now!

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 Yellowstone 36’ 2003, 330 Cat Diesel, 12K, 2 slides, exc. cond., non smoker, no pets, $95,000, 541-848-9225.

Autos & Transportation

Washer/Dryer, 2 A/C’S and more. Interested parties only $24,095 OBO. 541279-8528 or 541-279-8740 Rockwood 32’ 1993, diesel with Allison 6 spd., beautiful interior, $19,995. 541-617-1249

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $17,995. 541-923-3417.

Lance Camper 11' 1993, fully self contained, $9,000 OR incl 1993 Ford F250 w/59,850 mi., $14,000. 541-923-2593. email for photos, redbird33bt@yahoo.com

Cedar Creek RDQF 2006, Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, gen., fireplace, granite countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, take over payments or payoff of $43,500, 541-330-9149.

Show Your Stuff. Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online.

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK M A G A Z I N E C R E AT E D TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND M A I N TA I N A N A C T I V E , H E A LT H Y LIFESTYLE.

Central Oregon Business Owners:

To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly

1. Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your

in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share.

ad package.

2. Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3. Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online.

S0305 5X6 kk

Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

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R E S E R V E Y O U R A D S PA C E T O D AY C A L L 5 4 1 - 3 8 2 - 1 8 1 1


To place an ad call Classified • 541-385-5809 940

975

Vans

Automobiles

THE BULLETIN • Monday, March 15, 2010 E5

Dodge Van 1991, 134K, great for second car to work, $500. 541-389-1626

Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, newer timing chain, water & oil pump, rebuilt tranny, 2 new Les Schwab tires $1500. 541-410-5631.

975

Automobiles

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, auto., front & side air bags, leather, 92K, $11,900. 541-350-1565 Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

BMW 325Ci Coupe 2003, under 27K mi., red, black leather, $15,000 Firm, call 541-548-0931.

BMW 330CI Convertible 2004, 22K mi., auto, leather, loaded, sport pkg., immaculate, $19,500, 541-504-0145.

Mazda Protégé 5 2003, hatchback 4 dr., auto, cruise, multi disc CD, 107K mi., $6500.541-350-7017. never pay for gas again, will run on used vegetable oil, sunroof, working alarm system, 5 disc CD, toggle switch start, power everything, 197K miles, will run for 500K miles easily, no reasonable offer refused, $2900 OBO, call 541-848-9072.

90K loaded, 30 mpg hwy., you’ll like it! $3250, 541-508-8522.

BUICK LESABRE 2005

Custom white cloth upholstery, 94K, lots of nice things you’ll like. Dependable. Only $6495. 541-815-3639 Cadillac Deville 2000, new body style, V-8, 25 mpg., auto trans, 120K, silver/grey, heated leather seats, fully loaded, w/front & side air bags, great cond. in and out, new tires, brakes & rotors, water pump, maintained extremely well, $5400 OBO, 541-350-9938.

Chevy Corvette 1980, glass T top, 43,000 original miles, new original upholstery, 350 V8 engine, air, ps, auto. trans., yellow, code 52, asking $8,500. Will consider partial trade. 541-385-9350

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $13,900. Call 541-815-7160.

Mercedes E320 2004, 4-matic, 4 door sedan, loaded, exc. cond. $10,900. 541-536-5774.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Nissan 350Z Convertible 2009, 5400 miles, roadster tour model, silver with black leather interior, $27,500, 541-923-7689.

Nissan Altima 2005, 2.5S, 53K mi., 4 cyl., exc. cond., non-smoker, CD/FM/AM, always serviced $9500 541-504-2878.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!!

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Celica GT 1994,154k, 5-spd,runs great, minor body & interior wear, sunroof, PW/ PDL, $3995, 541-550-0114

Toyota Prius Hybrid 2005, silver, NAV, Bluetooth. 1 owner, service records, 168K much hwy. $1000 below KBB @$9,950. 541-410-7586. Toyota Scion XA 2006, almost new only 22,300 mi., auto., A/C, pwr. locks, CD, $10,750. 541-923-6032.

VW Bug 1969, yellow,

sun roof, AM/FM/CD , new battery, tires & clutch. Recently tuned, ready to go $3000. 541-410-2604. Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Reach thousands of readers!

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $18,000. 541- 379-3530

Chevy Impala 2001, Excellent shape, runs good, 104,000 miles, A/C, cassette player, power windows & locks, $4200 541-548-4051.

Ford Mustang Cobras-2003 & 2004, extremely low mi., 7700 mi. on Mystichrome 2004 - $29,500 OBO; 1700 mi. on Red tint anniversary edition 2003 - $24,500; Both pampered, factory super charged “Terminators”, never abused, always garaged, 541-390-0032.

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

VW Bug 2004, convertible w/Turbo 1.8L., auto, leather, 51K miles, immaculate cond. $10,950. 541-410-0818.

VW GTI 2006, 1.8 Turbo, 53K, all service records, 2 sets of mounted tires, 1 snow, Yakima bike rack $13,500. 541-913-6693.

Ford Taurus SE 2006, 6-cyl., 67K mi., very clean, non-smoker owned, $8250, call 541-548-4284.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 44K miles,

VW Jetta Wagon 2003, 2.0 engine, A/C, PS, 75K, incl. 4 studded tires w/rims, asking $6750, Mike, 541-408-8330.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., extra set snow tires, $13,200, 541-419-4018. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Honda Hybrid Civic 2006, A/C, great mpg, all pwr., exc. cond., 41K, navigation system, $15,200, 541-388-3108.

Lincoln Continental Mark IV 1979, 302, body straight, black, in good running cond., tires are good, $800 OBO. 541-536-3490

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LEGAL NOTICE

Skanska - Invitation to Bid Three Rivers School Remodel and Expansion 3/23/2010 @ 1:00pm For questions contact Mark Jones at 503-641-2500 or mark.jones@skanska.com Bids can be faxed to 503-643-0646 Three Rivers School Remodel and Expansion

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Buick LeSabre 1998

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Mercedes 300SD 1981,

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 BMW M3 Convertible 2002, SMG gear box, 28k mi., mint cond, caramel leather, built for the young at heart, $26,500. 541-480-1884

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541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The scope of work includes All Trades. The Project consists of the addition of a single story gymnasium building, remodel and expansion of the administration area, a two story "middle school" addition, mechanical system upgrades, site work reconstruction and associated landscape and irrigation improvements. All questions are due in by 3/16/2010. Bid Bonds will be required. This work may require approved prequalification prior to accepting a bid. Prequalification instructions and status can be found at dfs.skanskausa.com. Documents are available at the following locations: For Review: Skanska, 2555 SW 153rd Drive, Beaverton, OR 97006; (503) 641-2500 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 Online at http://dfs.skanskausa.com/ For Purchase: Ford Graphics, 1151 SE Centennial Court #3, Bend, OR 97702 (541) 749-2151 Ford Graphics, 1431 NW 17th, Portland, OR, 97209 (503) 227-3424 Central Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th, Bend, OR 97701 (541) 389-0123 * Any addenda issued related to this bid will be available at the locations above upon issue. Please note that bid documents that may be posted at other locations will not receive notification of any addenda. All bids are to be in strict accordance with the Contract Documents and all other related bid documents. We are also requesting all bidders actively solicit local, minority, woman owned, ESB contractors, suppliers and their organizations. All bidders must comply with the following requirements: BOLI Prevailing Wage Law, January 1, 2010 Edition. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0470844838 T.S. No.: OR-235976-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TIMOTHY J. CARLSON as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.), as Beneficiary, dated 10/12/2006, recorded 10/16/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-68884 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 249521 LOT THIRTY-FOUR (34), COPPER SPRINGS ESTATES PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20581 BASKET FLOWER PLACE BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $219,073.30; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,617.30 Monthly Late Charge $69.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $219,073.30 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/1/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby

secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Donna Fitton Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3408442 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359509428 T.S. No.: OR-236305-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN JOHNSON AND BRENDA J. JOHNSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to QUALITY LOAN SERVICES, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR NOVASTAR MORTGAGE, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 12/26/2006, recorded 12/27/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-84076 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 115482 LOTS TWENTY (20) AND TWENTY-ONE (21), BLOCK TWENTY-TWO (22), DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, INC. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17171 SPRING RIVER RD BEND, Oregon 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $397,983.09; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,049.82 Monthly Late Charge $85.26 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $397,983.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.125% per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned

trustee will on 6/3/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/11/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3409320 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713911680 T.S. No.: OR-236620-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON D. NEEL and CONNIE L. NEEL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER MORTGAGEIT, as Beneficiary, dated 9/1/2005, recorded 9/7/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-60133 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 245215 LOT TWENTY-SIX (26), DIAMOND BAR RANCH PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2485 NE 7TH LANE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $131,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $736.88 Monthly Late Charge $36.84 By this reason of said default the

beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $131,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3411512 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7441414422 T.S. No.: OR-163567-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHELLE ST. JOHN, GERALD ST. JOHN, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR MILA, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 5/3/2006, recorded 5/3/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-30621 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 120404 LOT 7, BLOCK 1, JANELA COURT, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61363 FRANKE LANE BEND, OREGON 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91411 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JUDY VERMAES-HIPPENHAMMER, A SINGLE WOMAN, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as Trustee, in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK, as beneficiary, dated 5/5/2005, recorded 5/11/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-29046, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC FEDERAL BANK, FSB SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO INDYMAC BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 29, BLOCK YY, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 18796 CHOCTAW ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 26, 2010 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 4 payments at $1,041.82 each $4,167.28 (11-01-09 through 02-26-10) Late Charges: $ 614.19 Beneficiary Advances: $ 66.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 4,847.47 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $262,233.22, PLUS interest thereon at 3.858% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 1, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/26/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3468026 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010

Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $212,825.25; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2008 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,571.38 Monthly Late Charge $62.07 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $212,825.25 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from 5/1/2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 5/28/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/15/2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Maria De La Torre Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3416019 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010, 04/05/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713911679 T.S. No.: OR-236618-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JASON D. NEEL and CONNIE L. NEEL, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC

REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER MORTGAGEIT, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 8/26/2005, recorded 9/7/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-60025 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 247736 LOT 40 OF CENTENNIAL GLEN, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 638 SE GLENCOE PLACE BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $176,000.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2009 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $990.00 Monthly Late Charge $49.50 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $176,000.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 10/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/4/2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/13/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services,

LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Cindy Sandoval Authorized Signatory WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ASAP# 3411517 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010, 04/05/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59263-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BILL G. CHANEY AND ELIZABETH CHANEY, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of BAY CREEK MORTGAGE, A MICHIGAN CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 01-12-2005, recorded 01-19Â2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No, 2005-03019 , and Re-recorded on 11-02-2005, Book, Page , Instrument 2005-75246 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 149125 LOT FORTY-FIVE, IN BLOCK ONE, OF NEWBURY ESTATES, PHASE I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 17676 PENNY COURT LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 09/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE, Monthly Payment $799,69 Monthly Late Charge $31.98 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $92,286.04 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 08-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-24-2010 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OREGON County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by ay D. Jaeger as the grantor, First American Title as the trustee, and Bank of America, National Association, as the beneficiary under that certain Deed of Trust dated January 2, 2008, recorded on January 7, 2008, as document number 2008-00819 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: See the Attached Exhibit "A" Which currently has the address of: 20450 Arrowhead Drive, Bend, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums of this loan (Loan Number 6856768541): Payment Due Date PRINCIPAL INTEREST DUE PAYMENT AMOUNT DUE 12/01/08 $8,569.95 $10,032.19 01/01/09 $9,456.50 $10,032.19 02/01/09 $9,160.98 $10,032.19 03/01/09 $8,274.44 $10,032.19 04/01/09 $9,160.98 $10,032.19 05/01/09 $9,160.98 $10,032.19 06/01/09 $8,569.95 $10,032.19 07/01/09 $9,456.50 $10,032.19 08/01/09 $8,865.47 $10,032.19 09/01/09 $8,569.95 $10,032.19 10/01/09 $9,752.01 $10,032.19 11/01/09 $8,865.47 $10,032.19 12/01/09 $14,507.43 $10,032.19 01/01/10 $10,499.77 $10,032.19 EKOS protective advance $217,422.00 $0.00 Trustee's Sale Guarantee $3,342.00 $0.00 TOTALS: $353,634.38 $140,450.66 TOTAL DEFAULT: $494,085.04 By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: Principal: $1,705,191.36 Interest(from 11/01/08-02/22/10):$150,482.90 Attorney Fees: $ACCRUING Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $3,342.00 Uncollected Fees Due: $195.75 LBAC File Review Rec Z ($180.00) Inspection - Vacant ($15.75) Interest continues to accrue at the rate of 7.25% per annum or $338.70 per diem WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on June 4, 2010, at the hour of 1:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor's or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed by payment of the entire amount then due and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: January 29, 2010, James P. Laurick, Trustee State of Oregon, County of Multnomah )ss. On this 29th day of January, 2010, before me, a Notary Public in and for said County and State, personally appeared James P. Laurick, personally known to me to be the person whose name subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged that he executed the same. SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me this 29th day of January, 2010, by James P. Laurick. NOTARY PUBLIC FOR OREGON My Commission Expires: 06/16/2010


E6 Monday, March 15, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; February 10, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC, P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 MARIA DELATORE, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3460312 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010 PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS For Architecture, Engineering and Related Services Bend Multi-Modal Transit Center The Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) will receive proposals for Ar-

chitecture, Engineering and Related Services for the Bend Multi-Modal Transit Center project until, but not after, 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 18, 2010 local time, at the office of Doug Smith, Fiscal and Administrative Manager, Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, 2363 SW Glacier Pl, Redmond, Oregon, 97756. Date Issued: March 3, 2010 Close Date: March 18, 2010, 4:00 p.m., local time Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council (COIC) is seeking competitive proposals for architectural, engineering and related services pursuant to ORS 279C.100 et seq. for the remodel of facility for COIC. Proposals from professional entities capable of providing all of the needed services or proposals from teams of separate entities are welcome. For team proposals, a lead entity must be specified. COIC is the local public transit provider for Redmond, Madras, Prineville, Sisters, and La Pine, also proving public transit services connecting all communities to each other and Bend. The project will include the remodel of the approximate 13,000 square foot building to include a 1,500 square foot multi-modal transit center, and a remodel of some of the existing office and warehouse space to better serve the administrative and operational needs of COIC, and to provide leased space for related services and possibly appropriate retail. In addition, the landscaping in front of the building will be changed to include ADA accessible paths to the transit center. Heated

sidewalks, shelters, security and lighting will be added for the intercity connections on NE 4th St. Where possible, COIC would like to utilize "green" building techniques that provide long-term cost savings and reduced energy consumption. Oregon Department of Transportation grant funding will be used for the facility, so the design firm must have working knowledge of state requirements related to a project of this nature. Copies of the complete RFP are available via the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council web site at www.coic.org/publicmeetingnotices.htm, Five (5) copies of the proposal must be delivered by 4:00 pm, March 18th, 2010 addressed to Doug Smith, Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, 2363 SW Glacier Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Late submittals will not be considered. PUBLIC NOTICE The Tuesday, March 16, 2010, meeting of the Board of Directors has been cancelled. The Board will conduct a work session and business meeting on Tuesday, April 6, 2010, beginning at 5:30 p.m. The April 6 agenda and supplementary reports will be posted on the district’s web site, www.bendparksandrec.org, Friday, April 2, 2010. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-097097 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KRISTA GUTCHES, (UNMARRIED), as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/7/2007, recorded 6/12/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-33005, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 27, WHEELER RANCH, PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16677 WYATT DRIVE LAPINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2009 7 payments at $858.01 each $6,005.07 (08-01-09 through 02-16-10) Late Charges: $141.80 TOTAL: $6,147.87 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 8/1/2009 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $147,950.00, PLUS interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from 7/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 24, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 2/16/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer ASAP# 3454377 03/01/2010, 03/08/2010, 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3322 T.S. No.: 1247392-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Anthony Sprauer and Staci Sprauer, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin, A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated December 02, 2005, recorded December 07, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-83997 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 39 of Maplewood-Phase 2, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2502 N.W. 13th Street Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,781.30 Monthly Late Charge $57.35. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $207,765.15 together with interest thereon at 6.625% per annum from December 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 03, 2010 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 25, 2010. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is May 4, 2010, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify' your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 http://www.osbar.org Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-291664 02/22/10, 03/01, 03/08, 03/15

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-343971-SH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TINA M. LINDQUIST as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LAND HOME FINANCIAL SERVICES, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/27/2007, recorded 10/8/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xxx at page No. xxx fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No 2007-53954, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 252734 LOT EIGHTY-SIX OF ASPEN CREEK MANUFACTURED HOME SUBDIVISION, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2307 S.W. MARIPOSA LOOP REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 7/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,385.42 Monthly Late Charge $54.63 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $154,779.58 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.3750 per annum from 6/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/6/2010 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, ogether with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com 1 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO TENANTS If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the Trustee of the Deed of Trust written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you must give the Trustee a copy of the rental agreement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is 6/6/2010 the name of the Trustee and the Trustee's mailing address is set forth on this Notice of Sale below. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your Landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included below with this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included below with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 3/1/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By Seth Ott, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3471797 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010, 04/05/2010 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L504357 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: GOLDBERG AP #1: 204923 AP #2: 130170 AP #3: 130169 Title #: 4309594 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by GARY GOLDBERG as Grantor, to PCB SERVICE CORPORATION as Trustee, in favor of SANTA BARBARA BANK & TRUST as Beneficiary. Dated October 24, 2007, Recorded October 31, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-57575 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Exhibit "A" Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: PARCEL 1: LOT 101, GREENS AT REDMOND, PHASE 6A, BEING A REPLAT OF A PORTION OF GREENS AT REDMOND PHASE 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. PARCEL 2: A PARCEL OF LAND BEING A PORTION OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29; THENCE ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER, NORTH 89° 47' 39" WEST, 387 FEET; THENCE AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID NORTHERLY LINE SOUTH 00 DEG. 12' 21' WEST, 479.02 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 87° 15' 41" EAST, 102.95 FEET TO A POINT IN THE NORTHWESTERLY SIDE LINE OF BEND-REDMOND STATE HIGHWAY; THENCE ALONG SAID LINE NORTH 35 DEG. 27' 25' EAST, 492.65 FEET TO THE EASTERLY LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 29; THENCE ALONG EASTERLY LINE NORTH 00° 15' 56' EAST, 81.25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION DEEDED TO THE STATE OF OREGON IN A WARRANTY DEED RECORDED DECEMBER 19, 1934 IN BOOK 53 PAGE 229, DEED RECORDS ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION DEEDED TO THE STATE OF OREGON IN A WARRANTY DEED RECORDED JULY 16, 1991 IN BOOK 240 PAGE 41, OFFICIAL RECORDS PARCEL 3: IN TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON: SECTION 29: A PARCEL OF LAND SITUATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 29 MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER MARKED BY AN "X" ON A ROCK, FROM WHICH A 3/4 INCH IRON ROD ON THE BEND- REDMOND STATE HIGHWAY NO. 97 BEARS SOUTH 89° EAST 52.35 FEET, THE INITIAL POINT; THENCE NORTH 89° 47' 39" WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 387 FEET TO A 1/2" X 24" IRON PIN, THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEG. 12' 21" WEST 479.02 FEET TO A 1/2" X 24" IRON PIN, THENCE NORTH 87° 15' 41" WEST 654.02 FEET TO A 1/2' X 24" IRON PIN; THENCE NORTH 00° 12' 21" EAST 450.12 FEET TO A 1/2" X 24' IRON PIN ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH 89° 47' 39" EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 653.65 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; EXCEPT BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER MARKED BY AN "X: ON A ROCK, FROM WHICH A 3/4 INCH IRON ROD ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF THE BEND-REDMOND STATE HIGHWAY NO. 97 BEARS SOUTH 89' EAST 52.35 FEET, THE INITIAL POINT; THENCE NORTH 89° 47' 39" WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 852 FEET TO A 1/2" X 24" IRON PIN, THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEG. 12' 13" WEST 458.46 FEET TO A ½" X 24" IRON PIN; THENCE NORTH 87° 15' 41" WEST 188.84 FEET TO A ½" X 24" IRON PIN; THENCE NORTH 00° 12' 21" EAST 450.12 FEET TO A 1/2" X 24' IRON PIN ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER; THENCE SOUTH 89° 47' 39" EAST ALONG SAID NORTH LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER 188.65 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 07/01/09 TO 11/01/09 @ 5,898.08 $29,490.40 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $1,199.26 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $2,570.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$33,259.66 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be Vacant Land: The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $1,104,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 9, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.ascentex.com/websales/ DATED: 11/30/09 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 884726W PUB: 02/22/10, 03/01/10, 03/08/10, 03/15/10

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (Matured Loan) Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by John Annichiarico, who is the grantor, Wells Fargo Financial National Bank is the trustee, and Wells Fargo Bank, National Association, is the beneficiary under that certain Deed of Trust dated January 12, 2007, recorded on January 18, 2007, as document number 2007-03379 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: Lot 7 in Block 19 of Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 21, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon APN: 190087 - Which currently has the address of 2885 NW Horizon Drive, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums of this matured loan: Loan Number 0298002477-26 Principal Outstanding $760,676.73 Accrued/unpaid interest as of 01/14/2010 $25,331.57 Force-Placed Insurance (six month premium) $3,123.64 Costs for Additional work on the subject property (done as protective advances separately from the loan) $7,223.28 TOTAL: $796,355.22 Interest continues to accrue at the rate of 3.25% per annum or $67.73 per diem WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on May 28, 2010, at the hour of 1:00 p.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor's or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed by payment of the entire amount then due and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: January 19, 2010, by James P. Laurick, Trustee State of Oregon, County of Multnomah)ss. On this 19th day of January, 2010, before me, a Notary Public in and for said County and State, personally appeared James P. Laurick, personally known to me to be the person whose name subscribed to the within instrument and acknowledged that he executed the same. SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN to before me this 19th day of January, 2010, by James P. Laurick. NOTARY PUBLIC FOR OREGON My Commission Expires: 06/16/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-91632 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, KURT USELDINGER, A MARRIED MAN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR THE MORTGAGE STORE FINANCIAL, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 3/28/2006, recorded 3/31/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-22368, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to- wit: LOT 68 OF ARROWHEAD, PHASES I, II, III, AND IV, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2785 NORTHEAST SEDALIA LOOP BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 3 payments at $ 1,844.02 each $ 5,532.06 3 payments at $ 1,859.90 each $ 5,579.70 (10-01-09 through 03-02-10) Late Charges: $ 410.50 Beneficiary Advances: $ 33.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 11,555.26 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $219,174.00, PLUS interest thereon at 8.99% per annum from 09/01/09 to 1/1/2010, 8.99% per annum from 1/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 6, 2010, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee BY CHAD JOHNSON, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3472667 03/15/2010, 03/22/2010, 03/29/2010, 04/05/2010 LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: D390939 OR Unit Code: D Loan No: 1044638692/MILLER Investor No: 4000656838 AP #1: 161549 Title #: 4170273 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by CHAMESE MILLER as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN as Beneficiary. Dated January 27, 2006, Recorded January 31, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-07054 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON AND AN ADDENDUM TO NOTE DATED 01/27/06 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: Exhibit "A" Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: A parcel of land located in the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE1/4NE1/4NE1/4) Section 20, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the North 1/16th corner between Section 20 and 21, Township 15 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 89°34'55" West, 674.24 feet along Quartz Avenue to the centerline intersection of said Quartz Avenue and Twenty-First Street; thence North 00°51 East, 268.37 feet along the centerline of said Twenty-First Street; thence South 89°34'55" East, 30.00 feet to a point on the East right-of-way of said Twenty-First Street and the Northwest corner of the property conveyed in Book 311, Page 675, Deed Records, said point being the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING of this description; Thence continuing South 89°34'55" East, 125.00 feet to the Northeast corner of that property conveyed in Book 311, Page 675, Deed Records; thence North 00°51'49" East, 95.15 feet; thence South 89°13'49" West, 105.02 feet to a point; thence South 00°51'49" West, 4.52 feet to a point; thence North 89°48'25" West, 20.00 feet to the East right-of-way of Twenty-First Street; thence South 00°51'49" West, 88.37 feet along said right-of-way to the true point of beginning. NOTE: This legal description was created prior to January 1, 2008. Tax Parcel Number: 161549 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 1 PYMT DUE 01/01/09 @ 1,218.54 $1,218.54 1 L/C DUE 01/16/09 @ 52.43 $52.43 11 PYMTS FROM 02/01/09 TO 12/01/09 @ 1,220.92 $13,430.12 10 L/C FROM 02/16/09 TO 11/16/09 @ 41.19 $411.90 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $35.96 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $1,864.48 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $73.50 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $1,914.66 $1,914.66 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$19,001.59 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1818 SW 21ST STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $143,793.92, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 12/01/08, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 23, 2010, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.ascentex.com/websales/ DATED: 12/14/09 DAVID A. KUBAT, OSBA #84265 By DAVID A. KUBAT, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 886707 PUB: 03/08/10, 03/15/10, 03/22/10, 03/29/10

Bulletin Daily Paper 03/15/10  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Monday March 15, 2010

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