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TUESDAY July 30,2013

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bendbulletin.com TODAY'S READERBOARD

PUBLIC SAFETY

Future of Bend

KidRunner —ABend company hasdesigned ababy stroller to appeal to runners.

c6

Fire up

Why monogamy? — Two research teams studying why it evolved come to somenotso-sweet conclusions.A3

Up next for Michael PhelpS —Thewinningest athlete in Olympic history called it quits, right? Maybe not.C1

By Hillary Borrud

* Bend Police Department numbersunavailable.

The Bulletin

Deschutes County Sheriff

3,000

2,500

120

neighborhoods, the procedure isusedtohelphomeowners.C6 Cancer —Experts urge a

2,359 2,151

2,000

58 (through July)

60

1,738

1 878 (through July)

90

,423

1,500

892 (through July)

1,012

40

Eminent domain —ln a California town with blighted

2,515

110

101 — Soda pop has its uses in recipes from bakedgoods to meat entrees.D1

Oregon State Police

149

150

Cooking with soft drinks

for talks

Bend-area CellpitOne CitatiOnS • Clta«o» L Warn)ngs

8

30

500

(through July) 2010

2011

2012

2013

2010

2011

2012

2013

narrower definition.A2 Sources: OSP, Deschutes County Sherrif's office

And a Web exclusiveChina's coal-fueled economy parched by lack of water. bendbufletin.com/extras

Greg Cross/The Bulletin

• OSP is crackingdown, andthe Legislature hasvoted to increasethe fine to $500 By Branden Andersen

Knowthelaw EDITOR'SCHOICE

Pope on gay priests: 'Who am I to judge?' By Rachel Donadio New Yorh Times News Service

ROME — For generations, homosexuality has largely been a taboo topic for the Vatican, ignored altogether or treated as "an intrinsic moral evil," in the words of the previous pope. In that context, brief remarks by Pope Francis suggesting that he would not judge priests for their sexual orientation, made aboard the papal airplane on the way back from his first foreign trip, to Brazil, attracted significant attention. Never veering from church doctrine opposing homosexuality, Francis did strike a more compassionate tone than that of his predecessors, some of whom had largely avoided even saying the more col-

The Bulletin

Fines for operating a motor vehicle while using a mobile

communication device range from $110 to$250, according to Bend Police Lt. Chris Carney. Law enforcement officers can pull over andcite drivers for the offense alone.

The law doeshaveexceptions. A mobile device user is exempt if he or she is:

• Summoning medical or emergency help if no other people are in the car • Using a mobile communication device for farming or

agricultural operations • Operating an ambulance or emergency vehicle • 18 or older and using a hands-free device • A volunteer or paid employee driving for public safety • Employed in a iob that requires driving • Activating or deactivating the phone or a function of the

phone • A licensed amateur radio operator using an amateur radio • Operating a two-way radio device transmitted to an

authorized frequency The Legislature agreedthis year to increase the fine for unauthorized cellphone use to $500; the governor has yet to sign it into law.

Bend police conducted an operation focused on pedestrian safety Wednesday at the intersection of Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Riviera Drive. To draw drivers' attention to the scene where police officers waited to ticket violators, officers erected cardboard signs warning of an enforcement detail ahead. They marked out a special zone of orange traffic cones — a well-advertised trap. Two police officers shooed away a woman passerby who attempted to flag drivers and warn them of police up ahead. "It wasn't a secret we were there," said Bend Police Traffic Officer Matt Baldwin. "There were some drivers who were still on their cellphone by the time they got to me. They drove through something so obvious and had no idea." Bend Police cited six drivers over four hours for use of cellphones while operating a motor vehicle. The fine starts at $110 and can go up to $250. Oregon in January 2010 outlawed the use of mobile devices while driving. In January 2012, the Legislature closed a loophole that allowed drivers to use cellphones for business calls. The law, which applies to texting, as well as any other use of a mobile phone, is a class-D violation. That means polic a e officerneeds no other reason to stop a driver other than seeing a cellphone in action. "I cite people a couple times a week," Deschutes County Sheriff's Sgt. Dan Bilyeu said. "It's like the seatbelt lawif I went out just to catch people on their cellphones, I could get a lot of people each day." Last year, statewide convictions for using mobile phones while driving rang in at 22,892, according to Oregon State Police spokesman Lt. Gregg Hastings. OSP alone cited 2,151 and warned 1,878, nearly 300 more interactions than in 2011. The big change, Hastings said, is that previously, authorities were more apt to give drivers warnings while they learned about the law and its exceptions. "As you see, total contacts and citations trending up, warnings going down," Hastings said. "The honeymoon is ending for those who think a warning is more likely than a traffic citation."

See Cenphones/A6 Thinkstock

loquial "gay." "If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?" Francis told reporters, speaking in Italian but using the English word

Changed livesfor government whistleblowers By Emily Wax The Washington Post

gay See Pope/A6

Correction A story headlined "Local owls won't face lethal tactics,"

which appeared Monday,July

WASHINGTON — The former high-ranking National Security Agency analyst now sells iPhones. The top intelligence officer at the CIA lives in a motor home outside Yellowstone National Park and spends his days

29, on page A1, incorrectly referred to the location of the

Coast Range inOregon. The mountain range is in Western

Oregon. The Bulletin regrets the

error.

TODAY'S WEATHER Partly cloudy High 86, Low 51

Page B6

fly-fishing for trout. The FBI translator fled Washington for Central Oregon. This is what life looks like for some after revealing government secrets. Blowing the whistle on wrongdoing, according to those who did it. Jeopardizing national security, according to the govern-

ment. They're all people who had to get on with their lives. As Edward Snowden eventually will. The former NSA contractor who leaked classified documents on U.S. surveillanceprograms isnow in Russia, with his fate in limbo. The Justice Department announced last week that it

won't seek the death penalty, but he is still charged with theft and espionage. Say he makes it out of there. What next, beyond the pending charges'? What happens to people who make public things that the government wanted to keep secret'? See Whistleblowers/A5

INDEX

The Bulletin

At Home 01- 6 C lassified E1 - 8 D ear Abby 06 Obituaries B 5 C1-4 Busines s/Stocks C5-6 Comics/Puzzles E3-4 Horoscope 06 Sports D6 Calendar B2 Crosswords E 4 L o cal/State B1-6 TV/Movies

Vol. 110, No. 211, 32 pages,

AnIndependent Newspaper

5 sections

Bend fire officials say the true test of their ability to protect the community is when the calls start flooding in. cYou can have absolutely nothing going on, and then all of a sudden calls start stacking up," Battalion Chief Bill Boos said Monday. Sunday was one of those days. The pileup began in the early afternoon when a fire engine and ambulance were dispatched to help a person injured in a car wreck near Devil's Lake, close to Mount Bachelor. Then, someone reported a possible drowning at Elk Lake, farther out on the Cascade Lakes Highway. It was outside the Fire Department's coverage area, but the agency has a trainedwater rescue team, and it offered to help. "Then I got a structure fire," at a northeast Bend home, Boos said. "That tapped all my resources out within five minutes, six minutes." Fortunately, the pace of calls for service slowed after that, but Boos said situations such as this occur frequently. During the recession, the city cut its workforce through a combination of layoffs and attrition. The Fire Department eliminated 10 jobs as employees retired. Now, it is just beginning to bring back some of those jobs. The City Council voted earlier this summer to hire the equivalent of three full-time firefighters and one part-time firefighter over the next two

years. See Fire/A4

Employers LiSe FBI fileS

to checkhires By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Employers are increasingly turning to the FBI's criminal databases to screen job applicants, sparking concerns about the accuracy of the agency's information and the potential for racial discrimination. Many of the FBI's records list only arrests and not the outcomes ofthose cases, such as convictions. A lawsuit filed against the Commerce Department by minorities alleges that the use of incomplete databases means that African-Americans and Hispanics are denied work in disproportionate numbers. The FBI's background checks "might be considered the gold standard, but these records are a mess," said Madeline Neighly, staff lawyer at the National Employment Law Project. See Checks/A4

+ .4 We usereoycled newsprint

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GaS Plant blaSt —A series of major explosions at a Florida gas plant has injured several workers and left others missing. TheOrlando Sentinel reported Monday night Tavares City Administrator John Drury says10 of 24 people working at Blue Rhino, a propane-tank

ruesto e inecancer

business there, havenot beenaccounted for after the blasts.

By Tara Parker-Pope

sweep in 76 cities. The agency said it had been monitoring Backpage.

The group, which includes some of the top scientists in A group of experts advis- cancer research, also suging the nation's premier cancer gested that many lesions deresearch institution has recom- tected during breast, prostate, mended changing the definition thyroid, lung and other cancer of cancer and eliminating the screenings should not be called word from some common diag- cancer at all but should instead noses as part of sweeping chang- be reclassified as IDLE condies in the nation's approach to tions, which stands for "indocancer detection and treatment. lent lesions of epithelial origin." The re c om m endations, While it is clear that some from a working group of the or all of the changes may not National C a ncer I n s t itute, happen for years, if it all, and w ere published Monday i n that some cancer experts will The Journal of the American profoundly disagree with the Medical Association. group'sviews, the report from They say, for instance, that such a prominent group of scisome premalignant c o ndientists who have the backing tions, like one that affects the of the National Cancer Institute breast called ductal carcinoma brings the discussionto a higher in situ, which many doctors level andwillmost likely change agree is not cancer, should be the national conversation about renamed to exclude the word cancer, its definition, its treatcarcinoma, so that patients are ment and future research. "We need a 2lst-century less frightened and less likely to seek what may be unneeded definition of cancer instead of and potentially harmful treat- a 19th-century definition of ments that can include the sur- cancer, which is what we've gical removal of the breast. been using," said Dr. Otis W.

Brawley, the chief medical officer for the American Cancer Society, who was not directly involved in the report. T he impetus behind t h e call for change is a growing concern among doctors, scientists and patient advocates that hundreds of thousands of men and women are undergoing needless and sometimes disfiguring and harmful treatments for premalignant and cancerous lesions that are so slow growing they are unlikely to ever cause harm. "We're still having trouble c onvincing people that t h e things that get found as a consequence of mammography and PSA testing and other screening devicesare not always malignancies in the classical sense that will kill you," said Dr. Harold Varmus, the director of the National Cancer Institute. "Just as the general public is catching up to this idea, there are scientists who are catching up, too."

New York Times News Service

Child PrOStitlitiell —Declaring child prostitution a "persistent threat" in America, the FBIsaid Monday that authorities had rescued 105 young peopleand arrested150 alleged pimps in athree-day com and other websites as aprominent online marketplace for sex for sale. Backpage.com said that it was "very, very pleased" by the raids and that if the website were shut down to the advertisements, the ads would be pushed to sites that wouldn't cooperate with law enforcement. The young people in the roundup, almost all of them

girls, ranged in age from13 to17. Readadout the sweep in Oregon, page B3 NeW Zealand SurVeillanCe —A U.S. official said Mondaythat the National Security Agency did not monitor phoneconversations between a New Zealand journalist and his Afghan sources, following claims by the journalist that his reporting was monitored by the U.S.

intelligence programs revealed byNSAleaker EdwardSnowden on behalf of New Zealand's military. Officials in the intelligence community and experts said if any surveillance was done, it was more likely that

his phone calls werecaught up bystandard military intelligence monitoring of enemy communications in war zones.

Jewelry heiSt —Wearing a scarf to mask his face, the gunman sneakedinto the posh Cannes hoteland held up adiam ond show as three security guards looked on, then fled on foot about a minute later.

In the end, hemadeoff with a breathtaking $136 million worth of valuables — the biggest jewelry heist in years, maybe ever. On Monday, a state prosecutor provided new details about the brazen heist a day earlier at the Carlton lntercontinental hotel — not least that the loot was actually worth more than twice the $53 million estimate that police had first announced.

RuSSian beyCOtt talk —Russian vodka andthe Winter Olympics in Sochi. For now, those are the prime targets as gays in the United

States and elsewhereproposeboycotts and other tactics to convey their outrage over Russia's intensifying campaign against gay-rights

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EGYPTIAN MILITARYCONTINUES CRACKDOWN

FiOSSie dOWngraded —Weather officials downgraded a tropical storm moving through Hawaii to atropical depression on Monday

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night, but weaker winds and rainfall still knocked out power for about 6,500 people on Maui and the Big Island. The National Weather Ser-

vice canceled all storm warnings for Tropical Storm Flossie in Hawaii on Monday evening, keeping a flash flood watch in effect statewide until tonight.

Traci Donaca ......................

PakiStan attaCk —Dozens of Taliban militants armed with guns, grenades andbombsattacked a prison in northwest Pakistan, freeing more than 250 prisoners, including 25 "dangerous terrorists,"

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officials said. The militants killed six policemen, six Shiite Muslim prisoners and two civilians during Monday night's attack in the town

of Dera Ismail Khan, said the town's commissioner, Mushtaq Jadoon. One of the Shiites was beheaded. Fifteen policemen were wounded,

said Jadoon. Ireq bembiilgS —Asurge of violence in Iraq continued Monday when15 car bombs killed at least 50 people and injured more than

100, according to security officials. Ten of the bombings were in Baghdad, mainly in Shiite neighborhoods. The targets included a hospital, a restaurant and markets. At least 34 people were killed

REDMOND BUREAU

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Oregon Lottery results As listed at www.oregonlottery.org

MEGABUCKS The numbers drawn Monday night are:

9Q21Q 27 Q as Q2QsQ The estimated jackpot is now $2.4 million.

brand Stolichnaya. Activists also are pressing the International Olympic Committee and NBC, which holds U.S. broadcasting rights for

Sochi, to be moreaggressive in criticizing new Russian laws.

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activism. At manygay bars across North America, owners havejoined a campaign to stop selling Russian vodka —notably the popular

Manu Brabo/TheAssoaatedPress

and more than100 werewounded, the authorities said. Officials in

A picture of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi decorates a makeshift barricade in an area of

sat, or Center Party, according to state media. Prosecutors issued warrants for their arrests last week,

the Shiite-led government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, fearing that even more devices could be detonated, tightened security in

Cairo where protesters have installed a campand

accusing the men of inciting violence and "insulting

Baghdad.

hold daily rallies. The Egyptian authorities pressed their crackdown

the judiciary," a crime under Egyptian law.

on the Muslim Brotherhood and its allies Monday,arresting two more senior Islamist leaders and hinting

at possibly declaring a state of emergency, evenas the EuropeanUnion's top diplomat was visiting Cairo and talking to both sides in an attempt to mediate an easing of the crisis.

The police arrested Aboul-Ela Maadiand Essam

The EuropeanUnion's senior foreign policy official, Catherine Ashton, who arrived in Egypt late Sunday,

MeXiCO ViOlenCe —Twomonths after Mexico's president sent troops to the embattled state of Michoacan, gunmenambushedand

was meeting with the interim president, Adly Mansour, his vice president, Mohamed EIBaradei, and the

killed one of the Mexican navy's most senior officers on Sunday, raising the stakes in a battle for control of an area long considered a vol-

defense minister, Gen.Abdel Fattah el-Sissi. Shewas

cano of rebellion andviolence. Thepresident, Enrique PenaNieto, and

scheduled to meet later with some of the remaining Muslim Brotherhood leaders who have not been ar-

Jesus Murillo Karam, the attorney general, both pledged on Monday to increase attention in the area where last week armed gangs mounted

rested.

at least sevenseparate attacks on thefederal authorities, killing four — New YorkTimesNews Service

Sultan, senior figures in the moderate Islamist al Wa-

Jewish settlements loom

officers in gun battles that also left about 20 gunmen dead. — From wire reports

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

XIsa'x2v3vg But

chaeological parks, shopping malls, heritage sites and wine bars. The impossible-to-miss message: These settlements are here to stay. On Monday Secretary of State John Kerry a cknowledged the challenge of old and new realit ies as he opened preliminary talks in Washington with Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat. "It's no secret that this is a difficult process. If it were easy, itwould have happened a long

ish settlements in the West Bank, according to Israeli government data. Another 300,000 Jews live in East Jerusalem, which Palestinians claim for their future capital city. While there remain r ugged encampments of tents and trailers arranged on isolated hilltops, manned by y ouths with extreme views, many of the settlements in the West Bank today have taken on the air of m i d dle-class permanence: comfortable villas of white stone and red-tile roofs, landscaped with olive trees and date palms. They're the kind of gated communities that look more Southern California than Holy Land.

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time ago," said Kerry, who addand Anne Gearan ed that the negotiators would The Washington Post seek "reasonablecompromises PSAGOT, West Bank — The on tough, complicated, emolast time Israeli and Palestin- tional and symbolic issues." ian negotiators sat down for Many of the core issues to extended,serious peace talks be addressed have remained in the waning days of the sec- unchanged for decades: how ond Bush administration, the to arrange for Israel's security effort to reach a compromise needs; whether, where and how was excruciating. to divide Jerusalem to create It could be even harder now. a Palestinian capital; what do In the past five years, the about Palestinian refugees and population of Jewish settle- their desire to return home; and ments in the West Bank has where to draw the borders for a grown by about 20 percent, future State of Palestine. and pro-settler politicians have But the growth of the settlebecome majorplayers in Isra- ments presents a particularly el's government. thorny challenge. There are Here in t h e W est B ank, now between 340,000 and which Palestinians claim as 360,000 residents living in Jewa basis of their future state, settlers have built museums, a full-fledged university, ar-

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TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

MART TODAY

A3

TART • Discoveries, breakthroughs, trends, namesin the news— the things you needto knowto start out your day

It's Tuesday, July 30, the 211th day of 2013. There are154 days left in the year.

RESEARCH HAPPENINGS WlklLeaks —A military judge announces verdict a in the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, the former Army intel-

ligence analyst whoserelease of some 700,000secret documents to WikiLeaks opened a

window into American military

Monogamy might is ear oneso ercLies sound sweet, but to eat o ocean,s ecies why it evolved isn't

and diplomatic activities. By Seth Borenstein

MarketS —The U.S.Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee holds a

hearing on Wall Street reforms and systemic risks in financial markets.

HISTORY Hlghllght:In 1863, American

automaker Henry Fordwas born in Dearborn Township, Mich. In1729, Baltimore, Md., was

founded. In1864, during the Civil War, Union forces tried to take

Petersburg, Va., byexploding a gunpowder-filled mine under

Confederate defense lines; the attack failed. In1918, poet Joyce Kilmer, a sergeant in the 165th U.S. Infantry Regiment, was killed during the Second Battle of the Marne in World War I. (Kilmer

is perhaps best remembered for his poem "Trees.") In1932, the Summer Olympic

GamesopenedinLosAngeles.

Greg G>lbert/The SeattleT>mes

Katherine Maslenikov holds the inner-ear bones of a shortraker rockfish. The fish is found in waters off Washington and Alaska. The bones, known as otoliths, tell a historical story of growth, like rings on a tree.

A collection of the bones at the University of Washington was started in the 1960s, and scientists hope to Use it to track the health of the ocean up and down the West Coast.

In1945, the Portland class

heavy cruiser USSIndianapolis was torpedoed by aJapanese submarine during World War II; only 316 out of some 1,200

men survived.

In1953, the Small Business Administration was founded. In1956, President Dwight D.

Eisenhower signed ameasure making "In God We Trust" the national motto, replacing "E

Pluribus Unum" ("Out of many, one"). In1963, the Soviet Union announced it had granted political asylum to Harold "Kim" Philby, the "third man" of a British spy ring. In1965, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law the Medicare bill, which went into effect the following year.

In1975,former Teamsters union president Jimmy Hoffa

disappeared in suburban Detroit; although presumeddead, his remains haveneverbeen found. In1980, Israel's Knesset

passed a lawreaffirming all of Jerusalem as the capital of the Jewish state. In 1990, British Conservative

Party lawmaker lan Gowwas killed in a bombing claimed by the Irish Republican Army.

Ten years ago:President George W.Bushtook personal responsibility for the first time for using discredited intelligence in his State of the

Union address, but predicted he would be vindicated for go-

ing to war against lraq. Iraq's U.S.-picked interim government named its first president: Ibrahim al-Jaafari, a Shiite

Muslim from a party banned by Saddam Hussein. Five yearsago:President George W.Bushquietlysigned a housing bill he'd once threatened to veto; it was intended

to rescue somecash-strapped homeowners in fear of foreclosure. One yearago: Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney, on a visit to Israel,

outraged Palestinians by telling Jewish donors that their culture

was part of the reason Israel was more economically successful than the Palestinians.

BIRTHDAYS Major LeagueBaseball Commissioner BudSelig is 79. Feminist activist Eleanor Smeal is 74. Singer Paul Anka is 72. Former California Gov.

Arnold Schwarzenegger is 66. Actor Jean Reno is 65. Actor Laurence Fishburne is

52. Actress Lisa Kudrow is 50. Actor Terry Crews is 45. Movie director Christopher

Nolan ("The DarkNight") is 43. Actress Hilary Swank is 39. — From wire reports

The studies were published online Monday in the journals WASHINGTON — Only Science and the Proceedings a few species of mammals of the National Academy of are monogamous, and now Sciences. The mammal paper dueling s cientific t e ams in Science excluded humans think they've figured out while the primate analysis in why they got that way. But PNAS counted people both as their answers aren't exactly monogamous and not, because romantic. that differs around the world. The answers aren't even Opie drew on data about how the same. 230 primate speciesbehave, One team looked just at and he mapped out evolutionprimates, the animal group ary family trees for them. that includes apes and monHis result: Before any of the keys. The researchers said social traits associated with the exclusive pairing of a monogamy appeared, Opie male and a female evolved saw signs of high rates of outas a way to let fathers de- side males killing babies. In prifend their young against be- mates that developed monogaing killed by other males. my, such pairing up appeared The other scientific team to develop only later, he said. got a different answer after Why? B ecause p r imates examining about 2,000 spe- breast-feed their offspring for cies of nonhuman mam- a long time, even for years, and mals. They concluded that competing males kill off infants m ammals b ecame m o - if the dad doesn't stick around nogamous because females to fight them off. had spread out geographiBut Tim Clutton-Brock, a zocally, and so males had to ology professor who wrote the stick close by to fend off the all-mammal study in Science competition. with Lukas, said their research So it's not about romance, saw absolutely no evidence of said researcher Dieter Lu- infanticide spiking before mokas of the U niversity of nogamy. Instead, Clutton-Brock Cambridge, lead author of and Lukas found that in nearly the mammals study. "It's just every case, solitary females really the best he can do." came before social monogamy. Both teams discounted Those females had spread a long-standing explana- out to monopolize food like tion for monogamy, that it fruit that was of better quality providestwo parents rather but harder to find. That made it than one for rearing off- harderfor males to keep other spring. That's just a side males from inseminating the benefit, they said. females, Lukas said. "Romance obviously The Associated Press

By Sarah Zhang

uncover the effects of climate

The Seat tle Times

change.

without causing a whole species collapse. SEATTLE — A tiny white Trained observers go to sea sliver inside the heads of fish with fishermen to gather catch could hold evidence of a centu- and bycatch data. NOAA's fishry's worth of humans wreck- ery research centers rely on ing the environment: atomic scientific survey boats as well bombs, overfishing, even clias these observers to collect mate change. otoliths. "Each fish has its sweet spot," Fish ear bones, also known as otoliths, are like tree rings says Katherine Maslenikov, for the ocean. A layer of cal- fish-collections manager at the cium carbonate laid down each Burke, who has dug through year offers a snapshot of both fishheads herselfas an observthe fish's yearly growth and its er on fishing boats. surrounding ocean conditions. Three pairs of otoliths — sciThe University of Washing- entists collect only the largest ton's Burke Museum has been pair — sit in capsules of liquid transferring and cataloging 2 behind the fish's head. Techmillion pairs of otoliths, repre- nically, they are stones, not sentingsome 80 species.Scien- bones, because they contain no tists hope this collection, gath- live cells. ered over the past half-century, Otoliths are unique to each will help them track the health species. A pollock's are wingof fish populations and ocean shaped and about 2 centimeters conditions up and down the long. Others are delicate white West Coast. filigrees pretty enough for jewThe otolith collection, dating elry. The salmon has especially to the 1960s, had been sitting in tiny and hard-to-find otoliths. an old Sand Point hangar beThis huge variation among longing to the National Oceanic species is what makes aging and Atmospheric Administra- otoliths such difficult work. tion (NOAA). Last year, Ted Determining the age of otoPietsch, a UW professor and liths is the specialty of Tom curator of fishes at the Burke Helser's lab at the Alaska FishMuseum, got a grant to transfer eriesScience Center,a part of the otoliths to the museum — all NOAA. His 12-person lab ages of a 10-minute drive away. about 30,000 otoliths a year. The reason for the not-so-big The low-tech method for move? Fire. Although NOAA aging otoliths is called "break scientists had been doing active and burn." Heating them in a research on the collection, the simple flame darkens the anthousands of flammable Sty- nual bands, so they are easier rofoam boxes — piled 20 feet to count. high and filled with ethanol for A more sophisticated methpreservation — were a huge od involves drilling out tiny fire hazard. slivers of the otolith. The wisp The threatof fire persuaded of powder — barely enough the National Science Foun- to be visible to the naked eye dation to f un d a t w o -year, — is analyzed for oxygen-18, a $500,000 grant. Instead of sit- slightly heavier form of the usuting haphazardly and uncata- al oxygen-16. Because it varies loged in a hangar, the otoliths with temperature, the oxygenwill be archived in the Burke 18 level rises and falls with the and searchable online for out- seasons.Each rise and fallrepside scientists. resents one year. The UW recently made the But it's the change in elefirst loan of the otoliths to Or- ments like o x ygen-18 over egon State University, where many years that has scientists researchers are studying the really excited about otoliths. "Flight recorders" is how NOage when flatfish settle to the AA's Helser likes to describes ocean floor. Information unlocked by an- otoliths. alyzing the chemical makeup Ocean temperature, and thus of each otolith layer has piqued the oxygen-18 level, varies from the interest of archaeologists, shallow coastal waters to deepgeochemists and fish biologists er ones, so otoliths record mialike. gration patterns. A recent study Fishermen, not s c ientists, in yellowfin sole found a sharp were the original beneficiaries increase in oxygen-18 after the of the otolith data, which feed fish turned 7 years old, meanpopulation models that help de- ing it moved into deeper, colder termine catch limits each year. waters. As juveniles, they must Fish populations are closely have lived near the coast. "This is an animal that remanaged by NOAA so as not to repeatdisasters such as cod sponds extremely closely to overfishing on the East Coast. temperature as it grows older," Otoliths reveal age, which said Helser, noting how climate when aggregated with the sex, change could interfere with the size and locations of capture for fish's usual behavior. many fish, paint a portrait of Jeremy Harris, a g r a duthe population's health. Thus, ate student working with the scientists can estimate how otolith collection at the UW, is much fishermen can c atch also leading a project that could

He is comparing the otoliths of walleye pollock from 50 years ago with contemporary ones, with the primary

goal of figuring out whether the species has gotten smaller over time. This happened in cod when the largest fish were caught and only smaller ones were left to reproduce. Combining growth data with temperature could also shed light on climate change. On a l o nger t im e scale, 4,000-year old otoliths in prehistorictrash heaps are a record of ancient surface-water temperatures. This is the basis of a c o llaboration between Helser and archaeologists in Newfoundland. The chemical signature of the atomic bomb is seen in otoliths, too. Atomic bomb testing in the 1960s caused a sharp spike in carbon-14 in all living things, from rhino horns to tree rings. That carbon-14 signature is one way to validate the age of older otoliths. Some of the otoliths in the collection date to the 1960s, and that includes rockfish, which can live more than 100 years. The ultimate goal in cataloging the collection is to aid this wide range of research.

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A4 T H E BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Where are most incidents in andaround Bend? In 2012, the Bend Fire Department responded to 8,201 emergency and nonemergency incidents. Those incidents were mostly concentrated within the city limits, but there were other hot spots within Deschutes County Rural Fire

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Fire Continued from A1 The l ong-term f i n ancial outlook for the Fire Department, however, is not good. "The city's long-term projection for the fire fund shows that thecurrent revenues do not support their operations," said Chief Financial Officer Sonia Andrews. The city pays for fire services out of its general fund, much of which comes from property taxes. But u n less the city by 2015 starts spending another $1 million annually on its Fire Department, the department expenses will e xceed it s a l l ocation. The city anticipates it can p rovide t ha t s u b sidy, b u t only if it stops paying for bus service. The Bend C it y C o u ncil plans to begin discussing the Fire Department's financial future at an Aug. 7 meeting. The eventual result could be that the council asks voters as early as May 2014 to approve a new tax levy or to merge t he Fir e D e partment i n t o the surrounding Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District No. 2, said Bend Fire Chief Larry Langston. In February, a consulting firm, E m ergency Services Consulting Int e r n ational, recommended three strate gies for th e c it y a n d r u r al fir e d i strict. First, t h e agencies could cut costs by searching for efficiencies and reducing services. Second, they could ask voters to approve a l o cal o p t ion tax levy. A third option calls for the Rural F ir e P r otect ion District t o a n nex t h e city Fire Department, which would increase the tax rate inside city limits. " There's concern i n t h a t o ption (to a n nex t h e F i r e Department) that we have a system that has worked well for years," said Mayor Jim Clinton. C urrently, th e c i t y p r o vides many services to the Fire Department — accounting, human resources, legal advice — which a separate district might duplicate. The r ural district and city F i r e Department are already in a partnership, in which the c ity provides nearly al l o f t he employees and the r u ral district provides the fire stations. C linton said the t yp e o f situation B o o s d e s cribed, when all f i r efighters were busy Sunday afternoon, is c ause for c oncern o n t h e City Council. "Those things empty out stations, and then we're left vulnerable," Clinton said. " It's really up t o people who live around here to decide how much are they willing to pay to have the fire guys available when they're needed." The department needs to raise an additional $2 million annually if it is to "create a sustainable fiscal foundation," the study's authors wrote.The department's current annual budget is roughly

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$17 million. Currently, 19 f i r efighters and paramedics are working at an y t i me, i ncluding t he b a t talion c h i ef . T h e c onsultant f ound t h e F i r e D epartment's ratio of f i r e fighters per 1,000 residents is lower than at other agencies in the region and nationally. Bend has 0.72 f i r efighters per 1,000 r esidents, compared with a r e gional median of 0.91 firefighters and a national median of 1.35 per 1,000 residents. Langston, who served as police chief until 2008, returned as interim fire chief

after Chief Larry Huhn r etired earlier this year. The opening for a new chief drew 83 applicants but in the end, the city did not hire anyone. Langston said Monday that the city ha s r emoved "i nterim" from his title and he plans to stay on as chief indefinitely, as the city works on a financial solution for the Fire Department. "I don't know how long it's going to be, but I am working on some big projects, including what we do with f und-

Checks

2 003, and th e j u dge h ad promised that the case would Continued from A1 be dismissed if she served a NELP is slated to release a year of probation, according report Tuesday showing that to a suit she filed to regain the FBI processed nearly 17 her work license. But her file million employment backin the FBI's database was g round checks l ast y e a r never updated. — six times as many as it W ith the country in t h e did a decade ago. The advo- depths of the recession, she cacy group estimates that as was unable to find another many as 600,000 of those re- job. She eventually lost her ports contain incomplete or home to foreclosure and batinaccurate information. tled depression. "I felt like I had lost everyIn a statement, the FBI said that it receives its data from thing and there wasn't anystate records agencies and one out there that could help that states are responsible me, or would listen to me," for keeping the information she said. updated. She was finally able to Background checks can clear her record this spring serve as important safety with the help of a l a wyer precautions, helping to enfrom Michigan's Legal Aid sure that sex offenders do not clinic, four years after she get hiredatday-care centers, lost her job. "It's been quite a r ough for example. The FBI emphasized that the agency is not road leading up to fighting involved in hiring decisions, this case," Vanderpool said. but the number of industries "It's caused us quite a bit that use its data to screen of damage that it's going to workers skyrocketed after take usyears to really recovthe 2001 terroristattacks. er from." Because of new regulations, Data and limitations port workers, truck drivers and even mortgage procesThe FBI's databases are sors must now undergo FBI t he l argest r epository o f background checks, turning criminal information in the the agency's rap sheets into country. Records are linked a virtual gateway to millions to fingerprints, as well as of jobs. names, reducing the chances The issue has gained trac- of an incorrect match. tion on Capitol Hill amid the Employers can request an tepid economic recovery and FBI background check only the tight job market. Rep. when authorized by s t ate R obert "Bobby" Scott, D or federal laws and regulaVa., is planning to introduce tions. Many i ndustries rea bill this week that would quire potential e mployees r equire the FB I t o t r a c k to be screened by the FBI down updated information before they can receive work within 10 days for employ- licenses. ment screenings. A similar But th e F B I d a t abases measure sponsored by Rep. were not intended to be comKeith E l l i s on , D - M i n n ., p rehensive. I n stead, t h ey would apply specifically to function as a sort of index background checks for fed- composed of arrests; the outeral jobs. comes of those cases often "Finding a job in this econ- are not reflected in the FBI's omy is already hard enough," records. A 2006 U.S. attorney Ellison said. "No one should general's report e stimated lose the chance to work be- that half of the FBI's arrest cause of an inaccurate back- records did not include disground check." position information. Detroit r e sident R aquel A s p okesman f o r th e Vanderpool lost her p o si- FBI's Criminal Justice Intion as a n u r se's aide in formation Services, which 2009 after an FBI screening handles the databases, did turned up outdated criminal not provide a more current information. estimate. In a s t a t ement, Vanderpool had pleaded however, the agency said guilty to a drug offense in that it relies on the states to

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provide its records and keep them current. The design "decentralizes the criminal history responsibility by making the states, rather than the FBI, primarily responsible for r e cord maintenance and dissemination," it said. At the state level, many of the records are incomplete. A report by the Justice Department in 2010, the most recent available, found that in about half the states, as many as two in five records w ere m i ssing f i n a l o u t comes. Twenty-seven states reported a backlog of disposition data. Transmitting the information from the courts to state r ecords agencies could take less than a day in Delaware to 555 days in Kansas. Updating the records of those who fall through the cracks can be confusing and cumbersome. FBI r e g ulations say that employers and licensing agencies should give a p plicants t i m e to challenge and correct their records, either by contacting the FBI or the jurisdiction that collected the data. But applicants are not a l ways given a copy of their report or told why they were disqualified. Often, the burden is on them to prove an error was made. The NELP report h i ghlighted the T r ansportation Security A d m i n i stration's move to requireFBI screeni ngs for p or t w o r kers i n 2007. Since then, more than 120,000 applications were initially disqualified because of a background check, according to T S A s t atistics. Just over half of them filed for waivers or a ppeals to prove they were eligibleand 94 percentof them were successful. Meanwhile, about a quarter of the 4 million applications to work on th e 2010 C ensus were put o n h o l d after the Commerce Department ran FBI background checks, according to a lawsuit filed against the agency. Applicants had 30 days to prove the FBI's information was incorrect — but the alleged infractions were not reported to them.

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TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN seriously damaged, Whistleblowers 58-year-old burned-out intelligence officer." Continued from A1 A look at the lives of a handful of those who did just that shows that they often wind up farfrom the stable government jobs they held. They can even wind up in the aisles of a store.

From NSA toApple "Let's sit in the back," Thomas Drake says when choosing a booth at Parker's Classic American Restaurant in downtown Bethesda, Md., during his lunch break from Apple. "I have a lot to say. I was a public servant. That's a very high honor. It's supposed to mean something." Drake was prosecuted under the World War I-era Espionage Act for mishandling national defense information. His alleged crime: voicing concerns to superiors after 9/11 about violations of Americans' privacy by the nation's largest intelligence organization (NSA) and later, in frustration, speaking to a reporter about waste and fraud in the NSA intelligence program. (He says he revealed no classified

Barlow says he suffers from chronic PTSD, which makes it hard for him to deal with stress and sometimes other humans. He finds comfort in his three dogs: Sassy, Prairie and Spirit. H is supporters say t h a t shouldn't be surprising considering what he went through. Barlow startedhis career as a rising star tasked with orga-

RI D E S

jokingly when speaking to a reporter on his cellphone from his motor home outside Yellowstone National Park. "I'm out here with the grizzly bears," he says. "But this is where I'm comfortable. I'm a

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"The connectionis reallybad, it must be the NSA surveillance program," Richard Barlow says

partment had asserted that the F-16s were not capable of delivering Pakistan's nuclear weapons. Barlow said that Congress was being lied to, and he objected internally. D ays later ,hewas fired. "BackthenIwas disgustingly legally precluded a sale of $1.4 patriotic and I thought the govbillion worth of additional F-16s ernment is allowing Pakistan to Pakistan. to develop and spread nuclear But in August 1989, Barlow weapons and I got destroyed learned that the Defense De- for trying to stop it," he said.

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Sometimes Washington is just the last place you can stand tobe. Sibel Edmonds was once described by the American Civil Liberties Union as "the most

'Out here with the grizzly bears'

Secretary of D e fense Dick Cheney. He concluded that Pakistan already possessed nuclear weapons, had modified its F-16s to deliver these weapons, and continued to violate U.S. laws. The intelligence would have

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Fleeing to Central Oregon

the United States." And she was a regular on Washington's protest circuit. She was fired from her work as a translator at the FBI for trying toexpose security breaches and cover-ups that she believed presented a danger to U.S. security. Her allegations were supported and confirmed by the Justice Department's inspector general office and bipartisan congressional i n vestigations, but she was not offered her job back. She also published a memoir, "Classified Woman — The Sibel Edmonds Story." Then last summer, Edmonds, 43, decamped with her 5-yearold daughter and husband to Bend to enjoy the sunshine, lack of humidity, coffee shops and microbreweries. "I am touring every single one. Plus, we don't even have air conditioning here," she said. "We open the windows and feel the breeze." For years before she left, Edmonds found Washington's atmosphere suffocating. Many of her neighbors in Alexandria, Va., were lobbyists and contractors, who she says stopped talking to her after her name appeared in the newspaper. Luckily, her husband of 21 years is a retail consultant and could live anywhere. She says that most whistleblowers have spouses who work in the same agencies, which typically puts pressureon theirmarriages. She is still dedicated, she says, to the cause of exposing injustice and making information free. She spends hours running "Boiling Frog Post: Home of the Irate Minority," a podcast and website that covers whistleblowing and tries to create broader exposure for revelations. She is also founder and director of the National Security Whistleblowers Coalition.

in the CIA, who were supporting the jihadists (including Osama Bin Laden) in the first Afghan war against the Soviets. He says he chose to leave the CIA, and in early 1989, he went to work as the first weapons of mass destruction intelligence officer in the administration of President George H.W. Bush. Barlow continued to write assessments of Pakistan's nuclear weapons program for then-

• A K I B KA I S • E Z H I B I T S • F O O D • Q A S KE S • SKORE

information.) He lost his $155,000-a-year job and pension, even though in 2011 the criminal case against him fell apart. The former top spokesman for the Justice Department, Matthew Miller, later said the case against Drake may have been an "ill-consideredchoiceforprosecution." Drake, now 56, is tall and lanky and dresses as though he's ready, at any moment, to go on a gentle hike. He is the type of person who likes consistency. He went to work at Apple the day after the charges against him w er e d r opped, surprising his co-workers who thought he would at least take a day off .In 2010,he gotan adjunct professor job at Strayer University but was fired soon after, he says, while he was under government investigation. "I was just blacklisted," he said, adding that he started his own company but has only had minor work. "People were afraid to deal with a federal government whistleblower."

nizing efforts to target Pakistan's clandestine nuclear-buying networks. He won the CIA's Exceptional Accomplishment Award in 1988 for work that led to arrests, including that of Pakistani nuclear scientist A.Q. Khan. He testi fied before Congress under directorders from his CIA chain of command, but he says he later became the target of criticism from some of those

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Pope Continued from A1 Francis' words could n ot have been more different from those of Benedict XVI, who in 2005 wrote that homosexuality was "a strong tendency ordered toward an intrinsic moral evil," and an "objective disorder." The church document said that men with "deep-seated homosexual tendencies"should not become priests. Vatican experts were quick to point out that Francis was not suggesting that the priests or anyone else should act on their homosexual tendencies, which the church considers a sin. But the fact that he made such comments — and used the word "gay" — was nevertheless revolutionary, and likely to generate significant discussion in local dioceses, where bishops are divided over whether to accept priests who are gay but celibate. "It's not a great opening in terms of contents, but the fact that he talked about it that way is a great novelty," said Paolo Rodari, a Vatican expert at the Italian daily L a R epubblica. Francis would probably agree with Benedict's writings on homosexuality, he added, "but it doesn't interest him." "It interests him to say that the problem in the end isn't if someone has this tendency, the

important thing is to live in the light of God," Rodari said. "Said by a pope, it's enormous." Francis also told reporters that while Pope John Paul II had definitively closed the door to female priests, he sought a "theology of women" and a greater role for them in Catholic life, news reports said. The pope's comments on homosexuals and women in the church were yet another sign of the different directions from which Benedict and Francis approach doctrine. While Benedict, the shy theologian, focused more on ethics and advocated a more pure church, even if it might end up being smaller, Franciswas elected for his be-

lief that the Catholic Church must engage in dialogue with the world — even with those it disagrees with — if it wants to stay vibrant and relevant. "At a certain point, tone becomes substanceifit's seen as revitalizing the prospects of the church," said John Allen, a Vatican expert at The National Catholic Reporter. In Benedict's more subdued 2007visit to Brazil, where evangelicalchurches are making rapid inroads in the Catholic majority, he delivered speeches to bishops about how to respond to post-modern society. In contrast, Francis spoke on the beach, delved into the masses and was greeted like a rock

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Cellphones Continued from A1 In 2011, one year after the law went into effect, OSP was g iving a p proximately t w o warnings per citation, according to information Hastings provided. So far this year, the ratio has flipped, and police have given two citations for

his direct manner, has shifted things. "He's completely changedthe narrative about the church," Allen said. "In five months, now the dominant Catholic story is 'Charismatic Pope Takes World by Storm."' During his papal trips, John Paul II loved to walk to the back of the plane and chat with reporters, while Benedict only responded to a handful of preselected questions. Francis, on the overnight flight back to Rome from Rio de Janeiro, spoke freely to reporters for 80 minutes about everything from the Vatican Bank troubles to his decision not to live in the Apostolic Palace but rather in a

star by followers entranced by his approachable style and homespun folksy adages. ("You can always add more water to the beans," he said at one point.) In 2007,"Benedict came and played the standard classical nocturne that he was famous for, and his devotees loved it. Francis came and played the guitar in his very accessible style and the crowds went wild," said Allen, who traveled to Brazil for both trips. Before he resigned in February, Benedict's papacyhadbeen marked by scandals — a sex abuse scandal, a leaks scandal and trouble with the secretive Vatican Bank. Francis, with his style of radical simplicity and

Vatican residence. Francis did not dodge a single question, even thanking the person who prompted his comments on homosexuality, asking about Italian news reports of a "gay lobby" inside the Vatican, with clerics blackmailing one another with information about sexual missteps. "So much is written about the gay lobby. I have yet to find on a Vatican identity card the word 'gay,"' Francis said, chuckling.

"They say there are some gay people here. I think that when we encounter a gay person, we must make the distinction between the fact of a person being gay and the fact of a lobby, because lobbies are not good."

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every warning. Despite the increase in citations, challenges p ersist. Sheriff's Sgt. Bilyeu believes drivers are getting sneakier with their cellphone use. "If we see it, it's easy to enforce," Bilyeu said. "But people see us in their rearview mirror or up ahead of them and drop the phones in their laps. We might think we see somebody talking, but when we get a better look, the phone is gone." The county is employing a heavier hand with cellphone violators, but still gives out a fair number of warnings, the sergeant said. "I'd say, realistically, that I think th e Sheriff's Office writes far more warnings on that rather t han c i tations," he said. "We are writing a lot more citations than before, but still giving a lot of warnings." Baldwin, who patrols Bend on a motorcycle, said he has an advantage over officers in patrol cars. When an officer in a car sees a person looking into his or her lap, it's a safe assumption but not definitive that the driver is texting, Baldwin said. With a motorcycle, the officer can ride right up to the driver's window at a traffic light. "I've been able to get so close to a car that I could watch them text," Baldwin said. "It's probably the most efficient way to get people when they are texting." The law still ha s exceptions, mostly geared toward e mergency p e rsonnel a n d situations. For th e a v erage commuter, the law allows only the useof a hands-free device while driving. Despite this, Baldwin said he doesn't see a lot of hands-free devices. "I've made stops before where the driver has a Bluetooth device but doesn't use it," he said. "It's an easy option to make talking while driving legal and safe. I'm not sure why it's not working." OSP Sgt. David MacKenzie believes the citations will continue to climb. As an administrator, he said patrol officers talk to him about the frustrations of not being able to enforce the law. "The more people flaunt it in front of you, the more frustrated you become," MacKenzie said. "It wouldn't surprise me if they started cracking down on it." And with an increase in the number of applications available on smartphones, MacKenzie believes drivers will become more distracted and less aware of their surroundings. "It's a crash waiting to happen," he said. "With more functions — texting, GPS, phone and others — people will find more ways to keep their eyes off of the road. The distraction will continue." — Reporter: 541-383-0348, bandersen@bendbulletin.com

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Save on your grocery purchase of $50 or more with your Safeway Club Card and this Savings Award. *Use this Savings Award on any shopping trip you choose at any Oregon Safeway store (except Milton-

Freewater) and S.W. Washington stores serving Clark, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, Skamania and Klickitat counties by 8/6/13. This $10.00 Savings Award excludes purchases of Alcoholic Beverages, Fluid Dairy Products, Tobacco, US Postage Stamps, T r i met Bus/Commuter Passes, Money Orders, Container Deposits, Lottery, Gift Cards, Gift Certificates Sales, All Pharmacy Prescription Purchases, Safeway Club Savings, Safeway Store Coupons and Sales Tax. One Savings Award redeemable per household. COUPON CANNOT BE DOUBLED. Online and in-store prices, discounts, and offers may differ.

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Calendar, B2 Obituaries, B5

Weather, B6

©

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

o in - ax increase sou • Deschutes County would userevenue for marketing, salesat Fair 5 ExpoCenter By Shelby R. King The Bulletin

Deschutes County voters in November may be asked to approve a I percentincrease to the overnight lodging tax, mostly affecting tourists visiting the area. If approved, the money generated — an estimated $475,000 annually — would go to fund marketing and salesforthe Deschutes County Fair tL Expo Center.

The commission on Monday met with Fair R Expo Center Director Dan Despotopulous and Alana Hughson from Central Oregon Visitors Association to discuss the details of the proposed tax. "It is critical for that facility, moving forward, to get out there to market and promote it," Despotopulous said. "But it's going to take some dedicated funding to do so."

~

WHATEyER

The next step is to schedule a public hearing on the proposed increase prior to the mid-August deadline for placing measures on the November ballot. A date for the hearing has not been set. The commissioners were all supportive of moving forward with the process of getting the increase on the November ballot, citing the Fair & Expo Center as a large generatorof revenue forthe county. "Right now, we only spend $40,000 a year to market the Fair 8 Expo Center, which

is a $90 million facility," said Commissioner Tammy Baney. Commission Chair Alan Unger agreedthat amount

was "puny." "I am so glad we have such

an amazing fairgrounds," he said. "Having the Expo Center is a great advantage." Hughson said COVA also supports a room-tax increase. "We believe the funds will be very well invested and will be great for the citizens of this county," Hughson said. SeeTax/B3

Follow i n g up on Central Oregon's most interesting stories, even if they've been out of the headlines for a while. Email ideas to news@bendbulletin.com. O To follow theseries, visit www.bendbulletin.com/updates.

NEGLECTED POWELLBUTTE ANIMALS

recover

OI'OLl

• Dozens of horses are being rehabilitated after having beenmalnourished By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A year-and-a-half after they arrived at the Equine Outreach rescue ranch, the t h oroughbreds seized from a Powell Butte property in January 2012 once again look like they could be galloping down the homestretch. R esponding t o ci t i ze n c o m plaints of malnourished animals o n th e r a n ch , C r o o k C o u n t y s heriff's d eputies a r r ested t h e ranch caretaker, seized 11 horses and assumed care of another 44 horses and 16-18 cattle left on the

property. Eventually, 35 of the horses found their way to Equine Outreach, a rescue ranch east of Bend that rehabilitates neglected, abandoned and injured horses. SeeHorses/B3

Andy Tullis i The Bulletin

Laurie Wood, left, and Gayle Park feed and look after some of the rescued thoroughbreds at Equine Outreach east of Bend on Friday.

WHAT'5 HAPPENING WITH ... Following up on Central Oregon's ongoing stories.

CRIMINAL CASES Montana M a r latt faces charges of murder and first-Marlatt has pleaded not Marlatt is expected to go to trial Silk Marlatt degree manslaughter, for allegedly killing guilty to the charges and is on Sept. 9. Devon Moschetti,19, with whom he was currently being held in the shooting targets in April. Jefferson County jail. Kevin The f o rmer Bulletin employee was arrestedO'Connell pleaded not O'Connell i n August on suspicion of prostitution and guilty March 18.

O'Connell is expected to go to trial on Aug. 13.

second-degree sexabuse. Kevin and Tami

Sawyer

The Sawyers were charged with a variety

of financial crimes stemming from allegedly bilking real estate investors out of more than $4.4 million.

The pair were sentenced :'The Sawyers haveappealed on April 30 in federal their sentences andare court in Eugene.Kevin currently housed in separate Sawyer was sentenced . federal prisons.

In a separate case,Tami Sawyer is charged to 27 months in prison, while Tami Sawyerwas with theft and criminal mistreatment charges stemming from businessdealings sentenced to nine years in with an elderly man who put her in charge federal prison. of his trust shortly before his death in 2009.

(l~ai4 /

Luke Wirkkala

Wirkk ala is charged with one count of m u r der after he allegedly shot and killed . his houseguest, 31-year-old David Ryder, Feb. 4 in Bend.

Wirkkala pleaded not guilty on June 7 and is being heldin the Deschutes County jail

' Tami Sawyer's theft case is still

: open, but no newhearings have : been set. : Tami Sawyer is writing a blog from prison, www.tamisawyer. wordpress.com.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

United Way

BRIEFING

Fire department investigates blaze

to distribute

$1.1 million

Crook County Fire 8 Rescue respondedearly Monday afternoon to a home engulfed in flames

By Megan Kehoe

on Riggs Road in Powell Butte.

The Bulletin

Firefighters arrived af-

Local nonprofit agencies will receive thousands of dollars in funding from United Way of Deschutes County this year, after the organization announced that it will provide just over $1.1 million to local programs. "We're very happy," said Jane Wendell, director of finance and administration with United Way of Deschutes County. "We've been going down in funding for five years in a row now, so we're very happy that it went up this year, and that it went up so significantly." Last year, United Way of Deschutes County distributed $969,019 to local agencies. This year, the organization will divvy upthe money among agenciesin fourkey areas of the community: $256,223 will go toward basic needs, $181,532 will go toward violence and abuse prevention and support services, $160,663 will fund youthdevelopment and mentoring services, and $109,919 will go toward screening and early intervention services for children. The rest of the $1.1 million will go toward agency support services and donor designations to nonmember agencies. Wendell said the uptick in funding is a promising sign for nonprofits that have struggled over the past five years in the economic downturn. "It looks like Deschutes County is over the worst of it," Wendell said. "It's pretty obvious that it's getting better all over the place." The KIDS Center, which falls into the violence and abuse prevention area of funding, received an allocation of $41,000, which is down about $5,000from the previous year. Despite the decrease, Shelly Smith, the executive director with The KIDS Center, is pleased with the funding, which doesn't include designated private donations through United Way. "United Way is supporting more nonprofits than in years past, which means there's less money for all of us," Smith said. "But it's really a good thing because moreorganizations are getting money." NeighborImpact's funding alsodecreased from lastyear by about $2,000. The organizationreceived $43,000 from United Way this year. "We've been surprised by how consistent support has been even through the economic downturn," said Scott Cooper, executive directorof NeighborImpact. "With the presence of need all around us, it seems like people have been even more generous."

ter1 p.m. and had the fire

contained byearly evening. Thefire destroyed a house andshop building on the property, said Fire Chief Matt Smith. "The structure is

going to continue to smoke, and wehave crews out mopping it up right now," Smith said.

The occupants were home during the fire, but

there were no reported injuries. The fire remained under investigation early

Monday evening. "It appears the fire had come from the wildland and

spread to the structures, but what ignited that is the question," Smith sald. — Bulletin staff report Nore briefing, B3

STATE NEWS • Wildfires:Residents

are evacuated asfires rage in southwest

Oregon. • Medical pot:Panel

suggests standards for plant inspections. • Wheat: Genetically modified plants limited to one field, federal

agency says. Sfories on B3 and B6

Underpass detour The Third Street

underpass will be closed from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. nightly throughout

August as city crews work to correct frequent flooding. A signed detour will lead commuters to Franklin Avenue, Ninth Street

and Wilson Avenue. Gre wood ve. ctS CO

Franklin Av .

0 CKI

Detour

Thir Stre Unde as ilson Ave.

R d Market Rd Greg cross/The Bulletin

— Reporter: 541-383-0354, mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Wirkkala's trial is scheduled for Jan. 7, and a hearing to set bail . in his case is set for Sept. 16.

Lawrence L oeffler is charged with one count of : :Loeffler pleaded not guilty Loeffler is expected to go to trial Loeffler mur d er after he allegedly shot and killed : onApril2andisbeing held onSept.17. : :in the Deschutes County his wife of 39 years, 83-year-old Betty , :jail. Jane Loeffler, in a January domestic dispute at their home outside La Pine.

OTHER STORIES •

Kevin Perry : 'Perry shot and killed Shane : Munoz in June 2012, after : :Perry allegedly returned

: home to find Munoz in his : :home. Summit1031: :Local companyallegedly : misappropriated $44 million : inclientfunds; itfiledfor

: :bankruptcy in 2008. Desert Sun : Thirteen employeesand Management,associateswereaccusedof : 'multimillion-dollar loan fraud : 'in 2009.

The Deschutes County District Attorney's Office asked the Bend Police Department in April to re-examine the events surrounding the case. According to an email, the DA's office

No charges have

' •

' •

been filed or

arrests made.

considers the case"open indefinitely." Three executives of the company, Lane Lyons, Mark Neuman The trio are and Timothy Larkin, went on trial in June, and a jury found all scheduled to be three guilty of wire fraud andconspiracy charges. sentenced Oct. 23.

All but two charged in the case, including Desert Sun

Eight charged in

President Tyler Fitzsimons, have pleaded guilty. One, Kevin t h e case are to Mandlin, was sentenced to one year of probation this month. be sentenced in

October.

EXPERIENCE A TASTE OF CABO at Pronghorn - August 2nd 8 3rd Our 3rd event will feature Executive Chef Gonzalo Cerda of Esperanza inCabo San Lucas, Mexico. Dining at Esperanza showcases product fr om l o c al f a r m ers and f i s hermen, using only the freshest possible ingredients. Travel+LeisUre Magazine recently named Esperanza as the ¹5 R esort in Mexico on their 2013 World's Best Hotels list. ' •

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

E VENT

AL E N D A R

Email events at least 10days before publication date to communitylife®bendbulletin.com or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. 5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. "SPRINGSTEEN & I": A screening of a compilation of the personal insights and reflections of Bruce Springsteen fans; $15; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium16 & IMAX, 680S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. JIVE COULIS: TheAshland rock band performs, with the Mondegreens; free; 10 p.m.; The Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-388-0116 or www. astroloungebend.com.

bendfarmersmarket@gmail.com or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. PICKIN' AND PADDLIN' REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat Free admission; 3-6 p.m.; Centennial demonstrations in the Deschutes Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen River; Polecat, the Bellingham Avenue; 541-550-0066 or bluegrass-Americana band redmondfarmersmarket1@hotmail. performs, with John Hise; proceeds com. benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; TUESDAYFARMERSMARKET: Free $5, free for children 12 andyounger; admission; 3-7 p.m.;Brookswood 4-6 p.m. demonstrations, 5-9 Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak Meadow Drive, Bend; 541& Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, 323-3370 or farmersmarket© Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407 or brookswoodmeadowplaza.com. 411©tumalocreek.com. MOUNTAINSTANDARD TIME: WHERE'S WALDO PARTY: A wrapThe Colorado bluegrass band up party for the month long Where's performs; free admission; 6 WEDNESDAY Waldo hunt; cake andactivities; free; p.m.; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 4 p.m.-6 p.m., raffle drawings at 5:30 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541DESCHUTESCOUNTY FAIR & p.m.; PaulinaSprings Books,252W . 728-0749 or www.facebook. RODEO:Carnival rides, games, Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. com/events/150546488460842/. rodeo and a free CheapTrick concert; WHERE'S WALDO PARTY: A wrap$10 daily passes,$11-$19 season TWILIGHT CINEMA: Anoutdoor passes, free for seniors today and for up party for the month long Where's screening of "Ice Age"; bring lowWaldo hunt; cake andactivities; free; profile chair or blanket, no dogs; free; children 5 and younger; 10 a.m.-10 4 p.m.-6 p.m., raffle drawings at p.m., concert at 7 p.m., gates open 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners 5:30p.m.;Paulina Springs Books, Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 at 5:30 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair 8 Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport 422 S.W. Sixth St.,Redmond; Overlook Road; 541-585-3333 or 541-526-1491. Way, Redmond; 541-548-2711 or www.sunriversharc.com. http://expo.deschutes.org/index. ALIVE AFTERFIVE: Junior Toots OREGON ENCYCLOPEDIAHISTORY php/fair expo/fair/. performs, with Sagebrush Rock; NIGHT: "Seeing the Elephant: BEND FARMERSMARKET: Free at the north end of Powerhouse Songs Inspired by the Oregon Drive; free; 5-8 p.m.; Old Mill Trail" presentedby The Quons; admission; 3-7 p.m.;Brooks free; 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m.; Alley, between Northwest District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Franklin Avenue andNorthwest Drive, Bend; 541-389-0995 or www. 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382Brooks Street; 541-408-4998, aliveafterfivebend.com.

TODAY

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NEWS OF RECORD •

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT Theft — A theft was reported at 2:57 a.m. July 23, in the 2500 block of Northeast Twin Knolls Drive. Burglary— A burglary was reported at 9:33 a.m. July 23, in the 300 block of Northwest Colorado Avenue. DUII — Joshua Lee Baker, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:33 p.m. July 23, in the 62900 block of OB Riley Road. Unauthorizeduse — A vehicle was reported stolen at 3:37 a.m. July 25, in the area of Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Wilson Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:22 a.m. July 26, in the 1600 block of Southwest Chandler Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:24 p.m. July 26, in the 61000 block of Brosterhous Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:32 p.m. July 13, in the 20500 block of Jacklight Lane. DUU — Jesse Thomas Taylor, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at1:32 a.m. July 21, in the area of Northwest Drake Road and Northwest Nashville Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at1:32 a.m. July 21, in the area of Northwest Drake Road and Northwest Nashville Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:39 p.m. July 22, in the 500

block of Northeast 15th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:48a.m. July24, in the1400 block of Northwest Lexington Avenue. DUII — Malia Lani Ward, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:43 p.m. July 24, in the area of Northwest Mount Washington Drive and Northwest Crossing Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 2:55 p.m. July 25, in the area of Northwest Broadway Street and Northwest Riverside Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:01 p.m. July 25, in the 300 block of Northwest Second Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:55 a.m. July 26, in the 600 block of Northwest Wall Street. DUII — Shyanna Darlene Sanders, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at1:15 a.m. July 27, in the area of Northeast Boyd Acres Road and Northeast Ross Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at1:30 a.m. July 27, in the 2200 block of Northeast Lynda Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at11:15 a.m. July 27, in the 61800 block of Avonlea Circle. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:08 p.m. July 27, in the 900 block of Northwest Bond Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 5:53 p.m. July 27, in the 61100 block of Rustic Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at11:55 p.m. July 27, in the 300 block of Southeast Railroad Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:16 a.m. July 28, in the 100 block of Northwest Pinecrest Court. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 6:44a.m. July 27, inthe1500

block of Northeast Third Street.

'

PRINEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT •

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at1:04 p.m. July 26, in the area of North Main Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:50 p.m. July 26, in the area of North Main Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at12:15 a.m. July 26, in the area of North Main Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:43 p.m. July 27, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:48 p.m. July 27, in the area of Northwest Deer Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:42 a.m. July 28, in the area of Northeast Pippen Lane.

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JEFFERSON COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE Theft — A theft was reported at 12:50 p.m. July 26, in the 400 block of Seventh Street in Metolius. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:18 p.m. July 27, in the 1400 block of South U.S. Highway 97 in Madras.

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Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4 p.m. July 26, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 118. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at1 38 p.m. July 28, in the area of Cascade Lakes Highway near milepost 27. DUII — Kevin Shad Platz, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:33 p.m. July 28, in the area of Burgess Road and Ponderosa Way in La Pine.

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TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

B3

BRIEFING Continued from Bt

Evacuated campers may return for gear The Deschutes County Sher-

iff's Office announced aprocedure for reclaiming gear for the scores of campers forced from south county campgrounds by fire over the weekend. The Browns Creek Fire had burned more than 40 acres at

REGON

was closed on the west side of

Road 4260 to Wickiup Reservoir, including the Ship Bridge campground to the Gull Point Campground. The Gull Point

Wildfires prompt evamations

campground was open. Campers who evacuated will be allowed back into the area to

retrieve equipment with a Forest Service escort beginning at10

last count but was surrounded

a.m. today. To return to the area, take the Cascade Lakes Highway

by fire lines and 20 percent contained, according to the Central

to the intersection of Forest Ser-

Oregon Interagency Dispatch Center. By Monday, the evacuation order for North Twin Lake and

South Twin Lakecampgrounds, imposed Sunday,had been lifted, according to the Sheriff's Office. However, Forest Ser-

vice Road 42 from Road4260 to Cascade LakesHighway remained closed. All camping

Horses Continued from B1 Equine Outreach founder and President Joan Steelhammer said when the thoroughbredsarrived atthe ranch, they wouldn't stay still long enough to allow veterinarians to work on their feet and teeth. "When we first got a hold of them, you almost couldn't touch them, they were just terrorized — they'd just run," she said. Steelhammer said a vet advised them to let the horses adjust to their new home at their own pace, and in recent months, they've put on weight and recovered to th e p oint where they can be adopted out. Ten of the thoroughbreds have already been adopted out to new homes, and Steelhammer said the recent High Desert Classic down the street from her ranch generated a number of seemingly serious adoption inquiries. Meanwhile, the legal issues surrounding the ranch have yet to be resolved. Ranch caretaker Timothy Coffia was convicted on two counts of second-degree animal neglect in June 2012. Robert Gruntz, head of a California company that owned the horses, has not been charged in this case but continues to face chargesfrom a 2009 seizure of malnourishedhorses from the same ranch. At trial on the 2009 charges, Gruntz's attorneys successfully argued that evidence obtained in search warrants served at the ranch was inadmissible due to insufficient probable cause to issue those warrants. The Oregon Court of Appeals overturned that ruling in February 2012, and in June 2012 the Oregon Supreme Court declined to hear Gruntz's appeal. Gruntz, who operated the Arlington Group as means of allowing investors to buy into a group of horses that would supposedly be raced and bred, had been set to go to trial on Aug. 5, but his trial has been delayed. Steelhammer said she'shad a difficult time getting documentation from the Crook County District Attorney's Office that would show the parentage of the horses, key information in the world of horse racing. In court hearings, attorneys for Gruntz have claimed at least one of the horses was worth more than $250,000. Steelhammer said while she doesn't want people to adopt a horse purely for its pedigree — she's set the adoption rate

vice Road 42. Do not travel Road 42; it will be blocked at the Crane Prairie Junction.

Forest Service personnel will

area is re-opened or all property has been removed,according to the Sheriff's Office. — Bulletin staff report

for the thoroughbreds at $500, the same as any other horse — having that information could accelerate the adoption process. " People want to k n ow because it will give us a definitive age, and sometimes people take a horse for sentimental reasons," she said. "Maybe it's the daughter or the granddaughter of one of their deceased horses." Steelhammer said Equine Outreach faced a serious financial stretch taking on 35 horses at once — late last year, she had roughly 140 horses on the 20-acre ranch. "It was tough at times, it was scary, there were times I didn't sleep, but we got them through, and one year later we're proud to present them to the world and give them a real chance at a life," she said. — Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulleti n.com

— Reporter: 541-383-0376, sking@bendbulletin.com

PORTLAND — Erin Rightbower was not surprised to see the sheriff's deputy pull up to the driveway with an evacuation notice. She was expecting him. The family h a d s t arted

City Hall and firing a shot was high

on mushrooms andhallucinating. No one was hit by the bullet in the Friday evening scuffle. The Or-

— including three birds and a dog — when they saw the skies fill with smoke from the nearby Douglas Complex wildfires. Th e p a p erwork only affirmed the need to leave. Within 45 minutes of receiving Saturday's evacuation notice, the family was out the door to stay with friends. Late July and August is wildfire season in Oregon, and crews are battling six major fires. Lightning late last week touched off dozens of fires in southwest Oregon near Glendale. Most of the small ones were contained, and some merged into larger fires that make up the Douglas Complex. Those fires have burned

Andy Atkinson/The Mail Tribune

A fire-bomber and guide plane make a pass near Rattlesnake Creek in Glendale on Sunday. Lightning late last week touched off dozens of fires in southwest Oregon near Glendale.

Monday whether he had a lawyer.

Troudles forworkers' compensation group —Oregon

insurance regulators said Monday 21,000 acres, or nearly 33 square miles, and were just 2 percent contained as of Monday afternoon. More than 100 houses have been evacuated and others are on evacuation alert. Cheyne Rossbach, a fire spokesman, said a total of 400 homes are threatened, but none has burned. More than 1,000 firefighters and support staff have been assigned to f i res t hat h a ve

scorched on e o u t building and two railroad trestles. Another fire beingwatched closely in southwest Oregon is the 870-acre Labrador Fire, burning near the Illinois River, about 12 miles northwest of Selma. The fire is i n t h e same area as 2002's Biscuit Fire. Spokeswoman Virginia Gibbons said the fire is in steep terrain, and there's potential for explosive growth.

that they've taken the first steps toward decertifying a workers'

compensation self-insurance trust and will shut it down next week if the employers can't come up with

$750,000. TheOregon DepartmentofConsumerand Business Services said OregonEmployers Trust lnc. must increase its

security deposit to $3.95 million based onmembership growth and estimated claims liability through

June 2012. Thegroup is Oregon's largest private group of employers that self-insure for workers' com-

pensation, state officials said.

Oregonkids part of pros-

Pot inspection standardsrecommended The Associated Press PORTLAND — Th e citizen committee that advises Oregon's medical marijuana

state's new dispensary program, effective in March. The call for organic pot is out of concern for patients program has recommended with immune system deficienadopting the plant-inspection cieswho could be affected by standards used for organic pesticides, mold and fungi. certification. Plant inspection is expected Thecommittee'srecommen- to be a complicated part of the dations to the Oregon Health new law, since the state is creAuthority will help shape the ating a model from scratch.

' •

.

.

The law will allow growers to be reimbursed by dispensaries, which will then charge patients. Supporters say the market will set appropriate prices for growers' labor and other costs. Opponents say the reimbursements will allow growers to set their own prices, leading to abuse.

titution sweep —Oregon

authorities say two children were rescued from prostitution over the

weekend aspart of a nationwide sweep.The FBIsaid M onday that four Portland pimps were arrested, and a fifth identified, while 13 adult women were picked up and likely will face prostitution

charges. A babywas placed in state custody. Agency spokeswoman Beth Anne Steele told the

Oregonian the local sting began Friday and ended Saturday night in the Portland-metropolitan area. — From wire reports

Aaffordable CountyFair with somethingFUNfor the whole herd!

JULY 31$T THROUGH AUSUST 4TH DESCHUTESCOUNTY FAIR 8 EXPO CENTER

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egonian reports that Jared Steven Leone wasarraigned Monday on two counts of assaulting a public safety officer, three counts of unlawful useofaweaponandone count of possessing acontrolled substance. It wasnot known late

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I%otitttrttg rttka IIIIÃ Dtmillrtttrtttttl@~

See the Official Fair Guide in The Bulletin and Redmond SpokesmanJul y 24th

-•

An old-fashioned affordable Count Fair with something FUN for everyone!

The Bulletin qe, j

Qnceyou'vepaidfor general admission, comeenjoy Iames, contests, shows,andmore! Andil's all FREE!

Petting Zoo and Pnny Rides

C UTE S T

Shovv

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Sponsored byCentral OregonRanchSupply

Conttal Ore fibn

sponsored byMobile Cat8 DogVet ob<"'

E art h

W Ranch Supply Lil' BUCKAROOS CAN HONE ' THEIR WILD WEST SKiLLS

Cat ' Dog Vet

A high-energy showdesigned to get family members playing together. Kidsdress upand become star performers in a livetheater experience of "Let's PretendFarmTimeTour". Each showfeatures upto18 kids of all ages chosen from theaudience.

with fun activity stations such

as gold panning, roping, horse saddling and more. MILK A COW! (It's not reol but it's reallycool!)

PEDAL TRACTOR AREA! DRESS LIKE A COWBOY OR COWGIRL!

Tax Continued from B1 County Administrator Tom Anderson reminded the commission that the city of Bend is also proposing a room-tax increase of 1.4 percent spread over two years on the November ballot. "They will likely be next to each other on the ballot, and city residents will be voting on both," he said. "So it's important we get this to the public and let them know why it's important." Ifvoters approve an increase, 70 percent of the revenue generated would go to marketing and promotion of the facility. It was unclear at the meeting what would be done with the remaining 30percent,and the commissionrequested Anderson compile a list of possibilities for them to consider.

The Associated Press

lES SCHWAB

Mushrooms dlamed in gun incident —Beaverton police say an18-year-old manaccused of grabbing a sergeant's gun inside

By Steven Dubois

gathering their belongings

escort individuals into and out of the area to retrieve property and items that were left behind. This process will continue until the

AROUND THE STATE

Performances each day at noon, 3 p.m.,5 p.m.and 7 p.m.

Return this year from the DD Ranch in Terrebonne. BROWNIE THE STEER WILL BE THERE TOO!

Other contests throughout the day. Some with cash prizes, some with ribbons, some with carniva1 tickets as prizes. Including: ABCDI".'

• Watermelon Eating Contest, Wednesday,1:30 p.m

Il l( LM N O I ORSTltVWXY7. ~

• Pie Eating Contest, Saturday, 1:30 p.m. • APPle BObbing eVeryday 2 to 5 P.m. by Bobbie Strome Real EState • Humane SOCiety of Central OregOn

~HyIAJQ WASH Qe

• Games and contests by Ridgefield High Lacrosse Team • Smokey Bear Birthday Party, Saturday, 4 p.m.

Sudsy s Sarn It's an interactive water station built like a mini-theme park with animals that talk! Washing your hands has never been so fun! Awarded one of the most popular Fair attractions in the West. THE BULLETIN FAMILY FUN ZONE IS MADE POSSIBLE BY THE SUPPORT OF THESE FINE SPONSORS: ~

RE0 MQHO ~

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

The Bulletin

EDITORIALS

AN LNDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

is aiin agement Agency, is not so good at preventing

FEMA froze the $3 million grant from 2010. Rather than pay up, Deschutes County fought back. At one point the money FEMA wanted back ballooned to $700,000, retired Deschutes County Forester Joe Stutler sa>d. Obviously, if Deschutes County spent money for wildfire reduction on acreage not covered by the grant, FEMA was entitled to ask for it back. But the OEM was responsible for disbursing the grant money, and it failed to ensure the money was being spent in the proper areas. The county had every reason to believe it was following the prescriptions of the grant. It heard nothing from OEM. FEMA also made a poor choice. It would also seem to be better and quite useful for a federal agency that is providing money to a county to reduce the risk of wildfire to actually use the money to reduce the risk of wildfire. FEMA decided, instead, that $3 million would be better doing nothing. OEM, at least, has apparently learned from its mistake and plans to pay Oregon Department of Forestry officials to inspect where thinning work is done. Six months from now, long after another fire season has gone, some of FEMA's $3 million grant may actually be spent on reducing fire danger.

governor'sfocuswell-placed

w

Fditur in-Clnrf Editor of Edttorials

RICHABD CoE

LUNGR.

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gSAP At4ARN& It4TO

PERS board faces reality; hen Oregon's public pension board agreed Friday to reduce its assumed earnings rate, it was acknowledging the reality of reduced investment earnings. Facing up to that reality — at least partially — is a crucial first step in addressing the critical issue of public pension obligations. Oregon'sproblems are not as serious as bankrupt Detroit's, but the underlying factors echo nationwide. Governments across the country have promised public employees more than they can deliver without severely limiting funding for critical public purposes, such as schools,roads, courts, health care, etc. Years of high investment returns lulled negotiators into making unrealistic commitments. Actuarial assumptions may have helped to obscure the extent of the future problems. The board of Oregon's Public Employees Retirement System is expected to formalize the rate change at its Sept. 27 meeting, lowering its investment return assumption from 8 percent to 7.75 percent. The effect will be to cut some returns to retirees and increase the amount school districts

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disaster. It did a sketchy job reducing wildfire danger in Central Oregon. Oregon's Office of Emergency Management, or OEM, messed up, too. The result is Deschutes County is stuck paying back $43,472.92, because it unknowingly used money to reduce wildfire in an area that was not approved by FEMA. The OEM is also paying back another $50,000 itself. What's worse is what happened to a $3 million grant to protect Central Oregon from wildfire. FEMA announced in September 2010 that Deschutes, Crook and Klamath counties were going to get $3 million to protect homes. Not a dime of that money has been spent. FEMA froze it. This all started with grants FEMA gave Deschutes and Crook counties in 2007 and 2008. It was to do thinning work to reduce the fire danger to homes. The grants were about $1 million a piece. D eschutes County spent i t s share for those grants. It filed reports to the OEM as required about its spending. The OEM approved the reports. Deschutes County assumed all was well. But then in 2011, FEMA asked for $328,000 back from Deschutes County from the 2007 and the 2008 grants. It claimed Deschutes County used the 2007 and 2008 grants for work in areas that were not authorized by FEMA. And

Chairaomnn Palll&lter

I

a ire reven ion he master of disaster, the Federal Emergency Man-

BETsY McCooc Gottoott Bcnctt

and other governments must pay into the system. It's a move in the right direction to align calculations to the current investment climate, but it could wipe out the modest savings in PERS contributions approved in the recent legislative session. Although the effects won't be felt by governments until the next biennium, that fact only exacerbates theincreasesto come. Gov. John Kitzhaber tried to broker an agreement for a "grand bargain" of tax increases and further PERS reform during the 2013 legislative session. After the effort failed in the waning days of the session, he said he'd keep working on it and would call a special session if he could find the votes. In pursuit of the "grand bargain," the governor held a "listening session" in Hillsboro last week and a Salem session is planned today, according to a report in the Statesman Journal. It's the right focus for the governor's attention. Comprehensive PERS reform may be the most critical issue facing the state, determining the state's ability to address most of its other concerns.

Bringing dad home in a box ShIra ToeplItz

Israel, on the outskirts of Tel Aviv. The day before our flight, we trudged up the steps to the top floor of a building that had the aesthetic appeal of a dentist's office. His ashessaton a conference room table in the cardboard box, inside a

Special To The Washington Post

s we boarded our flight in Tel Aviv, carry-on baggage in hand, I turned to my little sister, llana. "Should we stow Dad in the overhead compartment?" I asked. "Beats checking him in our luggage," she replied. "What if the airlines lost him?" We hoisted the box containing our father's ashes into the overhead bin, next to crumpled jackets and wheeled suitcases. His entire six-foot-tall, 300pound personality now fit into a cardboard box the size of a flower vase. Ten days after he died, somewhat suddenly at age 66 during a visit to his native Israel, we were transporting him back to the States. I had sobbed the entire first leg of the journey: a 70-minute flight from Washington to Boston to meet my sister. nIt doesn't get any better," a flight attendant had said, offering unsolicited advice on losing a parent. nBut it does get easier." Kind of like flying, I thought, except grief has no estimated time of departure. Instead, you're cramped in a middle seat, honking into the last tissue before switching to stiff paper towels from the airplane bathroom, making fellow passengers uncomfortable with your tears. The grief trip is inevitably tough, whether it's a short car ride to the cemetery or a 5,500-mile flight. We journey for people we love. For me and my 24-year-old sister, that journey involved bringing Dad back in a box — according to his wishes and against those of his religion. Judaism forbids cremation, but obviously, our Jewish father did not. He had made it clear that he wanted his ashes spread around his home in western Massachusetts. In the meantime, he wanted his remains stored in a blue glass container that used to hold flour. My mother reserved the smaller, matching jar she still uses for

A

purple gift bag, ready for transport. Ilana and I cried for a while, but a few hours later, we were joking that we were transporting chocolate Kinder eggs in that bag. Dad would have preferredthe chocolate,anyway. Unfortunately, the security guards at Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion Airport did not share our sense of humor. After all, we were two 20-something foreigners traveling alone with a box of off-white powder. We repeatedly explained our nDad-in-a-boxn to passport control and luggage inspectors, appropriate paperwork in hand. I grimaced as bags collided with our package on the X-ray conveyor belt. "Did you watch him get cremated? Please be honest," a particularly stern security guard with a submachine gun strapped to his chest asked at the final checkpoint. "Uh, no,n I replied. For a second, I thought he wouldn't let us go because I hadn't witnessed the all-consuming flames. "I'm sorry for your loss," the guard said. "Next, please." By that flight backto the United States, all we could do was laugh at the situation. It was better than sobbing in the middle seat. The last four years of my dad's life were frustratingly humorless, especially for my sister, who handled most of his care during and just afterhercollege years. A sudden brain injury and diabetic complications had left him unconscious in the ICU for weeks. In his early 60s, he had to learn to talk, walk, think and type all over again. He improved but never fully recovered. There were moments when his vulnerabilities made him endearing and affectionate — perhaps more so than when he was in good health. Early in his career as a symphony orchestra

sugar. There's only one crematorium in

executive, his brusqueness earned him the nickname "Mr. T," a nod to the A-Team'sdecorated tough guy. But mostly there were tense arguments over finances, diet and his illadvised desire to drive. One night at the hospital, a nurse pulled me aside to caution about how much insulin my father needed. As I sat down on the side of his bed, I heard the familiar crinkle of a candy wrapper. I pulled out the contraband — a Swiss chocolate bar hi s h alf-sister had brought as a gift — buried between his white bedsheets. "Sugar-free chocolate is still chocolate!" I gasped. He flashed a mischievous smirk, then rolled his eyes. As my sister and I made our way home, we didn't care if fellow passengers overheard us talk about our extra baggage, physical and emotionaL During a layover in Vienna, my sister blurted in a crowded boarding area: "I'm goingto check on Dad, okay?" She briefly pulled the white cardboard box out of the bag and peered inside. All was intact. An avid traveler, my father logged most of his miles organizing international tours for orchestras, most prominently as the managing director of the Pittsburgh Symphony. He reveled in finding the final available hotel room near a crowded music festival or finagling a first-class flight for a prissy artist. He proudly smuggled a six-figure violinthrough U.S. customs once without declaring it. He would have appreciated his final journey. I won't ever think about a flight — or even packing a suitcase — in the same way. My father carried me so many times: as ababy in his arms or a child asleep after a long car ride. He supported me as a teenager, college student, young professional. Carrying me was never a problem for him. But my baggage?aYou pack it, you carry it," he always said about backpacks,suitcases and my overstuffed work bags. Relatively, Dad was an easy load. — Shira Toeplitzis a politicseditor for Roll Call.

Letters policy

In My Viewpolicy How to submit

We welcome your letters. Letters

In My View submissions should be between 550 and 650 words, signed and include the writer's phone number and address for verification.

should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer's signature, phone number

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We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons.

and legal reasons. Wereject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters

We reject those published elsewhere.

submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one

the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are

letter or Op-Edpieceevery 30 days.

In My View pieces run routinely in

Please address your submission to either My Nickel's Worth or ln My View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Write: My Nickel's Worth / In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 Fax: 541-385-5804 Email: bulletin©bendbulletin.com

limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Kids caught up in foster, court systems need your help By Jesse Felder ight here in our community there are abused and neglected children who live in t h e shadows of our lives. She may be the little girl in your son's kindergarten class who had to move homes and change schools three or four times in the last year. He may be the lonely child at the park who doesn't join the

R

game. The foster care and child welfare system is full of compassionate lawyers, judges, social workers and foster families, but according to recent statistics, each year roughly 400 children are placed in foster care right here in our community. This intense need can strain the system to

the point where it is simply unable to protect the rights of each child. So the little girl, who has already suffered in an abusivehome, enters the foster care system, which places her in three or four different homes in just a few months. Or the two siblings who lost their mother to incarceration are split up and end up living on opposite sides of town. This isn't just a problem; it is nothing short of a violation of their human rights. A child cannot defend his or her own rights, but a CASA volunteer can! Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon is a nonprofit organization that trains and supports volunteers — people like you and me

IN MY VIEW — to speak and act as advocates for the best interests of abused and neglected children. They are trained to work within the child welfare and family court systems and are appointed by judges to individual cases. With the help of a CASA volunteer, a child is half as likely to languish in foster care and much more likely to find a safe and permanent home. I have seen firsthand the transformative impact a CASA volunteer can have on a child. Without his CASA volunteer, who has stood by him for over a decade, my foster son would not be the confident, thriving young man he is today. His CASA volunteer

is an inspiring example of the major positive impact we can have on the lives of kids in need when we are willing to fight for and protect their fundamental right to be safe, to be treated with dignity and respect and to learn and grow in the safe embrace of a loving family. But right now, 32 children do not have access to a CASA volunteer. We are dedicated to ensuring that each and every child in the foster care and child welfare system has a qualified CASA volunteer looking out for their best interests. To do this, we must significantly increase our volunteer base here in Central

Oregon. Every child has a right to thrive,

to be treated with dignity, and to live in a safe, loving home. Every child deserves a fighting chance. Once grown, these former foster youths could be our future doctors, teachers and leaders. Coming through a period of vulnerability and fear, the child can then understand his potential and his rights. She will believe in herself. That is our incredible opportunity, our challenge and our obligation as a society. I invite you, my fellow Central Oregonians, to stand up with me and support these children. There are all kinds of ways to get involved. Go to CASAofCentralOregon.org and see how you canmake a difference. — JesseFelder lives in Bend.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

BS

BITUARIES DEATH NOTICES Paul Borg, of Redmond Nov. 20, 1921 - July 24, 2013 Arrangements: Autumn FuneralsRedmond (541-504-9485) www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Memorial Service: 11:00am, Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, Faith Lutheran Brethren Fellowship, 210 Fishers Lane, Kelso, WA.

Glenn E. Rediger, of Leavenworth, WA Jan. 18, 1935- Mar. 4,2013 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel in La Pine www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Services were held.

Grace Katherine Beyer, of La Pine Dec. 4, 1937 - July 17, 2013 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel, La Pine www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held, per Grace's request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org. 541-382-5882.

Virginia C. Browne, of Bend Nov. 17, 1918- July26, 2013 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds is honored to serve the family. Please visit the online registry at www.niswonger-reynolds. com 541-382-2471. Services: A memorial service will be announced for this week. Contributions may be made to:

Bend First Methodist Church 680 NW Bond St. Bend, OR 97701 or Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Esther Elizabeth Olson, of Madras Dec. 21, 1918 - July 23, 2013 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Graveside Committal services will be held on Thursday, August 1, 2013 at 1:00 PM at Mount Jefferson Memorial Park in Madras. A memorial service will follow at 2:00 PM at the Living Hope Christian Center in Madras. Contributions may be made to:

Living Center Christian Center, Madras, Oregon.

Loren E. Dyer, of Bend Aug. 30, 1928- July27, 2013 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds is honored to serve the family. Please visit the online registry at www.niswonger-reynolds. com 541-382-2471. Services: A Memorial Service will be held on Friday, August 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM at Niswonger-Reynolds Chapel, 105 NW Irving, Bend, OR 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701.

William "Bill" Karl Usher, of Bend Feb. 23, 1934 - July 22, 2013 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Graveside Service Thursday, August 1, 2013 1:00 P.M. Willamette National Cemetery. Celebration of Life will be held Saturday, August 3, 2013, 2:00 P.M. at Bend Golf and Country Club, Bend, Oregon, 61045 Country Club Drive, Bend, Oregon 97702.

Dorothy Anita Bogumil Nuv. 17, 1928- July16, 2013 ' Dottie' A. Dorothy Bogumil was born November 17, 1928, in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of W illiam an d E m m a L u p pold. S he w a s u nited i n marriage to Ca r o l K. Bogumil on J une 1 7 , 1950, in New York. Dorothy They Bogumll m oved t o Milwaukie, Oregon, and then O regon Cit y , Or eg o n , where she wa s e m ployed for 31 years as administrative a s s i stan t t o th e C lackamas County B o a r d o f Commissioners. A f t e r ward, Dottie and her family m o v e d t o Ca l i f o r n i a, where she wa s e m ployed for another eight years in River S i d e C o u n t y A d ministration. Dottie w a s p r e deceased by her loving and devoted husband of 3 9 y e ars, and a fter h e r r e t i r ement s h e m oved to L ak e Sa n M a r cos, California, where she lived for 22 years. She loved spending time w ith h er f ami ly and f riends. D ot t i e ado r e d a nimals an d s h e w a s a l ifelong m e m be r o f th e Lutheran Church. She enj oyed golfing and w a s a n a rdent b o w l e r en t e r i n g some major c o mpetitions, e ventually r e c e ivin g t h e "Gold Club" award having b owled a 6 0 0 s e r i e s o r more a couple of times. Dottie lived th e r e m aining two years of her life at T ouchmark i n B e n d , O r egon, with additional care f rom h e r d a u g h te r a n d s on-in-law. T he fam i l y gives t h e c o m p assionate h ospital sta f f of St . Charles, Bend, who c ared for Dottie, the loving caret akers at T o u chmark a n d t he supportive staff f r o m Partners In C are Hospice, o ur deepest gr atitude f o r all everyone has done. Dottie entered H e aven's gates on July 16, 2013. Dottie is survived by her l oving d au g h t e r and son-in-law, Car e n and John Burton. Funeral ar r an g e ments a re b e i n g pr o v i de d b y B aird F uneral H o m es, i n Bend. S he w i l l b e i nt e r r e d alongside her h u sband at t he R i v e r sid e N at i o n a l Cemetery in Ri ve r s i d e, California. C ontributions i n l i e u o f f lowers, may b e m a d e t o Partners In C are Hospice, 2 075 N E W y a t t Co u r t , B end, O r egon 9 7 7 01, i n m emory of D or ot hy Bogumil.

Virginia C. Browne

Elvira A. Chantry Loren Emery Dyer Oct. 1921 - July 25, 2013

ttuv. 17, 1918 - July 26, 2013 Virginia ' Ginny' J e w e ll Browne was born Novemb er 17, 1 918, i n M i n e r al Point, Wisconsin. She was the loving daughter of Rev. Orlando a nd M a r t ha J e w ell and the , „".:] oldest o f f our c h i l dren, For...i I: Jlf ' e st, B o b , a nd P a u l Jewell. Ginny GinnyBruwnu was married to Willis 'Brownie' Browne for 64 wonderful years and mother t o f o u r c h i l d r en, Barbara Negley of San Ant onio, Texas; Carol M a t h o f T a m pa , F l o r i da ; B o b B rowne of R e dmond, Or e gon; an d D o n n a B r u m baugh of P e t aluma, California. She is also survived by he r b r o t h er , R o b e r t 'Bob' Jewell and her sisterin-law, J e s si e W r a b e l la; A rdie J e w ell , 1 0 g r a n d children and seven greatgrandchildren. Ginny was an active participant in the Bend United M ethodist Church, an d a member for the past 27 y ears. Sh e w a s a p as t p resident o f t h e Un i t e d Methodist Women's group in R i c hland, W a s h ington a nd a church choir m e m b er t h r o ughout h e r l i f e . She also led several prayer g roups, including ones i n Montclair, New Jersey, Bet hesda, M a r y l a nd , an d B end, Oregon, for a t o t a l of 50 y ears. She enjoyed t raveling, m u s ic , p l a y i n g b ridge, b a k in g r o l l s a n d p ies, p l ayin g t h e p i a n o , a nd e s p e ciall y en j o y e d spending t i m e wi t h h er family. She brought joy to others with her good sense of humor and p ositive attitude toward life. G inny w i l l be gr e a t l y m issed by her f a m ily a n d friends. Her special gift of l istening t o ot h e r s an d lending a sympathetic ear was h elpful t o e v e r y o ne s he touched. W e a r e a l l grateful to her kind, sweet spirit and her strong Christ ian faith. She was a l o v ing wife an d a w o n d erful m other, as well a s a c a r i ng f r i e nd . S h e w as a blessing to all of us. Ginny passed away peacefully on July 26, 2013, on her husband, Brownie's birthday! S he wa s s u r r o unded b y family a n d i n h er ow n home w h e n s h e p a s sed, p eacefully. She's with h e r 'Brownie', in husband, heaven now. A memorial service w i l l be held at the Bend United M ethodist Ch ur c h on W ednesday, J u l y 3 1 , a t 11:00 a.m. Private cremat ion wa s h e l d u n d e r t h e care o f N i s w o n g er-Reyn olds Funeral H o me. T h e family suggests memorial contributions to Ben d United Methodist Church, 680 NW B o n d S t . , B e nd, O R 97701 or P a r tners I n C are H o s pice, 2 07 5 N E Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701. Please sign the online regi stry f o r th e fa m i l y at www.niswonger-reynolds. com.

Elvira A . C h a n tr y ( n e e: N apolitano). B o r n Oct . 1921, i n S a n Fr a n c isco, CA; passed awa y p e a cef ully J u l y 2 5 , 2 0 1 3 , i n Redmond, OR. E lvira w a s p r e ceded i n d eath by h e r l o v in g h u s band, Wm. Chantry. She is survived by her sist er, O l g a Alexander i n Pleasant on, CA Elvira ChantrY eral nieces. E lvira w a s an acc o m p lished opera s i nger a n d p ianist. H e r car e e r i n cluded a n R K O c o n t r a ct t hat i n vo l v e d per fo r mances in C a lifornia, Or egon, Washington, Canada and throughout Europe. In addition to having a beaut iful v o i ce, sh e a l s o a c c ompanied herself on t h e piano as well as the accordion. Gastone Usigli, conductor, composer and well k nown m a estro, i n I t a l y , o nce said of E l v i r a , "It is not often one hears acoloratura wh o ' s vo i ce a l s o has lyric dramatic quality. Her natural ac ting ability and dramatic feeling when she sings is a rare combination." Elvira was a very special and i n spirational p e r son. She was loved and will be m issed by a l l w h o k n e w her. Per Elvira's r e quest, no services will be held. Contributions my be m ade to: Partners In Care, 2075 NE W yatt C o u rt , B e n d , O R 97701. Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond.

JoAnn Helen (Butler) Smith Sept. 22, 1940-July15, 2013 JoAnn wa s a w o n d erful m other, grandmother an d friend. She loved spending t ime with h e r f a m il y a n d h aving f un w i th h er f riends. Sh e h a d a v e r y strong s pirit a n d a d eep f aith in God. She w as k i n d a nd c o n siderate, always thinking of others JOAnn Smith f irst. S h e had an energetic, cheerful and gracious attitude. She will be missed very much. S he w a s p r e c eded i n death by her husband, Joe and her brothers, Bill Butler and Ricky Butler. S he is s u r v ived b y h e r brothers, Robert, Leonard and Les Butler; her daught ers, C i nd y L e h r er , C o l l een Goodsell, Cory W i n slow an d B e t h R a g u i n e; h er s t ep-children, D a v i d Smith, Sandy H u t chinson and Collin Smith; as w e ll as her gr andchildren an d great-grandchildren. M emorial i s p l a n ned i n Forsyth, MT at a later date.

63875 N. HIGHWAY97 ' BEND

S41.382. S S92

~.~.~ g~.. cM~Z Deschutes Memorial now displays obituaries on our website. Please go to www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com to leave condolence messages for the family and to learn about funeral/ memorial services.

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DEscHUTEs MEMQRIAL CHAPEL R GARDENs

ment with the Bend Bulletin in the pressroom and later had Aug. 30, 1928- July 27, 2013 two sons, all of whom were Loren Emery Dyer, a lifelong raised on a farm on Deschutes resident of Bend, Oregon died Market Road. L oren spent h i s e n t i r e July 27th in the presence of his working life as The Bulletin's many loving family members. Operations Manager, retirLoren, and his identical twin Laurence, were born August ing in 1988. He enjoyed the 3 0, 1 9 28 newspaper business because to Hooper itprovided a sense of accomand Irene plishment as they produced D y e r . a product from start to finish H o o p - every day. He remained a loyer, and al friend to Bob Chandler and the Chandler family through L ore n ' s years. grandfa- theAfter retiring in 1988, Lother Howren and Ella t r avelled and Loren Dyer ard,homelived in a m otor home full steaded in time. H e m a stered stained Millican in 1912, later moving glass and n umerous other closer to Bend to farm. Growcrafts including building Ading up on a farm through the irondack chairs, all of which depression era, Loren and his he generously gave to fammany siblings were always ily and friends. Many people well fed and enjoyed a good have something to remember life. him by as a result. When he L oren a t t e nded A l l e n wasn't m a king s o mething, School through eighth grade, he and Ella enjoyed golfing although his mother some- together, BBQ'ing with close t imes had to follow him t o friends, and spending preensure he didn't slip off to fish cious time with their family. on the river rather than atHe is survived by his wife tend classes. He later gradu- Ella of Bend, daughter and ated from Bend High School son-in-law Lori and Jim Wilin 1948 where he was on the son of Bend, son and daughcheerleading squad. ter-in-law Kerry and Monique After graduating from high Dyer of Albany, Or, son and school, Loren began work- d aughter-in-law Shane a n d ing for the Bend Bulletin in C hristy Dyer o f B e nd, h i s the pressroom at a time when six grandchildren, five great melted lead, cast typeset, and grandchildren, and all five of flatbedpresses were state-of- his siblings. We are all sad to art. Shortly after, Loren en- see him go. He was a generlisted for service in the Korean ous, loving, and fun person to war as a Bosun's mate on LST be around. He will be dearly 772. In 1950, he first met Ella missed. May Dewitt, and then marServices are to be held this ried her in August 1952 before coming Friday at 11:00AM at shipping out. His first child, a Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral daughter, was born while Lo- Home, 105 NW Irving Averen was on duty in the Pacific. nue, Bend, OR. Contributions After returning from the war, can made to Partners In Care Loren resumed his employ- (Bend).

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

W EAT H E R Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central, LP ©2013.

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Today:1 Partly cloudy

Tonight: Partly cloudy

LOW

86

51

68/56

63/55

76/54

93/61

The Biggs • Dal«s 80/64 ~a rlington

82/65

89/63 •

Hiilsborii Port and 81/60

C 8 6/57 McMinnville 84/53

Lincoln City 68/54

Umatilla

Hood River

Seasidem Cannon Beach~

62/56

WEST Expect partly to m ostly sunny skies today.

As t o ria

TiBamook•

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8 59

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Albany~

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52 87/59 Union~ 83/~

81/45

81/51

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85/44

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Ham ton • RurnS • • La Pine ss/M Crescentm Riley Lake g$ Crescent • Fort Rock87/46 87/56 •

,

60/50 •

83/41

77/45

Roseburg

59/51

94/64

95/58

82/57

Coos Bay

Chemult

8 3/42

88/55

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Port Orfor 62/52

87/40

'Ashiand

92/58

Rome

87/48

• 94'

91/59

Paisley

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86/57

FallS 83/49

8/053 ~

56/48

87/55

Frenchglen

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Yesterday's state extremes

Jordan Valley

Chr i stmas Valley

Silv e r

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McDermitt

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90/54 ~

84/5 3

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Vancouver K 75/61

• Calgary 68/48

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• 111

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Beatrice, Neb.

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100s

a Paz 99/76

Anchorage 71/56

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

HIGH LOW

83 52

75 49

74 53

82 54

Monterrev 307/72

Mazatlan 91/79 .

Juneau

78/50

CONDITIONS . m+ e++++ +++ v ++

FRONTS

O 'ALA S K A Cold

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE Sunrisetoday...... 5:51 a.m. Moon phases Sunsettoday.... 831 p.m. N ew First F u l l Last Sunrise tomorrow .. 5:53 a.m. Sunset tomorrow... 8:30 p.m. Moonrise today... 12:1 5 a.m. Moonsettoday .... 2:56 p.m. Aug.6 Aug.14 Aug.20 Aug.28

Pi •

PLANET WATCH

TEMPERATURE PRECIPITATION

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury....4:21 a.m......7:18p.m. Venus......8:42 a.m...... 9:56 p.m. Mars.......3:37 a.m...... 7:04 p.m. Jupiter......3 22 a.m...... 6 42 p.m. Satum......l:22 p.m.....12:04 a.m. Uranus....10:52 p.m..... 1 1:34a.m.

Yesterday's weather through 4 p.m. inBend High/Low.............. 82/48 24 hours endmg 4 p.m.*. . 0.00" Recordhigh.......100m1929 Monthtodate..........000" Record low......... 34 in 1970 Average month todate... 0.53" Average high.............. 84 Year to date............ 3.1 9" Average low .............. 49 Average year to date..... 6.25" Barometricpressureat 4 p.m29.94 Record 24 hours ...0.22 in1984 *Melted liquid equivalent

FIRE INDEX

OREGON CITIES

WATER REPORT

Y esterday Tuesday W e d . Bend,westofHwy 97......Ext Sisters...............................Ext Hi/Lo/Pcp H i / Lo/W H i /Lo/WBend,eastofHwy.97.......Ext. La Pine................................Ext

City Precipitationvaluesare24-hour totals through4 p.m.

Redmond/Madras.........Ext. Prinevine...........................Ext Astoria ........63/56/0.00....68/56/pc......66/55/c Mod. = Moderate; Exi. = Extreme Baker City...... 85/36/0.00....89/53/pc...... 90/50/t To report a wildfire, call 911 Brookings......59/52/0.00....56/48/pc.....57/48/pc Burns..........88/40/0.00.....88/53/s......90/49/s

Klamath Falls .. 85/45/000 ....83/49/s ... 82/45/s Lakeview...... 88/41/0.00 ....84/53/s..... 83/49/s La Pine.........84/35/NA.....85/42/s......83/35/s Medford.......90/58/0.00.....93/60/s.....88/56/pc Newport.......61/45/0.00....62/56/pc......61/53/c North Bend......66/48/NA....60/52/pc.....63/51/pc Ontario........91/61/0.00.....95/65/s......98/64/s Pendleton......89/49/0.00.....92/58/s.....96/56/pc Portland .......76/59/0.00.....81/60/s.....82/56/pc Prineville.......83/60/0.00....88/52/pc.....86/49/pc Redmond.......85/40/0.00.....88/50/s.....88/50/pc

Roseburg.......83/57/0.00....88/55/pc.....82/55/pc Salem ....... 80/53/0 00 ..87/59/s ...86/55/pc Sisters.........88/42/0.00....84/42/pc......82/42/s The Dages......88/55/0.00.....89/63/s.....91/62/pc

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen.

Reservoir Acre feet C a p acity Crane Prairie...... . . . . . . 28,332...... 55,000 Wickiup...... . . . . . . . . . . 89,297..... 200,000 Crescent Lake...... . . . . . 69,051......91,700 Ochoco Reservoir..... . . . 17,438...... 47,000 The higher the UV Index number, the greater Prineville...... . . . . . . . . 111,543.....153,777 the need for eye and skin protection. Index is R iver flow St at i on Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie ...... . 279 for solar at noon. Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup .... . . . . . . 1,690 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake ...... . 147 LOW MEDIUM HIGH Little DeschutesNear La Pine ...... . . . . . . . 81.1 0 2 4 6 8 10 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend .... . . . . . . . . . 127 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls ..... . . . . 2,081 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res..... . . . . . NA Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res.... . . . . . 214 Updated daily. Source: pollen.com Ochoco CreekBelow OchocoRes. .... . . . . . 19.4 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne ..... . . . . . . 81.1 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 MEDIUM or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

IPOLLEN COUNT LOWO

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TRAVELERS' FORECAST NATIONAL

o www m e

Mostly sunny

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun,pc-partisl clouds,c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers,r-rain,t-thunderstorms,sf-snowflurries, sn snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix,w-wind, f-fog,dr-drizzle, tr-trace

INATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS

Yesterday s extremes

Mostly sunny

HIGH LOW

Eugene........82/50/0.00.....82/57/s.....80/53/pc

Valem 96/67

• Brothers 87/48

Oa k ridge

Partly to mostly sunny skies will be the rule today.

89/53

Prineville ssaz

Slemm

EAST

6aker Ci

• Mitchell 86/54

86/49

Eugene•

<ENTRAI Look for partly to mostly sunnyskies today.

81/4 6

La Grande•

• MadraS

86/56

Florence•

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89/54

rvallis

Yachats• ~

Ruggs

ssms

Warm Spri g

87/58 •

Wallowa • Pendleton s i/47 • Enterpris 92/58 • Meacham • 83/52

89/54

87/59•

• Hermiston93/61

93/63

c mWasco

82/60

Government CamP

I

Salem

Slight chance of thunderstorms

BEND ALMANAC

IFORECAST:STATE I,

Slight chance of thunderstorms

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W ar m Stationary Showers T-storms Rain F l urnes Snow

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Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene TX......96/78/0 00..98/77/pc. 100/75/s GrandRapids....71/57/0 10..77/63/pc...7I65/t RapidCity.......86/55/000...84/61/t.. 81/62/s Savannah.......89/74/0 00..89/75/pc...88/74/t Akron ..........72/55/000..77/58/pc...82/63/t Green Bay.......73/55/000..76/61/pc...77760/t Reno...........92/60/000..91/60/pc. 90/58/pc Seattle......... 77/56/trace..77/58/pc. 77/58/pc Albany..........81/63/000..81/57/pc. 84/63/pc Greensboro......84/65/001..87/68/pc...84/69/t Richmond.......86/71/001 ..87/68/pc...86/69/t SiouxFalls.......71/50/000...80/63/c...sl/58/t Albuquerque.....92/64/001..95/65/pc...96/68/t Harusburg.......80/60/001..82/61/pc. 82/67/sh Rochester, NY....73/57/000 .. 77/58/pc.82/65/pc Spokane........84/55/000 ..89/58/pc...85/58/t Anchorage ......69/56/000..71/56/sh. 69/55/pc Hartford,CT .....87/70/0 00..83/60/pc. 85/66/pc Sacramento......81/55/0.00... 87/56/s .. 88/55/s Springfield, MO ..83/66/0.01... 80/69/t. 87/68/pc Atlanta .........86/69/000..87/68/pc...87/69/t Helena..........76/55/002..81/54/pc. 84/55/pc St Louis.........81/607000...77/67/t .. 84/68lc Tampa..........92/75/000... 92/78/t...92J76/t Atlantic City.....86/67/0.00..80/66/pc...82/71/t Honolulu........87/75/0.02...88/78/i. 89/77/pcSalt Lake City....88/71/000 ..90/70/pc. 93772/pc Tucson.........100/77/000 102/78/pc105/79/pc Austin.........101/76/0 00..99/74/pc. 100/75/s Houston ........95/75/0 00..96775/pc.95/77/pc 580 Antonio....102/80/000..97/75/pc.. 98/76/s Tulsa...........90/69/000... 91/72/t. 93/72/pc Baltimore .......84/64/0.00 ..85/72/pc...85/73/t Huntsville.......85/66/0.00 ..89/69/pc...87/70/t 580 Diego.......73/64/000 ..74/64/pc. 73/63/pc Washington,DC..84/68/000 ..85/6ipc...85/72/t Bitings.........75/56/0.06...84/59/t...84/60/t Indianapolis.....78/55/0.00... 77/65/t. 80/67/pc 580 Francisco....69/55/000..67/55/pc. 68/55/pc Wichita.........85/65/000... 86/69/t. 90/69/pc Birmingham .. 87/68/000 ..91/74/pc. 89/73/t Jackson, MS.... 93/72/0.01 . 94/74/pc.. 94/74/t SaoJose..... 80/56/000 .. 73/56/pc 72/55/s Yakima.........90/58/000 91/59/s. 93/64/pc Bismarck........74/55/000... 78/55/t. 78/55/pc Jacksonvile......91/72/0.00... 92/77/t...90/78/t SantaFe........87/56/000..84/59/pc. 85/59/pc Yuma..........107/81/000 103/81/pc1C6/83/pc Boise...........93/59/000..92/61/pc. 97/58/pc Juneau..........80/50/000... 78/50/s.. 74/49/s INTERNATIONAL Boston..........81/66/030 ..84/65/pc. 83/66/pc Kansas City......68/62/131... 80/68/t. 88/67/pc Bodgeport,CT....86/71/0.00..82/64/pc. 82/68/pc Lansing.........71/55/0.02..77/61/pc...79/64/t Amsterdam......73/63/000 ..72/63/sh 68/62/sh Mecca.........109/86/000 104/82/5. 106/82/s Buffalo .........69/58/0.09..76/60/pc. 82/65/pc LasVegas......102/76/0.00 100/81/pc102/80/pc Athens..........94/81/0.00... 97/78/s .. 92/76/s Mexico City .....81/55/0.11... 78/50/t...73/55/t BurlingtonVT....83/66/0 17..76/58/pc. 80/62/pc Lexington .......80/54/000..82/65/pc...80/67/t Auckland........59/45/000 ..59/42/pc.. 59/47/c Montreal........73/63/0 59..73/61/sh .. 81/64/s Caribou,ME.....70/58/021..75/53/sh. 77/56/pc Lincoln..........67/60/0.72...81/67/t...87/65/t Baghdad.......104/78/000..108/86/s.110/87/s Moscow........66/61/000..83/59/sh.79/63/pc Charleston SC ...93/73/0 22..88/75/pc...87/74/t Little Rock.......88/68/036...93/76/t. 93/74/pc Bangkok........91/79/003 ..87/74/sh...89/76/t Nairobi.........70/57/000 ..72/57/sh. 71/56/pc Charlotte........87/67/0 00..87/71/pc...83/71/t LosAngeles......72/64/0 00..70764/p71/65/pc c. Beiyng..........90/77/000..101/81/t...97/79/t Nassau.........90/82/001... 88/78/t. 84/79/sh Chattanoogs.....84/62/000 ..87/68/pc...86/70/t Louisville........83/59/0 00... 84768l/t...8V/67lt Beirut..........88/797000...86/72/s .. 85/72/s New Delhi.......95/81/000 ..102/88/t. 91/81/sh Cheyenne.......82/55/0.00... 82/56/t. 81/58/pc Madison, Wl.....76/54/0.00 .. 74/63/sh...81/62/t Berlis...........77/667000..83/63/sh.79/62lsh Osaka..........82/79/007... 87/76/t...86/77/t Chicago.........76/57/000 ..75/66/sh. 82/66/t Memphis....... 89/70/0 00 89/73/t .. 91/74/1 Bogota.........61/4670.07... 63/45lt...65/45/t Oslo............73/57/0.00 .. 71/54/pc. 66/52/sh Cincinnati.......79/54/000 ..81/66/pc. 81/67/pc Miami..........92/79/0.01..89/80/pc. 90/79/pc Budapest........99/70/0.00..88/65/pc .. 88/66/s Ottawa.........73/55/0.09..75/59/pc.77/63/pc Cleveland.......71/56/000 ..78/60/pc. 81/67/pc Milwaukee......68/58/000..73/65/pc...79765lt BuenosAires.....66/46/000... 63/59/c. 67/59/sh Paris............79/63/061 ..81/66/pc. 81/65/pc Colorado Spnngs.77/60/0.10..86/59/pc. 84/60/pc Miuneapolis.....79/56/0.00..79/65/pc...80760/t Cabo580Lucss..97/79/0.00..95/77/pc. 94/78/sh Riode Janeiro....75/59/0.00..69/58/pc.. 73/60/s Columbia,MO...74/59/0.02... 79/66/t. 85/67/pc Nashvite........82/60/0.00..85/70/pc...85/69/t Cairo...........97/77/000..100/72/s. 100/73/s Rome...........91/72/000...86/78/s .. 90/71/s Columbia,SC....90/74/1.13 ..89/72/pc...88/73/t New Orleans.....93/75/0.00 ..91/78/pc...91/79/t Calgary.........54/46/0.03... 68/48/s .. 73/52/s Santiago........50/41/0.00... 53/47/s.. 51/45/s Columbus GA... 90/73/trace..92/74/pc...91/72/t NewYork.......85/69/001 ..83766/pc.84/69/pc Cancun.........90/77/000..89/78/pc. 88/78/sh SaoPaulo.......68/48/000..66/50/pc.. 74/52/s ColumbusOH....76/57/000..79/64/pc...81/66/t Newark,NJ......87/70/000..84765/pc.85/69/pc Dublin..........70/57/049..71/53/sh...60/60/r Sapporo ........79/70/062... 79/66/t. 75/64/sh Concord,NH.....84/64/0.01..80/55/pc.83/58/pc Norfolk,VA......83/75/0.00..87768/pc...88/727t Edinburgh.......70/52/000 ..67/50/sh.67/55/sh Seoul...........84/75/000... 86/76/t...88/75/t Corpus Christi....94/80/000 ..94/80/pc. 91/79/pc Oklahoma City...90/74/0.06... 92/72/t. 92/73/pc Geneva.........68/59/549..72/57/pc .. 79/62/s Shanghai.......104/90/000... 95/84/t. 95/82/pc DallasFtWorrh...97/78/000..96/76/Pc. 97/77/Pc Omaha.........70/55/004...80/67/c...86/64/1 Harare..........79/46/000..66/44/pc. 65/45/pc Singapore.......86/79/007..89780/sh...83/78/t Dayton .........76/56/000 ..79/65/pc...80/66/t Orlando.........93/73/0 00... 94/76/1...93/75/t HongKong......90/81/001 ..89/78/pc. 86/77/pc Stockholm.......75/63/007... 70/58/c. 70/54/sh Denver..........75/57/001 ..88/62/pc. 84/63/pc PalmSprings....106/75/0.00..103/79/s. 104/79/s Istanbul.........90/72/0.00... 91/72/s .. 85/73/s Sydney..........73/50/0.0071/51/pc. .. 70/50/pc DesMoines......75/57/0.00... 76/66/t...86/62/t Peoria..........78/52/0.00... 75/66/t...81/65/t lerusalem.......86/67/0.00...86/67/s ..86/67/s Taipei...........95/81/0.00 ..89/79/pc. 90/81/pc Detroit..........72/57/000 ..77/65/pc...80/68/t Philadelphia.....84/68/0 25 ..85/67/pc...86/69/t Johsnnesburg....64/29/0.00..60/36/pc .. 60/35/s TelAviv.........91/77/0.00...93/70/s .. 92/69/s Duluth..........76/47/000 ..76/59/pc...71/57/t Phoeuix........l07/85/0 00107/86/pc111/88/pc Lima...........63/59/0.00...70/60/s ..71/60/s Tokyo...........81/75/0.00 ..84/72/pc...83/72/t El Paso..........97/73/000... 99/77/t. 102/76/s Pittsburgh.......74/54/0 00 ..78/60/pc...81/65/t Lisbon..........81/61/0.00 91/62/s 84/58/s Toronto.........72/55/000 75/61/pc. 75/63/sh Fairbanks........79/64/000 ..82/54/pc. 81/57/pc Portland,ME.....75/60/0.19..79/59/pc. 80/60/pc London.........75/61/0.14..71/58/sh.73/60/sh Vancouver.......72/59/0.00..75/61/pc.73/59/pc Fargo...........77/51/000...827597t. 78/55lpc Providence ......84/70/0.00..85/61/pc. 85/66/pc Madrid .........86/54/0 00... 97/65/s.. 98/68/s Vienna..........91/70/000.. 88/63/pc.. 81/61/s Flagstaff ........76/51/007..79/56/pc.80/56lpc Raleigh.........87/69/0 24..89/70/pc...87/70/t Manila..........86/77/1.10... 86/78/t...89/76/t Warsaw.........97/72/0.00... 75/58/c. 80/65/pc

OREGON NEWS

Fedssaymodified wheat limited to 1field on 1farm

Wheat stunteddy laCk Of rain —A long dry spell is taking ils toll on the Eastern Oregon wheat crop. uln general, it's going to be a

E nroll t o d a y VYi thout Regret!

far-below-averageharvest," By Eric Mortenson

mation "indicates that the extent of the presence of this GE

The Oregonian

In the agency's first statement about the geneticallymodified wheat investigation in nearly two months, the U.S. Animal and Plant Health lnspection Service said all the evidence collected so far indicates the "Roundup Ready" plants are limited to one field on one

Oregon farm. In a news release, APHIS said it has tested seed and grain samples and interviewednearly 270 farmers. None ofthe growersreported seeing glyphosateresistant plants in their fields, according to APHIS. The infor-

remains the single detection of the GE wheat plants in one field

said extension soils scientist Don Wysocki of Oregon Stale Universily's Pendleton center. Total precipitation is about 70 percent of normal

of one farm in Oregon."

for the crop yearbeginning

The i n vestigation b egan when an Eastern Oregon farmer, as yet unidentified, reported that wheat plants he'd sprayed with a glyphosate-based herbicide did not die as expected. Testing by Oregon State University and APHIS determined the plants were a Monsanto Co. variety that had been genetically modified to resist glyphosate, the key ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup herbicide.

Sept. 1, 2012, he said, a deficit of about four inches. As

(genetically-engineered) wheat

a result, a majority of wheat plants are growing to about

pf I

"JIII/

• 'I +

60-75 percent of average height, the EastOregonian reported. Wheat is also

producing less seedthan it would Undermorefavorable conditions, Wysocki said. — The ASSOC iated PreSS

1. Students develop a love for learning through small class sizes and one-on-one instruction.

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instruction in academics, spirituality and creativity. Return this year

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from the DD Ranch in Terrebonne.

We provide Bus Service, Early drop Off — 7:30, Late Pick Up - 5:30

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IN THE BACI4: BUSINESS Ee MARIKT NE%S > Scoreboard, C2 Swi mming, C3 Sports in brief, C3 Golf, C4 MLB, C3

© www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

WCL BASEBALL

GOLF

Elks get homewin over AppleSox

Crucial month ahea or Ben pro essional

The Bend Elks stayed within one game of

West Coast League South Division-leader

• Golfer Tiffany Schoninghasa busyAugust coming upthat endswith Q-School

Corvallis on Monday night with their 5-1

home victory over the

By Zack Hall

Wenatchee AppleSox. Corvallis beat Victoria

The Bulletin

Tiffany Schoning did not mince words when talking about the month ahead. "So far I would say yes, it is definitely the most important month of my career," the Bend golfer said Sunday by phone from Phoenix, Ariz., where she is playing in an event on the Cactus Tour, a developmental mini-tour based in the Southwest. A little more than a month into her professional career, Schon-

6-5 Monday night. Elks starter Adam Grantham earned the

win after allowing zero runs and one hit over five innings while

Bend's bullpen gave up

just one run and two hits in four innings of

work. The Elks (26-16 WCL), who havewon

Tiffany Schoning Andy Tulhs/The Bulletin file

six of their past10

ing, a 24-year-old Summit High

games, took a1-0 lead

School graduate, is beginning a busy four weeks.

in the second inning off a Cullen O'Dwyer RBI

She was one of "hundreds," she said, who auditioned Sunday for the Big Break, a Golf Channel reality show that showcases budding professionals. Schoning also plans to play three mini-tour events, including one in Florida, as well as the Ohio Women's Open — all before the first stage of the LPGA Tour's National Qualifying School, which tees off Aug. 27. "As far as having the confidence going into and starting my career out strong, this is going to be really important," Schoning said. "And financially, not having unlimited funds, you never know if you are going to get another shot at it. So making the most

out of this next month is going to be

huge."

Schoning h a s re a son t o be encouraged. After delaying her pro debut for nine months while shoring up her finances, Schoning played in two Cactus Tour events as an amateur this

spring, notching a second-place finish in June. That persuaded her to turn pro (and her family to help foot the

bill, she said). In her pro debut in a Las Vegas Cactus Tour event, Schoning tied for second place out of 34 golfers and earned $1,450. SeeSchoning /C4

double and made it 3-0 in the sixth following RBI singles by Seth

Spiveyand Derek Dixon. The AppleSox (23-22), the reigning WCLchampions, scoredin the top of the seventh to make the score 3-1, but Bend

added runs in the seventh and eighth to hold on for the win. Dixon, the Elks' standout first base-

man from GeorgeFox University, went 3-for-4 with an RBI and one run scored. Outfielder Zach

Close, a CrookCounty High graduate, also contributed three hits and two RBls. Bend is at home again tonight with the

first of three games against the Cowlitz Black Bears. — Bulletin staff report

HIGH DESERT CLASSICS

NFL COMMENTARY

Off-field

Angie Chamberlin jumps a barrier on a horse named Kipling while competing in the hunter class at the Oregon High Desert Classics at J Bar J Ranch in Bend last week. Sunday marked the end of the two-week event.

troubles

should not be

surprising By Dan Le Batard

Andy Tullis/ The Bulletin

The Miami Herald

arnell Dockett, the menacing defensive lineman for the Arizona Cardinals, found his murdered mother in a pool of her own blood in their kitchen when he was LL She had been shot in the head. A few months later, Dockett's father died of cancer. His sister couldn't afford him. His grandparents didn't want him. So an uncle took him in. Dockett says he wandered from fight to fight through his formative years until

SWIMMING

Phelps vague about future BARCELONA, Spain

— When Michael Phelps walked away from swimming after the London

Olympics, hewasadamant about one thing:

His career wasover. Now, it sounds like

he's not so sure. While saying he's never beenhappier with his life — and certainly doesn't miss the grind of what it took to become the winningest athlete

in Olympic history — Phelps left the door

he stopped fearing pain

open to change his mind before the 2016 Rio

By Emily Oller

Inside

The Bulletin

• Complete results from last

Games.

It is hard to imagine 800 horses in one place at one time. But the 40-acre J Bar J Boys Ranch in Bend hosted that many equines throughout the two weeks of this year's Oregon High Desert Classics. Dianne Johnson, horse show manager for the High Desert Classics, said that she and event host J Bar J Youth

"I don't know what's

going to happen inthe future," Phelps said Monday. "I don't know

what's going to happen tomorrow." In Barcelona for the

world swimming championships, Phelps spoke to The Associated Press and other international

week's High Desert Classics in Scoreboard,C2

spots that opened after the first week were quickly filled with new horses. "To be honest with you, (last

year) I only put up 780 stalls Servicesdecided to increase last year's stall count to 800 for both weeks for the 2013 show. Thedecision came after reviewing this year's entries and determining that many competitors would be returning for the second week. The

the first week and 680 stalls for the second week and we filled them all," Johnson said Monday, a day after the final day of the 24th annual High Desert Classics. According to Toni Ryan, developmental coordinator

media organizations in a series of one-on-one asked by the AP, yes or no, whether he'll compete at the next Olym-

days. Yes, he enjoys being paid for beating up other men; but mostly he just

enjoys beating up other men. SeeTroubles /C4

Tftr, jjtlIC /g 00l" P~

U.S. PiCking LIP

pics, Phelps coyly said he hasn't planned that

'MXV/, u:1r'-

steam after rolling

far ahead in his life. That's a striking

change from his comments before and

through GoldCup

immediately after the

London Games,whenhe insisted his retirement was set in stone and it

By Steven Goff

The Washington Post

had always beenhis goal to quit swimming before he turned 30. Phelps will be 31 at

the time of the opening ceremony for the Rio

Games. "I don't know. We're in 2013," he said, before adding, "There's nothing

in the works right now." There's plenty of time

for a comeback. Phelps

— The Associated Press

it is a needed outlet to release all his anger with legalized violence that would get him in trouble if expressed just about anywhere outside of Sun-

SOCCER

sponsor, Speedo.When

end of the year.

in a hissing rage, saying

at J Bar J Youth Services, the local nonprofit will be working to better accommodate the increased number of stalls as the show approachesits25th year. "We are really trying to increase (access to) water and electricity," Ryan said. "This was one of our biggest years, but our infrastructure can't keep sustaining that." SeeClassics/C4

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interviews set up by his

would likely want to begin training before the

altogether. Dockett didn't find football as much as football found him, and it was something of a salvation. Dockett plays the game

• As the popular Central Oregonequestrian programwraps upfor 2013, event officials are alreadyeyeingwaysto managegrowth as the show heads into its 25th year

Nam Y. Huh/The Associated Press

United States' Brek Shea, left, celebrates with teammate Landon Donovan after scoring a goal during Sunday's Gold Cup victory in Chicago.

As a reward for winning the CONCACAF Gold Cup, the biennial regional championship, the U.S. national soccer team raised a 20-pound, gold-plated trophy at Chicago's Soldier Field on Sunday. Parting gifts included bragging rights over bitter rival Mexico and an inside track on a berth in an international competition four summers from now in Russia. They are nice prizes, deserved and embraced, but ancillary to the intangible assets that Coach Juergen Klinsmann collectedover four weeks, four time zones and six fruitful matches. The roster pool reached new depths. Landon Donovan resurfaced. A new group embraced Klinsmann's progressive ways. Goals flowed. See U.S./C4

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

COREBOARD EQUESTRIAN Oregon HighDesert Classic 0 AlJ BarJ BoysRanch, Bend July 24-28 Class winners, with horse,owner, rider

$10,000 USHJAInternational Hunter Derby: Princeton,AveryFarley, KendaffBourgeois $2,500 UBHJANational Hunter Classic: Sabina FeyKathleenThomas,AshleyPapaila $25,000 Sherri Allis Memorial GrandPrtrr Atlantis New Venture Investments, MeganJordan $2500 The Stirrup Cup, In Memory of Dina Happy, Mini Grand Prix: Loverboy,Bailey Smith, BaileySmith R.W. MutchEquitation Classic: LoranaCrowley Adult Equitation, 18-30: ErinRurak Adult Equitation, 18-30: Margaret Blasco Adult Equitation, 18-30 Flat: ErinRorak Adult Equitation, 31-49: LisaWiliams Adult Equitation, 31-49 Flat: Lisa Wiliams Adult Equitation, 50 &Over: MicheffeGaubert Adult Equitation, 50 5 Over Flat: LeslieThornton Adult Amateur Jumper Classic, 1.10m: Christina Beda Wachter, JustineTainsh

Adult Amateur Jumpers, 0.90m: Connor, Jiff Brooks,Jil Brooks Adult Amateur Jumpers, 0.90m: NarniaShane , Melski, Shane Melski Adult AmateurJumpers, 0.90m:AceInTheHole, Jeri Couperus, Brittany Hicks Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.00m: Vickie,Heather MackenzieSt , aceyTalbot Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.00m: Copperlrne, CopperLaneFarm,NancyButano Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.00m:BertrandDeLopez 10 SRanchLLC,PJ(Philippe) LeDorze Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.10m, 18-39: Loxorious Kathleen Waldorf, ColleenBiemer Adult AmateurJumpers, 1.10m, 18-39: Dublin, CorenaCuhane, CorenaCulhane Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.10m, 18 fk Over: Bongo,SusanBernard, SusanBernard Adult Amateur Jumpers, 110m, 408, Over: Cassius, BlueMeadows,gc,Leslie Cox Adult Amateur Jumpers, 1.10m, 40 5 Over: Bongo,SusanBernard, SusanBernard Adult AmateurWorkingHunter Classic: Cornino, Lisa Lamoreaox,LisaLamoreaux Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 18-39: Duck DuckGoose,Amy Bean, AmyBean Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 18-39: Glamour, Shannon Segers,DanieffeSmith Adult AmateurWorking Hunters, 18-39: Eugenius, ErinRorak,ErinRurak Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 18-39: GoodnessGracious,CarolynBiemer, Carolyn Biemer Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 18-39-U/8: EugeniusErinRurak,Erin Rurak Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 40 & Over: HydePark,Patty Osberg, Patty Osberg Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 40 & Over: ZinfandalBeverlyBecker, Beverly Becker Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 40 & Over: Cornrno,LisaLamoreaux, LisaLamoreaux Adult Amateur Working Hunters, 40 & Over: Broderick,NatalieHill, AnneHil Adult AmateurWorkingHunters, 40 fk Dver-U/ 8:HydePark, Patty Osberg, Patty Osberg Amateur Owner Working Hunter, 3'3": Rendition, LexieFranklin, LexieFrankiin

Amateur OwnerWorking Hunter, 3'3" Handy: After Dark,LauraMathews,LauraMathews Amateur Owner Working Hunter 3'3": After Dark,LauraMathews,Laura Mathews Amateur OwnerWorking Hunter 3'3"- U/8: Pirouette,Shawna Dash,ShawnaDash Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Fleetstreet, Lisa Wifframs, LrsaWiliams Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Princeton, AveryFarley,AveryFarley Amateur OwnerWorking Hunters-Handy: Fleetstreet, LisaWiliams,LisaWiliams Amateur OwnerWorking Hunters-U/8: Juiffiard, Lisa Williams,Lisa Wiliams

Amateur0wner/Junior JumperClassic,1.25m: StanleySM,JennaPowel, JennaPowell Amateur Owner/Junior Jumpers, 1.25m: Juliander C,GenyoueffLlc,Courtneyyoueff Amateur Owner/Junior Jumpers, 1.25m: Fiametta G,Gina Luciano, GinaLociano Ariat National Adult Medal: ErinQuesnel ASPCA Horsemanship Class: LexiePerry BabyGreenWo rkingHunters:Rendezvous,Sue Lightner,MarisaMetzger

Baby GreenWorking Hunters: Playlist, Alexandra Zell ShelleyCampl

Baby GreenWorking Hunters U/8: Resplenden t, HelenMcEvoy, Kely Smith Beginnin g Jumpers,0.75m: Pal eo,AlexAbe, AlexAbe Beginning Jumpers, 0.75m: Genuine, Olivia Trump,DliviaTrump Beginnin gJumpers,0.75m:Chauff eur,TracyHolland,TracyHolland Children's JumperClassic, 1.10m:WHCatalina, BedaWachter,Megan Randal Children's Jumpers, 0.90m: Kalilinoe, Shelby Brooks,ShelbyBrooks Childr en' s Jumpers,0.90m: Madison Avenue, LaurenJanes,LaurenJanes Children's Jumpers, 0.90m:Wellington,Lily Gillespie,LilyGiffespie Children's Jumpers, 1.00m: KilkennyAsante, SageSkyFarm, SageWiltse Children's Jumpers, 1.00m: Regalo,Madison Toolouloan,MadisonToolookian Children's Jumpers, 14 & Under 1.10m: Big Sor, CaroiinePearl-sacks, CarolinePearl-sacks Children's Jumpers, 14 & Under1.10m: Euro, MeganChampoux, MeganChampoux Children's Jumpers, 15-17 1.10m:ArchieBunker, TiffanyHiam,Emilia Bullone Children's Jumpers, 15-17 1.10m: Earl Grey, ErikaLauer,ErikaLauer Children's Jumpers, 1.10m:Renaissance,Hailey Dyck,ShelbyEdwards Children's PonyEquitation: JosiePaulson Children's PonyEquitation Flat: JosiePaolson Children's PonyWorking Hunters: Wishingweff Birdie,Emm aTrudeau, Cerlidh Mckay Children's Pony Working Hunters: Hopscotch, Lisa Lamoreaox,JosiePaolson Children's Pony Working Hunters: LuckyGold Mine,MelissaAllen, SkylerAllen Children's PonyWorking Hunters U/8: EllaBeffa, SadieCole,SadieCole Children's Pony Working Hunters Classic: LuckyGoldMine,MelissaAllen, SkylerAllen Children's Working HunterClassic: BlackPearl, Hilary Sosne,LizaPeters Children's Working Hunters,12 & Under:Rembrandt,LauraFerran, Abi Elerding Children's Working Hunters, 12 & Under:Gettysburg,EmilyPerkins EmilyPerkins Children's Working Hunters,12 & Under: Black Pearl, HilarySosne,LizaPeters Children's Working Hunters, 12 & Under-U/8: Gettysburg, EmilyPerkins,Emily Perkins Children's Working Hunters, 13-14: CashM, Flying MFarm,GraceGambel Children's Working Hunters, 13-14:Avion,Celia Tonkin,CeliaTonkin Children's WorkingHunters,13-14: MyThoughts Exactly,Emm aGlaunert, Emm aGlaonert Children's Working Hunters, 13-14- U/8: Rejoice, Susan Massey Tiffany Martin Children's Working Hunters, 15-17: BestRegardcz,LoisFetveit, LoisFetveit Children's Working Hunters, 15-17: Aff Talk, Hannah Morris, HannahMorris Children's Working Hunters, 15-17: SneakA Little Peak, BrennaWeems, Makenzie Brooks Children's WorkingHunters, 15-17- U/8: Sneak ALittle Peak,BrennaWeems, Makenzie Brooks Cloverleaf Medal: ClaireMoore Cross Rail Equitation: Sydney Allen Cross Rail Equitation: Carissa Macdonald Cross Rail Equitation Flat: Sydney Alen Equisport/UBEFPonyMedal Class: NicoleBakar Equitation, 13 8 Under:JennaBarker Equitation, 13 8 Under:EmilyPerkins Equitation, 13 & UnderFlat: EmmaGlaunert Equitation, 14-15: BaileySmith Equitation, 14-15: ChloeGreen Equitation, 14-15 Flat Hanna Krista Norris Equitation, 16-17: Kendaff Pedigo Equitation, 16-17: Katie Steiner Equitation, 16-17 Flat: KendalPedi l go First/Secondyear Green Working Hunter: Papiro, Karen Badgley,SaraPetersen First/SecondYear GreenWorking Hunter: Pirouette,ShawnaDash, Shelley Campf First/Secondyear GreenWorking Hunter: Veritas, Alexa Peterkin, JimDahlquist First/Secondyear GreenWorking Hunter-Handy: Pirouette,ShawnaDash, Sheley Campf First/Secondyear GreenWorking Hunter-U/8: Pikasso,TheresaMansfield, JimDahlquist Green Conformation Hunters: Valentine, Sue Lightner,MarisaMetzger Green Conformation Hunters-Model: Valentine, Soe Lightner,Marrsa Metzger

Green Conformation Hunters-Handy:Valentine, Soe LightnerMansaMetzger Green Conformation Hunters-U/8: Castine,Samantha Cristy,MeganChagnon High PerformanceWorking Hunters: Starstruck (3'6), LauraMathews,Jim Dahlqoist High PerformanceWorking Hunters: Maiffisko, BaileyCampbell, MarisaMetzger High PerformanceWorking Hunters: Starstruck (3'6), LauraMathews,Jim Dahlqoist High PerformanceWorking Hunters-Handy:Le Cavalrer,RobrnKelogg, Shelley Campf High PerformanceWorking Hunters-U/8: Zeppelin, KorinaWinkler,Dustin Goodwin Hopeful Jumpers,Fences 2':Windrose Coby, Linda BurkeCuff igan,KaylaLong Hopeful Jumpers, Fences2': Bling It On,Hunter Redding,RebekahSwan Jumpers, 0.70m: At Last,AlexHeintz, Catherine Gregory Jumpers, 0.70m: Atl.ast,Alex Heintz,AlexHeintz Jumpers,0.70m: Show Me The Money,Hannah Heskin,HannahHeskin Jumpers, 0.75m: AtLast,Alex Heintz, AlexHeintz Jumpers, 0.75m: JackCade, LorraineWilcox, Lily Giffespie Jumpers, 0.75m: PotiquimiGuessAgain, Derek Latty,HannahHeskin Jumpers, 0.80m: CuriousGeorge, Heather Elerding, Heather Elerding Jumpers, 0.80m:Ham denPlace,LorraineWilcox, Ali Levy Jumpers, 0.80m: Vinyasa, AlexandraPoter, AlexandraPotter Jumpers, 0.80m: Hamden Place, LorraineWilcox, Ali Levy Jumpers, 0.80m: Bela noir, Corinna Bybee, CorinnaBybee Jumpers, 0.85m: Wodka II, NancyBozek, Nancy Bozek Jumpers, 0.85m: Speechless,MckennaNorris, Mckenna Norris Jumpers, 0.85m: Airtight Alibi, JesseShortleff, KateShurtleff Jumpers, 0.85m: Just Right,BaileyFuller, Reed Dinger Jumpers, 0.85m:J Crew,RandiRay,RandiRay Jumpers,0.90m: Tango, Beda Wachter,Claudia Thorsrud Jumpers, 0.90m:Connor,Jil Brooks,Jill Brooks Jumpers, 0.90m: Madison Avenue, LaorenJanes, LaurenJanes Jumpers, 1.00m: ForParadox LeslieGiacomeffi, LynneStephenson Jumpers, 1.00m:Optical fflusion,Maplewood Inc, KevinWinkel Take 2 ThoroughbredJumpers, 1.00m: Airtight Alibi, Jesse Shurtleff, JesseShortlelf Take 2 ThoroughbredJumpers, 1.00m: Airtight Alibi, Jesse Shortleff, JesseShurtlefi Take2ThoroughbredJumperClassic,1.00m: Regalo,MadisonTouloukian, MadisonTooloukian Jumpers, 1.00m: Regalo, MadisonToolookian, MadisonTooloukian Jumpers, 1.00m: Rabshakeh,Erin Moehnke,Erin Moehnke Jumpers, 1.00m: Cleopatra gl, MicheffeBews Anderson ,Micheff eBewsAnderson Jumpers, 1.05m: HighTop,HayleyBowen, Jennifer Davis Jumpers, 1.05m: DmegaMeganSeidel, Megan Serdel Jumpers,1.05m:AnnieUp,KarenDearmont, Karen Dearmont Jumpers, 1.10m:Sarducci,MargaretAbeles, MeganGarcia Jumpers, 1.10m: Kantos, Macy Mitchell, Jelf Campf Jumpers, 1.10m: Balim Baloo,DanieffeWalker, Kyle King Jumpers, 1.15m:Tora,MargauxChanneff, Margaux Channell Jumpers, 1.15m: WH Chico, BedaWachter, Lynne Stephenson Jumpers, 1.20m: FiamettaG,GinaLociano, Gina Luciano Jumpers, 1.20m: Cancun,AndreaStrain, Andrea Strain Jumpers, 1.20m: RoyalBeachFarao, Kelly Smith, Kelly Smith Jumpers, 1.20m: Rugby, Lisa Pleasance,Lisa Pleasance Jumpers, 1.25m: MagaLSLaSila, LexiePerry, LexrePerry Jumpers, 1.25m: WH Chico, BedaWachter, Lynne Stephenson Jumpers, 1.25m:Alchemy,SarahGariepy, Heather Northup Jumpers, 1.30m:Quigley,PaulPoliteskiAndLochside Lane,KyleKing Jumpers, 1.30m: Cartiano Z, TamiMaler, Jelf Campf Jumpers, 1.30m: GSCO Exceffo, MicheffeEbert, MichegeEbert Jumpers, 1.40m: Atlantis, NewVenture Investments,MeganJordan Jumpers, 1.40m: KilkennyRindo, KilkennyCrest Lic, JeffCook Jumpers, 1.40m: Dancer,CrooksShowJumping Llc Lauren Crooks Jumpers,1.45m: Armus GS,Thunderbird Show Park,LauraJaneTidball Junior Working Hunters, 15 & Under:Truma,n KatieAoki, KatieAoki Junior Working Hunters 15 & Under-Handy: Veritas,AlexaPeterkin, AlexaPeterkin Junior Working Hunters, 15 & Under-U/8: PadarcoDolce,BaileySmith, BaileySmith Junior Working Hunters, 16-17: Declaration, MorningStar Sporthorses PeytonLyons Junior Working Hunters, 16-17:Maiffisko,Bailey Campbell,BaileyCampbel Junior Working Hunters, 16-17-Handy: yoshi, ThunderbirdShowStables, JennaPowell Junior Working Hunters, 16-17 U/8: Pikasso, Theresa Mansfield, MadisonMansfield Just A Jumper, 0.70m: GoneWest, Makena Whims,MakenaWhims Just A Jumper,0.70m:ShowMeTheMoney, Hannah HeskinHan , nahHeskin JustAW orkingHunter:DannyBoy,WendySubotrch Wendy Sobotrch Just A Working Hunter:WorthTheWait, ZoeKimmaskeff,Heather Northup Just A Working Hunter: Aragon,Nancy Shortleff, Lisa Petersen Just A Working Hunter:WishingweffBirdie, Emma Trudeau,Ceilidh Mckay Just A Working Hunter U/8: WorthTheWait, Zoe Kim-maskeff, HeatherNorthup Large WorkingHunters: HydePark, Patty Osberg, CoreneSmith Large Working Hunters: Gettysburg,Emily Perkins, DostinGoodwin Large Working Hunters: RealAppeal,GreyHil Farm Nancy Free Large WorkingHunters: Wem bley, AlexandraZeff, DustinGoodwin Large WorkingHuntersU/8: Cornino,LisaLamoreaux,DustinGoodwin Lead Line: State OfGrace, AnnaSemer, Wiliam Semler Limit Children's/Adult Equitation: JosiePaulson Limit Children's/Adult Equitation: Grace Mathias Limit Children's/Adult Equitation: SkylerAllen Limit Children's/Adult Epuifation Flat: Skyler Allen Limit Jumpers, 1.00m: LoneStar, Martin Ridgeway, NicoleRidgeway Limit Jumpers, 1.00m:Vitale,MeissaBeardsley, TaraNiculescu Limit Jumpers,1.00m: BalticAdelaide,Kelly Bowman,MeganJordan Limit Jumpers, 1.00m:Vickie,Heather Mackenzie, StaceyTalbot Long stirrup epuitalion: Jiff Hil Long Stirrup Equitation Flat: Jiff Hil Long Stirrup WorkingHunter Classic: Celebrity, KathleenWaldorf KathleenWaldorf Long Stirrup Working Hunters: Moonlight Sonata,JanetWeaver,JanetWeaver Long Stirrup Working Hunters: DannyBoy, WendySubotich,JiffHil Long Stirrup Working Hunters: Celebrity, KathleenWaldorf, KathleenWaldorf Long Stirrup WorkingHunters U/8: Celebrity, KathleenWaldorf, KathleenWaldorf Low Child/Adult Equitation: Melanie Pennington Low Child/Adult Equitation: LaurenPleasance Low Child/Adult Equitation Flat: AffeCarter Low Adult Working Hunters: Mape,Martha HoweCrowleyPatti Laird Low Adult WorkingHunters: Maestro,Barbara Butler,HannahStein Low Adult Working Hunters U/8: Maestro, BarbaraButler,HannahStein Low Adult/Low Children's Working Hunter Classic: Paleo,AlexAbe,AlexAbe Low Children's Working Hunters: Mister,Lisa Pieasance,LaurenPleasance Low Children's Working Hunters: Porter, GraceMathias,GraceMathias Low Children's WorkingHunters U/8: Mister, LrsaPleasance, LaurenPleasance

Bernhard Langer (422), $210,50068-67-66-70—271 CoreyPavin(196), $97,813 69-71-69-65—274 PeterSenior(196),$97,813 68-71-69-66—274 DavidFrost(196), $97,813 68-68-68-70—274 PeterFowler(132), $66,280 6 9-68-70-69—276 70-68-69-70—277 SandyLyle(114),$56,800 TomPerniceJr. (90),$44,870 70-72-70-66—278 69-69-73-67—278 Jeff Hart(90), $44,870 67-70-70-72—279 GeneSaoers (76),$37,820 SteveElkington,$33,650 72-68 71 69—280 GaryWolstenholme,$33,650 70-72-68-70—280

IN THE BLEAcHERs BASEBALL WCL WESTCOAST LEAGUE

League standings North Division Bellingham Bels WallaWallaSweets WenatcheeAppleSox VictoriaHarbourCats Kelowna Falcons South Division Corvallis Knights BendElks MedfordRogues KlamathFalls Gems CowlitzBlackBears KitsapBlueJackets

Monday'sGames

/7 r

v www.gocomics.com/inthebleachers In the Bleachers © 2013 steve Moore Dist by Universal Uclick

L 20 19 22 23 27

W 27 26 23 21 20 16

L 15 16 22 21 22 29

Bend 5,WenatcheeI Kitsap 5,KlamathFaffs1 Medford5,Cowlitz 2 Kelowna 6,Beffingham5 Corvallis 6,Victoria 5 Today's Games Cowlitz atBend,6:35p.m. Corvalrs atKeowna, 6:35p.m. KlamathFalls atVictoria, 7:05p.m. MedfordatBegingham,7.05p.m. WallaWallaatWenatchee,7:05p.m.

/

/ ./ . . , .

W 24 23 23 18 15

v/3y

"The Vikings rejected peace talks, Majesty. They want to play hardball!!"

Wednesday'sGames

Corvallis atKelowna,6:35p.m. Cowlitz atBend,6.35p.m. KlamathFails atVictoria, 7:05p.m. WallaWallaatWenatchee,7:05p.m. MedlordatBegingham,7:05p.m.

Monday's Summary

Elks 5, AppleSox1 Low Jumpers, 0.80m:Balius,DanieleFournier, IsabellaSendar Low Jumpers, 0.80m:Vinyasa,AlexandraPotter, Alexandra Poter LowJumpers,0.80m:Beff anoir,CorinnaBybee,CorinnaBybee Low Jumpers, 0.80m:CuriousGeorge,Heather Elerdrng,Heather Elerding Low Working Hunter, Fences18": CardiffPrivate Affair,IsabellaMuffan,Catherine Cruger Low Working Hunter, Fences 18": Clover, DavidCrowley,ZoeDupzyk Low Working Hunter, Fences 2': Spilt Mik, SophiaIbanez,JamieSmith Low Working Hunter, Fences 2': Happy Thoughts,Cameron Brown, Kely Smith Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'3": StateOf Grace,AnnaSemler AnnaSemier Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'3": Danny Boy,WendySobotrch, Jiff Hil Low WorkingHunter, Fences 2'3": Good Golly MissMolly, StephanieRay Catherine Cruger Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'3": StateOf Grace,AnnaSemler, KristaVangstad Low WorkingHunter, Fences2'3": Moonlight Sonata,JanetWeaver, Janet Weaver Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'6": El Capitan, NancyJubitz,AkikoHamada Low Worki ngHunter,Fences2'6":Hampton, BetsyMcCool, MeganGarcia Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'5": Kenzo, MargotSnowdon,GraceGambel Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'6": Spellbound,TaylorVadset,Taylor Vadset Low Working Hunter, Fences2'9": Fagahno, Micheffe Gaubert, JessicaAllan Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'9": Paleo, Alex Abe,AlexAbe Low Working Hunter, Fences 2'9": Maple, MarthaHoweCrowley, Patti Laird

Low Workin gHunter,Fences2'9":Leonida, KatieWanng,Alle Carter Low Working Hunter, Fences 3': Privilege, Peyto nLyonsEmmaHainze Low Working Hunter, Fences 3': Pirouette, ShawnaDash, Shelley Campf Low Working Hunter, Fences 3'6": Veritas, AlexaPeterkin, JimDahlquist Low Working Hunter, Fences 3'6": Tetley, Wendy Valdes, BrentBalrsky Low Children's Pony Working Hunter: Ella Enchanted, JamieSmith, JosephineHarbottle Low Children's PonyWorking Hunter: Wishingwell Birdie,Emm aTrudeau,Ceilidh Mckay Maiden Children's/Adult Equitation: Payton Potter Maiden Children's/Adult Equitation: Samantha Finnegan Maiden Children's/Adult Equitation Flat: SamanthaFinnegan Modified Amateur/Junior Jumper Classic: Crursrngwrth Rosre,TyeMcaffrster, BreanneMcAllister Modified Amateur/Junior Jumper, 1.15m: Renai ssance,HaileyDyck,ShelbyEdwards Modified Amateur/Junior Jumper, 1.15m: Carino,MargaretBlasco,MargaretBlasco Modified Junior/Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Fleetstreet,LisaWiliams, LisaWiliams Modified Junior/Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Pikasso, TheresaMansfield, Madison Mansfield Modified Junior/Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Juiffrard,LrsaWifframs,LrsaWiliams Modified Junior/Amateur Owner Working Hunters: Privilege,PeytonLyons, Peyton Lyons Modified Junior/Amateur Owner Working Hunters U/8: Maiffisko, Bailey Campbell, Bailey Campbell Non-Thoroughbred Working Hunters: Aria, Sydney Hagenbuch,Kimberly Koch Non-Thoroughbred Working Hunters: Rossini, Mary Richter, Wendy Subotich Non-ThoroughbredWorking Hunters: Snow Patroi, Caroline Jones, KimberlyKoch Non-Thoroughbred Working Hunters U/8: The Breeze,KayLynch, Catherine Croger OHJAChild/Adult Medal: RandiRay OHJA Mini Medal: OliviaTrump PCHAHorsemanship/Adult Class: Mckenzie Mills PerformanceWorking Hunters- 3'6": Rendition, LexieFranklin, ShelleyCampf PerformanceWorking Hunters- 3'6": Tetley, Wendy Valdes, BrentBalisky PerformanceWorking Hunters- 3'6"- Handy: Tetley,WendyValdes BrentBalisky Performance Working Hunters- 3'6"-U/8: Xanthos,KathleenLewis, MeganGarcia Performance Working Hunters, Fences 3'3": Xanthos,KathleenLewis, MeganGarcia

Pre-Green Working Hunters, Fences 3'. Qoidam'sStar,EizabethWilson, PhilippaFraser Pre-GreenWorking Hunters, Fences3'-U/8: RumorHasIt, StephanievonGortler, ShelleyCampf Pre-GreenWorking Hunters, Fences 3'8": Bertolucci,RobinKellogg,Shelley Campf Pre-GreenWorking Hunters, Fences 3'3"U/8: Bertolucci,RobinKellogg,Shelley Campf Regular Conformation Hunters: C. Quito, MargotSnowdon,Jessie Lang Regular Conformation Hunters-Model: C Quito, MargotSnowdon,Jessie Lang Regular Conformation Hunters-Handy: C Quito,MargotSnowdon,Jessie Lang Regular Conformation Hunters-U/8: C.Quito, MargotSnowdon,Jessie Lang Schooli gnJumpers,0.85m: Augustus,Kate Bymes,AkikoHamada Schooling Jumpers, 0.85m:JustRight, Bailey Foler, ReedDrnger Schooli gnJumpers,0.85m:Speechless,MckennaNorris, MckennaNorris Schooli gnJumpers,0.85m: J Crew,Randi Ray,RandiRay Schooling Working Hunters: StateOf Grace, AnnaSemler, AnnaSemler Schooling Working Hunters: JetstreamMary DeloreyDVM,MirenSanchez Schooling Working Hunters: ThreeWishes, Ceilidh Mckay,Ceilidh Mckay Schooling Working Hunters: EllaEnchan ted, JamreSmrth, JosephineHarbottle Schooling Working Hunters U/8: Three Wishes, CeilidhMckay,Ceilidh Mckay Short Stirrup Equitation, Horses: Holland Hartman Short Stirrup Equitation, HorsesFlat: Emm a Clouser Short Stirrup Equitation, Ponies: ZoeDupzyk Short Stirrup Equitation, Ponies: Karson Parry Short Stirrup Equitation, Ponies Flat: SamanthaFinnegan Shorl Stirrup Working Hunter Classic, Horse: Dirty Harry,Margaret Kolata,Holland Hartman Short Stirrup Working Hunter Classic, Ponies: Riviera,Stephanieyerigan, KarsonParry Short Stirrup Working Hunters, Horses: WorthTheWart, ZoeKrm-maskell, ZoeKrm-maskell Short Stirrup WorkingHunters, Horses: Good Goiiy MissMolly, StenhanieRay Lindsay Knight Short Stirrup WorkingHunters, Horses:Dirty Harry,MargaretKolata,HollandHartman Short StirrupWorkingHunters, HorsesU/8: WorthTheWait, ZoeKim-maskeI, ZoeKrm-maskeg Short Stirrup Working Hunters, Ponies: Clover, DavidCrowley,ZoeDupzyk Short Stirrup Working Hunters, Ponies: BlackBerry,Tayler Cobb,Emily Hale Short Stirrup WorkingHunters, Ponies: Clover, Dawd Crowley, ZoeDupzyk Short Stirrup Working Hunters, Ponies U/8: Heart ofGold SaraPetersen, JosiePaulson Pony Hunters Model: Madeline,MargaretMcgovern,KatieAoki Pony Hunters Conformation: Madeline,MargaretMcgovern,Katie Aoki Pony Hunters Hand

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN'SNATIONAL BASKETBALLASSOCIATION AH TimesPDT Monday'e Games

No games scheduled

Today's Games

No games scheduled

Wedneeday'e Game NewyorkatWashington, 4 p.m.

SOCCER

Kohki idoki,$30,320 71-68-73-69—281 JamieSpence,$27,220 75-69-70 68—282 RussCochran,$27,220 71-73-70-68—282 DesSmyth$27,220 76-69-69-68—282 TomKrte,$27,220 70-72-71-69—282 RoccoMediate,$24,040 70-68-75-70—283 StevePate$24040 70-72-68-73—283 GregTurner,$22,960 70-69-75-70—284 Barry Lane, $21,040 72-68-74-71—285 Larry Mize, $21,040 71-73-70-71—285 FredCouples,$21,040 74-72-68-71—285 SteveJones,$21,040 73-70-70-72—285 Colin Montgomerie$21,04 , 0 72-71-69-73—285 75-70-72-69—286 MichaelAllen,$17,297 KatsuyoshiTomori, $17,297 7 1-72-73-70—286 71-74-71-70—286 SteenTinning,$17,297 72-72-70-72—286 TomLehman,$17,297 74-68-72-72—286 MarkO'Meara,$17,297 70-67-76-73 286 Mark McNulty,$17,297 71-72-70-73—286 Rod Spittle,$17,297 BradFaxon,$14,647 74-69-74-70—287 GaryHallberg,$14,647 69-75-73-70—287 PedroLinhart, $14,647 73-72-72-70—287 Kirk Hanefeld$13,230 , 73-75-70-70—288 TomWatson, $13,230 73-71-73-71—288 David J.Russell, $13,230 72-73-72-71—288 BobTway,$13,230 74-72-69-73—288 PaulWesselingh,$11,600 70-76-74-69—289 Seiki Okoda, $11,600 73-72-73-71—289 DuffyWaldorf,$11,600 76-72-70-71—289 John Inman, $11,600 71-76-70-72—289 Peter Mitchell, $11,600 75-72-68-74—289 Willie Wood,$10,340 75-71-72-72—290 40 72-75-65-78—290 MrgueAngelMartrn,$10,3 74-73-71-73—291 MarkJames,$9,800 73-73-73-73 292 Booncho Ruangkit,$8,540 71-77-71-73—292 Lu ChienSoon,$8,540 71-74-73-74—292 Mike Goodes, $8,540 72-73-73-74 292 Dick Mast,$8,540 72-74-72-74—292 SantiagoLuna,$8,540 a-ChipLutz 71-71-75-75—292 75-70-72-75—292 Eduardo Romero, $8,540 73-74-72-74—293 BruceVaughan,$7,110 74-74-71-74—293 Philip Golding,$7,110 Esteban Toledo $6160 74-72-74-74—294 MarkBrooks,$6,160 74-73-73-74—294 Jeff Sloman, $6,160 71-75-72-76—294 AndersForsbrand,$6,160 73-70-73-78—294 MassyKoramoto, $5,130 70-77-74-74—295 John Cook,$5,130 69-79-73-74—295 FrankieMrnoza,$5,130 68-78-72-77—295 Carl Mason,$5,130 74-70-73-78—295 HendrikBuhrmann,$4,315 76-72-75-73—296 Philip Walton,$4,315 70-76-75-75—296 Joe Daley,$4,315 75-73-73-75—296 MarkCalcavecchia,$4,315 75-72-73-76—296 75-71-78-73—297 FredFunk,$3,770 Bill Longmuir$3,770 , 73-69-77-78—297 74-72-75-77 298 AndrewOldcom, $3,410 76-72-73-77—298 PeterDahlberg,$3,410 74-71-79-77—301 Phil Gressweff, $3,410 74-72-77-81—304 Mitch Kierstenson, $2960

DEALS

MLS MAJORLEAGUESOCCER AH TimesPDT

Wednesday'sGame RomaatMLSAII-Stars, 6 p.m. Saturday's Games Montrealat DC.United,430 p.m. Chicago at Philadelphia 4:30p.m. NewyorkatSporting KansasCity, 5p.m. RealSaltLakeat Colorado, 6p.m. ColumbusatHouston, 6p.m. ChivasUSAatSanJose, 7p.m. FC DallasatSeatle FC,7:30p.m. Vancouver atPortland, 8p.m

Bunday'sGame

Toront o FCatNew England,4:30 p.m

TENNIS

Performance Working Hunters, Fences

3'3": MoonlightSonata,JanetWeaver, CoreneSmith Performance Working Hunters, Fences 3'3"-Handy: Knees-Hi, Mckenzie Mills, Jessica Allan

Performance Working Hunters, Fences

3'3"-U/8: RealAppeal, GreyHil Farm,NancyFree Pessoa/USEF National Hunter Seat Medal: Sydney Hotchins Platinum Performance/UBEF Show Jumping Talent Search: Lurana Crowley Pony Equitation: KatieAoki Pony Equitation: CeilidhMckay Pony Equitation Flat: Sam antha Finnegan Pony Working Hunter Classic: LadyHenslee, RachelRothenberg,Emm aSmith Pre Adult Working Hunters: Aragon,Nancy Shurtlefl, Karen Badgley Pre Adult Working Hunters: RegalDonMorr, SelahShepherd,SelahShepherd Pre Adult Working Hunters: Hampton,Betsy McCool BetsyMcCool Pre Adult Working Hunters U/8: Hampton, BetsyMcCool, Betsy McCool Pre-Adulf Equitation: BetsyMcCool Pre-Adult Equitation: SelahShepherd Pre-Adulf Equitation Flat: SelahShepherd Pre-Adult/Pre-Children's Working Hunter Classic: Finesse, PamWhite, KendaffCarlson Pre-Children's Epuifation: Shea Martin Pre-Children's Equitation: TaylorVadset Pre-Children's Equitation Flat:TaylorVadset Pre-Cbildren's Working Hunters: Finesse, PamWhite, KendaffCarlson Pre-Children's Working Hunters: Spellbound, TaylorVadset,Taylor Vadset Pre-Children's Working Hunters: Chantelle, SarahHanly,SarahHanly Pre-Children's Working Hunters U/8: Monty, LilianaKaneshige, LiianaKaneshige Pre-GreenWorking HunterClassic: Quidam's Star, ElizabethWilson, Philippa Fraser Pre-GreenWorking Hunters, Fences3hBertolucci,RobinKelogg,SheleyCampf

FISH COUNT

GOLF


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

C3

SPORTS ON THE AIR TODAY BASEBALL MLB, St. Louis at Pittsburgh MLB, Seattle at Boston

Time TV/Radio

MLB, Cincinnati at SanDiego

7 p.m.

FOOTBALL CFL, B.C. Lions at Toronto

4:30p.m. NBCSN

1 p.m. MLB 4p.m. MLB, Root

Time TV/Radio

SOCGER

Audi Cup, semifinal, Manchester City vs. AC Milan

9 a.m.

E S PN2

Audi Cup, semifinal, FC Bayern Munich vs. Sao Paulo FC 11:15 p.m. ESPN2 MLS, All-Star Game, AS Roma vs. MLS All-Stars 6 p.m. E S PN2 BASEBALL Big LeagueWorld Series, teams TBD 3:30p.m. ESPN2 MLB, St. Louis at Pittsburgh 4 p.m. ES P N 4 p.m. Roo t MLB, Seattle at Boston Listings are themostaccurateavailable. The Bulletinis not responsible for latechangesmade by TI/or radio stations.

SPORTS IN BRIEF Bandon PiCked fOr 4-dall ChamPianShiP —The U.S.

White Sox on Monday in an attempt to bolster their bullpen for the AL East stretch run. The White Sox will receive players

make a splash in its selection of

to be named or cashfor Crain, a 32-year-old right-hander who

sites for the new U.S. Amateur

is 2-3 with a1.15 ERA in 38 ap-

Golf Association wanted to

Four-Ball championship announced earlier this year. And

it believes it has done just that. Just a year after hosting the U.S.

pearances. Hewas placed on the disabled list on July 3 with a right shoulder strain.

Open, TheOlympic Club in San Francisco wasselectedMonday

Tigers acquire reliever

to host the inaugural men's

Tigers added some help for their

four-ball championship in 2015.

shakybullpenMonday,acquir-

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on the Oregon coast will hold the

ing reliever Jose Veras from the

first women's event that spring.

frOm AStrOS —TheDetroit

Houston Astros for minor league outfielder Danry Vasquezanda player to be named.Veras is 0-4

Winged Foot Golf Club just outside New York City will be the

w ith a 2.93 ERA this season,and

site of the men's tournament in

the 32-year-old right-hander has

2016, while the women will go to the newly designed Stream-

struck out 44 in 43 innings with only14 walks.

song Resort near Tampa,Fla., that year.

SOCCER Commissionerstates MLS

BASEBALL MLB may SuSPendA-Rod under lahor deal —Major

Will eXPand —Expansion is coming to Major LeagueSoccer. The only questions facing the

League Baseball may try to suspend Alex Rodriguez under its

league's board arehowmany teams to add, where to locate

collective bargaining agreement instead of its drug rules, The

them and when to bring them into the fold. Commissioner Don

Associated Press has learned.

Garber told TheAssociated Press

Why does that matter? Because if MLB goes ahead with the

in a wide-ranging interview Mon-

it means the Yankees slugger

detail" on Wednesday. The MLS

day that the league's owners plan suspension under the labor deal, to discuss expansion "in great would lose virtually any chance will play Italian club AS Roma of delaying the penalty while he in its annual All-Star gamethat appeals the case. Rodriguez has night. never been disciplined for a drug offense, and afirst offender under baseball's Joint Drug Agreement is entitled to an automatic

TRACK & FIELD

stay if the players' union files

Gay left Off U.S. rOSter

a grievance. That means the penalty is put on hold until after

— As expected, TysonGayhas been left off the U.S. roster for

an arbitrator rules. But a person

next month's world championships in Moscow.Gayqualified

familiar with management's deliberations told the AP that MLB could skirt that problem by punishing Rodriguez for other alleged violations.

Rays get pitcher from White SOX —The TampaBay Rays acquired injured reliever

in the100 and 200 meters at

the nationals in June, but relinquished his spots after failing an out-of-competition drug test for

a banned substance. Mike Rodgers will take Gay's place in the 100 and Wallace Spearmon will

go in the 200.

Jesse Crain from the Chicago

— From wire reports

SWIMMING

Lithuanian teen sets record in100 breast By Paul Newberry

Britain. "It's one of the steps, one of the dreams. ObviousB ARCELONA, Spai n ly, a gold medal would be a — Ruta Meilutyte just keeps cherry on top." getting better. The kids are doing all right A surprising gold medalist at these worlds, that's for at last year's London Olym- sure. pics, the 16-year-old from Eighteen-year-old M i s sy Lithuania set the first world Franklin cruised into the firecord of the world swim- nal of the 100 backstroke as ming championships Mon- the top qualifier, despite slipday night — in the semifinals ping on her start in the semis. of th e 1 0 0-meter b reast- Another young A merican, stroke, no less. 16-year-old Katie Ledecky, Meilutyte will be an over- followed up her gold medal whelming favorite in the final in the 400 freestyle by easily today, but she considers the qualifying for the 1,500 free world record a bigger accom- finaL There were no American plishment than a gold medal. She nearly broke the mark golds on the second night of during the morning prelimi- swimming at the Palau Sant naries, then returned itn the JordL eveningtogo even faster. The home crowd got a The youngster touched in thrill when Mireia Belmonte 1 minute, 4.35 seconds, beat- of Spain won bronze in the ing the record set by Ameri- 200 IM. can Jessica Hardy in 2009 at Ryan Lochte put himself the end of the rubberized suit in position to take a run at his era. first individual gold of these "My biggest aim is accom- championships. He was the plished now and I'll give it second-fastest qualifier in the my best shot in the final," semifinals of the 200 free besaid MeiNtyte, who trains in hind Russia's Danila Izotov. The Associated Press

a two-run double and had three RBls, and Oakland beat Toronto.

Standings

ML B

WEDNESDAY

GOLF

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL All Times PDT

TampaBay Boston Baltimore NewYork Toronto Detroit Cleveland

Kansas City Minnesota Chicago Oakland Texas Seattle Los Angeles Houston

AMERICANLEAGUE East Division W L Pct GB 63 43 594 63 44 .589 '/z 58 48 .547 5 55 50 48 57

Central Division W L 59 57 51 45

45 48 51 57

57 50 48 35

49 55 56 69

40 63 West Division W L 63 43

.524 7'/z .457 14'/z

Pct GB .567 .543 2'/z

.500 7 .441 13 .388 18'/z

Pct GB .594 .538 6 476 12'/z

.462 14 .337 27

Monday'sGames Tampa Bay2, Boston1 Cleveland3,ChicagoWhite Sox2 Texas 4, L.A.Angels 3 Oakland 9,Toronto 4 Today'sGames ChicagoWhite Sox(Peavy8-4) at Cleveland(Kazmir 6-4), 4.05p.m. Houston(B.Norris 6-9) atBaltimore(W.chen 5-3), 405 p.m. Washington(Strasburg 5-8) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez 8-7),4.08p.m. Arizona(Kennedy3-7) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 5-11), 4:10p.m. Seattle (J.Saunders9-9) at Boston(Workman0-1), 4.10 p.m. LA. Angels(CWilson11-6) atTexas(DHogand86), 505 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana6-6) at Minnesota(Peltrey48), 5:10p.m. Toronto(Buehrle6-7) at Oakland(Straily 6-4), 7.05 pm. N.Y.Yankees(Petrtte 7-8) at L.A.Dodgers(Greinke 8-3), 7:10p.m. Wednesday'sGames

Jed Lowrie singled home arun and Josh Reddick hit a sacrifice fly in Oakland's four-run first inning. Cespedes led off the eighth with his16th home run, snapping a

career-high 25-game homerless streak for the HomeRun Derby champion. Toronto

Oakland

ab r hbi ab r hbi Reyesss 4 0 0 0 Crispct 31 0 0 Mecarrlf 4 0 0 0 Sogard2b 41 0 0 Bautistrf 3 1 1 0 Lowriess 5 1 1 1 Encrnc 1b 4 1 1 2 Cespdslf 5 2 3 3 Lind dh 4 1 1 1 Moss 1b 5 2 2 0 CIRsmscf 3 0 00 Dnldsn3b 4 1 1 0 Mlzturs2b 3 0 0 0 Reddckrf 4 1 1 3 DeRosaph 1 0 0 0 S.Smithdh 3 0 2 1 Arenciic 3 0 1 0 Vogtc 301 1 Lawrie3b 3 1 1 1 Totals 3 2 4 5 4 Totals 36 9 11 9 Toronto 000 013 000 — 4 Oakland 401 030 01x — 9 E Reyes (2), Encarnacion(8). LOB Toronto 3, Dakland10. 2B—R eddick (15), SSmith (21) 3B—Cespe des(3).HR—Encarnacion(29), Lind(13), Lawrie(8),Cespedes(16). SF—Reddick. Toronto I P H R ER BBSO E .Rogers L,3-5 4 1 - 3 98 6 3 3 McGowan 21-3 1 0 0 1 0 Cecil I 1-3 I I I I 0 Oakland Griffin W,10-7 7 4 4 4 2 5 Doolittle 1 1 0 0 0 1 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2 HBP —byCecil (Sogard). T—2:38. A—13,309(35,067).

Rays 2, RedSox1

F razier3b 3 0 0 0 Venalerf 2 0 0 0 Paullf 1 0 0 0 Denorfiph 1 1 1 2 H eiseylf 1 0 0 0 Kotsaylf 3 0 1 0 Mesorcc 4 0 0 0 Vincentp 0 0 0 0 Cozartss 3 0 0 0 Grgrsnp 0 0 0 0 Leakep 3 0 1 0 Forsyth2b 3 0 0 0 H ooverp 0 0 0 0 Hundlyc 3 0 0 0 Hannhn ph 1 0 0 0 OSuIvn p 2 0 0 0 C hpmnp 0 0 0 0 Thtchrp 0 0 0 0 G uzmnlf 1 0 0 0 Totals 3 3 1 7 1 Totals 2 92 5 2 C incinnati 000 0 1 0 0 00 — 1 S an Diego 000 0 0 0 002 — 2 No outswhenwinning runscored. E—Cozart (11). DP—San Diego 1. LOB —Cincinnati 10, San Diego 6. 28 —Voto (22), Bruce

KDavisph 1 0 0 0 BParkrp 0 0 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 0 0 Borbon ph 1 0 0 0 YBtncrph-1b1 0 0 0 Totals 3 3 5 7 5 Totals 32 0 6 0 M ilwaukee 000 0 0 0 005 — 5 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 E—J.Francisco(I3), Bamey(4). DP — Milwaukee2,Chicago 2.LOB— Milwaukee6, Chicago9.

2B — Weeks(17), Gindl(6), Bianchi(5), DeJesus(17). CS — Lake(3). S—Gindl. Milwaukee IP H R ER BBSO Lohse 6 5 0 0 3 6 Mic.Gonzale z 1 1 0 0 0 1 KintzlerW,3-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 Wooten

1

0

0 0

Chicago (31) 3B —D.Robinson(3). HR —Denorfia (9). CSSamardzija 7 3 0 1-3 0 0 Ev.cabrera(10). Russell Cincinnati IP H R E R BB SO Guerrier 2 -3 0 0 1-3 3 5 Leake 7 4 0 0 2 5 Strop L,1-1 2 -3 1 0 HooverH,5 1 0 0 0 0 0 B.Parker —bySamardzija (Lucroy). ChapmanL,3-4 0 1 2 2 1 0 HBP San Diego T 3:05. A 32,848(41,019). O'Sullivan 6 5 1 2-3 2 0 Thatcher Vincent 1130 0 GregersonW5-5 1 0 0 Chapman pitched to2 batters inthe9th. T—2:37.A—24,050(42,524).

1 0 0 0

5 0 0 0

1 0 2 2

Braves 9, Rockies 8(10 innings) ATLANTA — Andrelton Simmons

drove in DanUgglafrom first base with a triple off Edgmer Escalona in the10th inning, and Atlanta won its fourth straight game with a victory over Colorado. After Uggla led off with a walk, Simmons

hit the ball too deepinto the gap in left-center field for Carlos Gonzalez and Dexter Fowler to keep it from reaching the wall.

1

0

0 2

7

0 0 5 0

0 0 1 0

0 0 1 2

Meis 6, Marlins 5 MIAMI — Ike Davis had agoahead RBI double in a three-run seventh inning, Daniel Murphy drove in three runs, and New

Yorksnapped afive-game skid against Miami. David Aardsma (2-0) pitched an inning in relief of Jeremy Hefner for the win. Bobby

Parnell retired Giancarlo Stanton with runners on first and third to end it for his 21st save in 25 opportunities. Jeff Mathis drove in

two runs for Miami.

Miami ab r hbi ab r hbi EYonglf 5 1 2 0 Hchvrrss 5 0 0 0 after being acquired in a trade with D nMrp2b 4 2 2 3 Yelichlf 4 0 0 0 DWrght3b 5 0 2 1 Stantonrf 3 1 1 0 the Los AngelesAngels earlier in Washington at Detroit,10 08am. 5 I I 1 M orrsnlb 4 0 0 0 TorontoatDakland,12:35 p.m. the day andarriving at Turner Field Byrdrf i n six days, and Tampa Bay won I .Davis1b 3 0 1 1 Lucas3b 3 2 1 1 ChicagoWhiteSoxatCleveland, 4:05p.m. not long before the first pitch. Lagarscf 4 0 0 0 DSolan2b 3 1 0 0 to retake first place in the AL HoustonatBaltimore, 4:05p.m. Reckerc 4 1 1 0 Mrsnckcf 3 1 2 0 Arizona at Tampa Bay, 4:10p.m. East. Price (6-5) was dominating Colorado Q untngss 3 I I 0 Mathisc 3 0 I 2 Atlanta Seattle atBoston,4:10 p.m. the makeupgamebefore it was H efnerp 2 0 0 0 JaTrnrp 3 0 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi L.A. AngelsatTexas,5:05 p.m. Ardsmp 0 0 0 0 MDunnp 0 0 0 0 F owler cf 5 2 I 0 Heywrd ct 5 I 2 I KansasCityat Minnesota, 5:10 p.m. delayed for 39 minutes because Satinph 1 0 0 0 ARamsp 0 0 0 0 LeMahi2b 4 1 2 0 J.uptonrf 4 1 1 0 N.Y.YankeesatL.A. Dodgers, 7:10pm. of a brief downpour that arrived E dginp 0 0 0 0 Webbp 0 0 0 0 CGnzlzlf 5 1 5 2 FFrmn1b 5 1 1 0 ABrwnph I 0 0 0 Dobbsph 1 0 1 0 as fans were singing "Sweet T lwtzkss 4 1 0 0 Gattisc 5 1 0 1 Cuddyrrf 4 I I 2 CJhnsn 3b 5 2 2 2 Hwknsp 0 0 0 0 Pierrepr 0 0 0 0 NATIONALLEAGUE Caroline" and hewas warming up Parnegp 0 0 0 0 H eltonlb 4 0 I I Uggla2b 4 2 I 2 East Division T ota s 37 6 10 6 Totals 3 2 5 6 3 WRosrc 5 1 3 1 Smmnsss 5 0 3 2 W L Pct GB for the bottom of the eighth. New York 0 03 000 300 — 6 A renad3b 4 1 2 1 Trdslvclf 3 1 2 1 Atlanta 61 45 .575 Miami 0 00 302 000 — 5 J DLRsp 2 0 0 0 Avilanp 0 0 0 0 Washington 52 54 .491 9 E Quintaniga (6). LOB NewYork7, Miami7. CDckrsph 1 0 0 0 Waldenp 0 0 0 0 Boston Philadelphia 49 56 .467 11'/z TampaBay 2B — EYoung(18), DWright(22), I.Davis(6), Stanton Corpasp 0 0 0 0 SDownsp 0 0 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi NewYork 47 56 ,456 f 2'/z (16). 38 —Lucas (I). SB—Dan.Murphy (12), HechaOutmnp 0 0 0 0 Beachyp 1 0 0 0 D Jnngscf 4 0 0 0 Egsurycf 4 0 I 0 Miami 40 64 .385 20 varria(8),Pierre(19). CS—Marisnick (1). WLopezp 0 0 0 0 Dcrpntp 0 0 0 0 Longori3b 5 1 2 0 Victomrf 4 0 0 0 Central Division New York IP H R E R BBSO B lckmnph 1 0 0 0 Ayalap 0 0 0 0 W L Pct GB Zobrist2b 4 0 1 0 Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0 5 134 5 3 5 4 Hefner Beislep 0 0 0 0 Constnzlf 1 0 0 0 WMyrsrf 3 0 1 1 D.Ortizdh 3 0 1 0 St. Louis 62 41 .602 AardsmaW,2-0 2 - 3 0 0 0 0 0 Culersn ph 1 0 0 0 Pittsburgh 62 42 596 '/z Scottdh 4 0 0 0 Iglesiaspr 0 0 0 0 Edgin H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 Escalnp 0 0 0 0 Y Escorss 3 I 2 0 Napolilb 4 0 0 0 Cincinnati 59 48 .551 5 H awkins H,11 1 1 0 0 0 0 Totals 4 0 8 1 5 7 Totals 3 8 9 12 9 Chicago 48 56 .462 14'/z Loney1b 4 0 0 0JGomslf 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 Colorado 113 2 0 0 001 0 — 8 Parnell S,21-25 1 JMolinc 2 0 1 0 Lvrnwyc 3 0 1 0 Milwaukee 44 61 .419 19 Miami Atlanta 006 020 000 1 — 9 S Rdrgzlf 2 0 1 1 Navapr 0 0 0 0 West Division Ja.Turner 6 135 3 3 3 4 No outswhenwinning runscored. W L Pct GB Joyceph-f 2 0 1 0 Sltlmchc 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 M.Dunn E—Arenado (7). DP—Atlanta 1. LOB—ColoF uldlf 0 0 0 0 Drewss 3 0 I 0 Los Angeles 56 48 .538 A.Ramos L,3-4 BS, 3 -3 12-3 21 1 0 1 rado 8, Atl a nta 7. 28 — F o wl e r (15), Arenado (17), BSnydr 3b 3 1 1 1 Arizona 54 51 .514 2'/z 1 I 0 0 0 0 C.Johnson(23), uggla (9), Simmons(13), Ter- Webb 3 11 5 1 Colorado 51 56 .477 6'/z T otals 3 3 2 9 2 Totals —Cuddyer (2), Srmmons(3). M.Dunnpitchedto 2baters in the7th. Bay 0 0 0 1 1 0 000 — 2 doslavich (3). 3B San Diego 49 58 .458 8'/z T ampa W.Rosario (15), Arenado(8). SB—C.Gonzalez HBP—byHefner (D.Solano).WP—A.Ramos. Boston 0 00 001 000 — 1 HR — SanFrancisco 46 58 .442 10 2 (21). CS — C .G on zalez(3). S—LeMahieu,Arenado, T 3:26. A 19,343(37,442). DP —Tampa Bay1,Boston 3.LOB— Tampa Bay 10, Boston4. 28—Longoria (24), S.Rodriguez(8), Beachy,DCarpenter. SF—Helton. Monday'sGames IP H R E R BB SO D.Ortiz(25),Lavarnwa y(5), Drew(15). HR —B.Snyder Colorado Pittsburgh9,St Louis2 J.DeLaRosa 5 10 8 5 2 3 Atlanta 9,Colorado8,10 innings (2) SB W Myers (5), Egsbury(39) Leaders Corpas 2 1 0 0 0 4 TampaBay IP H R ER BB SO N.Y.Mets6, Miami5 Outman 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 ThroughMonday's Games Price W,6-5 7 1-3 2 I I 0 8 Milwaukee 5, ChicagoCubs0 W.Lopez 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 AMERICANLEAGUE Jo.PeraltaH,27 2 - 3 2 0 0 0 0 San Diego 2, Cincinnati1 1 0 0 0 0 2 BATTING —Micabrera, Detroit,.360, DOrtiz,BosToday's Games RodneyS,26-31 1 1 0 0 1 1 Be isle E scal o na L,1-4 0 I I I I 0 t o n,.329; Trout, LosAngeles,.324; Mauer,Minnesota, Milwaukee (Gagardo8-9)at ChicagoCubs(Viganueva Boston Atlanta .324; Loney, TampaBay,.317; TorHunter, Detrort,.313; DoubrontL,7-5 5 8 2 2 3 4 2-7), 11:20 a.m.,1stgame Beachy 3238 7 7 1 5 ABeltre,Texas,.309. I I 0 0 2 3 St. Louis(Lynn12-5)at Pittsburgh (A.J.Bumett 4-7), DeLaTorre D.carpenter 21-3 1 0 0 0 3 RUNS —Micabrera, Detroit, 78; CDavis, BaltiD.Britton 2 0 0 0 0 2 1:05 p.m.,1stgame Ayala H,1 1 1 0 0 0 0 more,74;AJones,Baltimore, 73; Trout,LosAngeles, Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 1 SanFrancisco(Zito 4-7)at Philadelphia(Lannan2-4), Avilan H,17 I 2 0 0 0 0 70; Bauti sta,Toronto,68; Encarnacion,Toronto, 67; De La Torre pi t ched to1batter in the 7th 4.05 p.m. WaldenBS,1-1 2 - 3 2 1 1 2 1 DeJennings,TampaBay,67. —Rodney. Washington(Strasburg 5 8) at Detroit (Ani.Sanchez HBP—byDoubront(Y.Escobar). WP S.DownsW,1-0 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 RBI — Micabrera, Detroit, 99; CDavis,Baltimore, T—3:21(Rain delay:0:39). A—37,242 (37,499). 8-7),4:08p.m. Escalona pitchedto 2baters in the10th. 97; Encarnacion,Toronto, 84; Fielder, Detroit, 75; Arizona(Kennedy3-7) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez W P — B e ach y, D C arp enter A Jones, Bal timore,74; Ncruz, Texas, 71;Cano, New 5-11),4:10p.m. T—3:46.A—31,218 (49,586). York, 70. Colorado(Nicasio6-4) at Atlanta(A.Wood0-2), 410 Indians 3, White Sox 2 HITS—Micabrera,Detroit, 136, Machado,Balp.m. timore,135;Trout, LosAngeles, 133;ABeltre, Texas, N.Y. Mets(Z.Whee ler 4-1) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 129; AJones,Baltimore, 129; Ellsbury, Boston,125; CLEVELAND — Pinch-hitter Jason 4.10 p.m. Pirates 9, Cardinals 2 TorHunter,Detroit,122;Pedroia,Boston,122. St. Louis(Lyons2-3) at Pittsburgh(Undecided), 435 Giambi homeredover thecenter DOUBLES —Machado, Baltimore, 39; Mauer, p.m., 2nd game PITTSBURGH — Francisco Minnesota,31;CDavis, Baltimore,30; Trout, LosAnMilwaukee (Thornburg 1-0) at ChicagoCubs(Arrieta field wall leading off the ninth geles, 30; Napol Boston,28; JhPeralta, Detroit, 28; 0-0), 5.05 p.m., 2ndgame inning to give Cleveland its fifth Liriano allowedone runover seven Jcastro,Houston,i,27. Cincinnati (Latos10-3) at SanDiego(Volquez8-8), straight win. Giambi, batting for dominant innings, Pedro Alvarez hit TRIPLES —Trout, Los Angeles, 8; Egsbury, 7:10 p.m. Boston, 7, Drew,Boston, 6; Gardner,NewYork, 5; N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 7-8) at L.A.Dodgers(Greinke struggling Mark Reynolds, belted his NL-leading 27th home run and D eJenni n gs, TampaBay, 5; LMartin, Texas,5; Kawa8-3), 7.10p.m. a1-1 pitch from Chicago's Ramon Pittsburgh beat St. Louis. Liriano saki, Toronto,4; HKendrick, LosAngeles, 4; McLouth, Wednesday'sGames Baltimore, 4. Troncoso (1-3j high over thewall (11-4) struck out eight and walked Washington at Detroit,10:08 am. HOME RUNS —CDavis, Baltimore, 37; MicaCincinnati atSanDiego, 12:40a.m. and into the bushes in center. It just two to win his fifth straight b rera, Detroi t, 32; Encarnacion,Toronto,29;ADunn, San Francisco at Philadelphia, 4:05p.m. was the 436th career homer and start. The Pirates kicked off the key Chicago,25;Bautista,Toronto,24; Ncruz,Texas, 24; St. LouisatPittsburgh, 4:05p.m. Ibanez,Seatle, 24. Arizonaat Tampa Bay, 4:10p.m. ninth career walk-off shot for series at PNC Park by sending the STOLEN BASES—Egsbury, Boston,39; RDavis, Colorado at Atlanta,4:10 p.m. the slugger, who had a bucket of Cardinals to their fourth straight Toronto,31; Aituve,Houston,25;McLouth,Baltimore, N.Y.Metsat Miami,4.10p.m. 25; Andrus,Texas, 23;AIRamirez, Chicago,23;Trout, water dumpedover his headby loss to pull within a half-game of Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 5:05p.m. Los Angeles23. N.Y.YankeesatL.A Dodgers, 7:10pm. teammates after the game. the lead in the NL Central. PITCHING —Scherzer, Detroit, 15-1; MMoore, Tampa Bay,14-3, Colon,Oakland,14-3; Tilman,BalChicago Cleveland St. Louis Pittsburgh timore, 13-3;Masterson,Cleveland,12-7; FHernanAmerican League ab r hbi ab r hbi ab r hbi ab r hbi dez, Seattle,11-4;CWilson,LosAngeles,11-6. D eAzacf 4 0 0 0 Bourncf 2 1 0 0 M crpnt2b 4 0 1 1 Tabatarf 3 1 0 0 ERA —FHernandez, Seattle, 2.34; Kuroda, New Rangers 4, Angels 3 AIRmrzss 4 0 1 0 Swisher1b 3 0 0 0 Beltranrf 4 0 1 0 Watsonp 0 0 0 0 York, 2.51,Colon,Oakland, 2.54;AniSanchez,Detroit, R iosrf 4 I I 0 K ipnis2b 4 0 2 0 J aycf 0 0 0 0 Blackp 0 0 0 0 2.68; SaleChi , cago, 2.69; Darvish,Texas,280; Iwa ARLINGTON,Texas — Geovany A.Dunn1b 4 I 1 I Acarerss 4 1 0 1 Hollrdy f 4 I 2 0 Walker2b 2 2 1 0 kuma,Seatle, 2.87. Soto hit a game-ending homer, Konerkdh 4 0 1 1 Rabumlf-rf 4 0 1 0 Craiglb 4 0 0 0 Mcctchcf 5 2 2 I STRIKEOUTS —Darvish, Texas, 172; Scherzer, Gigaspi3b 4 0 0 0 CSantnc 3 0 0 1 YMolinc 3 0 0 0 PAlvrz3b 4 1 1 3 Detroit, 164, FHernandez,Seattle, 158, Masterson, the second long ball in the ninth Viciedo f 4 0 2 0 MrRynldh 1 0 0 0 RJhnsnc 1 0 1 0 RMartnc 2 1 0 0 Cleveland,153;Sale,Chicago,149; Verlander,Detroit, inning for Texas off Los Angeles B ckhm2b 3 0 0 0 Giambiph I 1 I I Freese3b 2 0 0 0 GJones1b 3 0 1 0 132; DHolland, Texas, 129;Iwakuma,Seatle,129. Pheglyc 3 0 0 0 Aviles3b 2 0 0 0 SRonsncf-rf 3 0 1 1 GSnchz1b 0 0 0 1 SAVES —JiJohnson, Baltimore, 35; MRivera, closer Ernesto Frieri, and the Stubbs rf 2 0 0 0 Kozmass 3 0 0 0 Presleylt-rt 4 1 I I NewYork ,33,Nathan,Texas,32;Balfour,Oakland, Rangers snapped afour-game Brantlyph-If 1 0 0 0 Salasp 0 0 0 0 Barmesss 4 1 2 2 28; GHogand,Kansas City, 27;AReed, Chicago, 26; T otas 3 4 2 6 2 Totas 2 73 4 3 MAdmsph 1 0 0 0 Lirianop 3 0 0 0 losing streak. A.J. Pierzynski led Rodney,TampaBay,26 Chicago 0 00 002 000 — 2 Westrkp 1 0 0 0 SMarteph-If 1 0 1 1 off the Texas ninth with a homer C leveland 010 00 1 0 0 1 — 3 T cruzph 1 I I 0 NATIONALLEAGUE to right. Nelson Cruz followed No outswhenwinning runscored. Rzpczy p 0 0 0 0 BATTING —CJohnson, Atlanta, .339; YMolina, E—Gigaspie(7),Aviles(6), Allen(2). DP—CleveDescalss s 2000 St. Louis, .331;Cuddyer,Colorado, .329;Craig, St. with a single off Frieri (0-3) before land1 LOB —Chicago6, Cleveland7.2B—Rios(22) Totals 3 3 2 7 2 Totals 3 19 9 9 Louis, .322;Votto, Cincinnati, .321;Mcarpenter,St. David Murphy grounded into a A.Dunn(10), Viciedo(15), Raburn (13). 38—Viciedo St. Louis 0 00 001 001 — 2 Louis, .317;Segura,Milwaukee,.313, Scutaro,San P ittsburgh 400 0 0 0 5 0x — 9 (3). HR —Giambi (7). SB—AI.Ramirez 2 (23). SFrancisco,.313. double play. Soto then pulled a Aviles. SF —C.Santana. DP — St. Louis1, Pittsburgh1. LOB —St. Louis 7, RUNS —Mcarpenter, St. Louis, 79; CGonzalez, full-count pitch into the left-field Chicago IP H R E R BB SO Pittsburgh7.2B—G.Jones(22), Barmes2(11). 3BColorado,72;Votto,Cincrnnati, 72;Choo,Cincinnati, 6 2 2 1 4 3 Tcruz (1).HR—PAlvarez(27). SF—G.Sanchez. seats.Jason Frasor(1-2j pitched Joh.Danks 71; Goldschmidt,Arizona,66; Hogiday St. Louis, 65; 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis IP H R E R BBSO SMarte,Pittsburgh,65. a scoreless ninth for the Rangers, Lindstrom Veal 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 WestbrookL,7-5 5 4 4 4 3 2 RBI — Goldschmidt, Arizona,85;Philips, Cincinthree days after hegave upa TroncosoL,1-3 1 1 1 1 0 0 Rzepczynski 11-3 2 2 2 1 0 nati, 81; Craig,St. Louis, 79;Bruce,Cincinnati, 73; Cleveland Salas 1 2-3 3 3 3 1 2 DBrown, Phi ladelphia,69;CGonzalez, Colorado, 69; game-ending homer in an 11McAilister 7 5 2 2 1 2 Pittsburgh PAlvarez, Pittsburgh,68. inning loss at Cleveland. Allen 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 LirianoW,11-4 7 4 1 1 2 8 HITS — Segura, Milwaukee,129; Votto,Cincinnati, R.Hig 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Watson 1 0 0 0 0 1 127; Mcarpenter, St Louis,126;Craig,St.Louis,124; C.PerezW,3-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 Black 1 3 1 I 0 1 Los Angeles Texas DanMurphy, NewYork,121; DWright, NewYork,120; Joh.Dankspitchedto1 batter inthe7th. HBP —by Westbrook (Walker, Walker,R.Martin), by YMolina St.Louis,119. ab r hbi ab r hbi Black(Freese). Aybarss 4 1 0 0 LMartncf 4 1 1 0 Veal pitched to1batter in the 8th. DOUBLES —Mcarpenter, St. Louis, 32; Bruce, T—2:51.A—32,084(38,362). Calhon rf 5 0 1 0 Andrus ss 4 1 1 0 Troncosopitchedto1batter in the9th. Cincinnati, 31; YMo ina, St. Louis, 30;Rizzo,ChiVeal. Troutcf 2 I 2 0 Kinsler2b 3 0 I 2 WP — cago, 30; Posey,San Francisco, 28; Desmond, T—2:42. A—14,868(42,241). Hamltnlf 4 0 2 2 ABeltre3b 4 0 2 0 Washington,27; Mccutchen,Pittsburgh, 27, GParra, Trumo1b 4 0 0 0 Przynsdh 4 1 1 1 Arizona,27. Brewers 5, Cubs0 HKndrc 2b 4 0 1 0 N.cruz rf 3 0 1 0 TRIPLES —CGomez,Mi waukee,9; SMarte, PittsC agasp3b 3 0 0 0 DvMrplf 4 0 0 0 burgh, 8;Segura,Milwaukee,8;Span,Washington, National League C ongerc 4 0 0 0 G.Sotoc 4 1 2 1 CHICAGO — Carlos Gomezbroke 7; CGonzalez,Colorado, 6; DWright,NewYork, 6; Shuckdh 4 1 1 1 Morlnd1b 3 0 0 0 Hechavarria,Miami, 5. a scoreless tie in the ninth inning T otals 3 4 3 7 3 Totals 3 34 9 4 HOME RUNS PA —lvarez, Pittsburgh, 27; Padres 2, Reds1 with an RBI single and Jeff Bianchi CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; DBrown, Philadelphia, L os Angeles 0 0 0 0 3 0 000 — 3 Texas 0 00 001 012 — 4 24; Gol d schmi d t, Ari z ona, 23; Bruce,Cincinnati, 22; added a two-run double to lift Twooutswhenwinningrunscored. Uggla, Atlanta,21,Beltran, St. Louis, 19;Tulowitzki, SAN DIEGO — Chris Denorfia hit Milwaukee over Chicago. The E—Conger (6). DP—l.os Angeles 1. LOB —Los a two-run, pinch-hit homer off Colorado,19. Angeles8, Texas5.2B—Trout (30), G.Soto(5). HRSTOLENBASES—Ecabrera, SanDrego,36; SeBrewers, sitting in last place in Shuck(1), Pierzynski(11), G.Soto(5). SB—Andrus Aroldis Chapman in the bottom gura, Milwaukee,31;SMarte, Pittsburgh, 30;CGomez, the NL Central, won for the third Milwaukee,26; Revere, Philadelphia,22;CGonzalez, (23). SF —Kinsler. of the ninth inning to give San Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO time in eight gamesand ended Colorado,21; Mccutchen,Pittsburgh, 21; EYo ung, Diego a victory over Cincinnati. Weaver 7 5 I 1 I 6 NewYork,21 the Cubs' winning streak at three D.DeLaRosaH,IO 1 I 1 0 0 0 Chapman (3-4j walked leadoff PITCHING —Wainwright, St.Louis, 13-6;Corbin, games. Frieri L,0-3BS,3-28 2-3 3 2 2 0 0 Arizona,12-2, Lynn, St. Louis, 12-5; Zimmerm ann, batter Yonder Alonso on a 3-2 Texas Washington,12-6; Liriano,Pittsburgh, 11-4; 8 tied Garza 7 5 3 3 3 6 Milwaukee Chicago at10 pitch, then Denorfia drove a 98 Cotts 1 2 0 0 1 2 ab r hbi ab r hbi ERA—Kershaw,LosAngeles, 1.96; Harvey,New FrasorW,1-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 mph first-pitch offering from Weeks2b 4 0 1 2 DeJesscf 4 0 1 0 York, 2.11;Locke,Pittsburgh, 2.15, Corbin,Arizona, WP Garza Chapman over the center-field Aoki rf 5 0 0 0 l.akelf 4020 2.24; Wainwright,St. Louis, 2.51;Leake,Cincinnati, T—3;04.A—36,282 (48,114). Segura ss 3 I 0 0 Rizzo lb 3 0 2 0 2.59; Fernandez, Miami, 2.71. fence 423 feet away to deal the Lucroy c 3 I 1 0 Schrhltrf 4 0 0 0 STRIKEOUTS —Harvey, New York, 164; KerReds their fourth straight loss. CGomzcf 4 1 1 1 Stcastrss 4 0 0 0 shaw,Los Angeles,156; Samardzija, Chicago,146; Gindl lf 3 1 2 0 Valuen3b 4 0 1 0 Wainwright,St. Louis,145; HBailey,Cincinnati,138; Athletics 9, Blue Jays4 Cincinnati San Diego Lince cum,SanFrancisco,137;GGonzalez,WashingJFrncs1b 3 0 0 0 Barney2b 2 0 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi Wooten p 0 0 0 0 Castigoc 3 0 0 0 ton, 136;Latos,Cincrnnati, 136. DRonsncf 5 1 2 0 Evcarrss 4 0 2 0 Bianchi 3b 4 1 1 2 Smrdzj p 3 0 0 0 SAVES —Kimbrel, Atlanta, 31; Grigi, Pittsburgh, OAKLAND, Calif.— Yoenis 2b 5 0 0 1 Amarstcf 4 0 0 0 p 0000 Lohse p 2 0 1 0 Russeg 30, Mujica,St. Louis,30,RSoriano, Washington, 26; Cespedes homeredandhitatwo- Clzturs 4 0 2 0 Headly3b 4 0 0 0 McGnzl p 0 Votto1b 0 0 0 Guerrirp 0 0 0 0 Chapman, Cincinnati, 24;Romo,SanFrancisco, 24; Brucerf run triple, Josh Reddick added 3 0 2 0 Alonso1b 2 1 1 0 LSchfr ph 0 0 0 0 Stropp 000 0 Gregg,Chicago,22;Cishek,Miami,22.

BOSTON — David Price allowed just two hits over 7~/s innings to beat Boston for the second time

Scott Downs (1-Oj earnedthewin

New York


C4

TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

GOLF

Wiebe wIns

Senior British

Open

Classics Continued from C1 The Oregon High Desert Classics is the largest horse show in the Northwest, and Johnson said she believes it is also the most prestigious. Relatively few horse shows are staged on grass surfaces, she observed,and the High Desert Classics at Bend's J Bar J Boys Ranch is one of them. "This is the best footing," Johnson said. "A number of people have asked for the show to go three weeks, but that won't happen because the grass wouldn't hold up that long." The High Desert Classics show is widely popular, drawing competitors from locations throughout the West. This year, riders came to Central Oregon from eight Western states as well as from the Canadian provinces of British Columbia and Alberta. Johnson said that nonlocals typically make up more than 85 percent of the Classics competitors. With relatively sparse population bases, she noted, Central and Eastern Oregon are home to fewer barns — and fewer riders — than many other places

of the West. "I think people like the horse show because they can see new faces," Johnson said. "Most competitors are used to seeing the same people at their local horse shows. So when they come here, there are riders from the western United States and Canada." This year, Johnson added a few new events to the prize list, including TAKE2 Thoroughbred classes (competition classes restricted to Thoroughbred horses) and a second $10,000 United States Hunter Jumper Association International Hunter Derby. She saidplans are in the works toadd more classes for next year, but she noted that most of her efforts in the months ahead will be directed toward the

show grounds. "I don't want to go into our plans before they happen," Johnson said, "but we do have some plans for next year, mostly for improving the facility." Upgrades at the J Bar J Boys Ranch in northeast Bend are not only crucial in sustaining the increased number of horses, but also in accommodating the high number of spectators at the Classics. Johnson said she was particularly impressed with the num-

ber of equine enthusiasts who turned out at both of this year's $25,000 Grand Prix events. "It's always great to see the patrons' tent sold out both weeks (of the Grand Prix events)," Johnson said, "and at least 10 people deep all around the

ring."

The High Desert Classics show is the largest annual fundraiser for J Bar J Youth Services, and according to Ryan, this year's show is expected to bring in a minimum of $200,000. Ryan noted that a large portion of that money will go toward J Bar J's Living Options for Teens program. While J Bar J Youth Services and Johnson are always looking for ways to improve and add to the Oregon High Desert Classics, Johnson said she does not plan to increase the number of stalls from 800 next year. "All I can say is, 'If it ain't broke, don't fix it,' Johnson said. "This show is really special, and I think that if we made it any bigger, the show may lose what makes it special." "

— Reporter: 541-383-0375, eoller@bendbulletin.com.

The Associated Press SOUTHPORT, EnglandBernhard Langer gave Mark Wiebe one toomany chances at the Senior British Open. Wiebe took advantage of Langer's failure to close out the tournament, beating the German on the fifth playoff hole Monday at Royal Birkdale for his first senior major title. The American used a superb approach shot from the rough to set up a two-putt for par, while Langer failed to get

Continued from C1 A program grew. Winning the Gold Cup has no bearing on the U.S. squad's chase for a 2014 World Cup berth, as the two are separate pursuits using different personneL But by capturing the formerand doing it with style and personality — the latter's already bright outlook

up and down, seeing his par

grew luminous.

putt stay out. "I'm speechless," Wiebe said. "I think it's always better for both players had there been a birdie to win the playoff instead of a bogey, but right now, I don't really care. I'm glad it's over, and I'm honored." Langer led by two shots going into the final hole of regulation Sunday, only to settle for

"We all know there are different benchmarks out there," Klinsmann said. "There are a lot of other benchmarks waiting for us, but it's time that you see progressfrom thisgroup of

a double bogey when he struggled to get out of a bunker. The playoff was then halted after two holes because of darkness and resumed Monday, with Langer immediately missing another chance to win when his 12-foot putt wouldn't drop. "I just was luckier today and last night than Bernie I guess," Wiebe said. "I also feel like Bernie has won, what, a couple hundredtournaments. He's won so many, I feel like this was my turn." Langer, who won the tournament in 2010, was up by three shots entering the fourth round. He looked certain to earn a second SeniorBritish Open title when he teed off at the 72nd hole. But his approach shot landed in a greenside bunker, and he needed two strokes just to get out of the sand. Wiebe, meanwhile, shot a 4-under 66 to match the German at 9-under 271.

Schoning Continued from C1 In her next event she finished in sixth, just two shots behind the winner. "I had three really, really solid tournaments in a row," said Schoning, who is still searching for backing to continue her career. "And I know that (my game) is there right now." Lessons have already been learned. In her second pro tournament, a t S i l v erstone G olf Course in Las Vegas, Schoning needed par on her final hole to make her way into a playoff and card a 6-under-par 66, which would have been a career best. After a solid drive and second shot on the par 5, Schoni ng came up short w it h a wedge. The shot fell helplessly into the water hazard guard-

ing the green, leading to double bogey and into sixth place, two shots out of a t wo-way playoff. The d i fference between the winner's check and Schoning's was $2,200. Schoning said "nerves p layed a r ole," and she i s still adjusting to playing for

money. "When you ar e standing over (the ball) and you're like, 'This is t h ree grand, right here,' it's a little more nerveracking," Schoning said. "But it is a learning experience." L earning ho w t o mi n i mize mistakes is crucial for

a young professional if she is to survive the gauntlet en route to the LPGA Tour, said Schoning, who shot a 1-underpar 71 Monday to move into fourth place in a Cactus Tour event at Legacy Golf Resort in Phoenix. For Schoning, that gauntlet really begins now. And she is confident that she is ready. "I'm r eally h a ppy w i t h where I am at and excited," Schoning said. "Very excited." — Reporter:541-617-7868, zhall@bendbulletin.com.

U.S.

players." The Gold Cup capped a triumphant two months for Klinsmann, the former German striker and coach whose ideas had been slow to take hold since his appointment two years ago, yielding sluggish results. And if the Americans show well at the World Cup next summer in Brazil, regardless of how

deep they advance, fans and players will surely point back to this pivotal period. Since a 4-2 loss to Belgium on May 29 in Cleveland, a friendly not nearly as close as the score suggested, the Americans have won 11 consecutive matches to obliterate the previous program record (seven in 2007). A

Trouble

veteran gang bolstered the World Cup campaign by winning three qualifiers in early June, and a secondary squad sailed through the Gold Cup unblemished to win the tournament for the fifth time in 12 tries since 1991. Mexico, sputtering in the World Cup race, was nowhere to be found, fortunate to reach the semifinals before bowing out against Panama - its worst Gold Cupperformance since2005. The U.S. winning streak requires context: Ten of the 11 games were played on home soil. Aside from a friendly against a watered-down German side at RFK Stadium, every opponent was from CONCACAF, the middling jurisdiction blanketing North and Central America and the Caribbean. Not exactly Spain and Brazil. Wipeouts against Guatemala, Belize, Cuba and El Salvador — ranked between No. 82 and No. 130 in the world — were compulsory exercises and contributed to a 35-8 goal difference during the 11-game run. The Americans' manner of success, however, was the greatest takeaway. Only a few games required unsightly, grinding efforts. The Americans became fun — not a word usually associated with U.S. men's soccer. They played with uninhibited joy, a tone set by the expressive, upbeat Klinsmann. (His emotions

cost him in the semifinal, resulting in a late ejection and suspension for the title match against Panama.) No one had more fun than Donovan, the U.S. career scoring leader who made an exultant return after a year'sabsence from the national team. Following a soul-searching sabbatical early this year, Donovan was not included in the World Cup qualifiers and had to re-demonstrate his dedication and international skill set. He was magnificent as both scorer and provider in Gold Cup play, recording five goals and seven assists. He was focused on the task and unforgiving on defenders. Any doubts about his inclusion in the next set of World Cup qualifiers — Sept. 6 at Costa Rica and Sept. 10 against Mexico in Columbus, Ohio — were set to rest. "I've enjoyed it tremendously," Donovan, 31, said after a 1-0 victory over Panama in the final. "As I get older, the things that matter to me are winning, and when you look around and see kids holding the trophy and experiencing something for the first time, it makes me really happy." Donovan is not the only Gold Cup player to make a strong case for inclusion on future World Cup qualifying rosters. Forward Eddie Johnson was summoned for the knockout stage and continued hisresurgence. Strik-

er Chris Wondolowski (five goals early in the tournament) proved he could score outside MLS. Midfielders Joe Corona, Alejandro Bedoya and Mikkel Diskerud bolstered their chances. Back in the fold for the first time in 2/2 years, veteran midfielder Stuart Holden was enjoying a fine tournament until a knee injury early in the final threatened to derail his career for the fourth time since 2010. A dditional help may b e o n t h e way. John Anthony Brooks, a German-American defender with Hertha Berlin, and Aron Johannsson, an Icelandic-American striker with Dutch club AZ Alkmaar, said they want to play for the U.S. squad. Both might receive invitations to an Aug. 14 friendly against Bosnia in Sarajevo. With the A team and B team in good form, and new options in the mix, Klinsmann has an enviable problem: difficult roster decisions. It's not just about Clint Dempsey, Michael Bradley and Jozy Altidore anymore. "This Gold Cup showed us that we have a lot of players being ready for the next level," he said. "We have developed over the last two months a bigger pool of players that understand what international football is about, and they're ready and are all hungry for the next opportunity."

free minor-league system for Meyer was there. You can point to outliers, the NFL, contaminated and Continued from C1 corrupt, all manner of soul- but it is much harder to find selling going on in the name big winners without criminal He doesn't believe he would be as good withof getting good football play- complications than with them. out this anger and violent ers, shamateurism supporting Heck, in 122 years of football, streak, and he doesn't beitself by filing it under "free Vanderbilt has been to only lieve that someone who four bowl games but two of education" when it i s really just "free football." Many of lacks these things has a them have been the past two chance of stopping him. the playersare in school mere- seasons ... as their coach now The crime involving his ly to play football, and many uses a helicopter to find remother, it should be noted, of them wouldn't be allowed cruits i n t h e S o utheastern in school if not for football, so Conference ... and last month has never been solved. That Dockett has been the coach who takes too many had to kick four players off the an upstanding member of moral stands on character or team for alleged sex crimes. the NFL despite his past academicissues isthe one who Goodell will continue to be and his path is a tremenloses his recruits and his job to punitive, and Meyer will condous tribute to him. But the one who doesn't. tinue to be furious, and that ls there an answer? that's not always how it violence will continue to spill Facts are facts M urder, specifically, is a goes, as we've seen more right over those sidelines on often in football than we deviant crime, and there is Think t hi s i s h y perbole? occasion and into real life. The rest of us can keep redo in other sports. And as nothing to suggest the Patri- ing and drugging that produc- Consider this: The last time ots could have seen it coming es bad decisions that also get Colorado was championship questing that the gladiators former New England tight end Aaron Hernandez is in Hernandez's case, despite you handcuffed. good at football, Sports Illus- please, please be more civil. his alleged gang ties. This isn't charged with m u rder You say boxing and hockey trated reported that one-third But how surprised can we about trying to bring sense to and MMA are violent and also of the roster had been arand as NFL arrests go up be anymore when they aren't? in spite of the most puni- the senseless by turning one hurt, but without this many rested. Ohio State went more tive commissioner in the meathead's alleged c r imes of these kinds of problems'? than four decades without a history of American sports into a symbol or trend for the T hat's true. But t h ere a r e national championship ... un... and as Ohio State coach whole. It is merely trying to un- many more football players til Maurice Clarett. Nebraska Urban Meyer again finds derstand how powerful lead- to get in trouble, given the size went without a national chamhimself more helpless than ers such as Goodell and Urban of the pro and college rosters, pionship for almost a quarter his proclaimed "furious" Meyer can't seem to control which skews public percep- of a century ... until Lawrence Phillips. You can find links about his players getting the misbehavior despite retion. Skewing it more is the between arrests and comproin trouble yet again ... is it peated efforts, making this extra scrutiny invited when fair to wonder how footlook like an ingrained stain on Goodell is so loud about clean- mised standards and winning ball itself contributes to its this sport that won't ever come ing up his league without ac- all over college football, from own perceived behavior out, no matter how much the tually doing so, every arrest a those notorious University of problem? powerful try to scrub it away. noisier failure than it is in the Miami champions to the UniArrests are up 61 percent other sports. A hockey player versity of Florida ones who It seems like the violent game's culture and pipeline since Goodell took office, ac- can be arrested without it be- had 31 arrests in the brief time P — combined with a trafcording t o T h ebiglead.com. ing an indictment of the entire ficking on broken, desper- How does one explain that? league's conduct code. Goodell a te backgrounds for t h e The most vigilant commis- points to the statistic that his A • • • A • • mining of talent — conspire sioner ever — a man who has employees get arrestedoneto make this an unsolvable thrown around unprecedented third less than men that age issue fo r c o m m issioner consequences and deterrents in society, but that is at least a Roger Goodell, no matter — failing big with his loudest little misleading. Poverty and how loudly he tries and no crusade? Theanswer to allof desperation are at the roots of I' 1 matter how much he'd like this is ... there is no answer to most crime for men that age. What's the NFL player's exto pretend he can exert all of this. FREE MEAL TICKET And the very c u lture of cuse? The NFL player not only control over this. The gladiBring this coupon in for a free ators who choose this par- football is one of many issues has fewer reasons to commit meal at Stone Lodge. Please call ticular career path are of- here. Football is populated by crimes butmore tolose for doten shaped by broken back- bad, bad men. And that is usu- ing so. ahead to reserve your seat! I I grounds that help them ar- ally viewed as good — physiAnd then there's the entire I Expires 7/31/201 3. I I I rive at football ... with some L J sharpened and rewarded A Free Public Service character traits that might ~> < Orepan Newspeper Additional Events: QIQ~+ vumishera aseociation not serve them as much July 18 ( 3:30 pm - Adventure Travel Club Alaska I away from the game. It is not a coincidence that the July19 ) 3:30 pm — Learn to use Microsoft Outlook majority of football arrests July 25 ) 4:00 pm — Bend the Beautiful: Bend occur during the offseason, when players have too Historical Society acceptable behavior but also feeding and needing them. B efore heading t o o f a r down this path, some things need to be noted in the name of fairness. Many, many more football players behave than don't. In fact, football players get arrested about one-third as oftenas men ages 22 to 34 everywhere else in America, so we're concentrating here on the statistical outliers at least in part because Goodell himself has taken such a public stance in trying to eradicate the statistical outliers without success.

cal, intimidating, powerful. You have to be different and kind of crazy to choose this as a lifestyle, feeding your family by being more of a man than the next guy. The ego and attitude that breeds is helpful in this line of work, but dangerous in most other social settings, especially in the hands of the reckless — and reckless is what you have to be to choose thiscareer path, given what we're now reading about head injuries and given that just Saturday, the Cleveland Browns' Ryan Miller left the field by ambulance with a concussion. This kind of work, it hurts, which can lead to the kind of self-medicating, drink-

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much free energy and free time away from the more disciplined violence Dockett prefers. This is not to suggest all angry, violent men would

be good football players; it is to suggest you'll find a lot of angry, violent ones in some of your best huddles. And football does a hell of a job of not only finding men who live on the edge of

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

S&P 500

N ASDAQ ~ 1 4 0 3

+

Toda+

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Another uptick? Economists expect that a key measure of U.S. home prices increased in May from the previous month. More buyers and a limited supply of available homes have lifted prices

in most cities across the country, a sign of a broad-based housing recovery. The Standard & Poor's/Case-Shiller index showed U.S. home prices jumped 12.1 percent in April from a year earlier, the mostsince March 2006. The May reading is due out today.

I I

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156

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150 I

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Close: 15,521.97

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15,400

1,700

16,000

1,650

15,500

1,600

15,000

1,550

14,500

1,500

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StocksRecap NYSE NASD

Vol. (In mil.) 2,721 1,511 Pvs. Volume 2,709 1,728 Advanced 9 17 7 9 3 Declined 2146 1699 New Highs 93 10 3 New Lows 42 18

+ +.08

$19.85

S&P 500 1 0 DA Y S

1,450

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Change: -6.32 (-0.4%) 1,640 '

Case-Shiiier home price index Not seasonally adjusted

10 YR T NOTE ~ 2.60%

6 3P

1,685.33

3,599.14

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DDW DDW Trans. DDW Util. NYSE Comp. NASDAQ S&P 500 S&P 400 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

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HIGH LOW 15557.14 15482.27

6464.63 507.98 9601.53 3618.86 1690.92 1230.58 17942.75 1048.78

CLOSE 15521.97 6396.30 6401.65 503.22 505.78 9554.91 9571.79 3592.80 3599.14 1681.86 1685.33 1219.97 1223.06 17834.03 17871.47 1038.93 1040.66

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Spotlight on Aetna Will Aetna's latest earnings match the strong performance of other big health insurers? That's what Wall Street will be watching for today, when the No. 3 health insurer based on enrollment reports second-quarter results. Two rivals, UnitedHealth Group and WellPoint, have already reported second-quarter earnings that trounced expectations.

$70

AET

$63.40

60 50

$35.30

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'13

131

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2Q '14 2 Q '13 Price-earnings ratio:

13

based on past 12 months' results

Dividend: $0.60 Div. Yield: 1.3% Source: Facteet

Expansion plans update? Amgen, the world's biggest biotech

company by revenue, reports second-quarter results today. The company is expected to review sales of key drugs and lots of recent research results, both for experimental drugs and ones already on the market. Investors will be listening for an update on the company's plans to expand operations in Japan, China and other key markets.

ALK 32.69 AVA 22.78 B AC 7 . 10 BBSI 23.64 BA 6 9 .03 CascadeBancorp CACB 4.50 Columbia Bukg CDLB 16.18 Columbia Sporlswear COLM 47.72 CostcoWholesale COST 93.51 Craft Brew Alliance BREW 5.62 FLIR Systems FLIR 18.58 Hewlett Packard HPQ 11.35 Home Federal BucpID HOME 9.66 Intel Corp INTC 19.23 Keycorp KEY 7. 81 — Kroger Co KR 2157 — Lattice Semi LSCC 3.45 LA Pacific L PX 9 . 87 MDU Resources MDU 19.59 — Mentor Graphics MENT 13.21 Microsoft Corp MSFT 26.26 ~ Nike Iuc 9 NKE 4 4.83 ~ NordstromIuc JWN 50.94 ~ Nwst NatGas NWN 41.01 ~ OfficeMax Iuc DMX 3.76 ~ PaccarIuc PCAR 37 67 ~

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PLNR 1.12

PCL 39.77 ~ PCP 150.53 ~ S WY 14.90 $$SCHN 2307 ~ S HW 132.29 ~ SFG 28.74 — 0 SBUX 43,04 — 0 TQNT 4.30 — 0 UMPQ 11.17 USB 30.96 WAFD 15.34 W FC 31.25 ~ W Y 2 2.85 ~

68.00 59 .55 303 -48 w L 29.26 28 .81 0 1 . . L 15.03 14 .52 21 -1.4 w L 70.33 67 .93 79 -1.1 w L 109.49 104.81 79 -0.7 w L 7.18 6 .1 6 09 -1.4 V L 25.55 24 .41 34 -1.4 w L 66.69 65 .29 + 58 +0 9 L L 119.39 117.14 +.57 + 0.5 L L 10.00 8 .7 5 -.22 -25 w L 32.79 31 .89 55 -1.7 w L 26.71 25 .67 32 -12 V L 14.81 14 .45 +08 +06 L L 26.90 23 .24 02 - 0.1 V V 12.50 12 .17 -.23 -1.9 w L 39.68 39 .85 +.20 +0.5 L L 5.71 5 .0 0 -.03 -06 w w 22.55 16 .24 17 -1.0 V L 28.65 28 .00 17 -0.6 w L 20.78 19 .86 01 -0.1 V L 3 6.43 3 1.5 4 -.08 -0.3 w w 66.07 62.7 1 +.1 8 +0 .3 L L 6 3.34 61.6 3 +.1 1 +0 .2 L L 50.80 4 4. 1 6 -.17 -0.4 W L 13.17 11.31 52 -4.4 w L 60 00 56.05 05 -0.1 V L 2.36 1.90 +.02 +1.1 54.62 48.69 -.42 -0.9 V L 2 70.0 0 224.45 -.55 -0.2 w w 28 . 4 2 26.05 +.07 +0.3 3 303 25.91 +.23 +0.9 L L 194. 5 6 174.31 +1.48 +0.9 L V 53.20 52 .63 -.41 -0.8 w L 73.52 72 .45 -.91 - 1.2 V L 8.10 8 .0 2 +.05 +0.6 L L 17.23 16 .56 -.08 -0.5 W L 37.74 37 .49 05 -0.1 w L 22.76 21 .81 32 -1.4 W L 44.79 4 3.2 5 -.26 -0.6 w L 33.24 2 7.9 9 -.81 -2.8 w v

L +38 2 +80 8 1131 14 0 80 L +19.5 +9.6 141 21 1 .22 L + 25. 1 + 1 06.086467 26 0. 0 4 L + 78. 3 + 1 94.6 55 33 0 . 52 L +39.1 +43 . 4 3960 19 1 .94 V - 1.6 +25.3 2 41 L +36. 1 +4 1 . 0 350 20 0 .40 L + 22 4 +25 2 129 21 0 .88 L + 18.6 +30 . 0 1185 25 1 . 24 L +35 0 +5 0 27 L +42.9 $. 5 7.7 2106 20 0 .36 L +80 1 +47 3 9036 dd 0 .58 L +16 3 +47 3 29 cc 0.24a V + 12.7 -5.3 84879 13 0 .90 L +44.5 $. 5 6.4 8 113 14 0 . 22f L +53.2 +86 . 8 2 4 71 1 4 0. 6 0

w +253

+37 8

66 0 dd

- 15.9 +54.5 1751 23 L +31. 8 +3 0 .2 3 5 1 c c 0. 6 9 L +16.7 +2 9 .9 4 1 0 2 1 0. 1 8 w +18. 1 +1 1 .528042 12 0 . 92 V + 21.5 +31 .2 2 5 04 2 3 0. 8 4 L +15.2 +17 .5 79 9 1 7 1. 2 0 L -0.1 -4.4 75 2 1 1.8 2 L +31. 2 + 2 12.6 9 4 1 2 0.0 8 a L + 24. 0 +4 9 .3 9 0 2 2 0 0 . 80a +32.9 +23.7 11 dd L $-9.7 $2 7.2 51 7 3 4 1. 7 6f L

w +1 8 5 + 4 3 4 8 3 0 2 2 0 12 +44.0 +77.0 3539 12 0.80f L -14.6 V + 13. 3 L +43.5 L +35. 1 L + 66.0 L + 40. 5 L + 17. 4 L +29. 3 L +26.5

+ 1 .7 2 87 9 3 0.7 5 +3 1 .1 68 6 2 5 2. 0 0 +79 .7 18 0 1 2 0. 9 3f + 41 .5 6 1 57 3 5 0. 8 4 +50 .7 2 4 56 d d +3 6 .3 4 5 6 1 8 0. 6 0f +14 .2 5 9 23 1 3 0 . 92f +4 1 .9 3 8 5 1 6 0. 3 6 +31 .8 12279 12 1 . 2 0

w

+28 .7 7 848 26 0 .80f

+0.6

Dividend Footnotes: 3-Extra dividends were paid, ttot are eot included. tt - Annual rate plus stock c - Liquidating dividend. 6 - Amount declared or paid in last12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was mcreased bymost recent dividend announcement. i - Sum ot dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. I - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dIvIdetxt was omitted or deferred k - Declared or paIdthI3year, 3 cumulative issue with dividends m arrears. m - Current annual rate, which w33 decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Imtial dividend, annual rate not known, yIeld not shown. 7 - Declared or paid in precedmg t2 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approxImate cash value on ex-distrittution date.pE Footnotes:q - stock is 3 closed-eed fund - eo p/E ratio shown. cc - p/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last t2 months

Caterpillar to buyback $1B shamsl;.;l;",l Caterpillar is set to buy back $1 billion of its shares from French bank Societe Generale at market prices. The planned buyback includes 11 million shares right away. Based onMonday's stock price of around $83 pershare,those shares would be worth $913 million. Caterpillar's board authorized a $7.5 billion buyback in 2007. It had bought back $4.8 billion worth of

Caterpillar(CAT) Monday's close:$83.02 Total return YTD: -6%

$4F

0

its stock as of the end of June. Last week, Caterpillar reported that its secondquarter net income slid 43 percent as a slump in the global mining g industry hurt equipment sales. / t Ca t erpillar stock is down 6 percent this year. Along with Alcoa, which is down 7 percent, the two are the only stocksamong the 30 that make up the Dow Jones industrial average that are in the red this year.

52-WEEK RANGE

$79 ~ 1- Y R : -1%

~

~

3-Y R*: 8%

~

100

FundFocus

Ann. dividend: $2.40 Div. yield: 2.9%

5-YR*: 6%

total returns through July 29

AP

Price-earnings ratio (trailing 12 months):13

Market value:$54.6 billion *annualized

Source: FactSet

SelectedMutualFunds

PERCENT RETURN Yr RANK FUND N AV CHG YTD 1Y R 3 Y R 5YR 1 3 5 American Funds BalA m 2 2.80 08 +12.7 +17.4 +14.0 +8.3 A A A BondA m 1 2.4 9 01 -2.3 -1.0 +3.6 +4.2 D D E CaplncBuA m 56.23 13 +85 +12.1 +10.7 +5.0 8 A C CpWldGrlA m 41.17 21 t12.3 +22.3 t11.3 t4.4 C C C EurPacGrA m 43.79 32 +6 2 +1 8.3 +7.2 t2.7 D D A Elan 874772 15.46 + . 53 F ttlnvA m 47. 4 4 22 +17.0 +24.6 +15.6 +6.7 C D D BkofAm 864666 14.52 -.21 Fidelity Largecap FLCSX GrthAmA m 40.50 24 +17.9 +27.3 +15.9 +6.8 A C C Intel 848792 23.24 —.02 IttcAmerA m 19.65 07 +10.7 +15.3 +12.8 +7.8 8 A A S&P500ETF 726416 168.59 —.52 VALUE BL EN D GR OWTH IttvCoAmA m 35.43 16 +18.4 +23.8 +15.0 +7.2 D D C iShJapatt 600783 11.13 -.25 NewPerspA m35.26 21 +12.8 +22.8 +13.3 +6.6 C 8 8 iShEMkts 489172 39.33 -.50 ocC 63 Saks 443505 15.95 + . 64 WAMutlnvA m37.06 12 +20.0 +23.0 +17.8 +8.3 D A 8 12.47 —.12 Io MicronT 381306 IL Dodge &Cox Income 13.54 -.01 - 0.9 +1.3 +4.5 +6.9 A 8 8 Pfizer 370565 2 9.54 t . 1 7 IntlStk 38.64 -.32 t 11.5 +29.1 + 9.3 t3.2 A A A Stock 1 49.03 -1.03 +23.3 +33.6 +18.4 +7.8 A A C cC o Gainers 53 Fidelity Contra 89.93 -.40 + 17.0 +20.9 +16.8 +8.0 C 8 8 GrowCo 112. 53 - .37+ 20.7 +24.2 +20.3 +9.6 6 A A NAME L AST C H G %C H G C3 LowPriStk d 47 .57 -.21+ 20.4 +31.4 +18.6+11.1 B 8 A Lightbrdge 3 .15 +1. 5 5 +96 . 9 Fidelity Spartan 500l d xAdvtg 59 .78 -.22+ 19.5 +24.3 +17.7 +8.3 C 8 B Reliv lntl 2 .26 +.80 +54 . 8 «C USEC rs 2 9.02 +9 . 8 1 +5 1 . 1 63 FrankTemp-Fraukliu Income C m 2. 37 ... +8 . 1 + 13.7 +10.3 +7.4 A A A SytttaPhm 7 .15 +2. 0 9 +41 . 3 «C IncomeA m 2.3 5 . .. +8 . 5 + 1 4.4 +11.0 +7.9 A A A BakerM 4 0.39 + 1 0.79 +3 6 . 5 FrankTemp-Tem letouGIBottdAdv 12 . 99 - .03 -0.4 + 6 .8 + 6 .2 +9.5 A A A IO UranmR rs 5 .32 +1. 1 7 +28 . 2 RisDivA m 20. 02 - .09+15.7 +20.1 +15.0 +6.2 E D D Mornittgstar Ownership Zone™ Oppeuheimer Spherix rs 8 .65 +1 . 8 0 +2 6 . 3 RisDivB m 18. 13 - .07+ 15.1 +19.0 +14.0 +5.3 E E E Interphase 5 .69 +1. 0 9 +23 . 7 O e Fund target represents weighted RisDivC m 18 . 03 - .08+ 15.2 +19.2 +14.2 +5.4 E D E CitizFst 1 2.17 +2 . 1 7 +21 . 7 average of stock holdings SmMidValA m40.41 -.17 + 24.7 +36.3 +14.7 +5.6 A E E HudsonTc 2 .75 t .41 +17. 5 • Represents 75% of futtd's stock holdings SmMidValBm 33.95 -.14+24.0 +35.2 +13.7 +4.7 B E E Losers 0. 0 + 4 .0 +7.0 C C B CATEGORY Large Blend PIMCO TotRetA m 1 0 . 79 .. . -2.8 NAME LAST CHG %CHG MORNINGSTAR T Rowe Price Eqtylnc 31.34 - . 15+19.5 +26.9 +16.5 +8.4 C C B RATING™ * * * * f t GrowStk 44.3 8 - . 27+ 17.5 +22.0 +18.2 +8.8 C A 8 -1.59 -33.8 Dataram rs 3.11 HealthSci 54. 0 9 - .30 +31.2 +34.4 +32.5+16.9 C A A ShandaGm 4.99 -1.26 -20.2 ASSETS $1,577 million -8.17 -19.9 Newlncome 9. 4 4 - .01 -2.7 - 1.2 +3.3 +5.8 D D C Chattgyou 32.90 EXP RATIO 0.85% TurqHIIIRs 4.27 -1.05 -19.7 Vanguard 155.52 -.57 t19.5 +24.3 +17.7 +8.3 C 8 8 500Adml MANAGER Matthew Fruhan -1.40 -17.9 GeoMet pf 6.40 500lnv 155.50 -.58 +19.5 +24.2 +17.6 +8.2 C 8 8 SINCE 2005-05-02 CapDp 42.75 -.29 t27.2 +38.0 +18.2 +9.3 A A A RETURNS 3-MD +9.6 Foreign Markets Eqlnc 28.67 -.08 +20.4 +24.0 +19.6+10.0 D A A YTD +23.5 StratgcEq 26.58 -.08 +23.9 +34.1 +21.0 +9.1 A A C NAME LAST CHG %CHG 1-YR +33.5 Tgtet2025 14.93 -.05 t 9 .9 +15.7 +11.6 +6.4 6 8 8 Paris +.07 3,968.91 3-YR ANNL +19.8 TotBdAdml 10.67 -.01 -2.3 -1.7 +3.2 t5.3 D D D London 6,560.25 + 5.46 + . 08 5-YR-ANNL +11.1 Totlntl 15.36 -.13 +4.1 +17.9 +6.2 +0.8 D E C Frankfurt + 14.12 + . 1 7 8,259.03 TotStlAdm 42.44 -.17 +20.2 +25.9 +18.1 +8.8 8 A A Hong Kong 21,851.68 -117.27 -.53 TOP 5HOLDINGS PCT Mexico TotStldx 42.43 -.16 +20.1 +25.7 +18.0 +8.7 8 A A 40,341.86 -722.72 -1.76 JPMorgatt Chase &Co 3.78 Milan 16,275.71 -145.80 —.89 USGro 24.89 -.09 +17.1 +23.5 t17.5 $7.7 8 8 C Apple Inc 3.38 Tokyo -468.85 -3.32 13,661.13 Welltn 37.58 -.11 t12.4 +16.9 +12.8 +8.4 8 A A 2.69 Stockholm 1,226.98 -.88 -.07 Wells Fargo & Co Fund Footnotes. b - ree covering market costs 1$paid from fund assets. d - Deferred sales charge, or redemption Sydney + 4.10 + . 0 8 General Electric Co 2.59 fee. f - front load (sales charges). m - Multiple fees are charged, usually a marketing fee andeither 3 sales or 5,027.90 Zurich 7,814.11 t 17.27 $.2 2 Chevron Corp • 2.43 redemption fee. Source: MornIgsta7.

Morningstar hiked this fund's rating for future performance to MarketSummary silver from bronze, noting that the Most Active fund's manager, Matthew Fruhan, NAME VOL (Ogs) LAST CHG has served investors well. Facebook 1217992 35.43 +1.42 A. Veiga, J. Sohn • AP

FAMILY

1.3267+

-.0007

StoryStocks Major stock indexes finished lower Monday, with energy companies and banks among the biggest decliners. Drugmaker Perrigo agreed to buy Ireland's Elan for $8.6 billion, one of three big-name merger deals that failed to lift the market higher. The National Association of Realtors reported that fewer Americans signed contracts to buy homes in June, suggesting higher mortgage rates may be starting to hamper sales. Investors should get a better sense of how well the economy is faring on Wednesday, when the government reports its first estimate of the nation's economic growth for the second quarter and the Fed winds up a two-day policy meeting. SKS Omnicom Group OMC Close:$15.95L0.64 or 4.2% Close:$64.75 V-0.36 or -0.6% The luxury retailer is being purTo combine in a "merger of equals" chased by the parent of Lord & Taywith Publicis Groupe SA, which tolor for about $2.4 billion. gether will form a $35 billion advertising behemoth. $16 $70 14

65

12

60 M J 52-week range

$924 ~

J $17.51

VolJ66.7m (17.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$2.4 b

PE :49.9 Yield: ...

Suntech Power

52-WK RANGE oCLOSE YTD 1YR VOL TICKER LO HI C LOSE CHG %CHG WK MO OTR %CHG %RTN (Thous)P/E DIV

NAME

I

100

+ -.15 '

Saks

13'500

J

Change: -36.86 (-0.2%)

10 DAY S "

$104.55

STP Close:$1.44 %0.03 or 2.1% Rallied with other Chinese solar companies after the European Union and China settled a dispute that had roiled the industry. $2.0 1.5 1.0

M J 52-week range

J

$45.11~

$75.55

Volc17.6m (8.8x avg.) PE: 1 7 .5 Mkt. Cap:$16.65 b Yiel d : 2 .5%

Michael Baker BKR Close:$40.39 %10.79 or 36.5% The Pittsburgh engineering company said it has agreed to be acquired by Integrated Mission Solutions in a $400 million deal. $50 40 30

M J 52-week range $3.33~

J $1.99

VolJ 4.9m(1.1x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$260.88 m

P E: .. . Yield :...

Perrigo

PRGO Close:$125.17V-9.06 or -6.7% The U.S. drugmaker will pay $8.6 billion to acquire Irish drugmaker Elan and will move its tax residence to Ireland. $140 130

20-

M J 52-week range

J

$17.84 $40.40 Volx1.5m (33.6x avg.) PE: 61.2 Mkt. Cap:$390.49 m Yi e ld: 1.8%

YRC Worldwide

YRCW Close:$28.51 V-2.96 or -9.4% Credit Suisse initiated coverage with an underperform rating and a $7 price target. YRC's shares closed at $31.47 on Friday.

$40 20

120

J 52-week range

J

M

52-week range $99.79~

$134.3 1

$5. • 1 ~

$36.99

Volc10.5m (12.9x avg.) PE :27.5 Volx1.3m (1.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$11.77 b Yiel d : 0 .3% Mkt. Cap:$267.91 m

P E: .. . Yield :...

Chelsea Therapeutics CH TP Activision Close:$2.82 V-0.25 or -8.1% Announced another delay in the review of its drug Northera, saying there are technical problems with its application.

$4

ATVI Close:$18.27%0.81 or 4.6% Shares continued higher after the announcement Friday that Vivendi SA would sell most of its majority stake.

$20 15 M J 52-week range

$3.73~ Volx2.1m (1.9x avg.) Mkt. Cap:$189.18 m

J $3.25 PE: . Ye i ld: .

M J J 52-week range $19.45 ~ $15.39 VolJ 20.7m (2.5x avg.) P E: 1 7 . 1 Mkt. Cap:$20.42 b Yiel d : 1. 0% AP

SOURCE: Sungard

InterestRates

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note climbed to 2.60 percent on Monday. Yields affect interest rates on consumer loans.

NET 1YR TREASURIES YEST PVS CHG WK MO QTR AGO 3 -month T-bill

. 03

+0 .0 2 L

-

W

.10

6-month T-bill

. 0 6 .06

...

w

w

w

.14

5 2-wk T-bill

.10

...

L

W

~

.18

2 -year T-note . 32 .32 ... L 5-year T-note 1 .38 1 .37 + 0.01 L 10-year T-ttote 2.60 2 .56 + 0 .04 L 30-year T-bond 3.68 3.62 +0.06 L

V W L L

L L L L

BONDS

.01 .10

NET 1YR YEST PVS CHG WK MO IlTRAGO

Barclays Loog T-Bdldx 3.40 3.36 +0.04 L L Bond Buyer Muni Idx 5.08 5.08 . . . L L Barclays USAggregate 2.33 2.37 -0.04 L W PRIME FED Barclays US High Yield 6.11 6.08 +0.03 L W RATE FUNDS Moodys AAA Corp Idx 4.33 4.38 -0.05 L L YEST 3.25 .13 Barclays CompT-Bdldx 1.50 1.55 -0.05 W 6 MO AGO 3.25 .13 Barclays US Corp 3 .22 3.26 -0.04 W W 1 YR AGO3.25 .13

Commodities The price of oil dipped on Monday ahead of several big economic reports this week. Metals were mostly higher, led by platinum. Aluminum fell. Crops were mixed.

Foreign Exchange The dollar edged higher against the euro and several other currencies in advance of a two-day policy meeting by the Federal Reserve. It fell against the

Japanese yen and Canadian dollar.

h5N4 QG

.24 .65 1.54 2.63

L L L L L

2.35 4.25 1 7.2 7 0. 8 3.25

L

.88

L

2 9. 6

CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD Crude Dil (bbl) 104.55 104.70 -0.14 + 13.9 Ethanol (gal) 2.23 2.24 + 0.18 + 1 . 8 Heating Dil (gal) 3.02 3.01 +0.20 -1.0 Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.46 3.56 - 2.70 + 3 . 2 Unleaded Gas(gal) 3.01 3.04 - 1.05 + 7.1 FUELS

METALS

Gold (oz) Silver (oz) Platinum (oz) Copper (Ib) Palladium (oz)

CLOSE PVS. 1328.40 1321.70 19.85 19.77 1441.80 1421.90 3.12 3.11 743.75 723.10

%CH. %YTD +0.51 -20.7 +0.45 -34.2 +1.40 -6.3 +0.24 -14.4 + 2.86 + 5 . 9

CLOSE PVS. %CH. %YTD -6.0 1.22 1.22 +0.25 1.21 1.22 -0.90 -15.8 4.89 4.92 -0.25 -29.9 Corn (bu) Cotton (Ib) 0.85 0.85 -0.48 + 12.7 Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 327.90 322.70 +1.61 -12.3 Orange Juice (Ib) 1.46 1.44 +1.21 +25.8 Soybeans (bu) 13.68 13.50 +1.32 -3.6 Wheat(bu) 6.73 6.50 +0.27 -13.5 AGRICULTURE

Cattle (Ib) Coffee (Ib)

1YR. MAJORS CLOSE CHG. %CHG. AGO USD per British Pound 1.5360 —.0023 —.15% 1.5728 C anadian Dollar 1.0 2 56 —.0028 —.27% 1.0041 USD per Euro 1.3267 —.0007 —.05% 1.2312 —.36 —.37% 78.60 Japanese Yen 97.88 Mexican Peso 12.7 379 + .0699 +.55% 13.2346 EUROPE/AFRICA/MIDDLEEAST Israeli Shekel 3. 5764 —. 0071 —. 20% 4.0448 Norwegian Krone 5.9374 +.0290 +.49% 6.0468 South African Rand 9.7948 +.0027 +.03% 8.1665 6.4740 +.0060 +.09% 6.8699 Swedish Krona Swiss Franc .9304 +.0017 +.18% .9757 ASIA/PACIFIC Australian Dollar 1.0866 + .0064 +.59% .9 5 49 Chinese Yuan 6.1372 +.0007 +.01% 6 .3817 Hong Kong Dollar 7.7571 -.0000 -.00% 7.7571 Indian Rupee 59.275 t.210 t . 35 % 5 5 .245 Singapore Dollar 1.2663 +.0024 +.19% 1 .2466 South Korean Won 1112.01 -.40 -.04% 1138.35 Taiwan Dollar 29.92 + .01 +.03% 30 . 07


© www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

BRIEFING

Amazon plans to add 7,000 jobs

What: KidRunner

says it is adding 7,000 jobs in13 states,

What it does:Develops kid strollers for runners Pictured:Will Warne, founder of KidRunner

beefing up staff at the warehouses where it

Where:Bend

Employees:Three

fills orders, and in its

Email:kidrunners@gmail.com Website:www.kidrunners.com

Amazon.com Inc.

customer service division. The company said

Energy regulator targets

EXECUTIVE FILE

+

jPMorgan By Jessica Silver-Greenberg

Monday that it will add 5,000 full-time jobs at its U.S. distribution

New York Times News Service

centers, which currently employ about 20,000

workers who packand ship customer orders. Distribution center jobs are available in Phoenix; Middletown, Del.; Patterson, San

Bernardino andTracy, Calif.; Indianapolis and Jeffersonville, Ind.; Hebron, Ky.; Breinigsville,

Pa.; Charleston and Spartanburg, S.C.; Chat-

Elon Glucklich /The Bulletin

einven in

tanooga andMurfreesboro, Tenn.; Coppell,

Drugmaker to buy rival for $6.7B

deal worth $6.7 billion. Under the terms of

the deal, Perrigo said it would offer $16.50

in cash andshares to Elan's shareholders, 11 percent aboveElan's closing share price in New York on Friday. — From wire reports

DEEDS Deschutes County • Brayden W.Clark to Frederick M. andKimberly A. Rafilson, Broken Top, Phase 2H,Lot 211, $713,850 • Ludwig J. andJanice C. Geibel to Thomas A.and Amy L. Paprocki, Parkway Acres, Lots 5 and 6,Block 3, $177,000 •Jack E. andVerna L. Hindsto Rick P.Lewisand Beverley J.Carrara, Skyline Ridge, Lot 24, Block5, $200,000 •Amo D. andTraci Krischik to Patrick N. andPennyA. Hughes, Morningstar, First Addition, Lot 20, Block1, $273,000 •Michael andGenaCaston to Loren A.andAmber N. Anderson, Saddleback West, Lot10, Block 7, $439,000 • Mark and NancyRussell to Scottand Chiho Gray,River Canyon Estates, No. 3, Lots 216 and 217,$337,000 • Richard F.and Kimberly E. Walter to Chad R.and Debra A.Crowther, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase26, Lot 9, Block 26, $685,000 • Helm lnvestments LLC to Todd S.and Susan M. Smith, Sunpointe, Phase3, Lot 22, $180,000 • Randal E. andTeresaM. Schwartz to Robert M. and Rosemary Tanzer,Deer Park 3, Lot 4, Block 21, $334,000 • Brent S. and Lonnie D. Williams to Terry L. and Sandra R.Brown, Stonebrook, Phase 3,Lot 10, $296,500 • Sara J. Waldheim, trustee for theWaldheim Family Trust, to Sylvester V. and Diane S. Quitiquit, Courtyards at BrokenTop, Lot 2, Courtyard Garages at Broken Top,Tract F, $351,000 • Choice One Builders to Benjamin W.and Erika-Britt Vandenbos, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lot 50, $547,366 • Deschutes County Ventures LLC toSteven K. and BonnieBinstock, Hunters Circle, Lot16, Block 6, $167,000 • Lloyd E. andVallie J. Gilham to Shawn E.and Amber V.Cross, Paulina Peaks, Phase2, Lot47, $260,000 • Daniel J. St. Germain and Ann L.Clemensto Michael W.and Valerie K. Ells, Broken Horn, Lot 5, $378,000 • Markand Joan Gallinger to Margaret Thompson, Highland Addition, Lot 3, Block 25, $175,500 •West Bend Property Company LLC to Greg

A

from HomeDepot. It worked great, but it was long

and inelegant, with PVC tubing.

The drug company Perrigo agreed Monday biotechnol ogycompany Elan in a cash-and-stock

have you faced developing KidRunner? • I built the . first KidRunner with parts

esro er

Haslet and San Antonio,

Texas, andChester, Va.

to acquire the Irish

Q •. lenges

What chal-

So I partnered

By Elon Glucklich •The Bulletin

Will Warne's entrepreneurial moment came on the

people in the (San Francisco) running community a lot of questions about

streets of San Francisco, pushing a baby stroller. A supply company director who distributes products to Nike, Target and others, Warne is also an avid runner. But the birth of his daughter, Harper, in 2009 made pushing her stroller a new and burdensome addition to his jog-

KidRunner video

what features they would like. It

To see the KidRunner in

action, visit http://vimeo.com/

has taken alot of

kidrunner/meet-us

work. You have to

ging trips. "Fifty percent of running is upper body," Warne said. "When you're pushing, you lose that part of the workout." So he got to thinking: Why not invent a lightweight stroller that runners can harness to their waists, pulling their children as

they go'?

Today, KidRunner is nearing completion. Warne moved to Bend last year with his wife, Megan Karnopp, and Harper, and he's been working on KidRunner in earnest, along with two business partners, one in the Bay Area and another in Denver. A runner attaches a harness to his or her waist. A curved suspension system attaches to the harness, connecting it to what's essentially a two-wheel stroller. Warne said the product is 70 percent finished. He's still working out some minor kinks with the

with a bike builder to improve the model. I asked

seat and harness. But he hopes to be selling KidRunners at some point in 2014. The device is currently about 20 inches high and 32 inches long, and can be broken down to fit into a custom backpack. It weighs 25 pounds, but Warne is hoping to get it to about 20 pounds by the time it hits the market. It can support kids between 10 pounds and 45 pounds. He's seeking investors and plans to launch a fundraising campaign on Kickstarter this fall, hoping to raise $50,000 to $100,000. He's also looking for runners in the Bend area to take his KidRunner prototypes on test runs. Warne said he isn't sure what the price for each KidRunner will be. But it could be comparable to a mountain bike, set of skis or snowboard.

believe you've got something in spite of your doubts. • Where do . youseethe business in five

years? . We envision

• reinventing the way people run and explore with their kids.

Maybe wewill have several employees manufacturing them and distributing them nationwide.

There could be some variations to the model, like one that can seat two kids.

— Reporter: 541-617-7820 egluckfich@bendbullefin.com

A novel use of eminent domain By Shaila Dewan New York Times News Service

Recent gains in home prices have done little for blighted neighborhoods in the working-class, largely black and Hispanic town of Richmond, Calif. Federal promises ofhelp have notamounted to much either. So Richmond is about to become the first city in the nationtotry a novel wayto stop foreclosures: turning to eminent domain. Traditionally, eminent domain, or the compulsory sale of private property to governments for a public purpose, works ~ hom e owners -as when houses are bought up

Welch Construction lnc., NorthWest Crossing, Phase 18, Lot 664, $177,000 • Greg Welch Construction Inc. to William R.and Maureen A.Bedell, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 18, Lot 664, $177,000 •Varco Properties LLC to Mark K. andNancy J. Russell, Ponderosa Cascade, Lot5, Block6, $225,000 • Nancy R. Fernelius to Jesse andLaurel Risenmay,Township16, Range 12,Section 12, $299,000 •Terrance J. Martin to Natalie C.Stone, Riverside, Lot 4, Block 42, $186,000 • Matthew Greento Ronald M. Brewster, Obsidia nMeadows,Lot74,

to make room for ahighway or a commercial development. But in this case, the use of eminent domain is meant to help people stay right where they are. The results will be closely watched by both Wall Street banks, which havevigorously opposed the use of eminent domain to buy mortgages and reduce homeowner debt, and a host of cities across the country that are considering emulating Richmond. The banks have warned that such a move will bring on a hail of lawsuits and all but halt mortgage lending in any city with the temerity to try it. But local officials, frustrated

$204,970 • Hans W. andCynthia A. Behrensto Kevin D.and Ana L. Blair, Rim atAspen Lakes, Lot 8, $635,000 • Michael R. andMargo E. Degray, trustees for the Degray Revocable Family Trust, to Equity Trust CompanyCustodian, Timberline, Lot1, $158,000 • Roland L. Whiteto Deborah A. Remblcnce, Canyon RimVillage, Phase 2, Lot49, $215,000 • James M. andDiane L. Dunn to Daniel J. and Isabella M. Becker, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 13, Lot 641, $700,000 • Ryan B. Vaughanto Brenda L.Ysen,Red-Bar Estates, Phase 3,Lot 81, $155,000

• Freda A. Simmons, Wanda L. Yarbroughand Charlotte L. Hensleyto Toby andCarmenElliott, Lazy River, Lots 46 and47, Block1, $155,000 • Casey T.andShiley D. Miller to Arthur J. and Sarah J. Williamson,West Bend Village, Phases3-5, Lot 65, $559,000 • Jason Beverly to Ryan and Holly Vaughan, Forrest Commons,Lot 38, $179,000 • H. Bruce andSharon A. Millerto Dan St. Germain and Ann L.Clemens, Township 18,Range12, Section 9, $315,100 • David-Bryden andCheryl A. Pease,trusteesfor the PeaseFamily Trust, to William and Ellen E. Latiolait, NorthWest

at the lack of large-scale relief from the Obama administration, relatively free of the influence that Wall Street wields in Washington, and faced with frayingneighborhoods and a depleted middle class, are

beginning to shrug off those threats. "We're not willingto back down on this," said Gayle McLaughlin, the former schoolteacherwho isserving her second term as Richmond's mayor. "They can put forward as much pressure as they would like, but I'm very committed to this program and I'm very committed to the well-being of our neighborhoods."

Crossing, Phase1, Lot15, $350,000 • Borgies Inc. to Bruce A. and Peggy J.Humphreys, Tuscany Pines, Phase1, Lot 27, $280,870 • lan and Lisa Bergto Cheri Miller, High Pointe, Phase 1, Lot11, $270,000 • Hayden HomesLLCto JasonA. Beverly, McKenzie Rim Estates, Lot 21, $229,650 • Hayden HomesLLCto Construction Funding Resources LLC,Obsidian Ridge, Phascs1 and 2,Lot 16, $158,020.15 • John D. andGlenda M. Berryto Sidney M. and Barbara M.Meyers, Deschutes RiverRecreation Homesites, Unit 9,Part2, Lot 44, Block 41,$334,000

The nation's top energy regulator Monday formally accused JPMorgan Chase of manipulating energy markets, foreshadowing a multimilliondollar settlement that is expected as early as this week, according to people briefed on the matter. The action by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is largely a formality ahead of the settlement — a deal that is expected to help JPMorgan avert a clash over accusations that the bank orchestrated trading strategies to turn inefficient power plants into profit centers, people briefed on the matter said. From the outset, JPMorgan, which declined to comment Monday, has denied any wrongdoing. The bank has also mounteda fierce defense of the top executives who supervisedthe traders in Houston accused of devising the trading strategies. The accusations against JPMorgan stem from its rights to sell electricity from power plants. The rights come from assets that the bank acquired in the 2008 takeover of Bear Stearns.

Apple to investigate labor claims Bloomberg News BEI JING — Apple Inc. will investigate allegations by advocacy group China Labor Watch that factories run by Taiwanese supplier Pegatron Corp. use underageworkers,payinsufficient wages and force employees to work overtime. The New York-based group found at least 86 labor rights violations while investigating threePegatron factoriesfrom March to July, it said in a report issued Monday. Apple has been in close contact with the group forseveralmonths, yetthe report contains "claims that are new to us," and those will be probed immediately, Carolyn Wu, a Beijing-based spokeswoman for Apple, said in a phone interview Monday. Apple became the first

technology company to join the Washington-based Fair Labor Association last year after criticism by human-rights organizations about conditions at suppliers including Foxconn

Technology Group. Pegatron factories "are even worse than those at Foxconn," CLW Executive Director Li Qiang said in a statement Monday. "We will investigate these new claims thoroughly, ensure that corrective actions are taken where needed and report any violations of our code of conduct," Wu said.

• Steve R. andDonna L. Fiddler to Michael L. and Gayle C.Stamler, Woodside Ranch, Phase 5,Lot 7, Block13, $400,100 • Richard Adamoto Ryan R. and Jessie M.Sanford, Brier Ridge, Lot13, $263,000 •BenjaminR.andW endyJ. McGrane toPaulA. Hutter and Emilie M. Hart-Hutter, Rockwood Estates, Phase 4, Lot1, $427,000 • James E.and Sharon A. Rainsto James R.and Carol E. Hastings, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 9,Lot 269, $319,900 • Michael and Laurie E. Fisherto Marie I. Medford, Foxborough, Phase 6,Lot 263, $229,900 • Federal Home Loan

Mortgage Corporation to Sarah M. Cook,Deschutes River Woods, Lot 34, Block TT, $175,565 • West Bend Property Company LLCto Greg Welch Construction Inc., NorthWest Crossing, Phase 18, Lot 644, $187,000 • MAMC LLC to Christopher M. andLorri A. Benefield, Partition Plat 2007-21, Parcels 'I and 2, $210,000 • Clay H. Scofield Jr. and Myra F. Scofield, trustees forthe Family Trust of Clay H. Scofield Jr. and Myra F.Scofield, to Dale A. and Lynn S.Anderson, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 47, Block DJ,$282,600 • Robert E. andJill S. Erickson to Stann Clare, Deschutes River

BRIEFING

Pending home sales dip inJune Sales contracts on homes fell in June, backing away from six-year peaksafter a recent rise in mortgage rates, according to data

released Monday. Pending homesales fell 0.4 percent, though

they are up10.9 percent from June 2012levels, the National Association of Realtors said.

"Mortgageinterest

rates began to rise in May, taking some of the

momentum out of contract activity in June," NAR Chief Economist

Lawrence Yunsaid in a statement. — From wire reports

BEST OF THE BIZ CALENDAR WEDNESDAY • Nonprofit Grant Writing:Discover tips on research, effective wnting, board involvement grant management and reporting; students are encouraged to bring a current grant project; identify funding sources, especially in Oregon; registration required; $69; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; COCC Chandler Building, 1027 N.W. Trenton Ave., Bend; 541-383-7270. THURSDAY • Women'sRoundtable Series:Marketing to theSubconscious Mind; learn the workings of the subconsci ous mind,the power of imagesandhow to become aconscious marketer registration required $25 for members $35 for nonmembers; noon;Bend'sCommunity Center,1036 N.E.Fifth St.; 541-312-2069 or www. bendchamber.org. • Craft3 openhouse:A nonprofit community development financial institution; meet the team, partners and clients; free; 3-6 p.m.; Craft3, 917N.W. Harriman Street, Bend; 541-385-6034. AUG. 9 • CricketTrailer Tour: Representativesfromthe travel trailer companywil demofour newCricket Trailers; registration requested atwww.cricket trailer.com;free; 4-7 p.m.; BeaverCoachSales & Service, 62955BoydAcres Road, Bend;800-382-2597. AUG.10 • CricketTrailer Tour:(See above) AUG.13 • ProfessionalEnrichment Series:Mike Hollern, president ofBrooks ResourcesCorp.,andTroy Reinhart, partner with Northwest QuadrantWealth Management,answer questions; registration required; members$20, or $30 for bothAugust sessions; nonmembers $35, or $45for bothAugust sessions ;7:30a.m.;Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70S.W.Century Drive, Bend;541-323-1881or www.bendchamber.org/ • Membership101DrivingYourMembership: Connecting new members of the BendChamber of Commercewith current members; registration required;10a.m.;Charles Schwab8 Co.,777N.W. Wall St., Suite201,Bend; 541-382-3221,shelley© bendchamber.org orwww. bcndchamber.org/ For the complete calendar, pick upSunday's Bulletin or visit bendbu/ietin.comlbizca/

Recreation Homesites Unit6, Part2, Lots64and 65, Block 70, $220,000 • Lyle D. andSandra K. Charon to Gary andJeanne Giersdorf, trustees for the Gary and JeanGiersdorf Trust, Hillside Park, Phase 4, Lot 8, Block 4, $850,000 • Nelly Van Eikeren, trustee for the Nelly VanEikeren Revocable Trust, to Joseph M. Sebulsky, River Bluff Section of Sunrise Village, Lot1, Block 2, $355,000 • Jim A. and Debbie J. Harrer to Robertand Laura Rene,Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase15, Lot 1, Block19, $729,000 • Frank H. Bakerto JD Ncel Construction lnc., Ponderous Pines, Lots 9 and 19, $152,000


IN THE BACI4: ADVICE 4 ENTERTAINMENT > Food, Recipes, D2-3 Home, Garden, D4-5 Martha Stewart, D5 THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

O» www.bendbulletin.com/athome

AT THE MARKET A weekly look at produce

GARDEN

at local farmers markets.

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

What:New potatoes; this variety is Austrian

Crescent Season:Spring, summer About:When I was little, I thought potatoes

came in three types: russet, red andYukon Gold. Only as I began to

shop at farmers markets as an adult did I realize the rich variety of potatoes available. It's

fun to experiment with different varieties of potatoes, particularly new

potatoes, which havea thin skin and are quick

to cook. Newpotatoes are harvested before full maturity. They often

have a sweet flavor becausetheirsugars

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have not yet been turned into starch. There are

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numerous varieties of

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new potatoes to try.

Austrian Crescents are fingerling potatoes,

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which means they are

longer and thinner (kind of like a finger). They

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have a yellow flesh and a sweet flavor. The only

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downside to newpota-

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toes, in my mind, is that

they do not keeplong, especially compared with their grown-up brothers. Don't wash

them until you are ready to serve them, because

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the dirt on the skins

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helps keep thepotatoes from going bad. Keep them just a few days at

room temperature before cooking. Preparation:Because of their thin skins, new potatoes do not need to Photos by Joe Ktine /The Bulletin

A chicken wanders through the Huff/Brown garden in northeast Bend. The meandering grass pathways with bits of overhanging branches here and there give the illusion of a much larger space. By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

am sure every garden enthusiast who toured the 20th High Desert Garden Tour in Bend went home with at least one inspiration or problem-solving solution to incorporate into their landscape. Young garden, older, small lot or acreage — all the gardens were winners, featuring plants we'd never seen and ideas to re-create. The Friess garden on Riverside Boulevard has been a visual treat for the town for many years. You know the house; it's the green house across from Drake Park with a totally planted front, side and back yard. It is a landscape we have all appreciated, with its changing seasonal

0

preparation is to simply boil the potatoes until just soft, then splitapart, and serve with butter

and salt. Roasting new potatoes is agreat way to bring out their sweet-

ness. Youcan roast the potatoes whole or in pieces. Simply toss with olive oil, a few cloves of

garlic and somesprigs of rosemary. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

A concrete slab increases the heat factor under raised beds at the McCabe garden.

Soda has been in the news a lot lately — from its purported contribution to childhood obesity to its attempted serving size regulation in New York City. And there's the rising trend of making your own soda at home with countertop-size carbonation machines. Whateveryour feelings are about soda, canned and bottled soft drinks can be

great ingredients in cooking up some tasty fare. Soda has attributes that cooks love. Its sweetness serves as a substitute for the sugar calledfor in many recipes. The sparkle and fizz act as a leavening agent in baked goods. The carbonation and acids are great for tenderizing meat. And, in many recipes, the soda liquid replaces eggs and oil, thus lowering fat and sometimes calories. SeeSoda /D2

By Linda Turner Griepentrog

In a story headlined "Layers of flavor," which appearedTuesday, July 23, on page Dt, two phonenumbers were incorrect. The correct phone numbers are 541-318-1054 for The Village Baker and 541-728-0555 for

The East Village. The Bulletin regrets the error.

A trio of homemade pillows shows different styles and fabrics.

For TheBulletin

You don't have to be a sewing guruto createsome great looking pillows to brighten up your decor. Three simple pillow covers can be made sim-

ply by wrapping, and anyone can do that. Whether they will be your permanent decorating scheme orsimply a seasonal refresher, they're so easy you'll want to make several for every room in the house.

Inside information

Correction

Produce purchased from Agricultural Connections, which distributes goods from regional farms (www. aghculturalconnectiohs.com).

TODAY'S RECIPES

HOME

Cooking with soda Easy pillows anybody canmake For The Bulletin

calls for more herbsand less gloppy mayo —this cover it up. Another easy

FOOD

By Linda Turner Griepentrog

using a preparation that will enhance the sweet flavors, rather than

See additional photos on The Bulletin's website: beodbulletio.com/athometour colors. Maples and rhododendrons are favorites, which help to offer the seasonal color. One wouldn't expect to find a magnolia tree in Bend, or a pagoda tree, a unique pseudocameliaor, many varieties of maples, plus rhodies the size and colored foliage of which I have never seen before. I was fascinated with a Korean fir. The needles are green on the top side, silvery white on the underside, and the tree produces upright green cones that mature to a blue-purple color. SeeTour /D4

be peeled. Theyareideal in potato salads, but try

All the pillow styles require a pillow form inside to hold their shape. Square pillow forms are available at fabric stores and come in sizes from 10to26 inches. Two of these techniques work best with squares but can be adapted to rectangles

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

Soda recipes:7UP Biscuits, Slow Cooker Coca-Cola Chicken, Root Beer Ribs, Simple

Salad with Coca-Cola Dressing, Spicy Dr Pepper Shredded Pork,

Cream SodaPancakes, D2

Chicken Fricasseewith New Garlic,D3 Sweet Bruschetta with

Peaches,D3 The Flexitarian:Millet with Corn, Mango and as welL The third option uses a bolster pillow, sometimes called a neck pillow. These are cylindrical, and the circular ends canbe from 5to 10 inches diameter. Pillow fillings can be synthetic fiber, solid or shredded foam or a mixture of down and

polyester, depending on your preference. Allarewashable.

If you're simply refreshing or updating a room, use the throw pillows you have and simply cover them up with colors in your new choice. Or, if you're short on cash, roll up a towel and encircle with a few rubber bands for the bolster, and fold a towel or small blanketto create a squareform. SeePillows/D4

Shrimp, Farro Nigoise, Puffed Rice Salad with Chicken,D5

Big Martha's Pierogi Dough:Plus ideas for filling, D5

Recipe Finder: Traditional Germanstyle butter kuchen,D3


D2

TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

Fooo

Next week: Making jam

Soda

What's inaname?

Continued from D1 Sugary soda caramelizes well when subjected to heat, making it i deal for sauces, glazes and marinades. If you opt for diet soda, the resulting food has many less calories than its full-sugared cousin.

What do you call a carbonated sugary drink in a bottle or can? Well, the

answer likely depends on what part of the country

you are from. It could be soda, it could be pop, a combination (soda pop), or it could be called a Coke,

Cake cues

even though it may not be that brand name drink at all.

Weight Watchers r ecom-

mends preparing cake mixes with diet soda to minimize calories while still offering a tasty sweet snack. Instead of the eggs and oil normally called for in the mix preparation, the company suggests substituting a single 12-ounce can of diet soda. And it also suggests using the soda to make a cake glaze. The flavor combo is up for grabs, and many diet soda/ cake combos can be found online. Weight Watchers suggests a spice cake mix p r epared with diet root beer, a chocolate or devil's food variety mixed with Diet Coke or Diet Pepsi, or a white or yellow cake mix made with Diet Cherry 7UP or diet orange soda. The same cake mix/soda c ombinations can a l s o b e prepared with non-diet sodas

as well, depending on your preference. The combos are almost endless, so experiment and create your own pairings. Try some lesser-known soda flavors as well, such as Pibb Xtra, Fanta, Squirt, etc. Ginger ale melds well with almost any cake flavor without adding a strong flavor of its own. Use sodas for the liquid in brownie mixes, too, omitting the oil, egg and water called for in the package directions. Note that cakes, cupcakes and brownies made using this substitution are o f ten v ery moist and require a slightly longer baking time to ensure doneness.

Meat magic

To see thegeographic differences, checkout

www.popvssoda.com.

Dutch oven, a slow cooker or a conventional oven, using soda as either a flavorful marinade, a barbecue sauce or a glaze adds superb goodness to even inexpensive cuts. C aramelized colas work well for cooking chicken, pork or beef, and make any rib irresistible.

Fruit frenzy Slow cooking pears, peaches orapples with a clear soda (like 7UP, Sprite, etc.) creates a light sweet syrup sure to please.The fruitcan be served whole, in chunks or blended into a smooth sauce.

Ryan Brennecke/rhe Bulletin

7UP Biscuits gain additional tenderness from the carbonated soda. Serve with whipped cream and blueberries.

Flour power Making biscuits with carbonated soda creates a fluffy t enderness not f ound w i t h traditional fare. And adding lemon-lime soda to pancakes makes them puff. The bubbly soda creates air pockets in griddlecakes forextra rise. So, survey your soda and pantry stash, or head to Powell's Sweet Shoppe in Bend for some lesser-known soda flavors, and start creating. Note that in some recipes the substitution of diet soda doesn't work well, especially where caramelization i s n e e ded, since it doesn't contain sugar. — Reporter: gwizdesigns@aol. com

Whether you cook meat in a

Spicy Dr Pepper

7UP Biscuits

Shredded Pork Makes 18 servings.

Makes 8 biscuits. 2 C Bisquick or other baking mix '/2C sour cream

t/z C 7UP or other lemon-lime soda

'/4 C melted butter

Preheat the oven to 425 degreesandgrease a large baking sheet. Whisk the sour cream into the biscuit mix, then add the 7UP and butter to make a soft dough. Drop the biscuits by the large spoonful onto the baking sheet and bake until golden brown, about12-15 min-

utes. Let biscuits rest 5 minutes before serving.

1 Ig onion 1 (5-7 Ib) pork shoulder roast 1 can (11 oz) chipotle peppers in adobo sauce

2 cans (12 oz) Dr Pepper

2 TBS brown sugar — Adapted from ailrecipes.com Salt and pepper Preheat the oven to 300 degrees. Peel the onion and cut it into quarters. Lay them in the

Slow Cooker Coca-Cola Chicken Makes 4-6 servings.

bottom of a large Dutch oven. Generously salt and pepper the

1 whole fryer chicken (or parts) 1 1 lemon, quartered

m ed onion, peeled and quartered

1 bottle (18 oz) barbecue sauce 1 can (12 oz) Coca-Cola

pork roast and set it on top of

the onions in the pan. Pour the undrained chipotle peppers over

Rinse the fryer and place it in the slow cooker. Toss in the onion and lemon quarters. Pour in the barbecue the pork. Pour in Dr Pepper, add

sauce andCoke. Cover andcook on lowall day, or on high 3 to 4 hours until the chicken is tender.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate •

••

brown sugar to the liquid and stir

— Adapted from southernpiate.com to combine. Cover and cook for at least six hours, turning the roast

TheB u lletin

two or three times during the cookingprocess.Checkthemeat

Root Beer Ribs

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falling apart. If it's not, cook for 2 cans (12 oz) root beer

another hour. Remove the meat from the pot

and place on a cutting board. Use

/2C brown sugar '/4 C cornstarch '/4 C vinegar 3 tsp powdered ginger

two forks to shred the meat, discarding fat pieces. Strain the fat

off the top of the cooking liquid

and discard it. Return the shredTo make the rids:Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Place the ribs in ded meat to the cooking liquid, the bottom of a shallow baking pan. Sprinkle with 1l/e teaspoons salt, and keep warm until ready to cover tightly with aluminum foil and bake 1 hour. Remove from the oven serve. and pour off the accumulated fat. Serve on warm flour tortillas or

To make the glaze:Drain the peaches, reserving the syrup, and set over rice or noodles. — Adapted from tastykitchen.com aside. In a medium saucepan, combine peach syrup, root beer, brown sugar, cornstarch, vinegar, ginger andremaining salt. Cookover low heat, stirring constantly, until smooth, thickened and clear (about 5 minutes). Pour two cups of the sauce over spareribs and return to oven. Reserve Cream Soda Pancakes the remaining sauce. Bake the ribs another 30 to 45 minutes, turning and

sauce-basting several times. Add sliced peaches to the reserved sauce; Makes 2-3 servings. heat. Pour over ribs before serving. — Adapted fromepicurean.com

B/GGER

kND BETTER THAN EVER ! II<I+I

18-18 2012 uS H SC WIIIMPIITHIITIR

PublishingDate: Friday, August 9

BEND BREWFEST THECOMPLETEGUIDETOTHE BREWE RIES,THEBEERSANDALL THEFUN.

Simple Salad with Coca-Cola Dressing Makes 4 to 6 servings. FOR THE SALAD: 2 C cherry tomatoes, halved

The Bend Brewfest is a celebration of the craftsmanship and artistry of beer making across the Northwest, offering fine brews, food and entertainment while supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon. Held in Bend's Old Mill District, the event honors the success of local brewers and spotlights their roles in the vitality of Central Oregon's economy. This official booklet, designed as an interactive reference guide as well as a beer lover's keepsake, is distributed to all Bulletin readers and the thousands who attend the festival.

( ay, SrlrLirrrtrar 'l5, 2tra Satar3 'ttr a.rru 4 y Jll. StO trt tlrl QrL" rrr > ~ ri» <a reae ~rr LMr~etravrtalllltttlvatkr

OREGON FESTIVAL OF FESTIVA + L CA R S CARS THEGUIDETOCENTRALOREGON'S EXCLUSIV EEXOTICCARSHOW The Oregon Festival of Cars features the world's most rare and exotic automobiles. Both new and vintage models are featured in this show that attracts spectators from across the region who dream of sitting behind the wheel of such sophisticated machinery. The guide includes photos and descriptions of each car featured in the show as well as additional event details.

>L J> www.oregonrestlvalofcars.rom

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2 C baby red beets, cooked '/4 C parsley, chopped (optional) 2 pinches sea salt Fresh ground black pepper Lemon zest

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PublishingDate: Wednesday, September 11

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1 C pancake mix 1 TBS vegetable oil /2 can (12 oz) cream soda Separate the egg. Beat the white until stiff and set aside. Put the yolk

Lemon juice 8 TBS extra-virgin olive oil '/4 C shallots minced FOR THE DRESSING: 16 oz Coca-Cola 2 tsp apple cider vinegar

To make the dressing: Combinethe Coca-Cola andapple cider vinegar in a double boiler. Cook on high heat until the sauce thickens to syrup consistency. Remove from the heat and let stand until cool.

To makethesalad: Tossthe vegetables and remaining ingredients with

in a mixing bowl with the pancake mix. Add the vegetable oil and the

creamsodato the pancake mix. Mix with a fork until large lumps disappear, but do not overbeat. Fold the stiff egg white into the mix. Add a bit more soda if batter is too thick. Let sit until bubbles appear all over top and the mixture rises a little. Ladle pancakes onto a hot

greased griddle. Turn thepancakes over when bubbles appear on sur-

olive oil. Serve the salad and top with the desired amount of dressing. face and the sides look dry. — Adapted from coca-coiacompany.com — Adapted from food.com

ASK A COOK

Substitutions whenbaking By Kathleen Purvis The Charlotte Observer

cookie recipes call Q •• My for sticks of margarine.

CARS • FOOD • M U SIC • F u ttt FOR YIIE WHOLE FAMILY

tr = —

2 C green beans, cooked

1 egg

Can I substitute oil'? • Baking substitutions are • tricky, but they are worth trying to see if you like the result. However, oil doesn't work exactly the same as something

A

like butter or shortening that is solid when chilled. Many cookies or cakes involve creaming, or beating air into the mixture of butter and s ugar. Oil won't hold air i n the same way, so the cookies may have acrunchier texture and may dry out more quickly when you store them.

T ry replacing half of t h e butter or margarine with oil and see if you like the texture. If you want to use all oil, use a little less than the butter called for, usually 3'/2 tablespoons of oil for 4 tablespoons of butter. — Email questions to kpurvis@charlotteobserver com

Weekly Arts 5 Entertainment Fridays In TheBulletin

CX)! hGhGAZINE


FOO D

TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

D3

W enitcomesto aric, The almost-famousbutter kuchen res means sweet By Julie Rothman

RECIPE FINDER

The Baltimore Sun

By David Tanis New York Times News Service

You may not think of garlic as a seasonal ingredient, but it is, and the season is now. I am an unabashed garlic lover, and from midsummer forward, I use it in just about everything. This is garlic that, instead of

being plucked young and sold as shoots called green garlic, is allowed to mature and form large heads. It comes with the roots still on and the stalks attached, and since it hasn't been air-dried for long storage, like the familiar grocery-store garlic, the skin enclosing the individual cloves is still moist, not

• .<

Fred R. Conrad/New York Times News Service

Chicken fricassee makes use of new garlic, which hasn't been dried for storage and has a delicious flavor of its own.

papery. Those cloves, when peeled, look like shiny pearls, and they have a fresh-tasting sweetness even when used raw. There's a classic French dish called poulet aux 40 gousses d'ail, which translates as chicken with 40 cloves of garlic. Although that much garlic might sound overpowering, the idea is this: Garlic cooked slowly and

thoroughly loses its pungency, becoming sweet and unctuous in the process. The garlic is then eaten as a vegetable accompaniment, or spread on toasted bread. A lthough you c a n m a k e this dish with ordinary garlic in cooler weather, the result is sensational with summer's new

crop.

Aside from the garlic, all you need is a good chicken, an onion, a few thyme branches and a little white wine. I use a Dutch oven to make it — since the cut-up bird is moist-cooked, not roasted, a heavy pot with a tightfitting lid keeps all the succulence in, and the fragrant ingredients are concentrated into flavorful pan juices.

Betty Bensel from Columbia, Md., was looking for a recipe for a butter kuchen like the one made by the Heitzman Bakery in Louisville, Ky. She said this was a favorite of hers but that she had had no luck getting the bakery to share the recipe. She has experimented with recipes she has found online but they are not anywhere near as good as the one baked at Heitzman's. D orothy S c hneiter o f Hurricane, WVa. said that the Heitzman Bakery was a favorite of her husband's family and they too were p articularly fond o f t h e bakery's version of the butter kuchen. Her sister-in-law sent her a recipe that was printed in The L ouisville Courier- Journal some years ago for a traditional German-style butter k u chen that she thinks comes pretty close to the Heitzman Bakery specialty, although perhaps not quite as runny as the bakery version. For a r u nnier kuchen, Schneiter recommends us-

ing only one egg, instead

Chicken hicassee with New Garlic Makes 4 to 6 servings. 1 sm chicken, about 3 Ibs Salt and pepper 2 TBS butter

1 Ig onion, diced (about 2 C) 6 heads new garlic Several Ig thyme sprigs

1 C white wine Parsley or basil, for garnish

(optional)

With a sharp knife, remove back bone from chicken. Cut chicken into 4 pieces: 2 legs with thighs attached, and the breast split lengthwise, wings attached. (Reserve back bone, giblets and extraneous chicken fat for an-

other use.i Season chicken piecesgenerously with salt and pepper andset aside. Heat oven to 375 degrees. Melt butter in a Dutch oven or enameled pot with lid over medium-high heat. Add onion and cook briskly, stirring occasionally, until nicely browned, 5 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, cut stalk and roots

from garlic heads. Trim off1 layer from eachhead's tough exterior. Cut heads inhalf, top to bottom. Add garlic to pot, season with salt and pepper, and stir to coat. Place thyme sprigs on mixture, then add chicken pieces in one layer. Add wine and1 cup water and bring to asimmer.

Cover pot and transfer to oven. Bakefor 35 minutes, covered. Remove lid and bake for 10 minutes, or until chicken has browned and juices at thigh run clear when probed with paring knife. Let it rest off heat for10 to 15 minutes. (If desired, cut breasts in half and divide thigh from drumstick with a sharp knife.)

Serve eachguest a piece of chicken andseveral garlic halves. Spoon panjuices over everything. Sprinkle with chopped parsley or basil if desired.

of three, and adding three tablespoons of water to the topping mixture. She also said that she likes the toppingso muchthat she makes an extra one-third of the original topping amount. With a vi s i t t o the Heitzman Bakery website, I uncoveredthe history ofthe bakery's most popular dessert: "In Louisville, around 1 890-1910 what w e n o w know of as 'Butter Kuchen' was formulated in various master-bake shops. In our lineage, Jacob Heitzman passedhis formulationdown to his sons, Joe and Charles. Over the ensuing decades, the dough was softened and the filling evolved into a runny or gooey delight. Today, we in Louisville, enjoy the end product of hundreds of years of baking evolution — The Butter Kuchen!" Unfortunately for Bensel, the Heitzman recipe will re-

Looking for a hard-to-find recipe or can answer a request? Write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278, or email

baltsunrecipefinder©gmail.com. Namesmust accompany recipes for them to be published.

Butter Kuchen Makes 8 piecesineach9-inchpan. 3'/s C flour

FOR THE DOUGH: '/s C milk 4TBS butter, melted '/4 C sugar 1 tspsalt 1 ('/4-oz) pkg dry yeast '/4 C warm water

FOR THE TOPPING: '/s C butter 1 Csugar 3 eggs /2 tsp vanilla

2 eggs To make the dough:Heat milk until lukewarm; add butter, sugar, and

salt. Dissolve yeast in warmwater andadd to milk. Beat in eggs: then beat in flour. The dough should be very soft and wet. If the dough is too much like batter, add a little extra flour. The dough should be soft and sticky.

Cover and put in awarm place for1 to1~/~ hours. Turn out on afloured board and roll to fit a very large greased cookie sheet or two 9-inch cake

pans. Pinch the edges to form sides, and press down the center some, which later will hold the butter topping. Put in a warm place again for 45 minutes to an hour for a second rising. Mix ingredients for topping and pour onto the dough after the second

rising. Reshapeedges to contain topping if necessary. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 25 to 30 minutes. Let cool completely before cutting.

Note:Sometimes the rising dough pushes the topping into an uneven pattern. main a family secret.

Request Kathy Stumer of Tuscarora, Pa., is looking for a recipe for something that her husband's grandmother used to m ake

some 60 years ago. She called it "cheese dough" and it was made with c o ttage cheese and eggs that were somehow shaped into pillow-like squares and topped with bread cubes and sour cream.

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To make dessert bruschetta, top slices of grilled bread with a cream cheese mixture, peaches, honey and some choppedpistachios.

essert rusc etta? im e By Lauren Chattman Newsday

Dinner is over, the grill is still warm, and you have a craving for something sweet. What can you improvise, outside and over a fire, besides banana boats and s'mores? If you have a half a loaf of day-old crusty bread, you can make bruschetta. Wait a second, I hear you say. Isn't bruschetta like garlic bread but with chopped tomatoes on top? Well, yes, that is one type of bruschetta. But the name, which comes from the Italian verb brusciare, or to burn, simply means toast. As a matter of fact, the chemical reaction that occurs when bread is toasted (called the Maillard reaction, you'll remember if you were paying attention to your high school chemistry teacher) involves the transformation of starch into simple sugar, resulting in a deliciously caramelized flavor and aroma. So bruschetta makes perfectsense fordessert.And just as Americans with a sweet tooth turn toast into a sweet treat by sprinkling it with cinnamon sugar, Italians use dayold bread to make rustic little grilled chocolate, cheese, and fruit tarts. You can, too. For best results, start with

Sweet Bruschetta with Peaches Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Combining cream cheese, sour cream and heavy cream will give you a mixture with a taste andconsistency similar to Italian mascarpone, which

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Sea salt 2 peaches, pitted and sliced 2 TBS honey 2 TBS finely chopped pecans, walnuts, almonds, pine nuts or pistachios

Preheat a gas grill to medium-high. Combine cream cheese, sour cream, heavy creamand vanilla. Brush bread on both sides with oil.

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Clean grill grids thoroughly with a wire brush. Grill bread slices until bottoms are golden and marked by the grill, 2

to 3 minutes. Turn, sprinkle with salt, and grill another minute or two.

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Transfer to a serving platter.

Spread creamcheese mixture over bread slices. Arrange sliced peaches on top of cheese. Drizzle with honey and sprinkle with nuts. Serve immediately.

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leftovers of an a r tisan loaf. (Flimsy slices of supermarket sandwich bread will turn to dust on the grill.) Before grilling, brush both sides of the slices with olive oil or melted butter. Not only will this add flavor, but it will promote caramelization. And don't forget to clean your grill grids well before making dessert, so your sweetbruschetta doesn'thave a

hint of barbecue sauce. To finish, raid your fridge and pantry. You could top your grilled bread with a little bit of chocolate, which will get soft and melty. Creamy, mild cheeses (goat cheese, cream cheese, mascarpone) are also good, combined with fruit and sprinkled with a little turbinado sugar or drizzled with honey or maple syrup.

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

H OME 4 Pillows Continued from D1 Any or all of t hese three wrapped pillows are sure to

add apop of color.

Cornercues One of the quickest decorating options ever, this pillow requires two squares of fabric 10 inches larger than the pillow form; the squares don't have to be the same fabric — if they're different, the pillow is reversible. An easy option is to use fabric napkins or scarves with pre-finished edges. If you're purchasing fabric, allow enough extra to turn under '/ 4-inch hems on each side and secure them with '/4-inchwide fusible web tape, such as Steam-A-Seam2. 1. Lay one fabric square right side down on the tabletop; center the pillow form on top. Add the other fabric square rightside up over the pillow. 2. Tuck under th e f a bric edges to cover the pillow form and grab one corner to form dog-ears. Using a n e l astic pony tail holder (or a ribbon tie), secure each corner, adjusting the extended fullness evenly. Repeat for the other pillow corners.

Knot pretty Begin with a piece of fabric that's three times the width of the pillow form and twice as tall plus 3 inches. There's no

Tour Continued from D1 Experimental plantings are included every year. Some work, and some end up being referredto as the $50 stick. A

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need to finish the fabric edges, as they'll be hidden. 1. With the fabric wrong side up, place the pillow form in the center of t h e l a r ge square. 2. Fold the fabric up to the pillow center and fold the upper portion down until the edges overlap about P/z inches. The fabric should wrap the pillow

Next week: Diagnosing tomato trouble

Knot pretty How to create a no-sew pillow cover by knotting folded fabric Begin with a piece of fabric that's three times the width of the pillow form and twice as tall plus 3 inches. There's no need to finish the fabric

edges as they'll be hidden.

form snugly.

Fold the fabric up to the pillow center and fold the upper portion down until the edges overlap about1'/2 inches. The fabric should wrap the pillow form snugly.

Tie the fabric ends into a square knot

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the pillow top, wrapping snugly. 5. Tie the fabric ends into a square knot and tuck in the loose fabric ends. Shape the knot. This pillow can be used with the knotted side as the front side, or with the flat surface

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Select fabric 18 inches longer than the bolster and the measurement of the bolster circumference plus 5 inches. Turn under t/4 inch hems on each edge and secure with '/4inch-wide fusible web. 1. Lay out the fabric wrong side up on a tabletop and center the bolster form. 2. Roll the f a bric snugly around the pillow form, over-

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Greg Cross/The Bulletin

side yard of healthy vegetables are mulched withdried grass clippings. The gardens are filled with the unusual, and I left with a list of plants to investigate. Walking through the garden gate of the Huff/Brown garden in northeast Bend was like entering an enchanted garden. What was once a yard of cheat grass, juniper and lava rock is now a sea of colorful plants and unique art. The meandering grass pathways with bits

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and there give the illusion of a much larger space. At each turn of the pathway is another little vignette, different, but yet related to the area you just

Photos by Joe Kline /The Bulletin

Pieces of artwork are incorporated into a stump in the McCabe garden in Bend.

passed.

• •

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Many of the plants have a history, coming from the family farm in Polk County. The abundance of roses, between 40-50 shrub roses, is attributed to Huff's grandma, as is his interest and love of gardening. We don't see many b igleafed plants in Central Oregon other t han L i g ularia. Japanese Fuki, a zone 5 plant located on the north side of the house, is the size of a gunnera and has proved successful in that location. A great

arbor was constructed from the prunnings off the property. And bet you didn't even recognize the old m i r rored sliding closet doors that were reframed in rough wood, then disguised with some hog wire and hung on the fence. If you were looking for ideas and culture advice on vines, you would have found varieties and a wealth of information at the Henneous garden. Varieties of clematis, including the native clematis, Virginia

creeper, honeysuckle and silver lace grow over arbors and walls, making a colorful transition from flower garden to a prolific vegetable garden. The loss of a large Scotch pine has changed the environment of the front yard, which 'r ' now has more sun. The change R has required replanning and replanting. I couldn't help but think, "What if?" Vegetables abound in their garden, enough t o a l w ays share. Tomatoes and peppers are grown in large black nurs- The rock wall is filledwith a variety of plants in the Perce garden in ery pots, set against a wooden Bend. The native rocks are placed to resembie a wandering rocky fence in full sun. Raised beds stream bed. at a good height for "stand straight" working are mulched with dried grass clippings (no ,' «P:;

weed and feed clippings). •

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The Woodside Ranch area certainly e ncounters every Central O r egon g a rdening challenge.There isa requirement to create a fire-defensible area, a need to create a warmer microclimateand, ofcourse, a plan to deal with deer. The three featured gardens here have done their problem solving in similar ways that work. The newest of the Woodside gardens is the 3-year-old McCabe garden.

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FREE 2013 FAIR BUS SCHEDULE DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIRAND RODEO

Continued on next page Flowers grow in the rock wall at the Perce garden.

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All times include

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ln the Huff/Brown garden in northeast Bend, mirrored sliding closet doors — reframed in rough wood and disguised with hog wire — hang on a fence to reflect the garden back into the yard.


TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

THE FLEXITARIAN

ASK MARTHA

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a in er ect iero i,

rainsma esim MARK BITTMAN This monthly feature explores healthy and delicious food ideas from the New York Times' food columnist. By Mark Bittman New York Times News Service

You can't mention quinoa w ithout hearing about t h e plight of the Bolivians who can no longer afford to buy their crop because we're willing to pay so much for it. The word "rice" has become loaded: There are more colors (red?

. MARTHA STEWART

Makes 4 to 6 servings. 1 C millet Salt 2 TBS neutral oil 4 ears fresh corn, shucked, with kernels stripped off cobs 1 TBS cumin seeds Freshly ground black pepper 8 oz peeled shrimp, roughly chopped

.Do you have a good . recipe for p i erogi

1 sm red onion, chopped

1 mango or 2 peaches, peeled and chopped 4 C arugula /2 C basil, chopped Juice of 2 limes 3 TBS olive oil

Put the millet and a large pinch salt into a medium saucepan with

water to cover by about an inch. Bring to a boil, then adjust the heat so the mixture bubbles gently. Cook, stirring occasionally until the millet is tender, 20 to 30 minutes. Add water if necessary to keep the grains

covered; if any liquid remains by the time the millet is tender, strain it out. While the millet cooks, put1 tablespoon neutral oil in a large skillet occasionally. Keep the corn in a flat layer until all of the corn kernels are

deeply browned (or even lightly charred) on at least one side. Add the cumin seeds and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about a minute. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, transfer to a serving bowl and wipe out the skillet.

Put the remaining tablespoon of neutral oil into the skillet. When it's hot, add the shrimp, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the shrimp are pink all over and just cooked through, 2 to 3 minutes. Add them to the bowl with the corn. When the millet is tender, add it to the bowl along with the onion, man-

go or peach, arugula, basil, lime juice and olive oil. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Makes 4 servings. 1 shallot, peeled and roughly

chopped 1 TBS capers 1 (6-oz) can good tuna in olive oil '/s C parsley leaves Ground black pepper 3 ripe tomatoes, cut into

wedges 4 hard-cooked eggs, halved /2C niiyoise or other black olives

Put the farro and alarge pinch salt into a medium saucepanwith water to cover by about an inch. Bring to a boil, then adjust the heat so the mixture bubbles gently. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the farro is tender but still has bite, 20 to 30 minutes. Add water if necessary to keep the grains covered; if any liquid remains by the time the farro is tender, strain it out.

Meanwhile, bring another mediumpan of water to a boil andsalt it. Add the green beans and cook until bright green and crisp-tender, 2 minutes or so, then plunge them into a bowl of ice water or run under cold water to cool them. Put the anchovies, olive oil, lemon zest and juice, mustard, shallot and

capers into a food processor and puree. Chop the tuna and parsley by hand and mix them in. (Alternatively, add the parsley to the food processor and pulse to chop, then add the tuna and pulse, once or twice,

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one that can be filled with sweet or savory contents — and be sure to let the dough rest.

Housebreaking a cat

Q•

How do I t r ain an • older, adopted cat to use a litter box'? • Cats are very prac• tical. If a litter box seems to bethe most convenient place to r e l ieve itself, the cat w il l l i k ely use it. Katie Watts, senior feline behavior counselor at the ASPCA's Adoption Center, suggests o utfitting your house with more t han one bo x a n d s e t ting aside a kitty-friendly room to encourage it t o

A

Big Martha's Pierogi Dough 1 Ig egg, lightly whisked 2 TBS sour cream 1 C whole milk 1 C water 5 C all-purpose flour, plus more for surface and dusting Cornmeal, for dusting

stay indoors and to pick the obvious, easy place to eliminate. Gradually restrict the cat's access to the outdoors as it acclimates to the box; as a last resort, confine the c at in th e r oom i f i t d o e s not. To make the transition easier, you can even set out more than one kind of litter at a time to discern the cat's

it can be kept in the freezer from a month up to a year; after that, it should be thrown out. This w il l p r e vent o v ercrowding and view obstruction. Lastly, make sure you keep likefoods together: red meat with red meat, sauce with sauce, and so on. It's much easier to find what you preference. need if you don't have to rummage through every o ther Organizing your freezer food group on the way. Whatisthebestwayto For additional ideas on how . organize a freezer'? to bestorganize your freezer, • The k e y t o k e e p ing Lucinda Scala Quinn, food • order in y o ur f r e ezer e ditorial d i r ector a t Ma r is knowing what exactly is tha S t ewart, r e commends "Can I Freeze It?" by Susie going in and when exactly to take it o ut. Use freezer Theodorou. bags or containers marked — Questions of general interest with freezer labels, such as can be emailed to mslletters~ t he preprinted k i tchen l a marthastewart.com. For more bels from M a r tha Stewart information on this column, visit H ome Office W i t h A v e r y www.marthastewart.com.

Q.

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and record the contents and freeze dates of everything you store. This makes cleaning out your freezer, which Whisk together egg and should happen four times a sour cream. Whisk in milk and year, a breeze. water. Stir in flour, 1 cup at a D epending on t h e f o o d, time, until a loose and sticky

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knead, dusting with flour and needed, until elastic and no

longer sticky, 8 to 10 minutes. Be careful not to add too much flour, which will toughen the

dough. Cover with an inverted bowl, and let dough rest 1

the seasoning, and pile it on a platter. Arrange the green beans, toma-

dust generously with cornmeal

toes, eggs and olives around the farro, as artfully as you like. Drizzle the

to prevent sticking. Roll out1 piece of dough on a lightly floured surface until /s inch thick. (Keep other pieces

Serving Bend, Redmond, Sisters, Sunriver, Powell Butte and Terrebonne

covered with plastic wrap.) Cut out circles very close

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ing dough. For a twist on the

Put the oil into a medium skillet over medium-high heat. When it's hot, add the chicken; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until browned and cooked through, 5 to10 minutes. Add the shredded coco-

traditional potato-and-cheese pierogi, try filling the dumplings with fruit, such as blueberries or Italian plums. Visit marthastewart.com/pierogi for

nut and curry powder. Cook, stirring to coat chicken, until curry is fragrant and coconut lightly toasted, a minute

recipes.

chopped

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or two. Transfer to a large serving bowl; let cool for a few minutes. Add the remaining ingredients to the bowl, and toss well to combine. Taste and adjust the seasoning, and let

the salad sit for a few minutes (no morethan10) before serving.

From previous page

tinued self-seeding, will transform the area into the effect of a mountain meadow. During the month of May, more than 20 varieties ofbirds found their way to the various birdhouses, feeders and birdbaths. Good usage was made of a small triangle of land between the shop and the garage. It is being developed into a native garden to p r ovide viewing pleasure while enjoying sitting on the patio. Bird f eeders, perennials, trees, potatoes and raspberries sharethe property at the Paznokas garden. One wouldn't lenges, especially this spring think it necessary to purchase with m am a d ee r t e aching a rock, especially in the area the fawns how tasty the new of Woodside Ranch, but it did growth of rhodies can be. Said happen. A backyard pond and shrubs are now recovering, pro- recirculating stream coming tected by sturdy wire cages. out of a lava outcropping was Native rocks placed to re- created, but needed a large flat semble a w a ndering rocky rock for a "bridge." Nothing stream bed is home to min- appropriatecould be found on iature rock g a rden p l ants, site, so it was off to purchase including many sedums, min- the perfect size and shape. iature potentilla and a n ew An 8-foot deer fence protects favorite, aurinia saxatillis. An the six 4-by-8 and 28-inch-high upper hill has been seeded to raised beds. The raised beds native grasses, blue flax, na- have the hoop house covertive daisies, which, with con- ings ready to be lowered for Half ofthe 2.5 acres have been left native with attention being given to reviving overgrown beds. Larch trees, a personal favorite, plus other trees are replacing junipers to conserve moisture. Eight elaborate raised beds at a stand-up working height were built on a concrete slab, which increases the heat factor. Garden art is placed in and among the garden beds, which is always a d e l ight w h en discovered. The Perce garden has also successfully dealt with the chal-

Celebrate

plant protection and season extension. The strawberries are also in a raised bed with a cloth screen hoop house for protection from the birds. The screening,attached to a frame, is raised and held in place with

The Hummingbirds 6z Butterflies Of Summert Special Hummingbird 4 Butterfly Wildflower Seed Vast Selection Of Perennials R. Alluring Wildflowers Glazed Earthen Bird Baths • Whimsical Bird Feeders

a bungee cord for easy picking. A new project is in progress for a hidden hammock getaway carefully hidden behind a lava outcropping. Sounds like a perfect place for a good book and a glass of lemonade. A trip to Hollinshead Community Garden on Northeast Jones Road is fun anytime. The garden is a joint effort between Bend Park 8c Recreation District and the Central Oregon Chapter of Oregon State University Master Gardeners. M a ster g a r deners manage the garden, maintain the garden beds that surround the community garden and assist the gardeners in the 90 garden plots that are available to rent in April. Free classes on gardening topics are offered monthly. For class listings, go to www.gocomga.com. — Reporter: douville@ bendbroadband.com.

I

Turn out dough onto a

pieces. Line a rimmed baking sheet with a kitchen towel and

/2 C chopped scallions /2 C coconut milk 3 TBS lime juice 3 C puffed brown rice cereal /2 C chopped fresh cilantro

I

floured surface. Using a bench scraper, turn and fold dough to

pepper, then taste and adjust the seasoning. Toss the farro, warm, with about half the dressing. Taste and adjust

Makes 4 to 6servings.

BarkTurISo|l.com

dough forms.

hour. Divide dough into 4 equal

remaining dressing over them andserve.

Tony Cenicola/ New York Times News Service

Be sure to label the foods in your freezer — you'll thank yourself later.

(available from staples.com),

pourable; if it isn't, add lemon juice, olive oil or water to thin a bit. Add

to blend. Don't puree the tuna, but chop it well.) The mixture should be

1 C cooked or canned chickpeas, drained 1 carrot, chopped 1 cucumber, peeled and seeded if necessary, and chopped 1 Ig ripe tomato, cored and

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dough and advice on how to make it? The consensus • a mong t h e foo d editors at Martha Stewart Living is: Try Big Martha's

Farro Niqoise 1 Cfarro Salt 1 Ib green beans, trimmed 3 anchovy fillets /s C olive oil, plus more if needed Zest of 1 lemon Juice of 2 lemons, plus more if needed 1 tsp Dijon mustard

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Pierogi D ough r e cipe (listed below) — a basic

Puffed Rice Salad with Chicken 2 TBS olive oil 1 Ib boneless chicken thighs, cut into small chunks Salt and black pepper /2 C shredded unsweetened coconut 1 TBS curry powder

reezer stora e, cat trainin

Millet with Corn, Mango and Shrimp

black?) and types (extra-long over high heat. When hot, add the kernels and cook, shaking the pan brown Basmati?) than those of us who grew up knowing only Carolina and Uncle Ben's could have ever imagined. What whole grains aren't is a panacea, or a substitute for anything except the h yperprocessedgrains that replaced them in the first place. But at this point, the widespread, almost universal availability of farro, quinoa and millet alone would be more important and valuable than all of the gorgeous heirloom beans that have been rediscovered in the last decade. Legumes we already had; these are new to most of us. Throw in spelt, kamut, wheat berries and brown rice, along with the semi-processed bulgur (cracked and steamed wheat) and steel-cut oats, as well as couscous, which i s u s ually treated as if it were a grain, and kasha (buckwheat groats), and it's a new world out there. These questions seem to baffle many people: I) How do you cook them? And 2) What do you do with them'? These are the answers, in short: Until they're done. And whatever you'd like. Glibness aside, the first answer is for real. Whole grains don't all taste the same — far from it. But they all act pretty much the same, so you can treat them all, including bulgur and steel-cut oats, pretty much the same way: Cover them in abundant salted water and simmer until tender but still chewy. As great as the grains are, they cannot stand alone; they are role players. They need vegetables, fruits, meat or fish, and they need well-thought-out sauces.

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TH E BULLETIN• TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

ADVICE 4 E N T ERTAINMENT

' unn in eru e ome ieva mur er TV SPOTLIGHT By Dave Itzkoff New York Times News Service

PHILADELPHIA — No matter what the title of the show promises, the skies over this location shoot for "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia" had offered onlythunderstorms broken up by occasional periods of mugginess. Maybe that was typical weather for this recent summer morning, or maybe it was the influence of the authors of the scene about to be filmed, who were thousands of miles away, busy with their regularly foreboding duties. For most episodes of "It's Always Sunny," the proudly depraved FX comedy about miscreant friends who run their own bar, the stars and producers Rob McElhenney, Glenn Howerton and Charlie Day keep the writing assignments to themselves and their like-minded colleagues. But for this installment, the three (momentarily gathered beneath an overhang, waiting for the rain to pass) entrusted those duties to David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, the creators and show runners of the starkly brutal HBO fantasy "Game of Thrones." Benioff and Weiss have won acclaim for "Game of Thrones," about a battle for power in a cutthroat medieval world; last week, it was nominated for 16 Emmy Awards, including best drama.

Patrick McElnenney/ FX via New York Times News Service

Mary Elizabeth Ellis, left, and Charlie Day appear in an episode of "It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia." The fast-paced depraved comedy recently had the show runners of HBO's "Game of Thrones" guest-write an episode. They have also gained a reputation — consistent with the George R. R. Martin novels from which the show is adapted — forkillingoff prominent characters in gruesome fashion. In one of their few outside writing assignments, Weiss and Benioff wanted to split sides in the figurative sense, not requiring broadswords or battle-axes. They pursued "It's Always Sunny" not only because they were fans of the show and its creator, McElhenney, but also because its humor and fast-paced halfhour format would challenge them. Emailing from Belfast, where they do most of their "Game of Thrones" work, they said that McElhenney was "a sadist and likes to watch drama writers

crash and burn." McElhenney said he embraced their offer knowing it was a good opportunity for his show, and respecting what Benioff and Weiss do on "Game of Thrones," "executing that many story lines with that many characters, and creating such a rich and full tapestry every week." Also, McElhenney said, "you don't know who's going to get theirhead chopped off." The "Game of Thrones" creators first met McElhenney and his wife, Kaitlin Olson, another star of "It's Always Sunny," several months ago at a party in Los Angelesand confessedtheir love for the comedy. "Like all actors," Benioff and Weiss said, "they respond wellto worship." As it turned out, "Game of

Thrones" is one of a few shows that McElhenney and Olson, who are parents of two young sons, still watch regularly."Once those kids are in bed," Olson said, "we get real grown up." When Weiss and Benioff hit upon an idea for "It's Always Sunny" — a gloss on the novel "Flowers for A l g ernon," in which Day's ne'er-do-well character is convinced that a scientific experiment is making him smarter — they suggested it to McElhenney. Asked whether they were tempted to kill off any principal "Sunny" characters, Weiss and Benioff said: "Nah. Those guys are immortal in our m i nds. They're like th e Simpsons." As for supporting players like the unnamed Waitress or the d own-on-his-luck Rick e t y Cricket, well — they didn't quite answer the question. Certainly, the "Game of Thrones" connection and the large youthful audiences it brings in are a powerful promotional opportunity for "It's Always Sunny" at a time when the series is migrating to a new FX spinoff channel, FXX, that is aimed atyoungerviewers. (Both the new channel and the new season of the show will make their debuts in September) Still, McElhenney and his colleagues had to be sure that the "Game of Thrones" guys could emulate the wayward tone of "It's Always Sunny." More crucially, McElhenney said that the intricate serialized

ounterto sno ace orto ers Dear Abby:I work inthe print center of an office supply store. Often when parents of small children come in to get copies made, they'll sit their babies/toddlers on the counter while we discuss their needs. Sometimes these children have dirty diapers. W hile I a m n o t DEAR a parent, I d o u n ABBY derstand that small children have a tendency to run off or otherwise misbehave if they are left standing. But sitting children on the counter strikes me as unsanitary and unsafe. Would it be appropriate to ask these parents to remove their children from the counter? Because my w orkplace isgeared toward satisfying the customer, I worry about offending a customer and displeasing management. I haven't said anything so far, but this is really getting to me. —Disgusted in Ohio Dear Disgusted: After reading your letter, I confess that my first impulse was to gag. The idea of a child in a soiled diaper sitting on a counter in a place of business is, indeed, disgusting. You would be doing your employer a favor to suggest that if a child should fall off the counter,

there could be liability involved. Tell the customer that for the child's safety to please remove him/ her from the counter. And if the child has a dirty diaper, make sure you have a large supply of sanitary w ipes on h and s o staff and customers will be protected from the bacteria. Dear Abby: After years o f e n d uring overdraft cha r g es and dodging bill collectors, I have finally gotten my financial house in order. Ipay all of mybills, and Ipay them on time. However, I have very little money left over at the end of the week. Many of my friends have two-income householdsor use creditcards when they go out to eat or to the movies, which is often. I want them to know that because I decline their invitations does not mean I'm antisocial — I just can't afford it. I have said so at times, but I hate to be a broken record. Friends: PLEASE know that I appreciate being invited, but don't be offended when I am unable to join

you. — On Track But Still Broke in Maine

HAPPY BIRTHDAY FORTUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013:This yearyouhave

Dear On Track:I congratulate you for straightening out your finances. It's not always easy to do, and breaking ingrained habits can be a

challenge. The next step in your "recovery" is to KEEP reminding your freespending friends that while you'd like to join them, you are not always able to do so. If you repeat it often enough, eventually they will get the message. It would be better if they hear it directly from you rather than read it in my column. Dear Abby: My neighbors borrow my lawnmower every summer to mow their lawns. It broke down, and I had to purchase a new one. The dealer told me not to loan it to anyone because they pushed the old one over sticks and stones and destroyed the blades. How do I tell them to buy their own mowers? My new one is expensive. — Against Mower-Moochers Dear Against: Here's how: Keep uppermost in your mindthat it is perfectly all right to advocate for yourself. Then tell your mower-mooching neighbors that after what happened to the last one, you are no longer loaning your mower to anyone. — Write to Dear Abby at dearabby.com or P0. Box69440,Los Angeles, CA 90069

SCORPIO (Oct.23-Nov.21)

YOURHOROSCOPE

a very positive outlook that promotes By Jacqueline Bigar success in your endeavors. Not only will you see your immediate circle expand, but you also will see along-term wish come to manner later, if you feel it is appropriate. fulfillment. If you Tonight: Do your own thing. Stars showthekind are single, you'll CANCER (June 21-Joly22) ofdayyou'llhave meet many new ** * * * D ynamic people. Somewhere** * * Y ou'll opt for a new idea or try a ** * * P ositive a m ong them lies new suggestion that seems like a sure** * A verage the person who will bet winner. Stay in touch with someone you consider a dear friend, but be smart ** S o-so introduce you to — don't make a close loved one jealous * Difficult your next sweetie. of this friendship. A meeting proves If you are attached, important. Tonight: Where your friends the two of you experience agreater sense are. of connection. There could be somevery intense and intimate moments. TAURUS is LEO (July23-Aug.22) ** * * You clearly need to take the lead equally as stubborn as you. in an important matter. Others naturally will ARIES (March 21-April 19) followyou, even if you veer off the chosen ** * Be aware of what is happening with course. You knowwhatyou are doing, and your finances andwith any agreements you'll clearly communicate thatfact in your you make that concern you andyour words and body language.Tonight: Out till skills. Initially, someone might seemvery the wee hours. generous, butas time goes on, you'll see VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept. 22) that this person's offer is not what you ** * * You'll want to focus on the long thought it was. Tonight: Catch up onnews. term. You aresomeonewho specializes TAURUS (April20-May20) in details, and you haveatendencyto get ** * * * Y ou have a strong sense of what caught upinthe hereand now.Makean works. Do not hesitate to useyour charm effort to detach andsee asituation from and skills. Listen to news with an open other perspectives. Tonight: Get into the ear, and beaware of your limits regarding good times and put on afavorite CD. what you should communicate to others. LIBRA (Sept.23-Oot.22) At times, the less said the better. Tonight: ** * You'll discover the needfor more Beam in what you want. one-on-one conversations, especially GEMINI (May21-June20) with someone whocan impactyour life ** * Know when to backaway from a profoundly. You will feel better when you volatile situation. You could betakenaback by the strong words you want to say, which knowthatyouareonthesamepage. Tonight: Say "yes" to an invitation, but do is a good reason to distance yourself. You not share this information with anyone. can verbalize the samephrase in acalmer

** * * You like to have control, but others continue to dominate. Let it be. Youwill have your turn when the time is right. You can't push someone — you needto wait for him or her to focus. However, this just might be the last day you need towait. Tonight: Your turn to choose.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov.22-Dec. 21)

** * You might not lookforward to carrying out all the tasks that lie aheadof you, but know thatyou will do anexcellent job. A conversation with a partner or an associate will allow both of you to find some middle ground, asyoumight notagree on a key matter. Tonight: Put up your feet.

CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan.19) ** * * Your ingenuity once more will save the dayandleaveeveryone smiling and wanting more. Youcould feel as if you needto makeachangeofsortsand head in a new direction. You will turn on the charm and coax others to agreewith you. Tonight: How about some good times?

AQUARIUS (Jan.20-Feb. 18) ** * * * T h ere is a chance that you will be in the midst of a different type of energy. You could find someone unusually demanding and their desires stressful. You have choices to make, butyou will put them on hold until you are more clearheaded. Tonight: Settle in at homeandrelax.

PISCES (Feb.19-March20) ** * * Howyou say whatyou think andtheanswersyougivecouldbem ore important than yourealize. Youmight decide thata project involving several people needs to berevised at its core. You needto be gentle whengiving your assessment. Tonight: Get together with friends. ©20t3 by King Features Syndicate

style of "Game of Thrones" was "the polar opposite of what we do on 'Sunny."' Rule No. I of "It's Always Sunny," he said, is that "our characters neverreallychangeorgrow," or else"there'dbe no show." By design, he said, "you could pick up Episode 6 from Season 7, and have no idea what was happening in the previous seasons or episodes, and catch

right up." So Weiss and Benioff were subjectedto the same process any other potential contributor would undergo. They went to the production offices, pitched their idea to the writing staff, wrote an outline that was further refined by the show's writers and then a script that was also revised. The "Game of Thrones" creators said it "was humbling to step into a room with 15 guys who are smarter, funnier and quicker than we are." They added, "They were all very gracious about the fact that we're both brutally unfunny." But the writers of "It's Always Sunny" said that Benioff and Weiss delivered a script that was structurally sound. "We knew that most importantly there would be a working story, and we can always add or subtract jokes," Day said. "If a random actor came in and wanted to write an episode, I would be concerned. But anyone who runs a successful show, I know they're probably

going to do a good job."

MOVIE TIMESTOOAY • There may beanadditional fee for 3-0 and IMAXmovies. • Movie times are subject to change after press time. t

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Regal Old Mill Stadium16 8 IMAX,680 S.W.Powerhouse Drive, 541-382-6347 • THE CONJURING (R) Noon, 3:25, 7:40, 10:20 • GROWNUPS 2(PG-I3) I2:30, 4: IO, 7:45, IO: l5 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG)10:45 a.m., 1:20, 4, 6:30, 9:15 • HAPPYFEETTWO (PG)10a.m. • THE HEAT (R) 12:05, 3, 7:05, 9:55 • THE LONE RANGER(PG-13) 11a.m., 2:25, 6:10, 9:35 • MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G) 11:15a.m., 2:55 • PACIFIC RIM(PG-13) 12:45 • PACIFIC RIM IMAX3-0(PG-13) 12:25, 3:35, 7, 10:05 • RACINGSTRIPES(PG) 10a.m. • RED 2(PG-13) 11:25 a.m., 3:10, 6:25, 9:10 • R.I.P.D.(PG-13) I2:40, 4:25, 7:25 • R.I.P.D. 3-D(PG-13)9:50 • SPRINGSTEEN & I (no MPAArating) 7:30 • THIS IS THE END(R) 7:50, IO:25 • THE TO 00 LIST(R) 11:35 a.m., 2:35, 6:50, 9:20 • TURBO (PG) 11:50 a.m., 2:50, 6:05, 9 • WHITE HOUSE DOWN(PG-13) 10:50 a.m., 2:40, 10:05 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 4:15, 6:45, 7:30, 9:45, 10:20 • THE WOLVERINE 3-D (PG-13) 12:15, 3:45, 7:15, 10:15 • WORLDWARZ (PG-13) 11:10a.m., 2:20, 6:15, 10 • Accessibility devices are available for some movies. t

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Regal Pilot Butte 6, 2717N.E.U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-6347 • FRUITVALE STATION(R) 1, 4, 7 • THE KINGS OFSUMMER (R) 1:15, 4: l5, 7 • THE LONE RANGER(PG-13) Noon, 3, 6 • MUD(PG-I3) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15 • STAR TREK INTODARKNESS(PG-13) 12:30, 3:30, 6:30 • THE WAY WAYBACK(PG- l3) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45

TV TODAY 8 p.m. on FAM, "Pretty Little Liars" —Hanna (Ashley Benson) turns to Mona (Janel Parrish) to save her mother (Laura Leighton) from being convicted. Spencer (Troian Bellisario) visits an old haunt to investigate Wilden's (Bryce Johnson) ties to another mysterious death. Emily (Shay Mitchell) turns to her old boss (Rumer Willis) for an escape from her stress. Aria (Lucy Hale)seeks Jake's (RyanGuzman) help understanding Mike's (CodyChristian) attitude in the newepisode "The Guilty Girl's Handbook." 9 p.m. on l3, "NCIS: LosAngeles" —Chechen terrorists are recruiting foreign fighters to their cause and planning anattack in the U.S. In an effort to stop them,Callen (Chris O'Donnell) goes under cover to infiltrate the network in "The ChosenOne." LL Cool J, Linda Hunt, Daniela Ruahand Eric Christian Olsenalso star. 9p.m. on TNT, "Rizzoli 5 Isles" — We all havebaddays, but most of us aren't caught on video that goes viral while we're having them. Poor Jane (AngieHarmon) isn't most of us. Sheaccidentally spills coffee on astranger at Boston Joe's, and someonerecords the incident and posts the video, putting her careerand reputation in jeopardy. A murder involving a conspiracy theorist keepsthe squad busy in the newepisode "Somebody's Watching Me." 9 p.m. on USA, "Covert Affairs" — Annie (Piper Perabo) is back in Colombia trying to figure out whose sideTeoBraga(Manolo Cardona) is on in anattempt to thwart a potential terrorist act. Joan (Kari Matchett) begins a series of interviews that could change her careerpath in the new episode "Into the White." Christopher Gorhamalso stars. 10 p.m. on ES, "Person of Interest" —Reeseand Finch's (Jim Caviezel, Michael Emerson) latest person of interest isn't a very nice one; he's anenforcer for the mob. Thetwomen havea tough decisi onto make:Dotheysave him or let karma haveits waywith him? Finch seeksout help from an unlikely source in "Triggerman." 10p.m. on TNT, "Perception" — Pierce (Eric McCormack) teams up with Donnie (Scott Wolf) to investigate a malfunction in a device designed to control tremors. When a murder raises the stakes in their investigation, their already shaky alliance is put to the test. Lewicki (Arjay Smith) learns something about dating in the newepisode "Defective." ©Zap2rt

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McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W.Bond St., 54I-330-8562 • THE GREAT GATSBY (PG-13) 6 • THE HANGOVER PARTIII (R) 9:30 • After 7 p.m., shows are 21ando/der on/y. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p m. ifaccompanied by a legal guardian. t

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Tin Pan Theater, 869 N.W.Tin PanAlley, 541-241-2271 • DIRTY WARS(NR)7 • FAROUT ISN'T FAR ENOUGH: THE TOMI UNGERER STORY(no MPAArating) 5 • FRANCES HA(R) 9 I

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Redmond Cinemas,1535 S.W.OdemMedo Road, 541-548-8777 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG) 1:45, 4, 6:15 • GROWN UPS (P 2 G-I3)2:15,4:30,6:45,9 • PACIFIC RIM(PG-13) 9:30 • RED 2(PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 3:15, 6:15, 9:15 Sisters Movie House,720 Desperado Court, 541-549-8800 • THE HEAT (R) 7:30 • RED 2(PG-13) 5, 7:30 • R.I.P.D.(PG-13) 5:45, 8 • TURBO (PG) 5: I5 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 5, 7:45 rt

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Madras Cinema 5,1101 S.W. U.S. Highway97, 541-475-3505 • DESPICABLE ME2 (PG)Noon, 2:20, 4:40, 7:05, 9:25 • GROWN UPS (P 2 G-I3)12:35,2:50,5:05,7:20,9:40 • RED 2(PG-13) 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:30 • TURBO (PG) Noon, 2, 7:10, 9:30 • TURBO3-0(PG) Noon,5 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 4:10, 6:50 • THE WOLVERINE 3-0 (PG-13) 2: IO,9:20 •

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Pine Theater, 214 N.MainSt., 541-416-1014 • TURBO (UPSTAIRS— PG)6:30 • THE WOLVERINE (PG-13) 6: l5 • Theupstairs screeningroomhaslimited accessibility.

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ON PAGES 3&4.COMICS & PUZZLES ~ The Bulletin

Create or find Classifieds at www.bendbLllletin.com THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013

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$350. 541-350-1201

HAVANESE PUPPIES

AKC, non-shed, hypo- The Bulletin The Bulletin recomu/////:",. mends extra caution Chihuahua puppies, tea- allergenic, Dewclaws, recommends extra U TD s h ot s $ 8 5 0 .I ca i • when purc h as- cup, shots 8 dewormed, i e. p. 541-460-1277. ing products or serchasing products or • $250. 541-420-4403 vices from out of the I services from out of I KITTENS! Fo s t ered, area. Sending cash, Chihuahua/Yorkie the area. Sending i friendly, fixed, shots, Puppy, Female, shots, ID chip, more! Varichecks, or credit incash, checks, or loving, sweet, t i ny, f ormation may b e i credit i n f ormation ety of colors 8 persubjected to fraud. apricot. With kennel. sonalities. Adopt from may be subjected to For more i nforma- $250 541-815-4052 home (see i FRAUD. For more tion about an adver- Donate deposit bottles/ foster information about an t TomTom Motel Mgr, tiser, you may call from Sonic) or advertiser, you may i the O r egon State cans to local all vol- across call t h e Ore g onI unteer, non-profit res- sanctuary (65480 78th I' State Attorney General's Att or n ey ' Tumalo), Sat. 8 Office C o n sumer cue, to h e l p w / cat St., i General's O f f i ce i• spay/neuter vet bills. Sun. 1-5 PM. Just $25 Consumer ProtecProtection hotline at per kitten; adopt a pair Cans for Cats trailer 1-877-877-9392. t ion ho t l in e at I for $40! 3 8 9 8 420, at Jake's Diner thru i 1-877-877-9392. 7/30, then at R a y's www.craftcats.org. The Bulletin Serving Central Oregon anre 1903 Foods on Century Dr. Lab Pups AKC, black & D onate Mon-Fri a t yellow, Master Hunter Just bought a new boat? Smith Sign, 1515 NE sired, performance pediSell your old one in the 2nd; or at CRAFT in OFA cert hips 8 elclassifieds! Ask about our Tumalo anytime. 541- gree, 541-771-2330 Antiques & Super Seller rates! 389-8420. Info/map, bows, www.kinnamanrelrieveraoom 541-385-5809 www.craftcats.org Collectibles Labrador purebred pupAdopt a nice cat from pies, yellows & blacks, DO YOU HAVE PetSmart or Tumalo males 8 females, ready SOMETHING TO rescue! Fixed, shots, now! $300. 541-771-5511 SELL ID chip, tested, more! FOR $500 OR Sanctuary open Sat/ Maltese AKC champion Sun 1-5, other days LESS? bloodlines 7 wks , Non-commercial by appt. 65480 78th, $600. 541-420-1577 advertisers may Bend. Photos, map at Beautiful handwww.craftcats.org. place an ad with carved coffee table OUI' -4 S + " S e 541-389-8420, or like (44" x 19'/4" x 17y2") "QUICK CASH us on Facebook. Manx kittens, a s st'd and 2 matching end SPECIAL" colors, short tails, $30 tables (shown) 2434" Adult b arn/shop/work- 1 week 3 lines 12 Cash. 541-678-7599 x 15" x 24'/4". Built in ing cats, fixed, shots, ~ 2 k 20 ! Taiwan between some friendly, some Ad must include POODLE Toy pups & 1940-1950, all glass not. No fee 8 free deteens. Also, POMAPOOS price of single item covered, in excellivery. 541-389-8420 Call 541-475-3889 of $500 or less, or lent condition. $1000 multiple items A pet sitter in NE Bend, OBO. 541-382-6731 Queensland Heelers whose total does warm and loving home Standard 8, Mini, $150 not exceed $500. with no cages, $25 day. & up. 541-280-1537 The Bulletin reserves Linda at 541-647-7308 www.rightwayranch.wor the right to publish all Call Classifieds at dpress.com BOXER AKC puppies, ads from The Bulletin 541-385-5809 reat litter, 1st shots, www.bendbulletin.com newspaper onto The Schnoodle pup, Black 700. 541-325-3376 Bulletin Internet webmale, Great w/ kids. Cavalier King Charles 2 German Shepherds AKC Shots, wormed, dews, site. females 8 wks AKC www.sherman-ranch.us non-shed. $400. The Bulletin $1200. 541-678-3724 541-281-6829 541-410-7701 Serving Centrat Oregon since i903

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Now you can cidd a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting clt only $15.00 per week, when you order your cid online. To place your Bulletin ctd with cf photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com,

click on "Place an ad" and follow these easy steps: Pick ci category (for example — pets or transportation) and choose your ad package. Write your ad and upload your digital photo. Create your account with any major credit card, All ads appear in both print and online.

Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

a.ssi Ie S

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E2 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Can be found on these pages: Ranch Managerfor 400 acre ranch in Central Oregon. Responsible for EMPLOYMENT FINANCEAND BUSINESS day-to-day operations 8 410 - Private Instruction 507 - Real Estate Contracts m anagement of staff,un- 421 - Schools andTraining 514 -Insurance der direction of board of 454- Looking for Employment 528 - Loans and Mortgages directors. Must provide exceptional 8 p r o fes- 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 543 - StocksandBonds sional service to ranch 476 - Employment Opportunities 558 - Business Investments owners and guests, Will 486 - Independent Positions 573 - BusinessOpportunities provide maintenance of equipment & e n viron476 476 mental stewardship of Employment Employment property. Must have 5 years' ranch manageOpportunities Opportunities ment or related experience 8 high school diThe Bulletin Looking for your next ploma. No calls. Send resume: ranchmanager@ I Recommends extra employee? caution when purPlace a Bulletin help aperionmgmt.com chasing products or I wanted ad today and services from out of ' reach over 60,000 readers each week. I the area. Sending 528 Call a Pro Your classified ad c ash, c hecks, o r Loans & Mortgages Whether you need a I credit i n f o rmation will also appear on bendbulletin.com fence fixed, hedges I may be subjected to WARNING FRAUD. which currently trimmed or a house For more informareceives over 1.5 The Bulletin recommends you use caubuilt, you'll find tion about an advermillion page views every month at tion when you proyou may call professional help in I tiser, vide personal the Oregon State no extra cost. The Bulletin's "Call a I Attorney General's Bulletin Classifieds information to companies offering loans or Service Professional' Office C o n sumer s Get Results! Protection hotline at I Call 385-5809 credit especially Directory those asking for adI 1-877-877-9392. or place 541-385-5809 vance loan fees or your ad on-line at companies from out of LT}ie Bulletin bendbulletin.com state. If you have concerns or quesRESTAURANT tions, we suggest you MCMENAMINS FIND YOUR FUTURE consult your attorney OLD ST. FRANCIS Trucking HOME INTHE BULLETIN Class B Driver is now hiring or call CONSUMER Immediate openings, HOTLINE, LINE COOKS! Your future is just a page straight truck, with 2 1-877-877-9392. Qualified apps must years experience. M-F away. Whetheryou're looking have an open 8 flex Some l ifting for a hat ora place to hang it, schedule i n c luding, nights. The Bulletin Classified is BANK TURNED YOU required. Benefits. days, eves, w e ekyour best source. DOWN? Private party E-mail resume to ends and h olidays. will loan on real eskellym@ftlinc.com Every daythousands of We are looking for tate equity. Credit no buyers andsellers of goods applicants who have problem, good equity and services dobusiness in previous exp. related is all you need. Call these pages. They know exp. and enjoy workSell an Item Oregon Land Mortyou can't beat The Bul l etin ing in a b usy cusgage 541-388-4200. Classified Section for tomer ser v ice-oriselection and conveni e nce ented enviroment. We - every item isjust a phone LOCAL MONEyrWebuy a re also w i lling t o secured trustdeeds & call away. train! We offer oppornote,some hard money tunities for advanceIf it's under$500 The Classified Section is loans. Call Pat Kelley ment and e x cellent 541-382-3099 ext.13. easy to use. Every item benefits for e l igible you can place it in is categorized andevery employees, including The Bulletin cartegory is indexed onthe Need to get an vision, medical, chiro, section's front page. Classifieds for: dental and so much ad in ASAP? Whether youare lookingfor more! Please apply You can place it a home or need aservice, online 24/ 7 at $10 • 3 lines, 7 days your future is in the pagesof online at: www.mcmenamins.com The Bulletin Classified. or pick up a paper app $16 3lines 14days www.bendbulletin.com at any McMenamins location. Mail to: 430 (Prlvate Party ads only) The Bulletin 541-385-5809 N. Kill i ngsworth, Portland OR, 97217 or fax: 503-221-8749. Call 503-952-0598 for info on other ways to

Heavy equipment operator position. Central Oregon based excavation and site work company looking for a motivated, honest hard working person to join the team. Fun, hard working, healthy work environment. Applicant must be willing to work full time, have a minimum of 2

Monday • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5500 pm Fri •

Tuesday•••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Mona Wednesday •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 5 Noon Tuess

Thursday • • •••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • N oon Wed. Fr i d ay . . . . . . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • . • Noon Thurs. experience Saturday Real Estate • • • • • • • • • • • 11:00 am Fri • years running heavy with a Saturday • • • •. . . . . . . 3 : 0 0 pm Fri. equipment valid drivers license and transportation. DOE. Please • • • • • • • • 5:00 pm Fri • Pay Sunday. • • • • fax all resumes to

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Place a photoin your private party ad for only $15.00 perweek.

Starting at 3 lines

"UNDER '500in total merchandise

OVER '500in total merchandise

7 days .................................................. $10.00 14 days................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days.................................................. $18.50 7 days.................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days..................................

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW M A R K E D W ITH AN ( *) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.

*Must state prices in ed

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opportunity, please i nvestigate tho r oughly. Use extra c aution when a pplying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme c aution when r e s ponding t o A N Y online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer H o tline

at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws c o ntact Oregon Bureau of Labor & I n dustry, Civil Rights Division, 971-673- 0764.

a pply. P lease n o phone calls or emails to individual locations!

The Bulletin

E.O.E.

541-385-5809

Call54I 385 5809totramote yourservice'Advertise for 28daysstarting at I'4I Irtrr 5psslprdrgeir ratrsilaileonourrealrel

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Responsibilities include posting payments and invoices, researching and resolving billing issues, collecting on past due accounts, maintaining customer account information and providing customer support. Requires knowledge of Microsoft Office, strong verbal and written communication skills, excellent customer service skills and ability to negotiate. Les Schwab has a reputation of excellent customer service and over 400 stores in the Northwest. We offer a competitive salary, excellent benefits, ret irement, and c ash b onus. Visit u s a t : www.LesSchwab.com.

Resumes will be accepted through July 31, 2013. Please send resume and salary requirements to: ZYLSHuman. ResourcesI lesschwab.com. Emails must state "Central Billing Clerk" in the subject line. No phone calls please. EOE

Advertising Special Projects Editorial Assistant The Bulletin is seeking a motivated, energetic, creative and skilled editorial assistant to join the Special Projects team. This part-time position will support in the production of magazines, tabloids, event guides and other special publications by offering writing, photography and general editorial assistance 20 hours each week. The successful candidate will contribute by: • Being a Storyteller — The editorial assistant must prove to be a s avvy storyteller whether writing copy, constructing a feature story or photographing subjects/topics covered in our publications. Candidate must show he/she can create solid content on a variety of levels, both visually and via the written word. • Sharing Ideas — We're seeking a creative thinker as well as a creative doer. Contribute to our team by sharing a part of yourself — your ideas, your personality and your flair for turning ideas into stories and/or visual concepts

(e.g. feature photography). The ideal candidate will be eager to work toward his/her full potential both independently and as a mem-

ber of the team. • Serving as a Team Player — Expect to do a little bit of everything, from writing feature stories, photographing interesting subjects and assisting with community events to formatting calendars, managing a database and proofreading lines of copy. The editorial assistant will wear several hats. This is an entry level position offering the ideal opportunity for an up-and-coming creator of quality content to discover his/her full potential while publishing work within some of Central Oregon's most successful publications. Qualified candidates must possess good writing and basic photography skills, be computer savvy, and have access to reliable transportation (proof of insurance required). Hours are flexible, and benefits will be offered with the position. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace. EOE. To apply, send a cover letter, resume and writing/photography samples to: bmontgomery© bendbulletin.com.

FAST!

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** FREE ** SUPER TOP SOIL Since September 29, www.hershe eoilandbarlccom Garage Sale Kit 1991, advertising for Screened, soil & com- Place an ad in The used woodstoves has post m i x ed , no Bulletin for your gabeen limited to mod- rocks/clods. High hurage sale and reels which have been mus level, exc. f or a Garage Sale c ertified by the O r - flower beds, lawns, ceive Kit FREE! 421 egon Department of gardens, straight Schools & Training Environmental Qual- s creened to p s o i l . KIT I NCLUDES: ity (DEQ) and the fed- Bark. Clean fill. De- • 4 Garage Sale Signs Oregon Medical Traineral En v ironmental liver/you haul. • $2.00 Off Coupon To ing PCS - Phlebotomy Protection Ag e n cy 541-548-3949. Use Toward Your classes begin Sept. 3, Next Ad (EPA) as having met 2013. Registration now 270 • 10 Tips For "Garage smoke emission stanP Sale Success!" dards. A cer t ified Lost & Found medicaltrainin .com w oodstove may b e 541-343-3100 identified by its certifi- FOUND: crate of tools pIGK up YQUR cation label, which is and workbelt, Bear GARAGE SALE KIT at permanently attached Creek and P u rcell. 1777 SW Take care of Chandler to the stove. The Bul541-330-4078 Ave., Bend, OR 97702 your investments letin will no t k n owingly accept advertis- F ound set o f ke y s The Bulletin with the help from Honda car keys + 8 i ng for the sale of The Bulletin's others, at Todd Lake. uncertified 541-383-5982 woodstoves. "Call A Service Where can you find a F ound small m a l e • Sales Other Areas • Professional" Directory C hihuahua-mix i n helping hand? Christmas V a l l ey Moving Sale - Entire 476 From contractors to area. 541-576-2544 household and barn Employment yard care, it's all here F ound; tailgate for a 8-4 Fri.-Sun. Aug. 2-4. Opportunities in The Bulletin's pickup on Horse Butte Mt. Vernon, 5 mi. west of John Day, then 5 Rd, on 7/20. Call to "Call A Service identify, 541-389-2420 mi. so. o n L aycock Add your web address Professional" Directory Creek Rd/CR49, left to your ad and readFound wedding ring at at junction, first right, ers on The Bulletin's 267 Chevron gas station follow signs. Antiques, web site, www.bendon Highland Ave. in Fuel & Wood trunks, housewares, bulletin.com, will be Redmond. To c laim c anning, tools, a n able to click through email alicia@partner- tique f ar m e q uip., automatically to your WHEN BUYING shiptoendpoverty.org horse tack 8 packing website. FIREWOOD... ear, child's 8 s i de LOST between 7/11-12. g camping gear, To avoid fraud, womans 10-diamond saddle, AUTOMOTIVE The Bulletin anniversary ring. Very and split firewood. recommends paysentimental. Reward! ROBBERSON ment for Firewood Sisters, 541-549-1132 only upon delivery and inspection. Robberson Ford, Just too many • A cord is 128 cu. ft. Central Oregon's ¹1 4' x 4' x 8' collectibles? D ealership i s a c • Receipts should cepting applications include name, Sell them in for both an experiphone, price and enced Import SerThe Bulletin Classifieds kind of wood vice Tec h nician, purchased. Mazda p r e ferred, • Firewood ads 541-385-5809 and an experienced MUST include full t i m e S e r vice Technician, Ford exspecies 8 cost per cord to better serve perience preferred, at our Bend location. our customers. REMEMBER: Ifyou Looking for your Our growing quality have lost an animal, next employee? organization o f fers The Bulletin don't forget to check Place a Bulletin sem na centrat Qreqonsrnce l903 g reat benefits i nThe Humane Society help wanted ad cluding medical 8 Bend today and dental insurance, vaAll Year Dependable 541-382-3537 cation, 401k, profit reach over Firewood: Seasoned Redmond sharing, etc. 60,000 readers Lodgepole, Split, Del. 541-923-0882 Email resume to sereach week. Bend: 1 for $175 or 2 P e l l e vice@robberson.com for $335. Cash, Check Your classified ad 541-447-7178; or Apply in person at or Credit Card OK. will also or Craft Cats Robberson Ford 541-420-3484. appear on 541-389-8420. Mazda bendbulletin.com Young man willing to split 2100 N.E. 3rd Street To the lady who lost her which currently Istack firewood. Wage Bend, OR 97701 receives over negotiable. 541-419-6651 sunglasses/ reading Robberson Ford is a glasses at the Three 1.5 million page drug free workplace. 269 S isters Lions y a rd views every EOE. sale l as t w e e kend Gardening Supplies month at no 7 /19-20, they h a v e extra cost. & Equipment been found! Please Bulletin CPA-TAXt Gr o wcall Hel e n at Classifieds 541-595-6967 ing, team-oriented BarkTurfSoil.com Get Results! Bend, OR CPAI Call 541-385-5809 Consulting firm hir280 PROMPT D E LIVERY or place your ad ing a Staff AccounEstate Sales 542-389-9663 on-line at tant. Bachelor's bendbulletin.com degree, CPA certifiEstatesale downsizing, cation and 2-3 100s of antiques & For newspaper years recent public collectibles, oak bufdelivery, call the accounting tax exWhat are you fet, Waywood WakeCirculation Dept. at perience required. field table, dressers, 541-385-5800 looking for? Send cover letter 50s p a ti o ch a irs, To place an ad, call and resume to: tables, desks, old raYou'll find it in 541-385-5809 SGA CPAs, 499 dios, Victrolas, clocks. or email See Craigslist. Fri. & The Bulletin Classifieds SW Upper Terrace, classified@bendbultetin.com Dr., Suite A, Bend, S at. 8-4 , 7 7 2 N W OR 97702 The Bulletin Fieldstone Ct., Prinev- 541-385-5809 Serving Central Oregon since l903 ille, 541-408-4533. •

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Sales Northeast Bend

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CAUTION: Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" in clude employee and independent p o sitions. Ads fo r p o sitions that require a fee or upfront i nvestment must be stated. With any independentjob

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

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Say "goodbuy" to that unused item by placing it in The Bulletin Classifieds

PLEASE NOTE:Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central OregonMarketplace each Tuesday.

Heating & Stoves

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PRIVATE PARTY RATES

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Building/Contracting LandscapingNard Care LandscapingNard Care NOTICE: Oregon state law r equires anyone who con t racts for Zedf',t Z gaa8rip construction work to be licensed with the Za~< gu-~ i,. Construction Contrac- More Than Service

NOTICE: Oregon Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that a dvertise t o pe r form Landscape Constructors Board (CCB). An tion which includes: Peace Of Mind active license p lanting, decks , means the contractor fences, arbors, Fire Protection is bonded 8 insured. water-features, and inFuels Reduction Verify the contractor's stallation, repair of ir• Tall Grass CCB li c ense at rigation systems to be • Low Limbs www.hirealicensedlicensed w i t h the contractor.com •Brush and Debris Landscape Contracor call 503-378-4621. tors Board. This 4-digit The Bulletin recomnumber is to be i nProtect your home mends checking with with defensible space cluded in all adverthe CCB prior to contisements which inditracting with anyone. cate the business has Landscape Some other t r ades a bond,insurance and Maintenance also req u ire addiworkers c o mpensational licenses and Full or Partial Service tion for their employ• Mowing ~Edging certifications. ees. For your protec• Pruning «Weeding tion call 503-378-5909 Concrete Construction Sprinkler Adjustments or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to Fertilizer included check license status JJ & B Construction, quality concrete work. with monthly program before contracting with the business. Persons Over 30 Years Exp. doing land s cape Sidewalks; RV pads; Its not too late maintenance do not Driveways; Color & for a beautiful r equire an LCB Stamp wor k a v a il. landscape cense. Also Hardwood flooring a t aff o rdable •Lawn Restoration ALLEN REINSCH •Weed Free beds prices. 541-279-3183 Yard maintenance & •Bark Installation CCB¹190612 clean-up, thatching, plugging tt much more! • D e bris Removal EXPERIENCED Call 541-536-1 294 Commercial Villanueva Lawn Care. JUNK BE GONE & Residential Maintenance,clean-up, I Haul Away FREE Senior Discounts thatching + more! For Salvage. Also 541-390-1466 Free estimates. Cleanups & Cleanouts Same Day Response 541-981-8386 Mel, 541-389-8107 Maverick Landscaping Mowing, weedeating, yd • C oncrete/Paving detail., chain saw work, Nelson bobcat excv., etc! LCB Doug Strain Landscaping & ¹8671 541-923-4324 Construction, Inc. Maintenance Concrete Division Serving Central Painting/Wall Covering Residential & Oregon Since 2003 Commercial concrete; Residental/Commercial WESTERN PAINTING foundations, driveways, CO. Richard Hayman, sidewalks & curbs. Sprinkler a semi-retired paintCall Chris for appt. Activation/Repair ing contractor of 45 541-280-0581 Back Flow Testing years. S m al l J obs CCB¹109532 Welcome. Interior & Maintenance Exterior. c c b ¹51 84. Handyman Thatch & Aerate 541-388-6910 I DO THAT! Home/Rental repairs

• Spring Clean up •Weekly Mowing & Edging

Small jobs to remodels • Bi-Monthly & Monthly Honest, guaranteed Maintenance work. CCB¹151573 •Bark, Rock, Etc. Dennis 541-317-9768 ~Landsca in ERIC REEVE HANDY •Landscape SERVICES. Home 8 Construction Commercial Repairs, •Water Feature Carpentry-Painting, Installation/Maint. Pressure-washing, •Pavers Honey Do's. On-time •Renovations promise. Senior •Irrigations Installation Discount. Work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 Senior Discounts or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured Bonded 8 Insured 541-815-4458 CCB¹181 595 LCB¹8759

Remodeling/Carpentry j SILVER LINING CONSTRUCTION Residential const.,

remodels, maint. & repair. CCB ¹199645 Cody Aschenbrenner 541-263-1268

USE THE CLASSIFIEDSI

Door-to-door selkng with fast results! It's the easiest way in the world to sell. The Bulletin Classified 541-385-5809

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING •

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' Health Datebook keeps you informed on all local health happenings & classes ' Nutrition, Fitness, Money & Medicine A •

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THE BULLETIN• TUESDAY JULY 30 2013 E5

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

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682- Farms, RanchesandAcreage 687- Commercial for Rent/Lease 693- Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719- Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 730- New Listings 732- Commercial Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740- Condos &Townhomes for Sale 744 - OpenHouses 745- Homes for Sale 746- Northwest BendHomes 747 -Southwest BendHomes 748- Northeast BendHomes 749- Southeast BendHomes 750- RedmondHomes 753 - Sisters Homes 755- Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756- Jefferson CountyHomes 757- Crook CountyHomes 762- Homes with Acreage 763- Recreational HomesandProperty 764- Farms andRanches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780- Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - RoommateWanted 616- Want To Rent 627-Vacation Rentals& Exchanges 630- Rooms for Rent 631 - Condos &Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NEBend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NWBend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SEBend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SWBend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for RentGeneral 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652- Housesfor Rent NWBend 654- Houses for Rent SEBend 656- Housesfor Rent SWBend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent LaPine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 Mobile/Mfd.Space

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Boats & Accessories

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

lg~ ~ 1 20' 1993 Sea Nympf Fish 8 Ski, 50 hrs on new f engine, fish finder, chart plotter & VHF radio with antenna. Good shape, full cover, heavy duty 12~/~' HiLaker fishing trailer, kicker and electric Fleetwood D i s covery 40' 2003, diesel moboat with trailer and motors. 850 $7500 or best offer. newly overhauled 18 torhome w/all Snowmobiles 541-292-1834 h.p. Johnston o u toptions-3 slide outs, b oard, $ 85 0 ob o . satellite, 2 TV's,W/D, (2) 2000 A rctic C at Eves 541-383-5043, etc. 3 2,000 m i les. !0RICF PEO UM / Z L580's EFI with n e w Wintered in h e ated covers, electric start w/ days 541-322-4843 20.5' Seaswirl Spyshop. $89,900 O.B.O. reverse, low miles, both 13' SmokerCraft, 15 hp 541-447-8664 excellent; with new 2009 Yamaha, Minnekota der 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., Trac-Pac 2-place trailer, trolling, d o wnrigger, drive off/on w/double tilt, super clean extras, stored indoors for l ife $ 9900 O B O . lots of accys. Selling due $3200. 541-416-1042. 541-379-3530 to m e dical r e asons. $6000 all. 541-536-8130

Travel Trailers •

Trav el T railers

oQ00

Arctic Cat ZL800, 2001, short track, variable

exhaust valves, electric s t art, r e v erse,14'8" boat, 40hp Mermanuals, rec o rds, outboard (4-stroke, new spare belt, cover, cury trim, EFI, less heated hand g rips, electric than 10 hrs) + electric nice, fast, $999. Call trolling motor, fish finder, Tom, 541-385-7932, $5000 obo. 541-548-2173 • Yamaha 750 1999 Mountain Max, $1400.

G ulfstream S u n sport 30' Class A 1988 new f r i dge, TV, solar panel, new refrigerator, wheelchair l i ft . 4 0 0 0W

20' Seaswirl 1992, 4.3L V6 w/OMC outdrive, open bow,Shorelander trlr, nds some interior trim work. $4500. 541-639-3209

g enerator,

G ood

condition! $18,000 obo 541-447-5504

Cougar 33 ft. 2006, 14 ft. slide, awning, easy lift, stability bar, bumper extends for extra cargo, all access. incl., like new condition, stored in RV barn, used less t han 10 t i mes l o c ally, no p ets o r smoking. $20,000 obo. 541-536-2709.

Orbit 21'2007, used only 8 times, A/C, oven, tub s hower, micro, load leveler hitch, awning, dual

batteries, sleeps 4-5, EXCELLENT CONDITION. All accessories are included. $15,000 OBO. 541-382-9441 Roadranger, 1996 clean, solar unit, 6 volt batteries. $5000 obo 541-416-1042

Creek Side 20' 2010, used 8 times, AC, flat screen TV, oven, microwave, tub/ shower, awning, been stored, non-smokers, no pets, 1 owner. $13,900 obo.

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work ... You Keep The Cash! On-site credit

21' 2001 Skiers Choice approval team, web site presence. Moomba O u t back, 383 stroker engine, We Take Trade-Ins! • 1994 Arctic Cat 580 JAMEE 1982 20', Free Advertising. $8500 o r c o n sider EXT, $1000. low miles on it, BIG COUNTRY RV • Zieman 4-place trade for good vehicle self-contained. Runs Bend: 541-330-2495 with low mileage. trailer, SOLD! Great, everything Redmond: All in good condition. 14' a luminum bo a t Call 541-604-1475 or works. $3,000. 541-410-2360 541-548-5254 Located in La Pine. w/trailer, 2009 Mercury 541-604-1203 (leave 541-382-6494 msg if no answer) CalI 541-408-6149. 15hp motor, fish finder, $2500. 541-815-8797 648 745 Starcraft Galaxy 1999 Ads published in the Want to impress the pop-up camp trailer, "Boats" classification Houses for Homes for Sale exc. cond. sleeps 6-8, relatives? Remodel include: Speed, fishRent General extra tires & wheel, your home with the ing, drift, canoe, NOTICE partial trades considhouse and sail boats. PUBLISHER'S All real estate adver- help of a professional e red. $ 2 90 0 o b o . For all other types of NOTICE tised here in is subfrom The Bulletin's 541-549-9461 Jayco Eagle watercraft, please go All real estate adver- ject to t h e F e deral "Call A Service 14' LAZER 1993 sailKOUNTRY AIRE to Class 875. 26.6 ft long, 2000 tising in this newspa- F air H o using A c t , Professional" Directory 1994 37.5' motorboat with trailer, exc. 541-385-5809 per is subject to the which makes it illegal home, with awning, c ond., $2000 o b o . Sleeps 6, 14-ft slide, ''~e F air H o using A c t to advertise any prefand one slide-out, 541-312-4168. awning, Eaz-Lift which makes it illegal erence, limitation or 860 Serwng Central Oregon since 1903 Only 47k miles stabilizer bars, heat to a d v ertise "any discrimination based Motorcycles & Accessories and good condition. & air, queen preference, limitation on race, color, reli$25,000. walk-around bed, or disc r imination gion, sex, handicap, 541-548-0318 Trail Sport 2013 very good condition, based on race, color, familial status or naHDFaf Bo 1996 (photo aboveis ol a 23' Travel Trailer $10,000 obo. religion, sex, handi- tional origin, or intensimilar model 8 not the Like new, used twice. 541-595-2003 cap, familial status, tion to make any such actual vehicle) Tow with SUV or 14' Seadoo 1997 boat, marital status or napreferences, l i m itasmall pickup. Queen twin modified engines. Beautiful h o u seboat tional origin, or an in- tions or discrimination. <.i Need help fixing stuff? bed, air, TV, micro, 210hp/1200lbs, fast. $85,000. 541-390-4693 tention to make any We will not knowingly IC '' Call A Service Professional www.centraloregon built-in stereo, elect$5500. 541-390-7035 such pre f erence, accept any advertisfind the help you need. houseboat.com ric awning, barbecue, limitation or discrimi- ing for r ea l e s tate Completely www.bendbulletin.com extras. Non-smoker. nation." Familial sta- which is in violation of GENERATE SOME exRebuilt/Customized Selling due to health; tus includes children this law. All persons citement in your neig2012/2013 Award Sacrifice, under the age of 18 are hereby informed borhood. Plan a ga- Monaco Windsor, 2001, Winner $16,000 obo. living with parents or that all dwellings ad- Showroom 16' O ld T o w n rage sale and don't Condition loaded! (was $234,000 CalI Jim, 541-401-9963 legal cust o dians, vertised are available Camper c a n o e, forget to advertise in new) Solid-surface Many Extras pregnant women, and on an equal opportuclassified! 385-5809. counters, convection/ Low Miles. exc. cond, $ 7 50. people securing cus- nity basis. The Bullemicro, 4-dr, fridge, 541-312-8740 $77,000 The Bulletin is your tody of children under tin Classified washer/dryer, ceramic 541-548-4807 Serv>ng Central Oregon vnce 'l903 Keystone Sprinter 18. This newspaper tile 8 carpet, TV, DVD, E mploy m e n t will not knowingly ac31', 2008 satellite dish, leveling, 763 17.5' Glastron 2002, 875 King size walkcept any advertising Recreational Homes 8-airbags, power cord HD Screaming Eagle Marketplace Chevy eng., Volvo for real estate which is Watercraft around bed, electric Electra Glide 2005, reel, 2 full pass-thru outdrive, open bow, 8 Property awning, (4) 6-volt in violation of the law. 103" motor, two tone Cummins ISO 8.3 Call stereo, sink/live well, 1994 Yamaha Wave trays, O ur r e aders a r e 350hp turbo Diesel, 7.5 batteries, plus many candy teal, new tires, w/glastron tr a i ler, 637 Acres with recreRaider, low hrs exc. Diesel gen set. $85,000 more extras, never hereby informed that 23K miles, CD player, incl. b oa t 5 41 -385 - 5 8 0 9 c o v e r, $2250. 541-480-3937 ation cabin and obo. 541-233-7963 all dwellings adversmoked in, first hydraulic clutch, exLike new, $ 8 500. owners, $19,900. tised in this newspa- stream. in forest, west cellent condition. 541-447-4876 to advertise. of Silver Lake, OR Ads published in "Waper are available on Highest offer takes it. .541-480-7215 tercraft" include: Kayan equal opportunity Call 541-410-5415 541-480-8080. aks, rafts and motorbasis. To complain of www.bendbulletin.com Ized personal discrimination cal l 775 Mallard 2 2 ' 1 995 by watercrafts. For HUD t o l l-free at Manufactured/ Fleetwood, sleeps 7, "boats" please see 1-800-877-0246. The fully equipped, very Mobile Homes Class 870. NATIONAL DOLPHIN clean, good cond, $5000 Serving Central Oregon smce 1903 toll f re e t e l ephone 37' 1997, loaded! 1 541-385-5809 number for the hear17' Cris Craft Scorpion, slide, Corian surfaces, obo. 541-678-5575 ing im p aired is Delivered and Set up Honda Shadow/Aero fast & ready to fish! I/O & 023/4 bd,2 ba. 42,900 wood floors (kitchen), 1-800-927-9275. 750, 2007 Black, 11K trolling motor. Lots of ex2-dr fridge, convection 10 2/3 bd, 2 ba. 47,900 mi, 60 mpg, new de- tras! $5000. 541-318-7473 541-350-1782 microwave, Vizio TV & tachable windshield, 880 roof satellite, walk-in Smart Housing LLC Mustang seat & tires; 17' STARCRAFT 60 hp shower, new queen bed. Motorhomes detachable Paladin and 9.9 Merc motors, White leather hide-aFACTORY SPECIAL backrest 8 luggage e xc. f i s hing b o a t , bed & chair, all records, New Home, 3 bdrm, rack w/keylock.Vanceno pets or s moking. $6000. 541-815-0665 $46,500 finished Fleefwood 31' Hines pipes, great $28,450. on your site. Wilderness Gl sound. Cruise control, 18.7' Sea Ray Monaco, Call 541-771-4800 J and M Homes 1999 audible turn signals 1984, 185hp, V6 Mer541-548-5511 12' slide, for safety. $4495 obo. Cruiser, full canvas, life 24' awning, RV Jack, 541-549-4949 vests, bumpers, water Brougham 1978 motor LOT MODEL queen bed, FSC, CONSIGNMENTS or up to skis, swim float, extra home, Dodge chassis, 745 LIQUIDATION outside shower, WANTED prop & more. EZ Loader 17' coach, sleeps 4, 52 weeks Prices Slashed Huge E-Z lift stabilizer We Do The Work ... Homes for Sale trailer, never in saltwater, rear dining. $4500. Savings! 10 Year hitch, like new, You Keep The Cash! always garaged, very 541-602-8652. -whichever On-site credit been stored. clean, all maint. records. 6 Bdrm, 6 bath, 4-car, conditional warranty. comes first! approval team, $10,950. $5500. 541-389-7329 4270 sq ft, .83 ac. corner, Finished on your site. ONLY 2 LEFT! 541-000-000 web site presence. view. By owner, ideal for Redmond, Oregon We Take Trade-Ins! extended family. 541-548-5511 Victory TC 2002, $590,000. 541-390-0886 Free Advertising. JandMHomes.com BIG COUNTRY RV runs great, many Includes up to 40 words of text, up

00~0~

i

616

Want To Rent

Mature, quiet secure Christian male seeks room. 541-420-4276 627

Vacation Rentals & Exchanges Ocean front house, each walk from town, 2 bdrm/2 bath, TV, Fireplace, BBQ. $95 per night, 3 night MIN. 208-342-6999 632

Apt./Multiplex General CHECK YOUR AD

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on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. "Spellcheck" and human errors do occur. If this happens to your ad, please contact us ASAP so that corrections and any adjustments can be made to your ad. 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified 634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend **No Application Fee **

2 bdrm, 1 bath, $530 & $540 w/lease. Carports included! FOX HOLLOW APTS.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Management. Co.

Call for Speclals! Limited numbers avail. 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks. MOUNTAIN GLEN, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Looking for your next emp/oyee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line

For

only $99

accessories, new tires, under 40K miles, well kept. $5500 or P artial Trade/firearms 541-647-4232

Rent /Ovrn 3 bdrm, 2 bath homes $2500 down, $750 mo. OAC. J and M Homes 541-548-5511

Have an item to sell quick? If it's under '500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for: '10 - 3 lines, 7 days '16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

at

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ATVs

18'Maxum skiboat,2000, inboard motor, g reat cond, well maintained, $8995obo. 541-350-7755

19.5' Bluewater '88 I/O, new upholstery, new electronics, winch, much more. $9500. 541-306-0280 Honda TRX 450R sport 2002 Blindside Five-0 quad 2008, low hrs, new Mojo 138 wakeboard, wheels & DNC perf. pipe w/nice bindings. $125. $4250. 541-647-8931 541-382-6806

Alfa See Ya 2005 40' excellent cond, 1 owner, 4-dr frig w/icemaker, gas stove/oven, convection oven, washer/dryer combo, flatscreen TV, all electronics, new tires, many extras. 7.5 diesel gen, lots of storage, basement freezer, 350 Cat Freightliner chassis. Asking $86,500. See at Crook County RV Park, ¹43. 520-609-6372 BOUNDER 1993 34.6', 43k miles, loaded, $13,900. Info - Call 541-536-8816.

Bend: 541-330-2495 Redmond: 541-548-5254

• lg5j Winnebago Suncruiser34' 2004, only 34K, loaded, too much to list, ext'd warr. thru 2014, $54,900 Dennis, 541-589-3243 •

Tra v el Trailers

23' Salem Lite, 2004, 6' slide, very clean, extras, $10,000. 541-233-9197

to 2" in length, with border, fuff color photo, bold italic headline and pricel * Plus the following publications:

The Bulletin daily publication with over 76,000 subscribers. The Central Oregon Marketplace weekly publication DELIVERED to over 31,000 non-subscriber households. The Central Oregon Nickel Ads weekly publication - 15,000 distribution throughout Central and Eastern Oregon. *A $290 valuebased on an ad with the same extra features, publishing 28-ad days in the above publications.

*Private party merchandise ads only, excludes pets, real estate, rentals,

and garage sale categories.

Where Buyersand SellersMeet egoies oee~ spor~u . tho~orho P>oK~P~ ) s S,pV'~ ' y d e s . P,oa g o) 0 ~o 0®o>~ <4<aAers pg',, qrave f/Ifft l h~

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O.


E6 TUESDAY JULY 30 2013 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9

NOTICE Midstate Electric Cooperative, Inc. Gives notice that Capital Credit payments are now and have been available since December 2, 2006 at the office of the Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Rd, PO Box 127, La Pine OR 97739, 541-536-2126 or 800-722-7219; to the members named hereunder.Unless the members named, or their heirs, claim payment not later than Monday, November 11, 2013, the Capital Credits for patronage during the years 1989 through 1991 will be forfeited to the Cooperative. ABEENE,IVAN ABY,STEVE ACOSTA,JOSE ADAIR,TODD ADAMS,CHETE ADAMS,FRANK ADAMS,LEE ADDY,PAULM ADKINS,TERR ELL ADLER,DARLENE ADLER,MICHAEL ADLETA,THOMASL ADRIAN,DAVID AFSETH,JACOB S AHRENS,MARJORIE H ALBERT,LAWE RENCEJ ALDRICH,STEPHEN ALEXANDER, ARTHUR D ALEXANDER,JB ALEXANDER ,STEPHEN B ALEY,JAMES ALFORD, TONYA ALLAN,STEPHANIEL ALLEN,MAMIE ALLEN, RD ALLEN,ROBER TL ALLEN,SAMUEL ALLENBY, TERRE ALLIS, CHARLES ALLISON,CHARLESE ALLISON,DAVIDB ALLISON,ROBERTH ALLISON,SCOTT ALLWORTH, CLARK ALMOND,EDWIN A ALPINEPACIFICCONSTRUC ALSUP,JOEL ALTENHOF EN,GREG ALTSTATT, ARTHUR ALTSTETTER,MARK ALTURA,ALANR AMACKER,DANIEL R AMADISTO,RHONDA AMERICANPROPERTYMANAG AMES,ELDREDL AMUNDSEN, ALF ANDEREGG , RICK ANDERSON,CEC ELIA ANDERSON,CHARLES E ANDERSON, CHRISMAN ANDERSON, CLARENCES ANDERSON,DENNISW ANDERSON,DONALDF ANDERSON,EMIL ANDERSON ,GREG ANDERSON,HAYE S ANDERSON,KEN ANDERSON,KEVIN ANDERSON, MICHAEL ANDERSON,MICHAEL H ANDERSON,MICHAEL S ANDERSON,MILDREDM ANDERSON,NC ANDERSON,NOR MANA ANDERSON,RON ALDJ ANDREAS,JOHNJ ANDREASE N,STEVE ANDREWS,CAROLJ ANDREWS,ERNESTC ANKER,ARTHUR M ANTHONY,GREGORY A ANTHONY,JAMESK ANTHONY,ROBERT L ANTONIOLI,ROBERT AQUITAINE INC ARANDA,SONIA ARBUCKLE JR, ERNEST C ARBUCKLE,DAVID ARCHIBALD,THOMAS E AREHART,ESTATE0 ARGYLE,JOHN ARMPRIEST, VIOLET ARMSTRON G,J H ARNETT,LARRY ARNOLD,JOHNR ARNOLD,NANCY ARNOLD,RUDOLFC ARRINGTON, HENRY L ARVEY,DIANE ASCHOFF, WA ASHBURNJR,DOUG ASHBY,TEDL ASHER,DON ASHTON,ROBE RT ASLESON,DAVID ASPEL,JAMES AT&TCOMMUNICATIONS ATKIN, WILLIAML ATKINS,BONITAB ATKINSON, DAVIDM ATTOLINI ,FRANCISCOJ ATWOOD,DONALD K AUDIA,ANN AULTOM,PAUL AUSTIN,DERE K AUSTIN, RICHARD H AUSTIN-POWELL, ANITAG AUTHIER,DANIELD AYNES,KENNITH I BACH,JAMES BACHMAN,SANDRA BACHMEIER, EB BADGER,MICHAEL BAGWELL, GARY A BAILEY,CHARLES BAILEY,DAN BAILEY,DORISL BAILEY,GARYR BAILEY,JUDYK BAILEY,LEWIS BAILEY,RUTHC BAILOR, DONNA I BAILY,ROBINL BAIR, JAMES R BAIRD,DON ALDA BAKER,CECIL BAKER,DARRIN BAKER,FRED J BAKER,GERR Y BAKER,GORDONJ BAKER,JEFFRE YA BAKER,JOHN BAKER,KEN BAKER,KENNETH D BAKER,MARGA RETA BAKER,NELL M BAKER,PHILIP C BAKER,ROBERT N BAKER,SUSAN L BAKER, THOMAST BAKER, WILLARDE BAKERSDOZEN BAKKE-HUFF , LINDAK BALCOM,DUANE BALDWIN FREEMAN& HICKS BALDWIN,WILLIAMJ BALL, ALTON BALL, DANIEL H BALLARD,FREDE BALLARD,LOUISA BANDZI,JOE BANFIELDPROPERTIESLTD BANKS,JACK R BANKSTON& HARSHMAN BANNING,LLOYD BARBEE,RANDALL BARBOUR,JOHN D BARCL AYSAMERICAN/FINANC BARKALOW, JIM BARKHURST,DOROTHY BARKMAN,ROBE RTA BARNARD,DAYMO N BARNES,BILL BARNES,DON W BARNES,GEORGEW BARNES,HAZEL BARNES,TAMIA BARNETT, LOUISER BARNHART, PHILIP N BARNHOU SE,DEAN B BARNWELL,ROBERT P BARRJR,JERRYL BARRETT,CHER YL BARRETT,FJ BARRETT, MICHAEL W BARRY,HAROLD BARSOTTI,MARYB BARTHOLM AUS, C.D. BARTHOLO MEW, SAMUEL BARTON,DERRICK

BARTON,I.P. BARTON, JIMMY BASSETT,IDAM BATCHMAN, RONALD 0 BATDORF , WAYNER BATESON,LARRY BATESON,SHARRO NG BATTELLE,IVANM BALIGH,RITAL BALIGHMAN,MARRITAA BAUMAN,MARTY BAUMANN,WH BAXTER,BRUCE BAXTER,CHRIS BAZE,BILL BEALS,SCH ONN R BEAN,ARTHUR BEARD,BOYCE R BEARDSLEY, JAMESR BEARDSLE Y,STEPHEN BEASLEY, SHARON BEAUDRY,RON ALD D BEAUDRY, STAN BEAVERS,EDWARDS BEBOUT,RALPH J BECKER,ARTHUR K BECKER,HAROLD N BECKER,HENRY E BECKER, WILLIAM BECKETT,ROBER TD BECKMANN, DAVID BEEBER, MARLINL BEEMAN,TODD M BEGLEY,JUDITH BEHUNIN, GEORGE BELCHER,RICK BELCHER,RICKY BELLIN,ROBERT BELLINGER,BRENDA BELLINGER, BRIANF BELLINGER, LESLIE BELLIS,BERN ARD BELT,ROBERTL BENFRANKLINFEDERALSALN BENARO YA,NEIL BENARO YA,NEILW BENDER, GREGP BENDER,KAREN BENDTZEN,FRED BENEDA,EVER ETT BENEFIEL,JOHND BENJFRAN DEVELOPMENT I BENJ.FRANKLINSAVINGS BENNETT,CHARLES E BENNETT,LARRY BENNETT,ROBE RT BENNING HOFF,BARBARAA BENSON,HAROLD P BENSON,LYLEM BENTLEY,LORNE BENTON,BEVE RLY BERG,T 0 BERGER,BILL BERGERONPROPERTIES BERGSTR OM,LARRY BERKOWITZ,ALAN BERNERT, EDWARD BEROVIC,MIKE BERRETH,ALLENE BERRETT,MARGARET BERRY,EARL BERRY,JOSEPH R BERRY,STEPH ANIE M BEST,DONNAA BEST,SHEILAG BEST,WALTERW BETZ,LEONARD B BEVEL,GREGORYA BEVERLY, ELMER R BICKEL,ALLANE BICKFORD,JACK BIDABURA,AITOR BIDGOOD, DUANE A BIEDERMAN,J.C. BIGMOUNTAINENTERPRISES BIGRIVE RDEVELOPMENTINC BIGGS, ROBERT BILLINGS,EE BIRD, BARB ARAJ BIRNEY,MICHAEL BISHOP, J.L. BIVENS, MARGUERITEA BIVENS,PAULN BIVENS,RUDIE BLACK,ERIC BLACK,NOEL BLAKE,ERLEG BLAKE,WARRENJ BLAKELEY,BOYD BLAKESLEE,RUTH L BLANCHARD,PAUL BLANCK,HERBE RTF BLANK,GREGORY R BLASZCZAK,STANLEY BLEIL, RICHARD A BLEVINS,HARVEY BLEYER,MAUREEN BLIVEN,RONALDE BLIXSETH CO., THE BLOHM,PHILIPG BOAZ,BARBARA R BODINE,DONALDP BODLEY, THOMAS BODLEY, WAYNE BOECKM AN,GENEVA BOECKNE R,CHARLES BOEHM,RALPH BOETTCH ER,FRED BOGDANO FF,STEVENJ BOGGS,WILSON E BOHANNON,JOHN A BOIES,GARY W BOLDENO W,BRUCE BOLLER,GERALDINE BOLLMANN, JAMESD BOLSTER,RODN EY BOND,GLENNE BOND,STEVEN BONDS,NANCY BONES,GREG BOODT, MIKE BOOEN,LARRY G BOOM,GREGG BOONE,CAROLYN R BOONE,MARGO BOOTH,HARRIETTP BORGES,LULA M BOTTORFF ,CHARLESM BOULDEN, WAUNITA BOURRET, BILL R BOUTTOTE, WL BOWDEN, LUTHER B BOWERS,CYNTHIA B BOWERS,DON BOWERS,HARRYF BOWIE,LINDAM BOWLES,ROSSJ BOYD CYADEN,TRUSTEE BOYD CYADEN,TRUSTEE BOYD,CANDY C BOYD,LAURIE A BOYER,BRIAN BOYER,PEGGY BOYNTON,DAVID BOYUM,JENS BRACEY, JAMESC BRADFIELD,WANDA BRADFORD, TERRY BRADLEY, JACK BRADSHAW ,GARY D BRADY,JAMESL BRAIN,SUE BRALEY,CAROL L BRALEY,LENETT E BRANCH,BT BRANDON,FRANCINE BRANDT, DANIELA BRANDT,LUCILLE BRANOM,DUNCAN R BRATTAINBRO THERS BRAWLEY,RICHARDD BRAY,ROBER T BRECKEN FELDER,BESS BREEDEN,JOAN BREHMER,CAROL D BREICKLER, LESLIEM BREITENSTEIN ,ROBERTW BRELL BERG ENK BRENEMAN,JOHN S BREWER,DANIELJ

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FLINTSTONE CRLISHING DOWNING,LILLIAN FLODEEN,ROBER TT DOWNING,REXG FLOGSTAD,SP DOYLE,MIKE FLOOD,JOSEPH DRAKE,BARBARA FLORES,JOSEPH L DRAKE,EDWARD FLORES,MURIEL DRAKE,SHARON FLORES,ROBERT DREDGE,DENNIS FLOYD,JEFF DREESSEN, W ILLIAM FLOYD,RANDY L DRENNAN,MICHAELE FLURY,PAUL W DREW,MARTHAW FLYNN,KERRY P DREWITZ,WILBUR B FOGELSON,JERRY DREXLER,WALT FOLSOM,DARLEN E DRGASTIN-PAGE, KRISTY FOLSTON,JAMES DRIVER,ELBERT FOOTE, THOMAS DRULINER,WAYNE FOPPE,JACKIE DRUMWRIGHT,RUBYM FORBERT, MORGAN S DRWALL,MICHAELP FORD,GEORGEW DRYER,TRAV ERS FORD,MICHAEL DUDEK,ROBERT FORD,NEWTON DUDLEY,PAULH FORSYTH,LANC E DUERR,HR FOSTER,GARY F DUEY,DAN FOSTER,PAMELA M DUFF,MICHAEL G FOSTER,STEP HEN DUFRESNE,TOM FOSTER, WILLIAM DULANY,DARA FOUTS,DAN DULEY, W ILLIAM FOWLER,JOHNF DUNCAN,CHURC H0 FOWLER,STEVE DUNCAN,JAMESE FOX,ROBERT D DUNFORD,EARL G FOX,WARREN DUNHAM,JL FRALEY,GARY DUNHAM,LYNDA K FRANCIS,GENED DUNKLEE,THOMAS FRANCK, JAMES DUNLAP,DOLO RESJ FRANK,GORDON FRANK,JIM DUNN,BILLYJ DUNN,LLOYD0 FRANKLIN,JASON DUNNING,DAVIDD FRANKLIN,THOMAS DURAN,FRANK FRASHOUR,RON DURHAM,KENNETH W FRAZIER,J P DUTTON,STEVE FRAZIER,MIKEH DUVICK,JOHNR FRAZIER,ROBYNA DWYER,DON FREALIFF, DONALD C DYE, DARRIN FREALIFF, DONALD M DYER,BARRY FREBEL,NORMAN DYKEMAN,ROYW FREDA MOORE INC EAGLEMOUNTAIN FREDERICK,BETTY CONSTRUC TI FREEDO MFEDERALSAVINGS EARL,DEANNE N FREEMAN,FRANCISM EARL,ROBERT D FREEMAN,NATHANA EARLE,THOMASB FREEMAN,ROBER TL EARLS,JOHN FREEMAN,ROB ERTS EARNEST,EDWARD W FREESE,DICK EASTHAM,PERRY F FRENCH,JAMES R EATON,FRANCIS M FREUND,RICHARDD FRIBERG, RICHARD W EBEL,MARG ARETE ECKL,JOHNA FRISCHMAN, SCOTT ECKLES,HARLEYB FRISTROM,RG EDDY,ELIZABETH FRONTIER FEDERALSAVING EDELBRO CK,GAY H FROST,LINDA EDGIL, JAMESG FRUMENTI,SALVATORE EDGIL,PATRICIA FRY,DANIELW EDIN,CHRISTOPHER D FRY,WESLEY EDISON,DELBER T FRYE,HERBE RT EDMONDS, MARCR FRYE,JULIEG EDMONDSON, VIRGIL FULLER,JOHNP EDWARDS,BOB FULLER,REBE CCA EDWARDS,CHARLESW FULLERT ON,CAROL S EDWARDS,DAVIDL FULLMANCO EDWARDS,DIONA FULTON,ROBERTA EDWARDS,DONNA FULTON,ROBERTA EDWARDS,ESTATE0 FUNK,ROBE RT EDWARDS,LARRY FURMAN,ILENA EDWARDS, RUSSELLB FURRER,DANIEL EGGER,ROBE RT FUTTER,RUSSELL GA INVESTM ENTCO EIKUM, LM EISENBEIS,JAYP GABRIELE, VIDAK ELDER,DALER GAGE,DAVID ELDER,DENNIS GAGE,WILLIEL ELDER,GARY A GAHRES,SCO TT ELDER,MARYV GAILING,STEPHANIE ELFORD,GERTRUDE GALLAGHER,DAVID ELI, EUNICE GALLAGHER,DAVID L ELIASON,ELWARDP GALLAGH ER, MARY ELLER,RODNE Y GALLAGHER,RL GALLANT,ALFREDJ ELLER,SW ELLIOTT,CHAD GALLAWAY, JM ELLIOTT,DIANEE GALLOWAY,DALEE ELLIOTT, JOAN M GALLOWAY , MICHAELJ ELLIS, C J GAMAUNT,LEON E GAMBLE,DARRELL K ELLIS,JAMESS ELLIS, KENT M GAMBLE, JACQUELINS

HANFORD,KATHLEE NL HANKS,DUNNIE HANNA,SHEILAB HANNAH,CAROL HANNIGAN,CHESTER HANSEN,BRUCE D HANSEN,EVA HANSEN,GREG HANSEN,JAMES A HANSEN,JANICEN HANSEN,LANCE HANSEN,LESA HANSEN,RAYMO ND HANSEN,WOODROW R HANSHEW, EG GASSNER, CHRISTIAN M HANSON,GEORGE GATES, DAVIO HANSON,KENN ETHP GATES, MARIAILONA HANSON,STEPHEN W GATES, MARIA-ILO HARDCASTLE,DARLA S GATES,RICKA HARDER,CHARLES E GATTI,RICHARD HARDIE,KATHY GAVE,TAMARA HARDING,ROY GAY,DONALD HARDS,BOBE GEBHART,LINDAL HARNISCH FEGER, HEATHER GEDDE, MELVIN E HARP,GREGORY M GEDDES,BEVERLY HARPER,DOUGLAS GEHRING,SUZANNE HARPER,RON GEIGERPOINDEXTERBGEI HARPER ,STEVENSON,MCCA HARRIES,SUSAN GEIS,PAULG GENERAL ELECTRICGEMS HARRINGTON,EVERETT GENTRY,LEEE HARRIS,CARLUS GENTRYLEMUELE HARRIS,GERAL YN GERALDE,RAMONA HARRIS, IRWINC GERARD,RONALD D HARRIS,JACK GERLICHER,ANDREWJ HARRIS,ROGE RD GERLITZ,CHRIS HARRIS,WAYNEL GETTINGERS,ARAH HARRISON,MAXE GETZ, M J HARRISON,ROBERTB GHERARDINI ,JOE HARSAN YMDPC,ROBERTM GIBBONS, JAYD HART,CHARLESD GIBBS,LYNN HART,DONALDD GIBSON,CHARLES HARTMANN,WILLIAMA GIBSON,JIMMY HARUDA,FRED HARVEY,DAWSON C GIFFIN,ALVAH GIFFORD, ALLANH HARVEY,ROSS L GILBERT,BRUC E HARVEY,WADEE GILBERT,EVELYN K HASLAM,WILLIAMR GILBERT, NORMAN M HASTAY, RICHARDF GILCHRIST GARDEN CLUB HATFIELD,JAY GILCHRIST, W ALLACE HATFIELD,LEWIS GILL, ROY C HATFIELD,SHANE GILLIAM, STANLEY R HATLEY,HAROLD GILLILAND, NORMAN HAUCK,FRED R GILLINGHAM,WALTER HAUETER,DAVID GILMER,DONA J HAUGAN,BRAD GINGLES, TIM HAWKEYECONSTRUCTIONIN GINGRICH, J. L HAWKINS,MARVIN GINTER, DAVIDW HAWORTH,RAYL GINTHER,VERGIE C HAYES,JAMES B GIRARD,GE ORGE HAYS,ALBERTA M GIRODSHILLTOP HAYS,GARRY R SUPERMAR HAYTER,CATHY D GIUDICE,FRED HAZEL,HARRYD GLANDER,KEVIN S HEATH,FLOYD J GLANDER,TONY HEBERT, EDWARDL GLASS,GEORG EM HECKMAN,SANNA GLEBE,MARSHALL HEDGE,ROGER GLIMM, DIANA R HEDGES,FR GLUM,GARY L HEDRICK,ROYA GODBEY, HILDAR HEGEW ALDINC GOEHLER, MICHAEL E HEIECK,PENNYF GOIN,DOROTHY N HEIM,LOLA HEININGE, SCOT GOLD,JOHN C HEINKE,BARBARA GOLD,MARJORIEV GOLDING,BENJAMINA HEINTZ,ANNAB GOLDSTEIN, M ELVYN HELDING,MARYL GOLSIE,BRETTC HELIN,ML GOMES,SYNDEY HELVEY,MICHAELD GOMEZ, JOHN HENDERS ON,CAROLYN GOMEZ,TONI HENDERSON,GEORGEE GONYA, WILLIAM HENDERSON,GEORGEH GOODALL, PATRICK HENDERS ON,JOEY D GOODELL,PAUL HENDERS ON,KIMBERELY GOODMAN,DAVID HENDLEY, ANGELAG GOODMAN,DOLIGLASE HENDRICKS, JOHN GOODMAN,REGENA HENDRICKS,LORRAINE GOODWIN, STEVEN W HENRY,EARLL GOOSLYRESOURCES LTD HENRY,LADDIE GOOTEE, MARJORIEB HENRY-LONG, DOROTHY B GORDON, AJ HENSCH EL, JILLISON GORDON, ALOYSUISC HERAUF, ALLAN GORDON,ERROLW HERMAND SON, RUSSELL GORDON, HC HERMANS,RHONDA HERNANDEZ,FRANKR GORDON,RICKA GORE, TERESA M HERNANDE Z,MARGARET GORMAN,JAMES T HERNANE DZ,VICTOR GOTT,DONALD HERR,WILLIAM GOUDSMIT,A HERRICK,ROBERTF GOUGH,DONALDW HERRINGTON, LEIF GOULD,DAVIDS HERRLE,JOSEPH H GOULD,WILLIAM HERSH,JOHN GRAHAM,M L HERZOG,DAVID GRAHAM,ROBERTL HESS,GREG GRANNIS,STEVE HESS,WILLIAM GRANT,KARENL HEUSER,PETER E GRANT,PAMELAD HEYDON,LORI A GRANT,THOMASH HIATT, GEORGE E GRAVES, WILLIAM0 HICKEY, CHARLES GRAY,DONM HICKS,BRENT GRAY,EDWARDA HIGGINBOTHAM, EARLE GRAY,JOYR HIGHT,RICHARDB GRAY,PATS Y HILBRAND,DENNIS GRAY,ROBER TW HILEMAN,BERDA GRAY,RODNE Y HILGER,STEVEJ GRAYDON,ROBE RT HILL, ALMA GREATWOOD,FRED E HILL, ARCHIE GREELEY, WILLIAM B HILL, DAVID C GREEN, EARLW HILL,E C GREEN,HOWARD HILL, GENE E GREEN, PATRICK HILL, HAROLD GREEN, RICHARDD HILL, LAWREN CE GREEN, STANLEYA HILL, PATRICK W GREENA WALD, JERRY HILLMAN,JOANA GREENE, NIMROD T HILLS,ALVINF GREENSIDES, WILLIAM HILTON,MARK GREENWA LT,JAMES HINDS,JOHNA GREFSRUD,BRAD HINDS,TONYA GREGORYAFFILIATES HINES,FRANKLIND GREGORY,HAROLDR HIROMLIRA,RONALDE GREGORY, JOHN HOAGLIN, ROBERT GREGO RY,PAUL J HOBIN,GARYR GRIBLING, RAYMOND G HOCKENB ERRY, C.W GRIER,ROBERTE HOCKE TT,CLYDEJ HODGE,DONN A GRIFFIN, GERARD R GRIFFI TH,ROBERTE HODGE,GERA LD GRIMES,KARLJ HODGES, CHRISM GRIMES,RENEE HODGES,KEVEN C GRONBERG ,DALE HODGSON,ALLANL GRONEMYER,ROBERTW HOEKSTRA, JAMESJ GROSS,SIDNEY HOERST ER,JOHNK GSCHEIDLE, WE HOFF,DELO RESC GUARDALABE NE,GINA HOFFMAN, DANIELM GUENTH ER,T H HOFFMAN,GERALDT GUILBERT, JOHN HOFFMAN,HAZELR GUITTEAU-NEWL AND HOGAN,THETA N LUMBER HOGGBROTHERS GUJRAL,PERR Y HOGLIE,HOLLISW GULICK,K.C. HOLCOMB,REID E GURNEY, KATHIE HOLCOMB,TED GUSTAFS ON,JOHN HOLLAND,MASONJ GUSTAFSON, WILLIAM H HOLLENBE CK,WILLARD GUTZWA,MARK HOLLIDAY,D GUYETTE,LEON ARD HOLLINGER, DOROTHY I HAAS,STAN HOLM,CARLE HAASE,LISA HOLM,JOHN H HADDEN,SHIRLEYL HOLM,WALTERB HAFDAHL,RAYMOND0 HOLMAN,JETTAA HAGEN,DANIELR HOLMES,DWAYNEE HAGENBL ICH, WALTER D HOLMES, JAMES HAGEST AD, MARSHA HOLT,DENNISE HAID, ROBE RT HOLT,MILLARD HAINES,BETTY HOLT-MCLAIN, MARIAN HAINES,ELIZABETH B HOOD,DARRELL HAINES,JENNY R HOOD,HENR Y HAINES,KENNE TH HOOPER,ANGU S HAIT,LARA HOOPER,CLARE NCE HAIT,PAUL HOOVER,CINDYL HALE,STEPHEN C HOPKINS,DAVID HALEY,DIANA K HOPKINS,DENISE HALEY,MICHAEL HOPKINS,PATSYJ HALEY,MICHAELS HOPKINS,VIRGINIA M HALFORD, DAVID HOPP,GERALDF HOPPER,CHETE S R0 HALL, C D HOPWOOD,DENNIS HALL, IVORY L HALL, JIMMY D HORN SMITH& RAUCH HALL, LR HORN,TRUDY M HALL, LAWRE NCEL HORTON, WILLIAM J HOSCHEK,DOU GLASJ HALL, PETER B HALLER,ELSIEM HOSE,CHARLEA S HALLIBURTON, EMILIEJ HOSMER,COLLE EN HALLIDAY,LEIGHA HOTT,GLENN W HALLIWILL,ANITAK HOUGHTON,BETTYJ HALLSTAFF,THOMAS HOUSE,LYLE HALVERSON, GEORGE HOUSER,JERRY HAMBERG ER,KAREN M HOUSER,JOHN HAMILTON,BRUCE HOUSLEY,WAYNE HAMILTON, CARLAL HOWARD,DANIELLEE HAMILTON, CHARLES W HOWARD,KAREN HAMILTON,MARTHA L HOWARD,RAYD HAMILTON,VERNV HOWARD,RICHARD HAMILTON, VIRGINIAL HOWARD,ROSS EDWIN HAMILTON, WILLIAM HOWARTH, CB HAMM,CRAIGS HOWELL,ROBERT H HAMM,WILLIAM HOYT,HELEN HAMMERSLEY , DR HUBBARD, AMOS HAMMETT, JOHNB HUBBARD,ASA G HAMPSON,LARRYE HUCKABA,KRIS HAMPSON,PATRICIAL HUDSON,DERRILL L HANCOCK,JUDY E HUDSON,ELIZABETH HANDY,DOUG LASC HUDSON,HARVEY H GAMBLE, M W GANLEY, GRACEE GARBER,BRUCE L GARDNER,BYRONJ GARDNER, MARILYNE GARDNER,RAYMO ND GARDNER, THOMASC GARMON,MICHAEL GARNICK, CD GARNIER,MARKE GARRETT,JERRY GARRICK, GREGORY J GARRISON, DOROTHY E GARVIN, GEORGE GARZON,JANE D

HUDSON, JOHND HUDSON,M M HUERTA,DAVID HUESGEN,JAMES H HUFF,ELSIE HUFF,ROBR ET HUFFMAN,JAMES HUFFMAN, SHARON HUGHES,DAVID HUGHES,GARY HUGHES,HERB M HUGHES,KENN ETHC HUGHES,OSC AR HUGHES,TODD HULBERT,CLARA L HULL,JACKE HULSCHER,JOSEPH P HULSE,EDWAR D HUMMEL,RALPH HUMMER,RICKD HUMPHRE YS, DON HUMPHRE YS, MICHAEL HUMPHRE YS, RICHARD HUNGER FORD, STEVENE HUNNICUTT, TOM HUNT,CONNIE HUNT, JD HUNT,JAMESK HUNT,JODY HUNT,MARSHA HUNTER,JEAN HUNTER,LARRY A HURD,LEONAE HURRELBRINK, DAVID L HURST,LARRY HUSEBY, LEIGHJ HUSSEY, JOHN HUTCHINS,DAVID M HUTCHINSON,JAMES HUTCHISON, ORVILLEA HUTTON, MELVIN F HYMAN,GLENP IDEALGASINC. IDENCIO,JOHN IMHOFF, STEVE IMPLOM,ETHEL INGALSBE, SUEM INGER,IVAN INGLEDUE, THOMA

MC DOLE, AMALIAL MC DONALD,BRUCER MC DONALD, DJ MC DONALD, DJ MC DONALD,DARRYL MC DONALD,GLORIA MC DONALD,WAYNE MC DONELL, MELEISA MC DOW ELL, LARRY MC ELRATH, KELLY MC ELROYSH , IRLEY MC EWEN, LYLEW MC FADDEN, WMG MC FARLAND,FREDC MC FARLANE, ROBERTL MC FARLANE, ROYLYNEM

MIRAMONTES, YOLANDA I MITCHELL, ARCHIEW MITCHELL,JOSEPH MITCHELL,PAULINES MITCHELL,RICHARD MITCHELL,RODNE Y MITCHELL, SAMP MIX, MARTHA M MIXER,JAMES MOELLER, RICHARDA MOEN,RICHARDP MOERSCHB AECHE,R RAY MOFFATT, RUSSELL MOHR,RON MOLITOR, JAMES MOLLET, DOUGLAS MOLLIER, MONTY B MOLONEYFAMILY MONROE, JAMES G MONTAG, JOHN H MONTAGNE,ROBERTJ MONTGOMERY,STEPHAN MOODY, DENNIS MOONEY, JAMESE MOORE, ALICE MOORE,DELILAHM MOORE,EUGENE MOORE,FRANKJ MOORE,GEORGE L MOORE,KATHRYN M MOORE,LARRY MOORE,RUTH D MOORE, TERESA L MOORE, VIRGILH MOORE, WILLARDT MOORE, WILLIAM A MOORE, WILLIAME MOOSER,MARY-ANN MOQUIN, DELORES Y MORDAUNT, PHILIP MORGADO,FRANCES MORGAN, ALICEI MORGAN,BERT MORGAN,JAMES A MORGAN,JOHN W MORGAN,RICHARD MORI, DONALD MORITZ, GENE P MORLEY, WILLIAM R MORRIS, KIMBERLY MORRIS,PHILLIPW MORRIS, RW MORRIS,RICHARD D MORRISON,MARLENE MORROW, JAMESE MORROW, WILLIAM MORTIMORE, JEFF MORTON,RICHARD B MOSEGARD,MELRENE


E8 TUESDAY, JULY 30, 2013 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 5 41-385-580 9 975

• u

BOATS &RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890- RVsfor Rent

v

Antique & Classic Autos

AUTOS &TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916- Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 -Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932- Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935- Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Automobiles

Chevrolet Equi-

Buick Century Limited 2000, r u n s gr e at, beautiful car. $3400.

Mustang 5.0, 1990 nox 2006 LT, 4-dr Convertible, 1 owner, 5 Silver exterior/ spd, low miles, very few graphite interior, made of t h i s m o del 59,706 miles, V6 3.4 $6900. Good investment! liter, auto, AWD, 541-382-7689 leather, sunroof, tow pkg, alloy wheels, power windows, 4-wheel ABS, tilt, power door locks, cruise, roof rack, traction control, AC, Must Sell! Health forces AM/ FM premium sale. Buick Riviera 1991, sound multi-disc CD. classic low-mileage car, Below Blue Book at garaged, pampered, $10,850. Call Neal, non-smoker, exclnt cond, 541-385-3085 $4300 obo 541-389-0049

Buick Lucerne CXS 2006 Sports sedan, low miles, all the nice features you'll want, truly an exc. buy at $8000. Come & see no charge for looking. Ask Buick Bob, 541-318-9999

I

Aircraft, Parts & Service

Nlfyay

© Bend.) Also: Sunri-

ver hangar available for sale at $155K, or lease,

© $400/mo.

541-948-2963

1 /3 interest i n w e llequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, new 10-550/ prop, located KBDN. $65,000. 541-419-9510

Backhoe 2007 John Deere 310SG, cab 4x4, 4-in-1 bucket Extendahoe, hydraulic thumb, loaded, like new, 500 hours. New $105,000. Sell $75,000. 541-350-3393 Mitsubishi Fuso 1995 14' box truck with lift gate, 184,000 miles, needs turbo seal.

$3500 or best offer. 541-420-2323

1/5th interest in 1973

Cessna 150 LLC

150hp conversion, low time on air frame and engine, hangared in Bend. Excellent per- Peterbilt 35 9 p o table iormance & affordwater t r uck, 1 9 9 0, able flying! $6,500. 3200 gal. tank, 5hp U 541-410-6007 p ump, 4 - 3 hoses, camlocks, $ 2 5,000. 541-820-3724

$2500 obo.

541-420-4677

931

Loaded, super crew,

88 miles, YES ONLY 88, o riginal M S RP $47,960. Vin ¹D15232

Automotive Parts, Service 8 Accessories

1974 Bellanca 1730A

Ford F-150 Lariat 2011,

$36,988

2180 TT, 440 SMO, 180 mph, excellent condition, always hangared, 1 owner for 35 years. $60K.

60' wide x 50' deep, w/55' wide x 17' high bifold dr. Natural gas heat,

offc, bathroom. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation business. Financing available. 541-948-2126 or email 1jetjockOq.com

1952 Ford Customline Coupe, project car, flathead V-B, 3 spd extra parts, 8 materials, $2000 obo. 541-410-7473

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN)

Piper A rcher 1 9 8 0, based in Madras, always hangared since new. New annual, auto pilot, IFR, one piece windshield. Fastest Archer around. 1750 toChevy C-20 Pickup tal t i me . $6 8 ,500. 1969, all orig. Turbo 44; 541-475-6947, ask for auto 4-spd, 396, model Rob Berg. CST /all options, orig. owner, $19,950, 541-923-6049

Ford Thunderbird 1955, new white soft top, tonneau cover and upholstery. New chrome. B e a utiful Car. $ 25,00 0 . 541-548-1422 P—•

i

MGA 1959 - $19,999 Convertible. O r iginal body/motor. No

Superhavvk Ownership Share Available!

rust. 541-549-3838

Chevy Nova - 1976, $3,400. Economical flying Rebuilt 327 engine. in your own Call Matt 541-280-9463 IFR equipped Cessna 172/180 HP for only $13,500! New Garmin Touchscreen avionics center stack! Exceptionally clean! Hangared at BDN. Call 541-728-0773 Chevy Wagon 1957, 4-dr., complete, T-Hangar for rent $7,000 OBO / trades at Bend airport. Please call Call 541-382-8998. 541-389-6998

~ OO

MorePixat Bendbulletin.com

Mustang 1966 2 dr. coupe, 200 cu. in. 6 cyl. Over $12,000 invested, asking $9000. All receipts, runs good. 541-420-5011

transmission. Silver, blue leather interior, moon/sunroof, new quality tires and battery, car and seat covers, many extras. Recently fully serviced, garaged, looks and runs like new. Excellent condition $29,700 541-589-4047

SUBBRUOPBRNB COM

BULLETIN CLASSIFIEDS Search the area's most comprehensive listing of classified advertising... real estate to automotive, merchandise to sporting goods. Bulletin Classifieds appear every day in the print or on line. Call 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Berptng CentralUngon pnce IPUP

4g® SUBARU.

877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

Porsche 911 Turbo

BUBBRUOPBBNOCOM

2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

NM~-

877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

One owner, Turbo Diesel, Eddie Bauer 4WD, 46,400 miles,

Tick, TOCk Chrysler Newport (2) 1962 4 door sedans, $2500 and $5500. La Pine, 541-602-8652.

$26,500

Call (206) 849-4513 in Bend.

Jeep C herokee

Grand 1 9 99,

1 59,970 mile s . 4WD, au t omatic transmission, cloth interior, power everything, A/C, trailer hitch. Well maintained & runs great. $4250. 541-385-5286

Good classified ads tell the essential facts in an interesting Manner. Write from the readers view - not the seller's. Convert the facts into benefits. Show the reader how the item will help them in someway. This advertising tip brought to you by

Garage Sales Garage Sales Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin

Classifieds

541-385-5809

2003 6 speed, X50

Tick, Tock...

added power pkg., 530 HP! Under 10k miles, Arctic silver, gray leather interior, new quality t i res,

...don't let time get away. Hire a professional out of The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory today!

and battery, Bose premium sound stereo, moon/sunroof, car and seat covers. Many extras. Garaged, perfect condition $5 9 ,700. 541-589-4047

Porsche Carrera 911 2003 convertible with hardtop. 50K miles, new factory Porsche motor 6 mos ago with 18 mo factory warranty remaining. $37,500.

~IBP

The Bulletin M

My little red Corvette" Coupe

Kia Roi 201 1,Auto, gas saver, 14K miles. Vin

¹ 9275 4 6

$11,888

©

Volkswagen Karmann Ghia 1970 convertible, very rare, new top & interior upholstery, $9000. 541-389-2636 WHEN YOU SEE THIS

~OO

More PixatBendbuletin,cfjm On a classified ad go to www.bendbulletin.com to view additional photos of the item.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Daythrough The Bulletin Classfyieds

Looking for your next employee?

Place a Bulletin help

wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-322-6928

S UBA R U

2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

1996, 350 auto, 132,000 miles. Non-ethanol fuel 8 synthetic oil only,

garaged, premium Bose stereo,

$11,000.

Mercury Sable 2000 4-dr sedan, good condition, $2400. 808-640-5507 Mini Cooper Country- Subaru BRZ L imited man 2011, 14,504 mi., 2013, manual, spoiler, ¹WH9814. $2 3 , 995 premium wheels. Vin ¹600209

541-923-1781

$26,688 S UBA R U .

Oregon

Aufngnurne

BUBBRUOPBRNU COM

541-598-3750 www.aaaoregonau!osource.com

©

your best source. Every daythousandsof buyers and sellers of goods and services do business in these pages.They know you can't beat TheBulletin Classified Section for selection and convenience - every item isjust a phone call away. The Classified Section is easy to use. Every item is categorized andevery cartegory is indexed on the section's front page. Whether youarelooking for a home orneed aservice, your future is in the pagesof The Bulletin Classified.

1996, 73k miles, Tiptronic auto.

SUBBRUOPBBNU COM

$15,888 I nternational Fla t Bed Pickup 1963, 1 S UBA RU. SUBBRUOPBRNU COM t on dually, 4 s p d. trans., great MPG, 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 could be exc. wood Dlr ¹0354 hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950.

FIND YOUR FUTURE $19,700! Original low mile, exceptional, 3rd HOME INTHE BULLETIN owner. 951-699-7171 Your future is just a page away. Whether you're looking for a hat or a place to hangit, The Bulletin Classified is

(phntn forillustration only)

only one left! $500 Call for details, 541-548-6592

Ford Taurus 2003 SSE s edan, e xc . co n d 63,000 miles. $5,000

¹749542

GMC frston 1971, Only

877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

Ford Bronco 1981

Ford F250 SuperCab 2001, Triton V8, May '15 tags, ONLY 89K miles, $6495 obo 541-610-6150 Jeep Wrangler X 2004, 4.0. 4x4, hard top, MUST S E E ! Vin

541-41 9-5480.

BUBBRUOPSBNU COM

4 speed 4x4, 302 engine, low miles, h eaders, roll b a r , lphnln lnr illustration nnlyf hitch kit, good tires, Chevy M a l ibu L T Z straight body, runs 2010, V6, aut o great, $950. w/overdrive, leather, iphntn for illustration only) 541-350-7176 loaded, 21K m i les,H yundai Elant r a Vin ¹103070 Touring GLS Wagon $17,988 2011, 5 Spd, air, tilt, Ford Excursion cruise. Vin ¹121821 ) SU B A R U . 4@ 2004 $13,888 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

1921 Model T Delivery Truck Restored 8 Runs $9000. 541-389-8963

4 @ S U B A R U. 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

541-389-9569

r

In Madras, call 541-475-6302

$11,988

877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

541-771-2852.

(4) Michelin LTX M8S t ires, 4 5 % tre a d , Ford T-Bird, 1966, 390 I BN® SUBAR U P265/70/R17, $ 1 50. engine, power every- 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 541-504-3833 thing, new paint, 54K 877-266-3821 original m i les, runs Jeep Wrangler 1989. Dlr ¹0354 932 great, excellent condiA utomatic, 2 d o or, tion in & out. Asking 71,094 miles. $1,925 Antique & $8,500. 541-480-3179 (503) 862-8175 Classic Autos BUBAllUOPBBNU COM

¹397598

Sports, G.S. floor

mats, 17,000 miles, Crystal red.

ways garaged, serious only $36,500.

Ford Ranchero I979

iphntn for illustration nnlyl

541-598-3750 www.aaaoregonautosource.com

©

541-280-4671

with 351 Cleveland modified engine. Body is in excellent condition,

Oregon Aufngnurse

Nissan Versa S 2011, Gas saver, auto, air, CD, alloys, Vin

4i®

latpu~

530-515-8199

CORVETTE COUPE Glasstop 2010 Grand Sport - 4 LT loaded, clear bra hood 8 fenders. New Michelin Super

Toyota Avalon Limited DON'IMISSIHIS 2011, Beautiful c ar, c ompare to new a t Chevrolet Corvette Olds Aurora 1999, white $43,500. Vin ¹384729 Coupe 2007, 20,700 4-dr, 134K miles, front $24,988 mi., beautiful cond. wheel drive, leather, 3LT loaded, victory S UB A R U . air, CD/radio, excel(phntn for illustration only) I'ed, two-tone lent condition. $4000 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. Ford Focus SE Sedan leather, powerseats, or best offer. 877-266-3821 2009, 5 s p d, M P 3, with logos, memory, 541-548-5886 Dlr ¹0354 c ruise, til t . V in headsupdisplay, ¹130071 nav., XM, Bose, tilt, $10,988 chrome wheels, upPorsche 911 Toyota Camrysr Carrera 993 cou e graded drilled slot1984, SOLD; S UBA R U . ted b rake r o tors, 1985 SOLD; extra insulation, al- 2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 1986 parts car

lines, 541-593-2597

CARS: Chevy Corvette Coupe 1964 PROJECT FB 1949-(SOLD) & 530 miles since frame 2-dr Coupe 1950 off restoration. Runs Chevy chassis's $1750 and drives as new. rolling ea., Chevy 4-dr 1949, Satin Silver color with complete car, $ 1949; black leather interior, Cadillac Series 61 1950, mint dash. PS, PB, 2 dr. hard top, complete AC, 4 speed. Knock w/spare f r ont cl i p ., offs. New tires. Fresh $3950, 541-382-7391 327 N.O.M. All Corvette restoration parts in and out. $64,500. Pickups Call: 541 410-2870 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classifieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809 F ord Model A 1 9 3 1 Chevy 2500 HD 2003 Cpe, All new rebuilt 8 WD w o r k tr u c k, balanced eng. Asking 4 140,000 miles, $7000 $6500. 541-408-4416 obo. 541-408-4994. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, Dodge 1-ton dually, 2001 V8, automatic, great Cummins diesel, Knapheide service box, new shape, $9000 OBO. tires, great cond, $7100.

Automo b iles Subaru Outback 2012 2 15i P r emium. 5 k ¹252888 $ 2 3 ,995

$45,000.

The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory is all about meeting Chrysler 300 C o upe v your needs. 1967, 44 0 e n g ine, Chevy Equinox LT auto. trans, ps, air, Call on one of the Sport AWD 2010. frame on rebuild, reprofessionals today! Auto, 6-Spd w/Overpainted original blue, drive, 29 Hwy mpg, original blue interior, 1987 Freightliner COE 3- original hub caps, exc. 41K miles, traction axle truck, Cummins en- chrome, asking $9000 control, keyless engine, 10-spd, runs! $3900 or make offer. try, moonroof, air, obo. 541-419-2713 power e v erything, 541-385-9350 X M S a tellite e n 2009 26' Load Max flatPlymouth B a r racuda gaged, OnStar avail. bed gooseneck trailer, $21,500. Call $4000. 541-416-9686 1966, original car! 300 MP3. 541-419-0736. hp, 360 V8, center-

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, $150,000 (located

Automobiles •

503-358-1164.

916

'Qrj u

Au t o mobiles

541-312-3085

Trucks & Heavy Equipment

S

Sport Utility Vehicles

CORVETTE Convertible2005 Automatic LS2 high performance motor, only 29k miles, Sterling S ilver, b l ack leather interior, Bose premium sound stereo, new quality tires and battery, car and seat covers, many extras. Rec e ntly factory serviced. Garaged. Beautiful car, Perfect cond. $29,700

2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

Nissan 350Z 2005 Black, excellent condition, 22,531 gently driven miles, 1 owner, non-smoker, $15,500.

541-589-4047

The Bulletin recoml

mends extra caution I I when p u r chasing ~ f products or servicesf from out of the area. J S ending c ash ,J or credit inI checks, formation may be I

Subaru lmpreza M/RX / subject toFRAUD STI 2005, 6 s p e ed, For more informapower windows, f tion about an adverpower locks, Alloys. tiser, you may call I the Oregon State I Vin ¹506223 $20,988 ~ Attorney General's I Office C o n sumer S UB A R U . f Protection hotline at

J

1-877-877-9392.

SUBBRUOPBBNU COM

2060 NE Hwy 20, Bend. 877-266-3821 Dlr ¹0354

541-480-9822

r----

The Bulletin

Serving Central Oregon since 1903

FOR ONLY

00+

The Bulletin

'Llttle Red Corvette"

Nlonaco Dyna Y Bnanant RBBB .~ selid Fea atures include rs, COunte 4-dr S'Qltase micro, 1 'd Q, cenvectien er, cebuilt-in washer/drye, ramic ti'le tloor, TU, o

~gppgg gy&fNCC af P

ggP

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Bite dish, 1

Buy 8 Sell Safely

In TheBulletin Classifieds Unlike unregulated lnternet advertising, we make every attemPt tO enSure that PrOduCtSSOld in OLir ClaSSifiedS are

from a valid source.

Call 541-385-5808 to place your ad today.

assi je s

ass-throuQh d ak!rig size bed tray, an A!I for onlY $149,000 541-000-000

Your auto, RV, motorcycle,

boat, or airplane ad runs until it sells or up to 12 months

2004 Corvette Convertible Coupe, 350, auto with 132lniies gets 26-24 mpg Add lots more description and interesting facts for $99! Look how much n agiri couldhave in asweet car likethfsl

$12,5OO 541-000-OOO

(whichever comes first!) Includes up to 40 words of text, 2" in length, with border, full color photo, bold headline and price. • Daily publication in The Bulletin, an audience of over 70,000. • Weekly publication in Central Oregon Marketplace —DELIVERED to over 30,000 households. • Weekly publication in The Central Oregon Nickel Ads with an audience of over 30,000 in Central and Eastern Oregon • Continuous listing with photo on Bendbulletin.com * A $290 value based on an ad with the same extra features, publishing 28-ad days in the above publications. Private party ads only.

I f


Oper 2,OOO NEW Check Out Our HeIII

MEAT

oc( I 09il g

PROGD0Ut E

Department

PR DUCTS! e

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BEEF TRI TIP ROAST

NECTARINES Northwest Grown

I

I '

$8 LB

Sweet & Juicy

58c

VALENCIA ORANGES

Boneless

Y

PINEAPPLE

LB

BEEF BOTTOM ROUNDSTEAK

California Grown

JUMBO ARTICHOKES

8 $8 LB

98!

LB

PORK COUNTRY STYLERIBS

LITEHOUSE SALAD DRESSING

JUMBORED ONIONS

Boneless

Washington Grown

LB

LB

BEEF

BACKRIBS

HONEYDE W

Frozen

California Grown

13 Oz, All Varieties

$2$8 :4

BEEF

T-BONE STEAK

$$48

8 48

BEEF CHUCKSTEAK Boneless

LB

LB

$288

ASSORTED

CHICKEN LEG

TROPICAL

QUARTERS Southern Grown Frozen

MELONS

Eet

PORK LOIN

Sweet & Juicy

Boneless Whole In Bag

I

$4q LB

Your Locally Owned Ad Items Subject To Avoilobility

I i

t

$q88 LB

PRICES EFFECTIVE: I

31 1

$3455 Hwy. 97 N., Bend • 541-388-2100

4

5

2

3

6

FOOD 4 LESS - BEND I TUESDAY, JUL 30, 2013 IPA GE 1


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EA + DEP

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LEMONADE S

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6 Pack 12 Oz Bottles

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6 Pack 12 Oz Bottles

EA + DEP

FRITOS 8 CHEETOS

OROWEA ENGLISH MUFFINS

9 to100z Selected Varieties

12 to 14 Oz Selected Varieti

EA + DEP

CUPCAKE WINE

BAREFOO T WINE

750 ML Selected Varieties

1.5 Liter Selected Varieties

STARKIST

llla Illllll

WESTERN FAMILY MUSTARD

50z In Water

EA

24 Oz

EA

EA

PEPSI

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'IIIIt.SIERRA MIST,

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Pnee(Sofj 6t1ssyeAnsss i1

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24 Pack 16.9 Oz Bottles

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LAS PALMAS

ENCHILADA SAUCE

ANGEL SOFT EA + DEP

PAGE 2 I TUESDAY, JUL30,2013 IFOOD 4 LESS - BEND

EA + DEP

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EA

28 Oz Selected Varieties

EA


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STUBB'S BBII SAUCE ies

EA

18Oz Selected Varieties

FA

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80z Se l ected Varieties

EROlER VAlUES

EA

OAIRV IIAlUES EBEHHARDe s~+ „,aen

@ERHARD'S t~ /

FRANL HOTDOG8 HAMBURG ER BUNS

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HAWAII'S

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13.5 to 15 Oz

GARLICBREAD

EA

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SOURCREAM

12 Oz Selected Varieties

EA

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16 Oz

EA

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NATIIRAL ~ ~ ~ e DIRECTIONS ITALIAN SPARKLING MINERALWATER 33.8 Oz Selected Varieties

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SLICED EA

SWISS CHEESE

COFFEE-MATE

PS EBERHARD ICE CREAM LB

4 Quart Pail

CREAMER EA

32 Oz Selected Varieties

EA

FOOD 4 LESS - BEND I TUESDAY, JUL30, 2013 IPAGE 3


esL e)oc~3qt.SPECIALS.

GREEN 5 RED SEEDLESS GRAPES

LB

CUCUMBERS Northwest Grown

FOR

I Seeded or Seedless

ORGANIC JUMBO MANGOS

HERMISTON WATERMELQN

LB

" 'gs< ~nt Ait<3~)t. SPECIALS.

FOSTERFARMS SPLIT CHICKEN Northwest Grown

STONE CRAB CLAWS

28

2Lb Bag Frozen

LB

RESERts BAJA

CAFEBURRITOS 8 Count Package

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WE ACCEPT:

Bend

$3455 Hwy. $7 N. 541-388-2100 PAGE 4 I TUESDAY, JUL30,2013 IFOOD 4 LESS - BEND

• Food Stamps • W IC Vou c h e r s • M anu f a c t u r e r ' s We reserve the right te limit quantities

Coupons


Bulletin Daily Paper 7-30-13