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Serving Central Oregon since190375

WEDNESDAY June 25,2014

k-. ,

SPORTS • C1

Sceniccycing

Ll I

OUTDOORS • D1

bendbulletin.com TODAY'S READERBOARD

OREGON HEALTH PLAN

oca

Science for Jedis — star Wars-inspired experiments aim to hook kids in Bend.B1

roU Werld Cup —Everything you ever wanted to knowabout stoppage time.C1 PIEIS —Biting in the Uruguay vs. Italy match andthe rest of the action from Brazil.C4

• Barbara Haslinger, who in 1990 wasDeschutesCounty's first female judge, will still serve asafill-in, but she's officially stepping down after 24yearsonthe bench

earns onlls By Lily Raff McCaulou

College edge —Itstlll

The Bulletin

makes financial sensedespite soaring tuition, a study finds.C6

PORTLAND — In 2013,

Oregon Health Planpatients went to the emergency room less often and were

Grass skiing —checking

more satisfied with the care they received than in 2011 according to a quarterly report released Tuesday. This was the first report

out one of the world's nichiest of niche sports in Southern Oregon.D3

to show a full year of data

Sharks underthe streets

since the state launched its massive effort to reform

— Mexico City's new aquarium is three stories downand made to withstand a quake.A3

the Oregon Health Plan,

the state's version of Medicaid. Tuesday's report was the fourth quarterly statement on the effort, the first

In national news — Incumbent Sen.ThadCochran holds off a tea party challenger in Mississippi.A2

with performance bonus checks attached.

In 2012, Oregon created 15 regional entities called

Coordinated Care Organizations, or CCOs, to ad-

And a Wed exclusivePressure is building against France's ban onfracking. bentlbulletin.com/extras

minister the Oregon Health Plan and attempt to lower

costs and improve health carewith new payment con-

EDITOR'SCHOICE Joe Kiine/The Bulletin

Moving a

Judge Barbara Haslinger speaks to an attorney last week during a hearing at the Deschutes County Justice Building in Bend. At the time of her judicial appointment in 1990, Haslinger was the youngest judge in the state.

parayzed hand with a thought By Jim Tankersley The Washington Post

COLUMBUS, Ohio-

First they screwed the end of the gray cord into the metal silo rising out of Ian

By Scott Hammers eThe Bulletin

ith her retirement less than a week away, Judge Barbara Haslinger hasn't bothered to

State University Extension

be several stints as a substitute judge of sorts, over the next five years. Judges in Oregon are eligible for retirement benefits once they

Service master gardeners.

ence fiction come true: His thoughts would bypass his broken spinal cord. With the help of an algorithm and some electrodes, hewould

called upon to fill a vacancy on the Deschutes County

David Shepard knew he would grapple with a string of tough issues when he ran for mayor of Mission, Kan.

District Court.

district court docket — mis-

At 35 years old, Haslinger was at the time the young-

demeanor criminal cases, family law and civil cases with claims of less than $10,000 — while judges on

place, but Miller won't be seated until January.

first of what she expects to

If he succeeded at this next task, it wouldbe sci-

The Kansas City Star

going to be the most qualified candidate," Haslinger sard. For much of her career, Haslinger handled the

judge in Deschutes County. Last month, Bend lawyer Randy Miller won the election to take her

Burkhart's skull. Later

for him to try.

By Brad Cooper

ultimately, the decision was

June 30 is the official last day on the bench for Haslinger, who has logged nearly 24 years as a

they laid his right forearm across two foam cylinders, andtheywrappeditwith

drills, and then it was time

an interest in bringing female judges to the bench, but

After all, she'll be coming back to work the very next day.

husband and plans to take classes from the Oregon

film from an old home movie camera. They ran him through some practice

"What they told me at the time was there was certainly

Abortion foes try a oca approach

start cleaning out her office at the Deschutes County Courthouse.

remain on the bench, in the

thin strips that looked like

Instead, Haslinger will

turn 60 — Haslinger turned

60 inMarch — butthey can boost their benefits by providing 175 days of service as an unpaid fill-in judge after their official retirement. Haslinger said she hasn't made too many plans for her near-retirement just yet. She's hoping to spend a bit more time traveling with her

"For some reason, I can't

get my sunflowers to grow," she said. Portland-born, Haslinger came to Central Oregon just after graduating from the University of Oregon School of Law in 1981. At the time,

she was one of three female lawyers practicing in Deschutes County. Haslinger practiced general law in her first few years in Central Oregon and servedasa protem judge for

the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and as a public defender in Redmond's municipal court. In 1990, Haslinger applied for and received a judicial appointment from Gov. Neil Goldschmidt, who was

est judge in the state and

Deschutes County's first female judge. (She's since been joined by Chief Judge Alta Brady and Judge Beth Bagley.)

the circuit court dealt with

felonies and higher-dollar civil cases. SeeHaslinger/A4

move his once-dead limb again — a scientific first. "Ready?" the young engineer, Nick Annetta, asked from the computer to his left.

"Three. Two. One."

Burkhart, 23, marshaled

every neuron he could muster, and he thought

KANSAS CITY, Mo.-

Redevelopment. Streets. Stormwater. But abortion? Shepard fell 16 votes

short in April's election after his opponent was endorsed by Kansans for Life, which sent postcards backing his rival. The city councilman still

scratches his head. He wonders just what abortion had to do with presiding over a Kansas City suburb.

On the OuterBanks,asw itch in climateforecast By Lori Montgomery

would be 39 inches higher and

The Washington Post

Inside

about his hand. The last time the hand

her home on the Outer Banks

obeyed him, it was 2010 and Burkhart was running

dangers of climate change were revealed to Willo Kelly

The state had detailed maps to illustrate this claim

• Bipartisan report paints dark picture of economic costs,C6

into the Atlantic Ocean.

in agovernment conference room in the summer of 2011.

and was developing a website where people could check by

the steering wheel as he

By the end of the century,

streetaddress to see iftheir

drove the van from Ohio

state officials said, the ocean

property was doomed. There

The hand had gripped

tracts and improved coordination among providers. Central Oregon's CCO fared well in Tuesday's report card and earned a $3.52 million performance bonus. SeeCCOs/A6

NAGS HEAD, N.C. — The

would be swamped.

house."

So Kelly, a lobbyist for Realtors and home builders on

"It seems misplaced to

me," Shepard said. Not to anti-abortion

groups. They say no race is too local, no office too small, to make sure voters

the Outer Banks, resolved to

know where a candidate stands.

plan to hold back the tide.

prove the forecast wrong. And thus began one of the nation's

civil war over abortion

The 39-inch forecast was "a

most notorious battles over

grows more local all the

death sentence," Kelly said, "for ever trying to sell your

climate change. SeeForecast/A5

time.

was no talk of salvation, no

America's long-standing

SeeAbortion/A5

University to North Carolina's Outer Banks, where he

and friends were celebrating the end of freshman year. Thehandunclenchedto drop his towel on the sand. SeeThought/A4

TODAY'S WEATHER n

Couple of storms High 68, Low46 Page B6

INDEX Business C5-6 Comics/Puz zles E3-4 Horoscope D 6 Outdoors D1-6 C1-4 Calendar B2 Crosswords E 4 L o cal/State B 1-6 Sports Classified E 1 -10 Dear Abby D6 Obituaries B5 TV / Movies D6

The Bulletin AnIndependent Newspaper

Vol. 112, No. 17e, 34 pages, 5 sections

Q I/i/e use recycled newsprint

': IIIII I o

8 8 267 02329


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

T TODAY

T ART • Discoveries, breakthroughs,trends, namesin the news— the things you needto know to start out your day

It's W ednesday,June25,the 176th day of 2014.There are 189 days left in the year.

DID YOU HEAR?

DISCOVERY

New info sheds light on Titan's oceans

HAPPENINGS D.C. —President Barack Obama meets with Israeli President Shimon Peres.

Ukraine — Russia'sparliament is scheduled to vote on rescinding President Vladimir Putin's legal authority to invade Ukraine, a request Putin says he made toencouragethe peace process.

A3

The new aquarium where the sharks — and other marine creatures — swim is three stories below the street. And yes, it's built to withstand an earthquake, officials say.

By Geoffrey Mohan Los Angeles Times

HISTORY

The sudden disappearance of a bright spot on a

Highlight:In 2009, death

methane sea on Titan could

claimed Michael Jackson, the "King of Pop," in LosAngeles at age 50andactress Farrah Fawcett in Santa Monica, Calif., atage 62. In1788, Virginia ratified the U.S. Constitution. In1876, Lt. Col. Colonel George A.Custer andhis 7th Cavalry were wipedout by SiouxandCheyenneIndiansin

add more proof that Saturn's largest moon is a lot like Earth, just colder and

gassier. Astronomers at Cornell

University were flipping between radarimages of Ligeia Mare, a sea of frigid methane on Titan's north-

ern hemisphere. They discovered a bright spot from a Cassini satellite fly-by in July 2013 that wasn't visible on images from a previous

the Battle of the Little Bighorn

in Montana. In1888,the Republican National Convention, meeting in Chicago, nominated Benjamin Harrison for the presidency. (Harrison went on to win the election, defeating President Grover Cleveland.)

satellite pass, nor on a sub-

sequent one. They gave it the whimsical name "Magic Island," which embraced both their sense of wonder and scientific skepticism that the

In1910, President William

Howard Taft signed theWhiteSlave Traffic Act, more popularly known asthe MannAct, which made it illegal to transport women across state lines for "immoral" purposes. In1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act of1938 wasenacted. In1943, Congress passed, over President Franklin D.Roosevelt's veto, the Smith-Connally Anti-Strike Act, which allowed the federal government to seize andoperate privately owned war plants facing labor strikes. In1950,war broke out in Korea as forces from the communist North invaded the South.

In1962, the U.S.Supreme Court, in Engel v.Vitale, ruled 6-1 that recitation of a state-sponsored prayer in New York State public schools was unconstitutional. In1973,former White House Counsel John W.Deanbegan testifying before theSenate Watergate Committee, implicating top administration officials, including President Richard Nixon aswell as himself, in the Watergate scandal and cover-up. In1984, the Prince andthe Revolution soundtrack album "Purple Rain" was releasedby Warner Bros. Records. In1998, the U.S.Supreme Court rejected a line-item veto law as unconstitutional, and ruled that HIV-infected people are protected by theAmericans with Disabilities Act. Ten years age: Republican Jack Ryanwithdrew from the U.S. Senate race in lllinois after revelations of sex-club visits with his then-wife, actress Jeri Ryan. Five years age: North Korea vowed to enlarge its atomic arsenal andwarned of a "fire shower of nuclear retaliation" in the event of aU.S.attack, as the regime markedthe 1950 outbreak of the KoreanWar. One year age: Russian President Vladimir Putin confirmed the whereabouts of National Security Agency leaker EdwardSnowdenat a Moscow airport but promptly rejected a U.S.plea to turn him over. Democratic Texas State Senator WendyDavis began a one-womanfilibuster to blocka GOP-ledeffort to impose stringent newabortion restrictions across the nation's second-most populous state.

BIRTHDAYS Civil rights activist James Meredith is 81. Basketball Hall of Fame memberWillis Reed is 72. SupremeCourt Justice Sonia Sotomayor is 60. Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain is 58. Actor-writer-director Ricky Gervais is 53. Rock singer George Michael is 51. Retired NBAAll-Star Dikembe Mutombo is 48. Rapper-producer Richie Rich is 47.Rapper Candyman is 46. — From wire reports

phenomenon might be little more than visual trickery. "It was exciting, but our

Susana GonzalezIBloomberg News

Visitors look at one of the fish tanks inside the new Inbursa Aquarium in Mexico City. The aquarium, funded by billionaire Carlos Slim, features 230 species of sea life with water brought in from the Gulf of Mexico, according to the aqusrium's director.

science reservations kick i n an d i m m ediately w e start thinking, 'What are

By Nick Miroff

many Mexican families. Per-

skeleton and a chesty wooden

the errors that could have

The Washington Post

standard gallery of psychedelic jellyfish, back-lit and squirtMEXICO CITY — P r etty ing around to woozy trance much everyone in this earthmusic. "They're sparkly," said quake-prone megalopolis of 20 million can tell you the last 4-year-old Santiago Vasquez, place they want to be when the seeing one for the first time. "They look like flowers." Big One hits. And here, three stories beThis was precisely the idea,

haps more jarring is the visual

mermaid. There's also a glass tunnel

caused this?'" said Jason

low the street, there is a new

horror to contemplate: the brand-new, subterranean Ac-

uario Inbursa, Mexico City's first aquarium and perhaps the only place in the world where it would be possible to be trapped underground and a ttacked by a shark at t h e

same time. Not to fear, said aquarium spokesman Victor Osuna.

"Safety was the first thing our designers thought of," he assured, noting that the shark

tank glass is eight inches thick. "This place was built to withstand a 10.0 on the Richter

ica's largest, at least in terms of the number of species on

display (230). Visitors enter at street level and descend three floors to undulating, mood-lit tanks that mimic the ocean's

depths. Then they gradually ascend to brighter environs: shallow tropicalreefs, beach ecosystems and freshwater habitats like the Amazon River, exhib-

iting piranhas and crocodiles in turbid lagoons under a canopy of plastic foliage. Of course, there's also the

Hofgartner, an astronomy graduate student at Cornell

silvery facade of the Souma- where visitors can pose for ya and the dull, cheap-look- selfies with manta rays, and ing exterior of the aquarium, a grotto where teenagers can which doesn't even offer vis- smooch in the low light. itors an awning for shade or Smaller kids and their parrain while they wait in line.

University.

Radar imagery can play tricks on the observer, tossing out anomalies that are

the equivalent of a fly on a lens.

ents were clearly wowed, but

The bathrooms aren't finished the aquarium seemed to disapto loveand respect the oceans yet, either. point many young adults, esand seas. Mexicans are fond At least the aquarium's oth- pecially those who had visited of seafood, ofcourse — the er plumbing appeared to be bigger versions to the north. aquarium site was formerly working as intended. To fill Its ambitions didn't seem to occupied by an oyster barthe underground aquarium match the great fortune of but they haven't been the best tanks, trucks hauled in nearly Mexico's biggest fish, Carlos stewards of their coastal wa- 6 million gallons of seawater. Slim. "I've been to the one in Bosters, he added. An elaborate network of fil"We have very little culture ters recirculates the water five ton, and that one has penguins o f marine c onservation i n times a day. and seals," said Cassandra "Every one of these animals Cortez, 21. "I expected a little Mexico," Osuna said. The sprawling capital had requires a different care re- more." elaborate canals and water- gime," said veterinarian DaWhile the exhibits at large ways in the Aztec era, but mian Rojas, "but the system U.S. aquariums tend to re-cremodern Mexico mostly dried we have installed allows us to ate entire ecosystems, the Osuna said: to teach city kids

them up. And while Mexico

City is famous for its art and scale." anthropology museums, the Named for its corporate nearest aquariums were on sponsor, the Inbursa insur- the coasts in Veracruz and ance company,the aquarium Mazatlan. opened to greatfanfare this month, billed as Latin Amer-

contrast between the soaring,

attend to the needs of every

tanks at Acuario Inbursa toss

species." The subterranean design

together species from all over the world. Some were still

means that none of the animals will ever see the sun, but

waiting to be f i lled, so the

Rojas said most of the speci-

The M exican b i l l ionaire mens were bred in captivity,

But the research team,

which included scientists from a dozen universities and space agencies, is nearly certain that those possibilities don't match the data. They believe the spot

probably came from rising bubbles, suspended solids or liquids, or waves. Scientists have found ampleevidence ofaseasonally driven global methane cycle similar to the water cycle of Earth's surface and

atmosphere. They've even detected evidence of methane storms. Cassini will take more

crowds gathered at the touching pools where kids could

images of the area in August, and Hofgartner and others will be eager to see whether Magic Island reap-

handle rays and starfish after

Carlos Slim apparently spot-

not captured, and will be per- cleaning off their city germs t ed an opportunity i n t h i s fectly healthy with artificial with special hand sanitizer. "This place is awesome," deficit. He is a principal in- light. vestor behind the $20 million The aquarium plans to grow said Rodrigo Ramirez, 9, project, and the aquarium coral in its tanks that can be whose family drove him nearsits directly across the street used to "reforest" dead and dy- ly two hours from Cuernavafrom the Soumaya Museum, ing tropical reefs in Mexican ca, where he has his own fish which is named for Slim's waters, Osuna said. tank. "I want a shark," he told late wife and houses their art Some of the tanks make his mother. collection. innovative use of the aquarSlim cut the ribbon June 11 ium's unusual s t ructure. alongside Mayor Miguel An- Black-tip sharks swim circles gel Mancera. around the enormous conmplements 'H a rs e '3 n,l e~ i.a ~ J B ut while Slim's art m ucrete columns that support seum is free, the for-profit the upper floors, sharing the 70 SW Century Dr., Ste. 145 aquarium has a $10 entrance " sunken ship" exhibit w i t h Bend, OR 97702• 541-322-7337 fee, putting it out of reach for ersatz anchors, a fake whale complementshomeinteriors.com

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A4 T H E BULLETIN 0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

Thought

Haslinger

Continued from A1

Continued from A1

Burkhart splashed into the

"That's what's most mem-

orablefor me, is the cases where I felt like I made a difference in people's lives," she

The district and circuit

courts were consolidated in 1998, and Haslinger accordingly was named a circuit court judge, but she continued to specialize in

waves,the hand fl ying above his head, the ocean warm aroundhis feet, the sun roasting

his arms, and he dived. In an instant, he felt nothing.

Not his hand. Not his legs. Only the breeze drying the saltwater on his face. His friends had saved him from drowning. A helicopter carried him to a hospital. He

sald.

Haslinger said she's seen far too many people appear repeatedlyin her courtroom over the years, particularly for driving under the influence of

lower-profile cases until

learned that he had smashed

just a few years ago. Haslinger said that although she's had plenty of memorablecases,she's hesitant to discuss the details publicly.

into a sandbar, hidden by the waves, and broken his neck.

only so much a judge or the leabout cases because they gal system can do.

He rehabbed at a special facility in Atlanta. He returned

aren't cases. They're people," she said. "One that

home to the Columbus suburbs, unable to move anything below his elbows.

would be memorable would

He lived in his father and s tepmother's basement. H e

In 2001, pro-nudity activist Terri Webb was called

needed help with almost everything. Showering took 2 tA hours, with assistance. When it was time to eat, family mem-

"I'm r eluctant to

d a y , d o c tors

dening" to see the same defendants again and again, and while she's often tried to find the right words to get through to repeat offenders, there's

talk

"Some people choose to

drink because of losses, the loss of a loved one, and I'll remind them, 'Is this how your

be the woman who showed

up without clothes." Lee Powetl/The Washington Post

cord — the electrodes stimulate muscle fibers, causing movement.

When the time came to start t he attempt, the room w a s

opened Burkhart's skull. They crowned his head with a small packed with several journalmetal cylinder, attached to ists, at least seven cameras, two bone by screws, and ran a wire Battelle engineers (Annetta between it and the chip they and Chad Bouton, the project stuck like Velcro to his brain. leader), two doctors (Ali Rezai, The wound healed nicely, who had performed the brain though Burkhart's head hurt a surgery, and Jerry Mysiw, the lot, especially when, in the days rehab specialist who recruited after the operation, his hospi- Burkhart to the project) and tal wing decided it was a good Burkhart's father, Doug. time to test its fire alarms. BurThe doctors knew the chip khart finished his finals at Ohio was in the right place to pick State University, where he had up the brain signals. The enenrolled after the accident. He gineers knew their algorithm helpedcoach the lacrosseteam was translating his thoughts at his old high school — where to movements. They believed he had been a standout goalie the film strips strapped around — to the state finals. his forearm, which they called Three times a week, he rolled a sleeve, would stimulate his his wheelchair up to a computer muscles to make those movemonitor and allowed scientists ments a physical reality. The from Battelle, a nonprofit re- big variable was Ian Burkhart: search organization that invent- Could he will his hand to move? "He's got to focus on the ed thetechnology they hoped would let him move his hand task," Rezai, the surgeon, said.

"Imagine the task." They started with the drills

sibilities now seemingly open to them, in the bionic future

Burkhart had done for weeks, they had just ushered in. They moving the animated hand on

talked of sleeves that would

the screen with his thoughts. slide over paralyzed limbs, He repeated the sequence sev- headbands that would do the eral times. "Both Ian and the work of abrain chip, cellphones computer are learning at the that would do what the computsame time," Bouton said. The last drill ended. "Awe-

some job," A nnetta t old Burkhart. And then it was time.

Before Burkhart's surgery, Bouton had talked about this

day, and his hopes for it, which boiled down to one finger. They hoped Burkhart could move one finger. Now the day had come, and Bouton was more ambitious. He wanted Burkhart to do something that

would be a building block — a movement that could lead to

orders, at least not yet. " It's not a matter of if' he

D eschutes

County, she said she'll miss her near-daily visits with the

courthouse staff and lawyers she's known for years.

Mysiw said most of his pa-

The framed l etter, sent

tients spend at least some part

along with the coin the man received from Alco-

"It's a matter of when."

of every day asking whether it would have been better if they had just died in their accidents. Most of them, but not Burkhart. "What drove him" to volunteer for this, Mysiw said, "was the

"I can definitely feel it al-

shammers@bendbulletin.com

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holics Anonymous to mark

10 years of sobriety, is a thank-you note in which the man credits Haslinger

Class™ifie s

with helping him turn his life around.

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M AGAE H I E

••

self. Bouton placed it next to

Ian Burkhart thought about Burkhart's hand on the table. his hand. "You really have to There was no practice, no vizone everything else out," he sualization. Burkhart grabbed would say later, "and focus on the spoon by the handle, that movement." flipped his hand over and held At 2:58 p.m., his fingers quiv- on for abeat. ered. His hand opened. Not all Then he dropped it, like a the way, but it opened. A moment later, he balled his

ments will be i n

a man who appeared in her courtroom years ago.

him eating or brushing his teeth, someday, byhimself. need to contribute." "We're going to see if Ian With the sleeve strapped on, can open and dose his own Burkhart trilled his f i ngers. hand," Bouton told the camer- He opened his hand wide. He Annetta counted down from three.

summer. While she expects many of her fill-in assign-

reminder of the need for a

a handwritten letter from

His last task was a spoon. A first step toward feeding him-

in until she actually vacates the courthouse sometime this

judge to maintain impar-

would get movement back in his limbs, Burkhart would say.

pressure.

Haslinger said the reality of her retirement won't fully sink

court, even in the most un- ready," she said. "I love the usual circumstances. work that I do. I love the legal One of the few memen- challenges. I love interacting tos from Haslinger's career with people." on display in her office is — Reporter: 541-383-0387,

Burkhart would unplug and go home and be stuck with a body that still didn't follow his

curled his wrist some more.

ly, it's up to them."

tiality and deal fairly with those who come before the

er did now. That's all far away;

as. To Burkhart, he added: "No

loved one would want to see you, in and out of jail, putting your life and other's lives at risk?'" she said. "But, ultimate-

to Haslinger's courtroom to answer charges of disorderly conduct for repeatedly appearing nude in Bend. She stripped down to a pair of red cowboy boots in the courtroom. Haslinger had Webb arrested for contempt, and she said the episode was a

Electrodes are attached to lan Burkhart's arm during a training session at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. Responding to the signals from his brain — but bypassing his spinal

bers strapped a fork to his limp hand; using his shoulders and with his thoughts again, to plug elbows, he could spear bites. into his brain. Together, they The night before the doctors practiced. He would watch a strapped Burkhart's arm into digitalhandmoveonthescreen, an elect rode sleeve, before he and he would think about movtried to make that hand move ing his hand the same way. again, he had to call his dad to The computer would read his come turn him from his side to thoughts and move a second, his back so he could sleep. animatedhand athis direction. His doctors said he signed up Finally, last Wednesday, four for this experiment — for elec- years and a week since he lost tive brain surgery — because command of the hand, it was he hoped, someday, if the tech- time to try for real. nology could get there, to ease Burkhart rolled his electric his parents' burden in caring wheelchair into a narrow room forhim. at Ohio State's Wexner Medical "I'd say that the thing I miss Center in Columbus. He wore most is just being independent," a green T-shirt over a white Burkhart said in April, shortly T-shirt. His father had shaved before doctors implanted a chip his head that morning with in his brain. eYou have to rely electric clippers. The round on other people so much. port stuck awkwardly out of it. "It would really be nice," he When they plugged the cord in, added, "to just do something as he looked like Neo, the Keanu simple as open up a water bot- Reeves character from "The tle myself." Matrix" movies. The n ex t

intoxicants. She said it's "mad-

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hand into a fist, and he curled the fist toward himself, like a

weightlifter doing curls. Again and again, he balled

HunterQouglas

his hand and curled his fist. "What do you think?" Bou-

ton asked Ian's father. "Pretty cool," he replied. Ian Burkhart smiled.

Later, the doctors and engi-

e

I• •

.

neers would talk about the pos-

How theNeurodridgeworks Researchers at Battelle, a large nonprofit research and development organization, have invented a multistep process meant to help paralyzed people move their hands again with their own thoughts. BRAIN IMPEANT

1

Surgeons embed a chip with 96

electrodes in the patient's brain. The electrodes "read" the commands from the part of the brain that controls

TRANSMITTER Penny to scale

A wire connects the chip to a port, screwed into the skull. The port connects to a cable that carries the information from the brain chip.

2

Chip's actual size

hand movement.

DECODING The cable (not shown) links to a computer, where analgorithm "decodes"the braincommands and adds additional commands, which normally would come from the spinal cord.

-e

' •

.

.

e •

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

Abortion

Forecast

"That is definitely the push, that's definitely where

we're going to win," said Troy Newman, the presi-

Continued fromA1 Sometimes the fights -

Continued fromA1 Coastal r esidents j oined forces with climate skeptics

in races as obscure as those dent of anti-abortion group f or w ater d i s trict b o a r d Operation Rescue. — aim to make sure a canNewman claimed victory didate with an opposing last year when city zoning abortion view never gets a rules were used to effectivetoehold in politics. ly close Virginia's busiest Sometimes control of a abortion clinic in Fairfax. city council or zoning board Needing new office space can determine whether and to comply with state regulawhere a particular abortion tions for abortion providers, clinic might operate. the clinic looked to move. Other times, the battles But it was denied a permit simply reflect the desire to at its new location because fight abortion on all fronts. parking wasn't adequate. After all, it springs from Fairfax later amended its an issue that many see as zoning rules to define abornothing less than a life-and- tion clinics as medical facildeath matter. ities, meaning they would "Pro-life people want to need city council approval. know," said Mary Kay Culp, Under the old rules, abort he executive director of

to attack the science of global warming and persuade North Carolina's Republican-controlled l e g islature jection, which had been advanced under the outgoing Democratic governor. Now, 30 years out and therefore

show the seas rising by no more than eight inches. Environmentalists are ap-

level." Not always. Last year,

tide. Some c l imate-change experts a r e sy m p athetic,

however, calling the rebellion

has met with coastal leaders.

treat," Kelly said on a recent morning in a sunny Manteo cafe that would be underwater if the sea were 39 inches higher. "In the backs of their minds, what everyone is thinking is that they just

coastal economy and coastal

abortion clinic Tiller ran be-

development interests. And,

fore he was shot to death in

at this point, we don't actual-

2009. Kansans for L ife h anded the city petitions with

ly know what we're going to do about it." Cities such as Norfolk, Va., want people off t h e O uter and Miami have embraced Banks." the data, identifying inunLong before that would dation zones as a first step happen, though, Kelly wortoward planning — and seek- ries that codifying the 39ing federal funds for — sea inch forecast would crush the walls, floodgates and oth- local economy, which relies er forms of p r otection. On entirely on tourism and the lonelier stretches of the U.S. construction, sale and rentshoreline, however, govern- al of family beach houses. ment aid seems less likely In Dare County alone, the than interference and aban- islands' largest jurisdiction,

abortion to city government.

disputed. They say it is about paving Last fall, Albuquerque, streets, caring for parks and N.M., voters rejected a bal- ensuring adequate police lot measure seeking to ban and fire protection. abortions after 20 w eeks. Abortion opp o nents r e f erendum, w h i c h counter: Just because local

donment, and the forecasts

the state has identified more than 8,500 structures, with an assessed value of nearly I n t h e Ca r o l inas a n d $1.4 billion, that would be inSouthampton, N.Y., isolated undated if the tides were 39

are sparking deep anxiety about the future.

drew thousands of cam- government doesn't directpaign workers from outside ly regulate abortion doesn't

enclaves of ultrarich shore-

the state, was believed to be

mean it can't play a r ole.

the first in the country for a municipality. Abortion opponents say local government — not necessarily Congress or

pre-emptively to build private bulkheads to protect

row's state senator voting

t he statehouse — i s

in our toolbox other than re-

"They realize this is going to have a huge impact on the

SalineCounty, Kan., Commission rejected a $6,000 14,000 signatures seeking to state grant for contracep- change the zoning so abortives after one member of tions couldn't be provided the panel compared intraat the site. Ultimately, operuterine devices to murder. ators of the abortion clinic A commissioner opposed prevailed, opening the facilt o abortion t h o ught t h e ity in April 2013. contraceptive would abort Some suburban leaders a pregnancy, an a r gu- don'tsee the relevance of

T he

Waves lap around the stilts of a row of condemned homes in Nags Head, N.C. A report by state officials predicting that the ocean at the Outer Banks would be 39 inches higher than current levels by the end of the century outraged coastal residents who feared the data would make their homes impossible to sell.

rapidly becoming both widely available and alarmingly precise. "The main problem they of wild seashore. In spots, the have is fear," said Michael Or- islands are barely 100 yards bach, a marine policy profes- wlde. "We don't have any tools sor at Duke University who

using zoning to stop the reopening of the Wichita

ment local health officials

Nikki Kahn /TheWashington Post

an understandable reaction to sea-level forecasts that are

abortion o pponents t r i ed

About the same time, the

+

palled, and North Carolina has been lampooned as a hotbed of greedy developers trying to "outlaw" the rising

Kansans for Life. "They cer- council approval. "There are a lot of procomes to voting. When we life organizations focusdon't tell them, they call us." ing on Washington, D.C., But the abortion issue is but where has that gotsurfacing in local govern- ten us the last 40 years?" ment in a variety of ways. Newman said. "Where we K ansans fo r L i f e t h i s are making communities

son County Commission to delay appointing a chief public health adviser. The group was upset about testimony he gave in support of a physician associated with late-term abortion provider George Tiller.

II

the state is working on a new forecast that will look only

tainly want to know when it

abortion-free is at the local

a

to deep-six the 39-inch pro-

tion providers didn't need

month persuaded the John-

Culp

abortion.

advance to the next level."

tion. If the state ever activates

i I /

I/f4

I I / I

g

l

II

e i g ht-inch

are not an option on the Out- the website that lets potential er Banks, a string of narrow investors search by address, barrier islands dotted with Kelly said, "All of a sudden, busy beach towns, isolated t hose properties would b e fishing villages and stretches worthless."

sa i d .

"You make sure your guys

Even with a n

forecast, 414 Dare County properties worth $70 million would be marked for inunda-

their homes from the rising sea. But such fortifications

on abortion bills. "It's about political ad-

f e r - v ancement,"

inches higher.

front owners h ave m oved

Today's local water board member could be tomor-

tile ground for stopping

w

I I I I « l( «

Nationwide, $700 billion of coastal property could be

ment projects of their own. "We lose beach because

the water is rising equal to end of the century — and an the thickness of two nickels additional $730 billion could every year," Bobby Outten, be at risk at high tide — with- the manager of Dare County, out new policies to forestall said on a recent tour of the climate change, according restored shoreline. "Some to a new report by the Risky call it sea-level rise, but from Business Project, a high-pow- our perspective it's erosion, ered group of financial and and we've been living with it p olitical figures who a r e forever." set to meet today with seThe arrival of man-made below mean sea level by the

nior Obama administration

beaches on the Outer Banks

officials. has drawn the disapproval So far,locals say there of some environmentalists. is no sign that the housing For generations, the islands market on the Outer Banks

have moved with the waves, and human settlements have moved w it h t h e m . T h e se

is suffering. Nags Head's town manager, Cliff Ogburn,

days, however, the islands are booming business in building so heavily developed, houses permits and that "occupancy threatened by the surf often is as high as it's ever been," have nowhere to go. having rebounded from the Beach nourishment offers dark days before 2011. That a temporary solution. But as is when Nags Head and Dare the sea rises, it "ceases to be County spent $36 million to cost-effective and it becomes repair severe erosion on 10 obvious that something else miles of beachfront, where has to happen," said Spencer e ncroaching w aves h a d Rogers, an erosion specialclaimed nearly a dozen hous- ist with North Carolina Sea es and the seaside swimming Grant, a research consortium pool at the Nags Head Com- based at North Carolina State fort Inn. University. "If things get to the worst Now the beach looks great, the tourists are back, and extent, then we're going to D uck, Kitty Hawk and K i l l be abandoning places," RogDevil Hills are talking to the ers said. "There won't be any county about beach nourish- option." said that the town is doing a

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TH E BULLETINe WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

TODAY'SREAD: GLOBAL UNREST AND THE MARKET

Workers, Retirees 8 Spouses. ~+,(P >g

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The Associated Press file photo

Trader James Doherty, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange earlier this month

People are trading 38 percent less each daythan they did four years ago, and for nearly 50 days in a row, the Standard & Poor's 500 index has risen or fallen by less than1 percent.

HeaiingaidsatNOCOSTtofederalworkers,retireesictspouses!

Wa Street is mi t cam ... soL! tatmae o s ants? By Bemard Condon

As with weather, the the-

The Associated Press

ory goes, so with markets:

NEW YORK — Is the lack of fear on Wall Street some-

Calm often precedes storms.

thing to fear?

too much risk, and prices of stocks and bonds collapse.

Investors get cocky, take on

CCOs Continued fromA1

cent of the money withheld. Money that wasn't earned back was combined into what

Federal Employee Program Member Name

angry middle classes and the ease with which they can organize using the Internet and

www.fepblue.org

John Doe

Member

R00000000

social media. In Italy, " Pitchfork Pr o-

tests" broke out over political ing closer to Baghdad. A Most professional inves- corruption and unemployhousing bubble in China is tors, strategists and econo- ment in December as demdeflating. Russia is massing mists don't appear worried onstrators blocked roads and troops near th e U k r ainian t hat the lack of worry i s occasionally clashed with border again. Military forces leading to reckless bets, not police. In Brazil, people have in Egypt and Thailand have yet anyway. Yellen, for one, taken to the streets over high staged coups. says there's little evidence of transportation costs and exIn a world suddenly more trouble brewing. But a f ew penses for hosting the World dangerous, you'd think fund dissenting voices see trouble Cup. managers and traders would aplenty. The Citigroup report sugbe selling and buying and Investors ar e b o r r owing gests this new "vox populi selling again in a frenzy of money more than ever to risk" isn't going away soon second-guessing. I n s tead, buy stocks. Sales of "junk" and asks, Why so little reacthey're the picture of calm bonds from the riskiest com- tion from investors? and contentment. panies are at a record. Some David Levy, chairman of People are trading 38 per- investors are so heedless the Jerome Levy Forecastcent less each day than they now that they're willing to ing Center, blames "fear fadid fouryears ago. Prices of accept rock-bottom interest tigue." Investors have faced bonds and stocks are bare- payments to lend to risky down lots of trouble over the ly moving day by day. For countries. years, from a European debt almost 50 days in a row the Spain, struggling to col- crisis to two near defaults by Standard 8 Poor's 500 index lect taxes from a population the U.S.government.None of has risen or fallen by less facing 26 percent unemploy- these things have kept stocks than 1 percent, a state of se- ment, is paying just 1.3 per- down for long. "It's hard to be scared all renity unmatched since 1995. cent to borrow money for five Then, last Wednesday, Feder- years, less than the U.S. pays. the time," Levy says. But, he al Reserve Chair Janet Yellen Says M i chael L e w itt, adds, "The more sectarian told investors the U.S. eco- founder of the Credit Strat- violence, the more countries nomic recovery was on track, egist Group, an investment fighting civil wars, the greatand things got really dulL A manager: "No one is afraid of er the potential for something gauge of expected swings in anything." going wrong." stock prices, known as the The list of things to shrug Another reason for calm is "fear index" among traders, off over the past three years central banks. From Tokyo sunk to lows not seen since is lengthy: two dozen gov- to Washington and London, 2007, when stocks began a ernment collapses, surprise they've kept short-term bor2'/2-year plunge. military moves and mass rowing rates they control low Which helps explain why demonstrations. and bought trillions of dollars the calm may not last: The That tally comes from a worth of bonds to push down lack of fear is spooking some recent Citigroup report that, long-term rates, too. Many people. p redictably, c reated f e w investors are convinced little "It's quiet out there," says waves. Titled "Taking It To can upset markets as long as Robert Buckland, chief global The Streets," i t a t t r i butes central banks are willing to stock strategist at Citigroup. much of the political turmoil pump money into the finan"Eerily quiet." lately to a combustible mix of cial system. Sunni extremists are inch-

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committee. Stevens said the committee

hopes to review proposals as the state called a "challenge soon as July. day's report was good, howev- pool"and divvied up among PacificSource e x ceeded er. Access to health care state- C COs according t o th e i r benchmarks in four categowide — in other words, getting scoresin four categories.Pa- ries: electronic health record an appointment to see a doctor cificSource was one ofthree adoption, follow-up care for quickly — was a challenge in CCOs to improve its perfor- childrenprescri bed medica2013. And although data from mance in each of those four tion for attention deficit hyperthis year are not yet available, measures. activity disorder, timeliness officials warn that access All to l d , Pa c i f icSource of prenatal care and reduced probably has become worse earned 106 percent of its with- elective deliveries performed in 2014, as Oregon Health Plan held funds, which amounted to before 39 weeks of gestation. enrollment has surged. just more than $3.52 million, But PacificSource failed to The plan was expanded Jan. according to Kate Wells, direc- show improvement over 2011 1, as part of the Affordable tor of community health devel- data in the rates of colorectal Care Act. More than 340,000 opment for PacificSource. cancer screenings, follow-up new members have enrolled PacificSource is also the visits within seven days for paunder new income guidelines. CCO for the Columbia Riv- tients recently hospitalized for Adults who earn less than er Gorge region, so that sum mental illness, and mental and about $16,100 per year for a will be split between Central physical health assessments single person or $32,900 per Oregon and the Hood Riv- within 60 days for children in year for a family of four are er area. Central Oregon will Department of Human Sernow eligible for coverage. get $2.7 million, according to vices custody. Beginning t hi s m o nth, a news release from PacificAlso, local Oregon Health CCOs are reimbursed in part Source and the Central Ore- Plan patients reported slightbased on how well they per- gon Health Council, the local ly decreased access to care in formed in 17 key performance CCO's board of directors. 2013. An annual patient satareas. For scoring purposes, Dan Stevens, senior vice isfaction survey found that data from 2013 were com- president of government pro- 80.6percent ofOregon Health pared with data from 2011, the grams for PacificSource, said Plan members within Pacificyear before all of the changes 60 percent ofCentralOregon's Source"thought they received took place. portion of the money will go appointmentsand care when The Oregon Health Author- back into the CCO's regular needed" in 2013, down from 81 ity withheld 2 percent of the budget, to pay for health care percent in 2011. 2013 budget for each CCO. for local Oregon Health Plan Patients were more satisfied To earn their full payments, patients. with the care they received, CCOs had to show improveThe remaining 40 percent of however. In 2013, 83.5 perment on at least 12 of the 17 the bonus money will go into cent of Oregon Health Plan measures and have atleast60 what's being called a "quality patients in the local CCO said percent of patients enrolled in fund." Providers in the region they "received needed infora primary care clinic. who propose new ideas to im- mation or help and thought Of the state's 15 CCOs, 11 prove health care quality may they were treated with cour— including Central Oregon's be granted money to fund tesy and respect" compared CCO, PacificSource — showed their projects. Grants will be with 81 percent in 2011. improvements in enough cat- awarded by the Central Ore— Reporter: 541-410-9207; egories to earn back 100 per- gon Health Council's finance rraff@bendbulletirt.com

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Calendar, B2 Obituaries, B5 Weather, B6

© www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

BRIEFING Two BullsFire area closure lifted The DeschutesNational Forest onTuesday lifted the last largepublic land closure aroundthe Two Bulls Fireareanorthwest of Bend. The public land closure hadcovered 29,574 acres surrounding the 6,908-acre wildfire. A half-mile stretch of the MrazekTrail will remain closed, though, allowing crews to repair damage doneduring firefighting, according to the DeschutesNational Forest. Trail users will be detoured onto forest roads aroundthe closed section of trail. TheDeschutes also reopened the Bearwallow firewood area, which was inthe closure areabut not burned bytheblaze. The TwoBulls Fire was spotted June 7and prompted evacuation warnings for nearly 200 homes inand near west Bend.The Deschutes CountySheriff's Office hassaid the human-caused firemay have beenarson.

Adult foster home inquiry leads to 72charges By Scott Hammers

allegations against Constance

facilities owned and operated

The Bulletin

Marie Herrera-Firkus, 66, Lorisa Firkus, 24, and Michael

by Herrera-Firkus. Instead, investigators discovered Herre-

James Gardner, 27,LorisaFirkus'husband.

ra-Firkus had been employing her granddaughter, Lorisa Firkus, a convicted felon legally barredbythe state from working in such facilities.

An investigation into theft

reportedbyaresidentofa Bend adult foster care home hasresultedin 72chargesfor defraudingthe state and has ledto the arrest of the home's owner and her granddaughter. Charging documents filed in Deschutes County Circuit Court in late May outline the

A probable cause affidavit

filed in the case indicates it began with an investigation

County Jail since June 3. Investigators discovered Fir-

kus hadbeenusingher cousin's name to elude detectionby authorities, and that Firkus and Herrera-Firkus both submitted

official documents to authori-

someone they later learned was Firkus running out the

back door. The resident manager later told the licensers Firkus had been working full time using her cousin's identity with her grandmother's knowledge,

ties using the assumed identity. On a November 2013 visit to

and that employees had been cousin's name if anyone from the state visited.

by Adult Protective Services

Firkus, who was still on

into a complaint that money

probation for a conviction for

one of the facilities, licensers

had been stolen from a resident of one of two Holden Homes

first-degree theft in 2009, has been held at the Deschutes

with the state Department of

instructed to call herbythe

Human Services observed

REDMOND

Council

fills gap in golf course budget

4"

Man accusedin knifepointrobbery A Dufur manwas arrested Monday in connection with the alleged robbery at knife point of a Bend man,according to Bend police. William Joseph Baker, 28, offered aride to Bram ParkerJacobson, 21, around 9p.m. Sunday. Bakerstopped the car in theareaof Northwest IdahoAvenue and BroadwayStreet andallegedlydemanded Jacobson's wallet while holding a knife to his throat, police said. Jacobson obliged andwas left on the side ofthe road with non-life-threatening injuries. Authorities later identified Baker, andOregon State Police arrested him at his home inDufur at 7 p.m. Monday. He was takenback to Deschutes County and lodged on suspicion of robbery, assaultand

By Leslie Pugmire Hole The Bulletin

REDMOND — Having little choice, the Redmond

City Council voted 6-1 Tuesday night to close the 2013-

Liam Rogers, 9, of Bend, reacts to the colors produced after he dipped a barbecue skewer in lithium chloride and placed lt into a flame

14 fiscalyear payingthe entire annual mortgage bill of $405,000 and up to $30,000 of the operating costs for Juniper Golf Course, a 10-year-old facility the city backed with full faith and credit bonds. Councilor Ed

during the Jedi AcademyCampat the Bend Science Station on Tuesday morning.

Onimus voted no.

'e i ca em ' raws 1 S in o science e uca ion

room who was around to

Photos by Andy Tullis l The Bulletin

Police are looking for a man suspected of breakingintoaBendwoman's car, taking hercredit card and then usingthecard around town. The suspect is described asage20 to 30 and about6feet tall, according to theBend Police Department. He may also haveatattoo on the front of his neck. Officers suspect the man broke into theSUV of Tara KealohaBell, 39, Thursday in northeast Bend. He issuspected of using Bell's credit card at multiple placesaround Bend until shecanceled it, police said. Anyone with information about theman should contact Officer Wes Murphy bycalling 541-693-6911.

The Bendpolice have investigated morethan 200 thefts from cars or trucks this year, sopolice advise peoplenot to leave valuables inthem. — Bulletin staffrapon's Nore briefing, B6

Well shot! Reader photos

• We want to see your photos for the next special Well shot! — "psyched about summer" — to run in the Outdoors section. Submityour best work at bendbulletln.com/ summer2014.

stars as students measured the

temperature of flames and used chemicals to change the fire into hues of red, orange andto the class's greatest amusement — green. SeeScience/B2

or the Hogwarts Academy," said David Bermudez, the sta-

60 years old, the course

the time, it was expected Juniper would be self-supporting, much as the Redmond Airport — also a city facility — operates. The city had begun paying all or most of the annual mortgage payment beginning in 2009, when declining revenues made

periments, and we do our best might be interesting to kids,

wouldn't do it again." Although more than

force by working with magne-

kids into the lab conducting ex-

whether it's the Jedi Academy

good at the time, but I

community-created facility to its current location. At

ulate iron filings. On Tuesday, Bunsen burners stood in for

to embed it into a theme that

Patrick said. "It looked

On Monday, the camp's first

color.

"Our primary goal is to get

since then," Councilor Jay

d ay, students e x p lored r e a l-world incarnations of t h e

tion glasses into his shirt Tues-

day, crossing into the dark side at the Bend Science Station's Educational newsand Jedi Academy. activities, and local kids But Bryce strayed only briefand their achievements. ly, as he readily handed the • School Notes and cardboard and plastic glasses submission info,B2 back to his instructor with almost no prompting.

vote on backing Juniper's loan,and I'vebeaten myself up over it frequently

fell under city auspices 10 years ago when Redmond officials agreed to back a nearly $6 million loan needed to relocate the

tion's executive director, who is known to students as "Bermi."

The Bulletin

OUR SCHOOLS, OUR STUDENTS

"I'm the only one in the

The class's exploration of diffraction capped a morning Bryce White, 9, was so taken of StarWars-inspired science with the power to see the full experiments focused on excolor spectrum hidden within ploring what can be learned white light that he surrepti- about a star's temperature and tiously stuffed a pair of diffrac- composition from studying its

By Tyler Leeds

theft.

Police lookfor ID theft suspect

SeeCharges/B6

tism and electricity to manip-

it impossible for Juniper to

make its payments. Ron Grace, president of Juniper Golf, Inc., the

all-volunteer organization that managed Juniper before 2009, brought to the

council meeting a copy of the course's lease with the Bureau of Land Management, owners of the land the course was built on. It specified that Juniper

would be a low-cost municipal course covered by the city's general fund. "The city should look at the history of Juniper, how it was built and what

ABOVE: Drew Salarl, 9, of Bend, colors ln the results of adding different chemicals to flames. RIGHT: David Bermudez, the executive director of the Bend Science Station, talks to the class about the findings of their experiment.

it meant to the city," Grace said. City Attorney Steve Bryant said the BLM lease

provisions did not transfer when the city agreed to back the relocation. But

Grace said attorney Ron

Mayor wants Bend to have walkable schools By Hillary Borrud Bend Mayor Jim Clinton wants the city to follow the

district already strives to build

Oregon. Planners are working on updatingthe plan to accommodate population growth,

schools in locations where as

and Clinton said he wants

exampleofLakewood,Ohio,a city where there are no school

many students as possible can walk, but it is impractical to do

the community to consider

want to encourage, and which kind you want to discourage,"

ways to make it easier to walk

Clinton said. "You are stating

buses and all students can

that for all schools.

walkto school.

Clinton said the idea occurred to him while he was thinking about the city's plan for the urban growthbound-

to school, such as possibly a gieater number of smaller

as a city your No. 1 priority is the health and safety of your

schools, so students are closer

children.... One of the net ef-

to a neighborhood school. "There's all kinds of different ways for a city to grow, and without some kind of guiding

fects is everyone is happier and healthier than they would be

The Bulletin

Clinton sent an email May 1

proposing the idea to the BendLa Pine School Board, but on Tuesday Clinton said he had yet to receive any response.

School Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said'Itiesday the

ary, the line outside which city

development is prohibited in

principle, you're a little bit uncalibrated as to what kind of development patterns you

otherwise." SeeWalkable/B6

Bryant, who was a former

member of the Redmond Public Building Corp., the entity that managed the

course in its old location, told him the lease terms were still in effect. (Ron Bryant is Steve Bryant's father.) Course Co., a golf management firm, has been at the helm of Juniper since 2010 in hopes of turning the facility around in terms of increasing membership and daily rounds and trimming operating expenses. See Redmond/B5


B2

TH E BULLETIN0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

Evxxr

Exm a

Email events at least 10 days before publication date to communityli fe®bendbulletin.com or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

"COMMUNICATINGDOORS": A time-traveling comic thriller by Alan Ayckbourn about a woman BEND FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 who stumbles into a murder plot; p.m.; Brooks Alley, between $19, $15 seniors, $12 students; Northwest Franklin Avenueand 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, Northwest Brooks Street; www. 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; bendfarmersmarket.com. www.cascadestheatrical.org or PICKIN' ANDPADDLIN': Featuring 541-389-0803. Americana band the Blackberry "SWEENEY TODD:THE DEMON Bushes from Seattle, with Quincy BARBEROFFLEETSTREET": Street and Franchot Tone; $5, free Stephen Sondheim and Hugh for children12 and younger; 5 p.m.; Wheeler's humorous musical about Tumalo CreekKayak 8 Canoe, a murderous barber and culinary 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, crime; $22 for adults, $19 for Bend; www.tumalocreek.com or students/seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd 541-317-9407. Street Theater, 220 N.E.Lafayette MUSIC ONTHE GREEN: Summer Ave., Bend; www.2ndstreettheater. concert series with entertainment Joe Kline 1The Bulletin com, 2ndstreettheater[egmail.com by Out of the Blue, food vendors David DaCosta, as the barber, rehearses a scene from "Sweeney or 541-312-9626. and more; free;6-7:30 p.m .;Sam Todd," playing at 2nd Street Theater In Bend. CRUTCHES:The Seattle punk band Johnson Park, S.W.15th Street and performs, with Frustration, Locals S.W. Evergreen Avenue,Redmond; Cascade AvenueandAsh Street; BARBEROFFLEETSTREET": www.redmondsummerconcerts.com EFAand Hog's Breath; free; 8 p.m.; Third Street Pub, 314 S.E.Third St., sistersfarmersmarket@gmail.com. Stephen Sondheim and Hugh or 541-923-5191. Bend; 541-306-3017. Wheeler's humorous musical about FOURTH FRIDAYSTROLL: Local THE LIBRARY BOOKCLUB: Read a murderous barber and culinary JOSEPH EID: The Cal i f ornia band downtown businesses are open with and discuss "Tell TheWolves I'm crime; $22 for adults, $19 for performs; $5; 8 p.m.; Volcanic special sales, music, art, food and Home" by Carol Rifka Brunt; 6:30 Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, students/seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd beverages; free; 4-7 p.m.; downtown p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Bend; www.volcanictheatrepub.com Street Theater, 220 N.E.Lafayette Sisters; erin@sisterscountry.com or Cedar St.; www.deschuteslibrary.org/ or 541-323-1881. Ave., Bend; www.2ndstreettheater. 541-549-0251. sisters/, reneeb[edeschuteslibrary. com, 2ndstreettheater[egmail.com MISTA CHIEF: Reggae, with The org or 541-312-1055. SPLASH, PEDALANDDASH: or 541-312-9626. Rising Buffalo Tribe andAbstract Ages12 and younger, quarter-mile "THE METROPOLITANOPERA: Rude; $3, ladies free;10 p.m.; The VA VAVOOM BURLESQUE VIXENS: bike and run; $25; 4 p.m.; Sunriver LA RONDINE"ENCORE: Puccini's Astro Lounge, 939 N.W. Bond St., The Humboldt County, Calif. group Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation opera based on mid-19th century Bend; www.astroloungebend.com or Center, 57250 Overlook Road; performs, with Patrimony; $8 Paris; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old 541-388-0116. plus fees in advance, $10 at the 541-408-7747. Mill Stadium16 & IMAX, 680 S.W. door; 9 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Powerhouse Drive, Bend; www. FURBALLLUAU:Featuring food Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, Bend; fathomevents.com/event/metand drink, belly dancers, silent www.volcanictheatrepub.com or summer-rigoletto or 541-312-2901. auction and raffle, with live music FRIDAY 541-323-1881. by Bill Keale, to benefit the Bend FULL DRAWFILM TOUR: Lineupof PATIO AND BAKESALE: 9 a.m.-5 Spay and Neuter Project; $44 plus short films on bowhunting and the fees in advance, $300 for table for outdoors; $14 adults, $11 for children p.m.; Holy RedeemerCatholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, eight; 5:30 p.m.; Century Center, 12 and under; 7 p.m., doors open at SATURDAY La Pine; www.holyrdmr.org or 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W.Wall 541-536-3571. bendfurball.com. CENTRAL OREGONSUMMER St., Bend; www.towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700. MARKET:Featuring a street fair, COUNTRYQUILTSHOW: Featuring AUTHORPRESENTATION:Ellee flea market, farmers market, live a quilt show and araffle; $2; noon-6 Thalheimer will present on her ED 8[ THEREDREDS:The Portland music and more; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary book of poetry "Cycling Sojourner: band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Volcanic p.m.; DeschutesCounty Fair& Expo School, 640-641 N.E.Third St., Washington"; $5;6:30 p.m .;Paulina Theatre Pub, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Center, 3800 S.W.Airport Way, Prineville; www.crookcounty.k12. Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Bend; www.volcanictheatrepub.com Redmond; www.streetfair2014. or.us or 541-416-2636. Sisters; 541-549-0866. or 541-323-1881. com, bill ©streetfair2014.com or NORTHWEST CROSSING "COMMUNICATINGDOORS": 541-385-3364. HULLABALOO: A street festival A time-traveling comic thriller by GARAGE SALEAND AUCTION: A with food, bicycle racing, live music Alan Ayckbourn about a woman THURSDAY by the Indigo Girls and more; free; who stumbles into a murder plot; benefit for the Bethlehem Inn, with auction at 2 p.m; 8 a.m.; Bethlehem 3 p.m.; Northwest Crossing, Mt. $19, $15 seniors, $12 students; LEFTOVERSALMON: TheBoulder, Washington and Northwest Crossing Inn, 3705 N. U.S. Highway 97, 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, Colo., jamgrass band performs, with drives, Bend;www.nwxevents.com 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; Bend; www.bethleheminn.org or Bill Payne of Little Feat; $24; 6 p.m., 541-317-5700. www.cascadestheatrical.org or doors open at 5 p.m.; Century Center, or 541-382-1662. 541-389-0803. 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www. SISTERSFARMERSMARKET: COUNTRYQUILTSHOW: Featuring "SWEENEY TODD:THE DEMON theoutsi degames.com. 3-6 p.m.; Barclay Park, West a quilt showand a raffle; $2; 9a.m.-

TODAY

Science

soak in color-inducing chemicals like lithium chloride and copper sulfate. Bryce got the most out of his equipment,holding his sticks in the

Continued from B1 Dustin Johnson, 10,gouged the archipelago of his flame with an electronic thermo- flame until the color burned couple, attempting to find the off and the stick caught fire hottest part in an effort to dis- — but just the regular yellow cern whether blue or orange kind — before dunking it in flames are hotter, and, as a result, which color stars emit the most heat. After considering the data,

water.

"Maybe it's changing the

temperature

of t h e f ir e , "

Bryce guessed, conjecturing how the chemicals were able

Johnson concluded, "Blue is way, way hotter." to affect the flame's color. Sophie App-Singer, 9, who After the gas valves were earlier declared it's a good turned off, Bermudeztook a thing humans can't travel at

second to praise the room of

warp speed, correctly point- 10 students. "I'm impressed.We had the edout that the blue flame had more oxygen,and thus could burners running for 45 minburn more intensely. utes andno one got hurt," he After me asuring fl a me half-joked. temperature, students were given small wooden sticks to

— Reporter: 541-633-2160, tleeds@bendbulletin.com

SGHooL NoTEs REUMIONS TheBend HighSchoolclassof1974 will hold a reunionAug. 8-9; no-host bar, 61276 S.U.S.Highway 97, Bend, 5to11 p.m. Aug.8; BendHighSchool tour,10a.m. Aug. 9; BendGolf and Country Club, 61045Country Club Drive, Bend, 5to11 p.m. Aug. 9;visit www.lavabears.reunionmanager.com or contact Kathy Timm at541-4804345 or jktimmland[oaol.com. TheRedmond Union HighSchool class of1959will hold a reunion Aug. 2;American Legion Park,850S.W . Rimrock Way,Redmond, 2 to 5p.m.; a picnic with sandwichesandsalad served; $22 perperson, registration requested byJune15; Contact Marv Gage at541-419-2000 or marv. gage38[igmail.com. The USSIwoJima Shipmates

Organizationwill hold a reunion for LPH2 andLHD7shipmates Aug. 2731; CrownePlazaHotel, Jacksonville, Fla.; visit http://ussiwojimashipmates. cfns.net to register or contact Robert McAnally at 757-723-0317or yujack46709@gmail .com.

COLLEGE NOTES Nicole Olivier,of Sisters, has been named to the spring 2014Dean's list at Providence College in R.l. The following local students have graduated from GeorgeFox University:Ryan Rudnick,Justin HolmanandWeldin Yanes. The following local students havebeen initiated into Phi KappaPhi Honor Societyat Eastern OregonUniversity: Kathy Fish,AndrewZaiser andGarth Brown.

How to submit

Contact: 541-383-0358, bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Teen feats:Kids recognized recently for academic achievements or for participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups. (Please submit a photo.)

Story ideas

Contact: 541-383-0358,

youth@bendbulletin.com M ail:P.O. Box 6020,Bend,OR 97708

School briefs:Items and announcements of general interest. Phone: 541-633-2161 Email: news@bendbulletin. com Student profiles:Know of a kid with a

Other schoolnotes: College compelling story? announcements, military gradPhone: 541-383-0354 uations or training completions, reunion announcements. Email: mkehoe[ebendbulletin. com

4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E.Third St., Prineville; www.crookcounty.k12. or.us or 541-416-2636. MADRASSATURDAYMARKET:9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sahalee Park, Seventh and B streets; 541-546-6778. PATIO AND BAKESALE:9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Holy RedeemerCatholic Church, 16137 Burgess Road, La Pine; www.holyrdmr.org or 541-536-3571. SENSORY FRIENDLYMOVIE SCREENING: Screening of "How to Train Your Dragon 2," lights will be on in the theater, sound will be turned down, advertisements and previews will be removed, special dietary needs are allowed to bring snacks from home; $5; 9 a.m.; Madras Cinema 5,1101 U.S. Highway 97; www.thedatabank. com/dpg/195/personal2. asp?formid=codsnmeet8 =c 7979894, stephanie[ecodsn.org or 541-408-1092. CENTRALOREGONSATURDAY MARKET:Featuring local artists and crafters; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Downtown Bend Public Library, 600 N.W.Wall St.; 541-420-9015. NORTHWEST CROSSINGFARMERS MARKET:Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Northwest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www.nwxevents.com or 541-312-6473. BITE OF BEND:Food festival includes local booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a live Top Chef competition, a children's area and live music; free admission; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.thebiteofbend.com or 541-323-0964. CRUXAPALOOZA III: Celebrate Crux Fermentation Project's second anniversary with live music from Polyrythmics, World's Finest, Elektrapod and Wilderness, a pig roast, beer tastings and more; free; 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Crux Fermentation Project, 50S.W. Division Street, Bend; www.cruxfermentation.com, info[Icruxfermentation.com or 541-385-3333. CENTRALOREGONPRIDE: Featuring vendors, food carts, live music, comedy, face painting and more in celebration of the

LGBT community; free; noon; Drake Park, 777 N.W.Riverside Blvd., Bend;www.j.mp/bendpride, humandignitycoalition[egmail.com or 541-385-3320. STORY STARSWITH JUDY SIERRA: Featuring Judy Sierra, children's author, storyteller and puppeteer; free tickets available at all libraries;1 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W.Wall St., Bend; www.towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700. MICHAELFRANTI8[SPEARHEAD: The pop-reggae star returns to Bend, with SOJA, Brett Dennen and Trevor Hall; $42 plus fees;

5 p.m., gatesopen4 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend;

www.bendconcerts.comor 541-322-9383.

LAST SATURDAY:Surf and skate inspired artifacts and sculptures, with live music; free; 6-10 p.m.; The Workhouse at Old Ironworks, 50 S.E. Scott St., Bend; www. theworkhousebend.com or 347-564-9080. "COMMUNICATINGDOORS": A time-traveling comic thriller by Alan Ayckbourn about a woman who stumbles into a murder plot; $19, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend;

www.cascadestheatrical.org or

541-389-0803. "SWEENEY TODD:THE DEMON BARBEROFFLEETSTREET": Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler's humorous musical about a murderous barber and culinary crime; $22 for adults, $19 for students/seniors; 7:30 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E.Lafayette Ave., Bend; www.2ndstreettheater. com, 2ndstreettheater[egmail.com or 541-312-9626. LARRY ANDHIS FLASKBENEFIT: Featuring Harley Bourbon, Mosley Wotta, Patrimony, Noah Stroup and the High Desert Hooligans; $10 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; Volcanic Theatre Pub, 70 S.W.Century Drive, Bend; www.volcanictheatrepub.com or 541-323-1881. SPLASH, PEDALANDDASH: Ages 12 andyounger, half-mile bike and run; $12; 8 p.m.; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic 8 Recreation Center, 57250 Overlook Road; 541-408-7747.

NEws OF REcoRD POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log whensuch a request is received. Anynewinformation, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must beverifiable. For more information, call 541-633-2117.

BEND POLICE DEPARTMENT Burglary —A burglary was reported at9:13 p.m. June16, in the19900 block of Ashwood Drive. Theft —A theft was reported at 9:24 p.m. June 20, in thearea of Purcell Boulevard andCanal Street. DUII —AmandaAnnVincent, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at10:40 p.m. June21, in the area of Northeast Shepard Roadand Northeast CanyonPark Drive. DUII —Cynthia RoseHanson, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:27a.m.June22,intheareaofU.S. Highway 20and Northeast Dalton Street. Theft —Atheft was reported at 8:37 a.m. June 23, in the 100block of Southwest Taft Avenue. Theft —Atheft was reported at 9:25 a.m.June23,inthe3000 blockof Northeast Lansing Court. Theft —Atheft was reported at 9:31 a.m. June 23, in the600 block of Harmon Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:43 a.m. June23, in the 61500 block of Parrell Road. Theft —A theft was reported at 10:45 a.m. June23, in the1400 block of Northwest Kingston Avenue. Theft —Atheft was reported at11:08 a.m. June 23, in the1300 blockof Northwest Columbia Street. Unlawlul entry —Avehicle was reported entered at1:47 p.m. June 23, in the1100 block of Viking Court. DUII —Jon William Ambjor, 55, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:27p.m.June20,inthe2000 block of NortheastThird Street. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 8:53 a.m. June18, in the 800 block of Northeast Watt Way.

REDMOND POLICE DEPARTMENT DUII —Lydia Ann Lostroh, 41, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:04 a.m. June16, in the 3300 block of South U.S. Highway97. Vehicle crash — Anaccident was reported at 3:09 p.m. June16, in the area of Southwest 24th Street and Southwest SalmonAvenue. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 6:11 p.m. June16, in the 900 block of Southwest VeteransWay.

Vehicle crash —Anaccident was reported at12:13 a.m. June17, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street and Northwest HemlockAvenue. Unauthorized[jse —Avehicle was reported stolen at 7:26 a.m.June17, in the 400 block of Southwest 25th Street. Unlawful entry —Avehicle was reported entered at1:56 p.m. June 17, in the 2200 block of Southwest 21st Street. Theft —A theft was reported at 3:38 p.m. June17, in the1900 blockof Northwest Larch SpurCourt. Theft —A theft was reported and an arrest made at5:18 p.m. June 17, in the1800 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft —A theft was reported and an arrest made at6:11p.m. June17, in the100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. DUII —Carlos Feliciano Bueno, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:53 p.m. June17, in the1700 block of Southwest VeteransWay. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 2:15 a.m. June18, in the 2000 block of North U.S. Highway97. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 7:53 a.m. June18, in the 2100block of North U.S. Highway97. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 8:28a.m. June18, in the1500 block of North U.S. Highway97. Theft —Atheft was reported and an arrest made at11:50 a.m. June18, in the100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft —Atheft was reported and an arrest made at12:04 p.m. June18, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 3:33 p.m. June18, in the1400 block of South U.S. Highway97. Theft —Atheft was reported and an arrest made at5:45 p.m. June18, in the 300 block of Northwest OakTree Lane. Vehicle crash —Anaccident was reported at10:16a.m. June19, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft —A theft was reported at11:45 a.m. June19, in the 500 block of Southeast EvergreenAvenue. Theft —A theft was reported at 3:26 p.m. June19, in the 400 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft —A theft was reported at 3:31 p.m. June19, in the 500 block of Northwest17th Street. Theft —A theft was reported at 4:38 p.m. June19, in the 2500 block of Southeast JesseButler Circle. Criminal mischief —Anact of criminal mischief was reported at 5:33 p.m. June19, in the 500 block of Northwest17th Street. Vehicle crash —Anaccident was reported at 6:22 p.m. June19, in the

1700 block of South U.S.Highway 97. Theft —Atheft was reported at 9:37 p.m. June19, in the 900 block of Southwest VeteransWay. Theft —Atheft was reported at 8:23 a.m.June20,inthe3000 blockof Southwest Reservoir Drive. Theft —Atheft was reported at11 a.m. June 20, in the700 block of Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Theft —A theft was reported at 3:14 p.m. June 20, in the300 block of Northwest Sixth Street. DUII —Jerry David Jones, 54, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:51 a.m. June21, inthe 1500 block of Southwest OdemMedoRoad. Vehicle crash — Anaccident was reported at10:23 a.m. June21, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unauthorizeduse —Avehicle was reported stolen at10:51 a.m. June 21, in the area ofSoutheast Cascade Avenue andSoutheast Railroad Boulevard. Vehicle crash — Anaccident was reported at10:51 p.m. June21, in the area of Northwest Seventh Street and Northwest QuinceAvenue. DUII —Jose Alejandro Mendoza, 39, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:05a.m.June 22,intheareaofU.S. Highway 97and Northeast Hemlock Avenue. Unauthorizeduse —Avehicle was reported stolen at 3:15a.m. June 22, in the100 block of Southwest12th Street. Vehicle crash — Anaccident was reported at12:04 p.m. June22, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Juniper Avenue. Theft —Atheft was reported at 2:09 p.m. June 22, in the1500 blockof Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft —A theft was reported at 3:06 p.m. June 22, in the 900 block of Southwest VeteransWay. Vehicle crash — Anaccident was reported at 6:07 p.m. June22, in the area of Southwest Fourth Street and Southwest EvergreenAvenue.

PRINEVILLE POLICE DEPARTMEMT Theft —Atheft was reported at1:25 p.m. June 23, in thearea of Northeast Third Street.

OREGON STATE POLICE Theft —Atheft was reported at 3:45 p.m. June 23, in the8100 block of North U.S. Highway97.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 6:24 a.m.— Natural vegetation fire, 109 N.W.Greenwood Ave. 17 —Medical aid calls.

Saturday 7:41a.m.— Unauthorized burning, 65290 U.S. Highway20. 3:31p.m.— Unauthorized burning, 65370 Kiowa Drive. 8:59 p.m.—Authorized controlled burning, in the area ofNortheast 11th St. 9:26 p.m.— Authorized controlled burning, 19683 Hiller Drive. 18 —Medical aid calls. Sunday 4:31 p.m.—Authorized controlled burning, 60474 Iroquois Drive. 4:44 p.m. —Natural vegetation fire, 61573 American Loop. 22 —Medical aid calls. Monday 4:47 a.m.— Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 2500 N.E.Holliday Ave. 1:29p.m.— Natural vegetation fire, 20605 Foxborough Lane. 1:39p.m.— Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, in the areaof Coulter Lane. 4:11p.m.— Building fire, 20364 Shetland Loop. 9:02p.m.— Authorized controlled burning,1144 N.E.Hollinshead Court. 9:32p.m.— Authorized controlled burning, 61337 S.U.S.Highway 97. 22 —Medical aid calls.

REDMOND FIRE

RUNS June16 17 —Medical aid calls. June17 2:21 p.m. —Barkdust fire, 1585 S.W. Mountain Quail Drive. 8 — Medical aid calls. June18 7:08p.m. —Unauthorized burning, 4705 W. Antler Ave. 7:12p.m.— Unauthorized burning, 1200 N.W. 101st St. 8:59p.m.— Brush or brush-andgrass mixture fire, 2451 N.W.Glen OakAve. 6 —Medical aid calls. Thursday 10:20 a.m.— Unauthorized burning, 5780S.W.ImpalaLane. 5:31p.m.— Barkdust fire, 527 N.W. Elm Ave. 15 —Medical aid calls. Friday 9:29 p.m.— Brush or brushand-grass mixture fire, 2947 S.W. Meadow Lane. 7 —Medical aid calls. Saturday 9:19p.m.— Authorized controlled burning, 8148 Sixth St. 11 —Medical aid calls. Sunday 11:27 a.m.— Unauthorized burning, 5251 S.W.McVeyAve. 5 —Medical aid calls.


B4

TH E BULLETIN + WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

EDj To

The Bulletin

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oose re oca ion

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ar 's ro em

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t appears park officials have the goose-poop problem in Drake Park under control, using a method that most everyone — even the geese — can live with. Congratulations go t o B e nd Park & Recreation District staff who came up with a mix of nonlethal methods to control the birds' impact, including the annual relocation of goslings to Summer Lake State Wildlife Area about 100 miles south. Controversy erupted in 2010 when the district captured and gassed 109 adult geese from Drake Park,then butchered and delivered them to local food banks. The district was seeking to solve the severeproblem ofgoose poop, which was making park use unpleasant, if not hazardous. While some — including usthought it a good solution, providing nutritious food while improving park conditions, others were outraged. They complained bitterly, even holding a memorial service for the dead geese to call attention to their cause. By summer 2011, the district was again c onsidering k i lling some of the geese but found the population reduced enough that it could avoid that controversial action. It depended instead on hazing, oiling eggs to prevent them from hatching and transporting

young birds out of the area. The removals happen just after the birds have molted and therefore cannot fly. Only the goslings are moved, because adult birds will quickly find their way back, while the youngsters will settle in the new location. Oiling the eggs rather than destroying them prevents the adults from laying more eggs to replace them. The district moved 58 birds in 2011, 65 in 2012, 41 in 2013 and 53 this year. Although bird populations vary over short periods of time, park officials estimate about 100 geese live in Bend parks now, down from more than500 in 2005 and nearly 600 in 2010. We think there's nothing wrong with humanely killing wildlife for food, especially when the animals' population has g r own b eyond manageable levels. Still, the park district appears to have found a solution that honors the sensitivities of some of its patrons, while still giving the rest of us the chance to walk in the park without being overwhelmed by goose poop. Good forthem.

Schoolauditaddsfocuson studentachievement gaps

t

n an audit focused on Oregon's K-12 schoolachievement gaps, Secretary of State Kate Brown's office found disturbing rankings but had plenty of compliments for recentOregon Department ofEducation efforts. Indeed, the issue of lower performance by minority and disadvantagedpopulationshas received lots of attention in the state in recent years. It's a critical part of efforts needed to meet the governor's 40-40-20 goal, which says that by 2025, 40 percent of students should earn a bachelor's degree, 40 percent anassociate'sdegree or certificate, and the remaining 20 percent have a high school diploma. That means 100 percent graduating from high school, while the state now reaches 69 percent. The audit r eviewed eighthgrade test scores in reading and math. It f ound poor, Hispanic, black and Native American students mostly a full year behind other student groups. Worse, it found no improvement in those gaps between 2004-05 and 2011-12. ODE was recognized for making the issue a priority, and specifically for forming an Education Equity unit and a new report card rating system for schools. The au-

dit suggested a different numerical measurement could help the department monitor progress. State funding issues were acknowledged in the audit, along with the significant overhaul that has taken place in recent years in state-level education leadership and structure. It noted the increasingpercentage of minority and disadvantaged students in the state. One brightspot was a narrowing of the gap for Hispanic students from 2004-05 to 2011-12. The auditors visited schools identified as making progress in helping lower-performing students and summarized some winning strategies, such as principal leadership, use of rewards rather than punishments to influence student behavior, and methods to identify and deliver needed individual academic support. Reducing absenteeism, reaching out to parents and providing food and clothing were also cited, among others. We doubt ODE found much new in this audit's summary of the situation or in its suggestions for changes. This is not a subject that's been ignored in Salem. Still, it's a crucial one, and the audit can't hurt by giving it additional emphasis.

ReLC QHss 1HSSK KNBITAGEN CY PAKCONIST~

M 1Vickel's Worth Ban cars from Pilot Butte

ive, but not helpful. The doctor just didn't know what to do.

As an avid and frequent hiker up,

We really didn't understand what down and around Pilot Butte, I was he was going through and how it happy to see Candace Brink's letter could possibly be so bad. Your arregardingvehiclesand hikersshar- ticle has helped us to understand. ing usage on Pilot Butte. On way Although we knew that he suffered too many occasions, I've seen vehi- tremendously from lack of sleep and cles speeding up and down the road a host of other symptoms, we could nearly colliding with hikers, kids, not comprehend the incredible dustrollers and four-legged friends. ration of the suffering. It was only Yep, that is me yelling at you to slow through another relative's research

10-year plan and scope, and at worst

it's misrepresentation and fraud.

The Bulletin asserts that "it would launch a new level of government

coercion ... and new standard for development ..." to consider a site based on a published five- and 10year plan in favor of the initial plan — a plan that is always referred to as phase one'?

Using this logic it's actually feasible to shoehorn the campus onto the

and constant support that he was vacant parcels between downtown the butte still in your car smoking able to understand the numerous and the Old Mill, based on the initial a cigarette or eating McDonald's. protracted withdrawal symptoms plan, and then use eminent domain However, unlike Brink's view of and how best to deal with them. to grab parcels to expand into a presharing the road, I believe all ve- It has been a challenge to see both viously known 10-year expansion hicles should be banned from the of them suffer through this long plan. That too would be a disaster. butte. Do we really have to wait for process. No responsible planning entity a tragic accident for the State Park Even now, after two-and-a-half should ever approve this or any othDepartment to realize the hazards years, he still has symptoms recur, er project based on the phase one of the road before closing it to traf- and sleep is still not good. The ref- plan alone when long-term plans fic? There are plenty of other roads erences in your article, particularly are available. That is how governdown, only to see you at the top of

that lead to great views of the Cas-

the Benzo Buddies discussion site

ment lets us down. Let's do better

cadesand beyond.Let'sclosethePi- and Dr. Heather Ashton's research and use some common sense. lot Butte State Park to traffic and re- site have been cornerstones for his Glenn Millar store the peace and quiet that most recovery. Bend of us try and enjoy, and should have Benzodiazepines are outlawed in the right to enjoy, without the fear of Europe. Why do we still have them Lots of water lost being run over. here? Emily Pelletier Judy Dumm A June 19 Bulletin editorial on Bend Bend canal piping refers to the Juniper Ridge Piping conserving 19.6 cubic

Why do we still have benzodiazepines?

Need common sense

about campus

feet per second of water previously

lost to seepage or evaporation. If one figures out this calculation, this re-

I greatly appreciated your June I believe all of us in the communi- sult is about 146 gallons per second 1 article on benzodiazepines. My ty appreciate The Bulletin's cover- of wateror 527,788.8 gallons per relative has been in benzodiaze- age of the ongoing discussion of the hour of water lost. That sure is a lot pine withdrawal for two-and-a-half

OSU-Cascades west-side location.

of water that is lost through seepage

years. He was on the drugs for eight And for the most part I agree with years. His doctors had no idea that those who question the wisdom of

or evaporation. Gosh, we had better plan to pipe the Deschutes River before it dries up due to ground seepage and evaporation of water. Besides, where will the ducks live if the

the "benzos" were causing the is-

the proposed location. I won't re-

sues he had while he was on them, hash those reasons, rather I want and insteadprescribed more drugs to challenge your perspective on to counteract the symptoms he was planning. I expect the individuals canals are removed'? I am sure the having. On his own, he determined responsible for planning to work cityfathers can propose affordable that the drugs were the issue and he from a full set of facts. It's at best housing for our feathered friends. has been slowly removing himself misleading to place the campus in Thomas O'Brien from them. His doctor was support- a location incapable of handling the Redmond

Letters policy

In My Viewpolicy How to submit

We welcomeyour letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250words and include the writer's signature, phonenumber and address for verification. Weedit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. Wereject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhereandthose appropriate for other sections of TheBulletin. Writers are limited to one letter Or Op-Ed pieceevery 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 550and 650 words, signed and include the writer's phone number and address for verification. Weedit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. Wereject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating withnational columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed pieceevery 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel's Worth or In My

View and send, fax or email them to The Bulletin. Email submissions are preferred. Email: letters@bendbulletin.com Write: My Nickel's Worth / In MyView P.O. Box 6020

Bend, OR97708 Fax: 541-385-5804

Vote to overturn the immigrant driver card law By Cynthia Kendoll o see how industry lobbyists and Big Labor can collaborate to harm both law-abiding employers and low-skilled Americans, look no further than the new political action committee formed to push for illegal-immigrant driver cards. Two trade-association executives head the PAC: Bill Perry of the Oregon Restaurant and Lodging Association and Jeff Stone of the Oregon Association of Nurseries. Among the

T

PAC's first donors: the political arm of

the Service Employees International Union,which hascontributed $20,000. The PAC will work to garner "yes" votes for the November ballot measure via which Oregon voters will approve or reject driving privileges for illegal immigrants. Perry's and Stone's support of driv-

er cards is easily explained. Illegal IN MY VIEW protests since January 2013." immigrants inflate Oregon's supply The irony? By championing driver of low-skilled labor. By doing so, they bany Taco Bell Inc. and several Port- cards, the SEIU works to assure the depress wages. This juices the profits land-area Baskin-Robbins outlets; the continued oversupply of low-skilled of the restaurants and nurseries that Benson Hotel in Portland and Phoe- labor, which dampens fast-food workknowingly hire those illegal immi- nix Inns in Eugene and Bend; and ers' wages. Even the liberal Center for grants or make no effort to ascertain Woodburn's Amaral, McMinnville's American Progress, according to Eric their presence in their workforces. Country Garden and Ashland's Val- Ruark and Matthew Graham of the Driver cards would better enable ille- ley View nurseries. By using E-Veri- Federation for American Immigration gal immigrants to get to the jobs these fy, these conscientious employers put Reform, has admitted that "reducing businesses provide. themselves on the right side of the law the illegal-immigrant population in But they'd do something else as — but at a disadvantage to competi- the United States by one-third would well: namely, wrong Oregon employ- tors who knowingly use cheap and of- raise the income of unskilled workers ers who, via the free federal E-Verify tenpaid-under-the-table illegal labor. by $400 a year." "The average highworker-verification system, strive volAnd the SEIU? The union decries school dropout," writes National Pubuntarily to avoid illegal labor and as- fast-food workers' low pay and agi- lic Radio's Adam Davidson, would see sure their compliance with laws man- tates for their trendy new cause — the "abouta $25 aweek raiseiftherewere dating employees' legal U.S. presence. $15-an-hour wage. Indeed, USA To- no job competition from immigrants." Among those employers are some day reported last month, the Center In April and May 2013, the Legislain the very industries Perry's and for Union Facts has estimated the ture passed and Gov. John Kitzhaber Stone's lobbies purport to represent. SEIU "has spent more than $15 mil- signed the law granting driver cards They include Shari's Restaurants, Al- lion supporting (fast-food workers') to illegal immigrants. It was "rammed

through the Legislature so quickly," wrote Rep. Sal Esquivel, R-Medford, "that most Oregonians barely got the chance to scrutinize it and weigh in with their opinions." But over the next

five months, the law's opponents, led by the citizen activists of Oregonians for Immigration Reform, collected the signatures of more than 71,000 Ore-

gon voters and successfully referred the law to the November 2014 statewide ballot.

This fall, Oregon voters should reject illegal-immigrant driver cards. By doing so, they'll reward the honest businesses that reject cheap illegal labor and help raise wages for their lowskilled fellow citizens. — Cynthia Kendoll is president of Oregonians forImmigration Reform and authorized agent of Protect Oregon Driver Licenses.


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

B5

WEST NEWS

BITUARIES DEATH NOTICES Rita E. Boggess, of Bend Dec. 19, 1924 - June 23, 2014 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds is honored to serve the family. Please visit the online registry at www.niswonger-reynolds. com 541-382-2471. Services: A visitation time will be held Fri., June 27, 2014 from 3 until 5 PM at Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home. A graveside will follow on Sat., June 28, 2014 at 10:00 AM in Powell Butte

Cemetery.

Contributions may bemade to:

Hospice House, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Ralph E. Reynolds, of

Bend (formerly of Redmond) Oct. 15, 1937 - June 13, 2014 Arrangements:

Niswonger-Reynolds is

honored to serve the family. Please visit the online registry at www.niswonger-reynolds. com 541-382-2471. Services: A celebration of life will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

A memorial fund will be established and announced later,

Court asked tospeedup lynx recovery plan By Matthew Brown

vocacy groups says that's not soon enough. They're asking

Obituary policy

The Associated Press

Death Notices are freeand will be run for oneday, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. Theymay be submitted by phone, mail, email or fax. TheBulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on anyof these services or about the obituary policy, contact

life advocates want a federal judge to order faster action on a recovery plan for imperiled Canada lynx, after wildlife officials said it could take until 2018 to finish the long-delayed work. The U.S. government declared the snow-lovingbig cats athreatenedspecies acrossthe

541-617-7825.

Deadlines:Death Notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and by 4:30 p.m. Friday for Sunday publication. Obituaries mustbereceived by5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by1 p.m. Fridayfor Sunday publication, and by 9a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; pleasecall for details. Phone: 541-617-7825

Email: obits©bendbulletin.com Fax: 541-322-7254

Mail:Obituaries P.O. Box6020 Bend, OR 97708

BILLINGS, Mont. — Wild-

Lower 48 states in 2000. But officials haven't come up with

a mandated recovery plan, citing budget limitations and competing concerns from oth-

er troubled species. After a federal judge in Montana criticized the long

delay, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offered to complete

development. The government has desigU.S. District Judge Donald nated large areas in the West Molloy to order the work done as critical habitat for lynx by late 2016. in recent years. A pending Lynx dwell in the forest, proposal would expand that where they're rarely seen, and designation to about 28,000 there's no reliable estimate of square miles of public land, their population. They range primarily in northern Monacross parts of 14 states in the tana and the region surroundNortheast, the Rocky Moun- ing Wyoming's Yellowstone tains, the Great Lakes and the National Park. Cascade Range of WashingBut an attorney for the wildton and Oregon. life advocates said the desigLynx are about the size nations amount to a "paper of a bobcat, with large paws exercise" in the absence of a that help the predator stay on recovery plan's detailed road top of the deep snow typical map for protecting lynx. "I haven't seen any statethrough its range. Those paws also make it easier to capture ment from any agency that itsprimary prey, snowshoe lynx are improving," said athares. torney Matthew Bishop with Threats t o

i t s s u r v ival the Western Environmental

gingprojects even in lynx critical habitat."

Fish and Wildlife Service Assistant Regional Director

Michael Thabault said Tuesdaythe government'srecovery plan schedule was reasonable.

He cited limited agency resources and the complexity of addressing a species with such abroad range. Officials also say that lynx face a relatively low degree of threat compared with other protected species. The Fish and Wildlife Service wasforced to come up with a timeline on the recov-

ery document when Molloy last month expressed frustration with th e government's

progress. The judge said the "stutter-step" approach by

the work by early 2018. vary across its range and inA coalition of wildlife ad- clude timber harvesting and

Law Center. "If anything we're federal officials necessitated seeing a lot of industrial log- court intervention.

Redmond

and built courses. It's a very

"Long term I'd expect us to

continue to chip away at the debt, with some bad years

Continued from B1 The city had budgeted and some that exceed expec$303,000 in 2013-14 for Juni- tations," said Tom Bugbee, per, an amount that covered vice president of operations most — but not all — of the

for Course Co. Painful as it is,

mortgage butnone of the operational expenses. A record 45 days of no golf because of adverse weather early this year decimatedJuniper' s expected

he added, he would expect the

returns during the second half

of the fiscalyear.

city of Redmond will need to contribute some amount to the

long and expensive process," Bugbee said. "By the time some of them opened, the golf boom was slowing down, but they're not dosing, because it's so expensiveto get them off the ground. In most industries when demand goes down, so does supply, but not in golf." The city has backed two loans for Juniper, the $6 millionone requiring a $350,000

debt for years to come. "During the golf boom in the 1990s, manypeoplebought land, planned and designed annual payment that will be

paid off in 19 years and another with a $55,000 annual payment that will be retired in 12

years. "I think if you persevere and get through it, Juniper will eventually be a cash cow

for the city," said Don Noldge, a member of the Juniper Golf Commission, a citizen advi-

sory group appointed by the city. — Reporter: 541-548-2186; lpugmire@bendbulletin.com

Sient im actressLaemme oun 21st-century careerreviva By Margalit Fox

lywood history.

New Yorh Times News Service

Carla Laemmle, a dancer dioslot,shehad acharmed cinand actress whose screen ca- ematicgirlhood, with the studio reer began in the silent era and sets her playground and aniended with newfound celebrity mals from Universal's in-house in the Internet age, died June zoo her de facto household pets. 12 at her home in Los Angeles. A wide-eyed beauty, she She was 104. made herfirst screen appearHer grandniece, Rosemary ance in "The Phantom of the Laemmle Hilb, confirmed the Opera," the 1925 Lon Chaney death. silent. After the coming of A niece of Carl Laemmle, a sound, she uttered the opening founder of Universal Studios, line of the 1931 "Dracula," starLaemmle (pronounced LEM- ring Bela Lugosi. lee) had a modest resume of The naked abandon of Holbit parts, mostly uncredited, in lywoodbefore the imposition of films of the 1920s and'30s. the Hays Code in 1930 can also Those roles, according to be discerned without difficulty the Internet Movie Database, in Laemmle's early work. (The included Auction Spectator, oyster shell looms large in this.) Coach Passenger and Oyster Her last screen appearance Shell. And though it was an of the period came in 1939 with oyster shell of spectacular pro- "On Your Toes." But fittingly for portions, her credits were not one who got her start in horror the stuffofwhich careers are films,Laemmle's career,after a six-decade hiatus, rose from made. But what made Laemmle a

FEATUREDOBITUARY

Reared on the Universal Stu-

the dead at the dawn of the 21st

Stepping outside, she might encounter its resident camel,

whom she named Houdini for Laemmle was born in Chica- his frequent jailbreaks, breakgo on Oct. 20, 1909, and began fasting on the lawn. Belle Norton, Rebekah Isabelle ballet studies as a child. When

"I would go out with a little

she was 11, the familymoved to bowl of oatmeal, and he would California for Joseph's health follow me very dutifully," Laeat the invitation of his brother mmle told Los Angeles magaCarl. zine in 2011. "And then I would Carl Laemmle, an immi- go phone the back lot and say grant from Germany, had be- I had Houdini and would you come a successful operator of pleasecome pickhimup?" nickelodeons in early-20th-cenC arl L aemmle w a s re tury A merica. I n 1 912, he nowned for providing work helped found Universal Mo- to a bevy of relatives. ("Uncle tion Picture Manufacturing Carl Laemmle/has a very large Co., a progenitor of Universal faemmle," Ogden Nash once Studios. said.) Carla Laemmle was no Three years later, in the exception. countryside near Hollywood, When she was a teenager, Laemmle opened Universal her ballet training landed her City Studios, a self-contained metropolis with its own police

and fire departments, hospital, sound stages and zoo. Joseph and his family were installed in a bungalow on the grounds,

the small role of the prima bal-

peaks that frown down upon classic horror films, she rethe Borgo Pass are found crum- turned to the screen in 2001 blingcastles of abygone age." w ith the v i deo short " T h e "I didn't have to memorize Vampire Hunters Club." Her any lines or anything," Lae- later credits include "Pooltime" mmle said in 2011. "I was sup- (2010), "A Sad State of Affairs" posed to be reading from a lit- (2013) and "Mansion of Blood," tle booklet, so it didn't tax my yet to be released. In "Broken Dreams Blvd," brains at all." Her other films include "Un- which stars Danny Aiello, she cle Tom's Cabin" (1927),"The played the operator of a HollyGate Crasher" (1928) and "The wood tour company. Adventures of Frank MerriLaemmle was briefly marwell" (1936). ried to a sailor during World There was also "The Broad- War II; she had the marriage way Melody," a 1929 picture annulled upon discovering in which Laemmle emerges he had a wife and children from an immense oyster shell elsewhere. Her longtime comto dance before the camera. It panion, Raymond Cannon, an is difficult to make out precise- actor and screenwriter, died in ly what she is wearing in the 1977. scene, not so much because of Though Carl Laemmle sold the quality of the footage but his interest in U niversal in

lerina on the stage of the Paris

because of the incontrovertible Opera House in "Phantom." fact that whatever she does

a singular association with it to

(Disliking the name Rebekah, she adopted Carla, in her uncle's honor.) In "Dracula," as a passenger in a Transylvania-bound coach,

Universal's 100th-anniversary party," she told an interviewer in 2012, shortly before that

have on, there is amazingly lit- the end of her life. "I'm so looking forward to

tle of it. After the 1930s drew to a

fan favorite at autograph shows century, with credits includ- where they would live for the dose, Laemmle worked as a and horror-fihn conventions in ing the Web series "Broken next decade and a half. dancer in Los Angeles nightrecent years was her durable, Dreams Blvd." Every morning, as Laemmle she reads a sentence from a dubs and spent decades after genial existence, which encapThe daughter of Joseph Lae- recalled, she was awakened guidebook that sets the film in that living quietly in the area. sulated nearly a century of Hol- mmle and the former Carrie by the roaring of the zoo's lion. motion: "Among the rugged Amid renewed interest in

theworld:

some of the most glamorous, socially prominent women of

Gerry Conlon, 60: M an the 1960s — notably Jacqueline whose wrongful conviction for Kennedy, who famously wore Irish Republican Army bomb- one while riding an elephant. ings was told in the 1993 Acad- Died June 9 in Los Angeles. emy Award-winning film "In Felix Dennis, 67: Flamboyant the Name of the Father." Died businessman whose publishing Saturday in Belfast, Northern

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

May 29,194e -June 12, 2014

Gaile was bornMay29, 1946 inVancouver, Washington to Chester and Hilma Cockerham. She graduated from James John Elementary and Roosevelt High School in north Portland, Oregon where she acquired many close and lifelong friends. After graduation, Gaile did office and factory work. In 1981she married her soulmate, Ernie Hohman, after years of their being together. When Ernie retired in 1995, the Hohmansmoved to the Sunriver area where Gaile enjoyed kayaking, hiking, biking, working in her yard and (especiallyj shopping. Traveling was at the top of her list of things to do. Gaile was mother to Grant Dixon andgrandmother to Mario and Loralei Dixon. She is survived by twobrothers, Bruce and Robert Howel, and a sister, Rosemary. There are numerous nieces and nephews. According to her wishes, Geile will be cremated and her ashes stored in order to bemixed with her husband's upon his death. Their asheswill be released in places special to them. Contributions in Gaile's memory can be made to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NEWyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701. To all who cared for Gaile, a deeply felt "thank you verymuch".

I/

"» %1"l11am PreheT1Ck S'feerS cjT'. Orrcirrst zz, 19z8 - Jrrrre 18, zo1lj. William Frederick SteersIr. was born to William Sr. and Mary Elizabeth (Harrison) Steers on August 22, 1928 in Lexington, Kentucky. After graduating from Shortridge High School in Indianapolis, Indiana, William s attendedthe University of K entucky and earned a Bachelor's degreein forestry from Michigan State University. He then entered the United States Army. Whilein basic training he met Frances Harrell in Dunn, North Carolina. They were married just prior to William being stationed Lr Germany during the Korean conflict.

Following retirement William moved to Silverton. He then ( served for 12 years as a "grandfather" of the Silverton girls basketball team andwasinductedinto the Silverton High School Athletic Hall of Fame. William also served on the Silverton City Planning Commission and the Silver Falls School Board.

l

William waspreceded in death by his wife Franceson January 3, 2014. Heis survived by sons James Seldon Steers of Springfield, Oregon, 'Ihomas Ray Steers of Silverton, Oregon, William Frederick SteersIII of Wesley Chapel, Florida and Richard Julius Steers of Seattle, Washington. He also leaves 10 grandchildren and 16great grandchildren. Family serviceswill be held in the forest at a later date. Unger ~. Funeral Chapelis serving the family. • LI

*,' ~

December 22, 1929 — June 20, 2014

Dona was born December 22, 1929, in Lyons, Oregon, to Henry and Verda (Bay) Abbott. She grew up in Redmond, attending Jessie Hill Elementary School and Redmond Union High School. On August 16, 1946, she married Wesley Milton Hammack in Crooked River Ranch. Dona was a life-long resident of Central Oregon, living in Sisters for 41 Years. Dona was a woman ofmanytalents. She was an accomplished se~stress md cook. She enjoyed sewing, big game hunting, fishing and camping. She was an active member of the Sisters VFW Auxiliary, Mrd Redmond Moose Lodge.

Following military service William worked for the United States Forest Service in Lakeview and Silverlake, Oregon. In 1956 he began work at Gilchrist Timber Company and worked there until he retired in 1994. During this time William became a woods superintendent and helped to develop sustained yield forestry practices.

His enjoyments included his grandchildren, carving ducks and doing landscape work.

Dona LeeHammack '

A public viewing will tNe place on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 at 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at Redmond Memorial Chapel, located at 717 SW 6th Street in Redmond. A graveside service will take place Ihursday, June 26, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Camp Polk Cemetery in Sisters.' A Celebration of Life and potluck will immediately follow at the Moose Lodge in Redmond.

empire inciuded Maxim, Amer-

Gaile Hohman passed away at Partners In Care Hospice House in Bend,Oregon on June 12,2014.She succumbed to canceratthe age of 68.

one therewho's older than the studlo.

*

F ormer Sisters r esident, D o n a L e e Hammack passed away peacefully on June 20, 2014, with her family by her side. She was 84.

TheBu etm

ica's most successful young Ireland. Gustave Tassell, 88: Fashion men's lifestyle magazine. Died designer whose elegantly ur- Sunday at his England home. bane creations were favored by — From wire reports

Gaile Hohman

event. "I'll probably be the only

0

DEATHS ELSEWHERE Deathsofnote from around

1936, Carla Laemmle retained

Dona is survived by sons, Jack Hammack of Sisters and Jim (wife, Kristi) Hammack of Redmond; daughters, Patty HallToll (husband, Leonard) of Redmond and Denise Burger (husband, Andy), also of Redmond. Other survivors include a sister, Gladyce Damewood of Christmas Valley; many grandchildren and great-grandchildhen, nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband: of 41 years, Wesley Milton Hammack; sons, Lyle, Dick, and John Hammack; daughter, Rebecca Hammack; brothers, Bob and Joe Abbott md a sister, Marsha Bastian. R edmond Memorial Chapel i s i n charge of the arrangements, (541) 548-3219. Please visit the online register book at www.redmondmemoriaLcom


B6

TH E BULLETIN0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

W EAT H E R Forecasts andgraphics provided byAccuWeather,Inc. ©2014

I

o

i

'

I

TODAY

iI

TONIGHT

HIGH 68' I f' I

PRECIPITATION

WEST:Rather cloudy with a couple of showers today.MostlY cloudy with a couple of showers tonight.

Today Thu. Sunrise 5:23 a.m. 5: 2 4 a.m. Sunset 8:52 p.m. 8: 5 2 p.m. Moonrise 4 :22 a.m. 5:10 a.m. Moonset 7:2 6 p.m. 8:1 4 p.m.

MOONPHASES Full

Ju l 1 2 Ju l 18

THE PLANETS T he Planets R i se Set Mercury 5:11 a.m. 7: 5 2 p.m. Venus 3:32 a.m. 6 : 1 6 p.m. Mars 2:14 p.m. 1 : 2 9 a.m. Jupiter 7:07 a.m. 1 0 :12 p.m.

10 a.m. Noon

3 NI~ 5

Intervals of cloudsand sunshine

High: 90 at Ontario Low: 46' at Redmond

35 Moderate; 8-7 High;8-10 VeryHigh; 11+ Exlreme.

POLLEN COUNT G rasses T r ee s Wee d s ~Lo~w • Ig hg ~ ~Lo~w

71/57

sums

• pray

69/49 •

70/52

51

Ro seburg 71/58

eo/ Bro ings

n

• Prineville 72/48

La plne

• Fort Rock Cresce t • 70/46 65/44 •

Beaver Marsh

74/5

• John

69/47

uU 5/51

tario

72/ 5 2

8 62

Nyssa

• Burns Juntura 80/54

Riley 74/50 73/49

Jordan V gey

Frenchglen

80/52

76/52

• Burns Jun tion • 82/56

72/49

Rome

Klamath

• Ashl nd Falls

74I51

Valeu 83/59

• Ch ristmas alley Silver 71/47 Lake 69/45 • Paisley

chiloquin 3 MedfO d '68/45

ress

'Baker C

71/47

oay

Ham ton

Graniteu

• Pa lina

84/56

Fields •

• Lakeview

McDermi

71/50

83/54

Yesterday Today Thursday

H i/Lo/Prec. Hi/Lo/W Hi/Ln/W C i ty Hi/Ln/Prec. Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W 66/58/0.17 64/55/sh63/54/pc Ln Grande 77/59/0.00 75/56/pc 71/47/t 75/56/0.0174/51/pc 69/44/t Ln Pine 73/46/0.00 67/44/t 67/42/t 69/50/0.00 60/52/sh 60/50/pc M edfcrd 85/5 4/0.00 74/58/pc 79/54/t 80/58/Tr 7 4/50/pc 72/43/t Ne w port 64/5 5 /0.00 60/54/sh 61/52/pc 83/48/0.01 70/55/sh70/52/sh NorthBend 70/54/0.00 61/56/sh 62/54/pc 78/46/Tr 69/47/t 7 1/40/t On t ario 90/66/0.00 83/62/pc 81/55/t 82/52/0.00 71/50/pc 72/44/t Pe n dleton 81/ 5 9/Tr 7 7 /59/pc 76/54/t

city

Yesterday Today Thursday Hi/Lo/Prec. Hi/Ln/W Hi/Lo/W

Portland Prineville Redmond Roseburg Salem Sisters The Dalles

77/5 8/Tr 73/59/sh 69/57/ sh 73/ 4 8/0.0172/48/I 67/46/I 76/ 46/0.0270/47/I 72/43/I 83 / 53/Tr 71/58/sh 73/55/sh 80/52/Tr 71/58/sh 71/54/sh 73/52/0.04 69/49/I 70/45/I 8 3 / 60/0.00 78/63/sh 76/56/t

Eugene Klnmnth Falls Lnkeview Weather(W):s-sunny,pc-pnrtlycloudy, c-clcudy, sh-shcwers,t-thunderstcrms,r-rnin, sf-sncwflurries, sn-sncwi-ice,Tr-trsce,Yesterday data ascf 5 p.m. yesterday

NATIONAL WEATHER

Source: OregonAllergyAssccintes 541-683-1577

~ t es ~2 08 ~s os ~dos ~5 0s ~608 ~708 ~a os ~g gs ~tccs ~ttos ~ fos ~os ~ o s WATER REPORT Ignry ', o As of 7 s.m. yesterday NATIONAL Queu • i nioeg o n o nroony 7 Reservoir Ac r e feet Ca pacity EXTREMES 7 o 8 (for the C rane Prairie 440 7 4 80% YESTERDAY .t ii ai \ 64'yo 48 contiguousstates) 8 Wickiup 128393 74/88 nrtlnnd • Billings Crescent Lake 7 5 4 80 87% National high: 117 nI0 Minn n 78/84 dd 81/59 Ochoco Reservoir 29667 67% at Death Valley,CA 74/SO ntnn • a ill 79/8 Prineville 132092 89% National low: 30 olnn 8 87/84 River flow St a tion Cu. ft.lsec. at Pahaska,WY ninnn ew York che 6 • C ngn C n mb 84/TO Deschutes R.below Crane Prairie 420 Precipitation: 2 46" 81/5 X ilndnlphin Deschutes R.below Wickiup 945 at Wichita, KS Omaha n n a sc n S n lt Lake ity SITO 92/ss • Deschutes R.below Bend 133 SS/57 St. L uin L Invi ~ • Wn tnn < k Lnn V nn Deschutes R. atBenhamFalls 1910 44'nnensmty ST/SS S W 8 Ss/SS I02I Little Deschutes near LaPine 101 Crescent Ck. belowCrescent Lake 57 chnrln Lnn An len Crooked R.above Prineville Res. 5 4 • Phnnn x Anchornn •. ++++hkti tn Crooked R.below Prineville Res. 186 • fce/8 Albuquerq e k kk k k WW+ + +~ htiee 62/5 n o 94/Ss Crooked R.nearTerrebonne 81 5 Ochoco Ck.below OchocoRes. 0 onannx x x I Paso g snsxxxx x %' e ' OITS In inches as of 5 p.m.yesterday

New snow Base

Ski resort Mt. Bachelor Mt. HoodMeadows Timberline Lodge

0

61- 1 30

0

96-1 1 0

0

63-6 3

Source: OnTheSncw.ccm

41'

Hi/Lu/Prec. HiRo/W Hi/Lo/W 81/71/0.00 91/73/pc 92/73/pc 83/68/0.86 78/61/t 79/58/pc

Mostly sunnyand comfortable

70/57/0.00 66/54/pc 91/68/0.00 98/75/s Auckland 62/48/0.09 63/57/r Baghdad 106/85/0.00 111/82/s Bangkok 91/81/0.00 91/77/r seijing 89n1/0.32 86/71/t Beirut 82n3/0.00 83/68/s Berlin 65/53/0.41 65/50/I Bogota 64/52/0.19 64/48/t Budapest 72/59/0.22 67/53/I BuenosAires 63/46/0.00 59/45/s Cnbc ssnLucss 91/76/0.00 93/72/s Cairo 91/69/0.00 95/71/s Calgary 75/52/0.01 67/47/I Cnncun 88/81/0.00 9Ong/pc Dublin 68/46/0.00 63/56/sh Edinburgh 61/54/0.00 60/50/c Geneva 70/59/0.09 77/48/t Xo rlnndn Hsrnre 73/44/0.00 73/41/s Orlnnnn Hong Kong 90/82/0.40 91/84/I Honolulu Chihuahua xc ~ . f Istanbul 82/64/0.00 87/76/s 9$84 ' e 'e x x x x x w ' . Miami Jerusalem 81/62/0.00 81/63/s Montnr n~ Stns.- I Z . 91/T2 . W'e ' e ' e'eXXXX: Johannesburg 64/40/0.00 65/43/s 4 • . nnn'+'+n'+'+'+' Lima 72/66/0.00 69/60/pc Lisbon 73/59/0.00 75/58/pc Shown are today's noonpositions of weather systemsand precipitation. Temperature bandsare highs for the day. London 77/57/0.00 69/53/pc T-storms Rain S h owers S now F l urries Ice Warm Front Sta t ionary Front Madrid Cold Front 70/63/0.02 83/64/pc gong/o'.oo 89/79/t Manila

5

Yesterday Today Thursday

Hi/Lo/Prec. Hi/Lo/W HiRo/W 64/53/0.03 56/45/c 67/44/c 85/63/Tr 84/67/t 86/70/t 78/68/0.51 76/57/pc 79/60/pc 105/82/0.00 102/82/s 103/82/s 86/70/0.35 83/63/I 86/65/pc 84/61/0.00 84/64/t 89/70/t Litiie Rock 90/71/0.26 91n1/pc 87/71/t Lcs Angeles 79/63/0.00 79/63/pc 77/63/pc Louisville 87/72/0.53 86/68/pc 88/69/pc Madison, Wl 85/63/0.00 77/58/pc 76/60/I Memphis 85/71/0.33 91n2/pc 88/72/t Miami 91/75/0.00 91n5/pc 9Om/pc Milwaukee 80/59/0.47 67/54/pc 69/57/I Minneapolis 84/66/0.00 74/60/pc 76/67/I Nashville sen2/0.04 88/67/pc 90/69/pc New Orleans 91/76/0.09 89n6/t 88/74/t New YorkCity 81/68/0.00 84/70/t 84/68/pc Newark, NJ 84/65/0.00 85f/2/t 86/70/pc Norfolk, VA 85/68/0.00 88n4/t 89/72/t OklahomaCity 87/66/0.00 85n1/t 88/72/t Omaha 85/64/0.00 84/66/I 86no/I Orlando 94n4/o'.o4 94n4R 94n5/t Palm Springs toen5/o.oo105n8/s 106/76/s Poorin 86/71/0.01 85/65/I 84/68/I Philadelphia 86/65/0.00 86/70/t 87/69/pc Phoenix 105/80/0.00 106/82/s 106/82/s Pittsburgh 86/68/0.04 78/63/I 79/60/pc Portland, ME 72/60/0.00 78/64/t 75/61/I Providence 80/57/0.00 83/68/I 81/65/I Raleigh 86/65/0.00 90/69/I 92/66/t Rapid City 78/52/Tr 79/60/t 85/65/pc Renn 90/58/0.00 88/60/s 81/56/pc Richmond 87/61/0.00 89/69/I 91/68/pc Rochester, NY ssno/o'.59 75/64/t 78/59/pc Sacramento 91/60/0.00 85/58/s 83/54/pc St. Louis 88/72/0.52 87/69/pc 87/71/t Salt Lake City 95/60/0.00 92/66/s 86/60/pc Snn Antonio 94nr/rr 92f/5/t 92/75/pc ssn Diego 73/64/0.00 73/65/pc 72/66/pc Ssn Francisco 69/57/0.01 69/57/s 66/55/pc Snn Jose 75/57/0.00 79/57/s 75/53/pc santa re 89/59/0.00 91/56/s 92/58/s Savannah 89/71/0.26 95n3/t 94/73/t Seattle 75/58/Tr 74/57/pc 69/54/sh Sioux Falls 81/59/0.01 80/61/pc 79/69/I Spokane 72/62/Tr 78/58/pc 68/52/t Springfield, Mo 84/67/0.03 86/67/I 85/69/I Tampa Sgngfrr 91n7/pc 91/77/pc Tucson 103/75/Tr 103/77/s 103/78/s Tulsa 89/66/0.00 86f/1/t 85/73/t W ashingt on,OC 87/69/0.00 89n2/t 88/71/pc Wichita 85/67/2.48 83/68/I 86/71/t Ynkimn 85/64/Tr 81/59/pc 82/54/pc Yuma 106/79/0.00 106/80/s 1Osnns City

Juneau Kansas City Lansing Lns Vegns Lexington Lincoln

82/62/pc 94/66/s

63/52/sh 91/70/t 84/69/pc

92/73/pc 88/65/pc 84/57/I

gono/I

77/66/I 78/56/I 80/64/t 81/67/pc

76/60/pc 78/59/pc 67/51/r 95n5/I 92/67/t 91/66/I 87/58/I 76/60/I

84/66/pc 76/57/pc 89/60/pc 85/68/pc 95n2/I 92/71/t 83/63/pc 80/61/c 92/78/t

91/75/pc 82/64/pc 92/63/pc 85/69/I 80/61/pc 65/50/I 101/80/s 65/50/sh 77/66/I 82/55/s 79/60/pc 73/55/I 90/68/I 85/63/pc 84/64/pc 75/52/t

ssn2/s sgn5/I 90/69/I

83/65/pc 87/69/I 93/72/t o

Amsterdam Athens

'

SKI REPORT

43' Partly sunny

Abilene Akron Albany 79/66/Tr 82/69/t Albuquerque 92/66/0.00 94/65/s Anchorage 64/50/0.00 62/51/r Atlanta 85no/0.01 88/69/pc Atlantic City 77/66/0.00 77/71/t Austin 93n1/Tr 92/72/t Baltimore 84/65/0.00 88/68/I Billings 80/53/0.00 81/59/I Birmingham 87n3/0.00 90/69/pc Bismarck 69/56/0.01 74/58/pc Boise 87/65/0.00 83/62/pc Boston 84/60/0.00 84/68/t Bridgeport, CT 81/65/0.00 79/69/I Buffalo 84no/0.1 7 74/63/I Burlington, VT Tsno/o'.o4 78/67/r Caribou, ME 79/57/0.03 76/60/c Charleston, SC 92n5/Tr 93/74/t Charlotte 82n3/0.11 88/66/I Chattanooga 86/71/0.20 87/66/I Cheyenne 73/50/0.11 81/54/I Chicago 87n1 /0.41 75/56/pc Cincinnati 87/69/0.10 84/63/I Cleveland 85/69/2.56 75/60/I ColoradoSprings 81/50/0.05 84/56/I Columbia, Mo 86/68/0.01 86/66/pc Columbia, SC 92n4/0.06 94noft Columbus,GA 88/71/0.22 91/70/c Columbus,OH 88/72/0.56 82/65/t Concord, NH 83/58/0.00 83/67/I Corpus Christi 89n9/0.58 90/78/t Dallas 93/73/0.02 92/74/t Dayton 87n1/0.62 82/63/t Denver 81/54/0.00 88/59/I oes Moines 85/64/0.00 84/66/I Detroit 81/68/0.80 79/59/sh Duluth 59/53/Tr 62/45/pc El Paso 99n3/Tr 100/78/s Fairbanks 67/50/Tr 65/54/r Fargo 70/62/0.05 72/57/pc Flagstaff 81/43/0.00 82/46/s Grand Rapids 82/69/0.33 76/58/pc Green say 81/63/0.01 70/53/pc Greensboro 85/69/0.02 88/68/I Harrisburg 85/66/0.00 85/69/I Hsrffcrd, CT 85/61/0.00 84/69/I Helena 77/51/0.02 79/56/I Honolulu 88/72/0.00 88/73/s Houston 92n4/0.54 gon4/t Huntsville 86n3/0.33 89/67/pc Indianapolis 79/69/0.55 83/63/pc Jackson, MS 84/73/0.14 91/69/I Jacksonville 90no/0.00 96/72/pc

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OREGON EXTREMES co 6 6 YESTERDAY

Last

UV INDEX TODAY

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SUN ANDMOON

4:50 p.m. 1:26 a.m.

Clo uds and sun with a shower or t-storm

'"-

68 41'

Shown is today's weather.Temperatures are today's highs andtonight's lows.

Tigamo CENTRAL: Cooler 64/53 Mc innvig with clouds andsun today; a showeror Lincoln thunderstorm around 62/54 Sale in the afternoon. 71 I

24 hours through 5 p.m.yesterday 0.01 " 0.60"in 1975 Record o Month to date (normal) 0.0 1 " (0.59 ) Year to date (normal ) 4.04o(5.61o) Barometric pressure at 4 p.m. 30 . 0 9"

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SATURDAY

OREGON WEATHER ria

EAST: A mixture of TEMPERATURE clouds andsunshine Seasid Yesterday Normal Record today. Mostly cloudy 61/55 73 75 99' i n 1926 with showerstonight. Cannon 48' 43' 27'in 1985 60/54

Jun 27 J ul 5

FRIDAY

69 43'

46' Clearing and acouple of thunderstorms

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Bend through 5 p.m.yesterday

New

THURSDAY

S

I

Mecca Mexico City

69/55/pc 103/76/s 62/54/r 110/84/s

113/85/0.00 109/85/s 74/55/0.59 68/56/I Montreal 70/66/0.17 75/62/c Moscow 61/45/0.06 62/43/r Nairobi 75/57/0.00 77/56/c Nassau gons/o'.ot 89/77/s New Delhi 104/82/0.00 104n9/t Osaka 86/67/0.13 83/65/s Oslo 68/45/0.00 70/49/pc Ottawa 73/66/0.65 73/59/c Paris 79/55/0.00 75/53/pc Ric de Janeiro 86/66/0.00 83/71/s Rome 84/63/0.00 80/65/pc Santiago 59/37/0.00 56/35/pc Sso Paulo 77/59/0.00 79/61/pc Snppcrc 74/55/0.00 80/59/pc Seoul 79/68/0.01 82/66/c Shanghai 83/69/0.06 76/72/sh Singapore 90/82/0.04 90n8/t Stockholm 63/46/0.03 61/39/pc Sydney 63/47/0.00 64/52/s Taipei ssnT/o'.to 92/79/t Tel Aviv ssno/o.oo 85/69/s Tokyo 77/72/0.72 78/69/I Toronto 82/64/0.10 74/62/pc Vancouver 68/57/0.19 70/55/pc Vienna 72/61/0.06 71/55/I Warsaw 64/46/0.01 67/53/pc

92/77/t

96n4A

Ssnr/s

72/55/pc 64/47/c 76/47/pc 58/44/s 92/74/s 99/73/s 64/49/t

9Ons/pc 65/54/sh 59/47/c 76/50/c 74/41/s 93/83/c 92/75/s 84/68/s 64/45/s 68/61/pc 75/59/s 71/55/c 84/62/pc 91/80/I

107/84/s 70/57/I 77/60/pc 62/43/pc 78/58/pc 89/77/pc 103/78/t 81/65/r 66/48/sh 77/56/pc 77/58/c 85/72/s 77/63/pc 56/32/pc 81/62/pc 80/62/s 83/64/c 79/73/r 88/76/t 63/43/c 68/52/s 94/82/t 86/71/s 80/70/t 78/59/pc 71/56/sh 73/51/pc 63/47/r

LOCAL BRIEFING Continuedfrom Bf

Open house onMetolius-Windigo Trail Designation of theMetolius-Windigo Trail as astate scenic trail will be thefocus of an openhouse next month in Sisters. Public comment will be taken at thesession, planned for 6to 7:30p.m. July16at Ray's Food

Walkable email. "I think we're all open

and ready to have a conversation with the mayor about it,"

High said, adding the board might also discuss the issue during its August retreat. B e nd-La

Pine Schools has worked for more than a decade to build neighborhood schools. "It's definitely the philosophy of the school district to locate schools so that most students

can walk," Wilkinson said. However, he said it would cost too much to build and operate

the additional small schools necessary to

Stay Connected to Life with

PREMIUM HEARING AIDS at Factory Direct, Retail Outlet Prices

— Bulletin staff report

City C o uncilor V i c tor new schools are on the edge of Chudowsky said Dtesday that the city. although it wouldbe good if all Clinton's idea has some sup- students could walk to school, port on the City Council. May- it is not always feasible for the or Pro Tem Jodie Barram said school district to build schools Tuesday that some schools, close to all of the students who such as Bear Creek Elementa- will attend them. "There's only a c e rtain ry School and R.E. Jewell ElementarySchool,already meet amount of land available to Clinton's goal, and she sup- build a school, and modern POrtS his PrOPOSal to Set a gOal schools tend to have big playthat all students should be able grounds and soccer fields and towalkto school. stuff," Chudowsky said. Many "As a council, we could cer- of the large parcels that would tainly pass a resolution to fur- meet these requirementS are ther solidify the intent of the on the edge Of the city, or just policymakers," Barram said. outside its boundary, and "We needto decide as abody, is Chudowsky said this is also it something we want to really where developers will build take initiative on by passing a new city neighborhoods in the resolution or giving direction future. "I think what he's sayto the city manager." ing is a worthy goal, but again, Barram said the goal Of we have the constraints of schools and parks within availability of land. And then walking distance for all chil- we have to locate the schools dren also fits with the princi- where they're most needed, ples of Bend 2030, a civic group and that won't be so much in hoods, and that often means

Continued from B1 School board member Andy High said 7aesday he thought he had responded to Clinton's

Wilkinson s ai d

Place at 635 N.Arrowlaaf Trail. The trail designation program started In1971 to help promote outdoor recreation opportunities In Oregon. For more information or tocomment, contact Rocky Houston, state trails coordinator, at 503-986-0750 or by email at rocky.houston©oregon.gov.

h a v e s chools

within walking distance of all students."You'd have to build really small schools for them all to be able to walk," Wilkin-

son said. "We work with very limited budgets." The school district also builds schools wherethe city and developers have planned new neighbor-

that brought together represen-

Auoar

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the center of the city. It will be

tatives of local governments, more on the outer parts of the nonprofits and for-profit busi- city." nesses to identify a vision for the future of the city.

— Reporter: 541-617-7829, hborrud@bendbulletin.com •

m

• •

Charges Continued from B1 In January, the l icensers

visited again, and Firkus introduced herself using her cousin's name and presented a CPR certification card bearing the cousin's name. Firkus eVentually admitted

in February to the investigators that she worked at the fa-

cility, though Herrera-Firkus continued to insist she did not, the affidavit states. BeCause State laW requireS

a criminal background check that would disqualify Firkus from working at an adult foster care facility, prosecutors

72 charges. Several of the charges apply in Medicaid payments from to more than one defendant; the state Department of Hu- Herrera-Firkus faces charges man Services between Octo- of making a false claim for ber 2010 and May 2014. health care payment and agFirkus was paid more than gravated theft by deception, $47,000 over four years work- Firkus fOr identity theft, uning for her grandmother, the lawfully obtaining pubic asaffidavit states, while collect- sistance and tax evasion, and ing $185 a week in Unemploy- Gardner for tax evasion and ment and $200 to $443 per unlawfully obtaining supplemonth in food stamps during mental nutrition. much of that time. Firkus did No charges have been filed not report her income or pay in connection with the origitaxes and would have been nal theft claim that started the disqualified f ro m r e ceiv- state's investigation. ing unemployment and food Firkus is scheduled to enter stamps benefits had she done a plea to the charges July 10, received more than $300,000

Herrera-Firkus on Thursday

and Gardner on Friday.

act for the facility to accept

In late May, a grand jury indicted Firkus, Herrera-Fir-

state payments while she was

kus and Gardner on a total of

w a s a c r i m i nal

.

A •

' •

working there. Herrera-Firkus

SO.

contend it

O'*

— Reporter: 541-383-0387, shammers@bendbulletin.com

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IN THE BACK BUSINESS Ee MARIKT NEWS W Scoreboard, C2 M LB, C3 Sports in brief, C2 CWS, C4 Wimbledon, C2

© www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

GOLF

WORLD CUP

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Bend golfersmove on at Jr. Amateur PORTLAND — Bend

golfers Madison Odiorne and ColeChrisman advanced Tuesday to the quarterfinals of the Bob Norquist Oregon Junior Amateur Championship at Waverley Country Club. Odiorne, a rising senior at Summit High School, downed Portland's Ellen Secor, 2and 1, in the round of16 in the girls championship flight. Chrisman, a rising sophomore at Summit, beat Portland's Sean McHugh, 5 and4. Odiorne's win set up a quarterfinal showdown against Gigi Stoll, the Beaverton teenager who won the OregonAmateur Championship on Saturday. Chrisman will take on Jaiveer Singh, of Clackamas. After stroke-play qualifying on Monday, Odiorne andChrisman were the only Central Oregon golfers in the boys and girls championship flights. The championshi p matches for both flights is scheduled for Friday.

The Associated Press file photo

A fourth official signals for two minutes of added time. Is that 2 minutes, 1 second or 2:59? Only the head referee knows.

et

When will the game end? Wait and see

"U

.-.i ~s't~*>

.l

.' f~~

By Sam Borden New York TimesNews Service

-' C.

— Bulletin staff report

MANAUS, Brazil-

Imagine if an NFL coach never knew when to call

BASEBALL

1

forthelast-second pass,or

t

an NBA star had to guess

Elksslug HardourCats

d

Such situations would be unthinkable in other

VICTORIA, British

Columbia — Johnathan Brooks, ZachClose and Billy King eachhat three hits, and the BendElks scored six runs in the seventh inning en route to a13-7 West Coast League win over the Victoria HarbourCats on Tuesday. Bend (8-10) recorded a season-high18 hits on their way to aseason-best13 runs, as10 of 11 Elks that stepped to the plate picked upat least one hit. Brooks led theway with a 4-for-6 showing while driving in two runs. Close was 3for 5 and two runs scored, and King went3for 6 with two RBls. Nick Lo-

pez drove in three runs for Bend, andNickOsuna belted a three-run home run in theElks' six-run seventh inning. Bend goes for the three-game series sweep of Victoria (5-9) at 7:11 tonight. — Bulletin staffreport

NBA LeBron opts out of contract MIAMI — LeBron James is heading back to free agency. James told the Miami

Heat that he isopting out of the final two years of his contract. It does not meanJames isleaving the Heat — but there's no guarantee that he'll be in a Miami uniform next season, either. James addressed the lure of having flexibility last week in his exit

when to throw up his desperation half-court shot. sports, but vagaries of time

Wi.v~

~W ~

Rk. s

are the norm in soccer.

Photos courtesy of Outside Games

The Meadow Camp kayak race, part of the Outside Games, will be staged at noon Saturday, starting at River Rim Park.

Games do not end when a clock expires, but only when the referee decides

• Events run today through Sunday

Pub Races on Friday and the

Pickett's Charge! mountain bike race on Sunday — but the Outside Games are less about

they are over. In a world where quantities as varied as footsteps

and mouse clicks can be measured with scientific

competition and more about participation in some of Cen-

precision, soccer is a land

By Mark Morical The Bulletin

tral Oregon's favorite outdoor

What started as a nebulous 11-dayundertakingin 2012 is

sports. "It's about giving the people who have been on the fence about trying stuff a realistic

mirage. The most recent example came in the World

now a streamlined five-day enterprise for 2014.

The Subaru of Bend Outside Games return to Central Oregon for the third year today through Sunday. Organizers say that consolidating the Outside Games into a smaller win-

dow should help make it easier for participants and spectators to choose their events. Most of the activities willbe

staged at either the Century Center or Riverbend Park,

free mountain bike clinics. "The idea with Saturdayis to

Also Saturday, the Mead-

both in Bend. Sports include paddling, mountain biking, road cycling and rock climbing, all set against abackdrop

bring it all to Riverbend Park

of live music and craft brews.

says Outside Games event director Bart Platt. "Yes, the

Saturday will include numerouseventsatRiverbend Park, featuring the Bend Pad-

highest level and to learn how

only to see the advantage slip away when Portugal

Many of the 21 events that make up this week's Outside

Games already existed before the Games debuted in 2012. Riverbend Park on Saturday."

so that you can try rock climb-

ing, slacklining, and mountain bike demos all in one place," games are five days, but if you can't get to anything else, go to

Sudaru OfBendOutSideGameS TODAY GoPro ImmersionClinic: At Bend's Volcanic Theatre Pub from1 to 3 p.m.; free; learn about GoPro from the company's global education training managerand Bendresident Kris Jamieson. Pickin' and Paddlin':At Tumalo CreekKayak & CanoeinBendfrom 4to8 p.m.;demo boats available for free and live music starts at 7 p.m.

ow Camp kayakrace, taking paddlers through a 3-mile stretch of white water on the Deschutes River, will start at River Rim Park in southwest Bend.

Hundreds are expected to take part in competitive events — including the Cycle

"The idea behind the

Games was not to try to create something new," Platt says, "but pull together all these

great things we're already doing and deliver them in one concise message — not just to

Central Oregon, but throughout the region." — Reporter: 541-383-0318, mmorical@bendbulletin.com.

Sportingevents(Foracompleteschedule, visitsubaruofbendoutsidegames.com) FRIDAY Cycle PubRaces:Teams of six race at the Century Center courtyard; entry fee for a team of six riders is $100;4to6 p.m.

night, when the United States scored to take the

lead in the 81st minute

Platt says.

dleboard Challenge race and

Cup game here Sunday

opportunity to meet the professionals who do it at the to do these things from them," The Bend Paddleboard Challenge, part of the Outside Games, is set for 9 a.m. Saturday at Riverbend Park.

where time remains a

SATURDAY Outside Games atRiverbendPark:Bend Paddleboard Challenge from 9 a.m. to1 p.m., entry fee to compete; free yoga in the park at 9 a.m.; free slacklining at10 a.m.; free climbing wall at10 a.m.; free K-9 Kings Flying Dogs at1 p.m.; free mountain bike clinics from 11a.m. to 3 p.m.; Meadow Camp kayak race atnoon at River Rim Park, $20 entryfee.

SUNDAY Pickett's Charge!:Mountain bike race at 8a.m. at Wanoga Sno-park, entry fees $35 to $40; free group road ride at Crow's Feet Commons from 9:30 a.m. to12:30 p.m.; free mountain bike demos from noon to 4p.m.atWanoga.

of a 90-minute match, scored — wait for it — 14 minutes later.

For U.S. players and fans, the late goal was devastating. But it was also

confusing. Asked afterward about how long the game had lasted, U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard said: "Too long. Thirty seconds too long," and he was not

speakingmetaphorically. SeeStoppage time/C4

Inside • Uruguay's win over Italy marred by Suarezbiting incident,C4 • U.S. forward Altidore ruled outofGermanygame,C4 • Adraw would benefit both

Germany andthe Collusion at

the World Cuphas happenedbefore withthe Germans, in1982,C4

interview after the Heat

lost to San Antonio in the NBA Finals. The Heat havebeen preparing for this for some time. James, Wade andBoshall got six-year contracts when they teamed up inMiami in July 2010, the last

time free agencywas accompanied by the sort of frenzy that will envelop the leagueover the next few weeks. But each of those deals came with options to leave either this summer or in 2015. — The Associated Press

NBA DRAFT

Andrew Wiggins is one of eight Cana-

dian players who could

be selected in Thursday's NBA draft. There

are only six Canadians on a current NBA

roster. Orlin Wagner/The Associated Press

~~~ ~+~+®®~'

"L+j+y<

This year'sclasshasdistinctive Canadianflavor • Up to eight players from the Great White North could beselected Thursday By Cliff Brunt

at the 17-and-under world

The Associated Press

championships in 2010. His No. 2 scorer, Anthony Ben-

Roy Rana remembers the

pick in this year's draft on Thursday. Nik Stauskas, who played for the squad during qualifying in 2009, is a likely lottery pick. "At the time, none of us

signs suggesting that Canadian basketball might be ready to explode. He coached the Canada

nett, was the No. 1 overall pick in the 2013 NBA draft.

realized the long-term po-

The youngest player on

sard. Folks are getting it now

squad that finished third

gins, might be the No. 1

that team, Andrew Wig-

tential of this group " Rana See NBA draft/C3

NBAdraft When:4:30 p.m. Thursday TV:ESPN

Tep pick:The Cleveland Cavaliers have the first overall pickfor the third time in

fouryears.


C2

TH E BULLETIN• WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

ON THE AIR

CORKBOARD

TODAY SOCCER World Cup, Nigeria vs. Argentina World Cup, Bosniaand Herzegovina vs. Iran World Cup, Ecuador vs. France World Cup, Honduras vs. Switzerland

Time TV/Radio 8:30 a.m. ESPN 12:30 p.m. ESPN 12:30p.m. ESPN2

TENNIS

Wimbledon, early round Wimbledon, early round

11 a.m. ESPN2 4 a.m. E S PN

GOLF

PGA Professional National Championship EuropeanTour, BMWInternational Open

1 1 a.m. Go l f 1:30 a.m. Golf

BASEBALL

MLB, Washington at Milwaukee OR, St. Louis at Colorado College World Series, championship, Game 3:Vanderbilt vs. Virginia MLB, Detroit at Texas MLB, Boston at Seattle

1 1 a.m. noon

ML B MLB

5 p.m. 5 p.m. 7 p.m.

E S PN E SPN2 Roo t

THURSDAY Goi.F EuropeanTour, BMWInternational Open Champions Tour,Constellation Senior Players PGA, Quicken LoansNational EuropeanTour, BMWInternational Open SOCCER World Cup, United States vs. Germany World Cup, Portugal vs. Ghana World Cup, South Koreavs. Belgium World Cup, Algeria vs. Russia

5:30 a.m. GOLF 9:30 a.m. GOLF 11:30 a.m. GOLF 1:30 a.m. GOLF 8:30 a.m. ESPN 8:30 a.m. ESPN2 12:30 p.m. ESPN 12:30p.m. ESPN2

BASEBALL

MLB, Atlanta at Houston

11 a.m.

MLB

TENNIS

Wimbledon, early rounds Wimbledon, early rounds

11 a.m. ESPN2 4 a.m. E S PN

AUTO RACING

NASCAR Truck Series, Kentucky qualifying NASCARNationwide, Kentucky practice NASCARTruck Series, Kentucky

TENNIS

8:30 a.m. ESPN2

1 :30 p.m. F S 1 3 :30 p.m. F S 1 5 p.m. FS1

Listingsarethemostaccurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for latechangesmadeby 7Vor radio stations.

SPORTS IN BRIEF HOCKEY CrOSdy winS2nd IIIHL MVP award — Sevenyears after Sidney Crosby won his first Hart Trophy, the Pittsburgh captain has beenrecognizedastheNHL'sbestonceagain.CrosbywontheNHL's most valuable player award for the second timeTuesdaynight at the league' spostseasonawardsceremony inLasVegas.Crosbyalso collected the Art RossTrophy asthe leaguescoring champion and the Ted LindsayAward asthe players' choice for the NHL's most outstanding player. Boston goalie TuukkaRaskwonthe Vezina Trophy, and Bruins teammatePatrice Bergeron won his secondSelkeTrophy as the NHL'sbest defensive forward. Chicago's DuncanKeith won his second Norris Trophy astheleague's top defenseman. Colorado coach Patrick Roywonthe Adams Award, while Avalanche forward Nathan MacKinnon becamethe youngest player to win the Calder Trophy as the NHL'top s rookie. Colorado's Ryan O'Reilly won the Lady Byng Trophy for his sportsmanship andgentlemanly conduct after scoring a career-best 64 points while committing just one minor penalty all year. Washington's AlexanderOvechkin accepted his fourth Richard Trophy asthe NHL'stop goal-scorer, while Jonathan Quick and the Kingswontheir first Jennings Trophy for the NHL's fewest goals allowed.

GOLF WOOdS returning thiS Weekend — Tiger Woodssays heis without pain for the first time in two years as heembarks on his latest comeback. Nearly three months after having backsurgery to alleviate a pinched nerve, Woods returns to competition this week in the Quicken LoansNational at Congressional. Woods is the tournament host. He says heprobably wouldn't have played this week if the event did not benefit his foundation. Woodssays hehas beenahead of schedule in the recovery andbegantaking full swings with a driver a few weeks ago. Hisgoal all along was to bereadyfor the British Open. He already hasmissed two majors this year.

BASEBALL Royals fan hlt dy hot dog gets new trial —TheMlssoUrl Supreme Court has ordered anew trial for a Kansas City Royals fan injured by ahot dog tossed bythe teammascot. The unanimous opinion Tuesday from the state's highest court centered on alegal standard called the baseball rule, which says fans cannot sueteams over injuries caused byevents on the field, court or rink. Thecourt said it does not apply to amascot tossing hot dogs. John Coomerof Overland Park,Kansas,sayshewasinjuredata2009gamewhen team mascot Sluggerrr threw a hotdog into the stands, striking Coomer in the eye.

FOOTBALL DuCkS getting a head Start On 2015 reCruitingClaSS

— Oregon's 2015 recruiting class is already asizable one. The Ducks recently picked up threeverbal commitments in four days from offensive linemen. Five of the Ducks' eight early pledges in thecycle were recruited by longtime offensive line coachSteveGreatwood. The big future five are: tackle BradyAiello (of Lafayette, Calif., tackle Jake Hanson of Eureka,Calif., guard ShaneLemieux of Yakima, Wash., guard Zach Okun ofNewbury Park, Calif. and tackle Calvin Throckmorton of Newport, Wash.

SOCCER TimberS advanCe InU.S. OPen CuP—Gaston Fernandez scored two goals asthe Portland Timbers beat Sporting KansasCity 3-1 in the fifth round of the U.S.OpenCupon Tuesday. Fernandez scored in the 30th minute, Will Johnson converted apenalty in the 57th, and Fernandezscored his second goal in the68th. Sporting converted a penalty in the 73rd minute. The Timbers advance to thequarterfinals on July 9, whenthey will travel to play the Seattle Sounders.

COLLEGESPORTS Big Ten jOinSPaC-10 in SuPPOrt fOr refOrm — TheBig Ten said Tuesdaythat it supports guaranteed four-year scholarships and improved medical coveragefor its athletes. The league announced in a statement signedTuesday by its14 presidents that it proposes working within the NCAA structure to provide greater academic security for its athletes by guaranteeing scholarships for four years, even if an athlete can nolonger compete or has left for a professional career. Pac-12schools signed asimilar statement last month. — From staffand wire reports

U.ls. Open Cup

IN THE BLEACHERS

All TimesPDT

Wimbledon Tuesday atTheAll EnglandLawnTennis ft CroquetClub,London Purse:S42.5million (GrandSlam) Surface:Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jo-WilfriedTsonga(14), France,def. JurgenMelzer, Austria,6-1,3-6,3-6, 6-2,6-4. StanWawrinka (5), Switzerland,def. JoaoSousa, Portugal6-3,6-4,6-3. , Kei Nishikori(10),Japan,def. KennydeSchepper, France, 6-4, 7-6(5), 7-5. Nick Kyrgios, Australia, def. StephaneRobert, France, 7-6(2), 7-6(1),6-7(6), 6-2. Lukasz Kubot,Poland,def.Jan-Lennard Struff , Germany, 7-6(6),6-4,6-4. SantiagoGiraldo, Colombia,def. DanielGimeno-Traver,Spain, 6-1, 7-5,6-0. Yen-hsunLu,Taiwan, def. Aleksandr Nedovyesov, Kazakhstan,6-4,4-6,6-4,1-6,6-1. DenisKudla,UnitedStates,def. Marselghan,Turkey,7-6(3),6-4,4-6, 7-5. SamQuerrey,UnitedStates,def. BradleyKlahn, UnitedStates,6-7 (5), 6-4,6-1, 7-5. LleytonHewitt, Australia,def. MichalPrzysiezny, Poland,6-2,6-7(14), 6-1, 6-4. DusanLajovic, Serbia, def.GuiffermoGarcia-Lopez (28), Spain7-6 , (5), 6-2, 3-6,3-6,6-3. JerzyJanowicz(15), Poland,def. SomdevDevvarman,India,4-6, 6-3,6-3, 3-6,6-3. MarcelGranoffers(30), Spain, def. NicolasMahut, France, 6-4, 7-6(6),6-7(7), 6-4. RogerFederer(4), Switzerland,def. Paolo Lorenzi, Italy, 6-1,6-1,6-3. RichardGasquet(13), France,def. JamesDuckworth,Australia,6-7(3), 6-3,3-6, 6-0,6-1. Milos Raonic(8), Canada, def. MatthewEbden, Australia,6-2,6-4, 6-4. FrankDancevic,Canada, def. IvoKarlovic (29), Croatia,6-4, 7-6(5), 7-6(4). LukasRosol, CzechRepublic, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-3,3-6, 7-6(5), 6-4. Mikhail Kukushkin,Kaza khstan, def. DudiSela, Israel,6-4, 6-4,6-4. FelicianoLopez(19), Spain, def. Yuichi Sugita, Japan,7-6(6),7-6 (6),7-6(7). AntePavic,Croatia, def.AlejandroFaffa,Colombia, 6-4,6-3,7-5. Jiri VeselyCz , echRepublic, def.VictorEstreffaBurgos, Dominican Republic, 5-1,retired. RafaelNadal(2), Spain,def. Martin Klizan,Slovakia, 4-6,6-3, 6-3,6-3. Jack Sock,UnitedStates,def. Pierre-HuguesHerbert, France,6-7(5),6-2,7-6(5),6-4. GiffesMuller,Luxembourg, def. JulienBenneteau, France, 6-4,7-6(6), 7-6(5). John Isner (9), United States, def. Daniel Smethurst, Britain,7-5,6-3, 6-4. GaelMonfils (24),France,def. MalekJaziri, Tunisia, 7-6(5), 7-5,6-4. AdrianMannarino, France,def. PereRiba,Spain, 6-2,6-3, 6-4. Simone Bolegi, Italy,def.TatsumaIto, Japan, 7-5, 7-6 (3),3-6,7-6(5). Philipp Kohlschreiber(22), Germany, def. Igor Sijsling,Netherlands,6-4, 6-4,6-2. JarkkoNieminen,Finland, def.Federico Delbonis, Argentina,6-3, 7-6(3), 7-5. Denis IstominUzbe , kistan, def. DmitryTursunov (32), Russia7-5, , 6-4,3-6,6-2. TommyRobredo (23),Spain,def.Lukas Lacko, Slovakia,7-6(5), 1-6, 6-2,6-4. JulianReister,Germany,def. MichaelRussell, United States,6-4, 6-4,6-7(5), 4-6, 7-5. Women First Round AndreaPetkovic (20), Germany, def. KatarzynaPiter, Poland,6-1,6-4. Irina-CameliaBegu, Romania, def. Virginie Razzano, France, 1-6,6-4, 7-5. Alize Cornet(25),France,def. AnnaSchmiedlova, Slovakia,4-6,6-4, 6-2. SabineLisicki (19), Germany, def. Julia Glushko, Israel,6-2, 6-1. AgnieszkaRadwanska (4), Poland,def. Andreea Mitu, Rom ania,6-2, 6-1. CarolineWozniacki (16), Denm ark, def. Shahar Peer,Israel,6-3, 6-0. Karolina Pliskova,CzechRepublic, def. Karin Knapp,Italy,6-7(4),6-4,10-8. TimeaBacsinszky, Switzerland, def. SharonFichman,Canada,6-1, 6-3. CarolineGarcia, France,def.SaraErrani(14), Italy, 2-6, 7-6(3),7-5. VarvaraLepchenko,UnitedStates,def. Tsvetana Pironkova,Bulgaria, 6-7(6),6-2, 6-2. MadisonKeys, UnitedStates,def. MonicaPuig, PuertoRico,6-3,6-3. HeatherWatson,Britain, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia,6-3, 6-2. MicheffeLarcherdeBrito, Portugal,def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (28)r Russia, 3-6, 6-3,6-1. BelindaBencic, Switzerland, def. MagdalenaRybarikova,Slovakia,2-6,6-3, 6-3. MariaSharapova(5), Russia, def.SamanthaMurray, Britain,6-1,6-0. Petr a Cetkovska,Czech Republic,def.Jovana Jaksic,Serbia,6-2,4-6, 7-5. VictoriaDuval,UnitedStates, def. SoranaCirstea (29), Rom ania, 6-4,3-6,6-1. AngeliqueKerber (9), Germany, def. UrszulaRadwanska,Poland,6-2,6-4. KlaraKoukalova(31), CzechRepublic, def.Taylor Townsend ,UnitedStates,7-5,6-2. EugenieBouchard(13),Canada, def. Daniela Hantuchova,Slovakia,7-5,7-5. SerenaWiliams (1), United States, def. Anna Tatishvili, UnitedStates,6-1,6-2. Kaia KanepiEstoni , a,def. JelenaJankovic (7), Serbia,6-3,6-2. CarlaSuarezNavarro(15), Spain,def.ZhangShuai, China,6-1, 6-2. Lourdes DominguezLino, Spain,def. Petra Martic, Croatia,6-0,6-1. ZhengJie,China,def. AnnikaBeck, Germany, 6-1, 6-3. YaroslavaShvedova,Kazakhstan, def. Kristyna Plis kova,CzechRepublic,3-6,6-4,8-6. KirstenFlipkens(24), Belgium,def. Tamira Paszek, Austria,6-4,6-7(3),6-2. Silvia Soler-Espinosa, Spain,def. OlgaGovortsova, Belarus,6-2,6-3. SimonaHalep(3), Romania, def. TelianaPereira, Brazil, 6-2,6-2. Alison Riske,UnitedStates, def. AnastasiaPavlyuchenkova (26), Russia, 4-6,7-5, 6-1. LesiaTsurenko,Ukraine,def. DinahPfizenmaier, Germany, 6-3,6-0. Chaneffe Scheepers, South Africa, def.Christina McHale, UnitedStates, 6-3,6-3. Ana Ivanovic(11), Serbia,def.FrancescaSchiavone,ltaly,7-6 (6), 6-4. CamilaGiorgi, Italy,def.AlexandraCadantu, Romania, 6-1,7-6(5). Donna Vekic, Croatia, def.Roberta Vinci (21), Italy, 6-4,4-6, 6-4.

Zarina Diyas,Kaz akhstan, leadsKristina Mladenovic,France,7-6(4),susp.,darkness. VeraZvonare va, Russia, vs.TaraMoore, Britain, 6-4,6-7(3),susp.,darkness.

FIFTHROUND

Tuesday'sGames PhiladelphiaUnion2,NewYorkCosmos1 CarolinaRailHawks1, LosAngelesGalaxy0 PortlandTimbers3, Sporting KansasCity1 AtlantaSilverbakcs2, Colorado Rapids1 FCDallas3,HoustonDynamo2 SeattleSounders1, SanJoseEarthquakes1(Sounders advance onpenalty kicks) Today'sGames Rochester Rhinosvs.NewEnglandRevolution,4:30p.m. Columbus Crewat ChicagoFire, 5:30p.m.

In the Bleachers O 2014 Steve Moore. Dist. by Universal Ucnck www.gocomics.com/inthebleachers

MLS MAJORLEAGUESOCCER All TimesPDT

EasternConference W L T Pls GF GA D.C. United 7 4 4 2 5 22 16 N ewEngland 7 5 2 23 21 1 8 Sporting KansasCity 6 5 4 2 2 2 1 14 Toronto 6 4 1 1 9 15 13 NewYork 4 5 6 1 8 22 22 Columbus 4 5 6 1 8 18 18 Houston 5 9 2 1 7 16 29 Philadelphia 3 7 6 15 22 27 Chicago 2 4 8 1 4 22 25 Montreal 2 7 4 1 0 13 26 WesternConference W L T Pls GF GA Seattle 10 3 2 3 2 32 23 RealSaltLake 6 2 7 2 5 25 21 Colorado 6 5 4 2 2 21 18 FC Dallas 6 7 4 2 2 28 28 Vancouver 5 2 6 21 2 5 2 0 Portland 4 4 8 2 0 28 27 Los Angeles 4 3 5 1 7 16 11 SanJose 4 5 4 1 6 15 14 ChivasUSA 2 7 5 1 1 14 26

PigE AR

., i l/ BASEBALL West Coast Lea gue All Times PDT

East Divisioa W L W enatchee AppleSox 11 6 Y akima Valley Pippins 7 6 WallaWallaSweets 6 9 KelownaFalcons 6 10 South Division W L MedfordRogues 10 5 CorvagisKnights 9 8 BendElks 8 10 KlamathFallsGems 6 11 West Division W L Beffingham Bells 9 5 KitsapBlueJackets 8 5 CowlitzBlackBears 8 9 VictoriaHarbourCats 5 9

Pct GB

.647 .538 2 .400 4

375 41/2

Pct GB .667 .529 2

444 31/2

.353 5

Pct GB .643 615

r72

.471 2r/2

.357 4

Tuesday'sGames KlamathFaffs11,Medford 3 Yakima Valley 6, Kelowna0 Cowlitz 5,Kitsap2 Wenat chee3,Corvaff is0 Bend13,Victoria7 Today'sGames YakimaValey atKelowna,6:35p.m. KlamathFals at Medford, 6:35p.m. Kitsapat Cowlilz, 6:35p.m. Corva gi satWenatchee,7:05p.m. BendatVictoria, 7:11p.m. Thursday'sGame YakimaValey atKelowna,6:35p.m. Tuesday'sSummary

Elks13, HarbourCats 7 Bend 218 102 618 — 13 18 2 Vfctoria 121 201 Ogg — 7 11 2 Schneider,Mack(5), Albrecht (6), Pratt(7)andFinfer, Wildung(7);Lombana,Fagalde(6), Schneider(6), Keller(7),Marinch(7), Sullivan(8) andLesinski. WAlbrecht.— L Keller. 28—Bend:Brooks, King,Lopez, Kelly, Finfer,Wildung.HR —Bend: Osuna; Victoria; Andreychuk,DeGoti, Clark.

College COLLEGEWORLD SERIES

At Omaha,Neb. All TimesPDT

(Besl-of-3) Monday:Vanderbilt 9, Virginia 8 Tuesday; Virginia7, Vanderbilt 2 Today:Virginia(53-15)vs.Vanderbilt (50-21),5 p.m

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONALBASKETBALL ASSOCIATION

Draft Order

Thursday atBarclays Center, Brooklyn, N.Y. First Round 1, Cleveland. 2, Milwaukee.3, Philadelphia. 4, Orla ndo.5,Utah.6,Boston.7,L.A.Lakers.8,Sacramento.9, Charlotte(fromDetroit). 10,Philadelphia (fromNe wOrleans). 11, Denver.12,Orlando(fromNewYorkvia Denver).13,Minnesota.14, Phoenix.15,Atlanta.16, Chicago(fromCharlotte).17, Boston(fromBrooklyn).18, Phoenix(fromWashington).19, Chicago.20, Toronto. 21, Oklahoma City (fromDalas via Houston and L.A. Lakers).22, Mem phis. 23, Utah(fromGolden State).24,Charlotte (fromPortland). 25,Houston. 26, Miami.27,Phoenix(fromIndiana). 28, LA.Clippers. 29, Oklahoma City.30, SanAntonio. SecondRound 31, Milwaukee.32, Philadelphia. 33, Cleveland (fromOrlando).34, Dallas(fromBoston). 35,Utah. 36, Milwaukee (fromL.A. LakersviaMinnesotaand Phoenix).37,Toronto(fromSacramento). 38,Detroit. 39, Philadelphia (fromCleveland). 40, Minnesota (fromNe wOrleans). 41, Denver.42, Houston(fromNewYork). 43, Atlanta. 44,Minnesota.45, Charlotte. 46,Washington. 47, Philadelphia(fromBrooklynvia Dalas andBoston). 48,Milwaukee(from Toronto via Phoenix). 49, Chicago.50,Phoenix. 51, Dallas. 52, Philadelphia(from Memphis via Cleyeland).53, Minnesota (fromGoldenState). 54, Philadelphia(fromHoustonvia Milwaukee).55, Miami. 56, Denver (fromPortland). 57,Indiana.58, San Antonio (fromL.A.ClippersviaNewOrleans). 59,Toronto (fromOklahomaCity viaNewYork). 60,SanAntonio.

Today'sGame MontrealatVancouver, 7p.m. Friday's Games TorontoFCat NewYork, 5p.m. SportingKansasCity atPortland, 8 p.m. WNBA Saturday'sGames WOMEN'S NATIONALBASKEBALLASSOCIATION Seattle FC atD.C. United, 4 p.m. All Times PDT PhiladelphiaatNewEngland,4:30 p.m. FC DallasatColumbus, 5p.m. EasternConference VancouveratColorado,6p.m. W L P c t G B RealSaltLakeat ChivasUSA, 7:30p.m. Atlanta 9 4 .6 9 2 Los Angeleat s SanJose, 7:30p.m. Connecticut 7 6 .5 3 8 2 Sunday'sGame Indiana 6 6 .5 0 0 2r/z Houstonat Montreal, 4;30p.m. Chicago 6 7 .46 2 3 Washington 6 9 .4 0 0 4 NewYork 4 1 0 . 286 5'I~ HOCKEY WesternConference W L Pct GB NHL Phoenix 9 3 .7 5 0 r/z NATIONALHOCKEY LEAGUE Minnesota 11 4 . 7 33 SanAntonio 7 7 500 31/2 Draft order Tulsa 5 7 .4 1 7 4'/z Friday andSaturdayat Wells FargoCenter, Los Angeles 5 8 .3 8 5 5 Philadelphia Seattle 6 1 0 . 375 5'/z First Round 1 Florida.2 Buffal o.3 Edmon ton.4 Calgary.5 Tuesday'sGames N.Y. Isl a nders. 6, V an couver.7, Carolina. 8,Toronto. 9, Washington 81, SanAntonio70 Winnipeg.10,Anaheim(fromOttawa). Los Angele65, s Seatle 57 Today'sGames 11, Nashvile. 12, Arizona.13,Washington. 14, Dallas. 15,Detroit. 16,Columbus.17, Philadelphia. Chicagoat Connecticut, 4p.m. 1 8, Minnesota.19,TampaBay.20,SanJose. Tulsa atIndiana,4p.m. 21, St, Louis(conditional to Buffalo).22, PittsThursday'sGame burgh. 23,Colorado.24,Anaheim.25,Boston.26, AtlantaatSanAntonio,5 p.m. Montreal. 27,Chicago.28, TampaBay (from N.Y. Rangers).29,LosAngeles.30,NewJersey

SOCCER

DEALS

World Cup

Transactions

All Times PDT FIRSTROUND GROUP A W L T x-Brazil 2 0 1 x-Mexico 2 0 1 Croatia 1 2 0 Cameroon 0 3 0 GROUP 8 W L T x-Netherlands 3 0 0 x-Chile 2 1 0 Spain 1 2 0 Australia 0 3 0

GRoupc

GF GA Pts 7 4 6 1

2 1 6 9

7 7 3 0

GF GA Pts 10 5 4 3

3 3 7 9

9 6 3 0

W L T 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 GROUP D W L T x-Costa Rica 2 0 1 x-Uruguay 2 1 0 Italy 1 2 0 England 0 2 1 GROUP E W L T France 2 0 0 Ecuador 1 1 0 Switzerland 1 1 0 Honduras 0 2 0 GROUPF W L T x-Argentina 2 0 0 Nigeria 1 0 1 Iran 0 1 1 B osnia-Herzegovina 0 2 0

GF GA Pts 9 2 9 2 4 4 4 5 3

W L T 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 GROUP H W L T 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1

GF GA Pts

x-Colombia

x-Greece IvoryCoast Japan

GRoup G

German y UnitedStates Ghana Portugal

x Belgium Algeria Russia SouthKorea 0 1 1 x-Advancedtoknockoutrounds

2

6

1

GF GA tqs 4 1 7 4 4 6 2 3 3 2

4

1

GF GA tqs 8 2 6 3 3 3 4 6 3 1

5

0

GF GA Pts 3 1 6 1 0 1 6 4 3 2

0 1 3 2 3 4 6

4 1 0 4 4 1 1

GF GA Pts 3 1 6 5 4 3 1 2 1 3 5 1

Tuesday'sGames CostaRica0,England0 Uruguay1, Italy 0 Greece 2, IvoryCoast1 Colombi4, a Japan1 Today'sGames Argentinavs.Nigeria,9a.m. Bosnia-Herz egovinavs.Iran, 9a.m. Switzerland vs. Honduras,1 p.m. Ecuadorvs.France1 p.m. Thursday'sGames Germany vs. UnitedStates, 9a.m. Port ugalvs.Ghana,9a.m. Belgium vs. South Korea,1 p.m. Russiavs.Algeria,1 p.m.

BASEBALL AmencanLeague BOSTONREDSOX— SignedSSMichaelChavis to a minorleaguecontract. OAKLANDATHLETICS— ReinstatedOFJoshReddick from the15-dayDL.Placed18 Kyle Blanksonthe 15-dayDL,retroactiveto June23. TEXAS RANGERS— Purchasedthecontract of18 CarlosPenafromRoundRock(PCL). Designated18OF Brad Snyderfor assignment. National League NEWYORKMETS— RecalledCTravisd'Arnaud from Las Vegas(PCL). PlacedCTaylor Teagardenon the15-Day DL,retroactive toJune22. PHILADE LPHIA PHILLIES— SignedOFGrady Sizemore toaminor leaguecontract andassignedhim to Lehigh Valey (IL). PllTSBURG H PIRATES — Reinstated 28 Neil Walkerfromthe15-day DL.Sent DFJoseTabata outright toIndianapolis. BASKETB ALL National Basketball Association BROOKLYN NETS— AnnouncedFAndreiKirilenko exercised hiscontract optionforthe2014-15season. UTAHJAZZ— Named BradJones,Antonio Lang, AlexJensen,MikeWells andJohnnieBryantassistant coaches. FOOTBA LL National Football League ATLANTAFALCONS — Waived QB Dominique Croom. JACKSONVI LLEJAGUARS — SignedWRAllen Robinson to afour-year contract. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—ReleasedDTAndru Pulu. HOCKEY National HockeyLeague CAROLINA HURRICANES—Agreedto termswith DRonHainseyon a three-year contract throughthe 2016-17season. Agreedtotermswith LWChris Terry on aone-yearcontract. WASHIN GTONCAPITALS— Named Mitch Korn goaltending coach. SOCCER Major LeagueSoccer CHIVAS USA—SignedDAkira Kaji. FC DALLAS —TransferredGRichard Sanchezto TigresUAN L(LigaMX).

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook,jack chinook, steelheadandwild steelheadat selected ColumbiaRiverdamslast updatedonMonday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wsllhd Bonneville 3,362 5 7 8 51 4 229 The Daffes 3,107 52 2 2 1 5 72 John Day 2,416 3 3 7 150 57 McNary 2,500 3 2 0 91 24 Upstreamyear-to-date movement of adult chinook, jackchinook, steelheadandwild steelhead at selectedColumbiaRiver damslast updatedon Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 281,054 36,552 11,379 3,276 T he Daffes212,399 27,895 2,622 7 79 John Day 183,326 24,428 4,569 1,665 McNary 156,838 20,399 1,884 606

WIMBLEDON

Subbing for the champion, Lisicki advances By Samuel Petrequin

of a tribute to the late British

The Associated Press

player Elena Baltacha.

LONDON — A year after her loss to Marion Bartoii in

the Wimbledon final, Sabine

B artoli a n d

L i s i ck i e x -

changed smiles in a ceremony at the net before the German

thatthere aresome nerves invoived. It's such a special place for me." Rather than forget last year's championship match, in which she was visibly upset and began to tear up in the second set, Lisicki viewed some video clips

lems thathave hampered her play recently. "A few weeks ago I was also wondering how I would feel to come back here and play the

L isicki w a s r e u nited w i t h needed less than art hour to her victor at Centre Court on beat No.79 Julia Glushko 6-2, Tuesday under far different 6-1 in a first-round match. "I was quite nervous," Lisic- from last year's final. circumstances. "I did that yesterday," LisicT his time, L i sicki c a m e ki said after being asked how away a winner. she felt walking back on the ki said. "I watched a little bit to B artoli retired after w i ncourt where she lost 6-1, 6-4 calm down the nerves."

first round," Lisicki said. "It was

ning the Wimbledon singles title in 2013. In her absence this year, Lisicki was asked to play the opening women's match on Centre Court, and as part

toss ceremony ahead of the Lisicki match. Wearing her Wimbledon members' tag, Bartoli wiped awaytears on several occasionsduringtheceremony.

last year to Bartoli. Lisicki — playing her first "I played my first Grand match on grass this seasonSlam final last year and I'm was irt complete control from returning to the court where the start and showed no signs I played it on. That's normal of the shoulder and wrist prob-

awesome." Baitacha, Britain's former

No. 1 women's player, died of liver cancer on May4 at the age of 30. Bartoll took part in a coin


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

C3

OR LEAGUE BASEBALL Standings

American League

All TimesPDT

Tigers 8, Rangers 2

AMERICANLEAGUE

East Division

Toronto Baltimore NewYork Boston Tampa Bay

W L 44 35 40 36 39 37 35 43 31 48

Central Division

Pct GB .557 .526 2'/z .513 3'/z .449 8'/z .392 13

ARLINGTON,Texas— lan Kinsler homered in the first at-bat of his return to Texas as anopponent and J.D. Martinez had atiebreaking two-run shot for Detroit.

Mariners 8, RedSox2

Citbs 7, Reds 3

Nationais 4, Brewers 2 (16 inn.) Pirates 6, Rays 5

SEATTLE —Kyle Seager hadan RBI double in the first inning and

CHICAGO — Jake Arrieta retired his first18 batters and struck out nine in seven innings for Chicago. Arrieta was working on aperfect game before rookie Billy Hamilton started the seventh with a single.

Ryan Zimmerman's two-run home run in the 16th inning gaveWashington its fourth consecutive win. With one out in the16th, LaRoche hit a sharp single that bouncedoff the wall in right field. Zimmerman then hit his third home run of the year to give the Nationals the lead in a gamethat took 5 hours, 22 minutes.

hit a three-run homer in the fifth

off Boston starter JakePeavyas Seattle won its fifth straight. Boston

Seatge

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla.— Andrew

McCutchen drove in two runs, and Jeff Locke allowed three runs and eight hits over 7'/5 innings. Pittsburgh TampaBay ab r hbi ab r hbi Polancrf 2 1 1 0 DJnngscf 4 1 2 0 SMartelf 3 1 1 1 Zobristrf-ss 5 0 0 0 S niderlf 1 0 0 0 Guyerlf 5 1 2 2 AMcctcf 4 0 1 2 Longori3b 4 1 1 2 NWalkr2b 3 0 0 1 Loney1b 4 0 2 0 RMartnc 4 1 2 1 YEscorss 3 0 0 0 I.Davis1b 4 1 1 0 Kiermrph-rf 1 0 0 0 JHrrsn3b 4 0 1 1 SRdrgz2b 3 0 0 0 PAlvrzdh 3 1 0 0 Forsythdh 4 2 3 0 Mercerss 4 1 1 0 JMolinc 3 0 2 1 Joyceph 1 0 0 0 Totals 32 6 8 6 Totals 3 7 5 12 5 P ittsburgh 1 0 3 0 0 1 010 — 6 T ampa Bay 0 0 0 0 1 0 022 — 5 E—J.Molina (2). DP—Pittsburgh 2. LOB—Pitts-

ab r h bi ab r hbi Holtrf 5 1 2 2 Enchvzrf 5 1 3 1 Cincinnatiab r hbi Chicago ab r hbi Texas Pedroia2b 4 0 0 0 J.Jonescf 3 2 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi BHmltncf 4 1 1 0 Coghlnlf 4 0 0 0 D.Ortizdh 3 0 0 0 Cano2b 4 1 1 0 RDavislf 5 0 3 1 DRrtsncf 3 1 1 0 F razier3b 4 0 0 0 Lakecf 3 2 1 0 Kinsler2b 5 1 2 3 LMartnph-cf 2 0 1 1 Napoli1b 4 0 2 0 Seager3b 4 1 2 4 Votto 1b 4 0 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 2 3 1 Navalf 3 0 1 0 Morrsn1b 3 0 1 1 462 7r/r Micarr1b 4 0 0 0 Andrusss 4 0 1 0 Mesorc c 4 2 2 2 Scastro ss 2 1 0 1 Przynsc 4 0 0 0 Zuninoc 4 2 2 1 D.Kelly1b 0 0 0 0 Sardinsss 1 0 0 0 Washington Milwaukee West Division Bruce rf 4 0 1 1 Schrhltrf 3 1 1 2 B ogarts3b 4 0 1 0 Ackleylf 4 0 0 0 V Mrtnzdh 4 1 2 1 Choolf 4 0 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi Ludwcklf 4 0 0 0 Castigoc 3 0 1 2 W L Pct GB Drewss 3 0 0 0 BMillerss 3 1 1 1 JMrtnzrf 5 1 2 2 ABeltre3b 4 0 4 1 Spancf 6 1 1 0 Gennett2b 6 0 1 0 Oakland 47 30 .610 S chmkr2b 3 0 1 0 Olt3b 4000 JHerrrph-ss 1 0 0 0 Buckdh 4 0 0 0 R endon3b 7 1 3 1 Braunrf 6 0 2 2 Cstl lns3b 5 0 0 0 DMrph3b 0 0 0 0 Los Angeles 42 33 .560 4 Cozartss 3 0 0 0 Barney2b 3 0 0 0 BrdlyJrcf 4 1 2 0 W erthrf 7 0 0 1 Lucroyc 4 0 1 0 3000 Seattle B aileyp 2 0 0 0 Arrietap 1 1 0 0 42 36 .538 5r/r A Jcksncf 4 1 2 0 Riosrf LaRoch1b 6 1 2 0 CGomzcf 6 0 0 0 35 41 .461 11'/r Avilac 4 2 3 1 C.Pena1b 4 0 0 0 Totals 35 2 8 2 Totals 3 4 8 108 Hooverp 0 0 0 0 Sweenyph 1 0 0 0 Texas Boston 000 200 000 — 2 Zmrmnlf 7 1 3 2 ArRmr3b 5 0 1 0 J u.Diazp 0 0 0 0 Wrghtp 0 0 0 0 Houston 33 45 .423 14'/z Suarezss 4 2 2 0 Chirinsc 4 0 0 0 — 8 Seattle 210 040 01x Dsmndss 7 0 2 0 Grzlnyp 0 0 0 0 Choicedh 4 0 1 0 B.Penaph 0 0 00 Grimmp 0 0 0 0 E — D re w (1). LOB — B oston 12, Se a t l e 5. 28E spinos2b 7 0 0 0 Fiersp 1 0 0 0 burgh 3,TampaBay 8. 28—I.Davis (10), Guyer (4 Odor2b 3 1 1 0 Leakepr 0 0 0 0 Russellp 0 0 0 0 Tuesday'sGames Holt (13),Seager(19). 3B—En.chavez(2). HR —Holt Lecurep 0 0 0 0 Schlittrp 0 0 0 0 Loatonc 6 0 0 0 Maldndph 1 0 0 0 Totals 4 0 8 168 Totals 3 6 2 9 2 Chicago WhiteSox4, Baltimore2 J.Molina(1). 38—Forsythe (1). HR —R.Martin (4, Zmrmnp 2 0 0 0 KDavislf 7 0 1 0 Detroit 100 000 520 — 8 (2), Seager (11), Zunino(10). SB—J.Jones2 (14). NRmrzp 0 0 0 0 Toronto7, N.Y.Yankees6 Longoria(10). SB—Polanco (3). CS —S.Marte (6). SF — M orri s on. McLothph 1 0 0 0 MrRynl1b 3 1 1 0 Texas 001 000 001 — 2 Totals 32 3 5 3 Totals 2 8 7 6 6 N.Y.Mets10,Oakland1 S — Po l a n co. SF — N .W alk er . IP H R E R BBSO C incinnati E—Kinsler (2), Suarez(3). LOB—Detroit 7,Texas 000 0 0 0 201 — 3 B levinsp 0 0 0 0 Dukep 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh6,TampaBay 5 IP H R E R BBSO Barrettp 0 0 0 0 EHerrr3b 3 0 1 0 9. 28 — V.Martinez (18), J.Martinez(12), A.Jackson Boston Chicago 000 112 03x — 7 Detroit 8,Texas2 Pittsburgh 5 8 7 7 2 3 E—Votto (5). LOB—Cincinnati 3, Chicago 3. Stmmnp 0 0 0 0 Segurass 6 1 1 0 Atlanta3, Houston 2 (15),Avila(13),Suarez(2), L.Martin (9). HR—Kinsler PeavyL,1-6 7 1-3 8 3 3 2 4 LockeW,1-1 2 0 0 0 0 28 — Bruce(13), Rizzo(12), Castillo (9). HR—Me- Hairstnph 1 0 0 0 Gallardp 1 0 0 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, KansasCity 0 (9), J.Martinez (8). SB—R.Davis (21), A.Jackson(8). Doubront JHughes 0 1 0 0 0 0 Detwilrp 1 0 0 0 Wootenp 0 0 0 0 Mujica 1 2 1 0 0 2 soraco (14), Ri z zo (17). SF — S chier hol t z, Ca s t i l o . CS — R .D a vi s (6), A. J a c kson (3), An drus (6 ). ClevelandatArizona(n) WatsonH,20 2-30 0 0 0 1 IP H R E R BBSO Storenp 0 0 0 0 RWeksph 0 0 0 0 IP H R E R BBSO Seatge LA. Angel8, s Minnesota6 3 2 2 0 0 4 1-3 5 2 2 5 2 Cincinnati Dobbsph 1 0 0 0WSmithp 0 0 0 0 MelanconS,13-16 1 E.Ramirez Detroit Seattle 8, Boston2 TampaBay 11 - 3 1 0 0 0 1 Bailey L,7-4 51- 3 4 4 4 2 6 Clipprdp 0 0 0 0 FrRdrgp 0 0 0 0 SmylyW,4-6 6 5 1 0 1 5 BeimelW2-1 Today'sGames A rcher L,4-5 7 7 5 4 2 7 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 Hoover 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 RSorinp 0 0 0 0 Overay1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 Farquhar Pittsburgh(Morton4-8) at Tamp a Bay (Price 5-7), Alburquerque 1 1 1 1 1 0 2 11-3 1 0 0 0 2 Ju.Diaz 1 0 0 0 0 2 Totals 5 9 4 114 Totals 5 2 2 102 Boxberger Coke 1 1 0 0 0 1 Furbush 9:10a.m. Oviedo 1 0 0 0 0 1 11-3 0 0 0 0 1 Lecure Washington100 000 010 000 000 2 — 4 Medina 1 2 3 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 2 ChicagoWhite Sox(Noesi 2-5) at Baltimore (U. C.Smith J.Hughes pitchedto1batter in the8th. Milwaukee 000 020 000000 000 0 — 2 PB—Pierzynski. Chicago Texas Jimenez 2-8), 4:05p.m. HBP— by Locke (S.Rodriguez). WP— Melancon, E—Desmond (14). DP—Washington 3. LOB ArrietaW,4-1 7 3 2 2 0 9 61-3 9 4 4 0 6 T—3:14.A—20,015(47,476). N.Y.Yankees(Kuroda4-5) atToronto(Hutchison5-5), LewisL,5-5 Archer. Washi n gton 9, Mi l w aukee 11. 28 — A r R a m ire z (1 0). WWright 0 1 0 0 0 0 Rowen 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 4;07 p.m. —Rendon(12), Zimmerman(3). SB—Spagn f3), T—3:03. A—14,684(31,042). GrimmH,6 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 HR 1 0 0 0 1 2 Angels 8, Twins 6 Oakland(Mills 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 3-7), Sh.Tolleson (6), Desmond (7). CS—Braun(3). S enRussel H,3 l 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Rendon Poreda 1-3 4 2 2 0 1 4:10 p.m. rdo. SchlitterH,10 1 - 3 0 0 0 0 0 nett, Gaga 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Mets 10, Athletics 1 Detroit (A.Sanchez 4-2) at Texas(J.Saunders 0-3), Soria IP H R E R BBSO N.Ramirez 1 1 1 1 0 2 S.Baker 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 ANAHEIM, Calif.— Mike Trout hit 5:05 p.m. Washington WWright pi t ched to1batter in the 8th. —byAlburquerque(Odor). Atlanta (A.Wood5-6) at Houston (McHugh4-5), HBP a tiebreaking two-run homer after HBP — Slumping outfieldZimmermann 6 6 2 2 2 9 NEW YORK —byBailey(S.castro). T—3:32. A—35,526(48,114). 5;10 p.m. Blevins T—3:00. A—28,226(41,072). 1 0 0 0 2 0 er Chris Young homered LosAngelesandMinnesotaextwice, L.A. Dodgers(Haren 7-4)at KansasCity(Shields8-3), Barrett 1 0 0 0 1 1 5:10 p.m. changed five-run innings, and the Stammen 1 0 0 0 0 2 Travis d'Arnaud hit a three-run White Sox 4, Orioies 2 Cleveland(Kluber6-5) at Arizona(C.Anderson5-2), Detwiler 4 2 0 0 1 2 shot in his return from a demotion Angels went on to get their fourth Phiiiies 7, Marlins 4 6:40 p.m. Storen 1 1 0 0 0 0 BALTIMORE — Jose Qui n tana straight victory. Minnesota(Pino0-0) at LA. Angels(Richards7-2), C lippard W, 5 -2 1 1 0 0 1 0 and the towel-waving NewYork PHILADELPHIA — Marlon Byrd 7;05 p.m. allowed one run in seveninnings, R.SorianoS,18-20 1 0 0 0 0 1 Mets roughed upScott Kazmir Boston (Buchholz2-4) at Seattle (Iwakuma5-3), hit a two-run homer, and David BuMinnesota Los Angel e s Milwaukee Gordon Beckhamhomeredand 7:10 p.m. ab r hbi ab r hbi Gallardo 6 4 1 1 2 5 and Oakland. chanan threw five effective allowed Thursday'sGames Chicagosnappedafive-game DSantnss 5 1 2 1 Calhonrf 3 2 1 1 WootenH,9 1 0 0 0 0 2 two runs and six hits to help PhilaAtlantaatHouston,11:10 a.m. D ozier2b 4 1 3 1 Troutcf 2 2 1 2 New York W.SmithBS,4-5 1 2 1 1 0 0 Oakland losing streak. Minnesota at LA.Angels, 12:35p.m. Mauer1b 5 0 1 0 Pujols1b 4 1 0 0 F r Rodri g uez 1 0 0 0 0 2 ab r hbi ab r hbi delphia snap athree-game skid. ChicagoWhiteSoxat Toronto, 4:07p.m. W lnghlf 3 1 1 1 JHmltnlf 4 1 2 2 Duke 2 1 0 0 0 2 C rispcf 3 0 1 0 EYonglf 5 1 2 0 Chicago Baltimore Detroit atTexas,5:05 p.m. KMorlsdh 3 1 1 2 Aybarss 3 1 0 0 Gorzelanny 1 0 0 0 0 1 Sogard2b 1 0 0 0 DnMrp2b 4 1 2 1 Miami Philadelphia ab r hbi ab r hbi KSuzukc 4 0 0 0 HKndrc2b 4 1 2 2 Fiers L,0-1 4 4 2 2 0 4 Dnldsn 3b 4 0 0 0 DWrght 3b 4 1 1 1 ab r hbi ab r hbi Eatoncf 3 0 1 0 Markksrf 4 0 0 0 NATIONALLEAGUE Parmelrf 4 0 1 0 Crondh 3 0 1 0 T — 5: 2 2. A — 30,14 9 (41, 9 00). Moss1b-If 4 1 1 0 Campll1b 4 1 1 0 Mrsnckcf 4 0 0 0 Rollinsss 2 1 2 0 G Bckh2b 5 1 1 1 Pearcelf 3 1 2 1 EEscor3b 4 1 0 0 Freese3b 3 0 1 0 East Division Cespdslf-cf 4 0 2 1 Grndrsrf 4 1 1 3 D ietrch 2b 4 1 0 0 Ruiz c 4 0 0 0 W L Pct GB Gillaspi3b 5 0 2 0 A.Jonescf 4 0 2 0 Fuldcf 4 1 2 1 JMcDnl pr-3b 0 0 0 0 Stanton Vogtc 3 0 0 0 CYoungcf 3 3 2 2 rf 5 0 3 0 utley 2b 3 1 1 0 JAreu1b 4 0 1 0 N.cruzdh 4 0 1 0 Interieague Washington 41 35 .539 Congerc 3 0 0 0 Francisp 1 0 0 0 dArnadc 4 1 1 3 McGeh3b 4 0 1 1 Howard1b 4 1 1 0 A.Dunndh 3 0 0 0 C.Davis1b 3 0 1 0 Atlanta 39 37 .513 2 Greenph 1 0 0 0 Lowrie ss 2 0 0 0 Tejada ss 3 1 1 0 S ltlmchc 2 1 2 0 Byrdrf 4212 Miami 38 39 494 3I/2 AIRmrzss 4 2 2 0 JHardyss 4 1 0 0 lannettc 0 0 0 0 JiJhnsnp 0 0 0 0 Colonp 2 0 1 0 Ozunalf 4 1 1 0 Asche3b 4 1 1 2 Dodgers 2, Royais 0 Viciedorf 4 1 1 0 Machd3b 3 0 2 0 NewYork 36 41 .468 5r/r Totals 36 6 116 Totals 3 0 8 8 7 Jasoc 1 0 0 0 Floresph 1 0 0 0 4 1 2 2 Mayrrylf 3 0 0 0 Sierrarf 0 0 0 0 Schoop2b 3 0 0 0 Philadelphia 35 41 .461 6 M innesota 0 5 0 0 1 0 000 — 6 GJones1b R eddckrf 2 0 0 0 Blackp 0 0 0 0 Lucasss 4 0 1 0 Reverecf 4 1 1 0 DeAzalf 3 0 2 2 DYongph 1 0 1 1 Central Division Los Angeles 520 000 01x— 8 KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Clayton Callasp2b-1b3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 DBchnp 1 0 0 0 E—C.Wilson(1). DP—Minnesota2, LosAngeles Heaneyp W L Pct GB Flowrsc 4 0 1 1 Loughpr 0 0 0 0 Kazmirp 1 0 0 0 Morrisp 0 0 0 0 Rcedenph 1 0 0 0 Kershaw followed his first career CJosph c 2 0 0 0 Milwaukee 47 32 .595 1.LOB— Minnesota6,LosAngeles5.28— D.Santa- Hatchrp 0 0 0 0 Hollndsp 0 0 0 0 Puntoss 2 0 0 0 Flahrty ph 1 0 0 0 no-hitter by allowing six hits and a St. Louis 42 36 .538 4'I~ na 2(9),Mauer(14).HR —Willingham(7), K.Morales Totals 31 1 4 1 Totals 3 4 10 1210 0 0 0 0 DBrwnph 1 0 0 0 Totals 3 5 4 11 4 Totals 3 2 2 9 2 Pittsburgh 39 38 .506 7 (1), Trout (17).SB—Fuld(7), Trout(10). SF—K.Mo- Bourph Oakland 1 00 000 000 — 1 walk while striking out eight. R Jhnsnph 1 0 0 0 Gilesp 0 0 0 0 Chicago 1 10 100 010 — 4 Cincinnati 38 38 :500 rales,Calhoun. NewYork 04 3 0 1 2 ggx— 10 ARamsp 0 0 0 0 Rosnrgp 0 0 0 0 B altimore 000 0 0 1 001 — 2 Chicago 32 43 .427 13 LOB—Okaland 4, NewYork 3. 28—Cespedes(20), IP H R E R BBSO Diekmnp 0 0 0 0 Los Angel e s Kansas Ci t y E — C .Jo seph (1). DP — C h ic a go 4, Bal t i m ore 3. West Division Minnesota D.Wright(19), Campbell (5). HR —Granderson (10), GwynJ ph 1 0 0 0 ab r hbi ab r hbi —Chicago 8, Baltimore7. 2B—Gigaspie (19), GibsonL,6-6 W L Pct GB LOB 2 4 7 7 2 1 C.Young 2 (6), d'Arnaud(4). CS—E.Young (2). SPapeln p 0 0 0 0 JuTrnr3b 3 1 1 0 L.caincf 4 0 0 0 AI.Ramirez(12), A.Jones(15). HR —G.Beckham(7), Deduno SanFrancisco 45 32 .584 4 1 0 0 2 4 Totals 3 5 4 10 3 Totals 3 2 7 7 4 Colon. Kemplf 3 0 0 0 Hosmer1b 4 0 2 0 Pearce(7). SB—AI.Ramirez(13),DeAza(11). CSLosAngeles 43 36 .544 3 Guerrier 1 3 1 1 0 0 Miami IP H R E R BBSO 0 10 010 020 — 4 Puigdh 4 0 1 0 BButlerdh 4 0 1 0 (5). 35 42 .455 10 De Aza Colorado Thielbar 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia 31 0 003 Ogx— 7 Oakland AdGnzl1b 3 1 1 1 AGordnlf 3 0 0 0 IP H R E R BBSO Los Angeles SanDiego 34 44 .436 11'/2 Kazmi r L,9-3 E—Saltalamacchia (9), Dietrich (9), Utley (6). VnSlykcf-rf 4 0 0 0 S.Perezc 4 0 0 0 Arizona 32 47 .405 14 Chicago C .Wil sonW,8-6 5 9 6 6 0 4 DP — Ji.Johnson Miami1. LOB —Miami 9, Philadelphia 5.28A.Elhsc 3 0 2 0 Infante2b 4 0 1 0 QuintanaW,4-7 7 6 1 1 3 8 Morin H,2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Stanton2 (20), Howard (9), Asche(11). 38—Revere Romak Francis r f 3 0 0 0 V a l e n c i 3 b 3 0 2 0 PetrickaH,7 1 0 0 0 1 0 JepsenH,5 Tuesday'sGames 1 1 0 0 2 1 New York 4). HR —G.Jones (10), Byrd (13). SB—Rollins 2 Ethierph-cf 1 0 1 1 Maxwgrf 3 0 0 0 SDowns 0 1 1 1 0 0 Philadelphi7, a Miami4 Frieri H,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 ColonW,8-5 8 4 1 1 1 8 13), utley(2).SF —McGehee. Triunflss 3 0 0 0 AEscorss 3 0 0 0 BelisarioS,8-12 1 2 0 0 0 0 J.SmithS,6-10 1 N.Y.Mets10,Oakland1 1 0 0 0 Black 1 0 0 0 0 1 IP H R E R BBSO DGordnph-2b1 0 0 0 Baltimore Pittsburgh6,TampaBay 5 HBP —byFrancis(Tejada). Guerrierpitchedto 3batters inthe8th. Miami Rojas2b-ss 3 0 0 0 M .Gonzal e L, z 4 -5 5 9 3 3 3 1 HBP — b y G ue rri e r (Fre es e), bv G ibso n (A yb ar ). T — 2: 2 4. A — 25,751 (41, 922). Chicago Cubs7, Cincinnati 3 HeaneyL,0-2 5 4 5 5 2 5 Totals 3 1 2 6 2 Totals 3 20 6 0 McFarland 2 1 0 0 0 1 T—2:59.A—37,086 (45,483). Atlanta3, Houston 2 Los Angeles 10 0 000 001 — 2 Morris 1 2 2 0 0 2 Tom.Hunter 1 1 1 0 0 0 L.A. Dodgers 2, KansasCity 0 City 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 — 0 Hatcher 1 1 0 0 0 0 K ansas ZBritton 1 0 0 0 0 1 Leaders Washington 4, Milwaukee2,16innings DP— LosAngeles 1,KansasCity 1.LOB— Los A.Ramos 1 0 0 0 1 0 S.Downs pi t ched to1 bat t er i n the 9th. National League Colorado 10, St.Louis 5 T hrough Tuesday's Games A ngeles 7, Ka nsas C i t y 6. 38 — J u.T ur ner (1). CS Philadelphia HBP—by McFarland (De Aza). WP—Quintana. ClevelandatArizona(n) z D.Buchanan W,4-3 5 6 2 2 4 2 Ad.Gonzale(1). PB — C.Joseph. SanDiego7,SanFrancisco2 AMERICAN LEAGUE IP H R E R BBSO HollandsH,3 1 0 0 0 0 1 Rockies 10, Cardinals 5 T—3:09. A—20,596(45,971). Today'sGames BATTING —Altuve, Houston, .337; Cano, Seattle, Giles 1 0 0 0 0 2 Los Angeles Pittsburgh(Morton4-8) at TampaBay (Price 5-7), 2-3 3 2 2 0 0 Kershaw W,8-2 8 6 0 0 1 8 .329; VMartinez,Detroit, .329; Brantley,Cleveland, Rosenberg 9:10a.m. DENVER — Justin Morneau hit a S,23-26 1 0 0 0 0 2 .325; Beltre,Texas,.321; Micabrera,Detroit, .318; DiekmanH,11 1 - 3 0 0 0 0 1 Jansen Washington(Strasburg6-5) at Milwaukee(Estrada Blue Jays 7, Yankees Rios,Texas,.316. 6 three-run homer anddrove in six PapelbonS,18-20 1 1 0 0 0 0 KansasCity 6-4),11:10a.m. RBI — Encarnacion, Toronto, 63; Micabrera, 6 4 1 1 4 5 DuffyL,4-7 Heaney pi t ched to1 bat t er i n the 6t h . runs as Colorado snapped a sevSt. Louis(Gonzales 0-0) at Colorado(Flande0-0), 1 0 0 0 0 0 Detroit, 61;JAbreu,Chicago,60; Ncruz,Baltimore, HBP —byHeaney(Rogins). WP —Heaney2, Morris 2. Crow TORONTO —JoseReyesatoned 12:10p.m. en-game losing streak. Jorge De T—3:15. A—24,860(43,651). K.Herrera 11-3 2 1 1 1 2 60;Donal dson,Oakland,56;Trout,LosAngeles,56; SanDiego(Kennedy5-8) atSanFrancisco(Lincecum for a pair of misplays by hitting a Mariot 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Moss,Oakland,55. La Rosa becamethe first Rockies 5-5),12:45p.m. W P — K e rsh aw , Du ffy . DOUBLES —Micabrera, Detroit, 26; Altuve, Cincinnati (Latos0-0) at ChicagoCubs(E.Jackson leadoff double in the ninth inning starter to earn awin since June 12. T—3:02.A—28,302 (37,903). Houston,23; Kinsler, Detroit, 23; Pedroia, Boston, 5-7),4:05p.m. and scoring whenYankeesthird Padres 7, Giants 2 23; EEscobar,Minnesota,22; Plouffe, Minnesota,22; Miami(H.Alvarez 4-3) atPhiladelphia(A.Burnett 5-6), AGordon,KansasCity,21; Hosmer, KansasCity,21. St. Louis Colorado basemanYangervis Solarte threw Braves 3, Astros 2 4:05 p.m. HOMERUNS—Encarnacion,Toronto,24; Ncruz, ab r hbi ab r hbi SAN FRANCISCO — Alexi Amarista Oakland(Mills 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 3-7), away a bunt, lifting Toronto past Baltimore,23;JAbreu, Chicago,22; VMartinez, DeMcrpnt3b 4 0 0 1 Blckmncf 5 2 3 1 4:10 p.m. drove in three runs on three hits and HOUSTON — Brothers B.J. and troit,19; Donaldson,Oakland,18; Moss, Oakland,17; Hollidylf 5 1 2 0 Dickrsnlf 4 2 2 0 Atlanta(A.Wood5-6) at Houston (McHugh4-5), 5:10 New York. Boston,17;Trout, LosAngeles,17. Craigrf 5 0 2 1 Tlwtzkss 3 2 1 0 SanDiegohandedstumbl ingSan Justin Upton tied themajor league Ortiz, p.m. STOLEN BASES—Altuve, Houston, 27; RDa vis, MAdms1b 4 1 1 0 Mornea1b 5 2 3 6 New York Toronto Francisco its12th loss in15 games. L.A.Dodg ers(Haren7-4) atKansasCity(Shields8-3), record for brothers homering in the Detroit,21; Ellsbury,NewYork,21; Andrus,Texas,18; ab r hbi ab r hbi JhPerltss 3 1 1 2 Rosarioc 5 0 2 0 5:10 p.m. KansasCity,18; LMartin, Texas,17; Dozier, Bourjoscf 4 1 2 0 RWhelr3b 4 0 2 2 same gameasteammates, accom- AEscobar, Cleveland(Kluber6-5) at Arizona(C.Anderson5-2), Gardnrlf 5 1 2 0 Reyesss 5 2 2 0 San Diego San Francisco Minnesota,15;Gardner, Ne wYork, 15; Gentry, OakM.ERis2b 4 0 2 0 Brothrsp 0 0 0 0 Jeterss 4 2 1 1 Mecarrlf 4 0 0 0 6:40 p.m. plishing the feat for the fourth time. ab r hbi ab r hbi l a nd,15; Rey es,Toronto,15. T.cruzc 3 1 0 1 Ottavinp 0 0 0 0 E llsurycf 5 1 2 1 Linddh 3 1 1 0 Thursday'sGames Venal e rf 4 0 0 2 Blancocf 4 1 1 0 ERA —Tanaka, NewYork, 2.11; FHernandez, SeYMolinph-c 1 0 1 0 Stubbsph 1 1 1 1 Teixeir1b 5 0 0 0 Encrnc1b 3 2 2 0 AtlantaatHouston,11:10 a.m. Ecarerss 5 0 1 0 Pencerf 4 0 0 0 Atlanta Houston attle, 2.24; Buehrle,Toronto, 2.52; Darvish, Texas, SMillerp 0 0 0 0 Hwknsp 0 0 0 0 ASorinrf 4 0 1 0 CIRsmscf 4 0 1 2 Miami atPhiladelphia,4:05 p.m. S .Smi t hlf 4 0 2 0 Poseyc 4 0 1 1 ab r hbi ab r hbi 2 .62; K a zmir,Oakland,2.66;Jchavez,Oakland,2.71; Grenwdp 1 0 0 0 Barnesrf 5 0 0 0 Beltrandh 4 0 0 0 DNavrrc 4 1 3 3 N.Y.Metsat Pittsburgh,4:05p.m. Headly3b 4 1 1 0 Sandovl3b 4 1 1 0 Buptoncf 4 1 1 1 Fowlercf 4 0 0 0 KeuchelHouston,2,78r , Manessp 0 0 0 0 LeMahi2b 4 1 3 0 Mccnnc 4 1 2 0 JFrncs3b 2 0 0 0 WashingtonatChicagoCubs, 5:05 p.m. Grandlc 4 1 1 0 Morse1b 4 0 1 0 LaSte02b 4 0 0 0 Altuye2b 5 0 2 0 STRIKEO UTS—Price, TampaBay,133; FHernanRoinsnph 1 0 0 0 JDLRsp 2 0 0 0 BRorts2b 4 1 2 2 StTllsnph-3b 1 0 0 0 Coloradoat Milwaukee,5:10p.m. G oeert1b 2 2 1 0 Colvinlf 4 0 0 1 R.Pena2b 0 0 0 0 Springrrf 5 1 1 1 dez, Seattle,128;Tanaka, NewYork, 119; Scherzer, SFrmnp 0 0 0 0 Culersnph-3b2 0 0 0 S olarte3b 4 0 1 0 Pillarrf 3000 St. LouisatLA.Dodgers,7:10 p.m. Medicaph-1b1 1 1 1 BCrwfrss 3 0 1 0 FFrmn1b 3 0 0 0 Singltn1b 4 0 0 0 Detroit, 119; Darvish, Texas,118; Kluber, Cleveland, Goseph-rf 1 0 0 0 J ayph 1 0 0 0 Cincinnatiat SanFrancisco, 7:15p.m. Maybincf 4 2 2 1 Panik2b 2 0 0 0 Gatti sdh 4 0 0 0 MDmn3b 3 0 0 0 114; Lester,Boston,109. M ottep 0 0 0 0 Kawsk2b 3 1 1 0 Amarst2b 4 0 3 3 THudsnp 2 0 0 0 Heywrdrf 4 1 1 0 MGnzlzpr-3b 0 0 0 0 SAVES — Holland,KansasCity,22;Rodney,SeChoatep 0 0 0 0 Totals 3 9 6 114 Totals 3 3 7 105 Boyerp 0 0 0 0 Aff eldtp 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 1 Jcastroc 4 1 2 0 attle, 21;Perkins, Minnesota, 19;DavRobertson,New N ew York 000 0 0 1 500 — 6 Totals 3 6 5 115 Totals 4 0 101710 Hahnp 3 0 0 0 B.Hicksph 1 0 0 0 J.uptonlf History CJhnsn3b 4 0 2 1 Carterdh 3 0 2 0 Y ork,17; Nat han,Detroit,15; Soria,Texas,15; Uehara, S t. Louis 001 3 1 0 000 — 5 ATorrsp 0 0 0 0 J.Lopezp 0 0 0 0 Toronto 000 330 001 — 7 THIS DATE IN BASEBALL ASmnsss 3 0 1 0 Presleypr-dh 0 0 0 0 Boston,15. Colorado 300 3 0 0 2 2x — 10 T hayer p 0 0 0 0 Petitp No outswhenwinning runscored. 0 0 0 0 Lairdc 3 0 0 0 Grssmnlf 4 0 0 0 NATIONAL LEAGUE E—J.DeLaRosa(2). DP—Colorado1. LOB—St. E—Solarte(7), Reyes2(9), Me.cabrera(1). DP 1934 —PitcherJohnBroacatied a major league 1000 V igarss 3 0 1 1 BATTING —Tulowitzki, Colorado,.354; Lucroy, York1, Toronto1. LOB—NewYork7,Toronto 7. Louis 7, Colorado13. 28—Holliday (20), Rosario Petersn2b record by striking out five consecutivetimesbut New Totals 36 7 127 Totals 3 2 2 5 2 Totals 3 3 3 6 3 Totals 3 5 2 8 2 Milwaukee, .330; MaA d am s, St. Louis, .326; AMc2B — Gardner (9), Mccann(8), B.Roberts (10), Reyes (13), LeMahieu (8). HR—Jh.Peralta (11), Morneau an Diego 0 0 1 0 2 3 010 — 7 Atlanta pitchedtheYankeesto an11-2 victory overtheChica- (15). HR 011 100 000 — 3 Cutchen,Pittsburgh, .316;Puig, LosAngeles, .311; (13), Stubbs (5). SB—Blackmon (15), LeMahieu (7). S — J eter ( 2), B .R obe rt s (3), D. N av arro (4). SSan Francisco 000 011 000 — 2 go WhiteSox.LouGehrig hadbetterluckat theplate, Me.cabrera. Houston 1 00 100 000 — 2 LaRoche, Washington, .311; McG ehee, Miami, .308; CS — Dickerson(3). S—S.Miller. SF—M.carpenter. hitting forthecycle. E—R.Pena (4). DP—Atlanta 1. LOB—Atlanta 4, Stanton,Miami,.308;Goldschmidt, Arizona,.308. IP H R E R BBSO E—Panik 2(2). DP—SanFrancisco3. LOB—San IP H R E R BBSO 1961 —BaltimoreandCalifornia useda major New York D iego 6, San Fr a nci s co 4. 28 — A m arista (6), Pose y RBI — St a n ton, Mi a mi , 58; Morneau, Colorado, Houston10. 28 — C .John son (1 5). 3B — H ey w ar d (2). St. Louis —Medica(4). SF—Venable. HR — B.upton (7), J.upton (15), Springer(14). SBleaguerecord 16 pitchers,eight by eachside, as Phelps 57; Goldschmidt,Arizona, 52; Howard, Philadelphia, S.Miller 22-3 6 3 3 5 2 (9). HR 5 8 6 6 1 7 theOriol esedged theAngels9-8on Ron Hansen's Thornton IP H R E R BBSO Altuve(27),Presley(3). 50; AdGo nzalez, LosAngeles,47;AMccutchen, Pitts3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 GreenwoodL,1-1 1 2-3 5 3 14th-inninghomer. IP H R E R BBSO burgh ,47;McGehee,Miami,47. Maness 12-3 0 0 0 0 2 San Diego 2 1 0 0 2 2 Hahn W, 3 -1 6 4 2 2 1 8 1968 —BobbyBonds, in his first majorleague Betances Atlanta HOME RUNS—Stanton, Miami, 20; Tulowitzki, an 1 3 2 2 0 0 arrenL,1-4 0 1 1 0 0 0 S.Freem 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 HarangW,6-6 6 game,hit agrandslamoffJohnPurdin to help San W 6 2 2 2 5 Colorado,18;Frazier,Cincinnati, 17;Rizzo,Chicago, Motte 2-3 3 2 2 0 1 A.Torres Toronto Thayer 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Francisco to a9-0winoverLosAngeles. VarvaroH,7 1 1 0 0 1 2 17; Gattis,Atlanta,16;Goldschmidt, Arizona,15; JUp1-3 0 0 0 0 0 e 62-3 8 4 4 0 3 Choate 1999 — JoseJimenez, arookieright-hander hav- Buehrl Boyer 2 0 0 0 0 1 J.Walden H,6 1 1 0 0 1 2 ton, Atlanta,15. cGowan BS,1-2 0 2 2 0 1 0 Colorado ing oneof theworst seasonsof anyNL pitcher,threw M San Franci s co ERA —Cueto, Cincinnati, 1.86; Wainwright, St. K imbrel S,22-26 1 0 0 0 0 1 RosaW,7-6 7 9 5 4 0 3 THudsonL,7-4 5 2 -3 9 11-3 0 0 0 0 0 J.De La 6 4 2 4 Houston St. Louis'first no-hitterin16seasons,outdueling Ran- Loup Louis, 2.08;Beckett,LosAngeles, 2.28; HAlvarez, B rothers H,10 2 3 1 0 0 1 1 Janssen W ,2-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Affeldt 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 dy Johnsonina1-0 victoryoverArizona. FeldmanL,3-5 6 4 3 3 1 5 Miami,2.39;Teheran,Atlanta, 2.41;Samardzija, ChiOttavinoH,12 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 pitchedto 4batters inthe 7th. 1 1 1 1 0 1 2002 —LuisPujols' Detroit Tigerstookthe field McGowan Zeid 1 2 0 0 0 0 cago,2.53;Hudson,SanFrancisco, 2.62. Hawkins 1 0 0 0 0 0 J.Lopez pitchedto 2 batters inthe9th. againstTonyPena's Kansas City Royals. Pujols and Warren Petit 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1-3 00 0 0 1 Sipp STRIKEOUT S—Strasburg, Washington, 121; HBP —byS.Freeman(Blackmon). —byPhelps(Kawasaki). HBP —byT.Hudson(Goebbert). 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Cueto, Cincinnati, 119;Bum Penabecame the first Dom inican-born managers to HBP Qualls garner, SanFrancisco, T—3:55.A—34,554 (50,480). T — 3: 0 5. A — 34,206 (49, 2 82). T — 2: 5 6. A — 41,546 ( 41, 9 15). opposeeachother inamajorleaguegame. T—3:06.A—18,912(42,060). 111; Kenne dy, SanDiego,103. Detroit Kansas City Cleveland Minnesota Chicago

W L 41 32 40 37 37 39 36 39 36 42

Pct GB .562 .519 3 .487 5'/z .480 6

Detroit

I,

NBAdraft Continued from C1 Eight Canadians could be drafted Thursday, a stunning development for ahockey-crazed country from which only eight players have been selected after Steve Nash was taken in the first round in 1996.

CanadiansintheNBA Only six Canadian-born players are in the NBA. That number could more than double if as many aseight Canadians are selected in Thursday's draft. Player Team G Pts Reb Tristan Thompson CLE 82 11.7 9.2 Kelly Olynyk BOS 70 8.7 5.2 Andrew Nicholson ORL 76 6.8 3.4 Anthony Bennett CLE 52 4.2 3.0

Wiggins (Kansas), Stauskas (Michigan) and Tyler Ennis (Syracuse) are expected to go in the first Steve Nash* L AL 1 5 6 . 8 1 . 9 round. Dwight Powell (Stanford), C ory Joseph SA 68 5. 0 1 . 6 Khem Birch (UNLV), Melvin Ejim Joel~on y ~ OS~ ~ .~ 2 (Iowa State), Jordan Bachynski (Arizona State) and Sim Bhullar (New * Nash was born in South Africa but grew up in Canada Mexico State) also are possible se-

kind of drought likely will not hap- versity of North Carolina was rookie pen again because a strong system of the year in 1999 and led the Rapis finally in place to develop talent. tors to three straight playoff appearMore Canadian teams than ever are

ances. Nash, who was born in South

playing AAU ball, and prospects Africa but grew up in Canada, took are finding homes at major U.S. the mantle from there, earning MVP colleges. honors in2005 and 2006 with the "We're entering a cycle that's not

Phoenix Suns.

going to stop," Rautins said. "BeThe national program took adfore, there were reasons for the ups vantage of the budding interest and and reasons for the downs. But now,

bolstered its efforts. Bennett and

six of the eight Canadian players who are on the NBA's radar. Wiggins, Ennis, Powell and Ejim are from Toronto, Stauskas is from nearby Mis-

sissauga, and Bhullar is from neighboring North York. "There's a big-time basketball culture there that's been there for a very long time," Rana said. "There's so many kids playing the game and so many quality programs there now

there's only reason to continue to go Wiggins have been part of Canada that I think we're equal to or compabasketball's Targeted Athlete Strate- rable to any major city in the U.S. I UP. Many point to the Toronto Raptors gy, which started in 2009. Canada's think we're still kind of flying under joining the NBA in 1995 as the turn-

Junior Academy, unveiled in 2013,

ing point. Their presence created a helps seventh- and eighth-graders generation of Canadians that grew develop. The national program holds lections. The class gives Canada as- to be the best in the world." up with the NBA. camps to identify top prospects, then "It definitely had an effect on me," puts them in more specific training. pirations of becoming a world power Canada has not had more than "They're expanding and wanting in the sport. two players drafted in any of the Stauskas said. "I went to five or six "Our young basketball players previous 20 years, and from 2001 games a year and I watched every to make things better and better," no longer see themselves as sec- to 2010, not a single Canadian was one I could on TV. It had a lot to do NBA scouting director Ryan Blake ond-class citizens i n b a sketball," selected. Leo Rautins, Canada's for- with my love for the game." said. "When you have a federation Rana said. "They see themselves as mer national coach who was picked The Raptors got their first super- and people with passion about it, it equal to, if not better than, many of by the Philadelphia 76ers in the first star — Vince Carter — in 1998. The resonates with the people around it." high-flying sensation from the Unithe best in the world, and they aspire round of the 1983 draft, said that The GreaterToronto Area boasts

the radar, but after this draft, I think

that's going to change." Only six Canadian-born players are currently in the NBA — Bennett,

Kelly Olynyk, Tristan Thompson, Andrew Nicholson, Cory Joseph and JoelAnthony. None ofthem averaged

more than 12 points per game last season. The incoming class has several players with the potential to do much more.


C4

TH E BULLETIN0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

WORLD mp

A rigged

Stoppage time Continued from C1

result? It's

In what surely seems bizarre to soccer neo-

phytes (not to mention anyone who has ever successfully operated a stopwatch), Howard was offering an actual opinion about when the game — a timed game, it must be repeated — should have ended. (Muddying matters further, United

happened before

States coach Jurgen Klinsmann argued that per-

haps the game should have been abit longer.) That such a debate happens regularly only underscoresthe strangeness ofsoccer's rules.

Soccer's elastic definition of time means that no player on the field, no fan in the stands and no

By Elliott Almond San Jose Mercury News

announcer on television has any earthly idea as

In the 1982 World Cup in

to when the last kick of the ballwill come.

Spain, West Germany and Austria played a game that

"The only thing that matters is the watch on the referee's wrist," said Alexi Lalas, a former

changed the tournament

cer. A professional soccer game is 90 minutes

forever. The countries have been accused of colluding in a final group game so they

long. At the end of each 45-minute half, the referee is allowed to add any number of addition-

both would a dvance to the next round at the ex-

al minutes of play at his own discretion. This is known as "stoppage time" or "added time," and it is meant to make up for time lost during substitutions, assessment and treatment of injured players and time-wasting, as well as "any other cause," according to FIFA's Laws of the Game, the official rule book governing soccer around

pense of Algeria. Spanish newspapers dubbed it "El

defenderforthe U.S."He or she isthe onewho controls your fate." There are some times that are fixed in soc-

Anschluss," a reference to the Nazi's annexation of Austria in 1938. Whether collusion o ccurred o r n ot , F I FA

Ricardo Mazalan/TheAssociatedPress

the world.

Uruguey's Luis Suerez holds his teeth after running into Itely's Giorgio Chiellini's shoulder their match Tuesday.

changed the World Cup

In the game between the U.S. and Portugal, the referee added five minutes of extra time to

Chiellini claimed hewes purposely bit by Suarez, who hastwice before bitten opponents.

format so that final group

the second half. But "five minutes" could have been 5 minutes

and 1second,or5:59.Like a power-mad dictator, the referee can set the limits according to his whim.

It ended up being 5:28. Either way, Portugal scored its fateful goal before the five-minute mark — Silvestre Varela connected at 4:33. But

had thereferee added 4:30 of extra time, the U.S. team could very well have spent Monday

celebrating. With no giant clock ticking off the seconds,

games now are played simultaneously. Thirty-two years later,

ru ua a vances es inan e ee

"El Anschluss" is on the minds of soccer fans as the

United States prepares to play Germany in a Group G finale Thursday in Recife, Brazil, that will help

determine who advances to the round of 16. A draw would clinch first

place for Germany, which

soccer referees typically wait until a tame point

in the action to dedare the game over. Sometimes, though, as in the France-Switzerland match last week, the referee is more abrupt; in

that match, the official ended the game just before France scored what would have been its sixth goal. Lalas, who now works as an analyst for ESPN, says he adores that arrangement, adding: "That's where the beauty lies. It's not black and white." Others would like more clarity. "It seems to me," said Sunil Gulati, the president of U.S. Soc-

cer, "that with a billion-plus people watching a sporting event, we should have a system whereby more than one person knows when the game will end." The debatehas heated up recently because

soccerhas finally embracedtechnology, inuse at the World Cup, that determines whether the ball has crossed the goal line. If it crosses, a vibrating buzzer that the official wears like a watch goes off. The referee's wrist buzzer is an instrument of precision; his reading of his wristwatch is as muddled as a watercolor painting. Foryears,refereesdid noteven haveto reveal how much time they were adding on at the end

of a half. Jeff Agoos, who played on the national team from 1988to 2003,recalled referees simply ignoring questions from players about how much time was remaining. The official just blew his whistle when he decided time was up. Some soccer leagues play by more precise rules. In high school and college soccer in the U.S., a countdown dock — similar to ones used in other sports — is used, with specific rules as to

when time should be stopped. Agoos, who is now the vice president for competition at MLS, said the league was working with the team owners to develop a proposal to FIFA that would allow the league to "give a public view of official match time to our fans."

He added: "We would like to see more ac-

has abettergoal difference, and second for the United

Bulletin wire reports

the only goal of the game. The 1-0 when it took place, he "did see the NATAL, Brazil — T h e m o st victory simultaneously eliminat- bite marks on Chiellini's shoulder." ruthless soccer players often use ed Italy from the tournament and Suarez denied biting him, detheir hands or elbows or knees to made certain that the Suarez inci- spite photographs of Chiellini's rough up opposing players. The dentwould become an unappetiz- shoulder circulating publicly and most reckless — or dirtiesting reference point in the annals of seeming to i n d icate otherwise. "I had contact with his shoulder, might even use their cleats. soccer history. Then there is Luis Suarez. After t h e ma t ch , q u estions nothing more," he said. Suarez, the Uruguayan striker abounded: What was Suarez thinkChiellini said, " Suarez is a who has emerged as one of the best ingP What will happen to him now? sneak, and he gets away with it players in the world over the past And, perhaps most pointedly, after because FIFA wants their stars to year, is a biter. And, it seems, a se- two previous instances like this, how play in the World Cup." rial one. in the world could Suarez do it again? Also on'Ihesday: For the third time in his career, This much is sure: Uruguay Costa Rica 0, England 0: BELO Suarez is facing potential punish- will play a knockout round match HORIZONTE, Brazil — Costa Rica ment for appearing to sink his teeth against Colombia on Saturday, and finished first in a group with three into an opponent. This time, it hap- it is very possible that Suarez will previous champions with a dour, pened on the biggest stage of all, not be involved. A spokesman for scorelessdraw. Costa Rica faces the World Cup, during Uruguay's FIFA said the organization would Greece in the Round of 16. "evaluate the matter" in due course, 1-0 victory over Italy on Tuesday. Greece 2, Ivory Coast 1: FORLate in the second half, Suarez but the panel will rule before Uru- TALEZA, Brazil — Georgios Sabumped into Italy defender Giorgio guay's next game. maras scored an injury-time penChiellini while jockeying for posiItalian coach Cesare Prandelli, alty to send Greece into the second tion in the penalty area and then began his news conference by an- round for the first time. dropped his head into Chiellini's nouncing his resignation after the Colombia 4, Japan 1: CUIABA, shoulder. Chiellini immediately re- team's early exit but quickly pivot- Brazil— James Rodriguez scored coiled as both fell to the ground. ed to condemning Suarez, saying and set up two goals for Jackson Moments lat er,Uruguay scored that while he did not see the bite Martinez.

States. Portugal and Ghana would be eliminated.

In 1982, West Germany and Austria played a day after Algeria and Chile, allowing the teams to know a one-ortw o-goalGerman victory would allow both to

advance. When Germany scored, i n the

10th m i nute t h e

players stopped playing, knocking the ball around for the remaining 80 minutes while furious Algerian fans waved money at the

players. "You're talking about a game that is decades away that is only part of the Ger-

man history and not the United States," Klinsmann SBld.

Germany still is trying to overcome the game in

Spain, said James Montague, author of " T hirty-One Nil: On the Road With Football's Outsiders."

He said the result that day

Altidore tomissGermanygame SAO PAULO — Jozy Altidore will miss the United States' World Cup game against Germany on Thursday because of his strained left hamstring The forward was injured in theAmericans' opening 2-1 win against Ghana on June 16anddidn't play in Sunday's 2-2 draw against Portugal. "Jozy is recovering really well," U.S. coachJurgen Klinsmann said Tuesday. "This gamecomes still too early for him. But we're working on him. We'll get him back in this tournament, as wesaid, so oncethis game hopefully is done successfully, we'll have agood chance to havehim back then in the team." — The Associated Prgss

countability. I believe that transparency in terms

put a stain on Germany's "football character."

Upnext USA vs. Germany When:9 a.m. Thursday

Montague isn't surprised by the talk this week. The

Algerians, he said, haven't forgotten about it. "If it d i d h appen, it would be an apocalyptic, ground-shaking o c c urrence," he said. "Especially

TV:ESPN

On the line:TheUnited States advances with a win or adraw against theGermans.Theyadvancewitha draw betweenGhanaand Portugal, or a loss and atiebreaker win.

if another African team-

Ghana — gets denied be-

of the game dock makes a lot of sense."

cause of it."

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OMAHA, Neb. — Brandon Waddell l i m ited V a nderbilt to five hits in his first nine-in-

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c omplete an d

Game 3 on tonight. Virginia (53-15) forced the

comfortable c ountry club. . .

third game after Vanderbilt

(50-21) rode a nine-run third inning to a 9-8 victory in the opener. Waddell (10-3), who pitched a solid seven innings with no decision against TCU a week ago, was even better against the Commodores. He didn't allow a hit in the fifth through

Ted Kirk/The AssociatedPress

5

baseman DansbySwenson misses the throw in the sixth inning of Game 2 of the College World Series final Tuesday in Omaha, Neb.

three relievers. The Cavaliers turned a 2-1 deficit entering the sixth in-

Towns' third two-out single of

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© www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

BRIEFING Power hills to drop slightly Pacific Power electric bills will fall by10 cents for the average household starting next month. Energy Trust of Oregon carried over$11.6 million in public purpose funds from 2013. It is moneythe utilitycollects from consumers in Oregon to fund low-income weatherization, bill paymentandother programs. "This was dueto a number of factors, including very cost-effective savings secured from large data centers, industrial projects and strategic energy management practices," Sue Fletcher, spokeswoman for Energy Trust of Oregon, wrote in anemail. As a result, the Oregon Public Utility Commission agreedTuesdayto reduce thepublic purpose chargefrom Pacific Power by $1.3million annually. That translates to a slightly smaller bill for Pacific Power's nearly 600,000 Oregonresidential and nonresidential customers. In 2013, thecommission approvedrateincreases for Pacific Power thatadded about$3to the bills paidby residential customers whouse 900 kilowatt hours per month. Thoseincreases took effect this year.

Personal income on the rise Personal income in Oregon increased by1.2 percent in the first quar-

evice sim i les imaere o rimin um s warns o

economiccos

By Don Lee Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — Bil-

lions of dollars of property damage along the Eastern Seaboard. Sharply reduced yields of corn, wheat and soy at Midwestern farms. Rising

sea levels threatening military installations in Southern California.

These and other risks from climate change are spelled out in a new bipartisan report that attempts to tally the potential

l,jlj~41

•'g

®, ®

i

~

toll on the economy and to push what has been a highly politicized issue into corporateboardrooms forserious

I%

The report, titled "Risky

10th in the nation for income gains during the period, the U.S.Bureau of Economic Analysis announced Tuesday. A measure of economic conditions, personal incomeequals the income received by all people in the state from all sources. It generallycomprises three categories: net earnings (moneyearned from work); property income (moneyearned from rent, dividends and interest); and personal current transfer receipts (Social Security, unemployment benefits, retirement, tax credits, health-insurance subsidies and other government payments). All three categories increased in Oregon in the first quarter. Personal income grew in 46 states, and the rate of growth accelerated in 24 of those states, according to the bureau. Washington state had the greatest growth at1.4 percent. Nationally, construction earnings grew about $19.4 billion in the first quarter, more than double the increase in the fourth quarter of 2013, the bureau reported. Construction accounted for a larger contribution to earnings growth than anyother industry in 20 states, including Oregon. Construction earnings in Oregon increasedby 4.95 percent, according to the bureau.

W. Bush; former New York

Mayor Michael Bloomberg; and Thomas Steyer, a hedge fund manager and bigDemocratic donor. The trio commissioned the Rhodium Group,

— From staff reports

services forprojects similar to

The Bulletin

he said, referring to his new

Shurtleff's.

Tired of spendingnearly five minutes to manually

prime the irrigation pump on his Redmond ranch, Dave Shurtleff invented the Primer Assist.

business venture. "I'm not

relyingon employees to make customers happy. I'm able to take this product to somebody

"Lancair is really a manufacturing company that happens to be well-versed in aviation," Akacich said."We wanted to displaysome of our

restaurant and the similarly named pub, both in Red-

and see ajoyin somebody using it." Chris Carpenter, of Oregon Feed and Irrigation in Redmond, said the Primer Assist "is a heck of a way of saving a guy's arm" and an economical solution for farmers who have multiple pumps and pay work-

mond — came up with the

ers to maintain them.

idea in December. He reached out to Bob Wolstenholme,

other ideas where we end up with a number of different

demonstration video to my

innovations that accumulate and add up to a larger manufacturing operation," he said. "We are looking to help bring

The device automates the process, which now takes less than a minute.

Shurtleff — the former owner of the Coyote Ranch

his friend and the owner of

Redmond kit-airplane maker Lancair, tohelp engineerand

"When I'm showing the

customers, whether they're a large farmer or a small farmer, they're very interested in

expertise." Akacich said the scale of the Primer Assist production

is stillundetermined and will depend on demand. "However, we would like to

see these kinds of ideas spawn

it," he said. "Theywant to get

ideas to reality."

this week, he said, he'll start selling 100 units locally to get

in and have one." The cost is $249 per kit,

On average, every manufacturing job leads to the cre-

feedback from users.

according to Irrigation Inno-

ation of two more jobs in the

vation's website, although the

ket locally to see what kind of demand there is."

company off ersapricebreak for purchases of five or more. Shurtleff hopes the Mmer Assist will be the first of a

number of products made After about a decade in the locally to help people simplify restaurant industry, Shurtleff the tedious chores required to sold both restaurants in April irrigate their properties. and started his company IrRandy Akacich, general rigation Innovations a month manager of Lancair, said the later. company wants to provide en"I think it's excitingbecause gineering and manufacturing

serve Bank of New York.

student debt, according to a new government study.

Over a full working career, total earnings of the From 1970 to 2013, the average college graduate average college graduate has topped those of a high

rise by as much as 5.5 feet by the end of the century, which

from rising temperatures, the

and industry sector. By 2050, it

to dictate policy pathways."

warns, Americans could face double or triple the number of extremely hot days (temperatures exceeding 95 degrees) compared with the annual av-

Rather, the group says it wants

the U.S. business community "to play an active role in the public discussion around climate rmtrgatron."

Sourcessay787 still has productionissues By Dominic Gates The Seattle Times

SEATTLE — Last Thursday,

the point where all the fuselage sections and wings are joined to make the complete airframe,

the fuselage sections are held inplace by cradles. After the

community, said Roger Lee, executive director of Econom-

Boeing paid out bigbonuses to its South Carolina workforce for meeting an early May deadline to significantly reduce the amount of unfinished 787 Dreamliner work traveling

ic Development for Central

to Everett, Wash.

Oregon. "It also is abreeding ground

But an unusual production mishapon the787assembly

cradles that heldthe rear fuselage in place on Dreamliner

for innovation and new ideas,"

line in Everett two days earlier

he said. "Whenyou're actually makingthings, there's a discovery process for making otherthings and solving other problems."

revealsacontinued problem with incomplete fuselage sec-

JordanianAirways—nearly 100 improperly installed fasteners dattered to the factory

tions from South Carolina,

floor.

according to employees with knowledge of what happened.

A subsequent inspection found the South Carolina team

— Reporter: 541-617-7818, rrees@bendbuIIetin.com

school graduate by more than $1 million, the study

join is made, the cradles are

lowered and removed. Accordingto employees, when mechanics removed the No. 214 — destined for Royal

And a day after that in-

in Everett had installed hun-

cident, production of the jet

dredsoftem porary fasteners near the join between the aft

chanic on the same 787 assem-

factory by a team from Boeing's plant in South Carolina.

costs and burdensome

to say, that sea levels could

report states that "our goal in this risk assessment is not

By Walter Hamilton

ment despite soaring tuition

before 2050. There is a 1-in100 chance, the study goes on

report is that the risks vary, sometimes widely, by region

to work done inside the Everett

Going to college is still a

likely rise as much as 1.2 feet

Although the report details these and other potential harm

Is college still worth it? Studysaysyes worthwhile financial invest-

ue, the sea level along the coastline of San Diego will

study the economic impact of global warming.

Carolina work, an Everett me-

Los Angeles Times

if current conditions contin-

could imperil major Marine installations and naval bases.

suffered another blow. In an accident unrelated to the South

earned about $64,500 a year versus $41,000 for someone with only a high school diploma, according to the analysis by the Federal Re-

decreases in spring runoffsin the Rockies and California as high temperatures cause evaporation of existing reservoirs. The report also notes that

nonaviation manufacturing

manufacture the device. And

"Not only do we havebuyers lined up, but we have distributors lined up locally," he said. "We're testing the mar-

The Southwest faces some

an economic research firm, to A key conclusion of the

I can control the direction,"

water before the note is paid

on mountains could lead to

Henry Paulson, Treasury secretaryunder PresidentGeorge

By Rachael Rees

commercial properties with 30-yearmortgages inplaces in Virginia, North Carolina, New Jersey, Alabama, Florida and Louisiana and elsewhere could quite literally be under-

United States," comes from a coalition of high-powered business and political figures, including three former Trea-

Business Project co-chairmen

ter, putting the state

"If we stay on our current

climate path, some homes and

of the biggest risks as the climate heats up: Less snow

The money men who backed the project are Risky

pump easier. See one inaction at Hbendbulletin.com/primepump.

conditions.

Business: The Economic Risks of Climate Change to the

sury secretaries.

Andy Tullis/The Bulletin

Seaboard andGulf Coast

could see storm-related property damage jump by as much as $3.5 billion a year by 2030 and possibly more than double that given likely hurricane

off," the report says.

consideration.

Mike Ekstand, left, inspects a new Primer Assist that he built with Curtis Page, background, at Lancair International in Redmond. The Primer Assist is designed to make priming an irrigation

erage in the past 30 years. The study estimates that communities in the Eastern

bly line was seriously injured. The first mishap was traced

This team is in Everett to

fuselage sections without the

collars needed to hold them in place. "If they can't make sure this

is done, what else are they forgetting?" said a frustrated Everett employee.

He said that the error showed a lack of the most

found.

help complete so-called"travbasic knowledge and that this eled work" — work that should work should be routine at this have been done in Boeing's stage in the jet program. North Charleston fuselage-fabThis employee, like others rication plant but wasn't interviewed about the inci-

a wise economic decision for the average person," the

completed before the sections

dents, asked to remain anon-

shipped. During 787 assembly, before

ymous because he isn't authorized to speak publicly.

"Once the full set of costs and benefits is taken into account, investing in a college education still appears to be study concludes.

BEST OF THE

BIZ CALENDAR TODAY • BusinessAfter Hours: Register online; free; 5 p.m. Jones & RothCPAsand Business Advisors, 300 S.W. Columbia St., Ste 201, Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. • For the complete calendar, pick up Sunday'sBulletin or visitbendbullefin.com/bizcal

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter7 FiledJune17 • Roger L. Beach, 25263 Cultus Lane, Bend • John P. Bremmer, 63980 Pioneer Loop, Bend • Jerri L. Starr, 338 S.E. D St., Madras Filed June18

• Sean D. andAndrea M. Merkord, 63290 N.W. Lavacrest St., Bend • Kenneth E. and Jennifer L. Schumacher, 16059 Dick Road, LaPine • Lisa K. Severe, 8211 S.W. TowerRoad, Terrebonne

• Amber M. Rosebrook, P.O. Box4492, Bend • Michelle M. Hall, 61403 Fairfield Drive, Bend • Merike A. King, 1222 N.W. Madras Highway, Prineville • David A. Harnden, P.O. Box151, Prineville

Filed June19 • Joseph L. and Mary K. Steeves, 203 S.EganAve., Burns • Steven A. Brant, 834 N.W. Eighth St., Redmond • Barbara J. Smith, 61240 King Solomon Lane,Bend Filed June20

• Justin G. andJami Perkey,1810 N.E Neff Road, Bend • Daniel W. andLeslie J. Graff, 60234 Pawnee Lane, Bend • Rocky W. and Tina M. Wright, P.O.Box2158, LaPine

• Ashley M. Hayes, 1657 N.E. Lotus Drive, No.1, Bend • Terry L. and Carol L. Guiiiory, 7915 W.U.S. Highway126, No. 3, Redmond • Brett D. Burnham, 60817 Granite Drive, Bend

Filed June23 • Chas M. Fletcher, 17035 West Drive, La Pine • Ciinton L. Swearingen, 10781 S.W.Shad Road, Terrebonne • Arron R. and Merisa G. Post, 6624 S.E CedarSt., Prineville


IN THE BACK ADVICE Ee ENTERTAINMENT W Reader photo, D2 Outdoors Calendar, D4 Fishing Report, D5 THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

O< www.bendbulletin.com/outdoors

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

WATER REPORT

A tiring traversing of Mount St. Helens

For water conditions at local lakes and rivers, seeB6

BRIEFING s4rt

Bird experts at local state parks There are several ways to learn about our feathered friends this weekend at local state parks. Staff from the Sunriver Nature Center will be at Smith Rock State Park on Saturday to discuss birds of prey. The live birds of prey program will take place from 10 a.m. to noon at the park near Terrebonne. Admission is free (visitors must pay parking). Meet at the park visitors center. At The Cove Palisades State Park near Culver, volunteers from the East Cascades Audubon Society will mediate several bird-related events Saturday. From 10 to 11 a.m., a society member will lead a bird walk, identifying birds along the way. Meet at the Crooked River Amphitheater.

Sarah Grothjan The (Longview, Wash.) Daily News

"Is there an easier way to get down?" Two women

packed into puffy coats

.„z~r,>~

."' p;i''jj"h~w '

vocalized the question we

were allthinking. It was nearing 3 p.m., and the two female dimbers (who had their sights optimistically set on the summit) were still

„'P'

far from reaching the crater rim of Mount St. Helens.

Gettingup should have been their first thought. It was my first time

climbing the mountain, and I was well into my descent

from the summit alongside my hiking cohorts — a

t.

couple of coworkers and the

two volunteer guides who led our climb — when the women stopped to question

Photos by Mark Mortcat/The Bulletin

our guides. We werebusy dragging our tired, shaky limbs downhill, focusing on the freshly etched glissade paths as the silver lining to the long hike toward the tree line. The two women

r

At 7 p.m. at the

park's Deschutes Amphitheater, society members will lead a talk about what birds can be seen in the park. There will be games and fun for everyone, the park promises.

THAT' EA Y

N THE EYE

and the skies were mostly

dear, offering abreathtakingpanorama of the Three

— From staff reports

TRAIL UPDATE With ChrisSnbo The snowline has moved up to the 5,700-foot mark due to warmer temperatures. Popular wilderness trails above 6,000 feet will still

have some patchy to sectional snow and blowdown. These trails include Green Lakes, Broken Top, South Sister, Wickiup, Mirror Lake, Mount Jefferson, Canyon Creek Meadows and Tam McArthur Rim. Users are advised to avoid these trails still

under snow. High use adversely impacts trail tread and can cause damage. McKenzie Pass (state Highway 242) is open, but wilderness access along the road will be limited due

to snow coverage. Road 370 to Broken Top Trailhead will be closed until late July. Paulina Peak Road is still closed due to snow in the upper regions, and it could be another few weeks until it opens. Mrazek Trail is open and functional, with a quarter-mile marked re-route through Forest Service road 4609. North and South Fork trails have moderate snow and light blowdown. Flagline Trail is closed until Aug. 15. Wanoga Mountai n Bike Trails is snowfree, and bikers are advised of the Pickett's Charge race, which will occur on the trail Saturday. Phil's Trail area is becoming dusty but is being maintained by volunteer crews. Todd Lake and Tumalo Falls trails are still blocked by snow. Swampy Lake has patchy snow and moderate blowdown. SeeTrails /D2

were poised against a couple oflarge boulders, attemptingto gauge whether they should keep going or begintheir descent. It was a sunny June day,

Sisters, Mount Hood and

• This scenic8-mile stretch of singletrack in Wanogacomplex isone of a few designated as anOregon ScenicTrail

ing how far you can see," Howes says.

which cuts through the Cen-

The Dinah-Moe-Humm and Kiwa Butte section is the

of the Pacific Crest Trail — as an O r egon Scenic Trail.

only Oregon Scenic Trail purpose-built for

Bui l t from 2007 to 2011 by COTA vol-

Editorsnote: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin sports and outdoors writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Outdoors on alternating Wednesdays through the ridingseason.

mountain bik-

As if Central Oregon

tral Oregon high country east

.

unteers, the

ers, accordingto W Se e video coverage K iwa B utte and Howes. Oregon ~ o n The Bulletin's website: Dinah-Moe has eight other bemibulletin.com/scenictroil Hummtrails state scenic are fruits of the trails, six of which are located on or near the Oregon Coast.

a m b i tious efforts by the trail all i a nce and the U.S. Forest

Another is located in Central Oregon: the Willow Creek

S e r vice to design and constru c t the Wanoga network,

track, now one of its paths has

Trail near Madras.

which includes more than 30

been officially designated an Oregon Scenic Trail. The 8 miles of singletrack

"It's a pretty unique award from the state," Howes says.

The Oregon Equestrian miles of singletrack south of Trails club hasproposedthe Century Drive. Metolius-Windigo TrailSeeWenogn/D3

that includes the Dinah-MoeHumm and Kiwa Butte trails southwest of Bend in the Wan-

designated scenic trails must

needed another reason for mountain bikers to flock to its

hundreds of miles of single-

oga network was approved this month as a state scenic trail by the Oregon Recreation

Trails Advisory Council and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission.

MARK

MORICAL

According to the OPRC, be single routes of at least I mile in length that provide access to outstanding scenic areas or viewpoints. The trails

must be open to the public and be substantially complete. The Kiwa Butte Trail fea-

Kent Howes, a former board member with the Central Oregon Trail Alliance (COTA), wrote the designation

tures incredible views of Bro-

proposal for the section of trail, which was completed in

trail offers sprawling views of

2011 and includes numerous views of snow-covered Cas-

cade peaks.

ken Top, Tam McArthur Rim

and the Three Sisters. A section of the Dinah-Moe-Humm Mount Bachelor, Kwohl Butte, Tumalo Mountain, Diamond Peak and Maiden Peak.

"On aclearday,it'sam az-

Dinah-Noe-Humm andKiwa Butte trails Directions:From Bend,drive 15 miles southwest along Century Drive to WanogaSno-park. Start out on the Tiddlywinks Trail, which connects to the KiwaButte Trail after about 3 miles (right turn onto singletrack). TheKiwa Butte Trail connects to DinahMoe-Humm at afour-way intersection after another 3 miles (another right turn onto singletrack). Dinah-Moe-Humm runs for 5 miles to Edison Butte Sno-park. Bikers canalso start their ride at Edison. Distance:Kiwa Butte Trail is about 3 miles and Dinah-Moe-Humm is about 5 miles. Features:Outstanding Cascade peakviews, varied terrain, technical trail features andpassing lanes. Rating:Aerobically moderate and technically moderate.

Mount Jefferson mingling among white wispy clouds. One of the guides suggested the womenhike another 40 minutes to a stopping point near a GPS recording stationlandmarkbefore turningback, reminding them they'd have to retrace

whatever distance they climbedupon their descent. My thoughts were very much in the same vein as the female hikers. Early in the hike, I naively inquired how close we were to the summit within the

first couple of hours of the climb. Not close, I was told. "Everyone is looking for an easier wayup and an easier way down — of which there is neither," offered Sharon Steriti, a dimbing

ranger for the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. Her wisdom

— garnered fromher more than 17years working as a ranger — rang true during those last 1,000feet, during which I dug my already fatigued feetinto piles of ash, marching upward even as the loose pebbles below my boots scrambled downward. SeeClimbing/D2

FISHING

R ing and castingdownthe Upper Klamath When I started fly-fishing, I took a lot of guys with me. We were all 12 and 13 and lived then on the banks of the

Columbia River. We'd fish the mouths of tributary streams for trout and panfish, then

prospect up the little creeks for wild rainbows. We heard of people getting in on big dry fly hatches, but we mostly drifted nymphs or floated attractor dries.

No one used a strike indicator in those days. We highsticked or watched the end of

the fly line. One of thoseboys I used to fish with was Mike Tom and

now he has a couple ofhis own. We met up at the lodge at the

Running Y Ranch the night before our float down the river. Early in the morning, Mike and Jordan, 15, and my friend

tion, a stretch of stream with

~ <5

long rapids, short holes and lots

GARY

of whitewater, but no dass 4s.

LE WIS

Here the river winds through a steep gorge, just 6 miles from the California border.

Richard Ross waded in while I made the shuttle with our

With its flow managed for power generation, the river

guides from Roe Outfitters, Brandon Worthington and

is held back overnight, then

more spill is allowed when people wake up and turn the lights and air conditioning on. Unlike the Keno Reach

Tony Beals. When we returned, Mike, Jordan and Rich were an-

kle-deep, and Jordan had a

rainbows upstream, these trout are oriented to look up.

rainbow on the line and in the air.

Gary Lewis/For The Bulletin

In May and June, before the

One of my favorite rods is a Cabela's LSi, a six-weight rigged with a floating line and

Anglers drift through a small chute on the Upper Klamath River.

a WLX reel. When we headed to fish the Upper Klamath River last week, I put the LSi in the raft. It's a decent

a tandem nymph rig. I set

erman might call it a bobber,

monflies. In July and October,

the rod up that way and put

but fly-fishermen call it an in-

a Thingamabobber, which is a loop-on-the-line strike

dicator. They come in various colors. I'm partial to red.

there are a lot of hoppers on the banks, and enough get

rod for casting a dry, but is a great choice when running

indicator that looks a lot like a

sun hits the water, they sip

mayflies and midges and smash golden stones and sal-

bubble in the water. Spin-fish-

We fished 3-miles-of the

Klamath's wild and scenic sec-

blown onto the river that the fish watch for them.

See Upper Klamnth /D5


D2

TH E BULLETIN• WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

I ' I • We want to see your photos for the next special theme ofWell shot! — "psyched about summer" — to run in theOutdoors section. Submit your best work atbendbulletin.com/summer2014 and we'll pick the best for publication.

• Email other good photos of the great outdoors torenderpbotosO bendbulletin.comandtell us a bit aboutwhereandwhenyoutookthem. All entries will appear online, andwe'll choose the best for publication in print.

I II ' '

Teen with cerebralpalsy making 250-milebiketrip

I I

• Submissionronluirementa Includeasmuch detail aspossible—whenandwhereyoutook it, andanytechniqueused—aswell asyour name,hometown andphonenumber .Photos must behighresolution (atleast6incheswide and 300dpil andcannot bealtered.

The Associated Press

buy gear.

KALA M A Z O O, Mich.— A teenager with a form of ce-

"This is wonderful," said Gary B r a ndt, h i s f a t h er.

from the Van Buren County

has been held each summer

rebral palsy plans to make a "This is great, because other 250-mile round-trip bike ride kids can do stuff and he can't across western Michigan this a lot of times. This gives him week after getting the gift of that ability." a new set of wheels. Chris has been spending Chris Brandt, 14, outgrew the past few weeks practicing a modified tricycle that he four times a week for the trip, used more than a decade ago, which calls for about 50 to the Kalamazoo Gazette re60 miles a day. The 250-mile ports. On Tuesday, the teen ride, dubbed "The Bike Trip,"

village of Lawton plans to for 30 years, said Jeff Merasride with a group of kids and co, co-director of the trip. adults from his church. The group wil l d epart "I feel a lot more confident from Southridge Reformed than the days before because Church and head out to the I thought I wasn't going to be G rand Rapids area for t h e able to ride a bike, but I can night before taking off to now," Chris said. Muskegon State Park, taknI'm excited, but a little bit ing a day off to visit Michianxious." gan's Adventure. From there, Watermark for Kids, an they'll travel from Muskegon

,

ee

organization that helps un-

to Holland, from Holland to

der-served children, awarded Chris a specially designed $1,055 bike that he can pedal that attaches to a regular or tandem bike. It also covered the $180 price of the trip and threw in $200 in gift cards to

South Haven and then finally arrive back at the church

Sunday. "To have Chris involved is just a wonderful opportunity for the students and the other

adults," Merasco said.

Trails

Find It All Online

Continued from D1 Metolius-Windigo is mostly snow-free with sections of snow on the trail from Happy Valley to Sparks Lake. Horse Butte, Black Butte, Peterson Ridge and Suttle Lake trails are in good condition. Trail users are advised to be prepared with maps and compasses and not to rely solely on electronics. Wilderness rangers will be on the trails asking user for wilderness permits, which can be obtained at wilderness trailheads for free.

MAJESTIC VIEW FROM SOUTH SISTERS Ryan Carrasco documents lan Yurdin making ground on the last summit through the Sisters Traverse.

bendbulletin.com

Plars Well, Retire Well

2 locations in Bend

Climbing

2160NE StudioRd,Suite10

AT HOME

2863Nor thwest CrossingDr,suite tto

In

Continued from D1

The climb

NWX

During the climb toward

775SW onneWay,Snite120•Ben 541-720 -0321ewww.eteuationcapitatstrategies.com

541-389-9252

• • Th eBulletin

the summit, we took our first break on Monitor Ridge, the main rocky trail that extends up part of the mountain. We

sylvan©bendbroadband.com

S MOL ICH

sat beside large boulders to block the wind, which blows stronger the higher you climb. I watched hikers as I gulped water and rested my legs. It was our first break since leav-

Main Center

Food, Home & Garden

R YU< NDA'Ii Sarah Grothjan/Tha (Longvtew, Wash.) Daily News

ing the tree line, and it left our A lone hiker climbing the Monitor Ridge route up the south side of group somewhat refreshed, Mount St. Helelns as clouds close in around the crater rim.

• aa

still optimistic about climbing

this "big hill." Our final break before the

mostly used to brake at the freezer for my fingers than as end of each glissade. a layer of warmth. "Is there an easier way to er, was not so welcome. The One of my hiking partners momentary rest gave my mus- decided to wear shoes that'd get down?" cles time to tighten, making be better suited for a basketNo. No there isn't. it difficult to journey on. My ball court than a snowy, rocky, once-hopeful questions adopt- ashy landscape. But as we Additional information ed a less confident tone. Do were all first-time climbers, • The M o unt S t. H e lens you think we'll make it to the these were merely l essons "North Climb" route under desummit by 1 p.m.? How is our learned and egos humbled velopment will be open only to pace? by the somewhat unforgiving those who pay $300 for a guidOther times, such as when landscape of this "big hill." ed tour again this summer. we climbed the so-called "verThe Forest Service has tical beach," I kept my ques- The descent scouted a route that leads to tions to myself with my eyes Thighs on fire, we eventu- a point at 5,225-feet elevation fixed on my boots, thinking ally reached the summit after outside the north end of the about this story and my op- six hours of climbing. We took crater. It's accessible by climbtions for artfully telling read- in views of Mount Rainier in ing for 1 mile from the Loowit ers I hadn't reached the sum- the distance and Spirit Lake Trail, near Loowit Falls.

Z30Q-Klil

final push to the top, howev-

mit. I couldn't think of any-

in the foreground. We retired

thing, so I kept going.

our backpacks to the icy snow and enjoyed the silence at the

Steriti advised early in the

• The Forest Service is do-

ing an environmental analysis before opening the route, summit. Clouds moved in and which will likely require a out, obscuring our view before permit like climbing the south quickly reintroducing it. flank of M ount St. Helens. "We are putting a heavier foAfter taking some time to enjoy the summit, we final- cus on finding volunteers to ly began our descent, which be mountain stewards on the

climb to avoid short sprints followed by long rests. Instead, she suggested following each step forward with a quick rest. This technique alone got me through the final push, which was made more difficult by Steriti noted can sometimes be the fact that, as a first-timer, I more difficult than the climb, couldn't properly gauge how especially if glissading isn't an close I was to the summit, option. Luckily for us, it was which was made invisible by an option.

) LeaSeFOr

i

~

were countless times I couldn't

• The Mount St. Helens In-

seem to get my footing just right, leading to quite a few falls in the beginning.

stitute is offering guided daylong trips of the North Climb, which includes camping out the night before along a road

and enough water and snacks

of the descent, we took full advantage of the many glissade paths that were already carvedin the snow from previous hikers, making sure to avoid those too near the rocks. With the tree line finally

of elevation gain. Climbs are available July 25-26, Aug. 8-9 and Aug. 29-30. Or, for $600, peoplecan take a guided hike that actually goes into the cra-

to keep me nourished on the

in sight, I thought about the

ter on Aug. 15-17 or Sept. 5-7.

round-trip climb. What I wish

question those women asked midway through our descent. By this point, my gaiters were falling off, my legs were aching at the joints and my damp gloves were serving more as a

• To register for either hikes, see mshinstitute.org., or for in-

off Road 99. It's a 10-mile round-trip hike with 1,800-feet

formation on climbing Mount

St. Helens, which requires a permit, see http://mshinstitute. org/index.php/climbing/index.

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The first few steps of the descent were on icy terrain. The

When we left the icier part

)4

ment specialist for the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic

it an easy climb. Sun-burnt skin, fatigued limbs, shoulders bruised from backpack straps and rough hands from gripping rocks are all marks of the climb. I came prepared with a w a terproof jacket, gaiters to keep snow from dampening my socks, layers (probably several too many)

I had: trekking poles, which would have provided more balance while ascending. I borrowed a single trekking pole for the descent, which I

2014 HYUNDAtEIOIIarn5E

mano, community engage-

While true, that doesn't make

e

I

"NOPUIKHASENKCESSARY

Crater View route," Lisa Ro-

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the clouds.

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • T HE BULLETIN D 3

Grass-skier wants to cultivate his sport

s

By Mark Freeman The (Southern Oregon) Mail Tribune

ASHLAND

-

Brian

McKay deftly slices his way through the slalom gates, planting his poles to carve his downhill turns until one of his skis catches an edge and he spiral soffcourse. Instead of a face full of snow, the 54-year-old Medf ord man gets a l i t tle d i r t

on his face and a raspberry on his left leg just below his shorts.

"It's just like sliding into home plate," McKay says. "No big deal." That's the crash landing McKay occasionally gets while grass skiing, one of the world's nichiest of niche

r

s ports — and one t hat h e wants to i n troduce to ot h-

, sr • Z4

er Southern Oregon extreme-sports

ent h u siasts.

l He's offering a crash course for anyone who wants to join him on a grassy hangliders' Jamie Luech /The Mail Tribune hill above Emigrant Lake Brian McKay grass-skis down a slalom course that he set up at Emigrant Lake near Ashland. McKay east of Ashland. hopes to introduce grass-skiing to other Southern Oregon extreme-sports enthusiasts.

Anyone interested in this

extremesportofapastgeneration can test-drive it by bor- the mix o f e x citement and rowing one of his two extra risk was worth trying. sets of grass skis — short runThey convinced McKay, ners with wheeled, well-oiled, who had snow-skied only tanklike treads strapped to once in his life, to join them. standard downhill ski boots They rented grass skis at a — and give it a shot. S anta Cruz surf shop a nd E ven better would b e a started careening down whatfew landowners around the ever hills they could get on. Rogue Valley willing to let Later that year, McKay was McKay bomb down their big part of a small contingent hills once they stop laugh- of grass skiers who traveled ing at the concept. He can be to San Diego for a race. He reached at 541-531-9157. placed second, and a passion "I haven't even come across was born. anybody who even knows In 1983, he traveled to Auswhat it is," says McKay, a 25- tralia as part of the U.S. Grass year grass-skiing veteran SkiingTeam, which opened who has a few ski-bum film the door to what little fame credits to his name. "But I this odd corner of the skiing think there are more people genre could bring. "We were in a Japanese out there now willing to try it, once they've heard about it. potato chip commercial we "I want some ski buddies. never saw," McKay says. "And And a hilL" there was 'Ski Country.' " "Ski Country," a Warren Grass skiers trace their r oots to Germany in t h e M iller documentary, is t h e 1960s, when downhill snow- skier's version of surfing's ski racersdevised these ter- "Endless Summer." restrial contraptions for sumIn it, McKay and his friends mer training regimens. It was ski long h i lls, slaloming introduced to sporting crowds through trees and catching in Europe, then emigrated to air on jumps during a segthe eastern United States and ment that still gets some oninto the San Francisco Bay line love as a YouTube classic Area in the late 1970s. clip. That's where some friends "I like to say I was extreme in 1979 stumbled upon a when they spelled it with an grass-ski race and thought E," McKay says.

But a subsequent segment painted and flagged.

Mark Morical /The Bulletin

on the television show "That's Snow skiers typically have Incredible" al l b u t s e a led a slightly tougher time pick-

grass skiing's future, McKay says. The segment showed wild and apparently painful crashes, relegating legit grass gliders into the freak-show corner of skiing. "After that, people said, 'You grass skiers are nuts,'

The Dinah-Moe-Humm Trail has a few technical rocky sections like this one but is mostly smooth, flowing singletrack.

ing up grass skiing because there is no gliding or sliding

Wanoga

over dirt. The skis have t o c a r ve, but they leave no trace in the

"

grass and dirt.

Continued from D1 I have ridden the Kiwa

Catch an edge and there's little time for recovery.

B utte a nd Di na h - Mo e d o w n T y l e r's, w h ic h i n Humm trails several times, c l u ded more banked turns,

"There's a little bit of risk in

he says. McKay ended up marrying

end of D i nah-Moe-Humm

— named for a Frank Zap- Tyler's, I t u rned around pa song — which starts a n d was pleased to find

until he moved to Medford

at Edison Sno-park a fe w miles southeast of M ount

And there's no snow-plow-

two years ago to help care for his ailing mother. And he brought his skis, purchased three decades ago for about $120 a pair.

ing on dirt, either. "The only thing you can't control is your speed," McKay says. "You just go faster and

McKay has spent time driv-

or reachterminal speed." In order to grow beyond the what-the-hell-is-that-guy-doing stage, the sport needs an actual ski park, McKay says.

faster until you run out of hill

ing around the region looking for the best grass-skiing hills he can find. The paraglide launch on the western bank of Emigrant Lake is the best public-access slope he has found. He walks the hill first, putting little flags over squirrel holes. He can ski over them fine, but the dirt clogs the gears he laboriously oils before his day's runs. McKay also sets up his sla-

Bachelor. After about a 20-minute drive to Edison this month,

and then a bit of a climb . The trail transformed from

As I asc e nded B o w l Butte, the trees gave way

to ferry them uphill between

til I

let him know when he was

gaining or losing altitude. He sometimes climbed several

Although he'd been paragliding for 11 years, setting a recordhad never been in Ma tt Senior's flight plan. But May 31, using sophis-

thousand feet in a swoop. Once

ticated w e ather

beeps meant the search was on

d a t abases

of thermal activity and wind direction. The clouds were aligning in virtually the same pattern as they had Aug. 6, 2013, when Canadian

Alex

he dropped as low as 1,000 feet abovetheground. Accelerating beeps were music to his ears. Decelerating

Ra y m o nt

launched fromthe Chelan area and set the Washington freeflight distance record of 155

miles. "I hadn't realized going that far from Chelan was even pos-

sible until he set that record," said Senior, 37. "I fly for fun; but when I saw the exact same

forecast, I thought I'd give the record a go." His educated hunch w as

right: seven hours,47 m inutes after taking off from the popular launch site on Chelan Butte,

Senior landed near Deary, Idaho.

of Mount Bachelor, Kwohl Butte and, farther i n t h e distance to the southwest, Diamond Peak. I then de-

through the dust of the Columbia Basin, he saw very few birds May 31. The timing and

ing the restricted airspace of

same time golden eagles might

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they eachplayed on different He landed on a farm east of instincts. They soon drifted Deary and reunited with his out of sight, communicating by wife, Heather St. Clair, who'd radio with each other and the endured 12 hours in the car

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Fairchil d Air Force Base and launch to hunt for the same Spokane airports. reason. Morgan Hollingsworth, a Seven hours later, as he skilled flyer who launched came within 5 miles of the rewith Senior, lost his lift and cord distance, the sun was getlanded after flying 127 milesting lower toward the horizon while Senior stayed aloft. and not generating as much "We crossed over the Co- heat. "I didn't really know if lumbia River together but went I could stay up at that point, to different thermals on the but then I c a ught a nother flats," Senior said, noting that

As I

more thick forest and green arate paths to offer passing grass,Ilaunchedoffseveral r outes, the new trails are small jumps, built natural- no t only scenic, but also ly into the flow of the trail. r ace-friendly. I eventually arrived at a — Reporter: 541-383-0318, primary junction, where mmorical@bendbuIIetin.com

th e f l ats a n d

He logged 180 miles on his GPS unit in a journey fraught with logistics and luck. Raymont had paved the way by proving that a rare wind pattern could allow a paraglider to hop the thermals of the Columbia Basin while avoid-

s e t for this Sunday. A new co u r s e fo r t h e 2 014 race i n c l udes the K i w a B u t te, Di n a h -Moe-Humm and Ty-

scended Bowl Butte along l er's Traversetrails. s everal fast and fun banked Fe a turing several " Y " corners. sections where the single-

for another column of rising air. Senior flies a high-performance paraglider with 24 meters of fabric and a higher glide ratio than standard models. "For every mile above ground Thinketcck With proper wind patterns and weather conditions, paragliders can I can glide about 10 miles," he span distances that once were believed impossible. said. "An intermediate glider might go 8 miles. The beginner models have more passenger "chasers" in vehicles below. that day delivering him to the safety where I have to be flying "I could see it was a special launch and following his flight my glider all the time." day; 50 to 60 percent of the with a satellite tracking device Senior said the best part sky was perfect cumulus," Se- as she navigated the roads. about his record flight is the "The technology has made confidence it gave him. nior said. "We fly under those "Where I landed, I know it's clouds. That's where the lift is." it a lot easier," Senior said. A Like ocean fishermen who variometer constantly mon- possible to go maybe 30, 40 spot swarming sea birds that itored lift, sink and ground miles farther," he said. "Maybe signal good fishing, free-flight speed as Senior analyzed I'll have another go at it when pilots also keep an eye out for wind speed and yo-yoed from I see the right weather — or birds. one thermal to the next. Beeps maybe somebody else will." "We absolutely look for eagles, turkey vultures and redtailed hawks," he said. "If the birds are soaring in the sky, that's probably rising air." B ut over

r e ached the summit. tr a i n in g f o r t h e P i ckett's

From there, I took in views Charge! mountainbike race

actually bamboo sticks he's ing on snow."

The (S poheane,Wash.) S pohesman-Review

On the f a st, winding des c e nt, I e n countered only

to open space, and I twist- a few other bikers, one of ed around a few turns un- w hom mentioned he was

wants to walk up the hill, and it hurts to fall. It's not like fall-

lom course — his "gates" are

T r a i l network north of Cent u r y D r i ve, and the forest

a sandy track to a pine-nee- has a different feel — more dle-coveredpaththrougha lodgepole pine and dead dense lodgepole pine forest. trees.

the ventures failed in part because skiersneed a chairlift runs. And it would help if the ground got a little softer. "You need a major investment," McKay says. "Nobody

th a t m uch of the way back to w a r d Edison was downhill. I had not realized how m u c h I had climbed on the w a y out.

I hopped on my bike and Tra i l s i n t h e W anoga started out over a couple of complex seem to offer more technical, rocky portions, open spaces than the Phil's

He's tried it a few times, but

ByRich Landers

noticed a r ar e c ombination

A f ter a b out 2 m i les on

the world championships and thing you master the first lived in his adopted country time out."

Para i in recor ta entonew ei ts compiled by the University of Washington and paragliding websites, the Seattle pilot

I de s cended for a while

but until recently I had nev- jumps and rock features, er experienced the west a nd views of Paulina Peak.

it," McKay says. "That's what makes it fun. It's not some-

an Australian he met during

D inah-Moe-Humm, K i w a Butte and Tyler's Traverse trails all intersect.

Qjg ~Nature ~Shop N tu Sh

I

Forum Center Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend BIRD FOOD FEEDERS GARDEN ACCENTS UNIQUE GIFTS


D4

TH E BULLETIN0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

UTDOORS

END

Email events at least 10 days before publication to communitylifeibendbulletin.com, or click on "Submit an Event" at www.bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

CYCLIMG

SKY WATCH

TRINITY TRIXIES MTBWOMEN'S RIDE:Thursday, June 26, from 5:30 to 7 p.m.; meet at Trinity Bikes in Redmond, 865 S.W. 17th St.; 10- to 15-mile ride at

Maston area;achanceforwomen riders to meet new people, stay

inshapeandenjoycycling;www. trinitybikes.com; 541-923-5650. 2014 DIRTDIVAS WOMEN'S MOUNTAIN BIKERIDES: Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; July 14, 28; Aug. 11, 25; Sept. 8, 22; meet at Pine Mountain Sports in Bend for a women's-only group mountain bike ride where you'll divide into groups based on riding levels and pedal to the trails from the shop; free; www.pinemountainsports. com. GROUP MOUNTAINBIKE RIDE: W ednesdays at5:30 p.m .;July 2, 16; Aug 6,20; Sept. 3,17; meetat Pine Mountain Sports in Bend for a mountain bike ride for men and women of all abilities; divide into groups based on riding levels and pedal to the trails from the shop; free; www.pinemountainsports.com. 15TH ANNUAL FIRECRACKER RIDE:Friday, July 4, hosted by the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation; supported metric century (65 miles) bike ride to Prineville on a counter-clockwise route that starts and ends at Brasada Ranch Resort's Equestrian Center; begins at 8 a.m. and is $20 per person by July 3 and $25 on ride day; www.mbsef.org, molly© mbsef.org, or 541-388-0002. DIRT DIVASBIKE PARK GROUP CLINIC:Monday, June 30, at 6 p.m.; Evening skills clinic with local rider and coach Lindsey Voreis; clinics are held at the new bike park at Seventh Mountain Resort; RSVP

required;12 people persession; call 541-385-8080 to register. TOUR DES CHUTES:Cancersurvivors benefit bike ride and run; Saturday, July12, 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.; this nonprofit event benefits Central Oregon children and adult cancer survivors; register online at Tourdeschutes.org. BICYCLE REPAIR CLINIC: Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. at Bend's Pine Mountain Sports; July15, Aug. 5, Sept. 2; this beginners' clinic is taught in the workshop after hours and will cover the

Locating the SummerTriangle in the eastern sky The Summer Triangle — a shape made up of bright stars Vega, Deneband Altair — is easily found in Bend's night sky. Tonight, it is in the east about 40 degrees from the horizon. As the summer progresses, it will climb higher and higher, maintaining its position within the surrounding field of stars, and by late September the Triangle will appear in the west. Draw an imaginary line from Vega to Deneb to Altair and back to Vega and you havecreated the Triangle. Apparent brightness is the luminance of objects as seen from Earth. The smaller the number, the brighter the object. Deneb produces 70,000 times the luminosity of our star, the sun. Still, Deneb does not appear spectacularly bright because Deneb is more than 3,000 light years away, much farther than either basics including flat tire repairs, caring for your chain, and basic maintenance; RSVP required; 10 people per session; free; call 541385-8080 to register.

CYCLING SUMMER MOUNTAINBIKING PROGRAM:The Mt.Bachelor Sports Education Foundation will hold the sessions for two weeks each in July and August; call 541388-0002, email mbsef©mbsef. org, or visit www.mbsef.org.

FISHIMG

Vega

Deneb

Altair Star brightnessat10:Se p.m. tnntght Times brighter Lightyear Star name Constellation Brightness than the Sun distance Vega Lyra 0.00 52 25.3

Deneb Altair

Cygn us Aquila

1.25 0.75

Source:www.stellarium.om

www.cobc.us. DESCHUTESCHAPTER OFTROUT UNLIMITED:For members to meet and greet and discuss what the chapter is up to; 6 p.m.; meets on the first Monday of each month; Oregon Natural Desert Association

3,230 16.7 2

Greo Cross /The Bulletin

offices, Bend; 541-306-4509, communications©deschutestu. org, www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB:A group of fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; 6-8 p.m.; club meets on the fourth Wednesdayofeach month; location TBA; 541-306-4509 or

bendcastingclub©gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB:7 p.m.; meets on the third Thursday of each month; Sunriver Homeowners Aquatic & Recreation Center; www.

sunriveranglers.org.

CENTRAL OREGONBASSCLUB: New members welcome; 7-9 p.m.; meets on the first Tuesday of each month; Abby's Pizza, Redmond;

7 0,00 0 10

THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: 7 p.m .;meets on the third Wednesday of each month; Bend Senior Center; www. coflyfishers.org.

HIKING DESCHUTES LANDTRUST WALKS+ HIKES:Led by skilled volunteer naturalists, these

outings explore new hiking trails, observe migrating songbirds and take in spring wildflowers; all walks and hikes are free; registration available at www. deschuteslandtrust.org/events.

HUMTING LEARN THEART OFTRACKING ANIMALS:Guided walks and workshops with a certified professional tracker to learn how to identify and interpret tracks, signs and scat of the animals in Central Oregon; 8 a.m. to noon; two or more walks per month; $35; 541-633-7045; dave©wildernesstracking.com, wildernesstracking.com. THE BENDCHAPTEROFTHE OREGON HUNTERSASSOCIATION: 7 p.m.;meetsthesecond W ednesday ofeach month;King Buffet, Bend;ohabend.webs.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGONHUNTERS ASSOCIATION:7 p.m.; meets

Vega or Altair. Each light year is an astounding distance of 5.9 trillion miles. In astronomical parlance, an asterism is a grouping of stars that form a recognizable pattern in the night sky. Stars in constellations and asterisms are most often not related to each other physically, there being vast distances between them. They are simply visible in roughly the samedirection. Asteri sms may becomposed of just part of a constellation. The Big Dipper, for example, is part of Ursa Major, the Great Bear. Alternatively, an asterism can be made up of portions of two or more constellations, as is the Summer Triangle (Altair, Deneb and Vega are the brightest stars in the constellations Aquila, Cygnus and Lyra). Traveling a short distance from Bend to less light-polluted

venues, Pine Mountain Observatory forinstance, an observer will be treated to the Triangle's magnificent surroundings. Moving forward from star Deneb, discover the Northern Cross, another asterism. Looking a bit farther out you will behold the entire constellation of Cygnus, the Swan, with outstretched wings beyond both sides of the cross. It is said that Cygnus flies amid the beautiful Milky Way, an ethereal band of pale light splashed across the entire sky. A truly inspiring sight, you are now looking through the disk of our own home galaxy.

the first Tuesday of each month; Prineville Fire Hall; 541-447-5029. THE REDMONDCHAPTER OF THEOREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION:7 p.m.; meets the third Tuesday of each month; Redmond VFW Hall.

hand to assist children; rifles, ammo, ear and eye protection are provided; parent or guardian must sign in for each child; fee for each child is $10;10a.m.; third Saturday of each month; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range, milepost 24, U.S. Highway 20, Bend; Don Thomas, 541-389-8284. PINE MOUNTAINPOSSE: Cowboy action shooting club; second Sunday of each month; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range, milepost 24, U.S. Highway 20, east of Bend; 541-318-8199, www. pinemountainposse. com.

MISCELLAMEOUS METOLIUS-WINDIGO TRAIL DESIGNATION ASAN OREGON SCENIC TRAIL:Wednesday, July 16, from 6 to 7:30 p.m.; at Ray's Food Place in Sisters; Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is considering designating the MetoliusWindigo Trail as an Oregon Scenic Trail; public is welcome to come express support or opposition for this designation; 541-410-4552; centraloregon© oregonequestriantrails.org.

SHOOTIMG

7wo

came to me and said, 'Joe! Spokane M o untain- Joe! My food'sall gone!' as I

eers have lofty senior status had all of my food neatly orfor their role in taking a cou- ganized infront of me." ple of upstart climbers under Kopczynski repo r tedly their wings 50 years ago and said, "What should I do, Joe?" launching them toward the as helooked longingly at Collins's food,each m ealforeach top of the world. Bill Fix, 88, and Joe Col- day wrapped and labeled. uI put each package in my lins, 89, were among the club members who pi o n eered stuff sack, pulled the drawclimbs throughout the region string tight, put it in my pack anywhere within striking dis- and said, 'Next time you will tance. They would take epic remember.Let's goclimbing.'" three-day trips with barely Kopczynski le arned h i s enough time to return home lessons well. His long list of Mondayin time for work. In 1965, a teenage gradu-

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j tfaitity Ie always the benrr rttdue.

r ' <'~"'"ME r '

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in 1974 to become the first

American team to climb the North Face of the Eiger; becoming the ninth American

to climb Mount Everest and completing the Seven Summits, the highest peak on each continent,by 1994.

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t h c Best!'

'm"jims0 trl&tlttl D'ferlrnm Of rttefTrliPINQ

See us for retractable awnings, exterior solar screens, shade structures sun when you eantir, worth of food the first day," climbing a c complishments Collins recalled Sunday. uHe include joining Ro skelley shade ehen you needit.

Spoteesman-Review

www.hrp-sass.com.

COSSA KIDS:Coaches are on

.

The (Spoteane,Wash.)

HORSE RIDGEPISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns; 10 a.m.; first and third Sunday of each month; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range, milepost 24, U.S. Highway 20, east of Bend; 541-408-7027 or

Nraber...Sim~

Entertolnment

ByRich Landers

— Kent Fairfieldis a volunteer with Pine Mountain Observatory and a lifelong amateur astronomer. Hecan be reached at kent.fairfield@gmaif. com.Other PMO volunteers also contributed to this article.

CI

O >N DEMA N D

541-389-9983 www.shadeondemand.com

eedAfar ketRood 541-988-Q7ZZ;".:.„:„„", , 541 382-6447 j 2090 NE Wyatt Court j Suite 101 Bend OR 97701jbendurology.com

n-Sut 9:30-MO

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A Free Public Service

ate of the venerable Spokane Mountaineers M ount a i n

School was assigned during the Mountaineers Summer

Outing torope up with Fix for the rock-climbing portion of their ascent of Mount Moran

in Grand Teton National Park. Fix filed the trip report in

the club's journal: "A special commendation is due to John Roskelley for hishelp in route finding and leading to the summit.... At 16, he has tobe dubbed 'most promising new climber.'"

Roskelley later rose to the top of the world's best mourt-

Over 80 Oregon Newspapers, from 36 Counties

taineers — a career honored this spring in Italy — as hebecame the first American and

sixth recipient of the Golden Ice Axe award (Les Piolets D'or). Although Fix had an eye for Roskelley'sclimbing prowess, perhaps nobody could have foreseen that he would one day be onthe same mountaineering li fetime achievement list as Walter Bonatti, Rein-

hold Messner, Doug Scott, R obert Paragot a n d

Kurt

Diemberger. Also in 1965,Collins chauffeured Roskelley and another

16-year-old Mountain School graduate, Chris Kopczynski, for a club climb of 9,131-foot

Mount Shuksan in the North Cascades.

"Chris ate all three days'

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

D5

FIsHING REPoRT Here is the weekly fishing report for Central Oregon, provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

of redband trout and whitefish. There were excellent numbers of 12- to14-inch trout with several

ANTELOPEFLAT RESERVOIR: Fishing has been fair due to the turbid water. The water level has remained consistent, about a foot below the paved portion of the

reminded that trout over 20 inches are considered steelhead and must be released unharmed.

over18 inchescaught. Anglers are

become more difficult as summer progresses. Bass fishing has been excellent. PINE HOLLOWRESERVOIR: The reservoir is warming and has been stocked.

PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR:Fishing has been slow for trout, but the fish that have been caught have been ramp. large. Bass and crappie fishing BEND PINE NURSERYPOND: should be excellent this year. Current regulations allow for a PRINEVILLE YOUTHFISHING limit of two fish per day, 8-inch POND:Rainbow trout were have an adi p ose-fin clip. minimum length for trout. recently stocked in the pond. FALL RIVER:River stocked last BIG LAVALAKE: Anglers report Anglers are reminded that fishing week with rainbow trout. Restricted fair fishing with some catches of is limited to those17 years old and to fly fishing with barbless hooks. decent-size rainbow trout. younger. There is a two-fish bag HAYSTACKRESERVOIR: Fishing CLEAR LAKE:Clear Lake has been limit. stocked and should be a great place has been good for trout. Fishing for the warmwater species should SHEVLINYOUTH FISHING POND: to catch recently stocked legals, be good. Two trout per day, 8-inch minimum trophies and holdovers. length. Fishing restricted to HOSMER LAKE: Angers report fair CRANE PRAIRIERESERVOIR: anglers17 years old and younger. fishing. Anglers report fair fishing with LAKE BILLYCHINOOK: Fishing has SOUTH TWINLAKE:Fishing has reports of large rainbowbeing been good for kokanee, bull trout been fair with decent-size rainbow caught. Closed from one hour trout being caught. and smallmouth bass. after sunset until one hour before sunrise. LAKE SIMTUSTUS:Fishing for THREE CREEKSLAKE: Lake rainbow trout has been good. stocked with rainbow trout this CRESCENTLAKE:Anglers report week. fair fishing. NORTH TWIN:Lake stocked last week with rainbow trout. WALTON LAKE:Fishing has been CROOKED RIVERBELOW BOWMAN DAM:Recent sampling excellent. The lake will be stocked OCHOCORESERVOIR: Trout showedabundant populations fishing has been fair but will this week.

FLY-TYING CORNER

CULTUS LAKE:Lake was stocked last week with rainbow trout. EAST LAKE:Anglers report fair fishing with some large rainbow being caught. Catch-and-release for all rainbow trout that DO NOT

cam er-ins ire

Ryan Brennecke/The Bulletin

Black Para Ant, Courtesy Fly & Field Outfitters

Look close at thewater, even if the fish aren't rising. If there areants on the surface, the trout are going to notice, andwhenthey start to sip, it couldbebecausetheyarekeyingonants.W hen that happens, the action can gotill dark. When the wind blows trout, look to the sky for unlucky terrestrials. Ants and termites come ina variety of colors and sizes. It helps to have a selec-

tion to choose from whenthefish are coming to the surface. Sometimes adrowned ant will spark more strikes than adry. Tie the Black Flying Ant with black thread ona No. 14-18 dry fly hook. Build the body with black dubbing. Tie awing of white poly hair and finish with a small dry-fly hackle behind the head. — Gary Lewis, for TheBulletin

an erous ie or eer

By Pete Zimowsky

Well, these deer have been conditioned with

The IdahoStatesman

human food for years. Instead of migrating to the high country for natural food, they migrate to campgrounds. It's turning into a learned behavior passed on to generations.

ELGIN — Four deer sud-

denly appeared out of the thick evergreens bordering the campground and moseyed along the campground road. It was fun watching them

browse, prance and play at the edge of the campsites at

grandpa, but well-intentioned Seasoned r i ver r u n n ers campers who feed deer don't know it's wrong to feed wildrealize how dangerous it can life. They also keep extremebe if the animal is startled ly clean camps that don't tend and starts kicking. to lure them in. Campground snacks with OK, grandpa's word to all of their partially hydro- the wise: Deer eat nutritious genated vegetable oil, high plants and leaves and twigs fructose corn syrup, polysor- of woody shrubs to survive. You've got to think that cupbate 60and other man-made ingredients can't be good cake-eating deer just don't for an animal whose diges- seem like a good part of the tion i s a t t uned t o n a t ural whole evolutionary process. vegetation. Young deer that are used to Visit Central Oregon's getting handouts don't learn to fend for themselves. They

Minam State Park between

La Grande and Enterprise. We were setting up camp the day before launching on the Grande Ronde River.

While the four critters entertained us, what we didn't

see was another deer making a slow end-around and sneaking behind us. The deer slipped past and walked up to

• e"

hhl

h I

our picnic table. In a second,

it grabbed a bag of pita bread and started running toward the woods. Pita bread? How the heck

are also lured to heavy traffic

did a wild critter like a deer d evelop a taste for stuff i n

plastic bags? Well,these deer have been conditioned with human food

for years. Instead of migrating to the high country for natural food, they migrate to campgrounds. It's turning into a learned behavior passed on to generations.

One member of our party started yelling and chasing the pocket-bread thief. Heck,

the pita bread was key to some of the meals on our river trip.

The deer dropped it just before going into the timber. It didn't end there. Each

of the deer would dart toward the table looking for any morsel they could find.

Thinkstock

While it's fun to see deer prancing through your campground, giving food to these animals can be a danger to them and yourself. With a reliance on food from campgrounds, deer have often been unable to fend for themselves.

I were in Tony's boat. In the other boat, with Mike and Jordan, From Tony, I borrowed a

3-weight rigged with a golden stone dry fly. Down toward the tailout in the first drift, I floated on the surface. When next we

saw it, the fly was stuck firmly

COVERINGS 1465 SW Knoll Ave., Bend www.classic-coverings.com ••

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rg< A

Gary Lewis/ For The Bulletin

Guide Tony Beals nets an UpperKlamath rainbow for Richard Ross of Bend.

boat, hooked the next one. These are well-fed wild fish, lightly spotted, like most of the aboat. "Ummm. Tony..." Klamath-strain trout. In this In a few seconds, the rod was

e

flows out of Oregon into California. It is accessible, well-suit-

in the pool below the rapids, ed to older kids like us and our behind us by about 50 yards, new-to-fly-fishing offspring, but catching up. Then the riv- and not so big a person can't er heaved it out and sucked it figure it out. down. Soon all that was above the water was the red plastic

And the trout are eager to

take a fly on the surface, at

Thingamabobber just below least until the sun hits the wathe surface. The fly line was ter. Then you want to tie on a seen a raft flip on this river, so visible a couple of feet down. If two-nymph rig and put on a when our raft began to drag on Ihad used acorkieorapieceof strike indicator. I recommend a some rocks, I watched with not yarn, or even the clear or white red Thingamabobber. a little interest as Tony worked indicator, we probably never — Gary Lewis is the host of us through the end of the rapid. wouldhave seenthat rod again. Frontier Unlimited and author of "John Nosler — Going Ballistic," Then I looked down and saw To me, the Upper Klamath is one of the great rivers of

left it moments before. I looked Oregon though oft-ignored back and there it was, coming because it derives east of the down the whitewater without Cascades and away from the

4

state's population centers, then

fishbeginto feed subsurface. We fished and drifted. I've

my rod was not where I had

s~a C~SSIp

Bod

the fly down a foam line and watched it disappear in a swirl

the sun hits the water and the

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Continued from D1 We coaxed our rafts over the rocks and jumped in. Ross and

section of the river, they run 10 to 18 inches, smaller than in

tors like cougars. Fawns that

get used to the easy life at campground are not as wary They were like yellow jack- coolers, just like bears. I've hind legs in our direction. of their surroundings and beets buzzing around a piece of read where deer have also T hat was a c lear sign t h e come easier prey. watermelon. learned how to roll watermel- deer meant business. Any Deer habituated to campI've dealt wit h b e ars, ons off picnic tables to smash approach closer and sharp grounds tend to cause more s kunks a n d r a c coons a t them on the ground and en- hooves would be flying in all conflicts with family pets. campsites, but not marauding joy the sweet contents. directions. If deer are getting handDon't get me wrong, it's fun deer that were aggressive. An adult deer snorted at outs, you can bet bears and Eastern Oregon is known to watch wildlife, and it's neat us as we shooed a young one other less camp-friendly anifor its tame deer in camp- to get such great photo op- away. mals will figure out there's an grounds. The campground at portunities of critters coming As we enjoyed the evening easy food source. I t's ironic that w hen w e Wallowa Lake has deer that through camp. in camp, we watched the often mingle with campers. But deer can be more dan- band of calculating deer visit j umped into th e r a ft s a n d Photos of little kids feeding gerous than you think. As each campsite as new, unsus- headed downstream 15 miles, snacks to deer are common. we shooed one deer away, pecting campers arrived. we didn't see deer frequentDeer have learned to open it stopped and turned its Not to be the old, grumpy ing any of the river campsites.

Upper Klamath

in a 14-inch Klamath rainbow. Richard, in the front of the

areas, where they can be hit by a car. Campgrounds where deer congregate to get camping food also can lure in preda-

HunterDouilas

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D6

TH E BULLETIN0 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014

ADVICE EeENTERTAINMENT

ans oc tosee' awn tars' now-it-a TV SPOTLIGHT

P AW N

SH

By John M. Glionna Los Angeles Times

L AS

V EGAS -

g ray-bearded man i n

The

the

red shirt and wide-brimmed A mish hat w ades into t h e

crowd outside the Gold 8 Silver Pawn Shop, squinting into the noon-hour light. Suddenly, the fans are upon him. They know their quarry on a first-name basis. "Hi, Mark," a woman calls out. "Can we get a shot with

you? My boyfriend's daughter, she just loves you." Another stranger touches

John M. Glionna / Los Angeles Times

Mark Hall-Patton, center, poses for photos with fans outside the pawn shop featured on television's "Pawn Stars" in Lss Vegss.

his shoulder. "Mark, we're huge fans," says a goateed man, adding breezily, "We just got married most popular programs. Now last night." dubbed into 32 languages, the " Well, after 3 5 y e ars, I series has brought Hall-Patton heartily recommend it," says international fame. Mark Hall-Patton, who had

run an errand at the shop. For 10 minutes,cameras whir in the parking lot on Las Vegas Boulevard; people whisper in English, Spanish and Italian, their gaze shining as brightly upon the 59-yearold museum administrator as opening-night klieg lights. They all want a moment with one of America's unlike-

On camera, Hall-Patton is the learned authenticator in

ters — Richard "The Old Man"

ton has appeared in one-third

Harrison, son Rick, grandson He's praised by fans as an aes- Corey and goofy pal Austin "Chumlee" Russell — guard thetic purist who refuses to discuss an item's rank value, their privacy against their choosing to concentrate on its crush of followers: They rarespecific provenance and place ly appear in the pawnshop's in history. public area, conducting busiAlthough he realizes "Pawn ness and taping the show in Stars" is e ntertainment, he the back. says his reputation is at stake As an educator, Hall-Patton with every on-air proclama- sees the spotlight as helping tion. "I do my darnedest to be bring his heightened appreciaas accurate as possible, be- tion of historical artifacts into cause I'm representingmyself," millions of American homes he says. "Whether I'm trying to each week. He's director of the l itdetermine whether something of the series' 300 or so shows.

t le-known

is real or not, or whether it was used this way or that, it's im-

C l ar k

Cou n t y

Museum, where despite no advertising budget, annual at-

portant to be right." Among his fans, the muse- tendance has soared nearly 70 ologist is best known for the percent since 2012 — last year ry books spread around his agrarian hats he began wear- it reached 42,000. It is mostly house. Through his work at ing two decades ago — Amish because of Hall-Patton that various U.S. museums, he's originals purchased from the visitors drive to the city's far explored N ative A m e rican Pennsylvania hill c ountry. southern reaches, as he says, c ollections and i t ems t h at Then there's the flowing beard "far away from the white noise spanthenation's238-year his- that ripples and jiggles as he of the Strip."

oversize square glasses who tory. He also has studied U.S. can tell the guy from Tusca- utopias and fraternal societies, loosa, Ala., whether that Civil guns, printing, postcards and War musket his grandmother bridges. "When it comes to history, kept in the attic since the Great Depression is the real deal or a I'm an omnivore," he says. "I'm knockoff. all over the place." "Mark is the only rock-star Those things he doesn't museum curator I know," says know, he researches.

talks, and that baritone that

He also runs the city history

plumbs deep below his diaphragm to deliver his words. Hall-Patton sightings are a daily occurrence. Fans stop

museumin Searchlight andthe Howard W. Cannon Aviation Museum at McCarran Inter-

national Airport. He's already cultivating the next generation from passing cars. Women of museum-goers, handing want to touch his beard. Chil- children baseball-cardlike medren tug at his coat. He's been mentos with his picture and "Pawn Stars" creator Rick Richard Kunst, a R oman told he's the most popular TV museum contacts. But he can't liest celebrities. Since 2009, Harrison, holding a cigarette Catholicpriest from Minnesota character among the inmates be everywhere. Hall-Patton has played a in his office at the shop. "The with arguably the nation's larg- at a Walla Walla, Wash., prisSo many fans griped when cameo role on "Pawn Stars," guy knows so much stuff; he est collection of papal artifacts, on. Once,a hulking Mongol Hall-Patton w asn't a t t he the History Channel's real- must have a Xerox machine speaks often with Hall-Pat- biker approachedhim in a Clark County Museum that ofity show whose quirky off- inside his eyeballs. I've got a ton. "The fact he seeks me out crowded casino, m a king ficials ordered a life-size cardthe-cuff bargaining scenes nickname for him: the Beard shows he does his homework," Hall-Patton flinch, b efore board likeness of the Beard of between opportunistic sell- of Knowledge." Kunst said. "He wants to get to leaning down to say, "Hey, Knowledge — Amish hat and Hall-Patton is a voracious the source of things." all — that stands beaming in ers and jaded buyers quickman, I like the show." ly made it one of cable TV's reader w it h 2 0 ,000 h i stoOver five years, Hall-PatThe show's main charac- its lobby. him on the street and wave

Womanwantst ena e trut

MOVIE TIMESTODAY

Dear Abby: I met a guy four months ago. Our relationship is new and pretty casual for the most part. We like each other's company and spend nights together, but

that he still has body issues hav- to $1,500. Our finances have iming to do with his extreme weight proved a lot. loss. If you know him well enough There are nights my fiancee to spend nights at his house, you wants me to stay home. She says should be able to communicate if I had a part-time job, she would when we're intimate, with him about sex understand why I couldn't stay he keeps his clothes on a mature level home on the days she asked. But on — boxers and all. and tell him the ex- to me, poker IS a part-time job, DFP,R He is o»y 26, but he perience would be and it pays more than anything has told me about more satisfying for else I could find in this area. I play past r e l ationships, you if there was less the same set schedule every week, so I know he has had between you when so she should know what nights I experience. you are in his arms. need to go in to "work." What do Over the past two years he has Dear Abby: My fiancee and I you say? — AII-inin Virginia lost almost 100 pounds. He looks work full time. We are trying to great now — healthy and toned. save for our wedding and a deposDear All-in:You appear to be a I have seen him get in and out of it for a house. The trouble is, after skillful card player or a very lucky the shower. (I noticed a little ex- paying rent, bills and day-to-day one. Assuming that the games in cess skin on his stomach, but not expenses, we are left with next to which you are participating are much.) It's really weird. I don't nothing. legal, I see nothing wrong with feel comfortable taking my own I played poker when I was in what you're doing. clothes off when he doesn't. college, which generated a nice Because your fiancee feels This isn't exactly a deal breaker income during my late teens and lonely when you're not with her, for me, as I obviously am attract- early 20s. A few months back, I suggest that she do something ed to him. I just would like him to decided to pick it up again and with friends or take up a hobby. be comfortable with me. Should I found a group of people who like After all, you're doing this for the address this with him, and if so, to play. both of you, aren't you? And this how? Or should I just leave it be Since then, I have been playing "part-time job" isn't going to be

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Aggy

— Awkward Situation in Georgia

Dear Awkward: It's apparent

HAPPY BIRTHDAYFOR WEDNESDAY,JUNE25, 2014: This year you mobilize your creativity. You might be considering taking a special trip or simply adding to your life possibilities. You also will gain fi-

nancially, as youarelikely to receive a

promotion and/or a pay raise. If you are single, you could lavish a bit too much attention on someone you care about. Hold back a little Starsshewthe kind to aiiow the other sf day you'll have pa r ty to come ** * * * D ynamic forward. If youare p t attached, the two of you will want to regain some of the romantic fervor of the past. You might try many different ways, but going away together as a couple will help. GEMINI understands you a little too well.

ARIES (March21-April 19) ** * * Unexpected developments could pull you away from a key activity. Communication seems to flourish. If you encounter a difficulty, initiate a conversation with a friend, and he or she will offer feedback. Touch base with a difficult associate. Tonight: Go with the moment.

four hours two or t h ree nights

a week, and it has generated an extra monthly income of $1,000

YOURHOROSCOPE By Jacqueline Bigar

become animated, but not necessarily quarrelsome. Tonight: Be in the moment 100 percent.

forever. — Write toDear Abby at dearabby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA90069

than you realize. Listen to news more openly, and you'llsee how youcan put a positive spin on a difficult situation. A

newbeginning becomes possible,espe-

strikes Sue(EdenSher) asvery real in "The Optimist." She gets herself in immediate gear to try to earn a scholarship, though she has only two years in which to do it. Frankie (Patricia Heaton) realizes she made aprofessional mistake and tries to conceal it. Following some discord, Brick (Atticus Shaffer) holds fast to his requirement for a formal apology from Mike (Neil Flynn). 8 p.m. on 6, "Big Brother" —If Julie Chen is back in prime time, it's a pretty good bet another group of strangers is about to bond with — or scheme against — one another. The unscripted, three-times-weekly series starts Season16 with a new batch of houseguests developing a bunch of first impressions. Chen sets them on the path that will earn one of them $500,000 at the end. She'll also preside over the weekly Thursday airings that see someonevoted outofthehouse. 8 p.m. on 7, "Nature" —It's said that some people have to kiss a lot of frogs. If so, there certainly is a wide variety of the creatures to choose from, as the new episode "Fabulous Frogs" underscores. Sir David Attenborough surveys the differences, from physiology to behavioral traits. One of the variations is the wood frog, which can survive freezing winters — and which is under consideration to become New York's official state amphibian. 8 p.m. on FAM, "YoungIfl Hungry" —A young chef (Emily Os-

ment, "Hannah Montana") lands the job of her dreams as personal cook for a tech tycoon (Jonathan Sadowski, "American Dreams"). But when she's charged with preparing the romantic meal during which he was to propose to his girlfriend, events take an unexpected turn. Rex Lee ("Entourage") and AimeeCarrero ("Blue

Lagoon: The Awakening") also star in this new comedy series. 8:30 p.m. on 29, "The Goldbergs" —Murray (Jeff Garlin) learns much more about Erica (Hayley Orrantia) than he really wanted to know in "Daddy Daughter Day." Her somber behavior is having an effect on the whole family, so he hopes getting direct insight into her activities can help him turn things around

for her. Adam(SeanGiambrone)

is particularly edgy when Beverly (Wendi McLendon-Covey) goes on their annual shopping excursion for his school clothes.

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SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)

I

Burns Lakeview

** * * You might need to have a long-overduediscussion.You seem ** * * Your ability to understand what to see a matter differently from how a is going on with a child or pal might be challenged. It seems as if the other party partner or friend sees it. A conversation will be necessary, even if you see might feel criticized when any question little chance for agreement. Clear the or suggestion is made. You might want air. Tonight: Add a festive element to a to keep your thoughts to yourself. Toget-together. night: Stay close to home.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)

** * * * Y ou might decide to focus on a project and enlist others' support. You could feel a bit odd around an associate or loved one. A real estate matter or domestic issue is likely to present a limitation. Don't feel awkward —just handle the issue. Tonight: Join friends.

** * * Be more direct with someone in your life; otherwise, this person will

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)

** * * Your ability to handle pressure emerges. There might be one area of your life where you overindulge in order to relieve some stress. Take action, and be willing to verbalize what is necessary TAURUS (April 20-May28) ** * * You might be a lot friendlier than to correct the situation. Tonight: Out till the wee hours. usual. Perhaps you have had a sudden insight or a revelation that points you LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) ** * * You might be more forceful than to a new attitude. Don't push someone you realize. Share your bottom line with away, if possible. Respect your differences. Tonight: Your significant other or a friend in order to get some feedback. You have been more volatile lately, and it best friend might be uptight. would be good for you to get advice from GEMINI (May 21-June28) ** * * * Y ou'll come up with many new someone you respect. Tonight: Experiment with a new idea. ideas. You have a unique opportunity to share more of what is important to SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.21) you. A discussion with a loved one could ** * You could be pushing a lot harder

I I

8p.m.on29, "The Middle" — The approaching end ofher high-school years suddenly

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CANCER (June21-July 22)

LEO (July 23-Aug.22)

I

TV TODAY

have nowayof knowingwhereyou are coming from. You will be anchored in a discussion with a family member who likely will agree with you. Tonight: Get some exercise, then decide. ** * * A friend might express his or her caring in a way that inadvertently causes you a problem. Explain where you are

coming from, andremain sensitive to this person's feelings. Someone you look up to could cause a problem; he or she needs your time. Tonight: Ever playful.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March20) ** * * Take news with a grain of salt. One-on-one relating will take you down a new path. A partner could be angry and a bit upset. Give this person some space to

consider his or heroptions. Stay asneutral and unreactive as possible. Tonight: Run an errand on the way home. © King Features Syndicate

I

I

Redmond Cinemas,1535S.W.OdemMedo Road, 541-548-8777 • EDGE OF TOMORROW(PG-13) I:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9: I5 • HOW TOTRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2(PG)1:30,4,6:30,9 • MALEFICENT (PG) 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9 • A MILLIONWAYSTODIEIN THEWEST(R) 2,4:30, 7, 9:30

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O

Find a week'sworth of movie times plus film reviews in Friday's 0 GB! Magazine

45 5 4 1 . 8 4 V . 1 0 8 0

ss

sssns nwqnalltVroofin9.oom mauum


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206

Adopt a rescue cat or French Bulldog pups, Silky Terrier, female, kitten! Altered, vacci- beautiful cream, avail. born 4/24/14. 2 lbs The Bulletin nated, ID chip, tested, now $2000, Pet qual$ 250; m al e b o r n recommends extra ' ity. 541-382-9334 more! CRAFT, 65480 9/1 6/1 3, 6lbs, $150 l caution when pur78th St, Bend, 1-5 PM www.enchantabull.com Jeff 707 - 350-1981 chasing products or • services from out of I Sat/Sun. 389 8420, Christmas Valley. ~ the area. Sending ~ www.craftcats.org. Vari Kennel, medium • cash, checks, or • RANS Wave recum202 Bichon Frise AKC pups, sized, like new, $35. l credit i n f ormation b ent bike. Want to Buy or Rent vet checked, hand raised, Ol d e r 541-382-3076 may be subjected to model, easy to ride. $500+. 503-856-6107 l FRAUD. For more CASH for wood dressWell maintained. InSTUD SERVICEinformation about an g cludes Cateye Velo 7 Boxers AKC & V alleyFrenchton Puppies. 75% ers and wood diYorkie Silky 8 Ibs, advertiser, you may l Bulldogs CKC puppies. f rench bulldog, 2 5 % odometer/speedomnettes. 541-420-5640 $350. 541-416-1615 $ call th e $700-800. 541-325-3376 Boston terrier. Parents Or e gon $ eter, new chain rings, Wanted: $Cash paid for ' State Atto r ney ' new tires with extra on site. B or n 6 / 2 1. Yorkies, small females, vintage costume jew- Corgis, AKC, 1 male, 1 $1350. Put your deposit cute, playful, shots & l General's O f f i ce new seat cushelry. Top dollar paid for female, 1st shots, tails down now. 541-279-3588 docks, parents on site. Consumer Protec- • tube, ion and 2 water bottle Gold/Silver.l buy by the done. $500 not reg'd; $550. 541-536-3108 or tion h o t line a t i holders. Adjustable Estate, Honest Artist $650 reg'd.541 -447-43099 Help needed by local text seat and back. Askto 541-915-5754. i 1-877-877-9392. Elizabeth,541-633-7006 www.mysweetcorgis.com nonprofit rescue! Just ing $375. Call Dachshund AKC mini pup took in 57 cats/kittens USE THE CLASSIFIEDS! > Serving TheBulletin > 541-504-5224 205 Cencref Oregonsince l903 from one place. Need $100 down.541-508-4558 Items for Free go tobendweenies.com 6 foster homes for Door-to-door selling with 245 kittens or cats w/kit212 27" Sanyo TV with retens, for 2 to 6 wks, fast results! It's the easiest Golf Equipment Antiques & mote, w o rk s e xc. we provide food, litter, way in the world to sell. 541-598-5170 Collectibles vet care, etc.; you CHECK YOURAD provide a safe & lovThe Bulletin Classified Free Bachelor Buttons, Antiques wanted: tools, ing temporary home. you dlgf 541-385-5809 furniture, marbles,early www.craftcats.org, 541-548-2879 Dachshund mini choco- 541-815-7278. B/W photography, 210 late dapple male, $375, 206 beer cans, jewelry. avail 6/21. Pics avail. Kittens 1/2 Siamese fems, 541-389-1578 Furniture & Appliances Pets & Supplies 541-41 6-2530 2 tortoiseshell, $10 ea; on the first day it runs The Bulletin reserves to make sure it is corblack free. 541-977-7019 Donate deposit bottles/ the right to publish all A1 Washers&Dryers rect. 5Spellcheckn and The Bulletin recomcans to local all vol., Lab Pups AKC, black & ads from The Bulletin $150 ea. Full warhuman errors do ocmends extra caution non-profit rescue, for yellow, Master Hunter newspaper onto The cur. If this happens to when purc has- feral cat spay/neuter. sired, performance pedi- ranty. Free Del. Also Bulletin Internet webwanted, used W/D's your ad, please coning products or serCans for Cats trailer gree, OFA cert hips & el541-280-7355 site. tact us ASAP so that vices from out of the bows, 541-771-2330 at Jakes Diner, Hwy corrections and any area. Sending cash, 20 E & Bend Petco www.kinnamanretrievers.com The Bulletin adjustments can be Serving Central Oregon sincesgftg checks, or credit inG ENERATE SOM E near Applebee's, doPOODLE,pups, toy. made to your ad. f ormation may be EXCITEMENT in your nate M-F a t S m ith older pup to adopt. 215 541-385-5809 subjected to fraud. neighborhood! Plan a Sign, 1515 NE 2nd; or Schnoodle pups also. The Bulletin Classified For more i nformaCoins & Stamps garage sale and don't CRAFT, Tumalo. Lv. 541-475-3889 tion about an adverforget to advertise in For sale 1 gas golf cart msg. for pick up large tiser, you may call Private collector buying choice of two. For inclassified! amts, 541-389-8420. Queensland Heelers postage st amp al bums & the O regon State 541-385-5809. Standard & Mini, $150 call www.craftcats.org collections, world-wide formation Attorney General's & up. 541-280-1537 541-576-2477 Office C o n sumer English Bulldog 2 yrs www.rightwayranch.wor Kenmore white fridge, 26 and U.S. 573-286-4343 cu ft SxS, immac cond, (local, cell phone). Protection hotline at old, red & white, good 246 dpress.com $500/obo. 541-389-1356 with children, must be 1-877-877-9392. Guns, Hunting 240 only dog i n h ome. & Fishing Crafts & Hobbies The Bulletin $500. 541-382-9334. Twin E rgo-motion ServingCentral Oregon sinceSggg English Springer Spaniel 500 automatic bed Bend local pays CASHu AGATE HUNTERS with memory foam 7-mo.-old pups, lots of puppies. AKC, field for all firearms & Polishers • Saws mattress, like new, champion blood lines, ammo. 541-526-0617 snow white w/black only used for a short liver 8 white, avail. 7/1. SHIH-TZU PUP born highlights, great famCASH!! t ime. $ 75 0 o b o . Repafr& Supplles ily dogs, parents on $800/ea. Beaver Creek 4-23. Female, $500 For Guns, Ammo & 541-383-7603 541-589-1124 site. 3 @$150 each. Kennels. 541-523-7951 Reloading Supplies. armnjamOq.com blossomhutOgmail.com 541-447-1323 541-408-6900.

Estate Sales

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Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend

Estate/Garage Sale Annual Purge! Lots of in La Pine 6/27-28, 8-4. stuff — Furniture, colIt's a Lollapalooza! lectibles, everythinq from Something ofinterest for A-Z! Fri 8-5, Sat 8-1, everyone. To find us, 20913 Spinnaker St. take 6th St. to Dorrance Meadow to Brooks Lane; Dana Kenneth Johnson's follow the signs. lifetime collection of DIECAST CARS. Numbering well in excess of 282 10,000 models, every Sales Northwest Bend scale. Thurs., Fri., Sat., 9-4. 1153 NE HollinsGARAGE SALE head Ct. Everything Sat.6/28,8am-2pm, must go; no reasonable 848 NW f 7th St. offer refused. Other colLots of varietylectable toys and items don't miss it> for sale as well.

IMI'T lSSSTII DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial

advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week3lines 12 or ~2 e e k e 2 5 ! Ad must include price of o t e t e o f 5555 ~ or less, or multiple items whosetotal does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

3-person tent $25 541-647-2314

PATIO SET

255

Glass table with 6

chairs and cushions, umbrella & stand, $200.

Computers T HE B ULLETIN

requires computer adCall 951-454-2561 vertisers with multiple (in Redmond) ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the Swamp cooler, heavy business or the term duty, like new, 3ft. x "dealer" in their ads. 3 ft., p o rtable o r $375. Private party advertis- stationary. ers are defined as 541-382-6773 those who sell one computer. Need to get an ad in ASAP? 260 You can place it Misc. Items online at: Buylnfg Dfamonds www.bendbulletin.com /Gofd for Cosh Saxon's Fine Jewelers 541-385-5809 541-389-6655

BUYING Twin bed, used only Fish Cat 8' pontoon boat, Lionel/American Flyer twice, like new, $100. $250. Caddis float tube, trains, accessories. Room size window air $50. Both excellent! 541-408-2191. conditioner, used 2 mos, 541-280-0570 $125. Smaller doggie BUYING & SE LLING door, $70. 541-848-7165 Glock27.40 cal,3 m ags, All gold jewelry, silver 2 extenders, 50 r d s and gold coins, bars, ammo, DeSantis holster, rounds, wedding sets, BULLETINCLASSIFIEDS $495 541-306-0166 class rings, sterling sil- Search the area's most Private party wants to ver, coin collect, vin- comprehensive listing of buy WWII 1911 pistol, tage watches, dental classified advertising... S&W Victory, M1 car- gold. Bill Fl e ming, real estate to automotive, 541-382-9419. bine. 541-389-9836 merchandise to sporting Ruger Super Blackhawk LG A/C w/remote, $250. goods. Bulletin Classifieds 44 cal magnum, exc cond, GE Window A/C, $85. appear every day in the print or on line. $625. 541-385-6163 F ilter Q ueen D e Call 541-385-5809 Taurus .38 Spec, 2" bbl, fender Air c l eanerwww.bendbuiietin.com Bisley wood grips, 50 rds $50. Hoover W i nd bagl e s s The Bulletin ammo, 2 holsters, $295. T unnel vacuum, $100. 541-306-0166 ServingCentral Ofegonsince f9tg Hoover Wind Tunnel Wanted: Collector seeks with canister, $75. All high quality fishing items like new c ondition.Wanted- paying cash for Hi-fi audio & stu& upscale bamboo fly 541-548-8895 dio equip. Mclntosh, rods. Call 541-678-5753, or 503-351-2746 Marantz, DyLifeSmart quartz infrared JBL, naco, Heathkit, SanWinston F l y rod heater, never used, heats sui, Carver, NAD, etc. to 1000 sq ft, $45. (4-piece) new, $200. up Call 541-261-1808 Call 541-382-3076 541-647-2314

290

Sales Redmond Area

nsf

Huge Indoor Sale, in Trinity Lutheran High School Gym, 2550 NE Butler Market R d .,

3 Generation Yard Sale, ** FREE ** 2 storage units of antique furniture, many are Garage Sale Kit projects. Lots of small Place an ad in The 6/27, 8-4, 6/28, 8-2. collectibles, sewing maBulletin for your gaClothes, fu r n iture,chines, tools. 8am Frirage sale and rehousehold items, ex- Sat, 6/27-28, 2465 SW ceive a Garage Sale ercise equip., sports, Cascade Ave. Kit FREE! tools, children's items, and lots more! Huge Annual Sale! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs Ni-lah-sha Village and Moving Estate/Yard Sale, • $2.00 Off Coupon To Desert Meadows behind Thurs-Sat, 6/26-28, W al-Mart offNegas.Wa y Use Toward Your 9am-4pm. 1153 NE HolNext Ad too much to list! 9-3 Frilinshead Ct. Furniture, day-Saturday, • 10 Tips For "Garage 6/27-6/28. toys, tools,kitchen appli- Hotdogs and soda, Sale Success!" $1.50 ances, lots more! Every- back by popular demand! thing must go; no reasonable offer refused. PICK UP YOUR People Lookfor Information Estate Sale, 2137 NE GARAGE SALE KIT at THE CLIFFS of REDSale for Sarah behind MOND ANNUAL YARD About Products and Shepard Rd., Sat. 8-4. 1777 SW Chandler the preschool at 2891 Furniture, tools, antiques, SALE! Fri 6/27, 8-4; Sat Services Every Daythrough NE C o nners Ave. 6/28, 8-2, behind St. kn i ckknacks, Ave., Bend, OR 97702 The Bulletin Classiffeds dishes, High quality items. lamps, glassware, linens. The Bulletin Thomas Catholic Church seningcentral oregonsince fgog Benefit for cancer vic- off NW19th St. 8 Maple. GARAGE SALE tim. Sat. 6/28, 9-5 Find exactly what Sat-Sun, 9am-5pm, 20207 Morgan Lp. 286 292 you are looking for in the Friday 6/27, 8 - 1pm. Huge Cul-de-sac sale, Sales Southeast Bend Tools, exerase equip, Sales Other Areas CLASSIFIEDS R anch Village C t . some furniture, misc. (North of Cooley Rd.). 6/28, 8-4, 20662 Cherry Crescent Community Tree Ln. Bikes, gar- Center June Flea Market HOME & SHOP Estate / Moving Sale! dening, toys, electron- June 27-28, 8am-6pm. GARAGE SALE 20149 Selkirk Mtn IVay, Bend ics, houseware, sports. Good assortment! Gun 1966 Riviera RS, 12' Thurs-Fri, 7am-6pm o Sat, 7am-2pm art, black alum. boat and motor, Multi-Family Garage Sale accessories, Quality merchandise in good cond! Collectibles powder items, motorhand power t ools, Conestoga Hills, 5 mi E on home, gas appliances, from around the world, Lladros, Avon & other beer new Rigid wood lathe, Rickard Rd. steins.FurnitureOaktable w/2leaves & 8 chairs, 6 / 27-28, valuable treasures & new Decker p a ck Fri-Sat, 9-4. ATV, boat, tr- much more. 420 CresRedwood burl table, Ig curio cab, Italian tea cart, saddle with harness, recordplayer(33/78rpm), vinyls/CDs/tapes. Quality Irs, safe, furn, piano, com- cent Cut Off Rd, Creskitchen items, crystal, complete Denby stoneware saddles 8 tack. Fri. & puter desk/hutch, file cabi- cent, OR. Don't miss out Sat. June 27-28, 8-4 net, pellet stove, kerosene set, Bose wave acoustic sys, other electronics, Japon the great deals! anese glass floats. Household items/decor, holiday 62970 Deschutes Rd. heater, collectibles, tools, decor, yard implements, tools, camping equip, clothes, much more! YARD SALE! Myrtlewood pieces, pressure washer, Buffalo boots, Check out the YARD SALE! Some furniture, guy stuff, vintageAlaskanwood snowshoes, pictures,books, classifieds online Fri-Sat only, 9-4, Irg fireproof safe, Lifecycle exer. bike, luggage, lin- www.hendbulletin.com 61440 Steens Mtn Lp, Bend, June 27 & 28, 9020 SW Meadow Rd., ens, jewelry, framed pictures, and lots,LOTSmore! Updated daily Fri-Sat, 8am-3pm. Crooked River Ranch.

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The Bulletin

Serving Central Oregon since 1903

541-385-5809 H~ihborhgngd~e!e

Fri., Sat., 8«

s-5pm

64696 Wood Ave.

Loveseat, oak barrel, queen mattress set, and furniture, tools, lots of miscellaneous.

Includes upIo2" in length, with border,full colorphoto, bold headlineasdprice.

Includes: • Feature item photo/graphic • 7 lines of text

• Bold headline • Border • up fo 4 days of advertising

Your adwd/ also appear gn • The Bulletin • The CentralOregonNickel Ads • (entral Oregon Marketplace e bendbulletin.tom *Private party adsandfundraisers. Deadline I I:00amTuesday.


E2 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES -"';„,„.,„.„ Monday • • • • • • 5:00 pm Fri • Tuesday.••• • • .Noon Mon. Wednesday •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Tues. Thursday • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Wed. Friday. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate • • • • • • • • • •• 11:00 am Fri.

Saturday • • • Sunday. • • • • PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines

• 3:00 pm Fri. • 5:00 pm Fri • Place a photo inyourprivate party ad for only$15.00par week.

*IJNDER '500in total merchandise

OVER '500 in total merchandise

7 days.................................................. $10.00 14 days................................................ $16.00

Garage Sale Special

4 days.................................................. $18.50 7 days.................................................. $24.00 14 days .................................................$33.50 28 days .................................................$61.50

4 lines for 4 days ................................. $20.00

icall for commercial line ad rates)

*llllust state prices in ad

A Payment Drop Box i8 available at CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. BELOW M A R K E D W ITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT a8 well a8 any out-of-area ad8. The Bulletin The Bulletin bendbulletimcom reserves the right to reject any ad at any time. is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702

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PLEASE NOTE: Checkyour ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or moredays will publish in the Central OregonMarketplace each Tuesday. 263

Tools

269

325

Gardening Supplies • Hay, Grain & Feed & Equipment 1st Qualilty mixed grass hay, no rain, barn stored, $250/ton. Fornewspaper Call 541-549-3831 delivery, call the Patterson Ranch, Sisters Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call Looklng for your

Woodworking shop equipment: Sh opsmith with upgraded table saw; Band saw; Lathe; Jointer; Disk, Sander and working tools; Shopsmith 12" 541-385-5809 planer with s t and, next employee? Sears 12" wood lathe or email Place a Bulletln classifiedObendbulletin.com with Copy Crafter and help wanted ad working tools. Tormek The Bulletin today and Super grinder 2000 servingcentral o eyon sincesal reach over with many a t tach60,000 readers ments and i n struc- onda 3 8 " rid i n g each week. tions. Porter Cable Hmower, bagger, $450. Your classified ad 4"x8" belt/disc bench 541-480-1353 will also sander. Central Machinery 4"x6" beltfdisc appear on Prompt Delivery bendbulletin.com bench sander; Sears Rock, Sand & Gravel 8tA" slide compound Multiple Colors, Sizes which currently miter saw. AMT 4600 Instant Landscaping Co. receives over scroll saw ; B e n ch 1.5 million page 541-389-9663 grinder; Router table vlews every with Sears r o uter; 270 month at no Makita router; Ryobi extra cost. Lost & Found t able w i t h Se a r s Bulletin router; Makita router; Lost ladies Seiko watch, Classlfieds Ryobi t ri m r o uter;stainless steel w/18kt Get Results! Router bits; Bench gold accents, Redmond 541-385-5809 vise; various clamps. area, 6/17. 951-454-2561 Call or place your ad 541-549-9383 on-line at bendbulletln.com 266 Building Materials REMEMBER:If you have lost an animal, TURN THE PAGE La Pine Habitat don't forget to check For More Ads RESTORE The Humane Society Building Supply Resale The Bulletin Bend Quality at 541-382-3537 LOW PRICES Redmond 341 52684 Hwy 97 541-923-0882 Horses & Equipment 541-536-3234 Madras Open to the public . 541-475-6889

Looking for your next employee? National wholesale disa Bulletin help tributor of w aterworks Place products in Redmond is wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 seeking motivated and hard working part time/ readers each week. Your classified ad seasonal indwidual with a will also appear on good attitude. Candibendbulletin.com date must have good which currently communication skills, be receives over 1.5 professional, punctual, a million page views self starter, and work as a team player. Primary every month at job duties are driving and no extra cost. all warehouse functions. Bulletin Classifieds Secondary duties i nGet Results! volve counter sales, anCall 385-5809 swering phones, and or place various other d uties. your ad on-line at Class A CDL is required. bendbulletin.com Ability to operate a forklift, climb a ladder, ma486 n ipulate t o ol s an d e quipment, lift u p t o Independent Positions 100lbs, and type a minimum of 20 words per Sales minute is a must. We are Earn over looking to fill this position very quickly so please $1,000 email your resume to aaron.bondi@fer uson.com

e ROW I N G

363

THOMAS ORCHARDS

Kimberly, Oregon THE FRUITSTAND WILL OPEN JUNE 26! U ick or Read icked Dark Sweet Cherries. Ready by Saturday June 28. - Apricots! BRING CONTAINERS for U-PfCK!!! Open 7 days week, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. ONLY!

476

Employment Opportunities

please call us at

458-206-0905 or email us at

paperman09@hotmait.com

Class A and Class B CDL Drivers needed. Must be able to work hard, pass U/A and background check. No experience necessary.

528

Loans & Mortgages

Call Bill, 541-383-3362 for more info.

ll ot orcycles & Accessories

Harley Davidson 2003 1036 SW Rimrock Anniversary Road King, Way Redmond New Stage 1, pearl white, exconstruction to be condition, lots of All real estate adver- Built, 1800 Single cellent chrome & extr a s. tising in this newspa- Story, 3 bdrms., 2 $13,999. 541-279-0846 per is subject to the baths, 2 car garage F air H o using A c t with RV parking and which makes it illegal Canyon View. Call to a d vertise "any Kevin 541-948-8700 preference, limitation $259,000. or disc r imination based on race, color, religion, sex, handi- Looking for your next Harley D a vidson cap, familial status, 2006 FXDLI Dyna emp/oyee? marital status or na- Place a Bulletin help Low Rider, Mustang tional origin, or an in- wanted ad today and seat with backrest, tention to make any new battery, windreach over 60,000 such pre f erence, readers each week. shield, forward conlimitation or discrimitrols, lots of chrome, Your classified ad nation." Familial staScreamin' Eagle exwill also appear on tus includes children haust, 11,360 miles. bendbulletin.com under the age of 18 Well maintained! which currently reliving with parents or $8 650 in La Pine ceives over legal cus t odians, 1 5 million page (928) 581-9190 pregnant women, and views every month people securing cusat no extra cost. tody of children under Bulletin Classifieds 18. This newspaper Get Results! will not knowingly acCall 385-5809 or cept any advertising place your ad on-line for real estate which is at in violation of the law. O ur r e aders a r e bendbulletin.com Harley Davidson hereby informed that 2011 Classic Lim762 all dwellings adverited, Loaded! 9500 tised in this newspa- Homes with Acreage miles, custom paint per are available on "Broken Glass" by an equal opportunity Custom built contem- Nicholas Del Drago, basis. To complain of porary raised ranch new condition, d iscrimination ca l l for sale by owner. heated handgrips, HUD t o l l-free at 2706 sq . f t. 3-4 auto cruise control. 1-800-877-0246. The bdrms, 2 t/a b aths, $32k in bike, toll f re e t e lephone spacious kitchen and only $20,000or best dining room, wet bar, number for the hearoffer. 541-318-6049 ing i m p aired is granite and h eated 1-800-927-9275. stone, new c arpet, p rivate study, o a k HDFatBo 1996 cabinets, newer heat pump, fir e places, Houses for Rent Pozzi wood windows. Redmond on 4.6 h ighly s ecluded, heavily D esirable s g l le v e l w ooded acres b e 3br/2ba, lots of upt ween Bend & T u Completely grades, pets neg. No malo, 3-car garage, Rebuilt/Customized smoking $1200 mo irrig.system and wa2012/2013 Award 415-596-2006 ter feature. $589,900 Winner 541-410-2098 or SrShowroom Condition siewert©bendbroadMany Extras band.com Low Miles. Bantj

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Redmond Homes

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE

Your Neighborhood Publications

DRIVERS

541-934-2870

' j0 0

To learn more about thls new employment opportunity

with an ad in The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory

Produce & Food

Visit us on Facebook for updates and look for for us on Wed.at the Bend Farmers Market

a week!

if you are interested. The Company is an equal op- Welcome toYOUR portunity employer as well as a g overnment NEIGHBORHOOD PUBLICATIONS. contractor that s h a ll We are establishing abide by the requirea branch in ments o f 41 CFR Central Oregon. 60-300.5(a), which prohibits dis c r imination We are looking for responsible and against qualified protected Veterans and the ambitious individuals to sell subscriptions to requirements of 41 CFR The Bulletin at 60-741.5(A), which prohibits dis c r imination established sales locations. against qualified individuals on the basis of disability. Control what you earn by working a designated local Get your territory and essentially build your own business business!

860

750

Houses for Rent General

• H omes for Sale 5.17 acres. 65694 Old Bend/Redmond Hwy, Mtn view, power, water, septic approved. $174,000 O.B.O. Caii Brad 5 4 1-419-1725, or Deb 541-480-3956. debraObendbroad band.com

$15,000

775

541-548-4807

Illlanufacturedi Mobile Homes

FACTORY SPECIAL New Home, 3 bdrm, $46,500 finished on your site. HD Sportster, 2001 exc J and M Homes cond, 1 owner, maint'd, 541-548-5511 new t i r es , cu s t om Reduced TO $30,000! chrome, leather saddle 2006 Super G ood bags, 32,400 mi, $4200. Cents 1296 sq.ft. 3 Tom, 541-382-6501 bdrms, 2 full baths, walk in closets, all Honda Rebel 250, 1986, appl., plus f reezer. gets 60 mpg, excellent Very clean, must be commuter, 7213 miles, moved 541-382-6650 $1300. 541-788-6276

PiaggioNespa 3-wheel MP3 scooter 2009 WARNING The Bulletin recomwith only 400 miles. :s. NOTICE Not a scratch! Like mends you use caution when you proAll real estate adverbrand new! $ 5900. MENTAL HEALTH vide personal tised here in is sub520-360-9300, owner Mental Wellness information to compa- ject to th e Federal F air Housing A c t , Centers, Inc. nies offering loans or is in an evaluation stage credit, especially which makes it illegal of opening a comprethose asking for adto advertise any prefhensive outpatient / vance loan fees or erence, limitation or 860 community-based companies from out of discrimination based Snowmobiles m ental health/ s u bstate. If you have on race, color, relistance abuse treatment concerns or quesion, sex, handicap, Triumph Daytona program in Bend, Or- tions, we suggest you amilial status or na- Arctic Cat 580 1994, 2004, 15K m i l e s, EXT, in good egon. We are seeking consult your attorney tional origin, or intenperfect bike, needs condition, $1000. an Executive Director to or call CONSUMER tion to make any such nothing. Vin oversee the daily opHOTLINE, preferences, l i mita- Located in La Pine. ¹201536. erations of the facility. 1-877-877-9392. tions or discrimination. Call 541-408-6149. $4995 They must hold an acWe will not knowingly 860 Dream Car BANK TURNED YOU accept any advertistive masters-level DOWN? Private party ing for real estate Motorcycles & Accessories AutoSales cense in the State of 1801Division, Bend O regon such a s a will loan on real es- which is in violation of DreamCarsBend.com tate equity. Credit, no this law. All persons 2006 H-D Ultra L CSW or L PC, a n d 541 -678-0240 have clinical supervi- problem, good equity are hereby informed Classic. Twin Cam Dlr 3665 is all you need. Call sion/ executive experithat all dwellings ad- 88 w/ Stage One ence. We prefer some- Oregon Land Mort- vertised are available Kit. Screaming Vespa GTS 250 2007, o ne wh o h o l d s a gage 541-388-4200. on an equal opportu- Eagle exhaust. 28k red, just over 4k mi., certification in addiction Good classified ads tell nity basis. The Bulle- miles. Lots of exexc. cond. $ 3100. counseling along with tin Classified tras. Excellent. the essential facts in an 541-419-3147 the LCSW/ LPC, but it $12,999 OBO. is not mandatory. The interesting Manner.Write 746 541-280-8074. position will be salary, from the readers view - not Northwest Bend Homes DOE. In addition MWC the seller's. Convert the offers a f u l l b e nefit facts into benefits. Show Exceptional NW package. Furthermore, the reader howthe item will location, skyline the person hired will re- help them in someway. views and privacy. ceive growth incentives This Custom craftsman in addition to their saladvertising tip V ictory T C 2 0 0 2 , Tour Home borders ary. If you are interbrought toyou by 40K mi., runs great, Quail Park by Awbrey ested please email res tage 1 kit, n e w Golf. Interior upFXSTD Harley sume to The Bulletin tires, rear brakes 8 servlng ree~al o~n since 19ts Davidson 2001, twin grades, Courtesy to e ettin ill@mwcid.com more. Health forces Realtors. $575,000. cam 88, fuel injected, ax to 08-528-2945 or LOCAL fyfONEyrWebuy s ale. $4,50 0 . 2772 NW Rainbow Vance 8 Hines short for questions call secured trustdeeds & 541-771-0665 shot exhaust, Stage I Ridge Dr 208-542-1026 and ask to note,some hard money with Vance & Hines 541-848-0040 speak with Eric. loans. Call Pat Kellev fuel management 541-382-3099 ext.13. system, custom parts, Look at: Resort Housekeeper extra seat. wanted for small co. Bendhomes.com $1 0,500 OBO. Exp'd only; $10/hr to for Complete Listings of Thank you St. Jude & Call Today start. Send work history Sacred H e art of BSIII)I Clk 541-516-8684 Area Real Estate for Sale to resorthk©gmail.com Jesus. j.d.

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CAUTION: Ads published in "Employment Op poriunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads fo r p o sitions that require a fee or Prineville upfront investment 266 541-447-7178 must be stated. With Heating & Stoves or Craft Cats any independentjob 541-389-8420. opportunity, please NOTICE TO i nvestigate tho r ADVERTISER 275 oughly. Use extra 2001 Silverado Since September 29, 3-horse trailer 5th c aution when a pAuction Sales 1991, advertising for wheel, 29'x8', deluxe plying for jobs onused woodstoves has showman/semi living line and never probeen limited to mod- * Estate Auction * vide personal inforquarters, lots of exels which have been Sun. June 29, 10:00 tras. Beautiful condimation to any source a.m. at Wilbur Auccertified by the Ortion. $21,900. OBO you may not have tion north of Roseegon Department of 541-420-3277 researched and burg. Collections of: Environmental Qualdeemed to be repuCookie jars 200+, ity (DEQ) and the fedtable. Use extreme eral E n v ironmental Tonka trucks, Smokey c aution when r e Protection A g e ncy the Bear 500+, washs ponding to A N Y boards, Santas, (EPA) as having met online employment records, also primitive smoke emission stan- items. ad from out-of-state. REDUCED! antique furniture, dards. A cer t ified lots more. We suggest you call Worth the 3-Horse Trailer, 22' long, w oodstove may b e the State of Oregon drive! More info 7' wide, 2 rear axles, good identified by its certifiHotline Larry Hill, cond. Logan Coach Inc. Consumer cation label, which is 541-430-2689 at 1-503-378-4320 pics O $4200 obo. 305-794-0190 permanently attached For Equal Opportuto the stove. The Bul- www.wilburauction.com nity Laws contact No buyers premium letin will not knowCall a Pro Oregon Bureau of ingly accept advertisLabor & I n dustry, Whether you need a ing for the sale of Civil Rights Division, fencefixed,hedges uncertified 971-673- 0764. a woodstoves. trimmed or a house The Bulletin built, you'll find serw'nscensal oreyonsince ssr 267 I chasing products orI Coll54i 3855809topromoteyourservice• Advertisefor28daysstortingatrltorsme <~g 5n~~tots~~r~m> 541-385-5809 professional help in • services from out of • Fuel & Wood 630 The Bulletin's "Call a l the area. Sending c ash, checks, o r Rooms for Rent Service Professional" Add your web address Adult Care LandscapingNard Care Landscaping/Yard Care WHEN BUYING i n f ormation to your ad and read- l• credit Directory may be subjected to FIREWOOD... Furn. room i n q u iet ers on The Bulletin's 308 I FRAUD. Aeration/Dethatching 541-3B5-5BOB home no drugs, alco- Professional Caregiver web site, www.bend- For more informaTo avoid fraud, 1-time or Weekly Services 26+ yrs exp will proFarm Equipment hol, smoking. $450 with bulletin.com, will be The Bulletin vide private care in your Ask about FREEadded tion about an adver1st/1st. 541-408-0846 346 NOTICE: Oregon Land& Machinery able to click through l tiser, you may call recommends payhome. Disabled/elderly/ svcs w/seasonal contract! scape Contractors Law automatically to your ment for Firewood Livestock & Equipment Bonded & Insured. hospice.541-279-9492 the Oregon State 632 (ORS 671) requires all COLLINS Lawn Maint. website. only upon delivery Fuel tank, 300-gal diel Attorney General's Aptililultiplex General businesses that adand inspection. sel w/stand, filter, hose, Local couple wants to Ca/l 541-480-9714 Building/Contracting Office C o n sumer l vertise t o pe r form • A cord is 128 cu. ft. $500. 541-480-1353 buy young (3-mos to 2 CAREGIVERProtection hotline at I Landscape ConstrucCHECKYOUR AD 4' x 4' x 8' years old) mini donkey, Adult Foster Home I 1-877-877-9392. NOTICE: Oregon state tion which includes: Call The Bulletln At • Receipts should Ienny. 541-388-6849 needs employeeto help law requires anyone l anting, deck s , Allen Reinsch Yard include name, 541-385-5809 with residents 8 pets. LThe Bulleting who con t racts for ences, Reg. mini donkeys for arbors, Maintenance& Mowing Call 541-382-9334 phone, price and construction work to Place Your Ad Or E-Mail sale, and in- (& many other things!) $ 2 0 0 up, kind of wood be licensed with the water-features, At: www.bendbulletin.com 541-548-5216 repair of ir- Call 541-536-1294or Construction Contrac- stallation, purchased. rigation systems to be 541-815-5313 The Bulletin • Firewood ads on the first day it runs tors Board (CCB). An licensed w it h sewing renrral oregonsince rss th e General active license MUST include to make sure it is corLandscape ContracThe Bulletin Mailroom is hiring for our Saturspecies & cost per The Bulletin Circulation department is looking rect. "Spellcheck" and means the contractor tors Board. This 4-digit day night shift and other shifts as needed. We is bonded & insured. number is to be in- Maverick Landscaping cord to better serve for a District Representative to join our Single human errors do occurrently have openings all nights of the week. our customers. Copy team. This is a full time, 40 hour per week cur. If this happens to Verify the contractor's cluded in all adver- M owing, weedeating,yd CCB l i c ense at tisements which indiEveryone must work Saturday night. Shifts position. Overall focus is the representation, your ad, please condetail, chain saw work, start between 6:00 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. and sales and presentation of The Bulletin newspa- tact us ASAP so that www.hirealicensedcate the business has bobcat excv., etc! LCB servlnyceneal oregon slncessr contractor.com end between2:00 a.m. and 3:30 a.m. Allpoper. These apply to news rack locations, hotels, corrections and any a bond,insurance and ¹8671 541-923-4324 or call 503-378-4621. sitions we are hiring for, work Saturday nights. special events and news dealer outlets. Daily adjustments can be workers compensaThe Bulletin recom- tion Starting pay is $9.10 per hour, and we pay a responsibilities include driving a company vemade to your ad. their employLog truck loads of mends checking with ees.for minimum of 3 hours per shift, as some shifts hicle to service a defined district, ensuring 541-385-5809 For your protecgreen lodgepole the CCB prior to con- tion call are short (11:30 1:30). The work consists of newspaper locations are serviced and supplied, 503-378-5909 Painting/Wall Covering The Bulletin Classified firewood, delivered. tracting with anyone. or use our loading inserting machines or stitcher, stackmanaging newspaper counts for the district, website: Call 541-815-4177 Some other t rades ing product onto pallets, bundling, cleanup Senior Apartmentbuilding relationships with our current news www.lcbistate.or.us to also re q uire addiALL AMERICAN and other tasks. For qualifying employees we license status dealer locations and growing those locations Independent Living 269 tional licenses and check PAINTING ALL-INCLUSIVE offer benefits i ncluding l if e i n surance, with new outlets. Position requires total ownerbefore contracting with certifications. Interior and Exterior Gardening Supplies short-term & long-term disability, 401(k), paid with 3 meals daily the business. Persons ship of and accountability of all single copy eleFamily-owned vacation and sick time. Drug test is required doing lan d scapeResidential 8 Commercial & Equipment ments within that district. Work schedule will be Month-to-month lease, Debris Removal prior to employment. maintenance do not 40 yrs exp.• Sr. Discounts check it out! Thursday through Monday withTuesday and Call 541-318-0450 r equire an LC B l i W ednesday off . Requires good communication 5-year warranties JUNK BE GONE BarkTurfSoll.com Please submit a completed application attencense. skills, a strong attention to detail, the ability to lift Summer Special! 634 I Haul Away FREE tion Kevin Eldred. Applications are available 45 pounds, flexibility of motion and the ability to Call 541-337-6149 at The Bulletin front desk (1777 S.W. ChanFor Salvage. Also multi task. Essential: Positive attitude, strong AptiMultiplex NE Bend CCB ¹t 93960 PROMPT DELIVERY Cleanups 8 Cleanouts dler Blvd.), or an electronic application may be service/team orientation, sales and problem 54Z-389-9663 obtained upon request by contacting Kevin Mel, 541-389-8107 solving skills. Send inquiries and resume to: Call for Specials! Eldred via email (keldred@bendbulletin.com). Limited numbers avail. circulation©bendbulletin.com Free Manure will load, No phone calls please. Only completed appli1, 2 and 3 bdrms. Handyman PAINTING Zaped Qua/reI WESTERN Deschutes Mkt Rd., cations will be considered for this position. No Applications are available at the front desk. W/D hookups, patios CO. Richard Hayman, Bend. 541-318-8707 resumes will be accepted. Drug test is relttrarg gppd /grt, Drop off your resume in person at or decks. I DO THAT! a semi-retired paintquired prior to employment. EOE. 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97702; Home/Rental repairs Full Service ing contractor of 45 fyfOUNTAIN GLEN, Just bought a new boat? No phone inquiries please. 541-383-931 3 Small jobs to remodels Landscape Management years. S mall Jobs Sell your old one in the Pre-employment drug testing required. Professionally Honest, guaranteed 541-390-1 466 Welcome. Interior & classifieds! Ask about our The Bulletin sertrws central oregon sincersor work. CCB¹151573 Super Seller rates! EOE/Drug Free Workplace managed by Norris & Experienced Exterior. c c b¹51 84. Must be insurable to drive company vehicle. Dennis 541-317-9768 Commercial & Residential 541-388-6910 541-385-5809 Stevens, Inc. •

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The Bulle6n


TH E BULLETIN4 WEDNESDAY, JUN 25, 2014

E4

DAILY B R I D G E

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFED• 541-385-5809

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD wiii Shprtz

C L U B w ednesday, June25,2014

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Vanderbilt comeback By FRANK STEWART Tribune Content Agency In the venerable Vanderbilt Teams at the ACBL Spring Championships, the top two seeds led by Pierre Zimmermann ("Team Monaco") and N ick N i ckell m e t i n t h e f i n a l . NICKELL led at the half, fell behind, then mounted a winning rally that began with today's deal. At both tables West cashed two spadesagainstfour hearts.Then West for MONACO Ied a t r ump. Eric Rodwell for NICKELL won, took the top diamonds and ruffed a diamond. He drew trumps, lost a diamond and had 10 tricks.

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spade, you jump to three diamonds and he bids three hearts. What do you say? ANSWER: Yo u r j um p - shift s howed a p o w e rful h a n d a n d established a force to game. Since partner's hand may be weak, you need do no more than bid four hearts now. If he can visualize a slam, he will bid again. But if he has K 6 5 4 3, 105,43, A 6 5 4 , four hearts will be high enough. South dealer Both sides vulnerable NORTH 4o7532

SPADE RUFF In the replay, Steve Weinstein, West for NICKELL, forced declarer with a spade at Trick Three. East threw a diamond. South took the ace of diamonds, ruffed a diamond and drew trumps, but when trumps broke 4 -1, he couldn't score hi s f i f t h diamond. Down one. If MONACO's declarer takes just one high trump, then ruffs a second diamond, East can overruff, but declarer is in control and takes the rest. But if East discards (!) instead of ove~ g, S o uth succeeds only by leading a low club (!) from dummy next. DAILY QUESTION

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06/25/i 4


THE BULLETIN QWEDNESDAY, JUNE 25 2014 E5

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809 880

870

Boats & Accessories

Moto r homes

880

881

882

885

931

933

935

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Canopies & Campers

Automotive Parts, Service & Accessories

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

CHECK YOURAD

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do The Work ...

12' Aluminum boat with trailer, 3hp motor, good cond, $1200.. 503-307-8570

Allegro 32' 2007, like new, only 12,600 miles. Chev 8.1L with Allison 60 transmission, dual exhaust. Loaded! Auto-leveling system, 5kw gen, power mirrors w/defrost, 2 slide-outs with aw12' aluminum fish- nings, rear c a mera, ing boat, t r ailer, trailer hitch, driyer door motor, fish finder, w/power window, cruise, accessories, $1200. exhaust brake, central vac, satellite sys. Asking 541-389-7234 $67,500. 503-781-8812

You Keep The Cash! On-site credit approval team, web site presence. We Take Trade-Ins! Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend: 541-330-2495 Redmond: 541-548-5254

Mirrocraft w / 9.9 Evinrude, trader, xtras.

$1100. 541-788-2056.

spare tire, access., good cond. $1200 obo. 541-406-3811

16.2' 1967 Barron Ma-

rine, i/o, top cover, $4,500 obo 541-419-5731

18'Maxum skiboat,2000, inboard motor, g reat cond, well maintained, $8995obo. 541-350-7755 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please go to Class 875. 541-385-5609

Beaver Marquis, 1993 40-ft, Brunswick

floor plan. Many extras, well maintained, fire suppression behind refrig, Stow Master 5000 tow bar, $23,995.

541-383-3503

Dodge Brougham 1978, 15', 1-ton, clean, 69,000 miles. $4500. In La Pine, call 541-602-8652

The Bulletin Two 9' oars (near new) $200. 541-647-2314 875

Watercraft

TIFFINALLEGRO BUS 2010 - FULLY LOADED 40QXP Powerglide Chassis / 425HP Cummings Engine / Allison 6 Spd Automatic Trans / Less than 40K miles / Offered at $199K. Too many options to list here! For more information go to mne ~ ~alle rob s.com or email trainwater157@! mail.com or ca I858-527-8627

Tioga 24' ClassC Motorhome Bought new in 2000, currently under 20K miles, excellent shape, new tires, professionaly winterized every year, cutoff switch to battery, plus new RV batteries. Oven, hot water heater & air conditioning have never been used! $24,000 obo. Serious inquiries, please. Stored in Terrebonne. 541 -548-51 74

TOW EQUIPMENT Fleefwood Discovery Brake Buddy, $500; 40' 2003, diesel, w/all Guardian rock options - 3 slide outs, shield, $200; satellite, 2 TV's, W/D, Roadmaster 5000 etc., 32,000 m iles. tow bar, $450; Wintered in h eated OR $900for ALL. shop. $82,000 O.B.O. Call 541-548-1422 541-447-8664

Just too many collectibles?

16' Old Town Canoe, spruce, cedar & canvas, Lake model, 1 owner, verv good cond, w/extras. $1000. 541-388-3386 ds published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorIzed personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 670. 541-365-5609

The Bulletin

Serv>ng Central Oregon since 7903

880

Motorhomes w~

i

-

2007 Winnebago Outlook Class"C" 31', solar panel, Cat. heater, excellent condition, more extras.Asking $58K. Ph. 541-447-9268 Can be viewed at Western Recreation (top of hill) in Prineviiie.

PM Alfa See Ya 2006 36' Excellent condition, 1 owner, 350 Cat diesel, 51,000 miles, 4-dr frig, icemaker, gas stove, oven, washer/dryer, non-smokeri 3 shdes, generator, invertor, leather interior, satellite, 7'4" ceiling. Clean!$74,500. 541-233-6520 Where can you find a helping hand? From contractors to yard care, it's all here in The Bulletin's "Call A Service Professional" Directory

Allegro 28' Class A 2008 Ford V10 gas, 50K miles, 2 slides, satellite, 2 TVs, Onan gen, rear & side cameras, hydraulic levelers, 300w solar panel with inverter. Original owner. $55,500. 541-420-4303

SNUG TOP

Pickup canopy for Keystone Cougar 31' F250 short bed, on the first day it runs 2 004 2 sl i des, 2 white in color, bdrms, sleeps 7 with to make sure it is corlike new, rect. "Spellcheck" and r ear bunks, tub & $675. human errors do ocshower combo, elect. 541-416-9686 tongue jack, s o lar cur. If this happens to your ad, please conpkg. all the bells & tact us ASAP so that Need help fixing stuff? whistles, and lots of corrections and any Call A ServiceProfessional storage, immaculate adjustments can be find the help you need. c ond., always g a made to your ad. raged. Great for famwww.bendbulletin.com 541-385-5809 ily v a c ations or The Bulletin Classified part-time home. $16,400 obo o 541-480-9876

14'

15' tri-hull fiberglas fishing boat, 1971 walk-thru, fish finder, full top cover, 45 hp Evinrude, tra i ler,

Northland 1997 990 Polar, camper very clean, s/c Cooper studded tires, $4000. 541-617-0932 2 25/45/R17, M&S . $250. 541-316-7202

Take care of your investments with the help from Sell them in The Bulletin's The Bulletin Classifieds "Call A Service Professional" Directory 541-385-5809

lilg Ready to makememories! Top-selling Winnebago 31J, original owners, nonsmokers, garaged, only 18,800 miles, auto-leveling jacks, (2) slides, upsteps, back-up camera, graded queen bed, bunk washer/dryer, central vac, beds, micro, (3) TVs, ice m aker, l o aded, sleeps 10! Lots of storexcellent condition. age, maintained, very $27,500 541-620-2135 cleanlOnly $67,995! Ex(See Craiqs/ist tended warranty and/or fi¹4470374489) nancing avail to qualified buyers! 541-388-7179 FLEETWOOD PACE ARROW, 1999 Updated interior, 36', 2 shdes, 42,600 miles, V10 as, 5000 watt generator, hydraulic levelers, auto

~ HOLIDAY RAMBLER VACATIONER 2003 8.1L V8 Gas, 340 hp, workhorse, Allison 1000 5 speed trans., 39K, NEW TIRES, 2 slides, Onan 5.5w gen., ABS

brakes, steel cage cockpit, washer/dryer, firelace, mw/conv. oven, ree standing dinette, was $121,060 new; now, $35,900. 541-536-1008

Jayco Grevhawk 26SS 2005 6K miles, 1 slide, sleeps 4, full bath in rear, no bdrm, outside shower & BBQ, back-up camera, awning, solar panel, brand new tires, new engine battery, protective sealants in/out, lots more! Exc. cond, $38,000 5414!15-2737

Providence2005 Fully loaded, 35,000 miles, 350 Cat, Very clean, non-smoker, 3 slides, side-by-side refrigerator with ice maker, Washer/Dryer, Flat screen TV's, In motion satellite. $95,000 541-480-2019 Roadmaster Stowmaster 5000 tow bar & accessories, $200. Roadmaster Even Brake s ystem, $500. Both used, but in good cond. Cash only. 541-389-9292

932

Antique & Classic Autos

6.4L V8, Diesel, 4WD, automatic, 65k mi. Vin¹A32746 $33,977 ROBBERSON ~

Chevy C-20 Pickup 1969,was a special order, has all the extras, and is all original. See to believe! $14,000 orbest offer. 541-923-6049

maaa a

2 slides, ducted heat & air, great condition, snowbird ready, Many upgrade options, financing available! $14,500 obo.

Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara

& Service

1/3 interestin

Columbia 400,

Financing available.

$150,000

(located © Bend)

Pam 541-768-6767 or Bill 541-480-7930

Komfort Ridgecrest 23', 2008,queen bed, sleeps 6, micro & AC, full awning, living room slider, yule tables, outside shower, 4 closets, fiberqlass frame, as new, $11,500. La Pine call 541-914-3360

Holiday Rambler Alumascape 28' 2003, 1-owner. Self-contained, 13' slide, 80W solar panel, walkaround queen+ sofa/bed, loads of storage throughout. Excellent cond., licensed 2015. Must see!$15,700. 541-389-9214

Pontiac Firebird 1998 Alcohol Funny Car Current certification,

1/3 interest in wellequipped IFR Beech Bonanza A36, new 10-550/ prop, located KBDN. $65,000. 541-419-9510 www.N4972M.com

race-ready.

$25,000 obo. 541-388-1929

I nternational Fl a t Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 s pd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

$32,977 ROBBERSON LINCOIII ~

III RgDB

541.312.3986 DLR¹0205

GMC Envoy SLE

2005 4.2L6cyl., 4WD, auto., 141k miles, 20 MPG Hwy,Vin¹303927 BARGAIN CORRAL! $6,977

ROBBERSON 935

WHEN ONLY THE BEST WILL DO!

2012 3.6L V6, 4WD,

automatic, 26k miles, 20 MPG Hwy

LINCOIII ~

Sport Utility Vehicles

III S RDB

541.312.3986 DLR¹0205

NissanNurano SL 2011 Kit Companion 1994, good cond. 26' with one slide, $4500 obo. 541-389-5766

Laredo 30'2009

Like NEW! Trail-Lite 2011 Crossover, 21-ft. A/C, awning, AM/FM CD, custom queen bed, cus$25,500 tom drawer pullouts. Dry 541-419-3301 axle wgt 2,566; dry unloaded wgt 2,847. EquaFlex suspension, exterior shower, indoor tub/ shower combo, stabilizer jacks, 2 batteries, plus MORE!$12,995. Call 541-280-9516for MONTANA 3585 2006, info, or to see - in Bend. exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, Irg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $35,000 obo. 541-420-3250

-nle&

Q

+>A4."

541-288-3333

Plymouth B a rracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V6, centerlines, 541-593-2597

6.0L Turbo diesel, full power, a u t omatic, 6-disc CD, cruise, fog lights, running boards, tow pkg, bedliner, grill guard, folding rear seat. Tan cloth interior, metallic tan exterior. 91,400 miles. Pricereducedto $20,500 541-350-6925

Wi+ i

VolvoS60T5 2013

overall length is 35' has 2 slides, Arctic package, A/C,table 8 chairs, satellite, Arctic pkg., power awning, in excellent condition! More pix at bendbulletin.com

2013 R-Vision 23RBS Trail-LiteSportby Monaco -Expedition pkg, Sport Value pkg, convenience pkg, elec. awning, Winnebago Adven- spare tire, LED TV/ent. turer 2005 35~/~', gas, system, outside shower, less than 20,000 miles, elec. tongue jack, black excellent condition, 2 flush sys, beautiful inteslide-outs, work horse rior, huge galley, great chassis, Banks power storage, 1/2-ton towable, alloys, queen bed. brake system, sleeps 5, with al l o p tions,Likenew, asking $22,000 $62,000 / negotiable. Gordon, 541482-5797 Call 5 4 1-306-6711or email a i kistu©bendRV CONSIGNMENTS cable.com WANTED We Do The Work ... You Keep The Cash! On-site credit approval team, web site presence. We Take Trade-Ins! Winnebago Aspect Free Advertising. 2009- 32', 3 slideBIG COUNTRY RV outs, Leather inteBend: 541-330-2495 Redmond: rior, Power s e at, 541-548-5254 locks, win d ows, Aluminum wheels. 17" Flat Screen, Looking for your Surround s o u nd, next employee? camera, Queen bed, Place a Bulletin help Foam mattress, Awwanted ad today and ning, Generator, Inreach over 60,000 verter, Auto Jacks, readers each week. Air leveling, Moon Your classified ad roof, no smoking or will also appear on p ets. L ik e n ew, bendbulletin.com $74,900 which currently re541-480-6900 ceives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5609 Winnebago or place your ad Sightseer on-line at 30' 2004 bendbulletin.com w ith l i ving r o o m slide, 48,000 miles, 882 in good condition. Fifth Wheels Has newer Michelin tires, awning, blinds, carpet, new coach R t• •t M ss battery and HD TV. ]g

engine, power everything, new paint, 54K orig. miles, runs great, exc. cond.in/out. $7500 obo. 541-480-3179

Call Dick, 541-480-1687.

541-447-4605

Komfort Pacific Ridge Perfect Condition! Like NEW 27ft deluxe NW design, 15' Super Slide, priv bdrm, power jack, electric awning, solar panel, 6-volt, led lights, always stored inside. A MUST see! $26,000 obo!Call

2006 XLT 4-door Crew Cab

Ford T-Bird, 1966, 390

$23,900.

Ford F-350 4x4,

:3sa. I."'.:.,

908

Aircraft, Parts

cruise, power windows, power steering, power locks, alloy wheels and running boards, garaged. 541-419-5980

32' - 2001

KeystoneLaredo 31' Rlf 20 06 w ith 1 2' slide-out. Sleeps 6, queen walk-around bed w/storage underneath. Tub & shower. 2 swivel rockers. TV. Air cond. Gas stove & refrigerator/freezer. Microwave. Awning. Outside sho w er. Slide through stora ge, E a s y Li f t . $29,000 new; Askinq$18,600

JEEP WRANGLER 2009 hard top 16,000 miles. automatic, AC, tilt &

541-312-3986 DLR¹0205

Fleetwood Prowler

R

~I 8 •

Ford F250 Lariat 2008 Crew cab

- ~~ l

1/5th interest in 1973

Bend.Excellent performance & affordable flying! $6,000. 541-410-6007

approval team, web site presence. We Take Trade-Ins! Free Advertising. BIG COUNTRY RV Bend: 541-330-2495 Redmond: 541-548-5254 885

Canopies 8 Campers

$'31,000

Call Dick at

LINcoLN~

I M ZOR

|i,%

2180 TT, 440 SMO, 180 mph, excellent condition, always hangared, 1 owner

-4rI

Chev Crewcab dually, Allison tranny, tow pkg., brake controller, cloth split front bench seat, only 66k miles. Very good condition, Original owner, $34,000 or best offer. 541-408-7826

black w/ leather seat trim, 3.4L V6, 27,709 miles. vin¹362464 6.977 ROBBERSON l lllCOLN~

I IIB DR I

541-312-3986 dlr ¹0205 Nissan Rogue SV -2012 silver, 13k miles, ¹396452 $23,995

2005 Diesel 4X4

BMW X3

2 0 07, 99K miles, premium package, heated lumbar supported seats, pan541-598-3750 oramic moo n roof,aaaoregonautosource.com Bluetooth, ski bag, Xe940 non headlights, tan & black leather interior, Vans n ew front & re a r brakes @ 76K miles, one owner, all records, very clean, $16,900. 541-388-4360

FIND IT!

1974 Bellanca 1730A

In Madras, call 541-475-6302

RV CONSIGNMENTS WANTED We Do the Work, You Keep the Cash! On-site credit

ROBBERSON

Chevy Colorado LS 2004Extended Cab

King bed, hide-a-bed sofa, 3 slides, glass shower, 10 gal. water heater, 10 cu.ft. fridge, central vac, s atellite dish, 2 7 " TV/stereo syst., front front power leveling jacks and s cissor stabilizer jacks, 16' awning. Like new! 541-419-0566

( in La Pine ) WILL DELIVER

Pickups

L. 172 Cessna Share IFR equipped, new avionics, Garmin 750 touchscreen, center stack, 180hp. Exceptionally clean 8 economical! $13,500. Hangared in KBDN Call 541-728-0773

for 35 years. $60K.

307-221-2422,

933

AWD, less than 11k mi., auto, 6 spd. vin ¹202364 $30,977

541-312-3986 DLR ¹0205

OPEN ROAD 36' 2005 - $25,500

Recreation by Design 2013 Monte Carlo, 38-ft. Top living room, 2 bdrm, has 3 slideouts, 2 A/Cs, entertainment center, fireplace, W/D, garden tub/shower, in great condition.$36,000 obo. Call Peter,

Buick Skylark 1972

orig. miles. Please Cessna 150 LLC 17Khemmings.com for 150hp conversion, low see details. $18,900. time on air frame and 541-323-1696 engine, hangared in

SUY 17' SELL ITr The Bulletin Classifieds 3.5L 5 cyls, RWD, manual, 56k miles, vin¹200940 $11,977

BMW X3 2011 X drive,

ROBBERSON y LIIICOLN ~

~

Chrysler Town & Country LXI 1997, beautiful inside & out, one owner, nonsmoker,. loaded with options! 197,892 mi. Service rec o rds available. $4 , 9 50. Call Mike, (541) 6158176 after 3:30 p.m.

541-598-3750

541-312-3986 DLR¹0205

www.aaaoregonautosource.com Chevrolet Tahoe 2009 LT1

975

Automobiles

Ford Mustang GT 2006

1976 Cessna 150M Just over 3000hrs, 600 hrs since out of frame Ext. Cab 1991 major, Horton Stol Kit. Chevy camper s hell, Avionics: Apollo 65 GPS with ood cond., $1500 5.3L VS, 4WD, auto, & additional radio (4 fre4.6L VS, manual, 4k BO. 541-447-5504. 69k miles, 20 MPG quencies can be monimi., 23 mpg hwy, Hwy, Vin¹103597 tored at once). TranThe Bulletin RWD, Vin¹225922 sponder w/mode C, JPI 29,997 $19,998 To Subscribe call Fuel Flow Monitor, digiROBBERSON tal density, temp & amp 541-385-5800 or go to ROBBERSON LI II C 0 L II ~ II R M K I monitor. Nice paint & up- www.bendbulletin.com l lllCOLN ~ I IIB RDB holstery w/memory foam 541-312-3986 seat bottoms. Oil filter & 541-312-3986 dlr ¹0205 block htr. 1 owner past dlr ¹0205 14 yrs; always hangared no damage history. Buick LeSabre, 1995, N9475U.$26,000. with 102K miles, auto541-48(h4375 matic air powerwinChevy 3/4ton 1982, built dows, doors & seats. 350 with 450 HP and 3000 sq. ft. HanExcellent cond, well $1000 tires. $3000 gar Bend Airport all records obo. 541-633-8951 west side. 60' wide Chevrolet Trailblazer maintained, available. Must see to by 50' deep with 55' 2008 4x4 appreciate! $3000 or best wide by 16' high Automatic, 6-cylinder, Why buynew? offer. 541-475-0537 bi-fold door, 14'x14' tilt wheel, power winCheckout this truck! door rear side. Updows, power brakes, v graded with painted air conditioning, keyfloor, windows, sky less entry, 69K miles. lights, 240V/50 amp Excellent condition; outlets. tires have 90% tread. $195,000. $11,995. Buick LeSabres! (520) 360-9300, CBII 541-598-5111 2005 Dodge Ram 2002 w/cloth seats, Owner Diesel Dually 3500 $4750; 1995 w/leather 4x4,quad cab, towseats, $3750. Auto, ing & camper pkg, 5th T-Hangar for rent loaded. 130k mi. and wheel hitch, rear air at Bend airport. clean! 541-419-5060 bags, air shocks, Call 541-362-8998. brake controller, 916 spray-in liner, only Chev Trailblazer LS 2004, 37,000 mi.$26,000. Trucks & AWD, 6 cyl, remote entry, 541-382-4382 clean title, 12/15 tags, Heavy Equipment $5995. 541-610-6150 •

541-408-2387

A ltE P U B L I C NCYllCES IM ~ RTA N M

4-spd auto, 10-ply tires, low miles, almost new condition, Sell for $3500. OR For Hire

Call for quote An important premise upon which the principle of democracy is based is thatinformation about government activities must be accessible in order for the electorate to make well-informed decisions. Public notices provide this sort of accessibility io citizens who want fo know more about government activities. Read your Public Notices daily in The Bulletin cjassifieds or go fowvvvv.bendbullefr'n.comand

click on"Classi%edAds"

The Bulletin

Corvette 1979

5th Wheel Transport, 1990 Low miles, EFI 460,

Ask for Theo, 541-260-4293

Arctic Fox camper Model 660, 2003 • Full slide-out • Fits long bed truck

• Great condition

$8,900

(camper only)

541-419-7001.

a

-

'e

~x 'l

Arctic Fox 29' 2003, covered storage, slideout, exc. cond inside & outside 2016 tags, $14,500. 541-676-1449 or 541-410-6849 Challenger 32' 2005, 3 slide-outs, A/C, newer TV/VCR, stereo, e tc. Good tires, oak interior. $21,000. 541-410-3292

Eagle Cap 850, 2005 with slideout, AC, micro, frig, heater, queen bed, wet bath, exlnt cond, $16,900. 541-388-3477

leave message.

LEAR CANOPY 2003 blue, fits Ford F-350

s hort b ox ,

541-410-4354.

$5 0 0 .

Peterbilt 359 p o table water t ruck, 1 9 90, 3200 gal. tank, 5hp

Dodge Ram 2500 2008 Diesel, pump, 4-3" h oses, exc. towing vehicle, camlocks, $ 2 5,000. 2WD, 55,000 541-820-3724 miles. New batteries, rear air bags, 925 Roll-n-lock bed Utility Trailers cover, spray-in liner. 5th wheel hitch available, too. $19,000. 541-604-1285

Ford Bronco ii 4x4, 1989Automatic, power steering, stereo upgrade, set-up to tow, runs good. $1700. 541-633-6662

$995 Obo.

541-379-3530

Ford F150 LIGHTNING 1993, 500 miles on rebuilt engine. Clean interior & new tires. $7000, OBO. 541-647-8723

$12,900.

Dave, 541-350-4077

Ford Focus SES

tn~nn~p

Big Tex

Utility Trailer 5'x6', drop ramp. Perfect for hauling your dirt bikes, motorcycle, quads, etc!

L82- 4 speed. 65,000 miles Garaged since new. I've owned it 25 years. Never damaged or abused.

Ford Explorer 4x4 2001 2-dr Sport, V6, heater/AC works great, tags good 3/16, leather, good tires, everything works. Leavinq town, need to sell! $4000 obo. 541-815-9939

2011 2 .0L 4 cyls, FWD, automatic, 52k miles, 34 MPG $12,977

ROBBERSON y \ I II c 0 4 N ~

IM RD B

541-312-3986 DLR ¹0205


E6 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25, 2014 • THE BULLETIN

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809

975

Automobiles

Ford Thunderbird 2004 Convertible with hard & soft top, silver with black interior, all original,

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

allegations contained or cashier's check, hereby given that the Department, 61150 Department Director S heriff's Of fi c e , LEGAL NOTICE 63333 W. Highway Bank o f Am e rica, in the Complaint filed the real p roperty Deschutes C o u nty SE 2 7 t h Str e et, Sheriff's Office will on Bend, Oregon 97702, PUBLISHED: 20, Bend, Oregon, N.A., Plaintiff/s, v. Di- a gainst you i n t h e commonly known as Donn e r July 24, 2014 at 10:00 until but not after, DAILY JOURNAL OF sell, at public oral very low mileage, ana Eells, an i ndi- above entitled pro- 1 6767 2:00 p.m. on July 1, ceeding within thirty Place, La Pine, OrAM in the main lobby COMMERCE: auction to the highin premium condition. vidual; John Eells, an of t h e D e s chutes 2014 at which time June 18, 2014 and est bidder, for cash $19,900. i ndividual; an d a l l (30) days from the egon 97739. Condi702-249-2567 County Sheriff's Of- and place all bids for June 25, 2014 or cashier's check, other persons or par- date of service of this tions of Sale: Pofice, 63333 W. High- the a b ove-entitledTHE BEND BULLETIN: the real p roperty (car is in Bend) ties unknown claim- Summons upon you. tential bidders must June 18, 2014 and commonly known as ing any legal or equi- If you fail to appear arrive 15 m inutes way 20, Bend, Or- public works project egon, sell, at public will b e pub l icly June 25, 2014 61370 Huckleberry t able r i g ht , ti t l e , and defend this mat- prior to the auction o ral auction to t h e opened and r e ad P lace, Bend, O r estate, lien, or inter- ter within thirty (30) to allow the DesLEGAL NOTICE days from the date of c hutes Cou n t y h ighest bidder, f o r aloud. Bidders must egon 97702. Condiest in the real propFederal N a t ional publication specified Sheriff's Office to cash o r ca s hier's submit a S u bcontions of Sale: Poerty described in the bid d er's check, the real prop- tractor D i sclosure Mortgage Associatential bidders must complaint herein, ad- herein along with the review tion, its successors erty commonly known Statement. The subarrive 15 m inutes verse to Plaintiff's title, required filing f e e, funds. Only U . S. in interest and/or PLA N ET currency an d / or as 19957 Brass Drive, contractor d iscloprior to the auction o r any c l oud o n GREEN Infiniti I30 2001 assigns, Plaintiff/s, SERVICING, LLC will cashier's c h e cks Bend, Oregon 97702. sure statement may to allow the DesPlaintiff's title to the great condition/ v. Delbert V. Abbott; Conditions of S ale: be submitted in the c hutes Cou n t y Property, collectively apply to the Court for made payable to well maintained, Tamera Ann Potential bidders must sealed bid prior to Sheriff's Office to designated as DOES the relief demanded in Deschutes County 127k miles. Bechen; and occuthe Complaint. T he Sheriff's Office will arrive 15 minutes prior 2:00 p.m. on July 1, review bid d er's 1 through 50, inclu$5,900.00 obo. to the auction to allow 2014 or in a sepa- pants of the prefunds. Only U . S. sive, De f e ndant/s. first date of publica- be accepted. Pay541-420-3277 the Deschutes County rate sealed enve- mises, Defendant/s. currency an d / or Case No.: 13CV0910. tion is June 18, 2014. ment must be made No.: Sheriff's Office to re- lope marked "SUB- Case cashier's c h e cks N OTICE OF S A L E NOTICE TO DEFEN- in full immediately 13CV0877. NOREAD upon the close of view bidder's funds. CONTRACTOR made payable to Lincoln Town Car, 1995, U NDER WRIT O F DANTS: T ICE O F SAL E PAP E RS the sale. For more Only U.S. currency DISCLOSURE Deschutes County loaded, great s hape. EXECUTION - REAL T HESE UNDER WRIT OF information on this and/or cashier's STATEIIIIENT" Sheriff's Office will PROPERTY. Notice is CAREFULLY! You $4200. 541-322-9897 EXECUTION must "appear" in this " BRIDGE DRIV E sale go to: www.orchecks made payable be accepted. Payhereby given that the REAL PROPERTY. case or the other side egonsheriff s. com/sa to Deschutes County AND OTTER DRIVE" ment must be made Deschutes C o unty Notice i s h e r eby will win automatically. les.htm Sheriff's Office will be prior to 4:00 p.m. on in full immediately Sheriff's Office will on accepted. Payment July 1, 2014 at the given that the Desupon the close of July 31, 2014 at 10:00 To "appear" you must LEGAL NOTICE c hutes Coun t y must be made in full above location. the sale. For more AM in the main lobby file with the court a le- CitiMortgage, Inc., Sheriff's Office will immediately upon the information on this of t h e D e s chutes gal paper called a its successors in on August 14, 2014 close of the sale. For The proposed work sale go to: www.orCounty Sheriff's Of- "motion" or "answer." interest and/or asMazda RX-8 at 10:00 AM in the The "motion" or "anmore information on consists of the f o legonsheriff s.com/sa fice, 63333 W. Highsigns, Plaintiff/s, v. main lobby of the 40th Anniversary swer" must be given lowing: this s al e go to: les.htm way 20, Bend, OrEdition 2008 Dennis C. Morton, Deschutes County to the court clerk or www.oregonsheriffs.c 1) Overlay of the folegon, sell, at public Sr.; Janice M. MorS heriff's Of fi c e , Gray Mica Paint, lowing roads: om/sales.htm o ral auction to t h e administrator w i thin ton; Red & Black Leather and occupants • Approximately 3.29 63333 W. Highway thirty days along with h ighest bidder, f o r LEGAL NOTICE of th e p r e mises, LEGAL NOTICE 20, Bend, Oregon, Interior, Bose miles of Bndge Dnve GMAC M ortgage, cash o r ca s hier's the required filing fee. Defendant/s. Case Sound, Sunroof, CitiMortgage, Inc., sell, at public oral from Otter Drive to the check, the real prop- It must be in proper No.: LLC, its successors 4-Door, 6-Speed V 0993. its successors in end of County main- auction to the highin interest and/or erty commonly known form and have proof NOTICE 12C Auto. Trans. OF SALE interest and/or asest bidder, for cash tenance as Tax Lot 1801 on o f service o n t h e UNDER WRIT OF assigns, Plaintiff/s, signs, Plaintiff/s, v. or cashier's check, w/Paddle Shifters. • Approximately 0.27 v. Juan G utierrez Assessor Map plaintiff's attorney or, EXECUTION Original Owners. Deanna Sison; Anthe real p roperty if the plaintiff does not miles of Otter Drive 14-13-35A Ortega aka Juan (No REAL PROPERTY. drew Olsen, and occommonly known as 34,000 Miles. from Riverview Drive have a n a t t orney, Gutierrez; J o s efa County Assigned Adis h e reby cupants of the pre1346 Nor t hwest G utierrez; $17,000. to Bridge Drive dress Provided), and proof of service on the Notice Mo r t given that the Desmises, Defendant/s. C anyon Driv e , 541-588-6670 YOU 2) Installation of a gage Ele c tronic d escribed a s L O T plaintiff. IF c hutes Cou n t y Case No.: Redmond, Oregon w aterproof mem SEVEN (7), BLOCK HAVE ANY QUES- Sheriff's Office will R egistration S y s 12CV0991. NOMercedes Benz e320, TWO (2), OF LAKE TIONS, brane on the bridge 97756. C onditions YOU tems, Inc., Solely as on August 19, 2014 T ICE O F SAL E of Sale: P otential 1999 wagon, white PARK on Bridge Drive ES T A TES, S HOULD SEE A N at 10:00 AM in the N ominee for C i tUNDER WRIT OF bidders must arrive 120k mi., incl. stud- DESCHUTES A TTORNEY IMME3) Performance of ibank, N.A.; ObsidEXECUTION 15 minutes prior to ded tires, exc. cond., COUNTY, OREGON. DIATELY. If you need main lobby of the such additional and ian Estates, Inc.; REAL PROPERTY. $4500. 541-318-4502. Conditions of S a le: help in finding an at- Deschutes County i ncidental work a s the auction to allow O ccupants of t h e heriff's Offi c e , Notice i s h e r eby specified in the typi- the Desc h utes Premises; and the Potential bidders must torney, you may call S 63333 W. Highway given that the DesCounty Sheriff's Ofc al s e ctions a n d r eal property l o Porsche 911 arrive 15 minutes prior the O regon S t ate 20, Bend, Oregon, c hutes Coun t y f ice to rev i e w c ated a t specifications. to the auction to allow Bar's Lawyer Referral sell, at public oral 3018 Carrera 993 cou e Sheriff's Office will bidder's funds. Only (503) Southwest Pumice the Deschutes County S ervice a t auction to the highon July 22, 2014 at U.S. currency S pecifications an d Sheriff's Office to re- 684-3763 or toll-free est bidder, for cash Redmond, 1 0:00 AM i n t h e ca s h ier's Avenue, other bid documents and/or OR 97756, Defenview bidder's funds. in Oregon at (800) or cashier's check, main lobby of the checks made pay452-7636. The object may be inspected and Only U.S. currency dant/s. Case No.: p roperty Deschutes County obtained at the Des- able to Deschutes 12CV1332. NOand/or cashier's of the said action and the real known as S heriff's Of fi c e , chutes County Road County Sheriff's Ofchecks made payable the relief sought to be commonly T ICE O F SA L E 62959 Flo r e nce 63333 W. Highway f ice will b e ac Department, 6 1 150 UNDER WRIT OF to Deschutes County o btained therein i s 1996, 73k miles, rive, Bend, O r 20, Bend, Oregon, P a yment EXECUTION S.E. 2 7 t h St r e et, cepted. Sheriff's Office will be fully set forth in said D Tiptronic auto. egon 97701. Condisell, at public oral must be made in full Bend, Oregon 97702 is REAL PROPERTY. accepted. P ayment complaint, an d transmission. Silver, of Sale: Poauction to the highor t h e De s chutes immediately upon must be made in full briefly stated as fol- tions Notice is h e reby blue leather interior, tential bidders must est bidder, for cash t he close o f t h e County webs i te, given that the Desimmediately upon the lows: Foreclosure of a arrive 15 minutes moon/sunroof, new or cashier's check, sale. For more inDeed of Trust/Mortwww.deschutes.org. close of the sale. For c hutes Cou n t y quality tires and prior to the auction the real p roperty f ormation on t h i s Inquiries pertaining to gage. Grantors: The Sheriff's Office will more information on battery, car and seat to allow the Descommonly known as sale go to: www.orEstate of Mary E Harthese s pecifications this s al e g o to: on July 29, 2014 at covers, many extras. Coun t y 238 Southwest 10th egonsheriff s.com/sa shall be directed to D e c eased c hutes 1 0:00 AM i n t h e www.oregonsheriffs.c graves, Recently fully serSheriff's Office to Street, R e dmond, les.htm and Quinten S HarGeorge Kolb, County main lobby of the om/sales.htm viced, garaged, bid d e r's O regon 977 5 6 . Engineer, telephone graves. Property ad- review Deschutes County looks and runs like LEGAL NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE funds. Only U . S. Conditions of Sale: dress:53795 4th St., (541) 322-7113. Of fi c e , new. Excellent conFederal N a t ional S heriff's Bank of America, Na- La Pine, OR 97739. c urrency an d / or Potential b i d ders 63333 W. Highway dition $29,700 Mortgage Associational As s ociation, Publication: The Bulle- cashier's c h e cks must arrive 15 minBids shall be made on 20, Bend, Oregon, 541-322-9647 its successors Plaintiff/s, v. Murlan E. t in. DATED this 2 8 made payable to u tes prior to t h e the forms furnished by tion, sell, at public oral in interest and/or Grise; Debra K. Grise; day of May, 2014. Deschutes County auction to allow the the County, incorpo- assigns, auction to the highPlaintiff/s, The Ridge at Eagle Brandon Smith, OSB Sheriff's Office will Deschutes County rating al l c o n tract v. Vicki J. Swanson est bidder, for cash Porsche 911 Turbo Crest Owners Asso- ¹ 1 24584, be accepted. PayS heriff's Office t o Emai l : documents, including or cashier's check, ciation, other persons bsmith Orobinsontait.c ment must be made review bid d er's a Bid Bond or Cash- aka Vicki Joy Swanthe real p roperty son; JPM o rgan or parties, including om, Robinson Tait, in full immediately f unds. Only U . S. i ers Check for t h e commonly known as occupants, unknown P.S., Attorneys for upon the close of currency an d / or minimum amount of Chase Bank, NA; 3018 SW P umice claiming any r i ght, Plaintiff, Tel: ( 206) the sale. For more cashier's c h e cks 10% of the Bid Price, Robert H. Windlinx, Avenue, Redmond, Springleaf Fititle, lien, or interest in 676-9640, Fax: (206) information on this made payable to addressed and mailed JR; O regon 977 5 6 . nancial S e rvices; t he p r operty d e - 676-9659. sale go to: www.orDeschutes County or delivered to Chris Conditions of Sale: 2003 6 speed, X50 C rooked Rive r scribed in the comegonsheriff s.com/sa Sheriff's Office will Doty, Department Di- R anch Club a n d Potential b i d ders added power pkg., LEGAL NOTICE plaint herein, Defenles.htm be accepted. Payrector, 61150 SE 27th Maintenance Assomust arrive 15 min530 HP! Under 10k as dant/s. Case N o .: CitiBank, N .A . ment must be made Street, Bend, Oregon ciation; Occupants u tes prior t o t h e miles, Arctic silver, LEGAL NOTICE 13CV0323. NOTICE Trustee for American in full immediately 97702 in a sealed en- of th e gray leather interior, P r emises; auction to allow the OF SALE U NDER Home Mortgage As- CitiMortgage, Inc., upon the close of velope plainly marked Deschutes County new quality t ires, the Real PropWRIT O F E X ECU- sets Trust 2 006-4, its successors in the sale. For more "BID F O R THE and Sheriff's Office to and battery, Bose interest and/or aserty located at 7337 TION - REAL PROP- Mortgage-Backed information on this OVERLAY OF review bid d e r's p remium sou n d ERTY. N o t ic e is Pass-Through Certifi- signs, Plaintiff/s, v. Northwest Rainbow sale go to: www.orBRIDGE DRIVE AND funds. Only U . S. stereo, moon/sunRoad, Terrebonne, hereby given that the cates Series 2006-4, Robert Hopper aka egonsheriff s.com/sa OTTER DRIVE" and O regon, c urrency an d / or roof, car and seat 977 6 0 , Deschutes C o u nty Plaintiff/s, v. Paul D. Robert T. Hopper, les.htm the name and adcashier's c h e cks covers. Many extras. Defendant/s. Case Sheriff's Office will on W ilson; Denise K . individually and as dress of the bidder. Garaged, p e r fect August 19, 2014 at LEGAL NOTICE No.: 13C V 0631. made payable to Wilson; Persons or Trustee of the HopDeschutes County condition, $59,700. CitiMortgage, Inc., NOTICE OF SALE unknown per Family T rust 10:00 AM in the main parties B ecause the w o r k UNDER WRIT OF Sheriff's Office will 541-322-9647 its successors in l obby of t h e D e s - claiming any r ight, dated January 27, called for under this be accepted. PayF. interest and/or asEXECUTION c hutes Coun t y title, lien or interest in 2006; D e br a contract is for a pubment must be made signs, Plaintiff/s, v. REAL PROPERTY. Sheriff's Office, 63333 t he p r operty d e - Hopper individually lic works project subJose L. Gonzalez Notice i s h e r eby in full immediately W. Highway 20, Bend, scribed in the com- and as Trustee of ject to state prevailing given that the Desupon the close of a ka J os e Lu i s Oregon, sell, at public plaint herein, Defen- the Hopper Family rates of wage under c hutes the sale. For more Gonzalez; Vicki L. Coun t y o ral auction to t he d ant/s. Case N o . : Trust dated JanuO RS 2 79C.800 t o information on this Gonzalez aka Vicki Sheriff's Office will h ighest bidder, f o r 1 3CV1241FC. N O - ary 27, 2006; Grey279C.870, the County on August 7, 2014 sale go to: www.orLynn Gonzalez; JP cash o r ca s hier's TICE OF SALE UN- hawk C o ndominiwill not r eceive or at 10:00 AM in the egonsheriff s.com/sa Morgan Chase Bank Subaru Outback 2012 check, the real prop- DER WRIT OF EXums Owner consider a bid unless les.htm 3.6R Limited, 6 cyl, erty commonly known ECUTION - REAL A ssociation; an d successor in intermain lobby of the the bid contains a est to Washington auto. trans., AWD, as 8910 Eagle Crest PROPERTY. Notice is O ccupants of t he County statement by the bid- Deschutes leather heated seats, Blvd, Redmond, Or- hereby given that the Premises, D e fenMutual Bank; OccuS heriff's Of fi c e , der that the bidder will LEGAL NOTICE AWD, power moon egon 97756. Condi- Deschutes C o u nty dant/s. Case No.: pants of the Pre63333 W. Highway c omply with O R S Green Tree Servicmises; and the Real 20, Bend, Oregon, r oof, a n d mor e ! tions of Sale: Poten- Sheriff's Office will on 12CV0896. 2 79C.870 Each b id ing, LLC, its sucProperty located at 25,600 miles. Below t ial b i dders m u s t A ugust 5, 2 014 a t AMENDED NOsell, at public oral cessors in interest SAL E 60972 Bi l l adeau must contain a state- auction to the highKB O $2 7 ,500 arrive 15 minutes prior 10:00 AM in the main T ICE O F ment as to whether est bidder, for cash and/or ass i gns, Road, Bend, O r541-344-5325 to the auction to allow lobby of t h e D e s- UNDER WRIT OF the bidder is a resiPlaintiff/s, v. Jesse egon 97702, Defenor cashier's check, annie2657©yahoo.com the Deschutes County chutes County EXECUTION dent bidder, as deM. Sweetman AKA dant/s. Case No.: real p roperty Sheriff's Office to re- Sheriff's Office, 63333 REAL PROPERTY. fined in ORS the Jesse Mark SweetNOcommonly known as view bidder's funds. W. Highway 20, Bend, Notice i s h e r eby 12CV1256. 279A.120. V e ndors 7337 T ICE O F SAL E Nor t hwest m an; A ngela J . Only U.S. currency Oregon, sell, at public given that the Desshall use recyclable Rainbow Road, Sweetman AKA Anc hutes Coun t y UNDER WRIT OF Terand/or cashier's o ral auction to t h e products to the maxi- rebonne, Oregon gela Jamie SweetEXECUTION Sheriff's Office will checks made payable highest bidder, f or mum extent economi- 97760. C onditions man; State of OrREAL PROPERTY. ca s hier's on July 31, 2014 at to Deschutes County cash o r Bend Notice is h e reby cally feasible in the of Sale: P o tential egon; Sheriff's Office will be check, the real prop- 1 0:00 AM i n t h e performance of t he Anesthesiology given that the Desbidders must arrive VOLVO XC90 2007 accepted. Payment erty commonly known main lobby of the contract work set forth Group; occupants of c hutes Cou n t y AWD, 6-cyl 3.2L, 15 minutes prior to must be made in full as 1340 NW Constel- Deschutes County in this document. the premises; and power everything, S heriff's Of fi c e , Sheriff's Office will the auction to allow immediately upon the lation Drive, Bend, the real property logrey on grey, leather on August 7, 2014 the Desc h utes close of the sale. For Oregon 97701. Con- 63333 W. Highway Bidders s h al l be County Sheriff's Ofcated at 3028 heated lumbar seats, 20, Bend, Oregon, at 10:00 AM in the ditions of Sale: Pomore information on prequalified with the f ice Southwest Peridot 3rd row seat, moonmain lobby of the to rev i e w this s al e g o to: tential bidders must sell, at public oral State of Oregon in ac- bidder's funds. Only Avenue, Redmond, roof, new tires, alDeschutes County www.oregonsheriffs.c arrive 15 minutes prior auction to the highOregon 97756, Deways garaged, all S heriff's Offi c e , cordance with ORS est bidder, for cash U.S. currency om/sales.htm to the auction to allow 279C.430 279C.450 maintenance up to 63333 W. Highway and/or ca s h ier's fendant/s. Case No.: the Deschutes County or cashier's check, LEGAL NOTICE and Desc h utes 12CV1244. NOdate, excellent cond. made payOffice to re- the real p roperty 20, Bend, Oregon, County Code checks A STEAL/tT $13,900. CIRCUIT COURT OF Sheriff's T ICE O F SAL E commonly known as sell, at public oral able to Deschutes view bidder's funds. 541-223-2218 OREGON FOR DES- Only U.S. currency 1439 NW Juniper 12.52.020. The UNDER WRIT OF auction to the highSheriff's Ofprequalification clas- County CHUTES COUNTY. and/or EXECUTION Street 12 , B e nd, est bidder, for cash f ice will b e ac cashier's sification required for cepted. P a yment REAL PROPERTY. G REEN PLA N E T checks made payable O regon or cashier's check, 977 0 1 . t/yl/Jetta GL/2012 S ERVICING, LL C , Notice is h e reby the real p roperty this project is "(ACP) must be made in full Deschutes County Conditions of Sale: Plaintiff, vs. QUINTEN to Asphalt Con c rete immediately u p on given that the DesPotential b i d ders commonly known as Sheriff's Office will be Paving and Oiling". S HARGRAVES, THE accepted. P ayment must arrive 15 minc hutes Cou n t y 60972 Bi l l adeau t he close o f t h e ESTATE OF MARY E. must be made in full u tes prior to t h e The successful bidSheriff's Office will Road, Bend, O rsale. For more inders and subcontracH ARGRAVES, D E on August 19, 2014 egon 97702. Condif ormation on t h i s upon the auction to allow the CEASED, UN- immediately tors providing labor sale go to: www.orat 10:00 AM in the tions of Sale: PoDeschutes County close of the sale. For shall maintain a quali- egonsheriff KNOWN HEIRS AND more information on main lobby of the Sheriff's Office to tential bidders must s.com/sa Bluetooth, pl, pw, DEVISEES OF MARY this s al e g o to: review fied drug testing pro- les.htm Deschutes County arrive 15 minutes bid d er's manual trans. gram for the duration E. HAR G RAVES, www.oregonsheriffs.c S heriff's Of fi c e , f unds. Only U . S. prior to the auction Vin¹108574 D ECEASED, A N D om/sales.htm of the contract. BidLEGAL NOTICE 63333 W. Highway currency an d / or to allow the Desders shall be licensed $18,977 PERSONS OR PAR20, Bend, Oregon, cashier's c h e cks c hutes Cou n t y with the Construction Flagstar Bank, FSB, TIES UNK N OWN LEGAL NOTICE its successors in sell, at public oral S heriff's Office t o made payable to ROBBERSON W Contractor's B oard. CLAIMING ANY CitiMorgage, Inc., its interest and/or asauction to the highDeschutes County review bid d er's RIGHT, TITLE, LIEN, successors in interContractors and subest bidder for cash signs, Plaintiff/s, v. funds. Only U . S. Sheriff's Office will O R I NTEREST I N est and/or assigns, or cashier's check, be accepted. Payc urrency an d / or contractors need not John T. McGregor; 541-312-3986 THE PRO P ERTY Plaintiff/s, v. Kean L River Canyon Esthe real p roperty cashier's c h e cks be l icensed u nder ment must be made DLR ¹0205 ORS 468A.720. DESCRIBED IN THE D illon AKA K e a n tates Homeowner's commonly known as in full immediately made payable to COMPLAINT Dillion; Cindy D DilA ssociation; K i m3028 Sou t hwest Deschutes County upon the close of Advertise your car! Deschutes C o unty HEREIN, Defendants. lon AKA Cindy Dee berly Mc G regor; Peridot Av e nue, the sale. For more Sheriff's Office will Add A Picture! NO. 1 3 C V1443FC. Dillion; Cit i Bank information on this may reject any bid not Kenneth J. Sherrill Redmond, Oregon be accepted. PayReach thousands of readers! P LAINTIFF'S S U Min compliance with all South Dakota N.A.; a nd M ar y J o a n 97756. Conditions sale go to: www.orment must be made Call 541-385-5809 MONS BY PUBLICA- Midland F u n ding egonsheriff prescribed b i d ding Sherrill; Ray Klein, of Sale: P o tential in full immediately s.com/sa The Bulletin Classifieds T ION. TO:THE E S procedures and re- Inc., DBA ProfesLLC; Occupants of bidders must arrive les.htm upon the close of TATE OF MARY E. the Premises, Dequirements, and may sional Credit Ser15 minutes pnor to the sale. For more I The Bulletin recoml reject for good cause vices; Wendie EvH ARGRAVES, D E fendant/s. Case No.: LEGAL NOTICE the auction to allow information on this mends extra cautionI CEASED, UN- 13CV0714. NOCitiMortgage, Inc., its sale go to: www.orany or all bids upon a ery; the Desc h utes S t a t e of when p u r chasing I KNOWN HEIRS AND T ICE O F finding of Deschutes SAL E successors and/or as- egonsheriff O regon; Uni t e d County Sheriff's Ofs.com/sa f products or services DEVISEES OF MARY UNDER WRIT OF C ounty it is i n t h e f ice to revi e w signs, Plaintiff/s, v. States of America; les.htm from out of the area. public interest to do and Occupants of E. HAR G RAVES, EXECUTION John R. Blust; Kelly A. bidder's funds. Only f S ending c ash , D ECEASED, P E RREAL PROPERTY. Blust; and all other LEGAL NOTICE so. The protest pe- the Premises, DeU.S. currency checks, or credit in- q SONS OR PARTIES Notice i s riod for this procure- fendant/s. Case No.: h e r eby persons or parties unDESCHUTES and/or ca s h ier's formation may be I UNKNOWN CLAIM- given that the Desment is seven (7) cal- 13CV0562. known claiming any COUNTY,OREGON checks made payNOendar days. [ subject to FRAUD. ING AN Y R I G HT, c hutes Coun t y right, title, lien or in- ROAD DEPARTMENT T ICE O F SAL E able to Deschutes For more informaTITLE, LIEN, OR IN- Sheriff's Office will t erest i n t h e r e a l UNDER WRIT OF County Sheriff's Off tion about an adverINVITATION TO BID CHRIS DOTY TEREST I N T HE on August 19, 2014 property c ommonly EXECUTION f ice will b e a c tiser, you may call PROPERTY DE- at 10:00 AM in the k nown a s 19 9 5 7 FOR THE REAL PROPERTY. cepted. P a yment I the Oregon Statel S CRIBED I N T H E main lobby of the Brass Drive, Bend, OVERLAYING OF Notice i s h e r eby must be made in full Attorney General's t COMPLAINT Deschutes County OR 97702, Defen- BRIDGE DRIVE AND i mmediately u p o n given that the DesOffice C o nsumer I HEREIN. IN OTTER DRIVE T HE Sheriff's Off i c e, d ant/s. Case N o . : c hutes Coun t y t he close o f t h e f Protection hotline at NAME O F T HE 63333 W. Highway 1 3CV1096FC. N O 2014 Sheriff's Office will sale. For more in1-877-877-9392. STATE OF OREGON: 20, Bend, Oregon, TICE OF SALE UNon August 28, 2014 f ormation on t h is You are hereby re- sell, at public oral DER WRIT OF EX- Sealed bids will be at 10:00 AM in the sale go to: www.orquired to appear and auction to the highECUTION REAL received at the Desmain lobby of the egonsheriff s.com/sa Serving Central Oregon sinceSIB PROPERTY. Notice is chutes County Road les.htm defend against the est bidder, for cash Deschutes County

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LEGAL NOTICE Green Tree Servicing LLC, its successors i n in t e rest and/or ass i gns, P laintiff/s, v . U n k nown Heirs o f Linda M. Tiekamp; James Scott Mothershed; State of Oregon; Occupants of the Premises; and the real property located at 2445 Southwest 24th Street R e dmond, Oregon 97756, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV1125. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY.

Notice is h e reby given that the Desc hutes Cou n t y Sheriff's Office will on August 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 2445 Sou t hwest 24th Street, Redm ond, Ore g o n 97756. Conditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to revi e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s h ier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full i mmediately u p on t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h is sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Independent Bank, a Michigan corporation, Plaintiff/s, v. Gregory C. Horsley, an individual; Joel A. Horsley, an individual; The R esidence C l u b at Pronghorn V i l l as Condominiums Owners' A ssociation, a n O r egon mutual benefit corporation; and Villas at Pronghorn Homeowners' Association Inc. an Oregon mutual benefit corporation, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV0454. NOT ICE O F SA L E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice is h e reby given that t


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f ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full i mmediately u p on t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h is sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Option One Mortgage Loan Trust 2006-3, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-3, Plaintiff/s, v. Estate of Wesley M. Johnson, d eceased; Julie R . Johnson aka J u lie Rouse; Unk n own heirs and devisees of Wesley M. Johnson, deceased; State of Oregon, Department of Justice; Ray Klein Inc. dba Professional Credit Service; Persons or Parties unknown claiming any right, title, lien or interest in the property described in the complaint herein, Defend ant/s. Case N o . : 13CV0092. NOTICE OF SALE U N DER WRIT O F E X ECUTION - REAL PROPERTY. N o tice is hereby given that the Deschutes C o u nty Sheriff's Office will on August 12, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main l obby of t h e D e schutes County Sheriff 's O ff ice,63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public o ral auction to t h e h ighest bidder, f o r cash o r ca s hier's check, the real property commonly known as 645 6 0 Old Bend-Redmond Highway, Bend, Oregon 97701. Conditions of Sale: Potent ial b i dders m u s t arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. P ayment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. For more information on this s al e g o to: www.oregonsheriffs.c om/sales.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. a s T r u stee F/B/0 Holders of Structured A s s et Mortgage I n v estm ents II Inc. , S tructured A s s e t Mortgage I n vestm ents II Trus t 2 007-AR4, Mo r t age Pass Through ertificates, Series 2007-AR4, P laintiff/s, v . E d ward T. Pecoraro; Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union; O ccupants of t h e Property, D e f endant/s. Case No.: 13CV0415. NOT ICE O F SA L E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice is h e reby given that the Desc hutes Cou n t y Sheriff's Office will on August 14, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p r operty commonly known as 1 327 N E Bea r Creek Road, Bend, O regon 977 0 1 . Conditions of Sale: Potential b i d ders must arrive 15 minu tes prior t o t h e auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bid d e r's funds. Only U . S. c urrency an d / or cashier's c h ecks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Jon D. Soliz; Jennifer L. Soliz, AKA Jennifer Lea Soliz; Rivermark Community Credit Union; Ellen J . Kri d er; Steven D. Bryant; Stonehedge on the Rim A s s ociation, Inc.; Occupants of the Premises; and the real property located at 2558 Southwest I n dian Avenue, Redmond, Oregon 97756, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV1299. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice i s h e r eby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will

on August 7, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 2558 Southwest Indian Avenue, Redm ond, Ore g o n 97756. Conditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to rev i e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s hier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full immediately upon t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h is sale go to: www.or-

egonsheri ff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE

Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Socorro Aguilar; Rafael Barr i os; Canyon Rim Village Homeowners Association, Inc.; and occupants of the premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 12CV1222. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice i s h e r eby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on A ugust 2 1 st, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Office, 6 3 33 3 W. Highway 20, Bend, O regon, sell, a t public oral auction to the highest bidd er, for c ash o r cashier's check, the real property commonly known as 830 Northwest 17th Street, R edmond, O regon 977 5 6 . Conditions of Sale: Potential b i d ders must arrive 15 minu tes prior t o t h e auction to allow the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office to review bid d e r's funds. Only U . S. c urrency an d / or cashier's c h e cks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Dextra Hopper aka Dextra B. Hopper a k a De x t ra Baldwin H o p per; U nited States o f America; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 13CV0634. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice i s h e r eby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on July 15, 2014 at 1 0:00 AM i n t h e main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 61880 Walter Court, B end, Ore g o n 97702. Conditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to rev i e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s h ier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full i mmediately u p on t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h is sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Ro n al d D. Lowndes; Cinderella Evans; and occupants of the premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 13CV0612. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY.

Notice is h e reby given that the Desc hutes Cou n t y Sheriff's Office will on August 14, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Off i c e, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 16543 Fawn Court, La Pine, Oregon 97739. C o nditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to rev i e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s h ier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e ac cepted. P a yment must be made in full immediately upon t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h i s sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Bonnie M. Thompson AKA Bonnie Mary Thompson; O ccupants of t h e Premises; and the real property l oc ated a t 16 8 5 0 D owney Roa d , B end, Ore g o n 97707, Defendant/s. Case No.: 13CV0124. NOT ICE O F SA L E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice is h e reby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on August 21, 2014 at 10:00 am in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Off i c e, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 1 6850 Dow n ey R oad, Bend, O r egon 97707. Conditions of Sale: Potential bidders must arrive 15 m inutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office to review bid d er's funds. Only U .S. currency an d / or cashier's c h e cks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheriffs.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. David A. Hansen; Rob Marken; and O ccupants of t h e Premises, D efendant/s. Case No.: 13CV1166FC. NOT ICE O F SA L E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice is h e reby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on August 21, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County Sheriff's Off i c e, 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 20581 Dylan Loop, B end, Ore g o n 97702. C o nditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to rev i e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s h ier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full immediately upon t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation o n t h i s sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Shea Milliron aka Shea B . Mi e ch; Foxborough Homeowners Association, Inc.; an d O c c upants of the Premises, Defendant/s. Case No.: 13CV0451. NOT ICE O F SAL E

UNDER WRIT OF 13CV1082FC. NOEXECUTION T ICE O F SAL E REAL PROPERTY. UNDER WRIT OF Notice i s h e r eby EXECUTION given that the DesREAL PROPERTY. c hutes Coun t y Notice i s h e r eby Sheriff's Office will given that the Deson August 28, 2014 c hutes Coun t y at 10:00 AM in the Sheriff's Office will main lobby of the on August 12, 2014 Deschutes County at 10:00 AM in the S heriff's Of fi c e , main lobby of the 63333 W. Highway Deschutes County 20, Bend, Oregon, S heriff's Of fi c e , sell, at public oral 63333 W. Highway auction to the high20, Bend, Oregon, est bidder, for cash sell, at public oral or cashier's check, auction to the highthe real p roperty est bidder, for cash commonly known as or cashier's check, 20628 Cou p l es the real p roperty L ane, Bend, O r commonly known as egon 97702-2983. 1 9401 Gold e n Conditions of Sale: M eadow Loo p , Potential b i d ders B end, Ore g o n must arrive 15 min97702-3903. Condiu tes prior to t h e tions of Sale: Poauction to allow the tential bidders must Deschutes County arrive 15 minutes Sheriff's Office to prior to the auction review bid d er's to allow the Desf unds. Only U . S. c hutes Coun t y currency an d / or S heriff's Office t o cashier's c h e cks review bid d e r's made payable to funds. Only U . S. Deschutes County c urrency an d / or Sheriff's Office will cashier's c h e cks be accepted. Paymade payable to ment must be made Deschutes County in full immediately Sheriff's Office will upon the close of be accepted. Paythe sale. For more ment must be made information on this in full immediately sale go to: www.orupon the close of egonsheriff s.com/sa the sale. For more les.htm information on this sale go to: www.orLEGAL NOTICE egonsheriff s.com/sa Wells Fargo Bank, les.htm NA, its successors in interest and/or LEGAL NOTICE assigns, Plaintiff/s, Wells Fargo Bank, v. Janis Champoux; N.A., its successors Riverrim Commuin interest and/or nity As s ociation; assigns, Plaintiff/s, M ortgage Ele c v. Michael G. Fief tronic Registration aka Michael GreSystems, Inc., as gory Fief; Jo D. Fief nominee for Pacific aka Jo Deann Fief; R esidential M o r t - Selco C ommunity gage, LLC; Angela Credit Union; OccuCauser; G r egory pants of the PreLynn Roesch; and mises; and the real O ccupants of t h e property located at Premises, D efen20636 Mary Way, dant/s. Case No.: B end, Ore g o n

97701, Defendant/s. Case No.: 13CV0461. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice i s h e r eby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on July 29, 2014 at 1 0:00 AM i n t h e main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 20636 Mary Way, B end, Oreg o n 97701. Conditions of Sale: P o tential bidders must arrive 15 minutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc h utes County Sheriff's Off ice to revi e w bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency and/or ca s h ier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Off ice will b e a c cepted. P a yment must be made in full i mmediately u p on t he close o f t h e sale. For more inf ormation on t h is sale go to: www.oregonsheriff s.com/sa les.htm LEGAL NOTICE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff/s, v. Richard A. King; V onda K . Ki n g ; Providence Homeowners' Association, Inc.; Occupants of the Premises; and the real property located at 3085 Nor t heast W averly Cou r t ,

B end,

Ore g o n

TION - REAL PROPERTY. N o t ic e is hereby given that the 12CV1135. NODeschutes C o u nty T ICE O F SA L E Sheriff's Office will on UNDER WRIT OF August 14, 2014 at EXECUTION 10:00 AM in the main REAL PROPERTY. l obby of t h e D e s Notice is h e reby chutes County given that the DesSheriff 's O ff ice,63333 c hutes Cou n t y W. Highway 20, Bend, Sheriff's Office will Oregon, sell, at public on August 5, 2014 o ral auction to t h e at 10:00 AM in the h ighest bidder, f o r main lobby of the cash o r ca s hier's Deschutes County check, the real propS heriff's Of fi c e , erty commonly known 63333 W. Highway as 650-656 NW 8th 20, Bend, Oregon, Street, Redmond, Orsell, at public oral egon 97756. Condiauction to the hightions of Sale: Potenest bidder, for cash t ial b i dders m u s t or cashier's check, arrive 15 minutes prior the real p roperty to the auction to allow commonly known as the Deschutes County 3085 NE W averly Sheriff's Office to reCourt, Bend, O rview bidder's funds. Only U.S. currency egon 97701. Conditions of Sale: Poand/or cashier's tential bidders must checks made payable arrive 15 minutes to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be prior to the auction to allow the Desaccepted. P ayment c hutes Coun t y must be made in full Sheriff's Office to immediately upon the review bid d e r's close of the sale. For funds. Only U . S. more information on c urrency an d / or this s al e g o to: cashier's c h ecks www.oregonsheriffs.c made payable to om/sales.htm Deschutes County LEGAL NOTICE Sheriff's Office will Wells Fargo Bank, be accepted. PayNational A s sociament must be made tion as trustee for in full immediately S tructured A s s e t upon the close of Mortgage I n vestthe sale. For more m ents II Inc. , information on this Greenpoint M o r tsale go to: www.orgage Funding Trust egonsheriff s.com/sa 2 006-AR3, M o rtles.htm gage Pass-Through LEGAL NOTICE Certificates, Series Wells Fargo Bank, 2006-AR3, through N .A., Plaintiff/s, v . their loan servicing Mark Hinkle; and Per- agent J P M organ sons or Parties un- Chase Bank, Naknown claiming any tional Association, right, title, lien or in- Plaintiff/s, v. Mary terest in the property Poppenheimer-Han described in the com- son; Noel Hanson plaint herein, Defen- aka Noel E d win d ant/s. Case N o .: Hanson II; M o rt13CV0598. NOTICE gage Ele c tronic OF SALE U N DER R egistration S y s WRIT OF E X ECU- tems, Inc.; Green97701, Defendant/s.

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point Mor t gage Funding, Inc.; Occupants o f the Property o f 54 9 N ortheast Lar c h Ave, Redmond, OR 97756; Occupants of the Property of 551 Northeast Larch Ave, Redmond, OR 97756, Defendant/s. No.: Case 13CV0442. NOT ICE O F SAL E UNDER WRIT OF EXECUTION REAL PROPERTY. Notice i s h e r eby given that the Desc hutes Coun t y Sheriff's Office will on August 7, 2014 at 10:00 AM in the main lobby of the Deschutes County S heriff's Of fi c e , 63333 W. Highway 20, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash or cashier's check, the real p roperty commonly known as 549/551 NE Larch Ave., Redmond, Oregon 97756. Conditions of Sale: Potential bidders must arrive 15 m inutes prior to the auction to allow the Desc hutes Cou n t y S heriff's Office t o review bid d er's f unds. Only U . S. currency an d / or cashier's c h e cks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. For more information on this sale go to: www.oregonsheri ff s.com/sa les.htm

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THE BULLETI

TO PLACE AN AD CALL CLASSIFIED• 541-385-5809 CASSELJOSEPHW BRADLEY KEVIN K CASSELSSCOTTL BRAEM DONALDB CASTEEL SID M BRAKEMAN MINNIE CASWELL BURNEY BRALY DAVIDV CASWELLJOSEPHH BRAND MALCOLML SYLVIA R Central Electric Cooperative, Inc., gives BRANDENBURGELIZABETHA CASWELL CATER MICHAEL E BRANDER ALEX G CATES EDWIN C notice that unclaimed capital credit BRANDT ERNESTR CATES MARYA payments have been available since BRANDTFORREST CAUDILLO LUCY VIRGINIAM CAUDLE CAROLL DeCember 11, 2009 at the OffiCeOf the BRANSTETTER BRATLEY C M CAUFIELD JOSEPH S CAULFIELD EDWARD Cooperative, at 2098 N. Highway 97, BRAZEALJEFF BREADON CHRIS G CAYTON DIANEL Redmond, Oregon to t h e m ember's BREADONJULIE CENARRUSAJOE E BREADONROBERTW CENT OR INDEPHEALTH nameS hereunder Of memberShiP and BRENDLEHARRY L SERV CESSNA DOLORESL payments which have been authorized BRENIMAN LARRYD CHACE TOMC BRENIMAN SKEYESL for more than 4 Unlesssaid members BRESHINI CHRISTINA A CHADWICKDIANA DENISEA CHAMBERLAINCRAIG D Or heirS Claim Said PaymentS not later BREWER BREWERDONALDL CHAMNESSARTHURW CHANCE R E than Jan 1, 2015, they will be forfeited BREWERROYB BREWERSHARONJ CHANEY NATHAN to the Cooperative. These payments are BRIDGE DANIEL R CHAPLIN ELIZABETHW BRIGGS DOLORES A CHAPMANHOWARDC retired capital credits for patronage for BRILES JUDITH M CHARBONNEAU STEPHANIE A BRINKLEY THOMAS H CHARLEYWANDAV the yearS: 1985 and 2008. TO Claim the BRISLIN JOHNA CHARPILLOZEDNAM CaPital Credit Payment PleaSe PhOne Or BROADDUSROBERTS CHASE DEBRAJ BROADDUS RONALDL CHASE JAMESR Write Our OffiCe. BROCKJOHN CHASE NINA M BROCK TERRYV CHASE PHIL W BROCKETT DAURAL CHASTEEN WILLIAML A BAR D PINTORANCH BARTLETT FRANKW BROEKERRICHARD L CHATFIELDDEEA BARTLETT VERNR BRONSONROBERT P CHAVEZ MANUEL ABBOTT OLETHAM BARTO CRAIG A BROOKHART TIM F CHAVEZ TOMMYJ ABBY JOHN D BROOKSCONLEY CHENEY MARY ABRIEL RAYMONDD BARTONGARYA BROOKS LORI CHESHIRE MICHAELN ABRUZZO FREDPEGGL BARTON RICK M ACORD DONALDL BARTSCHERLYLE BROOKS SSHERMAN CHEWNING CONSTANCE V BARWIS LEON BROOME MARGIEG CHIAPUZIOROBERT ACOSTA JOSEA BASSETT CHARLESS BROSE DANIEL J CHICHENOFFGERALD P ACOSTA MARCIAA BROSSARDKEITH CHILDERS ALBERTD ADAIR RICHARD R BASSFORDPAULS BROSWICK BRUCEI CHILDERSRONALDE ADAMS FRANKR BASZLER ROSEM ADAMS JOEYL BATEHAM KELLEN A BROTHERSPAUL CHILLESS TEDD BATEMAN DALE L BROUGHTON HAL F CHOPPINGROBERT ADAMS KENARD BATES CARYLB BROUSE MARKS CHOTARDMARILYNL ADAMS KENNETHD BROW UNA W CHRISMANROBERT E ADAMS LEWISE BATES DAVIDL BROWNALICEA CHRISMANROSSC ADAMS NORMAN BATES DOROTHYD ADAMS SHERRYA BATES KARENJ BROWNALVIN R CHRISTENSENCHARLES S ADAMS TEDG BATES RAYB BROWNBARBARAM CHRISTENSENGERALD M BATHA JONW BROWNCHARLESC CHRISTENSENMELANIE A ADDINGTON ROBERTL BAUER KEITHJ BROWNCHARLESN CHRISTENSENRUBY ADDISON STEVE BROWN CHRIS P ESTATE OF ADUDELL KENNETHS BAUMAN JOHNS AFFOLTERCHRISW BAUMANNRODDYK BROWN CRAIGE CHRISTENSONMARLENE BAUNACH FRANCESV BROWN DONALD G CHRISTIE ALEXANDERV AGGEN ROBERT0 BAXTER CARRIEE BROWN ERICM CHRISTOPHERSON AGGIE'SANTIQUE NOOK BAXTER JOHNT BROWN HAZELF ARLENE H AIRHART RAYL BROWN J W CHUBB HL AITKEN JIM N BEAL WILLIAM R BROWN J SCOTT AKIN DAVID H BEALL PAULINE CHURCHILL JULIET N AKINS GIFFORDJ BEALS JEANNEA BROWNJAN L CIRCLE 5 TRAILERPARK BEAN LOIS M BROWN LESLIEA CIRCLE F RANCHESINC ALBERTJOHN 0 BEARD JOHNR BROWN RICHARDC CISNA JOSEPHA ALBERTINI ALAN F BROWN ROBERTL CITIZEN VALLEYBANK ALBERTSONKIRKL BEARD PAULD BROWN ROBERTN ALBERTSONLEOJ BEATY PATM TRUST ALBERTSON MIKE BEBB EDWARDE BROWN RON L CLAES THOMAS E BECHTELL CHARLESD BROWNSHAWN CLAFLIN PETERE ALBINGERJOSEPHZ BECK GARY M BROWNSUSANNAM CLAPP MARTINA ALDOR KATHRYN BROWN TAMMY L CLAREY DUVEEN0 ALDOUS EDGARJ BECK JOHNE ALDOUS JOHNE BECK MARGARET BROWNTRACY F CLARK DARWINH BECKETT GERALDN BROWNE JIM R CLARK DAVIDL ALDRICH ORENK BECKMANIKENT BRUCKER M CLARK MATTHEWC ALEXANDERDAVIDJ BRUINGTON ANNAM CLARK PAMELAY ALFONSO RICKEM BECKWITHJEFFERYD BRUNE LEROYA CLARK PATRICKM ALFORD FRANKE BECRAFT HARRYR ALGER RICHARDB BEEBE PRESTONL BRUNERGARYG CLARK RICHARDI BEEBE WILLIAMA BRUNMEIER R J CLARK ROBERTD ALLAN FREDW BEEK CHARLES J BRUTSCH DOUGLAS J CLARK RUSSELLB ALLBEE WILLIAMJ BRYAN JOYCEA CLARK STEVE ALLDREDGELLOYDG BEFUS ALICE G BRYAN KENNETH M CLARK TERRYL ALLEDRIDGEJEAN D BEGAJOSEPH R ESTATE OF BEITZ TRUDI C BRYAN TIMG CLARKTHOMASL ALLEN ARNOLD BELDING MICHAELT BRYANT KATHYF CLARK VIOLET E BELEFSKI STANG BRYANT WILLIAM M CLARKE EDWARDW ALLEN DENNIS L BELL ARTHURT BUCHANAN LA CLARKEJAMES H ALLEN JUNE L BUCHANANLEWISL CLAYPOOLDIANE K ALLEN KENNETHV BELL JOHNC BUCHMAN ED H CLEAR WATERCOMPANY ALLEN MARJORIES BELL MIKE S ALLEN ONETA BELL RANDALLN BUCKENDORFPAT CLEAVESWINIFRED BELLEFEUILLE PHILLIP C BUCKLE HARVEYH CLECKERMARIAP ALLEN STEVER BELLEMORE PAUL H BUCKNER AUGUSTA CLEMENSCECILE ALLEN WILLIS E BUCKNERGRACE CLEMENS MARYV ALMASIE LARRY P BELLINGERGROVERL BUCKNER ROBERT D CLEMENTBRAD D ALTIG SUZANNEM BEND REDI-MIX CONCRETE AMARALJOELJ BENDELEMARKA BUCKNERVIRGINIA A CLEMMONSRUTH BENDELEPAULA BUCKNERWA CLEVELANDDONALDE AMEN NANCY BENDIS HOMES BUDKE DALEG CLINE FALLSOASIS IMP DIS AMENS ROBERTD BUEHLER KARL CLOSE DANIELA AMERICAN FED SAVINGS BENHAM GORDON T BUEHLERROYE AMES A GARY BENJ FRANKLINSAVINGS CLOSEJOHN P AMES RONALDK BENJAMIN ROBERT M BUELL BILL CLOSE MARLYCE BENNETT JULIE A BUERMANN WILLIAM L CMC CONSTRUCTION AMSBERRY HMEL BENNETT MARJORIE BUIGI THOMASJ CNOSSENOWENP ANCELL CELESTEC BULGERJOSEPH E COBB DAVIDR ANDASOLA RICHARD BENNETT ROBERTL BULLOCKGARYR COBLANTZ RAYJ ANDERSEN STEPHANIE L BENSONCECILG ANDERSON BP BENSONGARYG BUNCH DAN COBURNPAMJ BENSON HELEN M BUNNELL LORENK COCHRANLESLIEA ANDERSONBENL BENSON RONL BURCELL TRACYL COCKBURNTIM ANDERSONBRUCEP BURCH JAMES A COE CHARLIE ANDERSONCARL BENTHIN DAVEW BURDICK JOYCEG ANDERSONCHADT BERG CLIFF A COE RICKY L ANDERSON DARRELL D BERG GARYM BURGER BETH COEY KATHLEENR BERG STEVEN BURGESSDALEE COFFEY KATHRYNN ANDERSONDELR BERGER CHARLES D BURGESS LEONARD L COFFEY LEONAD ANDERSONDONB BURING RICHARDM COFFMANPAULINE T ANDERSONDONALDL BERGERDAVID ANDERSONERNA BERGMANLINDA R BURING ROBERTA A COLDWELLBANKER ANDERSONJENNIFERI BERGSMAGEORGE BURK RICHARD H COLE HAROLDE ANDERSONLLOYDW BERGSMA RODDY G BURK ROBERTB COLE MARYA BERKSONEVEC BURKE MARGIE COLEMANLOIS ANDERSONMARYE BERLAND KENNETH BURKHARTEVERETT B COLEMANLULAI ANDERSONRAINSEE BURKHARTGEORGE COLEMANTROY ANDERSONRICHARD F BERNDT MERLEH ANDERSONRONJ BERNERTDIANNE BURKHARTRAYMOND H COLLEARYJIM F ANDERSON RUTHF BERRY CAROLE BURKHOLDERSELAB COLLIER LORRI BERRY DAVIDA BURKSJOHN COLLIER ROBERTL ANDERSONSCOTT D BERRY HERSCHAL A BURLESON ROBERT W COLLINS CHERYLD ANDERSONSTANH BURNAM LONNAD COLLINSGEORGE A ANDERSON WMR BERRY RONALDL ANDRESENDARVONM BERTRANDEDWARDP BURNS ALLENK COLLINS PATRICIAA BERTSCHJUNE BURNS DERALD W COLVARDGLENDAS ANDREWSAUDREC BERY KATHYS BURNS JANETM COLVIN DAVID P ANDYKELEANN M BURNSJOYCEJ COMBS DAVIDW ANGELL MILLARD BESS GREGS BURNUMDOROTHY COMBS JAMESL ANGLER KATHRYNM BESSEY KURT L ANSTETT GARYF BEST ROBERTD BURRELL JAMESH COMBS PAULW BETTUCCI FRANKA BURT MARIE M COMBS WARRENV ANTHONYPAULM BETZER NIKI BURTIS RAY COMPTONRONALD D APKER PAMELAK BURTON JEFFREY S COMSTOCK DOUGLAS D APOSTOLAKIS PETER P BEVER JUDYR BURTON MICHAEL A APPLEGATELOUISA BEVERIDGEROBERT A COMSTOCKROBERT ARCH PAGING BEYERLEINDAVIDA BURWELLTODDV CONANT EATONH BIDIMAN ORRINW BUSCHE MERCEDES M CONBOY MELVINH ARCHERWALTER BIERMANCLARENCEH BUSCHE MICHAELW CONKLIN EVELYNM ARENZJOHN BUSHARD PAUL CONLEY MARGUERITE ARIAIL JAMESM BIG W RANCH BUSS RONALDM CONNER BERKLEYR ARIZZIERMANNO BIGGS SUSANG ARMITAGEJANET E BIGHAM ELIZABETH A BUTLER EUGENE CONNER LINDAJ BILLHYMER HELEN J BUTLER MARY F CONNERSTHOMAS E ARMSTRONG JW BILLINGS DANM BUTLER ROBERTD CONNOLLYMICHAELJ ARMSTRONGWILLIAMC BUTTE VIEW MEADOWS CONRAD KIT S ARNETT NANISCHA BINA VICTORIAA BUTTERFIELDPATRICKL CONRAD RONALDJ ARNOLD BERNICE BINAM CLAUD ARNOLD DOYLED BIRCHFIELD JKAY BUTTKE CARLH CONTI GLORIA M ARNOLD JUNEA BISHOP FRED H BUTTRAMJANICE CONTRERASRICHARD M BISHOP LARRYD BUTTRAM WILBURG COOK ALMAA ARNOLD MIKEC BISSELL EDITH L BUZZARD WILLIAMG COOK DENNIS D ARONSONDAVIDJ BYERLY FORRESTG COOK GARYA ARREDONDO CHRISTINE BLACK JAMESE ART MERCHANT GALLERY BLACKBURNHELENM BYERS GEORGEJ COOK WINONA ARVIDSONCARLG BLACKSHEAR LRAY BYRD JOHNNIE COOKE BERNARDE BLACKWELL HENRY B BYRUM DAVE K COONCE LEEF ARVIDSON GMICHAEL BLACKWOODJEFFD C & L RANCH COOPER EDWARDL ASH MARYE CAIN TILLIE COOPERJACKA ASHBY LORIA BLAGG-HAWESELLEN A CALDWELL EDWARD P ASHLEY MGEORGE BLAIR GARYL COOPERJAMESH ASPEN BUILDERS &CONTR BLAKE SHARONS CALDWELLFRANKLIN H COPELAND MARIE J BLANCHARDEUNICE F CALDWELLLOUIS COPLEY JULIE R ASTON EDWINL BLANCHARDFRANK CALDWELLSYLVIA M COPP ROBERTS ATENCIO PATRICIA M CALEEN GARRISON CORBARI ROBERTS ATKINSONDANIELL BLANCHFIELDFREDJ ATKINSONJEFFREY L BLASDELLWALTERG CAMARILLOTHOMAS L CORDELL SAMW AUBREYJAN G BLATCHLEYKENNETHC CAMERONSHARON CORDESCONNIES BLEVINS DOROTHYJ CAMERON WILEY CORDON DONALDW AUBREY LINDAM BLISS BETTY E CAMMACK LOIS I CORDONMARIE AUFRECHTRICK D CAMOMILEBETTY CORNELIADOROTHY J AUGUSTINE FRANKE BLISS DIXONL AUGUSTINERUTHA BLISS MIKE C CAMP SHERMANSTORE CORNELL ROBERTD BLOCH BONNIEJ CAMPBELL ANNA M CORNER BERNICE AUGUSTYNOVICHRON BLOCH KEITHW CAMPBELLBOBC CORNO MICHAELL AURDAL MARTIN K CAMPBELLDARBYA CORNOGCHESTER AUSTIN GERALD BLOCH MARIANAT CAMPBELLGARYR CORRIGANCOLLEEN AUZENNEALLENJ BLODGETT JOHN T AUZENNERONALDJ BLOMQUISTDAINE CAMPBELL KIM L CORRIGANPATRICIAA BLONSKI ARTHURS CAMPBELL KIRK R CORUM ALLEN AVERILL JOANESTATEOF BLOOM WILLIAM H CAMPBELL LLOYD COSCIA ANDREWP AYERS RICHARDK CAMPBELLMALCOLML B & K FARMS BLOSS LOIS J COSSETTEJACKT CAMPBELL R L BL ANDERSONCONST BLUE SKIESDEVELOPMENT COUCH INVESTMENTSLLC BABBITT ANDREW E BOARDMANPHYLLIS M CAMPBELLVALERIE J COUNTRY COLLECTIONS BABBITT JAMESM BOCCI ROBERTL CAMPBELLWESLEYR COUNTRY SUNSETMOBILE BOCHSLERGERALD J CAMPER TRAILERMFG PARK BABCOCKNORMANP BOCHSLERSYDNEK CANDY RICHARD L COURSEY LINDAM BABLER CHUCK CANEPACRAIGD BACHANDANN BODWIN WAYNEJ COWAN DONALDE CANNON RICHARDR BACHAND JACK G BOE MARY A COWAN RICKW BACHELOR BROADCASTING BOEDERLEONARD CANNON ROBERTC COWLESJOHNN BOEHME MELVINH CANOY ELIZABETHA COX DARSELL BACHMEIERMICHAELS BOGART RAYMOND W CANTRELL VIRGINIA J COX GREGORY D BACKUS GREGORY CANYONCOURT BAGLEY ROBERTR BOGGESS MARK COX JAN G CARBAUGH PAUL B BAILEY MIKE BOHAM DANS COX LYNNE A BAILEY TERESA K BOHN MARY A CARDEN TIM J COX SANFORDS BOLCE ELLA M CAREY ANDREWG COYLE MIKE B BAILIN RICHARD A BOLCE NANCYM CAREY LUCILLE E COZBY BETSYE BAKER ALICE M CARGO KARINE BAKER BOBBIE E BOLDOSSERJAMESA CRABER DALLASH CARLEY MARGARETV BAKER CAROL BOLDT ROBERT CRAIG DALED BAKER EDWIN M BOLEYN ESTHERM CARLSON A B CRAIG DONNA L BOLLARD TERESA A CARLSON APRIL S CRAIG STEVEL BAKER HARVEY W BOLSERJAMES E CARLSONERIK CRAKES GEORGE G BAKER MACKT CARLSON MICHELLE M BAKER STEVER BOLT RUSS CRAM ANDRHOADS BALDRIDGEROGER H BOLTINGHOUSEWILLIAMA CARMICHAEL RALPHC CRAMERWALDOH BALES ANNAL BONDTHOMAS CARMICHAELVERNON D CRANDALLSHARONL BONHAM HARRYS CAROLUS VIRGIL L CRANE IVAA BALES ARLEEESTATEOF BONIFACERICHARD M CARPENTERANDREW CRATER JOHNS BALL DON CARPENTERBETH BALLARD SARAH A BONINE SARA CRATTY SHARONS BALLARD THOMASE BONKOSKYAMY CARPENTERJAMES R CRAUSEJOHN R BALLENGERCOLLEEN BONNIEVIEWRANCH INC CARPENTERLARRY K CRAWFORDILA L BONS KRIS CARR MICHELLE CRAWLEY ROBERTD BALLIN RUTHE BONS REBECCA N CARR RANDY J CREASEY DOUGLASK BALTZORARTHURL CARRIAGETRADEAPARTBANKERSREALTY BOODLE TOMJ CREASEYOPAL0 BANKOFIERJOEJ BOONE ERICAA MENTS CREE DEBBIE BANKS ROBERTM BOONE KAYH CARRICK MARVINR CRENSHAWMICHAEL P BANTA OREN C BOONE MICHAELS CARRIEREROBERTD CRESCENZI EDGARJ BOOTHE RONALDG CARRIGANCARROLLE CRESS LINDA E BAPTISTE JOEE BARBER MURL S BORDEAUX OLETAI CARRILLO JOELM CRESS SCOTTP BARBOURSTEPHEN BORDEN CLARA CARROLL BONNIES CRISAFULLI LINDYW BARCLAYJOSEPHJ BORDERSCARLD CARROLL JAMES D CRISMANWILLIAM G BORDERS EDGAR W CARSON LEWIS E CRISP JACKL BARCLAYCONTRACTORS BOSTIC JOHNE CARSON MIKED CRITZ JAMESA BARD N THOMSON BARIL JANE E BOTTS JAMESR CARSTENSENLEROY CROFTS FRANKLIN P BARKDOLLAGNESI BOUBEL RICHW CARTENSEN MIKE B CRONIN GEORGE R BARKER DARRELL W BOUCHARDROBERTE CARTER ALBERTL CROOK CO IMP BOUCHE PARRIS CARTER BEULAHM CROSS TRUSTHOWARD E BARKER GGLEN BOWEN AVERYC CARTER BILLY J CROSSANTERRYG BARKER LEROY E BARKER REED A BOWEN JEANE CARTER GEORGE W CROSSETT ADAJ BARKER ROBERT R BOWEN LADONNA B CARTER GREG A CROWEDAVID V BARLUP GERALD L BOWEN PAUL CARTER SONIA M CRUMLEYJOHNA BOWERJAY L CARTER STEWARTL CRUSE DAVIDL BARNARDROBERTH BOWERS MARION E CARTER TONI M CRUZ GILBERT BARNES EDWARD E BARNES GAYLAA BOWSER CHRISTINER CARTNER WILLIAM W CTRL ORSUNCOUNTRY INC BARNES LOYDC BOWSERDONALD L CARUSOJOHN R CUBERO TONYAA BARNES MARIES CUELLARJUDY K BOYANOVSKY-KUTSCH RON CARVER CHERI CARY MARIE N CUELLAR MOLLY BARNES MINNIE L BOYD CHARLEST CASCADEDEVINC CULLEN ALLISONM BARNES RE BOYD JEFF BARNETT LOUE BOYD NANCYD CASCADEPINESPECIALTIES CULLEN ANDREWJ BARNETT WILLIAME CASCADE RENTALS CULLER LETAM BOYLE CHRIS D BARNEY KENNETH W CASE JUDSON E CULLEY KEVIN R BOYLE ROBERTJ CASE KURT D CULVERALAN R BARRETT BONNIEJ BOZARTH CHRISTEA CULVERCHARLIEA BARRETT CHARLES BOZARTH JOHN N CASEY KATHY A BARRETT KEN BRADBURYHAROLDW CASEY OTIS J CULVERJOSEPHG BARRETT RODERICKD BRADBURYLOIS CASEY R VERN CULVER SUSAN BARRY OLIVE M CASEY VIRGINIA E CUMBERLANDPAMELAJ BRADFORDCAROLA BARTH HERBERTE CASLER BEATRICEP CUMINS JAMESE BRADFORD JPAT CASS DIANE D CUNNINGHAMJAQUELINEJ

NOTICE

BRADLEY BONNIE

CUNNINGHAM JOHNS CUNNINGHAMMINNIE CUNNION JOHNJ CURRIE JAMES A CURTIS MARCELLAR CURTIS MICHAELJ CURTIS MIKEC CURTIS ROBERTD CUSHING DONALD CUTANEO EUGENEC CUTSFORTHDAVIDH CUTTING PATJ D H M DEVELOPMENT CO D&M ENTERPRISES DACHENHAUSENROBERT D DACUSJAMESS DACUSJOANN DAHL CLYDE DAHL KEITH W DAHLEN RSCOTT DAHLSTROM VIRGINIAM DAILEY JAMESB DALESSI MIKEJ DALTONMILTONC DALY-RUNGECONSTCO DAMMANNCARLL DAN DEWITT DRYWALL

DANIEL BOBN DANIEL KEVIN N DANIELS 0 ROY DANLEY JAMESH DARR COREYJ

DARR PATRICIA A

DAUGHERTYELDREDD DAUGHERTY JRICHARD DAVENPORTDANS DAVIDSONGERALD0 DAVIES JULIE A DAVIS ALBERTW DAVIS ANDREAP DAVIS COLEMANE DAVIS DOUGE DAVIS FREDERICKA DAVIS HARRY L

DAVIS JAMESR DAVIS JOE W DAVIS JOHNF DAVIS JOHNW DAVIS KAPSU

DAVIS KATHRYN V

DAVIS KENNETH DAVIS RICHARDE DAVIS TED G DAVIS THOMASL DAVIS WES DAVISON BILLIE DAVISON ROBERTL DAVISSONRHONDA DAY APRIL B DAY DREENAC DAY FLOYD D

DAY GERALDINEB DAY LESTERA DAY MICHAELH DAZEY LEONR DE BEAUMONTJAMES DE KONINGEDWIN DE MERCADOKEN DEAN DENNIS E DEAN FRANKL DEAN HOWARDR DEASCENTISJOSEPH DEASCENTIS PATRICIA DEASON GERALDC DEASONMARYM DEASON SANDYS DEATSJERRY R DEBERNARDIGARYL DEBLANDERED DEBOERSTEVEE DEBRAYCHRISTINE M DECKER PENNYA DEERY PAMELAJ DEFREMERY MARY S

DEGARMO MELVINM DEGERMANKENNETH DEGROSSEDEBORAHL DEJANIKUS MIMIS DEKAY CHARLESW DELAMATER ROBERT E

DELANEY PATRICKA DELEO JOHNA DELESS CHRISTYK DELFS JEANETTED DELL GERALDC DELLER DAVIDJ DELONG DENNISG DELUCIA ROBERTA DEMARIS MARTYA DEMING MARTINR DENISON SHARONL DENNEY RBOB DENNHARDTLORENF DENNING DONNIVAN DENNING DOUGLAS DENNING JEFFREY DENNIS RONALD D DENTON ROBINM DENTONWAYNEE DERIEUX LARRYE DERR JANICE M DERRICK FLOYDJ DERSHAM RANDY M

DESCHUTESFRIENDS CHURCH DESOUZA MIKEF DEVINE PEGGY DEVORE LILLIAN DEWOLF THOMASN DEXTER DAVIDR DIAZ RICHARDE DIBBLE JANET E DICKENS DAVIDL DIEDRICH STEVENT DIGIORGIO PHILIP P DILLEY PATRICKW DILLIN CHARLIE R DILLMAN JUDYM DILLONJOYCE G DIRGA ELAINE A

DISCHERWESLEY D DITMORE DEAN DITMORE KENNETHE DIXON FLOYDL DIXON JERRY0 DIXON LILLIAN 0 DIXON MIKE L DIXON ROBERTG DIXON W B DLUEHOSHRICHARDJ DLUGOSCHCARROL L DOBKINS JOHNV DOD EUGENEC DODD KATHYRN DODD LESLIE DODD NEALJ DODGE MARK DODSONJAMESB DOE NEVAI DOGGETTWAYNEM DOHERTYRAYE DOLLARHYDEKEVIND DOLLEMORE DOUGLAS M DOLLENS BOBBYL DOMES TERRIA DOMIN LUANAJ DOMINGUES PAULH DON SCOTTENTERPRISES DONACARAYMONDC DONALDSONJIMMIE P DONNELLYALLEN W DONOHO WOODROW W DONOVANROYDALF DOOLIN FRED DORIGAN FRANCIS DORR ROBERTD DORRIS WILLIAMC DOSSER DARRELLE DOTSON ERICR DOTY MARK

DOUGHERTYLESLIE 0 DOUGHERTYSTEVE DOUGLASJEFFREYW DOUTHIT PAULAM DOVERJAMESW DOWD ROYB DOWELL LARRYG DOWERSDEBI K DOWNERKENNETHA DOWNING BONNIES DOYLE MARK W

DR TURNER-SPRANGETAL DRAHEIM BETHA DRAKE CHARLESW DRAKE HENRYA DRAKE STEVENA DRAMEN BRIAN

DRAPER ADEAN DRAYERDAVID M DREW DAVIDL DRINKER SHIRLEYE DRUM MICHAEL DUBISAR KIM DUBISAR LARRY DUCHETT ERIC DUCKWORTHCAROL A DUDA MIKEJ DUFF GREGR DUFFY TOM DUKE WILL D DULIN GLENN DULONGJACK DUNAWAYBARBARAA DUNAWAY 0 E DUNBAR ARLOW DUNBAR EDITHD DUNCANDAVID L DUNCAN EDWARDN DUNCAN ELIZABETHV DUNCAN HELEN DUNCAN LARRY DUNCAN N B DUNCAN NANCY DUNCAN REBECCAL DUNCAN WENDYL DUNCANWILLIAM L DUNLAP NORMANJ DUNN GENE DUNN JULIUS H DUNN PHILIP G DUNN ROBERT M DUNN SHIRLEYA DUNN STEVENW DUNN WILLIAMC DUNNE ERICN DUNNE RICHARDD DUPONT CHARLENE R DURAN MONSE DURHAMWILLIAMC DURR CORAM DURR RALPHE DUTCHERROBERT D DUVAL MICHELLED DYE ROYE

DYER MARKD DYKEHOUSERODD EAKIN HAROLDD EAKINS CHARLES H EARL CLAYTONC EARL RAYJ EARLYWINEWILLIAME EARWICKERJON A EASLON BOBBIEC EASLON GERTRUDE EASTPORTLANDINVESTMENT EASTERBROOKJANEW EASTERBROOKSSKIPW EASTMAN DARWINC EASTON KENNETHC EATON GARYE EATON SHERRILL L EATON TAMMY G EAVENSONLARRY P EBNOTHERCARLL ECKBERGCHRISJ EDDINGS GARYR EDENS GLENL EDER CYNTHIAA EDGINGTON JESSEC EDMONDSON MUSETTA EDMUNDSWALTERI EDWARDS CB EDWARDS CCHICK H EDWARDSDONNAM EDWARDS EUGENEL EDWARDS HA EDWARDS JNELSON EDWARDSLEEE EDWARDSMIKE EDWARDS TRANDY

FRELS LENA J FRENCH HAROLD FRENCH MURRELM FREY PHILIP E FRIDLUNDMIKEC FRIEDLUNDMIKAL R FRIEND DEL FRIESEN JAMESD FRITZGEORGIA FROLICK PATRICIA M FROMONG GILBERTE FRYE DELMER E FRYER CWAYNE FULLER VICKI J FULLERTONWENDELLC FULS CHARLES FULS OMERL FULTON IZETTA L FULTON LAMOINE FUNK ROBERT D FUNKHOUSERDONALDR FUQUA DONALD K FUQUA GREGORY L FURMAN LOUISE Y G& RRANCH G G PAPERCO GABEL CHRISTOPHERJ GAGE SUSANE GAGE THOMAS M GAGNON WILLIAM ESTATE OF GAINES LILLIAN GALE WESTONW GALES COLLENAM GALL RONALDM GALLO CLAIREC GALLOGLYDONALDR EDWARDS WILLIAM J GANDERDAVEC EGAN VIRGINIA G GANGER LAWRENCE EHNI ROBERTB GANT MARYANN EICHLER E L GARCIA ADOLFO EIDE MELVIND GARCIA ANAE EIDEMILLERDOROTHY D GARCIA LOLA EIDEMILLERGLENNTRUSTOF GARDEN HOME PROPEKLUND WALTER E ERTIES ELBERS JULIANNEM GARDINER GAIL ELK CREEKTRUCKING GARDNERDONALDL ELKINS JEAN L GARLAND RICHARDD ELLER WENDELLL GARNER CA ELLINGBOEBARBARAD GARNER RALPHJ ELLINGSONRANDYD GARRETT DALE ELLIOTT CHARLESR GARRETT-FLOCKNIKKIE ELLIOTT CUEW GARRIS DONALDE ELLIOTT DEBRAL GARRISONCALEENA ELLIOTT DONALDP GARRISON JAMES ESTATE ELLIOTT JAMES S OF ELLIOTT ROBERT L GARSIDE ANNM ELLIOTTRONALD W GARVERDANIEL J ELLIS EDMUND GASCONJOSEPHF ELLIS ROBERTD GAST MICHAELG ELLISON CARLH GASTON DAVE0 ELLISONDAVIDG GASTON DOLLY ELLISON MICHELLEM GASTON LEOW ELLSWORTHRUSSELLJ GATCHET GEORGE E ELSKAMP GLENDA GATES J D ELSTON JUDYK GAUT BAZIL W ELY JOSEPHB GAYLORDEDSONC EMMONS NEIL L GECARDO PROPERTIES EMRICK AL GEER JOHNC ENDICOTT CHARLES GEHRKE CLARENCEA ENEBO J K GEIGER GREGORY P ENFIELD CINDYL GEORGE DAVIDR ENGLE GLADYS GEORGE ERNEST ENGSTLERCAROLE L GEORGE MELODYL ENNIS JEFF 0 GERBER ETTAL ENOS LEWISW GERBERGARYR ENTLER RANDY S GERBER JOHNC EPPERSON GEORGE T GERBER ROBERTD ERCOLIN DIANE E GERBER THERESAL ERDMAN HENRY M GERKE EUNICE ERICKSONJOHNNIE C GERMAN LARRYL ERICKSON KGLENN GERRY ANDREWJ ERICKSON RICKM GERVAISWALLYA ERIKSSON CYNTHIAM GERVING DON ERVIN JERRY D GESIK KELLEY A ESKELSONDANNYA GESSNERRAYA ESSIG WILLIAM C GETTMANNJEFFREYP ESTERGREENALICE GHIRARDOLOUISJ ESTES RAY GIANNETTINO NICHOLASJ ESTRADAJESS GIBBTOM R ESTVOLD DENNISW GIBBONS JAMES H ETHREDGELOIS M GIBSON WARREN N EVANS BILL GIEFFELS MONTEJ EVANS REUBENW GIERKE JAMEST EVANS ROBLEYC GILBERT DORATHY EVANS ROSE M GILBERT TEDD EVANS RUBEW GILCHRIST EDITH EVANS TONYB GILIHAN CAL EVERED MARGARET J GILL LARRYM EVERGREENDANCE& GILLWILLIAM B EXERCISE GILLILAND GLORIAJ EVERGREENFAMILYTRUST GILLMANN DON EVERHARTCHARLESS GILMAN TIM B EVETT ROBERTE GILMER JERRYL EWING LEON GILMORE BERNADETTL FAGG FRED D GILMORE VIRGLEF FAILE RICHARDL GILPIN CLARENCEH FALLERT EVELYN L GILPIN EILEEN FALLON DAN J GINTHER JOHNB FANNING CURTIS H GITTINGSEMMA H FAR WESTFEDERAL BANK GITTINS BILL J FARIS JAMESC GLASPELL BRIAN FARLEY ARNOLD GLASPEY SUSANL FARLEY DANIELC GLAZIERHOWARD L FARLEY DANNA GLEASONTAFFY S FARLEY JOHN L GLIEBETHOMAS E FARLOWGLENDA GLOVER BILLI EK FARMERJOHN E GLOVER REXF FARMERS HOME ADMIN GOBLE WILBURM FARNEY JAMESM GODAT CARYLE FARR LEONARDC GODBY RUEBENBESTATE FARRA JAMES S OF FARRIS SHARON GODDARD LAVONNE G FARROWWILLIAM GODLOVEJAMESW FAST JEFFREYA GOERTZEN WALTRAUTK GOETZ R L FAUX CAROLE V FEARRIEN BARBARAL GOLD RENA FED LANDBANKOF GOLDBERG SARAG SPOKANE GOLDSMITH RICHARDE FEDERALSAVINGS &LOAN GOLDSTRANDLUCY FEGAN JODI L GOOD LARRY W FEHLMANAVALYNL GOODMANJOHNJ FENNELL DENNIS E GOODRICHTHORPED FENNIMOREMICHAELJ GOODRIGHTJERRI V FERGUSONROBERTA GOODWINTED W FERGUSONSAMUELE GORDON EVELYN FERINI RICHARD C GORDON HARRYA FERRERABARTR GORDONJOHNR FERRY WILLIAM M GORDON ROBERT C FERTSCHARONW GORDON SCOTT D FETZ LENNIE GORDON WAYNE L FIELDS CYRUSL GOSS JAMESL FIELDS THERESAL GOSSEN DIANEC FIENE EDMOND GOSSIN FRANKR FINCHER HAROLD M GOTCHERKARENL GOTCHY CLARENCEE FINCHER MARGIE FINDLAY HUGHG GOTCHY TROYM FINDLEY COLLEN GOUDY ANGELA M FINDLING TERRY J GOUDY RANDYD FINE ANGELA K GOUGEHAROLDI FINEGAN LESLIE M GOULD ALTAM FINK ALVIN H GOULD CRAY FINK ANNE H GOURLEY ROBERTH FINLEY GARY GOURMET GOODIES FINLEY RONR GOWAN DARRELL FINN RALPH E GOWER JEFFREYL FINNESTADCHRISA GOYAK NICK I FINNESTADDWIGHT F GRABENHORSTRICHARD FIRST INTERSTATEBANK GRABOYES JEROME FISHER FRANKA GRADY GARYL GRADY ROBERTM FISHER MARKR FISHER OLIVE E GRAGE DENNISH FISHER RODGER A GRAHAM BONNIE FISHER SHARONK GRAHAM DUANEK FISHER THOMASC GRAHAM MARVIN B GRANT CLOYCEJ FITCH HARRYL FITZGERALDMICHAELJ GRANT KATY FITZGERALDTHOMAS F GRANT MARKA FIVECOATGLADE R GRANT RAY FIX JANET L GRANT TINA L GRANT VICKI J FLAIG KELLYB FLANDEY MEYER F GRANT WESR FLECK MYRONJ GRAVES REBECCAK FLEGEL WINSTONM GRAVES ROBERTD FLEISCHMAN HORSTG GRAVLEY JAMES FLEMING ALLISONJ GRAY ALVINJ FLEMINGBONNIE M GRAY CHARLESE FLEMINGJOHN W GRAY CLAIRE M FLESHER RICK A GRAY HARLANDG FLETCHERDAVIDL GRAY HELENB FLETCHER HK GRAY JAMESP GRAY ROYALM FLETCHERJERRY FLETCHER &FITCHASSN GRAY SHERIA FLINT JACK L GREEN LESTERD FLOYD JEFFH GREEN MARYJ FLOYD PAULM GREEN PAULH FLOYD JIMCO GREENBLATALAN P FLURIE BETTY GREENE CORDELL F FOLEY ROBERTH GREENE ROBERTD FOLK JACK L GREENFIELD WMH FOLLETT LYNN P GREENOUGHED FOLSTONLYLA M GREENSTREETCHERYLA FOOTE ROBERTC GREGG MARGARET E FORBES CINDY GREGOIREJOHNJ FORD CLAUDIA F GREGORYBRENTA FORD EVELYN E GREGORY DAVIDF FORE STEVENE GREGORYLAURAD FOREMAN C J GRENNANDENNISP FOREMANLYLEG GRIBBLE DEBORAH L FOREMANMARTHAB GRIESMAN MICHAELP GRIFFIN E M FORESTERPATRICK L FORSMANRICK GRIFFIN MARLIN FORTH CHRISTENIA GRIFFITHLAWRENCE S FOSBACKCORKY GRIFFITHTHOMAS FOSTER A L GRIFFITH TRADING COINC FOSTER GRANT GRIFFITHSSALLE M GRIGGS DAND FOSTER JAYA FOSTER KENR GRIMES LISA D FOSTER RICHARD H GRIMSHAW MAX L FOUCAULTJAMES GRINDSTONE LIVESTOCK FOUNTAINTIM N GRINE RUTHJ GRIZZLY RESEARCH FOWLER DONALD B FOWLER STEVEC STATION FOX RODNEYG GROSS LESLIEJ FOX STEPHENP GROSS WILLIAM L FOXWORTHTHOMASG GROSS WILLIAM N FOY DWIGHTD GROUPEJOHNA FRADES LESS GROVE HARRYL FRALEY KATHRYN E GRUBBS EDWARDC FRANC RANCH GRUETZEMACHER MlFRANCE ALLENH CHAELJ FRANK MICHAELE GRUNBERG DOUG R FRANK RICHARDL GUBSER RAY FRANKE HERBERTP GUFFEY JOHNR FRANKLIN EDITH M GULSTROM AH FRASCA ROBERTJ GUMM STEVER FRASER PAUL GUNDERSONCECIL V FRATZKE FERNESTATE OF GUNDERSON EDWINF FRAZEE DBRUCE GUNTER CHESTERL FRAZEE NONAESTATEOF GUNTER ROBERTG FRECHETTEJOSEPHD GUPTILL JUSTIN B FREDERICKSRICHARD R GUS ASSOC FREDRICKSONDONALD R GUTHRIE RAY FREEMANJACKN GUYTON CHARLES FREEMANROBERTJ HAAS PAULG

HAAS PAUL H HABERLY KATHY HABERLY LANCE HACK EDITH HACKETT GERALDG HADDOCKSTEVEM HADLEY KENNETH L HAFTER ELVITA VESTATE OF HAGEMANPAULL HAINES DEBBIEM HAL LOUTHMFG CO HALBERT LANAJ HALDERMANROBERTC HALE CAROLEEA HALEY MARJORIEM HALEY RUSSELLH HALL EDWARDR HALL FREDA HALL HENRYH HALL JAMESR HALL JIMF HALL KENNETHE HALL KENNETHL HALL MARGUERITA HALL MAUREEN N HALL RICHARDL HALL SHANNONR HALLER ANNE HALLOWELLSCOTT A HALVORSENRONDA HAMAR BRUCEA HAMILTON BILL R HAMILTONGLORIAC HAMILTONLUCILLE M HAMILTONTHOMAS W HAMM VEATRICE HAMMACKALAN G HAMMACKBRICE HAMMACK RONALDG HAMMACKSANDRA HAMMERLARSON K HAMMON DURLINR HAMMOND JOSEPH D HAMMONS JOHNJ HAMPELJANET E HAMPTONDANAS HAMPTONBUTTEGRAZING

ASSN

HANBY MARIE

HANCOCKPAUL HANDEL LOIS L HANES JEFFF HANEYJEAN W HANEY JOYCEA HANKINS TRACYA HANNAH SINNA HANNAM DW HANNEMANNVIRGIL HANSARDCLAUDE L HANSEN DANIEL W

HANSEN HAZELL HANSENJOHN C HANSEN RONS HANSEN RUBYJ HANSEN STEPHENG HANSON BARBARAM HANSON DONALDA HANSON KENNETHR HANSON MELVING HANSON PHILIP L HARBAUGHEVA HARBICK WAYNE R

HARDIE ARTHURD HARDIN BOBW HARDING DAVIDL HARDING EDNA HARDING HAROLDS HARGIS ROBERTE HARING ARLINE HARKLEROADDONALDG HARKLEROADJIMMIE R HARLESS DEWEYR HARMON WILLIAM W

HARMS DARRYLL HARMS KENW HARNESSBECKYY HARNISH JONT HARP OTIS E HARPOLEJOHNJ HARRINGTONEVERET HARRINGTONSTEVE HARRINGTONVINIS HARRIS A DON HARRIS DANJ HARRIS DAVIDJ HARRIS EVERETTL HARRIS FLOYDR HARRIS FRANKJ HARRIS GERALDL HARRIS GRACE HARRIS JUNE E HARRIS MICHAEL HARRIS ROGERL HARRIS THOMASA HARRISW J HARRIS WAYNE L

HARRISON I K HARRISONWILLIAM F HART CHRISTINE L HART GLENNA HART JAMESE HART ROBERT

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E10 WEDNESDAY JUNE 25 2014 • THE BULLETIN LAWRANCEVANCEE MATTHEWS EMORY A LAWRENCE RAYMOND G MATTSON FLOYDG LAWTON WILLIAMC MATTSONLYNNE LAYTON FRANKP MATUJECMARYJ LAYTON GLEN R MAUPIN JOHNH LBK RANCHES MAXWELL ARTHURL LEADER ESTHER W MAXWELL DONALD A LEAF LYNETTEM MAY A DANIEL LEAVELL GARY W MAY FREDA LECK RUSSELL G MAYES HUBERT LECKBANDEVA MAYES LEROYM LECKBEEMERVIN MAYFIELDROBERT M LEDBETTERGARYA MAYFIELD RON LEDBETTER TNORMA MAYHUGH TIMOTHYL LEDGERWOOD LADONNA J MAYS HENRYJ LEE DOREEN STAPLE MAZIASVICTOR LEEJOHN W MCADAMSLLOYDC LEE MONROEA MCALLISTER ROBERTJ LEE PAULC MCALLISTERTODD LEE TERRI J MCAULAYROBERTC LEE WILLIAM F MCBETH ROBERT T LEFORS LAURIEJ MCBRIDE CECILIA J LEGG GALEN L MCBRIDE MAYM LEHMAN ALBERT S MCBRIDE MIKE LEHMAN ROBERTL MCCAHANESTHER LEHMANWILBURG MCCAIN ELVAG LEITH ADELAIDE F MCCAIN GARYA LEITH ANNAE MCCALEB J FRED LELACHEUR TIM E MCCALL RICHARDL LEMASTERS STACIA A MCCALLUMSYLVIA M LEMSKE RUBENG MCCALVYDALE LENGELELYNDONC MCCARTHY TM LENSKI RICHARD W MCCAWLEONARDF LENT GARY A MCCAWCABLEVISION LENTZ HAROLD C MCCAY DENNIS M LENTZ JOHN W MCCAY JAMESW LENZ ROSEMARY H MCCLAIN LUKEM LEONARDJAMES N MCCLAIN RUSTYL LEROUE TIM J MCCLAUGHRYLYLE LESLIE BILL R MCCLAUGHRYSHARON LETZ ROY MCCLELLAN DAVID LEUS DEBBIE MCCLELLANDMARJORIEJ LEVEILLE WILLIAM D MCCONNELLCOLVIN S LEVENSONSUZANNE MCCONNELLNANCYR LEVI COLIN T MCCONVILLE LAVERNAL LEVI FLOYD MCCORMACKGM LEVY BRADM MCCORMACKTERESAL LEWIN JULIE A MCCOY DAWN LEWISMICHAEL L MCCRARYPAMELAC LEWIS R L MCCREA GRACEM LEWIS RICHARD D MCCREIGHT DONALDL LEWIS STEPHENL MCCULLEYTERRI L LEWIS WILLIAM E MCCULLOUGH JOHND LEYVA ADALIA MCCULLOUGH RON LIBOLT RICHARDE MCCULLYPHILLIP E LIEN JEANNED MCCUTCHENMARK LIES THOMAS M MCDONALD BK LIETZOWHARRYF MCDONALD CHARLESA LIGHT ROBERT C MCDONALD DB LILJEBERGRALPH MCDONALD DOTTIEJ LILLEBO CHRISH MCDONALDKATIE E LILLIG EVERETT H MCDONALDPATRICK LILLYWHITEHEROLD S MCDONALDRANDYL LINCOLNSAVINGS &LOAN MCDONNELL JAY R LIND HILLA MCDOUGALTERYELL LINDAHL DENNISL MCDUFFIE &YORK LINDE DAVIDJ MCFADDENJAMESH LINDH RONALDCOESTATE MCFADDEN WILLIAMM LINDLEY DAVID R MCFARLANSTEVEND LINDLEY EARLF MCFARLANE JOHNW LINDSAY C R MCGEE JAMESA LINDSAYROYG MCGHEE LLOYDM LINDSEY JERRYL MCGIBBENPATRICKJ LINDSEY MARILYN F MCGILLROBERT D LINK DONALDA MCGILLAN JANETL LINTON PAMELA D MCGINNIS MORRISB LINVILLE MABELLL MCGINNISTHOMAS E LIPPINCOTT MICHAELR MCGINNIS TIM M LISIUS MATT MCGRATHBETH LISKABARBARAJ MCGRAWCHARLESA LIST VIRGINIA E MCGUIRE MARYJ LITTLE RICHARD D MCGUIRE STEPHENC LIVINGSTONRUTHF MCHENRY-HOLLAND MARIE LLOYD HERBERTG MCINTOSH DONALW LLOYD LOUISEP MCINTOSH HAROLDL LOBUE MILDRED V MCINTOSH JSTUARTH LOCHEN EUGENE J MCINTURFF DAN LOCKER JAMESR MCKAY ANNE LOCKWOOD ROBERT R MCKAY CHARLESB LOEB ALFREDA MCKAY JAMESR LOEKS RICK E MCKAY JEFFA LOGAN NORMAN D MCKECHNIEROBERTP LOMAX CHRISJ MCKEMIE BERTD LOMBARDO JOSEPHT MCKENZIE EARLINE L LONBORGKENNETH A MCKENZIEMARK W LOOMIS MARIONH MCKIBBINJOHN S LOOP BARBARA MCKINNEYGARYF LOPEZ ANTONIO MCKINNEY MERLAND F LOPEZ DARCI R MCKINNEYRAY LOPEZ DEMITRO MCKINNISMARGARET K LOPEZ STEVEN MCKITRICK BARBARAL LORENZ EUGENE R MCLAIN ALFREDH LORETZ LEE G MCLAINDOUGLAS LOVE HOMERL MCLAIN SUZANE M LOVE LEOF MCLANE ORVILLEJ LOVEGRENGRANTA MCLARENJOHN J LOWE LEONA MCLAUCHLIN RUTHS LOWE ROBERT I MCLAUGHLINANDREW C LOWE SHARLYNR MCLEAN DONALDT LOWE W F MCLEAN NANCYM LOWE WYNONA M MCLINN DIANAL LOWERYMYRAL MCMICKEN MARGARET L LOWNDES DARLENE D MCMILLAN JUDYA LUCAS VIRGINIA V MCMILLAN 0 E LUCAS WILLIAMA MCMILLANROBERT C LUCKENBACKDONALD J MCMILLINSTANTON L LUCKMANMARJORIE S MCMURRAYLYNN L LUDEMAN SHIRLEY MCNAIRY MORRISE LUDLOWJERRYC MCNEILLMICHAELT LUDLOW SHIRLEY A MCNELLIS LILLY0 LUDWICK ALANL MCPHERSONALAN R LUDWIG BRUCE D MCPHERSONDONALD LUDWIG KATHRYNL MCSHATKOHAROLD F LUDWIG MARVINL MCSWAIN MALCOLM M LUDWIG ROWLAND J MCSWAIN MARYE LUEDERS MARLENE L MCVAY SHAWNT LUFF EVERETT MEADE JOE L LUGO MARCIA MEADOWS BYRON D LUNA RAUL MEADOWSLARRYJ LUNAK FRANKE MEDEIROSLOUISJ LUND KENNETH M MEDLOCKCHAD LUNDGREN FERN L MEDLYNDOUGLAS R LUNDY DAVE MEEKER BARBARAL LUSK CHERYLL MEEKS LUCILLE M LUTHER MICHAELJ MEIER ROBERTF LUTON ROBERT C MEJDELL HARRYH LUTTRELL JIMMYE MELHORN THOMAS D LUTZ ELLEN K MELTON JEFF K LYBARGER W RAY MELTONWILLIE R LYLE JAMESA MENDENHALLELBERTH LYMAN MARIEF MENDONCAEDWARDD LYMAN STEVEK MENDOZA JONIG LYNAM ZYLPHA MENG KENNETHA LYNCH BARBARA A MERCER D E LYNCH GARY S MERCIER CE LYNCH LESLIEJ MERILO OLAV LYNN BARBARA MERIWETHERAL LYON LEON MERLICH STUARTK LYTLE E JOANNE MERRICK STEVEN LYTLE JIM P MERRILL MAX MABEE LINDAJ MERRILL LYNCHRELO. CATION MACBEANDONALDE MACDONALDJOHN MERTSCHINGGALEN L MESTON SHARON W MACKAYJUDY M MACKENZIE HUGH METCALF MARYE METKE J PAT MACLEANJOANNA MACY JAMESD METTEERCHRISTOPHERL MADDOXJERRY MEYER ARTHURB MADDOXROBERTH MEYER CFRED MEYER JOHNR MADRAS VET CLINIC MADRONMICHAELJ MEYER KENNETHL MEYERS DON ETRUST"B" MAGARE M L MAGBY JULIET V MEZZANATTOJACKA MAGEE DOUGLAS R MICHAELTHOMAS W MAGEE RONALDS MICHALSEN ROGER C MAGGIORA KEVIND MICHEL LOREENP MIDDLEBROOKOPAL L MAGILL PATRICK M MAHONEY AL F MIDWAYPLUMBING MILES VADAL MAINE ROYJ MAISH LORI L MILLAR BRANFORDP MILLER B R MAJOR DAVIDL MAJOR PATRICIAA MILLER BENNETTB MILLER DON M MALIN JERI L MANESS DEBBIE MILLER EDNAR MILLER EMILYJ MANION DOUG MANN A R MILLER FRANKE MILLER GARYLIND L MANN GLENN MANN HARLANA MILLER GLENN MILLER HARLANR MANN STEVEA MANOS U E MILLER HELEN A MANSFIELDROBERT W MILLER JEFFERYC MANZANARES DIANA R MILLER JOHNA MILLER KENNETHC MARBELL PAMELA K MARCUMJOYCEK MILLER KENNETHW MILLER L VIVIAN MARCUSASHTOND MARKEY BRIAN L MILLER LEE E MARKS RUSSELL J MILLERMICHAEL E MARKS CREEKLODGE INC MILLER MORRISM MARQUARDTGARY A MILLER RALPHE MILLER RANDALLP MARSH LEORAF MARSTON GILBERTM MILLER RHONDAS MILLER ROBERTL MARTEL CHERYLA MARTENSBRUCER MILLER STANLEYF MARTENS THOMAS J MILLER STEVEM MARTIN BYARDS MILLER CLARENCETRUST MILLIS MAX R MARTIN C DENNIS MARTIN FRANKT MILLS RAY A MILLS REBECCAS MARTIN GARYA MARTIN INESS MILLS STEPHENH MILLS WILLARDC MARTIN JOSEPH H MARTIN RALPH W MIMLER GABRIELK MINAHAN ROBERTD MARTIN WILLIAMG MARTINEZ ELIAZAR MINKLER T G MARYBROOKCORP MINMAC CO MASCIARELLI GEORGE D MINNICK PAULINE MIRROR POND MGMT MASON BETTY S MASON DALLAS J MIRSKY ROSALIND MASON LAURAA MISCHEL RODD MASSEY BURLV MISNER BRIANL MAST JOHN R MITCHELL GERALDR MATHENARALPH L MITCHELL JILL MATHENYRONALD G MITCHELL JIM MITCHELL JOELLEN MATHER DEMINGP MATHEWS CRAIGC MITCHELL JOHN R MITCHELL KARALYNNE MATHEWSLEOR MATHEWS VALERIEG MITCHELL RUTHM MATHIESON WALTERD MITTS JOHN MATHISONJAMES A MITTS LINDA MIZELL WALLACEC MATHISONTIMOTHY C MATHSEN RAYMOND M MOBLEY MARK MOBLEY SUSAN MATSON JW MATSON JIM MODDERMAN JACKIEL

MOE DARLENEE MOE JEROMEA MOELLER DEBRA A MOLLENHAUERRUTHE MONAHANBEVERLY K MONDAY MILTONG MONDOYBRAD P MONDRYJEFF L MONFILS DONG MONICAL OLIVEG MONROE BCHARLES MONROEBARBARA MONROE MARK E MONSONCHARLESA MONTAGUE RICHARD 0 MONTALBANOCLAUDIA MONTALBANO GARY MONTEL DONALDR MONTGOMERY DEANL MONTGOMERY EVANS MONTGOMERYTHOMASR MOOERS CLINTONR MOON GLORIAM MOON RONALD E MOORE CHERYLR MOORE DELLAM MOORE FRANCESN MOORE GARYT MOORE GERTRUDE A MOORE LIN G MOORE MICHAELT MOORE PANSYL MOORE RONNIEC MOORE SHARON K MOORETHOMASI MOORE CLEARCO MOORMAN JEANNETTEM MORAN CLIFF MORE JOHNH MORELAND MATTHEW J MORGAN BOBJ MORGANCARLE MORGANHAZEL L MORGANPAULAF MORGANREVAL MORGAN RUSSELLG MORKIN MARYA MORLEY MARGARET B ESTATE MORRELL RICHARDL MORRIS ARCHIEJ MORRIS BARBARA MORRIS C L MORRIS EVERETTR MORRIS GEORGE J MORRIS JOHNW MORRIS LLOYD G MORRIS LYDIAC MORRIS LYNND MORRIS MURRAYD MORRISON HARRY A MORRISON MILDREDM MORRISON NANCYJ MORRISON ROBINR MORRISON STANM MORRISON WAYLAND E MORTENSON DENISJ MORTENSON NEIL E MORTON DANIELE MORTON FRANKE MORTONMARSHALLJ MOSER KARENJ MOSER TOM 0 MOSES 0 PATRICK MOSIER JERRYE MOSS DIANA L MOSS SHELDOND MOSS TIFFANY MOTTNERJOHN E MOULDERJOHN M MOUSEROLENJ MOWDAY RICHARDW MOWLDS J D MOYE ADRIANA MOYER STEVEN MOYES DANIELC MOYLAN MICHAELD MUD SPRINGSRANCHES MUELLER FRED A MUIR EUGENE MUIR MICHAELW MULE SHOECATTLE CO MULKEY VICTOR MULLARD PHILLI PG MULLENS MICHAEL L MULLINS RICHARDD MUMMERTA EUGENE MUNKERSHAZELJ MUNKRES-ALLSTOTTJUDY MUNSON WE MURDOCHTHOMASL MURPHY MARJORISB MURPHY MIKEG MURRAYARTHURE MURRAYJAN MURRAYJOHNJ MURRAYSTANLEYR MUSENGOJEANETTE ESTATE OF MUSTARD AC MUZGAYPERRY MYERS BRENDA L

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ROBINSON RICHARDH ROBINSON RITA ROBINSONSHEA T ROBINSONSUSANJ ROBISON DARLENE ROBISONPAULT ROBY DONALDE ROCHEFORTJOSEPH R RODGERSBETHA RODGERSCHARLESL RODGERS GORDON D RODGERSNEIL H ROELKE JOHND ROGERS BEVERLY ROGERS DOUGLAS L ROGERSGEORGEL ROGERS LELANDT ROGERS RAYMOND E ROGERSSTEVEM ROGERSTERRY L ROGERSWILLIAM E ROGERS CONSTRUCTIONINC ROGERSON RONALDG ROHAN JAMES B ROHWERREBECCAS ROLFEJEANETTE G ROLL DAVIDA ROLLINSBONNIE M ROLLINS EDWARDD ROMBOUGH RUSSC RONCERAYMAURICE RONFELDELOISE RONNE HARVEYD ROOPERBARBARAD ROOT GAIL H ROSE DAVIDP ROSE DOROTHYA ROSE GARYC ROSE RODNEYL ROSE WILLARDP ROSENBERG CAROLE W ROSENBERGGLENN ROSENOWBARRY L ROSENSTIEL DENNIS R ROSENTHALJOHN C ROSES DELMARR ROSIN MAUDIES ROSS GEORGE W ROSS JAYK ROSS MIKE R ROSSA BRADL ROSTADMICHAELP ROTH RUEBEN ROTHBALLERBETTY-JO ROWDENKATHLEENJ ROWLAND JOSEPHM ROWLAND MARGARET A ROWLES GARYE ROY THOMASE ROYDON 0 M RUDDJOSEPHH RUDDELL BILL E RUDDIMAN R W RUE MAXINE B

RUEGG FCHARLES RUEGG FRANKC RUFKAHRROSEMAEB RULE CHESTER RUNDELL RONA RUNNING SANFORDE RUSH DEBBIEJ RUSHING CHARLESR RUSHING JONA RUSLING LEEJ RUSSELL GAIL RUSSELL MIKEC RUSSELL RONALDL RUSSELL VERNETAM RUTHERFORDJOHNA RUTHERFORDROBERTC RUTLEDGE CHIP A RUTSCHOWCHARLES0 RUTTENCUTTERJOHN L RUX DENNISW RYSDAMFRANCIS E S& B FARMSWEST S AND H TIMBERCO S T B RETREATCO SABIN PENNYM SADDLER GEORGED SADER SUSAN A SAGE KATHLEENJ SAGESERJACK E SALINAS JOEM SALING R L SALLEE GLENNAL SALOMONEKARENJ SAMS GLASSSERVICE SAMUELSTEVE SAMUELS RR SANDER C V SANDERCOCKPHYLLIS A SANDILANDSJOHN R SANDNER KE SANDO MARYA SANFORD MARGUERITE SANTIAGO ALBERT SARGENTWAYNEH SATTERLEEDONNA SAUL IVAR SAVA D MICHAEL SAVAGEMARILYNA SCANNELL LEONARDW SCAPARROMIKE SCAPARROSUZI SCHAEFERSJOHN M SCHAFFERJOE E SCHAFFNERPAT SCHALKA KARLA SCHALOCKDAVIDJ SCHARTNERHARVEYJ SCHAUB BRIANC SCHECHTELDAVID H SCHLAGERJOHN SCHLANGENNANCYP SCHLAUCHWILLIAM H SCHMAHL STEVES SCHMELZJOHN W SCHMID JOHNH SCHMIDT ANNETT G SCHMIDT CMICHAEL SCHMIDT CHARLESW SCHMIDT ETHYLEM SCHMIDT LAURETTA SCHMIDT VERLIN E SCHMIDT VINCENT SCHMITH D H SCHNABELESTEVEL SCHNEIBEL RICHARDR SCHNEIDERALAN C SCHNEIDERMARTIN J SCHNEPPERRHEAJ SCHOLL MARY VESTATE SCHOLLMEYERRUTH E SCHOONOVERCHARLESL SCHOSSOW GORDON F SCHOSSOWKARENE SCHRADERLARINDA SCHRADERLAURENCEG SCHREIBER LISAJ SCHREINERGENE0 SCHROEDERMERLEW SCHUDAWA WOLFGANG SCHUKARTTERRYL SCHULT MELVANW SCHULTZJAMES L SCHULTZSANDRAM SCHULTZEGERALDW SCHULZ ELIZABETHA SCHUMANWILLIAM SCHUYLERROBERTL SCHWEIGERTKENNETH M SCHWIEGER GEORGE B SCOFIELD ART E SCOTTAUBREYW SCOTTCYNTHIA SCOTT DANIEL SCOTT DAVIDR SCOTT DESSALL SCOTT EMILY SCOTT JIM J SCOTT L DOUGLASS SCOTT RANDYL SCOTT STEVENH SCRIVENSTERRYA SCROGGINS DOYLE8 SCROGGINS MIKEV SCRUGGSJAMESV SEALS CARLA SEARCY DENICE SEARLES RONALD N SEAVEY WILLIAML SEBASTAINPEGGY SEDBERRYJOHN W SEDEY JANETL SEE KEITH M SEEVERS TERRENCEL SEGO WILLIAMJ SEGOVIANO CRISTIANR SELINSKI LARRY SEPENUKNORMAN SEPUT WALTER SESSIONS GERALD SETHE DARRENK SETON FANN SEVEN STARRANCH SEVERSONKARLE SEXTON LEONARD E SHADDY LARRYE SHAFFER ROBERTD SHAKESPEARENANCYA SHAKESPEAREVERNAS SHANNONDENNIS K SHANNON SANDRA SHARER ROYH SHARFF ALFREDJ SHARP MONTE J SHAW KEITH SHAW MAXINE SHAW SAMUEL 8 SHEARERDAVEH SHEEHANMICHAEL SHEEHE BERNARD A SHEETS WANDAE SHEFFIELDJOYCE SHELDENTHOMAS M SHELTONTHOMASH SHEPEARDRUSSELL J SHEPEARDZOLA L SHEPHERDBARBARAJ SHEPHERD MELVIN D

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SHERIDANEDWARDW SHERMANOTTO E SHERRY MHARGER SHEVENOCKSTEVEC SHEVY MILLIE J

SHEW DALEL SHIELDS CATHERINE SHIELDS JERALDC SHIELDS JOHNA SHIPMANPAUL H SHIPPEN MARK E

SHIVE LOUC SHOBERGVALERIA J SHOEMAKERBARBRA A SHOLES ELDORAE SHORESDORIS J SHORT ALBERNL SHORT JAMESF SHORT JOYCEE SHORTSPENCER SHORT SUSANL SHORT MILDREDESTATE OF SHOWN GORDON SHROY MAUDE SIDES KEITHW SIKES JAMESM SILER FREDAE SILER ORVILLE P SILER S CRAIG SILVA JAMES SIMARD STEVEB SIMMONSCOLLEEN R SIMMONS CURTISS SIMMONS DONC SIMMONS GLENNC SIMMONS ROBERTJ SIMMS DONNA SIMON BENN SIMON JUDY A SIMONIS RICK SIMONSONGEORGE SIMONTONKIM M SIMONTONLINDA L SIMONTON ROBERTF SIMPSON JENNIE SIMS JOHN M SISSON TIM B SISTERS CABLETV SISTERS CABNT &WDWK INC SISTERS GENERALSTORE SISTERS LANDASSOC SISTERS MARKET SISTERSMINISTORAGE SISTERSREBEKAHLODGE251 SISTERS TRUAX SISTERS VIDEO SISTERSYOUTH & COMM SERV SITTON LAUREN L SITTON LEER SKAAR DENNIS SKAAR DENNY SKAAR VERN SKAGGS DONNAR SKEELLAUREND SKEELS BARBARAJ SKEEN VEVAE SKEES ERNESTC SKELTONKEITH D SKERRETT DANIEL H

SKILES DAVID K SKILLE ROBERT8 SKILLINGSTADDAVID L SKYBIRD PROPERTIES SLASEMANGREGH SLATE JUDYA SLATER J W SLATER SPENCERG SLOAN DONALDN SLOAN HAROLDL SLOCUM HARVEYE SMALL A E SMALLWOODANGIE R SMART ROBERTF SMITH AGNESC SMITH ALAN R SMITH ALFREDK SMITH ANDREWK SMITH ANTHONYL SMITH ANTONT SMITH BARBARAA SMITH BARBARA SMITH BENJAMIN R

SMITH BETTY M SMITH C GARY SMITH CARL H SMITH CHARLESR SMITH CRAIG SMITH CURTIS L SMITH DAN SMITH DAVIDB SMITH DAVID R SMITH DEL SMITH DENISE SMITH DENNISA SMITH DONALDR SMITH DONNAJ SMITH DORIS E SMITH DOROTHY C SMITH DOUGLAS C SMITH DOUGLASN SMITH FRANKL SMITH GARY SMITH GLEND SMITH GREGORY H SMITH HUBERT F SMITH JAMESB SMITH JANICE A SMITH JEFFREYS SMITH JERRYM SMITH JOEL G SMITH JOHN B SMITH JOHNC SMITH JOHN D SMITH JOHN E SMITH JOHN L SMITH JUNEC SMITH KATHI SMITH KENW SMITH LARRYE SMITH LINDAM SMITH MARVIND SMITH PAUL R SMITH PHILLIP D SMITH PIPERK SMITH RAYMOND K SMITH ROBERTP SMITH ROCKA SMITH ROGER M SMITH RONALDG SMITH RUTHL SMITHSHARON M SMITH STEVENW SMITH W D SMITH WILBURJ SMITH WILLIAMC SMT INDUSTRIES SNEDIGARTONY 8 SNIVELY STEVENC SNYDER EDGARM SNYDER PATRICIAA SNYDER THELMA SOARD LESL SODERBERGJOE SOLBERGDAVIDA SOLHEIM ALBERT W SOMMARS ROBERTD SOMMER DAVIDE SOOK HARRYC SORELLE RISTORANTEINC SORENSENDONALDJ SORENSEN E M SORENSENOLIVE SORENSONCLAYTONH SORENSON DOUG SOSA SAMS SOTH AL H SOULES DACOTAH0 SOUTH DARRELLL SPAHN CODY SPANGLERROBERT D SPANIOL SUSANE

TURNER DANIEL WICK MARY TURNER JESSEF WICKZACHARYP TURNER KATHYL WICKERSHAMREX WICKERSHAM RONG TURNER ROBERTM TURNER TRESAA WICKNICK I H TURNER VIRGINIA WIEDEN JAMESG TURNER F EESTATE WIEDENMANNKURT R TURNIDGE GORDON E W I E G AND ADELINE C TWIGG LORIMER L WIENS MONTEL TYSON BRUCEW WIESE IRVIN H TYSON LINDAJ WIESE JOE C TYSON CHRISTOPHERLLC WIESE RICHARD L U S ARMYCOTEF WIGGINSRONALD E U S BANK WIGGS RICHARDB UDELHOFENKAYL WILBER N E UDELL TERRENCEJ WILCOX HAROLDE UELAND ROBERTL WILCOX LAWRENCEA UNDERWOODJOSEPHC WILCOX AMELIAR ESTATE OF UNITEDPRESBYTERIAN W I LES DONALD R CHURCH WILES PATTYS UNITED TELE CO OF THE W I LHELMI WALTER W NW WILHOUR RAYMOND G UPCHURCHCRAIG F WILKINSONANNE S UPSHAWMAXD WILKINSON WILLIAM J US BANKREALESTATE LOAN WILLIAMS AUDREY M USHER ROBERTE WILLIAMS BESSIE L WILLIAMS CLIFFORDA UTERHARDTLUBY VACA DAVIDL WILLIAMS DONALDL WILLIAMS DOUGLASW VAN HISE A VAN ACKERJERRI WILLIAMS ELMERF VAN BUSKIRKJASON WILLIAMSGARRY A VAN GINKLE GARRITT WILL IAMS HELEN WILLIAMS JOHNF VAN HEESGERARD VAN HYFTEKENNETH WILLIAMS JUANITAG VAN OSTEN BARBARA W IL LIAMS KEITH VAN SCOYGEORGE WILLIAMS LARRYJ VAN SCOYRICK WILLIAMS LONNIED VAN SWOLL JULIE WILLIAMS MICHAELM VAN VLEETGEORGE WILLIAMS RAYG VAN WINKLEROBERT WILLIAMSROBERT C VAN ZANDTMIKE WILLIAMSROBERT D VANCE DANIELJ WILLIAMSROGER E VANCE DAVE A WILLIAMSSHARON VANCE M TOM WILLIAMSTHERESA VANDERVORSTE MARY M WILLIAMSTONY A VANDERVORSTE ARTHUR WILLIAMS WILLARDC ESTATE WILLIAMSON RALPH VANDERVORTLEOTA WILLIE LAVERNJ VANDEWEGDALEA WILLINGHAMLETHA P WILLISJAMES R VANKEURENDAVIDV VANOSDOLDAVIDL WILLS MICHAELL VANPAEPEGHEM AQUINN WILLS WILLIAM E VANVOORST JAMES A W I L SON ALICE F VANYIDOROTHY M WILSON ALVINP VARNER GILFORDC WILSON BARBARAJ WILSON BOBBIE VARNEY VIRL G VARNONJACK WILSON BRENDAF VAUGHANJEFFREYC WILSON BRENDAL VAUGHN BENNYW WILSON CHARLESE C VAY JACK G WILSON CHARLESK K V E HLEN ARTHUR H WILSON DAN VENN STEVENA WILSON DANAF VENNER ARLENEM WILSON DARLEC VERNON MICHAELJ WILSON DENNISD J V ERTZC H WILSON DICK R VETTERICKARNOLD E W I L SON DOUGLAS H VIERLING LYNN T WILSON E E VILES JOHNW WILSON EARL VINCENT DOUGLASG WILSON GEORGE VINCENT TIMOTHYL WILSON GRETCHEN C VIRGERY INC WILSON HARLANL VIRTUEMAGAZINE WILSON HAROLDW WILSON JACALYNNS VITITOEMARY E VLCEK JAMESJ WILSON JACKIE WILSON JAIN VOELKERCONNIE L VOGT JACKN WILSON JAMES0 VOISS DANIEL WILSON JONT VOLLE DEBRA WILSON JULIET C WILSON LEONARD H VOLZCHARLES G VON DESTINONLEONA W I L SON LOIS E VORCE ROBERTE WILSON MAX B VORPAHLVERA WILSON NEVADA VRANIZAN JAMESM WILSON PEGGYC W J RANCH INC WILSON RICHARDE WACHTELSHARONE WILSON ROBIN WADE DAVEA WILSON ROYN WADKINS JAMES R WILSON STEVE A WADMAN VKEITH WILSON STEVENH WAGENBLASTMARK WILSON VERAESTATE OF WAGER BRIAN K WINANS RAYC WAGGONER RUSSELL R W INDOLPH JAMESH WAGGONER TUESDAY N W ING WALTER E WAGNERJOHNF WING RANCHESINC WAGNERLINDAD WININGER ROBERTA WAGNER MARILYNA WINN CHARLESR WINSLOWJOHN B WAGNERWILLW WALDEN JAMESL WINTER JOEJ WINTER MERYLE J WALDEN SUSANJ WALDRAM DAVIDW WINTERBURN ROBERTG WALKER DANIEL WINTERSANITA WALKER GERALD WINTERS CARLT WINTERS EVERETTL WALKERGRAYSONA WALKER THOMASA WINZ ROGERW WIRTH GEORGE WALLACE JAMES WALLACE RANCHCO WISBECK STEVENW WALLS BILL L WISDOM JACK

SPARKMAN RAY J

SPARKS JUDITHA SPARKS WILLIAMF SPEAKMANDARRELE SPEAR CLINTON SPEAR SUSANA SPECKMAN CALVIN A SPEER &SONSNURSERY INC SPELBRINK MARCIAL SPENCERDEANH SPENCERERICR SPENCERGARYJ SPENCERRONS SPEZZA SIDNEYA SPIES EDWARDR SPILLMANPAULP SPIRES EARL SPITTLER LAURAL SPOHN WILLIAMJ SPOKES HARRYR SPOO THOMASR SPRADLEY DIXIE L SPRAGUE BETTY M SPRAGUEJENNIJ SPRINGATEKATHLEENM SPRINGER CRICHARD SPRINGERJEFFREYM SPURGONLESTERA SPURLING DONNAC STADUMSTEVEND STAFFORDJAMESG STAHL LEOG STANEARTSHARON STANGLEGREG STANLEY ANDREWH STANLEY NATHANC STANLEY TERRYL STANTONLYNNETTE M STANTON MARJORIEP STANTON RICHARD K STAPLESGEORGED STAPP WILLIAMB STARKY'SMYRTLEWOOD STARR EMILLIE M STARR JERRYL STATON ROBERTW STEED RALPHH STEEGE ELMERH

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Bulletin Daily Paper 06-25-14  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday June 25, 2014

Bulletin Daily Paper 06-25-14  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday June 25, 2014